The East Carolinian, January 22, 1991






QJiie iEaat (Kartfltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.64 No.68
Tuesday, January 22,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
US. denounces Iraq's
teataentcrfPOWfe)
Circulation 12,000
20 Pages
RIYADH Saudi Arabia (AP)
Iraq said Monday it had scattered its
�illuii prisoners of war at civilian,
economic education and other tar
gets a wo c th.it n .illil its pre
u.i - T,i!ty. ,�! using foreign hos
tages - human shields
rhe l nited States, Britain,
c anad i -uui It.iK deplored the Iraqi
move
It i one more piece of e idence
about thenatun 'of Saddam I luSSCin
Sn'Kr ot Defense Dick � heney
toldable V Network Pus
woukl be a cleat cut violation of the
i ienev ,i . i invention in etfo t ,i war
crime
henev and Britain � luetof staff,
n i. hief Marshal Sir 1 md i raig
said trx Iraqi ta tu wmiki not deflect
ilu allied .in assault
� med Mon
i with a constant stream o I S
warplanesmanngotl therunwavsof
a huge air basem Saudi Arabia ta
briefing. An I orce Maj i .en Burton
lre said s 100 sorties had been
flownsincethe tartofthewar,though
thealKes were nowhere near' tlu'ir
objective fo lestro Iraq's Scud
launching ability
i S I � ' missiles meanwhile,
thwarted Iraq �� I I arta k ol the
3-da oldPei tanGuItwai stopping
an earl) mot ning shower of missiles
bound foj Saudi Vrabia
rhe overnight bun ig� ol Iraqi
missiles was aimed attl eSaudicapi
taloi Riyadh and at Dhahran, me site
ot a huge air Kin.1. Moore snd eight
were destroyed and a ninth tell
hamilcsslv into the Persian Gulf. It
had been originally believed thai id
misiles were fired
i kte missile hit Riyadh, damag-
ing a building in a residential neigh
borhood,bul it was unclear whether
it was a Scud that was not counted in
the military's tallv. a Patriot that wen!
a wry or some other rocket
There were no injuries, the oint
Arab Command said Mondav
Baghdad radiosaid t dayitheld
more than 20 prisoners of war. the
highest number it had claimedyet
Hie radio, rnonitored in Nicosia, de
nounced the allied botnbing as "de
void of the minimum human st,m
� lards and viki "Because of this
rocketing, it was decided todisperse
the more than 20 prisooersof war to
civilian, economic, education and
other targets
rhe radio said the airmen had
been sent to the undisclosed sites
Sunday no Monday
The United States says its bomb-
ing ha targeted strategic sites and
has tml to avoid civilian buildings
Monday's Iraqi move to scatter
thePOW(s) attargetsitescameadav
alter it displayed seven l JV s
three Americans, two Britons, an Ital-
ian and a Kuwaiti on Baghdad
television.
See Iraq, page 9
Pilot or
weapons
officer pulls
� , tion
� . � ron
Ihei side
of seal
Survival kit: Two-way radio
signal mirror, cans of water,
medical kit lishmg equipmenl
survival knife.
Survival and rescue
? Search and rescue helicopters pinpoint crew through
survival kit radio or through beacon on ejected seat
? Crews have extensive training in survival, including a
simulated pow experience
�: - -� �� ���y)ay
Illegal captivity
defies rules of
Third Geneva
Convention
WASHINGTON, D.C (AP)
The State Department "strongly
protested Iraq's apparent treatment
of U.S prisoners of war as contrary
t( the third Geneva Convention of
1949" � an assertion that was sup
ported hvofficialsol'the Internationa!
Red Cross
The Geneva Convention on
treatment of POWs, which Iraq
signed, savs prisoners "must at all
times he protected particularly
against actsof violence or intimida-
tion and against insults and public
curiosity
Iraq claims the allies, have lost
more than 150 aircraft nearly 10
times the 17 aircraft the allies have
reported lost, )s dt them to hostile
fire That i. li. �. !i Anvni.in ur-
r.ut oncotthtiii �NavyF-14that
wao jowncd Monday.
An lone L-t. Col. Greg Pepin
told reporters in Saudi Arabia that
allied pilots are "looking at some of
thenxstformidableairdefensesever
encountered
"The only way I can describe it
is it ycrtj turn a room into the world's
biggesf p pcom popper and trv ti i
walk fnm one end U�theother with-
out getting hit by a piece of pop
com slid one U.S. stealth bomber
pilot.
Ihe commander oi US. forces
in the Gulf, Gen. H. Norman
See Convention page 3
Nortli Carolinians remember slain civil rights leader in Raleigh march
RAI EIGI About W0
people gathered .u the state eapitol
Mond IN m� � ' ' � a mart, h to
remi mbei i rights leader
Martin r.
Ih ci lpisterswith
adrawingol Kingand the headline
I iving the I 'ream
rhecrowd l bla � sand whites
included a f w rm mben of a peace
group Mn handed out fliers thai
mi tuded a King spei � h from l7
opp sing the Vieli �. ai
fhe I mci � . i i alition lor
� in fhe Middle ! asf handed
out the fliers n hi �ven marked
.is ,i membrame' ol King's
birthday.
State offi es v. en u ant as
stateemployeesobsi rved the king
holiday approved b tin legislature
three t irs .n i
Raleigh Cit) Coun ilman
Ralphampbell one of the orga-
nizers ol fhe march said it was
smaller than previous years, in part
because other cities are holding
marches ol their own
rhe holiday also wasobserved
by parades in Charlotte, (Ireenville,
Greensboro and Rockv Mount.
Some ol our other munici-
palities are observing the holiday
themselves he said, "SO wedon't
have as main in Raleigh .is we ve
had in past years
Campbell said
a celebration at
Raleigh's Memo
rial Auditorium
included a com-
munity choir oi
about 500 people.
"Those tolks
would be here
marching it thev
weren't involved in
the choir, so that
has held dow n
some of the turn
Out, tin he said.
The marchers
were led by mem-
bers ot the King
1 loliday Commis-
sion, which orga-
nized the holiday
celebration Thev
carried a banner that read "Let
Freedom Ring
The marchers moved around
the Capitol and four blocks to the
Rali �' ivii enterforthe rally. A low in thecrowd responded
During the march, a group of by chanting "Bring the troops
young Mi. ks with bullhorns ran home but then returned to sing
alongside ol the marchers veiling, ing'We AreSokJiersinthe Army
champion.
'There is no need for anyone
to trv to emulate him former
v leveland Mayor Carl Stokes said
Peace forum held in Greenville
By Robin Puffy
S t.i 11 Writer
At a forum held in honor of Dr. Martin
Luther King's dedication to peace and non-
violence, about 60 people voiced their hopes
for peace Mondav.
The atmosphere was calm vet anxious as
each person stood for five minutes to share
their viewsonlS. involvement in the Middle
East. A variety of opinions w ere aired, but the
majority seemed to agree that the decision to
declare war was a hasty one and that negotia-
tions should not have ended at the with the
Jan. 15deadline.Many thought that the deci-
sion was made for economic reasons.
Marc 1'etruska, a philosophy m.vjor at
ECU, believes that Hush made an error in
judgement. He said it is wrong to "kill people
for economic interest Petruska said that
the U.S. should reconsider its energy policies,
concentrating on the resources it has and
redirecting its use of fossil fuels.
Mr. Thomas Shuler stood and said that
the U.S. should respect a country's opinions
and beliefs before we impose solutions on
it. He went on to say that he believes the war
will never truly be over in the eves of flu-
Arab people.
Many speakers also agreed that the
problems will remain even after the last shot
is fired, and that America's interests are not
being served by this war.
An ECU graduate student said 'hat he
skpd one of his Jasses why they thought
See Forum page 8
m Ashevil
"Bring the troops home In Asheville, a friend of the
A woman asked "Come on, lue Martin Luther King fr. gave
don't you want the troops to what at first sounded like surpris-
come?" ing advice on the black civil rights
You couldn't
because Martin
was so peculiarly a
man ot his time
Stokes said. "1 lis
chemistry was
made into the
chemistry of the
people, the places
andtheeventsofthe
50s and '60s "
Stokes, who
was elected to
Cleveland's top
post in lub7, pre-
ceded by several
years the rise ol
black mayors in
scores Of other cit-
ies, including New
i ork, l.os Angeles.
Washington, At-
lanta and Philadelphia.
He was main speaker at 10th
annual Martin Luther King Break-
fast at Asheville Civic Center Sat-
urdav An estimated 1,750 people
attended the event to honor King,
who wasassasstnated Apnl4,1968.
"King wasn't a saint Stokes
said. "But he was about as dose to
being a noble person asone is likely
to be
In Lumberton Sunday, Rep.
Han Blue, D-Wake, said King's
passion and devotion for his work
sin hi Id be1 an example for all people.
Blue spoke toa tri-racialcrowd
of about ?(V at Lumberton Senior
High School on the oveof the state's
Martin Luther King r. holiday.
America hasdoneawav with
segregation and many Of the other
evils that Dr. King fought, but its
lob now is equality and quality
opportunities for everybody said
Blue, who is expected to be elected
as the first black speaker oi the
N.C. house
But that should not be used as
an excuse tor mediocrity, he said.
"Martin Luther King jrs
dream is for us to fully realize the
potential of America Blue said.
"We have the ability and oppor-
tunity to solve many of the world's
problems
Worst-case scenario for environment
could ha
watt, Iraqi and Saud1 Arabian oil fields and facilities � with their combined 3-18 billion barrels ot oil reserves �
tremendous environmental impact on the world In the worst case, here s how some see potential problems:
Fires In oil fields, storage terminals
Smoke from burning oil could block sunlight, lower temoer.itures by as much as 68� F within
I 000 miles of Kuwat Couid disrupt monsoons throughout India. Asia and Africa, causing crop
iilures for up to 1 billion people
Reduced sunlight to Northern Hemisphere couid lower average temperatures as much as 10� F.
Create equatorial ozone hole that would increase e�posure to cancer-causing ultraviolet light
Accelerate long-term global warming, carbon diomde from the burning oil t'jps heat be'ore it
escapes to the upper atmosphere, pushing up world temperatures
Pollution Irom chemical weapons
A strike against Iraq's major chemical
weapons storage site at Samarra could
unleash a toxic cloud contaminating crops
and water supples, including region's mam
t'esh wate' source Tigris and Euphrates
Major spills from oil platform, tanker attacks
Damage to a single onshore well could spill up lo
400 000 gallons ot crude oil daily Series of well
blowouts could lead to pollution of 1,000 miles of
coastline � roughly the distance Irom Miami to New
York Destruction ol ust two oil platforms during the
Iran Iraq war resulted n an 80 million gallon oil spill.
more than seven times worse than the 11-million
gallon spill of the Exxon Valdez m Alaska
Nuclear
contamination
S Attacks against
nuclear power plants
m Iraq. Saudi Arabia
or Israel could unleash
highly toxic Plutonium,
other radioactive
substances
endangering life,
water supplies tor
decades
Damage to nuclear
weapons aboard ships
in region could
contaminate gull wuh
plutonium, other
radioactive, chemical
contaminants.
Sou'ces Get t Oi PoHufo" Bu�� frtmnat o' ih E�fv PoWic Eoo"ogr GVouo
By Bot ia USA TOOAv
East Carolina Friends wins the 1990 Governor's
Award for Outstanding Voulenteer Service
By Jean Caraway
Staff Writer
On Nov. 29, 1990, Cov. im
Martin presented East Carolina
Friends with the 1990 Governor's
Award for Outstanding Volunteer
Service.
EC Friends is an organization
that pairs ECU students with chil-
dren,ages4 to 13, whoare in need ot
a big brothersister to provide �
positive adult role model through a
one-to-one relationship with a child.
The schools involved in the
organization are South Greenville
Elementary, Sadie Salter Elemen-
tary and Elmhurst Elementary.
EC Friends originated from an
idea by ECL' undergraduate Gay
Mancss in 1966 because there was
no "Big Brothers Big Sisters Pro-
gram at ECl as there w ere at other
universities.
Maness contacted Dr. Linda
Mooney, presently the faculty ad-
visor for EC Friends, and made this
dream a reality.
EC Friends then submitted a
Constitution and received official
recognition bv the SGA in January
17.
Dr. Mooney wrote and submit-
ted a program proposal to the Pitt
County Schools that same month
and in February a pilot program
was scheduled for the 1987 � '88
school year.
During thespringand summer
months, an Advisory Board was
created, consisting of school, com-
munity and uni versityofficials,and
money was secured from
Bun-oughs-Wellcome and TRW of
Greenville.
In the fall 1987, EC Friends
began with over 30 paired children.
See Friends, page 8
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial 4
Martin Luther King Jr is
remembered for making
everyone "free at last
Features 11
Tim Burton's "Edward
Scissorhands is a successful
comediCromantic fable.
Classified b
Sports 1!
Lady Pirates defeat the Tribe
of William and Mary. 79-76
Saturday night.





2
Ullje iEaiitdJarulttlian January 22, 1991
ECU Briefs
Dr. Brad Folcy currently serving
as acting dean of School of Music
i h Brad Foley is? late
professor of sa i honeandas
sistani l oi the EO' School
' . isic has been appointed
u ting dean 1 he appointment
w as effective )an. I.
t ole) $8, a nativeol India
olis, will serve as actine
m ol the s hool ol Music
�, hile a nation il search is con-
ducted for a successor to Pr
i. harlcs I Stevens, who re-
s' d at the end ol ho tall SC-
Dr. Brad Foley
memberof the E( I mu-
� ' icultv since l1 Foley holos advanced degrees from the
�rsitx of Michigan and had taught previously at Stephen
" istin State University in Texas Ho has served as regional
toi ol the North American Saxophone Alliance. He is well
ninth E U community as a participant in concert; asa
: th th b( I Symphonic Wind Ensemble and as a cham
He has been active in music educator and band
t ions
1 am pleased thai Dr Foley is willing to accept this now
appointrrw nl Dr. Marlene Springer, vice chancellor for a a
demu affairs said. ' I look forward to working closelv with him
I oley has served as assistant dean since uly 1. ' 985
Hardee's Mavo Boddie chosen for
Executive on Campus Program
ird chairman and chief executive officei
Roddic V v!l l'ntorpnst-s. Inc . will be the Exe utiveon Campus
at tin hi cl ol ol Business, an
Mn � cutive on Campus Program according t
Edward l Wheath . professor andhairman of the ECI D
partmcnl ol Marketing brings successful business leaders I
teractwith udents. faculty and businessexccuti �
I an execul hosen annually to partii ip il
' � urn
� native ol Nash I Boddie founded Boddii Nocll
Enl prises in 1962 ' tirm operates 282 Hardee's Restaurants
in North arolin i v- ith Carolina, Virj i, Y ntuck i i
. M .sissmpiand Arkansas rhecompanyempl
pie and is the largest singk private franchise company ii tl
I lardee s i ham
In addition to speaking at t lass s and attending meeting:
with ta. � 111v A-Ay students Boddie il! parti ipate in a breakfast
seminarian 25 for area business leaders at the Greenville Hilton
Sponsored bv E U and the Pitt-Green ville hamberof ommei
cminar will also feature Daniel Friel al ink economist with
NJ N1 hai tte, and George Richards 111, a tax specialist
KM � Marwi k of Raleigh The speakers will present views
��� " imii . lutlook f T the 1"
� � �n about the semin n and rest: i . itions � an be ob
tained b) calling the Pitt-Greenville hamber of Commen il
752 4101 .
Phi Kappa Phi chapter requests
applications for scholarships
1 he E Uhapter ol th ; I moi S i ierj of Phi Kappa Phi
invil ipplications b I : nt wishing to be nominati d I �i
petit � th up to $7,000 a year for first
il rprol
itionallv, 30 Phi Kappa Phi fellowships will b aw ird
solicited from students who have at least junior status ai I
i ul a ling academic re ords
itions and further information may be obtained f i i
Pr Mary llascoff, Room 105 Memorial (.vm.orat the 1 lealth
Education offic in Memorial Gym. 'scholarship committee
� ii lude Glascoff, Pr David Sanders of the Honors
'� �i - EuceneRvanoftheCenterforlntemationalStudies
and Prof.
s.ird of the S hool (�t Mum,
ECU enrolls record number of
students for the spring semester
E has a record on-campus enrollment for the spring
semester � itl 15,421 students registered for classes. Registrar I.
(iilbi rt M r ret rti d 1 hursday.
rhe 1991 total is 114 higher than the spring semester enroll-
ment last year, Moore said. Spring semester classes began an 11
ind n jstration was completed Tuesday Ian 1?.
! ! rollmenl for last tall was 16,500
�re said that for spring semester, the head count in luded
I743 undergraduates and -1 v graduate students.
Two percussionists to perform
in Fletcher Recital Hall Jan. 23
� ii aonists (lark Harrell of Purham and Nicholas Hoi
' Pittsboro, both senior students in the F.CU School of
Musi. , will perl m in recital Wednesday, an. 23, at 7 p.m. m
K I. s Fletcher Music Center Recital Hall.
Both r � students of Mark Ford of the ECU music
faculty and a for the Bachelor of Music Education
degree
Holland pi rti u i : the program will include a
Stevens'arrangement of Raymond Helble's "Grand Fantasy in C
Major " Pamel Kes s "Intercurrence" and David Friedman's
"Midnight Mar "
1 larrell will be featured in Edmund Cionek's "Stick It
"Fight Pte os for Unaccompanied Timpani" by Eliot Carter and
1-tude tor a Quiet Flail" by Chistopher F)eane.
fhe two students will perform together the Anthony Cirone
" Doubleoncerto for Two Percussionists and Orchestra Pianist
Elizabeth Norvcll will be accompanist for the joint recital.
Compiled from CCU News Bureau reports.
Support groups offer help for eating disorders
By Heather Modlin
Stall Wiiter
1 lealth and physical beauty are
given exaggerated importance in
American si x iety Ibis is the age of
the Slim I ast diet and intenseaero-
bu exercisi Man) people believe
that being thin is unquestionably
the besl ���� i to be a ccpted and to
tv-oi sei ure about themselves.
rhisattitudei hi result in a va-
rietj disorders Anorexia
� i it 'iiv bulimia
rging) and conv
ire the most
. orders plaguing
ru r. � �
(bineii
c uTim
� � t
peo
Anon tial asseveraldetectable
symptom aused by severe weight
loss. Anorexicsare normallvemaci-
ated but i. inear ot gaining �ms include dry
skin and htipatii in and di-
gestu iomnia and
amenonlemssuch
as iniit) to infec-
tionsk t� -sis and irl that could a a result ot
progressive weight loss.
Bulimicsare usually a verageor
slightly above average in weight
They typically binge and purge se-
cretly and gain and lose weight rap-
idly. Bulimics purge through self-
induced vomiting, tlu- use of laxa-
tives md diuretics, fasting or exer-
cising. They are subject to medical
problems as a result of their eating
and purging habits. These problems
include dehydration, constipation
and digestive disorders, severe
dental problems and muscle
weakness. Ulcers and heart irregu-
larities may develop if bulimia
progresses untreated.
Compulsive overeaters are
usually overweight and may even
become obese. Accompanying the
weight increase may Iv shortness
of breath, high blood pressure and
joint problems. If compulsive
overeaters become severely obese,
their problems may extend to
ost,oarthntis and life-threatening
disorders such as heart and gall
bladder diseases and diabetes
Fat mgdisorders are abie, prob-
lem facing college women todav In
fact. Dr. Diana Antonacci, a psy-
chiatrist at the Student 1 lealth Cen-
ter, said that depending upon the
survey, 5 to U percent ol college
students are bulimit.
There is a new support croup
starting oncampusfi r wi imen with
eating disorders It is similar to a
program the Student Counciling
Center instituted previously. Fhc
group will be a free sen k e headed
by ECU Medical School affiliates
Dr Diana Antonacci and I r Susan
Ehrlich.
The group will start meetings
m the last week ol anuar. FT
and a halt hi ur meet ing will N held
weekly throughout the semester at
the Student 1 lealth (.enter
The meetings will be partly
educational and partly support
group Dr. Antonacci wants to i re
ate a groupenvironment for people
to discuss their problems "There
will be some educational compo-
nent, but it will also be a supportive
group experience tor peopleshe
Slid
The meetings will consist of
discussion topics intndneed bv.and
of interest to, the group members
Interested females should cad
551-2404and speak to Regina to set
up an appointment. The more
quickly petiole respond, the more
quickly the meetings will .tart
People who would rather he
seen individually may call and s,v
one of the fhre psychiatrists on stati
at the Student I lealthenter
Midwife program backed
by grant money
E$3 I e lair I larper
Assistant !S�ews Editor
enable the
' "develop
ristered
-
r
He
e-i idw tte can
' � rial irc.m rmal
! Ml
the
� � mid
'� du e
il n t astern
-
� � ; � am is being funded
rant from the
teB.Reyi I an I rust.
second OOfr imthe
f Ei " runent,
alih a turd li'surNs to
11 district
� the pr
Fhel( i S' Ml- Will
Iv worki� m Area
: Martin
district
health d e i r Iind the
.tuimmans,
Camdian counties
Departn �ind Gy - ol ot

nurse-mid-
t its kind in
the �
u
th. S i
with
;��.�
med
stati
dean oi tin
said
"Our university is a perfect
sitting tor developing a model
. �� -ram m midwifery because we
in located at the heart of the region
in our state where infant mortality
and inadequate and poor prenatal
care are most prevalent.
� . p rtunity for
whk h shares
: ; � fessions
-�n to pa
to work in
lerserved areasol the
resel awter,associale
nursing school,
Crime
Doesn't
Pay
but we do.
The East
Carolinian,
it pays.
According to 1988 statistics.
astern orthC arolma had a infant
death rate of 12.6 per l.tXX) births.
In 1988, i'lttountv had an m
fantdeathrateot 17 4 per 1,000, The
infant death rate is based on the
numbersof deaths per JXX) before
the age ot one.
The nursing school plans to
recruit faculty immediately. They
hope to admit the first students in
the fail semester or 1991.
Once the program is in full
swing, the) hope to graduate 10
nurse mid wives a year.
Students hoping to enroll in the
program need to be certified regis-
tered nurses with baccalaureate
degrees who are eligible for the
graduate program at EC U
This Week's Entertainment:
11 "a i
Egypt
I burs. 24
DR UTMTI.
S5 admi sion for all you can drink
Fri. 25
Reason To 1 late
Sat. 2d
I ill inn Fence
; Cotanchc S;
I HI

' � urs in lam
� i-l an
.1 i
758-0080
Clbtudent
government
Association
ATTENTION!
There are openings still
available for legislative
positions in the Student
Government Association.
Day Representatives and
Dorm Representatives
positions available.
Apply today in the
Student Government
Assoc. Office -
Mendenhall Student
Center
757-4726
Convention
1

Continued from page 1Mohawk
Schwarzkopf, said Sunday that
allied pilotsare locating many of
Iraq's mobile missile launchers
- and have crppled some Iraqi
nuclear readers Before, the war,
some officials said preventing
Iraq from developing nuclear'
weapons should be a kev goal in
any fighting
Moore, thedinxtorot opera-
tions tor the US Central Com-
mand, said Saddam s ability to1
a mimu nicate wi t h h is troops had
been impaired, but not elimi-1
nated (ver all, "we are well on
our way to our objectives he
said
Rear Adm Rilev L Muson.
a immander ot the Red Sea battle
force of about 30 ships, said the
air war would take at least twoReconn,
more weeks � even longer if theA �, i .��
Iraqi air force 11 mtmues to avoidU S Mull
dogfights and keeps the bulk oflong rangt-
its planes on the ground. Thatsys'e"iS IC
WOuid require intensive bomb-1 jfg�!s ar.i
ing to destroy the planes in their heavily fortified bunkers, he said.

ECU gradilate i
B Robin Duffy�
"mei �
Slat t Writer
-i I. �
A new definition ot marketing
will be published this February K-Ther � �
ttie American Marketing Associa-ton
tion thanks to two EC U graduate�
-indents�
1 he stud v 14 marketing, at a rd -end upmqui
ingtotheE i definition,imadeup
ot "theactivities involved in satisfy
ing individuals groups ot organi-wanted �
ations who have objectives anddot � �
purchasing power and are poten-pns. � -
tially willing to exchange some �
thing of value tor something ex-�
pected to be ot greater aluethi �
The two ECU MBA studentspress i �
Barbara rerreil oi Elizabeth C itv and�
Louise Perreca-Smith ot Greenville� ���
came up with the idea when thevject
were assigned a research paper in
oneol their graduate courses
r. David W. Glascoff, an!little n
.ins oate profess t ot marketing n -mittevi totht
quested the assignmentrition
ABOVE
0
y
A.
i
Duriim the 22nd. 23rd, 2
Sigma Phi Fraternity will hold)
11 :(X) each evening. The Brotl
to come and find out what we
we are not the stereotypical erj
athletic program is gaining in
find out why we always have
Please look around at otl
Deltas. You will find that ve
to he both above and beyond.
Tiiesdav: Pizza
Wednesday: Sul
Thursday: Casii
Friday: Bid Nig
Call 757-1817
DELTAI
BROTHERHCM
510 E. lOthSt.Acro!





ing disorders
ind parth support
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ronmenl lot people
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ksentatives and
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available.
my in the
government
lice -
all Student
157-4726
Convention
Continued from page 1
Schwarzkopf, said Sunday that
allied pilots are kxrahng many of
Iraq's mobile missile launchers
� and have crippled some Iraqi
nuclear readers Before the war,
some officials said preventing
Iraq from developing nuclear
weapons should be a kev goal in
anv fighting.
Moore, thodirector of opera-
tions for the U.S. Central Com-
mand, said Saddam's ability to
communicate wi th his trwps hud
been impaired, but not elimi-
nated (Her all, "we an well on
our way to our objectives he
snd
Rear Adm Riley L Mixson,
OMmmmterof the Red Sea battle
(WES of about 30 ships, said the
,nr war would take at least two
mere weeks even longer if the
Iraqi air force continues to avoid
dogfights and keeps the bulk of
its planes on the ground That
would require intensive bomb-
ing to destroy the pl.irn in their
heavik fortified bunkers, he said.
(She gflfit (Earolinian January 22.1991 3
Mohawk
A 10
JFW
MLRS
The Grounds of Deis
The stages of a ground attack
ert Storm:
Air Artillery campaign :
Onc et'T'y misvle vies ind defensive
strongpo'its ,ue tocited rd identified low fiymq
aircrjtt -md multiple liunch rocket Systems I MLRS)
atlacK them
ECU graduate students redefine marketing
By Robin Duffy
Staft Writer
A new definition of marketing
will be published this Febn;ar bv
the American Marketing Assoo.i-
tion thanks to two BCU graduate
students
I hesludvot m.irketing,accord
ing to the EG definition, is made up
of "theactivities involved in satisfy-
ing individuals, groups or organi-
zations who have objectives and
purchasing power and are poten-
tially willing lo exchange some
thing ol value tor something ex-
pected to U'nt greater value"
The two ECU MBA students
Barbara l errdlol Elizabeth ityand
Louise Perrcca Smith of Greenville
came up with the idea when they
were assigned a research paper in
one of their graduate courses
I r David W. Glascoff. an ECU
associate professor of marketing re-
quested the assignment
As partol the written require
merits tor my graduate course, the
students writea paper which should
reflect a semester's worth a effort,
rherefore ! uxjn- them to submit
to me some preliminary informa-
tion about their chosen topic fairly
e.irlv in the process SO that thov don't
eixl uptnquM ks,ind heexpiamed.
When Ms I errell and Ms.
Pemca-Smrih indicated that (hey
wanted to examine me nature ol the
definition ot marketing, I was sur
prised because it was potentially a
very difficult topic
The two of them did a very
thorough job and assembled an im-
pressive collection of resources and
references, and even found a five-
year-old paper of mux' on the sub-
ject"
1 li � said their pa pi t was "techni-
cally erv well-written and, with a
little revision, could have been sub
mifted to the student papcrconipo
fit ion "
towever,aftci discussing the
matter with them and Considering
tin- options, i callable, we decided to
Collectively re-work the paper for
consideration as a narketing theory
paper ilascoA said.
Thecollaborativenatureoftiie
final version of the paper gave us tile
strength to propose a new definition
of the discipline, and we were
geniiinolyevcited that the pa per was
accepted in such a prestigious form.
Tins publication is indicative of the
level of motivation which mst ot
our MBA students bring to class "
According to c Sascoff, the ma-
jor dtfferencebetween the K I' defi-
nition aixl the one currently King
used liesm identifying what utni-
tiesare "markctii activities" and in
identifying the role (if expectations
in the exchange process.
According to (.lascoft, the
present dehnibondoesnot point out
the role of expectations snd. "ihir
definition d(Hs just the opposite and
ABOVE AND BEYOND
During the 22nd, 23rd, 24th and 25th of this month the Delta
Sigma Phi Fraternity will hold its Spring rush from 8:00 pm to
11:00 each evening. The Brothers of Delta Sigma Phi invite you
to come and find out what we have to offer you. To find out why
we are not the stereotypical greek "Frat To find out why our
athletic program is gaining in excellence year after year. And to
find out why we always have a hell of a good time.
Please look around at other organizations. Then look at the
Deltas. You will find that we are a new breed of Greek that strives
to be both above and beyond.
Tuesday: Pizza Night-Meet the Brothers
Wednesday: Sub Night with 71A
Thursday: Casino Night (PRIZES)
Friday: Bid Night with AOJC
Call 757-1817 FOR RIDE 8:00-11:00
DELTA SIGMA PHI
BROTHERHOOD OF THE SPHINX
510 E. 10th St. Across from Baptist Student Ctr.
mi;s jh.it expectations are the
driving force in exchange relation-
ship he said.
Pte role of expectations in the
ew hange process is depicted ir. the
article through the use of two indi-
viduals who each have see-saws or,
as the authors put it, 'teeter-totters'
f'nor to the exchange Kth teeter-
ti tters ,ire depicted �s level or h n-
ont.il with 'value' sitting on the
ends of each person's teeter-totter.
After the exchange each party s u v-
ter totter h.is tipped because the
value received by each was greater
than the value given up
The article, titled "Exchange,
Expectations and the Definition ot
Marketing isa revised version ot a
paper 1 errell ami Perreca-Smith
wrote f( r.i gr.idnateelass m market-
ing strategy
Hie American Marketing Asso-
( uition will publish the article in its
t-ntin'tvasp.irtot" Marketing Theory-
See. Marketing page 9
W A R
Get all of theThe Daily Reflector
latest news of the Persian Gull"l S, Today
at 1 he Nes iV; Observer
CentralThe Richmond Times
Book-The Washington Post
& NewsThe New York Times The Baltimore Sun
open ul 9:30 pm 7 days a week Greenville SquareThe Chicago Tribune
Shopping CenterThe Atlanta Journal
756-7177-The Greensboro Record
0X Rush '91
THETA CHI:
"THE GREEK LEADER OF THE '90s"
NEW HOUSE LOCATION
312 E. 11th Street
January 22-25
8 p.m. �11 p.m.
Tue. � Meet the Brothers and meet
the Ladies of AZ (Sub Night)
Wed. � Meet the Ladies of III
(Hors D'vores)
Thu. � Meet the Ladies of AOn
(Pizza)
Fri. � Invitation Only Party with
the Ladies of A An
For More Information or Rides Call:
758-OXOX or 830-6954





ing disorders
(HiE lEaBt Cgarolfnian January22.1991 $
ipporl
� people
.he

M
H t
imenl
SO
lent
rnnient
ciation
ION!
Still
lative
Student
s k iation.
' es and
sentatives
ailable.
ay in the
(vernment
fice -
all Student
57-4726
Convention
Continued from page 1
Schwarzkopf, said Sunday that
allied pilots .m- locating many of
Iraq's mobile missile launchers
and have crippled some Iraqi
nuclear reactors Before me war,
some officials said preventing
Iraq from developing nuclear
weapons should bea hey goal in
any fighting
Mo ire, t hedirector i t tpera
tions for the U.S Central Com
mand, said Saddam's ability to
communicate with his troops had
been impaired but not elimi-
nated Overall weare well on
our way to our objectives, he
said
RearAdm Rile) I Mixson,
commander cA the Red Sea battle
forir of about mi ships said the
ail war would take at least two
more weeks even tongerifthe
Iraqi air force continues to avoid
dogfights and keeps the bulk of
it planes on the ground That
would require intensive bomb
ing to destroy the planes in their
heavily fortified bunkers hesaid
ECU graduate students redefine marketing
B Robin Duffy
st.iii Writer
nrw definition of marketing
will be published this Februan bv
the Ann ncan Marketing sso ia
hon thanks to two E I graduate
students
Chcshidy of marketing a cord
� the II dennition,ismadcup
�t the hvitiesinvolved insatisfv-
ng individuals groups or organi
itions w ho have objei lives and
pun hasing powi i and are poten
hall) willing to exchange some
thing of value for something ex
f ted to beol greater value
rhctwoEC MBA students
Barbara Ferrdl of I lizabetht it) and
is Perreca Smith of (ireenville
�n C lip uth the idea when the)
�" assigned a research papei in
ore? et their graduate i nurses
Dr David W Hast off an I!
associate pn fcssor if marketing re
luested (!�� assignment
H ' ' 'hi '�. i it it n requin
merit loi m graduate course, the
students write a paper whk hshould
reflo t a semestci s worth o effort
rhereti
uy.
them to submit
to me some preliminan informa
!un about theirhoscn topi, tairk
early in ihe process so that the) don't
endupinqiiK ksand "heexplained
W hen Ms lerrell and Ms
Pi rre a Smith indicated thai the)
wantetf to examine the nature f the
definition of marketing, I was sur
prised because it was potentially a
very ditth uit topk
Ihe two of them did a er
thortvugh job and assembled an mi
pressive colkctknol resources and
releren. es. and even found a five
year ild paper of mine on the sub
K t
! lesaid Iheir paper was"te hni
1 all) i r) ��, ell w ritten and, with a
little revision, could have been sub
I 1.1 the student paper compe
Mtii n
i lowever iti. i .n-� ussing ihe
mallei w ith ihem are! consklering
tin options a vailabk we do ided lo
colfo tivelv re work ihe papei f i
consideranonasa marketing theor,
papei Ilascoff said
" Ihe. ollabiirative nature of the
final version of the paper gave us the
strength In prop sea new definition
of the diM ipiine, and w e w i re
genuine!) ex ited that the papn was
.h i epted in such a prestigious finm
rhis puWicatfon is mdi. am c i �f Ihe
leel of motivation whk h mt of
i mi MBA students brim; to i las
A adding to ilascoff the ma
Mf dittereiuelvtwevnthei 1 deti
nition and the one i urrenth I. ing
used lies hi identifying what a. hvi-
besart"marketinga tivitics and in
identifying the role i � ; expo tations
in Ihe ei hange process
Ai cording tollas off the
present dennitiondoes not pointoul
tin role of expei tations, sn.lur
definition does just Ihe opposite a nd
suggest" 'hat epe. taMons arc thi
drh � force in ew hange retatk m
ship he snd
11 e i t evtve lations in the
exchange pr��� ess is depk led in the
.irtu le through the use of two indi
id i i.i Is who each have see-saws or,
as the authors put it. 'teeter totters'
Prioi lo the ex hange both teetei
loiters are depk fed as level or h n
zontal with 'value' sitting on the
ends of i.ii h person s teeter tottcT
Mtertheexi hange each parry's tee-
tertett. t has tipped because the
value le. erved b) ea� h was greater
than the value given uy
i!n article, fitted ' Exchange
1 pe. tations and the I definition of
Marketing, ii revised versionof a
piper lerrell and Pcrreca-Smith
�� i tefora graduateclass in market-
ing strateg)
lhe American Marketing Asso-
i latii'n will publish the article in it
entiret) ispartof' Marketing rheo
� Marketing age 9
s
WAR
Gel all of the
latest news of
the Persian Gulf
at
Central
Book
& News
� pn to ��
Greenville Square
Shopping Center
756-7177
he DaiK Rcflcctoi
S Tod.
he New s .V Ibscrve
Ihe Kiel
1 lines
I he Washington l'i �sl
I he cw York I mies
I he Baltimore Sun
he (!hic;is I ribunc
I he .Atlanta Journal
I he Greensboro Record
ABOVE AND BEYOND
During the 22nd, 23rd. 24th and 25th of this month the Delta
Sigma Phi Fraternity will hold its Spring rush from 8:00 pin to
11:()() each evening. The Brothers of Delta Sigma Phi invite you
to come and tint! out what we have to otter you. To find out why
we are not the stereotypical greek "f rat To find out why our
athletic program is gaining in excellence year after year. And to
find out why we always have a hell of a good time.
Please look around at other organizations. Then look at the
Deltas. You will find that we are a new breed of Greek that strives
to be both above and beyond.
Tuesday: Pizza Night-Meet the Brothers
Wednesday: Sub Night with 71A
Thursday: Casino Night (PHIZES)
Friday: Bid Night with A()7I
Call 757-1817 FOR RIDE 8:00-11:00
DELTA SIGMA PHI
BROTHERHOOD OF THE SPHINX
510 E. 10th St. Across from Baptist Student Ctr.
0X Rush '91
THETA CHI:
"THE GREEK LEADER OF THE 90s"
NEW HOUSE LOCATION
312 E. 11th Street
January 22-25
8 p.m. � 11 p.m.
lue.
Meet the Brothers and meet
the Ladies of AZ (Sub Night)
Wed. � Meet the Ladies of III
(Hors D'vores)
Meet the Ladies of AOn
(Pizza)
Invitation Only Party with
the Ladies of AAn
For More Information or Rides Call:
758-OXOX or 830-6954
Thu.
Fri. �





Qftft i�mt damlintatt
Saving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
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Mlc HAFl D. Al.BUQUERQUE, Managing Editor
Bi aik Srinnfr, News Editor LeCi.air Harper, Asst. News Editor
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Dot c. Morris. Sports Editor Matt Mumma, Asst. Sports Editor
C kkii ARMSTRONG, Special Sections EMtot Scott Maxwell, Satire Editor
� r'M�Mi,ps, Com Editor
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i Ft Parki k Stafj Illustrator
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Phong Li'ONG, Business Manager
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fOIQ
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rad editorial in ea� h edition docs not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
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should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N.C
Opinion
Pagi 4 h sday, January 22. 1991
Holiday marks day of remembrance
King embodies strength, courage against oppression
Monda) marked the tilth annual commemora-
tion ' Martin I uth i King !r 5 birthday This day is
very important to some, of little consequence to
others, and mi? nderstood or despised by still an-
itln i group ol people.
However, this ii is mote than pist .mother
holiday from a rk .1 x hool It is a day set aside t(
celebrate the legacy, heritage and effort which Dr.
symbolized and embodied so well
For o er 330 ears, the great democratic legacy
ol America was blemished by a great indiscretion.
During this period, the government supported a
systemof: � ry and later segregation of black and
lacks could not eat in the same re
tnnk from the same water fountains as
� in s i he) w ere forced to it on tin- back of buses
and ill) had separate accommodations and
Howevei Di King's life is not just a tribute to the
' ts that were made to tear down that system of
mjustidB Mis Iff.it o "to' th. � pn'chief fvitv f a
strong and suppoi ti I famil) R hicn isan institution
that we should all strive to improve.
Dr. I" ng grew up in a strong family environment.
(lis fathei was one ol the forernosl ministers in
Atlanta In 1.1 t Martin I other King Sr worked to
end segregated elevators in the local courthouse.
l le als. instilled discipline and community in
his family. I or example he made his children whip
each other when they transgressed the rules he set
down Most ol alt, he provided a strong example to
his child �
Martin I uther King lr had a grandmother
' him In fai when he heard that she had
died he jumped from theii second story window in a
lit ol anguish he had a gentle mother that provided
nurt � ind support.
i !n-1 m ironment enabled him to excel in school-
He was able to jump ahead ol his classmates and
entered college several years earls- At the age of 17,
he chose to enter into the ministry. He staled that this
was not the result of a miraculous event, but a long
standing desire to serve God He went on to receive
his degree at Morehouse College and Croer Theo-
logical Seminary earning his Ph.D.
I Jr. King began his short but influential career as
America's foremost Civil Rights Activist bv serving
as pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, which
he called "a marvelous experience Although he
received many offers from churches other areas of
the country, he came to the South because of a desire
to change the lim Crow System that permeated the
a rea
His career was highlighted by victories in the
Montgomery Bus Boycott, The Campaign in Bir-
mingham, the March on Washington, his Nobel Prize
award and his triumphal exit in Memphis, Tenn.
I lowever,Dr. King was not a great leader because
of his verbal ability or notoriety. Rather, he wasgreat
because he wasone that refused to separate his moral
concerns from his political action. His most contro-
versial action was opposing the war in Vietnam, a
bold political move that would later captivate the
nation.
There are not appropriate words to eulogize,
memorialize or commemorate such a great man in
the history of America Dr. King wasone that refused
to take oppression sitting down. Several times he
wasofferedlucrativeamountsof money, upwardsof
$100.(XX), to abandon of the Civil Rights Movement
but chose not to because his job was yet to be ac-
complished
Dr. King wanted to see America liberated from
limCrow, which hasbeen nearly completed by those
who have followed him. He also wanted to put an
end to prejudice and discrimination, areas in which
we still have a long way to go. Finally, he wanted to
see an end to violence and poverty of this country
and ultimately, the world.
This holiday isan ideal time to reflect on American
values. We need to think about what they are and
what they should (and could) be. We need to think
about what kind of world we want ourselvcsand our
children to live in, whether it be one of war and
oppression (whether it be overt and individualized,
or covert and institutionalized) or justice and peace.
We need to think about why Civil Rights Activists
are still being stabbed or threatened with bombs. We
need to think about why campus racism is on the rise
across America.
As we think on these things, we need to remember
thfee statements of Dr. King on war, opportunity
and action. He spoke against the effects or implica-
tions of war when he said "Injustice viv where is a
i;a� at to justice everywhere.
Dr. King spoke of the great opportunity of
America to be an example of peace, justice, and
brotherhood when he said, "I'm disappointed with
America, and there can be no disappointment where
the re is nogreat love. Sometimes I get a little heated
about these things and about all the things 1 talk
about because 1 love America, and I want to see her
stand as the great moral example of the world
We must ask ourselves if we are fulfilling these
great hopes throughour activities as individuals and
as a government today.
Finally, Dr. King left a great epitaph in his tri-
umphal entry into Memphis, Tenn. He began by
going back through the great points of American
history. He made a prophetic forecast when he talked
about how people of the world were rising up, and
they were crying out to be free. He stated that he was
not afraid because he had been like Moses and Isaiah
and had seen the promised land. He expressed
confidence that one day, the final victory over
America's problem of racism would be won.
The challenge for us today is to take a good look
at ourselves in the mirror. We must confront our
attitudes and perceptions that are reflected in our
institutions. Both hate and love are color-blind (one
can hate or love regardless of their race).
We must strive to not let this holiday become
commercialized or be remembered simply as a day
off. Rather, we should let it be a reminder of those,
including Dr. King who gave their lives to make our
Constitution a reality for all if s people.
Food for thought Lenaisse potatoes?
By Tim E. Hampton
Editorial Columnist
Last week we were sitting
around my nephew's dorm room
looking at the posters pinned on
the wallsand contemplating what
todo for that evening ritual called
supper.
For reasons vet to be fath-
omed, I succumbed to the sugges-
tion of the Mendenhall Student
Center cafeteria During the walk
to Mendenhall, my mind regurgi-
tated horrid flashbacks oi
"Jonestown cafeteria" as bits and
chunks of a repressed memory
floated to the surface.
It was like a million Mallox
moments colliding at once.
Back in theearlv 19904,1 group
of students nicknamed the caf-
eteria in Jones Residence Hall
"Jonestown" after the great Rev.
Jim Jones' massacre of 1978 in
which hundreds of fanatical fol-
lowers drank poison -laced Kool-
aid.
Which reminds me of a g(Hd
joke on the incident, but I should
not tell it. Why? Because, it has a
really long punch line.
Jonestown on the Hill, the
unabridged name of fine cuisine,
is the place where I ate for a year.
Somehow I lived through the soy-
burgers and grease-laden fries,
over-cooked vegetables and
wilted lettuce and survived to be-
come a second year freshmen.
In my day. the menu was
somewhat predictable. The run-
ning bet on the second floor of
Aycock Dorm, uh, excuse me �
Residence Hall � was how many
different names theeafetenacould
classify the white potato.
The names included: white
potatoes, round potatoes (as op-
posed to square ones), Irish pota-
toes and lenaisse potatoes. Our
discriminating freshmen taste
buds could not differentiate one
potato, two potato, three potato,
four
After recalling the Lenaisse
potatoes, we swung through the
doors of Mendenhall. Instead of
the old-timev cardboard meal
tickets, patrons whipped out
computerized cards.
Since I did not have one of
those neat-o laminated cards, the
lady behind the register asked for
some "cash ol-la-ville
"That will be $5.20, sir she
said.
"No wav I said.
"Way she fired back.
1 leavens, thought, this food
better be good For five bucks, I
can go eat to my heart's content at
just about any restaurant in town.
For fivrrbucks, 1 can buy al-
most nine soft tadns at the best
place in town, Taco Bell. For five
bucks. I can drive down Highway
33
It is all you can eat It is all you
can drink. It is all you suffer
through. Most of the food was hot
and had a consistency of taste, but
my, oh my, $5 can go a long way
on a college person's budget.
But few kids really complain
about theoutrageouspricesat both
the Mendenhall cafeteria and
snack bar because thev never see
the moncv change hands.
When buyers do not see
money exiting their pockets into
thecash register, then buyers have
a false sense of "cash-ol-la
I call on the Servomahon
Corp, or what ever the name of
thecompanv which dominates the
campus fKd industry, for an ex-
planation of those over-inflated
prices, including the $5 meals
I i't's iis' ttn adequati d 7(k
term to describe this corp -
and call them rip off artists et '1
protest this thing, stagesit ins until
lower food prices are granted l.ct'$
burn as many corporation flagsai
we can get our hands on, even if
loyal corporation workers threata
10 kick our butts.
No, just kidding. Actually, 1
wanted to turn my head front the
first quarter of "Showdown in the
Gulf and center on something
trivial, something that turns my
stomach in other ways. The battle
is being lost bv the poor under-
classmen standing in the food line
Once inside, I relished the
thought gourmet cereal line, pon-
dering whether to twist the lem
forCaptain Cninch or Sugar Pops
Hey, what's this7 Five bucks
and no Lucky Charms
But the breakfast nook at
Mendenhall costs three bucks, I
mean, what would Wilford
Brimley think? The oatmeal man
would have to say: "Bad food and
the expensive way to do it "
So we sat down at the uneven
tablesandcommenced toeat God.
those Lenaisse potatoes vvere
good.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Gulf War seen differently by Arabs
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
So we're having a war. How
long will it last7 And how are we
going to know when it's over?
Conventional wisdom �an
oxymoron if there ever was one �
holds that we need only pound
the Iraqis into the dust (possibly
using noo-kyoo-lur weapons), to
make them tremble with respect
for our sheer might. After that, we
can tell 'em what to do, and they'll
just have to take it.
And that would be fine, were
it not for the fact that the Iraqis,
like other Arabs, arc a product of
a different culture than ours.
Asa result, they conceptual-
ize the world in a fundamentally
different way. So different, in fact,
that our goal (if it is indeed our
goal) of making them respect our
strength is certain to backfire.
Let's try to see some things
from Iraq's point of view. Know
thy enemy, and all that. Keep in
mind as we go that the Tightness
or wrongness of the Iraqis' world-
view is not at issue; what is impor-
tant is to understand that they look
at the world differently, and to try
to understand that viewpoint. This
will help us answer the two ques-
tions posed above.
First of ail, Iraqis and most
other Arabs strongly bel'?ve that
all Arabs are brothers. This con-
cept, deeply rooted in iV�ir cul-
ture, finds its expression in two
main movements: Islamic funda-
mentalism and Arab nationalism.
Though otherwise violently op-
posed, the two movements have
in common a desire to create a
single Arab nation from many.
Adherents to these two
causes � which, to varying de-
grees, include nearly all Arabs �
see the current division of nations
in the Middle East as a product
solely of English colonialism, and
wish to reverse the effects of that
colonialism
There are two main impedi-
ments to creating I single Arab
nation. First, there a re those Arabs
who were made rich by the carv-
ing up of the Middle East; they
don't want to give up their advan-
tages. (Similarly, America and
other comparatively rich Western
countries tend to frown on ideolo-
gies which hold that wealth should
be shared equally.)
Among these rich Arabs are
the Kuwaitis, who not only tend to
oppose Arab nationalism and Is-
lamic fundamentalism, but also
further insulted both attempts at
Arabic equality by importing la-
bor from surrounding Arab na-
tions, giving them the jobs no one
else wanted to do and treating
them little better than animals.
Kuwait is not described that
way in the West; Kuwait is instead
depicted as a benevolent monar-
chy, a hapless victim suffering at
the hands of more powerful ag-
gressors. But the mass of Arabs see
it differently, and there is justifica-
tion for their view.
In addition, the Iraqis have a
special grudge against Kuwait. A
little history: Iraq fought its war
against Iran partly for the benefit
of.and with the financial and moral
backing of Kuwait. When that war
ended, Kuwait declared that it
payments to Iraq had actually been
loans, and demanded that Iraq re-
pay them
Then Kuwait literally stole
oil from Iraq, bv drilling laterally
intoitsoil fields.and overproduced
oil. Taken together, these two acts
had the effect of depriving Iraq of
some of its oil (more damaging to
the national pndc than to the na-
tional coffers) and making Iraq's
oil less valuable, therebv making
Iraq even less well abk ' f-T1,
the debts Kuwait was suddenly
claiming it owed.
Add to this a statement from
the American ambassador to Iraq
that Iraq's gripes against Kuwait
were justified and that "we have
no opinion on your dispute with
Kuwait (or something like it; 1
have mislaid the exact quote) and,
well, what would you have
thought? (As a guide for answer
ing that question: what does
America do when its leader is re-
peatedly frustrated and enraged
out of all proportion by the leader
of a small and practically defense-
less southern neighbor?)
This is not to say that Iraq's
response was justified. There are
always better solutions than force
But the intent of this column is to
get you to look at the situation
from Iraq's point of view. So do
that.
The second impediment to
creating a single Arab nation, as
Arabs see it, i interference from
the West. In their view, Western
countries playdivide-and-conquer
games with the Middle East in or-
S�t AiaM. page 5
Three politicians!
By Derek McCuIlers
Editorial Column
In one of his greatest sermons
entitled "Creat, But "I)r Martin
Luther King stated, "When it
OOmej down to it. you've got to
My about ever) man and even
. real but
I IH � Ukd :� .
Monfrom the recent controvei
and inuei . lsh , Ir
dilating about him that he 11
have been talking about himself
However, it is one ot those
universal statements � hich I
ild like i apt ly to I
sen
I h'lnis jrj
bcon about whom I he's
reat. but
less- Hi most (er
tainl f the most
conti North
( arohna and mat
historv
He is charactt
things: a racist, an
conservative Ther
ing that states, "til
ain't bad It meanj
perfect I admire
being a conservati
timer, not for beinf
iebatable issi
less Helms is
the sense that he is
must git ba -
not support
money being spenl
because the states,
ing or wastir
have on heavy bull
inefficient te 1 j
dedicated an
out
He is a 1
believes in a strk
of the constitute
lei t that the
Arabs
Her to limit threats 10 the West's
oil supply Arab feel that
Western rtati 1 �� il then
hai k ward child rei v need to
1" h �;�� . . '
� : ��
It isly fight 1111
tl kind ' � " ���
unity, the traitorous riih Arabs
and the insultingly paternalistic
���rn nations A show of force
en out part is likely to reinforce
iheirresolve, not lessen it. sinceby
the simple act I �� sisting the)
engage the sympathy ot ether Ar
abs
Oh, sun vecan pound them
ubmission ; perhaps wt
ik their spirit 11 really may
h.ipivn But humiliating an Arab
n ition is not the way to win the
lasting and freely given respect ot
its people, nor is it the wav to win
(he respect of other Arabs. Other
rab nations now side with us
primarily be ause
fact that Presided
vaded a: j
trarj to the sj 1
SO, the
i lussetn in
ma also ir
support ti r
Hussein's resolve
the West, to fight us
after all, we're not
m their book, eithc
r of the two
and thev might y
minds about that
We can now ai
tfons posed at th�
this article:
How U
As long as we tr
misbehaving chik
sionaUy need to be
it our militarv utt
Iraqi militar
I'd place mv bet
n
r. -
o'
M
o�
o
21,
rr"
rn
1.
Janu
803
o
Call
Rides





dllie lEaBtOIarolintan January22, 1991 S

V
.v
?.V
naisse potatoes?
H igi hands
ers do not sec
n pxv kots into
� then buyers have
i �sh ol la
thi Servomation
. i � the name of
icl d iminatcsthc
i istr tor an ox-
ci inflated
k $5 meals
Initiated '70s
this,r potation
�� �� tists 1 efi
.1 igosit msuntil
an granted Let's
poration flags as
: � on, even it
irkersthreaten
� i. Iding Actually, I
m head troni the
� � � Show down in the
let on something
rte that turns niv
- ,r. s Ihe battle
i the poor under
� nc in the food line
; relished the
i i real line, pon-
� to twist the lever
� � I . ' Sugar Pop
this? 1 ive bucks
- . - hains
rcakfast nook at
sts three bucks, I
Ould Wilford
. 1 he oatmeal man
.i 'Bad food and
a) to do it"
v n at the uneven
m n. edtoeat.t lod,
e potatoes were
er Hammer
rentlv by Arabs
Opinion
Three politicians evoke memories of King's speech 'Great, But
By Derek McCullen
I tliloual I nlumni-a
ism and is
hsm, but also
I'
Biiu; Arab na
he )obs no one
and treating
tan animals
es ribed that
iw.nt is instead
'lent monar-
ftn suffering at
powerful m
SSOi Arabs set
� re isjustifica-
io Iraqis have a
list Kuwait A
If 'tight its war
fot the benefit
b lal and moral
�When that war
� declared that its
� iq had actually been
anded that Iraqre-
- nt literally stoic
drilling laterally
: and overproduced
ikenl thei these two acts
tol dpriving Iraq of
oil mere damaging to
i nde than to the na-
and making Iraq's
ible thereby making
II ible to repay
� Kuwait was suddenly
. I �
this a statement from
� an ambassador to Iraq
ripes against Kuwait
� �� justified ,nA that "we have
n on your dispute with
i � Mr something hke it; J
lid the exact quote) and,
well vsh.it would you have
ght s guide for answer
that question: what does
A mem ,1 do when its leader is re-
II) frustrated and enraged
out ot all proportion by the leader
t a small and practically defense-
less southern neighbor?)
I his is not to say that Iraq �
response was justified There arc
always better solutions Hum force.
But the intent of this column is to
get you to look at the situation
from Iraq's point of view. So do
that
Ihe MCOnd impediment to
creating a single Arab nation, as
Arabs see it, is interference from
the West In their view. Western
countries play divide-and-conquer
games with the Middle East in or-
See Arabs, page 5
Inoneol his greatest sermons
entitled .teat. Bui Pr Martin
1 uthei King stated, "When it
comes down to it. you've got to
sa about ever) man and ever
woman he'sgrcat, she's great but
i nt i ould draw the conclu-
sion from the recent ontroversies
and inuendos posthumously eir
i uiating about him that he ma)
have been talking about himself,
I lowever, it is one of those
universal statements which I
w ould like to appt) to three con
servative role models esse
lelms leorge bush and Richard
�Nixonabout whom 1 can sav he's
V.rcat but
lesse Holms will most cei
tamlv go down as one oi the most
controversial fieures m North
Carolina and maybe American
history.
lie is characterized .is three
things a racist, an old-timer and a
conservative. There's an old sav
mg that states, "two out of three
ain't bad " ltmeansth.it nobody's
perfect. 1 admire les.se 1 lelms tor
being a conservative and an old-
timer, not for being a racist t which
is a debatable issue )
Jesse I lelms is an old-timer in
the sense that hi- is saying that we
must got back to the basics 1 le
does not support more tederal
money being spent on education
because the states are mismanag-
ing or wasting what they already
have on heavy bureaucracies and
inefficient teachers who are not
dedicated ant) should be weeded
out
I le isa conservative in that he
believes in a strut interpretation
ot the constitution which would
denote that the government
Arabs
should not be in VOh ed in the lives
oi individuals; for the good or the
bad
However, ho does believe in
minority progression through
ontropreneurship
1 le could be i hat.u tcrizod as
visionmgbl.uk progress through
the development ol individuals
and the strengthening and net-
working ot traditional family
units, not a "biggovernment
I admit that 1 lelmsis not "pro-
black" like the white and black
liberals Rather he is "pro-
America" and "pro c onstitution"
like any good citizen should be.
Icsso 1 lelms is great, but
The liberal machiner) often
attacks George bush tor his at-
tempts to create a kinder, gentler
nation" through the hristian val-
ues ol volunteerism and what I
call conservative pmgrcssivism.
I le signed an em ironmental bill.
Continued from page 4
although it's not enough let the
states do more. 1 le has supported
limited social Welfare OT interven-
tion programs such as the criti-
cized Child Can bill, let the states
do more. 1 le worked diligently on
a Civil Rights bill that would not
endanger the bakke Decision on
quotas He is for black progres-
sion. Let the states do more. His
one weakness may be that he is
ready to take us off to war with
Iraq when the problem can be
solved through diplomacy or the
workol theU.N. In short, Ceorge
bush is great, but .
President Nixon was a great
president. I le was never afraid to
take actions that were necessary
in difficult limes 1 le stepped up
the Vietnam War. then he got us
Out. 1 le stood against wage and
price controls but in the midst of a
growing recession, he imple-
mented a 90day price wage freeze
d i to limit throats to the West s
oil supph Arabs further fee! that
Western nations treat them as
i � aid i hi Id re n w ho need t
hi shi i n I he Frue av
I: ,ui s pi i sentl) believe
ilu re stmu ush fighting
tl' kinds ol i nemies to rab
units, the traitorous rich Arabs
and the insultingly paternalistic
tcm nations A show ot force
on oui art is likely to reinforo
it ion resolve not lessen it, sinceb)
�ho simple a t ol resisting the)
( tin- s mpathj ot othei i
abs
Oh sure wecan poundthem
il mission pet haps v
break thou spirit II reall) ma)
But humiliating an Krai
n is not the w,�v to win the
.tingand freeh given respect ol
I . iple, not is it the v ay to w in
respet t ol other krabs.Nhei
tab nations now side with us
piimaril) bet ause theydislike the
fa t that President I lussein in
vaded another Arab nation, con
trarv to the spirit ot Arab brother
hood Also, the) realize thai it
1 lussein mv aded one countn he
m,i also invade others Bui thou
support tot us is weakened by
Hussein's resolve to stand up to
the West, to tight us to thedoath
atter all. we're not thegOOd guvs
in their book, either, we're just the
lessor ot the two available evils.
and the) might yet change their
minds about that
We can now answer the ques
tions posed at the beginning ol
this article:
I low long will this war last '
s long as we treat Arabs hke
misbehaving children who occa-
sionally need tobespanked Even
it our military utterly defeats the
Iraqi military and that's how
1 tl place mv bet we'll be deal
ing with the aftereffet Is, like anti
Americanism and powei va uums
and increased terrorism foi de
cades it not centuries And that s
all pal t ol the same w.it
I low arc e g nog U � know
� hen it'sot er? m sign i i ihal u
will have adopted a more rational
attitude towards the Middle East,
one based on an understanding ol
their culture A police, perhaps,
w hit h seeks to treat Arabs as Ihe
intelligent, mature human beings
thev are
But, in the lone, run, a "solu
tion" to the lull i risis that de
pent! son simple brute force hke
the (unde ired I war we're now
fighting must ine itably ause
more problems than it solves, even
leaving aside its questionable
morality. Onl) a polic) based on
respect rather than on Rambo ism
will put a real end to the problems
m the Middle East
and a system ot wage and price
controls, inflation promptly sub
sided.
President Nixon wasone who
was conservative vet aware ot so-
cial problems He is the prime
example ot a progressive conser-
vative. During his administration
the Environmental Protection
A gene v and Occupational Safety
and Health Administration were
termed. During his tenure the
welfare system was as bad as it is
today. Many recipients were
children or female. 1 le responded
with a bold program entitled the
Family Assistance Program which
included a guaranteed income but
required recipients to work. This
effort failed (probablv because ot
the liberals who have devalued
work anil effort).
He raised social security ben
etits by 20 percent and added the
cost of living index as well as ap-
proving the Comprehensive Em-
ployment and Training Act. Basi-
cally he shitted the welfare system
from a "service strategy" to an
"income strategy" He was sensi-
tive to the needs of individual
states and passed The State and
Local Fiscal Assistance Act of 1972
that provided $30 billion over 5
years His programs were ones
that I would support. His vision is
mv vision for the future.
President ixon did all of this,
vet he fell in with the racist camp.
1 le deliberately ignored the Civil
Rights front to a policy of "benign
neglect" whicheorge Bush may
also agree with. I lowever, I would
.uk that he was a great supporter
of minority business and entre-
preneurship through a system of
grants which were quite effective.
In addition to this there is
Watergate, which I need not dis-
cuss. Therefore, it could also be
said about President Nixon, "he's
great, but
Letters to the Editor
January 22nd-25th
803 Hooker Rd.
Call 756-2149 for
Rides & Information
Love of asphalt,
cars to change
ECU community
i"o the I ditoi
Majestic houses that once
skirted the south and west sides
oi ECU'S campus now stand
only in the pages of historians'
books, along with anecdotes
about the artisans and scholars
who made them groat
I ovc tor the automobile is
greater, it seems, than thedesire
to preserve the land surround-
ing our collegecommunitv, and
it has consumed every square
inch oi these houses' former
foundation.
While the slick, new asphalt
turns battleship gray, the per-
petual bulldozer can be beard
once more idling near the corner
of Ninth anil (harles streets It
appears this machine's only of-
fice is to oNiterate the historical,
the humble, the fine And in
plat eof these, to provide us with
a consuming visual blight
Many land-bound schools
have made the responsible
choice ol passing the architec-
ture ol their forebears to their
descendants.
I his preservation has been
realized through the promotion
oi vertical parking, walking.
carpoolingand mass transit.
Sadly, E U s v isionaries
have been unable to see past
their hotk1 ornaments. And thus,
bv building carscapes, conve-
niently located near every cam
pusdoorstep, they have ensured
that no diplomatic wingtip will
ever be tainted bv too long a
walk in tin rain
With E U's continued glo-
rification of the automobile, and
subsequent flattening ol its on
v i r. inments, one t an onl v
spei ulate about campus condi-
tions m the next century.
Perhaps this school will be
the first to perfect the concept oi
drive-thru education.
This would be fitting con-
sidering the institution's des-
perateattempl to ape the look oi
its fast-food neighbors.
Craig Malmrose
Assistant Professor
t'ommunit ation Arts
DISTII1GUISH
YOURSELF
gp '
R USH PHI PSI
IMMEDIATE LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITY
BECOME A FOUNDING FATHER
122 Multi Puroosr Room MSC 8pm 124 Social Room MSC 8pm
Information night with Alpha
Delta Pi
123 Multi Purpose Room MSC 8pm
Information night with Zeta Tau
Alpha
Information night with
Alpha Delta Pi
125 Bid Night
Refreshments served nightly
FOR MORE RUSH INFORMATION: 830-6767






r
6
Bhz lEagt (Haroliman
January 22. 1991
LASSIFIEDS
EAST
SERVO'S OFf 1 R( D
A BAHAMAS PARTY CRUISE: Six
days only S279! lamaica & Florida
six days S299! Daytona SI 59!
Panama Citv $99! Spring Break
Travel 1-800-638-6786.
HOT! HOT! HOT! JAMAICA
AND CANCUN FOR SPRING
BREAK We have trips left starting
at $479.00 No hype or false claims!
All prices include air, hotel, trans-
fers, parties, and more Call Sun
Splash Tours 1-800-426-7710'
SPRING BREAK: Only $350.00.
Spend it in the Florida Keys of Ba-
hamas on one ot our vachts. All
meals, sun and fun vou could ask
tor Easy sailing. Miami, FL 1 (800)
780-4001.
Student Income I ;i Returns
Program Developed b
Professionals Specilicall) toi
College Students
Pittard Perru
V.I Ll Id INCORPORATED
CIKTlFlfO PU�UC �CCOUNT�MTS
HELP WANTED
B 1ST PA RT-TIM E FOB IN TOWN
1 he Wattle House is currently ac-
cepringapplicarionsrbrall positions
full and part-time. Must be neat
pleasant, dependable and enjoy
working with the public. No expe-
rience necessar) We will tram
Apply in person only at 306 SE
( Wei n ille Bh d M � Fri2p.n to4
p m
SOCCER coach Experienced
coach to assist with 19 Greenville
Stars Select team Excellent salary,
must be available Mondays and
Wednesdaysafter4p m Send letter
describing experience to Willie
Nelms, 206 Lee Street, Greenville,
M 27858.
ARE YOl OUTGOING? Do vou
enjoy talking on the phone? It so.
we have the job for vou'
Telemarketing positions open for
spring semester starting immedi-
ately Work for ECU and get paid
while you gam valuable
telemarketing skills. Hours are 7-9
p m. daily; ear:1 extra spending
money without cutting into study
time! Call Robbie at "37-4215 or
757 6072 tor an appointment.
Wl NEED SELF-MOTIVATED
SUTENTS: tarn up to SlOhour
Market credit cards on campus
I .i bk hour? c onh If) positions
av; ibk I � . � s � 950-8472
! xl '
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call
tor information. 504-641-8003 Ext.
5920.
FOR RENT
BIG HOUSE FOR RENT Univer-
sity area, five bedrooms, 2 baths,
garage, fenced area, 1002 Forbes
Street. Ca 752-1116 for details.
10R RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED $135.00
month plus 13 utilities. Call 758-
0650 and leave message.
EFFICIENT ROOMS AVAIL-
ABLE: $137,507 month, all utilities
furnished. Walk to school. Perfect
for student on a budget. Call Larry
at 757-3543.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY; $162.50 plus 1 2
utilities, 2 bedrooms, 1 hath. 758-
3095.
ROOMMATE WANTED Rent
approximately $140.00month plus
utilities. 1 12 blocks from campus
Serious calls only 758-9617.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
large house right off 5th Street less
than one block trom campus.
$160.00month for vou own room.
Call Chaz or David at 758 -6268
ROOMMATE OR TWO needed to
share 2 bedroom townhouscS220
month plus 1 futilities Prefermalc
Convenient near campus Call
( lifton at 75.S ! 503
ROOMMATE NEEDED female
nonsmoker to share 2 bedroom
house and 12 utilities Rent
$125.00month. Allowed pets, lo-
cated next to campus Call Katie
752-8886
APT. FOR RENT Walk to ECU I
bedroom. I rath Call 752-2849
� fieauului I1�cc lo i jve
� All V� �
� AnJ RnJ ! u Real �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
:8V �� th Street
�Looted Ner ECU
�Near Maior Shopping Center
�ACfOM i-ront Higrt�,j t'airol Suium
Smiled Offer $300 a month
Conua J T of Tommy Wulmni
795-7tlSfM 130-137
Office ipen pi 1,12 i itlpm
'azalea gardens-
I .cfi rJ vfutfl w VOfixsri .�j�rj frunc4iu.
rimrgy eiT gtr 'rr�r - � �� v -�� .utV't Jrv
�r�. ,M( IN Mp�t � �Uij�B wu SZ3 � iTHStUl
n rrmxh cm MOMLfc HOM HtVl i�s .v�c�
M w ' � r Mri MM IMMM AAC�
vacm real Hnt Vu,cv CmMt) n
Conuci J I of Iminv Witlum
756-7�t5
FOR SALE
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Read
Residency status and Tuition, the
practical pamphlet written bv an
attorney on the in-state residency
application process For sale: Stu-
dent Stores, Wright Building.
WHY WNT? Homes tor $1 00.
Rcpos, Government giveaway pro-
gram! For information call (504)
649-0r�70exi R592
FOR SALE C ,reat college car. 1981
Plymouth Station Wagon. Excellent
conditior New tires and brakes
$850 or best offer. Call 7564919
after b p.m
FOR SALE; AT&T computer - IBM
compatible, 20 MG hard drive, 1
meg RAM, mono monitor, word
processorand spreadsheet included.
Call Lee at 757-0072 and leave
message. S9(X) neg.
FOR SALF
ULTIMATE SPEAKER BOXES:
For car or house. 200 watts each
Contains 12" sub, mid, tweet. 5150
tor pair. 931-8155.
JVC TAPE DECK: Rarelvused $50
931-8155.
'89 LOTUS STRATOCASTER
GUITAR with case. Also Dean
Markley Amplifier. Excellent con-
dition. $350 neg. 830-9293. Ask for
Neil.
PERSONALS
SIGMA TAU GAMMA would like
to invite all interested men to fra-
ternity rush on January 22-25. We
are located at 1210 Dickenson Av-
enue on the corner of 14th and
Dickenson Avenue. For more in-
formation or a ride during rush, call
757-0127.
BUDCn CANADA Get ready to
party Friday night! Guess who?
At PDA PHI would like to welcome
the following into our sisterhood:
fill Auerbach, I ynn Ca Id well,
Danielle Casale, Sarah Cross,
I anette 1 Jopko, Lynn Dzamowski,
Johnna Fussell, Jennice dander,
lennifer Codbold, Leanne
Highsmith, Wendy Keck, .Michelle
Keith, lennifer Kohut. Michelle
Marx in Mandy Morgan, Canulle
Patterson, Alicia Potter. Jackie
Schurtz, Lara Siva, Becky Smith,
Ann Snead, Sarah Spurgeon, len-
nifer Sydorick,Stephanie Williams,
and Danielle Yarmai. Congratula-
tions W( re proud - : vou! I ovc
SIC EP Welcome back and get
read) for a great semester. It's time
for something to come home. Study
and party hard!
SIC. LP It's time tor us to play ball.
That cup is coming back to 5th Street
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Spring Break
in
Key West
6 da s. 5 nights
; days of
Svubn diving cv snorkeling.
On1 $395.00 includes hotel
Os (li ing! For more info call
758- 1444
OPI-N UNDER
NEW OWNERSHIP
SI 11 I SERVING YOl
Witt QUALITY BP.
VNDMI S PRODUCTS
ACROSS FROM Ml 1 ROMA
RESTAI RAM
TENTH STREET
f3P
Id DISCOt NT WITH
H PI-VI ID.ON REPAIRS
Wl) St RMCI
752 2 1 15 2704 I Itiih Street
KOAUShKMC I (.kviuiIIc. C
pi hsonai s
where it belongs.
JOIN ECU'S BEST CO-ED OR-
GANIZATION. The ECU Ambas-
sadors are holding Membership
booths in front of the Student Store
and Mendenhall Jan. 28th, 29th,and
30th. If you love parties, banquets,
semi-formals, traveling, a close
family, meeting the Chancellor,
alumni and other important people,
then our organization is for you!
Come sign up and learn more'
SIG EP. Rush it, Pledge it, Love it!
THE STUDENT PIRATE CLUB is
sponsoring a bus trip to the UNC-
Wilmington basketball game on
January 26th. Cost is SI 5.00 for
members and S20.00 for non-mem-
bers. This includes ticket and
transportation. For more informa-
tion call 757-4540.
RUSH THETA CHI'
LASTCHANCE Learnmoreabout
ECU join ECU Ambassadors All
men and women welcome Sign up
today and tomorrow in front of the
Student Store and Mendenhall
Don't pass up what could be vour
best college memories'
ATTENTION ECU MALES Come
by and checkout Theta Chi Rush at
their new house located on 312 E.
11 th Street Tuesday through Friday
8-1 Ip m. For rides and further in-
formation, call 758-OXOX.
KKAL'SE: Replace your R (rejee-
PIMSONALS
tion) with L (love) and you've got
Klausc (and anything else you
want). Now Santa, let me tell you
what I want this year. Lenny
TO ALL FRATERNITIES Good
luck with Spring Rush! The sisters
and pledges of AOPi's.
AOPI'S: Get readv rage! Roscball
is 11 days away!
CONGRATULATIONS to
Stephanie Stone on your engage-
ment! Love you AOPi sisters and
pledges
PKA would like to myite all inter-
ested ECL' men to Rush. Rush will
be Jan. 22nd-25th at the Pirate Club.
WARMEST WISHES to Heather for
a speedy recovery - the sisters and
pledges of AOPi.
RUSH Phi Kappa Pm is holding
Spring Rush in Mendenhal
Center Ian 22nd-24th, 8 p m ca h
night Refreshments will be servi d
nightly lor more inform I in
- 5 6767.
HEY YOU Pi Delta - We had a blast
Thursday night, and we arc really
looking forward to seeing vou to-
night. Sincerely, the brothers of
Sigma Nu
LOW, LOW DUESnot being
hazedshort six week pledge pe-
riod � SIGMA NU. Call Tomat752
5279 for more information.
PERSONALS
JAMES DEAN, HARRISON
FORD, PAT RILEV AND BOB
BARKER . Whatdo they all have
in common other than celebrity sta-
tus7 They all rushed SIGMA Nil
loin our ranks, and become a part of
the greatest fraternity Rush starts
tonight ana goes through I hursday
night at the Kingston Place Club-
house There will be plenty of food
and you will havean opportunity to
find out more about Sigma Nu and
how you too can become a brother
For more information call loin at
752 5279 or 752-9607.
SIGMA NU RUSH begins to:
ucsday n �. I s Domino's Pizza
. . . �
lovelv ladies oi the new PI Dl I IA
sorontv Wednesday nighl is King
Sandwich nighl witl thi beautiful
sisters oi ALPHA OMK RON PI
Thursdav i I is Sub f
� .�� � th rs I
7-9 at the Kine,
e. All I en ai
invited n ring friend il
fom
STL ll I PIRATI (It l
meet to ed : :� " Ird ' :
the Pirate Club
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPUY CLASSIFIED
T-SHIRTS
Front
Support Your
Local W.A.N.T.
Raek
Waitstali
Against
Non
Tipper
A TShm designed to fit the frustrations of
waitresses, water harienden ind delivery' '
people.
The T shirt is long sleeve, 50 aatan-50 I
polycsier. white with Wad letters and comes
in sjcs: small medium large-x-large
Coa SP 00 2 00 postage and handling
Name:
Address.
Qrr .StateZip I
Lirgtst Librtry of information in U S -
a subjtcts
O'dc Catalog oc.a; itn vsa MC v COD
800-351-0222
TOIL f�f
HOT uW
f 'us" V )0 Rtiwrch Irtwrution
i � 3 0no Avt ?06 L� nge�s CA 900
KATHLEEN YOUNG
YACHT CHARTERS J
Ann: ECI Students!
It's run loo soon to start
planning that Spring Break trip.
Spend seven da) ol fun and sun
on a sailing yacht in the
Bahamas Call anytime for details
1-800-447-2458
FAMILY
MEDICAL CARE
Phone )
Send to Haves. PO 235.
Snow Hill. NC 28580
Office Hours:
8D0 AM � 80C PM. Mon-Fn
8130 AM-4:00 PM Sat
19 �ffl
�t tiff X
� uu
- H
D
No Appomtmstit Necessary
355-5454
George Klein, M.D F.A.A.F P
Physician
Henrietta Williams. Ph.D.
Psychologist
USE �EE�
SEEN. LIE NC278SJ
50 States Seminars our nationally known
organization is seeking an assertive, dynamic
and motivated individual to teach and con-
duct "No Money Down" real estate seminars
in your area. You have seen these seminars
on T.V now conduct them yourself.
$3,000.00 to $6000.00 per month possible
pt $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 possible ft.
Don't Delay, Call today for an interview,
(208) 342-0950 or (208) 338-9960.
El SIGMAALFUA
First meeting of 1991 semester if set for
Tuesday. Jan 22nd, 4 p.m. in BC 105
(POLS LIB) Hans for Spring will be
rruido 'lease tell Mrs. Smith (POLS
Sivretary), Dr Scavo, or Doug if you are
UNABLE TO ATTEND.
BASKETBALL
RECISTRATIQJn:
A team captain's meeting for intramural
5 on 5 basketball .vill be held Jan. 22nd at
530 p m in BIO 103 All interested in-
dividuals must attend this meeting! A
Recreational Representative will be tak-
ing individual sign-upsat the following
lx.ition and times:
Ian 16 11:30a.m 1:30pm. Cotton
3:00pm-5:00pm Bclk
500 p.m. - 7 00 p m Jones
Jan 17 11:30am - 130pm Umstead
3.0(1 p m - 5 00 p m White
� 00 p m - 7 00 p m Garrctt
For additional information call 757-f38
or stop by 201 Christenbury Gymna-
sium
TAEKW&NPOCIUJ
The ECU Tae K won Do Cluba nnounced
its first meeting on Wednesday Jan. 23rd
at9p.m. inthelowerWvelofChristenbua
Gym Membership dues are S5.00 and
insurance forms will be passed our
during this meeting The Tae Kwon Do
Club is open to any ECU student re-
gardless of experience.
WALT DISNEY WORin
QQLUSiLEEQGBAM
Walt Disney World Co. representatives
will present an information session on
the Walt Disney World College Pngram
on Monday, Jan. 28th at 7 p m. Alten
dance at this presentation is required lo
interview for the Summer Fall 91 Col-
lege Pngram Interview, are KHMMed
forTuesday,January 2, JWi ,n8 30a m
in the Co-op office All majors are en-
couraged toattend For information and
applications, please contact the Co-op
office.
WES2FIL
You are invited to come to Wes2fel this
Wednesday night at 5 p.m to worship an
grow closer to Jesus. After worship,
well eatadelicious,a!l-you-caneat home
cooked meal for 52.50. Signed for the
hearing impaired. Call 758-2030for more
information.
INTER CjrJFlSTIAN COUNCIL
Join with other students tonight to prav
for peace with justice in the Middle East.
9-10 p.m. at the amphitheater (Fletcher
basement if there's bad weather) We'll
pray for peace, safety, etc No politics,
just prayer Sponsored bv the Inter
Christian Council Everyone welcome
ECU STUDENT CHAPTER OF
HABITAT FOR HUMANITY
The ECU Campus Chapter for Habitat
for Humanity will be having a meeting
on Tuesday night, Jaa 22nd, at 7 p.m. in
Brewster D room 207. Upcoming events
and activities will be discussed so come
pin us. "The excitement is building"
and we hope to see you there.
ARTSTUPENTS
The Student Union if looking for a per-
son to fill the position of Graphics Artist.
This is an EXCELLENT opportunity for
gain experienceand utilize yourtraining
in graphiccommercial art. Design
posters, flyers, brochures, newsletters,
etc. for ECU's premier programming
organization! Help make fun things
happen at ECU (This is a paid position).
Contact Fran at 757-4715 or in mom 236
Mendenhall
FENCING Cl IJB
Fencing club is back in action! Fencers
and non-fencers are welcome. Please
meet at Christenbury Gym, Wed. 6:30-
8:00 p.m. or call 752-3052.
BUCCANEER
Student photos for the 1991 Buccaneer
willbetakenJan.22-Feb.l inMendenhall
Student Center from 12 noon -8 p.m.
Please bring your ID. You do not ha veto
sign up. The Buccaneer also has a posi-
tion for Graphics Editor Computer ex-
perience is necessary. Applications are
available in the officer or Media Board
Secretary's offkeT in the Publications
Bldg across from Jov ner Library.
NON-CREPrr EXCEL CQjJRSJ
The Decision Sciences Department will
offer a non-credit EXCEL course at no
cost Classes are 2-4 p.m Fridavs fnwn
February 1-March 1. Enrollment is
limited.pneference will be given to stu-
dents that received transfer credit for
DSC12223 (Introduction to Computers)
To register, call (919) 757-6893 by Jan.
28th. EXCEL is the spreadsheet and
graphics package used in Business
courses.
CAMPtS CRUSADE FOR CHRISJ
Andre is coming'
EAOJLJYJviEMBEBLAjsiD
HONOR STUDENTS
All faculty members and honor stu-
dents are reminded of their opportu-
nity to design or request an Honors
seminar ot their choice. The Honors
committee rnakes the final selection
Please submit pmposals (at least bv
phone) to David Sanders (757-6373) at
the Honors Office, 124 Fleming Hall bv
Fndjy Jan 2th. S.v Dr Sanders far
mon- information
i
FRA
JA
rlington Buk-
IIK
1. BFCONFll
bv your body and v
impression.
2. LOOK YOl
a bid frota a fratei
appeantnee can KJ
3. NEVER Bl
a pledge or brothej
ihey will.
4. NEVER HI
are introduced to
people that you
everyone's name





January 22. 1991


SIALSpirsonai s
&nd vou o Lti1'IWtrS DEAN, HARRISON
II ng else vFORD, PAT Rllt AND BOB
1 mo fell vouBARKtR Whatdo they all havt
�i I pnnyin common other th.in celebrity sta-
1? Tbov ail rushed SIGMA NL
kmts Goodotn our ranks and become partof
i h : h sistersthe greah si fraternity Rush starts
h -tonight and o through I hursday
. K ngston Place Qub-
� m l be plenr) ol uxki
and vou w ha e an opportunity to
Find we about Sigma Nu and
fhNs� i icar become .1 brother
1 � :tFor more information call Tom at
DPi sis752 752 9607
SICM M RUSH begins tonight!
lucsdai - - I s Domii - Pttat
bnthcrs and the
rtw new PI Pi LTA
iday night is kini;
� �Sand im � � � � "i luriful
l PHA OMICRON I'l
� ts in II i . nighl
7-9 ot thi ngston
-1 V . 1 I
STLDtXI I'llv M 1 CLUB w


rnicoi a rt ccicicri
mm
IMM
mmmmmm
m
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
FRATERNITY LOCATIONS
1991 RUSH
JANUARY 23-25 8-11 PM
GO GREEK

II 0222
mtofiiiion
KATHLEEN YOUNG
v YACHT CHARTERS
Vy
Ami ECU Students!
It tiot too soon to stan
planning that Spring Break trip.
Spend seven da) ol tun and sun
on a sailing yacht in the
Bahamas Call anytime Ibrdetails
1-800 447 2458
FAMILY
EDICAL CARE
i-Ri.
George Klein, M.D FAA.F P
Physician
Henrietta Williams. Ph.D.
Psychologist
No Appemtnwnl Nm-ssdry
355-5454
1
nationally known
n assertive, dynamic
al to teach and con-
real estate seminars
;een these seminars
t them yourself.
er month possible
KX).00 possible ft.
for an interview,
108) 338-9960.
i
ion! Fencers
Come. Please
m Wed f:30-
Buccaneer
i Mendenhall
�noon -8 p.m.
to not have to
so has a posi-
romputer ex-
tol nations arc
jViediJ Board
Publications
Library.
BBUMI
pJrtment will
ursc at no
ndavs fnm
llmont is
limited.prrferrnce will be given to stu-
dents that received transfer credit for
DSCI2223 (IntnKiuctK�n to Computers).
To register, call (919) 737-6893 by Jan.
28th. EXCEL is the spreadsheet and
graphics package used in Business
courses.
CAMELllSAfiLEQtaiRISI
Andre is coming'
EAOiLJYjvj�MBIRAJS!iD
HQJiQRHLJDtKTS
All faculty members and honor stu-
dents are reminded of their opportu-
nity to design or request an Honors
seminar of their choice. The Honors
committee makes the final selection.
Please submit proposals (at least by
phone) to Ctovid Sanders (737-6373) at
the Honors Office, 124 Fleming Hall by
Fndjy Jan 2Mh Sec Dr Sanders for
more information
II


E
E
3
Sth Street
AL
Downtown
Greenville
EE
5th Street
�Zu


� .j�
10th Street

7S1
ECU Campus
rrvaHi
il�3 � J '�-
frr. S H
TKE
Arlington Boulevard
1
M
D
T3
I
0
n
ex
V5 C sz 0


AEJn
Bon



ii urn aucci 1 KA J
w
Q
X
InKg
Fraternities Without
Housing At This Time
tK
nKA
RUSH TIPS: DOS AND DONTS
1. BE CONFIDENT OF YOURSELF. A fraternity will be affected
by your body and verbal language. A firm handshake is vital to a good first
impression.
2. LOOK YOUR BEST AT ALL TIMES. You probably will not get
a bid from a fraternity because of the way you dress and look, but your
appearance can KEEP you from getting a bid.
3. NEVER BE ARROGANT! Try not to act as if you were already
a pledge or brother of the house. If a house plans on inviting you back,
they will.
4. NEVER HESITATE TO INTRODUCE YOURSELF. When you
are introduced to someone, repeat his or her name. However, with all the
people that you will meet, do not feel like you have to remember
everyone's name.
5. ASK QUESTIONS if there is anything that you want to know about
the fraternity: finances, sports, grades, activities, etc.
6. Just because a lot of guys from your HOMETOWN are in a certain
fraternity, or just because you think one or more of your FRIENDS are
going to pledge a certain fraternity, this DOES NOT necessarily mean that
the fraternity is right for YOU Pledge the fraternity that can do the most
for you and where you feel most comfortable.
7. Attend the parties of AS MANY different fraternities as you can,
especially if you are not sure about which fraternities you are interested
in. In other words, SHOP AROUND. Besides, it's a great chance to get
to know more about the Greek system which you are about to join.
8. If you Have any questions about rush or need advice in a particular
situation, come by the IFC office in Mendenhall Student Center or call
757-4706. We are here to help!
East Carolina University fraternities do not discriminate on the
basis of race, color or creed. Membership selection is a subjective
one and a number of factors are taken into consideration in
issuing invitations to join.
� MfPtflf.1





8
Hljc iEaatOIaruliuian January 22, 1991
Friends
Continued from page 1
Last year there were 150 paired chi I-
dren; however, because EC FrieiKfs
is a non-profit organization, the
number of children paired is down
to 75. Yet more volunteers are
needed for other children.
EC Friends is very popular
among the elementary students.
There arc, literally, children wait-
ing for EC Friends says Susan
Moran, president of tho organiza-
tion. However, because there are
many boys without the guidance ot
an older male, more n vile volunteers
are needed.
Dr. Moonev sivs that the chil-
dren are referred to EC Friendsby a
counselor and teacher because there
has either been a divorce or death in
the family or the child isn't doing
well academically.
"They are not pre delinquents,
and that is a misconception
Moonev slid.
Volunteers are thoroughly
screened and go through training If
any problem arises, whether it be
medical or int a simple problem
the volunteers are prepared.
An 1V Friend must devote at
least two quality hours a week with
thcirasMgned child, attend meetings
regularlv, report to thogiotipleader
about the progress oi the relation
stupor any problems and complete
"activities and incidents reports
when necessary.
To be an IX Fi iend, one must
have at least a 2.2 grade point aver-
age; be responsible, mature and have
the sincere desire to help a child;
have the willingness to make a one
war volunteer commitment; and
attend a training session and com-
plete a volunteer contract and
pledge
Hie dead line for applications is
an 31 n, may be submitted to Dr.
Linda Mooney in the Sociology
Department.
Forum
Continued from page 1
the I S was involved in the war.
The silence th.it followed lasted
tor a minute and a half. No one
could answer
I le went ou to advise that the
ECU faculty set aside a few min-
utes during c lass and discuss the
war
1991 RESOLUTION
SOLUTION
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FILM DEVELOPING
Student Store Easi Carolina University Wrighi Building Greenville, NC 27851
Jg
3
'First-time members only
Read
The
East
Carolinian
Today.
7
Participate in our guarantee program and if you don't
get results in 8 weeks, we will refund your money.
1 The Club
for women only
oastal Fit
TT7S5
enter
S01 Plaza Drive, Greenville, N.C.
756-1592
Mon -Thurs. 9-9 � Fit 9-8 � Sat. 9-1
Without God, It's A Vicious Circle
i
Pray For Peace
"EpiscopalStudent 'Jetfozvship
Wednesday 5:30 pm Celebration oj 'Moli( 'L icfianst
Followed 'Bif Supper (prwided)discussion
St. 'Pauls 'Episcopal Church
401 T 4th St.
(cross 5th st. in front of Carre tt Huff; walk, .down
'JiotliSt. to 4th st. ou are there.)
Other services at St. TauTs
Sun: 7:0 am 9:00 am 11:00 am
'Weil: 7:00 am 10:00 am
Church open 24 hrs. daily
Campus Minister. Marty Qartman � 752-3482
�:
PI KAPPA PHI
anuary 22,23,24 & 25
8-11pm at the house
Tuesday
MEET THE
BROTHERS
Wednesday
PIG
OUT
Thursday
EXOTIC
NIGHT
Friday
TIME TO
LET LOOSE!
ENJOY
at
PI Kappa Phi
�NEW HOUSE
� DECK
�HOT TUB
�PARTY ROOM
�BASKTBALL COURT
� VOLLEYBALL COURT
�LAKE
�BROTHERHOOD
�LEADERSHIP
�COMMUNITY
SERVICE
�SPORTS
�SOCIAL
OPPORTUNITIES
�STRONG ALUMNI
�PUSH (leople
Understanding the
Severely handicapped)
Place: Pi Kappa Phi House
803 Hooker Road
Phone: 756-2149
(Call us if you need a ride)
larketing
Applications 19V1 Winter
jucators'Conference I Y( a vdmgs"
ffter Dr. Glascoff presents it at t!
MA. Conference in Orlando on
reb. 23-26
Ferrell, the lead author of the
rrjcle said: "We are wry pleased to
ave the paper accepted tor pubta a-
pn following blind review oi it by
iree members ot the American
Liarkermp, AsaN iation Dr Glascoff
.nvred to help us submit the paper
-ito the student back fot
khon, but wt beb , suij.
dance of the pap r fettii
iessage I I � �
roufld be i epted b . - � �
kithpapersuT !� � � . -
�nd other taeulu men �
raq
Answering questions put to
them, the pns, n rs gp ke stutl.
haltinglv. some echoing phrase I
ten usedbv the Iraqi govemma I
"I think our lead)r ind
people have kvrongh attacked ���
peaceful people of Iraq said me I
the captured fliers who (dentil d
himself as avv 1.1 Jeffre ' Zaui
survived this process
that I will he able to
papers before my
May"
As an undergrac
Ms Perrei a-Smith wi
sources managemen
completed her MB5
c ember 199
"Having a pa; � rJ
tte American Markeri
definitely helped
better candidate in thi
sht aid
��'
exposure I i bi
var �
� I
ii " with thi
Continued from pad

� � I
but to those m
� m wo
true
-
Mltetobk wTo
The Methodist
501 East Fil
Phone 7
Applications now being u
"A Symbol o
Rush Week January
Scheduled!
Monday Jan 22 Meet the B
Sub Night
Tuesday Jan 23 Pizza Nighi
Meet the
Wednesday Jan 24 Meet the S
Thursday Jan 25 Bid night
Invitation
Where: Tar River Estates CV
North Oak Street
Time: 8-11 Mon-Wed
6-8 Thursday
For Questions or Ril





r

1
��
ILM DEVELOPING
SAVINS COUPON FOR A
REE!
wd srr of mm j
ard & C-41 Color Roll Pro essing
�-s Not Include 4h Prints
'our Film Today & Save
)Wei I Kpiri
rt Musf Ai tomxinv Oriit'r
W righi Building � nvcn ilk- t
It's A Vicious Circle
2785l
-i
:
Peace
Jettrnvshiv
ichanst
I
,24 & 25
I) �use
Wednesday
PIG
OUT
Fr'nlii)
TIME TO
ET LOOSE!
�BROTHERHOOD
�I EADERSHIP
�COMMUNITY
SFRVIC1
�SPORTS
�SOCIAL
OPPORIUMTIFS
�STKONGA1I MM
�PUSH (People
Understanding the
Severely Handicapped)
I
Phone: 756-2149
(Call us if you need a ride)
survived this process I am hoping
that I will be able to submit other
papers before my graduation in
May
As an undergraduate at ECU,
Ms. Perreca-Smith was a human re-
sources management major. She
Marketing
Ijrkl Applications � 1991 Winter
Ifdiii-attrs'C onferencePrrvmlings"
IjtUT I C tecoff presents it at the
Ll A Conference in Orlando on
W 23-26
Ferrefl, the lead author of the
i, le s�d: "We arc very pleased to
�Aep�raccepted tor publica- completer MBAtuZsinSc"
pi following blind review of it by cvmber 1990
fcf mim!VrS �! thCr American "Having a paper published by
M,rk, ,ngAVMhon. l QmeoH the American Marketing Association
kned to help us submit the paper has definitely helped to make me a
, e student frack tor consider- better candidate in the job market
la � but we believed in the sub-
itanceoi the paper, felt it had a real
lirtessage to convey, and thought it
accepted in competition
; n ts written by professionals
her t.K ultv members. Having
MhLSaBLSLssshmJmjBiJS. 1931 9
Continued from page 3
A h
she said. "The MBA program at
ECU is designed to give students
exposure to a broad array of the
various functional areas of business
such as finance, accounting and so
on and with this publication, I will
Iraq
nswering questions put to
them tlvpnsonrrs spoke shfflvand
m: :iv some echoing phrases of-
sed by the Iraqi government
I think our leaders and our
pei have wrongly attached the
pcopleol Iraq said oneoi
��'� iptured tliers. who identified
. fas Navy It effre Zaun
Continued from page 1
28.
It could not be determined what
kindofduressthoPOWswereunder,
but to those who knew them, the
words uttered in wooden voices did
not ring tnie.
"It doesn't sound like left said
Zaun's father, CalvinZaunofCherry
Hill.NJ.
certainly be able to demonstrate that
I know marketing and that I can
communicate well on paper. De-
spite the somewhat complex nature
of the paper, it is quite readable
It isnot known whether thisnew
definition will be widely accepted
because only five years ago, the
American Marketing Association
made its definition. Glascoff is
pleased that the 'teeter-totter' idea
will get a chance to make its own
showing.
"I have been collecting minia-
ture teeter-totters and using them as
teaching vehicles for 10 years
Glascoff said. "Seeing the two of
them in print would certainly tip my
teeter-totter
The Su nt an a
5 Visit Plan $15
10 Visit Plan $25
15 Visit Plan $30
Wolfe Tanning System
756-9180
Coupon Good Through 33091
1212 South Memorial Drive
AfftetoIM(8 �tfondtefflft ffltowasta
The Methodist Student Center
501 East Fifth Street
Phone 758-2030
Applications now being taken for summer ami fall
RUSH
Sigma Pi
Fraternity
" A Symbol of Progress"
Rush Week January 22-25
Scheduled Events
Monday Jan 22 Meet the Brothers
Sub Night
Tuesday Jan 23 Pizza Night & Meet the Brothers.
Meet the Sisters of A07C
Wednesday Jan 24 Meet the Sisters of AZ
Thursday Jan 25 Bid night
Invitation Only
Where: Tar River Estates Clubhouse,
North Oak Street
Time: 8-11 Mon-Wed
6-8 Thursday
For Questions or Rides 752-1938
m
MM
KAPPA
ALPHA
Dear Rushee,
As you are contemplating rushing a
fraternity this spring, a number of doors
will be open to you. Here at Kappa Alpha,
we offer the door like no other.
As a rushee, you must choose the
organization which you wish to join. A
fraternity of men with whom you will live
for the next four years, and whom you will
call brothers for the rest of your life.
We believe that you will agree that, in
fact, Kappa Alpha is the most unique and
traditional of any college fraternity. We
strive for both unity and selection.
Won't you come by and sample a bit of
Southern Tradition?
Good Luck Rushees!
TUB RROTHLKS OP GAMNMA KIIO
CHAPTER Or KAPPA ALPHA ORDER
For Rides & info: Call 757-0128
lues. Ian.22 Wed. Jan 23
Chips & Coke Hickory Hams
meet sorority girls meet sororitv girls
Thurs. Jan11
Kinj; Sandwich
meet the brothers
mt0mmmmt0mm
ii. Jan. 25
Invite only
1
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
DIVERSITY
UNITY
For 145 years, men from diverse
backgrounds have come together to form
a strong bond of brotherhood. Join the
tradition of the 10th oldest fraternity in
the nation.
RUSH ALPHA SIGMA PHI
Jan. 22 - Meet the sisters and pledges of AI
Jan. 23 - Meet the brothers
Jan. 24 - Meet the sisters and pledges of XXX
Jan. 25 - Invitation only
Meet the sisters and pledges of AZ
422 W. 5th St. For info or rides call 757-3516





I
I
10
atje �nBt(rnriiliman January 22, 1991
Statistics show that numbers of rapes are declining
Men have become more sensitive to women
w m n ;ton -n
I leightened sensitiv ityamongmen
to the cotk erns of women over the
past two tli adesis bemg i rted bv
. riminotogists as ,i possible expla
�i for a dramatic decrease m
rapt' attempts.
'ate of attempted rapes of
girls and women m the I rtifed
State; � � ent from
to 1W7 . ording f- a study
� i Sunday bv the lusfk e 1 e
A � ti the Bureau of
� StatJSfJCS Stud) the rate ot
d rapes fell from 1 1 per
" � . r ' ind won K'ti in h'7 u
t 7 per 1 � � S7
1 liuvt'vcr,therateof offrytfted
rap-s O.ffper 1,000 heldsteadv
(u e? the sinic timt- sp.in
( riminologist Alfred
blumstein theorized that the de-
cline in attempted rap's could he
attributable to heightened male
sensitivity to concerns raised bv
women in the last 20 vears
Hut h'lumstem dean of the
h (tool of urban and publu affairs
at Pittsburgh 's Carnegie Mellon
I niversitv,suidhecouldonk guess
at the reasons Many women still
.ire reluctant to report the crime,
makinr, statist as unreliable hesaid
Onlv 53 percent of rapes or
attempted rapes ,ire reported to
Baltic republics
form defense units
after Soviet attacks
:
irliament, meefmg in ewer
' session in the carlv morning
lic hours just after the ommandos rtt
pohce, the study s.jui But (he re
port, compiled bv extrapolating
figures from a survey of 49 "
households, estimated there were
137, "(� rapes. m.l .ittempted raps
in P'S7.downtrom t5&jffKlin 1973
Women were more likelv to
call police it raped bv a strai
than bv someone the) knew.
Among women w ho weTeraped in
or near their home, -Js percent said
the attacker was someone Ihey
knew .u i ording to the study, titled
"FemaleVu timsof iolent( rim
Of the total lolent runes
againsf women, rape.a . ounled for
3 pereent. the report s.ud. 1 hesludy
found that 24.5 percent of the
na East Carolinian is now aceapting
application for ttftff Writof,
For mw in'formallon cH 7S7-SMS,
won ii i were h tan i t iolent
crimes rape robbery and assault
said tluv had heen attav k. d In
SOTW one ttiev knew nil in i.itrlv .
ontrasl i. � I of I
nien subjected to such violeno aid
tnt nd or relativt'
I he information tor the study f
was olle ted from � ur cvs of
1 ion ieh -Id -v undue ted I i ear
by I hi department N�al
( rime Surv .
I he survey is :� red a
more reliable u ' rirw
than F Bl sfati I rse thedata
liu h; ,i that �. In
rep
CLIFF'S 5h
Seafood House and Oyster Barj
Washington H.ghway.NC 33 E�t , Gre�n�l North Carolina
y J Phone 752-3172 V
-Mon. thru Thurs. Night
r� mandos! at,l.in Interior Ministry ap
ii' . Mj . .I a dei ree calling on ll rnent 1.1 estahlish a sell ,), fense unit i a draft age volunteers 11
dett� 1 other localdel VC t"ok i ttett immediateh
� -� I il,) details about the group
' -i. rmmandoswere unclear, but it was likely to
ll hi h alsotake the form of the Tafa group
-h leftthat holed up in the parliament
.building last week in the neighboi
allmg Baltic republn I ithuann f, 1 fig a similar d adly assault
;i hi 1 ithuanian sell defense
1force has uniforms and i ondu ts
' Illsdrills, hut far from alt of its members � i apoiis
FILL THI?
� � �
943
WRQR
U.S. envoy
visitsTel Aviv
following
Iraqi attack
lii in i ikesman
1 aid Ihetw i ibatti � �
ll r U.S. rows on
� � P-ot n by two
i re I li ' . �- m ih it ,h been
� ! ' if d I i � � n partially
lolivx'i 11 ' -
11 Tt days the
� ill h op Tat a ir
I H I tadli
Mini t ryi itzhakShamir
' ' I lei � � ' . is not asked
lltK ilprn etortheP.itrii .
! here is no deal We are
vorking I ether. Wc are thinking,
I rl . � i.b. tt.r Shamir
aid I ih i) iptimistk I think
" Patriots � �� Hi I -rai'l. we
reason to be optimistk "
I ' iti i in. h shot down
lr.n11 l� ud n ' iles iimtxl , Saudi
� ibia on I riday and on Sunday
night, I i.e. i given a boost to Israel's
Midi rv'
I ih Menashe,i meofthewi men
ho applauded I agleburger, said
� P Itti I made her tei'l terrihi
"I i an f put it m words, our
lingsfoi theAmern ans It'srealK
thing ' she s.nd
Eagleburget i hatted with resi
i.l : th � Teas where missiles
had blasted the fron I wallsoff houses
�nd destroyed cars I he missiles
have infured about 30 people, m
i ording to milii.m offk ials
fagleburget was accompanied
by Mayor ShJomo I shat, who like
most Israelis carried a gas m.isk
slung in case 'I a c hemieal weap �ns
attack lagleburger and U s diplo
mats kept masks m their linmusine
WALKING ON WATER
IIOW DOES HE DO IT?
THURSDAY NIGHT
THURSDAY, JANUARY 24,1991 - 8:00PM
ECU-WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
3.00 STUDENT TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE - MENDENHALL S. i
Sponsored by: Campus Crusade





January 20,1991
5Ui? ggflt (Earulintan
tt
Cappola runs
out of steam in
'Godfather ffl'
By Matt King
Features Fditor
Francis F rd Coppola dug "The
Godfather Ill's" grave a long time
aapwhenlteciaAedsucha powerful
and Mistering portrayal of the first
part of Mano Puzo's epic.
When we udge or place any
level of worth on a movie we must
weigh that piece of work relative to
another movie or group ot movies
that have a common denominator.
In the caw of movie sequels the
most logical (xvr t the movie would
he any of its predecessors
It was nothing short of cin-
ematic magic to stv Marlon Brando,
cheeks wide and eves glassed, be-
hind a dark desk, wishing the death
ot an enemy. The violence that
Brando and a voung Al Pacino ad-
ministered in theoarlier movies was
never given awav by their sullen
demeanor But the.ictsot violence
in the movies were so traumatic
that the viewer could never K sure
were the bkxxllettmg would end.
This was Reinforced when the
voung Don Corleone (Al Pacino)
ordered thedoathofhisown brother
because the don was unsure of his
brother's intentions and ambitions.
In "TheGodfather 111' we find
anolder, self-doubting Don Michael
Corleone (Al Pacino) who is being
honored bv the Roman Catholic
( hunrh fee his unquestioned gen
erosjtv. Afterward, the Corleone
J
clan is gathered for a celebration;
this is where the promise1 of the
classic C Uxltather scenano presents
itself.
To the moviegoer, it would
seem that the old magic is once
again about to unfold. But the
movie soon falls short of its ex pecta-
tions
There arc some shortcomings
in the parts of some of the relevant
See Coppola, page 12
Center to help
war-concerned
students
By Lisa Marie Jernagin
Staff Writer
New found Hollywood heartthrob Johnny Depp takes on the
unorthodox role ot the Frankenstein like f dward Scissorhands
Copy I '990 I a.ni ��� .�� n. Right.
Edward is the hero of the new film by Tim Burton the creator
Batman and Beetlejuice' from Twentieth Century Fox
'Scissorhands imagery, emotion leads to success
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Features Fditor
Initially, moviegoers may
consider the premise of Tim
Burton's latest cinematic effort,
"Edward Scissorhands to l a
bit uhi outrageous Come on, a
guv with scissors tor hands
some plot.
However, this attitude is
quickly dismissed after viewing
this delightful and very likeable
comedicromantic fable
Johnny Depp portrays, Ed-
ward, the creation of an eccentric
inventor (Vincent Price). Unfor
tunatelv, the inventor dies before
ho can replace ld ward's loot long
shears with normal hands. Which.
as Price explains, "is part of the
tragedy oi the boy. The inventor
didn't get as tar as making his
hands. So, he Still has these scissor
hands As ,i conseauence, Ed-
v. ard must facean existence where
even an iti h could prove lethal.
Alter his creators unex-
pected death, Edward is isolated,
living in a dreary mansion posi-
tioned on a hill overlooking a
colorful suburban community.
ExperiendngaluDmthedooT-
to-door cosmetics business, Peg
(Diane West), the kxral Avon lady,
pays Edward a visit At first. Teg
is startled by Edward's appear-
ance.
"What happened to von?" she
says.
"I'm not finished Edward
replies
However, she soon realizes
Edward's situation and out Of
compassion invites him to live
with her family Surprisingly, her
family does not object to their new
guest.
When Edward arrives, he
quickly becomes the topic of local
gossip and conversation.
Edward's reputation increases
when his special talent for prun-
ing shnibhery and cutting hair is
discovered. Some of the more
humorous scenes occur when
Edward grooms the neighbor-
he xh.1 pets.
As the movie continues, F"d-
ward tails m love with Peg's
daughter, Kim (Winona Ryder).
However, in Edward's quest to
win ICjm'stove he must overcome
anohstade, Imv Anthony Michael
Hall), Kims brutish boyfriend.
im considers Edward 10 be a
threat and deveiopsa scheme that
eventually leads to Edward's
downfall.
In preparation tor his role as
Edward, Johnny Depp studied
thesilenttilmsofC "harlicChaplin.
I hisaccentuated Edward snaive
and inexperienced personality.
"Because Edward is not human,
and not a robot, I didn't think he
See Scissorhands. page 12
As the crisis in the Middle East
continues, many at ECU arc find-
ing themselves in personal crisis.
Academic life is hard enough
without the added anxiety of
worrying about friends and fam-
ily serving in the Gulf and the
broader issuesof the world a t war.
Many students are finding it hard
to cope with their feelings or are
preoccupied with the war. Some
are having difficulty meeting the
demands of classes.
Dr Wilbert R. Ball, director of
the Counseling Center, stated that
calls started coming in the morn
ing after war broke out. Students
are anxious and arc requesting
help in dealing with the stress.
Many in the ECU community have
loved ones in the Middle East and
a re d ebi I i ta ted by concern for their
weltare while experiencing fee!
mgs ot helplessness, depression
and shock. Others who may be
experiencing war for the first time
are preoccupied with the violence
that is taking place and are
troubled by the more philosophi-
cal issues of warfare.
The Counseling Center has re-
sponded to the crisis bv offering a
Drop-In Support Service to stu-
dents, faculty and staff that are
attected bv the situation in the
Cult. The service will provide
counseling to these individuals
and the opportunity to share their
feeiingsand discuss their concerns
with others who are also feeling
similar worries.
The services are offered Mon-
day through Friday continuously
from 3:Oo p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the
Couseling Center offices located
at312 Wnght Building. The service
will be staffed by center counsel-
See Crisis, page 14
GreenviUebuahessmanlxrildsdj
empire dining high-tech age of music
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
So there you a re, all hope appar-
entlv lost You absolutely have to
find the second album released by
yourtavoriteband.Butithasn'tbocn
released on compact disc and none
of thc music stoats carry a copy on
cassette Apparently you will have
to do without the music you so
desperately desptrc.
Suddenly you realize that long
ago before the age of CD's and Milli
Vanilli there was another form of
musical transcription. No, not the 8-
track, but do you remember the vi-
nylalbum?Yes,of course, thearchaic
analog instnimcnt played on turn-
tables But where can you find these
forgotten treasures?
In a high-tech world of CD's
and digital watches noone seems to
want to deal with those once great
objects. No one, that is except for
Tom Ives the founder and propri-
etor of Quicksilver records and
books
Ives' store (which is also oper-
ated by his wife Rebecca), is located
on the corner ot fifth and C'otanche
streets. It is the only place in
Greenville where you may still find
a large selection of new and used
vmvl albums
Bv no means, however, are al
bumsall that may betbund at Quick-
silver. The store is also the home of
usedD'sand c.issettes,is well asan
assortment ot other obscure items
Ives first opened his Quicksil-
ver store (a name derived from the
60s band Quicksilver Messenger
Service) in Jacksonville in 1980. His
original establishment dealt solely
with new merchandise1 but when he
moved to Greenville he found that
thecity lacked a used record market.
Thushebeganconcentratingi n used
material
Presently, Quicksilver carries a
selection of used as well as new
merchandise. Ives tries to concen-
trate mostly on material which can-
not be obtained from other stores in
the area. For example, he carries a
selection of alternative music on
seven inch vinyl.
Ives caters to customers who
find it hard to acquire their musical
desires from large chain stores. Ke-
fernng to the items ho adds to his
selections Ives said dial "whenever
add anything else t i the sti a 11 kxik
tori something that nobody else is
doingand yet th.it pa plemight find
interesting
The majority of the used musk
to be found in Quicksilver is ob-
tained trom customers who sokl or
traded their recordings. Ivc spoke
of his need to keep and open mind
c tncerni ng some of the music com-
ing into the store. "I'll pretty much
buv one of anything he stated.
Oddly enough, he once bought
David Hasselhoff's (remember
Knight Rider?) lessthan blockbuster
album from 185. Who, do you might
think would want to hear thismusical
masterpiece?
Well apparently, surprisingasit
may seem. Knight Rider is a popular
show i wer in Germany and recently
a customer purchased the album for
a relative who lives there. Ives
See ouicksilver, page 12
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
ECU's Gray Art Gallery exhibits a
variety of styles in 'Three Directions'
By Lewis Coble
Staff Writer
"Three Directions a paint-
ing exhibition consisting of three
contemporary artists, will be fea-
tured at ECU's Gray Art Gallery
from Jan. 11 to Feb. 9,1991.
The artists being presented
in the concurrent solo painting
ex hibi tions of "Three Directions
are Steven Assael; Recent Paint-
ings and Works on Paper;
Marilyn Farinacci; New Work;
and Benito Huerta; East Fifth
Street.
Steven Assad's portraits and
figurative paintings contain a
haunting realism as he catches
the emotional dramas that his
subjects enact.
Assael has been compared to
some of the great artists, such as
Rembrandt, due to his mastery of
perspective, draftsmanship, and
anatomy. Through these skills
and research, Assael has been able
to depict the human condition so
that the viewer is left emotionally
strictened.
The showing of Steven
Assael's; Recent Paintings and
Workson Paper isavailablecour-
tesy of the Barbara Gallery,
Washington, DC. and New York,
New York.
Marilyn Farinacci's; New
Work is a collection of abstract
paintings that evoke the power of
lifeand energy. Concentric cone-
like shapes of light used in rep-
etition along with layering effects
and the building-up of colors
make up Farinacci's canvases.
Farinacci's work has been ex-
hibited in such galleries and
shows as Tlie May Show, Cleve-
land Museum of Art and Exhibi-
tion 280, Huntington Museum of
Art.
She is currently serving as a
visiting lecturer for the ECU
School of Art.
See Gray, page 14
� Poio Oy John Kan�
The world renowned dance group Momix will be appearing at Wright Auditorium on Thursday Jan. 31 at 8:00
p.m. The group incorporates modern music and everyday objects into their riveting proformance.
Momix joins modern dance, music
for breathtaking entertainment
Age selections. The performances
are centered for modem audiences
using a fast-paced cinemagraphic
design.
A "New York Times" reviewer
referred to the dancers as a "zany
group" who "got off to a rip-roaring
start as a packed house clamored for
more A "Los Angeles Herald Ex-
aminer" critic noted that "people
shouted out, gasped and applauded
furiously. Momix is ideal for turn-
ing audiences onto dance
The performance certainly
promises to be grand and should not
be missed. Advance tickets can be
obtained for$8 to ECU students ($12
for staff) from theCentral Ticket Of-
fice. If you care, you can mail or
phone your request to MendenhaH
Student Center (757-4788).
So whether you are into dance
or not, Momix appears to be enter-
taining. It should be an eye-opening
experience for one and all. Besides,
I've never thought of an umbrella as
a thing of beauty�have you?
There I was, sitting alone in my
apartment looking for some real
entertainment. What was I looking
for? Well I likedance performances,
but none of that stuffy ballet. I'm in
the mood for something new and
different.
I want a performance with
modern music and modem dance,
but most of all I would like to see
normal everyday objects, like um-
brellas, turn into indescribable
shapes of beauty. To my surprise, I
had just described the stage antics of
the avant garde dance troupe
"Momix And I was even more
surprised to learn that Momix will
be coming to ECU!
Momix is billed as one of the
world's "most innovative dance
companies They will appear at
Wright Auditorium on Thursday,
Jan 31 at 8 p.m. as part of ECU's
1990-91 Performing Arts Series.
Momix has been performing their
off-beat style of dance for the past 10
years. It started asa solo performance
by Moses Pendleton at the Lake
Placid Winter Olympics, but over
the years he has expanded the per-
formance widely adding many fac-
ets to the show.
Recently, Momix was seen in a
55 nation broadcast for an Italian
elevision special. They were seen
throughout much of the world in-
cludingRussiaandChina. Thedance
group also participated in a Danish
program which was entered in an
international film festival.
The Momix dancers claim to be
the "best example of surrealistic
theater They combine props and
bodies to transform themselves into
unusual images In fact,evenan um-
brella is utilized as an object of
transformation. Now thaf s enter-
tainment!
The dances are set to a wide
variety of musk such as composi-
honsot Henry Purcell andothcrNcw





January 20,1991
cBItc iEaHt (Earolintan
11
Cappola runs
out of steam in
'Godfather ffl'
By Matt King
Features T-ditor
1 rancis 1 irdCoppi 'la dug "The
Godfather Ill's" grave a long time
ago when hecraf ted such a powerful
and Mistering portrayal ot the first
piirt ot Mario Puzo'sepk.
When we judge or plaee anv
level ot worth on .1 movie we must
weigh that piece of work relative to
another movie or group ol movies
that have a common denominator.
In the nisi' l movie sequels the
rrw �st U gica txvr to the movie would
he anv o( its predecessofs
It was nothing short ot tin-
ematk magk to see Marlon Brando,
cheeks wide and eves glassed, be
hind a dark desk wishingthedeath
ot an enemy The violence that
Brando and a voung Al Pacino ad-
ministered m theearliermev tesvvas
rtevei raven awa by their sullen
dcmcimT Hut the acts ol violence
m the movies were SO traumatic
th.it the viewer could never be sure
were the bloodletting would eixl.
Tins was reinforced when the
young Don Corleone (Al Pacino)
ordered thedeathofhisown brother
because the don was unsure of his
brother's intentions and ambitions
In "The( .odtathcrlll we find
anokJer,self doubting Don Michael
Corleone (Al Pacino) who is being
honored bv the Roman Catholii
( hurch tor his unquestioned gen
erositv. Afterward, the Corleone
clan is gathered for a celebration;
this is where the promise of the
classk 1 iodfather scenario presents
itsell
To the moviegoer, it would
seem that the old magic is once
again about to untold. But the
movie soon falls short of its expecta-
tions
There are some shortcomings
in the parts ot some of the relevant
See Coppola page 12
Center to help
war-concerned
students
By Lisa Marie Jernagin
Staff Writer
New found Hollywood he.irtthrob Johnny Depp takes on the
unorthodox role ot the f rankenstem like I award & i- orhands
F dward is the hero of the new film by Tim Burton the creator
Batman and Beetlejuice from Twentieth Century Fox
'Scissorhands imagery, emotion leads to success
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Features I liitor
Initial!). moviegoers may
Consider the premise ol Rm
Burton's latest 1 inemati effoit
I dward issorhands to be .1
bit too ilutrageousome on a
guv with scissors for hands
s me pit't.
However, this attitude is
quick!) dismissed after view
this delightful and er likeable
comediCj romantk table
lohnnv I Vpp portra) 5 Id
ward, the creation of an eo entri
inventor (Vincent Pru e) I ntor
runately, the inventor dies befon
he can replace Ed ward sfoof long
shears with normal hands hu h.
,�s True explains, "is part t the
traged) oftheboj The inventor
didn't gel as tar as making his
hands So hestill has these scissor
Kinds s a consequence, id
ward must faceanexisterK e where
even an itch could prove lethal
tter Ins 1 reator's imex
pei ted death Edward is isolated
living in .1 drearv mansion posi
honed on a hill overlooking a
cokirful suburban communit)
1 xperienanga lull in the door
to-door cosmetics business Iv.
(I Sane West), the local Avonladv
pa) s Edward a visit At first Pee.
is startled by Edward's appear-
,m e
What happened to you T'she
s,ns
Tm not finished Edward
replies
However, she soon realizes
Id wards situation and out ot
compassion invites him to live
with her family Surprisingly her
familydoesnotobjecttotheirnew
guest
When Edward arrives, he
quickly becomes the lopk of lot al
gossip and conversation.
Edward's reputation increases
when his special talent tor prun-
ing shrubbery and cutting hair is
discovered Some of the more
humorous scenes OCCUr when
Edward grooms the neighbor-
hood pets
As the m. � ieo rntinui��� I d
ward tails in love ith P
daughter. Kim (Winona Ryder)
I lowever, in 1 dward's quest I
winKim'sk �vehei ero me
anobsta le im nth n M had
I I.ill Kim's brutish boyl
hm considers Edward to be .1
threat and d v lopsas hemethat
eventually le ids to Edward's
dovi ntall.
En preparation for his rok as
Edward, iohnnv Depp studied
the silent filmsof( hariie( haplin.
lhis.Kienluatedidv,�rd snaive
and inexp rw need personalit)
"Because Edward is not human.
and n t a n h I I didn't think he
See Scissorhands page 12
As the.tisis in the Middle Fast
continues, many at ECU are find-
ing themselves in personal crisis.
Academic life is hard enough
without the added anxiety of
worrying about friends and fam-
llv serving in the GaM and the
broader issues of the world at war
Manv students are finding it hard
to cope vvith their feelings or are
preoccupied with the war. Some
are having difficulty meeting the
demands of classes.
Pr Wilbert K. Ball, director ot
theC ounsehngCenter,staled that
1 alls started coming in the mom
ing alter war broke out Students
are anxious and are requesting
help in dealing with the stress
Manv inthcFX U community have
loved ones in the Middle Fast and
aredcbilitated by concern tor their
welfare while experiencing fed
ings ot helplessness, depression
and sh(�k Others who mav be
experieni ing war tor the first time
are preoccupied with the violence
that is taking place and are
troubled bv the more philosophi-
cal issues of warfare.
The Counseling Center has re-
sponded to the 1 risisby offering a
Drop-In Support Service to stu-
dents, faculty nd start that are
affected by the situation in the
Gulf. 1 he service vill provide
counseling to these individuals
and the opportunity to share their
feeiingsand discuss their concerns
with others who are also feeling
similar worries.
The services are offered Mon-
day through Friday continuously
from 3s0p p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the
ouseiing Center offices located
.it 12 Wright Building. Theservice
w ill be staffed bv center counsel-
See Crisis, page 14
GreenviUebiiabessmanrdsvird
empire during high-tech age of music
By Malt Jones
Staff Writer
So there youare,a!l hope appar-
ently lost You absolutely have to
tind the second album released by
your favorite band .But it hasn t been
release! on compact disc and none
ofthemusM storescarrj acopyon
cassette Apparently you will have
to do without the musk you so
desperatet) despire
Suddenly you realize that long
ago before the age ofP's and Milh
Vanilli then' was another form of
musical transcription No, not the 8-
track. but do you remember the vi-
nvlalbum?Yes,of course, thearchaic
analog instniment played on turn-
tables Hut where i an you find these
forgotten treasures?
In a high tech world of CD's
and digital watches no one seems to
want to deal with those once great
objects No one, that is except for
Tom Ives the founder and propn
etor of Quicksilver records and
books
ated by his wife Rebei 1 a), isk cated
on the comer ol I itth andotaiuhe
streets. It is the only place in
(.reenville where vou mav still find
a large selection ot new and used
vinvl albums
bv ik means however, .ire al
bumsallthatmaybefoundatQuk k
sih er fne store is also the home ol
used I rsandcasscttesaswellasan
assortment of other obscure items
lves first opened his Quicksil
ver store (a name derived from the
60s band Quicksilver Messenger
Service) in Jacksonville in 1980. I lis
original establishment dealt solely
with new merchandise but when he
moved to Greenville he found thai
the city lacked a used record market
Thushelx'gatu oik entratingon used
material
Presently, Quicksilver carries a
selection of used as well as new
merchandise, lves tries to concen-
trate mostly on material which can
not be obtained from (ther stores m
the area. For example, he carries a
selection of alternative music on
lves1 store (which is also oper- seven inch vinyl.
lves caters to customers who
find it hard to acquire their musical
desires from large chain stores. Re-
ferring to the items he adds to his
s. -lo t ions Ives said that "whenever I
nA anv thine, else to the store 11 look
tor something thai nobody else is
doingand yet that people might find
interesting
11 ie maiotitv ol theuscd musk
to Iv found in Quicksilver s ob-
tained from i uston ;ers who sold or
traded their recordings lves spoke
ot his need to keep and open mind
concerning some of the musk com-
ing into the store. "I'll pretty much
buy one of anything he stated.
Oddly enough, he once bought
I'avid Hasselhoff's (remember
Knight Rider?) less than blockbuster
aJbumfrom1985 Who,doyoumight
think would want to hoarthismusu a!
masterpiece?
Well apparently, surprismgasit
mav seem, Knight Rider is a popular
show i v er in C iemiany and recently
a cust mer purchased thealbum for
.1 relative who lives there. Ives
See Quicksilver, page 12
Poio Ov Jo" Kae
The world renowned dance group Momix will be appearing at Wright Auditorium on Thursday Jan 31 at 8 00
p m The group incorporates modern music and everyday objects into their riveting protormance
Momix joins modern dance, music
for breathtaking entertainment
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
ECU'S Gray Art Gallery exhibits a
variety of styles in 'Three Directions'
By Lewis Coble
Staff Writer
"Three Directions a paint-
ing exhibition consisting of three
contemporary artists, will be fea-
tured at ECU's Gray Art Gallery
from Jan. 11 to Feb. 9,1991.
The artists being presented
in the concurrent solo painting
exhibitionsof "Three Directions
are Steven Assael; Recent Paint-
ings and Works on Paper;
Marilyn Farinacci; New Work;
and Benito Hucrta; East Fifth
Street.
Steven Assad's portraits and
figurative paintings contain a
haunting realism as he catches
the emotional dramas that his
subjects enact.
Assael has been compared to
some of the great artists, siu h as
Rembrandt, due to his masterv of
perspective, draftsmanship, and
anatomy Through these skills
and research, Assael has been able
to depict the human condition so
that the viewer is left emotionally
strictened.
The showing of Steven
Assael's; Recent Paintings and
Workson Paper isavailablecour-
tesy of the Barbara Gallery,
Washington, DC. and New York,
New York.
Marilyn Farinacci's; New
Work is a collection of abstract
pa in tings that evoke the power of
life and energy. Concentric cone-
like shapes of light used in rep-
etition along with layeringeffects
and the building-up of colors
make up Farmacci's canvases.
Farmacci's work has been ex-
hibited in such galleries and
shows as The May Show, Cleve-
land Museum of Art and Exhibi-
tion 280, Huntington Museum of
Art.
She is currently serving as a
visiting lecturer for the ECU
School of Art.
See Gray, page 14
There 1 was, sitting alone in my
apartment looking for some real
entertainment. What was 1 looking
for? Well I likedance performances,
but none of that stuffy ballet. I'm in
the mood for something new and
different.
I want a performance with
modem music and modern dance,
but most of all I would like to see
normal everyday objects, like um-
brellas, turn into indescribable
shapes of beauty. To my surprise, I
had just described the stage antics of
the avant garde dance troupe
"Momix And I was even moiv
surprised to leam that Momix will
be coming to ECU!
Momix is billed as one of the
world's "most innovative dance
companies" They will appear at
Wnght Auditorium on Thursday.
)an 31 at 8 p.m. as part of ECU's
1990-91 Performing Arts Series.
Momix has been performing their
off-beat style of dance for the past 10
years. It started �sasotopariormance
by Moses PendBeton at the Like
Placid Winter Olympics, but over
the years he has expanded the per-
formance widely adding many fac-
ets to the show.
Recently, Momix was seen in a
35 nation broadcast for an Italian
elevision special. They were seen
throughout much of the world in-
cludingRussia and China. Thedance
group also participated in a Danish
program which was entered in an
international film festival.
The Momix dancers claim to be
the "best example of surrealistic
theater They combine props and
bodies to transform themselves into
unusual images. In fact,evenan um-
brella is utilized as an object of
transformation. Now thaf s enter-
tainment!
The dances arc set to a wide
variety of music such as compos!
hi msoi Henrv Purcell and other New
Age selections. The performances
are centered for modem audiences
using a fast-paced cinemagraphic
design.
A "New York Times" reviewer
referred to the dancers as a "zany
group" who "got off to a np-roanng
start as a packed house clamored for
more A "Los Angeles Herald Ex-
aminer" critic noted that "people
shouted out,gasped and applauded
furiously. Momix is ideal for turn-
ing audiences nnto dance
The performance certainly
promises to be grand and should not
be missed. Advance tickets can be
obtained for$8 to ECU students ($12
for staf 0 from the Central Ticket Of-
fice. If you care, you can mail or
phone your request to Mendenhall
Student Center (757-4788).
So whether you are into dance
or not, Momix appears to be enter-
taining. It should be an eye-opening
experience for one and all. Besides.
I' ve ixvcr thought of an umbrella as
a thing of boautyhavc you?





Jwi'vk 20.1991
uJIic lEast CHarulinian
11
Cappola runs
out of steam in
'Godfather III'
By Matt King
! ratx isl ordt "oppoladug lbo
i kxltatht r Ill's grave a li'nr. time
ago when he raftexisuchapoxverful
and blistering portraval ol the first
part ol Mario Puo sipn
W hen vvc judge or ptao anx
� � � must
ivi igh that pux i ol work n latix eto
mother i i � i I mox ies
that I i i �� n ixator
is� � nxw'i- sequels the
eouki
. - , �
� � � .
ematti m . tosei Mai l� n Brando
uiarkdi k.w ishing thodeath
of an i nemx H i that
Brandt uxl a oung I ino ad
ministered in lheoarlierm icswas
never given awa b then sullen
demeanor But the acts ot loktxce
in the n ie; won so tram ith
that tlit v ii-vm : i ould nox et t
were the hkxxlletting kvonld end
Tins w 1 reinforced when the
voung Dor . orlcone (A! Pacino)
ordered thedeathothis ivnbrother
Kx ausc the don was unsure of his
brother s intenti� �ns and ambitions
In ' hct iodfatherlll. wefind
ler.seligDonMichael
red hx man Call
� - - �
eroMtx Vf'tei �� � tl i �
isu i � vit.
Center to help
war-concerned
students
By I isa Marie Jernagin
suit Writer
unor1v�o
� � � ����� i the new I
� teetk juk '� n
'Scissorhands imagery, emotion leads to success
By Stuart Oliphant
.ssist.ini li.ihiiis I tiil.it
1 � .K� I
1�oor it would�'is A� 1 i
sevnn : is oneC(�
h i� � � old But the'mn h
m it � itesh �rtofitsi mx taware)thi n iti �
tions
levant
� �
�nsid �
�� n's

s.l s
I'm � ishod i '
n plies
� � � i
: . . . -
.
t h her ta 111 i


ind convei

'
loot

xxonladx ing shnibbery and oitring hair i�
Coppola page 12
: '
, � � � �
!v �:� � '
irswithi rn
. . .
.
eon' 'she
I ered Snx I the n
in � �� � " ir v
:��:��
p '
I his,i i ntu i
Scissorhands
the risis in 11���- Middle East
i ontinues, mam at E( 1 arc find
elves in personal i risis.
v d. mi life is hard enough
with.mi! the added anxiety of
worrying about friends and fam
il m ring in the lull .nd the
idei issuesof theworldat war
Manx students are finding it hard
1 � ith their feelings oi are
prooo upied with the war Some
an ha ing diffn ulty meeting the
indsof lasses
� hert K Ball dm i toi of
insehng enter stated that
� I oming in th m rn
rbroki it Students
anxious and are reejui st
thng w ith the stress
Manx mtheECI community have
in the Middle East and
� � i ni for then
�sntss di �ression
and shock ithers who may tx-
� periencing war for the first time
are preoi upied with the iolence
� it is taking pli e and are
troubled bv the mon philosi phi-
. if warfare.
IIhm (Hinselingt enter has rc-
I � : � � �'� � . nsisbx offering a
In Suppirt s- rx-ici to stu-
� � � fa iltx a' statt t! il
� I v the sit ' in th
servio ; i
� thesi indix iduals
� � � rtunitvto -hare their
� � - sanddiscusstheiro no n -
s xvho are als� feel
- " ilai 'a i n
1 he serx ices an tl red Mon-
igh i ridax (ontinuouslv
from MXo p.m to5.X)pan at the
i eling O nter offices l k ated
2 VVnght Building rheservice
taffed bx centir ounsel
See Crisis � :� 14
Greenville businesarian birilds vinyl
emphe during high-tech age of music
By Matt Jones
st.itt VXriH-r
Sothervvou in �. r peappar
�� 1 - ' . iuvc to
� � x"cwd album released bv
� ti band.Butithasn tbeen
reloa omrxKt Jis. and ntne
� � n sti �res i arr a 11 px im
� � '���'�. M
. � � . c V(H1 N
Suddenlx you realize that long
agp before the age oft 1 )'sand Milh
V'anilli Ihere was atxither form of
musical transcription No,not Ihc8
track but do von remember the vi
nylalbum?Ytofcourse,thearchak
analog instrument played on tum-
tabli But where i an yi -n find these
tore �tten treasures ?
In a high tix h world of t 1's
and digital vati hesnt one seems to
want to deal with those once great
objects No one, that is except tor
Tom Ives the founder and propri
etot t�f Quicksilver records and
Kks
Ives store I whk h is ,ilsi oper
ated bvhi � I �-
on th �� � � t Fift � :n. he
streets 11
� - � erex till find
a lat. � � � ' � � ' I ustxi
invl albums

humsallth itnvivlxM I it i -
sih er � ' � � �� �
er stere (a name derixwl h I
�xV Kind Quicksilxvr Mess
Serxice) in jacksotmlle in b,s I lis
original establishment dealt �-�ieh
with new men handisebut h n he
moved to (ireenx ille he finnxi that
theeit lacked a used record ma
Thushebegan oixvntratingt�nused
material
Presenth QuicksiK'ei trTi,i
selection of usl as well as
merx haixiise Ixvs tries te
Iratemostl) on material which win
not be obtained from other stores in
the area For example hi carries a
sekxtion of alternative musk on
en iik h vim I
in sti res
Ixx1 else is
tonxTs who stkl or
� - afings ! � spxke
� - txeed to keep and open mind
� nine. - -meet the musk Com
nto the store 111 prettx much
of anything, he stated
(.Xldlx enough, he once bought
David Hasselhoff's (remember
tRider? less than blockbuster
alrximfroml)8? Who doyoumight
think weuld wantteheai thismuskal
ma-ti into e?
ellapparvnd surprisingasit
ma sx?m,Knight Ridei isapopular
shew overint iermany .nA uwnth
,i. ustomei pun based thealbumfbi
,i relative who lues there Ives
Quicksilver page 12
Theworld renowned dance group Momix will b- appea-mg at VVngtit Auditorium on Thursday Jan 31 at8 00
pm rhe group incorporates moctem m tndeveryd bjed I tl � eting protormance
Momix joins modern dance, music
for breathtaking entertainment
By Matt ones
SUtt XXrilor
ECU's Gray Art Gallery exliibits a
variety of styles in 'Three Directions'
B Lewis Coble
Staff Writer
Three Directions � paint-
ing exhibition consisting of three
contemporary artists, will be fea-
tured at ECU's (.ray Art Gallery
from Ian 11 to Feb.9, 1991.
The artists being presented
in the concurrent solo painting
exhibitionsof "Thiee Directions
are Steven Assael; Recent Paint-
ings and Works on Paper;
Marilyn Earinacci; New Work;
and Benito Huerta, East Fifth
Street
Steven Assad'sportraitsand
figurative paintings contain a
haunting realism as he catches
the emotional dramas that his
subjects enact
Assael has been compared to
some of the great artists, sm h as
Rembrandt due to his mastery of
perspective draftsmanship, and
anatomy through these skills
and resean h. Assael hasbeenable
to depict the human condition so
that the viexver is left emotionally
strictened
The showing of Steven
Assaels, Recent Paintings and
Workson Paper isavailablecour
tesv Of the Barbara Gallery,
Washington D and New i ork.
New i ork
Marilyn Farinacci's; New
Wotk is a collection ol abstract
paintings that ex oke the power of
life and energy Concentric . one-
like shape; of light used in rep
etition along with layering effects
and the building up of colors
make up 1 annacci's canvases
Farinact i'swork has been ex-
hibited in such galleries and
shows as I he May Show. Cleve-
land Museum of Art and Exhibi-
tion ,Sil I luntington Museum ol
Art
she is currently serving as a
visiting lecturer tor the ECU
s hool ol Alt
See Gray page 14
fhere l was, sitting alone in my
apartment looking tor some real
entertainment What was 1 looking
tor'Well IHkedanceperfrjrrnances
but none of that stuffy ballet. I'm in
the iihhk! tor something new and
different
1 want a performance with
modern music and modern dance,
but most of all I would like to see
normal everyday objects, like um
brellas. turn into indescribable
shapes ol beauty. To my surprise I
bad justdest nhed mestageanticsof
the avant garde dance troupe
Momix And 1 was even more
surprised to learn that Momix will
becoming to ECU!
Momix is billed as one of the
world s "most Innovative dance
companies They will appear at
Wright Auditorium on Ihurada)
Ian Jl at S pm as part of R I 5
lUuO-ui Pertormmg Arts Scvncs
Momix has been pertormmg their
oft beat style of dance fbt the past 10
wars It started asasxloporfixnmance
b Mom PendkHon at the Like
Placid Winter CHympics but over
the years he has expanded the per-
formance wide!) adding mam fac
ets to the show
Ki ently, Momix w as sn ina
55 nation broadcast tor an Italian
cleviston special lhe were seen
throughout much of the world m
eludingKussi.iandv hnu rhedance
group also pirtiopiud ina Danish
program which was entered m an
international him festival
l"he Momix dancers datm to be
the K-st example of surrealistic
theater ITiox combine props and
bodies to transform themselves mto
unusual images In fact,evenan um
brella is utiliil as an object of
transformation Now that's enter
tainment!
llx' dances an st to a wide
vanet of musk such as compost'
tM nst t I cnr Purcell andothcr Ncv
c.e selections The performances
an oontered for modem audiences
using a tast paced onemagraphie
desigri
New i ork Tinx's review er
referred to the dancers as a 'zany
group w ho got off to a rip-roaring
start as a packed house clamored 'or
more A 1 os Angeles I ierald Ex-
aminer critic noted that people
sin mtod out gasped and applauded
furiously. Mi mix is ideal tor turn-
ing audiences! nto dance
I'he performance certainly
promises to be grand arxi should not
be missed Advance tickets can be
obtained tor$s to EC l students 81:
tor Staff) fmm theC'entral Ticket' X-
tuv It you care vou can nxail or
phone your request to Mendenhal
student Center (757-4788V
So whether you are into dance
or not Momix appean to ho enter-
taining It shoukl he an eye-opening
experience tor one arxi all Besides.
I've never thought of an umbrella as
a thing ot beauty baxv vi'ii"





V
12 el?c jyygj (Earulintan January22.1991
This Week in Film
Henr (cenl
Photo rourtpsy of The Samupl Goldwyn Company
nnetrt Branagh) leads England into battle
Academy Award winning Henry V
brings Shakespeare to Hendrix
Since World War I, movies have served as one ol America's
1 lei dicrsions from ihe gravity ol Ihc world's crisis. Anxious
n have long gathered in crowded theatres to escape the
�s ot lite during wartime Henr V, 'Flatlincrs" and "The
' I luh all j'i.n at Hendrix Pheatre this week and arc
reliel from tension built up over tin' last
� n Desert sirm
lcm ward for Best Costume Design and
� V tor and Best Director, Kenneth Branagh's
f the highest grossing specialized films of all
' ?r-veai old British wunderkind, Branagh,
the film makes Shakespeare's stor acccs
mdience
I uncertain monarch, King Henry is convinced
I �f Canterbury that he has a legal claim to the
' � i b the contemptuous response to his
res for invasion Spiritsareat rock bottom
���-��. �� � �! r, uivi laini-hrd army
sibilit that a knv must shoulder his con
� - I bv morning With a rousing
nto battle he two armies clash in a
rrowsof the English an herscreate
i vatry, and the French aredefeated
� h � is Henrv discovers the bloodshed
innitu

impnsed ol Branagh s fellow
� I mpany in hiding Ian I lolm,
who si ilks the sets in modem
rus rhe dialogue is beautiful and
though delivered in an unaffected
ns to it hieve his goal ol giving
� I look and pace, rhe use of close-
� i I i as n al people and draws the
v realized m him m
� �
aiu
" by sir
luring World War II, OHvier's version
I hen iism and made a i lear analog)
�' put the tied defeat oft rman,
nry as an intense study ol leader-
ketl ights about the psvehes of our
r in tl lulf o mtinues
' hilosoph) has tailed all that's lefl is
; t-n lernmedical student KieferSutherland
is he tries to i on incc his feltow
: � ife after death, rhe film features the med
� Kevin Ba on, William Baldu in and
take turns experiencing death nd finds that
� tun in't quite th same
ht feature iseveryone's favorite high
; � ikfastlub, a portrayal of five high
injj about themselves and each other while
lay detention. Strangers when they meet, and
i different teen stereotype, they soon find out
the same tears, pressures, embarrassments
! desii
the film featun s wherc-are-they-now actors Ally Sheedy,
nd Molh Ringwald, man at work Emilio Esteve2
ha II lall who ran be seen displaying shear
rd S issorhands I Hrected by the man who has
l I living �ff of the nightmare that is adolescence, John
indies "Ferris Beuler's Day Off "Some
� '� nderful the film is insightful and funny, and
� ition's ' Big( hill
storms tl screen al 8 p.m. Wednesday, Ian. 23.
s f ir three nights at 8 p.m. beginning Thursday,
rday, Ian. 26. "The Breakfast Club" is served
� Ian 27, also at 8 p.m.
t I nion tilms are shown m 1 lendrix Theatre
� ndi nhatl Studententer. Admission to each ol
witha valid E l student ID bearing a Spring 91
r a Spring'91 Film Pass ard available to faculty
n the Central Ticket Office. With either form
hi ,ire permitted to bring one guest.
' i ion Films Committee would like to thank
isi and Video tor use o their videotapes in the
I latlin

ip SlIIK
I! f Ml
� � hese Minis
ompiled by Lisa Marie lernigan
Bits and Pieces
ABC explains war to young viewers
�.�. ,u Kid
( lull � l
spe( l,il tepi �
w.ir to '� i 'inn
ids' needs during the Persian GuM
ings giving a geography lesson on the
ning cartoons were interrupted with a
pondent Mill Greenwood explained the
rs I he network says more reports for kids
Teachers show interest in Mid-East
War in the,ulf has teachers ordering arsenals of Mid-East
information Amonl hggsofthe Foreign Policy Association says
orders for maps, books and audio cassettes on foreign cultures
have increased drastically over the last six months Newsweek,
Whittleommunu ations and Time- Warner also report increases
m its educational material on the Gulf region.
(�'pyr,fht 1001, USA rODAYIAppte CnUtt Information Nttwork
Uprooted Floridian brings bluesy
style to Emerald City faithful
By Rich Tern an
Staff Writer
loshua Ryan, guitar player-
singer, entertained al the s last
rhursday night, coveringthesongs
ot many artists, from Van Morrison
(0 Paul Simon le opened up with
lames Favlor's "Fireand Rain and
included a few originals in his act.
Ryan moved to (ireenviile last
October. After leaving Honda where
he played in chibs for over 13 vears.
le also spent five years in Australia
where he plaved with a band
calledate April
Armed with a brash sense of
humor, Ryan started the evening oft
by asking Are there any war pro-
testers here tonight?" Well, there's
always one in every crowd. Ryan
invited the fellow who was against
I Vsert Storm to indulge in self for-
nication, rhen lie laughed, swore
and began playing.
Ryan graduated trom high
Coppola
school in-Florida and went right to
Vietnam. When he came back, he
picked up his guitar and started
playing for a living He never had
any other job and he never played
anything other than the kind of
music than he plays today. He has
hair past his shoulders and calls
himself "just anold hippie " Ryan is
bound to give Bruce Fry a run for his
money.
When asked how he liked
Greenville compared to Tampa, he
says Greenville is a whole different
Ml game. "The crowds an? a lot
morofun. In Honda peoplecameto
listen to the music, so they sit there
and drank a few beers and just lis-
tened. Greenville likes to party
He played two originals that
were first class. One, "Old Friends
is about a girl, first love, and how
they grew apart. Tut us down
tear us apartbut when we meet
again were like old friends The
other he wrote for his wife atter she
passed away, I Remember You
The song is beautifully done, cen
tenng around the theme that no
matter what, he will fondh remem-
ber his lost ite
OlK thing that makes loshua
Rvan unique in downtown enter
tainmenl circles is that instead ot
having a bass player to ba k him up,
he uses a saxophonist Mike Adams
plays sax tor the majority ol Ryan's
songs, including California
Dreaming" and "Knockin on
Heaven's Door" Thisaddsabhics)
character to mm hot the classic n h k
that other performers present in a
wav that can only be dcs ribed as
redneck This makes tor an interest
ing combination.
Rvan also played some old
Drifters, "Under the board walk and
Muddy Hollvs "Fade Away" He
ended the evening with Don
McLean's music.il cliche, Amen
can Pie
See Ryan page 14
Continued from page 11
and not -so relevant characters
Michael's sister onnie, played
b I aha Shire (who can bea power
ful force in a movie), iscast into such
.i weakly written part that it one
mi i lamiliar with the other two
movies, il is easy to mistake her tor
Michael's wife (he is a divorcee in
I heiodfather III").unnie
mumbles and stumbles her way
through every scene she is in
Mi hael's lawyer and financial
advisor B I Harrison (George
1 la mil ton lisalways seen and never
he.ud throughout It the part had
not existed it would ol been better
tor the. out11mitv ot the mov le The
audience keeps expecting this om
nipresenl character to do or sa
something important but it never
happens.
oppola cast his real-lite
daughter in the part ol Michael's
daughter (Winona Ryder was ini-
tially cast to the part but dropped
out when production started).
Sophia oppola, who plays the part
ol Mary, has the face but not the
ability to display the emotional
framework ol the part rhe part
itself is somewhat shallow. Between
the two, Mary comes oft as a fickle,
sillv schoolgirl
Michael's e wife Kay (Diane
Keaton) is so melodramatic in her
pleas aiu) mental reflections ot her
and Michael's turbulent past that
she simply is boring.
Don Altobelk) (FJi Wallach). is
Scissorhands
an old friend of theCorleone family
whose presence is never explained
It makes it hard to believe that he is
close enough to Michael to betrav
him because his relationship to the
family is never justified
C haracfers who could and
should ot had an impact in the n m i vie
did not. Coppola, who has a mar
velous tlare for character develop-
ment, tails short on this protect.
There am some bright spots in
the casting. Vincent (AndyGarcia),
the bastard son of Michael's dead
bother, al tirst appears to be a con-
niving gold lgger try ing to cash in on
the family wealth His intentions
are convincingly questionable
through a g(xnl part ot the movie
I !is forbidden love with Mary
makeshimeven morehard toaccept
-is ,) "g(xxi guv (as tar as mafia
men go). He eventually shows his
true colors and becomes possiblv
the noblest Corleone of them all.
Michael has so much faith in V mi ent
that hepasseson theCorleone crown
to him in one ot the movie's most
gripping scenes.
Trying to figure out Vincent's
intentions sharpens the movie'sdull
edge.
The flashv gangster, ocy Zasa
(oe Montcgna) is a believable
troublemaker He plavs a mob
chieftain in the ranksottheCorieone
tamily trying to get more than his
share Flc is eliminated most dra-
ma ticallv in one of the film's violent
episodes.
In the first third of the movie the
stage is srt and some promising
mob-style violence takes place it
some ot the i hara tors v ere n�
weak, it would seem that the movie
would be upto par to its p. i � ame
sakes
In the snd third th rt
drags us through Michael'satti i i I
at legitimizing his business via i
deal with the atu an bank Mi ha I
is prone todiabetu coma's, which is
pom tod out with more zeal than
Hi essarv in this part ol the n
It does h '��� evei mo
viewer to see the legi lai. Mi hael
( orleone hovering helpksslv be
tween life and death in a hospital
bed Mk hael recover to find
that he has been double i rossed in
his soul saving deal
In the last part i if the m
Michael gives up his title as the Doi
of the family to Vincent who engi-
neers a predii table n fi r tin-
enemies ol the t.tmilv
I'he movie fal's all over itself
and has no strong roles stand ing b
to help it get back on its feet Ref
erences are made to the past movies
in the series so often that it their
memory is not fresh in mind im-
portant tacts are missed And the
movie is set in 1979, there is no
attention paid to time authenticity
The five dollar admission to
The iodfather III ' would be better
spental thevideo store renting ' rhe
Godfather
Continued from page 11
would talk .1 lot. I le would cut
through everything and have the
most honest, pure answer with all
the clarity in the world sn 51 tepp.
Being based on .1 short story
written bv Burton makes 'Edward
Scissorhands" burton's most per
sonally inspired film to date. En ev-
ery sense, the movie is completely a
burton film. Burton's other films
include TceWoe'sMig Ad venture
"Beertejuice" and batman
As a child, burton was fasci-
nated with tair tales. "The idea
with this is to take the themes and
the ideas of those and just
contemporize it a bit more, and
hopefully make the link between
real life and fairv tale a bit closer
explains burton
The movie's cinemate
-hv
emphasizes Burton'sextraordinarv
artistic vision. The pastel painted
houses and sculptured shrubbery
are truly awe inspinng images
The effort that went into cap-
turing this unique atmosphere was
immense After repainting 44
houses, the production crew placed
topiaries (sculptured shrubbery) in
each yard. Marry ol the topiaries
which ranged trom dinosaurs to
FKis had to be lifted into place with
a thirtv toot 1 rane
1 Edward Scissorhands is 1
n pt ��;��. rtdous emotional
interisitv vith Edward
SaBaovhands Burton dearly de-
fines himself .is ,1 director of true
Conceptual genius Moviegoers
whose expectations were left
unfulfilled bv rhecomrnen ial h pe
ot "Batman" will not be disap
pKimtivl bv Button's latest heartfelt
creation
Quicksilver
Continued from page 11
wonders whether the
I l.issdhott album is a pmper
cultural exchange, but it none-
theless supports his notion to
keep an open mind as to what
is considered popular.
In addition to the rare al-
bums to be found in the store,
Quicksilver also carries a col-
lection of various posters and
T-shirts featuring musical art-
ists. Also featured is an im-
pressive array of music maga-
zi ties w'hicharedifficult to find
elsewhere. A col lection of new
and used books are another
fact of the store as well as an
assortment ot postcards and
stickers.
It seemsas though there is
something for everyone to be
found arQuicksilver Whether
you are searching for a classic
Beatles album or a not-so-
classic album from K.C. and
the Sunshine Band, you are
almost sure to find it at
Quicksilver records
Save
Time!
Save stamps too
Pay your utility
bill at the NEW
EAST BANK at
Mendenhall.
Monday-Thursday,
10 a.m4:30p.m.
and Friday,
10 a.m5 p.m.
Call Greenville Utilities,
551-1539 for further information
LIMITED
TIME ONLY
ROUND TRIP FROM
GREENVILLE. N.C. ON
JSAIR ANDOR AMERICAN.
ANDOR UNITED
TAMPA
ORLANDO
DAYTONA
FORT "
LAUDERDALE
FROM
R
DENVER
PHOENIX
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRAN.
SEATTLE
READ THE
FINE PRINT
These special fares
are extremely limited
and may be already
sold out for selected
travel dates. Travel
must begin by Feb.
9-16 and be complete i
by Feb. 20 varies by
city. 7 day advance :
required purchase.
Travel to destination
Wed Thurs Frl. or
Sat. Return from
destination Sun
Mon Tues or Wed.
Maximum stav to
first Wed. 6nce
ticketed, fares are
nonrefundable and
nonchangeable. Call
for full details.
TRAVEL
The Plaa � Greenville
355-5075
800-562 8178
Offices also in R�ei�jh.
Chapvl Hill. RIP A
Wilmington
E
11
i
Accomplishments
1987-88 1989-90 - We
wore again honored by
winning an award tor
outstanding fraternity
charter at East Caro-
lina.
1987-89 - We were hon-
ored as being one ot the
top twenty over all
chapters iout oi nearly
300) in the nation for
which we received the
Buchanan Outstanding
Chapter Award.
1984-89 - We have won
the over all sports
championship award
among all fraternities,
The Chancellor's Cup.
1984-90- We have been
represented on the
Student Government
Association Executive
Board by past two SGA
presidents.
2 Houses and party
room





I
V
121 g?bt jEaat fflnrnlinian January 22 1QH1
This Week in Film
-Photo courtesy of Th� Samuel Goldwyn Company
Henry V (center, Kenneth Branagh) leads England into battle
against France
Academy Award winning Henry V
brings Shakespeare to Hendrix
Since World War I, movies have served as one of America's
chief diversions from the gravity of the world's crisis. Anxious
iliens have lont gathered in crowded theatres to escape the
stress of lite during wartime. Henry V "Flatliners" and 'The
Breakfast Club' all play at Hendrix Theatre this week and arc
yoilf prescription for relief from tension built up over the last
several days of (Operation Desert Storm.
Wmnerof 'the Academy Award for Best Costume Design and
nominated for Brst Actor and Best Director, Kenneth Branagh's
I lenrv V is one of the highest grossing specialized films of all
lime The talented 27-jrear-oW British wunderkind, Branagh,
dire tor and tar of the film, makes Shakespeare's story acces-
sible to a broad audience.
� young and uncertain monarch, King Henry is convinced
b the Archbishop of Canterbury that he has a legal claim to the
throne of f ranee Angered bv the contemptuous response to his
demands, 1 Ienr prepares for invasion. Spirits are at rock bottom
over the loss of hfe among I lenrv's worn and famished army.
Wear of the responsibility that a king must shoulder, his con-
ncc wavers, but is restored bv morning. With a rousing
speech, he sends his men into battle the two armies clash in a
welter of bfi d and steel. The arrows of the f-nglish archers create
let ki!h.voeoer the French eavalrv, and the French are defeated
I lowever joy turns to sadness as Henry discovers le bloodshed
th.it is the COSf of winning
I he cast o4 t lenrv V" is comprised of Branagh's fellow
actors of the Royal Shakespeare Company including Ian Holm,
Paul field and Derek (aeobi, who stalks the sets in modern
dress as he plays the Chorus. The dialogue is beautiful and
remains in its original form though delivered in an unaffected
manner Branagh kxk gre.it pains to achieve his goal of giving
thefilm i ontemporary sound, look and pace. The use of close-
up helps toconvey the characters as real people and draws the
1 deeply into the storv.
Henf) V was originally realized in film in 1945 by Sir
! awren o Aivier. Made during World War II, OIivkt's version
emphasi eel the beauty of heroism and made a clear analogy
between the battle at Agincourt and the Allied defeat of Germany,
Branagh describes his " lenrv V" as an intense study of leader-
ship rhe film should provoke thoughts about the psvchesof our
own leaders (is the war in the Culf continues.
Religion has failed; Philosophy has failed all that's left is
� ience laments post modem medical student Kiefer Sutherland
in the summer hit "flatliners" as he tries to convince his fellow
students to explore life after death. The film features the med
squad team of lulia Roberts, Kevin Bacon, William Baldwin and
Olivet Platt. Bach take turns experiencing death ,nd finds that
win n Ihey return, life isn't quite the same
! his week'sSunda) night feature is everyone's favorite high
school movie. "The Breakfast Club' a portrayal of five high
school students learning about themselves cind each other while
serving' a Saturday detention. Strangers when they meet, and
ea h representing a different teen stereotype, they soon find out
they they all share the same fears, pressures, embarrassments
ami desires
Hie film features where-are-they-now actors Ally Sheedy,
ludd Nelson and Molly Kingwald, man at work Emilio Estevez
and Anthony Michael Hall, who can be seen displaying shear
hatred in "Fdward Scissorhands Directed by the man who has
made i good living off of the nightmare that is adolescence, John
Hughes (Sixteen Candles "Ferris Beuler's Day Off "Some
Kind of Wonderful"), the film is insightful and funny, and
perhaps this generation's "Big Chill
1 lenry V" storms the screen at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 23.
I latliners" runs for three nights at 8 p.m. beginning Thursday,
Ian. 24 through Saturday, an. 26. "The Breakfast Club" is served
Up Sunday night. Ian 27, also at 8 p.m.
Ml Student Union films are shown in Hendrix Theatre
located 111 the Mendenhatl Student Center. Admission to each of
the films is free with a valid ECU student ID bearing a Spring '91
a tivilvstiekeroraSprmg'WI fjm Pass Card available to faculty
find stall tori It) from the Central Ticket Office. With either form
of admission you are permitted to bring one guest.
The 'student Union Films Committee would like to thank
Fast C oast Music and Video for use of their videotapes in the
review of these films.
�Compiled by Lisa Marie Jernigan
Bits and Pieces
ABC explains war to young viewers
AB( � ll i kids' needs during the Persian Gulf
war Kids si, "ings Riving a geography lesson on the
( ulf when S,uur rning cartoons were interrupted with a
special report t orteapondent Bill Greenwood explained the
war to young viewers. The network says more reports for kids
may be in the works
Teachers show interest in Mid-East
War in the Gulf has teachers ordering arsenals of Mid-East
information Amon liggsof the Foreign Policy Association says
orders for maps, books and audio cassettes on foreign cultures
have increased drastically over the last six months. Newsweek,
Whittle Communications and Time-Warner also report increase;
in its educational material on the Gulf region.
OCnpyrfffct mi, USA TODAYApr Cnlltg InfotmtHtm NHmerk
Uprooted Floridian brings bluesy
style to Emerald City faithful
By Rich Ternan
Staff Writer
Joshua Ryan, guitar player-
singer, entertained at the Fizz last
Thursday night, covering the songs
of many artists, from Van Morrison
to Paul Simon. He opened up with
James Taylor's "Fire and Rain" and
included a few originals in his act.
Ryan moved to Greenville last
October. After leaving Florida where
he played in clubs for over 13 years.
Fie also spent five years in Australia
where he played with a band
cal)ed"Late April
Armed with a brash sense of
hu mor, Ryan started the evening of f
by asking, "Are there any war pro-
testers here tonight?" Well, there's
always one in every crowd. Ryan
invited the fellow who was against
E)esert Storm to indulge in self-for-
nication. Then he laughed, swore
and began playing.
Ryan graduated from high
Coppola
school in �Florida and went right to
Vietnam. When he came back, he
picked up his guitar and started
playing for a living. He never had
any other job and he never played
anything other than the kind of
music than he plays today. He has
hair past his shoulders and calls
himself "just an old hippie Ryan is
bound to give Bmce Fry a run for his
money.
When asked how he liked
Greenville compared to Tampa, he
says Greenville is a whole different
ball game. "The crowds are a lot
morefun. In Florida people came to
listen to the music, so they sat there
and drank a few beers and just lis-
tened. Greenville likes to party
He played two originals that
were first class. One, "Old Friends
is about a girl, first love, and how
they grew apart. 'Tut us down
tear us apartbut when we meet
again were like old friends The
other he wrote for his wife after she
passed away, "1 Remember You
The song is beautifully done, cen-
tering around the theme that no
matter what, he will fondly remem-
ber his lost wife.
One thing that makes Joshua
Ryan unique in downtown enter-
tainment circles is that instead of
havinga bass player to back him up,
he usesa saxophonist. Mike Adams
plays sax for the majority of Ryan's
songs, including "California
Dreaming" and "Knockin" on
Heaven's Door This adds a bluesy
character to much of the classic rock
that other performers present in a
way that can only be described as
redneck. This makes for an interest-
ing combination.
Ryan also played some old
Drifters, "Under the Boardwalk, and
Buddy Holly's "Fade Away He
ended the evening with Don
McLean's musical cliche, "Ameri-
can Pie
See Ryan.page 14
Continued from page 11
and not-so-relevant characters.
Michael's sister Connie, played
by Taha Shire (who can be a power-
ful force in a movie), iscast into such
a weakly written part that if one
isn't tamiliar with the other two
mov les, it is easy to mistake her for
Michael's wife (he is a divorcee in
"The Godfather III"). Connie
mumbles and stumbles her way
through every scene she is in.
Michael's lawver and financial
J
advisor, B.J. Harrison (George
H.imil ton) isai ways seen and never
heard throughout. If the part had
not existed it wouid of been better
for the c'Hitmaitv of the movie. The
audience keeps expecting this om-
nipresent character to do or say
something important but it never
happens.
Coppola cast his real-life
daughter m the part of Michael's
daughter (Winona Ryder was ini-
tially cast to the part but dropped
out when production started).
Sophia Coppola, who plays the part
of Mary, has the face but not the
ability to display the emotional
framework of the part. The part
itself is somewhat shallow. Between
the two, Mary comes off as a fickle,
silly schoolgirl.
Michael's ex-wife Kay (Diane
Keaton) is so melodramatic in her
pleas and mental reflections of her
and Michael's turbulent past that
she simply is boring.
Don Altobello (Eli Wallach), is
an old friend of the Corleone family
whose presence is never explained.
It makes it hard to believe that he is
close enough to Michael to betray
him because his relationship to the
family is never justified
Characters who could and
should of had an impact in the mo vie
did not. Coppola, who has a mar-
velous flare for character develop-
ment, falls short on this project.
There are some bright spots in
thecasting. Vincent (Andy Garcia),
the bastard son of Michaei's dead
bother, at first appears to be a con-
nivinggoldigger trying tocashinon
the family wealth. His intentions
are convincingly questionable
through a good part of the movie.
His forbidden love with Mary
ma kes him even more hard to accept
as a "good guy (as far as mafia
men go). He eventually shows his
true colors and becomes possibly
the noblest Corleone of them all.
Michael has so much faith in Vincent
thathepasseson theCorleone crown
to him in one of the movie's most
gripping scenes.
Trying to figure out Vincent's
intentions sharpens the movie'sdull
edge.
The flashy gangster, Joey Zasa
(Joe Montegna) is a believable
troublemaker. He plays a mob
chieftain in theranksof theCorleone
family trying to get more than his
share. He is eliminated most dra-
ma ncally in one of the film's violent
episodes.
In the first third of the movie the
stage is set and some promising
mob-style violence takes place, if
some of the characters m ere not I
weak, it would seem that the movie
would be up to par to its past name-
sakes.
In the second third, the movie
drags us through Michael'sattempt
at legitimizing his business via a
deal with the Vatican bank Michael
is prone to diabetic coma's, which is
pointed out with more zeal than
necessary in this part of the movie
It does, however, move the
viewer to see the legend.irvMu hael
Corleone hovering helplessly be-
tween life and death in a hospital
bed. Michael recovers to tind out
that he has been double . romd in
his soul saving deal.
In the last part of the movie
Michael gives up his title as the Don
of the family to Vincent who engi-
neers a predictable revenge for the
enemies of the family
The movie fal's all over itself
and has no strong roles standing bv
to help it get back on its feet. Ref-
erences are made to the past movies
in the series so often that if their
memory is not fresh in mind im-
portant facts are missed And, the
movie is set m 1979, there is no
attention paid to time authenticity.
The five dollar admission to
'The Godfather III" would be better
spent at the video store renting "The
Godfather
Continued from page 11
would talk a lot. He would cut
through everything and have the
most honest, pure answer with all
the clarity in the world says Depp.
Being based on a short story
written by Burton makes "Edward
Scissorhands" Burton's most per-
sonally inspired film to date. In ev-
ery sense, the movie is completely a
Burton film. Burton's other films
include: Pee Wee's Big Adventure
"Beetlejuice" and "Batman
As a child, Burton was fasci-
nati-d with fairy tales. "The idea
with this is to take the themes and
the ideas of those and just
contemporize it a bit more, and
hopefully make the link between
real life and fairy tale a bit closer
explains Burton.
The movie's cinematography
emphasizes Burton'sextraordinary
artistic vision. The pastel painted
houses and sculptured shrubbery
are truly awe inspiring images.
The effort that went into cap-
turing this unique atmosphere was
immense. After repainting 44
houses, the production crew placed
topiaries (sculptured shrubbery) in
each yard. Many of the topiaries,
which ranged from dinosaurs to
Elvis, had tobelifted into place with
a thirty-foot crane.
"Edward Scissorhands" is a
movie of tremendous emotional
intensity. With "Edward
Scissorhands Burton clearly de-
fines himself as a director of true
conceptual genius. Moviegoers
whose expectations were left
unfulfilled by the commercial hype
of "Batman" will not be disap-
pointed by Burton's latest heartfelt
creation.
Quicksilver
Continued from page 11
wonders whether the
Hasselhoff album is a proper
cultural exchange,but it none-
theless supports his notion to
keep an open mind as to what
is considered popular.
in addition to the rare al-
bums to be found in the store,
Quicksilver also carries a col-
lection of various posters and
T-shirts featuring musical art-
ists Also featured is an im-
pressive array of music maga-
zines which aredifhcult to find
elsewhere. A collection of new
and used books are another
fact of the store as well as an
assortment of postcards and
stickers.
! t seemsas though there is
something for everyone to be
found arQuicksilver Whether
you are searching for a classic
Beatles album or a not-so-
classic album from K.C and
the Sunshine Band, you an?
almost sure to find it at
Quicksilver records.
Save
Time!
Save stamps too
Pay your utility
bill at the NEW
EAST BANK at
Mendenhall.
Monday-Thursday,
I0a.m4:30p.m.
and Friday,
10 a.m5 p.m.
Call Greenville Utilities,
551-1539 for further information
L
WEEKEND
FUNSHINE
LIMITED
TIME ONLY
ROUND TRIP FROM
GREENVILLE. N.C. ON
JSAIR ANDOR AMERICAN
ANDOR UNITED
MIAMI
TAMPA
ORLANDO
DAYTONA
FORT "
LAUDERDALE
FROM
R
DENVER
PHOENIX
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRAN.
SEATTLE
READ THE
FINE PRINT
These special fares
are extremely limited
and may be already ,
sold out for selected
travel dates. Travel
must begin by Feb.
9-16 and be complete
by Feb. 20 - varies by
city. 7 day advance
required purchase.
Travel to destination
Wed Thurs Fri. or
Sat. Return from
destination Sun
Mon Tues or Wed.
Maximum stay to
first Wed. Once
ticketed, fares are
nonrefundable and
nonchangeable. Call
for full details
fifp-l IRAVKL
I !� I'l.ja - Ctvr.iv ill'
trr )7r
I )ff I, , s ,iv, j i I ti,1,
t ii.ipi i MiM kit
V I i III 1 ! . I t , . f
E
i&&LAZ.
Accomplishments
1987-88 1989-90 - We
were again honored by
winning an award for
outstanding fraternity
chapter at East Caro-
lina.
1987-89 - We were hon-
ored as being one of the
top twenty over all
chapters (out of nearly
300) in the nation for
which we received the
Buchanan Outstanding
Chapter Award.
1984-89 - We have won
the over all sports
championship award
among all fraternities,
The Chancellor's Cup.
1984-90 - We have been
represented on the
Student Government
Association Executive
Board by past two SGA
presidents.
2 Houses and party
room






y
LIMITED
TIME ONLY
ROUND TRIP FROM
GREENVILLE. N.C. ON
JSAIR ANDOR AMERICAN.
ANDOR UNITED
TO
TAMPA
ORLANDO
DAYTONA
FORT '
LAUDERDALE
FROM
R
DENVER
PHOENIX
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRAN.
SEATTLE
READ THE
FINE PRINT
These special fares
are extremely limited
and may be already
sold out for selected
travel dates. Travel
must ben by Feb.
9 16 and be complete
by Feb 20 - varies by
city 7 day advance
required purchase.
Travel to destination
Wed . Thurs Fii. or
Sat. Return from
destination Sun
Mon Tues or Wed.
Maximum stay to
first Wed. Once
ticketed, fares are
nonrefundable and
nonchangeable. Call
lor full details.
TRAVIL
y CENTI rt
The Plaa � Grvcnv ill�'
355-5075
800 562 81 7S
Office also in Hilih
Chapel Hill. RIP K.
Wilmington
RUSH
ECU'S 1 Fraternity
Sigma Phi Epsilon
sNW

.
A lodge, a crest, a secret handshake - none
of these ever made a fraternity.
The things that are seen are merely the
beginning. The invisible things - the brotherhood,
the friendship, the loyalty, the honor -
are the foundation.
Together they develop the fraternity, and
strengthen the individual.
Sigma Phi Epsilon is not looking for just anyone.
We are searching for a man who is willing to com-
mit himself to the principles and goals
of our fraternity. A man who wants to associate
with an outstanding brotherhood.
We are looking to the future -
your future and our future.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: TOMORROW'S FRATERNITY
- TODAY
Accomplishments
1987-881989-90-We
were again honored by
winning an award for
outstanding fraternity
chapter at East Caro-
lina.
1987-89 - We were hon-
ored as being one of the
top twenty over all
chapters (out of nearly
300) in the nation for
which we received the
Buchanan Outstanding
Chapter Award.
1984-89 - We have won
the over all sports
championship award
among all fraternities,
The Chancellors Cup.
1984-90- We have been
represented on the
Student Government
Association Executive
Board by past two SGA
presidents.
2 Houses and party
room
Information
Jan 22 III
Jan 23 A7A
Jan 24
Brothers
and
Invited
Rushees
Jan 25
BEST LOCATION ON CAMPUS
(Across from Garrett Hall)
Call 757-0487 or 757-0305 or
830- 9647 or 830-9646
For Information or a Ride
Invitation
Only





V
I
14 ffftt HaelJ�iuniimaiLjANUARY 22:im
Grey
The Ohio Arts Council Indi
vidual Artist Fellowship was
awarded to Farinacci and her
work is held in Cleveland, Ohio
collections of B.P. America, the
Federal Reserve Bank, and TRW.
Benito Huerta's; East Fifth
Street is a Texas native whose art
work is experimental in nature
rod symbolic in content Hisw k
has been influenced bv the
Chicanoand Anglo cultures, plus
art history.
Huerta's work deals with Un-
social strife throughout the world
whether it is poverty, war, etc.
Some of his newer work deals
with theartist taking a closer look
at the outside world.
Huerta goes beyond the tra-
ditional oil painting bv including
substance to his paintings It is
not unusual to find straw rhine-
s: n vihei terial. in his
paintings
Theartists work has been fea-
tured throughout the country, but
most recently his work was se-
lected for the 1991 Mid-America
Biennial organized by the Nelson-
Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas
City, Missouri.
The Cray Art C.allerv is host
inga group of lectures and recep-
tions in conjunction with the Three
Directions exhibition, there is no
Read
Hie East
Carolinian
ad mi:
ission fee and the public is wel-
come to at tend
Steven Assael lanuarv 14, 7:(X)
p.m
Continued from paae 11
p.m
Benito I ruerta lanuarv 24,7W
Marilyn Farinacci lanuarv 31,
7:00 p.m.
All of the lectures will be held in
Jenkins Auditorium and the
receptions will be held in the
Grav Art Gallery.
The Gray Art (lattery is
open Monday through Satur-
day 10:(X)a m to 5:00p.m. and
Thursday evenings until 8:00
p.m For further information,
call (919)757-6336.
0XL�
AUTOMOTIVE
fof4gn ti Dom�itic
PAtTS Ik siavici
510 N. Greene St.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
Crisis
Continued from page 11
ors and volunteers from the cam
pus community including campus
ministers and staff and graduate
students from Community 1 lealth.
Social Work, Psychology, Child
Development and Family Rela-
tions, Counselor Education, and
Rehabilitation Counseling.
All students, faculty and staff
are encouraged to drop by to join
m the group discussion. Ball en-
courages the expression of
thoughts and feelings about the
war whether in the Counseling
Center environment or in the
classroom or dorm room, and ad-
vises that students work with one
another to get though this difficult
time
Have you discovered the
Missing Link?
Ryan
Continued from page 11
Ryan played at Corrigans last
week and mav be at Crandaddv
R -ssers m the near future. Ryan has
a stage presence and natural talent
that make for a good time, whether
you arc ust listening to the music or
partying as hard as you can.
'cross from da
library
No, not that missing link! Have you discovered
the missing link to meaning and fulfillment in life?
At Christ Presbyterian Church, we believe that
this missing link can be found, through a right
relationship with the One who created you.
Come and discover tor yourself this Sunday.
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When: January 22-25
Where: 409 Elizaheth St.
ti
Tue: Meet the brothers
Catered by Hickory Hams
Wed.Pizza Meet the Ladies of A&l
Sorority
For more Info or ride call 757-1319
mmmmmmw m i 11 � n mmmmmm
Thur:Meei the ECU Pure Ciold Dancers
Catered by Hickory Hams
:
g
I
I
m
a
Januahy 22,1991
X
' 11

Junor forward Conme Small prepar
.
ECU swimm
Bv Christine Wilson
Matt Writer
en's and women's
: � ated Duke Uni-
versity � t the third year in a i
As then ike 1345
omen 1311 105
thePiratesei - nrtpleted their

The meet began by recogniz-
ing ea - - �. e Benkusky,
Mered Bridgers Sean
hristensen, lohn
Martinez,
Cook lead
swim team
in academics
Bv Christine Wilson
Special to The East Carolinian
Swimming for ECU is not all
senior Du�t) Martinez and junior
Marc Cook cart put on their re-
sume They can also say they main-
tained a4. gradepointaveageand
still found time to practice with
their band
Martina 22 ot Miami, and
Cook. 20, ot North Palm Beach,
ham been swimming for over 15
.cars In swimming tor the uni-
ersitv. both studentshavebeoome
lose Mends, stayed m physical
shape and been taught how
compete.
Martinez and Cook have
wum under head coach Kick Kobe
since their freshmen year "Kobe
has been very supportive The
support comes from between the
lines. For example, he helps to ad-
ancc our image said Martinez.
"Thev are both good solid
people who are hard workers and
conference finalist. They are what
college athletic academics is all
about said Kobe.
Both students say good grades
do not come easy. "We're not nec-
essarily smarter than other people.
We have more motivation and
drive to do well said Cook.
Martinez also explains that
grades arc based on motivation. "It
has nothing to do with ability. It
has everything to do with motiva-
tion. We each have a set technique,
just like in the water. If vou keep
SeeHershiser ,pafjei8
m
� �ls; s. .
-
-
Nelson
This student sp
of Mendenhaii
Start!
By Mat
Assistant j
The Lady
points amongI
Wednesday as
girua Common w
54.
Sophomerl
O Donnell anc
Connie Small ea
and had four
ateo had eight
wardTonvaHarl
with 15 points
bounds.





I' page 11
ttp:
January22J991
SHie iEagt Carolinian
15
AUTOMOTIVE
forwgn fc Dom�ahc
PARTS � SfRVtCI
HON. Greene St.
Greenvilte, NC
830-1779

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VOl�
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ity
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Williamsburl
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Apartments)
Summerfielu
and
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Available
Now
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Energ) efficeni
Apartments v itlil
asher and dryen
hook ups.
("all
aron Spain
W 6187
756 8(X0
SoiTV V PctS
'�
�.
a
Mhc ECU Pure Gold Dancers
Kiieredb Hickory Hams
SPORTS
Lady Pirates defeat Tribe, 79-76
Grace injures knee, but still wins in overtime
Celeste Hoffman � ECU Photo Lab
Junior forward Connie Small prepares to pass the ball to a teammate
By Matt Mum ma
Assistant Sports Fditor
In i game that went neck and
nedkandintoovertime.theFCTMxKlv
Pirates emerged victorious hut not
unscathed over William and Mary,
7l-7rv
Senior forward Sarah Gray was
irred with two minutes left in regu-
lation. She hurt her knee with what
might bed tagnosed as torn cartilagi ,
according to head coach Pat FVrson.
At the start ot (lie game junior
forward Connie Small madea three-
pointer on ECU's first possession.
SopliomoreguaidGaynorCyDonnell
and senior forward Sarahr.iv tol
lowed up uith held goaK ot their
own (in EG snext twochancesand
tin- Lady Pirates wore up7-2.
But William and Mary was not
to be taken so easily as the rest oj the
gameproved. WhateverECl puton
the board the I nix- returned with a
methodical offense that answered
even ECU scoring nin.
William and Maty also played
well defensively as thev K'ld junior
forward Tonya I largrove to a mere
two points hi the first halt.
"i was struggling through the
game 1 largrove said. "I wasn't get-
ting open and when 1 did get the hall
1 didn't do anything with it
Sarah t .rav scoring over half of
it U's -1n first hall points She also
grabbed seven rebounds.
Wiliiamand Mary played with a
tough full court defense that kept
pressure on the ECU ball handlers.
ITie Tnbe also rebounded well on
defence.
As a result they Mere ahle to
contain any ECU fast breaks ami
forced 12 turnovers in the first half.
At the halt William and Mary
was up by two, 30-28, but by rx
means did they dominate the game.
ECl andWilliamandMarvkept
pace with each other. Senior center
Sandra (Ira e kid a chance to tie the
game with fivesecondsteft in the first
halt, but six- missod an easy layup.
he Lady Pirates were on a scor-
ing nin threatening to take the lead
w hen tinv ran out ot the first half.
The second half started with the
I ady Pirates giving the ball to
1 largrove on thoir first two posses-
sions and getting her into the flow of
the game.
t iiace made her presence felt in
tho second built, storing IS points
along with Hargrove, who had 19
points in the game. They were a
fearful combination filling in the lane
and drawing the necessary fouls.
At 14:14 in the second half the
rribefoundered whenOTJonnell hit
a three-pointer and Hargrove fol-
lowed that up with a jump shot.
After that. William and Mary
committed tour fouls in a row and
allowed ECU totakeover the lead on
a field gcvil by Grace.
Hargrove added another shot
and at 10:24 ECU went up 47-14.
William and Mary called a rime out
But the hmeoutdidn't work the
way Wiliiamand Mary wanted it to
because the Lidv Pirates kept pres-
sure on them.
Grace added two baskets to
maintaina snvill ECU lead at926and
another at 7:45 and that lead held
until the 3:46 mark
At this point ECU not onlv lost
the lead but lost Cray, who hurt her
healthy knee. This wasa big losssinee
(irav had scored 21 points as well as
14 rebounds.
This was a real test for ECU.
Could they plav well without (.ra '
Could thev hold (mi and win trxgamc
in the final div minutes"
C .race Stepped into.rav s scor-
ing role and senior forward Kim
Fhipnv came off the bench to grab a
few reb Minds But the team stalled a
bit uith Gray out of the game
With 1:2()lett ECU wasahead67-
64 and kxked to have the game
controlled. HargroveandGraceeach
made successive three-point plays,
drawing the foul and making the
basket and the- free throw.
But in that last 1:20 the Lady-
Pirates only scored once more on a
Small free throw and made two use-
lesstoulsthat gave Wiliiamand Mary
time at the free throw line
ECU also made a poor showing
(n their free throwsin the last minute
making one of six. Because of ECU's
poor free throws William and Mary
was able to foul, waste only a few
seconds,get theballbackand not lose
any points that way.
The Tribe simply exploited
ECU'spoor free throws tocomehack
and tie the game with eleven seconds
left. Junior Mechelle Jones had a
chanceto win thegamebt it shemisscd
her free throw.
The score was tied at 68.
In overtime ECU was without
Gray orO Donnell, who fouled out oi
the game, two players who had got-
ten them this far.
But senior forward Michelle
Marsh came in as did Duprec and
Jones also played wd I to n v keup fit r
the missing starters.
In the five minute overtime
C.race scored first and Jones hit a
three-pointer to go ahead 75-70.
This should have been enough
for ECU tt build (Mi and put the game
out of reach but William and Mary
came back to he the game at 76 with
a minute left.
They proceeded to foul ECU
rrvingduplicate what they did earlier
butthisbmcC.race,Smalland Dupree
made their free throwsand sealed the
um 79-76.
"It was an ugly win Pierson
said. " but it wasa winand we'll take
it. O'Donnell has a virus and didn't
practice yesterday so she wasn't on
topof her game. Grace did a good pb
and MechelIdJones) hit the three that
we needed
ECU swimmers defeat Duke for third
-�-frt, : ;3af i
By Christine Wilson
St.it 1 W riler
I he E( I men's and women's
swim team defeated Puke Uni-
versitN for the third year in a row.
As the men defeated Puke 134.5
to 98 5 and On women 131 to 105,
the Pirate Minor- completed their
final home meet.
I he meet began bv recogniz-
ing eat h senior: Steve Benkusky,
Meredith Bridgers, Sean
Callender red hristensen, John
Martinez,
Cook lead
swam team
in academics
Farrell, Uirulvn Green. Ton)
i -
Moisten. Steven Hopkmsoh John
Lambrakis, 1 D. Lewis, Danny
Martinez, Mark O'Brien, Perry
Smith and (eorge Walters
The 400-yd. medley relay be
gan the defeat Walters, freshman
Lance late, Holsten and sopho
more Mike Sever took first with a
time of 3:33 28 In the 200 yd.
freestyle, sophomore Derek
Nelson placed second in 1:45.11,
while Callender placed third in
1:46.92.
Moisten took iirst m the 200-
vd. individual medley fr? &
and Christensen placed second in
I 58.92. Walters took third in that
event with a timeot 2:00.77. In the
200-yd. butterfly, Christensen
placedfirstin 158.27, defeating his
competition by 56-tenthsofa sec-
ond.
In the lOO-yd. tree. ECl
claimed first through third posi
tions. Sever took first in 4836,
Callender second in 48.49 and
Benkusky third in4850.
The lasMwoeventsqfthe rneet
�were helcfcls exhibitions. "We
couldn't score any more points
because we were ahead more than
22 Technically, it you have more
than 22, you have basicalK won
said Benkusky.
The women began the meet
by taking first in the 400-yd. med-
ley relay. Sophomores lulie
Wilhelm, Bridgers, Suzanne
O'Brien and Tia Pardue finished
with a time of 4:07.11.
Freshman Jacqueline Silber
took first in each event she swam.
In the l0t)0-yd?Wceshe�iisW8 in
10:36.31, and in the 500-yd. free
she finished in 5:12.41. Along with
Silber, who finished first in the
200-yd. free in 1:58.42, JanCordon
placed second in 2:02.58.
O'Brien took first in the 200-
vd. fly with a time oi 2:12.41.
Bridgers also took first in the 200-
vd. breastroke showing a time of
2:22.43, her best time all season.
Freshman Nancy Depalo took
first in the 2(X)vd. backstroke in
By Christine Wilson
Special to The hast Carolinian
I
I
Swimming for ECU is not all
senior Dann) Martinez and junior
Marc Cook can put on their re-
sume. They can also say they main-
tained a 4.0 grade point aveageand
-till found time to practice with
their band.
Martinez, 22, of Miami, and
� ook, 20, of North Talm Beach,
have been swimming for over 15
years. By swimming tor the uni-
versity, both students have become
i lose friends, stayed in physical
shape and been taught how to
i ompete.
Martinez and Cook have
wum under head coach Rick Kobe
since their freshmen year. "Kobe
has been very supportive. The
support comes from between the
lines. For example, he helps to ad-
I m. e our image said Martinez.
"Thev are both good solid
I copfe who are hard workers and
conference finalist. They arc what
college athletic academics is all
about said Kobe
Both students say good grades
tin not come easy. "We're not nec-
essarily smarter than other people.
We have more motivation and
drive to do well said Cook.
Martinez also explains that
gradesare based on motivation. "It
has nothing to do with ability. It
has everything to do with motiva-
tion. We each have a set technique.
just like in the water. If you keep
See Hershiser, page 18
2:16.77 and Wilhelm pitted sec-
ond with a time of 2:171.
During Christmas break, the
ECU swim team increased their
record bv defeating Ashland Uni-
versity in North Palm Beach. The
team also swam against the Uni-
versity of North Carolina-Chapel
Hill on Thursday were defeated
The men's record now stands at 8-
2 and the women's at 7-3.
The Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation Championship begins Feb.
2 and ends Feb. 9.
Superbowl
officials
prepared
for terrorists
By Mark Woods
Gannett News Service
This student spends some of his free time playing pool in the basement
of Mendenhall Student Center In addition to the cafeteria and Hendrix
Cai �ste Hoffman � ECU Photo Lab
Theatre, MSC offers various activities to students ranging from pool to
bowling and video games.
Starters score big lo give ECU win over VCU
By Matt Mumma
Assistant Sports Editor
The Lady Pirates spread the
points among the starters last
Wednesday as they defeated Vir-
giniaCommonwcalthUniversity,r�9-
54.
Sophomore guard Caynor
O'Donnell and junior forward
Connie Small each scored 13 points
and had four rebounds. O'Donnell
also had eight assists. Junior for-
ward Tonya Hargrove lead the team
with 15 points and had seven re-
bounds.
C.race had 13 rebounds and
added 10 points but senior forward
SarahGray played thebestall around
with 11 rebounds and 14 points.
The game was decided in the
first few minutes when ECU went
ahead 13-11 with 14:19 left in the
game and never relinquished the
lead.
Small increased the lead to 16-
11 on a 15 foot jump shot halt way
through the first half but the Rams
staged a small comeback.
At7:14VCU'scentcr Jan Warner
pulled them to within three points of
ECU, 22-19.
However, senior forward
Michelle Marsh drained a three-
pointer that opened up the lead to six
points.
O'Donnell followed with an
outside jump shot and was fouled.
She converted on the free throw and
ECU soon was up 28-19 with five
minutes left in the half.
The Lady Pirates pulled ahead
36-26 with 1:13 left to go on a basket
bv senior center Sandra Grace.
The half ended with VCU's
guard Heather Burik cutting ECU's
lead to seven, 37-30.
In the second half the Lady Pi-
rates came out shooting outpacing
the Rams 43-30in the early minutes.
ECU'ssuperiorreboundingand
team play helped them maintain a
big lead in the second half. Each
starter got at least ten points and all
shot well from the floor.
One big reason that ECU won
was that the Rams only shot 29 per-
cent (23-78) from the floor and only
made 3 of 24 three-point attempts
ECU made a considerably bet-
ter percentage of their shots making
47 percent and the Lady Pirates also
helped themselves by hitting12of 21
See Hershiser, page 18
TAMPA, Fla. � The threat of
international terronsm mav have
increased with the start of war in
the Persian Gulf. But the manager
of Tampa Stadium remains confi-
dent that the facility will be safe for
Super Bowl XXV. '
How confident?
Rick Nafe will have his three
children in the halftjme show on
Jan. 27.
"I certainly would n't allow that
if I didn't think it was (safe) he
said.
Nafeand other Tampa Stadium
officials are veterans of preparing
for the threat of terrorism.
When the Super Bowl was held
in Tampa Stadium in 1984, it came
twomonthsaftertheBeruitbarracks
were bombed.
Four days before that game,
officials received a bomb threat. No
bomb was found, and the game
was played without problems.
"So we're used to this Nafe
said.
Even before the war broke out
this year, extra precautions were
being taken.
Nonrnallyabout8(X)peopletake
care of Super Bowl security. This
year about 1,600 law enforcement
officials will be used, including
SWAT teams, hostage negotiating
teams and bomb squads. A bomb
sweep, which officials described as
routine procedure, was conducted
See Terrorists, page 18





"N
VII
V'OI K
II M)
li
iSV.
UK K
AUTOMOTIVE
xjn t Domestic
9ARTS k SIBVICI
N reene St.
e NC
830-1779
illiamsbur
Manor I
partments
Summerfielc
and
Hi assw ood
Available
Now
January 22 1991
ellrc lEaHt (Uarultntan
15

ity
3
nt
CU1 I OH
j officer
'Ms vvi
d (1!
ips.
Call
Spain
� � h 1 N 7
( Mllill
N
I i )
�2
) Hk kory Hams
Lady Pirates defeat Tribe, 79-76
Grace injures knee, but still wins in overtime
By Matt Mumma
ssistant Sports 1 ilitor
In a game th.it went ne� K and
iKckandintoovertime theE( I I �ui
Pirates emerged victorious hut not
unscathed it William and M n �
79 76
Si nior forward Sarah i iray was
injured with two minutes left in regu
lation. She hurt her knee with wh.it
mightbediagnosedastom artilage
,i i ording 1.1 head i � �a h fat Pierson
At the start t tin gai " junior
forward I onnieSmall made a three
pointer on 1(1 's first possession
am
Kmoreguard iavnoi CTDi mnell
senior foi tvard Sarahra to
ill I
Cslssts Holtman ECU Phou
pa " �� bail to a 1 tn n at
lowed up " ' ' i t then
ownonE it tv n
But William and Man . i I
lobe taken so st ol the
� : � � lever 1
th board tin Inbe returned w
methodii a! offcnsi th it insw n I
every ECUs oring run.
William and Man also played
well defensively as they held junior
forward i � i ; n gi �� I
two points in the first hall
"1 was struggling through the
game I largnnv said "I wasn I
pei � lid get tl eball
! didn t do am thing i il
Sarahira s oring over half ot
s 28 first lull . � I She ilso
. � ibbed seven rebounds
William and Marvplavedx
tough tnll court defense that kept
pressure on the E( U ball handlers.
Ilie Inly also nNmnded well on
defence.
As a result thev were able to
contain an E I fast breaks and
ft r ed 12 rurm vers in the tirst half.
At the half William and Mary
was up b two, yQ 28, but b no
meansdid the) dominah tin game
E I andWilliamandMarykept
; � h ther Senior enter
had a i h.iiu i- to tie the
a ithtivesecvndsleft in the first
half, hut she missed an eas layup
ad Pirates wereon a scor
ing run threatei I take the load
� � � � first hall
� . f started will the
� � ,ii ill to
n their first I
sionsand ttii r into the flow ol

: i � er preset e felt in
the second hall � ring 'v points
along with Hargrove, who IvkI 19
points in the game They were a
ti arful a imbinatjon filling in the lane
and drawing the necessan fouls
At 14:14 in the second hall the
1 ribefoundered when Y onnellhit
. � nter and ! fan
�wed th.it up with a jump shot.
fti � that. William and Man
mirted four fouls in a row and
: I ' totaki vet th� l
.i field goal h.i
largrovc added anotl � i
and at 1024 ECU went up 47-44
William and Mary called a time out
But the time out didn't work the
way William and Mary wanted it to
because the Lady Pirates kept pres-
sure on them
Grace added two baskets to
niamtainasmallE I 'leadat9:26and
another at 7:45 and that lead held
until the 3 46 mark
At this p mt E( I not nlv h ist
the lead but lostWay, who hurt her
healthy knee, rhiswasabiglosssince
( .r,i had s ored 21 points as well as
14 rebounds
This was a real test for ECU.
( ou Id they play well without Graj
uW they holdon and win thegame
in the final dizzv minute
race stepped into .ra s s i
� rol and senior forward Kim
pree came offthe bench to grab .i
� bounds. But the team stalled a
. ith irayout of the game.
With! 20lertECUwasahead67
64 and looked to have the game
controlled. I largroveandC iraceeach
made successive throe-point plays,
drawing the foul and making the
basket and the free throw
But in that last 120 the Lady
Pirates onrv scored once more on a
Small free throw and made two use-
lessfouIsthatgaveWiUiamandMary
timcal the free throw line
ECU also made a poor showing
on their tree throw sm the last minute
makingoneol six. Becauseof E U's
poor free throws William and Man
was able to foul, waste only a few
seconds,gct the ball backand not lose
any punts that way.
The Tribe simply exploited
E I spoor free throws to come ba k
and tie the game with i fevenseo nds
left, lumor Mechelle loncs had a
i rvineetovvinthegarnebiitsheniisBed
her free throw.
The a ore was tied at 68
In overtime E I was without
C ,ra or( I mnell, wlio fouled out :
the game, two players ��� h i liad ovt-
ten them this tar
But senior forward Michelle
Marsh came in .is did Duprei and
ones also played well tomakeupfcw
the missing starters
In the tie minute overtime
Grace scored first and Jones hit a
three-pointer logo ahead 75
his should have boo ei nigh
forE Utobuildonaixiputthegame
out of reach but William and Man
came bu k u' tie the game at 76 with
a minute left.
hey proceeded to foul ECU
tmngduplicate what thev did earlier
butthistimeC .race.Smallaivi Dupree
made their free throwsand sealed the
win 79-76
It was an ugh' win. Pierson
said butitwasawinand we'lltake
it QDonnell has a virus and didn't
practice yesterday so she wasn't on
topof her game (Iracedidagoodjob
and Mtxhellemes)hit the three that
we needed
ECU swimmers defeat Duke for third consecutive year
l t hrisdine Wilson
si.itt V r iti'r
� : men s
1 1 �uke I in
. . .
1 arrell rolv-n 'feen( I �nj
I ;ols' � � .en I l(pkinsohs lohn
mbrakis, J. D. 1 ewis Dai -
Martine; Mark O'B) i
� : rgeWaltei
: d.medlevi
� lolst - ni in tl
d individual med!e-v in
and l hristensen pla ed set � md in
-
s � �
: I � last :��� oevi ntsi
were held 3s exhihit; -v
- � �
l � i
mpleted their mi i Miki
time ol
gniz fn tyle,
: � : - usk i I "
' � � - Sean vhile Calk
H � � � . � lohn . �� �
ok third in that
In the
i hri; tensei
tent
t with
� i
!
th
tirst

tl

lion: ver look tirst in 4
t allender second in 48.49
1 knkusk third n 4s i(l
meet
"We
couldn't score am more points
he. ause v i en ahe id morethan
� hnicalh . it vou ha i n i
ii hav i
Benkuskj
I he women began the meet
b taking first in the 4 I med-
� . r( la Sophomores ulie
Wilhelm, Bridgers Suzanne
rien ,d Iia Pardue finished
with a time of 4 07.1 i
i reshman acqueline Silber
took tirst in each event sheswam.
In the ! 000 Ad. free she fir !rie&m
10 56.31, and in the 500-yd. tree
she finished in 5:12.41 Alone, with
Silber, who finished tirst in the
d.freein 1 "s.42. anGordon
placed second in 2:0258
O'Brien took tirst in the 2
yd fly with a time ot 2:2 4!
Bridgers also took tirst in the 2-
s d. breastroke show me. a time of
2:22.43, her best time all season.
Freshman Nancy Depalo took
tirst in the 200vd. backstroke in
2:16
and Wilhelm
Martinet
Cook lead
swim team
in academics
By Christine Wilson
spco.il to 1 he t .�� � irolinUn
; for ECU is not all
senior 1 ai i M irtinez and junior
� � - an put on their re
in also say they main-
: : intaveageand
, nd time I pracrtce with
Vlartu 22, ot Miami, and
oi North Palm Beach,
e rx en swimming tor over 15
, ai I swimming tor the uni-
ersity,bothstudentehavebecome
lose friends, stayed in physical
and i � � �) taught how to
. mp ti
Martinez and Cook have
um under head coach Rick Kobe
. their freshmen year "Kobe
. i , p � r supportive 1 he
. ;� rt �n s from between the
, i oi example, he helps to ad-
, mceourimage " said Martinez
. are both good solid
pic v. ho are hard workers and
mference finalist. They are what
,Hcge athletu academics is all
ut said Kobe
Both students say good grades
donotcomeeasy "We're not nei-
sn! smarterthanofherpeople
.e have more motivation and
jnve to do well, "said Cook.
Martinez also explains that
idcsare based on motivation. "H
1ms nothing to do with ability. It
I severything to do with motiva-
� � We each have a set technique.
like in the water. If youkeep
See Hershiser page 18
This student spends some of his free time playing pool in the basement
of Mendenhall Student Center In addition to the cafeteria and Hendrix
Celeste Hottman � ECU Photo Lab
Theatre. MSC offers various activities to students ranging from pool to
bowling and video games
Starters score big lo give ECU win over VCU
By Matt Mumma
Assistant Sports J ditor
I he Lady Pirates spread the
points among the starters last
Wednesday as they defeated Vir-
eamai ommonweahhl Iniversit) ,69
54.
Sophomore guard Gaynor
O'Donnell and junior forward
Connie Small each scored 1J points
and had four rebounds CXDonndl
also had eight assists. Junior for-
ward I onva Hargrove lead the team
with 15 points and had seven re-
bounds
(irace had 11 rebounds and
added 10 points but senior forward
SirahC iravplavodtheNst all around
with 11 rebounds and 14 points
The game was divided in the
tirst tew minutes when K I' went
ahead 13-11 with 14:19 left in the
game and never n iirtquished the
lead
Small increased the lead lo lo-
ll on a 15 toot jump shot halt way
through the first half but the Rams
staged a small eomeKuk
At 7:14 VCU'scenter Ian Warner
pulled them to within three points (t
IX l. 22-R
However, senior forward
Michelle Marsh drained a three-
pointer that opened up the lead to six
points.
(YDonnell followed with an
outside rump shot and was fouled.
She a inverted on the free throw and
ECU soon was up 2.sVlQ with five
minutes left in the half.
lhe Lady Pirates pulled ahead
36-26 with 113 left to go on a basket
by senior center Sandra Grace.
The half ended with X'CU's
guard I leather Burik cutting ECU'S
lead to seven, 37-30
In the second halt the Lady Pi-
rates came out shooting outpacing
the Rams 43-30in theearlv minutes.
ECU'ssupenorreboundingand
team play helped them maintain a
big lead in the second half. Each
starter got at least ten points and all
shot well from the floor
One big reason that ECU won
w as that the Rams only shot 2� per-
cent (23-78) from the flew and only
made 3 of 24 throe-point attempts.
ECU made a considerably bet-
ter percentage of their shots making
47 percent and the Lady Pirates also
helped themselvesb hitting 12of 21
See Hershiser page 18
Lact d set
6nd with a time oi 2 I .BI
Dunne Christmas break, the
ECU swim team increased their
record by defeating Ashland Uni-
versity hi North Palm Beach Phe
team also swam against the Lni-
versitv of North Carolina-C hapel
Hill on Thursday were defeated
The men's record now standsat8-
2 and the women s at 7-3.
The Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation Championship begins K'b.
2 .md ends i eh 9.
Superbowl
officials
prepared
for terrorists
Bv Mark Woods
Gannett News Service
TAMPA, Fla. The threat ot
international terrorism may have
increased with the start ot war in
the Persian Gulf. But the manager
of Tampa Stadium remains confi-
dent that the facility w ill he -site for
Super Bowl XXV.
How confident?
Rick Nafe will have his three
children in the halttime show on
Ian. 27.
"Icertainlv wouldn tallow that
it I didn't think it was (safe) he
said
Nafeand other Tampa Stadium
officials aa veterans of prepanng
for the threat of terrorism.
When the Super Bowl was held
in Tampa Stadium in 1QH4. it came
twomonthsaftertheBeruithirracks
were bombed
Four days befoa that game,
officials received a bomb threat No
bomb was found, and the game
was played without problems.
"SoWe're used to this Nafe
said.
Even before the war broke out
this year, extra precautions were
being taken.
NormallvaboutSOOpeopletake
care of Super Bowl security. This
year about 1,600 law enforcement
officials will be used, including
SWAT teams, hostage negotiating
teams and bomb squads. A bomb
sweep, which officials described as
routine procedure, was conducted
See Terrorists, page 18





16 �1? ast (Uarultnian January 22, 1991
ECU Briefs
Beeman named honoree for award
R.L. Beeman, a senior football player at ECU, was named one
of the top 44 honorces in football for the annual NCAA Post-
graduate Scholarship.
Beeman's application was approved at the District III level
and sent to the NCAA office in Overland Park, Kan.
The Montgomery, Ala native, has earned a 4.0 grade point
average every semester at East Carolina. He has been awarded
the CT&T Academic Excellence Scholarship Award for three
seasons and was a GTE-Co-SIDA Academic All-District III as a
junior.
"R.Ls scholastic achievement, along with his community
serviceand football abilities were very important in the application
process said Dr. EmieSchwarz, Faculty Athletics Representative
to the NCAA from East Carolina.
He was also given the Jerry T. Brooks Award for Academic
Achievement on the football squad, the Kappa Alpha Psi Aca-
demic Award, the Omega Psi Phi Award and the Richard Award
for Outstanding Senior in the School of Technology.
Beemanserved in thcU.S. MarineCorpsforfouryearsbefore
coming to East Carolina.
Football team holds annual dinner
The 1990 ECU football team will be honored onSaturday,
Ian. 26, at its annual banquet, to be held at the Greenville Hilton
beginning at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets are available to the public at $18 per person. Tickets
can be ordered in advance, by contacting the ECU football office
at 7S7-4S70. The dead line for ad vance orders is Thursdav, Jan. 24
at noon.
The entire football coaching staff and squad will be in at-
tendance. Awards will also be presented for outstanding per-
formances.
From ECU Sports Information
Men's track upends Virginia Tech
i he ECU men's track team raced away with a win in several
events in their second meet Ian. 19.
Held at Virginia Tech, the men faced stiff competition from
10 learns including ACC rivals, N.C. State and UNC-Chapel Hill
The team held their own, however, and came out victorious in
several events.
The 4400 relay team, which consists of Corev Brooks,
William Davis, Brian Irving and Ered Owens, took first place
I 'don Check took second place in the 400-meter race. Brian
Williams took third place in the 55-meter indoors hurdles.
The next meet is scheduled for (an. 26 and will take place at
I .ist Tennessee State University. The event may be televised on
ESPN.
From staff reports
Sports Briefs
Giants play Bills in Super Bowl
The New York State professional football championship will
be played in Florida next week under the auspices of Super Bowl
XXV. The Buffalo Bills earned a trip to Ta.npa when they pounded
the Los Angeles Raiders 51 -3 Sunday. Liter in the day, the New
N ork Giants foiled the San Francisco 49ers' chance to win their
third consecutive Super Bowls with a last-second 15-13 upset.
Yzaga fells WiJartder in five sets
Smooth-stroking Jaime Yzaga of Peru bounced three-time
Australian Open tennis champion Mats Wilander out in the
fourth round (7-5,2-6,6-1,3-6,6-1). Monday (Sunday night EST).
Yzaga attributed his win to a steadfast concentration. No. 86
Yzaga meets the winner of a later match between No. 1 Stefan
Edberg and No. 13 Jim Courier.
Little change in basketball polls
UNLV (13-0) remained No. 1 in this week's USA TODAY
CNN college basketball poll. The rest of the top ten: No. 2
Arkansas (17-D; No. 3, Ohio State (15-0); No. 4, Indiana (16-1);
No. 5, Arizona (15-2); No. 6, Syracuse (16-2); No. 7, Duke (15-3);
No. 8, North Carolina (13-2); No. 9, Kentucky (14-2); and No. 10,
St. lohn's.
Marinovich arrested for cocaine
Southern Cal quarterback Todd Marinovich, 21, was ar-
rested Sunday in Newport Beach, Calif for possession of about
one gram of cocaine. He was booked and released on his own
recognizance, pending an arraignment at Harbor Municipal
Court. Marinovich, a sophomore, has said he might enter this
year's NFL draft.
UCLA overcomes California 98-81
Tracy Murray scored 22 of his 26 points in the first half and
Gerald Madkinshad 15of his 18in the second half as 12th-ranked
UCl.A beat California 98-81 to end a two-game, Pacific 10
Conference losing streak at Los Angeles. Don MacLean had 24
points for the Bruins (14-3, 3-2). The win was UCLA's 61st in its
last 64 meetings with California.
Trail Blazers continue win streak
The Portland Trail Blazers blew a 21-point lead and then had
to come from lOdown in the final quarter todefeat the Milwaukee
Bucks 116-112. Terry Porter made six free throws in the final 40
seconds for Portland, which has won four in a row.
Wadkins captures Hawaiian Open
lnny Wadkins and Jane Geddes were winners Sunday in
the Hawaiian Open and the Jamaica Classic golf tournaments,
respectively. Wadkins won by 4 strokes. The title is his 20th in the
PGA. Wadkins unleashed a 7-under-par 65 over the Waialae
Country Club course in Honolulu to win.
Mendoza TKO's Jockey gym for title
Luis Mcndoza of Colombia retained his WB A junior feather-
weight title, stopping Thailand's Norce Jockcygym in the eighth
round at Bangkok. Referee Bernie Soto stopped the fight at 2:10
of the eighth round after Mendoza knocked down the challenger
a second time.
tXjynfk im.USATODAY!Ak(jlkitlnpnnmNmk
U.S. Olympic Committee
investigating U.S. Bobsled
By John Pitts
Gannett News Service
The U.S. Olympic Committee,
citing questions about financial
records, is threatening to decertify
the U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Fed-
eration as a national governing
body.
The USOC has given the fed-
eration until April 15 to produce
financial documents about a petty
cash account in a Swiss bank. The
account was controlled by Jean
Chaintreuil - the federation trea-
surer voted out of office in April
-1989.
Chain treuil, now an accountant
in Rochester, NY said Tuesday
theSwissaccount "wasstrictly used
as a transfer while our teams were
in Europe. Our team managers
accounted for all the money to me.
It was in the books
But federation financial records
from Oct. 1988 to April 1989 have
been lost. "I sent everything to the
federation office Chaintreuil said.
Academics
Continued from page 15
things in perspective you will know
what counts he said.
A fixed schedule stands be-
hind the motivation. "Swimming
forces us to adhere to a schedule to
achieve good grades. You don't
prepare tor a meet the night before,
nor can you prepare for a test the
night before Martinez said. "You
shoot for knowledge, it is inevi-
table. Knowledge is the gcvil, grades
will follow
Martinez and Cook say a
schedule is of utmost importance.
Their schedules range from school
to swimming to band practice and
socialinvolvement. 'Thcmoretime
you have, the more time you
waste Martinez said.
Mark O'Brien, who is a room-
mate of Cook's, said, "Mark al-
ways is involved in manv activities
and he still can maintain his 4.0
GPA. He even has a job working
for the New Deli
Both students are involved
with many extra activities beside
school. "We do this because they
arean escape for each other Cook
said. "Swimming is a escape from
school and the band from swim-
ming, which is a stress of its own.
'The band is not a blow-off for
us. lt'ssomethingwetakeseriously
and like to do. It's a hard thing to
describe the feeling we get from
creating music
Motivation is once again a
major factor behind the band. "Our
biggest motivation is to play for
people and the swim team both
Martinez and Cook said. "Theyare
our biggest followersand support
The band often plays on "Open
Mic Night" at the New Deli in
downtown Greenville. They cover
bands ranging from Led Zeppelin
to the Rolling Stones to ACDC.
They are shooting to play down-
town as a regular gig by the end of
the semester.
Martinez, who is a philosophy
major, plans toattend la w school at
Florida State University. Martinez
plans to study criminal and enter-
tainment law. He wants to become
a prosecutor.
Martinez expresses his appre-
ciation to two people that have in-
fluenced him over the years, Ed
Hargas and Thomas Kapitan.
Hargas is a criminal attorney in
Miami and Kapitan is a philoso-
phy professor at ECU. "They both
demand excellenceand take no less.
I had to ri se to meet them Martinez
said.
Cook, who is a finance major,
also plans to attend law school at
FSU. Cook plans to study corpo-
rate law and hopefully become a
representative of a major corpora-
tion.
"I don't know what happened after
that. I surely don't have it
Asked if any money remained
in the account, Chaintreuil said: "I
doubt it. The federation never had
any money
The USOC never has decerti-
fied a national federation, which
selects and supervises teams the
USA sends to international events
such as the Olympics.
Louis Pugh, the federation's
acting executive director, said he
would travel to the USOC's Febru-
ary meeting in Dallas to plead his
fedcration'scase: "I would hope it's
more of a threat to get us moving
than a real threat to decertify
Auditors arrived Nov.7 at the
federation's office in Lake Placid,
N.Y. The auditors' report to the
USOC is "a wholesale indictment
of the management of the federa-
tion John Samuelson, the USOC's
chief financial officer, said.
"They left the federation with a
fairly substantial list of documenta-
tion they need he said. "Theaudi
tors are just kind of on hold
Pugh said: "We're doing ev-
ery thingin our powerWe'll bring
legal action if we have to, to get into
the accounts
If the federation is put out of
business, the USOC would provide
financial support directly to the
athletes, as it is does now for those
See Bobsled, Page 17
ll
East Carolina
Coin & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
DIAMONDS
STERLING
SILVER
TELEVISIONS
GUNS
JEWELRY
GUITARS
COINS
CAMERAS
STEREOS
752-0322
CORNER OF UrTH AND DICKINSON
GREENVILLE
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
756-2011
Lunch only
Small Shrimp
Platter
only
I
I
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� Sun In
Beverage not included
� Expires: 2-1-91
I
I
I
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I
I
I
I
I
I
756-2011
Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Get the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter FREE
Good anytime
Beverage not included
Expires: 1-31-91
I
I
I
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Exciting Summer Work Opportunity
United Methodist Camp Counselors and Sailing Staff
Variety of Positions Available
Information Session - February 7th - Room 242
Mendenhall 3 to 5 PM
Or call John Farmer - CAMP DON LEE
919 249 1106
.Application forms available - The Methodist Student Center - 501 last liith
"RUSH"
vcu
Continued from page 15
free throws.
In the second half the Rams
never threatened to pull ahead or
remotely dominate the game.
The game ended on a crushing
note with ECU'S biggest lead of the
ga me 69-54. The win brought ECU'S
record to 5-7.
Ti appa Mpfia
"A Step In The Right Direction"
Winner of the 1990 Chancellor's Cup
Athletic Championship
�1989 National Chapter Excellence Award
�1988-89 Most Improved Regional Chapter Award
and Regional Chapter of the Year Recipients
�1988-89 Interfraternity Council's Most Outstanding
Fraternity Chapter Award
Jan. 22nd: Meet the Brothers of 7CKA
23rd: Meet the Ladies of Xft
24th: Meet the Ladies of AA7C
25th: Invitation only
For Information Call 758-3152
Terrorists
several day s bef i-1 imj . forv-
in theGuM' � � � dents ai that wi
Jim Steeg direcl i events forth � � -
havenotchai �
game.�
"We w illtht
rations until' dlt
ferentiy t a
haveanyalten itivebui�
but we do ha'� � . �
bngencj pi How ci�
trances to Tam tighten 1�
Ba ��� ill '�
gates. And i
vim. nsor
permitted t� .
being install

Steeg said
W'lllobM"
illb
i

Kespd
in these �;��
Nut
Bobsled
Continued from page 16
competing in rung
in Lake Placid
TheathJetesshoukin I
said imPage,thi - � -
of grant: indal
said 14 � - �
payments
USOCj
halt f the fed
get of about $1 mi
der is raised Ihi rionsand
corporate sv
hm Herb, rkl 1988 bol
Olympian si t of our ath-
letes remainskepti i! iboutv
going to happen but so far, the
situation hasn't really affected
eCcpyrigfcl : "�'
Ktiii
I it-
STUDENT UNION
ECU St
Making TK thi
FOR A GOO
The ECU Program Hofl
the Student Unio
Movies This We
?
MY l
?
X
Wed. Jan. 23 B P.M.

M







Thurs. - Sal.
ECU ID. or Current
ATT
i Positions are now availat
Programs developed
Freshmen, Sopl
GET!
For more informatioi
216 Mendenhall





d
Ad
doing e
Ve 11 bring
: into
pul oul or
iilct provide
icily to Ihe
t for those
Kast Carolina
Coin & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
DIAMONDS
STER1 INC.
Sll VER
W IH I-MSIONS
(I NS
II Wfcl m
i OINS
'A C Wll K S
w STEREOS
752-0322
Ml ROf KFTH ND DICKINSON
GREENV II I E
January 22, 1991 �ht �aat (EaroHniatl 17
DICKS
1890 SEAFOOD
h l
lip
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
756-2011
Bu one
Regular Shrimp
Plattei at $6.50
Get the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter FREE
C iood ail) lime
, crage not iih huled
I nns I tl-)l
ik Opportunity
selors and Sailing Staf
is Available
rv "th - Room 242
5 I'M
k wir don i li
It s
I I Student t LMtter - Mil List l-iith
ft

ftipha
it Direction"
Ihancellor's Cup
pionship
P.xcellence Award
;ional Chapter Award
(he Year Recipients
(cil's Most Outstanding
ter Award
(rothers of 7CKA
idies of Xf2
idies of AAK
inly
:all 758-3152
Terrorists
Continued from page 15
several days before war broke oul
in theGutf.
im Steeg, director of special
i ,entsfortheSuperBowl,saidthey
ha venotchanged their plans for the
line
We vvill continue our prepa-
rations until we are told to act dif-
ferently he said. "We really don't
haveanyalternativebut tocontinue,
put wedo have all manner of con-
y iu plans "
I iowever, security at the en-
trances to Tampa Stadium will bo
toned.
Bags will bo inspected at the
v nd no cameras, radios, tete-
tnsor video equipment will lv
mitted beyond a fence that is
- nginstalled around thestadhinrt
Under the circumstances
Steeg said, "I don't think anyone
ibi� t to thesespecial measures
these special times
Not everyone wants to be in
Tampa for Super Bowl weekend.
More than 3,0W Pay area resi-
dents are hoping to win a contest
that will send them out of town�a
three-day ski vacation in Park City,
Utah before the Jan. 27 game.
WFNS, a sports-oriented sta-
tion in Tampa, has been promoting
the contest with ads that tell listen-
ers it is a chance to get away from
the T-word: tourists.
"Hey, if you're going to be
watching the game on TV anyway,
you might as well be watching it in
Park Citv, Utah said Nanci
Donnellan, host of an afternoon
spocts talk show. "We're calling it
the 'Great Get of of Town Ski Es-
cape
Apparently the idea of getting
away when thousands of fans and
media are pouring into town ap-
peals to many local residents.
Donnellan said the WFNS fax ma-
chine has been busy ever since the
contest began.
"The response hasbeen incred-
ible shesnd. "We'vegotbetween
3.000 and 4,000 entries
Donnellan, who is nicknamed
"The Fabulous Babe will draw the
winning name out of a barrell dur-
ing her afternoon show on Jan. 23.
Normally there are two weeks
between the conference champion-
shipsand theSuper Bowl.This year,
because of the expanded regular
season, there is only one week.
And that puts the pressure on
the people who will be selling Su-
per Bowl memorabilia.
Who will be in thegame? What
colors should they have ready for
the silk screens? The manufacturers
won't know until late Sunday
"We'll have to hurry Marty
Jacobsen, president of Nutmeg In-
dustries, said.
The company plans to start
cranking out T-shirts and
sweatshirts with the Super Bowl
participantslogosminutcsaftcrthe
conference championship games
are finished.
Copyright 1991, USA TODAYIApple College
Information Network
ABORTION I
-PH�SOM AND COSFDfcNTIALCABS"
FREE PREGNA. ,
TESTING
M-F 8.80-4p.m.
Sat. 10-lp.m.
Triangle Women's
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Call fix tppoinamn Moi ihn S�t
i -� Cat TeiminatK la X wmkl at IVgnancy
vrsA'
1-800-433-2930
cIngscDominion
Bobsled
Continued from page 16
impeting in Europe and training
I ,ke Placid.
Iho athletes should n't sut tor
iui Imi Page, the USOC'sdirector
� tntsandathleteassistance.Page
: I4 bobsledders gel support
� nts
I SOC grants account for about
ill i the federation's annual bud-
� r about $1 million. The rernain-
h ; is raised throughdonatJonsand
��, � Tato sponsorships.
im Herhorich. a 1988 bobsled
( Hympian, said, "Most of our ath-
remain skeptical about what's
. ing to happen but so ;ar. the
situation liasn't really affected us
. pyrightt99l USATODAYlApfU CoOtgi
nf()r"ufii'H Setwoek
NOW 11IR1(;
I OOI) AND BEVER (il
SUPERVISORS
"Responsibilities include:
the overall performance of your own location in all aspects (
production, inventory, labor and food cost controls.
trainingdevelopment, scheduling of personnel, product qual
satisfaction
Requirements
Previous experience is important but not necessary.
Musi work tull time June, Jul) and August.
Must have excellent communication skills.
Must have own transportation.
Benefits
Excellent pay rate
$5.40-$6.50hr depending on loc ition
Commission and bonus programs
Extra dollar per hour on weekends.
For more information
see the Kings nonunion representative
at the E.C.U. CampusHome Economic Bldg.
Wednesday, January 23. 1991
from in am- 4pm
No appointment necessary
or contact Rani Bal at 804876-5590
oi write Kings Dominion, Resale Dcpt.
P.O Box 2000, Doswcll VA 23047
EC )l-
i revenue
it and uesi
Wednesday
WZMB
Progresssive Dance Night
introducing
.10 9 oz. Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
1.00 Kamikazees
Ladies Free til 10:30
STUDENT UN'N
� -r !�7 elm
ECU Student Union
Making VA things Happen At ECU
F O R A GOOD TIME, CAM
The ECU Program Hotline 757-6400 to find out what
the Student Union has planned for YOU!
Movies This WgejtAtjtoidrix Theatre!
Wed. Jan. 23 8 P.M
Alpha Phi Omega
SERVICE: BE A LEADER
Rush Alpha Phi Omega
National Service Fraternity
CO-ED

4a.FLAT-LlNERS
Thurs. - Sat Jan. 24-26 8 P.M.
THE BREAKFAST CLUB
Sun. Jan. 27 8 P.M
ECU I.D. or Current Films Pass is required for admission.
ATTENTION!
Positions are now available on Student Union Committees.
Programs developed by the Students, for the Students.
Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors.
GET INVOLVED!
For more information, call 757-4715 or stop by room
7f Mendenhall Student Center to appl
Open House on Sunday, January 27,
Monday January 28 and Tuesday, January
29 in the Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
for anyone interested in pledging. Call
Howard at 931-8526 for more information.





18
ellic �mtt((ariiHnian January 22, 1991
NCAA
By Tom Witoski
Gannett Nows Service
NASHVI1 I 1- renn. Ignor
mg the opposition from coaches
and women's sports advocates,
major college athletic officials
overwhelming!) voted fan 9 .it
theN A A Convention to impose
a 10 percent cut in scholarship
opportunities in almost all their
sports programs
"Every time we tr to i ut
scholarship levels to save money
we hearcompiaintsabout robbing
the young of educational oppor
tunity Wake Forest University
president Thomas Hearn said
What 1 want to know is win is all
the concern about students who
are6 9and has ea softjumpshol'
I le made his comments iiist
prior to the approval by NCAA
Division I delegates of a series ol
scholarship reductions.
I ho.ii lion, all bv at least two
thirdsmajori ties, came on the third
day of the 85th annual convention
of the National Collegaite Athletic
Association
The convention, which con-
cluded Ian 11, was highlighted by
a strong showing of influence by
collegechiel executives who have
made reform of the college spoils
a top priorit) tor the next several
years
On Ian 9, the drive for greater
control and cost reduction con
tinued with adoption ol several
proposals designed to cut costs
and time demands on collect ath
10 percent cut on scholarships for college athletics
'vh number of scholarships in nvn'� nr� -v i .uTL
"We aro making excellent
progress, and it appears that the
message is finally getting
through Michigan State presi
dent ohn DiBiaggio said. "1 am
hopeful that it will continue "
In adopting the & holan hip
ruts 1 i vision I delegates ordered
Reduction ol the total
number of scholarships in Di ision
I-A football from95to85 Thecuts
are to be phased i nover three years
beginning with the 1992 93 aca
demic year.
Reduction ol the total
number of scholarships m Divi
sion I A A football from 70 to 63
and in the overall annual squad
size limit from 95 to 85
Reduction ol the total
number ot scholarships in men's
and women sbasketball from from
15 to 1 t Those cuts will take place
during a two year period begin
ning with the 1992 93 a ademu
year
Reduction ot the total
number ot scholarships bv about
lOpen ent in all other sportsexi ept
women s volleyball ,nd tennis.
In arguing tor the cuts, 1 learn
said overall major college athletic
department expenditures could be
reduced by as much as 10 percent
I le said most athletii depart
ments are unable to generate
enough revenue to p.w tor all ex-
penditures.
I he question here is
whether there .ire going to be t tits,
but how (lo (ni want to k it "
I (earn said "You do it this way
or you will face the time when
entire programs will have to In-
dropped
Hut approval ot the i uts
brought strom; criticism from
women's groups and some
�'dies, whoargued they should
be the last step taken, not one ot
the first
Women's sports off i ialssaid
thei uts would haveadispropoi
tionateimpacl on female athletes
bei ause they already have fewer
opportunities than male athletes.
"This is unwise, unfair ,)k
possibly illegal rexas women s
athletu dine tr Donna I opiano
said 'What we want and need is
greater opportunity and equity
before this re.u hes a . risis i n
portion
"Tobehonesl Ireallvctw stion.
whether tfw Presidents'ommis
sion and tin Nt A r. truK �n
mitted to equit) in sports tor
en I. .�. ,i women � athletu
director i hristincirant said
'(low mm h I. wgi r i. i we have to
ait h tore there is equity or at
least ,inmmitment to it
INK A A offi i.tis ordered the
redui tion . 'i s, hol.tr ' i) s in the
women � track, fi n. ing,
field hockey, it �,si.nn.
s n r . ft ball and � - miming but
maintained I urrent scholarship
levels iii vi illi ball and tennis.
Se ei ii fixitball i oai hes also
s.nd th -1, : inted by
the cuts in �� hi l.u ship It � els
�' � "� �� i roo.n ppk i itgt
O ' ' ma tion . r
AXA
500 ELIZABETHSTtfeer 7J736?
HAiVGiV our- BASK�T6Aix,?n& Pong
POOL, ALWAYS SOfeTHiNs
10 DO
BPMS - DILLON f�NC� , MflRYON
me MSH.THE lUSUALS,to.?OTfKTOe H6AD.D 9HI?�S
JAN. 12
TUESDAY
-orsm night
-RUT W LHOIES
Of A2A
-SUD�SHW
-HOUSE 1W&
JAM.Z3 JAMZtf
WEDNESDAY TJIjtfPAY
JANZ5
PIZZA NIGHT
of aait
SLIDE SHOW
MOUSE tour
-SUB NIGHT -310 NI6HT
IQ1H STREET
Athletes, coac

By Steve Vn Ieberg
Gannett News Sen
NASHV11.1 ! The sn
groupotwrt-sti. i
players and other
attending Ian 9 V
tion session struj
question
With c i
scholarship lii
coaches' demand
newhrestricted
out of this conventi
behind7
"In some ar. a: �
Mississippi fo tl
Sandronisaid rhel
are a big concen
Said Perm -� ��
Fahev. "Then ire i
Ainnt-rsorloser; '�
to put some flexil
ngid proposal- g
inspired exo ptioi
practice limit
Jiving and sevei
But people an
because of thi �
and coaches
Wednesday
proposals wen I n
survey of at!
them spending
hours a eek n tl
sports and comj la
interfering ��� tl
. rk
In additii n to I
weekly limits
practice time tb
and Division II i
larante l
one day ffa
Redu �
most team sports I
weeks and ind
.eeks.
� .
contests in all sj rt
ball and b.i
Pn hibit n
tor prach � -
rl
Tue: Meet the brothers
Catered bv Hickory Hams





18
vTIk tiiuittliiriiltninn January 22. 1991
NCAA Officials impose 10 percent cut on scholarships for college athletics
By Tom Wiloiki m �1 �,� i ,� :�,I.1J11, �, �� � H , O
i miii ii Nrw Srrvirr
m � final I ,
ig me opposition Irom coaches I he at lion, all by at least two through Michigai mi
and women's sports advocates thtrdsmajorities,cameonthethird dent Johi DiBi
major college .ith!eti( officials davof the85thannua�convention ho I that it wil
rwhelmingh voted an 9 dl of the National Cotlegaite Athlel In adopting the hola
thi'Nl A l on Vent ion t imp �� ition
a 10 percent cut in scholarship Phe convention which cor
' Hts I i ision I ,i.
nil ill, fhe I" ' �
.mi year
' � ion i't �
th i tl
it
nashvhl m� z ; � ��;��'��
inc the opposition from coarh�s l i. turn .Ill ,i �. . i m. , '�
il of th
1 � �
t (� I,�! r o u I � � i
it coach
I Open entinallothi rsporl ; - ho tl ist step taken, nol � �
Kedui tion of the I la won n volleyball and tennis th. I �
opportunities in almost all then eluded Jan 11, wash.hlightedb) numberofscholarsh.PMn Dv i In amuinc'for tht-rm M �
� lop pnoritv for iln n ,t ,��. � ral d mil veai 11 . , ,i i
I athletic depart rtumtiestl
N' ll of th � ment are unabh I rat. rhis is ui
Oiian� th, t1rn, forgriMU ,���,� , , h �, . ,e to Pav for all, �
t reducti � AI i Iball ����-��
ptn mi ol ��, era I I i the overall am I
nip lev els t sav v in. mii
we In .it, ompl mil ibout robbing
the v iinp ii edtuational itppi vim
tunitv W ak( I oresl I niv i rsitv
� idenl I homas I leal n said
What I want to know is whv is all tinned with idopfion of

intair and mil
� �
ii th
11 � i :
i � ul r at
h
.
; but
ihi ncern abouf students
ind hav I �(( jump shot
; � .sals � , � ,
' di m,nuls , m ioIIi

Kedui tii
tioi '

�ut hov le

before tl � � �
AXA
SOOELIZABETHSmEr 7J736?
MNGIN OUT-BASK�TgAutfW� Pong,
POOL, ALWAYS SOfETHiNs
70 DO
SOS'DILLON FENCE MARY ON
THE PASH.THE SUALS.rtR- ?0TPC(0E HEAD, DR ?Hg�5
JAN. 12
TUESDAY
-CffSTgR NIGHr
-flEET TUB tADtBS
OF AS
SUD�SH0W
-HOUSE 1tU&
JAM.Z3 JAM 2tf
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
JANZ5
FA I DAY
PIZZA NIGHT
Heet rue Lwes
of AMf
SLIDE SHOW
HOUSE TotfR
-SUB NIGHT -310 NIGHT
Athletes, coacfi
B) Steve v , ,
( .jnni tl S. ,
cri'i ' '
plav' � othei
attending lai
� ion sessii i
quest
With i

newl) restni I
,ilt t! this ,
� � ind '
'In - ��
Mississij � �
Sandroni
ire a big
lid cm
i ahe
innersi r
t i put son � �
: : � :
inspired � �� pi
pra ' '
diving ai I -
. -
and coat hes
roposa
�. . f afl
, . �
irs a
: �� � 1

- V
In addii
weekh . "
ractio tin
� D
� � : i.

ks
� tests ii
ball ai :
rv i
ft
ft
w
Tue: Meet the brothers
Catered b Htckon Hams





:ollege athletics
January22, 7997 il?c tast (Carolinian 72
i II l StlOn
' ommis
otn
I i foi
ll ill lu
t slid
i veto
t or .it
ii the
I Ullv-
I
MY
m
r
5TH 5T�t�
r
Athletes, coaches say NCAA changes may harm students
By Steve Wieberg
l .anni'II . n �. Service
NIASHN II I I I In- small
: .i wrestlers divers, football
plavi � �nd other college athletes
;r an 9. conven
Hen session struggled with the
lion
, ith i oat hing statts and
irship hunts cut and
m s demands on their time
. restricted, would the) come
� � this - on ention ahead ' I r
nd?
iome areas we v ill um
ppi football safet) fodd
msaid fhetimedemands
I ie t'lu em
� Penn State divet Beth
Some athletes, however,
questioned whether the proposals
were too well intenlionod
'Sometimes Fane) s.iUl ot
the convention delegates, "we
Approval came only a da) .it there's a let ot force to theargu- dates has not been overlooked In
terothercost-savingreductionsin ment that we should cut costs in addition to football and basket-
ihe sie (i coa hing st.itts
It deprives kids ol getting .1 to scholarship opportunities "
therareasbefore we take the knife ball, cuts in other sports don't go
i h.1iHe.1t,1 nedm.ition Nebraska
think they feel we can't handle athleticdircctorBobDcvaneysaid
I thmk wecan spend money that
way and save it somepla e else
When you start taking teach
hat criticism was muted Bui ers whichcoachcsare Kentucky
I he delay in implementation
into effect until August 1993.
Says Witte "I wouldn't be
surprised if it came back. I'd be
more surprised it it didn't
1 opyrijfcf ;��(, USA TODAYApptr 't.llrgr
Information Xrtu-ork
responsibility Some can some
can't but they're voting t.r ev-
er one
criticism ot the scholarship re
dlh III Mis u ,s not
athletn directori 1 Nevvtonsaid,
'and you st.irt taking awa) stu
denl athletes I don'l know how
In Division I A football the its going to affect competition
numbers will drop from 95 to R � But I Hunk it will
over a three-year period fheygo Even N A Prcsidenl Al
from 15 to 13 over two years in Witte, faculty athletic reprcsenta
basketball and If: across the live .it Arkansas, "would have
board in other sports preferred a 5 percent cuI I think
I here .ire in
1 proven
t losers We vebeenable
� some flexibility in some
� posals (gaining safer)
red cptions to offseason
limitations in swimming,
and SCt er.il other spoi ts �
. � 1 iph are going to be hui t
ieof the(fewer)scholarships
� ' , J lies
dnesda) s time demand
nils m ere bom ot .1 ll�SM
. of athletes w hi h found
pending ,111 ,ierag ��
i .eek in then respct live
� � � ind i omplaints thai it w .is
� mg w ith then a ademii
Idition to the daily and
� limits on pla) ing and
C time, the new I Hvision I
ion II restru tions
narantee athletes at Kist
iff a w eek
!ih epla ingseasonsfoi
im sports from 26 to 2
md indi idual sports to 21
Redut e the number ol
sts in all sports et ept fen �1
I basketball
Prohibit missed �. lass turn
� 11 tu es
Let Us
Tempt
You
with our
III LY-MKN
Ml k & (III
S D K M
SI
he traditional si
�'� sauteed onn 1 �.
� - bin u ith :� � or ol
I
Introductory
$3.95
521 Otanehe St. 757-16it
���OliWL� ��
Order your college ring NOW
J( )STEXS
a v a
Date I.in. 23. 24,25 Time. 10 a.m4 p.m. Deposit Required S2IMW
Place: Ifcmkstore on Wed. Ihuis. Iii.
M- 1; .Mill �.� �ir instt-iis representative ior hill details See . �. miis)
��Kf U.� Kslo't.
SUCCESS
STARTS HERE"
Toe: Meet the brothers
Catered bv Hickory Hams
When: January 22-25
Where: 409 Elizabeth St.
Wed:Pizza Meet the Ladies of ASA
Sorority
For more Info or ride eall 757-1319
Thur: Meet the ECU Pure Gold Dancers
Catered by Hickory Hams





:ollege athletics
January 22, 1991 iStie �aat(garoUntan 19
il th
! ha
t,ln illvquesttort
.ick nis t. ommis-
i ' � tiuK com
;llt III SD 'tis tor
men s athletic
tin rant s.tul
vi'i -ti i �' i � have to
H i- equity or at
U I tO ll "
l red the
,��� in the
'� n ing,
Il e, skiing
ting Nil
� l.n ship
mis
hes also
ntcd by
els
� � I �Hry-r
A ,JH i -v ic�
1
N
J
y&tftfX
mf
5TW 5Tftt�T
I in
r

Athletes, coaches sav NCAA changes mav harm
Bv Steve Wieberg
i iniit-ii New Service
" NASHVILLE The small
�roup of wrestlers, divers, football
payers and other college athletes
attending Ian NCAA conven
tuMi session struggled with the
question:
With coaching staffs and
scholarship limits cut and
coaches' demands on their time
newh restricted. would thev come
(jut of this convention ahead? Or
nd?
In some areas, we will win
Mississippi football safety Todd
Sandronisaid "The time demands
m? .i big concern
Said Penn State diver Beth
There are no proven
� is or losers We' ve been a ble
i some flexibility in some
proposals (gaining safety-
inspired exceptions to offseason
pra tice limitations m swimming,
diving and several other sports).
Bwl people are going to be hurt
becauseol thel fewef)scholarships
.u hes
Wednesday's time demand
proposals were born ot a 188
surve oi athletes which found
spending an average ol 301
i week m their respective
: rts and complaints that it was
.ring with their academic
-
In addition to the daily and
iveekl) limits on playing and
practice time, the new Division 1
� I Di ision II restrictions:
I Guarantee athletes at least
da off a week
Reduce playing seasons for
� team sports from 26 to 12
ksand individual sprts to 24
Reduce the number oi
stS in all sports except toot-
ind basketball.
Prohibit missed class rirro
� i ra Hoes
Some athletes, however,
questioned whether the proposals
were too well-intentioned.
"Sometimes Fahey said of
the convention delegates, "we
think they feel we can't handle
responsibility Some can. some
can't But they're voting tor ev-
eryone
rhat criticism was muted. But
criticism of the scholarship re
ducttons was not.
In Division I-A football, the
numbers will drop from to Sr
over a three vear period.The) go
from 15 to 13 over two years in
basketball and 10rr across the
board in other sports
Approval came only a day ai-
terothercost-saving reductions in
the size of coaching staffs.
"It deprives kids of getting a
chanceat an education, Nebraska
athletic director Bob Devaney said.
1 think we can spend money that
way and save it someplace else
"Whenyou start taking teach-
ers, which coaches are Kentucky
athleticdirectorC.M. Newton said,
"and you start taking away stu-
dent athletes . I don't know how-
it's going to affect competition.
But I think it will "
Even NCAA President Al
Wittc, faculty athletic representa-
tive at Arkansas, 'would have
preferred a 5 percent cut 1 think
there's a lot ot force to the argu-
ment that we should cut costs in
ot her areas before we take the knife
to scholarship opportunities
The delay in implementation
dates has not been overlooked. In
addition to football and basket-
ball, cuts in other sports don't go
into effect until August 1993.
Savs Witte: "I wouldn't be
surprised if it came back. I'd be
more surprised if it didn't
i �Copyright 1991. USA TODAYAppl Collie
Information Network
Let Us
Tempt
You
with our
piiiu.Y ii
STEAK & (III l-SI
SANDWICH
I he traditional steak and
cheese with sauteed onion vv
peppers bin with the floor of
fajitas
Introductory
$3.95
Mexican Resfrrujant
521 Cotanche St. 757ft$t�
���l�.�Mty .ibK.A.1 � �'
R J1 lft � �� - wmmi:
n
Order your college ring NOW
X )STENS
� M . i.
Date. Jan. 23,24,25 Time: 10a.m. -4 p.m. Deposit Required S3tm
Place: Rnokstorc on Wed Thurs. Kri.
MM with vHir Itwtrns representative lor hill ill tuiln st �ir . uiiipttMr nnij sele, Imhi m tJis(il,i n m � nUge.Ul� kMore.
i
RUSH!
W I II
�yyyyyyyyyy.
yyyyyyyyyy
yy.yyyyyyy.
mmmmmm
mmmmmmmmmmmm
yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy.yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy
�yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyA-vyy
yyyyyyyy-yyyfyyyyyyyyyy
SUCCESS STARTS HERE
When: January 22-25
Where: 409 Elizabeth St.
Tue: Meet the brothers
Catered by Hickory Hams
Wed:Pizza Meet the Ladies of ASA
Sorority
For more Info or ride call 757-1319
Thur: Meet the ECU Pure Gold Dancers
Catered by Hickory Hams





�� I
MM
1
u
H
PI KAPPA ALPHA
A NEW ERA
ANOTHER DECADE OF TRADITION
Construction of new TlKA House underway in Mid February
Completion date of New House will be August 1, 1991.
RUSH Will be January 22nd-25th from
8:00-11:00 at the PIRATE CLUB
i
1 x �


Jan. 22nd: Meet the Brothers of 7TKA
23rd: Meet the Ladies of XQ
24th: Meet the Ladies of AA7C
25th: Invitation only with the Ladies of AS.
All catering by Hickory Hams
For information or rides call 758-3152
,?$?
I





Title
The East Carolinian, January 22, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 22, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.784
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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