The East Carolinian, March 5, 1991






�iie 4�uBt (EntBlxnxnn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
o4 No.80
Tuesday, March 5, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
10 Pages

Vew fees
pay for
computer
�xpansion
Media Board halts
Bv Bill 1 gbert
S),ltt Writer
-t hools and14
�its willK purchasing i�
'nt with monev from
1 1 .pufinji hnologA
donstudents tintion
�i
�1 t!v �
'
��

. :�rd � .
-� � Dij -� . lueatkw'
� �
��
indck parln �
incudr
� -ri. s � mistn lilttN
.ir � :
ting .gFee
� : general
production of yearbook
Bv Blair Skinner
News I liitor
Collesn Haimbaugh ECU Photo Lao
? he 1991 Buccaneerhasbeen will not be published because production
began too late in the year for it to be completed on time
Furney Tames dies
over weekend
The Media Board voted Mon-
day night in suspend the publica-
tion of Th u � for this year.
What wedid wasdecided that
n going to end the production
f thr :�" irb�" 'k. Media
B iard C1 on Fran Frazier
� ; We'rejustwav too far behind
to have anvthtng nut b early tali.
We mt i i'uin. : . � : �� ut
1 razier said . rk began too
late fi r the yearh ���k to be om
plt'ted i'ii tirra
Prodi tion ' . tting
started in (anuarv I rau-r said
k thai � '
should ha been done as earl i
las; �, �. . �� � i
1 . � obk a i op editor at
� ��.� � -1' ce i Htxember ot
said po.T planning was one
ted the yearbook
no waj that the XJ
tull pages thai are expected can be
produced oWesaid-There'sncrt
enough time Currentlv.
everything's sort of been put on
hold
'The basic shape ot The Bucca-
neer in the end was that everybody
was sort (t optimistic he said
"After 1 had been on staff lohn
� Rutherford, layi putdesignerforTte
, aneer) and I discovered that no
production other than having pic
rare requisitions done and having
rhe ov t designedi had K endone)
The pn 'Jtk tion amounted ti i
little or none at that point in anu-
an
I raursai.i I � i i aneer had 3
k ontrat t w ith I avlor Publishing to
print the book Media Adviser .rev;
Br �. md ruvi rsitv Attomev Ben
Irons will meet w ithrepres ntatives
ol layior Publishing to discuss
contract obligations b the end ot
the week, she said
Brown was unavailable lor
comment Monday night
1 raier said she did not kn ��
how much money had been spent
to date on vearbHk operations, or
' i student in the
ingdigi-
lent could use the
d Similarly,
find th 11 ab useful
iniv rsit
�� � i � ere re
mputing and
mitti � v huh
� : � erx latu i
� �� - and
� rson
� �
iidtrx critenaused
imb
vl : �ukd beserved K
patibilil
� � itn existing
I ! w li.i! 1 a is
ustifii ation"
.i. tenon �
i subjei '
. �! , nOW linu h the
' � ould.i, Hi,ill impTl the
� � Computer � igi .
ECU News Bureau
Fumey Keith fames, who had
inseled i it, ouraged and helped
manv thou sands of colk?ge students
during 25 vcarsas aneer Planning
and Placement director at East
( arofina University, died Sunday
night ot a cerebral hemorrhage He
wa �
uffered the fatal str. lu
r in the dav and died at Pitt
( ounty Memorial I iospitalat6p.m.
rding to W ilkerson 1 uneral
Home 1 uneral arrangements were
in; i mplete
i lined the East c arolma
st.itt ,1 ' ; -lev ment and lob I rain
� n i 66, the yeai before
. ;nated a universitv
Insixmoi �: met areerPlanning
,mc Placement Office was estab-
: md 1.inies bei ame its firs!
dm � � �
� itive ot rural Martin
ount imes is sun i by his
�. �� the I oner i Isie Roberson of
bersonville and two children,
Michael Keith and Rae Marie He
as the son ot' laston and Mamie
lames of rural Martin ounty
I lis first p 'sit.on afu i gradua-
im Eastt arolma in .
busint ss education at
JamesviUe High School 1 le
: reesinscl
ministratu n tnd supervi
inseftngat 1
i studied guidance
� i Statel i r I
fames wasguidancedirei tor.u
Pitt lechi il Inshtuti
egi ��
hired I arofinaaneer Plan
I h ement is a ui ii
s 1 h vision i i Studk nl i il
K: ielv for his personal
��it. ft students and his n
ii manner in helping students
in er i hoices fames ted
manv thi lusands to �� a
reei
( Kir mam purpose is to serve
Ihi rudi nts, lames said Since a
i universin is frequi
iali d b its alumni and the su
i ess th, hieve m tin it i
professions, it becomes our respoi
. . . .
. �. t p'ssihle (.hou e
1 le as an organiei
founder ot the North arolma
Placement Asstx lation and served
as one of its tirst presidents I ! ��� as
Fumey K. James
ber of the Southern College
merit Association and served
on its board of directors and was a
bei f the College Placement

gether with ECI 's Schools
tursinvid MltedHealth lames
ized and ondu ted the
� s annual 1 leaithareers
it vhu h 1 v 1 iiiniors and se
niors pursuing health related de
are int � ed by prospei
� mpioers He organized and
: icted numerous other i areer
; � � onentatioi si s
rkshi 't-s
� �
(Via Kappai hapterofthePiOmega
Phi honor s,i it c. in business edu-
t at mi was dedicated to f umey K
lames m rev unit ion ot his sin loss
in hdpingstudents find nbs
Member of Society of Friends addresses post-war Middle East
By I itn Rogers
stjff WnU-r
�� believes the al
, lory over Iraq is a
foi the free world
I riendsommittee on
l egislatton, a lobbying
iated with the Religious
fFriw I otherwise known
akers believes that there are
innersand many losi-rs.isa
�In war in th Middle Hast
.�, a representative
aatdtheworld'senvi
� and i hildren are IWO
. � M losersofthewarinaconfer
last week
war, the losers out-
the winners Nve said.
aid tlu fKillutionof theair
ind � and flw exposure of chil
ihei to the violence of warareprob-
i aused v the war
11 in ot 50 years down tin'
: iad i hildren of today will still lx'
scarred by the memories of this
Nye s�ii�l
Nye also questioned the ben-
etits (it the liberation ot Kuwait,
M ln h wasoneof President(,eorge
Mm �h's primary goab of the war
Will Kuwait Iva winner? "she
asked Kuwait, the county where
m mnenarenot treatedequalhwith
men, th country ruled by a mon-
archy, the country that will cost
one hundred billion dollars to re-
build?"
Nye also said that the IS.
n onomyand the citizenry wiB face
potentially grave consequences
li ause of our involvement in the
war "In dollars and cents, we can-
not calculate where the U.S. will be
after paying for this war Nye said.
She mentioned that the United
States sx'nt more in the first three
hours of the war than it spent on the
homeless all last year
"The United States has created
enemies around the world Nye
said "The only place it is safe for us
(U5 ' itiens) to be is within our
own borders
Evert though Israel will benefit
militarily from Iraq's defeat, Nye
questions the gams of the victory.
"Will the citizens (of Israel) feel
sater six-said "Will theybecloser
to peace?"
Nye said the United States looks
to be taking on a new worldwide
role of poluemen of the world
She said one benefit to the
1 rated States would be, "the years
of guilt and inadequacy of the
United States military after Viet-
nam will be erased
She also snd that US compa-
nies wills-egrowing revenues from
the contracts they will have to help
Nancy Nye
rebuild Kuwait
One unknown winner of the
war, according to Nye, are Islamic
fundamentalist movements.
"Extreme fundamentalists are
atnghteningenemyNycsaid. vso
matter what religion they repre-
sent" Nye said that the- current
situation in the Middle East is a
recipe tor disaster.
When asked what she believ ed
the United Nationshadgained from
the war, Nye said that she did not
teel sure that they had become any
stronger because of the United
States' influence over the other
countries in the alliance
Shi- said that the 1 anted a
tions resolutions against Iraq were,
how much money is involved in the
contract with Tavlor Publishing.
"I don't believe we've paid
anything vet. she said.
Coble said " . right now we
owe lavlor Publishing' a down
payment ot $5OjO0l Basically
were Irving ti i find out or dist over
whether or ra I .v .vouid ha i I
pay that (moncA i
Wi disi ussed (in the meeting
Monda whether we could go to a
smaller format or rxti ble s.m.1
"We might � ould get awav with a
sm.iilertorm.it but we might have
to p.u ap nalrv to I ivli r Publish-
ing h r i hat and als ti� book
protibU wouldn't make it out un-
til la I the si mester
il : d i.i �� . ' � : tion
ot next �. ear s hi n k Lite, he said
( oble said the yearbook statt
will meet either "the Mondav
d ifterspringbreak t d
vhat t U with the money, what to
doab tuttheb -ok tor next year and
what to do about finding someone
to edit the book
SGA faces shortfall,
forgoes special election
By Shannan Copeland
Staff Writer
Student Government Associa-
tion President Allen Thomas said
�he student govemmen t budget was
running short of cash in Monday
night's meeting.
"There is only $19,090 left in
the budget for the year he said
'We art in a sort of red flag area '
Thomas said he had assumed
control of finances since former
Treasurer Rand v Ri ival resigned last
month Withoutatn-asuar.Thomas
said, they were unaware of the
current amount left in the budget
Thomas was not acting trea-
surer for long Because he was
running unopp'sod in the special
election to replace Royal I OT)
Dudley was appointed s , mea-
surer Mondav night Dudlev said
this was done to save monev
Dudley was Thomas schief of staff
Thomasalso said he had toveft �
last week's$5,679appropriation to
the iospdhoir.
the (lospel Choir could still
attend their concert t. wv a transfer
was made, Phomassaid. The monev
that was given t( them for robes
will now be used for the tnp rhev
wereabo given an addmonal 2
The choir will K able to ask t r
money to buy robes during annual
budget requests
Phi Beta Lambda was given
$1,292 to attend a state leadership
conference in Charlotte Thev origi-
naBy asked for $2,500
In other business l"he f:nt;lish
Graduate Society received $1 s
and a constitution forStudents tor
Mother Earth, an environmental
educationorgar.izahor � aspassed
Noted Professor speaks
on nature of Islam
By Matt King
Features Editoi
"purchased bv lames Baker in his
tnps u i countries prior to the vote.
She said many government debts
were forgiven bv the United States
it they voted in favor of the
res ilutions.N ve, who was once the
director of a sch(xl in Jerusalem
and has lived with Palestinians,
claims there are "deep, heartfelt
roots in the Arab community
Her niece was living in Kuwait
during the timeof the Iraqi invasion
but escaped to the United States in
early September,
We said she heard conflicting
reports about what actually hap-
pened dun ng the invasion horn her
niece, another acquaintance in Ku-
wait and the American media.
"1 Tie media has had a tremen-
dous influence on the public opin-
ion Nvesaid.
"They areshowinga very, very
narrow view of what is going on
ECL students and C.reenville
area residents were offered a liok
into the world of Islam last Monday
night.
Dr. Ralph braibanb, full pro-
fessorof historv at Duke University
presented! a forum on "The Struc-
ture and Natureof Islam
Braibanti has served as a v lsit-
mg professor at The University of
Kuwait, as a Ford Foundation con-
sultant in Beirut and Saudi Arabia
and he was a UN consultant in
Malaysia.
Braibanti started the seminar
by illustrating examples of how the
western world perceives the people
that follow Islam as being raging,
vengeful, terrorist. He read five
examples from contemporary au-
thors that labeled Muslims as near-
fanantics.
He then went on to give some
reasons for Muslim Chnstian ani-
mosity. He cited years of British
rule, the development of Israel as a
state, the massing of wealth by a
verv few Muslims, the Iranian revo-
lution and the emmergence of the
Avhtollah Khomeini.
Braibai ti ib n i ; n dlra . s
recent behavior a. being a contrib
uting factor oi western anti-Islami
behavior
1 le went on to point out th-
overwhelming presence of the
Muslim religion in the world. Ihen-
are over 1 billion Muslims in the
world wruchamountsto27percent
of the world's human population
Dr. Braibanti constructed a
seven step postulate to examine the
make-up oi the Islamic people 1 le
explained that, contrary to popular
belief. Muslims of Arabic origin are
in the majority. There are 4" coun-
tries in the realm of Islam, most of
which either have Mushmconstitu-
tions or the Muslims are in the ma-
jonty.
Braibanti said thatWhat ex-
ists, is a quarter of the world's
population that shares the same re-
ligion, but hasmany different socia'
influences. This leads to conflicting
moral values
Within the Muslim world there
are different sects that further dis-
rupt anv continuity that Western-
ers might look for in Islamic faith.
The Sunni Muslims make up 80
percent of the Islamic peoples and
See Islam, page 2
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial
University staff and students
should make simple changes
to help beautify our campus
Features ft
Stuart Oliphant interviews Phil
Solem of The Rembrandts and
reviews their Friday show
Classified 6
Sports 9
The ECU baseball team split
a Thursday double-header
with St Augustine





oltjc �uat Ear0litrian
o4 No 80
Tuesday, March 5, 1991
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Greenville. Nohth Carolina
Circulation 12,000
10 Pages
Mew fees
pay for
computer
xpansion
H Bill I gbert
SUII U ritei
Media Board halts
msttldt t!

� i rM di

1 H
I
, � �;
production of yearbook
H Blair Skinner
Neto s I lilt or
Die Media Board voted Mon
da night to suspend the publica
I .� r f(�i this year
how much money is involved in the
i ontrai t v ith Taylor Publishing
"1 don'l believe we've paid
anything yet she said
( obk? said ' ru;ht now we
was sort c( optimistic he said owe (Taylor Publishing) a down
enough time Currently,
everything's sort of been put on
hold
"The basic shape of The Bucca
et in the end was that everybody
nt
t I '�. I , .� rtorthisyear was sort cl optimistic, he siM owe tlaylor fublishing) a down
What wed id wa li idedthat "After 1 had been on start fohn paymenl I I �� Basically we
ing to end thi production (Rutherford.layoutdesignerforTJii weretrvii I find out or discover
ii irbo k Media ' . � ind I disci vcrcd that no whethci ri ve i Id have to
; 1 . : . . . . 1 . I t � I , . , , 1. i , . . m . mi � I , . t
nsl am '
� an i
iti for tin �� � irl
i in u
rtHiiKl �
ran Frazier production ther than having pi
o far behind ture reu,ui ition done and having
ihei ovei I ��)' hadbcendone)
The pr dui tii m amounted to
little or nom il thai point in anu-

i reji
e anvtl ' I i irlv ta
.�nt
in anuai
� - � - m Iihi
k to b
I raier said
ii
I raii i �� I � i .�� �r had a
� ontra I ��� ith 1 a l r Publishing l
print the book Media Adv iser reg
,ed thi meeting
M � ' ther we could go to a
smalli � ' " it rncl Coble said
We n ild ith a
smalli � � � it, but v night hav
� �. �, � ; � 'ublish-
� il �
; � ildn't make it i ut un
iUi h
w ,v � (��� i
iv t: n � i ��� mil � � it tt ti m vBen ' lat� in tl
: earlv as Inn willmeel threpresentative
: I to discus
iop editor at i ontrat t obligatu n: I . ,l
the week she said
� : :
, ne
v n to'a;
Colinan Haimbaugh ECU Priolo lab
� 1991 Bu - meer has been will not be publish! Ibe lusepi I I i
. in � late in the year tor it to be c ompleted on time
Furney James dies
over weekend
i
i � ' � � � �
I the yearbook ommenl Mi mday nighl
thai th� � Frazier said she did not knov
�jch money had been spent
lull ages th il are expected can Ik- how mm
i iblesaid. There'snol to date on yearbook operations, or
duo
ECU News Bureau

� ; � � and
� rtk I
: � endationsti
afl urs and
�sin
pal
istil
tin Keith lames, who had
in iged and helped
I llegi students
dm isCareer Planning
. : icen t directoi at 1 isl
L'nr ersitv, died su
night t a i erebral hemorrhage I le
hi
suffered the fatal stri ke
� i the dav and died al I itl
ml Menu nal I lospitalat6p m
� ilkerson i uneral
i i uneral arranger� nts w n
ii n omj Ii ti
lined the i ast i arolina
tail plov mint and lob I :
. ' l r in 1 the yeai bef re
. ited a univi �
� � ireei Planning
: � i iffii i �vas estab
imes , ame its fii I
i � Iness u3iK.li i
rees i
I supervi
� ' i id stud icd
i I it N � . rsil
s v asguidant edin I �

na.Canvi
� '� ' � . . � luction
nt next veai h�xk lati ' � aid
l . ble said tin v� arh k �k .tatl
will n eithei the Mi inda .
luesdavattei phngbn kl
v hat ti do a ith tlu- monev whatl
di iboutthel k for next) irand
what ti i do about finding some m
to liit the book
SGA faces shortfall,
forgoes special election
�.

in,ii i.
th U
�ion ot StucU nt 1 il
students and his insi i
in, ni ; i :
r choice:
��ai ids to ' � I
and � lao i
iti! tudi nts. lames said
11 'ill . i � iniversitv is tn
llleli

tibji
h the
� the
e Computer
i ruia! Martin
ml lames is survived b) his
the fi Tiner I Isic R iberson t 't
� � i mi illi and t i hildren,
ii I Keith and Rai V1 n I le
i th son of iaston and Mamie
11 rural Martin ' mt
I Ii- first p isihon afti i gradua
Furney K. lames
'� - � f thi -s'utln niollege
� ition and served
� - ird of directors and as a
- � il theollege Placement
il
, " � � Mb E I s Sv hools
I" rsii � '�� II tl imes
ed a nd
rsitv sannual I lea tl u
.i w hu Ii FX L junu 'is and se
pursuing hi ted di
id b prospei
� mpli ei rganiil
� I nui ' i � ' ' � '
B Shannan Copeland
Stjlf Writer
Student (Government Assm ia
turn President Allen Thomas said
the student government budget was
running short of cash in Monday
night s meeting.
"There is only �sN.i) left in
the budget for the year he said
'We are in a sort of red flag area "
Thomas said he had assumed
control of finances since termer
i reasurer Randy Ri iya! resned last
month Withouta treasurer Thomas
said, they were unaware of the
. tirrent amount left in the budget
rhomas was not acting trea
surer for long Be ause he was
ninning unopposed in thi pei �
� Ii lion to replace Royal ! larry
I udlev is appointed i.A "� i
surer Mondav nieht Pudlev said
this was done to save mone
! hidley was rhomas schiefof staff
rhornasalsosaidhehadtoveto
last week's$579 appropriation to
the l .ospvl C hoir.
So the lospelhoir ould still
attend their concert tour a transfer
was made, Thomas said The mi ne
that was given to them tor robes
will now be used tor the tnp hey
to erealsn given an addltu 'nal $2 "
Thei hoir will be able to ask tor
money to buy robes during annual
budget requests
Phi Beta I ambda �� .�-
"fl.?u2 to attend a st.itr leadership
conference in Chariotti �
nallyaskedfor$2 300
In other business ' hsh
Graduate Society received SI "s
and a constitution tor S
Mother Earth, an environmental
educationorgani7ation �� aspassed
Noted Professor speaks
on nature of Islam
i . and
foundei of the No than lina
I . 1.1 ii nut "sMKiatKn and served
asoneof its first presidents I lewas
Phi
irl
� � : thePi( hnega
� in business edu-
By Matt king
l eatures I Jitnr
alien vas dedii ited to : urnev k
James in recognition ol his success
in hell ' ts find jobs
iV
lember of Society of Friends addresses post-war Middle East
Bv Iiin Rogers
Stjlt VNiiti-r
tne ai
rid
Is G immittee on
a lobbying
ithtl eReligious
t 1 nends,otherwisekn �wn
i rs heiievt s that there are
nei " �" losers as a
in th Middle East
i representative
aid tl i v.orld'sem I
: and � hildren are two
fthewarinaci �nfer
A.ir. the ksers out
her thi ' old
aid tin pollution of the air
ind s posure of chil
to the violence of warareprob-
- � ar
us down the
i ,u luldren of toda) will still lv
- are ' � thi inenx)ries of this
,iu I
� il iu stu rned the tx'iv
lib ration of Kuwait,
wasoneof PresidentC leorge
nm iry goab ot the war
Will Kuwaitbea winner?" die
. " vail i ounty where
ire not treated equally with
ih. country ruled (n ,i rrm
archv the countrv that vmII .ost
om hundred billion dollars to re-
build?
Nye also said that the U S
economj andthecitizenr) toillface
potentiall) grave consequences
hi au' of our involvement in the
war "In dollars and cents, we (an-
not i ak ulati where the U S. will be
after paying for this war Nyesaid.
She mentioned that the L'nittxi
States spenl more in the first three
hours of the war than it spent on the
homeless all last vear
The United Slates has created
enemies around the world Nye
said "The only place it is safe for us
(US. itiens) to be is within our
n tx irders
Even though Israel will beneftl
militarily from Iraq's dete.it, 'ye
questions the gams of the victory.
Will the citizens (or Israel) feel
s,it�r she said "Will they be closer
to peace?"
Nye said the United States looks
to be taking on a new worldwide
n ile i if polnemen of the world
She said one benefit to the
United States would be, tin years
of i;uilt and inadequacy of the
i nited States military after Viet-
nam will be erased
She also said that I' S compa-
nies will seegrowingrevenues from
thee 'ntrai ts thev will have to help
Nancy Nye
rebuild Kuwait.
One unknown winner ot the
war, ai cording to Nye, are Islamic
fundamentalist movements
"Extreme fundamentalists are
a frightening enemy, Nyesaid No
matter what religion thev repre
sent Nye said that the current
situation in the Middle East is a
recipe lor disaster.
When asked what she believed
the! anted Nations had gained from
the war, Nye slid that she did not
feel sure that thev had become am
stronger because ot the United
States influence over the other
countries in tin' alliance
She said that the I nited a
tn ms res ilutK ns against Iraq were.
I un hasedb) lames Baker in his
trips t � . ountries prior to the vote.
She said mam government debts
were forgiven by the I nited States
it thev voted in favor of the
res, 'lutums ve, who wasonce the
director of a school m Jerusalem
,u has lived with Palestinians
claims there are "deep, heartfelt
n k ts in the Arab community
Her niece was living in Kuwait
during the tirneof the Iraqi invasion
but es( aped to the United Suites tn
early September.
Nye said she heard conflicting
reports about what actually hap-
pened dun ng the invasion from her
nave, another acquaintance m Ku-
watl and the American media.
"The media has had a tremen-
dous influence on the public opin-
ion, e said
I hej areshowinga very, very
narrow view of what is going on
E I students and Greenville
area residents were offered a look
int the wi irldi f Islam last Monday
night
I r Ralph Braibanti, full pro
fessorof history at 1 hike University
presented a forum on "The Stnic-
ture and Nature ot Islam
Braibanti has served as a visit-
ing professor at Hie University of
Kuwait, as a Ford Foundation con
sultant in Beirut and Saudi Arabia
and he was a L N consultant in
Malaysia.
Braibanti started the seminar
by illustrating examples of how the
western world perceives the people
that follow Islam as being raging,
vengeful, terrorist. He read five
examples from contemporary au-
thors that labeled Muslims as near-
tanantics.
I le then went on to give some
reasons for Muslim Chnstian ani-
mosity. He cited years of British
rule, the development of Israel as a
state, the massing of wealth by a
very few M uslims, the Iranian revo-
lution and the emmergence oi the
Avhtollah Khomeini.
Brail antials menl llrat
recent behavior as being a contrib
uting fact! �r i t western anti-lslami.
behavior
I le went on to point out tl
overwhelming presence oi tl
Muslim religion in the world fhere
are over 1 billion Muslims in the
world which amounts to 27 percent
of the world's human population
Dr. Braibanti constructed a
seven step postulate to examine the
make-up of the Islamic people I le
explained that,contrary to popular
belief, Musi mis ot Arabic originate
in the majority There are 4" coun-
tries in the realm of Islam, most of
a hich either have Muslimconstitu-
tions or the Muslims are in the ma-
lontv.
Braibanti said that. What ex-
ists, is a quarter of the world's
population that shares the same re-
ligion, but has manv different s, via'
influences. This leads to conflicting
moral values "
Within the Muslim world tluTe
are different sects that further dis
nipt anv continuity that Western-
ers might look for in Islamic faith
The Sunni Muslims make up St1
percent of the Islamic peoples .wd
See Islam page 2
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial
Features
rr Sports
University staff and students
should make simple changes
to help beautify our campus
Stuart Oliphant interviews Phil
Solem of The Rembrandts and
reviews their Friday show
The ECU baseball team split
a Thursday double header
with St Augustine
:
Oaarffted





2 JBti �agt (Earolfnlan March 5, 1991
ECU Briefs
Kris Gadbow wins free Spring
Break trip to Key West, Fla.
A drawing for a free Spring Break trip to Key West, Fla for
Spring Break was held Friday, March 1 at the University Book
Exchange
Kris Gadbow, a junior majoring in social work, won the trip.
She will take with her Kim Woods, a friend from high school who
is also a student at ECU.
The trip includes air transportation furnished by American
AirlinesAmerican Eagle Gadbow and her guest also won a
work long stay at I.a Concha Holiday Inn.
(uibow's entry was drawn from about 82,(XX) entries. She
placed 418 entries in the drawing.
Don Fdwards, manager of UBE, said, "We're just over-
whelmed by the number of people who registered
( .adrxuv s.iid she filled out entries whenever she had spare
time and that she didn't take the entries in until the day before the
drawing The entries had to be taken from The Fast Carolinian,
cosponsor of the trip with UBE
( idbow planned to go to 1 lilton 1 lead with her father before
she found out she had won the trip.
She has never been to Key West She said she has a guide
book she is going to take with her but, "We're going to live on the
beach basically
(iadbow said, "I am so excited, (but) it hasn't sunk in yet
Majors Fair to be held in General
Classroom Building Wednesday
The Career Education Committee will be sponsoring the
Majors lair from l to 3 p.m. Wednesday on the first floor
hallways of the General Classroom Building to help students
choose their major.
The objective of the Majors lair is to provide ECU students
time to meet with representatives of various academic units to
discuss their future plans More than 40 stations, ranging from
education to technical departments, will be operating for stu-
dents to review
Each Station will have faculty, senior students or trained
operators to answer questions. Literature on the departments
will also bo provided to help students become more informed
about potential majors.
Dl Leonard D. l.illev r ,a professor of the School of Educa-
tion and chairman of the Career Education Committee, said the
Majors Fair is especially helpful if a person is thinking of choosmg
or changing their major.
I illev said students tan go from table to table to pick and
Choose the major that is best suited to their individual needs
I lure wiilbebrochuresand program information for students to
take home and read.
Las! year was ECU'S first Majors lair. "More than 300
students look advantage of the Majors Fair. It was quite success
tui It this year works the Majors Fair may become an annual
event I Illy said
All students interested in choosing or changing their major
are urged to attend the Majors Fair. Studentsdo not have to make
an appointment to talk to the representatives, the) can discuss
their interests and needs immediately
Compiled from slid reports
Researcher Arthur Powell to present
Writing in Mathematics program
Noted researcher Arthur Powell will present a program,
Writing in Mathematics, at ECU on Thursday, March 7. The
program is under auspicesof the ECU Minority Presence Initiative
Program, the Science and Mathematics Education Center, IX
partment of Ma thematicsandTheCoastal Plains Writing Project.
Powell's will speak at 4 p.m. in Room 3008 of the General
Classroom Building. Faculty, studentsand the general public are
invited.
Powell is l noted African-American researcher and profes-
sor of mathematics at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J.
Compiled Irom ECU News Bureau reports
Crime Scene
Intoxicated student injures
himself in Scott Residence Hall
Feb.27
1110 Gotten Residence Hall and Ninth and Cotanche streets
parking lots: took a vandalism and larceny report.
1711 �Tyler Residence Hall (east): student issued campus
citation for speeding.
Feb.28
1008�Aycock Residence Hall: took a report of damage to
personal property. Damage was to the victim's bicycle.
1114 �Mendcnhall Student Center (west): issued a state
Citation 10 a student for no operator's license and inspection
violation.
2025- Jones Residence Hall: recovered stolen property.
Student given campus citation for same.
2128�Chnstenbury Memorial Gym: assisted rescue in
transporting a student with a fractured elbow to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
March 1
0048 Slay Residence Hall: took a report of harassing phone
calls.
March 2
0247 - Magistrate's office: subject issued a state citation for
speeding.
March 3
2014-�Ficklen and Charles streets: issued a state citation to a
student for having expired tags.
2249�Belk Residence Hall: investigated a report of a broken
window on the Third Floor.
March 4
0114�Location unknown: issued a non-student a campus
citation for speeding and failure to carry operator's license.
0128� Fresh Way (TOth Street): officer observed subjects
breaking into vehicles. Greenville Police were advised, and the
subjects were taken into custody by Greenville officers.
0148�Scott Residence Hall: assisted residence hall staff with
an intoxicated male student who had injured himself. Subject
was transported to PCMH Emergency Room by residents.
Crime Scam to lake from official ECU Palk Safety logs
�lje �a0t(Saniiiman
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Elementary Education
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I Computer
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By Rebecca Barber
Special to The East Carolinian
Today, ECU'S elementary edu-
cation students will take part in a
Health Teaching Fair.
These students will present
lessons to about 100 first-graders
from local elementary schools.
The ECU students study health
education and physical education
teaching methods. Today they will
put what they have learned to
practical use. As part of a semester
project, the teaching students must
design learning projects about dif-
ferent topics. These topics include
pollution, drugabuse, nutrition and
dental health.
The fair will consist of about 21
lessons,each being taughtby groups
of five University students. Because
the fair lasts only two hours, each of
the youngsters will attend about 10
ten-minute lessons.
Mary Glascoff, an assistant
professor of health education, said
the children could expect to see
models of the heart and the tongue
along with educational puppet
shows.
The ECU students have also
designed role playing activities to
educate the youngsters.
Glascoff said, in one case, the
teaching studentsact ou t emergency
behavior with the children. Pre-
tending to be 911 emergency opera-
Islam
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theShiites, which make up the rest
These two groups have a his-
tory of conflict that over-shadows
the faith.
Braibanri spoke of the "con-
flicting trends of consolidation and
fragmentation that adds to the
confusion of figuring out the Mus-
lim people. This concept refers to
the way the actual borders of the
Muslimand Arabic countries are in
constant transition.
To conclude, Dr. Braibanri de-
tors, the University students instruct
the elementary students about pro-
viding information if they should
ever have to plaoe such a call.
Another activity shows the ef-
fects of arthritis. The children put
on gloves and try to button shirts
A lesson on blindness is also
included in the health fair It involves
blindfolding the children and
teaching them to count steps to reach
a certain place.
Along with the visual aids, the
ECU teaching studen, enveloped
several short songs related o some
of the lessons being taught The
effectiveness of this activity is based
largely on the fact that this is a
hands-on experience for all in-
volved Glascoff said.
The elementary students will
also receivean assortment of health
related stickers and handouts from
the ECU students to remind them
of their experiences at the fair.
This is the fourth time the fair
has been held.
Glascoff said: "The (ECU) stu
dents love it. They feel more com-
fortable teaching to young children
instead of to each other "
Glascoff said because the F l
students are taking lower-level
methods classes, which are not de-
signed to prepare them for imme
diate teaching positions, this project
is related to their educational abih-
ties
Continued from page 1
tailed some of the beliefs of tk
Muslim religion It turns out that
Mulems and Chnstians and lews
have very similar religions, hesaid
They also share many religious
doctnnes, such as the birth of Christ
and his existence as a great prophet
When asked what one thing
would be necessary to calm things
in the Middle East, Braibanti said
"Somewhere down the road some
land must be given to the Palestin-
ians
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for a Pool Manager at its City Outdoor
Pool. Applicant must have Water Safety
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management experience. Application
may be picked up at the City Personnel
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information, contact
Charles Williams, PMSS
student body's aca to computer
11" wnmitti i tlso worked
i id mi ,(i raphi - cover-
1 can us . � I rev aided
in rdi partmerrtaJ cooperation by
bvoring proposalswhich involved
more th m . . artmenl or
needed .vith
1 e I u rtfalis and
� ��� , to insure
graduates oi East Carolina
I raversiry are computer (iterate
fc .i Ktevethi end theuniver-
tt .
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Ho or, the a (ministration
ssa
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��
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Thj commitl
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student -
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(hark- Kirbj
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hat a bea
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SIKH KS ��AI I1RNATOKS





OJlie fEaat (f uruliniuH March 5, 1991 13
Itary Education
give health fair
arber
Zaroliniin
Mitarv edu
Ike part in a
ill present
Ifi tt graders
IS'hools.
rudy health
i! education
the will
arned to
t : atmcstci
tdents must
about dit
mcs include
ctntionand
t of about 21
r:n groups
Because
� each ol
11 a about 10
insistent
ition said
ect to see
the tongue
puppet
wve also
tivities to
case the
nptvpncv
It
pe
ra
tors the University srudentsinstruct
the elementary students about pro-
viding information if they should
ever have to place such a call.
Another activity shows the ef-
fects of arthnhs. The children put
on gloves and try to button shirts.
A lesson on blindness is also
included in the health fair. It involves
blindfolding the children and
teaching them to count steps to reach
a certain place.
Along with the visual aids, the
ECl teaching sruden tu veloped
set oral short songs related :o some
ot the lessons being taught. "The
etfectn enessvt thisactivity is based
largely on the tact that this is a
hands on experience for all in-
volved Qaacoffand.
The elenvntarv students will
Ts, nvoneanassortmentofhcalth-
rvitod stickers aixi handouts from
the K I students to remind them
ot their experiences at the fair.
This is the fourth time the fair
has been hold
Gtescofl said: The (ECU) stu-
dents love it Thcv tool more com-
fortable teaching to voungchildren
instead ot to each other "
Qascoff said because the ECU
students are taking lower-level
methods classes which arc not de-
signed to prepare them for imme-
diate teaching positions this project
is related to their educational abili-
ties
Continued from page 1
ip the rest
�have .i his-
the con
bdation and
Idds 10 the
lit the Mus-
lr refers to
fcaibanti dt
tailed some ol the belied of the
Muslim religion It rums out that
Mulems aixl vlinstians and Jews
haw very similar religions, he said.
rhe also share manv religious
(kxtrines such as the birth of Christ
and his existenceasagmat prophet.
Wheri asked what one thing
would be necessary to calm things
Middle Fast Braibanri said,
Somewhere down the road some
land must be given to the Palestin-
ians
DICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
ily
imp
uided
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
756-2011
Buy one
Regular Shnmp
Platter at $6.50
Get the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter TREE
Good anytime
Beverage not included
Expires: 3-25-91
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Coin & Ring Man
IMMEDIATE
ASH $
SPRING BREAK
$
SMALL ELECTRONICS
S
WES
& SILVER (REGARDLESS OF
CONDITION)
AND
THES (JEANS. AND OTHER ITEMS
ESPECIALLY LARGE &
EXTRA-LARGE)
On the corner Below Fizz
4(X) S. Evans St.
752-3866
VILLE RECREATION
RKS DEPARTMENT
OL MANAGER
'ille Recreation and Parks
now accepting applications
lanager at its City Outdoor
tant must have Water Safety
Certificate and 2 years pool
it experience. Application
led up at the City Personnel
jated on corner of 5th and
rton Streets. For more
formation, contact
p Williams. OMSS
Computer
Continued from page 1
student body's seem tocampmer
. hi 'logy.
The committee also worked
U ward an oven geographic cover-
age (�l the campus, and rewards!
interdepartmental cooperation by
vonngproxMls which involved
more than one department or
school
We needed some way, with
ill these budget shortfalls and
w. 01 IXivis explains, "to inoure
I .i graduates of bast Carolina
i mversitv are computer literate
i to achieve thisond, the uni er-
�stablishifthet ompuhng.ind
rechnolog) lie anil its corre-
sponding allocation committee.
However, the administration
1 It the �5 fee w.ts necessary to
ute a means of raising money
; r the purchase ot computers
I he fee provides E U with a
n n s ,t upgrading and cxpand-
ii gthecomputerfacilitiesavailable
to students at a much faster rale
a reliant e on state money
rid ill �
Fmic Marshburri manager of
academic computing, emphasizes
the pains which were taken to in-
sure that the money was allocated
in accordance with the fund'sobjoc-
tives.
The decisions were made
chiefly bv faculty aivj students.
The committee is composed ot
representatives from the Univer-
sity administration, faculty, �nd
studentbody The members include
Inez Fridlv (Student Housing),
Charles Kirby (Planning & Institu-
tional Research), Dr. Dorothv
Clayton (Political Science), Or Ri
chard Kems (School ot Business)
and lohn I amb, a graduate student
Next semester, the corwnittec hopes
to have an undergraduate partici-
pate as well.
Marshbum said the objective
ot the these purchases is to "provide
students with dm vt experience with
state-of-the-art, discipline-specific,
technological equipment
1 k- outlines some advantages
to expect:
� he School ot Music's MIDI
system, in addition to increasing
students' access to technology, will
also show ase university items. No
Other university in thestatehasone.
The nearest MIDI system is at the
University of Tennessee.
� A grant to the Department of
Chemistry will allow students to
simulate chemical reactions on
computers. Asa result, the amount
of toxic waste routinely produced
by conventional labexpenmentscan
be significantly reduced
� A Computer-Aided Design
(CAD) Lab kxated in the Sclxxil of
Home Economics will allow stu-
dents to draft designs on-screen.
Experience in thisfield will increase
students' marketability after
graduation.
� The purchase of a VAX
mainframe by the Department of
Computer Sciences will give stu
dents mow access to technology.
Marshburn stresses the impor-
tance of this purchase, noting that
ECU is the last campus in the I'm
versify of North Carolina system to
obtain a VAX mainframe.
I jocal pharmaceutical company forced to recall drugs after poisonings
i.i � i -Ki H rRIANGl E
i Kt N.t (AP) rampei resis
� to nf liners and striienl regu
make it doubtful deconges-
� ��! i ipsuics Named for twocya-
do deaths were tainted during
di� u i the drug - maket said
Burroughs IVcHcome Co on
Sund n ccderedanationwiderecal
about one million packs ol
S lafed I2-Hnui after ttii federal
and I Vug Admmtstraoontoid
II i'North arolma basedcompjury
people died and one toll sen-
i ill after taking the capsules,
anidewasfound in thebodiesof
o of) the k nrns all of whom
re from Washington Mate.
1 vpiu � lai appears to be a
ilized situation, thecornpany has
ided ft institutt a nationwide
ill Phil (racy, president and
f xcoitiveoffkxTofBurroughs
. said Sunday at a news
afervno at th pharmaceutical
company s headquarters in Re-
search rriangle Park.
Meanwhile, a capsule that
showed signs of tampering was
returned toa racoma area store after
the ret all order was issued Sunday,
authorities said Pests were being
conducted to determine whether it
contained cyanide.
TheSudafed 1? Hourcapsules
art' manufactured tor Burnmghs
Wellcome by KV Pharrnaceuticals
in St Louis Burroughs Wellcome
packages them in tamper-resistant
containers at its plant in Greenvifle
Burroughs WeOcomedoes not own
k Pharmaceuticals, 1 racy said.
Company officials sud fhej
believe any tampering with the
capsules must have occurred after
the products were wrapped in cel-
lophane and shipped from the
Greenville plant.
Our assessment is that it
tampering did occur it occurred af-
ter it lett our control Tracy s.nd
The Greenville plant uses a
high speed mechanized process
that makes it highly unlikely that
human hands could interfere, said
I i id Barry, Burroughs Wellcome
vice president ot research and de
vetopment.
He said it was unlikolv the
product had been contaminated at
k Pharmat i uticals because of the
high (xids against any capsules
doitored there ending up in
Washington state
Thecompany tirst learned then
might boa problem on Feb. 7, when
Washington state health officials
told burroughs Wellcome that a
woman from (Xympia, Wash had
gotten sick after taking Sudafed 12-
Hour.
The woman, who took the
medication Feb I displayed some
ot the semptomsof cyanide poison-
ing, which include sudden attacks
oi nausea and extreme weakness-
She Iwis since recovered, nd
after investigating the incident,
burroughs Wellcome concluded
that it was not to blame and that no
avail was necessary, Tracy said.
Saturday night, the I DA in-
formed Burroughs Wellcome of a
cyanide poisoning death linked to
tampering with Sudafed 12-Hour.
4lVear-old woman fromTaco ma,
Wash , died Feb. 11 after taking the
capsules the dav before.
Early Sunday, Tracy said, the
company learned oL second death.
thistimeofa 44 year-old man from
1 aosy, Wash. The man took Sudafed
12 Hour on Feb. 17 and died the
ivxt dav, but nuanide w as found
in the body.
All three victims consumed
Sudafed horn blister packs bearing
the lot number 8U2H4b. The boxes
bore the lot Numbers tX12847 and
8U2849. Authorities speculated that
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SIIOi IS A
KNA1 s KS
IKON 1 IM
(It I (
the Uinled Sudafed capsules prob-
ably vere taken fronume box, laced
with cyanide and scaled m another
Kx.
"I'm not aware t this ever
happening before' lYacy s��ki
"When thtv are packaged �t our
plant0iey(thelotnumbcrs)rnatch "
Sudafed packaging has thav
lamper-proofl features, including a
blue gelatin buixl around tl�e cap-
sulc which makis it hmposBrfote to
takeapart;thealiiminiimarxlpMastit.
blister pack; and the carton, which
hastapeoncitherend that will break
ifaomranetriestoopen fhepx ke
But nothing is tanifx-r-proot,
Barry said. "If you really try hard.
vou can always tamper with this
product � or anv product
Burroughs. Weilconx' is asking
customers to return Sudated 12-
Hour, the only Sudafed prtxiuct
being recalled, to the store where
they bought it.
Shipments of the I? hmircap
sules which accounted tor more
than Sl million in L.S. s,iics last
year - have been hatted.
Kathv Ivirtlett, spokeswoman
tor Burroughs WeHcomc in Re-
search Triangle Park, s.iul the com-
pany h.ul not determined the cost
ot the avail.
At this point in tune, we're
really not kxking at the i t M
BtUllett said. "We re con a ur.ttin ;
ourettortson paolecting ii puWi
safety
In Charlotte, the KBI was not
commenting on the investigation
into the poisonings in the North-
west, including whether local FBI
agents were visiting the (.avrmlie
plant where the cvnanide-laced
Sudated capsules were packaged.
In 1986 two people in south
King County, Washdied in a tam-
pering case involving ot Extra
Strength Excedrin.
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1 'z'S
Live from New York,
Its Saturday Night!
Jeff Weingrad, co-author of A Backstage
History of Saturday Night Live, will present a
program about the book, the the relationships
of the SNL ensemble, the early problems
encountered in producing the show, and the
factors identified in maintaining the show's
success.
Book signing: 6:00 pm Tuesday March 5
at the Student Store
Program: 8:00 pm Tuesday, March 5
Hendrix Theatre-Mendenhall
Admission: Free
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Forum Committee
Student Union - making things happen at ECU





V
Site �aat Carolinian
Sprang tne ast Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bi air Skinner, News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Ciypy Editor
LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Stuart Oliphant, Asst. Features Editor
Kerry Nester, Ami. Sports Editor
Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
Doug Morris, Editorial Production Manager
Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Caria WiurnFil), Classified Ads Technician
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Stuart Rosner, Sysrmis Engineer
Phong Luong, Business Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
1 u Last c arotimUm has served the Easi Carolina campuscommuniiy s.nce 1925. emphasizing information thai d.rcctly affects
E( 11 students. During the ECl I school year. The East Carolinian publ.shes twice a week with a circulation of 12.000. The East
i aroUmaH reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age. sex. creed or
national origin I he masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual but rather
is a majorit) opinion of the Editorial Board. The EastCarolmian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters'should
be im.ted to 250 words or less For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
- anon 1 etters should be addressed to The Editor. The Easi Camhntan, Publications Bldg ECU Grcenv.ilc N C
2 s 4; of can roio) 757 f, ' '�
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, March 5, 1991
ECU must support beautification plan
Campus beautification hasbeena topic of con-
tro ersy since Dr. Richard Eakin initiated the program
upon assuming duties as Chancellor of ECU in 1988.
Both students and faculty alike have condemned
Eakin tor continuation of the project despite severe
budget cuts that affected the university and a lack of
support by students in general.
But Eakin had different thoughts when he en-
visioned the 20-year plan for beautification. He was
quoted in the May 1.1968 edition of Pieces of Eight (a
university publication) as saying only through
this visionary approach will the university be able to
attain an acceptable blend of academia, heritage,
beauty and efficiency
Only three years into the plan, remarkable
strides have been made - allowingaehangeof heart
for some protesting the plan. But the change hasn't
satisfied everyone. And for the project to be a com-
plete success everyone must take an active role in
cleaning up the university.
John Bell, assistant vice chancellor for business,
spear-headed an 18-member beautification commit-
tee comprised of students, community leaders and
faculty that determined needed changes to the
university's environment. Bell asked for student
support in the April o, 1988 edition of The East
Carolinian when he said, we (the committee)
want to appeal to the student body for suggestions,
no matter how simple or large
Therefore, we challenge the university's staff
and students to make some simple changes that
won't cost a red cent to implement but will require a
little extra effort from everyone
� Those students, faculty or staff who smoke
should quit putting out there cigarettes or cigars on
the ground. There's nothing more disappointing
than to see a campus littered with cigarette butts,
while workers try to improve the aesthetic look of
buildings and sidewalks.
� Student organizations that use the trees on
the Mall and at the bottom of College Hill to hang
banners and sheets should remove them promptly
followingtheirevent.InthepasUheseorganizations
have left string and rope hanging from these trees
while salvaging only the banner. This is cluttering
the trees and disturbing the natural beauty.
� Start using the bicycle racks the university
has provided. It is illegal to lock bicycles up to trees,
stairwells and inside buildings � although some of
these bikers seem to forget that.
� Put trash in its respective place. Don't throw
paper or your empty drink cups on the ground, use
the trash can or the proper recycling container.
� When you finish reading The East Carolinian
orany other campuspublication or newspaper, don't
leave it lying around. Recycle it!
These are just a few ideas that take very little
effort and time and no money. But the key to success
for Dr. Eakin's beautification plan not only comes
from the university, but those who use it everyday.
Dr. Eakin was quoted in the April 19, 1988
edition of The East Carolinian as saying, imple-
menting the recommendations provided by the
(beautification committee's) plan could help re-es-
tablish this campus as one of the most beautiful in
North Carolina and the country
Asopposi tion to the plan decreases, the financial
strain on the university begins to unfold and people
start making a conscience effort to clean their envi-
ronment, the plan will be a certain success. But it's
not entirely up to the university, everyone must do
their part.
Letters To The Editor
Kuwaiti Emir
not worth
fighting for
To The Editor:
Whvdid Saddam Hussein
think he could get away with
invading Kuwait? We knew
that Iraq was having a border
dispute with Kuwait and on
July 25, 1990, according to the
Jan. 16 Seattle Times, Ambas-
sador April Glaspie received
the following written instruc-
tions from the secretary of state,
approved by the president, to
deliver the following message
to Saddam Hussein: "We will
not become involved in your
border dr- ute with Kuwait
and we take no position on this
dispute According to Ohio
Representative Mary Rose
Oakar, Ambassador Glaspie is
now incommunicado.
Why did President Bush
give the green light to Hussein
in July and then a few weeks
later start calling him "a Hitter"?
Was Hussein set up by Bush?
Now President Bush
wants the Emir of Kuwait re-
stored to power (statusquo ante).
The Emir does not represent the
American way of lite � 70 wives,
seven personal 747's, sole owner
of Kuwaiti Oil Company, with
half of the oil money going into
his personal pocket. Are
America's sons and daughters
to be sacrificed this guy ?
Alan Rhodes
Willoughby, Ohio
Student pleased
with African-
American events
To The Editor:
1 am writing to commend
the organizers of this year's Af-
rican-American history month
activities. It is easy for many to
complain about the shortcom-
ings of our university society
but it is important for us to rec-
ognize when things are going in
the right direction. The organi-
zation of this year's African-
American history month de-
serves such recognition.
African-American his-
tory month is an important
time for everyone of African
descent and everyone that is
not. It is a time for us to rec-
ognize and hopefully appreci-
ate the contributions of Afri-
can-Americans to our lives.
February's activities
helped me to do this more than
I have ever done before. It is
essential forall of us, regardless
of ethnicity, to know who we
are and to be proud of it. So
much negativity has been put
forth about African-Americans
that it has seriously affected
cultural esteem. This year's
African-American history
month helped to restore some
of that esteem.
There is still a long way
to go for all mankind to ap-
preciate each other. I com-
mend the organizers of the
activities and hope that many
others benefi tted from them as
(did.
Terrell Worthem
Senior
Art Education
ECU Professor plans ne1
Maxwells Silver Hammer
End of Gulf War raises new questions
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
I consider it a responsibility
of my job to admit when I'm
wrong, as publicly and as vocally
as I claimed I was right. And al-
ready you can hear the hasty re-
treat � i t's not a stampede, not yet
� of many who, like me, thought
the undeclared war in the Gulf
was a bad idea from the start. The
trouble, you see, is that things have
gone so darn well for our side. The
sky hasn't fallen
However, I think this retreat
won't include me. I'm glad the
war has left far fewercasualtieson
both sides than anyone expected;
I was wrong about that, as were
many who supported the war and
many who opposed it. There are
few things I'd rather have been
wrong about
And let'sassume for the sake
of argument that I and others will
be proved equally wrong about
side effects of the fighting. Let's
assume there will be no wave of
anti-Americanism, no increase in
terrorism directed our way and so
on. I'd be perfectly happy to be
wrong about all this, too.
But despite the military's
success, and despite whether any
lasting harm comes to us Ameri-
cansasaresultofthe war, I remain
unconvinced that the war was
right, or even necessary.
What's at issue is not
whether the fighting went well,
but whether there should have
been any fighting in the first place,
whether the New World Order's
birth need have involved so much
pain and blood.
Neither people nor nations
will always voluntarily refrain
from doing wrong, so maintain-
ing any order depends on some
credible threat to keep dangerous
individuals and groups in line.
But must this threat involve
the use of force, as Bush's oft-
hailed and never-explicated New
World Order seems to? In a world
redefining itself in terms of eco-
nomics, embargoes and other
economic sanctions will prove
more effective than wars. Less
bloody, too, and less expensive.
Of course, human nature
flaws embargoes, too: they can
never be airtight, since there will
always be someone willing to cir-
cumvent them This is one of the
many reasons a zero tolerance
drug war is doomed to failure But
an embargo need not be zero-tol-
erance; what it must do is drasti-
cally reduce the influx of various
commodities into an area. We arc
capable of that much.
In short, I'm celebrating the
end of the Gulf War, but I haven't
changed my mind about it At
least, not much. It's proved less
disastrous, in terms of human life.
than I ever thought it could; fair
enough, I admit it.
But the whole affair was still
a far bigger disaster than it need
have been: we have seen propa-
ganda from all sides, unwarranted
censorship (not all the censorship
was unwarranted), hypocritical
slander of demonstrably objective
journalists, and, neither last nor
least, the systematic obstruction
of all pre-war attempts at peace
From the United States, no less.
Certainly I'd be somewhat
more convinced of the nghtness
of our struggle if I were convinced
ourallies were convinced of it. But
many of the countries Bush claims
stand with us because of "the
nghtness of our cause are in fact
simply not opposing us because
we've bribed them not to.
For example, consider two
of the U.N. Security Council
On The Fringe
members, members
power the So ict Unioi
China The United Stati
not only to overlook t
crimes perpetrated by h.
tries, but also appn i I
them in tin- bargain
Surel) a caus a:
ours active!) opj -
illegal Soviet aggression
misttcalh i ailed a
against the Baltic Ri ; .
much .is it oppos - ui
aggression against Kum
Sureh t.i.
.is ours opposes th :
ot i nines student;
as it opposes the brut
Kuwaitis
Surely people as
are, would never rew ai
sum.Sav.bv making a $
loan to China or .i $7 I ilh
the Soviet Union But we'n
it.
I he hypoc ris j
with Bush's nod in I
China and th" Soviet
though those cases alone -
be enough to sick n an
lombia. Saudi Arabia, Yen
even the United Nations its
threatened or bribed t. .
This, from a mar
wouldn't give Saddam I
polite word, much tess
U.S. dollar (at least atu;
Appeasement of our s. ,
lies, from a man whodend
face-saving measure that
have averted this pointless
"appeasement "
Is this our New v �
der? A system in whu I
appointed police tore
the privilege of enforcing
in some instances and m I
ers?
Thanks, but no thai
have the old world order
please.
Royal's departure creates problems
By Tim Hampton
F.ditorial Columnist
In the aftermath of the
grades-released-over-the-phone
controversy, one of the most con-
scientious executive officers ever
to hold a position in the Student
Government Association has had
his term cut short.
It came down to a millionth
of a point.
Before leaving his post as
SGA treasurer two weeks ago.
Randy Royal accomplished more
than many of his predecessors. In
a ho-hum year for the SGA, Royal
stood as an outspoken man of ac-
tion � a virtue rarely seen in the
government association.
When Joyner Library re-
duced its operating hours during
the fall semester, Royal became
the brainchild of a plan to keep the
library doors open. Working with
the government and the univer-
sity administration, Royal paved
the way for the SGA to allocate
$10,000 to Joyner.
Barring a huge proposal in
the latter part of the this semester,
the legislation to aid the library
will win "best SGA btllof the year
As far as meeting student needs,
the library bill was the most ef-
fective item the SGA enacted
during the 1990-91 school year.
Royal also revamped the
SGA loan process and created a
record number of loans for stu-
dents. Traditionally, loans were
issued for only the first month of
each semester. Royal extended the
loan period by three months dur-
ing the fall semester, allowing stu
dents to obtain loans until No-
vember.
With the record number of
loans. Royal's administration had
the fewest percent of loan defaults.
To assure that students would be
less likely to default. Royal insti-
tuted a policy in which the trea-
surer notifies students of delin-
quent payment through post
cards.
While his exploits for the
good of ECU students have not
gone unnoticed, it is sad com-
mentary on the procedure sur-
rounding Royal's departure.
And the students are the
losers. Not only are students left
without an outsiders treasurer, but
they will lose some money as well.
The process to usurp Royal from
his post and hold new elections
will cost students $1,000.
Furthermore, whoever is
elected treasurer will only serve
two and an half weeks before
spring elections begin. For the
bargain price of $1,000, the stu-
dents will have a treasurer for 18
days.
The make-shift election for
treasurer following Spring Break
is too expensive and will only serve
to confuse the already apathetic
voters on campus.
These dismal problems fol-
low Royal'sself-dismissal from the
position two weeks ago, after SGA
legislator Leslie Nicholson inves-
tigated Royal's grade point aver-
age. SGA executive officers must
maintain a 2.0 to remain in office.
In an interview last week.
Royal said his (,r
1.99999999999 He said hi
have a 2.0 or better after th
graduating semester
Some sav rules ire n
say when a millionth ot i point .
at question, then rules
broken. For the mere fact th
new election will cost
SGA should have suspend.
rules. For the mere fact that Ro)
was the best treasurer it will.
have, the SGA should haw
pended the rules.
The story now continues
A secretary in Dean Re
Speier's office released the infbi
mation which led to Royal's dis-
missal, but that fact is beside the
point.
Although Nicholson a
at fault for inquiring and receiving
information on grades or tor ad
ministering to governmental pre
cedure, her reasons for following
through with the plan have ban
questioned by some SG A of finals
Royal said the ordeal was a
personal attack on him He saw
Nicholson wanted to introduced-
library legislation and when he
instead choose a non partisan
member, SGA Speaker Alex Mar
tin, Nicholson became intimated
Nicholson denies t he libran
bill held any relevance to her in-
vestigation. She said that she was
only upholding the SGA's integ
rity.
And for $1,000, the students
of ECU receive a lesson in integ-
rity�a lesson that a millionth of
a point is more important than
public concern.
By Caroline Haire
MernbmofECXsdepartment
of Health, Physical Education
Recreation and Safety are prepar-
'dmgprevennonand education
program designed for elementary
teachersand students called Project
Directed by professors Dr
David Wh.teand Karen Vail-Smith.
Project SIDE aims 1.1 use peer pres-
sure as a positive influence in pre-
venting drug use, with hopes that it
can be part of the solution instead of
the problem
Research has shown that drug
abuse prevention efforts are more
effective before abusive behavior
begins, so the program is designed
for fifth-grade students.
"The program is for fifth grade
students btva use-1 hey a re the oldest
kids in elementary schools Vail-
Smith said "By presenting them-
selves as public role models these
studentscan bea positive influence
on even younger students
Iraqis release CBS news tl
Project SIDE
dents to prepare
activities such as
and puppet shows
entedactivitieaallof
creative think atJ
sociated with dnij
tinuea drug (Yet dt
out their lives VaiiJ
Seventy-five
counsek rs from
(arottna will attend
workshop August
campus
Thistra.ning'
drug abuse Mom
making skills ana
education through
project Aflideasat
implemented in 'h�
nculum
Final selection
ticipating in Project
announced March
Vail-Smith ml
planned th.
1990

professional
NEW iORK(AP) - CBS re-
porter Bob Simon described beat-
ings and hunger during su weeks
of Iraqi captivity, but colleagues
detained with him said the most
terrifying moment was when an
allied bomb hit the Baghdad
building where they were held.
Simon, CBS London bureau
chjd Peter Bluff, freelance camera-
man Roberto Alvarez and
soundman nan Caldera were re-
ported in good condition at a hos-
pital m London on Sunday after
being freed in Baghdad on Saturday
The four werecaptu red bv Iraqi
forces neartheKuwait-Saudi border
on Jan. 21.
Iraq released them after prod-
ding from Soviet President Mikhail
S Gorbachev.
The four have lost weight be-
eiusjofmalnutnhon.butotherwise
were "in remarkablv good shape
v tvn you consider they've been in
prison in awtul circumstances tor
40 days, said Dr
who examined tht
lorn Goodma
tort BS News said
have am internal h
bones or bn
In an inn -
Sund
Simon said all tourn
within earshot i I
"We were blind
made it all the mod
he said. "Thev bea
with sticks, on the lei
"When thev weJ
important quest
the door and beat It
Roberto so Ihey v m
I would hear the
thev were asking me
beating me at the saij
Alvarez s3k'
bornbingoftherraliu
headquartt rs here
ing held was more tt
the beanne.s
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703 E. Greenvil
756-421





,
Ht?e tast (Earolinian March 5, 1991 5
k� 'I I
r.
0 0 0
r Hammer
s new questions
ibU
:
i

N�
L -
��


L-
inge
reates problems
i
� i point i-
� it th'
(
' in-i ip nded the
pugh p-them. �
� r it .vili
I
I i
Hnuos
f -urn Dean Rof�W
Mfrurethe mtor
pts are thehon which led to Ki �l'a dis
kt i'lenf left�1, hut that f,i t is Nratde tfi
reMurer,butpoint
)ney as well
Royal from
fw elections
boo
'hoever is
ny serve
oelrt; hef'ire
kin F-rr the
0, the stu
Usurer for H
election for
jpring Break
ill only serve
Iv apathetic
roblems fol
Issalfromthr
(o.afterSGA
lscm invev
noinf aver
Officers must
nn in office
last week.
Although v n is not
�ruirinj ind n� ivm;
information O! tde. Of fOf � !
mimst nt,ii pro
re, her n following
through with the plan have been
questioned bysomeSf , A officials
Royal tid (he ordeal vv
personal ttu I Mm He rfcl
ic holson wanted to tntrodlM .e the
librarv legislation and when he
instead choose i mn partisan
member, 5G A ipeakei Me Mar
tin. k holson bei -nix- inturiateil
Nicholson d niestlK-lihrarv
bill held any relevance to her H
ves�ig�jhon She MMd that she was
(�nlv upholding the 91 .As integ
nty
And for $1.1X11). the student
of E( I receive a IffMOfl in integ-
rity a lesson that a millionth 9
a point is more miportaot than
public ((in. em
ECU Professor plans new drug abuse program
By Caroline Haire
Special to The East Carolinian
Membersof ECU'sdepartment
of Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Safety are prepar-
ingadrugpreventionand education
program designed for elementary
teachers and students called Project
SIDE.
Directed by professors Dr.
David Whiteand Karen Vail-Smith,
Project SIDE aims to use peer pres-
sure as a positive influence in pro-
ven hngdruguse, with hopes that it
can be part of the solution instead of
the problem.
Research has shown that drug
abuse prevention efforts are more
effective before abusive behavior
begins, so the program is designed
for fifth-grade students.
The program is for fifth grade
students because they are the oldest
Wids in elementary schools Vail-
Smith said "By presenting them-
selves .is public role models these
students can be a positive influence
on even voungcr students
Project SIDE allows the stu-
dents to prepare drug prevention
activities such as art shows, plays
and puppet shows. These peer-ori-
ented activities allow the kids to be
creative, think about problems as-
sociated with drug use and con-
tinue a drug free attitude through-
out their lives. Vail-Smith said.
Seventy-five teachers and
counselors from eastern North
Carolina will attend a Project SIDE
workshop August 6 to 8 on ECU'S
campus.
This training session -will teach
drug abuse information , decision
making skills and peer influence
education thmugh use of student
projects AH ideasareexpected tobt
implemented in their schools cur-
riculum.
Final selection of schools par-
ticipating in Project SIDE will be
announced March 15.
Vail-Smith and White have
planned the project since October
m&
"David has a background and
professional interest indrugeduca-
tion Vail-Smith said. "We have
read about what hasnot been work-
ing, so now we want to try this
approach
ECU students are also being
involved in Project SIDE. Sociology
and counselor education majors are
helping write the curriculum for
the summer workshop
Also, the program is being in-
corporated in the health methods
course that is taught to ECU el-
ementary education majors.
"ECU has a long standing
reputation for its education pro-
gram Vail-Smith said. "Schools
look to us for new ways of teaching
information, such as drug preven-
tion education, and take the infor-
mation back to their schools air
riculum "
Funding for Project SIDE i
provided by a grant from the US
Department of Education's Drug
Free Schools and Communities
program. These fund sco ver the cost
of registration, curriculum ma ten
als and teacher travel expenses
Iraqis release CBS news team after six weeks
NFW YORK (AP) � CBS re-
porter Rob Simon described beat-
ings and hunger during six weeks
of Iraqi captivity, but colleagues
detained with him said the most
terrifying moment was when an
allied bomb hit the Baghdad
building where thev were held.
Simon, CBS London bureau
chief Peter Bluff, freelance camera-
man Roberto Alvarez and
soundman uan Caldera were re-
ported in good condition at a hos-
pital in Iondon on Sunday after
being freed in B ighdad on Saturday.
The four were captured by Iraqi
forces near the Kuwait-Saudi border
on Jan. 21.
Iraq released them after prod-
ding from Soviet President Mikhail
S CVrhachev
The four have lost weight be-
causofmalnurntion,butotlvTwise
wort "m remarkably good shape
when you consider they've been in
prison in awtut circumstances for
40 days' said Dr. Stuart Sanders,
who examined the crew.
Tom Goodman, a spokesman
for CBS News, said the tour do not
Nave any internal injuries, broken
bones or bruises
In an into'view broadcast
Sunday nightonCBS' "60 Minutes
Simon said all four men wenbeaten
within earshot of ore another
"We were blindfolded which
made it all the more frightening
he said. "They bea m with canes,
with sticks, on the legs, on the head
"When they were getting to
important questions they opened
the door and beat Juan, Peter and
Roberto so they would scream and
I would hear them scaam while
they were asking me questions and
beating me at the same time
Alvarez said the Feb. 23
bombing of the mihtarv intelligence
headquarters where tliey were be-
ing held was more fnghtc ning than
the beatings
"The day we got hit with the
bombs, that was probably the scari-
est moment I went through he
said.
Caldera said a bomb smashed
open the toei ot his room and he
suffered an ankle injury when ma
sonry fell on him.
"When I went back to the ream
I could see the sky he said
Simon said that during one in
terrogation, a captain in the Iraqi
armv "grabbed me by the face,
forced my mouth open and said
Yehudi, Yehudi, which means
Jewish, and then spat at me aiMi
slapped me
"I would have killed him if I
could have said Simon. "I would
have killed him and I would have
had no more remorse than I had
every morning when ! got up and
killed a cockroach in mv room
Simon said his greatest desire
during 24 days ot solitary confine-
ment was for food.
EYE
EXAM
AND BUY ONE
GET ONE FREE!
The Optical Palace has joined the
Optometric Eye Care Center Family
To celebrate, we are offering you:
-a complete professional eye exam
for $39 (contact lens exams and
fittings extra)
AND
-Buy one pair of glasses at regular
price and get a second pair free
Call our office to schedule your $39 eye exam, or just stop by lo
check out our wide selection of frames.
Offer valid through March 29, 1991
(Some restrictions apply)
OPIOMeiNC
�Y�CAr�C�H1�R
PA
(!)
Gary Harris
Licensed
Optician
YOUIX LIKE THE WAY WE CARE FOR YOUR EYES
703 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-4204
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
l')() bedroom, 2 bedroom. &
F.fficency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
.&.�.
Present
Student Budget
Night
1.15 TALL BOYS
1.25 IMPORTS
M2.50 Pitchers
2.75 ICE TEAS
�LAMES FREE
Pi; !h�- MINK at 5:00 "KK(i PARTY" lac A.lm S-H:30
I
-JitrX
i
QUALITY FILM DEVELOPING
photo Center
SLPLR SAVING Ol PON FOR A
T Onlv 99tf i
i " . i
I second set ot prints
I wittJ cvorj dfetc or roll of color print film brought in lor processing i
1 oiler good ihrouiih March 25. Wl
FXTJ Student Store Wright HKlu
(livcnvillc C 2785H
4fj Prmiv not irx Imlcd
Coupon Mum tLomp.in
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
ECU Student Union
Making 'A. Things Happen At ECU
to 20
tti
�t
t
THE FORUM COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
THE BACKSTAGE HISTORY of
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
with author
JEFF WEINSTAD
-TUESDAY, MARCH 5 (TONIGHT!
-FROM 8-10PM IN HENDRIX THEATRE-
Dr. Ix'VVi.s L
Casey
Optometrist I
This Week
AT
:Hendrix Theatre
JiCI IICIIISII
Kami
IWOJAHfS
ft
w
Wed. Feb 13 8 pm
ECU ID or Current Films Pass is Required for Admission






6
�lie gagt Carolinian
PI AQQIFIFTYQ
March 5, 1991
h h 5.1991
s Hvia.sofn.rn d
ON-CAMPUS FUNDRAISER
Needed Organized and industrious
fraternity, sorority or student group
to earn hundredsof dollars for anon
campus marketing project Call l
BOO-NOW P051
SPRING IREAK AMAICA Onl)
5549 including Kl air fare from
Raleigh, great hotel, gratuities and
more! t .ill the Spring Break experts
.it POt K SEASONS, 1 800 131 3136
si PER SKIING AT SNOWSHOE
All 13 slopes open 24-48 in base
DeluxeSlope side 2DR condo,sleeps
8 For 2 to 6 night in Feb onl) Sff1
discount on condo rent Call 756
8860 after 7:00 p.m
Student Income Tax Returns
Program Developed by
Professionals Specifically foi
College Students
;ss .D77
Pittard Perry
V.I Ul It. INCORPORATED
il�'irip �ULIC �CCOUN'�NTS
FOR RLNT
March i Call 355-3195.
HOUSE FOR KIM 4 bedroom, l
l '2 bath, short walk to ECU Low
utilities S725month Availablcmid-
i,n J55 1195 Other properties
available for spring and summer.
NON-SMOKER WANTED to share
I bedroom house, S125 and 13
utilitiosW, D 5 miles from ECU Call
Shelley,752 � If no answer, tea ve
message
HOUSE FOR KIM 1bedroom, l
bath brick home, close tocampusand
supermarket, heat and air, washer
and dryer S475month Available
May oi lunc I (.ill fbmat758-6839
ROC )M M A11 vv A III) to share 2
bedroom apt in Ringgold lowers
starting August, c ireat location,$210
month plus 12 utilities Call Mike,
SW 4963
ihh BLEWIDE on private tot tor
rent Call 758 I559afta 5 JO 5400
( o COUR1 2 bedroom, !
1 bath S350 month Century 21,
I he Realt) (iroup, 758-4711
WANTED TO BUY
ll I HKs George I ov� models
S5000-S10,000; Wilson B) Palmei
$1,000; 8802 $300 $700; 881 ;
S2O0 $500 Iron Master's$100 $1 KX
Ping Anser Scottsdale S15OO-S23O0
Other Ting models S2 vsX1 �lst
buying irons, woods 919 524-4588
FOR RENT
HOUSE I OR RENT 4bedroom, 1
: 5 blocks from ECl 13 N.
I astern I ireplace, living room din
ing area ��iH, month Available
UeMunlul i'l.i. v- Ul I jvt
� Ml V� �
� nU Ki j.iv I ' KcM �
UNIVERSITY tPAATMENTS
�litmtim) Sen ! i
�tr Mjiui Shi5iin( Cmtrn
�AcroM From Highway I'juni StMioa
I JflUMd (tlet iVH) j month
Conuct J T .r lommy Willumi
56 rtl3� I3��1W7
OIIkt OpM pi I, 12 9 'lpm
�AZALEA GARDENS
. cn ai�3 �ri t� hMlflWWr htftaattd p4rmrma
rnsry e?T�. ru trot wtfatr &i�i fi tarrt .irv
- �-� i iMjtttif tmetMy MM) �
ftmunin.eaaa MUHU I Ml'Mr "IN i � h.i� �
r uiir� ;miuiCM �.m RMMl ' iMM � V,�.rt
vsjdaiu ir�j ttn uic �. n.i I �
Contact J I Of ruRVflV Vii!urm
F56 rsis
FOR SALE
V IN-STATE rUITION? Read
Residency Status and fuition, the
practical pamphlet written by an
attorney on the in-state residency
ipplteation process For sale Stu-
dent Stores, Wright Building
FENDER GUITAR AMP Deluxe
Sr 758-0464.1
FOR SALE Completedaybed set,
udes mattress, frame, wedge
pillow s, covers and a paii ol draw-
ers that go underneath $100, please
call 155-7282
87PONT1AC SI NBIRDSI PS,PB,
AC . IVV,
. ass. p
extras,
$4,000. Call 792 5831 after 5.00 p.nx
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call for
information 504-641 -8003 Ext. 5920.
AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR
NEEDED I ho Greenville Recre-
a tion and Parks Department ishiring
part time positions tor Aerobic E-
ercise Instructors. 1'or more mfor-
mation, call 758-6892 and ask for
Kathleen Shank.
HELP WANTED
CHEERLEADING INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED tor summer camps
in North Carolina. If von love
cheering, this is the summer job for
you1 College experience not neces-
sary, but strong High School back
ground a must. Flexible scheduling
and great pav. Call collect for more
information, (919) 383-0086.
M VV ENGLAND BROTHERSIS-
TEK (AMI'S MASSACHUSETTS
Mah Kec Nac tor BoysDanbee tor
(�iris Counselor positions for Pro-
gram Specialists: All Team Sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball. Field
I lockey, Softball, Soccer and Volley-
ball;251 cnnisopenings;ateo Archery,
Riflery, WeightsFitness and Biking;
other openings include Performing
Arts, Fine Arts, Newspaper, Photog-
raphy, Cooking, Sewing, Roller-
skating, Rocketry, Ropes,and (amp
Craft; All Waterfront Activities
(Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing,CanoeKayaking). In-
quire: Mah-Kee-Nac (BOYS) 190
I indenAvcnue,C,len Ridge, N)07028
Call i 800 753 9118 DanbeefGIRI 5)
16 Horseneck Road, Montvillc, Nj
07045. Call 1-800-776-0520.
PERSONALS
BECKY LEWIS: CONCRATUl-A-
I lONSon your new AS1Doffice We
know you will do a great job as
treasurer love, vour Delta eta
sisters
GOOD LUCK tonite in Sorority All-
stars Basketball! Love, the Sigmas
FLORIDA BOUND? I need a ndeto
and from Orlando, FL during Spring
Break I'll pav share of gas and can
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
OPEN UNDER
NKW OWNHKSHIP
SITU. SERVING YOl
wrmot i.rn bp
yT) vn,$wonicrs
�.CROSS FROM VILi ROMA
RESTAURANT
TENTH STREET
1091 DISCOl NT WITH
STl DENT 11) ON REPAIRS
M) SEKVICt
PERSONALS
leave after Thursday. Call KRIS at
752-4860
SABRINA AND ALEXIS Are there
anv tret's still standing in Sftowshoc?
Was it really sinful???
TOGAYS, LESBIANS, their tnendv
roommates, and all those concerned
with issues relating to homoscxualih
A support group is currently meeting
on campus to discuss these issues
and more Call 757-6661 tor more
information
AZD'S I he countdown is on, onl v 3
more days til we ret some real sun
Hope everyone has a great Spring
Break' I ove, vour secret sorontv
TKE: Thursday night was rockin
1 hanks tor a wild evening' Love, the
Sigmas
SISTERS Of ALPHA PHI So what
was that, a rush,oradrysocial? Hell,
PERSONALS
we don't know but we had a great
timeanvwav' All ofyou were terrific,
as usual. We can't begin to thank you
enough, but we'll sure try Let there
be no mistake, I hose Phi-Bears are
awesome' Love, the brothers and
new pledges of Sigma Nu
SIGMAS would like to wish every-
one a safe and happy Spring Break'
See you in a week!
I KL We had a great lime slainmin'
and jammin' tothesoundsol ohnny
Quest last Thursday night He was
hip! Thanks for the invite Love, the
Alpha Phi's.
ROBYN AND MARI Congratula-
tions! We're so excited to caT. you
sisters' I ove, your Sigma sisters.
PI DELTA SORORITY We would
like to thank you tor helping us oul
with rush once again. All oi you are
such sweethearts! What would we
PERSONALS
do without you1 Love, yourbuddies
forever, Sigma Nu
riKT. KA, KF: Can't wait 'til tonih
See you there' 1 ov th S gmas
ALL CAMPUS V; ivishes
everyone a safe and sped
Spring Break. I ihs . Pl Im.inia
(. ltv, Key West and the Bahamas an
the hot spots this year Doritforg tt
wear vour sunscreen I ove, th( V
oha Phi's
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Advertise in
JU
RESEARCH KfORMA H0N
largest Library ol information in U S -
all subjects
O'oe' Catalog fodai �tm Visa M v COO
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
800 351 0222
roil f�t
HOT IMC
Of rusn $? 00 lo RtiMrch Inlor-Jtion
WANDS WORTH COMMONS GREENVIUJFS NEWES1 NAME IN Mll.n IAM11 V HOUSING ExceUenl locMm on Arlinion Hvulcvard Choice units available (nc and two bedrooms, cneigy effacnt, cjqu-l, rangi rvfngcrator, washer dryer hookups Blidl coiistnKlion, fillet with extra insulation FREE BASIC CABLE l
Go-

the Hsallv ;rml 75X-471I
FAMILY
MEDICAL CARE
Office Hours:
8XJ0 AM � 8Q0 PM MonFri.
8V0 AM -4:00 PM Sat.
George Klein. MD. F.A.A.F P
Physician
Henrietta Williams. Ph.D.
V
HHHt Al
D
Psychologist
No Appointment Necessary
355-5454

;s: 2115 2 w I niiti Street
ROAD SERVICE Greenville, NC
50 States Seminars our nationally known
organization is seeking an assertive, dynamic
and motivated individual to teach and con-
duct "No Money Down" real estate seminars
in your area. You have seen these seminars
on T.V now conduct them yourself
$3,000.00 to $6000.00 per month possible
pt $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 possible ft.
Don't Delay, Call today for an interview,
(208) 342-0950 or (208) 338-9960.
wjW�5
ANNOUNCEMENTS
�:
SKYDIVING CLUB
Interested m skydiving? We wre
looking lor current skydivers or
people interested in learning to sky
dive who would k' interested in
forming a skydiving dub here m
E.C.U. For more information, call
7r 7572 or 752 2.1
fiCX PART CLLH
If you ore interested in joining a
duo and enjoy a relaxed sport activ-
ity. theFCL' Dart Club would right
tor you. Weareinterested in people
who want to become part of an
organized group and also enjoy the
game of English Darts. You do not
have to be experienced to on and
there are nod ues t( pav This game
i t.isv to learn and tun to plav
There will bea meeting on Tuesday,
March 5, 11 in the Mendenhall
Student C enter. Rinim 248 at 7:15
p.m. Students, staff and faculty are
encouraged to join Also, please
contact Brian Johnson at 431-9073
for more info.
UBS IMMSCHEBULE
The second block of LIBS 1000, sec-
tions 21-50, will begin after spring
break. The first day of Mon.Wed.
classes will be March 18th. The first
day of Tues.Thurs. and Tues.
evening classes will begin March
19th. Tne first dav of Wednesday
evening class will be March 20th.
REGISTRATION FOR
STJJBENIS
General College students should
contact their advisers the week of
March 25-29 to make arrangements
for academic advising for summer
terms and fall semester, 1991. Early
registration will begin April 1 and
end April 5.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAM
(CRE)
rhe Graduate Record Examination
will be offered at East Carolina Uni-
versity on Saturday, April 13,1991.
Application blanks are to be com-
pleted and mailed to Educational
Testing Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540. Applications
must be postmarked no later (Kin
March 7,1991. Applications maybe
obtained from the Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Building, East
Carolina University.
ACT ASSESSMENT
The ACT Assessment will be of-
tered at I at Carolina University on
Saturday, April 13,1991. Applica-
tion blanks are lobe completed and
mailed to ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa 52243.
Applications must be postmarked
no later than March 15,1991. Appli-
cations may be obtained from the
Testing Center, Rwm 105, Speight
Building, East Carolina University.
VVQMtN'SSIUIDlES
ALLIANCE
WSA, a feminist-oriented student
organization, advocates social, po-
litical, and economic equality for
women and men. Open to all stu-
dents regardless of race, age, or
creed, WSA works to eradicate in-
equality in privileges, status, and
rightsof all people. JoinusatChko's
at 5 p.m. on first Wednesdays this
semester.
PITETAS1GMA
There will be a meeting in GCB 1008
at 5:00 on Monday, March 18. Any
questions or concerns call 931 -7799.
I lave a great break!
STUDENT UNIONJORAIM
CaMMITTEE
eit Weingrad - coauthor of A
Backstage History of Saturday
Night Live will present a program
and clipsabout the history of Satur-
day Night Live. Mr. Weingrad will
also be available to sign copies of
the book at the Student Store Tues-
day afternoon, March 5, 1991. The
program will be held at 8:00 p.m
March 5 in Hendrix Theatre. Ad-
mission is free. Sponsored by the
Student Union Forum Committee.
QE YESTERIEAB
Volunteer opportunities for history
lovers of all ages are available at the
East Carolina Village of Yesteryear
at the Pitt County Fair Grounds.
The historic site interprets small
town and agricultural life in eastern
North Carolina from 1840 to 1940.
Interested persons are invited to a
7:00 p.m. meeting on Monday,
March 11 at the Humber House in
Greenville (117 W. 5th Street). For
more information, call 758-6385.
SEP.
There will be a meeting on March 5,
1991 at 5:30 in GCB room 2015. We
will be discussing upcoming events
such as The Great American Meat
out. Please attend.
ECU MATH CLUB
The ECU Math Club will meet on
Tuesday, March 5 in Austin 204 at
4:00 p.m. Guest speaker Kelly Mo-
rales will be doing a presentation.
New rnembersarealways welcome.
Any questions, call 931-7872.
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS ON
CAMPUS
ECU Recreational Services is
sportsonng a wellness seminar en-
titled "Close Encounters on Cam-
pus: Healthv Relationships ond
Sexuality Suzanna Kellermananu
Shelly Green from the ECU Student
Health Service will be sharing their
ideas on March 5 fmm 5:00-6:00
p.m. in GCB 1016. The seminar is
free of charge so do yourself a favor
and join in! For further informa-
tion, call 757-6387 or stop by
Chnstenburv Gym.
GREHCLLXAR
TOJJRNAMENI
On Tuesday, March 5 at 9:00 p.m in
Christenbury Gym, Recreational
Services will be sponsoring a Greek
All-Star Basketball Tournament
Both mensand womens teams will
be playing. The All-Star Sorontv
team will beupagainst the Women's
Independent Champions and the
fraternities will be competing with
the East against the West. Don't
miss our on this All-Star event! For
further information call 757-6387 or
stop by 204 Christenbury Gym.
YOU MAKE
THE CALLS
Interested in making the calls for
softball? There will be a softball
officials meeting Wednesday,
March 6 at 5:00 p.m. in BC103. For
further information call 757-6387or
stopby204CrtristenburyGyrn. No
experience necessary - Recreational
Services will train all interested
softball umpires!
ALL-TERRAIN BIKING
WORKSHOP
Get your wheels turning at the All-
Terrain Bicycling Workshop spon
sored by K'l Recreational Services.
rhe workshop will be held on March
6 at 5:00 port in Christenbury Gym
117 at the ROC rhe costs is 'S3.00
students and 54.00facultvstaff
gxiests. loin in on the fun and leam
new trail nding techniques For
additional information call 757-
6911.
SENIOR INFORMATION
COMMITTEE
Don t forget us, we haven t forgot-
ten you! May 8 is not too far away.
Mark it on your calendar. This will
be a red center date (one among
many) prior to your matriculation.
On that date, we will be offering
you the opportunity to bop til you
drop and to say "I slept with the
senior class There is also a rumor
that PTA and the Senior Informa-
tion Committee will be providing
free food. Pick up more informa-
tion at Senior Information Day
Thursday, April 4,1991 from9a.m-
4 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center.
EASICARQUNA FRIENDS
All volunteers should bring their
Little Friends to Sportsworld on
Tuesday, March 5 at 630 p.m. for an
evening of skating. Admission is
$2.75 per person, and ECF will not
be providing funding. Sportsworld
is located on Red Banks Road across
from tverlbns Sports Center and
beside theComfort Inn at Green viile
Blvd. If you cannot attend, please
call you Director of Services imme-
diately. This is a mandatory event
for further information, contact
Sarah Pouiosai 758-3067
SPRING I LING
ECt Recreeational Services is
sponsonng a pre-sprmg break fit-
ness cabs featuring Hi-I ow m u
bics. The catss will be held on
Wednesday, March 6at 530 p.m. in
Chnstenburv Gvm FREE ot charge
A drawing wil be held forprizes
trom area businesses An All 1 er
rain mountain bide trom The BicvcU
Post will also be raffled off Tickets
for the bike raffle are a vilable in 204
ChristenburyGvmUhecostis$i.� �
For further information call 757
6387 or stop by 204 Chnstenburv
Gym.
SPIKEFEST!
ECU Recreational Services presents
the first annual CertsTndent (
ed Volleyball Spikefest. Thr lour
nament takes place March 25-27 al
MingesColiseum. Registration will
be held prior to March 20 (registra
tion forms can be picked up in 2(M
Christmenbuy. Come out and nun
the fun and get some free refresh-
ments! For further information call
757-6387 or stop by 204
Christenbury Gym.
SOFTBALL SIGN-UTS
Batter up! ECU Recreational Ser-
vices will be holding Intramural
Softball sign-ups in the residence
halls the afternoons of March 5-7
Sign up stations will be located
inCotten, Jarvis, Clement, Fletcher,
Belk and Jones. Individuals and
teams are welcome to sign up. for
further information call 757-6387
embrandts p
i

.X

-y.
he R tilSotem etl ind Danny WikJe I
� -eat the Attic Fi
Dinosaur Jr. rele
B Matt King
res I ditoi
someth . out I
� : -
I

� iteiKOur-
to think
��ell

. upJed
tlu. v ilt in the
idult
-
� 1 n-
IThe w
exemplify the I
H

equate the ta�
fron
i andccr
It is i
er been I
music, but
Author recounts coi
Hendrix theatre to show progri
Bv Lisa Marie emigan
SUH Writer
er 11,1975, television as never the sarm �
vu ' udy Night Live a potent blend
nee ard often teatetess satire
, houKvaTneaailmralpnomenonthat ceedj
thu �hum�r tan entire en .It was andntimiestobe.part
of underground comedy hill of drug references, carnal
rmv- :iti.de towards sex, Wislering political satii
distrust ol �he establishment
rhe anarchist attitude of the program coupled with!
personalities of the cast made "Saturday Night Live a tal
and speculation Pi J Bill Murra v reallv punch out Chev 0
minutes before airtime? Whydki Can en Morns rareh apf
man in sketches wh.le Bddte Murphv almost alwavs d.d
Beleshi dislike TheBBBS?'
Th .tl,trxseandtherquesnonsu-illbcrevealo
inHe�vfnxTh.RletfWe.nad,ccvauthorottheKsenei
will recount the turwdtuous history of He show in his er
entertaining program "A Backstage History of Saturday .
Tne rjrogra m is a n abaorHng recreation of the chaotic 1
wrewntersaixifvrtomxfromtaimedvuixicrgroi
OMted an n,io;ade show tor a generation raised on TVas,
The program begins with a bnef history of Chicagos Seci
National La�p�r, "Channel One and 'The Chickerj
Hour ,
Weingrad then takes the audience from SNL s cone
of "cumedv commandos on a miSMon of truth behind j
united bv their eagerness to bite the hand that fed thH
evolution of the show into a comedy institution that mad
Chase, QWa Radner, John Belushi, Pan Aykroyd, JaneCul
and Eddie Murphv The most interesting segment of tH





Ma �
jJlie �a0t (Earolintan
7
PERSONALS
Ke
picturesq
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Advertise
v
J
RfSARCH FORMATION
� -
PS 800 351 0222
AMILY
AL CARE
55-54541
J
Pr�slon P�rc� � ECU Photo Lab
tnny Wilde (right! pose for a
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Features Editor
Ten vears passed before Danny
Wilde and Thil Solem, former
membersof the new- va ve-era ba nd
t. ,reat Buildings, decided to reunite
latelast year and combine therrsong-
wnting abilities.
I sing Wilde's garage as a stu-
dio, Wilde and Solem created a 13-
song collection of pop-oriented
melodies. Eventually, the record
ing fell into the hands of an AtOO
record executive. Inat'sjustthewav
it is. baby, rhe Rembrandts were
-�orn
(n March 1, The Rembrandts'
1991 tour reached the Attic Before
theconcert.lhadtheopportunit to
talk with Phil Solem
Were you surjtrist-d oxer the
��access of uour debut album7
We were shocked. When we
recorded it, we were just basicalk
having a good time. We didn'l
submit it through the regular
channel' We simply gave it to a
trn nd who, in turn gave it to a
record company executive
Where did you record the al-
bum?
We recorded it in Danny's ga-
rage We tried to make it clean. To
gilnd of that hollow garage sound,
we restructured the garage with
dry wall. This helped to contain the
sound
between The Rembrandts' sound
and Great Buildings' sound
Great Buildings was not a per-
sonal production effort. The
Rembrandts was produced by us.
We had the control, making it our
most honest record We dressed the
songs up as little as possible,
whereas "Great Buildings"
sounded thin.
What inspired you to become a
musician?
That fateful day, string The
Beatles on The Fii Sullwan SmJKwwi
Show.
What was the lowest point of
your career?
While in Minneapolis, 1 was
going against the grain of what was
going on and ended up pushm' a
broom a round a warehouse. I )army
was fortunate in having three well
received sotoalbums But, the more
down you get the more you get
inspired.
Did you meet Prince and u as
he as wend as he seems7
I recorded at hi studio & f n
Prince went into the studio, he had
to have thingsexactly right Before
his arrival, a lady would enter the
studio with a cardboard box of
trinkets and proceed to decorate.
How has your tour been going
so far?
Fantastic
Why sm�Ji clubs instead of
arenas?
out, going for clubs because we
thought that we would have a bet
ter chance of filling em up.
After our interview, The
Rembrandtsgavea ruvholds-barred
performance at The Attic The
opening band, lirnmyl.ee and 910,
got the evening started with a hard
edged stvle of blues "They're like
C reedence Clearwa ter dossed with
Motorhead said oneconcert goer
With cover songs such as
"When the levee Breaks" and
Midnight Rambler Jimmy Lee
and 910 were an enjoyable contrast
to The Rembrandts stvle of pure
pop.
When The Rembrandts finally
appeared on stage, it was evident
that thev were trying to compete
with the warm up bands raw vol-
ume This gave their otherwise
melodic sound a distorted edge
l'hekc to rhe Rembrandts success
rs their lyrics and simpterhythms. It
seemed a shame tor them to drown
i nt their lyrics with distortion
l ne of the more enjoyable
moments occurred when 1 hi
Rembrandts invited the audience
on stage to help out vsith the -ng
Follow You Down " Turning the
stage into a scene of utter chaos, the
audience complied
Overall,The Rembrandts gave
a good solid performance How-
ever, themesmenzing sound found
on their debut album seemed lost
� al the Attic I nday night
What is the major difference At th.s stage we're just Startin amidst a sea of distortion
l
I v l
ui
K
lll()
Lamic third
i
seminars
eminars
j i( )SS
ssible i i.
t ievv.
i-1.
i

ti
t .i da
� ��, the
.
� Court�sy ot Sire Records
Mind, the latesi album trom Dinosaur Jr promises to win critical
. , its long awaited release has fans cheering
omes
It � � that I msaui lr has
never been the court jesh i of rock
music, but on Green Mind the band
has ascended to a new level of emo-
tional shock therapy. There may be
some go( d reasons why the band is
feeling so pissed-off at the world
There is a lot of speculation
about the recent history of the Kind
and why they have been so unpro-
ductive in the last two years. Dimv
saur Jr has released one song that
appeared on Legend, a tribute tf Neil
Young in that two year period.
The song was a cover of "Lotta
Dove" and it sounded bad.
So, whv does a band, that in a
three vear period (roughly 115 to
�RS) released two full length LPs, at
least two EPs and a bouquet of
singles suddenly dry up?
That is hard to pin down ex-
actlv,but are some possibleanswers.
SST, the band's record company in
that fruitf ul period has run intosome
financial problems of late
It also seems that Dinosaur lr
and SST weren't seeing eye-to-eve
on several recordingsihiations. SSI,
who historically let their Kinds go
on to mapr laMsas thev were npe.
did not do so in thecaseot Dinosaur
lr.
Amid recording otters with
several big labels. SST threatened to
sue the band for breech of contract
if they left the label. All the while,
the SST executives (if thev can be
thor recounts comedy show's backstage life
, i, eatre to show program about Saturday Night Live's history
called that) knew that thev didn't
have the capitol to promote an LP
from any band.
It was a last ditch effort to save
their establishment. Don't misun-
derstand,SST,in itsdav.wamavbe
?he best alternative label in exist-
ence. Thev are as much responsible
for the growing resurgence of le-
gitimate nx"k music as anyone
The record company problem
eventually worked itself out; Sire.
Warner Brothers wert the lucky
benefactor oi the Kind.
Something else that is strange
about the album are the credits. .
Maseis, who has always been the
lead singer tor the Kind, is listed as
producing, performing and writ-
ing all the songs on the album.
Other past members are onlv
listed as participants on individual
tracks. It is possible that I Mascis is
Dinosaur Jr. the way Da vid Cilmore
is rink Royd
The Dinosaur lr faithful were
about to give up on the band when
with not a moment left to spare, the
Kind released their best and most
complete work to date.
(reen Mind is a jewel set in the
ring the oi emotional gauntlet. In
Masas's own words, "and when
Greenville
acquires
organic
mercantile
By Bill Egbert
Staff Writer
Evans Street Organic (Irocery
Store on 40 Evans Street had its
grand opening in February. ECU
student Wendy Compton and
former E U student Stephanie
IngTam are the entrepreneurs be-
hind this venture.
The arcityof (rgamc grocery
stores in Greenville inspired
Compton and Ingram to open their
own. Compton said, "We were
looking tor this kind of store We
figured weshoulddo it by ourselves
It anybodv. we i ould do it
Although the process ol
opening a grocery store seems
overwhelming ompton said that
it was not that diftu ult, and thai it
tookthemon!) a month toget things
started. "W� had to till out a tot of
paperwi rk and make a 1 tof phone
calls, that's about all, " she said
Fhev also borrowed money
trom familv members to invest in
their business, and most of the
store s equipment was purchased
secondhand.
Although small, the store itselt
Kasts shelves of food, herbs and
spices, vitamins and supplements,
refrigerated and froen items, hy-
giene products, a book and maga-
zine set tion. t-shirts, and even a few
items of jewelry. I"he wooden de-
cor offers a very comfortable and
familiar atmosphere.
VShat is special about their
Stole? inet pea ent of their prod-
ucts are organically grown. They
also carry a variety of recycled pa-
per products including napkinsand
paper towels Inaddition.Compton
said, "Eventually, we want to carry
an entire line of cruelty free prod-
ucts
I urrenth thev stock lason
cosmetic and hygiene products
Thev sell herbal based medicines,
sunscreen and first-aid spray.
Shampoos, soaps and toothpastes
composedof natural mgredientsare
also featured items I'hov even carry
pet products, including herbal dog
collars
Their healthy food items
helptulh provide tor the vegetar-
ian lifestyle Soy products, milk
and egg replacers, totu hone) and
rreshl) ground peanut butter are
�Mild 1K abocaiT) a varietyof
pastas bread truit juiccsand min-
eral waters I hey even have frozen
pizza and sorbet.
See Organic. Page 8
Bv Lisa Marie Jernigan
Staff Writer
rihl I I SI'
'



r �l :
ND5
SQETBAII SJGN-I
Batter up' EG Recn
- will be holding Intramural
all sign tips m the resicfc
��� moons of M h
Sign up stations will be located
I �� inCotten,Jarvtslenient, Retcl
'Hi Wk rtes Individuals
teams are welo (me t i sign u
further information call " �
t, . ;skn was never the same. n that night
day Night Live a potent blend of innovative
and often tasteless sabre
e i cultural phenomenon that siicceededm reshaping
ra.ltv r and continues to be, part of the tradition
full of dmg references, casual profanity, a
- jex, blistering political satin? and a bitter
tablishment
� � . t the program coupled with the mtnguing
asl mad. "Saturday Night live a target tor rumors
i lid Bill 1urr tvreallv punch out Che-v Chase ona five
time? WhydidCarreu Morrtsrarefyappearasa leading
while Eddie Murphy almost always did7 Why did John
� IV-s'1"
, indc4rwTquestkmswillberevealedtonightat8�J
. � eingT nDcanthoroftheK-stsellerNnto.f,
.multuoua history of the show m his enlightening and
� , A W kstage I hstorv of Saturday Night Live
I hs, �rb, nr. n-crratioP of the chaotic backstage scene
�,llt.r trom the.v.n,xivund(rgToundofthe147(rs
� , m tora generation raided on IV and rock and roll
, th a brief hist.�ry. 4 Chicago's "Second Cty 'The
, 5 , � ,n hannel One " and "The Chicken I ittle Comedy

no
Tad then ta V the audience from SN Is conception by a group
� mmandos on a mission of tnith behind the enemy lines,
.� ,r eagerness 10 bite the hand that fed them" through the
rhe show into a comedy institution that made stars of Chevy
;W Radnet John Mush Dan Aykroyd.laneCurtin, Bill Murray
I Eddie Murphy The most interesting segment of the show focuses
around disclosing the behind-the-scenes battles the
show waged with network executivesandcensorsand
the chaotic frenzy of rewrites, tantrums and rivalries
among cast members.
The program includes an exclusive 40-mmute
collage of sketches gathered from the vaults of
"Saturday Night Live The film clips and lecture
communicates the excitement of the show's early
years when sketches such as The Coneheads, the
Samurai Warrior, Nick the Lounge Lizard, The
Bees, the Blues Brothers and the Bass-O-Matic
were regular features.
Weingrad, who penned Saturday Night with
Columbia University Journalism School grad
Doug Hill, is the TV editor oftheNYorfc Daily
News. He previously worked as the editor for
Woman's WrrWmagazine'scelebritypageand
has also served as a reporter for the New York
Post.
He has written about television for nu-
merous publications including the New York
Daily News, Esquire and the Toronto Globe and
Mail.
Weingrad will make a special book signing
appearance today at the Student Stores at 6:00.
Copies of Saturday Night will be on sale there for
$8.95. He will also be available for book signing at
7:30 p.m. at Hendrix Theatre.
"A Backstage History of Saturday Night Live"
is presented by the Student Union Forum Commit-
tee The show begins tonight, March 5, at 8:00 pm at
Hendrix Theatre located in the Mendenhall Student
Center





i.

gjftc tEaat (garulfnian
17
PERSONALS
k
nbrandts paint Attic with picturesque pop
DISPLAY CLASSfTED
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Poio Lab
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant lectures tditor
ren years passed before Danny
Wilde and Lhil Solem, former
membersofthenew-wave era band
( Ireat Buildings, decided to reunite
latelastycarandcornbinetheirsong
w nting abilities
I sine, Wilde's garage as a sru
di�. Wilde and & item (reated a l I
song collection ot pop-oriented
iv kxiies Eventually, the record
fell into the hands ot an Atco
record executive rhafs just the wa)
it is babv rhe Rembrandts were
S rn
l Man h 1,1 he Rembrandts'
� � rrea hed tru Atti Befon
the incert I had theopportunir to
talk with 1'hi! Solem
Were you surprised over the
u i ss of your debut album?
W were shm kod When we
nrdi I it ��' were just basicalh
havinc d time We didn't
i rougl tl � regular
n rum gav il t it
� � rd n panv executri �
Where did you record the al
hum '
We ro � rded it in Danny's ga-
� We tried to make it clean To
rid of that hollow garage sound,
wr restructured the garage with
dr wall, rhishelped tocontainthe
- up,
between The Rembrandt' sound
and Great Building' SOtmd?
Great Buildings was not a per-
sonal production effort The
Rembrandt was produced bv us
We had the control, making it cur
most honest record Wedressed the
songs up as little as possible.
whereas "Great Buildings"
sounded thin
What inspired you to become a
musician
That fateful day, seeing rhe
Beatles on The I d Sullivan Sullivan
Show.
What was the lowest point ot
uour career?
While in Minneapolis, 1 was
going against tl � gr lii I
going on and ended up pushin' a
broom around a warehouse 1 tennj
was fortunate in having thre� well
received solo albums But,therm n
down you get the more you get
inspired
Ihd you meet Prince and u as
he as weird a he seems
�� i irded at his studi
Prim c went into th 'tudi
to have things e . tl nght Bef n
his arrival, a lad) would enter the
studio with a cardboard box of
trinkets and proceed to decorate
How has your tour been going
SO far?
Fantastic.
Why small clubs instead of
arenas
c-
out. e,oine, tor ilubs because we
thought that we would have a b I
ter nance of tilling em up
After our interview. The
Rernbrandtsgaveano holds bamxt
performance at rhe Attic I hi'
opening band, jimmy 1 eeand910,
got the evening started witha hard
edged style A blues They re liki
i reedence learwateTcrossed with
Mitiirhead said onec 'n itt gler
W ith cover songs su. h as
When the 1 evt e Break - and
"Midnight Rambler irnmy Lee
and 910 were an enjoyable contrast
to rhe Rembrandts style of pure
pop
When 1 he Rembrandts finally
anj - ! � i � il �as e ident
that they were trying to compete
will the warm-up bands raw vol
ume i his gave their others i -
melodk sound a distorted edge
rhekc to lhe Rembrandts success
i-stl � ii Ivncsandsimplerhythms It
seemed a hamefor them to dn ��. i
� �� , � . � � � � I portion
On t the � njoval
Rembrandts inv ited th ludieno
on stage to help out ��� ith the mg
Follow You i a i rurning tb
stage inti a seem of utterchaos the
audience complied
Overall, The Rembrandts gav
a good solid performance Hi ���
ever, the mesmerizing sound found
on their debut album seemed lost
Greenville
acquires
organic
mercantile
Bv Bill Egbert
statt Write!
EvansStrectrgani;rocer
Store ; � � ins Street had its
grand op February ECt
student W ndy mptoi and
former E I student St hanie
Ingram are the ntn preneurs be-
hind this venture
: h a an it oi gani grocen
stores in Ireenville inspired
( ompton and Ingram ti open their
own ompton said We wen
? ing tor this kind i 'I ston We
hguredwesl Idoil rsclvi
' - ' lid do 11
Alt: the Pi

� �

. '
111 lit i
HI
What is the major difference Atthisstage we're just starrin amidst a sea of distortion
lamic third LP on major lab

- Courtesy ot Sire FUcords
um fi not turJr promises to win critical
tsi � awaited release has tans cheering
� �
bei n tl
it on
ha
i nd
! i ascended t� a new level of emo
tional shock therapy rherema) be
somegood reasons why the Kind is
feeling so pissed off at the world
There is a lot of speculation
about the recent history ot the band
and why they have been v unpro-
ductive in the last two years. Dino-
saur Jr. has released one s mg ,Uiat
appeared on! egend: a tribute h bled
Young in that two year period.
Thesiing wasacoverof "Lotta
Love" and it sounded bad
So, why d(xs a Kind, that in a
three year period (roughly H" I
'88) released two full length LT .it
least two Hi's and a bouquet of
singles suddenly dry up?
That is hard to pin down ex-
actfy,butaresomepossible answers
SST, the band's record company in
thatfruitful period hasrun into some
financial problems of late
It also seems that 1 tinosaur r
and SSI weren't seeing eye-to-eye
onseveralrecordingsituations.SSl.
who historically let their band- go
on to major labelsas the) v ere n p
did notdosointhecaseot I tinosaur
r
Amid recording otters with
several big labels, SST threatened to
sue the band tor bree h ol contract
if they left the label. All the while,
the SSI executives (if they can he
y . �
counts comedy show's backstage life
to show program about Saturday Night hive's history
illed that) know that they didn't
have the capitol to promote an 1 P
from any band
It wasa last ditcheffort to save
their establishment Don't misun-
derstand,SS1 ,initsday,wasmaybe
�he best alternative label in exist-
ence, rhey are as much respx msibk �
tor the growing resurgence ol le
gitimaterock musk asany me.
The record company problem
eventually worked itself out; siro
Warner Brothers wen the lucky
henet.k tor of the band.
Something else that is strange
about the album are the credits I
Mascis, who has always been the
lead singer tor the band is listed as
producing, performing and writ-
ing all the stngs on the album
(ither past members are only
listed as partk ipantson indi idual
rra ks. It is possible that 1 Mascis is
Dinosaurjr thewayDavidC almore
is Pink Floyd.
! he 1 Hnosaur r faithful were
about to cue up on the band when
with not a moment left to span the
band released their best and most
complete work to date.
reen Mind is a jewel set in the
ring the of emotional gauntlet. In
Mascis's own words, and when
� . . thing
� I � , out -i i tot
papei vuri � : lotof phone
calls, thai - it a she said
, iho bon ' nev
from fan mbers to invest in
their busip.es- and tnt ol the
stores equipment ��� is purchased
so . indhai
Although smal I re itself
boasts shelves �( food, herbs d
spices, vitamins and supplements
refrigerated and frozen items, hy-
giene products al ok and maga
zinesection t-shirts andevenafew
items ol k wir rhe wooden de-
cor offers a very comfortable and
familiar atmosphere
What is special about their
store? NineK ;� nl ftheirprod-
ucts are orgarucally grown, rhey
also carry a variety oi re. y led pa
per productsincludingnapkinsand
papertowels Inadditi nompton
said, Eventually, we want to carry
an entire line or cruelty tree prod
IK
the stock ason
cosmetu and hygiene products
rhey sell herb based medicines,
suns r� i n and first aid spray
shampoos soaps and hxithpastes
omposed of natural ingredtentsare
also featured items ITiev evencam
pet piodu ts ii i ludme, herbal doe
collars
I heir healtl y t ' items
helpfully provide I i the vvgetar-
ian lifestyle Sin pi "ducts, milk
� ers, totu h.one and
freshh I :� anut butter an
stkl l'h� y also i arry a vanety ol
I istas breads innt ui sand mm
oral waters I hey even havefrozen
pizza and sort t
See Organic Page 8
Lisa Marie ernigan
I Writei
n . r the same ' tn that n ght
lav . potenl blend of no ative
� eded in reshaping
� c partofthetradihon
rcfen m es i asual profanity, a
� i - . r� �lih al satire and a bittrr
H
5 �l IBM blCN

i .a ijoi I �� ith the intriguing
,ht Livi a targi I fi r rumors
in hout hi- y haseonce.five
� � ' irrisrarelyappearasaleading
� . i ,i � , sdid? Why did John
� rmswilll n � � ill dtonightat8O0
Ithe bestseller SaturaayNight,
� theshevw in his enlightening and
i � � � , f aturda) Night Live
eationol thci haotii backstage scene
iii d undi rgroundofthel970 s
. . , raisedon rV ,w rock and roll
ithabnefhist i f hicago "Secondt ity The
I On �nd "The hicken I ittleComedy
� . ludienie'romsM 's conception by a group
n , mission of truth behind the enemy lines,
to bite the hand that fed them" through the
. medy institution that made stars of Chev
hnlVlush. PanAvkrovd,ane( u.tin BillMurrax
, Mi. ,� interesting segmenl of the show focuses
around disclosing the behind-the-scenes Kittles the
show waged with networkexecutivesandcensorsand
the chaotic frenzy of rewrites, tantrums and rivalries
ami ng east members.
The program includes an exclusive 40-mmute
collage of sketches gathered from the vaults of
"Saturday Night Live' The film clips and lecture
i ommunicates the excitement of the show's early
years when sketches such as The Coneheads, the
Samurai Warrior, Nick the Lounge Lizard, The
Bees, the Blues Bmthers and the Bass-O-Matic
were regular features.
Weingrad, who penned Saturday Ni$htwlh
Columbia University journalism School grad
1 tougl lilldsthe TV editor of the N�w York Daily
Se; le previously worked as the editor for
Woman' VVerWmagazine'scelebnrypageand
hasalsoservedasa reporter for the New York
Post.
le has written aKut television for nu-
merous publications including the New York
Daily News, Esquire and the Toronto Globe and
Uil
Weingrad will make a special book signing
appearance todav at the Student Stores at 6:00.
( opies of Saturday Night will be on sale there for
$8.95.1 le will also be available for book signing at
7:30 p.m. at Hendnx Theatre.
"A Backstage History of Saturday Night Live"
is presented bv the Student Union Forum Commit-
tee The show begins tonight, March 5, at 800 pm at
I lendrix Theatre located in the Mendenhall Student
Center





w
8 51ic Sagt ffarolfnfan March 5r fl?r
UnCH 5.1991
Sale
25 off
additional 10 off with Valid Student ID
all Men's & Women's clothing at
Moore's FAshioiN
and consignment
1412 W 14th St.
Greenville. NC
758-8202
The Two Jakes' begins the week in film Organic
ByLisaMarieJemigan
Staff Writer
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Barj
Washington Highway INC. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phona 752-3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night �
� $3.95
The Jack attack continues at
Hendrix Theatre. Thismonth'sjack
Nicholson Rim Festival feature is
The Two Jakes Nicholson's long
awaited sequel to the 1974 Roman
Polanski classic "Chinatown
Two-time Academy Award
winner Nicholson returns as Jake
Gittes, a jaded private detective in
1940s Los Angeles. Harvey Keitel
("Taxi Driver") plays Jake number
two, Jake Berman, a shady realtor
who hires divorce detective Gittes
to spy on his adulterous wife (Meg
Tilly). The essential mystery takes
form at a motel stakeout where an
unexpected shooting occurs.
Berman is suspected of murder and
Gittes is targeted as a conspirator.
Woven into the plot are sub-
mysteries making the film much
more than a whodunnit. Nicholson
and Towne have created a wonder-
fully twisted story of love, deceit
and memory wrapped up in a vi-
sual tribute to the dark and moody
film noirs of the '30s and '40s. Tilt
shots, shadows, Raymond Chan-
dler-esque smart aleck narration
and a haunting musical score do
much to set the tone of the film.
A fresh viewing of
"Chinatown" probably wouldn't
hurt in following the Robert Towne
scripted plot, but if you don't have
time to visit the video store, here's
what you need to know:
The name Mulwray that Gittes
hears on a tape in 'The Two Jakes"
refers to Katherine Mulwray,
daughter of the late Evelyn
Mulwray (FayeDuna way). In 1937,
Evelyn hired Gittes to investigate
themurderofher husband and they
had an affair. She was shot at the
end of 'Chinatown" while fleeing
with her daughter from her corrupt
land baron father (John Huston).
Gittes is now haunted by the
disappearance of Katherine, the
product of incest between Evelyn
and her father.
The water rights and orange
groves mentioned in "The Two
Jakes" refers to a dam project that
Evelyn's father sought to control.
Nicholson himself said that
"The Two Jakes" is not a "popcorn
movie" in that it isa serious picture
requiring rapt attention. If you're
looking for some fluffy entertain-
ment you should go down to
Bunny's instead.
"The Two Jakes" will be shown
Wednesday night, March 6 at 8.00
p.m. at Hendrix Theatre located in
the Mendenhall Student Center.
Admission is free with a student ID
bearing a current semester activity
Argentine guitarist comes to Fletcher
By Archie Manning
Special to The East Carolinian
GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPARTMENT
LIFEGUARDS AND INSTRUCTORS
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is now accepting applications
for Lifeguards and Instructors at its City
Outdoor Pool. Applicant should have
current WS1 or Advance Lifesaving
Certificate and 2 years pool management
experience. Application may be picked up
at the City Personnel Office, located on
corner of 5th and Washington Streets. For
more information, contact
Charles Williams, 830-455
Jose Luis Merlin, classical and
Latin American guitaristcom-
poser, will perform at ECU in
Fletcher Auditorium tonight at 8
p.m.
Mr. Merlin is from Buenos
Aires, Argentina, and gave his first
public recital at age nine. Since
t hen he has performed ex tensi vely
in the most prestigious concert
halls of Argentina, and in numer-
ous cities and universities in both
the United States and Canada. He
has also given master classes in
the United States and his own
country. He also performed with
leading symphony orchestras
throughout North and South
America.
The noted gui ta rist composer
began playing the guitar at age
five and did advanced study with
Abel Carlevaro, a student of Mae-
stro Andres Segovia. As a com-
poser. Merlin has adapted the
works of such masters as
Beethoven, Bach, Piazzola, and
others. Dr. Miguel Angel Inchusti,
famous Latin American musical
critic, said: "His interpretative
quality is reflected by a fruitful
trajectory and a singular knowl-
edge of international classical ma-
terial And the El Nuevo Diario
from San Juan, Argentina, has
written: "The fine performance by
the guitarist Jose Luis Merlin de-
serves our praise. His pure tech-
nique brought to mind Segovia
a memorable concert
Mr. Merlin's presentation is
being sponsored by the ECU In-
ternational Students Association,
the Latin American Area Studies
Committee,as well asGreenville's
newly organized Eastern Carolina
Hispanic-American Cultural As-
sociation. The concert is free to the
public and will be followed by a
reception in the School of Mask
next door to Hetchcr Hall.
p
The EastCarolinian;
the tower of power
Continued from page 7
The literature secbon h � a i
variety of cookbooks, nutrition
booksand pamphhts on nutrition,
animal rights and adncc of becom-
ing a vegetarian. Magazines will be
arriving this week.
Comptonsaid, "We're getting
someanimal rights, vegetarian and
environmental magazines, a lot of
magazinesthatyoucan'tgetaround
here. We'regettingacoupleof new
age magazines, and a couple of
feminist magazines. We'll have
Animals Agenda. Buzzworm, East
West Journal, Funny Times, Sierra,
Herb Companion, Organic Garden
ing, Total Health and Garbage. We're-
trying to get a wide variety
They will sell a total of twent v-
four different magazines. Soon
they will also be offering a larger
variety of books.
Compton and Ingram oftei
other services as well. Compton
said, "We are going bo have bag
lunches starting next week, with a
sandwich, a vegetable, like carrots
and chips Their bag lunches will
offer an alternative to fast food fa
the many people who work in th
downtown area
Compton and Ingram alsi
send out a newsletter to keep CttS
tomcrs informed on the latest sales
and the newest items in the store
The newsletter has rc ines with in
gredients that can all he found in
the store. It also has information n
the environment and nutrition
Fresh produce will start coi1,
ing m this week Compton �
nfVengomgtohaveptodti i k,
rhey look like vegetable produce
hags, but they're made out of ceilu
lose. They're also reusable
As an added bonus. Compti n
and Ingram will even order sp
brands of merchandise, thai tl
store does not cam farcustomci i
Compton said, "Wemostly want�. -
cater to the individual
In addition, 10 percent dis
counts are also offered tocustonx rs
with student IDs.
s-
.V
V
&
,c
d
&
.o
vV
s

a
Jp
x N V niP
jo &
ov � � 0 , & jp
�ryrVr '
� jp VV

& $
r
9
4
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$ JF
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ATTENTION ECU GROUPS
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Annual Fund-raising Planning Sessions Are
Scheduled for:
Wednesday, March 20
Thursday, March 21
Wednesday, March 27
Wednesday, April 3
Thursday, April 4
Wednesday, April 10
Thursday, April 11
Wednesday, April 17
Thursday, April 18
Room 242
Rooms 8A-B
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
Rooms 8A-B
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
all times 3:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m.
A Representative of Your Organization
Must Be Present At One Session
In Order To Obtain
1991-1992 Funding
All Groups With SGA Funded
Status Are Eligible
For Further Information Call
Tripp Hoag, 757-0303
Amy Harris, 758-9923
If You Are Unsure If You Are
Eligible For Funding -
Please Call
Millie Murphrey at 757-4726
CU splits
ith St. A
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
ECU showed why puchingand
defense are the key to winning
j baseball games Thursday afternoon
against St. Augustine's.
In the first game ECU had
strong pitching from sophomore
left-hander Jim Ambrosius and
played good defense while muting
St. Augustine 11-2.
The second gan proved to be
different, however five Pirate er-
rors in two innings coupled with
only two hits left ECU on the short
end of a 3-1 decision
The first game was all Pirates
Sen lorthird baseman JohnGast put
the Pirates on the board with a
lumer to left-center in thebottomof
the first.
After St. Augustine's tied it at
1-1 in the top of the second, the
Pirates exptoded h r h ve runs in the
bottom of the inning QymtBeck
led oit with a single to center and
Tom Move
popouttothj
was hit by a i
bases.
Corev
to third that'
baseman, ailj
Atter a strike
to tenter wr
ten
walked, and
left, bni I
to finish the
The Falo
a single run
pushed am.si
m the fifth arf
Ambrosii
allowed two
walking one j
Cast vent 2 i
RBI and SI �
RBI
In the sec
i ouidn't set 'i
Si Kugusnnej
nehitani


(M�
A Pirate player throws the ball to his teammate i
Howard almost tied the game but an apparent g
Lacrosse team
By Earle McAuley
SUf f Writer
It was a dark and stormv night
for the Howard I ru versify lacrosse
-
team.
The Ed men S lacrosse team
was able to outdistance Howard 6-
5ona verv rainv and wind Sundav
afternoon
The first quarter hekmged to
Howard, as they were able to build
an early 3-0 lead from man-up situ-
ations.
The Pirates were able to get on
track in the second quarter, how-
ever, and Howard took a 4-3 lead
into the intermission.
Central campus
into scavenger h
The secoi
mvnadofaetivl
two third-ul
Howard one
In the foul
score one goaP
thecontrovci
Howard
situation, andl
peartxi to be tl
flared, and thq
But as soon as I
pipped (u:
ECU thoul
amiss, wrule I
was a hole in tl
After offi
referee detc
By Jeanctte Roth
Recreational Service
Admitted I
came the mostl
quire. Huds
windsurfing
Recreational
place finishers
Wright and
Jarvis Hall
nerstoAnnat
This
vices is offer
events for eacl
The hunt was on for Central
Campus residents who took part in
a Scavenger Hunt sponsored by
ECU Recreational Services. The
scavenger hunters were given 1
hour and 45 minutes to collect a
total of 28 items located across cam-
pus.
A pink flamingo, copy of Dr.
Eakins signature, male chest hair, a Greek organi
dead roach, a loft ladder and roller Upcomi
heckeyhdmetwerejustafewofthe Greek All -
items traveling across campus to
hunt headquarters located in the
General Classroom Building.
m addition, a 30-point bonus
item in which hunters searched for
a Rec Services staff member high-
lighted the event.
Over 30 participants enjoyed will take place
Utearrtics of tte clay. Fierrang Hall offer a variety
House Council members Karin activities in ad
Stefko, Candy Hudspeth, Ray Beach vott
Oberhouser and Ron dark com- the Hill as Cc
pieted their list with 10 minutes to can sign up
spare. play in April.
March 5, in Chi
rority All-Star
with the frat
their own
versus West'
In early Ajj
West Campus i





March 5,1991
cylje iciiBt (BaruHnum
9
ilm Oiganic
�d Irom
pton said W i n :
ghts eg lanai i
. i � ics
. � ���
� v ; "
her
.
1
1
r
II GROUPS:
MONLY?
nning Sessions Are
for:
KCX
RiMims 8A B
Room 242
R(X)m 242
Room 242
Rooms 8A-B
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
uuil 6:00 p.m.
ur Organization
One Session
(Obtain
inding
SGA Funded
Eligible
irmation Call
57-0303
758-9923
�elf You Are
uncling -
2all
at 757-4726
ECU splits twin bill
with St. Augustine
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
ECU showed whv pitchmgand
ji nse are the key to winning
tasehallgamesThunday afternoon
against St Augustine's.
Ir the tirst game ECU had
strong pitching trom sophomore
, fi hander lim Ambrosius and
, i ved good defense while routing
-� Augustine 11-2.
! he second game proved to he
� in however, five Pirate er-
n two innings coupled with
' � o hits left ECU on the short
� r al decision
tu tirst game was all Pirates.
i third baseman johnGast put
Pirates on the board with a
� � lo lett center in thebottomot
fter Si Augustine's tied it at
� the top of the second, the
.exploded few five runs in the
- �� �m pi tlie mmng I ,1 nn Wvk
II with a single to center and
Tom Move then walked After a Pirat
pop out to the pitcher, Davel.eisten the bottom ol the
washitbya pitch, which loaded the walks an. I a i
bases.
Corey Reddick hit a grounder
to third that wasbootod bv the third
baseman, allowing Beck to score
Alter a strikeout, Cast lined a single
to center which scored Mine and
Leisten. Tommy Eason then
walked, and Corey Short singled to
lett, bringing in Roddick and (las)
to finish the scoring for the inning
rhe Falcons managed to score
a single run in the third while E I
pushed acTossonein the third.three
in the fifth and one in the sixth
Ambrosius, who is now -1 0
allowed two runs on six hits m hilt'
walking one and striking out eight
Cast went 2-2 at the plate with four because i
lie in
?n three
.nit but
r the rest
ahead tor
third and
i the sixth
i thebase
could get nothii
ot the game.
St. Augustine w 11
good with .1 run in
added an insui ino
fhe Piral left I rm n
paths in, luding the tying runs in
the bottom ot tlv se enth
Sophomore right -handei
I toward Whitfield (0
start el th i
losei 1 . onand
both 1 -3and had
i,i
well in th first
coach Gai
In th� set
.ill l
ii ill
in his tirst
hard huk
itklllS riv
1 ii ite hits
. uted very
s.11 I head
, .1! ' II "S
fell behind
1 !
RBI and Short was 2 4 with three
RBI
In the second game, I h 'Pirates
couldn't seem to get things started
St Augustine's jumped toa 1 Olead
on one hit and three Pirate errors
made ph
in the kwi
Wit!
m i - i.
March "
Mason
Sophc
rhurs
Lady Pirates lose
ght
Dail Re�d ECU Photo Lab
' Pirate player throws the ball to his teammate in Sunday's game against Howard which ECU won 6 5
ward almost tied the game, but an apparent goal went through the net and was rest inded
Lacrosse team edges Howard, 6-5
By Earle McAuley
Staff Writer
it was a dark and stormy night
� rthel Eoward University lacrosse
he E I nuns lacrosse team
ible to outdistance Howard 6-
a ven rain) n wind) Sunday
�Ms m n
fhe tirst quarter belonged to
ird.as they were able to build
art) Mileacl from man-up situ-
itu ins.
I he Pirates were able to get on
track in the second quarter, how-
ever and Howard tcxik a 4-3 lead
into the intermission.
The second half contained a
myriadof activity as the But ssi �red
two third-quarter goals and
1 toward one, to knot the score at
In the fourth, l:Cl' was able to
score one goal, and as time ran out
the controversy began
1 toward was in a man up
situation, and they shot what ap
peared to be tin- tying shot: the net
flared, and they began celebrating
But as soon as me net flared, the ball
popped out behind the goal.
ECU thought that the shot was
a miss, while Howard claimed then
was a hole in the net
After official inspection the
referee determined that the net was
indeed in good repair
and thi
II . � turned out in
ingfat loi asa str i . I
. � ' �
; n dilemma
off the b I
i hi I'll.I I. '
hustleofseni �rn
. � ni iiI kel
: � -i � 'i it 1 �i t iii
he sin ; w.i'
ff the

w
IVT
( haj
lar I
spring
Pirates
ill in dI
ill h
i
I rone
I squad Wednesda) night
II then return to action ifter
ireak.
By Matt Mumma
Sports I ditor
rhe ECU women's tennis team
ho not had much luck at home this
season is the) lost their second
memati h against James Madison
. . LTsibi I Ion 1 riday
Ml sho � dl fine talent and
i iccellent i oaehing in their sweep of
the Pirates whofailed to win a single

nhke the last home match,
hi. wasal . autitul day tor ten-
, �. t am returned home after
: away matches and seemed
r id to pl.o
luniorcaptain Kim larvevgot
fit toa decent start in the tirst set 2-
l but fell behind quickly 5-2. Her
i�iponent w as tough and ended up
winning the first set 6-2 even though
she was playing against possibly
thebesl athlete on the E U squad.
NumberoneseedSuna I leinila
ivii �: i � i �� iblemsas well as
�.he tc Ii behin 14-1 in the tirst set. It
ooked like it might boa quick loss
: i, i madeadashing
back and found a way to get
hei game togethci
She '�� on two straight games to
ihesi ore t ; and put hewlt
. � , i pi .sition to w in the set
i nloi lunately she did not win the
first s( t ind lost 6-3.
Even though sophomore Jen
t enton lost her first set, there was
re ison to believe she could not
beat her opponent. She had some
great backhand shots coupled with
Pirates
fall to
No. 2
Spiders
By Kerry Nester
Assistant Sports Fditor
For the first six minutes of play-
Saturday night at the Richmond
Coliseum, the ECU Pirates
outhustled and scrapped the Rich-
mond Spiders to open up an 11 -f
lead.
"Thev started out very intense
and pushed us out of our operating
areas and made us work very, very
hard Richmond head coach Dick
Tarrant said. "Thev ran both their
zone and man defenses very well
After the encouraging start,
however, thebottom tell out for the
Pirates as they wen! into a scoring
drought that lasted tor 434, some-
thing that has plagued tlie Pirates
all season long
Thisenabled Richmond to score
six straight points to take the lead at
12-11 with 11:23 remaining in the
first half.
ECU senior forward Darrell
Overton followed up his own shot
in the lane with 1003 left on the
really nice hits that kept her oppo- clock to give the Pirates their last
nent running around chasing the lead of the game at 13-12
ball. After the basket by Overton,
She was hitting the ball so hard the Pirates would not score again
that she broke a string on the for another 5:19. This was another
opponent's racquet. Somehow, droughtthattheSpiderscapitalized
though, Fenton managed to lose onbysconng 12 unanswered points
Celeste Hottman - ECU Photo Lab
more pitcher Jim Ambrosius delivers a pitch in the first game of
lays double header against St Augustine
her first set 6-1
In the second sets ECU pretty
much choked 1 larvey lost 6-2 and
Fenton lost r-l.
1 leinila was the last hope for an
ECU victory. She started with an
impressive 3-2 lead but )MU won
two games to put the set at 4-3.
Thev traded games, each win-
ning the other's service game. The
score was 5-4 JMU and Heinila
needed three in a row if she was to
win the set.
She won the first one she
needed. That tied thesetat 5but she
had to win her own crucial service
game. In that specific game Heinila
and JMU were tied 30-30 and the
game could have gone either way
from there. Heinila, however,
double faulted two times and that
lost the game
Down 6-5 in the second set.
leinila's chances were pretty slim.
She lost the net game and lost the
match 6-3 and 7-5.
The team is now 1 -3 on the year
atter losing to Peace College last
Wednesday. Fenton and number
five Karen Atkins each won their
singles matches while Heinila and
Harvev won a doubles match.
to build a 24-13 lead.
Richmond senior guard Curtis
Blair had eight straight points dur-
ing the run, with six aiming on two
three pointers.
He finished the game with a
career high 27 points and was
named the game's Most Valuable
Player.
"Our strategy was to force Blair
to shoot three's ECU head coach
MikeSteelesaid. "Buttodavhewas
3of4,afterthatwehadtogooutand
guard him, that allowed him to start
penetraringanddoingother things
He also finished with five as-
sists.
"If we could have kept the lead
in single digits, I think we could
havestaved with them Steelesaid.
"We could have stayed in the zone,
but when they got it out to 14 or 15,
we had to go to the man
"If you don't, then thev hold it
for30secondsand men go into their
offense, we couldn't let them do
that
Without having a bench with
some depth, it took a lot out of the
Pirates having to play Richmond
man to man.
Blair said: They had gone into
Central campus jumps
into scavenger hunt
A 1 �i I k a. .it I U, �� l.ii'
By Jeanette Roth
Recreational Services
l"be hunt was on for Central
( ampus residents who took part in
i Scavenger Hunt sponsored by place finishers Brian Hunt, Andna
Admittedly the dead roach be-
came the most difficult item to ac-
quire. Hudspeths team won a free
windsurfing trip sponsored by
Recreational Services while second
FCU Recreational Services. The
scavenger hunters were given 1
hour and 45 minutes to collect a
total of 28 items located across cam-
pus.
A pink flamingo, copy of Dr
Wright and Heather Fraser from
Jarvis Hall received discount din
ners to Annabelles Restaurant.
This spring, Recreational Ser-
vices is offering unique special
events for each area of campus and
Eakins signature, male chest hair, a Greek organizations.
dead roach, a loft ladder and roller Upcoming activities include
h(Kkeyhelmetwerejustafewofthe Greek All-Star Basketball night,
items traveling across campus to March5,inChnstenburyGym. So-
hunt headquarters located in the rority All-Stars will play at 9 p.m.
General Classroom Building. with the fraternity stars playing in
In addition, a 30-point bonus their own version of the NBA East
item in which hunters searched for
a Rec Services staff member high-
lighted the event.
Over 30 participants enjoyed
the antics of the day. Fleming Hall
House Council members Karin
Stefko, Candy Hudspeth, Ray
Oberhouser and Ron Clark com-
pleted their list with 10 minutes to
spare
versus West contest at 10 p.m.
In early April, school is out for
West Campus residents as RECess
will take place April 3. RECess will
offer a variety of early childhood
activities in a carnival atmosphere
Beach volleyball is the toast of
the Hill as College Hill residents
can sign up for beach volleyball
play in April.
The women play Appalachian a zone defense, but we hit a couple
State at home next Friday along See Spiders, Page 10
with the men's tennis team at 2 p.m.
Track team balances grades,
practices, with traveling
� � � � � � ��t
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
day and Thursday are weight train-
ing days. On Friday, the members
make up for what was missed
The track team has made great during the week or what they feel
strides at improvement this season needs improvement. Saturdays,
in the ever changing world of track they compete in compebtionsacross
and field.
ECU'S head coach, Bill Carson,
who has been at ECU for 24 of the 35
years he has been coaching, feels
that the team has been stronger this
the country.
Coach Carson feels being on
the track team does not hinder stu-
dents' academic performance.
The track team works less than
year than any otheT team that he has other teams on campus, and prac
coached in the past
'Track is a progressive sport
where one week can affect next
week's performance Carson said
He has not thought about next
season but is more concerned about
the present. "The team must
tiee is one and a half hours a day or
less.
He feels practice does not bother
members, bu t the travel does, so he
tries to schedule meets that are rela-
tively close to home.
Eric Dillard, who has had five
� Photo Courtasy of R�cr���ion�l Sfvlc�
ECU student Will Thompson goes up for a dunk in the Slam Dunk
Competition Thompson won the event over 16 competitors
progress from week to week he years track experience, runs the
said. � 4x100 200 and 100-meter events.
The team has lived up to their He feels that track helps, not hin-
coach'scompetiHveexpectationsas ders, his academic performance,
they rank sixth in the country. Practicing with people who
The routine training week is know what to do pushes one to the
broken down into sections on des- extreme. According to Dillard, be-
ignated days that vary in difficulty, ing on the track team "helps your
Monday and Tuesday include high grades, gives you determinahon
speed workouts, whereas Wednes- and makes you more competitive





March 5,1991
ailn East (ffarulinian
9
Of game

KM
) '
I
11 GROUPS
MONEY?
lining Sessions Arc
for:
R
i
M H 'ill -
Rot
Ro
- I
Ri
Room
mr Organization
)nc session
lOhtain
uncling
S (i A F u n (I e d
K I i g i b 1 e
rmation�?!l
57-0303
58-9923
Ire If You Are
Minding -
Lall
at 757-4726
ECU splits twin bill
with St. Augustine
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
F( I showed why pitchingand
ise are the key to winning
i hall games rhursdayafternoon
� St ugustine s.
In the tirst game E I had
pitching from sophomore
ler imi Ambrosius and
oddefense whilerouting
istine 11-2.
second game proved to be
however five Pirate or
two innings coupled with
I its left ECU on the short
I a 3-1 decision
first game was .ill Pirates.
� third basemanJohn lastput
ti - on the board w ith .1
� left center in the bottom ot

� St Augustine s tied it at
th loj ot the sei ond the
� pkxled for five runs in the
f th inning 1 .1 nn Ixvk
:�� .1 sincle to enter and
Fom Move then walked After .1
popout to the pitcher, Dave I .listen
was hit by a pitch, which loaded the
bases.
Corey Reddick hit a groundei
to third that wasbooted by the third
baseman, allowing Bock to score
Aftera strikeout,(.ast lined .1 singli
to center which scored Moye and
1 eisten. Tommy Eason then
walked, and( nrey Short singled to
left, bringing in Reddick and Gasl
to finish the scoring tor the inning
The Falcons managed to score
a single run in the third bile E I
pushed acrossone in the third three
in the titth and one in the sixth
Ambrosius who is now 11
allowed two runs ��n six hits , hile
walking one and striking out eight
1st went2 at the plate with foil!
RBI and Short was 2 1 with thro
RBI
In the set. nd game tht � 1 'irates
v ouldn t seem t 1 gel things stai ted
Si ugustine's jumped toa 1 Olead
on one hit and thre Pirate errors
the bottoi 1
walks 1 .1 .1
omld get nothi
ol tin gai �
v-�t ugusfm
good with a ni 11 I
iddedan insui 11 -
llu Piral le'l
paths includ
tin bottom of tl
Sophomon
! lev ard hitfieldO)
farl ol th . 11. um
I 1 t , . ;
both 1-3 a
Wepla '
in 1
,1 foi
Celeste Hottman ECU Photo Lab
lim Ami rosius delivers a pitch m the first game ot
� � idei againsl St Augustine
Lady Pirates lose
ght
Bv Matt Mum ma
Sports Editor
1 Rac;
ECU Photf
� -ate plaver throws the ball to his teammate in Sunday? game againsl I low ird which I
a ard almost tied the game but an apparent goal went through the net ar .
Lacrosse team edges Howard, 6-5
B) I arle McAulev
Staff Writer
i a dark and stormy night
� ird 1 nivi rsity lacrosse
l I nun s lacrosse team
utdistance 1 toward -
n and wind Sunday
firsl quarter bekmged to
tvard as th wi n ableto build
: � U ad fromman up situ
Pirates were able to get on
k in the second quarter, how
� ind 11 ard took a 4-3 lead
the intermission.
The second halt contained
myriadofactivityastheBut � �
two third-quarter goals ai
Howard one to knot the scon at
In the fourth, EC1 was hk
st ore one goal, and a timi �
the t ontroversy began
I low ard was in a n �
situation, and the fw l ��� hal a
peared to be the tying shot tht
flared and thej began ekbi ii
But as soon as the net flared, the ball
popped out behind the goal
ECU thought that the shot m is
a miss, while I toward claimed thei i
was a bole in the net
After official inspection the
referee determined that the net was
� .


-
:
i
net
i
Far Heel so,
i i � I . 111 � i
Rrii


tU r
CUv ' stennisteam
had mu - u homt this
east tost sin ir second
st James Madison
I riday
' ileni and
fcoachu mtl irsweej
Itowinasingle
ihki tht � � home match,
-nd tiful daj tor ten
. i turned home after
o. ' � � ind s 'med
i apt.nn Kim 1 larveygof
tin the first set 2-
� hind quickly 5 2 Her
; � h indinded up
thefii t �� �-� 2eventhough
I . igainst possibly
the E I squad.
heron . edSuna 1 leinila
ms as well as
14-1 in the first set It
� a quk k loss
idea dashing
lav a to get
Ihei
� iighi games to
ind put herself
; � n to win the set.
tun it ly sht did not win the
� ; : lost 6 1
though sophomore en
nton lost her tirst set. there was
, - n to believe she could not
beat her opponent She had some
great oat khand shots coupled with
Central campus
into scavenger hunt
" � J�L.1IV�)
By leanette Roth
Recreational Services
The hunt was on for Central
ampus residents who took part in
i Scavenger Hunt sponsored by
E ! Recreational Services. The
scavenger hunters were given 1
houi and 45 minuted to collect a
t( tal ot 28 items located across cam-
pus
A pink flamingo, copy of Dr.
Eakins signature, m�lechest hair, a
dead roach, a loft ladder and roller
hockev helmet wercustafewofthe Greek All-Star Basketball night,
items traveling across campus to March 5, inChnstenburvGym. So
hunt headquarters located in the rority All-Stars will play at 9 p.m.
(leneral Classroom Building. with the fraternity stars playing in
In addition, a 30-point bonus their own version of the N
Admittedly the dead n m h be
came the most difficult item to at
quire. Hudspeths team won a free
windsurfing trip sponsored by
Recreational Services while sea m I
place finishers Brian 1 hint, Andrea
Wnght and Heather Fraser from
Jarvis Hall received discount din
ners to Annabelles Restaurant
This spring, Recreational Sit
vices is offering unique special
events for each area of campus and
Greek organizations
Upcoming activities include
item in which hunters searched for
� Rec Services staff member high-
hghted the event
Over 30 participants enjoyed
versus West contest at 10 p.m.
In early April, school is out for
West Campus residents as REGess
will take place April 3 RECess will
the antics of the day Fleming Hall offer a variety of early childhood
11, -use Council members Kann activities in a carnival atmosphere
Stefko Candy Hudspeth, Rav Beach volleyball is the toast of
(Iberhouser and Ron Clark com- the Hill as College 11.11 residents
pitted their list with 10 minutes to can sign up tor beach volleyball
spare P,ay in APnl
really nice hits that kept her oppo-
nent running around chasing the
ball.
She was hitting the ball so hard
that she broke a string on the
opponent's racquet. Somehow,
though, Fenton managed to lose
her tirst set 6-1.
In the second sets E U pretty
much choked. 1 larvey lost 6-2 and
Fenton lost 6-1.
1 leinila was the last hope for an
K U victory She started with an
impressive3-2 lead but IML won
two games to put the sot at 4-3.
Thev traded games, each win-
ning the other's service game The
score was 5-4 IML and Heinila
needed throe in a row if she was to
win the set
She won the first one she
needed. That tied the set at 5 but she
had to win her own crucial service
game. In that specific game 1 leinila
and IML' were tied 30-30 and the
game could have gone either way
from there Heinila, however,
double faulted two times and that
lost the game
Down 6 5 in the second set
I leinila s chances were pretty slim
she lost the next game and tost the
mat h 6-3 and 7 5
I he team is now 1 on the v ear
alter losing to Peace College last
Wednesday. Fenton and number
five Karen ins each won their
singles matches while Heinila and
Harvey won a doubles match.
The women play Appalachian
State at home next Friday along
with the men s tennis team at 2 p.m.
Pirates
fall to
No. 2
Spiders
By Kerry Nester
Assistant Sports 1 dilor
For the first six minutesof play
Saturday night at the Richmond
Coliseum, the E U Pirates
outhustled and s. rapped the Rich-
mond Spiders to tpvn up an 11-6
lead.
"They started out v cry intense
and pushed usoutol our operating
areas and made us wtrk very, very
hard Richmond head oa h I Vk
Tarrantsaid. 'Thev ranboth their
zone and man defenses very vsell
After the encouraging stari
fiowevcr thebottom fell out forth
Pirates as thc went into a scoring
drought that lasted foi 4 ;4 sorm
thing that has plagued the Pirates
all season long
Thisonabled Ric hrnondtoscore
six straight points to take the lead at
12-11 with 11 2" remaining in the
first half
ECU senior forward Darrell
Overton follow td up hisown shot
in the lane with IOkX3 left on the
clock to give the Pirates their last
lead of the game at 13-12
After the basket by (H erton.
the Pirates would not score again
for another 5:19. This was another
drought that the Spiderscapitalized
on bysa Ting 12 unanswered p �nts
to build a 24-13 lead
Richmond senior guard Curtis
Blair had eight straight points dur-
ing the nin, with six coming on two
three pointers.
He finished the game with a
career high 27 points and was
named the game's Most Valuable
Player.
"Our strategy was to force Blair
to shoot three's ECU head coach
MikeSteelesaid. "Buttodayhewas
3 of 4. after that we had to go out and
guard him, that allowed him to start
penetrahngand doing other things
He also finished with five as-
sists
"If we could have kept the lead
in single digits, 1 think we could
havestayed with them Steelesaid
"We could have stayed in the zone,
but when they got it out to 14 or 15,
we had lo go to the man
'It you don't, then they bold it
for 30secondsand then go into their
offense, we couldn't let them do
that
Without having a bench with
some depth, it ttxk a lot out of the
Pirates having to play Richmond
man to man
Blair siid Thev had gone into
a zone defense, but we hit a couple
See Spiders. Page 10
witntnemen Mennis teamdi p.m.
Track team balances grades,
practices, with traveling
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
The track team has made great
stndes at improvement this season
in the ever changing world of track theycompeteincompetitionsacross
day and Thursday are weight train-
ing days. On Friday, the members
make up for what was missed
during the week or what they fed
needs improvement. Saturdays.
Photo Courtly o4 R�cr��lioo�l Srvtcs
ECU student Will Thompson goes up for a dunk in the Slam Dunk
Competition 1 hompson won the event over 16 competitors
and field
ECU'S head coach, Bill Carson,
who has been at ECU for 24 of the 35
years he has been coaching, feels
that the team has been stronger trus
year than any other team that he has
coached in the past.
Track is a progressive sport
where one week can affect next
week's performance Carson said.
He has not thought about next
season but is more concerned abou t
the present. "The team must
progress from week to week he
said. '
The team has lived up to their
coach'scompetihveexpectabonsas
they rank sixth in the country.
The routine training week is
broken down into sections on des-
ignated days that vary in difficulty
the countrv.
Coach Carson feels being on
the track team does not hinder stu-
dents' academic performance.
The track team works less than
other teams on campus, and prac-
tice is one and a half hours a day or
less.
He feels practice does not bother
members, but the travel does, so he
tnes to schedule meets that are rela-
tively close to home.
Eric Dillard, who has had five
vears track experience, runs the
4x100.200 and 100-meter events
He feels that track helps, not hin-
ders, his academic performance.
Practicing with people who
know what to do pushes one to the
extreme According to Dillard, be-
ing on the track team "helps your
Monday and Tuesday include high grades, gives you determination
speed workouts, whereas Wednev and makes you more competitive






10 nic �aat (Earoltntan March 5, 1991
i
Spiders
Continued from page 9
r
1
of jumpers. They had to go back to
the man, and we were able to beat
it
"They ran out of steam late in
the half, you could tell it Tarrant
said. 'They don't have the depth
that the rcst of the .teams in the
conference have for reasons every-
one is aware of
The teams went into the lock-
ers with the halftime score, 36-24.
To open the second half, Colo-
nial Athletic Association rookie of
the year Lester Lyons hit a jumper
on the baseline to pull the Pirates
within 10 points.
Lyons finished the game with a
game-high 21 points and three as-
sists. He was also eight of nine from
the free throw line, but suffered
from the three point range, shoot-
ing only one of six.
Richmond then exploded with
another 12-2 run to extend their
lead to 48-28 with 15:22 remaining.
The Pirates were able to ai t the
lead to 14 at one point, but missed
on several other opportunities due
to turnovers.
For the game, the Pirates com-
mitted 18 turnovers.
"It's something we've battled
all season with Lester Steele said.
"He's only got one speed and that's
full-speed
His ambitious style of play
caused Lyons to commit six turn-
overs. The final score was 86-62 in
favor of Richmond.
The same things that have hurt
the Pirates all season remained the
same Saturday night. They shot
only 39.7 percent from the field and
went into those scoring droughts
when they couldn't buy a basket.
Richmond shot 56.3 percent
from the field and hit 833 percentof
their free throws.
"This wasn't an easy win
Tarrant said. "The bottom line is
that it looked easy, but it wasn't
easy
"But when you shoot 60 per-
cent and hold your opponent to 40
percent, things are going to go your
way
Duke takes UNC, 83-77
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � No. 8
Duke took the North Carolina
crowd out of the game early, but it
took a little longer to silence the
eighth-ranked Tar Heels.
Duke (25-6,11-3) grabbed a 10-
point halftime lead in the Dean E.
Smith Student Activity Center and
led by 19 points with 12 minutes to
play. But North Carolina (22-5,10-
4) stormed back behind a platoon
defenseand some key 3-pomtshots.
The 83-77 victory Sunday gave
Duke the AtlanticCoastConference
regular-season titleanda first-round
bve for this weekend's tournament.
It also gave the Blue Devils some
confidence.
"We took the crowd out of the
game right away because we were
playing really well said Duke
center Christian 1 .aettner, who
joined guard Bobby Hurley in
scoring 18 points to lead the Blue
Devils.
Grant Hill, who finished with
16points,also provided an offensive
spark by scoring inside against the
taller Tar Heels.
"Grant can be a point guard,
but in our starting lineup he is our
power forward said Duke coach
Mike Krzyzewski. "He has had a
great year and hoisplayinghisbest
nght now "
"We were supposed to send
him baseline and get a trap, but the
traps were too slow in getting there
said NorthCarolina forward George
Lynch. "We tried to match up
against their five men, but that last
man was a matchup problem
Duke took command early with
crisp 3-point shooting and solid
passing to get the ball inside. The
Blue Devils led by as many as 13
points in the first half and settled for
a 46-36 half time lead.
Dukequieted the sellout crowd
of 21,572 with a 10-4 run midway
through the second half which was
started and finished with3-pomters
by Hurley. The run gave Duke a 67-
48 lead with 12:02 to play.
NorthCarolina guard King Rice
said Hurley was a handful.
"1 really wanted to work him
and prcssurehimand a couple times
I lost sight of him Rice said. "He
really handled the ball well. He
knocked downopen 3-pointersand
he ran the offense well "
Things started changing as
North Carolina came back with a
14-4 run to get within 71-62 as the
Blue Devils went ice cold from the
field.
They had one field goal over
the final eight minutes but made 10
of 13 free throws in the last 429.
A 3-pointer by Rick Fox pulled
North Carolina within 78-74 with
twominutestogo. But Duke ran the
45-second shot clock down to four
seconds after Fox's 3-pointer and
Thomas Hill, who finished with 13
points, scored on the baseline with
1:17 left.
Greg Koubek and Thomas Hill
combined for three free throws as
NorthCarolina missed three 3-point
attempts in the last 28 seconds.
Register foi a Free
135 mm Camera
to be given
away at 10:00 am
on Thursday March 7,
Just in time for
Spring Break!
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Wright Building
East Carolina University
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513Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080





�he iJzuxt Qlutaimmrx
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vot.65No.t6 VC. (cH Vo�l Thursday, March 7, 1991
Greenville, North Carouna
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
Specialists dispose of possible explosive
By Matt King
Features Fditor
Editor's note: Features Editor Matt
King is a student in the chemistry de
partment
A hazardous waste disposal
team removed a potentially explo-
sive solution from the Flanagan
building Wednesday.
As it turns out, the substance,
when detonated, did not explode.
Officials in the chemistry depart
mentelected to not takeanv chances
when the mixture was discovered
Tuesday moming.
Sources inside the department
say an organic chemistry professor
discovered a three-week-old bottle
of Kllens reagent in Riom 239, an
i Tganic chemistry lab.
Knowing that thechemical can.
in some cases, degenerate to an ex-
plosive material, the professW dis
CUSSed the explosive capabilities of
the rtagent with colleagues.
Tollen's reagent is used to de
termine the presence of certain types
of organic chemicals. Students of-
ten use Tollen's reagent in the or-
ganic chemistry lab. After the stu-
dent has finished with thereagentit
can be harmlessly poured down a
drain which should be done
immediately after use.
If Tollen's reagent is allowed to
sit i t can decompose into two things
that are potentially explosive.
Silver fulminate, which can
explode, isoneof the possible prod-
ucts, but in thiscase the production
oi the fulminate was not possible,
Dr Chia-yu Li, the chairperson of
the chemistry' department said.
The second product that might
appear is silver nitride, Li said,
which is extremely shock sensitive
and also explosive. This was the
product that the ECU chemists
feared might be present, he said.
"After evaluating the situation,
we decided the most prudent thing
to do was to isolate the area and call
in the experts said Dr. Donald
Clemens, chairperson of the
department's safetv committee.
With ideal circumstances, the
most of the stiver nitride that could
have been synthesized was ap-
proximately one ounce, according
lo Dr. lames I iix ot the chemistry
department.
If it had been induced, the en-
suing explosion would have been
mild
"It would be like a couple of
cherry bombs going off one source
within the department said.
Still, the productsof old Tollen's
reagent are highly unpredictable,
so ECU chemists called in experts.
A team oi "reactive management"
authorities were summoned to the
scene from Virginia.
The specialists from Virginia
were working in conjunction with
the ECU iVpartment oi Environ-
mental Health and Safety. Parts of
Flanagan were isolated early Tuev
dav, but the team of specialists did
not arrive until Wednesday.
After the ttam arrived, the re-
A hazardous waste disposal team prepares their equipment prior to
removing a potentially explosive solution from an organic chemistry lab
Rodney Strickland -
m the Flanagan building Wednesday The solution was taken to an
unpopulated area for detonation
agent could not be moved until the
state was notified and gave its per
mission. At I p.m Wednesday, the
substance was moved to a local
landfill and detonated.
rhe bottle was wired to accept
enough electrical charge to deto-
nate what might have been the sil-
ver nitride. The jar was then placed
inside of series of shock absorbing
barrels and the charge was acti-
vated.
After exa mining thecondihon
oi the wires used to explode the
substa nee, the reach ve management
team concluded that there had been
no explosion Li said.
A $4,900 fee will be assessed to
the University for the disposal of
the reagent.
Bush outlines post-war vision
By Bill Egbert
Staff Writer
President Bush addressed a
joint session oi Congress Wednes-
day night lo report on the war and
comment on his vision of America's
post-war direction.
Inhisforty-minutespeech Bush
outlined a four-punt plan for las
ing peace in the Middle East and
reviewed domestic challenges to&ef? resolution
addressed
Bushcalled for "shared security .
arrangements" in the Middle Fast
as the fifsl element of his "frame-
work forpeace HetlOted that these
arrangements would not involve a
permanent U S ground presence
in the regK �n. They would, however.
Involve periodic, air and land mill
tarv exercises and an Intensified U.
S naval presence in the Persian Gulf.
SGA
hopes to
increase
loans
By Shannan Copeland
Staff Writer
A new Student Government
Association treasurer was sworn in
Tuesday by House Speaker Alex
Martin
Garry Dudley, who had run
unopposed, was appointed to the
position in Monday night's SGA
meeting. Theelection wascancelkd
to save money
Dudley, a junior majoring in
marketing, has been involved with
the SGA executive offices for the
last three years.
Most recently he wasPresident
Allen Thomas' chief of staff The
chief of staff heads 15 university
committees that represent the stu-
dent body.
"We are the eyes and earsof the
campus Dudley said. "We give
the legislature the talk around
campus
Dudley was also campaign
manager for Thomas and former
president Tripp Roakes. He was
See SGA, page 3
Secondly, Bush stressed the
need to control the spread of weap-
ons of mass destruction in the re
gion, asking for a continuation of
the armrjnlbargo a&rifist Jraq.
fn prs third point, Bbreeald
that there should bt "nosubstitute
'hf diplomacy' B solving fhu
, region's oMt pnims I le pe- �
f cifically rpitjiwfaeli-PaJ-
'esiinian oftiifJiCt ijr'that the
on "the
prii iple oHIfflpPfoih �v
Bi&b aialpi,xiiritv
Council ri'sAhiiliwllJch addre
thalvoe must he acted upon,
Lastfy,�Btwb wid that the oil-
nch nation of the (vW�ShouW re
direct tha'rfev'enueawavfrorn the
military and use their wealth for
more peaceful purposes
Bush is sending Secretary of
State lames Baker to the Middle
Fast to begin the implementation 14
this plan Part of Baker's mission
will also be to work for the release of
the American hostages in Lebanon.
"There is no single solution, no
solely American answer the
president said He sees the Lnitd
States rather as a catalyst tor posi-
tive change
After outlining his Middle East
peaic plan, Bush called tor a new
tack in domestic politics. "It's time
V) him away from the temptation to
protect unneeded weapon systems
and obsolete bases he said He
also advised pulling the strings ofl
oi our foreign aid. ending "rrm ro-
managetnenl 'of oursei urity assis-
tant e toother nations
Bush said that our first priority
in the DOSt-war peri id should be to
revive the economy ow that the
See Bush page 3
Rodnay Strickland � ECU Photo Lab
And the winner is
Dean of Students Ronald Speier (foreground, third from left) draws the winning ticket in the Pi
Kappa Phi pre spring break $500 scholarship giveaway Wednesday
Spring break can be made safer with these tips
By Jennifer Ellison
Staff Wriier
When planning a tnp for spring
break, whether to the beach or the
mountains, there arc precautions to
take before leaving and upon ar-
riving at your destination.
Harriet Clark, an employee of
Quixote Travels in Greenville said
in a past interview to make plans,
especially before leaving the coun-
try.
"Be sure to take proof of your
citizenship if you're leaving the
country she said. She advised
students bound for destinations out
of the country to take a passport or
an acceptable substitute � a certi-
fied birth certificateor a voter regis-
tration cord and a driver's license.
Clark said students heading to
the Caribbean should be prepared
for a surprise.
"The minute they get off the
plane, students will be specially tar-
geted by drug dealers she said.
No matter how hard the
temptation, Clark advises student
to abstain.
"Don't take them, don't bring
them out (of the country) and don't
use them while you're there she
said. 'They are still illegal, and if
(the students) are arrested they will
find themselves in a foreign jail
where their parents can't help
them
Other hazards lie in foreign
lands.
"Don't drink the water Clark
said. "But also don't eat any raw
fruits or vegetables. Both can give
you dysentery
Students traveling in cars
should exercise caution as well.
"Keep car doors locked at all
times when dnving from place to
place Maxine Anderson, another
employee of Quixote Travels, said
recently.
If there isanother person riding
with you, switch drivers periodi-
cally, Anderson said.
"Do not drive until you are too
tired she said.
Many hotels at the beach dur-
ing spring break season are full
during the evenings.
"Do not wait until too late in
the evening to stop for lodging
Anderson said.
See Tips, page 2
INSIDE THURSDAY
Editorial
The Media Board should took
to outside sources to produce
the Buccaneer
Features 17
Dating in Greenville can be a
tedious experience for many
students.
Sports 9
Lady Pirates play against
William & Mary in the Colonial
Athletic Association opener.
Classified 6
Comics 12





Title
The East Carolinian, March 5, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 05, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.796
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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