The East Carolinian, February 5, 1991






!
�Ij� iEaBt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.64 No.72
Tuesday, February 5,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pages
Bush vows victory
in the Gulf during
Cherry Point speech
By Doug Morris
Sports Editor
CHERRY POINT AIR STA-
ITON � President Bush told a
crowd of about 8,0W gathered at
Cherry Point Friday that U.S. forces
in the Persian Gulf are defeating
Iraq's military.
"Day by day, night by night,
Iraq scapacity to wage war lsbeing
systematically destroyed bv US.
J -
government military forces
President Hush said to the cheering,
flag-waving crowd. "Our invest
ment, our traimngand our planning
are paying off
Bush visited Cherrv Point,
Seymour Johnson Air force Base
and Fort Stewart mSavanah, Ga , to
discuss Operation Desert Storm
with the families of many of the
people who are lighting in the Per-
sian Gulf. The president said that
support from home was important
to the war in the Gulf.
"Unfortunately, there are no
medals of valor tor military fami-
lies Bush said. And if there were,
tliere would beas much decoration
on your chest as there is pride in it.
To all of you, spouses, chil-
dren, parents, loved ones, Marines.
ou re doing more than just keep-
ing the home fires burning. Your
dedication and bravery is lighting
the hearts of everv American. You're
hastening the day when your men
and women will come home
Bush also praised the soldiers
who are currently serving in the
Persian Gulf.
"Their professionalism and
sacrifice will end the nightmare �
I am absolutely confident of that �
will end the nightmare of Iraqi oc-
cupation and ensure that Kuwaitis
once again free he said. 'Their
courage and commitment will help
fight encroachmentsand protectour
new world order from ruthless
dicta tors with no concern for human
life-
Next, Bush gave listeners an
optimistic report of events m the
Gulf.
"We're now more than two
weeks into Operation Desert
Storm he sud. "And my report to
you, today, is that we are on course;
we are on schedule, and things will
go well
However, Bush warned against
being loo optimistic. He said that
the war in the gulf will not be short,
nor will it be painless. Nevertheless,
he emphasised his confidence that
the U.S. would be victorious.
"We will prevail, make no
mistake about it he said. "And
when we do, we will have taught a
dangerous tyrant, and those few
who would follow in his footsteps,
that there is not place for lawless
aggression in thiscntical region and
in the new world order that we seek
Big support
for war effort
A significant majority of the U.S. public agrees on many of
the key questions of the war with Iraq, a recent USA
TODAY poll shows.
On President Bush's decision to attack
Q Jan. 15 Q Now
75 76
a Black a White
83
� �
18 16

43

Support
Oppose
Support now
to create
Bush also s.nd that the troops'
involvement in the Gulf would not
be endless.
"We will stav in the Gull for as
long as necessary he said. "But
not one day longer
The president also mentioned
the men and women who have died
and will die in this conflict, a topic
which had a special importance to
the men and women to whom he
spoke.
In the two days preceding his
speech, II Manncshad died battling
an Iraqi incursion intoSaudi Arabia.
"first of all, wethinkof all those
who have given the last full measure
of devotion he said. "And I will
always keep a place in my heart for
the memories and especially for the
families of these American heroes
The militarv and the families of
the tnops over in the Gulf who
attended the event voiced their
support for the president.
"I came to support my hus-
band, David Gibson, who is over in
Saudi Arabia Keshia Brown, a
milit.irywifes.iid. "I think he (Bush)
is doing a great job and I support
him all the wav "
Keith Carter. USA TODAY
Reactions here at E U, how-
ever, were mixed
"I think it wasa political move,
morethana moralebooster,M Buddy
Canady,a health and physical edu-
cation major, said. "I think he was
trying to help his presidency
"I think it was comforting to
the families of the pilots Chris
Allen, a history major, said. "It was
reassuring to know that they're
doing all they can to protect them
over there.
"I think th.it he WSS showing
that he felt enough to come all the
wav down there. It was his ob
U.S Iraqi troops exchange fire; Iran bids for peace
DHAHRAN. Saudi Arabia
(AP) � U.S. and Iraqi forces Mon-
day traded fire across the desert
frontier, and Iran's president made
a surprise offer to hold direct talks
with both Iraq and the United States
to trv to end the Persian Gulf War.
Allied warplanes, meanwhile,
pounded Baghdad before dawn
Monday. Witnesses said commu-
nication centers, government offices
and industrial installations werehit
some of them for the second and
third times since the war began
nearly three weeks ago.
U.S.officialsdisclosed Monday
that the battleship USS Missoun
used its 16-inch guns in action for
the first time since the Korean War,
targeting prefabricated concrete
bunkers that the Iraqis were mov-
ing into Kuwait.
The newspaper of Iraq's ruling
party boasted the Baghdad gov-
ernment would drag the allies into
a drawn-out ground warby staging
more attacks like last week's Iraqi
push into the Saudi town of Khafji.
"Combat On the Saudi periph-
ery should be based on the hit-and-
run tactic formulated by our an-
cestors, "the newspaper Al-Thawra
said Monday.
For the moment, Iraqi forces
appeared to be in a defensive pos-
ture. The U.S. military said Iraqi
troops were deeply dug in, seeking
shelter from punishing allied air
attacks. Those attacks continued
Monday, with F-15sand Tornadoes
roanng north into hazy skies f nm a
Sltudi air base.
The allied air strikes have been
soef fective that senior Iraqi officers
are moving their headquarters into
schools because "they know we're
not going toattack civilian targets
thecommander of Operation Desert
Storm said.
Asked whether that inhibited
the air campaign. Gen. H. Norman
Schwarzkopf said Monday, "in all
probability, yes But he sud he
was not concerned.
The general also said he hopes
Iraq'sclaimof 321 civilian casualties
from allied bombing was correct
"I'd hope that reflects exactly
what I've been saying all along,
Schwarzkopf said.
SGA officer
may step
down with
low GPA
By Shannon Copeland
Staff Writer
C ne SGA executive offi-
cer has been asked to step
down after administrators
checked their grades in their
nutting Monday night.
St A President Allen
Thomas declined comment
on the issue
(.rades of the legislators
will also be reviewed. All leg -
islatorsarc required to ha vea
2.0GPAand must be in good
standing with the University
In other action, 11 new
day and residence hall rep-
resentatives were appointed
to the SGA.
The new members in
elude the following: Michael
Davis, day representative;
1 is.1 BertJng, day representa-
tive; Matt I lednck. Garret!
Dorm; Erica Levdic, day rep-
resentative; Craig Jackson,
dav representative; Jeffrey
ones, day representative,
Mike ichols, day represen-
tative. Tern Avcry. dav rep
resentati ve; LaToya I lankins,
Greene Dorm; Knsten Lang,
Senior Glass Vice President,
and Keith Dyer, Freshman
Class Vice President
In other business, the In-
ternational Students Asso-
ciation received $2,071.
The money will be used
for honorariums, performers,
supplies and travel
The Association of
Nursing Students received
$915. The Student Health
Service! lealth Educators re-
ceived $894.
The Student Health Ser-
vices received $548; the
Speech, Languageand Hear-
ing Association received
s4l; and the Society for Ad-
vancement of Management
received $800.
Fishing workshops offer tips
for bass anglers on Saturday
By Matt King
Features Editor
The ECU Division of Continu-
ing Education will host a two-day
Bass Fishing Techniques Institute,
on Feb. 9-10 at the Ramada Inn.
Some of the nations most re-
vered anglers will be conducting
workshops in a classroom setting
from 9a.m. until 5p.m. on both days.
Topics include fish behavior, judg-
ing water conditions, bait selection,
topwater tactics and electronic fish
finders.
Larry Nixon of Bee Branch, Ark
bassfishing'sall time money winner
($1 million in lifetime earnings)
highlights the list of speakers. Danny
Joe Humphrey of Kinston, will bring
his electronic fishing prowess to the
institute.
Jackie Weekley, a coordinator
with the ECU Division of Continu-
ing Education, organized the event.
"The institute will teach tech-
niquesand tactics(for catching bass)
that are productive in a variety of
circumstanccssaid Weekley. She
said the instruction will add to the
fishing enjoyment of novice and
expert anglers.
"I put together the same kind of
fishing clinic when 1 was at the Uni-
versity of Georgia and the response
was tremendous said Weekley.
Weekley said that with level of en-
thusiasm for fishing being what it is
in this area, a techniques institute
would be worth a try.
Weekley laughingly admits that
a bass fishing seminar is a little unor-
thodox, "but the response we've
gotten proves tha t the i ntcrest is there.
"At first 1 thought 1 heard some
gigglcsaround the office, but in spite
of what my co-workers thought of
the idea, they were all really help-
ful said Weekley.
The registration fee is $59 and
reservations are still available.For
more information call the ECU Divi-
sion of Continuing Education at
757-6143.
Communications professor speaks
on hoaxes, professional writing
By LaToya Hankins
Staff Writer
Over 100 communications-oriented students
had the chance Jan. 31 to meet someone who
influenced their early development.
Dr. Fred Fedlerspokeat ECUThursday night.
He wrote the textbook used in Basic Reporting
classes at ECU and about 600 schools across the
country. He told the audience about developing
as a writer, with examples taken from his latest
book, "Media Hoaxes
Fedler asked if anyone in the audience was
trying to write a book. He related his own early
experiences by telling that he started in 1963 as a
free-lance writer. He had a tough time, he said.
Once, he framed all of his rejection slips and
hung them on his wall. When he got more rejec-
tions, he said, he bought a bigger frame.
He advised the audience to always write
about things they know and to always be persis-
tent.
Fedler said a media hoax is a story that was
planted to fool the public and increase sales for
the newspaper. He said that this practice was
common in 19thcentury America when there was
strong competition among newspapers.
Fedler said that he began research for his
book while still a graduate student at Central
Florida University. He had planned to incorporate
the information he found in a short article. As he
found more examples, he decided to write a book
about them instead
He began writing the book on hoaxes in 1980.
It involved skimming hundreds of research texts
to find information on hoaxes that were notable.
Some problems occurred with his research
because most of the stories were written in the
lth century. Most o the writers of hoaxes were
dead, and the newspapers did not have indexes.
However, that did not stop him. He said his
method involved finding the hoax itself and then
supporting it.
Finding a supportive company proved diffi-
cult, as publishers turned him down. This is part
of writing, he said, and writers need to be thick-
skinned.
Fedler used examples of hoaxes to illustrate
points in his speech. One example was printed in
1833.
A newspaper trying to boost circulation began
running a series of stories on the discovery of life
on the moon.
After that story, sales skyrocketed, Fedler
said, and the newspaper announced that the
telescope broke.
INSIDE TUESDAY
These men are working as part of a project to improve lighting across the campus.
Editorial 4
People need to curtail their own
spending before expecting
Congress to do the same.
Features 5
Cathy Wickern, an ECU
communications instructor,
hosts radio talk show.
Classified k
Sports 7
Lester Lyons scores 23 points
in ECU'S 75-66 win over Navy
at home Monday





(Hlfc �aat (Earolintan February 5, 1991
WEEKEND
LIMITED
TIME ONLY
ROUND TRIP FROM
GREENVILLE. N.C. ON
JSAIR ANDOR AMERICAN.
ANDOR UNITED
r MIAMI
TAMPA
, ORLANDO
DAYTONA
FORT
LAUDERDALE
FROM
DENVER
PHOENIX
LOS ANGELAS
SAN FRAN.
SEATTLE
READ THE
FINE PRINT
These special fares
are extremely limited
and may be already
sold out for selected
travel dates. Travel
must begin by Feb.
9-16 and be complete
by Feb. 20 - varies by
city. 7 day advance
required purchase.
Travel to destination
Wed Thurs Fri. or
Sat. Return from
destination Sun
Mon Tues or Wed.
Maximum stay to
first Wed. Once
ticketed, fares are
nonrefundable and
nonchangeable. Call
for full details.
ES
1 TRAVEL
UJ CENTEFt
The Plaza � Greenville
355-5075
800-562-8178
Open MonFri. 9-5
Closed SatSun.
Offices �ilso in Raleigh.
Chapel Hill. RTP A
Wilminqtnn
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
7.56-2011
Lunch only
Small Shrimp
Platter
only
$2.99
Sun-Fri
Beverage not included
Expires: 2-17-91
756-2011
Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Get the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter FREE
Good anytime
Beverage not included
Expires: 2-17-91
Register for Key West Give Away
s
Let
Us Tempt
You
With Our Sample
Platter For Two
includes dessert
$14.95
Served All Day
Thurs. Feb. 14
Pitcher of Strawberry
Q Margaritas $9.95
Street Tart$2.50
Happy Valentine's Da)
L.� f
I H i
Mexican Rottaurani
37
521 (otanche St. 757-1666
11 19 i
10
II �� I
Save stamps too
Pay your utility
hill at the NK.VV
EAST BANK at
Mendenhall .
Monday-Thursday.
10 a.m4.30 p.m
and Friday,
10 a.m5 p.m.
ities.
Call Greenville I tilil
551-1539 for Further information.
f
'ii i.
� SSi(
I
:� tL-j'

Wednesday
WZMB
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
j Progresssive Dance Night
introducing
.10 9 oz. Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
1.00 Kamikazees
Ladies Free til 10:30

�w
� J
Starting today, construction begins on lighting improvements on Fifth
Street between Elm and Reade Streets. Fifth Street will be closed to
trafficTuesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Construc-
tion is expected to last until mid-March.
p�Vlp'f
AUTOMOTIVE
Foreign Dorrwatic
PARTS SiRVrCI
Ritici provided ii iar kept overnight
510 N. CreeneSt.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
j The 5u ntana
I 5 Visit Plan SI5
I 10 Visit Plan $25
I 15 Visit Plan $30
I
' Wolfe Tanning System
1 756-9180
gllfe East (Carolinian
Director of Advertising
John F. Semelsberger
Advertising Representatives
David Bailey Gregory oncs
John Parks Patrick Pitzer
Tim Peed
Advertising Production Manager
Mary Piland
�Coupon Good Through 33091;
"3212 South Memorial Drive
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
National $6.00
Local Open Rate $5.00
per column inch
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00-5:00
757-6366
J
"Vjt

Preview
'91
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applieations available in 316 Wright
February 4-29, 1991
Deadline tor completed applications is March 8, 19�1
(4:00 pm)
The Student Union
is now accepting applications for position on the
1991-92 Program Board
Any full-time student may apply to chair on
of the following committees:
3 Films 3 Minority Arts O Special Concerts
3 Forum O Productions 3 Special Events
3 Coffehouse 3 Public Relations 3 Travel
3 Major Concerts & Publicity 3 Visual Arts
Each Chairperson leads a committee of 8-12 students to select, plan, pro-
mote and present a variety of programs for the ECU community. Chairper-
sons are actively involved in all aspects of the programming process and are
invited to participate in progressive leadership and student development
programs, retreats and regional and national conferences.
For additional information and application contact:
ECU Student Union
236 Mendenhall Student Center
757-4715
Application deadline: 5:00 pm, Friday, February 22
r.
f-mwx:
ru
SWUNG BREK
PANAMA CITY BEACH
FLORIDA
I � Higf- Quahty beachfront accommoda I
� !Kns tor 7 exciting lights C
I � Round trip chartered motor coacf- ,
� �fm pooi deck parties activities & jfr
promotions W
� �'me'Campus Programs ' 0 Ov I ,
. ,��.��� complete
V �. stance
J A' 'aes tips 4 service marges
VS mriuded
The East
For de
?f119

L
Ss
1)4
-1

Mi'2L
4
U I W llll 7,1
ft
Kl IN (K
BRI
J55-X �
�E� - -
l-lh llam-1
LET HANKS DELIVER
balloons and ani
ice cream c -
for $11 19 v- ' -
316 � loth St. 758-0000
� �
Fast Carolina
C oin �Sl Pawn
INSI M VSH LOANS
DIAM( NDS
STERi ING
SU V ER
. EVIStONS
Gl NS
JEWtl H
GUITARS
O HNS
'T W.i K s
w ST1 Rl I S
752-0322
O KNEROf l(JTH Wi K NS IN
GREENVtLI I
This
$5
i
Ilk
ll'Ull s
STUDENT UNION
ECU Stud
Making 'W'Thin
f A
Program Hoti
: This Week at H
: The Man Bel
Wed. Fel
COME SEE ARNOLD
IN HIS HOTTE
Thurs-Sat. F
"The King, Eh
Alive Vlvj
Sun Feb.
I ECU ID or Current Films P
BILL OEMBV is goin
Theatre Mon. Feb.
program Is being spoi
Arts Committee andl





2 ll?c East (Xarulinian February 5, 1991
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
756-2011
I uiK'h onl)
Small Shrimp
Platter
Sun-Fi
756-2011
Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Planer ai $6.50
Gel the 2nd
Remilar Shrimp
Planer FREE
iood anytime
Weraiie noi included
R eiiist e r for Ke West Give lw
a
LIMITED
TIME ONLY
GREENVILLE. N.C. ON
ANDOR UNITED
TAMPA
ORLANDO
DAYTONA
FORT
LAUDERDALE
fro:
R
DENVER
PHOENIX
LOS ANGELAS
SAN FRAN.
SEATTLE
READ THE
FINE PRINT
These special fares
are extremely limited
and may be already
sold out for selected
travel dates. Travel
must begin by Feb.
9 16 and be complete
by Feb. 20 varies by
city 7 day advance
required purchase,
Travel to destination
Wed , Thurs Fri. or
Sat. Return from
destination Sun
Mon Tues . or Wed.
Maximum Stay to
first Wed. Once
ticketed, fares are
non re fund able and
nonchangeable (all
for full details.
TRAVEL
J CENTEli
The Plaza � Greenville
355-5075
800-562-8178
Open MonFri. 9-5
Closed SatSun.
Office also in Raleigh.
Chanel Hill. RTP A
Wilmington
Vt , ps Km
t'a your utiiilv
bill ai th M w
! SI I5WK at
lenhali
M� ! il.i I hi:
, V() n
i '
10
Call driTinillf I till
551-1539 foi further
v.
JzlMjA m a
f y Wednesday
- WZMB
Progressive Dance Night
introducing
MO 9 oz. Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
1.00 Kamikazees
Ladies Free til 10:30
� �'
I
s&
Starting today, construction begins on lighting improvements on Fifth
Street between Elm and Reade Streets. Fifth Street will be closed to
trafficTuesdavs and Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.onstruc-
" tion is expected to last until mid-March.
ovio�
AUTOMOTIVE
Foreign Domestic
PARTS k SfRVICf
;vii vid �: 11 v .ir kept overnight
510 N. GreeneSt.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
I The Sunt qn a
5 Visit Plan $15
I 10 Visit Plan $25
I 15 Visit Plan $30 I
�je Ea0tlar0ltman
Director of A d v C r t i S i n g
John F. Semelsberger
Advertising R e p r e s e n I .U i .� s
David Bailey Gregory Jones
John Parks Patrick Piter
Tim Peed
Advertising I'rodm tion Manage i
Marv Pi land
I
I
' Wolte Tanning System �
756-9180 -
�Coupon Good Through 33091'
j 212 South Memorial Drue'
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
N.ition.il ScS.OO
I M .il Open KMr $00
per column in h
Hulkontr.u t
I )jm omits Available
Business Hours
Morul.n - Frid.jv
H:()0 V.00
757-6366
Preview
'91
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
Hast Carolina I imcrsiu
� � '
Orientation
Staff
Applications available in 316 Wright
February 4-29, 1991
Leadline tor completed appiications is March 8, lgC)
(4:00 pm i
:S
The Student Union
is now accepting applications for position on the
1991-92 Program Board
Any full-time student may apply to chair on
of the following committees:
1 Films 3 Minority Arts
"I Forum "1 Productions
"1 Collehouse "I Public Relations
"I Major Concerts & Publicity
"I Special Concert
"1 Special Events
"I Travel
d Visual Arts
Each Chairperson leads a committee of 8-12 students to select, plan, pro-
mote and present a variety of programs for the ECU community. Chairper-
sons are actively involved in all aspects of the programming process and are
invited to participate in progressive leadership and student development
programs, retreats and regional and national conferences.
For additional information and application contact:
ECU Student Union
236 Mendenhall Student Center
757-4715
Application deadline: 5:00 pm, Friday, February 22
ran
The Fast
! PANAMA CITY BEACH
FLORIDA ft
For ck



fit s

11M
P4
i

� M I M IIMI
Ikiw 'r
II Wk S !)! 1 1 h
r)
I astaroliua
( oin S. I'au n
INSI N I MI i o vvs
i' i ��
752-0322
U
STUDENT UNION
ECU Stud
Making 'tiThin
Program Ho
This Week at Hi
The Man Bel
u -
Wed. Fel
COME SEE ARNOLD
IN HIS HOTTE
ill
Thurs-Sat. F
The King, Eh
Alive Vivj
Sun Feb.
ECU ID or Current Films P
BILL DEMBV is goin
Theatre Mon. Feb.
program is being spoi
Arts Committee andl
MNP INIGHIS






Uuhting improvements on Fifth
I- ifth Street will be closed to
Ml a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Construe
itil mid-March.
astdJaroltman
or of advertising
I hi F. Setuelsberger
s i ni; K r p � o I o n t a t i C s
c CrcgOT) oncs
r Iirks r.itrii k Pitor
I im Peod
rig i r� �l ti� tion Manager
Man Piland
l K 1 IM.(
h (Ml
Mi' $5.00
It'll.H t
ailahtc
Business Hours
Stond.n Friday
11:00-1:00
757-6366

ev
Indent
i
l!
livcrsilN
ion
in ; In W'riuht
Ulions is laivh 8, lvK1l
t Union
mis for position on the
rani Board
i applj to chair on
committees:
itsl Special Concerts
s"1 Special Events
itions"I Travel
z"1 Visual Arts
s 12 students to select, plan, pro-
I r the ECU community. Chairper-
jt the programming process ami are
oership and student development
aiul national conferences.
itid application contact:
it Union
(tudent Center
15
m, Friday, February 22
(5he JEaat (Earolintan February 5.1991 3
P1'TBBIB!8T
T SPRING BREAK 1
mmm cm beach �
t FUNMM
J � High quality beachfront accommoda I
f� lions tor 7 exciting nights Jt
I � Round trip chartered motor coach l"
4a � c pool deck parties activities & t
promotions 7
W � inter Campus Programs I 0 'Discount
f

�On location start tor complete
assistance
' AH taxes tips & service charges
included

The East Carolinian is now accepting applications
for Assistant Sports Editor
and Staff Writers
For details, call 757-6366 from 9 ajn. to 5 p.m.
r
All von can eat
"1

SJ
shrimp and trout, r
$4.95 $&
?$r
KKVINOR xk
BRIAN T
4�- �i.
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
M- Hi tlam-8pm F-Sat llam-9pm Sun llam-4pm
1 ET HANK'S DELIVI
l balloons and .111
ice cream cake
For$l 1 4l w i.i
316 E. 10th St. 758-0000
East Carolina
Coin & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
Dl MONDS
SI'ERt IV.
�V.sli MR
jf 11 1 I ISIONS
Gl NS
11 M i K
Gl 1 1 Ks
COINS
STEREOS
i 752-0322
O 'KM km- j'l'll VNDDICKINSON
I 1REI W II i I
r
r&a&
This Week's Entertainment:
Hours
Mon 11 am- Jpm
1 no ! 1 am-3pm
v oil 11 am jpm
'�pni lam
! luiiv I lam lam
In I lam lam
Sat. "pm lam
Wed, fi
The Other People
Former members ot Liquid Sound
Tluns. 7
Draft Nile
$5 admission for all you can drink
Frifi "
(ream of Soul
Sal, g
The Mood
513 Cotanche St.
(located across Rom UBE)
758-0080
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
ECU Student Union
Making yThings Happen At ECU
Program Hotline 757-6004
.�������������������������������������������a
This Week at Hendrix Theatre
The Man Behind the Plan
i i n. i JZr 111
Wed. Feb 6 8 pm
COME SEE ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER
IN HIS HOTTEST ROLE YET
SCHWARZENEGGER
TOTAL RECALL
Thurs-Sat. Feb 7-9 8 pm
"The King, Elvis Presley, is
AliveM Viva Las Vegas
Sun Feb. 10 8 pm
ECU ID or Current Films Pass is Required for Admission?
BILL DEMBV is going to speak in Hendrix
Theatre Mon. Feb. 11 8 pm-IOpm. This
program is being sponsored bg the Minoritg
Rrts Committee and Dupont Corporation.
Read
The
East
Carolinian
I l I KM I Ol NOR I H CAROLINA AT CM MM I
INM1I S APPLICATIONS I OR TML
I99 MINORITY PR! -OR ADC All
ri si.arc ii i;xpi:ril;nct.
1
� 9 week Summer Research Project with UNC-CM Faculty
Mentor
� Rising Senior Minority Undergraduates
� Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Biomedical
and Environental Engineering
� Skills Enhancement Workshops Available
� Housing, Plus $850 Food Aloowance and $2(XX) Stipend
� Application deadline MArch 1, 1991
� Period of Program - May 28. 1991 to July 26, 1991
For Application Forms and Additional Information
Local Contact Is:
Dr. Larry Smith
204 Whichard Building
Fast Carolina University
UNC-CH Contact Is:
Associate Dean Henry T. F ncrson. Jr
The Graduate School
200Bynum Hall CB4()1()
University of North Carolina at C 'hapcl Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-4010
(Or Telephone Collect: (919) 966-2611
Preview

'91

Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications available in 316 Wright
February 4-29, 1991
Deadline for completed applications is March 8, 1991
(4:00 pm)
Keep
informed
of the
VrvMf hV tU l arrWifu cariym community . ce 192$
issues, events
and people
affecting the
ECU campus
and community
Subscribe to QJJte �a0t (Earnlm!an
Wit !jst" iftarofinian"
Name:
Address:
Subscription form
Date to Begin:
Subscription type:
O Business ($35.00yr)
Enclosed amount:
Date to end:
3 Individual ($25 00yr) �
Retumto:
The East Carofnian
�Please make al checks Pubtoatons Bag, ECU
payable to The East Carolinian Oaon�ia,NC27BSM3S3





Qftft i�uzt (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bl AIR SklNNEK, News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor
Doug Morris. Sports Editor
An Edwards, Copy Editor
LfClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Stuart Olii hant, Asst. Features Editor
MaTI Ml'MMA, Asst. Sports Editor
Jason Johnson, Cotry Editor
Mikf MARTIN, Editorial Production Manager Larrv. Huggins, Circulation Manager
jEFf PARKER, Sta Illustrator STUART RoSNER, Systems Manager
Chris Norman, Parkrwm Technician Phong Luong, Amu'ium Manager
Cvri a Whitfieid, Classified Ads Technician Deborah Daniel, Secretary
. he Ea
1 CUsi
1 'S u
aCarotinim has served the East Caroliiucampus community since 1925, emphasizing information thai directly affects
udents During the ECU school year. I he EastCarotimkm publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12.000. The East
uan reserves the right io refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex. deed or
iloi igin. 1 he masthead editorial in each edition docs not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but. rather,
orit) opinion ol the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
ted to 250 words or less. For purposes ofdecetK) and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
ilion. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Rldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
ot call (919) 757 6966.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, February 5, 1991
tresS:
?OYAL
��
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
City Council proposes compromise
Why not treat national leaders like kids?
With our national attention turned
toward the Cult War and the Middle last,
rut) of us have tailed to see the conflict in
our own backyard. War is not the only crisis
facing our nation right now. In tact, our
toughest battle ma) lie in the months ahead
is we attempt to solve our growing eco-
nomic problems.
The federal government, which has
already saddled us with an enormous defi-
cit, unveiled its 1991 budget on Monday
with a projected shortfall oi S318 billion
This conies less than a month after President
Bush finally conceded that we are, indeed,
in a recession.
According to many economists, the
popular theory that war stimulates economic
growth does not hold true in our current
situation
From an economic standpoint, it
seems we will come out of this war no better
or worse) than when we started.
Although the federal government
nusl certainly bear a portion of the blame
for our financial woes (not to mention the
savings and I .oan industry), we, the Ameri-
can public, are responsible for the majority
ot this recession
The pervasive American attitude thai
we should buy more than we can afford has
doomed us to submit to the hard times that
ultimately follow the beginning of a reces-
sion.
Soon almost everyone will begin
feeling the pinch of our current economic
dilemma Already this crisis has begun to
effect not only spending on a national level
but locally as well.
Despite emergency funding oi more
than $16,000 by the Student Government
Association and the University, Jovner Li-
brary has been unable to resume its normal
operating schedule oi 100 hours per week
this semester.
We at The East Carolinian have also
been unable to maintain "business as usual"
under these trying conditions. As our con-
densed newspapers this semester can attest,
sales revenues have shrunk as local busi-
nesses have been forced to reduce advertis-
ing expenditures.
We live in a society built around the
premise that it is all right to live "outsideour
means" and just "charge it Only after it is
too latedo we realize that this is just not true.
Although these budget cutbacks will
help resolve some of our national and re-
gional financial troubles, we must begin to
change our values and attitudes toward
spending.
Until we are willing to control
spending on an individual level, we cannot
expect our representatives in Congress to
do the same.
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
For someone who makes such
a big deal about hiring solelv on
the basis ot qualifications, Presi-
dent Bush seems to have made an
odd decision in hiring Bob
Martinez as America's new drug
czar.
Martinez was once Tampa's
mayor He did a bad job. Then he
ran for governor of Florida and
won. Atter one term, Florida's
voters roundly, soundly and sen-
sibly ousted him.
And did George Bush takeany
of this into account? Did he ask for
references trom Martinez's former
employers, the voters of Tampa
and the rest oi Florida?
There are two possible an-
swers. One is that Bush really
doesn't know what a lousv gov-
ernor and mayor Martinez was,
and didn't think to ask anyone
who could give him a straight
answer. If true, Bush must be
woefully incompetent.
The alternative, which I think
more likely, is that Bush knows
Martinez is a horrible leader and
manager, and doesn't care.
Make no mistake: when 1 say
Martiiu was a lousy governor,
I'm not kidding. Neither am I ex-
aggerating. I'm not employing
sarcasm and really saying
Martinez did a good job.
I mean to sav he stank. He was
just plain awful. 1 had thedubious
advantage of living in Florida tor
part of the time Martinez was
governor, and he did a really
crappy job.
And George Bush must knovy
this. I'd have known, even :f I'd
ncer been to Florida; Martinez's
political debacles were so spec-
tacular that thev made national
headlines more than once.
Remember when a certain
governor called a special session
of the state legislature and sen!
them no fewer than four anti-
abortion bills, each oi which suf-
fered a miserable defeat7
That was typical Martinez. So
was his boast, during his recent
doomed re-election campaign, to
have ordered the deaths of 90
human beings. So was throwing
Florida's criminal justice system
into utter chaos, and so on ad
nauneum.
So Martinez hasdemonstrated
amply and clearly that he's just
not very good at this politics thing,
and Bush appointed him drugczar
anyway. Because, as I asserted
before. Bush just doesn't careabout
those sorts of qualifications.
What qualifications matter in
a candidate for drug czar? One is
forced to conclude that there are
only three things that count: ide-
ology, ideology and ideology.
After all, what did Martinez's
Lets Be Adamant
predecessor, William ! �
have going for hinT His t
work as secretary of edu l
Hardly. Bennett sperter
EducationCzarwasliterally
When Reagan he-cam- ; i
he tirst tried toabohsh I
nil-nt ot Fduc ition
that didn't .ork out ;
next best thing he hin I
Bennett to head it
No, Bennett had � . �
thing going for hin ;
remains) a zeak it, a i
logue with a frighti nine
age temper. I Not to n � ntioi
inability to kick nicotine ai I
i oho! What a hypcx rite
His unproductive
opponents is legendary
didn't matter, because Bci i
also willing - you migl I
eager � to ignore fact;
pursuit ot policy. This is a
acteristic shared equ
Mnmma.
Now, with the tor.
preamble, do I think Bu� I
tire Martinez? Perhaps surpris-
ingly, I don't. Look again it
drug czar's history Iam
to get nd of him. onh tofii
governor. Florida tried to . � �
of him, only to find him drug
If Bush gets rid ot him Marl
will probably be presidi
Next stop, God.
And believe me, it s
scarier than you think
Bush unable to build 'better America'
Must answer for his actions in 1992 election
Letter to the Editor
Campus Forum
enlightens
student with
fresh outlook
To the Editor:
On Jan. 21,1 attended a cam-
pus forum on war and peace. I
left with new perspectives and
some positive wordsphrases
like "renegotiation" and respect
for other people (and their pri-
orities, agreed with or not).
A speaker reminded me that
a way we can show respect for
other people is to learn some
words in their language, some of
their courtesies and proper pro-
nunciation of at least names (the
most personal of all interaction).
Further responsibilities
might be to recognize all realms
in which the quality of life may
be affected by the loss of life
and injury. For example, there
may be people who wouldn't
even be eligible for a draft who
would face impending death
(like those needing blood trans-
fusions.)
I move that we not take life
for granted, as those in the
Middle East do not have this
option. Suddenly, being a stu-
dent is a luxury.
Furthermore, I move that
we remain careful to respect
friends and families of soldiers
so that they know their loved
ones are not risking their lives
in vain.
Most of all, let us not con-
demn people, but instead
strongly object to behavior. We
should recall that our media and
government spokeof the unfair
propaganda tactics of the Soviet
union. We should equally expect
the media to demonstrate dismay
over the same behavior by our po-
litical forces.
I hope we can stop the arbi-
trary identification of enemies and
uphold more consistent expecta-
tions of behavior. Let us be a coun-
try which is depended upon for
superior ethics and not artillery.
We can begin by learning in a time
of en sis and continue by hoping for
peace.
As one speaker noted at the
recent forum, caring about our
nation's interest is not unpatriotic.
We should not fall victim to sim-
plistic thinking.
Nancy Moody
Social Work
Craduate Student
By Derek McCullers
Editorial Columnist
The Gulf War brings many
questions andor concerns into
one's mind. Logically, the first
would be, "why are we there?
There are basically three rea-
sons why the President of the
United States has committed over
400,000 troops to the cause of re-
moving Saddam Hussein from
Kuwait. First and foremost, we
are there to protect U.S. oil inter-
ests.
Kuwait holds between 15-20
percent of the world's oil supply.
Saudi Arabia holds another 25
percent. If Saddam would have
gotten control of both of these ar-
eas, he would have controlled
nearly half of the world's oil sup-
ply.
Secondly, if Saddam was to
gain control of these resources he
would upset or destroy the bal-
ance of power in the Middle East.
A "balance" of power is
achieved by the international
community allowing certain na-
tions to have nuclear capability
and massive military power while
others seek protection through
collective security (i.e. NATO and
the United Nations). Saddam has
long been seen as a local but toler-
able threat.
However, his invasion of Ku-
wait brought this danger to the
surface and heated pressures to a
boiling point. I do not have a clue
as to his mode of thinking at that
time. However, I think his moti-
vation was tost oil fields in the
Iran-Iraq War. He was in a state of
economic desperation.
Finally, there is what some
would consider the moral issue.
Saddam's invasion of Kuwait ma v
be seen as naked aggression in the
words of George Bush. A .prin-
ciple behind the President's ac-
tions was that this could pot be
tolerated.
In a political sense, we had to
be drawn out of our traditional
policy of limited international in-
tervention in order to stop this
aggressive bully.
The supporters of this action
make cries of appeasement and
use the examples of World War 1
and World War II. They say that
appeasement never works and
that wecan't do such a thing again.
They say that we must act now
toavoid greater risks in the future.
They underpin this with the ab-
stract moralitiesof democracy and
freedom to justify possib.o loss of
lives.
JohnSpanier's text talksabout
how dissent is seen as unpatriotic
in America. Dissent is viewed as
unpatriotic because we lack the
history of conflict that Europe has.
There have always been dis-
putes in Europe between the Aris-
tocracy, Middle Class, and the
Proletariat (lower class working
people).
However, we in America think
that we have an egalitarian soci-
ety and are not used todissentand
conflict because we supposedly
share the same goal of progress
through the "almighty dollar
Therefore, those who express res-
ervations about this war arc
viewed as unpatriotic.
There are several script
that stand as a call tor us '
port our leadership In E -
17:12 we see that Aaron and i lui
stayed up the hands of Most - lest
he fail in his appointed job W(
have elected George Bush and vx
should support htm (at least until
1992).
Judah 20:11 reads. "So all the
men of Israel were gathered
against the city knit together as
one man We've got to stick to
gethernghtncHvit we are going to
win this yvar quickly and without
many casualties
Finally, in I Samuel 14:6, 7 v-
see that Jonathon's armour bearer
said, "Do all that is in thy heart
turn thee: behold I am with thee
according to thy heart We've got
to support our commander in chief
in times of crisis. However, after
the battle isover George Bush has
a price to pay.
I am reminded of King David
who was a great warrior for God
God told David that a temple
would be built in his kingdom
However, David could not buld
it because there was too much
blood on his hands The task went
to his successor, Solomon.
George Bush will not be able
to build a temple of a better
America because of the blood on
his hands. He cannot build better
education, health care, environ-
mental, energy, and civil right
policy because of the blood on his
bands.
George Bush has jumped the
gun and shed blood for oil. This
blood will be required of him n
1992, after the battle's over.
February 5,1991
Wickern h
radio help
By Michael Harrison
stjtt Writer
Infant mortal t MDSand
brain diseases re!
hard-hitting subjo Is of a
radio pr ; .
"Housecails
Addibi rial toj
eluded terminally! pal tits'right
to die, ehildh. �: njurv pre
tion and evt : I - ne in
: . � r
seei d I

� � :��

I � �
� '
-
eastern North Cai iniaJ
Tin host � H . . � is
Cathenru i n in ECU1 1
broadcasting � �' 1
instructor pr gramairsev-J
ery Friday fr i � p.m on"
WTFB, a pan ol the National1
Publk Radv s) ten i 39 ; 1 M
' 1 lousi : � : . edbyI
the ECU Scho � Medicine in
associati i th tln
partment 1 itioi"
c iuests or I pre-i
dominantly health pi fe�� : v. �
sionalsShi � �
However t) is notmed . '
tull of i : ited medical jar
gon, Wickern said Itisasl ��� 1 ially coped v. � J
the lay people' in North Caro-with babies �
lina.from physical ahu
Wickern draw- keen obser-Thedoct -
vations and attitudes about her�
work i n "Housecailswhile at the 1
Wickern said tli.it contraryem �
to the opinion ot a public that can
perhaps be a bit cynical at timesWicken
money did not seem to be a chiet"I'm sorn -
motivation tor doctors todo theirwhat is d i
Hbs at least not the nes she in-ing
terviewed on Housecails SheShe then prod
'60s genre en:
Bv Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
Blue Dixie' had the crowd
grooving to the sound of psyche-
delic music last Thursday night at
the Attic in downtown Greenville
Performing tor their second time
here since late December, the band
attracted a much larger and more
enmusiasnecrowdthjstimearound.
The band orignates from
Charlottesville. Va. and includes
members: Brad Sarno on lead gui-
tar and vocals; Andrew Barnes i
bass guitar Dave 'Chopper'
Campbell on l als and
rhvthm guitar I am I und on
keyboards and Dave Nichols and
Mike'Smittv v
The 'j
resembles u- -
other 1960s ps
Although Ca
� that if p
reminisce b -
and what

image
Th
I Trot's what
CamgbJR! said
kd the nd
thoroughly i
the Attic Thursd
that psychedelic ij
place in the n
long time t j
Marvel's Hulk
continues to e
By Clifford Coffey
Staff Writer
Marvel has had mam top sell-
ing comics dunng its 30 wars, and
The Incredible Hulk hasrarelybeen
upthere. Latch thoughthasbeen
pickingupsubstanhal sales figures.
That is m large part due to the
intelligent stones that Peter David
has been churning out. The Hulk is
now one of the most solid selling
tides that Marvel has. The Hulk has
been going through numerous
changes in the past few years; from
.turning gray, to becoming a Las
Vegas bouncer, to having three
distinct personalities trying to take
over Bruce Banner's body.
The first is the mind of Bruce
Banner, a sh, timid scientist. The
second personality trying tocontrol
Banner's body is that of the green
Bulk, dumb and savage.
Finally there is the mind of the
gray Hulk, the sarcastic
disposboned Hulk, trying to in-
habit Banner s body. This issue is
resolved in issue 379 of the Hulk.
In issue 377, a friend of Bruce
Banner, DrxSarnpsoaisadoctorof
psychotogy and is finally allowed
to find where the personalities of
tivHulteoriginatedfTominBruce's
mnxi Sarnpsori
persona was (
Banner's overbc,
We find thai
his mother and a
forced him to livi
am emotion
atedasaamalgaj
tions, to the a
somehow found
ot the thnv set,
one being.
Banner's mind.J
strength, and tf
position
Issue 379 d
improved Hulk.J
are expressions j
the sarcasm and
Hulks and the
intelligence of 1
The celebrj
long, for the lift
rarelv quiet,
strikes out, and I
the intelligence
casm.
The writu
never lacksenenj
or humor.
Hulkavery(
character and i
supporting cast
a supporting ca





te MAJESTY,
�?OVAL rOTC
�.taajsr P�U6S
VWCT
AV.
rK
As
?
&-?
er Hammer
i leaders like kids?
11 ��
in n
,hshou
. : "
Martin
� �
lamant
'better America'
2
tion
Mi in
Uitd. �
l I iui
� � �' 1, � �
� � � : � b VV
' tlsh .iHi) V I
� until
S illlht
;athered
� � get her as
� � stick to
. ing to
md ���� ithoul
14 6,7 WC
ui bearer
� is in th heart
I ; am with thee
rdingt �� . heart We'vegol
� �' r mm mder in chief
I li i ver, after
n � Bush has
reminded ol King David
rrior forGod
: : � thai a temple
his kingdom.
lid not build
was too much
: ; hi task went
tohissu. � mon.
(ieorge Bush m ill not be able
to build a temple of a better
America because of the blood on
enca think hishanda He cannot build better
education, health care, environ-
mental, energy and civil rights
policy because ol the blood on his
hands
George Bush has jumped the
gun and shed blood for oil. This
blood will be required oi him -n
1992, after the battle sever.
I 'i dis-
theAris-
and the
s working
ssentand
pposedry
It progress
l dollar
(press res-
war arc
Februarys, 1991
allie lEaHt (Earaltnian
5
Wickern hosts new
radio help-talk show
By Michael Harrison
SUtt Writer
Infant mortality, A11 and
n diseases are but a few of the
� i hitting subjects of a local
i lio program called
use .ilK"
Vdditional topics have m-
uded terminally ill patients' right
die childhood injury preven-
and even folk medicine in
m Morth Carolinia.
I he host ol I lousecalls" is
v atherine Wickern, an ECU
adcasting communications
tructor. Hie program airs ev-
r Friday from 630 to 7 pam. on
IT-B, a part ol the National
iblic Radiosystem on893FM.
I lousecalls" isproducedby
ECU School of Medicine in
ition with the ECU De-
� tment ol . ommunication
� on the show .ire pre
mil antly health profes-
ials
1 lowever, the show is not
� f i omplicated medical jar-
n,Wickemsaid. It isa show for
the lay people in North Caro-
lina.
Wickern draws keen obser-
ations m attitudes about her
workn "I lousecalls
Wickern niiJ that contrary
the opinion ot a public that can
perhaps be a bit cynical at times.
me did not seem to boa chiet
�ti at u ui for doctors to do their
Ms at least not theories she in-
terviewed oil "I lousecalls She
said the doctors she interviewed all
seemed to care about the jobs thev
do and that they sincerely wanted to
help people.
1 lowever, not all her guests are
doctors
She recently interviewed an
AIDS victim tor a show that has yet
to be aired, and tin overall develop
ment oi that interview amazed her
somewhat she said.
The man she interviewed, she
said is only 30 years old, and he
knowshes going to die Yethedid
not talkabdut his plight, shesaid. 1 le
expressedanupbeatatotudeofhope,
compassion and a joj ot living she
-xlld
The topicscovered are not usu
ally pleasant Wickern pointed out.
Infant mortality she specified, 'is
not a fun thing to talk about but
added it is ,i subnet that is verv
neccssarv to discuss It was also a
subject that seemed to profoundlv
touch Wickern
She said she had talked with a
medicalguestoutsidi therecording
studio and asked how he emotion-
ally coped with seeing and working
with babies who had been murdered
from physical abuse.
Thedoctorbasicallytold her he
was able to do his p b pn ifessii �nalh
while at the hospital but afterward,
emotional side-effects would trouble
him.
Wickern paused fora moment
"I'm sorry she said 'It's just that
what is done to babies is so disgust
nig
She then pn iceed d ti i talk aK nit
a tob she uscl to have where she
billed people for -rays
"Many rays were for chil-
dren shesaid, "and I know there
was an insane reason tor much ot
it Forexamplesbesaidsheknew
of an infant boy w ho had a tooth-
pick jammed into his x-ms 'I he
horrors were unbelievable she
said
Wickern siul her work on
House-calls' has motivated her
to take stronger stands and Iv
i ome more involved with certain
issues Its rnoii me to do
things she -iid I think I'm
getting more involved
On anuary22, sheattended
a candlelight prrx hoice abortion
rally. It was something she s.n,i
she would not have done six
months earliei
Wicken lid i ildl -
ol "all then - .� hv she would
rn t hav i � �; tn in bul a�:�� l
she would not infringe on therights
ol other pe� ple ti � make thai de
i ision tor tb mselvi It is
persona issue, and the govern
menthasnorighl to interfere with
it, she said
She pointed out that babies
can actuallv die from lack ol love
and affection and cor luded by
saying, "Every living bab has a
right to be loved
Wickern said she would
eventual!) liketodo Housecalls"
he At this nine, the show is
recorded, and heavy editii gwill
sometimes be required.
1 imeliuutationsimposestru t
s
� ken � eofl Us most esteemed instructors ishostinqa
new rad I a - how sponsored by the ECU School of Medicine
guidelim wl h can often be diffi those in the communications dc
ailt to handle noosing the best partment but she said, "I don't
n it rial from the show is the main want peopte to listen just because
challenge hero Wickern said, be- I'm on
cause most of the rratenaldiscussed,
it not all, seems important
! isteningti hersclfon the radio,
ancl know ing pie are lis
tening to her, . an strike a cord ot
uneasiness sh, saKi because the
show is new for hi r and is unlike
anythingsheha everdone Never-
�1 teles shesaid 'I'm feeling better
about it as 1 g
W u keniis well -knownamone
She said she wants people to
listen "becausethev want to" .ni
because the show helps bring, an
understanding to important top-
i. s
Besides, she said she is not
into rested in being another maji r
national talk show host "Geraldo
and I don't agree on much she
slid, "and 1 don't look as good in
a tie anci coat as I'hil l nahui
'60s genre ensemble 'Blue Dixie' visits Attic
Bv Kerry Nester
stjft Writer
Blue Dixie" had the crowd
ving to the sound ol psyche-
music last hursday night at
i ttic in downtown Greenville.
�� rming for their second time
� since late December, the band
ttra ted a much larger and more
iastk i rowdthistimearound.
The band orignates from
ii ottesville, Va. and includes
bers Brad Samo on lead gui-
md vocals; Andrew Barnes on
ass guitar; Dave 'Chopper'
impbell on lead vocals and
� � �) -uitar 1 arry I und on
ards arui Dave Nichols and
Mike 'Smitty'Smith on percussions.
The style of music very much
resembles the Grateful Dead ancl
other 1960s psychedelic-type bands.
Although C ampbell made it very
clear that it people are coming to
reminisce back to the 'hippy-era'
and what it might have been like.
thev are not trying to portray that
image.
fitis isn't the 1960s, it's 1991
andfrtrrt's what we're playing
Campbell said. "Music for 1991
� And the number ol people
thoroughly enjoying themseh esat
the Attic Thursda night proved
that psy hedelic music will have a
place in the music world tor a er
lone time to come
'We like to pla music that
people can dance to just howevei
thev fell like darn ing to it Samo
said.
1 his was no problem for the
crowd, which showed mam stvles
ot maneuvering the bodv to the
coritinii.il flowol rhythmand notes
whit h seemed to have no ei id
1 he band opened up the show-
In playing a few original song:
which are now available one assette
tapeal thev oncerts. 1 hi n followed
these up w itii main.r.itetnl I )ead
tunes such as "Bertha, I S
blues "Mr . harhe. Samr - I ii
Delilah, and Sugaree
Also mi hided in the fiist set
was Warren Ze von s "Werewolves
ol London, and Chuck Berry's,
Pn imised 1 and
Alter taking a short break, the
band returned to play the second
and final set Again they played
mam onginalsand moreGrateful
I lead tunes all �ngw imPaulSimon's
(lassk , Me & ulio
I he crowd showed their ap
preciation tor the performance b
cheenngratlKTloudl) until the bind
came bai k to play an encore, the
Grateful Dead's "Shakedown
strevt
We really want to stress just
how much weenjoyed the people
here in Greenville Sarno said.
ii r. 'in tvas lust gnat
Foui . oncert-eoers were for-
tunate enough to get a recording ot
the concert by plugging into the
band's sound Kurd lor a perfei t
sounding tape. Blue Dixie allows
people to matte 'bootleg' tapes of all
their shows and in fact, encourages
it.
"here is also a mailing list
available to anyone who wished t-�
signup. 1 hey send out information
on what s going on with the band
and it let's vou know where they
will be pla ing.
l.ink for "Blue Dixie" to be
coming to C .reenville on a tegular
basis and come on out anci check
them out. The cost is verv inexpen-
sive, but the musk is worth paying
much more than thev charee
Farinacci
brings
'lighf to
Art School
By Heather Modi in
Staff Writer
1 hursday, January I5at7pjn
I( I s School ol rt's visiting art-
ist Marilyn Farinacci delivered a
lei ture m enkins Auditorium
I arin,n ci prcsenh daslideshow ol
her mature works examples ot
which are featured in E( I s (,rav
rt (ialleiy.
Farinacci's "New Work" e
hibit.tobcshow n until February)
i nnsists or abstrac t paintings that
evoke thought and emotion She
uses ,i variety ol mixed media,
mainlv wood no pie tins, m her
paintings. Farinacci applies color
liberally and with feeling. Her
paintingsarepredominantl) dark
but a few boast bright canvases
,i!ni i, (tuple maintain a prevalent
v hit stirta e Farinacci uses a re
curringthemeofi onical thorn-like
shapes ol light in her works.
mong her recent works that
app ared in the slide show were
I In t aiardian. Witness, The Gift,
( ntered,( rown. Blind Faith, The
Mus(. ncSunday, AI hemy'sBe-
het ShadcsofCDl and Desecra-
tion
I annaci i said ol Witness, "It is
tl !� :npie state ot man versus the
i ontinuumofnature " (1 IheC.itt
shesaid. "It'sdealing with the gift
of light Darkness is a given Light
ft 1 arinacci said of Blind
I aith 'It s something I think all
artists deal with . An artist is
alto .i s mo ing into unknown ter-
ntor- . . Sometimes it's quite
threatening She said of Des-
ivra.tion, "You bring to the painting
what you want In the end the
work comes into being through
the dialogue I have with the work
Farinacci's work has been
sb . ii in a number of group exhi-
bitions including The May Show,
in the leveland Museum ot Art;
Inhibition 280, tn the Huntington
Museum ol Art. I tuntingti m W A a.
and others.
! annai ci has taught art classes
at Notre Damc ollegeofl io.the
( Iceland Institute ol Art no
c uyahoga i. ommunityollege
I he C le eland native has re
ceived awards including the Ohio
rtsi ouncil lndi idual -rtist I el
lowship and an award for painting
from theleveland Museum ot
Art
Marvel's Hulk still
continues to evolve
By Clifford Coffey
Staff Writer
Marvel has had many top sell-
: o innsdunngits30 years,and
nielncnxliblelfulkhasrarelvKvn
up there Lately, though, it has been
pickingupsubstantial sales figures.
I "hat is in large part due to the
intelligent stones that Peter David
hasbeenchumingoui TheHulkis
now one of the most solid selling
titles that Marvel has. Theffcrikhas
been going through numerous
changes m the pist few years; from
barring gray, to becoming a Las
Vegas bouncer, to having three
distinct personalities trying to take
ova Bruce Banner's body.
The first is the mind of Bmce
Banner, a shy, timid scientist. The
stvond personality trying to control
Banner's txxly is that of the green
Bulk, dumb and savage.
I mall v there is the mind of the
gray Hulk, the sarcastic
dispositioned Hulk, trying to in-
habit Kilmer's body. This issue is
reaorved m issue 379 of the Hulk.
In issue 377, a friend of Bruce
Banner, Doc Sampson, isa doctor of
psychology and is finally altowed
to find where the personalities of
the Hulksorigina ted from in Brucc's
miixl. Samps in found that the Hulk
persona was created to combat
Banner's overbearing father.
We find that his father killed
his mother and abused Bruce, and
forced him U i live without showing
any emotion The Hulks were cre-
ated as a amalgamation of his emo-
tions, to the extreme. Sampson
somehow found a way to join each
of the three separate entities into
one being. That being having
Banner's mind, the green Hulk's
strength, and the gray Hulk's dis-
position.
Issue 379 debuts the new, all
lmpmved Hulk. Immed lately, there
are expressions of each personal i ty,
the sarcasm and the strength of the
Hulks and the reasoning and the
intelligence of Banner.
The celebration doesn'l last
long, for the life of a super hero is
rarely quiet. Attacked, the Hulk
strikes out, and continues to show
the intelligence, strength and sar-
casm.
The writing of Peter David
never lacksenergy, suspense,action
or humor. David has made the
Hulka very enjoyable, verylikeabk
character and included a brilliant
supporting cast thatdoesn't act like
asupprtingcast.
Flamingo's finds
success, fame in wake
of The Crow's Nest
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
bach character is presented in
the way that tliov appear like major
players in each appearance. David is
a master at subplots, foreshadowing
and displaying the psychological as-
pectsof man. He setsnew standards
for writing comics.
Dak Keown, the current Hulk
artist, had t�g shoes to fill when ho
took on drawing the adventures of
the Hulk. Todd McFarlane became a
sensation while drawing the Hulk
and nv w exists as the hottest artist
in comics today. John Byrne pre-
ceded Keown, and any comic
n�adcr knows that John Byrne is
one of the biggest names in com-
ics. Even so, Keown stands his
owngroundand n'ally impresses.
His style is like neither of
McFarlane's nor Byrne's, but is
strikingly beautiful.
The Question: Where can you
find gOOd fCKXi, g(HKl drink, glMkl
friends and good music? The An
swer: Hamingo's Cafe
Flamingo's is the only 24 hour
eat-in restaurant near the college
community. It is located on the cor-
ner of 10th and Cotanche streets just
outside of downtown Greenville
Ramingo'softers its customers
a wide selection of sand wiches and
breakfast items as well as a variety
(if drink specials. If s atmosphere is
bright and amiable complete with a
large screen TV and a 130 gallon
fish tank.
The restaurant, which opened
in March of 1990, was an instant
success. In part thiscould have been
due to the fact that the building it
(Kcupies once housed the now infa-
mous "Crow's Nest Hamingo's is
certainly a step up from its former
incarnation which at best could be
described as "rather rowdy '
In fact the owner of the build-
ing had at first some reservations
about opening another 24-hour es-
tablishment But he agreed after ht"
saw the4 plans for Flamingo's ,md
realized that there would be tew
similarities to the Crow's Nest.
Hamingo's sue ess can prob-
ably be most attributed to its inex-
pensive prices and excellent man-
agement. The restaurant is busy
virtually seven days a week e en m
nights when the downtown busi-
ness is slow
The business at the cafe is
mostly college students (about 80
percent), however the mornmgsat-
tract quite a few focal residents for
breakfast.
Classics from Led Zeppelin,
Fink Floyd and even Frank Sinatra
area few of the musical recordings
that can be heard on the jukebox.
When asked what heliked most
about Flamingo's one patron
boasted, "Wellyou need two things
on a Friday nightgood beer and
good musk And you've got both of
them here
In the future, Hamingo's plans
to start serving pizza and has al-
ready begun to serve homemade
lasagna (arguably the best in town).
Therutum ccrtairiy looksbright
for Hamingo's Cafe, which is pros-
pering as one of FCU's nvst fn-
quented establishments. Whv
shouldn't it bo?





(Bin iEagt (HaroHnuui
Ffrriiary5. 1991
SIFIEDS
LfWICES OFFERED
RIDESHAREOFFERED: Raleigh to
iiXtl " � m , ECU to Raleigh 5 p.m.
t�MJh. Ciwen 757-6723.
T RETURNS PREPARED I r
cated � from campus Call 758-
Ai atu "mJ p.m. on weekdays or
. imjjrfaiu! on weekends.
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
Terir papers Dissertations, Letters,
Resumes Manuscripts Projects Fasl
ii i nd Call Joan 756-9255
PAR"H hoi sis North Myrtle
IVt come groups of 4 M
3Ce
p leaderdiscounts. Call
MyrtU ! iours u-4 p.m. (703)
A HAH 1 s�ARTYCRUKI Six
Javsoi , S27Q!famaica& Florida six
da? iS2(� : �. Cib 59 � Sprin p If tvSfc. tona S159! Panama ;Break (ravel 1-800-
rf3T! HOT! HOTJAMAICA AND
QAN L' F( R SPRING BR1 Ak"
Vtfe have rnps left starring at $47
W yp oi � ilso claims! All prices
iichid " tel transfers, pai' cs
and men h Tours 1
8 ft 42i
tog Miami, 11 1 (8W) 780-4001
SPRING BR1 AK Only 5350.00.
Spend � nth Florida Keys i Baha-
CMcoi t four yachts All meals,
Sit1. and tun vo amid jsk tor Easv
J Student Income lax Returns
'� Program Developed b
rJloioMOiutU Spec ilicalh toi
College Students
355 -i1
Pittard Perry
frnnp
V.I J IV, INCOBPOPATED
Cf�' "ID PUBilC ACCOUNTANTS
FOR SALE
UL1IMATESPEAKER BOXES: For
car oi �� 200 watts each Con-
Jgi . sub mid, tweel S150 fot
�ftr :
I API Die K Rarel) used S5fl
'M I ous STRATOCASTER
(in VR ��� case Also Dean
Markli or. I o llei I condi
- , . v, (293 Ask � �
e
B7PONTIA( SUNBIRDSE,PS,A
(V Hit, Cass plus extras 54200
OtBi 792 i$31 after 5:00 p m
FOR SAIL 18 braided l4kt.gold
lees; iolided K .i i
t i � i 'v7" Ca, s �'ftet '�
FOR RENT
ff)OMMATE VANTEDMale
rt�i sm�kei to siar 2bedroom
������ise -month,12ntili-
!K5 G� at :36 7g39after 70)
P-JT
ROOMMATE WANTED Male or
female student to share 3 bedroom
hftfesel illy furnished. Pets allowed.
Rent Slfc2.50month, 12 utilities.
we call 355-7282 - leave message.
hot
)MMATL WANTED large
house near campus and downtown
Own room, washer and dryer Easv
going house. S145month plus 13
utilities lay 524-5790 days, 75X4375
.nights.
HOOSE FOR RENT: 4 bedroom, 1
bath, 5 blocks from ECU, 113 N.
.1 . m -T
FOR RENT
Eastern. Fireplace, living room, din-
ing area. SriOOmonth. Available
March 1,355-3195.
SHAREYOLRLIVINGEXPENSES
with a roommate. 3 bedroom, 2 bath
iii Twin Oaks. Fully furnished,
laundry facilities. $225month and
share utilities. Call Liz Samsel at
Clark Branch Realtors 355-2000 or
946-8667.
APT. FOR RENT: Walk to ECU 3
bedroom, 1 bath Call 752-2849.
I FFICIENT ROOMS AVAILABLE
51; 50month,allutiliHesfurnished.
Walk to school Perfect for student on
a budget Call Larry at 757-3543.
FOR RENT: 2bedroom,l bam house,
1 W 12th Street, S385monm, 1
moi th deposit, 1 year lease. Respon-
sible tenants only. Call 756-9141.
WAN I LI) Roommate to share 1 3
rent and expenses on a 3 bedroom
house close to campus Call Doug or
Arthur at 830 3728.
ROOM I OR KENT 5145 month -
iril � i rossfromC olleecl fillall
ROOMMATE WAND D Prefer
ibh non smoker, 2 bedroom in Wil-
son Acres 5135 month plus 13
itilities Includes owr room No
deposit needed 752-4860
ROOMMATE NEEDED I OK APT.
2 bedroom, 2 12 bath townhouse,
fully rurnished,S150monthincludes
itilities. ' 12 mile from campus,
ECl bus service, please call 758-1828
Beautiful 1'lav c to 1
� Ml New �
� VndRead) roRc� �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2S99 E 5ft Sti
� � cMed Ne�i ECl
�New Majot Shopping ('i Men
� �( From Highwi) Pan l Status
miied Offer -
tad J.I or 1 onvrt) W illi in i
sf. ' v, 5 ,k .
Office open Ar " 12 5 ip"i
�AZALEA GARDENS
I -a- � � ��- 'r Ii � - ' �; i " f
energy efTteaei free eater andaewci - ��- �
Lty�n,ca4eT Caepteaaf amglei i . S ��� - I
- . rj rt MOf)S��tOM1 RENTM coiplfci
' M f. r Kpu uncnt and m i - a -a
ns near Brook Valley .�-�.(
Conua J I or rorlfci . a
75 r�i
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble pndufsathome Call :tr
informatioi 504-641 8003Ext J;
PT COLLECTORS NEEDED A
good speaking voice and depend
ability will land you this position
Hours are Mon -Thurs 5p mp.m ;
Sat 8 a m � 12 p m. It interested, con-
tact Myma Bunns 7r-7 2102.
IIND OUTWHY IBM, PROCTER
GAMBLE, XEROX and PORTUNf
5(X) COMPANIES are interested in
graduates of our Summer Program.
It vour interested in developing your
resume, enhancing your future ca-
reer options, MAKING OVER SXX)
and traveling, call us today (919)743-
5429 or (919) 249-2213.
AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR
NEEDED: TheGnenville Recreation
and Parks Department is hiring part
time positions for Aerobic Exercise
Instructors. For more information,
call 758-68V2 and ask for Kathleen
Shank.
WIN A TRIP TO DISNEY WORLD
disrribuhng subscription cardsat this
campus. Good income. For informa-
tion and application write to: COL-
LEG1ATE MARKETING SERVICES,
HELP WANTED
303 W. Center Avenue, Mooresville,
NC 28115.
IF YOU AREsittingout thissemester
OR available to work Mon-Fn 8:30-
5:30 p.m Brodv's has temporary
positions available m receiving. Un-
pack mcrchandiseveritv invoices.
Apply Brodv's, The Piaza Mon-Wed
1:00-4:00 p.m
EAST FUNDRAISING PRO-
GRAM: SlOOOinjustoneweek. Earn
up ((SllXXl for your campus organi-
zation. Plus a chance at 55000 more!
This program works' No investment
needed Call 1-800-932-0528 Ext 50
BABYSITTING JOB WANTED
fight years experience with miant
and �-mall children. Fourth year child
development major. Loving care and
guidance guaranteed Please call
Susannah 752-9070.
HUP WANTED Part time Must
show giHH.1 mechanical ability s
dexterity Will tram. Flexible sched-
ule. 20 30 hours.a Phi! Moore ai
757 (279
HI IP WANTED L ven I riv rs
Needed for Valenrirw s Day. Call
( yrnthia's Rowers fi r more informa-
tion "7 1892
FEMALE DANCERS WANTED
Price is negotiable Call "5?
GOOD MONEY WEEKLY. Pro
cessing mail For nformahon send
self-addressed stair ped envelope E.
Harrison, P.O Box 42f-2. Greenville,
NC 27836.
THE GRELN VILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPARTMENT is
recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
indoor soccer coaches for the spring
indoor soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth Appli-
cants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18 in soccer fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3 p m. to 7 p.m.
with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run fn im
the first ot March to the firs: i: May
Salary rates start at S; per hour.
For more information, please call Ben
lames at 830-4567
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSIS-
TER CAMPS MASSACHUSETTS
Mah-Kee-Nac for BoysDanbee for
Girls. Counselor positions for Pro-
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Ltrgest Libnry of information in U S �
ill subjects
Ooe' Catalog Tortay will Visa MC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL F�E
X0T LINE
Or rush $2 00 to RMMrch Inlorrwtion
13?? Mario A f?0f, A iot Anqew; CA 900?'
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757.0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville, NC
Hours
M-F8:30atn-3pm
HELP WANTED
gram Specialists: All Team Sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
Hockey, Softball, Soccer and Volley-
ball; 25 Tennis openings; also Ar-
chery, Rifiery, WeightsFitness and
Hiking; other openings include Per-
forming Arts, line Arts, Newspaper,
Photography, Cooking, Sewing,
Roller-skating, Rocketry, Ropes, and
Camp Craft; All Waterfront Activi-
ties (Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing,CanoeKayaking). In-
quire: Mah-Kee-Nac (BOYS) W Lin-
den Avenue, Glen Ridge. N 07028
Call 1-800-753-9118. Danbcc(GIRLS)
16 Horaeneck Road, MontviUc, Nl
07043. Call l-SOO-776-0520.
PERSONALS
IIKA would like to thank the ladies
of XI2 and AMI tor helping with
rush
TO THE SISTERS OF A2 Wei
a great time Friday night, can't wait
toclo it again' Love, Alpha Sigs
ECU SWIMMERS: Good luck at
r�i ference Fhe sisters and pledges
� i lelta Zeta
WENDY: W i � nd you all the
way! (,od Luck at conference
I ove, your Delta vu sistc-rs.
TKE: We'resorrythatit'ssolatebul
ADPi would like to thank vour tor
the great Hoe 1 town party. We look
forward to next time! 1 ove ADPi
THETACHI We really had a great
time Friday It t's get together again
soon! Love, ADPi
ALPHA DELTA PI would like to
remind everyone to pray tor our
troops and their families
PHI KAPPA PSI Sundays
Superbowl partv was a blast! We
look forward to getting together
with you guys again' Love, the
sisters of Pi Delta.
SIGMA NL We had a great time
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
this weekend1 I ove, the sisters of Ti
Delta
CONGRATULATION'S to the new
sister ot Pi Delta Shannon Burks,
jean Caraway, Susan Falk, Amber
Linear, Brenna Toberts, Nikki
Samuel, Brooke Taylor & Jennifer
Thompson' We love Vii guys!
TKE'S Thanks for kidnapping us
Saturday night. Wc had a great time
and i(k forward to partying
soon! I ove. the pledges o� .Z
BETA PI'S ANT) � losed
weekend was awesome' We
"bonded Sticks and stoned may
break our boncbut wordst
us row' Weneed mon R ns! Xi
1 I'M'
TO 'l BE! Ii K I All THAN
NEVER! rhanks for the rush issis-
i.ir.ee and a scrumptiou
evening! fhe fellas al IT
(.IKI IRATES


�: Ml
- � n
KA t
11 pt to do it
1 ove, the sisters of Zl -
IT WAS mi J1S1 01 iani Ain
r,d all was going well � w headed
dowi � rkev's to rais a
hell To you it i eseemcdto
be an av rage da Bu
KR1STI NELSON it v er 21st
birthday Now thai you're
what will you do, Y( u II bej
the stort formi ndforyou. 1
KATHRYN Y(
Big Sistei ir the world ! I ns for
all you've done for me I AM �
Dare v.
PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS to the
president oi TA, feni Hcdrick,for
becoming the new panhellenic
president Wc know that you will
.o a great job 1 ove, the sisters and
pledges of Zeta Tan Alpha
THE KAPPA pledge class of ZTA
would like to congratulate cni
Hedrick for becoming the new
Panhellenic prcsidenl
PHI I Al"S o: the 8tl � � lary,
We're sure that wi � '� � .
merry Yes, we've don this I
before, But it s your w
implore. Si as vow . I vour
day, Think about our social that's
: "i �vav! Zeta's
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
igl � wasa HI AM Lct'sdi
indd � .� nl si ' I
PI 1)1 I I W � : I t tin �
with yol I: i hi
nd pledgi
(i s( ;r 11 i i k s
for yi �'� � �
I Pledges oi
KA: Weki �v there v
ps : � �'� � .�
� � . meai c. VV
Zed wc were v. r �� .� - i �
�� � � : : .� The I
�fchc ipbeverag - u
� the dance floor a
so wc ill stai ted to
� � n the hood and the i
irii pretty soon non� I i � i
'�r. i lanced twoand thei
� � � .�. we'd have todo tl
real soon. 1 ove, the eta s
DISPLAY CUSSIFIED
KATHLHf-N YOUNG
YACHT CHARTERS
Aim: EXT'
Enjo) a fabulous trip to the
Bahamas aboard a sailing yacht.
(T)nnkinu age is IS on the island, i
Discounts available lor trip
orgaimers. Call anytime for details
-800-447-245
OPEN I NDER
NEW OWNERSHIP
SMI I SERVING Yd
WIIHU Mil i B.P
�M) Ml SPRODUCTS
( ROSS I l� �M VIL.I Kt )l
x jJ-
Kl S i M K N
I IN I II S IK I I I
tjp
HI DISCI )l I YAM H
SI I DIM I.D.ONR1 PAJRS
WD s! K l( t
:7lM I II h Sircci
KOAll si K H I )r� . ie- ilk (
H SHIRTS
j Front
I Support Your
Local W A N
I Hack
YV.install
I Against
1 Non
! Tipper
I A T Shm lesigned to fa the rcusmtkns of
1 wtitieurv watti bartenders and fclivcn
peqfc
The T � n :v' � l- - 50 I ooo . S �
vtcr. �hiic with bKk Ictten nd
I in ��ta's snn'lmcdiiirn lai);c I
W � � LOOpottgendhmlnj
, N m

I I'lc,
' Ph�mc i
�yes, it) 235,
Snow Hffl.NC 28580
jp
50 States Seminars our nationally known
organization is seeking an assertive, dynamic
and motivated individual to teach and con-
duct "No Money Down" real estate seminars
in your area. You have seen these seminars
on T.V now conduct them yourself
$3,000.00 to $6000.00 per month possible
pt $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 possible ft.
Don't Delay, Call today lor an interview,
(208) 342-0950 or (208) 338-9960.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
STOP SMOKING!
lA the habit! The Student Health
SfH'icf offers a stop smoking pro-
gram free of charge to all staff and
focViltv For more information and
to sign up call 757-6794. The pro-
gram starts on Monday, Feb 4th,
from 3:30-4:30 p.m. and continues
every Monday for four weeks. You
must attend the first session to
participate.
NC. TEACHING FELLOWS
AH Freshman Teaching Follows will
rjM� 41 Feb 4 at 5 pm in Firming
eeti ng Room The sem i na r topic wi 11 be
Managing Finances
1�CTURE ON ISLAM
TheMiddle East StudiesGroupat ECU
present a lecture entitled Islam: A
Historical Perspective" by Jason
Thompson, visiting professor at the
American University of Cairo 1989-90
It will be held on Wed Feb. 6 from 7-9
p.m. in the General Classroom Build-
ing in Room 1028.
RACOUETBALL DOUBLES
Registration for Racquetball Doubles
be held on Tuesday, Feb 5 at 5 p.m. in
BIO 103. All interested individuals
must attend this meeting! For further
information call 757-6387 or stop by
204 Christenbury Gym
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olympics will beconductinga training
school Saturday, Feb 9 at E B Aycock
Jr. High School foranyonemterested in
volunteering to coach track and field
for special athletes. No experience is
needed Wcarealso looking for coaches
in the following sports bowling,
swimming, gymnastics, tennis,
powerlifting, volleyball, equestrian,
and rollerskating. All interested per-
sons should contact Greg Epperson at
the Special Olympics office, 830-4556.
RACQUETBALL DOUBLES
REGISTRATION
Registration for Racquetball
Doubles will be held on Tuesday,
February 5 at 5:00 p.m in BIO 103.
All interested individuals must at-
tend this meeting! For further in-
formation call 757-6387 or stop by
204 Christenbury Gym.
NATIVE AMERICANS OF ECU
The Native Americans of ECU are
having their first spring semester
meeting on Monday, Feb. 4th at 7:30
p.m. at 203 Elm Street, Apt. 5. We
encourage anyone interested to at-
tend. If anv questions, call Penny at
931-7531 or Kim at 931-7732.
STUDENTS SUPPORTING OUR
TROOPS
There will be a meeting of all members
and interested parties wishing to be-
come a member at 5 p.m. in the base-
ment of Fletcher Residence Hall on
Tuesday Feb. 5
ASSERTIVE TRAINING
WORK5J1QP
A three part workshop offered to stu-
dents at NC) COST by the University
Counseling Center on Thursday, Feb
7, Thursday, Feb. 14, and Thursday,
Feb. 21. All three sessions will be con-
ducted from 3-4 p.m 312 Wright
Building (737-6661). Asscrtivencss
trainingcan sharrxwur interpersonal
skills and help you target personal
goals. The workshop will ftxus on
helping you distinguish between your
assertive, aggressive, and nonawrtive
behaviors Call the Counseling Center
for registr.it ion
Pirates burn
75-66 to bring
By Tim Hampton
sum V- �
ECU has been notot
season for a
creepbai kintogai
halt
The creep-l
seemed tobesl
again Mond
Coliseum b itthei
guard Lestei
Ironicalh
foul on Lyons
to the second fl
light reeidui -
Pirate- en rout
rualAthler '� - �
Alt! igl
disalk �� d, th
t dust 11 � '
buildinga 19-pomt
part of the half bel
Four PiraI
,i- Lyons lead th
serve power toi
played a stellar n th
post and finished
Ikt :� :
down 14 ret I forward
Darrefl Overt i
As � n many coi
tests this seas : ' �
tiHk vet '�" '
coach Peti : m
pla ot the m
its conce n. i ind
believe Lestei ngtoh
oneoi the best pla) i
had in the CAA
Atter th ' are
r
ECU loses to Gol
j
w
Freshman guard Les:t-Lye-
Lyons tied his persona! best 23 po
the Duke University
Irvin adds spar
By Latova Hankins
Slatt Writer
Quiet, friendly and easy-go-
ing are three words that track star
Bnan Irvin uses to dot nbe himself
However, the lightning boH cut m
his hair fits the desenption ot him
given bv so nvinv ot his fellow
runners and friends
The junior architecture major
wasbom 20vearsago in PI ttsburgh
Pa. Bnan Keith Irvin began life as a
quiet middle child in a tamih et
five. He began running on the trak
team m his sophomore vear in hih
school. Dunng his junior vear he
also played football, but it was on
the advice of his track coach, who
told him that he was too small tor
football, that set him on the path to
the glorv on the track.
Irvin adds there was another
reason for his going out for the team
in the first place "1 started track
because I wanted to do something
else. My cousin on the girl's team
wante I
Irvin -viic
He was
scholars .
Pill
change tro:r
Greenville prol
oi cultun i
any 17 year ok
awavtrom; j
to be m another
is tmlv a chan
Carson sa i
began runnimjj
sprinting eve
pulled in the -J
man year force
all of Iran's e
relavs such ai
x4oa
"Irvin has
gressiverunne'
on at even rmi
hasgottenaloti
400 meter runrl
Senior lkr
seen the pi J





4
7
&hc iEaHt (Earulinian
February 5,1991
PERSONALS
)S
( i�i,Kn i i IONS
: i. � Hcd
i
i � . Ian .
! HI K VV nlcdgt i s
�hi r.u's - � � �
�;�' t
I
-
: I'M sh,m rm
'i ni i i
I Mil �s
K
1
Cl


.
the Zeta s
DtSPLAY CLASSIFIED
i shiris
,ii i
w
ns ai
� �
ii nationally know n
m assertive, dynamic
lual to (each and con-
ical estate seminars
seen these seminars
let them yourself
) per month possible
.000.00 possible ft.
ay for an interview,
(208)338-9960.
VNS.OJ IU
- f EG
Tine
Feb 4that 7 i
1 � � Apt 5 Ut
ASS! I V TRAINING
WORKSHOP
A thrti- pan workshop offered tostu-
di -is i NOG 1ST by tha University
ounsciingt enter on rhunday, Rib
7, Thurvi.iv. feb 14, and Thiirsdav,
FA 21 Ml thrcr sessions will be con-
ducted from M p.m M2 Wright
Building tyhhD AMeruventM
h'OKTINC. OLK trainingiinsh,trrxTW(nirintexpersonal
PCS ifcBh Md help von target personal
Itgot all members goals The workshop will focus on
wishing to be- helping vou distinguish betwivn ytnir
m in the base- tNcrtrvc, aggrcssivt, and ntHWCrttvc
dencc Had on behaviors (all the Counseling Center
tor registration
it -
Pirates burn R
75-66 to bring
By Tim Hampton

ECU h.is been notorious all
�on tor allowing opponents to
pback intogames in the second
"he creep-back syndrome
I to be showing its nasty face
nn Monday nighl at Minges
liseum bul then Piraterreshrnan
ester I yons took charge
Ironicallv . it was ,m intensive
on 1 yons who had elov ated
h so ond floor foranother high
� reel dunk that charged the
en route to their third Colo
thletic Asso� iation win.
Although 1 yons' dunk was
allowed, the Pirates proceeded
dust rhe Naval cademy by
In ga I ' p �inl � id mthe latter
� � � the halt before setting tor a
hf� win ovei the Midshipmen
ut Pirate? hit double figures
�; lead the way with 20. Re-
.� power torward ! im Brown
i a stellar game on the low
md finished with 12. c enter
peland had It' and pulled
It rebounds, and forward
i herton netted 10.
s he has done in main con
� this season, it was Lyons who
.� t tter the game Navy
Pete 1 lernnann lauded the
� the freshmen sensation
e been in this league since
� . eption i 1 years ago and I
ester 1 yons is going to be
� thebest players we have ever
thet A V" 1 lerrmann said.
tter the charging call which
met a mass uproar from the Pirate
crowd,an Kevin Armstrong lay-up
and six straight pointsfrom( vcrton
allowed I c U to capture a 13 point
advantage ith 6 25 remaining
While 'in Pirates found .1
smooth oiti nsive gear late, it was
the team s Ik n.n ious, mostly man-
to man defense whii h ga e the
Midshipmen troubles Navy's
leading seorei guard Erik Harris
19.7 pei game was held three al
the hall and s. ored the majority ot
his 15 points have E l had built a
big lead
I Cl head coach Mike Steele
credited Lvons and Stanley Love
with gotxt cov rage on th Navy
star.
e K.ilK ined I i larris,
1 think w e h.t� � I - h!
detensi c teai " �
Steele said
rhetrapi
defense h I tii tin
der4t perci I hilc
It I hit over 4 j cii
field goals.
Anothei key lo h' I �- hm cess
Monday w as the plav f Bi
who prefers his rok' if coming oft
the bench ti � iontribute
"Earlier in thi
to me and said 1 � is moi m
fortab eof rol
Steele said oi Bn n Hi has ad
justed well and h.is had a solid
year
Afivemini first
half was .ill im Brow n '�� i
Navy s Sami n k I I n ut id
jumper to put the Midshipmei
bv one theirlast lead ot the came
with 12:48 remaining in the first half
Brown answered with by mus-
cling in a deuce.
(h a semi f.istbreak the next
time down ourt, Lyonsfed Brown
toroneol hismonster truck)ams. A
minute later, Brownscored again to
boost the Pirate lead to seven.
I he Pirates now travel to
Georgia Southern to take on the
! agl� s Wednesday as part of a four
game road trip.
On lob l, K I will play al
lames Madison and then travel to
(leorge Mason tor a Feb. 11 CAA
contest
Naval Academy
(6 15, 2-7)
Mel Davis, 5-1 I, 10,
Eddie Reddick, 1-6,3, Nick
Marusich,6 IO,12,ErikHar
n it 15 MichaelBurd,3
11,7,1 ance Reinhard, 2-7, 5,
Sam ook, l5, 7, Pepper
Dav.O 0,1. Kevin Havens, 1
1,6
I ast Carolina University
(10-10,3-6)
kein Armstrong, 3 6,
8 Darrell Ovcrton, 3 5, 10,
k opeland, 3 9, 10,1 ester
I yons,8 1 $,20,Stanley 1 ove,
1 5,4, PauK hildress.O 0,0,
Mt vc Ri hardson, 0-6, 1,
Robin 1 louse, 4 6
�it
Pcrlkrh, 0-2,1, joe Brightwdl
0 11,0, 1 im brown. 610, 12
ntti fokinen, 0-0,0
Ddii R�ed � ECU Photo Lab
Freshman forward Kevin Armstrong powers o�� � I irforward
Eddie Reddick for two from the paint Armstrong made three ot his six
attempts for eight points ;
iwmn
ECU loses to Golden Eagles, 63-60 after leading entire game
Cel�sl� Hotlman � ECU Photo Lab
f reshman guard Lester Lyons tosses up another two horn the floor
l yons tied his personal best 23 points a record he originally sel during
the Duke University game
By Matt Mumma
Assistant Sports Editor
I he American University
( oldenl:agle'scombinationol( taig
Sedmakand Brian Gilgeous pet ked
awavatanearlv ECU lead Saturday
night to go ahead in the final two
minutes and win the game 63-60.
This was the Pirate'ssecond loss
to American the season after splii
ting two games last year. With the
loss, the Pirates tell below the 500
markat9-10ontheseasonand tell to
2 6in A,A plav
rhfe Pirates di not match up
well against the Eagles. American
has Moot 11 center Sean Stevens
and (vtoot u torward Sedmak, but
11h tallest Il fplayerissophomon
.enter Ikeopeland who is onh
foot 8.
rhe Pirates decided to takead-
vantageol their smaller sizeand ran
the court emulating the Runnin'
ReK-lsotUNLV.
We were looking to beat them
up and down thecourt because they
had some big guys said freshman
guard Lester I yons after the ganxv
The fast paced style mat E I
adopted put them ahead tor most
oi thegameand it looked like they
might win the game bo ause ot it
rhe Pirates started out the first
half in a tur
rheygainedanearh 10 punt
lead over American just seven
minutes into the game 1 yonsled
the way with 16 tirst halt points
and Copeiand contributed nine
points
The Pirate's 10-poinl lead in
the tirst halt dw indled athalftime.
But it should have been much
more.
"We struggled offensively
said ECU head coach Mike Steele
At halftime instead ot being up
six wehadachancetobeup ' lor
14 punts it we completed
plays
Thereasonthe failed tocom
pteteplays wasbecause they tried
U nish the ball up and down the
court. Main times this led to
unforced turnovers or bad passes.
As a result the Eagles were
able to whittle .nwtv ECU'S lead
from 24-14 at the 1027 mark to
comebai k to w I
play in the first halt
"Weli.Ki them at i p inl where
wecould have taken them out of the
game or let thcmbacl
them back in said i �
At halftime the - ,v ;
iI ;adeticitthatisnota!lthatwide
in college basketball
The s ond : � in with a
s oring drought for E I Sopho-
more guard Steve Richardson hit
the first E I bask ift r Hvc rnin-
utes had ti. ked off the lock
Hu' teams coi : ! 1 fouls
in the first lOminutesof the second
halt
We probabi) set the game ol
basketball back lOyears rhcfirstlO
minutesol tlel trcet
tieht, said �� � ri
( hris Kn n he.
ThebruisinRsryleofplayhelped
the bigger and stronger American
players gam a small $7-36 load at
15:18 in the second half.
They controlled the paint by
not allowing (opeland any second
half points and also worked the ball
See American Page 8
ECU swim
teams leave
forUNC-
VVlImington
By Christine Wilson
Staff Writer
With the ECU men'sswimteain
record at 8-2 and the women's 7-3,
head coach Rick Kobe says the team
should place high in th�.v Colonial
Athletic Association Championship.
The CAA Championship
started Feb. 2 and will continue until
Feb. 9 at the University ol North
Carolina at Wilmington
"We have no idea how the meet
will him out Kobe Said Wc lust
have to do our best and swim fast"
Kobe savs that each swimmer
he is taking to the conference will
probably be a finalist "The tough
part ison them he viid Ihcveach
have to try to place in the top eight it
we are going to come home as
h.iuipions"
"Many ot the nun swimmers
will do reallv well Kobe said. "Se
niors Mark O'Brien and George
Walters will swim the 100-and 2 � i-
vd.hat kstroke. Their mam competi-
tion will come from a backstroke
swimmer from ML "
Si niors Ted Chnstensen and
T( �m 1 lolsten unll swim the200-and
lOO-yd individual medley. "Last
year at the CAA Championship,
Moisten won the 200-yd. butterfly
eveni He is entered in it again
Kobe said Also senior John
Limbrakis will swim the 400 yd.
individual medley.
Seniors lohn Farrell and Sieve
Benkusky, juniors Marc Cook, De-
rek elson aiui Marc Ward will
Uimpctt: in nWdle di sUikc i rtvsty le.
Benkusky and sophomore Brad
Hemdon willswim frees tvlespnnts
For the women, senior Meredith
Bridgers will swim the 100- and 200-
d. breasfroke event "Meredith
should do extremlv well She has
won both events tor the past three
years and went to the NCAA
Championships last vcar Kobe
s.nd.
f reshman Jacqueline SiTber will
swim the4(XVvd. mdi wlual mod lev
and a �mpete m d istance rreestyle. "I
am impressed with lacquelinc's tal-
ent she hasshown this season Kobe
said "Shosordy a freshman and she
has already set a varsity record (in
the lOOOO-yd.freeal IO36dQ5M
Sophomore Suzanne O'Brien
will compete in the butterfly events
and sophomore Tia Pavdue will
swim freestyle sprints Sophomon;
IiiIk Wilhelm is entered in the 2i"Hv
vd individual rnedk. and scmot
i arohn Gn?en will compete m the
distance freestyle.
Each event is spread over the
three day period. On Saturday Feb.
9, the swimmers will compete in the
last events. That evening, the teams
will receive their a wards. "We hope
to get a lot oi support from the stu-
dents, kibe savs.
Irvin
ECU men's track team
By Latoya Hankins
Staff Writt-r
Quiet, friendly and easy-go-
ing are throe words that track star
Brian Irvin uaestodeaattwlumsetf.
1 iowever, the lightning bolt ait in
his hair tits the description of him
given bv so many of his fellow
runners and friends
The junior architecture major
uasborn20vearsago in Pittsburgh,
Pa. Brian Keith Irvin began life as a
quiet middle child m I family of
five I fe began running on the track
team in his sophomore year in high
school Dunng his rumor year he
also played football, but it was on
the advice of his track coach, who
told him that he was too small for
lootball, that set him on the path to
the glory on the track.
Irvin adds there was another
reason forhisgomgout fortheteam
in the first place. "I started track
because I wanted to do something
else. My cousin on the girl's team
wanted me to come out and run
too Irvin said
He was recruited to ECU on a
scholarshipextendodln tr.u kcoach
Bill Canon. Irvin admits that the
change from Pittsburgh to
Greenville provided him with a bit
of culture sh(vk. "It's .i dream tor
anv 17 vcar old to be on his own
a way from parents said Irvin. "But
to be in another part o! the country
is truly a change.
Carson siw the potential and
began running him in all ot the
sprinting events. A hamstring
pulled in the summer ot his tresh-
man year forced Carson to channel
all of Irvin's energy into running
relays such as the 4 x 200 nd the 4
x400.
"Irvin has alwavs been an ag-
gressive ru nner a nd ca n be conn tod
onatevery meet Carson said. "He
hasgottena lot stronger He thebest
400 meter runner in the area
Senior Ike Robinson, who has
soon the progress m Irvin's run-
ning, said that he is the key to all of
the relays.
"Brian has to bo a part of the
relays to make them good
Robinson said. "I don't think that
he knows his own potential
Robinson added that he be-
lievesthat lrvincould be better than
he is now.
Irvin currently is ranked fourth
in the nation in the 400 and runs the
last leg in the 4 x 400 relay team that
is ranked fifth in the nation.
Irvin explains the unusual
haircut by saying the idea came to
him last summer.
"At first it was just twolinescut
in mv head he said. "However,
every time I went to the barber, I
kept telling him to add something
else to it. Finally it came out to look
like this Irvin adds that the cut
usually last for three weeks.
In his spare time Irvin likes to
draw graffiti and read track and car
magazines.
Irvin sa id, "lama fanof any car
that can go over 150 miles per hour
I le added that he has two
Limborgini posters on his wall.
"That'smydreamcar'hesaid.
He also takes pride in his in-
volvement in The Wheel, a organi-
zation within the track team. Irvin's
said the group is based on the unity
of the track team.
Besides bei ng a member on t he
team, there isalso a secret ritual that
must be undertaken to becoming a
member.
When asked the procedure
Irvin said It's a Wheel thing; You
wouldn't understand
Irvin is proud of his teammates
and the strides that they have taken
in bringing recognition to ECU.
However he feelsa bi t slighted when
the subject of funding comes up.
"1 feel that we don't get the
respect we deserve he said. "We
are the best team on campus but the
football team gets all theattention. I
don't think that is fair to the team "
See Irvin. pa9 8
Cavs continue win streak,
improve record to 16-4
CHARLOTTESV1LLE, Va.
(AP) � The Virginia Cavaliers, who
often use physical defense" in an
attempt to frustrate more talented
opponents, have met their match in
DavcOdom.
Not surprisingly, he used to be
one of them.
Odom, who spent seven years
asa Virginia assistant, ncwhasbecn
involved in three games against the
Cavaliers since becoming Wake
Forest's coach last season. The first
two were decided by one point
apiece. Virginia won the third
meeting 83-80 when Chris King
missed a 3-point attempt at the
buzzer Saturday.
In all three contests, hustle and
bxxlies flying around the lane have
been the norm.
"Thcv reallv make us work
Virginia point guard John Crotty
said of the Denxn Deacons. "They
puta lotofbodyoncvery body. You
can't reafly cross the lane without
getting hit, and that's the way we
plav defense, too. It's an effective
way to play. After a while, you
don't even want to cut into the lane
when you keep getting hit
On Saturday, Wake Forest's
hard work wasn't enough. Bryant
Suth scored 31 points and Crotty
added 24 to lead the 15th-ranked
Cavaliers to their fifth victory.
Virginia (16-4 overall, 5-2 At-
lantic Coast Conference) also got 10
points from Kenny Turner, all in the
second half.
Wake Forest (10-7, 34) lost to
Virginia for the 10th time in their
last 11 meetings.
"We've asked for a great effort
from all of our players all year, and
we got that again today Odom
said. "Sometimes you get a good
effort, but you don't quite get the
performance you want"
Odom's team gets a shot at re-
demption this Sunday in Winston-
Salem.





8 Stic �aat (Uaralinian February 5, 1991
American
continued from page 7
outside, opening up senior guard
Brock VVortman to MOM 10 points.
" ITieir sie was I big factor. (We
could) not v;et the Kill inside said
SUvle.
Another big factor was sopho-
n ro lorward BmnGilgeous, whose
quiet and consistent play silcnoxl
Minges (loltseum more than once.
I lc 9cored 20 points, grabbed 10
reboundsand battled freshman for-
ward Kevin Armstrong and
Richardson who were assigned to
him defensively.
I think he's the best plaver m
the league I le always guards the
toughest player, he's always good
tor six to 2 rebounds and you can
pencil him in tor 17. IS or 19 pointsa
game sir) kiuvhe.
Ilv Mcid v pkiv oK .ilgeousand
Sedmakworedown ECLTsdefenses
and brought the game down to the
last thirt) secondswhereRichardson
hit . thrce point shot that was ruled
onh a two-point basket. Instead of
63-61 American, thescorewas63-60.
ECU needtxi thav points and
the Eagles had the ball with 25 sec-
onds. Sophomore guard P.ml
Childress fouled American's guard
Dbtuld Grant, who missed hisone-
Mid-one attempt.
With 20 seconds left, ECU had
the Kill and a chance to makea three-
pointer and possibly tie the game
Noted three point shooters
Richardson and junior guard Ribin
I louse came in the game.
Childassdribbled theballdown
thecourt His three possibilities were
Lyons, who had the hot hand;
Richardson, who had just nude a
clutch basket a few seconds earlier;
or House who had just comeinto the
game.
Lyons and Richardson were
both covered so House got the ball.
He put up a three-point shot but it
didn't go in.
Copeland,whohad lOrcbounds
in the game, got the ball and passed
it right back to House. He shot and
missed again from three-point land.
This time Gilgeous got the re-
bound, timeexpiaxl and American
won 63-60.
FAMOUS FROZEN YOGURT
Welcome Back Students
Come lo Zack's aiici show us your Student I.D. andi
get 109$ off any purchase over $3.(X)
Come to think of it, why not bring a friend!
Romantic
At Heart
Irvin
Continued from page 7
In the future Irvin hopes to run
in the 1992 Olympic m Barcelona
Spain and live in Honda. I le cites
his fathei and Olympic hurdler,
Roger Kingdom, as his track influ-
ences. 1 le remember th.it his father
attenxjedallofhishighschoolrneets
His involvement with kingdom
earnedurii ig t he past su miner when
he trained with him at a track club
run b Elberl Kennedy.
Ask what keeps him going in
meet at tot meet and Irvin replies it
is the advice ol his father. "Never
giveup, and the feeling that comes
fromcatching someone and captur-
ing yet another victory.
Wf Er
1991 BSN
STUDENTS.
V�
�.nter the Air Force
immediately after gradua-
tion � without waiting for the
results of your State Boards. You
can earn great benefits as an Air
Force nurse officer And if selected
during your senior year, you may
qualify for a five-month internship
at a major Air Force medical facili-
ty. To apply, you'll need an overall
2.50 CiPA. Get a head start in the
Air Force. Call
I'SAF HFALTH PROFESSIONS
(919)850-9549
COLLECT
IAN'
l I lil'Kjt lot In hi),
a i r ('a! 11 tit hit s.
1 nl iijll. v � n ri '(
41" Evan St Mall
P ntow n
TS2 175(1
There's plentj of KREK
parking at our rear
entrance off of
Cotaneh
Blood Drive
Mendenhall Stn.lent Center
from 12 pin to 6 pm
our goal is 250 donors
Sponsored by
The Easi Carolinian
your college paper
The University Media Board
seeks editors and general managers
The University Media Board is seeking fulltime
students interested in serving in the following posts for
the 1991-1992 academic year:
J Editor Expressions minority students magazine
J Editor The Rebel fine arts magazine
J Editor Buccaneer yearbook
J General Manager The East Carolinian student newspaper
J General Manager Photo Lab
J General Manager WZMB student radio station
J Day Student Representative
All applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7
SILVER
BULLET
(JIRI.S
;iri s
GIRLS
COLD BEER
WEDNESDAYS:
PodTournament Night! Doors open
7pmGame time 7:30 pm
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
Female (exotic) dancers!
(.hxirsopen S pm. Static time l-11 pm
SATIRDAV
D.I playing request!
Bring your friends and come out to the Silver Bullet and let's .ill have ;i real good time
756-6278
Location: (Old 264 Playhouse) Bin Blue Building behind Earl's Store on Farmville Highway
4 miles west of Greenville 264 Alt.

FEBRUARY
TANK
55 gallon SALE
Tank � Hood Light Combo
99
$79
All Other Tanks On Sale Too!
University Center
14th & Charles St.
Open Nightly till 9 pm
Sunday 1-6
757-0056
1
Preview
�91
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications available in 316 Wright
February 4-29, 1991
Deadline for completed applications is March 8,1991
(4:00 pm)

J)





Title
The East Carolinian, February 5, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 05, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.788
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy