The East Carolinian, March 28, 1991






�ife iEaHt Camltman
6! N 20
Thursday, Mahi h 28. 1991
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12.000
12 Pages
Sanford defends stance on war
By I eC lair Harper
sMstjn! i'vs I dilor
North Carolina Sen Ferry
Mnt. rd defended his stance on the
ui i lull War .it D.H. onley
- htv�l Wednesday morning
: d be ashamed ol nn self it I
I kepi mouth shut and voted
�' � pre idenl Sanford - aid
when asked about his vote againsl
tlic president to use I
the Persian lull
( nnle Principal Ike Baldree
mtnxlui ed Sanford ti � a group ol
I 1 students and Ich al t iti
'���� rpresenhngSanfordwith
.m offii lal P H i onley lapel pin
� � � : d Santi rd torhiswork
,
d servi 1 is g ivernor ol
ilina from I1 to l5
nalh bo ausethal sthe
��'� i. hing, tb.it he
iti in around in orth
"Primarily . it doesn't serve my
purposes toi omeout here and make
you a speech Sanford said
i ou've heard plenty ol speei hes,
and I've certainly heard plenty ol
sptvi hesfrommeanddon'l need to
hear am more
It von want tofussal me Ion'I
mind fussing at me because that
helpstoo, Sanfordsaid "Justd
do too mm h of it "
Sanford talked about tin na
tional debt before he opened the
tloor tor questions
Right now we are trying I
deal with the greatest national debt
in the history ol the world �ai I i
said.
Sanford said that while the
government has been reporting a
reduced debt, thai isn't true He
said President Bushannour edtl
over five vears the plan to reduce
the debt K S5X)miIlion It was not
.aid that in that �ime pern I
trillion in debts will he addii
ment to report theamountot debt at
the beginning i l ea h veai vhal
interest was paid whatw is added
t nl and tin final ami nml at the
ol the e.ir
Sanford alsi � mentu med I
lean Water Bill l ,lol al V irming
Bill and a bill to n dui � tl �
ol money that can be spent on po
lih( al i ampaij i
Sanford als� talktd ��:� il the
federalg '�� rnmenl sroli n
tii m
Edu .iti. m l� li mgs tothi
community Sanford said ' 1 he
fedei i rnmenl has � i
play. bul thevl tbei
it very
Sanford said federal pi
suchasHeadstarl
ire not rec
uld
� iren t puttn : tin
ke we. I � � �
� �� �� � .
.
� � '
the Middle Fast, h hopes to help
educate people on issues such as
n ligi n ulture aixl g ivernmenl
� ith students and citizens
isked Stinford questions ram
In m the Middle East situatii in 1.1
trade � ith M �u o
� ii hi ilson the dirt � ' �
� ��. 1 astern Norths arohnai ei tet
n Poverty, presented
i report on poverty im astem Nortl
irolina and asked Sanford t i .it
: i t. rei e on thi problem
Sanford was � I ah�ul the
prosptx tsi 't the demo rats in 1992
ti d he said thai he felt po pit s
pinn � � � uld not be affci ted by
the war rhe would be rm ��
�� � : . � LVtingi andidateswho
ivoul ' iddressdomesbcissuessuch
as ' ronmenl educatii
'� � tl nd ol iesl n and
ver s 101 Sinrord pn �sentcd
thai I been fli �� n
� � �
� �
u h would requm tl
Soda
shop to
open
April 15
P K im Rose
h i l a -1 t a 11111 n i j n
:� � �
I 15

I
I ill bring
man
roctorol tining

� �
:
�. will
;hl oda
� � kethe
: . � �
th lld
� il i,vith
Greenville to begin test
curbside reveling project
T
Bv Ann I ipscoinb
I In Mil" 1 .��! l JPlll 111.111
" �

, mbaugli ECU PI
� I � . en April 15 afterbeing
� :���� li
la i re loth said then
�em. idel
I
r it
ano

VVi
I wi lei icited about the new
�. i i ' p because students will be
ible I . i ' i glimpse ol what the
Dining Service is trying to do
I iin loth ud
Starting pril ;
� . � lentsv havea ess
. �� . ng pi lot project
lu h vcar residents of Gn
die Pitt � iwa
enough trash to fill I icklenSl i I
from the football field tothehighi � I
ble.n hei said( nthia Man. in tl �
publu infi rmation ofl � i I r n
em i!le
(Irei m ille s recvcling : i
will not cost the taxpayi i i Iditional
money unlike! "harlotte sroi i ling
program that costs an extra S3 mil-
lion yearly Man in said
(ireem ille s projet t will use
existing manpower and equipment
tocutcosts Sanitation workers w ill
pick up recyclable materials on
Wednesday the same d.iv they
piek up yard trash
All manpower and equipment
will come from thecity sSanitation
1 Vpartment
The money made from recy-
cling will go back into the proei I
Marvin said thai for every 52 �-
made from recycling trash, about
Self exams
can expose
testicular

By using curbside i ' i
ixmonths Mai � Icitvofticia
manpiiwei ' ssan,
all of Pitt intv

t ardbOfir � i I : -
lected tor rei . ling
C ardboard I must be bi
ken dou n. bundli I ii I tied witl
string
Plastic bottle- md bevera
cans should be put in paper I
plastic bar- or irl �. ig
St �.r pnl v residents ol
Greenfield lerra. e Movewixxi
C oil. �
and( hatham Circle � their
reeve I.ible matt nal picked u
the first and third V. da
� : h nionth
Starting pril I i I
k. lohnstm
i � � �'� �'��
� : � - Springs v ive their
�� . ibli '� I : 'v- � � ' '
md I irtl .�.��� il eat h
patinj
ii isV I to 1
; il thembv
iesi itirby 6a.n
: : � � itv s initation
; � - ��� url li recycling
ton il " �� ' listnbuted b
.vorkei to the partic i
� �. � imes n Man h 1 3
Reminder fliers were redistnb
� � bj sanitati i ��� rkr- oi
v ir : J"
- tie recycling flier
irl de Recycling isaseas
as one two three All you have tt
doisoru allect,two bagorbundk
and three pla e y �ur recyc labiesby
vi iui i urb
Marvn lid th� direx tor ot
rk M i. '�. '� n, and his
� 11 � � � � pnect
: ne has bei n very en-
thusiastx about it said Doroth
1 ini. Is thi pn i- irdinator
cancer
Hxercise, weiglitlifling only path to large muscles
B) Babbi S. Hawkins
Iril n oluiniusi
which
in the
is pro
thleti juatepi '�in
iscli � � ' � that
: intsol pro
i must le
li � � tn n tn ngth,
: DO 'd
igh i les are made
I pi leu eating huge amounts
� ; � ill ni il enable you to
mi im les It's ,1 t (vm
. non that needs
� ing
I irsl look at how protein
tii ns in the ;u. All people
. pr tt hi in the diet for such
�. ital i" i ds as fluid balance, pro-
duction ol antibodies (anti dis-
ease agi nts. blood clotting, de-
.� I ipment oi must le cells and
r� When protein is ingested, it
kin down rhen the body
i, i ides where these building
II . protein n � he n ii
number ol pla� es b- side mus� le
tissue C hi. e the bod; need tor
protein and i alones has b i n met,
left o ver protein is i rl iinto
t it and stored as fat in irl I
So, there is n. ibenefit inexo
protein needs
Americans tend I
phasizc protein in tl i liel
Although meal i: od
�un eot protein in thediel it t an
also be high in fat and calories
the amount ol protein an
adultactually needs isdetermined
bv body weight I be adult re
quirement isO 8 grams ol protein
p r kilogram ol body weight
An estimate l� r the daily pro
tein requirement is 11 grams tor
females weighing about 122
pounds, and 56 grams tor males
weighing about 155 pounds.
The diet should include not
onlv meat, bul also a variety of
protein sources such as lov tat
dairy prodm ts dried beans and
grams.
s tar as the athlete is con-
cerned, protein needs are about
the sami .is tor everyone else:
about 0.8 grams per kilogram ol
body weighl
I he onlv w ay to nn rease
muscle mass is through exercis-
ing and weightlifting Genetics
alsi i play s a n �le
Surprisingly, body builders
, not benefit from increasing
their consumption ol protein, but
research militates that athletes
who p.irtu ipate in vigorous aero-
bu .u tn ides ism h as endurance
running, swimming and cycling)
do require higher levels of protein
on a daily basis The athlete's in-
t reasedneed is met and probably
still exceeded with usual intake.
Although protein is an im-
portant nutrient tor everyone, it
should comprise only lOto 15 per-
cent of total calories Most calories
should come from carbohydrate
sources siuh as bread, cereal,
grains, etc.
Carbohvd rates should supply
See Muscles page 2
By Lauren Grant
Peer Health Educator
Cancer is a group ol more than
HX) diseases, each one differing in
mam ways. Every type of cancer is
adiseaseoi someol thebody scells
Sometimes.iellslosetheabilitv
to li mil and direct their growth, and
they grow t(H rapidly
Therefore, tixi much tissue is
produced and rumors are formed.
These tumors can be benign or
malignant Benign tumors do not
spread to other parts of the Kxlv
and are seldom a threat to lite. Ma-
lignant tumors can invade and de-
stroy nearbv healthy tissues and
See Cancer, page 3
INSIDE THURSDAY
Editorial
ECU must clean up financial
abuse within Public Safety
before raising parking fees
Features 17
The Godfathers release their
third rnaior label recording.
"Unreal World
Sports 9
Eddie Payne a former ECU
assistant coach, is the new
head of men's basketball
Classified 6
Comics12





eljc �aBt (Enrulintan March 28. 1991
S3S3
SENE
L.A. police brutality case spurs rise of reports in N.C.
, I .1 I. 1.1. . . . Ik,llv Al .I1T
Cancer
Public Safety investigates
campus assault on female
March 24
(VvjH -OirlsttMirnuA Memorial Gym (south) student issued a
campus citation for speeding,
0347 Belk Residence Hall (south) motorist found asleep in a
vehicle Subject cleared the area
March 25
1132 Public Satet) took a larceny report.
U Clement Residence Hall investigated an .iss.mli cm a
female
1822 oyncr I ihr.try investigated suspicious activitN Sub
Kts were gone on arm al
?(MS BfOlog) Building (south) investigated two suspicious
people hv were (detitified as students looking for thei i frisbee
r 151 lyler Residence Hall investigated a report of ,i subjei t
throwingormges Same was goneon arrival
2337 ITiird and Reads streets student given verbal warning
tor careless and reckless driving
ti(U4 ! ocat ion unknov. n student given a verbal wai nmg for
failure to bum headlights.
(4iio College I lili 1 rive student given a verbal w armng f i
speeding and failure to stop at a stop sign
March 2b
0S14 Fletcher Music Building: checked on a subject stiuk in
the elevator
1630 ryler Residence Hall: checked the area for loud mush
Same was unfounded
1712 Mendenhall Student Center investigated an automo
bile accident.
1735 lenkins Art c enter investigated dogs in the building
I wo officers assisted
2018 BiologN Building investigated a strong smell of m
or the third floor
; 139 often Residence Hall took a larceny rop i t
2123 o) ner I ibrary: two officers investigated indecent expo
sure Another officer assisted
2 14 Aycock Resident e i lall assisted tire and res ue with a
possible fire on thetliird floor Same was caused by smoke devn es
2327 Carretl Residence Hall responded toanactix it
alarm Same was caused b smoke detpctor on the first I
activating
2337 i �ncs Residence 1 lall responded toa report of an obscene
phi �ne call Subjei t declined to file a report
0015 Bclk Residence I lalltnortrtk responded to three students
on skateboards Verbal warning were given to same
0221 T ler Residence Hall responded to male subje ts exiting
the east curfew door five campus citation were issued to students
0559 W Rock Springs Road assisted a (Ircenville officer in
locating a suspicious vehicle
( rime Scene is taken imm official Publn Safety I obs
omplamts of police brutality
are all too common in Northaro-
lina, but none have attracted the
level of attention given to the vid
cotaped I os Angeles beating of a
bla k man
hat is part ol the reason so few
wants a natu mal pr ibeof the prob-
lem N ARRV ailed for a simi
lar investigation focused on this
southern state
1 he request w.is spurred by
what the group sud was an 'esca
lating pattern of fear and violence
cases of excessive force by North in the relationship between law
( arolina law oltu ersevermakeit to enton ers .nut (itizens
N( ARRV documented ciht
killingsb) l.m enfon ersi iveraspan
t rimtnal i ourt, . i il rights acti ists
s.l
It may be that people just aren t
aw.ue. because tor years we have
given law enforcement the nb of
preserving and protei ting us s.ihi
1 uuia illiams.i memberol North
t arolinians gainst Racist and Re
ligious Violence, an ad vcxracy group
based in I 'urh.un Wejustnarurally
assumeth.it the re working within
the balance of the law
It ma) take ,i i ,ise like I os
ngeles for Northarolina to re
alize we have a problem here in our todeathb) p lice
state as well, she said I he State Bureau of Investiga
In April 1990 nearl) a year tion .ils reports ai
before mencans tuned in to the
filming ol I A officers beating reaching the agenc)
Rodne King footage so shock rheSBl received 15complaint
Vpartment in the year ending in luh 11S7
compared with33sofarthisyear. In ism, said Kelly Alexander ,
the wars ending ulv 1988, 1989 dent of the N A AC Pstatebrai
and 1990. rheSBl handled 25,31 and rhecasc thai hasparki I �
�2 complaints respectively. Dowdy m,si puNicrt) in Northai
ikj recently was the I ebruar)
Of the total 136,35 complaints shootingor Sidney Bowen.a � �
stemmed from incidents resulting first black mayor Bowendied
i n death, 43 from non fatal shootings leastfivegunshotsfiredbyati
and h others from some other who said he resisted am I
means ot undue force. drunken driving charges
In all, charges were brought it was not the first
of I"1 month and said six of them against seven officers, none of them trooper had been ac used
inc the I s lustu
appeared to be like the 1 A ia
r.u lall) molr. ated
M�nda the group - cased.hi
has grow n b a half dozen rep it -
since February Mixiudinga 24-year
old Beaufortmint) man shot to
death as he waved a gun at police in
Washington and a 24 war old un
armed Franklinton man who was
acting deranged outside a conve
nience store in his tow n when hot
i int rease in
mplaints ol pi li e brutalit
involved in fatal in kients, Dowdy excessive tone
,kj OnMarchl6,199(),a(
rheagencykeepscountonryof ounty grandjur) of 14 whit
its probes, hecauraonod, adding that tour minorities sided .
many reports of police brutality are tnxiperdespiteautops) rep n
handled internally and resolved eyewitness accounts coi
before they make it to theSBl some key pointsof hisb
For that reason and because ivil rights activists n
statistics of police abuse are not ately attacked the gra
available on a state basis, no one findings and hundred- i r .
knowsjust how large is the problem marched in Bolton the fi
ol police brutality is in North Saturday
( arolina State Atti rney General
Butciviirightsactivistssaythey rhomburgandothercnm I
are receiving more and more calls
And thepeoplecallmgtend to
believe thai the actions ot the offi
ers involved are motivated bv rac-
�ud al the time that a shan
in violent i rime and a '��
sped tor polk e i 'ttit ers �
root of such slayings
Muscles
Continued from page 1
35 to 60 percent of calories and fal
should compriseaboul Wpercent
Working muscles prefer carboh
:�� ind fat for i nerg)
� nl i-siit in spor's nu
ise i 'i pri item
ind amnii � a. id supple
� . � aims made b) the
inula turers these produ ts
not proven to be ol benefit
and mav in fact cause problems
I orexample the useoi protein
ipj � � � nts mav lead to deh
.
" h 'd �- attempt ' i �
� : t th protein v aste pi duct
� i lluid is exi reted and the
kidnev s ��� i 'i k in teased
I �. drated is im-
i
Kd health
If you thought thai finding a color Madntosh
system you could afford was just a dream,then the
new; affordable Macintosh LC is a dream c me true.
The Macintosh LC is rich in a k r. I nlike many
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Macintosh LC expands your palette t() 256 colors. It
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adding voice or other sounds.
like even-Macintosh
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And it mas thousands of
available applications that
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Apple intrcxluces the Macintosh LC.
you've learned one program, you're well on your way
to learning them all. line Macintosh LC even lets you
share information with someone who uses a different
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Macintosh, MS-DOS, OS 2, and Apple II floppy disks.
Take a look at the Macintosh LC and see what it
gives you.Then pinch yourself.
It's better than a dream-its a
Macintosh.
For further
information visit
The Student Stores
Wright Building
757-6731
The power to be vour best"

Oi
' �
I
.
the pti in a 1 � .
permandl -
. . .

Read Tlie Ea
ahe EastCaroliti
Director if
Advertising
John F. Semelsberger II
Production Manager
Mary n
DIMM AY ADVERTISING
per v h
$6 :
I i k ()pen Rate .$5
Bull ntracl
! lsc
Business I lours: M nda
757-6366
I)
( rl
e isSOAoowComcuw ha vtf m��wi��9o tm MMM � W�� It�!� ol Hum Omm mt Sup�rt)ny�KW Th. pom. w m ytw MM rnnmu d le Ctmtmm �c





Bhe �nat (garo�niatLMdqPH 28.1991 13
reports in N.C.
� ir n ism !k1 Kelly Alexander, prcsi-
. dent ol the NAA P state branch.
I u,j ise that hasparked the
Mtctt) in North Carolina
a,is the lebruary 1990
,i�in(S t Shiney Bowen, Be4ton's
k mayor Bowendied of at
. i nshots fired bv a trooper
athoi �� " 'u rcsl,� arrest on
driving charges.
not the tirst time the
been accused o usi
nR
V1 in h Irj lvKMa(. ohimbus
� ind nir vl 14 whitesand
tics sided with the
spiteautops) reportsand
iccounts contradicting
kev p nts of his testimony
its .Ktu ists immedi-
k� d the grand jury's
hundreds ot people
B� ilton the following
Mtornc) General Lacy
id other crime fighters
it a sharp increase
ind a waning re-
fheers was at the
Ja mgs
. l
r "
ttriiiii
Oholo courtesy o' Andy orbis
� .Var
orial
:il on your way
en lct�u
ijses a different
tile Apple'
Fvrite t)
floppy disks.
i sec what it
a dream -it's a
further
ion visit
ident Stores
it Building
17-6731

�r to be vour best"
Cancer
Continued from page 1
organs.
One of the most common can-
cers in young nvn between the ages
ot 15 and 34 is cancer of the testes,
the male reproductive glands.
The testes aa located behind
the penis in a pouch of skin call the
scrotum.
The testes produce and store
sperm and they are also the body's
mam source of male hormones,
which control the development of
the reproductive organs and other
male characteristics.
These characteristics include
body and facial hair, low voice and
wide shoulders
Most testicular cancers are
tound by men themselves, by acci-
dent or when doing testicular sclf-
examinatkms (TSE).
ITe tirst sign of festiculai can-
cer is usually aslightenlargcment in
one of the testes and a change in its
consistency 1 he testes are smooth,
oval shaped and rather firm. By
dome, the PSE regularly one should
become familiar with the wav one's Seminoma, the most common
own testes normally feel. type of testicular cancer, has a sur-
Testicular cancer can also cause vival rate approaching 100 percent
a number of other symptoms that in cases detected and treated early
men should watch for such as a The best hope for early detee-
lump in the scrotum, enlargement ton isa simple three to live minute
in either testicle, a feeling of heavi
ness in the scrotum, a dull ache in
the lower abdomen or the groin, a
sudden collection or fluid in the
scrotum, pun or discomfort in a
testicleor in the scrotum or enlarge-
ment or tenderness of the breasts
These symptoms are not sure
signs of cancer and can also be
caused by other conditions. How-
monthlv self-examimihon. The best
time is a I tor a warm bath or shower,
when the scrotum skin is most re-
laxed.
Roll each testidegenthbetween
the murnbandfingcrsof both hands
and check for consistency onamonth
to month basis
If hard lumps, nodules or any-
thing different from normal are
ever, it is very important to consult found, see a doctor promptly be-
t these conditions causethisisn'tsomothmgtohctaken
a doctor if any ot
last as long as two weeks
Also, men who have an unde-
scended or particularly descended
testicle are at a much higher risk of
developing testicular cancer.
Another incrcased-risk factor
applies to men whose mothers took
the drug DES(diethylsalbcstrol) to
prevent miscarriages.
lightly.
Tor more information on tes-
ticular cancer or to schedule a pro-
gram on male health issues call the
Student 1 lealth Service at 757-6794.
'To Your 1 lealth" is a weekly
health education and information
column. Pteasedirect any questions,
comments or suggestions SI IS.
atye iaatGIarolurian
Director of
Advertising
John E SemelslxTger II
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
Tim Peed
Patrick Pitzer
Production Manager
Mary Piland
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National$6.00
local Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business I lours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
-4
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
( arolina Pregnancy "ciifei
7 57-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville, NC
H�UTa
M-F 8:30am-3pm
�mtH'Mi twmtim'i
? w .I'lMl.
�fWNM
Student
government
Association
APPLICATIONS
are currently being
accepted for
seats on the
Honor Board
and the position of
Attorney General.
Applications are
available in the SGA
office (upstairs
Mendenhall) or
209 Whichard.
For more information,
contact
Maria DeNoia
at 757-4184.
Harris feeler
WE WILL BE CLOSED EASTER SUNDA Y
LOW PRICES
EVERYDAY!
Hamilton SS4 3 A
Semi-Bcmeiesslp97
Whole Ham
Lb.
Broccoli
Kleenex Premium
Bath Tissue
G.E. Soft-White
Light Bulbs
16 Oz. N.R. Bottles
6 Pack
Coca-Cola
189
Prices Good Through Tuesday, April 2,1991
Prices in this ad effective through Tuesday,April 2, 1991 in Pitt County Stores only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quant�. None Sold To Dealer. We Ctodty Accept federal Food Stamps.





(Sift Saat (Earoltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bi air Skinner, News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor
Mait Mumma, Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor
LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Stuart Oliphant, Asst. Features Editor
Kerry Nester, Asst Sports Editor
Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
Doug Morris, Editorial Production Manager Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator Stuart Rosnfr, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician Phong Luong, Business Manager
Cari a Whithfio, Classified Ads Technician Deborah Danifi , Secretary
the I-uu Carolinian has served the Fast Carolina campus community mtuo 1425. emphasizing information that directly at fecU
ECl I students During the ECl' sch(Hl year. The Fast Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12,000. I he East
( ar. Union reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age. sex, creed or
national origin. The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but. rather,
is � majority opinion of the Editorial Board The FastCarohnian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes ol decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The Fast Carolinian. Publications Bldg EC Li, Greenville NC
27834; or call (Wi) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4. Thursday, March 28. 1991
Abuse must stop before fees increase
rhe price of cable TV must bo going up ECU'S
�" ommittee has endorsed a proposal toincrease
I rice ol ,i parking sticker from $50 to $75 The
i $500,000 thai this maneuver would bring in
n Id be added to the Traffic Fund This is the tund
it Pi! hi 11 Safety officials siphon money from to bin
scrum and new carpeting lor Director im
� office and to subscribe to Law Enforcement
fhis fund, hv the way, is not the one thev st-
oned mone from
to
hu the VCR and those
i visions That fund is the Investigative Fund, the
fund that pays for theirpig pit kin's (It's hard to keep
. ith Public Safety's fund diversions without a
recard.)
So, it the Frafftc Fund needs more money, it
ust be because Law Enforcement TV rates are
oing up.
Or maybe it's the price of bus tickets. Public
i tv also dips money out ol the Traffic Fund pay
for travel to law enforcement seminars on subjects
ranging from "internal affairs" (so thev can catch
joffii whgpibezsJeads) to "SatajtpAbusjeg
(Strolled tjcpf y.atanis-nokav jgQfc,�j�cn kids
wnflw the !js has to k1mk
Then again, maybe local furniture stores have
iked their prices In '89, our parking tecs put a
� atitifui love seal and corner table in Mr. Depuv's
iffice.
Oi course, there's the possibility that the uni-
ity needs the extra funding for some legitimate
purpose You see, once in a while, the Traffic and
irking Committee uses whatever money is left in
he fund to do things like put new lights in the
irkinjjSJots, buy land for new lots and maintain
istirt�nes.
ObViouslv the revenue from parking tickets
fuctvajso feeds the fund) still isnot enough, despite
he lact that the committee raised the tines last year
But then again the) did not jack up the fines because
the tund needed more money But rather, they real
ized that E I charged less tor parking violations
than other institutions and, ot course, thev had to
take swift and aggressive action to correct such a
discrepancy
Parking meter revenue also supposedly goes
into the tund, but not all ot it gets there. Some
portions of meter money paid for a couple of Public
Safety cookouts
So maybe the 1 rathe Fund is running low on
money The Traffic and Parking Committee just paid
out $500,000 to install that industrial-strength light-
ing in the parking lots. They're aKo paving off a
$200,000 note for the parking expansions they've
already done, and thev figure they'll need to make
capital investments ot up to $500,000 more if they
want to expand parking in the future.
Stack on top of this the cable TV subscriptions
and Greyhound tickets, and it's understandable that
the Traffic Fund may need to raise some revenue.
But is a W percent, across-the-board hike in
vehu4e registration tees the next logical itep?,T.hjej-e
a()therupUonsTheTrafficandrarMn&Qi
is iooioMHr at a plan tor scaled fees which -woui
charge people more to park in more convenient lots.
I hat plan has some promise. Or thev could appropri-
ate some money from that vitally important Campus
Beautification Program, if the administration feels
we could live without it ()r maybe, just maybe, the
Traffic and Parking Committee could keep a closer
eye on Public Safety's use of their funds.
IftheTrafficFundissomismanaged that Public
Safety can skim off $31,139, unquestioned, then the
first step in refilling the fund should be to tighten up
the bookkeeping.
The Traffic and Parking Committee should
stop up the leaks before thev ask us to pour any more
water in their bucket
Sen. Sanford
represents N.C.
embarassment
To The Editor:
It will soon be time for
orth Carolinians to recall our
junior U.S. Senator, Terry
Sanford. Mr. Sanford is an em-
barrassment to this state and
must be replaced
After monthsof economic
motions and continued bluff-
ing by Saddam Hussein, it be-
came clear to a majority of
Americans, and to the United
ations as well, that military
force would be necessary to
make Saddam leave Kuwait.
Mr. Sanford felt we
should give sanctions more
time to work.
How much longer did he
think the world should wait?
Most people could see from the
unfolding of events that it
would take more than sanctions
to make Saddam leave.
Was the senator playing a
political game with such an im-
portant issue1
Very shortly after the use
of force wasauthorized, Sanford
felt the need to tour military fa-
cilities. Senate and He use com-
mittees were satisfied that the
allied forces were prepared.
The American people had
been expressing their support
of the troops since the first de-
ployment. What could have
motivated Sanford's tour but to
try to repair his political image.
1 don't question Mr.
Sanford's patriotism or his sup-
port of the troops. But it appears
from his behavior that he lacks
good judgement andor he was
playing a political game with a
very important issue. In either
case, it is time for him to be
replaced in Washington.
Greg Harmon
Chairman
ECU College Republicans
Student defends
his right to
express ideas
To The Editor:
Let me express thanks to
Mr. Glenn Thompson, ostensi-
bly an English major, for his
well-meaning but awkwardly
'vritten criticism of my poem
"Armageddon The poem and
Mr. Thompson's rebuttal ap-
peared in The East Carolinian
on Feb. 28 and March 7, re-
spectively.
When I wrote the poem,
ourcountry wasat war against
a vicious, sadistic and ungodly
enemy, Saddam Hussein. The
poem "Armageddon" issimple
and to the point, expressing
the patriotism and religious
convictions of an overwhelm-
ing majority of Americans.
As Mr. Thompson ex-
plained, "Armageddon" was
See Lett�n, page 5
Letters Cor
WM0SUJN6
&ALL00H
030O'mmmnm f
Seen hbeuh a� is sils
SAMC t$CAWK ffSfd
On The Fringe
Public Safety renews 'Same' stereotypes
By Tim Hampron
Editorial Columnist
0030�Garrett and Fletcher,
investigated irea for ubjects throw
ing water balloons out of windows
Same was u nfou nded ta ken f n mi
Crime Scene, March 19, 1991.
Another Public Safety in-
vestigation gone awry. Maybe the
officers were ill-equipped in this
particular investigation. Maybe
the money ear-marked for water
balloon detection was spent on a
pig pickin' and (Crispy Kreme
donuts instead
Hold on to the thought of
pigsandueamed-filled eatery, for
now we have more pressing mat-
ters to encounter, such as the
funky language used in Crime
Scene.
One thing is for sure, this
guy Smm seems to get into a lot of
trouble Samewasapprehended in
the CotWn &eniknce t Uli hiaw-
$rs with .mother latheredsubiqet�s
MMefeat transported tf th�'
Pitt County Memorial Health Sci-
ences Services Really Long Name
Hospital tor psychiatric observa-
tion after attempting to say the
Hospital name three times in a
row.
And as in the entrv above.
Same was unfounded. Does this
mean the officers could not find
Same or that Same really was not
throwing water balloons thus
making the report unfounded? In
anv event, Same is still prowling
thecampus, terronzincusall with
water balloons.
After some intense reporting
which spanned a quart of The Bull
and half a pack of Kools, I finally
uncovered the water balloon
controversy.
I Vspite the ambiguity i t the
report, proiectilos were launched
from Fletcher in the early hours of
March 8, according toconfidential
sources at Garrett.
The balloons smashed
against the Garrett bncks to cries
of "Scud Attack, Scud Attack "
The scene was promulgated
by freshmen "just letting off some
steam and no one was injured in
the 10-minute raid.
The incident added flavor
and excitement to an otherwise
alcohol-free Thursday night.
But some weasel had to oil
the cops.
�,�'�- oirucrci
socials
"Honey, I'll be a littii
Same will be basting the - i
with barbeque sauce " ai
was overheard during it
wiretapping drill
And at
AMeBafcerCharrieDogtp � ta k
for Knspv Kreme), one ��. tn
recalls Aug. 11,1989 whi i PubSc
Safety purchased 521
freshments
"The officer nii I
have several dozen rot :
glazed subjects " she said
applying a velvetine glazi
oral dozen subjects.
After all the rid; .
students heave on the pr I I -
oi the peace, isn't kind of sad t
Public Safety actually li
all the stereotypes? N I �
but twice.
In the infamous statt
auditor's report, the two .hecks
iftUtUMa one another
eparkoi frUSpwKmteUflBaStelte&w mMl9m an account -
sAibiect A4Mka4letf f�blieSafeHrifop- tHtatphes a�U equij n I :rr
on the moming of March B should
be seriously harangued.
I he phone call did nothing
more than waste the valuable time
of three officers, who by the wav
were forced to listen to humiliat-
ing cat calls ot "Pubic Safety
And the unnecessary phone
call prevented the Public Safety
Investigative Squad from per-
forming normal duties such as
planning pig pickin's and donut
Pearls For Swine
investigations" Public Sa
wrote a 1231.14 check to a- i
supermarket for "pig pi kit
supplies and of course the
for the donuts.
So instead of finding n
ods to catch the hardened crimi-
nals on campus, the investigation
fund was delegated to paying tor
food.
Mo wonder this Sana gin -
running rampant.
Government meddling hampers education
By Bill Egbert
Editorial Columnist
Now that the cornerstone of
the Mew World Order has been
laid, a lot of the folks who missed
out on that ground breaking are
standing around in the vacant lot
across the street, saving that what
our skyline needs now is a New
American Order.
The argument is that if we
can lick the fourth-largest army in
the world, surely we can make
America a better place. Of course,
the equation isn't as simple as that.
Wars are easy. Societal overhauls
are hard.
If we, the people, are going
to turn this new political agenda
into anything more than a catchy
campaign slogan, we're going to
have to make some fundamental
changes in the way our nation
operates. And that won't happen
unless we start talking.
So, in the spirit popular dis-
course, over the next few weeks
I'm going to toss out some ideas
about what those fundamental
changes might be. The first order
of business is education reform.
First and foremost, the fed-
eral government should keep its
mitts off. No solution that Wash-
ington could offer would ever
adequately address the problems
of any local school system.
All Congress would come up
with would be an inert, watered
down, politically safe whitewash
designed to silence everyone and
offend no one. And it would come
about only after several years in
sub-micro-net her -committees.
The only thing the federal
government could co that would
help solve our education problems
would be to send out death squads
to liquidate conservative school-
board members.
Individual school systems
should be allowed to solve their
problems any way they can,
unhampered bv government
fumbling. By empowering every
school system to aggressively
improve education we will create
a gigantic, nation-wide R&D lab
which will inevitably turn out
more solutions than we could
squeeze out of Washington in a
good decade.
Of course, the primary ben-
efit of keeping reform local is that
we'll be cutting a few more bu-
reaucrats out of the loop, and that
should be the first objective of
education reformers.
Bureaucrats (particularly
elected ones) are like flat worms
and sea cucumbers: they move
slowly, and only when their ex-
istence is threatened. If we want
anything to change soon, we can't
waste our time chasing inverte-
brate politiciansaround with cattle
prods. We'll have to work around
them, and if possible, behind their
backs.
We (the teachers, the stu-
dents, the parents and anybody
else not holding elected office)
can't wait for the federal govern-
ment, the state government or the
school boards to put forth the sort
of radical solutions needed to re-
invent American education.
We must seize control of
education in a bloodless and silent
coup When we see a problem i
shouldn't ask the encumb re I
solve it. We should do wh it
we need do to solve it. ours,
even if that leads to a run in ith
thebureaucraticgarden slues w rv
think they're in charge
Parent-Teacher Associations
could become active lobbying or
anizations, supporting innova
tive teachers and administrators
who circumvent school boards to
enact reforms.
Since the demography cat-
egory of "parents with children in
public schools" represents a
monumental chunk oi anv
district's voting population
there's no reason whv PTAs
couldn't keepelected officials on a
tight leash.
With a little organization and
a few eloquent leaders. PT Ascould
bully their school boards into be
ing hands-off rubber-stamps
which would (for God's sake) let
the teachers run the schools
Of course, the politicians will
still control the money But a net
worked, strong-arm, PTA mafia
could "convince" them to part with
it in the form of lump sums with
no strings attached, no questions
asked � like protection money
After the state and local
governments allocate the monev
and the school board drops it off
behind the cafeteria in a small,
black satchel, schools should be
free to spend their monev any way
they need to in order to improve
the quality of the students they
turn out. If they find that the only
way they can motivate their classes
See Meddling page 5
not a masterpiece of the finer
points of technical poetry as
defined by scholars of English,
nor did 1 necessanly intend it to
be However, many told be they
felt the poem wag very good,
even outstanding
The poem was not wntten
as "art" but as an expression of
ideas, which is a constitutional
right, as is Mr Thompson's
right to criticii-and to disagree
with the merit of mv work.
I he expression of patrio-
tism, religion and the horrors
in i triumpl - � i , tempo-
rary war ma v seem offensive to
many individuals.
Just the same, mv poem
"Armageddon has much
greater merit, even as "art
than do many ersat2 works of
contemporary literature, po-
etry, art and music that are
billed .is 'great" or "awesome"
ust because the particular art-
ist has name and fame, and for
no other valid reason except
monev.
Much ot Mr Thompson's
rebuttal is basically anattoo
exercise in inane, pedantic dil-
ettantism unfounded in the
spirit and reality of these times
Also. 1 question some of Mr
Thompson'sawk ward sentence
structure and incoherence ot
ideas.
Richard Becker
Senior
History
Central is
in religioi
be remem
To The EditoJ
When evalua
Carolinian's three
religion, keep in
tral issues
Who was It-sj
his death and
mean7 How did i;ej
should I get saved!
W ho was I
himself, "I am the vl
and the life: no maq
the Father but by
andhe that hath
- ��, � ither"
- � �
bear record in he
ther, mt A i I
Ghost: and these
rtn5:7
"In tht �
Word, and '� -1
God, and the
(John 1:1-2)
"And?' j
flesh, and dwell
(John 1 14)
What d
the a
vet sinners i
much more than!
tified by hi-
apv from I
tor it when
we were recond 14
saved bv his life"
Meddling
is to pass out 2 LiveCrew tapes to
A students, so be it.
Of course, under such a sys-
tem some schools will fall victim
to mismanagement To keep folks
honest, the Education Department
would monitor standardized test
scores in individual schools and,
it a school isn t producinga return
on our investment, the govern-
ment can audit the hell out of that
school and send the mismanagers
to prison for
And whosa
mismanaged air�
spends more m
than any nation n
look what our sv �
out
Better tha
waste for a I
we fix them, trn
schools to be mi srt
bv people wh
QUALIT
o�
SUPER SAVING COI
r
I
I
I
� uith every disc i
ECU Student Store Wnght
Greenville NC 2785�
TVf KKT THE
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for SGA
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�Any questions? Call me.
752-7081
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Vote April 3
my motto
LeadFoIlowor





I
�l?e �a�t (Earolinfan March 28, 1991 5
amastf,
I w OT&0H
Scimo' stereotypes
he 1 little Ui
� � he subjpcl
an officer
i fp enl
H ihi
; li. t.ilk
i in
h, r I'ubii.
!ft ol it
� nt tttti will
� � un i. i in
lid a Kite
fill el.)� t( �
� III lilc th.it
!� ci let H
1 id th.it
1 til v one
� Mt.
two checks
ihel
� ' 11 n 11 i A1
; �� I � ' !( r
ihli Safot)
k l(i art lrii
� pig pii km
111 .i he hrck
' ' in i; rncth
1 irdi ned i rim!
tl � inwMigtition
it d i" j n Ing for
ruler tl imi guy is � t
Swine
hampers education
I ll IS th.H
w more hu
i th.it
KVtlVl" il
iii r
I IthCAttll
v ' k around
Ibehind their
� - till- stu
P�i mybod)
ltd oltuv)
jeral gown
iinrnt or the
rth the sort
dil lo re-
ition
control oi
��HuUllonl
i ic i problem vtt
tti umbers to
�. do h.itevcr
nlvi i1 oumelvw
i run in with
ii len slugs ho
ncharge
i. in i VsiociAtions
i itvc lobby Irtg r
pp. t ttng mnov.i
I i Iministratofs
: � ti.m-I boards K)
th denv igraphn cal
� ; irents with children ta
represents �
ntal i hunk of in)
ling population
� i , ti why PTAi
h '?� led offta mIsoii.i
� i$h
W itti.ihttlc'niniAilion�invl
' � eloquent leaden PI AmouM
� � � hi iol boards Into bt
' inds-ofl rubbei stamp!
' would (for.ihI's s.iko) M
the u.m. hers nm th�- m hooto
Keourse ihepoUHdanawil
ontrol tht money But I net
rked strong arm, ITA rmiWi
d convtni �� themtopaitwMh
n in the t,rn of lump sums with
no strings irtached no qpnataW
asked Uke protection money
tt.r the state and local
iwnnmrnts iloOHl the monc
and the school board drops it ott
behind the cafumti m .� small.
Mack satchel, schools should be
tnv to spend their money any way
thev need �o in order to improve
'he quahiy of the students they
turn out If they find thai the only
way they can moti vate their classes
See Meddling page 5
Letters Continued
not a masterpiece of the finer
points of technical poetry as
defined by scholars of English,
nor did 1 necessarily intend it to
be However, many told be they
felt the poem was very good,
even outstanding.
The poem was not written
as art" hut as an expression of
ideas, which is a constitutional
right, as is Mr Thompson's
righltocritu)efindtodis�igree
with the merit of mv work.
The expression of patrio
tism, religion and the horrors
and triumphs of a contempo
rary warm.iv seem offensive to
manv individuals
lust fhe s,ime, my poem
'Armageddon" has much
greater merit, even as "art
than do manv ers.it works of
contemporary literature, po-
etry, art anil music that are
billed as 'great" or "awesome
Hist because the particular art
1st has namt and fame, and for
HO other valid reason except
money.
Mm hit Mr Thompson's
rebuttal lsbasu ally an atrocious
exercise in mane, pedantic dil
ettantifffl unfounded in the
spirit and reality of these times
AlSO, I question some of Mr
Riompsonsawkward sentence
structure and incoherence ot
ideas
Richard Bei ker
Senior
111 story
Central issues
in religion must
be remembered
To The Editor:
When evaluating The East
Carolinian's three part series on
religion, keep in mind the cen-
tral issues.
Who was jesus? What did
his death and resurrection
mean? Howdol get saved? Why
shouid I get saved'
Who was lesus? I le said of
himself, "I am the way, the truth,
and the life: no man cometh unto
the fa ther but by me" (John 14:6)
and, "he that hath seen me hath
seen the Father" (John 14:4).
"For there are three that
bear record in heaven, the fa
ther, the Word, and the Holy
C.host: and these three are one"
(1 ohn5;7).
"In the beginning was the
Word, and the Word was with
Cod, and the Word was Cod"
(ohn 1:1-2).
"And the Word wasmade
flesh, and dwelt among us"
(John 114V
What did lesusaccomplish
Ofl the cross' "When wc were
vet sinners,hnst died for us,
much more than being now jus-
tified by his bl(xd we shall es
cape from wrath through him
for if when we were enemies,
we were reconciled, we shall be
saved by hislife" (Romans WO).
"There is therefore now
no condemnation to them
which are in Christ Jesus
(Romans 8:1)
How do I get saved?
Saved from what? "So shall it
be at the end of the world: the
angels shall come forth and
sever the wicked from among
the just, and shall cast them
into the furnace of fire: there
shall be weeping and gnashing
of teeth" (Matthew 13:49-50).
Some things are hard to
believe, but death is obvious.
Do vou feel 100 percent safe
assuming "when you're dead,
you're dead and thereare no
real consequences for sin?
"The heart is deceitful
above all things, and desper-
ately wicked, who can know
it1" (Jeremiah 17:9).
"There is a way that
secmeth right unto a man, but
the end thereof are the ways of
death (Proverbs 16:?5)
If this seems narrow-
minded or intolerant, Jesus
said, "Enter ye in at the strait
gate, for wide is the gate and
broad is the way, that leadeth
to destruction, and many there
be which go in thereat: because
strait is the gate and narrow is
the way, which leadeth unto
life, and few there be that find
it
David Fee Cherry
Graduate Student
Pnntmakirg, Art I)ept
Racism widespread in police departments
Fortunately, Greenville is spared from these injustices
By LaToya Hankins
Editorial Columnist
The Greenville Gestapo �
for some ECU students this name
is synonymous with the local po-
lice department.
These pseudo law enforce-
ment agents have been given this
title for having the nerve to parade
around breaking up noisy parties,
not to mention the pleasure they
receive from handing out tickets
for minor infractions to otherwise
law-abiding students.
Yet, this official harassment
pales in comparison to the actions
of police officers in other univer-
sity towns.
During the peak of rejoicing
over our victory in the Persian
Gulf, we were forced to focus our
attention to another form of
"kicking butt" right in our own
backyard.
The brutal tactics used in the
detcn lion of a Los A ngeles A frica n -
American man by that city's "fin-
est" has raised new questions
about how police officers go about
upholding the law.
A city resident, close to the
age of many students, was struck,
kicked, shocked with a stun gun
and otherwise terrorized for �
according to police reports � go-
ing 115 miles per hour in a car that
the manufactures say cannot ex-
ceed 100
This travesty of justice was
recorded on videotape by a citizen
and serves as a visual testament to
how some law enforcement offi-
cials become carried away with
upholding the law.
I would like to address the
question, "how much force is
enough?" Being an African-
America n female w ho co mes from
a family of law enforcement
agents, I can identify with both
sides of the story.
I have heard countless tales
of officers being killed in the line
of duty for simply trying to protect
the public's welfare. I have also
heard countless stones of harass-
ment by the police simply based
on the color of a suspect's skin,
who most times were guilty of
being at the wrong place at the
wrong time.
For the first time, 1 have to
agree with conservativecolumnist
Mr. George Will, who said, "(The
problem) is that his (Police Chief
DarrylGates)departmentisguilry
of an intolerable show of abuse;
much of it resulting in racism
But then again Mr. Gates is
the same man who authorized the
use of the choke hold as a method
of detention to test whether Afri-
can-American's respiratory sys-
tems were like those of "normal"
people.
It seems this one act of bru-
tality is not an isolated incident
Meddling
People, especially ones ot color,
have been getting the short end of
the stick when it comes to police
protection.
As columnist William
Rasberry said, "The mapr differ-
ence between the recent beating
and scores, perhaps hundreds, of
others, is that this one was video-
taped and therefore undeniable.
It is not just Los Angeles that
has a problem with gung-ho of-
ficers either. In many cities, both
big and small, a sadistic streak
seems to be prerequisite to
graduate from the police academy.
ForycarstheSouthern police
departments were satirized by the
caricatureof "Bubba the redneck
sheriff from hell.
However, as more and more
attention was turned on the area
during theG vil Rights movement,
this image faded slowly away,only
to be re-invented in the bigger
cities across the land.
Police brutality reports shot
up in such places as New York,
Boston, Houston and yes, little
university towns UkeCollege Park,
Md.
Far be it from me to heap
praise on top of praise on the
Greenville Police Department But
at least when you get stopped for
speeding in the Emerald City
you don't have to worry about
going to Ihehospital withabroken
-aw or suffer major brain damage.
Continued from page 4
is to pass outLive Crew tapes to
V students, so be it
(f COUrse, under such a sys
left! Some KhoolS will fall victim
to mismanagement, lb keep folks
in inestthc Education l vpartmont
would monitor standardized test
$Core in individual schools and,
it a school Isn'l producing return
(in our Investment tin" govern
mint�an audit the hell out of that
s hool and send the nnsmanagers
to prison for 20 years
And who said schools aren't
mismanaged already? America
spends more moncv per student
than any nation in the world and
look what our schools are turning
out.
Better that one or two schools
waste for a few more years until
we fix them, than for all of our
schools to be mismanaged forever
by people who are immune to
prosecution.
The point being, we would
be able to fix any small, local prob-
lems that arise on a case-by-casc
basis, after we've streamlined the
system as a whole.
The biggest hairball clogging
the throat of educational reform is
the misconception that we must
find a solution that could not un-
der any circumstances cause any
other problems.
The root of this timidity is,
needless to say, the same as that of
all other evilsin the universe: poli-
ticians. They're afraid to vote for
anything that might cause a
problem they'd have to answer
for later.
Ofcourse,anysolutioncould
conceivably cause seme problems,
and if we allow politicians to keep
squirmi ng around looking for one
that won't, our children will be
bitching about the same problem
20yearsfrom now (only they won't
be able to write their congressional
representatives about it, because
they won't know how to wnte).
Hence, the need for the
people to usurp control. We run
this country, not those sociopathic
gastropods.
If we really give a damn
about our children's education,
then we will mass at the next PTA
meeting and draw up battle plans
to renovateourschools,ourselves.
Our principals will throw the
school board's fundmgallocations
out the window and hammer out
a new budget from scratch.
Our teachers will teach
whatever and however they have
to, to motivate their students.
And if our elected officials
don't like it, they can look for a
real job after the next election.
QUALITY FILM DEVELOPING
?�
Center
3�!P-
1)1 Kl C I I-ROM THE USSR
hirst hver I S. lour
Student Union Minority Arts Committee $
presents
0Vip'$
AUTOMOTIVE
Foreign a Oom��t�c
pasts a sfevicf
SUPER SAVING COUPON FOR A
r FREE �
I c �
I second set of prints
� with every disc or roll of color print film brought in for processing i
1 offer good through April 15, 1991 "
ECU Student Store Wright Bldg
Greenville NC 27358
4xb Prints not included
Coupon Must Accompany Order
MKFJ THE CANDIDATE
Gary BEAMER
for SGA Treasurer
(Nullifications
� Major: BusinessFinance
�7 years International &
Domestic Business Experience
�5 years Small Business
Management
� Investment Portfolio
Management
Any questions? Call me.
752-7081
Vfv
Vote April 3
SOVIET
ACROJ3ATIC
evu
"INC RtJMBLt: PRODUCTION,
GREAT ENTERTAINMENT
EOR THE WHOLE EAMILY
DONTMISSITT
LONDON I9HX
Tuesday April 2
8:00 PM Wnght Auditorium publi(, s,()
ECU FacultyStaff $8
ECU StudenLsyouth $6
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR $10
For tickets, contact the Central Ticket Office,
Icndenhall Student Center, 8:30 AM-6:00PM,
Monday-Friday,
757788
I pr
jrcpl ' ulilti j
510 N. CreeneSt
Greenville, NC
830-1779
The
MculerCord
ORL
for
SAL
Round Trips swing at
Miami-Caracas378
New York-Malaga 578
Chicago-Amsterdam 338
Ralclgh-Tokyo 789
Los Angeles-Sydney 995
Greensboro-Paris 715
Greensboro-London 595
Taxes not included Restrictions apply
Fares subiect to change One ways and
faculty tares available WorVStudy Abroad
programs International Student & Teacher
lOilURAIL PASSES ISSUED ON
THFR�E�id�niTrlCM.Iosl
Travel
709 Ninth Street, B- Durham
919-S86-4M4
my motto
LeadFollowor Get Out of the Way
�ije East Ear0ltman
is njrjw accepting applications for the following positions:
� Assistant News Editor
Assistant Features Edit
Copy Editor
� Editorial Production Manager
� Director of Advertising
Business Manager
Advertising Representatr
Typesetter
S�M�er.

intereii srxnffl alhty in pewoh at The East Cwlwi4 office. The officesis
IrvBi SMpi Publkatiom Butl&lfe across from Joyner Library.
i $pfr"m�tttionf is April 4. For moire information, call 757-6366.
� -�� � � -





uJlie Saat (Sarultnuin
March 28. 19Q
FOR RENT
phono and utilities) on two bed room
apartment tor summer and or next
veai &55 1551
FOR SUMMER RENTAl 2 bed
room, 1 Kith cottage with tuli kitchen
9462aftet kflOp-m or all da) week
ends
WANTED TO SUB I I st ,
onebedroomapt from Ma .
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING si RVK l S
reran papers dissertations letters
resumes manuscripts projects last
turn around Call loan 756 9255
FOR SALE
KENDERGUTTAR MP lluxe85
1980 HONDA c t MM) MOTOR
i. Cl t 1 v'w mik ag� im n tires and
� a I met Mustsi nn edi
ateh v' Kl A' test ffci CalI75f
Ml si SAI t IMMEDI U l
Men s Raleigh 10 speed like 5K1
Women's Huth 12 speed iki $35
� w tanV $4 window an I
v works greai SI 11 indlBMrC
w 2 flopp J sk di ivs tVtOK
i acci pi best . ��. r all ih ms
758-7099 fen del -
PORTABLE H SH1K vV PKM K I OK KIM IMMI Plum R
�" w as!
l K I I
rantoeu liw ne k
FOR RENT
c VNNON COl Kl
i c
M Hit W EFHCIENO R d
�wers I V' iw � erkast in
S2611 month -a ab � Ma I
h "58-18 - v eat i
VS M FEMALI OVSMOKl K
I NIVERSm APARTMENTS
. . v .
�Neir Mi
� -v � �- - ��� gtl l - W ��"
umtodOffei S300 � moetii
iui i m fc Iihh
y $i v . �
en Apt V i,
� l h U VKDINv
II 1 l t KOOMM l W I p
v, mi i 5
n nth p ts 2 uti itu - I bed
o pets v
HELP WANTED
I s WORK' 1 c t I I I M PAY!
tormal I 64 -
BICOPPORTl Ml V tvpis
needed ' Acti w
778
t AS! Fl NDRAISING I'KC -
c.KWl SI st
up to S1000 for your campus orj
Plus a chana at " r�
. � .gramworks No nvesti
ded s(Ti' ' 28 F
I S GOVERNMI N I OBS
II - h$2
l ASK si MM1 K I MPLOY-
Ml M she nes I
HELP WANTED
and Bin rd! Over 8,000 openings No
experience necessarj Male or Fe
male Foi 68-page employment
indSH toM&l Research
Box s- S Seattle A 98124 Saris
faction aranteed
SUMMI R JOBS! t ounsel

' esin .i : v ik I'is� oi : l " i �'� 0 � :v-S, � f
�a.i i � t: ;okup.ECl �IIIU.I
stop ' a aparhTM' complex - J: y t! en -
I :��! at "s N MLABU lb - iarea M Phtn� I -
:i summ r 11 iei cres 4 ;vks froBRODi s
bt fore April 4 Pi: i 758 628 1 VskVcves
foi im duals . �
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rK i :i
PERSONALS
HI IMM. FOR I I ROPI 1 His
si MMI R? let
URH � � � � � �
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISE IN
THE EAST
CAROLMAN
i )ii i ni r
111 I si R INGYt !t
I I I I I s I KI I I
I w 1111
I
PERSONALS
RESPONSIBII STUDENT wanted
�� ho travels regularly to Chapel Hill-
Durham area to transport two mo-
lescent childn r I �r weekend - ts
Will pay gas plus' Call 42 -6509.
si SANHOOF1 K Youaredcnnga
en it ob as Presi l� nl I ove, me si-
mi rACHI let sgetn �� forth
� �� il �� ii �. � forevei 1 he
, t and the Atlanl
� �. Ch
VPRII tool s i i di v (v ir
! emestei ngas ECU s
Pirate Mascol ' �. its an Moi
' Minces Colis
at 4 p.m
sK VHKENNEDi Yourwed
wrwasfu fl i surprises We
ches. Love
s
S inks I � i ��
� � � ' � Delta Zeras
l I'll PHI � . lived
. rt i nd sla i
ant v t at Greek
�'��
Kl C Kl U II Wl
� eekend '� g sta Hope
OISPLAY CLASSFIEO
PERSONALS
theopporrunirv todosomecoxswair
tossing, but ivinor tosi ��
warmers an bt hii � � '
CONGRATl LATIOhK PS -
Alpha, winner of pre-si �
tourney Waj togoguys kei pupthc
dominal
io rui ms
vI
n ci ( fhe 5A's
ex Killei
VIph. Si;
1)1 I I A I 1 SPAGHETTI DCS
1 K " ;
ill. Se
ALPHA SK.s : . -
� .�.� isl
( ONGRATI I lHs
Mike Martu ia Oes '� il
t. 1 v- . ' rd �
Marshal jefl A
' than k
DISPLAY CLASSFED
Ringgoldrowers
1 ,lKl�ics 'r.s(
1 he� '� �.V
nLs,
CM1 '52-2865
WANDSWt IRTH(IMMONS � �

� ��
h k I �
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Fret, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
v The Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
PERSONALS
M I

IHt Ml I I I I s
wish ' � Ha
WANTAUTTU .
: p. IN. AND
� �
�� HI
lit PI I Ml 1
- "
I
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED

Greenvifit. i
� ony one-of-o
� 41 kind co 1
1H dresses c
BTwoftbrdcc.
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rifl V
1 ' '
1 mSMatita
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Godfather
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"


'Reluctant )azz
to perform dtiri
GOLDEN GIRL IRULTS
ttention interested dancers I w ho
can dazzle and sparkle) Become
a part ol tht 1991 EC I Football
Spirit! Share the spotlight b per-
forming with the East c arolirw
Pirates dun the 1991 football
season Uv GOLDEN GIRI S
DANC1 LINE will hold tryouts
Apnl 13 14; 9 a m 4 p m Situr-
da) and 1 p m4 p m Sunday in
Memorial Com for more infor-
mation call i,s;
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
I he 1991 Greenville -Pitt c o Spe-
cial Olympics Spring (iames will
be held on April 19th at I B
Aycock lr 1 licli School in (ireen-
vilie (rain date pril 24 Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as
hudk&eschaperones tcr the spe
cial Olympics Volunteers must
be able to work all day from
am -2 p mThe first ones there
will be assigned a position) An
orientation meeting will be held
on April 17in Old foyner I ibrary
room 221 from mK) pm Free
lunches and volunteer t-shhis will
be provided the day oi the games
to all volunteers who have at-
tended theorientahon 9ession For
more information, contact Lisa
Mills at B3Q4551
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST (LSAT)
The LSAT will be offered on Man
day, June 10, 1991. Applications
must be completed and mailed to
Law School Admission Service,
Box 2000, Newtown, PA 18940
Postmark deadline if May 7,11
Applicarionsposrmarketlafterthis
date must be accompanied bv a
�s-40 non-refundable late registra
tion fee 1 lu Nl VV appikati
ma) be obtained from the 1 c I
resting Center Speight Building,
RoonH05
PI AN1 sL I
ilu EC U Biology Qub will be
sponsoringa plant sale April )& 4
Ihe sale will take place in the Biol-
ogy Greenhouse, room BS 111
from 7 30 a ml OfJ pm
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC
Immunization Qinic being held at
thestiKient Health (. en ter-lpciate
your tetanus now! Available with
out appointment Wednesday and
ITiursdav. March 27 and 28 l'l
from lflOp.m to4J0p.m fhereis
a S2 00 fee for this vaccination.
SUMMER SCHOOL 1491
ROOM RESERVATION SIGN-
l P INFORMATION
Residence 1 lall room payments for
Summer Schcxil 1991 vmII be ac
cepted in the Cashiers Office,
Rixmi 105, Sptlman Building be-
ginning Apnl 3, 11. Room as-
signments will be made in the
Department ol University Hous-
ing, 201 Whichard Building, Apnl
3 and 4. The rent for a term of
summer school is $175 (Cotton.
Hemingand arvisHalls$210)for
a semi-private room and $260
(Cotten, Fleming and Jarvis Halls-
$300) for a private room Resi-
dence halls to be used for summer
school are: Cotten and Fleming
(women); Jarvismen); Slav (co-
ed).
MEDICAL RECQRDSJOBS
Want to be insured of a ob after
graduation? Interested in man
.ii. men! in a health rdau-d set
ting? . ontacl the Departmenl ol
Medical Administration tor 'all
Semester advisement March 2sth
E I scHOOl Ol Ml SU
� da Apnl i I-X I Facuiri
Re featuring SeJma Gocken,
cell �� aul lardit.piano als
featuring . tice facuh) A 1 ouise
roppii 0 nna Dease,and !a A
Piers n ! irsl I "resbj teriant hurch
Greenville,7 Vpm .freeandopen
lothepublic I or information, call
757 o33i ,s0 Monda April 1
ECU Faculty Recital featuring
Cindy Stachowski, flute, vMtli
Kerr C arlm piano A I Fletcher
Recital Hall, Greenville, 9D0pjn
tnv and open to public For more
information, call 757-6331. Apnl
I 7 K I lay Festival featuring
iay greats Ethel Ermis and Earl
Arnett with the EC U la En-
semble, under the direction ot
Carroll DashieU. Ihe Festival will
feature masterclasses open re
hearsab and two concerts t on
certs art1 April th at 900 p m m
the A. I Fletcher Recital hall and
Apnl 7th at 8 15 pm in Wright
Auditorium All events are tnv
and open to public For more in
formation, call 757-6331.
EDUCATIONAL LOANS
AVAILABLE
Three educational loan programs
for North Carolina residents at
tending colleges in or out of state
and for nonresidents attending
college in North Carolina are
available through College Foun-
dation, inc. These loan programs
are funded by North Carolina
- sandothei investors Stafford
1 oans are for dependent or inde-
pendent studentsand an? based on
financial need Supplemental
i oans are tor independent self-
supporting students are arc not
based on financial need PI US
1 oans are tor parents ot depen-
dent studentsand are not based on
financial need For more informa-
tion, writeCoUege Foundation mc,
2100YonkersRoad,P.O. Box 12100,
Raleigh, NC 27605 2100. or call
(919)821-4771.
STUB) ABROAD
EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
ihe Office ot International Pro-
grams is still accepting applica-
tions tor summer study abroad
programs as well as exchange
programs for the academic vear
1991-1992. Students may apply for
studies at Leicester Polytechnic
(England), Acadia University
(Nova Scotia. Canada) or other
semesteracademic vear pro-
grams Applications tor the Na-
tional Student Exchange are also
Iving accepted tor students who
want to spend an exciting semes-
ter or vear at oneof over 99 colleges
or universities in the U.S. If vou
think vou might have trouble get-
ting the classes you need at ECU,
consider an exchange to another
campus! Come by Brewster 117
to pick up an application or call
757-6769 for further information
on the programs available.
MCTUJGOEWAR
join in the fun at ECLrs Annual
Barefoot on the Mall and show
your support to the Ronald
McDonald House Recn it
Services is sponsoring a M
War competition i let youi team
oi ten members (male, femah c
� i together and �t ps I fot
anafternoonof.M f War fun!
� minimum of$1.00d pet
participant is requested For fur
ther information contact Kendra
Curtis at 757-6387 or stop b ; ;
Christenbury Gym
SENS ATI ON AI SOVn I
ACROBATIC RL IT
Ihe Sensational Soviet Acrobatic
Revuecornesto ECU Apnl 2. .
Wright Auditorium,8X)p m Call
Central Ticket Office at 757-4788
Sponsored by the Student I nion
Minority Arts c. ommittee
PH CHI PRESENTATION
Flovvdo vou cope u ith the stres- t
war and ot having friends and
loved ones overseas? Come and
find out. Discussion given bv Dr.
Thomas Durham and Psi c hi on
today at 3:00in Rawl 302
HABITAT LOR HLMANin
Habitat for I lumamtv is having an
information meeting on Tuesday,
April 2 at 7 00 pun. in Raw 1, Room
ISA, We will discuss activities of
the ECU Chapter along with ex-
plaining the purpose of Habitat
Everyone is invited! If interested,
and can't attend, contact Mark at
757-3356 or Kim at 752-2930.
MLDANDCRAZ1
The search is on for ECU guvs and
girls who have a great sense of
humor and are athletic minded
Become ECL's hrate Mascot and
act crazy in front of 6,000 Minges
iseumtans. Noshyp

If you think 1 ouldb
If tl :� � k� �
front of M (
�: ' 1
Nl IFAl H1NG EELLt
All Freshman reacl
will meet on Vpril 1 at 5
i ntraK an pus i -
ihis seminar will :�
coven Inp
CANOl PAHMl Ei
Learn beginning and
instruction on the
c anoeing and Kavakii
Recreational Services ��
soring a workshopon i �
3iX-600 pm Interested p
p�mt should meet atChnstenl
Gym at 2 30p m DJecost�$l
students and $5.001
and guests ! nKh h i
and have some fun! !
information .ai! 757-6911
STOP SMOKING
kick the habit' LheSruck nl r
Service i ifters a stop Smi
gram free oi charge rot
mformation or to sign up (
67�4 The program starts or
2nd
SOiTBALLHOML KL N
DERB1
Derby das are here' Registratt :
for the Sottball Home Run ft
will be on Tuesday, Apnl 2 at 5iX'
p.m. in BIO 103. All interest
individuals must attend thi
mtxering Vot further intormatic:
call 757-6387 or slop by 204
Christenbun, (,yni
'

autl
Ennis
Wh
Nortli Carolina Synr
Lc I News Bureau
rher
and the Fast
will combine
cert scheduk '
I3,at8pjn mEQ sWright Audi
umum Mtemating at the podium
will be N i. sur!phon condi
Gerhardt Zimmermann arn.1 East
Carolina svmph.Mn conductor
Robert Hause
Feaiiedsok)ist for the concert
is pianist Horatio v .utiem aiwtnc
oflliiranaCiihi w fwhasadwved
mtematioruil aodainn is i sokwl
Gttttena wfll be featured in the
Rachmaninoff Concert No J in D
Mirxr Opus30,withZHiwteiinann
conducting
The combined orchestras wtl
present the BrahmsSvmphorn No

he has appear!
with the I
tras notabK v
Ncn ork atx
Orchestzas
has toured
America .n'
ments rune M
secunVeappe
Miu'art test
IjncolnCenterl
His recoH
leased on the
tx-ls aho he i
khntn C ars�il
His fourth aa





March 28, 1991
PERSONALS
ard Pat Carroll, 2nd I
rVal v rtaplin-Jesse t
tulal ins theBn
mt PfcLTA ZETAS would like
Hapj Eask �
tV-WTALITTU
VNDAZ We h
uarch 28,1991
�hs Sagt (garoiinfan
17
i I'liPt t Here svourbiecha
k h i
EC I Mas
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
i i
HMAIKJN
and
' shy people ,r
�i fans need apply
, (Mild beyou,take
an ket and be in
c oliseum at 400
NC II AC HINClllLUWb
reaching Fellows
. ril I at 5:00p.m i'1
in pus meeting room.
vill be on the ls-
CANOI PADDLE?
� nnii .and intermediate
n the Kir River in
� � and Kayaking. EC I
� � � nalS -vices will bespon-
rl hopon April 4ncrri
�� interested partici-
ild rneetatChfislenbury
Gymat2 X)p.m lhe cost is $4.00
students and (5.00faculty, staff
I a- ready to roll, rip
ii II ivi some fun! lor further
information, call 757-ol I.
HLMAMPi
is having an
Jngon ruesday,
. in Rawl,Room
uss activities of
wtg with ex-
ose of Habitat.
i! If interested,
Contact Mark at
t "2-2930,
CRAZY
r ECU guys and
;reat sense of
Ithletic minded.
ite Mascot and
mW Minges
SI or SMOKING
Kkkthehabrr! The Student Health
� rvtcioffers a stop Smoking prt)"
gram free oi charge. For more
Room information or to sign up, call 757-
6794 The program starts on April
2nd.
SCJTRAUHQMLrUlN
DlREl
Derby da vs are here! Registration
for the Softball Home Run Derby
will be on Tuesday, April 2 at 5:00
p.m. in BIO 103. All interested
individuals must attend this
meeting For further informanon,
call 757-6387 or stop by 204
Christenbury Gym.
Godfathers perched for widespread success
B� I. mrt "I Love What's I lappening to Me helps to fflus- jL ' rm
By Matt King
Features I ditor
I Sammy Hagar were to have hislobotonn undone
. in to pursue making musk with some lyrical
� � ,u-t.t sound a lot like The Godfathers do on
album Hie I nglish band delivers guitar nfts
i ntless and the vocals have direction.
� inter of 1969 the band lettered on the brink
� nwhi nguitanstKmrolHmoTehittheroad.
� v memory and success of More Songs Aboui
ill in their minds the band opted to stay
isn placed bj ex Presidents ol Expk
nmtman hns Burrows in January, and 10 days
'tre touring in Spam.
material tor Unreal World was
band entered the studio in I ondon with Steve
nanning the boards ITte result is an album that
broader and more capable of thnisring thern
k and roll stardom than its predecessors
� the album is strait ahead heavy on the
� k musk but on occasion we hear the band
ine unexpet ted into the Unreal World I he
Sorrn thing bout You" breaks up the
"1 Love What's I lappenmg to Me helps to illus-
trate the bands versatility with itspsychedelicovertones.
The title track from the LP endeavors in the risky and
questionable matter of mixing music and politics.
PeterCovne. vtvalistand pnmary creative impetus
for the band says, "The 'unreal world' is simply the
world around us
"It's the most sa agelv political song we've done in
a long time Coyne continued.
The song questions English politics in a way that
sounds like they could have had some influence from
Elvis Costello (possible but not probable).
The bands nse to relative stardom happened fairly
quick. In early 1987, the band, then known as the Sid
Presley Experience, was touring the United States with
three top ten UJC singles under their belt. At the end of
the tour the band changed its name to The Godfathers,
in hen of being sued and was signed by Epic records.
Ineir first release KirfivW WorkandDetdhturned
themintoaluorativemuskaU t In April 1989,MoreSwt,gS
Aboui I ove and I Ue made an even bigger splash in the
rock music pond
The band backed up the album with a North
American tour opening for Love and Rockets. In the
wake oi (���� '�'� '�'��' the band will siirelv tour again
soon, treating Arnerican farts to their gutty guitar based
sound
. Photo Courtesy ot Epic fleco-
The Godfathers return from the studio presenting their most dominant album to date UnreaIVorWlustra-
the band s musical matunty with flare and passion Tune to WZMB for a taste o� the album
I Oscars prove to be boring
� umI ot Fortune " The award for With countless long-
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant features ditor
File Photo
Lnms will appear at the 1 'etcher Recital Hall next Friday evening
nor ot the hast CarolirTfSorWtrerrMrjsfc'S Ja7rWeelr
There were few surprises tor
the critics who predicted that
"Dances With Wolves" would R5-
ceivcanabundantsupplvot golden,
sword-toting statuettes.
Receiving Oscars for best pic-
ture, best director, best soundtrack,
original score,filmediting, cinema-
tography and screenplay adapta-
tion, "Dances With Wolves"
moonwalked through the63rd an-
nual Academy Awards ceremony.
1 low ever, the event was not totally
dominated by Kevin Costner's epic
western.
Jeremy Ironsreceived anOscar
for his performance as murder
nispect Clans Von Btrlow in Re-
Reluctant Jazz Star' Ethel Ennis
to uerform during Tazz Week
versa 1 ot fortune" The award tor
best actress went to Kathy Hates tor
her role as a fiction writer's sadistic
tan in "Misery
foe Pesri was awarded an (s
(ar tor best supporting actor for his
vi 'lent portray, alofa mob meany m
Martin Scorcese s (ioodfeBas
Chalk one up for Wayne
Campbell
Rounding out the top awards.
WhoopiC oldberg obtained an (ts
car for her performance as a clair-
vovant in "Ghost
Every year the Acadenvj
Awards comes doser to perfection
However, an honorar Oscar
should go to the home viewing
audience tor having to sit through a
three-and-a-half hour award show
that should have started at B pan.
r
With countless long-winded
introductions, unprepared accep-
tance speeches, excessive and overly
extravagant choreographed dance
numbers and the inevitable histori-
cal film clip chronicling r3 years ot
great film moments, the Oscars
proved ho-hum once again.
Although the ceremony con-
tained abt wtas much excitement as
re-reading a three-part article on
snail reproduction in last years
Readers Digest while perched on
the crapper with a terminal ase of
diarrhea,hi St BillvC rvstal managed
to make tlu best out i a hopeless
situation.
Crystal's performance ot a
musical montage saluting the
nominees tor best picture W&an
te-u re in a coma and tn. J. i �
d dopaj A�(�. s, was hilari
ous.Arrivmgonhorseback,( - �
created a comedk itmosphen
quickly keeled ovi i anddied
the technical awards started
Crystal did even thingshoii
kissing Michael Jackson q i
Iheteethtosavetheew nt Sp
ot Michael lackson tl
spentmorerjmetrair 1
fellow crotch grabtvr Maddi i i
than on an other celebi irj
Hollywood gala
Additional tx- ars shou d �
given to toe Pesci and yes e n
Kevin c ostner.
v h) ?
Ihe kept tlu it acceptai
speectM ssh rtandswci I � In't
thank tlu- entire stati ' �
iorhavingncdai inchtl .
1
By John DeFreise
I ecial to The last Carolinian
azz lovers will want to be in
nville April 3 7 tor the East
i School Of Musks Spring
I la Festival. Phi Mu Alpha
Fraternity and the ECU Student
iMirwrityArtsComnutteeare
sponsoisvrirhtheschoolofrnusK
� bringingthe vibrant la v icalist
Ethel Ennis to perform with the
EC l jazz Ensemble I riday April 5
� Op m in Fletcher Recital I fall
Ethel is a personal friend ot jazz
fessor Carroll Dashieu, director
t East Carolina's first azz En
x mble, and is "very exc ited to see
.11 that is going on at ECU in pz2
Shehasbeen tncontad with Dashiell
for quite a while, but has never
isited the Grtvnville area before
A native Ot Baltimore, Ethel
Ennis has been described by the
author of her biography as, "Ethel
Ennis, The Reluctant Jazz Star
When asked how she got the label,
she cites the hussel and bussel of the
musk business that caused her to
drop out of the main stream tor
several years to open a jazz club,
Mitel's Place in the cultural dis-
trict of Baltimore.
Ethel performed at the White
House for Presidents Nixon and
Carter, and represented the United
states in Xiamen, China for their
tirst ever International Festival tor
Performing Arts.
su- calls herself an Into-
t.uner, reeling that nuisii can do
more than just entertain, it can also
enlighten and inform the listener
Although not currently on tour.
Ethel visits East Carolina after a trip
u i the I lonnell I lampion lazz Festi-
val . w here she perfi 'rmod along side
jazz tegendsMkeDizzy (aJespieand
Billy Eckstme. Her performance at
ECU is a must for any jazz enthu-
siast.
Jazz Week begins on Wednes-
day, April 3, with an open rehearsal
featuring Ethel Ennis and the First
)azz Ensemble. Activities continue
on Thursday when Ethel and her
husband Earl Arnettdeliverlectures
on "Women in Jazz" and "The vari-
ous aspects of the Music Business'
After theconcert on Friday, The
East Carolina University azz En-
semble Day will begin Saturday
morning at 10 a.m at the band
shelter on the ECU campus mall. As
part of the lazz Festival, Ensemble
Dav will feature Jazz Ensembles
from up and down the East Coast.
ECU's very own Jazz Bones will
lead off, followed by the Contem-
porary azz Insemble directed by
Paul Tardif at I&45 a.m. At 115
a.m. theSecond ECU Jazz Ensemble,
directed bv Dennis AHeman, will
deliver their contribution to Jazz
Week
After a short lunch ba-ak, The
University of District of Columbia
lazz Ensemble directed by Calvin
lones will play their favorite selec-
tions from the big band era, fol-
lowed by an always energetic per
formance bv ECU's well known
First Jazz Ensemble directed by
Carroll Dashiell.
Dashiell has played a kev roll m
organizing lazz Week's activities
See Ennis page 8
Dream Factory makes wishes come true
- ri,uicmn built eameb I
By Rondalyn Mount
Special to The Fast Carolinian
Carolina
ECU News Bureau
ITie North Carolina Symphony
md the East Carolina Symphony
will combine forces for a joint con-
cert scheduled for Saturday, April
13,at8 p.m. in ECU's Wright Audi
torium. Alternating at the ptxlium
will be N.C. Symphony conductor
Gerhardt Zimmermann and East
Carolina Symphony conductor
Robert Hause.
Featured soloist for the concert
ispiarust HoratjoGutierrez, a nabve
ofHavana,Cuba,whohasachieved
international acclaim as a soloist.
Guherrez will be featured in the
Rachmaninoff Concerto No. 3 in D
Minor, Opus30, with Zimmermann
conducting.
The combined orchestras will
present the BrahmsSymphony No.
1 in C Minor, Opus 68, with Hause
conducting.
Horatio Gutierrez made his
professional debut in 1970 with the
Los Angeles Philharmonic and
conductor Zubin Mehta. Since then
he has appeared numerous times
with the world's leading orches-
tras, notably with the Los Angeles,
New York and Israel Philharmonic
Orchestras. An active recitalist, he
has toured throughout North
America and Europe. His engage-
ments have included several con-
secutive appearances at the Mostly
Mozart Festival in New York's
UncolnCenterandatCamegieHall.
His recordings have been re-
leased on the Telarc and Angel la-
bels, and he is a favorite guest on
johnny Carson's "Tonight Show
His fourth appearance with the
ECU students helped the
Pitt County community to col-
lect over $1,700 as they raised
money, dreams and spirits, Sat-
urday at the Dream Factory
Easter Egg Hunt and Carnival,
held at Green Springs Park
The Egg Hunt, co-spon-
sored bv local OrthiKiontist. Dr.
William Cox, and the Dental
Office of Dr. Gary Midheb, at-
tracted over 1000 people with
the theme " Children Helping
Other Children IX-lta .eta
sorority members Rondalyn
Mount and BridgetClay ton were
the student coordinators for the
event
Over 800 children eagerly
searched tor eggs, had their faces
painted, scooped up Delta Zeta
goldfish, revelled in the pup-
petry of ECU student Mary
Harrison and ate hot dogs and
hamburgersmadeby the Dream
Factory' Board members. Elmo
the Clown sold helium balloons
and made everyone laugh.
"Since we provide last
wishes forterminally illchildren,
Michels said. "We felt it was
important to provide an atmo-
sphere of healthy fun for all.
"Wealso wanted to provide
an opportunity for kids to do
some of the work in raising
monev for other kids in their
own community who are less
fortunate
The Dream Factory,
founded three years ago. is open
to all members of the community
who wish to provide their time
and energy to raising monev
which will be used to subsidize a
local child's dream. The dreams
themselves vary fromcasetocase.
Some child may want a
VCR. or a Game Boy" senior
volunteer. And ECU professor
Fred bchaddler said 1 have been
fortunate to be able to go on some
of the dreams
Tvebeentoa New Kids On
the Block' concert and King's
Dominion, Schaddler said.
According to Schaddler, Walt
Disney World isa popular request
and the next recipient of a dream
is, in fact, travelling to Disney
World with her family next Sat-
urday.
The mother of the child
shared the family's excitement
about the upcoming trip and the
role oi the Dream Factory in their
lives. The families of wish re-
cipients are usually strapped fi-
nancially and have to deal with
death on a daily basis.
Being able to have a wish
granted and participating in that
wish is a healthy break which
cheers the child up and gives the
family a wonderful moment, free
of pain and distress, to remember.
"The money we're raising
todav Michels said, "will go
into an interest-bearing fund
which we hope will one day be
self perpetuahng "This is our
goal"
Children's organizations
built gam boot
hunt partii ipant '
during the festivittos. Dr C
said there v. B
students of EC! have bo
major asset this vear
Students were m
all areas of tin fundraiser, from
seDingfc�)d at the concessions to
face painting supen ising game
booths w even playii
Easter Bunny.
Andrew Venditti, a senior
majoring in pre mod said he
wasn t sure he wanted to vol-
unteer. It was .i lot of pressure
from his girlfriend KeBy, but
"once 1 walked onto the grass
and the little kids threw Hum
selves into my arms, 1 knew it
was an important and fulfilling
thing to do
The Dream Factor itself
sponsorsmanvi ventv Mh hels
said. ' It ust so happens thi-isan
event sp n- wed bv Pr C v and
myself for the benefit foi the
Dream Factory It helps to have
others provide the seed money
and work force, although the
volunteer group is very large
Volunteers meet en ery first
Monday ot the month at tJfteH I
Medical Foundation Building
All interested persons are i nvited
todropby and find out how they
can help. The meetings begin at
6p.m. and generally last 45 mm
utes to an hour.
Mr. Schaddler said the next
fundraisingev ent willbea u'rney
Softball game between commu-
See Wishes, page 8
COMING UP
Horatio Gutierrez
Chamber Musk Society of Lincoln
Center received an Emmy Award
four years ago.
Gutierrez became an Ameri-
See Symphony, page 8
Attic
Friday
The Point
Saturday
Riff Raff
Monday
NCAAs
Cowboys
Friday
Ladies (8-Ball)
Saturday
Horseshoe
tournament
(4:00 p.m.)
Silver Bullet
Friday
Male Exotic
Dancers
Saturday
Female Exotic
Dancers
Fizz
Thursday
Burke Ingraiia
Friday
Gael and Rich





8 �fre gaat (Earolinfan March 28,1991
1 arch 28,1991
Ennis
including Jazz Ensemble Day. In a
phone conversation, Ethel Ennis
expressed her deep respect and
gratitude for the work Dashiell has
put into the jazz program here at
EastCarolina. Along with teaching,
directing and playing in three dif-
ferent jazz bands, Dashiell is also a
member of the ECU Symphony
Orchestra and is often seen playing
his bass at The Fizz restaurant on
Symphony
Continued from page 7
Saturday nights.
Other jazz events coming up at
ECU, the 1st Jazz Ensemble's final
concert for the semester will be held
at the conclusion of Jazz Week, Sun-
day April 7 at 8:15 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium. The East Carolina
School of Music will also hold their
annual Alumni Weekend April 19
and 20, featuring workshops and
concerts by some of ECU'S promi-
nent alumni in music. A final con-
cert will be given by the alumni
musicians, Carroll Dashiell, and
other faculty members in Fletcher
Recital Hall on April 20 at 7 p.m it
will surely be an extraordinary
performance.
Incaseof rain,all Jazz Ensemble
Day events will be postponed until
1:30 p.m. where they will begin in
Fletcher Recital Hall, at the music
Continued from page 7
building. With thecareful planning
and invited guests involved, East
Carolina's Jazz Week '91 is sure to
be a fabulous event for all that at-
tend. Alleventsarefreeand whether
you are a jazz enthusiast or not, take
advantage of this musical resource
by attending some events. You will
become a fan of the Swing, Be Bop
and Ragtime before you can say
"Jelly Roll Mortin
can citizen in 1967, five vears after
moving to Los Angeles with his
family. He is a graduate of the
luilliard School and won the Silver
Medal in the fourth annual
Tchaikovsky International Compe-
tition in Moscow.
The combined North Carolina-
East Carolina Symphony Orches-
tras concert has become an annual
favorite in the Greenville area, be-
ginning with the gala re-opening of
Wright Auditorium several years
ago.
Advance tickets are $15 each
for the general public, $12 for ECU
faculty and staff and $8 for students
and youth.
Tickets may be ordered from
the ECU Central Ticket office, 757-
4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS. Any
tickets remaining to be sold at the
door wi 11 be sold at the general pub-
lic price.
Happy Birthday, Greg Jones
PLylNT SALT
ECU Biology Club
Wednesday April 3
Thursday April 4
7:30 am- 1:00 pm
at the
Biology
Greenhouse
RoomS-111
Hot Tub Rentals
& Sales
T
v.
)

U
B
Q
O
��
o
I
E
S
Deliver Anywhere
Call for Reservation
RobLawler 975-1818

�A �iS -rrifl4.
Wishes
Continued from page 7
nity leaders, held on April
7th at 2 p.m at Guy Smith
Stadium.
"It was a great day" Dr.
Cox said, "And we couldn't
have achieved such success
without Delta Zeta, Mary
Harrison, Andrew and the
rest of the ECU volunteers.
It'sa wonderful thing to have
such a dedicated group of
college students in this com-
munity
Presents
Student Budget
Night
1.15 TALL BOYS
2.50 Pitchers

1.25 IMPORTS
2.75 ICE TEAS
?LADIES FREE
In: The ALIVE at 5:08 "KEG PARTY" Free Adm. 5-8:30
Fri: 29th
The Point
original Rock
and Roll
ATiTIC
752-7303
209 East
Fifth St.
Mob: Apr. 1st
NCAA
Championship
Game -Free
Admission - SI.50
32 o Draft
Sat 30,h: Riff Raff
ACDC tribute act
(direct from Canada)
wB
"V
b BEAUTIFUL FULL COLOR
OLOR COPIES
Beautiful full color copies
from any original print or 35mm slide.
We can enlarge up to 11" x 17"�use your
imagination and give us a try!
Of course�we do the standard print shop
operations�plus a whole lot morel
POSTERS � DECALS � BUMPER STICKERS
QUICK COPIES � FAX SERVICE � DESKTOP PUBLISHING
mmm
th Street. Greenville 752-0123 � FAX 7520620
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
756-2011
Lunch only
Small Shrimp
Platter
only
$2.99
Sun-Fri
Beverage not included
Expires: 4-25-91
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
756-2011
Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Get the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter FREE
Good anytime
Beverage not included
Expires: 4-25-91
WANTED: Part-time staff
w apartment included
Looking for:
Rising Sophomore of Junior ECU student that can
handle pan-time work, is willing to relocate to apartment with
male roommates, is clean cut honest, and works well with
people
�Light work for rent �Flexible night schedule
�Other work with pay 'Rotating weekends off
�References required
If interested contact Robert Wilkerson
or
Don Wilkerson
at 752-2102
Wilkerson & Sons Inc.
Funeral Home
2100 E. 5th St.
Grenville, NC
0
�f
et
� v f V6'
Join us for all the
NCAA Basketball
action via satellite
on our
4 new TV screens!
Daily
Food & Drink
Specials
Come join the crowd!
Don't
Monkey
around
with other
newspapers
Read The
East
Carolinian
SOAR TO NEW HEIGHTS
Try-outs begin Monday April
1st and continue through
April 8th for anyone
interested in becoming an
ECU Cheerleader or Pirate
mascot. Show your spirit
at 4:00 in front oMinges
Coliseum. For more
information
contact Lee
Workman at
757-4514.
Jp
521 Cotanchc
Street
757-1666
brmer EC
By Kerry Nester Assistant Sports Fditordata �t said tha

A decade ago, Eddie Paynew as
� assistant under head
3dom at ECU; todaj'
�umself at the heir � �� �
laskethall program.
Director of Athletu sDa�
r announced Wedrtt la thai
Payne will serve i �� �
Tjskethall coach.
"I am extremishe
:herumoutet tr pro
and the candidate
lected Hart said
"The select: i �
handled the job in a .� pr �itoucl '
sional manner and attr i� r
number of high-quahu mdi-
Pirates
club 1 ywV vi "V r
lerrapins, at home
Bv Owen Cox
Statt Writer
ECU did all the nht things
Tuesday r ght and defeated the
University of M in d 4-2 in
baseball iction.
The victory, the firs! ovt
Atlantic Coast ' rtfen ppo-
nent this year, broke i 11
game losing skui fort!
lacked off a five .
on a winning n b
Coach (,a' I ertoi ��� is
pleased with the 1 ra '���
did some things offensivt
nighthesaid. W i inufa hired
some runs with hit and ran mov-
ing the runners Things rffco rhat"
The Pirates jumped I u
lead in the -
struckoul to lead ffth�
fore Tom Moyt - :
Chad Triplet: reached I
an infield single with Moye .
to third on a throw nig error b
pitcher. C.hnn Beck grounded to
EC


�Mff-f
-�
Strike three!
Pirate pitcher Johnny Beck delivers a pitch
amassed 10 strikeouts in nine innings of work a'
Rebels to face proba
By Mike Lopresti
Gannett News Sen ice
It is not justaFinalFour.lt is a
j going-away party. One last blast for
the basketball program at Nevada-
Las Vegas before the walls cave in.
The Indianapolis Hoosier
Dome will be crawling with storv
angles this weekend How Duke
always gets to this thing but never
wins it. How Kansas Roy Williams
worships Dean Smith but must now
try to beat him. How Dean Smith
: has won only one national champi-
onship at North Carolina, and isn't
it getting kind of late?
Now this tournament, which
has had a hard time keeping TV
viewers up until midnight, has one
last chance for drama and upsets.
Nine of the 12 regional games this
past weekend were decided by 12
or more points. The Final Four has
two No. 1 seeds (UNLV, Carolina),
a No. 2 (Duke)and a No. 3(Kansas).
Cinderella has i
But all of tr
Here is the maj
big Feflon top:
repeat tMcatrttj
longgoodbye
Tuesday, the
Vegas.
Probation,
gained awa tl
season. Anoth
tion is near anj
with more san
of the starters
ior Anderson
reason to retu?
ter of Jerry Tai
at any blackpc
So this is
as we've knowi
But rest assure
how to party
It is a fitting
intends to
grandness. Inc
of basketball cl





?
8L�ftg �gJLgrpnJan�, March28J991
Ennis
Iarch 28,1991
Continued from page 7
including jazz Ensemble Day. In a
phone conversation, Ethel Ennis
expressed her deep respect and
gratitude for the work Dashiell has
put into the jazz program here at
FastCarolina. Along with teaching,
directing and playing in throe dif
terent jazz bands, Dashiell is also a
member of the ECU Symphony
Orchestra and is often seen playing
his Kiss at The Fizz restaurant on
Symphony
Saturday nights.
Other ).izz events coming up at
ECU, the 1st )azz Ensemble's final
concert for the semester will be held
at the conclusion of azz Week, Sun-
day Apnl 7 at 8:15 p.m. in Wnght
Auditorium The East Carolina
School of Music will also hold their
annual Alumni Weekend April 19
and 20, featuring workshops and
concerts by some of ECU's promi-
nent alumni in music. A final con-
cert will be given by the alumni
musicians, Carroll Dashiell, and
other faculty members in Fletcher
Recital Hall on Apnl 20 at 7 p.m it
will surely be an extraordinary
performance.
lncaseofrain,all azz Ensemble
Day events will be postponed until
1:30 p.m. where they will begin in
Fletcher Recital Hall, at the music
Continued from page 7
building. With the careful planning
and invited guests involved. East
Carolina's Jazz Week '�1 is sure to
be a fabulous event for all that at-
tend. All events a re free and whether
you areajazzenthusiastornot, take
advantage of this musical resource
bv attending some events You wi
become a fan of the Swing, Be Bop
and Ragtime before vou can say
"lelly Roll Mortin
can citizen in 1967, five years after
moving to I os Angeles with his
family. He is ,i graduate of the
luiUiard School and won the Silver
Medal in the fourth annual
Tchaikovsky International Compe-
tition in Moscow.
The combined North Carolina-
East Carolina Symphony Orches-
tras concert has become an annual
favorite in the Greenville area, be-
ginning with the gala re-opening of
Wnght Auditorium several years
ago.
Advance tickets are $15 each
tor the general public, $12 for ECU
faculty and staff and $8 for students
and youth.
Tickets may bo ordered from
the ECU Central Ticket office, 757-
4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS. Any
tickets remaining to be sold at the
door will be sold at the general pub
lie price.
Happy Birthday, Greg Jones
'PLAN7 SALT
ECU Biology Club
Wednesday April 3
Thursday April 4
7:30 am - 1:00 pm
'1$' �' Biology
3t rreennouse
.4 Room S-lll
0

Hot Tub Rentals
& Sales
x
u
B
B
I
E
S
Deliver Anywhere
('all tor Reservation
Rob hauler 17S-1K1N
Wishes
Continued from page 7
nity leaders, held on April
7th at 2 p.m at Guv Smith
Stadium.
"It was a great day" Dr
Cm said, "And we couldn't
have achieved such success
without Delta Zeta. 1arv
I larrison, Andrew and the
rest of the ECU volunteers
It'sa wonderful thing to have
such a dedicated group of
college students in this com
munity
i
M
Presents
Student Budget
Night
1.15 TALL BOYS
2.50 Pitchers
1.25 IMPORTS
2.75 ICE TEAS
LADIES FREE
In I In- l l Kat 5:M -kl (. PARTY" Free Adm. 5-8:30
TET
Fri: 29th
The Point
original Rock
and Roll
ATiTIC
752-7303
209 East
Fifth St.
Mon: Apr. 1st
NCAA
Championship
Game -Free
Admission - SI .50
2 oz Draft
Sat 30 Riff Raff
ACDC tribute act
(direct from Canada)
b BEAUTIFUL FULL COLOR
OLOR COPIES
Beautiful full color copies
from any original print or $5nrtm slide.
We can enlarge up to 11" x 17"�-use your
imagination and give us a try!
Of course�we do the standard print shop
operations�plus a whole lot more!
POSTERS � DECALS � BUMPER STICKERS
QUICK COPIES � FAX SERVICE � DESKTOP PUBLISHING
GfeMc'i
1 310b. 10th Street, Greenville
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
t
i
756-2011
Lunch only
Small Shrimp
Platter
only
$2.99
Sun Fri
Be erage n �i included
' pircs 4 25 91
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

I
756-2011
Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Gel the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter FREE
Good anytime
Beverage no! included
Expires: 4 25-(l
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
WANTED: Part-time staff
ml apartment included
Looking for:
Rising Sophomore of Junior ECU student that can
handle part-time work, is willing to relocate to apartment with
male roommates, is clean cut honest, and works well with
people
�Light work tor rent 'Flexible night schedule
�Other work with pa) "Rotating weekends oft
�References required
If interested contact Robert Wilkerson
or
Don Wilkerson
at 752-2102
Wilkerson & Sons Inc.
Funeral Home
21(H) E. 5th St.
Cirenville, NC
&
e
Join us for all the
NCAA Basketball
action via satellite
on our
4 new TV screens!
Daily
Food & Drink
Specials
521 Cotanchc
Street
757-1666
MeslrxmitottaufanA
Don't
Monkey
around
with other
newspapers.
Read Tlie
East
Carolinian
�Ni
fife" 4k2
: stf: WtEhkU

B- it" ���' '1 !l�a pm
SOAR TO NEW HEIGHTS
Try-outs begin Monday April
1st and continue through
April 8th for anyone
interested in becoming an
ECU Cheerleader or Pirate
mascot. Show your spirit
at 4:00 in front ofMinges
Coliseum. For more
information
contact Lee
Workman at
757-4514.
ormer EC
By Kerr Nester
Assistjnt Sports f
decadea
ina-v
lom it I
timseH al " �
asketball : r i
Director of Al
r. annoui
feyne ���� ill - r
isketl-i

ind tru
Jected Mar' .
he
handled Ihe n
kjonalma
(number r
Pirates
club
Terrapiis,
at home
Bv Owen Cox
Stj
� �
ECU I
luesda)
Universit
The vicl
AtlantK Coasi
nenl I broV
game
kicki I ffal
on a �� � mi
icl
pleased ��� ith th
did some thii ffei
night '���
simenir
ng ther
The Pii
I in l
struck it I
n Tom V -
� '
an infield sinj
to third on a throv
pitcher � �
Strike three!
Pirate pitcher Johnny Bee-
amassed 10 strike Jc
Rebels to face proba
B Mike Lopresti
Gannett New- vnut
It is not just
goingVA.np.irn On
t he basketball program a" �
Las Vegas Man the waUscave at
The Indiana p is Ho sier
Dome will bo crawling with storj
angles this weekend H I �
always gets to this thine but never
wins it. How Kansas Ro Williams
worships Dean Smith but must now
trv to beat him How Dean Smith
has won onK I w national champi-
onship at North Carolina, and isn't
it getting kind of late"
Now this tournament, which
has had a hard time keeping TV
viewers up until midnight, has one
last chance for drama and upsets
Nine of the 12 regional games this
past weekend were decided by 12
or more points. The Final Four has
two No. 1 seeds lUNLV, Carolina),
a No 2 (Duke) and a No. 3 :Kansas)

Tuesi
Vegas
Prob
gained awa) tl
tnn is near
with more sancj
of the starters
ior Andersori
reason to retui
ter of lerry Tar
at anv blackjad
So this is p
as we've know1
But rest assure
how to party
It is a fitting
intends to
grandness Ind
of basketball c





t
I
1
�it.
s �
�t!
er
w
) l W HEIGHTS
, wgin Monday April
ntinue through
or anyone
in becoming an
erleader or Pirate
hlunv your spirit
i front of Minges
For more
on
ee
jf
f �" ,uttt
fRCH 28,1991
OUt? �agt (Earolinian

SPOflTS
Former ECU assistant coach to replace Steele
By Kerry Nester
si�.tjiit Sports Fditor
ideago, Eddie Payne was
t under head coach Dave
qJi m il ECU; todi) he finds
ii the helm ot the Pirate
. (ball program.
Hire tor of Athletics Davt Hart
in il Wednesday ih.it
, il serve .is the new men's
. thall oach
xtremelv pleased with
noutoi theevaluationprocess
andidatc we have se
(l.irt said.
; he selection committee
! the tob in I very protes-
manner and attracted .i great
il high-quality candi-
Pirates
club
Terrapins,
at home
By Owen Cox
M.itl Writer
did .ill the right things
night and defeated the
� it of Maryland 4-2 in
: i 'ion
ii h i the first over .in
( oast (onference oppo-
ear, broke a brut, two-
ng skid for the Piratesand
� � ff a five-game home stand
ing note
i h .arv Overtoil was
ed with the Pirate effort We
-rue things offensivelv to-
hesakJ. "We manufactured
ruttt with hit and runs mov-
� FDrieTS ihingslBanint-
Pirates jumped loan early
� the second l orey Short
- to lead oft the inning, he
n. Moye walked
i rriplett reached first on
� field single with Move going
rd ii .i throwing error by the
� i ;h�nn IVvk grounded to
dates
(l.irt s�iid that outof 100 candi-
dates, he made the choice to offer
the job to Payne Tuesday night. The
decision wasconsumma ted late that
night by Chancellor Richard I akin
Payne comes to 1 CU from the
i Iniversity of South Carolina where
he has been an assistant i oach tor
the past five seasons under (leorge
lelton.
This season tlte Gamecocks fin-
ished with a 20-13 record and ad
vanced to the second round of the
National Invitation roumament.
He will make a great coach:
but more importantly,he will bring
a touch (it class and a sense ot caring
tor even, one at bast (, arolina I ni
versify lelton slid
"ECU is very fortunate to have
a person like Eddie at the helm. I
truly believe in time they will be one
cf the most competitive programs
in their conference
Before his five years at USC,
Pay ne was the bead coach and ath
letu director at Belmont Abbey
College (1981-86). 1 let unshed with
a 103-51 record ,wn. was twice
named NA1A District 26Coach of
the Near
Payne was also head basket-
ball coach and athletic director at
Tnictt-McConncll Iumor College in
Cleveland.C.a,for one season(lu7H-
79) before coming to ECU as an
assistant tor three years (1979-81).
Payne led the Panes to a 25-5
rev ord and a league championship.
For hisachievements, he was named
the Georgia Junior College and At-
lanta Tip-Oft Club Coach of the
Year.
This is something he expressed
in the press conference given
Wednesday. "I'm not interested in
winning games; I want to win
championships Payne said.
V.wnc indicated that in the 10
years since he's been to Greenville,
ECU has made somcimprcssive
improvements to the facilities and
the potential of the basketball pro
gram.
"In some cases, 1 was gTeatly
Surmised with the resources and
opportunities at Fast Carolina
Payne said.
I le spoke with the players for
the first time 30 minutes prior to the
pressconfcrence,exprcssed the real
potential of the players and said he
is very excited about the challenge.
With the deadline for signees
coming up April 10, recruiting has
been a big question in everyone's
mind concerning the upcoming
season.
Payne said he wanted to recruit
players that can help ECU win
championships, but cautioned that
potential signees must possess ex-
pectations to excel academically as
well.
"I know that if werecruit young
men who are career interested in
getting their degree, these are the
kind of guys that are going to win
championships Payne said.
'I have no doubt that a pro-
gram that doesn't have youngsters
that take academics seriously will
not be successful
Payne also said that although
the signing date is rapidly ap-
proaching, he knows of quality
players that are still available.
Flowever, he said he wouldn't sign
a player, just to sign a player.
Also on his list of high priorities
is hiring assistant coaches. He has
already compiled a number of ap-
plicants but said he will approach
the situation conservatively.
"The only thing 1 do quickly is
buy clothes Payne said.
The assistant coaches would
have to possesscertainqualitiesac-
See Steele, page 10
Women1 s tennis team
wins two in a row
D�il R��d � ECU Photo L�b
ECU'S senior second baseman Cory TOdick hits Maryland's Matt Baumanns pitch m Tuesday night's game
The Pirates won 4-2, boosting their record at Harrington Field to 11-5
short, scoring Moye. Pat Watkins
followed by singling to lett, which
brought home Tripled barrv
Narron walked, and Dave I eistcn
filed out to right
leading hitter, provided E I with with a walk, scored on a double to
another run with his fifth home run center by C.lvnn Beck.
Of the war Ihat put the Pirates up
3 0 after three
( U a,kU another in the
Ohn Gast, the CAA'S third fourth when Tnplett. who led oft
In the sixth inning, Maryland
got to starter lohnny Beck. The Ter-
rapins scored two runs on fourhits.
See Terrapins, page 10
Graduation
bad news for
some athletes
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
The EC U women' s tenni s e,n m
won two matches in a row as they
handed Barton College an 8-1 loss
on Tuesday and also beat Peace
Collegeon March 21 winning their
fifth and sixth matches.
Sophomores Jennifer Fenton
and Kelly Buck, juniors Kim Harvey
and Karen Atkins and freshman
Kris Robinson all picked up wins in
two sets against Barton.
Aside from Sanna Heinila's
loss, the Lady Pirates lost only 12
games in the singles matches.
Robinson and Harvey allowed
their opponents to win only one
game apiece in the rout.
In the doubles matches the
scores were not as lopsided. The
team of FentonBuck won 6-3 and
7-5 while HeinilaHarvey won 6-1
and 6-4. AtkinsJcnings also re-
corded wins in doubles play, win-
ning 6-2 and 6-0.
Against Peace the Pirates won
5-3 in a close match that could have
gone either way.
The number one and two play-
ers, Sanna Heinila and sophomore
lennifer Fenton,both won their first
sets 64, but each ended the day
losing their singles match two sets
to one
Heinila lost the first gameot'the
first set and fell behind 2-1. She
cane bck to in two games n a
row to go ahead 3-2 and from then-
she won her first set.
Again in the second set I Jcinila
fell behind 4-1 and again she came
back to tie the set at 5-5. She could
not duplicate her earlier comeback,
though and lost the second set 7-5.
In Fenton's match she came
closest to winning in the third set
after she won her first set 64 and
lost the second 6-2.
She fell behind in the third set
2-5 but came back winning two
games in a row w ith the score 4 5.
She could not win the next one an
lost the match 2-1.
Junior Kim Harvey rolled over
Peace's Caroline Vinson 6-0 and 6-
. 2. Number four sophomore Kelly
Buck also won 64, 3-6 and 6-1.
Freshman Kns Robinson won
her match in two sets while junior
Karen Atkins finished off heroppo-
nent in three sets.
The Pirates are now 6-5, and
they play Barton again April 4 in
their next match.
By Mike Lopresti
Gannett News Service
u ohpk to face probation after tournament
lveDeis iu lace wyyr rf KnigJ
By Mike Lopresti
Gannett News Service
coi
It is not justaFinalFour.lt is a
.ng-awav party.Onelast blast for
. � basketball program at Nevada
i as Vegas before the walls cave in.
The Indianapolis Hoosicr
DtMM will be crawling with story
angles this weekend. How Duke
al� avs gets to this thing but never
�vnisit How Kansas' Roy Williams
vs orships Dean Smith but must now
fey fej beat him. How Dean Smith
has won only one national champi-
onship at North Carolina, and isn't
it getting kind of late?
Now this tournament, which
has had a hard time keeping TV
viewers up until midnight, has one
last chance for drama and upsets.
Nine of the 12 regional games this
past weekend were decided by 12
or more points. The Final Four has
two No. 1 seeds (UNLV, Carolina),
, No. 2 (Duke) and a No. 3(Kansas).
Cinderella lias left the building
But all Of that is the sideshow.
Here is the main event under the
big Teflon top: UNLV's run at �
apeattitle,athistory.ltistheRcbols'
longgoodbye.Startinga week trom
Tuesday, the hangover begins in
Vegas
Probation, the one they bar-
gained away this year, awaits next
from the front door of Bob Knight,
the last man to coach an unbeaten
champion. Not 50 miles from the
boyhood stompinggroundsof John
Wooden, the last man to coach a
repeat champion.
The thnv opponents left, par-
ticularly Duke and North Carolina,
are the embodiment of the basket-
ball establ ishment. Programs above
gamed awav this year, awaus km
season. Another NCAA tomtig g� JJ
t,on is near an end, quite possibly Ke nthemUsilhasbeensince
with more- sanctions to corneFour nu
of the starters are seniors, and jun- J
ior Anderson Hunt wilI hamno g mmtmi
reason to return, rne ����� carcful, m �, wceks,
ter of Jerry Tartarean leaving; than u
how to party. �! carne in thinking Vegas a
It,santnngplacewtereWLV Hall coach P.J.
intends to make �!���� S1esimosaidSaturday.�AndPm
grandnesslndianapohsistheheart fmm 1Q
of basketball country, not 60 miles
The graduation rates are in �
and several football and basketball
pt i wers pn habl y aren' t comfortable
with how they're doing.
One of the most widespread
surveys ever taken of graduation
rates by athletes at major colleges
found the good, the bad and the
Some good: The five-year
graduation rate for all Division 1
athletesentenng school in 1984 was
56.1 percent, far ahead of the 47.9
percent graduation rate for all stu-
dents m general.
Some bad. Graduation rate for
football players at Division 1-A
schools was only 425 percent, in-
cluding 32.2 percent by the South-
eastern Conference, 32.5 by the
Southwest and 39.4 by the Big Eight.
Some ugly: Graduation rate for
basketball players in Division I was
only 39 percent, and only 31.9 per-
cent at schools that are Division I in
basketball and Division 1-A in
football. This includes 14.0 percent
by the SEC, 18.9 by the Big West
Conference, which also hit only 23.8
percent for its football players.
The survey was just published
by the Chronicle of Higher Educa-
tion, and included responses from
262 of the 295 Division I schools. It
took freshmen going into school in
fall of 1984, and counted how many
had graduated by Augustl989.
' The results were not highly
surprising. Athletes in general long
have graduated better than the
general student population, and
football and basketball has always
lagged behind.
"We've been collecting data
since 1986, and if s been that way
See Athletes, page 11





�bc iaat (garolinian
I
� �
Former ECU assistant coach to replace Steele
H Kerry Nester
Ijnl Sports 1 ditoi
. w as
�vachPave
finds

'
i.n that
non s
data i
I lart said that crntol 100c mdi
dates he made tl ice to offi i
thejobt �Pa no 1 nosdaynighl I fa
deosioiuvasi mated latothat intheirconta
: I : fisven fortunate to havi Forhisachiewments,hewasnamed
a person like Eddie at the helm. 1 the Georgia Junior College and At-
tnily believe in time they will beotK lanta "ipOf!lub Coach ot the
.�I tlic most competitive programs Year
, � � livi . �; at US
. � ��). oat h and ath
in director at B. Imont Al �
,i - twice
his is something he expressed
in the press conference given
Wednesday I m not interested in
winning games; 1 want to win
ampionships Payne said
Payne indk ated that in the 10
d NA1A District 2b oach ol years since he's been to Greenville,
, ir E I has made someimpressive
Pavne was i I id basket improvements to the facilities and
Kill avich and athletu director at the potential ol the basketball pro-
"nietl Mc onnell lunioH ollegein pram.
v leveland -a ,for one season (1978 In some cases. 1 was greatly
jti as an surprised with the resources and
h in a ven protes
I attract la great
� . � andi
mghl bh �n� rlii't Kit hard I akin
Pa iii . �� ' '� i m Oh
! itw ersib ofSoutht arolina w hen
is been in assistant coat h for Coll
pastfiv i is'iisniiilei � � a 1
ton
ITusseasonthtiamoctxrksfin
istu! with a 20 ! record and .
a need t the secoi It
Nati � itation I imnum i I
I le will make a o e coach
hut more importanth hew illbni
atouchofclassandasonseotcanng assistant for three years l�79-8U opportunities at last Carolina.
for everyone at East n Pavne led nes to a 25-5 Paynesaid
;t elton
poke vMth the players h
Pirates
dub
Terrapins,
a t home
8 i h en Cox
si.it' ntt'i
T
hi �
nd 4-2

the first time 30 minutes prior to the
pressconference expressed thereal
potential i t the players and said he
is very excited about the challenge
With the deadline tor signees
coming up April 10, recruiting has
been a big question in everyone's
mind concerning the upcoming
season
Paynesaid he wanted to recruit
players that can help ECU win
championships, but cautioned that
potential signees must possess ex
pectarjons to excel academically
well.
1 know that it we recruit young
men who are career interested in
getting their degree, these are the
kind of pus that are going to win
championships Payne said
is
"1 have no doubt that a pro
gram that doesn't rune youngsters
that take academics seriously will
not ho successful
Payne also said that although
the signing date is rapidly ap-
proaching, he knows of quality
players that are still available
1 lowever. he said he wouldn't sign
a player, just to sign a player
Msoonhtslist of high priorities
is hiring assistant coaches. He has
already compiled a number of ap-
plicants but said he will appro h
the situation conservatively.
"The only thing 1 do quickly is
buy clothes Payne said
Fhe assistant coaches would
have to possess certain qualities ac-
See Steele page 10
Women's tennis team
wins two in a row
By Matt Mumma
spurts Editor
'
II
M V III K,II IS
nril
ft
wit
t

� �
)ail Red - ECU Photo Lab
day nighl sgam
ilk, SO red on a double to
, . nn Bet k
In the sixth inning Maryland
� � ohnm Beck rheTer-
� a � s scored two runs on four hits,
Terrapins, page 10
Graduation
bad news for
some athletes
rheECl women stennistenm
won two matt hes in a row as tl ey
handed Barton College an 8-1 toss
on Tuesday and also beat Peace
C ollegeon March 21 winning their
fifth and sixth matches
Sophomores Jennifer Fenton
,n. Kelly Buck, luniors Kim I iarvey
and Karen Atkins and freshman
Kris Robinson all picked up wins in
two sets against barton
Aside from Sanna Heinila's
loss, the Lady Pirates tost only 12
games m the singles matches
Robins m and 1 Iarvey allowed
their opponents to win only one
game apiece in the rout
In the doubles matches the
scores were not as lopsided rhe
team ol FentonPuck won 6-3 and
7 5 while IleinilaHarvey won 6-1
and 6-4. AtkinsJenings also re-
corded wins in doubles play, win-
ning 6-2 and b-0.
gainst Peace the Pirates w n
5-3 in a close match that could have
gone either way
The number one and two play-
ers, Sanna Heinila and sophomore
Jennifer Fenton.both won their first
sets 6-4, but each ended the d.
losing their singles mato h two sets
to one
Heinila lost the first gameof the
first set and tell behind 2-1 Sht
came buck to "in two games �n .�
row togoahead 3-2 and from there
she won her tirst st
Again in the second set 1 leinila
tell behind 4-1 and again she can i
Kick to tie the set at 5-5 she could
not duplicate her earlier o ?meba k
though and tost the second set 7 5
In Fenton's match she came
closest to winning in the third set
after she won her first set 6 4 and
lost the second -2
'she fell behind m the third si I
2-5 but came Kick winning two
games in a row w ith the score 4 5
he could not win the next one
lost the match 2-1
funk Kim Harvey rolled 0 er
Peace's Caroline Vinson 6-0 and 6
2 Numbt r f ur � ph m re K
Buck also won 64. 3-6 and 6-1
Freshman Kris Robinson won
her match in two s�-s while junn -
Karen Atkins finished i iffheroppo
nent in three sets
The Pirates are now 6-5, and
they play Barton again April 4 in
their nevt match
ISv Mike Lopresti
c .jnnett News Sen ice
ECU Photo Lab
Rebels to face probation after toumanient
! he graduation rates are in
and several football and basketball
n � � rsprobaNyaren'tcomfortable
� how the re doing
One ot the most widespread
surveys ever taken ot graduation
rates by athletes at major colleges
found the good, the bad and the
iglj
Some good I he five-year
graduation rate for all Pi vision 1
atMetesentering school in 1984 was
v, ! percent, tar ahead of the 47.9
percent graduation rate tor all stu-
dents in general.
Si me bad Graduation rate tor
football players at Division l-A
schools was only 425 percent, in-
cluding 32.2 percent bv the South-
a
B) Mike Lopresti
(.jnnott News Service
� just a 1 inal hour It
lWayparr) One last blast for
. tball -1 igramatNevada
eas before the walls cave in
e Indianapolis Hoosier
- � , vsrill be crawling wi story
tl is weekend How Puke
gets to this thing but never
� How Kansas'Roy WilBams
psDeanSrnimbutmustnow
� � beat him " Dean Smith
: onl pnenationaKhampi-
i-ship at (rth C arolina, and isn't
it getting kindot late"
Now this tournament, which
has had a hard time keeping TV
. iewers up until midnight, hasone
last chance tor drama and upsets
Nine of the 12 regional games this
past weekend were decided by 12
or more points. The Final Four has
two No l seeds (UNLV. Carolina).
a No 2 (Duke) and a No 3 (Kansas)
Cinderella has left the building
But all ot that is the sides v,
Here is the main event under the
big teflon top: I NL S run at a
repeattitle athistory ItistheRebels
tonggoodbye.Startinga week from
ruesday, the hangover begins in
egas
Probation, the one they bar-
gained away this year, awaits next
season Another M AA investiga-
tion is near an end, quite possibly
with more sanctions to come. 1 our
ot the starters are seniors, and jun-
ior Anderson Hunt will have no
reason to return rhe odds are bet-
ter ot jerry rarkanian leaving than
at any blackjack table on the 'stop
So this is probably it tor 'egas
as we've know n it The last shindig.
But restassured. the Rebebdoknow
how to partv
It isa fitting place whereUNLV
intends to make its last stand of
grandness Indianapolis is the heart
of basketball country, not 60 miles
ght,
the last man to coach an unbeaten
champion. Not 50 nules from the
bovi od ' mj inggroundsofjohn
Wooden, the last man to .oach a
� �- it champion
lh� three opponents left, par-
ticularly DukeandNorthC arolina.
are the embodiment of the basket-
ballest.ibhshment Programsabove
repute. It is against this that the
Rebels can make their final state-
ment In the end as it has Kvn since
the beginning, it will be Vegas
against the world
The nation has examined
I NLV carefully in recent weeks.
looking for possible thinks Sup-
posedly, the Rebels am not plaving
well. They have won their tourna-
ment games bv 34. 8, 17 and 1-
Some stamp
"1 came in thinking Vegas a
great team Seton Hall coach P
Carlesimo said Saturday 'And I'm
See Rebels, page 10
eastern Conference, 3225 bv the
Southwest and 3.4 bv the Big Eight.
Some ugly: Graduation rate for
basketball players in Division 1 was
onlv 39 percent, and only 31.9 per-
t ent at schools that are Division 1 in
basketball and Division l-A in
football. Hiis includes 14.0 percent
by the SEC, 18.9 by the Big West
Conference, wbkhalso hit only 23J
percent tor its football players.
The sur ev was ust published
by the Chronicle of Higher Educa-
tion, and included responses from
2h2 of the 2sS Division I schools. It
took freshmen going into school in
tall ot I984,and counted how many
had graduated by Augustl9.
The results were not highly
surprising. Athletes in general long
have graduated better than the
general student population, and
football and basketball has always
lagged behind.
"We've been collecting data
since 16, and it's been that way
See Athletes, page 11





101 Sin: �ant (Carolinian March 28, 1991
Rebels
Continued from page 9
leaing thinking they are a great
team
The collection left to stop the
Rebels has a decided Atlantic Coast
Conference and North Carolina
flavor to it. Duke and the Tar Heels,
or course.
And Kansas' Williams learned
his X's and Cs at the nght hand of
Smith.
Toor Duke If not for UNLV,
the Blue Devils' March record
would be the top headline. Four
straight Final Four trips. Five rimes
in six years. Positively UCLA-ian.
But the Blue Devils have this an-
noying habit of losing a Final Four
with the same frequency they enter
it.
They have been in eight, and
never have won a title. Now here
they arc again, and look who's
waiting. The Princes of Darkness.
Remember last year's title
game1
UNLV 103, Duke 73.
St. John'scoach Lou Cameseeca
said Sunday this Duke team is bet-
Terrapins
ter than last year. Quicker. Better at
both ends.
"We have a week to get ready
for UNLV. That will help us a lot
lukeguard Bobby Hurley said. I ast
year, the Blue Devils had one day.
Hurley will be the key. He will
be the man to face Vegas' wilting
pressure that so melted Seton r lall
for a stretch, it left Carlesimo a
shaken manSaturdav. "Weliterally
could not make a pass he said.
Hurley, as a freshman with the
stomach flu, had five turnovers last
Continued from page 9
vear against UNLV. He's had four
in the entire tournament this sea-
son. Something to keep in mind.
The other game will be the ul-
timate in respectful student against
honored teacher Williams was an
assistant for 10 years at North
Carolina, learning every nuance.
Tins is what he had to sav last week:
"Ninety-five percent of what
we do came from Coach Smith. 1
think he's the best there is and ever
will he. Coach Smith is the innova-
tor and I'm trying to steal every-
thing I can
So Kansas' game week is not
exactly beginning with a smear
campaign of the opponent.
This is Smith's eighth Final
Four, though the trips used to come
more often.
Hislastappearancewashisone
championship, when the Tar Heels
edged Georgetown 63-b2 in 1982 on
a late shot by this freshman kid,
Michael Jordan.
Carolina would seem the slight
favorite. But Kansas is building an
impressive victims list, including
Indiana and Arkansas.
The Jayhawks have a way of
being overlooked, though this is
their third Final Four in six years.
They have motivated themselves
by repeating the idea they get no
respect.
Well, the NCAA seeded them
third That is not a slap in the face
But with what the challengers will
face this week in lndianap lis. thev
are excused to use whatever inspi-
ration thev can find.
three of them consecutive, tocut the
margin to 4-2.
Beck regained his composure
and limited Maryland to two hits in
the final three innings to hold on for
the win.
lohrmy Beck, now 1-2, went
the distance on the hill for the Pi-
rates. I le allowed two runs on nine
hits, struck out 10and walked one
With the ten strikeouts, he took over
the con ference lead i n tha t category.
On his performance, Coach
Overton said: 'We had fine pitch-
ing from Uohnny) Beck He al-
lowed few base ninners and was
Steele
cording to Payne. "1 recognize that
this is a very high priority Payne
said
Experience, followed bv an ex-
pertise in recruiting and contacts in
the held Payne said, "Ifsabogood
when you can hire somebody you
know.
As tor the style of pla Payne
will bring to MingesColiseum next
season; look for an aggressive team
with major emphasis on the defen-
sive end of the court
"We're going to create a more
up-tempo style with aggressive
man-to-man, pressure defense
Payne said. "If you're very defen-
sively oriented, this brings great
benefits tor the team in terms of
their attitude
Although some feel Minges is
behind the times compared with
other coliseum'saround the league.
Payne fedsit can beapositivefactor
for the Pirate program
"My view of Minges is that it's
masterful in places
At the plate, Watkins went 2-3
while Triplet! and Narronboth were
1-2 with two walks. Tnplett also
scored two runs.
With the win, ECU moves to
13-9 on the year, 1-1 against teams
from the ACC
Continued from page 9
a strength Payne said. If we put
6,000 people in there every night,
pooploaregoingtohaveareal tough
time beating us.
"Because of the recent im-
provements, 1 think there's great
promise in Minges "
Pirate fans have a lot to look
h MTward to in the coming ears with
Coach Payne running the show
With his experience in Division I
plav and recruiting, a much im-
proved ECU program is inevitable
Read The East
linian
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce the following
HOLY WEEK AND EASTER SERVICES
Holy Thursday Services (March 28): 7:30 PM at St. Peters Church
Good Friday Services: 12:15 PM - Stations of the Cross at St. Peters
7:30 PM - Good Friday Liturgical Service ai
St. Peter's
! Saturday Vigil Easter Service (March 30): 8:00 PM at St. Peter -
Piaster Sunday Masses: 11:30 AM Ledonia Wright Building
(between Joyner Library and
Health Center)
8:30 PM: Newman Center.
I 953 East 10th Street
( St Peter's Church is located at 2700 E. 4th Street)
For further information please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at 757-1991
S w
All you can eat
shrimp and trout
$4.95
AVjALEOFAMEAL
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
M- fh 1 lam-Xpm Sat 1 lam-9pm Sun llam-4pm
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� . .� Mtw aat�� r�4lKSng ff verry. Mvmgs o a ramctiKft Mtactt �ril �� ou M cx�rc�� tn�
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� �� .� . � rEMSAMC PWCES GOOD SUMOAV MAR(h 2 hROu S �5a �
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With Low Prices
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Thompson White
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Moore's
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Athletes
every year said Ursula Walsh, the
NCAA director of research. "That
follows the trend "
The NCAA last year found 37.5
percent of Division I-A football
players and 333 percent of basket-
ball players graduating within five
years.
But the size of the response was
striking. Schools an- not currently
required to release graduation ratt
(put will be by federal law next
vear).
Among schools that would not
release figures were Penn State
Bngham Young, Paul and Mi-
ami (Fla.)
There is widespread questions
about the value of graduation sta
tistics, as now kept bv the NCAA
and used bv this survey.
Some sav using a five-year pe
nod is no longer valid; that manv
athlete and non-athlete students
take six or seven years to complete
their degrees
Otherschargethatitisunr
include as non-graduates trai I i
students who leave school in g
standing to move elsewhere
Another criticism is that it is ni t
valid just to use a one-year snap-
shot as a true, indication r h w I
school is doing-graduating its
letes.
But the overall signal is .
niable: schools are much
'in graduating football and ba �
�ball plavers than othei
here :s a crisis of rw n grad
students in the sportj
and big money
And some schc
the good overall grac
Division ! s hools
achievement may
nde on the backs ot I
and Notre Dame
Division 1 schools
ketesat a rate lower '1
lar student body. Of j
I-A football schools'
to the survey, 21 gra
or few eirati
" ' 1
anetnbarrassmi
uld hope
neth I've, preside!
Methodist and a
Knight ComrrussK

intercol �
� b
tit said hi � j
the numbers in thu
i


financial, ai
.

A n
� -
JOauli
-CL
� Dress Making
� Alterations
� Maternity � Tailoring
Bridesmaid, Wedding
and Formal Gowns
FAST DEPENDABLE SERVICEl
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919-3S5-0154
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Whole Slab
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Camellia Sugar
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Continued from page 9
� t'k IS nt't
With I M1H.H
�ponenl
l s eighth (in.il
impressive victims list, including
Indiana .ini 'Vrk.ans.is
I"he lavhawks have a wav of
being ovorlixked, thtuigh this is
their third Final Pout in six years
Yhv have motivated themselves
bs repeating the idea they get no
Tspw t
Well the i A -ts.hxi them
� rhal is not a slap in the face
� w ith what the i hallongers will
this Vi ivk in Indianapolis they
J to use w hatcvet inspi
� i' n "f can tmd
MAN
ident Center
i ce the following
EASTER SB RVK TS
Mi PM at Si. Peters Church
Si itions o1 the Cross ,ii si. Peter's
I Ii uld I iturgii di Sci v ice at
St, Petci s
rch 0): s;(io ci at Si. peters
W1 I.edonia riehl Building
s V.
' tween Jo) nor I .ibrar) and
alth 'entei i
PM New man Center,
v ; l asi loth Street
ated ,d " ; Sti !Ci I
i dil l-T. Pau! Vaetti al 757-1991
And Your Family
VOUs . . .

D

ipson White
Hess Grapes
Pound
psi $109
il C0la 2Ltr X
n
im Tissue
4 R
Chips
10oz
Butter
18oz
99
69
19

Athletes
jjffrc gagt (Earolinian March 28, 1991 11
,uTv vear said Ursula Walsh, the
Sv dim tor of research. "That
v,nvs the trend
The TAA last year found 375
Mfceni of division I-A football
payers and 333 percent of basket-
njil players graduating within five
(�IS
But I he size of the response was
striking vhools are not currently
squired to release graduation rates
;ni: will be by federal law next
:nong schools that would not
� If.ist ftgtfflN were Perm State,
im Ming DePaul and Mi-
�la I
is widespread questions
� the value of graduation sta
is now kept by the NCAA
led In this survey
s n. sn using a five-vear pe
no longer valid, that many
and non-athlete students
r seven yean to complete
rees
� ersi harge that it is unfair to
19 non graduates transfer
ts who leave schtxtl in g(xxj
rtgtci nil nt1 elsewhere.
�In rmtinsmisthatitisnot
valid just to use a one-year snap-
� is a true, indication of how a
is doing graduating its ath-
th( overall signal is undo
s, hools are much more lax
luating football and basket
lyers than other athletes
i tisis of non-graduated
Continued from page 9
students in the sports of big names
and big money.
And some schools that point to
the good overall graduation rate of
Division I schools as their own
achievement may be taking a free
nde on the backs of the Ivy League
and Notre Dame. More than 100
Division I schools graduated ath-
letesat a rate lower than their regu
lar student body. Of the Division
I-A football schools who responded
to the survey, 21 graduated a third
or fewer of their athletes.
Someof the figures would seem
an embarrassment to schools.
"1 would hope so said Ken-
neth Pye, president of Southern
Methodist and a member of the
Knight Commission, which last
week released a report stating
intercollegiate athletics needed
much more control.
I le sud he was not surprised a t
the numbers in this survey.
"C iraduation rates for athletes
ought tobeconsiderably higher than
for students in general Pve said
"One of the primary reasons tor
students dropping out of schuxil is
financial, and finances are not a
problem tor athletes
The Knight Commission, in
fact, has called for each sport to
have a graduation rate comparable
to that of the general student bodv
Among some of the other
Chronicle ot Higher Education sur
vev findings
Private schools did much bel
ter in graduation rates for athletes,
as they do for all students Private
schools graduated 78.8 percent of
its athletes, compared to 45.8 percent
for public schools.
�The SEC numbers were par-
ticularly bleak. For all students, the
SEC graduating rate was 46.0. For
athletes, it was 36.4.
� The most impressive single
schwl for figure may have been
Princeton for basketball. Ten play-
ers were recruited in 1984. All 10
graduated.
Some of the best-known pow-
ers in football had little to be happy
about in graduation rates;
Auburn 14.8 percent, Okla-
homa and USC 25 percent, Ohio
Sta te 21.7 percent. Duke, on the other
hand, had 92 3 percent, and Notre
Dame 81.3.
Sixty Division I schools did not
graduate any basketball players
who came into school in 1984. It
should he noted, however, that some
were like UNLV, and had only one
plaver involved. But Louisville went
0-for-3, LSU l-for-6, Cincinnati 0-
fof-5, Maryland-Eastern Shore 1-
for-10.
"I haven't drawn any incred-
ible conclusions said Doug
1 .ederman, the writer of the
( "hroniclc story. "But I think in some
places in this country, these num-
bers have never gotten out before. I
hope on each campus, it generates
some debate
opyrtgkl I USA TOOAVAppkCotttp
Inlormahim Srtutirk
� Dress Making
� Alterations
� Maternity � Tailoring
Bridesmaid, Wedding
and Formal Gowns
SI DEPENDABLE SERVICE
1421 S ChH�SI
"�i�nss ois4
standy Friday
? 00 � in. SlOp.m
��i �� (d
i
IT'S
HAMMER
TIME!
ECU HABITAT
FOR HUMANITY
INFORMATION MEETING ON TUESDAY APRIL
2ND AT 7:(K) PM IN RAWL 130
WILL ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT HABITAT
AND DISCUSS ACTIVITIES OE THE CHAPTER.
EVERYONE IS INVITED! IE YOU CANNOT ATTEND
AND ARE INTERESTED-CONTACT MARK 757-3356 OR
KIM 752-2930
��gjpjpfe�7i�r���?���"
Student & Faculty Savings at
Overtoil's
Whole Slab
Beef or Pork Spare
Ribs
lb$.99
Grade A
Medium Eggs
Dozen790
( amellia Sugar
5 lb bag
990
Limit 1 with $10.00
food order
Del Monte
Size 303 can
Garden peas- Cut
(ireenBeans- Whole
Kernel Corn
380
Cottonelle Tissue
4 roll pkg
890
Florida Indian
River
White Grapefruit
4 for $1.00
Thompson's
Seedless
White Grapes
lb990
New Coke-Diet Dr.
Pepper-Mello Yellow-
Sundrop
2 liter bottles
.790
New Flordia
Red Bliss Potatoes
8 lb. bag 990
Strict limit of 1 per
customer per order
with $10.00 food order
OVERTONE
Supemdfc
2H MR VIS S MEET
HOWE Of GAECNVIUE S BEST MEATS
QUANTITY HIOMTt MSCNVEO
Store Hours;
Open Sundays 12 Noon - 7 pm
Monday - Saturday 8 am - 8:30 pm
Prices Effective Wednesday, March 27
through Saturday March 30,1991
Adventure Weekend
for more information call 757-6911 or stop by the ROC 11 7 CG
Visit scenic George Washington
National Forest in Virginia and
enjoy a 12 mile romp along the
Appalachian Trail. Tnese
beautiful two days of moderate
hiking feature early spring
flowers in bloom, oreathtaking
water falls and romantic views
of natures many wonders.
Equipment, food, and transportation are all provided for the low
cost of $25 for students & $30 for facultystaff
A pre-trip meeting will be held Wednesday, April 3 at
5:00pm in Brewster DI 01
April 12-14
Enjoy two days of paddling along the easy flowing
Neuse River at the Cliffs of the Neuse State Park.
You'll experience 25 miles of exciting river
paddling and an outdoor stay featuring plenty of
spring vegetation as well as the cliffs that make
this State Park a favorite of North Carolinians.
Equipment, food and transportation are yours for $25.00 students
and $30.00 facultystaff.
A pre-trip meeting will be held Wednesday, April 10 at 5:00pm in BD101
19-21
Rock and roll along the French
Broad River near Hot Springs,
NC. Along with the wild white
water adventure enjoy a one
day hike into the Pisgah
National Forest.
quipment, food, transportation and outfitters
fee are yours for $60 students and $65
facultystaffguests.
A pre-trip meeting will be held Wednesday, April 17
at5:00pmin BD101.





12 3!c Coat (Earolintan March 28, 1991
ME fllNG
AnjounNfo
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By Grumpy, Doc, Shorty, Smarty and Itch
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over for now' . if
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something0 Yep- the gang we
the future, fought aliens and
robots the Dead King was made
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Kemple Boy had fun Ch. and the
Dead King had a romantic
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By Kemple
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the future, fought aliens and
robots II 1 Dead King w is
human for while, a robot
duplicate s made of Ren ind
Kemple Boy had fun Ch. and the
Dead King had a rom 11 I
erlude. and the bovs saved the
ixy, and everyone went back to
their respective time zones, and
then they were safe You missed
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 28, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 28, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.801
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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