The East Carolinian, February 12, 1991






$fj� i�uBt (HutttlMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.64 No.74
Tuesday, February 12, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
Student group
holds Mall rally
By LaToya Hank ins
Staff Writer
Overt 50 peopledisplayed theii
support tor the troops stationed in
the Persian Cailt at a rally spon
sored by the IT I Students Sup
porting the Troops rheralh, was
held rhursday on the Mall
Before the speakers took the
stage the ECU Residence Hall V
sociahon sld linkstoshow suppirt
for the troops. Michael Aycoek an
ECU junior who is the National
c ommunication Coordinator foi
the RHA explained the links pui
pose
We want toshowoursuppoi t
tor the family and dependents it
the troops in Saudi Arabia, ycocl
siid The links will be sold today in
front ot the Student Store and Feb.
13 in front ol Mendenhall After
being on display .it Mendenhall it
willbe sent tot lovemor im Martin
as a siw;n o( support for the troops
The rally began with modera-
tor Chris ames of radio station
VVDIX introducing Angela Sanders,
a junior, who sang the National An
them.
ohn I lard) s 1 ice president,
then introduced (Ireenville Mayor
Nancy enkins who said that she
was proud of tlu- students tor the
efforts that they had made in show-
mi; their support for the troops.
Ron Kimble, city manger of
c uvn ille. also commended the
crowd tor their efforts
"This isone night that wedon't
have to worry about the noise that
we make kimble said
land Summer, the president of
v-1 explained the purpose of the
organization to the crowd
We arc not a political group
she slid. " e are a group support-
ing the men and women thai are
� rseas fighting tor our rights "
She thanked those present tor
making a visual stand tor what thev
believe in
The silent majority will stav
silent no longer she said. This is
no! usi about imI It is about one
man S quest lor power.
You take of those who take
ire i �! you
"he next speaker was Ted
Sampley, an area Vietnam veteran.
Samplev reflected on the how of
support that was evident that night
and the reception he received on his
return to the State after Vietnam.
I le also added his feeling on
the situation in the Cult
"There is no doubt that the US
will w in but it is only with support
See Rally Page 2
Pr�slon Pi�rc� � ECU Photo Lab
The students holding the US flag attended the rally held on the Mall on Central Campus Thursday by sponsored by Students Supporting The
Troops Both have relatives that are service members stationed in Saudi Arabia
Transit board initiates shuttle service for commuters
By Dave Robertson
Special lo The Fast Carolinian
A new Student Government
Administration-sponsored shuttle
van began service Monda) from
Minges Coliseum parking lot to
Mendenhall Student (. enter
PatGert2,theassociatedirector
of traffic services, said the program
isona four-week trial basis and is in
response to growing concern about
parking problems (in campus.
he shuttle servPcw-operates
from 7:40 a.m to 2 p m , Mondays
through Fridays.
Vans arrive at Minges on the
hour, 20 minute's after and before
the hour. Vansarriveat Mendenhall
1' 'mini Ites before and after the hour
as well as 30 minutes past the hour.
"If it's used it will eliminate a
lot of illegal parkers who can't
find a place (to park Gertz said.
"The mam campus is prett) c'l
Uull) by9a m
Gertz and tody Seymour, the
SGA transportatii in manager serve
together on thes ransit Board.
The group Mis governing policy
and supervises St -A money that
provide stu dent busservice and bus
charters U mpus organizations
Gertz is also involved with the
Parking n. Traffic Committee,
which sets policies that affect park-
ing and traffic
This will provide timelv, reli-
able transportation to and from
class (lertz said
The gold bus route provides
transportation from Minges to
Mendenhall on the hour, 30 min-
utes after and 10 minutes before the
hour, but is not an express route.
Theg 'Id bussti psat tour additional
places and takes more than twice
the time of the shuttle van.
Differential fees for the fnnge
lots are likely to become widely
used if this trial is a success, Gertz
said. The fees would be structured
similar to the night deeal commut-
ers can buy. The regular commuter
decal is $50; however, a night com-
muter can bu a decal, good only
after 4 p.m. tor $23. Offering in-
centives for people to park in fringe
areas should encourage using the
shuttle van. C ,erfy. said.
The structured decal pay sys-
tem is alreadv used at most larger
universities including both UN'C-
Chapel Hill and C. State.
ECU has been spoiled by con-
venience, Gertz said, but as the
school continues to grow, so will
commuters habits.
Gertz said the old Freshmanlot
on Fourteenth Street at the top of
College Hill is nevermll and isctoser
than the mostly empty Minges lot.
SGA names Support Our Troops Day
Collsan Haimbaugh � ECU Photo Lab
Members of the Wilhamston High School Quiz Bowl team moved to the final round of competition, which will
be held Wednesday, April 17. The Quiz Bowl is part of an effort to recruit outstanding high school students.
Quiz bowl teams advance
By Shannan Copeland
Staft Writer
The Student Government As-
sociation passed two resolutions
and appropriated $9,635 to four or-
ganizations in their meeting Mon-
day night
A resolution supporting mili-
tary personnel serving at home and
abroad was passed. This resolution
will make February 14,1991, Sup-
port Our Troops Day.
The SGA also approved a reso-
lution recognizing and supporting
National Condom Week.
A resolution for the expansion
of the cun-ent smoking policy was
�I i- It. 'ki.ijtfHSt ���
not passed. The new resolution
would include restrictive smoking
m hallways, restrooms, all class
room buildings and at least 50 per-
cent of residence hall dining facili-
ties.
The resolution was bought be-
fore the SGA after a studv wasdone
by Jennifer Phillips, a graduate stu-
dent in Health Education
About 300 Health 1001 students
were used in the study.
Phillips' study concluded that
over 50 percent of the student body
prefers smoke free facilities.
"The responsibility of the SGA
is to represent the majority of stu-
dents she said.

Legislator Keith Tellman said
that the majority of Health 1001
students are freshman and tresh-
man are not representative of the
student hodv
Themaiont ot legislators said
thev felt the resolution to be dis-
cnminatorv towards smokers and
upperdassmen
It was not passedbyavoteof21
to 28.
In other business, the Student
Planning Association Network re-
ceived $2,173 and the National Po-
litical Science Association received
$126.
The ECU Model UN. Club was
See SGA, page 2
By LeClair Harper
Assistant News Editor
Teams from Jacksonville and
Williamston high schools have iA
vanced to the finals of the third
annual ECU Academic Quiz Bowl.
The quiz bowl, coord mated by
the Pitt County ECU Alumni As
sociation and the ECU I lonors Or-
ganization (ECHO), began in Janu-
ary.
Sixteen teams were chosen
randomly from 34 teams who en-
tered. On Saturday morning, Feb 9,
eight teams participated in the
quarterfinals
After a luncheon, the winners
of each of the four morning rounds
competed for the final competition,
to be held Wednesday, April 17.
Thecompetition for third and fourth
place will beaired on WNCT-TV on
Sunday, April 21. The competition
for first and second place will be
aired Sunday, April 28. Both shows
will be at 6:30 p.m.
A $1,000 award will be pre-
sented to the winning team. This
money is to be divided among the
tc ui r placers for scholarships. A $500
award tor scholarships will be pre-
sented to the second-place team.
The scholarships may be used at
anv school in which the student
enrolls.
At the luncheon, James Lanier,
Vice Chancellor for Institutional
Advancement, announced that
members of the four final teams
will be awarded $1,000 book
scholarships at the ECU Student
Stores if they decide to attend ECU.
Thi s of fer is made to each of the four
members oi the team and one al-
ternate. As many as 20 students
may receive the scholarships.
Teams From Eastern Wayne
and Wallace-Rose Hill high schools
will compete for third and fourth
place.
John Anema, co-director of the
quiz bowl, said in the future they
hope to accept all teams that apply
to the competition. At this time,
competition is limited to 16 teams
Chancellor Richard Eakin
spoke to the students, giving them
advice on becoming well-rounded
individuals. He told them to learn
from the past, think critically and
remember that an individual can
make a difference.
ECU professors serve as fridges
and moderators. ECHO members
developed questions and serve as
time- and score-keepers.
Christine Waters, one of the
coaches for the D.H. Conley team,
said that they center their attention
on the ECU quiz bowl. She said that
the scholarship money is unique to
the ECU competition. Most quiz
bowls provide recognition and
honor out not money.
Anema was inspired to start
the quiz bowl by a similar competi-
tion held at Rutgers University. The
format of the quiz bo wl is that used
by the nationally televised GE Col-
lege Bowl.
Toss-upquestions are asked in
which the first students to buzz in
responds. If that student answers
the question correctly, hisher team
gets to col labora te on a bonus ques-
tion.
Sponsors include Carolina
Telephone and Telegraph, ECU
Student Stores and Centura Bank.
Coiton Haimbaugh � ECU Photo Lab
Members of the Jacksonville High School Quiz Bowl team competed for scholarship money Saturday in
Mendenhall Student Center. They were among 34 teams that originally entered the competition
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial 4
Peace protestors should realize
that the best way to bring about
change is by example
Features 7
Transactors Improv. Co
appears tonight in the
Mendenhall Underground.
Sports 1
Tonya Hargrove scores 32 as
the Lady Pirates fall to JMU.
74-68
( lassified. 6





�Jj� i�uzt GLntaiMnn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Voi.64No.74
Tuesday, February 12, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
Student group
holds Mall rally
Rv I a 1 ova Hankins sijit v ritei� rt that thev had made in show . tin ir support tor the troops Ron Kimblc, . 11x manger ol
l h tT ! 50pco ledis i.i. : �� .ille also ommended the
support tor the troops -t.itivd for their efforts
the Persian (lulf .it .i � �H : is(ne night that wedon'l
. � bs the E I Stu l i I� wi rr about the noise that
porting the fro ps fl� i iki Kimbh said
held rhursdav on t! e M� Summer, theprcsident ol
Before the speaki rs 1plained the purpose ol the
stage the EC TJ Residi i
. � ihon sold links to si v support � an i ' .i politu ,il group
foi tlii tro �ps Mil 1aid V in a roupsupp-it
1 junior v ho is th� �� � � iii.i women thai are
i. .immuni it i rseas fighting foi r right!
RH A explained tl�� � 1 1 :e prt sent tor
' -aik mga isual stand foi w hit tin s
We want t hoi i pporl�� 1 u in
for the family an 1 depend Isilent majorit w ill .t.o
thetroopsu Saudhi said Hmsis
siul rhelinkswil �� Itodavii� - � ibout one
fronl ol the Stu lent
13 in fronl f Men 1 i tteii tak of i i take
being on disp
will be sent toi � � i mMartn: ikei red
asa � � i heti; n.n tnan veteran
I lit' ralK bega lei� : reflected n the how ol
: iihris Ian � 1 i 1 tati(iPI rtthatwase idenl that night
A I ' . � r t rodi ' i iS.ii� � . � � ereceh edonhis
� w . � �� atioi - �it� ifter Vietnam.
tntMiddi 1 hi feeling i m
ill
introduced1 � � ul : thai the US
Nan Jenkins who s� but it isonh v. ith support
was proud . 't t1 � � See Rally :� .
Praston Pisrca - ECU Photo Lab
rhe students holdii � I Magatti� rally held on the Mall on Central Campus Thursday by sponsored by Students Supporting The
Troops Both have r ilive " it are sen mbers stationed in Saudi Arabia
Transit board initiates shuttle service for commuters
By Dave Robei Ison
special to The I aMarnliniai
� new Stu Ii � �
Administrati n-spoi tx
van began s i. ����
Minges Colis in ; rkinj I I
Mendenhall Studi iCentei
Pat krtz,theasso i iti I no I
ol traffic sen ices, said the pi
is oii a four-week trial basis an I
r es pons � to grow ingconcen iboi
ng pi � � � 'ii i ampus he nun pu prcttv well
,in . � strvicw-operates dull b)
7:4 ! p.m Mondays Gcrtz ' fa
Fridays SC A ti
Vans arrive at Minges on the togethei ntheSCATi tl
� � .�� ifti i md before Hie gi
lour.VansarriwatMcndenhall and sup- (iA i . that
: ;�� before and after the houi providi !
ii inutes past the hour chartersl itu
If it's used it will eliminate a Gen I with the
sal parkers who can't Parking and mittee
a place (to park), Gertz said whichsel :� lectpark
� �� ittu
kVttl provid
u' ft : irtation to and from
t lass
I he i;old bus route provides
transportation from Minges to
Meru.1i nhall thi I mm-
utesaftei d lOminuti be! i th
ii � it i ! in express route
� � . � � in additii ii il
; a � md takes rrw re th in rwi e
i ol the shutl . hi
Differential fees for the hinge
Ii �ts ire like!) t i become w I
U9cd if this trial is success, f .erl
said I he t � �s w i iuld be structured
similar to the night decal commut-
erscan bu ! he regular commuter
decal - i a night
u l i decal
aftei I p.n ' � r. Offering n
centives for people to park in fi i
are is I ltd em mirage usii . I �
si uttl van . i tz aid
�� . tured decal pay sys-
tem is alread u t most 1 irger
universities in lud nq hi �fh L NC-
( hapel 1 lill i
! I hasbei I by i on-
� . Gert � � ' i the
' ' OC5 t. I - V ill
. . .
: - . � � shm in lot

rfullandiscloser
n then ' mph Minges lot.
SGA names Support Our Troops Day
Colleen Hiimbaugh � ECU Photo Lab
Members of the Williamston High School Quiz Bowl team moved to the final round of competition which will
be held Wednesday April 17 The Quiz Bowl is part of an effort to recruit outstanding high school students
Quiz bowl teams advance
B Shannan C ope land
stall Write!
I he Studi nl iovernmenl As
sooation passed two resolutions
andap ti pnatcd $9,6 i5 to four or-
ganizations in their meeting Morv-
night
resolution supporting mili-
t.u personnel servingal home and
�� id wasp is; ed fl is reshition
will make February 14. 1c'vm Sup
porthir 1 roops Day .
FheS IA also approved a reso-
lution recognizing and supporting
National Condom Week.
A resolution tor the expansion
of the current smoking policy was
not passed rhe new n solut
would include restrictive smok
in hallways, nstrooms, all class
� m buildings aiKJ at least "� � i
cenl of residence hall dining I
tics
1 he res ilution was bought K
forethi S lAafterastudywasdone
bv Jennifer Phillips, a graduate stu
denl in I lealth 1 ducation
U ut?00l !� alth 1001 stu 1 i I
were uscxl in the stud)
Phillips jtudy concluded that
over 30 percent of the student body
prefers smoke tree facilities.
"The responsibility of the SC, A
is to represent the majority ot stu
dents she said.

s,nd
I i iltl : 01
� � � it �� ii and frcsh-
tativc of the
slid
the) fell tht �� lul n to be dis-
cnminaton toward: smikcrs and
uppcrclassn i
it was . itxJbva . t ol 21
Inotl et 1' isiness the Student
Planning Association Network re-
ceivi $1 173 and thi National Po-
litical Scicm e Asso tatton received
$126.
TheECUMocWUN Clubwas
See SGA. page 2
Bv I eC lair Harper
Assisljnt News dilir
Teams from Jacksonville and
Williamston high schools have m
vanced to the finals ol the third
annual ECU Ai ademii Quiz bowl
Theiui bowl, i cwrdinated by
the Pittounty Et I lumni As
sociation and the E( UHonoi
gani.ition ' K 1� beg in hi lanu
arv
Sixteen teams wore chosen
randomly from "U teams who tn
tered.OiSaturda) morning,Feb 9,
eight teams participated In the
quarterfinals
After a lum heon. the winners
of each of the four morning rounds
competed for the final o mpctition,
to be held Wednesday, Apnl 17
Thecompetirk n u ir third and fourth
place will beftired on WN 1 l On
Sunday, Apnl 21 The competition
for first and second plate will be
airetl Sunday. April 2S Both shows
will beat 6'J0p.m
A $1,(XX) award will N pre
senttxl 10 the winning team TTiis
money is to be divided among the
four players for scholarships A$500
award for m holarships will be pre
sented to the second place team
1 ho s� holarships may be used at
any school in which the student
enrolls
At the luncheon, lames Linier,
Vicehancellor tor Institutional
Advancement, announced that
nwmbers of the tour final teams
will be awarded 51.000 book
s, holarships at tin- ECU Student
Storesifthe) dei ide to attend ECU.
1 hi sot ter is made to eat hot the four
members of the team and one al-
ternate. As many as 20 students
may receive the scholarships.
bams From Pastern Wayne
and Walla e Rose 11 high schools
will compete tor third and fourth
place.
John Anema. 10 director of the
quiz bowl, said In the future thev
hope to accept all teams that apply
to the competition. At this time,
competition is limited to 16 teams
(hancellor Richard Eakin
Spoke to the students, giving them
advice on becoming well-rounded
individuals He told them to learn
from the past, think 1 ntualk and
remember thai an individual can
make .1 differeni e
E( I professors serveasjudges
and moderators. E( HO members
developed questions and serve as
time and si ore-keepers.
Christine Waters, one of the
coaches for the P 11 C onlev team,
siid thai the) center their attention
on the EC I 'quiz bowl. She said that
the scholarship money is unique to
the ECU competition. Most quiz
bowls provide recognition and
honor bul not money.
Anema was inspired to start
the quiz bowl by a similar competi-
tion held at Rutgers 1 mversity.The
format of the quiz bowl isth.u used
by the nationally tele im1 GE Col-
lege Bowl,
Toss-up quest ions are asked in
which the first students to buzz in
responds It that student answers
thequestioniorreitlv.hisherteani
gets t( col lab 'rate on a b mus ques-
tion.
Sponsors include Carolina
Telephone and Telegraph, ECU
Student Stores and C entura Rink
Coliacn Hatmbaugh - ECU Photo Lab
Members of the Jacksonville High School Quiz Bowl team competed for scholarship money Saturday in
Mendenhall Student Center. They were among 34 teams that originally entered the competition
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial 4
Peace protestors should realize
that the best way lo bring about
change is by example
Features 7
Transactors Improv Co
appears tonight in the
Mendenhall Underground
Sports 11
Tonya Hargrove scores 32 as
the Lady Pirates fall to JMU,
74 68
Classified 6





2 �?j gaHtfgnraltnian Februaiyj2, 1991
ECU Briefs
Students wanting residence hall
housing in fall must reserve rooms
Students enrolled spring semester 1991 who plan to return to
ECU for fall semester 1991 and wish to be guaranteed residence
hall housing will be required lo reserve rooms between Feb. 18
and 22. Prior to reserving a room, I student must make a room
payment of1 (Kl in advance No waivers will be given for
payment of this foe
These payments, which must be accompanied by housing
applicationscontracts, will be accepted in the Cashier's office,
Room 105, Spilfltan Building, beginning Feb. 14.
Students now living in residence halls should obtain hous-
ing applications from their residence hall office.
Students residing off campus should obtain the application
from the Department ofUniversity Housing, Room 201, Whichard
Building These will be available beginning Feb. 12.
Students who enrolled this spring will have priority for
residence h.ill housing for the school year 1W1-92 only if they
reserve a space between Feb 18 and 22. Assignments for return-
ing students will not be made after this week until alt new
students are assigned.
For more information and for sign-up times, contact the
Department ol I 'mversitv I lousing at 757-6450.
Compiled (rum stiff reports
ECU and Caswell Center sponsor
developmental disabilities program
EC U and the Caswellenti i will sponsor the third annual
conference o( the Developmental Disabilities Intervention and .
Research Program on Feb .14 and 15 at the Ramada Inn, Greenville
Focus of the conference, entitled "Creative Dimensions in
Developmental Disabilities will be on issues facing profes-
sionals, agencies and organizations who deal with persons who
are dcvclopmentallv disabled
According to Dr. feannieGolden, an EGU psychology pro-
fessor, the conference was designed tor professionals and'para-
professionals working with individuals who have mental retar-
dation or developmental disabilities, students interested in
working with those populations and parents of individuals with
developmental disabilities
This vear the Conference will otter a job fair, giving partici-
pants an Opportunity to meet with employers from across the
state. In addition, current research projects will be highlighted in
exhibits and posters on display.
Registration is required tor the two-day conference. Current
registration is$70 and includes materials, one lunch and refresh-
ments.
To register or for more information, contact the Eastern Area
Health Education CenterMK co sponsor of the conference,
m Greenville at 919 551-5200.
I nrupil.d Imm 1(1 Newt Murvju moM
Crime Scene
Officers investigate rape involving
female in Scott Residence Hall
action was taken against a stu-
Fcb. 6
134 -Bell Residence Hal
dent for suspicious activity.
111 lenkms Art (enter: responded in reference to a
structure that had caught on lire. The fire department and other
officers also responded
210V. Fletcher Residence Hall: investigated a domestic
dispute; same was settled.
Feb. 7
0129 Fletcher Residence 1 lall: campus citations issued to
two intoxicated female students
0215 NthandPrownlea streets, male student charged with
DWI. 6
0238 Scott Residence Hall: responded to a report of a
female having been raped
024 Scott Residence Hall (east): male student charged
with DWI.
0534 White Residence 1 lall: responded to a report of a male
subject climbing out of a ground floor window. Incident was
determined to be a breaking and entering of a maid's room.
1905 Rawl Building: assisted housekeeping with a student
with a dog in the building.
2236 Location unknou n: assisted Greenville Police in ref-
erence to a larceny. Subject lived in Scott Residence Hall
Feb. 8
0132 Scott Residence Hall: responded toa loud party on the
4th floor.
0255 10th and Brownlea streets: campus citation issued to
student for speeding and stop sign violation
Feb. 9
0012 -5th and Reade streets: male non-student charged with
controlled substancealcohol violation.
0101�Aycock Residence Hall (west): four campus citations
issued to students for alcohol violations.
0104�Scott Residence Hall: assisted the residence hall staff
with an intoxicated male non-student. Subject turned over to a
resident of Scott Residence Hall.
0129�Belk Residence Hall (south), assisted a female SGA
transit driver with two intoxicated male students in the bus.
Subjects advised to clear from the bus and the area.
0216 - -Fletcher Residence Hall, responded to a report of a
fight on the 2nd floor. Rescue dispatched for victim; subject
treated on scene.
0242 Jones Residence Hall: responded to an intoxicated
female causing a loud disturbance. Subject located and advised
to leave the area.
0521- Aycock Residence Hall: served a warrant for arrest.
Subject transported to magistrate's office.
1905�Wright Circle: campuscitation issued to staff member
for a stop sign violation and speeding.
2305�Slay Residence Hall: assisted residence hall staff with
intoxicated male subject. Same was turned over to residence hall
staff.
2335�Fletcher Residence Hall (south): campuscitation issued
to non-student for stop sign violation.
Feb.10
0634-Umstead Residence Hall: observed an intoxicated
male non-student try to enter the building. Keys to a 3rd floor
room confiscated from subject; subject was turned over to a
resident.
Crime Scent is taken from official ECU Public Safety logs.
ECU to
expand
paridng
By Tony Smith
Special to The East Carolinian
As a result of the growing
number commuters, ECU is plan
ning to build two new parking lots
next to the existing student lot be-
hind Joyner library.
Layton Getsingef, manager of
business operations, said that the
lots will be built on property that
ECU already owns.
"Theuniversitycurrentlyowns
the property at 500 E. Ninth St 600
E Ninth Stand 602 E. Ninth St. "he
said These locations are aban-
doned homes that will be removed
to build parking areas
The lots were bought with
money from parking fines and reg
istration fees, according to
Otsingcr, and the new lots will be
built with money from these re
sources.
The process of removing the
homes beginson February 19 when
state officials will receive contract-
ing bids on the property.
"We have to go through the
state to get the buildings removed
because- it is a state supported
project Getsinger said. They will
take care of handling all the bias
and dividing on the contractor
Once that decision has been made I
expect the houses to be physically
gone within the next 60 days
In addition to removing the
houses, the contract company will
beresponsibleforhaulingawav the
debns from the lots and grading
them for proper drainage
"Since the lots will not be cov-
ered with concrete or asphalt, it is
important that they (the contrac-
tors) grade the property to make it
suitable for parking he said "Fail
uretodothiscould result in the lots
being unusable when wet.
"We're anxious to get started
with the project Getsinger said,
"but we have to be careful Those
houses are so old they might fall
down themselves if someone goes
inside
Getsinger also stated that do
spite the age of the houses none of
them are considered historic. "We
wouldn't destroy a histoncal site
he said.
Each lot will be able to hold 20
to 25 vehicles according to
Getsinger, although that number
will vary because there will be no
lined parking spaces. The spaces
will be reserved for registered
commuter vehicles only
There are no current plans to
build more parking areas, but
Getsingersaid, "ECU isalwaysopen
to input from people who know of
property for sale
However, he warns that own-
ershipofpropertynearcampusdoes
not insure that it will be bought.
"Thestateappraiseseach piece
of land and, through the use of a lot
of rhyme and reason, decides what
will be bought Getsinger said He
added that ECU has bought some
other properties but has not de-
cided what to do with them.
"We must get the most out of
our buck Getsinger said, "I know
that50parkingspacesdoesn't sound
likemuch,but it'sa start, and people
have to realize that those spaces
add up after a while
Rally
Continued from page 1
of those back home that we can get
out of there quickly he said.
Sampley added that once the
conflict ends: "no American service
person should be left behind. It
would be an empty victory if we
allow one American to remain in
Hussein's hand
SGA
Continued from page 1
given $4,968. They will be attend-
ing a convention in New Yorlc City
this Spring.
The Irates, the ECU Frisbee
Club, received $2,368 fortheirspring
tournaments.
The Student Government As-
sociation passed two resolutions
and appropriated $9635 to four or-
ganizations.
Central Campus
Scangcr Hunt
February 26
from
4:00-6:00pm
Sign up February
20-22 at your
residence hall lobby
from ll�0am-l:30pm
Fy Central Campus Residents
are eligible to participate!
jnsorod by KCfJ Recreational Services
nil 757 6387 for derails
TheHunthon lllSIhp ffflfit total!
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
John Parks
Tim Peed
Patrick Pttzer
Director
of
Advertising
John F. Semelsberger II
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column Inch
National$6.00
Local Open Rate$5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
FEBRUARY
TANK
55 gallon SALE
Tank � Hood- Light Combo
99
$79
All Other Tanks On Sale Too!
University Center
14th& Charles Si.
Open Nightly till 9 pin
Sunday 1-6
757-0056
��'�'or
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
ECJU Student Union
Making Things Happen At I
9M , Program Hotline 757-6004.
(ZotKvfy TONIGHT!
u
LU
A Spontaneous comedy act
In The Underground (ground floor of Mendenhall) from 8-10 pm
'Admission is free and refreshments will be served
-sponsored by the Coffeehouse Committee-
TheVisual Arts Committee
Presents j�fc
Mlumina Art Competition"7
Entry Dates: Feb 13-15 2-5 pm in room 221
Mendenhall
Applications are available at the information desk
Opening reception will be Wed. Feb 20 from
6-8 pm in the Mendenhall Gallery
:This Week at Hendrix Theatre
"MG.IHJT
romWUNDEXRiRIVL'
(.iMMllVilas
Thurs-Sat Feb 14-16 8pm
u,�cki AFTER HOURS
Wed. Feb 13 6 pm Sun Feb 17 8 pm
ECU IP or Current Films Pass is Required for AdmiIJ
Air war contii
Iraq lowers drl
I H lAHRAYSdudi Arabia! Al)
- Allied air raidson Iraq destroyd
another major bridge m Baghda I
Monday, and American pilot
claimed lik.lv hitson five Iraqp -
missile lawm hers
U5 officials, meanwhile, said
Iraqi jets thai fled to ban pose little
threat because their plots are ine
perienced and the planes (arm. ,t I
kept combat ready
In another indication ot the
wars toil on Iraq Baghdad said
Monda) it will begin drafting all 17-
year-old males Last month, Iraq
red the conscription age from
l8tol7,butexempted youths still in
s� h. ol
Thousai
have been
allied air rail
tairs MmisteJ
Monday m
It was
government!
high
could rv I i
viou I
civili
AI
near �H
I
The University Med
seeks general ma
The Media Board wishes to ii
number of applicants intereste
general managers for the ff
organizations for 1991
� Expressions minority student)
� The Rebel fine arts magazine
� Photolab photography servict
Contact: University Media Boar�
2nd Floor. Publications
Telephone: 757-6009
Applicants should have a 2.5 gradi
or better
Application deadline: Noon. Mondi
Register for Key West
Let
Us Tempt
You
With Our Sampll
Platter For Two
includes dessert
$14.95
Sen-
Thul
Pitcher
�r Street 71
H;ipp Valentine'
521 Cotanche St. 75 7-16
Wednesday
- WZM
Progresssive Dane
introducing
.10 Draftl
1.15 Tall B
1.00 Kamika;
Ladies Free til
�w
j�L





2 H1k t�iHt jEarotftttan February 12, 1991
ECU Briefs
Students wanting residence hall
housing in fall must reserve rooms
Students enrolled spring semester 1991 who plan to return to
ECU for fall semestci 1991 and wish to be guaranteed residence
hall housing will be required to reserve rooms between Feb. 18
and 22 Prior to reserving i room a student must make a room
payment ol $100 in advano No waivers will be given for
payment t this fee
Those payments, which must be accompanied bv housing
applicationscontracts will he accepted in the Cashier's office,
Room 10i Sptlman Building, beginning Feb. 14
Students now In ing in residero e halls should obtain hous-
ing applications from their residence hall office.
Students residing of! i ampus should obtain the application
from the Department of Universitv Housing, Room 201, Whichatd
Building rhese will Io i � I, beginning Fcb 1?.
Students who enrolled this spring will have priority for
residence hall housing foi the s hool year 1991 92 only if they
nserveaspao hetw � � I 8and22 Assignments for return-
ing students will not he m.�de after this week until all new
students are assigned
For more information and for sign-up times, contact the
I epartmenl - . lt (v-(,
ECU and Caswell Center sponsor
developmental disabilities program
p n� r the third annual
ities In ten ention and .
Ramada lnn, Ireenville
reative I imensions in
;I and thi . �
confercrx e of thi
Resean hPn �gram i
Focus of the c onleien �
Developmental Disabilities will b, on issues facii profes-
sionals, agencies and � izations who deal wilh persons who
are developmental disabled
� � oldi � an F psychology pro
� " '� � ; � �'� ' ' professionals and para-
indi idtials who have mental retar-
ibiiitn : -Indents interested in
I ' i tsol indi iduals with
According
fessor th� 11nfi ren
professionals u � .
dation or i
work
developmen ta
rhis veai thi
pants an i i rtunil
otter a ob fair, giving partici-
employei fi �m a. ross the
��� ill be highlighted in
state In ad
exhibits and : ters � i ;
Registrai da, inference. Current
registration is $7 lesmatei ne lunch and refresh
nients.
(
in Grcem die
thel ist, rn Area
the conference.
Crime Scene
Officers investigate rape involving
female in Scott Residence Hall
Feb. h
1346 Bell ��
dent for
is taken against a stu-
reference to a
lepartment and other
i stigated a domestic
pus i ttations issued to
ts male student charged with
responded to a report of a
� '�' -fiuient charged
structure that had caught � I
officers also � ;
2106 Flotchc! : lei
dispute, san ttied
I oh.
0129 Flel
two intoxicate 11 � �
215 14tl n �
DW1
0238 �� loi H
female ha ng been rai
0246 Scotl R m.
with DW1
0534 Whit responded toa report of a male
Mlbuv! ' ,i ' � window Incident was
determined to be a bi king and ntering r a maid's room
kee ing witha student
with a d g in the h ildn .�
� � ' lion unki : istcdt Ireenville Police m re!
eren, e to a larceny Subjci t lived in Scott Resilience flail
Feb. 8
0132 ScottRe: lei e Hall responded toa loud party on the
4th floor
0255 lOthand Brownlea streets campus citation issued to
student for spi � ling ind sto gr violation
Feb. 9
0012 5thand R adesfreets male non-student charged with
controlled substanceah ohol violation
0101 Aycock 1 I e Hall (west): four campus citations
issued to student- tor ah oh I violations.
0104 Scotl Residen c I fall: assisted the n stdence hall staff
with an intoxicated male non-shident. Subject turned over to a
resident of St ott Residence I lall
Bolk Residence I lall (south): assisted a female SGA
transit driver with Iwo intoxicated male students in the bus.
Subjects advised to i lear from the bus and the area.
0216 Fleti her Residem e I lall responded to a report of a
fight on the 2nd floor Rescue dispatched for victim, subject
treated on s ene
0242 Jones Residence Hall responded to an intoxicated
female causing a loud disturbance Subject located and advised
to leave the area.
0S21 Aycock Residem e I fail: served a warrant for arrest.
Subject transported lo magistrate's office
I90S Wrightirele campus citation issued to staff member
for a stop si-n violation and speeding.
2305 Slay Residence I fall assisted residence hall staff with
intoxicated malesubji 11 Same was turned over to residence hall
staff
2335 Het( her Residence Halsouth) campuscitationissued
to non-student for stop sign � lolation.
Feh 10
(.M Umstead Residence Hall observed an intoxicated
male non student try to enter the building. Keys to a 3rd Ooor
room confiscated from subject; subject was turned over to a
resident.
( rime Scvnr ,s uk, � fnm official tCU Public SiMy log.
ECU to
expand
parking
By Tony Smith
Special lo The Rasl Carolinian
As a result of the growinj
number commuters, FCU is plan
ning to build two new parking lots
next to the existing student lot he
hind lovner library
1 avion Cetsingef. manager oi
business operations, said that the
lots will he built on property that
FCU already owns.
'Trteuniversitycurrently owns
the property at 500 F Ninth St ,666
F Ninth St and 602 F Ninths he
said 'Those locations are aban-
doned homes that will be removed
to build parking areas
The lots were bought with
money from parking fines and reg
istration fees, according to
(.etsinger. and the new lots will be
built with money from these re
sources.
The process ot removing the
homesbegmson February 19 when
state officials will receive contract
ing bids on the property
"We have to go through the
state to get the buildings removed
because it is a state supported
protect (.etsingersaid. "They will
take care of handling all the bios
and deciding on (he contractor
(Vice that decision has been made 1
expect the houses to be physically
gone within the next 66 days "
In addition to removing tin
houses, the contract company will
beresponsibleforhaulingaway thi
debris from the lots and grading
them for proper drainage
"Since the lots will not be cov
ered with concrete or asphalt it is
important that thov (the contrac
tors) grade the property to make it
suitable for pvirkinq he said "1 ail
ure to do thiscould result in the lots
being unusable when wet
"We're anxious to get startt1
with the project Cetsinger said
"but we have to ho careful Thov
houses are so old thov might tall
down themselves if someone �oos
inside
Cetsinger also stated that de
spite the age of the houses none of
them are considered historic We
wouldn't destroy a historical site
he said
Each lot will be able to hold 20
to 25 vehicles according to
(etsinger. although that number
will vary because there will be no
lined puking spaces The spaces
will be reserved for registered
commuter vehicles onlv
There are no current plans to
build more parking areas but
(. etsinger said. "FCU isalwavsopen
to input from people who know of
property for sale "
However he warns that own
ershipofpropertvnearcampusdvH-s
not insure that it will be bought
The stateappraiseseach piece
of land and. through the use of a lot
of rhyme and reason, decides what
will bebought Cetsinger said He
added that ECU has bought some
other properties but has not de
cidod what to do with them
"We must get the most out of
our buck Cetsinger said. "I know
that 50parkingspacesdoesn't sound
likemuch,butit'sastart,and people
have to realize that those spaces
add up after a while
The Hunt is on
Central Campus
Scavenger Hunt
Rally
Continued from page 1
of those back home that we can get
out of there quickly, " he said
Sampley added that once the
conflict ends: "no American service
person should be left behind. It
would be an empty victory if we
allow one American to remain in
Hussein's hand
SGA
Continued from page 1
given $4,968. They will be attend-
ing a convention in New York City
this Spring.
The Irates, the ECU Frisbee
Club, received $2,368 for their spring
tournaments.
The Student Covemment As-
sociation passed two resolutions
and appropriated $9,635 to four or-
ganizations.
February 26
from
4:006:00pm
Sign up February
20-22 at your
residence hall lobby
from ll:30am-l:30pm
i)jv Central Campus Residents
�f are eligible to participate!
�knsorad bv ECU Recreational Servica
011757-4387 for defattk
�lie iEast tolinian
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
John Parks
Tim Peed
Patrick Pttzer
Director
of
Advertising
John F. Semelsberger II
DlSPlAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National$6.00
Local Open Rate$5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours: Monday Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
FEBRUARY
TANK
55 gallon SALE
Tank � I food ! ,ighl Combo
99
$79
AM Other Tanks On Sale Too!
I fniversitenter
14th & Charles St.
Open Nighth till 9 pm
Sunday 1 -fS
757-0056
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION W
CJU Student Union
Making Things Happen At
I r Program Hotline 757-6004
(vfy TONIGHT!
A Spontaneous comedy act
In The Underground (ground floor of Mendenholl) from
'Admission is free and refreshments will be
-sponsored by the Coffeehouse Committee
TheAisual Arts Comm
OL
Presents J
lllumina Art Competitio
Entry Dates: Feb 13-15 2-5 pm in room
Mendenholl
Applications are available at the information desk
Opening reception will be Wed. Feb 20 from
6-8 pm in the Mendenholl Gallery
I: This Week at Hendrix Theatre
Ml RIHK v DfNSfRI
rtm ami vwFJirUKriE
9 7
' V
MMIw
Thurs-Sat Feb 14-16 8pm
AFTER HOURS
,Wed Feb ,3 8 Pm Sun Feb 17 8 pm
ECU ID or Current Films Pass is Required for a'dmissiom '
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
Air war contii
Iraq lowers dr


�� ,
-



: - � �

The University Med
seeks general rnaj
The Media Board wishes to
number of applicants intereste
general managers for the I
organizations for 199
� Expressions minority student
� The Rebel fine arts magazine
� Photolab photography se
Contact: Universi a Boar
2nd Floor. Pubhca I
Telephone 757-6C
Applicants should have a 2.5 g
or better
Application deadline Noon Mono
Register for Ki West
Let
Us Tempt
You
With Our Sampii
Plattpr For Tivi
$14.95
5
Pit
l l otanche St
$
.40 re- J
if:
I
Wednesda
WZM1
Progresssive Dane
introducing
.10 Draftl
1.15 Tall Be
l.OOKamika
Ladies Free til
�' V





aat Carolinian
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg ones
ohn Parks
Tim Peed
ratrlck Pltzer
tor
?f
tising
lelsberger II
.DVFRTISING
liimn inch
$6.00
late$5.00
ontract
Available
irs: Monday Friday �00 - 5:00
757-6366
BRUARY
TANK
SALE
STUDENT UNION
nt Union
Happen At ECU
IE 757-6004.
HT!
:omedy act
)f Mendenhall) from 8-10 pm
?hments will be served
lehouse Committee-
Committee
mpetition '91
5 pm in room 221
iall
it the information desk
e Wed. Feb 20 from
lenhall Gallery
ndrix Theatre
urs-Sat Feb 14-16 8pm
TER HOURS
Sun Feb 17 8 pm
Required for Admissk
Urie gnat Carolinian February 12, 1991 3
Air war continues,
Iraq lowers draft age
Dr IAHRAN,Saudi Arabia( AT)
� Allied air raidson Iraq destroyed
another major bridge in Baghdad
Monday, and American pilots
claimed likely hits on five Iraqi Scud
missile launchers.
U.S. officials, meanwhile, said
Iraqi jeti that fled to Iran pose little
threat because their pilots are inex-
perienced and the planes cannot be
kept combat-ready.
In another indication of the
war's toll on Iraq. Baghdad said
Monday it will begin draftingall 17
year-old males. Last month, Iraq
lowered the conscription age from
18 to 17. but exempted vouths still in
schixl
Thousands of Iraqi civilians
have been killed or wounded by
allied air raids, Iraqi Religious Af-
fairs Minister Abdullah Fadel said
Monday in Baghdad.
It was the first time a senior
government official spoke of such
high war casualties. Fadel said he
could not give precise figures. Pre-
vious Iraqi government reports put
civilian casualtiesat about 650dead
and 750 wounded.
Allied pilots, meanwhile, flew
nearIy3,(XX)strtiesMoixfayinwhat
the U.S. Command described as an
intensification ot the air campaign
leading up to a ground assault ex-
pected in the next tew weeks.
The University Media Board
seeks general managers
The Media Board wishes to increase the
number of applicants interested in serving as
general managers for the following
organizations for 1991-1992:
� Expressions minority students magazine
� The Rebel fine arts magazine
� Photolab photography service
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Publications Building
Telephone: 757-6009
Applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
or better
Application deadline: Noon, Monday, February 18
Register for Key West Give Away
i
Wednesday
- WZMB
Progresssive Dance Night
introducing
.10 Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
1.00 Kamikazees
I
r-�1
The Suntana
5 Visit Plan $15
10 Visit Plan $25
15 Visit Plan $30
Wolfe Tanning System
756-9180
Coupon Good Through 33091
3212 South Memorial Drive
SPRING BREAK
from Washington D.C.
CanCUII starting at $489
Jamaica starting at $529
Price includes:
Round trip airfare A transfers
� 7 nights accommodation A hotel
Bus trips from Durham to Florida
available!
Low Student Airfares!
CALL FOR MORE
INFORMATION
703 Ninth Street, t9
Durham
919-286-4664
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FOR ALL YOUR VALENTINE NEEDS
"A Delicious Russell Stover Assortment for Every Taste"
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itaVJjhiiriiK
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floating
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J EVERY OCCASION
Latex Balloons $1.50 each
Candies from 60 to $39.95
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Ladies Free til 10:30
II
'Remember Your Valentine"
Free Valentine Gift Wrap
Quality � CompWv� Prets � Srvce
911 Dickinson Av�. 1 2301 StartOMfem Rd. �3
.LH-I1;? � City Wld� Fr� Delivery .wmwj
1700 W. �ih Sti��t �2 w w 1631 S.E, GrvOTflU Blvd. 4
758-4104 752-0030
mSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS SSSSSSSSSSm






�lie lEant (Eamltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bi.air Smnner, Nam FJitor LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Matt King, features Editor Stuart Oliphant, Asst. Features Editor
Mai i Mumma, Spurts Editor Kerry Nlster, Asst Sports Editor
An Edwakds, Cy Editor Jason Johnson, dyy Editor
Done. Morris, Editorial Production Manager Lario Hucgins, Circulation Manager
Jl 11 PARKER, Staff Illustrator Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician Phong Luonc, Business Manager
CARl a VVlliTFILLn, Classified Ads Technician DEBORAH Dwill, Secretary
The Easi Carolinian has served the East Carolina campust.omnumii since 1925,emphasizing information that direcily affects
1I' students During the ECU school year. The Fast Carolinian publishes tw ice a week with a circulation of 12,000. The East
( arotinian reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age. se. creed or
national origin The masiheadediton.il in each edition does not necessaril) represent the views of one individual, hut, rather.
is a majority, opinion of the Editorial Board The East Carolinian t&comcs tetters expressing all points of view Lettersshould
he limited to250 words or less For purposes of decency and brevity. The East ('arotinian reserves the right to edit letters for
publication 1 etters should be addressed to The Editor. The Fast Carolinian, Publications Rldg ECU, Greenville. N C .
2 834; oi call (919) 757 o66
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, February 12. 1991
Protestors need to set example
In tins time of war, Americans are tak-
ing a conscious look al what our men and
women are fighting tor Peace protests, a
relicol the Vietnam era, are again sprouting
all over thocountrv, and they have kept our
government in chock � but only when they
have been carried out rosponsiblv.
The current protests are not working,
aad there are some significant reasons whv
Americans, especially our government, will
not Hsten to people who protest in a haphaz-
ard wa
The only time Americans have really
protested tor peace is when our military i
called into action If peace is so important,
then should it not be on the priority list all of
the time? Will these protestors continue to
express their views when we are not at war?
� The best example of the government
taking aaion from protests is the civil rights
marches and sit-ins by African Americans
of the 1950s and '60s. Almost everyday there
were marches and speeches to tell the gov-
ernment justice had to be served. These
protestors didn't stop protesting until their
point was made, and the government acted
on it.
Today, however, protestors seem to
think that simply carrying a sign or burning
a flag will bring about change. Wrong. The
best way to bring about change is to lead bv
example.
For instance, some protestors carry
signs that state "No Blood for Oil How-
ever, these same people are driving their
cars everyday (some even drive to the pro-
test), or they continuously use by-products
of crude oil. By doing this, they undermine
the very cause they seek to support.
The president should be urged to takea
sincere Uxk where our country should be
without oil, rather than where Saddam
1 lussein will be with over 50 percent of the
world'soil market This would createa two-
told effect � changing our oil-consuming
ways and preventing unnecessary deaths.
William Blake once wrote "Without
contraries is no progression " If there is
reason to disagree with the president's
views, stand up and be heard � it's theonlv
way change can come about.
If the reasons behind this war are worth
protesting, follow the precedent set bv our
civil rights leaders. Don't quit when our
men and women come home. Put down the
signs only when there is peace everywhere.
Letters To The Editor
'Vampire fan'
disappointed
with review
To The Editor:
In response to Stuart
Oliphant's article on the televi-
sion show, "Dark Shadows I
would like to makea few obser-
vations. This television show is
not a comedy, and therefore
does not warrant a comic cri-
tique.
Mr. Oliphant also needs
to pay more attention to the facts
before he writes about them in a
newspaper. Victoria Winters
does not look like(Bamabus')
ex-wife The truth is more ro-
mantic She is the reincarnation
of his lost love, Josette.
Wedevoted "vampire fol-
lowers" are thrilled to see the
"reincarnation" of the older se-
ries that deviates enough from
the original to create its own
style. If Mr. Oliphant chooses to
write in the future, I sincerely
hope that he is more careful re-
garding his facts and leaves the
jokes for something that is
funny.
Elizabeth Bradbury
Junior
BusinessSpanish Major
Cartoonist
responds to
'Fred's Corner'
To The Editor:
I am writing this letter in
response to those who, over the
past few weeks, have found the
comic strip "Fred's Corner to
be offensive.
The jokes in "Fred's Cor-
ner" were never aimed at the
models at this or any other
school, and in fact, no deroga-
tory remarks were ever made
about the models at this school
� or even models in general.
The two characters were
placed into a situation where the
model shoutsinsultsand threats
of physical violence at them. This
situation is,of course, completely
unrealistic.
The jokes were made at the
expense of Olga May
Duckworth, a totally fictional
character, who was conceived by
me before I had ever come in
contact with the figure drawing
models in any way, shape or
form.
I have great respect for the
courage that the models have, to
do what they do.
I believe this whole situa-
tion has been a simple misun-
derstanding of a joke. I never
meant to offend or hurt anyone.
Sean Parnell
sophomore
art education
WITT- ��-
7MJ17 Y�jRe(
BUT ACTUALLY, youMSOlLY WAS MISTAKEN
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Silencing protestors undermines freedom
'Divided nation7 charges show irresponsibility
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Of all the charges levelled
against a nti-war demonstrators bv
those who are pro-war, probably
none is simply more stupid than
this: the protesters, it is said b
some particularly thoughtless
people, are "dividing our nation
To me, this is a little suspi
cious, not to mention undemo
crane. Alter all, how can the pro
testers "divide the nation except
by changing minds? And, if thev
succeed in changing minds, thev
areat least arguably correct, so the
division would seem to be a not
altogether bad thing.
More important, the pro-war
types seem to have forgotten one
ol the central tenets of the de-
mocracy we're supposed to be
somehow defending in the Cult
that dissenting speech, oven in
wartime, is not only to be tolerated
but is in tact essential to a func-
tioning democracy. Speech es-
pousing unusual viewpoints
should not merely be listened to, it
should be actively sought out.
Thankfully, only a few of the
pro-war people think speaking
against war should be deemed il-
legal; thev area lunatic fringe, not
a representative group. But a
growing number of war support-
ers think speaking against tins war
should beconsidered treason,asif
marching around with a placard
could reasonably be construed as
rendering aid and comfort to the
enemy.
(Incidentally, here's a free
clue: you can't commit treason
except when the country is fight-
wa declared war. Otherwise, from
a legal perspective, there exists no
"enemy" to whom anybody could
give aid and comfort.)
Doubtless, it would be more-
efficient to run a war without
anyone giving us reasons whv it
should be stopped But a democ-
racy that ignores its own principles
because they are inconvenient is
not a democracy worth defend-
ing.
Frankly, 1 suspect the real
objection to the objectors is that
they aren't lumping on the band
wagon. Thai they remind the rest
of us, in the throe minutes of tele-
vision coverage thev get between
army-censored videotapes of
Nintendo style smart bombs, that
our great nation is preparing to
hurl hundreds of thousands of
vital young human bodies into a
meat grinder, in pursuit of a cause
that was steadily losing support
m the weeks before the war
It'san unpleasant thing lobe
reminded oi, and the natural ten-
dency, ! suppose, is to translate
t hat discomfort into anger directed
against the messenger. But, natu-
ral or not, it's dishonest as hell
A somewhat more cogent
criticism of the war protesters u,
the we need to show-our-troops-
that-we-support-them argument
But that one falls flat, too.
Very few of theanti-war folks
are against the troops, vou know.
Some are, certainly, but thev are
hardly representative of the whole.
Most of the people who object to
the war don't blame Ihett
the war they're fighting in Trut
would be pretty dumb
Rather, it is then ,
counterparts who insist cm fram-
ing the debate, not in terms ol
supporting the war. but
of supporting the troops is the)
who refuse" to recognize il � sena-
ratenessof the two issues
And by their insistence that
opposition to the war is s nonv-
mous with opposition
tnxps. t is they who lend c r denci
to the thoughts of am sen vmer
orservicowomen who believe thai
America does not supp " them
But if you were a sen i-man
in the Saudi desert (1 can hi a
asking wouldn't vou rail -hear
that the American p- r were
behind you one hundred p rcent?
Well, 1 don't real . hi n
Nobody who is not in :1 at situation
can give an answier th know to
be accurate But I'm pn fry sure
that my response would be hell,
no.
If 1 were a servu email in the
Saudi desert and ��� h ki ws,l
may be one, one of these days 1
think I'd rather hear mat I
ick home were trying I bring
me back home, not rooting forme
to get mainxxi and slaughtt red
I'd also be more than a
worried to hear that there existed
no group of people wh. ; il
be openly critical ot ofrw
� any official polk) but espe
ciallv one as ill-advised as thi
war.
Otherwise, what the hed
would I be fighting tor"
U.S- apathy to blame for Gulf War
American public failed to talk to government leaders
By Bill Egbert
Editorial Columnist
As temptingas it may be, we
cannot blame this war on George
Bush. We cannot blame our presi-
dent for sending our soldiers into
battle because we, the people he
works for, didn't tell him not to.
For the past five months we
have simply wrung our hands
about theGulfCrisisif we thought
about it at all.
No one seemed to want war,
but no one actually objected to it
either. We just waited, like sheep,
and watched the situation esca-
late to war, unable or unwilling to
suggest an alternative.
Perhaps we thought that our
government would somehow read
our minds (instead of the opinion
polls) and bow to our
unarticulated fears.
Maybe we simply assumed
that after Vietnam, war would as
unacceptable to our government
as it is to the rest of us.
Whatever we were thinking,
we certainly weren't talking, and
in a representative democracy, si-
lence is consent.
Simply voting every once in
a while and assuming that your
government will do as you wish is
only a breath away from figuring
that your monarch is probably the
only person who's fit to rule any-
way.
For democracy to work, we
have to talk to our government,
and the voting booth is a tin-can
phone at best. Our loudspeaker,
so to speak, is protest.
Not the reactionary, after-
the-fact protest which is now
spilling into the streets, but the
kind of pre-emptive protest that
should have been happening from
the moment our troops left for
Saudi Arabia.
As protesters continue to
massm Capital Hill in the coming
weeks we will have to ask our-
selves, where was this peace
movement five months ago when
peace was first threatened?
Where were the mass rallies
in our state capitals? Where were
the mailbags full of telegrams to
ourcongressional representatives?
Where were the candlelight vigils
every night before the Security
Council votes?
Where was all of this anti-
war sentiment when it could have
prevented this war?
It's easy for us to be arm-
chair citizens, watching our na-
tional policy unfold around us,
then later complain when itdoesn't
suit us. Citizen reaction is always
easier than citizen action.
But as we mutter about
Bush's "hasty" decision, or even
take to the streets to demand its
reversal, we must also accept our
own responsibility for the deci-
sion we now regret We must stand
up and admit that we could h.ivt
prevented this war but chose not
to, and anything we do now will
be a weak and soggv substitute tot
what we should have alreadj
done.
When we lament the many
human failures which allowed this
conflict to expUxje. we must in-
clude ours.
The most damaging diplo-
matic failure was not Bush s fail-
ure to talk to Hussein, but our
failure to talk to our own govern-
ment.
We are not at war because
George Bush is a warmonger, but
because we are a sleepy and irre-
sponsible citizenry.
Until we admit that the re-
sponsibility for this war is as much
ours as our government s, all pro-
test will be hypocrisy
The Vietnam War taught us
that war is a rusty, bloody meat
grinder scarcely less wicked than
the evil it strives against.
The Gulf War will teach us
that it is our apathy which starts
that grinder turning.
Next time, we will be more
vigilant. Next time, we will act
rather than react. Then, our pro-
tests will not simply compla
about those words which come
out of our president's mouth. Our
Protests, instead, will place then
there.
Married man to be
RAI.EICH (AP) - A marned last in Akron,
man will be ordained a Roman He is ond
Catholic pnest next month in Rocky clergymen v
Mount in an exception to the ministries did
church'scenturies-oldnquironx-nt turmoil in thai
that its priests remain celibate. have turned
Richard Turner of Spring Hope Roman! atho
wdlbeordamedbymebishopofthe The( had
Catholic Diocese of Raleigh on in the Nash
March 23 at Our Lady ol Perpetual Hope ivith h,
Help, his Turner's homi hurch He left hi in 1'
will bo assigned to Our Lady ol threegrowni
Lourdes parish in Raleigh as an as- "Mj � 4
SOCiate pastor. alCrw
! urner, 57, was an Episcopal -
priest tnm 1958until 1981,servini
Show Your HI
That Vou
Them Send T
Loue Line
Loue Lines Must Be in by Februanj
Loue Lines Can Be Purchase
; $2.oo
at
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Offices Second Floor
Publications Buildmq Across f
Library or In Front of the Sturtt
P February 3 from 1 01
Remember I s For u ),u,
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Mun. lluus. 9-D





Dlje �aBt(�aruliuian February 12, 1991 5
Hammer
tidermines freedom
sponsibility
� trcx ps tor
. � tuiv; in That
umb
then pro n at
i irvsisl on rram
' in terms
�� ,ir but in terms
; i It isthe
. � i.i' the sepa
� ics
nsistence that
r is s nom
tion to the
� � .1. redena
-�men
�that
. �orl 'hem
i -cr ii eman
ii m
. rather hear
pie wen
� Jrcd percent?

at situation
. know
-ure
-old be hoi!
nin the
I
i days I
� ��
p ' i bring
ting for mo
. ightcred
'� than a little
it then i xi '�
wl d ired to
. . � .
; � ut espe
I ised as this
vhal the net k
lie for Gulf War
ernmeni leaders
regret �'�� muststand
uld have
ut i hose not
� ill v will
tibstitutefof
. : � i alread)
� r� 'In- main
� eiuresuhii hallowed this
� � I � tplode -� e must in-
he i t d imaging dipl-
i net Hush's fail
talk to 1 fussein, hut our
it � talk I urown govern-
� not at waf because
Bush is a warmonger, bul
ire a sleepy and irre-
� sble itizenry
��� admit that the re-
sponsibility tor this war isas much
?urs as out government's, all pro-
tesl will b�' hvpK nsv
The Vietnam War taught us
that war is a rusty, bloocfy meat
grinder Man �-iy loss mu ked than
the evil it strives against
The Cult War will teach us
that it is our apathy which starts
that gnndtr turning
Next time, we will be more
vigilant Next time, we will act
rather than react Then, our pro-
tests will not simplv complain
about those words which come
out of our president's mouth Our
protests, instead, will place them
there.
sentat
igils
5 ti di irn
Jtt rung our na
fli around us.
whenitdoesn t
tion is always
action.
i (Utter about
Mon, or even
to demand its
lalso accept our
for the deci-
Married man to become Catholic priest
RALEIGH (AP) A married
man will be ordained a Roman
Catholic priest next month in Rivkv
Mount in an exception to the
ehureh seen tunes-old requirement
that its priests remain celibate
Richard turneroi Spring I lope
will he ordained hv the bishopot the
C at hoik Diocese of Raleigh on
March 2 5 at (ktr 1 ady ot Perpetual
1 lelp. his Turner shomoi hurch. 1 le
will be assigned to tXir Lady ot
1 ourdes pansh in Raleigh as an as-
sociate pastor.
furrier, 57, was an Episcopal
priest from 1958 until 1981, serving
last in Akron, Ohio, tor 13 years.
He is one of many Episcopal
clergymen who have left their
ministries during recent years ot
turmoil in that denomination and
have turned to priesthood in the
Roman Catholic ("hurch
The Charlotte native has lived
in the Nash County town of Spring
I lope with his wife, lane, since he
left Ohio in 1W1. The turners have
three grown children
'My reasons tor leaving the
Episcopal Church were the result ot
a very long self-examination about
the Episcopal hurch and its au-
thority and the way that authority is
administered' he said. "When
you're being hobbled by thesystem,
maybetiresystemiswrongfirxrvou
Catholic officials said Turner
would bring toabout 50 the ma mod
men all former Episcopal priests
tobeordained in the United States
in the past lOyears. Another dozen
as�s await review by Pope ohn
Paul II.
Turner will become the third
married Catholic priest in the state
The number ot C athoftc priests
in orth Carolina is about 280,offi-
cials slid
r
Show Your Honey
That Vou nnw
Them Send Them fl
Loue Line! ! !
Loue Lines Must Be in by Febmanj 13 at 5:00 PM.
Loue I ines C an Be Purchased For Only
$2.00 Z
P at
The East Carolinian
� Offices Second Floor Of The
Publications Building Across from Joyner
Library or In Front of the Student Store on
February 1 3 from 10 2.
S1,KR T()SHA(,mn
953 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
NEWMAN
757-3760757-1991
Location:107 CamelliaCane
(ireenv ille, NC
Cost $25tor 5 weeks
Instructor;s: Slay and W Jacksonlllard
Phone: 756-6567 -Starts-
londalehruar18th
Catholic Student Center
LENT BEGINS: SPECIAL ASH WEDNESDAY MASS,
Feb 13 at 5:30 pm in the Ledonia Wright Building
fbetween Joyner Library amd the Health Center)
For More information about programs, sponsored by the Newman Center,
call or visit the center. Newman is open to all students daily from
8:30 am and 11:30 pm.
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
East (Carolina
( oin& Pawn
lSI M(ASH LOANS
DIAMONDS
STERLING
f2k-Ml M-K 111 1 ISIONS
TmGl NS JEWI i
s3GUITARSi HNS 1 KV1I !�: Xs-STEREOS
Flowers
Kt nu mlu r For Mlour
L E M T i H E ' S
Select From:
St off fd Animals
HEEDS
Balloons 1 r
alentine's Baskets V y
0
Koscs
( ut Flowers Plants
t Win 1 ImMrs World NMdt
M)n. tst loth M
(lit t n illc. N(
757-WM
752-0322
( (RNER t )(� KfTH M! k KINS )S
(iKI IW 11.1 1
QUALITY FILM DEVELOPING
pc-nr
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second set
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Lunch onl)
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onl
$2.99
v- un-Fri
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I V ; 1 I ' - 1 1
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Buy one
Regular Shrimp
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Gel the 2nd
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( n �od an) lime
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�d I �� do run out ot tn KMRaM mn
�MM �� (noda you to purchaaa m. �r��
d Hani � raqumd to 0. w� I Kitm lor mm '� Mdt Kiogm Skw. aapt m I
Hi oftv you youi cnoE� o( � comoanCM fMn. .�� � �MtM '��cwiq th. Mm
liMrriM 9a nMraMl pm MM 3D day Of�y ona �BMBI coupon b. Kow
eirtW
COPVRiGMT MM TH�KROG�BC0 ITEMS AHO PRICES GOOO SUNDAY
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RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLO TO DEALERS
with Low
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301 Plaza Drive, Greenville, N.C.
756-1592 I
MonThurs. 9-9 � Fri. 9-8 � Sat. 9-1 � Sun. 1-5
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE.
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Madame Del Bard ly 99
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rv (
linos freedom
ponsibility
ti
i � i

no for (iuIf War
nt leaders
:
will
htutcfor f
: � l!rr 1 i .
� tl � m.iin
ivedthis
� �. must in
i, Mr. dipto
� � ush s '
t n but ("ir
n govern
� r because
ni;tT, but
; . and irre
��it the rt'
is much
ill pro-
n taught us
� , ,K meat
�.i. ked thm
igainst
. � it in teat h us
it is nur a path) whu h starts
r turning
Next time, we will be molt
� '� ' Next tun wi will act
� r than r t I hen. our pro
' will not simply eomplaw
about those words which cot
out of our president's moutft-C
Iso accept our protests, instead, will place them
fur the deci there
(Elje leant (Harulinian February 12, 1991 5
Married man to become Catholic priest
RALEIGH (AP) A married last in Akron, Ohio, few I3ycars thorityandthewaythatauthorityis
man will be ordained .1 Roman He is one of man) Episcopal administered he said "When
Catholic priest next month in Rock) clergymen who have lefl their you'rebeing hobbled by the system,
Mount in an exception to the ministries during recent years ol maybethesystemiswTongforyou
chun'h'scenturies-oWrequirement turmoil in that denomination and Catholu officials said turner
that its priests remain celibate have turned to priesthood in the wouldbring to about 50 the married
Kichard Turner ot Spring Hope Roman Catholii Church men all former FpiscopaI priests
willbeordainedb) Ihebishopofthe rheharlotte native has lived tobeordainedinthel InitedStates
( itholii Diocese ol Raleigh on in the Nash County town of Spring in the past 10 years notherdozen
March 23 at Our I ad) of Perpetual Hope with his wife, lane, since he ases await rev icw by Pope ohn
1 lelp his rumei shomechureh He left Ohio in 1981 rhe 1 umershave Paul 11
; he assigned to Oui Lad) ol thnv grown children rurner will become fhe third
urdespiirishinRaleighasanas M reasons foi leaving the married Catholic priest in the state
siviati pastoi -opal Church were the result ol Phenumberoft atholic priests
met " was an Episcopal a very long self-examination about in North Carolina is about 280, off i
� si from 1958 until 181 rvmi the Fpis opal hurch and its au cialssaid
953 Fast 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
NEWMAN 757-3760757"1991
Catholic Student Center
Show Your Honey
That You mmh
Them Send Them fl
Lone Line! ! !
I ove l Ines Must Be in by 1 ebtuanj 15 �t S:00 PM.
I one I inesan Be Pun hased I or (Inly
$2.00 Z
al
The East Carolinian
m Offices Second Floor Of The
Publications Building Across from Joynei
l ibrary oi In I ront of the Student Store on
P l ebruaty 1 ft out 1 0 2.
LEARN K) SU (N
! I S
Location lo Camellia 1 .mc
(JreetiN ille, N('
Cost $25 foi 5 weeks
InstriK tors Sla) and illard
Jackson
Phone 756 6567
Stan
MoikI.in February 1 Sth
East (Carolina
( oin & Paw n
lS S () S
)l 1i )i 'S
s I IK I l i
M1 i K
' 1 I I I V ISM iS
LENT BEGINS: SPECIAL ASH WEDNESDAY MASS,
Feh 13 at 5:30 pm in the Ledonia Wright Building
(between Joyncr Library- amd the Health Center)
For More information about programs, sponsored by (he Newman Center,
call or isil the center. Newman is open to all students daily from
8:30 am and 11:30 pm.
Kr. Paul Vacth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
r lowers
rm mbi r L.v b oi Ml 1 our
"LEHTiHE S HEEDS
Select I rom:
stufti-d Vnimals

Balloons C") r
ulentine's Baskets V W
CJ
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hi I I"m rs & Plants
X Win I km� is Win Id W id
30111 I asl 10th Si
( 11 t i in lilt , N (
75- iX92
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
756-2011
I .uiich onl
Small Shrimp
Platter
756 2011
Bu one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6 50
(lei the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter I KM
(I � i lime
noi iiK'hulcd
�VALENTINE'S SPECIALS
The Club � -
Limited Time - 1st Time Members Only
Offer Good With Coupon Only
301 Plaza Drive, Greenville, N.C.
756-1592
MonThurs. 9-9 � Fri. 9-8 � Sat. 9-1 � Sun. 1-5
s
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ECU Sludeni Store Wrighl Hide 46. Prints not included
Greenville NC 27858
MiM AejomDan Orde
WVUTaKS ITBI HUT tier ' tftaaa �wu� nama � mounts to ba -o iviMM �- an �- �aci i .j Sttx a�capt a �pac�caav mad x 9m
ad rt �� do oin out o' tr, aOwtaMK) nmr � � ot� rox rom choc o' � convntm xir mnr au:m 'tfWcong m� um� tavmgt v � 'Mnctaaat
wruch M �noaa you to ourchaa m� Ktwnmao mrr tn� �diif�j one �nf�n Xi o�vi Or onm ��y coupor ft o accatnad gm a�m IkaaWaH
entM
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Madame Del Bard
Red Rosesstem





6
She gagj Carolinian
CLASSIFIEDS
FEBRUARY 12, Wl
February 12,P91
SERVICES OFFLRFD
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES:
Term papers, Dissertations, Letters,
Resumes, Manuscripts, Projects. Fast
turn around. Call Joan 756-9255.
A BAHAMASPARTYCRUISE Six
davs only $279! Jamaica & Florida six
days $299! Davtona $159! Panama
C itv S991 Spring Break Travel 1-800-
638-6786.
SPK1NC, BREAK: Only $35000
Spend it in the Honda Keys or Ba-
hamas on one of our yachts. All
meals, sun and fun you could ask for.
Iasy sailing, Miami, FL 1 (800) 780-
4001.
H PING SERVICES: Term Papers,
Reports, Resumes, I otters, Theses
rypedonPC. laser Pnnter. Fast him
around Call 756-1783.
Student Income Fax Returns
Program Developed by
Professionals Specifically for
College Students
355-4977
Pittard Perrij
V-l Ul IC INCORPORATED
CCKTlFlfO PXJBHC ACCOUNTANTS
FOR SALE
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Read
Residency Status and Tuition, the
practical pamphlet written by an at-
torney on the in-state residency ap-
plication process. For sale: Student
Stores, Wright Building.
FOR SALE: 1980 Fender Srrat with
Seymour Duncans, factory gray,
rosewood neck, near mint with case
s-40 or trade for acoustic guitar plus
cash also have Boss digital delav,
$70 756-6904.
FOR SALE. 1987 IBM �5
i wywriter typewriter, like new
Cost $2000 new, must sell ShVi or
B.O. 758-6904.
87PONTIACSLNBIRDSE,PS, At
IW, Tilt, Cass plus extras, $4200.
Call 792-5831 after 5:00 p.m.
lENDERGCITARAMP DeiuxeSS
464
ULTIMATE SPEAKER BOXES For
ii or house. 200 watts each,
oi tames 12" sub, mid, tweet. $150
for pair, 931 8155
89 LOTUS STRATCX ASTER .
tar with case Also Dean Ma
Amplifier. Excellent condition. $350
neg. 830-9293. Ask tor Neil.
LOR SALE: '86 Samurai JX New
tires, trannv, oxygen sensor. Fresh
insp $4200 747-3546 - machine
doesn't bite'
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share apartment one block from
earn pus, $160month includes own
room, heat, air conditioning, water
and basic cable. Call 757-1024.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Good lo-
cation, 12 block from campus, 2
blocks from downtown. Clean apt.
just $175month plus split expenses.
FOR RENT
Needed quickly C all Wade for in-
formation at 758-0723.
ROOMMATE WANTED Male
non smoker to share 2 bedroom
town house. $170month, 12 utili-
ties. Call Pat at 756 7839 after 7:(X)
p.m.
ROOM FOR RENT in young
couples home (females only) $200
month plus 14 utilities. Private
bathroomand kitchen privileges Call
355-5078.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
modern condominium, $260month
plus 12 utilities, prefer male non
smoker profgrad. Call 56-9342
evenings.
H luuful i
� All V. �
� tad Rca.K i K i �
UNIVERSITY APAR1 MIA I S
2S99 E sih Sued
�I ocated War ECt'
�Neat Maior Shopping i ' inert
�Acroi From Highway Patrol Stai
I.milled Offer S 500 i im
(ontaci I it mm) W Mian -
756 '815 or 83
(itiur open p: f
�AAI.K G KII-s.
Clean �nd aptm one ��-
etergvefr m Hi �� ,
Jryrrm GBfala !V C Kipltf , � ; ?
tan MOB " �
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED Perfect part-time
ob for college girls Fashion cons ill
ants wanted for Ml i III i i
to retail fashion Forward M
Knit Line. Call 757 1044
ARE YOl STRUGGLING I p
that light bilP Ease your mind, lean
help. Phone 756-9003 for part-time
opportunity.
EASY WORK! LXCLt I ENT PAY!
Assemble productsat .
information. 504-641 80031 : W.
FINDOUTWm fBM,PR i
GAMBLE, XEROX and FORT! NE
500 COMPANIES are interested in
graduates of our Summer Progi u
If your interested in develop
resurne,enhartcing your future career
options, MAKINCA'l-K $5000ai I
traveling call us toda) 9 9 '45
2 tr (1) ?49 22 i
AEROBK S
nni d I i
ind Parks Departmei
time positions for V
Instructors For i
call 75f�6892 and isl
shank
INS 1 Kl '( I)K
t atnieen
WIN A TRIPTODISN1 WOR1 D
distributing subscription cardsat this
eampus. Good income For infor-
mation and application write to
COLLEGIATE MARKETING SER
VICES, 303 W. Center Avenue,
Mooresville, NC28115.
Cruise Ship Jobs
HIRING Men Women Summer
Year Round PHOTOGRAPHERS
TOUP- GUIDES RECREATION PERSONNEL
Excellent pay pijs FREE 'ravel Car.bbean
Hawaii Banarr.as South Pacific Me�cc
CALL. IMOWI Can refundable
1-206-736-7000, Ext.OJ.ZJ
HELP WANTED
FAST FUNDRAISING PRO-
GRAM: SI (XXI in just one week. Earn
up to $1000 for your campus organi-
zation. Plus a chance at S5000 more!
This program works! No investment
needed. Call 1-800-932-0528 Ext. 50.
HELP WANTED: Assembly Tech-
nician - Part time. Must show good
mechanical ability and dexterity. Will
train. Flexible schedule, 20-30 hours
Call Phi! Moore at 757-0279.
THEGREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPARTMENT is
recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
indoor soccer coaches for the spring
indoor soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth Appli-
cants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18 in soccer fundamen-
tals I lours are from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
vith some night and weekend coach-
ing. This program will run from the
tirst ot March to the first of May.
Salary rates start at S3.85 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben
lames at 830-4567.
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSIS-
11 RAMPS MASSACHUSETTS
Mah-Kj ic tor BoysDanbee tor
i. iirls ounselor positions tor Pro-
gram Specialists: All Team Sports,
iall) Baseball, Basketball, Field
I iockey, Softball, Soccer and Volley-
ball; 25 Tennis openings; also Ar-
chery, Riflery, Weightsntnes�and
Biking; other openings include Per
framing Arts, Fine Arts Newspaper,
Photography, Cooking, Sewing,
Roller-skating, Rocketry, Ropes, and
("ampCraf t; All Waterfront Activities
(Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing, Canoe Kayaking). In-
fuin Mah-Kee-Nac(BOYS)190Lin-
. Avenue Glen Ridge, NJ 07028.
' 900-7! 1-9118 Dbnbee(GIRLS)
16 Horseneck Road, Montville, J
45 (all 1-800-776-0520.
PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW SISTERS OI AHA; Crysti
se Heather Uearne, Ashley
imes i. oebe Dickerson, Courtney
I enetl Marcie Hasson, Heidi Hicks,
r
M:s-
( mi
fanuzzo, Annstey Kennedy,
King, Katherine Lynch, IXi-ibie
isky Scarlet Parks, Shay Pierce,
Pauline Richardson, Beth Shook,
sia Sloan, Angela Sn id lerne
Smith, Missy Stephens, Elizabeth
I: � mas and Audrey Weathers WE
�R1 SOPROUDOFYOU! Hang in
then Karen frina I ina, Aiissa,
ie a:
hnsi
We
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
�phjsonai MDOOMSBrrMLCMV
FREE PREGNANCY
TESTING
M-F 8:80-4p.m.
Sat. 10-lp.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call fof �pponmett Man thru S�
I o� Com Ternimuoo to 2T ncu rt Pgnaiwry
1-800-433-2930
PERSONALS
AZA'S: I ock-in was lots of fun but
Splash wasoutragcous! Do you think
they uill let us comeback???????
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES: You have-
all now seen,Turtles, rose and green.
Happy, tun times, Silly laughing
rhymes; And now your big sis is on
her way ;To put more sparkles in
your day'
ELLEN JOYNER: Congratulations
for the Greek Hall of Fame and
ArtemusAward. Wetoveyou Love,
Alpha Phi
ALPHA PHI VALENTINE'S BAL-
LOON SALE: Mon. (211) through
Wed. (213)9-4 and Thurs. G14)9
12, outside student store. Only 75
cents per balloon -it includes message.
We deliver too!
KIM MANNING Congratulations
to Greek 1 lall of Fame We love you
Alpha Phi
CONGRATULATIONS to Alpha
Omicron Pi for winning the Chapter
Excellence award and the following
wards: Lisa Turner Outstanding
Pledge Award - Dena Price, Artemis
ward - Lisa Gale, Greek Hall ol
lame � I isa Gale and Melinda
Huffman, ECl PanheHenic Leader
�-hip Award - Lisa Gale. Way to go
�irls: WeareAOPand proud
of it
( ONCRATULATIONS to ECL
I 'anhellenic for a job well done - AOI1
ETT; Thanks for the partv last
Wednesday night Sorry about the
mix up. Keep the ice block frozen
We all hope to use it soon! Love
�XOII's.
SETA NUS: OTl, V HI, Now you
snow the Big I! I ove. your sisti
C.J Tomorrow we celebrate 8
wonderful months together . or245
days or 5880 hours or 352,800
minutes or 21,168,000 seconds.
However you measure it, I cherish
every moment I spend with you!
Love, D.B
( ONGRATLI ATIONS GAIBY!
We know you'll do a wondi job
as Assistant Vice-President ol
PanheHenic. I ove, the sisters and
pledges oi Chi Omega
PERSONALS
riKt EEE,t�KT: Thanks so much for
thePre Downtown. Wehadablastat
Pantana's. Let's get together again
real soon. Love, the sisters and
pledges of Chi Omega
CONGRATS to the Chi Omega Bas-
ketball team for winning our first two
games. Keep up the good work.
We're behind ya'll 100.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
sisters of Chi Omega: Jennifer
Anderson, Shannon Allred, Tracey
Boyer, Carter Buffington, Melanie
Carwile, Heather Fraser, Cindy
Gresham, Allison Harvey, Elizabeth
Hume, Candace Jacobs, Allison Jo-
seph, Aimee Lewis, Louisa Michael,
Laura McMillian, Suzanne Nuckois,
Christy Nvlen.GretchenShinebarger,
Sonya Smith, Duffy Smithwick. We
love you guys. Your sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS to the 1991
Chi Omega Executive Officers
loanne Britt - President, Loanna
Askew - Vice-President, Lee Magner
- Secretary, Angie Osbourne - Trea-
surer, Claire Purvis - Pledge Trainer,
Jennv Barnes - PanheHenic, Jennifer
Kinlawand Christy O'Brien - Rush
We're behind voualL You're doing a
terrific jub so tar. Love, vour sisters
and pledges
TO DELTA SIGS: Thanks fora most
memorable evening last Thursday
night. We think you guys are out of
sight. We lwk forward to more good
tunes in the future. Love, the sisters
of m
STUDENTS SUPPORTING OUR
TROOPS: There will be a mooting
for all members and interested par-
ries at 9 p.m. at Mcndenhall Student
(. enter in Room 221 This is a very
important meeting, it able to attend,
be there' It is on 21291.
ANYONE WHO WAS at the SST
Rally on Feb. 7th and videotaped at
least a portion of it, please contact
lohn Hardce or Chnstle Mavton at
?3J;$QQi We would like to buy a
copy from you.
AOM (lad we could get to see some
of you last week We know it's hard
when your regional are watching.
I lope we can get together soon The
Brothers and Pledges of Sigma Tau
Gamma.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Ifie CN(oi� Company
of Qrunvdk Ltd.
GREENVIUES FIRST FULL SERVICE NAIL CARE SALON"
( olke Students
x ing your ID and gel a full set of nails for $36.00 (Rec. $45.00)
�Fill-ins for $16.00 (Reg. $20 00)
Tanning Package
5 visits $15.00
10 visits $25.00
FRANKIE U WES 2408 S. Charles, Suite 5
Owna (919)355-4596
FAMILY
MEDICAL CARE
Office Hours:
BtiO AM � S.tW P.M. Moa-Fn
8.00 AM -4:00 PM Sat
George Klein, M.D FAAF.P.
Physician
Henrietta Williams, Ph.D.
It.llll �
CAUL
S'fAn
HQvSt
?
Meyer
Cve�rv'H� oivcj
Kroger
Psychologist
Ho Appomtnwnt rtecary M � g iM
GREENVIUE NC 27858
355-5454
UNCEMENTS
Pf FSONALS
THE UNDERGROUND Con
the spontaneous COMED
Transactors Improv Co Iheyv
performingTuesday,Feb 12th
p.m. in the Underground U
of Mendcnhall). Come early, ad n
sion and refreshments an �
Brought to you by the Studen I!
Coffeehouse Committee
AA BASKETBALL PLAYERS
guys have been doing grc I
cheenng for you! L�U
ters.
WOMEN SURVIVORS o
SEXUAL ABUSE GROUP
days 5-6:30 p m. for sevci
Contact Elizabeth Wootei -
more informahon at 752-66
PIKES: Welcome the Nu pled
classof Spring 1991 Rkhard I
Robert Harper, Troy Ham
King, Richard Kraemer, P.�. n i M
Tom Moms, Brad Osbon i I
vour seat belt, the ride has �
Good Luck!
STUDENTPIRATEC LI H
today at 4:00 p.m. in the Pir ��
social room.
THE 2ND ANNUAL STl DIM
PIRATE CLUB IMC, OUT .
Saturday, Feb. 16th at 5:3 lj
Pirate Club. S2 member
members. Memberships
available. RSVP - 757
ATTENTION ALL STl DENTS,
STAFF, FACULTY BIT
ing Valentine's Dav Special S
for a dozen bovevl rcse's witl
breathand greens. Toordei
1007 todav.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Lsrgtst Ubnry ol information in U S
aff subjects
Ooer Catalog Tooav )Mti v a '�'
800-351 0222
rou f�i
HOT UNt
O 'j 2 00 to1 towtrch Uiiot�iO(i
n
KATHLEEN YOUN(
YACHT CHARTERS
Aim: ECU
Enjoy a fahulous trip ihc
Bahamas aboard a sailing yachi
(Drinking age is 18 on the island
DiscounLs available for trip
orgainicrs. Call anydme fbrdejaifc
1-800-447-2458
j
OPEN UNDER
NEWONVNEKSHIP
STILL SER V ING YOl
WITH QUALITY B1'
AM) ATLAS PRODUCTS
ACROSS FROM III K( V
REST At RW
fTENTH STREET
lUr DISCOl NT WITH
STUDENT 1 D ON REPAIRS
ANDSERV U I
752-2135 27(M E. Hih Sued
KCMUSEKVtct Greenville. NC
SOlOQLQFEDyCATIQN
The School of Education's Fourth
Annual workstudy trip to Puebla,
Mexico is scheduled for this Spring
Break Don't miss the opportunity of
a lifetime" All ECU students may
apply Applications and further de-
tails are available in the Dean's Com-
plex, School of Education, Speight
Building.
STUDENTS SUPPORTING OUR
TROOPS
There will be a meeting for all mem-
bers and interested parties at 9 p.m. at
Mcndenhall Student Center in Room
221. This is a very important meeting,
if able to attend, be there! It is on Feb.
12th.
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
OVERSEAS!
More than one thousand English-lan-
guage oriented schools and colleges
in over 140 countries offer teaching
and administrative opportunities to
American educators Positions exist
in most all areas, on all levels, from
kindergarten to university Salanes
very from school to school, but in
most cases they are comparable to
those in the U.S. Vacanciesoccurand
are filled throughout the year. For-
eign language knowledge is seldom
required. Some overseas schools will
hire graduating seniors for student
teaching Graduating seniors should
investigate these challenging oppor-
tunities! For a free descriptive bro-
chure, please send a self-addressed
stamped envelope to: FRIENDS OF
WORLD TEACHING, P O. Box 1049,
San Diego, CA 92112-1049.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
"H.M.S. Pinafore" by Gilbert and
Sullivan will be performed by the ECU
Opera Theatre with orchestra under
the direction of Clyde Hiss. The per-
formances will be on Feb. 14-16, be-
ginning at 8:00 p.m. and on Feb. 17,
begmningat 200p.m. (Fletcher Music
Hall; for ticket information call 757-
4788) Mon Feb 18 - Sally Moseley,
piano. Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00 p m, free). Mon Feb. 18 -
Sigma Alpha Iota pledge recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall,9:00 pm free)
Dial 7574370 for the School of Music
"Recorded Calendar
FEELING BLUE?
If you're feeling lonely and depressed,
you're not alone Attend our DEAL-
ING WITH DOWN TIMES workshop
and pick yourself up! Tuesday, Feb.
12 from 3-5 p.m. in room 329 Wright
Bldg Please call Counseling Center
&757-6661) for Registration.
STUDY SKILLS WORKSHOP
Studying hard but not seeing the re-
sults you would like? Can't quite put
your Finger on the problem? This
workshop will focus on new ways to
approach your course work and en-
hance the skills you possess Monday,
Feb. 18at330-5:00p.m.in313Wright
Bldg. or Tuesday, Feb. 19 at 3:30-5:00
p.m. in 313 Wright Bldg.
ECU STUDENT CHAPTER OF
HABIIATFQB. HUMANITY.
The ECU Chapter of Habitat for Hu-
manity will hold a meeting Tuesday,
Feb 12 at 700 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 8 C, D, and E (downstairs in
Mendenhall). This meeting is open to
all students, staff and faculty and we
will be discussing upcoming events
so please try to attend.
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
CLUB
Attention! All Elementary Education
Club Members. There will be a
Valentine's Social meeting on Feb. 13
at Speight 308 at 4:00 p.m. Pleaseplan
to attend. Food, drinks and fun.
SENIOR INFORMATION
COMMITTEE
Our "hearts" go out to graduating se-
niors! Tuesday. Feb. 14th at 9a.m. In
front of the Student Store. Free hot
chocolate and details on Senoir Infor-
mation Day (Thursday, April 4,1991).
Also, keep your eyes peeled for info.
onyourchanceto"sleepwiththesenoir
class" on Wed Feb. 8 more later!
ECU AMBASSADORS
There will be a General Meeting on
Wednesday at 5.00 p.m. at Menden-
hall in Gieat Room Section 1. See you
there!
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter wishes to announce a Special Ash
Wednesday Massand the Distribution
of Ashes on Wednesday, February 13
at 5-30 p.m. in the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center between Jovner I
brary and the Health Center Ail are
welcome to attend this service mark
ing the beginning of Lent
STUDENT UNION
COFFEEHOtlSF COMMITTEE
Come see the spontaneousCOMED'i
of the Transactors Improv Co They
will be performing Tuesday. Febn;
ary 12th at 8.00 p.m. in the Under
ground (Basement of Mendenhall)
Come early, admission and refresh
ments are free. Brought to you by the
Student Union Coffeehouse Com-
mittee.
ANIMAL RIGHTS
Students for the Ethical Treatment ot
Animals (SETA) will have a meeting
Tues Feb. 12 at 5 JO p.m. in GC 2017
to finalize preparations for our up-
coming video festival and to discuss
organizational changes.
Impiovosation
group Transac
visits Mende
By Lisa Maie jernigan
Staff 'riler
They are nt zanv, wacky,
madcap or kook. They don't do
stand-up and th arc not mimes.
They are spontanpus, witty, satiri-
cal silly and ddmtcly not what
you exrxil
The award inning Transac-
tors Improv Co spearing tonight
in the Mendenhj Student Center,
offers a uruqutcornedic-theatre
experience. Onet the few groups
in the country jerfonning pun
improvisation,fie Chapel Hill
baMd'I ransactotcreate theirshov
on-the-spot frorraudience sugges
tions
When you ak n audience to
participate ma envdv showbased
pure!) onimprovit n, theresults
are in hi rend) unoedvctable What
is consistent is trf way the group
elaborates on, reinterprets, bas-
tardizes and othfwise improvises
on their ideas. IT results are often
off colored and noire but always
riotous.
Past audit.L dictated perfor-
mances have r�ged from such Not
Ready for PrhrTimePlayers-esQue
sketches as "I' i- asPhysicisf and
"Sallv lesse BtJeefli and iuest
"TanwithaingPenis "Bui
improvisatJri no two shi
ahke 1 hat juts eiKfmous pressure
on the gpup to be brilliantly
creative, iiickh.
The success of t
attributed to their
vidual talent and c
stage, a lot
Transactional chern
�rmedinlsl.
in Carrboro wherl
mances are standil
Though the
has changed �
last decade, the c
have been togethei
and si-em to have
eat V . -ther
Senii r men
I leartinger and En
lohnst; m I �
die direction EacJ
razor sharp sense
an otf-the-wall id
make the most of a 1
��

rw
kected repeat
residents. Rest IJ
in the annual Spei
poll They have I el
tional Public Radi
entertain ov rA I
times a wo I
leigh
Tht ' I
comedy is si i
hastob
itterwhatrj
situation theaudid
see, it need onrj
the group �� �
Inlimbo returns fr
Bv Brian Pack
Spe�il to The Fast Carolinian
Ts Wednesday Feb. 13.
Greemlle's iivvn "What" Records
recomngartists "In Limbo" will be
plavrg at the New Deli lust back
frorrtt bnet east coast tour, the band
wilUlav a few local dates and then
hed out to cover the southeast re-
gie
Over the past year and a halt In
Linbo has enjoyed great sw -
lorallv and has received critical ac-
chim from all over the southeast
vith their original progress) e p r
androck tunes. Inarecentinterview
witli the band's lead singer I 'a id
Mason said the after their recent
tour the) saw some major record
label interest, but thev re shopping
arOUl dlX'tonsicninganvci-ntrav rs
Smcetheir independent n leasi
"What? cameout last summer, the
band has written more thanenough
new material t
bum Plans to recc
made once thi d
which studio an
deril
ducers nght n.
"including
-
producer and
live.
According
Lirnbo'ssetV
songs from 'W'haj
Suitor Tax
well as newer si ri
heve 1 Declare
at to hear the
our owns i I
guitarist Erk J
Playing
Rollercoastei
Asking M
fun, but it s ok
pro Kite theoncTi
W, Steve Martin re;
Bv Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
SteveMartinchalksupanother
ad nurableoexlit to hislist with "L. A.
Stcry
A sneak prc iew was screened
in Iiendrix ITxatreon Tuesday. 1 he
movie is scheduled for nationwide
release on Febn
"LA SI
around Harn
Martin). Han
television weatfvi
his way througl
telatfonshtp to sj
claimed queen
Marihi Henner
1
"J
� J
Steve Martin s lkadaisical characterization is teai
about a down-and-out, middle-aged man who fir-





FtBHLJAHYl2.J$Q
PERSONALS
Hi ! m RGROUND Come see
nee s v OMED of the
- ' rsli pro Co rhcywiltbe
sda) Feb l2that8:Qrj
� l rground (Basement
v ome early, admb-
' Is are free
i -�� d ntl
wki ti; i IMAM rs You
e lo ng prcat Wj �,
� l 1H1 IS ,�
si Kll ls Of
VI IU SI GRCH P I ies
- 11 :
v SV for
dBissctl
R 1
i PIR lhllli
W'Nl l si I
1 CLUB I'll, (H I .
bNTlON Ml silDI ls.
STAFF. FACULTY BL1 is offer
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
RESEARCH KrORMATDN
� �� ji nformation in U S �
ill subiects
800 351 0222
Cj'Sl-ch ln(o�"iltion
KATHLEEN YOUN
BARTERS
ECU
. iriptothe
ailing yahi
$ n the island
' H trip
Ic details
I PI I nik
SEWOWNERSrflP
STUJ SERVING YCX
wfTHC M.ITYB.P
SPRODUCTS
I A K IMA
IIMIIM ki II
(J7
,FP
DISCOI M vmi'h
DIM ID ONRJ PAIRS
WD M KV l( I
� l ntl Street
� cnvilie. NC
no
hot
' iral enter between Jovner l.i-
� �. ind the Health Center All are
me to attend this service mark-
ing 'he beginning ot Lent
I STUDENT UNION
lil-U1" COFFEEHOUSE COMMITTEE
Hfor mtc Come see die SfonttineousCOMEDY
h esenoii of the Transactors rmprov (a They
ore later' will be performing Tuesday, Febru-
arv 12th at 8:00 pm in the Under-
IRS ground (Basement of Mendenhall)
Beting on Come early, admission and refresh-
en- mentsare free Brought to you by the
See you Student Union Coffeehouse Com-
mittee.
AMMALEIGiflS
JC Students for the Ethical Treatment of
IK Animals (SETA) will have a meeting
lent Cen- Tues, Feb. 12at 530 p.m. inGC 2017
ecial Ash to finalize preparations for our up-
stnbution coming video festival and to discuss
?ruary13 organizational changes
Wright
February 12,1191
�be iEaat Carolinian
7
Impiovosation
group Transactors'
visits Mendenhall
By 1 isa Male Jernigan
Staff friter

1 hey are nl zany, wacky,
nadiap or kxl4 They don't do
stand-up and thf are not mimes
he) arespontanuis, witty,satiri-
al silly and ddnitelv not what
�II expect.
rhe award finning Transac-
tors Improv Co.Spearing tonight
in the Mendenhl Student Center.
offers a uniqu�eomedic-theatre
experience. Onetf the few groups
in the country kerforming pure
:mpro isation, Jhe Chapel Hill
based 1 ransactoicreate their show
on the spol frorrpudieno? sugges-
tions
When vou ajkan audience to
partiripateinacoredyshow based
reh on improvisation, theresults
ire turn renth uneedkrtable.What
is consistent is th way the group
elaborates on, reinterprets, bas-
tardizes and Othfwise improvises
on their ideas. TJfe results are often
ofl colored indoscure but always
Past audiece dictated perfor-
mances have mged from such Not
Ready forPtnvTimePlayers-esque
sketi hesas "IvisasPhysicistand
Sail) (esserMiceBi and Guests" to
' I !n MthSiemglYnis' But with
pro' isatfn, no two shows are
k I hat uts enormous pressure
the eup to be brilliantly
abve .�neklv
The success of the group ca n be
attributed to their incredible indi-
vidual talent and comfort with the
stage, a lot of "rehearsal" and
Transactional chemistry The group
wasfbrrned in 1981 at the ArtsCenter
in Carrboro where their perfor-
mances are standing room only
Though the group's composition
has changed several times in the
last decade, the current members
have been together for two years
and seem to have no secrets from
each other.
Senior members Allison
1 leartinger and English-bom Tim
Johnston provide most of the come-
dic direction. Each seems to have a
razor sharp sense of where to take
an otf-the-wall idea and how to
make the most of a bizarre scenario
dreamt up by an imaginative au-
dieiH i
The Transactors have been se
lected repeatedly by Triangle area
residentsas "f3est Local Comedian"
in the annual Spectator Magazine
poll They have been heard on Na-
tional Public Radio and currently
entertain over 40,000 listeners three
times a week on VVPTF-AM in Ra-
leigh.
The Transactors' unique brand
of comedy is something that iust
has to be experienced lobe hoi ieved
No matter what tvpeof humorous
situation theaudience would like to
see, it need only be requested and
the group will serve it up fresh
� Fi!� PhotO
Greg Hohn. Dan Sipp Tim Johnson and Allison Heartingei mak tipthe uansactors Improv Co Thetroup
will bring their audience inspired act to The Underground in Mendenhall tonight The show starts at 8 p.m.
The troupe will be in town lor
one perft irmance tonight. February
12, in The Underground (formerly
known as the Coffeehouse) located
inthelowerleveloftr ' It ndenhall
Student Center Show lm� is s Ot I
Admission is free and so are all the
refreshments you desire
This rare experience oi inven-
tive absurdity is brought to you by
the Student Union Coffeehouse
i. ommittoe.
,T r .urn mv. h'K �t " �� v r' "�
Inlimbo returns from road to rock New Deli Wednesday night
� 11 .� i ii- � i Tii i a1 1,1 ,i uii. r, N.irth'iroluia musicians. Doo:
By Brian Pack
Speal to The Fast Carolinian
rks Wednesday Feb. 13,
Pille'sown "Wh.it" Records
� ingartists "Inlimbo" will be
iyjg at the New Deli. ust Kick
11 briefeast coast tour, the band
� ill A.w a few local dates and then
heal out to cover the southeast re-
git 'i
( h er the past year and a hall. In
I mho has enjoyed great success
ioallv and ha received critical ac-
i'in from .ill over the southeast
with their original progressive pop
rxlrock tunes Ina recenl inten k rw
ith the band's lead singer, I avid
Mason said the after their recenl
to it the) saw some major record
label interest, but thev're shopping
arotindbeforesigningany contracts
UKetheiruulependentrelease
V h.it 'ameout last summer, the
band has written more thanenough
new matenal to record another a
bum. Flans to record again will re-
made once the band decides on
which studio and producer to use.
"We're considering several pro-
ducers right now said Mason,
"includingJohn Plymaleand Mitch
Faster Plymale isa member f the
So Police and Easter is a long time
producer and member of Let's Ac-
tive.
According to Mason, In
Lirnbo'sset Wednesday will include
songs from "What?" such as The
Suitor Tax and Coming Back as
well as newer songs like 'Make Be-
lieve 'I Declare' and 'Fallen ' It's
great to hear the crowd yell out tor
our own songsmorrand moresaid
guitarist Fnc Davis.
'Tlaying covers like 'Love
Rollercoaster' (Ohio Players) and
'AskingMe Lies (Replacements) is
tun, but it's nice when people ap
preciate the originals" said Davis.
All five of In Limbo's member
equally share songwriting and cre-
ativeinput. "Noonein theband has
to be pulled along. We've all been
making music for a long tune and
have a pretty good idea about what
we're doing Davis commented.
The result is a mesh ot upbt at me-
lodic tunes that area! once strange,
fun and varied.
When asked what the past year
has taught them, the band said the
they learned not to play tor Kit, to
confirm the sht w beforedriving to
it and. as tar as they can tell, thev
still play pretty well when they're
drunk. "We have the Pere Ubu
packing foam incident, the Sarah
Vaughn801 lays Bridge, Deee Lite
choreographer from Norfolk, Sml
Asylum crib notes, hand drillbeer
bottle guitar effects and the obliga-
tory metal song s.iid Davis Ac-
cording to him, this is the root ol all
that is In I imbo
Record label talent scouts an
planning to be at the N ew I Vli as
well o see this eclectk group oi
North Carolina musicians. Doors
i pen at 931' p.m. and the show will
begin around 10.30 p.m.
File Photo
Greenville's own In I imbo will be at the New Deli Wednesday night In
Limbo aims to drive the ciowd into an insane throng tomorrow night
Martin
Gwendolyn
Brooks
celebrates
Valentine's
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
It is a rare occurrence for a
bona-fide celebrity to visit the ECU
campus, but this is what will hap-
pen on thiscoming Valentine's Day.
On that night the highly acclaimed
poet, Gwendolyn Brooks, will con-
duct a poetry reading.
Brook's visit is in part due to
the celebration of Black History
Month She will be at lenkins Art
Auditorium at 8 p.m.
One of contemporary
literature's most renowned authors.
Brooks has become a widely an-
thologized author. The 74-year-
oldhas been wntting poetry since
she was seven.
Although born in Topcka,
Kansas, Brooks considers herscW a
lifelong Chicagoan, the citv she
describes in most ot her works.
Many of the topics dealt with in her
writings concern race relations, a
problem she witnessed while
growing up in the city.
Many of her earliest works
dealt with the white-biased valuing
of lightness among blacks, bu t over
time she expanded her focus to ex-
plore racial confrontations in gen-
eral.
Brooks has always been proud
of her ancestry. Her home envi-
ronment gave her the confidence to
first publish her works. After visits
to Afnca in 1971 and 1974, her feel-
mgof African heritagedeepened. "I
have always felt that to beblack was
good she said in her autobiogra-
phy.
Early in her life she met James
Weldon Johnson and Langston
Hughes at her church in Chicago.
Hughes, another great poet of the
time inspired her and later served
as her mentor.
Her finely tuned writing style
has been influenced by authors such
asTS. Eliot, Emily Dickinson, Rob-
ert Frost and Langston Hughes "If
there ever wasa bom poet Writter
Alice Walker once said in an inter-
view, "1 think it was Brooks
Brooks has received the high-
est praises awarded to her profes-
sion. She won the Pulitzer Prize in
1950 (the first black writer to do so)
and also received two Gugenhein
fellowships. She was selected as
consultant ot poetry to the Library
of Congress and in 1968, she was
appointed Poet Laureate of Illinois.
Throughout the course ot her life
See Brooks page 8
L A. Story
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
release on February 8.
"L.A. Story" centers itself
around Harris K. Telemacher
(Martin). Harris is an unusual
television weatherman whotrudges
his way through a ball-and-chain
SteveMartinchalksupanother
admirablecredit to hishst with "L.A.
Story
A sneak preview was screened relationship to superficial sclf-pro-
mHendnxTheatreonTuesday. The claimed queen Trudi (played by
�in.vie is scheduled for nationwide Marilu Henner
One night, Harris' car stalls
along the highway in front ot a
digital readout sign that gives traf-
fic reports to travelers When I lar-
ris examines thecar, the sign begins
to feed him personal messages.
Change's are coming, it says, and
weather will have something to do
with it.
� Photo couilMy ot Tri-St�r Picture
Sieve Martins lackadaisical characterization is featured in Tri-Stars latest release "LA Story � The film is
about a down and out, middle-aged man who finds himself tasting the fruits of Los Angeles
Surely enough, I lams is tired
from his forecasting job when a
taped forecast of his prows to be
highly inaccurate
Tmdi breaks ofl her relation-
ship with Harris, much to his de
light, and he then fives his gae on
Sara McDowel (played by Victoria
Termant), whom he met at a recent
luncheon.
"L.A. Story" has much going
for it. It has a gcxxl cast. Sarah
Jessica Parker gave an especially
memorable performance as Sandee,
a free-spirited young fling of I lar
ris and Manlu Henner played
Trudi perfectly, full of just the right
amounts of superficiality and petti-
ness to make the character believ-
able and enjoyable to watch.
Richard E. Grant plays Roland
Mackey, Sara's ex husband, who
wants to give their relationship an
other try, while at the same time, he
is carrying on another relationship
with Trudi.
Mike Jackson, an award-win-
ning English filmmaker, directs
"L.A. Story with a comfortable
roaming camera. Whether it is to
the credit of Jackson or writer Steve
Martin, the movie is able to sort
through the zaniness to deliver
characters with more depth than is
usual in many comedy pictures.
The film is funny, and for the
first half hour, or so, the laughs are
loud and frequent. Liter, however,
the film seems to lag a bit, but man-
ages later lo get back on track for the
most part
The worst aspect of" L. A. Story"
was its predictability. Even before
the movie started, it was generally
known (or should have been) that
I larns(Martin)and Sara (Tennant)
would be united at the end. To go
through with watching the movie
was to merely see how it was done.
The story is simple. It is a love
story, but a well-above-average
script with good actors giving a
spontarietHisfeeltogood lines made
it all very worthwhile.
"L.A.Story" was filmed entirely
on location in Los Angeles. Loca-
tionsincluded such exotic locales as
the Ambassador Hotel on Whilshire
Boulevard, Nichols Beach i n Malibu,
a $5 million mansion in Long Beach
and the Boardwalk in Venice. Con-
temporary landmarks included the
Los Angeles County Art Museum,
the Hard Rock Cafe, theTail-othe-
Pup hot dog stand and the Esprit
clothing store at Santa Monica and
La Cienega boulevards.
Difficulties arose with shoot-
ing a scene at a cemetery. When the
cemetery director found out the
scene to be filmed would show a
skull being dug out of the ground,
another cemetery had to be found.
Key scenes in the film take place
on a Los Angeles freeway, and find-
ing one there that could be closed
off for filming the scenes was a bit
difficult. Eventually, film makers
were able to get an okay to close off
one section for several evenings.
The highway sign in the film was
speciallyconstructecLand the scenes
were shot as planned.
Additional locations included
Los Angeles public TV station
KCET, KYOY, and the historic Hol-
lywood landmark Grade Court,
which wasa residence for stars from
silent films.
Meticulous care seems to have
taken place for the casting of this
picture, even in supporting roles.
For instance, Patrick Stewart left
"Star Trek's" 24th Century U.S.S.
Enterprise to play Maitre U at
L'Idiot with utmost effectiveness.
Additional mentionable perfor-
nvmces came from Susan Forristal
("Internal Affairs" and 'The Two
Jakes"), Kevin Pollak (frequent
guest on "The Tonight Show" and
"Late Night with David
Letterman") and Sam McMurray
("National Lampoon's Christmas
Vacation" and "Raising Arizona)
Steve Martin began his career
in the early '60s as a writer for tele-
vision, winning an Emmy Award
for his work on The Smothers
Brothers Comedy Hour Later, he
See Martin, page 8





mi�- a:
PERSONALS
i

(Ks
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Ffc� 800 351 0222
THLEEN YOUN
VI II
fj?
rA I I II KIRS
.
! I HOI sOMMI III I

- �

I
ibution
MMA1 KK.1IIS
the El ca rreatmi i
i A) will have a met
lues.Fi tt5 lOp.rri in �(
diae preparations for our up
ng video festival and to disi i�
nali hanges
� R 12, 1)91
elite ?�afit (JkiriiHuiau
7
ImpiDvosation
group Transactors'
visits Mendenhall
H I isa Male fernigan
st.it! fulor
I .� hi vs ack ,
. or ki ok ! hey don t do
� utms witri s.ittn
Idnitelv not what
rhc success of the group can be
attributed to their incredible indi
idual talmt and comfort with the
stage a lot ol "rehearsal" and
rransactional chemistry rhegroup
nd thy are not mimes was formed in 1981 at the ArtsCenter
tn arrboro where theii perfor
manees an? standing room only
igh the group's composition
ha- changed several times in the
last decade the current members
beet ' ther foi two years
and mi n I I ive no secrets from
ea h other
members Mlison
! It artineei and Enelish lorn I mi
' . nine fransat
�� o ppeanngtoi
t
1 rudent i. enter
nod Hv atn
)t the few groups
. pun
ip Hill
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1
.
II pi
i idem st ot the � rn
�k an aut lieno to
, �� i I show hasi
p lu tabk V hat
ges di dinvtion Each seems to have a
la.ii sharp sense ol where to take
an oft the wall idea and how to
ni.i kt the most of a bizarre s enario
� �
n '
msa ti rs havi rxvi
rrsinterprel lee I I rep itedly b) rriangle area
. vise improvises residentsas BestLocaK omedian
' resultsan often in the annual Spectator Magazine
� urebutalways poll rhey have been heard on Na
il Public Radio and currently
� I perfor entertain over 40,000 listeners threi
jed from such Not times a week on WPI 1 AM in Ka
� � - .
v isasl'h f'and FheTi msactors' unkji ��
lests" I � �medy is something tl I
� � � � bccxpei need to be believed
. �� 'o inattei w hat typ I I m
sure situal nl i ludieno would like to
. brilliantb see it need only be requested and
the croup will serve it up fresh
Gwendolyn
Brooks
celebrates
Valentine's
By Malt Jones
Stjff Wnler
.
FHe Photo
� troup
it 8 p m
IiiLimbo returns from road to rock New Deli Wednesday night
ill tan Pack
; , l:asi Carolinian
� I 3.
o" v
� i � ' v!i In back
nevs material to record an thei
bum Plans to record again will be
made on i the band decid
which studio and produce! I is�
re considering several pro
ducers right now said Mason
including John Plymak'and Mitt h
ter Pl maleisamembi i ol the
lici and ! aster is a I.
theast n prcxlucei ind member ol ! el
i i ording to M i n In
� � 1 imbo'sset Wednesday ���
nticala from What? su h as Ihi
� r tl � theasl Suitor. '1 i and i mm� Back i
pot is newer si mgs liki v il
- I,in- and alien It s
i gi it tt hear the rowd yi ii l i
� � �� rm �reand mon d
1 I , i W I .1V is
Haying covers like Love
, nntrai ts Rolli n istei I hio Pla ei ind
i , � . Replaeemt i
� . nil nil ' Hi when pet �
ivthanei �' late the ongmals said Pavis
:
. �.
. 11. � r i1
, i,
(In In � -
.
il
� � �
makn . tor a
t what
re don �� :
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he I tareal
. � � ii
11
: �
Asvlum cnl
bottli ttevl
KM

th.il is In I in
- -
i iml ,i
It is a rare occurrence for a
bona-fidecelebrity to visit the K U
campus, but this is what will hap
p-nen this ommg Valentine si )av
(n that night the highly a laimed
pH't .wcndclvn Hnxik-s w ill i on-
duct a pxtrv reading
Hnx'k's visit is in part due to
the celebration ol Black History
Month she will be at lenkins Art
Auditorium at 8 pan
i )ne ot ontemporary
literature's most renow nod authors,
Brooks lias become .i widely an
thologized author 11" 74 year-
oldhas been writting p�etry since
she was seven
Although born in ! � peka,
Kans.is Broi �ksc(�ns lei herself a
lifelong hicagcvin tl i n slic
describes in most ol her works
Many of the topics dealt with in hcT
writings concern race rdations, a
problem she witnessed while
growing up in the citv
Many Ol her earl St works
dealt with the white biased v aluing
ot lightness among blacks, but over
rime she expanded her I ow
plore racial confrontations ii gen
eral
Brooks has alwav sheen proud
ol her ancestry I tor h me en i-
ronment gave her th � onfidence to
first publish her works After visits
to Africa in 1971 and 1974, her feel-
ingol Atn an rieritagedeepened I
have always felt thattobeblack was
good she said m her autobiogra-
i tans lAnrs phy
� md the show will Eariyin her life she met James
p Weldon lohnson and 1 angston
Hughes at her church m Chicago
Hughes, another great pvt ol the
time inspired her and later served
as her mentor
Herfineh tuned writing style
has been influenced by auhSorssuch
as 1 s Eltot Emily Dickinson Rob-
ert frost and 1 angston 1 highes It
there ever wasa born poet Wntter
Alice Walker once said m an inter-
view. 1 think it was Brooks
Brooks has received the high-
est praises awarded to her profes-
sion She won the Pulitzer I'tve in
19501 the first black writer to do so)
and also received two Gugenhein
fellowships She. was selected as
consultant ol poetry to the Library
ot v ongress ni in 1968, she was
-r Photo appointed Poet I aurcateol Illinois
. . . . � �� night in rhroughou! the ctnirse ol her life
aneth, . �. nighl Se. Brooks page 8
It
� � � tinven
ii by
Coffeel
Martin
B) Michael Harrison
suit Writt'r
release on February 'ln' ' Harri
"1A Story" centers itsell all i . hwa in li
around Harris R IcKtilh her dig
Martin chalks up another (Martin) Harris is an unusual ficrepi
redittohislistwith'X.A television weatherman who trudges risexamini
his wav through a ball and chain to feed hin p'l m
o-eened rdarionship to superficial self-pro Changes an comii
ltrtonTuesday. The claimed queen Trudi (played b) weather will hav thmj
Cheduled tor nationwide Manlu Henner. with it
St11s
!
Stl it
I It ir
fgin:
and
� to do
� Photo court�sy ot Tn Star Pictures
aeve Martin s lackadaisical characterization -s featured m Tri Stars latest release L A Story The film is
about a down and out. middle aged man who finds himself tasting the fruits of l.os Angeies
Sureh enoii I
M m his forei .ran. I
tapeil fort
I
Inn ii breaks �tion
I j w it! i i lai � " ck
� ii and he tl ieon
Sara M� � ia
1 ennanl v hon ivenl
luiv heon
"1 .A Stor has i
for it It has ,i good � ast Sarah
fessica Parker gai e an es e ialh
memorableperfoi mano asSandee
a tree spirited oung flii gol I lar
ns and Mania 1 lemur played
I nidi perfectl). full ol ust the right
amounts of superfk ialit) am I p tn
ness ti make the di.ua. tei belies
able .md enjoyable to watch
Richard I (.rant pla s Roland
Mackey, Sara's ex-husband who
wants to give then relationship an
other trj. while at the same hme he
is earn ing anvthei relationship
with I rudi
Mike la kson, i award w in
nine, English filmmakei direi ts
"1 A Story with a comfortable
roaming i amera w hethei it is to
thereditot l.nksonoi ritei Steve
Martin, the movie is able to sort
through the zaniness to delivei
characters with moredepth than is
usual m many comedy pk lures
The film is funny and tor the
first half hour orso IheUnhsarc
kudand frequent 1 ater.however.
the film seems to lag a bil butman-
ages later to get back on track for the
most part
rhe worst aspect of 1 A Story"
� as its pred � lability Even betore
�;).� k? started it was generally
knov n loi should have been) that
i larris (Martin) and Sara I lennant)
� � ould be united at the end. logo
through with watching the movie
� asto merely see how it was done.
The stprv is simple It is a love
st.uv but a well above-average
script with good actors giving a
spntaneousfeeltogood lines made
it all verv worthwhile.
I A Merv ' wastilmedentimlv
on location in I os Angeles. Loca-
tions included such exotic Icvales as
the Ambassador Hotel on Whilshw
K'ulevardAicholslVvuhinMalibu,
a $5 million mansion ml ong Fk'ach
and ttie Boardwalk in Venice Con-
temporary landmarks included the
li s Angelesounry Art Museum,
the Hard Rock ate the I'ail-o -the-
Pup hot dog Stand and the E'spnt
clothing store at Santa Monica and
I aienega boutevaads
PithcnltH-s arose with shixt-
inga sceneatacemetery When the
cemetery director found out the
scene to be filmed would show a
skull King dug out oi the ground,
another (enx-terv Eiad to be found.
Kev -venes m the film take place
on a Los Angeles freeway ,and find-
ing one there that could be closed
ott tor filming the scenes wasa bit
difficult Eventually, film maker-
were able to get an ekav to cfc se i tt
one section or several evenings
rhe highway sign in the film was
specially constructed andthescenes
were shot as planned
Additional locations included
Los Angeles public IV station
KCET, kS 0 . and the historic lol-
lywood landmark Grade Vourt,
which wasa residence for stars from
silent films
Meticulous can1 seems to have
taken place tor the casting ot this
picture, even in supporting roles.
E:or instance, Patrick Stewart left
"Star Trek's" 24th Century U S.S.
Enterprise to play Maitre D at
lldiot with utmost effectiveness.
Additional mentionable perfor-
mances came from Susan lornstal
('Internal Affairs and "The Two
lakes"), Kevin Pollak (frequent
guest on The Tonight Show" and
"Late N'ght with David
I etterman " and Sam McMurrav
("NatKmal Umpcxni's Christmas
Vacation" aivl "Raising Arizona ")
Steve Martin K-gan his career
in the early ' as a writer tor tele-
vision, winning an Emmy Award
for his work on "The Smothers
BmthersComedy Hour Liter, he
See Martin, page 8





I
jJEjlt Coat (Carolinian Febhuafi 12L�991
This Week in Film
Photo courtesy ot Warn�r 0ro9. Ine
Griflin Dunne portrays a computer programmer in Martin
Scorsese's hillanous comedy "After Hours
Greenaway explores depravity
while Scorsese tackles the mafia
The Student Union Films Committee celebrates Valentine's
week with .i deliriously depraved love story by PeterGreenaway
�Md two great films by master writer-director Martin Scorsese.
The much ballyhooed and condemned The Cook, The Thief, His
Wife and f ler 1 over" comes to I lendrix Theatre tomorrow night.
The critically and commercially successful mafia opus
"GoodFellas" screens on the weekend, and the hilarious "After
Hours playsSunday night.
A film that begins with to roe fed teces and ends with can-
nibalism may not be to everyone's taste. A tale of passion set in
a gourmet restaurant. The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her
Lover" is no B.ibette's Feast
The title tells the whole storv Frenchman Richard Bohnnger
("Diva ') takes on his urst English-speaking role as the philo-
sophical cook whi's,1 lavish restaurant is owned arid dominated
bv a boorish racketeer and his gang of thugs. The brutish, sadistic
thief (Michael (lambon) is too busy flaunting his extorted wealth
and exhibiting appalling insensitivity towards sex, race, religion
and human nature to notice that his wife (Helen Mirren) is
conducting an attair right under his nose.
Her lover (Alan Howard, the antithesis ot the thief, is a
regular restaurant patron. The two have sex in the ladies' room
and in the pantries amid the cook's meats, poultry, creams, salads
and desserts
When the thief learns about the affair he threatens to kill his
wifes lover and eat him her he makes good on the first part of
th- threat she lories him to make good on the- second part.
The him is a visual (east Designers ben Van Os and Ian
R i Its stun the viewer with gargantuan sots that are color coor-
dinated with the moods of the film as well .is with the spectacular
pageant ot costumes tailored by avant-garde couturier lean-Paul
Caultier
Tcter Greenaway's rhythmic direction glides the viewer
back and forfh between the opulant dining room, the chaotic
kitchen, the ladies room and elsewhere The scenes enacted
depict associations between eating and sex, money and excre-
ment, as well as class .iml manners
In this reviewer's opinion, "The Cook" is a stunninglv
beautiful him However, it is not for everyone. Alter much
controversy over its initial X-rating received last summer, the
film was released as unrated by the Motion Picture Association
of America. As it explores human corporeality: eating, drinking,
defecating, urinating, copula ting, belching, vomiting, nakedness
and Weeding, many may find it somewhat offensive.
Martin Scorsese's latest film "CoodFellas" tells the story oi
Henrv Hill, the half-Sicilian, half-Irish Brooklyn kid who is
enamoured by his neighborhood's "wiseguys I le wants noth-
ing more than to emulate what he perceives to be their heroic
stature I le is taken in b these gangsters and grows up to be a
faithful member of their family. Henry becomes an insider of the
most privileged kind, until he ultimately moves in a different
direction and makes a dangerous break from these "good fellas
Characteristic or Scorsese's view of the world, the wiseguys
who Henry fraternizes with would just as quickly shoot a man as
thev would break bread with him. The film's unpredictability
makes it mesmerizing.
Unlike "Mean Streets Raging Bull" and "Taxi Driver
there is not an underlying ntt of tragedy pulling the characters
downward. Instead, "(.oodbellas" depicts a deadly world whose
seriousness is acutelv comedic This paradox gives the film an
interesting edge and makes it highly entertaining.
The second Scorsese feature, "After Hours details a few
long hours in the life of a ew York City computer programmer
(Griffin Dunne) who meets Rosanna Arquette and winds up
spending the night in SoHo hell. Thisunique, witty and absolutely
hilanoi is movie tea hires (b-och and Chong and TeriCarr amongst
a cast of trulv unforgettable characters.
"The Cook. The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover" will be
shown VVednesdav, Feb. 13 at 8 p.m. "CoodFellas" will play two
nights, Fridavand Saturday, Feb. 15 and 16 at 8 p.m. And "After
Hours" screens Sunday night, Feb. 17, also at 8 p.m. All will be
shown in Flendrix Theatre located in the Mendenhall Student
Center. Admission is free with a valid student I.D.
�Compiled by Lisa Marie Jemigan
Bits and Pieces
Doll-world segregation days end
The days of segregation in the doll world are over. Mattel
Toys unveils three fashion dolls with authentic black facial
feahires, skin tone and clothing� a change from white dolls
painted brown�Monday at a toy fair. Among the offerings: Baby
Face dolls from Lewis Galoob Inc Little Oopsie from Tyco and
The Playground Kids from The Ertl Co.
Comedy mushed by sugary prose
Sugary prose and lace frills reign supreme among Valentines
for the first time in years. "Love and commitment is the way to
go says an industry associate. In the Potshot line, 3-D mushy
missives with Victorian-style cupids and flowers outsell funny
one. Hallmark offers elaborate reproductions from its historical
collection and a new line with schmaltzy prose.
OCtnrif right 1991, USA TOVAYIAyyVt CoHlgt In formation Nttwork
Brooks
Continued from page 7
she has been awarded over 50 hon-
orary degrees.
Presently, Brooks travelsa great
deal, enjoys visitingschools, libraries
and prisons as part of her tours. On
Thursday she will visit J.H. Rose
High School before her poetry
reading.
Her trip is being sponsored by
several campus organizations. The
Minority Arts Committee, the En-
glish Graduate Society, the Minor-
ity Affairsprogram,and theEnglish
Department Colloquium Commit-
tee.
Everyone aware of Brooks'
reading is certainly thrilled to have
someone of her magnitude visit
ECU. Professor Tom Shields, acting
chair of theColloquium Committee
said that Brooks is "certainly the
biggest name we've had in the last
couple of years
The Brooks reading is sure to
be enlightening as well as enter-
taining. Whether you are poetry
lover or not, you are urged to attend
It will certainly be a Valentine
gift for one and all.
Martin
Continued from page 7
moved to performing in clubs and
in television.
Martin gave frequent perfor-
mances on "The Tonight
Show later hosted several shows
of "Saturday Night Live and con-
tinued to perform on national con-
cert tours.
Box office motion pictures
eventually formed a large part of
Martin's career. The Jerk" was
Martin's first feature-length film,
which was later followed bv "Pen-
nies from Heaven "Dead Men
Don't Wear Plaid" and The Man
with Two Brains
Martin's performance opposite
Lily Tomlin in "All of Me" earned
him rave reviews, as did his sup-
porting part as the dentist in "Little
Shop of Horrors
"Roxunnc released in 1987,
revealed a wider acting range for
Martin and won him a best screen-
play award from the Writers Guild
of America and another from the
Los Angeles Film Critics Award for
best actor.
Martin's most recent films in-
clude "Planes, Trains and Automo-
biles "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels"
and "Parenthood
Victoria Tennant studied at a
ballet theater school before making
her film debut in 1972 in "The
Ragman's Daughter Other cred-
its include "All of Me "Stranger's
Kiss The Holcroft Covenant
"Bestseller" and "The Handmaid's
Tale '
Tennant isprobably best known
for her important role in "Winds of
War" and "War and Remem-
brance She is currently working
ona British minisenes "Act of Will
"L.A. Story" is director Mike
Jackson's second American film.
Jackson's career began as a film edi-
tor for the British Broadcasting Cor-
poration and he quickly started to
direct and produce documentaries.
His 1984 drama "Threads" dealt
with a small English community
coping with the effects of a nuclear
war.
Jackson's most recent project is
an upcoming film called "Mr. Jones
a love story, which will star Richard
Gere.
The East
Carolinian is
now accepting
applications
for Staff
Writer. Anyone
interested
should apply in
person at The
East Carolinian
office, on the
second floor
of the
Publications
Building
1. Change Oil with Pcnnzoil
2. Install new oil filter
3. Lubricate Chassis as required
4. Check & Fill Transmission Fluid
5. Check & Fill Differential fluid
America's
Favorite
Oil
Change
And
6. Check & Fill Brake Fluid 11 Check WCr Blades
7. Check & Fill Power Steering Fluid 12. Inflate T.� to Proper Pressure
8. Check & Fill Window Washer Fluid 13. Vacuum tfcnor
9. Check & Fill Battery as Requires 14. Wash ExUor Windows
10. Check Air Filter �LptoSqu.m
A
Whole
Lot
More.
CLIFFS
'Seafood House and Oy"
"A Washington H.ghw.y N C 33 Eat.) Till! Hi N
II Phone 752 3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
OUR SERVICE HAS A LOT
OF GOOD POINTS
Pcto cptaeT4inTsnvicTcovev thin SmptySrSmi lubing your chassis, to v Miming your interior
I
I
Shrimp
Plate
$3.95
it
$2.00 OFF
We Have Your Ready In Minutes - -No Appointment
126 Greenville Blvd. Phone 756-2579 Mon-Fri 8 am-6pm Sat til 5 pi
EasLCaiplina
whouse
19!
C?J
presents
Beth (CRIMES OF THE HEART) t
THE WAKE OF
TT
0
The Student Union
is now accepting applications for position oi the
1991-92 Program Board
3 Films
3 Forum
3 Coffehouse
3 Major Concerts
Any full-time student may apply to chair on
of the following committees:
3 Minority Arts 3 SpecialConcerts
3 Productions 3 SpecialEvents
3 Public Relations 3Travel
& Publicity 3 Visual Arts
Each Chairperson leads a committee of 8-12 students to selectjlan. pro-
mote and present a variety of programs for the ECU communityXThairper-
sons are actively involved in all aspects of the programming proems and are
invited to participate in progressive leadership and student development
programs, retreats and regional and national conferences.
For additional information and application contact:
ECU Student Union
I T2i. MI 11 I C�J�i� r�t�r
February 15, 16. 18 a nd 19. 1
8:15 p.m.
McGinnis Theatre
ECU Students: $3.00
General Public. $7 50
CALL 757-682
I
236 Mendenhall Student Center
757-4715
Application deadline: 5:00 pm. Friday. February 2
T "
�KWMfrH-OI �.t HIM
ysS
XX-XvXyX-X'X-X-X-XCvXvXvX-XvX-Xv
ATTIC
W r
752-7303
N.CS
LEGENDARY
ROCK N ROLL
NIGHTCLUB
209 East
Fifth St.
NOW !N OUR
19th YEAR IN
DOWNTOWN te
GREENVILLE

ST 11
Nfy "
�: �.��.��

p
i
I
3SS
m
x:
m

i
I
m
THURS.
14th
W
EVf IKE MESME
Doors pen .it 9 p m � VL : k(
OrOnh !
rhere ts Si "dine R � I a
�earlf f
chants � e
Special (,ir-M: Rural Swine '
! .
Fkl
15th
32 oi Draft $2
I
Coll
()nl S3 Members � 4iuesfe
Free 1 War Membership Rhvthm i
Id (
I
ILLUMINA ART COMPETITION '91
Entry Dates: February 13-15 � 2-5 p.m.
Mendenhall � Room 221
Pick Up Application (prior to submitting work) at Information Desk
$5.00 fee per entry � 3 entry limit per person
1st Place � $150.00
2nd Place � $100.00
3rd Place �75.00
5 Honorable Mentions � $25.00 each
OPEN TO ALL ECU STUDENTS
Opening Reception � Wednesday, February 20
Mendenhall Gallery � 6-8 P.M.
Ail work not selected must be picked up by 11 p.m. Sunday, February 17
or it will become property of the Student Union. Work must be ready to hang.


&
c
leffe
enson,
A.
20 V fitttiSr�M t,rw,
c�

?

Gk
'Of
'Balloons
Cakes
;our TOI
SPONSORED BY
THE ECU STUDENT UNION VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE
LOCATIONS
1720 W. 5th St. 505 Ra
752-6195 756-61'
(behind





f
i
� tffct Blades
t ki Propel Pressure
lie n� r
h I hi Ifoi Windows

Whole
1 o!
More
�?
�mm
i s LOT
?OINTS
OFF i"1 1 1 1

it I Dion
lor position ��i the
m Board
i ' is
1
1 11
' 'III
J
PETITION '91
3-15 � 2-5 p.m.
n 221
- ' 'n'ormation Desk
try limit per person
115000
h oo.oo
7500
- $25.00 each
IU STUDENTS
nesday, February 20
- 6-8 P.M.
kindty February 17
� rparly In hang
BY
IAL ARTS COMMITTEE
S�:
uilie Cast Carolinian Fibhuahy 12. 1991 9
w
CLIFF'S
Shrimp
Plate
l�SSSSi
Seafood House aid Oyster B
J k W��bt�9ton M.ghw.y (N C 33 ExtGreenv.de North Carotin
J I Pone 752 3172
Won thru Thurs. Night
ATiTIC
752-7303
i NDARY
� � N ROI
i
WED. IMhqS&st
ZONE
209 East
Fifth St.
NOW IN OUR
l'Hh YtARIN
IXWNTOWN fc
GREENVILLE
STILL & MAX
THUBS.
14th
w
z

MIKI Ml SMKR "KYIS"
it 9pn � i ancc I ickcts At (!ifi Shop
�7 Or Only $12 For 'ouplcs
I here w .i Si mdinc Room 'nl I asl Maj al o'Xr
i ki
i .it
earth
mur.
c,ants
.nil ,ili sf Klllill SwilH'
S;it .16th
2 o Draft $2
(uh Members � S4 (iiu.ts
l it M eat Membership
9
jllli
(Old Sweat
I ; .iiurmi' I and) Spain
Ml lIlln.V lillK's( itntlP lll.lt VIK-(i
St ilntiM lll.il I JI
Cn l�l llli' Himl
1 �s��
LOCATIONS
1720 W. 5th St. 505 Red Banks Rd.
752-6195 756-6195
(behind Adams Car Wash)
itzu �
JL
OOJ�11
1 dozen Roses $65.00
12 Dozen Roses $37.50
1 Rose $11.50
Free Delivery to campus area
10 off cash & carry

Sing-a-gram $15.00 by itsell
$10 with flower purchase
108 W. Main St.
Winterville, NC
f
355-7603
Nights 355-2269
Don't Forget
Your
weetheart on
alentine's Day!
February 14
Central Hook & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open till 9:30 pm
7 days a week
756-7177
Preview

91
Summer Student
Leadership j
Opportunity ;
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications available in 316 Wright
February 4-29, 1991
Deadline for completed applications is March 8,1991
(4:00 pm)
V
jj
PACKAGES
FREEP0RT
FROM

3 Nights At Bahamas
Princess With Air From
Raleigh. 4 and 7 Night
Stays Available
LONDON
FROM
Ik
6 Nights Hotel. With Air
From Raleigh, Cont.
Breakfast Daily,
Roondtrip Travels
BAHAMAS
CRUISES
FROM
IF
3 Nights With Carnival
Cruise Lines From Miami.
4 Nights From 335.00
From Miami.
KEY WEST
FROM
H
3 Nights With Afr, Hotel
& Car Rental
CALL ITG FOR
THESE AND
OTHER
PACKAGES
READ THE
FINE PRINT
Travel on these
packages is extremely
limited. Hotel
upgrades available.
Space is subject to
availability and is
subject to prior sale.
Rates are per person
and based on two or
four persons sharing
accommodations.
Weekend and Holiday
rates slightly higher.
Call us for brochure
or full details.
The Plaza � Greenville
355-5075
800-562-8178
Open MonFri. 9-5
Closed SatSun.
Offices also iii W.ilt i)h
Chapel Kill. HI I'
Wilmington





f
mui 11 Check Wtr Blades
tl xfiag Fluid 12 Inflate liL to Proper Pressure
L Washd Fluid 1 ; Vauium Ilcnor
as Requires 1J W.ish Ftoi Windows
�l p u S qu�rt
A
Whole
Lot
More.
HAS A LOT
POINTS
has s. lo' . vow micrio
n
OFF
N appointment
ji m 6pm Sal til 5 p

hi Union
on for position oi the
am Board
app �l
"i SpeciaConcerts
"i SpeciaHvents
i rravel
"I Visual Ats
to select, lan, pro-
( l community.Chairper-
n rning proems au are
cleni deveapmeni
nferences.
n contacl
I ebruarv 22
:��k$x$x:xX:�:$x
J
sSSs
m
:���:
1
�:�:

�'��
PETITION '91
3-15 - 2-5 p.m.
loom 221
Ing work) at Information Desk
try limit per person
150.00
1100.00
75.00
� $25.00 each
U STUDENTS
nesday, February 20
� 6-8 P.M.
11 pm Sunday. February 17
n Work must be ready to hang
I
Sss
m
BY
IAL ARTS COMMITTEE
JJ!LJgBt Carolinian February 12, 1991 9
LasUCaooltna
louse
1990-1991
Reason
C

presents
Beth (CRIMES OF THE HEART Henley's
THE WAKE OF
February 15, 1� 18 and 19. 1991
8:15 p.m.
McGinnis Theatre
ECU Students: $3 00
General Public: $7.50
CALL 757-6829
0(AJ�,rl�
1 dozen Roses $65.00
12 Dozen Roses $37.50
1 Rose $11.50
Free Delivery to campus area
10 off cash & carry
Sing-a-gram $15.00 by itself
$10 with flower purchase
Su
ATTIC
752-7303
NCS
11GF.NDARY
KOCK N ROLl
nightclub
WED. 13th Co&y
2J0NE
209 East
Fifth St.
NOW IN OUR
19th YEAR IN
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
STILL & MAX
THURS-
14th
MIKE MESMER "EYES"
I )oors open .it 9 p m. � Advance Tickets At Gift Shop
17 OrOnh $12 For Couples
I taste Was Standing Room Onlv last Ma c�Ut
Tui earlfi" "
mur. �
chanU �'
Special GuesfTRural Swmm
()nl $3 MemlKTs � $41 .nests
I Mil
M (� Draft $2
Cold Sweat
Featuring I and) Spain
Free I Near Membership Mryema BluesGrMpatOpened
tor Chairmen of the Board
I
LOCATIONS
1720 W. 5th St. 505 Red Banks Rd.
752-6195 756-6195
(behind Adams Car Wash)
ZU i jLOWLXi.
108 W. Main St.
Winterville, NC
355-7603
Nights 355-2269
� " t's '����'�-�
Dont Forget
Your
weetheart on
alentine's Day!
February 14
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open till 9:30 pm
7 days a week
756-7177

Preview
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications available in 316 Wright
February 4-29, 1991
Deadline for completed applications is March 8,1991
! (4:00 pm)

J)
i i
111
PACKAGES
FREEP0RT
FROM

3 Nights At Bahamas
Princess With Air From
Raleigh. 4 and 7 Night
Stays Available
LONDON
FROM
It
6 Nights Hotel, With Air
From Raleigh, Cont.
Breakfast Daily,
Roundtrip Travels
BAHAMAS
CRUISES
FROM
IF
3 Niqhts With Carnival
Cruise lines from Miami.
4 Nights From 335.00
From Miami.
KEY WEST
FROM
H
3 Nights With Air. Hotel
& Car Rental
CALL ITG FOR
THESE AND
OTHER
PACKAGES
READ THE
FINE PRINT
Travel on these
Packages Is extremely
imited. Hotel
upgrades available.
Space is subject to
availability and Is
subject to prior sale.
Rates are per person
and based on two or
four persons sharing
accommodations.
Weekend and Holiday
rates slightly higher.
Call us for brochure
or full details.
The Plci.i Greenville
355-5075
800-562-8178
Oihmi Mon.Tri. 9-5
C lost'd Sat. Sun





10 uUje �aat (Taroifnian Ft
HRLIAH) 12.1991
Travel Films
offers glimpse
of Austria
From Staff Reports
lave you ever wanted to visit
usrria? Well, now you can!
On Feb 14 To Austria With
! ove will be presented as part ot
this month s travel adventure film
soru's sponsored by the Student
I nion lYavel Committee A theme
dinner will precede the film at t JO
pin in MendenhaO'sGreat room
rhe film will follow at S pm in
f lendnx rheatre
i n Silent wings you will he able
to see the Austrian Alps, gliding
oi-t th -j tabular Grossgkxkner
alpme highway to the pictureNvk
village ot Heiligenblut. From there
you will traei to the flower-cov
Tti v halets ot the Valley of Virgen
and so " idibonal Turolean festi-
St hutzenfest with music
and v ostume
u will go on to visit the iron
in amuntum, the crag-
hosterwitz castle and
royal family, the
irgs oii llseeanorgancon
�� � baroque Melk Abbe
I �� nee a-year street tail
: Melk
vu 11 travel to Ferlach, where
� �� built to defeat Napoleon
irks and famih work
1 tine hunting weapons
la� re it sontothegentle
Stvna mtn side and then de
� 2 oneof thesmalldties
ol the south "i ou II c ruisedown the
. �steii whereRichard
� artod was imprisoned
t en hanting ot the
� i s
net mei u w ill
id.bak I n ish hen
t sa . :� fried pota
' � indsquasl
'� an �. ed
� lii ner are
� � : irehased b
� � � � htm are$4 tor
Stu k � ts .vr cm
"�- ' ketwh nthe presentavalid
� � � Dal the I ket Office
When an Ordinary
Valentine Won't Do
see our Couples 78th St High Brow
and other card collev tions!
Student Store �
asto!ma I H!ersll Jm
0ynp'$
AUTOMOTIVE
fof4Qr. lb Domestic
PARTS A SfRVICE
Rid ,� . ; � .ernighl
510 N. Greene St.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
AII you can eat
shrimp and trout

((I�) 758-0327
105 Airport Road
M-Th llani-8pm F-Sa! Ilam-9pm Sun
am-4pm
Don't Forget
ri
I
�r.
(ALL NOW
� Lollipops By Vivian
Don't Forget
WE SELL ONLY THE BEST!
c -ill I ollipops H Vivian right now and place youi valentine order I ri
s carnations & lollipop Valentine arcane n
Don't wait or it ma) be loo late!
�j (hock our prices on the best!
Call Lollipops lu Vi ian
Hw) 33 I We Delivei
Phone 758-2137
Don't Forget Don't Forget
y
'71
V.
I
t
If you thought that finding a o A r Madntosh'
system vou could affi rd was just a dream,then the
new, affordable Maeint h L( is a dieam a me true.
The Macintosh LC is rich in a h r. I nlikc many'
computers that can display nlv 16 a A tfs at (nee, the
Macintosh LC expands y ur palette t 1256 a k as. It
also comes with a mien ph ne and new m wnd input
technology that lets y u perse rnalize y )iir w rk by
adding voice or ()ther S( unds.
like every Macintosh
computer, the LC is easy t)
set up and easy t) master.
And it runs th iusands ()f
available applications that
all work in the same,
consistent way�so once
Apple introduces the Macintosh LC
"( )u'e learned (ne pn )gram, )iiiv well ()n y air wav
to leaning them all.The Macintosh LC even lets y �u
share inh rmati )ii with si me( )ne wh i uses a different
type (f a mputer-thanks t( the versatile Apple
SuperDrive" which can read from and write to
Macintosh MS-DOS, OS 2,andAppleIl floppy disks.
Tike a k h k at the Macintosh LC and see w hat it
gies y iiiIhen pinch y mrself.
Its better than a dream it's a
Macintosh.
The power to tx1 your best
US DOS '� � �yMMM wmOmrrmr a Wfl�I Corooraftor OS- 2 a BMMp� fraoamani o ni�mcftonaf Bu�km UacfMn Corpor�jor
For Further information Contact The Student Stores Wright Building 757-6731
FlBHUAhr h ' � ��
Outdoor
center
offers
alternative
H K�rr t
Assistai
in
� � . . -
ti � ,iii tu li � �

featum
-
'� equipn
f th. : n
.
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matk i � �
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kpackn
. �
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rhe ti
parti, ipo I l
nrm.Mil

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Gav
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Duke, Laettn
R
19LSUcam
total
focused onS
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. � '
center incolli
'�
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ton

the lit!
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juniorcenh i Butt
thv nation doesn't V w it
rabbed
high 11 reboi '
Neal, who ent red
leading tin nal
ol lr a game
"IJuIn t do anything diffi
than trytodoe � tak.
a few jump shots and try todri
the basket, I aettner sakl
Despite his numbers, hecalled
it a team ict( -r
"We never approached thi
ganxasC hn-b.m versusShaquilk
O'X'ealor Duke versusShaquffie
��d Duke coach MikeKrzyzewski
"We have a lot ot respect tor thi
team If you oncentraieoiionepeT-
1
trouble I





W Il?c iznat (Tnrulnmin Ft bfh , v 12, igg-j
Travel Films
offers glimpse
of Austria
I rom Staff Reports
��� � you ever wanted to isit
ustnj ' Well, now you can!
'b 14 ro Austria With
a i be presented as part of
� " s travel adventure him
- ' � � � nsored bv the Student
( � mmittee A theme
; recede the film at 6 HI
' '� � lei I all - i ;reat room

�v at p m in
itre
i ntvvingsyouwillbe
ustnan Alps el I i
at (irossg
iv to iho pictureb � l
. � � blul From l
the flow r i �.
� � e alle ol i
:�' ' run lean festi
When an Ordinary
Valentine Won't Do
upios rsi
: �� � ird
IC'1 t�l
T
w
AUTOMOTIVE
lurugn & DomeiMc
PARTS h StHVlCi
510 N. Greene St.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
M
AII you can eat
shrimp and trout
S4.(5
i))) 758-032'
I lain Xpm I Sal II
Don't Forget
r-
tr.
CALL)W
Lollipops By Vivian
Don't I oi Lief

Wl- SELL ON! l III- Rl Si '
l Call I ollipop H , ri hi now and :
S irnation �
Don't u ait or it i
C hec k our pri �
Call Lollipop Bv
11 � . � � i w h
Phone 758-2137
Don't Fori�el Don't Forget
n

It V( u th( )ught that finding a c i 1 r Macintt sh!
system y )u c uld aff rd was just a dream,then the
new; affordable lacint ish L( is a dream o me true.
Tlie Maont( jsh L( is rich in c 1 r. I 'nlike many
computers that can display mly 16 c h rs at (ince, the
Macint( sh LC expands y �ur palette t 256 c 1 rs. It
als) a )mes with a mien ph me and new s mnd input
techni lqgy that lets y u pers nalie y ur w rk b
adding voice or other sounds.
Like even' Macinti ish
computer, the LC is eas to
set up and easy t master.
And it runs th rnsands if
available applicati ns that
all work in the same.
o insistent wav s (nce
Apple introduces the Macintosh LC.
y �u've learned (ne pn igram.vou're well i
t) learning them all. The Macint ish LC e
share inf nnati( m with si )me ne win i uses
type (�1 o imputer thanks u�the versatile A
super! )rieT which cm read fr im and w rite I
Macintosh Ms Ik )S, )S 2, and Apple (II
Takeakx)katthe Macintosh LC and see
gives you. Then pinch yourself.
It's better
Macintosh.
rhe power to be vourbest
For Further information Contact The Student Stores Wright Building 757-6731
Outdoor
center
offers
alternative
v J i
Duke, Laettn
.
-
gan �
o. , . .
said I Hit MikeKi
We h respect 1
team lf





10 che �aat Carolinian
Iravel Films
offers glimpse
of Austria
I rom M.ift Reports
. ,
� ' � � �
When an Ordinary
Valentine Won't Do
OAVIO's
AUTOMOTIVE
for��gn & Dom�ihc
PABTS StWVtCf
) 10 N : e �' I
i
830- J779
ll on can ,it
shl imp ,iihI 11 out
S4.95
�H i 75S �l27
Don't Fornet
i

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I .olli pops P,
I s II I Hi
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Don't I hi
m?

Don't Koruel
IMiom 75S-21 V
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JO)UI I
t
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I
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LJ il

. ' ' '
ad ling
like even M
computer, the'
set up and eav i i

dlable applicati i - i
all work in tlie same,
i insistent wa e
Ls
Apple introduces the Macintosh LC
rhepowertobevourbesi
For Further information Contact The Student Stores Wright Building 757-0731
Outdoor
renter
offers
alternativ
Duke, La






J hi' tmi U arultnian
I
ravel Mini
offers glimpse
ot Vustria
' Hi
AUTOMOTIVE
�so- 1 77�l
S.cA

Ml
I )o' lii!
()u
on
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Apple introduces the Macintosh LC
For Further information ('ontacl The Student Stores Wrmhl Building i





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and trout
1
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-
;4.95
r) S M
Sun llam-4pm
Don't Forget
1:111
s

'71
-J
Ion't Forge!
I
Yy it, you'll like it
� �
kobevourbest"
lding 757-6731
Ft bhuafiy 12,1991
oUt? i�.EiBt (EntaixnUm
11
Outdoor
center
offers
alternative
By Kerry Nester
Assistant Sports Fditor
p interested m what the
rs has to utter should come
ml l7atChristertburyGym-
his is an Outdoor Recreation
� provided by the ECU-Rec-
� � al Services and is available
tudents, faculty and staff.
I here are workshops that con-
ntrab on outdoor smorgasbord
�. ituring cooking techniques), ca-
;� kayaking all-terrain bicv-
wilderncss gourmet cooking,
i. m king and windsurfing.
Ml equipment needed for any
preceding activities, hnclud-
imping utensils is for rent at
I Hitdoor (enter tor very rea-
� prices
he equipment is available tor
� � il on a daily weekend or ev
!ed-use basis. Further infor-
n for weekend and extended
- rates tan be obtained at the
n addition to many trips being
��� red bv the Outdoor Center, a
break backpacking and
water canoeing trip is being
� I for students, faculty, staff
� v guests
� etrip is being planned bv the
nator ol the (hitdoor Recre-
ind Intramural Sports, Brian
his is a great first-time expe-
- � e in the outdoors Miller said.
g red 1 �r thenovu e, and we're
' I ive a great time
tnp is being scheduled tor
. 1 Wild and Scenic River
-� : � in (leorgia ami South
� first fi urdayswillbespent
kmg 2 miles along the
haUx ga trail. Partici-
pant pass by sheer diffs and
trwaterfallssuchasSpoon
I - 11 1 reek Falls
II 1 .rail will also expose the
int to the wildlife and en-
� nment ol the Chatooga River
� 1 ludes deep coves, rapids
sold turkeys and many
� � � f deei
� nal two days oi the trip
pent 1 im einc down sec-
ndIIIofthe( hatoogaRiver.
ill be provided by the
e RS Page 12
Lady Pirates fall
to JMU, 74-68
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
Hi:
t.
� i irtfT" ti�"tfttfi�a; i �&&��
Jun
to.
4CTT6 9CTfJ
overall and 31-5 record n the CAA
ior forward Connie Small dribbles past a James Madison defender in Saturday's game ECU lostthegame lead just to have E U continue to with four conference games re-
-?ir-oi :ij tli k , �.r. i.k oi n�.nif ,K, n.Mi- iiii mainine.
Oleste HoHman � ECU Photo Lab
lames Madison, led by Jeanine
Michealsen,ov�icameacareer-hrgh
sconng night by Tonya Hargrove
and an outstanding team effort by
the Lady Pirates. Saturday night .it
Minges Coliseum.
Michealsen had 2b points, in
duding 6-6 from three point land.
and had five straight points in the
overtime period to put JMU up tor
pood in their 74-68 victory over the
Pirates
Overshadowed by this perfor-
mance was a career high 32 points
by junk r t(irward 1 largrove and an
excellent team effort bv the Pirates
Coach Pat PfeTSOn said: It's
probably the hardest effort we've
had this sear They (the girls) re
sponded real well
The first halt started slowly,
both teams tried to tone the ball
inside earlj resulting in several
curnoversforeachsquad. Each team
onlv had one field goal in the first
430of the game.
ECU then went on a 12-6 run tc i
lead by six, 14-8. Sophomore point
guard GavnorO'Donnell had seven
pomtsdunng thisnm and Hargrove
added tour
After trading the lead once,
IMP started to warm-up as E I
went cold. IMC went on a 15-3 run
over the last 752 of the first half.
E U during this time had no field
goals and just five free throws, to
trail 33-24at the halt.
ECL' gave the Lady Dukes all
thev wanted in the second halt
IMC hit a trey to go up by jo
swpYod prmftc�ainhe lead
IMP then pulled out toa six point
With 10:06 left m the second
half, senior forward Kim Dupree
hit an eight foot jump shot to tie the
game up, 4343 Dupree then hit
two free throws to put the Pirates
up with 9:37 to play
Afteroxchangingbasketsanda
IMP' free throw which cut the Pirate
lead to one, junior guard Mechelle
hues stole a MU pass and was
touted, hitting both free throws to
increase the lead to 49-46.
Michealsen. who was a thorn
in PC I 'ssideallnight.hitathreeto
tie the game up with 5:35 left.
Hargrove scored three straight
p �nts to put ECU up, 52-49, only to
have Michealsen hit another three
p -inter to knot the score at "2-52
IMP edged out to a two point
lead with 1:00 left after two free
throws Dupree hit a l(U(xtertotio
the up at 61 -61 with 36 seconds left
IMP had two chances to win the
game but missed both to sent the
game into overtime
In the overtime period both
teams staved hot EC "I hit their first
three shots, and JMU hit all their
attempts in the extra period
Trading the lead back and forth,
1 �'( Y lev! 68-67with 3:04 remaining.
Michealsen hit another three pointer
to put IMP up for good 70-68.
ECU then had to resort to
fouling to cut the lead, but IMC hit
tour consecutive free throws while
ECUcoukhVtconvert from the flow.
When the horn s. tundedj M U came
away with the victory, 74-68.
Hargrove had 32. O'Donnell
had 1 3 and Dupree had 10 off the
bench, to lead the Pirates sconng.
Hargrove also had eight rebounds
Ml) m overtime 74-68 bul junior forward Tonya Hargrove had a career high 32 points
Gaynor O'Donnell
hi
p away at it
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
N'
m r o nor( YI ionnell
has
E I
mc vav t i
lav f
It was there thai she was re-
t. ruited bv EC and she has be-
come a two-year starter and is al-
re.uK tilth on tin Pirates career as-
sists list
!Pas is impressive considering
she only started playing the game
when she was 15 years old tor a
O' 1 ionnell, from Birkenhead,
England, is the I Pirates point
guard and floor leader, as well as basketball club thai practiced tw
the Colonial Athleti Association's hours a week. Now she has
assists 1� id r with 6 pei cine
She ame to the I Inited States
,is an exchange student at S �uthern
Wavne I ligh S( hool in Dudley
pra
Moll!
dailv
t � i V'unell, who says the
Stroi gesl point ol her game is in
transition and her weakest is
shooting,can play well Shecan hit
the jumper (sheaverages 7 7 points
per game), and she can distribute
the ball, as her assists indicate
About her assists totals, shesaid
she's "proudol it" and that she was
neverawareof her totals in England
because her team did not keep sta-
tistics
s for the team, v Y Donnell
said We remorecons tousaboul
having to win We re more into the
game as a team And going into
the second halt ol the season the
Pirates
chemistry is needed.
As.i physical education major
(KDonneflwantstocoachand teach,
whether here or back in England.
(Her the summer though. O'
Donnell plans to return to England
to play for the national teamoi En
gland as well as for the ireat Britain
team in the Student Olympics.
For the meantime. O'Donnell
is going to continue to lead E( I s
Pirates toward the conference tour-
nament, running the shou on the
floor.
Gavnor O'Donnell
Dllke, Laettner Upend LSU Wake Forest upsets No. 11 Virginia
JL umuir.ini , u,r. � m�. i�,i, nociiid w ro.ired hai k trom a 35-26 hail
DURHAM, (AP)- When No
I91.S1 amenorth to Tobacco Road
lo taki n . h Puke, all eves were
sed on Shaquille O'Neal
� � ; u;ers7-tiot-l sophomore
ation has been called the best
ter in college basketball.
� n Sii nda v, he was the second-
� � i nteron thecourtat Cameron
� i r Stadium.
ike'shnstian Paettner
- -� 24 points to O'Neal's 15-
I is season low total - as the
m : Vvilsf2M)rolledtoan88-70
���Ktorv over the'l'igers(15-7).lt was
� s sixth straight victory and
the 11 th in their last 12 games.
I know what I can do said
laettner, a 6-foot-ll, 240-pound
pmiorcenter "But thepressaround
the iwtion dfxsn'f know it
Uetrner alsc grabbed a game-
high 11 rebounds, one more than
'eal, who entered the game
leading the nation with an average
of 15a game.
"I didn't do anything different
than I try to do every game � take
a few jump shots and try to drive to
the basket laettner said.
Despite his numbers, he called
it a team victory.
"We never approached this
Rame as Christian versus Shaquille
O'Neal or Duke versus Shaquille
said Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski
"We have a lot of respect for this
�? Mm If vouconcentrateon one per-
son, vou can get in a lotol trouble
! nun the outset. 1 aettner
clearly outolayed the 18-year-old
O'Neal, who was limited to "iilv
nine shots by foul trouble and a
swarming Blue Devils defense that
denied him the ball in the paint.
"1 le wasn't getting any angles
to the basket said Krzyzewski.
"He had to reach for the ball
I aettner said his teammates
played such good defense against
the LSU guards that they had diffi-
culty finding the 295-pound CNeal
under the basket
"At times, thev couldn't even
see him hesaid. "1 nt tned to do
my foP 'inl nt lve nim tnc' 'ou
post
ONeal admitted after me game
that the boisterous homecrowd got
to him
At times, the Duke students �
known tor their antics jeered
O'Neal withchants like "Overrated,
Overrated and "One, two, three,
four, Shaq can t play this game no
more
'It was like a high school gym
� very loud a dejected ONeal
said after the game. 'The crowd
was a factor
O'Neal scored only four points
in the first half as he missed.more
than 10 minutes because of foul
trouble. His 15 points matched his
season-low against Auburn.
I .aettner scored 16ot hispoints
in the first half, as Duke scored the
last seven points to lead 48-39.
O'Neal scored mostly mean-
ingless baskets in the second half as
LSU fell behind bv as main as 23
points.
After the game, he was trying
10 put it all behind him. like his
coach. Dale Brown, he called Duke
the best team he's faced all year
1 le's only 18 years old said
Brown. "1 le's not Superman '
But Krzyzewski described him
as "the next really great basketball
player
Broun said the difference in
the ball game was on the other side
of court.
"We lost to the best team we
haveplayed thisyear hesaid. "We
have never seen that kind of de-
fense. Thev hustled from beginning
to the end.
"We got whipped he said.
Bill McCaffrey scored 19points
fi r the Blue Devilsand Thomas Hill
added 15. Duke shot 57 percent for
the game and held the Tigers to 40
percent, including 30percent in the
final 20 minutes.
Mike Hansen scored 15 points
and Vernel Singleton added 12
points for the Tigers, who scored 23
points below their season average.
"In my 19 years (of coaching), I
don't think I recall a team tha t played
as hard as this team Brown said
about the Duke defense.
W1NSTON-SALEM. (AP)
Now that Dave Odom's re-
building jobal Wake Forest has
cleared yet another hurdle, the
FVmon Deacons have an even
bigger one in front of them.
'It's time to see how we can
reallv do Odom said after the
Demon Deacons rallied from a
rune-point halftone deficit Sun-
day for a 74-66 victory over No.
11 Virginia.
I Vlom didn't plan on a long
celebration. The Demon Dea-
Clns play Wednesday in Chapel
Hill against North Carolina, a
team thatbeat them by 10 points
in Winston-Salem last month
"But I'd much rather be
going down there with a couple
wins under my belt said Odom,
Wake Forest's second-year
coach.
The victory over Virginia
was the fourth in a row for the
Demon Deacons and just their
second in the last 12 games
against theGivaliers.
It also came one day after
the Demon Deacons had rallied
to beat Georgia Tech, and it
moved them to 14-7 overall and
gave them their first 5-4 record
in the Atlantic Coast Conference
since 1984.
"I am overflowing with
pride for our team Odom said
"I am proud for our university
and for I uir tans who have stuck by
us. I am particularly pleased for the
students, because thev have been
waiting to be a part i this fora long
time
Two of Odom's kev players,
Rodney Rogers and Randolph
Childress, haven't been waiting long
at all. lust freshmen. the two teamed
up in the second half to help send
Virginia (17-7,3-5) to its third loss in
as many games on its four-day
swing through North Carolina.
The Cavaliers, who went into
Thu rsday' s game a t Du ke seeking a
share of the lead in the ACC, were in
fifth place by the time they left the
Tar Heel state Sunday night.
"When it was time to step up
and make a stand, we couldn't do
it Virginia coach Jeff Jones said.
Rogers and Childress, he
added, "came in and took over the
game. That might seem surprising,
but they have been doing it all year.
We've told our guys all along that
they are very aggressive, very con-
fident and that they are the ones
who can do it
The 6-foot-7 Rogers, Wake
Forest's leading scorer and
rebounder, was too aggressive in
the first half. He picked up his third
foul with 615 left and ended up
scoreless for the half.
Buthescored 11 pomtsas Wake
Forest, hitting 10 of its first 12 shots
from the floor in the final period.
roared bak from a -26 half-
time deficit.
The 6-2 Childress took it
trom there, scoring 11 of his 19
points in the final 10 minutes.
The Demon Deacons took
the lead to stav when Chns King
hpped in a missed free throw by
Ri ibert Siler to make it 65-63 with
353 left.
Childress hit three of five 3-
point attempts and Rogers
wound up with 15 points and
eight rebounds.
"It's difficult to play a whole
half without Rodney Rogers,but
we hung in there said CXJom,
whose team shot 52 percent, in-
cluding 73 percent in the second
half. "Rodney came out in the
second half and scored 15 points
and didn't miss a shot You have
to be pleased with that
The Demon Deaomsalso got
13 points from King, 12 from
Siler and 11 from Anthony
Tucker.
Bryant Stith led Virginia
with 26 points, but did not make
a field goal in the final 11 minutes.
John Crotry added 18 points for
the Cavaliers and Kenny Turner
had 13.
"In the second half. Wake
Forest changed defenses and we
didn't adjust as well as we could
have, or as well as we needed
to Jones said.





I 01 101

I
A
y it, you'll like it
dins 757-6731
� fggi
atie lEast (ilnrultniau
11
Outdoor
center
offers
alternative
R Kern Nestei
- . -
� � reasbord
nded
Lady Pirates fall
to JMU, 74-68
With 10:06 left in the second
Kveno� .entor forward Kim Dupwe
Staff Writer� � . iiimpshi � he the
� � ' ' : i ����; ; ! hiprei tht n hit
Mu healsei � � � '� � . . � � . r . � . . �

rati rurd . � . � � , � � �.
. . . , guard Mi � helle
'�'�.��� iid was
' �� ; - ' �th fret' throws to
� . . �� I i ; � U
nei 1 � � � �� � . . � 1 i thorn
���.� � � .or thi
. ��
i � � ; � �' �� � ' � .traighl
� � ; � � I , � "1 to
� �' ' � � � �� ' three
. � � .�
��. � �
� �� � �
� �. . t ondsleft
th�
�. �� ���.
. :� . � , � both
" � �'� irffrsl
� � � �nd IM � all Shew
, thei � ' � - ' �
: � . ; - - � � : ����� - and forth
. �. . - . rung
; 1 ��'�;�
� �. - , .
� � . � had t resort to
tlNt! hit

. . . . . . � . .
1.1, - -i -y �'�� �

� ' ime
O re . '
� - �� the
� �� - ' ' .
� rebounds
. 4 � - . �
� i1pmuinr!hf : IP TIT "
TirrattrTfrnt. ten to Q-10
( A.
es re
Gaynor O'Donnell leads Lady Pirates
H
: ' '�
'to �
� �.
(.a nor () Ponnell
Duke, Laettner Upend LSU Wake Forest upsets No. 11 Virginia
Vhen
rthl�.
.
��

-
. , .

.
I 1 . �� �
� I i an d
� und
� � ' v il
, . irw
� . rnori than
� i. n ! thi , it i
il � vtth in i-1 rap
' . � . � � ��
1 � � mythingdiffi -
� . � � . . r, H)i( taki
� Mi.l lT to dtl'O ti I
I. itin i nil
h . , hi numbers, he ailed
� � �� in id
,� � ,pprM( hed this
� � in versu j5haquille
, i Kike versus Shaquille


I .� '
im
11 � '

ntsliki � mi tod
t to thi best I
111 . � h aid v
� . � , � � " ' km. I i '
I �. hustled frombegmning
) whipped hi aid
Bill Mel afire) stored �- ints
� ior IheBlui I cvilsand ITiomasI fall
iddi 115.1 hA i hoi 'pen int tor
the 001K' and hi Id tin 1 igers to 40
. p nt.im luding K)per ent in the
, i 10 N'cal final i1 minutes
Mikf I lansen si �rod
int�
u'l Sinck ton addrvl ?

. , and Vernel Singi
,i- retl only four points piintsfortheTigers.whoscti I
,it s ru �.tl tnon ptinl tx km thru season avi � i;
ti . rnmuti '� i � oi foul lnm I9ycars(ofeoaehing)
rXtkeahMikeKryzewski Ihk Mi lopoim matchedhJs Antth�nklr�anateamthatplayed
igainst ubum as hard as this team Brown said
I � i � ; i mts about the Dukedefense
'�� haw a kl o( respect tot thi
li im it votii nnei nrrak'ononepi i
� � v
thai ive Odoi
ki � ' has
�p.
� '
. �
, : I aid after th
� � � � i i
point half! '
l-66victi�i
11 Vii
Od tplai mg
ition Hie Dei � �
� ; : ��. , ednesd i) ii I apel
I hll against Northamlina, a
m that beat themb) I p ints
� �! Salem last mnth
But i d mu h rathei be
going down there w itha� ouple
ins under m) belt said Viom
Wake I orest's second year
Il
hv victory over Virginia
was the fourth in a row tor the
1 Vmon Deacons m jusl their
sot oiu) in the last 12 ganx s
against the Cavaliers
It ,ilso (ame one da) .ittor
the I Vmon I ieai onshad rallul
to boatleorgia Teh and it
nioved them to 14 7 overall and
gave them their tirM 5-4 record
intheAtlantkoast onferere
I am overflowing with
pride for our team Odom said
' am proud tor our univcrsit)
us. lam par! rlv
i
time "
ke
Inev Rogei ind Rand ph
( hildress ha
� ill (ustfn ' 'hvI
�� 1(17-7 � tsthirdlossm
as n ii v 'n its foui da
swing thi � ' � "h i arol
ke seeking a
shan ithel '� i werein
fifth place by the time I the
Tar I lo ! state Suru.lay :
When it wa time I �� ; up
and make island wecouldn'tdo
it Virginia coat h efl i said
Rogers and Childress he
added, "cameinand took over the
game I hat might sei m surprising
hut thi- have been d �ng it all oar
We've told oui guys all along that
they are ven aggassiv� vvr con
fident and that the) are the ones
who can di1 :t
rhe 6 toot 7 Rogers, Wake
Forest's leading scorer and
rebounder, was too aggressive in
tho tirt halt 1 lepk kil up hi third
foul vsith 6 15 left and ended up
scoreless tor the half
Buthescored 11 pointsasWake
Forest,hitting lOof itsfirst 12 shots
from the tloor in the final period,

Idi took it
trom there. ' s 19
n, ,jnts in 'l ' tes
i. ns took
n King
tipped Irei throw by
h � - w ith
ti � of tit3
� ' g rs
ind iy with 15 piints and
It sdiffi ' � plav a whole
:� itR(HJrk Rogers but
we ' thi re said Jdom,
ivhosi learn shot 52 percent in-
cluding : ;x r, ent in these ond
half Rodne) came out in the
second halt and orod 1" points
and didn't missa shot "i ou have
to be pk-ased v ith that
rheDemonDeai onsabogol
13 points from King 12 from
Siler and 11 from Anthony
1 iu kor
Bryant Stith led irginia
with 26points but did not make
a field goal in the final 11 minutes
lohn Crotty added Is points tor
the Cavaliers and Kenny Turner
had 1 5
� In the second lialt Wake
Forest harmed defensesand we
dkm t adjust as vnvII as we could
have, or as well �s we needed
to tones said





7
12 (Bbt gaat faralfartm February 12, 1991
Associated Press Briefs
Baseball sets new arbitration record
NEW YORK (AD � Waily loyner sot an arbitration record
when arbitrator Gil Vernon awardtxl the California Angels first
baseman a salary of $2.1 million for the 1991 season.
It was the first $2 million salary over awarded in arbitration
and broke the previous record of $1 ,Q75,(XXl which Don Mattingly
of the New York Yankees set in 1987 Andre Dawson, Lonnie
Smith and IVnito Santiago all went to hearings requesting $2
million salaries, but ihe lost their cases.
While joyner won. Philadelphia shortstop Dickie Thon and
Cleveland second baseman lorrv Browne lost.
Browne's case also was deckled by Vernon, who picked the
Indians otter ot $800,000over his request tor $1.1 million. Arbi-
trator Reg Allovnc chose the Phillies' offer ot $1.25 million over
Thon s request torl 7 million.
Volkov wins first Grand Prix title
Mil Italy (AP) Eighth-seeded Alexander Volkov won
his first i .rand Prix title Sunday by defeating Cristfano Caratti h-
1 7-5 m the final ot the $600 iHX Milan Indoor tournament
olko w ho beat Jakob I llasck in the semifinals, won$77,7rj0
for his victor) over Caratti who upset top seeded Kan Lendl in
the second rvuiul
Baur defeats Roese in tournament
GUARl IV Brazil (AP) Patrick Baur rallied to win a
suspended semifinal match then beat Fernando Roese e-2, 6-3,
Sunday to win the $125,000 Chevrolet tournament.
Two world records set in Moscow
MOS()v r Sergei Bubkaoi the So iet Union broke his
own w orld indoor polo vault record on Sunday, clearing 1 feet,
1 l.5inchesattheSo iet winter track championships in Volgograd.
Soviet speedwalker Iran K. Minchanin also set a world
record covering 5,000 meters in is minutes, 23.SS seconds.
Minchainin S tune broke the record ot 1 27.10 set bv Mikhail
Shchennikov ot the Soviet Union at Budapest, Hungary on
March 5 lus�
Pippig sets women's world record
STUTTGAR1 Gcrmanv (AP)
I'K
rd forth
'men
Uta Pippig set a world
meters on Sunday in a time
ot 15 minutes 13.71 second Sonia O'Sullivan of Ireland had set
the pre ious record ot 15:17 28 on Ian 25at the Boston University
I erucr c l.issi,
Earnhardt conquers Busch Classic
DAY"10NABfcACH,Fla - KP) Dale barnhardt conquered
the new Busch c lash format Sxindav hammering the rest ot the
14-car Held to win both halves ol the sprint race tor the previous
year s polo wini ers Earnhardt, finishing ahead ol Mikt Martin.
won theevent at Daj tona International Speedway for tl e fourth
tune in six tries
Earnhardt, whoseaveragpwas 189.474 mph, picked up another
$ DOO tor his twoar-length victory over Mike Martin, giving
him a total ot $60 000 tor the event. Martin, who was sixth in the
first halt, won $31,000
Hess wins late model stock car race
P-U rONA BEACH Fla I fcP) A crash on a restart three
laps from the end helped ben I less pick up a VK tory Sunday in the
Daytona ARCA 200 late model stock car race.
I Vtondini: race winner immy 1 lorton w as leading holding
off Mess b ,i matter of feet, alter a yellow Bag came out. But
I lorton was running out ot gas and. on tin- restart on lap 78, he
suddenly slowed at the head ot the pack, causing a chain reaction
crash behind him
� From Associated Press Reports
Sports Briefs
NBA All-Star game won by West
The East led be 11 points early in the second half of the NBA
All-Star games Sunday, but the outcome was not decided until
kar! Malono was called tor offensive goaltending on a three-
point shot by Kevin Johnson with 2.9 seconds remaining. The
East went in to win 116 114 The East's Michael lordan had a
game high 26 points but committed 10 turnovers and missed 1?
field goal attempts
Pavin chips in from 40 feet for win
C orev Pavin chipped in from 40 feet on the first playoff hole
Sunday to win his second Hob Hope hrysler (lassie in five
ears Pavin tired a 7-under par t-n to catch leader Mark O'Meara
at 29-under-par 331, breaking the PGA lour 90-hole record of
333 by three players.
Daniel holds off Lopez for victory
Beth Pamel. "90 LPt .A Player of the Year with seven wins,
repelled challenges by Nancy I opez and I aura Baugh with three
birdies in the last eight holes Sunday to win the $500,000 Phar-
Mor at Inverrary, Fla. Paniel shot a closing 3-under-par 69 at
Inverrary Countrluh tor a 209 total and a 2-shot victory over
Lopez, also runner up last year Baugh was third at 212.
Charles breezes to Senior victory
Bob Charles shot 2-under-par 70 Sunday and coasted to a 4-
stroke victory in the $430,(XK) GTE Suncoast Senior Classic.
George Archer and Lee Trevino tied at 2-under 214. Also, P.H.
Horgan III shot 67-64-i5 �196 for a 2-stroke victory over Olin
Browne.
WLAF holds draft for first season
Six weeks before its first kickoff, the NFL's new World
League of American Football has everything owners, general
managers, coaches, team colors except players. That detail is
scheduled to be addressed during the next two weeks, as the 10
franchises fill their 40-man rosters from a pool of worldwide
talent invited to Orlando for workouts.
Copyright iMl, USA TOO AY Appt CoMf Information NHwort
Barkley captures MVP,
Leads East to Victory
CHARLOTTE, (AP) - If the
NBA keeps forcing Charles Barklev
to play in the All-Star Game, there
may come a rime when his oppo-
nents would just as soon the league
leave him alone.
Barkley scored 17 points and
grabbed 22 rebounds to lead the
East to a 116-114 victory over the
West in Saturday's All-Star Game
This was after the Phi ladelphia
7t�er made noises like he would
rather be at home resting the stress
fracture of his left foot and after
the NBA advised him Charlotte is
nice in February and he ought to
make the trip.
"Myfoothuttsand it sgptngto
hurt Barkley said. "AikI fmgoing
to come back from my injury
Barklev wanted to miss the 1990
All-Star Game in Miami due to an-
other injury. But the league urged
him to attend and he complied,
becoming one of seven players to
score in double figures
This time, he had 11 rebounds
in each half to grab the most re-
bounds of any All-Star since Wilt
Chamberlain had 22 in 1967, but
tiveshortof BobPettit's 1? record.
It was enough to earn Barklev the
most valuable player award, right
in the backyard of favorite son
MR hael lordan ottheC hicagoBulls
Charles won theMVPand I'm
happy for him " Jordan said. "We
deserved to win the game Charles
is certainly an all-around player.
He's what I call a utility man
Barklev might not have won
theaward � indeed, the East might
not have won at all � except for a
bizarre ending to a close game.
There were 20 lead changes and
17 ties the last change giving the
Fast the lead at ter an 8-0 run. Patrick
Hwing scored tour oi the points in
that spurt as the East moved in front
103-100 lead with 724 left.
But in the last three minutes of
thegame, the West thrice was wit run
a basket of the Eist, the last time
afterChnsMullin's two free throws
with 95 seconds left. It would be the
last time the West would score, but
not for lack of trying.
Withsecondsremainingand
a chance to tie the score, David
Robinson threw a cross court pass
m the direction of Kevin Johnson.
The pass went left. Johnson went
right.
Was 11 a bad brea k tor the West ?
"No, no. no Robinson argued.
1 started throwing it toward Kevin
and the guv hit mv arm and it started
going the other way
"And you still didn't get a call
Johnson yelled, hoping Robinson
would go into a tirade about the
officiating.
Robinson came right back to
force a ump ball, then won the tip
Alter a timeout, the West
worked the Kill around to Johnson,
whose 3-pomt attempt was touched
by Karl Malono. who wascalled for
offensive interference .That gave the
ball to the last with 2 9 seconds left
and lordan ran out thpdock.
"It was gameouldhavehven
a hero Johnson said of the shot
that almost was
Malone wouldn't talk to re-
porters in the locker room at first.
but he was morecandid in the post-
game news conference
"It looked good. Whyldid that,
I don't know Malone said.
Ewing had IS points and 10
rebounds tor the last which in-
i teased itstead in theseriesto27-14.
Ionian scored 26 punts, but com-
mitted 10 turnovers
Robinson, Malone and Magic
fohnson led the West with l6points
each,and Malone had 11 rebounds
UNLV remains undefeated,
manhandles No. 2 Arkansas
Ap) Maybe everyone is
right. Maybe UNLV belongsin an-
other league Otherwise, how else
will the Runnin' Rebels ever lose"
"Play Detroit, the Lakers one
ot those teams, or just have what
you call a terrible night on the road "
Arkansas coach Nolan Richardson
said Sunday after o 1 UNI V ran
away from his second-ranked Ra-
zorbacks 112-105.
In what was long-billed as col
legohaskethall'sK'stregular season
game in years, UNLV ovi rcame a
tour-point halftime deficit, broke
away toa23-point lead and coasted
to its 3ist straight victory.
They'rea great team wi th grea t
talent. They need logo to the NBA
Arkansas' Oliver Miller said.
UNLV 2(V0 is trying to Iwomv
the first undefeated team since In-
diana in 1976 and the first repeat
national champion since UCLA in
1973. Stacey Augmon scored 31
points as the Rebels became the
eighth top-ranked team to win a
No. 1 vs. No. 2 matchup in 10 meet-
ings in the past 10 years. Arkansas
(23 2) had its 20 game winning
streak Stopped.
i ou ne er sei � teams that plav
great defense run and teams that
run usual I) pta) vtt defense
UNI V coach lerrv Tarkanian said.
"This team is -o focused and so
tough mentally, rheseguysgoboth
waysand the) doit for40minutes
UNI V star 1 arry Johnson,
however, did not plav the entire
game I le and Arkansas ace Tbdd
Day were ejt ted � ith2 27 left after
a brief scuffle.
UNI V trailed "Moat halftime.
the first Hme this season it has been
behind at the break But the Rebels
started the second halt with a 16-2
spree and later increased their lead
Anderson Hunt scored 26
points and Johnson had 2 for
I l V Daj scored26and Miller22
tor Arkansas, which had won lu
straight at home
Center
Continued from page 11
Nantahala Outdoor Center
The price of the trip is $185 tor
students and $IM5 for faculty, staff
and guests.
This isan incredibleprice when
you consider it includes all trans-
portation, food, equipment, wet
suits for canoeing and guide fees.
For anyone worried about the
possibility of getting lost in the
woods, Miller said that the ontirv
Chatooga Trail follows along side
the river. So, it would be easy to
catch back up with the group.
Even though participants will
be on a schedule. Miller said that
there will be lots of free time for
individuals to get there outdoor
experience in nature.
"Anyone can do this trip
Miller said. "It's a chance for the
novice to meet new peopleand have
a terrific time in the outdoors
A pre-trip meeting will be held
on Wednesday, Feb. at 5 p.m. in
Room D101 Brewster Building. A
$100 deposit is required, and the
remainder of the balance is due at
the meeting.
This is not the only trip offered
thi s semester by the Outdoor Recre-
ational Services. For information
j on other trips and services stop by
Christenbury Gym.
LEI HANKS DELIVER
3 balloons and an
ice cream cake
for $11.49 w tax
316 E. 10th St. 758-0000
f SPRING BREAK 1
r PANAMA CITY BEACH 1
t FLORIDA
J � High quality beachfront accommoda-
J& tons for 7 exciting nights
� Round tnp chartered motor coach
t� Free pool deck parties activities. &
promotions
jit � Inter-Campus Programs I 0 Discount
N card
� On-location staff for complete
assistance
� AH taxes, tips. & service charges
included
Yl
194
C At i. ANYTIME
KEVIN OR
BRIAN
355-8372
The East Carolina University Gospel Choir
presents
"A Melody of Praise"
an 8th Anniversary Celebration
featuring
Pitt County Youth Mass Choir Jamming For Jesus
Barton College Gospel Choir
(Formerly Atlantic Christian College)
Saturday. Feb. 16, 6:30 pm
Wrisihi Auditorium
S2 for students
S3 for general public
Send A Valentine's Gift
That Your Loved One
Will Never Forget
Catuiij
'Balloons
Inirnaia
looses
'jUnocrs
756-7226
698 E. Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village
na.
758-2183
1 17 W. 4th Si.
Downtown Greenville
� �
Scuba Diving Classes In I
As Little As 2 Weekends f
2 �
1
I In GoUisboro Febuarv 16, 17, 23. 24
� or April 6, 7, 13, 14 onlv $245 00
i
� In Kinston March 1ft, 17. 23, 24. 30, 31
or June 1. 2, 8. 9, 15, 1 ft only $200 00 �
VrKt include cer thine but mask, tins, snorWIf jrvd book
� . !
I For moe info call �ticoOtry �t'jtnfl Company Int.
I 728-2265 or SCUBA OK
414 Orange St Beaufort, N.C.
� �
� Biiuwry �r.j ftitcjocrt- fttiuafl ft crt- ft 24 ftttwwrf ftiVtmg ft.icj-�ry
This Week's Entertainment
wgd. 13
In Limbo
Thurc. 14
Draft Nite
$3 admission for all you can drink
Fri 15
Homeboy Madhouse
Sat, 16
Roily Grey and Sunfire
Hours
Mon. 11 am-3pm
Wed. U-i 513 Cotanche
9 pm-1 am (located across from UBE)
Thurs. 11am-lam
Fri. Ham-lam
�-�- 758-0080





Title
The East Carolinian, February 12, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 12, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.790
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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