The East Carolinian, November 19, 1991






Everything is Peachv
irates earning mu h-deserved national respe I
4
SK�
Panic hits the Attic
Virginia Bea h band to ro k lo .1! night spot
5

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(Bhz iJznzt (Ear0ltntan
Serving tm t
mil
Una . ampus i ommunity sint e 192 5
Vol.65 No.63
1 � �AY, November 19. 1991
N h��! Cab . �.���
C ���� in 1? 000
Pciqos
vrounrf 0?ey-
znS
Shrinkage for survival

Peach Bowl
Bv Brian Kim us
� :
be tun
ranked .

Pirates set to play N.C. State
� �.




Campus housing decreasing
Campus fax sen ice closed

Students prepare shelter
University plays lottery
: - '

� '
� �
� - '
kin no
Fraternity houses vandalized
nti � up of feminists called the re
il Underground Network of truthful Sisters" has
been making midnight atta kson fraternity houses at the
' ' � �alifomia Santa Barbara, according to an
� � �
and sigi tacki it i �� mi graj
iprion such as ' this is hiw fraternirii :ee j . i :
ges protesting - � isl tn ���
omen.
()nly one fraternity, Phi Kappa Psi, has fill I
mi lint 1 hey lateT di i . - 1 thei hai
stered p sters n fi �
pictun � .�� n nwitl
: .
Inside Tuesday
: '
Driver Education
� � �� '
ible 1
iqhl
for I
Pea h
SGA
denies
Kittrell
resolution
B I ul ie Kost i )�.�
I .
v - � � �
- , n Moi

i
re �'
:i
ii �
a
SGA
R.A. claims
rights violation
B) left Becker
Sul (VVrii
A settlement is still pend
ing in the dispute tx twei i
1 lal! tv- lent 1 i ilite
. .�. said he h
washavingpersonal problems
and would benefit from
fficialsandtheSlayHall prayer,
lent adviser who said he According to Shaw, the
was hn-d tor expressing his Slay Hall assistant coordina
religious beliefs tor, Stacey Staton, received
Paul M Shaw, a born- permission from Michele
again hristian, said univer- Garafolo, the coordinator I i
sitvoffii : � redhimonOcI her and her pastor to pray
23 fi � i tercising his 1 irst with Polite. Although Staton's
Amendmentrightofreligious pa-tor never prayed for Po
expression.DavidEmmerling, lite. Shaw assumed that it
dean of student development, would be all right foi hisp
Something Fish-y
going on Thursday
B 1 im Hampton
Stafl W lei
would not iomment on the
situarii n rnr wnld he dis-
cussa p issiblesettlementdate
.vever Sh r artome
1 imothv Barl lid hee
rpi -
nivi rsirv
tor to pray with her
Staton, Shaw an
pasti r Walh V an I iem,al
with the pastor s � ire went
inti i '� � tndpi
th 1 � 'lite was taki i I
���:��' � lay
Paul M. Shaw
ained the reasons tor
Shaw s probation.
1 his i- to follow up the
com ci sation concerning
Elnora Polite My concerns
about this issue were dis
i ussed and ! have asked that
vou do not use the laying on
ot hand- in the future as ,i
1.1 probtems
wit! � � � �� �
� the situati
� � RA .
� iponents of the a
honal Association of Sch�
ma be scaling in the wak
an ideological shock this v - -
And die shock ma be a bit
tishv or 1 ishv
Stanley Fish,an acclaimed
literary theorist and professor
of English and law at Puke
will speak Ihursday at ECU
mi There's No Such I hingas
Free Spee h, and It's a (lood
rhing roo
fish, w ho has written six
major books on literary criti-
cism, is renown tor his reader
response theory .md wntii
on reading communities In
the fMst decade his �
havecalled tor retui I
lesol commui
tioi
I
-
� �� . . tessoi
said
.
� it
ornx tness
itingfreespeech anargument
held by N'AS members
N'AS decries the Polit
reel camp tor siding w ith eth-
ni femii 4 and socialist in-
the .s-v
ciationsavshaverestrii I Ifrei
speech
I ish willspe � �
in 10 ;1 v icnei illassroom
build
Williams who ii I I
bo take
( loquium 1 o. tune Senes
prcsei
� � �
� - Fish





2
bt)c �ast(TaroItntan November 19, 1991
University sponsors Bill of Rights conference
Student injures leg north of Joyner;
taken to hospital by friends
Nov. U
0903�Rawl Building: Responded to a report of a student com-
municating threats to a staff member.
1056�Brody Building: Vehicle stopped forastopsign violation.
Female non-student issued a state citation for the stop sign violation
and for driving with a revoked license.
1534�Memorial (Jymnasium: Responded to the area south of
the building in reference to a traffic accident. Male student was
charged with driving without a license.
Nov. 14
1012�lovner Library: Checked out a report of a truck hitting tree-
in the area north of the building.
1406�White Hall: Responded to a report oi harassing phone
calls.
1413 (ones 1 folk Checked out a report of loud music coming
from a vehicle east of the building. Owner was advised to lower the
volume.
0117- Music Building: Vehicle stopped for exceeding a the
posted speed. A verbal warning was given.
3�Fletcher Hail: Checked out a reference to disorderly
conduct. A report was taken.
Nov. lb
2048- -Joyner Library: Responded to a report of a suspicious
person in the area between the library and MendenhaD Student
Center. Subject was gent- on arrival.
2245 -lovner Library Responded to a report of a student who
hail injured her leg north ot the building . I � ubje t was taken to Pitt
County Memorial Hospital by friends
2251 Scott I foilhecked out .1 report of the tiro alarm fcx ing
activated he cause nvas unknown subjects burning popcorn.
2258 Fletcher Hall rted �� male student from south ol
the buildign to Belk Ha student i a impus
citation for underage drii ��
2330 Third and Keade streets: Responded to a report of suspi-
cious activity in the area, contact was made and all subjects were
identified. Fournon-srudents were banned from campus for careless
and reckless behavior and a weapons violation.
$5�Fletcher! foil: Checked out a possible curfew violation. A
non-student was banned from campus and a student was given a
campus citation.
5 s Scott Hall: Vehicle stopped south of the building U r
driving on the curb. 1 he non-student was given a verbal warning.
Nov. 17
2143 ECU PublicSafety Vehicle stopped east ot the building
for speedii n Campus Di . "he student was givei i verbal
� $6 General Classi i Building: Vehicle stopped west of the
building for not burning headlights. The student was given a verbal
warning.
Crime Scene is taken from ottical Public Saftey Logs
Special to The East Carolinian
The University will beco-spon-
soring a conference to comemorate
the foundation of our system of
government � the Bill of Rights.
Theconference,called "TheBill
of Rights at 200 will feature Pro-
RA
fessor Nadine Strossen, the young-
est person and first woman to serve
as president ot the American Civil
Liberties Union.
In addition to top ECU schol-
ars. Professor kermit L. Hall from
the University of Florida and Peter
C. Williams from the State Univer-
Continued from page 1
sity of New York at Stony Brook
School of Medicine will speak at the
conference.
The t we i day conference, taki ng
place on Nov. 2(-2 Lisa celebration
of the Bill of Rights. Co-sponsored
by the Chancellor, Phi Kappa Phi
honor society and the ECU Com-
Fish
mittee on the bicentennial of the
Constitution, this conference will
be the last event m BClTsfouryi �
Salute to theonstitution's Hi i :
tennial.
Carol Meyers, Renocntof the
Bill of Rights Essay Competiti
will also Speak at theconten I
Continued from page 1
tion for the Fall and Spring semes-
ters
Polite said she consented to the
prayersand did not filea complaint.
"I remember the minister wanted
to prav for me. In a very conscious
state of mind I agreed to that she
said.
Shawsaid hewould havecalled
authorities soonerifhehad realized
Polite's problem was medical.
Shaw also said he followed the
guidelines the university set up
under his probation.
According toShaw.hechanged
the way he approached people bv
taking (ones' ad vice to passou t pa m-
phlets and written prayers as an
alternative to verbal confrontation.
Shaw sud he is not sure of the
reasons tor his dismissal, but he
said two incidents were described
to him bv university officials.
"A person went to a movie with
me and apparently he was not told
it was a Christian movie he said.
"Apparently that person was of-
fended. Then, l asked a guv to a
movie and he said 'no Thafs all it
was
An anomyous resident of Slay
Hall filed a complaint on behalf of
several students in the dorm who
found Shaw's behavior disruptive.
The compfointant said Shaw
was incapable oi doing his job be-
cause the manner in which he ex-
pressed his beliefs kept residents
from seeking his help.
Shaw said he may have talked
about his beliefs while mi duty, but
never forced his opinions on any-
one or used religion m a profes-
sional situation
coinciding "The Bill of Rights Sym-
posium" 2:30 Thursday in
Mendenhall.
Fish and Strossen are diametri-
cally opposed on the issue of politi-
cal correctness.
"In his rhetorical style � akin
to his style of basketball � Fish
shoots from the hip Williams said.
Since writing Is There a Text m
tiasdassin 1978�a ground break-
ing book in literary circles for its
argument that there are as many
lnterpretahonsasarereadcrs.called
reader response � Fish has written
on law and rhetoric.
"An attribute that isadmirable
about Fish is that he has worked as
a legal theorist and a literary theo-
rist, vet remained a public figure
instead of an academic recluse
Williams, who initiated the lecture
series in 1990, said.
"Not only has he done aUl
work, but he keeps moving He
hasn't rested on his laurels, he pub
Iishes all the time Williams said
An essay in Fish's latest r k
Doing What Come Naturally relates
the "no consequence" argumei I
thedialoguel'rwoenarnaxreac"
pitcher and a manager.
Fish writes of a meeting at I
mound between Baltimore (
pitcher Dennis Martinez and �
per Earl Weaver in which We.r -
advises the hurler to "throw striki
and keep the runners of f the has�
Fish savs Weaver's words
a theoretical ideal which have no
results on Martinez's actual pra
tice of throwing the baseball, '
illustrating' the "no conseqin I
of theory.
Kat Carolina 1991-1992
Playhouse z $eas(
ason
W immedi
1992 BSN
STUDENTS.
MAFMBKR 21. 22. 23. 25 and 26 at H:15 p.m.
N0VEMMB 24 at 2:15 p.m.
EO STl DENIS: $4.5(1
Live Theatre For lss Than A Moie" So Bring Date"
Call: 737-6829
Fnter the Air Force
mmediately after gradua-
tion � without waiting for the
results of your State Boards You
can earn great benefits as an Air
Force nurse officer. And if selected
during your senior year, you may
qualify- for a five-month internship
at a major .Air Force medical facili-
ty To apply you'll need an overall
2.51 GRfc Serve your country
while you serve your career
I NAF HKAFTH PROFFSSlONs
COLLECT
919-8$-9540
MR-05
ECU Crew Club Finishes Fall Season
In Nicole Prati
I he EC1 Oca Club finished in tall season last
weekend, November 2 at the he.nl of the Occoquan
Regatta in kxoquan, A John hi.tit is and Jen-
nifer Phillips rowed and raced together for the first
tune in the mixed doubles event. The) passed two
boatsaiongthe wind) -mile course and won a bronze
medal with a time of !l� minutes.
Six new team members competed in the open
r e c r e a t i o n a 1
drainer) double
cent against three
other crews. Maft
Nichols and Brian
W illiams took
home a gold medal,
winning the event
in 22 minutes, 20
seconds. Matt
Byrne and Vt mm
Feipoidt placed
fourth with a lime
of 24:37. and Chris
McCaffrey and
Am Broun fin-
ished one minute
later.
Racing in the women's novice four event were
bow Collette Sagar. two seat-Karen Jacobelh
three seat (arrington Cosbv suoke-Molh Kear-
ney and coxswain-Sat O'Neill in their first umc rowing
together the) look eighth out of 1 with a time of 2V! 1
Hast Carolina heat crews from Carnegie Mellon. St.
Mary's College. Franklin and Marshall. West Virginia
Universit) and Virginia Boat Club.
In the men's championship tour event, bow-Mike
Mc( ulle. two-seat-Rob Sloan. three-seat-Dave
Burnetle stroke John Juaitis. and coxswain Megan
W ile . competed. The passed two crew s, landing them
with l.ith out of 25 with a time ot 17:50.
The ECU
women schampion-
shipfourdid not tare
as well. Bow-Karx
Dengler. two-seai-
Heather Warfield.
three-seat - Niki
Pratt. stroke-Angie
B r o v� n . a n d
coxswain-Shannon
Nobles, ended up
taking 14th place
with a time of 22
minutes. Baltimore
Rowing Club won
the women's cham-
pionship four event
in 19 minutes 7 seconds. The ECU Crew Club will be-
gin its winter training soon to prepare for the spring
season. So far, the team plans to race at the Augusta In-
vitational, Duke, Clemson. and SIRA Regattas.
Volleyball Top Picks
Enlcmito GaM
1. Sigma Pi A
2. Delta Chi A
Fraternity Purple
Sigma Phi Hpsilon B
Pi Kappa Alpha B
MmkfiflM
1. Cubbies
2. BOH.P.
Sorority
1. Alpha Omicron Pi
2. Delta Zeta
3. Alpha Phi
Women's Gold
1. he Crew
2. Physical Terrorists
3. Rooters
Women's Purple
1. The Flinstones
2. Southern Comfort
et Set for a Sizzling Spring
I Outdoor Smorgasboard
January 15 CG 117 5:(X)pm
Drop in Fitness Classes begin
January 13 CGI IK 3:00pm
I First Session Fitness Class Reg.
January 21 CG 204 9-5:00pm
1 5-on 5 Basketball Meeting
January 21 BIO 103 5:00pm
Spring Into Fitness Workshop
January 23 CG 107-A 12:00noon
Friday Fitness Fling
January 24 CG 108
Recreational Services is sponsoring
a Turkey Trot RunWalk for
giving,
two mile
time run
held
v e m -
at Bun-
Track.
ested
viduals
Register
November 19 at 5:00pm in BI0103"
Timex Fitness Week
A Time for Fun!
October 21-24 marked HCl's annual Timex Fitness
j Week. Nearly two hundred people participated in various
j activities throughout the week. Awards sponsored bv
Timex. Ocean Spray. Reebok and Recreational Services were given
away throughout the event. A 21 -minute tnatholon was held in which
participants competed in ten minutes of swimming, ten minutes of
biking and one minute o timed sit-ups. Winners Scott Bailey and
Marlee McDonald received Timex watches tor their outstanding
participation. There was also a bicycle scavenger hunt in which
participants Chad Deal and Beth Glenn were the winners. Another
popular event was the aqua aerobics splash party where participants
had a "splashy" time while engaging in a vigorous aerobic workout.
During fitness assessment open house individuals received pertinent
information about their personal level of fitness. Of those who turned
out for this event. Martin Leary was the winner of a Timex watch
and Carter Lawrence and Christie Hester were the winners of
Reebok shoes.
Overall, the week was a big sucess and everyone that came out had
the opportunity to raise their fitness awareness and win neat prizes.
Kathy Hill, Assistant Director of Physical Fitness and Outdoor
Recreation at Recreational Services said. "It was excellent
ROC Exposures
? Spring Break in Florida Keys:
Spend an active outdoor oriented spring
hreak in the Florida sun with ihe Recrea-
tional Outdoor Center. Although final
details are currently being confirmed, ac-
tiviues will include sailing, snorkehng.
sea kayaking, windsurfing, camping at
John Pennikamp Slate Park and a visit to
Key West. Cost is anucipated to be
around S350-S4(X).tX)and would include
transportauon (van), lodging, activity
fees, equipment, and most food. Final
details of the trip package w ill be adver-
tised beginning November IK with regis-
tration beginning December 2.
? ROC Thanksgiving Rentals: Plan
now for your outdoor Thanksgiving
adventure. The Recreational Outdoor
Center will be open on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 26 from 3-6pm to check out rental
equipment over the holiday for a 5 day
charge with return on December 2.
A For details about these and other ex-
citing outdoor adventure programs stop
by the ROC - The Recreational Outdoor
Center in 117 Christenbury Gym or call
757-6911.
� Fitness is as easy as" A. B.C�.M. No-
vember 18-21 ECU Faculty. Staff, and
students are eligible to take pan in any
one fitness class offered FREEof charge.
But here's the catchyour last name has
to begin with the daily alphabet combi-
nation. Call 757-6387 to see when you
are eligible to participate.
� 2nd Session Fitness Classes End:
2nd session fitness classes will end
Tuesday, November 26. December 2-
12, drop-in classes at both Christenbury
Gymnasium and the Pipeline Pumphouse
will be held. Stop by 204 Christenbury
Gym for a drop-in schedule.
SGA
"he author of the resolution,
Matthew Gilbert, vice-chair ol
RuJesaridjwiiciaiyCornrrB ttee, said
there are three opti i � aveth
resolution.
Gilbert said he could a; p
the decision of the Rules and udi
iry immittev, oratten ;
'e the resolution from t
'idar by a tv.
� '� I � the legislative bod) - i
write and introduce a new res

"Mygriefisthatlo . li
the committte meetin'G; I
said
Gilbert said he was under the
impression that theComn � -
going to fix spelling errors u
resolution during the comn

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Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp
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DON I 1 t )K
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Get it right.
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Get it said,
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The East
Carolinian
Nov
0
I
aoopj
Me
Ten
Thurs
Fast
Rid
ADVERTISE WITH
T EAST
CAROUNIAN
1
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
BATES PER COLUMN INCH
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
Bulk & Frequency Contract
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Advertisinf; Representatives:
Lisa Berting Beau Cannon
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Business Hours
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hts conference
tcnnial ot the
inference will
I s four year
n's Btcen-
penl vt the
i . �mpetirion,
� rence
n iige 1
lone all that
mo ing 1 ie
he pub-
ns said
s latest Kxik
. . relates
Liment to
ijf � league
� U the
re Oriole
and skip-
Weaver
a strikes
'bases
vis were
ave no
il prac-
il! thus
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sll DfcNTS
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Fun!
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in an)
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pour las) name has
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It- December 2-
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afafc
SGA
November 19,1991 alie �afit (Carolinian 3
Continued from page 1
Peach
The author of the resolution,
Matthew Gilbert, viee-chair of the
KulesandJudidaryCommittee.siid
there are three options to save the
resolution.
Gilbert said he could appeal
the derision of the Rules and udi-
dary Committee, or attempt to re-
move the absolution from the unfa-
vorable calendar by a two-thirds
vote by the legislative body, or re-
write and introduce a new resolu-
tion.
"My grief is that I couldn't be in
the committtc mceting'Gilbert
said.
Gilbert said he was under the
impression that thcCommittee was
going to fix spelling errors in the
resolution during the committee
meeting. 1 lesaid he had previously
spoken to four members of the
commirte during another meeting
but an additional tour who voted
had not heard him speak.
Gilbert said he has obtained
copies (if the court reports of the
Kittrell case and also plans on talk-
ing to Chancellor Richard Eakin
l'ripp Roakes, employee) A the
Pirate Club, spoke to SGA and said
new information on student Peach
Bowl tickets is coming in day by
day.
"he ECU ticket office currently
holds 20,000 tickets, of which a sec-
tion will be offered tor students on
I Vc. 2 Roakes said.
On Dec. 2, student organiza-
tions can a t blcx k seating and stu-
dents with a valid ECU ID can buy
tickets for the Peach Bowl.
If it appears that there will not
be enough tickets for all ECU stu-
dents who want toattend thegame,
officials may discontinue the policy.
Speakerof the House, Courtnev
lones announced a committee is
being formed for the Recreational
Services, double funding, resolu-
tion.
Alex Martin, SGA president,
suggested a recommendation be
made to the Board of Trustees to
raise student activities fees $1 per
student for RS.
"This would leave us (SGA)
with the same amount of money
but club sports could have their
own funding from RS Martin said.
Continued from page 1
stayed in the stadium 15-20 min-
utes after the game, and the players
came back out to the stadium to
acknowledge their support.
"We now have fans that stay
four quarters and even after the
game Arnold said.
"Its been a long time coming
Ernie Lewis, linebacker for the Pi-
rates said. "This whole season I
would dedicate to the seniors be-
cause they set the foundation and
now we have to keep building
With ECUbeingallotted 20,000
tickets, every Pirate fan who wants
to go should have no problem get-
ting one. Also, Atlanta has more
hotels thanany city in theEastCoast.
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IT'S COLLEGE NIGHT"
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$.75 Draft
$1.75 House Hi-Balls
$1.00 Off Shooters
Relaxed Dress Code � Underage Students Allowed
� Doors Open 9 pm � Ladies in Free before 1000
� Band Plays 10:30 - 2:00
In The Hilton Inn Greenville � 207 SW Greenville Blvd � 355-5000
Get it right,
Get it straight,
Get it told,
Get it sold,
Get it said,
Get it read,
Get it all,
Get-
The East
Carolinian
ADVERTISE WITH
THE JESST
CAROLINIAN
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
RATES PER COLUMN INCH
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Advertising Representatives:
Lisa Betting� Beau Cannon
Jim Knisely 'Richard Littiken
Andy Sutorius
Business Hours
Monday .Friday
9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
Student Union
November Events November 19-25
Open-Mic Nig
TONIGHT!
Tuesday. Nov. 19 � The Undenpound
&Q0RM
Metropolitan
Vfednesdny,Nov.20
Terminator II
Thurs Fii, end Sat. Nk 21 -23
Fast Times at
Ridgemont High
Hendrixlheatre &00PJVL
T-A Theme Dinner I
Monday,Nou25 MSCMuM-
PutpaseRoom 6c30PJVL
TAFfci Joe&MnylizAdw
Mountains Southern Style
HendrixTheatre &00RM.
Peach Bowl Ticket Info.
ECU students may purchase Peach Bowl tickets at the
Student Organization Booth in Mendenhall Student
Center Dec. 2-4 between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Tick-
ets are $32 each.
Any ECU fan may order tickets by sending their
name, address, daytime phone number and the quan-
tity of tickets requested on a sheet of paper, along
with payment in form of check or Mastercard or Visa
to the ECU Athletic Ticket Office, Minges Coliseum,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353. There is a $3 service
charge per order (not ticket).
Ticket order forms may also be picked up at any
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�lie HZnzt Cartfltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
W. Douglas Morris, Jr Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Matt Jones, Wens Editor
Jennifer VVardrep, Assistant News Editor
MATT King, Entertainment Editor
Lewis Coble, Assistant Entertainment Editor
Brian Kerns, Sports Editor
Lf.Ceair Harper, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
RICHARD HASELRIG, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
LARRY HUGGINS, Circulation Manager
M. Chanial Weedman, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The Eiiu Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that aflects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bids ECU, Greenville, N.C,
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, November 19, 1991
Pirates will win Peach Bowl
The Pirates are now confirmed for the Peach
Howl alter having proven themselves once again
by defeating Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.
Throughout the season, the Pirates have
been continually underrated. People said that
the Pirates would not be able to receive a bid for
a bowl on New ear's Day. Often, ECU has been
picked to lose to teams they ended up del eating.
Always, the Pirates havesurprised the har-
bingers ot doom by overcoming their predic-
tions.
After ECl defeated Virginia Tech, 1 ee
Courso,a football commentator on ESPN, com-
mitted mock hara kari with a Pirate saber bear-
ingthe phrase 'i Believe" to atone for his lack of
faith. Two weeks before the game. Courso had
said that he was certain the Pirates could not
defeat the Hokiesin Blacksburg.
Now there is one final hurdle left tor the
team to leap. The Pirates will finish the regular
season against Cincinnati next week and then
will have over a month to prepare tor N.C State.
Five years ago, the series between these
two rivals ended when ECU defeated N.C. State
32-14 and spectators proceeded to celebrate on
the field, finally leaving with the goal posts.
The post-game celebration rated national
coverage and was used as a reason to discon-
tinue the series.
In the following week, ECU was blamed
for beating up a police officer and just generally
being poor winners. The Pirate fans wereeven-
tually exonerated when ECU Public Safety offi-
cials identified the assailant asa native of Cary
and not an ECU student.
By then the damage had been done. Jim
Valvano, N.C. State director oi athletics at the
time, suspended the series indefinitely.
Now, the two teams will (ace off again in
Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium on New Year's
Day.
It seems fitting (from a Pirate fan's point of
view) that the stadium is t he same one where the
Braves gained the respect ot a nation in their
pursuit of the National League Pennant.
The Pirates' saber slash is a spin-off from
the Braves' tomahawk chop And the Pirates
fought from semi-obscurity at the beginning of
the season to be ranked highly in the Associated
Press poll (13th).
Across the country, ECU has made believ-
ers of almost everyone. How better to end to this
season than a rebirth oi the local rivalry between
these two teams.
The Pirates will win. Ask any ECU fan and
they will say "I believe
So, to paraphrase Jeff Charles, the voice of
the Pirates, ECU will paint the peach purple.
Entertainment
The Other Side
U.S. citizens dislike Bill of Rights
By John Carter
Editorial Columnist
The Soviet Union has been the
biggest enemy of the United States for
many years, until now. With the fall oi
Communism, the Soviets have turned
to the U.S. tor aid and mav wn be-
come a full-fledged ally.
In theory, Communism, or
Marxism (in itsoriginal form), is pi
abty the best form of governnu l
U nder Marxism, all the people (worked
solely for the benefit of the nation. A!l
wages earned would godirecdytothe
government and would then be dis-
tributed evenly among the people. Of
course, the government would take a
cut right off the top.
The Soviets blew it. When they
tried to adopt Marxism, they ended
up changing too many things about it
and never properly established this
form oi government. Instead, they
ended up with Communism and it
never had much chance oi surviving
For one thing, most of the world
opposed this new government. As a
result, nations cut off trade with the
Soviet Union and did whatever they
could to help this government fail. No
nation can survive without some out- f
side support. (Excluding Israel; Israel
doesn't seem to need anyone's help to
survive.)
Now, most of the world seems
to be adopting our stvle of govern-
ment: Democracy. Mav Cod help us
all.
There are SO many problems
with Democracy as v know it that it
is hard to find a starting place. So, let's
start with politicians. In reference to
Bureaucrats, the comedian Callagher
said "it ought to be spelled b-u-r-r-o.
like they act. Bingo
Congress can't balance a bud-
get.Thev write hundredsof thousands
of dollars worth of bad checks con-
stantly.They can't decide who should
receive funds for what; who should
serve on what job or what position or
anything else. Words are spelled the
way they art- for a reason, s
the opposite of pro, then congress must
be the opposite or progress
ndlv. nobody truly betk es
in the whole basis of a Democi
Our Bill ot Rights is basically null and
�. id it least when it applies to some-
� � her than ourselves.
We don't truly believe in free-
dom of speech We hide behind this
right m : en we are theone that is being
censored then we turn around and
try to censor others. On top of this, we
:rv to show that whatever wedo
burrung) is somehowaform of speech,
therefore justifying our actions. In re-
ality, some of these actions closely
resemble treason.
We don't believe in the right to
beararms. Asa result, wchavepeople
pushing for more firearms regulations.
The Constitution clearly states that
the right to bare arms shall not be
infringed upon Yet we infringe upon
it constantly.
Chir individual rights what s
many people have died trying to ob-
tain. The dying has not stopped vet
and we still do not fully have the
rights promised bv the Constitution.
This whole concept ot majority
ru'es isa big problem. It is fine as long
as our opinion happens to be what the
majority believes, but, as sooa as we
are in the minority, everyone else is
wrong and we are right.
A government cannot operate
this way We elect our leaders on a
basis of majority rules It our leaders
are screwing then all we can do is
veto them out of office next time What
really makes people angry is when
the rest of the voters re.vlect that per-
son they thought was screwing up.
Think about allot' the bad things said
about Sen. Jesse Helms and rhoseofus
that voted for hi m.reople make out as
if he is so terrible, but the majority ot
this state wrants him in office.
We don't believe in mat'rv
rule. When you operatea government
on this basis, majority rule am ins
wavs; not just sometirri -
We don't brik w fn ntei
- S ire, �
shou to I
� own bush ess i i
rovero
don't :
I. wealthy whi ui
comes along with t:
Peopb can't � � � �
. � � r. We
� �
thesai r.
munism and we a w that
Communism u ill not
In contr tsttotl
to believe that ever I
equal taxes We de
brackets so that people .
from about 1 5 percent �
taxes. Why not devis i �
e eryone pays 2 percent11 �
$10 last year, your taxes u
it vou made S10 million, .
would be S2 million.
Basically, we d
the principles thai our goven
was founded upon. 11
us free. Today, th
a terrible idea If it is so bad ��� �
:t work so welU It
were worth dying tor, whj
work around them irrftWKl or .
them1
rheSo tet Lfo
beour friend. We dk
much about them an, :r n N
an i:r biggest enemy W
StTO) � :
The Civil Wai eve '��
ich other in I
and ki thei � � i.
are not tl n i tbk n
people.
We don't believe in each other
anymore and we don't 'rv.u m in our
government. No, there is nogood
of government. Denruvrao, is the best
from the choices we ha1, e
present conditions, our Democracv
will never survive Since ���
model tor the rest ot the world
will happen toother nations ore
government falls?
Alumnus argues that
Pirates are better
than Notre Dame
To The Editor:
Tennessee beat Notre Dame by 1 point.
Florida beat Tennessee by 18 points.
Syracuse beat Florida by 17 points.
ECU beat Syracuse by 3 points.
Therefore, ECU is 39 points better than
Notre Dame.
David Cox
Alumnus
Class of '43
Residents treated
like children during
Halloween night
To The Editor;
Well, here it is again. Halloween. All of
those Greenville watchdogs are at it again. As
a result, I am being treated with about as much
freedom and respect as a common criminal.
What am I referring to specifically? I am
referring to that ridiculous rule that does not
allow visitors in dorm rooms past 8 p.m.�not
even other campus residents are allowed in
How ridiculous can one get?
I understand fully that the law enforce-
ment is concerned and doesn't want dorm
residents bringing in all kinds of trouble mak-
ers from the outside, but why in the world are
they saying that even other dorm residents
cannot come in? It makes me feel like I am in
elementary school all over again, being forced
to sit "boy-girl, boy-girl" rather than with my
specific friends. When am i going to be treated
like an adult over here?
I am 22 years old, almost 23.1 am plenty
old and mature enough to invite whomever
over I want to and be responsible with any
problems caused thereby. To not be allowed to
bring over friends from other dorms � most
of which would honestly never hurt a flea � is
totally stupid and ridiculous. Why in the world
does Greenville go so overboard on Oct. 31.
What's so bad, in addition to making me
feel like I am still in elementary school, is that
I'm being punished for the infamous Hallow-
een party of 1988, when I wasn't even enrolled
over here at that time � as is the case with
many others as well.
A news flash for you, folks � next year,
Halloween is on a Saturday night. What are
you going todo then? Declarean8p.m. "lights-
out" curfew and order us to wear a dunce cap
and stick our noses in a corner if we do not
comply? It wouldn't surprise me.
I am just short of 23 years old, and I am
sick to death of being treated like an ignorant,
1
Letters to the Editor
immature little brat. I am always being told
that one has to act like an adult in order to be
treated like an adult. Well, I have, but I'm not.
Larry R. Harrison, Jr.
Senior
Accounting.
Student retracts
accusation against
Chancellor, secretary
To The Editor;
Recently, I had a letter published stating
that the chancellor must have been to busy to
discuss a grade I had received in a math class
I took here. I goofed, I stuck my foot in my
mouth and I need to correct my erroneous
statement for my own conscious and for the
ones 1 offended.
I had given the Chancellor's secretary a
friends phone number so that she could con-
tact this friend in order for us to meet with the
Chancellor ti discuss this math class. I thought
I had given the Chancellor's secretary my
phone number as well.
lam sorry I insinuated that the Chancel-
lor did not care to talk with me and that his
secretary had not contacted me or this friend.
I know that they both have busy schedules,
and they did notdescrve this statement against
them.
.
The chancellor told me the reason why
the grades received under this teacher could
not be taken off of our transcripts.
1 am dissatisfied over this incident, but
I realize that nothing can be done on the cam-
pus level.
Perhaps this rule can be rewritten to
accommodate certain situations.
Again, I am very sorry.
Ronald Mercer
Junior
Chemistry
SGA funds should
be used for academic
groups, not RS
To The Editor:
Asamemberof theECli Environmental
Health Club I ask: what ever happened to the
importance of academics?
The recent debate over the continued
funding of Club Sports by the SGA is a very-
important issue
Regarding the appropriation of funds
by Student Government for Recreational
Sports activities. The Recreational Sports De-
partment indeed has their own budget of about
5750,000.00, yet allocates only 3 orS10,000.00
for Club Sports.
The SGA spends 20 of their budget.
about S30,000.00, on Club Sports. The cues
tion that arises is why does Recreational Sports
appropriate so little funding tor its responsi-
bilities? Student Government should not be
made to bear any responsibility for athletics
when there is a Recreational Sports Depart-
ment and an Athletic Department (about
S3.000,000.G0 budget).
Both departments receive vastly larger
budgets from Student Activity Fees than does
SGA.
SGA responsibilities should provide a
more equitable representation of other stu-
dent activities rather than athletics.
Bill Winchester
Department of Environmental Health
ECU
Christian Science
wrongly referred to as
'crap' by columnist
To The Editor:
Asone who wasbroughtupin the Chris-
tian Science faith, 1 felt it was unprofessional
of your editorial columnist, Scott Maxwell, to
refer to an aspect of that faith as "crap
Larry Herter
Graduate Student
Business School
Attic pulsa
pop waves
By Lewis Coble
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Tame is the sudden, overpow-
ering response some people often
experien e when hearing a new
blind for the first time; however.
Panic isalsothenameofaband that
will be appearing at the Attic on
Nov.21. And no, that's not how the
band gOl its name
Pastil out of Virginia Beach,
Panic is a progressive band whose
music has been described as "dance-
rock "dance-oriented tunk" and
"avant-dance
The band's influences an.1 as
diverse as the history of each of the
band members. I "he-diversity in the
band's music is reflected by the
cover tunes they play. Music from
the Red Hot Chili Peppers, New
Order, EMF, fesus Jones and
Depeche Mode makes up just a
sample of what Panic can plav
However, Panic
amountof original mat
own. In fact, Panic is
does not need toimita?
bands in order to achi
Panic blends the soundl
ences of other bands
sound that is entirely t
Panic has just rete
cassette, "Stand n
The new cassette is a sel
project
The title � i
The Edge is an inten
� � Tlx-kiss
as sheet I i n wit
cussions and "(
stearin tdj
"Let it G
tempo song and
is a upbeat, all-dnvingl
When listen I
ihouldbv
Ian?. md that thj
tened to in the
rm nai � 2 The ludgi
Thursday, Friday and Saturday, v.
I across tl
i nemo l
Sent back to 1984 by the 1
� rate a wa
-
� as a hei
t the
t who (if he lh the 1

sent up against a decker shape-sl �
movie forces the audience h swallow" a difl
Arnold as an underd
Fast Times at Ridgemoni Hi
Sunday. Nov. 24
Touted as the epitome of the horan
rimes" actually a :a:r re i
� . �� .
- rs' bars
bu t grea t.
"Fast Times is a mature beach oar
formed consciousness The movie i
rate, probabl) because the writer. Can
hormone land impersonating a teenager
Writing asid Fast Times'
budd ngactoi niferjasonb
and Sean Penn spend time deckling bi
getting stoned
Madrigal dinm
Bv Wes Leonhart
StJtt Writer
Haveyou ever wondered what
it would be like to attend a Christ-
mas feast at an Elizabethan manor
house of the late si teenth cert bury?
At 7 p.m. on Dec. 5-7, student
pertormers, dad m Elizabethan era
costumes, will present the 15th an-
nual Christmas Madrigal Dinner
Thecannerserie
b ttsfourairigcurecfo
IV Moore of tht
Music, and sports
Department of L'nivel
Hosts of thedinnl
Lord and Lady of the
bv the ticket-helding
All will enie.
dinner with a salute
r
PEACH BO
1992
SUPPORT THE
PIRATES IN
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agency for the Pirate Club.
To get your best value on tours to
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VX�i ���op �
ke Bill of Rights
v nere
rcent in
� where
umade
DC 9X
ir taxes
v e in
� Tent
?me
. did
leas
w c
inder
Entertainment
�he iEaat (Earoiinian
November 19,1991
Attic pulsates with
pop waves of Panic
By Lewis Coble
Assistant ntertjinment Editor
Panic is the sudden, overpow-
ering response some people often
experience when hearing a new
band for the first time; however.
Panic isalso the name of a bond that
will be appearing at the Attic on
Nov. 21. And no, that's not how the
band got its name.
Based out of Virginia Beach,
Panic is a progressive band whose
music hasbeen described as'dance-
rock "dance-oriented funk" and
avant-dance
Ihe band's influences are as
diverse as the history of each of the
band members. Thediversitvin the
band's music is reflected by the
cover tunes they play. Music from
the Rev! Hot Chili Peppers, New
Order, EMF, Jesus Jones and
Vjxvhe Mode makes up just a
sample of what Panic can play.
However, Panic has a vast
amountof original material of their
own. In fact, Panic is a band that
dots not need to imitate successful
bands in order to achieve success.
Panic blends the sounds and influ-
ences of other bands to create a
sound that is entirely their own.
Panic has just released a new
cassette, "Standing On The Edge
The new cassette is a sel f-produced
project.
The title track, "Standing On
The Edge is an intensely woven
song. "The Kiss" has been described
as sheer dance jam with Latin per-
cussions and "Crime Of Passion"
gives way to steamy funkadelics.
"Let It Go" is a solid, mid-
tempo song and "Visions Of You"
is a upbeat, all-driving dance tune.
When listening to Panic, any-
one shouldbe able find some simi-
larity to a band that they have lis-
tened to in the past, such as Simple
Terminator 2: The Judgement Day
Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 21-23
Arnold Schwarzenegger pummcled across the screen a an
i : al cyborg of destruction in the original "Terminator
back to 1984 by the leaders of the world in 2029, his mission is
liti rate ,i waitress whose womb will beget a future resistance
1 righteningand funn) he led this movie to box office block
'� now he's back as a hero. In the sequel,
' negg ' - job is to protect the xtcntial juvenile delin-
who (u he lives) will attempt to save the future from the
ines. But, there's a catch; od Arnold is an outdated model
up against a sleeker shape-shifting cyborg. Basically, the
vie forces the audience to "swallow" a difficult concept �
Id as an underdoe.
Fast rimes at Ridgemont Higfi
Sunday, Nov. 24
11 Ute
of th, -
s the epitome oi the hormone carbonating teen Hicks
ast I Lmes" is actually a fair representation oi high
school life I g out that this movie is above B status is like
rtgthat Snickers 'bars and Coke are nutritional� startling,
but great
"Fast Times" is a mature beach party; it has "evolved and
formi igher consciousness The movie is undeniably accu-
rate, probably because the writer, Cameron Crowe, spent a year in
hormone land impersonating a teenager.
V riting aside "Fast Times" will also be remembered for its
tors It nniferjason Leigh, PhoebeCates, Judge Keinhold
ng between surfing, studying or
e ciecnj;
Minds, TheOutficId or Naked Eyes.
Panic's music demonstrates a lot of
work and talent. The quality of the
band's music is largely due to the
members' long history together and
their individual backgrounds
Panic is made up of four mem-
bers: David "Dukes"Simmons,per-
cussions and drums; Carv Lvons,
bass;Scottie Land ry,guitarand Tod
Washbum, guitar and keyboards.
Each member sings lead vocals on
different songs.
Panic was originally based in
Charlotte, N.C, but moved to Vir-
ginia Beach, Va. to increase their
visibility to record labels and reach
a crowd that was more open to their
music.
The band now plays clubs and
colleges from Florida to Halifax,
Nova Scotia. However, the band
centers their club scenes to the areas
of New Jersey, Virginia, Washing-
ton, D.C. and Delaware.
Photo courtesy Cellar Door Entertainment
Panic, one of the hardest-working bands on the East Coast, will be at the Attic this weekend The band
specializes in souped-up, electronic, alternative pop. Panic has pleased Greenville crowds tor a decade.
ECU graduate hits prime -time TV
By joe Horst
Staff Writer
Graduates from the Theater
Arts Department at IX T' have gone
on to lively and fulfilling careers in
TV and film. One of the more recent
a nd memora bfc grad ua tes has been
Sandra Bulkxrk, who starred in the
movie "Love Potion 9" and the
short-lived television show, "Work-
ing Girl
But Connie Ray,a 1977gradu-
ate from ECU. is rivaling Bullock's
Success with her own in TV and otf-
Broadway productions
Ray is currently starring in the
new 'BC television sitcom, "The
Torkelsons Playing Millicent
Torkelson, a single housewife and
mother living in Pyramid Comers,
Ok Ray portraysa woman single-
handedly trying to raise five chil-
dren and still manage to keep a roof
over their heads.
Endlesslycheerf ul witha tough
streak running through her, Ray-
constantly strives to make up for
the family's lack of material goods
by instilling a sense of family and
togetherness into her children.
Ray was bom on a dairv farm
outside of Chapel Hill, N.C
She started acting at the early
age of 10, winning local and district
4-H Club competitions with an
original play titled "Maude &
Myrtle Ray and her brother went
to Raliegh for the statewide con-
test. When asked if the production
Photo Courtesy of Toucnstone Television
ECU graduate, Connie Ray, stars as the sweet-talk'in mama, Millicent,
on NBC's new comedy series, "The Torkelsons "
crew could get her anything, Ray
said, "A spotlight
Ray got the spotlight and from
that point on, Ray said, "You could
not keep me on the farm after that
I la i ng graduated in 1977, Ray
ma jored m acting before the Profes-
sional Actor Training Program was
developed in 1984. "Connie was
talented and serious in our
classesDon Biehn, associate pnv
lessor, said.
"She trusted her instincts and
her work on The Torkelsons' re-
flex ts a string sense of self
She's a wonderful actress
Ray moved on to Ohio Uni-
versity for masterscoursesand to a
summer theater at Cape Cod after
she graduated.
After Ohio University, Rav be-
gan her career as an actress and
playwright.
Ray's first stab at
piaywrighhhg, "Betsy Loves Soup
Beans launched her into guest-
star spotson As the World Turns
"One Lite to Live and parts in
Broadwav and regional t heater pro-
ductions.
Ray's talents in acting and per-
forming have paid off by way of
her award-winning, otf-Broadwav
musical, "Smokeon the Mountain
Nominated tor a Drama Desk
Award mo Outer Critics' Circle
honors, "Smoke on the Mountain"
ran tor 14 weeks and received rave
reviews from critics.
Ra y a trri bu tes some of her suc-
cess to the acting classes she at-
tended here at ECU.
"I think you have to have basic
skills Ray said.
"You have to have a basic tech-
nique and you have to have a com-
mon language.
There is a language out there
that is used in acting � that every-
body knows � and if you don't
know that, you're in trouble
In "TheTorkelsonsRav works
with Lev Norms, another veteran oi
East Carolina Summer Theater.
Madrigal dinner tradition continues
�: her
HI
form
I
are a
hat
e our
By VVes Leonhart
Staff Writer
I lave you ever wondered what
it would be like to attend a Christ-
mas feast at an Elizabethan manor
house of the late sixteenth centurv?
At 7 p.m. on Dec. 5-7, student
erformers,clad in Elizabethan era
stumes, will present the 13th an-
imal Christmas Madrigal Dinner
Series.
Thedinnerseriesiscoordinated
by its founding director, Dr. Charles
W. Moore of the ECU S hool of
Music, and sponsored by the ECU
Department of University Unions.
Hosts of the dinner will be the
Lord and Lad1 of the Manor, joined
by the ticket-holding guests.
All will enjoy a fine traditional
dinner with a salute to the Boar's
Head, a wassail toast to everyone's
health, and a flaming desert.
Some of the student perform-
ers will be eight maidensof the ECU
Madrigal Singers, seven dancers
from the ECU Department of The-
atre Artsand a Lord High chamber-
lain.
Other entertainment includes-
juggling, tumbling, poetry reciting,
atrioof herald trumpetersandother
musicians and costumed servants.
All who attend can be sure to
find a warm atmosphere filled with
merriment. At the end of each
evening, the dinner guests will join
the performers in a Christmas carol
sing-along.
For those who wish to attend
this dramatic feast, tickets may be
obtained at the ECU Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter or by phoning 757-4788 or 1-
800-ECU-ARTS.
Those1 who purchase the tickets
in person will be allowed to chose
their seats at the banquet tables.
Student and youth tickets are
$15 each, premium seats are $25
each and other seats are $20 each.
Seating charts are being kept
for each night's celebration; one
night is already sold out, but some
places are still open for the other
two nights. Major credit cards are
accepted at the ticket office.
So consider celebrating the
yuletide season in an Elizabethan
atmosphere with fine food and joy-
ous entertainment for all.
This simulated sixteenth-cen-
tury dinner has become an ECU
tradition and promises to entertain
as well as educate.
I DC
� ithletica
� Depart-
� about
Student
tn ore
dent act
� ! � �� larger
' v � an does
ties si fuW provide a
' tation of other stu-
Mn athletics.
1C
Bill V.
ronmental Health
11
Christian Science
wrongly referred to as
'crap' by columnist
imenta!
to the
a V; -V
It tunds
phonal
rts De-
n about
lOOOXM
tian Scie
was brought up in thcChris-
I felt it was unprofessional
ot your editorial columnist, Scott Maxwell to
refer to an aspect of that faith as "crap
Larry Herter
Graduate Student
Business School
PEACH BOWL
1992
SUPPORT THE
PIRATES IN
ATLANTA!
ITG Travel Center is proud to be the official
agency for the Pirate Club.
To get your best value on tours to Atlanta
call ITG Travel Center immediately to
receive information on our various
packages.
ITG Travel Centers
GREENVILLE
I 355-5075
RALEIGH
782-2662
DURHAM � RTP
941-5014
CHAPEL HILL
967-1438
J
ty
"Greenville's Only Exotic Nightclub"
Adult Entmrtainmmnt Cmnfw
Location: (Old 264 Playhouse) Big blue building behind Earl's
Store on Farmville Highway 264 Alt.
TUESDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers.
WEDNESDAYS:
Amateur Night (Female Dancers). Cash Prize.
Doors Open at 4:00 pm.
THURSDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers.
Doors Open at 4:00 pm.
FRIDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers.
Doors open at 4:00 pm.
SATURDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female"Exotic" Dancers.
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 off admission Saturday Night.
Open Tues.Sat.VALID ID Required at the Door
Interviews Accepted for New Dancers. Call 756-6278
(excludes service specials and accessories)
MUST SHOW STUDENT I.D.
East Carolina
Auto & Truck Center
Lincoln Mercury Chrysler Plymouth Dodge CMC
MWV 11IIM BVMSS � �MKNVtLLC, MC
355-3333
Dodge
CAM NOT BE USED WITH OTHBCCHJfOK
iBj
I





"f
Ofj CRAP
AAoNPAv
V.
Ik
cs.
ke Bill of Rights
part-

nic
. ide a
n stu-
Christian Science
wrongly referred to as
'crap' bv columnist
nal
II, to
��
Entertainment
ulbx iEast (Earulinian
November 19,1991
Attic pulsates with
pop waves of Panic
By Lewis Coble
V t.i in l ntertatnment Edkoi
is the sudden, overpow-
� ponse some people often
perience when hearing a new
ind tor the first time; however,
mu is also the nameofa band that
appearing at tht Attic on
I And no. that's not how the
I got its name.
ed out of Virginia Beach,
a progressive band whose
beendeseribed as "dance-
dance oriented sunk" and
� dance
���' band s influences are as
- as the history of each of the
nd members, rhediversityinthe
music is reflected by the
ver tunes they play. Music from
Red Hot Chili Peppers, New
i EMF, esus ones and
peche Mode nukes up just a
�I w hat Panic can play.
I lowever, Panic has a vast
amount of original material of their
own. In fact, Panic is a band that
does not need to imitate successful
hands in order to achieve success.
Panic blends the sounds and influ-
ences oi other bands to create a
sound that is entirely their own.
Panic has just released a new
cassette, "Standing On The Edge
I he new cassette isa self-produced
project
The title track, "Standing On
The Edge is an intensely woven
song. "The Kiss" hasbeendescribed
as sheer dance jam with Latin per-
cussions and "Crime Of Passion"
gives way to Steamy funkadelics.
"Let It Go" is a solid, mid-
tempo song and "Visions Of You"
is a upbeat, all-driving dance tune.
When listening to Panic, any-
one shouldbe able find some simi-
larity to a band that they have lis-
tened torn the past, such as Simple
Minds, TheOutfield or Naked Eyes.
Panic's music demonstrates a lot of
work and talent. The quality of the
band's music is largely due to the
members' long history together and
their individual backgrounds.
Panic is made up of four mem-
bers: David "Dukes" Simmons, per-
cussions and drums; Oarv Lyons,
bass;ScotticLandry,giiitarand Tod
VVashburn, guitar and keyboards
Each member sings lead vocals on
different songs.
Panic was originally based in
Charlotte, XC, but moved to Vir-
ginia Beach, Va. to increase their
visibility to record labels and reach
a crowd that was moreopen to their
music.
The band now plays clubs and
colleges from Florida to Halifax,
Nova Scotia. However, the band
centers their club scenes to theareas
Pho"o courtesy Cellar Door Entertainment
of New lersev. Virginia, Washing- Panic, one of the hardest-working bands on the East Coast, will be at the Attic this weekend The band
ton, D.C and Delaware. specializes in souped-up. electronic, alternative pop Panic has pleased Greenville crowds for a decade
ECU graduate hits prime -time TV
By Joe Horst
St.ilt Writer
('
2: The judgement Dai
rir; '
isu.iY. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 21-23
: � � : Schi r pun meled across the screen as an
r� in I he original " i ei rr inat i
1984 by 1 � � � . tvorld in 2029 his mission is
��� � . becet a furun :t �.�� i
� �" ' � ftelcd this movie to box offi eb
�� � � � � - a hero. In the sequel
: � protect the : potential ju enile d lin
"� mpl to save the future from the
n : Arnold is an outdated model
� it a sleeker shape-shifting cyborg Basically the
' � ' swallow" ,i difficult coi cent
mt � at Ridgemont High
Sunday, Nov. 24
�mc : the hormonecarbonating teen flicks
i Mir representation iil I
thai tl is movie is above B status is like
irsand Coke are nutritional -startling
b i
s fvoiwd and
�� � me movie is unaeniaoiy accu-
e the writer, Cameron Crowe, spent a year in
iting teenager
��"�' ' rimes wiU also be remembered for its
Phoebe Cates, Judge Reinhold
� � g fcx tween surfing, studying or
I raduates trom the I heater
ArtsDepartmentatECUhaveg ne
on to lively and fulfilling careers in
rVand film. Oneofthemorc recent
and memorablegraduatcshasbcen
Sandra Bullock, who starred in the
movie "I ove Potion 9" and the
short lived television show Work-
ing l arl
But Connie Ray,a 1977gradu-
ate trom ECU, is rivaling Bullock's
su cess with herown in rV and off-
Broadway productions
Ray is currently starring in the
new NBC television sitcom, The
lorkelsons Playing Millicent
rorkelson, a single housewife and
mother living in Pyramid Comers,
C )k Kay portrays a woman single-
handedly trying to raise five chil-
drenand still manage to keep a rooi
over their heads.
Endlessly cheerful witha tough
streak running thnmgh her, Ray
constantly strives to make up tor
the family's lack of material goods
by instilling a sense of family and
togetherness into her children.
Ray was born on a dairy farm
outside of Chapel Hill, .C
She started acting at the early
age of 10, winning local and district
4-H Club competitions with an
original play titled "Maude &
Myrtle Ray and her brother went
to Raliegh tor the statewide con-
test. When asked if the production
Photo Courtesy of Toucnstone Television
ECU graduate. Connie Ray, stars as the sweet-talk'in mama. Millicent.
on NBC's new comedy series, "The Torkelsons "
crew could get her anything, Ray stonaiActorTraining Program was
said, "A spotlight developed in 1984. Connie was
Ray got the spotlight and from talented and serious in our
that point on, Ray said, "You could classes'Don Biehn, associate pro-
not keep me on the farm after that fessor, said.
1 la ing graduated in l977,Ray "She trusted her instincts and
rnajoredinactingbeforetheProfes- her work on The Torkelsons i
� i � f sell
: � �
versityfori tei � Itoa
summer �� � � al - daftei
she grad .
After thioUnivi rsity, Raj be-
gan her career as an actress and
plavwri
Raj first stab it
playwrighting Betsy 1 . Sou
Ked � nto guest-
starsj ' i: kVorld rums
Livi ind parts in
regional theat t pro-
ductions
Ray's! ting and per-
formii f by way
her a war : �� � iroadway
musk . - on the Mountain
Nominated tor a Drama Desk
Award and Outer Critics' C i
honors, "Smokeon the Mountain"
ran tor U weeks and received rave
reviews from critM -
Ray attributes some of her suc-
cess to the acting classes she at-
tended here at ECU.
"I think you have to have bask
Rav said.
"You ha veto have a basic tech-
nique and you have to have a com-
mon language.
There is a language out there
that is used in acting � that every-
body knows md if you don't
know that, you're in trouble
In "The ft ?rketeons'Ray w rks
with! eeNorris another veteran of
East( arotina Summer Theater.
Madrigal dinner tradition continues
By Wes Leonhart
Staff Writer
ivi . u ever wondered what
uld be like to attend a Christ-
feast at an Elizabethan manor
eol the late sixteenth century?
� 7 p.m. on Dec. 5-7, student
- ri rmers, clad in Elizabethan era
mes, will present the 15th an-
hristmas Madrigal Dinner
Series
Ihedinner series iscoordinated
by its founding director, Dr. Charles
W. Moore oi the ECU School of
Music, and sponsored by the ECU
Department oi University Unions.
Hosts of the dinner will be the
Lord and Lady of the Manor, joined
by the ticket-holding guests.
All will enjoy a fine traditional
dinner with a salute to the Boar's
1 lead, a wassail toast toeveryone's
health, and a flaming desert.
Some oi the student perform-
ers will be eight maidensof the ECU
Madrigal Singers, seven dancers
from the ECU Department of The-
atre Artsanda Lord Highchamber-
lain.
Other entertainment includes -
juggling, tumbling, poetry reciting,
a trioof herald trumpetersand other
musicians and costumed servants
All who attend can he sure to
find a warm atmosphere filled with
merriment. At the end of each
evening, the dinner guests M ill join
the performers in a Christmas carol
sing-along.
Eor those who wish to attend
this dramatic feast, tickets may be
obtained at the ECU Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter or by phoning 75 T Ss or I-
B00 ECU-ARTS.
rhosewho purchase the tickets
in person will be allowed to chose-
their seats at the banquet tables.
Student and youth tickets are
SI5 each, premium seats are $25
each and other seats are $20 each.
Seating charts are being kept
for each night's celebration; one
night is already sold out, but some
es are still open for the other
two nights Major credit cards are
accepted at the ticket office.
So consider celebrating the
vuiotidc season m an Elizabethan
atmosphere with tine food and joy-
ous entertainment tor all.
This simulated sixteenth cen-
tury dinner has become an ECU
tradition and promises to entertain
as well as educate.
PEACH BOWL
1992
SUPPORT THE
PIRATES IN
ATLANTA!
ITG Travel Center is proud to be the official
agency for the Pirate Club.
To get your best value on tours to Atlanta
call ITG Travel Center immediately to
receive information on our various
packages.
ITG Travel Centers
GREENVILLE
355-5075
RALEIGH
782-2662
DURHAM � RTP
941-5014
CHAPEL HILL
967-1438
"Greenville's Only Exotic Nightclub"
Adult Entertainment Center
.ocation (Old 264 Playhouse) Big blue building behind Earl's
Store on Farmville Highway 264 Alt
TUESDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers.
WEDNESDAYS:
Amateur Night (Female Dancers). Cash Prize.
Doors Open at 4:00 pm.
THUr3DAYS:
Silver bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers.
Doors Open at 4:00 pm.
FRIDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers.
Doors open at 4:0C pm.
SATURDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female'Exotic" Dancers.
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 off admission Saturday Night.
Jpen Tues.Sat. VALID ID Required at the Door
Interviews Accepted for New Dancers. Call 756-6278
(excludes service specials and accessories)
MUST SHOW STUDENT I.D.

East
Auto & Truck Center
Lincoln Mercurv Chralcr Ptvmoulh
Dodge
(iM(.
HWY 11IM4 IYMII � aM CMVtIXC, MC
355-3333
He
Dodge
MERCURY
LINCOLN
QIVIC
CAN NOT IE USED WITH OTHEt COUPONS





Classifieds
Fh;e SaHt (Earwltnian
November 19,1991
Sports
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY: 1 black doctoral
gown and mortar board; should fas-
ten in front. Please phone Marge
Inman at 757-6929.
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typing and photocopying services.
We also sell software and computer
diskettes. 24 hours in and out. Guar-
anteed typing oi. paper up to 20 hand
written pages. SDFProfessiona 1 Com-
puter Ser-ices, 106 East 5th St. (be-
side Cubbie's), Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
ABSOLUTELY PROFESSIONAL
TYPING: Fast service and lowprioes!
Call 321-2522 after 5 p.m.
TYPING, WORD PROCESSING
AND FAX SERVICES: Fast sen ice,
low prices. Free pick up and delivery!
Call 355-2203.
FREE HAIRCUT TO FIRST FIVE
GIRLS WHO CALL: Regularly S7.
Sketch of haircut included. Short cuts
a specialty. Jay'sCuts and Styles, 355-
0168. Please leave message.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED Jfc
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
. Thu Lee Building
Greenville, NC
Usmn
M-F 8:30 am-3pm
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE. Fast, accurate,
grammarical corrections, copies upon
request Reasonable rates, convenient
location. Call Angie at 756-8545 days
or 753-3924 after 6 p.m. Leave mes-
sage.
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
for spring semester. Non-smoker to
share 2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment.
SI57.50 and 12 utilities and cable.
Have 1 cat-no more pets. Call 335-
1644.
ROOMMATE WANTED: in quiet
neighborhood near campus. Female
only. SI25.00 monthly plus 1 2 utili-
ties and phone. No pets. Call after 3
p.m. 758-4789.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share 2
bedroom apartment. S215 rent elec-
tricitv. 1 12 baths, washerdryer,
fireplace. Graduate students only.
756-1699.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
for spring semester to share 3 bed-
room house close to campus. SI54.34
and 13 utilities. Have a dog. Call
830-1674.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
WANTED ASAP: Non-smoker,
S115.00- . Jutilibes, I '12fromcarn-
pus,onEC U bus route. Call 758-8652
anytime.
SUB1 II 2h � i ��� duplex I bl �
from campus con etelj furnished.
TVc. 2 Aug 5 oi portion thereof.
S325 monthly plus utilities and de-
posit Refen noes re. uired Call 830-
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for sprii to si ire 2 bedroom apart-
ment 5 I 2 blocks from campus,
rent 2 utilities no pets, no
children. Call 757-1 $72.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
FOR RENT
WANTED: Female roommate to
share 3 bedroom house w3 other
students. 3 blocks from campus.
S137.50month. 14 utilities. Call
Kristen at 752-8112.
WALK TO CAMPUS: 1 block from
ECU. Spacious home available Dec.
1.4 bedroom, 2 1II bath, central air,
washerdryer. No pets. 758-7515.
A Beautiful l'lacc to live
�All New
�And Ready To Rcni-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5ih Sircct
�Iocatcd Near HCU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across I'rom Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - S330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8, 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroiwn furnished apartments,
energy effkicrtt. tree i?cr and sewer, aher�, dryeri.
cable TV. Couples or au-igje only. J240 a mortth. 6
momh Inn MOBILE HOME RENTALS couples or
singles. Apartmeni uJ mubJe humes m AaJea Gardena
near Brook Valley Country Cub.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
FOR SALE
GILBERT'S MUSIC: offers20 dis-
count to ECU students and faculty -
40�' of! non-stocked items. Musical
instrument repairs of all types. 2711
F lOthSt 757-2667.
FOR SAIL: Nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
mobile home set up in a quiet park
dose to campus Washerdryer, A
C, 2 sheds Was 53,500. Reduced to
S3,(Xi Call
3-HH).
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for
l Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
s1
RAISIMG
lor your Trmtmmlfy.
emo r or 11 y. tfrrr or otrt&r
campum organisation.
INVfS7MNr RflOUiMDf
CALL 1 -800-950-8472. ext. SO
1982 YAMAHA MAXIM: Excellent
running condition. Looks sharp, too!
A steal at S700all Greg at830-9131.
FULL SIZL REFRIGERATOR: for
sale. S30, Good condition. Call 758-
8225 after 5:30 p.m. or 757-1295 be-
tween 11) a.m. -530 p.m.
FOR SALL: Airline ticket, one way,
Greenville to I os Angeies.$15Q. Con-
firmed for Dec 16 but valid through
Dec. 31, except someholidavblockout
dates Call 830-9125.
FOR SALE: Comfortable brown
couch-$35, brown rediner chair-$20
Negotiable. Call Juli 752-5139. Leave
message.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library ot information In U.S.
19.27$ TOPICS - ALL SUBJECTS
aw Ctttiog Toaay vWi VISA. VC cr CCD
EEL 800-351-0222
0' Rusi � X lo -vvi -v � -u�
n3?2 i3ao Ave rex A 10 Ajem CA 90G7S
FOKSAIF
FOR SALE: Brand new, nevr used
Nishika 35 mm 3-D camera, case,
flash. SI75 or best offer. 752-5663.
FOR SALE: Snake ball python. 50
gallon tank. Many accessories. Great
disposition. 757-1018. Ask for Rob.
SEGA GENESIS FOR SALE: Three
weeks old, with extra controller, ste-
reohookups,seven games. $500 value
only asking S350. Price negotiable.
Call 758-5354. Ask for Lew.
WANTED
EXERCISE INSTRUCTORS
WANTED: Part-time. Hours vary.
For more information, contact
Kathleen Shank 758-6892. Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department.
FUNDRAISER: We're looking for a
top fraternity, sorority, or student
organization that would like to earn
$500-51500 for a one week on-cam-
pus marketing project. Must be orga-
nized and hard working. Call Jo Ann
or Pam at 1-800-592-2121.
MAKE S500-S1000 WEEKLY: stuff-
ing envelopes at home. Start now!
Rush S.A.S.E. plus SI .00 to Home
Employers, 2301 Kent 8 Las Cruees,
NM 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED IMME-
DIATELY! Noexpenence necessary.
Process FHA mortgage refunds
Work at home. Call 1-405-321-3064.
THL CREDIT BUREAU OF
GREENVILLE: is seeking part-time
collectors. Flexible hours between 9
a.m. to 3 am Monday thru Thurs-
day. We will train. Call Terri Mohr at
757-2101.
EXPERIENCED WAITERS AND
WAITRESSES: Fine dining. Apply
in person at( ireenvilleCountryQub,
Tuesday-Friday after 3 p.m.
PART-TIMESALES:EARTHSAFE:
Sell to residents and businesses for
recycle pick-up. Sign up 10 and cam
S100 cash. Call 758-9411 for Cliff.
HLLP WANTED Morning hours
only apply- Apply in person at Car-
pet Bargain Center at 1009 Dickinson
Ave.
BIG MONEY: Telemarkerersand de-
livery. Call 757-0567.
PERSONALS
SPRING BREAK '92: You've only
got one week to liveso don't blow it!
Make it Jamaica with low, low prices
starting at $429 Call Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
PI DELTA PLEDGES: Thank you all
for the great birthday gift. Love,
Teresa.
PI DELTA SISTERS: We are really
looking forward to the 1st Annual
Founder's Day Formal. We love you!
The pledges.
NAD, NAD: If s bad, what you had.
Still more dues to be paid to hand w
Mas. Bros.
EAST CAROLINAUNIVERSITY:
'The Best Univeristy in the South
PI DELTA: Congratulations to out-
going President Jennifer Schustcrand
to incoming President Meg Lewis. To
the new pledges, you are in for a
super new year at ECU.
TUCKINS, TUCKINS. If you want
that special guy to be tucked in nighty-
nighton Tuesday, call the AOPi house
PERSONALS
or 931-9560 for more information.
Sweet Dreams
JENNIFER: Good luck with student
teaching 2nd semester. "DAD
ADPI ALPHAS: Thanks for coming
over and eating pizza. We will all
have to get together again. AOPi
pledges.
ECUBOWL BOUND PIRATES: You
arealwavs.No. 1 with us. Senior dass
1991 P. E. Majors.
WE ARE ON A ROLL: to a bowl! We
proudlv support the ECU Pirates'
Good job you guys! ECU Ambassa-
dors.
HAPPY 21ST BIRTHDAY: Jennifer
Lee Schuster! Proud to have you for a
daughter. Have a great senior year.
Love va'll, "DAD
CONGRATULATIONS TO
BILL LEWIS AND THE EAST
CAROLINA PIRATES FOR
THEIR PEACH BOWL BID
AGAINST N.C STATE!
WHO'S AFRAID OF THE
BIG BAD WOLF? NOT US
WE BELIEVE
NEVER BE EMBARRASSED AGAIN!
ORDER BY MAIL!
�Pregnancy Test � Acne Medicine � Laxatives
� Embarrassing Creams and Sprays �Contra-
ceptive Items Much, Much More
"SSKSSKS? ' 1-800-368-7151
DISCRETE PHARMACEUTICALS
CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Line Ads:
For 1 st 25 words:
Students$2.00
Non-students$3.00
Display Ads:
Open Rate per
column inch$5.50
DEADLINE:
Friday, 4 p.m for Tuesday issue and Tues-
day, 4 p.m. for Thursday issue.
Announcements
THEORY COLLOQUIUM
LECTURE SERIES
Stanley Fish (Arts and Sciences Pro-
fessor of English, Duke University).
"There's no Such Thing as Free
Speech, and if s a Good Thing Too
Thursday,Nov.21,4.p.m.GCB1031.
This lecture series is sponsored by the
Departmcntof English asa part of the
newly initiated Colloquium for Lit-
erary and Critical Theory. Each lec-
ture will be followed by a short dis-
cussion period, a nd therea f ter we wi 11
adjourn to the English Faculty Lounge
formorediscussionand refreshments
All are welcome to attend. For more
information, comments, or sugges-
tions, please contact Professor Jeff
Williams (GCB 2142, 757-6388).
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS NOV. 19-25
Wednesday, Nov. 20�ECU Sym-
phonyOrchestra, Robert Hause,Con-
ductor (Wright Auditorium, 8:15
p.m free). Thursday, Nov. 21�An-
gela Burns, voice, senior recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 p.m free);
and Concert BandSymphonic Wind
Ensemble, William Wiedrich, Con-
ductor, (Wright Auditorium, 8:15
p.m , free). Friday�Melissa Bell,
voice, and Russell Smith, trumpet,
senior recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7
p.mfree);and Jazz Ensemble,Carroll
Dashiell, Director (Wright Audito-
rium, 8:15 p.m free). Monday, Nov.
25�Valanda Nelson, bassoon, senior
recitaKFletcher Recital Hall,7 p.m
free); and Bert Sullivan, trombone,
senior recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 9
p.m free). Dial 757-4370 for theSchool
of Music's 24-hour "Recorded Calen-
TRAVEL-STUDY-LEARN
Ifs not too late to apply for the Na-
tional or International Student Ex-
change or for one of many study
abroad opportunities! If you are in-
terested in paving ECU tuition and
attending one of 107 other universi-
tiesaround the United Statesor if you
are interested in study in a foreign
country, investigate the many
opporrunitesavailablc to you through
the ECU exchange programs. You
may still apply for spring semester
1992 or go on exchange beginning
next fall. Also available is informa-
tion on numerous summer opportu-
nities. Visit Ms. Stephanie Evancho
in Brcwster A-117 before you leave
for Thanksgiving or call 757-6769 for
a brochure and application form this
week!
STUDY ABROAD
Now is the time to consider a sum-
mer study abroad or academic se-
mester or year abroad experience.
Come be the Study AbroadEx-
change Expo in the Mendenhall Mul-
tipurpose Room on Nov. 19 from 10
a.m2 p.m. and in the lobby of the
GCB from 9 a.m2 p.m. on Nov. 20.
Discover the many opportunities
available for 1992! Contact 757-6769,
Center for International Programs,
for further information.
STUDY IN LONDON
New opportunities are available for
study in London through the Ameri-
can Collegein London! Find outabout
the opportunities at a meeting with a
representative from the College on
Thursday, Nov. 21, 4 p.m. in 1009
GCB. If you are unable to attend,
please contact Stephanie Evancho,
BA-117, 757-6769 for a personal ap-
pointment to learn more about his
exciting program!
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAIORS
Criminal Justice T-shirts are still on
sale for just SI 0. You can have one of
your own. Take pride in your major!
Sold by Alpha Phi Sigma. For more
information contact Melissa Smith,
president, 931-7569.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Recreational Services will be spon-
soring a Bench Press Contest in
Garrett's "Pipeline Pumphouse" on
Nov. 20 at 5:30 p.m. Bring your ECU
ID and register at Garrett between 5-
5:30 p.m. Call 757-6387 for more in-
formation.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Recreational Services will be spon-
soring a Leg Press Contest in Minges
on Nov. 19. Registration will begin
on that day at 5 p.m. The event will
take place at 5:30 p.m. Bring your
ECU ID and join in the competition!
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
There will be a registration meeting
at 5 p.m. in BIO 103 on Nov. 19 for
those interested in participating in
the Turkey Trot. Come run with us
and have lots of fun at Bunting Track
on Wednesday, Nov. 20. Call 757-
6387 for more information.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
The International Student Associa-
tion presents Latino Fiesta (Latin
American food, performances, mu-
sicand dancing) Nov. 23,6:30-11 p.m.
at Mendenhall social room. Admis-
sion S5 for students and $7 general
public. Our main interest is to pro-
mote awareness of Hispanic culture.
Tickets are available at the
Mendenhall Ticket Office.
INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
Meeting: Wednesday, Nov. 20,4p.m
GCB 3106�lounge. Thank you!
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
English not your native language?
Need to take ENGL1200? Section 199
spring semester is for non-native
English speakers. See Professor Lee
Cheung in GCB.
WINTERC.UARD
Assembly line winterguard will hold
its first rehearsal of the season on
Saturday, Nov. 23. Anyone with
colorguard experience interested in
participating should contact Jody
Jones at 752-6912.
STUDENT UNION MINORITY
ARTS COMMITTEE
Along with ECU Graduate
Colloquium Committee and Interna-
tional Students Association, presents
"Cultural Awareness Week" Nov. 18-
23. The keynote speaker will be
Marilyn Waniek, African American
award winning poet, on Thursday,
Nov. 21 at 8 p.m. in GCB 1031. Watch
for other events and details in The
East Carolinian. For more informa-
tion, call J. Marshall at 7574711.
INTERVIEW
SKILLS WORKSHOP
The Career Services Center will con-
duct a workshop on interviewing
techniqueson Thursday, Nov. 19and
Tuesday, Nov. 21 at 3 p.m. in the
Bloxton House. These one-hour ses-
sions will include guidance on what
one should do before, during and
following theemployment interview.
A video and printed materials will be
shared with participants.
BAC,C.H,U,S.
If you are interested in alcohol aware-
ness and concerned about helping to
prevent alcohol abuse on campus,
BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol Con-
sciousness Concerning the Health of
University Students) is the organiza-
tion for you. Our next meeting is
scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 20,4
p.m Mendenhall Room 14. For more
information, contact the office of
Health Promotion and Well-Being,
757-6793.301 Erwin Hall.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Persons interested in working in sum-
mer camp are invited to the Method-
ist Student Center, Thursday, No-
vember6p.m. A snackdinner will
be provided free of charge. The Stu-
dent Center is located across from
Garrett Dorm at 501 E. 5th St. For
more information, call 758-2030.
ECU SOCIETY OF PROFES-
SIONAL JOURNALISTS
The Society of Professional Journal-
ists (Sigma Delta Chi) will meet on
Thursday, Nov. 21, 6 p.m. in GCB
2025. The guest speaker will be a
representahve of a local advertising
firm. The SPJ is open to all interested
communications students and fac-
ulty, as well as members of the stu-
dent media.
HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION
HMA meeting Tuesday, Nov. 19,330
p.m. in room 237. All members are
encouraged to attend.
NATIVE AMERICANS OF ECU
TheNative Americans of ECU will be
selling Indian Fry Bread Thursday,
Nov. 21 in front oi Wright Student
Stores. Please support the Native
Americans by buying a piece of Fry
Bread. The cost is SI .00 for one piece
orS150fortwo.
Pirates fr
By Brian Kerns
Sports Editor
The Pirates defeated Virginia Tech 24-
17SaturdayU move toNo. 13 m the AP poll
and earn a Beach Bowl berth playing N.C.
State on New Year's Day.
ECU, who was puked to lost- by most
national experts, came back from a 14-0
second-quarter deficit to drop the Hoka I
4-6 on the year
The Pirates stored on a third-and-ten
situation on a 15-yard pass from Jeff Blake
to Don Johnson with 1:25 left in the first
quarter to pull ECU within seven.
Tech came out in the second half and
drove 76 yards to the four-yard line. On
second down and goal to go, Gi
Grandison saved the Pirates from going
down by two touchdowns bv intercepting
a Tehpasson the ?-vard line and returning
it 95 yards to tie the game at 14-14
The Pirates' next possession was
stopped by the Hokies on the Tech 22-yard
line. ECU'S Anthony Brenner kicked
yard field goal to give ECU the a 17-14 lead
with 7:17 left in the third quarter
Tech tied the game with a field gi
their own with 959 left in the fourth quar-
ter
But Blakeand the Pirates �� � � I I
yet.
Led by Blake, the Pirate mat I I :
sard- on el.
tO li
gamegivinj
Th
thai
quarter
ing on the H
Blake
date p� �
and Iwi '
total yards (
tormance,
yards on th
I In the
American I
on the da
as we;
� .

head footbi
E(
bi I
Year
& i
la � �
Associated
The Top 25 teams in the 1991 college
parentheses, records through Nov. 16. total
vote through one point
Record Pts
1. Miami (46) 9-0-0 1.486
2. Washington (14) 10-0-0 1.446
3. Florida St. 10-1-0 1.371
4. Michigan 9-1-0 1.313
5. Florida 9-1-0 1.270
6. California 9-1-0 1.173
7. PennSt. 9-2-0 1.111
8. Alabama 9-1-0 1.047
9. Iowa 9-1-0 1.036
10. Tennessee 7-2-0 929
11. Nebraska 8-1-1 899
12. Texas A&M 8-1-0 896
13. East Carolina 9-1-0 731
14. Clemson 6-1-1 719
15. Colorado 7-2-1 622
Men's bask
ready for new
By Bobby Owens
Staff Writer
The ECU men'sbasketballteam
went 1-1 during its first two games
under first-year head coach Eddie
Payne
The Pirates crushed St. Peter
burg AAU by a finalscoreof 106-91
The Pirates then dropped to the
US.S.Rs Samara team, 79-72.
The Pirates will return last
season's CAA Rookie of the Year.
Lester Lyons, and three other all-
conference rookies in the last two
years - guard Stew Richardson, for-
ward Kevin Armstrong, and center
IkeCopeland.
Lyons led the Pirates in scoh ng
(17.6 points per game), assists (3.1
per game), steals (25 per game).
blocked shots (1.0 per game), and
free throw percentage (79.6?.) in
1991.
Richardson holds almost all of
the school's three-point field goal
records, but was suspended for team
rule violations much of last season.
Payne has given Richardson a clean
slate.
Armstrong, originally sched
i.led to be red-
started m eigh
rates and averaj
1.9 rebound! I
v opeland hJ
rebound
averaging S
Co pel and ha
doubles last sol
missed two star
Inside
facing the Pirate)
a lack oi depth!
OrfyGopebnd
Only Armstrong
than 20 games
6 6 'forwaii
first signet of
will help ECU
the basket And
ward horn Ralii
points in the cor
Antti Jokinen aj
provide depth
Outside -r"
solidtalent in I
addition to Lvd
the Pirates
House, Jeff
VVhi taker. HouJ
See Bas
Ticket gui
From Sports Information and
Staf f Reports
I
ECU has announced guide-
lines for purchasing tickets to the
1992 Peach Bowl on )an. 1,1992 in
Atlanta, Ga.
All ECU fans should order
their Peach Bowl tickets through
the ECU Athletic Ticket Office by
mail.
Bowl ticket order forms are
being mailed on Mon, Nov. 18, to
the following groups. Pirate Club
members, f(
holders, alui
and staff.
Pirate Ch
ceive first pril
signments by
into the ECU
ficeby Nov.
All ECU
Bowl ticket;
name, add re
number and
ets requested
along with
� �' '�!�





I s
,1 DIVERSITY:
PERSONALS
or 9 : r more information.
JENNIFER: G id k with student
h mestei "DAD
ADP1 VLPHAS rhanks for coming
ovei ' pizza We will all
�ether again. AOPi
. I BOWI BOUNDPiRATE&You
. ivithus Senior class
vt ki ON VROLLtoabowHWe
ICI Pirates!
ij EG kmbassa-
HAPn 21S1 BIRTHDAY: Jennifer
have you tor a
a t ser or year.
RATULATIONS TO
EWIS AND THE EAST
UNA PIRATES FOR
PEACH BOWL BID
sST N.C STATE!
'S AFRAID OF THE
AD WOLF? NOT US
BELIEVE
SIFIED AD RATES
s:
1-5 words:
$2.00
$3.00
udents
Ads:
Rate per
�nn inch$5.50
DETUNE:
m for Tuesday issue and Tues-
p.m. for Thursday issue.
ill UN
WESLQ lULMXATIQN
rested in workii sum-
an .)��:� � .
Cei ter, I: irsd iv. Mo-
A
P
fl tree d charge rhe Stut-
ter is located acr s$ from
� � at 501 E. 5th St. For
rmation, call 758-2030.
Ew
HQP
v,ov 19and
p.m. in the
lone-hour ses-
pneeon what
during and
lent interview.
? swill be
If-
LS,
pcohol aware-
put helping to
on campus,
icohol Con-
the Health of
the organiza-
t meeting is
av. Nov. 20,4
4. For more
h? office of
W'el-Bcing,
LCL SOCIETY QFJRQF�S:
SJONALJQL'RNAUSIS
riety or Professional Joumal-
ists Sigma Delta Chi) will meet on
rsday, Nov. 21,6 p.m. in GCB
guest speaker will be a
lanve of a local advertising
nrm. The SPj is open to all interested
communications students and fac-
ulty, as well as members of the stu-
dent media.
HOSPJTALm MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION.
HMA meeting Tuesday, Nov. 19 330
p.m. in room 237. All members are
encouraged to attend.
TJVEAMEEICANrfcij
I he Native Amencansof ECU will be
selling Indian Frv Bread Thursday
Nov. 21 in front of Wright Student
Stores. Please support the Native
Americans by buying a piece of Frv
Bread. The cost is SI 00 for one piece
or SI 50 for two. P
Sports
aJlj� i�ust (Eartfltntan
November 19,1991
7
Pirates frustrate Hokies, win 24-17
By Brian Kerns
Sports Editor
The Pirates defeated Virginia Tech 24-
17SaturdaytomovetoNo.l3intheAPpoll
and eam a Peach Bowl berth playing N.C.
State on New Year's Day.
ECU, who was picked to lose by most
national experts, came back from a 14-0
second-quarter deficit to drop the Hokies to
4-6 on the year.
The Pirates scored on a third-and-ten
situation on a 15-yard pass from Jeff Blake
to Dion Johnson with 1:25 left in the first
quarter to pull ECU within seven.
Tech came out in the second half and
drove 76 yards to the four-yard line. On
second down and goal to go, Greg
Grandison saved the Pirates from going
down by two touchdowns by intercepting
a Tech passon the 5-yard lineand returning
it 93 yards to tie the game at 14-14.
The Pirates' next possession was
stopped by the Hokies on the Tech 22-yard
line. ECU'S Anthony Brenner kicked a 39-
vard field goal to give ECU thea 17-14 lead
with 7:17 left in the third quarter.
Tech tied the game with a field goal of
their own with 959 left in the fourth quar-
ter.
But Blake and the Pirates weren't done
yet
Led by Blake, the Pirates marched 80
yards on eight plays scoring on a 14-yard
pass to Clayton Driver with 7:12 left in the
game giving ECU the lead for good, 24-17.
The drive was the first time this year
that Tech has been scored on in the fourth
quarter, with the exception of Akron scor-
ing on the Hokies defensive reserve unit.
Blake, ha vinganotherHeisman-candi-
date performance, was 24-47 for 337 yards
and two touchdowns. The Pirates had 434
total yards of offense. With Saturday's per-
formance, Blake moved to 2,789 passing
yards on the year and 26 touchdowns.
On the defensive side of the ball, All-
A men can Robert Jones recorded 11 tackles
on the day which moved him to 134 on the
season. Grandison had an outstanding day
as well making eight tackles and a touch-
down.
"That was an awfully big win that was
won by a football team that has a heart as
big as I've ever seen Bill Lewis, ECU'S
head football coach, said.
ECU officially accepted a Peach Bowl
bid Sunday to play N.C. State on New
Year's day.
ECU will travel to Cincinnati for it's
last regular game oi the season against the
Bearcats with the kkkoff starting at 12:10
p.m.
With a win Saturday, the Pirates will
have the best record ot any football team in
ECU historv.
Photo by Oail Read �ECU Photo lab
Associated Press Top 25
The Top 25 teams in the 1991 college football poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Nov. 16, total points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th- place vote.
ECU quarterback Jeff Blake threw for 337 yards and two touchdowns to lead the Pirates in a come-from behind victory against the
Virginia Tech Hokies Saturday m Blacksburg Blake has thrown for 2,789 yards and 26 touchdowns this season.
ECU and N.C. State to
RecordPts
I.Miami (46)9-0-01,486
2. Washington (14)10-0-01,446
3. Florida St.10-1-01.371
4. Michigan9-1-01,313
5. Florida9-1-01,270
6. California9-1-01,178
7. Penn St.9-2-01,111
8. Alabama9-1-01,047
9. Iowa9-1-01,036
10. Tennessee7-2-0929
11. Nebraska8-1-1899
12. Texas A&M8-1-0896
13. East Carolina9-1-0731
14. Clemson6-1-1719
15. Colorado7-2-1622
Record Pts
16. Syracuse 8-2-1 561
17. Notre Dam 7-3-0 516
18. Ohio St. 8-2-0 490
19.0klahoma 8-2-0 476
20. Virginia 7-2-1 383
21. Stanford 7-3-0 304
22. N. Carolina St. 8-2-0 169
23. Tulsa 7-3-0 121
24. Georgia 7-3-0 90
25. UCLA 7-3-0 87
Others Receiving votes: Brigham Young
82 12, Baylor 58, San Diego St. 26 12, Georgia
Tech 18, Bowling Green 16, Air Force 13.
Fresno St. 12, Mississippi St. 8, Illinois 6.
clash on New Year's Day
RALEIGH (AP)�North Caro-
lina State and East Carolina have
fonnallyagreedtoanencoreof their
discontinued football rivalry fan.
1st in the Peach Bowl.
The official bowl bids were
made Sunday at 3 p.m.
NX State showed some reluc-
tance before agreeing Thursday to
facethe Pirates. ButWolfpack coach
Dick Sheridan, who is 1-1 against
ECU, apparently had no reserva-
tions about facing the Pirates.
"The first objective was to play
the best opponent we could possi-
bly play and give our players and
program the chance to measure
ourselves against a good team
NCSUathleticdirectorTodd Turner
said. "We wanted that to be the
highest-ranked team available.
"The second objective was the
site. We wanted a fun site where the
plaverscould enjoy themselvesand
our fans would have an opportu-
nity' to go
Neither Turner nor ECU ath-
letics director Dave Hart would con-
tirm that the game had been set
earlier last week.
An NCAA agreement with the
bowls prohibited formal bowl an-
nouncements until 3 p.m. this past
Sunday. If so, the bowl could be
fined $250,000.
The Wolfpack and the Pirates
last met in the 1987 season opener,
with the Pirates winning 32-14 at
Carter-Finley Stadium in Raleigh.
A fracas began after the game,
with 2,000 fans on the field. One
policeofficer suffered an eye injury.
Tickets to the series became one
of thehottest tickets in the 1980's.
Officialsof the twoschoolslater
agreed todiscontinuethesenes, and
recent efforts to reviveit have failed.
The 13th-ranked Pirates face
Cincinanti this Saturday. No. 22
N.C. State faces Maryland.
The Peach bowl also consid-
ered an ECU - Virginia match-up
before the Calivers deeded to in-
formally take a Gator bowl bid.
"Both teams have had to over-
come a great deal to get where they
are and eam their national rank-
ing said Robert Dale Morgan, ex-
ecutive director of the Peach Bowl.
"I wouldn't bet against them
Men's basketball
ready far new season
By Bobby Owens
Staff Writer
The ECU men'sbasketball team
went 1-1 during its first two games
under first-year head coach Eddie
Payne
The Pirates crushed St. Peters-
burg AAU by a final scoreof 106-91.
The Pirates then dropped to the
US.S.Rs Samara team, 79-72.
The Pirates will return last
season's CAA Rookie of the Year,
Lester Lvons, and tnree other all-
conference rookies in the last two
years - guard Steve Richardson, for-
ward Kevin Armstrong, and center
IkeCopcland.
Lyons led the Pirates in scoring
(17.6 points per game), assists (3.1
per game), steals (25 per game),
blocked shots (1.0 per game), and
free throw percentage (79.6) in
1991.
Richardson holds almost all of
the school's three-point field goal
records, but wassuspended for team
rule violations much of last season.
Payne has given Richardson a clean
slate.
Armstrong originally sched-
uled to be red-shirted last season,
started in eight games for the Pi-
rates and averaged 3 4 points and
1.9 rebounds a game.
Copeland has led the Pirates in
rebounding the last two seasons,
averaging 8.1 rebounds a game.
Copeland had seven double-
doubles last season, and has only
missed two starts in his career.
Inside - The biggest problem
facing the Pirates in 1991-92 will be
a lack of depth under the basket.
Only Copeland returns as a starter.
Only Armstrong saw action in more
than 20 games last season.
6'6" f orwa rd James Lewis is the
first signee of the Payne era, and
will help ECU with muscle under
the basket. Anton Gill, a 6'8" for-
ward from Raliegh, N.C. scored 13
pointsinthecontest against Samara.
Antti Jokinen and D.J. Morgan will
provide depth.
Outside - The Pirates will have
solidtalent in the guard position. In
addition to Lyons and Richardson,
the Pirates boast seniors Robin
House, Jeff Perlich, and Jeff
Whitaker. House was three for three
See Basketball, page 8
Irates gp undefeated
in home tournament
By Keith Lewis
Staff Writer
Photo by Oail Rd �ECU Photo lab
ECU'S Curley Young goes in for a reverse dunk inthe Pirates' scrimmage
Thursday night. ECU opens their season Monday night against Duke.
The Irates, ECU'S Ultimate
Frisbeeclub, went 6-0at their home
tournament, Ultimax, over the
weekend. The undefeated week-
end marks the second consecutive
tirst place finish for the Irates, who
are 17-1 in their last three tourna-
ments
The Irates came out firing on
Saturday and shot down Bad Te-
quila (from Columbia S.C.) 15-10,
the X Rates (a combined team of
ECUalumnusand the Irates B team)
15-4, and a very strong team from
Washington DC known as Warren
Burner 15-11.
Going undefea ted on Saturday
definitely created a stoke for the
Irates who stormed Camel City out
of Winston Salem, beating them 15-
7.
This victory advanced ECU
into the semifinals where they met
Bad Tequila once more. The Irates
spanked them a second time with a
score of 15-9.
In the finals, the Irates were
pitted against sectional rival UNC-
Wilmington, who finished second
in the Country at the 1991 National
Collegiate Championships, but
ECU refused to be intimidated. The
Iratesstarted strong, scoring the first
goal oi the game and were ahead 9-
7 at halftime.
The second half went even bet-
ter for F.CU with them staying fo-
cused, remaining composed, and
plaving good defense. The Irates
won the same 17-11 after an 8-4
second half.
Irate co-captain Gary Hurley
commented on the tournament vic-
tory saying, "After not having won
a tournament, to turn around and
win two straight is an awesome
feeling for everybody on the team
The Irates have a chance to
qualify for Collegiate Nationals in
the spring.
ECU has qualified for Nation-
als three out of the last four years.
The Irates finished 10th in the
nation this year and they are very
hopeful at an even higher finish
next semester.
The Irates said that they would
like to extend a special thanks to
WZMB and all of their sponsors for
their outstanding support and con-
tributions.
Ticket guidelines are set for 1991 Peach Bowl
From Sports Information and
Staff Reports
ECU has announced guide-
lines for purchasing tickets to the
1992 Peach Bowl on Jan. 1,1992 in
Atlanta, Ga.
All ECU fans should order
their Peach Bowl tickets through
the ECU Athletic Ticket Office by
mail.
Bowl ticket order forms are
being mailed on Mon Nov. 18, to
the following groups: Pirate Club
members, football season ticket
holders, alumni and ECU faculty
and staff.
Pirate Club members will re-
ceive first priority on seating as-
signments by having their orders
into the ECU Athletic Ticket Of-
fice by Nov. 27.
AH ECU fans can order Peach
Bowl tickets by sending their
name, address, daytime phone
number and the quantity of tick-
ets requested on a sheet of paper,
along with payment in form of a
check or MasterCard or Visa to
the Athletic Ticket Office, Minges
Coliseum, Greenville, N.C. 27838-
4353. Peach Bowl ticket are$32.00
each plus a $3.00 postage and han-
dling service charge per-order (not
per ticket).
Peach Bowl ticket order forms
can also be purchased beginning
Nov. 19 at any Wachovia Bank in
Eastern North Carolina.
Pirate Club member's will re-
ceive first priority in ticket assign-
ments by meeting the Nov. 27
deadline. All other orders will be
assigned on a first-come, first-
serve basis after the Pirate Club
members priori ty orders are filled.
If ticket demand exceeds supply,
ECU reserves the right to reduce
order quantities.
Student Ticket Information: A
block of Peach Bowl tickets are
being held for ECU Students.
These tickets will be make avail-
able to the ECU Students on three
designated days� Dec. 2-4. ECU
Studentscan purchase Peach Bowl

tickets during these designated
days ona first-come first-serve ba-
sis. Students must present their
valid ECU identification to be eli-
gible to purchase these tickets.
The location to purchase stu-
dent tickets on Dec. 2-4 is the Stu-
dent Organization Booth in the
Main Lobby of Mendenhall Stu-
dentCenter between8:30a.m. and
5 p.m.
Student tickets can be pur-
chased at $32.00 each. All other
Peach Bowl ticket orders will be
I
accepted by mail.
1TG Travel has been desig-
nated as the official travel agency
for the Peach Bowl game for ECU
fans. Pirate fans can to call 1-800-
247-3643 (ITG Travel) to arrange
travel needs to Atlanta and the
Peach Bowl.
Three different packages are
available. These include air, bus
or own transportation to Atlanta.
This information will also be in-
cluded in the mailing to Pirate
Club numbers only.





8 She Eaatglarolinian November 19, 1991
Basketball
Continued from page 7
from the three-point line in the sec-
ond exhibition game, while Perhch
and VVhitaker provide depth. The
guard spot is also home to Paul
Childress, Ronnell Peterson and
Curley Young. Childress has led
the Pirates during the last two sea-
sonsin assists, having fi vein the last
contest. Peterson led the Pirates in
scoring with 16 points against Sa-
mara, while Young has the abilities
to make an immediate impact.
The Pirates were picket! to fin-
ish seventh in a pre-scason poll of
CAA coaches, garnering IV points.
Richmond was the favorite with all
eight first place votes. American
was chosen second, and James
Madison third.
The Pirates play their first regu-
lar-season game of 1W1 against de-
fendingNCAA DivisionChampion
Duke University, on Nov. 25 in a
7.30 p.m. contest.
Tremendous Intensity
Photo by Dail Raad �ECU Photo lab
Robert Jones, Ken Burnette and Greg Grandison concentrate on Saturday's game against Virginia
Tech. The Pirates allowed only three points in the second-half.
'SAVE
5 O
I
I When You buy a medium or large cup of frozen yogurt
I In Original, Nonfat and Sugar Free Nonfat.
I
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I Coupon not valid with any other offer
J THE TASTE THAT'S WONJHEWORIP OVEIV
I Can't Believe Itfs
Yogurt!
D
A Cry of HopeA Call for Action
IMPACT 91
There is a cry of hope among
African-Americans today. At
Impact 91, you'll understand that
cry, leam how to answer with the
good news of Jesus Christ and be
called to action during these
critical times.
The International Student
Christmas Conference
Leam about Cods love and
forgiveness, and about the enabling
power of God's Spirit. Join hundreds
of American and other international
students for this 1991 Christmas
celebration.
Cost: Impact $140, International $120
Where: The Hyatt Regency Atlanta
When: December 27, 1991 to January 1,1992.
For more information and a brochure call Tommy Dove at 757-1273.
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ International
WANTED
� Self-Starter
� High Energy Individual
Exceptional Leadership & Organizational Skills
� Service Oriented
For
The Student Committee Chair-Elect to work with the 1992
Student Homecoming Committee and oversee the entire
function under the auspices of the ECU Homecoming Steering
Committee. This position is highly visible and prestigious.
Application forms are available at the Information Desk,
Mendenhall Student Center. Please return the application and
a letter detailing your involvement in student organzations
here at ECU by 5:00pm, Tuesday, November 26, 1991 to the
Information Desk, Mendenhall Student Center. The top three
candidates will be interviewed by the Steering Committee on
Tuesday, December 3, 1991 at 4:00 pm. For further
information, contact J. Marshall at 757-4711.
um
U
it
� �
f A
r
Progressive
Donee Night
10 Droft
$1.15 Toll Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30
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4
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F . :
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$tw
COUPONS FOR CHRISTMAS
Athletic Shoes
COUPON
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(�ft
EXPIRES 12-15-91
" ftft REG PRICES !
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OFF PRICES
new balance
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$iaooi Z
SJ� ASICS
PRICES DOLFIN
CASUAL ISLE
MENS � W0MENS � KIDS
EXPIRES 12-15-91
j1 CPU PON 1ICOUPON
Warm-up
Suits
$3.00
OFF EACH
XS-XXL
EXPIRES 12-15-91
COUPON
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" OFF REG
PRICES
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EXPIRES 12-15-91
COUPONl
$5.00!
OFF REG!
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Adult & Youth !
LIMIT 6 PAIRCUSTOMER I
EXPIRES 12-15-91 I
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Athletic World
Plaza Mall
355-0500
OPEN:M-F 10-9
SAT 1-6 & SUN 1-6
Carolina East Mall
756-7550





Title
The East Carolinian, November 19, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 19, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2798
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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