The East Carolinian, March 7, 1991






�1ib iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Voi.65No.l6 TC. (r4 Vc- Thursday, March 7, 1991
Greenville, North Caroljna
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
Specialists dispose of possible explosive
By Matt king
Features ditor
futures I ditcn Mitt
� ��: r . hemtstry de
�����
hazardous waste disposal
removed a potentially expto
olution from the Flanagan
building Wednesda
- it turns mil the substan e
n detonated did not explode
its tn the i hemistrv depart
mentclet ted to not takeam i ham es
w hen the mixture was discovered
� i es inside the department
i hemistrv professoi
t1 a three week old bottle
Men s reagenl in Ri mm 2 in
organit i hemistn lab
knew ingthatthechemicali an
in some v ases degenerate to an ex
plosive matoria the pri fessot dis
. ussed thee i abilities ot
ent with i ics
! -lien s reap i I to vie
presi fcei tain t pes
ten use rollen s reagent in the or
ganii chemistn lab After the stu
dent has finished vith the reagent it
an be harmlessl) poured down a
dram i1 should be done
imi � ise
lien sreagent isallowed to
pose into two thin;
that ,irv potentialh explosive
fulminate, w hie h can
is ncol the possibleprod
u tv hul in this case the produi tion
et the fulminate was not possible,
IVhia u 1 i the chairperson ot
the i hemisrj department said
Hie s-v ond product that might
appear is silvei nitride, li said
whi h is extreme!) shock sensitive
ami also explosive 11ns was the
produ t that the ECU . hemists
feared might he present, he said
Aftei e aluaungthesituation,
wede ided the most prudent thing
to do was to isolate the area and call
in the e perts said I v I tonald
(, lemens � hai i person ot the
department ssafetx committee
With ideal circumstances the
most ot the silver nitride that could
have been svnthosized was ap
proximateh one ounce, according
te I r lames I Ii et the i homistn
department
It it had been induced, the en
suing explostoi would have been
milk)
It would be like a ouple ol
- mbsgoingi iff onesource
w ithin the depai tment said
Still.thepnxiuctsofold rollen s
reagent are highlv unpredictable,
so E l chemists called in experts
A team et reactive management"
authorities were summoned to the
s ene from irginia
The specialists trem Virginia
working in conjunction with
the I�( I I department et Environ
mental I lealth and Safety Parts ol
Flanagan were isolated earlv I ues
d.i but the team ol sp,t l.ihsts did
net arnve until Wednesday
�tter tin' team arnvod the re
A hazardou waste I ;
removing apotet tia . ��
agent could not be moved unt
state was notified and gave its per
mission t 1 p.m Wednesday "�
substaix e vas moved f . ca
landfill and detonated
. re their equipment prior to
olution from an organic chemistry lab
Rodn�y 5trickland � ECU Photo Lab
in the Flanagan building Wednesday The solution was taken to an
unpopulated area for detonation
bottle was wired to a cept
trii al charge to deto-
nate w hat might have been the sil-
ver nitride. I he jar was then placed
inside of series of shock absorbing
barrels and the charge was acti-
vated.
After examining the condition
of the wires usevi to explode the
substance, therea live management
teamconcluded that there had been
no explosion Li said
A $4,900 fee will be assessed to
the University tor the disposal of
the reagent
Bush outlines post-war vision
By Bill Egbert
st.itt Writer
V Mil t
Easl'
this plan Part of Baker's mission
willalsi bcf �� rkfortherelea
the An ei inhostagesi ' hai -
lhere is no single solutii �i
mdlj Hush stressed tl
need to introl the spread of wi ap
ons of mass destruction in the re
t Bush addressed a g�" asking for4 continuation of
�t 1 ongress VVednes the armsrnbargp agstfraq
0 report on the war and fn hrs thud (omt. bush said
m nt on his vision of America s trut thetg should b� ho'aibstitute
vst-war direction 1r diplomacy" in solving (he
Inhisforty minutespeechBush regfOn's other problem He spe
ned a four-point plan for List- citicalh mentioned tin braeli Pal
� e in the Middle Cist ami wtmian conflict, saving'that tht
veddomestk challenges tojje
sh ailed tor "shared security.
irrang n ents" in the Middle I isl
is tl rsf element of his frame
� - r peace 1 lenotedth it these
irrai ents would not involve a
S ground present e
rtK. lutlun rJUiSt be iiffi en tlx
prim :pe �. f terriforyH ��� r
Rush also said tlif t Ni. !xi uritt protect unnee
Council nlu�wiivhlchaddtts,s and obst ett
thaXiitSoe mustW acted upop; also advised
Lastly Bush said that ihe mi- �' '� '
ri h natrorevof the .ult should re ,n
presidi � � - I. Hi ws the 1 nited
States ratht rasa italvst for p
tave change
After outlining his Mi Idle I ast
peace plan. Bush called for a nt w
t;uk in domestit ; liti It's timt
totiiniaw.i fromtht ptal
direi ffhcirtevenuesawav ft em the
intht region rheywould,howvver, militan and use then- wealth tor Busl ai
nx�re peaceful purposes intheposl war pei
bush is sending Secretar) of revive the economy N
State lames Baker to the Middle SeeBush ; m
: 1 hi .in air ami land mill
taryo ri ises and an intensified I
S nava presenceinthePersiant iult
SGA
hopes to
increase
loans
B) Shannan Copeland
sijff Writer
A nevs Student Government
ss Hiatu m treasurer was sworn in
I uesfav bv House Si,iker Alex
Martin
( .arr Dudley, who had run
nopposed, was appointed to tlx1
position in Monday night's SCiA
meeting The elect ion wastanielkxl
t save money
Dudley, a junior majoring in
marketing, has boon involved with
the Si .A executive offices for the
List three years
Most reit-ntly he was President
Allen Thomas' ehief of staff The
chief of staff heads 15 university
committees that represent the stu
dent btxlv
"Wearetheeyesandearsof the
campus Iidley said "We pve
the legislature the talk around
campus
Dudley was also campaign
manager for Thomas and former
president Inpp Roakes He was
See SGA. page 3
ihouid � � �
�v. that the
Spring break can be made safer with these tips
By Jennifer Ellison
Staff Writer
When planning a trip for spring
break, whether to the beach or the
mountains, then? are precautions to
take before leaving and upon ar-
ming at your destination
Harriet Clark, an employee ol
Quixote Travels in Greenville said
in a past interview to make plans,
especially before leaving the coun-
try
"Be sure to take proof of your
citizenship if you're leaving the
country she said. She advised
studentsbound for destinations out
o the country to take a passport or
an acceptable substitute a certi-
fied birth certi fica to or a voter regi s-
tration cord and a driver's license.
Clark said students heading to
the Caribbean should he prepared
tor a surprise.
"The minute they get off the
plane, students will be specially tar-
geted bv drug dealers she said.
No matter how hard the
temptation, Clark advises student
to abstain.
"Don't take them, don't bnng
mem out (of the country) and don't
use them while you're them she
said. "They are still illegal, and if
(the students) are arrested thev will
find themselves in a foreign tail
where their parents can't help
them
Other hazards lie in foreign
lands.
"Don't drink the water, "Clark
said. "But also don't eat anv raw
fruits or vegetables. Both can give
you dysentery
Students traveling in cars
should exercise caution as well.
Keep car doors locked at all
times when driving from place to
place Maxine Anderson, another
employee oi Quixote Travels, said
recently.
It thereisanotherperson nding
with you, switch drivers penodi-
callv, Anderson said.
"Do not drive until you are too
tired she said.
Many hotels at the beach dur-
ing spring break season are full
during the evenings.
"Do not wait until too late in
the evening to stop for lodging
Anderson said
See Tips, page 2
INSIDE THURSDAY
Editorial
The Media Board should look
to outside sources to produce
the Buccaneer
Features n
Dating in Greenville can be a
tedious experience for many
students
Spons 9
Lady Pirates play against
William & Mary m the Colonial
Athletic Association opener
Classified6
Comics12





g. (Plie �aat CEarolfnfan March 7, 1991
CRIMFQ-ENE
Health resouireroonv Peer Educates ofer health educate I 7S�S��!�
Eakin suffers burnt-out porch light
March 4
1239�Public Safety: took a larceny report.
1354� Public Safety: took a damage to personal property re-
1530�Slay Residence Hall: investigated a drug violation Same
was referred to another officer.
1650�Public Safety: took a larceny report.
1744�Greene Residence Hall: took a larceny report.
1938�Belk Residence Hall (north): student was given campus
citation for speeding.
2004�Tyler Residence Hall (southwest): motorist given verbal
warning for speeding.
2016�Joyner Library: investigated a larceny report.
2023�Garrett Residence Hall: investigated a report of damaee
to state property.
2050�Umstead Residence Hall (west): student issued campus
citation for stop sign violation.
2348-Jones Residence Hall (west): non-student given a cam-
pus citation for speeding.
March 5
0040� Sports Medicine Building: responded to a report of a
controlled substance violation. Unable to locate any suspects.
0106�Chancellor's residence: discovered one of the porch
lights to be burned out Same was noted on maintenance report
0138� White Residence Hall (south): responded to two intoxi-
cated male subjects climbing the construction ladder One non-
student was banned from campus and one student was banned
from residence halls and property of same.
1532�Fletcher Music Center (southeast): investigated a minor
accident.
1657� Flanagan Building: three officers investigated a chemi-
cal spill.
1658 Public Safety: investigated a report of indecent expo-
sure r
1658- Flanagan Building: an officer investigated the chemical
spill.
1723- Flanagan Building: another officer sent to investigate the
chemical spill.
1817�Hanagan Building: officer sent to investigate thechemical
spill.
1832�Location unknown: student given a verbal warning for
a stop sign violation.
2254- Public Safety took a larceny report.
2329 -Tyler Residence Hall (north): student given a verbal
warning for a stop sign violation.
March 6
0026�Greenville Boulevard: stopped a car for a stop light
violation. Non-student arrested for no operator's license, stop light
violation and driving while intoxicated violation.
Crime Scene is taken from official ECU Public Safety logs
By Lauren Grant
Peer Health Educator
The Health Resource Room,
which offers ways to learn about
health,islocatedonthesecond floor
of the Student Health Center and is
open to all students.
Games, activities, videos and
informational pamphlets are pro-
vided for students' convenience.
Peer Health Educators are there to
helpstudents withallof their health
concerns.
Health and Wellness programs
by Peer Health Educators are given
in residence halls as well as for stu-
dent dubs and organizations, such
as fraternities and sororities.
The programs usually last
about 45 minutes to an hour, and
they are full of useful information
The programs are designed to be
open and informal with time allot-
ted for question and answers.
The Peer Health Educators are
specially trained to present these
programs in a non-threatening
manner with accurate information.
The goal is not to be judgmen-
tal, intimidation or eval uati ve.They
seek to create a comfortable atmo-
sphere between the students and
the Peer Health Educators.
Peer Health Educators assist
students in making personal be-
havior changes concerning crucial
social issues such as safe sex, safe
sunning, contraception methods
and breast and testicular cancer.
They also help raise student's
awareness about AIDS and HTV
infection.
Peer Health Educators want to
provide assistance to all students
regardlessof their age, sex or sexual
identity.
They can communicate well
with students because the Peer
Health Educators are students
themselves.
ATLANTA (AP) - A two-
pack-a-day smoker is likely to have
a heart attack 11 years earlier than a
nonsmoker, a study concludes.
In addition, smokers who quit
had their first heart attacks an av-
erage of three years later than those
who continued to smoke, said Dr.
Arthur Moss, a cardiologist at the
University of Rochester in New
York.
There was a striking inverse
relationship between amount
smoked and theageat which people
had heart attacks. Moss reported
Tuesday at the annual meeting of
the American College of Cardiol-
ogy
Nonsmokers had their first
heart attacks at a median age of 62;
two-pack-a-day smokers had their
heart attacks at a median age of 51,
Moss found.
When the numbers were cal-
culated separately for men and
women, the danger was higher for
women, Moss said.
Men who smoked a half pack
to a pack per day, for example, had
their first heart attacks at a median
age of 57, compared to 60 for non
smoking men.
Women who smoked the same
amount advanced the median age
at which they had heart attacks by
four years, from 63 in nonsmokers
to 59. Women who smoked more
than two packs a day had heart
attacks at a median age of 51, Moss
found.
Moss' findings suggest that
smoking encourages the formation
of blood clots, which can lead to
heartattacksif they block theartenes
that supply blood to the heart
muscle.
In another study reported
Tuesday, Dr. James Quillen of the
University of Iowa said smoking
tightens and shrinks coronary ar-
teries by up to 38 percent tor about
Play
Paintball
n
BnngihisanipnrTI -Great New Sport
for 5 clips
of free paint I KT. . .
(Good through March -Nice Playing Field
One per pcrsnn
-Paint Washes Out of Clothes
To play call 758-5211 for more info
Tips
Students can schedule pn
grams by stopping by the office in
Room 121, Student Health Cent,
or by calling 757-6794 Monday
through Friday, 8 am. to 5 p.m. It i
best to schedule programs at least
three weeks in advance.
The Resource Room is open
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m except for
certain hours when meetings or
classes are being held. Call ftm to
make sure it is open.
To Your Health" is a weekly
health education and inforrnano
column, neasedirect any questions,
comments or suggestions to 757-
6794.
art attacks
30 minutes after each cigarette.
That constriction can contrib-
ute to a heart attack as well.
Moss said he undertook the
study to give doctors ammunition
when discussing the risks of smok-
ing with their patients.
"We haven't really made an
impact on the patients to stop
smoking he said. They don't re-
ally believe the big statistics
The study was based on an
analysis of 2,455 patients who sur-
vived a first heart attack. Informa-
tion on the patients and their
smoking habits had been collected
for earlier studies-
Continued from page 1
There are hazards to carrying
cash, Anderson said.
"Always take traveler's checks
instead of cash to prevent theft or
loss she said.
Vacationers that will be out in
the sun for long penods of time
should think while they play,
Anderson said.
"Do not stay out in the sun too
long, and do not drink an excessive
amount of alcohol before going into
the sun Anderson said.
Although most students will
be traveling to much warmer des-
tinations, several students will be
STUDENT UNION
UUL
my
k
111 �
We Welcome All:
Bands
Comedians
Soloists
To Enter the Underground's
OPEN-MIC NIGHT
April 2, 1991
8:00-10:00 pm
Application forms available in room 236 of Mendenhall
Cash Prizes 1st Place $150.00
2nd Place $75.00
3rd Place $25.00
Applications must be received no later
than Friday, March 22nd.
Tryouts will be held on Wednesday,
March 27th from 6-10 pm
Brought to you by the
Student Union Coffeehouse Committee.
Questions should be directed to
Patrick Kenney
757-4715
spending time skiing in the moun-
tains.
Jimmy Wynne, an employee of
4 Wynnes Ski Tours and Travels,
said most people usually get hurt
when falling on ice.
If it is a cokl day and then? is
snow or ice on the ground, be cau-
tious when walking from place to
place Wynne said. "Ice forms
quickly on stairs and makes them
extra slippery
"Learn toski Wynne said "Bfc
careful where you are going on the
slopes, if you see danger coming,
just fall down
i
informed
of the
issues, events
and people
affecting the
ECU campus
, and community
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Thirty-five allied prisoners ot
war, including 15 Americans, ar-
-ved Wednesday m Saudi Arabia
om Iraq, whereSaddam Hussein's
�security forces struggled to put
tiown rebellions flaring in the north
Ind south
The allies also freed the first
Iraqi POV'(s)Wednesdav,about3a)
'out of morp than 63,000 held by
?oalihon forces. They left northern
audi Arabia for Baghdad aboard
Hvo planes, the US military sdid
The turmoil in Iraq was under
�cored by word from Baghdad rad i.
"That Saddam had hred his interior
minister and appointed a I ousin r
the post.
The new minister. All Hassan
Jl-Majid, crashed a rebellion by
Kurdishseprahsts in the north tv.
years ago in which government
forces used I
also served!
former "19t
Saddan
sure his mos
Baghdad raj
Republican
a $30n-a-nj
that was n
"heroic -tan
battle!
In thee(
the
routed
The all
air base in tr
aboard ach�
and were
mander
Schwarzl
Vhv, � -
N.C Drug Cabi
RALEIGH (AP� With more
I han nO percent of its rec wnmenda
oons for m either completed or
Beingdei-li ped, the Northarohna
FVug Cabinet is pushing new : -
posals for this year, Li Got hm
Hardner sdvs
Initiatives for 191 Gardner
aid, are proposed legislation tor
mandatory minimum sentence for
Jrug dealers, a mandator. 10
sentence tor those who use or pos
seas a firearm during the commis
gon f a drug felony, and the death
penalty in Mrst-deree murder i -
vr r I
illegal dl


igan
(Gardner saidj
the 1990 repq
sit Ol i
I

The East Carolinian is now accepting
our office. We are located on the
olJje iEaatfllar
Director of
Advertising
JohnF.SemdsbeigerD
v i
V
Production Manager
Mary Piland
DISPLAY ADVERTING
per column inch
National$6.00
Local Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours: Monday - Frid
757-6366
CLIFFS
Seafood House and O
J ft Washington Highway IN C 33 Ext Gr��nv.lie
Phone 752-3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Shrimp
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$3.9
Free Lun
at Wen
iitt mir MU'itth s (iitt ertifkatci
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fOMOTI V E
-ION. Greene Si





tZIlje Caat (Tarolinfan
March 7. 1990
3
t r hiMlth education
the moun
mplov
� i
get hurt
� l then- is
md bei.m
' �" plar to
form.
es them
said Hr
ingon the
, � r . ommg.
'
vents
ple
the
��
us
nunity
Mt CTnrultnian
rnlinian
' ' H ll'H.lt
� schedule prr
topping by the office fo
Student Health Center,
p s T 74 Monday
. � � m loSp.rn.ltjg
. Togramsat least
i K.xm is open
p m . except for
neetingji or
Idall first tc
pen
ilth is a weekly
ind information
� ' ��nvquesnona,
tions lo 757-
rt attacks
irette
an a�nrnr
� is well
dittook the
immunihon
s i t smok
v made an
fits to Stop
don t rv
1'isfu s
based on an
nts who sur
li In forma
nd fhoir
collected
�qe 1
�Iraq releases more FOWCs), F lussein appoints new interior minister SGA
Ihirty rive allied prisoners r�t
.�r m.hiding 15 Amen, .ins .r
?not Wednesday in Smith r.ih.i
'Iromlr.iq whereSeddaml lussein s
m !t fot� es struggled � �
d m n rebellions flaring in the north
1 I south
Continued from paqe t
ilh.
s ,ilse freed the first
pPt V. Wednesd.e. ihout �
mi;
r ' � �' - Ties T"he left n, ithern
�udt Anhi.i Pot Ragh dad ih �.�
PWo planes lh� ' 5 roilifai aid
turmoil in !r.i w i- undi �
'�1 redfry word � , in-
ind appointed a 1 usin t.
the post
r ia minis!)�� .

tciu s iisil iln rnii.il weapons fie
ils served .is governor "t Iraq's
met !lMh prev in. e Kuwait
Saddam .ilso soughf to make
ut. hismest lov.il triHpsst,i loyal
� radio said sokliers t the
RepubH an .uard would be given
. - 00-a iii. nth p,i raise If said
a.is m recognition of their
ik stands in lh rn. ithet of .ill
Kittles
In theconfrontafww with allied
� � 1 R piil'lu an (aiard w a:
led
illied 1 W � A n
hasi fh� � d iiMt.il Ri .ulh
tboai i 1 r. tssplane
md were greeted N alln .1om
rnandet 1 II orman
ind 1 t
n
-
tr.ti (VVs "If s almost over
Several of the former l'ovs
were bandaged and one had .1 .1st
on his leg Another identified ,is,tn
Amerii.in 1 lh pilot was . .irnod
from the pi.me on a strel. her Phe
only woman, U.S Ainu Maj
Rhonda I Comiwn had both arms
bandaged and in slings She smiUxi
.is she left the pi,Hie
( niiim's arms wi re believed
to he hr'ken. rnihtarx spokesman
Hne, (.�n Richard I Nealsaid He
said one h 'V siWer�l thr ken leg
and tM' had ha. k mpines
� riiuui 16 1 t 1.1st Aurora,
had been reported missing
. verthc 'a eekend a hileonasi an 1
.hhI res, lie mission in .1hfmxfc
!� r One tin 1 V'
: � ' '� -1 Rathbun
Mondav bv Iraq
The freed Ameruans vere
flown to Bahrain Liter Wednesday
and wen' to be taken to the aw
h .spital ship. I SS Men v. Neal s.nd
fhe I't VVs wen' turned over to
the Relross m Baghdad on Tues-
d.iv. hut high winds and poor .is
ibihtv delayed their departure
from Iraq
Wednesday, under the super-
vision of Red ross representatives.
they left their Baghdad hotel arul
boarded a bus tor the airport
All won? vellov. (iimpsuits em
blazoned with the letters F'VV, and
all appeared in generally koinf
lition
In addition lo the 15 Amen
.ins the freed aptives included
nine Britons, nme Saudis ai Italian
and .1 kuvHti
htMd (if prom n( ms t r the h �ard ot
!eadTs tor Roakes
Besides being active with the
St ,A, he was also the assistant ro-
oreiinat.rof (,arrett Resi.leneeHail
His other ai tivities include
serving as an F( U Ambassador,
working tor VVMB and working
with the admissn ms department
With only eight to nine weeks
left in this term, 1 tudley said it is
possible he will run for re-eler bori
on Apnl 3, when annual elections
are h�'ld
He s,h.1 that in the next two
months hi- is w;oing to get things
established tor the next treasurer
"Whether it be me or so mo ne
else, he said
fudiey said the Sf ,A bud I
N.C. Drug Cabinet proposes minimum sentence Bush
was low tor this im� f ear
cause m we orgam tti.
found out how to i'et rn m
th 9 . A
"Basically, this has I �
learning pro ess toi rh. !��� Ut
he said "e�t vear'a e'Hknovn
to give (to student orgai
and wkit not to gp �
Dudley said his goats . . taa
surer mcrude trymg hi t hi'
through the legisi.ir reasi
student loans from J
He said he m
Mn irl ti, me ��� W� ki .
prophatJ �� " �
.ih'Ut si ; A t, hv itv
"So that a. f. 1 � 11
SUjOOOhl � : � ek
m he said
Continued from page 1

d.l hv
1 -nth presente�l to 14 law ntor

r was

i at�Ti


� � �
Martin ii I igent les
I Gardner said other devek ;
: menLs of the cabinet include publ
, . : � . � nils aimed at redt
� nts mg enme i : il iw ireness and
: it : . .iti, ii program lo
percent form i ' men of the
ted in langei I drug use duni .
� � � .��� tudenla lan e
���� )
, , . . th al-nsk student
. heir fa es.andli gislation ti
� � , �� . peruiltH
I oft � -V
Get a Job!
ai The I st u tfinian.
' ins for � i- � �� � Anyone interested should apply in person at
rt floor f the I il itions Building across from Joyner Library.
war is 11 and the urn ertaint.
passed, he invites the American
people � end pend and invest
I"he presidenl s legislative r
i tntiesim ludei nn � rat porl
i ivil rights and a i mortal enei
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atye �aHt Carolinian
Serving fie East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Blair Skinner, News Editor LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor Stuart Oliphant, Asst. Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Kerry Nester, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
DOUG MORRIS, Editorial Production Manager Larry HuggiNS, Circulation Manager
Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician Phong Luong, Business Manager
Carla Whitfield, Classified Ads Technician Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The EastCaroltnian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that directly affects
ECU students. During the ECU school year, The East Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12,000. The East
Carolinian reserves the nght to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex, creed or
national origin. The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
is a majority opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg. ECU Greenville N C
27834; or call (919) 757-6366
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, March 7, 1991
Do students really want an annual?
Now that the Media Board has decided to
cancel this year's publication of The Buccaneer, a whole
new can of worms has been opened.
By Friday, the Media Board should know
whetheror not The Buccaneer will have to pay $50,000
for breaking its agreement with Taylor Publishing,
their contracted printer.
But this is by no means the only problem facing
the future of our yearbook.
After spring break, the Media Board will de-
termine the fate of The Buccaneer's future format,
attempt to solve the recurring staff problems and
decide what to do with the remaining $50,000 from
the yearbook's budget � money that is allocated
from student fees.
With all the problems arising from the Media
Board'sdecision, many students are wondering who
to blame for this mess. The answer, which is difficult
to untangle, is already a moot point.
More important than finding fault with anyone
or everyone, is how to solve this problem and make
sure it doesn't happen again � a difficult task the
Media Board has begun to tackle.
Among the suggested solutions.� far are a
yearbook videotape; a magazme-type�ffrnnat and a
smaller version of the existing yearbook.
While each of these solutions merit additional
considerations, they all overlook the one major flaw
that led to The Buccaneers demise � student apathy.
True, there were other contributing factors that
doomed The Buccaneer, but the root of the problems
lies with the student body's unwillingness to sup-
port it
According to several Media Board officials and
former yearbook staff members, The Buccaneer has
always been plagued with problems � both in pro-
duction and management.
Much of this can be traced to the fact that
although many students want a yearbook for them-
selves, few are ever willing to put in the time and
effort needed to help produce it.
For example, no one � out oi over 16,000
students � applied for any of the ad vertised yearbook
positions that will be available this fall.
Students seem to have indirectly decided on
the fate of The Buccaneer by their own lack of desire to
help produce one.
Perhaps this would account for the fact that out
of 5,000 yearbooks printed in 1990, over half were
never picked up by students Boxes of these annuals
now sit collecting dust in The Buccaneer office.
In other words, by their unwillingness to help
produce the yearbook, students ha ve brought thison
themselves � perhaps forever.
However, the Media Board has not yet decided
the future of The Buccaneer.
Perhaps if students express their desire to
continue having some form of a yearbook, the Media
Board will look into other alternatives.
The best solution forfuture yearbooks, no matter
what their form, lies in the possibility of seeking an
outside source to produce them.
This would probably require additional
spending by the Media Board. But if students are
really interested in having yearbooks, they should be
willing to pay a little extra in their fees.
Hiringan independent contractor would ensure
that future yearbooks would be something worth
remembering: professional, timely and properly
done.
Letters To The Editor
New treasurer
responds to
media chair
To The Editor:
I would like to comment
on the letter to the editor by
Fran Frazier, Media Board
Chairperson. First of all, I would
like to congratulate you as new
chairperson but also I would
like to tell you, don't let all of
this new found attention go to
your head.
Being chosen by the board
to run the meeting is a respon-
sibility, but doesn't make you
an instant authority on every-
thing happening on this cam-
pus (i�. Student Government
and the Treasurer situation.) It
would have been hist as easy to
show some "integrity, prov-
ing you are capable of acting as a
responsible leader, by find ing ou t
the facts behind a situation be-
fore you make a premature re-
mark. After all Fran, it's a com-
mon fact that not everything you
see in a newspaper is the exact
truth nor may it be in the exact
context which certain comments
were presented, (i.e. the quote
from SGA President Allen Tho-
mas concerning "rocking the
boat" and wha?s best for our
campus in this situation)
Please Fran, don't "preach"
about what you would do in a
situation unless you've been
there. You have enough to worry
about with WZMB being off the
air the entire year and the year-
book going belly up than to get
involved with Allen Thomas a nd
Student Government Take care
of your own problems, find out
the facts and then you can say
whatever you like. And, if you
are still interested, elections
for SGA President are April 3.
Get elected, and then you can
show everyone how big a dif-
ference you would make.
I hope this doesn't of-
fend you. A little constructive
criticism that is well founded
has never hurt anyone. We
have heard enough about ev-
ery little negative The East
Carolinian can sensationalize
concerning Student Govern-
ment.It'sa shame the students
are missing out on all of the
positive SGA has accom-
plished for our campus this
year. There is no reason why
we all can't learn from mis
and not be a part of the prob-
lem but be a part of the solu-
tion. Our campus will be a
much better place because of
Set Letters, Page 5
Letters
Vietnam, Gulf wars teach valuable lesson
By Bill Egbert
Editorial Columnist
This war must have sur-
pnsed a lot of peace activists.
It wasn't supposed to go this
way.
We were supposed to be-
come embroiled in a prolonged
ground war. The world was sup-
posed to turn against us. The Ira-
qis were supposed to fight fanati-
cally for their homeland. The body
bags were supposed to come roll-
ing in, exposing falsified govern-
ment body counts.
This war was supposed to
turn into another Vietnam. It was
supposed to drive home the les-
sons of that 10,000-day seminar
on the futility of war.
But instead, we won � and
we won big.
Our casualties were one-
sixth of the Pentagon's lowest pre-
dictions. The Iraqis surrendered
by the battalion, kissing our hands.
The nationsof the world are lining
up to have their pictures taken
with us. We one-upped the Israe-
lis with a 100-hour war.
We're getting everything we
wanted, and we didn t have to
give an inch. This war did exactly
what wars are supposed to do: it
eliminated the need for compro-
mise in a situation where compro-
mise was unacceptable.
Far from being a final, so-
bering slap in the face, the Gulf
War showed us that war some-
times works.
This war went so damn well,
in fact, I'm surprised we aren't all
settling back in our armchairsand
echoing Patton, shouting for more.
There'sa lot of unfinished business
in this world.
As long as we're in the re-
gion, we might as well hang a left
and drive the Syrians and the Is-
raelis out of Lebanon. After that.
we could kick the Israelis out of
the West Bank and establish the
Republic of Palestine.
And after we've established
the Pax Americana in the Middle
East, why don't we send our troops
on a grand tour? We could head
north into the USSR and liberate
Georgia and Azerbaidzhan. then
go up and kick the Red Army out
of the Baltics.
After that, we could air-lift
our troops back over the Atlantic
and parachute them down into
Colombia to have a word with the
Medellin drug cartel. Then wed
loadafewM-1 A-lsonto the Rain-
bow Warrior, steam into Rio de
Janeiro, and put a stop to this de-
forestation business once and for
all.
At this point, our troops
would split up. Operation Veldt
Storm would rein-in South Africa
(that other world-famous outlaw
nation). We'd carpet bomb the
Security Police,establish one-man-
one-vote, and kick their white
butts out of Namibia once and for
all. And while we're on the conti-
nent, we might as well send a
couple of Apaches up the coast to
restore order in Liberia.
The other half of our troops
would occupy Shanghai and es-
tablish a student newspaper Our
B-52s could fly over every rice
patty in China, throwing copies
out the back doors. We'd show-
Deng Xiaoping just wha t the Paper
Tiger can do unleashed into the
hands of dissidents.
Then the American Eagle
would fly back home and perch
on the UN to preen its feathers.
Needless to sav. the above
Let's Be Adamant
scenario isn't on America's imme
diate agenda. Yet as far-fetched a
it mav sound, at this point in ti
America probably could get away
with a few of those little exercise
in planetary domination
For the moment, the United
States of America is the undis-
puted heavyweight champion of
the world The United Nationstsa
functioning global alliance in'
it's taking its cues from us If we
decided that the Syrians and the
Israelis should pull out of Leba-
non, they wouldn't be able to ar-
gue for long.
As uncomfortable and com-
plex as the role mav be. Amencais
presently the helmsman ot the
planet Our role, ot course, wffl
not be dictatorial (that apprcao
would turn us into an Iraq ot
Napoleonic proportions) but
rather managerial. We will be the
chairof a global advisory commit-
tee. More specifically, we wii! be
the only member with the might
to enforce the committee's will,
and that is where our true power
(and responsibility will lie.
America will have the deciding
vote. We will have the only true
veto.
This state of attairs will not
give us the right to impose the
American blueprint on the world.
however. Every move we make a?
the world power will have to be in
accordance with the consensus, in
an abstract and undefined, global
proto-democracv ot nations
Without our might, however, that
consensus would never be acted
upon. It will be the threat ot
American might (and that ot other
UN allies) which will uphold the
laws and values of the emerpns
global village.
See Lesson, page 5
Anglo-Saxon control must be stopped
By Darek McCullers
Editorial Columnist
History has shown that the
Anglo-Saxon has been the greatest
practicioner of oppression, dis-
crimination and exploitation in the
history of humankind. Often
times, this has been done under
the guise of morality. They have
used such mottos and catch
phrases as "God, Gold and Glory"
Manifest Destiny, Democratiza-
tion, Integration and Assimilation.
This trek of exploitation and
domination began with the Age of
Exploration. Some historians
contend that this started in 1492
with the famous voyage of Co-
lumbus. The Anglo-Saxons ex-
plored and developed theories of
domination for North and South
America.
There were a number of fa-
mous "conquerors such as
Cortez, De Gamma, Amerigo
Vespucci and others. The Anglo-
Saxons greatly benefitted from mis
period. They acquired land, gold
and other commodities of value
and interest.
Around thissame period, the
Anglo-Saxons began to explore or
see what they could take from
Africa. By 1434, they were placing
forts along its coastline. Within 70
years, they had penetrated into
the Congo River area in the interior
of commodities which were grain,
gold, ivory and manpower
(slaves).
Until 1650, the Portuguese
were the principal exploiters, but
they were soon to be challenged
by the French, English and the
Dutch. When competition reached
a point where it threatened Anglo-
Saxon unity, they held a confer-
ence in Berlin. The Berlin Confer-
ence of 1884 divided Africa with
the use of a map. They disregarded
existing indigenous tribal struc-
tures. This ensured the final split
and disunion of Africans and
made them slaves to Western
powers. Before the Age of Impe-
rialism was finished, 9.4 million
slaves had been deported from
their native land�800,000of these
came from the United States.
By the early 1800s the prac-
tice of slavery has been ended in
most of the civilized world, except
America. Tensions increased be-
tween the North and the South
during this period and the Civil
War was started in the early 1860s.
I would postulate that some
Anglo-Saxons in America were
truly morally opposed to the
domination and exploitation of
black people. However, they was
few and far between.
The larger issues were and
will always be economic. The
Northerners saw that ending sla-
very would be an opportunity to
industrialize and diversify the
South, thereby increasing the
economic status of the whole
United States. They had no prob-
lem with allowing blacks the
TTKHJest,gains which would be due
to industrialization but they never
intended to change the real power
structure that had existed
It appears that the Anglo-
Saxon in America also had a po-
litical agenda, at least those who
belonged to the Republican Partv
Before the Civil War, the demo-
crats were in control. Upon the
ending of slavery, the radical
reconstructionalists saw the op-
portunity to gain a large power
base.
They proceeded to give
blacks the right to vote and started
programs such as the Freedmans
Bureau. At the same rime, they
were trying to rebuild the South
However, when the Anglo-Savons
of the South got back on their feet
they rested political control via
the Democratic Party and ended
Reconstruction.
Today, the republicans have
wrested control from the demo-
crats along economic issues which
happen to be intertwined with
race. They talk about such things
as quotas, preferential treatment
and reserve discrimination.
One white writer recently
talked about the ills of so-called
reserve discrimination, and it an-
gered him. I admit that other
people have been oppressed
However, people of color are the
only ones I know that have been
exploited, humiliated and domi-
nated for nearly half a nruUmium
S�e Anglo-Saxon, page 5
it.
i
�jirij
Show you are capable Fran, 1
have faith in you. After all, our
offices are only about 25 feet down
the hall That's not too far away is
it? 7'
Garry Dudley
SGA Treasurer
SGA legislator
responds to
editorial column
To The Editor:
After reading Mr Tim
Hampton's editorial on March 5,
it is obvious he neither followed
the SGA developments on March
4, or spoke with me regarding my
involvement. To correct some
significant points, our SGA Con
stitution in Article IV, Executive
Section 3, Treasurer B aped ties the
qualifications for treasurer, par-
ticularly a minimum ot 2 0 GPA
since our Constitution in mat
suspendable, there was no way to
alter the rules to help Mr Randy
Royal.
I would like toclanfy that on
March 3,1 madea motion tocancel
the election to ac our SGA
money and get a new treasurer
into office as soon as possible
While we did spend some of the
appropriated $1,000 to advertise
filling dates for the election, tin
majority will be reverted hack into
our general fund
I would like to further clarify
that I did not bring up Mr. Royal's
lack of qualifications as a vendetta
asMr. Hampton implied An indi-
vidual brought to my attention
Mr. Royal's situation and ex-
pressed concern that the rules
would be "overlooked " Since 1
am the Legislature's Parliamen-
tarian, 1 felt I could not simplv
"overlook" our Constitution that
I, as well as every other SGA
member, serve to uphold. While !
am sorry Mr. Royal had to resign,
it was not my fault he did not
maintain the minimum 2.0 GPA.
Regarding the library reso-
lution, I would like to state tht
original idea was not mine, nor
did I do any research regarding it
Mr. Royal did all the research and
Mr. Martin introduced it (after
offering to let me introduce it.
which I refused). They did the
work,and they deservethecredit.
I have no personal problems with
either Mr Rov
but I do hope al
regarding mef
my actions
rather than as
as facts.
I hope
Dudley, our
chance to fulfj
you write it
integrity anc
for his two-mc
l.eslu "i
SGA lei
Parliam
Reader
nevvsp,
'insensi
rhe
I nderstJ
limitations ofj
thought 1 coul
on the front
photo-repro
Cassity s"C ai
This quickly
turned to page!
case of inserts!
of art; the
Becker 1 questl
p�eni here fxvf
cannot fall i
mishap.
Casein
represented I
negative can
assuming it wl
sonsofcreatinl
and svmmetr
work This d(
disable thotij
duction of an
that a mere ph
can be "shi
photographer!
needs and a�
sumingitisnol
the former si
tain what th�
had in mind
artist's paintij
have done hn
indeed vou
everything hj
when creating
printa literary
then expect tf
thus, but voi
thing worse si
the student bo
work has beei
The lmt
though is Bee
Lesson
writ
I
i
- �.
i :j
Might does not necessar-
ily make right, but right without
sufficient might must bow to any
mighty wrong.
That is the lesson of this
war. Yet it is not a contradiction of
the lessons of Vietnam. In fact,
they are complimentary.
We should be impressed
by the might we were able to exert
to enforce the Security Council's
resolutions. More than impressed,
we should be in awe.
I'm not talking aboi t the
starry-eyed amazement we feel at
Epcot Center. We should be teel
ing Old Testament, Jenco, Pillar of
Fire awe � the kind of awe we tel t
at the end of World War II, after
we turned two cities into radioac-
tive clouds.
We leveled a nation in a
Anglo-Saxon
month and a h
fourth largest
We did It Wltl
bered two-tol
should not m
chests. Thev sh
blanklv for ai
our hand.
This wai
respect the
slow to bring i
World
b) thr Amenf
everv nation
the exception
regarded Am
power on Eartl
phenomenon
nate hubris w I
The lessons of
us keep such
suiting this tir
I . � .
vod-
jbu
BftO)
�JVbf
-om
rbirl
Hli a
(tin
bsl
-rib
wH
.b
-im
c
(500 years).
The problems that Afncan-
Americans face today are ones of
economic and socio-political con-
trol. Slavery per se has ended.
Segregation per se has ended.
However, Anglo-Saxons still
maintain control over black
people. 1 submit to you that inte-
gration was a means of control.
There are white people who
would rather allow you the
privilege to sit down in a restaurant
for a cup of coffee, ride the same
bus, stay in the sai.ie hotel and
attend the same school than to
allow you to unify and amass
economic and political self-de-
termination.
The Anglo-Saxon used two
principals methods to maintain
control over Hack American dur-
ing and after the Civil Rights era.
First of a II, there was infiltration. I
have been reading the book,
"Bearing the Cross which is
about Dr. King and the Southern
Christian LeadershipConference.
This is the prime example of the
method of mf
A ma 1
Levinson apt
friended Dr.
assistance. Lev
trust so muchl
him the leverl
tions or deleft
A prime exai
tion was whei
leave out a
blacks to
reliance. Inst�
what blacks
eminent to do
I conte
ask them to cM
handleourov
white intervc
intervention
starting what
victimization.
Wehavel
the gov
situation inst
sdf-determir
It is through
Anglo-Saxon I
trol the black ii





alif �imt (Carolinian Mahch 7, 1991 S
Letters
it.
aluable lesson
n merica'simmf
� isfar fetchedd
- point in tirrt
uld get awal
lose little exerci
nation
it the United
� .1 is the undis
� I t hampion oi
1 Nations isi
� - alliance .
� 's :r �m us ' wi
e S rums and th
:t ot Leba
be able to ai
� � :� and v ml
. be Amerii a i
� elmsman ot thd
oi course, v
i thai appn
nto an Iraq o
I trtions) bul
We will be the
id isorycommiH
iik. we will hel
� . nh the might!
mmittee's will.l
re ur true powerj
Mbility) will lie.
the decidingl
rtly true!
ffairs will not
impose the
� on the world.
A e make .is
ill havetobein
nsensus in
fined global
natii ' s
ver,thal
er be a
�� i threat �
� it of other
uphold the
� the emer.
esson cage 5
must be stopped
Show you a re capable Fran, 1
have faith in you After all, our
offices are only about 25 feet down
the hall That's not too far away, is
it?
Garry Dudley
SGA Treasurer
SGA legislator
responds to
editorial column
To The Editor
Atter reading Ml I mi
Hampton's editorial oil March 5,
it is obvious he neither followed
the SGA developments on March
4, or spoke with me regarding my
involvement o correct some
significant points, our Si .A Con
shtuuon in Article 1 Executive
Section 3, Treasurer Bspecifiesthe
qualifications for treasurer par-
ticularlv a minimum of 2 0 GPA
since our Constitution in not
suspendable. then wasnowaj to
alter the rules to help Mi Rand)
Royal.
1 would liketo larif) that on
March 3.1 made a motion to cancel
the election to save ur SGA
money and get a new treasure)
into office as soon .is possible
While we did spend some of tht
appropriated $1,000 to advertise
filling dates tor the election, the
majority will be reverted back into
our general fund
I would like to further clarify
that I did not bring up Mr. Royal's
lack of qualifications as a endetta
as Mr Hampton implied An inda
vidual brought to my attention
Mr. Royal's situation and ex
pressed concern that the rules
would be "overlooked Since 1
am the legislature's Parliamen-
tarian, 1 felt I could not simph
"overlook our Constitution that
1, as well as every other SGA
member, serve to uphold. While I
amsorrv Mr Royal had to resign
it was not my fault he did not
maintain the minimumOGPA.
Regarding the library reso
lution, I would like to state thi
original idea was not mine, nor
did I do any research regarding it
Mr Royal did all the research and
Mr Martin introduced it (after
offering to let me introduce it.
which 1 refused) lTiey did the
work, and thev deserve the credit.
1 have no personal problems with
either Mr. Royal or Mr 1 lanipton,
but 1 do hope any further concerns
regarding me, my intentions or
my actions be directed to me,
rather than assumed and printed
as facts.
I hope you would give Mr
Dudley, our new treasurer, a
chance to fulfill his office before
you write it off as ' a lesson of
integrity and a waste of money
for I � two-month term.
Leslie Nicholson
SGA Legislator ami
Parliamentarian
Reader question
newspaper's
'insensitivity'
I'o The Editor
Understanding the inherent
limitations of a student paper I
thought 1 could forego the error
on the front page concerning the
photo reproduction of Dan
c assits s X arand Fin Hydrant '
1 his quick!) chang� I when I
turned topageSand foundanother
uw ot insensitivib to the world
of art the 'poem I Richard
IV i kei I question th It finioonof
poem here be� ausi th esur l
cannot Mil into tru �t� go of
mishap
t, asstt) s worl � . mi
represent J because ot a flip t�f i
negative can be torn I imishap
assuming it was not dor li�r r a
sons of creating a senseof balance
and symmetry for . ti Ragle's
work 1 his does not n iki it en
disable though. A pi q m
duction of an artwork is different
that a mere photograph, the latter
can be "shaped to tit the
photographer's and or editor's
needs and aesthetic sense as-
suming it is not photographic art
the former should strive to main
tain what the artist in question
had in mind. By replication this
artist's painting in reverse you
have done him a great di: sen ice;
indeed you have thrown askew
everything he brought to tear
when creating it. One would not
printa literary piece back ward .uul
then expect the readers to read it
thus, but you have done some
thing worse still; the majorib of
the student body yo not know this
w ork has been misrepresent.
The impetus tor this letter
though is Becker's piece It speaks
Continued from Page 4
poorly of the taste of the editor
editors who decided to print such
an atrocious, insensitive and
pointless correspondence, and in
addition, to label it as a "poetic
view This piece does not even
scrape by under that misnomer.
Arranging words into something
resembling stanzas and abusing
rhyme is predictable beyond sti-
fling, the flow of words forced,
and the stanzas do not form co-
herent themes. Furthermore, the
religious perspective presented is
not even consistent with any in-
telligent Christian viewpoint.
Welcoming letters that express
different points of view is com-
mendable. Publishing tasteless
writing that leaves us, the reader-
ship of this publication, with
nothing gained but disgust is an-
other.
Glenn Thompson
junior
English Philosophy
Lesson
Media Board
member upset by
student apathy
To The Editor
As a member of the Media
Board, I am deeply disheartened
and saddened at the lack of inter-
est and support displayed by the
student body over the now de-
funct yearbook
f he Seniors should be fun
. ic Thev will have no nostalgia
or memory book to look at or share
with their children.
ihe yearbook at ECU has
been published since 1923 when it
was .ailed Ihe Tecoan of East
i arolina Teacher's College Since
then, it has undergone maor
changes but even with the changes,
there was still a yearbook pub-
lished.
Though numerous attempts
were made at finding a staff, the
Media Board received no applica-
tions from anvone interested in
working for the Buccaneer. This is
a scary thought. Out of 16,000 stu-
dents, not ONE felt compelled to
even apply
The indifference and lack of
support by the student body is
saddening and 1 think it's a real
shame to see a 67-year tradition at
this school broken.
Sincerely,
Mary Beth Morde
Media Board Member
Continued from Page 4
crlo.tat
lues were and
tonomic. The
at ending sla-
ypportunity to
iiversifv the
reasing the
or the whole
had no prob-
ig blacks the
� �: ivouldbedue
� tut they never
the real power
� � it ad existed
� i that the Anglo-
� , i also had a po-
la at least those who
. Republican Party.
i , ir, the demo-
ontrol. Upon the
rv the radical
- . � � (lists saw the op-
,s. a large power
� , ,eded to gve
. thenghtl and started
ichas the f-reed mans
reau the same time, they
vererr rebuild the South
er ��� � -the nglo-Saxons
got back on their feet
political control via
en crati Party and ended
� traction.
dav, the republicans have
� � control from the demo-
i ngnomk issues which
happen to be intertwined with
� . talk about Mich things
as quotas preferential treatment
and reserve discrimination.
One white writer recently
talked about the ills of so-called
reserve discrimination, and it an-
gered him. I admit that othei
people have been oppressed
However, people of color are th
only ones 1 know that have beer
exploited, humiliated and domV
nated for nearly half a milling
See Anglo-Saxon, page 5
Might does not necessar-
ily make right, but right without
sufficient might must bow to any
mighty wrong.
That is the lesson of this
war V etit is not a contradiction of
the lessons oi Vietnam. In fact,
thev are complimentary
We should be impressed
bv the might we were able to exert
to enforce the SecurirjounciTs
resolutions More than impressed
we should be in awe
I'm not talking aboi t the
starrv eyed amazement we feel at
Epcot Center. We should Iv feel
ingOld Testament, Jerico, Pillar ot
Fireazi'e � the kind of awe we felt
at the end of World War II, after
we turned two cities into radioac-
tive clouds
We leveled a nation in a
Anglo-Saxon
month and a half. We crushed the
fourth largest arm in the world
We did it with tones out num
bered two-to-one These feats
should not make us puff out i.ir
chests, rhej should make us stare
blankb for a moment it thegun in
our hand.
This war should make us
respect the power we have mk
slow to bring it to beai again
World War II was followed
1' the American Decade, when
ever) nation in the i Id (with
the exception of the S ut Woe)
regarded America as the greatest
power on Earth The result of this
phenomenon was tin nnle-crum
nate hubris which led to V ietnam
The lessons of that war will help
us keep such a tragedy from re-
sulting this time.
The Vietnam War was not a
warning against the use ot our
might, but rather a reminder to
use it judiciously and decisively.
TheGulfWarwasa reminder
that we have that might and that
wecan use it effectively when there
is an acceptable reason to do so
Both of these lessonsare m i w
part of our national mythology.
They will influence our foreign
policy, our voting habits and the
way we raise our children for as
long as America is a nation
Both lessons were necessary
tur our national education, and
Uth lessons should be remem-
bered. We cannot allow either of
them to overshadow the other.
They provide the philosophical
balance necessary for the manage-
ment of awesome national power
Continued from Page 4
Hatrisfeeter
lOMf PRICES
SALUTING THE MEN AND WOMEN OF THE STANDARDS DIVISION gg�
OF THE NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE! jj�
n j j
mu
(500 vears).
The problems that African
Americans face today are ones of
economic and socio-political con-
trol Slavery per se has ended
Segregation per se has ended.
However, Anglo-Saxons still
maintain control over black
people I submit to you that inte-
gration was a means of control.
There are white people who
would rather allow you the
privilege to sit down in a restaurant
for a cup of coffee, ride the same
bus, stay in the same hotel and
attend the same school than to
allow you to unify and amass
economic and political selMe
termination.
The Anglo-Saxon used two
principals methods to maintain
control over black American dur-
ing and after the Civil Rights era
First of all, there was infiltration 1
have been reading the book,
"Bearing the Cross which is
! about Dr. King and the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference.
This is the prime example of the
method of infiltration
A man named Stanley
Levinson approached and be-
friended Dr. King, often ng his
assistance. Levinson got 1 r King's
trust so much so that King gave
him the leverage to make inser-
tions or deletions in his speeches.
A prime example of his inten en-
tion was when he got Dr. King to
leave out a section admonishing
blacks to responsibility and self-
reliance. Instead, he focused on
what blacks should ask the gov-
ernment to do.
I contend that we shouldn't
ask them to do anything We can
handleour own problems without
white intervention This critical
intervention was responsible for
starting what I call the rhetoric of
victimization.
We have come to depend on
the government to improve this
situation instead of our own unity,
self-determination, and strength.
It is through infiltration that the
Anglo-Saxon has been able to con
trol the black liberation movement
Holly Farms
Breast
Quarters
However, in the future we
will make our own strategies for
progression. We will not moralize
a problem that is economic and
political (other than perhaps as a
source of unity and strength) 1
think that you will find the masses
will begin to say that we don't
want your quotas, programs de-
signed to keep us eternally de-
pendent, or crumbs from your
table. What we seek now is power
for our masses.
We will pool together and
create our own industries so that
all our people can enjoy the fruits
of our labor (not a token few). We
will educate our own children (to
be free from brainwashing and to
understand the greatness that be-
longs to Africa and African
Americans).
Finally, we will worship our
God, the father of Abraham, Isaac,
and Jacob (not Beliah, the God of
deception from which you draw
the power to be religious hypo-
crites). Anglo-Saxon control of
black people must end!
Cream
ViGal.
2 Liter Bottle
Coca-Cola
Sprite
Prices Good Through Tuesday, March12,m






6
ulln lEaBt (garnltnian
March 7, igg
� � � � ����
GLASS IF
SERVICES OFFERED
ON-CAMPUS FUNDRAISER:
Needed: Organized and industrious
fraternity, sorority or student group
to earn hundreds of dollars for an on-
eampus marketing project Call 1-
SW-NOW-POST.
SUPER SKIING AT SNOWSHOE
All 33 slopes open, 244S in. base
Deluxe Slope-side 2PReondo, sleeps
8. For 2 to 6 night in Feb. only, 5091
discount (in condo rent. Call 756-
8860 alter 7.00 p.m.
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
Term papers, dissertations, letters.
resumes, manuscripts, projects. Fast
turn around. Call loan 756-9255.
TYPING SERVICES rerm papers
Reports, Resumes, 1 etters
rypedonPC. LaserPrintei I a
around. Call 756-1783
FOR RENT
HOUSE FOR RENT: 4 bedroom
bath, 5 blocks from ECU, 113 N
Eastern. Fireplace, living room, din-
ing area fNX1 'month Available
March I. Call 355-3195
HOUSE FOR RENT ; bedroom, I
� 2 batl shrt walk to K I 1 ow
utility's -f 'month. Availabli n id
HELP WANTED
STAFF REFERRAL SERVICE 200-
500 Summer Camp Positions Avail-
able. Stafi Keterral Services provides
a network (it Gimps, now hiring, from
1 heKeys" to Wisconsin-Minnesota.
One application reaches all camps
Applications at the Student Employ-
ment Office
SOFTBALL OFFK IMS 1 he
(Ireenville Recreation and Parks De-
partment will be having their first
organizational meeting for any inter-
ested Softball officials w ho would like
to officiate in the spring and summer
adult softbail league lhe meeting
will be held at the Eli reet Ivmon
Wednesda) Marcl . 7:00p m. It
you are interested nol make
pl� as I n:s
evenii sat752-2081 - Ben I in "sal
is GOVERNMENT OBS: Now
hiring 24-hour requesl (609)875
0711 Exl 682
PERSONALS
I I ORFP BOl NT)? :
I- Rl
May 355-3195. Other properties DO YOl HAV1 DIFFICULT
available for spring arei summei itine to peoi I in
HOUSE FOR RENT J bedroom
bath brick home,close to campus and
supermarket, heat and air, w
and dryer, $475month. Availa
Mayor June 1. Call Tom at 758-6839.
ROOMMATE WANTED toshan 2
bedroom apt in Ringgold rowers
starting August Greatlocal
�� � lill and
jhon j( wsexualirs lerstand and
impus to
US5 1 ,t 'sCall 757 666
TOGA1! Con
near you llkl
DELTA ZJ I A EXE HOARD We
s 31 -496 i
DOUBLEWIDE or private
ant. Gill 758-1559 after 5 V �
month
OVNNpN CUURTP J beriii
l2bam.S3507monthl Irt 21
The Realty Group, 758-4711.
FOR SALE
FENDER GUITAR AMP: Deluxe85
758-0464
FOR SALE i omplete daybed set
includes mattress frame, wedge pil
lows, oners and a pair of drawers
that go underneath. SI (XL please call
J55-7282.
87PONnACSUNBIRDSE,PS,PB,
AC,IW,Tilt,Cass,plusexh-as,S4,(XXl
Call 792-5831 after 5:00 p.m.
IS IT TRUE feeps for $44 through
the U.S. Gov't? Call for facts' 504
649-5745 Exl 5-5920.
HELP WANTED
EAS WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call foi
information 504-641-8003 Ext. 5920
CONGRATT LATIONS thenew
sisters ol Alpha 1 elta Pi Melissa
Barboui ; Barm � I i ce)
Mindx v. i : rad, i aura (. rawford,
Kem or leHi mi ingham
: AnflVr i '� ' C- ' '� i iV-tN-
( hrist) 1 art, 1 isa ! ulcht i ndn a
Jones d ones 1 risten ones
Amber un'g Erin King Shari
Knowleton Stacev Lawrence Pam
Leffeu, El ehr Mary
Reynolds � R. Rena
Salameh, Buffy
Sh � eel - rist; Ward 1 auren
Wiln sandl eV iysare
AZLTS On!) e mon da) I
until w� � � hes So have a
great timi n safely Ha
Spi ing Bn �. our seen I v-
rorirj
TO ALL BROTHERS and 1,
ol Phi Y . Party hard over
Spnne Break and lei - n turn � - -
8X. 11. KA for the j real
: irt) i �n Saturday i I � I and
'��'�' yball wasgreat W lookforward
to � � � time! I, Mpha Delta Pi.
BIG OPPORTUNITY! Hometypist IT'S BA K!
I V
needed" Actnow! (609)875-0711 Ext
778.
HELP WANTED: Waitresses, lunch
and dinner. Riverside Steak Bar. 313
Stantonsburg Road near hospital.
dn ner Apr 1, 1991
LAMBDA CHI'S May (m the !fesh
and the Lush's wen greal Saturday
night. Can waitfi r me next jammin'
band party Love, the Alpha Phi's.
VxUvf;�S'yS
�SvSKK
ECU DART CLUB
If you an? interested in pining a club and
enjoy a relaxed sport activity, the ECU
Dart Club would right for you. We are
interested in people who want to be-
come part of an organized group and
also enjoy the game of English Darts
You do not have to be experienced to join
and there are no dues to pay This game
is easy to learn and fun to play. There
will be a meeting on Tuesday, March 3,
199 m the Mendenhall Student Center,
Room248at7:15p.m. Students, staff and
faculty are encouraged to join. Also,
please contact Brian Johnson at 931 -9073
for more info.
UISJQMSCHEDULE
The second block of UBS 10(X), sections
21-50, will begin after spring break. The
first day of MoaWed classes will be
March 18th The first day of Tues.
Thurs. and Tues. evening classes will
begin March 19th. The first day of
Wednesday evening ?lass will be March
20th.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAM LORD
The Graduate Record Examination will
be offered at East Carolina University on
Saturday, April 13, 1991 Application
blanks are to be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service, F3ox 9hh-R,
Princeton, N) 08540 Applications must
be postmarked no later than Maah 7,
1991 Applications maybeobtained from
the Testing Center, Room KB, Speight
Building, East Carolina University
ACT ASSESSMENT
The ACT Assessment will be offered at
Eat Carolina University on Saturday,
April n, 99i Application Mania are to
be completed and mailed to ACT Regis-
tration, P.O Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa
52243 Applications must be postmarked
no later than March 15, 1991. Applica-
tions may be obtained fnm the Testing
Center Rixm 105, Speight Building, East
Carolina University
WOMEN'S STUDIES
ALLIANCE
WSA, a fcminist-onented student orga-
nization, advocates social, political, and
economic equality for women and men
Open to all students regardless of race,
age. or creed, WSA works to eradicate
PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS to the 1991
Alpha Del a Pi Basketball Champs!
PI KES would like to wishevervonea
safe and wonderful Spring Break.
Don't drink and drive!
ALL CAMPUS: Alpha Phi wishes
everyone a sate and spectacular
Spring Break Looks like Panama
Gty, Key West and the Bahamas are
the hot spots this year. IXm't forget to
wear your sunscreen. Love, the Al-
pha Phi's
CHI O DIAMOND PLEDGES: usl
a little note to lei ya'U know how
much we love you. Hang in there.
Vou n all doing a great job Keepup
tl i ;ood work and the time will fly
I I ove, vowr Sisters
. A Thanks tor the bands last Sal
urday. It was a knockout' Pi Kapps.
SLSAN AND WENDY: "hanksfor
your love and encouragement that
bn ught me home to eta Tau Alpha
Zl 1 Pamela
PERSONALS
looking forward to doing it again.
ex
PERSONALS
see vou all out again real soon. Love,
the SistersandPledgesofChi Omega.
SIC; EPS rhanksfo) C ONGRA ILLATIONSto Iv"for
matchS day night! Wei � ing Brother of the Month. The
iuse looks greal keep up the good
vork �X
CONGRATULATIONS to Kenny
i cord and PomMusslemanonajob
well dorr "he Hoodwink Festival
isi rheBrothersand Pledges
mi l A CHI
� are ookmg I
igain Sigma Pi
V Another great band 1: inks
again for another greal : arty! Low,
th Sigmas.
I MBDA CHI ALPHA Mary on
the Dash was a blast' Thanks again
for the invite we had a great time.
Love Alpha Delta Pi.
THE SISTERS OE ALPHA OMI-
CRON PI are anxiously awaiting our
Jlsl Anniversary lea or, March 19.
M 1. AJ. AHA, AZ. XLL IIA. HI tnd
! A We hope' to see you then!
( MI'S 1 toes FTP always jump on
.� 'Mvstageiswaiting- anytime.
( Ml l
rmilTAS frrwsTAnnualP.J.Jam
was a blast! "iou looked so cut
your pajamas Can't wait until next
yeartodoitagain! Love, the Brothers
and Pledges of Sigma Nu.
rHETA CHI Fraternity of MuPJedge
v lass would iike to congratulate
Mk he le Rickardsasa winner ol 5
iffl( rheta Chi - Mulass
�()ll: Happy March Birthdays to
v: aron Brechka, Amy Hudson,( arey
i ucas, Jennifer Or: and t athy Sa
I lave a good one girls
( HI O'S We had an awesome time
at Sharkey s Wednesday night.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
to play al least! Low �
Water Polo N
TO THE PI I IX,IS OF H ,
guys are coming along oka)
Keep up thegood work it s i
much longei or will il � . ain
only tirra will tell.
DEI 1 A I I A would like to
ev ryone a safe and hapi pri
E
M
id : ! ovi tl eSij .
CONGRATT I I IONS .
sisters of i i . '�.
Bark i mio Barretl 1
v ime) ' ids Mil d � Fi
Apr Dan
rdan, J(
Kenyan, I Matlock, Pamela O
' F � k, Mai
n
HAL (INANDOII 11 �
1 kx'is Ki e. Go
Clemsor Sti ethe I irnamenl
� go Duki bel
ALPHASIGMAPH1
time at thepre-d
DISPUY CLASSIFIED
Ml. Ml ZTA, KT, I&, HI &
:K1 IITT11 SISTERS Saturday
night bias! "Manifest Dcs
got the party going
: O � '�. kept it there. It
�. okii
� gain! h
SIGMA M ii daj sPJ PJpart)
We had m: awesome
ire greal 1 e, the
indpledgi so: 1 IA
Ml (. INI RA l&LI K.ion-
rh
� Mi
� ,
� � ��
er t rip! Lev v K
I HI.I u Hi inks so much for the
PERSONALS
pre-downtown. Hope you all had
much fun as we did. LeVsdoitagaai
real soon. Love, the sisters �� -
pledges of Chi Omega
DELTA ZETA Sorryabi rtrhen
up at the pre-downtowT Car
ever forgive us? Love, Alpha $w
8X: The band party was great Lef�
do it again' Alpha Sig
AOri wishes evervonea fur a- j .
Spring Break.
THANKS TO ALL Of THE ECU
STUDENTS who cam
Annual Hoodwink Fi
he! ved make it a grea
P; '
IA 1 he pre-downti:�.�
was a blast Let's d i it
TO THE MOST BLALTIFU
WOMEN ON CAMPUS
who you are)- We had
rsdayatP.Bs
tcxcellenttog i. Tl
CHI OMEGA would
everyi w a safe and I
; reak Remember dor I - -
drive, we want to see youa
back alive
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Advertise in
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Largest Library of information in U S �
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T0URKI
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(Ol L�GE STUDENTS -TEACHERS ADI 1 Is,1 19 and
LINE UP SUMMER WORK now!
WHEN:Early MayJune toLate i Field scounts to
AugustEarly Sept. . . vv
w m. ni- i' V,w- monitor crops We train.
WHERE: Eastern N( Cos. , , , !
Unior, Craven, Pitt, Jones, Ul A1 Conscientious,
Onslow, Greene Good physical shape, Ha .
PAY: Mm 5.50hourplus Own Vehicle, Reliable
Mileage expenses
mm SESIUMESTO: MCSI - PO Box 17�)
Griffon, NC 28530
WWW KINGSTON
PLACE
WE HAVE
)PENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
B1 II I ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: II LLY 11 RN1 SHED APARTMENTS
ALL GLASSESDISHESSILVERWARI
D1SHW ASHHRPOTS & PANS
MAIL SERVICE-CLUBHOUSE � LAUNDR W I
SW I MM INC, FOOL & LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
( (IMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
March 7, 1991
m
Dating can b
trying for m
By Michael Harrison
SUff Wnter
Getting a dab
tedious and exha
for manypeopfa indasl
students he v. �
varied (and
Manv studi �
downtown, rrunr .
Saturdavni;ht- canbeafasi
get a date :�
more people (Apr
ant vud
Othi-r peoj
to meet peoj �
comment will be that il
talk with pe pfc fron
cause there is : � hi
the loud rnusn
crowds thai ire r
nightclub iti
Studi
felt that
forward ppi
essar) I
11 me �
himseit Shi aid
offended I - t
him. she added
dine
Susan H
second an. scien luoal
said she w look
manners i
Openinu doors foi
stvle, -he said I rsf �-1
should USO looi
slob were her sp
should be able to carr) i ersa
rion
Hu ad pie to tight
shvness, which sh(
ike ���
� . - . run
� ral . a
prit ntir
I
'
aid
� : ttract na
� nh him � �
� radati a

-

�I
� �
-
� I
1
The New Mut
By Cliff Coffe)
s-tatf Wnter
Usually wh i
poor sales Kit in rheNewMuta I
of starting am �
installments rheNi Mutants ei
endoi their butt
in une 1991, btled I
When T"hc New Mutai
Qaremont rhemasterofMai
it was supp sed to
quicklyevolved
a specific race
The mutants i
against oppress
all started h risClarei
down and killed
were bom witl
became one of the I
through the Mut
Mutant- through the I nf i
through the -rin r� n
on tht oppression ot Mut
Alter six " - issues (
scripting the adventures t the te�
Louise Simonson stepped in as d
contouedwimthepretudio
harsh view ot it
With the art h Bret Bli
artist the look of the boc turn �
wilhectien�is�iesadiressd Ihena) ungsterna
n a- th
J Rob beteld stepped i
with him a new dynamic look and a fi
triatcamefromlouiNinw ther they created
the character Cable, which is now the mainstay of the
book and the team Simonson relinquished her wnting
inequality in privileges, stdtus,and rights
of all ptxiple. oin us at Chico's at 5 p.m.
on first Wednesdays this semester.
PIT ETA SIGMA
There will be a meeting in GCB U308 at
xODon Monday, March 18. Any ques-
tions or concerns call 931-7799. Have a
great break!
STUDENT UNION FORUM
COMMITTEE
jctt Weingrad - coauthor of A Backstage
History of Saturday Night Live will
present a program and clips about the
history of Saturday Night Live. Mr.
Weingrad will also be available to sign
copies of the book at the Student Store-
Tuesday afternoon, March 5, 1991 The
program will be held at 8:00 p.m , March
5 in Hendrix Theatre. Admission is free.
Sponsored by the Student Union Forum
Committee.
EAST CAROLINA VILLAGE OF
YESTERYEAR
Volunteer opportunities for history lov-
ers of all ages an- available at the East
( arolina Village of Yesteryear at the Pitt
County Fair Grounds The historic sue
interprets small town and agricultural
life in eastern Northarolma from lrt-10
to 194(1 Interested personsare invited to
a 7:00 p.m. meeting on Monday Mardi
11 at the Humber House in Greenville
(117 W. 5th Street) For more informa-
tion, call 758-lv38
SETA
Thrv will be a meetingonMarch5 1991
at 5.3(1 in GCB room 2015. We will be
discussing upcoming events such asThe
Great American Meat out. Please attend
LCL MATH CLUB
The ECl Math Club will meet on Tues-
day, March 5 in Austin 201 at 4.00 p.m.
C.uest speaker Kellv Morales will be do
ing a presentation. New members are
always welcome. Any questions, call
931-7872.
CLQSiEV�QyIEEs ON
CAMPUS
ECU Recreational Servues is sponsor
ing a wellness seminar entitled "Qok
Encounters on Campus Healthv Rela-
tionships and Seualit Stuanna
keilerman and Shelly Green from the
ECU Student Health Service will be
sharing then ideas on March 5 from 5:00-
&00pjn inGCBl01& The seminar is
fi ee of, ha rge m i do yourself a fa vor and
join in! For further information, call 757-
8387 or stop by Christenburv Gym.
TQUJLNAMENI
On ruesday, Maa-h 5 at 9:00 p m. m
c hnstenrnirvC.vm,RecreatK)nalServices
w,ii be sponsoring a Creek All-Star
Basketball Tournament Bothmensand
v omen tea ms will be playing. The All-
var Sorority team will be up against the
Women s Independent Champions and
the fraternities will be competing with
the Fast against the West Don't miss our
on this All-Star event! For further infor-
mation call 757-6387 or stop by 204
Chnstenbury Gym.
TOJUMAKE
TUEJCALLS
Interested in making the calls for soft-
ball' There will be a softbail officials
meeting Wednesday. March 6 at 500
en, mBC 103 For further information
call 757-6387 orstopbv 204Chnstenbun
Gym. No experience necessary - Recre-
ational Services will tram all interested
softbail umpires!
WORKSHOP
Cet your wheels turning at the All-Ter-
rain Bicycling Workshop sponsored b
ECU Recreational Services. The work
shop will be held on March 6at 500 p.m.
in Chnstenbury Gym 117 at the ROC
The costs is S3'00students and $4.00.
facultystaffguests. Join in on the run
and learn new trail riding techniques
Foradditional mformatfoncall 757-6911
Don t forget us, we haven t forgotten
you! May 8 is not too far awav Mark it
on your calendar. This will' be a red
center date. On that date, we will be
offertng you the opportunity to bop
you drop and to say "I slept with the
senior class Pickup more information
at Senior Information Day Thursday
April 4, 1991 from 9 a.m4 p.m m
Mendenhall Student Center
31





1
March 7, 1991
glhg 3Eaat fllarolurian
17
� ���own Hope you all had a;
is we did. Let'sdoitagaii
1 ove, the sisters anj
s f Chi Omega.
PI I I I nttv about the rni
re downtown. Can voi
is? 1 CWB, Alpha Sig
:irr- was great. Lefj
pha .
�. se eryone a fun and safe
HWks TO ALL OF THE ECU
� u pints who came to the lsi
� dwink Festival and
i ereal success Sii
�wntown at Sr
Dating
trying for many
do il again soon.
Ml MOST BtALTlFULT
. IN CAMPUS (You know
d a creat time
read v tor
I hcPiKa
'Nil c,
- h
pp) Spring
� ' don I drink and '
see vou all make it
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED

Advertise in

J
FORMATIONS HOI ARSHIPS
:i V! GRANTS
�AN SEARCH
B 351 02221 M . - (iuarantee!
rmation
02ExtCl293

Bv Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
King a date can be a vorv
tedious and exhausting experience
for many people, and asking ECU
srudentshenvtodo it brought many
varied and conflicting) answers
Many students said going
downtown, mainly on Friday and
Saturday Mghts,canbeafastwayto
get -i date. "It's ust where I meet
more people student April Pleas-
ant said
Other people said thev prefer
t meet people in classes usual
-inment will be that it is easier to
talk v ith people from classes bo
cause there is no competition with
oud music and "congested"
sjs that are typical of the
nightclub atmosphere.
Student 1 Vnna Barrett said she
�� � 'hat even restaurants could boa
i meeting ground A straight
� rward approach wouki be net
essan here Barrett said a guv. can
to her table and introduce
ieil She said she would not be
led If she is not attracted to
she added, "I can always de-
Susan Hu, a chemistry and
set Midarvsciencccducationmajor.
said she would look for good
timers in a perspective date.
a Ming doors tor women is still in
�. e she said. Perspective dates
lid also look neat ("Don't be a
.sere her Specific words) and
should be able to carry a conversa-
tion.
Hu advised people to fight
shvness, which she said can
H KINGSTON
a PLACE
WE HAVE
GSFOR STUDENT
LSFt )R FALL SEMESTER
UDI NTS SHOULD
LL 758-5393
i SPI l i FOR Ml STUDENTS
APARTMENTS
HI 3 511 VERWARE
: J&PANS
51 �: l NDROMAT
S LOTS MORE
PRICE THAT WILL
I 11 W ITH THE DORMS!
I
i ry (lym
I STAR
itvr
m. in
playing, n
� Mains the
k miss our
I Forrurthei
or Mop bj
0F
S
�he cafe for snft-
"fthal! officials
ktanrh at HB
nformation
' ' " ?opbv204Christenbury
�-perienee necessary - Recre-
crvioa will train all interested
'�� i. tmptresi
ALL-TIiyiAlN�BlKlNG
WORKSHOP
Get your wheels turning at the All-Ter-
rain Bicycling Workshop sponsored by
Kevreational Services, The work-
shop will be held on March 6at 5:00 p.m.
m Chnstenburv Gym 117 at the ROC
The costs is $3 riOsrudents and S4.00
'iff 'iriiests. iotn in on the fun
and learn new trail riding techniques
Foradditional information call 757-6911.
SENIOR INFORMATION
COMMITTEE
Utmi forget us, we haven't forgotten
vou' May 8 is not too far away Mark it
Mj vour calendar. This will be a red
center date. On that date, we will be
offering you the opportunity to bop til
vou drop and to say I slept with the
�emorclass" Pick up more information
at Senior Information Day Thursday.
April 4. 1991 from 9 a.m4 p.m. in
Mcndenhall Student Center
wrongfully make them appear to
be "stuck up" or uninterested. In-
telligence, moral values and per-
sonal priorities are other important
features she said she would look
for.
As for basic looks, Hu said a
man would need to be physically
appealing to her to consider ro-
mance "Looks aren't everything,
she said, "but they do determine
initial attraction and whether you'll
talk with him in the first place
Furthermore, Hu said she
thinks it is fine for women to ask
men for a date (women, take special
note here).
Hu advised men not to ask a
girl out more than twice If she says
no after two times, she said, forget
it.
Student Shareka McCormick
said people can meet other people
easily at parties and also in front of
the student store on campus. Begin
m ith a "hello" or "hi she said and
proceed from there (. iotng to mov-
ies out to eat or dancing are gxd
ways to spend a date, she said.
Tall men can be especially at-
tractive, McCormick said, but other
worthwhile traits, such as having a
good sense of humor, as well as a
good personality and enthusiasm
are vital
To those who are not currently
dating, McCormick says, "Don't
worry about it. Your time will
come
Meanwhile, student Lonn
Muellersaidhisdateshave "all been
people I've gone to class with He
said conversation would be easy to
initiate because there would be at
writes from
nee. wisdom
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
CoM��n Haimbauah � ECU Photo Lab
Craig Heffley and Michelle Scott appear to be two of the "lucky ones"
to face the challenges of student dating in the '90s
least one common interest: the class,
or at least passing the class. Start
with small talk, he said. Talk about
the class itself, assignments, the
professor, etc. Start essentially with
general information and gradually
get more personal.
People can meet other tople
through friends, he said, 'if you
hear about somebody hooking up
with someone downtown he
added, "it's usually for a one-night
stand Besides, he continued, many
women who go downtown are not
lookingforadateanyway; 'They're
just down there to have a good
time he said.
To men, Mueller does not rec-
ommend a direct approach to
meeting women. It rarely works, he
said.
The fear of rejection keeps men
from asking for dates, Mueller said.
See Dating, page 8
"You do learn from things
along the way. One thing you learn
is to really enjoy the life that you
have, because there is a lot more to
enjoy than you might have thought
when you were younger
These are the words
Gwendolyn Brooks. She said these
words in the context of a normal
conversation, not a speech or a ser-
mon. She was simply offering her
view on the enjoyment of life.
"Do you ever stop and just
look at the trees? The sunset?' she
continued. "Because you think
you're going to have those things
forever. And then someday when
you've got nothing else to do, you'll
sit around and look.
"1 think young people waste
a lot of time wondering 'What's it
all about7' It'sabouf what you see"
Gwendolyn Brooks is con-
sidered by most literary critics to be
one of the most profound and pro-
lific poets writing today. She has
been awarded numerous awards
for her works including the first
Pulitzer Prize received by a black
author. She recently gave a poety
reading at ECU and beforehand
granted an interview.
Due to her many merits. It is
easy o understand why someone
might be nonplussed at the idea of
interviewing her.
Brooks found this notion to
be frivolous.
"Oh for goodness sake she
said, "You know, I don't know what
to say when people say things like
that. I am so accessible. I mean I am
so easy to reach
Brooks spoke about many
subjects, and as the interview went
on, it was evident that she is an
extremely intelligent and wise
woman.
She began by saying that she
would most like to be remembered
for "writing poetry that told the
truth
"I believe there's no point in
lifting up pen to paper unless you
are going to write your truth on that
page she continued, "Sometimes
that can be very hard to do � to tell
the absolute truth and to know it. So
many poets are afraid of hurting
others � which is legitimate but
not to be catered to
On that same note Brooks
commented on her poem entitled
"The Mother which she read dur-
ing her poetry reading. The poem
deals with abortion and its effects.
The opening lines read, "Abortions
will not let you forget. You re-
member the children you got that
you did not get, The damp small
pulps with little or no hair, The
singers and workers that never
handled the air
After the reading, she told
the audience that she would be glad
to reveal her position on the abortion
issuein a personal format. However,
she said that she felt no need to
alienate half of the group by telling
her position in public.
She said refenng to the poem,
"People on both sides of that con-
troversy have asked me to let them
use it for a standard bearer �
See Brooks, page 8
The
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Usually when a comic title cot s cancelled its due to
poor sales, but in l"he Now Mutants case, its just a way
� starting a new beginning. After five vearsof monthly
nstallments, The New Mutants number 100 marks the
end of their run. but thev txgin a new series that starts
in lune 11, titled X-Force.
When The New Mutants were Started by Chns
Clammont.themasterofMarvelComicsmut.intlxxiks,
is supposed to be a Hghthearted. tun book. It
.ui,klvevolvt1intoagnmkxkafthepreudiceagainst
a specific race
The mutants that live in the Marvel I Iniversecame
against oppression and scrutiny in the past few years,
aiistartedbvChnsClaremont Mutantsbecamehunted
down and killed in cold blood due to the fact that they
were bom with superior genes The New Mutants
became one of the flagship titles for this message,
through the Mutant Massacre through the Fall of the
Mutants, through the Inferno series and most recently
through theX-tinction Agenda storv lines that centered
on the oppression of Mutants
Atter sixty or so. issues, Chns Claremont quit
scripting the adventures of the teenage mutants and
Louise Simonson stepped in as the new writer. She
ntnuH-d with the pre,ud.ce Story lines but used a less
harsh view of it.
With the art by Bret Blevins, a very chancature
artist, the look of the book turned into a kiddie book
withextrerrissuesaddressed.Thenavoungsternarned
Rob Liefeld stepped in as the new artist and brought
with him a new dynamic look and a freshness of ideas
thatcamefromLouiseSimonson.Togethertheycreated
the character Cable, which is now the mainstay of the
book and the team. Simonson relinquished her writing
duties to the very capable Rob Liefeld and Fabian
Nicieaza.
Since thev took over the exploits of the mutants,
they havereshaped theappearanceanddirectionof the
book. Thev have introduced several intriguing char-
acters, such as Dead pool (issue 98), Gideon (issue 98).
Domino tissue 98), Feral (issue99),Shatterstar(issue 99
& 100), and Warpath (issue 99, though he was ongi-
nally introduced many years earlier asThunderbird ID.
Each of these characters promise to play a large role
in oncoming days of X-Force. The new team consists of
Warpath,Shatterstar, Domino, Feral,Cable, Boom Boom
and Cannonball and they ha ve banned together to fight
for their rights and their freedoms.
Each member has their reasons for joining Cable's
cause, some more involved than others. Cannonball
and Boom Boom just want to do some good in this
world. Warpath wants revenge on the Hellfire Club, a
group of mutants that am on the other side of the law
that killed everyone on his Indian Reservation He has
made a pact with Cable to fight his war if the team will
help him fight the Hellfire Club. Similar to Warpath's
reasons, Feral joined as a way of protection against her
former friends, the Morlocks.
TheMorlocksareagroupofmutantsthathidinthe
subway tunnels of New York to hide from the surface
world. Of late, though, they have fallen under the
power of the one called Masque. Masque wants to take
over the surface world and kill anyone that stands in
her way. Feral stood in her way and escaped to the
protection of Cable and his army. Her war will be
fought by X-Force in exchange for her fighting their
wars.
Shatterstar is in allegiance with X-Force so that he
can build a defense against attackers from another
deminsion. X-Force will battleShatterstar'sattackersin
exchange for his help in fighting to preserve the rights
of mutants. Cable and Domino's reasons for this war
and their parts in it are still unclear as is their previous
relationship.
The intrigue built around the characters and their
backgrounds as well as the war that they are fighting is
the center of the group's attraction. They work well
together though they don't know each other well, and
are willing to lay their lives on the line for people they
barely know. The alliance is interestingand promises to
be action filled.
Liefeld'splotsandNicieza'sscriptingmakeagood
team and a good direction for the comic. The New
Mu tants werebrought back into the higher salesbracket
with the addition of Liefeld, but with the acquisition of
Nicieza, it has become a major seller.
Liefeld adds a new deminsion to the look of The
New Mu tants with his thin lines and details. Heemerged
in a period that was dominated by Todd McFariane
clones and at first people thought him just another one
in the pot, but he has come into hisown in a big way. He
relies on realism more than most artists in the medium
and has a fresh layout to his work.
His creations don't have the processed look that so
many new characters seem to incorporate. Though his
ideas aren't legitimately new, his handling of them is,
and this shows in his work.
Nicieza hasemergedasoneof the best new writers
See Mutants page 8
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
On Saturday, March 2nd,
Greenville was host to the North
Carolina Hemisphere Pageant
Preliminary. Out of 17 girls en-
tered, ECU sophomore Kelly
Sapp won the title of the Miss
division.
The "Miss Hemisphere"
creed extolls its being more than
)iist another beauty pageant. "It
isayouthdevelopment program
designed to give our youth the
chance to be seen and heard
Contestants are judged on their
poise, personality, community
work and other related qualifi-
cations.
The pageant was handled
bv "Touch of Class" modeling
e wins beau
school owner, Shelby Allegood.
With schools in Wilson, Rocky
Mount and Greenville, Allegood
teaches students professional
modeling, make-up and skin care
and voice and diction. These
schools give students a chance to
meet with various modeling and
casting agencies around the na-
tion.
Held at the Hilton hotel in
Greenville, the contestants were
interviewed and judged in bath-
ing suit and evening gown com-
petitions. Being a regional pre-
liminary, the winners will vie for
the state title. In the state's com-
petition, contestants are recom-
mended to preparemodelingand
talent divisions.
A broadcasting major from
Clemmons, N.C, Sapp will now
Kelly Sapp
compete for the state title sched-
uled in June. If she is chosen,
Sapp will then go to Miami, Ra.
for the national competition in
August. Sapp adds another ac-
complish mentto show that ECU
students are really involved in
theirtown and state community.
Aquatic center offers varied exercise pro-ams
1 Hnnin "What makes us different Theseinclude theSchool sOut
By Howard Shelly
Special to The East Carolinian
Have you lost that firm muscle
tone? Maybe you gained enough
winter fat to hibernate two seasons.
Do you just lack energy you once
had. The right fitness center might
be the place to start changing these
things. Now, what features will you
look for in a facility?
Does you list of needs include a
6,000 square foot gymnasium,
stairclimberand lifecyde machines,
a free-weight, tanning beds and
even kid's programs?
If it does, Greenville Aquatics
and Fitness Center is your place.
GAFC has operated under the
auspices of the Greenville City
Recreation and Parks rjepartment
since 1986. Bill Twine, director of
GAFC, explained this unique rela-
tionship. "What makes us different
is that we operate on our own rev-
enues. We don't receive any tax
dollars. This was the only way the
city council would let us take over
the building, which part of the vo-
cational center before. Any money
we make, however, stays in the fa-
These include the School's Out
Day Camps provided during
teacher work days and other holi-
days where kids can leam about
exercise and fitness while parents
are working. Theeight week Kid Rt
Program is another popular
wellness activity geared towards
riutyarrfgoestowardmoreservices the younger crowd, as well as
and equipment summer day camps.
Twine and his staff of more In addition to self-paced
than 40 people are working to fill a workouts for adults, members of
void they noticed in Greenville. GAFC can team up for three-on-
"Our goal is to provide a fitness three basketball tournaments and
facilityforthewholecommunityat volleyball or swimming compeo-
an affordable price. Before us, no tions
one was doing this. Students are Exercise classes include
welcome the same hours that the aerobics, toning and stretehing,pre-
othermembersare. Weareanequal and post-natal fitness and a healthy
opportunity facility Twine said, back program.
"We borrow a lot of ideas from the Rtness evaluations are avail-
programs and philosophies of the abtetodeterrmneyourpresenttevel
YMCA ee Eaeiclit, page 8
Coming Up
viufiei
��m�






,1ah 7. 1991
March 7, igg
Eire lEaBt (garoitninn
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PERSONALS
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ega
W i
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Dating can be
trying for many
n n mi .
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� � -� -u ,iu.iy Mark it
ttf rhU will be a nd
I I M we will hr
� � : i- rtur h n i�p �'
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� mm I'n k up mot information
' 'nfnn.)tin Dty ! hurdav
Vni � IW1 fl m 9 i m f I m m
�ludi nti rih t
B Michael Harrison
staff Writer
' ' ' .(T
i ind exhausting experk nee
m pet �pk? and asking II
tshw todoitbrought mam
i ; � 'iitlh ring ansv
v' �� studt nts said
� nainlv �hi I n.ia ui
-i Ms i anb � �
its 'U
po , k? student April fleas
� . ir in i lasses V usual
e that il
i I mpetitior, a ith

� f h a I a i � : i
.ikl she would n.
� I II � "
. Ided I i an al �
.
st ten eedu anon major
. � �
in i perspet five date
rsfor men is till in
he said 1 v dates
so kxk neal n't b� i
she mi
wrongfully make them appear to
be stuck up' or uninterested, In
feltigence moral values and per
�m ni.il pn Titles are other important
ire- she Sflid she would look
for
s tor basic looks. Tin said a
man would need to be phvsieally
appealing to her to consider ro
mance 1 ooks arm t everything,
� said but they do determine
initial rttra tionand whetheryotfll
talk with him in the first place
Furthermore, Hu said she
think- it is fine tor women to ask
nun tor a date women take sp vial
� �
I hi advised men not to ask a
rrl out more than twice It shesavs
if f two times, she said forget
:� i � Mian ka Miormick
. � pie can meel othei pe ple
nd also m front ot
lent streoni ampus Begin
� in in s,iui and
; � . � �� m then kwng 1.1 m
r dan me, are good
.1 .� fid a datr. she s,ikl
an be especially at-
tractive. Met ormk k said, but othef
rth w hile traits, such as having a
. -d sense of humor, as well as a
ti pvrsonaliU and enthusiasm
are vital
fo those win are ft rt currently
dating, Mi ormick says, Don't
e ut it t our time will
con
Meanwhile, student I orin
Muet let said hisdateshave allbeen
people i ve gone to class with " I le
oi - mversation would be easy to
initiate because then- would be at
writes from
nee, wisdom
Connor H,�inbtJOH ECU Photo Lh
Craig Heflley and Michelle Scott appear to be two of the lucky ones"
to face the challenges of student dating in the '90s
least one common interest: the class.
or at least passing the class. Mart
with smail talk, he said Talk about
the class itself, assignments, the
professor, e Start essentially with
general information and gradually
get more personal
People can meet other people
through friends, he said "It vim
hear about lOmebody hooking up
with someone downtown, he
added, ' it susnallv for a one night
stand ' Besides, heconhnued,many
women who go downtown are not
l.ioking for a da teanvwav "They're
USt down there 10 have a good
time he said
To men, Mueller does not rec-
ommend a direct approach to
meeting women It rarelv works, he
said
I"he fear i n rerection keeps men
from asking for dates. Mueller said
See Dating page 8
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
"You do leam from things
along the way One thing you leam
is to reallv en)oy the life that you
have, because there is a lot more to
eniov than vou might have thought
when you were younger "
These are the words
Gwendolyn Brooks She said these
words in the context of a normal
conversation, not a speech or a ser-
mon She was simply offering her
view on the enjoyment of life
"Do you ever stop and tust
look at the trees? The sunset? she
continued Because you think
you're going to have those things
forever And then someday when
vou've gc t nothing else to do, you'll
sit around and took.
"1 think oung people waste
a lot ot time wondenng 'What's it
all about? it safari what vou see "
Gwendolyn Brooks is con-
sidered bv most literary critics to be
one of the most profound and pro-
lific poets writing today She has
been awarded numerous awards
for her works including the first
Pulitzer Pnze received by a black
author She recently gave a poety
reading at ECU and beforehand
granted an interview
Due to her manv merits. It is
easv to understand why someone
might be nonplussed at the idea of
interviewing her
Brooks found this notion to
be frivolous.
"Oh for goodness sake she
said. "You know, I don't know what
to sav when people sav things like
that 1 am so accessible. I mean I am
so easy to reach "
Brooks spoke about many
subjects, and as the interview went
on, it was evident that she is an
extremely intelligent and wise
woman
She began by saving that she
would most like to be remembered
for "wnting poetry that told the
truth'
"I believe there's no point in
lifting up pen to paper unless you
are going to write your truth on that
page she continued. "Sometimes
that can be very hard to do � to tell
the absolute truth and to know it.So
manv poets are afraid of hurting
others � which is legitimate but
not to be catered to
On that same note Bmoks
commented on her poem entitled
"The Mother which she' read dur-
ing her poetTv reading The poem
deals with abortion ,td its effects
The opening lines read "Abortions
will not let vou forget Yew re-
member the' children you got that
vou did not get, The damp small
pulps with little or no hair, The
singers and workers that never
handled the air "
After the reading she told
the audience that she would be glad
to reveal her position on the abortion
issue in a personal format. However.
she said that she felt no need to
alienate half of the group by telling
her position in public
She said refenng to the poem.
"People on both sides of that con-
troversv have asked me to let them
use it tor a standard bearer �
See Brooks page 8
The New Mutants to be reborn rSophomore wins beauty pageant
bliff C oflev
(.iff Writ, r
. riacomi Itod itsdix ��
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tl e master of Marvi s mutant books,
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� � i i live in tl " � ' ' ' t,mc
: . � indscftini i?
. jpV( hn �� mont Mutant �- i � hut ted
Mutant-
.i. ��
.ill t � �
' ' �

ind killed incold blood due I "� ' i
� �
f, he I
Mutant M re, thi

� n As ndaston I " " '� '� �
� I �. if Muta
or so It � ' laremontquit
vnM �� igei itantt and
on stepp.l masf � writer She
Ihth. prejud lines but used a less
t it
W.thtN irt b) Bret Bk H � " chncfT
, t,�MlL ( the book turned i I i kiddteboofc
thwttemetsstiesaddressed tienaytungsternamed
, d �rl�,)ins.henev. irttstand brought
. vdvnamH look and,iti-hness of ideas
. ,mrfr,�nhl�,seMmon-n rogether they created
II h r able, whk h,s noes the,na.nstav of the
hotik an, )the team Mtnonnrelimu.slHxl her writing
duties to the verv capable Kob I.iefeld and Fabian
icieaa
Mnce they took over the exploits of the mutants,
thev have reshaped the appearance and direction ot the
book Ibev have introduced several intriguing chat
ac ters. such as I Vadpool I issue 98),adoon I issue 98 �
I'v.nunoOssue'M oral Mssuelt.Miatterstar'issued'
& 100), and Warpath (issue 99 though he was oniM
nalh introduced many yearsearterasTlwmderbird II)
1 achot these characters promise to plav a largenle
m (ma wrungdaysof x-i m e The new team t msists i A
VVarjMthhatterstar.l.mino.reral.C abke,BoomBoom
and annonball and thev hi veKinntxl together to tight
ti if their rights and their trexl( mis
Each member has their rea ma u n oming abie's
cause, some more involved than others (annonball
and Boom Boom jUSt want to di some good in this
work! Warpath wants revengeon the Hellfire( luba
group Of mutants that are on the other sideot the law
that kitted everyone on his Indian Reservation Me has
made a pat t witht able to fight his war if the team will
help him fight theHelJfire lub Similar to Warpath s
reasons, (oral joined asawa) ol protection against hei
f friends, the Morloi ks
1 he Morhnksarea groupof mutants that hid in the
subway tunnels ot New York to hide from the surtac e
world. Ol late, though, thev have fallen under the
power of the one calked Masque. Masquewanis to take
over the surface world and kill anyone that stands in
her way, Feral stood in her way and escaped to the
protection ofable and his army Her war will be
fought bv X-lorce in exchange for her fighting their
wars
Miatterstar is in allegiance with X-Force SO that he
can build a defense against attackers from another
deminsion XIorecwillKittleShatterstar'sattackersin
exchange tor his help in fighting to preserve the nghts
of mutants Cable and Domino's reasons for this war
and their parts in it are still unclear as is their previous
relationship
The mtngue built around the characters and their
backgn uinds as well as the war that they are fighting is
the center of the group's attraction They work well
together though they don't know each other well, and
are willing to lay their lives on the line for people they
barelvknow Theallianceisinterestingand promises to
lx' action filled.
I irteld'sploteandNiciea'sscnptingmakeagood
team and a good direction for the comic. The New
Mu hints were brought back into the higher salesbracket
with the addition of I.iefeld, but with the acquisition of
Niciea, it has become a major seller.
1 leteld adds I new deminsion to the look of The
New Mutants with histhmlimsanddetails Heemerged
in a period that was dominated by Todd McFarlane
clones and at first people thought him ust another one
intlHpot.buthehascomeintohisowninabigway.He
relies on realism mom than most artists in the medium
and has a fresh layout to his work
I liscreationsdon't have thepnxessed Uxk that so
manv new characters seem to incorporate Though his
ideas ann t legitimately new, his handling of them is,
and this shows in his work
Nicieahasemcrgedasoneof the best newwnters
See Mutants page 8
Bv Joe Horst
Staff Writer
()n Saturday, March 2nd,
(,reenvillewashosttotheorth
( arolina Hemisphere Pageant
Preliminary. Out of 17 girls en-
tered, ECU sophomore KelK
Sapp won the title of the Miss
division
The "Miss Hemisphere'
I reed ex tolls its K'ing more than
Hist another beauty pageant. "It
is a vouth development program
designed to give our vouth the
chance to be seen and heard '
( ontestantS are judged on their
poise personality, community
wort and other related qualin-
. a tons
The pageant was handled

fouch ot (lass' modeling
school owner. Shelbv Allegood.
With schools in Wilson, Rocky
Mount and Greenville, Allegood
teaches students professional
modeling, make-upand skin care
and voice and diction These
schools give students a chance to
meet with various modeling and
casting agencies around the na-
tion.
Held at the Hilton hotel in
Greenville, the contestants were
interviewed and judged in bath-
ing suit and evening gown com-
petitions Being a regional pre-
liminary, the winners will vie for
the state title In the state's com-
petition, contestants are recom-
mended to prepare modelingand
talent divisions.
A broadcasting major from
( lemmons Sapp will now
Kelly Sapp
compete for the state title sched-
uled in June. If she is chosen,
Sapp will then go to Miami Fla
for the national competition in
August. Sapp adds another ac-
complishment to show that ECL
students are really involved in
their town and statecommunity.
Aquatic center offers varied exercise programs
tionship. "What makes us different
By Howard Shelly
Special to The Fast Carolinian
Have vou lost that firm muscle
tone? Maybe you gained enough
winter fat to hibernate two seasons.
Do you just lack energy you once
had. The right fitness center might
be the place to start changing these
things. Now, what features will you
look for in a facility?
Does you list of needs include a
6,000 square foot gymnasium,
stairclimberand lifecycle machines,
a free-weight, tanning beds and
even kid's programs?
If it does, Greenville Aquatics
and Fitness Center is your place.
GAFC has operated under the
auspices of the Greenville City
Recreation and Parks Department
since 1986. Bill Twine, director of
GAFC explained this unique rela-
is that we operate on our own rev-
enues. We don't receive any tax
dollars. This was the only way the
city council would let us take over
the building, which part of the vo-
cational center before. Any money
we make, however, stays in the fa
These include the School's Out
Day Camps provided during
teacher work days and other holi-
days where kids can learn about
exercise and fitness while parents
are working. Theeight week Kid Fit
Program is another popular
wellness activity geared towards
ahtyandgoestowardmoreservices the younger crowd, as well as
and equipment summer day camps.
Twine and his staff of more In addition to self-paced
than 40 people are working to fill a workouts for adults, members of
void thev nonced in Greenville. GAFC can team up for threeon-
"Our goal is to provide a fitness three basketball tournaments and
facility for the whole community at volleyball or swimming competi-
an affordable price. Before us, no tions.
one was doing this. Students are Exercise classes include
welcome the same hours that the aerobics, toning and stretching, pre-
other membersare. Weareanequal and post-natal fitnessand a healthy
opportunity facility Twine said, back program
"We borrow a lot of ideas from the Fitness evaluations are avail-
programs and philosophies of the able todetermine your present level
!MCA � See ���:���. pag� 8
� i �'





I
8 H!?c taat (Enrolinian March 7, 1991
�iLaii-ji-
METAL NOTES
Slayer shoots second video in Egypt
VWIeomotoMot.il Notes First of all, I'd like to congratulate all the
troops m Operation f Wrt Storm' for liberating Kuwait They are all
definitely the peacemakers and the peacekeepers in this world Now
on with the news'
Cinderella, along with Lynch Mob and the BulletBoys. has can-
ivlod their North American tour No word vet on the reason for the tour
break ,nd make-up dates have not been scheduled Meanwhile, the
BuDatBoyi will join Gnat White and Steelheart out on the road
Sptlklng ot the BulletHoys, their MOOnd effort. Freak Show, is due
out in stores anytime now Produced by Teddy Templeman (Van
Halen), Freak Show is th� second album tor these boys who almost
mfd� pi.itiiuim s.iU-s with their debut I .P. The tirst videosingle from
themu i,srx)is'TheHardC'oreCrovealsoknownas'THCC.rove "
Ron Keel, tenner trontman tor Keel, has a new Kind that is
currently gigging around 1 os Angeles However, there's twist to this
note Th& new Kind is actuaOy an all female Outfit, expert for Keel, of
courts
l Msgadeth guitarist lett Voung has put together an act cattsd
Broken Silence The si stringer is aud itioning singers now to complete
the line up
Poison'sC C 1 Wille w.s recently arrested in 1 ouisviBe, Kv , tc�r
publicdrunkennessand criminal rrdschiei I Wille was taken from the
1 ouisvillabar and spent six hours inalocal prison before hisbandmates
posted k�i
MCA hasdropped Indiana's Sweel F A from their record label it
Stum Mv A has been droppings lot of bands from their heavy metal
hard NM k deportment Other bands that have been dropped in the past
year are Lillian Axe, Cold Sweat and jetboy. New sensations Trixter
and Steelheart (I'll Never 1 et You (io")are still a part o4 the depart
men! I et s hope it stays that way
M IX ran into some mess when they inserted a picture o( Angus
Young s face (where the Queen - should be) on artwork of British
currenc) foi the group's single, Moneytalks Young and company
faces 2,00X1 pound fine for defacing British currenc
Vixen's debut home video, "Revved Up is on the way The
release includes five video clips from Kth IPs, never-before-seen
backstage footage, home footage and an uncut version ot 1 ove is ,i
Killer from their second album Rev it Up
Slayer is tensing the follow up to their first-ever video, "War
Ensemble heir second ideo will be for the song Seasons in the
Abyss the l P's title track Asalways in their music, Slayer went to the
extremes but in video form this time fhe speed metal kings went to
1 opt to shoot their new video After negotiations were settled with the
Egyptian government, Stayer headed tor the Pyramids, which were
I lostd to tourists while the band performed, to make the video
On thekxal metal front, Vile Existencewill beat Lisa'sBar and Grill
in Atlantic Beach, N.C, on Mar 10. I he deathhardcore band will be
Competing in 103 S talent contest Thrash act Kurupsure will bring
their three piece assault to the Attic on March 9 and 10 March 10 will
be an all ages show
rune in ts o w eeks from now and tind out who's who in thrash and
death metal t ntil then, kivp rockm and have a killer Spring Break'
� Compiled by "Diyy" Ocarina Ncvgloski
Brooks
March 7J1991
something to represent their cause
But she said, "l didn't write it to be
an advertisement.
"Of course some women just
don't want that care, that responsi-
bility, but there are a lot of them
who would be only too happy to
have the children if they knew they
were going to havesomeassistance.
Many, many women who have
abortions have bad stones to tell
about the men involved
When a reference was made
to her current success as a writer,
she pointed out how she viewed
success.
"Well, you know if you want
to use that weird success she said,
"you're talking about, I hope, suc-
cess with your writing. And you
never achieve that. You never write
SO satisfy yourself. You're always
Contkwd from page 7
Mutants
Continued from page 7
in comics. From writing the
Avengers, Alpha Flight and
The New Warriors he built a
reputation for good stories
and fast paced plots. His
characterizations arc very
believable and make each
person thai more under-
standable When hodebutod
Oft The Mew Mutants, it
promised the reader mdepth
knowledge into the charac-
ters actions and thought
processes.
ith all (tthis going for
it. VForcoisonoof the most
anticipated series to come
along since Todd
Mclarlane sSpidorman.and
that's sayine a lot
looking ahead toward improve
ment.
"I want to write in accor-
dance with my own standards and
still be acceptable. I'd like to be
more steadily acceptable than I am
now. Thaf s what is called creativ-
ity
Brooks summed up her in-
tent concerning all of her works by
referring to one of her poems, "I
said exactly what I wanted to say in
it
"It just takes a compulsion
and persistence she said, "That is
so true. There are many very tal-
ented people but they don't use
their talent, thereforeyou never hear
of them
Brooks currently travels
around the country, giving read-
ings to different groups.
Exercise
of fitness and design an exercise
program tailored to your goals.
A new addibon at GAFC is a
room that will house universal and
nau tilus-type weight machines that
were custom designed by Fitness
Pros, of Greenville.
GAFC also sponsors two an-
nual road races. The Run for Chil-
dren and The Emerald City Run.
She said that she conducted
her readings at "chiefly universi-
ties, but also a lot of prisons, high
schools, kindergarten classes and
drug rehabilitation centers
She explained why she be-
gan reading at prisons; "Well, I first
went to see a man named)
Etheridge Knight who had been
writing to me. And one day I wason
TV and he hadn't been able to see
me.
"But his friends told him
about it and he said he was sorry he
had missed it. And I said 'Well you
ask your supervisor if I can come
and visitand I'll read toyouand the
other prisoners And thaf s what I
did and that started it
Referring to the youngsters
to whom shealsoreads: "A kinder-
gartner asks the most interesting
questions. They think straightfor-
ward
She mentioned the project
on which she is currently working
"I'm writing a long poem called
'Children Coming Home' and it's
about a class of dfcfldren who are
on their way home from school.
They are going home to different
situations. It's a wondrous oppor-
tunity
About her age of 73, she
said, "I'm glad to have reached the
age I am. It represents a lot and I've
got a lot of friends that didn't make
it to this end
Brooks concluded, "But
when you're 73, you're also 10,
you're seven, you're 17, 20, 30, 40.
50,60, etc etc. what is really true is
that you are all the ages that you
ever were"
Continued from page 7
The atmosphere of the com-
plex is fnendly and spacious. Over-
crowding of the facility and high
pressure sale pitches are not the
style here according to Twine.
"We've got a slow, but steady
membership growth rate. There is
not one salesperson on the staff,
even though anyone here can sell
you a membership. We are part of
Dating
the city and no one is going to run
off with your money
Drop the cupcakes and check
this place out! Memberships are
rated as individual, family, senior
orstudentand can be purchased for
three months, a semester or by
monthly bank draft.
"We like to think everybody
gets a break here Twine said
Continued from page 7
However, the desire for, shall we
say, a social life becomes greater
than the fear, he said.
Self-confidence increases with
practice, Mueller attests, and not
taking a refusal personally isa must,
he added.
A woman who says no to a
date rrught not be interested in a
relationship at that time, he said,
and those who say they have boy-
friends could actually have boy-
friends. "More often than not
Mueller concludedshe's telling the
truth Hmmm.
Get what vou will from this
article, but when it comes down to
it, it's like anything else, vou will
probably have to work at it to be
successful.
If you are someone who does
nothaveto work at it, write a "How
to" book about it. The book will be
a guaranteed bestseller.
The East Carolinian
the students'
Ringgold lowers
No raking 1 cases fot August
I1'I I fxcfnvtn. 2 K1t(MTi. &
Efficcnc) Apartments,
CALL 752-2865
� lleaulilul PlaM to lave
� Ml New �
� And Retrf) !� Ki-iu �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2w Mb sum
�LoCMd N�SI H I
�Ncif Msjm Sksppng Gbsjmn
�V, rtM i m Highujv I'airol Suuoo
united rfei SKllim.wh
Conud J r �f Tocnmv Williams
f rtlSa 130-1937
Ottucprn p� I, 12 i .Vlpm
�AZALEA GARDENS-
l�ii umI -j�i �� riM�n remote r�rtrnctaa
��? t;f� �� !rat �wr ml v fi �ufttn .uv
an asVai Ot,�.� � ��imp' Sao ununiii
lattHfclMBi mmu i NOMkMatNTALS-oaaH
I I ft-r ����.� e aim iMtf�tk Niikj i r�
I ajjeru hM tin. t.c. wnnu Qajfc
Comau II irl mmi) WtttMmi
fS6 Via
I
?All you can eat
shrimp and trout
$4.95
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
111
1
M-ThJlam-8pm F-Sat llam-pm Sun llam-4pm
OPEN UNDER
reW OWNERSHIP
Sill I SERVINGYCK
wrmQi un bp
WD All � PRODUCTS
( K iss I � i VIU.A ROMA
Rl S! U RANI
TENTH S I Rl I I
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STUDENT 11) ON REPAIRS
Wl) SERVICE
n I HHh Struct
(irccnxillc NC
'52 21 15
ROAD SERVKTI
RAMADA INN
Greenville, NC
203 W Greenville Blvd
THURSDAY, APRIL 4
SHOWS 7 & 10 PM
Tickets
$22.50
AVAILABLE AT
DCKETRON'
Including
SHIRTSTOP, INC
Call 800-543-3041
To Charge By Phone
ONE NIQHT ONLY
LIMITED SEATING
ATiTIC
752-7303
Thurs. 7,h:
209 East
Fifth �
99? Highballs
99? Memberships
$1.50 32 oz Draft
CORROSION
I'll'
roMumniY
ATTENTION ECU GROUPS
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Annual Fund-raising Planning Sessions Are
Scheduled for:
Wednesday, March 20
Thursday, March 21
Wednesday, March 27
Wednesday, April 3
Thursday, April 4
Wednesday, April 10
Thursday, April 11
Wednesday, April 17
Thursday, April 18
Room 242
Rooms 8A-B
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
Rooms 8A-B
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
all times 3:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m.
A Representative of Your Organization
Must Be Present At One Session
In Order To Obtain
1991-1992 Funding
All Groups With SGA Funded
Status Are Eligible
For Further Information Call
Tripp Hoag, 757-0303
Amy Harris, 758-9923
v If You Are Unsure If You Are
Eligible For Funding -
Please Call
Millie Murphrey at 757-4726
IV
v
tat
Lady Pira
B 1at
Tb� I

Pat Pierson
recoi


r foi
RS plays
AU-Star
game
By Dustin Shearon
Assistant Sports f ditor
On WediwJav the tirvt annual
Grivk All-Star basketball touma
ment took place in Memorial
Gymnasium
rhe sororities were divided up
into F:ast and West and bet
nine
Each team had n � i representa-
tives tnTn five ditten-nt sororities
tor each team
West controlled the tip-off and
proceeded to contn �! the rest of the
first halt The so wed the first a
of the first halt and car-� tontO
21-11
It should be rnentli ned that the
West had lsu members from Alpha
Delta Pi. the first .
MstsoMBrv-fHieonfivi wkmpimtvd
a big part in wiping the Wesi �
an early lead
The West again I - trolin
the second half even though the
East's Holly Holland I S
Sigma Sigma stepped
tensive efforts
The Fast never
-)
�ess
i
�� SH ' '� � ((
"

tellii

� �
a de
Committee changi
KANSASCm (
usi1 to K1 tradition would de
the fate of college bask) H
grams hoping to make the V '�
tournament
Not tus ear
And teams �� victories
may be disappointed unless the
wins came igainst Division I foes
"We hate made a decision that
tradition should nt haveanimpa �
Baseball plavers
for larger salarie:
� �


CINCINNATI OHIO (AP)
Jack Armstrong and foe Oliver t
the Cincinnati Reds and Texas
pitchers Kevin Brown and Kennv
Rogers vant nxre money. And to
show their unhappiness, thev lett
spnng training
Today's the mandatory report-
ing date, so if thev don't come back,
they could be in trouble
Even though the exhibition
season opens Thu rsday, plavers are
still battling to fatten their check-
books.
The four who walked Tuesdav
all were renewed at salanesof their
team s choosing
"I don't want to start plaving
for the monev, said Armstrong
who got a $215,000 contract. 'It's
the principle 1 feel that s a burden 1
have to bear for the plavers who
will follow me
Armstrong, the National
League's All-Star Game starter last
July, wantsapproximately $100,000
more.
Oliver, renewed for $185,000,
wantsappTOximately$90,000more.
Tm not happy with the treat-
ment I've gotten Oliver said. 1
just wanted to make a statement
Armstrongand Oliver have the
same agent, Scott Boras He said not
i
Beginn i
can be fined '
The player
me that they are s
as well BorassaK
statements to mcj
waiting kv the
negotiate
Brown had
nevvedbv Pexasfo
was renewed I
This is not th
relationship for thl
said Tm not del
monev in the uoj
that wav 1 ust n a
the market to
number would btl
Out in Scoff.
ers on the Oakla
takingupacollecl
Leapie V1T Ricj
who thinks he's
million for four y�
renegotiate.
A collection
near the entrancei
room and it was I
of varying denor
end of Tuesday's
On the bottle j
ten message "Ricl
Fund Not Tax





March 7,1991
ffiie �aHt (Carolinian
9
Continued from paga 7
it she inducted
iefl umversi-
iof pnsons. high
rten classes and
ienera
led why she be-
ll a Well. I first
nan named
ho had been
rteda) 1 wason
lb vr. able to see
lends told him
m m is sorr he
i said WeB you
an come
tovouand the
I: � � - vshat i
� kinder
iterestine
questions. Thev think straightfor
ward
She mentioned the project
on which she is currently working
Tm wnting a long poem called
Children Coming Home' and it's
about a class ot qflfldren who are
on their way honx1 from school
Thev aa1 going home to different
situations. It sa wondrous oppor-
tunity
About her age of 73, she
said 1 m glad to have reached the
age I am It represents a lot and I ve
got a lot ot friends that didn't make
it to this end
Brooks concluded, Hut
when you re 73, you re also 10,
you re seven vim re 17, 20, 30, 41'
C 60,etcetc what is really true is
that vou an- all the ages that u
ever wen1
Continued from page 7
� � it) and no �ne is going to run
- ver ff with your mone
ugh Drop the cupcakes and check
not the 'his place out! Memberships are
rated as individual, family, senior
tsti rstudentandcanbepurchasedfoi
threi months a semester or b
y bank draft
'� si We like to think everybody
��" pets a break Hen 1 wine said
Continued from page 7
but u hen it i irncs down to
ng Isc vou will
low rk at it to be
have boj success!
en than not If you are someone whe does
s telling the nothaveto workatit. wntoa "How
to book about it The hook will he
� s a guaranteed bestseller
fwspaper
U GROUPS
Id money?
arming Sessions Are
d for:
Room 242
Rooms SAB
Rwm 242
Room 242
Room 242
Rooms XA-B
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
until 6:()0p.m.
bur Organization
it One Session
Obtain
funding
SGA Funded
Eligible
irmation Call
1757-0303
758-9923 Jt
Ire If You Are fj
unding -
:all
at 757-4726
Lady Pirates face Tribe in CAA opener
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
Tat Pierson
RS plays
All-Star
game
By Dustin Shearon
VsMstjnt Sports Fditor
On Wednesday the first annual
- Ireek All-Star basketball tourna-
ment took place in Memorial
( Ainnasium.
I"he sororities were divided up
I ast and West and began at
Each team had two representa-
tives from five different sororities
for each team.
West controlled the tip-off and
proceedqfl to control the rest of the
first halt Thev scored the first points
� the first halfandcameouton top
21-11
It should be mentioned that the
W est had two members from Alpha
� ta Pi the tirst place winners ot
� - -roritvtiMeontive. wfetpUved
a big part in helping the West take
irl) lead.
The West again took control in
second halt even though the
East's Holly Holland of Sigma
: Sigma stepped up her de-
�� � sn e efforts.
The East never realty had a
The Lady Pirates begin the first
round of the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation Tournament Thursday
against William & Mary in the cul-
mination of a halfway decent sea-
son.
rhe Pirates finished 10-16 this
season and are ranked fifth in the
CAA with a 4-8 record William &
Marv hasanidenticaKn oral! record,
but thev have a slightly better con-
ference record at 5-7
This season, W&M and Et I
have split two games E U won the
tirst game at home with the help of
senior forward Sandra.race who
had 22 points in a close overtime
victory 79-76. The second game was
in Williamsburg, and the Pirates
lost 51-49.
Over the last 12 years when
W&M and ECU have been playing
each other, the Pirates have won 17
out of 20 meetings Two of the pre-
vious meetings have been victories
in the CAA Tournament in 1
and 1987.
rheoretieallv. the Pirates have
a good chance of advancing to the
semifinals in this war s tournament
it statistics speak the tnith. How-
ever certain factors should be ob-
served betore any serious specula-
tion about the game.
The first factor that may influ-
ence the game Thursday is the ab-
senceof senior forward Sarah Cray.
Cray has been absent since the
Feb.l6gameagainst W&M in which
she hurt her knee
Cray, who has had knee prob-
lems her whole college career, has
led the Pirates in scoring and re-
hounding for the last two years.
I ast vear she was named first team
All-CAA and was on the CAA
Tournament team
She had 17 starts this year, and
her loss will be felt when the tour-
namenthegins. The Pirates will have
to play without her experience and
dependability on the court that is so
necessary when the end of the sea-
son is at hand
Jill Chrry � ECU Pholo Lab
The women's sorority basketball team. Golden Girls pose for a picture betore Tuesday nights game against
Clueless On Wednesday the women's East and men's West team won the annual Greek All-Star games.
chance in the game and wound up
4i ising ?� �i better Wt"t-rt aw- -
After the sorority game the fra
termtv All-Star game took oft Since
the fraternity five on five tourna-
ment has not finished there was rw i
telling who had the ad vantage. The
East,though,had6-foot-5Beta rheta
Pi Mike I'avlor who put the last at
a decided advantage
he Fast got oft toa gooctetart
- orrrp mrring tlwWeyt and pass-
ing well Thev got the first points
and gave the West no room with
which to work
Hv the end ot the first half the
West wasdi uvn 22-15 and it seemed
like the deficit was too much to
overcome
When the second half started
the West kept up the pressure with
two quick dunks hv Mike Tavlor
but thev could not pick up enough
momentum to take a lead.
The Fast went on to win the
game 45-36.
West player, and Kappa
Sig,Tim Mclntvre said, "We just
couldn't get it back in the second
halt, the court was ust too long
Committee changes NCAA Tournament rules
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) -It
used to he tradition would decide
� ite of college basketball pro-
grams hoping to make the NCAA
tournament.
Not this year
And teams with 20 victories
may be disappointed, unless the
wins came against Division I foes.
"We hale made a decision that
tradition should not have an impact
Baseball
for larger s
CINCINNATI, OHIO (AP) -
lack Armstrong and joe Oliver of
the Cincinnati Reds and Texas
pitchers Kevin Brown and Kenny-
Rogers want more money. And to
show their unhappmess, they left
spring training.
Today's the mandatory report-
ing date, so if they don't come back,
they could be in trouble.
Even though the exhibition
season opensThursday, players are
still battling to fatten their check-
books
The four who walked Tuesday
all were renewed at salaries of their
team's choosing.
"I don't want to start playing
for the money said Armstrong,
who got a $215,000 contract. "It's
the principle. I feel that's a burden I
have to bear for the players who
will follow rne
Armstrong, the National
League's All-Star Game starter last
July, wantsapproximately$100,000
more.
Oliver, renewed for $185,000,
wantsapproximately$90,000more.
"I'm not happy with the treat-
ment I've gotten Oliver said. "
ust wanted to make a statement
Armstrongand Oliver have the
sameagent,Scott Boras. Hesald not
positively or negatively NCAA
committee chairman im Delany
said ohodv should be rewarded
for what thev accomplished in the
past or be penalized tor what they
failed to act omplish in the past. It's
irrelevant to this year's selection
process
Because of scheduling, those 20
victories should come against ri
vision I opponents and had better
ers fight
aries
to expect them back today
Beginning today, the players
can be fined for not being in camp.
"The players have reflected to
me that thev are staying tomorrow
�swell BorassaidTuesday Their
statements to me is that they are
waiting for the Reds to properly
negotiate
Brown had his contract re-
newed by Texas for $327,500. Rogers
was renewed at $287,500.
"This is not the way to build a
relationship for the future Brown
said "I'm not demanding all the
money in the world. I don't think
that way. I just wanted a chance for
the market to show what a fair
number would be
Out in Scottsdale, An , play-
ers on the Oakland Athletics are
taking upa collection for American
League MVP Rickey Henderson,
who thinks he's underpaid at $12
million for four years and wants to
renegotiate.
A collection bottle was placed
near the entrance to the trainer's
room and it was full of greenbacks
of varying denominations by the
end of Tuesday's workout.
On the bottle was a handwrit-
ten message: "Rickey Appreciation
Fund. Not Tax Deductible
Ii turn committee
vim I Vianv said
he what the s
deems "quahrv
1uesdav.
And. as much .is anything
( tournament hopefuls would
do well not to have am losses at
home against poor teams
Ihe committee looks at qual-
ity opponents, quality wins.
Delany aiil during a nationwide
telephone hookup. "About 15 to 20
years ago, there were probablv
magic yardsticks � 20 wins could
get vou in. But that's no longer the
case
Delany and his committee will
hole up in a midtown Kansas Citv
hotel Friday evening and rn.iv not
see daylight until they emerge
Sunday afternoon with theM-team
field. Thirty bids are automatic to
See NCAA, page 10
DailRMd �ECUPtertolab
Be all you can be!
A local Air Force ROTC cadet rides through campus on his
way to that all-important class. Don! be late.
Without Gray, ECU will need
to get some extra offense from jun-
ior forward Connie Small who av-
erages 9.2 points per ga e. Sopho-
more guard GaynorODonnell will
need to preform as she has all sea-
son long.
Since she has started most ev-
ery game for the Pirates this season,
her relative inexperience because
she is a sophomore should be of
little to no importance in the game
ODonnell is currently fourth
mcareerassistsat ECU, even though
she is iust a sophomore. She has 158
assists this season, averaging 6.1
assists per game as well as averag-
ing 75 points per game.
The Pirates will also need jun-
ior forward Tonya Hargrov eto play
well if thev hope to win There is no
indication that Hargrove will not
play well; she has averaged 17.7
points a game as well and almost
nine rebounds a game She leads
the Pirates with 461 points and also
became the eleventh ECU player to
reach 1,(MX) points earlier this sea-
son.
Senior center Sandra Grace will
be an important factor in the game
against W&M She has a tendency
to foul out of games (93 fouls in 2h
games)andgetdisqualified(sixthis
year), but she will be needed tht
entire game
The Pirate bench is less than
See CAA. page 10
Golf team looks for
good spring season
By Kerry Nester
Assistant Sports Editor
After participating in four en-
couraging fall tournaments, the
ECU golf team feels very positive
abou t their chances of having a suc-
cessful spring season and advanc-
ing to the NCAA Championships.
The team consists of seniors:
Jimmy Manos (Ashland, Ohio),
Simon Moye(Greenville), Jeff Craig
(Pinehurst), lohn McGinnis
I Durham), Greg Powell (Whiteville)
and Francis Vaughn (Hershev, Pa.).
Also on the roster is junior Mike
Teague of Charlotte and sopho-
more Rvan Pema from Boca Raton,
Ha.
With the six seniors returning
to the squad, head coach Hal
Morrison feels it's the most poten-
tial that a Pirate team has ever had
since he has been at ECU.
"With the experience of the six
seniors, we should achieve a higher
level of competitiveness Morrison
said
Morrison is a long time coach
incollegiategolt, having coached at
Baptist College and EastTertncss t
State before coming to ECU
Dunng his v ears ot exponent
Morrison has coached the likes ot
professional golf stars Bob!
Wad kins, J.C Snead and Mik
Hulbert.
The goals that the team has set
tor themselves are simple. Win tht
Colonial Athletic Association con
ference title and advance to the
NCAA Championships.
Move said, "With the leader-
ship and the ability or the goiters we
have this year, we should bring the
conference title home
"I'm expecting that we'll have
the best team ECU has ever had
Manos said.
A recent article in the Raleigh
News & Observer stated that senior
John McGinnisisone of the five top
players to watch in North Carolina
See Golf page 10
Long putters cause
undue controversy
(AP)- "Theaverage player was
making sevens and eights when he
hit into a trap. He'd come home
crabbv But with the sand wedge,
he'd make no worse than bogey
and a une home smiling. There were
fewer divorces after I invented that
club � Gene Sarazen recalling
the reaction to his introduction of
the sand wedge m ls32.
Rocco Mediate might have
Uxiked like a well-dressed janitor
come to sweep te greens at Dora!
and not master them, but that long
putter he used to wi n there is here to
stay.
And while most of us will ap-
plaud (and throw open our wallets
for) anything that makes the dam-
nable game a little bit easier, the
news is not good on all fronts.
Metal woods, graphite shafts,
perimeter-weighted clubheadsand
balls with dimple patterns less
comprehensible than the structure
of quarks have reduced the margin
of error in every facet of golf �
except for putting.
And now, the game's last little
sanctuary, wheredisaster could still
be measured in inches, is about to
disappear as well.
Scott Hoch (as in choke) be-
came much more famous for miss-
ing an ttty-bitty putt at the Masters
in 1989 than for the Las Vegas In-
vitational he won a few weeks later.
Butif enough pros follow Mediates
lead and go to the long stick, a blown
3-footer � at the professional level,
anyway � will become as rare as
that oh-so-delicious gutter ball that
Del Ballard Jr. uncorked over the
weekend.
In Sarazen's day, a few thou-
sand failed marriages would not
have gotten in the way of golfs
once-imperial rulesmakers � the
Royal and AncientandtheUS. Golf
Association � if they set out to get
rid of something. But today, la wyers
for the manufacturers of clubs and
balls will stand in the way of prac-
tically anything
On top of which, even Presi-
dent Bush, the nation's No. 1 golfer
is prowling the greens armed with
a 52-inch "Pole Kat" model.
And who among us would be
foolhardy enough to trv and tak�
anythingout of hishandsnght about
now?
Actually, the fact that it s a
popular club is not an issue. The
issues governing the long putters
are the same that they have always
been for all tvpes or equipment,
John Mathenv, director oi opera-
tions for U.S.G.A said in a tele-
phone interview Tuesday.
"First, is it golf as we know it
and as the tradi tions dicta teSecond,
does it provide some advantage to
a player that is otherwise not
available? We wereasked to rule on
the long putter in 1989, when it
becamea fixtureon the Senior Tour,
and our committee decided it was
OK.
"You could say it's still an is-
sue, and I don't think a meeting
goes by where it's not discussed
But that doesn't mean Mathenv
said in an interview Tuesday, "thai
we're going to reverse it
Long putters stand between 44
inches and 52 inches high when
sold, and are grasped with the left
hand at chest height and the nght at
about waist level. On the stroke, the
left hand is held stationary and the
right glides the club through in a
motion similar to the way a broom
is used to sweep.
While their effectiveness from
10 feet and beyond is still open to
debate, the putters have been
proven to work exceptionally well
from that distance inby minimizing
hand, wrist and body motion (the
major cause of "yips") and maxi-
mizing the fixed baseand pendulum
swing that gets the ball rolling
smoothly on its way to the hole.
The club also provides an ad-
ditional visual aid by allowing the
user to study the line of the putt
longerwhile standing erect.





?
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This week at FIZZI
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Miller posts
first double-
triple for
Charlotte
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) �
Reggie Miller had a simple expla-
nation for his first ever NBA triple-
double.
"Rebounds were falling in my
hands, my shots were going down
and guys were getting open said
Miller of his 22 points, 10 rebounds
and 10 assists Tuesday night in
Indiana's 112-101 victory over the
Charlotte Hornets.
"It's definitely something to
savor Miller said. "It's a great
feeling getting my first triple-
double, and to come with a win like
thisonemadeiteven more special
Chuck Person, who scored 17
points in the first half for the Pacers,
was sent to Methodist Hospital for
X-rays after colliding with team-
mate Greg Dneiling in the opening
minutes of the third period.
"Chuck was focused early and
the only guy who was really into
the game Indiana coach Bob Hill
said. "He had 17 points in 15 min-
utes and got (Johnny) Newman in
foul trouble. To lose him forawhile
would be a big blow
Indiana trailed 57-53at the half,
but went to workimmediatelvafter
Person went down. Miller scored
Indiana's first 7 points of the third
period, ana Vern Fleming had 4 to
cut Charlotte's lead to 67-64 with
H:40 left in the period.
Mike Sanders hit a 3-pointer
for the Pacers, which triggered a 17-
6 Indiana rally led by Rik Smits. He
scored 8 of his 16 points in the run,
giving Indiana an 81-73 lead.
"Things started going right for
me in the third quarter, and I felt
really good Smits said. "After the
slump I have had, a game like to-
night really helps my confidence
"In the third quarter, we hit a
terrible drought and couldn't get
anything to fall for us and that
turned the game around
Charlotte's Rex Chapman said. "It's
a long season, and when vou take
shots like this, it makes for a longer
season �.Tt r
Detlef Schrempf had 12 re-
bounds and LaSalle Thompson 11
as Indiana outreboundedCharlotte
the first time in four games the
Pacers ou(rebounded their oppo-
nent.
CAA
adequate so it will be of head coach
Pat PJerson'surmostinterestto keep
Grace out of foul trouble.
On the whole, it would seem
that ECU'S chances of a victory in
ContinufxJ from page 9
the first round are fair to midland
this year, provided all the starters
work well together and Grace
doesn't foul out of the game.
If they do beat WfcM they will
Golf
"I'm expecting John to lead the
team again this year as he did last
Manos said. "Last year he finished
second in a tournament held at Old
Dominion University against very
tough competition
Both Manos and Moye believe
thattheteamcancompetewithother
higher ranked division I teams this
year such as UNC-Chapel Hill, NC
State and Duke due to the quality
and experience of the players.
face James Madison University ir
the semifinals. JMU has a bye in tht
first round and are seeded first ir
the tournament ECU lost both
games against JMU this season.
Continued from page 9
The Pirates will get an early
chance to prove this as they operi
the season next week as the host a
tournament in New Bern with the
second-rankedTar Heels coming to;
town.
NCAA
Continued from page 9
the conference regular season or puterinformationaswellasregional winsoverlessquality, "Delanysaid
tournament champions and 34 are reports from coaches' advisory "Other factors are opportunities
at-large. The four brackets are groups. Lots of times a good t�m might bej
seeded 1 through 16 with No. 1 "Assuminga certain modicum in a weak conference! make ani
meeting No. 16, No. 2 meeting No. of success, a team that's produced attempt to play a lliijliiiii luiJ
15, etc in the first round. the most quality wins and played ence schedule Thenlfecommittee!
When analyzing teams, the the strongest schedule has an ad- attemptstogivethatBhooltheben-
committee will have reams of com- vantage over a school with more efit of the doubt J
Son of racing king strives to make own name
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP)
� Kyle Petty doesn't expect he'll
ever completely get ou t of the long
shadow cast by his father, Richard,
who just happens to be NASCAR's
king.
But that's all right, he's won
so many races and done so much
foroursport.youreallydon'tmind
it, "the younger Petty said "I drive
these cars and there are a lot of
other guys too that owe a lot to
Richard Petty for wleel he's'lone
for the sport
The 30-year-old Petty was in
Myrtle Beach on a promotional
tour Monday, just one day after he female autograph seekers
Seated at a small table at thej
back of a local department store
Petty signed shirt sleeves, scrap
won the Goodwrench 500 in
Rockingham, N.C � his fourth
NASCAR victory.
Petty's dad is known as "The
King" to racing fans, a tribute in
part to his 200 victories on the
NASCAR circuit � the most in
the history of stock car racing
Like his father. Petty, 30,
knows how to drive a car and sign
autographs.
Two hours late arriving ir
Myrtle Beach because of prior
commitments, Petty entered the
store to a throng of predominately
Petty signed snin sieeves, scrap-
books and pictures All the while
he flashed that famous Petty smile.
"In the past 24 hours I've!
signed a ton of 'em fifty said of
the autographs. "I've ffn all over,
everywhere. It's jus been a real!
hectic day
And a long one It started at:
5:30a.m. witha morning television j
show appearance in Charlotte,
N.C And 14 hours later, he was!
sail going strong.
Graf ends her stay as No. 1
BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -
For 3 1 2 years, Steffi Graf was the
best. Sometimes she was even bet-
ter than that.
' 'At one stage, I wasin vincible
she said. "I was not even close to
being beaten
the top spot because her second- Top-ranked since August 17 j
roumilossinlastyear'stournament 1987, Grafts trying tocomeout of a!
at Boca Raton will no longer count slump that began after she broke!
in the computer rankings.
Graf, the top seed this week,
advanced to the third round Tues-
day night when her scheduled op-
But the reign is nearly over, ponent, Cecilia Dahlman of Sweden,
Graf's record 186-week stay as the had to default because of illness.
No. 1-ranked player in women's Graf instead met RennaeStubbs
tennis will end Monday in a one-set exhihjflgnLoa?,
"I'm sure I'm not happy about smiling and playing to the crowd,
itshesaid, "but I have no problems the German won 6-1.
dealing with it
The German will fall to No. 2
evenif she wins this week's Virginia
Slims of Honda. Monica Seles, who
is skipping the event, wi 11 take over
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"I know Rertnae very well and
we have a lot of fun said Graf,
who usually presents a somber de-
meanor. "If you don't have to be
serious, you enjoy it more
her right thumb in a sknng accident I
13 months ago. She has not won a
Grand Slam tournament since after
winning eight of the previous nine
Her 6o-match winning streak ;
� second-longest in history �
ended last Mav. In her two previ-
og� tounaments this year she has
failed toneach the semifinals.
"The point for me is to plav I
well Graf said 1 don't care about
the Number 1 ranking or who's on
the other side of the net It's just me
on the court, and doing the best 1
can
Fee and Tuition per Session:
Undergraduate $110 phis
Graduate: $110 plus
1991 SUMMER SCHOOL
CALENDAR
Session I: May 20-June 24
Session II: June 26-July 31
NC Resident
$30 p�r credit hour
$40 per credit hour
Nonresident
$210 per credit hour
$220 per credit hour
UNC-CH often, during two 5 W week sessions, one of the largest summer programs in the
United States. Over 900 courses ant scheduled in 40 disciplines A typical course load per session
� 4-7 semester hours
For the first time, some evening and night courses ant offered Spaces are also available in
Summer School Study Abroad programs.
Students from any college or university, teachers, rising high school seniors, and others who
are not enrolled at UNC-CH may apply as Visttng I�� Students.
Please send me a catalog and application form:
Name
Street
City
State
Zip
Mail to.
Phone:
The Unirereity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Sum
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(919) 962-1009
(AABO
School, CB 3340,
08
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Continued from page 9
rair to midland
I all the starters
er and Grace
game
V &M thev will
face lames Madison University ir
the semifinals JMU hasa bye in th
first round and are seeded first ir
the tournament. ECU lost both
games against jMU this season.
Continued from page 9
Move believe
ipete with other
Ion I teams this
ipelHill,NC
to the quality
� players.
The Pirates will get an
chance to prove this as they
the season next week as the host a
tournament in New Bern with
second-rankedTar Heels coming
town.
Continued from page 9
�st a:
the!
gtoj
veil as regional
ies advisory
rum modicum
at s produced
and plaved
i.e has an ad-
ol with more
winsover lessquality Delany said
Other factors are opportunities.
Lots of times a good tdjm might be
in a weak conferenceJ�d make an
attempt to plav a gc
ence schedule Then
attempts to give that
efit of the doubt j
ion-conier-i
committee!
hooltheben-2
i
is to make own name i
v dav after he
K,rch 5(X) m
his fourth
�wr as The
a tnbute in
tnes on the
the most m
c �r racing
lr Petty JO,
a rand sign
arriving Ir
ise of pnor
entered the
rodominatelv
female autograph seekers.
Seated at a small table at the
hack of a local department store,
Pettv signed shirt sleeves, scrap-
books and pu hires All the while
he flashed that famous Pcttvsmile.
"In the past 24 hours I've
signed a ton of em Petty said of
the autographs I've ftfern all over,
everywhere It's ust been a real
hectic day
And a long one. It started ad
5 30a.m. with a mom'ing televisions
show appearance in Charlotte
N C And 14 hours later, he was!
still going strong.
:ay as No. 1
?
her second-
s tournament
�nger count
mgs
this week,
round Tues-
rheduled op-
u of Sweden.
1 of illness.
f.ennaeStubbs
Ir the crowd
r-trv well and
said Graf,
la somber de-
It have to be
ore'
Top-ranked since August 17,
1987, Graf is trying to come out of a
slump that began after she broke
her right thumb in a skiing accident
13 months ago. She has not won a
Grand Slam tournament since after
winning eight oi the previous nine.
Her 6vmatch winning streak
� second-longest in history �
ended last Mav In her two previ-
(4k toyjnaments this vear she has
tailed to reach the semifinals.
The point for me is to play
well Graf said Idon'tcareabout
the Number 1 ranking or who's on
the other side oi the net. It's just me
on the court, and doing the best I
can
SUMMER SCHOOL
CALENDAR
tesion I: May 20-June 24
Ission II: June 26-July 31
tent Nonresident
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tit hour $220 per credit hour
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ire offered Spaces are also available in
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I Chapsi Hill, Summer School, CB 3340,
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 7, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 07, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.797
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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