The East Carolinian, March 19, 1991






�te i�uBt (Hutalxnmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No. 17
Thursday, March 19, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pages
State audit finds mismanagement
Bv I eClair Harper
Assistant News I ilitor
rhc State uditor s office re-
leased .1 report ucsda detailing
abusesatE I ranging from misuse
of funds to wiretapping "hereport
also included EC I s response
l "he departments t ECl thai
wire investigated were the Phvsi
cal Plant Buildings Department ot
Publu Safer Department of rek
communications and the Depart
men! ot (luman Resources
rhe allegations relating to the
EC I Ph sical Plant Buildings wore
thai tlit- superintendenl ot build
ings, Gene Howell. misused uni-
rrsit employees, equipment and
facilities Howell was investigated
i the university tor misuse ot
employees in 1979 and no action
was taken 1 lowoll was suspended
on No 15, 1990. He resigned on
Feb 22 1991
rhe report stated that the SU
perintendent had misus1 person-
nel Incidents include having a uni-
versity mechanic do work at his
houseon university time tor a tune
jvnod of si years
The mechanic stated that he
w as net told to take leave and that
he felt pressured to do the work He
also reported having been told to
buy mobile home roof supplies and
work on a root on state tune He
worked on thesupenntendent'scar
on state time
Another university garage me-
chanic had been instructed to work
on lawn mowers and weed eaters
on state time for Howell.
I Hher duties were reported to
have been performed by employ-
ees on state time tor the superin-
tendent. Also, an employee saw
l lowell destroy hisofflce telephone
intentionally.
I lowell denied all of the allega-
tions except that of destroying the
Registration catalogs
available for summer, fall
By oev Jenkins
(General Mjnjier
Students who w ish to recjster tor classes during
the summer sessions and tall semester should lv on
the look out this week tor the E( l registrar's Sunv
ECU � CLASS � REGISTRATION � MAGAZINE
Summer &
Fall 1991 D
mer and Fall lggl Class Registration Magazine
�Vi ording to associate registrar Bobbie Austin.
copies ot the magazine should be available to stu-
dents .is early as rhursday from their advisors and
academu departments
The magazine should also he available from the
ECU student Stores bj rhursday. Austin said that
the registrar s office in hichard Building will dis-
tribute copies on March 25.
While course listings comprise the bulk ot the
magazine, there is much more to it I his updated
almanac tor the registering student includes infor-
mation on university tees, how to regisiterdrop a
class, how to apply tor graduation, how and where
to registeror withdraw,schedules tor final examina-
tions and a map of the university.
Hark registration tor the summer sessions and
tall semester will be from April 1-5.
Graduate students, handicapped students and
students with more than 75 semester credit hours
may register on April 1. Students with 4b-74 semes-
ter credit hours may register on April 2 Students
with 18-45 semester credit hours may register on
April 3 Students with 11-17 semester credit hours
may register on April 4. All students are eligible to
register on April 5.
The magazine's cover features an illustration of
the Old Austin Buildings'cupola bv area artist Roger
Kammerer.
I onstructed in 1908, the Old Austin Building
wasdemolished in 1968 to make room tor the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center and School of Art Building. The
cupola was one of the most recognizable landmarks
on campus.
Located in the center of the magazine is an ad-
vertising section featuring manv of Greenville's restau-
rants and businesses and campus organizations.
Governor's commission discusses infant death
By David While
Staff Writer
The Governor's Commission
on Infant Mortality discussed ways
toreducetheintantmortalitvratein
a meeting held Friday, March 8.
Recent statistics show that ba-
bies born in NorthCarohnaaa'moa1
likely to die before reaching their
first birthday than those born in 47
other statts.
In North Carolina. Pitt County-
ranks near the top of the 1(X) coun-
ties � ana verage of 25 babies die in
Pitt County each year.
In 1989Gov. Jim Martin formed
a 29-member commission tocombat
the problem of infant mortality The
commission opened a hotline run
by Jodie Weiner.
The purposeof thecampaign is
to reduce infant mortality by in-
creasing awareness of the steps
women can take to insure a healthy
baby and pregnancy.
"Most of the near 40(X) calls
since the hotline wascreated in May
have heard of the First Step hot line
by public service announcements
and by billboards Weiner said.
"They want to know what services
we do and what more can we tell
them
The hot line is staffed by trained
counselors who are available to
provide support and answer ques-
tionsaboutservicesand procedures.
Dr. C. Timothy Monroe, the
director of the Pitt County Health
Department, gave a profile of Pitt
See Commission, page 2
phone He had initially dented de-
stroying the phone, but admitted to
it after being shown a photograph
ot the damaged telephone
The report stated that the su
perintendent had "intimidated, ha-
rassed and used unprofessional
conduct in dealing with employ-
ees The report stated that some
employees said the superintendent
called them stupid" or idiots
rhe report also said that "he
threatened a pun basing officer to
the extent that he said he had a
pistol, and. it he had to he would
start shooting people
The report stated Ui.it the su
perintendent had boon issued a gun
by Public Safety in the 1970s
The state auditor's office re-
ceived eight allegations relating to
the Department of Public Safety
Thev included misuse of funds, the
issue of a university pistol to the
superintendent of buildings and
violation of students' rights during
drug investigations.
The current director of Public
Safety, lames DePuy, was aware
that Howell had been issued a pis-
tol DePuy and former ECU police
chief met with Howell in 1999 but
the pistol was not returned at that
time. IX I Attorney Ben Irons got
the pistol from Ho well's attorney in
November of 1990.
The report questioned money
used from the investigations fund
totaling $2,854.43. This fund is to be
used tor "supplies and equipment
of investigations and as 'bait' in
investigations Out of the ques-
tioned monev, $633.94 was reim-
bursed to DePuy for lunch meet-
ings and expenses that the auditors
did not find applicable to investi-
gation matters. These expenditures
included groceries and food for
parties and televisions and VCRs.
The audit also found money
See Wiretap, page 2
City may take over control
of Greenville Utilities
Bv Iim Rogers
siatt Writer
The Greenville I tilities Com-
mission may lose its control of the
city s utilities turn tions it theity
Council decides to take legislative
action to abolish the .1 C'scharter.
I he( it . ounci I unanimously
oted to seek legislative authority
to do .n ,i w ith the iitihtie
commission si barter March 11. But
in a meeting rhursday the C itv
Council decided to meet with
membersol the IIboard before
taking action against the commis-
sion.
The c ity Council is concerned
with the XX in areas ot money,
street lighting, contract terms and
employee pa
Mayor Nancy enkins, who
presides over the City Council, said
that control over the city's utility
extensions is mst one way to better
"stimulate and guide growth in our
community
It the City Council decides to
pursue legislative action to rescind
the( .IX s charter it must hedrafted
by April 4 and approved bv the
(ieneral Assembly
It the General Assembly ap-
proves the proposal the city will
take control ot (nvnville's uhlitv
functions
Members of the GUC board
were surprised and disturbed by
the initial division reached by the
City Council.
GUC Board member Rk Miller
said that theCoundl should have at
least talked to the board about the
areas of concern before Liking any
actions against the commission.
The Citv Council met once
again Monday, March 18 to ensure
ontinuity among all Council
members on the issue.
Even though the initial vole was
unanimous, one Council member,
Lorraine Shinn, changed her mind
about abolishing the GUC charter.
"I feel that information 1 re-
ceived m last Monday's meeting
was not entirely accurate Shinn
said
Shinn asked the other Council
members to explore different ways
to sol ve the problems with the GUC
such as creating charter amend-
ments instead of completely abol-
ishing the charter.
The Council agreed once again
not to take any further action until
after the City Counal and the GUC
board members meet in City Hall
Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.
See Utilities page 2
Water better
for athletes
than sports
drinks
By Babbi S. Hawkins
Nutrition Columnist
"Energy for Performance
Fluid Replacement & Energy
Drink The Sports Performance
System High-Energy Carbohy-
drate Drink Mix These are some
oi the alluring claims to entice you
to purchase sports dnnks. These
products arc so cleverly marketed
that not only are elite athletes using
them, but non-athletes in need of a
beverage are using them as well
What are the myths and realities
surrounding the usage of sports
dnnks?
Athletics is big business. Some
food companies ha ve responded by
developing "sweat replacers" or
sports dnnks. These sweet-tasting
liquidsaremixturcsof water, sugar,
sodium and potassium. These for-
See Water page 3
SG A review board to decide on special election
By Shannan Copeland
Staff Writer
The Student Government As-
sociation may ha ve to hold a special
election fora new treasurerafterall.
Mana Dcnoia, theSG Aattorney
general, said the SCi A must hold an
election for the treasurer even
though the sole candidate is Garry
Dudley.
Legislator Leslie Nicholson
appealed Denoia decision.
"There is nothing in the consti-
tution that says we have to have an
election Nicholson said in theSG A
meeting Monday evening.
Vice President Beth Howard
disagreed saying the constitution
clearly states that there must be an
election.
Denoia decision will go before
the review board either Tuesday or
Wednesday. If it passes, an election
will be held Thursday.
Dudley will replace Randy
Royal, who was forced to resign his
position as treasurer because his
grades did not meet the minimum
requirement of 2.0.
A resolution was passed by the
legislature in support of foregoing
the election.
In ot her business, a constitu tion
for Phi Mu Alpha, a music profes-
sional fraternity, was passed. They
also received $800 for advertising
and honoraria for a Jazz Festival.
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial
4 Features
Sports
FT
Governor Martin's flexible
tuition proposal would create
elitist schools
Students should beware ol the
potentially harmful effects of
the food additive MSG.
Classified b
Men's basketball coach Mite
Steel was fired last week after
four seasons.





2 (Efte �agt (EaroHnfan March 19, 1991
CRIMF'S'ENE
Student charged with DWI, controlled
substancealcohol violation
March 7
0223�Garrett Residence Hall: student given campus citation
for underage drinking and for visitation violation.
023&�Aycock Residence Hall: investigated a possible fight on
the fourth floor. Same was handled by the residence hall staff.
1041�Garrett and Hetcher Residence Halls: campus citation
issued to student for one-way street violation.
1111�Nursing Building (area near): investigated report of
indecent exposure. Subject was not located.
1150�Umstead Residence Hall (east): took a report of a larceny
of a hubcap from a student's vehicle.
2335�Third and Reade streets: a student was given a state
citation and three non-students were banned from campus.
March 8
0030�Garrett and Hetcher: investigated area for subjects
throwing water balloons out of windows. Same was unfounded.
01 Oh�Third and Reade streets: subject who was passed out
was identified and let go.
0217�Jenkins Art Center: three subjects trying to get into the
building were banned from campus.
0324 Jenkins Art Center investigated a report of a gas leak
coming from a blow torch.
0427�Jones Residence Hall: student given campus citation for
visitation violation and a former student was banned from campus.
1808�Location unknown: assisted a residence hall staff mem-
ber by securing a door which had fallen from the hinges.
March 10
0045�Third and Reade streets lot: investigated a vehicle left
running with a subject passed out inside. Same was identified and
turned over to a friend.
March 14
2228� Ficklen and Charles streets: investigated a fight between
six subjects. No report was taken because no one wanted to press
charges.
March 15
0124- General Classroom Building (southwest): four students
given verbal warnings for removing drainage grate.
0135�Green Bam: non-student charged with DWI.
1905�Fifth and Reade streets: Greenville officers observed
juvenile subjects carrying bicycle tires. Subjects taken into custody
and transported to the police department for processing.
2214 - Jenkins ArtCentcr: assisted Fire and Rescue with a small
fire on the 2nd floor.
March 17
0013�Maintenance warehouse (west): Verbal warnings given
to a student and non-student for skateboard violations.
0144�College Hill Drive student issued a stated citation for a
stop sign violation and expired tags. The student was also charged
with DWI and Controlled SubstanceAlcohol violarionsby another
officer.
Wiretap
from the traffic fund totalling
$31,13937 was used for redecorat-
ing DePuy's office, travel expenses
and computers.
The report also stated that the
director of telecommunications, Ted
Roberson, wiretapped a telecom-
munications employee. The report
stated "The University Telecom-
munications Services Director
secretly recorded telephone con-
versations of another telecommu-
nications employee in possible
violation of (state law) In the re-
port Roberson said he taped the
con versa tions because he suspected
an employee was using drugs.
The report stated that Roberson
said he met with Evan Midgette, the
assistant director of the department
of human resources, and a Public
Safety captain in the spring of 1990.
He said they discussed the possibil-
ity of record ing the employee's tele-
phone conversations. The report
stated Roberson said the captain
asked him: "One � can you tap the
employee's line? Two � how hard
would it be to do? Three � would
the employee know that his phone
was tapped?"
The report stated that the as-
sistant director and captain did not
remember this meeting.
The assistant director listened
to the tapeand then met with DePuy.
The assistant director said he asked
if the information could be used,
and DePuy said in certain circum-
stances it could be. In the auditor's
interview, DePuy said "(I) told the
assistant director that the informa-
tion am Id not be used in a court of
law, but (I) did not tell him that
wiretapping was illegal
On June 5,1990, they decided
to have an undercover officer work
with the employee. "According to
Dance Around And Bare
Ydur Tan For Hundreds Of
These Dirty Old Men.
Tuesdays
March 19. 26
April 2 9
Finals:
April 16
Weekly Prizes:
Winner-SKX)
Runner Up-S25 Gift Certificate
Final Prizes: �
Wmner-$350
Runner Up�$150
Fridays
March 22. 29
April 5. 12. 19. 26
Finals:
May 3
Weekly Prizes:
Winner-$100
Final Prizes:
Winner-$300
Plus A Free Saturday Night
Stay At The Hilton "
thedirector, the Vice Chancellor for
Business Affairs was informed
about the tapping and approved of
the undercover operation the re-
port stated.
In November of 1990 The Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation was
informed about the wiretap ECU
officials started an internal investi-
gation, and Roberson was disci-
plined. The report said other uni-
versity employees were also in-
volved or knew about the wiretap-
ping including Richard Brown, the
vicechancellor for Business Affairs;
DePuy, thedirectorof Public Safety;
John Burris, the captain of investi-
gations; Richard Farris, the director
of Human Resourcesand Midgette,
the assistant director of Human
Resources for Employee Relations.
The report stated that "the
university officials referred to
ha ve sta ted tha t they were not a wa tv
Commission
Continued from page 1
that taping employee's telephone
conversations without the
employee's knowledge was poten-
tially illegal
The FBI has finished its inves-
tigation and will present its report
to the U.S. Attorney
The University reopened its
investigation of the wiretapping m
February
Roberson and Burns resigned
on March 8.
In a letter to Edward Renfrew,
the state auditor, Chancellor Rich.
ard Fakm wrote, "While I still mat
not share your opinion in even
case, I generally concur with the
recommendations in the report and
will take the neoessarv actions to
resolve each and every matter
In the attached ECU response
to the report, ECU agreed to almost
all of the recommendations Inter
nal investigations continue.
Continued from page 1
County families to help identify
high-risk mothers.
He pointed to indicators such
as poorer families, less education
and race.
However, he said it is almost
impossible to use onlv these en tena
becaure many people with similar
indicators have healthy babies. For
this reason, Monroe called infant
mortality the "invisible problem
Monroe said women who have
a high risk of having an infant die
share these characteristics:
� Women who receive little or
no prenatal care.
� Women in their teens or over
40 years old.
� Women who use drugs such
as cocaine or alcohol dunng preg-
nancy.
Utilities
� Women who are malnour
ishod dunng their pregnancy
� Women who get prej
less than onv year after then
deliver.
An announcement was made
th.it the I990general assembl
proved a (bur-year plan to n
infant mortality and desigi
(103 million to pav for it
The package included i
ston of Medicaid to cover ��
and infants with family in
to 185 percent of the federal p
level, expansion of the Rural Ob-
stetrical Care Incentive progi
help offset malpractice cost- ,
health care providers in med
understaffed areas and inert ed
Medicaid reimbursement for I
tors who perform prenatal and ob-
stetrical services
Continued from page 1
The City Coundl's initial deci-
sion was made dunng a private
meeting.
This prompted the Dailv Re-
flector to file a suit against Mayor
Jenkins and the City Council for
violating North Carolina's open
meetings law
City Attorney Mac Mc
said that the meetings were
darify the relationship between the
Utilities Commission and th�
Counctiand therefore are pn tected
by attorney-client privilege
ATTENTION ECU GROUPS
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Annual Fund-raising Planning Sessions Are
Scheduled for:
Wednesday, March 20
Thursday, March 21
Wednesday, March 27
Wednesday, April 3
Thursday, April 4
Wednesday, April 10
Thursday, April 11
Wednesday, April 17
Thursday, April 18
Room 242
Rooms 8A-B
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
Rooms 8A-B
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
all times 3:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m.
A Representative of Your Organization
Must Be Present At One Session
In Order To Obtain
1991-1992 Funding
All Groups With SGA Funded
Status Are Eligible
For Further Information Call
Tripp Hogg, 757-0266
Amy Harris, 758-9923
If You Are Unsure If You Are
Eligible For Funding -
PleaseCall
Millie Murphrey at 757-4726
History Departm
By Wendy Smith
Special to The East Carolinian
A lab used to restore artifacts
from shipwrecks held an open
house Wed , March 6, on campus.
The open house included
guided tours of the lab with expla-
nations about the processes in-
volved.
The laboratory isa new addition
to the maritime history and under-
water research program of the ECU
department ofl
rentlv one of
J
country that I
search
Oner artif
they are treal
which help
sion and color
are placed ir
they are slow!
The com
behind the
Health Surd
Great American
By Heather Modlin
Staff Writer
The Great American Meat-out,
Wednesday, March 20, is the sev-
enth annual national public educa-
tion campaign sponsored bv Farm
Animal Reform Movement.
FARM is a national non-profit
educational organization formed in
1981 to convey to the American
public the effects of animal agricul-
ture
Shanna Mornssev, the presi-
dent of the ECU chapter of the Stu-
dents for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals said of the event. "We're
trung to inform the public of the
hazards of meat, both health wise
and environmentally, and the hor
rots that acmj
industry"
The (.real
is headlined a
including I ij
River Phoeni
Cesar Chave
entertainer
endorsed b) j
environ: -
organizati i
A instil
velopn I
tion Netwoi
Workers
The Mea
to encourage
the meat nab
m an efl
COttSumptio
Water
mutations are made to replace fluid
and minerals lost dunng profuse
sweating. This sounds like a good
idea, but are thesednnks really nec-
essary for fluid replacement and.
for that matter, who should use
them?
Dehydration, a condition that
occurs when water excretion ex-
ceeds water intake, is the most seri-
ous threat to optimal athlebc perfor
ma nee and well-being. Dunng vig-
orous exercise, the muscles warm
up and you begin to sweat. Sweat-
ing is the body's cooling mecha-
nism. Rapid water loss in the form
of sweat can reduce muscular en-
durance. Dehydration can lead to
fatigue, thirst, increased body tem-
penture,niusrJe cramps, heat stroke
and even death. Adequate fluid in-
take isessential so that sweating can
occur.
The purpose of a "sweat re-
placer' is to rehvdrate the body
Research ind
athletes, tho
events lastinJ
utes,mayexd
in endurance
ing a sports
Enduran
on the athlel
grycogen Mu
energy needel
an athlete h
ha- exercisej
thus, grj
Since a
contain grua
spared and ei
Howev ej
dnnks by M
does no)
inent since
provide enol
two hours
exercise Thi
pnmanlv ccd
The tnitl
RESERVE OF


TOUR FIRSTS'
YOU
fkx information contact Capa Gary B.
;J





OIt?e gagt (garolfnian March 19.1991 3
:ontinued from page 1
lformovl
;on
nployw's telephone
itions without the
- - know ledge was poten-
Bl has unishtxi its inws-
� and w ill present its report
� rte)
niversit) reopened its
�f the wiretapping in
irris resigned
� � ird Renfrow,
"v i-ll.H Rich-
a hile I still may
�mi in even
with the
n �"� reportand
sai actions to
� r matter
� sponse
agreed to almost
� � itions Inter
r�d horn page 1
malnour-
nregnano
an!
� their list
is made
itcd
i expan-
,��
sup
Liral v b
.r u to
, OStS o(
icdically
icreased
ci from page 1
iriev
held to
- n the
the i. itv
n itected
STUDENT UNION
jut Union
appen At ECU

r
.fif
J
ix" Theatre
IS
21-2
is Required for Admission!
STUOLNT UNK N
History Department holds open house at new lab
By Wendy Smith
Special to The East Carolinian
A lah used to restore artifacts
trom shipwrecks held an open
house Wed March 6, on campus.
The open house included
guided tours of the lab with expla-
nations about the processes in-
volved.
The laboratory isa new addition
to the maritime historv and under-
water research program of the FCT
department of history, which iscur-
rently one of two programs in the
country that study underwater re-
search.
Once artifacts arrive at the lab,
they are treated with chemicals
which help preserve their dimen-
sion and color. Finally, the artifacts
are placed in a humidifier where
they are slowly dried.
The conservation lab is located
behind the Belk Building (Allied
1 lealth Sciences) at the corner of
Greenville Boulevard and Charles
Street.
The two building lab is
equipped with facilities for pre-
serving organic, metal, stone, glass
and ceramic artifacts for museum
display. There is also an office, li-
brary, classroom, darkroom, car-
pentry shop and study area with
equipment for artifact analysis and
identification.
Gordon P. White, co-director
of the Maritime History and Un-
derwater Research program, said
the lab is the culmination of years of
effort to establish a site on campus
for the conservation of artifacts.
Currently, the lab is being used
to treat artifacts recovered from a
Revolutionary War vessel exca-
vated in the York Ri verat Yorktown,
VA.
The department will provide
the artifacts to the commonwealth
of Virginia for display this spring at
the Yorktown Victory Center.
Great American Meat-out to be observed Wednesday
By Heather Modlin
Staff Writer
The Great American Meat-out,
Wednesday, March 20, is the sev-
enth annual national public educa-
tion campaign sponsored bv Farm
Animal Reform Movement.
FARM is a national non-profit
educational organization formed in
1981 tii convey to the American
public the effects of animal agricul-
ture.
Shanna Mornssev, the presi-
dent of rite ECU chapter of the Shi
dents tor the 1'thical Treatment of
Animals said of the event, We're
trying to intorm the public of the
hazards ot meat, both health wise
and environmentally, and the hor-
rors that actually occur in the meat
industry
The Great American Meat oat
is headlined bv a National Council
including Dons Day,Casey Kasem,
River Phoenix, Cleveland Amorv,
Cesar Cha vesand other wntersand
entertainers. The campaign is also
endorsed bva number of consumer,
em ironnxmt and animal protection
organizations, including the
ASPCA. Institute for Food and IV
vetopment Policy, Rainforest Ac
rJon Network and United Farm
Workers.
I"he Meat-out'sprimarv goal is
to encourage Americans to "kick
the meat habit" tor at least one day
in an effort to reduce the national
consumption of meat and conse-
quently the raising of animals for
food
The great American Meat-out
also serves to inform the American
people about the impacts of fann-
ing practices on consumer health,
natural resources and animal wel-
fare. Sources state that over 1.5 mil-
lion Amencans are crippled and
killed prematurely each year by
chronic diseases that have been
linked to the consumption of ani-
mal fat and meat.
In addition, sources say raising
animals for food also wastes up to
90 percent of the earth's topsoil.
groundwater, destroys lakes and
streams, and levels rain rotestsand
other habitats.
The Great American Meat-out
Water
is observed by thousands of con-
sumer and animal protection ad vcv
cates. At over 500 locations
throughout the United States, dem-
onstrations will be held in support
of the event. Chapel Hill, Durham,
Raleigh, and Charlotte have recog-
nized March 20as theGreat Amen-
can Meat-out Day. Canada, Great
Britain, and Indiaalso acknowledge
similar observances.
Nation wideralliesare planned.
They include stops at a live animal
auction, a slaughterhouse, a restau-
rant, and a hospital.
SETA will havean information
table in front of the Student Store
March N-20. Great Amencan Meat-
out pamphlets will be displayed
Meatless recipes will be available.
Continued from page 1
mutations are made to replace thud
and minerals lost during profuse
sweating. This sounds like a good
idea, but are these drinks really nec-
essary for fluid replacement and.
for that matter, who should use
them?
Dehydration, a condition that
occurs when water excretion ex-
ceeds water intake, is the most seri-
ous threat to optima! athletic perfor-
mance and well-being. During vig-
orous exercise, the muscles warm
up and you begin to sweat. Sweat-
ing is the body's cooling mecha-
nism. Rapid water loss m the form
of sweat can reduce muscular en-
durance. Dehydration can lead to
fatigue, thirst, increased body tem-
perature, muscle cramps, heat stroke
and even death Adequate fluid in-
take lsessenhal so that sweating can
occur.
The purpose of a "sweat re-
placer" is to rehvdrate the bodv.
Research indicates that endurance
athletes those who participate in
events lasting mote than X) min-
utes, may experience improvement
in endurance asa result of consum-
ing a sports drink.
Endurance fitness isdependent
on the athlete's storage of muscle
glvcogen Muscleglycogensupplies
energy needed forendurance. When
an athlete "hits the wall he or she
has exercised to exhaustion, and
thus, glvcogen stones are depleted.
Since endurance sports dnnks
contain glucose, muscle glvcogen is
spared and endurance improves
I lowever,consumptionof these
dnnks bv non-endurance athletes
J
does not lead to such an improve
ment since noFrolfldBg�rti�artf I
provide enough energy for about
two hours of moderate intensity
exercise Thus, the glucose present
pnmanlv contributes calonos.
The tnith is that, for all athletes,
plain, axil water ingested before,
during and after exercising works
just as well and, in fact, is absorbed
morequicklv than fluidscontaming
sugar
The essential minerals lost in
sweat cm be easily replaced bv eat-
ing a balanced diet including nutri-
ent-rich fcxxls and beverages such
as fruits, fnnt juicers and fresh veg-
etables In fact, the body stores
enough sodium, potassium and
other minerals to compensate tor
losses during most activity
Another consideration is cost
Whereas water is free, some sports
dnnks costs about SI per quart in
the grocery store; mete per unit
measure if you buv individual serv-
irut hot ties
What's most important, if you
exercise, is fluid replacement and
that the quantity of fluid needed for
rchydrabonisrelahveto the amount
Of fluid vou lose.
Dnnk plenty of clear, cool wa-
terpnor to exercising and thendnnk
water throughout the activity.
Weigh yourself before and after the
event on the same scale. You will
need to dnnk one pint ot fluid for
every one pound body weight lost
dunng theevent. Do so within a few
hours after the event or training
session.
Remember, thirst is satisfied bv
small amountsoi water and, thus, is
not a n-liablemdicatorof the amount
of fluid vou need to rehvdrate your
bodv.
Some water replacement "rules
of thumb" are:
� Consume two cups of fluid 15
minutes before the sports event.
� Consume one cup of fluid
everv 15 minutes for events lasting
longer that 30 minutes.
� Consume enough fluid after
theevent to bnngbody weight back
to pre-event level.
RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
YOUR FIRST STEP TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE
YOU COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
At Army ROTC Camp Challenge you'll learn
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For .formation contact: CapoGary B. lamon, Ea Carotin. Un.rsuy ARMY ROTC. Raw! Bklf. - Room 344 phone: 757-6974967
Crime doesn't pay, but we do.
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications
for staff writers. For more information, call 757-6366.
EasL-Carplina
Playhouse
19.90-1991
(Season
presents
Tennessee Williams' modern classic
March 22, 23, 25 and 26, 1991
8:15 p.m.
McGinms Theatre
ECU Students: $3.06 General Public: $7.50
Call 757-6829
CLIFFS
'Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway INC. 33 Ext i Grvcnvill. North Carolina
Phono 752-3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Shrimp $3 95
Plate
PINEBROOK APTS.
formerly Riverbluff
under new ownership
Renovations Underway
1 Bedroom apts & 2 bedroom townhouses
12 price special for June & July (conditional)
Water, sewer and Basic Cable included in rent
Pool Low Deposit
Pets Allowed ("Conditional) Laundry Room
?Accepting applications August I
121 Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
Wednesday
WZMB
Progresssive Dance Night
introducing
MO Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
1.00 Kamikazees
Ladies Free til 10:30
WE

Join us for all the
NCAA Basketball
action via satellite
on our
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Specials
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Street
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Stye Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bi air Skinner, News Lditor LeClair Harper, Ami News Editor
Matt Kinc Eeatures Editor Stuart Oi .riant, Asst Eeatures Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Kerry NlfTtt, Ami Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor JASON Johnson, Copy Editor
Dour. Morris, Editorial Production Manager Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Jeff Parker, Stiff Illustrator Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
CHRIS NoRMAN, Darkroom Ttetmkkn Phong Luong, Business Manager
Carla Whitfield, Clarified Ads Technician Deborah Daniel, Secretory
1, J �
BCT Muden.v Darin, ,hc U V sch.ol year. The TaslCamhman publics twice a week w.th a circuit, �f 12 000 The East
taroUnum reserve, Ihe r.gh. to refuse or discontinue any advert.scmen.s lha. d.scnm.na.e on the has.s of age sex creed or
nanonal or.gm The masthead eduonal m each cd.lion dx-s no. ncccssanty represent the views ol one md.v.dual p rather
sama,on,v�yln1onnf ,he Fdi.onal Board w( welco,TKsleersexpressu,g ,I, pomtsofv.ew. Letters should
be limited to250 words Of less. For purposes of deem v and hrev.ty. The F,iUCarohn,an reserves the right toed letters for
����5��� " �m '��� �� �. �. ��,e. nc. Greenpeace activities raise questions
By Jason Johnson
Editorial Columnist
Governor's plan not without flaws
On Jan H,tnhisStateofiheStateaddress,Ckn
Inn Martin dropped ,i bomb on the I system
Board oi Governors He suggested th.it the Board
give up its principle power (regulating the state
wide tuition rate) so that individual campuses could
raise their tuitions (within state limns) as needed to
till in the cracks during the present budget crisis
rhe plan would alsoalkow schools to keep their
tuition proceeds (which presently go into the state
general fund). To keep the expected tuition increases
from shutting out low-income students, each c.im-
pus would have to direct 2 percent oi the extra
revenue to scholarships for needy students Gov
Martin hopes that the plan will raise$28 million tor
the UNC system
While the propos.il looks inviting on the sur
face, thecentral element of tuition deregulation could
have some disturbing effects.
Kight now, tuition isrelativelv equal state wide
It individual schools were allowed to set their own
tuition, certain schools would surelv raise their tu-
itions more than others, according to what their
respective student bodies could afford
If a school with a relatively affluent student
body was to raise its tuition on the Kisis what its
average student could afford, dents (and pro
spochvc students) with incomes lower than that
affluent average would not be able to attend th.it
school As result, that school would develop a
wealthier student bod v, sloughing oft the lower end
of the spectrum of income) and thus allowing for a
further tuition increase
That cycle of a�ademic natural selection would
produce an elite group ot state supported schools
which are too expensive lor most state residents to
attend
Such a Situation would make the whole idea of
state universities ridiculous. It could alsochange the
demographics ot the l system in absolutely un-
acceptable ways
Seventy five percent ot black students and 4
percent ot all undergraduates required financial aid
in ISH Even with 25 percent of the tuition increase
going to scholarships, the effects of uneven tuition
hikes could not be eliminated. If tuitions were higher
on some campuses than others, the UNC system
could become stratified by race and social class
Gov. Martin's plan is not completely Rawed,
though Mis suggestion that individual campuses
should keep their tuition proceeds and spend them
as they see tit is one ot the best contributions he has
made to higher education
In the current system, tuition money from the
entire system is pooled with other state revenue in
the state's general fund and is then meticulously
allocated by state legislators who bundle it up into
neat, centrally planned parcels dangling on theends
ot numerous strings
It each campus is allowed control its own rev-
enue, the effect will be streamlined budgets, reduced
waste and a more precise addressing of campus
needs
State legislators should not be in the business of
spending university funds Perhaps they are quali-
fied to run our state, but thev should notbeallowed
to run our universities as well
Letters To The Editor
Student Union
president writes
about letter
To The Editor:
I would like to respond to
S( .A Treasurer (,arv Dudley's
letter to the editor. His response
to Media Board Chairperson
Iran l-raier's letter was map
propnate for two reasons.
First, it was merely a per
sonal attack and failed to ad-
dress the issue of academic
standards, and second, it was
factually incorrect.
Ms. Frazier's letter stated
her position on academic stan
dards for student leaders, a
position she formulated and
expressed as an elected
spokesperson for the Media
Board.
The ability to consider
such an issue and state a posi
tion isnot necessarily a function
of tenure in a leadership posi-
tion, as Mr. Dudley suggested.
Futhermore, Mr.
Dudley's assessment of Ms
Frazier' s leadership is incorrect.
Inaddition toservingasa leader
on the Student Union Program
Board, Ms. Frazier has repre-
sented the Student Union on
the major university boardsand
committees along with other
student leaders, including Allen
Thomas and Randy Royal.
She has been a member of
and held leadership positions
iri many other campus organi-
zations while maintaining an
outstanding academic record.
In short, during her four
years at ECU, Ms. Frazier has
clearly demonstrated her skill,
experience and integrity as a
leader
Finally, and most impor-
tantly, Mr. Dudlev'sletter failed
to address the issue of academic
standards.
I applaud Ms. f raier s
willingness to "rock the boat"
by enforcing academic stan-
dards tor the campus media. If
Mr I hidlev disagrees with this
position, he should s.iv so and
support his position instead of
attacking the credibility ot an-
other student leader
TheStudent Union hasand
will continue to "rock the boat"
by assuming that its leaders met:
academic requirements. To al-
low a student leader to fall below
the standards required to
graduate is a disservice to that
student.
In addition, it is a disap-
pointment to see so little concern
for academics by some SGA
leaders at the third largest in-
stitute of higher learning in
North Carolina. As Ms Frazier
questioned, we are first and
foremost foraneducation,aren't
we?
Ken Drake
Student Union President
Racist guilt
must be shared
by all races
To The Editor:
The editorial "Anglo-
Saxon control must be stopped"
betrays an abysmal ignorance
of world history. The opening
statement libeling the Anglo-
Saxon as "the greatest
practicioner (sic) of oppression,
discrimination and exploitation
in the history of humankind" is
patently false
The writer should consult
a dictionary for a correct defini-
tion of "Anglo-Saxon His
misuse tit this ethnic term is
especially ludicrous in the im-
plicit classitication of Cortez,
"De Canuna" (sic), Vespucci,
and Stanley I.evinson as
Anglo-Saxons If the writer
wishes to indict these white-
skinned men ot crimes against
people ot color he might
more accurately use the terms
"Furopean" or "Western and
even then this would be mis-
leading in the case of Levinson.
Actually, most of the
rights and responsibilities
6imed and enjoyed by today's
African-Amencansonginatein
notions of law and justice
conceived and practiced by the
Anglo-Saxon people centuries
ago. All the world wecall "free"
owes an enormous debt to
Anglo-Saxon culture.
European civilizations
ha ve no monopoly on injustice.
Histories of Asian and African
societies are replete with in-
stances of domination, exploi-
tation and cruelty down
through the ages. Those un-
fortunate captives brought to
the New World to be sold into
slavery were already enslaved
� by fellow Africans � before
they ever set foot aboard a
Dutch or Yankee trading ship.
It is a sad fact that the
history of ALL humankind is
blighted by our malicious and
hateful treatment of each other,
for wealth, land, power, or
promulgation of a particular
religion. If a heritage of guilt
for ethnic evil is to be home, all
of us � black, white, yellow
and red � share a similar
burden.
Franceine Rees
ECU Alumna
Greenpeace has, of course,
been a leader in the fight to clean
upandpreserveourworld'senvi-
ronment However, some of the
other fights in which it is involved
arc less publicized because the
"environmentalist" group realizes
that public knowledge of some of
its lesser known activities could
jeopardize its fund-raising status.
This organization has con-
tinually attempted, with some-
success, to convince people to
contribute to its cause And
through a policv of white lies and
subtle deception, it has even at-
tempted to convince those against
whom it isexecuting itscampaign
of belligerence to contribute
money to further its cause.
It is not the organization's
opinions which I wish to question,
tor this is America, where free
speech is an important part of the
mechanics of our svstem of gov-
ernment. I do, however, take issue
with some of the methods utilized
by this group.
One of the activities which
Greenpeace is less publicly vocal
about is its method for carrying
out its policy in favor of disarma-
ment. Instead of using the legal
avenuesof dissension available to
them through U.S. law, thev have
continued to advocate a policy of
interference with military training
and testing programs throughout
the world.
Their most recent stunt was
to infiltrate the security of a nuclear
testing facility in the Nevada
desert. While there, they pro-
ceeded to seat themselves on the
desert sand directly above the
underground testing chamber, in
an attempt to impede and ulti-
mately stop the nuclear explosion
testing scheduled to be held that
day
In the last decade alone,
Greenpeace has intervened in the
naval maneuvers of several
countries throughout the world
While trying to disrupt the
operationsofa U.S. Navy training
mission, their ship, the Rainbow
Warrior, had tobeassaulted, seized
and removed from the training
theater of opera t ions bv one of the
Navy's elite S.E.A.L. teams.
The prench governrru nt was
at one time, pushed so fat by the
Greenpeace intrusion of its nuclear
sub tests that it employed a group
ot French commandos, highly
trained in demolitions, against a
Greenpeace ship. The commando
team was successful in mining the
vessel, with devastating results
They incurred great damage to
the hull ot the ship, putting it out
of commission.
In addition to their blatant
disruption of military operations.
C.reenpeace has persecuted those
who peacefully take part in some-
thing 'hat has been an American
instit tion since even before the
formal inception of America as a
nation � hunting.
Greenpeace members have,
endangering themselves and oth-
ers, gone on to private and public
hunting landsand put themselves
between hunters and their game
Thev have also employed noise-
makers and other game-scaring
devices to scare animals off of
game lands while hunting was in
progress.
Not only is this activity ille-
gal and dangerous, but it is coun-
terproductive to the goals of those
who wish to promote the healthy
Lets Be Adamant
management of our nation's wild
life resources.
Hunting helps to control
wild game populations that, with
out this healthful thinning, would
certainly starve to death atter
eating all of the available food
sources Certainly starvation is a
much moreghastly death than thi
humane, immediate termination
of lite brought about bva hunter -
bullet.
At the same time, this group
has solicited money from hunter-
and hunting organizations, under
the claim that it was an environ
mentahst group that wished tt
advance the cause of wildlife
management and environmental
protection.
Somehow thev never seem
to mention that thev are going to
disrupt the activities of those
people from whom thev are so-
liciting monev.
It is this kind of dishonest
approach that has turned meoff to
Greenpeace as a whole.
Granted, they have done
much to advance some worthy
causes, like the dolphin-safe tuna
campaign. Their constant efforts
to stop the killing of whales, seals
and endangered animals have
been noteworthy as well. And thev
have been instrumental in bring-
ing about awareness of the
depletion of the world's rain for-
ests.
Despite all of these good
deeds. Greenpeace members con-
tinue to cut their own throats,
through their radical, and often
hazardous, jaunts into places
where they don't belong. How-
ever important they feel their
crusades are, they have no busi-
ness intruding on the rights of
others as a means to an end
Gulf War illustrates oppression of blacks
By Darek McCullers
I ditoriil Columnist
Last semester, 1 espoused the
principles of Black Conservatism.
The central tenets of this philoso-
phy include black development
through entrepreneurship, self-
improvement (i.e. education) and
limited but effective government
programs.
I still believe that these are
some of the greatest tools that we
have for our development.
However, through my
studies and experiences I have
come to realize that there is a larger,
worldwide problem, which I dis-
cussed in my last column: white,
Anglo-Saxon domination and ex-
ploitation, which I discussed in
my last column.
This domination has reached
from the Middle Ages to the war
in the Persian Gulf.
These acts are just as intoler-
able now as they were then.
Africans and African
Americans have never been com-
pletely liberated; it has always
been piecemeal.
The Gulf War reminded me
more than ever of this.
This war is a tragic example
of the continued efforts of the
Anglo-Saxons, and their American
extensions (as currently, they are
almost always in these things to-
gether) to assert global control and
domination over indigenous
people.
The United Nations is simply
a manipulative tool for these ob-
jectives, and there must be a
change in the power structure.
There must be more perma-
nent members who have veto
power if there is to be change in
this Anglo-Saxon institution cre-
ated after the World War II.
I sympathize with my Arabic-
brothers in oppression and would
like to say that now more than
ever is the time for an Arab con-
clusion (since they weredenied an
Arab solution.)
Saddam Hussein has been
humiliated. Now the American
forces must return home and not
intervene anymore.
Negotiation must begin be-
tween and among the Arab na-
tions for this and others regional
issues.
Furthermore, there should
be a permanent UN. contingency
force of 50,000 to 100,000 troops
(after the pattern of the foreign
legion) that would be prepared to
handle any future situations or
international crises.
These changes would give
real legitimacy and credence to
this traditionally weak organiza-
tion.
However, we as African
Americans must not insist that if
we are to give our sweat, blood
and toil (often in disproportionate
numbers), the previously men-
tioned acts or patternsof continued
and recurrent oppression must be
ended.
At the same time, we must
continue to exercise powers that
the great Anglo-Saxon leader,
Thomas Jefferson, has already
stated we have.
Jefferson said: That when
ever any form of government be-
comes destructive, it is the right
of the people to alter or abolish it,
and to institute new government,
laying its foundation on such
principles and organizing its
powers in such form, as to them
shall seem most likely to effect
their safety and happiness
He continues with a state-
ment that answers the question of
why more blacks are not active in
solving their problems.
He states. "All experience
hath shown, that mankind are
more disposed to suffer, while
evils are sufferable, than to right
themselves by abolishing the
forms to which they are accus-
tomed. It is their right, it is their
duty to throw off such a govern-
ment and to provide new guards
for their security
Yes, Africans and African
Americans have been oppressed
and exploited for a long time.
Throughout this period, our
struggle for independence has
largely been controlled by our
Anglo-Saxon oppressor.
We demonstrated the way
he prescribed, our rhetoric was
delivered the way he prescribed, :
and our various ventures toT
achieve our goals were manipu-
lated or halted by his prescription
(either force, subversion, intimi- ,
dation or legal technicalities and.r:
periodic success that he allowed.) f
However, this will not be the
case in the future because the times
have ended to take these things
lightly. v l
March 19, 1991
Some shou
By Nathan Hicks
Staff Wntrr
After earing Q I � .
you find yourself w
burning stomach i�,i
If so, then you ma I �
sands of people suffer
'Chinese Restaurai �
Why does this i� wins
people' Theanswi - �
tiny ingredient used
Chinese food, Mora -
mate or MSG
There is a great dea.
and research looking nto tl
fectsofMSG.Despit. �
astute sounding nam I
common substance to u
rally in sugartxvts soybi
and seaweed.
MSG is a white ;
to enhance the tl.i
asChinese and man.
cuisine It tastes mud
salt, but if used inexori
Pure Gold
Dancers
enter
competition
By Lara Ellington
Staff Writer
Dedication, entfr is -
ergy and team spirit at
the standards
Gold Dancers
Team membi rs n isl
willing to sacra Seen
timeforthepursi fperfecl
Often 'the 'Pure G Dancers
will practice as mam as five
hoursaday to prepa re foraga
Team members a I a r.
lock,Tricia Burk,CandiLaru
Kerri Martin, Alt is -
Vicki Edmunds. Kristin Suarez
Crystal Clark, Temt Hai .
Bass,JennvWest, arrueBla) 1
Tiffany Griffin. Anita Wl
Nancy Joe Agsten and La risha
Bameshavebeen practicing
hours to prepare for a c irr
tion dance, in which onlj 12
participated
� Former member
Vyalker has been unable to par-
ticipate due to a knee injury
"I hate being on tra sid�
watching , but at least inst
help by being 'team ritk
said
Coach Lynette ' ns : and
competition choreogra
Mark Evans have been workir g
with the dancers tor 2-5 hours a
night for the past few weeks
Weight-lifting for30mir
prior to practice has also been
required.
Team captain LaTara Bui
lock has been with the squad
three years and is also a dancer
for the Universal Dance Asso-
ciation (UDA)
"Dancing is mv God-given
talent and I'm using it to the best
of my abilitv he said I have
been fortunate enough to have
the opportunity to choreograph
the routines for a great group of
dancers
A video tape of the dance
routine, which was performed
at the ECU vs UNCW basket-
ball game, must be sent to the
Universal Cheerleader Associa-
tion by Feb. 27.
It will be judged by theUDA,
based on choreography, overall
team appearance, technique,
motion sharpness and facial ex-
pressions.
In 1990, the Pure Cold
Dancers placed 19th out of all the
nation's dance teams. If they are
among the top 13 teams chosen
"His year, they will compete in
the nationals at Sea World in San
Antonio, Texas.
� v
Area nv
B Sheril n
fs
S ha
who s nghtand wj
Re!
large!) existe
themseh I
nominations 1

onl tnie fbllowei
In the Nmthoj
United Stati -
Jehovah's Witness
largest of the Pro
nations and v is
Three minist
talkabouttheirrelu
Rev Larry Ml
ter of the lehoval
the Falkland High
don't make up a
s.n we do
He savs eho
believe and worst
tures of the HoK
lames or the mod
Jehovah's Wir
ety of ministers
door to door to pi
God's, message
Russell began the
zation in Pennsylv;
Mosingosaysl





Mxhch 19. 1991
uHn �aat iilarnlinian
r
yoitL hAme: to
v. .
U
e questions
5 wild
ntrol
thai with
� g w ould
ith after
able food
� ation is a
iththan the
� mi nation
� �unter's
i MIJ
� lers
� s undei

� v, ildhfe
n cntal
� � r seem
� I oing t
? those
. arc so
� � done
.sorthv
afe tuna
stanl efforts
jcals
� - have
And the
im tor
"��ts con-
throats
ind often
p!a es
, How-
���� I 'heir
� - n busi-
� � nehts of
ssion of blacks
il a hen
mmenl be
ihe right
i iish it,
� �rnment,
�n Mich
. i n i z l ng its
� them
� to effect
r i o ss
"h a state-
lestion of
� i. tive in
� ems
� perience
� il mankind are
iuffer, while
� rable than to right
. abolishing the
ire accus-
� ght, it is their
row fl an h a govern-
le new guards
ins and African
been oppressed
ed foi i long time
u! this period, our
� independence has
beei -ntrolled bv our
Ang ppressor
�'�' demonstrated the way
bed air rhetoric was
delivered the wav he presenbed,
and oilf various ventures to
achieve cur goals were manipu-
lated or halted bv hisprescnption
�either force, subversion, intimi-
dation or legal technicalities and
periodic sir cess that he allowed.)
However, this will not be the
as in the future because the times
have ended to take these things
lightk
men
i in d
must
that
I ider
eadv
Some should be wary of the effects of MSG
MSG has exhibited the power
By Nathan Hicks
Stall Writer
v�t-r eating i. hinese food do
� nurseil with a headache
sti ma h or facial pressure?
s, then vou may be one of thou
� people suffering from
Restaurant Syndrome "
Iocs this o curinsomanv
1. inswei isfound inone
gredienl used to prepare
� od Monosodiumt lluta
� M '
a great deal ot interest
titles or on fruit it produces a semi a suffering student wondering wh) M1 -
sweet taste you ate at the Iun Amien Square It issafetosa) thai theaverage
gestudenthaspul morethana
Mam studies ha e been con
ducted seeking the truth Nhnul
MSG In labraton test animals the
i hemi ,il has been shone to excite
nuemns in the brain to the point ol
destmction At this tune there are
wo warnings being applied or
mandated
I he Federal 1 nig Xdministra
tion has however ordered thai thv
ingredianl be left out of baty food
Most reportsol labraton studicsdi
(, afeteria oi you simply till u
cheaply and remain happih flatu couple MSG-containing items in
ut their shopping basket
"his illness caused bj MS, is MS. can be found in mam
not produced by Chinese food but brand named cigarettes as well
rather.In avarict) offoodsthatcan HighercontentsofMSt lareoftenin
be found lurking on theshelvesol bargain or generu brand cigarettes
the neighborhood supermarket It is impossible to tell the amount o(
irtuall) .ill iv pes of sausagt MS i in an given brand o( i iga
products contain M1- ! as well a;
manvcanned tondsand vegetables
hicken simp �u not be tin
confess thai intense amounts of universal cure-all considering MSG people to become extremely thirst)
. .i i . .1.1 h, .nlh. , ! iiwimMdn inn
to excite brain cells to the point
of destruction in lab animals
rettes because cigarette makers
iren't required lolisl ingrediants
MS 1 ti also cause certain
Vj
vsearch looking into the et MSGwereusedonthesubjectsinthe
ISC. I espitethe hemkal s lab
inding name it is a tairK People manifesting the svnip
ubstancc Itoccursnatu tomsol "Chinese Restaurant Svn
irbeets,soybeans,wheat drome have yel to exhibit high
eed death rates oi become drooling
- :s,i white powdei nsl brain damaged idiots sostudiesot
tl. flavor of foods, such careful and costlv research have
i I manv other styles ol produced two landmark conclu
�����. � like mild
ised in exorbitant quan
Pure Gold
Dancers
enter
competition
H I ara Ellington
st.itt Writei
sh ns ! " � � get hinese
I mrantS ndronie andlv orr
is one ol die mam ingredients Per
i apita bean u ith ba� on soup on
tains more Ms . than am othei
store bought fcx 1
i weh e foi a dollai oi tental
I1CX idles i alls- man i . le dlS
v Miit. 'it �- . ii � w hi' s in them
I leal and . it rex mi temperatun
dinners dinm is thai make ham
. � � re like a meal and lla
rdi tain hieh lev.
whi hresultsmtheconsumptionol
lots 0 liquids Tins makes the per
son feel likeabloated waterbound
moose Phissvmptom isclassical
ilhinese Restaurant Syndrome
� his. I uestions raised bv
scientists who have studied the
chemical and Ihe know n side ef
fcx tsonlfibrati r animals insum
ers should N a �� m ot MS( i levels
in then Ux d
:i
-vt
m
?m
vVj
m
itj �� i nthusiasm en-
� �pii I are a few ot
� irds ot the ECl Pure
ii c. rs
members must be
isacraficemuchoftheir
� � i pursuitol perfection
e Pure lii'U Dancers
tic as man) as five
I topreparefoi igame
- mi 'rlv- I a I ira
� Burk andil anning
rtir �. � el ian
mds KristineSuarez
irk, rerriel larris.l on
� . kVestJamieBlaylcK k,
i Iriffin, Anita White.
. gsten and l�i risha
� eenprac tu inglong
rej ire for a mpel
in which only 12
I ited
� ner member Ann
: i been unable to par
t due to a knee injur)
I atebeingon thesidelin�
ng but at leasl 1 can sti
. being team ' ntu sh�
. : Lv nette (ohnson and
I etition choreographer
- Evans have been worl
��-ithhe dancers tor 2-5 bouts a
ht for the past few weeks
Veight-liftingfor JOminutes
� r to practice has also been
ired
� am captain LaTara Bui
- r has been with the squad
�� � ears and is also a dancer
� r the Universal Dance Asso
iation (UDA)
1 lancing is mvkxi-given
talent and I'm using it to the best
�f my ability he said "I have
fortunate enough to have
� ipportunity to choreograph
'tie routines for a great group ot
lancers
A video tape of the dam e
it me, which was performed
at the ECU vs UNCW basket
ball game, mast be sent to the
I niversaK"heerleader Assoda
' n bv Feb 27.
It will berwdged bvtheUDA,
based on choreography, overall
team appearance, technique,
motion sharpness and facial ex
pressions
In 1990, the Pure Cold
Dancers placed 19thoutofallthe
nation's dance teams If they are
among the top 13 teams chosen
this year, they will compete in
the nationals at Sea World in San
Antonio, Texas.
1 his is your brain ir brain on MSG
Desert Storm fits in wallet
By Cliff Cottev
SUtt Writer
With the tremendous mark. �
that has been building in rr
i aids in re ent years, the I :
ompany has rek?ased a new set i t
. aids for 1 iesert Storm calked 1 i "sen
Stomi c oalition For 1 'ea e
Baseball cards started becom
mg a hu; business a tep yean ij
ind it started mam diffcrenl
� begin prinbng ba �
is rtipps Fleer 1 Kinross and
: 'ppcr I V- k t � name a few
rhe trend began to spill
r sports as well Now vou
bus baseball fcxrtball, ba �
� ea t c ai � '
tightei ;
� � c armed
initioi
� . ' � -
I he Hi ' ' �
mia ted - � � ' '
- � � '
:�'�'�
I war ti
tntl �
� . �
�P
� ttlii
.
ball hockeyandra. u : ard the j
ted tl
heeni idefoi ptviai
nts as well.
Remember si Million Dollai
Man cards or KISS ard; i Stai
Wars cards and the list goes (n
,uv vou van v. licet cards i �
the war in the Middle East
Ihe cards i ome in a set


� �
: .
nd a sticker set is also included in

the marketing of Desert Storm
I a. h individual pack ire lude
aids and one sti ker
Eachcardhasapictun
war time figure or militan objei t
hke a tank or an ain raft .md the
:n k ol the card has a bnef de
s nption of the pn tured objecl
! oi instance the Royal �)"
dian Air Force I Is card reveals
Part ofanada's - onrribution to
'pi ration 1 eserl Storm
ks
ddu �
. I thai
II : � I (
ilal
'
Area ministers mull over theological theory
Bv Sheril n (ernigan
stjtt n ritei
ditors note St i rl ynn
rnigan's article on religbn .nil
appeal in I '�:�� East arolinian in
threeparts
rhe w. rd n ligion guar
mtees to stir upconflict all over the
elobe Since long ago, Pmtestants
andatholics have battled over
who's nv;ht and who's wrong
Religious i ontroversies have
largel) existed between Protestants
themselves, because so mam de
nominations and sects have
evolved, some claiming to be the
nl true followers
In the Southern region of the
i nited States, Baptists and
ehovah's Witnesses are two of the
largest of the Protestant denomi-
nate 'ns and sects
Throe ministers in.reenville
talk aboutt heir religkmsandbeHers
Rev 1 arry Mosingo, .i minis
ter ot the fehovah's Witnesses on
the Falkland Highway, says, We
don't make up a Bible like people
sav we do
He says Jehovah s Witnesses
believe and worship bv the scrip-
tures ot the Holv Bible, the King
lames of the modem versions
lehovah'sWitnessosareasoci
etv of ministers who travel from
door to door to preach lehovah's,
Cod's, message Charles Taze
Kussell began the modem organi-
zation in Pennsylvania in thel870s.
Mosingi' says like other (Chris-
tian religioi � i
hel t na I hega
fomiatior i i the earth and its p
v ies tin fall of damand Eve later
followed b) the birth, death and
resurrection ol esus hristand that
hrisl will come again
i fowever,Jehovah sWitnesses
beliefs mainl) differ from other
d. iminantt hristianreligionsonthi
1 riniry, the (Ma. e called hell and
everlasting life
Referring first to the I rinit)
Mosingo asks how lehovah theSon
of ehovah and the I loly Spirit can
possible be one being t le sa s the
rrinity is a false doctrine, because it
is not supported anywhere in the
Bible
I le says the traditional belief of
the rrinity originated from the
Ntcenei reed and has been i.mssI
from generation to generation in
other religions rhe Nicene Creed
is not the Bible, he adds
throughout the New lesta
ment, CSUS refers t( his almighty
I ather who gives him authority and
comfort, Mosingo sa s
For instance, lesus pra S to le
hovahwhenheisdyingonthec ross
Purthermore, lehovah spicks from
heaven when lesus is Baptized
otonlvdid ehovahsend his
Son to Farth, but he als.) sent his
comforter, the Hory Spirit, Mosingo
sis lehovah cannot be himself
his Son and the Holy Spirit in three
unique forms at the same tune, he
continues
"()neandoneandone is three
Antthei fa trine taught
bv other religions includes thedcK
rrine ot 11. II the fit where the
wicked will supposedly bum tor
eternit Mosingosays
le ays he turned from the
: iptisl religion when he re-evalu-
ated Romans6 23 which states, 1 or
i sof sin isdeath; but the gift
i k , is eternal life through lesus
( lirist our 1 ord
Mosingo stresses that the erse
a s death not eternity in hell, re-
sults from sin ITie word Hell is the
translation ot the Hebrew word
Haetes, meaning grave, Mosingo
savs hus,going to hell in the Bible
only means going to the grave
without resurrection, he continues
I teabosays, thefire mentioned
in the Bible is only a symbol of the
city dump outside of lerusalem
m here people burned tmsh
Referring to the eternal tires
tor the wicked, Mosingo says,
(,tvd's not that cruel
In addition, Mosingo savs
lehovah's Witnesses h.ive a differ-
ent mow ot everlasting life.
Some of the other religions
have the wrong idea of the King-
dom, he continues. Christians do
not die and go to heaven, he savs.
I nstead. thev will be resurrected
to abide forever with Christ on the
earth which will be reformed over
a period ot flBB wars during the
Battleot Armageddon, until it is the
way lehovah intended it to be in the
beginning, he savs.
The Glass Menagerie
opens in McGinnis
ECU Playhouse presents rennessee
Williams' modern classic
ECU News Bureau
rhe East Carolina Playhouse
will present I ennessee Williams
modem classic rhe Glass Me
nagerie I tailed by mam critic
as his most human and tender
work. The Glass Menagerie ran
in New York for over M) porter
mances and won, among mam
other honors, the New York
Critic's Award. The Playhouse
production will Open on March
22, with additional performances
on March 23, 25 and 26 at 8:15
p.mm the McCannis Theatre on
the K I campus
The Glass Menagerie is thi
story of a young man struggling
to emancipate himself from his
dependent hut domineering
mother, a faded Southern belle
being portrayed bv Ann Dewing
Lincoln. Her children make up
the few resources she has left.
Tom, the son, wishes to leave the
nest but feels a terrible respon
sibility 10 his mother and his
crippled sister, I-aura, a creatum
as fragileas the glassanimals she
collects At his mothers msts
tence (and in his own interest)
lorn brings Laura her first
v ntleman C aller, a big
natured Irishman What!
is a bittersweet tender acl
touching i Umax and d i
ment
my OW n nn I V :
cohi from Rak igh Nortli are
lina isthemother Amand
dreams of her 1" genth men
callers in her magnolia s� ted
past l ler career spans ove �
plavperibnnancesinsu! ; : ices
as New ork Connei tu ut.
( alifbmia ,od North Can lina
Ms Lincoln has graced the sl iges
of Broadway in The ellar
IheVVeHandourownSUMMER
PHEATRE in AT ON HOI
riN RcX M as Big Mama ,um. in
STrf-i MACNCH IAS as
Tickets tor IHE Gl VSS
MEN At EWE will go on sale
March is and are priced at1 �
for ECL students aixl $7 SO for
the (-enera I Publ k rhe Box H
lice is open Monday through
Fndavfrom IO30Ba.m untiHflO
p.m. and is open until 830 p m
ou pertormance nights Phone
reservations may be made with
a Mastercard or VISA For more
tuket information, call in
Greenville 919-757-6829.





6
Qttiz Must(Hazalinimn
March 19, 1991
CLASSIFIEDS
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSfNG SERVICES:
rw letters,
resumes manuscripts, projects. Fast
him around (. ail loan 756-9255.
FOR SALE
F1 l)R(.i II k MP Deluxe85
464
Qt 11 si w mikhiI) $175.00.
Keith at 8 $663
nv n SIZl BED with mattress
cover erSflC p.m.
1980 HONDAM 100 MOrOR-
CYCL1 i tires,and
� i ' Must sell immedi
stoffera!i 756
2657
FOR RENT
HOI si FOR Rl VI I bedroom I
EC1 11 y N
I


H l SI M K R I
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble prod ucts at home. Call for
information. 504-641-8003 Ext. 5920.
BIG OPPORTUNITY! Home typist
needed Art now! (609)875-0711 Ext
778.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS The
Greenville Recreation and Parks De-
partment will be having their first
organizational meeting for any in-
terested softball officials who would
like to officiate in the spring and
summer adult softball league. The
meeting will be held at the Elm Street
Gym on Wednesday. March 12 at
"V p.m. If you are interested and
cannot make this meeting, please call
Charlie Davis, evenings at 752-2081
or Ben lames at 830-4550.
US GOVERNMENT JOBS: Now
hiring 24-hour request. (609)875-
I �� 662
ALASKA SIMMER EMPLOY-
MINT fisheries Earn $5,000
r transportation! Room
Over 8,000 openings No
e necessary Male or Fe
1 � r�8 page employment
ttl.sci i$8.95toM&LResearch,
Box 84008 Seatrle,VVA 8124 Sati;
" n r ffxl
and Res
HOI SI
FOR RENT M A KES500-S1500 WEEKLY stuffing
envelopesathornefStartnow-Rush
S.AS.I plus SI .00 to Home Em-
ployers, Inc. 1120 Plain �8B, Las
3 ruces '1 snxh
3 WANTED
an energetic individual to be a cam-
pus representative. Work one night
and average S50-S100 per week.
Knowledge of retail sales and the
Greek system is helpful. Call 1-800-
472-9415.
MODELS NEEDED for spring pro-
motions, for ladies apparel and ac-
cessories. No experience necessary.
Hurry in, promotions start soon.
Limited part-time sales positionsalso
available. Apply , The Plaza, Mon-
Wed, 1 p.m.4 p.m.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED for summer camps
in North Carolina. If you love
Cheering, this is the summer job for
vou! College expenence not neces-
sary, but strong High School back-
ground a must. Flexible scheduling
and great pay. Call collect for more
information. (919) 383-0086.
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSIS-
TER (AMPS MASSACHUSETTS
M.ih Kee-Nac for BoysDanbee tor
Girts Counselor positions for Pro-
gram Specialists AH Team Snorts.
especially Baseball, Basketball, F
Hockey, Softball, Soccer and VoBe;
ball; 25Tennisoperungs;abo Archery,
Riflery, WeightsFttnessand Biking
other openings include Performing
Arts, Fine Arts, Newspaper, Photog-
raphy, Cooking, Sewing, Roller-
skating, Rocketry, Ropes, and Camp
DISR AY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
Craft; All Waterfront Activities
(Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing, CanoeKayaking). In-
quire: Mah-Kee-Nac (BOYS) 190
Unden A venue, Glen Ridge, NJ07028.
Call 1-800-753-9118. Danbee(CIRLS)
16 Horseneck Road, Montville, Nj
07045. Call 1-800-776-0520.
PERSONALS
ALPHA PHI'S: Get ready for the
lock-in on Friday. We are going to
have a blast . . See you there!
ALPHA PHI OLD EXEC: You sure
did a terrific job in office. Thanks for
being so organized. We are verv
proud of you. Love, the Alpha Phi's
TO ALL GREEKS Mark your cal
endar now and leave March 22 open
tor Phi Kappa Tau's Hawaiian Luau
complete with sand and Tiki huts
FXIT 37and the ever famous Honda
band. THE SNOW, will pm together
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
to make a Hawaiian Ho Down Do Ho
won't want to miss.
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
SUMMER? Jet there anvtime with
AIRHITCH (n for $160 from the hist
Coast' (Reported m NY limes &
let's Go'l AIRHITCH i.r) 212-864-
2000.
TO GAYS, LESBIANS, their fnen.ds
roommates and all those concerned
with issues relating to homosexuality:
A support group iscurren try meeting
on campus to discuss these issues
and more. Call 757-6661 for more
information.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
IS NOW
HIRING
WRITERS FOR
ALL
POSITIONS
ADVERTISE IN
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
K.
NMUmi
SI III I SI F'l
M
KMH APARTMENTS
!
en
4
� � MH
intact J T u) . s ami
KL.L ; ui�t s-
r . , , ,
- � - m urcrt j
' a � . � . �
tarn M
� I . t
Mill' WANTED: Part-time ware-
JC work and driving Must have
reliable car, mornings preferred.
Apply m person at Larrv's
110 E. 10th Street,
� ilk
si mmer JOBS! Counselors, Arts
andrafts Directors and Lifeguards
are needed to work at Pisgah Girl
Seoul (amp in the mountains of
North Carolina. For a summer of
ex citement and memories, please call
1-SW22-6280.
GROWING SPORTSWEAR
COMPANY that sells merchandise
:o-ror.t;es,frateiT.itiesislixkingfor
Cruise Ship Jobs
HIRING Mftn Women Summer
Year Round PhOtOGRAPhERS
' RG j'CfcS RECRFATiON PERSONNEL
I � � i, p a FREE "avei Ca'ibbean
� �tda Bananas Soot PacC Me�ico
CALL NOW! C�fl refundable
1 206-736-7000, Ext.�0pN2
Kinygold Towers
Now Taking I oases tor August
1991 1 bedroom. 2 bedroom. &
Efficenc) Apartments
CALL 752-2865
WANDSWORTH
COMMONS
GREENVTJ ii-SM.WISl NAME
IN MULTI FAMILY HOI SING
ExceBeM location oa Mktgum Boairvaad
Choice unitt available One jnJ in
bodvooou, energy cfficrnr. carpet, range,
rcfngcralor, washer dryer boofcofM Bruk
construction, 4111CI with extra lnsulatum
FREE BASIC C A HI.h TV
OM
I'h Rirallv (iri�ip
758-4711
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
sTK Thc Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
OPEN UNDER
NhWOWNhRSHlP
STILL SERVING YO(
WTTHQl Aim BP
rND ATLAS PRODUCTS
ACROSS FROM nj r. m
RES1 M RAN i
ILMM STREET
103 DISCOl I WITH
SI I DENT ID ON REPAIRS
�h SER l( I
27041 loih Street
KOAOSERVH 1 Gnxavuk.NC
50 States Seminars our national!) know n
organization is seeking an assertive, dynamic
and motivated individual to teach and eon-
duct "No Money Down" real estate seminars
in your area. You have seen these seminars
on T.V now conduct them yourself
$3,000.00 to $6000.00 per month possible
pt $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 possible ft.
Don't Delay, Call today for an interview,
(208) 342-0950 or (208) 338-9960.
Ihf i .LSI (
LLJ1U
( arolina i lonors (Jrga
� will nuvt en rhursday,
March 21 at 5 p.m in the meeting
room in the basemen) ot Fleming
I l.ill Any I ionors students inter-
ested in being on the Fkmors team
m ,1 practice round against Qui2
Bowl finalistson April 16should
attend the meeting
MTsllllULJiWJLlkitt
DOWN
Winding Your Wright Down, a
nine week weight loss program is
ginning on Tuesday, March
19thlasses will be held at the
Famil) Pra ti e enter every
ruesday at 11 (X) ajm. to Noon
( all Mary Merner at 551-5459
Monday through Friday from 8
a.m. to5pjn for registration and
more information There is a
Charge tor the program. It's not
t(x late to sign up.
MAKCHIMC BAND
Attention interested dancers (who
c� dazzle and sparkle) Become
a part of the 1991 !( 1. Footbal
Spirit! Share the spotlight by
ptTtormingwiththfFuistCarolina
Pirates during the 1991 football
season. Tin- GOLDEN GIRLS
DANCE LINE will hold tryouts
April 13-14; 9a.m. A p.m. Saturday
and 1 p.m4 p.m. Sunday in Me
morial Gym. For more informa-
tion, call 757-6982.
2ND ANNUAL "OrnFRS.
coLniESTiANfrr
BCl I District 97, State Employees
Assooation of North Carolina, will
be sponsoring their 2nd Anraia
"Oldtes-Goldies" Dance on Sat-
urday, April 6, 1991, from 8.X)
pm -1(K) p.m. at the Greenville
( bun try C lub, witha DJ featuring
musk from the '50s, '60s, 70s.
There will be door prizes, light
hors d'oeuvres, and cash bar, as
well as prizes for winners of dance
contests. Advanced tickets at a
costof$6persort may beobtained
by calling Peggy Nobles (757-6012)
or Treva Matthews (551 -2937). A
limited number of tickets will be
available at the door.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Ilie 1991 GreenvillePittCo. Spe-
cial Olympics Spring Games will
be held on April 19th at E. B.
Aycock Jr High School in
Greenville (rain date: April 24).
Volunteers are needed to help
serve as buddieschaperones for
the Special Olympics. Volunteers
must be able to work all day from
9 a.m2 p.m. (The first ones there
will be assigned a position). An
orientation meeting will be held
on April 17 in Old Joyner Library,
room 221 from 5-6:00 p.m. Free
lunchesand volunteer t-shirts will
be provided the day of the games
to all volunteers who have at-
tended theorientation session. For
more information, contact Lisa
Mills at 8304551.1
GAMMA BFTA PHI
HONORS SOTIFTY
Welcome back from the Spring
Break 7.00p.m. Mendenhall244,
Tuesday, March 19th. Officers
will meet at 6:15 p.m.
BLOOD DRIVF
Army ROTC will sponsor a blood
drive at the Mendenhall Student
(enter on March 21 from noon
until 6 p.m. There is currently a
shortage of blood in this area of
the state due to deployment of
soldiers to Saudi Arabia. Help us
inoureffort tobuild uplocaJ Hood
supplies.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST(LSAT)
The LSAT will be offered on Mon-
day, June 10, 1991. Applications
must be completed and mailed to
Law School Admission Service,
Box 2000, Newtown, PA 18940.
Postmark deadline if May 7,1991.
Applications postmarked after this
date must be accompanied by a
$40, non-refundaHe late registra-
tion fee. The NEW applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight Building,
Room 105
ECUSTUrFIMTKFHAn
ASSOCIATION
ECU Student Rehabilitation As-
sociation Yardsale, March 23,1991,
7:0t)a.muntil,cornerofGreenville
Blvd. and Charles Blvd. (In front
of the Belk building).
Business groups and civic groups
are needed to fill volunteer posi-
tions during the 1991 North
Carolina Special Olympic Sum-
mer Games. Typical responsibili-
ties include serving as housing
escorts, chaperons, assistants at
competition staging areas and
sports specific assistants (timers,
scorers, measurers, etc.). Volun-
teers must be at least 16 years (ld,
and will need to attend an orien-
tation training session and a job
specific training session. Training
sessions will be held in May. Rep-
resentatives of groups can call
Alice Keen or Rita Rov at (919)
83042l6or83O42l7 Thedatesof
thegamesareMay30-une2,1991
at East Carolina University.
GROUP ADVISINC FQR
PRE-OTSTUDFNTS
Group advising for Pre-OT stu-
dents will be held Monday, March
25th from 3:00-500 p.m. in Room
205, OT Classroom Belk Building.
If you are unable to attend the
group meeting on Monday, March
25th, the OT Department faculty
will meet with general college
ad vises on the folio wing dates and
times: Tuesday, March 26th, 9:00-
12.00; Wednesday, March 27th,
12:30-2:30; and Thursday, March
28th, 900-12:00.
MATH LAB
Students who received a grade of
Incomplete (I )m Math ()001 (Math
Lab) Fall semester must remove
that incomplete by 4O0 p.m Fri-
day, March 22, 1991. The Math
Lab is open from 2O0 pm. until
4:00 p.m Monday through
Thursday, to allow students
needing to remove an incomplete
to take their remaining tests. A
student with an incomplete from
Fall semester who fails to com-
plete the required work by March
22nd will receive a grade of "F"
and be required to take Math 0001
again QNote: Tobeallowedtotake
any test, a student must present a
'picture" IDlo the Math I ib per
sonnel I
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL CO! I FC.F
STUDENTS
General College students should
contact their advisers the week of
March 25-29 to make arrange
ments for academic advising for
summerstermsand fall semesters,
1991. Early registration will begin
April 1 and end April 5.
MEDICAL CO! I .FC.F.
ADMISSION TEST (MCAT)
The Medical College Admission
Test application has been received
by the ECU Testing Center. The
test will be offered on Saturday,
April 27,1991. Application blanks
are to becompleted and mailed to:
MCAT Registration, The Ameri-
can college Testing Program, P.O.
Box 414, 2255 North Dubuque
Road, Iowa City, IA 52243. Ap-
plications must be postmarked no
later than March 29,1991. Appli-
cations may be obtained from the
Testing Center, Speight Building,
Room 105, East Carolina Univer-
sity.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place-
ment Service in the Bbxton House
is offering one hour sessions to
assist you in the interviews on and
off campus. Sessions to help will
be held in the Career Planning
Room of the Bloxton House at 3
p.m. Come on any of the follow-
ing date March 5 19 and 25
STUDENTS W1U DIG
CLKrsTRinrvr
SOKEEESm
East( arolina Unrversir) students
will participate in the country's
largest intramural volleyball pro
gram this year as CertsTrident
SpikeFest 91 makes a -mashing
debut on college campuses For
the inaugural season,anestinated
130,000 students at 600 colleges
and universities have already reg-
istered to participate CertsTn
dentSpikelest 91 is scheduled for
March 15-27. Students interested
in registering a team should con-
tact Paulette Evans at 757-6387.
CertsTndentSpikeEestl begins
when each of the participating
schools hosts an intramural 4-on-
4 coed volleyball tournament for
teams oi 2 male and 2 female play-
ers. Varsity- volleyball players are
ineligible to participate. In the
Spring, the winning team from
each on-campus tournament will
advance to one of 16 Regional Fes-
tivals with other winning teams to
determine Regional Champions.
To keep the tournament within
the fun spirit of intramural com
petition, there are not plans for a
national championship. "Because
volleyball is oneof the most popu-
lar sports on college cam puses, we
felt that this would bean ideal way
to reach active college students
and provide them with a fun and
competitive activitysaid Robert
Clouston, Vice President of Prod-
uct Management of the Warner-
Lambert Company.
March 19,1991
Athletic
Selection cornmittt
searches for replac
By Kerrv Nester
Assistant Sporti ! d
On M nda)
ofnciafeamH tmced
head basketball
head am hot
seasons.
"After ag
cision for several
odedthatMiki � -
htsdutiesashead
ECUDirecto? I
'r aid "Thi la
ihe best inter
cemed
"Person
tsstmpbsl
This de is � �
m iththechan � � � � � .
with Coach 5te
Scro
decision
offenseC oa I -��- i
thi- year
Assistants Chr enetti, Scoti
Lewisandt riffM
to stay on until their nrractsrui
out in June A thai time,
also be dismissed
Hart said that I learch ford
new head roach � �� 91 -
js possible
Steele ended
English Majors?
TwoECi students playafi
illegal in tne state of Nortt
Ruggers to h
state tournaiil
By Tom Woerner
Special io the Fast Carolinian
When most people think o:
nigbv their minds immediately go
to a large group oi people plavnng
football without pads somewhere
in a foreign country
Some people don I realise that
rugbv thrives in America and there
is even a team presenting ECL In
fact, last vear the Tirate squad cap-
tured the North Carolina title at thc
college level
Rugby has its derivatives in
ancient football .On ginallv football.
as the people of the 14th century
called it, was plaved as a type ot
medieval folk game These garner
wereusualh "ad hoc" meaning that
the teams did not ha ve a designated
number of plavers.
The sport in the 14th century,
as it is today, was seen by many to
be a violent sport Many people felt
that the sport reflected the violent
tenor of life.
The sport did then and does
now, however, give the players a
way to vent their frustrations. Rugby
today is perhaps not as violent as it
was 500 years ago, but it is not far
from it
According to one ECU player,
who played high school football,
rugby is much tougher. Although
many of the rules are different, the
mair
leather Ks
playing I
between
ferent rules
not � car pads
-t:
opposed to a vai
basketball 01
being supportei
department thq
cerves it suppoj
ational services
The team is rj
out scholarships
members solely
athletes This Of
,i greater numhe
The rugbv tel
than 111st a sprtj
to one member.
likcatraternit
the team takes
withsomntiesan
parties.
There is a oi
mplaingnigb
four times a vvej
game a week, usj
Because the
state title last yo
chosen to host th
that will be held I
This should
citing tou mar
across North Ca
the coveted stato





5Iie iEaHt (Earultninn
March 19. 1991
CLASSIFIEDS
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
FOR SALE
� I
PI RGl
Ol I I
II k Mr m 95
v Ml RBEI)
Ol I 1 SIZI HI I
S0 HOND.A
� MOTOR-
i u
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
I VS WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble productsal home Call for
information 504-641-8003 Ext 5920
BIG OPPORTUNrm Home typist
needed Act now! (609)875-0711 Evt
778
SOFTBALI OFFICIALS: ihe
' nville Recreation and Parks IV
partmenl will be having their first
organizational meeting for any in-
terested softball officials who would
- to officiate in the spring and
n mer adult softball league. The
rtg will be hold at the Elm Street
on Wednesday, March 12 at
. m It you arc interested and
tt make this meeting, please call
die I tevis, evenings at 752-2081
or Ben lames at 830-4550
l s GOVERNMENT )OBS Now
I ' ng! 24 hour request. (Nn K7s
HELP WANTED
an energetic individual to be a cam-
pus representative. Work one night
and average S50-S100 per week.
Knowledge of retail sales and the
Greek svstem is helpful. Call 1-800-
472-9415.
MODELS NEEDED for spring pro-
motions, for ladies apparel and ac-
cessories. No experience necessary
Hurry in, promotions start soon.
Umited part-time sales posifionsalso
available Apply , The Plaza, Mon-
Wed, 1 p.m4 p.m.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED tor summer ramps
in North Carolina It you love
cheering, this is the summer ob for
you! College experience not neces-
sary, but strong High School Kick
ground a must. Flexible scheduling
and gnat pay. Call collect for more
information, (Qsn 383-0066
PERSONALS
PERSONALS
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Craft; All Waterfront Activities tomakeaHawaiian Dol
(Swimming, Skiing, Sailing, won't want to miss
Windsurfing,CanoeKayaking). In-
quire: Mah-Kee-Nac (BOYS) W
Linden Avenue,GlenRidgeN107028
Call I-800-753-91ia Danbee(GIRLS)
16 Horseneck Road, MontviBe N)
07045. Call 1-800-776-0520.
HEADING FOR 1 UROPE I His
SUMMER? let there anyt . i �
AIRHITC H(r)for$160 from the East
Coast! (Reported ir N Hn
Lefs i k! AIRHm Mr. -�
2000
PERSONALS
TOGAYS, LESBIANS tl i
ALPHA PHIS: Get ready for the roorr
lock-in on Fndav. We are going to
have a blast See you there'
ALPHA PHI OLD EXEC You sun
did a terrific job in office Thanksfor informatii
being so organized. We are very
proud of you Love, the Alpha Phi s
withissu �� .
A support. .
on campus �. �. . .
and mon I il 757 � � �
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSIS-
U.ASKA SUMMER EMPLOY- TERCAMPS MASSACHUSETTS
Ml I
ries Earn S5 �
ansportation! Room
�r�VV. :i : � , i
. Rex irch
Mah Kee-Na for Boys Danbee for
Girls t iunselor posihons foi Pro
in Specialists' A ream Sexrts
1 ���� il Baseba . R tbalLPiel i
� : Softball Soco rand Volle
b ill 25 lei rtisopenings alsoArchery,
Riflery, Weights I imessand Bikn
TO ALLGRLLKS Mark your cal
endar now and leave March 22 open
for Phi Kappa Tau's Hawaiian 1 uau
complete with sand and Tiki I
EXIT 7 and the ever famous Flori la
band, I HI- SN W, will join toe tl 11
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
IS NOW
HIRING
WRITERS FOR
ALL
POSITIONS
r
V.
ADVERTISE IN
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
HOI M i i 'K K!
other openings include Performing
Arts. Fine Arts Newspaper, Photog-
MAKJ S50f$1500WEEKLYsruffing raphy, Cooking, Sewing, Roller-
v lopesat home! Start now Rush skating, Rocketry, Ropes, and Camp
S S.I plus SI � to Home 1 m
. V.WON COL'K
'
� M s-
Hl I i' u.wiiPart time ware
rk ai d driving. Must have
ar mornings preferred.
A.ppl person al 1 arr s
: '�� 1 10th Street,
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Ringgold rowers
Now raking I cases tor August
1991 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom,
Efficencv Apartments
CALL 752-2865
WANDSWORTH
COMMONS
RHKNVH.LFS NKWESTI N v
IN Mil � v hoi sin �
I ii llent location on Arlington R� �.
Choice units available One and two
�u-r; efficent, carpi I � mg
refi rator, wi hei U:n hi�4t pi Bn
construction, quiet with extra tnsu H
IKI.l BASK'C AHI I r
9fe
I h� Realt) ,rui
758-4711
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential
pregnancy
�Financial assistance
Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
The Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
� � �
U'KlMI-s
SI MMER OBS! t oiinselors, Arts
ind Crafts n h rs aiid Lifeguards
- led ti work .i� Pisgah Girl
ountains ol
Nortl Foii summer of
�, pleas
522-62SI
V i I ' , l I t �
w -
GROWING SPORTSWEAR
c OMPAN1 that sells merchandi
- : ties fraten i ties is looking for
Cruise Ship Jobs
HIRING Met v. �- ��� Summer
� MiONPER
� � � � pay FREE irae ai bbean
���� Banama � Pacific Mfi
c Al L NOW! a �' in lat e
1 206 736 7000, Ext 600N2
OPEN I NDER
NEW OWNERSHIP
Mil I SERVING YOl
wrTHcx i in b.p
�l VT1 YM'Kt oi -�
( K SS 1 R IM ILI R 1
RES i K :
1 EN NISI KM i
Hi' DIMi WITH
S11 1)1 1 ID ON REPAIRS
WDM K l( I
�" !(M 1 H itii Street
ROAD SI RVK i tircenvdk NC
50 States Seminars our nationalh knov n
organization is seeking an asserth e, d) namic
and motivated indh idual to teach and con
duct "No Money Down" real estate seminars
in your area. You have seen these semtmirs
onT.V now �conduct them yourself
$3,000.00 to $6000.00 per month possible
pt $10,000.00 to$15,000.00 possible i i.
Don't Delay, Call toda) for an inten kv,
(208) 342-0950 or (208) 338-9960
enl � � i mine
' � ts inter
irsteam
' .hit
fihould
i nd tl mei
WINDING i QLIi w LIU11
DOWN
Windit . . .� � town, a
nil � � - erarnis
March
19th i vall be held at the
enter ever)
tesda) al 11:0 t� Noon
( all Mary Mernei il 551 5459
Mend ihrouj � Fi la) from s
� ihon and
�' il rhere is a
cJhat . ,n it not
Uh lati . : up
MAKUilNL BANS
Attention interested dancers (who
i an dazzle and spai kle) Become
a part ol the ' � I! Football
spirit: sh.irr the ipotlight by
perforrningvviththeEastCarolina
Pirates during the 1991 footbaS
season The GOLI l (,IKI.S
DANC E LINE will hold tryouts
April 13-14;9ajn 4pm Saturday
and 1 p m -4 p m Sunday in Me
monal (.vni For more trtforma-
tion, call 757 6982
2NPANNUAL.X!Li2JLS-
GQiJ21�SI.L)ANCj;
E ' District 97, State Employees
Ass k Ki'ii �ioI Northt aroiina.wiO
!x' sponsoring their 2ml Annual
i 'iJirs c loldies I )ance on Sit
urday, April 6, l'l, from 8.X)
p.m IflO p m at the Greenville
( ountry( lub, with a DJ featuring
music from the '50s '60s, 70s.
rhere will be door prizes, light
lurs d'oeuvres, and cash bar, as
well as prizes for winnersof dance
ontests. Advanced tickets at a
a st i l $6person may beobtained
by callingPeggy Nobles (757-Wl 2)
orTreva Matthews (551-2917). A
limited number oi tickets will be
available at the door.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
I he 1991 Greenville-Pitt Co. Spe-
i ial i Mympics Spring (lames will
be held on April ltth at E. B.
Aycock Jr. High School in
( .reenville (rain date: April 24).
Volunteers are needed to help
serve as buddieschaperones for
the Special Olympics. Volunteers
must be able to work all day - from
9 am -2 p.m (The first ones there
will be assigned a position). An
orientation meeting will be held
on April 17 in Old Joyner I.ibrary,
room 221 from 5-6:00 p.m. Free
lunchesand volunteer t-shirts will
be provided the day of the games
to all volunteers who have at-
tended theorientation session. For
more information, contact Lisa
Mills at 830-4551
GAMMA BF7TAPHT
HONORS SOCIETY
Welcome back from the Spring
Break 7.00p.m. Mendenhall244,
Tuesday, March 19th Officers
will meet at 6:15 p.m
BLOOD PR IT
ArmyROTC will sponsor a blood
drive al the Mendenhall Student
(enter on March 21 from noon
until 6 p.m There is currently a
shortage of blood in this area of
the state due to deployment ot
soldiers to Saudi Arabia. 1 lelp us
inour effort to build up local blood
supplies.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST(LSAT)
Ihe 15 A r will be offered on Mon-
day, June 10, 1991. Applications
must be completed and mailed to
Law School Admission Service,
Box 2000, Newtown, PA 18940.
Postmark deadline if May 7,1991.
Applicatioas postmarked after this
date must be accompanied by a
$40, non-refundable late registra-
tion fee. The NEW applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight Building,
Room 105
ecustudfntrf:hap
ASSOCIATION
ECU Student Rehabilitation As-
sociation Yardsale, March 23,1991,
7:00a.muntil,wmerofGreenville
Blvd and Charles Blvd. On front
of the Belk building).
Business groups and civic groups
are needed to fill volunteer posi-
tions during the 1991 North
Carolina Special Olympic Sum-
mer Games Typical responsibili-
ties include serving as housing
escorts, chaperons, assistants at
competition staging areas and
Sports specific assistants (timers,
scorers, measurers, etc I Volun-
teers must be at leasl 16 eai -1 ld.
and will need to attend an orien-
tation training session and a ob
specific training session Training
sessions will be held in May Rep
resentatives of groups can call
Alice Keen or Rita Roy at (919)
83(M216or 8304217. Thedatesd
the games are May 30-June 2,1991
at East Carolina University.
GROUP ADVlSINCrOK
PRE-OTSTtJDFNTS
Group advising for PreOl stu-
dents will be held Monday, March
25th from 3:00-5.00 p.m. in Room
205, OT Classroom Belk Building.
If you are unable to attend the
group meeting on Monday, March
15th, the OT Department faculty
will meet with general college
advisesonthefollowingdatesand
times: Tuesday, March 26th, 9:00-
12:00; Wednesday, March 27th,
12:30-2:30; and Thursday, March
28th, 9:00-12:00.
MATH LAB
Students who received a grade of
Incomplete (I) in Math 0001 (Math
l.ab) Fall semester must remove
that incomplete by 4:00 p.m Fri-
day, March 22, 1991. The Math
Ub is open from 2:00 pm. until
4:00 p.m Monday through
Thursday, to allow students
needing to remove an incomplete
to take their remaining tests. A
student with an incomplete from
Fall semester who fails to com-
plete the required work by March
22nd will receive a grade of "F"
and be required to take Math 0001
again (Nott lobe allowed to tak
am test, a student must pi
"picture ID to the Math lal �
sonnel
RLG IS IK A riON EQB
GENERA! COM K.I
General College students should
contact their advisers the weekol
March 25-29 to make arrange
ments for academic advising tor
summers terms and fall semesters
1991 Early registration will begin
April l and end April 5
MEDJ�ALCQLLEGE
ADMISSION TEST (MCAT1
Ihe Medical College Admission
rest application has been received
by the ECU Testing Center. Phe
test will be offered on Saturday,
April 27,1991. Application blanks
aretobecompfetedarrimailedto
MCAT Registration, The Amen
can college Testing Program, P ()
Box 414, 2255 North Dubuque
Road, Iowa City, IA 52243 Ap-
plications must be postmarked no
later than March 29,1991. Appli-
cations may beobtained from the
Testing Center, Speight Building.
Room 105, East Carolina Univer-
sity.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOP
rhe Canvr Planning and Place-
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offenng one hour sessioas to
assist you in the interviews on and
off campus Sessioas to help will
be held in the Career Planning
Room of the Bloxton House at 3
p.m Come on any ot the tollow-
STUDENTS Will jl(,
Q RTSfTRIDl
SPIKEFES1
East arolina I nb rudents
will participate in tl � ountn s
gesl intramural v lle ball pn
' thi ear as erts Indent
Spike! esl mak� s a smashing
d� bul : . i .�� campuses
thi' inaugural seas tn, anestimated
150)00 students at 6 - i l ges
and universities have alread) n
istered to participate tits rn
dentSpikeFest vM is scheduled I
March 2" 27 Students interested
in registering a team should con
tad Paulette Evans at "usr
Certs i ridentSpikeresI 91 Ixms
when each of the participating
schools hosts i intramural 4 on
4.oti volleyball tournament foi
teams of 2 male and 2 female play
ers �irsit voHeyball players an
ineligible to participate In thi
Spring, the winning team from
each on campus tournament will
advance tooneof 16 Regional res
tn als w ith other winning teams to
determine Regional Qvunpions
lo keep the tournament within
the fun spoil of intramural com
petition, there are not plans tor a
national championship "Because
volleyball is one oi the most popu-
larsportson college campuses. �
telt that this would bean ideal wan,
to reach active college students
and provide them with a hm and
competitive activitysaid Robert
( louston, Vice President oi IYod
ud Management oi the Wamer-
I ambert Company
March 19,1991
Athletic
Selection committ
searches for repla
B K�-rr Nester
Assistant Sp. rl
�� ialsann
I basket
I
. i ons
At � �
cisi n tor si .
cidedthat.M - - -
hisdutie!
r.said I I
bestintei
��
rsonrx -
I
rhisd
.
� -
-
� .�-�
this y ii
Asststai �

out in ui ' '
. �
Hart ' �
now head
Stei h
English Majors?
TwoECl
illeq ' ' � ' �'�
-
Rugger to h
state tournaiil
By Tom Woemer
Special to the f Jt . arohnian
When nk
nigbv their mir !
to a large gn : f p
toothall without pads a mev
in a forewji ci �untr
Somepe ; lon'trea that
nigbv thrr. es in nvnca and then1
is even a team representing EC I In
tact, last year th ' irate sq
tuned the North ar ina titk
college level
Rugbv ha- its derr
ancient football OriginaU) foott�ll
as the people ol the I4th century
called it was played as a rp
medieval k Ik game I1 garrH-s
wenuisvialK ad ha rnearengthal
thetearnsdkdnothaveadesnated
number of players
The sp.irt in the 14th centur)
as it is tix1a, was seen h manv to
bea violent sport Manx people felt
that the sport reflected the violent
tenor of life
The snort did then and does
now, however, give the players a
way to vent their tnastrations Rugb
today is perhaps not as violent as it
was 500 vears ago, but it is not far
from it.
According to one EC I plawr
who played high school football.
rugby is much tougher Although
manv of the rules are different, the
� -

a tit
out - I
ers si
rh�
than Hist a sp
h' tine memh
'ike a fraternity
thf team
withsororibesai
pa rtu-v
There is
in playing rugby
tour times ,i wvj
game a week, us
Because thel
tate title last 11
chosen toh.st th
that wfllbeheWj
This should
a ting tou ma mer
across North Ca
the coveted star�.





19, 1991
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
IS NOW
HIRING
Rl 11 RS F( )R
I ALL
I v ill
HMMMM�I
-632-1400
,1 S
M

msto
11 �� impions.
,u � � � , jthm
i ' in ural i om
are nt)l plans for a
pionshij "Because
stpopu
� ' ampuses,w
ould bean ideal waj
j: ssions bo � h m rive oolk ge students
r iewsonand and provide them with a fun and
competitive activity, said Robert
Planning touston. Vice President of Prod
aa
tonl '
March 19,1991
Blie i�aat (flarultnian
17
Athletic department removes
Selection committee
searches for replacement
Steele
inherited i Pirate program that v is "Rather, they will serve in an ad i
in shambles and had usl gon� sor capacity ust as it did in th
througha 12 I6sea onundci former search tlt.it resulted in the hirii
head coach Chariii Harrison Bill Lewis (E U's head footl
! he Pirates finished the season av� h
By Kerry Nester
ssisiani sports Editor
i Mondav March 11 school
sannourH ot the dismissal of
isketball coach Mike Steele
� i hot F( I for the past tour
v ter agcmizingover tins de
� � si veral das it was de
�it MikeSteeleberelievedof
is head basketball coax h
in � ro( Mhlctk sDavel lart
s decisii �n was made in
� interests ol .ill parties con
nsan never
� � " ight assume
�. is made in corn ert
� inn � ' itterdis ussions
ifficialsdenied that tin
� is related to the DVV1
: i Steele reo r ed earh
itantshn. Benetb Scott
li rift Mills will beaDowed
m until their contra ts run
� At th.it time, they will
� hsmissed
� irt said th.it the search for .1
� id 1 u h will begin as soon
ssible
leelei ii.iivl his fourth season
,it the helm ol the Pirates witha 12
1 record 1 Its overall record since
(oming to E( 1 is 48 68; .1 41 4
percent winning average
In his tenth season ol collegiate
1 oaching, Steele hascompiled a 172
l(W record, for .1 M 4 percent mark
Before coming to E( I , Steeh
spent six seasi ns .is head (oa h .it
DePauw I niversity, where he led
the Rgers to four straight N( A A
Division 111 tournaments
Me also led his squad to the
NCAA 1 inal lour in 1983 84 and
his figerteamwon6l straight home
games, .1 1 hision III record
rhisissomethingSteele wanted
to a complish w hen he a me to
!il ,i w inning tradition at home
Sim v His an
2 2 I iei or i .it Minges 1 olisoun
ando ei 1 me hall ol the games II
has played have been decided b 1
mints or less
A quo: � taken fr �m .1 l tti
the edit ,r 1! The I � man on
Man h 2 1989, said For th first
time, we ha c people on this, am
pus whose favorite team is East
v arolina ind the reason the) � ire is
due to the hope that oa h Sti � ���
has built around what used to be
perceived as a hopeless situation
Inh first si as, mat EC I Stei l�
with an v- n rd but lost two
overtime indwen beati
him � 10 p : loss In his
second y a r, Steele led F 1 I to their
tirst winning season since the I9H2
R3 team posting a l"1 14 record
I tn 1 1st two seasons, E I has
slumped ��� ithal '� I8n ord in 1988
89and thisvear sdisappointu .
16 mark
In 1 i 1 r tir st v' 11 things wen
so bad �� ith the r� niiting situation
that wi i'i iden I this onh our
thin) eai Sttvle said This � as
the vear we wen ipj � I t
17 � ,� .
� � I
, i�nt '
� irv ol
.��� � . itakei
earlv in th � � I : � �
I a let ol
this .1 m '� nd
�� �. � hurt us

urn edon Mai il a se
Id tioni . , �, ;
h 1 1
ai 1
basket
.
I lart will ultimately make the
final ili'i ision on w hi h 1 an.lit
will get the job rhen ' hanccllor
Rii ii ird Eakin will give ins ap
proval
1 he membersof thei mmittei
include the following: harhet in
,issh latr athlrtn s direi tot 1 l
an Sant ass late athletii idirei
tor Rilev Roberson, chairman
Boai I of 1 nistees Athlcti. s '
mittee Mien fnomas Student
�� emment Assi� iatii mpresi li
Stanlcs i ove, senior member of the
Pirati b isketball squad; i I rnn
� '�. atv 1.1. nlt atl let
ni itive l hrisFurlouj
� �� . ;(' Fdiii atn nal I
ind Pam Pei 11
.
I lart indicated tl it
. � � v the selectioi mj li '� I
pnl rt
� cr, thai i
tatr � ' �
the timi t: 1" � ' "
� H.art
said
I lart slid tb ll
alios that it ism the ml i �f thi
l niversitv t sele t a o �a h is
quii klv as p. � .sibk hi woul
: - nist to help with n
Steele 1 1
1.1
Cel�st� HoHman - tcU Photo Lab
11 11 (erei ill during one of the Pirates home
� � edlead 1 hmgiob
ECU Golf team splits two
tourneys over spring break
By Francis Vaughn�
st.itt Writer.� �
The Eastarolina goii tram�th to
plaved in tv � 11 stai '
dunng Spring Break � irl' ir
on at the. 11I� : I2tl
In ten ollegiate in Santei S 11
�� imsplaved in th ti uirnament.
lerbittei
1 In � plaved a ig 1
s first tournament st;
w mhK and rain in the final 1
� ,1m' s con hij.
. pccti d tin. first da Ihe la-�: ��
rates shut 517 atunting the h- st�1 troi
1 ,� iresout ol five 1 h . trai.
. rh leader South l arolina b)
tsN (
Iho lone bright spcHs the fi. . � �
� , ,vere Senu rs lohn M igu 1.
n : Creg Powell tiring 1 1. ith a
Southarolina s Brett Quigle) ledsixth pla e fmisl2:i
ii 1 idn ilh .� itl � � ndei 0 il��
- nd E 1 10 noner
llegiateatthe ;reenbner oil
� w B� rn ! ast � ar the
ites finished second t hind the
�. ond ranked team in the country,
orthi arolina his year the Pi rates
n � fi r sweet revenge as th.
faced North Carolina and eleven
other teams
E( I s purple team shot 507
� �� tiled leadei Hd Dominion
bv tour shots I bug 11" ' as the
r iti . fer the first dav as he
led the E I gold team th a 4
hn Hurst ot Old dominion shot a
three under pai f�9 to J in-
dividual lead
!he Pirates purpk h am shot
v.M the seccmd day to move into a
tie for the lead with Old I on inion
iding th �� 1 ��'� senkii t in
1'oweil whi hot '
Francis Vaughn was the low Pirate
Sc1 Golf pane 8
Ruggers to host
state tournament
By Tom Woerner
Special to the asl Carolinian
When most people think of
� � . their minds immediately go
1 irge group of people playing
- thai! without pads somewhere
� ireign country.
iome people don't realize mat
� igby thrives in America and mere
. n a team representing KU In
� 1.1. last vear the Pirate squad cap
ired the North arolina tide at the
liege level.
Rugby has its derivatives in
lentfootball. Originally football,
the people of the 14th century
ailed it, was played as a type of
medieval folk game Thesegames
were usually "ad hx" meaning that
imsdid not have.idesignattxi
� imber of players
The sport in the 14th century,
is it is today was seen by many to
� aviotentsport Many people felt
thai the sport reflected the violent
tenor of life.
The sport did then .md d(xs
now, however, give the players a
a ,n tovent theirfnistratuns Rugby
h day is perhaps not as violent as it
was mX) years ago, but it is not far
from it
According to one ECU player,
who played high school football,
rugby is much tougher. Although
many of the niles are different, the
main goal remains the same 1.1 get a
leather ball past.� ertam p int 1 ffl a
playing field I he main difference
between the sports, besides thi dil
ferent rules, is that rugby players do
not wear pads
At E I' nibv is a 1 tub sport as
opposed to a varsity sport such as
basketball or football Instead of
being supported by the athletii
department the rugby team re-
ceives its support from the recre-
ational services department.
The team is not allowed to give
out scholarships and thus gains ifs
members solely through walk-on
athletes.This opens the spirt up to
a greater number of students
The rugby team at E 11 is more
than just a spirts team According
to one member, the team is almost
like a fraternity Some of the events
the team takes part in are mixers
with sororities and sponsoring team
parties
There is a lot ot work involved
inplayingrugby The team practu es
four times a week ami plavs one
game a week, usually on Saturday
Because the ECU team won the
state title last year, they have been
chosen to host the state tournament
that will be held in Apnl
This should prove to be an ex
citing tournament as teams fromall
across North Carolina compete for
the coveted state title.
UNC, Eastern Michigan
an unlikely match-up
P) it
A . find a stranger
pairim I ' ' A A tournarm nt s
� � � than Northarolina
and '
1 h, - ovei even �
thin I vi rsus 12) to
conferehi the powerful At (
versus the underrated MAC) to
coaches (Dean Smith versus Ben
Braun)
hose an thes hixils meeting
in one halt of the Kist Regional
semiftnalson Friday night at bast
Rutherford, N.J ,afterthey each won
rbeir way thereSunday with second-
round victories
Top seeded and fourth-ranked
North arolina 5) 1 ruised past
Villanova 84 69 and into the round
of 16 for the record I Ith consecutive
vear and improved its record in 25
N( A A appearances to 52-25.
Eastern Michigan (26-6) is now
10 Sweet 16s behind the Tar Heels
after twiting Penn Mate 71-68 in
overtime to bring their overall
record in two tournament appear-
ances to 2d.
"Ithasn t sunk in yet Eastern
Michigan's Marcus Kennedy said
Til he sittinginmvrixm tomorrow
and somebod) will come in and
sav, "You're in the final 16 That's
vvhtMi it might hit me
As Kennedy and the other se-
niors on the Hurons prepare for
their first regioruil semifinal, Rick
Fox and the seniors on orth
( arolina are set tor their fourth in as
man) years.
It's a great feeling, Fox said
"I've been in tour of them myself
and now l want to accomplish one
more thing in life and that'sgetting
a regional championship
A regional championship
means a berth in the Final Four,
something North (arolina hasn't
managedsincewinrangitallinl982.
"You show me sonx'other team
thafs been to the Sweet 1M1 times
m a row Fox said Fans want to
sv us beat everyone then when we
don't it sa disappointment. Some-
times they forget about the great
regular seasons we've had.
"There's nothing we can do
aboutwhatthe) say We'regoingto
have tun and I'm sure they will too
There's no big team left. When we
saw the seedings we woe thinking
it would be us, Syracuse UCl. A and
someone else"
Well. the got the someone else
right
Second-seeded Syracuse, No 4
UCLA and No 5 Mississippi State
all lost in the first round, the latter
two to Penn State and Eastern
Michigan, respectively.
The Tar Heels held up the se-
lection committee's seeding ability
with an easy win over Northeastern
and then an equally impressive run
See UNC, page 8
arner
I ambi � � ipan)





March 19, 1991
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t enter, rhe
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and mailed r i
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1,1991. Apph
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IRKSHOPS
kg and Place
L xton House
lr sessions to
r lews on and
ID help will
reer Planning
n House at 3
' She follow
ralsea ;on,ani stimated
tudents at 600 colleges
: � ersirjeshavealread) reg
istered to participate ertsTri
dentSpik 11 l 91 is scheduled tor
March 25-27 Students interested
in registering a team should con-
tad Paulette Evans at 757-6387.
erts I rtdentSpikefest'91 begins
when each ot the participating
schools host an intramural 4-on-
4 co ed voUeyball tournament tor
teams 42 male and 2temalepiay
ers Varsity volleyball players are
ineligible to participate In the
Spring, the winning team from
each on campus tournament will
advance to one ot 16 Regional Fes-
tivals with other winning teamsto
determine Regionalhampions
Fo keep the tournament within
the run spint of intramural com-
petition, there are not plans for a
national championship. "Because
volleyball isoneof the most popu-
lar sports on col lege ca mpuses, we
tel t that this would bean ideal way
to reach active college students
and provide them with a fun and
competitive activity said Robert
Houston, Vice President of Prod-
uct Management of the Warner -
I amhert Company.
March 19J991
iBlu lEant QTargHnian
7
PORTS
Athletic department removes Steele
Selection committee
searches for replacement
l
By Kerry Nester
Assistant Sports Editor
i.n Mondav, March 11, school
ottinalsannourKed the dismissal of
ht ad basketball coach Mike Steele,
head coach of ECU for the past four
v asons
After agonizing over this de-
cisi n tor several days, it was de-
it ha t M ike Steele be relieved of
; itiesasheadbaskethallcoach
Directorof Athletics Dave Hart
� wiid ITiis decisionwasmadein
best interests of all partiescon-
med
Personnel divisions are never
mplistic as one might assume
de ision was made in concert
the haixellorafterdiscussions
.�, th oach Steele
School officials denied that the
ision was related to the DVV1
� rtst Coach Steele received early
vear.
Assistants Chns Benetti, Scott
isandGrittMillswiubealowed
� stay on until their contracts run
it in lune At that time, they will
also be dismissed.
! lart said that the search for a
head coach will begin as soon
as possible.
Steele ended his fourth season
at the helm of the Pirates with a 12-
16 record. His overall record since
coming to ECU is 48-68; a 41 4
percent winning average.
In his tenth season of collegiate
coaching, Steelehascompiled a 172-
108 record, for a 61.4 percent mark
Before coming to ECL Steele
spent six seasons as head coach at
DePauw University, where he KM
the Tigers to tour straight NCAA
Division III tournaments
He also led his squad to the
NCAA Final Four in 1983-84 and
hisTiger team won61 straight home
games, a Division 111 record.
This issomethingSteele wanted
to accomplish when he came to
ECU; a winning tradition at home
Since his arrival, the Pirates have a
32-21 record at Minges Coliseum
and over one-half of the games FCl
has played have been decided by 10
points or less
A quota taken from a letter to
tne edit r at The t Can Union on
March 2, 1989. said, "For the first
time, we have people on this cam-
pus whose favorite team is Fast
Carolina ami the reason they careis
due to the hope that Coach Steele
has built around what used to be
perceived as a hopeless situation
In hisfirst season at ECU.Steele
inherited a Pirate program that was
in shambles and had just gone
througha 12 lb season under to rmer
head coach Charlie Harrison.
The Pirates finished the season
with an 8-20 record, but lost two
overtimegamesand were beaten 11
times by 10 points or less. In his
second year, Steele led ECU to their
first winning season since the 1982-
83 team, posting a 1514 record.
The past two seasons, FCl' has
slumped witha IM8 record in 1988-
89 and this vear sdisappointing 12
lb mark.
"In our tirst vear, things were
so bad with the recruiting situation
that we considered this onh our
third year Steele said. "This was
the year we were supp sed to win
16, 1" or 18 games
Controversy with sophomore
guard Ste e Ri hardson and junior
center oe Brightwell, combined
with thf season ending injury of
senior pint guard lett Whitaker
early in the vear might have con-
tributed to the losmg season.
had a lot of iontroversy
this season Steele said " knd l �s
ingour point guard really hurt us
Following the dismissal, Hart
announced on March 14. that a se-
lectii n a nrnitteehad been sele ted
to head up the hunt tor a new head
oiih
"This committee will not be
accountable tor naming the next
basketball oach. Hart said
'Kather, thev will serve in an advi-
sory- capacity, iist as it did in the
search that resulted in the hiring ot
Bill Lewis (ECU'S head football
coach)
Hart will ultimately make the
final decision on which candidate
will get the job. Then, Chancellor
Richard Fakin will give his ap-
proval
Hie members of theo mmitttv
include the following: Charlie Carr,
associate athletics director; Henry
Van Sant, associate athletics direc-
tor; Rilev Roberson, chairman.
Board of Trustees Athletics Com-
mittee; Allen Thomas, Student
Government Association president;
Stanley 1 ove, senior member oi the
Pirate basketball squad; Dr Ernie
Schwarz, faculty athletics repre-
sentative; Qtrisftirlough, president
ot the ECU Educational Founda-
tion; and Pam Penland, assistant
athletics director.
I lart indicated thai he would
like to see the selection completed
by April 8.
"However, that is a very ten
tative time frame We will discuss
the time frame further in the
committee's first meeting' Hart
said.
1 lart said that although he re-
alizes that it is in the interest i the
I niversity to select a coach as
quickly as possible, he would not
do so ust to lielp with recruiting.
See Steele paqe 8
5ES5 WoHm.n - Ecu Pk�o Lit
Coach Steele argues with a referee's call during one of the Pirates home
games 1 as! Monday Steele was dismissed trom his head coaching ipb
ECU Golf team splits two
tourneys over spring break
By Francis Vaughn
Staff Writer
� -
The East Carolina- orf-ream
piaved in two golf tournaments
during Spring Break, starting their
season at the Palmetto
Intercollegiate in Santee, S.C. High-
teen teams played in the25thannual
tournament
The weather played a big role
in E T s first tournament Strong
winds and rain in the final nine
holes pushed ECU'S scores higher
than expected the first day. The Pi
rates shot 317, counting the best
four scores out oi five. They trailed
early leader South Carolina by 22
shots.
The lone bright spots the tirst
were Seniors ohn Maginnes
and (.reg Powell tiring 76s each.
South Carolina's Brett Quigley led
individually with one under par at
71.
Da) two brought sunshine and
relatively calm winds. The Pirates
shot 298 and moved from 10th to
ninth place in the team standings.
ohn Maginnes shot an even par 72
to put him in .i tie for 12th indi-
vidually.
Hie final round ot the tourna-
ment was piaved under bitterly cold
and windy conditions. Many golf-
ers wore hats and gloves to stay
warm
Phe Pirates ignored the weather
and shot the low round ot the day,
301. The Pirates aulted from ninth
to fifth in the tournament. South
c arolinawt ntheteamcempetition
while Kelly Mitchum from (
state won the individual title
shooting a one under par 215 lohn
nine- led E I golfers with a
sixth place finish with 221
ThePiratesi ameback homo to
host the Second ECU-Greenbrier
lnterallegiateattheGnvnbnerGolf
Club in New Bern. Ust vear the
Pirates finished second behind the
second ranked team in the country,
NorthCamlina. ThisvearthePirates
were out for sweet revenge as thev
faced North Carolina and eleven
other teams.
ECU'S purple team shot 307
,md trailed leader Old Dominion
bv four shots. Doug Hoey was the
low Pirate golfer the first day as he
led the ECU gold team with a 74.
John Hurst of Old dominion shot a
three under par b9 to grab the in-
dividual lead.
The Pirates purple team shot
301 the second day to move into a
tie tor the lead with Old Dominion.
Leading the way was senior (ireg
Powell who shot a one over par 73.
Francis Vaughn was the low Pirate
See Golf, page 8
Ruggers to host
state tournament
By Tom Woerner
Special to the East Carolinian
When most people think of
rugby their minds immediately go
to a large group of people playing
football without pads somewhere
in a foreign country.
Some people don't realize that
rugby thrives in America and there
iseven a team representing ECU. In
fact, last year the Pirate squad cap
tured the North Carolina title at the
"liege level.
Rugby has its derivatives in
ancient football. Originally football,
as the people of the 14th century
called it, was played as a type of
medieval folk game. These games
were usually "ad hoc" meaning that
the teamsdid not havea designated
number of players.
The sport in the 14th century,
as it is today, was seen by many to
be a violent sport. Many people felt
that the sport reflected the violent
tenor of life.
The sport did then and does
now, however, give the players a
way to vent their frustrations. Rugby
today is perhaps not as violent as it
was 500 years ago, but it is not far
from it.
According to one ECU player,
who played high school football,
rugby is much tougher. Although
many of the rules are different, the
main goal remains the same to get a
leather ball past a certain pint on a
playing field. The main difference
between the spirts, besides the dif-
ferent rules, is that rugby playersdo
not wear pads.
At ECU rugby is a club spirt as
opposed to a varsity sport such as
basketball or football. Instead of
being supported by the athletic
department, the rugby team re-
ceives its support from the recre-
ational services department.
The team is not allowed to give
out scholarships and thus gains it's
members solely through walk-on
athletes. This opens the sport up to
a greater number of students.
The rugby team at ECU is more
than just a sports team. According
to one member, the team is almost
like a fraternity. Some of the events
the team takes part in are mixers
with sororities and sponsoring team
parties.
There is a lot of work involved
inplaying rugby. The team pactices
four times a week and plays one
game a week, usually on Saturday.
Because the ECU team won the
state title last year, they have been
chosen to host the state tournament
that will be held in April.
This should prove to be an ex-
citing tournament as teams from all
across North Carolina compete for
the coveted state title.
UNC, Eastern Michigan
an unlikely match-up
ill ft6 - ECU WxXo Lab
Hit and run!
A Pirate baseball player gets caught between second and
third base Last weekend ECU split two games with JMU.
SYRACUSE, NY. (API It
would be hard to find a stranger
painng in the NCAA tournament's
round ot lb than North Carolina
and Eastern Michigan
The differences cover every-
thing from seeding (1 versus 12) to
conference (the powerful ACC
versus the underrated MAC) to
coaches (Dean Smith versus Ben
Braun).
Those are the schools meeting
in one half of the East Regional
semifinals on Friday night at East
Rutherford, N.J alter they each won
their wav thercSunday with second-
round victories.
Topseededand fourth-ranked
North Carolina (27-5) cruised past
Villanova 84-b9 and into the round
of 16 for the record 1 Inconsecutive
year and improved its record in 25
NCAA appearances to 52-25.
Eastern Michigan (26-6) is now
10 Sweet 16s behind the Tar Heels
after beating Penn State 71-68 in
overtime to bring their overall
record in two tournament appear-
ances to 2-1.
"It hasn't sunk in yet Eastern
Michigan's Marcus Kennedy said.
'I'll be sitti ng in my room tomorrow
and somebody will come in and
say, 'You're in the final 16 That's
when it might hit me
As Kennedy and the other se-
niors on the Hurons prepare for
their first regional semifinal. Rick
Fox and the seniors on North
Carolina are set for their fourth in as
many vears.
"It's a great feeling Fox said.
"I've been in four of them myself
and now 1 want to accomplish one
more thing in life and that's getting
a regional championship
A regional championship
means a berth in the Final Four,
something North Carolina hasn't
managed since winningitall in 1982.
"You show me someother team
that's been to the Sweet 1611 times
in a row Fox said. "Fans want to
see us beat everyone then when we
don't it's a disappointment. Some-
times they forget about the great
regular seasons we've had.
"There's nothing we can do
about whatthey say. We're going to
have fun and I'm sure they will too.
There's no big team left. When we
saw the seedings we were thinking
it would be us, Syracuse UCLA and
someone else"
Well, they got the someone else
right
Second-seeded Syracuse, No. 4
UCLA and No. 5 Mississippi State
all lost in the first round, the latter
two to Penn State and Eastern
Michigan, respectively.
The Tar Heels held up the se-
lection committee's seeding ability
with an easy win over Northeastern
and then an equally impressive run
See UNC, page 8





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Georgetown scares Runnin, Rebels
(AP) - On Thursday, UNLV
playsUtahand Arizona meetsSe ton
Hall in the West Regional at Seattle.
In the Southeast Regional at
Charlotte, Arkansas plays Alabama
and Indiana meets Kansas.
The top-ranked Runnin' Rebels
passed their toughest test of the
n , i season on Sunday, beating
J lH'P F-l lam-9pm j Un IJF?J Georgetown 62-34 to extend their
winning streak to 43.
"It was a really tough game,
one of the toughest games 1 can
remember being in said UNLV
coach Jerry Tarkanian.
It was the second-closest game
this season for UNLV, but this one
was even more competitive than
the Rebels' seven-point victory over
Fri 22nd
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Georgetown never folded,
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"We'renot in the moral victory
business at Georgetown said
Hoyas coach John Thompson. "But
that'sa great team Vegas has, and in
all probability they'll win it
Arkansas downed Arizona
State 97-90 and Alabama defeated
Wake Forest 96-88 to reach the final
16, while Ohio State beat Georgia
Tech 65-61 and St. John's topped
Texas 84-76.
Continued from page 7
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over the Wildcats.
"I didn't expect it to be easy
and it wasn't Smith said refusing
to be drawn into any talk about the
Final Four. "All the streak means is
that I'm old and I've had a lot of
good teams. Actually, last year was
special because we beat Oklahoma
to get there and we weren t sup-
posed to
But there were expected to be
there this year and the way the Tar
Heels used their size, speed and
depth against Yillanova (17-15 ,rhey
showed why they received the No.
1 seed after winning the Atlantic
Coast Conference tournament
"If we had scored we would
have been fri good shape Villanov a
coach Rollie Massimino said after
the Wildcats went 24-for-58 (41
percent) from the field. "Their
athleticism took over a couple or
times
Villanova got within66-59 with
8:24 to plav, but the Tar Heels an
swered with a 7-0 run with George
Lynch starting and ending it down
low.
"We know it's sweet but it's
also kind oi bad luck Lynch, who
had Npointsand 1(1 rebounds,said
otthe streak. 'NorthCarohna hasn't
been to the Final Four since 1982
We're trying tit be the team that
takes them Kick. We want to give
the three seniors something to go
out with
Eastern Michigan is looking for
something special for its six seniors
including point guard Lorenzo
eelv, who made the free throw
with 10 seconds to plav for the final
margin over Tenn State.
The last three years the MAC
representative has advanced past
the first round and the last two
RAMADA INN
Greenville, NC
203 W Greenville Blvd
THURSDAY, APRIL 4
SHOWS 7 & 10 PM
Tickets
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years it was Ball State and us reach-
ing the Final lt" said Neeiy, who
finished with 18 points. "1 hope the
NCAA .committee has noticed
we've done well the last few ears
and gives us a couple of more teams
to represent the M AC
When Neeiy was dune poli-
ticking, Braun started telling his
team it can play with the likes of
'orth Carolina.
"You don't win 11 games in
row like we have and win your
league and tournament unless you
believe in yourself he said. "No
one handed us a ticket to this tour-
nament, ii will be an honor 2nd a
� hallenge at the same time to plav
North Carolina
l he Kurons had to scrap
against Penn State in a matchup of
similar, solid teams before earning
the nght tor the honor and challenge
Thev fended ott foul trouble to
their entire frontline, which was
anchored by Kenned). who had 21
points Sunday tor a sub-regional-
leading total ot 43.
"Thebigguv'sawesonx Penn
StatecoachBrua-Parkh ill said We
lost to a really, really good basket
ball team
The Nittanv I.ions (21-11) had
two chances to tie at the overtime
buzzer, but 3-potnt attempts bv
Freddie Barnes were oft the mark
"1 got fouled on the first one,
said Barnes, one oi tour Penn State
players to finish with 12 points
"Both were the shots we wanted
Now North Carolina and
Fastem Michigan will get the shot
thev want The Tar Heels to get
within one win of the Final Four
and the Hurons to get a chance at
more respect tor themselves and
their conference.
Steele
Continued from page 7
"We don't want to move so
quickly as to not to do a thorough
H'b Hart said.
The national signing date this
year tor recruits is April 10
Candidates that have men-
tioned early include the following
I lerb Krusen,a former EC I pla er
now an assistant at George Mason;
ferry Green, an assistant at Kansas
who was one oi the finalists for the
Golf
UN( -W Kb last year; Hillv Lee, a
former F( I aide now head o.Kb
at Campbell; Han Kenney, an EC U
graduate and current!) head coach
at Pembroke State; Oliver Purnell.
head coach at Radfbrd; butch Estes,
a former ECU aide now head CO h
at Furman; Bob Burke, head coach
at Chowan College, and Tomnw
Aniaker. a current assistant and
former player at Duke.
Continued from page 7
golfer after two days with 150. First
round leader lohn Hurst shot an
even par 72 and increased his lead
to six shots.
Hie final day brought typical
Eastern North Carolina weather
sunnv and warm. Under ideal
playing conditiorts the Pirate purple
team shot a tournament low 24 to
take the title bv seven shots over
Coastal Carolina.
Senior lohn Maejnnes fueled
the Pirate victory with a closing
round under par69.Maginnes leap-
frogged into second behind Old
Dominion'sjohn Hurst who closed
with a 75 and an even par total of
216. ECL also had twoother golfers
in the top 10. Greg Powell and
Francis Baughan each shot 224 and
finished tied tor sixth.
The Pirates head tor
Spartanburg, S C. this weekend to
play in Wofford Colleges tourna-
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-j
sented by the insignia you wear
as .i member oi the Army Nurse
Corps. Thecaduceus on the letr
means yn wre p.irr i t a healthcare
system in which educatu ti.il and
career advancement .ire the rule.
nor the exception. The gold har
ght means you command respect as an Army officer: It you're
a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, TO. Box 7713,
NJ 07015. Or call toll tree: 1-8004 SA-ARMY. ext. 438.
on
the rt
earning
Clifton,
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
East Carolina Counseling Center Services
CONSULTATIONS
FREE
L
ECU Student Store Wright Bldg.
Greenville NC 27858
4x6 Prints not included
Coupon Must Accompany Order'
THE DOCTOR
IS! IN
One-Time-Only Consultation
The Counseling Center recognizes that
students often-times are unsure whether or
not they need counseling. In some instances
a one time supportive interview can help
you get unstuck and moving again. If it
affects your life, no issue is to small. Our
staff is available to help you and is simply a
phone call away. Some issues can be better
served if they are addressed by a helping
professional. Please feel free to call
757-6661 or drop by 316 Wright Building
and meet our staff. For appointments please
call between 8-5:00 PM
Monday through Friday.





Title
The East Carolinian, March 19, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 19, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.798
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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