The East Carolinian, March 21, 1991






�to lEaat (Earalmtati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65No.18
Thursday, March 21,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
14 Pages
Public Safety mishandles state funds
Audit finds $231 used for Pig Pickin'
By Tim Hampton
Staff Writer
ECU Administrators notified
Public Safety's use of money from
an investigative fund for a pig
pickin' and refreshments from
Knspv Kreme following report by
the state auditor on corruption at
the university.
The 4 s page report detailed
mismanagement and questioned
actions undertaken by university
officials
Under guidelines established
in hjne1989, the im estigative fund
was to be solely used tor supplies
and equipment for investigations"
and as "bait" in investigation,
cording to the report.
However, two monthsafter the
fundingsripuiabons were set. Public
Safety dipped into the account to
pav tor food
According to exhibit A o( the
report, a check in the amount of
1331 was paid toOverton'sSuper
market for " pigpickin' supplies A
week later, on Aug. 11.1989, Public
Safety paid $21 to Knspy Kreme for
refreshments.
The remainder of the ques-
tioned expenditures include two
television sets, a VCR, a drawing of
the Public Safety building and
"various lunch meetings The
amount of questionable spending
from the investigation fund totaled
$2,854.
James DePuy, director oi Pub-
lic Safety, said in an interview
Wednesday that the money used
from investigative fund were "tor
legitimate law enforcement func-
tions
Concurring with DePuv, the
university's response to the allega-
tions concluded that the "all of the
expenditures questioned were ap
propnateand directly beneficial to
the tunctioning of the Public Safety
office in total
"It was accounting problem,
simplv not good book keeping
said Richard Brown, vice chancel-
lor of business affairs.
Instead of establishing several
accounts. Brown said. PublicSafety
charged many expenses to one ac-
count.
The state auditor recommends
that "the university stop allowing
the director of Public Safety to use
the investigation fund as a discre-
tionary account
Brown said the funding
guidelines were revised in April
1990 to include lunch expenses Bu t
prior to the revision, DePuy spent
investigation money on lunch
meetings
Concerning the check for the
pigpickin DePuy said it was pa)
ment tor a function initiated by his
predecessor, Josephalder Deruj
replaced t alder in ink 1989 ihe
Clvdk was written in August. 1989
Money for the investigative
fund is generated from revenue re-
ceived from officers serving court
papers to students.
��Cheek���� i
Oat 110987fiitf1199846.70DatcrlBtion
Trophy BouseEngraved Clock
113087Norman Warren113131337.50Party for 73 people
ll88Ovarton'a Supermarket11543237.93Grocarlaa
62388Dvarton'a Suparmarkat11667887.02Orocariaa
22389Ovarton'a Suparmarkat118524102.71Grocarlaa - Chrletarts Party
70189Trophy House11973633.62PIaqua
80489Ovarton'a Suparmarkat120056231.14Grocarlaa - Pi6 Pickin Suppliaa
81189Ertapy Kreme12011821.28tefreehmente for B. C. Criminal Juatica and Standarda Meeting
82989Warran Dlat. Corp.120268279.20Zenith VCX
83189PMUlpa Conausser Elac.120298377.50Magnavox Television and VCR
101789l.aa Hartman and Sona120641238.00RCA Talavlelon with Remote
120589Cotta� ln the Wooda121021150.00Drawing of Public Safety Building
?1090Jim Oapuy �12214460.12Various Lunch Meetings for March 1990
50890Jim Depuy �12246663.20Various Lunch Haatlnga for April 1990
51190Cant a an - Mendenhell12251141.77Catering from Campus Dining
1 80590Jim Dapuy �122740�0.47Various Lunch Meetings for Hay 1990
i 71090Jim Dapuy �123115� 1.16Various Lunch Heatings for June 1990
73190Jim Dapuy �12339319.27Varloua Lunch Meetings for July 1990
i 91490Jim Dapuy �12377421.14Verloua Lunch Heetlngs for August 1990
I 100990Jim Dapuy �12403636.21Various Lunch Meetings for Septembar 1090
1 i 110990Jim Dapuy �12433466.51Varloua Lunch Meetings for October 1990
j 121090Jim Dapuy �124703179.96Various Lunch Meetings for November 1990
!Total Quaationad Expend1turaaWBL2
The state auditor questioned expenditures from November 1987 to December 1990 out of the lnvest.gat.ve
Fund as one facet of his investigation of allegations of wrongdoings by campus officials
WZMB to resume broadcasting March 25
By Carolyn Malpass
Staff Writer
WZMB will begin broadcast
ing for the spnng semester starting
Monday morning at 6 a.m.
"Everything is just brand
spanking new left' Skillen, the
station's general manager, slid of
VVZMB'snew location in Mendon-
hall Student Center.
Skillen said new equipment
includes two compact disc players
a digital delay and a reel-to reel
tape player.
The only equipment that will
be used from the station's former
location in lovner library is the
control console, Skillen said. It will
he used in the production room of
the new office.
should the new console break
dov n, skillen said, the station will
still be able to broadcast from the
console in the production room.
We wen not able to do that at
the other (location)' Skillen said.
Skilk n said the new office cost
ewer $180,000
Scott Makey, WZMB's promo-
tion director, said the new office
offers a more polished approach
and appearance.
The new equipment requires
training, so announcers will start
training today, Makey said.
The new office is larger, Makey
said. Skillen has a separate office,
and there is a separate newsroom
where stones are prepared, a con-
trol room where announcers work,
a production office where an-
nouncements are recorded and a
storage room.
WZMB was supposed to begin
operating Ian. 7. SlaBensaid several
factors contributed to the delay.
"We had ceiling damage from
the food service kitchen (above the
office), we had water damage from
poor drainage, delays in getting
equipment (that had been) ordered
Skillen said.
Skillen credits the station's en-
gineer with working ha rd to get the
station going.
"He's worked tirelessly for four
days so we can get back on the air,
Skillen said. He appreciates the
student body's patience, he added.
Rutgers professor speaks
on math education
Dr. Arthur Powell explains latest innovations
By Brad Strom
Special to East Carolinian
Imagine trying to teach math,
English and spee h,ator e?WeD,a
Rutgers I niversity professor is
doing ust that
Tuesday. I 'r Arthur 1'owell
came to EC"L to speak on his ap
prc-ach to leaching college algebra.
Powell wants to get students more
involved in their education.
"I want to change the nature of
the classroom' Powell said.
He assigns indents algebra
problems and also a journal that
they write in after every class about
the algebra problems thev arc
working with.
The purpt �se of the journal is to
make the students reflect on the
math which shows them how it
builds upon itself, Powell said.
"The journal provides a me-
dium for dialogue between the in-
structor and the students he said.
"It allows them to use their own
language which helps create an
easier atmnspheav" They become
more personally involved, and he
can see which studentsareconfused.
"When students write imper-
sonal or unreflective, then I cannot
get them into writing to under-
standing as easily he said.
Another technique Powell uses
is to allow classmates to talk in class
about the math problems.
"Only 20 minutes of my classes
is where the teacher actually stands
m front of theclassand talks Powell
said. "The rest of the time is used for
the students to collaborate
Multiple-entry logs also play a
key role in Powell's technique of
teaching. He has students fold a
piece of paper in half. On one side
he has them write a math subject
thev want to write about.
Powell says that the students
usually put the problems that they
are having trouble with. The second
step is to have the students write on
the half of the sheet, their reflections
or feelings on the problem. Later,
after the class had discussed the
problems they wrote about, the
papersarc returned Thisallows the
students to reflect on the problem
again. This time they can go back an
see how their thinking was wrong
the first time and correct it.
City Council to vote
on utilities charter
By Jim Rodgers
Staff Writer
Juggli
File photo
ling your time
Wednesday was Ihe first day of spring and many students took
a break from studying to enjoy the warm weather.
Cholesterol can endanger
health in high levels
By Paula McCullen
Peer Health Kducator
Cholesterol, a lipid, or fat, that
is found in all cells and fluids of the
body, is affected by an individual's
diet and rate of metabolism.
Animal products such as meat,
egg yolks and whole-fat dairy
products are primary sources of
dietary cholesterol.
Plant foods do not make or
contain cholesterol, so fruits, veg-
etables, grains and legumes are
cholesterol-free.
Cholesterol is carried in the
blood by lipoproteins Low density
lipoproteins (LDL) are responsible
for transporting approximately 70
percentot the totalblood cholesterol.
High density lipoproteins (HDL)
transport roughly 20 percent of the
total blood cholesterol. Generally,
an increase of the level of total
cholesterol is due to an increase in
the level of LDL cholesterol.
Elevated levels of cholesterol
atv a major cause of coronary heart
disease. Excess amounts of choles-
terol are deposited in the arteries
giving rise for arteriosclerosis.
To insure a healthy life, it is
important for people to monitor
their blood cholesterol level. A test
to determine blood cholesterol levels
can be easily given as a part of a
regular physical examination.
Individuals identified with el-
evated cholesterol levels can possi-
bly control their levels through ap-
propriate measures which may
decrease the number of deaths
caused by coronary heart disease.
Cholesterol screening is avail-
able at the Student Health Center
Monday through FndaytromSam.
to noon. The price for a screening
test is $5, and a total lipid profile
cost $8.
Cholesterol screening will also
he available at the Health and
Wellness Fair on Friday from 10
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The fair will be
held at Mendenhall Student Center
in the Multipurpose Room. For
more, call SHS at 757-6794.
The Greenville City Council
and the Greenville Utilities Com-
mission board discussed seven key
issues in the Council's attempt to
rescind the GL'C's Tuesday.
Council members wanted to
find the GUC board member's
opinions on the issues before any
action is taken by the city
MayorNancy Jenkins began the
meetingby defending theCouncil's
actions.
"We are not out to scuttle the
UtilitiesCommission Jenkins said.
There is conflict between the
groups in determining who will
makepohcydedstonaboutthe city's
utilities, she said.
The GUC is responsible for
making these decisions as stated by
a charter drawn up by the city in
1941.
The City Council wants to re-
scind the current charter and draw
up a new one with seven changes in
mind.
The seven changes are: length
of term of GUC commissioners,
control of large utility contracts,
serviceduplication, growth and ex-
tension, turnover of money to the
city, employee pay and benefits and
the cost of utility services for city
facilities.
TheUtilities Commission board
members contend that charter
amendments are a more logical so-
lution that the abolishment of the
entire charter.
"Do you want Greenyille
Utilities to be a non-political, sepa-
rateorganizationora political toy?'
GUC board member Ric Miller
asked the Council.
"I am willing to fight until my
dying breath to make sure that a
In al ord inance is m t passd Miller
said
An ordinance passed by the
Council would rescind GU S
charter and give utility control to
the City Council.
All seven of the issues were
discussed at the Tuesday meeting
and differences of opinion wen'
present of five of the seen issues.
Council said that the five-year
term of office for utility commis-
sioners is too long.
The commissioners said that
because of the complexity of their
job, a five year term is needed to
ensure board member's effective-
ness.
The Council want to have a say
in the approval of all utility contracts
over $10100. The commissioners
said that $100,000 was more realis-
tic.
"You cannot buy a pickup truck
for (lees than) $10,000 Miller said
"Idon'tthinkyou wantusoverhero
every time we need to buy a pickup
truck
The council also wants more
control over utilitv growth and ex-
tension policies.
"Decisionsongrowth must rest
See Utilities page 2
INSIDE THURSDAY
Editorial
ECU must disclose the
improprieties uncovered in its
investigat ion to uphold integrity
Features 7
The Health and Wellness Fair
Friday offers health checks,
demonstrations and exhibits.
Sports 'H
The Lady Pirates sottball team
will playing the ECU-Holiday
Inn Classic this weekend.
Classified 6
Comics14





1
2 OUie Cast (Carolinian March21,1991
crimhsene
Subjects activate Aycock Hall fire
alarm by setting off fireworks
March 18
0716� Bclk Residence Hall: served subpoenas.
0740�Spilman Building: delivered the mace.
0749�Bclk Residence Hall: served a subpoena.
1214�Public Safety: took a larceny report.
1432�White Residence Hall: served legal papers.
1450- Location unknown: transported a subject to the
magistrate's office for arrest
1751 - Brody Building: investigated a domestic dispute.
1826 -Gotten Porm: investigated smoke in the lobby. Same
was cleared.
2058 Location unknown: student given a verbal warning for
speeding.
2119�dement Residence Hall: Reset the alarm.
March 19
(VII5 Nmth and lames streets student given state citation for
having revoked license.
0032Ninth and lames streets: transported a subject to the
magistrate's office. 4.
0057 -Ninth and Charles streets: student given verbal warning
for speeding.
011(v Aycock Residence Hall: investigated a fim alarm that
had been actuated ort the third floor. Same was caused bv un-
knowns Setting off fireworks.
0358�-Magistrate's office assisted a GreenViUe officer.
1007 - Aycock Residence I la II: Uxk a larceny report
1225- Public Safety: took a larceny report.
1511 -Public Safety: Uxik a harassing call report.
1741 -Gotten Residence flail: assisted a Pitt Cotuitv officer in
serving papers No contact wa made.
1938 larvis Residence I fall took a larceny report.
2051 10th Street, staff member gnen .t verbal warning for
failure to bum headlights
212 Belk Residence I fall (southeast I faculty member given
campus citation tor speeding.
2249�Brewster Building: student given verbal warning for
speeding.
2336 14th Street student given verbal warning for speeding.
234u Tyler Residence Hall ncaMKudentgivenstateritationfor
having revoked license.
2357�Greene Residence Hall (west): student given verbal
warning for Stop sign violation
0404�College Hill Drive student gnen verbal warning tor
speeding
0424 Fifth and Reade streets: investigated a breaking,entering
and larceny of a vehicle.
Crime Scene is taken from official ECU Public Safety logs
RESERVE OFFICERS' T��1MIMC CORPS
YOUR FIRST STEP TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE
YOU COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
At Army ROTC Camp Challenge you'll learn
what it takes to succeed�in college and in life.
You'll build self-confidence and develop your
leadership potential. Plus you can also qualify
to earn an Army Officer's commission when
you graduate from college.
Army ROTC Camp Challenge. It may be
just what you need to reach the top.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
For information contact: Captain Gary B. leamon. East Carolina University ARMY ROTC, Rawl Bide Room $44 phone 757-6974 6967


Delta Chi is Here!
Be a part of a NEW tradition at ECU
"Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice
William Jennings Bryan, AX
For more info, contact:
International Staff
Kevin Kostoff & Mike Geary
at
355-8300
The Delta Chi Fraternity
Woman charged
with murder,
kidnapping
NEW YORK (AP) - A woman
who wanted to present her boy-
friend with a baby despite a still-
birth invited a friend over and with
the help of her 13-year-old daughter
lulled the woman and kept the
victim's infant son, police said.
Pamela Andrews, 37, and her
daughterShakota Andrews, both of
Brooklyn, were arrested Tuesday
and charged with murder and kid-
napping.
Ms. Andrews, the mother of
two children and two foster chil-
dren, was eight months pregnant
when her baby was stillborn in mid-
February. Inspector Edward Capello
said
"Her boyfriend wasoutof town,
her bovfnend knew that she was
pregnant he said.
"She lost the baby, she didn't
want to disappoint her boyfriend.
Hence, she was looking around for
a child
Direct
Advert!
John F. Semt
Production
Mary Pi
DISPLAY Al
per coli
National
Local Open RJ
BulkCJ
Discounl
Business Hoi
Utilities
Continued from page 1
with the elected officials Jenkins
said.
Miller disagreed with her, say-
ing that growth has always been a
business decision.
"Historically in the city of
Greenville, growth goes where the
developersare willingtogo Miller
said.
TheCouncil said theory should
receive a fixed percentage of all
money made by the Utilities Com-
mission, rather than the 6 percent
the citv gets each year.
Theublities board contendsthat
a fixed rate could cause problems in
the future because their amount of
revenue is constantly changing.
Both the council and the GLC
board agreed on providing utility
service for city facilities at cost and
revising the GLC employee pay-
ment plan and benefit schedule.
TheCouncil lsexpected to make
a decision in their meeting tonight.
Didn't like somj
something? Orl
something on q
letter
Sea
bBEAU
OL
w
e c.
im.
Of course-
operat
POSTE!
QUICK COPiE!
r!
G
mO h. 10th Sttd
Student & Facu
Over
45th Annive
2nd Big Week! Come help us cell
Sale with these low prices. Greed
Greenville's best meats. 0
Family Pack
Whole Slab
Fresh Pork Spare Ribs
lb$.99
Cottonelle Tissue
4 roll pkg
89C
Family
Whole
BeefRI
lbS.
Budweis
12-121
cans
Busch or Busch
Light
Suitcases
$10.99
Pepsi
All 2 litei
.851
f
111 JMVttSTMEtT
HOf GNEENVIUE'S KST MEATS"
QUANTITY MGMTS KSiftVCO
Store Hours;
Open Sundays 12 Noon - 7 pm
Monday - Saturday 8 am - 8:30 pm






I G CORPS
J fmjT.
Jto
IS IS THE ONE
1ER.
�.�
ere.
f
I !
per of choice
ity
Woman charged
with murder,
kidnapping
NEW YORK (AP) - A woman
who wanted to present her boy-
friend with a baby despite a still-
birth invited a friend over and with
the help of her 13-year-old daughter
killed the woman and kept the
victim's infant son, police said.
Pamela Andrews, 37, and her
daughter Shakota Andrews, both of
Brooklyn, were arrested Tuesday
and charged with murder and kid-
napping.
Ms. Andrews, the mother of
two children and two foster chil-
dnn, was eight months pregnant
when her baby wassnllbom in mid-
Februarv. Inspector Edward Capello
said.
"Herbovfriend wasoutof town,
her boyfriend knew that she was
pregnant he said.
"She lost the baby, she didn't
want to disappoint her boyfriend.
Hence, she was looking around for
a child
gfte �aat Carolinian March 21,1991 13
Stye iEaHtdarflltman
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
Tim Peed
Patrick Pitzer
Director of
Advertising
John F. Semelsberger II
Production Manager
Mary Piland
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National$6.00
Local Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
Utilities
Continued from page 1
with the elected officials lenkins
said.
Miller disagreed with her, sav-
ing th.it growth has alwavs been a
business decision
"Historically in the citv of
Greenville, growth goes where the
developersare willingtogo Miller
said
TheCouncil said theatv should
receive a fixed percentage of all
monev made by the Utilities Com-
mission, rather than the 6 percent
the citv gets each year.
The utilities board contendsthat
a fixed ratecould cause problems in
the tuturc because their amount of
revenue is constantly changing.
Roth the council and the GUC
board agreed on providing utility
service for city facilities at cost and
revising the GUC employee pay-
ment plan and benefit schedule.
TheCouncil lsexpected to make
a decision in their meeting tonight.
Didn't like something we had to say? Thought we missed
something? Or are you just generally disappointed with
something on campus or in the community? Then write a
letter to the editor. Address all letters:
To The Editor
The East Carolinian
Second floor, Publications Building
East Carolina University
Greenville, N.C. 27858-4353
Hot Tub Rentals & Sales
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WEDNESDAY MARCH 27 11-6
b BEAUTIFUL FULL COLOR
OLOR COPIES
Beautiful full color copies
from any original print or 35mm slide.
We can enlarge up to 11" x 17"�use your
imagination and ive us a try!
Of course�we do the standard print shop
operations�plus a whole lot morel
POSTERS � DECALS � BUMPER STICKERS
QUICK COPIES � FAX SERVICE � DESKTOP PUBLISHING
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XpWH
1310 K. 10th Street. Greenville 752-0123 � FAX 752-062
Student & Faculty Savings at
Overton's
52o
N
N

0
7)
Z
45th Anniversary Sale
2nd Big Week! Come help us celebrate our 45th Anniversary
Sale with these low prices, Greenville's freshest produce, and
Greenville's best meats. Overton's is the place to be.
Family Pack
Whole Slab
Fresh Pork Spare Ribs
lb$.99
Cottonelle Tissue
4 roll pkg
89tf
Busch or Busch
Light
Suitcases
$10.99
Family Pack
Whole Slab
Beef Ribs
lb$.99
Budweiser Beer
12-12 oz
cans$6.59
Pepsi-Cola
All 2 liter bottles
.85!
White
Potatoes
10 lb paper bg
99c
Fresh Fryer Leg
Quarters
lb390
Store Hours:
Open Sundays 12 Noon - 7 pm
Monday - Saturday 8 am - 8:30 pm
0VERTON'6
Supemtti�
111 iAftVIS STREET
HOME Of GAEENVHIE'S BEST MATS"
OUANTITV RIGHTS RESERVED
Prices Effective Wednesday, March 20
through Saturday March 23,1991




















.Mn Students Against Multiple Sck-msis (SAMS'
Kmtv week l1rTT mum nfiiln in iliipwiiul miili mnliqfc ikiu m ntedncne
short i in nils the central nervous s Hem ol more th.in 2SO.IMM) iiktk jus
most ol whomjrc between the apesol 20 and But their air tram wavtn
short i in tut Ms IiikI out how ou i an help h tont.n twig M ur sis
( luirperson kicai MS tupter or call IMiHHHI sl Ms
ECU DINING SERVICES, ARA & 171
Presents SKIP A MEAL FOR MS
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room 11-6
FREE
PIZZA
&
DRINKS
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DRUG AWARENESS
MARCH 25-28, 1991
1 his is your bruin.
LJ
This is your brain on drags
� 3,
Cfftfft the habit.
Monday, Maich 25
ll:00-l:00pm
DACCHUS Resource
Booth & Drug Display.
Student Activity Booth
Mendenhall Student Center
Tuesday, March 26
6:00-9:00pm Sex, Drugs and All
That Soul en The Mall
Concert on the Mall featuring
Cold Sweat a Contemporary Soul
Band.
Kathy Bookman, a counselor
at ECU Counseling Center will
discuss the role drugs play in
date rape.
Rain site Jenkins Auditorium
5:00pm Sex, Drugs and Remote
Control
A presentation and video which
discusses the facts about drugs
influencing decision making
ability.
7:00pm Ris Quo' Business
Fleming Hall Lobby
A video presentation in which
several social issues including
DWi, drug use, and date rape
will be addressed.
8:00pm Cathy Broatcn
A Jazz performance at the
ECU Underground.
Wednesday, March 27 11:00-1:00pm BACCHUS Resource Booth
and Drug Display.
ECU Student Store
7:00pm PROJECT D.A.R.E.
MSC Multipurpose Room
Rick Fisher of the Pitt County
Sheriff's Department will present
� program on drug awareness and
resistance.
Thursday, March 28 11:00-1:00pm
7 00pm
BACCHUS Resource Booth
and Drug Display.
Jones Cafeteria
KisQuc' Business
Jones 1111
id
w
13
N
N

70

































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Hhe East Carolinian
Smi'n the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bi air Skinner, News Editor LeClair Harper, Ami. News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor Stuart Oi iphant, Asst. Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Kerry Nfster, Ami. Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
Doug Morris, Editorial Production Manager
Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Carla WHITFIELD, Classified Ads Technician
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Phong Luong, Business Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
TheEastCarohnian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925. emphasizing information that directly affects
ECT students. During the ECU school year. The East Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12.000. The East
Carolinian reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex. creed or
national origin. The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
is amajonty opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. Th Boaturoliman reserves the right to edit letters for
publication Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27834; or call (919) 757-6366
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, March 21, 1991
ECU must restore its integrity
Are rules made to be broken7 The Fast
Carolinian addressed this issue oil Fob 28.
At that time, the question was whether or
not the rules should be ignored concerning
Randy Royal's GPA
Student leaders and university advisors
agreed that, no, rules are not made to be
broken and decided Mr. Royal must step
down from his position as SGA treasurer.
Three weeks later we are again facing a
dilemma of rules violations This time, how-
ever, university officials are to blame.
' J
The state auditor's report, publicly re-
leased on March 12 along with ECU'f own
findings, has revealed examples of wide-
spread abuse and corruption within various
administrative departments at the univer-
, Specific findings charged by the audU
included the following:
� Telecommunications Director Ted
Roberson conducted wiretapping of another
university employee � possibly violating
federal laws.
Five other ECU officials were directly-
involved in or knew about the wiretapping
before the university began its investigation
in November, according to the auditors.
� Public Safety Director James DePuy
and others within his department misman-
aged $33,993 from two separate accounts.
� Superintendent of Buildings Gene
Howell misused university employees,
equipment and facilities over a 7-year pe-
riod. Mr Howell has denied allegations
made in the auditor's report, and university
officials have said they cannot release the
findings of their investigation because of
legal constraints outlined in the state's Per-
sonnel Act.
With the state's
audit finished and
most of ECU'S in-
vestigation already
completed, the out-
come seems likelv to
remain shrouded in
the university's lib-
eral use oi the Per-
sonnel Act. This act
guarantees the em- Dr. Richard Eakin
plovees right to privacy in certain personnel
matters, such as job performance and sal-
ary.
But can one extend this guarantee of
privacy when it includes the committing of
potentially criminal acts? It is not fair to the
students of this university and the taxpay-
ers who support it that these matters are
being "swept under the rug" by university
officials.
The information uncovered by the
university's internal report ultimately af-
fects everyone who contributes money to
the university.
And the administration should not at-
tempt to humor us with these thinly veiled
attempts to cover up the truth.
The state auditor recommended that
Chancellor Richard Eakin conduct his own
investigation into the numerous impropri-
eties in an effort "to restore the employee's
and the public's confidence in the integrity
of the university "
But what about OUR confidence in the
university?
It seems only right that if we hold such
high standards for our own student leaders
and officials, can we not at least expect the
same from our university?
Letter To The Editor
Metal Notes fan
requests space
for music news
To The Editor:
I've noticed that in recent
issues more and more of the
paper is becoming advertise-
ment. I do know that times arc
tough now, and you have to
pay the bills. However, it seems
you may have decided to cut
out one of my favorite articles
in the process, nameiv'Metal
Notes I'm not sure about how
"popular" metal is on this cam-
pus, and even I don't care for
some of the bands the column
regularly features. However,
it doesoffer useful concert and
record information, jf you are
considering cutting out "Metal
Notes" please reconsider it; try
to find a place somewhere to
put it.
David Perry
jJusrcArfr!
Revenue
Maxwells Silver Hammer
Gas tax would generate revenue
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Partly to cover a half billion-
dollar benefit package for Ameri-
can troops involved in the Gulf
War. Congress is trying to con-
vince itself it should raise taxes.
Congresscntters make an amus-
ing spectacle: oneday they're pro-
claiming their unbounded admi-
ration and support for the troops,
the next day they lack the courage
to pass the hat for them.
But the government doesn't
need the money just to cover the
added benefits. Thanks in part to
budgets based on impossibly rosy
economic predictions, the gov-
ernment keeps running out of
money. Clearly something has to
be done
On this issue the country is
divided into twocamps One says
weshould tax more; theother says
we should spend less. To the best
of my knowledge, there are no
camps saying we should tax more
and spend less, but that's another
matter
Republicans are the main-
stay of the spend-less camp. They
think that the government ought
to balance its budget by cutting
spending, which isn't such a bad
plan except for the small fact of it
being impossible.
Will they cut the money from
"defense which at a third of a
trillion dollars is the single largest
section of the budget? Of course
not.Republicanshavesooftentold sheer folly to cut funding or id
the lie that any cut in the
Pentagon's budget is an
unpatriotic attempt to weaken
America, that the lie is now ac-
cepted as truth Certainly they're
not about to open themselves up
to charges that they're out to
weaken America, not in the wake
ence and technology (tollv, but
not politically unthinkable shame
that there's a difference), and fi-
nancial aid to the needy is tairlv
well protected though hardlv in-
vulnerable
So if none of those can have
its budget cut, how about � ;
of the fighting in the Gulf. No ing the way the federal govern-
ment operates7 There's a lot oi
way.
The Democrats are no more
likely to dip into the Pentagon's
pockets, for similar reasons. Both
sides might � might �- agree to
shelve a few pet weapons projects,
perhaps even close a military base
or two, but the simple fact is that
serious spending cuts are about as
likely as hell freezing over or
Marion Barry getting elected
president in '92.
What about Social Security,
the second largest outlay? Any
cuts there? No, again. Partly be-
cause it would be unfair, mainly
because if s politically unthink-
able. That makes more thaa half
the budget untouchable already. "
Other untouchables: Medi-
care, federal pensions, health,
education, veterans' benefits and
services, international affairs and
natural resources and the envi-
ronment. This leaves only two
portions of the federal budget up
money and paperwork generated
just bv keeping records of whe
ordered how manv pencils this
week. Wouldn't it be a lot simpler
and lesscostly just to let individual
offices buy their pencils or what-
ever from the drugstore down the
street, rather than going through a
long, complex and expensive
requisitioning process?
Well, yes, it would he much
simpler and less cos'W But pre-
sumably we're buying more than
pencils when we do things this
way; we're also buying insurance
against misuse of those funds �
the kind of situation where the
office manager pMYrhouarv
bucks for three pencils, and no
body knows where the rest of the
money went or even finds ou t that
it was used at all. In the long run.
presumably, the money spent
keeping track of where the rest of
the money goes, saves us all
forgrabs: financial aid to the needy money. We're cutting our losses.
and general science and technol- When you get right down to
ogy, which comprise about 8 per- it, it's politically impossihle in this
cent and 1 percent of the federal country to balance a budget by
budget, respectively. It would be See Revenue, page 5
Pearls For Swine
Stanford officials master 'grant larceny'
By Bill Egbert
Editorial Columnist
Stanford University has
conducted some of the most in-
fluential research that has ever
taken placeon thiscontinent. Now,
that pillar of the academic com-
munity has set itself to the task of
exploring a woefully
underpublished subject: outright
stealing from the federal govern-
ment.
Typically, such research is
undertaken by the commercial
sector (defense contractors, Cali-
fornia agribusiness, etc.) and by
independent researchers (welfare
shysters and ordinary hairballs
who don't pay their taxes). How-
ever, the Stanford Institute of
Embezzlement Studies has con-
ducted a lord-knows-how-many-
year study to test the limits of
fund-siphoning. Stanford's Cen-
ter for Illicit Accounting published
their findings before a Senate
subcommittee last week.
The results were truly
ground breaking:
� $45,000 in federal research
money was diverted to send the
Stanford Board of Trustees to Lake
Tahoe.
�$2,500 went to refurbish a
grand piano.
�$9,000 went to stock the
university president's house with
antique furniture.
�$2,000 per month was spent
on flower arrangements.
�$185,872 went for adminis-
trative costs at a mall Stanford
owns.
�$184,286 covered depre-
dation costs on the university's
yacht and other boats.
The federal government
suspects that the diversions tally
up into the tens of millions.
Stanford, however, never an in-
stitution to blow its own horn,
says that such estimates of their
achievements are over-zealous.
Furthermore, Stanford adminis-
trators are confident that their in-
novative accounting techniques
have covered their butts to the
point that the government can't
pin them down on anything.
in the spirit of good faith,
though, Stanford announced plans
to repay some $500,000 in blatant
over-charges. This "repayment"
would not, however,be in the form
of actual cash reimbursement, but
rather discounts on future research
(another triumph for the Center
for Illicit Accounting research
team).
Stanford officials admitted
that they diverted funds to cover
the depreciation of their yacht, but
said that it was a "mistake Who
are they kidding? What kind of a
moron could mistake a 72-foot
yacht (complete with Jacuzzi) for
a research expense?
And if anybody at Stanford
could actually make such a mis-
take, what are we doing paying
them $241 million a year to do
research? We grit our teeth over
how Johnny can't read? Well,
finding out mat one of our top
universities can't tell a sail boat
from a white rat ought to set off
sirens somewhere.
Of course, a few extras tacked
on to the government's tab is
nothing new in academia. Most
top-notch schools list their faculty
tennis courts and swimming pools
under "research overhead" with
cutting spending, the occasional
$6,000 hammer notwithstanding.
So the only other alternative is to
raise taxes.
Or is it7 No, there's a third
choice, which Republicans con-
sistently choose when faced with
the impossibility of implementing
meaningful spending cuts, borrow
it Buy now, pay later.
The government can make
some money by selling off seized
Savings and Loan assets, but not
enough, and not quickly enough
It either borrows, or it raises taxes.
The problem with borrowing is
that, )ust as with credit cards, ev-
erything ends up costing more in
the long run 'Not that this ever
sic ws anybody down.) The more
responsible and less palatable
choice is to raise taxes, which
Democrats accept and Republi-
cans don't
Republicans call Democrats
the reasoning that these niceties
are necessary for attracting top-
notch faculty. We academicians
have sponged off the res of soci-
ety since classical times (Mercury
was the patron god of hot h scholars
and thieves), but when one uni-
versity gets too greedy, that spoils
the racket for the rest of us.
This investigation at
Stanford will probably not be the
end of the problem. Other research
universities will come under sus-
picion, if not scrutiny The net ef-
fect of this new wariness will
probably not be reduced waste of
federal grants, but rather reduced
grants in general. When the time
comes for Washington to concoct
a budget with a slimmer, trimmer
figure, money for basic research
may be in jeapardy because one
university sucked a little too hard
on its government teat.
The most distasteful aspect
of Stanford University's exercise
in "grant larceny" is not so much
the deviousness of their methods
or the scale of their embezzlement,
but rather the absurd stupidity oi
their arrogance. They spent $7,000
on linens for the university
president's house. They used
$10,000 in federal research dollars
to cover depreciation costs on
university-owned silverware.
They charged the government
$24,000 a year for flowers. Won
yet, they are now publicly defend-
ing these expenditures as legiti-
mate overhead costs.
In doing so, they are not onlv
making their own university �
laughing stock, but they are also
calling into question the legitimacy
of government-funded researchas
a whole.
"tax-and-spenders" � whij
obviously true but vehemj
denied, thereby lending theel
more credence than it desej
Democrats don't like to adi
but they are tax-and-spendt
in the sense that they realiz
if the federal government is
to pay for everything every!
wants it to do, if s going to h
do it through increased taxj
My personal favontel
for solving our immediate
problems is my own invej
though it borrows heavily
an idea proffered by Mil
Kinsley of The New Repur
excellent magazine to whi;
should give me a subscript
Kinslev areues that
vihans have a moral re
itv to pav for more of theGul
than just the ordinance He
cates slapping a ta x on ga v ll
return prices app' i
Read The East
aJfje iEast �
is now accepting applications for tl
� Assistant News Edit
� Assistant Features E
� Copv Editor
� Editorial Production!
� Director of Advertisi
� Business Manager
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s I I CAMt
Revenue
(gftt gant Carolinian March 21, 1991 �
&
lerate revenue
ooftpntold
it in thi-
on
I weaken
it is now
t inl thc re
mschcs up
I
I . lull v
nv n
ntagon s
isons
agree to
bonsprojei ts
II tary base
� is that
� itas
r or
hne elected
�ru
in Partly rv
rtiir. m.nnlv
iy unthmk
ire than ha;
1N0 already
iWes M�n1i
ions health,
benefits and
affairs and
1 the
' nlv two
i budget tip
ind technol
iNuit k per
lt the federa
would br
Swine
sheer folly to cul funding of sci-
ence and technology (folly, but
not politically unthinkable; shame
that there s a difference), and ft
nan ial iu1 to the notxlv is fairly
well protei led though hardlv m-
ulncrable
none o( thoso cm h.ivc
its budget cut hov about chang-
ing the way the federal govern
runt operates? There's a lot of
money and paperwork generated
Hist by keeping records of who
ordered how many pencils this
� Wouldn t it bee lot simpler
and lesscostly nist to let individual
offices buy their pencils or what-
ever from the drugstore down the
street, rather than going througha
long, complex and expensive
requisitioning process?
Well, ves.it would be much
simpler and less costly. But pre-
sumably we're buying more than
pencils when we do things this
ay we're also buying insurance
against misuse ot those funds �
the kind of situation where the
office manager .ivs1 Sf"rhouSalrtfr
bucks tor three pencils, and no-
body knows where the rest of the
money went or even finds out that
it was used at all In the long run,
presumably the money spent
keeping track of where the rest of
'ho money goes, saves us all
ey Ve re cutting our losses.
When you get right down to
it itpoliticallyimpossibleinthis
country to balance a budget by
See Revenue page 5
iter 'grant larceny'
rnment
versions tally
�t millions
� in in
W1 horn.
wtes ot their
IV'T zealous
rd ad rani!
that their in
techniques
butts t0 the
tmeni
lvthing
ood faith,
lunced plans
in blatant
"�payment'
in the form
rs'ment,but
ture research
the Center
ig research
fls admitted
uls to cover
nr yacht, but
stake Who
Sat kind of a
fe a 72-foot
Jacuzzi) for
' at Stanford
such a mis-
sing paying
vear to do
teeth over
fread? Well,
of our top
a sail boat
tt to set off
�tras tacked
Jnt's tab is
?mia Most
beir faculty
vning pools
with
the reasoning that these niceties
are necessary tor attracting top-
not h faculty We academiaans
have sponged off the rest of soci-
ety since classical times (Mercury
a is the patron god ot both scholars
and thieves), hut when one uni-
v ersity gets too greet! v, that spoils
the racket for the rest of us.
This investigation at
Stanford will probably not be the
end of the problem. Other research
universities will come under sus-
pi ion, if not scrutiny. The net ef-
fect of this new wariness will
probably not be reduced waste of
federal grants, but rather reduced
grants in general When the time
comes for Washington to concoct
a budget with a slimmer, trimmer
figure, money for basic research
may be in jeapardy because one
university sucked a little too hard
on its government teat.
The most distasteful aspect
of Stanford University's exercise
m "grant larceny" is not so much
the deviousness of their methods
or the scale of their embezzlement,
but rather the absurd stupidity of
their arrogance They spent $7,000
on linens for the university
president's house They used
$ 10,000 m federal research dollars
to cover depreciation costs on
university-owned silverware.
They charged the government
$24,000 a year for flowers. Worse
yet, they are now publicly defend-
ing these expenditures as legiti-
mate overhead costs.
In doing so, they are not only
making their own university �
laughing stock, but they are also
calling into question the legitimacy
of government funded research as
a whole.
cutting spending, the occasional
$6,000 hammer notwithstanding.
So the only other alternative is to
raise taxes.
Or is it? No, there's a third
choice, which Republicans con-
sistently choose when faced with
the impossibility of implementing
meaningful spending cuts: borrow
it. Buy now, pay later.
The government can make
some money by selling off seized
Savings and I,oan assets, but not
enough, and not quickly enough.
It either borrows, or it raises taxes.
The problem with borrowing is
that, just as with credit cards, ev-
ery thing ends up costing more in
the long run. (Not that this ever
sK ws anybody down.) The more
responsible and less palatable
choice is to raise taxes, which
IXnnocrats accept and Republi-
cans don't.
Republicans call Democrats
Continued from papa 4
"tax-and-spenders" � which is
obviously true but vehemently
denied, thereby lending thecharge
more credence than it deserves.
Democrats don't like to admit it,
but they are tax-and-spenders �
in the sense that they realize that,
if the federal government is going
to pay for everything everybody
wants it to do, it's going to have to
do it through increased taxation.
My personal favorite plan
for solving our immediate fiscal
problems is my own invention,
though it borrows heavily from
an idea proffered by Michael
Kinsley of The New Republic, an
excellent magazine to which you
should give me a subscription.
Kinsley argues that we ci-
vilians have a moral responsibil-
ity to pay for more of the Gulf War
than just the ordinance. He advo-
cates slapping a tax on gasoline, to
return prices approximately to
November's level (maybe $1.30
per gallon), and later giving that
money back to the people in the
form of a cut in their Social Secu-
rity taxes.
Kinsley's plan is intended as
an energy-saving incentive pack-
age, not as a "revenue enhance-
ment But I don't see what's
wrong with directing that money
to Gulf troops in the form of edu-
cation vouchers and so on, rather
than putting it back into the
pockets of the people.
This will generate that half-
billion dollars before you can say
"ouch After all, if we all support
the troops as much as we say we
do, paying a few extra cents at the
gas pump ought to be a small
enough matter.
Plus, you're encouraging
people to use less gasoline, which
is good for the environment. And
what could be wrong with that?
Read The East Carolinian
Utlj iEaHt (Eamltman
is now accepting applications for the following positions:
Assistant News Editor
Assistant Features Editor
Copy Editor
Editorial Production Manager
Director of Advertising
Business Manager
Advertising Representative
Typesetter
Staff Writer
Anyone interested should apply in person at The East Carolinian office. The office is
located On the second floor of the Publications Building across from Joyner Library.
Deadline for applications is April 4. For more information, call " 57-6366.
EYE
EXAM
AND BUY ONE
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price and get a second pair free
Call our office to schedule your $39 eye exam, or just stop by to
check out our wide selection of frames.
! Offer valid through March 29, 1991
(Somc'restrictions apply)
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Carolina Power & Light
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Weyerhauser
TRW
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Procter & Gamble
Northern Telecom
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Yellow Freight
What Will Your Future Hold?





iicm
erate revenue
" ruling ol vi-
. �- A but
kabte srunv
: ��� rence) and fi-
� i is fatriv
i hardh in-
in haw
�. about�Kang
govom-
.1 lot ol
v generated
rds of w ho
� pencils thi
simpler
el indu idual
- r what-
.�, -c down tho
through a
� expensive
v : he much
Bui pre-
. ing more than
things this
ng insurance
�se funds �
- . here the
i rhousalti)
- and rtOr
�� the rest ol tho
finds out thai
��i. long run.
i -rvnt
re the rest of
tves us all
a losses
lownto
-lbloin this
i i budget h
Revenue age 5
Swine
ter 'grant larceny'
i �
� �
tv a 71
lacuzzi' for
at Stanford
pint; pav
voar
Ir teeth over
jrad1 Well,
of our top
a sail boat
Iht to set oft
p 'ras tacked
" t S tab is
tTtia Most
eir faculty
urung pools
lead w.th
� these niceties
� � ittrat tmc top-
i idemicians
� �� rest ol soci-
Men vir
� holars
ne um-
sreedy, that spoils
� r the res! oi us
stigation at
pi habh net N1 the
I thor research
me under sus-
crutiny The net ef-
� m ariness wt�
1 waste of
I ather reduced
� hen the time
ton i concoct
limner, trimmer
money ter bask ICJUtfdN
jeapard because one
university sucked a little too hard
� . vernment teat
most distasteful aspect
� stantord University's exercise
. nt larconv is nut so much
viousness I their methods
r the vale of their embezzlement,
but rather the absurd stupidity of
urrogance rhej spent $7,000
inens tor the university
president's house Thev used
00 m federal research dollars
�' depreciation costs on
university owned silverware
Thev charged the government
$24,000 a rear for 7rum. Worse
ret. they are now publicly defend-
ing these expenditures as legiti-
mate overhead costs
In doing so thev are not only
making their own university a
laughing stock, but thev are also
calling mtoquestion the legitimacy
ot government funded research as
a whole
Revenue
UleJEaBt(EaroItnian March 21, 1991 s
Continued from page 4
anting spending, the occasional
$6,000 hammer notwithstanding
So the only other alternative is to
raise taxes;
Or is if? No, there s third
choke which Republicans con
sistentlv choose when laced with
the impossibility ol implementing
meaningful spending outs borrow
it Buy now, pay later
The government can make
some money by selling oft seized
Savings and 1 oan assets but not
enough and not quickly enough
It either borrows, or it raises taxes.
The problem with borrowing is
that just as with credit cards, ev
cry thing ends up costing more in
the long run (Not that this ever
sk us anybody down I The more
responsible and less palatable
choice is to raise taxes which
Democrats accept and Republi-
cans don t
Republicans call Democrats
tax and-spenders" � which is
obviously true but vehemently
denied, thereby lending the charge
more credence than it deserves.
Democrats don't like to admit it,
but they are tax-and-spenders �
in the sense that thev realize that,
it the federal government is going
to pay for everything everybody
wants it to do. it's going to have to
do it through increased taxation
My persona favorite plan
lor solving our immediate fiscal
problems is my own invention,
though it borrows heavily from
an idea prottered by Michael
Kinsley ol The New Republic, an
excellent magazine to which you
should give me a subscription
Kinsley argues that we ci-
vilians have a moral rosponsibil-
ity to pay tor more of the Cult War
than inst the ordinance 1 le advo-
cates slapping a tax on gasoline, to
return prices approximately to
November's level (maybe $1.30
per gallon), and later giving that
money back to the people in the
form of a rut in their Social Secu-
rity taxes
Kinsley'splan is intended as
an energy-saving incentive pack-
age, not as a "revenue enhance-
ment But 1 don't see what's
wrong with directing that money
to Gulf troops in the form of edu-
cation vouchers and so on, rather
than putting it back into the
pockets of the people.
This will generate that half-
billion dollars before you can sav
"ouch After all, il weal! support
the troops as much as we say we
do, paving a tew extra cents at the
gas pump ought to be a small
enough matter.
Plus, you're encouraging
people to use less gasoline, which
is giMxi tor the environment. And
what could be wrong with that
Read The East Carolinian
attic iEast QJarnliman
is no� accepting applications for the following positions:
� Assistant News Editor
� Assistant Features Editor
� Copy Editor
� Editorial Production Manager
� Director of Advertising
� Business Manager
� Advertising Representative
� Typesetter
� Staff Writer
Anyone intent sled should appl in person at Tin East d:r Union office Rte office is
located on the second flc �r of the Publications Building across from Joyner Library
Deadline foi applications is April 4. For more information, call 757-6366.
EYE
EXAM
AND BUY ONE
GET ONE FREE!
The Optical Palace has joined the
Optometric Eye Care Center Family
To celebrate, we are offering you:
-a complete professional eye exam
Tor $39 (contact lens exams and
fittings extra)
AND
-Buy one pair of glasses at regular
price and get a second pair free
Call our office to schedule your $39 eye exam, or just stop by to
check out our w ide selection of frames.
Offer valid through March 29. 1991
(Some restrictions apply)
OPIOMCIWC
�Y�CAR�C�N1�R
PA

Gary Hams
Licensed
Optician
YOU'LL LIKE THE WAV WE CARE FOR YOIR EYES
703 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-4204
Dr. jzv.$ I.
Casey
Optometrist
7
2l
gjfr �30D�
& O 3,
-Q
JL
Cl
r g
2�2
O o
So ZSA
CAREER OPPORTTNITIES'CAREER OPPORTUNITIES-CAREER OPPORIT'NITIES
Wanted!
30 Undergraduate Scholars
Interested in Earning Top Salaries
With Fortune 500 Companies
The
Department of Manufacturing
School of Industry & Technology
Preparing Students for Managerial & Decision-Making Careers in Industry
Graduates of the Department of Manufacturing obtain some of the highest
starting salaries and the most challenging careers of any degree program on
campus with employers, such as:
Black and Decker
Burroughs Wellcome
Collins & Aikmen
Perdue
Glaxo
National Spinning
Stanadvne
ABB Power T&D
Yale Materials Handling
Fountain Power Boats
Tyson Foods
Grady White Boats
Carolina Power & Light
Great Northern Insurance
Weyerhauser
TRW
Simps�n Industries
Procter & Gamble
Northern Telecom
Burlington Industries
Yellow Freight
What Will Your Future Hold?
If you xe interested in learning nwinociaiaor in the
Department ctf ManrofacturuML cafi 757-6T65 to discuss
yew career





V
!
March 21,1991
6
Bhz gnat Qlarolinian
March 21, 1991
CLASSIFIEDS
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES:
rerm papers, dissertations, letters,
rtes, manuscripts, projects. Fast
tum around. Call loan 756-9255.
WANTED TO BUY
PUTTEES George low models
SSV V;i � n Pv Palmer
55a 51 . 8802 $300-5700; 8813
S5O0 Iron Master's SKXVSiaOO;
nsa Scottsdak S15OO-S2300.
Other Ping odds S25-S5O0, Abo
buying irons woods 919-524-4588
FOR SALE
FENDER GUITAR AMP Deluxe85
758-0464
Ql I ENSIZEWATERBED: S175JJ0,
Call Keith y. 830-3663.
QUEEN SIZE BLD with mattress
cover c all 355-0971 after 5:00 p.m
1980 HONDA CM 100 MOTOR-
CYCI E 1 ow mileage, new tires, and
full face helmet. Must sei! immedi-
ateh S7O0.00 or best offer. Call 756-
FOR RENT
CANNON COURT 2 bedroom, 1
I 2 bath, S350month Century 21,
rheRealtv Group o8-4i il.
SL BLtASE APT: 1 bedroom at 803
eoldl wers.availablenow.CaD
, AN Kit LOOKING FOR a female,
sxi k( � � � mn ate who is neat
ind responsibk willing to pay halt
of S500 rent plus utilities Call 931-
ONL BEDROOM APT for rent
starting n Maj Call s 1091
FOR SUMMER RENTAL: 2 bed-
room. bath cottage with full kitchen
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call for
information. 504-641-8003 Ext. 5920.
BIG OPPORTUNITY! Home typist
needed Act now! (600)875-0711 Ext
778.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS The
Greenville Recreation and Parks De-
partment will be having their first
organizational meeting for any in-
terested softball officials who would
like to officiate in the spring and
summer adult softball league. The
meeting will beheld at the Elm Street
Gym on Wednesday, March 12 at
7:00 p m 1: you are interested and
cannot make this meeting, please call
Charlie Davis, evenings at 752-2081
or Ben lames at 8304550
US GOVERNMENT JOBS Now
hinr.g" 24-hour request. it-Ot S75-
0711 Ft. 682.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: fisheries Earn $5,000
month Free transportation' Room
and Board! Cher8,000openings No
experience necessary Male or Fe-
male For t8-page employment
manual, send S8.95 to M&LRcseareh
Box 84008, Seattle. VVA 3S124 - Satis-
faction Guaranteed.
M A KE S500-S1500 WEEKLY stu ffi ng
envelopes at home! Start now - Rush
S.A.S.E. plus SI.00 to Home Em-
plovers, Inc. 1120 Plain 8B, Las
Cru'ces, NM 88001.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Part-time ware-
house work and driving. Must have
reliable car, mornings preferred.
Applv in person at Larrv's
Carpetland, 3010 E. 10th Street,
Greenville.
SUMMER JOBS! Counselors, Arts
and Crafts Directors and Lifeguards
are needed to work at Pisgah Girl
Scout Camp in the mountains of
North Carolina. For a summer of
excitement and memories, please call
1-800-522-6280.
GROWING SPORTSWEAR
COMPANY that sells merchandise
to sororities, fraternities is looking for
an energetic individual to be a cam-
pus representative. Work one night
and average $50-5100 per week
Knowledge of retail sales and the
Greek system is helpful. Call 1-800-
172-9415.
MODELS NEEDED for spring pro
motions for ladies apparel and ac-
cessories. No experience necessary.
Hurry in, promotions start soon.
Limited part-time sates positions also
available Applv . The Plaza, Mon-
Wed. I p m -4 p.m
PERSONALS
PERSONALS
HOOTIE AND THE BLOWFISH:
Friday night at CRocks. Be there for
another great JAM!
PI KAPPA ALPHA would like to
welcome back faculty and students
from break. Hope it was fun!
DELTA ZETA SPAGHETTI DIN-
NER wall be on Monday, Apnl 1st
from 5:30-8:30 p.m. in Mendenhall.
See any Delta Zeta for rickets.
A REMINDER TO FRESHMEN
who have achieved a GPA of 3.5 or
higher the deadline to join Phi Eta
Sigma National Honor Society is this
Friday, March 22. Bring your com-
pleted membership blank and mem-
bership fees to the Honors Program
Office, 124 Fleming Residence Hall.
PIKES: Tledges keep working hard
and you'll reach the ultimate goal of
being a P1KF. The Brothers.
CONCERNING THE TIP JAR sto-
len from Corrigan's on Sunday night
March 17th: Return money and we
will not press charges. You have
been identified. Call 758-3114
riKT: We needed another excuse to
party. So let's get leid! FIKO.
PERSONALS
COME TO THE FIZZ Thursday
night for ladies Night: All ladies in
FREE! Fndav night. Paul larditf -
Jazz; Saturday night Mike Hamer -
Improv Folk. Dnnk specials each
night.
SORORITIES, FRATERNITIES &
GRADUATES. Now is the time to
get your tuxes and gowns altered
and tailored for Spring formals and
graduation. Wealsododress making
30 years of experience and fast de
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
rvndableservice. Call 355-0354 Mi it
Fn. 910-5:30, 2421 Charles Street
(ireenviile.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
WANDS WORTH
COMMONS
GREENVO 1 ESNEWES1 NAM1
IN MULTI I-AMU Y HOI SING
Excellent location on Arlington Boulevard
Choice units tvaila&fc One and iw.
bedrooms. enorg cffitcni. carpet, range
refrigerator, uashcr irrr hook Vp� Mru k
construction, 41111-1 with vita wntltoon
l;RM BASIC ABl,i. iv
�ftl
I he Rctll (ir.up
758-4711
THE EAST
CAROLMAN
IS NOW
HIRING
WRITERS FOR
ALL
FOsrnoNS
Cruise Ship Jobs;
HIRING Men Women Summer!
Year Round PHOTOGRAPHERS
TOUflG ES SE ;scaTiON PERSONNEL
! � � enl ;a, p us crEE ave1 Caribbean
Ka�a 5a-aas Scot1 Pao'c We
CALL NOWI Cdi r�fundab�e
1 206-736-7000, Ext.6�0N?
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
SUMMER? let there anytime with
A1RHITCH 8 for$160 from the Fast
Coast' (Reported in NY Times k
Let's Go!) AIRH1TCH212-864-
2000.
DO YOU HAVE DIFFICULTY re
lating to people that don't under-
stand you? Do you feel guilt and
isolation associated with feelings of
homosexuality7 We understand and
are currently meeting on campus to
discuss these issues. Call 757-6661.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
it irtri Myrtle Beach. Phone "2-
jvZ v v .r a day week- I,
V
THE EmWCAROElNIAN
j
WANTED TO SUBLEASE very nice
ne b� dn n m ipt. from May-August
: . ther have option to move out,
resign 11 ne year lease or pav month
� rr ntr 5255.00 a month, low
ihlit es � shei ind drver hookup,
ussl p nice apartment com-
n . . I isa r 758-8016
(Mtf)
I NlVERSm PRTMENTS
289 � 5 ft Si reel
� . ated Scat
�Neat j ' Shopping Centers
�A - � From Higtway rMfOt Sbm
jiaiWd I f!er 5300 rr.unin
uniad I . I omray Wiihamt
� "gl5or S30- i937
1 x open VptS. 12 - j 30pna
�AZALEA ,ARI)F;nS-
jcm nd -��� ' -r.j MMftftd r�rrneaL�
�r jk � -�wt'�cji � �e��i S2A :�n
a - ca�c VtCBtt-k HOMk RENTALS aa
� unglm
itkj x J�
Ringgold Towers
a ! aktng ! eases tor August
bedroom, 2 bedroom, &
EfficeiK '� Apanments,
CALL 752-2865
KINGSTON
PLACE
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: FILLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
ALL Gl ASSESDISHESSILVERWARE
DISHWASHERPOTS & PANS
MAIL SERVICE-CLUBHOUSE-LAUNDROMAT
SWIMMING POOL & LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
i FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Sen-ices & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville, NC
Hours
M-F 8:30 am-3pm
Townhouse for rent
Students Only
Best Deal in Town
(Kingston Place)
�By Owner
�Accomodations for A students
�2 levels
� 2 12 baths
�Air conditioned
�Pool and clubhouse
�Excellenl condition
�SI SO per person
Owei will pav all utilities
except phone and cable
Phone (703)560
(PEN 1 NDER
NEW OWNERSHIP
SI U.I SERVING YCH
WIIIK.K Lm BP
wi) vn s f
KAN
IIMIISIKII 1
10 Mm 'CM M WITH
STUDENT ID ON REPAIRS
WIM KS HI
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
yv The Children's Home Society
w of North Carolina
�"�J A united Way Agency
50 States Seminars our nationally known
organization is seeking an assertive, dynamic
and motivated individual to teach and con-
duct "No Money Down" real estate seminars
in your area. You have seen these seminars
on T.V now conduct them yourself
$3,000.00 to $6000.00 per month possible
pt $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 possible tt.
Don't Delay, Call today for an interview,
(208) 342-0950 or (208) 338-9960.


EMENT
CROUP ADVISING FOR
PRF-OT STUDENTS
Group advising for Pre-CT stu-
dents will be held Monday, March
25th from 3:00-5:00 p.m. in Room
205, OT Classroom Belk Building.
If you are unable to attend the
group meetingon Monday, March
25th, the OT Department faculty
will meet with general college
advises on the following dates and
times: Tuesday, March 26th,9:00-
12:00; Wednesday, March 27th,
12:30-2.30; and Thursday, March
28th, 9:00-12:00.
MATH LAB
Students who received a grade of
Incomplete (I) in Math 0001 (Math
Lab) Fall semester must remove
that incomplete by 4:00 p.m Fri-
day, March 22,1991. The Math
Lab is open from 2:00 pm. until
4.00 p.m Monday through
Thursday, to allow students
needing to remove an incomplete
to take their remaining tests. A
student with an incomplete from
Fall semester who fails to com-
plete the required work by March
22nd will receive a grade of "F"
and be required to take Math 0001
again (Note: To be allowed to take
any test, a student must present a
"picture" ID to the Math Lab per-
sonnel).
BFr.I;TttAT10NFOR
STUDENTS
General College students should
contact their ad visers the week of
March 25-29 to make arrange-
ments for academic advising for
summerstermsand fall semesters,
1991. Early registration will begin
April 1 and end April 5.
MFH1CAI COLLEGE
ADMISSION TEST(MCAT)
The Medical College Admission
Test application has been received
by the ECU Testing Center. The
test will be offered on Saturday,
April 27,1991. Application blanks
are to becompleted and mailed to:
MCAT Registration, The Ameri-
can college Testing Program, P.O.
Box 414, 2255 North Dubuque
Road, Iowa City, IA 52243. Ap-
piications must be postmarked no
later than March 29,1991. Appli-
cations may be obtained from the
Testing Center, Speight Building,
Room 105, East Carolina Univer-
sity.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place-
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering one hour sessions to
assist you in the interviews on and
off campus. Sessions to help will
be held in the Career Planning
Room of the Bloxton House at 3
p.m. Come on any of the follow-
ing dates: March 5,19 and 25.
yniPFNTS WILL DIG
CERTSTRIDENT
SPIKEFEST'tt
East Carolina University students
will participate in the country's
largest intramural volleyball pro-
gram this year as CertsTrident
SpikeFest "91 makes a smashing
debut on college campuses. For
the inaugural season,an estimated
150,000 students at 600 colleges
and universities havealready reg-
istered to participate. CertsTri-
dentSpikeFest "91 is scheduled for
March 25-27. Students interested
in registering a team should con-
tact Paulette Evans at 757-6387.
CertsTridentSpikeFest'91 begins
when each of the participating
schools hosts an intramural 4-on-
4 co-ed volleyball tournament for
teams of 2 male and 2 female play-
ers. Varsity volleyball players are
ineligible to participate. In the
Spring, the winning team from
each on-campus tournament will
advance to one of 16 Regional Fes-
tivals with other winning teams to
determine Regional Champions
To keep the tournament within
the fun spirit of intramural com-
petition, there are not plans for a
national championship Because
volleyball is one ol the most popu-
lar sports on col lege campuses, we
felt that this would be an ideal wa v
to reach active college students
and provide them with a fun and
competitive activity, "said Robert
Clouston, Vice President of Pnxi
uct Management of the Warner-
Lambert Company.
PLANT SAUE
The ECU Biobgv Club will be
sponsoring a plant sale April 3 &
4. The sale will take place in the
BiologyC.reenhouse,room BS-111
from 7:30 a.ml :00 p.m.
Satan attem
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Features F ditor
Si
Movies such as 'The ExorasT and "The Omen
Mrted a national fascination with (heoccuH But, what
could cause normal Godfearing Americans to be at
tractedtotrvdarkrnysteriesoftheunderworid? ould
it be SATAN!?
i es Ihe mam reason hemp, nothing is m re fright-
ening than string the Prince t I'arkness plot the
downfall of mankind Sure Fredd) Krueger
Vorhees, Michael Meyers and a slev � ther slash-
and-hat klackeysinsptreaudjenoestoboltthedo -
� under the bed Hut hr true terror rvothinj
sures up to Beelzebub.
fust when you think Satan ha ��
hen. pit tor good, he pops up again men- pisse
than everunvntK the Prino I ies ha- a
weapon against the force; fgood
Health
fair
begins
tomonow
By Sherrilynn Jernigan
Staff Writer
( an � afford medical examina-
tion Vfci some ad vice on health
and fitness?
ECt s Recreational Services
and Student Health Services will
present the iealth & WeUness Fair
tomorrow from 10a.m to 1:30p.m.
in the Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room.
Suzanne KeUerman, health
educator, said the event will give
students the opportunity to take
advantage of free health checks,
demonstrations and exhibits.
Free health screenings will in-
clude examinanons tor glaucoma,
blood pleasure, dental problem
Mood u car and bodv composition
Baptist religion of
Woodie
This display at the
manufacturers of 0
Chotesterol che �
dietary analyse a
Exhibits
and safet) and dn.
abuse led I
as well as safer tarmi
displays
Individuals
Intramural SerK a I
piOonai 1 nerapyCc
dent Nutrition Cro
By Sherrilynn Jernigan
sutt Writer
Baptists make up one of the1
largest groups oi the world's Prot-
estants, especially in the southern
'ocion of the" United States
IVrr. ing their rule of faith and
practice from the Bible Bap4
ernpfiasizeapriman byaltj I es is
Chnst. who forgives sir ind gives
eternal life through faith
The Baptist ordinances include
the 1 ord's Supper and Baptism b
immersion in water
lohn Smyth founded the first
KaptiM Church in Amsterdam in
l60,andRogerWiffiarnsorgaruzed
�he first Baptist congregation in 1639
Though Baphstsand lehovah s
Vitnesscs are both Protestant reh-
nons.some of their beliefs are quite
different, ac, rd
inson of the Mei
Church on C.r -
Vinson says
nesses seemingl) st
their beliefs witi i
the Bible that -
points But ever I
must be consid- i

Trmirv is
the Bible does sug
tfietlueemarufes) 1
mlohnU lJ � I
that hath seen me
Father ! an
Father in me mic
you anotherComl
abide with you tore'
Vinson als I
r seems to be a dirq
theTnnirvwnththe
Hilton hosts second annual
Bv Tracey Kirk
Special to The Fjs� Carolinian
If vou missed the second an-
nual Greenville home and garden
- how w hile on spnng baak, never
tar The show was so successhil
�hat the staff of sponsor WCZI983
FM. teels that a third annual home
and garden show is certain
This vears show, held the
veekend of March ninth, at the
.blton Inn, C.reenville, was orga
rued bv WCZI president arxi gen
-Tal manager, Henry Hiton. The
,how included more than 70 par-
ticipants promoting a vanetv of
�.Toductsand services related to the
home and garden
Some local businesses partio
ranng in the show included The
ardage Shop, Pittsburgh Paint,
vpress Glen Renmment Commu-
nity, Greenville Utility Company.
Vill Rogers Carpet and Rug,
kitchen and Bath Decisions and
lewlett Packard
The home and garden show
ponsor, WCZI, is a local radio sta-
tion described by staf� members as
Hult contemporary, featuring
� �pular nines from the 'ffls, '70s
nd '8o Muchhke the radio station
'hat organized it, the Greenville
home and garden
towards the profess
of Greenville The
specifically targets 'I
als that have a wa
improvmgormaint
and garden homo
The obvious pr
show is advertise
motion tor both thl
and their ad vertis r
garden show also prj
torum tor different
hshments in the aj
allows companies
products, conduct
and provide explai
services
"It's gxxxi tor
nesseslandit sgoo
said. One of the tr
bcipants, Keith Bish
Pool and Supply a�
Bishton says that tl
is great exposure ic
nesses and althouj
participants only
products and servi
the sales definite!
'Teople remembe
said
This yea rsshoN
Hilton Inn's large I
adjoining hall and!





21 1991
jl?c lEnfit (Harulintan
Makh21. 1991
SERVICES OFFERED
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
PERSONALS
PERSONALS
i trers,
pets. I .is!
WANTED TO BUY
II 111 ks
EAS WORK' EXCELLENT PAY! HELP WANTED: Tart time ware
Assemble productsat home. Call for house work and driving. Must have
nformahon 504-641 8003Ext 5920 reliable car, mornings preferred
Apply in person al 1 arry s
BIG OPPORTUNITY! Hometypist arpetland, 3010 E. 10th Street,
needed1! Actnow! (609)875 0711 Ext ' ireenville
SUMMER OKS! Counselors, Arts
SOFTBAL1 OFFICIALS rhe and Crafts Directors and Lifeguards
. t , iin m(j ParksDe ar(' needed to work at Pisgah Girl
. . A � � � � � , first Seoul (.amp in the mountains of
ahonal meetine foi anv in North Carolina For a summer of
terested Softball officials who would exot mentand nru rr nes pie is can
( . Spnr,g and ' nX 62$
� id ill si ftball league The
cting will beheld at the Elm Streel GROWING SPORTSWEAR
C. " Wednesda March 12 al COMPANY that sells mer
HOOTIE AND THE BLOWFISH COME TO TH1 FIZZ
Friday night at CRocks Betherefor nightl rLadii
anothergreat 1AM' FRE1 I rida
Jazz; Sahirda nigl � v' - '
PI KAPPA ALPHA would like to P� Folk Dun
welcome back faculty and students n'8n
from break om' it was fun!
soRORmES, frad rmth s
DEI I A ZETA SPAGHETTI DIN- GRADUATES
MR will be on Mondav April 1st � Y� ' "�"
S 50-8:30 p.m. in Mendenhall and '
See ,nv Delta Zeta for tickets graduaho. W. -
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED

DISPLAY CLASSFED
In
3(1
FOR SALE
! 1 l -1 K 11 K W'P I Vluxi s"
w 11 KHl n
I
I: vou are interested and
ke this meeting pleas i
I s GOVERNMENT OKs ,
iesl N19 S
ities fraternirie �� � i .
n?s ' �" '� � i � ' f
per w
Mom is m nun
M( TOR- 1 K 'si MM! K 1 Ml'l ("
Ml fisheries :
FOR RENT
M kl S500-S1500WEI M
: � '
Cruise Ship Jobs
PERSONALS
HI MUM. FOR 1 I ROPI I HIS
st MM! R?
� , . . � � . from the 1
M
no MH H W I DIM II 11 n
A REMINDER I( FRESHMEN
who haw achieved a (IP A of 5 5 or
higher the deadline to oin Phi Fra
Si cma National Honor Societv is this
n March 22 Bring youi orr
pleted membership blank and m rr
bership fees to the Honor- Program
( m ' 14 Fleming Re; li i �
1'IKI s P edges keep rkinghard
ind thi ilol
h i Ph hi Broth rs
CONCERNING TH1 FIT AR sto
. . . sonSui la
v I in h 'tr Rerui i none; � I ����
nol press i arges rtavi
� . n � � � - � I 1117"H I
1 !K i '� i needed ai ther exo - I
i��� s. lei - eel leid! I IK�I
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
! v V I �!�' I 11

THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
IS NOW
HIRING
WRITERS FOR
ALL
POSITIONS
sX-4l I
HIRING
(Alt M O W �
1 206 736 7000 Ext.600N?
- It " ISS
.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
I i
ADVERTISE IN
THE EAST CAROUNfAN
I Sl
VJENTS
KINGSTON
PLACE
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS TOR FALL SEMESTER
INTF.RF.STKD STl DKNTSSHO! I.D
CALL 758-5393
Bl II I ESPECIALLY FOR EC I Ml DENTS
Fl 1.1 Y I ' RN1SHI I) APAR l"MENTS
Al ! C.I SSES DISHES Sll ! K VA RI
DISHW SHER POTS & PANS
CE� CT I BH ICSFI V SI
a IMM1M i ' )l & LOTS M' RI
ATA PRICE THAT WILL
OMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
( arolina Preunano (enter
7 57-0003
11! E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville, NC
Bsaucs
M-E S:30am-3pm
I s. nl
Studeni � ��
Be � ! i '� '
Kinj t. PI
� B Owi
� '�
�: lev
� 2 I 2 batl
�An
�Pool and .
�Excellent
�$151
( )u �
e
Phone i r03t 5(
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices.
�Free, confidential
pregnancy
�Financial t
�Help select adopUve family
1-800-632-1400
The Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
1 A United Hay Agency
50 States Seminars our nationally know n
organization i seeking an assertive, dvnaiiik
and motivated individual to teach and eon-
duet "No Money Down real estate seminars
in your area. You have seen these seminars
on T.V now conduct them yourself
$3,000.00 to $6000.00 per month possible
pt $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 possible N.
Don't Delay, Call Uxla for an inten ievv,
(208) 342-0950 or (208) 338 9960.
l'KJLJl STUDENTS
;r n ad ng for Pre H sru-
. . : w nday,Mar h
� � �m in Rtx m
- � Building
�-� 11 ab ' i it-fend the
pmeetii ' ' nday,March
theO Dej artment faculty
neel � " general college
iesi f thef ?llowingdatesand
rime ' esdaj March 26th.9:00-
nesda) March 27th,
hursday, Marrh
�' I 0 . '
day, March 22, 1991 The Math
! .ib is open trom 2Q0 pm until
4:00 p m , Mondav through
rhursday, to allow students
needing to remove an incomplete
to take their remaining test A
student with an incomplete trom
Fall semester who tails to com
plete the required work by Match
22nd will receive a grade of "V
and be required to take Math 0001
again (Note: To be allowed to take
anv test, a student must present a
"picture" !D to the Math Lab per-
sonnel).
RFCilSTRATIONFOR
r.FNFRAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
MATH LAB
. ts ho recei ved a grade of
IncompleteOin Math 0001 'Math
� c -mester must remove Cneral College students should
vbvWlp.m.Fn- contact their advisers the week of
March 2 2(' to make arrange
ments for academic advising tor
summers term sand fall semesters,
1991. Earlv registration will begin
April 1 and end Apnl 5
MFniCAl. COLLEGE
ADMISSION TEST (MCAT)
rhe Medical College Admission
Test apphca tion has been recei ved
by the ECL Testing Center I "he
test will be offered on Saturday,
April 27,1991. Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to:
MCAT Registration, The Ameri-
can college Testing Program, P.O.
Box 414, 2255 North Dubuque
Road, Iowa City, 1A 52243. Ap-
plications must be postmarked no
later than March 29,1991 Appli-
cations mav be obtained from the
resting Center, Speight Building,
Room 105, East Carolina Univer-
sity
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
ITie Career Planning and Place-
ment Service in the Bloxton I louse
is offering one hour sessions to
assist vou in the interviews on and
off campus. Sessions to help will
be held in the Career Planning
R(m of the Bloxton House at 3
p.m. Come on anv of the follow-
ing dates March 5,19 and 25
STl IDFNTS WILL DIG
CERTSfTRIDENT
SnKEFEST'91
East Carolina Universitv students
will participate in the country's
largest intramural vollevball pro-
gram trm year as . erts Iridenl
Spikel-ost 91 makes ,i smashing
debut on college campuses For
the inaugural season an estimated
150,000 student al � colleges
and universities h �vealready reg
istered to participate erts In
dentSpikefest 91 is scheduled for
March 25-27 Students interested
in registering a team should con
tact Paulette Evans at 757-6387
Certs rridentSpikeFesI 91 begins
when each of the participating
schcxils hosts .in intranuir.il Ton
4 co-ed volleyball tournament tor
teams of 2 male and 2 female plav
ers. Varsitv volleyball players are
ineligible to participate In the
Spring, the winning team from
each on-campus tournament will
advance tooneot 16Regional Res
rivals w ith other w inr ing ' ai
determine Regionalhampions
lo keep die tournament within
the fun spirit of intramura
petition then are i ' �'
national . hamptonshtp Be aust
vollevball isorn rnosl pTu
larsportsonaHlegecampuses c
felt that this would be an ideal wax
to rea h active oltege students
and provide mem with a fun and
competitive activity, said Robert
louston, Vice President 't Prod
ud Management of the Wamei
! ambert C twnpanx
ELAfln SALL
I he K 1 Bn-iogv C lub will h'
sponsoring a plant sole Apnl ; ft
4 llx' s,iii- win take place in the
Biology( ireenhou9e,roomB8-1 H
from 7 M) ,i m 1 00p.m.
Satan attem
Bv Stuart Oliphant
Health
fair
begins
tomorrow
B Sherrih nn ernigan
Woodie
iyj. SSU
Baptist religion or"
B - n e
,
1 ilton hosts second anri
B I race Kirk
nun

V teels 1
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li


how
htkIucI
(mpan
it, hen and Batl cisions and
kard
me md . irden show
ponsi � VCZLis
lescnbedtri
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March 21,1991
(Bht jsaat (Carolinian
7
March 21, p,
DISPLAY CLASSif-
Tv idableservice Cal 1355)354 Mofl
0-5:3 2421 Charles St
'aul fardiff i Ireenville.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIF D
UNITIES A � andTHE EAST CAROLINIAN
SSIFIED1SNOW 1
I ��HIRING !
WRITERS FOR
ALL
POSITIONS
w 1 . HPI
II
(fjHS N : 'I 1 f;K ING YOU �851 � � vs PRODUCTS A A ROMA � M RANI
IINTHS'I KI I 1 hist oi r WITH STl DEVT'I D ON REPAIRS
�rwi) si kvici
M 1 n�ih Strcd ' rrcin ilk' N(
'regnant
I help making choices
Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
Financial assistance
Help select adoptive family
0-632-1400
Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
national! known
i assertive, dynamic
il to teach and cort-
real estate seminars
teen these seminars
them yourself
her month possible
00.00 possible rt.
Tor an interview,
:08)338 9960.
?rtsTrident
la smashing
lpuses. For
wunMmaitd
) colleges
alreadvreg-
rrKln
:heduled lor
Is interested
should con-
il 757-6387
fesl 91 begins
jrticipating
murai 4-on
rnament for
male play-
players are
ite. In the
leam from
wment will
pgional Fes-
tivals with other winning teams to
determine Regional Champions.
W Map bv tournament within
the tun spin! of intramural com-
petition, there are not plans for a
national championship "Because
volleyball is one of the most popu-
lar sports on collegecampuses, we
felt that this would bean ideal way
to reach active college students
and provide them with a fun and
competitive activity'said Robert
Oouston, Vice President of Prod-
uct Management of the Warner-
Lambert Company
PLANT SAfi
The ECU Biology Club will be
sponsoring a plant sale April 3 k
4 The sale will take place in the
BkilogyC.reenfcniw.rwm �111
from 730 am-1:(X) p.m.
Satan attempts to reverse creation in "Warlock"
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Features Editor
Movies such as 'The Exorcist" and "The Omen"
started a national fascination with the occult. But, what
could cause normal Cod-fearing Americans to be at-
tracted tothedarkmysteriesof the underworld? Could
it be SATAN!?
Yes. The mam reason being, nothing is more fright-
ening than seeing the Prince of Darkness plot the
downfall of mankind. Sure, Freddy Krueger, Jason
Vorhees, Michael Meyers and a slew of other slash-
ed hack lackeys inspireaudiences to bolt the doora
check under the bed. But for true terror, nothing mea-
sures up to Beelzebub.
lust when you think Satan hasbeen banished to the
fiery pit for good, he pops up again more pissedoff
than ever Currently, the Prince of Lies has a new
weapon against the forces of good � "Warlock
Health
fair
begins
tomorrow
By Sherrilynn Jernigan
Staff Writer
Can't afford medical examina-
tions? Need some ad vice on health
and fitness?
ECU's Recreational Services
and Student Health Services will
present the Health & Wellness Fair
tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room.
Suzanne Kellerrnan, health
educator, said the event will give
students the opportunity to take
advantage of free health checks,
demonstrations and exhibits.
Free health screenings will in-
clude examinations for glaucoma,
MMt denial pa!
artrJrtody composition.
"Warlock" tells the tale of a warlock's (Julian
Sands) quest to unite the pages of the original satankr
bible, The Grand Grimoir, whichcontains thesecret name
of God. If successful, the warlock will beable to reverse
creation. Move over Dr. Bombay.
The movie begins in late 17th century Boston.
Imprisoned in a tower, the warlock receives a typical
Puritan death sentence, burned alive over a basket of
cats. This seems to please the resident witch hunter,
Giles Redfeme (Richard E. Grant), who tells the war-
lock in Shakespearean fashion that the party is over.
However, Satan hasother plans. Suddenly, the warlock
and Redfeme are whisked away to 20th century lxs
Angeles.
While in L. A the warlock visits a soothsayer and
learns of Satan's scheme to reveal the secret name of
God. Satan tells the warlock that he will be rewarded
by becoming the chosen one, a sort of Damien. How-
ever, finding the Grand Grimoir proves difficult con-
Woodie
This display at the upcoming health lair was sponsored by Lifestyles,
manufacturers of condoms and pretty handy with a lathe as well.
Cholesterol checks will cost $5 and
dietary analyses will cost $2.50.
Exhibits will be set up for crime
and safety and drug and alcohol
abuse led by ECU's Lt. Keith Knox,
as well as safer tanning and safe sex
displays.
Individuals from ECU's
intramural Services, Student Qocu
' palo&at TTlwapyCNrWtiW, b
dent Nutrition Group, American
Cancer Society and the Pitt Coi intv
Health Department will also speak
about various categories of health
and fitness.
Becoming a popular style of
aerobic exercise, step fitness will be
demonstrated by members of
inrraumural Services along with a
self-defense demonstration
The fair will also include free
See Fair, page 10
Baptist religion of choice in South
By Sherrilynn jernigan
Staff Writer
Baptists make up one of the
largest groups of the world's Prot-
estants, especially in the southern
region of the United States.
Deriving their rule of faith and
practice from the Bible, Baptists
emphasize a primary loyalty to Jesus
Chnst, who forgives sin and gives
��ternal life through faith.
The Baptist ordinances include
tk lord's Supper and Baptism by
immersion in water.
lohn Smyth founded the first
Baptist Church in Amsterdam in
I609,and Roger Williams organized
the first Baptist congregation in 1639.
Though Baptistsand Jehovah's
Witnesses arc both Protestant reli-
gions, some of their belief sare quite
different, according to Rev. E.T.
Vinson of the Memorial Baptist
Church on Greenville Boulevard.
Vinson says Jehovah's Wit-
nesses seemingly support each of
their beliefs with a few verses from
the Bible that seem to prove their
points. But everything in the Bible
must be considered, he continues.
Unlike Mosingo, who says the
Trinity is not supported, Vinson says
the Bible does suggest the Trinity,
the three ma nifestatioasof one God,
in John 14:9-11,17, which say, he
that hath seen me hath seen the
Father lamintheFatheT,andthe
Father in me and he shall give
you another Comforter, that he may
abide with you forever
Vinson also says Genesis 126-
27 seems to be a direct reference to
the Trinity with the word, us "And
God said , Let us make man in our
image, after our likeness. So God
created man in his own image
According to Jehova's Wit-
nesses, there are three gods: Jehova,
Chnst and the Holy Spirit, Vinson
says.
In addition, he says God is
omnipotent and almighty, and he
can tx? in three unique forms at one
time.
Disagreeing with Mosingo
even further, Vinson says he be-
lieves the fiery place for the wicked
called hell does exist and that
Christians inherit etrrnal life in
heaven, not on Earth.
Matthew 18, "it is better for
thee to en terintolife halt or maimed,
rather then having two hands or
See Baptist, page 8
Hilton hosts second annual home and garden show
By Tracey Kirk
Special to The East Carolinian
If you missed the second an-
nual Greenville home and garden
show while on spring break, never
fear The show was so successful
?hat the staff of sponsor WCZI983
FM, feels that a third annual home
and garden show is certain.
This years show, held the
weekend of March ninth, at the
Hilton Inn, Greenville, was orga-
nized by WCZI president and gen-
ial managpT, Henry Hiton. The
show included more than 70 par-
ticipants promoting a variety of
, -rodnets and services related to the
home and garden.
Some local businesses partici-
pating in the show included: The
Yardage Shop, Pittsburgh Paint,
Cypress Glen Retirement Commu-
nity, Greenville Utility Company,
Will Rogers Carpet and Rug,
Kitchen and Bath Decisions and
Hewlett Packard.
The home and garden show
sponsor, WCZI, is a local radio sta-
tion described by staff members as
�dult contemporary, featuring
inputor runes from the '60s, '70a
ind'aos. Much like the radio station
that organized it, the Greenville
home and garden show is geared
towards the professional residents
of Greenville. The show however
specifically targets those individu-
ate that have a vested interest in
improvingor maintaining the home
and garden: homeowners.
The obvious premise of such a
show is advertisement and pro-
motion for both the radio station
and their advertisers. The home and
garden show also pro videsa unique
forum for different business estab-
lishments in the area. The show
allows companies to display their
products, conduct demonstrations
and provide explanations of their
services.
"If s good for them (the busi-
nesses) and ifs good for us Hiton
said. One of the trade show par-
ticipants, Keith Bishtonof Greenville
Pool and Supply agrees with Hiton.
Bishton says that this type of show
is great exposure for the local busi-
nesses and although most of the
participants only promote their
products and services at the show,
the sales definitely come later.
"People remember you Bishton
said.
This years show was held in the
Hilton Inn's large banquet room,
adjoining had and a tent-covered
area outdoors. Colorful booths and
elaborate displays filled the hotel.
In addition to the other festivi-
ties, WCZI radio announcer David
Horn conducted live broadcasts
from the Hilton throughout the
weekend, promoting the show on
the air while simultaneously enter-
taining those individuals at the
show.
WCZI sales representatives
Kirk Smith, Steve Gowan and Bill
Cozart also interviewed various
trade show participants. Conces-
sions were sold by the Hilton to
enthusiastic homeand garden show
spectators. One Hilton employee,
Laurie McLaughlin, more than had
her hands full serving food and
drink to what she describes as a
really good turnout.
Last year the trade show had 65
exhibits whichdrewmorethan 1,200
observers The increased number
ofpartiripantsandexhibits,coupled
with the weekend's beautiful
weather, brought in even better
numbers this year, according toone
WCZI spokesperson.
The show has been an in-
credible success Hiton said, "and
we're excited about the Cad that
people in thecornmunity responded
so well again this year
sidenng that it was divided into separate sections and
scattered across the United States.
In his quest to assemble the Grand Grimoir, the
Warlock must face his old nemesis, Redfeme. Aiding
Redfeme in his battle against evil is Kassandra (Lori
Singer).
Overall, "Warlock" is a lot of fun. With a clever,
wrath-of-God soundtrack, "Carmina Burana and
"Bewitched" inspired incantations, "Warlock" man-
ages to create an almost comedic atmosphere.
Another howl is the wardrobe. Considering that
both the warlock and Redfeme are 300-year-olds, it
would seem that they would appear slightly out of
place. This is true for Redfeme, who resembles a de-
mented Davy Crocket, but the warlock looks more like
a refugee from Saturday Night Live's Sprockets than a
conjuror.
Warlock is currently showing at the Carolina East
Cinema.
Photo Courtaoy of Trimaifc Ptetur�
Julian Sands, a wily warlock, makes a deal with the
Devil to unravel the order of the universe.
Queen makes up for '80s drought
By Cliff Coffey
Statf Writer
Since Vanilla Ice stole the basic
music from Queen's song, "Under
Pressure to fuel his number one
song, "Ice Ice Baby Queen's name
has been said more often. Even the
radio had begun to play old Queen,
including "Under Pressure Well
now Queen has given Vanilla Ice a
whole new album from which he
can "borrow" music. It is called
Innuendo.
With Queen's fourteenth studio
album, they have shown time and
time again why they are a super
group. With classics ranging from
arockanthem. "We Will Rock You
to an operatic song, "Bo:icmian
Rhapsody to a groovy 50s style
popsong, "Crazy Little ThingCafied
Love to just plain fun songs, "Fat
Bottomed Girls" and " AnotherOne
Bites The Dust Now they are out
to prove that their time is not up.
Innuendo is very eclectic in its
material and Queen preforms it afl
with style, finesse and savoir faire.
Queen allows each member to do
his best and to get into the spotlight
for themselves. The result is one of
the best efforts the band has re-
leased in years
Bnan May continually proves
that he is arguably the most versa-
tile, accomplished guitarist in mu-
sic today. With the surge of speed
riffs today. May still takes his time
to make each note very noticeable
and he proves that he can do it with
speed too.
Freddie Mercury lets his voice
ease-out of his throat, and the impact
stays lmgenng in the air for an im-
measurable amount of time. He
takes the lyrics and makes you be-
lieve that he was bom to sing them.
His voice has been the mainstay ot
Queen since its inception. Hismulti-
octa ve voice allows formanydiffer-
entstyJesof music and many diverse
sounds
Innuendo is much stronger than
The Miracle, their previous effort, in
its utilization of their diversity. In-
nuendo allows Queen to fully
expressthedifferent styles that they
have been perfecting over the past
18 years. They utilize the epic song
("Innuendo"), the perplexing love
song ("1 Can't Live With You"), the
rock anthem song ("Headlong"),
andtheinstrumentalsong("Biiou").
Although the songs are well
orchestrated, the filler songs can
sometimes get monotonous. "I'm
Going Slightly Mad" tends to get
redundantly dull and "Don't Try
So Hard" winds up just lingering
around. But when they throw out
the filler, they know what works.
Though only two songs are what
most would consider "hard rock
they know when they are called for
and how to arrange them. They
aren't concerned with over power-
ing the song with loud incoherent
sounds, they are more concerned
with a clear, precise sound that is
rich with quality.
The lyrical content of Innuendo
is as diverse as the styles of music
that they use. One minute they are
singing about the questions of the
universe and the powers of God (If
there's an answer to the questions
we feel bound to ask Show your-
self-destroy our fears-release your
mask), the next they are singing of
sex (Are you ready for the sting
Gonna waste that thing Hitman is
king). The messages in their lyrics
in the past few years had been strik-
ingly odd for men that are mostly
interested in having a good time
(You take my body I give you
heat You say you're hungry I
give you meat. Get down make
love).
No w i t seems tha t they are con-
cerned with the condition of the
world today. From The Vvbrte, the
song "Is This The World We Cre-
ated?" asks, "Is this the world we
created, we make it on our own Is
this the world we devastated, right
to the bone If there's a God in the
sky looking down What can he
See Queen,page 9
B '
INNUENDO
Photo Courtesy of Hoiywood HoeomHf
Queen, a band that some say had lost its will to live, makes a surprising,
strong comeback with their latest release. Innuendo.
Coming Up
ATTICNEW DEU CROCKS MENDENHALL
ThursdayThursday Friday Thursday
SnowThe Other People Hooty and the Blowfish Friday
FridayFriday Saturday Saturday
The StegmondsManifest Destiny Private Party Darkman
SaturdaySaturday Sunday
Quadra NixxDillon Fence A Clockwork Orange





March 21,1991
GUje iEaot UUirulinum
7
It
THE EAST
( ROUNlAN
IS NOW
MIKING
RITERSFOR
A! L
roSITIONS
: M�I R
RSHIP
NCi YOI
1 ! 1 l WITH
MRS

I?1li
I 1
choices.
�0-632-1400
MOW !)
n
vi lamic
and con-
seminars
seminars
11
nnMiiii possible
1 possible li.
toi .mi inter iew,
9960
thei � inning teams to
� .ii I h.impions
� ament within
rttramural cow-
are not plans for a
iptonship Because
� fthemostpopu-
� �� ampuses,we
s would bean ideal way
rea h active college students
and provide them with a run and
armpetitive activity, said Robert
touston,Vice President of Plod-
ucl Management ot the Warner
l amberfompany
OATilSALL
rhe K I F3iotogluh will be
sponsoring a plant sale April 3 &
4 rhe sale will take place in the
tVlovv.rtvnlHniyrixmiRS-lll
from 7 K)a.m l 00p.m.
I �ukl
I
lnnir.il I on
It ament for
� rnaleplay
players are
ite In the
team from
lament will
pgional I es
Satan attempts to reverse creation in "Warlock

By Stuart Oliphant
Antanl t iMiurt-s Fdilor
Movies such as The Exorcist and The Omen"
started .i national fascination with theoccult But. what
could cause normal God tearing Americans to be at-
tracted to the dark mysteriesof the underworld ?ould
�the SATAN!?
i es rhe main reason being: nothing is more fright
wing than seeing the Prime of Darkness plot the
downfall ot mankind Sure, Freddy Krueger, Jason
nrhees Michael Meyers and a slew of other slash
in,I h.n Uackesinspireaudioncostohltthediorand
k under the bed But tor true terror, nothing mea-
sures up to Beelzebub.
lust when you minkSatanhasbeen banished to the
fu r mi for gpod, he pops up again more pissed-off
than ever Currently, the Prince of I ies has a new
we.ipi n against the forces of good "Warlock
Health
fair
begins
tomonow
By Sherrilvnn lernigan
Statt Writer
"Warlock" tells the tale of a warlock's (Julian
Sands) quest to unite the pages of the original Satanic
bible. 7V(iWCrmii,whichcontains the secret name
of God. It successful, die warlock win be able to reverse
creation Move over IV Bombay.
The movie begins in late 17th century Boston
Imprisoned in a tower, the warlock receives a typical
Puritan death sentence, burned alive over a basket of
cats Tins seems to please the resident wiu h hunter,
( ali Redferne (Richard E. (.rant), who tells the war
lock in Shakespearean fashion that the partv is over.
1 lowever, Satan has other plans Suddenly, the warltnk
and Redferne are whisked away to 20th century I os
Angeles
While in I. A . the warlock visits a soothsayer and
learns (t Satan's scheme to reveal the sex ret name of
(. .oil Satan tells the warlock that he will be rewarded
by becoming the chosen one, a sort of I Umien 1 low-
ever, finding the (rtmd Grimoii proves difficult con-
� � afford medical examina
bons? eod some advice on health
and fitness?
ECU's Recreational Services
and Student Health Services will
pi i ieni the I iealth & Wellness I air
tomorrow trom 10.nn to 1:30p.m.
'ii the Mendenhall Student (enter
Multi Purpose Room.
Suzanne Kellcrman, health
educator, said the � er.t vmII give
students the opportunity to t.ike
advantage of free health checks,
demonstrations and exhibits.
Free health screenings will in-
clude examinations tor glaucoma.
Mood pressure, dental problems.
Moor! sugar, indhodv Composition
Woodie
This display at the upcoming health fair was sponsored by I ifestyles
manufacturers of condoms and pretty handy with a lathe as well
("holesterol checks will cost $5 and
dietary analyses will cost 2 50
Exhibits will be set up for crime
and satetv and drug and alcohol
abuse led by ECU's 1 I Keith Knox,
as well as safer tanning and safe sex
displays
Individuals from ECU'S
Intramural Services, Student Occu
pittonal 1 herdpy Committee, Stu
dent Nutrition Group, American
ancer Societv and the Pitt ountv
1 Iealth I epartrnenl w ill also speak
about various categories of health
and fitness
Becoming a popular style ot
aerobic exercise step fitness will h
demonstrated by members ol
lntraumural Services along with a
selt-dotense demonstration.
The tair will also include tret
See Fair page 10
Baptist religion of choice in South
B Sherrilvnn Jernigan
Matt Writer
!iiptiss make up one Of the
largest groups ol the world's Prot-
estants, especially in the southern
n of the I nited states
I eri ing their nileot faith and
practice trom the Bible, Baptists
empruszea primary loyalty tojesus
hrist, ho forgives sin and gives
ti rnal life thr. �ugh faith.
I he Baptist ordinary esiro hide
the Lord's Supper and Baptism by
. i tii -n in water
lohn Srm th founded the first
iaptist Church in Amsterdam in
I6i ' and RogerW illiamsorgaruzed
the first Baptisti ongregatjoninl639.
rhough Bapbstsand fehovah's
Witnesses are both Protestant reli-
a ns, sniiH'oftheirbeliofsarequite
different, according to Rev. E.T
inson of the Memorial Baptist
Church on Greenville Boulevard
Vinson sa s fehov ah's v 11
nesses seemingly support each of
their beliefs with a tew verses from
the Bible that seem to prove their
punts But everything in the Bible
must be considered, he continues.
I'nhke Mosingo who says the
rrinity is not supported, Vinson says
the Bible does suggest the Trinity.
thethreemanifestationsofone( lod,
in lohn 14 9-11,17, which say he
th.it hath seen me hath seen the
Father I am in the lather, and the
Father in me and he shall give
you anotherC omforter.thathomav
abide with you forever
Vinson also says lenests 1:26-
2? seems to bo a direct reference to
the Trinity with the word, us "And
l .k1 said I et us make man in our
image, after our likeness i ,oi
treated man in his own image
According to lehova's Wit
nesses, there are three gods: lehova,
Christ and the I loly Spirit Vinson
s.is
In addition, he sa s ' �h1 is
omnipotent and alrrughtv and he
can be in three untom forms at one
time
Disagreeing with Mosingo
t i'ii further, in n ays he be
lieves the turv plat e t t the "i' U-d
called hill does exist and that
( hnsttans inherit eternal life in
ht 'awn not on Earth
Matthew 18:8, it is better tor
thiv to enter into lite halt or maimed
rather then having two hands or
See Baptist page 8
Hilton hosts second annual home and garden show
By Tracey Kirk
Special to The Kast Carolinian
If you missed the second an-
i.il ' ireenville home and garden
how while on spring bnik, never
ar l"he show was so successful
'hat the statt of sponsor WCZI 983
V fei'Is that a third annual home
md garden show is certain.
This vears show, held the
veekend 0 March ninth, at the
hlion Inn, (.reenville. was orga
ird bv W( I president aixl gen
ral manager, Henry Hiton. The
how mduded more than 70 par-
ticipants promoting a variety of
iroductsand servtoesretated to the
�inx' and garden
Son- local businesses partici-
pating in the show included The
ardage Shop, Pittsburgh Paint,
vpress(,lenRetir(Tnrnt( ommu-
ttv, Creenville Utility Company,
Vill Rogersarpet and Rug,
K itrhen and Bath IVcisions and
I lewlett Packard
rhe home and garden show
ponsor, W( is a local radio sta
N n dtlU'fced by staff members as
�dult rontmporary. featuring
.ipular tunes from tlv HK '7fK
.nd'Hfk Muchlikrtheradiostation
�hat organized it, th" (.reenvilk-
home and garden show is geared
towards the professional residents
of Greenville. The show however
specifically targets those individu
als that have a vested interest in
improvingor maintaining the home
and garden: homeowners
The obvious premise of such a
show is advertisement and pro-
motion for both the radio station
and their advertisers. Thehomeand
garden show also pro videsa unique
forum for different business estab-
lishments m the area. The show
allows companies to display their
products conduct demonstrations
and provide explanations of their
services.
"It's good for them Ithe busi
nessesl and it's gxd for us" Hiton
said One of the trade show par-
tiopants,KnthBishtonof(.ro,nvilk
Pool and Supply agrees with Hiton.
Bishton says that this type of show
is great exposure for the local busi-
nesses and although most of the
participants onlv promote their
products and services at the show,
the sales definitely come later
"People remember you Bishton
said
This years show was held in the
Hilton Inn's large banquet room.
adoining hall and a tent-covered
area outdoors C oiorful b othsand
elaborate displays tilUl the hotel.
In addition to the other festivi
ties, WCZI radio announcer David
Horn conducted live broadcasts
from the Hilton throughout the
weekend, promoting the show on
the air while simultaneously enter
taming those individuals at the
show
WCZI sales representatives
Kirk Smith, Steve Cowan and Bill
Coart also interviewed various
trade show participants.once
sions were sold by the Hilton to
enthusiastic home and garden show
spectators One Hilton employee,
Laurie Mel aughlin, more than had
her hands full serving hxnl and
drink to vhat she describes as a
really good turnout
1 .ast year the trade slu m ha 165
exhibits whichdrewmorethan 1,200
observers. The increased number
ofpartmpantsandcxhibits coupled
with the weekend's beautiful
weather, brought in even better
numbers this year, according to one
WCZI spokesperson.
"The show has been an in
credible success" I liton said, "and
we're excited about the fact that
r�eoplein the community 'responded
so well again this year
sidenngthat it was divided into separate sections and
scattered across the United States.
In his quest to assemble the Grand Grtmoir, the
Warlock must face his old nemesis, Redfeme. Aiding
Redferne in his Kittle against evil is Kassandra (Ixn
Singer)
Overall, "Warlock" is a lot of fun. With a clever,
wrath-of-God soundtrack, "Cdimina Burana and
"Bewitched" inspired incantations, "Warlock" man-
ages to create an almost cornedic atmosphere.
Another howl is the wardrobe. Considering that
both the warlock and Redfeme are 300-year-olds, it
would seem that they would appear slightly out of
place. Ibis is tnie for Redferne, who resembles a de-
mented Davyrocket, but the warlock looks more like
a refugee from Saturday Night Live's Sprockets than a
conjuror
Warlock is currently showing at the Carolina East
c inema.
Photo Courtesy ot Tnmarh Pictures
Julian Sands a wily warlock makes a deal with the
Devil to unravel the order of the universe
Queen makes up for '80s drought
By Cliff Coffey
Sijtl Writer
Since Vanilla Ice sti le the basic
musk from Queen's song, "Under
Pressure to tuel his number one
song, l e Ice Baby Queen's name
has been said more often. Even the
radio had begun to play old Queen,
including "Under Pressure" Well
now Queen has given Vanilla Ice a
whole new album from whk h he
can "borrow" music It is i.illfd
Innuendo.
With Queen's ton rteenth studio
album, thev have shown time and
time again whv they are a super
group . With classics ranging from
a rock anthem We Will Kink You
to an operatic song, "Bohemian
Rhapsody to a groovy T50s style
popsongCrazy Little lhing( ailed
I ove to lust plain fun songs. "Fat
Bottomed (arts" and "AnotherOne
Bites I "he Dust Now thev are out
lo prove that their time is not up
Innuendo is very eclectic in its
material and Queen pnforms it all
with style, finesse and savou fane.
Queen allows each member to do
hisbestand to get into the spotlight
for themselves. The result is one of
the best efforts tlu band has re
leased in years.
Brian May continually proves
that he is arguably Xw most vtrsa
tile,accomplished guitarist in mu-
sic today With the surge ot sXti
ntts today, May still takes his time
to make each note very noticeable
and he proves that he can do it with
speed too
Freddie Mercury lets his voice
easeoutothisthro.it. and the impact
stays lingering in the air tor an mi
measurable amount ol time He
takes the lyrics and makes you be
lievetli.it he was bom to sing them
Mis (nee has Ken the mainstay ot
Queensrnceitsinception I lismulti
octave voice allows for many d liter
entstv lesof musicand many diverse
sounds.
Innuendo is much stn mger than
The Miracle, their previous effort, in
its utilization of their diversity. In-
nuendo allows Queen to fully
expressthediffcrent styles that thev
have been perfecting o er the past
18 years. Thev utilize the epic song
("Innuendo"), the perplexing love
song ("I Can't I .ive With You"), the
rock anthem song"Headlong")
and the instrumental songt "Bijou")
Although the songs are well
orchestrated, the filler songs can
sometimes get monotonous. "I'm
(ioing Slightly Mad" tends to get
redundantly dull and "Don't Try
So Hard" winds up just lingering
around But when thev throw out
the filler, they know what works.
Though onlv two songs are what
most would consider "hard rock
they know when they a re ca I tod for
and how to arrange them. Thev
aren't concerned with over power-
ing the song with loud incoherent
sounds, thev are more concerned
with a clear, precise sound that is
rich with quality.
rhe lyrical content of Innuendo
is as diverse as the styles ol musk
that they use. One minute thev are
singing about the questions ii the
universe and the powers of God (If
there's an answer to the questions
we feel bound to ask Show vour-
setf-destroy our tears-release your
mask), the next thev are singing of
sex (Are you ready for the sting
(.onna waste that thing I litman is
king). The message's in their lyrics
in the pist few years had been strik-
ingly (x1d for men that are mostly
interested in having a good time
(You take my bH.lv l give vou
heat You sav you're hungry I
give you meat Get down make
love).
Now it seems that thev are con-
cerned with the condition of the
world today. From The Works, the
song "Is This The World We Cre-
ated?" asks, "Is this the world we
created, we make it on our own Is
this the world we devastated, right
to the bone It there's a Cod in the
skv looking down What can he
See Queen page 9
Photo Courtssy ol Holywood Recording
Queen, a band that some say had lost its will to live, makes a surprising,
strong comeback with their latest release. Innuendo
Coming Up
ATTIC
Thursday
Snow
Friday
The Stegmonds
Saturday
Quadra Nixx
NEW DELI
Thursday
The Other People
Friday
Manifest Destiny
Saturday
Dillon Fence
QJOCKS
Friday
Hooty and the Blowfish
Saturday
Private Partv
MENDENHALL
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Darkman
Sunday
A Clockwork Orange





i
8 Pht taat (Carolinian Mahch21,1991
Baptist
Continued from page 7
Anthrax to release new EP in April
Who needs Riki Rachtman when you have Metal Notes?! Oh
well, on with th notes!
Chicago's Warrior Soul is set to release tlieir second album,
Drugs, God and The New Republic, this month. The follow up to last
year's DecadeDtnJ Century, the Geffen release, which no doubt covers
plenty of political ground, contains 14 songs, including a cover of Joy
Division's "Interzone
In early April, Anthrax has plans to unleash a new EP titled
Attack of the Killer Bs. The record will contain mostly B-sides from
their singles and a rework of their smash rap hit "I Am the Man
There will also be a cover of Public Enemy's "Bring the Noise Scott
Not and company will start headlining concerts in May.
Arizona's Lynch Mob will beat the Mad Monk in Wilmington,
N.C, on March 22.
Drummer Carmen Appice h.i been replaced by new basher
Anders Johnson in Blue Murder.
Who's who in death and thrash metal?! Read on.
Atheist, Honda's answer to techno-death metal, offers their
second ITUuestwnaHc Presence. Their first record,PieceofTitne. has
recently been released in the States through Metal Blade Records.
Death has begun work on material for their next full-length
thrash piece They'll go into the studio this spring to record
letf Becerra. the former bassist vocalist for the Bay Area's
Possessed, has suffered a gun shot wound to his stomach. The shot
left Becerra permanently paralyzed from his chest down. And just
as tragedy stnkes, Possessed guitarist Mike ibrrao plans to continue
with the reformation of the group with Kissist Bob Yost and drum
met Colin Carmu hael
1-astest releases available m the death thrash genre include
Xentriv s For Whose Advantage Agony Column s Brave Words and
Pkody Knuckles, U.D.Osfocdess World, Reverend's World WoritM-
You (lite atter Metal Church), Destructions Crocked Brain and
Obituary's Cause of I iith. Death thrash metal bands to keep a
watch on are 1 miiiiam s Lxhorder with faeir Slaughter in the Vatican
1 P, San Francisco's Sadus with their latest release Swallowed in Bliek
vet another Bay Area k t) and Brooklyn's Biohaard
On the local metal front, C.reeimlle s Scythian played one at
� he ir first show s at O'Rocketeller s a couple weeks J�o. A band that
is built on a bluesv, hard-edged foundation, Scythian offered the
rowd some killer originals like the Pink Floyd influenced "Bn-ak
'he Sky Other originals in the Scythian camp include "love
V alked Out the Doer Teaser" and a ballad titled "Monday All
this aside, Scythian is currently scouting new drummers tor their
lttit Interested musicians call John Rae at 752-6181 and leave a
tessage.
Tune in next weak and gs the scoop on Mordred's long aw aited
second LP It's a killer!
Until next week, mav the music be hard and heavy!
� Compiled by "Dizzy" Deanna Nevgloski
two feet to be cast into everlasting
fire
Luke 10:20, but rather re-
joice, because your names are writ-
ten in heaven
Matthew 620, But lay up
for yourselves treasures in heaven,
where neither moth nor rust doth
corrupt, and where thieves break
through and steal
Though Romans 6:23 states
that the wages of sin is death and
does not mention eternity in hell, as
Mosingo says, Vinson explains that
man was not originally supposed
to experience death.
With the fall of mankind,
however, everyone dies because of
sin, he continues. Death is the price
everyone has to pay for sin, and
other verses say that hell is the price
for those who do not repent for their
sins.
Furthermore, Mosingo says the
loving and merciful God would not
send people to hell , but Vinson
says. Individuals have the option to
choose it or refuse it.
Vinson also emphasizes that
he believes individuals cannot vio-
late God's law without suffering
the consequences, just as individu-
als cannot break society's law
without being fined, imprisioned
or even executed.
A problem in many chuches
continues to be narrowminded
views, Vinson says.
"Nobody can really under-
stand the Bible and have all the
answers he says.
According to Vinson, the
people of each religion or church
are entitled to believe and preach
their views, but nooneshouldclaim
that one particular way is the only
way.
He explains that a number of
questions remain unanswered in
the Bible, and that many questions
and answers are too vast for the
human mind to comprehend.
For instance, some people
condemn abortion, usingthey Bible
as their defense. However, Vinson
says the Bible does not have any
information as to whether or not
having an abortion is a sin. The
Bible states that murder is sinful,
but Vinson asks if abortion is mur
ders. No one can have a definite
answer, he stresses.
Vinson says he does not gener -
ally support abortion, but depend-
ing on theindividual's situation and
feelings, abortion may sometimes
be the best choice
Though many aspev ts of the
Bible create controversy, Vinson
says one theme remains consistent
throughoutitscontents- salvation
Vinson sayshe thinks it doesn't
matter what religion an individual
belongs to if he or she has accepted
Christ as his or her personal savior
and repents for all sins.
East Carolina University
Health & Wellness Fair
IVfarch 22, 1991
Friday, March 22
10:00am-1:30pm
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
!
Health Screenings
Cholesterol $5.00
Glaucoma
Blood Pressure
Dental
Blood Sugar
Body Composition
Dietary Analysts $2.50
Educational Exhibits
STEP Fitness Demonstration
Self-Defense Demonstration
Door Prizes
Refreshments
For more information call 7.57-6794 or 757-6387
Sponsored by ECU Recreational Services and
Student Health Services
MICHELOB
m' mW � m
0
Here's your chance
Help Start A New Fraternity!
CHRISTINA LEARDIM Q LLANN LEE
MISS APRIL 1991 MISS JANUARY 1987
YBOY, Playmate, and Rahhn Head symbol arc marks of, and arc used with permission of. Playboy.
IN MYRTI F BEACH, S.C. MARCH 29 AND 30 AT:
APPLE ANNIES
BLACHWAGON
CHA RUES LOW COUNTRY
COWBOYS
'RA.ZYZACKS
JAMAICA JOES
MOTHER FLETCHERS
SANDPIPERS
STUDEBAKERS
2fX)l
THE AFTER DECK
THE GALLEON
XANADU
ALSO:
1991 SPRING BREAK MALE POSTER MODELS
)' NATURAL LIGHT CAROLINA MODEL
Delta Chi
is coming to ECU March 21st
For more info, call:
mr4 iV
.
Queen
�tnu�d from page 7
think of what we've done To the
workJ that He created From The
Mtracle they preach, "If every child
on the street, had clothes to wear
and rood to eat That" s a miracle If
all God's people could be free, to
live in perfect harmony It's a
nurade" in the song The Miracle"
Finally on Innuendo, on the song
"Innuendo they proclaim, While
,ve live according to race, color, or
creed While we rule by blind
madness and pure greed our lives
dictated by tradition, superstition,
and false religion
AU this change coincides with
their Live Aid appearance, and the
fact that they are old enough no w to
have their own children could be
the cause, or mavbe they just de-
cided that there are troubles in thi-
world. The fact that some of the
gongs on Innuendo have the classic
Queen subjects could be an indica-
tion that they haven't forsaken the
life of a rock star, thev just found
more to life than women and sex
Music has moved into a new
direction since Queen angned the
charts, and since thev haven't gpne
the wav of commercialism, thev n
popularity has faltered, but their
music has only improved .Although
Innuendo does not equal their al-
bumsof the seventies, li ke A Nigh t at
the Opera, News of the World, or Jazz
it does stand above albums such as
Hot Space and The Works
The East Carolinian
CLASSIC
NEWSPRIN
Monday thru Sund;
Big Splash Aq
Greenvi
"Home of the
Fee and Tuition per
U nderg rad u a te
Graduate
IJNC-CH offers, duj
United States Over
is 4-7 semester hours
For the hrt rime,
Summer School Srudi
Students from anvj
are not enrolled at I
Please send me a cati
Name
Street
Cirv
Mai) ��
Phone
"ill
mainuci t�-
� mna to am '�dv L
Sun ocapi m �McAcjy
run out ol �n �0n�ri��1 f
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IN THE DAIRY CASE
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GET ONE
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mm " w w�





Ehe lEaat (Earolinian March 21.1991
9
e fair
�! 41
il
I i II
Ol I )lh I
Queen
Continued from page 7
at we U' done Jo the
� that He i nit�l From Fl
� prea h If every child
street had clothes to wear
� I ' cat fh.it s.irnir.u le It
people could be free to
- � fei t harmom It s a
song The Miracle
� n � � . �� i onfhesorte
they pro) laim While
rao t olor, or
� � � il I , �
11 d pure greed ran
tradition superstition
h les w ith
Vk1 � md the
�� w to
�ilid rv
" � tist de
111 ' �
� � � �
Ibi 11 ind �
� � rsaken I
" iust found
' ' I I
' ' ' I
' - � � igned the
� ilism tho n
Get Spring Fever at The Big Splash
Iflf W H " 4 �mmm Clip ?� ?� ?� �� 4�
�-v T r- -� � � � � � � � � ��j �.
� . Clip this coupon for a j
i FREE BIG SPLASII i
sJB
HUGGER
with any ball rental
NEW SPRING HOURS
Monday thru Sunday 10 a.m 9 pan.
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"I lom�- �.f the K I' ( ream"
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5IG SPLASH
Pcct and Tuition pet -�eMon
' ndergraduate SI 10 plus
Graduate $110 plus
1991 SUMMER SCHOOL
CALENDAR
Session I: May 20-June 24
Session II: June 26-July 31
NC Resident
$10 p�-r niht hour
5-40 per crcxiit hour
Nonresident
$210 p�T credit hour
$220 per credit hour
i ?arolinian
Hn Cl ssk
1 hM 4 H offers during two 5 i week sessions, one of the largest summer progiams in the
I nited States vvr l,o courses .ir�- s, heduled in 40 discipline"? A tvpical course load per session
is 4 7 semester hour.
For the first time, some evening and night courses are offered Spaces are also available in
Summer s hil Study Abroad programs
Students from any college oi university, teai hers rising hih si 1uhI seniors, and others ,s ho
an- mt enrolled at I 'N - M may apply as V'istmg Summer Students.
Please send me a iatalop and application form
Name
Mate
Zip
rhe l m ersir) ot North I arolina at c hapel Hill. Sumtnei S� hool, B 1W.
200Petigrew Hall, Chapel Hill NC 27599-3340
19) 2-1009
IN THE DAIRY CASE
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8 0Z '100 CALORIE"
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NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE,
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� .o All you can eat
JrS shrimp and trout
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
M-Th llam-8pm F-Sai liam-9pm Sun llani-4pm
4&
Student Budget
Night
1.15 TALL BOYS 125IMpoRTS
2.50 Pitchers
2.75 ICE TEAS
LADIESFREE
Fn: The ALIVE at 5:00 "KKCJ PARTY" Fi di �

5
SILVER
BULLET
(ADULT ENTERTAINMHN 1 )
WEDNESDAYS:
Amateur Night (Female Dai
Cash Pne
THURSDAY
Si � ei Bullet Female exoi dai
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SATURDAY
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic Dancen
Doors Open 7 I'M Each Night
Dancing Starts 9:30 I'M
hr more lnt�r call 756 62 r8
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THURSDAY. APRIL 4
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Tickets
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.A.LABLE AT

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ifexkxmtattauKinft





I
10 Slit taat (Carolinian March 21J991
Han is feeler
LOW PMCES
EVERY DA Y!
Another Reason To Switch To Hams Teeter!
D R i: C I ROM I II I L . S. S. R
First Fver I S. lour
Student Union Minority Arts Committee
presents
Fair
March 21.1991
More Than 70
GrounH
Beef
sdyiet
acroj3atic
evu
"li( RFDIBLF PRODUCTION,
GREAT ENTERTAINMENT
FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
don't miss i rr
LONDON 19HH
Tuesday April 2
HOC) PM Wnghi Audiionum p s.
ECU FacultyStaff 58
ECU StudcniVyouth S6
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR $10
For tickets, contact the Central Ticket Office,
rvlcndcnhall Student Center, 8:30 AM-6:00PM,
yjS Monday-Friday,
757-4788
MostorCofd
Continued from page 7
refreshments given by ECU's din-
ing services and door prizes.
Kellerman said, "We're trying
to promote the concept of a healthy
body and mind and we're hoping
to bring about positive life-stvie
changes
Read
The
East
Oaohmm
J
Fri 22nd
752-7303
ATTIC
209 East
Fifth St.
Sat 23rd
Nixx
ECUs favorite band-
Classic Rock & Roll
$2.00 32 oz draft
April 1st
former members of Sidewinder
& Avalanche
$2.00 32 oz draft
9 PM NCAA Championship Game 15" Television
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
Northern
Bath Tissue
165
Sq.Ft.
4Pk.
Agree Shampoo
Or Conditioner
199
15 Oz.
BuRttN
sP?nap GLACIER CLUB
Li-J j,
m
0 0
Pm
Ice Cream
VzGal.
2 Liter Bottle
Coca-Cola,
Sprite
Prices Good Through Tuesday, March 26,1991
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesday, March 26, 1991 in Greenville Only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamos
We Welcome All:
Bands
Comedians
Soloists
To Enter the Underground's
OPEN-MIC NIGHT
April 2, 1991
8:00-10:00 pm
Application forms available in room 236 of Mendenhall
Cash Prizes 1 st Place 150.00
2nd Place $75.00
3rd Place $25.00
Applications must be received no later
than Friday, March 22nd
Tryouts will be held on Wednesday,
March 27th from 6-10 pm
Brought to you by the
Student Union Coffeehouse Committee.
Questions should be directed to
Patrick Kenney
757-4715
DLNl UN tor-
Men's track exce
NCAA tourn
By Melanie McNeill
Suff Writer
The ECU men's track team
earned some impressive honors
during spring bnak as they par-
ticipated in the Sea hawk In vita
tional, the Clemson Relays and the
NCAA indoor track and field
champiORshipsin India nap ihs. !nd
The 4x400-metiT relay team
traveled to mdJanapobson Mar I -
and brought home a third place
finish with a time of 3 09 24, a slight
improvement from last wars fifth
place finish.
In addition, the effort earned
the team All-America honors tor
the second consecutive year Any
finish in the top-five at the meet
earns All-America honors
Baylor took first place in the
event with a time d 7 74 I
lowed by Auburn I niversity .
finished with a time of 3 8.95
The relay team is mack i
William "Junior Davis
Owens. Corey Brooks and Brian
Irvm. Davis ran the lead. H
followed by Owens, Brooks and
Irvm running the anchor split
Davis'leadoft split of 47 4
the fastest of the race accord.
Pirate head coach Bill Car
Owens kept the pace up with a time
of 47.6. Brooks then matched the
effort of Owens with a time of 4 7
and Irvin gave it all he had to finish
with a 46.3.
On March 9, ECU - Ira I
traveled to Wilmington to partici-
pate in the Sea hawk Invitational
Bnan Wilhar
the 110-meter huj
of 14.61, and Idol
first inth. I � i
time of " -
In the 4 � I
time of 5154 1
; �.����
behind S
Livings) me The
beam finished se
with a time A
TheQei I
on March 17
ten
Tht
place m th I
combination I
Robers i
Bush
"The I '
� � �
aid
In ; .
m finished

Irvin and 'A .
in the 4 � - � i
I '
and Da i
Ch - �
the 400-meta
� .
with a time
was disqual I
n
bonthisSatuj
Invitational in
Ambrosius contini
family baseball tra
By Dustin Shearon
SUff Writer
Jim .Ambrosius. one of ECl -
stating pitchers, has a 186 earned
run average so far this season.
Ambrosius, in his second year
at ECU, is from Collmgswood N
where he played baseball for
Collingswood High School. Heal so
played some oi his high school ca-
reer at Brooklawn, the best schoohn
the northeast region.
He began plaving baseball 12
yearsago. .Ambrosiusstarted pitch-
ing earlv with the help of his father
who plaved semi-professional ball
m Philadelphia Ambrosius rather
was not the only relative of r
play baseball.
His grandfather, Granville
Hamner, plaved shortstop for the
Philadelphia Phillies tor 17 years
Hamner was one of the wizkid-
the earry 1950s.
When Ambrosius pitched as a
high school senior he narrowed his
choices of schools down to five. He
was offered scholarships by UhK
Jim Am,
N( -��� niv
Univers I I
Hewaite
to mali
Ambi
in w r
chanoi . 1
year, so he s i
In Ambr
he had trouble wil
from an earlier cJ
See Ambros
.� , to
Jump on it!
Austin Baste tights to gam possesson of the ball i
to improve this fall after a disappointing season





1
10 Xlic taut Carolinian March 21.1991
Mahch21. 1991
Hawsfeefer
Fair
LOW PRICES
EVERY DA Y!
Another Reason To Switch To Harris Teeter!
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DIRECT FROM THE USSR
First Ever U.S. lour
Student Union Minority Arts Committee
presents
THE
MOT jF 1 Las 1
!�RA
r
ACROBATIC
evu
iv m mm i I'kom imv
C.RI l FMhKIUNMFM
FOR llll WHOII FAMILY
DON! MISS II
1.OH DOS I'tss !n :sda Apnl 2 S:flOPM w nhi Auditorium r , ,
ECU FacultyStaff $8
ECU Studentsyouth $6
VISA
AI I TICKETS ATTHE DOOR $10
I i uckcts contac i the Central I k kei Office,
Mendcnhall Student Cenier, 8 JO AM 6:00PM,
Monday -Friday.
'5 4788
Continued from page 7
refreshments given K E I 'sdii
in services and door prizes
KeQerman said, "We'n trying
u promote the oncept ofa healthy
body and mind andwi reh
? to bnn about positive lit-
ihuingt-s
"
Read
The
East
Ccwobrtkni
&�$
m.
(ff&4
P&



'
Chilean White
Seedless
Grapes
-VS.
Fri 22nd
f, All III
s;it 23rd
209 East
Fifth St.
Quadra Nixx
ECU's favorite band-
Classic Rock & Roil
$2.00 32 oz draft
former members of Sidewinder
& Avalanche
$2.00 32 oz draft
April 1 si
9 PM NCAA Championship Game
15' Tele isi
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
Northern
Bath Tissue
99
Agree Shampoo
Or Conditioner
199
15 Oz.
Prices Good Through Tuesday, March 26,1991
Prices In this Ad Effective Through Tuesday, March 26, I99l m Greenville Only
Wp Rpvrvp The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To'Dealers We (l,idly Arrept Federal food Stamps
We We 1 c ome All:
Bands
Comedians
Soloists
To Kntcr the Underground's
OPEN-MIC NIGHT
April 2, 1991
8:00-10:00 pm
Application forms available in room 236 o Mendenhall
Cash Prizes 1 st Place 150.00
2nd Place $75.00
3rd Place $25.00
Applications must be received no later
than Friday, March 22nd
Trvouts will be held on Wednesday,
March 27th from 6-10 pm
Brought to you by the
Student Union Coffeehouse Committee.
Questions should be directed to
Patrick Kenney
757-4715
STUDENT UNION
Men's track exce
NCAA tournan
Bv Melanie M
The E
earned
during
bcipated i �
bortal, t'r �
( A �, �
champi
Th. 1x4(11
traveled I
and br; �� � I
finish �'��'� ihi
improvemei I It
i � �
� � :
the ti an '�
the se ' "
pan
� I �
. , � � . �� it
finisl

��
- ' :

the fastest
ral

f 47 rooks
indh
i ��
Ambrosius contini
family baseball trai
Bv Dustin Sheai
Staff Writei
A � � - �
Loiungs ��� - -
played somx
reei :��"
the

ears ag
irtg .
�.sh pla -
m Phila :� ;
a as rv �
base!
His � �� �
: Ian � � - .��
Phi i
Han erwa
the ear � 1950s
When - T" -
highscho lemorh
choices f scl - -
was offered si r
�.
� -
JM
Jump on it!
Austin Baste fights to gam possession oi Ihe ball i
to improve this fait after a disappointing season





I

Fair
Mahch 21,1991
CSlje lEaat QJnrulinian
11
S.R.
Continued from page 7
refreshments given b ECU'sdin-
rvtces and door pruea
Kdlerman said We'retrying
�mole the concept of a healthy
hod and mind and we re hoping
ring about positive life-style
changes
:
Read
The
East
GuvtirifDi
IC
209 Last
Fifth St.
Sal l.hd
Quadra Nixx

:jsi h
1 �TlA.4)iT Si
tner membersol Sidewindei
& valanche
$2.00 ; 2oz drafl
nshipGame15 television
STUDENT UNION
me All:
S
ans
ts
Jerground's
NIGHT
991
) pm
Km 236 ol Mendenhall
$150.00
e $75.00
$25.00
feceived no later
rch 22'kl
bn Wednesday,
� �
6-10 pm
by the
use Committee.
directed to
iney
STUDENT UNION
SPORTS
Men's track excels at
NCAA tournament
By Melanie McNeill
Staff Writer
The ECU men's track team
earned some impressive honors
during spring break as they par-
ticipated in the Seahawk Invita-
tional, theClemson Relays and the
N A A indoor track and field
hampionshipsin Indianapolis, End.
rhe 4x400-meter relay team
traveled to Indianapolison March8
and brought home a third place
finish with a timeot 3:09.24,a slight
improvement tmm last vear's fifth
p ice finish.
In addition, the effort earned
�S team All-Amenca honors tor
the second consecutive war. Any
finish in the top-five at the meet
earns All-Amenca honors
Baylor took first place in the
event with a time ot IK37.74, tol
lowed by Auburn Universit) which
finished with a time ot 3 08 g
The relay team is made up ot
.mi Junior" Da is. red
� is c orey Bnxks and Brian
Irvin Davis ran the leadoft split.
followed by Owens. Brinks and
ninning the anchor split
Pans' leadoft split of 47 4 was
'he fastest oi the race according to
irate head coach Bill Carson
v. ens kept the pace up with a time
' 47.6 Bnxiks then matched the
� � rt ol Owens with a time of 47.7,
and In in gave it all he had to finish
�� ith a 4f 3.
On March 9, ECL s track team
traveled to Wilmington to partici-
pate in the Seahawk Invitational
Bnan Williams placed first in
the 110-meter hurdles with a time
of 14.61, and Udon Cheek finished
first in the400-meter hurdles witha
time of 53.78.
In the 400, Will Duff posted a
time oi 5154 to place ninth The
4x100-nvtemIavteamplaced third
behind South Carolina and
Livingstone The44(XVmeterrelav
teamfinishclstvondlx-hindI.iNrty
with a time of 3:PM
lluHlenvsonRelavsUok place
on March 17 with the400 80tVlind
lWXVmeter relay teams taking first
place.
I "he men ran away with first
place in the 4HXV.nieter with the
combination ot Pave Carter, Ike
Roberson, Damon Desueand Ron
Bush
"The time could have been
faster it not tor poor exchanges
Roberson said.
In the same event R I S
learn finished ahed of the B team
but was disqualified for being out
of the exchange one
The team of Owens, Invk,
Irvin and Wilham Davis took first
in the 4x400-meter Owens ran the
first split, followed bheek, Irvin
and Davit.
Cheek also Brushed second in
the 400-meter hurdles with a time
of 52.0, and Williams finished as the
topquahherinthe 110 high hurdles
with a time oi 14.4. However, he
was disqualified in the event.
The men's team returns to ac-
tion thisSaturdavat the Wakeiorest
Invitational in Winston Salem.
Softball team
Hosts tourney
R��d � ECU Photo Lab
ECU sottball player swings at a pitch in a game against Furman The
Pirates are 8 3 and host the I ady Pirate Classic this weekend
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
The ECU softball team has
started their 191 season much
Where they left off last year. In 1991,
a very ex penenced Lad y Pi ra te tea m
compiled a 27-13 record, but
graduated eight seniors.
This vear the team features a
wry young line-up of five juniors,
four sophomores and five fresh-
men
With this new line-up, under
1 Ot h year head coach Sue Manahan,
the team already has a 10-5 record,
and they are looking ahead to rack
up some more wins at this
weekend's annual ECU-Holidav
Inn Classic.
The round robin tournament
features UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC-
Wilmington. LC-Charlotte,
( oastal Carolina and I imestone.
I he Pirates had a very busy
spring break pi.a mg in I 1 games
rhey won eight games, including
double-headers against UNC-
Grcensboro and Coastal Carolina.
ECU trawled to Tallahassee,
Fla to participate in the 18-team
Florida State Tournament. They beat
the University of Rhode Island 4-2
and Winthrop 4-2. They lost to
Western Illinois University 9-2, Mi-
ami of Ohio 1-0 and host Florida
State 13-0.
Junior shortstop Laura
Crowder has emerged as an i mpor-
tant force behind the plate. She is
batting 321 and has one home run.
Last year Crowder batted .391
overall and was named the team's
outstanding offensive player.
Cammie Smith is leading the
Pirates with a 435 average and an
on-base percentage of o3 .
On the mound hasbeen sopho-
more Jenny Parsons and freshman
Ceorgeann Wilke. Last year Par-
sons' 12-3 record set the freshman
record for the most wins in a season
Included in those 12 wins were five
shut-outs and an ERA of 1 26 This
vear she has 5-3 record and Wilke is
at 5-2.
The Pirates wil I be playing their
next home game Friday, March 2?
at 2 p.m. against the University ol
New England
At home March 23 they will
play at 1O.30 a.m 2:30 p.m. and 4
p.m. Then on March 24 they will
play at 11 a.m. and at 3 p.m.
ECU ultimate has tough time in Florida
Ambrosius continues
family baseball tea
By Dustin Shearon
Staff Writer
im Ambrosius, one of ECUs
iting pitchers, has a 1.8 earned
" .� iverage so far this season.
Ambrosius. in his second vear
it I � L is from Collingswood, NJ,
"�� he played baseball for
illingswood High School. He also
lyed some of his high school ca-
rei � it Brooklavvn, the best school in
: ortheast region.
le began playing baseball 12
?earsago Ambrosius started pi tch-
arh with the help of his father
� played semi-professional Kill
tladeiphia Ambrosius' father
was not the onlv relative ot his to
�;i.i baseball.
His grandfather. Granvitle
iamner, played shortstop tor the
hiladeiphia Phillies tor 17 years.
I Iamner was one of the wiz kids' of
the early 1950b,
When Ambmsius pitched as a
I" gh school senior he narrowed his
11 licesof schools down to five. He
was offered scholarships by UNC,
Jim Ambrosius
N.C. state. University ot Miami,
University of Nebraska and ECU.
He waited until August of 1989
to make his final decision
Ambrostous looked for the school
in which he would have the best
chance .it pitching his freshman
year, so he signed with ECU.
In Ambrosius' freshman war,
he had troublewitha fractured back
from an earlier car accident
See Ambrosius. page 13
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
The E V ultimate team began
their spnng break. March9and 10,
in sunny Florida for the PM West
Palm Beach Bowl.
The tournament attracted 22
men s and 12 women s teams this
Vhey traveled from ali over
the United States and Canada to
compete in the Beach BowL Part of
the tournaments'sattraction isth.it
lose C uervo was a sponsor.
the top two teams from the
weekend wouldqualif) fora$10,000
cash tournament this summer in
Atlanta GA lour other tourna
ments across the country will send
two teams t i Atlanta
I he field ol teams were broken
into A and B brackets K I steam,
the Irates. were seeded in the H
bracket
rhe Irates onl) won 1 of their4
games ,n Saturda) . fheir first de
teat was dealt In a 1 oronto-Plus
team rhe Irates led the wholegame,
only to lose in overtime.
rhe loss unnerved the Irates
and they lost their next two games,
iMie to University of Pennsylvania
and the other to Haverford The
scores were 7 13 and 8-13 respex
lively
Flat Earth Society, a Miami
based team, was the onlv team the
Irates managed to K'at Hat Earth
had the Irates down 12-9 and onlv
needed one more point to win, but
last c arolina scored 4 in a row to
take the game over the top team in
their pool
The Irates failed to qualify for
the playoffs on Sunday. Veteran
Pom Quill slid, "We had high ex-
pectatfons tor this tournament, but
m losing we learn our weaknesses
On Sutxlay, Perm, outscored
Rat Earth Society for the B-Bracket
title and a cash prize of $300. Later
that day in the A-Bracket, a Boston-
Washington, D.C. mixture team,
McGus, defeated Gainesville, Flas
vicious cycle. Both teams qualified
for foseCuervo Atlanta tournament,
but McGus left with $1,500 in prize
monev.
Fit Photo
Ultimate players practice at the bottom of the hill The Ultimate team
began their season in Florida and won three games in two tournaments.
On the following weekend, the
Irates were in Miami for their sec-
ond tournament during spring
break. After the long week, the Irates
were down to half their team's
manpower.
A long, hard day of play for the
Irates began with a handy defeat by
Turmoil, the number-one-seeded
team in the 12-man tournament.
ECU could not break Turmoil's de-
fensive zone, and the Irates fell bv4-
13.
East Carolina came back strong
in their second game and overcame
Tampa by 13-7. From there it was
two tough games in a row. Vicious
Cycle won by 7-13 and Just Say No,
a Washington, D.C, team outscored
the Irates 9-13.
The last game of the day was
between the new-rivals Flat Earth
Society and ECU. Rat Earth did not
allow ECU to come from behind
this time. The Miami team took the
k'ad early and never gave it up to
finish 13-11.
Dave Kelly, defensive captain
said, "Considering five days for
spnng breakin' we played very
consistent and competitive
Keith Lewis added, "We now
have a good stoke for next week-
end
This weekend March 23-24, the
Irates will be competing at the
University of North Carolina-
Chapel Hill for the Collegiate
Easterns Last year the team finished
second in the tournament.
Corruption a permanent part of college atheltics
Fll� Photo
Jump on it!
Austin Baste fights to gain possession of the ball in a soccor game last season The Pirates will look
to improve this fall after a disappointing season in 1990
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
The corruption of college
football and basketball is so
deeply enbedded in the games
that to restore the integrity of a
typical student athlete would be
nearly impossible
The student athlete is a
misnomer because only 30
percent of all Division I football
and basketball players ever
graduate, and little over 1 percent
ever become pmfessionals.
On Tuesday, the Knight
Commission Report released
suggested changes designed to
purge college athletics of its
hypocrisy and criminal tenden-
cies.
The report stressed heavily
the importance of university
presidents to take more control of
their athletic programs.
Most of the responsibility will
then fall on presidents banding
together and making the changes
themselves.
Two areas that need to be
strongly supervised are the
graduation of student athletes and
the financial integnty of universi-
ties with large football and
basketball programs.
Gross mismanagement of
funds coupled with low gradua-
tion rates are two of the biggest
problems facing athletic depart-
ments today.
The report again urged
university presidents to take a
bigger hand in correcting these
problems and making sure they
do not recur.
One way for the presidents to
control these areas is to maintain
internal vigilance as well as
having annual audits done by an
outside party.
One of the biggest offenders
of NCAA recruiting policies is
UNLV. Head basketball coach
ferry Tarkaman has been under
scrutiny for most of his coaching
career.
Some of the violations that
are being investigated go back to
1978 and are just now coming to
judgement.
One thing for which
Tarkaman is famous is sending
his recruits to junior colleges for
two years until such time as thev
can pass their ACTs and enroll at
UNLV.
This is a perfectly legal
arrangement and other coaches
arc starting to do the same thing.
What necessitates this runaround
is the perennial low entrance
scores that recruits make
Proposition 48 of the NCAA
regulations requires that fresh-
man athletes make at least 700 on
their SATs and acquire a 2.0 GPA.
One notorious case at N.C.
State under Jim Valvano's reign of
tenor was Chris Washbum, who
was admitted to N.C. State after
getting a 470 on his SAT. This, of
course, helped precipitate
Valvano's evenhial dismissal.
College athletes often arc
recruited illegally by coaches,
paid illegally be alumni ami
booster clubs and are admitted
with national test scores that arc
less than average. AH because a
university wants to win games.
The major culprits of NC A A
violations arc Division 1 schools
because they get the most public-
ity and benefit from cheating.
Also, Division I schools a wan!
See Corruption, page 13





t
fr
Fair
March 21,1991
dKrc �aat !larulinian
ii
IkY J
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Continued from page 7
refreshments given b U I sdin
dc i prizes
aid e re tr ing
� � . ' ' i health)
and we re hoping
positive life M le
Read
The
East
?
w ?
: Gvvbmvi
ic
209 Lait
Fifth St
vn 23rd
Quadra Nixx
HUlcT
tnche
- � ui a 11
STUDENT UNION
m e All:
u
Dans
s
lereround'
S
NIGHT
pm
" : Mcndcnhall
SI 50.00
e $75.00
: $25.00
'ceived no later
Ireh 22
n Wednesday,
6-10 pm
by the
use Committee,
directed to
ne
Men's track excels at
NCAA tournament
B) Melanie McNeill
Staff IVntpr
rhe ECU men's track team
rned some impressive honors
ng spring break as the) par
pated in the Seahawk Invita
theOemson Relays and the
indoor track and held
� pionshipsin Indianapolis Ind
Hie 4x400-meter rela team
� i toindianapolison March8
rough! home a third place
ish with a time of ; 19.24 a slight
pro emenf from last vear s fifth
ish
In addition the effort earned
im All-America honors � i
sei nd rnsei utive .ear Am
m tl lop-fiv( it the meet
took fir
in the
A fol
m hi h
Idi inn!
I � IS ran the leado't split,
ved bv Owens. Brooks and
� tinning the am hi r spin
. � leadott split of 47.4 was
� st of the raee according to
� ad oach Bill c arson
- k pi the pace up with a tinx
� Brooks then matched thi
"�sens witha bmeof 4 7
gave itall he had to finish
�it s rra k �
ed to Wilmington to part
� ,aw k Invitational
Brian WiQiams placed first in
the 110-meter hurdles with a time
of 14.61, and Udon Cheek finished
firstinthe400 meter hurdles with a
time ot 78
In the400, Will Duff posted a
time of rl r4 to place ninth rhe
4x100-meterrelayteamplaced third
behind South Carolina .nd
1 ivingstone rhe 4x400-meter relay
teamfmishedsecondbehindl iberrj
with a time of 3:19.4
rhe lemson Relays took place
on March 17withthe400 ,800-and
1600 meter relay teams taking first
plaee
Hie men ran ,iu,i with first
place in the 4xl00-meter with the
i ombination of I )ave Carter, Ike
Roberson, Damon Desue and
Mush
The time could ha i been
faster it not tor poor exchanges
Roberson said
in the same event, 1 (
team finished ih . ftl
but .va Ii a jiialified foi -
ee� hange zon
t am ofHvens,heek,
Irvin and William Davis Uxk first
in the4x400-meter Owens ran the
firstsplit followed bheek Irvin
and Da is
� tit-k also finished second in
the 400-meter hurdles with a time
of V indW illiams finished as the
ualifierinthe 110 high hurdles
with a time of 14.4. However he
was disqualified in theevenf
he men's team returns to a
tionthisSaturdayattheWakel orest
Invitational in Winston Salem
s
'l ,1111
Softball team
Hosts tourney
I! sottbai
Pirati
Sail R��d - ECU Photo Lab
al a pitch m a game against Furman The
I ady Pirate Classic this weekend
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
The ECU Softball team has
started their 1W1 season much
where they left off last vear In 1991,
a very experienced Lady Pirateteam
compiled a 27-13 record, but
graduated eight seniors.
This year the team features a
verv young line-up of five juniors,
four sophomores and five fresh-
men.
With this new line-up, under
10th-year head coach Sue Manahan,
the team already has a 10-5 record,
and the) are looking ahead to rack
up some more wins at this
weekend's annual FCU-Holidav
Inn �, lasSM
The round robin tournament
r- atures I Nhapel Hill, UNO
W ilmington, I�( harlotte,
c oastalarolma and I imestone
� Pirates had a very busv
spnnj ; i mg in 1 1 games
i h� v won eight games, including
double-headers against UNC-
( ireensboro and oastalarolma
E "U traveled to Tallahassee,
Ra to participate in the 18-team
FloridaState rdumament ITwbeat
the University of Rhode Island 4-2
and Winthrop 4-2 They lost to
Western Illinois University 9-2, Mi-
ami of Ohio 1-0 and host Flonda
State 13-0.
Junior shortstop Laura
Crowder has emerged as an impor-
tant force behind the plate She is
Kitting .321 and has one home run.
bast year Crowder batted 391
overall and was named the team's
outstanding offensive plaver
Cammie Smith is leading the
Pirates with a 435 average and an
on-base percentage of 63
On the mound has been sopho-
more lennv Parsons and freshman
Georgeann Wilke. Last vear Par-
sons' 12-3 record set the freshman
record ft r the most wins in a season
Included in those 12 wins were five
shut-outs and an FRA of 1 2h This
year she has 5-3 record and Wilke is
at 5-2
rhe Pirates will be playing their
next home game Friday, March 2.1
at 2 p m. against the University ol
iv. England.
At home March 2" they will
plav at 10-30 a m 230 p.m. and 4
p m Then on March 24 they will
plav at 11 a.m. and at 3 p.m.
ECU ul timate lias tough time in Florida
Hv Gary Hurte)
sutt Writer
Ambrosius continues
family baseball tradition
By Pustin Shearon
Staff Writer
'� mbn isius, one of EC U s
� � � rs has a 1 86 earned
- � this s. ason
'�" : ' ' ' . - I 1 vear
�� m( ollingswood, 1,
I ived baseball for
. � ichool.I lealso
. - n � t his high school ca-
erai � iwn, the best school in
� beg ir plav ing baseball 12
Ambrosius started pit
lelp of his father
� � fessional ball
a :� : � : Vmbrosius' father
� �� � i . n laave i t his ti
2rai dl ither, iran ilie
played sh rtsti �p fi �� the
id p! 'Linn's fo? l years
imnerwasi �ne f the wiz kids i t
ar . 1950s
-� hen Ambrosius pitched asa
. rtool senior he narrowed his
s f schools down to five. He
rrered seholarships by UN( .
rhe E U ultmi.it. ti m
thcirspring I n ak ' Ian : and 10
in si la for thi 91 West
: � eacl
mament itti i I :
men sand . women's teams this
�fPHT. They traveled from aii over
thi United States and Cai i la I
� '� in the B Part ol
itrna rion is that
loseCuei isa sponsoi
�' i ' teams from the
w i ki nd � ilduualil foraSl �

� ' � . : � �
ti : I
Fastarolma scored 4 in a row to Flat Earth Society for the B-Bracket
take the game over the top team in title and a cash prize of $300. Later
their pool tht dav in the A-Bracket a Boston-
rhe Irates failed to qualify for Washington, D.C. mixture team.
s on Sunday. Veteran McGus, defeated Gainesville, Flas
. ill said, 'We had high ex-
itions for this tournament, but
sing w e learn our weaknesses
in Sunday, Perm, outscored
vicious cycle. b)th teams qualified
tor l eeCuervo Atlanta tinirnament,
but L Jus left with $100 in prize
money.
immer in
Jim Ambrosius
State, I niversity r Miami,
Universirv of Nebraska and I i
� watted until August of 1989
make his final de ision
Ambrosu us looked for the st hool
fin h he would ha � the K-st
chance at pitching his freshman
year, so he signed with E '
In Ambrosius' rreshmaf! year,
hi'had trouble with a fractured back
from an earlier car accident.
See Ambrosius page 13
t ai
inmIratt
i . theost theii �;ame

ind trv
Earth vs ietv i Miami
base i tean was the onh team the
Irate iged to beat Flat Earth
had the Irates down 12 9 and only
needed one nrv�re punt to win, but
Fil� Photo
Ultimate players practice at the bottom of the hill The Ultimate team
began their season in Florida and won three games in two tournaments
On the following weekend, the
Irates were in Miami for their sec-
ond tournament during spring
break. After the long week, the Irates
were down to halt their team's
manpower,
A long, hard dav of play for the
Irates began with a handv defeat bv
Turmoil, the number-one-seedeHJ
team in the 12-man tournament
ECU could not break Turmoil's de-
fensive zone, and the Irates fell bv 4-
13.
East Carolina camebaek strong
in their second game and overcame
Tampa by 13-7 From thea it was
two tough games in a row Vicious
Cycle won bv 7-13 and lust Sav No,
a Washington, D.C, teamoutscored
the Irates 9-13.
The last game oi the dav was
between the new-rivals Flat Earth
Society and ECU. Rat Earth did not
allow ECU to come tnim behind
this time. The Miami team took the
lead early and never gave it up to
finish 13-11.
Dave Kelly, defensive captain
said, "Considering five days for
spring breakin we played very
consistent and competitive '
Keith Lewis added. "We now
have a gcxvf stoke for next week
end.
This weekend March 23-24. the
Irates will be competing at the
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill for the Collegiate
Easterns. I jst vear the tea m ti nished
second in the tournament
Corruption a permanent part of college atheltics
Fil� Pho�o
STUDENT UNION
Jump on it!
Austin Baste fights to gam possession of the ball m a soccor game last season The Pirates will look
to improve this fall after a disappointing season in 1990
By Matt Mumma
Sports Hditor
The o irruption of college
fwthall and basketball is so
deeply enbedded in the games
that to restore the integrity of a
typical student athlete would be
nearly impossible.
7"he student athlete is a
misnomer because only 30
percent of all Division I football
and basketball players ever
graduate, and little over 1 percent
ever become professionals.
On Tuesday, the Knight
Commission Report released
suggested changes designed to
purge college athletics of its
hypoensv and criminal tenden-
cies.
The report stressed heavily
the importance of universirv
presidents to take more control of
their athletic programs.
Most of the responsibility will
then fall on presidents banding
together and making the changes
themselves.
Two areas that need to be
strongly supervised are the
graduation of student athletes arnl
the financial integritv of untversi
ties with large kxitball and
basketball programs.
Gross mismanagement of
funds coupled with low gradua-
tion rates are two of the biggest
problems facing athletic depart-
ments today
The report again urged
university presidents to take a
bigger hand in correcting these
problems and making sure thev
do not recur
One wav for the pnsidents to
control these areas is to maintain
internal vigilance as well as
having annual audits done bv an
outside party
One of the biggest offenders
of NCAA recruiting policies is
UNLV. Head basketball cMch
lorry Tarkanian has been under
scrutiny for most of his civKhmg
career.
Some of the violations that
are being investigated go Kick to
197H and are just now coming to
judgement.
One thing for which
Tarkanian is famous is sending
his recruits to junior colleges for
two vears until such time as thev
can pass their ACTs and enmll at
UNLV.
This is a perfectly legal
arrangement and other coaches
are starting to do the same thing
What necessitates this nirvaround
is thi" perennial low entrance
SCENES that recruits make
Proposition 48 of the NCAA
regulations requires that fresh-
man athletes make at least 'V on
their SATs and acquire a 2 0 GPA.
One notorious case at N C
State under lim Valvano s reign of
terror wasChns Washbum. who
was admitted to N C State after
getting a 470 on his SAT This, of
course, helped precipitate
Valvano'seventual dismissal
College athletes often are
recruited illegally bv cliches,
paid ilkgallv he alumni and
booster clubs and are .nfmitted
with national test scores that are
kss than average All because a
university wants to win games.
The major culprits of NCAA
violations atv Division I schools
because thev get the m�M piHie
itv arnf boneht mm cheatng
Also, Division I schools award
See Corruption paqe 13





4

I
Get involved in these post
Spring Break Recreational
Services activities:
� Putt-Putt Golf
Registration March 25 at 5pm in Bio103
� Co-Rec Volleyball
Registration March 26 at Spm in Bio 103
� Indoor Soccer
Registration March 26 at 6pm in Bio 10 3
Outdoor Gourmet Workshop
March 20 5:00pm in CC117
Backpacking Workshop
March 27 5:00pm in CG117
��
m

'n.
LeSe Pa'Tigiano
Amy Spruili
Lady Hoopsters capture
All Campus championship
Corruption
Continued from
Women's intramural basketball play concluded prior to
Spring Break with the following results:
New Sorority Champs Crowned
Alpha Delta Pi reached the finals for the fourth consecutive year by dethroning two time champions Sigma Sigma Sigma. The championship
shootoutwas led by magical ballhandlingskillsofKelly Morton, superb inside play of CaraVallas and the all around attack of previously sidelined
Elizabeth Black. Chi Omega fell prey to the ADPi attack 24-12. Julie Pope and Angie Procter led the Chi O hopefuls.
Golden Girls fall Clueless
Women's independent action highlighted several outstanding individual players including ECU Assistant Women's Basketball Coach Kosie w hi
she everretirer Thompson. Thompsons explosive inside play combined with a deft outside touch led Clueless to a 41-38 victory over I he uoiden
Girls. Lori Rose, Angela Robbins, Charlene Cutrell and Amy Pierce supplied the majority of the Golden Girls offensive power
�THE FINAL FOUR" FEVER STRIKES INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS
As the memory of Spring Break faded the action of men's intramural championship basketball reached anall rime fever pitch. The fraternity
gold championship highlighted the Cinderella fellas Tau Kappa Epsilon up against Sigma Phi Epsilon. Brett Schecter of TKE landed an 18 toot
fallaway jumper at the buzzer of the TKE semi-final matchup against Phi Tau to carry his squad into the championship contest. With the Mead)
ballhandling of Bruce Selby and the crowd of rowdies cheering in support, the TKE team proved hard to beat. Sig Ep reached the- finals with a
46-27 thrashing of Kappa Alpha. The Sig Ep arsenal includes a variety of long range weapons and outstanding inside play by ECU s version ot
"Fire & Ice" Joel Saunders and Rob Evans.
Tau Kappa Epsilon found the midas touch in the fraternity purple division as well. Mike Kehoe and Parish Nichols led their squad past
Pi Kappa Phi 32-28 in the semi's to meet Phi Tau. Phi Tau luckily passed Kappa Alpha in their purple semifinals game after a one man onslaught
by Cale Sumrell almost ended their dream of a purple division championship. Sumrell singlehandedly put his team into the overtime contest bv
netting several NBA range jumpers before Phi Tau found their way to the free throw line and the final divisional contest.
The independents have once again defied all prognostications as only one of the pre season favorites remain m the all tournament bracket
The Young Guns face the Funky Inte lectuals while the Wolfpack was pitted against the Crips in both purple semifinal games 'Leapm' Bryan
Lee and Slam Dunk Champ Wil Thompson lead the Young Guns attack while the deep bench and explosive point guard play Dwayne Whitley
powered the Intellectuals game plan. .r.
In independent gold action. Beef or Ballin' faced A Taste of Chocolate for what sounds like the championship of the Food Court Division
Chad Greens' outstanding shootingand leadership is the Beef of his team while Grant Lowe and Walt Hammett add the rebounding and defensive
prowess to the "Ballin end. A Taste of Chocolate has been fueled by Tim Lewis and the Twin Towers' Lee Greene and Rafael McBroom In
other semi final play, Z's Team squared off with Blazin the Trail. John Aliens' Z-men have bragged themselves into the championship game
from the beginning of the season. With the open court skills of Al Whiting and outside game of Donny Thompson and Pete Zophy the Z Team
takes the Dream Team Award of 1991
ps based on athletic
ty whereas Division II and QI
Is give out scholarships on a
basis.
The Knight Report did not
Oon in great detail the most
rtant part of the problem
jvj't keeps college athletics in the
nud
Television contracts need to
abolished, at least on a national
pvel, if there is to be any changv
way college athletics are
Handled
The corruption of college
and college athletes
?s the guise of television
jnbrosius
Despite the injury he vwnt on
pitch a 2-0 season and had a 1.88
A.
I couldn't have accomplished
that I did last year withou the help
,f the assistant coach Kevin
Anderson Ambrosius said
Dunng his freshman moml
CL Ambrosius pitched against
INC.
1 went out on the held with the
totude let them hit the ball and let
�e team do the plays Ambrosius
ud
He went on to pitch six score-
ECU Women's Club Soccer
a season of victory
After a championship in the Fiesta Cup Indoor Soccer Invitational in January, the
ECU women's soccer team marched into their spring season with high hopes of once
again defeating teams like UNCW, N.C State, UNC CH, Jacksonville Unidas and
Winston Salem. After all, the lady kickers kicked these squads out of the Fiesta
Tournament with ease.
Next, they posted a 2-1 victory over the UNC Club squad and made their way
back to Seahawk (and to play UNCW. In a game marred by miserable weather, Kern
Griffiths began the scoring attack with a goal at the 22 minute mark in the first half.
UNCW countered with a goal off of a missed played ball which woke the Pirate team
up from the tiring defensive struggle. The Pirates matched the Seahawk attempts to
score with outstanding goalie play until Mariana Maussen broke the deadlock contest
with a goal from the far corner of Seahawk territory and once again gave the ECU
team an impressive 2-1 victory.
The ECU women's soccer team heads to Jacksonville next to take on the
Unidas team who post a 1-1 record against the Pirate booters.
Racquetball Double Trouble
On February 23rd, five racquetball doubles teams met at
Minges for a round robin tournament. In the tournament,
each team was scheduled to play one another. The winner of
the tournament was determined by the total number oi
points each team attained during each game. The team of
Brian Weil and John McKee defeated Wayne Klewar and
Will Thompson 121-120. Thedeciding point difference came
in their head to head match with Weil and McKee taking the
round 21-20.
You should be commited
With the approach of spring and summer, now is the time to get into some type of
fitness routine. The Commit-to-Fitness Club is an individual self-directed pro-
gram based on accumulating points through individual exercise. Individuals set
point goals for the activity of their choice with the help from a Commit-To-Fimess
Club advisor. Your program can be set up on a six week time period. To begin
your fitness regimen, set up an orientation session today by calling 757-6387 or
stop bv 204 Christenbury Gym. Club memberships are FREE OF CHARGE!
Resolution Solutions
Pursue a healthier lifestyle with participation in the following programs co
sponsored by the ECU Medical School and Student Health Services:
� Grab the Gusto Before it Grabs You March 21 5-6pm
� Defend Yourself From April 10 5-6pm
Violent Behavior
These programs will be held in the General Classroom Building room 1016.
SLAM DUNK 1991
The day was February 25th, the time was 9:00pm, the stage
was set for the 1991 Slam Dunk Contest. With sixteen eager
participants ready to show their stuff. The participants were
judged on creativity and difficulty by five distinguished but
tough judges. The majority of participants were newcomers,
except for Jim Jemigton, third place winner in 1990. He was
hoping to take the title by "slamming" to the top. t
From these sixteen the field would be narrowed down to
eight participants. Each participant was given three dunks,
the dunks ranged from Dennis Morgan who attempted the
"clear two people, oops I popped him in the head" slam jam,
to Jerry Dillon's poetic "I thought he was going to miss it"
one-handed on the fly slamming jamming dunk. Dillon's
dunk received a perfect score of 50 giving him that final eight
spot.
The eight participants were Charles Miles, Will Th-
ompson, Dennis Morgan, Maurice Moody, Bryan Lee, Kevin
Hollingsworth, Jim Jernigton, and Jerry Dillon. They all
received three additional dunks to really slam their way to
victory. Will Thompson finished first by nailing his 360 de-
gree reverse dunk for a perfect score of 50, total score was 95.
Second place was Dennis Morgan with 93 points and third
place was Bryan Lee with 89 points. A big thanks to all the
participants, judges and the over 100 spectators for making i t
a really big show
ECU Underwater Hockey Tournament
On the weekend of March the sixteenth, the East Carolina University Underwater Hockey Club hosted the Third Annual East Coast Tourna-
ment. The event attracted underwater hockey clubs from as far away as Illinois and Massachusetts. Eight teams attended the tournament in-
cluding the University of South Carolina, Orlando, West Virginia, Fort Pierce, and West Palm Beach. East Carolina entered two squads in
purple and gold divisions.
The tournament began on Friday with an open pool for practicing and I captain's meeting to discuss regulations and tournament rules.
On Saturday the round robin competition began at nine in the morning. Each tcnm played five games for a total of five hours playing time. On
the basis of the round robin competition seed was established for Sunday's eliminations. Single eliminations began at nine o'clock and con-
cluded at two o'clock with an awards ceremony honoring participating teams and players.
The East Carolina Underwater Hockey Club enjoyed hosting the tournament. The out-of-town teams cooperated fully in implementing the
tournament policies. Sponsors such as the Rum Runner Dive Shop, Cressi-Sub USA, Ovcrton's Sporting Goods, King Sandwich and Sub Station
II contributed generously to the event. The East Carolina a University Club wishes to thank all sponsors mA the Crnville community for it's
support of this event.
Juita Hennigan Michelle Shuler ReCTea tional SerViceS
Fitness Instructors
Spring 1991
Drop in on any of the these instructors by purchasing a
drop-in fitness pass in 204 Christenoury Gymnasium.
Get 5 classes for $5.
Paula Zanm
Greg Stivland
Beth Gallagher
Bonnie Teague
Eileen Healy
Kelly Sapp
contracts, alumni, ar
departments themsell
A good Division f
could get huge amo
publicity and monev
mg to the NCAA tou
getting a prestigious 1
Television contraj
biggest money and
source for an athletic
CBS is paying &
seven years to the ns
broadcast theAa
With the endless!
money that televisu
can never be am
change in college athl
Continued from pa
less innings This v
Coach Gary Overtoil
man lohnnv Beck
and the Pirates tost
Ambrosius sav
about 12 hours a wee!
preseason.
His motto is
work at something
get out of it
Ambrosius. whi
physical educaboi
history, would like
school and coach
graduation
The
ORL
for
SAL
Round Tnps lUtmj 1
Miami-Caracas278
New York-Malaga 578
Chicago-Amsterdam 338
Raleigh-Tokyo 789
Los Angeles-Sydney 995
Greensboro-Paris 715
Greensboro-London 595
Taxes not incluoed RnkKHKI SO
Fares sat))e� to cra'ge Ore wait and
'acuily fares avaote W(y�.S!ix5� fcO'cacJ
jyoo'arrs tniefar;or.a Sr�aer: & Thcm
IdIuRAIL PASSES ISSUED ON;
THE SPOT! , , ,
FREE Student Travel C�ksl
Council
703 Ninth Street, - Durtom
919 286664
�vet CM�og!
Travd
A Cure for the "
1 BakeH
Reg. Co
Up To 4 Of;
Please present coupon before ordenng
must pay and sales lax due Offer (KM e �j
value 1100 of lc Offer
good at participating Harder s
restaurant's during regular
breakfast hours through �
April 30. 1991 A III
174 lb.
burge
Up To 4 01
Please present coupon before ordering
must pay and sales tax due. Offer not gc
value 1100 of U Offer
good at partkipatmg Hardee's
restaurants after regular
breakfast boars through
1 April 30,1991 �j
m. J&
910 Counche Street,





. pia conciu:
If results
or to
champions Sigma Sigma Sigma. The championship
alias and the all around attack ot previously sidelined
K'ter loci the Chi O hoix'tuls
11 CL Assistant Women � Basketball Coach Rosie "Will
touch led Clueless to a 41 38 ictorv over The Golden
its. ot the Golden c.irk offensive powcf
1 AYOFFS
jasketball reached an all rime fever pitch. Thefratornity
Phi Epsilon Brett Schecter ot rKE landed an 18 foot
uad into the championship contest With the steady
p-o ed hard to beat Sig Ep reached the finals with a
�ns and outstanding inside play b ECU s version of
like Kehoe and Parish Nichols led their squad past
It r purple semifinals came after a one man onslaught
klehandedh put his team into the overtime contest by
d the final divisional contest
- ason favorites remain in theall tournament bracket.
ips in both purple semifinal games 'Leapin' Bryan
h h and explosive point guard play Dwaync Whitley
s like the championship oi the Food Court Division.
I Walt Hammettadd the rebounding and defensive
�in Towers' l ee Greene and Rafael McBroom. In
bragged themselves into the championship game
ot Donn) 1 hompson and Pete Zophv the Z Team
cuetball Double Trouble
ruarN 23rd five racquetball doubles teams met at
� tor a round robin tournament In the tournament,
t am was scheduled to play (me another. The winner of
Tournament was determined by the total number of
s each team attained during each game. The team of
Weil and John McKee defeated Wayne Klewarand
"hompson 121 ! 20 The deciding point differencecame
fr head to head match with Weil and McKee taking the
AM DL'XK 1991
ebruary Sth, the time was:i0pm. the stage
the 1991 Slam Dunk Contest With sixteen eager
-how their stuff Hie participants were
and difficulty by five distinguished but
iges Tiemaiontvot participants were newcomers.
rjimjernigton third place winner in 1990. He was
- the title bv slamming to the top
these sixteen the field would be narrowed down to
rticipants Each participant was given three dunks,
ks ranged from Dennis Morgan who attempted the
tvvo people oops I popped him in the head slam (am.
Dillon's poetic I thought he was going to miss it"
mdod on the fly slamming lamming dunk Dillon's
d a perfect score of 50 giving him that final eight
eight participants were Charles Miles, Will Th-
. Dennis Morgan, Maurice Moody, Bryan Lee, Kevin
fcgsworth, Jim lernigton, and Jerry Dillon They all
:hree additional dunks to really slam their way to
Will Thompson finished first by nailing his 360 de-
- - dunk ti-ra perfect score of 50, total score was 95.
was Dennis Morgan with vH points and third
is Bryan I ee with B9 points A big thanks to all the
�pants judges and the over 100 spectators for making il
ub hosted the Third Annual fast(lllst Tourna-
etts Eight teams attended the tournament m-
n Be h Eastaroltna entered two squads in
feting to discuss regulations and tournamenl rules
games for a total of five hours playing time On
gie eliminations began at nine o'clock and con-
teams cooperated full) in implementing the
Sporting Goods, King Sandwich and Sub Station
sors nfinville community for it's
'eational Services
tness Instructors
Spring 1991
these instructors by purchasing a
204 Christenbury Gymnasium.
iPP
I
Corruption
larships based on athletic
tv whereas Division II and fJI
jjpob give out scholarships on a
Tal basis.
The Knight Report did not
tion m great detail the most
Mortant part ot the problem
iteeps college athletics in the
pd
Television contracts need to
,atvlished, at least on a national
rtH it there is to be any change
he wav college athletics are
and led
The corruption of college
etics and college athletes
,ssunx the guise of television
Ambrosius
respite the injury, he went on
pitch a 241 season and had a 1,88
RA
1 couldn't have accomplished
hjt i did last year withou the help
the assistant coach Kevin
laderson Ambrosius said.
IXinng his freshman seasonat
Ambrosius pitched against
� ent out on the field with the
Mude let them hit the ball and let
wm do the plays Ambrosius
He w ent on to pitch six score-
ConHnudlrompag�ll
contracts, alumni, andthe athletic
departments themselves.
A good Division I school
could get huge amounts of
publicity and money for advanc-
ing to the NCAA tournament or
getting a prestigious bowl bid.
Television contracts are the
biggest money and publicity
source for an athletic program.
CBS is paying &1 billion over
seven years to the rights to
broadcast the NCAA tournament.
With the endless supply of
money that television offers there
can never be any significant
change in college athletics.
Continued from page 11
(Sfte �aat (Earolinian March 21. 1991 13
less innings. This year, however.
Coach Gary Overton started fresh-
man Johnny Beck against UNC,
and the Pirates lost 2-1.
Ambrosius says he puts in
about 12 hours a week practicing in
preseason
His motto is "the harder you
work at something, the more you
get out of it
Ambrosius, who is majoring in
physical education, with a minor in
history, would like to teach high
school and coach baseball after
graduation.
The
ORL
SAL
-v- � rnpt staring as
Miami-Caracas978
New York-Malaga 578
Chicago-Amsterdam 338
Raleigh-Tokyo 789
Los Angeles-Sydney 995
Greensboro-Paris 715
Greensboro-London 595
o: iciuded Restrictions apply
� i �� - c: to change One ways and
k 'a-es available WorttStudy Abnoafl
i 5-x-a-s Inter-asonai Student & Teachef
EURAIL PASSES ISSUED ON
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Get the 2nd
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Good anytime
Beverage not included
Expires: 3-25-91
presents
Tennessee Williams' modern classic
March 22, 23, 25 and 26, 1991
8:15 p.m.
McGinnis Theatre
ECU Students: S3.00 General Public: 57.50
Call 757-6829
QUALITY FILM DEVELOPING
photo Center
SUPER SAVING COUPON FOR A
Only 99tf !
I second set of prints
j! with ever) disc or roll of color print film brought in for processing i
offer good through March 25, Vwi �
I�1
4fi Prints not included
Coupon Must Accompam Ordci
ECU Student Store Wright Bldg
Greenville NC 2785il
This Week's Entertainment
Thurs. March 21
The Other People
Frida March 22
Manifest Destiny
$2 cover
Saturday March 23
Dylan Fence
Hours
Mon. 11 am-3pm
Tuc. 11 am -3pm
Wed 11 am-3pm
l pm-l am
Thurs. 1 lam-lam
Rri. 1 lam-lam
Sal. 4pm-lam
513 Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080
A Cure for the "After Spring Break-I'm Broke-and-I'm Hungry Syndrome"
TBakeryMuffn&
Reg. Coffee 99tf
plus tax
Up To 4 Offers Per Coupon
Please present coupon before ordenng. One coupon per customer per visit.
Customer
must pay and sales tax due. Offer not good mcombi nation with any other offers Cash
value 1100 of U Offer
good at participating Hardee's
restaurant's during regular
breakfast hours through
i.i iwniiMiiiuiuii wiui uiy oilier oners.
Hatdeer
ifEUil1 -dUJtflJdsQfGood Stuff j
2Sa"usage
Biscuits 99tf
plus tax
Up To 4 Offers Per Coupon
Please present coupon before ordenng. One coupon per customer per visit. Customer
must pay and sales tax due. Offer not good incombinaiion with any other offers Cash
value 1100 of lc Offer
good at participating Hardee's
restaurant's during regular
breakfast hours through
April 30,1991 All Kinds ofGood Stuff
xxl in combination with any other off
Hadeer
g nui �� �
Reg. Roast Beef
Sandwich 990
plus tax
Up To 4 Offers Per Coupon
Please present coupon before ordenng. One coupon per customer per visit. Customer
must pay and sales lax due. Offer not good in combination with any other offers Cash
value 1100of lc Offer � � m m
good at participating Hardee's
restaurant's after regular
breakfast hours through
"J'A
I
I
I
I
I
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14 lb. Cheese-
burger 990
Up To 4 Offers Per Coupon
Ha
L - - -fi- f�nds �lS2PfL uff
fffgTJeTiixe
Burger 990
plus tax
Please present coupon before ordering. One coupon per customer per visit. Customer
must pay and sales tax due. Offer not good in comhination with any other offers. Cash
value l100of U Otter MJf
good at participating Hardee's
restaurant's after regular
Ha
breakfast hours through j
L Apri. jo, 1991 A11 KtHOS Of Good Stuff j
'J'A
plus tax
Up To 4 Offers Per Coupon
Please present coupon before ordering. One coupon per customer per visit. Customer
must pay and sales tax due. Offer not gootin combination with any other offers. Cash
value 1100 of 1 Offer �� 1f
good at participating Hardee's
restaurant's after regular
f breakfast hours through .
i
All Kinds of Good Stuff
:
910 Cotanche Street
6-11 Sun-Wed
24 hrs Thurs-Sat





X
fj
a�
vx
V
�vj
�Nf
iJ
iO :

Timewankers
By Kemple, Law, Mason, Parker, and Robinson
Ij�st episode: The evil Dead King is unleashed on Atlantis, wreaking havok on the
city. When it seems all is lost. Rex saves the day by incapacitating Vic in the powerful
jaws of The Nautilus. Captain Nemo is then free to convince The Magic Pirate to
surrender, and. as the underwater metropolis celebrates its victory, from the depths
comesKTNG NEPTUNE! And now
- -1
. �
Y�
?
W
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 21, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 21, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.799
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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