The East Carolinian, January 15, 1991






1
Wt lEaat (Earulmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.64 No.66
Tuesday, janurary 15, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
24 Pages
Draft could activate
as many as 100,000
men in 13 days
By Blair Skinner
News Editor
A spokesman tor the Selective
Service System sas the agency is
are able to call up men 13 days after
thev have been notified bv Con-
gress
Larry Waltman, a spokesman
tor the system, said it would takean
act of Congress to begin a draft.
Following the president approval,
the system could hold a nationally
televised lottery in three days
The lottery would establish a
draft priority, which is based on
men's birthd.ns Waltman said.
National law pre ents women from
being drafted
Waltrnan said the tottery would
randomly rank the days of the year
from one to 3vr For example,
Waltman said, if April 7 is ranked
first in the lottery, then 2i Wear-old
men bom on that date would be the
first group drafted.
Draftees would he notified bv a
computer printed m.uigram. which
would tell them thev have 10 days
to report to a military processing
station tor a phvsical examination.
Twentv year -old men will be in
the first priority category, Waltman
Said. Twentv-one-vear-olds are in
the second pnontv group.
Kach succeeding vear.nxTidrop
into a lower group until their 2nth
birthdav. Waltman said. At that time
thev are considered too Old for the
draft.Afterthe25-year olds, i�and
then 18-year olds would be drafted.
The options tor men that are
drafted and who do not want to
serve are limited Exceptions are
sometimes made tor conscientious
objectors, hardship cases, clergy-
men, ministt-n.il students, elected
officials, National (iuard and Re-
serve members, voterans.aliensand
dual nationals
Those who qualify may have
their service either postponed, de-
terred or exempted.
Determents and postpone-
ments delay military service; an ex-
See Draft, page 8
Fall commencement sends 1,600 graduates into the 'real world'
By LaToya Hankins
Staff Writer
On Dm s I 00 students were
inducted into the real world" as
ECU held its 82nd tail commence-
ment.
Thecererm ny wasplit.as those
receiving master's degrees gradu-
ated at 10a .m .whilfundorgraduatos
motived their degrees at 2 p.m.
Senior class President Tnpp
RoakeS was the tirst to svak to the
graduates. He reminded them that
bv graduating thev were going to
have to endure those dreaded 8 a m
though this time thev w ill last until 5
p.m. (Graduates weread si to re
member what college means
"To be a good college student is
to beagood scholaris vMiiasagiHKi
citizen,in the world around you he
said
Other spv.ikrrs included D.G.
Martin, secretary tor the University
ot North C arohna svstem; I r. fames
oy e, chair ot tho E U Faculty Sen-
ate and Chancellor Ru hard Fakin.
The coinmencement address
was made bv aniee Faulkner, the
director ot the Regional Develop-
ment Institute She graduated from
EastCaroHnaC ollegem IQOwithan
English degree.
She spoke of a pvm wntten
during tho debate between evolu-
tionists and creationists m the late
18005 ! he pi vm telK of a world torn
apart bv battles and differences of
opinion Faulkner said the conflicts
could be related to tho current situa-
tion in the Middk East, or the envi-
ronmental and economic batks in
the United States.
"We live in a worki that is less
than perfect, but just because a world
is messiHi up there is no reason tor
thepeoplein that world tofaemessed
up too she said.
She told the audience ah nit her
youth in Martin County She said
while some mav see the experience
of knowing everyone in town as a
perfect lite, she would not return or
wish that lite on anvone she cares
about. They saw the pursuit o an
education as a waste, she said.
Fa u lkner urged the graduates to
i stilie the technology that lies before
them to make the world a better place.
The only thing that is a con-
stant in this world is a certainty of
change, she said. "Choose your
battles carefully; make sun' thev a
bigont nigh to fightand small enough
to win which Faulknerquoted fr ini
leonard lenkins, the first chancellor
of ECU.
She- told the graduates that she
hoped she had inspired them to be-
lieve that a life well led will make a
difference.
As the students celebrated thnr
independence frTm the univorsitv.
one woman's message on her gown
expn-ssed a thought that summod
up the theme of the eemmonv the
party's over.
Inseparable twins prepare
for call to active duty, war
By Robin Duffy
st.ift Wnt.T
I n and I ee Baird are 18-
uir old twin sisters trom
Powhatan Va Fhey share almost
everything. They both attend
1 i the rt room i nates and they
both march for the Pirate
Marching Band And, if war
breaks out in the Middle East,
they expect to be in the thick of it
together there too.
These twin sistcrsare soldiers
in the National Guard- the same
battalion.
"We've been doing things
together since we were little said
I.yn,short for Rosalyn. A slender
girl with long,brown hair Lyn isa
dancer who someday hopes to
become a physical therapist.
Her sister Rosalie, Lee for
short, obviously has the same
features, but has much shorter
hair lee, a music education ma-
jor, enjoys the outdoors.
The twins are both freshman
although Lee is a semester ahead
of her sister I ast spring Lyn took
her Advanced Individual Train-
ing (AIT) in the National Guard
while I ee enrolled at ECU. That
was one of the few times the two
have not been side by side.
"I recruited her for the guard
said Lee who is classified as a
specialists stepaboveprivate first
class.
"Sheconnedmeintoit Lyn,
who is a Pfc, said jokingly. "She
got an advancement in classifica-
tion because I joined
Although Lyn said she didn't
care for basic training, both enjoy
their duties as medical specialists
in the 167th National Guard MP
Battalion in Washington, N.C.
1'm rea I ly a neat person, and
SGA appropriates $10,000 for Joyner
Library in first meeting of semester
By Shannon Copeland
Start Writer
In their first meeting this semester, the SGA
appropriated $16,675 to campus organisations.
lovner Library was appropriated $10,000 to pay
employee wages The library will use the money to
return to normal operating hours Last semester,
budget problems forced administrators to shorten
operating hours. No.malk. the library is open 1(X)
hours per veek.
According to SGA Treasurer Randy Royal, the
library's operating hours were cut back as a result ot
a $40,000 budget shortfall. Overall, $16365.16 is
needed to keep the library open for its regular sched-
ule.
"1 have been told that if the we cover the $10,000,
(the university) will try to cover the other $6,000-
plus Royal said last semester
At that time. Roval viid the monev will onlv he
used for the wages to run the library and will cover
onlv s�2 hours per week at Fletcher Musk Center
which normallv operates 4 hours weeklv
The Lacrosse Club was given $3,865 tor eouip-
ment, travel, and league dues, The IRS gave thee lub
$1,450. Between the two. the Lacrosse Club received
$5,313 ot the S5,tS5 thev asked tor
The American Choral Pirei tor s.Association was
.lppropna'ecjs OMijnd I fence Expressions receive
$810.
Plans were also made to set up a committee with
IRS representatives to investigate sports teams who
are funded by both of the groups.
In other action, a public hearing on the noise
ordinance. It is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday above
the Greenville Police Station.
WZMB makes final move
R'tfard Davit � ECU tmn Bureau
Lee and Lyn Baird keep their bags packed just in case their National
Guard Batallion is called to active duty
I hate to be dirty Lyn said.
"When I went to basic it was like
dirt everywhere so 1 had a lot to
get used to. But when I graduated
from basic I felt I had accom-
plished somethingimportant. I'm
proud to wear the uniform
Lee joined the National
Guard at age 17 when she
graduated from high school. Her
father had been in the Navy so she
always had a strong interest in the
military. She decided to enroll at
ECU on the recommendation of
her band teacher, and ECU
alumnus, after she completed her
training.
See Twins, page 8
By Carrie Armstrong
Special Sections Editor
Some WZMB listeners may
have to adjust their listening habits
for the next two weeks.
Because they are in the process
of finalizing their move from joyner
Library to a new location in
Mendenhall Student Center,
WZMB may not be on the air for
the next two weeks. WZMB's
general manager Jeff Skillen said
the new station was supposed to
beoperationalbyjan.7. However,
because Mendenhall was closed
for the two weeks prior to this date,
the engineer was unable to com-
plete the wiring and meet the
station's operational date.
"It will be at least two weeks
before (the new station) will be
operational Skillen said. "We are
waiting for wiring and for a couple
of components that the engineer
has to have to hook everything
together, so we're going to wait
and not sign on until we get into
the Mendenhall studio. If it is go-
ing to be longer than two weeks,
then we're just going to sign on
from our old location.
"What we're trying to do is
look into our crystal ball and figure
out when we can be back on theair,
and we feel like two weeks is the
maximum that we should be off
the air. Anything over two weeks
is going to be to our disadvantage
and to our hsiteners' disadvan-
tage
Skillen said WZMB will use
the two weeks as a transition from
the old loea I 'm I to the new one and
SVTMB, page 3
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial 4
As the threat of war approaches,
men between 18 and 25 have
realized the possibility of a draft.
Features 13
Raleigh-based comedian Bitty
C. Wirtz will appear at the Attic
Thursday night
ClavutuNi IS
Sports 19
George Mason upset EC U last
night in Minges Coliseum, 74-
72.





2 I
Btre �nHt(Harolinian January 15, 1991
ECU Briefs
Prominent Polish sociologist to
speak Thursday in Mendenhall
Dr. Kenata Siomienska-Zochowska, a prominent Polish po-
litical soriotogisl will K delivering a lecture on "Women and
Political Change in Eastern Europe" at � noon, bag luncheon,
rhursday, Jan 17 in Room 221 Mendenhall Student Center The
lecture, sponsored bv the ECU Center lor International Pro
grams, isopen to students, faculty and members of the community
I h Siemienska-Zochowska will discuss the various political
roles of women in Poland as well as recent developments in that
country's democratization process
I h Siemienska Zochowska is an intemattonali) known po
litical sociologist who has written numerous journal articles,
book chapters, and books on the subject of political culture,
publit opinion, local government and women's roles m I olish
society Her most recent book is entitled Sex, Professions and
Polili, - IV men in Publit I ife in Poland (1990).
She has been a visiting professor at a number oi American
universities including the University o( North Carolina
(ireensboro, She has isited ECU several times and iscollaborat
ing uith tuo members ol the ECU political science department
on a concerning environmental values and local administrators
in Poland and the United States
I'rum ll I'l onlri fol lnt rn.itinn.il Pmftt.ims
Regional leaders establish goals for
eastern N.C at 1991 Chancellor's Forum
Crime Scene
Investigation concerning weapons
violation uncovers water pistol
1444 Messick I heater a hit and run report in the private
park ing lot
( ollege Hill Drivciparking lot): investigated suspi
i khis M tu itv 1 'wo subjects were banned trom campus and one
as transported to Publu Safety.
Ian. 10
roatan in,estigated an automobile accident in volv-
mi. i l niversitv vehu lo a minor accident report was ttl J
142(1 ollege Hill chei ked out to lot ate a vehicle unable to
,
Mendenhall Student c entertparking lot) took an a
i uien report.
' 52 Umstead Residence Hall (east): campu: citation i�
sued to indent tor speeding
0?1 Hanagan Ruilding(east) campus citation is�
Ian.11
mtOl arvis Residence Hall responded to an activated fire
at.in- necauseil by unknown subject pulling thealarm -t
thin! flooi east
IK)H I mstead Residence Hall responded to report ol i
i ontrolted substance iolation on the third tloor
0.1 v MingesColiseum(freshmanparkinglot) investigated
suspti ' tis subjei i, non student banned from i ampus.
joncs Residence HalKsouth) investigated damag� to
p. tsohal prbpeit report
1214 Scott Residence Hall responded to i Soud part
suhj � i - were verbal!) warned
! !9 (onesResidence I tail: investigated larceny report and
assisted residence hall stafl with an alcohol violation on t'ne tiurd
tloor
2312 Location unknown: male subjei t placed, into prote�
tive custody subject was turned over to rescue unit for transport
lo I'itl omunitv Memorial Hospital emergenc) r "atn Subpil
w ,i . extreme!) inebriated
Ian. 12
vctxk Residence Hall responded to icpori oi te
nwk Mihje. is refusing to leave; same ere gone or arm �!
iu (iarrett Residence Hall investigated a disturbance on
third Roof Damage to a door lei ated, and residence hall staff
advi -�'
131 iaris Residence Hall responded to activated tire
alarm ire located on second floor. The officer extinguished the
tire ind � - ue was dispatched
lH3f mstead Residence Hall responded to a report ol
intoxicated subjet ts refusing to cooperate with the re idence hall
Staff; subj� ts located and referred to administration tor disposi-
t ion
oi (.arrett Residence Hall checked damage on the third
llooi di: position referred to residence hall statt
1302 White Residence Hall responded to complaint ol
male in shower on second floor
1513 Public Safety investigated report of a bike larceny
which OCCUred at Clement Residence Hall.
180? MingesCoiiseum(west): investigated weapon viola
tion. same was a water gun.
?109 White Residence Hall: investigated cetftng falling out;
mainter a" e was called
tan 13
(Mm; 10th Street: stopped subject lor speeding subjei I was
borderline intoxicated and was advised to park vehicle V erbal
warning given tor violations
Q126 Slay Residence Hall: responded io a report Dl a .nale
student who was Intoxicated and bad cut his hand: student
refused transport to PCMH emergency room
0217 Slay Residence 1 lall: responded to disruptive, intoxi-
cati cl male student; student refused to cooperate v ith residence
hall stafl Student was placed in custody tor 24 -hour lockup.
i �.arrett Residence Hall assisted the residence hall
siatt w i'l in overflowing toilet.
U3 White Residence Hall advised loud subjects on the
10th tlov quite down; the matter was cleared.
Otv � m stdenceHalKwest): advised subjects on the
second fI or t own; Hie matter waa cleared
i'4. Locati ' unknown: responded to report ot sexual
assault I Suftejr, DM. Suggs and IM. Jenkins responded as
well
1611- College Hill Dnvo playing field): assisted rescue with
Student with I broken collar bone, same was tiansrn rtevt to
PCMH
23 -Fletcher Residence Hall: report of student receiving
harassing phone calls
? 104-Mendenhall Student Center ATM alarm sounded;
contact was made with bank staff.
2?()0 Maintenance Warehouse: responded to alai m MM no -
ing; same was an alarm clock in Cotten Residence Hall.
Crime Scrnt is taken fmm offkial ECU fablk Safety toft.
By LeClair Harper
Assistant News Editor
Earlier this month, 11 eastern
North Carolinians spoke at the
third annual Chancellor's Forum
to help regional leaders plan how
to identity and develop the poten-
tial of vouth in the area. These
leaders met to establish goals for
their communities, but no set plans
of action have been established.
The forum, titled 'Celebration
in the Fast: Successful Eastern
North Carolinians' was held in
Mendenhall Student Center fan.
7-8.
Twelve speakers were sched-
uled to address the audience on
Monday and Tuesday mornings.
The sessions were attended by
community leaders invited to at-
tend the forum and were open to
the public.
Monday morning speakers
included lames Hunt r, former
governor of North Carolina; I larry
facobs r.hiot Executive Officer
ol the Martin Agency in Richmond;
Pr I inda Flowers, Jefferson Pilot
Professor ot English at Wesleyan
College and author ot Fhrowtd
Away Failureso) Progress in Eastern
North Carolina; Pr Loonis
Met llohon, composer and
coproducerol North ("arolinais My
Home and Pr William "Billy"
lav'ior, jazz educator and musi-
cian.
I t Governor fames Gardner
planned to appear but was unable
to attend because of schedule con-
flicts.
Tuesday morning'saddresses
wen- made b lames Mavnard,
chairman ol the board and CEOof
Investors Management Corpora-
tion and chairman ot the board ot
Golden Corral Corporation;
Deloris Jordan, mother of profes-
sional basketball player Michael
Jordan and president of the
Michael Jordan Foundation;Clyde
King, a member of the North
Carolina Sports Hall of Fame,
Horace "Bones" McKinney, also a
member of the North Carolina
Sports Hall of Fame; Dr. Valerie
Lovelace, an eminent educator and
director of research of "Sesame
Street and Dr. James Jones, a
professor at the ECU School of
Medicine.
After the Monday morning
speeches, lOgroupsof community
leadersorganized by their county
region met to establish three goals
that they would like to implement
in their communities. These goals
were to relate to the purpose of
identifying and developing the
potential in eastern North Caro-
lina.
Leaders from across eastern
North Carolina were invited to
attend this fonim.
Bertie Fearing, director of the
forum and acting chair of the En-
glish Department, explained that
they targeted CEOs, superinten-
dents of public schools, officialsof
universitiesand colleges, economic
development officers, mayors,
state legislators. rheUNt board of
governors and the ECU board ol
trustees.
Also involved in the group
sessions were ECU student leaders
selected primanlv from honors
program participants.
The groups were assisted bv
ECU teams comprised ot a discus-
sion leader, facilitator, reporter and
timekeeper. These leaders met on
Dec. 6 for a training session to help
them explain the purpose of the
meetings to the participants and
to help the meetings run smoothly.
Each group developed a plan,
which was recorded on a
worksheet by the reporter. The
worksheet detailed the three goals
of the group, ranked by impor-
tance, possible barriers to meeting
the goals; possible ways to over-
come the barners; and resources
available or needed to achieve the
See Forum, page 8
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School of Education
to receive $500,000
endowment position
Bv LeClair Harper
Assistant News I ditor
1 he School ol Education will
receive a $50 ow endowment to
establish the 1 era Wilson King
Distinguished Professorship in
Education Chancellor Richard
Eakin said at the (hancellor's Fo-
rum on lan s
According to Pr Charles
Coble, dv.m ol the n hool ot Edu-
cation, the endowment will allow
( I to recruit a prominent mem-
ber ol the education profession.
'We will be able to recruit an
individual of national stature to
our campus to provide a level of
outstanding leadership in research
v hk h w ill in turn pro idesupport
needed tor both teacher education
,m. t mihh vht i K in r.ivtcrn 'i rlli
When a university receivesan
endowed professorship, a new
faculty position is automatically
established.
Eakin announced the endow-
ment on the second day oi the
Chancellor s Forum, a yearly re-
gional symposium oi community
leaders.
The locus of the forum was to
identify and develop the potential
of youth m eastern North Caro-
lina. Many speakers on Monday
for institutional advancement, ex-
plained that an endowment is ac-
tually an investment much like a
savings account. The $500,000 is
invested, and the university uses
the interest gained to supplement
the salary of the new professor.
Some oi the earned money may be
used for travel, work shops or other
duties of the new professor. Also.
some of the earned money is re-
invested into the fund.
King lett $414. 8 from her
estate to ECU, stipulating that the
money could be used for anv
purpose the university wished
King was a retired school
teacher from Duphn County. She
received her undergraduate de-
gree in elementary education trom
ECU in 1933 and her master's de
vreoirom FCI I in 1QS7 Shf'Mm-ht
North Carolina.
The establishment of the Lora
Wilson King Oistinguished Pro-
fessorship will be the third distin-
guished professorship at ECU. The
first was the Robert D. Teer Distin-
guished Professorship in the
School of Business and the second
was the Thomas W. Rivers Distin-
guished Professorship in Interna-
tional Studies.
"We're hoping to add addi-
tional distinguished professor-
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had discussed the improvement ships in the future Lanier said
of public schools and teacher edu-
calionasa meansto reach the youth
of this area.
"As plans proceeded along for
this forum, it became clear to me
that East Carolina's commitment
to teacher education is a funda-
mental and critical ingredient in
preparing our youth to become
tomorrow's leaders Eakin said.
"To demonstrate the
University's commitment to
teacher education and to honor
Mrs. King, I am pleased to an-
nounce today the establishment of
the Lora L. Wilson King Endowed
Distinguished Professorship in
Education. This $500,000 endow-
ment iscomprised of $334,000 from
the bequest of Mrs. King and
$166,000 from the Board of Gov-
ernors of the University of North
Carolina
James learner, vice chancellor
E.C.U. & P.C.C. Students
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(Bite gagt Carolinian
Director of Advertising
John F. Semelsberger II
Advertising Representatives
David Bailey Gregory Jones
Margie cyshea Tim Peecf
Patrick Pttzer
Advertising Production Manager
Mary Piland
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Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
WZMB'sgeneralmanagerJeflSkillenis
Student Center. The move will give
ECU faculty me
Moore, Carson and Stevi
By Bill Egbert
Staff Writer
The Athletics Congress ot th
I SA ' ! A the national govern
m b�d tor trtuk and field has
appointed threeEt I fa ulr n i
tvrs to aid America's Orympk ef-
fort
Dr. William "Bill" Moore,
assitant protessor and head tennis
coach, will serve as a sports psj
Chology consultant. Dr ! I i
Stevenson, director oi the I
Biomechanics Laboratory, will
serve as a biomeohanist tor the
javelin throw BUI Carson. ECU
track coach, has been named s uth-
ern regional coordinator I
i. Mvmpic development.
All three men are part ot the
Department oi Health Ph)
Education. Recreation and Safety
(HPERS)
"It isquiteanhonor.buth tor the
irKtferkkssiejta depastmenVei
White.acti" hairofHrEKS. 'Thi-
is a reflection on some oi the out-
standing work that our people are
doing in HPERS"
In reference to the length of the
appointments, Stevenson likened
the arrangement to the Supreme
Court. "As long as they're happy
with your work and you're willing
to stav onhe project, it's usually a
long-term relationship he said
TAC covers anv costs incurred
in tl
th. �� �
pk effort

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Charlotte names
CHARLOTTE(AP) Dewe
Ronald Stone was named
Charlotte's 30th police ch� I
Monday, culminating a 36-year
rise trom records clerk to leader
of the flOO-othcer force.
The 56-year-old Charlotte-
born officer was selected b City
Manager Wendell White, who
announced Stone's appointment
at a city council meeting Mono.
an assistant chief, was one oi four
finalists. He will replace Chief
Sam Killman, who was appointed
in 1983 and retires Jan. 31
Maj. J.J. Kelley, who had ap-
plied for the pb, praised Stone as
a skillful administrator and a man
of integrity. He gave Stone, 56,
high marks for communicating
with employees and the public
"He knows what's going on
� he's been involved in every
� section of the department said
Kellev, a 29-year officer who
; heads the Baker bureau.
Officers critical of Stone said
he had spent too much of his ca-
reer behind desks and not enough
on the street. Some officers, who
spoke on condition their names
weren't used in interviews, also
said they didn't consider Stone
progressive enough at a time
many police problems require in-
novation.
"We'll go back to the l�50s
one officer said
Some criticized Stone's lack
of formal education, but others
said he has overcome it with
hundreds of hours of law en-
forcement training. Stone finished
high school but earned no college
degree.
"His lack of formal education
to pi
r ad '
THH
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i f
iliie faBt Carolinian January 15.1991 13
WZMB
Celeste Hoffman � FCU Pnoto lab
WZMB's general manager Jeff Skillen is feeling the burden of move from Old Joyner Library to Mendenhall
Student Center The move will give WZMB'S staff more room to work, as well as new eguipment.
to train people and familiarize
them with the new equipment.
"We'll be busy during the two
weeks to get everything done, but
still we hate to be oft the air for any
length of time he sud
According to student publi-
cation coordinator and media ad-
Visor,Greg Brown, another cause
for the delay is WZMB's trans-
mitter, which is on top of Tyler
dorm. The transmitter was dam-
age during a heavv rain storm
last semester, and fixing it slowed
down the process of installing the
equipment in the new studio
Brown said a major step that
has to bo token during the two
weeks that WZMB will be off the
air is to pull the two microwave
relay units from the roof of the
library and relocate them on
Continued from page 1
Mendenhall's roof.
'There have been a lot of dis-
appointments Brown said "Back
in the fall, we had pipes to burst in
the roof over the station and so we
had to install new, larger pipes.
Then we had a torrential rain one
morning thatcaused water toeome
up from the ground and into the
facility. "
The new station is located on
the bottom floor of Mendenhall
Brown said the initial plans tor the
station began six or seven years
ago, but the final design was put
out for a bid about a vear ago
Construction on the station began
last spring.
The new facility will have an
entirely new control room, but
equipment from the old station
will be set up in a training produc-
tion room and used to train new
employees.
In addition, there will be a
newsroom, which the old station
did not have, a production room,
a n of fice f or the genera I ma nager,
a storage room and a large area
for staff desks. "It has much
larger floor space � the rooms
are more open said Brown
Brown said he thinks the
two-week break from the air is a
good idea.
'The staff was incredibly
disappointed � we had hoped
to have all this stuff worked out
Over Christmas break he said.
"I think the two weeks will give
people a chance to continue to
work with the tiles and get ev-
erything set up, and I think we
candoeverythingin two weeks
$ffi4ifi$in$fn4ffi4ffi$fn
ECUfaarity
Moore, Carson and Stevenson named by U.S. Athletic Congress
Bv Bill Egbert
Stall Writer
The Athletics Congress ol the
USA t TAO the national govern
ing bod) toi tr.uk and tieU has
at�txinted three E I facultvmem
hers to aid America's Olvnipu et
tort
Dr. William 'Bill" Moore,
-issit.int professor and head tennis
coach, will serve as a sports ps
chology consultant. Dr. ohn
Stevenson, director o( the E( U
Biomechanics I aboratory, will
serve as a btornechanist tor the
javelin throw Bill Carson, ECU
track coach, hasbeen named south
ern regional coordinator tor
(Mympk development.
All three men are part ot the
Department ot Health, Physical
Education Recreation and Satetv
(HPERS.
It isqmte�mhMior,bothlorthe
irtdtvidaaalaaassat dc paatmanexrxi
the UnfeflM1 Sftt,
White.actiTVohairofl IPTRs
is a reflection on some of the out
standing work that our people are
dome in NPERS
In reference to the length of the
appointments, Stevenson likened
the arrangement to the Supreme
Court. "As long as they're happy
with your work and you're willing
to Stay orvthe project, it's usually a
long-term relationship he said.
TAC covers any costs incurred
m the course ol their service, but
the three will be serving our Olym-
pic ettort as volunteers
Moore s job will be to work with
athletes on psychological field de
velopment 1 will talk to them
about what the psvi holoRical skills
.ire concentration and compo
sure (and1 how to set yourself up
mentalh and emotionally through
preparation to have an elite ideal
performarM c he � id
In addition to coa hing the ten
nis team Moore teaches sports
psychology and performs biome
chanics rescan h at E 1' I le ex-
pects his appointment to'benefil
him as a teacher as well. "Any tune
you have case studies to talk about
to classes in psychology, it's very
valuable hesaid 'It will also help
me understand athletes and make
me a better sports psychologist
Stevenson s duties as a
biornechanist tor the javlin throw.
will take lii � various compdti-
d lkti.�s.tiX"CO.istU�cM. where be
his VvtlJfld.ijVathtfteasthevper
form their event
fhen we bring those tapes back
to the lab ompilcall the data, and
sit down as son as possible with
those athletes and give them feed
back on then performances he
said
E I sBoimechanics Laboratory
hasbeen ret entlyoutfitted with new
imagine, and measurement equip-
ment Stevenson believes that the
excllont facility was influential in
his selection.
The governing bodies like to
get people involved who have the
facilities to do the work he said
v e certainly have that
Stevenson, who threw the
javelin in high school, hopes to in-
volve his students m collecting and
analyzing the data. "What we'll
gain from this experience as sports
scientists is the data necessary to
better understand the mechanics Ol
the sport he said.
As southern regional coordina-
tor tor Olympic development,
Carson is primarily involved m
athlete recruitment, but his long-
term g al is to improve the quality
ot track and field coaching in the
region
' The United States used to
dominate the world in track and
field he said, "but now we're iust
average We're a second-rate
power, and that's not ffod. If we
don tgpt on thsrbaU, things are oajly
iuMoVt wrse �? "Mcr InftRrJ of M .mr1g HvrV
"A lot ot talented athletes are
slipping through the cracks he
said "Nowadays, it a kid can'l go
to college his tr.uk and held ca-
reer is over Thcv have no wiv ot
getting the monev. equipment or
coaching the need
Carson hopes to find ways to
prevent those talented athletes
from being shut out ot the sport
Also, he plans to improve the
quality of track-and-fiekd coj
ing through state-wide sympo-
siums 1 le has already scheduled
such a coaching conference in
Florida and others are slated for
Georgia, North Carolina and Vir-
ginia
Carson looks forward to his
new responsibilities,realizing that
his work will benefit the Univer-
sity as well as himself.
"It might help me get some re-
cruits and be a better coach, since
ill bo teaming too he said. "It's
thrilling to become involved in
something this stimulating at my
mmm
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Carson said that the problem
lies in the fact that many high school r
coaches simply have no training in I
track and held. "We're getting les- '
and less true coaches and more 01
what I call 'babysitters, ' he said.
Another problem which Carson
cited is the fact that unless an ath-
lete has the grades to get into col-
lege, that their track-and-field ca-
reer ends with hih school.
finishing out mv career
vThr itvinq and (Quern
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vuaiuilics
12 'I'M
availahK
Charlotte names new police chief
( HARLOTTE(AP) Dewey
Ronald Stone was named
Charlotte's 30th police chiel
Monday, culminating a 36 year
rise from records elerk to leader
ot the 800-offii er force.
The 56-year-old Charlotte-
born officer was selected by City
Manager Wendell White, who
announced Stone's appointment
at a city council meeting Stone,
an assistant chief, was one of four
finalists. He will replace Chief
Sam Killman, who was appointed
in 1985 and retires fan. 31.
Maj. J.J. Kelley, who had ap-
plied for the ob. praised Stone as
a skillful administrator and a man
of integrity. He gave Stone, 56,
high marks for communicating
with employees and the public.
"He knows what's going on
he's been involved in every
section of the department' said
Kelley, a 29-year officer who
heads the Baker bureau.
Officers critical of Stone said
he had spent too much of his ca-
reer behind desks and not enough
on the street Some officers, who
spoke on condition their names
weren't used in interviews, also
said they didn't consider Stone
progressive enough at a time
many police problems require in-
novation
"We'll go back to the WOs
one officer said.
Some criticized Stone's lack
of formal education, but others
said he has overcome it with
hundreds of hours of law en-
forcement training. Stone finished
high school but earned no college
degree.
"His lack of formal education
has been overcome by his ability "He hasexcel tent communication
to project the talents he does skills He projects a good public
have, said apt I (. Barnes, image
head of the vice and narcotit sunit.
THE OVERWHELMING
RESPONSE TO OUR 30TH
BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION
HAS BEEN
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would Like to
Wei ome New and Returning Students
and
Invite You le Join Us In Worship
Campus Mass Schedule For Sorint? Session:
Sunday 11:30 am. Ledonia Wright Building
8:30 pm. Newman Center
Wednesday 5:30 pm, Newman Center
953 East 10th Street
(At the foot of College Hill Drive)
Greenville. NC 27836-2605
757-3760
For information about these and other programs sponsored by the Newman Center,
Call or visit the center daily between 8:30 am and 11:30 pm.
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister (757-1991)
ITS TIME FOR DOMINO'S PIZZA.
Call 758-6660
Order any large pia at regular price
and get a medium pizza
with one topping for only JOtf.
MOVING UP HAS A WHOLE
DIFFERENT MEANING FOR
AIR FORCE ROTC CADETS.
Virtually all college students plan to move up in their
career But Air Force ROTC cadets can begin the train-
ing toward a career that goes higher and faster. In fact, if
you'd like to begin a life in the skv. vour best first step is
Air Force ROTC.
You'll learn the confidence you'll need whether
you're going to plot a course as a navigator or take the
controls as a pilot FAA-approved flight lessons will
launch you for the first time. And as your college career
develops, so do the skills you'll need as an Air Force
officer.
Flegin early in college, and you'll be eligible for schol-
arships that can pay expenses and provide you $100
each academic month, tax-tree After graduation, you'll
be ready to take the challenge of an intensive, rigorous
training program.
Move up with Air Force ROTC now. and you can
move up wtth the Air Force as an officer. Contact your
campus Air Force representative:
DEFT OF AEROPACE STUDIES
(919) 757-6597
Leadership Excellence Starts Here





UJre iEant Ear0ltnian
Saving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bi.air Skinner, News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor
Douc, Morris, sports Editor
Carrif Armstrong, Special Sections Editor
Lee Harper, Asst. News Editor
Stuart Oliphant, Asst. Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Asst. Sports Editor
Scorr Maxwell, Satire Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor
MlKF Makiin, EJiiorui! Production Manager
JFFF PRKFR, Star-f Illustrator
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Cari a W'mi i mm i), Clashed Ads Technician
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Stuart Rosner, Systems Manager
PHONG LuONG, Business Manager
Deborah Daniels, Secretary
Th East Car, Union has served the East Carolina canipua tommmk linea 1025, emphasizing informanon thai directly affects
FCU Students. Dufii g the ECU school yew, The Fast Carolinianpbhcs twice a week with a circulation of 12.000. The East
('arolmian rescrv es the right to refuse or liismntinuc any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age. sex. creed or
national origin 1 he masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, bin, rather.
is a majority opim I ditoriaJ Board. the EastCarolman welcomes letters expressing all points of view eaten should
be limited to 250 words or less, For purposes of decency and brevity. The Easi Carolinian reserves ;he right to edn letters for
publication I etters should In- addressed to The Editor. The Fast Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, NX
27834: or cal 919 '57 6 66
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, January 15, 1991
Threat of war raises questions
Youth must decide, is K
As the I deadline tor Iraq's
withdrawal from Kuwait expires to-
day, the threat oi war seems to pivot
toward art inevitable question of
win n. the presidential stopwatch has
expiret the world uneasily awaits
thealarn
VVhilesme Americans continue
toquestion(njr country's motivesand
actions m the Middle East, the time
for sue h questions hasended for many
more Americans, and apparently for
Congress as well.
With their acceptance of an im-
pndiu, war, ilu public increasingly
ntailfcee that unof and moM families
from eastern North Carolina will be
affected by the present and future
events thai ex cur in this region.
Even though government and
military officials publicly shrug off
the promises of military escalations,
theAmerii an people are beginning to
discover tl al this may very well be
another long, drawn out "conflict"
like Viet:
Sudden!v, the events that have
been occurring half-a-world a way are
becoming the most important concern
of college aged men, specifically those
between the ages of 18 and 25. Only
recently have so many men within
uvvait worth dying tor?
to ask these men to serve their conn
try if this conflict is indeed a long one.
This fact could be onv of the
reasons why President Bush ad-
dressed an open letter to all college
students last week calling tor their
support in the American
government's most recent political
decision.
in essencethe president wanted
college students to ask themselves,
"What their country means to them7"
Currently, it seems most Americans
are willing to accept the ultimate chal-
lenge as citizens, to an extent.
Jrue, in recent y Al the m.ijor
ity of the country supports the
president's actions in the Middle fast,
but the majority of the country is not
comprised of young men between ihe
ages oi 18 and 25. Across the United
States, young adults might face an
ethical dilemma - whether or not to
risk their lives on the values of an
older, and perhaps more archaic,
group of Americans. They must now
ask themselves, "What is my life worth
to my country?"
The question remains: Is the lib-
eration of Kuwait worm the loss of so
many young lives?
I lowever, this question can only
sonal tie to a situation that once restsontheheartsandmindsofyoung
seemed to hold such little concern of men (and women) everywhere,
theirs. whether they are in the comforts of
President Bush realizesheneeds home at ECU or in the sands of Saudi
their support; he mav eventually have Arabia.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Bush manipulates way to top honors
By Scott Maxwell
f ditorijl Columnist
As tht t risis in the Persian
Gull has 'aaxed on, I've found
mvself listening less to what the
dramatis � �. are saying, and
more to how they're saving it.
Or. in some eases not saving it
I he most widely �. ritictzed
disingenuous use ot language
has come from the man we're
told is the 1 litter ot the �
Saddam Hussein himself la
belling hostages "guests' surely
earns him an Honorable Men-
tion in the Ronald Reagan
'ewspeak Hal! of lame (Re-
member Ronald Reagan? the
guv who brought us
"disinformation for "lie
'freedom fighters" tor "U.S-
backed terrorists"1 -h, those
were the days! I
Pint i! Saddam Hussein is
trying to beat I s politicians al
the euphemism game, that Hon-
orable Mention is the best he an
hope for. (After all. calling Ku-
wait "Province 19" was really a
poor follow-up to his earlier dis
play of raw talent iFirsI through.
fourtl . prizes in the Ronald
R agan Newspeak Hall of I ame
Awards (Special Persian Gulf
Edition � have already beer
awarded bv me. as follows
Fourth place goes to the
Hush administration and ever)
one else who has knowingly lied
about "Iraq's use ot poison gas
against its own Kurdish minor
ity Inexplicably, this claim is
never i Directed: Iraq didn't gas
them The Kurds in question
lived in a village near the Iran-
Iraq border, during the war be-
tween those two ' untries, part
of a battle raged through the
Kurds' village Poison gas
weapons were used, killing some
Kurds The Kurds who died from
gas pois ming v ere poist Tied bv
cyanide Iraq doesn't use cya
mde in its chemical weapons.
Iran do I he i on lusion is ob
ious; ind Bush's owi
partment of I defense prepared a
report to this effe I Wanna bet
George knows and isn't shar i g
I hud pu egoes lo the des-
picable ongresscritters who
st. uttled onto national television
last week with their belated
cluttering about the pressing
need for a national debate The
national delate had been taking
place without them for months
the term "national debate
. use it, means a few hours of
tree air time nSPAN, plus
maybe a couple of sound bites in
the nightly network news, pa-
tentlv intended to keep them in
ot their i onstituents
(Not in a -I hasten to ad-
duce SomeC ongresscritters ate
not . � most of them I
I usinesSman
employee who
icted �� G Tigress fur-
ther demeans its inexcusably
tard. - rtti nto the national
debate bv acting as it debates
don't exist unless Congress is in
session.
In addition, many of the
aforementioned
c ongresscritters Representa-
tive Robert K Dornan, R-Calif
among them deserve special
mention When demanding a
national debate, th-
mil roencephalics also insist
was the 'dutv" of Congn
unequivocally support
president's Persian Gulf p
whatever it is this week Saj
Congress has ,1 dutv to Supp rt
the president means that �
before the debate begjr -
tors and representatives shi . I
dismiss out of han I
and i oncems of the
ted them. If all Congn
di is blindly foflov
dent, let'em take another
ktion and spare us the j
turing
Second prize belong
whoever it was who first cla
the interests ot American :�
mocracy are served . -
American lives tor k u i
monarchs' comfort, since b)
mg vi "we're protecting our .
tal national interests
who started this one :�
probably either Bush or Bai - -
Sunurai or Cheney ?
or one of their innurm -
speechwriters, but ever
from senator Bob Dole to
Q Public hasparroted itb
f f's impress! veenouk"
on such short not � the
ncJrtifnrsrration coti'd find
a charming euphemtsn I -
"gaining more influenci
strategic raw materials
I dunno sav. oil ' (Th-
does not explain why y .
halt as much money and
power into researching
live energy sources is not
sidered to be similarly n tl
national interest Still
impressive is that, given tvs
See Manipulates page 5
Awareness key to ending crime
Bv Howard Clerv
and Connie Clery
fhc Collegiate Network
During the early morning
hours of April 5, l986,ourdaugh-
ter, Jeanne Ann, was tortured,
raped,sodomized and murdered
in her dormitory room at I.ehigh
University. Her killer wasa drug
�rtd alcohol abuser, a I.ehigh stu-
dent whom Jeanne had never met
1 le gained access to her room by
proceeding, unopposed, through
three propped open doors, each
of which should have been locked.
He was convicted and sentenced
to death.
The aftermath of this crime
became for us a learning experi-
ence that changed our lives.
Welearned that institutional
response to such tragedies can
involve callousness, cover-ups
and stonewalling. Lehigh officials
publicly passed off Jeanne's tor-
turemurder as an "aberration
The college, in an ill-conceived
attempt to protect its image, pro-
duced a self-serving report, writ-
ten by one of its trustees, K.P.
Pendleton, which concluded that
there was no negligence on the part
of the university and that "our
present safety policies were com-
plete this, despite the
administration's knowledge of
prior violent crimes on the cam-
pus and that there had been 181
reports of propped-open doors in
Jeanne's dormitory in the four
months prior to her death.
We learned that crime on
campus was one of the best-kept
secrets in th ountrv I ntil I �
onl) tour percent of America s
colleges reported crime statistics
to the FBI, or generall) speaking
to students parents or anyone
else.
We learned that the true
picture of campus crime is star
tling, even horrifying In 1987, for
example, there were at least 31
murders, more than 1,500 armed
robberies and 13,000 physical as-
saults on college campuses na-
tionwide. A recent survey, cited
by the U.S. 1 louse of Representa-
tives, reported that 38 percent of
college women questioned had
either been raped or werv victims
of felony sexual assaults. The
latti-r takes on more ominous sig-
nificance in light of the fact that
the Center for Disease Control
reported in 1988 that one college
student in 300 is infected with
AIDS.
We learned, to our great re-
lief, that the law does not tolerate
willful indifference to the per-
sonal safety of college students.
After Lehigh had unilaterally
absolved itself of blame in
Jeanne's death, we had no choice
but to turn to thecourts, suing the
colleged for negligent failure of
security and failure to warn of
foreseeable dangers on campus.
In 1988 Lehigh settled with us
and agreed materially to enhance
security on its campus. We
founded, in living memory of
Jeanne, Security on Campus, Inc
the first national, not-for-profit
organization dedicated to the
prevention of criminal violence
� leges and to assisting
pus m tims nationwide
l Hir daughter died K
of what shedidn'i kno rhefirsi
major initiative of Security r
( ampus was to ensure that the
same fate did not befall other stu-
dents. In 1987 we began efforts
toward enacting laws requiring
colleges and universities nation-
wide to make available, to current
and prospective students, 000
plete information about violent
campus enmes and drug and al-
cohol offenses, and, in addition
to provide information about se-
curity procedures already in ef-
fect.
In October of this year the
U.S. Congress unanimously
passed a bill requiring all colleges
receiving federal funds to report
crime statistics.
Our credo is simple: crime
awareness can prevent campus vic-
timization This has been proven
to work in practice. Chief Michael
G. Shanahan of the University of
Washington Police Department
established in the late 1980s a
campus crime awareness pro
gram, including publishing sta
tistics in the student newspaper
By 1990 he was able to report that
violent crime had been reduced
by more than 50 percent, stating
"Much of the credit goes to the
community's increased aware
ness of crime
In 1989, weestablished,asa
part of Security on Campus, the
Campus Victims Litigation Pro-
gram. This, the first program ot
its kind in the nation, has devel
See Students, page 5
President Quayi
By Michael Albuquerque
Managing Editor
Last year can be described, at
best, with mixed reviews by liber-
als and conservatives alike. With
that in mind let's begin 1991 with a
look into the swami's crystal ball
hT a preview of what to expect
from the important dat and faces
of the new year
Ian. 15: (12:01 a.m.) George
Bushdeclareswaronlraq. In I
news, Vice-President Dan Quavle
and Secretary � I � �ense Richard
"Dick"henev both immediately
apply for hardship deferments
from the draft Aid - �. tell
both men that governm � �
cials Are aln a
draft.
Ian. Ik President Bu
his most recent campaign
premise bv saying, "Read mv lips
� no new war
Jan 17: City Council holds its
public hearing tor recommended
changes to the current noise
nance. Among the changes under
consideration an leclaring
' IreemriHeunder I mer-
gencv"until - m on ilmember
put it, we can figure out "w; al
do with al! these damr
kids"
� 2 in his continuing
' rtt ��. rid pieces
! mean p i � Fn siderrt '� .
i. alls Saddam Hussem - n her a
dirty skunk. That wacky Iraqi,
sddam. retaliates bv calling Bush's
mother (who incidentally is NOT
Barbara Bush; a broccoli-pushing
American housewife who lies
down with strange camels.
Feb. 3: Bush continues to
maintain his gut feeling that
saddam will withdraw from Ku-
wait before the Ian. 13 deadline
Feb. 15: After much debate,
both pubhclv and pnvatelv, Citv
Council announces its decision on
a revised noise ordinance Mayor
Nancy Jenkins announces that stu-
dents who are caught whispering
in public will get a "good spa -
ing" by the appropriate autr r
bes.
Feb. If Madonnaannounces
at a national press confena I I
she has decided to become a I
time rc-ident of Greenville, N.C ,
and begin whispering in public
V irch 5 After success:
completing their tour of Japar
year with the Rolling Stones, "The
Keating Five" (Sens. Alan
Cranston. lohn McCain, Dennis
DeConmi. lohn Glenn and Donald
Riegle Jr.) kick off their rtl
American tour with opening act
Milli and his lj
Vanilli
March 11
former-presid'
"to get to the a
ings and Loan
March 31
dares himself'
States
April 1 C
King Bu
chip :
for n i
Apr J
about hisp - I
lentC
1
Manipulates
Continued from
sec TJs. the same speaker to
igj r proclaim thai 'we're not
over there for oil were over
there to deter naked aggression
Of course we'remterested in de-
terring aggression � when that
aggression threatens our oil
supplv.anvway Wedon'tworry
SO much about aggression in the
Soviet Union, Ireland, El Salva-
dor and South Africa Hell, we've
funded "naked aggression" in a
few places, and actually carried
it out in others. But we always
find nicer words for it.
Last but least (drum roll,
please): the glorious first prize
and an all-expenses-paid one-
wav ticket to Oceania isa warded
to none other than George Bush,
for his claim that his reading of
the Constitution doesn't make
him think he needs Congres-
sional approval to enter into a
war. Isn't it amazing how cre-
ative "strict constructionists"
suddenly become when strict
construction is inconvenient7
Naturallv, Bush doesn't quite say
war" � he usually says some-
thing more like "send troops into
action But only a dolt could
fail to take his meaning.
Don't think it's a moot
point just because Congress gave
Bush the green light to wage war
against Iraq They did it late;
terribly late, longafter what they
said was all but academic. Con-
gress has proved increasingly
willing to cede power to the
president; it's already all but
abandoned its oversight role in
covert operations, and by not
star
tutionai n 1
on declarati i -
moment Bush fir -
at
effective! v
matter. Granting
the power to makj
war, as long as tu
the word is a dam
take the first step
World Order " BuJ
first president to
dering American ti
other troops is somj
policv and not w
Congress evident
won't be the last a
We won't havj
tionalCrisis (capital
the proper sense q
Doom) anv time
has the guts. And1
vou read this, it - r
sible the Persian G
already be a won I
into the Tersian (J
tion. In anv event,
good that we won'
morrow and find tl
pointed out by thia
turned the world if
But it's propd
alarmed when the
an ostensibly free
his country's higl
the while trying
country into war or
of half-truths and
Not to men
dangerous decepbl
lies: the ubiquitouj
ful, government-sp
phemism.





She JSaat(Carolinian JanuaryI 1S91 5
to top honors
ilso insisted it
�ongress to
upporl the
iii (.nit polk .
s w eek Saying
h to 5uppoii
th.it even
i gins sens
tatives should
and the desires
� � ptv �ple ho
� i. i ongresscan
the presi
�ther week's
us the pos
I � longs to
first laimed
� merican de-
rved by trading
for Kuwaiti
� � � since bv do-
ting our vi
l forget
one it was
! Baker or
. or Par man
� umerable
everyone
le to John
tb) now
� lughthit
the Bush
�' ' ' id MK'h
ism tor
� � ��hi' oer
terials like, oh
� phrase
� , putting
ind man
a!t"rna-
is rot con-
in the vital
Mill more
en twenty
Manipulates page 5
nding crime
i sting caw
i because
1 rhefirsl
� urity on
. t mre that the
tbel .II other stu-
?87 v began efforts
I iws requiring
d universities nation-
- -ailable, to current
e students, com-
n about violent
� and drug and al-
and, in addition,
rmation about se-
� i lures already m ef-
� berol this year, the
unanimously
� .uring all colleges
ral funds to report
-
' lo is simple: enfflf
m in � - tni campus vic-
� � Ihis has been proven
rkii ra. licehief Michael
(I Shai ahan ot the University of
' Police Department
established in the late 1980s a
campus rrime awareness pro-
cram, iih hiding publishing sta-
tistics in the student newspaper.
By 1991 he was able to report that
violent crime had been reduced
by more than 50 percent, stating:
Much of the credit goes to the
community's increased aware-
ness of crime
In 1989, we established, as a
part of Security on Campus, the
�profit Campus Victims Litigation Pro-
tO the gram This, the first program of
i fence its kind in the nation, has devel-
See Students, page 5
udents
iterally
I me in
I' hi
ingthe
lilure of
arn of
lam pus
� ith us
Enhance
Is We
"iorv of
his. Inc ,
Quayle, King
By Michael Albuquerque
Managing Editor
l-ast year can be described, at
best, with mixed reviews by liber-
als and conservatives alike. With
that in mind let'sbegin 1991 witha
look into the swami's crystal ball
for a preview of what to expect
from the important dates and faces
of the new year.
Jan. 15: (12:01 a.m.) George
Bush declares war on Iraq. In other
news, Vice-President Dan Quayle
and Secretary of Defense Richard
"Dick" Cheney both immediately
applv for hardship deferments
from the draft Aides quickly tell
both men that government offi-
cials are already exempt from the
draft.
an. Irv President Hush reiter-
ates his most recent campaign
promise' by swing, "Read mv lips
no new wars
Ian. 17: City Council holds its
public hearing tor recommended
changes to the current noise ordi-
nance. Among the changes under
consideration are declaring
(Ireenville under a "stateof emer-
gencyuntil, as cmecoundlmember
put it. we can figure out "what to
do with all these damn college
kids
Feb 2: In his continuing el
fort toachieve world pieces oops!
I mean peace. President Bush
calls Saddam I lussein's mother a
dirty skunk That wacky Iraqi,
Saddam, retaliates bv calling Bush's
mother (who incidentally is NOT
Barbara Bush) a bnxxoli-pushing
American housewife who lies
down with strange camels.
Feb. 3: Bush continues to
maintain his gut feeling that
Saddam will withdraw from Ku-
wait before the an. 1? deadline
Feb. 15: After much debate,
both publicly and privately, City
Council announces its decision on
a revised noise ordinance. Mayor
Nancy Jenkins announces that stu-
dents who are caught whispering
in public will get a "good spank-
ing" bv the appropriate authori-
ties
Feb 16: Madonna announces
at a national press conference that
she has divided to become a full-
time resident of Greenville, N.C
and begin whispering in public.
March 5: After successfully
completing their tour of lapan last
ear with the Rolling Stones, "The
Keating live (Sens. Alan
Cranston, lohn McCain, Dennis
DeConini, lohn Glenn and Donald
Kiegle r I kick off their North
American tour with opening act
Milli and his lip-syncing partner
Vanilli.
March 11: Congress tells the
former-president's son, Neil Bush,
"to get to the bottom of this Sav-
ings and Loan mess
March 31: President Bush de-
clares himself "King of the United
States
April 1: Congress impeaches
King Bush and declares Quayle
ring to Saddam Hussein or King
Hussein of Jordan, Quayle replies,
"The one in the Middle East
April 29: At his first annual
State of the Union Address, Bart
Simpson tells Saddam "not to have a
cow, man (And you thought all
that Garficld stuff was getting old.)
May 7: FantasticStrip-O-Gram
Inc. hires an out-of-work Margaret
Thatcher for fantasy dances with a
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president In the nationally tele-
vised inauguration later that day,
President Quayle says. "This 13 al-
most as exciting as the chocolate
chip birthday cake my wife baked
for me this morning
April 2: Asked by reporters
abou t his position on the Gulf War,
President Qua vie sivs. "Hussein is
a very, very, very bad man When
questumed whether he was refer -
pohtical theme.
May 11: Bush declares himself
"King of the Britons
Mav 23: President Mikail
(iorbechev categorically denies re-
ports that the Soviet Union is on the
brink of an internal conflict reminis-
cent of the American Civil War.
June 1: Congress announces
that the federal budget may need to
be re-balanced and have its tifrs ro-
ta ted becau se it veers a li rtle bi t to
the left. General Dynamics
quickly announces that it has
$7,000 mufflers which the gov-
ernment can purchase for half
price.
June 18: President
Gorbechev survives unscathed
after an assassination attempt by
John Wilkes Booth IV at the reno-
vated Ford's Theater in Wash-
ington, D.C.
June 26: Manuel Noreiga is
released from prison early for
good behavior.
July 4. The United States
celebrates its 213th birthday with
a Fantastic Strip-O-Gram from
Congress featuring Maggie
Thatcher
July 8: George Bushdeclares
himself "Queen of France
July 17: Neil Bush finds th
Neil Bush did "absolutely noth-
ing wrong when Neil Bush was
in charge of getting to the bottom
of the Savings and Loan mess
August 15: Harvey Gantt
demands and recount of last
year'ssenatorial race against Jesse
Helms. The U.S. Census Bureau
steps in to recount the ballots.
August 21: Noreiga enrolls
at ECU as a "nontraditional
freshman student
Sept 4: George Bush de-
clares himself "Kingof the Hill
Sept. 19: The Census Bu-
reau declares the Gantt-Heims
race a tie with both voters split 1 -
1.
Oct. 31. Greenville Police
arrest over 6,000 ECU students
for failure to trespass � no, as-
sault with intent to disperse �
well, something like that, al-
though they're not sure yet.
Nov. 2: City Council de-
clares Halloween an "over-
whelming success" and an-
nounces plans to build more cor-
rectional facilities. "We're hop-
ing our future jails can be mod-
eled after the finest in the state �
Greenville one councilmember
says.
Nov. 5: Jesse Helms and
Harvey Ganlt step up their politi-
cal campaigning around the state
bv avoiding the issues and chal-
lenging each other to an arm-
wrestling contest.
Nov. 20: George Bush de-
clares himself "Duke of Earl
Dec. 3: Prior to final exams,
Noreiga is charged with drug
possession in Scott Residence Ha 11
bv Greenville Vice.
Dec. 31: George Bush de-
clares himself "King of Beers
Manipulates
seconds, the same speaker will
eagerly proi laim thai "we're not
over there for oil; we re over
there todeter naked aggression
Of course we'reinterested in de-
terring aggression � when that
aggression threatens our oil
supply, anyway We don't worry
so much abou t aggression in the
Soviet Union, Ireland, El Salva-
dor and South Africa. Hell, we've
funded "naked aggression" in a
few places, and actually earned
it out in others. But we always
find nicer words for it.
Last but least (drum roll,
please): the glorious first prize
and an all-expenses-paid one-
way ticket toOceaniaisawarded
to none other than George Bush,
for his claim that his reading of
the Constitution doesn't make
him think he needs Congres-
sional approval to enter into a
war. Isn't it amazing how cre-
ative "strict constructionists"
suddenly become when strict
' construction is inconvenient?
Naturally, Bush doesn't quitesay
"war" � he usually says some-
thing more like "send troops into
action But only a dolt could
, fail to take his meaning.
Don't think it's a moot
point just because Congress gave
Bush the green light to wage war
against Iraq. They did it late;
terribly late, longafter what they
said was all but academic. Con-
gress has proved increasingly
willing to cede power to the
president; it's already all but
abandoned its oversight role m
covert operations, and by not
Continued from page 4
standing up tor its clear Consti-
tutional responsibility to decide
on declarations of war from the
moment Bush first putiliclu sneered
at that authority, Congress has
effectively castrated itself in this
matter. Granting the president
the power to make and declare
war, as long as he doesn't use
the word, is a dangerous way to
take the first step into a "New
World Order Bush is not the
first president to claim that or-
dering American troops to fight
other troops is somehow foreign
policy and not war. Thanks to
Congress'evident cowardice, he
won't be the last, either.
We won't have a Constitu-
tional Crisis (capitalized to strike
the proper sense of Impending
Doom) any time soon. Nobody
has the guts. And by the time
you read this, it's remotely pos-
sible the Persian Gulf Crisis will
already be a won war turning
into the Persian Gulf Occupa-
tion. In any event, the odds are
good that we won't wake up to-
morrow and find the hypocrisy
pointed out by this column has
turned the world upside down.
But it's proper to become
alarmed when the president of
an ostensibly free country skirts
his country's highest laws, all
the while trying to goad his
country into war on the strength
of half-truths and outright lies.
Not to mention a more
dangerous deception than the
lies: the ubiquitous, all-power-
ful, government-sponsored eu-
phemism.
Students
Continued from page 4
oped a database of case law in civil
actions bv victimsofcampuscnmes
and victims of administrative
cover-ups of such crimes.
This, and other legal informa-
tion, is available to victims them-
selves, their attorneys and to all
other parties who wish to do
something constructive about pre-
venting campus crime.
We are convinced that much
of the current epidemic of campus
crime and violence can be curtailed
and we intend to continue our ef-
forts to this end
We can do nothing less in
memory of Jeanne.
(Distributed by the Collegiate
Press, a program of the Madison Cen-
ter for Educational Affairs)
So, what if we win?
By Tim E Hampton
Editorial CohimnUl
Barring an eleventh-hour miracle tonight, the inevi-
tability of war � or what Joyce calls ineluctable modality
� is to occur under the year's first New Moon.
Whether it be editors, managers or presidents, it
seems everybody is hung up on this deadline thing. We
are not a patient people, the most immediate item � like
a fast food cheeseburger � is to get Saddam and his boys
out of Kuwait and then worry about the complications �
like indigestion � later.
Critics argue that the United States would lose
respect by backingdown from the midnight deadline, but
there is more than respect to lose if we win.
What if the night-vision equipped United Nation
forces wipe-out Iraqi strongholds tonight, paratroopers
are able to place Bagdad under siege and accomplish
Washington's intention: kick Saddam's can? Backed by
the technologically advanced weaponry of the United
States, the U.N. forces are the favored team.
What if all of the above can be achieved in a 24-hour
span for the incredibly low, low price of 10,000 lives and
$10 billion?
But wait, that is not all. Not only will we capture the
madman, make the Iraqis get out of Kuwait and diffuse
Iraqi's nuclear capabilities, but we will also receive the
unadulterated hatred from most of the Arab world.
A U.N. victory, tomorrow, a week from tomorrow
or three months from now, will not be the end of U.S.
diplomatic problems in the Middle East. Instead, a win by
the U.N. forces will only serve to increase tensions as
Westerners once again attempt to place Western values
on a very Middle-Eastern people. It would be like an
uninvited frat boy living in a dead-head house: the ide-
ologies tend to cause dissent.
Once we have Saddam, extradite him to Florida to
share a prison cell with Manuel Noriega, tnen what do we
do?
Some 13 months since American troops invaded
Panama, political and economic chaos � marked by
uncertain political partiesand staggering unemployment
rates� still run abound in theCentral American country.
Granted, the objectives were achieved � Noriega was
jailed and illicit-drug prices in Greenville inflated three-
fold � but U.S. troops are still there and the road to
stability is no where in sight.
Unlike Panama, American and other Western troops
will not be welcomed in Iraq. In a land where Old Glory
and effigies of Bush are burned daily, UN. forces will
have an ambitious task of quelling unrest in the country
of 19 million Iraqi citizens.
Moreover, these people are not immune to war on
their soil, they fought Iran for eight years in which over
250,000 Iraqis were killed, and now they have prepared
for the worst.
After the hypothetical fall of Iraq,a continuing U.S.
presence will almost certainly be required by President
Birsh. The multi-national Arab brethren will almost cer-
tainly raily around the anti-Western sentiments whictn
run fervent throughout the region, to unite against the
U.N perpetrators.
Also, fueled bv the unresolved Palestinian question
and resentment of Israel, the Arabs would probably
retaliateagainst Israel, prompting America toaid its step-
child.
Following several of these bloody scrimmages in
which U S. troops hvpothetically claim victories, we would
then have to establish a puppet government in Iraq �
maybe a Shah of Iraq.
Once the government is intact, it would still remain
susceptible to coup attempts, thus prolonging the U.S.
presence to safeguard Western interests, i.e. oil. �
The power vacuum remaining from the fall of Iraq
would lea ve Iran as the king of the hill in the Persian Gulf.
On the last count, Iran and the United States are far from
being best buddies Led by neo-Ayatolla fanatics, Irani-
ans are not quick to forget when the Shah was in power.
This is what we have to look forward to if U.N.
troops are fortunate enough to oust the Iraqis from Ku-
wait and topple the Saddam-led tyranny. There will be no
laurels for the victors, just several more thrones in the
side, calling for more military uimmitment.
As we huddle in front of the tube tonight to witness
the 10-minute ticker on the war results, perhaps an old
Buffalo Springfield tune would be appropriate back-
ground music.
"Stop children, what's that sound?
Everybody look, what's going down
Letters to the Editor
Wasteful spending
at university must
be stopped by us
To the Editor:
"The economy is great
That's the biggest lie I've ever
heard in my life.
If this were so, why would
the library cut its hours so
drastically, why would the
pricesof things be so ridiculus,
why would taxes be outra-
geous, and why would the
"commoners" be living from
paycheck to paycheck? Why?
The officials of ECU must
think that the economy isokay.
Why else would they waste so
much of our money?
It is very nice to have the
royal pleasure to walk on that
a 11expensive" brick wall way
in front of the library that is
hardly ever open. But what in
the hell was wrong with
walking on the dirt that is un-
derneath that "stupid waste
of money?" I guess it was not
impressive enough for the
chancellor to show to all of
his important colleagues on
the days he actually goes
outside.
How about the walk way
in front of Umstead? What a
waste!
The chancellor even has
his very own parking space so
he will not have to walk across
the street from his mansion. If
students and teachers have to
walk, why shouldn't the
chancellor have to walk as
well?
1 wonder why he gets paid
a six-digit salary per year? He
is supposed to work for the
students, but yet he's never in
his office. What gives?
As quoted from the The
East Carolinian in the issue of
February 13, 1990, "The ath-
letes' rooms in Scott will re-
ceive new, movable furniture,
and the basement will include
a new carpeted and painted
vending area, study space and
television area These im-
provements were to take place
over this past summer.
First, only the athletes'
rooms were renovated which is
very much so discrimination.
Secondly, the lobby and
basement are the same as they
were left at the end of last se-
mester.
And as for the vending area
in the basement, I have yet to
see a candy bar come out of a
washing machine.
These statements made by
the housing department to the
paper are outright lies. These
people should become politi-
cians.
When I called the housing
department about the rest of
the rooms in Scott, they said
that they had run out of money.
How did they put up all of
those expensive lights on Col-
lege Hill around the residence
halls? I think they want to make
daytimea 24-hour affair around
here. It was bright enough on
the Hill before the spotlights
were added. Such a waste!
1 saw another case of waste
when I left the library on Sat-
urday at closing time, 4 p.m
as I walked through Rawl to
get to Austin. Even though I
saw no one else in the building,
the whole hallway was lit with
lights. This occurs throughout
the week as well. The lights
should be turned off in class-
rooms that are not in use.
If you like what's going on
around this place, be happy,
don't speak up and let's con-
tinue our downhill course.
If you can't stand the
present situation, speak up,
and let them know you're
(mad).
As for the rest of Scott Hall,
1 expect the rest of the rooms
to be renovated during the
summer of 1991.
Ronald Mercer
Chemistry
Sophomore





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a
aHie Ca�t (Carolinian January 15, 1991
Draft
Continued from page 1
emption releases men from (hew
obligations to serve.
Conscientious objectors will
serve in a manner that is consistent
with their belief s. They may serve i n
a noncombatant role, or in a 1 vil ian
Job which assists the war effort.
Once they have been notified
by the service, a man mav ask his
local draft board to classify him as a
conscientious obje�:tor. The board
will postpone the man's toductkwi
while they judge the validity of the
man's claim.
In order to qualify as a con i
enttoua objector, a man must be
Opposed to participation to all wars,
n ot a selective objection toa particu-
lar war. Their beliefs must be reli-
gious, moral or ethical in nature, as
opposed to beliefs based on politics,
expediency or self-interest.
Hardship cases �� sole family
supporters, for example�will have
their service deferred. National
(.tiard or Reserve members will be
t l.issititAl separately and may have
to serve. Ministerial students will be
deferred until they graduate. Cler-
gy men mav lv exempt from service.
College students who pass their
physical examination can apply at
their local draft I oards for a post-
ponement that w dallowthemto
finish their serr r or academic
year as a studem
Certain elected officials are ex-
empt from service for as long as they
hold their office.
Veterans, aliens and dual na-
tionals are generally exempt from
service.
Samuel Lessey, the national
director of the selective service sys-
tem, said in a press release that he
has.no indication that a draft is
needed. Lessey said defense policies
formed in the early 1970s made the
National Guard and Reserve Forces
the primary source of manpower
for active forces.
The system is designed to be
mobilized 13 days after Congress
approves a draft. The system could
call up as many as 100,000 men in
the first 30 days.
There are 14 million men reg-
istered with the selective service
nationwide. In North Carolina
374340 men gistered.
East Carolina
Coin & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
DIAMONDS
STERLING
SILVER
TELEVISIONS
GINS
JEWhLRY
GUITARS
COINS
CAMERAS
STEREOS
O )RNER OF lirm AND DICKINSON
GREENVILLE
Forum
Hair on 5th
(Formerly Hair b Rvcke)
HTflflat Am or 'I tun ai 7S2-606U
wet cuts 110.00
Walk in s welcome
Comer of 5ih & Cotanche
(201 E5th Street)
Tanning beds
1.UIV perms, vorulihoning, coloring
'Jn
C m � '�
Continued from page 2
goals.
These worksheets wen
presented to Dr. James Jotm s who
presented a synthesis address i
the goals or outcomes of neel
ing at the Tuesday morning ses-
sion.
Most of the goals had to do
with improving education, not
only in thepublic schools but also
in teacher education.
Flowers said one mainprob-
lem was the tracking c�t students
Manv felt that the potential of
young people is not being de el
�ped because studentsaregrouped
by ability at such young ages. I or
manv students a labelI 'slov
becomesa self-fulfilling pro �ho
Mentoring systems area
Hon that communities hop� will
help to reach young people
region. Fearing explained
mentoring systems bring togetTH r
role models who would take a
personal interest in children.
She added that the
Friends program, which re
received an award from the
Governor's office, is a model of a
successful mentoring s st.
Many participants tdt t!
school system could be improved
by greater involvement with par
entsand private businesses. "With
the help of industry at the upper
levels of the high school grades
we would make sure that our I
drendeveloped marketable! i-
.Jonessatd. �
�infianif laafdniiiiii i in i
�ffetno 1rVrp1H�rl.f1rfe 1rf� K
Many felt that overcomii
problemsotapathv, greed and I k
of commitment would h- tin
difficult.
"There was a rein.a I-
sensus that we have tl
withal to solve these pi
ourselves Jones said
Many cited E I
communitv leader- t
J
eastern North Caroiii
sources and support in i� h
the goals of the forum.
Jones tied up the spirit
forum in the closing of his spei
when he said: "It we follow
through with thegoalsestablishod
through this forum, our children
can say Tm only one but I'm not
alone. My finest day is yet tin-
known. I want to lx- thivrrv b� - I
I want it all, no time for loss vt
laid the plans now ;av the chance
here in my hands. 1 want one mo-
ment in time when I'm more than
1 thought I could be You are a
winner for a lifetime if you seize
thatonemoment in timeand make
it shine
The community leaders in-
volved in the forum how have the
Job of trying to produce programs
mat will meet the goalsestablished
at the forum. A newsletter will be
published detailing efforts being
made throughout eastern North
Carolina.
Test your book cents
Twins
Continued from page 1
A semester later, Lvn.enrolled
at ECU for its medical program
If called to active duty, the two
would be assigned to guard pris
(duringa military action Both
i are trained as medical spe-
cialists in their guard. Asof yet, their
battahon has not been placed on
alert, but both girlsknow that atany
they could be called and are
� for duty if necessary.
"I wanted to finish the (fall)
�atECU LawsNow
I'm prepared to do whatever I have
todo
Lee, on the other hand, seems a
Mile less anticipant. She knows her
parents are going to be worried,
wMchconcemsher,but said "If Igo,
I go. Jm ready
Most of you have enjoyed a nice, long break and are a little rusty
on quizzes, so in the public interest University Book Excb offers
this semesterwarm-up for Text Buying 101:
? 1. Used textbooks save you 25 over the cost oj new texts, and have the same
resale value as new books.
TRUE. Shop early for used texts, right after you go to class.
Check out UBE 's big supply of used books. Used books sell out a few-
days into the semester, so hurry! Who knows, in addition to saving some
money you may get some great liner notes and a hot phone number!
?2. You have to wait in linejor hours to buy your books.
FALSE. The best time to buy your texts on the first days of classes
is early morning, around noon, or at night. If you brave peak book
rush between 2:30 and 430 on the first three days ot classes, you may
have to wait in line 30 minutes or more.
v
�5'
to
N
Peace on earth?
Jill Ocr
Following a Congressional vote Saturday more
marched tor world peace, just as these people a
Thursday
UMtlfyou buy th'pmong text, ycni'fe stuck with it until you scalp it to next
year's freshmen.
FALSE. To get a full refund when you buy the wrong text, return
it to the store of purchase within two weeks after the start of classes.
Do not write in or mark a new text unless you are sure it's the correct
title, because texts with ink are not new anymore and do not rate a
full refund.
Q4 Sell back your books as soon as you finish yonrfinals.
TRUE. Don't wait for the ink to dry in that bluebook-drag
� yourself in to sell us your texts. If you wait until after exam period,
UBE may be overstocked and you may get less money. But don't be
too early: if you try to sell in mid-semester or out of session, buy-
back lists may not be available.
?5. There's a group of deviant eggheads who steal books, and if they get yours
you'll never see them again
FALSE. Most people steal books to sell them, not read them. If
your books are stolen, contact UBE. Usually your books can be
recovered if you report the theft immediately.
There's a whole lot more to UBE than books. We carry a great
line of athletic wear, school supplies, greeting cards, dorm do-aads,
and the world's largest selection of ECU memorabilia. All for you.
The East Caroliniai
is now accepting applicati
� Editorial Production Ma
� Copy Editor
Apply m person at The East Carolinian � sec
Publications Building (across from Joynt
� Deac' -e 'o- ass ca:o-s s 5 o r� Jar

ihe
Wednesday
WZM
Proaresssive Dance
introducing
.10 9 oz. Dr
1.15 Tall Bo!
1.00 Kamika;
Ladies Free til
UNIVERSITY
Frame Shop
and
Art Gallery
(919) 752-46X
520 S. CotwcheSt
oreer.wli. NC 27858
SPECIA1
� posters
� limited editj
� custom fran
� creative ma
� pottery
� jewelry
� original art
�Art Majors �
Check with us about puttj
your art work in our gall
on consignment.
New Hours
Mon - Thurs 9-6
Friday 9 - 5:30
Saturday 10-5
�Student
square
circle opej
(if you dnj






)
I
8
Jljc lEaet(Xarolinian January 15, 1991
Draft
Continued from page 1
emption releases men from u
obligations to serve
Conscientious object i
serve in a manner th.it is a '
with their beliefs. They ma;
a noncombat.int role, or m
job which assists the tvai
Once they have been
by the service, a man m.n a V
local draft board to dassil
conscientious objectoi I
will postpone the man s indu
while they judge the validity i l
man's claim.
In order to qualify as a
ii u
entknis objector, a man must be
ipposed to participation toal wars,
n � aselet tiveobjectiontoa particu-
n llu ,r beliefs must be reli-
�ral or ethical in nature, as
- d to beliefs baaed on politics,
i sell interest.
p cases sole family
� i 'i example willhave
ervice deferred. National
ill Reserve members win be
ified separately and may have
Ministerial students will be
� until they graduate. Cler-
ew mptfrpmservke.
College students who pass their
physical examination can apply at
their local draft 1 oaricts for a post-
ponement that w d allow them to
finish their sen r or academic
year as a student
Certain elected officials are ex-
empt from service for as long as they
hold their office.
Veterans, aliens and dual na-
tionals arc generally exempt from
service.
Samuel Lessey, the national
director of the selective service sys-
tem, said in a press release that he
has no indication that a draft is
needed. Lessey said defense policies
formed in the early 1970s made the
National Giard and Reserve Forces
the primary source of manpower
for active forces.
The system is designed to be
mobilized 13 days after Congress
approves a draft. The system could
call up as many as 100,000 men in
the first 30 days.
There arc 14 million men reg-
istered with the selective service
nationwide. In orth Carolina
374540 men gistered.
Kast Carolina
Coin & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
DIAMONDS
STERLING
fS SILVER
TELEVISIONS
GINS
JEWELRY
Gl ITARS
COINS
CAMERAS
STEREOS
I 752-0322
( ttNER OF IirTH AND DICKINSON
GREENVILLE
n
Hair on 5th
Forum
Continued from page 2
goals.
These workshei I
presented to Dr. latin
presented a synthe;
the goals or outcomes i l
ing at the Tuesday rw
sion
Most of the goals
with improving edui it
only in thepublic scho
in teacher education
Flowers said one
lem was the tracking l
Main telt that the
young people is not bt ii
oped because student;
by abilitv at sin. h you
many students .1 lab
becomes a x-it fulfi lii
Mentoring s stem; 11
tKn thai communitu
help to reach young peo
region. Fearing explau
mentoring systems bring
role models v ho woul
personal interest in
She added thai
Friends program,
received an award fi
Governor's office, is a m
successful mentoring s
Many partk ipantsfe
school system could be ii
by greater involverrv nl
entsand private bli-
the help of industry at t
levels of the high sv in ,
we would make sun
dnendevetoped mark tal
Jones said
Groups listed nwm
tier to implem?V.ri'r r�
Manv felt that ovi i
probiemsofapath .
of commitment wo i
difficult
"There was an 1
�emus that we ha
withal to Solve the;
ourselves, ones ii
Manv cited I (
communitv lead
eastern Northai
sources and suppoi t :
the goals of the forum
Jones tied up th
forum in the closing of I
when he said. It
through with thegoa!
through this forum i
cansav Tmonl) on butl'i
alone. My finest da) is
known 1 want to be the.vervb
I want it all, no tune fi i less I . i
laid the plans now lay thc( I n
herein my hands. I want on n
ment in time when I'm more than
1 thought I could be . You are a
winner for a litetmi. if you 51
thatone moment in time and
it shine
The community leaders in
volved in the forum now have the
fob of trying to product programs
��twill meet the goals established
at the forum. A newsletter will In-
published detailing efforts being
made throughout eastern North
Carolina.
i Former!) I lair by Ryckej
LunutLl Aim ii loni.ii '52-6060
wet cuts $1(1.00
Walk in s welcome
( orner ol 5th V Cotanche
201 E 5th Street)
Tannins beds
perm;
' .
our book cents.
.���
�.tablish
Twins
Continued from page 1
A semester Liter, Lynenrolled
at ECU for its medical program
If called toactivedutv the two
would be assigned to guard pris
oners during a military action lVth
women arc trained as medk al s x
dalistsintheirguard Asotet,their
battalion has not been placed on
aJert,butbothgirlsknowlhatatanv
time they could bo called am) are
ready for duty if mcemuy.
1 wanted to finish the (fall)
semester at ECU Lyn Mid. "Now
I'm prepared to do whate er I have
to do
Lee, on the other ha nd, seems .1
Httle less anticipant. She knows her
parents are going to be worried,
which concerns her, but said "If I go,
I go. I'm ready
Most ot you have enjoyed a nice, long break and are a little rusty
. ;i quizzes, so in the public interest University Book Ext! liters
this semester warm-up tor Text Buying 101:
Dl.C Jsed textbooks save you 25 over the cost oj new texts, and have the same
resale value as new hooks.
TRUE. Shop earlv tor used texts, right after you go to class.
Check out UBE s big supply of Used books. Used books sell out a few
days into the semester, so hurry! Who knows, in addition to saving some
money you may get some great liner notes and a hot phone number!
D2. You have to wait in line for hours to buy your hooks.
FALSE. The best time to buy your texts on the first days o classes
is early morning, around noon, or at night. It you brave peak book
rush between 2:30 and 4:30 on the first three days ot classes, you may
have to wait in line 30 minutes or more.
?3. you buy thefmmg text, you h stuck with it until you scalp it to next
year's freshmen.
FALSE. To get a Kill refund when you buy the wrong text, reuirn
it to the store ot purchase within two weeks after the start of classes.
1 )o not write in or mark a new text unless you are sure it's the correct
title, because texts with ink are not new anymore and do not rate a
Rill refund.
?4.5(7 hack your books as soon as you finish your finals.
TRUE. Don't wait for the ink to dry in that bluebook-drag
� yourself in to sell us your texts. If you wait until after exam period,
UBE may be overstocked and you may get less money. But don't be
too early: if you try to sell in mid-semester or out ot session, buy-
back lists may not be available.
?5. There a group of deviant eggheads who steal hooks, and if they get yours
you'll never see them again.
FALSE. Most people steal books to sell them, not read them. If
your books are stolen, contact UBE. Usually your books can be
recovered if you report the theft immediately.
There's a whole lot more to UBE than books. We carry a great
line of athletic wear, school supplies, greeting cards, dorm do-dads,
and the world's largest selection of ECU memorabilia. All for you.
Peace on earth?
Following a Congressional vote Saturd �
marched tor wena peace just ar �� � � peopk
ThursdoV


The East Caroliniai
is now accepting applicati
� Editorial Production Ma
� Copy Editor
Apply m person at The East Carolinian � sec
Publications Building ,across from Joyr
jeac �
Wednesda)
WZMf
Progresssive Dance)
introducing
.10 9oz. Dm
1.15 Tall Bo
LOOKamika
Ladies Free til
university
Frame Shop
and
Art Gallery
516 South Cotanche Street � Greenville, NC 27834
Largest selection of used
All for you.
� :�:
-biggest saving? for you!
52 46X
520 S Cotanche St
Greer.v.lw NC "?8S8
SPECIAL!
� posters
I � limited edit!
� custom Iran
� creative ma
� potter)
�jewelry
� original art
�Art Majors �
Check with us about puttj
your art work in our gall
on consignment.
New Hours�Student 1
Mon - 'rhurs 9-6square opt
Friday 9 - 5:30circle ope
Saturday 10-5(if you dr





8
LI?c tunt(Carolinian January 15, 1991
Draft
Continued Irom page 1
emption releases men
obligations to serve
Conscientious i bj
servo in a manner thai
with their beliefs l'l�
�noncombatant role
job which assists ihc ami
Once Ihey havi beei
bv the service i mai
local draft board t cla
conscientious objtx t
will postpone the mai
while they judge th
man's claim.
In order to qualih
Forum
Continued from pa
goals
These work
presented toDi
presented i s i
the goals or out
inp at the ruesdax i
sion
Most ol the
with impro inj
onh in the pul .
in teacher edui �
Rowers sa d
lem vis the tr.u kini
Mam felt that tl
young people i: n
op�l be .ins. tudeni
bv abilit) .it siii '
m.in studei I
becomesasi I I
Mentoni
Hon that conn
help to nn h vi
region Fearing i
montonm: sj stem
role models v. I
personal interi
She added I
Friends progi n
received an a
Governor's offi e, is a n
successful men I ri
Main part cipani
school s stem
bv greater ins
tntsand privat I
the help of indi i i
levels of the ! .
we would maki
drendeeli'P� di
Jones said
droups Iisku in.
tier to imp
Main felt "
problemsi taj I
ofcommitn � i I
difficult
"There w i
sensns that w� � �
with.il tosolvi
ourselves
Main v ited I l
communit) lead
eastern Nortl
sources and su
?he goals of thi I i
ones tied uj '
forum in tin .
when he said
through with tl -
through this fi :
can s,n
alone 1 tini I I
known I want I
I want it ail
bed the plans . .
here in my hands
ment in time whei
I thought I could h
winner tor a lifetimi
thatone moment ii
it shine
The communit.
volved in the forum
Jobof trvmg to prodm
that will meet th-
at the forum. A new
published detailii .
made throughout casl
Carolina
Twins
Continued from page 1
A semester later, I
at ECU for itsmedii
If called toai ti
would be assigm d
oners during i milit u
women are tran !
cialists in their guard A
battalion has not beei
aJert,butbothgirlskn .
time thev could be i
ready for duty it nei essai
"1 wantixl to timsh tin
semester at EG i
rn prepared to do what
lodo
Lee, on the other i �
Httlelessanticip.int She I
parents am going to tx
whkhconcemsher.butsi.t it
1 go. I'm ready
a ti
1-
1 l l II !
a man must Ih College students who passtheir
ripationtoall wars, physical examination can applv at
u bontoa particu- their local draft 1 -ards tor a post-
liefs must be reli- ponementthatw d allow them to
tl ical in nature, as finish their sen r or academic
� based on politics, year as a student
�It interest Certain elected officials are ex-
sole family empttromsorvicetoraslongasthev
cample willhave hold their office.
red National Veterans, aliens and dual na-
bersu ill be bonals are generally exempt from
ind m i) have service.
tudentswillbe Samuel l.essev, the national
� tduate. Cfer- director ol the selective service sys-
miservio tern, said in a press release that he
has no indication that a draft is
needed. 1 essey si id defense policies
formed in theearlv 1970s made the
National Guard and Reserve Forces
the primary source of manpower
for active forces
The system is designed to be 2�M
mobilized 13 days after Congress
approves a draft. The system ould
call up as many as UXl.lXV) men in
the first 30 days.
there are 14 million men reg-
istered with the selective service
nationwide. In North Carolina
374540men gistered.
East (Carolina
Coin & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
DIAMONDS
STERI ING
� SH UK
W TEI E ISIONS
Gl ns
II I IO
t.lll ks
tA- AMI RAS
STEREOS
752-0322
Hair on 5th
( ORNI ROF I0TH ND DICKINSON
,ki I ii I I
hornier!) rtau on kvo
; 1 ; I fin , ' '
wet cuts SKMK)
W r .��; mc
� of 5lh &. t itai '
201 I Ml Stl
Tanning beds
Test your book cents.
I
I
Most of you have enjoyed a nice, long break and are a little rust)1
i i quizzes, so in the public interest University Book Exc! �fTers
tin semesterwarm-up for Text Buying 101:
D . (Tsed textbooks save you 25 overthecost of new texts, and have the same
resale value as new hooks.
TRUE. Shop early for used texts, right after you go to class.
Checkout UBE 'sbigsupply of used books. Used books sell out a tew
days into die semester, so nurry! Who knows, in addition to saving some
money you may get some great liner notes and a hot phone number!
12. 'ou have to wait in line for hows to buy your hooks.
FALSE. The best time to buy your texts on the first days of classes
is early morning, around noon, or at night. It von brave peak book
rush between 2:30 .ud 4:3 I on the first three days of classes, you may
haw to wait in line 30 minutes or more.
. If you buy theivrono text, you're stuck with it until you scalp it to next
year's freshmen.
FALSE. To get a hill refund when you bin the wrong text, return
it to the store of purchase within two weeks after the start of classes.
1 )o not write in or mark a new text unless you are sure it's the correct
title, because texts with ink are not new anymore and do not rate a
hill refund.
C4. Sell hack your books as soon as you finish your finals.
TRUE. Don't wait for the ink to dry in that bluebook-drag
� yourself in to sell us your texts. It you wait until after exam period.
UBE may be overstocked and you may eet less money. But don't be
too early; if you try to sell in mid-semester or out of session, buy-
lu k lists may not be available.
-
-
-
i
-

T
-
����
?5. There's a group oj deviant eggheads who steal hooks, and if they get yours
you'll never see them again,
FALSE. Most people steal books to sell them, not read them. It
your books are stolen, contact UBE. Usually your books can be
recovered it you report the theft immediately.
There's a whole lot more to UBE than books. We earn a great
line of athletic wear, school supplies, greeting cards, dorm do-dads,
and the worlds largest selection of ECU memorabilia. All tor you.
All for you.
516 South Cx)tanche Street � Greenville, NC 27834
Largest selection of used books-biggest savings for you!
Peace on earth?
Folk ���
mar
Thui
The East Carcliniai
is now accepting applicati
� Editorial Production Ma
� Copy Editor
Wedno
WZMI
Progresssive Dane
introducing
.10 9oz. Dra
1.15 Tall Bo
1.00 Kamika
Ladies Free til
UNIVERSITY
Frame Shop
-
Art Gallerv
I
II
. I6X � 2 S xtondhe Si
wt v-�

SPEC1 l
sterji
� lim
� v usiom frai
� creative m�
� p itter)
� jewelr)
� original an
�Art Majors �
Ok;ck with usabout putt
your art workin our galh
on consigrtment
NewHours�Student I
Mon- l'hur9-6square Op
Eriddy 9-5:30circle ope
Satindav 10-5(if you dr;





I
i oliim
A
Hair on 5th
22
hods
V
s
� a .
X
sjL Y. J&m

gr?e gout CarolinianJanurary 15. 1991 9
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications for
� Editorial Production Manager
� Copy Editor
in person at The irolinian� second floor ot the
it'ons Building (across from Joyner Library
ryou.
ings for you!
Wednesda)
WZMB
Progresssive Dance Nigh!
introducing
.10 9o. Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
1.00 Kamikazees
Ladies Free til 10:30
U.N. leader loses hope of peace in Persian Gulf
WASHINGTON (AP) � Iraq's
rubber-stamp legislature Monday
unanimously backed Saddam
I lussoin's no-concession stand on
Kuwait with the blood ot the nation,
and UN. Secretary-General Javier
Perez de Cuellar said he had lost
hope for peace.
"Unfortunately, I don't see any
mom reasons to beoptimistic. I don't
see any reason to have real hope
the secretary-general said grimly
after meeting with President
Francois Mitterrand in Pans todav.
His 2 12 hour meeting with
Saddam in Baghdad on Sunday had
been considered the last best chance
to avoid an attack on Iraqi forces bv
the US-led multinational force
drilling on Saudi sands.
President Bush on Sunday
'ailed Iraq's apparent intention to
�ve troops in Kuwait beyond the
Puesday midnight EST withdrawal
deadline "a tremendous mistake
In Baghdad,Saddam said any "last
minute initiatives" for peace were
up to the United States
Across the world, prayers and
antiwar protests grew more pas
sionate. In the states that line the
'ersian Cult, residents stocked up
on provisions and sealed windows
and doors toprottvt against poison
gas attacks
Some people sought gas masks,
others hunted tor .1 flight � tut
Fearing the attack Iraq has
UNIVERSITY
Frame Shop
and
Art Gallery
' �. M '
�"otanch1 St
�le NC 27858

SPECIALIZING IN
� posters
� limited edition prints
� custom framing
� creative matting
� potterv
� C vdr
� original art
�Art Majors �
(!heck v ill) us about putting
youf art work in our gallery
on consignment.
.
New Hours
Mon - Thurs 9-6
I ruiav l - 5:30
Saturday 05
�Student Matt Cuts:
square openings $1.(K)
circle openings S3.(K)
(it ou draw them out)
Williamsbure
Manor
Apartments
Summcrtield
and
Brasswood
Available
Now
1 c: 2 bedroom
Energy efficent
Apartments v ith
washer and dryer
hook-ups.
Call
Aaron Spam
355-6187
756-8060
355-5006
Son No Pels
promised it it is struck, Israel called
up reserves and the United Nations
ordered the dependents of its staff
members to leave that country.
"The hope that I had is already
gone Perez de C uellar said after
his 45-minute meeting with
Mitterrand "I'm a diplomat but as
you can mv I'm going to be honest
and direct
le was als 1 s heduled to meet
with Foreign Minister acques Poos
ot I uxembourg, which holds the
rotating presidency of theEuropean
Community, and return to New
iirk later Monday to report to the
Security . ouncil.
Pen?zde( uellar said he thought
it was now too late tor any diplo
mark inihatn es
i or months, Saddam has sug
gested thai .1 peaceful settlement ir
the gulf could be linked toa Middle
Eastpea i o infereix e that addresses
the Palestinians' demands tor an
independent state on Israeli-occu-
pied land
Perez do u liar said he did not
brim; up the issue ot a Middle East
11 inter. 11, em his talks with Saddam
I le said t!i- ider "never
mentioned tru word withdrawal,
or it he mentioned the word, it was
not in the ensi 1 l beingprepared ti
w ithdrau
In Baghdad n �- 1 ol the
National ssembh shouted that
thev were willing to ba k Saddam
"with our blood, our S ' we are
ready to sacnfice for Saddam
The assembly speaker, Saadi
Mehdi Saleh. called Saddam 'the
knight of the.Arab nation" and said
the nation was behind him in his
showdown with "U.S.imperialism,
Zionism and Arab stooges "
The United Stateshascalled the
Iraqi claim th.it it seized Kuwait to
push tor a solution to the Palestin-
ian problem baseless, accusing
Saddamol seizing theemirate in the
Aug. 2 attack purely for his own
aggrandizement.
"A last-minute initiative is now
up to the Americans because they
are the cues now raising the slogan
of war Saddam said Sunday in
commentscarnedbvtheoitinal Iraqi
News Agencv.
Secretary of State lames A Baker
III was headed to Washington fol-
lowing a nine-dav 1 it with allies.
Baker, who wrapped up the tn .
Canada Monday, said he found all
12 leaders he spoke with remain in
support of the internatmn.il uiah-
tion against Iraq
Last week, the Senate voted 52-
47 and the House 250-183 to autho-
rize the use of force against Iraq
alter the deadline Defense Secre-
tary I �ii'k heney has said the
deadline expires at midnight EST
Tuesday
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ol more than N)0.(K)0 troops faces
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1MM' Dickinson enue
Mon-Sal 'am-5in





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price, you II be able to keep a hand on your budget
1111
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HE A
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f
!
12,
gtK taat (flaroltntan January 15. 1991
First lady Barbara Bush takes spill fjf
while sledding, breaks left leg
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
WASHINGTON (AP) � Bar-
bara Rush will be on crutches for
several weeks, nursing a broken leg
suffered when she slammed into a
tree while sledding with her
grandchildren at Gamp David, Md.
Hie 65 vcar-old first ladv re-
turned to the White House in a
wheelchair following the accident
Mrs. Bush "was going down a
hill that was very icv' on a plastic
inftet tube-type sled, spokeswoman
Anna IVnv said.
She doesn't know why he
didn't bail out She ust held on and
the next thing she knew, there was
the tree'
A presidentialdoctor. Lawrence
Mohr, chocked her cuts and bruises
and sent her off bv ambulance to a
Hagerstown, Md hospital, where
X ravs revealed "a non-displaced
fracture of the left fibula bone the
White House siid
The break was not severe
enough to require a cast, but the
doctors ordered the first ladv not to
put anv weight on her left leg for
several days.
Mrs. Bush had gone sledding
with 'resident Hush, several grand-
children and guests, including actor
Arnold Schwarzenegger, at the re-
tnit in Maryland's( atOCtin Moun-
tains.
Schwarzenegger, the former
Mr. Universe who is head of the
President's Council on Physical
Fitness, was a weekend guest at
CampDavid with his wife, journalist
Maria Shnver, and their baby
daughter
Doctors said the fracture would
t.ike five to six weeks to heal, Ms
Perez said, adding that Mrs Bush
wasexperiem 'ing some pain but did j
not require medication.
Goibachev denies
involvement in
Lithuanian assault
VILNIUS, I'SSR AL IVsi and gone back into iteStolinistshelV
dent Mikhail S Gorbachev s.nd British Foreign Secretary Douglas
Monday that a kxal military com Hurd told tin- British Broadcasting
mandor decided to use fonv in the orp
breakaway republic of Lithuania, in Ins comments to reporters
where an assault by Soviet troops on during a break al the Supreme Soviet
Sunday claimed M Im. legisktunnnMoscow (iorbai hevcHd
T1111 I . � � � . .
1 kffbachev Mid of the assault. "I
teamed only in the morning, the early
morning, when they got me up When
it happened, no one knew
i ithuania's foreign minister, who
is in Poland kvith instructions to form
a governmentinexileif Moscow takes
� the republii said the army is
taking control in tle Soviet I inJon
"In Vilnius. theSviotann � is the
t-nenn .nvl nobody knows who is
commanding it s,iul 1 oreign Minis
ter Algirdas Saudargas
Gorbachev said Sunday sassaull
i line atter a group of what he called
w t ifkersai 11 intellectuals had asked
the military cornrnandeT in Vilnius,
the hthuanian capital, to give us
protection
He appeared to be retemng to
opponents of Lithuanian indepen-
dence who have tormed a setf-de-
Janxl National Salvation Commit-
lee
Sunday sdeaths were the first m
the 1U month-old standoff between
the Kremlin and the republic of 3.7
million people, which was annexed
by the Soviet Union at the start of
World Warn
The Storming of the republics
mam broadcast facility provoked
harsh condensation from the United
States .md tlx' Europeanommu
nitv Westemgovi?mmentsexpress!ed
renewed concern ��ni.iy .tln'iit the
situation m Lithuania
l don't see how we could �on
tinue with the kind oi ptogrants ol
help lorretonn in the Soviet I nion
if the Soviet I 'nton has turned Itsback
��. � . i .i. . � . i
during his 10-minute conversation
with reporters, did he express regret
tor the deaths or explain why ho
waited until today too mment �n the
violeni c
rheotherBaltk republics atvia
and Estonia, braced Monday tor
possible crackdownsitizenssetup
barricades in the streets ol Riga, the
Latvtafi capital, .nx1 gathered to pro-
tect telephone ,iml radio buildings
Latvia's parliament met through the
night
In Lithuania Mi inday,thcstreets
werccjuict. and then publu closed its
schools to begin three days ol official
mourning
larlier Mondav, Soviet I defense
Minister I mitn YftSBOV atxl interior
Minister bons Pugo snd the ass.iult
was requested by the National Salva
tion Committee
Put m remarks to the Supreme
Soviet national legislature, neither of
them explained how the shadowy
committee had the authority to order
army Links and tr ips inti i action
Nvietinitnvvts thekt .Main!
Communist Party loyalists have also
seized a radio relay station, bringing
to eight tlie number of buildings oi
CUpted in ainl around Vilnius, snd
l Jthuanian parliament sp �k 5woman
Rita Dapkus
i �ipv snd heisstKxIordcrsearl)
today tkit t.inks m the its not usi'
their kveapons and tliat troops he
confined to barracks the defense
minister said he wanh i tanks rv
moui fmm thedovs ntownarea but
thai to nmn obw ts werebkx'kinc
Become a part of
the ECU media
f
Jp
'PLICATIONS ARE
CURRENTLY BEING
ACCEPTED FOR
PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR
THE SPRING SEMESTER
Stop by the Media Board office in the Publications
Building (across from joyner Library) for an
application or for more information.
ECU Student Union
Making Tf things Happen At ECU
WELCOME BACK!
Call the Program Hotline 757-6400 to find out what
the Student Union has planned for YOU!
HURRY
The deadline to sign up for the Spring Break Bahamas Cruise is Feb. I, 1991
Prices are $479.(X) for quad occupancy and $549.00 for double occupancy.
Transportation, accomodations. and meals aboard ship are included.
I'or more information contact the Central Ticket Office m Mendenhall.
DON'T MISS IT
Sponsored by the S.U. Travel Committee
! Movies This Week At Hendrix I ncatrc
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RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
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IS IN CLASS.
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I
I
V
)
Janurary 15.1991
uJljc ?Ea0t (Harultnian
13
The Rev Billy C Wirtz will be appearing at the Attic this Thursday
night in support ot his latest comedy release Backsliders Tractor
� Photo coon�sv ot M�rk Pucci �r�d Associate
Pull Appearing with Wirtz is his rowdy band ot nondenommationai
cut-ups which includes Ginger Snap and Mr Purvis I ee Rancid
God's homespun funnyman Billy CWiitz
schedules appearance at the Attic Thursday night
By Stuart Oliphant
-iMjnt tojtuto I dttoi
I oes Satan ha o ou in .1 sleeper hold ?
Does your toaster sing like johnny 1 ash?
Did your girlfriend just toll von let s be
friend ' Well novel rear rhr Re trend
BittyC Wirt and his First HouseofPolves-
tor Worship and Horizontal rhrobbing
reenage Desire have the spiritual euro to
heal what ails you As part ot Awesome
1991 Week this rhursda) anuary 17, Re
Wirti and his spiritual flock are scheduled
to make an appearance at the Attic So
prepare lo gather around the lava lamp and
listen to Re Wirtz s words ol inspiration
1tu.1lh Billy C Wirt iv not a revet
end but a clever Raleigh-based comedian
w ho does a marvelous no holds bar spool
ol inevangelical re ival Aspartofhistoui
in support ol his latest comedk release
Backslider's rractorPull Wirtz brings a
unique combination ol musu and corned)
to Greenville
pjHirug with Wirtz is a colorful en
murage that includes- vVtrtts wire, the
love)) Miss Ginger Snap hischoirdirector
Mr Purvis Lee Rancid; and the Fabric
Twins. Rayon and BarUon
Critics applauded Wirtz s first release,
Deep Fried and Sanctified Pet
magazineeven wont asfar to say that Wirti
is the "dixified answer to Weird At
Wirtz's latest release is no loss ol a
comedk masterpiece With material rang
ine from tho Norwegian folktale ol "Erik
the Red So me the immortal truck drivei
ot the heavens and ownei ol the alhalia
IruckStop to Burnie the Toaster .uu'ivi
common kid tun appliance who enjov
singing the musii ol country great lohnnv
Cash, Wirta is certain to attract national
attention
A a performer Wtrti ntiMxes off-beat
stage theatrics toenhance his special musical
talent According to Playboy magazine as
a climax to his act Wirtz unzips his pants
sticks his hand through his th and plays
red-hot pi.mo as the five-headed albino
snapping trouset trout
Wirt. s upcoming performance prom
ises to be a definite out ot the ordinan
event For tans ot live comedy at its best
Rev lill C Wirtz is a must see
The Bridge' pays
tribute to rock
legend Neil Young
By Matt King
1 Ntum Editor
Neil Young is one ot tho feu
enigmas in rock-and-roll who
deserves to be called a legend
rhrough the past three decades
he has managed lo generate legiti
mate roc musk in tho form ol
man) hybrids
He has weaved soulful songs
about personal tragedy, social
shortcomings, and even the rap
ot an entire culture (Cortea the
Killer) Young has done all this
and still maintained ha conscience
m lion ot enhancing his personal
worth; atn t sing in tor Bud, ain't
sun; in tor Miller
Maybe this is win Caroline
Records do ided toassembtesorne
of todays most promising artist
anil dedicate an album to Neil
Young bj covering some ol his
host musk Or, maybe they viid it
is K ause the music is so g,
In an) case 'the bridge a
tribute to ncil young w�s pro
duced and compiled "heresult is
an album w orth ot the man w ho
inspired it
N'ul Asylum took time from
tlu-s: nd the I lorse 1 ou luvic in
On' sessions tv cut the tirst track
on tho album 'Barstool Blues is
a gritt) sons about a Kir room
resident who eventually finds
himsdl too drunk to function
The Flaming Lips bring a spe
cial, hollow Mrt ot psychosis to
After me (.oldrush" a song that
was meant to relay the singer's
confusion When Wayne Coyne
sings. I was looking for a replace-
ment when the sun burst in tho
sk it paints a previse imago ot
the mental haziness that tho mam
1 hara. tei ot thesong isexperienc-
ing
! he irony in the song Cap-
tain Kenned) can be relayed in
t w t dines from the song; The wind
in the s,uls feels good, I hope that
w hen I get to shore I can kill good
1 hissongisabouta youngmanon
his wa to war via a sailing ship
His thoughts clntt between his
ow tuli lemma and his father's role
as the captain ot a ship in some
distant past The song tolls ,1 erv
identifiable ston. 1kk1 Sudden
sings as though he were a s.dt
sailor caught up in the spell ot the
Ml
i oop throws some extra
twang into "Cinnamon Carl a
song that lends itself to a broad
interpretation whore the guitar
part is ootm erned
1 he lead Bad Seed. N k k 1. ave
whose voice is usually hoarse and
See Young page 16
'Job: A Comedy of Justice'
confronts the traditional
religious framework
ECU dance instructor motivates
mind, body with lifelong passion
By Rich 1 ernan
Malt Wnloi
lob A Comedy ol Justice
published in luS4 is perhaps one ol
tho most thought provoking and
eontTouTssaiot Robert Heinlom s
novels
rhestor) centersarounda fun-
damentalist minister loander
1 lergcnaheimer raking a hohda
onacruiseship Alex swholeworld
suddenu changes around him lo
finds himselt on a slight)) different
ship aivl instead ot being a tutkia
mentalistmmistoi hebcCOmesAlec
Graham an underworld figure
Adding to the contusion, it
seems that he has become Involved
with Margrotho a stewardess on
the cruise hip
Ak' s world keeps changing,
world attor world after world.and
Man: rot ho always happens to be
with him whenever it happens. The
gist ot it is that ahw eh IC .od thinks
that ho has found another lob
someone that will serve him no
matter what ho does to him.
Towardstheend Ak'ahonts
Satan, only to loam that this time
the devil had absolutely nothing to
do with it.
Satan explains to Alex that,
"You are indeed another Job With
the original Job, I was one of the
villains This time I'm not. I'm not
proud of the fashion in which I
bedeviled Job. I'm not proud of the
fashion that I let my bmther Yahweh
maneuver me into doing his dirty
work-starting clear back with
MotherEveand before that in ways
I cannot explain. And I've always
been a sucker tor a bet. any sort ol
bet and I m not proud of that ei-
ther
Satan goes on to explain that
nxstot Alex seirorscomefiomthe
talso assumption that Yahweh is
sohuuyandaB powerful, something
that Yahweh active!) encourages
When in tact both Satan and
ahw eh are no mote than privates
to the comma nder-in-chiet. along
with all the other deities that exist.
including the Norse gods. Greek,
Egyptian, Oriental and etc That
behind every mystery lies another
m sterv infinite recession, and just
as we hac oui g�nJs. tho gds. in
turn, have theirs.
lnc controversial aspectsof this
hook are that all aheofteigpdt look
down On 1 ahw eh tor being so mse-
cure as to make his people praise
and worship him all day long and
then rum amand and chastise and
tost them to see just how faithful
thev are Like a child building sand
castles and populating them with
ants, then killing the ants for not
worth �pmg t ho boy. Yahweh, how-
ever, doesn't stop with just killing
his people for not doing exactly as
he commands, he wants to damn
them to an eternity of torture, too.
The God of Satan and Yahweh
doesn �demand anything, doesn't
want anything, doesn't expect any-
thing. Unlike Yahweh, He isn't in-
terested in that kind of bootlicking.
In the end it rums out that this time
it's loki (another God of equal
power) that Yahweh finds to do his
dirty work, and Satan takes Alex to
His God and tries to intercede for
See 'Job, page 15
By Michael Harrison
statt Urrfect
Some people are fortunate enough to work at
a job that ties into a personal lifelong interest East
Carolina dance instructor Patricia Weeks seems
to be such a person.
Weeks has turned a lifelong passion into a
career that suits her and her students perfect!)
Path Weeks was born in Washington State
� Pans anaaoj o m H�a Am Depn��
Patti Weeks, an ECU Dance instructor, has shared her
endearment for dance with ECU students for over a decade
(theyear was withheld which probabf) explains
the absence ot an accent When he w as l r years
old she moved to Mississippi, a place she simply
soid was vCT) different trom Washington
Once she finished high school (no war ot
graduation was given), she immediately entered
Mississippi State Universit) and rnajoted m soci
ofogy but continued to operate the dance studio
Atter Mississippi State. Weeks finally closed
the dance studio and entered graduate school at
Ioas Woman's I'm vorsitv. where
she got an MA in dance.
Atter college, she got a teach-
ing iohat Western Illinois Univer-
sity and Stayed then" tor one ear
Dance was part of the phvsical
education program, she said ki
mg that such a combined program
was. and still is, generally not artis
ticalK oriented.
She wanted mori1 security, she
added, and so she went to Utah
and oinod a Modern Dance pro-
gram as a student She worked tor
M.F A. in Modem Dance ami bo-
came a teaching assistant during
her second year there.
Weeks taught continuing edu-
cation at a children's behavior
therapy unit where she worked
with emotionally disturbed chil-
dren Dunng her stay, she incorpo-
rated some "dance therapy"
movements into behavior therapy
techniques.
Weeks especially enjoyed be-
ing able to perform for three years
with RDTToo, an apprentice com-
pany of Utah's Repertory dance
theatre, in Salt Lake City, while she
also worked as a waitress.
In 1980, Weeks came to East
Carolina University. "Money she
said encourages her to stay here.
See Dance, page 14
Teach for
America'
recruits top
students
By Amy Edwards
SUM Writer
I ducators across tho countn
haw been disturbed b the dechri-
mg numbers ot topcoBegestudents
who ciwse teaching as a earner.
Reasons cited tor this decline
according to the North Carolina
Department ot Public Instruction
(NCDPfX include low teacher pc.
lack of community respect foredu
Gators and the multitude ot other
professional opportunities avail
able
Despite these disappointing
reasons, educators aa- optimistic
saving that this trend is due to the
fad that perhaps no one has invited
them 10 consider the teaching pnv
ies.Nicn,according to X'CPPI mports
In addition, manv prestigious uni
ersitiesdo not have formal schools
of education or downplay educa-
tion degrees so much that manv
students do not consider teaching
as a professi �"
Boca. . : the crisis in educa-
tion and the teacher shortage,
Wendy Kopp, a 23-year old
Princeton University graduate,
founded Teach for America, a Peace
Corps-type program devoted "in-
fusing public education's under-
staffed and overburdened teaching
ranks with.devoted college stu-
dents" who might not have turned
to teaching otherwise, according to
Kopp.
Last vear. the pnvate, non-profit
See Tench page 14





I
Janurary 15.1991
(Blic iEast CUaruliniau
13
The Rev Billy C Wirtz will be appearing at the Attic this Thursday
night in support ot his latest comedy release Backsliders Tractor
� Photo courtesy of Mark Pucci and Associates
Pull Appearing with Wirtz is his rowdy band ot nondenonnnational
cut ups which includes Ginger Snap and Mr Purvis I ee Rancid
God's homespun funnyman Billy G Wirtz
schedules appearance at the Attic Thursday night
The Bridge' pays
tribute to rock
legend Neil Young
By Matt King
1 ejlures ditor
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant eatures ditur
! ocs Satan ha c v ou in a sleeper hold ?
Does your toaster sing like fohnnyash?
Did uiir girlfriend jut toll you "lei s be
friendsVV II never fear, the "Reverend
BtllvC Wlrfz and his-First House ot Polyes-
trr Worship and Horizontal rhrobbing
Teenage Desire have the spiritual cure to
heal what ails you. As part ot Awesome
1991 Week, this Thursday, anuary 17. Re
Wirt and his spiritual flock are scheduled
to make an appearance at the Attu So,
prepare to gather around the lava lamp and
listen to Rev Wirtz's wordsol inspiration
Actual!) Bill) t. Wirt is not a revet
end. but a clever, Ralcieh-hased comedian
who does a marvelous no holds bar spool
ol jne angelical revival As part of his tout
in support ol his latesl comedk release
Ba k slider s rai lor Pull, Wirtz brings a
unique combination ot music ami i omedv
to Greenville
Appearing with Wirt isa ci h rtt.l en
tourage that mehtdes: Wirtz's wife the
lovely Miss GingerSnap his choir director,
Mr Purvis Lee Rancid; and the Fabri
I Wins. Rayon and Banlon
. ritksapplauded Wirtz's first release,
Deep Fried and Sanctified " People
magazineeven went as tar to s.iv th.it Wirtz
is the "dixified answer to Weird 1
Wirtz's latest release is no less ol a
comedic masterpiece With material ram;
ine from the Norwegian folktale ot "Erik
tin
- M r
S i
ot th .i ens .i � i � � :
! ruck Stop, I � theToastei inotso
i ommon kit in n appltarn t t enjovs
singing the musk ol countn great lohnnv
Cash Wirtz is crtain to attract national
attt ntion
As a p�-rfom cr Wirt utilizes off-boa I
stage theatrii sto nhance his special musii al
talent . i ordtnj . . . magazine 'as
a climax to his act Wirt unzips his pants,
Sticks his iiand through his tlv and plays
red-hot piano as the five-headed albino
snapping trouser tro I
Wirtz s upcoming performant c prom
isi's u be a definite out ot the ordinary
evenl Foi fans ol live cornedv at its host
Rev bilk v Wirtz is a must see
Neil Young is one of the tew
enigmas in rock-and-roll who
deserves to be .ailed a legend
Through the past three decades
he has managed lo generate legit:
mate rock musk in the torm ot
mam h brids
He has vvcaved soulful songs
about personal tragedy, social
shortcomings, and even the rape
ol an entire culture c ortez tin
Killer) Young has done all this
and still maintained hisconsctence
in lieu ol enhan. ing his personal
worth ain't sing m for Bud ain't
sing in tor Miller
Maybe this i vvh v aroline
Recordsdei u!ii toassemWesome
ol todays most promising artist
and dedicate an album to Neil
Young b covering me ol his
best musk i hr, maybe thev did it
is beans, the music is so g(
In any case, "the bridge .i
tribute to neil young was pro
diued and compiled I he result is
an album worth ol the man w h i
inspired it
Soul As) hue took tune fr
� � And tin 1 krse ou R(
On' sessions to cut the first ti
the album Barstool Blues is
ntt song about a bar ;
resident who eventually finds
himsell too drunk to fuiH tion
The blaming 1 ips brine, a spe
cial, hollow sort ol psychosis t
�tter the.oldrush a song that
was meant to relay the singer s
confusion When Wayneoyne
sings i w as looking fora replace
ment when the sun burst in the
-kv it pamts .i pre. isc image ot
the mental haziness that the main
i hara. ter of thesongiscxperien
mg
c iroin in the song ap
tain Kenned) can be relayed in
� �� ��: the s. � I he Wind
in the sails fi elsgood, I hope that
when 1 gel to shore I cankillgood
This- iboutayoungmanon
his m i to � iir i ia a sailing ship
His thoughts .tritt between his
own dilemma and his father's role
as th captain ol a ship in some
distant past 1 he s ng tells a crv
identifiabk ton ikki Sudden
sings as though he wi n a siu
viilor caught up in the spell ot the
sea
: throws some extra
innamon arl a
� th it lends itselt to a broad
interpretation when the guitar
�; is cot erru d
Ihelead Bad Seed ,Nk k avi
whose voice is usually hoars ti I
� Young p Kje 16
'Job: A Comedy of Justice'
confronts the traditional
religious framework
ECU dance instructor motivates
mind, body with lifelong passion
By Rich Toman
Malt Writer
"Job i i hth dy ot ustice'
published i'1 1984 is perhaps one of
the most thought-provoking and
OOntr iversialofRobertA 1 leinlem's
rum Is
rix'storv centers around a fun-
damentalist minister. Alexander
Hergensheimer raking a holiday
on a. rui v ship. Alex's whole world
suddenly changes around him. He
finds himself on a slightl) different
ship aixl instead c�l being a funda-
mentalist minister he becomes Akx
Graham an underworld figure
delme, to the confusion, it
seems thai be has bet ome involved
with Margrethe a stewardess on
the cruise ship
Alex's world keeps changing
world after wi rld after world, and
Vlargrethe always happens to be
with him whenever it happens. The
gist of it is that Yah wohK ,od) thinks
that he has found another Job,
someone that will serve him no
matter what he does to him.
Towards the end Alex confronts
Satan, only to learn that this time
the devil had absolutely nothing to
do with it.
Satan explains to Alex that,
"You are indeed another Job. With
the original Job, I was one of the
villains. This time I'm not. I'm not
proud of the fashion in which I
bedeviled Job. I'm not proud of the
fashion that I let my brother Yah weh
maneuver me into doing his dirty
work-starting clear back with
Mother Eveand before that, in ways
I cannot explain. And I've always
Ixvn a sucker tor a bet. any sort ot
betand I'm not proud ol that ei-
ther "
Satan goes on to explain that
most of Alex s errors come from the
talse assumption that Yahweh is
soli tary and all powerful, something
that Yahweh actively encourages.
When in t.ut, both Satan and
Yahweh are no more than privates
to the Commander-in-chief, along
with all the i ither deities that exist,
including the Norse gods, Creek.
Egyptian, Oriental and etc That
behind every mystery lies another
mystery, infinite recession,and just
as we have our gids, the gods, in
turn, have theirs
rheamtroversialaspectsofthis
book are that all theother gods look
dov� mm Yahweh for being so inse-
cure .is to make his people praise
and worship him all d long and
then turn around and chastist and
test them to sv tust how faithful
thev are Like a i hild building land
castles and populating them with
ants, then killing the ants for not
worshiping theboy. Yahweh,how-
ever, doetn'l stop with just killing
his people for not doing exactly as
he commands, he wants to damn
them to an eternity of torture, too.
The God of Satan and Yahweh
doesn't demand anything, doesn't
want anything, doesn't expect any-
thing. Unlike Yahweh, He isn't in-
terested in that kind of bootlicking.
In the end it tumsout that this time
it's Loki (another God of equal
power) that Yahweh finds to do his
dirty work, and Satan takes Alex to
His God and tries to intercede for
See 'Job page 15
By Michael Harrison
Stjft Writer
'some people are fortunate enough to work at
a job thai ties into a personal lifelong interest. East
Carolina dance instructor Patricia Weeks seems
to be such a person.
Weeks has turned a lifelong passion into a
career that suits her and her students perfectly
Patti Weeks was born in Washington State
� Phoio courw�y ol tte Theare Arts Dp�T�nt
Patti Weeks, an ECU Dance instructor, has shared her
endearment for dance with ECU students for over a decade
(theyear was withheld i, which probabiy explains
the absence of an accent When she was 1? vears
old. she moved to Mississippi,a place she simply
said was very different from Washington.
Once she finished high s.huHl (no year ol
graduation was given), she immediately entered
Mississippi state University and majored in soci-
oiogy but continued to operate the dance studio
Atter Mississippi state. Weeks finally closed
the dance studio ,ud entered graduate school at
fexas Woman's University, where
she got an MA. in dance.
Alter college, she got a teach-
ing Kb at Western Illinois Univer-
sity and staved there for one vear.
Dance was part of the physical
education program, she said, add-
ing thai such a combined program
was, and still is, generally not artis-
ticalK oriented.
she wanted more security, she
added, and so she went to Utah
and joined a Modern Dance pro-
gram as a student. She worked tor
M.F.A. in Modern Dance and be-
came a teaching assistant during
her second year there.
Weeks taughtcontinuingedu-
cation at a children's behavior
therapy unit where she worked
with emotionally disturbed chil-
dren During her stay, she incorpo-
rated some "dance therapy"
movements into behavior therapy
techniques.
Weeks especially enjoyed be-
ing able to perform for three years
with RDTToo, an apprentice com-
pany of Utah's Repertory dance
theatre, in Salt LakeCity, while she
also worked as a waitress.
In 1980, Weeks came to East
Carolina University. "Money she
said encourages her to stay here.
See Dance, page 14
Teach for
America'
recruits top
students
Bv Amy Edwards
SU�t Writer
Educators across the countn
have been disturbed bv the declin
i ng numbers of topcollege students
who choose teaching as a career.
Reasons cited for this decline,
according to the orth Carolina
Department of Public Instruction
(NCDPI), include low teacher p. .
lack ot community respect foredu
Liters and the multitude �! other
professional opportunities avan
able.
Despite these disappointing
reasons, educators are optimistic
saving that this trend is due to tin
fact that perhaps no one has invited
them to consider the te.u hing pro
tession,according to NC DPI reports
In addition, many prestigious uni
versi ties do not have formal schols
of education or downplay educa-
tion degrees so much that manv
students do not consider teaching
as a profession
Boca. . : the ensis in educa-
tion and the teacher shortage,
Wendy Kopp, a 23-year old
Princeton University graduate,
founded Teach for America, a Peace
Corps-type program devoted "in
fusing public education's under-
staffed and overburdened teaching
ranks withdevoted college stu-
dents" who might not have turned
to teaching otherwise, according to
Kopp.
Last year, the private, non-profit
See Teach, page 14





Janurary 15. 1991
3ifc lEaHt (Harulinian
13
The Bridge pays
tribute to rock
legend Neil Young
K Matl king
I ejlure�i Jitor
Photo rourPsv o M.trk PuCCi a,( Assoc idtp
rhel
nkjl '
� appearing at the Atli this Thursday Pull Appearing with Wirtz i hi: rowdy I n I I
omed) �� ea i Ba ksliders fractor it u n hii ide; iingei ! i � md Mi Pi
� itional
Ran I
God's homespun funnyman Billy CWirtz
schedules appearance at the Attic Thursday night
: ing is i 'in- ol the few
enigmas in rock and roll who
desei '� � t. � be i ailed a legend
I hrough th past three decades
h has managed ti i generate legiti
mate r� � k musu in the t. irm i l
mam h brids
1 le has wca � d soulful sone
about personal Iragei l o lal
shortcmings, and even the rapt1
ol an entin iltun ortez the
Killer) Young has done .ill this
and still maintained his( ons ii i
in lieu ol enham ing his pei
worth; ain i sing in f r Bud ain t
sing in for Miller
Mavtx �� � h I ai ii �
:� lti t assemblesome
' ' '� � � promising artist
:� � in album to v
� � . ring mi
� � � �: isk Oi mav be the did it
c the musii �� .�
� ii , � the bndj
I I.Thei
f the
. � lit
. .
nd thel i. rse � �� i
� ; � ions to cut the tirst ti
n th( : : Barsl Blu
. � � � . - n ib �' i I i �
resident wh eventualh finds
himsell too drunk to tuncti n
rhel laming I ips bring a spi
� i.iI hollo �� ' I '
Aftci the ildrush i soi
i me ml �� relav � i �
i onfu ioi �'� �'� � i
��'�; � �
,K : �

I lull.i I � �' i � ; i ' �
ing
. . . nj . .
tain F .1 in
m ihe sails I eels g d, 1 hi pe that
.vhei I � in kill p
I In s nig i . � 'ung mam in
his wav to . � . � � sailing I i
His tl � I � lrifl betweei his
,nd mi i and lathei role
� captan ' a .hip in
listant t I hi � ' � � .
. , - , .
� � h he wei
. � .

� � . � � innan i ar I a

. �.�, ��. ; � . �
Young
H stu.utHiphanl
Assistant I e.ihires I ditoi
Does Satai hav you in a sleep i I
Din your I isl i sing like ohnnash
I 'id I jusi tell you lei - b�
till II '� � � �� � �
Bill) � M ��� m I hi I irst House of Pol vet
let vA oi p and I ionzontal I hrobl i
'��� � � . . the spiritual cur l
he I wl il .ui As part ot Awesonv
Iim i marvi I d ai : I
� in ingel il rev il � ; � 11 � ' '� . I 11 I 11
upport of his latest omed releasi
I i I. shdei - rrai '� �� Pull V � � rmj i
unique i ombinatu n of mtr m� iv
rev i i '� 11 i t �
Vppi irii v. ith VVirl
tourage that Includes' Wni" tvife try
lovely Miss i iingei Snap his I rdiri l i
Mr l'ur is I ee Rai cid ind thi Fabi
I ins Ravon and Banlon
( ritics applauded Wirtz's first release

. .
( ash � � rta I ittract nation
rforn ri Wirtz utilizes i ff-beat
' � . i � ' ; �
lwul Wi i - �� "hursdav. lanuary 17. Rev
Wirtz and hi; : ritual flock are schi I I eep Fried and Sanctified
to maki :� p pea ranee at the AttH s �
prepare! r a round the lav a lamp ai I
'� � � Rev . irtz i v ords ol inspiratn n
llv W irtz is not a rev i
i . ma ' �'� rtz unzips h i ml
sticks hi; hand I i igh his tl and plav
� � � � � thi I � leaded all
gazmeeven went astar tosav that Wirtz snapi trouser li
Ihe di iified answ ei to VN eird 1
Wirtz's latit release is m U
lii masterpieci tVith material r.
nd b
� � Raleigh-based c i ing from the Norwegian folktale ot Erik R
tVirl p perforniance pi
� � I letiniti at oi thi � . rd i arv
� � :� � io omedv at ;f- I � I
. � irl is a must set
'Job: A Comedy of Justice'
confronts the traditional
religious framework
By Rich I ernan
Stall Writei
the
no i
ib Comedy �: ustu e
� i � � -� i per ha p
,v-t thought pn iv oking and
.orsialol Robert I !� u
been a suckei for a bet, a sort ol
U t and I m not proud of that ei-
ther
S�itan i- s "ii to explain that
� � ern�rs i�mefrom the
tals. assumption that Yahvveh is
ECU dance instructor motivates
mind, body with lifelong passion
Hv Mic.iael Ilarrison
Staff VVritir
slitar anda
llpov.i
rfu
iiH'thinr,
rhestorv centers around a fun
dann ntalisl min ti i Mi icandei
Hergcnsheimer. Faking a holiday
onacruis : ; Mex'swhi le world
suddrnl change iround him t le
find
ms� ,i n ,i
Iv Jiltrrrnt
ship and instead tf being a funda
mentalistministet he becomes Alec
(irahani an under rid figure
dding t. � tin 11 infusion, it
ms that he has bei i me involved
with Margrethe a stewardess on
the i nnsc slnp
l. . s i .rkl keeps i hanging
a orld aitrr world after world, and
Margrethe always happens to be
vs ith him whenever it happens. I he
gist of it is that ahwehtt led) thinks
that he has found another job,
someone that will serve him no
matter what he does d i him.
rbwardstheend Alex confronts
Satan, only to learn that this time
the devil had absolutely nothing to
do with it
Satan explains ti Alex that.
"You an1 indeed another job With
the original fob, I was one ot the
villains This time I'm not. I'm not
proud ol the fashion in which 1
bedeviled fob. I'm not proud of the
fashion that I let mv brother Yahvveh
maneuver me into doing his dirtv
work starting clear back with
Mother Eveand before that, in ways
I cannot explain And I've alwavs
that Yahweh activeh encourages
When in fa t both Satan and
Yahweh an no mi re than privates
ti' the commander in chief, alone,
with all the � �ther deities thai exist,
including the Norse codsreek.
Eg) ptian i nental and eh Thai
behind even n ysterv lies another
mv. stery infinite ret esskn,and int
as we have out gods, the gods, in
turn, have theirs
rhecontn ivcrsialasptx tsofthis
book are that ail the other gods look
down on ahweh tor being so inse-
i ure .is to make his jvople praise
anil worship him all day long and
then turn around iu chastise and
test them to see ust how faithful
the) .ire I lke.n hild building sand
castles and populating them with
ants, then killing the ants lor not
wi t shapingtheb y. i ahweh, how
ever, doesn't stup with just killing
his people for not doing exactly as
he commands, he wants to damn
them loan eternity ol torture, too.
Ihe (,k1 .�t Satan and Yahweh
doesn't demand anything, doesn't
want anything, doesn't expect any-
thing. Unlike Yahweh, He isn't in-
terested in that kind of bootlicking
In the end it tumsout that this time
it's I .oki (another God of equal
power)that Yahweh hndstodohis
dirtv work, and Satan takes Alex to
His Cih.1 and tnes to intercede for
See 'Job page 15
Somcpeoplearefortunateenoughto rl al
a job that ties into a personal lifelong inter l ! ast
i irolina dance instructor Patricia Weeks sei i
ti be sin h a person.
Weeks has turned a lifelong passion into a
career that suits her .wxi her students perfei tlv
I'atti Utx'ks was born in Wasluneten State
Photo cou'tesy o' r"e Tseafe Arts Deoareni
ii ivas withheld which probably expla i
Iheabsei � of an accent When she was 12 years
old she moved to Mississippi, a place she simplx
said � � . diffi ri nl Irom Washington
I ; � h� finished high s hool (mi v ai il
gradu tioi ivasgivei ' � imnediately ent n I
Mississippi "t.it L niversitv and majored in s, i
but continued to operate the dance studio
Attei Mississippi Stah Weeks finally closed
the dant e studii � and entered graduate s hool at
rexasWoman si nnersitv, where
she got an M - in dance
Atter c(llege, she got a teach-
ing ob at Western lllmvis Univer-
sitv and sta ed there tor one year.
Dance vas part ot the physical
education program shesaid add
ing that siik h a combined program
was, and still is. generally not artis
ticallv oriented
She wanted moresecurit) she
added and so she went to Utah
and joined a Modern Dance pro
gram as a student She worked for
M I A in Modem Dance and be
came a teaching assistant during
her second year there
Weeks taught continuing edu-
cation at a children's behavior
therapy unit where she worked
with emotionally disturbed chil-
dren During herstay, she incorpo-
rated some "dance therapy"
movements into behavior therapv
techniques
Weeks especially enjoyed be-
ing able to perform tor three years
with RDTToo, an apprentice com-
pany of Utah's Repertory dance
theatre, in Salt I akeCitv,whileshe
also worked as a waitress.
In W80. Weeks came to East
Carolina University. "Money she
Pattt Weeks, an ECU Dance instructor, has shared her said encourages her to stay here.
endearment for dance with ECU students for over a decade $ee Dance, page 14
Teach for
America'
recruits top
students
By Ann 1 dwards
suit V ritei
Educators across the countn
have been disturbed b thi d
� � imbers of top college student
hoch �ose teaching .is a career.
Reasons c ited for this decline
a ording to the N'orth Caroln
Department of Public Instructun
I i . I in hide low tea he: p. .
lack ol communitA respei t t.irtin
cators and the multitude .t other
pi fessional opportunities avai
able
1 )espite shes. diStippoinl i
reasons, educators are optimistit
saving that this trend is or to th.
fact that perhaps noone has invited
them to consider the tea limv pro
fession,accordingto' I PIn?ports
In addition, many prestigious uni
v ei si ties do not have tt rmal schools
ot education or downpla) educa
tion degrees s� niu. h that main
students do not consider teaching
as a profess! �
Bei -i - ! the crisis in educa
tion and the teacher shortage
Wendy Kopp, a 23 year old
Princeton I Iniversity graduate
founded Peach lor America aPeace
Corps-type program devoted "in
fusing public education's under
staffed and overburdened teaching
ranks with devoted college stu-
dents" who might not have turned
to teaching otherwise, according to
kopp
Last year, the pn v ate, non-prof i�
See Teach, page 14





i
14
(IJije �aat (flarolfntan Janurary 15,1991
This Week in Film
�Photo courtesy of Columbia Pictures
Robert DeNiro and Cybill Shepherd star in Taxi Driver
coming this Wednesday to Hendrix Theatre
Film Series opener brings madness,
mystery and mysticism to Hendrix
Thefirst weekol the Student Union Rim Committee's Spring
Film Scries features madness, mvstorv and mysticism. The pro-
foundly disturbing "Taxi Driver" gets the series rolling. The
tense murder-mystery "Presumed Innocent" screens on the
weekend followed by the cult favorite animated film "Wizards
The Wednesday night alternative film series could not open
v ith a more intense film than the 1976 stiidy in alienation, "Taxi
Driver Robert DeNiro is absolutely unforgettable as Travis
Bnkle the slightly psychotic New York cabbie who vents his rage
on a pubescent prostitute's pimp. This is the film than lohn
1 lincklev saw a reported fifteen times and inspired the assassi-
nation attempt on the president in order to impress DeNiro's
ostar fodie Foster.
IIh'm reenplay was written by Paul Schrader, thecowntorot
"Raging Bull" known more recently for penning "The Last
I emptation ol Christ Travis Bickle is the prototypical Schrader
protagonist, alienated and repellanl, existing on the periphery.
His lid- achieves meaning only when pushed to cathartic acts o
extreme violence. 1 le is a loser, ignored and despised by society.
Schrader writes to tell his side of the storv in such a way that we
immediately feel empathy and warmth for the character.
Muchol the success ol Taxi Driver" can be attributed to the
sublimely poetic streetwise director Martin Scorsese
� GoodfeHas After Hours" who makes a cameo appearance
a m ot DeNiro's despicable passengers. The cast also features
( bill Shepherd, Albert brooks, 1 larvey Keitel, and Peter Boyle.
A landmark in film history, "Taxi Driver" should not be missed.
"Presumed Innocent" emerged last summer among the ac-
tion packed megafnovleas tprslasoiffs lhirH�r Aan'JftJm.
Harrison lord is Rusty Sabich, a veteran prosecutor who still
takes great stock in our justice system and truly believes in its
ability to wield some truth now and then. However, he is not
quite the idealist he was when his i bbegan. Perhaps the fact that
he begins to waver between belief and despair makes him ripe for
what awaits him.
When a voting femalecolleague (thebeautiful (.iretaScacchi)
with whom Rusty had been carrying on a torrid affair is found
murdered, he is assigned to investigate the case. However, it is
only a matter ol time before he finds that he himself has become
the prime suspect. There seems to be overriding evidence that he
was in her apartment the night of the murder. Most convincing
is the drinking glass found bearing his fingerprints. The evidence
that is certain to indict Sabich never seems to materialize
throughout the film. The glass, or lack thereof, is important in
these proceedings because its location becomes a metaphor for
tin i mbigu 11 rof Sabich's innocence. We never know until the last
minutes of the film whether or not he did indeed murder his
colleague.
Presumed Innocent" exploits the more visual and psycho-
logical element . of IMK American cinema in its thoughtful and
often agonizing studyof moral ambiguity. Director Alan J.Pakula
makes thoughtful use of light in the film, light and dark images
clearly represent light and dark sides of the soul. And until the
very List moment, we are not quite sure on which side of the soul
our hero lies.
"Wizards" opens the Sunday night film series. This series
features classics and critically acclaimed films of various genres
that did not receive the box office recognition that thevdeserved
Forthcoming films in this series include "Sunset Boulevard "A
Clockwork Orange" and "Parents
1970s super animator Ralph Bakshi tells another talc of good
versus evil in the 1976 cult favorite "Wizards Bakshi, well
known for his fantasy flicks "Heavy Metal" and "Lord of the
Rings' and the X-rated "Fritz the Cat" combines scintillating
animation with live action photography to create a unique cin-
ematic experience.
The wizards of this post-apocalyptic talc arc two brothers,
Avatar and Blackwolf. Avatar is the good wizard who grows up
to resemble Peter Falk in demeanor. Blackwolf is the evil wizard
who grows up to be the new Hitler and, accordingly, aspires to
rule the world. He has difficulty motivating his sinister army
until he resurrects Nazi propaganda films which succeed in
rallying the troops to fight the battle of science and technology
versus magic and religion
Rakshi's characteristically muscle bound pointed-eared
creatures move in backgrounds of intricate animation and live
action photography including film footage from World War II.
The effect is stunning, creating an almost 3-D appearance.
"Wizards" si '� be seen for its artistic merit as well as its
entertaining fable, story.
"Taxi Dm I be shown Wednesday, 16 January, at 8:00
p.m. "Presumed Innocent" will play Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day nights, January 17-19 at 8:00. Please note that this semester
there will beonlv ncThursday night feature which begins at 8:00
p.m. "Wizards" will be shown Sunday, January 20 at 8:00 p.m.
AH filmsare shown in Hendrix Theatre located in the Mendenhall
Student Center. Admission is free to all films with a valid student
ID bearing a current activity sticker.
The Student Union Films Committee would like to thank
East Coast Music and Video for use of their videotapes in the
review of these films.
�Compiled by Lisa Marie Jernigan
Teach
Continued from paga 13
organization invited graduates of
the country's top universities to
consider teaching. Today, 490
graduates of the eight-week train-
ing course are teaching throughout
the nation in rural areas and in in-
ner-city schools.
Teach for America graduates
are crash-trained in the eight-week
summer course and an- then sent to
some of the mtst needy schools in
the country.
The progmm is currently oper-
ating in New York City, Los Ange-
les, New Orleans and Baton Rouge
and in rural distnets in North Caro-
lina and Georgia. Each of these ar-
eas had teacher shortages and were
willing to take on teachers with
Bachelor's degrees who have not
been through the usual teacher cer-
tification process. The Teach for
America teachers are required to
give a two-vear commitment to
teaching in the selected schools.
In North Carolina, 29 Teach for
America teachers a re meeting a need
in rural counties which have diffi-
culty finding quality teachers. Par-
ticipating counties in the state are
Vance, Granville, Northampton,
Dance
Halifax, Edenton-Chowan, Nash,
Warren, Hertford and Martin coun-
ties. Teach for America has brought
to NorthCarolina graduates of Yale,
Stanford and the University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley.
Despite its success. Teach for
America has had its expected
glitches. This fall, teachers were ad-
versely affected by the teachers'
strike in New Orleans, by jobs that
did not materialize in rural North
Carolina and by certification delays
in California that left some teachers
without pay.
Nevertheless, Kopp is optimis-
tic, "We expected it to be tough
she said. "And we expected what
corps members are telling us, that it
is the most challenging thing they
have even done
Teach for America advertised
in December for applicants from
ECU but no one responded, before
the January 4 deadline, said Mr.
Fumey James, director of the Career
Planning and Placement Center.
think that it was because of
timing he said. "Thead was placed
right before people went home for
the break.
Continued from page 13
Weeks added that other conditions,
such as g(xnl camaraderie among
the dance faculty and other faculty
of the Theatre Arts Department,
sustain her interest in her job at
ECU, as well
She also acknowledged an aca-
demic freedom in which she said
she can leach her classes. She add-
ing that unlike her job at Western
Illinois University, where dance
was combined with the physical
education department, the dance
program at EC I. is to itsown within
the Theatre Arts Department, and
is therefore, much more artistically
oriented
A number ol changes have
t.i ken place since 1980, Weeks said.
Back in'81 or'82,shesaid, McCmnis
Theatre was renovated. Until it was
yOPrnpfeted. the dance studios were
temporarily located at the vacant
Wilkerson Funeral Home across
from Margaux's Restaurant on
Evans Street.
Her office, she added with a
laugh, was next to the embalming
room but eventually every thing got
back to normal.
Students, she said, became
more well-rounded. Eventually
even a "jurv system" was imple-
mented in theprogram. Weeks said
the proposed dance majors are re-
viewed to he sure thev have reached
an adequate level of proficiency
and potential for the successful
completion of their B.F A. degree.
When asked about the best
change at the Theatre Arts Depart-
ment , Weeks jokingly said, "1 got a
new desk after years of asking for
it
Nevertheless, she added that
the dance studios could use more
space, and she would like to have a
new studio or at least ha ve the large
posts in the large studio removed.
A challenging aspect of her job
at ECU,she said, is to reach a "happy
medium" between more experi-
enced dancers and basic beginners
in her classes.
Luckily, she said, experienced
people still give good responses in
her basic courses.
"You can always learn from
basics she said, adding that de-
spite her years of experience in
dance, she could be a student in a
beginning level course and still
learn something.
Understanding what teachers
want or expect is the biggest chal-
lenge for students in dance courses,
Weeks said, adding that the chal-
lenge probably exists in all types of
courses. There is always some type
of verbal and non-verbal commu-
nication between the teacher and
the students. Weeks said, but it is
even more so in a dance class for
Deli Kitchen
Homestyle Cooking
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(complete meal)
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Phone 752-5339
Hours: 6:30 am-7:3() pm M-F
FOSDICK'S
obvious reasons.
Weeks said she docs not want
to show students a sencs of dance
steps and merely have them copy
or imitate the movements Weeks
sud she tries to use methods that
develop critical thinking.
She tries to accomplish this
goal by simply asking questions of
the students. For example, if a da nee
student loses his or her balance.
Weeks will ask the student whv it
happened what was wrong in b k! v
placement and what can be done to
correct it.
Weeks said she wants to
stimulate the students and encour-
age them to think independently,
which will ultimately push thestu
dents to make all types of discover-
ies about the classes. Learninghow
to learn is a large part of education,
she concluded.
Learning student's names is a
heftvchallenge, she said, especial Iv
during summer school sessions
when the course moves more
quicklv. Weeks sees the challenge
as a necessary one to conquer.
"You're a person to me when I
know your name she said.
Weeks also thinks she and her
students share a mutually respect
and that they, the student, trust her
knowledge. As a result, she said
the students do hard work.
Problems between Weeks and
studentsdo not often arise, she said.
Her comments and criticisms, are
meant to be used by students to
leam, but sometimes students will
take her comments personally.
Students who have a "chip on
their shoulders" will sometimes be
especially difficult to handle, she
said. However, when a problem
does arise, she simply pays more
attention to someone else.
Weeks married Brian Jensen, a
free-lance desk-top publisher with
his own business four and a half
years ago.
"1 like my name she said.
"Why would I want to change it?
Changing it would seem kind of
silly Notes of her strong indi-
viduality ring out.
Weeks is also the president of
the North Carolina Dance Alliance,
a non-profit state-wide organiza-
tion that supports and promotes
dance.
She is currently preparing to
choreograph a piece for a four-hour
faculty concert that is slated for
presentation in McGinnis Audito-
rium on April 24-27.
Weeks said auditions for the
concert will be held on January 22
and 23 at 6:30 p.m. in studio 114 of
the Theatre Artsdepartment. Any-
one is welcome to audition.
1890 SEAFOOD
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301 Plaza Drive, Greenville N C
756-1592
Mon -Thurs 9-9 � Frl 9-8 � Sat 9-1
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i
Adult parly garru
By Bill Egbert
Staff Writer
You're too tired for Down-
town You're not in the mod to
throw a yard party You just want
to have a few friends over and do
something Enter, the trustv party
game
The on-high "Grand Hooka"
ol adult party games is Trivial
Pursuit, invented in the earl) -
by a cabal of yuppy shut ins who
saw the need for a non-greasv so-
ul lubricant at parties I heir
concept was simple roll dice,move
around a board and answer ques
tions that prove how much you
paid attention in school.
Their idea caught on, flooding
the market with similar games, all
ol which come m hatboxes and
involve a small box of two-by-three
cards They all accomodate a (lev
ible number of players, take about
an hour to play, and otter a
somewhat greater intellectual
challenge than "Quarters
As.you wade through the se
lee tion iit your local tov store, you
may ftpd yourself a bit over-
whelmed. The original Trivial
PwrsKiGenusedition, for instance,
has divided like a strepta coccus
ba tenum into the Genus 11 edition,
the '81 'sedition, the Disney Famik
edition. The Vintage Years, Sports,
Music, Movies and various other
specialized editions designed to
i orr.il the greatest possible market
share lor the Trivial � iif eame
cartel (headqil
off the coast if
Aside tro
arc a few othq
you might wi
If you likt
out Baldt
player draw i
a strari't
? which, is reel
one dictionai
member ol �
The rest of til
their
secret!) I
hand tl
writes thi I
other si
The I
definite i I
tr ?
gain
definition .ui
players wit:
In additl
detmiti
the dark re
brains, "
be a hool "
I he 1
would iik I u
trivari
trie's ti
able v.
Hin whi
with a h �


i
Schwarzenegg
adversary in
By Lewis Coble
Staff Writer
Who would have thought that
Arnold Schwarzenegger would
meet his match with a group c t
unrulv children The ultimate
strongman faces his greatest oppo-
ohn kimble Arnold
Schwarzenegger) trailing Cullen
Cnsp (Richard Tyson), a high-roll-
ing drug dealer who is looking for
his son
kimble arrests Cnsp but not
before Crisp discovers the where-
abouts cJf his ex-wife and son how-
ever, Cnsp is released, and Kimble
must go undercover to find crisp's
ex-wife and son.
Kimble is joined by Phoebe
CHara (Pamela Reed) as his part-
ner in the undercover operation to
locate and protect Cnsp's ex-wife
and son
The search for the woman and
ben take Kimble and O'Hara to a
small town in Oregon. The original
plan was for O'Hara to enter the
School where Crisp's son played
bv loseph and Christian Cousins)
attends kindergarten However,
OHarafallsillandKimbleisforced
to become a kindergarten teacher.
Kimble's worst nightmare be-
comes a reality when he faces his
class of young children Kimble
discovers that he has no control
over the children and no wav of
communicating with his students
He finds himself being walked over,
ignored and abused.
How ever, he slowly gainscon-
trol over his class through the use
of hispohcetrainingand discipline.
He finallv manages to get his stu-
dents to become the best class in
the school.
While working in the school,
Kimble meets a young teacher,
Joyce Paulmarie (Penelope Ann
Miller). As the two of them gradu-
ally become involved, Kimble
discovers that Joyce and her son
areacruallyCrisp'sex-wifeand son.
mo" � I
ma ki tl
ii
his best i
eve! IS-
T
V .r 1
kimble. was
the rotes he u
changes
an undtril
i
r
r
Arnold Schw
Doys m one
Job'
him. Froml92i
"Job- A Comedy of Justice" is on Naval
Heinlem at his best, a novel to not Carriers. He
only make you mink, it makes you Lieutenant af
smile. culosis. Fror
Heiruein was born in Butler, worked as a
Mo. m 1907. He was educated in rado, sold re
Kansas City, after one year at the architecture.
University of Missouri, he received fornia politic
an appointment to the U. S. Naval cessfullyforr.
Academy at Annapolis. Hemajored that he once tl
in Naval Science and was a cham- owned becau
picmswordsman.Hegraduated20th buy it was tc
in a class of 243. the deal was i





1
Bte Cast (Earoltnian Janurary 15.1991 15
leli kitchen
estyle Cooking
ll Special ; Vs
�omolete meal
d Raleigh Ave
- - S339
;� - H) .Mil i F
DICKS
1800 SEAFOOD
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756 2011
Bu one
Regulai Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Gel the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
ter FRI I
. time
ioi included
; ; i l l
I
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I
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. "
SAVINGS
on .my f.�M or winter
sale item Jusl cUp coupons �oi in
cxtu 10 - 15' . Oft. Thursday thru Sund.iy'
ROOM SHOES
I omits MM WtM.f OMHI I
K2t MitilmJIV.Kilvh f
.lMK�TI�t-0fcrSl lltKStKMKII nv
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ESOLUTION
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:a Drive, Greenville, N C
756-1592
jrs. 9-9 � Frl. 9-8 � Sat 9 1
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fW�r�fyAvttW�te
I
Adult party games offer entertainment alternative
By Bill Egbert
SUff Writer
You're too tired for Down-
town You're not in the mood to
throw a yard party You just want
to have a few friends over and do
something Enter, the trusty part v
game.
The on high "Grand Hooka"
ol adult party games is 1'nvuil
Pursuit, invented in the earlv 80s
by a cabal of yuppv shut ins who
saw the need for a non -greasy so-
cial lubricant at parties Their
i oncept was simple: roll dice, move
around a board and answer ques-
tions that prove how much you
paid attention in school.
Their idea caught on, flooding
the market with similar games, all
ol which come m hatboxes arid
involve a small box of two-bv three
cards. They all accomodate a flex-
ible number of players, take about
an hour to play, and otter a
somewhat greater intellectual
challenge than "Quarters "
As.you wade through the se-
lection St your local toy store, you
may find yourself a bit over
whelmed. The original Trivial
Pursuit Genusedition, for instance,
has divided like a strepta coccus
baterium into the Genus II edition
tin- '80sedition, the 1 Hsney Family
edition, The Vintage Years, Sports.
Mush, Movies and various other
specialized editions designed to
corral the greatest possible market
share tor the Trivial1 Pursuit game
cartel (headquartered on an island
off the avist ot Columbia).
Aside from the TP line, there
are a few other adult party games
you might want to look at.
If vou like to bluff, then check
out Balderdash. In this game, one
player draws a card and reads oil
a strange, little known word
(which, is recognized by at least
one dictionary as a legitimate
member ot the English language)
The rest oi the players make up
their own definitions for the word,
secretly scribble them down and
hand them to the reader, who
writes the actual definition on an-
other sheet of paper.
The reader reads oil all ol the
definitions and the other plavers
trv to guess the correct one. You
gain points by guessing the actual
definition and by fooling other
plavers with your own.
In addition to the bizzare
definitions which will crawl outol
the dark recesses ol your friends
brains, the actual definitions can
be a hoot, too.
The average round ol play
would include such words as
charivari" a noisy crowd which
tries to wake up newlyweds, or
"able-whackets" a sailor's tlird
game in which the loser is whacked
with a knotted hankerchiet
t hitburst another word came.
taxes yourmemory more than vour
creativit) the plavers divided
intotwoti ams.havetorattk'off 10
examples ,t .1 i ertain categof)
For instance, your team may
be asked to name 10 Woody Allen
movies. 10 things you'd find in a
kitchen or 10 singers whose names
begin with the letter "S "
You gain points according to
how many examples vour team
conies up with in one minute
The game is a blast, but it
tends to get loud, especially it you
and your fellow plavers are. . .
impaired.
If vour interest is psychology,
then vou need to get Therapy. It's
loads o' fun This game is more
complex than the others, but it's
also tar more intersting. As you
move around the board, you an-
swer questions regarding the re-
sults of actual psychological re-
search.
You might bo asked, tor in-
stance, whether stuttering is more
common in girls or boys, or what
the most common word-associa-
tion response to the word "sex" is.
At the bottom of each card is a
reference indicating which study
the information came from.
If you land on another player's
home spacetthat player's "office")
you automatically enter therapy.
That player draws a therapy card
and asks you a question such as,
"So tell me which of the
pia vers sitting at this bi�rd d y u
think would most enjoy ruling the
world
vi on write down your hi west
opinion, and vour therapist tries
to guess nur response
If the answers match, you're
cured and you move on. You win
by fillingyourcouch (your playing
piece) with cured patients (colored
pegs). You earn the pegs by an-
swering questions and curing fel-
low players.
These games are easy to find.
Almost every toy and discount
store in Greenville has a section of
adult party ganxs The drawback
to most of these games, however,
is their cost (usually about 20 or 30
bucks a pop), but if you split it
with a friend, it's not too outra-
geous.
Besides, when you have
friends over after a weekend binge,
it's nice to have something mellow
to do.
ANNUAL WINTER SALE
All Fall and Winter Clothing
Selected Jewelry and Accessories
some spnng and summer
merchandise
Mon Sat 10-6 919 Redbank Rd
rhurs - 10-8 Arlington Village
756-105H
Schwarzenegger faces toughest
adversary in 'Kindergarten Cop'
By Lewis Coble
Staff Writer
Who would have thought that
Arnold Schwarzenegger would
meet his match with a group ot
unrulv children1 The ultimate
strongman faces his greatest oppo-
CnVe Kf?rJ3&h 0)4 V
in K imble I Arnold
Schwarzenegger) trailing Cullen
( nsp(Richard lyson),ahigh-roll-
mg drug dealer who is looking for
his son
kimble arrests (nsp but not
before Crisp discovers the where-
abouts of his ex-wife and son how-
ever. Crisp is released, and Kimble
must go undercover to find crisp's
ex-wife and son.
Kimble is joined bv Phoebe
O'Hara (Pamela Reed) as his part-
ner in the undercover operation to
locate and protect Crisp's ex-wife
and son
The search for the woman and
boy take Kimble and O'Hara to a
small town in Oregon. The original
plan was for O'Hara to enter the
school where Crisp's sonplaved
by Joseph and Christian Cousins)
attends kindergarten. However,
O Mara falls ill and Kimble is forced
to become a kindergarten teacher.
Kimble's worst nightmare be-
comes a reality when he faces his
class oi young children Kimble
discovers that he has no control
over the children and no wav of
J
communn atmg with his students.
He tinds himself being walked over,
ignored and abused.
1 lowevor. heslowlvgainscon-
trol over his class through the use
of hispolice training and discipline.
He finallv manages to get his stu-
dents to become the best class in
the school
While working in the school,
Kimble meets a young teacher,
Joyce Paulmane (Penelope Ann
Miller). As the two of them gradu-
ally become involved, Kimble
discovers that Joyce and her son
are actually Crisp's ex-wife and son.
Eventualrisp and his cruel
mother. Eleanor (( .invll Baker),
make then wa to ' regon and to
Dominic's s hool rhe battle over
the( nsp sson heginsand Kimble s
life is changed forever.
Schwarzenegger gave one of
lushest performances in thismo ie
.even though it was not a trutilm
i f violent . or adventure
VVvJUfrneirteT'fc -hJKn.
Kimble, was more complex than
the roles he usually plays, kimble
changes from a street tough cop to
an understanding and caring
tea, her. kimble also has some in-
ner problems thusprov idingsome
unusual depth to a
Schwarzenegger.
I he character I plav goes
through a complete transforma-
tion, N. hwarzenegger states. "At
first he'sa cop who knowsonl) one
thing llisjob, Artd.uV.w4vhee.oes.
about it sometimes rubs even the
putwif�tepartmuTttftheiwrone. way
And then all ol a sudden he goes
under (v er and has the painful ex-
ponent eof facing30 hildren in the
See Cop. page 16
1109 Charles Blvd.
Greenville NC
758-4251
Convenient Drive-Thru
Jan. 15 through Jan. 31
Present your ECU ID
& Receive 10 off all
Regular Price cassettes
and CDs
Also: S2.00 Video Rentals with
ECU ID
n t � i.
I
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
t t � � � � �
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts lor January rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near Major Shopping
Centers
�ECU Bus service
�Onsite Laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
Job'
Photo by Universal City Studios
Arnold Schwarzenegger has his hands full chasing bad guys and bad
boys m one of Universal Studios latest releases, "Kindergarten Cop
Continued from page 13
him.
"Job: A Comedy of Justice" is
Heinlein at his best, a novel to not
only make you think, it makes you
smile.
Heinlein was born in Butler,
Mo. in 1907. He was educated in
Kansas City, after one year at the
University of Missouri, he received
an appointment to the U. S. Naval
Academy at Annapolis. He majored
in Naval Science and was a cham-
pion swordsman. He graduated 20th
in a class of 243
From 1929 to 1 934 Heinlein served
on Naval Destroyers and Aircraft
Carriers. He retired at the rank of
Lieutenant after developing tuber-
culosis. From 1934-1939 Heinlein
worked as a silver miner in Colo-
rado, sold real estate, dabbled in
architecture, and worked in Cali-
fornia politics. He even ran unsuc-
cessfully for political office He wrote
that he once failed to sell a mine he
owned because the man who was to
buy it was tommy-gunned before
the deal was closed.
In 1939 he began wntmg sci
ence-fiction, and since then he has
been regarded as a major figure in
the field. The Hugo award, named
for HugoCernsback, wasinstituted
to honor the best science-fiction
published each year. Fleinlein has
won this award four times; an un-
equaled record. In 1975 he received
the First Grand Master Nebula
award from the Science Fiction
Writers of America.
�Azalea Gardens
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom fur-
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sewer, washers, dryers, cable TV
$240 a month. 6 month lease

MOBILE HOME RENTALS Apartments
and mobile home in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815





1
16 $�K jEggt (gatPlintan JanuraryJ5, 1991
Metal Notes rocks into 1991
By Deanna Nevgloskt
Staff Writer
It was �i big year in 199() for the
htMvv TOM I hard nxk industry .and
1W pr ves to br.in even bigger yea r
with new record releases ami up-
andaiming tours.
Although the ve�u ended on I
rcxkin g(x1 note. 11 had I bad
tart when I� leppard guitarist
Steve "Steamin C lark was found
deaii in his London ap.irtment on
Ian. 7,is,i result
of alcohol poi
signing
Clark, who
w.is considered
a heaw drinker
(off the road and
.1 toner, found it
hard to believe
the over
w h e I m i n g I v
popularstatuspt the band. A found-
ing member of the band at 18 vears
old, Clark. 30, left the music world to
mount the tragic loss of a great and
talented guitarist
Hie man .in� I his music will con-
tinue to live in the hearts of those
who listen to Del l eppard and those
who will discos it them Meanwhile,
the l.eps will most likely take a well
deserved break Nine songs have
been completed all of which have
Clark's last licks and solos, for the
follow up to the multi platinum
I Ksteria (nh time will tell when
thoiH-w recordwiflcvrokvised Metal
otc-s will keep you posted
Ozz ('sbMinu is set to make
itmre than appearance in l'l when
he releases the tentatively titled I P
km iBItvnt Mt in Apnl,withasingle
comingoui in Man h (iuitanstZakk
VVvMc will joint V again as will new
bassist Michael Inez and drummer
Rand).isiiiio
Poison just launched the second
I s leg ol theii Flesh and Blond"
tour Several show;�will he taped tor
a double live album im hiding tour
new studKi trai ks t be rekased at
the end ol the tout A corn crt home
k1eo will also bt n leased and possi
lh a video I ollection ompriscd ol
the fa�pa4tfftxKf ffidosingles.
Miiltka hasbeoryn the studio
for a tew months with producer Bob
Rock An April or May release is
slated for the new, long-awaited I P.
The Bay Area thrashers will hit the
road in June or July with a tour that
will last through '92.
"Oh Say, Can You Scream is
the new home video from Skid Row.
Get used to watching that one euz
the Skids will spend a great deal of
'91 in the studio with producer
Michael Wagcner working on the
six ond album.
t one of a
mil series
��
Cinderella is starting the new
ye.ir off nght with their latest LP,
Heartbreak Station, and tour plans in
the works. You may havecaugN the
Phillv boys on MTV's New Year's
Fve Ball where they performed two
cuts from the new record, "Shelter
Me" and More Tilings Change
and a track from their last opus,
"Coming 1 lomc
Queensryche will tour in sup
portofEmpirt in March. Well keep
you potted as dates come in
Winger is tekmsible via their
new video I asv (. ome. 1 asio,
the tollow up to '90s "( an't Cel
limit and Miles Awa) VVmgei
will return to l S shores in February
after their stint with the Scorpions in
I uropc
Both bands will team up State-
side and tour until May V inger, in
support of In the I font o) the Young
LP, will DC On the road throughout
thesummer, rhcScorpions will keep
teasm'and ple.ism Americanaudi
ences with their new recordm
World
San Francisco's Testament
i nded '91 u m the road with Megadeth
and lestament Starting this month
I estamenl wiilbeco headliningM ith
Slayer acrossthecountry until March
i aith o More is doing the iat
n Mind of tour dates in lapan. Europe
Cop
and the States They'll wTap it up by
Marchand start workona newrecord
to be released next fall or early '92.
Australian Kid boys ACDC
will remain on the road w ith their
LP, The RaiWS Cdgl , as the second
videosingle. "Moneytalks climbs
the' charts
Kiss plans to begin tracking tor
a new LP in March
Strvper is still on the road with
their fifth IP, Agmmi the Um You
can catch them on M IV with their
new vid-
eo! "Two
T i m e
Woman"
I It d
"Lidy " A
home
video is in
the works
lor '91.
Mot-
ley Crue isslated to release a greatest
hits LP in the spring titled Decade Of
Decadence. The new album may in-
clude a new song or two and will
most hkelv hit the stores in May
L'ntil then, therue is videoized in
"Dr. Feelgood: The Videos"
I inns n Roses has already re-
corded 36songs for their next LP,but
when we'll hear them ondtSC is not
known Al and company hop- to
have the album out around March
with a tour geared up tor the sum
mer.
White 1 ion roars back into v,i
with their I 1 tra. k ! P Vfto lfi
tk . . in Mid Man h h- should
begin i oncertizing in May.
I'x 'ii o i has a live record in the
works he album will alst contain
new studio ti.tiks from ihc Jersey
tin kers (iuitarisi RichieSambora is
current!) working on a solo effort
that is sl.itivl tor a summer release
Iron Maiden.hh) Anthrax begin,
a VS tour on Ian 15 Iho tour is
epttil to stop in the Caroiinas in
the von near future We'll keep vou
DOStCd
lesla is riding, high w ith their
new effort Fi � '�'��. i tiail fatn
A new record is in tin works and
shouldl out K sumnvrtuuc I ntil
then, lesla is SCftriflg points op the J
charts with a romakecd "Signs i
e I a- '
Continued from page 15
classroom with absolutely no idea
ot how to communicate with them
It changes him completely
Ivan Reitman directed and
ri lui ed th' film Reitman also
directed ami produced the film
I wms" which starred Arnold
Schwarzenegger and Manns
DeVitO. Reitman was one ol the
first people to perceive
Schwarzenegger's potential outside
action Minis Alter "Twins
Reitman wanted to work with
Arnold on a him thai was more
realistically based.
The children in this him truly
made this film entertaining (h er
2 000 children were interviewed to
till the 30 roles portrayed in the
mo ie
I he film rew. staff, and actors
observed kindergarten classes in
both publn and private schools.
The producers developed an
entire infrastructure tor the30chil-
dren. The children had teachers,
social workers,anda teamot "child
wranglers" looking after them.
In addition to personnel, the
children were built an enclosed play
area that contained a i lassroom, a
playroom, wardrobes, and a lounge
for parents
Duetoactingin the film, many
oft he children missed their kinder
gartengraduation. The film makers
and statt had a special graduation
ceremony put together for the chil
dren Schwarzenegger handed
each child theirdiploma ,is Ihechtld
crossed the stage
"he movie contained a good
mix ot comedy, action, and drama
that made the film interesting and
entertaining However,
Schwarzenegger's past perfor-
mances still hamper him in more
romantic or sensitive scenes It is
still hard to accept Arnold as ro
mantle or sensitive. When he is in
such scenes, he appears awkward.
Arnold Schwarzenegger plays
John kimble, an undercover cop
who finds himself teaching a kin-
dergarten class
Arnold's most recent tilm "To
taI Recall"earnedovorSlOOmillion
in its hrM fort davs, thus making
him one ot the biggest money mak-
ers of last year. He is currently
working on "Terminator If,
Schwarzenegger was born m
Austria and became an American
citizen in 1983.
Schwarzenegger's life has been
full of awards He has won five Mr
Universe Titles, seven Mr Otympia
titles, a Golden Globe Award, and
has been named Chairman of the
President's Council of Physical Fit-
ness and Sports He has also wnt-
ten four fcxxikson bodybuilding.
Young
Penelope Ann Miller portrays
Joyce Paulmarte, Crisp's ex-wife
and a third grade teacher Miller
made her tilm debut in Adven-
tures in Babysitting
Since that tilm. Millerhasacted
in tilms sue h as "Dead Hang' and
"Big Top Pee Wee Miller also
plays a role in the tilm Awaken-
ings" with Robin Williams and
Robert De 'in.
Pamela Reed co-Stars .is
Kimble s partner, Phoebe I Y lara.
Reed has played in tilms like
"Cadillac Man" and The Right
Stutt
Linda I hint portrays the prin
cipal, MissSchlowski, in theschool
where Kimble is teaching. Hunt
received an Oscar for role in "The
Year ol Living Dangerously She
has also k led many popular hi ins,
such as "Silverado "Dune and
"She-Devil"
Richard Tvson is Cullen Crisp,
a L.A. drug dealer looking for his
son. Tyson made his film debut in
"ThrevOCIoik High "and hasalso
played In "1 wo Moon lunction
"Kindt irga rten Cop" is a movie
that is funny and entertaining. It is
not a film with a lot of depth or
meaning It is not the greatest tilm
in the world,but it is a good film. It
is worth siring once at the movie
theater, but not twice.
Continued from page 13
often depressing sings a surpris-
ingly soulful version of "I lelpless
Two Kinds that have recently
jettisoned themselves into a rela-
tive stardom make strong contri-
butions on the album. The Pixies;
the band of KXX) styles, select an
innocent and melodic sound for
"Wintcrlong Sonic Youth deliv-
ers an expected throttle-to-the-
floor rendition of "Computer
Age
It is hard to believe thata band
as musically traumatic as Psychic
TV (who historically pound songs
out rather than use finesse) could
do such a stirring cover of "Only
Love Can Break Your Heart In
this case, however, there is some-
thing hauntingly honest in the
band'sdclivery.
Henry Kaiser contributes to
the album with three songs; an
abridged version of "The Needle
and the Damage Done "Tonight's
the Night" and "Words The mu-
siconall three of these songs sound
as if Neil himself came into the
studioand played the instruments.
There is no big surprise in the vocal
parts of the first two, but on
"Words Victoria Williams's fin-
gernail-on-chalk voice reinforces
the theme of the song, words do
make a difference.
"CXitof the Blue asongabout
the immortality of Rock-and-Roll,
is included by BALL. The band
sounds as though it just a (tended a
Phil Spector "wall-of-sound"
clinic. The song is effective and
livesupto the statement Mr. Young
was trying to pass along: rock-
and-roll is alive, and it ah.ays
will be.
'The bridge" is a rose in a
field of pansies, but it does have its
thorns.
Bongwater's version of "Mr.
Soul" is all together ugly. And,
while Dinosaur jr. is one of the
most provocative (in the mental
since) bands working, their ver-
sion of "Lotta Love" is repulsive.
Despite these two blemishes,
"the bridge" is still an album that
is hard to match. The album's
magic lies in the fact that it is ap-
pealing to new music fans and
Neil Young fans alike. If you fall
into both of these categories the
album is nothing short of a trea-
sure.
ATTENTION
Get Your SummerFall Sel
(tes m
a caring Christian Community
invites you to
PRAYER & FELLOWSHIP
and
LASAGNE for $1
Wednesday Jan. 16 5 p.m.
Methodist Student Center
501 E. 5th St.
across from Garrett Dorm
wes Id Christian Fellowship at ECU is sponsored jointly by the
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus Ministries
501 East Fifth St. Greenville, N.C. 27834
Pirates Landing oners a new concept
for 1 year lease. $200 Security Deposit
$225 00a month with a 4. 6' or 9 mo
Short Term Leases also available
Rooms Complex
�Furnished �Sundeck
�Refrigerator �Gazebo
�Fully carpeted -Outdoor Gnil
Convenient & Economl
�Three Blocks for Campus & I'jl
�Utilities Included in Rq
�Energy Efficient
Laundry Facilities on Si
�Free Maid Service
�Central Heat & Air
&EMCQ EAST INC � P,Q BOX 602� �
The kev Michelle Mike" Burcher
illl) 752 7240
The kev Daniel T Earnhardt
tlV) 758-2030
Check i - . � �

OUR SERVK
0FG00I
$2.0
We Have Vou Reach In
126 Greenville Blvd P
fe m
East Carolina University
Recreational Services
CIIRISTENBl'RY GYMNASIUM
FITNESS Cms SCHEDULE
1991
Mjreh !�. 1
' 0M ftt wttionfl? ilaiini
i 10.00 Studfoa
ITU fnvfif niiy mttt if mi
Ail claim ivtlUbk on drop in tutlt wtth purchw of i nclvt Tfclva
�r� iviiliblr In 204 ChrUwnbury Cymniilum, M nday ThumUy. t � m -6 p m
Friday. 8 � m S p m Tickta mu�t b p rch���d In munlmum !ncr�mena o
OAYS
i Mm
2 Mon
Mon
Mori
7 lift
Tuct
Tu�
I Am
9 Tun
10 Frl
II Sal
12 Sun
11 Mon H Wnl
14 Tu� �� Th
15 Tu� (t Th
TIMES
h Wrd
h Wrd
I Wrd
�� Th
h Th
. Th
N Th
fcTK
J5.0O5tudena and JlOOCVFaculry Su� Spouw
Arn?lcs
LOCATION
3 00pm 4 00pm (Hl-Lo)
J JOp m4 ZSp m. (Power Pump)
4 04pm.SOSpm (Acroblci)
5 1Spm-6:lSpm (Low Impact)
6.4Sa m7 4Sa m (Law Itnpaci)
J.OOp.nt-4 OOp m. (Hl-Lo)
4 OSp m 5 OSp m (Intrrval)
5 ISpm 6ISp m. (Acroblci)
6 10pm 7 30pm (Lew Impact)
4 OSp m -5 OSp m (Acrobkj
HOOa m 12O0noon (Hl-Lo)
J.OOp m -4 OOp.m (A roblc�)
4:30pm S2Spm
300pm -4.00pm.
S 30 p m30p.m.
IoniriK
CC 10�
CG 111
CG10�
OC 101
CG I0S
oG 10S
CG 108
CG10J
CG10S
CG 10
CG 101
CG lOS
CG 112
CG 112
CG 112
Stwlon :i;n January 2S-March 7
March 182S
Coat fa drop-in ctaw
i OOSruotnti
J2 O0F�cuky Seal! Spoux
rNlTIUCTOl
T1A
T�A
T�A
TiA
T�A
TtA
TIA
TiA
TiA
AItt mating
Altrrnaimi
Altrmatini
16 Mon ft Wrd 6 OOp m 6 JOp m
17 Mon ft Wed
IH Turtft Th
19 Sat
FkxBclay
CG 112
BtllY Bmtrrs - coiu
CG112
CG1M
6 00-6 30 pm
S:30p.m6.O0p.m.
4 30 p m. - S p.m
12 OS pm 1235 pm
S5.00ttudcnts ft J10 00lacuIty �UH ipouK per wuton
"50 50itudfnn ft i I OOfacull y luff-tpouw per drop-lr 52 SO ft �S 00 minimum punhnr
TiA
TBA
T�A
TiA
TIA
TBA
Alter na tint
20. Mon ft Wed.
6 30 p m SOOp m.
Supra a-ss
CG10B'
TBA
� 51S OOirudemt ft 52S nofaculty -naff irxxjar Regutratton Required
An opportunity to spend your noon hour (12:05- 12:SSp.m.) wise-ly by
participating in a law Impact aerobics program held on Monday, Wednesday, and
F rlday In 108 Christenbury Gymnasium. AH ECU Faculty and Staff are welcame to
participate free of charge. Instructor: Bonnie Teague
PIPELINE PUMPHOUSE
GARRETT HALL FITNESS CLASS
SPRING 1991
Registration dates
�204 CG9 am-Spm
January 22-25
March 5-19
'Ciarrett Basement3:(X)p.m6 pm.
Jan. 22&23&24
March 5&6&18
Cost Per session (12 classes)
$10.00 Students
$20.00 Faculty staff spouse
Session date
January 28 - March 7
March It-April 25
All classes are available on a drop in basis with purchase of a ticket. Tickets are available In 204 rhritt-nf rL
M-Th8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. andFrlday8.005p.m. Tickets must be purchased In mialmuinlnnritV �V
Students and 110.00 Faculty staff spouse. "a ��i �a.
AmhOiASS
Cost per drop In class
II 00 Students
$2.00 Faculty staff spouse
jymnasluam,
WOO
DAYS
1 Mon (t Wed
2. Mon & Wed
3. Tues & Thurs
4. Tues et Thurs
5. Mon & Wed
6. Tues fit Thurs
TTMES
3-4pm
5:15-4S:15pm
4:05-5:05pm
S:lS-6:lSpm
rNsnucroi
TBA
TIA
TIA
TIA
Aerobics
Hl-Lo
HILo
Low Impact
Icjnlnjj
4:05-5:05 pm Toning
3:30-4pm Belly Busters
SS.00Students fir $10.00Faculty staff spouse per session
S.SOStudent &$! .00 Faculty ita� spouse per drop in; S2.50 fit $5.00 minimum purchase
TBA
TBA
Recreational Services wants to meet your fitness needs. Please let us know what classes you would like offend a
specific times and days. Drop by 204 Christenbury Gymnasium or call 757-6387 to give us your suaestUms
V





I
?
I
1
i Community
ui to
K
1LLOWSHIP
1
K for $1
in. 16 5 p.m.
dent Center
th St.
tt Di irm
nsored joint!) b) ilie
us MmiMiies
. N.( s � .
111 ttnauf 2i Matih 7
M�rrh 1 25
� � per drop-in clan
$ OOShKWnli
� irjKy Suit SpauK
IN'STtUCTOt
TBA
TBA
nu
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TIA
TIA
vternitlni
� lIMUNf
irrniiin
rBA
TBA
TIA
TBA
TBA
TBA
Mnrntng
ptlff Mli
TBA
.� by
Wednesday, and
fi are welcame to
PHOI S!
INI SS ! ASS
1991
Session datci
January 28 - March 7
March 18-Aprll 25
Cost per drop In class
$1 00 Students
r. . . J2 00 Faculty staff spouse
I k ket are avalabie tn 204 Chrlstenbury Gyrnnatluam;
purchased in minimum Increment! of JS.00
LASS
tobies
ILo
impart
INSTRUCTOR
TIA
TBA
TBA
TBA
llnJ?
ly Busters
y staff spouse per session
p in; $2.50 & $5.00 minimum purchase
TBA
fBA
se let us know what classes you would like offend at
mm or call 757-6387 to give us your suggestions.
gjg nt Mar oilman Januhary 15,1991 17
ATTENTION ECU STUDENTS
let Your SummerFall Semester Application in NOW!
Common Area
�2 large bathrooms
�Storage Closet
IS
�� a
'�mco
� �it
� 11'a'f ���a ,1 .
Pirates Landing - oners a new concept in student housing $200.00per month
for 1 year lease. $200 Security Deposit.
$225.00a month with a 4. 6. or 9 month lease. $225 Security Deposit.
Short Terni Leases also available
Rooms Complex
�Furnished �Sundeck
�Refrigerator "Gazebo
�Fully carpeted �Outdoor Grills �Kitchenette & Minrowave
Convenient & Economical
�Three Blocks for Campus & Downtown
�Utilities Included in Rent
�Energy Efficient
Laundry Facilities on Site
�Free Maid Service
�Central Heat & Air
REMCQ EAST INCjlPiQ POX 6026 � GREENVILLE. NC 27834 � 919 758-6061 i
m
� Install , � . �
I tbr .ii c ha tsu as n quired
4 fhtck A .11 Vransmtkston I lumi
5 Chti. a , , ��� � . a
fi I Heck a BraJu Fluut
i � ck a Pom ' s Ii
- ChtckA I ill Window Waaktt Fluid
9 ('htei A l-ill Battery .j Requires
'hei k t�
n. � Wuh f Blmdu
12 Infliin iinsu P'oper Pressure
I ii. umn Interior
14 Kjid Exterior W ,mow
� - Hura
OUR SERVICE HAS A LOT
OF GOOD POINTS.
I
j w VeHae
. rvci " i - from changing your oil. and tubing your chassis, to ucuumimvour interior
$2.00 OFF
on Ready In Minutes No Appointment
26 Greenville Blvd Phone:756-2579 Mon-Fri 8am-6pm Sat til 5pm

ATTIC
NX'S LEGENDARY
ROCK N ROLL
NIGHTCLUB
-�-
NOW IN OUR
19th YEAR IN
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
TUES. AN. 15TH
WELCOME BACK ECU
CONCEPT
WED. JAN. 16TH
THURS. JAN. 17TH
CARROT TOP

o
V�
FRI.JAN. 18TH
AWESOME rev. billy c wirtz
1991 OUTRAGEOUS AAUSIC
WEEK

CLASSIC ROCK
ECUS �M
BAND
BEACH AAUSIC'S "1 SHOW
209 East Fifth St. if 752-7303
THIS BUD'S
FOR YOU.
GET IN THE CLUB
A$100 Opening Deposit gets you all this�
Unlimited Checking with No Minimum Balance
Personalized Duplicate Checks with Check Storage,
the first order is free
Automatic Teller Machine with National Network Ac t ess
MasterCard or Visa Credit Card
Credit Card Protection
Overdraft Protection
Emergency Cash Advances
Travelers'and Official Checks with No Issue Charge
Accidental Death Insurance
Key Loss Protection
Discounts on Travel and Recreation
Free Notary Service
Discounts on Safe Deposit Box
Savings Plan Option
We're the Only Bank on Campus!
NEW
EAST
BAN K
Hrxip Monday through Friday 9am unrtSpm 7S7 11R8 OF GRllNVILLl
Mi-mbprf(rhrFodrtdltppositln�jfarKrCfirporarain ECU � MENDENHALL





i
!
1
18
Qibt Sflgt (Harolininn
1991
CLASSIFIEDS
Janurary 15,1991
St HVICI S
A BAHAMAS PARTY CRUISE Six
daysonly$279! Jamaica & Florida six
days $299! Davtona $159! Panama
Cify$99! Spring Break Travel 1-800-
638-6786.
WAN 111)
Student Income Tax Returns
Program Developed b
Professionals Specifically tor
College Students
W5-4977
Pittard Perru
Vl Ul lv INCORPORATED
CtNTlFlfO �U�IIC �CCOUT��M
HELP WANTtD
RES! PART-TIME JOB IN TOWN
The Waffle House is currently ac-
cepting applications for all petitions
hill and part-time. Must be neat,
pleasant, dependable and enjov
working with the public No experi-
ence neeevarv We will train. Apply
in person only at XK S� Creenville
Hlvd Mon In 2p.m to4 p.m
hi lp wanted Welcome back
Students! What better wav to begin
the semester than with a position m
retail Limited part-time sales posi-
tions available with Brady's and
Brady's for Men Apply Brody's the
Plaza Mon-Wed 1p.m.4 p.m.
BABY-SITTERS NEEDED Com
munity Bible Stud y, a women's inter-
denominational Bible Study, meet
ing at Oakmont Baptist Church
Thursday mornings, 9 a.m. to 11:30
a.m needs several young women to
work in our nurscrv area to provide
patient, loving rare to our youngest
participates. Church nursery experi-
ence preferred but not necessary.
Must provideown transportation and
lie able to make commitment through
May 2nd. Call Pat Stansell. class
coordinator, 756-0842.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at homo Call far
informat ion. 504-641 -MM fixt. 520
FEMALE DANCERS wanted
Bti ppersMor adult night dub. Start-
ing at P 00 hour. 756-6278. Audi-
tion on Tuesday 7 p.m9 p.m. Call
lor appointment
SOCCER COACH: Experienced
OtMCh to assist with 1977 Greenville
Stars Select team. Excellent salary,
must be available Mondays and
Wednesdays after 4 pan. Send letter
describing experience to Willie
Nelms, 206 Lee Strect,Greenville, NC
27858.
PART-TIME BABY-SITTER needed
for Tuesday and Thursday from 2:15
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Must have own
transportation. Please call 756-6319.
HELP WANTED: NewUsed Car
Sales position. No experience re-
quired. Contact Jeff Allen. 355-3333.
TELEMARKETERS needed imme-
diately! Big money! Call 355-1686.
40 HOUR WEEKS. Seeking 30 col-
lege-age or older staff for Durham
YMCA summer day camps. Re-
quirements: Own transportation,
current First AidCPR certification.
Enjov outdoor activities, 10-12 weeks
commitment required Two sites with
swimming, gymnastics, archery,
crafts, music and nature Salaries
range from $2400 to $4200 for the
season. Resumes incl ud ing references
no later man 1-20-91. Applvto: Sum-
mer Day Camp Counselor, Durham
YMCA-Eno,P.O.Boxl5940,Durham,
NC 27704, or Durham YMCA-Liko-
wood. 2119 Chapel Hill Road,
Durham, NC 27707.
FOR SALE
LAPTOP COMPUTER IBM com
patible (MS-DOS 3.2) with 10 MEG
HP, internal printer, external DD.
Full documentation with many extra
accessories. HOO. 355-5949.
APPLE MACINTOSH SE COM-
PUTER with two internal floppy disk
drives, extra software and all manu-
als. SI(XX) cash 746-9157.
TOR SALE: AKC Mini Schnauer
pup. Male7 weeks. All shots Excel-
lent watch dog for your apt. Ador-
able $250. Price negotiable. 757-
1044.
HARDWOOD FOR SALE $50 per
truck load. Delivered and stacked
free Call 752-3368 and leave mes-
sage
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Head
Residency Status and Tuition the
practical pamphlet written b) an
attorney on the In-state IfstfeftC)
application process. For Safe Stu-
dent Stores, Wnght Building
PFRSONALS
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF
AOl h hope evervone had a wonder-
ful break and are ready for an excit-
ing semester!
AOriv BETA NUS: Keep US the great
work! The search for the BIG I begins
soon - the sisters.
AOl h ROSEBALL - 18 days away'
AOIli: Congratulations to the 1991
officers- -PresidentMervdithC.rogan.
PFRSONALS
Vice President - Fay Jones, Pledge
Educator - Elizabeth Freeman,
Chapter Treasurer - Myra Winget,
Corporation Treasurer - Christi
Smith, Recording Secretary - Jamie
Hixon, Corresponding Secretary -
Laura L.uguire, Chapter Relations -
Andrea Levison, House Manager -
Carey Lucas, Rush Chairman -
Heather Hatch. Assistant Rush
Chairman - Jana Holland, Scholar-
ship - Natalie Brown, Social Chair-
man - Amy Fridel, Public Relations -
Caroline I laire, K of R - Terri Edelen,
ranhellenicPelegate- Tracy Woody,
Panhellenic Executive - Jodi Gear,
Membership Educator - Melissa
Spam, Alumnae Relations - Cathy
Savage, Fundraising - Torry
Davidson, Songleader - Stephanie
Sylvester, Intramural Representative
Beth Weiler, 1 listorian - Lisa Gale,
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share
2 bedroom apt. furnished $200.00
month plus 1utilities. Prefer male
nonsmokcr Must be neat and re-
sponsible (. all Scott at 757 2402.
ROOMMATE WANTED I cmale
nonsmokcr preferably senior or
graduate student needed to share 2
bedroom house plus 12 utilities.
1 ocated next to campus. Call Katie
at 752-8886.
Dea ill) il �' i
� � �
i nt t- .1 ' li �
I DIVERSITY rRIMF.MS
�I i .hi .1 V it iI
�N it ii St i i Men
�in High�a) Patrol Suuun
1 iiniH a i m: � S300i iin.nih
i tilavi M.i linim iUi.imi.
i mii.i upen p' B. 2 5 !mh
�AZALEA (. KII S�
uetarj t � �-a-fc ��na'� � 1241
Ml ihti !l Ml Kl M i �
PERSONAl S
Corporation Representative - Marg-
aret Ihlendfeld.
THE S1G EPS would like to wish all
ECU students good luck in the spring
semester!
LORE On the "21st day of Christ-
mas" I give to you: one Christmas
present, one Happy Belated Birthday
wish, anything else that you wish for
and a new name: Krause. Lenny
CONGRATULATIONS to the
newly elected officers of Kappa
Sigma. Em Croom -Grand Master,
Greg Burgess Grand Procurator,
Noland Mattocks Treasurer, Tho-
mas Bell - Secretary, Clint Williams -
Grand Master of Ceremonies and to
Carlton Pools - IFC Treasurer. Your
Brothersand Pledges of Kappa Sigma.
ATTENTION LCA. First Mr. Potato
Head and then it was Dillon Fence.
Thanks for two awesome parties.
Next time we'll trash our house. From
the Kappa SigS
WELCOME BACK ECU (ustincase
you don't remember there was a
personal in December. It said some-
thing new is on the rise, and to look
for it in the lanuary sky Well now
we're here and ready to go. We're a
local somntv you should get to know.
So lwk for i is this week all vou misses
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
rjM OPEN I NDER
Km M vv ownership
STILL SERVING YOI
win I a Aim HP
WD All � PRODUCTS
ACROSS 1 K �1 VILI K IMA
and misters and come meet the new
Pi Delta sisters. Join us Thursday at
Wrong Way Corringan's.
ADP'S. If s a little late but the social
was a blast. Lef s do it again this
semester. The Sigma Pi's.
ALPHA PHI'S: Hell of a social damn
it. Sigma Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS! to
Courtney Jones for being selected as
one of the new DRUM MAJORS for
the ECU Marching Pirates! I knew
you could do it. Keep those directing
muscles in shape and good luck next
year. Love, Pee Dee the Pirate.
THE STUDENT PIRATE CLUB is
sponsoring a bus trip to the UNC-
Wilmington basketball game on
January 26th. Cost is SI 5.00 for mem-
bers and 520.00 for non-members.
This indudes ticket and transporta-
tion. For more information, call 757-
4540.
ALPHA PHI would like to welcome
everyone back. We hope you have a
wonderful spring semester' Love,
the Alpha Phi's.
I
Moooove
your stuff with
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Carolinian
classifieds,
its utterly
fantastic!
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Limited nine onl)
240H Charles St Suite s s -Sl
FASHION MODUS
NEEDED
local photographct has
immediate for female
models tor a sportswear
catologue. Prefet size 8,
ages 18-26. Call 830-0872
toi an appointment
GEl YOUIt MONDAY CARD I KM
AN I.XTRA DISCO! "NT ON ART ANT)
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SAT SI N MON
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IN III STREET
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KOADSERVM i i ircenvdfc. NC
ART OF
THE STATE
FAMILY
MEDICAL CARE
Office Hours:
8MAM -8.WPM Mon-Fri
8M AM - 4.00 PM Sat.
(.Will II � N �
VI III! 'I I
n �
George Klein, M.D FAAF.P.
Physician
Henrietta Williams. Ph.D.
Psychologist
No Appo.ntme.it N�K���a.v gg QRfBAUi BlVO
GREEWLLt NC 27558
1355-5454
WC GIFTS
Unique Valentine's Gifts
Handmade Cards, Jewelry, Pottery
Gift Baskets of Gourmet Foods
Fine Chocolates, Coffees
It's downtown, next to UBE
Mon-Sat 11-6 (Emer at ir:w Cotanchc St. Counvardi 752-9881
ANNOUNCEMENTS
PiSlCxMAALPilA
First meeting of 1991 semester is set
fur Tuesday, January 22nd, 4 p.m. in
BC 105 (POLS LIB)Plans for spring
will he made. Please tell Mrs. Smith
(POLS Secretary), Dr. Sea vo or Doug
if you are unable to attend.
ECUQ
East Carolinian Honor's Organiza-
tion will be meeting January 17,1991
at 5 p.m in the Fleming Hall base-
ment. All Honor Students are invited
to attend
BLQQDJ2&IVE
The Biology Club is sponsoring a
Blood Drive the 16th and 17th of
January (Wed k Thurs). It will be
held at Mendenhall Student Center
from 12:00 to 600 p.m. Domino's
Pizza will be providing free pizza to
dolors! Due to the absence of our
troops in the U.S the Blood bank
MM many new donors. Please come
oi it ind give! Also anyone interested
in helping with the drive please con-
tact Heather Pattie 752-1706 or
Deborah Daniels 355-9183. Any help
would be appreciated!
STUDENT UNION
1 he Student Union Public Relations
and Publicity Committee will meet
on Tuesday (today), January 14 at
? 00 p.m. in room 242 of Mendenhall
Student Center. Please plan to at-
tend!
EREE BJJl PRESSURE
Did you know that high blood pres-
sure is one of the three majors nsk
factors for heart disease? Know your
number. FREE screening will be
available at the Student Store on
Tuesday, January 15th from 1:00 p.m.
to 3:00 p.m. Call 757-6794 for more
information.
WE NEED YOUR EXPERIENCE
Your achievements in everyday situ-
ations can be useful to others. Earn
that feeling of accomplishment. Real
Crisis Center is recruiting volunteer
crisis counselors for our telephone
hot-line and walk-in center. We will
be offering training classes in this
enriching field beginning January 23,
1991. Call 758-HELP or come by 312
East 10th Street.
TEENS!
Dial-a teen is interested in your valu-
able time. We are looking for special
teens, between the ages of 15 and 18,
who would like to volunteer their
valuable listening skills to help oth-
ers in crisis. We are offering training
classes for out teen hotline beginning
January 23,1991. Call 758-HELP or
come by 312 East 10th Street.
NATIONAL STUDENT
EXCHANGE
Why not spend an exciting semester
or year at one of over 99 colleges or
universities in the US. and earn credit
towards graduation. Don't miss this
opportunity to sec new places, trawl,
and take on new challenges. If you
have a CPA of 2.5 or better, you can
pay ECU tuition and avoid the red
tape normally associated with trans-
ferring to another institution. There
isa simple application procedurcand
the deadline for next fall or spring is
March 1! For more information and a
brochure contact Stephanie Evancho
in Brewster A-l 17, or call at 757-6769.
SUEFORI - EDUCATIQNAL
GROUP
On campus support-educational
group is forming for women students
who binge or purge and binge. For
more information call 551-2404, ask
for Regina.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
Tucs, 115: Gerri Reese, darinet, Se-
nior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7
p.m free). Thurs, 117: East Caro-
lina Brass Quintet, Jeff Jarvis, director
(Fletcher Recital Hall,7pjn free) Fri,
118: Steve Fitts, trombone, Gradu-
ate Recital (Fletcher Rerital Hall, 9:00
p.m free). Sun, 120: Linda
Smith.piano, Graduate Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 3:15 p.m free).
Sun, 120 Faculty Recital, Jay A
Pierson, baritone with guest artists
Terry Rhodes, soprano, and Victoria
Fischer, piano (Fletcher Recital Hall,
M5 p.m free). Dial 757-4370 for the
School of Music "Recorded Calen-
dar
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed for figure drawing
classes spring semester. Wages $5.70
per hour. Contact Connie Follmer,
Jenkins office, 757-6563 or Tran
Gordley, Jenkins 1307,757-6259.
ATTENTION ALL NURSING
STIITIFNT GRADUATING
In order to receive your Nursing Pin
in April, orders must be placed in the
Student Stores, Wright Building no
later than February 8, 1991. Orders
should be placed at the Service Desk.
Orders must be paid in full when
placed.
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter invites you to worship with them.
Sunday Masses 11:30 a.rru (Ledonia
Wright Cultural Building) and 8:30
p.m. (Newman Center, 953 E. 10th
St two houses from Fletcher Music
Building). Weekdays 8 a.m. and
Wednesdays 5:30 p.m. at the
Newman Center.
HOW NUTRITION AFFECTS
YOUR HEALTH
Special classes will be offered to the
Family Practice Center and will fo-
cus on different areas of nutrition.
January 28: "Exercise and Your
Health" will be presented. " High
Cholesterol and High Blood Pres-
sure- Healthy Eating for a Healthy
Heart will be held on February 11,
1991. On February 25,1991 "Eating
Disorders: HowThinis'TN"?" There
is a small charge for each program.
Call Mary Merner at 551-5459 Mon-
day through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. to register for any or all of
these dasses.
FITNESS CLASS
REGISTRATION
Registration dates for the first session
of fitness dasses will be January 22-25
in 204 Christenbery Gym. The ses-
sion dates will be e from January 28-
March 7. The cost for the session is
$10.00 students and $20.00 Fac-
ulty Staff Spouse. For further in-
formation call 757-6387 or stopby 204
Christenbury Gym.
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS
MEETING
There will be an intramural basket-
ball officials meeting Wednesday,
January 16, 7100 p.rnVBC 103. For
further information, call 757-6387 or
stop by 204 Christenbury Gymna-
sium.
EO; AMBASSADORS
Welcome Back! Our first General
Meeting will be in Mendenhall Great
Room 1 at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
January 16.
OUTDOOR SMORGASBORD
The ROC-Recreational Outdoor
Center will sponsor an outdoor
smorgasbord on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 16,7p.m. to9a.m. in Christenbury
Gym 117. So tempt your tastebuds
and come join the fun. For further
information call 757-6387 or stop by
204 Christenbury Gymnasium. The
Outdoor Smorgasbord is Free of
charge for all faculty, staff and stu-
dents
INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL
REGISTRATION
A team captain's meeting for intra-
mural 5 on 5 basketball will be held
January 22at5-J0pm in BIO 103. All
interested individuals must attend
this meeting! A Recreational Repre-
sentative will be taking individual
sign-ups at the following location
and times:
January 16 11 JO am. - 130 p.nv
Cotton 1
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Belk
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Jones
January 17 11:30 a.m. - 1J0 p.m.
Umstead
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m
White
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 pan.
Garrett
For additional information call 757-
6387 or stop by 201 Christenbury
Gymnasium.
How the ECU basketb;
teams have fared thus
By Doug Morris
Sporti Editor
&
Matt
Assistant
V
p.
i
7
O
V
MIKE STEELES PIRATES
The ECU men's basketball team has had a topsyi
season to date With a 7-7 record (1-2 in conference
team does not look like the exceptional grouping oi
had seemed at the beginning of the season
Granted, there are some exceptional players s
guard Seve Richardson already holds the H 11 cart
for three-point shots with 104 and will probably Lki
several more three-point records before the end of u
In addition, Lester Lyons continues to score in i
figures leading the all the freshmen in theCotoroaJ
Association with 17.8 points pr ga ter the Pill
over Campbell, Lyons was named CAA pi a i
Sophomore center Ike Copeland ranks seventh in ;1
rebounds with 6.5 rebounds per game.
Asa team, the Pirates are sei w d in the league
accuracy (47.8 percent I
But with all these bonuses, why is the Piral
They have lost to such basketball greats asDuki j
and their losses to American. lames Madia m and
were all close, tough games
Part of the problem ecu Id h the Piratesdismal
accuracy (55.4 percent) which puts them last in the
throws can make or break a tean
that the Pirates have faced
Or it could be as senior center Tim Bn
game against Amencan We aw the t
are going well, everything rust gceb a ell
wrong, everything goes wrong
The ECU-American game is but one l
went into the second half up by six points but on t
possession, thev himed over the ball to Aum j
for three points
Then Copeland fouled America!
up, to give the Eagles another three point plav ' i
two unanswered shots bv Amencan and the Piratej
gone
The game against MU isanothersu hcasi
of the second half, the Pirates led bv six, but thing
wrong. Not terriblv wrong, but when every thing d
for the other team, it does not take much
Copeland missed his first fav throw on i
with 7:31 left, Richardson picked up a foul. Tb
Brooks hit both shots, and Steve Hood followed uj
more baskets. Suddenly the Pirates were trailing
clock down and each time ECU would foul I
�rJtWMrf theflfol r ff-UAf�J
Most teams havealaadv conceded the lop spj
conference to IMU Unless something srunrar
battle is going to be for second through fourth
If Brown's explanation is right, then the
play exceptional basketball tor the rest of the si
to avoid finishing the season as anything but a m
With onlv three non-conference games remai
13 it is crunch time.
PAT PIERSON'S LADY P1RA1
The Ladv Pirates basketball team started
thp i99f'91 season in good fashion hey earned
junior forward Tonya Hargrove named Colonial
tion Player of the Week and handilv won the 1 adj
The Lady Pirates crushed Coastal Carob
game of the season despite poor Kill control. Thd
stomp Dayton University KXVWand then won thj
Classic beating Northwestern Stale Universit) �
Hargrove proved herself in the first three ganj
points and six rebounds which won her the CAAF
Week honor the first week oi the season
Through the first three weeks of the seat II
nation in field goal accuracy, shooting an arnaanj
However, in the next five games ECL suftenl
tive losses that deflated their early season elation
Against Appalachian State, ECU suffered it
season losing a tough game ?6-72
At home against Campbell University, ECl
an eleven point first half deficit and threatened t.
the final minutes. The Lady Pirates let the game
77-73.
In that game senior center Sandra Grace hacil
rebounds and Hargrove had 22 points and eight
ECU went to Northwestern Louisiana for tr
and tost another close game 71-67.
The Lady Pirates went into their seventh gai
State with a 3-3 record and suffered a fourth on
They were held to a season low score of 54 tosH
Senior forward Sarah Crav lead the team wi
five rebounds. In the game ECU made 30 petosj
the lowest percentage of the year.
After their Louisiana tour the Lady Pirates I
the University el Flonda, then 11-3, and hoped
game losing streak ECU put together a dtp
69-54 to push their losing streak to five games
The one bnght spot of the game was HargT
26 points and six rebounds. Grace lead the tear
eight. ,
ECU finally reiieemed themselves at home
University in their first conference match of the?
Pirates won bv a decisive score of 80-62 aided H
efforts who lead the team with 18 points and h
forward Connie Small also pitched in 16 points
After the Ainerican game Hargrove was
of the Week for the second time this year. Dun
Hargrove average 22 points and 11 rebounds
Asa team the Lady Pirates are 15th in tr
accuracy and first in the CAA m scoring and "
aveTages74p�itsagameandisshooting46.4i
in the CAA in rebounding averaging 42 a gar
SeeTaajma,pagei8
h
r.





JmmiJA.132
PIUSONAI o
w rhis indudcs ticket and transporta-
tion For monMnformation, call 757.
1540
M PHA PHI would hke to welcome
- 1 eback We hope you have a
spring semester! Love
� ,i Phi s
l)S
I
Moooove
our stuff with
The East
Carolinian
classifieds,
its utterly
fantastic!
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Company ofgrunwffe Ltd. 1
IIH U'l M iXI
lODI I s
w
v NDA CARD FOB
OUNTONARTAND
SI PPUBS
SI N MON
Art store
Rlvd Pk JS3 fM8?
. 'I.IWI
ART OF
THE STATE
ierv
I BE
� : '52-9881
I hi' Ms
� iarv 28-
-1, is
H �
r further in-
r stop by 204
piClALS
tral basket-
I :nesday,
IBC 109. For
757-6387 or
irv Gvmna-
)ORS
frst General
enhall Great
Wednesday,
QUEQQQS SMORGASBORD
The ROC-Recreafional Outdoor
� r will sponsor an outdoor
smorgasbord on Wednesday, Janu-
' 7p.nt to9i m.inChristenbury
117. So tempt your tastebuds
come joir the fun. For further
nation call 757-6187 or stop by
� nstenbury Gymnasium. The
"� Smorgasbord is Free of
charge tor all faculty, staff and stu-
l M RAMfRALBASKtTBALL
REGISTRATION
A team captain's meeting for intra-
mural s on s basketball will be held
ternary 22at 5.30 p.m. in BIO 103. All
fed individuals must attend
this meeting! A Recreational Repre-
m tative will be taking individual
� upl a the following location
ami times
January 16 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
I rton 1
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Belk V V
SaOO p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Jones
lanuary 17 11 30 am - 1:30 p.m.
I'mstead
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
White K
5:00 p.m. - 7.00 p.m.
Garrett
For additional information call 757-
J387 or stop by 201 Christenbury
Gymnasium.
Januhary 15.1991
How the ECU basketball
teams have fared thus far
By Doug Morris
Sports Editor
&
Matt Mumma
Assistant Sports Editor
� ' -rthe
i ii things
ne thing goes
MIKE STEELE'S PIRATES
The ECU men's basketball team has had a topsy-turvy
season to date With a 7-7 record (1-2 in conference play), the
team does not look like the exceptional grouping of talent that it
had seemed at the beginning of the season.
Granted, there are some exceptional players. Sophomore
guard Sieve Richardson already holds the ECU career high mark
for three-point shots with 104 and will probably take over
several more three-point records before the end of the season.
In addition, Lester Lyons continues to score in double
figures leading the all the freshmen in the Colonial Athletic
Association with 17.8 points per game After the Pirate's win
over Campbell, Lyons was named CAA player of the week.
Sophomore center Ike Copdand ranks seventh in the CAA for
rebounds with 6.5 rebounds pit game.
As a team, the Pirates are second in the league in field goal
accuracy (47.8 percent).
Put with all these bonuses, why is the Pirate's record still 7-7.
They have lost to such basketball greats as Puke and Purdue,
and their losses to American, lames Madison and Old Dominion
were all close, tough games.
Part of the problem could be the Pirates dismal free-throw
accuracy (55 4 percent) which puts them last in the league. Free
throws can make or break a team especially in the close- games
that the Pirates have faced.
Or it could be as senior center Tim Brown
game against American: "We are the typeo
are going well, everything just goes well, but
wrong, everything goes wrong
The FCU-American game is but one example. The Pirates
went into the second half up by six points, but on their first
possession, they turned over the Kill to American who converted
for three points.
Then Copcland fouled American's Craig Sedmark on a lay-
up, to give the Eagles another three-point play. Next followed
two unanswered shots by American and the Pirate lead was
gone.
The game against (MU is another such case. At the midpoint
of the second half, the Pirates led by six. but things started to go
wrong. Not terriblv wrong, but when even thing is going right
for the other team it does not take much.
Copdand massed his tirst free throw on one-and-one. Then
with 7:31 left, Richardson picked up a foul. The Dukes' Kenny
Brooks hit both shots, and Stove I Iood followed Up with two
more baskets Suddenly the Pirates were trailing. JMU ran the
clock down and each time EG would foul to get possession
Most teams have already conceded the top spot in the
conference to JML I fntess something stunning happens, the
Kittle is going to be for second through fourth
If Brown's explanation is right, then the Pirates will have to
play exceptional basketball for the rest of the season if thev want
to avoid finishing the season as anything but a mediocre team.
With only three non-conference games remaining out of the next
13 it is crunch time.
PAT PIERSON'S LADY PIRATES
The Lady Pirates Kisketball team started out the first week oi
the I9f0'91 season in good fashion. They earned three wins, had
junior forward Tonya Hargrove named Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion Player of the Week and handily won the 1 jdv Pirate Classic
The Lady Pirates crushed Coastal Carolina 85-55 in the first
game of the season despite poor ball control. They went on to
stomp Dayton University 100-80 and then won the Ladv Pirate
Classic beating Northwestern State University 81-69.
Hargrove proved herselt in the tirst three games averaging 22
points and six rebounds which won her the CAA Player of the
Week honor the first week of the season.
Through the first three weeks of the season Hargrove lead the
nation in field goal accuracy, shooting an amazing 73 percent.
However, in the next five games ECU suffered five consecu-
tive losses that deflated their early season elation.
Against Appalachian State, ECU suffered if s first defeat of the
season losing a tough game 76-72.
At home against Campbell University, ECU came back from
an eleven point first half deficit and threatened to win the game in
the final minutes. The l.ady Pirates let the game slip away and lost
77-73.
In that game senior center Sandra Grace had 15 points and 13
rebounds and Hargrove had 22 points and eight rebounds.
ECU went to Northwestern Louisiana for their next match up
and lost another close game 71 -67.
The Lady Pirates went into their seventh game at Nicholls
State with a 3-3 record and suffered a fourth consecutive loss.
They were held to a season low score of 54, losing 69-54.
Senior forward Sarah Gray lead the team with 12 points and
five rebounds. In the game ECU made 30 percent of their shots
the lowest percentage of the year.
After their Louisiana tour the lady Pirates came back to host
the University of Florida, then 11 -3, and hoped to break a four
game losing streak. ECU put together a depressing game and lost
69-54 to push their losing streak to five games.
The one bright spot of the game was Hargrove, who amassed
26 points and six rebounds. Grace lead the team in rebounds with
eight.
ECU finally redeemed themselves at home against American
University in their first conference match of the season. The Lady
Pirates won by a decisive score of 80-62 aided by Hargrove's
efforts who lead the team with 18 points and 14 rebounds. Junior
forward Connie Small also pitched in 16 points and Gray added
13.
After the American game Hargrove was named CAA Player
of the Week for the second time this year. During the week
Hargrove average 22 points and 11 rebounds
As a team the Lady Pirates are 15th in the nation in shooting
accuracy and first in theCAA in scoring and shooting accuracy. ECU
averages74pointsa game and isshooting464 percent. ECU is second
in the CAA in rebounding averaging 42 a game.
See Teams, page 18
She JEaot (Unroltnian
19
SPORTS
i ss
Patriots hand ECU
third CAA defeat
Pirates now 1-3
C�lMla Hoffman � ECU Photo Ub
Sophomore center Ike Copeland attempts to power through George
Mason's senior forward Robert Dykes for the lay up
By Tim Hampton
Staff Writer
Times are getting tough for
East Carolina in conference play
as the George Mason Patriots
handed the Pirates their third
straight Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation loss74-72 Monday night at
Minges Coliseum.
Exploiting an advantage in
size, George Mason pounded the
ball into power forward Robert
Dykes and center Byron Tucker,
who both contributed 19 points.
ECU was lev! by its potent
outside attack of freshman guard
Lester Lyons, who tied for scoring
honors with Mason's M ike Hargett
with 21 points, and Stevie
Richardson, who scored 14 in-
cluding three three-pointers.
Although ECU forged a three-
point lead in the opening minute
of the second half, GMU mounted
a 10 pc.r.t lead with 7:24 remain-
ing or. two Dykes free throws.
AfterclosingMason'slead,the
Iirates came within a chance of
overtime as Richardson hita three-
pointer with six seconds left.
Dykes then sank a free throw
to assure the Mason victory before
the Pirates' Lester Lyons hit two
inconsequential free throws with
no time on the clock.
In the early going,
Richardson had the hot trigger
as the sophomore sharp shooter
scored eight points in the span
of a minute to give the Pirates a
13-6 lead. However, Richardson
was benched for the majority of
the second half.
"We really couldn't find
anybody he (Richardson) could
match up with and, they were
taking it right at him ECU head
coach Mike Stecle said when
asked why the guard remained
out for eight of the final nine
minutes.
The match-up problems
Steele referred to were with
Dykes, who at 6-7, 225, proved
to be the muscle while Tucker,
at 6-10, 215, played the finesse
gamc,canningdunksand three-
pomtcrs alike.
"Tonight, they were taller
and stronger than we were, just
ke James Madison and
American Steele said. "We
were goingagainst bigger guys,
and we are in a situation where
we are struggling anyway
George Mason head coach
Ernie Nestor said he was sur-
prised with the victory.
See GMU, page 22
JMU's Hood overcomes illness, Pirates
Richardson sinks personal high 32 points as team falls, 72-68
By Tim Hampton
Staff Writer
I
Shaking off an upset stomach '
prior to Saturday night's game,
James Madison standout guard
Steve Hood found the medicine
necessary to fetid off ECU'S
chancesofan upset over the Dukes.
Scoring eight of MU's last 12
points, Hood led the Colonial
Athletic Association's top dogs to
a 72-68 victory over the home court
Pirates ina sold out Minges Coli-
seum
Led by the unconscious out-
side shoo tingof Steve Richardson,
the Pirates avenged a four-point
halfttme deficit to lead the Dukes
for the majority of the second half.
Richardson, who connected on six
three-pointers, poured inacareer-
high 32 points, including a trey-
pointertoput ECU npby five with
under eight minutes remaining.
But then Hood, theCAA'sco-
playex of the year for the 1989-00
season, hit a 1? footer off the glass
a minute later to evaporate the
ECU lead to one. following a Pi-
rate turnover, Hood converted a
lay-up to give IMLi a 62-61 ad-
vantage, its first since the opening
moments oi the half.
The Pirates came Kick with a
Richardson lay-in to recapture the
lead with 4:27, but that proved to
be theclosest the Bucs would come
to defeating last war's conference
champions. I Iood hit an 18-footcr,
assisted to forward left Chambers
and hit two dutch free throws with
24 seconds remaining.
"You got to give them (JMU)
credit, they made the free throws
down the stretch ECU head
coach Mike Steele said "We were
just a couple plays away from
winning, our guys thought we
were going to win
Stock i.nd he vpteci to go With
a three guard offense of Paul
Childrcss, Lester Lyons and
Richardson after Richardson ex-
ploited the Dukes' zone for 17
points in the first half.
A see-saw battle for the first
10 minutes, James Madison
opened a 12 point lead before
Lyons netted two three-pointers
to cut the visitor's lead to six.
Lyons, a freshmen guard, finished
with 20 for the same including a
blistering four for six from three-
point land.
Although JMU has played the
likes of national ranked University
of Nevada at Las Vegas, Okla-
homa and East Tennessee State,
Dukes head coach Lefty Driesel
said the tough earlv schedule was
not the difference in Saturday
night's contest.
DrieseUhe flamboyant coach
who- previously , headed
WTarVlatirs pt-rjraWi,f�ria" he
thought the team would be with-
out the services of their star.
"I didn't even know if he was
going to play, but 1 have had
players to be sick before the game
and come out and play one of their
best Driesel said.
lames Madison University
7-6 (2-0)
Jeff Chambers, 1-5, 2, Billy Coles. 5-
10,10. Chancellor Nichols. 4-7,9, Fess Imn.
4-9, 13, Steve Hood. 8-12 (1-3), 21, Kenny
Brooks, 3-4 (2-2), 10, Barry Brown, 2-2, 5,
Troy Bostic. 1-1.2
East Carolina University
7-6(1-2)
Stanley Love, 0-3,0, Darrell Overton,
1 -2,4, Ike Copeland, 2-8,4, Lester Lyons, 7-
12 (4-6) 20. Paul Childrcss, 1-3, 2. Steve
Richardson. 12-21 (6-12). 32, Tim Brown. 3-
7,6
Swimmers bring in large crowd in
defeat of UNC-Wilmington Seahawks
By Christine Wilson
Staff Writer
Onceagain the Pirateswimmers
brought ina packed,cheeringcrowd
of aboutfjO people toMinges Aquatic
Center as they displayed outstand-
ing qualities which have brought
their records to 6-1 for the men and
5-2 for the women.
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams came away with an-
other victory by defeating the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Wilmington this past Saturday. The
men's team defeated the Seahawks
148-95 and the women's, 1405 to
1025.
The Pirate men started the
dominating lead by taking first and
second in the 400-yd. medley relay.
Seniors George Walters, Tom
Holsten and Steve Benkusky and
freshman Lance Tate took first with
a time of 3:34.65. Seniors Mark
O'Brien and Danny Martinez and
freshman Brian Soltz, and sopho-
more Brad Hemdon placed second
in 339.00.
Senior John I ambrakis took
second in the 1000-yd. freestyle in
9:58.90 along with Walters who
placed third in lfh04.88. In the 200
yd. free, the men's team once again
took the top three leading positions.
Junior Derek Nelson took first
with a time of 1:44.66. Freshmen
Mark Ward placed second in 1:4827
and junior Marc Cook took third in
1:4831. In the 50-yd. free, sopho-
more Mike Sever placed first with a
time of 22:46.
Senior Ted Christensen placed
first in the 200-yd. individual med-
ley with a time of 158.59. The back-
stroke duo, Walters and O'Brien,
came out on top again. Walterstook
first in the 200-yd. backstroke in
159.91 with OBrien placing second
in 2:00.44. Tate took first in the 200-
yd. breastroke with a time of 2:13.14.
In a tight race in the 400-yd. free
relay, the Pirate men battled it out
against the Seahawks relay for the
win. Seniors Sean Callender and
senior John FarreJl, and Benkusky
and Hemdon took first with a time
of 3:1662 to end the meet.
Top women contenders for this
meet ranged from senior Meredith
Bridgets to sophomore Tia Pardue
I-1CUI
Freshman swimmer Lance Tate bums down the lane in the 400-yd.
breaststroke Tate won the event in 3:34.65
and freshmen Jacqueline Silber.
The Lady Pirates began the lead
by taking first place in the 400-yd.
medley relay. Sophomores Julie
Wilhelm, Karen Baldridge and
Suzanne OBrien and freshmen Jan
Gordon finished in 4:09.11.
Silber, who swam for the
Brevard Space Coast Swimmers be-
fore entering college, set a new ECU
varsity record in the 1000-yd. free.
She replaced the old record of
103698 withatimeof 103605. Silber
also placed first in the 200 yd. free in
158.17and the500yd. freein5:l 1.01.
Pardue placed first in both the
50-and 100-yd. free. Inthe50-ydshe
set a time of 25.26 and in the 100-yU
a time of 5573. Bndgers took first in
the 200 yd. breastroke in 225.96.
Bridgersalso placed third in the 200
yd. IM in 2:1671.
The Lady Pira�es'400-yd. free
relay team of Pardue, Wilhelm,
Baldridge and Carolyn Green com-
prised a time of 3:4528 for another
win.
With two dual meets remaining
on the schedule, the teams will face
UNC-Chapel Hill Jan. 17 in Chapel
rUbetbrereturningtoECU for their
final meet on Jan. 19, against Duke
University.





f
f
t
20 Bht tagt (Earottntan Janruary 15, 1991
Sports Briefs
Hoss leads Giants over Bears, 31-3
with Jeff Hostctlei �' i I tr two touchcjownsand run-
ning tor another, and tl imped defense smothering the
run, the New York iiants rushed! hicago 51-3 to reach the NFC
championship Hostetlei mbstituted for PhilSimms(sprained
right arch Dec 15) pa; irdsand had 43of New York's
194 rushing yards San Francisco Sunday for a
berth in Super Bowl XX
Allen makes 140 yards in 21 carries
laySchrocdi i I
lorton sparked thf I
against Cincinnati
Raiders pla Mum il
his first 100 yard n
carries) Schroedi
i pass to tight end Ethan
Raiders to i 20-10 victory
emifinal Sunday The
final. M.iri us Allen had
the s 140 yards on 21
U.S. swimmers capture 23 gold
The U.S men team inished the week-long
World Swimming � ith 11 medals(sixgold);
U S women w� oth h on team titles
Newly unifii 1w eckend high-
lights worl i �� iwman (2 11 .23 in
the 100 meti i 1art 1 55 69 in the
200butterfl
Mickelsonw i n sNorthern Telecom
Phil Mickel -�� � ame the second
amateur in 35 �� a hen he sink an 8-
foot birdie putlmillion Northern
Telecom Open �t n 20,overcame
a triple boge H�1 irdie twool the last
throt- and win in i�: J ! om Purtzer.
Errly upsets in Australian open
No 12 seed tralian ()pen
debut earlv Mo ��. imping Magnus
LarssonofSw t��l ing day of the grand
slam tourn imi he USA � ored the
tournament's firsl victory routing Kelly ones f�-0, 6 1. 6-0.
Swede I ars � . " Mar RossetofSwit-
zerland -1 -
UNLV hangs on to top position
Nevada-Las - lii I No. 1 in this week's USA
TODA CNN college I I pol rest ol the lop 10
includes No. tate (14-fl No. 4.
Indiana (14-1); N No. 6 Arizona (13-
2);No.7,Syracuse �� No.9,U I.AU3-
2); and No, 1(1 L
Redmen suffer first loss at home
Malik Seah (John's ended
nnecticut's2 k wil '2 " victory
Sunday ag r.nsi � Conn rhe
Redmen (11-2 I beat the I luskies in
10 games it I last -� ison Fhe
strr.ik ,ils�i mi lu � u �, other homo
courts
Purdue beats Iowa in overtime
In "won i �
and No. 7 Purdti
84 75 victory in i
other games Mi
Stanford 80,Wasl
nirj 57; .uui N � 2i i
I !8 points
� ertime to eam an
.i I it. low,). In
orthw estern 73; No 10
� ineton 78,Califor
Trail Blazers end losing streak
1 erry Porter had 26 ; � tints and 10 assists and Buck Williams
scored ?4 points as the Port Blazers stopped a two-
game losing streak heating the i . Nets 116-103. The
Nets have lost 1 In the mils other'NBA
garni- 1 A 1 aker � �
Roses's punishment: gym teacher
Pete Rose be ome? i .�� m tea h i s assistant Mondav as ho
begins a new phase of his sentence for federal tav offenses. Rose
it scheduled to report 1 nday morning atincinnati's Heberle
Elementary School t I00 hours of commu-
nity service
Blair places well at World Cup
U.S Olympian ; Rlair missed winning her 10th con-
secutive World Cup sp � I ng medal Sunday at Davos, Swit-
zerland She finished t urth in the 1,000meters, won by Monique
Grabrocht of Switzerland Blair won the 500 Saturday.
Soccer riot kills 40 in South Africa
At least 40 people day when fans K'gan brawling,
and a panic ensued during at hibihon soccer match in the
South African town ot Orkney, 80 miles southwest of
Johannesburg, police and witnesses said. The death toll is ex-
pected to rise because the numben t seriously injured spectators,
estimated at more than 50
Rangers come from behind to win
Brian I.eetch's second goal of the game enabled the New
York Rangers to sur ivo.i blow n three goal first-penod lead and
beat the Hartford Whalers 4 !nothor'H! games: St. Louis 3,
Montreal 1; Edmonton " Philadelphia 3; N Y. Islanders 4, Que-
bec 3; Winnipeg 4, Calgary 3;hicago 5, Minnesota 3.
QCoryright 09?, MM TOMl 1r I .l,y, Ufvrmttion Network
Lady Pirates tame
LadEagles, 8062
By Doug Morris
Sports Editor
American University never had
a chance as the Lady Pirates took
the lead at the beginning of the
game and never turned it over,
trouncing the Lidy Eagles 80-62 in
ECU's first conference game of the
season.
The Lady Pirates won the tip
of) and took it to tho basket, where
sophomore guard Gaynor
O'Donnell was fouled.
She sank the first shot and
missed the second, but the Kill was
recovered by the Lady Pirates' jun-
ior forward Tonya Hargrove
Hargrove scored two to give the
Pirates the tirst throe points jir
seconds into the game.
The Lady Pirates opened up
the load to nine points midway
through the tirst half. American hit
a spurt and in tho next two minutes,
Closed ECU's k id to two.
But the Lady Pirates had hit
thoirstndo and in the eight remain-
ing minutes ol the half, they opened
up then le I to 13 points, and went
intoth rswiththeseore43-30
: i halt st.irtod evenly
both t n trading baskets for the
tirst tivi tinutes of the game.
The 1 ady Pirates were offered
severalshots from thecharity stripe,
but they showed why they arc last
in the league in tree throw shooting
(42.9 percent tor the day).
They missed throe ot their first
tour attempts, allowing the Lady
Eagles to cut the lead to nine points.
F ! f called time out with 12:43
loft in the game and regrouped It
was all they needed.
The Lady Pirates came outfrom
the break and wont on a 16-2 point
tear, opening up their load to 2b in
the next four minutes.
TieStreak turned out to bo the
death knoll for the Lady Eagles
Teams
0VIO't
AUTOMOTIVE
Foreign ft Domestic
PAftTS a SIBVICf
510 N. CreeneSt.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
Thev slowly cut the ECU lead, but
there was not enough time left in
the game and the Lady Pirates
coasted to an 18-point win.
r
MEMORIAL COINS
&PAWN
�SPORTS
�CARDS
�STAMPS
�COIN SI PPLIES
�DIAMONDS
�'IT-1 EVISIONS -STEREOS
�VCR'S -Ml S1CA1 INSTRl MENTS
�(AMI.HAS -COINS
INSTANT CASH LOANS
UK MJ GOLD A SILVER
�XII Transactions Strict!) Confidential
752-7736
655 MEMORIAL DRINK

GREENVILLE
Continued from page 19
Iheonearea that E I slacking
is free throw accuracy, whore they
are last in theA A at 59 3 percent.
Among personal bests
i largrove is on top ot the scoring,
rebounding and field goal a curacy
lists
She leads theA A in held goal
accuracy, making 67.6 percent ol her
shots. Shei; second in scoring and
rebounding averaging 17.8 points
and nine boards a game
I largrove also has tho host
shooting accuracy m ECU historv
making 543 percent of her shots
over three seasons.
Cray is fifth in the CA A in scor-
ing with 15 points a game, fourth in
rebounding witheight per gameand
eighth in shooting accuracy, making
46 percent ot her shots.
Cray is also 11 th in ECU career
scoring with i,ii85 points. She needs
onlvhvonvwpointstomovetolOth.
She is also seventh in career re-
bounding with 651 and is sixth in
career hlocks, totalling 58.
Cracois third in theC A A in field
goal accuracy making 48.8 percent
ot her shots and tenth in rebounding
with 65 boards a game
Sophomore Gaynor ODonnell
leads the CAA inassists with6.4 per
gameand isalso tied for fifth in steals
recording two a game.
Senior Mechelle Jones contrib-
utes 35 assists per game for sixth
best in the conference.
O'Donnell is eighth in ECU ca-
reer assists, amassing 215 in 1 12
seasons. She accumulated 160 last
season as a freshman.
A few recent injuries have dis-
rupted the starting line up. Both
(.rav and Small missed the Univer-
sity of Florida game. Gray has torn
cartilage in her left knee but man-
aged to play against American as
did Small, who is suffering from a
sprained ankle.
Where everybody knows your name!
Partyto yourfavorite classic rockwith thesespecials
Tue:Ladies ntte. All 1;idles m tree.
Wed: Free uk�mlx'i'slupnite
l�: 11 lapp) 11 Bartendeout 5 nl v I s choicelose. FREE munchies dunk specials
Sun"The ()riginal linK�n Nue' SI.00 imports
Don't miss our bij� Superbowl Partj Jan. 27
Big ScreenTV � Free Munchies � Ice Cold Beer
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Splash is a private club for members and guests 21 and
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Special Me:
th thi
A SALUTE TO THE
LEADERS OF TOMORROW -
AIR FORCE ROTC CADETS.
I (illcvjc is a time lor decision Some will choose to
ecorne leaders - through Vr �
Smart move The whoie I '�� rceROTt
revolves around tho cultivation of qualities that count
for leadership And whether you're about to start col-
lege or have already begui � -� .
de� ision noil
Upon actuation, you'll be an ir � � Hkref You'll
;�issess solid management skills and a strong sense ol
self-assurance You'll km the demands �: sui i ess and
the meuiing f responsibility
And you'll have the great wealth i opportunities
accorded, to those who choose t be eaders
start now Contat t
DEFT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES -
(919)757 6597 ' r'
I eadership Excellence Starts Here
Billy E. Creech
Optician k Manager
Doctor's Park, Blcig. 1
Stantonshnr Road
dreenville, NC Z7&34
(same office complex with
Greenville Eve ilinio
Welcome Back Students and Faculty
25 Discount on all Designer Frames
and Preseription Lenses for all
ECU students and Faculty plus
no charge for tinting lenses
($15.00 value)
Especially for ECU
Special selection
Frame and lense. Presecription including tinted lenses
only $69.95 for single vision and only
$79.95 for bifocals
Appointments made upon request
"Putting you first makes us 1"
Same day service on most prescriptions
Call Greenville Opticians To Help Arrange
Your Next Eye Examination
(919)752-4018
Get Fit E
GAME PLAN
ECU Flag Football
Teams head to the
Nationals Finals
The men's and womens
campus flag football
got a first Hand look at
Mardi Gras country over
the Christmas holidays as
they took part in the Na-
tional Intramural R
Football Championship
Tournament Dec 28-31.
Women's representatives
Hammertime enjoyed
their trip to New Orleans,
LA despite being nailedby
the University of Ala-
bama-Birmingham (Na-
tional runner-ups
Over 141) men s
and co-rec squa m
across the nation ar.
vited yearly. Three ECU
officials were selet ted I
represent ECU thro igl
the tournament Haywood
Dillahunt, Willie George
and Craig Nestor c
ated a variety ol ntests
Nestor was selectee, is u
All- American Official
earned the right I ffici-
ate on the floor of the
Superdome during an
exhibition contest at the
Sugar Bowl.
Schick Super Hoops
3-on-3's Dribble to
South Carolina
Strictly Business and
LP Rejects, men s and
�women's intramural 3-on-
�3 basketball champ
will be traveling to Fur-
man University Ianuar 26
to t
Super Hoops
Tournament.
Griffin leads
- while Anl
bins ; � n
- hav
to work the
Hi
lahunt, John 1
Locke Monroj
Mack, Craig
Chuck Know
George. Kris
Al 1
Hoop an
B-ball SI
Upon L
i
no-
Th- '�
for I
be held januaj
pm in Biolov;
tea usl

: regis
lay
Recre
live wi
Cgtte Rv
fanoary
Belk l
fones urn
5 I
I7atll F
ary 17 at 3:1
Garrel
January 17
incH duals r
I
bpring 1991 Recreational Facility
Hours of Operation
Garrett Weight Room
MonThurs l 0Qpm-� Xprr
Friday ' OOpm-5 I
Sunday I OOpm-5 Xc-
Christenbury Gym Swimming Pool
MonFn 7 0Oam-8 00am
MonFn II 30am-l 3Qpm
Tues. & Tbcirs. . . 3 Xprrvo 30pm
Mon.& Wed3 00pm-? CXp
Friday 3Xc-oXc-
Saturday 12-00-5 00c
Sunday. 1 00pm-5 OOpro
Christentxiry Gymnasium
Mon.Wed.Fn. 12 noon-1 30pm
Mon.Tues 4Xpm-6.Xpm
Wed.ThursFn 300pm-6 00p
Saturday 12 00-5 00pm
Sunday 1 OOpm-5 00pm
Ctwtstentxjry Gym Weight Room
MonFn. 7 Xam-8 00am
MonThurs i000am-9Xpm
Friday I0 00am-6 00pm
Saturday I2 00am-5 00pm
Sunday . I 00pm-5.00pm
Mngcs CoHseum Swimminfl Pool
Mon.AAed.Fn 7 30pm-9 00pm
Tues Thurs 6 00pm-8 00pm
Mngcs Coliseum Weight Room
MonThurs 200pm-800pm
Friday 2 00pm-5 00pm
Equipmtnt Chech Out
(115 Christenbury Gyms
MonThurs. . 10:00am-9 00pm
FridayI0:00am-600pm
Saturday12:00-5 00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
informal
SP
Karate
The ECU
success I
Cham
Cai
place finisj
f
Enjoy ai
Recreatio
program
is instrucl
These teat
welcome
students
interested!
sport prod
call Tat CJ
Current a
fencing,
rugbv, wd
crewrow!
E
e





1
20 v�J?c �m�t vf uruliuian Janruaw 15. 1991
Sports Briefs
smotherine the
torea htlu-M (
Hoss leads (iiants over Bears, 31-3
With I s ns and run
n i n g t. � r . i � � � �
run theNc
championsh , � Simms ; sprained
right an I . I fNev York s
194 rushing -unday foi i
berth in Sup i
Allen makes 140 yards in 21 carries
� tend 1 than
lav N ni
Hortoi
ist Cii
Raidri :
his hi '
i .i! ni � �
U.S. svvin
it i s �
� i
l ivomi �
Newh
i, .1
Mickelson w
amatem
foot bird
.1 t
� I .
1-10 vicl �
undav
� Mien had
to re 23 gold
week lone
: ni titti
� n I high
' in the
rn Telecom
�nd
. i � '� a n H

Lady Riates lame
Lady Eagles, 8032
By Doug Morris
Sports Editor
Early upsets in Australian open
slan
tournan
Swedi ' �
UNLV ban
lm ludi �
Red men su
1. Ml
American University never had
a chance as the Lady Pirates UhI�.
the lead .it the beginning of the
game and never turned it over,
trouncing the Lady Eagles80-62 in
ECU's first conference game of tin-
season.
1 he I ad) Pirates won the tip
oft and took it to the basket, where
�.phomre guardi nr
( Donnell wasfoukxJ
She �nk the first shot .o i
xf the second bwtlhcbaHwas
recover I by the lid Pirates' jun
ior t. �! w ard ! pin .1 1 largrov e
Hargi vc s i �red ���. o to give the
Pirates the first Ihro points iii
second; inti i the game
rhe 1 �uh Pirates op ned up
the lead to nitx p nl midwa
through the firsl hall meri an hit
a spurt and in then t hvo minuti s
v losed ECU's lead to two
Bui " ady Pit Hi h id
tin irstridt hntl . ;hl remain-
ingminul lh� o eneti
i 11 ; i it; and '�'�� i �
ill stai edi . � nl
�- �� � ti i � baskets for the
first ti n f th riim
1 he : ' ' rates were offered
severalsl thei haritystripe
but thev showed wh) they arc last
� �� � igui in !nr thn �w sh(x�ting
�l � I for th lav
-l threeol theii Hrsl
ing the I adv
I agl st � the lead toninepoints
illedtimeout with l-1 i;
ft n i' gam ind n pn iiiped It
hw slowly cut the 1 �'( U lead, but
there was not enough time left in
the game and the I ady Pirates
i oasted to an 1 p .nt win.
MEMORIAL COINS
& PAWN
�SPOR is
�i KDS �!( 11 V ISK NS �STI RfcOS
�si AMI'S .V �'�' � V: '�
�i) SI PPI II S �( Wli R i � .s
MONDS M M s I OXNS
f v 1 B1 N �.Ol I) & SII VER
Ml Transact! Sti I i
655 MlMOKI l DKI I " (;RE

n to top position
SA !
i
loss at home
courts
ami init from
ik and wi nt on, 162 point
tear i ipening up their Iidto ni
the tiexl four nun
ik tuntut to be the
leath km Foi thi Lid)
Teams
Continued from paqe19
in ith.n I �
�.
ist in the V '� ��. �
; � -lal� � i i.ur,ii
Purdue bed
) ertime
ii �
M
olhei I .
Stanfoi I
ni i " ii
Trail Blazers end Losing streak
s( i m
eanv
1 w 1illitims
�� 11 1 1il l w o 13 Phe
.thit NBA
garni I
Roses's punishment: gym teacher
Pete Ron tanl Mi mdav as h�
begii �
is s hedi
I'll I-
nit iei
v offenses Rose
innati s I leberle
' i oinmu
BKiir plaees well at World Cup
I S i H n ; �hei I Ot h co n
sccuttvi w rldit Davos Sv it
zerland Shi 1� el � wonbv Miiniqu
(irabret ht ol' - 1 .IllJ.lV
Soccer riot kills41)in South Africa
At Ir.it �n fans began brawling
am) .i paniiccei match in tin
South tn in ccs southwest oi
Johannesburg i1 he death toll is en
pfN led lortsebinjured spectators
rstim,ih) .it mi �'� ii
Rangers come from behind to win
Brian I eeti h �� � enabled the New
York Rangers to survi al first period lead and
bcit the Hartford Whalei NH1 games: Si Louis 3,
Montreal I; Edmonton � Phil i Islanders4, Que
bee 3; Winnipeg I, Calgai Minnesota I
COpy I l ll rftM. A mttion Nttwotk
he leads thi in I �
irao nwkii t � : � � enl
�. � - ;
� .� : � ,�� .
II ilso has the best
shetint; a i ur,K in Ml histor)
making 54 I percent ol her shots
ict three seasons.
i .rav istitth, in the A inscoi
ii ij ��. ith Ir points .i game fourth in
rebi lundingwitheightpei gameand
eighth in shooting a curacy, making
i" pen ent ol her shots
( .ra is also 11th in E I career
scorings ith l ,085point - She needs
inK twomorepointston'Hwcto II th
She is .ilvi seventh n career re-
bounding with 651 and is sixth in
i anvr blocks totalling ;s
(iraceisthird inthe( Ainfield
goal accuracy making 48 3 percent
of her shots and tenth in reU tunding
with 65 Ixvinis.i game
Sophomore iaynor t I )onnell
leatlsthe( A in assists with 6.4 per
gameand isalso tied for fifth insteals
n ording two a game.
Senior Mechelle lours contrib
utes 3s assists per game tor suth
best in the conference
( I Vnndl is eighth in E( I ca
reer assists, amassing 215 in 1 12
seasons. She accumulated 160 last
season as a freshman.
A tew recent injuries have dis
rupted the starting line up 1Mb
( .r.n and Small missi the I Hier
sit of Florida game Gray has torn
cartilage in her lett knee but man
aged to play against American as
did Small, who is suffering from a
sprained ankle
0avios
AUTOMOTIVE
foreign 4 Dom�ttic
PARTS SIBVICi
r10 N. Greene St.
Creenvitie nc
8?,0-1779
WKere everybody knows your name!
Part) to your favorite classic rock with these specials
l ue: l .adies nite !l ladies in tree.
W L'd: i i.v mem be i ship nile
In I lapp .II i IKI I mum iiK's
liarteiulei s p � . k ial
Sun I lu t )i ii ip i i Nite Sl.(K) impuriN
Don't miss our big Superbowl Part) Jan. 27
li S rV � I ree Muiu hies � Ice Id H
I Ionic of the "Fresh Squeeze
Snlasl
A SALUTE TO Y
LEADERS OI rOMORROW-
AIK FORCE ROTC CADETS.
tin

revolves ai M I I � . � � �
� � leadership v
. . . �
ll is
I'pon gi � � ��'��
;n .ss.ss solli . �
elf-assurance
the :� � �
. II havf thi �'��
�� . � . �
tarl ��� tael
DEFT OF AEROSPACE Ml DIES
(919) 77 r�7
mil) 1 .rcech
Optic i.tn ex Manager
Doctors Park. Bldg. 1
Stiintonshuiv; Road
(irccn ilk. N(
'KU
i s.mie tiKe complex with
c Ireenvilte Eve c link i
Welcome Hack Students and Faculty
25CA Discounl on all Designer Frames
and Prescription Lenses lor all
ECU students and Facult) plus
no charge for tintinc lenses
(Sis.00 value)
Especially for ECU
Special selection
Frame and lense. Eesecription including tinted lenses
only $69.95 for single vision and onl
$79.95 for bifocals
Appointments made upon request
"Putting you first makes us 1'
Same day service on most prescriptions
Call Greenville Opticians To Help Arrange
Your Next Rye Examination
(919)752-4018
Get Fit E
&AME PLAN
ECU Flag 1 ootball
Teams head to tin-
Nationals Finals
The men's a: : .
: campus flag
got a first ha: : -Hooj
Mardi (,r :f ourn
theChr. �Qj . . .
I they t - .
tional Intra
Football I �
Tournamei I
Womei re'
Hammertimi
their trip 1. '
LAdespih- 1
the Uni � rsih"
bama-Birri-
tional i tnnei
Over 140 mi
and o t-n across Hoop a
vited � � irB-ball
officials ���� � � represi i 1Upon L
the toui Ha) Vk
Dillahunt, Willii
and Craii;
ated a tri
Nestor is
All- Ami r i
earned the right l
ate or the 1 t f 1
Supei Ion
exhi
Sug �
,
Schick Sucer Hoops
3-on-3's Dribble to
South Carolina
Strictly Business
LP Rejects :
?women s inn
3basketbal I
will be trav lit
man University
Spring 1991 Recreational Facility
Hours of Operation
Garrett Weight Room
Mon It i ; � - ' :
Friday '
Sunday 'I
Christentxjry Gym Stm
Mop
Mon Cr
Tues &
Mon & Wed
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
SP
� : '
i .
� � I
2 00-i ' : "
Christenbury Gymnasium
Mon Weo
Mon Tues
Weo 'S
Sdturday
Sundav
- i � i
l .
Christenbury Gym Weight Room
Mon -Fn
Mon -Thurs
Friddy
Sorturddv
Sunday
, 3m
i
0am-600pn
. i im-50 .
i . � �
Mlnges Coliseum Swimming Pool
Mon Wed ('
Tues . Thurs
Mlnges Coliseum Weight Room
Mon -Thurs 2 00om-8 OOpm
Friddy 2 OOpm-5 00pm
Equipment Check Out
(115 Christenbury Gym)
MonThurs 10 00dm-9 00pm
Friday1000am-6 00pm
Saturday 1200-500pm
Sunddy 1 00pm-5 00pm
I njov ai
-
Thi
v�
inti �
-
i
ten . nc n
rugby v
crev
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informal





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EMORIAL COINS
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�VCRS -Ml S1CAI INSTRUMENTS
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hows vour name!
L rock with these specials
It rbowl Part Jan. 2"
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I
A SALUTE K) IHE U DERSOF lOMORROVV-VIKK)K( 1 ROTC CADETS.
Vir Force ROT � thatmint
�� our
" . ei Y�u il sense l ess and
ities
, AEROSPACE STI DIE
(919) 757-6597
tf
. �
dents and Faculty
li Designer Frames
1 Lenses for ail
iul Faculty plus
Inting lenses
value)
for ECU
selection
?lion including timed lenses
igle vision and onlv
br bifocals
uide upon request
M makes us 1"
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lansTo Help Arrange
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B 2-40IX
Get Fit East CarolinaOn Campus
Same plan
ECU Flag Football Qfr�
Teams head to the iT
Nationals Finals
1
A Tidal Wave of
Fun Ahead
Grab an innertube Polo
v vAW Pony and head for the
The men's and womens all
:ampus flag football teams
Igot a first Sand XooY. at
JMardi GrasJ country over
the Christmas holidays as
they took part in the Na-
tional Intramural Flag
ootbftil Championship
I Tournament Dec. 28-31.
Women's representatives
Hammertime enjoyed
their trip to New Orleans,
I A despite being nailedby
the University of Ala-
bama-Birmingham (Na-
tional runner-ups).
Over 140 men's, women's,
and co-rec squads from
across the nation are in-
vited yearly. Three ECU
officials were selected to
represent ECU throughout
the tournament. Haywood
Dillahunt, Willie George
and Craig Nestor offici-
ated a variety of contests.
Nestor was selected as an
All- American Official and
earned the right to offici-
ate on the floor of the
Superdome during an
exhibition contest at the
Sugar Bowl.
to take part in the Schick
Super Hoops Regional
Tournament. Darryl
Griffin leads Strictly Busi-
ness while Angela Rob-
bins powers the women's
champs. In addition, ten
officials ha �e been selected
to work the tournament
including: Haywood Dil-
lahunt, John Mitchell,
Locke Monroe, Glenn
Mack, Craig Nestor,
Chuck Knowles, Willie
George, Kris Waters and
Al Lee.
Hoop and Holler
B-ball Season is
Upon Us
Get your teams together
now for 5-on-5 basketball.
The registration meeting
for all team captains will
be held January 22 at 5:30
pm in Biology 103. Each
team must have one repre-
sentative in attendance in
order to register the fol-
lowing day. In addition, a
Recreational Representa-
tive will be located at
Cojtei Residence Hall �
Sch'lCk Super HOOPS January 16 at 11:30am;
3-on-3's Dribble to
South Carolina
Strictly Business and the
LP Rejects, men's and
�women's intramural 3-on-
3 basketball champions
will be traveling to Fur-
man University January 26
Belk January 16 at 3:00pm;
Jones January 16 at
5:00pm; Umstead January
17 at 11:30am; White Janu-
ary 17 at 3:00pm and
Garrett Residence Hall
January 17 at 5:00pm for
individuals needing infor-
mation and an opportu-
nity to form a team.
waves of Christenbury
pool for this semesters
water polo league play.
You don't have to be an
Olympic swimmer to have
a blast as teams of 6 thrash
through the H20 in an
attempt to catch a wave to
the all campus champion-
ship. Registration will be
held January 29 at 5:00pm
in Biology 103. Sign up as
an individual and meet
people! � �. �
Let Us Give You a
Few Pointers
during the 3 Point Basket-
ball Shootout this fall. Pat-
terned similarly to the one
seen on NBA All-Star
Weekend, the 3 Point
Shootout allows males and
females to shoot 25 basket-
balls from 5 designated
spots during a specified
time period. This individ-
ual sport offers not only
the recognition of becom-
ing the all campus champs
but several great awards
for placing in the final
round. Registration will
take place January 24 at
OppftflBiolSfct !Q.
O.K. Let's try this again!
This Is
your body with
Rec Services
This Is your
body without
Rec Services
Cot it?
With ECU Recreational Services
the ULTIMATE playing experience
re you a coach potato extraordinaire? Do you want to start a fitness program? Are you
already a fitness fanatic with an informal program of activity?
Whatever shape or unshape you're inmake an appointment with the Fitness
Assessment Center (107A Christenbury Gymnasium) to assess body composi- j
tion, cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility and blood pressure.
These evaluations are fun and will help in formulating a personalized plan for
improving and maintaining optimal fitness. Registered fitness class participants
may take part in this service free of charge. Fitness assessments Costs for other
interested persons are $10Students & $15FacultyStaff.
Soccer Champions
The Freshman Follies
kicked their way into the
women's championship
title spot lead by Susan
Vanore and co-captain
Susan Shelley. The re-
maining championship
booters include: Jaelle
Pierce, Melissa Cone,
Jaimeson Pierce, Shelly
English, Erica Jenkins,
Eileen Moore, Christine
Burdt, Heather McKis-
sock, Kim Kilgore, Kate
McNamara, Emily
Cekada, Stephanie
Aicher and Jenny Mazur.
The championship soror-
ity team Sigma Sigma
Sigma defeated Alpha Xi
Delta team in the Sorority
Greek Cup. Captain
Michelle Klun led her
teammates; Kati Mulli-
gan, Christi Harris, Sonya
Hemingway, Monica
Bray, Melissa Terranova,
Kristy Wrigly, Laura
Finger, and Robin Madg-
ett to the winners circle.
In the fraternity gold di-
vision, Denriy Rayrieartd
co-captain Mike O'Hoppe
with teammates Scott
Heaton, Doug Suhr,
Chuck Tanner, David
Rusevlyan, Jack Vitale,
Tyler Waltsak, Sammy
Brown, Scott Hilton,
Brian Rightsell, Harrison
Hubbard and Joseph
Get a piece (of adventure) at the ROC.
(Recreational Outdoor Center 117 Christenbury Gym)
Fitness Flashes
Registration for first session fitness classes will be held
January 22-25. Make your fitness class choice in 204
Christenbury Gymnasium for classes held at that loca-
tion or the Pipeline Pumphouse (Garrett Residence Hall).
Choose from aerobics, Power Pump, Hi-Lo, Low Impact,
Supra Class, Interval, Belly Busters, FlexRelax, Toning
and Aquarobics. The cost is $10 for students and $20 for
facultystaff and spouses for the 12 class session.
Friday Fitness Fling
Get a taste of the variety of fitness class offerings avail-
able thjou&h Etional-Services January 25 at 4:00pm
in Christenbury 108. The Friday Fitness Fling not only
samples a variety of fitness class formats and instructor
styles but is highlighted with a multitude of participant
giveaways For additional information, call 757-6387.
All faculty, staff and students are eligible to attend.
Weight Training Orientations
Learn how to properly utilize the weight facilities on
campus prior to beginning your spring fitness program.
Oreintations are held at each weight room location on the Kiker defeated Pi Kappa
Spring 1991 Recreational Facility
Hours of Operation
Garrett Weight Room
MonThurs1 00prn-800pm
Friday1:00pm-500pnn
Sunday1:00pm-500pm
Christenbury Gym Swimming Pool
MonFri7:OOam-8:OOam
MonFri11:30am-1:30pm
Tues. &Thurs3:00pm-6:30pm
Mon & Wed3:00pm-7:00pm
Friday3:00pm-6.00pm
Saturday12:00-500pm
Sunday1:00pm -5 00pm
Christenbury Gymnasium
Mon Wed.Fril2 noon-1:30pm
Mon.Tues4:00pm-6.00pm
Wed.ThursFri 3:00pm-6:00pm
Saturday12:00-500pm
Sunday1:00pm-500pm
Christenbury Gym Weight Room
MonFri7:OOam-8:OOam
MonThurs10:00am-900pm
FridayI0:00am-6.00pm
Saturday12:00am-5:00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
Mlnges Coliseum Swimming Pool
Mon.Wed.Fri7:30pm-9:00pm
Tues Thurs6.00pm-8:00pm
Mlnges CoHwum Weight Room
MonThurs2:00pm-8:00pm
Friday 2:00pm-5:00pm
Equipment Check Out
(115 Christenbury Gym)
MonThurs10:00am-9:00pm
FridayI0:00am-6:00pm
Saturday12:00-5:00pm
Sunday1 :(X)prn-5:00pm
SPOT
SOUGHT
Karate Kicks Up Its Heels
The ECU Karate Club achieved overwhelming
success at the North Carolina State Goju-Shorin
Championships in Raleigh, NC Twenty-five East
Carolinians captured a total of 23 first through eighth
place finishes with 4 first place victories and seven
second place showings.
Enjoy an Ultimate Club Sport Experience
Recreational Services offers a diverse Club Sport
program as over 11 teams enjoy competitive as well
as instructional activity at the non-varsity sport level.
These teams are organized by interested students and
welcome participation from all faculty, staff and
students registered with the University. If you're
interested in finding out about any of the following
sport programs, contact the Club Sport President or
call Pat Cox at 757-6387.
Current active programs include: underwater hockey,
fencing, men's and women's frisbee, karate, kayaking,
rugby, women's soccer, water skiing, snow skiing and
crewrowing.
following days and times:
Minges Wt. Room January 22 8:00pm
Garrett Wt. Room January 23 6:00pm
Christenbury Wt. Room January 24 8:00pm
� All Weight Room Orientations are FREE OF CHARGE
Weight Center Appointments
Learn to enjoy the weight centers at Garrett Hall (Pipe-
line Pumphouse), Christenbury Gym and Minges Coli-
seum with one-on-one iunstruction by qualified weight
room personnel on the following days and times:
l
Christenbury Gym
Mon-Fri7-8am
Mon-Thursl0-9pm
Fri10-6pm
Sat12-5pm
Sunl-5pm
Pipeline Pumphouse
Mon-Thurs1-8pm
Fri & Sat1-5pm
Mlnges
Mon 4 Wed2-8pm
Tu 4 Th2-8pm
For lurther information contact
Gray Hodges at 757-6911.
Phi A in the North Caro-
lina lup.
The Grand Champion of
the season was the hit
comedy team "The
Simpsons Led by team
captain Ernie Codero and
Kevin Clarke, The
Simpsons defeated the Phi
Kappa Tau A team. Other
Simpson family members
include: Jeff Savage, Steve
Roper, Mark Wilson,
Chad Kidwell, Charlie j
Futrell, Rob Kessler, Joe
Rogers, Mike Sander and
Mike McDevitt
Player of the Month
Congratulations Michelle Kkin of Sigma Sigma Sigma You have oefn
selected as the Department of Recreational Services Player of the Month.
Michelle, an Early Childhood Education student from Raleigh, NC has lead her
sorority house to all campus championship titles in flag football, soccer,
volleyball and water polo. Michelle exhibits outstanding sportsmanshtp, dedtc-
tjon and leadership serving as a sorority representative for the Tri Sigs as well
as a SHIPREC (Campus Promotion Coordinator) with Recreational Servtces.
� ���

informal
Where else in the Emerald City can you find over 30 fitness classes,
weight room facilities, fitness clubs designed for your favorite type
of exercise, two swimming facilities, gymnasium, racquetball courts,
exercise assessment services, FREE equipment check-out services, a
wide variety of outdoor adventure trips and workshops, club sport
competition and all available with your ECU identification card?
� Throw those 'Other' clubs' coupons away
Get the most from your student fees
Don't pay extra to get a CHAMPIONShip physique
Chancellor's Trophy
Point System Leaden
Fall 1990 Results
Fraternity
Phi Kappa Tau 1373
PiKappaPhi 1310:
Sigma Phi Epsiton 1309
PiKappaAlpha 1131
TheteChi 1049
I
Sorority
Tri Sigs238
Zeta Tau Alpha225
Alpha Date Pi200
AtphaPN180
.





22 &k fewt a'arultnian Janurary 15,1991
Gilgeous, American stop Bucs for a 92-88 CAA win
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Stjff Writer
What started off as an excellent
game offensively for the Pirates in
the first half turned into a second
half nightmare.
ECU, who went into the half
holding a six point lead, let it slip
through their hands, losing 92-63 to
the American Eagles at Bender
Arena.
"They just outworked our kids
said head coach Mike Steele. "We
had the same problemsas weal ways
have, if you can't stop the defense it
hurts you on the offeisivend, and
tonight wo couldn't finishourshots
After comingoff their firstColo-
mal At! vtic Association win over
Navy, ECU expected to come out
fired up against the Eagles. What
they saw was a very quick run by
A.U. and a 13-2 score, with the one
Pirate basket coming at the 18:24
mark from senior Stanley Love.
ECU immediately called a rime-
out, and sophomore Steve
Richardson entered the game. He
broke a long Pirate drought hitting a
three-pointer, making the score 13-
5. On their next trip down freshman
U-ster Lyons added a trey of hisown,
bringing ECU to within five.
The Pirates were able to tie the
gameupand then takethelead with
5:25 remaining in the half. It was
Richardson's sharp shooting that
enabled ECU to take the lead. He
went six for six from three point land
to have 20 points at the half. Senior
Tim Brown had eight and junior
Robin House had six points in their
first half run.
A.U. head coach Chris Knoche
said, "We wanted to make
Richardson's first move be a dribble,
as opposed to letting him aim, cock
and shoot. I told them we needed to
do a better job on their perimeter
players in the second half
Thafs exactly what they did.
Brian Gilgeous got assigned the
task to stop Richardson, and it was
his tight defense, and the excellent
offense from Craig Sedmak, that
brought the Eagles from a six point
deficit to a quick nine point lead and
a 21-8 run.
Sedmak scored 18 second-half
points to finish the game with 23
points. "Craig is a focal point in our
offense, but tonight healso had a big
game rebounding both on offense
and defense said Knoche.
Richardson got only three three-
point shots with Gilgeous guarding
himandwasunabletoscoreanother
field goal for the rest of the game.
Richardson finished witha team high
22 points.
ECU struggled in the second
half and had problems passing the
ball inside offensively and getting
rebounds. A.U. caused the Pirates to
turn over the ball 11 times in the
second half (18 total).
Asa team they went 15 for 31 (48
percent) from the field and one for
nine from three-point land in the
second half.
Brown said: "We didn't have
any emotion coming out in the sec-
ond half. We are the type of team if
things are going well, everything
just goes well, but if one thing goes
wrong, everything goes wrong and
thafs what happened tonight
ECU was able to come as close
as five points with 2.1)0 remaining in
the game, but their lackluster play
gave A.U the green light and (hey
quickly notched their lead up to 11
and forced the Pirates to foul in the
waning seconds of the game.
Sophomore Ike Copeland, who
finished with eight points nojed,
"One of our biggest problems was
that not everyone was boxing out
Their guards kept penetrating and
then our big men would be forced to
help out and that would leave A.U
with easy wide open shots
The Eagles' guards Brock
Wortman and Chns Roonev shot
over 70 percent and had 27combthed
points. Gilgeous tinphed with
1
GMU
Continued from page 19
George Mason University
5-11 (2-2)
Kenny Johnson, 1-1,2, Robert
Dvkes, 5-7,19, Byron Tucker, S-15
(2-4H9 Mitch Madden, 37,6. Umol
Perkins, b, 7, Mike Hargett, 7 14
�3-5)21
Fjst Cji.Mir.j Univcnit)
7-7(1-3)
Stanley Love, 3 3, lk�
Copeland. - 6,5, Lester Lyons, b 12
(1-4)21, Slew Richardson 5 V,
7) 14. Robin House, 0-2, 9, U-n
Terhch, 1-1 (1-1) V foe Bnghtvvell
1-3.3. Ti Brown 4 -
Three-pointers, free throws lead Pirates past Navy97-81
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
Saturday jan 5. began the first
week of O nial A thletic Assooa tion
plav, and tor the Pirates, it was a verv
good beginning.
They (ipened up conference play
on the road against the Midshipmen
from tlie aval Academy and ran
away with a 97-81 victory at Haisey
Field base
"It was a very solid game f w us
said fourth year head coach Mike
Steele "Wereattyptayed weBonboth
ends i uir defense was prettv sharp.
Affordable
banking
for
students.
i
ECB's University Club is a special checking account
exclusively for full-time students, faculty and staff
members in a college, community college, university
or technical school.
Along with many club benefits, the account requires
only a $100 minimum balance for tree, checking for
stufSfnts ABfeity and sttrff'can eiiminat�ftieoaiMc�
requirement by direct deposit of their payroll check.
Stop by the Greenville branch of ECB and ask about
University Club checking. It's a great deai
11k-
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Arlington Boulevard & Red Banks Road
(919)355-8200
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n
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and on offense our kids were very
alert
The win gave the Pirates a 1-0
CAA acord and anoverall record 7-4,
and was their fifth win in their last six
games.
ECU was paced by sophomore
guard Steve Richardson who racked
up21 points, including three-pointers
and six of seven free throws.
Freshman point guard Lester
Lyons continued to play well, sconng
19 points, six of seven at the chanrv
Stripe. 1 le dished out four assists and
Nad tw t steals.
Ilv Pirates led bvcismanvas IS in
the first half with big spurts coming
from strong inside play by senior for-
wardTimBrowmvrttlaid inaghtfirst-
half points.
Bench scoring was an important
factor in ECU'S early lead over Navy.
The combined scoring of Richardson,
Jeff Perlich, Kevin Armstrong and
Brown made up more than half of the
team's points.
"We were really pumped up for
this game said Brown. "Our guards
got hot on the outside and that just
opened it up for us inside
The Midshipmen reallv truvat-
ened EC U and went on a run to out-
Get a View of the R.O.C.
Wednesday, January lb
117 Christenbury Gym
7:00pm-9:00pm
Free of Charge
Your persona) preview of alt the outdoor recreation
program and services olt'ered through
E rational Service can be lrieiwj v urine this
Outdoor Smorgasbord
Highlights include
� outdoor cooking techniques
�food sampling
� � iipmeni displays
� presentations
� trip workshop and equipment package s-veawavs
RffMumal Outiiacr Ctt
Soeciaf Offer
"e vede"ice "an ?oo.
eoatrnent 6Mk OrQOni
r r on c Cofouj Cfgor�-
zc or. wtt t os pecce
r cteoaorce � 'ec eve c
FREE
Windsurfing
Adventure Trip
for 12.
� i�i ; pertor. rorn aadl
�� �p MUM ancrtd to oa. I
The Great Escapes Party
Get M ay from the every A.t '
�. �: ese Great Escape Outdoor ATflvVrffiiM field throL icmi '
;gh ECU Recreational Sen

-�9rt ry at vpnng vtvtrtjti "pi "C worvop rwym arjrv 'ft ��
�. Trp�Pr-TpMfQTfc� Plc�
) IttOk� -
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i'Otg� .xr S3;�
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3So S2"t : �:
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�" " v� re
M - �� aV
� -I �5o
' - � -� .io-c y
� ,3 ;o� .
� -t -3
' Q4 Kiy-�
2�'�
The ROC � Ke.rrjtiora: Outdoorr-Mt
" ChT:tenbury Cymnjiiurr
Hrur� of Oprjiion
Mmtfaj & r- ti w $tmm ' I
'� � m - X)ptr
SjtufwJv 6t vjrvdUv C
and BUY ONE
GET ONE FREE!
The Optical Palace has joined the"
Optometric Eye Care Center Family
To celebrate, we are offering you:
-a complete professional eye exam
for $29
AND
-Buy one pair of glasses at regular
price and get a second pair free
Call our office to schedule your $29 eye exam, or just
stop by to check out our wide selection of frames.
Offer valid through Feb. 1, 1991
(Some restrictions apply)
onoMcnuc'
�VECAR�C�HT�R?
YOU'LL LIKE THE WAY WE CARE FOR YOUR EYES
Gary Harris 703 E. Greenville Blvd. Dr. Lewis L.
Licensed 756-4204 Casey
Optician Optometrist
score the Pirates 17-9 in the opening sconng 11 second-halt points. In the
n-unutesofthesecondhalttopulltoN)- punt, ECU was able to find SDtfho
57 with just over 13 remaining. more Ike Copeland who ended, up
Richardson then went to work with 13 points on the night.
GIRLS
SILVER SEI
BULLET cnMma
WEDNESDAYS:
Pool Tournament Night! Doors open
7pm Game ume 7 H) pm
THlKSDAl AND EKIDAV
Female (exotic) dancers'
doors open 8 pm Stage time l i 1 pm
SAll RPAY
l)J pi.i ig request!
Bring your friends and come out u the Stiver Bullet and let
all have a real good tune 756 '0"v
Location: (Old 2t-4 Playhouse) B:c Blue Building behind
Earl s Store on 1 armvilk Highwa)
4 miles west ol ireenvilk 2o4 Alt.
s
ATTENTIO
DANCERS
If you are Dancing, Aerobtcizing,
to be in Style while exercising.
Visit At Barre Ltd
Eastern .( � !
Dance and Aerobic Apparel
Capezio Dance shew
Arlington illaui- f44 rliniton B1J
iM3
Welcomes Back
All ECU
students
and facultv
Save on our Januar Clearance Sale
Save
Time!
Save stamps i'
Pay your utilit)
bill at the MAN
EAST BANK at
Mendenhail
Monda- 1 "hui v.a.
10 a.m4. 0 ;
and Friday.
10 a.m.o p
Call (ireeni!k I tiliticv
551-153 foi furthei ti ition.
6
All 14KT. chains
and bracelets
now 40 otT
14KT. Gold Bracelets NOW ONLY
7" Herringbone
7" Herringbone
8" Heavy Herringbone
7" Solid Rope Diamond Cut
7" Solid Rope Diamond Cut
7" Solid Rope Diamond Cut
8" Solid Rope Diamond Cut
14 KT. Adjustable Cuff
14KT. Gold Chains NOW ONLY
18" Herringbone $3935
18" Herringbone $78.95
18" Superflex Herringbone $170.00
18" Superflex Herringbone $315.00
18" Heavy Herringbone $410.00
18" Solid Rope Diamond Cut $105.00
20" Solid Rope Diamond Cut $230.00
20" Superflex Herringbone $339.00
All chains and bracelets have a lifetime warranty
Revolving Charge
90 Day Charge
Layaways
GETTING ENGAGED!
LARGE SELECTION OF LOOSE
DIAMONDS NOW ON SALE
.25 CT Round
.58 CT heart
.70 CT oval
1.48CTmarq
ALL ECU STUDENTS RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL 10 OFF
Arlington Village
355-5090
Behind C. Hebcr Forbes





i
.
i
2-88 CAA win
had problem passing the
i" offensively and getting
t I caused the Pirates to
p the hill 11 times iii the
alfUStofcl)
beam they went I5tbr M (48
r i tho field and one ton
thrw point land in the
M it
n said i didn t haw
t! m coming out in the v
Ac are the t peol team ii
h going well even thing
well, but it one thing pixs
crything goes wrong and
Bl happened tonight
asclose
ii � � nainint
the game but their IsckluHg play
gave U the green light and (hey
quick!) notched their load up to 11
and kneed the Pirates to foul m the
waning seconds ot the game.
Sophomore HCopcland, who
finished with eight points nrird,
()ne oi our biggest problems was
that not evetyone was boxing out.
rheif guards kept penetrating and
then our big men would be forced to
help out and that would leave A.U.
witheas) wideopen shots
fhe Eagles guards Brbck
W'ortman and Chris Rooney shot
over 71 cercentandhad27cornbied
point Qlgcous hoished with fe.

es past Navy97-81
l v
� �
scoring 11 -orvi Ivilt points. Intlv
was able to find s. rhr
� v opeland w ho ended; up
with 11 points on the night
SILVER
BULLET
WEDNESDAYS!
;iri s
(;iki s
;iri s
COI I) HI IK
I Ml s) D i u)
n It K I
bullei and let s
behind
ie I light a
on
vytt �
)lamond Store
tarylearance Sale
K 1. chains
� elets - �J
off I
Gold Bracelets NOW ONLY
535 95
$79 l5
$207.00
Gold ("hams NOW ONLY
s m ss
lex f lei
Herringbone
Rope Diamond Cm
Rope Dii I Cut
lex 1 lerrinebone
a
ains and bracelets have a lifetime warranty
3 ENGAGI I)
ELECTION oi LOOSI
IDS NOW ON SALE
fund
trt
RegSale
: -49
5 952395
21951 595
1995.l ls
arq
rUDENTS RCI-IVI- AN ADDITIONAL IOOPB
. Arlington Village
ge ic- m� Student !
targe J55-5U5KJ Accounts:
ivs Behind C Hebcr Forbes Welcome'
3Jfre �aat (Carfllfnlan January 15. 1991 23
ATTENTION
DANCERS
It you are Dancing, Aerobici.ing, or Just want
to be in Style while exercising.
Visit At Barre Ltd
Eastern N.Cs Leader in
Dance and Aerobic Apparel
Capezio Dance shoes
Arlington Village 644 Arlington Blyd 756-6670
Save stamps too
Pay your utility
hill at the NEW
FAST BANK at
Mendenhatl .
Monday Thursday.
Hi a.m4:30 p.m.
and Friday.
l) a.m5 p.m.
Call Greenville I til
551-1539 tor further
�:
Let Us
Tempt
You
with our
PHlLY-MEX
STEAK & CHEESE
SANDWICH
The traditional steak and
cheese with sauteed onion &
peppers hut with the flavor of
fahitas
Introductory
Price
$3.95
521 Cotanche St. 757-1666
The Sun t an a
5 Visit Plan $15
10 Visit Plan $25
15 Visit Plan $30
Wolfe Tanning System
756-9180
Coupon Good Through 33091
3212 South Memorial Drive
� � � -� � � �� � � J
FAMOUS FROZEN YOGURT
Welcome Back Students
me to Ziick's and show us your Student I.D. and
get Wt off any purchase over $3.00
Come to think of it, why not bring a friend!
1898-A Greenville Blvd.
752-9440
We've Made
Some
Changes
And we're better
than ever!
Downtown � 757-3658
DRINK SPECIALS
SUN.$l00 Domestics
MON.$2.75 Margaritas
TUES.$L25 Hi-Balls
WED.$2.00 Sangrias
THURS.$L25 Imports
The party is here!
Quality � Competitive Prices e Service
911 Dickinson Avc. 1
1700kmL02 City Wide Free Delivery
2301 Stantontbura Rd. 3
7570026:
758-4104
1631 S.E. Greenville Blvd. 4
752-0030
Fountain Special
2 Hot dogs & Small Cola
$1.00
All LOCATIONS
10 Off
any purchase
Quality e Competitive Prices e Service
Please present coupon
FILL TEDS SPACE
943
WRQR
WEEKEND
FUNSHINE
LIMITED
TIME ONLY
ROUND TRIP FROM
GREENVILLE, N.C. ON
JSAIR ANDOR AMERICAN.
ANDOR UNITED
MIAMI
TAMPA
ORLANDO
DAYTONA
FORT "
LAUDERDALE
FROM
B
DENVER
PHOENIX
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRAN.
SEATTLE
READ THE
FINE PRINT
These special fares
are extremely limited
and may be already ,
sold out for selected .
travel dates. Travel '
must begin by Feb. �
9-16 and be complete
by Feb. 20 - varies by �
city. 7 day advance j
required purchase.
Travel to destlnaUon
Wed Thurs Fri. or
Sat. Return from
destination Sun
Mon Tues or Wed.
Maximum stay to
first Wed. Once
ticketed, fares are
nonrefundable and
nonchangeable. Call
for full details.
0 TRAVEL
5) CFNTEFt
I hf Pl.jd � C�rven ill
.rs-ro;r
SOUr()2-SI 78
v 11.i . I ! I'll Kit
nin.it, i





t
t
24 gta taut (Karoltnian jtwowr ?5, ?99T
CONGRATULATIONS
The following people have received $250.00 scholarships from The Student Stores
in recognition of their outstanding academic performance.
Chantel Marie Bellinger
James Scott Daggerhart
Amy Marie Denius
Christine Renee Foreman
Sheryl Lyn Gutierres
Charlie Leonard Hall Jr.
Scott Sovera Harris
Katerina Svoboda Hilts
Robert Lee Hinton
Michelle Lynn Hunt
Audrey Ann Jefferson
ana-Kay Titus Ketner
Jennifer Lynn Marlowe
Amy Lvnn Mikolaiczyk
Karen Sue Olson
Richard Noble Sprinkle
Marianne Christine Marini
Debra Ann Nickelson
Kevin Lawrence Niebauer
Virginia Gauvin Spencer
Kerry A. Akin Marvin
Shamin U. Ansari
Monica lave Austin
Mary Ann Adams
Kristen Anderson
Jeana K. Artus
Jane I. Ash ford
Gillian Kim Ashley
Machete Daitoy
Christopher Ballew
Karla Bannister
Jennifer Barger
Renee Marie Barnette
Melanie Becton
Jeffrey Bell
Laura F. Biggers
Authur Bishop
Jennifer Brannon
Kimberly Buck
John F. Burch
Amy Burke
Heiner Carter
Loree Carver
Judith Gates
Susan Clark
Norma Clark
Rebecca Clark
Mary Clyburn
Kathleen Cochran
Debra Coker
Flora Cole
Richard Colvin
John Congleton
Brian Cook
Marc Cook
Jocelyn Copeley
Phyllis Council
Kevin Cummings
Daniel Curtis
Darlene Gardner
Michelle Gaskins
Royce Gilham
Roger Goins
Leah Gragg
Mary Green
Eva Griffin
Eileen Groblewski
Timothy Greubel
Cythia Gurlin
K.M. Guthrie
Ginger Haddock
Cherie 1 lanks
Jennifer Hardee
DJ. Hardesty
Kenneth Hardin
Beverly
Harrington
Sheri Harrington
Robbie Harris
Sandra 11 art well
Lisa Hapburn
Lucy Hocutt
Douglas Hoey
Dalen Holloman
William Hooper
Carolyn Howard
Anna Howel!
Tammy Huggira
Derrick Hyman
Teresa Ingram
Terri Jarvis
Anne Marie
Jennings
Katherine letter
Charlotte Johnson
Jason Johnson
Jeanette Jones
Cynthia Justice
Margaret Kalet
Robert Kessler
Bonnie Kincaid
Eriks Kheib
Stacey Khett
Ronald Kohake
William Leary
Beverly Leigh
Terry Light
John Mowe
Carolyn Mahaffey
Andrea Marchese
Jenifer Marion
Daniel Martinez
Bharti Mathur
Monica Matkin
Michelle Matteo
Kristen Matthews
Scott Maxwell
Karla Pannister
Kenneth Paramora
Jefferson Parker
Vavlyn Parks
Brent Parrish
Rodney Passe 11
Heather Pattie
Thomas Pemberton
Dana Phillips
Andrew Polese
Karen Pope
Teresa Price
Robbie Pi "en
Sarah Pulley
Marilyn Ragar
Angela Raper
Rodney Reeves
Barbara Rich
Laura Richard
Selina Rilev
4
Julie Sanders
Angela Sandquist
Laura Schiller
Heidi Schultz
Amy Sellars
Gregory Sembei
Joshua Sheperd
Tanya Sherrill
Claire Sheilds
Debra Show
S.L. Singleton
Jeffrey Skillen
Patricia Sloop
Jonathon Smart
Patricia Smith
Edith Smith
Melanie Smith
Andy Smith
Scott Smith
Panuk Soomsawasdi
Craig Spitz
Paul Springer
Wesley Stallings
Jean Sugg
Elizabeth
Summerlin
Lynn Sutton
John Talton
Theresa Tate
Mary Tayloe
Joseph Taylor
Lisa Teal
Melissa Terrell
Laura Terry
Jada Tew
Elizabeth Thacker
Royce Thrower Jr.
Tracy Troiano
New Extended Hours
Mon - Thurs 8-8
Friday 8-5
We Put the "Student" Back in the Student Store!
"One stop shopping at the heart of campus"
Located in Wright Building
owned and operated by East Carolina University
We can meet all your book needs
Both used and new
For all classes BOTH
Undergraduate and Graduate
Store Phone
757-6731





Title
The East Carolinian, January 15, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 15, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.782
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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