The East Carolinian, November 21, 1991






Unfair ticket sales 4
Students get caught in the middle when buying bowl ticket!
We believe
II
The Pirates travel to Cincinnati for their penultimate win,
WWWffW.�.�o�
QJlie iEast (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.64
Thursday, November 21, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
CirculA-iOn 12.000
i2Pages
School president bans play
v PS) rhe play Acts of Passion was banned
fromappearingatMcKendrecC ollegc,achurch affiliated
institution, after President�rrit renbrink learned that
the play makes use ol strong language.
"Acts ol Passion, which consists ot three, one-a I
plavs, was to be performed by a professional acting
troupe that has been performing at the college tor years
Tenbrink felt that the play violated the college's
mission statement to support Christian values.
After hi announcement, Tenbrink's decision came
underfirefrombothstudentsandfaculty. I hesupporters
of the plav felt that renbrink had violated the First
Amendment rights to freedom ol speech, imposed his
conservative moral views on the college and limited
student access to the arts
A special committee has been formed to review the
president spolicyregardingtheuseofvulg u lai igem
a school sponsored event.
University sells property
Liberty University will be selling its North c ampus
on Nov. 21 to place the university on tinner finan
ground, according to an article in he Chompii n
North CampushousedtheSchoolOfLifeLong Learn-
ing, but LUSLL will be moving to the main campus. Hie
only thing that will be left at North Campus w
administrative services
Liberty Universit) � - �. ng $2 million a year in
principal, interest and operating costs.
The money will be redistributed to educational arras
and increase the university's financial standing.
Advice book explains classes
Students at the University ol North c aroIina-Char-
lotte can expect a booklet explaining all the details ol a
particular class bv the fall of 1992, according to an arrk le
m 77k University Times.
FheStudent Government Association and the Aca-
demic Affairs Office are sponsoring the development ol
the booklet.
The booklet will contain a detailed description i I
what each course entails for that parti ular instructor,
includinglevturest vie, numlvr of tests lass size.numlvr
of papers and a brief course description.
Society opens doors to women
(CPS) � Yale University's exclusive all-male kull
and Bones society will begin admitting women
OnOct 2 the societv's alumni voted to clear the wav-
ier the initiation of six women students who were asked
to join last May.
'I"he club initiates the 13 "best and brightest" Yale
seniors who are chosen during their junior year.
Supporters of the women said that tocontinue admit-
ting the "15 best" students, women had to be included
The Skull and Bones was one of only two remaining
secret societiesat Yale that did not admit women after the
university became co-ed in l4�iu
Student recants rape story
(01) - Texas A&M University is continuing its
investigation of its Corps of Cadets after allegations ol
sexual harassment bv several women cadets.
But one female student who said she was raped by
some male members of the corps told university investi-
gators recently thai she lied about the assault.
The university also issued a statement saying that the
committee investigating the harassment complaints had
confirmed some of the charges.
Pepsi theme hits universities
(CPS) � Don't be surprised to here the Pepsi theme
song during football and basketball games this year.
A few weeks ago, Pepsi contacted Iowa State Uni-
versity marching band director Roger Cichy and asked
him to arrange a college band version of the popular Kv
Charles jingle.
A f ter the wri ting of"Diet Pepsi Fanrare a &K-seci nd
musical piece, Cichy and the ISU band recorded the song
for Pepsi.
Now, Pepsi plans to distribute Cichy's arrangement
to college bands across the country.
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene2
Editorial4
Classifiedsf
Entertainment17
Comics10
oports11
Student Stores voices displeasure
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
Problems between the
advertisingdepartmentol I
I asl Cat Union and Mike
Coston, manager ol the Stu
dent Stores, were brought to
the attention ol the Media
board at last I hursdav 's
mcetii
"1 he meeting spurred
from a letter Coston wrote ti i
the Media Board expressing
his dissatisfaction with the
busincs � tacti s of Ti East
� � n Ac cording to
i oston, the back page ol the
I � registration magazine was
'111!
to feature hisadvertise-
persi �nto onrunit to the prime
spot
1 lowever, L niversity
book Exchange received the
spiit instead ol the Student
Storesbei ause �l a misundcr
standing at I �. Eastn lin
� � Inoston s letter to the
Media board, he mad it dear
that it the Student Stores were
a privately owned busim
Ihavi sued the pants
fhe EastCat linian
"Unlessthereare hanges
'iident Stores will See
no other recourse than to -
.��� elsewhen Costin
said.
t In � ones, Dire tor ol
Advertising .it i �. Easl u
�� sel the deiUsing
I � edures usc-d to sell th
ba k page ol the pr regi .tra
t ion magazine Any advertiser
interested in purchasing the
full page ad w ith two colors
on the ba k cover was able to
do so on a first come first scrvi
h
1 lowever, . new ad �
rising representative sold the
Student stores the back ow i
without the rivocotor require-
ment. Meanwhile, am therad
representative soki I BE the
bai kcover with the two ol r
requirement. According I
ones, the first advertiser that
mettherequirenu nl �a : BE;
therefore, he felt that lb! s
i : � rti � ment should be on
the back cover.
lories said c I St n was
k ted and madeawai
this problem 1 Eewasalsotold
that he would 1- . the
inside front cover sini � thi a I
� itive who helped
him did not tell (oston about
the two color requirement. In
I � � n t the present
pr blem, stw lent tor
i. .i pnmium spit in the
magazirv yet tb . wen rv it
. remiumspol
fe Cost n '��� � itisfied
Atthemeeting lone
tinually apologia ed to'
� � the mix up, and agreed to
: ivhatevei ry to
correct the
Alexander, assistant vice-
chai
See Media page 2
Volunteers, McDonalds light up Christmas
By Angela DeRosia
Senior New S VN ritcr
"Wecouldn't possibiydo
: : � . : with �ut the I
ot thed11 Student Volunti
I : .���: sai I Ki'iii.i Britl
�. the Ronald Mel tonald
House
Britt's comment reflected
�� rts ol students in
� � classes wl w i I
Ronald Mel �
ist intl � irai inual
� nary Proji I
. uminaiA Projet I i
Rimaid Mc I �onald
1 louse's biggest annual fund
: lisei
"We .ire hoping to make
� � trem the luminai �
alt . I i itt said.
1 he 26 students involved
scooped sand into plastic bags,
added candles, bags and in-
structions uiput utgetherea h
luminary kit.
When asked why they
volunteered their time, a ma
Jones Hall
displays
tribute to
Pirates
By left Becker
st.it! Writer
A mixture ol articles,
photographs, drawings and
even a little profanity has
transformed thewallsol ones
1 kill's fourth floor into a trib-
ute to the 1991 football Pirates.
I he idea of the tribute,
which stretches across the
entire north wing, came from
fourth-floor residents Wes
Furr, osh I'otena and Chris
Starbuck. Potenza said they
thought up the idea after sit-
ting around discussing the
team's accomplishments.
"This is for the football
players Potenza said. "This
is to show them what thev
have done. It's not huge, and
there is not a whole lot up
here, but I think the players
will get an idea of how much
the school really appreciates
how well they played this year
and how we look forward to
the rest of the season
The tributeconsistsof five
sections, with each section
relating to a specific part of the
1991 season. Starbuck said if
the players walked from be-
ginning to end, they would
seo their season in review.
They will see a (review)
of the season Starbuck said.
"Then they will see them-
selves, then they will see what
thev have done and how they
did it, then they will see where
thev stand now and, finally,
See Jones, page 5
tudents men
rxj fe lii .� tl ��
feel that peo l
� � .ii nivivou- I
Moseh
. was asked to d this by
one � fi � ' I sol ameti
help out tl thei student,
. � � i Steii ' said.
����: I � � . mteerl nnie
nod I
nthenumbei �
k needed to complete
V
.
i
ly Baker
to cio all
� : � .ved OUT '
ing this year from Z
Reynolds through a $20,000
grant, I ire tor
aid �'� e re trv i
we can to ensure that the pro-
gram will K- able to keep go-
ing tor several vears and even-
tuall) becomepartol theuni-
versity curriculum.
On Dec. 7, in the
reen ille fown . ommons
Pholo by (JlMd Hornslain
These student volunteers took time from their busy schedule to help out the Ronald
McDonald House Together, they will set up roadside Christmas candles for chanty
during the Festival of Lights,
luminaries will beon sale
: fhe kit includes sand,
instructions
Each luminary is to be lit
on hristmasEve. rheproject
is in honor of all the families
who cannot be together tor
( hristmas.
i Hher upcoming projects
See Ronald page 2
Student cadets
leave campus for
instruction, eames
Photo by Colleen Haumbaugh�ECU Pholo Lab
In Memory
The recently renovated Plaza, located beside
Mendenhall. was donated by ECU'S class of '76.
Son ial to I be I .ii � arolmian
It was early, 0500 hours
and the weather was unusu-
ally mild dnd drv for It Lick
son in early November
Twenty-four teams from 20
different colleges and univer-
sities were preparing to begin
competition in the first of eight
events that would last until
sundown.
This was the Annual
Armv ROTC Brigade Ranger
Challenge Competition, and
one of the 24 teams belonged
to ECU'S own Army ROTC
department
ECU'S Ranger Challenge
Team departed campus Fri-
Jav morning, Nov. 1, bound
tor Ft. (ackson, SC. ream
members included Andrew
knell. Derrick Lewellyn
evm( amble. Paul I Vrncks,
Brian Bentlev, I odd Irvm,
Richard Ravnor, lack Corrao
and fason Weisman
The competition took
placeonSaturday,No 2 and
the events included a IT test
(push-ups, sit ups. two-mile
run), a grenade assault course
the erection and crossing ol a
one-ropebridge, M I6rifleand
Mm miachine gun assembly, a
Ii ve fire M16 rifle range, a land
navigation course, a written
patrolling test, and finally a
10km ruck-sack run.
Teams competed in each
ii the 8 events and accumu-
lated points based on how thev
finished in each event. Each
event wasgraded onaccuracy
See ROTC, page 2
Prison population under control with new additions
By Jeana Shallcross
Special to 1 he t ast Carolinian
One year ago, North
Carolina voters gave their
approval to a prison construc-
tion program, and the state-
prison system is now prepar-
ing for a period of rapid
growth.
"Early in 1992, we plan to
open a new 624-bed medium
security prison in Anson
County funded by the legis-
lature in July 1990 Aaron
Johnson, State Correction
Secretary, said in a press re-
lease. A total of SI 12.3 million
in bonds was approved this
year tor prison construction,
and thev are being drafted
now.
In fury 1990, a compro-
mise between Governor Mar-
tin and lawmakers resulted in
approval for prison construc-
tion funds and a referendum
on additional prison con-
stmction being placed on the
tall ballot Lawmakers ap-
proved $75 million for the
construction of two new pris-
ons and additional dormito-
ries at five existing prisons
Voters gave their ap-
proval for issuing up to $200
million in bonds to pay for
prisonconstTuctioncluringthe
Nov. r, 1991 elections. Law-
makers responded to the ref-
erendum bv approving$112-5
million in bonds for prison
construction at ter facing ditti-
cult budgetary times in ulv
1991. The funds will be used
to build five new prisons.
makeadditionsat tiveexisting
prisons and provide S mil-
lion for improvements in De-
partment of Human Re-
sources facilities for youth
services.
When the Lmergency
Prison Population Stabiliza-
tion Act was passed in March
1987, the prison population
was at 18,000. The number of
inmates rises as construction
provides additional prison
beds. Currently, the prison
population is at 19,646, but is
scheduled to nse Feb. 1, 1992
to 20394 and again on May 1,
192 to 20,594.
'This nse in the Prison
Cap will be a result o newly
constructed dormitories
opening to accept inmates
Joe Hamilton, Division of
Prisons Director, said. "Con-
tracts have been let and work
See Prison, page 3





2 �lic izast (Uarolintan November 21, 1991
S;ene
Media
Continued from page 1
ROTC
After-hour basketball players make
to much noise; advised to leave
Nov. IS
1150 College! lill Drive Vehicle stopped tor an illegal left turn.
Student was issued a campus citation.
1338 Music Building: Investigated a traffic accident south of
the building
1409 Move Boulevard: Vehicle slopped in the Brody Building
parking lot. Non-student issued a state citation for a sale movement
violation and failure to have insurance.
1635 Mendenhall Student Center: Responded to a minor acci-
dent west of the building
2014 ones lall: Vehicle stopped wcstofthebuildingforastop
sign violation. Student was issued a campus citation.
2025 oyner Library: Escorted a subject from the library to Slay-
Hall.
2110 lenkms.Art Building escorted a subject from the building
to Fletcher Music Building.
2114 14th Street ,md College ! till Drive Vehicle stopped for
speeding, he student was issued a campus citation.
222t -Cotton! lall: Responded to a report of a harassing phone
call.
2247 NinthStreet:Respondedtoareportofasubjectwithguns
on campus. Same was unfounded.
0009 -Fletcher Hall: Checked out a report of subjects having
weapons on campus Subjects were identified as students. Noac tion
was taken.
0250�Allied 1 lealth Building. Vehicle stopped in order to check
on the well-being of the passenger.
Nov. 19
0923 ECU Student Stores: Investigated a report ol larceny.
Campus citation (administrative arrest) issued for larceny.
0945 Riird and Reade streets: Investigated a report of larcem
from a red 1 oyota truck in the parking, lot.
1220 Brod) Building: Investigated a report of larceny of license
plates in the parking lot north of the building.
1659 MemonalCAmnasuinv AsMtedinarescueatthebuildmg
The subject was transported.
1738 Belk ! lall: Checked out a report of subjects) soliciting.
Subjects gone on arrival.
2134 Fletcher Music Building: (Jbserved a vehicle speeding
south Ol tin building. Same was Stopped al Wendy's parking lot.
Student was given a verbal warning.
221; arvis Hall: Vehicle stopped south of the building for
spei lii . StudenI was given a verbal warning.
224.i liege Hill Drive: Issued a campus citation to a student
for a skateboard violation.
� 25 Belk 1 lall: Responded toa report ol a disturbance east o(
the building Subjects playing basketball after hours wereadvised to
leave the area.
Crime Scene is taken from official Public Safely logs.
expressed that in the future.assoon
as a client seems interested in the
back cover the advertising repre-
sentative should call to let The East
Carohraan know so thisproblem will
not happen again.
On theadviceof Earl McAuley,
chairman of the Media Board, and
Alexander, TheEasl Carolinnin and
Student Stores will meet t( see it the
problem can be resolved by the next
meeting so the Media Board can
decide what to il with tins situa-
tion. Following the advertising
problem, committee reports began
and everything seemed to be run-
nun; smoothly in all other areas of
the media.
Ronald
Rekayi Isley, general manager
of Expressions, announced that the
publication received anaward from
Associated College Press The
award honored the magazine with
five marks of distinction and the
honor rating of All American in the
National Critical Service of the Na-
tional Scholastic Press Association
at the University of Minnesota.
Continued from page 1
for the Ronald McDonald House
and the student volunteersinclude
gift wrappingatCarolina Bast Mall
in front (t Walden Books from
Thanksgiving until Christmas.
The wrapping will be for do-
nations.
On Dec. 8, there will be an
(teen 1 louse from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m
including appearances by Ronald
Mel tonald, Santa and Mrs. C laus.
Former ECU faculty member
Stuart Aronson will tell ahrist-
mas story, play the piano and sing
Christmas carols.
'The Ronald McDonald
1 louse was the organization I was
most interested in to do my vol-
unteer work with Penny Har-
ris, another volunteer, said.
Luminary kits can be pur-
chased from the Ronald
McDonald House as well as the
Greenville Town Commons be-
fore Christmas Eve.
Continued from page 1
of execution and time required to
complete it.
The team with the most points
at the end of the day was the
overall winner and will go on to
the Regional competition al �
Bra
It was a long da for th
dets. both physically md i
tally. And although ECU'S R i
Challenge Team didn't finish first
in the competition, the) ' I
all they had.
The team departed for 11
Sunday morning. No , and ar-
rived back on campu�
noon.
Iiwwma
This Week's Entertainment
Fri, Nov 22nd
BS&M
50 Draft
$1.00 longnecks
Sat, Nov 23rd
thc Mood
513 Cotanche
(located across from LBE)
758-0080
Hours
MonThurs. 11am- 5pm
Fri. 11 am -2am
Sat. Mpm-Jam
IF YOU PURCHASED AN
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
FROM THE STUDENT
STORES, the exam
schedule was incorrect.
Please note the correct
schedule. The schedule
is as follows:
TIME CLASS TIME AND
REGULARLY DAY OF
MEETS: EXAMINATION:
8:00 MWF8:00-10:00 Wednesday, December 11
8:00 TThj2:00-4:00 Tuesday, December 10
9:00 MWF8:00-10:00 Friday, December 13
9:00 TTh 8:00-10:00 Saturday, December 14
10:00 MWF11:00-1:00 Monday, December 9
10:00 TT11:00-1:00 Wedesday, December 11
11:00 MWF11:00-1:00 Tuesday, December 10
11:00 TTb11:00-1.00 Thursday, December 12
12:00 MWF11:00-1:00 Friday, December 13
12:00 TTrt2:00-4:00 Friday, December 13
1:00 MWF2:00-4:00 Monday, December 9
1:00 TTh8:00-10:00 Thursday, December 12
2:00 MWE2:00-4:00 Wednesday, December 11
2:00 TTh2:00-4:00 Thursday, December 12
3:00 & 4:00.MW�8:00-10:00 Monday, December 9
3:00 & 4:00 TTh8:00-10:00 Tuesday, December 10
RACK ROOM SHOES
PEACH BOWL SHIRTS
AVAILABLE IN STUDENT STORE
LADIES
Nike � LA. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Avia � Tretorn
Borelli � Rockport
Easy Spirit � Mia
Pappagallo
Etienne Aigner
Proxy � Van Eli
Joyce � Selby
Soft Spots � TWB
Dexter � Esprit
Bandolino � Enzo
Sebago � Isotoner
Impo � Sam & Libby
Regency � Calico
Maripe � Ellesse
Evan Picone
Capezio � 9 West
What s What � Onex
Westies � Calttsto
Station Six � Clarks
New York Transit
Borelli � Easy Street
White Mountain
9 & Co. Maine Woods
North Country Casuals
Daniel Green
RACK
ENTIRE STOCK
L YELLOW
SALE ITEMS
& HANDBAGS
���Register to Win
FREE
CHRISTMAS
SHOE WARDROBE
($200 value)
CHILDRENS
Nike � L.A. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Step and Stride
North Country Casuals
Hushpuppies
Osh-Kosh
MENS
Nike � L.A. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Avia � Converse
British Knights
Sperry . Sebago
Rockport . Clarks
North Country Casuals
Dexter . Woodstock
Hushpuppies � Bally
Borelli for Men
Florsheim � Cole Haan
What s What . Ellesse
Oleg Cassini
Stacy Adams
Johnston & Murphy
Ftenfcfr Shriner
Georgio Brutini
ROOM SHOES
Branded Footwear
UFO heads t LOSANCEUowardl
terious object will fly near Earth '�'�� month, and scientist I know ififsa new type of asteroid or a 20-year-old Apol ketthal past the � and is ;I he onlj asters � . hunk ol t , '�' � I aid.
� i
"Unlessthemilitar) i ai I
isn't .��don't kmn �.�� nomerBrianM rsdei director of the Internal� 1 .
a : . n'sCentra ifoi
� . � reoort. ��
� - .�

The object, estimai I I sure one yard toll . u I I- � �
one of the sm illest asteroid
- . � red, if not I
it is an asteroid a I
n astronomer it N I ��
: . �.� �
iteverit is, itw

a.m.or3a.m.P! � .
bridee.M�
FOSDICI
1890 SE.
3003 S. Evans
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp,
Deviled Crab Cakes, U Clam StH
� Small Shrimp 1 Re��sl
. at Lunch ! Dinner atl
I i2QQ I Get �t,el
I g Beverage not
I Beverage not included ! Good Monday �
� Expires: X2-21-91 Expires: 1
ible for Pnvate Cl rist
ATTIC
752-7303 1209 E. 5th St.
Thursday
PANIC
WZMB'S Christmas P
Progressive Dance R
�99� Draft
�99c Highballs
�99c Memberships
DILLON FEN
Progressive Ro
Saturday
ICE WATER MANSIOr
High Production Rock
Sunday
Dont Forget the Attics Benefit f
Greenville Homeless Shelter.
Five Bands will take the Stagt





2
die t:ai5t(�arulintan November 21, 1991
Media
Continued from page 1
ROTC
After-hour basketball players make
to much noise; advLed to leave
Nov. IS
1150 College Hill Drive: Vehidestoppedforan illegal left turn.
Student was issued a campus citation
1338 Music Building Investigated a traffic accident south of
the build
UV) Move Boulevard: Vehicle stepped in the Brody Building
parking lot. Non student issued a state citation for a safe movement
violation and failure to have insurance.
1635 Mendenhall Student Center: Responded to a minor acci-
dent west of the building.
2014 jonesl fall: Vehicle stopped westofthebuildingforastop
sign violation. Student was issued a campus citation.
2025 oyncr Library: Escorted a subject from the library to Slay
Hall.
2110 enkins Art Building Escorted a subject from mebuilding
to Fletcher Music Building.
2114 14th Stret and College 1 fill Drive Vehicle stopped tor
speeding. "he student was issued a campus citation.
222o e otton ! all: Responded to a report of a harassing phone
call.
224 NinthStreet: Responded to a report ot a subject with guns
on campus. Same was unfounded.
(X Retcher 1 all: Checked out a report of subjects having
weaponsoncampus.Subjects were identified as students. Noac tion
was taken.
0250�Allied Health Building. Vehictestoppedinordertocheck
on the well-being of the passenger.
Nov. ll
0923 EG Student Stores: Investigated a report oi larceny.
Campus citation (administrative arrest1 issued for larceny.
�; hird and Reade streets: Investigated a reportof larceny
from a red I ovota truck in the parking l�'t-
1220 - Brodv Buikiing:ln estivated a report ot larceny ot license
plates in the parking lot north of the building.
1659 Merru irialGymnasium: Assisted ma rescue at thebuilding
The subject was transported.
173s k 1 kill: Checked out a report oi subjects) soliciting.
Subjects gone on arrival.
2134 I � her Music Building I )bs rved a vehicle speeding
soutl ol th� building Same was stopped at Wendy's parking Sol
Student wa- rivena verbal warning.
221- arvis Hall: Vehicle Stopped south ot the building tor
spei g Studen was given a verbal warning.
2241 � ollege Hill Drive Issued a campuscitation to a student
for a skat ; - ti d violation.
� elk Hall: Responded to a report of a disturbance east ol
the Subjei ts paying basketbaH after hotas were advised to
leave the an
Crime Scene is taken from official Public Safety logs.
expressed that in the tuture,ussoon
as a client seems interested in the
back cover the advertising repre-
sentative should call to let The East
CarotinianlaNOw so this problem will
not happen again.
On theadviceot Earl McAuley,
chairman of the Media Board, and
Alexander, The East Carolinian and
Student Stores will meet to see it the
problem can be resolved by the next
meeting so the Media IVvird can
decide what to do with this situa-
tion. Following the advertising
problem, committee reports beg in
and everything seemed to be run-
nine, smoothly in all other are
the media
Ronald
Rekayi Isley, general manager
ot Expressions, announced that the
publication received anaward from
Associated ollege Press 1 he
award honored the magazine with
five marks ot distinction and the
honor rating ot All American in the
National - ritual Serviced the Na-
tional S holistic Press Association
at the University ot Minnesota.
Continued from page 1
tor the Ronald McDonald House
and the student volunteersinclude
gift wrappingatCarolina East Mall
in front of Walden Books from
Thanksgiving until Christmas.
The wrapping will be tor do-
nations.
Cn Dec. 8, there will be an
Open I louse from2p.m. to5p.m
includingappearancesby R �:
M! 'onald. Santa and Mrs.( I
Former ECU faculty men
Stuart Aronson will tell a Christ-
mas story, play the piano and
Christmas carols.
"The Ronald McDonald
1 louse was the oreanizatii n I
most interested in to do my vol-
unteer work with Penny Har-
ris, another volunteer, said.
Luminary kits i an be pur-
chased trom the Ronald
McDonald House as well as the
Greenville Town Commons be-
fore Christmas Ev
Continued from page 1
of execution and mm required to
complete it
The team ith th�
at the end ot the da
overall winner and will
the Regional omp til Ft
Brag
It was a long day for th
dets, both physical!) u I i
tally. And although ECl 'sR
Challenge Team didn't fir
in the competition, th� y ga
all they had.
The team depart
Sunday morning, Nov $, ai
nved back oncampu
noon
this Week's Entertainment
Fri, Nov 22nd
BS&M
50 Draft
$1.00 Longnecks
Sat, Nov 23rd
TH� MOOD
51 Cotanchc
(located across trom L BE
758-0080
Hours
MonThurv 11am- pm
Fri. 11am-2am
s.it. Mpm-Jatn
ywv.1,
IF YOU PURCHASED AN
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
FROM THE STUDENT
STORES, the exam
schedule was incorrect.
Please note the correct
schedule. The schedule
is as follows:
RACK ROOM SHOES
TIME CLASS
REGULARLY
MEETS:
TIME AND
DAY OF
EXAMINATION:
8:00 MWF8:00-10:00 Wednesday, December 11
8:00 TTh2:00-4:00 Tuesday, December 10
9:00 MWE8:00-10:00 Friday, December 13
9:00 TTh8:00-10:00 Saturday, December 14
10:00 MWF11.00-1:00 Monday, December 9
10:00 TT11:00-1:00Wedesday, December 11
11:00 MWF11:00-1:00 Tuesday, December 10
11:00 TTb11:00-1:00 Thursday, December 12
12:00 MWF11:00-1:00 Friday, December 13
12:00 TTh2:00-4:00 Friday, December 13
1:00 MWF2:00-4:00 Monday, December 9
1:00 TTh8:00-10:00 Thursday, December 12
2:00 MWF2:00-4:00 Wednesday, December 11
2:00 TTh2:00-4:00 Thursday, December 12
3:00 & 4:0Q.MW�8:00-10:00 Monday, December 9
3:00 & 4:00 TTh8:00-10:00 Tuesday, December 10
PEACH BOWL SHIRTS
AVAILABLE IN STUDENT STORE
Nike � LA. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Avia � Tretom
Borelli � Rockport
Easy Spirit � Mia
Pappagallo
Etienne Aigner
Proxy � Van Eli
Joyce � Selby
Soft Spots � TWB
Dexter � Esprit
Bandolino � Enzo
Sebago � Isotoner
Impo � Sam & Libby
Regency � Calico
Manpe � EUesse
Evan Picone
Capezio � 9 West
What s What � Onex
Westies � Callisto
Station Six � Clarks
New York Transit
Borelli � Easy Street
White Mountain
9 & Co. � Maine Woods
North Country Casuals
Daniel Green
ENTIRE STOCK
YELLOW
SALE ITEMS
& HANDBAGS
���Register to win
FREE
CHRISTMAS
SHOE WARDROBE
($200 value)
CHILDRENS
Nice � LA. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Step and Stride
North Country Casuals
Hushpuppies
Osh-Kosh
MENS
Nike � LA. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Avia � Converse
British Knights
Sperry � Sebago
Rockport . Clarks
North Country Casuals
Dexter . Woodstock
Hushpuppies Bally
Borelli for Men
Florsheim � Cole Haan
What s What . EUesse
Oleg Cassmi
Stacy Adams
Johnston & Murphy
French Shnner
Georgio Brutini
RACK ROOM SH0BS
Branded Footwear
BUYERS MARKET � MEMORIAL DRIVE � 355-25I9
UFO heads toward
ibjed will
-

ear-okJAp
rte.
� - � . �
� � l � ' : - .
tted I

��
. ��
-
� � � .
an : �
I
� � �

FOSDIC!
1890 SE.
3003 S. Evans
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp.
Deviled Crab Cakes, ii Clam Stri
� Small Shrimp i R �J $
, at Lunch Dinner at
I 2QO I �et �tle
� ��� W 9 j Beverage not
4 Beverage not included Good Monday -
" Expires: 12-21-91 Expires: 1
ATTIC
752-7303 1209 E. 5th St.
Thursday
PANIC
WZMB'S Christmas P
Progressive Dance R
�99 Draft
�99c Highballs
�99 Memberships
I
Friday
DILLON FEW
Progressive Ro
Saturday
ICE WATER MANSION
High Production Rock
Sunday
Don t Forget the Attics Benefit f
Greenville Homeless Shelter
Five Bands will take the Stag





Che -feast (Carolinian N
21. 1991
Media
Continued from page 1
ROTC
� : �� .i .I thai in the fuhire.assoon � � riKvl
a. a i lient seems interested in the prol
ii- .iiUtTiinir. rcprc
. . ,
Continued from pa �
ns. announced that thi . � �
.�����:�� i
After-hour basketball players make
to much noise; advised to leave
n. i'
�.�. n will ti
not happ
tl a Iviceol Earl K Auley and � � I to b
�� tin� 1ili.i rd,and
isf Carol � n and
111 ii i
Ronald
i
i � �
: lid .
mteei ii lude
naFa tMall
award I
in five ma11
f All Amen

. . . � �
Continued from p
� �
: v. n
� �

: � : :
II � ' � I
will '
l 1'
jm off) � il i Safety logs.
Fri, Nov 22nd
BS&M
50 Droft
$1.00 longnecks
Sat, Nov 23rd
TH� MOOD
Hours
Sion1 Inn v 11am- 1pm
! � ' lam Jam
otdfUhl
�loiatt
'(ii;

8-0080
IF YOU PURCHASED AN
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
FROM THE STUDENT
STORES, the exam
schedule was incorrect.
Please note the correct
schedule. The schedule
is as follows:
TIME CLASS
REGULARLY
MEETS:
TIME AND
DAY OF
EXAMINATION:
8:00 MWF8:00-10:00 Wednesday. December 11
8:00 TTh2:00-4:00 Tuesday, December 10
9:00 MWF8:00-10:00 Friday. December 13
9:00 TTh8:00-10:00 Saturday, December 14
10:00 MWF11:00-1:00 Monday, December 9
10:00 TT11:00-1:00 Wedesday, December 11
11:00 MWF11:00-1:00 Tuesday, December 10
11:00 TTti11:00-1:00 Thursday, December 12
12:00 MWF11:00-1:00 Friday, December 13
12:00 TTh2:00-4:00 Friday, December 13
1:00 MWF2:00-4:00 Monday, December 9
1:00 TTh8:00-10:00 Thursday, December 12
2:00 MWF2:00-4:00 Wednesday, December 11
2:00 TTh2:00-4:00 Thursday, December 12
3:00 & 4:00.MWF8:00-10:00 Monday, December 9
3:00 & 4:00 TTh8:00-10:00 Tuesday, December 10
PEACH BOWL SHIRTS
AVAILABLE IN STUDENT STORE
LADIES'
Nike � LA. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Avia � Tretorn
Borelli � Rockport
Easy Spirit � Ida
Pappagato
Etienne Aigner
Proxy � Van Eli
Joyce � Selby
Soft Spots . TWB
Dexter � Esprit
Bandolino � Enzo
Sebago � Isotoner
Impo � Sam & Libby
Regency � Calico
Maripe . Ellesse
Evan Picone
Capezio � 9 West
What's What � One
Westies � Callisto
Station Six � Clarks
New York Transit
BoreHi � Easy Street
White Mountain
9 & Co. � Maine Woods
North Country Casuals
Daniel Green
RACK
Off
ENTIRE STOCK
DlHS
ALL YELLOW DOT
SALE ITEMS
& HANDBAGS
Register to Win
SHOE WARDROBE
($200 value)
CHILDRENS
rake LA. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Step and Stride
North Country Casuals
Osh-Kosh
MEN'S
Mke � L.A. Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Avia � Converse
British Knights
Sperry � Sebago
Rockport � Clarks
North Country Casuals
Dexter � Woodstock
Hushpuppies � Bally
Borelli for Men
Fkxsheim � Cole Haan
What's What � Ellesse
Oteg Cassmi
Stacy Adams
Johnston & Murphy
French Shriner
Georgio Brutini
ROOM SHOES
Branded Footwear
UFO heads toward Ii
FOSDICl
1890 SE
iOOi S. i v
Fresh Oysters, Floun
Deviled Cr ib e
Small Shrimp" BUY
at Lunch
$2.99
Beverage not included
I pirt s: 12 21-91
Regular SI
Dinner
Get On
Beverage no
Good v
I:pit
ATTIC
752-7303 1209 E. 5th St.
Thursday
PANIC
WZMBS Christmas Pc
Progressive Dance R
�99c Draft
�99c Highballs
� 99c Memberships
DILLON FEN
Progressive Ro
ICE WATER MANSION
High Production Rock
Sunday
Don t Forget the Attic s Benefit fc
Greenville Homeless Shelter.
Five Bands will take the Stagd
I





Won msi a 21.1991 (Bbt East tfarulintan 3
ROTC
m page 1
' to
ints
the
� �
.
o HI
JS&M
?CK Draft
)0 longnecks
o 23rd
l� MOOD
8-0080
it
ll.li
o
OK
OCK
'i
o
Off
DOT
IS
iGS
TH
CHILDRENS
Nfce.LA.Gear
Reebok � Asics
K-Swiss � Keds
Step and Stride

North Country Casuals
a aa �
Osh-Kosh
2:ci
Nfce � LA. Gear
K-Swiss � Keds
Avia � Converse
British Knights
Sperry � Sebago
Rockport � Clarks
North Country Casuals
Dexter � Woodstock
Hushpuppies � Bally
BoreNi for Men
Fkxsheim � Cole Haan
What's What � ENesse
Otog Cassini
Stacy Adams
Johnston & Murphy
French Shriner
Georgio Brutim
UFO heads toward Earth Prisons
Continued from page 1
LOSANGELES(AP) nn
terious object will fl near Earth
next month, and scientists don'l
know ifitsanew type of asteroid oi
a 20 year-old Apollo rocket that shot
past the moon and is now
home
Unlessthemilitarykri �
isn't sa ing vvedon't know
is, said jstronomer Brian M i di
director ol the International A
nomicalUnion'sCentralBun mtoi
mical relegr in rep "
agenc) for asrron - �
bje t. estimated to i ea
Mire one vard u 11 ya
one ol the sma I i
creel, if not mall I
anasteroid
an a r al t Pi
put: . -
, is underway at all seven ol the sites
or tin' nuH'ii. lu S.IK1 - ,
� . , �, ,r, , i funded as part it the- & million
1 he onlv asteioui ohereu r
tl ing closer to the planet was a JO-
foot wide chunk of reek that flew
� 00 miles from Earth Ian. 1 5,
Mai idc n said.
I ha I was less than halt the dis-
tant e between Earth and the moon
: ivas considered a "near miss"
. . tronomers.
Paul Chodas, a let Propulsion
I aboratorvaerospaceengineer,said
ili ulaHonssuggesttheobjectis
. steroid, but it may be an upper
�: �m one ol the rockets that
;enl p Ho spacecraft to the moon
68 through lw"
Somi � � those rockets were in-
� � � � rashedon themoon for
micstudies,butfourrocketsflew
. � the moon, escaped Earth's
� itional pull and started or-
I i aid
I man-made space debris
. irth themysteryobjectisin
roi '
construction program
Nearing completion is the
Brown Creek Correctional Institu
tun. a 624-bed, medium custod)
prison near Wadesboro in Anson
County. Steve Boyles has tx
named superintendentoftheprison
Boyles has already hired �0
employees for the new facility and
another 2ll will be hired before the
i-I is, m opens next spring
I he $75 million construction
programalso includes the additions
ol one 104 bed dormitory al the
C olumbusCorrectionalcenter,four
104 bed dormitories at PenderCor-
rectional Institution, two 104-bed
dormitories al the North C arolina
t, orrectional Institution for Women
and tour 50 bed d rmitorics at
Western " outh Institution
I'lie South Mountain Correc-
tional Institution near Morganton
in Burkeounry is the most com-
plex project included in the $75
million construction program.
The $285 million prison will
provide at least 48Q dose security
single cells, which is theonl) close
security prison other thanentral
Prison receiv ing funds.
The site is being prej ared tor
this prison, which may be ready to
receive inmates as early as fall of
1993.
The pns tn system hasalso been
making preparations tor the five
new prisons and additions at five
existing pnsons that will be built in
the $1125 million construction
program.
"When this construction is
completed, the state prison system
will have 21,661 beds Hamilton
said.
COUPON
! Our Gift To You - Now Thru Dec 14th
20 OFF
Must
present
H this
coupon
ANY ONE ITEM IN OUR STORE!
(EXCLUDING VIDEOS)
Christian Bookstore
300 PLAZA DR - BEHIND PEPPI'S
Tar Landing Seafoods
Resuunnt
ALL - U - CAN - EAT
FRIED SHRIMP
$6.95
(DAILY SPECIAL)
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. Evans "JSb-2011
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp, Trout,
Deviled Crab Cakes, U Clam Strips.
" " � � � T � vjV"one
� Small Shrimp � Regular Shrimp
at Lunch I Dinner at $6.50
at Lunch
$2.99
Get One Free
Beverage not included
Good Monday - Thursday
, Beverage not included
Expires: 12-21-91 Expires: 12-21-91
752-5855
ATTIC
752-7303 1209 E. 5th St.
Thursday
PANIC
WZMB'S Christmas Party
Progressive Dance Rock
�99 Draft
�99c Highballs
�99 Memberships
Friday
DILLON FENCE
Progressive Rock
Saturday
ICE WATER MANSION
High Production Rock
Sunday
Don t Forget the Attic's Benefit for the
Greenville Homeless Shelter.
Five Bands will take the Stage.
Peach Bowl Accommodations
and Ride
$59 ea. for four people in a quad room
$69 ea. for two people in a twin room
Includes round-trip bus ticket, motel room,
and ride to game.
' I AM 9 PM MON-SAT
'0AM 8 PM SOAr'
Old-Fashioned
Homemade
Ice Cream,
Yogurt & Sorbet
Open Daily
11 a.m11 p.m.
316 E. 10th St.
758-0000
Hanks Old Fashioned Ice Cream
31610th St.
Buy One � Get One
Free Mini-Sundae
We serve sood food like they used to make it in the old days, when
standards were hisher and stomachs
were bigger. Come and eat at our place
and everybody else's fast food will taste
like wimpsville.
� THE GOODFELIA'sSrriPANSyBURGER COUPON
GoodfelJct's
ORIUE-in

I
BUY ONE
CHARBROILED BASKET
GET ONE
Buv a Charbroiled Basket of your choice Steak. Steak, n
Cheese, Grilled or BBQ Chicken Sandwh served with
our usual fixinss in a basket with a senerous ptle of our
mouth-waterms batter coated fries and with thrs
coupon set another Charbroiled Basket of equal or
lesser value FREE a savmss of at least $3 29' But ptease
tell us you have a coupon when vou order Sorrv this
coupon can't be used with any other offer and ves
you have to pay sales tax on the free Basket Limit one
coupon per customer per visit
This Offer b Good Throush 123191.
'Of equal or lesser value
(At Least A $3.29 Value!)
Goodfella's
DMUC-in
Provms You Can Have It Fast, Cheap, And Good.
Goodfella's Drive-In, 711 S Memorial Drive, Greenville
Across the Street (and in another leasue) from McDonalds, Burser Kins and Wendy's
1
Enter Our Name The Fat Cook Contest
We're the only fast food place in Greenville with a fat cartoon cook for a mascot But as
of now, he's nameless Submit the winning name for our mascot and win $230 worth of
Goodfella's food and, who knows, maybe a chance for real immortality Ask for details
at Goodfella's
1W1 Goodfeiias Dnv� in





�Jte SaHt (Earoltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
W. Douglas Morris, Jr Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Matt Jones, News Editor
Jennifer Wardrep, Assistant News Editor
Matt King, Entertainment Editor
Lewis Coble, Assistant Entertainment Editor
Brian Kerns, Sports Editor
Michael G. Martin, Sports Editor
LeClair Harper, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
LARRY HUGGINS, Circulation Manager
M. CHANTAL WEEDMAN, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The Last Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information thai affects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, November 21, 1991
Students must wait for tickets
Students can buy tickets for the Peach Bowl
between Dec. 2 and Dec. 4 at the Student Orga-
nization Booth in Mendenhall. There will be a
block of seats reserved for those students.
Pirate Club members, season ticket hold-
ers, alumni, faculty and staff can buy their tick-
ets bv mail with forms that were mailed out
Nov. 18. Pirate Club members will receive the
best seats, everyone else is first-come, first-
served.
And remember, buying tickets through the
school allows ECU to receive some of the pro-
ceeds.
This cannot be the best system for selling
Peach Bowl tickets.
Already, many students have been rush-
ing to Ticketron booths to buy their own first-
come, first-served tickets. And the seats are not
bad, so far.
However, by Dec. 5, those seats will prob-
ablv be in a section where students will have to
duck to avoid Atlanta air traffic as well as hav-
ing to carry plenty of Kleenex to stop sudden
nose bleeds.
Many students, perhaps correctly, have hit
the panic button, fearing a sell-out of the student
seats, or a chance that they might miss the three-
day ticket-buying window. What difference if
ECU is missing a few dollars if they can see the
game?
By waiting until Dec. 2 to begin selling
student tickets, the university has forced stu-
dents to decide between risking a poor seat and
supporting the school, or ensuring a good seat
now.
Although it may seem self-serving, it would
be idiotic not to take the safer route and buy
from Ticketron.
According to the N.C. State box office,
students tickets for the Peach Bowl have been on
sale since Monday.
There is no good reason for ECU to wait 15
days to begin selling tickets to students. The
only conceivable reason is if the block of tickets
reserved for students will be decided by the
number of tickets left after the Pirate Club mem-
bers, season ticket holders, alumni, faculty and
staff have theirs.
In anv case, students must decide whether
to trust the university, or buy from Ticketron
now.
Ticketron may need to hire help.
Tue E.C.L. TUfrtMTs'
Zl�W AT
Re:ach BoJu
f&�KKfl4(
Letters to the Editor
School should
learn how to
spend money well
To the Editor.
1 am writing in response to Ms.
Metzler'sSept. 17 letter to the editor in
which she trashed John Carter for ex-
pressing his dissatisfaction with the
preferential treatment of the ECU ath-
letes living on the first and second
floors of Scott Hall. Well, now it's my
turn to express dissatisfaction with
the misuse of money involving athlet-
icsat thiscollegeand with Ms. Metzler.
Let me first explain that 1 have
noangerormalicetoward theathletes
themselves. 1 have a gTeat apprecia-
tion for their talent and I wish them
luck in every game. Each time 1 see a
guy in a 'TEAM mc T-shirt, I realize
that he is a normal person with nor-
mal thoughts, emotions, strengths and
weaknesses. I also realize that the guy
in that TEAM me" T-shirt is worth
no more or no less to this campus than
a long-haired barefoot student bal-
ancing those sticks on the campus
mall while wearing a tie dye.
Th� wise senior, Ms. Metzler,
informed us that football players de-
serve all the goodies they get. And
damn it, she's right. But, they deserve
it no more than anyone else, if some
guy on the first floor of Scott Hall
automatically receives a new mattress,
then why on earth should a fourth
floor student have to travel down the
stairs and beg for one? And gee.
wouldn't itbeniceif people who work
their way through school could all
register on the first day of registration
so that they could all escape from
classes by 2 p.m. and get a decent job
with a steady schedule?
It's true that athletics bring
bucks to this school. But, this school
gives bucks back � in scholarships,
books and housing money Isn't that
enough? Do they really need movable
furniture to take along for the free
ride? After all, aren't those big bad
athletes here for an education like the
rest or us? Ms. Metzler claims that
those renovations in Scott were "pos-
sibly done for recruiting purposes If
ECU can't attract decent athletes on
educational merits alone, then per-
haps this university should start pour-
ing money into new professors in-
stead of renovations in the first two
floors of Scott Hall. And, if ECU can't
recruit anymore ball players, then we
can fill those beautifully renovated
rooms in Scott Hall with students who
excel in other activities�like academ-
ics. Maybe they can wear shirts that
say "KNOWLEDGE me" or "Justifi-
cation for an Education C.
But how about we just persuade
the maniacs in power at this school to
use the money to benefit everyone
instead of just a chosen few? How
about we get a few more professors
and a few more library books? How
about a nice new parking deck that
accommodates stickers of �U colors?
I'll even voteforfootball-shaped park-
ing stickers. How about air cond ttion-
ingforAycockand Jones? How about
p�.�")Z2.
CUMKS
AGRICULTURE
On The Fringe
ECU much better than that school
By Tim E. Hampton
Editorial Columnist
KALFIGH � Jav. Jack and
jimmv all attended that school which
rheycontend is really a reputable uni-
versity offering degrees in Utter Sci-
ence and I'igology.
My three friends eventually
graduated trom thit supposed insti-
tution of higher learning, but then
again theonly graduation requirement
vva. reciting the ABCs. All three barciy
passed the test; they all stumbled over
theE, Cand theU.
And in 1987 all three were re-
allv poor sports about the Pirates'
smashing of that university's football
team field and several fences, road
signsand apartment buildings Not to
mention the toilet paper rolling of the
sacred bell tower or the stealage of
eight hotdogs trom the Hillsborough
Street Fast Fare.
All three said Pirate fans were
a maniacal group of beer-turgid psy-
chopaths who pillaged their red and
white fief and directed lewd looks at
their women.
But that was four years ago. The
image of East Carolina University has
changed dramatically. Joyner Library
is now utilized for research purposes
instead of being a primary pick-up
pint Thanks to the "Campus Beauti-
fication Plan Part VI �the Invasion of
the Green Trucks students now
amble on brick walkways instead of
mud paths.
Of course there are problems �
like Doughnut Gate and the yet to be
uncovered misuse of state vehicles
tentatively duped "Chew Gate" �
but overall the university has begun
to blossom.
With excellent academic pro-
grams in Medicine, Nursing, Business
and of course English, ECU is "upand
coming" (sorry for the pornographic
cliche).
Still it is difficult to convince
Jay, Jack and Jimmy that ECU is any
different. Then I explained that Pi-
rates no longeT feast on opponents'
goal posts, we tear down our own.
And with an emphatic "dammit I
exclaimed we have a perfect right to
be a maniacal group of beer-turgid
psychopaths � the Pirates are 9-1.
Because ottheireducation, there
was no comprenda. Maybe thai uni-
versity did not teach Jay, Jack and
Jimmy any of the finer arts.
Finer arts like: images of a
Blakian poem, a rainbow spiral on a ;
deep fade to the corner ot tfu i
one Or the electrical intensit)
Johnsonianpicceentitled "High,
of Neon Dion Or the powerful
moving orchestration ot a Jo; i
concerto in DDDDD minor,aUed
where to Run '
Sure Jay. Jack and Jimrm
dissect a pig blindfolded, but the)
have no couth, no culture Their n
terv of the English language includes
phraseshke: "Hell, Yeah" and V
said K-Marts" (not K-Martt "has I
special for99-cent" (instead of cents:
And all three would pick KFC over
chicken cordon bleu in a h
terol heart beat
All three guys took their high
school prom dates to Quincy'j AD
three took a required course at Art
university entitled: "Barnvard Hv-
giene: Whattodo wuhthedroppings
And of course, all three now work ill
convenience stores.
Final note on the putting sur-
face: slamming fans ot thai university
could go on tor rages, so in the inter-
est of saving newsprint, which in turn
saves trees, I'll j I lowed Coach Lewis's
fine lads do the maiority of the slam-
ming.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Term limits will not help fix Congress
a free weekend bus service for those
intoxicated ECU students celebrating
their latest team win? How about
equality between athletics, academics
and student life?
No one student or group of stu-
dents on this campus deserves more
benefits than any other. I don't give a
damn if they play football, kick soccer
balls, dribble basketballs, fingerpaint
or strum Jim Croce in front of the
student store. They all contribute to
this university and they are equally
important. Hurrah for uniqueness.
Hurrah for diversity. Get it?
Perhaps certain groups on this
campus will always receive preferen-
tial treatment, just because a few-
higher-ups think that sports are more
important than art, music or academ-
ics. It's the way it is. It's the way it
goes. It's not the way should be.
As far as Ms. Metzler is con-
cerned, I won't be as rude to her as she
was to that not-so-fresh man student
John Carter. If I were, I would instruct
her to remove her head from one of
the seven orifices of her body or put
her head back into one of those ori-
fices or whatever. I just can't bring
myself to steal something so tasteless
But. do-ask that she open her eyes.
And hey, sinccshe is the secretary of
Scott Hall and a big senior, maybe she
can help John get a new mattress �
oh, yes � and get someone to fix his
door.
Cathryn Yeomans
Senior
Psychology
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Term limitsarealmostcertainly
unconstitutional, but that's not the
reason they're a bad idea. They' realso
undemocratic, but that's not the rea-
son they're a bad idea, either.
They're a bad idea because they
cannot reasonably be ex peeled to work
as advertised, and they will probably
do more harm than good. What's
more, they're a waste of effort; the
time, energy and money that gets
dumped into term-limit efforts could
be better employed reforming the sys-
tem in other ways
Todetermine whether term lim-
its would be likely to work � that is,
whether instituting term limits would
result in our having higher-quality
Congresscritters � let us first con-
sider the only term limit the Constitu-
tion presently provides for: the
Twenty-second Amendment. That
amendment limits presidents to two
terms (and, revealingly. President
Reagan was always opposed to it).
The Twenty-second Amend-
ment � a dart belatedly aimed at
Franklin D. Roosevelt � was ratified
in 1951. So we need only ask whether
the presidents America has elected
since 1951 have been better than the
presidents we had before.
The quick answer is that post-
1951 presidents have not been an im-
provement on the pre-1951 presidents;
in fact, they have pretty clearly been
worse. American presidents before
1951 were a mixed bag�sure, we had
Washington and Jefferson and Lin-
coln, but we also had Harding and
Garfield and Fillmore (well, that last
one's a cheap shot). But the presidents
we've had since 1951 have been a
downward trend: Eisenhower,
Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon (twice!).
Ford (who, to be fair, was not elected
to the job). Carter, Reagan, and now
What's-his-name.
You may disagree about the
relative merits of the more recentpresi-
dents, but, even allowing for the small
sample size and the unavoidably sub-
jective nature of the comparisons, it's
indisputable that the Twenty-second
Amendment has not improved the
quality of our presidents. And there's
absolutely no reason to believe that
Congressional term limits would have
any more substantial effect.
So if term limits won't provide
us with higher-quality legislators,
what other purpose might they serve?
Sherry Bockwinkle, leader of Wash-
ington state's LIMIT (the largest and
best-known organization pushing
term limitations),claims that term lim-
its would providethe voters with more
choice.
That's about par for
Bockwinkle's reasoning powers. Was
there really no discernible difference
between Jesse Helms and Harvey
Gantt? Was there no distinction be-
tween David Duke and Edwin
Edwards? Those elections may not be
typical, but few contests are as moot
as Bockwinkle seems to think � once
you have taken the time to find out
what the candidates really stand for,
and what their records really are.
Term-limit proponents like
Bock winkleargue that the voters want
more choice, that the reason voters
don't vote is that the two major parties
offer indistinguishable candidates. But
they don't put that assertion to the
simple and obvious test: all the term-
limiters need to do is to offer their
own candidate, one who clearly pro-
vides voters with a choice.
The would-be term-limiters
have done a pretty good job of raising
money, so they can't refuse to proffer
their own candidate on the grounds
that campaign costs would be pro-
hibitive. If voters really want choice,
the term-limiters can provide it.
What's more, their candidate would
doubtless voluntarily leave office af-
ter a specified time, perhaps two terms,
to make way for a new Congresscritter.
And, naturally, the term-limiters' can-
didate would rigorously eschew the
use of franking privileges and other
Congressional perks.
What prevents LIMIT and other
groups from running their own
grassroots candidates, apart from a
misguided belief that it makes sense
to prevent voters in a democracy from
being able to vote for the candidates
they want? (Also apart from the fa
that their main source of funding a
pair of rich Republican oilmen �
LIMIT'S support is hardly as mud
from the "grassroots" as thev claim
It must be their other misguided be
lief, that Congress has made it virtu
ally impossible to beat an incumbent
in an election.
It is true, as LI MIT-type groups
complain, that Congresscritters regu-
larly and hypocritically exempt them-
selves from theirown legislation They
grant themselves all kinds of perks, a
few sensible, most ludicrous. More to
the point, they've given themselvest
franking privileges, television stud iosJ
and all kinds of other things designed.
to help themselves get re-elected �
That's a genuine problem Bum
term limits aren't a sensible solution
If franking privileges give incumbents
an unfair advantage, get rid ot th�
franking privileges. Once such untaifr
advantages have been eliminated. badj
incumbents will (theoretically) M
thrown out and good incumbents wiljf
remain, as they should.
Congress's re-election mecha�
nismscanonlydothemsomuchgood
The main reason so many badj
Congresscritters are re-elected (and�
re-elected and re-elected) is that theij
constituents don't have a sufficiently
strong sense of civic responsibility tap
cast an informed vote. Most voting
age adults don't bother to vote at all
informed or not.Those whodotrudg
into the polls have, for the most panV
swallowed whole the lies and halfj
truths served upby TV campaign ad
they can't be bothered to seek out thd
truth.
As longas America's voters cant
so little about doing what it takes tj
ensure a good government, they �n
not get a good government, term lirnj.
its or no term limits.
People get pretty much the kin
of government they deserve And slac
voters deserve cynical, pork-ban
legislators.
No system of government cai
be perfect. Ours certainly is not. Bu
we don't have to screw it up eva
worse. Term limits are no solution �
our problems.
9
Something Fish-y
Stanley Fish, an acclaimed lit
English and law at Duke, will speak to I
ot the General Classroom Bu I
renown for his reader-response tfu
SPRING BREAK
CANCUN FROM $434 PER
JAMAICA FROM $444 PER
Includes : Nonstop roundtrip air from Chark
accommodations, al hotel taxes, service c
welcome party and many extras!
ORLANDO OR PANAMA Cl
FROM $119 PER
Includes: Seven nights hotel accommodatic
charges, welcome party and many extras1
Some restrictions apply. Book early' Prices if
January 1, 1992!
1-800-752-1139
Travel foi
BTRRVIELEXI
w
WAN
� Self Stal
� High Energy
Exceptional Leadership
� Service Oi
For
The Student Committee ChaiMEle
Student Homecoming Committee
function under the auspices of the
Committee. This position is highlj
Application forms are available
Mendenhall Student Center. Please
a letter detailing your involvemei
here at ECU by 5:00pm, Tuesday,
Information Desk, Mendenhall Stu
candidates will be interviewed by
Tuesday, December 3, 1991 a
information, contact J. MaJ
Peach Bowl
Package A: Two night bus package ded
M 420 Dec. 31 and returning Jan
Quad Oce
inmidtown Atlanta.
Package B. One night bus package ded
$9750
Quad Occ
Package C
$27000
Quad Occ
Dec. 31 and returning after
die Days Inn in midtown M
One night with Charter Air!
at Howard Johnson Plaza In
Leaves December 31, Retui
(Package C With Nikko Hotel, Add '
Air Onlv - From Kinstonj
Hotels (
Starting At $75 Per Night
PACKAGES INCLUDE: �
3. Quixote Travi
4. All ground tra
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOVN
T I
QUIXOTE T
'757-0234
319CotancheSt.
1-800-846-6158
GREE!






wk -
fGZCULTUKB
han 7rtf school
er Hammer
ra on a
the end
t of a
z Kts
rful a nd
nesian
o-
can
� i � ey
� mas-
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� is a
i'S- l
high
Hv-
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ity t
turn j
wis's (
ilatn- J
I
i
j
help fix Congress
he tact
f funding is a
men
. is much
. . iaim.)
ther i . . ed be-
ide it virtu-
� n umbent
� . �. � group!
� tters rcgu-
.1 .11 mpl tht-m-
ition TheV
esg
u
pme to find
fine voters wax l
reason voters
to maior parties
candidates. But
pssartion to the
st all the term-
o otter �
eai � pro-
It
term-liir
job ot raising
Jtuse to proffer
n the grounds
Iwould be pro-
llv want choice,
in provide it
ndidate would
leave office af-
laps two terms,
Jongresscntter.
ltmiters'can-
sly eschew the
eges and other
llMITand other
g their own
a par i from a
ii makes sense
Bmocracy from
Ithe candidates
ill 1 A perks, a
tlud rous More to
e given themselves
studios,j
?hert! � gs designed
�elected. L
problem. Bu
i � le si lutionjf
'�� . veincumbents
idvai tage get rid of thar
rivileges. Once such unfaifr
'��� t e i m i na ted, bacjj
theoretically) ge(
� dg odincumbentswiM
uld. �
� gress s re-election mecha
nismscanonlvdothemsomuchgood
n reason so manv bad!
The ma
Coneres;
rs are re-elected (and
re-eiected and re-elected) is that theiaj:
constituents don't have a sufficiently;
strong sense of civic responsibility tor
cast an informed vote. Most voting-
age adults don't bother to vote at all
informed or not Those whodo trudge
into the polls have, for the most part�
swallowed whole the lies and halfj
truths served upby TV campaign ads�
they can't be bothered to seek out th�J
truth.
i
Aslongas America's voters caref
s little about doing what it takes trf
ensure a good government, they wilS.
not get a good government, term linvj
its or no term limits.
People get pretty much the kind
of government they deserve. Andslad
voters deserve cynical, pork-bar
legislators.
No system of government cad
be perfect. Ours certainly is not. Bt
we don't have to screw it up eve
worse. Term limits are no solution I
our problems.
November 21. 1991 al?c East (Carolinian 5
Jones
Photo Courtesy Duke University
Something Fish-y
Stanley Fish, an acclaimed literary theorist and professor ot
English and law at Duke, will speak today at 4 30 in Room 1031
of the General Classroom Building. Fish, a literary theorist, is
renown lor his reader response theory
Continued from page 1
they will seeanencouragementand
a surprise
According to Potenza, a few of
the football players already come
up to view the tribute.
"They really appreciated it and
thought it was a great thing to do
he said.
Starbuckand Potenza said they
wanted people to stop bv and con-
tribute to ha; thev startec.
"We have been thinking itvut
putting u? another section tst for
tans Potenza said. 'Tnev x�uki
put anything they want like 'We
believe' or 'Go ECU Anything they
would like to sav
Ibget there, walk through Jones
1 lall's front door and take the first
left. Continue to the end of the hall
until you reach a set of stairs.
Follow the stairs to the top of
the hall, and voila:a tribute to what
may be the greatest football season
in ECU'S history.
SPRINC BREAK VACATIONS
CANCU N FROM $434 PER PERSON (4 TO A ROOM)
JAMAICA FROM $444 PER PERSON4 TO A ROOM)
Includes : Nonstop roundtrip air from Charlotte or Atlanta, seven night hotel
accommodations, al hotel taxes, service charges and departure taxes,
welcome party and many extras!
ORLANDO OR PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
FROM119 PER PERSON (4 TO A ROOM)
Includes: Seven nights hotel accommodations, all hotel taxes and service
charges, welcome party and many extras!
Some restrictions apply. Book early! Prices increase $30 per person
January 1, 1992!
1-800-752-1139

Travel for less.
TRHVELEXPRE5S
FULL 5CQVICE TDfJVEL QCSEriCV
1101 Charles Blvd. Gitcnviilf, NC 27838
7521663
FAX 919-752-1139
WANTED
� Self-Starter
� High Energy Individual
� Exceptional Leadership & Organizational Skills
� Service Oriented
For
The Student Committee Chair-Elect to work with the 1993
Student Homecoming Committee and oversee the entire
function under the auspices of the ECU Homecoming Steering
Committee. This position is highly visible and prestigious.
Application forms are available at the Information Desk,
Mendenhall Student Center. Please return the application and
a letter detailing your involvement in student organzations
here at ECU by 5:00pm, Tuesday, November 26, 1991 to the
Information Desk, Mendenhall Student Center. The top three
candidates will be interviewed by the Steering Committee on
Tuesday, December 3, 1991 at 4:00 pm. For further
information, contact J. Marshall at 757-4711.
Harris feeler
HARRIS TEETER HitAHS
101V PklCiSl
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I Whole Ham
v Peach Bowl Specials
Package A:
$142oo
Quad Occ
Package B:
$9750
Quad Occ
Package C:
$27000
Quad Occ
Two night bus package departing Greenville 7:00 am
Dec. 31 and returning Jan. 2. Two nights at the Omni hotel
in midtovvn Atlanta.
One night bus package departing Greenville 7:00 am
Dec. 31 and returning after game on Jan. 1. One night at
the Days Inn in midtown Atlanta.
One night with Charter Air from Kinston, includes one night
at Howard Johnson Plaza International in Downtown Atlanta.
Leaves December 31, Returns January 1.
(Package C With Nikko Hotel, Add $35)
Air Only - From Kinston $250.00 Per Person
Hotels Only
Starting At $75 Per Night In Downtown Atlanta
PACKAGES INCLUDE: I. Hotel accomodations for selected number of nights.
2. 13 sales tax.
3. Quixote Travel escorts for entire trip.
4. All ground transfers.
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT RATES � CALL FOR FULL DETAILS
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REDUCED
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Prices Effective Through November 27, 1991
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Wed November 27, 1991 in Greenville Stores Only.
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers We Glodly Accept Federal Food Stamps.





Classifieds
5Hj� lEaBt (Carolinian
November 21,1991
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SER-
VICES: We offer typing and
photocopying services. We also
sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out. Guar-
anteed typing on paper up to 20
hand written pages. SDF Pro-
fessional Computer Services,
106 E. 5th St. (beside Cubbie's),
Greenville, NC 752-3694.
ABSOLUTELY PROFES-
SIONALTYP1NG: Fast service
and low prices! Call 321-2522
after 5 p.m.
TYPING, WORD PROCESS-
ING AND FAX SERVICES:
Fast service, low prices. Free
pick up and delivery! Call 355-
5203.
FREE HAIRCUT TO FIRST
FIVE GIRLS WHO CALL:
Regularly S7. Sketch of haircut
included. Short aits a special tv.
lav's Cuts and Styles, 355-016'8.
Please leave message.
TYPING SERVICE: FasUccu-
rate, grammatical corrections,
copies upon request. Reason-
able rates, convenient location.
Gill Angie at 756-8545 days or
?3-3924 after 6 p.m. Leave mes-
sage.
TYPESETTING: Resumes and
reports. Brochures and news-
letters. Call 752-0833 or 830-
9090. Ask for Lisa.
NEED PAPERS TYPED? Fast
service, low prices. Call Julie
355-2583 8-4 p.m 830-3874 af-
ter 4 p.m.
FOR RENT
A Beauuful Place 10 Live
�All New
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Umitcd Offer � S330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8. 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quet one bedroan fumuhed aparnner.ta.
encrg affii ionKi free w Wm mi ae�er. �a�Sen, drwi.
cable TV Cutriei or lir.gica trJv. S240 a mocah. 6
momh has MOB1LK HOME RENTALS c-�jpiea tx
1. ci Apar3Tcnlaiaim.btiehomejinAulcaGanlena
near Brook Vdta Camtn Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: for spring semester.
Xon-smoker to share 2 bed-
room, 1 bath apartment. $157.50
and 1II utilitiesand cable. Have
1 cat-no more pets. Call 355-
1644.
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for
1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FOK REV
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to
share 2 bedroom apartment.
$215 rent electricity. 1 12
baths, washer dryer, fireplace.
Graduate students only. 756-
1699.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: for spring semester
to share 3 bedroom house close
to campus. $154.34 and 1 3utili-
ties. Have a dog. Call 830-1674.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP: Non-smoker, $115.00
13 utilities, 112 blocks from
campus, on ECU bus route. Call
758-8652 anytime.
SUBLET: 2 bedroom duplex, 1
block from campus, completely
furnished. Dec. 28-Aug. 5 or
portion thereof. $325 monthlv
plus utilities and deposit. Ref-
erences required. Call 830-9125.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: for spring to share 2
bedroom apartment. 5 12
blocks from campus, $150.00
rent, 12 utilities, no pets, no
children. Call 757-1372.
WANTED: Female roommate
to share 3 bedroom house w3
other students. 3 blocks from
campus. $137.50month. 14
utilities. Call Kristen at 752-8112.
WALK TO CAMPUS: 1 Mode
from ECU. Spacious home
available Dec. 1. 4 bedroom, 2
12 bath, central air, washer
dryer. No pets. 758-7515.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: Private balconv bed-
room, Wilson Acres. 1II utili-
ties and rent. Free cable. Dish-
washer. Need for second se-
mester.
ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT: Eastgate; new; can catch
ECU bus t o school; J ohn Pa rd u e
752-2142. Available Dec. 17.
MATURE, RESPONSIBLE
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
needed immediately. Must be
quietand respect privacy. Share
12 low rent and utilities. 758-
2893.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: tosharea 2 bedroom
apartment with 2 girls. Fully
furnished. Across the street
from campusat Regencv House.
$130 a month plus utilities. 758-
8272.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to
take over a room in 3 bedroom
apartment at Plantation. Call
321-1969.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
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I-OKSAIE
GILBERT'S MUSIC: offers
20 discount to ECU students
and faculty - 40 off non-
stocked items. Musical instru-
ment repairs of all tvpes. 2711 E.
10th St. 757-2667.
FOR SALE: Nice 2 bedroom1
bath mobile home set up in a
quiet park close to campus.
Washerdrver, AC, 2 sheds.
Was $3,500 Reduced to $3,000.
Call 1-919-423-6090.
1982 YAMAHA MAXIM: Ex-
cellent running condition.
Looks sharp, too! A steal at $700.
Call Greg at 830-9131.
FOR SALE: Airline ticket, one
wa v, Greenville to Los Angeles.
$150. Confirmed for Dec. 16 but
valid through Dec. 31, except
some holidav blockout dates.
Call 830-9125.
FOR SALE: Brand new, never
used. Nishika 35 mm 3-D cam-
era, case, flash. $175 or best of-
fer. 752-5663.
FOR SALE: Snake ball python.
50 gallon tank. Many accesso-
ries. Great disposition. 757-1018.
Ask for Rob.
SEGA GENESIS FOR SALE:
Three weeks old, with extra con-
troller, stereo hookups, seven
games. $500 value only asking
$350. I'nce negotiable. Call 758-
5354. Ask for Lew.
79 CHEVY WAGON: 330. Y-
8. Must sell now $500 or best
offer. 756-7493. Ask for Andy.
SEIZED CARS: trucks,boats,4
wheelers, motorhomes, bvFBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area
now. Call 805-682-7555 ext. C-
5999.
REPOSSESSED AND IRS
FORECLOSED HOMES:
available at below market value.
Fantastic savings! You repair.
Also S&L bailout properties.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. H-6314.
HELP WANTED
EXERCISE INSTRUCTORS
WANTED: Part-time. Hours
vary. For more information,
contact Kathleen Shank 758-
6892. Greenvi lie Recreation a nd
Parks Department.
FUNDRAISER: We re looking
for a top fraternity, sorority or
student organization that
would like to earn $500-$ 1500
for a one week on-campus mar-
keting project. Must be orga-
nized and hard working. Call
Jo Ann or Pam at 1-800-592-
2121.
MAKE $500-$1000 WEEKLY:
stuffing envelopes at home.
Start now! Rush S.A.S.E. plus
$1.00 to Home Emplovers, 2301
Kent 8 Us Cruces, NM 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED
IMMEDIATELY! No experi-
ence necessarv Prrvpsc pha
mortgage refunds. Work at
home. Call 1-405-321-3064.
PART-TIME SALES
EARTHSAFE: Sell to residents
and businesses for reevde pick-
up. Sign up 10 and earn $100
cash. Call 758-9411 for Cliff.
HELP WANTED: Morning
hours only apply. Apply in per-
P WASTED
son at Carpet Bargain Center at
1009 Dickinson Ave.
PART-TIME: Light manual
labor stuffing delivery bags.
Easv work, good pa v. 6-10 p.m.
each night. Gall 757-1040. The
Valve Hanger.
N.S.A.P. SEEKS CAMPUS
REP 4 hours per week. Great
pav. No selling. Call Aaron 1-
800-284-3842.
FREE TRAVEL Air couriers
and cruiseships. Students also
needed Christmas, spring and
summer for amusement park
employment. Call 805-682-7555
ext. F-3464.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE:
Manvpositions. Great benefits.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. P-3712.
PERSONALS
SPRING BREAK '92: You've
only got one week to liveso
don't blow it! Make it Jamaica
with low, low prices starting at
$429 Call Sun Splash Tours 1-
800-426-7710.
DELTA CHI: We're looking
forward to tonite at Sharky's.
Be ready to have an awesome
time. Pf Delta.
MIKE AND ALLISON: Con
Satulations on your new baby
v. best wishes and love, n
Delta.
TO MY HOT BABY: Happy
Birthday! 1 love you with all my
heart. Love always. Poo.
ZEBRANKENKO MOUN-
TAIN BIKE: stolen from
George to wne Apartments.
Royal blue men's frame with
gold tire rims and gold handle
bars. Left hand break broken. If
seen call 752-2254.
$200 REWARD: for any infor-
mation leading to the recovery
of a red, white and blue Vv
Honda CBK 600 motorcycle.
Stolen from Tar River Apart-
ments. Call 752-1217.
ATTENTION ECU STU-
DENTS: Aloha Phi is hosting a
campus wide tashionshow. The
show will be held Saturday,
Nov. 23 at 3 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium. Tickets are $2 and
all proceeds are going to the
heart foundation. For further
information, contact 757-0494.
Pf KS( ;i S
BUFFY: Congratulations on
winning the contest! For the first
time I'm glad I was the loser! So
don't deny it, because on behalf
of evenone that knows you
"We Believe (You know the
rest.) Love, Nacho.
AOPI: Sorry for the delay. We
are still recovering. Had a great
time at the Fizz last Thursday.
Hope to do it again soon. Love,
Phi Psi's "Gys9,
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA,
THETA CHI, ALPHA SIG
AND SIG NU: Thank vou for
all vour help at dinner. Keep up
the good work and we look
forward to seeing vou next se-
mester. Thanks again. Love, the
Zetas.
TONOLANDJIMANDTIM:
Thank you for your time and
effort coaching our soccer team.
We couldn't have done it with-
out you. Love, the Alpha Phis.
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES: We
can't wait for the fashion show.
You all are doing an incredible
job and we are very impressed.
We love you! Your Alpha Phi
sisters.
SIGMA PIS:Thepre-dowtown
last week was a blast. Let's get
together again soon. Love, tne
Alpha Phis.
ALPHA PHI SOCCER PLAY-
ERS: Congratulations on win-
ning the championship! You
plaveda great game. Love, your
sisters and pledges.
ALPHA PHI VOLLEYBALL
PLAYERS: Keep up the good
work. You are doing a great job.
CkkxI luck in the "semi-finals.
Love, the Alpha I'hLs.
HEY, HEY EC: I feel sorrv for
the goal posts in Atlanta. Con-
gratulations Bill Lewis and the
mighty Pirates - Rack the Pack
and paint the peach purple!
CELESTE RESLL There's no
doubt about it. I know I've been
blessed to have a big sis who is
truly the best! Thanks for mak-
ing'mv pledge period a blast!
Love always, Jodie.
CONGRATULATIONS: to
Coach Lewisand the ECU foot-
ball team for getting the Peach
Bowl Bid! Well be there to sup-
port vou against the Pack! Good
luck! Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
Entertainment
SPRING BREAK '91: Guaran-
teed lowest prices to Cancun
and Bahamas. Call Scott or
Paulfor more information at
752-6681.
ANNOUNCING: the 1992 Ex-
ecutive Council of Sigma Pi
president�Jim Chiperfield,
vice-president � Steve
Campbell, treasurer�Shane
Ray, secretary�Andy Kunz,
alumni�Steve Eikenberrv, his-
torian�Fuller Reeves. 'Con-
gratulation guys.
TO THE LADIES OF ALPHA
PHI: Glad you enjoyed the pre-
downtown. Hope todo it again.
The brothers of Sigma Pi.
BOWL TRIP: Includes party
ride in bus and 2 nights in Holi-
day Inn. $79 from Greenville
$69 from Raleigh. Call Fred
Jones 1-800-849-2511.
CENK: Dinner was incredible
and the flower will never die
Later was more exciting. But
lefs save that for another time!
However, if you think months
1 and 2 were good, vou ain't
seen nothin' yet! Thank vou for
making evervmoment the tru st
"memorable moment. I love
you, Lauri.
DON TETER: Happv 21st
Birthdav! I hopeyoucan handle
vour presenfHiigs and kisses
SPRING BREAK Bahamas
Parts' Cruise$279' Panama Citv
$99! S. Pad re199! Ca ncun S
Jamaica $399! Jasa 758-5165,
Georgia 931 -9363, Jeff 830-5367
Wayne 757-1360.
CONGRATULATIONS: to
the ECU Pirates for an awe-
some win over Virginia Tech:
CONGRATULATIONS: to
the ECU Pirates who are on
their wav to the Peach Bowi to
plav the "Wolf pack!
TOTHE LILSISTERS:of Delta
Zetas: thanks for a wonderful
xMardi Gras Party with the
Kappa Sigs.
KAPPA SIGS: Thanks formak-
ing the Big SisUttle Sis of
Delta Zeta a lot of fun.
KIM: I wanted vou to know-
that I love vou for being mv best
friend and for just being you
All mv love, Marc.
peach purple in At-
ari. 1,1992!
Announcements
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS NOV. 20-25
Wednesday, Nov. 20�ECU
Symphony Orchestra, Robert
Hause, Conductor (Wright
Auditorium, 8:15 p.m free).
Thursday, Nov. 21�Angela
Burns, voice, senior recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 p.m
free); and Concert BandSym-
f)honic Wind Ensemble, Wil-
iam Wiedrich, Conductor,
(Wright Auditorium, 8:15 p.m
free). Friday�Melissa Bell,
voice, and Russell Smith, trum-
pet, senior recital (Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7 p.m free); and Jazz
Ensemble, Carroll Dashiell, Di-
rector (Wright Auditorium, 8:15
p.m free). Monday, Nov. 25�
Valanda Nelson, Dassoon, se-
niorrecitaKFletcher Recital Hall
,7 p.m free); and Bert Sullivan,
trombone, senior recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 9 p.m
free). Dial 757-4370 for the
School of Music's 24-hour "Re-
corded Calendar
EAST CAROLINA
FRIENDS
There will be a full membership
meeting of the volunteers of East
Carolina Friends on Thursdav,
Nov. 21,6 p.m. in GCB1031. All
members should plan to attend.
If you cannot attend, contact
Jennifer Hague immediately, or
call 757-6137.
TRAVEL-STUDY-LEARN
If s not too late to apply for the
National or International Stu-
dent Exchange or for one of
many study abroad opportuni-
ties! If vou are interested in pay-
ing ECU tuition and attending
one of 107 other universities
around the United States or if
you are interested in study in a
foreign country, investigate thp
many opportunities available
to you through the ECU ex-
change programs. Youmay still
apply for spring semester 1992
or go on exchange beginning
next fall. Also available is infor-
mation on numerous summer
opportunities. Visit Ms.
Stephanie Evancho in Brewster
A-117 before you leave for
Thanksgiving or call 757-6769
for a brochure and application
form this week!
STUDY IN LONDON
New opportunities are avail-
able for study in Lc idon
through the American College
in London! Fmd out about the
opportunities at a meeting with
a representative from the Col-
lege on Thursday, Nov. 21, 4
p.m. in 1009 GCB. If you are
unable to attend, please contact
Stephanie Evancho, BA-117,
757-6769 fora personalappoint-
ment to learn more about this
exciting program
INTERVIEW SKILLS
WORKSHOP
The Career Services Center will
conduct a workshop on inter-
viewing techniques on Tues-
day, Nov. 21 at 3 p.m. in the
Bloxton House. These one-hour
sessions will include guidance
on what one should do before,
during and following the em-
ployment interview. A video
and printed materials will be
shared with participants.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Persons interested in working
in summer camp are invited to
the Methodist Student Center,
Thursday, Nov. 21, 6 p.m. A
snack dinner will be provided
free of charge. The Student Cen-
ter is locatedaaossfromGarrett
Hall at 501 E. 5th St. For more
information, all 758-2030.
ECU SOCIETY OF PROFES-
SIONAL JOURNALISTS
TheSociety of Professional Jour-
nalists (Sigma Delta Chi) will
meet on Thursday, Nov. 21, 6
p.m. in GCB 2025. The guest
speaker will be a representative
of a local advertising firm. The
S3PJ is open toallinterested com-
munications students and fac-
ulty, as well as members of the
student media.
NATIVE
AMERICANS
OF ECU
The Native Americans of ECU
will be selling Indian Fry Bread
Thursday, Nov. 21 in front of
Wright Student Stores. Please
support the Native Americans
bv buying ajpiece of Fry Bread.
The cost is $1.00 for one piece or
$1.50 for two.
HONORS PROGRAM
Anyone who has completed 24
semester hours of honr; course
work with a G.P.A. of 3.4 or
bettc: vviio expects to graduate
fall semester 1991 should
present a list of classes com-
pleted to Dr. Sanders in the Hon-
ors Office, 124 Fleming Hall, by
Tuesday, Nov. 26.
tJJJWiiiittttiC
The Gamma chapter oT the
North Carolina Council of
Teachers of Mathematics will
be having their next meeting on
Monday, Dec. 2, 4 p.m. in Aus-
tin 203. All education majors
are encouraged to attend! Come
join the mamematics fun
All SOCIALTWQBKERS
All declared and intended so-
cial work majors are encour-
aged to become part of NASW.
The next meeting will be on
Monday, Dec. 2, 4:10 pm. at
Ragsdale 218. Spring semester
goals will be the mam agenda.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our last meeting this semester
is Dec 1 The time rue been
changed to 8p.m. Please bring
canned goods. Refreshments
Antenna r
Blake Bab
By Doug Morris
Managing l.ditor
Some people jus annot seem
tomakeuptheirminds�and 9
bands too.
Antenna, formerly Sway, then
Shine, then Cake, with two mem-
bers originating from Sake Babies
is one example.
John Strohrn, singer and
twist for Rake Babies, wanted I
out some songs that did 11
Babies' normal sound S
than revamp the band, he f rmed a
new one
Antenna is foi I froi
Strohm, Freda Low
Babies Vess Ruhtenb �
of Datura Seeds and mith

' 'I
� j
� �
gs,buta �
from I
Th
bin:
Studio: 15 jars & a drawing
Artist reduces v;
Gray Galler Press Release
A "tour de force" in contemp i
paintingand drawing isbeii sentedin
the nationally traveling exhibi tion
Lundim A Decade of Dm
which will be shown at the Wellinj
Cray Cillery, ECU fromXov. 19 to Dec. 13.
The exhibition of 35 oil paintings and
pastels by Seattle artist Norman Lundtn
wasorganized bv the 1 i ng Beach Museum
of Art in association with Tai Assod
International The exhibit's show ing at the
Wellington B. Grav Caller) is made pos-
sible bv underwriting from ECU Student
Government Association Fine Arts I wild-
ing Board.
A free public lecturereception with
the artist w ill be held Thursdav Nov 21 at
7p.m. in theauditonumof the Jenkins;
Arts Center.
Norman LurJin: A Decatk of I w
and Painting marks the first solo traveling
exhibition of the artist' work. Norman
Lundin has been an important member of
the west coast art communit since the
mid-hOs and during the last decade his
� '
the
-
I
ricul
formally
itv
lerri I � j
��
j
the cerebral
between nj
The a
page I
with I
Faculty artist
ECU Nevs Bureau
Eastern Europeansbelieve most
Americans are gangsters and 0OW -
boys so when an ECU artist went to
Latvia thi rail he packed h; west-
am boots and wide-bnmmed hat.
"Howdy Richard G. Sp
said, speaking politely to uneas)
passers-bv in the citv of jurmala, a
resort on the Baltic Sea. At first his
arhrcbrought drab stares, then flick-
ersof uncertaintv,and tinalK �broad-
faced gnns from a people whose
country is undergoing monumen-
tal change.
Latvia, formerly one of the So-
viet Socialist Republics,declared its
independerK
Aug
at their v.
uncen
j
month as
artists partic :
of artists bet
SJ?
He had � �
viet Artist!
artists visited L
year. An art'
part ester
Posing a
the best thine sue.
said alter return;n
will be provided.
AtticORocW
ThursdaySatur
PanicFeed
FridayChildren
Dillon Fencefeaturing
SaturdayMerch
Ice WaterSPAWf
MansionFountc
SundayYod
Homeless
Benefit
: : i
��MH






PERSONALS
1 PHA
SIG
lDTIM
Ikpi v
YBAI I

SPRINT, BREAK '91: Guaran-
teed lowest prices to Cancun
Bahamas. Call Scott or
for more intormation at
ANNOUNCING: the 1992 Ex-
ivi v ouneil of Sigma Pi:
m Chiperfield,
i d e n I � Steve
I treasurer�Shane
ndv Kunz,
� �nberrv. his-
FuUer ReevesCon-
guys
It) im l .ADIES OF ALPHA
PHtGlady vedthepre-
� ipetodoitagain.
;ma Pi
BOW1 1 Kir includes partv
� busai htsmHoli-
wm Greenville
m Raleigh. Call Fred
- K?511.
c 1 K - �. ts incredible
r � never die.
� iting. But
rtothertime!
. Kirtk months
lod you ain't
- you tor
menttnemost
ent I love
DON II If R: Happy 21st
handle
; i . ind losses.
!(, BR1 AK" Bahamas
- v . .� amaCity
5199 (ancun$469.
5 - asa 758-5165,
3, Jeff 830-5367,
60
( ONGRATULATIONS: to
r an awe-
. - trginia Tech'
ONGR ML LAI IONS: to
rates ��� ho are on
the 1 Bowl to
pact
rOTHELU SISTER&ofDeka
ks :or a wonderful
Vfar ras Partv with the
K yPASlGS:Th mksformak-
� � � ; � Sis Little Sis of
� ; � � � o: fun.
KI Nl. i . u to know
rbeing mv best
nd for just being you.
Marc

it the
le in At-
1,1992!
S
b of ECU
TV Bread
front of
?s Please
im erica ns
fry Bread,
le'pieceor
RAM
peted 24
w course
of 3.4 or
graduate
should
jses com-
itheHon-
,Hall,bv
Teachers oi Mathematics will
be having their next meeting on
Monday, Dec. 2, 4 p.m. in Aus-
tin 203. All education majors
are encouraged to attend! Come
! �;n the mathematics fun
NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION OF
au SOCIAL WORKERS
All declared and intended so-
cial work majors are encour-
aged to become part of NASW.
The next meeting will be on
Monday, Dec. 2, 4:10 p.m. at
Ragsdale 218. Spring semester
goals will be the mam agenda.
CAMMA BETA PHI
Our last meeting this semester
guui is Dec. 2. The fame has been
PCS changed to 8 p.m. Please bring
fr of the canned goods. Refreshments
uncil of will be provided.
Entertainment
5ij� lEast (Karnlinian
November 21.1991
7
Antenna rises from
Blake Baby offshoot
By Doug Morris
Managing Editor
Sane people )ust cannot seem
to make up their minds�and some
bands too.
Antenna, formerly Sway, then
Shine, then Cake, with two mem-
bers originating from Blake Rabies.
is one example.
John Strohm, singer and gui-
tarist for Blake Babies, wanted U try
out some song? that did not fit the
Babies' normal sound. So, rather
than revamp the band. he termed a
new one.
Antenna is formed from
Strohm. Freda Love, also of Blake
Babies; Vess Ruhtenberg, formerly
oi Datura Seeds and Jacob Smith
from the Strohm's home town.
Bloommgton, Ind.
Sway, their first release, is some-
what ot a mixed bag of songs. But
despite the wandering styles of the
album, it is packed with 13exo?llent
songs.
Sway, for the most part, is a
compilation oi danceable, up-beat
91 wigs, but a few songs stand out as
different from the rest.
Snakes" and "Spinning
Dreams are slow and somewhat
melancholy.
"Cast Away Demons" differs
from the band's energetic, electnc
SOond with an acoustic guitar and a
quieter sound.
The biggest oddballs on the al-
bum, however, are "Sav a Player" a
funky song that sounds 70s-ish in
places, and "Blood Red a song
that starts slow and escalates in
speed and volume to climax with a
ball of noise.
The band uses extra guitars, a
piano, an organ and violins in sev-
eral oi the songs.
The other eight songs on the
album employ an up-beat, pop
sound with lyrics that will find
themselves mumbled on the lips of
anyone who listens to the album.
"Girl Who Fell to Earth in
particular, is a toe-tapping, fast-
paced song that will lock into the
subconscious with a vengance.
Antenna is planning to tour in
order to promote thealbumand are
likelv to plav in the area.
Photo courtesy Howard Higgins
Antenna proves to be a band of many moods. The band has called itself Sway. Shine and Cake. To make
matters more confusing two of the bands' members are part of thy Blake Babies. What s in a name7
In a press release from Mam- Antenna has finished tounng. Carrbore. Mammoth also handles
moth Records, Strohm says that the The album was released by Dillon Fence, a local tavonte.as well
Blake Babies will return as soon as Mammoth Records, a label based in as Blake Babies
Makers of L. A. Law
deliver new legal drama
Studio: 15 jars & a drawing, 1987 Six Jars, Table and Drawing.1986
Artist reduces variable to increase effect
Crav Gallerv Press Releaf
A "tour de force' m contemporary
painting and drawing is being presented in
the national! v traveling exhibition, Norman
Lundin: A Decade Drawing and Painting,
which will be shown at the Wellington B.
Gray Gallery, ECL fromW v. 19 to Dec. 13.
The exhibition of 35 o paintings and
pastels by Seattle artist Norman l.undin
wasorganizedbv the Long Beach Museum
of Art m association with Tai Associates
International. The exhibit's showing at the
Wellington B. Grav Gallcrv is made pos-
sible by underwriting from FCU Student
Government Association Fine Arts Fund-
ing Board.
A free public lecturereception with
the artist will beheld Thursdav, Nov. 21 at
7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Jenkins Fine
Arts Center.
Norman Lundin: A Decade of Drawing
and Painting marks the first solo traveling
exhibition of the artist's work. Norman
Lundin has been an important member of
the west coast art community since the
mid-60s and during the last decade his
work has been increasingly ehi ited Jii
collected across the country. A master ot his
medium, heuses trad ltionaltechniquesand
representational forms to explore light.
space and atmosphere and through them
the very nature oi drawing and painting
itself.
losine lanco-Starrels, curator ot the ex-
hibition, has selected 35 oils and pastels
from American public and private collec-
tions with a concentration on Lundin's re-
cent work Starrelssaid.
"The work elicits resonances oi par-
ticular significance quite apart from their
formallvand technicallvaecomplished qual-
ity.
The images Lundin creates inhabit a
terntorybetween Vermeerand Male itch�
a sort oi psychic space between superb
realismandexquisiteabstraction�between
the cerebral and the emotionally charged�
between reason and sensory perception
Theexhibitionisaccompaniedbva 64-
page catalogue, fully-illustrated in color,
with an introduction bv Robert Flvnn lohn-
son, chief curator of the Achenbach Foun-
dation for Graphic Arts at the Fine Arts
Museum of San Francisco, fohnsonsaidof
Lundin s work:
i he art of Norman Lundin seduces
our eyes with the appearance ot reality. His
superior draughtrnanship creates the illu-
sion oi rendering, of observable fact. Yet,
representation of Lundin s work is only the
beginning, part of the journey but certainly
not the destination. Lundin'sartisof world
constructed through line, color, composi-
tion and choice of subject matter. It is an art
abundant with feeling to the viewer willing
to traverse the visible into the subconscious.
It is a world created through his memorv
that resonates in our own
! he catalogue also contains an inter-
view with the artist bv Patricia Failing,
assistant professor of art history at the Uni-
versity oi Washington, Seattle. The publi-
cationisavailable through the museums on
the tour, as well as through the University
of Washington Press, Seattle.
Prior to coming to the Wellington B.
Gray Gallery the exhibition has traveled to
the Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock; the
Huntsville Museum of Art, Huntsville, Ala
See Artist, page 8
FV YORK (AP5 Listn.ght's pre-
miere of "Civil Wars on ABC was worth
watching even ;t you were a little tired ot
courtroom dramas.
It's the episodes that will follow in the
next few weeks that may be trouble.
The new scries from Stephen BochcO
(creator ot "Hill Street Blues LA. Liw"
and "IXvgie Howser, MJD.) stars Manel
Hemingway and Peter Onorati as Manhat-
tan divorce Lowers Sydney Guilford and
Charlie Howell.
In Lastnight s episode, we saw people
quarreling over the fiduciary remnants of
their shattered mamages. We also saw the
"comic" aspects oi bizarre property claims.
delusional beha tot and eccentric lifestyles.
"What we do takes its toll says
Sydney's partner, EM (Alan Rosenberg), a
COnoded soul who promptly makes his point
by having a nervous breakdown. Charlie,
aware of LliScollapse, offers to help out, and
Sydney accepts.
This is not much to hang a series on, but
New York divorce gives series co-creator
and executive producer William M.
Fmkelstein any number oi choices for each
episode's story lines. And "Civil Wars" hasa
number of things going for it.
Chief aimmg them is Onorati, who al-
most smglehandledlv gave Bochco's late,
unlamented musical drama ' Cop Rock" its
narrative sizzle. As the wonderfully vile,
murderous Lt. Ymce Russo, he finally was
the only reason to watch.
As Charlie Howell, Onorati brings some
distinction to an unhappy profession. His
Charlie is honest, fair, a shrewd litigator, a
skilled negotiator and a decent man. "I'm
good at it he says. "I like the combat
The pilot also is distinguished by an-
other Bochco stalwart, Dennis Franz (Lt.
Norman Buntz on "Hill Stnvt"). Hens, he's
virtually unrecognizable as a middle -aged
appliance dealer who s being sued for
divorce because he insist on dressing,
looking and at ling bke IK is Presley.
vn the witness �stand, his delusion is
shown tor what it is s the scene la
that unmistakable I I vis half-snevr steals
across his upper lip. It's a moment I
manages u i be hmn v sad and compel
But Civil Wars' has trouble in Manel
lemingway. She's one of those problem-
atic actresses Earner von think she can a t
or you know she can t
Miss lemingway is struggling with
her character here. Sydney is supposed to
be savvy, tough and bright, but there s
something that doesn't quite add up I Irr
character starts at her skin. ! here s no
depth, no suggestion oi the inner person
Subsequent episodes also Kur dis
brief evidence ot tinkering, dating from
when the network brass saw the pilot.
The brass said the series was tot i blea k
toogrim, toodrab, toodark, Uk depress
ing for network TV. Bochco was called in
to lighten it up.
This included Miss Henungwa s
haircolor, whichchanged from a surreal 1 v
drab brown to straw berry blonde. By the
third episode, she is practically Nordic.
It's grafted into the plot as subtly as a
Frankenstein neck-holt.
Bochco's "fixes" resulted in what
subsequent episodes reveal as a kind of
"LA. Law East"Attempts to hype the
show'scomie aspects do an injustice to the
fragile EM, nuking Buffoonery of his ef-
forts k) stop being crazy. 1 his includes
criminal assault as a negotiating tactic.
Hyping thedrama takes'Civil Wars
down SOtnt unlikely avenues, including
an extremely dubious fishing expedition
on cross-examination that unearths a child
molestation. Lawyers iust don't ad that
way. Honest.
Faculty artist spurs cowboy image behind Iron Curtain
ECU News Bureau
Eastern Europeansbelievemost
Americans are gangsters and cow-
be ys so when an ECU artist went to
Latvia this fall he packed his west-
ern boots and wide-brimmed hat.
"Howdy Richard G. Spiller
said, speaking politely to uneasy
passers-by in the city of Jurmala, a
resort on the Baltic Sea. At first his
attire brought drabstares, then flick-
ersof uncertainty, and finally broad-
faced grins from a people whose
country is undergoing monumen-
tal change.
Latvia, formerly one of the So-
viet Socialist Republics,declared its
independence from Moscow last
August. With economic conditions
at their worst, the future of Latvia is
uncertain.
A visiting professor of ceram-
ics at ECU, Spiller went to Latvia
last month as one of 12 American
artists participating in an exchange
of artists between the U.S. and the
USSR.
He had been invited bv the So-
J
viet Artists Union after 12 Soviet
artists visited U.S. campuses last
year. An artist from Latvia spent a
part oi a semester at ECU.
Posing as cowboys "wasoneof
the best things wecould do Spiller
said after returru ng to campus with
stonesof his tnp. Hesaid twoother
American artists, Randv Schmidt
of Arizona State University and
Rick Pope oi Montana State, also
came in western duds.
"It gave us the opportunity to
break through the barrier hesaid,
adding that the barrier was a con-
dition in which people had become
fearful of being outspoken or even
noticed. For more than 30years the
people have tried to be "invisible
Spiller explained.
"We found that the cowbov
J
hats and boots got their attention
and their smiles and eventually the
people opened up to us he said.
Spiller said Latvians have great
respect for Americans. For example,
he cited an elderly woman he met
the first day he arrived who began
to cry axo touch his arm after real-
izing he was an American.
Amenca.oh America thewoman
said.
"As soon as the people found
out we were from America they
wanted to know if everything was
okay said Spiller. He said "they
wanted assurance
"We would ask them how they
felt about their new freedom and
they would say 'It's on paper, but
we don't know he said.
A purpose of the ECU artist's
visit was to demonstrate his style
and technique to artists represent-
ing many of the Soviet republics
Two of the art pieces Spiller crea ted
at studios in Jurmals will be placed
in collections owned by galleries in
Moscow, the Societ capital and m
Riga, the capital of Latvia.
Spiller gave several of his art
pieces to sonic of the other artists he
befriended.
After a month of living and
traveling in the Baltic nation, the
ECU artist acquired a number of
opinionsaboutthelifeandtheartof
Latvia.
Art materials such as clay are
scarce and are sometimes difficult
to obtain.
ihe same thing can lv said
about most other items - tothing,
food, gasoline. Latvian art re
sembles the art produced in the
U.S. about 30 to 60 years ago lhe
artists,especially theceramists.are
reluctant to explore experimental
techniques.
Spillersaysthisisbecause "the
artists want to control the way art
is produced in the same wav the
governmnet controls the lives ol
people" Spiller also said the
Latvianartistsneed American k. h
nology to use contemporay tech
niques.
Some items, when available.
See Cowboy, page 8
Bandstand
Attic
Thursday
Panic
Friday
Dillon Fence
Saturday
Ice Water
Mansion
Sunday
Homeless
Benefit
ORockefeller's
Saturday
Feed the
Children Benefit
featuring Earth
Merchants,
SPAWN and
Fountain of
Youth
Grandaddy
Rosser's
Friday
Victor Hudson
Saturday
Victor Hudson
Mendenhali
Thursday
Terminator II
Friday
Terminator II
Saturday
Home Alone
Hartj Times
Friday
Shelley West
&Little Rock
Saturday
Little Rock
Fizz
Friday
Paul Tardiff
Saturday
John & Mary
(formely of
10,000
Maniacs)
T
ie�f if





8 iiH?e gggt (Uarolfnian November 21,1991
Modern unites with classical in local Sculpting exhibit
Gray Gallery Press Release
An exhibition of contemporary
sculpture which combines classical
forms with modem concerns. Hun-
gers: Sculpture by Be Gardiner, will be
shown at the Wellington B. Gray
Gallerv, ECU from Nov. 19 to Dec.
13.
A free public educational pro-
gram featunnga lecture by Gardiner
and reception for the artist will be
held on Monday, Nov. 18 at 7 p.m.
in the auditorium of the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center.
Working with Italian whiteand
Botticino marbles, Gardiner'ssculp-
tural exhibition, Hungers, will
present three recent large scale
sculptures exhibited in pairs rang-
ing from 7 to 6 feet in height.
Gardiner's sculptural work,
described by critics as post modem
in content, is concerned with disin-
tegration and decomposition of
form.
Cowboy
are cheap for Americans. A bottle
of champagne is 26 ruples-about
fifty cents.
Riga, the capital ot Latvia, is a
very tired and sad city. But the
buildings are beautiful. Someday.
Spiller believes, it will be a great
city.
The people rune vitality and
energy but they are trying to re-
build society with grandfather's
tools he said.
Latvian women dress el-
egantly. "We makeour own clothes,
we save a woman told Spiller.
"No one can take away our dig-
Artist
nity Spiller said transportation
and delivery systems are unpre-
dictable.
As a result, he noticed that
most people have acquired a con-
siderable amount of patience.
Flowers are everywhere.
Spiller said flowers symbolize the
freedom Latvia lost following a
1939 GermanSoviet agreement
that turned control of Latvia over
to the Soviet Union.
When all property came un-
der government ownership,
Latvians secretly planted Bower
bulbsinyardsthroughoutthecoun-
the Bergen Museum of Art and Sci-
ence, Paramos, N.J the Boise Art
Museum, Boise, Idaho;and the Art
Gallerv. Newcomb Department of
Art, Tulane University.
The Grav Gallerv is located off
oi Fifth and Jams streets on the
campus of ECU in the Jenkins Fine
Arts Center.
Gallerv hours are Monday
through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. On Thursdays, hours are ex-
'FbCTRtf
CO NTCST f
A hfUeK0O ft8'
A lrW5o Cau Tsjffioz
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756-4204
Xiaobing Tang ot" Western
Carolina University Press's Crits,
1990 said of Gardiner's work:
"A historical narrative is con-
tained and circulated in each piece
of Be Gardiner's work; it isno whim-
sical imagination that draws the
sculptor to name his work, care-
fully drawing from Greek mytholo-
gies and Biblical tradition.
"It is in a historical imagina-
tion, in always reverting to a for-
given or repressed past that
Continued from page 7
tryside.Spillersaid heand theother
American exchange artists plan to
donate a computer word processor
to the artists' union.
He also said he wants to visit
Latvia again with his family. He
said he would especially like for his
teenagers to see how kicky they arc
to be living in the United States.
Spiller was selected for the ex-
change program because of his
teaching and research reputation in
the field of ceramic art.
He currently teaches ceramics
and foundations study in the ECU
School of Art.
Continued from page 8
Gardiner findsawayoutof the post
modern hyper-real scenario of
depthlessness
Gardiner received a bachelor's
degree in religion from the Univer-
sity of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.
Graduate studies include Appala-
chian State University and SGF
Scuola Scultura di Torano, Carrara,
Italy.
Selected exhibitions by the art-
ist are solo exhibition. Southeastern
Center for Contemporary Art, Win-
ston-Salem, 1984; first prize sculp-
ture, Brenau National Invitational,
Brenau College, Brenau, Ga , 1989;
and two-person exhibition. Eve
Mannes Gallery, Atlanta,Ga 1990.
Gardiner's commissions in-
clude: Los Once, I'otrentus, Hon-
duras, 1990; Allenton Realty
(Durham Arts Council), Durham,
1987; and Wolfson Memorial,
Asheville, 1985.
The Gray Gallerv is located off
of Fifth and Jams streets on the
campus of ECU in the Jenkins Fine
ArtsCenter. Gallery hoursare Mon-
day through Friday from 10a.m. to
5 p.m. On Thursdays, hours are
extended to 8 p.m.
The gallery is closed for state
and university holidays All exhib-
its and receptions are open to stu-
dents, faculty, staff and the general
public with no admission fee
For more information, please
contact Charles Lovell, Gallery Di-
rector at (919) 757-6336.
tended to 8 p.m. The gallerv isdosed
tor state and university holidays.
ABexhibitsandreceptkHisareopen
to the public uithnoadrnisMon fee
For more information, please
contact Charles Lovell.
A Party that You Don't Want to Miss!
The WZMB Christmas in November Party
Live Progressive music by
PANIC
A Hoard of Door Prizes will be given away
Grand prize: A year's free admission to
the Attic
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its and receptions are open to stu-
dents faculty, Stall and the general
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t)





The Death of Kemple Boy
By Kemple
T-Mt P�S7KOY you ' 41 .
ir 'SSI'S
Harris Supermarkets
Support Coach Lewis and
�-

the ECU PIRATES,
WE BELIEVE
II
ECU
9
0
E
Harris
Supermarket
SUPERMARKETS
The
I'laa
8 Locations To Serve You
I'ickk'n
Statiitim
Harris
Supermarket
(Bells I:ork Squaret
Sports
Blake hop
Pirate quarterback is
By Brian kerns
Sports 1 ditor
EO . �
thebestquari rl �
ot the Pirates
the t � '
luntryt
Blaki
Piraterei ordbookii
is also fifth ii
fourth intol
And in t
ingNev
in the 1 l
analyst wh
speal ei I I
quet.said th I
rmd in the I !�

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( in
Home: I
Nickname:
Mascol
I nrollment:
C olors:
stadium-
1990 Record
Head I i
IvevI rd
Career R
N . Vfl
Returning i i ��
Returning
Series:
Last Meetii .
An
EC
F Brian k
i � � � ��
r third
ling i
hmai
aver igi
touchdov �
v incini it
.1 '
:
Chadwkk,Welc
Bv Ricky Chann
sutl W r.t.r
.
Ihe mens ai
country te u
season this . i
NCAA Dish I
meet held in (Ii
Four m mbei
team traveled to the i
with six men
team.
I he men i
10K62 miles i
bv Tone Chadwicl ' �
placed 218
Asstisi mi
tice said Chad �� �
pert or mar

Swimmers domi
By Christine Wilson
Matt Writer
The ECU men'sand
swim team defeated
University this v ei � in-
creasing botil team :�
victories.
The men - tear I rated
Georgetown 142 99 He
Rick Kobe said rh
everv event while the n woo
12 of 13 events
norm
-
trx" -

meters, whid
than th I
-
cou! '
Bowl bound YVolfpack
RALEIGH tAP - Even with
the knowledge that they will be
going to the Peach Bowl, North
Carolina State nvtball coach Dick
Shendan savs ROW is not the time to
let up.
"Bowl opportunities are obvi-
ouslvoutgoals.buttheplaverswant
to do something significant
Shendan said at his weekly news
conference Monday in reference to
the season ending game against
Maryland. They want to be only
the third team I
0 win '
season
Stafc
home against I
ensure the n;j
achieved aU
teams. But SheJ
more than an.
Maryland.
One Of 1
about Joe (Krij
ways tight hi





By Kemple
� ' - &h$
�.�
.h&�Z' J
by Kathleen Ryan

I
i he
I jckteH
Stadium
Harris
Supermarket
(Bells Pork Square)
Sports
(Hire lEaat (Earalfntan
November 21,1991
Blake hopeful for Heisman
Pirate quarterback is among the nations best at his position
By Brian Kerns
Sports Editor
ECU quarterback Jeff Blake i
tl i best quarterback in the history
f thel 'trates and legimately one of
the best college football plavers in
ountry this year.
Blake, who has re-written the
Pirate record book in every category
is also tilth in passing efficency and
fourth in total offense in the NCAA.
nd in the latest editionoftheSport-
. News, Blake is listed seventh in
the 1 leisman Trophy list.
Lee Courso, an ESPN f(X)tball
analyst who will be the guest
speaker at the ECU football ban-
i : -viid that Blake should be Seo-
ul in the Fleisman race. Courso is
Jeff Blake
the same person who bad-mouth
ECU all season and swore the Pi-
rates could not beat Virginia Tech
in Blacksburg.
Blake, a 6' 1 194 -po md se-
nior from Sanford, Fla says that he
doesn't really have a chance to win
the Heisman.
"Defintaley, (the Heisman) is
on my mind, but the other players
have been in the limelight all sea-
son Blake said. "1 think being a
part of the ceremony would be fas-
cinating
With the excitement and posi-
tive distractions of the Peach Bowl
date with N.C. State, Blake and the
team are trying to stay focused for
this Saturday's game against
Cincinatti.
"I don't think we'll be relaxed
like we were against Tulane, we
learned from that experience' Blake
said.
Blake said that the spring
pra t ice wi t h hi s recei vers ha s hel ped
him build a chemistry with them
that complements each others' tal-
ents.
"It'sdifferent from last yearbe-
cause they can read the different
coverages and they know how to
run to not get covered Blake said.
"The key is that they can see
what 1 can see Blake said. This
allowsthereceiverstomakechanges
in their routes if necessary with
Blake being able to read the change.
Blake says that he doesn't have
a favorite target. "All of my receiv-
ers have close to fourty catches
each Blake said.
See Heisman page 12
Cincinnati facts:
Home: Cincinnati, Ohio
Nickname: Bearcats
Mascot: Bearcat
Enrollment: 364)00
Colors: Red and Black
stadium: NippertStadium
26392)
ll�M0 Record: 1-10
Head Coach: Tim Murphy
Jrd year)
Record: 2-19-1
Career Record: : 17-27-1
NCAA Affilliation: Division 1-A
Returning Lettermerc 43
Returning Starters: 19
Series: ECU leads 5-0
Last Meeting: ECU 56 - UC 32
An inside look
ECU vs Cincinnati
1991 ScheduJej
Penn State0-81 L
North Carolina16-51 L
Bowling Green16-20 L
Miami (Ohio)9-22 L
Louisville30-7 VV
Kent38-19 W
Virginia Tech9-56 L
Southern Miss17-7 W
Kentucky-17-20 L
Middle Tennessee30-10 VV
East CarolinaNov. 23
Kerns's Pick: ECU-47, UC-13
By Brian Kerns
Sports Editor
The No 13 Pirates look to improve their mark to 10-1 when they
i to Cincinnati, Ohio, to i.Kv the4-h Bearcats.
('incinnati has won four of their last six games, and are looking
their third straight home victory.
I he Bearcats boast a 197 3 yard-per-game rushing average. The
: rusher on the team is David Small, a 5'ST, 178-pound
in, with 888 yards on the season � a 5.0 yard-per-rush
ige fhe team has amassed 1,973 yards on the ground with 17
downs.
Cincinnati has had success throwing the ball as well, gaining
I 767 yards and five touchdowns in the air. Quarterback letf Stofa,
a 6'5 200-pound sophomore, has thrown for 1,160 yards and five
touchdowns on the season,while Lance Harp, a 6'5 220-pound
sophomore, has thrown tor 557 vards.
Most oi the Bearcats' offense has been produced in their last six
outings. The team, who lost 81-0 to Penn St. and 51-20 to North
Carolina, has produced 445.6 yards and 235 points per game in their
last six outings.
"This team reminds me of the 1990 Pirate team who started out
slow and finished up strong to carry over into the next season ECU
head football coach Bill Lewis said.
On defense, Cincinnati has allowed only 107.3 vards rushing per
game, and just 2.7 yards per carry. The Bearcats have tallied nine
sacks and 1 tackles for a loss of 108 yards over the past three games.
Ronnie Shannon, a 5'9 183-pound senior free safety, leads the
team with 83 tackles. Nate Dingle, a 6'3 239-pound sophomore
linebacker, has 46 solo tackles on the year and eight assisted tackles.
The Bearcats special tcamsareled by David Rowe. He has hit 18-
of-26 field goals, and 28-of-33 PAT's, for 48 points.
Chadwick,Welch pace cross country teams
By Ricky Chann
SUtt Writer
1 he mens and womenscross
ountry teams concluded their
eason this past weekend at the
NCAA District HI Championship
i ieel held in Greenville, S.C.
four members of the men's
team traveled to the meet along
��� i th six members of the women's
team.
The men competed in the
K2 miles) race and were lead
by Tony Chadwick. Chadwick
placed 218th with a time of 35:36.
Asstistant coach Charlie Jus-
tice said Chadwick had a "good
performance
This was Chadwick second
season in a a row competing in
this meet.
Freshman Sean Com.oily
and Mark Mathis finished in
36:24 and 36:36 respectively.
Justice said this race was a
"learning experience for Sean
and Mark
Matt Morris was the fourth
member of the team to compete
at the meet covering the course
in a time of 37:23.
The race was the qualifying
meet for the nationals and at-
tracted the top runners from the
region.
Justice said, "racing against
this kind of competition will help
them improve
The womens team brought
enough members of the team to
tield a team at this meet for the
first time. They placed twenty-
seventh out of thirty-three teams.
The womens race was won
by the team from N.C.State.
Senior school-record holder
Anne Marie Welch from Wash-
ington, N.C, finished her cross
country career at the meet with a
58th place finish and a time of
18:43.
Freshman Stacy Green ran
the 5K (3.1 miles) course in 19:40
for 114th place and Marianne
Manni ran a 20:14 for 154th.
Justice said both Green and
Marini, "ran good races
Cathrine Norstrand com-
pleted her first season of cross
country with a 21:17 and was
followed bv Susan Hu finishing
in 21:24.
Norstrand and Hu placed
195th and 199th respectively.
Sophmore Gretchen Harley
rounded out the womens team
finishers with a 21:52 for 208th
place.
Justice said he was pleased
with the womens overall finish.
Justice said he, "wasn't sure
how they would stack up"
against other teams because it
was their first time competing as
a team at this meet.
He added that this was a,
"stepping stone to bring the pro-
gram up a notch
11
Photo by Dail Reed�ECU Photo lab
He could go all the way
ECU'S Mark Washington intercepts an errant Virginia Tech pass in
the Pirates' 24-17 victory over the Hokies last weekend
Cunmulaj returns to
spark the Pirate's 'U
By Graham Teel
Staff Writer
lunior College transfer and Pi-
rate noseguard Zaim Cunmulaj has
come a long way over the past two
years. The 6-f6ot-2, 250-pound jun-
ior from Farrnington Hills, Mich,
played two years at Grand Rapids
JuniorCollegebetorecomingtoECU.
"Z as he is known by teammates
and friends, said he never thought
he would be playing at ECU asapart
of The Associated Press' 13th- ranked
football team, but heisglad he made
the decision.
"After visiting ECU, 1 knew this
was the place for me Cunmulaj
said. "ECU is great, the people here
are really nice to me and I'm finally
starting to adjust"
After an early season knee in-
jury in the Memphis State game,
Cunmulaj has worked hard to over-
come adversity.
"They told me it might take tour
to six weeks before I could come
back he said. "1 saw how every-
body was having fun and that made
me work that much harder to get
back
And come back he has.
In just seven games this season,
Cunmulaj has racked upa total of 21
tackles�71 2 tackles for a lossof 31
yards, 2 12 sacks, and 4 quarter-
back hurries.
Cunmulaj attributes much ot
hissuccess to a very supportive fam-
ily, and says that if there is anv one
player that has really helped him to
adjust to the defensive scheme, it
would be senior defensive tackle,
GregGardill.
Zaim Cunmalaj
"Grc'g has been there for me
throughout the season Cunmulaj
said. "He really stuck by me and
gave me the confidence to play up to
my potential
Cunmuhjalsocreditsdefensive
linecoach Cary Godette for pushing
the defensive linemen and making
them socornpetitive witheachother.
According to Godette,
Cunmula is definitely a force to be
reckoned with.
"Zaim is the type of guy that
leams from his mistakes and im-
proves himself asa plaver Godette
said. "Our plavers have now raised
theiremotionstohislevel,andthjsis
oneof the reasons we were fortunate
enough to get a guy of Zaim's talent
nere at hCU
Cunmulaj says that he is look-
ing torward to playing N.C. State in
the Peach Bowl, bu t stresses that the
Pirates will have to concentrate on
their final regular-season game in
Cincinnati Saturday.
Swimmers dominate Hoyas in Washington, D.C move to 2-0 on season
By Christine Wilson
Staff Writer
The ECU men's and women's
swim team defeated Georgetown
University this past weekend, in-
creasing both team records to 2-0
victories.
The men's team dominated
Georgetown 142-89. Head coach
Rick Kobe said the men's team won
every event, while the women won
12 of 13 events.
"We totally dominated the
water Kobe said. "I even had
swimmers swim in events that they
normally don't
Kobe was pleased with his
team's performance considering
they swam meters ra ther than yards.
"Georgetownis pool is in
meters, which is a nger distance
than the team normally swims
Kobe said. "1 was happy to see they
could out swim a team who con-
stantly pratices in that pool
Sophomores Doug Bescher,
Lance Tate and Brian Soltz teamed
with freshman Jason Gallagcr in the
800-meter medley relay to capture
first place with a time of 4:14.55.
Soltz took another first in the 50-
meter freestyle in 24.82, and
Gallaher took the 200-meter butter-
fly in 2:16.48.
In the 800-meter freestyle, jun-
ior Derek Nelson won with a time
of 9:0433. He also took first in the
100-meter freestyle with a time of
54.48.
Freshman John Donvan won
the 200-meter freestyle Vith a time
of 2:02.18, while fellow frosh Robert
Goral captured the 200-meter indi-
vidual medley with a timeof 2:20.78.
The Pi ra tes'also captured all of
the exhibition events, which help
other teams receive points.
The Lady Pirateswimmersalso
finished strong.
In the 400-meter medley relay,
juniors Tia Pardue and Suzanne
O'Brien teamed with freshmen
Michelle VValckand Elizabeth Sugg
to finish 450.05.
In the800-meter freestyle, fresh-
man Meghan La wtoncameinshow-
ing a time of 9:5656.
Pardue took the 200-meter
freestyle in 2:2054, Lawton took the
50-meter freestyle in 28.89.
Sophomore Jacqueline Silber
took the 200-meter individual
medly in 230.44.
The 400-meter freestyle was an
exhibition event with sophomore
Dawn Comi so coming m at 4:56.87.
The final event was the 400-
meter free relay with O'Brien, se-
nior Wendy Smith, Comiso and
freshman Tracey Garrett coming in
at a timeof 422.14.
The Pirate diving team also fin-
ished well withMatt Lawrence win-
ning the one-and three-meter
events.
The next swim meet for the
Pirates is Saturday, Nov. 23.
Bowl bound Wolfpack looks to nine -victory season Saturday as they host conference foe Maryland
RALEIGH (AP) � Even with
the knowledge that they will be
going to the Peach Bowl, North
Carolina State football coach Dick
Sheridan says now is not the time to
let up.
"Bowl opportunities are obvi-
ously out goals.buttheplayers want
to do something significant
Sheridan said at his weekly news
conference Monday in reference to
the season ending game against
Maryland. "They want to be only
the third team in N.C State history
to win nine games in the regular
season. That's significant
N.C. State (8-2) needs a win at
home against the Terrapins (2-8) to
ensure the nine-victory season,
achieved also by the 1927 and 1974
teams. But Sheridan said it will take
more than an average effort to beat
Maryland.
"One of the things I respect
about Joe (Krivak) is his teams al-
ways fight hard every game
Sheridan said. 'To watch the tape
of the Gemson-Maryland game,
you would think they were playing
the conference championship.
"Consider their out of confer-
ence schedule, with Penn State,
Pittsburgh, West Virginia and
Syracuse. Their team is a lot better
than people give them credit for
being Sheridan said. "We feel like
we'll have to achieve the highest
level of intensity to beat mis team
N.C. State knew it would be
invited to the Peach Bowl long be-
fore the Duke game, and Sheridan
feels that bowls should wait longer
before naming teams.
'Thelateryou could determine
who's in what bowl, the better
Sheridan said. '1 thought it was
going to be later this year
N.C State has achieved a rarity
in the ACC already this season, win-
ning conference games with three
different starungquarterbacks. This
could leave Sheridan with the sticky
dilemma of choosing which of the
three would start for the Wolfpack
against ECU on New Year's Day.
Each quarterback � Terry Jor-
dan, Geoff Benderand Terry Harvey
� has been impressive in their re-
spective starts. Harvey played well
against Duke,and that left Sheridan
all smiles.
'Terry played excellent in the
Duke game Sheridan said. "One
of the biggest things Terry Harvey
showed us in the Duke game was
V
he was very relaxed and very confi-
dent. He made some excellent
throws and directed the team well.
So wiU there be a problem on
New Years Day?
"If s a good problem to have
Sheridan said. "I said in the pre-
season that our quarterback situa-
tion was the best it's been since we
got here (in 1986). I think that has
shown this year





12 iiu' �ast(Earolintan
N.
er21, 1991
Fearless Football Forecast
ECU .it Cincinnati
Ohio St. at Michigan
Duke .it North Carolina
Wake orest .it N.n v
Baylor .it 1 e.s
Rice at Arkansas
Maryland at N.C. State
UCLA at Southern Cal
Virginia Tech at Virginia
California at Stanford
BRIAN Kl Ks
Sport I ditor
Last Week (8-2)
ro Date: (20-9-1)
E( 1
Michigan
Duke
Wake Forest
rexas
Arkansas
N.C. State
use
Virginia
California
DO! (. MORRIS
Managing Editor
I as! Week (3-7)
fa Date (71-42-5)
E U
Mit higan
Morth c 'arolina
Wake Forest
Baylor
Arkansas
N.C ' State
K
Vii ini.i
Stanford
BRIAN BAH 1
WNC 1-1 V Sports Director
La: � '�'� i � - (7- J)
fa Date (80-35-5)
I i i
Mk higan
Northan ima
Wake 1 orest
i kansas
N.C Si ii
' !
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Iist Week: f-4
To 1 ate: (72-41-5)
ECU
Michigan
North Carolina
Wake Forest
IV-x.is
Arkansas
N.C. State
I.M
Virginia
Stanford
MATT KING
Entertainment Editor
last Week: (6-4)
To Dale: (74-39-5)
ECU
Michigan
North Carolina
Wake Forest
rexas
Arkansas
N.C. State
UCLA
Virginia
California
1 ARLE McAt LI
11C President
Last Week (7-3)
To Date (74-39-5)
I i
Michigan
Northan ilina
Wake Fore I
rexas
Arkansas
State
I I LA
Virginia Te h
' ilifornia
JIM HAMPTON
General Manager
; asl Week: (7-3)
,�� (67-48-5)
EC!
Mst higan
Du)
iki I rest
lexa
Ki. �
i State
' S
'11 ;
� rnia
Heisman
Continued from page 11
Blake, who vvascoached b fa-
ther in Inch school, was hit by a
drunk driver in a mot i . '��
dent.Theaccidentbrok ; thi �
ing arm, and a leg, which caused
him to miss lus junior veai I I
ball.
Piral � ' - ' n
whogrew i: �� -
high school football will him cai
ried Blak I - - ' ror nil
while he was on crul
ell rehabilital �
.
knivked ' - '
5
Bad Bob & the Rockin' Horses
Trashed Gypsie
Cold Sweat
Sex, Love and Money
The Strange
a
benefit
for
The
Greenville
Community
Shelter
Clinic
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24
DOORS OPEN AT 7:00 PM
$5 DONATION
ATTIC
752-7303 I 209 E. 5th St.
752-7303
stXacolina 19911992
'lavnouse � -�,�
pi
Season
i
i
i
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i
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Includes Parts and Labor!
(excludes service specials and accessories)
MUST SHOW STUDENT I.D.
East Carolina
Auto & Thick Center
Mercurv Chrvsler Prvmouth Dodee GM
HWY 11 A 24 BYPASS � ORECNVIL1C. NC
355-3333
MERCURY
LINCOLN
CAN NOT BE USED WITH OTHER COUPONS
3JB1MBM
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I
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SOVKMBI K 21, 22. 23. 25 and 2f at K:15 p.m.
NOVEMBER 24 at 2:15 p.m.
II ST! DENTS: $4.50
1 ive Irualrt tor l�ss Ihan Movie So Hrinn Datt"
Call: 757-6829
Put on your sett belt. You're about to take a trip to Italy.
In half a sentence we'll be landing into a delicious description
of Applet's Btseateitrae, Mama's Sjwghettj & Meatballs.
Mound? of fresh pasta covered in spicy marinara sauce with
tender meatball' seasoned to perfection. h have four
different pasta dishes tearjoi our kitchen ew; dav. So drop
by the nearest Appttees Neighborhood Grill k Bar for your
first class accommodations for lunch or dinner. It's the best
wav to tour Italv withe yt teavim vour seat.
flpplebee's
ll SW Greenville Blvd
imp -����

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A-
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. ftp &j&5f �'��W,WRY-� vi
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�Kv-r
Thursday
Student
Budget Night
$1.15 Tall Boys
$1.25 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.75 Ice Picks
$2.10 High Balls
$2.85 Ice Teos
Ladies Free All Night'
.�� u
:wi .
����"
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The City of Greenville
CONGRATULATES
Peach
Bowl
Bound
ECU
Pirates
We Believe!
� arv . � a
das �
�It1 !� -v. .

sa�

����I.M
ill
I he Dt-partincut tf Minority Affairs fc the
StiitU-iit I nioii Minority Arts (onimittee
invite von to attend the
KWANZAA
Pot Liick Dinner
Monday, December 2
MSC Social Room
6:00 P.M.
I or more informal inn tall the Program Hotline at
�"�" 7S7h(04 �"�





12 vi he tast(�aruliniaii
N .
Fearless Football Forecast
I (. I .itincinnati
(hio st. .it Michigan
hikt- .it u tli.iiol in.i
.ike 1 �n esl ,it .n
Ba loi .it I exas
Rice at Arkansas
Maryland .it .( . State
U I A at Southerna
Virginia rech at Virginia
California at Stanford
Ivl Kl Ks
not c; n kkis
Manj iiit i
171-42
BRIAN BAILIE
VVN 1 - i -�� i tirector
)r. RI M KD I Kt
K I i hancellor
� - �� :
� (72-41-5)

MAI I KING
Entertainment Editor
I as! Ueek (6-it
i tate (74-39-5)
! I
Mi I � in
rth ii Una
VVaki I n I
rI ii
! ' ��
ii1111.1
( .iliirnia
i ivi t m i i n
11 President
� � - (7-3)
� (7-J �
� � � �
I IM H MI'I )N
� r.il M.)

Heisman
Continued from paqc 11
5
Bad Bob & the Rockin' Horses
Trashed Gypsie
Cold Sweat
Sex, Love and Money
The Strange
a
benefit
for
The
Greenville
Community
Shelter
Clinic
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24
DOORS OPEN AT 7:00 PM
$5 DONATION
ATTIC
752-7303
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
V
Includes Parts and Labor
(excludes service speciols and accessories)
MUST SHOW STUDENT I.D.
PETER SHAFFER'S
Aimrd-Winning Play
East Carolina
� ����
HWY 11 A 2ft4 BYPASS � ORFFH. NC
355-3333
ili KM Hi
MERCURY
LINCOLN
Plymouth
CAR HOT BE USED WITH OTHER COUPONS
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I
1
I
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I
I
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This play contains partial nudity
and a minim of frank language

The City of Greenville
CONGRATULATES
M t MRI H 21. 23, 2? and 2f .it 8:15 p.m.
MMBKK 24 ai 2:15 p.in.
1 t I STl DENTS: 4.5ti
I it ih. .in. Eoi le-v Ih.in Mmie" so Brine l.iu
Call: 757-6829
f
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1
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IS
3
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1
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1

Put on; furseatht I i'r al ut 1 lal a trip I II
In half a senteti � ell be landing int a l ii aus description
of typlebe s newest entree Mama's spai-lti & Meatballs.
Mounds ifresh pasta covered in spicy marinara sail ��
tender meatbaOs seas Bed to perfection, $e har (nor
different pasta dishes leaving our kitchens even Jay.s r
by the neaxtst f lebee's Neijfib rho d I nll A Bar (or your
firt class iccoram xlations for lunch or dinner It's the best
wav to tour Italv without leaving vour seat
Tl
1
1
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flpplebee's

tohborttOOCl Gnu , Be
�W (rccnillcBlu
I
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W53$
T3�
per fl a
x1� - ir,
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,
Thursday
Student
Budget Night
$1.15 Toll Boys
$1.25 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.75 Ice Picks
$2.10 High Bolls
$2.85 Ice Teas
todies Free fill Night
r-
.1
I. �
V
as?
Air
i3
We Believe!
�;����
Jf
-U
'��' :&�&�
I he IK partiiunt of Minority ttairs K the
Slnilt nt I Muni MimiritN rtsom m it tee
in itc miii to .ittend the
KWANZAA
Pot Luck Dinner
Monday, IXcember 2
MSC SKial Room
6KM) P.M.
I in . 111 orni.it ii . .ill the- Program Hotline al





Title
The East Carolinian, November 21, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 21, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2799
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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