The East Carolinian, December 5, 1991






Break the norm
Students should tone down the party in Atlanta.
4 U2 reborn
Their new album rekindles spirit of yesteryears.
9
�he lEaat (ftanrliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.66
Thursday, December 5,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
16 Pages
Retaliation lawsuit proceeds
Springfest banned at UNC
Springiest, an annual zfl-campus Kind party, will
not be held this year in frcn! of Connor Residence I lall at
the University ot North Carolina-Chapel 1 lill because of
liability concerns
Vavne kuncl, university housingdirector, made the
call not to allow Springfest organizers permission to hold
the event in front of the residence hall.
Kuncl said that he thought all-campus events were
becoming a thine of the past because university officials
no longer wanted to assume the risks involved in the
events.
Springfest organizers said that they hope to hold the
Kind party at some other location.
Faculty fired for forming union
The National Labor Relations Board charging the
college1 with prohibiting faculty organizing.
The first charge was tiled in June bv five faculty
members that were tired in May tor "insubordination
and acting against the bc-st interest of the college
The charge hied bv the tired professors accused the
collect, ot violating a 1934 LaKr Relations Act, specih-
cally prohibition ot concerted efforts
The second charge was filed on Oct 1? bv a drama
protc �rdeepened the split K't ween faculty and admin-
istration.
Student objects to nude painting
Officials at Penn State University removed a repro-
duction ot a famous nude painting trom a cla-sn Cornwall
after a female faculty memKT complained.
The portrait. Nude Maya bv Goya was moved to
the student center lounge on the schcxil's Schuvlkill
campus.
According to officials, female faculty found it diffi-
cult to appear professional when forced to lecture to a
class with a picture- of a female nude behind them.
To avoid a deKite over which paintings should or
should not be removed, tour other paintings were also
removed and placed in other aais.
Pumpkin fraternity suspended
The Pi kappa Alpha cKipter of the University of
North AlaKima was suspended from all social activities
tor the remainder of the fall semester after a reported
pumpkin-stealing spree by pledges on Oct. 30.
Seven pledgesin a red truck raided an area neighbor-
hood bv stealing Halloween decorations and pumpkins.
The incident was reported bv a resident of the neigh-
KrKxd and an officer from the university found several
of the stolen articles in the fraternities house.
The Interfraternity Council suspended the'chapter,
saving that the fraternity was responsible for the behav-
ior cf ik members.
Holocaust music performed
The haunting music written by Jewish composers
imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp will be per-
formed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Florida
Atlantic University in December.
The concentration camp was located at Terezin, a
village north of Prague, and served as a way station for
the death camps. The Nazis named the camp
"Paradeisghetto
The imprisoned musicians, artists and writers were
allowed to practice their crafts and those works now
serve as a memorial to the Holocaust.
The music has been desenbed as powerful, painful
and uplifting. The music isa testament to the power of the
human spirit.
University overbills government
The federal government is looking into new allega-
tions agaiast Stanford University in a research overtoil-
ing scandal that has resulted in the resignation of the
university president and the return of more than $1
million to the Pentagon.
Earlier this year, the Navy's on-campus research
contract negotiator said Stanford inappropriately billed
the government $200 million for charges loosely associ-
ated with research in the 1980s.
Now, that figure has been increased to $480 million
because of allegations that the school also figured about
$180 million in employee benefitsand about $100 million
for mishandled federal property into the government's
bill.
Compiled from CPS and staff reports.
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene72
Editorial4
Comics5
Classifieds6
EntertainmentJ9
Sportsr11
See special Peach Bowl section
By Matt Jones
News Editor
The university responded
10 a request for information
concerning the a'legcj retali-
ation against a Public Safety
captain for his whisdebtowing
of the lO wiretapping scan-
dal
Captain Stanley B.Kittrell
filed a lawsuit against the uni-
versity in September alleging
that he endured retaliation
from University officials after
informing the W in Novem-
ber 1990about the illegal wire-
taps on campus.
The university's response
grants some information and
denies access to other materi-
als citing statute limitations.
One of the documents re-
quest eel is the rc'port compiled
University releases documents; some withheld
by Univenstv Attorney Ben
Irons following an in-house
investigation of the wiretap-
ping incident. i "he university
objected to the response be-
cause the documents "were
prepared bv Mr. Irons in an-
ticipation of litigation and
the documents are subject to
attorney-client privilege
Irons said that Tom Ziko,
the assistant attorney general
for the state who is represent-
ing the university, "can invoke
the attorney-client privilidge
for the university
The privilidge involves
confklentialitybetweencoun-
sel and defendants when deal-
ing with litigation matters.
When asked if the univer-
sity anticipated litigation from
Kittrell at the time the report
was made. Irons said that the
response eiid not specifically
cite from whom the litigation
was anbepated.
KittreU's lawyer, James
Vosburgh, balked at the re-
fusal to Mease' the a-port.
"I don't sev how the uni-
versity can claim attorney-cli-
ent privilidge Vosburgh
said. "Mv client contributed
to the compilation oi that re-
port
TheuniveTsitvalsodoniod
access to a axjue-st tor a ei py c t
the minutes oi the Board of
Trustevsin which theChancel-
lordisussed KittjvH's position
in the wiretapping issue.
The response state's: "The
dendendantsobject to pnxjuc-
ing the documents desenbeel
on grounels that the devil-
ments are subject to the attor-
ney-client privilidge
The executive session ot
the Board ot Trustees is con-
sidered confidential beca�.� �
legal matters are discussed
with the university attorney.
Irons said that the response
does not admit that the docu-
ments in question exist, only
that the'y are protected bv at-
tomey-dient confidentiality.
Other portions of the re-
sponse directly respond to in-
stances in which the materials
requested are not in
"possesion, custody or con-
Sunny Skies
Photo by Oail R��d � ECU Pholo Lab
These students gathered outside the student stores for who have lived in the city for some time, know there is no
some relaxing tun in the unseasonably warm sun. Those such thing as unseasonably warm Greenville weather.
SGA resolves funding problem
By Julie Roscoe
Staff Writer
SGA and Recreational
Services quickly solved the
budget crisis which almost
grinded ECU'S club sports
program to a halt.
The SGA is running out
of moneyduetofunding twice
as many clubs now than the
past years.
Recreational Services is go-
ing to fund the majority of club
sports' financial needs to lessen
the demands on SGA, said
Nance Mize, director of RS.
In October, Bill Carroll,
chairof theRulesand Judiciary-
Committee, introduced a bill
to stop the SGA from giving
money to the club sports.
The resolution sLitexl: "No
organization that receives, or
qualifies to receive, funeiing
faimanothersourceofstialent
activities fees shall be funded
(by SGA)
The resolution led to an
information hearing
schedueled for all groups who
receive money from SGA.
The participants of this
hearing found that from stu-
dent tuition fees SGA gets
$11.25 per student and RS a-
ceives $44.
The treasurer of SGA, Eric
Milliard, said the SGA gave 8
percent of- their money,
$13,200, to clubsportslast year.
The RS gives 3 percent,
$10,000, to club sports, said
Tanya Lee, student executive
ceimmittee member for RSclub
sports.
"Some priority system
needs to be developed from
both sidesof the issue Carroll
said.
Nance Mize, director of
RS said at the hearing, "We
will try as hard as we can not
J
10 let club sports die
RS has succeeded in their
promise for support of club
spe�rts.
"We aalize that a viable
part oi our pagram is grow-
ing and we need to readjust
Mize said. "The hearing sur-
faced positive results. The
SGA needs to look at appro-
priations and we need to give
more money to club sports
Mize met last week with
all the club sports officers to
See SGA, page 2
Religion saves student from alcohol, drugs
By Susan Montague
Special to The East Carolinian
Most students when
asked what is important to
them would probably answer
family, grades, girls and ECU
football.
Scott Lewis, a senior art
major, said that his interests
are no different from the next
guy, but another part of his
life has taken priority since he
came to ECU in the fall of
1990. He told his story on the
Town Commmons while lis-
tening to the ECU vs. Cincin-
nati football game.
Like most teen-agers,
Lewis got involved with
drinking and drugs in high
school, but it wasn't because
of personal choice.
"I really just wanted to be
accepted, and that meant do-
ing what the rest of my friends
were doing Lewis said.
Coming from a family of
abuse and neglect, Lewis said
his life was full of prblems.
Because of his drinking and
drug abuse soon became a
means of escape.
"1 was feeling very alone,
and a lotof short-terrosexuaUy
centered relationships with
girls didn't help my self-es-
teem either"he saidl wasab-
solutely miserable inside, but
I don't think 1 would have
admitted it
Even though Lewis' par-
ents were Christians, and he
had knowledge of the Bible,
he said Jx-did not believe there
was one God who controlled
everything.
"1 went back and forth
from believeing God to be
some sort of life-force to being
an atheisthe said.
When Lewis transferrd
from a community college to
ECU, he decided to live with a
friend who was a Christian.
"1 made it dear to him
from the bega inning that I did
not want him preaching to me
or telling me how to run my
See Student, page 3
tail" of the university.
Concerning two ther re-
'�iests, the university decided
to release the information if
the "plaintiff agrees to execute
the attached Consent Orde-r
on Discovery
In ns send that with the
consent order is an admis-
sion from the plaintiff that
the information is pets nnc 1
related anil thus restricted
bv a law confining the re-
lease ot personnel informa-
tion. I he information may
thus onlv be used bv the
counsel and may not K- dis-
closed.
! heinformation tobere-
leased following the consent
order concerns the investi-
gation of the Director of Pub-
lic Safetv lames Depuy's
break-in of KittreU's office.
Student
defends
firework
incident
By Jennifer VVardrep
AsiMant News Lditor
I wo students accused ot
lighting a cherry bomb ex
plosion during a showing of
Terminator 2 at Mendenhall
Student Center have denied
their involvement The bomb
was thrown toward the ta-nt
cf Hendnx Theater at the be-
ginning of the Nov. 21 show-
ing of the movie.
"We didn't do it said
Tyre Linton, one of the stu-
de-nts accused. "I just want
mvnamecleared. This has just
gone too far
Linton said that he and
his friend, Jason Walz, sat in
the front row ot the theater.
During the first scene of the
movie, when there are explo-
sions on the screen, he said
that a aal one occurred be-
tween he and Walz.
"Why would we put a
cherry bomb nght at our legs?
Linton said. He also said that
both he and Walz wcTebumed
by the explosion.
After the explosion, the
movie was stopped and an
usher identified Linton and
Walz as the perpetrators.
Linton said thatshe pointed to
other students as well, but
public safety officers onlv
ushered out he and Walz.
"The onlv reason the
woman pointed us out is be-
cause the explosion was near
us Linton said. "It doesn't
make sense that they're saying
we tArtu- a cherry bomb when
it exploded right at our legs
He said he suspects stu-
dents sitting several rows be-
hind him.
Linton said he is filing a
formal complaint against the
usher. He said that she "just
wanted to be a heroine and
save the theater" and that the
onl v reason he and Walz were
J
pointed out is because "they
just wanted somebody to
blame
"All we have right now is
a report of who might have
been responsible Ronald
Speier, dean of students said.
"We're investigating the po-
lice report now
He said he does not even
See Bomb, page 2





2 3K?e laHtCHarollnian Decembers, 1991
Overcrowding limits hospitals SGA
Continued from page 1
Public Safety stops student for
speeding, careless and reckless
Dec. 2
1349�ECU Public Safety: Chased a subject from Public Safety to
Anderson Street. The chase ended north of Slay.
1410�Magistrate's Office: Checked on a subject in custody at
the office. The subject was charged with obstruct and delay and
possession of stolen goods.
1447�Jarvis Hall: Checked out a report of the alarm being
activated.
1609�Seventh and Cotanche streets: Vehicle stopped near in-
tersection. Subject transported to magistrate's office. State citation
issued for no operator's license.
1620�Minges Coliseum: Provided an escort from Minges to
First Citizens Bank.
- 1752�Fifth and Hardee stavts: Vehicle stopped west of the
Graham Building. Campus citation issued to student for speeding
and careless and reckless driving.
1950�Third Street and Reade Circle: Checked out a report of
damage to property. A report was taken.
2056�Brewster Building: Attempted to assist motorist south of
the building in starting a vehicle. Officer was unable to assist.
2152�Minges Coliseum: Assisted motorist in unlocking a ve-
hicle.
2208�Ninth and James streets: Vehicle stopped near intersec-
tion. Campus citation issued to student for speeding.
2235�Scott Hall: Vehicle stopped south of the building. A
verbal warning was given to the student for speeding.
2355�Fifth and Harding streets: Vehicle stopped for a stop sign
violation north of Flanagan Building. A verbal warning was given
0007�Belk Hall: Checked on two suspicious male subjects in a
vehicle south of the building. Subjects were identified and no action
was taken.
0118�Belk Hall: Responded to a domestic dispute north of the
building. A male student was referred to the administration for
action.
0125�Belk Hall: Checked on two suspicious male subjects in a
vehicle south of the building. Subjects identified as a student and a
non-student. The subjects were installing a car alarm.
0134�General Classroom Building: Responded to a report of a
male student passed out north of the building. The subject was
transported to residence on east Second street.
Dec. 3
0854�Mendenhall Student Center Checked out a report of a
bank alarm being activated. Found to be an employee error.
0906�Jones Hall: Assisted in a rescue. The subject was trans-
ported to the Pitt County Memorial Hospital Emergency Room.
1121�Student Health Service: Transported staff member from
the health center to the Home Economics Building and back with an
injured subject.
Crime Seen Is taken from official Public Safety crime toga
(ARS)�When you 're sick you
want immediate medical attention.
Unfortunately, as emergency de-
partments across the country con-
tinue to close at an alarming rate,
long waiting times for care have
become the norm.
Overcrowding is a growing
trend in which the seriously ill and
injured arc being turned away or
delayed case. In fact, many hospitals,
because of limited resources, staff,
and space are forced to temporarily
close their emergency departments
to all incoming patients and go on
"diversion meaning ambulance
patients are sent to the next open
emergency department. This not
only delays the patient's treatment
but in some cases also increases
waiting times for others in need of
pre-hospital emergency medical
services, such as ambulances and
helicopters.
A nationwide survey of nurs-
ing staff and managers on the
problem of overcrowding in hos-
pitals and emergency departments
found that nearly 90percentof those
Bomb
Continued from page 1
kni w i t i t was a cherry bomb or not,
onlv that it was some type of fire-
work.
Speier also said that if "suffi-
cient evidence" or a positive iden-
tification is found implicating
Linton and VValz, they will have to
go before the Honor Board. He said
there is a person who says they can
identify the subjects, but "itdepends
on what shesavsand how she could
identify them in a dark theater
Linton said as the officers es-
corted he and VValz out of the the-
ater, students attending the movie
started chanting "Hey, hey, hey
goodbye" and that this embarrassed
him.
"1 was so humiliated Linton
said. "It was the most humiliating
experience I've ever had
The usher could not be reached
for comment
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responding considered over-
crowding to have become an issue
in their state or region within the
past two years.
"If s overcrowding! not just
affecting the poor, not just affecting
the uninsured, it affects everyone.
Whether you're hit while driving
your Mercedesor you're an indigent
stabbed in a knife fight, that's not
going to change the fact that if a
trauma center is busy or a hospital
is on diversion, you'll end up
playing Russian roulette trying to
find a hospital that can take you
says Nigel Keep, RN, MICN, CEN
(certified emergency nurse), nursing
services manager at Alta District
Hospital in Dinuba, California, and
co-author of the survey on over-
crowding.
The survey, conducted by the
Emergency Nurses Association
(ENA), shows that in a majority of
states overcrowding occurs when
there are no available hospital beds
for patients who are ready to be
admitted from the emergency de-
partment.
Matt Jones
d iscuss the problem and a long term
solution.
"We feel at this point in time we
will fund 75 percent of club sports'
requests Mize said.
Club sports will resubrrut their
budgetsona semesterlybasisrather
than annually, which is a more re-
alistic solution, Mize said.
Teams will not have to match
the money RS allocates by. fc
amount they will have to raise is
undedded.
"Bill Carroll is to be com-
mended for bringing the issue to
light Mize said. "But club sports
should be entitled to SGA funds
also, these students do pav their
$11.25"
NURSES:
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your talent and your skill. Nurses with BSNs get the
full-time pay and benefits of an Army officer plus a
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You'll be part of a top quality health care team,
making patient care decisions that count. We
encourage and could fund your continuing education.
And we offer you opportunities for travel and career
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To find out if you qualify, call your Army Nurse
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1-800-662-7473
(Sgt. 1st Class Jacobs or Sgt. 1st Class Reinelt)
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
BEFORE YOU LEAVE FOR HOME CHECK
YOUR CHRISTMAS LIST AT OVERTONS
STURTLENECKS
SSKI COATS
TENNIS SHOES
TENNIS BALLS
WOOL SOCKS
SRUSSELL SWEATSHIRTS
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Located behind Comfort Inn
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Sat. 8-6
We Hope You
Have A Happy and
Safe Holiday Season!
PIRATES
Congatulations on a Great Season!
Football Team in NC.
and the next
PEACH BOWL CHAMPIONS!
Student
Despite argument from his
roommate, Lewis continued drink-
inganddoingdrugs during most ot
his first semester.
"It really gi it v trse when I came
to ECU he said "I was smoking
pot at least every weekend
After a while, he said he got
tired of waking up every morning
hung-over ,and on Halloween he
decided b i stay si iber and be desig-
nated -driver
" was n-d surprised when '
acutualty had a good timehe
saidAnd it was great to wake up
in the morning and fed good
From that point on Lewis said
he stopped smoking pot and cut
down on his drinking.
During this tinKLewisbecame
friends with a guy in his painting
class named Dave md found out
he was a chnstian.
"It was hard to believe be
he didn't act like (ther chnsnans I
knewLewis said smoked and
cussed in class, buthedidn't put me
down
He said Daw was nice to him
and listned to his problems, even
though he knew thev were very
diffemt people.
Lewis found out that Dave was
involved with a group called Inter-
Varsity Christian Fellowship.
Lewis' roommate was also in this
group, and the two of them en
aged Lewis to go to one of their
weeklv meetings.
"I wasn't in to it rst, so 1
'con venientlv'had other plans when
they asked me to gi he said.
When hisexcusesranout, Lewis
gave in and went.
He said thai
and unoomfortai
attended IV
"I telt kind
the people ther
niceLewis - I
He said
feel accepted b
and decided t
This
V
54
FrL
Hi
Hours
MonTM
Fri. liar
Sat. 9pm
IT AT I III i
G OH r
Si k r
ABC

4
Glamour
Was The
Disguise
' ' "iflMt Hi n i �
WARREN BEATTY - ANMTTi
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a MILHOLLAND PR0DICT10NS BALTIMORE P
WARREN BEATTA ANNETTE BEN1NG a BARRA
HAREA K'EITEL BEN KiNGSLEA and JOE MA
ENNI0M0RR1C0NE .DENMS CASSNi
- JAMESTOBACk " , MARK JOHNSON B.
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it
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TRI
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LOCATIO'
Sponsored by the ECU St





Continued from page 1
blemand a longterm
Teams wall not have to match
the money RS allocates but the
amount they will have to raise is
undecided
Bill Carroll is to be com-
mended for bringing the issue to
light Mize said. "But club sports
lesterly basis rather should be entitled to SGA funds
, which is a more re- also, these students do pav their
Mize said. SI 1.25
�t this point in tune v e
jrcent of club sports'
said.
rt will resubmit their
NURSES:
LL PAY YOU A BONUS
health care organization that appreciates
ind your skill. Nurses with BSNsget the
i and benefits of an Arm) officer plus a
bonus!
I of a top quality health care team,
tn care decisions that count. We
id could tund your continuing education.
ryou opportunities for travel and career
� I you qualify, call your Army Nurse
t. ve at:
1-800-662-7473
- - x Isi Class Reinelt)
ARMY NURSE CORPS
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
FOR HOME CHECK
1ST AT OVERTOILS
SNOW SKI CLOVES
UMBRO SHORTS
BASKETBALL
FOOTBALL
BASEBALL CLOVE
ATHLETIC SOCKS
SWIM COCCLES
SNOW SKI COCCLES
CHAMOIS SHIRT
J�c&
gp&
HOURS:
MonFri. 8-7
Sat. 8-6
e You
appy and
iy Season!
TES
I a Great Season!
mm in NC.
next
HAMPIONSf
r-
t
ft
6
Student
Continued from page 1
Despite argument from his
roommate, Lewis continued drink-
ing and doing drugs during most of
his first semester.
"Itroallygot worse when Icame
to ECU he saidI was smoking
pot at least every weekend
After a while, he said he got
tired of waking up every morning
hungover,and on Halloween he
decided to stay sober and be desig-
nated-driver.
"I was real surprised when I
acutually had a good timehe
saidAnd it was great to wake up
in the morning and feel good
From that point on Lewis said
he stopped smoking pot and cut
down on his drinking.
During this time, Lewisbecame
friends with a guy in his painting
class named Dave, and found out
he was a Christian.
"It was hard to believe because
he didn't act like other Christians I
knewLewis said smoked and
cussed in class, but hedidn't put me
down
He said Dave was nice to him
and listned to his problems, even
though he knew they were verv
diffemt people.
Lewis found out that Dave was
involved with a group called Inter-
Varsity Christian Fellowship.
Lewis' roommate was also in this
group, and the two of them encour-
aged Lewis to go to one of their
weekly meetings.
"I wasn't in to it at first, so I
'con venienth had other plans when
they asked me to gohe said.
When his excuses ran out, Lewis
gave in and went.
He said that he was "nervous
and uncomfortable " when he first
attended I.V.
"I felt kind of out of place, but
the people there were incredibly
nice'Lcwis said.
He said that he soon began to
feel accepted by the people at I.V.
and decided to keeping going.
"I didn't want tobelieveinGod,
but I knew wassomethingdifferent
about those peoplehe said.
Each week the students at I.V.
sing songs of praise and worship
and dosevcral humorous skits They
also bring in a person to speak on
current issues and tell how God
related to them.
This Week's Entertainment
Thurs, Dec 5th
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(located across from UBE)
758-0080
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We Reserve The Rtqht To Limit Quantities. None
�Sfiii,1" Greenville Stores Only.
Sold To Dealers We GWry Accept Federal Food Stamps.





Continued from page 1
.
his will not have to match
RS allocates but the
have to raise is
arroll is to be corn-
g the issue to
said But club sports
' to SGA funds
nts do p.iv their
NURSES:
LPAY YOU A BONUS
IS .1
Nurse
800-6
ARMY NURSL CORPS.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE
FOR HOME CHECK
1ST AT OVERTON'S
� SKI CLOVES
SHORTS
SFOOTBALL
EBALL CLOVE
SATHLETICSOCKS
� GOCCLES
S i SKI GOGGLES
Si "OIS SHIRT
��&
HOURS:
MonFri. 8-7
Sat. 8-6
e You
ippy and
i Season!
TES
a Great Season!
earn in NC.
next
HAMPTONS!
Student
Continued from page 1
Despite argument from his
roommate, I ewiscontinued drink-
ami doing drugs ciunngrnostot
his first semester.
"Itreallygot worse when I came
to EO he snd " was smoking
pot at least every weekend "
After a while, he said he .�� I
toed ol waking up ever) morning
hung-over,and on Halloween he
decided tostaj sober and be desig-
nafted-driver.
! was real surprised when I
acutually had a good timehe
saidAnd it was great to wake up
in the morning and feel good
From that point on Lewis said
he stopped smoking pot and cut
down on his drinking.
Duringthistinie I ewisbecame
fnends with a gu in his painting
class named Dav� and found out
he was
"It washard tobi I - � ause
he didn't act like other Christians I
knew I evv is s
cussed in, lass buthi d
down
Hes II ivas
and listned ti
though he l
diffemt people.
1 ev is found . utthat Dav t i -
involved
Varsity s hristian ! elli a si in
He sud that he was "nervous
and uncomfortable " when he first
attended IV
"I felt kind ot out of place, but
the people there were incredibly
nicel ew is said.
He slid thai he soon began to
feel accepted by the people .it I.V.
and decided to keeping going.
"IdkhVtwanttobeiteveint lod,
but 1 knew was something different
about those peopte'he said
Each week the students at LV.
sing songs of praise and worship
and do several humorous sluts They
also bring in a person to speak on
current issues and tell how God
related to them.
'ked and
itme
even
verv
Lewis' roommate was a
group and thetv
aged I ev� is I
weekh i
-
hadot
the - :
When his excuses rai
eave ir ai 1 went
This Week's Entertainment
Thurs, Dec 5th
l�FT UIING FASCISTS
50 Draft � $1.00 Longnccks
Fri, Dec 6th
HI WOT
Hours
MonThurs. 11am-5pm
Fri. 11am-2am
Sat. 9pm-2am
Sat, Dec 7th
MftfiY ON TH� DASH
513 Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-00801
rr p F A MAIfiD 1 TTIfiN D
jii.
.
N PICTURE FROM
fn -Tin
- � PICTURE:
BC DAY T
TRIW
STAR
TIME : 8:00 PM
DATE: DECEMBER I0TH
LOCATION: HENDRIX THEATRE
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Films Committee
J
December 5,1991 elje tost (Earulinian 3
Harris teeter
HARRIS ffflR MAM
101V MKES!
Perdue Grade "A"
Drumstick's
PER LB.
Or Thighs
lb.
?tes
Golden Ripe
Chiquita
Bananas
�REDUCED-
SAVE
48
PiR 3 LBS.
Folqers
Coffee
13 Oz.
�tfOUCIO-
SAVE
10
154
Sq. Ft.
Kleenex
Bath Tissue
2 Liter Bottle Diet Coke Or
Coca-Cola
Classic
12 PACK
12 OZ. CANS
Prices Effective Through December 10, 1991
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesday December
We Reserve The Riqhf To Limit Quantihes None Soid To Dealers We Gladly Accent rederaltod Stamps
I991 r Greenville Stores Only





Continued from page 1
not have to match
ocates but the
have to raise is
is to be com
the issue (
il club sports
' ' 5GA funds
pa their
NURSES:
LL PAY YOU A BONUS
. c s
5E CORPS.
J CAN BE.
FOR HOME CHECK
1ST AT OVERTOILS
GLOVES
iORTS
ML
t LOVE
JCKS
GLES
- GOGGLES
SSHIRT
�CeM
HOURS:
inFri. 8-7
Sat. 8-6
e You
uppy and
v Season!
$

TES
a (.rent Season!
earn in NC.
next
HAMPIONS!
Student
Continued from page 1
roomS ' ' ;? S �HC "W3S "nervOUS "Ididn'twanttobelievein Jod.
h. ,u teLev,scimjtmucddnnk and uncomfortable " when he first butlknewwassomethingdifferen.
jnganddj mg drugs dunng most of attended I.V. about those pcoPle'hes!id.
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ta Fnrl:ff i? nkamC tht' fH"plr "UV uvrv incrcdiWV singsongsol praise and worship
I , , U'Si,J smoking nice Lewissaid. anddoseveralhumorousskitsn
F JM ' Ile said that he soon began to also bring in a person to speak on
tir�. - lh� � feel accepted by the people at l.V. current issues and tell how Cod
upterymoming and deaded to keeping going related to them
nung ovei and illoween he
decided tostaj sobei andbedesic
natisi driver
R
�h1 when I
d timehe
to wake up
�od
i 1 ev is said
K and cut
�wisbecame
I was real sui
acutua
said nd '
in the mon i
I n m thai i �
he stopped
down on his drinkii
Durii .
friends ��� �;�, painting
class named Davt and found out
hew
he tuse
h' didn I �
kin w'L ked and
cusse I In t put me
QOS '
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and - een
thouj h he 1 verv
diffen I i -�
i ew
involved Inter-
a r s
Lewis : ilso in I
group ncoui
aged to f then
week .
'con vi
the : - :
ga v
This Week's Entertainment
Thurs, Dec 5th
L�FT UIING FASCISTS
50 Draft � $1.00 Longnecks
Fri, Dec 6th
muinv
Hours
MonThurs. 11am-3pm
Fri. l lam-2am
Sat. 9pm-2am
Sat, Dec 7th
MflftY ON TH� DftSH
51 i Cotanche
I lot a ted across from UBE)
758-00801
" n M A1 " v
Ml m - T
. -
BC DAY T
STAR
TIME : 8:00 PV1
DATE: DECEMBER 10TH
LOCATION: HENDRTX THEATRE
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Films Committee
DfciMHfH 5.1991 dl)c taut (Earultnian $
Harris teeter
HARRIS mm MEANS
LOW PRICES1.
Perdue Grade "A"
Drumsticlcs
Or Thighs
Lb.
Golden Ripe
Chiquita
Bananas
2 Liter Bottle Diet Coke Or
Coca-Cola
Classic
12 PACK
12 OZ. CANS
Prices Effective Through December 10, 1991
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesday Decembe- 'C '991 I Greenville Stores Only
We Reserve The R.qht To unit Quantities None Sold Tc Dealers We Gladly Accept federal food Stamps





Stye SaBt (Earriltmatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
W. Douglas Morris, Jr Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
A'UANTA-BDdNP
$0 Mil PAST'
M 60TTA VMc�"r TU TH'AiZPoerf
Matt Jones, Mru Editor
Jennifer Wardrep, Asf. Nra� Editor
Matt King, Entertainment Editor
Lewis Coble, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Brian Kerns, Sports Editor
Michael G. Martin, Asst. Sports Editor
LeClair Harper, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
M. Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925. emphasizing information that affects ECU
students The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
1S the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Utters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right toed.t or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C.
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Bowl-goers must enjoy, behave
ECU Pirate football has entered a new era
� a time that will most certainly please fans,
players, coaches and athletic officials. Not too
many weeks ago, the team hit number 12 in the
Associated Press poll and accepted a bid to play
N.C. State in the Peach Bowl.
Head coach Bill Lewis had a great recruit-
ing year, and with many promising players and
coaches, the team improved their record to 10-1
� the best ever by any ECU team in history.
With the addition of some more big-name oppo-
nents in future schedules and the possibility of
membership to a conference, the Pirates will
definitely be a force to be reckoned with in
Division I football.
The Peach Bowl can't come too soon � it
has been a long-awaited event for many people.
Traditionally, Pirate football games have been
full of fun and excitement for the fans, players
and coaches. But some events that have tran-
spired in the last few years have left many ECU
supporters disappointed.
There are but a small number of these
events, but each instance, in one way or another,
dealt with Pirate fans (both students and non-
students). Of course not everyone is to blame,
but the few troublemakers make all of the fans
look bad � especially the students.
Between fights, intoxication and throwing
objects at opposing players, some of the ECU
fans have made enjoying Pirate football games
difficult for others. Not to mention we will play
our intra-state rivals on national television, now
is the time for Pirate football followers to be on
their best behavior. There's too much to risk.
The players have "played their hearts out"
this year, and it would be senseless to ruin their
accomplishments (and disgrace the university)
by getting out hand in Atlanta on New Year's
Day. For a long time, ECU students have looked
to the Greenville community to be treated as
adults, not merely as college students. The atti-
tudes and actions of students play an important
role in finally having the request answered. If
we want to be treated as adults, then we have to
act like adults.
Now what others (specifically non-ECU
students) do, we cannot control. But we can
control ourselves. And we should. Let's stop the
few people now from making those same mis-
takes that cost us the series with N.C State to
begin with, and a level of respect can certainly
be obtained between the two universities. The
Pirate football program has changed for the
good and so have the fans. So let's not blow it.
Take your sabres and Pirate pride to Fulton
County Stadium, but be sure to leave the old
ECU image behind.
fogKEHI
On The Fringe
Consume, crush a cheap six Pack
By Tim E. Hampton
Editorial Columnist
Editorial columnists are taken
too seriously. Recently an E-nigmatic,
E-nevrating and E-clectic columnist
compared the lowly Wolfpack to the
high-brow sensibilities of the Pirates.
Much to the dismay of the
writer, a riot ensued after thousands
of literate Pirate fans read the column,
drove to Raleigh, crashed through the
barriers of Carter-Finley Stadium and
obliterated North Carolina State
University's football field. And other
readers started a "1 hate State" club
which has plotted the assassinations
of State's Chancellor and key mem-
bers of the Wolfpack Club.
The columnist's portrayal of
NCSU students � as rednecks who
idolize Colonel Sanders, useimpro per
syntax and work at Fast Fare � also
upset many holders of Agricultural
degrees from that fine institution.
Thecolumn'sadjoiningcartoon,
which depicted the subtle differences
between "Culture" and "Agricul-
tural also inflamed those partial to
Wolves with the exclamation: "It ain't
fair
So, with this long preamble pro-
mulgating the rationale for never tak-
ing a columnist seriously, let's take
time out of our busy schedules to as-
semble The East Carolina Cheap Beer
Guide
Subtitle: Low Budget Premium
Beer is Not an Oxymoron Anymore�
Some frat boy types and computer
specialists whodriveBMWsmay look
down on some beer drinkers for im-
bibing lesser grades of golden ale. But
we all can't nonchalantly request "Mic
Light" � an intimate appellation
which true connoisseurs find repul-
sive.
Why do all the good beers have
cutesy little names like "Mic" and
"Bud"? We should add the following
to the beer-nickname cannon: "Bla
"O-limp "Shaf" and "M's B Here is
how future bar lingo should sound:
"Give me a triple-casading M's Bdraft
with a lemon twist in a cold mug
translation: "Give me a Milwaukee's
Best in anything but a Rugger's shoe
Since we all do not drive expen-
sive barvian-cream automobiles and
have names like Stef fan, cheap beer is
a way of life. It is an economic deci-
sion that even President Bush plugged
a few weeks ago: "Now is the perfect
time to purchasea house, a car and the
perfect time to buy a case cf Shaeffer
So instead of selling the cafete-
ria meal card for a six-pack of "Mic
why not try one of these fine brews.
� Black Label � when served
at one degree above freezing, "Bla"
looses its metallic taste and becomes a
true full-bodied beer. Depending on
the store, "Bla" is less than four bucks
for 12.
� Shaeffer� creates less intes-
tinal gas than the other cheap premi-
ums, but still gives the illusion of be-
ing a true full-bodied beer. A tangy
mixture of hops and barley, Shaeffer
only leaves a hint of morning-breath
after taste.
� Olympia � whose slogan
"It's the Water" is only accurate when
reading the fine print: "Made from
treated New Jersey water While
Olympia tastes like droppings from
one of N.C. State's farms, it has an
attractive blue can and retails for less
than most people are willing to pay
Caution:buy Olympia when youronly
currency is a ew rolls of pennies.
� Milwaukee's Best � phase
call this fine yellow ale by its correct
nomenclature, i.e. do not become con-
fused like most N.C. State graduates
and call "M'sB" � "Old Milwaukee i
Best
Anyone who says "Old
Milwaukee's Best" proves their beet
drinking ignoranteand should be cas-
tigated from the Emerald City and
forced to live in Raleigh. M's B, with
other perverse nameslike "the Bea�
is the finest of the cheap premiums.
M's B is the perfect beer for any occa-
sion, whether it be watching LseCortO
eat his words or telling tasteful N C
State jokes. (Editor's note: the phrase
"tasteful N.C. State" is an oxymoron)
� Blatz � Blatz is not sold m
Greenville after the famous Blatz boy-
cott of 1981 in which picketers car-ied
signs reading "Blatz is Wolfpack
Swill" However, Blatz can be pur-
chased in the state's capital where H �
theofficial inexpensive premium beer
of N.C. State University.
Final note on the putting
green � school rivalries can be taken
to the extreme and, at times, beyond
the edges of the fringe. Likewise, beer
drinkers can argue cogent pointsabou:
the differences between Black La be.
and Budweiser until the Cadillacs
comehome. Unfortunately, some ath-
letic supporters and beerdnnkers ta kc
a personal offense to such rhetoric
On New Year's Day, N.C. State
fans may drink all the expensive beer
they want, E will be drinking victor's
champaign out of Cinderella's slip-
per.
Maxwells Silver Hammer
Constitution should be rewritten, revised
Letters to the Editor
Scholars object to
restrictions on
Women's Studies
The East Carolina Association
of Scholars, an organization of fac-
ulty, administrators and graduate stu-
dents, was formed last April for sev-
eral purposes, which include support
of ECU's Equal Opportunity Policy,
promotion of the study of Western
culture and opposition to programs
of study designed to instill specific
political opinions.
We believe that university em-
ployees should know and obey the
law. Departmental Chairmen and
members of personnel committees
sometimes seem to be unaware that
preferential treatment of women and
minorities in hiring is illegal. The la ws
against discrimination on the basis of
race and sex are reflected in The Code
of the University of North Carolina
(section 103), the university's Affir-
mative A, on Equal Opportunity
Policy and the university's Affirma-
tive Action Plan. The code, for ex-
ample, explicitly states that "Admis-
sion to, employment by and promo-
tion in the University of North Caro-
lina and all of its constituent institu-
tions shall be on the basis of merit and
there shall be no discrimination on the
bases of race, color, creed, religion,
sex or national origin Preferential
treatment for women and minorities
in faculty hiring obviously discrimi-
nates and is therefore illegal.
We are also alarmed by
politicization in the Women's Studies
Program. An advertisement for the
Director of the ECU Women's Stud ies
Program that appeared in the Oct. 1
issue of Pieces of Eight emphasized
that the "applicant or nominee should
be committed to a feminist philoso-
phy We strongly object to the use of
ideological criteria for faculty appoint-
ments. It is unethical to exclude non-
feminists from faculty appointments
as it is to exclude feminists, Marxists,
Democrats, Republicans, conserva-
tives, liberals, theists, atheists, Jews,
Moslems or Christians. The
university's Equal Opportunity Policy
declares that ECU will hire "without
regard toxreedTheWomen'sStud-
ies advertisement is a direct contra-
vention of this policy and The Codeof
the University of North Carolina. Al-
though the advertisement's wording
has recently been revised and now
requires the applicant to "have a dem-
onstrated interest in feminist research
and teaching" rather than a commit-
ment to a feminist philosophy, we
continue to object to the advertise-
ment on the ground that the members
of the Women's Studies Director
Search Committee may yet find it pos-
sible to interpret the new and rather
more nebulous requirement in such a
way as to exclude non-feminist
women and men from employment.
That was clearly their original inten-
tion.
The East Carolina Association
of Scholars
Bush's support of
foreign labor not
surprising
To the Editor
It is no wonder Bush is support-
ive of America being the dumping
ground for foreign-made products
that exacerbatethetradedeficit. When
he owned tankers that went under the
name of Lepato Oil, these ships flew
the flag of convenience�foreign reg-
istrytoavoid paying taxes in this coun-
try and also to get crews at half the
wages he would have to pay Ameri-
can seamen.
Kenneth Hele
Dock Officer
United States Merchant Marine
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial CohimnUt
While writing my previous col-
umn (in which Your Humble Servant
rampaged against the evils of con-
gressional term limitations), 1 got to
thinking about Constitutional provi-
sions that ought to be modified, clari-
fied, or trashed.
First, and most obvious, is the
electoral college. Originally conceived
as a bulwark against too much de-
mocracy, it has since been castrated
and ought simply to be put out of its
misery.
In theory, the electoral college
is a last line of defense against crazed
voters. If the citizens were to elect
someone who was clearly going to
ruin the country, the theory goes, the
electoral college could pick one of the
other candidates instead.
Today, though, electoral college
members don't have that freedom �
at least, not in all states. In many states,
the electoral college must cast its votes
in a way that reflects the state's popu-
lar vote. That's a waste of time and
money if ever there were one. Dump
the electoral college
Now, about term limits. If we're
going to limit anyone's terms in office,
it ought to be the Supreme Court jus-
tices At least we should have regular
opportunities to throw the bums out,
as we now have with Congress ami
the president
The point of giving the
Supremes lifetime appointments was
to prevent their offices from becom-
ing political. But it hasn't worked out
that way; the nomination hearings for
Clarence Thomas showed that as
clearly as anything else has. Thomas
ran for that office, as any politician
runs for office nowadays. ("No, re-
ally, Senator, I've never even thought
about Roe v. Wade no, really, Sena-
tor, I didn't mean anything I ever said
in a speech no, really, Senator, I
didn't sexually harass Anita Hill)
Since lifetime appointments
aren't achieving their purpose, either
scrap them or replace them with some-
thing that will work better.Thafswhat
any sensible person would do. Prob-
ably the best alternative would be to
have the Senate "re-confirm" the
judgesevery lOyearsor so. Naturally,
they'd be free to toss out any justice
who hadn't been living up to prom-
ises he made during the confirmation
hearings, or who had clearly lied to
get the job, or whatever.
Of course, this means the Sen-
ate will continually be throwing out
justices whose views aren't cut to fit
this year's fashions. Even with that
serious drawback, the revised system
would be an improvement over the
present system, which is the biggest
morass of hypocrisy and lies since
Doughnat-gate.
At the very least, we should get
somebody to clear up just what "ad-
vice and consent" means�especially
the "advice" part. It's just so we edito-
rial columnists don't have to keep
drearily noting that presidents never
ask the full Congress (or even com-
mittees) for advice about who should
be nominated to the Supreme Court.
As long as we're mucking
around with the executive and judi-
cial branches, why not mess with the
Congress, too?
The Constitution requires Sena-
tors and Representatives to be resi-
dents of the states in which they were
elected. (Well, to be picky.they're only
required to be legal residents at the
time of their election; they could move
out the next day.) Part of the reason
for this was to ensure that the Con-
gresscritters stay in touch with their
constituents.
In a way, I think Congresscrit-
ters are in touch with their constitu-
ents. They must be. If they were truly
out of touch, they wouldn't know just
how stupid and uninformed and apa-
thetic their constituents are, and if
they didn't know how stupid and un-
informed and apathetic their constitu-
ents are, they wouldn't dare do half
the stuff they do.
In another sense, though. Con-
gress is outof touch. There seems to be
a strange bug in Washington that in-
fects politicians with I'm-lncredibly-
Important Disease. Everyone up there
has it � not just Congress, but also
people like George Bush and John
Sununu. Pat Buchanan is its latest vic-
tim.
At any rate, simply maintain-
ing residences in their home states
certainly isn't keeping Congresscrit-
ters in touch with their constituents.
Many are rich enough to afford mul-
tiple residences anyway, somein their
home state and some out of it So
there's another Constitutional pen-
sion that has proved useless, and that
ought to be stricken from the Consti-
tution just for the sake of honesty and
our national self-respect.
On the other hand, we COuM
modify it instead of cutting it. Require
Congresscntterstodo regular and rre-
quent public service (or maybe "pen-
ance" would be a better word) in their
home districts. Get them working m i
homeless shelter five hours a week,
and we'll get affordable homes built.
Send them walking down a street that
drug pushers are fighting over�with-
out bodyguards, like the rest of us �
and they'll legalize drugs (stopping
the attendant violence) before you can
just say no. Come to think of it, that's
medicine that ought to be force-fed to
all our elected officials, and most of
their aides.
While we're rewriting the Con-
stitution, there's at least oneConstitu-
tional provision that ought to be rein-
stated. I won't belabor the point here
(having belabored it elsewhere), but
the presidential candidate who re-
ceives the second-most votes ought to
become the vice president, as theongi-
nal Constitution provides.
One the advantages of restor-
ing this provision is that the candi-
dates are bound to campaign more
fairly � after all, you don't want to
end up working for somebody you've
been publicly lying about for a year
Moreover, it would stimulate the
growth of third parties, which would
no longer need to get the most votes to
get a candidate into the White House,
placing second would be enough to
give them a foothold, and third place
would at least be less disappointing.
Rewriting the Constitution
won't cure the nation's ills. None of
the flaws in that venerable document
is more serious than the nation's apa-
thy, cultural and mathematical illit-
eracy (not to mention the regular kind
of illiteracy), and so on.
So it's not a panacea. But then, it
can't hurt, either. Democracy is sup-
posed to be an experiment, after all
and we' re free to change the rules that
aren't working. And there are some
rules we ought to change.
DIDY
HIGHLIGHTS FR(
ARCH
You gotvBI
me!
Go aheadmake my day
l
a
w
y
'
4 t '
That's what you call a stiff arm
Have you had your titness as
Co-Rec Flag Football
Its once again the end !
another tall semi-Met and
rUx Flag Football has fcS nt
champion Hit n Run a
the regular season with a I
teoord The? continued there
dominance throughout the
offs by capturing the rown
with a overall record of 7-1
The championhip game was
won wiih one touchdown
scored in the first hall of the
game Hit n Run defeated tin-
Terminators i I giving them
the bragging rights to say; "We
are the Co-Rec Flag Football
Champions' Congratulation!
all the CO-4K Mag Foocbtfl
teams
Annual Turkey Tnt
a Success!
The annual "Turkev Trot"
was once again a great MCOafj
The race consisted of a two
mile course, which started at
Bunting Field moved down
Berkley Road where runners
parsed Ficklen Stadium and the
Intramural Fields. From cm
Berkley Road the competitors
turned left onto Ficklen Drive
then left onto Charles Street for
the home stretch They finally
: 1 W11

Scalise
he � .
lhre
In tii-
lon woo with
i 51 ;
H Kappa Phi
time oi J 5
unconte
ntion howew
from running
All fan a!
everyi ne 1
winners in bo
races each re
bv hi DtntaJ
up reoehed
also provided!
lot those whl
handed, bettel





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� its comet
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ite graduates
: M Iwaukce'a
says 'Old
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- not sold in
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s Wolfpack
� can be pur-
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�� :� iumbeer
rutting
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nsive beer
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rewritten, revised
gresscrit-
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I truly
Id n't know just
- landapa-
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stupid and un-
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ft dare do
tngtun that ln-
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tress, but also
ish and lohn
limits latest vic-
y maintain-
r home states
. ongresscrit-
.onstituents.
��� rd mul-
lein their
� of it. So
mal pi vi-
- and that
the Consti-
: � nesty and
we could
. � Require
irandfre-
- n aybe "pert-
.i) in their
-king in a
.rs a week,
homes built.
gdown a street that
gover � with-
� � rest of us �
�� I rugs (stopping
before? you can
to think of it, that's
ighl to be force-fed to
and most of
-
�� rewriting theCon-
:� least oneConstitu-
al tught toberein-
tbof the point here
� � rid it elsewhere), but
indidate who re-
sthe second-most votes ought to
idrnt,astheorigi-
nal Constitution provides.
i � is of restor-
� � ikm is that the candi-
I �� s are bound to campaign more
fairly � after ail, you don't want to
end up working :or vnebody you've
� n'ng about for a year.
Moreover, it would stimulate the
growth of third parties, which would
no longer need to get the most votes to
get a candidate into the White House,
1 ing ��� nd would be enough to
give them a foothold, and third place
would at least be less disappointing.
Rewriting the Constitution
won't cure the nation's ills. None of
the flaws in that venerable document
is more serious than the nation's apa-
thy, cultural and mathematical illit-
eracy (not to mention the regular kind
of illiteracy), and soon.
So it's not a panacea. But then, it
can't hurt, either. Democracy is sup-
posed to be an experiment, after all,
and we're free to change the rules that
aren't working. And there are some
rules we ought to change.
DID YOU FALL INTO FAME??
HIGHLIGHTS FROM RECREATIONAL SERVICES FALL 1991 PROGRAMS
ARCH
You got
me!
O.K. class, which
Kthn did the ball
me fnm?
f
Students
STEP into
fall fitness
V
J
3 cheers for
Alpha Phi
Co aheadmake my day.
lugb) takes State Championship again!



P
That's what you call a stiff arm!
I
AIRRR BALLH
life is beach in on The Hill
All central campus scavengers
Have you had your fitness assessment?
Co-Rec Flag Football
It's once again the end oi
another Fail semester and i
Kei Flag Football has it's nem
champion Hit-n-Run ende
the regular season with .i �
record They continued there
dominance throughout the ;
offs by capturing the crown
with a overall record of
'Ihe championship game was
won with one touchdown
scored in the first half of the
game Hit n Run defeated the
Terminators 6-0, giving them
the bragging rights to say; "We
are the C.o-Kec flag Football
Champions" Congratulations to
all the co-rec Flag Football
teams
Annual Turkey Trot
a Success
The annual "Turkey Trot"
was once again a great success
Itie race consisted of a two
mile course, which started at
Bunting Field moved down
Berkley Road where runners
passed Ficklen Stadium and the
Intramural Fields From West
Berkley Road the competitors
turned left onto Ficklen Drive-
then left onto Charles Street for
the home stretch They finally
1. v
Takm
home the
bird!
�. rossed the el up behind
i larringti m Field
The first inner, Pat Dougherty
cruised in with a lime I 11:28 I laim
place turi D ighert) i ame
� the finish line in fine I is! . �n, not
looking inded by the run I le
was I : sel) I hind by Rod
Scalise wl I tl f 11:35
In the women s ra e Kristi Bahr
was the top finisher with the- time of
13 35 Bahr bleu all the women (as
H the men I aw a In
' �� �. � ng the second woman by over
three minutes The sea nd place
� man was Carrie Cook with the lime
ol 17.05
In the team race, Sigma Phi Fpsi-
lon won with an impressive team time
ol 50:02 The Sig EpS were followed by
Pi Kappa Phi who galloped in with the
lime ! 52:50 In the women's team
ra e, un ontested Alpha Delta Pi
sororit) won first place Lackofcompe
tition howev r did not stop the women
from running hard with a team time of
70:10
All in all. it was a great race and
everyone seemed to enjoy the run. The
winners in both the individual and team
mes each received a turkey provided
by ECU Dining Services The runner's
up received pumpkin pies which were
also provided by ECU Dining Services
For those who went home empty
handed, better luck next year'
Aycock residents have worked it out.
Weight Lifting Competition
a heavyweight success
Leg press and trench press competitions
were held in campus weight rooms to
conclude a fall of record number
participations throughout die 4 campus
sites Fall 1991 Champions are listed
below Two more competitions will be-
held this spring'
Leg Press Winners
Minges Coliseum
Women's Division:
1st Place: Kara Permisohn 410 lbs
2nd Place Rhonda Kallam 400 lbs
Men's Division:
133-153
1st Place Steven Cozart 25 lbs
2nd Place Sherard Rogers 585 lbs
162-1-9
1st Place Jim Davis 955 lbs
2nd Place: Scott Bond 725 lbs
Heavy weight (188-Up) Lift Off
1st Place: John Cook 1005lbs
2nd Place: Christian Inftinto lOOOlbs
ECU'S Disc Coif
Country Club
Bench Press Contest
Garrett Pipeline Pump bouse
Men's Division
135-Lnder
1st Place: Tim Gams 195 H
142-149
1st Place
160-171
1st Place
184-186
1st Place
195-199
1st Place: Scott Stcphenson
Heavyweight
1st Place: Mark Socomon
Steven Cozart
Mike Basnight
Michael Chavis
Photo's by:
Garrett Killian
and James Casey
� Special thanks to Nathan
Ncwsome, Graham Teel, Clint
Hamrick, Darrin Fvans and Craig
Byrd who served as judges and
spotters for the competition
Upcoming Competitions:
February 4, 1992
lx-g Press
Minges Weight Room
February 5, 1992
Bench Press
Garrett Pipeline Pumphousc





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written, revised
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ilate the
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igh to
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the rules that
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DID YOU FALL INTO FAME??
HIGHLIGHTS FROM RFC REATIONAL SERVICES FALL 1991 PROGRAMS
ARCH
� got
me!
j
?f
y
Students
STEP into
fall fitness

4 ft
- life -
M
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a


m um
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All centra .�� �
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Ha
Co-Rec Flag Football
? 2
�w '�

� '
Pal I ughert
Hit ii Run
sili
Rod
Krisii Hahr
i ii Hit n Kun
Terminators
Annual Turkey Trot
a Success!
� . � �.
I when � �
pas i ;
Intramural Fields Froi
Berkley Road the mp rs
lurried Iff t nt i Ficklen rtve
then left onto Charles srr��
the home stret h They fina
;
arrieook
Sigma Phi Epsi
i
! b
; � I i
team
Vlpha Delta l'i
M
running hard tinn
was a grea
I to enjoy the run
tnd team
pro led
. he runner's
� : . which were
ib ' na Services
4yi . k res :� nts have worked it out.
Weight Lifting Competition
a heavyweight success
. : ress and bench press compeuti
were I tmpus weighi :� m ims to
I i ' til I re ird numbei
ighoul the t campus
1991 Champions are list I
� ire i mpetitii ns will be
� Id this spring'
Leg Press Winners
Minges (oliscntn
w omen s Division:
ice Kara Permisihn ilu lbs
ice Rhi nda Kallam 400 Ihs
Men's Division:
53-153
Place Steven Cozart 725 lbs
I Place Sherard Rogers 35 lbs
! ice Jim Da is 955 lbs
. I PI i e V utt Bond J lbs
Ileaw weighi I 18 1 p) hit I )l!
1st i'l.i e fohn Cook I005lbs
2nd Place Christian Inftinto lOOOlbs
kJ
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�Hfrl
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Country C
Bench Press c 'ontesi
Garreti Pipeline Pumpbause
Men's Division
135 Undei
Is) Place im (Ian �
1 12 149
Ki Place St
160-171
1st Place Mike Basi
184 186
1st place Michael Chavis 295 I
195 199
1st Place Scon Stephenson 530 I
1 lea yweighi
1st Plate Maik �icomi s 10 1
Photo's by:
Garrett k ilium
and Janus Casey
� Specia hanks v- i I
Newsome Graham Peel Clim
! lamn k, Darrin Evans andrai
Byrd wh sen ed as judg s
spotters for the compel
l 'pcomung Competitions:
February i, 1992
'inge
w c ghi Room
I ebi-uar 5. 1992
Hem h Press
(iarreu Pipeline Pumph use





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Classifieds
(SJlie lEast Carolinian
December 5,1991
Rich's Nuthouse
SERVOS Of FFKfD
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SER-
VICES: We offer typing and
photocopyingservices. We also
sell software and computer dis-
kette. 24 hours in and out. Guar-
anteed typing on paper up to 20
hind written pages. SDF Pro-
fessional Computer Services,
106 East 5th St. (beside
Cubbie's), Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
ABSOLUTELY PROFES-
SION ALTYPING: Fast service
and low prices! Call 321-2522
after 5 p.m.
TYPING, WORD PROCESS-
ING AND FAX SERVICES:
Fast service, low prices. Free
pick up and delivery! Call 355-
2203.
FREE HAIRCUT TO FIRST
FIVE GIRLS WHO CALL:
Regularly $7. Sketch of haircut
includecf Short cuts a specialty.
Jay's Cuts and Styles, 355-0168.
Please leave message.
TYPING SERVICE: Fast,accu-
rate, grammatical corrections,
copies upon request. Reason-
able rates, convenient location.
Call Angie at 756-8545 days or
753-3924 after 6 p.m. Leave mes-
sage.
H PESETT1NG: Resumes and
reports. Brochures and news-
letters. Call 752-0833 or 830-
9090. Ask for Lisa.
NEED PAPERS TYPED? Fast
service, low prices. Call Julie
2583 8-4 p.m 830-3874 af-
ter 4 p.m.
FOR KENT
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
u IN ii
ping I
"� ' ! l2-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
(ki AfMfttnetXandn
� �
Williams
L
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: Private balcony bed-
room, Wilson Acres. 12 utili-
ties and rent. Free cable. Dish-
washer. Need for second se-
mester or sooner. 758-5262.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom duplex.
758-5615.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share a 2 bed-
room apartment with 2 girls.
Fully furnished. Across the
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information in US
19.273 TOPICS � ALL SUBJECTS
rder Catalog Today m �� ISA, MC or CGD
800-351-0222
Or Rush 12 00 to R�a�icn itHorma'c
' '3?? )3�"J Ave trx A Lo A-jelct CA 9CC?5
FOR KENT
street from campus at Regency
House. $130 a month plus utili-
ties. 758-8272.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to
share 2 bedroom apartment.
$113.34 rent 13 electricity. 3
blocks from campus. Mostly fur-
rushed. Dishwasher and free
cable. Call Susan at 757-0329.
WANTED: Female roommate
to share apartment at Wilson
Acres. 14 of rent and utilities.
Will have own bedroom. Please
call for more information. 757-
0458.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED ASAP: 2 BR, 1 12
bath townhouse. Dishwasher
and laundry. On bus route.
Great location. Call 321-1560.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: FREE rent, utilities,
cable in house, near campus in
exchange for care a ttendant ser-
vices. Will provide own room.
NO experience necessary. Avg.
workume 10 hr. week. Call 752-
1932 for details Available Jan.
8. Ask for Courtney.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: 3
bedroom,21 2baths,fireplace.
Small pets allowed with pet fee.
Security deposit required.
Available Jan. 1, 1991. $590.00
per month. 355-5079.
TWO ROOMMATES: wanted
to share three bedroom
townhouse. $190 a month plus
13 utilities. Non-smoker pre
ferred. Call 355-0986.
FEMALE SEEKING: room-
mate to share 2 bedroom apt. at
Stratford Arms beginning Jan.
1. $175 a month 12 utilities.
Call 355-7640.
SUBLET: 1 bedroom apart-
ment. Unfurnished. Dec 1-Julv
31 or portion thereof. $265
monthly, plus utilities and de
posit. Call321-0288or 758-2320.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED ASAP: to share 3
bedroom house with 2 other
girls. Only 3 blocks from cam-
pus. $183month, 13 utilities.
Call Kristen: 752-8112.
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
Two bedroom, one bath. Lo-
cated on comer of 4th and
Meade streets. Rent $140 plus
12 utilities. First months rent
deposit. Non-smoker. 757-1814
anytime and leave message.
MATURE, RESPONSIBLE
FEMALE: roommate needed
immediately. Must be quiet and
respect privacy. Share 1 2 low
rent and utilities. 758-2893.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: for
spring semester to share 4 bed-
room apartment. $138month,
1 4 utilities, wd, dishwasher.
Non-smoker. Wild wood Villas.
Call 830-5125.
PRIVATE ROOM: with shared
bath, kitchen, living room. Lo-
cated next to campus. 504 E.
12th St behind Dominos Pizza
FOR KET
on Charles. $180 per month in-
cludes utilities. Call Marsha
Blair to see at 757-2110 days,
355-2228 nights.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED ASAP: Non-smoker,
on ECU bus route. $170 rent, 1
2 utilities. Share 2 bedroom. Call
757-0503.
FOK SALE
GILBERT'S MUSIC: offers
20 discount to ECU students
and faculty - 40 off non-
stocked items. Musical instru-
ment repairs of all types. 2711E.
10th St. 757-2667.
FOR SALE: Nice 2 bedroom1
bath mobile home set up in a
quiet park close to campus.
Washerdryer, AC, 2 sheds.
Was $3,500. Reduced to $3,000.
Call 1-919-423-6090.
1982 YAMAHA MAXIM: Ex-
cellent running condition.
Lookssharp, too! A steal a t $700.
Call Greg at 830-9131.
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats,4
wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available vour area
now. Call 805-682-7555 ext. C-
5999.
REPOSSESSED AND IRS
FORECLOSED HOMES:
available a the low market value.
Fantastic savings! You repair.
Also S&L bailout properties.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. H-6314
1983 FORD ESCORT:$1400or
best offer. New timing belt, new
water pump, good condition.
Relocating. Call: 551-2745. 8
a.m
p.m.
MERCEDES 240D: High mile
age. Extremelvdependableand
very safe. $500 firm. Call Amv
at 758-8395.
FOR SALE: 1984 Ford Tempo.
AC, AMFM, cruise, 86,000
miles, excellent condition inte
riorand exterior. $2300.00. Gill
757-3712. Leave message.
FOR SALE: Stuff your Finite
fans section with an ECU car
flag!One for$9and twoormore
for $8 each. Don't delav. Call
830-3691.
MARIN MOUNTAIN BIKE:
for sale. '91 model, 2 months
old. Bought as a gift, rode once.
White wsalamanders. Suntour
XCU components. Water bottle,
seat bag, lock and computer in-
cluded. Previewed in the De
cember issue of Mountain Bike
Action. $400 firm. Call 758-5354.
Ask for Lew.
BICYCLES: 1 men's beach
cruiser, $125 O.B.O. 1 Trek
men's racing tvpe, $200 O.B.O.
Call 355-3196. Leave message.
HELP WANTED
FUNDRAISER: We're looking
for a top fraternity, sorority, or
student organization that
would like to earn $500-$ 1500
for a one week on-campus mar-
DISPIAV CLASSIFIED
WESLEY COMMON APARTMENTS
BRAND NEW!
1 and 2 Bedroom Apt.
AVAILABLE JAN. 5-10
LOCATED NEAR CAMPUS
CALL FOR MORE INFO.
355-3647
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for
1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
HFI P WANTED
keting project. Must be orga-
nizea and hard working. Call
Jo Ann or Pam at 1-800-592-
2121.
MAKE $500-51000 WEEKLY:
stuffing envelopes at home.
Start now! Rush S.A.S.E. plus
$1.00 to Home Employers, 2301
Kent 8 Las Cruces, NM 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED
IMMEDIATELY! No experi-
ence necessary. Process FHA
mortgage refunds. Work at
home. Call 1-405-321-3064.
FREE TRAVEL Air couriers
and cruiseships. Students also
needed Christmas, spring and
summer for amusement park
employment. Call 805-682-7555
ext. F-3464.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE:
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. P-3712.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assemble products at
home. Call toll free. 1-800-467-
8585 ext. 5920.
GREAT HOLIDAY JOB OP-
PORTUNITY: Going home for
the holidays? Need a fun part-
time job? The Honey Baked
Ham Co. is in search of seasonal
help to fill our sales, counter
and production positions. We
have stores located in the fol-
lowing markets: Greenville,SC,
Columbia, Charleston, Knox-
ville, Raleigh, Durham. Greens-
boro, Winston Salem,
Wilmington,Charlotte, Atlanta
and other major cities through-
out the southeast. Please stop
by during your Thanksgiving
break to "inquire about Christ-
mas help. Check the white pages
for information on the store
nearest vou.
SPRING BREAK: Bahamas
Partv Cruise $279! Panama City
$99!S. Padre$199!Cancun$469!
lamaica $399. Jasa 758-5165,
Georgia 931 -9363, Jeff 830-5367,
Wayne and John 757-1369.
TRAVEL SALES REPRESEN-
TATIVE: STS, the leader in col-
legiate travel needs motivated
individuals and groups to pro-
mote winterspring break trips.
For information call Student
Travel Services at 1-800-648-
4849.
PIZZA HUT'S NEW DELIV-
ERY STORE: is accepting ap-
plications for Drivers, cooks,
phone personnel. We offer flex-
ible scheduling for both day and
night shift. Must be 18years of
age. Applications will be ac-
cepted Monday thru Friday
from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Apply in
person. Located Greenville
Square Shopping Center,
Greenville Blvd. Next to Cen-
tral Book and News in K-Mart
Shopping Center. Go Pirates!
PART-TIME SECRETARY
NEEDED: Malefemale. Flex-
ible hours. Will work with
student's schedule. Call be-
tween 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on
Wednesday, Dec. 4 thru Mon-
day, Dec. 9 to set up interview.
Call 752-1204 and ask for Tina.
PAINTERS NEEDED: Need
energetic people to help paint
Atlanta purple by displaying
ECU car flags on Jan. 1, I99Z
)ISPI AYGASSlMfD
"��1HELP WANTEDPERSONALS
Buy your car flags todav. Call
830-3691.
HELP WANTED: Wait staff
and bartenders. Apply in per-
son at Professor CCools (lo-
cated behind Quincy's on
Greenville Blvd.) from 8a.m. to
10 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Must beable to work Christmas
break.
PERSONALS
SPRING BREAK '92: You've
only got one week to liveso
don't Dlow it! Make it Jamaica
with low, low prices starting at
$429 Call Sun Splash Tours 1-
800-426-7710.
RIDETOTHE PEACH BOWL
with Pirate pride! Buy your ECU
car flags today. One for $9. Two
or more $8. Call now 830-3691
and leave message.
CONCERNED: about your fu-
ture? Will some uncertain fu-
ture income pay all of your cer-
tain future bills? Maybe we can
give you advise on what to do.
Free, confidential consultation
from people who want to help
people. 355-3789.
LOST: Red N'autica Ski jacket.
Reversible to blue and green.
Gill 355-5393. Big reward.
JOE CORLEY: Congrats on
your degree. But now vou'll be
leaving the center of 'the uni-
verse. From your friends who
are still stuck in the Emerald
City.
MITCH WELLS: Happv 1 vear!
Through the good and the bad,
we have endured. Thank you
forall thesmiles vouhavegiven
me this past year. Love va big
bunches, Natalie. P.S. I got vou,
Babe! '
PI KAPPA PHI AND
PLEDGES: It was 11 p.m now
that's not too late. But you guys
had a buzz and vou still sang
great! Thank you for the most
embarrassing yet memorable
experience thus far. Lauri. P.S.
Jenkjela.
AMY H Just want to say thanks
for a great semester. Hope you
are feeling better. I had a great
time at your formal. Thanks
again! Love ya, David B.
TO THE SISTERS: of Epsilon
Sigma Alpha: We'relookingfor-
ward to our pledge pin cer-
emony! Love, the pledges.
1991 SIGMA OFFICERS:
Sonya, Luanne, Monica, Amy
and Ashley. You made it!
Thanks for all your hard work!
Love, your sisters and pledges.
SIGMAS: would like to wish
everyone good luck on finals!
Have a great holiday!
CONGRATS BOWL-
BOUND PIRATES: We are so
proud! See you in Atlanta! Love,
the Sigmas.
CONGRATS: graduating Sig-
mas! We'll missyou! Love,your
sisters and pledges.
ECUFOOTBALLTEAM AND
COACH LEWIS: We our very
proud of you and we will be
Peach Bowl Special
SINGLE lor2persons $39.88
DOUBLE 3 or 4 persons $49.88
ncfudes: Overnight lodging, arrival h'ors duurvres,
super-deluxe complimentary continental breakfast
Super 8 � Atlanta South
1-75 Exit 73
(404)389-4108
20 minutes
from stadium
backing you all the wav in At-
lanta. We Believe" that
everything's "peachy Love,
the Alpha Phis.
THE ALPHA PHI: pledges and
the Phi Taus: The cars were lined
up and there we came, all ready
to be blind and go somewhere
strange. We traveled for what
seemed like hours to many des-
tinations where we drank some-
thing sour. When we finally ar-
rived to our surprise sisters spot,
the Phi Taus greeted us with
markers thev had bought. A
graffiti party'it sure was, to bad
Morris" had to much of a buzz.
We love you! The Alpha Phis.
ALPHA PHIS: Get your man
readyfoi Christmas cocktail Sat-
urday night. It will be a night to
remember.
THE ALPHA PHIS: wish ev-
eryone good luck on exams.
Study, study, party, study!
TOM C Happy Anniversary
sweetheart! You are everything
a bovfriend should be and vou
are me best friend I ever had.
This past year was great and 1
am looking forward to all the
rest. I love you. You're the great-
est. Penny A.
GOOD LUCK: to even one on
their final exams! Love, Alpha
Delta Ii.
ALL SORORITIES: We are
looking forward to seeing vou
at ourChristmas Tea tonight.
We wish you all the best this
holidav season! Love, Alpha
Delta PL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Get
ready for our PJ social tonight!
We know we'll have lots oftun
as alwavs! Love, Alpha Delta
Pi.
PRESENTING THE NEW OF-
FICERS: for Alpha Omicron Pi
Sororitv: president�Mvra
Winget vp admin.�Jamie
Hixon, vp pledge educators�
Jo Brooks and Jill Hammond,
chapter treasurer�Laura
Barnes, house treasurer�Tara
Stroud, recording secretary�
Liz Mullicai, corresponding
secretary�Andrea Levinson,
house manager�Michelle
Robison, chapter relations�
Holly Linville, social�Heather
Melton, panheUenic delegate�
Kim Faulkner, panhellenic
exec.�Fav Jones, k of r�
Meredith Grogan, pr�Susan
Tenille, historian�Dena Price,
membership ed.�Cathleen
Bryson, songleader�Jennifer
Hudgins, fundraising�Jamie
DeBiase.
CONGRATS: to thenewblood
of Delta Chi: Scott Brown�A,
Jason Alexander�B, Rob
Stevens�C, Rick Arie�D,Sam
Matheny � E,Todd
Holloway�F.
CONGRATULATIONS: to
Tracy Woodv on vour engage-
ment. AOP1 s'istersand pledges.
GOOD LUCK: to everyone on
exams. Alpha Omicron Pi.
WE BELIEVE: in Coach Lewis
and the Pirate football team.
We'll see vou in Atlanta. Love,
the AOPIs.
MERRY CHRISTMAS: ECU
students, faculty and staff. Love.
AOPI.
The East Carolinian is now accepting applica-
tions for Managing Editor, News Editor, Sports
�0r and Entertainment Editor, A&licatfons
W The East Carolinian on the
JpubBcatkm building across
Announcements
ECU SQjOQL OF MUSIC
EVENTS hltpj
Wednesday, Dec. 4�School of
Medicine and School of Music
Concert Series, "Seasonal Cel-
ebrations Symphonic Wind
Ensemble, William W.
Wiedrich, Conductor (Brody
Auditorium of School of Medi-
cine, 12 30 p.m free). Wednes-
day, Dec 4�Joel Mauger, gui-
tar, senior recital (FletcherTe-
cital Hall, 7 pm free); Thurs-
day-Saturday, Dec. 5-7�Mad-
rigal Dinners, Charles Moore,
director (Mendenhall Student
Center, 7 p.m. tickets required-
call 757-4788 for information).
Dial 757-4370 for the School of
Music's 24-hour "Recorded
Calendar
"bush�
Recreational Services will be
hiring for the following posi-
tions this spring.
S.H.I.P.RECS�2 positions for
commuter students interested
in marketing and promotions
of recreational programs. Per-
sons must be outgoing creative
and willing to contact and re-
cruit others interested in cam-
pus activities. ARTIST�1 posi-
tion for student illustrator. Po-
sition requires graphic devel-
opment of sports related illus-
tration for a variety of market-
ing and promotional resources.
Excellent for portfolio develop-
ment Call Jeannette 757-6387
to set up an mterview. Portfolio
required at mterview. Hours
vary. PHOTOGRAPHER�1
position for student photogra-
pher. Position requires black
and white developing, print-
ing, shootingofactionand team
photos. Slide photography pre-
ferred as well as ownership of
35 mm camera with various
lenses. Portfolio required at time
of interview. To apply. Stop by
204 Christenbury andf complete
an applications form. Or call
757-6387 for details. Self-help
and work students eligible.
All interested please attend.
�H�E
e weieht and
WEiGHTirmMnnup
nal meeting will be
aay, Dec 9(J at 6:30
pjn. in 102 Chirstenbury Gym.
Organizai
held Mor
tior
Monday
Lose weight and feel better
about yourself in just nine
weeks f WINDING YOUR
WEIGH DOWN, a nine-week
weight loss dass starts Thurs-
daynan.9from 5:15 to 6:15 pjn.
at the Family Practice Center.
Call Mary Merner at 551-5459
to register.
gur PeK'T n?i r. ;ri
tC�Ai By t
OuXE ClMi
CHRISTMAS BUDGET
Earrings - Large Selection unde
Handknitted Mittens and Socks
Cotton Tights and Leggings - $12
Camisoles and Panties - $3.30
Mon - Sat 10-6 Thurs 10 � 8
919 Redbanks Rd. 'Arlington Village
EXAM
WISE POTATO Cl
Plain or Lightly Sal
6.5
oz
99
12 pk. 12 oz cans
BUD, BUD LIG
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I ECU

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PERSONALS
vvav in At-
that
I ove,
M I'l II ; .and
n lined
'� I ready
ewhere
I tor what
� manydes-
drani sonte-
e finally ar-
� �"�� rsspot,
I us with
bought A
� is to bad
fabuzz
Jpha This.
i A ' your man
� ktailSat-
a night to
MIS: wish ev-
- on exams.
�. study!
iversary
verything
and vou
I i ever had.
�� at and I
to all the
retheereat-
iine on
Alpha
II s We arc
: you
night.
test 'this
Alpha
ON: Get
light!
:
Delta
M VVOF-
. ronR
Myra
famie
rs�
mond,
I.aura
r �Tara
� tary�
Tiding
vinson,
Michelle
itions�
1 leather
egate�
lellenic
- of r�
pr Susan
i Price,
ithleen
� nnifer
larrue
e new blood
a n�A,
r B, Rob
I ),Sam
I r o d d
' I I IONS: to
� � gage-
: � dges.
me on
'1.
! ewis
team.
I -ove,
iHRISTMAS: IX U
" Love,
irolinian is now accepting applica-
inaging Edrtor, News Editor, Sports
Entertainment Editor. Applications
ained at The East Carolinian on the
r of the publications building across
" Library.
id complete
rm ()r call
� It-help
:llb
Meeting will be
9fJ at �
lenburv Gym
All int. ittend.
family PRArnrg
UJNTLJi
ose weigh! and feel better
ul vourself in just nine
weej WINDING YOUR
WEIGH U)WN, a nine-week
weight loss class starts Thurs-
day fan. 9from 5:15 to6:15p.m.
at the Famih Practice Center.
� all Mary Merner at 551-5459
to register
Rich's Nuthouse
By Haselrig and Parker Matagot
by Kathleen Ryan
L
V
THAT -� TH� TWCOrfVT tOV� �v fht
n'5 4THi co-viG down
?
�v" ftW'7 FJP11 1 r
rwv, V-
Li 1 �- TA�r rfrt Av
����st BY 'hti
Fred's Corner
MWPPYS
WUuS KEftV. , Vl5THH& efts
roR I MAV�
By Sean Parnell
.y a-
)
g
i
'
w
Alnbr�aift
CHRISTMAS BUDGET BLUES?
Earrings - Large Selection under $15
Handknitted Mittens and Socks - $13
Cotton Tights and Leggings - $12 - $16
Camisoles and Panties - $3.30 - $15
Mon -Sat 10-6 Thurs 10-8
919Redbanks Rd. 'Arlington Village
756-1058
r
PURE PIRACY -
peach bowl special
Inn At The Peacj itreeS
� � � � � � ,
December 31, 1991
$79.00 Single, $89.00 Double (plus tax)
ADDITIONAL NIGHTS: $35 00 Single, $45.00 Double (plua tax) I
EITHER BEFORE OR AFTER 123191
I9fl�rXaiLc2.niX ,h ,flis couPon or,d reservation for 123191
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TOLL-FREE RESERVATIONS 1-800-242-4642
Inn AtThe PeachtreeS
330 West Peachtree Street. N.YV. � Atlanta, Georgia 30308
404-577-6970 � 800-242-4642 � Fa 404-659-3244
(Reservations must be guaranteed. i8 hour cancellation policy; subject to
availability; nol available wth any other coupon or discount)
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. Evans 7S6-20H
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp, Trout,
Deviled Crab Cakes, fcf Clam Strips.
�Small Shrimp
, at Lunch
� $2.99
. Beverage not included
BUY ONE
Regular Shrimp
Dinner at $6.50
Get One Free
Beverage not included
Good Monday � Thursday
h �Fipir� �� ���-E�plires: MU4i
EXAM WEEK SPECIALS FROM HARRIS
WISE POTATO CHIPS
Plain or Lightly Salted
COKE OR DIET COKE
2 liter
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12 ok. 12 oz cans
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8 Locations To Serve You
Ficklen
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Entertainment
CHRISTMAS SALE - 5 OFF
(SALE ENDS DECEMBER 31,1991)
The best way
to wrap up the term
What better wa than with an IBM Personal Svstem2 Make
your holidays realh happ) and the new vearalol less hertir
u ith ii computer designer! for vour collese needs.
Set' how the PS2' was designed jusl (oryou with it-
mouse that makes it eas to use and it- speeial student price
thai makes it even easier to on n. (!reate impressive papers,
graphics and spreadsheets with it- preloaded software, includ-
ing Microsoft1 indows 3.0.
Its been a great term. Vnd eventual!) al
good things must come to an end. But s ith
an IBM PS2, you ran be sure of a realh
great, new beginning,
TRUCKLOAD SALE
5 OFF
WE NOW HAVE THE SPECIAL
PRELOADED SYSTEMS AT THE STUDENT
STORES, READY FOR IMMEDIATE
DLEIVERY.
STOP BY � AND HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS!
;�
Cash Sales Only
U2 prod
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
When U2 released their Iifl
Achtung Baby, like the release ol tr i
Guns 'n' Roses album, Use I i
East Coast Music or
their doors at midnq
19.
Marry stood in Iti
to own the first studio album f:
their multi-platnium Tht osh a
years ago. tht
U2released a am
and a double album whu h hid a f
songs that showed t �
of this Irish band, as
power that they haw
stage.
The album was
but listeners wanted the old I
their unique Irish t � � dk
sound to return.
Since U2 made their
music world with Tht i
they have worked in the studio
ducers Daniel Liih
they both returr
Bnan Eno has said
U2 album is a long h m �
because fsever
Bono want- . -
to make it.
Eno calls fun
abandonned sonj
of songs and m
spectable numb
Eno says that Larry
Adam Clayton ax
when thing e perspecth
become too nan
come the voice mus
Conscience u rd
viewer Eno
The VJcc is :�� irchae
rough mixsaid Eno and
sorneenergyforasoi I itgi
Aquaman
receives his
own title
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Superman, Batman, Woi
Woman, the Flash and the Green Lan-
tern have had their own comic for a
long time, but there Mas oneoi -XTs
biggest heroes that didn ; alwaj shi
his own comic � Aquaman.
Now the amphibious hero has his
own title and he's out to a ebratc
50th anniversary and prove that he
deserves his own title.
Arthur Cum a-ka, Aquaman,
was bom in the sunken city of Atlanta'S,
where he now presdesasking. Though
he has fought against his royalty and
tried to deny 11, he S been thrust in to the
role numerous times
l he branU new oomc .enters its
first story around placing Aquaman in
the role of leadership again.
Aquaman has been tested se i
times in limited senesand specials,but
DC never had the right writer to handle
the delicate psyche The only success
ful series was the first limited series
that was written by Robert Fleming.
The series pit Arthur Curry, as a
See Aqua, page 10
I
hasn
I
Thou I
-
TheM
film
I
nous
that ol
terizaj
scene
numt
her sil
hercdj
to det
tear al
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tivel
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I ,1
PR,
:
Entertainment
�iE SaHt (Earaltntan
December 5,1991
U2 produces new masterpiece T
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
When U2 released their new album,
Adktwng Btiby, like the release of the new
Guns 'n' Roses album. Use Your Illusion,
Fast Coast Music on Charles St. opened
their doors at midnight on Monday, Nov.
19.
Many stood in line for the first chance
h i own the first studio album from U2 since
their multi-platnium The Joshua Tree four
wars ago.
U2 released Rattle And Hum as a movie
and a double album which had a few new
songs that showed the Americanized side
of this irish Kind, as well as, showing the
power that they have while thev are on
stage.
The album was well recieved at first,
but listeners wanted the old U2 back with
their unique Irish approach and distinct
sound to return.
Since U2 made their big splash in the
music world with The Unforgettalbe Fire ,
thev have worked in the studio with pro-
ducers Daniel Lanois and Brian Eno, and
thev both return on the newest release.
Brian Eno has said that working on a
12 album is a long, drawn-out process
because oi several elements Eno said that
Bono wants every song that is a possibility
to make it.
Eno calls him the Mother Theresa ot
abandonned songs. U2 starts with dozens
of songs and whittles them down to a re-
spectable number and works from mere.
Eno says that Larry Mullen Jr. and
Adam Clayton are, "reliable wide anglers
when things start to lose perspective or
become too narrowly focused: they be-
come the voice of musical
Conscienceaccording to Rolling Stone re-
viewer Eno
The Edge is, "the archaeologist of the
rough mixsaid Eno and he comes up with
someenergy for a song that grew a little Bat.
With the additions of Steve Lillywhite
(who has a brilliantly gifted ear when it
comes to the mixing stage) and Flood (who
has also helped other artists like Depcche
Mode, Nine InchNailsand Sisters Of Mercy
and has the ablility to awaken sleeping
songs with brilliant origional mixes after
everyone has gone home for the day), the
album was full of energy at the studio.
Eno said that the reason a U2 album
takes so long has nothing to do with the
bandbeing stuck for ideas but because
they never stop talking about them They
came into this record with the feeling of
something bigger, and better.
Though they weren't sure which direc-
tion to tike in the initial recording in Berlin,
but bv the time they returned to Dublin to
finish the album, their direction was strong
and direct.
U2's lvrics rune been praised for their
depth and meaning,but when Bono comes
in with the lyrics, he has pages of lyrics for
each song.
He builds the lyrical content as the
song progresses. He weaves his own ver-
sions of songs several times before he de-
cides on one specific direction.
Achhmg Biiby begins with a heavy
distorted guitar song, "Zoo Station" and
the song is controlled confusion. IT�e
strength m the song is because it is so un-
usual for thepercise sound that U2 usually
has. The distortion is remenisent of the
Beetle's Revolution 1" in the way that the
guitar sounds
The songs, 12of them in all, show many
different facets of the psychology that U2
has built up for themselves.
Thev have songs about love, they have
songsabout the condition of the world and
thev have songs about political .sions.
"The My their first single off the al-
bum, speaks about how things are learned
and passed on bv a By on the wall.
"It's no secret that a conscience can
sometimes be a pest It's no secret ambi-
seep from
fertile pen
By Lewis Coble
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Photo court��y ot Island R�cord�
U2s success is a tribute to hard work, talent and the stepping stone that college radio
can be. Achtung Baby is good U2 music that offers no surprises.
tion bites thenausot success Every artist is
a cannibal, every pi vtisa thief All killtheir
inspiration and sing about the grief
The song takes a harsh look at the way
the business world is built up and the way
to survival in the new world has changed.
1 he stmg is astrong impact song, and so the
music reflects that
The song, "So Cruel" tells the tale of a
love gone astray. The music has a strange
reggae-ish, danceabte beat to it that is un-
usual with U2 songs.
The most striking part of the song is the
cruelty that is in thelyrics'l disappeared in
you,youdisappeared from me 1 gave you
everything you ever wanted, it wasn't what
you wanted The men who love you, you
hate the most They pass through you like
a ghost They look for you but your spint is
in the air Babyyou're nowhere. You say
in love thereare no rules Sweetheart, you're
so cruel
Other songs like "Mysterious Ways"
and "Ultra Violet (Light My Way)" are
weaved through thealbumtocrcatea single
vision � a vision that is a difficult thing to
pin down.
As Bnan Eno said, 'To find a single
adjective for any song is difficult. If s an
album of musical oxymorons, of feelings
that should n't exsist together but are some-
how credible
Until recently, comic books re-
ceived only minor attention in the
world of literature, but with the ap-
pearance of artists like Rob Liefield,
X-Force artist, that has all changed.
At one time, comic books were
read only by a handful of faithful
followers. Slowly, people began to
pick comic books up again and take
an interest in them. Still, the world of
comic books was only revealed to
people if someone already involved
with comic books brought them into
the fold.
That has all changed now. Com-
ics are stronger today than ever be-
fore. Thanks to aggressive marketing
techniques and publicity, comicsand
their characters are becoming house-
hold names.
Une ot the strongest indications
of how popular comics have become
is the appearance of Rob Liefield in a
Levis 501 commercial directed by
Spike Lee. The Levis 501 commercial
featured Liefield and his work. The
commercial aired during an episode
of "Saturday Night Live" and three
times during Yankees' game.
Liefield said that he felt it was a
great move for his career, but he did
the commercial for an even bigger
reason. "If just one percent of the
people who watch that commercial
get turned on tocomicbooksthat'sa
lot of people Liefield said in an in-
�ee Comics, page 10
Aquaman
receives his
own title
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Superman, Batman, Wonder
Woman, the Flash and the Green Lan-
tern have had their own comic for a
time, but there was one of DCs
biggest heroes that didn't alwayshave
his own comic � Aquaman.
Now the amphibious hero has his
wn title and he's out to celebrate his
50th anniversary and prove that he
deserves his own title.
Arthur Curry, a.k.a. Aquaman,
was bom in the sunken city of Atlantis,
where he now presidesasking. Though
he has fought against his royalty and
tned todeny it, he's been thrust into the
role numerous times.
i he Drand new comic centers its
first story around placing Aquaman in
the role of leadership again.
Aquaman has been tested several
times in limited series and specials, but
IX never had the right writer to handle
the delicate psyche. The only success-
ful series was the first limited scries
that was written by Robert Fleming.
The series pit Arthur Curry, as a
See Aqua, page 10
animated tradition with
By Jeff Parker
Staff Writer
Since Disney's Beauty and the Beast
opened to rave reviews a few weeks ago,
skeptics in towns where the movie still
hasn't debuted (such as Greenville) are in
doubt of the statements that the new release
rivals the award-winning Little Mermaid.
Though it remains to be seen if the
soundtrack makes the impact as its prede-
cessor, what iscertain is theability of Beauty
and the Beast to take some Oscars home to
The Mouse, and earn a permanent place in
film history.
The actual animation of Beauty ap-
pears to be a cross between the Disney
house-style used in The Little Mermaid and
that of 101 Damahons.Thisrange of charac-
terization is most evident in the crowd
scenes, particularly the opening musical
number which introduces Belle and the
townspeople.
Bellehcrself is reminiscent of Ariel and
her sisters, but bv far the best drawings of
hercomedunng the wolf-fight scene. Diffi-
cult angles and dramatic lighting are used
to depict the heroine thrashing and swing-
ing aboutasvisciously manipulated wolves
tear at the horse and carriage.
The sets of the enchanted castle and
woods leading there are painted evoca-
tively, giving a foreboding quality that is
B?Sr
reinforced by the first appearances of the
Beast. Computer animation, which was a
bit too obvious in Rescuers Down Under, is
used in all the right ways in Beauty and the
Beast. Perspective shots of the castle make
use of the technology, giving animators the
edge to stage the types of shots previously
possibleonly in conventional film. The ball-
room scene previewed so often on televi-
sion is accordingly spectacular, and the
computer-genera ted art never upstages or
overpowers that of the animators.
Where theanimation succeeds themost
isin its most important function, which is to
bring characters to life on screen and make
them believable. This also owes a great deal
to the characterizations of the actors and
actresses who do the voiceovers, and all are
done well.
Belle, like Ariel before her, has more
personality than heroines of past cartoons,
and the Beast, with his range of anger and
compassion, is the most interesting male
lead in Disney history. Particularly enter-
taining as well are the supporting charac-
ters, such as the lascivious French candle-
stick and boastful, egocentric Gaston.
Though relatively popular talents such
as Robby Benson and Angela Lansbury
contribute voices, thecharacters themsel ves
take precedent, as they should in an ani-
mated feature. For anexamplcof how voices
can upstage the characters and destroy the
f�3C 6c�V
suspension of disbehef, watch Fexcel Goes West
and try not to be aware of Jimmy Stewart or Dom
DeLuise asyou watch the animals they speak for.
The focus of Beauty and the Beast, as in any
good feature animated or otherwise, is on
storytelling and all elements contribute in pro-
portion to that Though the fairytale is known
worldwide and has been adapted in
countless forms, Disney manages to
keep the story fresh and the drama
intriguing all the way through. In
many places the story is hilarious,
especially in moments where the Beast
See Beast, page 10
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Bus leaves at 7 a.m Dec. 31 from Mendenhall. For tickets or more
information, stop by the Central Ticket Office or call 757-4788.
Sponsored by the Student Union Travel Committee





10 olfre goat Carolinian December 5,1991
Cuckoo's nest
director goes
to Tields of
the Lord'
(AP)� Asa film paxiucer,Saul
Zaentz harks back to the era of
Samuel CMdwyn,DavidO.Selznick
and Sam Spiegel. He is more intel-
lectual than those giants and less
self-promoting.
But he has the same defiant
independence and single-minded-
ness of purpose.
Operating from Berkeley, Ca-
lif not Hollywood, Zaentz turned
two difficult subjects, "One Flew
Over the Cuckoo s Nest" and
"Amadeus into Academy Awaal
winners.
Healso produced the estimable
The Unbearable Lightness of Be-
ing
Now he tackles Peter
Matthiessen's modem classic, "At
Play in the Fields of the Lord
Matthiessen's novel about mis-
guided missionaries among the
Amazonian Indians has suffered
many a failed movie script.
Jean-Claude Carriere and Hec-
tor Babenco have captured most of
the author's essence, and Babenco
as director has drawn the best from
an accomplished cast. In many ways,
the film is a magnificent adventure.
It is the story of conflicts. Four
missionaries�JohnLithgow,Daryl
Hannah, Aidan Quinn and Kathv
Bates�are at odd s wi th each other.
Thev also combat the corrupt-
ing intrusion of two wastrel pilots,
Tom Berenger and Tom Waits, as
well as the venal commandant of the
aai. Jose Dumont. There's also the
indifference of the church people's
would-be converts, theNiaruna In-
dians.
The huge script cannot be
capsulized here. Thedramaacceler-
ates when Berenger, who is half
Chevenne, parachutes into the
primitive tribe and is accepted as a
deity.
The camera work by Lauro
Escoral is often breathtaking, espe-
cially when Berenger flies his plane
over the sweeping rain forest and
cascading waters of Brazil.
The actors perform wonder-
fully in what must have been a pun-
ishing location. Especially fine are
Kathy Bates as the dissatisfied wife
and mother (her near-nude mad
scene dance is a shocker) and Aidan
Quinn, the only voice of reason in
the deranged doings.
"At Play in the Fields of the
Lord" is a demanding film, both in
its complex issuesand its three-hour
length.
But it is also another rare
achievement to add to the imposing
credits of Saul Zaentz.
The Universal Pictures release
is rated R for language and nudity,
which is pervasive among the Indi-
ans and in one instance, of Daryl
Hannah.
Just how
bad will the
Pirates
decimate
the Wolfpack?
Turn to the
Peach Bowl
section to find
out.
Aqua
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Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
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Continued trom page 9
Beast
Continued trom page 9
man not a hero, against his half-
brother. The series was drawn by
Craig Hamilton and Mr. Hamilton
designed a new costume for the
outdated and drab orange-and-
green costume he always wore in
previous appearances The new
costume wasan overwhelming suc-
cess, as was the series Unfortu-
nately, DC let the team that made
the scries so great get away.
The next attempt at a series for
Aquaman was done by incompe-
tents. George Freeman drew the
special and the orange-and-green
costume was back (it turns out that
Aquaman needs the insulation that
the orange and green costume gave
him, thecostume regulated the pres-
sure changes underwater and on
land). The special itself was poorly
handled and Aquaman was put
back on the shelf.
Finally, DC decided it was time
for another ongoing series for the
underwater hero. Even after an-
other poor showing for a limited
series, DC signed Shaun
McLaughlin to write the new series.
McLaughlin plans on clearing up
someofthcinconsistencies that have
exsisted in Aquaman's history. For
instance,
Aquaman's abil-
ity to remain out
of water restricts
him to an hour,
but that doesn't
nessissarily mean
that he will diecx-
actly at the sixti-
eth minute.
Another in-
consistency is
the way that
Aquaman's tele-
pathic abilities
work. Some writ-
ers interpretation
had him forcing
the sea animals to
bend to his will,
others have pre-
sented him with
the ability to talk
to animals and
them talk to him.
McLaughlin
promises that he
will clear up a lot
tries to woo Belle. Other scenes are
tense and even sad as the conclu-
sion draws near, and the ending is
one of the hardest to predict of all
the studio's fairytale features.
Beauty and the Beast iseverybit
a heavy hitter as the press has said,
Comics
and with all respects to what was
Disney'striumphant return to great
animated features in 1989, yes�
this one blows The Little Mermaid
out of the ocean.
Somebody thaw out Walt, he'll
want to see it too.
Continued trom page 9
terview with Overstreet's Update.
Liefield went on to say that he
hoped the commercial would gar-
ner more recognition and exposure
for everyone in the comic book in-
dustry.
Liefield began hiscareer work-
ing on several books for short peri-
ods. His first big book was Hawk &
Dove. While working on the book,
Liefield's art was noticed by Todd
McFarlane. McFarlane helped to
open a few doors for Liefield and
Liefield's career took off.
Liefield took over the comic
book. The New Mutants, and sud-
denly everyone took notice of the
bookand hisarrwork. Liefield's art-
work and the introduction of the
character Cable propelled the comic
book into one of the leading sellers
on the stands.
The New Mutants book came to
an end at issue 100, but it was
transformed into what is now X
Force. X-Force now enjoys the the
number throe position in sales and
a huge fan following.
of these inconsistencies, as well as
many others.
McLaughlin also promises to
bring back the famous blue cos-
Photo courtesy of Marval Comics
Aquaman gets a new suit and a new series for his
his 50th burthday. He should be smiling.
tume that Craig Hamil ton designed
and the fans loved. This time. Ken
Hooper and Bob Dvorak will be
illistrating the life of Arthur Curry.
(r
Congratulations Fall
1991 Graduates!



�4
f
r:V
PF
VLrr
v;i
l
Thursday
Student
Budget Night
$1.15 Toll Boys
$1.25 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.75 Ice Picks
$2.10 High Bolls
$2.85 Ice Teos
Ladies Free nil Night'
�f
Annual East Carolina School of art
Christmas Sale
Jenkins Fine Art Building
LV .

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'a '
7r :�
ft "
ftEL
�JU
CERAMICS
T A L OK
JEWELRY
WOOD ITEMS
TEXTILES
.PRINTS
S H I R T S
It took Galileo 16 years to master the universe.
You have one night.
It seems unfair. The genius had all that time. While you have a few
short hours to learn your sun spots from your satellites before the
dreaded astronomy exam.
On the other hand, Vivarin gives you the definite advantage. It helps
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even when the subject matter's dull, your mind will stay razor sharp.
If Galileo had used Vivarin, maybe he could have mastered the solar
00 Reviw with VIVARIN:
VIVARIN
tor fast ptcK up -safe as coffee
Sports
Pirates crui
Battling Bis
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
ECU hit 12 three-pointers to set a new
school record in their 84-71 win over the
visiting Battl ing Bishops (2-2) of North Caro-
lina Wesleyan last night in Minges Coli-
seum.
"We hit some three's that reaJly helped
us keep the lead said first year head coach
Eddie Payne.
The win is the third straight home vic-
tory for the Pirates, after having lost their
season opener to the Duke Blue Devils 103-
75.
The team was led by sophomore guard
Lester Lyons. He had 16 pomtson the night
and shot five from the three point line.
Lyons is averaging over 14 points per
game which puts him sixth in the CAA.
Steve Richardson had an impressive
night shooting for ECU and hit four-of-five,
three-pointers, including three in the first
half. He finished with 14 points and two
assists.
Although N.C Wesleyan shot 56 per-
cent, they had 26 turnovers in the game
"We can't expect to win any games
with that many turnovers� no matter who
you play said Wesleyan head coach Bill
Chambers.
Big man Ike Copeland ripped
rebounds and dumped poii
second in the CAA in reb ind
averaging 10 boards : � -
The Piratesstiflcontinw
free throws. As a team they are 55 I
and against Wesleyan they shot IT
ot making free throws is defh
going to cost us some games. We
Doctor waits twe
ing progr
keep:
Mond
tirm
Long
The 1
was the
has reachd
pre- - I
bur- �
TheH
- �
The
like that
pla
played hi
pres I
ecu)
Peterson
Pete r -
averaging
Long
problems
firs1
Jam
SCOT I '
lead to 134
-
I
MONTREAL (AP) � A promii
! AIDS doctor says it was not hireponsibil-
1 ity to inform the NHL that a patient
died two years ago said she had slepl
I 50 professional hockey players.
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Continued from page 9
rscenes � and with all respects to what was
thv condu toney s triumphant return to great
he ending is anirwled feature in Wy
TCdicto this one blows The Little Mernmi
outc4 the ocean.
Somebody thaw out Walt, he'll
s has said wart to see it too
Continued from page 9
i i atures
I is even bit
. that he
would gar-
nd exposure
. ,
areerw -
- short p
a as ' �' '
n the N k k
� helped to
field and
l.iefielvi took over the comic
book, The '� '� Mutants, and sud-
denly everyone took notice of the
Kxkandhisartwork.ljetield'sart-
work and the introduction of the
craracterObtepTopriiedtheoofnic
book into one l the leading sellers
on the stands
tents book came to
an end at issue fHOO, but it was
iformed into what is now X-
� now enjoys the the
, . three position in sales and
owing.
ratulations Fall
1 Graduates!

, a School of Art
as Sale
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JEWELRY
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lZ. A I� tZ. D
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�� S H I R T S

ie universe.
rARgj
up-safe as coffee
m
Sports
�lie �aBt Carolinian
December 5,1991
11
Pirates cruise by
Battling Bishops
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
ECU hit 12 three-pointers to set a new
school record in their 84-71 win over the
v isiring Battling Bishops (2-2) of North Caro-
lina Wesleyan last night in Mingcs Coli-
soum.
"We hit some three's that really helped
us keep the lead said first year head coach
Eddie Payne.
The win is the third straight home vic-
tory for the Pirates, after having lost their
season opener to the Duke Blue Devils 103-
73.
The team wasled by sophomore guard
I ester Lyons. He had 16 points on the night
ind shot five from the three point line.
Lyons is averaging over 14 points per
same which puts him sixth in the CAA.
Steve Richardson had an impressive
right shooting for LCU and hit four-of-five,
three-pointers, including three in the first
half. He finished with 14 points and two
.lsslStS.
Although N.C. Wesleyan shot 56 per-
cent, they had 26 turnovers in uV game.
"We can't expect to win any games
with that many turnovers� no matter who
. u play said Wesleyan head coach Bill
( hambers.
Big nun Ike Copeland ripped down 10
'bounds and dumped in 10 points. He is
�4 cond in the CAA in rebounds, currently
averaging K1 boards per game
The rirates still continue to struggle on
tree throws. As a team they are 53 of 103
ind against Wesleyan they shot 12 of 21.
Not making tree throws is definitely
going to cost us some games. We are mak-
ing progress, but we arc going to have to
keep working on it Payne said.
Monday night, ECU took a 47-28 half-
time lead and wentona 28 point run to beat
Longwood College 100-61.
The 100-point performance by ECU
was the second time this season the team
has reached the century mark. Earlier in
pre-season action, they defeated St. Peters-
burg 106-91.
The fast paced game saw every Pirate
scoring and had five players in double fig-
ures.
'There are a lot of positives in a game
like that when you have an opportunity to
play everyone Payne said. 'The kids
played hard tonight and they did a good job
pressuring the ball
ECU was led by junior transfer Ronnell
Peterson who had 18pointsandfiveassists.
Peterson has started all four games and is
averaging almost 14 points per game.
Longwood gave ECU some first half
problems but only held a lead once � the
first basket of the game.
James Lewis came into the game and
scord five of his seven points, to up their
lead to 13. Lyons hit two shot and Copeland
scored underneath to end the half.
Copeland had a physical game with 12
points,ninereboundsand foursteals. Lyons
added 11 points and six assists.
The second half continued right where
ECU left oft. but snv a variety of Pirate
scorers. Richardson came off the bench to
score 10 points, and Curley Young scored
14. Taul Childress added eight points and
Antti Jokinen contributed seven.
"We made a lot better decisions about
penetrating and pitching out that made us
ECU keeps
records at
Carter-Finley
By Michael G. Martin
Assistant Sports Editor
MONTREAL (AP) � A prominent
6 doctor says it was not his responsibil-
ity to inform the NHL that a patient who
d ied t wo years ago said she had slept with
50 professional hockey players.
"We just run a clinic Dr. Clement
Olivier saidTuesday. "It isnot our jobto tell
athletes they must have safe sex
Olivier said the woman had not named
specific players. Even if she had, he and a
Photo by Dait R��� � ECU Photo Lab
Sophomore guard Lester Lyons has a great aenal v.ew of the House of Payne in
Mondav ntorCs 100-61 v.ctory over Longwood College The Pirates moved to 3-1 on
the year with an 84-71 vctory over N.C Wesleyan Wednesday night
able tomakemore three's Payne said. Slate. 79-76 in over-time.
ThePil Hes went 10-24(42 percent)on The Pirates Kittled back trom an lb
three-pomtersand 38-77 (49 percent) for the point defeat to tie the game oft a lay-up by
0 Lyons. Peterson and Anton Gill had strong
ECU racked up their first win of the performances offensively with 17 and 16
season lastSaturdaydeieatirig Appalachian points respectively.
iform NHL of AIDS patient
colleague said, they would not tell the pub-
lic.
"Why did the doctor wait two years?"
demanded Canadiens captain Guy
Carhonneau,designated theoffioal spokes-
man by his teammates. "I mean, he's a
professional, and I think AIDS is of serious
concern for everybody
Carbonneau wanted the woman's
name and picture released. It was not.
Flipping through the 1991 N.C.
State media guide the other day, I
found that through the years, ECU has
a strong hold on filling Carter-Finley
Stadium in Raleigh. Of the top 25
largest crowds, ECU played State in 10
of the games.
The largest crowd was Sept. 6,1986,
when 58,650 fans jammed into the
47,000 seat stadium to watch the
Wolfpack defeat the Pirates, 38-10. ECU
maintains the second (58300), fourth
(57,700), sixth (57,300), eighth (56,800),
10th (55,200), 14th (53,400), 16th (52,200)
, 21st (50,800) and 25th (49,700) spots
respectively.
Only North Carolina is close to
ECU, with record attendance eight
games in Carter-Finley. Clemson and
South Carolina are on the list each with
two games, while Duke, Perm State and
Virginia round out the other three
spots.
�This year's N.C. State team could
become the winningest team in the
history of Wolfpack football should
they defeat the Pirates on New Year's
Day. This season's 9-2 record ties the
mark previously set by three other
Wolfpack teams.
� Hats off to ECU placekicker
Anthony Brenner. If he continues to
kick as well as he plays Sega, a last-
second 51-yard, game-winning field
goal in the Peach Bowl will be pie for
the sophomore.
� Former ECU quarterback John
Casazza is coaching high school football
in High Point, N.C. Prior to the Jeff
Blake era, Casazza entered the record
books 18 times for the Pirates, includ-
ing: most attempts in a game (43), most
See Carter-Finley, page 12
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Pre-Registration Magazine.
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12 vSIk tziut (I'arnlinian
December 5. 1991
Big East,
ACC split
after four
games
All WTA (AP) rhe third
.uu1tin.il Atlantic Coast (lonference
Big East Challenge has reached the
halfway mark, and nothing's been
settled yet
For the second night in a row
the two high profile conferences
split a doubleheader, No. l7Geor-
gia rech overpowering Villanova
80 9 after Syracuse lud given the
Big East a 2-1 lead in theopener by
routing loridaState89-71 Tuesday
night
lech's Ion Barry was asked it
he wassorrj the series was corning
to an end.
"1 could careless said Barry,a
senior 1 m out of here
rhe son ol former NBA star
Ruk Barry was merely joking.
Its a great series, he said I
think it matches up the two best
baskefbaD conferences in the nation.
It's good It shows you where your
team is early in the year
The scene shitts to the Mead-
owlands in last Rutherford, N
where Manland meets Providence
and North Carolina plays Si ' i
Hall.
What dcxs
Fulton County Stadium
and ECU have in common?
A
BIG BOWL
PEACHES
A Store Full Of Hidden Treasures
�Toys �Typewriters 'Musical Instruments
�Pictures 'New & Old -Household Accessories
�Jewelry Furniture 'Exercise Equipment
924 UkUiuoa Avenue
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Telephone 752-2139
Open Tues. Thru lrl.
10:00- 5:00
Saturday 10:00 - 2:00
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RfSUBfi-
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(DAILY SPECIAL)
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a men : I I
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� f peo think you're
plavii ; � ik h tms in Decem-
Maekc said
"Thi un(,
you
an,
mtri-
uorctxecaniesm l.um-
Carter-Finley
Continued from page 11
attempts in a seas -1 277 most
completions in a game (21) most
yards gained in a season 1,312)
and most yards per came for his
career (119.8
Most of Casazza's records
were accomplished during the
1970 season By the books, the
Richmond game (Oct. 24. 1970)
his junior year proved to be his
best outing when he was 21 of 43
for 270 yards.
�let- - ild virtually
destroy all existing passing
reci rds from pre ious Pirate
bowl�ing teams In the Hues six
pos season appearances,
George Richardson holds the
record for most passing attempts
(1
id
let:
the 1965 Tangerine Bowl against
Maine. Billline leads the most
net passing yards with 178
against Massachusetts in the
lsM rangerineBowl.
Rk hardsort andline are bed
for the passing touchdowns
mark with one apiece.
�ECU is 4-2 in bowl plav,
and are currently on a four-
game winning streak in the post-
season Hie 1978 team defeated
Louisiana Tech 35-1 3 in the
Independence Bowl to keep the
streak alive Phe Pirates onlv
two losses came to Clarion
College m the 1952 Lions Bowl
(13-6) and to Morns-Harvev in
the 1954 FJks Bowl (12-0).
�Speaking of records, the
1991 ECU football team has
virtually rewritten the record
hook. As a team, the Pirates
have broken or taxi 100 school
records. Individually, over 30
records have fallen, mostlv to
senior quarterback eff Blake
Perhaps the oddest Greg
Grandison tied the school record
for three interceptions in one
game (Central Florida), one of
which was an intercepted
fumble.





1Z 5l)c �aBt (Carolinian
Decembers, 1991
Big East,
ACC split
after four
games
ATLANTA (AD The third
and final AtlanhcCoastConference-
Big East Challenge has reached the
halfway mark, and nothing's been
settled vet.
For tho second night in a nnv
the two high profile conferences
split a doubleheader. No. 17 Geor-
gia Tech overpowering Villanova
80-5 after Syracuse had given the
Big East a 2-1 load in the opener by
routing Honda State89-71 Tuesday-
night.
Tech's Jon Barrv was asked if
he was sorry the series was coming
to an end.
"1 could careless said Barry,a
senior. "I'm out of here
The son of former NBA star
Rick Barry was merely joking.
"It's a great series he said. "I
think it matches up the two best
basketball conferences in the nation.
It's good. It shows you where your
team is early in the year
The scene shifts to the Mead-
owlands in East Rutherford, N.J
where Man land meets Providence
and North Carolina plays Seton
Hall.
loch (4-1) riH.ie the scoring of
two freshmen to the victory over
Villanova (0-2) with i ra vis Best and
lames Forrest scoring 19 points
apiei e
Pave lohnson hit 7of 11 shots
from 3 point range and scored 29
points to lead Syracuse (3-0) over
FSU (1-1), which was nuking its
first splash on the national scene as
a member ot the Ac (after leaving
the Metro Conference.
A crowd of 8,416 tilled only
built the seats in The Omni, despite
hometown favorite Tech being in
the field
"A lot ol people think you're
playing cupcake teams in Decem-
ber, lech's Malcolm Mackey said.
"They don't -tart coming out until
you plav conference games in lanu-
ary
Carter-Finley
Continued from page 11
attempts in a season (277), most
completions in a game (21), most
yards gained in a season (1,512)
and most yards per game for his
career (1 IMS).
Most of Casazza's records
were accomplished during the
1970 season. By the books, the
Richmond game (Oct. 24, 1970)
his junior year proved to be his
best outing when he was 21 of 43
for 270 yards.
�left Blake should virtually
destroy all existing passing
records from previous Pirate
bowl�ing teams In the Bucs six
post-season appearances,
George Richardson holds the
record for most passing attempts
(17) and completions (9), set in
the 1965 Tangerine Bowl against
Maine. Bill Cline leads the most
net passing yards with 178
against Massachusetts in the
1964 Tangerine Bowl.
Richardson and (line are tied
for the passing touchdowns
mark with one apiece.
�ECU is 4-2 in bowl play,
and arc currently on a four-
game winning streak in the post-
season The 1978 team defeated
Louisiana Tech 33-13 in the
Independence Bowl to keep the
streak alive. The Pirates only
two losses came to Clarion
College in the 19S2 Lions Bowl
(13-6) and to Morris-Harvey in
the 1954 Elks Bowl (12-0).
�Speaking of records, the
1991 ECU football team has
virtually rewritten the record
book. As a team, the Pirates
have broken or tied 100 school
records. Individually, over 30
records have fallen, mostly to
senior quarterback Jeff Blake.
Perhaps the oddest � Greg
Grand ison tied the school record
for three interceptions in one
game (Central Florida), one of
which was an intercepted
fumble.
Wll.lt diK-s
Fulton Courtl St.idumi
titid I Cl h.iwin coninioi
A
BIG BOWL
PEACHES
A Store Full Of Hidden TVeasui
c.
KW, (i �
�Toys �Typewriters
�Pictures -New & Old
�Jewelry Furniture
924 McUmm Avi
Greenville, N.C.
Telephone 752-2139
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�Household Accessories
�Exercise Equipment
Open Tue�. Thru Krl.
10:00 � 5:00
Saturday 10:00 - 2:00
Tar Landing Seafood
Rtstiortat
ALL - U - CAN - EAT
FRIED SHRIMP
$6.95
(DAILY SPECIAL)





aHc lEaBt (Enrnltntnn
Peach Bowl Preview
December 5, 1991
Page 1
From Ficklen to Fulton County Stadium
OFFENSE
By Brian Kerns
Spoils Fditor
In what promistMo be as spectacular as the United
States'air raid on Iraq, ECU and N.C State are pulling
out the big guns for their New Year's Day showdown
in the nationally televised 24th annual Peach Bowl.
The ECU offensive has been touted as one of the
most exciting teams in the country to watch bv manv
national football analysts
Ihe Pirates, in their third season under head coach
Bill Lewis, have completed the most successful season
in the teams history bv winning ten games this season.
The offense this year finished the season with 4,808
total yards of offense rushing for 1,429 yards and
passing for 5,379 yards, which was a sch(xl record.
he N C State offense can be best described as a
truly balanced attack The Woifpack in 1W1 totaled
3,70 yards ol total offense on the season with 1,794
yards rushing and passing for 2,076 yards In addition,
the State backfield averaged 163.1 yards rushing per
game while passing tor 188.7 yards averaging 351.8
ime
The Wi lfpa k has had more than it's share of
injuries .it its quarterback position. After leading the
Woifpack to vi t riesin their first three outings, junior
starter Terry ordan broke his wrisl against North
(Carolina in. ime tour.
Red-shirt freshman (leoff Bender stepped up to
lead the Pack I ivict �ry against the I arheclsand in the
next four out of their six games. Bender suffered a
shoulder injury with two games remaining in the
- on.
Tenyl larvey,atrue-freshmancametotheforefTont
of the offense for State to lead the team in two come-
from-bchind victories against I Hike and Maryland.
Bender l ad all Woifpack passers completing 76 of
167 attempt I' yards passing on the year and
seven touchdowns. Harvey was second on the list
completing 40 of 71 passes for 523 yards with Jordan
third on the the list throwing for 511 yards on 38 of 68
attempts with tour tou hdowns
State is 1 have Jordan al the controls when
theWolfj i - I e the Pirates on New Years Day, but
with the experierK e (t winning close games in the final
minutes, Bender i r 1 larvey are capable of running the
offense.
NX State is the only ranked team in the nation's
Top 25 that had to start three different quarterbacks this
a as n and had each of those quarterbacks win at least
one game.
I I isteadbysenforquarterbackJeffBlake.Blake,
who has broken every Pirate passing record, has been
nominated tor several national awards, and is a can-
didate for the 1 leisman Trophy.
Blake his completed 203 of 368 passes for 3,073
yards and 31 total touchdowns and only had eight
interceptions on the season. He completed 55.3 percent
ot his passes and averaged 14.75 yards per completion.
The Pirates averaged 307 yards per game passing
the Kill and averaged 33.8 points per game and scored
in double figures in every game. He also has rushed for
286 vards on 77 attempts
Wake has thrown for over 300 yards in five games
this seasori I le is a post'season candidate for several
national p I easonl n iminationsincluding:The
leisman Trophy, The Da vey O'Brien Award, and All-
American honors He has thrown for than? or more
touchdown in five games this season. Blake is also
listed as tenth in the country in total offense and
efficient y
Ihe backfield for the 1991 Pirate team is led by
senior fullback David Daniels. Daniels, 5' 10 232
pi Kinds, is (me of the 34 nominees for the Doak Walker
running back award. Daniels rushed for 352 yards on
61 carries and averaged 5.5 yards per rush.
Cedric 'in Buren leads all rushers with 37V yards
on 90 carries Van Buren, 5'10 185 pounds, averaged
3.9 yards per rush, averaging 31.9 yards a game. Dion
Johnson was the third leading rusher for the team with
300 on 37 attempts.
ECU, who mixes the rushing game nicely with it's
explosive passing game, will try to keep the Woifpack
in check with the ground attack.
The Wolfpack's leading rusher in 1991 is junior
tailback Anthony Barbour. Barbour, 5'9 172 pounds,
rushed for 769 yards on 124 carries averaging 69.9
yards per game and 6.2 yards a carry with three touch-
downs on the year.
Joining Barbour in the backfield is junior fullback
Greg Manior. Manior, 6'0 244 pounds, nished for 272
yards on 79 carries averaging 3.4 yards per carry and a
touchdown.
Behind Barbour and Manior are tailbacks Aubrey
Shaw and Gary Downs. Shaw, a 5'11 200 pound
junior rushed for 257 yards on 59 carries averaging 4.4
yards a carry and four touchdowns. Downs,a6'0 195
pound sophomore gained 212 yards on 68 carries
scoring five touchdowns for the Pack.
With State boasting a number of talented rushers,
the Pi rates will have their work cut out to shut down the
Woifpack ground attack.
Senior split end and team captain Charles Daven-
port leads the Packs corps of receiver in 1991. Daven-
See Offense, page P2
How the teams
match up
Fans finally get a showdown
By Colleen Kirkpatrick
Sljff Writer
On January 1,1W2, ECU will take on N.C State
in the Peach Bowl, and Fulton County Stadium in
Atlanta, Ga will be packed with fans of rivaling
teams who have not met in five years.
In the 1987season opener, F.CU beat NX' State,
32-14 in Raleigh.
The two teams have not played each other since.
The Woifpack decided against playing the Pirates
after the gcvil posts at Carter-Finley Stadium wen1
torn down.
"I think it's about time we bring back the rivalry
we once had said Joel Mauney, a senior at ECU. "I
think we can handle it as students when we win
CharlieBvrd,al961AlumniofFCUsaidAfter
some 20 years of waiting to be in the big time, we
have finally achieved the status of institutions like
Duke and Carolina in the athletic arena
on fohndrow, a graduate student at ECU said,
"1 think it's g(Hd that ECU is finally getting the
recognition as a valid NCAA football team
While some students from ECU are pleased
with their team plaving in the Peach Bowl, others
fee! that we deserve better.
"I think the 1987 incident was an excuse not to
play us said Greg 1 iallow, a senior at ECU. "Ihe
reason why N.C. State will not play East Carolina
during the regular season is because if they loose it
hurts their instate recruiting
Robert (ones, a freshman at ECU said. "I think
we ought to play someone better. 1 think it's unfair
that we got put in a howl like that
While some students think that ECU is worthy
of a better team, some are glad they got a chance to
see the schools play in a bowl and hope it will help
renew the regular season rivarly between the two
schools.
Chuck Dunbar, a senior at ECU said: "1 think
they ought to resume the regular seasori games.
Maybe if the Peach Bowl goes well, they will consider
it
France's Bradburn, an ECU librarian said that
her family is choosing opposite teams in the Peach
Bowl.
"It's causing a havoc in my family because my
son's at State she said. "I figure I will invest my
money in watching his team get beat
While some SUite fans have mixed feelingsah ut
the game, vine fed as if ECU will be the winning
team.
Ian Beavers, a N.C. State student said, "Most
people here think ECU is going to win
Jim Emery, a resident ad visor at N.C. State, said:
"I think ECU is gi ung to win, but Dick Sheraton has
a month to prepare. I also think that Bill Lewis
See Rivals, page P2
DEFENSE
By Michael Martin
Assistant Sports Editor
The feud goes on
Many wars in years past have been won by a stiff
defense, followed by a quick series of offensive blows
that sent the enemy tumbling.
When the "Backyard Bash" between N.C State
and ECU moves to Ful ton Countv Stadium New Year's
Day, the winner in the defensive battle between the
Woifpack and the Pirates should hold the upper hand
in the latest edition of the intra-state feud.
Overshadowed by quarterback Jeff Blake's aerial
assault throughout the year, the ECU defense has
performed quite well. The defensive team came up
with eight points in the Pirates' regular season finale at
Cincinnati � an interception a'tumed for a touchdown
and a safety � to secure a 10-win season.
ECU allowed opponentsonly 148.8 yards rushing
and 260yardspassing per ga me thisyear, while hold ing
them to 243 points per game. NC. State's offense is
averaging 163.1 yardsrushingand lS8.7vardsintheair
per game, while averaging 243 punts per game
A true battle.
Oii one hand, N.C. State's potent rushii itta �
On the other. ECU'S awesome rush defense led by an
All-American linebacker.
It'll be Anthony Barbour versus Robert ones.
Sampson versus Goliath.
N.C. State against ECU tor all the peaches in
Georgia.
(ones, ECU's leading tackier with 151 total (104
unassisted, 47 assisted. will spearhead the overshad-
owed Pirate defense against the Atlantic Coast
Conference's second place team. He notched 12 tackles
for a loss of 58 vards, three sacks for minus 19 vards,
forced four fumbles and had 10 quarterback hurries
The Woifpack, who averaged 243 points and over
350 yards of offense per game, will look to tet the
stamina and endurance of the Pirate linebackers and
down lineman.
Senior linebacker Ken Bumette(6'0 220 pounds
has complimented Jones well throughout the season.
He has recorded 77 tackles and two quarterback hur-
nes. Junior defensive end Jerry Dillon(6'4 215 pounds;
has recorded 75 tackles and has two interceptions on
the season. At the other defensive end, senior Marc
Washington (6'1 237 pounds) and sophomore Ber
nard Carter (6'3 236 pounds) have both had playing
time, tallying 52 tackles between the two.
But the Pirates aren't the only ones with a tough,
hard-nosed defense. Woifpack opponents have only-
averaged 304.1 vardsof total offenseand 16.8 points per
game.
Billy Ray Haynes, a 5ll 222-pound inside line-
backer leads the attack for N.C. State. He has 102 tackles
on the year (52 assisted, 46 unassisted), caused two
fumbles, two interceptions, had two quarterback hur-
ries and one quarterback sack. But he's not alone.
Haynes is complimented with a sturdy corps of
inside and outside linebackers. David Memt, a 6'1
227-pound junior has 85 tackleson the year, enough for
second place on the Woifpack squad. Senior Ray Frost
(6'3 223 pounds) gets the majority of playing time
with Haynes and has collected 39 tackleson the season,
while sophomore Gregg Giannamore (5'11 220
pounds) has come through with 53 tackles ot his own.
At the outside linebacker positions, State is chock
full of talent. Led primarily by senior captain Clayton
Henry (63 230 pounds), the Woifpack ends contain
both sizeand speed. Sophomore's Tyler La wrence(6'3
224 pounds)and Keith Battle(6'2222 pounds have�x
tackles apiece and five quarterback sacks between the
two.
Sophomore strong safety Mike Reid (o'3 219
poundb)andjuniorcomerbackSebiistianSavage(5Tl
188 pounds) lead a talented, but young, Pack second-
ary. Reid is third on the team with 83 tackles and leads
the team with two blocked punts. Savage has63 tackles
on the season and a team-high five interceptions.
Corner oack Wade Burton (5'8 170 pounds i s the only
senior of the four, while junior free sa fety Ricky Tu mer
(5'10 185 pounds) has three interceptions and 48
tackles on the year.
The Pirate secondary has answered the questions
of some pre-season doubters � especially at the end of
the season. Junior safety Greg Grandison (6'2 218
pounds) has the team's second most tackles with 100
(70 unassisted, 30assisted), has forced two fumblesand
recovered two fumbles. Grandison also has four inter-
ceptions on the season, one that he returned 95 yards
for a touchdown.
Sophomore cornerback Greg Floyd (5'10 191
pounds) has 43 tackles, a forced fumble, one intercep-
tion for a 93-yard touchdown and a recovered fumble
Senior comerback Chris Hall (6'2 184 pounds) has 74
tackles, three interceptions and two fumble recoveries.
Freshman strong safety Fred Walker (5' 11 197 pounds)
has 56 tackles and two interceptions.
Although the Pirates' secondary has performed
well this season, none can compare with that of the
defensive line. Senior tackle Greg Gardill (6'2 239
pounds) has been on some key stops for ECU this
season. He has 74 tackles (11 for a loss of 49 yards), six
sacks for minus 38 yards and a team high 12 quarter-
See Defense, page P3





2 Sl)c Cast fflarolitlian Peach Bowl Preview December5. 1991
Offense
Continued from P1
port, a 6'4 205 pound senior,
gained 558 yards on 33 receptions
averaging 16.9 yards per catch scor-
ing tour touchdowns on the year.
Nexl isthonmlti-talented Ledel
i ieorge, who produces statistics in
rushing, receiving, scoring, punt
ret urns, kickoff returns and tackle
ieorge, .1 6'0 206-pound sopho-
t aughl 25 passes for 225 yards
on the season.
Senior tight-end Todd 1 larrison
has 205 sards receiving on 15 re-
ceptions and one touchdown. The
I I pound senior team captain
is averages 13.7 yards per reception
and has the ability to make the big
i itch
Rankers Eddie Goines and Ray
C Iriffis both have 14 catches on the
yearforover200yardseach. Goines,
r, 177 pound freshman is av-
eraging 15 6 yards per catch while
Grifjfis, a 5'ET, 162-pound sopho-
more averages 14.4 vards per re-
ception average.
ECU boasts a tremendous
v;roup of receivers and tight ends,
and they are arguably one of the
best ever Lead bv seniors Hunter
Gallimore, Luke Fisher and John-
son, all have caught 40 or more
passes on the season.
Gallimore, 6'0 171 pounds,
leads the Pirates with 49 catches for
881 yards and eight touchdowns.
He averages 17.9 yards per catch.
Fisher, 6'3 237 pounds who is
a clutch receiver, is second on the
team with 48 receptions for 686
yards and four touchdowns on the
season. Heaveraged 14.3yards per
reception and holds the ECU record
for the longest touchdown reception
at 91 yards against Horida State in
1990.
Johnson, 5'8 164 pounds, is a
multi-talented athlete who has
caught 40 passes for 743 yards as
well as compiling yards in rushing,
punt returns and kickoff returns.
Rounding out the core of re-
ceivers are juniors Clayton Driver
and Ronnie Williams. Driver, an
electrifying player who has scored
10 touchdowns on the season on 28
catches for 464 yards.Williams,6'l
175 pounds has 17 catches for 167
yardsaveraging9.8 yards per catch.
The ECU front line has out-
standing size and strength that has
helped the Pirates become one of
the most productive offense in the
country.
Anchored by seniors Keith
Arnold, a 6'3 280-pound center,
and Mike McCalop, a 6'1" 289-
pound left guard, the line has pro-
tected Blake well this season.
Earlier this season, the offen-
sive line went 20 quarters without
giving up a sack. One of the main
reasonsaf or this record isTom Scott,
a 67 338-pound left tackle is one
of the largest and most effective
lineman in college football.
Round ing ou t the of fensi ve 1 ine
are juniors Kenneth Crawford, a
6'5 266-pound right guard and
Nick Wilson,a6'4265-pound right
tackle.
The Wolfpack offensive line is
anchored by seniors Clyde Ha wley
and Scott Adell.
Hawley, a 6'3 285-pound left
guard is a three-year letterman for
the Pack and is an All-ACC candi-
date. Adell, a 6'4 279-pound right
tackle who missed the 1990 season
due to a shoulder was still consid-
ered an All-ACC candidate and isa
tremendous asset to the offensive
line this vear.
J
The rest of the front wall is lead
by left tackle Scott Wwds, a 6'3
283-pound sophomore, center Todd
Ward,a6'2245-pound sophomore
and right guard Mike Gee, a 6'4
275-pound junior.
State's place kicker, Damon
Flartman, finished the season
making 26 of 28 extra points and
was 12-22 on field goals. Hartman
had 62 points this season, and ac-
cumulated 48 career field goals,
bringing him to 241 career points.
Punter Tim Kilpatnck punted
59 times for 2,322 yards averaging
39.4 per punt. Punt retumerCeorge
had 40 returns for 328 yardsaverag-
ing 8.2 yards per return.
Kickoff return duties are
handled by Barbour, Goines and
Reggie Lawrence. Barbour lead the
group with 361 yards on 13 returns
averaging 27.8 yards per return.
Goines had nine returns for 216
yards followed by Lawrence with
nine returns for 201 yards.
Leading the Pirates' special
teams is senior punter John Jett. jett
has 49 punts on the year with 2,025
yards on the year for an 35.4 yards
average per punt.
Returning the ball on punts is
return specialist Johnson. Johnson
has returned 26 punts for 162 yai I
average of 62 yards per punt. John-
son also handles mi st of the kickoff
duties returning 21 kJckoffsfor513
vards
Place kicker Anthonv Bn
has kicked 14 of 22 field goals with
twotieldgoalslonrer than .ards
Brennensl 1 on7from39yardsoul
or closer.
Wolves are
an endarred
specips
Defense
back hurries.
Zaun Cunmula a 6T 240-
pound junior noseguard has oome
on strong despite an earl .
injury. He recorded 23 tackles (8 1
2 for a loss of 40 yards), 3 12 sacks
for a loss of 32 yards and four
quarterback hurries. Or
sophomore tackle Darel raylor
(6'0 243 pounds) has com.
stroi .
Ah- j
ad van til
Ju r � -
. '4 � �

Rivalry
I
would get national coach of the
year-
Fans from ECU as well a I
State said that they think it will be a
good game, because the two b
are both from North Car( lina.
"I think lfs good becaus. .
are from the same state said
Stephanie Fisher, a sophomore at
ECU. "If s good publicity
Hunter Cred
: nt said
ime the '
e
David
student said; "Ithi: � -
match uj �

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NOT-50-WfflEWEED
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Shop for t
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at ECU St





linued Irom P1
itsfoi 162 yards
- ' pmt.lohn-
Hhckkkott
�t-tor 513
nthony Brenner
! goals with
n K) yards.
. ardsoul
Wolves are
an endarSpred
specips
$20.00
it
� '
(MB: PRB
OH tNNW EXTRA
��&
(ROCK OF YA&E3):
MAW NRL1HE. MIES
xcmooF'M&cffeM-
5lt UJRL
�jje last Caroltntan Peach Bom. Preview December 5,�991 3
Defense
Continued from page P1
ATTIC
back hurries.
Z�im Cunmulaj, a 6'1 240-
pound unior noseguard has come
n strong despite an early-season
injury. 1 h recorded 23 tackles (8 1
: tor � k)M of 40 yards), 3 1 2 sacks
fof � loss of 32 yards and four
quarterbidi hurries. On his hip,
sophomoft tackle Darek Taylor
243 pounds) has come on
strong for the Pirates.
Although the Pirates have the
speed advantage on the defensive
line, the Wolfpack have the size
advantage.
Junior noseguard Rickv Logo
(5'll274pounds)anchorstheState
defensive line, llecollecttxl 46 tack-
les on the season, six behind the li no
Rivalry
of scrimmage for a loss of 19 yards.
Senior Mark Thomas (6'5 252
pint nds) has three sacks on the sea-
son, nine quarterback hurries,
caused throe fumbles and recov-
ered another two.
Thomas also has 46 tackles this
season, just three more than his
Counterpart John Atkins. Atkins, a
6'4 255 pound sophomore has
Continued from P1
forced one fumble, collected four
sacks and six quarterback hurries.
There's no doubt about it. With
the lineup ECU and N.C. State are
taking into this game � there's go-
ing to be a defensive war. And the
winner of that war will leave Fulton
County Stadium with bragging
rights, and a big bowl of peaches.
�The-
CoMedf
Every Wed.
752-7303
�The
CoMedY
2PHE
Every Wed.
Thursday
would get national coach of the
year "
Fans from ECU as well as N.C.
State said that they think it will be a
n id game, because the two teams
ire both from North Carolina.
I think if s good because we
trom the same state said
Stephanie Fisher, a sophomore at
E 1 "Ifs good publicity
Hunter Crcdle, an NCSU stu-
dent said, "1 think it will be the
biggest game the Peach Bowl has
seen
David Holder, a N.C. State
student said: "I think it'sgonna boa
good match up. It's probably gonna
be one of the best Poach Bowl's
ever
As Pirate and Wolfpack fans
travel to Atlanta on New Year's
Eve, there is no telling what is
actually in store for the teams. Five
yean was a long time to go without
playing.
But whether ECU or N.C. State
wins the Peach Bowl, the fans will
definitely take on the New Year
with a bang.
taking
the Saber
Slash to
Atlanta
INDECISION
99 Draft �99 Highballs �99� Memberships
Come Worship With
Grace Church
Highway 43 South at Bells Fork
355-3500
Friday
E X
T5
vSwj
9:45 am - College Bible Study
11:00 am - Morning Worship
6:00 pm - Evening Worship
2L church that is finding needs and fitting them"
(Opportunity of service; College 'Ministry & Choir, Special �Musk & Instrumental'Ensemble)
Making a difference at East Carolina
The Exam lam Concert
Saturday
PURPLE
SCHOOL BUS
Purple Pirate Shooters $1.50
Thursday Jan 9th
- FREE CONCERT
The ECU Student
Stores Has a Great
Selection of Holiday
Titles and General
Books for Adults
and Children.
Shop for the Holidays
at your Campus Store,
;C0 Statat St�s
Wright Building
Don't Forget Fall Textbook Buyback!
Get Christmas Cash Now for Selling Your Old Textbooks
at ECU Student Stores. Exam period Buyback will be in
the back of The Wright Place,





.K.k
hn-
- koft
net
with
ards
Jsout
Wolves are
an endarSgred
iac�r
aS
A
M
!S 1SPDI.
-ROCK OF WACL3);
MAW ARttHt WLIS5
VICTIM OF Trib tTO-
5NE tURL
(The �aat (Enruiinian Peach Bom Pm vn D. �� 5 1991 3
Defense
Continued from page P1
ATTIC
;kk humes
Zaim Cunmulaj, a 61 240-
td junior noscguard has come
strong despite an carry season
in He recorded 23 tackles (S 1
i �s of 40 yards),312 sacks
- a loss ot 32 yards and four
rfoack humes. On his hip,
homore tackle Darek I'avlor
243 pounds) has come on
strong for the Pirates.
Although the Pirates haw the
sjxwl advantage on the defensive
line, the Wotfpack have the suae
advantage.
Junior noseguard Ricky 1 ogp
(5ll274pounds)anchorstheStatc
defensive line. 1 le collect evl 4 tack-
les on the season, six behind the line
Rivalry
of scrimmage tor a loss of 19yards.
Senior Mark Thomas (h'1 232
pounds) has three sacks on the sea-
son, nine quarterback hurries,
caused three tumbles and recov-
ered another two
rhomas also has 4t- tackles this
season, just three more than his
counterpart John Atkins. Atkins, a
V4 255 pound sophomore has
Continued from P1
forced one fumble, collected four
sicks and si quarterback hurries
There's no doubt about it With
the lineup ECU and N.C State are
taking into this game there's go-
ing to be a defensive war. And the
winner ot that war will lea ve Ful ton
County Stadium with bragging
rights, and a big bowl of peaches.
. 752-7303 I 209 E. 5th St. -fl
COMedf A CoMedY
2PNE A 2PNE
Every Wed. " Every Wed.
d get national coach of the
Fans trom ECU as well as N.C.
said that they think it will be a
� vi game, because the two teams
both from North Carolina.
1 think it's good because we
rrom the same state said
. phanie Fisher, a sophomore at
It's good publicity
Hunter Credle. an NCSU Stu-
dent said, "I think it will he the
biggest game the Peach Bowl has
soon
David Holder, a N.C. State
student said: "1 think it's gonna bea
good match up. lt'sprobablvgonna
be one of the best Peach Bowl's
ever
As Pirate and Wotfpack tans
travel to Atlanta on New Year's
Eve, there Is no telling what is
actually in store tor the teams. Five
years was a long time to go without
playing
But whether ECU orN-C State
wins the Peach Bowl, the tans will
definitely take on the New Year
with a King.
taking
the Saber
Slash to
Atlanta
Thursday
INDECISION
99C Draft 99 Highballs �99 Memberships
Come Worship With
Grace Church
Highway 43 South at Bells Fork
355-3500
Friday
SEX
POLICE
The Exam Jam Concert
9:45 am - College Bible Study
11:00 am - Morning Worship
6:00 pm - Evening Worship

"Si church that is finding needs and jilting them"
(Opport unites of service; College Ministry & Choir, Special -Music c Instrumental'Lnsemb(e)
Making a difference at East Carolina
Saturday
PURPLE
SCHOOL BUS
Purple Pirate Shooters SI.50
Thursday Jan 9th
-FREE CONCERT
The ECU Student
Stores Has a Great
Selection of Holiday
Titles and General
Books for Adults
and Children.
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1





Fearless Bowl Forecast
Peach Bowl � 12 ECU vs. 21 N.C State
Sugar Bowl � 3 Florida vs. 18 Notre Dame
Orange Bowl � 1 Miami vs. 11 Nebraska
Rose Bowl � 2 Washington vs. 4 Michigan
Fiesta Bowl � 6 Penn St. vs. 10 Tennessee
Independence Bowl � 25 Georgia vs. Arkansas
Cotton Bowl � 5 Florida St vs. 9 Texas A&M
Hall of Fame Bowl � 16 Syracuse vs. 25 Ohio St.
Citrus Bowl � 14 California vs. 13 Clemson
Gator Bowl � 19 Virginia vs. 20 Oklahoma
Blockbuster Bowl � 15 Colorado vs. 8 Alabama
Holiday Bowl � 7 Iowa vs. 26 BYU
BRIAN KERNS
Sports Editor
ECU
Florida
Miami
Washington
Tennessee
Georgia
Florida St.
Syracuse
Clemson
Virginia
Alabama
Iowa
DOUG MORRIS
Managing Editor
ECU
Florida
Miami
Washington
Tennessee
Georgia
Texas A&M
Syracuse
California
Oklahoma
Colorado
Iowa
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
ECU
Notre Dame
Miami
Michigan
Penn St.
Georgia
Florida St.
Ohio St.
California
Virginia
Colorado
Iowa
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
ECU
Florida
Miami
Washington
Penn St.
Georgia
Florida St.
Ohio St.
California
Oklahoma
Colorado
Iowa
MATT KING
Entertainment Editor
ECU
Flordia
Miami
Michigan
Tennessee
Georgia
Flordia St.
Syracuse
California
Virginia
Colorado
Iowa
Mike Martin
Asst Sports Editor
ECU
Florida
Miami
Michigan
Tennessee
Georgia
Florida St.
Ohio St.
Clemson
Oklahoma
Colorado
Iowa
TIM HAMPTON
General Manager
ECU
Florida
Nebraska
Washington
Tennessee
Georgia
Florida St.
Ohio St.
Clemson
Oklahoma
Colorado
BYU
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The East Carolinian would like to
congratulate Brian Bailey for
winning the 1991 regular season
Fearless Football Forecast.
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 5, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 05, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2801
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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