The East Carolinian, March 26, 1991






V
�be i�uzt (ftarultman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.16
Tuesday, March 26, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
10 Pages
Trustees to vote
on parking fees
By Jim Rogers
Staff Writer
ECL"s board of trustees will
vote on a plan to increase the price
oi student and faculty parking reg-
istration 50 r.Tcent at their next
meeting on Mav 3.
ECU'S parking and traffic
committee endorsed the proposal
to increase the price oi parking de-
eds from $50 to $75 per year for
faculty and students
The money from the increase
will allow the university to make
capital investments for expansion
of parking facilities and to improve
the lots currently in use.
According to Richard Brown,
vice chancellor of business affairs,
the parking and traffic committee
suggested a capital investment of
$350,000 to $500,008 to build for the
future and help pav current ex-
penses
The development of parking
facilities includes thebimngof land
and the landscaping, paving and
lighting ot lots.
The university spent $500X100
improving the lighting ol parking
lots last year. Brown said $78,000of
that money came from university
resourcesotherthanthoseallocated
to parking and traffic.
The university is also paving
off a $200,000 note for the parking
lots at the bottom oi College Hill,
near Minges Coliseum and other
smaller lotsoncampus, Brown said.
The proposal was approved by
the Faculty Senate with the provi-
sions that the COSl be fixed at $75 for
five years and improvements be
made to parking lots currently in
use.
The five-year fixed rate mav
not work because, by 1995, the note
will be paid off, and the $200,000
burden will be lifted, Brown said
The proposal hasbeendeferred
until Mav so other options can he
examined.
The Traffic and Parkingom-
mitteeisexploring the possibility oi
having a scaled parking registra-
tion fee
This would allow studentsand
faculty the choice of paving less tor
a permit to park in a lessconvenient
location
In this arrangement, a permit
to park at Minges Coliseum mav
cost $50 while a permit to park bv
Mendenhall Student Center may
cost f75
This gives you the option to
pav less if vou are willing to park in
� Fil� Phcrto
The Board ot Trustees will vote on raising parking sticker fees May 3 Costs could be raised trom $50 to $75
to pay tor university tees related to parking areas. The increase it approved, would be effective m the tall
a lessconvenient location, ' Brown
said.
Most of the complaints about
parking are 'notbecauseofalackof
space, but a lack ol convenience
Brown said
"We are in better shape than
other universities Brown said.
Expansion ol the university
parkmgincludeslotson Ninth Street
which are already being worked on
and three other lots that have been
approved bv the Board oi Trustees
tor purchase and development on
10th Street and Charles Boulevard.
This proposed increase has
nothing to do with the increased
cost oi parking tickets that went
into effect last year, Brown said.
List year's parking ticket price in-
crease was due to the university's
need to get up to what other uni-
versities were charging, he -xiid.
The Parking and Yaffk Com-
mittee has 12 members, it' faculty
members, and two students.
If the Board of Trustees ap-
proves this increase it will most
hkelvbem effect tor the tall semester
'There is nothing more sensi-
tive on campus than price in-
creases. Brown said, 'especially
when thev have to do vvith parking
SGA
cancels
special
election
By Shannan Copeland
Staff Writer
In their Mondav meeting, the
Student Government Association
approved the constitution for Stu-
dents Supporting Our Troops.
The group was formed to sup-
port the troops in the Persian Cult
The group will probably
function through their biannual
period. Legislator Darek
1i ullers -viid
( onstitutions were also ap
proved forOrrocron Delta Kappa
1 lonorSociety and the( .olden Key
National Honor Society
In appropriations, the ECU
Decision Science Societ) received
$609 and the ECL Rehabilitation
Counseling Association received
$688
Also, Omicron I Vita Kappa
received $500and Phi Sigma Fau.a
national philosophy honorsociety,
received $400.
See SGA. page 3
Native Americans subject of
anthropology symposium
By Angie Camp
Special to The Fast Carolinian
More than 100 students and
professors attended a svmposium
on "The Native American
Chiefdoms of the Middle Atlantic
Tidewater" on Fridav, March 22
The svmposium, featuring
"The Southern Algonquians was
sponsored bv the Institute for His-
torical and Cultural Research and
the College of Arts and Sciences at
ECU. Dr. David Phelps, the associ-
ate director of the Institute and an
anthropology professor at ECU,
coordinated the day's events.
The Southern Algonquians
were Native American societies
who lived in the Tidewater zone of
the Middle Atlantic coast from
Delaware Bay to the tNeuse River in
North Carolina at the time of Eu-
ropean contact
Thev were chosen as this vear's
topic on a "need to know" basis
Professor
searches for
lost films
By Miriam Driot
Staff Writer
An exploratory attempt to
document early films, especially
before 1 0, made in NorthCarolma
is the focus of The Film Project, a
part of the ECU institute for His-
torical and Cultural Research.
The research process consists
of surveying libraries, businesses
and museums throughout the state
to locate the films. The Film Project
is essentially interested in non-
commercial releases such as docu-
mentaries, industrial films, home
movies and town documentanes.
About 400 films made in North
Carolina,so me from asearlyasl908,
have been located.
This project was initiated by
Alex Albright, who decided to turn
a hobby into a more productive
activity. Albright has been teaching
non-fiction writing at ECU since
1981. Since no one in the state was
actively involved incollcctingthese
films, he came up with the idea of
The Film Project.
See Films, page 3
Phelps said. Thev were the south-
ernmost speakers of Eastern
Algonquian languages and were
the most highly developed of all the
Algonquian cultures among the
Atlantic seaboard
Their hereditary leaders,
ranked societies and redistribute
economies, based on a combination
of highlv productive agncultureand
exploitation of a rich natural envi-
ronment, placed them at a
"chiefdom" level of complexity.
Using a holistic approach, the
svmposium covered an overview
of the regional culture and popula-
tion of the Southern Algonquians.
This was provided through a sum-
mary of past and recent research in
archaeologv, the srudv oi past hu-
man cultures; ethnohistorv. the
study of a culture through re ords
written bv other people; and lin
guistics, thestudy oi human speech:
and physical anthropology, the ex-
ploration of disease patterns in the
skeletal populations of that region.
Eight researchers from various
universities and departments of
historic resources traced the devel-
opment oi Southern Algonquian
culture through at least 2000 vears
and described its form at the mo
ment of European contact.
The linguists delved into the
distribution and term of languages
in the region and their divergence
from an ancestral Algonquian lan-
guage. The phvsical anthropologists
described the people, their ancestry
and diseases.
The presentations relied on vi-
sual aids, mainly slide shows, to
help get across the concepts in a
way the general public could grasp.
Phelps s.ud: "Although 11 reallv
was a job getting even, one together
for the day, overall 1 was pleased
with theeventsat the symposium
Phelps was a little disappointed in
the turnout, but he hopes that more
See Native Americans page 3
Civil War historian speaks on role of black women
By Margaret Ihlenfeld
Special to The East Carolinian
Black women during the 1860s
benefited both civilian and military
populations said a speaker at a
conference titled "Black Women
During the Civil War" held Thurs-
day, March 21 in the General
Classroom Building.
Dr. Martha Brown, who is a
Civil War historian, spoke in cel-
ebration of both Black and Women's
History months. She is a professor
at Old Dominion University in
Norfolk, Virginia and has received
awards from the United States
Education Fellowship and the Ford
Foundation Fellowship.
The conference was sponsored
by the Women' s Study Alliance, the
Women's Studies Program and the
Department of History.
"Mv great-grandfather fought
in the S4th tthe unit on which the
movie Glory' was based), Brown
said. "I got his records and they
made me wonder what life was like
for my great-grandmother
The problem Brown said she
found while researching was that
the black women met much resis-
tance and were unrewarded for their
efforts. "I think of the hundreds of
articles I read; only one black woman
was recognized
Brown said that most black
women suffered more than 18
months of depravation during the
Civil War because their husbands
took no pay rather than take unequal
pay.
She discussed some accom-
plishments of noteworthy black
women such as Harnet Tubman,
Suzie Tavlor King and Elizabeth
Bowser. 'These women ot the 19th
centurv were selfless Brown said.
Sc�rneaccomplishrneiitsot these
women included being unpaid
nurses, leading soldiers and acting
as spies. Brown said most black
women took life and death risks
during the Civil War Their efforts
also included boosting morale and
raising funds for the war effort.
Brown said thatalthoughblacks
were regarded as problems during
this time, evidence proving dis-
ennrunabon is hard to find. Black
women were patnotic before black
men were allowed to put on soldier
uniforms, she said
Brown also talked some about
the black women currently serving
See Historian, page 2
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial
Officials decision was hasty;
Mike Steele should have been
given another chance
Features 8
Folk musician Cathy B will
appear tonight in Mendenhall
Underground at 8 p.m.
Sports m
ECU goes 3-2 in the Lady
Pirate Classic but defeats the
Tarheels, 6-5
Classified b





�he lEaat (Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No 16
Tuesday, March 26. 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
10 Pages
Trustees to vote
on parking fees
By im Rogers
suit Writer
to parking and traffic.
I he university is also paying
ott a $200,000 note tor the parking
E I s board ol trustees will lots at the bottom ot College Hill
vote on a plan to increase the price near Minges C oliseum and other
ol student and t.u ulty parking rev: smallerlotsoncampus,Brownsaid
istration 50 percent at their next rheproposalwasapprovedb
meeting on Mav ; the Facultv Senate with the provi
� I s parking and tr.ittu sions that the cost be fixed at $75 for
committee endorsed the proposal five wars and improvements be
to increase the price of parking de made to parking lots currently in
cals from $50 to $75 pei year for use
fat ulrv and stud I 1 he ti i � n ' -ed I iti
I �� monex trom the increase notv rkb ,�;��� thei
tvill allow the univcrsih to make will be paid of) and the $2 � "
. t.i! investments for expansion burden wil � �
irk � . facilities and to improve I � ; posalhasbeei
rrentlv in use
V 11 rdmg to Kit hard Bi wn
� �� elloi i business affairs
parifl
� �� � i ipital invi
tut n ind help p.w current e
pei �'
,u elopmenl ot parking
until M,i so i ithei options i an K
i cammed
� ' � tees wil ote i r,
ii . � ty lei n ited to
1 his ouldallow stud i l
the hoice of paving less tot
. n
�ark ina lesscoi
t mi laints about
tacilitiesincludesthebuvingofland 1.nation - t;an tb ius talackol
ii It � ov. paving and In this arrangement a pom I pao hut a lack of com iei �
htinj ' ots to park at Mingesoliseum nia Bnnvn said
v spent $00,001 cost 55 w I � '� i permit I k b ittei hapo thai
mpi � .�"�� parking Mendenhall Student Centei Brown
tveai rownsaid$78,000ot cost$75 E th iniversin,
that l ' from universit Phis gives you th : lion I : irk.ii i n Ninth Street
� - � mother than thoseallocated pav less if vou are willing to park in which reali rked
Native Americans subject of
anthropology symposium
By Angie Camp
Special to The I jst Carolinian
Phelps said ITiev were the - iuth skeletal populationsol that region
ernmost speakers I I istern Eight researchers from vanous
'� . quian languages ar I . re universities and departments ot
Mi re than ltV students and themost highly developed lallth historii nsources traced the dev
pi fessors attended a symposium Algonquian cultures an
Native American Atlantic seaboard
Chiefdoms of the Middle Atlantic Iheir hereditary eadei
. � ' m Fridav March 22 ranked societies and red "
he svmposium featuring economies, based on a coml

ment ot Nuiti
quian
cultui " � ugh at least 2(X years
I o.i scribed its form at the mo-
ment i 'I European i ontact
1 he linguists di � I ii to the
The Southern Algonquians, was ofhighlvproductiveagricultureand distribution and formot languages
sponsored b the Institute tor His- exploitation ot a rich natural envi- in the region and thoir Liivergence
� ncal and Cultural Research and ronment, placed them at a from an ancestral Algonquian Ian
� liege �l rts and Sciences at "chiefdom" level of compk�irv guage.Thephysicalanthropologists
the described the peoph theii incestn
- and diseases
anthropology professor at E of the regional culture and po i i rhe presentations relied on vi-
�:� ited the dav's events tion of the Sou then lgoi luiai sual aids mainh l hows to
EC1 Dr David Phelps, the associ Using a holistit ip
ate director of the Institute and an symposium covered
Southern Algonquians rhis was pnwkied through a sum- help
aci " � epts in a
re Native American societies mary of past and recent research in wayth general could grasp
o lived in the Tidewater zone of archaeolog) thesrud) ol past hu- Phelpssaid: "Although it really
Middle tlantu coast from man cultures ethnohiston the wasajobgettingi .en, et other
�� Bavti the N'euse River in study of a culture througl record r the ovei pleased
rth i arolina at the tim. ol 1 u written b cither peopli h I tl tl � � � ' posium
ii �'� � gNishcs.tK'studyofhurruinspoecl ; ttled appointed in
� asthisvear's andphvsicalanthn . "� � �
eed to know basis ploration of disease patterns in th
turnoii' out hi
is-s :iuit more
Set Native Americans page I
Professor
searches for
lost films
Bv Miriam Driot
Sufi Writer
An exploratory attempt to
document early tilms, especially
before 1960, made in North Carolina
is the focus ot The him Project, a
part ot the ECl institute tor His-
torical andulrural Research.
rhe research process consists
oi surveying libraries, businesses
and museums throughout the state
to locate the films The Film Project
is essentially interested in non
commercial releases such as docu-
mentaries, industnal films, home
movies and town documentaries
About 4W films made in North
Camlina, some from asearly as 1908,
have hvn located.
This project was initiated by
Alex Albright, who decided to turn
a hobby into a more productive
activity. Albnght has been teaching
non fiction writing at ECU since
1981. Since no one in the state was
active! v in volvedincollec ting these
films, he came up with the idea of
The Film Project
See Films page 3
? I irkii
File Photo
ouldf eraisi 5! ' :
ippi . � I .�� � "� '
and three other lots thai
i ri ed b ' ird t I rustees
foi pun hase and do pi ent on
1 � t ri Street andharles Boulevard
This pn ij - d int n ise has
nothme to do with the increased
narkir

� ,vi nl
� � effi ' � �' Bnnvn said.
i .t vear s parkii I - I pnee in
e vis due to the universit -
up to w hat thi � uni-
versities were i hargint
I he Parking and
mittee has 12 membei taculrv
members and two students
It the Board ol I rustees ip
proves this increase it will most
lik -K beim ffeet t r the fall semester
I hi re is nothing more sensi-
tive on campus than price in-
creases, Brown said, especially
when they havetodo with parking
SGA
cancels
special
election
Bv Shannan Copeland
Suit Writei
In their Mondav meeting, the
� idenl cmmcnt Asso lation
i � �: �� . nstitution tor Stu-
li � ts Supporting Our I rex ps
r up
; n th Persian( i I
. � . � ip will probal v
tnncti thi
: itoi -
MeC'ullei aid
: � . � ��
Hoi � - ��:�� : - - i
Natioi : � � rS iet
in ippropi it � " � : ' L
. �: Scienei iet rect .ed
"� ii I the E i Rt habilitat i
i i mnseling ss lal i received
On � � elta Kappa
receivedS: � u I PhiSign iTau i
sophv hoi rsoael
reci �� IS4t
Set- SGA page 3
"
Gooood morning, ECU
Cherry � EC J Photo Lab
WZMB rad� resumed
Cent' r Da ige trom
jroadcastinq '�' � �
fatei leak and ate juipmentrA �� r
Civil War liistorian speaks on role of black women
Bv Margaret Ihlenfeld
Special to Tho I ast Carolinian
Black women during the ISM is
benefited both civilian and military
populations snd a speaker at a
conference titled "Black Women
During the C ml War" held ITiurs-
dav. March 21 in the General
Classroom Building.
Dr. Martha Bnnvn, who is a
Civil War historian, spoke in cel-
ebration of bom Black and Women' s
History months. She is a professor
at Old Dominion University in
Norfolk, Virginia and has received
awards from the Lnited States
Education Fellowshipand the Ford
Foundation Fellowship.
The conference was sponsored
by the Women sStudv Alliance, the
Women's Studio Program and the
Department ot 1 listory.
"My great-grandfather fought
in the 4th I the unit on which the
movie '(lory was based), Brown
said. "1 got his records and they
made me wonder what life was like
tor my great-grandmother
The problem Brown said she
found while researching was that
the black women met much nsis-
tanceand wore unrewarded tortheir
efforts. "1 think of the hundreds oi
articles I read ;onlv one black woman
was recognized
Bnnvn said that most black
women suffered more than IS
months of depravation during the
Civil War because their husbands
tixik no pav rather than take unequal
pay.
She discussed some accom-
plishments ot noteworthy black
women such as Harriet Tubman,
Suzie faylor King and Elizabeth
Bowser. Ihese women ot the Nth
century were selfless Brown said.
someaccomphshmentsot these
women included being unpaid
nurses, leading soldiers and acting
as spies Brown said most black
women took lite and death risks
during the Civil War Fheir efforts
also included boosting morale and
raising funds lor the war effort.
Brownsaidthatalthoughbiacks
were regarded as problems dunng
this time, evidence proving dis-
criminahon is hard to find. Black
women were patriotic before Hack
men were allowed to put on soldier
uniforms, she said.
Brown also talked some about
the black women currently serving
See Historian page 2





I
2 (She East Carolinian March 26, 1991
SGA
CRIMSENE
Dog visiting Clement Hall escorted
out by ECU Public Safety officer
March 20
1856� Fletcher Residence Hall: responded to a fire alarm acti-
vated by cooking.
2049� Mendenhall Student Center responded to a subject
t.uling to pay for billiards game.
2122�Mingcs Coliseum: responded to a report of a subject
h eaking glass in a door. A carpenter was called out to repair same.
0018�Tyler Residence Hall: assisted residence hall staff with
n winding the fire hose on the first floor.
0138- lenkins Art Center: investigated possible bra wl between
two subjects. Same were playing,
March 21
?8?.v-Mendenhall Student Center: responded toan activated
alarm. Same was caused by subject entering her office.
1957- -Tyler Residence Hall: responded to a report of subjects
tin owing objects at windows. Unable to locate subjects.
March 22
2245 Ninth and Charles streets: stopped a vehicle for speed-
ing. Verbal warning given for alcohol violations.
2307�dement Residence Hall area: all units responded to a
11 port oi a male subject damaging the glass of the house phone. The
subject was gone on arrival. An officer continued the investigation.
0111 MendenhallStudentCenter(vTst):twosubjt.x:rsTrKillv
n arned for drinking in public.
0114 Aycock Residence Hall: student stopped for skip sign
v lolation and for underage consumption. The student waigiven a
state citation and a campus citation.
0150 lenkins Art Center (northwest): subjects m the trees
given verbal warnings.
0222 Tenth Street and Memorial Drive: mi student given
i rbal warning tor dmmg in the wrong direction.
,i1�) C lemtMit Residence Hall: a dog in Oielobln was evorttl
i'lit of the residence hall.
March 11
1100�-Jones Residence Hall (east) student issued a campus
� itandn lor speeding.
1230 Fleming Baptist Church: recovered a vehicle that was
reported stolen from campus.
1 ?22 Clement Residence Hall: assisted students stuck in the
i i attT
1743 Fleming Residence Hall: investigated a peeping torn in
the area
2131harles Street: campus citation issued to student tor
speeding State citation issued tor underage possession of alcohol
224r Belk Residence Hall: assisted residence hall staff with
alcohol violations. Students were gjrVen verbal warnings and the
alt ohol was poured out.
- in.1iu tzi-rtrtn
Slje �aat(Ear0lmtan
Director of
Advertising -
John F. Semelsberger n
Production Manager
Mary Piland
Doctors, lawyers discuss
malpractice law ref orms
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
Tim Peed
Patrick Pitzer
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National$6.00
Local Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
w indow screen.
Crime
. . . I t
ti -q j in - . , rc
Scene is taken rotnV)WlcJl-EtT Ptiblic SiMy togs'
ATTIC
752-7303
209 East
RfthSt.
B I G
BIG
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NCAA Championship Game 15 T.V.
Free Admission - $1.50 32 oz Draft
103a Pizza & Popcorn
Sat 30th: Riff Raff ACDC tribute act
STUDENT UNION
By Missy Ellis
Special to The East Carolinian
The futureof malpractice cases
may become easier for both patients
and doctors according to medical
practitioners and lawyers at a local
symposium on malpractice crisis.
The symposium was held on
Wednesday, March 20 at the
Ramada Inn.
The theme for this year's con-
ference was 'The 1990s Malpractice
Crisis: Real or Imagined?" David E.
Rosendahl, Roy M. Hinson, Jeannie
Sedwick, and John B. Emery were
among the speakers at the sympo-
sium.
Rosendahl's topic was "Fo-
cused Tort Reform: Will It Workr
He is senior vice president in mar-
keting for the Medical Protective
Company and is responsible for all
marketing, underwriting, risk
management and regulatory op-
erations for the company.
'The intent of the tort system is
to provide a level playing field' so
that the defendant is not at a legal
disadvantage in defending against
chargesof professional negligence
he said.
There are reforms that are in-
tended to reduce costs by having
alternatives to court trials, said
Rosendahl. Someof theal tematives
include having a binding arbitra-
tion, having non-binding prctrial
screening panels and having fee
constraints.
Rosendahl also spoke about
reforms that are intended to reduce
the amounts that are collectible in
the law suits.
The Risk Management Pro-
gram is required to be basically the
Historian
sameinsmallerhospitalsasin largw
hospitals, said Roy M. Hinson, se-
nior vice president at Stanly County
Hospital.
"In smaller hospitals, I think
the program is approached more
on a personal basis than it is in a
larger institution he said
Hinson has been risk manager
for 10 years. His hospital has an
expense budget of approximately
$21 million annually. Hinson said
"Our risk management not only
includes reducing and eliminating
risk of injury to patients, visitors
and employees, but also isdesigned
to help protect the hospitals finan-
cial resources.
"If there is a Kid outcome, the
impact on the smaller hospital is
much greater than the larger hos-
pital mainly becauscof the impact it
has on vour image in the commu-
nity
In larger hospitals the Risk
Management Program has a scope
of responsibilities including risk
identification, nsk contml and nsk
financing,said jeannieSed wick, nsk
manager of Wake Medical Center
in Raleigh. She is responsible lor
directing the hospital's Corporate
Risk Management programs
John B. Emery, chief of the V-
partmentsofln.omal Medicine and
Legal Medicine with Kaiser
Permanente Medical Croup, said
that the risk management program
has quickly grown, and it seems to
be improving everyday
Thcsymposium wassp ns, nj
by the ECU School of Media ne and
Pitt County Memorial Hospital For
more about the program contact
the ECU Office of Continuing
Medical Edtocaionat(919)551-5200
Continued from page 1
STUDENT UNION
ECU Student Union
MakingW Things Happen At ECU
�1 Program Hotline 757-6004
o.
o
in the military. She said 48 percent
of the women serving i n the Persian
Gulf are minority women. Brown
said shpanriripatremnrh �ft
ognition for black women after this
conflict VTFtO 10 ii-i 32
"In addition to my research on
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black women during the Civil War
I would like to see something done
on the presence of black women in
all the wary Brown said
Brown has written two books
and saysHerkrurrertt emphasis is on
women in the black church.
PLylNT SyiLE
ECU Biology Club
Wednesday April 3
Thursday April 4
7:30 am - 1:00 pm
at the
Biology
Greenhouse
RoomS-111
The Coffeehouse Presents.
Blues-Rock Singer
Cathy Braaten
March 26 (Tonight!)
from 8:00 PM-10:00 PM-
Refreshments will be served
Admission is
free!
KPMG Peat Marwick
The KPMG Peat Marwick Foundation
is pleased to announce that a proposal from
John A. Bishop
has been selected out of 206 submissions
to receive one of 21
Research Opportunities Grants
Congratulations
tttftf iEaat (Earnlmtan
: This Week At Hendrix Theatre
Wed March 27 8 pm
ECU ID on Current Films Pass is Required for Admission
is now acceg
U ring positions:
n
�m
j ?
wm
is
��
rheSGA rev lew board met last
Wednesday night and decided not
to haw a special election for the
"ttu rot treasurer
Garry Dudley ran unopposed
tor the office
Legislator Leslie Nicholson
appealed Attorney General Mana
I tenoia's decision in last Monday's
91 ;A meeting to hold an election
The contested di
the review boa re
icholson
board what the lei
including two rej
passed on theelj
"Thevdelibej
and decided to
andnothaveanei
said
Films
"It is a fairly important style of
dociiments,and it will be even more
within another decade Albnght
said. "So 1 thought it might be a
good idea to be find, identify and
presrethesefilms,otherwistMhev
might just disappear"
Ideally in the funae Albnght
hopes to have a Film Archive func-
tioning on grantsand pa rtlvon state
funds So far there are only two
people workingon the Him Project,
Albnght and a graduate student
provided by the Institute for His-
torical and Culti
"Old movie
where said A ill
aters, in hbran
privatecoUectk
summer Albnyt
up with a list i
have been toun
and when the.
As tor now
Albnght is rw A
film itself but to
ueremade.it its
The next step wj
Native Americans
the turnout, but he hopes that more
� event publicity next year will
remedy the situation, he said
Two unique (actors this sym-
posium offered Phetpssaid, "was
that it i o ered a single regional con
i ept and its people; and that nooiM
has ever brought all the aspects to-
gether in a holistic approach as this
one did
This is the third annual symp -
sium sponsored by the Institute tor
1 listoncal and Cultural Research at
The Institute is designed to
facilitate research and to dissemi-
natt - edge
facu �.
����:� pu bl
gram
� import
are here not ju
and do
sun the public !
said
� �
-
American h
ina tnd
wbachek : I
Nine out or 10
prefer The East
all other n
CAREEK OPPORTUNITIES-CAREER OPI
War
30 Undergrcu
Interested in Ear
With Fortune
The
Department Oj
School o
Preparing Students for Managerial
Graduates of theDepartment of Mai
starting salaries and the most challen
campus with er
Black and DeckerABB Pou
Burroughs WellcomeYale Mat
Collins & AikmenFountain
PerdueTyson Fo
GlaxoGrady W
National SpinningCarolina
StanadvneGreat No
What Will Yoi
If you ate interested �g i





o
CTIjc iznxt (Tnriilintmi
March 26, 1991
SGA
SENE
I og visiting Clement Hall escorted
out by ECU Public Safety officer
March 20
Fletcher Residence Hall responded to a lire a Lam

v i okin�
� - Mendenhall Studententer responded to a sn
pay ur billiards game
Miiicos i. oliseum responded to .1 report :
jssmadoor carpenter was called out to repaii -
� S ryler Residence Hall assisttxi residence hall stetr with
. thi fire hose on the first floor.
lenkmsArK enter investigated possible brawl bet wet
cts. S uiK1 w ere plaving,
March 21
v - Mendenhall Student Center, respondedtoai
� was caused b subject entering her ot'fio
� Residence Hail responded to a rep rl l iibiecl
� I it windows L'nabli fe locate subject;
Slje SaHttitaraltnimr
Director of
Advertising �
ohn F. Semelsberger II
Production Manager
Mary Piland
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
Tim Peed
Patrick Pitzer
DISP1 AY ADVERTISING
per column iiu h
NationalSo.00
I ocal Open Kate $5.00
Bulk (lontract
I iscounts ailahle
Business 1 lours: M nday - I rielav J:(X) - 5:00
757-6366
Doctors, lawyers discuss
malpractice law reforms
M.
md harfes streets: stopped a vel ivd
mg given tot afi �1 l violations
n R siden� � � irea. all unit - pond I I i
. � subjet I damaging I . sol I �
on arrival An otl nrinued then
Student! : � .� twOSuhjectSVI
n
(onsunu-
Ian I- 2
ATTIC
752-7303
209 East
Fifth St.
l!l(,
B I (,
�� d foi .� h ter . .
JtJMtW S
� idi �
1 �u:
itrh�i i-rn' j.ii. nPflP fe (djjiumi
h � r
G
( A A (Championship Game 15f T.V.
f:ree Admission S1.50 32 oz Draft
Pizza .V Popcom
Sal 30th: Riff Raff ACDC tribute act
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
ECU Student Union
Making'W Things Happen At ECU
A
Program Hotline 757-6004
it tAu
By Missy Ellis
Special lo The F-jst C jrolinun
The hitureot malpractice cases
may become easier for both patients
and doctors according to mev1k.il
practitioners and lawyers at a local
symposium on malpractice crisis.
The symposium was held on
Wednesday March 20 at the
Kamada Inn
The theme for this year's con-
terence was The 1990s Malpractice
Crisis: Real or Imagined?" David E
Rosendahl, Roy M Hinson, leannie
Sod wick, and ohn B Emery were
among the speakers at the sympo-
sium.
Rosendahl's topic was "Fo-
cused Tort Reform Will It Work?"
I le is senior vice president in mar
keang for the Medical Protective
Company and is responsible for ail
marketing, underwriting, risk
management and regulatory op-
erations for the comp.nu
"The intent of the tort system is
td provide a level playing field' so
that the defendant is not at a legal
dis.idvantage in defending against
chargesof professional negligence "
hi' said
There are reforms that are in-
tended to reduce costs bv having
alternate e; to court trials, said
Rosendahl Someof the alternatives
include having a binding arbitra
tion having non-binding pn trial
screening panels and having foi
constraints
Rosendahl also spoke about
ref( Tins that are intended ti i reduce
the amounts that are coHecribk' in
the lav suits
I he Risk Management Pro
cram is required to be basically the
Historian
in the military. She said 48 percent
of the women serving in the Persian
Gull are minority women Brown
Said ihcantk-ipaiesmtu-h nuren.t
cognition for black women after this
conflict
In addition to mv research on
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
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Good anytime
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Expires: 4-25-91
I
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same in smaller hospital
hospitals, said Roy M Hins
ruor icepn sidentatStan . '
Hospital
"In smaller hos ital
the program is appn a � � d
on a personal basis than it
larger institution he said
I linson has been nsk
tor 10 years His hospital I
expense budget oi appr .
$21 million annual!) Hinsi
'(Air risk management �
includes reducing and elu
risk of injury to patu i I
and employees, but a ls
to help protect the hospitals �
i ial resi lurces
"If there is a ba.1 cuil
impact on the smaller hi ;
miu h greater than the lai
pital mainly be auseof tl
has on vour imagi
nit
In larger hospital- �,
Managemenl Program ha
(if responsibilities includ
idenhfi atn in nsk conti
financing,said feannieSedwi -
manager of Wake v
in Raleigh Sh� m- .
directing the h spital s � � � �
!i-k Management pi
ers ' '
���- Mnten i ' ' �
Permanenl Medi
thai ��
has qun kl gnwn and I
!v impn �. ing ��� er.)
rhesN mp siui�� i
K the�( I s htxlol tedi
Pitt ounrv Menxwial I h -1 I
mere about th pr. .r m
Ofl f Contn
Medical Fducah - �.� �
Continued from page 1
black women dunng the, i
I would like to see s -met!
on the presence ol blac k :�. �
-all the war Brown aid.
Brown has written � -
And sn g herurrent emphasis -
women in the black i hurt h
PLa4N7 SAL1
ECU Biology Club
Wednesday April
Thursday April 4
7:30 am - 1:00 pm
.1! ilk'
r , v Biolt
�'& " (ireenhousc
&4 RoomS
KPMG Peat Marwick
The KPMG Peat Marwick Foundation
is pleased to announce that a proposal from
John A. Bishop
has been selected out of 206 submissions
to receive one of 21
Research Opportunities Grants
Congratulations
This Week At Hendrix Theatre :
Wed March 27 8 pm �
ECU ID or Current Films Pass is Required for Admissio
n
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
is now accepting applications for the following positions:
� Assistant News Editor
� Assistant Features Editor
�Copy Editor
� Editorial Production Manager
� Director of Advertising
� Business Manager
� Advertising Representative
� Typesetter
�Staff Writer
Anyone interested should apply in person at The Mast Can Union office The office is
located on the second floor of th Publications Building across from Joyner Library.
Deadline for applications ts April 4. For more information, call 757-6366
Films
Native Americans
Nine out or 10 y
prefer TJic East
all other n
� pi � k
30 I ndi
Interested in Ea
With Fortune
The
Department of
School ol
Si lei ts foi Ma
v
v ii i s und the n
Bu
("o
& -
s
s
What Will Yoi
If you are interested in learning
Department of Manufactur
your career





!
lawyers discuss
lice law reforms
mi.
Tarolinian
practice CHS
th patients
to medical
k-rs at f local
rachce crisis.
S held on
20 at the
war s con
(Malpractice
DavkJE
m, eanrae
l very were
I he S) mpo-
ii was Fo-
il It Work"
nt in niar
kl Protective
InsiWeforall
ting, risk
h;lator 0v
lm
system is
ing field so
: at ,1 legal
ng against
gligence
thai are in-
to having
trials said
alternatives
Imt; arbitra
line prctrial
taving foe
oke aKuit
sd to reduce
ickvtible in
Bment Pro-
askrallv the
4 percent
i the Persian
ten. Brown
unoierec
ni after this
r-search on
same in smaller hospitalsasin larger
hospitals, said Roy M. Hinson, se-
me r i ce presiden t at Stanly County
Hospital.
In smaller hospitals, I think
the program is approached more
on a personal basis than it is in a
larger institution' he said.
Hinson has been risk manager
tor 10 wars His hospital has an
expense budget ci approximately
$21 million annually- Hinson said:
Our nsk management not only
includes reducing and eliminating
risk ot iniurv to patients, visitors
and employees,butabo isdesigned
to help protect the hospitals finan-
cial resources.
It there is a bad outcome, the
impact on the smaller hospital is
much neater than the larg?r hos-
pital mainly because of thoimpactit
has on your image in the commu-
mt
In larger hospitals the Risk
Management Program has a scope
ot responsibilities including risk
identification nsk control and risk
financing .said leannioSed wick, risk
manager ot Wake Medical Center
in Raleigh She in responsible for
directing the hospital's Corporate
Risk Management programs,
lohnB Emery chief of the Qr
partmentsot Internal Medictncand
I egal Medicine with Kaiser
Permancnte Medical Group, said
th.it the risk management program
has quickl) crown, and it stvms to
be improving everyday.
l"hes mposiumvi assponanied
b) the ECU Schoolo( Medicine and
PittCounty Memorial Hospital. For
more about the program contact
the EC L Office of Continuing
Medical Educabonat (919)551-5200.
Continued from page 1
black women during the Civil War,
I would like to see something done
on the presence of black women in
all the maw Brown, said.
Brown has written two books
and says hercurrent emphasis ison
women in the black church.
plUnt salz
ECU Biology Club
Wednesday April 3
Thursday April 4
7:30 am - 1:00 pm
at the
Biology
Greenhouse
Room S-111
'ick Foundation
lat a proposal from
ihop
J206 submissions
of 21
lities Grants
itions
arnlttuan
wHm following positions:
liter
'8
mW
s.
SGA
Ehe goat (Earolintan March 26,1991 13
Continued from page 1
The SGA review board met last
Wednesday night and decided not
to haw a special election for the
office of treasurer.
Garry Dudley ran unopposed
for the office.
legislator Leslie Nicholson
appealed Attorney General Maria
Denoia's decision in last Monday's
SGA meeting to hold an election.
The contested decision then went to
the review board.
Nicholson said she told the
board what the legislature had done,
including two resolutions they had
passed on the election.
"They deliberated forahalf hour
and decided to uphold my appeal
and not havean election Nicholson
said.
Films
Nicholson said theconstitution
states there must be an election if
there is a vacancy. However, it does
not say there must be one if some-
one is running unopposed.
Shcalsosaid there would prob-
ably not be an amendment to the
constitution that would resolve the
problem because 15 percent of the
student body must vote to amend it.
Continued from page 1
"It is a fairly important style of
documents,and it will be even more
within another decade Albright
said. "So I thought it might be a
gixxi idea to be find, identify and
preserve these films; otherwise, they
might just disappear
Ideally in the future Albright
hopes to have a Film Archive func-
tioning on grants and partly on state
funds. So far there are onlv two
people workingon the Film Project,
Albright and a graduate student
provided by the Institute for His-
torical and Cultural Research.
"Old movies can be found any-
where said Albright, "in old the-
aters, in libraries, museums and
private collection By the end of the
summer Albright intends to come
up with a list of all the films that
have been found as well as where
and when they were made.
As for now the first priority for
Albright is not so much to get the
film itself but to identify what films
weremade,if itstillexistsand where.
The next step will be to raise grants
Native Americans
and start to collect the movies be-
fore starting the actual preservation
process. "By next fall we should
know if we will have a Film
Archive Albright said.
However preserving films is a
very expensive process. "For a 30
mm film, (costs) can run from $2000
to $6000 Albright said.
The Film Archive will be lo-
cated in the library and films will be
accessible to anyone. A new negative
will be made from the original, the
latter being kept for reference.
Continued from page 1
the turnout, but he hopes that more
pro-event publicity next year will
remedy the situation, he said.
"Two unique factors this sym-
posium offered Phelpssaid, "was
that Hoovered a single regional con-
cept and its people; and that no one
has ever brought all the aspects to-
gether in a holistic approach as this
one did
This is the third annual sympo-
sium sponsored by the Institute for
1 ustorical and Cultural Research at
ECU. The Institute is designed to
facilitate research and to dissemi-
nate know ledge to the students and
faculty.Phetps said it is meant to be
a type of "public outreach" pro-
gram.
"It's important to remember we
are here not just to train students
and do good research, but to make
sure the public benefits as well he
said.
Fast years' symposiums in-
cluded "In Search of a Lost Heri-
tage a symposium on the Native
American heritage of eastern North
Carolina, and "Before Jubilee
w -hich dealt with thechanges in black
culture from slavery to the Civil
War.
Lookingahead to the IW2 sym-
posium, Fhelps said that nothing
wasdefiniteyet, but peoplecan look
forward to a day of discussion on
historical architecture in eastern
Norm Carolina.
A book on the Southern
Algonquians will be published
within the next year. It will be a
collaboration of all the information
presented at thisyear'ssymposium,
written by all the researchers who
studied the subject.
Nine out or 10 puppies surveyed
prefer The East Carolinian above
all other newspapers.
CARJEEK QPPORTONraES-CAREER OPPORTUNITlfiS'CAREER.OPPORTUNITIES
Wanted!
30 Undergraduate Scholars
Interested in Earning Top Salaries
With Fortune 500 Companies
The
Department of Mcmufaeturing
SchoolfJMmtry & Techaotagy
Preparing Students for Managerial & Peciwon-Maktng Careers in fodustry
Graduates of the Department of Manufacturing obtain some of the highest
starting salaries and the most challenging careers of any degree program on
campus with employers, such as:
Black and Decker
Burroughs Wellcome
Collins & Aikmen
Perdue
Glaxo
National Spinning
Stanadyne
ABB Power T&D ,
Yale Materials Handling
Fountain Power Boats
Tyson Foods
Grady White Boats
Carolina Power & Light
Great Northern Insurance
Weyerhauser
TRW
Simpson Industries
Procter & Gamble
Northern Telecom
Burlington Industries
Yellow Freight
What Will Your Future Hold?
SILVER
BULLET
(ADULT ENTERTAINMENT)
WEDNESDAYS:
Amateur Night (Female Dancers)
Cash Prize
Silver Bullet Female "exotic" dancers
THURSDAY
Silver Bullet Female "exotic" dancers
FRIDAY
Silver Bullet Female "exotic" dancers
SATURDAY
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
Doors Open 7 PM Each Night
Dancing Starts 9:30 PM
For more Info call.756-6278
Summer Session In
Guadalajara!
1991
Thirty-Ninth Year
July 7 - Auguit 15
Optional 3-week sessions
available lor selected courses
1st Session Jury 7lury 26
2nd Session: Jury 28-August 16
� Credit Undergraduate &
Graduate�Up to 8 units
� Opportunity to tuf�
BIHnguaVESL endorsement
&or Spanish language
proficiency requirements
� Courses hi:
- Spanish Language &
Literature (Proficiency and
Communication stressed)
- Bilingual Education
- Pottlcal Science
- Anthropology
- Mexican Musk and Dance
� Live with a Mexican family
� Travel to local and
surrounding sites
For information, contact:
Guadalajara
Summer School
Douglass Bldg Room 315
Tha University ot Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85721
(602)621-7551
Dance Around And Bare
Ydur Tan For Hundreds Of
These Dirty Old Men.
Wefyfi a
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Tuesdays March 19. 26 April 2. 9Fridays March 22. 29 April 5. 12. 19. 26
Finals: April 16Finals: May 3
Weekly Prizes: Winner-$100 Runner Up�$25 Gift CertificateWeekly Prizes: Winner-$100 Final Prizes:
Final Prizes: Winner-S350 Runner Up�S150Winner-S300 Plus A Free Saturday Night Stay Al The Hilton "
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HILTON
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For more
information call 355-5000




















EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DRUG AWARENESS
MARCH 25-28,1991
I his is your brain.
Lj
This is your brain on drug.
-3
ffftCk the habit.
Mondayi March 25
ll:00-l:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
BACCHUS Resource
Booth & Drug Display.
Student Activity Booth
Mcndenhall Student Center
Tuesday, March 26
Sex, Drugs and All
That Soul on The Mall
Concert on the Mall featuring
Cold Sweat a Contemporary Soul
Band.
Kathy Beckman, a counselor
at ECU Counseling Center will
discuss the role drugs play in
date rape.
?Rain site Jenkins Auditorium
5:00pm Sex, Drugs and Remote
Control
A presentation and video which
discusses the facts about drugs
influencing decision making
ability.
7:00pm Ris Que' Business
Fleming Hall Lobby
A video presentation in which
several social issues including
DWI, drug use, and date rape
will be addressed.
8:00pm Cathy Broatcn
A Jazz performance at the
ECU Underground.
i






















Wednesday, March 27 ll:00-l:00pm
7:00pm
Thursday, March 28 il:00-l:00pm
BACCHUS Resource Booth
and Drug Display.
ECU Student Store
PROJECT D.A.R.E.
MSC Multipurpose Room
Rick Fisher of the Pitt County
Sheriff's Department will present
a program on drug awareness and
resistance.





J
SUtc iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bi air Skinner, Sews Editor
Matt King, Features Editor
Matt Mi mm a, Sports Editor
An Edwards, Corn Editor
LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Stuart Oliphant, Asst. Features Editor
Kerry Nester, Asst. Sports Editor
Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
Doug Morris, Editorial ProductionMemger
JEFF PARKFR, Start Illustrator
Chris Norman, Darkrtwn Technician
C.ARLA Whiitiflp, Classified Ads Technician
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
PHONG Lu'ONG, Business Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
1 he Easti 'ari Union has served ihe East Carol ma c ampus community since 1925. emphasizing information that directly affects
ECU students During the ECU school year. The East Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12,000. The East
t 'at Union reserves the nghi to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that disenmmate on the basis of age. sex. creed or
ruiiona origin The masthead editonal in each edition docs not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but. rather.
- � ma ni opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view Letters should
be mited to 250 words or less For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right toedit letters for
p ibticalion Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C.
27834; or call (919) 757 M66
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, March 26, 1991
Coach Steele deserved more time
Mike Steele was onlv here for four years ECU scorer, an ex-
ts th :� i nought tune to let a head coach start tremely well liked
a good basketball program? player, have any-
It he were starting with a good program thing to do with his
intact there would be plenty oi time to build dismissal?
a winning team
But when Mike Steele came to ECU, he
inherited a team that had gone 12-16 the
eason and just had an awful re-
ar A a result, Steele managed to
rates to an 8-20 record in his first
previou
cruiting
Ivcid the
year
Mike Steele
��-
w
if H
� cond season, however, the
began to roll. The Pirates ended
1 V,
promts
ketball.
The official
word from the ath-
letic department is
that Steele was dis-
missed in the "best
i n teres t s of everyone
involved This answer, however, gives no
reason for his dismissal.
Steele declined comment as did every-
thing record, 15-14, and seemed to one else involved in the athletic depart-
etter times ahead for ECU bas- ment. Which begs the question: just why
was Steele fired?
The promise never came to fruition. Whileonly speculation, some possibili-
g�jgw nqqaiO tgwww4teifc'90iC8 trwriutie the toitowing?
tty'�Tffrfr IiMiWy 'Me sttspended two tine ptevers who
Senior guard etr UTiitaker's season- he could not aftord to lose it he wanted to
ending ankle injury, personnel problems win games. However, the objective of any
with sophomore guard Steve Richardson coach is not only winning games but also
and junior forward Joe Brightwell and doing what's best for the team � which
Steeled arrest for driving under the influence does not always mean winning games.
contributed to the dark clouds over the 1990- Whatever rules Richardson and
91 season. Brightwell violated, there had to be some
Whitakers injury forced Steele to rely consequences. Steele thought suspension
on freshman Lester Lyons as point guard, was the best way to handle the situation. He
Rather than cracking under the pressure, made a tough, but gutsy, decision.
Lyons blossomed. -Steele received a DU1 in December.
I vons was named rookie of the year by No one in the athletic department would
the Colonial Athletic Association and led comment on this, but it seems unlikely that
the team in scoring, assists, blocked shots it helped Steele's position at all.
and steals As a representative of the university,
Richardson was also a bright spot early his actions placed ECU in a bad light. Nev-
in the Pirates' season. But Richardson and ertheless, Steele will answer to the state for
Brightwell were suspended for team rules his actions. He should not have to answer to
violation Later reports said they were his employers for aspects of his personal
suspended for disciplinary reasons. life.
Prior to his suspension, Richardson led Ultimately, Steele should be judged by
the team with 54 three-point field goals in what happened on the court, not in it. Con-
the 19 games in which he played. He was sidering the problems he faced this season,
also the team's leading scorer when he was Steele should have been given the oppor-
suspended tunity to turn the ECU basketball program
Did Steele's suspension of the leading around, and four years was not enough.
Letters To The Editor
Student airs
grievences
against ECU
To The Editor:
I believe that my sequence
for writing to the editor is com-
plain, praise, complain, praise,
etc Well, here goes my latest
list or complaints
No.l � We hear so much
discussion on lighting around
campus in order to prevent
rape, but many of us failed to
hear of the student who was hit
while trying to cross 10th Street
in January.
Our beloved light in the
commuter parking lot across
from Brewster had been off the
weekend before the incident
and the night of the incident as
well. It must have been a coin-
cidence that the lights were back
on the following night.
Moral: Here at ECU, you
may be killed by a car in the
dark of night, but rest assured
that you will not be raped, and
if you are raped, they'll sweep it
under the rug with everything
else they don't want us to hear
about.
No. 2 � I had a sorry
teacher the first time 1 took pre-
calculus. My grade for the course
was terrible. Hold the criticism.
You're probable thinking it was
my own fault, right. Wrong!
He knew a lot of things,
but 1 couldn't understand any of
them. He would talk about stuff
that had no bearing on the class
he was "teaching I could have
dropped the course with the
majority of his class that did so
after the first test, but I was too
worried about my "credit limit
Instead of putting little
marks to indicate which prob-
lems I had missed on tests, he
would put big "X's" and ques-
tion marks all over my paper.
He would throw some problems
on the board, and make assign-
ments.
If we had problems with
the homework, we were in-
structed to go see him during
office hours, as if we didn't
have other obligations to up-
hold.
Needless to say, I took
the course over last semester,
and made a "C" in it. The dif-
ference was that one teacher
taught while the other one did
something else.
Moral: Here at ECU,
some teachers teach while
others do something else. Asa
result, you even get stuck with
an unfair "F
No. 3 � I live in Scott
Residence Hall, which is sup-
posed to be air-conditioned. It
costs around $80 extra per se-
mester, but it is not really worth
it. The system is hardly even
on although we pay for it.
Whenever I call the
housing department to ask
about the situation, they give
me some cocking-bull story
about how the system only
comes on after it has been hot
for a number of days in a row.
I don't care to pay $80
Set Utters, page 5
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Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Police need reminder there is no war
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
The Cook. The The Hz Wife
and Hfi I over is a marvelous film
th.it even the loutish rabbit, al
I (endrix Theatre had a hard time
ruining There's a scene in it in
which the thief (of the title) and a
female acquaintance are having a
shouting match in a restaurant.
He'son therighl side of the frame,
she's on the left.
She tells him, not delicately,
that his wife has been cheating on
him. The thief's nght hand, the
one blocked bv his bodv from the
camera, tumbles tor a moment,
and then he lunges at her. She
screams and falls, her boyfriend
going down with her. The thief
starts to walk away -ahttteshaky
but almost back in control of
himselt.
Next shot: she's sitting on
the floor her back against a table,
her boyfriend trying to comfort'
her. There's a fork stuck through
her cheek. The camera rises,
looking over the edge of the table,
and we see that the thief has put
on a bib and has begun to eat �
socking another fork into another
piece of meat
That's violence.
I've seen the film twice, and
both times that one scene has
rendered me dry-mouthed and
sweatv-palmed and just plain
goddamn scared. I get the same
reaction when I play the scene back
in mv mind: simple fear of human
beings stripped of humanity, re-
ducing themselves to mad and
snarling animals bent on doing
raw violence to one another.
i got tt�esame reaction again
a few davs ago, when 1 watched
the now-infamous videotape of
1 os Angeles police beating an
unarmed and pl.nnh helpless
motorist Of course there'sadil
ference: this u,i not iust a film,
this really happened
Forget for a moment that the
officers were white and the mo-
torist was black; we miss a ver
important point bv focusing onl)
on the observation that racism
ca ta 1 yzed the policemen's act ions
The fact that law enforce-
ment officers partook in the si v age
beating of a citizen who simpK
drove too fast, ought to be enough
in itself to scare you to death �
and motivate you to clamor tor
change
Let's accept Los Angeles
police chief Darvl Gates' surelv
spurious claim that the incident
was "an aberration Let's go one
step further. let'ssuppoWnotfimg
of tpeTcind Has ewiprwii�r,
this country before, though it has.
See, arguing over how often
it's happened before obscures
another important point: it'sgoing
to happen again, and again, and
again, until we overhaul our view
of crime.
American policemen think
these three things are true: that
they are at war, that theirenemy is
the civilian population and that
they are losing this war. It's a
deadlv echo of Vietnam, and like
that war it will inevitably drive
more and more g(od men and
women to extremes they other-
wise would never have consid-
ered
But the lesson that needs to
Let's Be Adamant
be brought home to An -
and to police most of all
this is not Vietnam, and that ir
on drugs" or no, we are rn � �
Criminals are not cnemw - fl
are fellow . itizens '��� bo
ken the law. and there is a diffi r
encc Suspects, loo, are m I �
emtcs; thev are fellow ihzt i - i
. used of breaking the law
Other law enforcement I
hcers must not be punished
chastised tor what some LA
did. Rather, they must K rt
minded gently, gently that
they are citizens, civilians ��'
are not in the military and not at
M ar
And let s give them some-
thing better than a gentle re-
minder Let's make their jobalittk
less impossible, by ending the war
we've told them they're fighting
Let's swallow our pride and
admit that drug prohibition has
cknerno��arni than i
like alcohol prohibition, has cre-
ated a rich and powerful criminal
class. Let's recognize that drug
legalization has inherent social
costs, but � again like alcohol
legalization iust isn't as bad as
prohibition.
As we welcome our ti
back from the Middle Fast, let us
also welcome our cops back into
thecnilian world After all, they've
been here all along, even if some
of them have forgotten it
If we don't, continuing and
escalating violence is all we can
expect from them, as well as from
the criminal class our drug war
has created And that's what we 1!
get
Three steps needed to solve racism
By Darek McCullers
Editorial Columnist
Recently, I was shocked to
read a very fine article in "Expres-
sions" magazine entitled "All Be-
cause My Friends Are Black
However, I am not surprised at
the anonymous white female be-
ing attacked because of her inter-
racial relationship and black
friends.
I would repeat the words of
our martyred leader. Minister
Malcolm X,about the violence that
was perpetrated against the great
Anglo-Saxon leader President
John F. Kennedy. This is simply a
case of the chickens coming home
to roost. This is the result of a
society that has not yet rid itself of
its long legacy of prejudice (of all
sorts). I contend that thisisa prob-
lem that will not be solved by
human relations sessions (al-
though 1 have nothing against that
type of activity). It is unfortunate,
but everybody will say that they
are not prejudiced at these ses-
sions.
I am reminded of the hypo-
crites that jesus condemned in his
day. They had the outward ap-
pearance of righteousness, yet in
private they committed many
travesties against Cod. This is the
case with mis victim's assailants. I
condemn this violence and express
my empathy for this young lady.
However, violence is nothing new
to mv family.
One of my great uncles was
accused of slapping a white
woman. The Klansmen came to
get him. Although he is probably
in the bottomof a river somewhere,
he did not go easily. I understand
that he armed himself with a rifle
and took a few of them with him.
He was a man.
Other members of my fam-
ily have had run-ins with more
than hosble white people. There-
fore, I do not feel that this problem
will be solved by any more ap-
peasement or talk of the beatitudes
of race relabons.
I do not feel that someone
can come and talk to me about
race relations when I am being
hampered economically due to the
new form of racism and discrimi-
nation. These forms come through
favors and allowances that are
given to whites that are not given
to blacks.
There is a quiet network that
gives the whites an ad vantage over
me. Some people call it the good
old boy network. 1 do not feel that
someone can talk to meabout these
things when blackson this campus
are not included in much of the
socio-political structure.
I do not feel that you can talk
to me about the beatitudes of race
relations when many black stu-
dents do not feel motivated and
do not perform when white fa.
ulty members emanate an attitude
of indifference toward them This
problem will be solved in three
ways.
First of all, we have to take a
stand to let people know that we
are not going to take these things
lightly anymore. I think that the
adversary will soon find that black
people are waking up to this new
covert colonialism, oppression and
discrimination.
Blacks must resist acts of
violence, like those committed by
police in Washington, N.C when
they shot a black man, and by
Raleigh police, when they shot an
innocent black motorist they mis-
took for a criminal.
I believe in the doctrine of
appropriate response and action.
When my problem is political, I
will deal with it in a political way
When my problem is social and
economic, I will deal with it in that
way. However, when my problem
is violence that is perpetrated
against me and threatens my lite,
I will not hesitate to respond.
Many great leaders, includ-
ing Mahatmah Chandi, under-
stood the importance of self- de-
fense. I would advise that young
woman not to be intimidated
anymore if she has made the
righteous choice of a mate or
friends that is in accordance with
See Racism page 5

1
y
c
p
v
b
c
a
extra per semester and not ac-
quire the services promised in
the housing contract Either get
the system fixed or prepare to
pay back some money due to
breech of contract
My suggestion to this
school as a whole, get the lead
out of your bottoms, and find a
way to change this place f. r the
better 1 think you should set
about having the "little switch'
removed from our air-condi-
tinning system as soon as pos
sible
Okay, 1 must include al
least one praise so here it is ;
find comfort in knowing that
The East Carolinian publishes
editorials without twisting
them all around Great job!
Ronald Men � �
Sophomore
Chemistrv
Coach Steele
seen as an ECU
representative
To The Editor
1 would like to respond t i
the article written bv K. i -
Nester about Mike
Steele s dismissal The article's
focus should not have Ken on
his wontost ratio, bet ause it
takes time to build a program
in anv sport
Instead, we should realize
that collegiate coaches must
possess several traits in order
to be successful. The m ts4 im
portant trait is a strong moral
character The DL I offense
Steele received earlier this ear
should have gotten him tired
on the spot.
Coaches are given cars to
drive, memberships to pru ill
clubs and other perks that help
make their profession very at-
tractive. But along with these
extra benefits comes an obhga
tion to uphold a professional
imageatall times. Thisincludes
not driving drunk.
Letter
Steel
damaged
athletu r
and as j
letic Dinj
m ing irl
Atf.
petitive I
that ouro
are role n J
dnd the
III
at �(
Howi
he, it bet
wht �
lemo
-
i
Animl
activi
add re
this
mclu :�
-
sum-
tend �
vtduals?

any ci I I
in the sci�
must addn
tions
5 for I
f you though
system you a ml
new; aff xdabie
The Macint I
computers that
Madntosh LC e. j
ako comes with
technology that I
adding voice on
Like even" Mil
computer, the I.C
set up and easy t
Anditnmsthous
available applicatj
all work in the sai
consistent wav





J
f
u!l?e lEaBt (Earolinian March 26, 1991 5
40 JctAS IN
LOSAUGtLlS
s A RECORD
IT
Letters Continued
Racism
Continued from page 4
mmer
there is no war
nun;
��. s Amoruans.
� SI ol .ill. is that
ind tint "war
arc no! .u war
� i mics lhc
� i bro-
I then is .1 Jitter
UK) .ire not en
!li'v citizensnc
- � the law.
i nforcemenl ot-
I be punished or
at some LA cops
� e must be re-
� v. gently that
s, . n ilians, who
lit.irv and not at
gi e them some
ir i gentle re-
ike their joba little
1 ending the war
ti ire fighting.
� i ur pride and
prohibition has
moreh.v. thangfiBtjSI �
r'vWBBcflli
. � � ibittoh, has cre-
�. erful cnminal
gmze that drug
inherent social
� ii like alcohol �
� isn t as bad as
ome our troops
Middle East, let us
. r ops back into
� d After all, they've
ig. even if some
fiirgotten it.
� � continuing and
lence is all we can
em, as well as from
ir drug war
I that's what we'll
to solve racism
�If with a r � �
of my fam
f
It this problem
mere ap-
� omeone
to me about
p I am being
tally due to the
and discrimi-
! methrough
n. es that are
are not given
network that
tlvantageover
ill it the good
Id not feel that
neabout these
nthiscampus
much of the
It'ire.
it you can talk
kitudesof race
iiv black stu-
hotivated and
m when white fac-
rsemanateanattitude
� ward them. This
m will be solved in three
fall we have to take a
I eople know that we
rig to take these things
lightly anymore I think that the
iryv I soon find thatblack
� pie �re waking up to this new
' olonialism, oppression and
ii nmination
Blacks must resist acts of
violence, like those committed by
police in Washington, N.C when
they shot a black man, and by
Raleigh police, when they shot an
innocent black motorist they rnis-
t(xk tor a criminal.
I believe in the doctrine of
appropriate response and action.
When my problem is political, I
will deal with it in a political way.
When my problem is social and
economic, I will deal with it in that
way However, when my problem
is violence that is perpetrated
against me and threatens my life,
I will not hesitate to respond.
Many great leaders, includ-
ing Mahatmah Ghandi, under-
stood the importance of self- de-
fense I would advise that young
woman not to be intimidated
anymore if she has made the
righteous choice of a mate or
friends that is in accordance with
See Racism, page 5
extra per semester and not ac-
quire the services promised in
the housing contract. Either get
the system fixed or prepare to
pay back some money due to
breech of contract.
My suggestion to this
school as a whole, get the lead
out of your bottoms, and find a
way to change this place for the
better. 1 think you should see
about having the "little switch"
removed from our air-condi-
tioning system as soon as pos-
sible
Okay, I must include at
least one praise, so here it is. I
find comfort in knowing that
The East Carolinian publishes
editorials without twisting
them all around Great job!
Ronald Mercer
Sophomore
Chemistry
Coach Steele
seen as an ECU
representative
To The Editor:
1 would like to respond to
the article written by Kerry
Nestor about Coach Mike
Steele's dismissal. The article's
focus should not have been on
his wonlost ratio, because it
takes time to build a program
in any sport
Instead, we should realize
that collegiate coaches must
possess several traits in order
to be successful. The most im-
portant trait is a strong moral
character The DU1 of tense
Steele received earlier this year,
should have gotten him tired
on the spot.
Coaches are given cars to
drive, memberships to private
clubs and other perks that help
make their profession very at-
tractive. But along with these1
extra benefits comes an obliga-
tion to uphold a professional
image a tall times This includes
not driving drunk.
Steele's brush with the la w
damaged the credibility of our
athletic programacr oss the state,
and as a result 1 applaud Ath-
letic Director Dave Hart for
moving in a new direction.
Athletics is a highly com-
petitive business, and it is vital
tha t our coaches reali ze tha t they
are role models for their players
and the voung people in our
area.
1 have been around big
time college sports my entire
life (my father coaches football
at UNO, and I realize the work
that it takes to build a program.
However difficult this task may
be, it becomes an impossibility
when the leader ol that program
has demonstrated the ability to
make poor decisions
ECU has had three athletic
coaches receive DWI's in the past
two years, let's hope, for the
sake of our school's image, that
the streak ends.
Don A Thompson, Ir
ECU Student
Animal rights
activists asked to
address issues
To The Editor
There are a few specifu
questions that I would like to
pose to membersot groups such
as FARM and PITA
Do vou reallv believe that
theconsumptionofanimal flesh
is unnatural or unethical? I toes
this "ban on animal products
include all products, such as
milk? Does an assault on con-
sumers of animal products ex
tend to other, non-human indi-
viduals?
If your movement is to gain
any credibility with those of us
in the scientific community vou
must address these vital ques-
tions.
The domestication of ani-
mals for food and other prod-
ucts, such as skin, bone and
sinew, is a hallmark of human
civilization. The establishment
of cities with large-scale agri-
culture would not have been
possible had it not been for the
domestication of animals for
milk products.
Even today, nomadic
peoples of Mongolia and West
Africa depend on herding for
their existence.
Do you propose that these
people give up their livelihood
so as to live in a way you con-
sider to be ethical' Does your
right to protect animals out-
weigh these peoples right to
exist?
If it is your contention that
the consumption of flesh by
primates is somehow unnatu-
ral, you are dead wrong. Hu-
man evolution was, and still is,
contingent upon the con-
sumption of animal flesh.
This point is evidenced bv
the configuration of our teeth,
the fact that we produce bile
necessary for the breakdown
of animal rat, and that we do
not naturally produce requi-
site .iniinn acids that must be
obtained from our diet.
(ranted some (but not all)
ot these proteins can be ob-
tained from plant foods, but
not to the degree that they are
acquired from animal flesh
My argument is not that
your movement is wrong I do,
however believe that itisrather
naive.
It seems to me that some
animal rights activists would
have us det 5 million years of
human evolution so that small,
turrv and cute animals could
be exempted from the process
of selection.
If this is indeed your aim
then l accuse ou of being a
"speciesisl a label no better
than racist or sexist.
Donald G. Campbell
Graduate Student
Speech, I anguage and
Auditory Pathology
the will of God or "qudrat Allah"
asmy Africanbrothersin Morocco
say She should be prepared to
defend herself by any means nec-
essary to preserve her well-being.
To clarify what 1 am saying,
I would state that this is not
Ghandi's Salt Marches or Martin
Luther King's demonstrations.
This is not the poet's moral uni-
verse. This is the United States of
America, where we have hypo-
crites that will tell you to be non-
violent in all situations and then
beat you, stab you, shoot you or
kill you (often behind your back
or when vou are not looking,
which is an act of cowardice).
1 believe that there is no
greater power than spirituality and
peaceful mass demonstrations.
1 lowever, I also believe in self
defense. I don't think that thisstster
should take this abuse anymore.
Secondly, African-Ameri-
cans need to unify. We have that
right (to get together amongst
ourselves and solve our problems
in our wav) We need economic
efforts that will be designed to
develop inir own self-sufficiency
Ifwecan'tgetintothecorporations
that are owned bv Anglo-Saxons,
we in make our own. It Anglo-
Savons cannot teach our children
the truth about the original sons of
Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and the
greatness that comes out of Afri-
cans and African-Americans, we
will do that job ourselves.
If we have noempowerment
in our social institutions, we must
create our own. If both political
parties seek to exploit our vote for
their own selfish gain, we will form
our own (which should be started
locally following the example of
the Mississippi Freedom Parrvon
the city, countv and possibly state
levels).
Finally, we must worship
God with all our hearts, minds,
souls and spints. Those who seek
to weaken our strength and bring
us to their own hypocritical form
of Chnstianitv will say that one
can't hold these views and be a
Christian This is not true. One can
hate the sin but love the sinner,
enough to tell them about true
salvation and remedy the results
of their immoral and evil acts.
Many tragedies have been
committed by the Anglo-Saxons
under the guise of Chnstianitv.
However, I tell you that God had
no part in it. These people are of
their father, the devil, and must be
redeemed. We must worship the
Cod of our direct ancestors,
Abraham, Isaac and Jacob who
were men o color (as opposed to
the "Hollywood" image of white
men). This faith is our greatest
strength as we march to victory in
a peaceful, nonviolent way, so long
as we are not the victims of un-
warranted violence and police
brutality
Finally, let me say that I am
no race hater of all white people.
Rather, 1 hate evil in the world,
and I know that the Anglo-Saxons
as a power structure have perpe-
trated evil against the Indians, the
Native Americans, the Africans
and African-Amencans, the Ab-
origines in Australia and the
people of Central and South
America.
I utter the words of Nelson
Mandella when he was on trial in
the 1960's. In his speech before the
court he said: "The point that I
wish to raise in my argument is
based on no personal consider-
ations, but on important questions.
I am frequently going to refer to
the white man and white people. 1
want at once to make it clear that I
am no racialist the terminology
that I have employed was com-
pelled on me bv the nature of the
application I am making
The race problem is a serious
problem in America, and there is
going to be a solution, so help mo
Cod
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March 26.1991
�lie lEaat (Earolinian
March 26, 1991
PI AQQIFIFnQ
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male For 68-page employment
manual,sendssQstoM&I Research,
Box 84008 Seattle, WA 98124 Satis
faction (luaranteed
HELP WANTED Tart rime ware
hous vork and driving Musthave
reliable car, mornings preferred.
Apply in person al I arry's
Carpetland, 3010 E. 10th Street Ire-
en ville
SIMM! K JOBS!ounsclors Arts
and rafts Directors and Lifeguards
ire ne work al P I rl
l , ;�;� �'� , rn � � � ' '
Northangina 1 or a summei i �l
i . temenl ndmen ries.pli
lit LP w MI I) Fen il exotu
Must be 18 Call 756 6278
I IFEG1 ARDS NEEDED for sum-
mer employment in the (Ireenville
area Musthavt current certification
HELP WANTED
Phone 355-5602 for interview.
BRODY'S is accepting applications
tor part-time sale positions in juniors
and Accessories. Enthusiastic indi-
viduals who enjov fashion and can
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSIS-
TER CAMPS MASSACHUSETTS
Mah-Kee-Nac for BoysDanbee for
Girls. Counselor positions for Pro-
gram Specialists: All Team Sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
Hockey, Softball, Soccer and Volley-
ball; 25 Tennis openings; also Ar-
chery, Kiflcrv, WeightsFitness and
Piking: other openings include Per
forming Arts, Fine Arts, Newspaper,
Photography, Cooking, Sewing,
Roller-skating, Rocketry, Ropes, and
camp Craft; All Waterfront Activi
ties (Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing,CanoeKayaking). In-
quire: Mah-Kee-Nac (BOYS) 190
LindenAvenue,GtenRidge,N)07028
Calll 800-753-9118 Danbee(GIRLS)
16 Horseneck Road Montville, N
07045 Call I B00-77fi 0520
CMSPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
SUMMER? let there anytime with
AlRHfTCH 8 for SI 60 from the East
Coast' (Reportcxl in NY limes &
Let's Go!) AKHITCH 212-bo4-
2000.
SORORITIES, FRATERNITIES &
GRADUATES Now is the time to
get your luxes and gowns altered
and tailored for spring formals and
graduation. VVealsododressmaking
30 years of experience and fast de-
pendablescTviccall 55-0354Mon-
Fri 9.00-5 JO, 2421 Charles Street,
(Irecnville.
RESPONSIBM Sll DINT wanted
who travels regular!) toChapel HiU-
Durham area to transport two ado-
lescent children foi weekend visits
Will pay gas plus' Call 42-hx
THE UNDERGROUND presents
PERSONALS
8:00p.m (Basement of Mendenhall).
Gome experience her jazzed up rock
music11 Free subs vvill be served be-
fore the show so come early Ad-
mission is free.
THESTUDENTPIRATECLUBwiB
meet todav at 4:00 p.m. in the Pirate
Club Building behind Ficklin Sta-
dium Everyone is invited to attend.
( all 757-4540 for more information.
ALL CAMPUS Hopecveryi i eh is
a site and ei I aster weekend
MyrtleBe3� I I iwesome! I ove
the Alpha Phi s
AOPI W had lov . timeat your
Mst Anniversan rea Party rhanks
for being - id . �� it I st sses 1 ove,
theAlpl a PI
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
singer-son
BRAATEN
CAT
March
IY
CMSPLAY
CLASSJFIEI
ADVERTISE IN
THE t AST (WHO l WAY
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
BWUUIul PlttC to uve
� All Ne� �
� nJ Rciav i - K. in �
I MYKRS1TY APARTMENTS
2S99 I ih Street
�IxsJlfU Ncji : i
�Nfji MiKT Shopping i "enters
� V From High�j i'juol Suuon
.imiied Offer S3fX muruh
Cunud J T or Tommy Williamj
756 7815or$3 1937
I )!ficc open Apt S. 12 5 3()pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
ai ant) .juci one 'cdKMsn twnitfvd tptruitcnu
fj� ctf�.�ni iw airr mi �� �jnrri ,ir
j.�Ui .ej� MOHU �' MUMJ Kt I MU�HMMfiM
. : frn pvuirr. i BHMl MMI (i iJL.cm
t.ieni :c4i rlri� VailC) ' uuBV) ib
CootKt J I f �tr.in iiliam
WW KINGSTON
PLACE
WEHAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR EALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STI DENTS
WEPROV1DE: It LLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
ALL GLASSESDISHESSILVERWARE
DISHWASHERPOTS & PANS
MAIL SERVICE �C1.1 BHOUSE � LAUNDROMAT
S IMM1NG POOL &LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
OPEN I NDER
M-V OWNERSHIP
SI II.I .SERVING Y()l
WITHOJ M.in HI'
YM) All SH0DUCTS
( "K( )SS ! R( IM ILI R 1
Ki-s I i H W I
I I I II S I KI I I
It) DIM '( H I WITH
STI DENTED ON REPAIRS
WD SI R ICI
Ringgold rowers
Now raking 1 eases lor Augusi
1991 - l bedroom, 2 bedroom, &
Efficenc) Apartments,
CALL 752-2865
WANDS WORTH
COMMONS
(.KI I NVII I fi S NKWES1 S ' " I
IN Ml ! IT i AMI! H(N SI! C
!�cllcnl lo �Uon m ri ,
, � - � - ivajsl
bedrooms,energ) efficeni,carpel fjnc.
���.�
lion, quid with extra insuUi
I KIT H
- 2135 ! (" I l "ih Sircci
KOAU SfcRYK'l � ircenvilk (
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
v The Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
- � A United Way Agency
50 States Seminars our nationally known
organization is seeking an assertive, dynamic
and motivated individual to teach and
conduct "No Money Down" real estate
seminars in your area. You have seen these
seminars on T.V now conduct them
yourself $3,000.00 to $6000.00 per month
possible pt $10,000.00 to $15,000.00
possible ft. Don't Delay,
Call today for an interview,
(208) 342-0950 or (208) 338-9960.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
fii nii tvvi n
GOLDEN GIRL TRYOUTS
Attention interested dancers(who
candaeand sparkle) Become
i part of the lwi FCl Football
spirit' Share the spotlight by per-
forming with the I-xist Carolina
Pirates during the iwi football
season. The GOLDEN GIRLS
DANCE LINE will hold tryoub
April 13-14; 9 a.m.A p.m Satur-
day and 1 p.m4 p.m. Sunday in
Memorial Gym. For more infor-
mation, call 757-6982.
The 1991 Greenville-Pitt Co. Spe-
cial Olympics Spring Games will
he held on April 19th at E. B.
Aycock Jr. High School in Green
ville (rain date: April 24). Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as
buddieschaperones for the Spe-
cial Olympics Volunteers must
be able to work all day - from 9
a.m2 p.m. (The first ones there
will be assigned a position). An
orientation meeting will be held
on April 17 in Old joyner Library,
room 221 from 5-6:00 p.m. Free
lunchesand volunteer t-shirts will
he prov ided the day of the garner
to all volunteers who have at-
tended theonentation session. For
more information, contact I ia
Mills at 830-4551.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST (LSAT)
The I .SAT will be offered on Mon-
day, June 10, 1991. Applications
must be completed and mailed to
I aw School Admission Service,
Box 2000, Newtown, PA 18940.
Postmark deadline if May 7,1991.
Applications postmarked after this
date must be accompanied by a
$40, non-refundable late registra-
tion fee The NEW applications
mav be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight Building,
Room 105.
REGISTRATION FOR
STUDENTS
General College students should
contact their advisers the week of
March 25-29 to make arrange
ments for academic advising for
summers terms and fall semes-
ters, 1991. Early registration will
begin April 1 and end April 5.
MEDICAL COLLEGE
ADMISSION LIST (MCAT)
The Medical College Admission
rest application has been received
by the ECU Jesting Center. The
test will be offered on Saturday,
April 27,1991. Application blanks
ore to be completed and mailed to:
MCAT Registration, The Ameri-
can college Testing Program, P.O.
Box 414, 2255 North Dubuque
Road, Iowa City, IA 52243. Appli-
cations must be postmarked no
later than March 29,1991. Appli-
cations may be obtained from the
Testing Center, Speight Building,
Room 106, East Carolina Univer-
sity.
ELANTSAiE
The ECU Biology Guh will be
sponsoring a plant sale April 3 & 4.
The sale will take place in the Biol-
ogy Greenhouse, room BS-111
from 7:30 a.m1:00 p.m.
COUNSELOR ASSOCIATION
There will be a meeting for alum-
nae and graduate students inter
ested in the development of an
I aM Carolina University Coun-
selor Association. Speaker: Dr
ohn I Schmidt, Chair Counselor
and Adult Education, Fast Caro-
lina University;Where FastCaro-
lina Universitvpeight, Room 129;
Date: March27,1991; Time: 5:00
p.m.
REGISTRATION ADVISE-
MENT FOR PRE-PHVSICAL
1HEJLAEYsiijj3EntS
Summer and or fall semester reg-
istration advisement sessions for
all pre-phuysical therapy students
will be held on Tuesday, March 26
and Wednesday, March 27 from 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Physical
Therapy Department classroom
(Belk-Allied Health Bldg.). All
general college pre-P.T. students
are required to attend one of these
sessions in order to have summer
andor fall semester registration
forms approved and sgined by
advisor. Only excused absences
will be rescheduled.
POTENTIAL SLAP MAIORS
All General College students who
intend to major in Speech-lin-
gua geand Auditory Pathologvand
haveR. Muzzarelli as their advisor
are to meet on Wednesday, march
27at 5i)0p m. in theC .eneral C lass-
room Building, Rixnn 2017. Ad-
vising tor earlv registration will
take place at that time Please
prepare a tentative calss schedule
before the meeting.
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC
Immunization Clinic being held at
the Student FlealthCenter-Update
your tetanus now! Available
without appointment Wednes-
day and Thursday, March 27 and
28,1991 from 1:00 pm. to 4:30 p.m.
There is a $200 fee for this vaccina-
tion.
SUMMER SCHOOLJ991
ROMESlRYjmOJNSlGNr
UP INFORMATION
ResidenceHall room payments for
Summer School 1991 will be ac-
cepted in the Cashier's Office,
Room 105, Spilman Building, be-
ginning April 3, 1991 Room as-
signments will be made in the
Department of University Hous-
ing, 201 Whichard Building, April
3 and -1. The rent for a term of
summer school is Si7 (Gotten,
Flemingand jams Halls-S210)tor
a semi-private room and 2r0
(Gotten. Fleming and larvis t lalls-
-$300) tor a private room. Resi-
dence halls to be ued tor summer
school are: Gotten and Fleming
(women); lamsmen); Slav (co-
ed).
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Plan
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering these one hour scsaons
to help vou prepare your own re-
sume. Few graduates get jobs
without some preparation. Many
employers request a resume
showing vour education and ex-
perience. Sessions to help will be
held in theCareer Planning Room
of the Bloxton House at 3 p.m.
Come by on March 26.
MEDICAL RECORDS JOBS
Want to be insured of a job after
graduation1 Interested in man-
agement in a health related set-
ting? Contact the Department of
Medical Administration for Fall
Semester advisement March 3Mv
Cathy B co
to Coff eeho
By LisaMarie Jernigan
SUU Wmer
The first time you see Cathy B
you might think hf's gone a littir
corrosive around some n�k and
roll image ideal. She walks on st.t-
wearing pink sneakers a Hims)
black lace skirt and a vague!) i
dinated spondex top and looks like
a vounger version of Ruth (lordon
in "Harold and Maude "
But then you notice her gentle,
inviting face and feel hv pres-
of her warm, outgoing pers naliry
and you know this is no m I
version of thi- Madwomai
ChaiBot. Cathy Bisa serious sii
sngwnterwitharxxivfullofbhu-s
rock gestalt
Cathy B didn't leap whok
her present persona -V I -
quendyhappens in in otherstempt
vou to pursu.
that is untrue I I
She starti I
Braaten. a figmei
store booking agent's imaginai
He wanted her to fill a slot some
where betweenrystalGayleand i
singing cow liiv But as his swi
country girl guitarptayer was
a tough little Minnesota to
meat packers and bean I
wasn't long before she left thi;
Mephisto music man and I �
writing songs for herself
Nobodj getstinrd
B show Cathy dni
musical instrument!
weapi ins, nordoesshfl
sounds then toss won!
sheet of paper Sh
about her 1 itc ex penerl
of the world From
songs like "Somebo
by her confrontaii
homeless in L A.)to tfl
blues lament about h!
her 9 ngs i onvey an
sonal reflection i
uch em i
" � �
'
9 ulpo try laced w it!
It speaks frorr
le p;
ps .
- ni.inii �
- -
hun
ithy Bha�.
ntra
av

i
- j hv countn
nginal songs ti
sensitivity and �
her tans the feeiine
Theater departrrn
Students direct
By joe Ho rat
rter-B"
LastWednesdayand rhursday
night, the Theater department
hosted a new concept in musical
theater: a Musical Cabaret
Directed virtually entirely by
students within the theater and
dance departments, the show
treated audiences to various songs
chosen from musicals like i'han
torn ot the Opera" or "Guvs and
Dolls
All of the singers and dancers
performed beaubh
light oi the entire ai
"Though "alTor
formed were of
stood out from the
In the firs; ad
rendition of the i
Night- �
the he -
Smcvr- Mary fo
Norman Mil
song with their
believable char a
The sing
act witl -
Tennesee William
By Christian Kieber
Special to The Hast C arolinian
On March 22, the Fastarohna
Playhouse ended its season with
"The Class Menagent 1 he per
formance would have made len
nessee Williams proud
Setmanalle mt 1 ouis, -
fog filtering through the detailed
but simple set and sad muSK
playing softly m the background,
the play began.
As the house lights dimmed
and the stage lights came up, Tom
played wonderfully by Greg
Watkins, began wiA the famous
line, "Yes, 1 have tricks in mv
� i rhroughc

and then goes I
ever, thi
mo m

Kim Pattersor
. rtSJtn
audiem
Patterson portrav
capped insecure
fection
Paris Feet, wht
snappinggenuernai
an undoubtedl)
mance I Eis -
towards the end
abaoiutely movmgl
Cole Porter still
Red Hot and Blue
By Richard Ternan
Staff Writer
Ever think that vou would hear I 2 playing Night
and Dav or Annie Lennox singing "Every Tine U e
Say CkxxJbye' � Pnbablv not, but Chrv-sals records
has made it happen, and that's only the tip of the
proverbial iceberg
"Red. Hot and Blue" is a tribute album to Cole
Porter to benefit AIDS research and relief. Among the
artists performing Porter's work areSinead O'Connor,
The Fine Young Cannibals, David Byrne, Erasure,
KristvMacColl.ThePogues, plus many more Includ-
ing Neneh Cherrv singing, "I've got you under my
skin made popular by Frank Sinatra.
Iggy Pop and Deborah Harry (Blondie) team up
for "Well, Did You Evah The song isa parody ot night
hfe and fancy parties, of materialism and it's lack of
intelligent reasoning.
Pop sings about going toL A. and being invited to
Pia Zadora's house. Deborah Harry asks if it was nice
and Popanswers, "I didn't go, it would have been swell
though, it would have been elegant What cars, what
rocks, what broads, what jocks. If s great, it's grand.
All the songs were originally composed by Porter
They are for the most part slow and mmanbe But its





jarch 26,1991
3lc �agt (garoUntan
Mar � 26, 1991
PERSONALS
MendenhalP
I'lK IUII H
tj
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
U )s
-st
egnant
;lp making choices
confidential professional
l�ey counseling;
�elect adoptive family
�632-1400
iren's Home Society
Vorth Carolina
tionalh know n
ssertive, tl namic
I to teach and
' n" real estate
have seen thes
k onducl them
X).(X) per month
to S15,000.00
l Delay,
iterview,
IS) 338-9960.
i otten,
thills �
i
� rvisHalls
. � rn
, � . .
� n and I leming
l
IGN-
InMor
Ih- k
"lice,
bt
mi as
the
I lous
pril
Ml ('I
' men i; Slav
RESUMl WORKSHOPS
!
� eti " leBloxtori (louse
� int' hi Hit SeSSKH'S
p vi"i pii part yi iui own re
1 jobs
without some preparation Many
employers reque A a resume
ihowtng m�Hi film ,iii.)ii and c.
perier c Sessions to help will bt
held in thi i Planning Room
of the BtoRton House atpjn
Come by on March 26
MEDICAL Bf-CCMtDS fOM
Want to be insured ot .i ob after
graduation? Interested in man
agemeni In i health related set
ting' c ontaci the I leptrtmeni of
Medical Administration tor fall
Sineste,idisenient Man h ifh
Cathy B comes
to Coffeehouse
Bv I isaMarie fernigan
Staff Writer
rhe first time you see Cathv B
i might think she's gone a little
su around some rock and
11 imago ideal She walks on stage
� aring pmk sneakers, a flimsv
u W laceskhi and a vague!) coot
iinated spandex top and looks like
inger version of Ruth Gordon
l larok) and Maude
Hut then you notice her gentle.
n iting face and feel the presence
; her warm, outgoing personality.
ou know this is n(i modem
sion of the Madwoman ot
1 .hlit it Cathy Bisaserioussmger
riter with a body full ofbhies-
k gesialt
i athy H didn't leap whole into
present persona As too ire
�itlvhapponsinliro.otherstompt
� piirsueadefinitionof success
. untrue ti � the s ml
She started out as t ath
ten a figment (t some dime
.tore hooking agent's imagination
anted her to till a slot some
here between Crystal ayteanda
ig v � lily But as his sweet
intry girt guitar player was from
i tough little Minnesota town of
� m packers and bean farmer! it
� asn't long before she left this
Siephisto music man and began
ng songs tor herself
Nobody gets tlnnrtusataC athv
B show Cathv doesn't employ
musical instruments as assault
weapons, nor does shesimplv write
sounds then toss words down on a
sheet of paper. She writes songs
about her life experiences and view
of the world. From socio-political
songs hke "Somebody" (inspired
by her confrontation with the
homeless in I A.) to the fuzzy funlt-
blues lament about lite on the road.
her songs convey an intenselv per
sonal reflection of her experiences
that touch emotional chords in
others.
Cathy Bs sound is blues and
soul poetry laced with rock and roll
It speaks from an acoustic guitar
that resonates deep within voui
psyche, and through rich smofcey
vocals as smooth asSouthem( om-
fort toddies I for warm, spontane
ens manner with audiences is part
sam wen hand part moonchild.a
persona that sparkles with wit and
humor
Cathv B has gotten her musical
Mantra in svne. earning seven
awards in the Nashville Music City
Songwriters Festival and develop-
ing a hefty grassroots following
across the Country. Her premiere
ilhum "Fragile Man features nine
original songs that display a range,
sensitivity and beauty that gives
her fans the feeling that she'll crack
Robin trains before
joining Batman
By Cliff Coffev
Staff Writer
Photo Courtesy ot Proton Productions
Cathy Braaten will offer her personalized style of folk music to the
underground faithful tonight The show starts at 8 p m
MendenhallShidentCenter,tomghi
at 8 p.m. Admission is free and so
are all the refreshments vou can
stomach
This mellifluous musical event
issponsomd bv the Student 1 nion
Coffeehouse Committee
the national scene any day now.
To many, she is always Cathy
Braaten. to others, she is Cathy B
Both are moniker- for a distinctive
new songwriter you'll be glad
vou'vestvn. She wilt be performing
at the Underground, located in the
Theater department presents musical cabaret
Students direct and choreograph production
Dick Grayson quit the H'h to
move on to a successful career on
his own, lason Todd died while on
dutv and Timothv lake has ust
been designated to take his place as
Robin, Batman's partner in fighting
crime.
DC Comics fi nally gave t he hoy
wonder a chance to prove himself
asaenme fighter without Barman's
help.
The Robin five issue limited
series was to allow the new Robin to
get his training and gain matunrv
Batman decided that Drake needed
more personal training that would
allowformistakesintheearly stages
instead of putting his life on the line
as an amteur and wind up getting
hurt. This was how las n Todd died.
Todd was ill-tit to tight the likes of
the Inker, and it was his undoing
Atter receiving a new, revital-
ized costume (thanks to Neal
Adams), Drake travels to Tans to
study with an ancient master of
martial arts In Tans, Drake studies
the arts of healing and defense
It doesn't take long for Rubin to
tmd trouble. Robin stumbles, nto.t
gang beating a single man. I lyde
Rawlins. Robin's gallantrv forces
mm to intef fere with the slaughter
Robin and Rawlins join tones fight
off the gang, and escape. Robin finds
that Rawhns is a renegade DEA
agentaftertheman.theKing'snake,
responsible ti r the death of his en-
tire family.
Rawlins teaches Robin how to
street fight and the two make an
uneasv alliance It isn't long before
the twoare joined by another fighter
looking for the King Snake, Lady
Shiva. Ladv Shiva is the most dan-
gerous woman in the world.
She wants to kill King Snake so
she can claim the title of "most dan-
gerous person in the world Lidy
Shiva teaches Robin the finer points
of martial arts. Using martial arts
allows Robin to focus his thoughts
and fight wislev rather than out of
anger
The King Snake is a ruthless
man whose business transactions
are executed with deadly stipula-
tions Everyone that deals with the
Snake fears disappointing him
The King Snake discovered an
abandoned laboratory in the hills of
Trance that had .1 man made strain
ofbubonu plague kingn. ike plans
to infect the population of Hong
Kong with the serum but the un-
likely too of Robin, Rawlins and
ladv Shiva foil his clastrudly plot.
In the process the true plot of
the Robin serums is revealed.
The success ot the series is al-
ready apparent, it is alreadv in its
second printing The first issue is
alreadv selling tor 10 dollars with a
one dollar price tag.
Chuck Dixon is the writer and
Tom I .vie does the art for this
popular series
By joe Horst
itfr
performed beautifully to the de- from "unsense I isa Edwards,
light of the entire audience. "playing the drunk nun, gave a hi-
" alHT1ne"songs peranous performance that ended the
Last Wednesday and rhursdaj
h1 the I heater department
1 new concept in musical
it r a Musical Cabaret
, irei ted virtually entirely by
� dents within the theater and
e departments. tlv show
d audiences to various songs
en from musicals like Than
� fn of the Opera" or "Cuvs and
Is
All of the singersad dancers
Though a
formed were of high caliber, a few
sUkkI out from the rest
In the first act, the company 9
rendition of the song "Summer
Nights" from "Guysand rolls left
the house 1 n laughter and applause
singers Marv o Horward and
Norman Miliard dominated this
song with their quality singingand
believable characterizations
The singers concluded the first
act with Tackle that Temptation
acton a high note
The second act was dominated
bv love songs from musicals like
1 es Miserables One of the most
outstanding performances that
dominated the second act was that
of lennifer Vartanian.
Singingasoloot "t mMy Hvn"
from "l.es Miserable. Vartanian
had theaudieive sitting in the palm
of her hand. Also, Vartanian worked
beautifully with Scott Shenk in an-
other "Les Miserables "song, "Little
Fall of Rain These tore singular
performanet's showcased talent of
supreme quality.
All of the students who partici-
pated should be given a round of
applause.
With the directing and chore-
ography being handled solely bv
students, it was a pleasant surprise
to witness Mich high quality.
Though this was a beginning
endeavor into musical theater, with
hope, it will make itself into an an-
nual event.
�Ml ,� 11 anger; ml dnm � with "Tad U-mP,M�m tva.miiy ��m��" �� - � ��
Tennesee Williams rounds out Playhouse season
-r- � r 1 U. rO �4 ,� lh.�ir e-erutinn. The aCtOH
By Christian Kieber
Special to The f a-ajrolinian
( n March 22. the last Carolina
use envied its season with
(,l,iss Mcnaon fhe per
t. rmancc would haw made len
lee Williams proud
Set in an alley mst I ouis,wrth
f g filtering through the detailed
but simple set and sad musn
playing softly in the background.
the play began
As the house lights dimmed
and the stage lights tame up, Tom.
I Lived wonderfully by Greg
' itkins, began with the famous
line, "Yes, I have tricks in my
pocket. Throughout the play, lorn
lashes out at the other characters
and then gees to the movies'
However, the audience soon real
!es th.it the mm ies is not the onh
place that lom is going
Kim Patterson, v ho portrayed
thcevcf s� sensitive 1 .aura,tiueNed
the audience with every line.
Patterson portrayed the handi-
capped, insecure I aura with per-
fei tion.
I'ansPeet, whoplaved thegunv
snappinggentlemancallerjim.gave
an undoubtedly superb perfor-
mance. His scene with Patterson
towards the end of the p'ay was
absolutely moving.
Ann Lincoln, who played
Amanda the ever loving, but at
times over-protective, mother,
mo ed the play along from begin-
ning to end Lincoln's performance
w asflawkssand m some cases, she
stole the scenes With her southern
.ncentandhcr"(,cntlenxTiCallcrs
Lincoln kept the play (lowing.
Cednc VVincheli, who directed
The( .lass Menagerie deserves a
round of applause1 for his dynamic
work
Winchell's vision of "TheGlass
Menagerie" effectively conveyed
the message of the piece. Winchell
pl.unK justified all of the actions
involved with the staging in terms
of their execution. The actors'
movements seemed to flow
smoothly and unmechanically
The costumes used in the plav
were vervsimple, whileat thes,ime
time appropriate m relation to the
personalities of the characters. The
lighting m the play also gave the
production a distinctive atmo-
sphenc sense of dismalness.
Chrtn 11. the production of 'The
Class Menagene" succeedeti won-
derfully and the people involved
should take pnde in their work. The
whole play can be summed up with
a line from Iom's ending speech.
The play "didn't go to the moon it
"went much further
Cole Porter still
Red Hot and Blue
By Richard Ternan
Slaff Writer
Fver think that you would hoar 112 playing "Night
and Day or Annie I ennox singing "Lvery Time We
Sty Goodbye? Probably not, but Chrysalis records
has made it happen, and that's only the tip of the
proverbial iceberg.
"Red. Hot and Blue" is a tnbutc album to COM
Porter to benefit ADS research and relief. Among the
artists performing Porter's work areSinead O'Connor,
rhe Fine Young Cannibals, David Byrne, Erasure,
Knsry MacC oil. The Pogucs, plus many more. Includ-
ing Neneh Cherry singing, "I've got you under my
skin " made popular by Frank Sinatra.
lpgy Pop and Deborah Harry (Blondte) team up
for "Well, Did You Evah The song isa parody of night
life and fancy parties, of materialism and it's lack of
intelligent reasoning.
PopsingsaboutgomgtoL A and being invited to
Pia Zadora's house. Deborah Harry asks if it was nice
and Popanswers didn't go, it would havebcen swell
though, it wouki have been elegant What cars, what
rocks, what broads, what jocks. If s great, its grand.
All the songs were originally composed by Porter.
rbey are for the most part slow and romantic But it's
sometimes face ridicule
Ptwle CourtMy ot ChryMlta ftoeoitfa
Cole Porters visionary music has influenced musicians
for generations Red. Hot and Blue says thank you.
refreshing to hear such dynamic artists perform them.
By using their own style, they add new dimensions
to these classic pieces, and make each one of them their
own. It's no surprise that this album was number one
among college listeners for several weeks.
Cole Porter was born approximately lOOyearsago,
composing songs when American musk was domi-
See Porter, page 8
By Sherrilynn Jernigan
Staff Writer
Catholics, a minority in North
Carolina, sometimes face ridicule,
perhaps because others do not un-
derstand the Catholic beliefs.
Father Joseph R. Jones, C.P.
says some of the Protestant and
Catholic beliefs many differ, but he
agrees with Baptist minister E.T.
Vinson in that the themeof the Bible
is to accept Christ as the Lord and
Savior and to repent of all sins. An
individual who follows this plan
willDe saved regardlessofhisor her
religion, he adds.
Cathohcsaccept the Pope as its
headonEarth. The Pope is seen as
the representative of Christ and as
the successor of Saint Peter who has
special powers given by Christ.
Along with the Bible, Catho-
lics accept all of Christ's teachings
as their rule of faith, which are not
found in the Bible. The Apostles'
Creed and its variants set forth the
bdwfs of the Catholic Church.
The first Roman Catholic
Church diocese in the United States
was established in Baltimore, Md
in 1789.
Today, theCatholic Church has
more followers throughout the
world than any other Christian re-
ligion.
Jones says a major distinction
of the Catholic Church is the prac-
tice of celibacy in the priesthood.
Since celibacy is a difficult
practice, a man must complete a ten
year training period before becom-
ing a priest, Jones says.
He compares a celibacy vow
to a marriage vow, saying that both
may be difficult to live by and both
require love and commitment.
Jones says today, however,
fewer men are coming into the
priesthood. Thus, the demand of
celibayn�yeventiiallybechanged.
Another Catholic rxactice in-
cludes intercessory prayer. Jones
says all Christians are brothers and
sisters of a divine unity. When
Christiansdicand ascend to heaven.
tnev have the power to hear and
obtain special blessings for others
on Earth, he continues. Catholics
pray not only to God, but to the
saints, dead relati vesand especialb
to Mary, Christ's mother
Jones also discusses drinking
in the Catholic Church, a practice
criticized by many Protestants.
Jones says moderate use of alcohol
is encouraged during Holy Com-
munions or celebrations, as long as
one does not indulge.
He says. "It's not the alcohol
that's bad, it's the misuse of it
Finally, the beliefs of utmost
importance in the Catholic Church
includes Christ's institution of the
seven sacraments which are the
anointing of the sick, baptism, con-
firmation, the Holy Eucharist, pen-
ance, the Holy Orders and mar-
riage.
Referring to the different reli-
gions, Jones says, " I think a won-
derful thir that's happening today
is that we're sitting down and talk-
ing things out





126.1991
(El?e �aat (Carulintnn
7
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PERSONALS
OSPUYCLASSnED
�.
egnant
sly making choices.
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tor v

� r HOUSI
e bv a l' � h
Minu l KU nuns jobs
� Want tobt red f a job after
ten led n man
the � m in a health ted set
ring? Contact the Departme lot
Medical Administration rot Fall
Sen � h. � - � v ' �
Cathy B comes
to Coffeehouse
K l isaMartc lerrtigan
stJlt H'nifi
rhe tust tinv vou �si't. 'athv B
ight think she s gone alittle
around some rw k and
IgC 'deal She w alkson Stage
ig pink sneakers a flimsy
k Kki skirt and .i agueh coot
I spandk v top .tvi looks like
iger version ol Ruth v lordon
old and Mainte
� i h n v ou iv lice r� i gentle
. face and tool tlir presence
narm out oingpcrsi�nalit
� this in no mod
� .� tlm Madwoman ol
� v .itln Bisaserioussngi i
ithabodv fullofblues

presi : isona s too tre
� m rstempl
-
gment ot some dime
� �ion
anted her lo fill a stot some
�lv ,w leanda
w hK But
rom
� �. v �
�� tin-
and h
. i tvT hoisclt
Nobody getstinnitusataC athy
B show Cathy doesn't employ
musical instruments as assault
w capons nordoesshesimply write
sounds then toss words down on a
sheet ot paper She writes songs
about ho lift? experiences and mow
ot the world I rom socio political
songs like Somebody' (inspired
bv hei confrontation with the
hnmetossinl A Itorhefuzzy funk
blues lament .iK�t life on the road
her songs convey an intensely per
sonal reflection of her experiences
that touch emotional chords in
others
v ath Bs sound is blues and
soulpoetn la ed with rock and mil
It speaks from an acoustic guitai
that resonates deep within youi
psvche and through rich srt key
lsassnxxthasSouthem( om
� �� todd - I lei warm spontane
ith audit '
h � nv hild a
, p,ul -� � ith wit a
humor
( ath B has gotten her musical
Mantra in svnc earning seven
awards in the Nashville Music City
Songwriters Festival and develop
ing a hefty grassroots following
ss the country Hot premiere
gtteMan featuresnine
rigi a mgs that display a range
sensitivio, and beaut) that gives
� instht feeling that she'll crack
Robin trains before
joining Batman
Pho
i Productions
Cathy Braaten wifl otter her personalized style ot folk music to the
� und faithfultonigN The show stans at d r m
the national scene am day now
le mam she is aiw.n s . athy
nr- she is athy l
Both ,m- � - for a distinctive
m-w songwritei m 11 be clad
,m veseen Shewillbeperfiormir
,�t the 1 indergTound located in tht1
MendeaBStiKientCenter tomct
at s p m AJmiNNion in lav and so
are all the refreshments you can
stomach
This mellifluous musical event
I-sponsored by theStudent Union
Coffeehouse �. ommittee
ieparhnent presents musical cabaret
Students direct and choreograph production
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Ick Grayson cpnt the hp to
move on to a successful career on
his own. lason Todd died w hileon
duty anil Tknothy Drake has ust
fxn designated to take his place as
Robin, Batrnan'spartner in fighting
crime
DCComics finally gavetheboy
wonder a chance to prove himself
asacrime fighter without Batman s
help
The Robin five issue limited
serieswastoaHoM thenewRobinto
get hiN training and pain maturity
Batrnandecided that Drakeneeded
more personal training thai would
aBowforrnistaikesinrheearly stages
instead of put tine hi life i n the line
,b an amteur and w ind up getting
hurt rhiswashow la-n rodddied.
Todd was ill-fit to tight the likes oi
the loker, and it was his undoing
Atttr rccei1 ing a m '��� n
red i ostume I thanks to N
Adams). 1'rake travels to Paris to
Study with an ancient n-uwer of
martial arts In Tans. PiA�. studies
e irtsof healing and defense
ltd bin to
findtroul � ' �
gang bea sii man, Cryck
RawKns Robin 5 gallantry I
him to interfi re
RobinandRawlinsjoinfoi
offthegang,andescape. Robin finds
th.it Rawiins is a renegack
aeentattertheman th. k!H.N- ak
responsible for the death of his en-
tire family
Rawiins teaches Robin how to
street tight and the two make an
uneasy alliance. It isn t long before
rhetwoarejoinedbyanotherfighter
hiking tor the King Snake, liidy
Shiva Lady Shiva is the most dan-
gcrous woman in the world
She w ants to kill King Snake SO
she can daim the title i f "mi �st dan-
gerous person in the world Lady
Shiva teaches Robin the finer points
ot martial arts Using martial arts
allows Robin to focus his thoughts
and tight m tsley rather than out of
anger
The King Snake is a ruthless
man whose business transactions
are executed with deadly stipula-
tion- Everyone that deals with the
Sn.iki fears disappointing him
The King Snake discovered an
abandoned laboratory in the hills of
1 ranee that hat! a man made strain
. fbuW � ; � � ms
nfccl the population of H �ng
kong with the serum hut th un-
likelv tno of Robin, Rawiins and
! adyShiva foil hisdastrudly
In the process the tme plot of
-
! h. of the series is al-
kJvappai : t ilready in its
�wiond prinhng 1 he nrst issue is
�. selling for 10 dollars with a
ne dv il.ir price tag.
Chuck Dixon is the writer and
fom 1 vie does the art tor this
popular series
t� foe l lorst
J rsclax
hi t: .ter departi
ncept in musiea
v � i - aban I
I virtually entirely by
the theater and

, - ind
. U �"
rforrned beautifulh to the de
:u vM the enure audience
ThxMigh "alToTlne sings per-
fon ted ven of rugh caliber a tew
wl out from tU.1 ro:
In tlv hrst act the company s
rendition ot the song Summer
ight- from GuysandDolls lett
tin . n laughter and applause
- ngers Mary Kv Horward and
�nan Millard dominated this
sing with their quahtv singing and
- i able characterizations
Ilx singers concluded the tirst
,ith lacklethat Temptation
from Nunsense Lisa Edwards
(laying the drunk nun. gave a hi
pei formance that ended trn-
,iv � v a high iv't�.
llx- second act w a- dominated
by love sengs from musicals like
I es Miserables One of the most
outstanding performances that
dominated the second act was that
nmfei V artanian
Stngingasoloof OnMyOwn
from i is Miserables V artanian
had thoaudience sitting in the palm
ofherhand Also,V artanian worked
beautifulh w ith Scott Shenk in an-
vtlvr LesMiserables song little
Pall ot Rain These tw singular
jx-rfornviixes showcased talent ot
supreme quahtv.
All ot the students who partici-
pated should be given a round of
applause
With the directing and chore-
ography King handled -olelv K
students n was a pleasant surprise
to witness such high quality
bhough this was a beginning
endeavor into musical theater, with
hope, it will make UseM into an an-
nual event
Tennesee Williams rounds out Playhouse season
B) Christian Kieber
al t,i riw 1 jsi v urohmaa
March22 thel ast an hria
seasi
pei
ikl have inavii
, '� � � po
- I in an alley h
t!v detailed
t simpk si I and sad musw
. -ttK in the KivkgrouiKi
. ay hi gan
s tK Ixuisi lights dimmed
lights came up rom
d wonderfully by Greg
kins began with the famous
fes have tricks m m
pocket IhroughvHit the play lorn
shes out at the other chara
and then goes to the movies
IK�eei the audicive �r
�'vit the mo te- is not the onh
ing
Kim Patterson - : pi :�vtl
aensitiw Laura, touched
the audience with every line
Patterson portrayed the handi-
capped insecure I aura with per
to DJ
ParisPeet w hoplayed thegum
-nappinccontlenviivallcTJim gave
an undoubtedl) superb perfor-
mance. His scene with Patterson
towards tin end ct the- play was
absolutely mm mg
Ann Lincoln, who played
d tlM 0.0 k ing b,
times over-protective mother,
; d the play along from begin
, riormanec
and ins ' es stn
tht scenes IVith her siHithem
t and hei c ientfemenC diets
I uvoin kept tin- play How ing
c edricWtnchell whodirected
TheC .lass Menagerie deservesa
round of applause for tedynamic
v�rk
inchell's vision of TheGlass
Menagerie effectively conveyed
(Ik- message of the piece W mchell
plainly justified all ot the actions
invoh cl w ith tlx staging m terms
ot their execution 1 he actors
movements seemed t flow
smoothly and unmecharucaBy
llx costumes usl in the play
. simple whileat thesame
� rsonalities oi tlv characters 1 Ik-
lighting in tlie pla abo gave the
production a distinctive atmo-
spheric sens i I dismaln� ss
iXerall the production of The
Class Menagene succeeded won
derfufly and the people involved
sh uld take pride in their w rk Tlie
whole plav can be summed up w ith
a line from loin s ending s, t-
Vhoplav dtdn'tgotothemcM
went much further
Cole Porter still
Red Hot and Blue
By Richard Tertian
sutl Wnloi
rvertlvnk that vou would hoarl Zplavmg Night
and liv r Anme I enn v singing Every fimeWe
SayCktodbye ' Probabhj it but hrysahs records
rvis made it happen and that s onlv the tip ot the
proverbial iceberg
Red Hot and Blue is a tribute album to Cole
Porter to benefit AIDS research and rebel Among the
artists performing Pei wr a work awSmeadCK oiwor.
Ihe fine Young CarWbafa, Owid Bvme. Erasure
knstv MacCol. 1 1h Pogues. plus manv nvre Includ-
ing eneh Chem s.nging, 1 ve got vou under my
skin made popular by Frank Sinatra
lRgv Pop and IVborah Ham fBondfe) team up
for' Well. Did You Evah- Thestngisapanxlv ot night
lite and taivv p.irtie of materialism and it s lack of
intelligent reasoning.
Pop singsabout going to L A andKnginvitexl to
ha Zadora s rnmse Deborah Harrv asks it u was race
and Popanswers 1 didnt go. it would havebeen swell
though, it would haw been elegant What cars what
rocks, what broads, what jocks. It's great, it's grand
All the songs were onginallv composed bv Porter
They are for the most part stow and mmanhc But it's
sometimes
By SherrilyTtn Jernigan
Suit Writer
Phoio Counasy ol Chrysalis Records
Cole Porters visionary music has influenced musicians
tor generations Red. Hot and Blue says thank you
refreshing to hear such dTiamic artists perform them.
Bv usingtheirown style, they add newdimensions
to theseclassk pieces, and make each one of them their
own. It's no surprise that this album was number one
among college listeners for several weeks
Cole Porter was bom approximately 100 yearsago,
composing songs when Amencan music was domi-
See Porter page 8
Catholics, a minority in North
Camlina. sometimes face ndicule.
perhaps because others do not un-
derstand the Catholic beliefs.
Father loseph R. Jones. GP.
savs some of the Protestant and
Catholic beliefs many differ, but he
agrees with Baptist minister E.T.
Vinson in that the theme of the Bible
is to accept Chnst as the Lord and
Savior and to repent of all sins. .An
individual who follows this plan
willbesavtxiregardlessofhisorher
rehgion. he adds.
Catholics accept the Pope as its
head on Earth. The Pope is seen as
the representative of Chnst and as
the successor of Saint Peter who has
special powers given by Chnst.
Along with the Bible. Catho
lies accept all of Chnst's teachings
as their rule of faith, which are not
found in the Bible. The Apostles'
Cre�d and its variants set forth the
beliefs of the Catholic Church
The first Roman Catholic
Chuah diocese in the U ruled States
was established in Baltimore Met,
in I7�.
Todav. theCatholic Church has
more followers throughout the
world than any other Christian re-
ligion.
lories savs a major distinction
Of the Catholic Church is the prac-
tice of celibacy in the pnesthotxl.
Since celibacy is a difficult
practice, a man must completea ten
war training period before becom-
ing a pnest, lones says.
He compares a celibacy vow
to a mamage vow, saying that both
may be difficult to live by and both
require love and commitment.
Jones says today, however,
fewer men are coming into the
priesthood. Thus, the demand of
celibacy mayeventuallybe changed
Another Catholic practice in-
cludes intercessory prayer. Jones
says all Christians are brothers and
sisters of a divine unity. When
Christiansdieand ascend to hea ven.
they have the power to hear and
obtain special blessings for others
on Earth, he continues Catholics
prav not only to Cod. but to the
saints, dead relahvesand especially
to Mary, Chnst's mother
Jones also discusses drinking
m the Catholic Church, a practice
criticized bv manv Protestants,
lones savs moderate use ot akrohol
is encouraged dunng Holv Com-
munions or relebrations. as long as
one does not indulge.
He says, "It's not the alcohol
that s bad, it's the misuse ot it
Finally, the beliefs of utmost
importance in the Catholic Church
includes Chnsf s institution of the
seven sacraments which are the
anointing of the sick, baptism, con-
firmation, the Holy Euchanst, pen-
ance, the Holy Orders and mar-
riage
Refcmng to the different reli-
gions, Jones says, " 1 think a won-
derful thing that s happeni ng today
is that we're sitting down and talk-
ing things out





$ ulljc lEnat (garolfntati March26,1991
All dietary fiber not created equal
Dietera should be aware of the differance between soluble and insoluble �itei
Mendenhall features A Taxing
Woman as sole film Easter week
Evading taxes is a popular pastime in the "I and ol the Rising
en japan's recent affluence has brought phenomena taxes along
with phenomenal profits. rhe result is a nation ot dedicated tax
evaders, from the small shopkeeper to the corporate giant.
A raxing Woman directed by Kizo Itami ("The Funeral,
Tampopo listhestor) ofhowonetaxcoBectergotherman rhefilm
in a delightful comedy that is as ediH .hkmi.iI .is u is entertaining.
I "he Japanese tax system' according to Itami, "isbased on the
assumption that humans are fundamental!) honest taxpayers are
supposed to report their income and expenses honestly, and the tax
collectors check the reports la pan is no society of saints rhe result ol
this system isobvKuis raxevaskxi is ommonplace win. h makes tax
revenues inadequate, w hich causes tax ratt-s to keep going up, vvha h
leads to even more tax e asion
Ti tight against this wiespread law kssness then' is Mains the
national tax police who with their swat-team-like tactics make
America s IRS agents appear kind and benevolent It is against this
backdrop that Itami scripted raxing Won
The story revolves around an eagei tax office canvrrst K
Itakura and her efforts to catch 1 lidekikxki a thtmnighh iirts ru
pulous hotel operator and real estati �� nl.itt
Ryoko happens upon (iondo s hotel ont '
inside to escape the rain. Ever attentiv� she count the cat
carageatmid da ,andn'ukeslnUK kestnn.i I - lili.il
room rates, expenses, and thereb taxabk irwori e. Back in th
that night, she kxks up the tax r turns , . the h. ���
immediately suspex ts massive under reporting of ino
Ryoko thenattemps to audit the suave but unethical donck Sh�
believes that he is a felonious taheater but find him i harming and
his finances impenetrable to her previously successful methods ol
auditing. His talent to avoid discovery is obvious!) a mat. h foi hei
determination to expose
Gondo sdemisebegins vvht n Rvoko is promoted foomauditoi to
tax inspector While auditors can onl) �.hevk records and books
inspectors are able to conduct stake-outs, earn out raids search
houses and businesses and even chase pople across rooftops and
down alleys it ne essan
Ryokoand her dedicated teamol inspectors use high tet h instru-
ments and lone, hours of detective work to track down i londo's
finances and estimate his true wealth. All that remains is to find ul
where the mone is hidden
rhe tax team plans a spectat u la r raid, invoh ing lOOinspex tors at
Gondo'shome, his mistress sapartment, his hotels, hisbanks,and the
dwellings of the gangsters and crooked politicians who facilited his
criminal activity rhe raid goesdown with split second bmingand the
taxing woman herself finds the loot, in part out of her luck, and in part
out of her intense understanding of i Iondo
In the final scene, Gondo otters Ryoko a new life with him and
when she refuses, gives up the chase in a great twist on the ritualistk
suicide of classic Japanese dramas. Hewritesdow n thenumberof Ins
safe-deposit box in blood on her handkerchief.
"A raxing Woman" was a huge box office hit in Japan rhefilm
was a Is i a critical success, sweeping the 1988 Japanese Acaderm
Awards Fhe prizes included 1W Picture, Besl Director, Best Actor
and Best Actress.
If you're interested in fapanese culture, appreciate great comedy,
or it your 1990 tax experience has left you feeling beaten, "A laving
Woman is a must see.
A faxing Woman, presented by the Student 1 nion Films
( ommittee, will be shown tomorrow night. Wednesda)
� Compiled by I isaMarie emigan
B Kathleen Klemme, R.P.
Special lo The East Carolinian
Question: What's the differ
once between soluble and in-
soluble fiber?
Answer: Soluble fiber, unlike
insoluble fiber, dissolves in water.
Citrus fruits, peas, beans lentils,
oats. Md barley contain soluble
fiber On the other hand wheat
bran, whole grain cereals and
breads m vegetables contain
insoluble fiber.
Both are important tor diffei
ent reasons. Soluble fiber may
lower cholesterol levels. m re-
duce the risk ol coronary heart
disease It also may reduce the
need tor insulin in diabetics and
may help in the treatment of obe-
sity by curbing the appetite. In
soluble fiber may reduce the risk
of colon and colorectal cancer.
Unfortunately, most Ameri-
cans don't get enough of either.
Whenever possible, choose dark
green and yellow vegetables and
whole gram breads and i erea Is. In
place i if (and v barsor potato chips,
snack on apples, oranges and ba-
nanas
Question; I'm and in ex-
cellent health However 1 often
use laxative
.e been taking r a ti
Metamucil but I understand it may
cause allergic reactions Should I
be concerned'1 What can I do?
Answer: PsylHum is the active
ingredient m MetamiK ll and main
generic laxatives And, indeed,
allergic reactions to psy 11 ium ha e
been reported.
Symptoms range from "hay
fever type symptoms (such as
watery eyes, runnv nose, and
sneezing) to more severe symp
toms (such as itching, nausea.
vomiting, and swelling of the face,
mouth,eyes,and tongue I hough
their incidence is not high,adverse
extr mel
threat run
It ;
;
h tl
1 here an
out
U t" �� In f
product
.
i
I
Porter
Cor i.
L
Wednesday
WZMH
Progresssive Dance Night
introducing
MO Draft
1.15 I all Boys
1 (Mi Kamikazees
Ladies Free til 10:30
nated by the musical theater
Records barely existed and were. i
poor fidelity, and composers strove
for Broadway success and earned
royalties fn m the sale ol sheet mu-
sk.
Porter's personal life was om
plicated by having to hide his ho
mosexualit) in order to tvork pro
fessionally, and later from an ac i
dent that k tt him i nj pied and in
great pain tor the re ol his I '�
tel
A
lie
Inspiti 'I
THURSDAY. APRIL 4
SHOWS 7 & 10 PM
Tickets
S22.50
��- LABLE AT
nCKETRON'
� �� j
HIRTSTOP, INC.
Call 800-543-3041
To Charge By Phono
ONE NIGHT ONLY
tIMITE0 StATING
V
WEDNESDAY MARCH 27
ffl
w
N
N

D
EasLCarplini
PlavnoiM
1990-1991
Season
presents
Tennessee Williams1 modern classic
THE
MENAGERIE
March 22, 23, 25 and 26, 1991
8:15 p.m.
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ECI Students: $3.00 General Public $7.50
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March 26,1991
ECU goes



M �l f.
SueManahar
advice Det
Lacrosse team I
Bv Rick Chen
Mat! Writer
rhe EC � e team
.Ht an impr. - igainstd
sion rival �d I rrur i
Saturday
lor one h. iri
whonevi - -
decided t ; �'
and call the g
As Saturd
heatLd up. a
The 4-1 Pirati
confidence b
theTarHee sbetoi
AflerODl �
Piratesgot the ball and �
ot of Kirk Katzburg - g
them up 1 0 rhissctth:
ECU offense tor th
quarter
Along with si mesi
the Piratesbuilt up �
cocaptain KeUy Hoyt sa ring
Men's tennis t
prounds Seah
o
By Kern Nester
Staft Writer
Spnng coukln t arrived al a
better time tor the ECU men's ten
nis team, as thev competed in thnv
matches over the weekend result
ing in a win and two loses in con-
ference plav
On Fndav. the Pirates umd
themselves matched up against
James Madison Heading into the
doubles play, BCU was down 4 -2
after losing thn?e very hard fought
singles matches.
ECU'snumberoneplayer luan
Alvarez, dominated his opponent
6-2,6-1 and at the number six spot
Jon McLamb handilv defeated his
foe, 6-3,6-2.
Pirate netters Sammy Tounsi
and Andre Moreau went to three
sets before both lost the final set 6-2
At the same time, Markku Savusalo
was battling his opponent to two
straight tie-breakers; unfortunately,
he lost both.
ECU came back strong in
doubles play, however, as Alvarez
and Hudson daimed the number
onespotand McLamband Savusalo
won the number three spot
enough thi
teatod I
in the m
M � I
Dukes u '�
I
matched u
Man This
doubles pi
TnK- after
plav with �hj
At the
McLamb wj
Hudsii i !a
spot for til
numh'r siv
in three toi
In doul
Savusalo t�
ECU win
opponents I
Hudson fel
Huisman ij
was anothtj
rates, A-
SundaJ
Moore's
Wilmingto
pounding
celled due





reated equal
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ou
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mm
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IE ALL YOU CAN BE.
March 26,1991
CHI)e lEaat (Carultnian
9
ECU goes 3-2, defeats Tarheels in Classic
By Doug Morris
Staff Writer


Dail Reed ECU Photo Lab
� ' Vinahan. head coach ot the Lady Pirates, otters her players some
� ice between games
!t seems to be the fate of Pirate
athletics to be hot and cold
With a record ol 11 5, the EC I
should have lvn going into the
Lady Piratelassu with high ex
pectations, but, in this case, those
expectations would turnout to have
Kvn unfounded
vm teams E U. UNC-C hape!
Hilloastal C arolin i I N Char
lotte UN Wilmington and
I imestone v ollege, came to face oft
in the i ad) Piratelassu and no
team left without some disappoint
men!
E( was had a tough time at
home losing tlm c ol their five
games winningaj linst Limestone
v ollegi and surprisinglv to I NC
II who was undefeated in th
tournament until they faced tin
Pirates
Th� Cai lina game w as the
hij hlij lit ot the season. ' said head
i ich Su v lanahan
l K i also went 4-1 i 'sing
onl to the I.ii I leels in then fourth
game ol thesei ies
(. onferenc e ri al ! N( W
mat hedth Pirati imamem
; i vrd by defeating E( I and
I imestone
( . tasta � irolina dr ipped tw i
nestoUN CH and UNC-
I imestoneollegi faced the
�st disappointment ol the tour
ih losing all fiveoi then games
i h Pirates opened well on the
hrst lav t thelassu, defeating
stone 5 Ob) seoringonerunin
the fourth inning and tour runs w
fifth Sophomore Jenny Parsons
pit, hed the entire game and onK
By Matt Mum ma
Sports Editor
ECU vs. Limestone
College
Sophomore lenny Parsons
pitched a two hitter and struck
out seven against I imestone in
EC! 's hrst game of the touma
ment ECl scored four runs in
the fifth inning with the help ol
sophomore !heryl 1 Idbson who
smashed a triple and drove in
two runs
The 5-0 win was the tirst
game tor the Lad) Pirates ami
promised good things to come
in the tournament
ECUvs UNC-
Wilmington
A pitching duel between
ECU'S junk r lammv Newman
and I NC - loelle Kibler
pr du� ed a 2-0 win foi
, ilmington Nt vman wa r
heved in the sixth inntne, aft i
giving up .i bunt and an error
brought in the dividing run
ECU was held to a scanty
two hits but in the seventh the
Pirates produced a tew scares.
(,ood defence by Wilmington
eventually gave them the win.
ECU vs. UNC-Charlotte
The Pi rate s third gameof the
tournament w asa tough loss that
should have been a win tor ECU
I he Pirates had many chances to
win the game with runners in
scoring position in the fourth, fifth
and sixth innings
After trailing the v hole game
PC I finally tied it up 1-1 and put
the game into extra innings
Charlotte scored a run in the
eighth off a wild pitch and ECU
could not answer
ECU vs. UNC-Chapel Hill
The Pirate- -cored tour
amazing runs in thebottomof the
eighth to beat UN 6 5 The Far
I leelshad scon Ithrei runsin the
top of the eighth and assumed
thev had the game won
Hobson hit the game win-
ning KB1 and Parsmis chalked
upanother victory on the mound
ECU committed five errors
in the game but made up for
them with eight hits junior
shortstop Laura Crowder had a
tnplein the sixth inningand came
homoonCammieSmith's single
ECU vs. Coastal
Carolina
E !U lost the last game of the
tournament 5-1 against Coastal
Carolina who finished second
over the weekend winning tour
of their five games
Parsons recorded the loss
and was relieved in the third
inning after allowing a triple by
the ("bantu leer's Bei k)
Andrews
The win tn or the Pirates was
o.istal's 20th wm ot the season
and Mich lie 1 kill re, orded her
14 i, ton
allowed the Saints two hits
After facing Limestone, E I
wentontobedefeated by the! '(
W 2-0 rhe Seahawks freshman
pitcher, loelle Kibler, allowed the
Pirates onl) two hits, which they
were unable to capitalize on unkr
!I piti her lamm) Newman a!
lowed two runs in the sixth inning
to seal the defeat
11 ended the ia losing to
N Lhe -Her- opened the
ith a run in the first inning
I he Pirates trailed for the entire
came until thesev enth inning when
;1� j cored one run to send the
gam into extra inning; In the
eighth inning the49ersscored early
making the game 2-1 and the Lady
Pirates were unable to gam a am
EC U gamed their second win
of the tournament in their 'sundae
opener against the Tar Heels I N(
scored in the first inning, but the
Pirates tied it in the second, lhe far
Heels again scored in th� fourth
inningand thePiratestied thegamc
in the sixth The seventh inning was
scoreless and so, the game went
into extra innings.
"The) just believed the) could
comeback said Manahan 'and
thev did"
In the eighth inning, 1 V
drove in three1 runs to take a 5 2
lead, but the Pirates came back with
tour runs ot their own to win the
game, 6-5
In the final game of the tour
nament, the Pirates lost tooastal
arolina, 5-1 Lhe c hanticleers
opened with three run- in the hrst
inning, then followed with two in
the third. ECU scored their only run
in the fourth inning
Lacrosse team hands ODU loss
By Rick Chen
stjtf Writer
rhe EC U lacrosse- team pulled
impressive win against divi
rivalHd Dominion this past
Saturda Lhe game was delayed
� � ne hour to wait for the referees,
who never showed up. E I 'scoach
decided to put on his running shoes
: call the game.
s Saturday's temperature
ted up. so did EC U's offense.
Tie 4 ! Pirates were coming off a
� dencebuilding 11-10 w inover
ar Heels before spring break.
� tier I )DU wonthetaccott.the
itesgot the ball and scoredquick
i Kirk katburg's goal to put
themupl 0 FTus set the pace for the
ffense tor the rest ol the first
, I ittet
Along withsome solid defense,
the Pirates built up a 4-0 lead with
n aptain Kelly Hoyt scoring one
Men's tennis
grounds
of the goals Scotl "Srnitty" Smith
scored later in the first quarter put
tmg ECU up 5 Oand beginnin
scoring run
ODU opened I
ter scoring but smith scored Iw
quick goals midway thn tl
quarter to put EC I' up 7 1 I
worked the ball around to get a
score after several ol theirshotshad
gone wide
ODl f'sdefense was pi ured
to hold ott the ECl atta k i mse eral
man down situations in the .
but when they wereat full stn
the Pirate offense turned th
upeven moretolead.it the halt 9 2.
Senior co captains Kelh Hoyl
and Brandin Ifhome reminded the
team at the half that the game wasn't
over At (MM lasl year, the Pirates
wetetheothel sideotthe 'Hide II
b the same margin ol 9 . I he)
battled backonlj to lost l1 13 foi
their third loss to ODU in as mam
.Its
i - ti 11�- the Pirates year
i tl � ' im was told to ome out
with composun against the ag
iveOI 'I team
i l U opened the so ond hall
withaquk kgiviltotn togainsome
momentum but the pace slowed
d' �� n as both side- bei ame patient
on offense md tightened up the
defensi After several minute- ol
tin- style play Scott Smith scored
his fifth goal ot the da)
�tt rman traded possessions,
the third quartei w as dow n to its
se, onds w hen the Pirates
s ored two quu k goals, one In
freshman Macon Bro k to ci-d the
third �- ith EC I up 12
Iln fourth quarter followed
much ol the same style the third
ECl red first, on another
goal by M icon Pi �� k lhe ODl
See Lacrosse page 10
Oail Reed � ECU Photo Lab
Behind Harrington Lield. two EC
beautiful weekend
U students tee oh at the fnsbee golf course Sunday enjoying the
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
Spring couldn't arrived at a
better time for the ECU men's ten-
nis team, as they competed in three
matches over the weekend, result-
ing m a win and two loses in con-
ference play
On Friday, the Pirates found
themselves matched up against
lames Madison. Heading into the
doubles play, ECU was down 4 -2
after losing thn?e very hard fought
singles matches.
ECU'snumberoneplayerJuan
Alvarez, dominated his opponent
6-2,6-1 and at the number six spot,
km McUmb handily defeated his
foe, 6-3,6-2.
Pirate netters Sammy Tounsi
and Andre Moreau went to three
sets before both lost the final set 6-2.
At the same time, MarkkuSavusalo
was battling his opponent to two
straight tie-breakers; unfortunately,
he lost both.
ECU came back strong in
doubles play, however, as Alvarez
and Hudson claimed the number
one spotand McLambandSavusalo
won the number three spot.
The comeback wasn't quite
enough though, as the Dukes de
feated Tounsi and C amile Huisnia w
in the number two doubles match,
6-4, 6-2. This victory enabled the
Dukes to win the match 4
Saturday saw the Pirates
matched up against William &
Mary. This time ECL went into
doubles play dead even with the
Tnbe after the teams split singles
plav with three wins a piece.
At the number four singles,
McLamb won easily 6-2, 6-1. John
Hudson claimed the number five
spot for the Pirates and at the
number six spot, Anders Ahl won
in three tough sets, 7-6, 36,6-4.
In doubles plav, Mel amb and
Savusalo teamed up for the only
ECU win as they defeated their
opponents 7-5, 6-3. Alvarez and
Hudson fell 61,62 and Tounsi and
Huisman lost 64, 63. The match
was another tough loss for the Pi-
rates, 4-5.
Sunday, ECU head coach Bill
Moore's team handed UNC-
Wilmington an embarrassing 6-0
pounding. Doubles play was can-
celled due to it not being necessary
See Tennis, page 10
Harvard squeaks by
Irates' ultimate team
'3
Dail Rm4 � ECU Photo Lab
Sophomore Samir Tounsi returns a serve in Saturday's match against
William & Mary Tounsi lost the match 7 5 and 7-5.
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
The ECU Ultimate team im-
proved on their tournament record
with a quarter final finish in the
second annual Collegiate Easterns.
UNC-Wilmington hosted the col-
lege tournament and brought in 30
teams from up and down the east
coast.
ECU'S Ultimate team, the
Helios, went one and four for the
weekend. They lost their first three
games on Saturday, to Columbia,
UVA and Cornell, but finished the
day with a win over the University
of Vermont.
Helios member Maria Long
said, "We were still asleep our first
game, but played well the mst of the
day
The Helios were eliminated by
Tufts Sunday morning. The home
team, UNC-Weed, won the
women's division.
The Irates enjoyed their best
success of the semester with a 3-1
record in pool play. William k Mary
were their first victims. The Irates
rallied 13 points in a row after giv-
ing up the first point of the game.
In the second game of the day,
the lratesbattled last years Eastern s
champions Boston. Boston's Tufts
defeated ECU in lW's finals for
the trophy. This year it was the
Irates who prevailed.
Ken Earlev, who played both
years said, "the revenge factor gave
us an edge. We used it well and
everyone played out of their mind
Cornell snapped the Irates
winning streak with long offensive
strikes and a tough defensive zone.
"We had trouble with the wind and
simplecatches" IrateChad Russette
said.
ECU rallied twice but the
Cornell lead proved to be insur-
mountable.
Every thingcame back together
for ECU'S last game of the day. The
Irates won the game handily 13-6
with strong rookie play off the
sideline.
"If s great when the defense is
there and our offense is rolling
Chris Hall said. 'Thaf s Irate Ulti-
mate
On Sunday, the Irates were
eliminated in the quarterfinals by
Harvard ECU took an early 3-1
lead only to watch Harvard score
four in a row. Harvard never gave
See Ultimate, page 10





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rm spot1
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Opportunities, RQ Box 77H
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AU YOU CAN BE.
March 26t 1991
(Bht lEnst (fiarnlinian
$
ECU goes 3-2, defeats Tarheels in Classic
By Doug Morris
Staff Writer
��-�� � Will, ill �M
w.
VJ " jit �
fi Mr N
Dai! Rpod - ECU Pholo Lab
Sue Manahan. head coach of the Lady Pirates, otters her players some
advice between games
Lacrosse team hands ODU loss
!t seems to bo the fate of Pirate
athletics to be hot and cold
With a record of 11 -5, the ECU
should have been going into the
Ladv Pirate Classic with high ex-
pectations, but, in this case those
expectations would turnout to have
been unfounded.
Six teams, ECU, UNC-Chapel
Hill, Coastal Carolina, l c -Char-
lotte, UNC Wilmington, and
Limestone College, i ame to face off
in the Lady Pirate Classic, and no
learn left without some disappoint-
men t
l( I was had a tough time at
home losing three ot their five
games winning against Limestone
College and surprisingly to UNC
(II who was undefeated in the
tournament until they faced the
Pirates
Thearolina game was the
highlight of the season said head
coach Sue Manahan
Nalso went 4 1 losing
only to tlu- lar I feels in their fourth
game of the series.
Conference rival UNC-W
matched the Pirate2 3 uun�ur�en(
record by defeating ECU and
I lmestone
Coastalarolina dropped two
games to I '( "��( H and UNC-C
1 imestone College faced the
biggest disappointment of me tour
ney, losing all five of their games.
i he Pirates opened well on the
tirst day of the Classic, defeating
I milestone 5-0 bj scoringonerunin
the fourth inning and four runs in
the fifth Sophomore Jenny Parsons
pitched the entire game and onK
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
ECU vs. Limestone
College
Sophomore Jenny Parsons
pitched a two-hitter and struck
out seven against Limestone in
ECU's first game of the tourna-
ment ECU scored four runs in
the fifth inning with the help of
sophomoreC'hervl1 tobson who
smashed a triple .xnd drove in
two runs.
The 5-0 win was the tirst
game for the Ladv Pirates and
promised good things to come
in the tournament
ECU vs. UNC-
Wilmington
A pitching duel between
� l 's junior Tammy Newman
and UNC -W s oelle kibler
produced a 2-0 win tor
Wilmington Newman was re
licved in the sixth inning aftei
giving up a bunt and an error
brought in the deciding run.
ECU was held to a scanty
two hits but in the seventh the
Pirates produced a few scares.
Good defence by Wilmington
eventually gave them the win.
ECU vs. UNC-Charlotte
The Pi rate's third gameof the
tournament was a tough loss that
should have been a win for ECU.
The Pirates had many chances to
win the game with runners in
scoring position in the fourth, fifth
and sixth innings.
After trailing the whole game
ECU finally tied it up 1-1 and put
the game into extra innings.
Charlotte scored a run in the
eighth off a wild pitch and ECU
could not answer.
ECU vs. UNC-Chapel Hill
The Pirates scored tour
a mazing runs in the hot torn of the
eighth to beat U( 6-5 Hie lar
1 feels had scored three runs in the
top of the eighth and assumed
they had the game won.
Hobson hit the game1 win-
ning RBI and Parsons chalked
upanother victory on the mound.
ECU committed five errors
in the game but made up for
them with eight hits unior
shortstop Laura Crowder had a
tnpleinthesixthinningandcame
homeonCammieSmith'ssingle
ECU vs. Coastal
Carolina
ECU lost the last gameof the
tournament 5-1 against Coastal
Carolina who finished second
over the weekend winning four
of their five games.
Parsons recanted the loss
and was relieved in the third
inning after allowing a triple by
the Chanticleer's Becky
Andrews
The win over the Pirates was
Coastal's 2oth win of theseast n
and Muhelle Hall recorded her
14 vu tor
allowed the Saints two hits
After facing Limestone, E I
went on tobedefeated bv the UN
W, 2-0. The Seahawks' freshman
pitcher foeBe Kibler, allowed the
Pirates only two hits, which thev
were unable to capitalieon. Junior
1 �( l pitcher Tammy Newman al
lowed two runs in the sixth inning
to seal the defeat.
ECU ended the day losing to
the I '( C The 49ers opened the
game with a run in the first inning.
I he Pirates bailed for the entire
gam' until the seventh inning when
thev scored one run to send the
game into extra inning1 In the
eighth inning the4ersscored early
making the game 2-1 and the lady
Pirates were unable to gain a run.
ECU gained their second win
of the tournament in their Sunday
opener against the Tar Heels IV
scored in the first inning, but the
Pirates tied it in the second. The lar
Heels again scored in the fourth
inning and the Pirates tied thegame
m the sixth The seventh inning was
scoreless and so, the game went
into extra innings
"Thev )ust believed they could
come back, said Manahan "and
they did"
In the eighth inning, UNC
drove in throe runs to take a 5-2
lead,but the Piratescameback with
four runs of their own to win the
game, 6-5.
In the final game of the tour
nament, the Pirates lost to Coastal
(arolina, 5-1. The Chanticleers
opened with three runs in the first
inning, then followed with two in
the third. ECU scored their only run
in the fourth inning.
By Rick Chen
Staff Writer
I"he ECU lacrosse team pulled
� in impressive win against divi-
sion rival Old Dominion this past
Saturday. The game was delayed
U r i ne hour to wait for the referees,
who never showed up. ECU'scoach
decided to put on hisrunningshoes
and call the game.
As Saturday's temperature
heated up. so did ECU's offense
I he 4 1 Pirates were coming off a
confidence building 11 -10 win over
the I ar I leels before spring break.
AtterC )DL won the fate of t, the
! i rates got the ball and scored quick
t of Kirk Katburg's goal to put
them up 1 -O.Thisset the pace f( r the
offense for the rest ot the first
, . irter
A long with some solid defense,
the Pirates built up a 4-0 lead with
co-captain Kelly Hoyt scoring one
of the goals Scott "Smittv" Smith
scored later in the first quarter put-
ting ECU up 50 and beginning his
scoring run.
OPl' opened the second quar
ter scoring but Smith scored two
quick goals midway through the
quarter to put ECU up 7-1 OI H
worked the ball around to get a
score after several of their shots had
gone wide
ODU's defense was pressured
to hold off the ECU attack on several
man down situations in the game
but when they were at toll strength
the Pirate offense turned the heat
up even more to lead at the halt v 2.
Senior co-captains Kellv I toy!
and Brandin Thome reminded the
team at the halt that thegame wasn't
over. At ODl last vear, the Pirates
w ere theother sideot meet 'in d( �vs n
by the same margin of c' 2 The)
battled back only to lose 15-13 for
their third loss to ODU in as many
years
rhis wa to ho the Pirates vear
as the team was told to come out
with composure against the ag
gressn e ODL team
(DU opened the second halt
with a quick goal to tr) � to gain some
momentum but the pace slowed
down as both sides became patient
on offense and tightened up the
defense After several minutes of
this style play Scot! Smith scored
his titth goal of the das
After many traded possessions,
the third quarter was down to its
final seconds when the Pirates
scored two quick goals, one by
freshman Macon Brock, to end the
third with K U up 12
The fourth quarter followed
much of the same style the third
did
ECU scored first on another
goal by Macon Brock Lhe ODU
See Lacrosse, page 10
Men's tennis team
grounds S
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
Spring couldn't arrived at a
better time for the ECU men's ten-
nis team, as they competed in three
matches over the weekend, result-
ing in a win and two loses in con-
ference play
On Friday, the Pirates found
themselves matched up against
James Madison. Heading into the
doubles play, ECU was down 4 -2
after losing three very hard fought
singles matches.
ECU'snumber one player, Juan
Alvarez, dominated his opponent
6-2,6-1 and at the number six spot,
Jon McLamb handily defeated his
foe, 6-3,6-2.
Pirate netters Sammy Tounsi
and Andre Moreau went to three
sets before both lost the final set 6-2.
At the same time, MarkkuSavusalo
was battling his opponent to two
straight he-breakers; unfortunately,
he lost both.
ECU came back strong in
doubles play, however, as Alvarez
and Hudson claimed the number
one spot and McLambandSavusalo
won the number three spot.
The comeback wasn't quite
enough though, as the Dukes de-
feated Tounsi and CamileHuisma w
in the number two doubles match,
64, 6-2. This victory enabled the
Dukes to win the match 5-4
Saturday saw the Pirates
matched up against William &
Mary. This rime ECU went into
doubles play dead even with the
Tribe after the teams split singles
play with three wins a piece.
At the number four singles,
McLamb won easily 6-2, 6-1. John
Hudson claimed the number five
spot for the Pirates and at the
number six spot, Anders Ahl won
in three tough sets, 7-6,3-6,6-4.
In doubles play, McLamb and
Savusalo teamed up for the only
ECU win as they defeated their
opponents 7-5, 6-3. Alvarez and
Hudson fell 6-1,6-2 and Tounsi and
Huisman lost 64, 6-3. The match
was another tough loss for the Pi-
rates, 4-5.
Sunday, ECU head coach Bill
Moore's team handed UNC-
Wilmington an embarrassing 6-0
pounding. Doubles play was can-
celled due to it not being necessary
See Tennis, page 10

Harvard squeaks by
Irates' ultimate team
MIAMI�Mil
Sophomore Samir Tounsi returns a serve in Saturdays match against
William & Mary Tounsi lost the match 7 5 and 7-5
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
The ECU Ultimate team im-
proved on their tournament record
with a quarter final finish in the
second annual Collegiate Easterns.
UNC-Wilmington hosted the col-
lege tournament and brought in 30
teams from up and down the east
coast.
ECU'S Ultimate team, the
Helios, went one and four for the
weekend. They lost their first three
games on Saturday, to Columbia,
UVA and Cornell, but finished the
day with a win over the University
of Vermont.
Helios member Maria Long
said, "We were still asleep our first
game, but played well the rest of the
day
The Helios were eliminated by
Tufts Sunday morning. The home
team, UNC-Weed, won the
women's division.
The Irates enjoyed their best
success of the semester with a 3-1
record in pool play. William & Mary
were their first victims. The Irates
rallied 13 points in a row after giv-
ing up the first point of the game.
In the second game of the day.
the Irates battled last years Eastern's
champions Boston. Boston's Tufts
defeated ECU in 1990's finals for
the trophy. This year it was the
Irates who prevailed.
Ken Earley, who played both
years said, "the revenge factor gave
us an edge. We used it well and
everyone played out of their mind "
Cornell napped the Irates
winning streak with long offensive
strikes and a tough defensive zone.
"We had trouble with the wind and
simplecatches" IrateChad Russette
said.
ECU rallied twice but the
Cornell lead proved to be insur-
mountable.
Everything came hack together
for ECU'S last game of the day. The
Irates won the game handily 13-6
with strong rookie play off the
sideline.
"Its great when the defense is
there and our offense is rolling
Chris Hall said. 'That's Irate Ulti-
mate
On Sunday, the Irates were
eliminated in the quarterfinals by
Harvard. ECU took an early 3-1
lead only to watch Harvard score
four in a row. Harvard never gave
See Ultimate page 10






10 ultie �ant Carolinian March26,1991
Join us for all the
NCAA Basketball
action via satellite
on our
4 new TV screens!
Daily
Food & Drink
Specials
Come join the crowd!
521 Cotanche
Street
7571666V
SOAR TO NEW HEIGHTS
Try-outs begin Monday April
1st and continue through
April 8th for anyone
interested in becoming an
ECU Cheerleader or Pirate
mascot. Show your spirit
at 4:00 in front of Minges
Coliseum. For more
information
contact Lee
Workman at
757-4514.
Golf team competes
with top schools
By Francis Vaughn
Staff Writer
The' rtegotfteam raced some
of'the best olf teams in the country
last weekend at Wot ford College's
tournament in Spartansburg, S(
five of the IS teams played in
the NCAA tournament last year
and four of them are currently
ranked in the top 20 in the nation
The Pirates were looking for the
upset rn hopes ol mem making i( to
the NCAA tournament later this
season.
The Pirates shot 298 the first
day and trailed first round leader
Wake Forest by eleven shots ho
Deamon Deacons shot 287 and lev!
by l shot over ACC rival Clemson.
The Pirates were in sixth place
after the first day. ECU senior (ireg
Powell paced the Pirates withaone
under par 71. Bobby Rollrnsof Wake
Forest grabbed the individual load
with a six under par 66
The second day bronchi over
Tennis
cast skies and very windy condi-
tions The Pirates shot 300and trailed
Clemson by 22 shots. Leading the
way for the Pirates was senior co-
captam lohn Mavinres with a 73
The Pirates slipped to eighth place
in the event going into the last day.
The Pirates dosed out the last
day with 310. The Pirates finished
ninth in the tournament. N.C State-
won the tournament beating run-
ner-up Clemson bv 1 stroke
Kelly Mitchum of N.C State
won the individual title with a tour
under par 212.
Sophomore sensation Rvan
Pemy led the Pirates with 224 and
finished tie for l'th Greg Powell
finished with 225and tied tor 18th
The I'ira tes tra vd tt (Grecnvii le,
S( this coming weekend to play at
Furman University Most �t the
teams they played last weekend will
be at Furman this weekend. The
Pirates need to play well this
weekend in order to get to the
NCAA tournament
Continued from page 9
Duke prepares for tJNLV
to determine the winner.
Alvarez again stomped all i or
pponcnt6 1,6 I Mel amb �� i I
three sets before winning �� � 1-6
i' and 1 luismaw ,iiso ���: ����
distance, coming from behm I '
m in - '� 6-2 6 1
i ludson Sa . . -i � ind rommy
McDowald also claimed victories
torl'( 1 withtheonly scarecoming
in Vk Dowald'smau h Whenit wis
over,hecameawaywtthanailbiting
0vip
AUTOMOTIVE
fortQn k Dom�itiC
PARTS StRVICI
510 N. Greene St.
Greenville, NG
830-1 779
1-6,7-5 7-6 in
Next up tor the Pirates will bea
nn c break from onference pla as
they host p ton i �llegi i n I hurs
J.o. .it'i rnoon ,it Mm. �
Lacrosse
i tffensedi idev.1 it w.is their turn to
score as the ECl defense (altered
slightly, giving up three i;oals m
under a minute and thirty seconds
making the store 13-6.
Ultimate
PONT1AC, Mich. (AP) �
Bobby Hurley, wretched and
retchingin last year's Final Four,
is ready to show Amenca what
a healthy Hurley can do.
And the Duke Blue Devils,
who have set standards for
NCAA tournament excellence
� and Final Four failure � are
ready to show America's best
team what they can do with a
poised, prepared and peppy
point guard.
"Last year Bobby wasn't
there for usand tha t really hurt
Duke's Brian Davis said. 'This
year.he'salwaysbeen thereand
he's very excited about having
another chance against UNLV.
He's a better player and he
proved that (Sunday) Bobby
had the best game of his career
Hurley led Duke in points
(20), rebounds (seven), assists
(four) and steals (four) and
committed only one turnover in
36 minutes in a 78-61 victory
over St. John's for the Midwest
Regional championship
The sixth-ranked Blue
Devils (30-7) are back in the Fi-
nal Four for the fourth straight
season, earning another shot at
top-ranked and unbeaten UNLV
which embarrassed Duke
103-73 in last year's title game.
I itirlev, then a flu stricken
freshman, scored onlv two
points in th.it game
Now one of the nation's
super sophomores, he's hoping
to make UNLV sick
"Last year, I was over-
whelmed. I couldn't swallow
much. I was taking medication
that inflamed my stomach
Hurley said
"I'm in much better shape
this year. I'm not rundown I
took care of myself. I've been to
the Final Four. Now I want to go
out and win it
Da vis, oneof Du ke's leaders,
said a victory over UNLV in
Saturdasnataonal semifinalsm
Indianapolis shouldn't be con-
sidered miraculous.
"We're hitting our peak
he said. "All we can ask for is a
great performance out of our-
selves. We can't ask for miracles
and I don't think we need them.
We can't ask Vegas to lie down
and die for us. We have to go out
and beat them
Getting to Indianapolis was
the easy part.
The Blue Devils beat their
four regional opponents by an
average of 18.8 points Their
smallest margin of victorv was
14 points.
Then,again, it always seems
like getting to the Final Four is
the easy part
Duke is onlv the third team
to make four straight Final Four
appearances, joining UCLA
straight from 1967-76) and Cm
cinnati (five, 1959-63).
Continued from page 9
This turned out to be the final
score as the solid defense led by-
veteran Wes Davis and goalie Phil
f nnett stopped the ODL offense
and handed them their first lose.
Co-captain Brandin Thome
said this game between the two best
in the division was "a big win
ECL's next home game is at the
allied health fieid against Richmond.
Continued from page 9
up their lead (nte again a steady
v,md and a good defensive zone
disrupted the rate's e.ime
I larvard was eliminated in the
semifinals bv Wilmington and the
I mversitv of Pennsylvania was
knocked off by Georgia.
Georgia came out of the finals
victorious, winning the second an-
nual Collegiate Easterns.
ext weekend the Irates will be
back in Wilmington to participate
in the Easter extravaganza tourna-
ment.
The tournament will host both
college and open teams. Play is held
on the university fields and will
begin around 10 a.m.
r
r.
UnttPtl W.iy
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not coma by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312 E.
10th St: or call 758-HELP, For Free Confidential Counseling or As-
sistance.
Our Volunleers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. a day. year around.
tf irder to ssi you iti virtually any problem area you might have.
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance
the quality of life for you and our community.
! -r- Z
A1I you can eat
,rr
shrimp and trout VH
45 AJAlJOfAMEAL
I irr�f�r1 Ami Ar
�d)td By Th UI nf NoMh f'olin
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
M-lli llam-Hpm F-Sai llam-9pm Sun llam-lpm
PINEBROOK APTS.
formerly Riverbluff
under new ownership
Renovations Underway
1 Bedroom apts & 2 bedroom townhouses
12 price special for June & July (conditional)
?Water, sewer and Basic Cable included in rent
?Pool Low Deposit
Pets Allowed (conditional) Laundry Room
?Accepting applications August 1
121 Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
BEAUTIFUL FULL COLOR
OLOR COPIES
Beautiful full color copies
from any original print or 35mm slide.
We can enlarge up to 11" x 17"�use your
imagination and give us a try!
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POSTERS � DECALS � BUMPER STICKERS
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mm
II:
CS
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce the following
HOLY WEEK AND EASTER SERVICES
Holy Thursday Services (March 28): 7:30 PM at St. Peter's Church
Good Friday Services: 12:15 PM - Stations of the Cross at St. Peter's
7:30 PM - Good Friday Liturgical Service at
St. Peters
Saturday Vigil Easter Service (March 30): 8:00 PM at St. Peter's
Easter Sunday Masses: 11:30 AM Ledonia Wright Building
(between Joyner Library and
Health Center)
8:30 PM: Newman Center,
953 East 10th Street
(? St Peter's Church is located at 2700 E. 4th Street)
For further information please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at 757-1991
1310 E. 10th Street. Greenville � 752-0123 � FAX 752-062
S inger-Song writer
Cathy Braaten
will be in the Underground
(Basement of Mendenhall)
Tuesday March 26 8:00 PM
Come experience her jazzed-up
rock music. Free subs will be
served before the show so come
early. Admission is free.





Title
The East Carolinian, March 26, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 26, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.800
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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