The East Carolinian, December 3, 1991






Bowling the Bearcats
Cincinnati fails to keep up with the Jones's.
4
Phoenix restaurant
Maria's rises from the ashes of Flamingo's.
II
&hz iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Voc.65 No.65
Tuesday, December 3,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Paqes
Students camp out for tickets
Vice Chancellor resigns post
David Mclntire, vice chancellor of student affairs,
resigned his position at the University of Missouri-Co-
lumbia on Mondav, Nov. 18 due to the recent controversv
J r J
from sexual harassment allegations.
Mclntire will stay at the university as a faculty mem-
ber in the department of educational and counseling
psychology. Because Mclntire has tenure, the university
would have to perform a long review process to fire him.
The charges of sexual harassment have followed
Mclntire all the way from Appalachian State University.
Asa resultofMclntire'sresignationtoa lower position, he
will be receiving a $21,000 a year pay cut.
Missing trophies recovered
Duke University's 1991 basketball championship
awards were discovered on the campusof the University
of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.
The awards were stolen from Duke's Cameron In-
door Stadium on Nov. 15. The a wards taken were the 1991
Atlantic Coast Conference regular season championship
trophy, Mike Krzyzewski' s coach of the year trophy, a net
cut down from the national championship game and a
symbolic game ball.
An anonymous caller informed UNC police that the
missing trophies were located in front of the Old Well on
the campus. Police recovered all the awards except the
basketball.
The anonymous caller later informed The Daily Tar
tied that the theft was meant as a joke, but the joke had
gone bad. The caller also said that the symbolic ball was
also left with the trophies and that someone else must
have taken the ball before police arrived.
University inflates condom
A two-stories-high, glow-in-the-dark condom floa ted
above the library mall at the University of Wisconsin as
part of the "Safe Sex Awareness Day" activities.
Members of the Madison AIDS Support Network
sponsored the giant condom as part of their effort to grab
students, and faculty's attention and give them the mes-
sage of how to protect themselves from AIDS.
The giant condom was on loan from the manufac-
turer. This was the first time they had let anyone borrow
it.
Sorority placed on probation
The Gamma Phi Beta sorority at the University of
Missouri-Columbia has been placed on probation after a
hazing incident that occurred in late October.
Jewel Howe, program coordinator for Greek Life,
said that several students reported the incident to her and
she launched a 10-day investigation. On Nov. 11, Howe
said that the incident allegations proved to be true and
that she was recommending a one year social probation
along with other sanctions.
The sorority will be able to hold rush and continue its
philanthropy activities.
Student charged with assault
A University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill student
was charged with sexual assault against a fellow on Oct.
31.
Robert Joseph Steele, 20, of 618 Craige Residence Hall
was arrested at 9:46 a.m. and charged with one count of
second-degree sexual assault. Second-degree sexual as-
sault is defined as forced sexual activity without the use
of a weapon.
The assault took place on Sept. 24 in a Craige dormi-
tory room. The victim reported it to campus police but
asked that no action be taken. The victim later changed
her mind and pressed charges
Rolling indicted in murders
After nine days of testimony, a grand jury needed
only 25 minutes to decide to indict a Louisiana transient
for the murders of five college students in August 1990.
On Nov. 15, the 17-member jury indicted Danny
Harold Rolling, 37, on five counts of first-degree murder
and three counts each of sexual battery and armed bur-
glary.
Four of the women were stud en ts of the University of
Florida and the other was a student at Santa Fe Commu-
nity College.
The jury relied heavily on forensic evidence for its
verdict.
Inside Tuesday
Crime Scene72
Editorial74
EntertainmentJ5
Classifieds76
Sports77
By John Carter
Staff Writer
Beer cans and rumors flew
as ECU students camped out
in hopes of obtaining a ticket
to the Peach Bowl in Atlanta.
The beer cans ranged from
M il waukee's Best to M ichelob,
and the rumors ranged from
"there are no tickets left" to
"there are more people
camped ou t than there are tick-
ets
"I'll be in Atlanta on New
Years'day (for thegame)even
if I have to sell peanuts ECU
student Draughon Cranford
said.
Such were the feelings of
students as they were faced
with the possibility of not ob-
taining tickets to the Peach
Bowl. As a result, about 1,200
studentspitched tentsanddug
out the blankets in hopes of
being one of the lucky ones to
get a ticket.
However, there was no
truth to these rumors. Four
thousand tickets were made
available to ECU students on
Dec. 1. By 10 a.m. Monday,
everyone that camped out
received a ticket and more
were available for those that
chose to sleep in a bed.
According to Dave Hart,
athletic director at ECU, the
students' biggest anxiety was
the fact that they had camped
out � some for two days �
and might not get a ticket.
Straightening out the rumors
helped to relieve the anxiety
and students soon felt more
confident that they would be
able to get a ticket
The problems began
when rumors surfaced that
ECU had more students want-
ing tickets than they had tick-
ets available for students.
However,many students pur-
chased tickets early through
Ticketron and Tracks, helping
to reduce the remaining de-
mand to more in line with the
limited supply.
The general rule of thumb
among universities is to allo-
cate 10 percent of tickets to
post-season games for stu-
dents. However, ECU went to
20 percent for the Peach Bowl.
"At other universities, stu-
dents pay full price for tick-
ets Hart said. "Here they are
Questions abound
over wiretapping
settlements' future
By Matt Jones
New Editor
Settlements are pending
for an additional five persons
in the wiretapping scandal
spurred from illegal phone
taps which occurred on cam-
pus in 1990.
According to Herman
Gaskins, theattomey who rep-
resented two previous recipi-
ents of settlements, the pay-
offs will be discussed in a
meeting of ECU'S Board of
Trustees. Gaskins said a deci-
sion will be made at the meet-
ing on whether or not the ad-
ditional settlements will be
paid.
This information could
not be confirmed with any of
the members of the board nor
with University Attorney Ben
Irons.
Irons said that the wire-
tapping issue is not on the
agenda for the normally
scheduled meeting which will
be held Friday.
Hesaid that .there will
be discussion of legal mat-
ters in the executive ses-
sion of the meeting. Irons,
however, did not speculate on
whether a discussion of the
wiretapping settlements will
be included in the session
According to J. Craig
Souza, vice chairman of the
board, the wiretappings are
not on the agenda, but .may
be in the legal discussion
Dick Edwards, executive
assistant to the Chancellor,
also had no knowledge of a
discussion of the wiretapping
settlements, but pointed out
that Chancellor Eakin made a
statement concerning the is-
sue at the last board meeting.
In the release, the Chan-
cellor states: To date no
payment of any kind has been
madeby the University which
was not properly sanctioned
by the Office of the Attorney
General
The statement continues:
As I have said before, in-
discretions or exercisesof poor
judgement by a few should
not detract from the overall
health and vitality of the Uni-
versity and the good and con-
scientious deeds of so many
members of the faculty and
staff
According to Federal law,
any person recorded on an
illegal wiretap may be
awarded up to $10,000. If the
Board approves the settle-
ment, a total of $50,000 will be
paid by the University.
Thus far, the university
has paid over $20,000 in other
wiretapping settlements.
Johnny Rose, former chief
of police for Public Safety, was
awarded over $12,000 in Sep-
tember after filing a lawsuit
which alleged that his voice
was recorded on the wiretaps.
The lawsuit was filed against
two individuals, but was
settled by the University.
Another settlement re-
cipient, Lois Braxton, received
$10,500 in October after in-
forming the University that
she too was recorded on the
phone tap.
The wiretapping oc-
curred in early summer 1990
on the phoneline of former
telecommunications em-
ployee. Brooks Mills.
The fol towing employees
were indicated as being in-
volved or having knowledge
of the wiretapping: Richard
Brown, vice-chancellor of
Business Affairs; James
DePuy, director of Public
Safety; Jim Burns, former cap-
tain of investigations for Pub-
lic Safety; Evan Midgette, as-
sistant director of Human Re-
lations and Teddy Roberson,
former director of Telecom-
munications.
Both Roberson and Burris
resigned three days before the
release of the State Auditor's
report concerning the wire-
tapping.
DePuy, Brown and
Midgette are still employed
by the University.
Photo by Jamas Browning � ECU Photo Lab
Lines, lines everywhere lines. These students took time out of their busy schedules to do a
little camping, a little drinking and a little purchasing.
halt price all year
Also, nobody actual ly has
ticketsin their handsnght now
except for students. I really
bel ieve we ha ve been as fair as
we could Hart added.
Four thousand tickets
went on sale to students. Stu-
dents were allowed to pur-
chaseonly one ticket with their
student l.D. and could not buv
one with someone else's iden-
tification.
According to Hart, this
decision was made in an at-
tempt to minimize abuse of
student tickets, to help lines
move quickly, and to maxi-
Photo by Jam Browning � ECU Photo Lab
O Beercan tree
This special Christmas tree is the epitome of the
Christmas spirit held by all ECU students.
Student honored with grant
ECU New Bureau
A talented medical stu-
dent with a penchant for bio-
medical research has landed
another prestigious honor at
the ECU School of Medicine.
Laura Harris, currently in
her third year of studies, has
been awarded a $25,000 grant
from the Howard Medical In-
stitute (HHMI) to defray the
cost of her medical education
and nuture her growing in ter-
est in research.
The grant is renewable for
an additional $25,000 for her
senior year.
The institute awards the
grants to 120 students each
year with the intention of ex-
panding the future pool of
medically trained researchers
in the United States and
abroad. True to the program's
goals, she plans to incorpo-
rate a research emphasis into
her medical career.
The HHMI award is only
the latest in a series of honors
that Harris has garnered. She
spent die last academic year
on leave from the medical
school to participate in
HHMl's Research Scholar's
Program, operated in concert
with the National Institute of
Health(NIH), the nation'spre-
mier biomedical research or-
ganization.
Each year the program
brings an eli te group of 35 stu-
dents from medical schools
across the country to HHMl's
Bethesda, Md campus, where
the chance to work with
world-renowned scholars at
the NIH on one of 20 different
research projects.
Harris spent her year in a
molecular biology laboratory
at the National Eye Institute,
studying proto-oncogene ex-
pression and proteins that
regulate the development of
the eye. She also had the op-
portunity to attend the Inter-
national AIDS Conference
held in Florence, Italy.
Harris called her year at
HHM1-NIH "an outstanding
experience
"1 was initially worried
about taking a year out of my
medical studies she said,
"but I only gained
Hams first made a splash
in the research field in 1988 as
a graduate student in ECU's
Department of Biology.
mize opportunities for all stu-
dents. However, students that
could not afford to miss class
while standing in line found
obtaining a ticket difficult be-
cause of this policy.
The Pirate dub received
about 16,000 tickets and
See Tickets, page 2
Police
suggest
Halloween
shutdown
By Julie Roscoe
Suf f Writer
The Greenville police de-
partment isattempting to gain
authority to close downtown
bars through state legislation.
At the Nov. 25 SGA meet-
ing Greenville Police Chief
Charles Hinman and George
Hurst, legal advisor for the
Greenville policedepartment,
both spoke about student is-
sues, one involving the an-
nual student Halloween cel-
ebration.
Halloween falls on a Sat-
urday night after a home foot-
ball game in 1992.
In response to what
Hinman predicts to be a higher
level of excitement next Hal-
loween, the Greenville police
department is trying to enact
legislation that will give the
policedepartment the author-
ity toctose the downtown bars.
"We don't want to ob-
struct anyone from ha ving fun,
but we need to maintain pub-
lic safety levels said Hinman.
'The legislation is for us to
have control in case we need
it
The plan to go to the state
legislation is in its infancy and
Hinman isaware that this type
of legislation might be infring-
ingonbusinessowners' rights.
Hinman also addressed
the lack of student and police
communication and asked for
student participation with the
Greenville policedepartment.
After speaking with stu-
dents in classrooms and on
the street Hinman is interested
in forming a group of 12 to 15
students to meet on a monthly
basis to attempt to solve prob-
lems in the community.
"I can learn from them,
they can learn from us Chief
Hinman said.
Hinman said meetings
with students in an informal
setting can only enhance po-
lice community relations in
every respect
SmSGA, page 2





2 Sfte East (Earnltntan December 3, 1991
crjmeSene
Public Safety responds to face-down
subject at Austin; same gone on arrival
Nov. 23
0542�Rugby Field: Checked out a report of suspicious activ-
ity. All units responded and subjects were cleared from the area.
2221�Jones Hall: Responded to a report of a disturbance.
One subject was arrested for assault and was transported to the
Magistrate's office.
0046�Scott Hall: Vehicle stopped for DVV1 west of the build-
ing. The student was arrestod and taken to the magistrate's office.
0142�Joyner Library: Vehicle stopped north of the building
for a one-way street violation, no operator's license and obstruct
and delay. The non-student fled on foot. Warrants are pending
and the vehicle was impounded.
1252�Austin Building: Responded to a report of a subject
lying face-down south of the building. Same was gone on arrival.
2237�Aycock Hall: Checked out a report of a fight on the
third floor. Rescue was called but did not transport anyone. One
subject was banned from campus.
2315�White and Clement halls: Checked out the area in
reference to a gathering. Subjects were gone on arrival.
0143�TenthStreet�Vehicle stopped for erratic driving. Mat-
ter was turned over to the Greenville Police Department.
Nov. 26
1008�Cotten Hall: Responded to a report of a female that had
fallen in the area north of the building. Student was transported
to Pitt County Memorial Hospital.
1011�Third and Reade streets: Responded to a report of a
vehicle being broken into in the parking lot. Several other vehicles
were found to be broken into also.
1210�Student Stores: Checked out a report of a male subject
causing a loud disturbance. Subject located and referred to the
Administration for review.
Nov. 27
022�Belk Hall: Checked out a report of suspicious activity
in the area. Subjects asked to leave.
004b�Scott Hall: Responded to a noise complaint. Subject
was given a verbal warning.
Nov. 29
2058�Mendenhall Student Center: Responded to a report of
a suspicious person west of the building. Subject was waiting for
a ride.
Nov. 30
1730�Scott Hall: Checked out a report of a breaking and
entering and damage to real propertv. A report was taken.
2013�White Hall. Responded to a report of two subjects
being in the building after it was closed. Both subjects were given
campus citations.
Dec. 1
202b�Joyner Library: Responded to a report of indecent
exposure.
Crime Seen )� taken from official Public Safety log�.
SGA
Continued from page 1
Tickets
Continued from page 1
Anyone interested in joining
the communication group to work
with Chief Hinman can contact hi m
at his office, 830-4332 or at home,
321-2213.
Speaker of the House Courtney
Jones removed the Captain Stanley
Kittrell resolution from the unfa-
vorable calendar and sent it to com
mittec for revision Nov. 25.
The resolution asks for SGA
support of Public Safety officer.
Captain Stanley Kittrell, who has
filed lawsuits against the university
and several high officials of ECU.
The resolution states "that the
ECU SGA goes on record in sup-
port of Captain Kittrell and in so
doing condemns the action of cer-
tain administrators who would
punish a person for his brave stand
against unethical and illegal acts at
our University
Matthew Gilbert, vice-chair of
the Rules and Judiciary Committee
is the author of the Kittrell resolu-
tion. He is researching the lawsuits
and is preparing to defend his reso-
lution or make amendments to it.
FOSDICK'S
) 1890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. Evans 7S6-2011
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp, Trout,
Deviled Crab Cakes, & Clam Strips.
" nnv Aur �
� Small Shrimp J Regular Shntnp
I at Lunch j Dinner at $6.SO
I a OO 1 C;et �fie Free
I ?'�V - Beverage not included
- Beverage not included J Good Monday - Thursday
� Expires: 12-21-91 " Expires: 1221-91
Includes Parts and Labor
(excludes service specials and accessories)
MUST SHOW STUDENT I.D.
East Carolina
Auto & TVuck Center
LrKain MtTrun Chmjg Plymouth Dodge CMC
HWV 11 4 24 BYPASS � OREENVILLE, NC
355-3333
Dodge
MERCURY
LINCOLN
GMC
TRUCK
CAN NOT BE USED WITH OTHER COUPONS
SAVE
5 O
When You buy a medium or large cup of frozen yogurt.
In Original, Nonfat and Sugar Free Nonfat.
Coupon not val.d with any other offer.
THE TASTE THAT'S WON THE WORLD OVER.
A Store Full Of Hidden Treasures
�Toy� �OoUiinp
�Pictures 'Till! Wl il 11 I
�Jtwrh-v � tc Old
Furniture
TrirptloM
�Musical Instruraenu
�Household Acccson�
�F.jcorcisc f qiupmml
Opn 1 um. Thru Jri.
10 XV5 00
Saturday 10:00-2 00
CONSIGNMENT SHOP
COUPONS FOR CHRISTMAS
Athletic Shoes
COUPON
asics
ZL� AND SALE
OFF
yy
new balance
PRICES
f0canvERsi
EXPIRES 12-15-91
COUPON
Warm-up
Suits
$1000
OFF REG
PRICES
ASICS
DOLFIN
CASUAL ISLE
MENS � WOMENS � KIDS
EXPIRES 12-15-91
COUPON
A
$3.00
OFF EACH
XS - XXL
EXPIRES 12-15-91
COUPON
EASTPAK
$5.00
OFF REG
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NIKE
ASICS
UMBRO
EXPIRES 12-15-91
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utnbro
$5.00
OFF REG
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Adult & Youth
LIMIT 6 PAIRCUSTOMER
EXPIRES 12-15-91
Athletic World
Plaza Mall
355-0500
OPEN:M-F 10-9
SAT 1 -6 & SUN 1 -6
Carolina East Mall
756-7550
quickly sold out. Rumors surfaced
early that the Pirate Club had also
bought up all the student tickets,
but, according to Hart, the Pirate
Club was not allowed to use tickets
allotted for students.
As a result of speculations that
student tickets would be almost
impossible to obtain, students
swarmed MingesColiseumasearly
as Saturday morning to begin the
long wait for Peach Bowl tickets.
At 2 p.m. Monday, a few stu-
dent tickets .still remained. After
everything students heard, most did
not think it possible to get a ticket
without camping out, so they did
not know they could still get one
until late in the day.
Post-season play is a new expe-
rience for ECU, Hart said. Ticket
distribution was handled in the best
way anyone knew how.
In response to the support and
dedication shown by students, 1 Ian
said "I hope what we saw out there,
we can see on a regular basis, not
just for football, but for basketball
and other sports
PEACH BOWL
OLD ENGLISH INN
�15 Minutes from
Stadium on 1-20
Call:
(404) 288-5458
1900 Glenfair Road � Decatur
Drjubk Occupancy
TOUCHDOWN AT
ST-
521 Cotanche S � 757-1666
MONDAY
12 Price
Pitchers
TUESDAY
Sangria $1.25
WEDNESDAY
$1.25 Mexican Imports
THURSDAY
$2.50 Margaritas
12 Price
Appetizers
SUN WED
9PM-1230 AM

� r,�
l' �r
r
Wednesday
Progressive
Donee Night
10 Draft .
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�ladles Free til 10:30
�,r
� ;�
tips selling cm
Its going to he pi
Ho
w re i
The IBM Personal
start in gradual! - hi
software, an IBjM 1;
PS2 Loan lor Loard
ATTE
This is vou
the 50 ol
We now ha
available at
IMMEDIA
Order between!
receive a 5 disci
all faculty, staff &
STOP BY THE S
'This offer is available only to qualified studl
may withdraw the offer at any t�me without!
IBM, Personal System2, and PS2 are regif
� IBM Corporation 1990
Casl





Continued from page 1
, K ed not think it possible to get a ticket
without camping out, so they did
t tickets not know they could still get one
ihl late in the day.
kets season pla vis anew expe-
rience tor R'l Hart said. Ticket
Jistr-butKuiHashandledinthebest
.n anyone knew how.
In response to the support and
i how n by students. Hart
; w hat wo saw out there,
i sei ma nv;ular basis, not
� tball Kit tor basketball
I
HBOm
VGLISH INN
27
95
458
Daubl� Occupancy
lair Road � Decatur
HDOWN AT
ii
9
u
b: Imports
i as
:e
ers
D
AM
� �.r
, �-
dnesday
ogrcssive
nee Night
0 Draft
5 Toll Boys
50 Pitchers
Kamikazes
is Free til 10:30
'n'
.V
�.�V
4
77.
V
:v-v
V
5'
ffri'V
GRADUATION SALE
(ENDS DECEMBER 31,1991)
'Hpi selling everything hut his PS2.
It's going to he part of his future
&�v
How're you going to do it?
I lit1 IBM Personal Svstem2 not onh helps you now, (ml can �ret you oil to a lii-t
start in graduate school or on the job. I 'he PS2" comes with easy-to-use, preloaded
software, an IBM Mouse and color display. ith a special student price and the IBM
PS2 Loan lor Learning, its cr affordable.
PS2 it!
ATTENTION SENIORS!
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???Order between 12191 to 123191 and
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all faculty, staff & students.?
STOP BY THE STUDENT STORE TODAY �
DON'T WAIT 'TIL ITS TOO LATE
'This offer is available only to qualified students faculty and staff who purchase IBM PS2 s through participating campus outlets Orders are subject to ava.lab.hty Prices are subiect to change and IBM
may withdraw the offer at any time without written notice �v��,���hi.10.1u,DIvi
IBM. Personal System2, and PS2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation
� IBM Corporation 1990
??Cash Sales Only





Continued from page 1
r surfaced not think it possible to get a ticket
ir ted abo without camping out, so they did
lent tickets, not know they could still get one
� ho Pirale until late in the day.
i se tickets IW-�ason play isa new expe-
rience tor ECU. Hart said. Ticket
labors that distribution washandled in the best
ibnost wjv am one knew how.
In response to the support and
X"1 the vitlicationshtwnbystudents,Hart
kets said I hi pe what we saw out there,
s 5tu w e v an see on a regular basis, not
t v ist for football, but for basketball
. si did and other sports
HBQWL
NJGLISH INN
$
95
5458
111
� Occupancy
tair Road � Decatur
HDOWN AT
clnesdau
B
ogres si vc
nee Night
0 Draft
5 Toll Boys
50 Pitchers
Kamikazes
Is Free til 10:30
M

�i
Jo
�. �M .1.
j�
GRADUATION SALE
(ENDS DECEMBER 31,1991)
"Hes wiling everything but his PS2.
Its going to be part of his future!
&&k
How're you going to do it?
The IBM Personal System2 not onl helps you now. but can �jrt vou oil to a last
start in graduate school or on the job. The PS28 comes with easy-to-use. preloaded
software, an IBM Mouse and color display. With a special student price and the IBM
PS2 Loan lor Learning, its vecv affordable.
PS2 it!
ATTENTION SENIORS!
This is your last chance to buy an IBM PS2 at
the 50 off student price.
We now have these preloaded systems
available at the Student Store for
IMMEDIATE delivery.
Order between 12191 to 123191 and
receive a 5 discount. Discount applies to
all faculty, staff & students.
STOP BY THE STUDENT STORE TODAY �
DON'T WATT 'TDL ITS TOO LATE
�This otter is available only to qualified students, faculty and staff who purchase IBM PS2 s through participating campus outlets Orders are subject to availability Prices are subiect to chanoe and IBM
may withdraw the offer at any time without written notice. ' �:� - -
IBM. Personal System2, and PS2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation.
� IBM Corporation 1990
"Cash Sales Only





My Way Or The Highway
Qiht ?Ea0t (EatUlttUatt Credit will limit American freedoms
� ,� - � � for them? . �" -
Entertainment
Serang the East Carotrw campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
W. Douglas Morris, Jr Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Matt Jones, News Editor
Jennifer Wardrep, As-sf. News Editor
Matt King, Entertainment Editor
Lewis Coble, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Brian Kerns, Sports Editor
Michael G. Martin, Asst. Sports Editor
LeClair Harper, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
M. Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
CHRIS Norman, Darkroom Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
a the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
1 imiied to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
f� publication. Utters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, December 3, 1991
Cramming no longer an option
It is time to start studying for exams. there will be more applications coming in
At this time of year ECU students next year and in the years to come. ECU
guzzle gallons of coffee, make midnight will be able to pick and choose the best
runs for snacks and finally gain an hour or students coming out of high school, thus
two of sleep before heading for their gruel- improving the overall curriculum,
ing two-hour finals. For students now at the university, this
This tradition is repeated twice a year means that classes will start becoming more
(four times a year for those sadistic enough difficult in an effort to challenge these stu-
to take summer classes) and leaves behind dents.
16,000 bleary-eyed husks known as college And so, the cramming tradition may
students. be left by the wayside � out of necessity.
The tradition has, up until now, been Students who have been cramming those
workable here at ECU. Students have been last three chapters of sociology will instead
By Matthew Bulley
Editorial Columnist
Let's play a little imagination
game.
Imagine a man and woman with
a modest income, maybe $2,500 a
month. Instead of living modestly,
though, they live like royalty. They
liveina3,000-square-foot house, with
a mortgage of $200,000. Five new cars
sit in the driveway. The finest stereo,
appliances, fuinishings, all fill their
life. All of it bought on credit.
The grocery store lets them
charge their food on credit.
The utility and phone compa-
nies accept their promise to pay, de-
spite their mounting debt.
Gas cards and credit cards all
carry four-digit debts.
Their personal debt tops SI mil-
lion. The combined interest on their
debt tacks on another S2,000 per
month. Sound okay? It gets worse.
Let's also say that t hey're dumb
and lazy. When they finish at work,
they go out to eat on their credit card,
and spend the evening shopping for
clothing, a boat and a motor-home.
Worse, they drink too much and
abuse drugs.
A sick couple. What lies ahead
able to do their homework and cram for 30
hours straight before their exam in order to
pass.
But ECU is not "that school in one of
the Carolinas" anymore. Around the coun
find themselves with seven chapters. Over-
all, the curriculum will become more de-
tailed.
This change will not occur overnight.
The students will have to come here first
RUSH'S
for them?
What lies ahead for the United
States? The economy of our country is
critically ill.
George Bush and the Congress
are rifling through their medicine
chests, looking for aspirin and band-
aids while the economy is in the inten-
sive care unit.
Diagnosis? A national debt that
approaches S2 trillion. Without see-
ing a trillion, it is hard to imagine, so
let's imagine something else.
A stack of $1,000 bills to equal a
million dollars would be about an
inch high.
A billion would create a stack
about 16 feet high.
A trillion dollars, stacked in
$1,000 bills would extend more than
67 miles into space. We are farther in
debt than that.
The people in Washington we
employ to keep our country sailing on
an even keel have our ship heeled
over on her side. Each session of con-
gress passes without meaningful
progress on reducing the staggering
debt. They continue to manage the
economy as if we are in a period of
rapid expansion, like the 1930's. We
are not.
Just two weeksagoouremplov-
ees in Washington loaned the Soviets
umpteen billionsof our dollars. How'
Can we afford to do that?
My point is this. The blame for
what is wrong with the economy is
irrelevant. Finger-pointing politicians
have three fingers pointing at them-
selves. The important task now is ad-
dressing how we are going to get out
of this mess. No one seems to grasp
that.
Fiddling with the interest rates
won't do it. Gramm-Ruddman hasn't
cut the mustard.
Just like the couple we imag-
ined, there is no way to have a bal-
anced budget when you spend more
than you take in. The finances of this
,3untry must re-examined, and diffi-
cult decisions must be made.
We have 1,200 aircraft at the
disposal of our national government
officials. Do .ve need so many?
Do we need "Star Wars
Sitting here, we are not the ones
to say that one program or another
program should becut. We pay people
to do that for us. But without serious
reviewofoureconomy,debtwilldra
the U nited States down to third world
nation status.
Imagine that
(pC VJhAT AtL?
jAi Jis' take:
SOME: o'M
RHeartATiz
AA MEC
POUNCE
ALL
The Other Side
Athletic Department mishandles ticket sales
By John Carter
Editorial Columnist
try high school students know where to and then the various departments will need
find the Pirates and will remember that time to react, but the day is not far over the
when they send out their applications. horizon.
For this, students can thank the foot- So, for all students who have worked
ball team. Bill Lewis and the rest of the so hard (in short bursts) to keep the cram-
Pirates have put ECU on the map and in the ming tradition alive, it is time to learn how
minds oi many people who would other- to really study,
wise never have heard of it. Because in just a few years, it will be
What this means for the school is that too late.
Congratulations to the 1991
ECU football team. Frankly, theseath-
letes have done it all this year and
deserve praise, not criticism.
However, certain university of-
ficialsdodeserve criticism for the way
they handled the distribution of Peach
Bowl tickets.
'Trust your university. Students
will be better off if they wait and buy
their tickets from the university on
December 2 This is what students
were told when tickets first went on
sale, and a lot of people actually be-
lieved it. Do you know how many
babies are born because of trust me?
Theproblemsbegan when ECU
first received Peach Bowl tickets. The
question was how to distribute them
so that everyone had a fair chance to
get one? ECU's answer � pretend to
take care of the students while screw-
ing them.
Naturally, the PirateClub mem-
bers had to be taken care of because of
the large amounts of money they gen-
erate for athletics. They were allowed
to buy tickets in large quantities be-
fore the university even physically
had these tickets. Then, after tickets
allotted to the Pirate Club were gone,
university officials dipped into tickets
that should have been reserved for
students and sold them to the Pirate
Club.
Where did this leave the stu-
dents? It left them camped out on a
rainy, though warm, Sunday night in
December hoping to be one of the
lucky ones to get a ticket. It was a
mess. Granted, it was a great party,
but it was still a mess and it never
should have come to this.
Also, for those fortunate enough
to get a ticket, it left them sitting in the
end zone at the game. Students that
purchased their tickets through
Ticketron don't have the best seats,
but they are better than end zone seats.
Students were allowed to pur-
chase only one ticket with their ECU
ID. The reason for this seemed to be
so that all students would have a
chance to get a ticket. However, this
madeit difficult forstudentsthat could
not afford to miss a class to stand in
line
But, a person can't be critical
and then refuse to say when things are
right. The Peach Bowl bid is beneficial
to this university in many ways. Play-
ers that may be straddling the line in
the NFL draft have one more oppor-
tunity to play a tough game and show
what they can do.
This game will bring a lot of
money into ECU's athletic program.
And it doesn't come from the stu-
dents pockets. This money could make
new scholarships available and help
to build future teams.
In light of all the bad press ECU
has received over illegal wiretapping,
the success of the football team has
given the university a lot of positive
exposure. Television stations and
newspapers have run feature stories
across the nation about ECU.
Of course, university officials
Left Nor Right
probablv did not start out with the
intentions of making ticket purchases
difficult for students, but that is the
wav it seemed to turn out. Rumors
and speculations before sales began
had a lot of students believing there
was no hope.
As it turned out, getting a ticket
was a hassle, but everyone that
camped out got one. Some people
decided that a ticket was not worth
the hassle of camping out and they
were still able to purchase one Mon-
day afternoon. Student tickets were
stiil available at 2 p.m.
Overall, getting a ticket to the
ECU-N.C. State match-up in Atlanta
wasn't all that easy for anyone. 1 can
think of ways that might have worked
better for everyone, but it wasn't my
decision to make. Rumors circulating
before tickets went on sale added to
the scare and there isn't much anyone
can do for rumor control. The deci-
sions made bv university of finals may
not have been the best ones, but things
pretty much worked out.
However, a couple of things
need to be corrected next time. Let
students purchase two tickets with
one ID. This way, a student can take
a date that may be a non-student or
pick up an extra ticket to help out a
fnend that can't afford to miss class.
Make tickets available to stu-
dents as soon as possible and allot a
greater number. Then allow two days
for students and only students to pur-
chase tickets. At the end of those two
days, the tickets should become fair
game for anyone.
Debt will lead U.S. into economic abyss
Letters to the Editor
Pirates should not
play N.C. State in
Peach Bowl
To The Editor.
This is obviously an exciting
year for the ECU football team and its
crew.
The mer� idea of arch-rival
North Carolina State University meet-
ing the Pirates in an Atlanta Peach
Bowl carries with it images of glory,
respect and national recognition, not
to mention what ECU is renowned
for, parties.
NCSU is a worthy opponent.
Thisbowl becomes a state champion-
ship match, the implications of whkh
are obvious. Almost every person in
the state will be pulling for one team
or the other to win on Jan. 1.
Who will be pulling for either
team outside of North Carolina?
Surely many people in our neighbor-
ing states, of course. Families of cur-
rent or former ECU students have a
right to cheer, too. In addition, all
mid-atlantic schools and their sports
programs will probably have a favor-
ite, for certain reasons. Who else in
this nation caresabout the Peach Bowl?
If you'd ask me that, I'd say
nobody. 1 think thisbowl will provide
ECU with state or maybe, at best, re-
gional recognition, but with no intent
to discredit NCSU's team or staff, it
seems that the Wolfpack being se-
lected as our peachy dbponents takes
away from the Pirates' que .or per-
manent respect in the NCAA.
NCSU fans might feel the same
way about State's search for glory.
Of course, teams are chosen to
compete in a college bowl for reasons
of maximum revenue and season per-
formances, not by who will receive
more recognition from whom. That's
understandable.
Still, had UVa or another state's
pride chosen to compete in or been
selected to the bowl, the national Peach
Bowl television audience would in-
crease dramatically to include fans
from two states instead of one. Popu-
lation turnout at the game would also
be higher, as there are many fans of
both ECU and NCSU.
I'm glad the ECU Pirates are
proving themselves. Atthesametime,
I'd like a chance to interest more non-
Carolinians and other cut-of-state
footM" �� in our excellent sports
program. Is that too much to wish for?
As we sports fans always say, maybe
next year. For now, belieoe.
Nelson Tibbitt HI
Junior
Business
By W. Clifton Nelson
Editorial Columnist
Most of us, mercifully, missed
out on the Great Depression. The
images of that time which our parents
and grandparents have described
seem remote and incredible. How
could this wealthy nation ever have
gotten itself into such a sorry mess?
Well, hang on to your hats,
youth of America; we may all be in for
the ride of our lives.
While Secretary of State George
Bush (for he seems little else) globe-
trots, dispensing billions of dollars in
credit to unworthy countries, we back
home have been busy running up our
personal charge cards as well. The
practice of deficit spending, of living
on credit, has once again infected this
country with a vengeance, and today
the pressure on our whole economic
structure is becoming acute.
Uncle Sam is hopelessly in hock,
and we all know it. Equally appalling,
though, is that our banks, large corpo-
rations, small businesses and house-
holds�truly all facets of the economy
� are assuming horrendous ouruens
of debt. The practiceof buyinggrocer-
ies with credit cards is symptomatic
of a people living beyond its means.
The old folks who saw it can tell
you what easy credit did to this nation
back in the Roaring'20s. Of course,
they didn't "max out" buying VCRs
and vacations to Florida; they took a
more "conservative" tack, leveraging
themselves into the stock market. But
either way it's done, the fact that cor-
porate revenues depended upon a
daily influx of borrowed money (as
they do today) condemned America
to the Great Depression.
President Bush is looking more
and more like Hoover all the time,
denying the recession, carping that if
Americans would only "start spend-
ing we'd see there was no problem.
Well, I've got news for the president:
weare spending, just as fast as we can,
and the problem is that we're spent
out. Look not to working America for
a "jump-start" from this recession, as
in the past. We're still trying to pay off
last year's Christmas bills.
The same is true of all those
lovely blue chip corporations where
our parents were able to work out
their lives in one city, one shop.
Today's generation must anticipate
frequent job changes and layoffs be-
cause there are so few economically
sound companies left. The corporate
bosses seem to believe more than any-
one else that the end is near, judging
by their ravenous orgy of t&:f tak-
ing, taking. Wr companies ma-
nip,iU�o i �,K oonds, trying to delay
collapse, their CEOs are squirreling
away obscene nesteggs, figuring that
at least "they and theirs" will be able
to live a civilized life while the poor
working bastards suffer.
The banks too, usurers though
they are, are going broke. That is why
they are littering this campus with
Visa and Mastercard applications, try-
ing to infuse some young blood into
their only remaining profitable racket:
high interest consumer loans. Stu-
dents should avoid these temptations
like the plague, especially in light of
the growing indebtedness of our soci-
ety as a whole. You may not get a new
wardrobe quite so soon by throwing
that charge application in the trash,
but you'll love yourself in the morn-
ing. We all saw the banks' immediate
reaction to the move in congress for an
interest rate cap: "Mess with us, and
we'll mess with you Whether true
or not, their threats to revoke half of
this nation's charge accounts were
blackmail. A word to the wise is suf-
ficient: stay on a cash basis.
Since we will never pay off this
country's debt (how could we?), we
must steel ourselves for a more cha-
otic settling of accounts. "Gloom and
Doom" economists have insisted for
years that America was living a fis-
cally unhealthy lifestyle, top to bot-
tom. They've taken their share of
ridicule as the years passed and noth-
ing untoward seemed to happen. Even
the crash of '87 produced only a
muffled thump on Main Street, with
all those credit cards flying around.
But today credit is drying up, and the
nation awaits, in quiet anxiety, a di-
saster whose nature no one can guess.
Let us hope it doesn't come
down to war. It is hard to say how our
leaders will react on that day of reck-
oning, when all the nations from
whom we have borrowed gang up
and tell us, "Enough John Q. Public
is more predictable, though. 1 wouldn't
bet the farm on a peaceful sentiment
when some Japanese president tells
him to give up his Discover card.
Maria's brin
Italy to the
Emerald Cit
By Matt Jones
News Editor
Those who have passed by the
now defunct barrestaurant
Flamingo's over the past few weeks
have surely had their interest piqued
as to the futureof the establishment
All questions were answered
when Maria's Italian restaurant re-
cently opened its doors to a city
which has long la. ked a proper eat-
ery for the tastebuds of Italy.
And Flamingo's it ain't.
Many college students have
spent nights roaming through the
short-lived establishments of
Greenville in wanton search of
cheap beer and good times.
However.over time the restau-
rant lost its novelty when the pa-
tronage turned more and more
rowdy. Traditional college students
even feaaxl for their safety in some
cases.
To quote one rug t
known only as 'Joe "Ho
you get by catering todoi
dnnkers?"
The answer was oM
owner closed up shop, n
renovationsand turned 1
into an establishment.
And when the dust I
cleared, there was Maru
I "he atmosphere in Lfi
taurant is much mor
Mana'sisdtmlv lit, bathe
ing pale-red colors whu
feeling of complacvnc.
A barrier hasbo -
separates the eating
kjtchen,sodinersarvrK tj
by those traveling towaj
One of the few items
fnm the Flaming
tish tank whichdividostl
ing from the rest of the
ment.
The bar area is dls
Equus shines
92 playhouse j
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Last week, the East Carolina Playhouse
closed its third production of the 1991-92
season with Peter Shaffer's, "Equus
The story oi a voting English ben- who
has committed a vicious act of violence
against six horses, "Equus" grabs the
audience's attention with a nerve-wrack-
ing look into the troubled mind ot this
young criminal. Combining religion and
psychology, "Equus" leaves the audience
breathless with anticipation for the next
revelation. Building tooneof the most tense
climax esseenat McGinnisTheater. "Equus"
tears away the thin veneer of civilisation to
reveal the coarser, more violent side ot
man.
John Shearin, playing Dr. Martin
Dysart, shows his breadth of acting talent
with his exemplary portrayal of the psy-
chiatrist who agrees to help the young boy.
Sheann delves into his multi-faceted char-
acter with an ease and grace that shows his
level of professional acting experience
Though at times lapsing from his character
into a more personal attitude, Sheann pave
an overall outstanding performance.
Carol Pendergrast, who played I tester
Salomon, detracted from the overall inten-
sity of the plav.
10 her charactd
in her emotioru
mere foil in he
Pendergrast s
her seen (
point that her
occurrence
Kevin an
gave a mind-bo
formanee that
into speechless
trasl to his pi
maker" and
a palpal' i
ming to exp
Varner kept thj
peak, leaving
they left their i
The set s
the added touj
bearing The
seemed to sen
distracted the
tion of the plaj
With the
done and the
the under -cur
the audience
unsaddled thd
ence spell-bod
Comedy tande
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Last Wednesday, the Attic continued
its Comedy Zone tradition with perfor-
mances bv Mike OHourke and Eliot Thre-
att.
QRourke opened the night with some
audience-related jokes, showing hisabilitv
to maintain a f unnv routine while interact-
ing withanaudience.aRturkepkedaKut
the differences between men and women,
focusing on gxj
"Men hai
take a piss n.i1
is stare at the vl
one of those b
can play hod)
bottom with -
can't piss in tl
difficult, dotl
QRourke
"battle crv
pens a Roil
'
r,i'
M
Sponsored by the
'ECU Student'Union
Produetwns Committee





vdoms
al
vss
.
Entertainment
Oil?c Cast (Earnlintan
December 3,1991
Maria's brings
Italy to the
Emerald City
; M.itt ones
Sew
one night man
e I low Ion v m
nu
" �
mI � :
�via.
�lorswhu h n �
� � .
� -
Prvoto by Jimas
' irdlingstor esil II theCrowsf
� � . � � - " taliai
D-oto aD
irant aficionados
Connie k or Frank Vail
ide mui h � � � � . ��
'�" ' � of all types of dnnl
� ' � : - � ik' and �
� - m be tease I with a
- ' i 'ii of unusual ippetizei
atraditioi alfavontef liciousform n I i
1 . � �
: ' -n 111 vd
� - ' � � � �
Equus shines as 91-
2 playhouse jewel
� � �,
-
.

� : � �
quk k delivery In short, it was e�
cellenl
rhe meal easily rivaled any
other in Greenville Specifically, 1
feel as though that particular dish
surpasses the predominant Italian
eatery Villa Roma
In addition to taste, Mauna'salso
vercomes other restaurants with
� � ir portii ns. Unable to
Ii ir the mammoth meal, it was
essaiy to take home over halt of
'�' i iter date, the other por-
� '�' u : � tpertise the bar
pa ed : � � m with flying col-
' � - prices .ire affordable
ii �' : ; 0 for a highball) and
" � in bian �� is wel oming. Gone
its atmosphere is the usual
. I music and rowdy customers
ind il the majority ot bars in
env ille
Even i : eudo-philoso-
phizerwrw partakes of alcohol con-
sumption despises a drinking ev
hment where the music blasts
so loud that conversation becomes
ossibk rhis is not the case at
Maria s
So those with a craving for good
food ind gi n d drinks, the search is
� � r Maria'sistheplacetogoforall
� essentials of an average college
student's night on the town
Summer The-
ater announces
pre-Christmas
Discount
sutt Reports
immer rheaten f Eastern North
'��� �� Producer Directorjohn
i d I
mce the 1992
Blah Blah Blah
.
� '����;� �� at now defu l goalpostsaic
ime interrogation fodder for I
Dati R�d-EClJ Pho�o taa

rhe t musical con edy, "Kiss
Kate" �� it hisbest will
� plaving 2-1 . . 4
- � . ari i farci Lend
MeaTenoi ��-� :� ronyawards
j � - irds and three Outer
i ��� Is will be appearing
ily 8-18 '� thic horror classic,
ila � il howl r kids as well
be perti rmed uly 22 -
. si .
rhe Summer rheater is excited to
present thiNhne-upand hopes you will hnd
� � be as thrilling as we do Shearin said.
Bun season tickets now either tor
� � r that ontwho-has-everything
on your Chnstma list and the Summer
rheater will give a whopping 25 percent
discount on the season price.
IThis will be the largest discount avail-
able for the season subscription and is ot-
tered onl until Dec. 20, 11
omedy tandem ignites Attic Thanksgiving-eve audience


� � -
: n the
tare at I �. : inless vou' l
obathl
�� garette at the
� buddy Womei fc �urse
in't now I think il - kind of
t vou?
� in to talk about I �
f medic rirv kit 1 lap
' '� irke finished with his obser-
��
ighl
ivinga baby
i baby i id me feel so . . .
I felt like the Im-
even h ld the doc t r alter mv
�" I'll be back But 1 always
get more sex it 1 was married.
- going to 5A Sex
nou � . : .tme is Hill and I
self -v.A soon tired the audience with his the stupidest sport yet You see the guy
rKn � ighterandl id jokes jump and his friends are likeHey, didn't
ilcameinthe realize we were that close to the ground.
� itine when he talked about Sony, Bob Then you're hanging there
haven t had sex tor six months
rhreatt then came on the stage and
pn iceeded ti i bore the aw ience to the point
of leaving rhreatt seemed unsure ot him-
his adventures flvinj mmuter air-
planes and bungee-cord jumping
"i looked at mv ticket and where savs
whatseatyou resitting in, vou know, 2C or
JD the ve got written in there Shotgun
said ihmatt
and they go. Hev. let s go fishing for pit
bulls! There sone Oooh, that must hurt
Finishing up with an almost guilty look
on his face, rhreatt left the stage to an
almost audible sigh of rebel The Attic's
!ead-inamxdian should be the headliners
Bungee-cord jumping from hot air because in the past tour weeks, they've
balloons saidThreatt This has got to be been the better performers
bu are cordially invited to the
'I i 'il Student 'Union $
tvlN 7'A '1 �iTKJlMcMleXg PSVTy
Tuesday, 'December 3, 1991
4:00 p.m.
�Mendenliall Student t 'enter Gaffery
Seasonal entertainment provided
By the ' ('11 Cjospet Choir.
'Produi i
'Refreshments unit be erred, and Santo Cuius will be
there to take those gift-fist requests.
SILVER
5
yjA
�L
i V

Aduit Entertainment Center

TUESDA YS:
WEDNESDA YS
Doors Open at 4:00 pm. THURSDA YS:
Doors Open at 4:00 pm. FRIDAYS
Doors open at 4:00 pm. SATURDAYS: � . � � - , �
11 STUDENT SP1!VL
$2.00 oft admission Saturdayight
Open Tues -Sat VALID ID Required ah? Door





� m&

loins
Entertainment
nhv iEaat (Earultntan
Di
ier 3,1991
Maria's brings
Italy to the
Emerald City
pm i
-
quus shines as 91-
2 playhouse jewel
� -

iuick Sort, it was e

� �- i . � . i. � : . 11 ,
" � r rtvnvilli peahca .
igl thai particular dish
" � . - - mil ant Italian
i'di i
Inadditi � � � ti M u i salso
" � � � � tauranl 11
� , � �
'� � � ' imi th meal, it was
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5� l 1: Gom . � � � �
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� " ewithacra ngforgood
�' ��� th( earcl
��� ' :� i ' :
� ' � � � n the 1 .vn
Summer The-
ater announces
pre-Christmas
Discount
Staff Rep
�� n orth
M
0
Blah Blah Blah,
. �
Mnesl
i
� � ��. nyav irds
I threeHiter
� ippearing
rr r classic
� t kids as well
. �

� � ited to
pes you will find
. � SI i inn aid.
5uy season tickets i ��� er for
� . erything
� " Summer
. percent
- mtavail-
nd is '
i
��� ;
�easi lbs
Dec. I
bmedy tandem ignites Attic Thanksgiving-eve audience
i

: :
i
� .
I
tmed
SA
s Bill and i
stage and
.ure ot I in
� : air-
- - � � . - - �
� - resitl -
D, t h e
balloons said fhn atl
"i ou see the guv
like Hey didn't
se to the ground
re hanging there
co fishing tor pit
� �

iom � hei �
and the
Is! rht re sone Oooh, that must hurt
Finishingupwithanalmost guilty look
on his face, rhreatt left the stage to an
st audible sigh of relief The Artie's
� ' i med insshouldbetheheadliners
i i� ' past four weeks, thev ve
Kvn the better performers
i ' i J
IS'
I K
in : to the
'Union �
; oo
4:00 p.m.
r
Men den hall Student c 'enter Gallery
onal entertainment provided
bif the '11 (7 i Jospel ('hair.
'Refreshment will be served and Santa Cluus will be
there to take those gift list requests.
vf-
silver;
V
V4
Adult Entertainment, Qeniec
TUESDA YS:
WEDNESDAYS
Doors Open at 4:00 pm.
rHURSDAYS
Doors Open .it 4:00 pm.
FQIDA YS
Doors opon .it 4:00 pm.
c ati innivc
M I STLDEY1 SPi! !
$2 "i1 tt admission Saturday Night.
Odc Tues Sat UALID ID Required at the Door





Classifieds
(Hire 3aflt (Unrulinian
December 3,1991
Sports
WWII 'OBIA
NOTICE: I will pay $75 for a
Peach Bowl ticket. 1 need a t least
20 tickets. Call Billy at 756-1566.
StKH iS OflLKf n
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SER-
VICES: We offer typing and
photocopying services. We also
sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out Guar-
anteed typing on paper up to 20
hand-written pages. SDF Pro-
fessional Computer Services,
106 East 5th St. (beside
Cubbie's), Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
ABSOLUTELY PROFES-
SION ALTYPING: Fast service
and low prices! Call 321-2522
after 5 p.m.
TYPING, WORD PROCESS-
ING AND FAX SERVICES:
Fast service, low prices. Free
pick up and delivery! Call 355-
5203.
FREE HAIRCUT TO FIRST
FIVE GIRLS WHO CALL:
Regularly $7. Sketch of haircut
included Short cuts a specialty.
ay's Cuts and Styles, 355-0168.
Tease leave message.
TYPING SERVICE: Fast, accu-
rate, grammatical corrections,
copies upon request. Reason-
able rates, convenient location.
Call Angje at 756-8545 days or
753-3924after 6p.m. Leavemes-
sage.
DISi'l N ASSHifD
Rinjiyold Towers
Now Taking Leases for
1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom.
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SIKVlCftOIMKl
TYPESETTING: Resumes and
reports. Brochures and news-
letters. Call 752-0833 or 830-
9090. Ask for Lisa.
NEED PAPERS TYPED? Fast
service, low prices. Call Julie
355-2583 8-4 p.m 830-3874 af-
ter 4 p.m.
FOK RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: for spring semester.
Non-smoker to share 2 bed-
room bathapartment.$15750
and l2utilitiesand cable. Have
1 cat-no more pets. Call 355-
1644.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP: Non-smoker, $115.00
13 utilities, 112 from cam-
pus, on ECU bus route. Call
758-8652 anytime.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: Private balconv bed-
room, Wilson Acres. 1 I utili-
ties and rent. Free cable. Dish-
washer. Need for second se-
mester or sooner. 758-5262.
ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT: Eastgate; new; can catch
ECU bus to school; J ohn Pardue
752-2142. Available Dec 17.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share a 2 bed-
room apartment with 2 girls.
Fully furnished. Across the
street from campus at Regency
House. $130 a month plus utili-
ties. 758-8272.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to
take over a room in 3 bedroom
apartment at Plantation. Call
321-1969.
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Fregnancy Center
7S7-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
A Hcauliful Place to Ijc
�All Ncv
�And RcaJ To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMKNTS
2899 E Sdl Strrcl
�Located Near ECU
�N � Majof Shaping Centers
� V: si From Highway 1'atro! Station
Ufer � $330 a month
Contact J.T. Of Tommy Williams
756-7S15 or 830-1937
Ofticc open - Apt. 8. 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Ckn and quiel uric bedroom furnished ajwtmri
er-erjjv efT. inK, free mtfn �r.d �etcr, �tiher, drwrs,
cable TV. CtMpie or sir.gjei itJv. S240 a munth. 6
nwiruh !eje MOB Bit HOME RENTALS Wf-M �
tk g;r� ArMrsnen!�JkirrxjbUehv�ncin Ax�ie� Garden
new Brouit Vtl'cy Country Cub.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7813
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library ol Information In U.S.
19.273 TOPICS - ALL SUBJECTS
Oraer Cala.s; To2ay wix VISA. MC or COD
H 800-351-0222
Of Run S2 DO to Research infofmacn
H322 iaao Ave �?06-A Lo� Angekr CA 900?5
COUPON
Our Gift To You - Now Thru Dec 14th
Must
present
this
coupon
20 OFF
ANY ONE ITEM IN OUR STORE!
(EXCLUDING VIDEOS)
Christian Bookstore
300 PLAZA DR - BEHIND PEPPI'S
IOK K! i
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to
share 2 bedroom apartment.
$113.34 rent 13 electricity. 3
blocks from campus. Mostly
furnished. Dishwasher and free
cable. Call Susan at 757-0329.
WANTED: Female roommate
to share apartment at Wilson
Acres. 14 of rent and utilities.
Will have own bed room. Please
call for more information. 757-
0458.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED ASAP: 2 BR, 1 12
bath townhouse. Dishwasher
and laundry. On bus route.
Great location. Call 321-1560.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED FREE rent, utilities,
cable in house, near campus in
exchange for careattendant ser-
vices. Will provide own room.
NO experience necessary. Avg.
worktime 10 hr. week Call 752-
1932 for details Available Jan.
8. Ask for Courtney.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: 3
bedroom, 212 baths, fireplace.
Small pets allowed with pet fee.
Security deposit required.
Available Jan. 1, 1991. $590.00
per month. 355-5079.
FOKSALE
GILBERT'S MUSIC: offers
20 discount to ECU students
and faculty - 40 off non-
stocked items. Musical instru-
ment repairs of all tvpes. 2711E.
10thSt.757-2667.
FOR SALE: Nice 2 bedroom1
bath mobile home set up in a
quiet park close to campus.
Washerdryer, AC, 2 sheds.
Was $3,500 Reduced to $3,000.
Call 1-919-423-6090.
1982 YAMAHA MAXIM: Ex-
cellent running condition.
Lookssharp, too! Astealat$700.
Call Greg at 830-9131.
79 CHEVY WAGON: 350, V-
8. Must sell now $500 or best
offer. 756-7493. Ask for Andy.
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats,4
wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available vour area
now. Call 805-682-7555 ext. C-
5999.
REPOSSESSED AND IRS
FORECLOSED HOMES:
availableat below market value.
Fantastic savings! You repair.
Also S&L bailout properties.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. H-6314.
FOR SALE Cobra Radar De-
tector, all bands, just bought.
Paid $110.00, will sell for $60.00.
Call 931-8815, leave message.
1983 FORD ESCORT: $1400 or
best offer. New timing belt, new
water pump, good condition.
Relocating. Call: 551-2745. 8
a.m5 p.m.
MERCEDES 240D: High mile-
age. Extremely dependable and
very safe. $500 firm. Call Amy
at 758-8395.
FOR SALE: 1984 Ford Tempo.
AC, AMFM, cruise, 86,000
miles, excellent condition inte-
rior and exterior. $2300.00. Call
757-3711 Leave message.
STUFF YOUR: PIRATE fan's
stocking with an ECU carflag!
One for$9 and two or more for
$8 each. Don't delay. Call 830-
3691.
WWIi )
FUNDRAISER: We're looking
for a top fraternity, sorority, or
student organization that
would like to earn $500-$1500
for a one week on-campus mar-
keting project. Must be orga-
nizecfand nard working. Call
Jo Ann or Pam at 1-800-592-
2121.
MAKE $500-51000 WEEKLY:
stuffing envelopes at home.
Start now! Rush S.A.S.E. plus
$1.00 to Home Employers, 2301
Kent 8 Las Cruces, NM 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED
IMMEDIATELY! No experi-
ence necessary. Process FHA
mortgage refunds. Work at
home. Call 1-405-321-3064.
HELP WANTED: Morning
hours only apply. Apply in per-
son at Carpet Bargain Center at
1009 Dickinson Ave.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers
and cruiseships. Students also
needed Christmas, spring and
summer for amusement park
�mr�lnvmenr. Callflrfi-ff?-7W
ext. F-3464.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. P-3712.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assemble products at
home. Call toll free. 1-800-467-
8585 ext. 5920.
FREE SPRING BREAK VA-
CATION: Organize a group,
earn commission and free trips!
Call: 1-800-826-9100.
GREAT HOLIDAY JOB OP-
PORTUNITY: Going home for
the holidays? Need a fun part-
time job? The Honey Baked
Ham Co. is in search ofseasonal
help to fill our sales, counter
ana production positions. We
have stores located in the fol-
lowing markets: Greenville,SC,
Columbia, Charleston, Knox-
ville, Raleigh, Durham,Greens-
boro, Winston Salem,
Wilmington, Charlotte, Atlanta
and other major cities through-
out the southeast. Please stop
by during your Thanksgiving
break to inquire about Christ-
mas help. Check the white pages
for information on the store
nearest you.
SPRING BREAK: Bahamas
Party Cruise $279! Panama City
$99!5. Padre$199! Cancun$469!
Jamaica $399. Jasa 758-5165,
Georgia 931-9363, Jeff 830-5367,
Wayne and John 757-1369.
TRAVEL SALES REPRESEN-
TATIVE STS, the leader in col-
legiate travel needs motivated
individuals and groups to pro-
mote winterspnngbreak trips.
For information call Student
Travel Services at 1-800-648-
4849.
PAINTERS NEEDED: Need
PART-TIME SECRETARY
NEEDED: Malefemale. Flex-
ible hours. Will work with
student's schedule. Call be-
tween 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on
Wednesday, Dec. 4 thru Mon-
day, Dec 9 to set up interview.
PFKSOSAIS
SPRING BREAK '92: You've
only got one week to livc.so
don't blow it! Make it Jamaica
with low, low prices starting at
$429 Call Sun Splash Tours 1-
800-426-7710.
$200 REWARD: for any infor-
mation leading to the recovery
of a red, white and blue '89
Honda CBR 600 motorcycle.
Stolen from Tar River Apart-
ments. Call 752-1217.
JEN THOMPSON: You did an
AWESOME job on the formal.
Though we don't say it enough,
we DO appreciate all the great
work you do for us. There will
never "be another like you! We
will greatly miss your warm,
loving personality. Love al-
waysTPi Delta.
PI DELTA PLEDGES: Thank
you so much for the great song
you sang for us at the formal.
Wp Iovp yrwi InK rhp �ic�orc
FOUND: Golden lab puppy.
Near 1st Street Sunday morn-
ing, 1124. Call 758-6788.
ALPHA XI DELTA: Would like
to thank Cathy Hill and Melisa
Mrozek for the great job they
did on cocktail! We love you
guys! Libos.
ALPHAXIDELTA: Would like
to wish a Happy Birthday to the
following sisters and pledges
who have birthdays in Novem-
ber: Ashlee Barnes, Christy
Coggins, Heidi Hicks, Kim
Iannuzzo, Angela Smith,
Audrey Weathers, Julie
Vanderburg, Dede Folck,
Louisa Lewis, Jennifer Stewart.
MOM, DAD and SHANER I
dun come home early to be with
ya'll 1 was tired ot seeing to-
bacco and this thieving hall. I
was ready for the beach and all
its fun! I was ready for home
food and Boca sun! 1' m glad 1
was home, but now I'm rack.
I'm studying hard. My finals
attack. Love, the kid.
RIDETOTHE PEACH BOWL
with Pirate pride! Buy your ECU
car flags today. One for $9 and
two or more for $8. Call now
830-3691 and leave message.
CONCERNED ABOUT
YOUR FUTURE? Will some
uncertain future income pay all
of your certain future bills?
Maybe we can help. Free confi-
dential consultation. 355-3789.
DON: I'm sorry I kept waking
you upyesterday. I knowyou're
not having a good week, but
cheer upI still wuv you
bunches. If you ever need to
talk, 1 will be there for you. Just
take things "Day by day Re-
member? Hugs forever,
Jellybean.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN fe HOW
accepting applications fbr the
following positions: Managing
Editor, News Editor, Sports Edi-
tor and Entertainment Editor.
Applications may be obtaihed at
THE EAST CAROLINIAN In the
publications building across from
gsonj.
Buy your car "
830-3691.
Bu
�njanuary i, I
flags today.
Call
CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Line Ads:
For 1 st 25 words:
Students$2.00
Non-students$3.00
(five cents for every word after 25 words)
Pisplay Ads:
Open Rate per
column inch$5.50
Please notify the paper immediately if your ad is incorrect We will not
be responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publishing. All
classified ads must be pre-paid. We reserve the right to reject any ad for
libel, obscenity andor bad taste.
DEADLINE:
Friday, 4 p.m for Tuesday issue and Tuesday, 4 p.m.
for Thursday issue.
Announcements
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS PEC, 4-7
Wednesday, Dec. 4�School of
Medicine and School of Music
Concert Series, "Seasonal Cel-
ebrations Symphonic Wind
Ensemble, William W.
Wiedrich, Conductor (Brody
Auditorium of School of Medi-
cine, 1230p.m free). Wednes-
day, Dec. 4�Joel Mauger, gui-
tar, senior recital (Retcner Re-
cital Hall, 7 pjru, free); Thurs-
day-Saturday, Dec. 5-7-nMad-
rigal Dinners, Charles Moore,
director (Mendenhall Student
Center, 7 p.m. tickets required-
call 757-4788 for information).
Dial 757-4370 for the School of
Music's 24-hour "Recorded
Calendar
NATIVE AMERICANS
The final meeting of the Fall
1991 semester wiff be Wednes-
day, 9:15 p.m. in MendenhalL
The meeting will be held in
rooms 8C-D-E. Please come and
invite a friend.
ATTENTION ALL
FMA MEMBERS
FMA Christmas party at the Fizz
on December 4,5:30 p.m. Don't
miss it!
STUDY ABROADEX-
CHANGE PROGRAMS
With Christmas break ap-
proaching, now is the time to
bring home some information
on an exchange for next aca-
demic year or a semester! This
is your chance to take courses
that you may not be able to get
at ECU. Why not spend an ex-
citing semester or year at one of
overlOO colleges or universities
in the US or in over 65 coun-
tries and earn credit towards
graduation. Don'tmiss your op-
portunity to see new places,
travel and take on new chal-
lenges. If you have a GPA of 15
or better, you can pay ECU tu-
ition and study out of state or
out of the country! There is a
simple application procedure
which will be explained at a
seminar on Wednesday, Dec. 4,
4 p.m. in 1001 GCB. If you can-
not attend the seminar, contact
Stephanie Evancho in Brewster
A-117,757-6769 for an appoint-
ment. DO IT NOW!
SUMMER
STUDY ABROAD
Are you interested in a summer
session in Costa Rica, France,
England or another country?
Come to the study abroad semi-
nar on Wednesday, Dec 4, 4
p.m. in GCB 1001 and learn how
Sou can participate in one of
tese exciting programs! If you
are unable to attend the meet-
ing, you may contact Stephanie
Evancho in International Aca-
demic Studies in Brewster A-
117,757-6769 for further infor-
mation. Now is the time to act!
Last meeting of the semester.
Possible guest speaker. Today!
5 pan. in room ON 109 of the
Science Complex
MATH CLUB
The ECU Math Club will be
having their next meeting on
Wednesday, Dec. 4 at 3 p jrt in
Austin 203. All interested stu-
dents and faculty are invited to
attend!
PRE-PHYSICAL
JHERA
will have
El
The pre-P.T. club will have if s
second organizational meeting
Tuesday, Dec. 3, 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Room 221. An ad-
visor will be present to answer
questions about applications to
the School of Physical Therapy.
NEED A JOB THIS
cruit others interested in cam-
pus activities. ARTIST�1 posi-
tion for student illustrator. Po-
sition requires graphic devel-
opment of sports related illus-
tration for a variety of market-
ing and promotional resources.
Excellent for portfolio develop-
ment Call Jeannette 757-6387
to set up an interview. Portfolio
required at interview. Hours
vary. PHOTOGRAPHER�1
position for student photogra-
pher. Position requires black
and white developing, print-
mg,shocmg of action andteam
photos. Slide photography pre-
ferred as well as ownership of
35 mm camera with various
lenses. Portfolio requiredat time
of interview. To apply: Stop by
204 Christenbury and complete
an applications form. Or call
757-6387 for details. Self-help
and work students eligible.
SE
Se
2
Recreational Services will be
hiring for the following posi-
tions this spring.
SJIJ.P.RECS�2 positions for
commuter students interested
in marketing and promotions
of recreational programs. Per-
sons must be outgoing creative
and willing to contact and re-
PUBUCATION OF ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANY ORGANIZATION MAY USE THE ANNKDUNCEMENTS
SECTION OF THE EAST CAROLINIAN TO LIST ACTIVITIES
AND EVENTS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 2 TIMES FREE OF
CHARGE ALL ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE TO BE TYPED OR
NEATLYPRINTED. DUETOTHEUMTIEDAMOUNTOFSPACE
AVAILABLE, THE EAST CAROUNIAN CANNOT GUARAN-
TEE THE PUBUCATION OF ANNOUNCEMENTS. IT B NOT
ADVISABLE TO RELY ON THESE ANNOUNCEMENTS ASA
SCJLEMEANSOFCXDMMUMCTICN.LEADLuNESAREFRI.
DAYAT4IP0RTlJESDAYinJBUCATTONANDMONDAY
AT 4PM FOR THURSDAY'S PUBUCATION.
Things are
looking
Peachy in
Pirateland
By Michael G. Martin
Assistant Sports Editor
There are those times in life that we
say good bye. Then there are those times
we say hello.
After a lengthy break from the office
overlooking the walkway to joyner
Library, I've deeded to come home � to
my roots at ECU. Although I never left
the Emerald City (nor sdwoD, 1 have had
a little vacation fnm the pages of The East
Carolinian.
For the paper, like a npe bottle ot
brandy, 1 had to come back for a little
more of the sleepless nights, deadlines
and Pirate athletics. Much has changed.
but the heart and dedication of the staff
hasn't
So, for all of the former editors
returning for another tour of duty, it's
time to say goodbye to the old, and hello
to the new:
ECU football has shed ttV cupcake
image for that of Cinderella I at least in
the eye of the national media I. Littk
my fellow journalists know that the'
Pirates are for real, book for the tradition
of excellence to continue into the future
� so long as Bill Lewis and Co. remain in
the Emerald City.
High School football has even
improved, especially since mv alma
mater reached the stare 3A xmi-nnals. 1
have not been to a football game this vear
in which the team I was pulling for didn't
win. I've made plans to be in High Point,
N.C this weekend, Chapel Hill in two
and Atlanta on New Year's dav.
Speaking of New Year's day, hats off
to the Peach Bowl for sanctioning the
ECU-N.C State match-up. Although
another year will pass, bragging rights
will be up for grabs again. Let's just hope
the goal posts in Fulton County Stadium
(and Carter-Finley) don't fall when the
final horn sounds.
The New Orleans Saints have had a
roller coaster ride this year, but I can't
wait for the trip to Minneapolis to see
them play Buffalo.
How about the ECU swimming and
diving teams? Opening the season with
two big wins each, look for the Pirates to
finish well in the CAA standings. Matt
Lawrence seems be diving well, and on
his current pace, he should make it to the
NCAA Championships.
Pat Pierson has one tough Lady
Pirate basketball team this year. Gaynor
ODonnell, Tonya Hargrove, Mechelle
Jones and Rhonda Smith should lead the
team to the NCAA tournament in March.
Speaking of leaders, senior linebacker
Robert Jones was recently named to the
first team All-America. Look for Jones to
be drafted in the first or second round to
the NFL.
The "We Believe" has carried over to
; Eddie Payne's basketball program The
! Pirates rallied to defeat Applachian State
; in overtime Saturday night. Looks like
the "House of Payne will be a tough
place for ECU opponents to play.
1
i
Blal
Sen
and �vi
times
student
plav N
Bowl carrj
tickets
The
afternoo
the ticket
Fo
NEU'I
appear
Fame ball
The ij
than 40
Writers �
Kurd ot
make inel
plavers
Rose
ballot tori
therequirl
as an arJ
indefinite!
Ro
of tax evafl
prison
With
Rosesureil
on the nrj
timeelipl
thatdistu
Seavel
major Iea$
eligible tol
gamewinf
National L
lifetime
ADVERTISE WITH
E EAST
CAROLINIAN
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
RATES PER COtUMNJNCH
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Advertising Representatives:
Lisa Berting Beau Cannon
lim Knisety 'Richard Littiken
Andy Sutorius
Business Hours
Monday - Friday
9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
WE
BELIEVE
V
The
If you
entertaH
Pi





Sports
V WWAMinIPERSON MS
ottfz 3East (Bataiimzm
December 3,1991
IE SECRETARY
4alefemale. Flex-
Will work with
ledule. Call be-
m. and 3 p.m. on
, Dec. 4 thru Mon-
ti set xip interview.
RSONALS
LEAK '92: You ve
It- week to live .so
y. Make it Jamaica
Trices starting at
i lash Tours 1-
KD: for any infor-
to the recovery'
- te and blue '89
600 motorcycle.
IT River Apart-
'SON: You did an
3 on the formal.
t say it enough,
ve ill thp vtp11
1 nei � �. I
� ike you! We
our warm.
Love al-
EDCES: Thank
11 r the great song
is at the formal.
len lab puppy
Sunday rnorh-
758-6788.
' TA: Would like
Hill and Melisa
e great job thev
il! We love vou
ALPHA XI DELTA: Would like
to wish a Happy Birthday to the
following sisters and pledges
who have birthdays in Novem-
ber: Ashlee Barnes, Christy
Coggins, Heidi Hicks, Kim
lannuzzo, Angela Smith,
Audrev Weathers, Julie
Yanderburg, Dede Folck,
Louisa Lewis Jennifer Stewart.
MOM, DAD and SHANER: I
d un come home early to be with
va IL. 1 was tired of seeing to-
bacco and this thieving hall. I
was ready for the beach and all
its fun! I was ready for home
food and Boca sun I' m glad I
was home, but now I'm back.
I'm studying hard. My finals
attack. Love, the kid.
RIDE TO THE PEACH BOWL:
with Pirate pnde! Buy your ECU
car flags today. One' for S9 and
two or more for 58. Call now
3 � -3691 and leave message.
CONCERNED ABOUT
YOUR FUTURE? Will some
uncertain future income pay all
of your certain future bills?
Maybe we can help. Free confi-
dential consultation. 355-3789.
DON: I'm sorry I kept waking
vou upvesterda'y. Iknowyou're
hot having a good week but
cheer up I still wuv you
bunches. If you ever need to
talk will be there for you. Just
take things "Day by day Re-
member? Hugs' forever,
Jellybean.
AST CAROLINIAN is now
.ing applications for the
ing positions: Managing
News Editor, Sports Edi-
id Entertainment Editor.
:atior,s may be obtained at
AST CAROLINIAN in the
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:RTUESDArSPUBUCATION AND MONDAY
fURSDAY'S PUBLICATION.
Things are
looking
Peachy in
Pirateland
By Michael G. Martin
Assistant Sports Editor
There are those rimes in life that we
sav good bye. Then there are those times
we say hello.
After a lengthy break from the office
overlooking the walkway to Joyner
I ibrary, I've decided to come home � to
my roots at ECU. Although I never left
the Emerald City (nor school), I have had
a little vacation from the pages of The East
Carolinian.
For the paper, like a ripe bottle of
brandy, I had to come back for a little
more of the sleepless nights, deadlines
and Pirate athletics. Much has changed,
bat the heart and dedication of the staff
hasn't
So, for all of the former editors
returning for another tour of duty, ifs
rime to say goodbye to the old, and hello
to the new:
ECU football has shed the cupcake
image for that of Cinderella (at least in
the eye or the national media). Little do
my fellow journalists know that these
Pirates are for real. Look for the tradition
of excellence to continue into the future
� so long as Bill Lewis and Co. remain in
the Emerald City.
High School football has even
improved, especially since my alma
mater reached the state 3A semi-finals. I
have not been to a football game this vear
in which the team I was pulling for didn't
win. I've made plans to be in High Point,
C. this weekend. Chapel Hill in two
md Atlanta on New Year's dav.
J
Speaking of New Year's day, hats off
to the Peach Bowl for sanctioning the
ECU-N.C State match-up. Although
another year will pass, bragging rights
will be up for grabs again. Lef s just hope
the goal posts in Fulton County Stadium
and Cartcr-Finley) don't fall when the
final horn sounds.
The New Orleans Saints have had a
roller coaster ride this year, but 1 can't
wait for the trip to Minneapolis to see
them play Buffalo.
How about the ECU swimming and
diving teams? Opening the season with
two big wins each, look for the Pirates to
nnish well in the CAA standings. Matt
Lawrence seems be diving well, and on
his current pace, he should make it to the
NCAA Championships
Pat Pierson has one tough Lady
Pirate basketball team this year. Gaynor
CDonnell, Tonya Hargrove, Mechelle
lones and Rhonda Smith should lead the
team to the NCAA tournament in March.
Speaking of leaders, senior linebacker
Robert Jones was recently named to the
first team All-America. Look for Jones to
be drafted in the first or second round to
the NFL.
The "We Believe" has carried over to
Eddie Payne's basketball program. The
Pirates rallied to defeat Applachian State
in overtime Saturday night. Looks like
the "House of Payne" will be a tough
place for ECU opponents to play.
LI
Blake earns more awards
Photo by Dail Read � ECU Photo Lab
Senior quarterback Jeff Blake was recently named the ECAC Player of the Year
and will play in the Japan Bowl. Blake was the ECAC Player of the Week five
times this season.
Defense reigns as Pirat
roll past Bearcats, 30-19
By Gregory Jones
Staff Writer
The ECU football team finished a very
believable regular season last Saturday,
posting their 10th consecutive win after
beating the University of Cincinnati 30-
19.
With the victory, the team became the
first ECU football team to win 10 games
and will have an opportunity to make the
new record eleven games, when they
travel to the Peach Bowl on New Year's
Day.
The Pirates arrived in the Queen City
with a guarantee of post season play in
Atlanta. Thus, the game offered this team
the title of the best football program in
ECU's history, as well as providing some
added respect from the national media.
In short, the Cincinnati win was for
all the bragging rights.
Standing in the way of that title and
needed respect was the University of Cin-
cinnati Bearcats, themselves looking to
end the season with an upset of a nation-
ally ranked team.
The game was much tighter than
might have been predicted, perhaps be-
cause of a lack of focus generated by
Peach Bowl mania. The Bearcats had two
weeks to prepare for the Pirates and they
spent their time wisely.
A crowd of over 8300 ventured to
newly refurbished Nippert Stadium on a
(AP) � About 1,000 East Carolina
students who want to see their Pirates
play North Carolina State in the Peach
Bowl camped out so thev could get game
tickets.
The students pitched tents Sundav
afternoon in front of Minpes to wait for
the ticket window to open Monday
Charles R. Bloom, ECU sports infor-
mation director, told The News & Observer
of Raleigh that about 23,000 orders were
received for the 20,000 tickets distributed
to the university.
The ECU athletic department has al-
lotted 4,000 of those tickets to students.
Students were worried that tickets to
the New Year's Day contest in Atlanta
would elude them as Pirate Club mem-
bers with big checkbooks snapped up
thousands.
"I'll be confident when I have the
ticket in my hand in the morning said
Lori Jessup of Pilot Mountain.
The Pirates' 10-1 record, bowl bid
Former Cincinnati stars top
Baseball Hall of Fame ballot
Rose fails to make list
cold and wet Saturday to watch the Pi-
rates and Bearcats battle it out.
The Bearcats scored first with a 18-
yard field goal in the first quarter. The
Pirates did not respond until the second
quarter with a 13-yard touchdown pass
from Jeff Blake to Luke Fisher. This set the
stage for a close game, giving the Pirate
defense the responsibility of protecting
the lead and winning the game.
In the third quarter, Cincinnati's run-
ning game continued to pound away at
the Pirate defense. The Bearcat offense
proved itself to be a formidable oppo-
nent.
UC'sredshirt freshman running back
Small ran for 131 yards in 25 carries for
the game. The Bearcat passing game had
also found its niche. Quarterback Lance
Harpthrew 18-32-4 fora totalof 283 yards.
As what has become a tradition for
the 1991 Pirates, the game came down to
the fourth quarter. And this time the Pi-
rate defense took control ensuring the
victory.
ECU led 21-19 with 1:50 remaining in
the game. The Bearcats had possession of
the ball and started to drive. Defensive
End Jerry Dillon intercepted Harp's pass
and ran it in for a touchdown, securing
the game for ECU.
The defense struck again with a 1:05
remaining by tackling David Small in the
end zone for a safetv, making the final
score 30-19 ECU.
e woodwork
and lofty ranking in the polls has the
university and town seeing purple and
gold.
The team's slogan "1 Believe" is ev-
erywhere � on buttons, shirts and signs.
"Unbowlievable is the way a motel
marquee put it.
See Peach, page 8
NEWYORK(AP)�Thirty-six names
appear on this year's baseball Hall of
Fame ballot, none of which is Pete Rose.
The list was mailed Friday to more
than 400 voting members of the Baseball
Writers Association of America, whose
board of directors vote-d in February to
make ineligible for the ballot any former
players banned from the gamt
Rose would have qualified for the
ballot for the first time this year, meeting
the requirement of five years' retirement
as an active player. But he was barred
indefinitely from the game for gambling
in 1989.
Rosewasconvicted the following vear
of tax evasion and served five months in
prison.
With an all-time record of 4,256 hits,
Rosesurely would have gone into the hall
on the first ballot. Now, only one first-
time eligible, Tom Sea ver, is likely to earn
that distinction this year.
Sea ver, a 311-game winner with four
major league clubs, is among 18 players
eligible for the first time. He was a 20-
game winner five times and holds several
National League records, including most
lifetime strikeouts by a right-hander
(3,272) and most years with 200 or more
strikeouts (10).
Another newcomer to the ballot, Tony
Perez, also could receive substantial sup-
port. Perez had a .279 lifetime batting
average for 23 seasons and had 100 or
more RBI seven times. He had 1,652 RBI
in his career.
The other newcomers on the ballot
are Dusty Baker, Vida Blue, Cesar Cedeno,
John Denny, Ken Forsch, George Foster,
Bobby Grich, Toby Harrah, Dave
Kingman, Dennis Leonard, Garry
Maddox, Ben Oglivie, Bill Russell,
Gorman Thomas, Pete Vukovich and
Steve Yeager.
Seaver, Perez and Foster all were
teammates with Rose at Cincinnati.
One of the 18 holdover candidates,
Rollie Fingers, who holds the major league
record with 341 career saves, missed elec-
tion by only 42 votes.
The other holdover candidates are
Dick Allen, Bobby Bonds, Ken Boyer,
Orlando Cepeda, Curt Flood, Jim Kaat,
Mickey Lolich, Bill Mazeroski, Minnie
Minoso, Thurman Munson, Tony Oliva,
Vada Pinson, Ron Santo, Rusty Staub,
Luis Tiant, Joe Torre and Maury Wills.
Making the move
RtoPtNKo
ECU running back Cedric Van Buren has bowled over opponents in the 1991
season, amassing 480 yards of total offense and four touchdowns.
CAROLINIAN
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
RATES PER COLUMN INCH
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Advertising Representatives:
Lisa Berting Beau Cannon
I'm Knisefy �Richard LHt&en
Andy Sutorkts
Business Hours
Monday - Friday
9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
WE
BELIEVE
WE BELIEVE! !
Register for 2 FREE tickets to the
Peach Bowl, New Year's Day!
(No purchase necessary.)
Drawing to be held Monday, December 16th.
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for staff writers.
If you are interested in sports, news or
entertainment, come by our office in the
Publications Building or call
757-6366
for more information
SPRING BREAK VACATIONS
CANCUN FROM $434 PER PERSON (4 TO A ROOM)
) AM AIC A FROM $444 PER PERSON4 TO A ROOM)
Includes : Nonstop roundtrip air from Charlotte or Atlanta, seven night hotel
accommodations, al hotel taxes, service charges and departure taxes,
welcome party and many extras!
ORLANDO OR PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
FROM $119 PER PERSON (4 TO A ROOM)
lncludes:��yjen nights hotel accommodations, all hotel taxes and service
charges, welcome party and many extras!
Some restrictions apply. Book early! Prices increase $30 per person
January 1, 1992!
1-800-752-1139
Travel for less.
FUUSCTVC1TRHV1LI
1101 Charles Bv4, CrwnvUle, NC 2785
752-1663
FAX 919-752-1139





8 �f)c �uBt(�arultntan
December 3, 1991
Faulk, Klingler set NCAA records despite losses �
��-�������� ���������� ���v
(AP) - Although their teams
lost, S.ui DtegO State's Marshall
Faulk And Houston's David
Klingler t�Hk individual honors
faulk became the first fresh-
m in to i apture the national nish-
and scoring titles when he
gained 154) ardson 27Cannes in a
. loss to top ranked Miami on
i.rd.iv
I le finished the regular sea
son with a s 7 yard rushing av
;e compared to 154.4 tor ron-
up Vaughn Dunbar of Indi-
ana. Faulk, who missed three
games with an injury, also scored
23 touchdowns and a two point
conversion to edge Michigan's
Desmond 1 toward tor the scoring
championship
"I proved 1 could do it against
an) body Faulk said. "I'm proud
ot myscH but 1 would havehecn
happier with a victory against
Miami
Klingler threw tor 533 yards
and six. touchdowns, and set 11
moreNC lAArecordsin I louston's
5246 loss to Texas Tech. Klingler
closed his college career with a
total of 54 records, but the Cou-
gars finished with a disappoint-
ing 4-7 mark.
"it didn't go the way we had
planned he said. "But what I'm
going to remember about this sea-
son a long time from now is that
this team never quit
In other games, third-ranked
Ik trida beat No. 5 Florida State 14-
9, No. 8 Alabama defeated Au-
burn l3-6,No. 10Tennessee routed
Vanderbilt 45-0, No. 13 Clemson
downed Duke 33-21, No. 18 Notre
Dameoutlasted Ha wait 48-42, No.
23 Tulsa edged Southern Method-
ist 31-26 and No. 24 Georgia beat
Georgia Tech 18-15.
At Miami,GinoTorretta threw
for a school-record 485 yards and
four TDs as the Hurricanes beat
San Diego St. 39-12.
The Hurricanes (11-0), who
will play Nebraska in the Orange
Bowl, maintained their hold on
the top spot in AP poll.
my
MQIN mi us SIM � i fl lO
Mil IMI � I. I U I" Ml I i� V
CRABS, I MMKM's y �� k. �J
( OMMWIION V llutttl.t.1

1HJKS & Whl) oniaH
M1YHNlM'KMMKv JI2.95
752-3172
I IKE Ol IS WKItiH
Mon -Ihurs.
4 30 9 00 10th St. Exl
vii-k-rM�sl'�c j .
1K01 r, SHRIMP &0V Mr RH NILS
� $4�5 � UTTH Fl.Ot MiriR - 55.V
i.)iji� �u mv.ut QIn junti.i i ?j
A tin iL ilr?33 OYSTER BAR OPI NS W .V�i I'M �
fU.9� A'lAB'Icrnnts Sleamed Oynter and Shrimp ft
Peach
Continued from page 7
A good chunk or the cit) s
- 0 residents are planning bus,
mr and car expeditions to At-
lanta tor the game
ackie Harberson, assistant
manager of I K, 1 ravel ("enter in
Greenville, said Pirate tans kept
five phones busy 12 hours a day
after the bowl appearance wascon
firmed
t !reen ille businessman lack
. trdssaid sportswearbusiness
haddoubkvi recently at hisdown-
town store. University Book Ex-
change,
There's a lot of what we call
sidevs aik alumni, he said They
didn t v;o to any school, but the
support the Pirates
Some sa the scl
community have benefited.
. mith, a philoso-
professor, said the su
!i has, reated a senseof
it) And, he said, athletics
. ide lessons tor people ��
� � r sports
ulie Woodring, an EC1 �
� said many people a wa) ft
� - :n illedon'f know a lot al -
udii v bother it's m
nk the whole chara t r
I ���� re : the m h
think about thesi
� - : alittlebit shesaid
Half Off!
All Frames In Stock.
I his holida) season you want to liHk our
best for all occasions. The Eye ("are ("enter
has nisi the look you wanf for halt the price!
Out awnplete inventor ol frames are now
5� olThoose from hundreds of stles
including designer and fashion frames. To
take advantage ol this special holida) offer,
visit the I -careenter and let us show you
the t'casnii uh vou'll lilu tin wa we care for
YOUI CTS
Eve (.are Center's professional
staff guarantees the best possible
care and service for you and your
family. We hope you have a happy
holiday season!
�Y�CAA�C�KT�rV
You'llLiki Tin Wa Wt Can ForYourEyes.
703 East
Greenville Blvd.
Gary M. Harris, licensed Optician
Hours:
Open Mon. & Wed. 9 to 7
lues f"hurs Fri. 9 to 6
Phone 7564204
The Florida Keys
Under $400.00.
Unbeatable
fa
f
Register beginning December 2 in
117 Christenbury Gym - The ROC.
Questions? Call 757-6911. U
DepotK of125 00 upon fgbtiaMon requited
Activities include:
� :
Cost covers
Sponsored by ECU Recreational Services
Student Union
Peach Bowl Accommodations and Ride
NURSES:
WELL PAY YOU A BONUS
We're a health care organization that appreciates
your talent and your skill. Nurses with BSNs get the
full-time pa and benefits of an Army officer plus a
$5000cash bonus!
You'll be part of a top quality health care team,
making patient care decisions that count. We
encourage and could fund your continuing education.
And we offer you opportunities for travel and career
progression.
To find out if you qualify, call your Army Nurse
Representative at:
1-800-662-7473
(Sgt. 1st Class Jacobs or Sgt. 1st Class Reinelt)
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
IE ALL YOU CAN BE
PRICES RANGE FROM FROM $59 - $92
(without ticket)
Includes round-trip bus ticket, motel room,
and ride to game.
Bus � � � it 7 a.m D M I - ets z- ore
ition, stop Dy the Central Ticket OttiCe or cail 757-4788.
Sponsored b the Student Union Travel Committee
Movies
8:00 pm Hendrix Theatre
3rd Animation Celebration
Wed Dec 4
Kindergarten Cop
Thurs Fn Sat Dec 5-7
Hunger
Sun Dec 8
Tree Trimming Party
Tonight 4pm Dec 3
Second Floor Mendenhall
(Refreshments Provided)
Sponsored by Student Union
Production Committee





Title
The East Carolinian, December 3, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 03, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2800
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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