The East Carolinian, June 27, 1990






tttye iEaat (Earoltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 64 No. 35
Tuesday, June 27, 1990
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
12 Pages
Two occurrences of attempted
rape in June; suspects caught
By Michelle Castellow
Staff Writer
Two suspects have been ar-
rested and charged with attempted
rape following separate incidents
occurring in the first week of June
on the ECU campus, according to
a source at ECU Public Safety.
Shon Stocks, 17, a Greenville
resident has been charged with
attempted rape and assault on
female; and Nadiem Al-Awar, a
student at ECU has been charged
with attempted rape of a resident
of Jarvis Residence Hall, accord-
ing to Lieutenant Rhonda J. Gurley
of the ECU Public Safety.
Stocks allegedly committed
two offenses on two females dur-
ing the afternoon of June 1, while
Al-Awar allegedly attempted to
rape a female in her dorm room on
June 7.
Gurlev, who is with Public
Safety's investigation division, has
been accredited with the arrest of
the two suspects.
According to Gurley, at ap-
proximately 2:50 p.m. on June 1,
an ECU staff member was walk-
ing near the intersection of 9th
Street and Lawrence when she was
approached bv a young black male
riding a mctalic blue mountain
bicycle. He rode past her several
times before he came up behind
her and grabbed her on the but-
tocks
Then he proceeded to ride off
toward Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. The staff member was fright-
ened by the incident and went
directly to the ECU department of
Public Safety where she gave a
statement and discription to the
dispatcher, Gurley said. The staff
member discribed the suspect's
clothing and stated that he was of
a slender build but she did not get
a clear view of his facial features.
During the victim's interview
with Gurley, a phone call came in
concerning an assault on a female
at theampitheaterbehind Fletcher
Residence Hall. The discription of
the suspect in both cases matched.
The second victim, a 20 year old
ECU student, was sunbathing
when she was awakened by the
suspect touching her groin area,
according to Gurlev.
She sat up abruptly and started
to scream for help when he reached
out and tore off her swim suit
bottom. The suspect then pro-
ceeded to flee the scene on his
bicycle after a male resident of
Fletcher observed the incident and
yelled.
Both the ECU staff member
and the student agreed to give
details for a composite photo-
graph. From their discretions,
Gurlev formed a composite draw-
ing of which lames Tripp, a Green-
ville police officer, later identified
as resembling a black juvenile
male. The suspect, oneShon Stocks,
was notorious for this kind of ac-
tivity, according to Gurley.
On Monday morning, Gurley
obtained a photo from the Pitt
County Sheriff's Department and
formed a photo lineup of six black
males with the same basic facial
characteristics. While compiling
the photos, Gurley received a call
from another ECU officer at the
Pitt County Court House. He in-
formed Gurley that Stocks was
appearing in court that day on
other charges. Immediately, Lieu-
See Suspects, page 3
Rape Prevention
Stalking the parking lot, this ECU Campus Security officer than
klessly performs his job. Unfortunately for parking violators, those
pink slips will carry higher fines as of August 1 (Photo by Celeste
Hoffman � ECU Photo Lab)
Program gives students
taste of medical school
By Tonia Andres
Staff Writer
A summer program at the
ECU's Medical School is allowing
future doctors to have a taste of
their own medicine.
Under the auspices of the
Center for Student Opportunities,
the eight-week Summer Program
for Future Doctors gives an inten-
sive preview for premedical stu-
dents who are minority andor
financially disadvantaged.
One aim of the Center is to
increase the number of doctors
who may have a rooted attach-
ment to underserved communi-
ties in need of medical doctors, an
Any woman is a
potential victim
By Michelle Castellow
Staff Writer
Warm weather brings out the
the best in some people and the
worst in others. During the sum-
mer months, more people are out
and about. Therefore, the sum-
mer months should be a time of
precaution and prevention. Fe-
males, especially, should be well
informed on important facts con-
cerning issues of rape and sexual
assault
Sexual assault involves any
type of forced sexual activity, in-
cluding physical as well as men-
tal, emotional, or manipulative
force, against a persons will or
without consent. Any woman is a
potential victim, and attackers are
of all types. They may be of any
race, appearance, age or social
standing, so all women should be
conscious and knowledgeable oi
all potentially dangerous situ-
ations.
Lieutenant Keith Knox of
ECU's Crime Prevention Division
offers these startling facts which
everyone should be aware of.
� One in four college at some
point are victims of rape or sexual
assault.
� 84 percent of all rape victims
are acquainted with their attacker.
� 57 percent of these involve
date rape.
� In the United States one
female is sexually assaulted every
six minutes.
� 90 percent of all acquain-
tance or date rapes involve the
misuse of alcoholic beverages.
� Only about 15 percent of all
rapes are reported to the police.
Knox stresses the importance
of knowing the facts about rape
prevention and offers these tips
for protection against sexual as-
sault.
� Be alert of your surround-
ings. Use the buddy system when
See Prevention, page 3
&�' '�
Cool Deal
With the extremely warm weather of June, it's surpnsmg more campus goers don't follow suit and spend
a few moments wading through the fountain in front of Wright Auditorium. (Photo by JD Whitmire �ECU
Photo Lab)
Dr. E. L. Henderson dies at 105
ByMichelle Walker
Staff Writer
Dr. E. L. Henderson, the old-
est former professor and adminis-
trator of ECU, died at age 105 at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital on
June 17.
In 1923, Henderson joined the
staff of then East Carolina Teach-
ers College. He served as first
chairman of the educational ad-
ministration and supervision pro-
gram, and also of the department
of administration and supervision
in the School of Education. He
directed the student teaching pro-
gram as well.
During a campus controversy
that led to the trial of President
Leon Meadows on embezzlement
charges, Hendersonand fiveother
�faculty members were dismissed
for "disloyalty" in 1944, just
months before he was to retire.
Meadows was convicted and even
though many students and The
Daily Reflector were on
Henderson's side, he never re-
turned to teach. He did, however,
receive pay for the months entitled
to him before his retirement.
It was not until the early 1980s
that Henderson's name was offi-
cially cleared. Dr. Charles Coble,
current dean of the School of
Education and long-time friend of
Henderson, brought his case to
the attention of then chancellor Dr.
John Howell.
"The evidence I saw was clear
and 1 decided that Henderson had
not been treated fairly Howell
said.
In 1983, Henderson's faculty
status was restored and Howell
gave him the rank of professor-
emeritus. Howell said he thought
Henderson hadn't pursued the
case back in 1944 because he was
so close to retiring and he did re-
ceive his remaining pay, and also
Meadows had gone to jail.
"The case was somewhat for-
gotten Howell said that every-
body back then was on his side
anyway and giving him profes-
sor- emeritus rank was more a
gesture than anything else.
Henderson wasa nativeof Hill
County, Texas. He received his
undergraduate degree at the Uni-
versity oi Texas and graduate
degrees in secondary education
and educational administration
from Columbia University. He
lived in Greenville a few blocks
from the ECU campus and re-
mained active in the community
asa Mason until a few monthsago.
From his 98th year on, he cele-
brated his birthday with friends in
the ECU school of Education. His
wife, several years his junior, died
within davsof his hundredth birth-
duv. Howell said that everybody
liked Henderson.
"He was a remarkable person.
He remained very positive and
active up until his last days; we
could all trv to be a little more like
him
Parking fines go on the rise
area where the Medical School is
already one of the nation's leader.
ECU had the highest percent-
age of minorities entered in the
1988-89yearofall medical schools
in North Carolina, according to
The New Physician, April 1989. ECU
ranked ninth in the nation in 1988-
89 for the highest percentage of
minorities enrolled in tradition-
ally non-minority medical schools.
In this summer program there
are 16 blacks, 5 whites, 2 Asians
and 1 American Indian. In theclass
of 24 there are 15 females, which is
very unusual according to the
program's staff.
Dr. Metcalf,associatedeanand
See Medical, page 3
By Tim Hampton
News Editor
Illegal parkers on the ECU
campus next fall may be fuming
after finding that dreaded pink
ticket wedged under the wind-
shield wiper blade.
On August 1, fines imposed
by Public Safety for a multitude of
parking and traffic violations will
be i ncreased. The la test rise i n f i nes,
approved in the last meeting of the
Traffic & Parking Committee, is
the second such hike in two years.
The across the board increase
includes jumps ranging from $5 to
$35. Offenses such as jaywalking
and unregistrated bicycle will
carry a $10 fine, the smallest on the
list. The penalty for parking in a
handicapped-only slot becomes a
$50 fine, a more than tripling of the
present $15 violation.
Other pertinent new fine fees
are as follows; unregistered ve-
hicle, $35 - a $15 hike; freshmen
sticker violation, $25, parking in a
no parking area, $25, parking in
the wrong zone, $15. All others
will see at least a $5 boost.
The jump was instituted by
the committee as an alternative to
raising parking stickers for which
students, faculty and staff pur-
chase for specific lots, according to
Pat Gertz, the assistant director of
public safety and a member of the
parking board.
"Before rising the decal fee,
we decided that the person who
illegally parks should experience
an increase Gertz said.
Although the fine hike will
help to alleviate the shinking park-
ing revenues, it will not prevent
the unevitable, Gertz said refer-
ring to the enluctability of sticker
increasesin the near future. Sticker
prices should see a jump by 1991,
Gertz said. Revenues from decals
and fines revert back to the park-
ing and traffic fund to pay for
personnel and aid in the purchase
of new land for potential parking.
Presently, sticker prices at
ECU are the lowest of the three
largest universities in the state with
a $50 annual fee for students, fac-
ulty and staff wishing to park on
campus.
At the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill(UNC-CH)
and North Carolina State Univer-
sity (NCSU), parking stickers can
cost as high as $210 per annuam
for premium parking slots. Finge
parking - slots in a remote section
of the campus - are the lowest
priced parking decal at NCSU with
a yearly fee of $78.
Gertz did point out that bi-
cycle registration is free at Public
Safety for those students who wish
to escape the escalating costs of
parking all together.
Revised Parking Fines
(Effective 9190)
�Parking Meter Violation $10
�Wrong Zone Violation $15
�No Parking Area $25
�Freshmen Wrong Zone $25
�Unregistered Vehicle $35
�Moving Violation$35
�Handicapped Violations50
�Reckless Operation $30
�Intentionally Moving Ticket
From OneVehicle to Another $20
�Dangerous Littering $35
Inside
Editorial4
2 Live Crew tests First
Admendment stands.
State and Nation7
Applications to col-
leges are on decline na-
tionwide.
Features8
Rita Long offers stu-
dents advice on listing pri-
orioties.
Classifieds6
Comics6
Sports10
Dudley High School
captures crown in the
annual Pirate Basketball
camp
Inside:
Satire Tabloid





t
4
2 The East Carolinian, June 27,1990
ECU Briefs
Patients to receive care at new clinic
Patients with muscular dystrophy will be able to receive clinicil
and follow-up care specific to their disease at a new outpatient clinic
established by the department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
at the ECU School of Medicine and Pitt County Memorial Hospital.
A ribbon-cutting ceremony for the clinic, which will be housed in
the Regional Rehabilitation Center at Pitt Memorial, will be held June
21 at 10 a.m. Officials from the ECU medical school, Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, the Muscular Dystrophy Association and the City
of Greenville and Pitt County governments will participate.
The clinic'sestablishment at the medical center provides a third site
for muscular dystrophy patients living in North Carolina to receive
services which range from medical evaluation to respiratory, physical
and occupational therapy. Other clinics in the state are located at Duke
University Medical Center in Durham and North Carolina Memorial
Hospital in Chapel Hill. The ECU clinic will operate one day per month.
"Theclinic here is patterned after others supported by the Muscular
Dystrophy Association said Dr. John Eisele, co-director of the clinic
and a specialist in physical rehabilitation. 'The new clinic will incorpo-
rate thorough diagnoses and evaluation for this complex disease, a
strong collaborative research component, and a linkage to community
agencies needed by muscular dystrophy patients and their referring
physicians.
A $12,51X1 grant has been awarded to the clinic by the Muscular
Dystrophy Association for development of the clinic's program.
ECU trustees to have short meeting
An abbreviated schedule for the quarterly meeting of the ECU
board of trustees July 13 has been arranged to fit the university's
summer energy-saving schedule. The board will meet at 10 a.m. Friday
morning and end its session by 11:30 a.m when the campuses close for
the weekend to save utilities costs.
The four and a half-day per week schedule has been in effect since
May 14. ECU employees work a 40 hour week by reporting at 7:30 a.m.
Monday through Friday and having a half hour lunch break.
Trustee committees on athletics, development and finance and
facilities are scheduled prior to the full board meeting July 13. On July
12, trustees, spouses and guests will have a social and dinner at the
Chancellor's residence and attend an ECU Summer Theatre production
of "The Cocktail Hour
Campus Briefs
States given new powers on abortion
The Supreme Court, in a splintered decision, gave states new
powers limiting teen-age girls' access to abortions. The court by a 6-3
vote upheld an Ohio law requiring one parent be notified before a
female 18 or younger be allowed to have an abortion. In a separate ?-4
ruling, the court rejected a Minnesota law requiring notification of both
biological parents.
Right to die limited by 6-3 vote
The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 6-3 vote, gave the state of Missouri the
right to stop the Cruzan family from withdrawing tubes to end their
daughter's life. If Nancy Cruzan would have made her wishes clear
while still competent, her parents could have disconnected life support
systems. The court said the state is entitled to guard against potential
abuses in such situations.
Federal agents raid public housing
Federal agents in four cities Monday raided public housing units of
suspected drug dealers, but could not go ahead with plans to evict the
tenants due to a federal court order that requires there be a hearing
before eviction. U.S. marshals served notices of intent to seize leases
under a 1988 federal law that allowsevictionsof suspected drug dealers
even without a conviction.
Judge rules on booby trap case
A Denver judge rejected an agreement to keep Philip Connaghan
out of jail for reckless manslaughter in settinga shotgun booby trap that
killed a suspected burglar in a warehouse. Judge Richard Spriggs
ordered Connaghan, 46, to stand trial and face a possible nine-year
prison term in thedeath of Michael McComb, 19. Spriggs said thedeath
was "non-justifiable
U.S. favors helping earthquake victims
Americans narrowly favor providing unconditional aid to earth-
quake-shattered Iran. About 43 percent of people polled by USA
TODAY favored helping quake victims. But 34 percent said they think
the USA should help only if U.S. hostages held in Lebanon are released
Copynght1990. USA TOOA YIApplt ColUgt InformtUon Sttu-ork
Crime Report
Along with summertime and warm
weather comes the threat of poison ivy
By Ralph Gilliland
Peer Health Educator
Summertime is here which
brings people outdoors to enjoy
the warm weather. Unfortunately,
it also brings many into contact
with poison ivv.
Poison ivy plants thrive in
areas that are warm and humid in
the summer. In order to avoid
andor treat poison ivy infection
it is important to recognize the
plant, and be aware of recom-
mended prevention and treatment
meth(xls.
Being able to recognize the
poison ivy plant is the kev to
avoidance. In eastern states poi-
son ivv has three leaflets which
.ire smooth edged.
Generally, poison ivy can be a
shrub, ground cover, or woody
vine covered with hairy aerial
rootlets
Poison ivy enjoys sun and is
most common on floodplains.
bottomlands, and along edges of
forest and road wa vs. In the spring,
young leaves appear red and
glossy but in summer they turn
green.
An allergic reaction can be
brought on by both direct and
indirect exposure to poison ivy.
First, direct methods of expo-
sure from poison ivv are brought
about by touching anv part oi the
poison ivy, plant roots, leaves or
flowers.
indirect methods which bring
on an allergic reaction from poi-
son ivyarccontact with pets, cloth-
ing, and the smoke from burning
ivy plants.
If you are exposed to poison
ivy, an itchy rash mayappear, and
in a matter of five to hours vou
may experience a painful, persis-
tent, and irritating itch accompa-
nied by blisters. These blisters
contain urushiol which is a com-
bination of skin-irntating chemi-
cals found in the plant's sticky-
sap. The oozing blisters can re-
main for up to two to three weeks.
Theability to recognize symp-
toms of an allergic reaction from
exposure to poison ivv will help
lead to a fast, effective recovery
The symptoms of poison ivy
include: redness and minor swill-
ing, blisters, bumps and bubbles
and itching.
If suffering from an allergic
reaction from exposure to poison
ivy the following treatment meas-
ures must be taken immediately
or relief. The sooner treatment
starts for poison ivy, the better.
Handle clothes and shoes
carefully until you have had a
chance to wash them.
Use of soap is not recom-
mended. It can spread urushiol
over the skin.
Apply herbal teas to the rash,
not to open sores. Add oatmeal to
a bath. Flush with clod water.
Bathe in hot water. Applv aloe
vera gel. Flush with vinegar.
The best way to ensure your-
self of not becoming exposed to
the poison ivy plant is through
proper prevention measures.
Avoidanceof the ivv plant is most
important. In doing so, the ability
to recognize the plant's physical
characteristics and know its ta.
vorite places of habitat is a n
sity.
On the other hand, for th,y
unfortunateoneswhoareexpt
to poison ivy, proper treatment
methods listed should by put int.
action as soon as possible in order
to east the painful, persisting, and
irritating itch of poison ivy
If the allergic reaction causes
any unusual and alarming
effects such as swelling,dizzins
breathingdifficulryorothersvrnp-
tomsofillnessafterbeingexpos.c
to poison ivy, contact the Student
Health Service at 757-6841
"To Your Health" is a wctk
health education and informal, n
column. Please direct any qu
tion, comments or suggestion �
757-6794.
Emergency services
to meet at the Hilton
Intoxicated subjects given citations
June 18
1847�An officer checked out at Carrett Residence Hall in referenct.
to alcohol violations. Campus citations were issued.
June 19
1439 � An officer checked out at Fleming Residence Hall in refer
ence to larceny of a table from the lobby.
2321 � Three officers responded to Jones Residence Hall in refer
ence to an intoxicated male. He was escorted away.
June 20
1345 � An officer took a wallet larceny report at Public Safety. The
owner reported recovery of the wallet.
1844 � An officer checked out at Jones Residence Hall in reference
to a subject that had hurt his back. The subject did not need transport of
rescue.
June 21
2306 � Two officers responded to Aycock Residence Hall in refer-
ence to a report of subjects on the roof.
June 22
0101 � Three officers responded on scene to intoxicated juveniles at
Belk Residence Hall.
2159 � Two officers responded on scene to Jones Residence Hall in
reference to a report of an assault on a female.
June 23
1800 � An officer responded on scene at Greene Residence Hall in
reference to assisting parents in finding their child. The child was
located.
June 24
1359 � An officer escorted orientation student with severe stomach
pains to Pitt Memorial Hospital emergency room.
June 25
0414 � Two of ficers checked on a su spicious subject sou th of Garret t
Residence Hall. The subject was identified as a non-student and was
advised to leave campus.
Tht Crimt Report it tmktn from official ECU PiHe 5ftti log
ECU News Bureau
When Hurricane Hugo struck
the South Carolina coast and
moved through North Carolina
last tall,emergency responsecrews
puttheirpl.insintoeffect.Buthow
well did the plans work?
those directly in charge of
emergency preparedness and
medical servicesduring Hurricane
Hugo will meet here lune 22 to
share their experiences and les-
sons learned during one of the
most destructive hurricanes in
history. The conference will be
held at the Hilton Inn from 8:30
a.m. until 4 p.m.
Conference co-coordinator
Dr. Richard C. Hunt, East Caro-
lina University professor of emer-
gency medicine and chair of Pitt
County Memorial Hospital's dis-
aster planning committee, said
officials will discuss the strengths
and weaknesses of their disaster
plans. "We hope this conference
will provide a forum where those
responsible for managing future
disasterscan learn from those who
experienced Hurricane Hugo
Hunt said.
Speakers include Dennis
Clark, director of the Charleston
County Emergency Preparedness
Division, recently featured on the
Division, recently featured on the
CBS program "Rescue 911 Clark
oversaw the evacuation of an esti-
mated 120.000 Charleston County-
residents and commanded the
Charleston County Emergency
Operations Center during the
hurricane.
Frank J. Hoffmeister,director
of Mecklenburg County Emer-
gency Medical Services in Char-
lotte, will relate experiences in
coord mating the activities of his
agency with other emergency
services during the preparation
for and response to Hurricane
Hugo.
Dr. Richard V. Aghababian,
chairman oi the division of emer-
gency medicine at the University
of Massachusetts Medical Center
and an internationally recognized
expert in disaster medicine, will
compare! lurricanel fugowith his
experiences with cither disasters
such as the 188 earthquake in
Armenia.
Other speakers include Dr.
fackson Allison, chairman ol the
ECU Department of Emergency
Medicine; Leon Boyd,trainmgand
quality control supervisor with
Charleston County Emergency
Medical Services; Dr. Kenneth L.
DeHart, director of the Grand
Strand General Hospital Emer-
gency Department in Myrtle
Beach, S.C; Charlie Hall, weather
anchor with WCSC-TV in Char-
leston; Grandee Hardv, disaster
control officer at the Medical
University of South Carolina
(MUSC) Medical Center; and
Alonzo W. Nesmith Jr disaster
control officer at MUSC Medical
Center.
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Director
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Adam Blankenship
Advertising Representatives
Ken Earley
Randy Evans
Julie Roscoe
John Semelsberger
Shay Sitfinger
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
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Local Open Rate $4.25
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available

Business Hours: Monday - Thursday 7:30 - 5:00 Friday 7:30 -1130 a.m. Phone 757-6366





The East Carolinian, June 27,1990 3
High schoolers gain interest in science careers
KCU News Bureau
Eighteen high school students
are it Ft 11 tor a special two-week
program to encourage their inter
est in careers m st left) e
The rising 10th graders, all
minority students from Pitt
County, are participating in the
BCU Science Track Enhancement
Program (s.T.Il). In the program
the Students tfe working individu-
ally with ECU faculty who teach
and conduct research in such ar-
eas as biologv, marine science and
medicine.
"ECU faculty from several
several science areas sefVC as
mentors to the students said Dr.
Mary Ann Rose, assistant to the
Chancellor for special assign
ments. Dr. Rose helped to develop
and initiate the program at ECU
five years ago.
"The students are assigned to
work with a mentor because a
canngand inspiringindividualcan
often make thedifferencebetween
pursuing or abandoning a career
choice she said
"When mentors adopt stu
dents for the two week period, we
believe there is a greater likeli-
hood of the students pursuing
science and mathematics careers
she said
All but three of the first 20
students participating in the pro
gram fi ve yea rs ago wi 11 be a ttend -
ing college next fall. ECU will
continue to follow the students to
see if they pursue careers in sci-
ence.
Students chosen for the pro-
gram were recommended bv guid-
ance counselors in the Pitt county
Schools, who submitted names of
students to participate in the pro-
gram I he final 18 were chosen
from this group.
The students spend six to
seven hoursa day in their assigned
duties.
"One thing that is different
about this program is that wedon't
seek the gifted and talented stu-
dents said Dr. Christine Fitch,an
instructor in the ECU School of
Education and the director of
STEP.
"We're look for the average
student who has potential she
said.
"The students experience the
practical side of the pbs and learn
that these jobs are not just glam-
our she said. "They arc exposed
to the nuts and bolts of the field of
science
Some of the students have been
assigned to work with medical
doctors in the School of Medicine.
Othersare working :n the Institute
for Coastal and Marine Resources,
the Department of Biology and in
the Department of Chemistry.
In addition, they attend eve-
ning seminars on topics dealing
with self-esteem, career choices,
job expectations, job performance
and behavior, and money man-
agement. Later this summer the
students will visit some other col-
lege campuses in the state as well.
"We're very encouraged with
the results we've seen so far said
Dr. Rose. "We feel like we've raised
their aspirations for college by
exposing them to a university set-
ting and we believe many of these
young people will be selecting
careers in science because of the
experiences they've had with our
doctors and scientists here at
ECU she said.
Support for the STEP, pro-
gram is provided by Heilig-Mey-
ers Furniture Company of Green-
ville and the Du Pont Co. of Kin-
ston.
The STEP, participants and
their schools m Pitt County in-
clude Frances A Brown and April
R. Gray from E.B. Aycock Jr. High
School; Temekka S. Barnes, Sha wn
D. Bridges, LaTasha Dixon, Sab-
nna Gunter and Kevin L Stormer
of Farmville Central High School;
Jayme E. Bell of �orth Pitt High
School; Hope L. Copeland, Gary
L. Payton and Roger M. Rice of
Ayden Grifton High School;
Glenda C. Dar els, Todre C
Daniels, Brian N. farper, Delquan
D. Lynch and Gv endolyn D. Ty-
son of D.H. Con' y High School;
and LaTasha Dix x Robert L or-
dan and Kevin V Vines of Agnes
FulliloveComnv -litv School.
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757-1666
Suspects
tenant Gurley contacted the two
victims.
Neither victim could identify
the SUSpeCl from the photo lineup
s(i( iurlev tmk them one by one to
the court house. The staff member
was unable to identify the suspect.
I lowever, the Ft l student recog
nized him immediately
Stocks is currently placed
undora$25,000bond and isawait-
ine trial in Pitt County jail and due
to the charge of attempted rape
will be tried as an adult in Pitt
County Pistrut Court on August
Continued
The second incident involv-
ing Al-A war occurred on June 7,at
approximately 2:30 a.m. at Jarvis
dorm, according to Gurley. In this
case, both the victim and suspect
were acquainted and lived in the
larvis Earlier that night, Al-Awar
and the victim had spoken at
Bogie's Night Club but she left the
downtown establishment early
because she was intoxicated, ac-
cording to Gurley
Shortly after 2 am, she re-
ceived a knock at her door. The
alledged perpetrator was one
Nadiem Al-Awar. Gurley stated
that Al-Awar "slithered" into the
victim's room, closed and locked
the door, and began kissing and
fondling the victim.
Gurley said that according to
the victim, he then pushed her
down on the bed, and although
she was resistmgdunng the whole
incident, proceeded to forcefully
remove her undergarments
against her will. A knock at the
door halted Al-Awar temporarily,
but he told her not to answer it.
igel
ageo
��ll ut
Medical
However, she m
from i
door.
The victim stated that if she
had not received the knock at the
door, she felt that Al-Awar would
have taken advantage of her in-
toxicated state and would have
had sexual intercourse with her
without her consent, Gurley said.
According to Gurley, Al-Awar
has been charged with attempted
rape but is out on a S 15,000 bond.
No court date has been confirmed
at this time
Continued from page 1
director oi Student (pportunities
and Minority Affairs,said it might
be .i new trend among minority
schools that may predict an in
crease in women, both black and
white, enrolling in medicine
Ranging in age from 14 to 50,
the Students learn concepts in Si i
ences such as biochemistry and
physiology; they also learn read
ing, studs and communication
skilis as well as test preparation
for the MCAT (Medical College
Admissions Test)
"The program has been highlj
successful,it ism its twelfth vear
Dr. Metcalf said.
The "Future Doctor" summer
program is aimed to bring stu-
dents to the ECU medical school to
see it tor themselves. They have
the opportunity to prepare and
improve their background for
medical school.
The initial planning started in
1976 and the funding for the
medical program came in 1978.
The federal government deter-
mines eligibility for the program
since it puts in most of the money.
Burroughs-WeUcome also helps
out on a local level. Eligibility for
the disadvantaged students is
determined by their SAT scores
andor their economic status.
Dr. Metcalf said that thev are
not only increasing representation
of minorities but in doing so are
contributing in fulfilling oneof the
missions of the medical school,
which is to provide medical edu-
cation opportunities to minorities.
Dr. Metcalf said, "We feel we are
making a very strong and positive
contribution to the ECU medical
school
" There is a limited applicant
pool because there are more black
college age men in jail than in
school. Thereare also limited funds
available for their medical educa-
tion Dr. Metcalf said. The small
numbersof mi nontiesin medicine
involve many other factors.
Smaller pools may be related
to culturally biased tests, although
not intentional, are very challeng-
ing to the minority student. There
Prevention
are a lack of sufficient role models
and mentors for minorities in the
medical field. "There are so many
educational opportunities within
the small pool that medicine is in
competition with so many other
professions, like law, engineering
and computer science as well as
other health professions Dr.
Metcalf said.
Dr. Saunders, coordinator and
counselorof the summer program,
said they try to find people who
can benefit from the program, who
might have a financial or educa-
tional battle in medical school. The
students rarely have problems in
achieving academically; however
trouble for many of these very
intelligent students lies in com-
munication, social or cultural prob-
lems.
"It's interesting work that I
have, the most exciting part is
working one to one with the stu-
dents Dr. Saunders said.
Continued from page 1
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Aquariurt
� Be alert of your surround-
ings. Use the buddy system when
walking or jogging.
� If you must walk alone,
walk briskly in well lighted areas
and walk with confidence.
� Know in advance where
you are going.
� Know your limits and
do not overindulge in alcohol use.
Do not use drugs.
� Trust people with cau-
tion and know your dates. Make
your feelings clear and be asser-
tive.
� Trust your instincts. If
you feel uneasv or uncomfortable,
there is usually a good reason.
� Keep doors to automo-
biles and homes locked at all times.
� Attend Rape Prevention
Programs to stay informed.
ECU's Crime Prevention
Division offers a number of pro-
grams concerning rape preven-
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and simple self defense. For more
information, contact ECU's Crime
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Lo ensure your own safety.
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oUje Saat Carolinian
Jostl'll L JENKINS JR General Manager
Michael G. Martin, tnmmging Editor
ADAM Bl ankenship, fhwor oMJivrttsin
Tim Hampton, News Editor
Makli Morin, Asst. News Editor
Caroline Cusck, Fortunes Editor
DEANNA NfEVGLOGKL Assl Feafure Editor
DOUG Morkis, Sports Editor '
EARLE M. McAULEY, Asst. Sports I ditor
SOOTT Mawvfi i , Satire Editor
PaU a GlGEE, Mate and Nation Editor
PtIONc; LUONG, Credit Manager
STUART RosNER, Business Manager
Michael Koie, Ad Tech Supervisor
Tory BARBOUR, Circulation Manager
TRACY WEED, Production Manager
CHARLES WiLUNCHAM, Darkroom Technician
STEVE Reid, Staff Illustrator
Deborah S. Daniel, Secretary
iTHAJKitJosreor
a pea? mm vk
new STINGER,
fit EmmCuroluuan has saved iho Fast Carolina campus community since It25, emphasizing information thai directly
affects EC students Daring the ECTI summer sessions. I'he East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of
5,000 Tht EastVirofillMfl reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of
age. sex. creed Of national ongin The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one
individual, but. rather, is a majority opinion t the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all
points of vie 1 etters should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to edit letters for publication 1 etters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications
Bldi . ECU, Greenville, NC. 2784. or call tW 757 M66.
Opinion
Page 4, Wednesday, lime 27. 1990
Rap group tests right to free speech
i antw2Xiiici ArtwS (JMtr&t�&rrvrt6Z suMj
An Ideal View
Clothes can never cover the heart
It seems that more and more freedoms
granted bv the C onstitvition are being challenged
each day. Ihe recent case of local governments
throughout the nation banning 2 Live Crew's al-
bums and concerts is a direct infringement on the
group's freedom of speech
Federal district judge losoGonzales upheld
the Biowatd County Sheriff's Department's charge
that the rap group's album Nasty As They Wianm Pi'
was obscene. That ruling, in rum, sparked contro-
versy throughout the nation. And when 2 L tveCrew
gave a concert in Brow ard County a few days later.
members of t he ra p group were arrested for viola ting
the county's obscenity laws.
And. as if the arrests were not enough, sev-
eral record stores elsewhere in Florida and Texas
have pulled the group's albums from the shelves,
tearing they may be arrested ur the same violations.
This is one effect ot obscenity rulings that is rarer)
mentioned such rulings inevitably lead to unnec
essary self censorship, so that a ruling has much
farther reaching effects than it has bv law.
'ot everyone likes the lyrics of the rap band
in fact, for the most part, main people find their
messages repulsive. And even though their concerts
may contain "vulgar' acts that go along with with
their lvncs the fans know what kind ot show they are
in for before thev even purchase the tickets But the
government should not have the authority to tell
these groups that their music is not liked or wanted;
that is the duty oi the consumer
The consumer is what makes America live
His choice determines which markets thrive and
which tail 1 ocal governments stepped l nl of line in
this case, and it is up to their voters to let them know
that thev were wrong
Why has the government not taken a harder
look at the concerts and albums of some of the
nation's comedians1 Eddie Murphy and Richard
Prvor, two of the most notorious vulgar (and ob-
scene, profane, etc. )eomediansof all time have never
faced the challenges 2 Live Crew recently suffered.
In recent years, there has been no record of either of
the two (or any other comedian for that fact) being
arrested tor an obscene concert.
Several vears ago, heavy metal star Ozzy
Osborne was banned from performing in Greens-
boro. N.C for what Greensboro Coliseum promot-
ers telt was a vulgar concert. But there was never a
court case concerning the situation.
Certainly, Murphv.Pryor and others should
not be censored. But neither should 2 Live Crew.
The case of 2 Live Crew is unique in that the
local governments are the guilty parties by choosing
to ban the "obscene" material. That alone is wrong
viMUM it is the choice of the individual to purchase
theatbum or pav to go to the concert The people who
buy 2 I ive Crew's albums and see them in concert
know exactly what they are going to hear.
People have the right to choose what thev
want to listen to or what they want to watch. If
someone sees a program on television and finds it
offensive, he can simply change the channel. In the
case ot records, a disclaimer is even placed on the
album cover so that the potential buyer will know
that the contents contain obscene language.
Not onlv do these bans infringe on the First
mendment's guarantee of free speech, but they
could set a precedent for local governments to start
regulating what messages groups may choose to
express. Once the machinery is in place for suppress-
ing expression of one view, it remains in place for the
suppression of others. That's frightening.
By Caroline Cusick
Editorial Columnist
At a friend's apartment, I saw
a picture of a kitten standing with
its front paws perched on the nm
of a gold fish bowl. l"he kitten
alone looked innocent and harm
less. However, in the given situ-
ation I have reason to suspect the
outward appearance of the furry
critter was drastically opposed to
the intent of its stomach
We are a lot like kittens in one
since. What we wear on the out-
side is totally separate from what
we wear on our heartsand minds.
Different from the kitten, we
can ch(xse how we look on the
outside. The kitten has the same
fur every day. We change our
clothes and change our appear-
ance sever times each oi
Many times people can tell
where we 're going or where we've
been' By wTBR wtf weSnTHpW
clothes, people can tell it we re
going to church to class, to sleep,
to exercise or downtown to party.
What we choose to wear re-
flectsouractivities ur personali-
ties, ou r preferenoesand our tastes
Our clothes also can reflect our
musical preferences. Remember
all the Madonna-wanna-besof the
past? How did vou know they
liked her music7 Their appear-
ances gave it away. Teen-age girls
in church youth groups wear their
hair long and wear black hats to
look like Amy Grant. People who
like the Grateful Dead often wear
tie-dyed clothes with dancing
bears and skeletons.
People dress for success, hey
dress to impress And if they tried,
thev could probably dress to de-
press.
Americans .ire so obsessed
with appearances that the quest
for fitness has opened doors to
businesses everywhere. 1 don't
believe it s all tor the purpose of
being healthier Most people diet
and exercise to k�k better or. at
the very least, look more like eve-
ryone else
The outward appearance of a
�"TJtfWrrWff W JMWlKf thrrurgrr
cosmetic surgery, haircuts, diet-
ing and exercise or choice of cloth-
ing. These things are easy to alter.
The clothing of the heart is
not aseasv tochange. Wecan never
take it oft. We must wear it dav
and night We cant use soap to
Under the Boards
clean it when it gets soiled b v
or tears. We can only try topi
it from unnecessary bruisi a
abuse
The Bible savs an exci k- �
wife is clothed in stn i
dignity 1 doubt that refer � i
new brand erf dungarees Stn - g-
dignity, shame honor tod
tion are all doming- mentii i
the Bible that have nothing
with fabric or thread
Ihe heart is vital for ph k
life, as it is tor spiritual lif i
told us we should protei I I
selves by wearing a overinj j
our bodies as well as our h�
protect us
He said to, "Put on tl i
armor ot I kxi, that you n
able to stand nrm again t
schemes ol the devil I
struggle is not against flesh ft
blood, but against the ru f'
against the powers, against I
world forces of thus dnrkm
against the spiritual forcesof
edness in the heavenly pla- -
(Ephesians r11-12)
The full armor given to i
ted hearts from harm is not r i
of metal or fabric but ol faith
See Clothes, page 5
Gonzo journalist found not guilty
By Tim E. Hampton
Editorial Columnist
Maybe our judicial system
isn't as screwed up as we make it
out to be.
After all, Dr. Hunter S. Th-
ompson - originator of a genre of
fiction labeled Gonzi journalism of
which arose Tear & Loathing in Las
Vegas fame - was recently found
not guilty on a crazed array oi bull
charges linked to a one-night
ordeal which allegedly unravelled
like one of the salacious and bibu-
lous plots of his novels.
The charges assault, sexual
assault, illegally possession ot
drugs, drug paraphenalia and four
sticks of dynamite were thrown
out of court bv Colorado state
judge Charles Buss, who said it
was "unable to establish guilt
beyond a reasonable doubt as
chronicalized in a recent issue of
The Rolling Stone. As a judge in his
sable cloak, he might have been
expected to say something of that
nature, but within the confines of
sensibilities, ole judge Buss must
have been a bit trickled after lis-
tening to the District Attorney's
evidence
It was if Thompson actually
became the dazed and confused
persona found in his narratives
All the elements were present in
his real-life chapter, illicit drug
use, a propensity to stumble upon
a strange conflict and the appear-
ance oi weird characters.
The episode began on Febru
ary 21 when a former pornogra-
phy film actress, former porno
producer, former Playboy "Girl oi
the BigTen but now present wife
oi a Wisconsin ophtalmologist -
Gail Palmer-Slater - called Th-
ompson, said she was a big fan of
the writer of gonzo fame and
wanted to meet him
Palmer Slater, win v a
cationing in nearby Aspen, C
rado with her eye doctor hust
was invited to Owl
Thompson's rural home I
the Grammys on ietevisi n ind
imbibe alcohol Fromthere I
get hazy. She alleges men
plate of a white granule sub '
passed around the room
mg oi rhompson's female J-s
tant and two male friends
Alter inhibitions ha
shead, the guest then r.
about rhompson's sexual
ence Upon hearing the qu -
the host so graciously k
hot tub. According t
Slater, she declined to
writer in the hot rub which n i
Fhompson irate. 1 lealleged
one of her breasts a harsh t -
and pushed the former .x-
See Gonzo, page 5
Is America's conservative movement dead? Well, what does it matter?
fined and maintained conser-
vatism since 1968 has now
collapsed. Opposition to com-
munism has been pretty much
irrelevant for some time; op-
position to abortion seems to
have backfired; and now, say
Beckel and others, opposition
to taxes may also fizzle out.
This seems unlikely. Bush a weakening economy.
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
While it's anything but
clear at the time of this writing
whether Bush plans to renege
on his now-famous (and po-
tentially infamous) "no new
taxes" promise, his cryptic
quasi-hemi-demi-semi-admis-
sion that tax increases may be
necessary has already long suspected is a closet
prompted speculation about moderate) is hardly the bell-
wether of conservative trends,
and even if he abandoned anti-
taxism, "real" conservatives
wouldn't necessarily go along.
Anyway, Bush probably hasn't
abandoned his anti-tax stance;
in fact, he probably hasn't yet
made up his mind about it. It suring that the state carries out unrestricted conservative so- Rather than advocating dur'
seems more plausible that he's its function of serving the citi- cial and economic policies have stitfer penalties for drug ies
simply "floating" the idea, as zen. For the past decade, if not left the country in an even in a stupid and misguide! at
is his wont, trying to find some longer, liberals have increas- worse mess than Carter left it tempt to prove to the eleftor
middle ground between the ingly allowed themselves to be in � the much-touted "longest ate how tough thev are, li4"
conservative Republicans he defined solely by contrast to economic expansion in his- politicians should be restdji"?
wants to see reelected and the conservatives. Conservatives tory" is a castle built on sand� the Fourth Amendment nint
liberal Democrats whose co- set the agenda; liberals oppose and liberals could do a good that have been the major qp1'
operation he needs to shore up it. (The liberal is the guy who job of cleaning up. They could alties of the war over dric
(whom conservatives have
the death of the American
conservative movement
The common wisdom, as
espoused by former Mondale
campaign manager Bob Beckel
among others, is that the last of
the three issues that have de-
Whether conservatism is
moribund or not, this is as good
a time as any for liberals to re-
juvenate liberalism. It's pain-
ful to admit it, but liberalism in
practice has largely degener-
ated into a series of petty
squabbles which have little if
only wants to put half the drug start by pushing for re-regula- They should quit whining
usersinjaiDOnallbutacouple tion of some industries that want leadership from Mr wtb
of traditionally liberal issues really need it, like the airlines on this issue and set mp
� abortion and the environ- In addition, liberals should providing leadership fp
ment � liberals have been ex- abandon their current inexpli- their own ranks,
clusively reactive rather than cable obsession with banning Liberalism is a potentfclh
active. certain naughty words from powerful force for uusV
What a waste. Liberals can college campuses, and should social change, and right to
do a lot more for the country, instead work to reelect Con- America really needs it i?1 s
anything to do with protecting and they should get out there gressmen who voted against not wait for conservatism
individual freedoms and en- and do it. A decade of nearly the ban on flag "desecration die first.
r
�xn��n�ln'in�ii.i.







The East Carolinian, June 27,1990 5
Clothes
feith thatGod is who Hesaid Heis
the covering which is an armor
stronger than any metal known to
man.
We are told to gird ourselves
with truth, and our breastplate
which covers and protects our
hearts is made of righteousness.
Righteousness is not a state of self
exaltation placing a person above
reproach or correction. The word
simply indicates a state of right
standing with the Creator.
For shoes, we are instructed
to wear peace. It is hard to walk
over people forourown gam when
we wear shoos of peace It's also
hard to raise our fists to fight when
grounded in peace.
Our shield is made of the
strongest substance possible, faith.
Continued from page 5
to extinguish flaming arrows, in-
sults, threats or anything else that
would weaken us. A shield is
mobile and can be used to protect
any side of us that is being at-
tacked. It is held in the hand but a
shiled is also a part of armor that
can be dropped. For this reason, a
firm grasp on our faith, or what
we believe, is important.
The helmet is of salvation and
our only offensive weapon, the
sword of the Spirit, is the word of
God.
What good is all this armor?
There is no proof that it exists.
Many people argue that there is
no proof God exists. Those of you
who argue this point, or lean
toward a faith-in-logic perspec-
tive may never agree with me or
even understand my point of view.
Nevertheless, my point of view is
ideal and unchanging. It comes
completely from the Bible and it
always will. I didn't originate this
view, I only support it.
According to the Bible, hav-
inga strong heart capable for battle
is dependant on prayer, prayer,
faith in the word of God, and more
prayer.
We are at war, often with our
selfishness and pride, sometimes
with decisions that weigh good
and bad and sometimes with other
people. All wars are either lost or
won.
I would like to close with two
questions. First: Is your heart well
dressed and armed for battle7 And
second: Who is winning?
Gonzo
Continued from page 5
queen.
An complaint to the police
ensued The Aspen cops, who were
denied a search warrant by the
Aspen-based judge, traveled 40
miles to find a propitiating judge.
Upon the search of Owl Farm, .09
gram of cocaine (not enough to
numbones' tongue), three Valium-
shaped pills, 39 hits of LSD, a
plastic casing of a Bic-pen with
coke residue, seven ounces of
marijuana and four sticksof dyna-
mite were found. Thompson, who
knew of the possession of the
drugs, was oblivious to the find-
ings of the TNT.
Dynamite aside, the list of
illicit substances was relatively
obsure compared to the stockpile
stored in the trunk of a rented
Cadillac convertible enumerated
in Fear& Loathing. Nevertheless,
the District Attorney pursued the
matter.
During a May 22 court hear-
ing, Thompson's lawyer found a
flaw in Palmer-Slater testimony.
On the stand, she contradicted
earlier statements that she saw
Thompson snort the white sub-
stances spread on the plate. In the
hearing, she said she couldn't
actually remember witnessing
Thompson snorting.
Adding a strange twist to the
already almost incredulous tale,
Mrs. Palmer-Slater of once lusty
hard-core scenes told the Rolling
Stone she was glad Thompson beat
the rap.
It is ironic that Thompson - a
writer who admonished readers
of the growth of the Orwellean
society, who slammed Nixon and
the Oakland Raider in the same
breath while chugging Crown
Royal and smoking hash in The
Great Shark Hunt - was free of
blame in thisover exaggerated and
over emotionalized War On
Drugs.
There was one sad loss which
followed the Wild Grammy Night
at the Owl Farm, Thompson's
brass hookah - purchased in San
Franciso during the height ot
1960's experience - remains in
police possession.
�'The
CoMedf-
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Editor: Second Floor of the Publications Building
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It was the Deltas against the
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M
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be $124 pef month plus i, t of utili-
ties, phono and cable Central air and
ilose to campus For more into, con-
tact MARC or Pete at 830-3904.
ROOMS FOR RENT: Utilities fur-
nished Walk to school. 757-3543.
FOR LEASE: Spacious 2 bedroom
apartment 2 blocks from campus Rent
includes hot and cold water, sower,
centra! heat and air. basic cable Call
74-41bsV
MOTHER Will PROVIDE FREE
ROOM and board near campus to
female non-smoker tor work ex-
change Call 7.7-l78
MAI FOR FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED. Walk to school. Utilities
furnished $l37.50mo. 737-3543 ask
for Larrv
RENT, LFASE AND BUY IN THE
EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS
STOP BY FOR DETAILS, NO PHONE
CALLS PI EASE
AVAII ABI E JULY 1ST for students
needing a roommate I ovely 3 bed-
room,2bathtownhouseat Twin Oaks
fully furnished with laundry facilities
and convenient to campus. $225
monthly and share utilities. Call Liz
Samsel at Clark-Branch Realty, 355-
2lW or 946-8667
FOR SALE
APPLE MACINTOSH SE: 2.5 MB
RAM, 20 MBinternal hard drive, 8X1K
internal disk drive. All for )ust $1,81X1
Call 752-2369, after 3 p.m.
FOR SALE: Coffee table. $30. Call
758-5422 after 6 p.m.
'78 4-DOOR CHEVROLET - Good
motor, Clean, New tia-s. New motor
parts, little needed. 756-5544 before 6
p.m. $700 cash
SURFBOARD CASTER TWINFIN
withlcash. $75 00. Alsocaramplitier-
Concord, 50 watts per channel, new,
still under warranty, $200.00. New
asking $125.00. Mike 752-7622.
FINDIT(ORSELLIT)INTHEEAST
CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS.
RESUME SERVICES, Desktop Pub
ushing,and Word Processing 24 hour
turnaround Mon-Fri on most proj-
ects IX-signer Type 223 W. 10th,
101. 752-1933.
TYPING SERVICES: Research pa
pors.Term papers, I ettcr quality pnnt,
pickup and delivery available. Call
756-0520.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING (Word
Processing) Term Papers, Resumes
Call 355-4695 Mon - Sat
COMPUTER SCHOLARSHIP
SEARCH I ocate financial aid h-2
sources guaranteed Call 1-919-946-
451 orwriteSchool Aid, POBox 2546,
Washington, NC 27889
HELP WANTED
ATTENTION: POSTAL JOBS! Start
SI 1 41 hour' For application info call
(1)602-838-8885,Ext M-5285,6a.m -
10 p m , 7 days
PART-TIME POSITIONS available
in. Modeling, Security and Sales.
Apply Brady's,The Plaza. Monday�
Wednesday, 1-4 p.m.
EXCE1 1 FNTPART-T1MF OBS:We
are looking tor a few ambitious stu
dents to work on an on- campus mar-
keting program tor maor companies
You must be personable and outgo-
ing Excellent earnings Call Bode or
Jenny 1-800-5922-2121
FREE TRAVEL BENEFITS! AIR-
LINES NOW HIRING! AI1 POSI-
TIONS! $17,500-558,240 Call(1)602-
838-8885. Fxt. X-5285.
FREE TRAVEL BENEFITS! CRUISE
SHIPS AND CASINOS NOW HIR-
ING! ALL POSITIONS! Call 111 602-
838-8885 Fxt i- -5285.
ATTENTION: EARN MOM .
WATCHING TV! $32,000 year in-
come potential Details (1)602-838
8885 Ext IA 285
ATTENTION: POST AI OBS! Mart
$11 41 hour! For application infocall
(1)602-838-8885,Ext M-5285,6a.m -
10 p m , 7 days
ATTENTION: EAS WORKEXCE1 -
LENT PAY! Assemble products at
home. Details. (1) 602-838-8885 Ext
W-5285.
ATTENTION: GOVERNMENT
YOUR AREA! $17,840
Call (1)602-838-8885, Ext R
OBs
ATTENTION: EARN MONEY
READING BOOKS! $32,00year
ituome potential. Details. (Dr)02-a38-
8885 Ext Bk-5285.
AIRi INES NOW HIRING. Flight
Attendants, Travel Agents, Mechan-
ic s. Customer Service. Listings. Sala-
ries to $105K. Entry level positions
c all (11 805-6876000 Ext. A-l 1W
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,040 -
S59,230yr Now Hmng. Call (1)805-
687 6000 Fxt R-1166 for current fed-
eral list.
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,412 -
$59,932yr. Now Hiring. Your area
all 111 805-687-6000, Ext. R-1166 tor
listings.
A TTl NTION: EASY WORK EXCEL-
I I NT PAY! Assemble products at
home Details.(l)602-838-8885Ext.W-
5 2 85
FIND IT (OR SELL IT) INTHE EAST
CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS.
ATTENTION: EARN MON! VTYl?
INC AT HOME!
potential Details (1 � � �
T5285
PERMANENT PART-T1M1 PC
TIONS AVAILABI E: Clerii
tant to the Buyer 1 ad esand M
sales, and security lempora
eling positions also avail i �
Brady's, rhePlaza Mon-Wed I
HELP WANTED: Hotel H in
Inn Greenville is now accej
plications for the posit -
night auditor and parttimi fi
i rk apply in person v �
rial Dr Greenville, N �
NATIONAL MARK1 HNG 1
seeks mature studi
campus promotions for � ;
nies this sihtHii e.ir 1 �
with earnings potent i I i
semester Must be organti
working and money n l
Bode or Jenny at l-SOO-5922-21:
RESPONSIBLE s'
WANTED to keep '�� h
home for th summi r4da
Call 756-1759 kto r� Oj n
Announcements
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student center
� � . . worship with them Sunda)
and 8 30 p m at the
53 E 10th St Green
a m at the Newman
iys 5 JO p in at the
Masses 11 '
Newman G
ville Week,
lei Wc
Newrn in �
1 a m
liter �
,i - 8
Inesd,
nter
STOP SMOKING
lo you want to stop smoking hut n
some help? Then this program isfoi ��
The Student Health Service otters
American Cancer Society Fresh Start !
cram to help vou kick the habit t'l.v
run one hour per week for three wi
starting Thursday June 28 at 1 pm !
is free of charge CaB757 6794 to sign u
tor more inl irmation
Ml
the
'r
�MS
eks
lass
por
�ram Hie cost is cheap while fun and
sun are high Call 7" 6387 tor detail- All
fat ult st.itt and student- eligibh
BICYCLE OUTING
Onjune30 1990 be Outdoor Rea
Program will be offering a bicycle
Register through une 28 Cyclist
da 11
AMBASSADORS
There will be a General Meeting at 3 p m
on Wednesday lune 27, in the Teletund
KiH'm
WINDSURFERS, TAKE
ANOTHER SHOT!
Two additional windsurfing outings tor
ha surfers will be offered July 5 and ul)
19 through the (Xitdoor Recreation ftp
Crimesland Beach and enjo) a healths
. irsion filled with fun and sun I all75
6387 tor details
BEACHVOLLOBALL
Get beached and sign up tor intramural
beach volleyball ltd v 2 at 4 p m in BIO 103
Men's, women's and eo roe teams encour
aged to sign up
tion i .ill 757 n
VOLUNTEI Ks Nl I BJ D EOS
RESEARCH STl "
"be Sectioi ' ' '
icho il of Medi ineii i '� i
Student Healtl
stud) on the sexual prea I I
ru-es We are looking for n
18 years and older who h ive i
genital herpes If you inti rested i
obtaining more information i i w
Askew. K N at (919) 551 2 7�
WINDSURFING OUTING
- p.ut in an in itructiona � � burring
�. 28at 3 pn in'1- will
. �� . unandsa irdsBeacl
while learning ba; rfing t
a!1757 638 "� i itioi lost
� .
-K RUN1500M WALK
. � � z � �
V �"� ilk during ��� � ses
:� R, gjster ul) : I it4pm in BIO I 0
variety of divisions have been estab
I shed Ail facult) staff are en ouraged to
register Call 7:C 6387 for details
ANXQiyrrMESTS
Duetoal �'���� I
East �� ���
� print a inn ��
not advisa
n � " � �
summi' �� �
�ir.j to find � �� ' ' � �' �'
one week bej � : �'





Page 6
- gibe �aat (Earolintan
Classifieds
June 27 ,199(1
FOR RENT
FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR RENT:Three-bedroom
duplex at 1306-B Willow St. Rent will
be $124 per month plus 13 of utili-
ties, phone and cable. Central air and
close to campus. For more info, con-
tact MARC or Pete at 830-3904.
ROOMS FOR RENT: Utilities fur-
nished. Walk to school. 757-3543.
FOR LEASE: Spacious 2 bedroom
apartment 2blocks from campus. Rent
includes hot and cold water, sewer,
central heat and air, basic cable. Call
746-4169.
MOTHER WILL PROVIDE FREE
ROOM and board near campus to
female non-smoker for work ex-
change. Call 757-1798.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED. Walk to school. Utilities
furnished. $137.50mo. 757-3543 ask
for Larry.
RENT, LEASE AND BUY IN THE
EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS.
STOP BY FOR DETAILS, NO PHONE
CALLS PLEASE.
AVAILABLE JULY 1ST for students
needing a roommate Lovely 3 bed-
room, 2bath townhouse atTwin Oaks
fully furnished with laundry facilities
and convenient to campus. $225
monthly and share utilities. Call Liz
Samsel at Clark-Branch Realty, 355-
2000 or 946-8667.
FOR SALE
APPLE MACINTOSH SE: 2.5 MB
RAM, 20 MB internal hard drive, 800K
internal disk drive. All for just $1,800.
Call 752-2369, after 3 p.m
FOR SALE: Coffee table. $30. Call
758-5422 after 6 p.m.
'78 4-DOOR CHEVROLET - Good
motor, Clean, New tires. New motor
parts, little needed. 736-5544 before 6
p.m. $700 cash.
SURFBOARD-CASTER TWINFIN
with leash. $75.00. Alsocaramplifier-
Concord, 50 watts per channel, new,
still under warranty, $200.00. New
asking $125.00. Mike 752-7622.
FIND mOR SELL IT) INTHEEAST
CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS.
SERVICES OFFERED
RESUME SERVICES, Desktop Pub-
lishing, and Word Processing. 24 hour
turnaround Mon-Fn. on most proj-
ects. Designer Type. 223 W. 10th,
101. 752-1933.
TYPING SERVICES: Research pa-
pers. Term papers. Letter quality print,
pickup and delivery available. Call
756-0520.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING (Word
Processing) - Term Papers, Resumes.
Call 355-4695 Mon - Sat.
COMPUTER SCHOLARSHIP
SEARCH � Locate financial aid 6-25
sources guaranteed. Call 1-919-946-
4551 or write School Aid, POBox 2546.
Washington, NC 27889.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
ATTENTION: POSTAL JOBS! Start
$11.41 hour! For application info call
(1) 602-838-8885, Ext. M-5285,6 a.m. -
10 p.m 7 days.
PART-TIME POSITIONS available
in: Modeling, Security and Sales.
Apply Brady's, The Plaza. Monday-
Wednesday, 1-4 p.m.
EXCELLENTPART-TIMEJOBS:We
are looking for a few ambitious stu-
dents to work on an on- campus mar-
keting program for major companies.
You must be personable and outgo-
ing. Excellent earnings. Call Bode or
Jenny 1-800-5922-2121
FREE TRAVEL BENEFITS! AIR-
LINES NOW HIRING! ALL POSI-
TIONS! $17,500 -$58,240. Call (1)602-
838-8885. Ext. X-5285.
FREE TRAVEL BENEFITS! CRUISE
SHIPS AND CASINOS NOW HIR-
ING! ALL POSITIONS! Call (1) 602-
838-8885 Ext. Y-5285.
ATTENTION: EARN MONEY
WATCHING TV! $32,000 year in-
come potential. Details. (1) 602-838-
8885 Ext. TV-5285.
ATTENTION: POSTAL JOBS! Start
$11.41 hour! For application info call
(1) 602-838-8885, Ext. M-5285,6 a.m. -
10 p.m 7 days.
ATTENTION: EASY WORK EXCEL-
LENT PAY! Assemble products at
home. Details. (1) 602-838-8885 Ext.
W-5285
ATTENTION: GOVERNMENT
JOBS - YOUR AREA! Sl7,840 -
569,485. Call (1) 602- 838-8885, Ext. R-
5285.
ATTENTION: EARN MONEY
READING BOOKS! $32,00year
income potential. Details. (1) 602-838-
H885 Ext. Bk-5285.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Right
Attendants, Travel Agents, Mechan-
ics, Customer Service. Listings. Sala-
ries to $105K. Entry level positions.
Call (1) 805-6876000 Ext. A-1166.
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,040 -
$59,230yr. Now Hiring. Call (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. R-1166 for current fed-
eral list.
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,412 -
S59 932yr. Now Hiring. Your area.
Call (1) 805-687-6000, Ext. R-1166 for
listings.
ATTENTION: EASY WORK EXCEL-
LENT PAY! Assemble products at
home Details. (1)602-838-8885 Ext.W-
5285.
FIND IT (OR SELL IT) IN THE EAST
CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS.
ATTENTION: EARN MONEY TYt-
ING AT HOME! 32,000yr incoafc
potential. Details. (1)602 -83M885G
T5285.
PERMANENT PART-TIME PQ
TIONS AVAILABLE: Clerical as
tant to the Buyer, Ladies and Ml
sales, and security. Temporary m4
eling positions also available Ad
Brody's. The Plaza Mon-Wed 1 V
HELP WANTED: Hotel Ham pi
Inn Greenville is now accepting j
plications for the positionsof full -A
night auditor and part time front dj
clerk apply in person 3439 S Mol
rial Dr Greenville, NC 27834
NATIONAL MARKETING FII
seeks mature student to managt
campus promotions for top coml
rues this school year. Flexible ruj
with earnings potential to S2VK
semester. Must be organizes
working and money motivated
Bode or Jenny at 1-800-5922-21211
RESPONSIBLE STL'DFJ
WANTED to keep 10 year-old in
home for the summer 4 days a vs�
Call 756-1759 After 6:00 p.m.
Announcements
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Center
invites you to worship with them. Sunday
Masses: 11 30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m. at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th St Green
ville Weekdays. 8 a.m. at the Newman
Center Wednesdays: 530 p.m. at the
Newman Center
AMBASSADORS
There will be a General Meeting at 5 p.m.
on Wednesday, June 27, in the Telefund
Room.
Do you want to stop smoking but need
some help7 Then this program is for voul'
The Student Health Service offers the
American Cancer Society Fresh Start Prcv
gram to help vou kick the habit Classes
run one hour per week for three weeks
starting Thursday June 28 at 1 p m ' Class
is free of charge Call 757-6794 to sign up or
for more information.
WINDSURFERS. TAKE
ANOTHER SHOT!
Two additional windsurfing outings for
basic surfers will be offered July 5 and Jul y
19 through the Outdoor Recreation Pro-
gram. The cost is cheap while the fun and
sun are high. Call 757-6387 for detaik All
faculty, staff and students eligible
BJOCJiQimNG
On )une 30, 1990 The Outdoor Recreation
Program will be offering a bicycle outing
Register through June 28 Cyclist pedal to
Crimesland Beach and enjoy a healthy
excursion filled with fun and sun Call 757
6387 for details
BFACH VOLLEYBALL
Get beached and sign up for intramural
beach volleyball July 2 at 4 p.m. in BIO 103.
Men's, women's and co-rec teams encour
aged to sign up. For additional informa-
tion call 757-6387
VOLLTNTEERS NEEDED FOR
RESEARCH STLDV
The Section of Infectious Diseases ECU
School of Medicine in conjunction with the
Student Health Center is conducting a
study on the sexual spread of herpes vi
ruses. We arc looking for men and women
18 years and older who have never had
genital herpes If you are interested in
obtaining more information, call Jean
Askew, R.N. at (919) 551-2578.
WLNrSURJJJSCQLTjrMi
Take part in an instructional windsurfing
outing tune 28 at 3 p m Participants will
enjoy the sun and sand at Whichards Beach
while learning basic windsurfing tech-
niques Call 757-6387 for information Cost
i�. onlv S4.
5K X1INA50QM WALK
Recreational Services will be hosting a 5K7
1 VX)M Walk during second summer ses-
sion. Register July 10 at 4 p m in BIO 103
A variety of divisions have been estab-
lished AH faculty, staff are encouraged to
register Call 757-6387 for details
Due to alimited amour fspa t f-t
East Carolinian may not l
able to print all announccmen I
not advisable to rehf on these in
mmtantentaasasolem m
munkatwn However during -�
summer months we :��� try m
hard to find room for uourannoung
ments. So. send them in � at least
one iveek before publication
' T II -agliiliailUBii
I





June 27,1990
Slfte gaat (gamltman
State and Nation
Page 7
Decline expected in college
applications for next vear
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina's colleges and universi-
ties are choosing next year's stu-
dents from a smaller applicant
pool, but school officials say en-
rollment should remain stable
decline, the school expects this
year's freshman class to be about
the same size as last year's, which
was about 3,200 students.
Ms. Polk said the smaller
applicant pool had not affected
di -spite j substantial drop in other the quality of this year's fresh-
states. men.
Officials at the state's two The decrease in the college-
largest universities � N.C. State applicant pool is the result of
University and the University of decliningbirthratessincethebaby
orth Carolina at Chapel Hill � boom. Colleges and universities
said that despite a drop in their have countered the decline in re-
applicant pools they expected this
year's freshman class to remain
about the same size as last year's.
t NCSU, the 1989 class com-
prised about 3,400 students, said
leorge Dixon, the school's direc-
tor of admissions. The shrinkage
in this year's applicant pool means
State has placed fewer stu-
dents on its waiting list.
At NCSU, 500applicants were
placed on a waiting list last year,
but only 350 are on the list this
vear.
At UNC-Chapel Hill, the
applicant pool declined by 10
percent, or about l,6O0applicants,
said Barbara Polk, associate direc-
tor of undergraduate admissions.
She said that even with the
cent years by enrolling non-tradi-
tional students. But many colleges
are finding the drop too steep to
overcome.
Evan Sun, a statistician at the
state Department of Public Instruc-
tion, said that based on birth rates,
it would be five or six years before
the number of college-age students
increases.
One reason the quality of next
year's freshmen should be high,
school officials say, is the higher
admission standards taking effect
this fall for all 16 schools in the
UNC system.
In contrast to UNC-CH and
NCSU, the number of applications
has increased or remained stable
at three of the state's predomi-
nantly black institutions.
The higher admission stan-
dards were expected to hit the
state's predominantly black
schools the hardest, but only N C.
Central University said it expects
the standards to limit the number
of freshmen it enrolled this year.
At NCCU the number of ap-
plicants increased, but because of
the standards this fall's class will
be smaller, said Nancy Rowland,
the university's admissions direc-
tor. Last year's freshman class
numbered 990 students, but this
year Ms. Rowland said she ex-
pects the class to be between 850
and 900 students.
Another factor in the expected
decline is the school's new em-
phasis on reducing its percentage
of out-of-state students, she said.
But Ms. Rowland said she
thought the decline in enrollment
would be balanced in part by a
better retention rate because of
students' being more qualified.
Despite earlier fears, officials
at two predominantly black
schools � Fayettevilte State Uni-
versity and VVinston-Salem State
University � said this week that
the new standards would not
cause new problems.
Orion pictures approve movie
sequel to 'Bull Durham'
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) �
Vion Pictures has approved a
movie sequel to "Bull Durham
the smash summer hit of 1988
.vhich grossed more than $50
million. Filming in Durhamcould
start bv the fall of 1991.
Producer Thorn Mount con-
firmed those plans from his Bur-
bank. Calif office.
We intend to make a sequel
to Hull Durham MounttoldThe
iDurham Morning Herald in an in-
terview published Saturday.
We've been working with Orion
for about four or five months, but
we just recently got the approval
to make the film
Mount estimated that about
two-thirds of the sequel will be
filmed in Durham.
Wnter-director Ron Shelton,
a former minor-league ballplayer,
is currently working on the sequel
screenplay. Shelton's original
screenplay received an Academy
Award nomination.
'I can't tell you the plot, but I
can tell you it will be set at least
partially in Durham Mountsaid.
"It involves the same three char-
actersat latter stages in their lives
The original starred Kevin
Costner, Susan Sarandon and Tim
Robbins. All three have been
approached about starring in the
sequel, Mount said.
The original was filmed pri-
marily in Durham during the fall
of 1987. Shooting lasted about
three months and involved some
2,500 "extras most of whom filled
the stands of Durham Athletic
Park.
Miles Wolff, owner of the
Durham Bulls, said accomodating
a film crew for the first movie
wasn't easy.
"It was a headache Wolff
said We told them we didn't
want them to come back, but it
was so successful.
Wolff said he would have no
problem welcoming Mount back
to Durham. Wolff said that with
his ball club occupying the sta-
dium April through August, the
fall of 1991 would be the most
likelv time to start filming.
Orion Pictures spent a re-
ported $8.5 million to film "Bull
Durham" and another $10-11
million promoting it.
Mount, 41, is a former Dur-
ham resident who now runs his
own production company, Liberty
Pictures.
Other Mount productions
include "Tequila Sunrise "The
Deer Hunter" and "Animal
House
Statewide manhunt for
convicted murderer continues
RALEIGH (AP) � Officials
are pressing their search for Roger
Lee McQueen, a convicted mur-
derer who escaped from a job
assignment last week, by issuinga
nationwide alert and the most
recent photograph available.
McQueen, 51, wasserving two
life sentences for two murders at
the time of his escape. It is because
of his record that Department of
(Orrechon officials say he should
be considered dangerous.
We're following every lead,
regardless of where it's at said
lim Byrum, the program director
for the Division of Prisons.
"He traveled extensively on
his last escape. The South, the
West, up in the Northeast. The
only area we don't have any clues
on are Oregon and Washington
State. Everything else, we're cov-
ering, and we're also looking at
those two states
McQueen escaped from a
Missouri prison, where he was
serving a sentence for murder. He
was apprehended in Pennsylva-
nia and returned to North Caro-
lina and tried for the two murders
in Fayetteville. He was convicted
for those murders in 1977.
Department of Correction
spokesman BUI Poston said
McQueen was on a work detail
from the Greene Correctional
Center, working at the state High-
way Patrol office in Greenville.
Officials said McQueen was one
of the better adjusted prisoners
and had just one infraction since
being imprisoned and had earned
a work detail position.
'We have not drawn any con-
clusions as to how he made his
escape. One moment he was there,
the next moment he was not there
Byrum said. "We don't know if he
had a ride, hitchiked or walked
off. Nothing has developed on
that
SBI searches air terminals, buses
Agents retreat from traditional patrol
When agents of the State Bu-
reau of Investigation look for
drugs these days they are more
likelv to locus on bus and air ter-
minals than the backwaters of the
coast or a clandestine airstrip
in recent vears, agents have
concentrated their drug interdic-
tion efforts on bus and air termi-
nals, retreating from the traditional
patrol of the state's 3,375 miles of
beaches, inlets and coastal rivers
that form a nook-and-cranny
shoreline long known as a haven
for smugglers.
It's been four vears since the
bureau cracked a major coastal
smuggling operation � the kind
of cases that occasionally yielded
huge hauls of marijuana and other
drugs.
They7 re not smuggling by the
water as much says David R.
Marshall, the supervisor for the
SBI'sCoastal District. "Cocaine is
the drug oi choice. They can do it
bv air, land or sea. I'm sure some is
getting bv us, but I don't think as
much is coming in
As the bureau looks for drugs
stashed bv the new breed of tran-
sient smugglers, italsoisinvolved
in another relatively new strat-
egy: street-level undercover cam-
paignscoordinated with local law-
enforcement agencies across the
state.
But the effectiveness of some
of the most highly publicized of
those- efforts is in question.
In Chad bourn, a small Colum-
bus County town, 97SBI agents �
part of a 113-agent force � swept
down last year in a Friday-night
raid heralded as the largest in the
state's history. But to date, the 14
arrests have produced only five
convictions.
'Chadbourn was political
grandstanding at its worst says
lawyer loseph B. Cheshire V of
Raleigh. Purely pabulum for the
public. They don't need to do that
This transformation of the
SBI's drug efforts, several years in
the making, comes at a time when
Li. Gov. James C. Gardner, a Re-
publican, has proposed establish-
ing a new state drug agency. The
proposed agency would be con-
trolled bv Democratic Attorney
General Lacv H. Thomburg, as is
Flag burning
and the voters
Voters were asked if they
were more likely or less likely
to vote for their congressional
representative if he or she
voted against constitutional
amendment outlawing flag
burning:
More likely25
Less likely
No effect31
41
Source: KRC Communications
Research telephone poll of 1,004
registered voters on June 17.
Sampling error, 3�.
Keith Carter. GNS
Spotted fever epidemic said to be par for the course
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina this hot season has been
home to an estimated one in four
f the nation's cases of Rocky
Mountain spotted fever, but health
officials say that is par for the
course.
As of June 1, North Carolina
had 14 cases of the sometimes
deadly disease, nearly a quarter of
the cases reported nationwide by
the Centers for Disease Control in
Atlanta, said Dr. Janet Fischer, a
professor of medicine who spe-
cializes in tick-home illnesses at
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill.
North Carolina is believed to
be a hotbed of Rocky Mountain
spotted fever because of a warm
climate that spurs outdoor activ-
ity and plentiful underbrush in
which ticks thrive. But the villain
in the disease is not the tick. It is a
bacteria called Rickettsia rickettsii.
The bacteria is carried by
about 3 percent of ticks and is
transferred when a tick is attached
to its victim while feeding.
Children, older people and
black men are particularly at risk,
Ms. Fischer said in a recent inter-
view.
While 60 percent of cases are
in children over 1 year old, "the
mortality is higher in people in the
mature years of life she said.
"But there need be no mortality
except in black males if thedisease
is treated early
Black males appear to have a
higher risk of death because of an
inherited deficiency of a certain
enzyme, Ms. Fischer said.
Antibiotics usually prevent
the spread of the disease until the
body's immune system can fight
it, Ms. Fischer said. But since only
60 percent of victims realize they
have received a tick bite, getting
treatment early can be difficult.
After the bite, the initial lesion
disappears and symptoms may
not begin for a week, Ms. Fischer
said. The initial symptoms are
similar to those from the flu, with
general muscle aches, headache
and fever.
Meanwhile, the bacteria has
entered cells and begun multiply-
ing. When they begin damaging
capillaries, usually in the first four
to six days, the characteristic rash
breaks out below the skin, Ms.
Fischer said. The rash begins in
the extremities, where the cooler
body temperature is most hospi-
table to rickettsia, then spreads
throughout the body.
However, 10 percent of vic-
tims never have a rash and an-
other 10 percent may not notice it
because it lasts only a short time.
The lesions that cause the rash
don't stop there, Ms. Fischer said.
The lesions are also on the
internal organs, the lungs, brain,
kidney, liver she said.
Through an unknown mecha-
nism, the bacteria is able to leave
infected cells and enter new ones,
Ms. Fischer said. Antibiotics,
which cannot enter the cells, fight
the disease by stopping the proc-
ess of spreading.
the SBI � but would be separate
from the SBI.
The Gardner plan represents
a threat to the bureau, because
drugs are big business for the SBI,
The News and Observer reported
Monday.
Over the vears, as the needsof
local law-enforcement agencies
have changed, the SBI has shifted
more and more of its resources to
drug investigations. In 1978, drug
cases represented 38 percent of
the SBI's work. By 1989, the figure
had soared to 63 percent, and the
bureau now employs h8 drug
agents out of its 174-agent force.
As the prevalence of d rug use
has increased, the importance of
the SBI has increased says
Raleigh Police Chief Frederick K.
Heineman. "There is a direct rela-
tionship between the growth in
drugs and our use of the SBI
Thomburg savs taking drug
enforcement away from the SBI
would be "a serious mistake"
because it would set up, in effect,
competing la w-enforcement agen-
cies.
Volunteerism
of students
increases
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina college students are still
out to get a job, but increasingly,
they want to change the world
too, say school officials, noting a
rise in student volunteerism.
"The last couple of years, stu-
dents seem more aware said
Caroline Craig, who coordinates
service programs at Davidson
College. "Thev come to Davidson
asking if therc'sarecyclingcenter,
if there's homeless shelter, if
there's a literacy program
Students at the liberal arts
college nearCharlotte have helped
build homes for the needy and
operate a campuswide recycling
program. More than 100 have
trained to serve as tutors for grade-
school and high school students.
James F. Keith Jr who directs
Guilford College's student intern-
ships and service programs, says
the students arriving on campus
appear to be more socially con-
scious than their peers a few years
ago.
More than half of the Greens-
boro school's 1,700 students do-
nate their energies to philanthropic
causes ranging from tutoring pris-
oners and refugees to working in
retirement homes and housing
projects.
"I see things over the past five
years as having radically
changed Keith told The News and
Observer of Raleigh in an inter-
view published Sunday. "The
(career) aspirations of students are
every bit as strong, but they're
bringing with them strong con-
cerns for the environment, for
human justice, for peace � much
more than perhaps a lot of stu-
dents five years ago"
i





�lje iEast (Carolinian
Page 8
Features
�.
June 17,1990
Pacemaker helps
man live normally
Sharpshooter wins competition
ECU News Bureau
In a fashion somewhat reminiscent of Clint Eastwood, R.L. "Jack"
Parks is blowing away mvths that people with heart pacemakers are
best confined to front-porch rocking chairs.
Parks, a 71-years-young resident of the coast near Cape Carteret,
N .C, recently earned age group first-team All-America status from the
20,000-member National Skeet Shooting Association (NSSA). To those
of you who aren't "shooters that simply means that Parks and three
other persons aged 70 and over are downright handy when it comes to
knocking little clay pigeons out of the sky with a shotgun. So handy, in
fact, that last year Parks also equalled a world record for a .410 caliber
shotgun by hitting a mind-blowing 99 out of 100 targets during NSSA
competition.
He did all that despite the fact that he has a cardiac pacemaker
battery implanted in his upper left chest. Or, it could be argued, he did
all that because of the pacemaker.
A burly retired Marine who survived a bout with cancer, Parks isn' t
the kind to go scurrying off to a doctor for every little bump and bruise.
That's why he wasn't overly concerned several years ago when he
began having fainting spells. Nothing too serious�he'd just "blip out"
for an instant, usually while resting. Then at a match in Rocky Mount
two years ago, he was about to shoot when it happened again. Con-
cerned that he might endanger others, he decided to act.
Parks was referred to a cardiologist at the ECU School of Medici no.
who diagnosed a slow heartbeat. More precisely, he had an electrical
short in the circuitry that produces a regular heartbeat. When that
happens, either as the result of disease or a buildup of calcium deposi ts.
the natural electrical impulse must be supplied artificially by a pace-
maker.
About the size of woman's compact, the pacemaker batterv is
implanted just under the skin on one side of the upper chest. One or
more wirescarrying an electrical charge connect the battery to the heart.
The device has become almost commonplace; 200 are implanted each
year at Pitt County Memorial Hospital in a relatively simple and safe
surgical procedure.
Parks admits he was fearful of the changes a pacemaker might
bring. But his doctors and nurses convinced him that "it wouldn't
interfere with mv life, except that it would make a better lifestyle tor
me His onlv request was that the pacemaker be implanted in his left
side "so 1 can still shoot" with the shotgun stock against his right
shoulder.
See Pacemaker, page 9
Total Recall7 matches
actor's average roll
Sunshine paradise
Nat Taylor (lett), Maria Milani (center; and Michelle McKmght avoid air conditioning and enjoy the heat of
the day by taking advantage of the summer sun Photo by J D Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
Air conditioners make hot
months more tolerable
(AP) � Air conditioners are a
real btessingduring the hot, humid
days of summer, rhey not only
cool, but also remove moisture,
tilter dirt and Just and replace
stale air with fresh.
To accomplish all this, they
use large amounts of electricity,
so there's a pnee for this comfort.
Here are some tips toensure cost
efficient operation o( your air
conditioner. How Air( ondition
ers Work
An air conditioner works on
thepnnciplethata liquid (a refrig-
erant) absorbs heat (cools the
room) when it expand- into a gas,
then gives off heat (to the out-
doors) when it isagaincompressed
into a liquid.
it circulates the refrigerant
through two sets ol coils in one
continuous lKp rhe evaporator
coil cools the room while the con-
nser coil gives oft heat to the
outdoors. Between them is an
insulating barrier that keeps the
two parts from working against
each other. Near the barrier as
part oi the rcfriger int loop is a
compressor which i irculates the
refrigerantandcornpressesit l"wo
tans help transfer the heat from
the .nr to the coils and to the out-
doors IoGet our Money's Worth
Install the aii conditioner as
far as possible from exterior doors
to prevent draft- and cross-venti-
lation from warming the cooled
air
Make sure there are no ob-
structions, such .is chairs or drap-
eries, in front ot the unit.
Direct the cnts upward so
you get cool air at the upper levels
of the room. It will drift down
naturally because cool air is heav-
ier than warm air
Seal or weatherstrip all gaps
around the unit and around exte-
rior doors and windows. Other-
wise, the unit will have to work
harder to remove heat and hu-
miditv. To Maintain in Optimum
Condition
Be sure to turn off and unplug
the unit before working on it.
Regula rl v clea n t he gn 1 le wi th
a soft doth, mild soap and warm
See Cool, page 9
Clocks
create a
new trend
(AD H vou love mod rp
design but can't afford a status
sofa or a work of art, buy a clock
Novelty clocks tor not a lot 01
monev are a phenomenon thea
da vs. courtesy of the inexpensive
vet accurate quartz movement
The 2-inch-square self-contained
movement, about S2 via mai
order, allows a designer to create
a unique dock that will run tor
several years on a single A A Kit
tery.
"Everyone knows the dock
face and the position of the hands
vi well that you can take liberties
with its design says Steven Holt
of Zebra Design. "So what vou a �
today is a rich series of experi
ments questioning ust how leg
lble the telling of time has to be
The kit, about $20. includes a
quartz movement in a mold'
plastic case with three hands
dots as numerals and a pap-
template to construct a circle
the wall. All mount with adlu
sive.
Some designers; such as ribt
KalmanofM&Co, New York, ha?
created dock faces withnumera
that are incorrect or in the wron
place I'he are for that sma
segment ot the public that is read
for confusion, parody and hi.
mor savs K tlmart.
Another source oi inspiration
is the verbal metaphor. Emili
Ambasz's Hare and TortoiseC kx
consists oi a glass-covered rircu
lar field on which the-hour hand i-
a plastic tortoise and the minul
hand a hare In a verbal pun ti
hanging clock is suspended on a
wire clothes hanger
(AP) � At last, a slam-bang,
body-count space movie with
brams!
Th: comment about "Total
Recall" can be taken two ways:
First, the plot hinges on brain al-
teration that permits weary work-
ers a century hence to experience
exciting vacations without board-
ing a jet. Second, the film has been
Coming up
Wednesday
ATTIC
WRQR Comedy
Zone
Thursday
ATTIC
Echoes Farm
Friday
ATTIC
Centerfold
NEW DELI
Modern Logic
Saturday
ATTIC
Quadranix
NEW DELI
Bad Bob &
The Rockin' Horses
made with a mind-bending imagi-
nation rarely seen since the first
"Star Wars
Derived from a short story by
Phillip K. Dick, 'Total Recall" has
been in the works for 10 years. The
credits reflect its many stages:
story by Ronald Shusett & Dan
O'Bannon and Jon Povill, screen-
play by Shusett & O'Bannon and
Gary Goldman.
Paul Verhoeven undoubtedly
was the galvanizing force that
brought the tale to reality. The
Dutch director has a rare talent for
the violently bizarre, as evidenced
by "Robocop
Arnold Schwarzenegger leads
a sterile Iifeintheyear 2084 (lotsof
Orwellian references here). He
works long hours with a jackham-
mer before returning to his bare
apartment and his wife, Sharon
Stone. His dreams are haunted by
adventures on Mars with a dark
beauty, Rachel Ticotin.
Against his wife's wishes,
Schwarzenegger enrolls at Rekall,
Inc a travel agency that implants
fantasy vacations in the minds oi
its customers. Oops, the machine
goes blooey, and poor Arnold is
immersed in a deadly battle. He
See Recall, page 9
'RoboCop' repeats
violence in sequel
(AP) - Halfway through
"RoboCop 2 vou tind yourself
wondering: Is this a satire oi the
heavy artillerv-superhero movies?
Or it is simply the most loathsome
example of the genre?
Despite the opaque humor of
the futuristic TV commercials
("Now that we have destroyed
the ozone layer, use Sunblock
5000"), you decide that these
moviemakers are playing it for
real.
"RoboCop 2" offers yet an-
other argument against sequels.
The first movie was cannily
directed by Taul Verhoeven with
a number ot real surprises and no
small amount of violence.
The new director is lrvin Ker-
shner, a qualified pro (The Em-
pire Strikes Back") who seems
Strairjacketed by an excessive
script (bv Frank Miller and Wav-
Ion Green).
The first five minutesare pure
hellishness The Amazon rain for-
est has been destroyed by a nu-
clear mishap. The U.S. surgeon
general is assassinated while
preaching against a new narcotic.
A drug treatment center is fire-
bombed. Mobs loot Detroit as the
police go on strike. An old lady
pushing a grocery cart of used
cansisnearty rundown by aspeed
ing car A mugger robs her, the
he is stomped bv a pair ot Ama
zons.
Time for RoboCop.
He zaps dozens ot bad guvs.
butheisdismemberedbv the drug
kingpins. After staging a come-
back, he faces a graver danger
Omni Consumer Products ha-
invented a RoboCop 2 with the
aim of destroying RoboCop I
More appalling than the re-
lentless butchery is the had taste
The Detroit mayor explodes in
vulgarisms when he is foiled by
the evil head ot Omni. A cute'
scene shows Little Leaguers loot:
ing an electronics store, led by
their coach. Six-vear-olds spoul
obscenities. One of the sadistic
drug leaders is a bov of 12 or 14
Much of me same cast isback,
An accomplished actor, Peter
Weller was ideal as the tirsi
RoboCop. his gaunt face and oth-
erworldly eves fitting the role
Here, he struts like a chorus
member in The March ot tK
Wooden Soldiers
Nancy Allen adds a much
needed note of humanity as his
See RoboCop, page 9
Listing priorities simplifies decision making
Read Along with Rita Long
Dear Rita:
I have a mother that wasover-
protective when 1 was growing up
and now that I am in college, she
still tries to make all my decisions
for me. 1 appreciate her advice but
I do think if sabout time for me to
make my own decisions. How can
I tell her in a way that won't be
disrespectful? Signed, Respect.
Dear Respect:
Sometimes you have to ad-
dress situations bluntly. You could
say something like this, "I appre-
ciate all the good things you have
taught me, but now 1 want to put
some of your good teaching into
practice. Even it 1 make a mistake,
learning how to correct it will be
good for me Or you may be more
comfortable saving, "I don't mean
any harm but as long as I'm de-
pending on you for all my deci-
sions, I will not be able to stand on
my own two feet Whatever you
say, try to leave your mom in a
positive light.
Dear Rita:
I have a problem of indeci-
siveness. For instance, if I need a
blouse, I'll go to the store and see
two I really like but can only af-
ford one. At this point, it seems as
if I can never make up my mind
which one I should get. This inde-
cisiveness has spread to other areas
of my life. How can I put a stop to
this? Signed, Indecisive.
Dear Indecisive:
Make a list of the things you
need most. Set them in an order of
priority reflecting your greatest
needs. Then make some short-term
goals and long-range goals and
do your best to stick with wha
you set tor yourself.
If you think about the thing?
you intend to do before you dc
them, you can save yourself en
ergy, frustration, and time. Aftei
you set goals, ask yourself what e
the quickest and most effective
way to achieve these goals. If tht
problem is big enough to call tr
your attention, it may be robbing
you of stamina and a better sell
image. Making smaller decisioru
will become easier once yot
achieve order in handeling voui
affairs.





The East Carolinian, June 27,1990 9
Campus Voice
What are you doing to beat
the summer heat?
Sherard Rogers, 21
senior, Accounting
like to stay cool by undressing and
laying in front of a large fan. I also
;pend as much time as possible in an
onditioned building, even if it
leans being at work
Ronnie Tope, 25
Junior, Psychology
"I prefer the heat to the cold any day.
I'd much rather spend my sunny after-
noons out of doors playing basketball
with friends
Michael "Buzz" Jones, 18
sophomore, Buisness
I'm pretty laid back anyway 1 Stay
cool mostly by enjoying the air-condi-
tioned dorms and hanging out with
friends. I also trv and spend a lot of
ime with my girlfriend
Matt Hedrick, 18
Freshman, Physics
"1 haven't really been staying cool. 1
like hanging out with friends, playing
tennis and volleyball. I also head lor
the beach whenever I get the chance
Kimberle Gooden, 20
Tunior, Speech Pathology
1 spend a lot of time cooling oft in
the dorms. Sometimes I go swim-
ming with friends at the pool over at
IVedgewood Apartments and enjoy
i sunshine.
�Compiled by Jessica Riggs
(Photos by Celeste Hoffman � ECU Photo Lab)
Music Notes
Cool
Continued from page 8
water. Do not use waxes or clean-
ers.
Clean or replace the filter
monthly. On most units, the filter
is mounted behind the grille on
the front of the unit. It can be taken
out after the grille is removed. If it
is a reusable filter, wash it in de-
tergent and water, then rinse and
squeeze the excess water between
newspapers and reinstall Replace
torn filters and ones made from
fiberglass.
With the filter out, vacuum all
accessible surfaces. If the alumi-
num evaporator fins are bent,
gently straighten them with a
putty knife so no fins are touch-
ing. Troubleshooting Tips.
� Does Not Run:
Check the outlet with a work
clogged with dust: vacuum them.
� Unit Cools Poorly:
Make sure there arc no air
gaps between the unit and the
window, between window sashes
or around other windows and
doors.
Filter may be clogged with
dust: wash or replace it.
Evaporator fins may be bent.
Straighten them gently with a
putty knife.
The ventilator door in the
barrier, which controls the flow of
outdoor air into the room, may be
stuck in an open position.
� Excessive Noise:
Tighten screws on trim or
exterior panels; secure window
mounting supports. If window
rattles, insert wooden wedges or
Position the air conditioner
cabinet so its outdoor side is
slightly lower then the indoor side.
Evaporator fins may be bent.
� Bad Odor:
A musty odor may mean
waterhascollcctedinthebasepan
because the drain hole is clogged.
Push a stiff coat hanger wiredown
the drain hole to remove debris.
An oil or tobacco smell means
the evaporator fins may need to be
vacuumed.
For help on a home repair or
improvement project, write
Reader's Digest, P.O. Box 700,
Pleasantville, NY 10570-7000.
THROUGH JULY llTH . .
BUY 1 CASSETTES OR
CDS & SAVE io
OFF REGULAR PRICE
vnecK ineouuei wmi a ���� � u
,ng lamp. If the lamp does not pieces of folded cardboard be-
light, replace the fuse or reset the tween the window and window
circuit breaker in your home's jamb,
central electrical supply panel. � Unit Frosts Up:
Makesurenootherappliancesare Avoid using when outdoor
plugged into the same circuit as temperature drops below 70 de-
vour air conditioner. grees- , �
Y . Fan Runs But Cooling Sys- Filter may be clogged by dust.
��m rw Mot wash or replace it.
'denser �ns may be � Moisture Drip, .n,o Roonv
11 �9 CHARLES BLVD
GREENVILLE NC
78 � 4XS1
NOW OFFERING J
2 DAY VIDEO �
AND NINTENDO I
RENTALS!
io OFF ALL PURCHASES
X 3W OVER $4.00!
- 4th ; (VIDEO RENTALS NOT INCLUDED)
?�.S�?�y
Recall
has a new identity as a secret agent
for rebels fighting the despotic
regime on Mars. He boards a tour-
ist rocket to Mars to discover
what's what.
Danger springs from every
corner, but Arnold is fast enough
to zap his attackers, which he does
often. He continues searching for
clues of who he is and what has
gone before. The quest is totally
gripping, even though the final
liberation of Mars is a bit much.
Pacemaker
This summer is going to be the hottest with scorching
, u releases from Vixen, Stryper, Extreme, Winger, Ratt,
' Bullet Boys, Anthrax and Guy Mann-Dude. Speaking of
v releases, Poison's "Flesh and Blood" IP is due out on
July 10 The LP's first video single "Unskinny Bop" had its
ivorld premier on MTV last week Poison will begin a
irld tour in support of the album on September 1.
Steve Vai's "Passion and Warfare" LP is doing very well
for this. Whitesnake guitarist. Vai and the rest of the Snakes
touring the country with their successful effort "Slip of
; the Tongue At the shows, Vai will perform cuts from his
i loLP for all vou guitar maniacs!
hile we're on the subject of tours, San Francisco-based
: Faith No More will be concerning this summer support-
their latest smash album "The Real Thing This
sically divers- and influential act will be coming to The
Boathouse in Norfolk, Va on July 21. You can catch their
it video single "Epic" on MTV.
Diamond David Lee Roth and mega-metalists Megadeth
, announced the new guitarists that will be joining them
in their respective bands. Jason Becker is the new axeman
for Roth, and six-stringer Marty Friedman has joined Dave
i Mustaine and company. Becker and Friedman are a umm
of Cacophony, a band that ripped out some of the fastest
md most incredible guitar work to date, before they parted
! ways to expand their horizons.
Thus past weekend, newly-formed Eavetteville act Street
I ethal made their first club performance at The Carousel in
(Ireensboro when they opened for Last Child. Stree
Lethal recently had some personnel changes when vocalist
limmy Walker left the band prior to the weekend shows.
Replacing Walker is Sid Starling, a frontman with some
Jooth and powerful vocal chords. Street Lethal is geared
n.toplaywithLastChildatArslungeinJacksonvilleon
Thursday Last Child's extensive road tours have turned
Qhis foursome into one of the tighest acts on the metal
circuit Street Lethal is headed in the same direction with
tight and talented players, and great originals that keep the
audiences rockin
Tipper Gor, Greenville's own homeboys from hell, is
making its way to The Attic on July 7. Don'X s one of the
heaviest thrash bands to invade Eastern North Carolina
On Saturday, there will be a reggae sunsplash concert
n Ddiuiu y, information call
going on in Atlantic Beacn, in �-� rui
WZMB at 757-6656. mM1(,
And flnally, SHU W'S
Mug in Fayetteville on Thursaay, rnuay
Until thenturn up the music and keep rockin !
�Compiled by Dearma Nevgloski
Continued from page 8
Shooting is a big part of Jack
Parks' life. He picked up the hobby
during World War II, when he
was an aerial gunner for dive
bombers. The Marine Corps used
skeet shooting to train the gun-
ners to hit a moving target.
In skeet shooting competition,
contestants may shoot up to 500
rounds with four different cali-
ber-size shotguns. The man or
woman who hits the most targets
wjnsn0 Small task when you
consider that the "pigeons" are
travelingat60to70milesperhour
up to 30 yards away.
To make the All-American
team, Parks had to perform well at
not one but numerous regional
and national shooting matches,
including the World Skeet Shoot-
ing Championship in San Anto-
nio, Texas. He traveled several
thousand miles and went through
about 35,000 rounds of ammuni-
tion in the course of a year.
"It's kind of a strenuous
game Parks said, but that should
be no problem for a man who cuts
his own firewood, tends a garden,
and still works part-time as a water
well contractor.
"He's as healthy as a horse
said Dr. William C. Reeves, head
of cardiology at ECU. Reeves,
himself a shooter, regards Parks
as the perfect counterpoint to the
mythology about pacemakers.
"There is an attitude that
people who have pacemakers are
somehow incapacitated said
Reeves. "It'sabsolutely incorrect
The only medical limitations
on Parks are annual checkups and
periodic monitoring of his pace-
maker battery which, astonish-
ingly, can be done in about five
minutes via telephone.
Parks hopes his experience
helps others view pacemakers�
and people with pacemakers-Hi
little differently. They're not just
getting older, they'reWell, you
know.
Says Parks: "I'm still enjoying
life and in some cases I think I'm
getting better at it
Continued from page 8
'Total Recall" is tailor-made
for Schwarzenegger's bulging
frame and lighthearted brutality.
Except for the villainous Ronny
Cox, the rest of the cast is little-
known (the star's $10 million sil-
ary apparently depleted the cast
budget). But all performed well,
especially Ticotin and Stone
Star billing should also go to
production designer William
Sandell, cincmatographer Jost
Vacano, and makeup artist Rob
Bottin. They depicted an Earth and
Mars that make the 21st century
seem uninviting.
The Tri-Star Pictures release
was produced by Buzz Feitshans
and Ronald Shusett. The R rating
reflects course language, excessive
violence and nudity (including a
three-breasted mutant woman).
Running time: 109 minutes.
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would like to
Welcome The Summer Students
and
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus Mass Schedule
Summer Sessions May 13 - July 22
Sunday: 11:3() am and 8:30 pm at the
Newman Center
Weekdays: 8:00am at the Newman Center
Wednesday: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For more information about these and other programs,
call or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am and 11:00 pm
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain & Campus Minister
953 East 10th St. (At the Fool of College Hill)
757-3760757-1991
Pre 4th of July Super Sale At
Overton s
PORTERHOUSE
STEAKS
lb$3.59
Grade A
Whole Fryers
lb 59
Fresh Meaty
Beef Spare Ribs
lb$1.19
Kraft Orange Juice
12 gallon paper
carton
990
Limit 2
Country Cane
Blended Sugar
4 lb bag880
Limit 1 with
$10.00 food order.
Boneless
Top Sirloin
Steaks
lb$3.69
Pepsi Products
2 liter bottle
$1.09
Ground Beef
Ground FreshDaily
3lbs or more
lb $1.29
Bold Detergent
Giant Box
980
Fresh Chicken
Breast Sale
Split Chicken Breast
lb$L49
Boneless Chicken Br.
lb$2.79
Breyer's All
Natural Ice Cream
12 gallon carton
$2.79
Embers Instant
Lite Charcoal
4 lb bag
Kraft Macaroni
&Cheese Dinner
7 oz box
2 for $1.00
Libby's Truckload
Sale
Garden Peas - Cream
Style Com - Whole Kernal
Com - Cut Beans - French
Style Beans
3 for $1.00
Limit 6 combined
RoboCop
Continued from page 8
! faithful sidekick.
TheOrion Pictures releasewas
produced by Jon Davison and was
rated R, apparently for violence
and language.
If "RoboCop 2" gets an R and
"Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down and
"Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer"
are condemned to an X, is there
something terribly wrong with the
rating system?
Keliogg's Rice
Krispies 13oz box
Buy 1 get 1 free
$2.59
Busch Beer
Regular or Light
Carton of 12-12 oz cans
$4.79
Salad Fixins:
Bell Peppers -
Cucumbers 5 for $1.00
Local Snap Beans
lb690
Local Vine Ripened
Tomatoes . . lb . . 690
Hunt's Ketchup
Plastic Quart Bott!e
990
Sfnro Hours:
Open Sundays 1 pm - 6pm
Monday - Saturday 8 am - 8 pm
Prices effective Wednesday June 27
through Saturday June 30,1990
Mastercard-Visa
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OVECK
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Quantity Rights Reserved
Corner of Third & Jarvis





�IE �aat (Harolmfan
Page 10
Sports
June 27,1990
Steele teaches
fundamentals
Bv Doug Morris
Sports Kditor
Students frornaQ over the state
have boon learning about basket-
ball in Minges Collesium during
Mike Steele's Pirate basketball
camp. he Mrst week of the an-
nual camp taught children from
agem to l . rhesechildrencome
for the day and go home at night.
rhesecond week sees high-school
students age 12 and over. Most of
these students come with their
coaches. Their week is spent m
intensive training.
"We Mart at 7:30 in the morn-
ing, -viul Mike Steele, head coach
of ECl s basketball team. "We
wake them up and coach them
until about 10:30 at night, so it's
constant basketball Steele said
that thestudentsareallowed some
time to lookaround. "Thev'vegot
a chance to swim and to see the
campus, but pretty much, it's
basketball
1 he high-school camp is di-
vided into two leagues. ,i "pro"
league which is comprised of
mostly juniors and seniorsin high-
school, o a "college" league
which is mostly junior varsity or
boys w ho did not come with their
schools. We've got somewhere
around 10 teams in each league
Steele said.
It's a team camp Steele
explained. 'It gives the.oachesa
chance to spend all ov for a whole
week with their players Steele
said that the camp is also good for
� the coaches. "It gives the coaches
f a chance to get to know us, and us
a chance to know them. "hey see
how we do things. Some things, 1
think they like, and some things
they do the way that they want to
do them. I think it's a good expe-
rience for them
Steele said that the camp fo-
cuses on basics. "We do all funda-
mental work at different times.
We do some defensive work and
some offensive work and then we
put them together. We put them
in some of our drills and then the
kids get to work on them with
their coaches
"We'd liketothink they'll pick
up some things fundamentally
said Steele, "but it gives them a
chance to play five league games
against other people and other
teams. Itreallvgivesthemachance
to have a week of intensified bas-
ketball During the week, the
teams compete against each other
and the winner receives a trophy.
Steele said the camp does
more than just give experience.
"It helps in a number of ways
Steele said. "It gives these people
a chance to see East Carolina and
a chance to meet a lot of people,
plus it gives us a chance to work
with some of the players and
coaches
ECL' has not signed any of the
players who have gone through
the camp in the past "Not yet
Steelestressesbut wvw ill. We've
already seen some sophomores,
juniors and freshmen from last
year that we're recruiting
Steele said that the camp is
larger every year. "The day camp
has grown from about 30 or 40
kids. We had about 85 or 90 this
time. It's the same with the team
camp We've had about 45 or 50
kids and now we're up to about
100. We're real pleased with the
progress we've made
Charlotte's footall
stadium delayed
Officials to shoot for '93
These "fro division champions from Dudley High School celebrate
their win with the trophy held high at Mike Steele s Pirate basketball
camp (Photo by Celeste Hoffman � ECU Photo Lab)
CHARLOTTE (AP) � A
Charlotte official said Monday he
doesn't believe an NFL football
stadium can be completed in time
for the opening of the 1992 season.
Loy McKeithen, the former
chairman of Charlotte Uptown
Development Corp. who isassem-
bling land for the stadium, said
the start of construction probably
will be delayed a few months for
relocation of underground utili-
ties and a business.
Buta spokesman for the group
seeking the football franchise
downplayed the chance of delay
and its significance.
"We feel we can work around
the bottlenecks said Mark
Richardson of Richardson Sports
Group. "If we have to be ready by
fall of '92, we can still hit that
timetable
Other options, Richardson
said, would be to play the first
1992 games away or in a univer-
sity stadium.
The stadium, to be built by
Richardson Sports if and when it
wins a National Football league
franchise, will go in a southwest
corner of uptown Charlotte be-
side 1-277 and Mint Street.
Construction is expected n
take at least 21 months. So whether
it can be finished by September
1992, the earliest possible expan
sion date, will become clear in
coming months.
McKeithen said two key (a.
tors are the relocations of WAV
Grainger Inc. and of Southern Bel!
lines buried in the area.
Both moves are expected to tx
finished in December. Construe
tion of the stadium tor 1992 was
originally to start in October
The delay won't matter it tin
NFL decides to expand in 1993
The league's expansion commit-
tee has met once but said nothing
"At this time, the league has
the flexibility to go either '92 or
'93 said Richardson "Theslower
the expansion committee moves,
the more it looks like '93
Intramurals boast winners in all sports
By Jeanette Roth
IKs
In the first summer session,
three men's softball teams battled
for the title with Montezumas
Revenge meeting the DPl's in the
championship later this week.
Cedric Howard, Ken Poss and
Mark Taggart have provided the
offensive firepower tor Mon-
teuma, while Paul Springer and
Lee Fleming have had the hot bats
for the DPI's The men of
Montezuma s Revenge, led by
their fearless aptain Monty Rish
have also been important to the
success ot theCo-Rec champions,
Boys & Girls, ackie Robinson and
Kelly Fields have provided excel-
lent fielding and timely hitting for
Bovs & Girls, while Bryan Ken-
nedy, Holly Eckman and Pete
Clemens lead the runner up. Si-
lent Attack
In3-on-3BasketbalU'dRather
be Balhn' survived the hot shoot-
ing of Rodney Boyceand Brandon
Eleby to defeat Bad Boys 11 in the
title game. Shane Wells'ball han-
dling and passing sparked I'd
Rather be Ballm'through the tour-
nament, but it was Lynn Johnson,
who was nearly unstoppable in
the title game as he scored from
every way imaginable. Also
making a strong showing were
"The Full Effect" and RS contin-
gent of Damn Evans, GregGoode
and Robbie Gupton known as
"Heavy D and the Boyz"
The pin action at Mendenhall
Student Center was fast and tun
ous as Bvron Kennedy outlasted
Scott Smith for the men's title and
Kelly Eckman held off Paige
Richardson in the women's divi-
sion. High scores go to Kelly
Eckman with a 18 game, and
Paige Richardson with a 192.
The tennis singles wound
See Intramurals page 12
Clemson football player faces
charges of assault and battery
CLEMSON, S.C. AP) �
Clemson defensive tackle Chester
McGlockton could face discipli-
narv action pending the outcome
of charges stemming from an early
morning fight outsidea nightclub.
Coach Ken Hattield said.
McGlockton, a 6-foot-5, 296-
pound sophomore from VVhitev-
llle, .C, wascharged Sunday by
Clemson city police with three
counts of simple assault and bat-
tery and one count of public disor-
derly conduct, Police Chief
lohnson Link said in a news re-
lease Monday.
McGlockton, 20, was released
on $1,800 personal recognizance
bond. A hearing has been set tor
July 11, Link said.
McGlockton could receive a
fine of $200 or up to 30 days in jail
for each count. Link said.
Hatfield, who spoke for 90
minutes with McGlockton on
Mondav, said the player should
"tell the truth get a lawyer and
prepare a defense. McGlockton,
like all football players who live in
the athletic dormitory, has an
unlisted telephone number and
could not be reached for comment
Monday.
Hatfield said he planned to
investigate the incident himself.
Any disciplinary action, if Hat-
field believed appropriate, proba-
bly would come after the case is
resolved. 'There is something to
be learned from all of this Hat
field said
McGlockton was arrested at
ter police received an anonymous
telephone call about 2 am. Sun
dayaboutahghtat the entranced
Village Green Apartments adia
cent to a popular Clemson lounge
called "The Zoo Link said
"As a result of information
received from witnesses and vic-
tims police charged McGIock-
ton, Link said.
"The football staff regrets the
recent incident involving Chester
McGlockton said Dick Ellis, as
sistant athletic director for foot
See Clemson page 12
Quit making all that racket
Ireland, Italy to face each
other in World Cup action
Michelle Wood enjoys her summer afternoon with a tennis match Here she demonstrates her back-
hand as she tries to defeat her opponent (Photo by J D Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
Ga.Tech considers move to SEC
ATLANTA (AP) - Georgia
Tech, which resigned from the
Southeastern Conference in 14,
has shown an interest in getting
back in.
Athleticsdirector Homer Rice
said he would listen if approached
by the SEC to leave the Atlantic
Coast Conference and rejoin the
SEC, although he said he has not
been approached.
Football coach Bobby Ross
said he feels the same, adding that
most Sou them prospects recrui ted
by Tech have "an SEC mentality
But basketball coach Bobby
Cremins was less enthused.
"I'm for the ACC he said.
"I'm an ACC man all the way.
That's one of the reasons I came to
Georgia Tech. I really think Tech
is embedded in the ACC, and 1
believe we're there to stay
The Yellow Jackets won their
second ACC basketball champi-
onship last season and went to the
Final Four.
The SEC has not identified its
target schools, but Southwest
Conference member Arkansas has
acted on the SEC's mood to ex-
pand its roster from 10 schools
and agreed to hold formal conver-
sations with league officials.
"I think all of our people are in
line with the ACC, but if some-
thing came along, you'd have to
listen Rice said. "It's not a matter
of greed, but a matter of survival
in the television market
After Tech resigned from the
SEC, football and basketball at-
tendance plummeted and recruit-
ing suffered. In'l 976 then athletics
See SEC page 12
ROMF (AD � Italy doesn't
allow goals. Ireland doesn't lose
games.
Both continued their streaks
Monday in entirely different ways.
The host Italians, seeking an
unprecedented fourth World Cup,
beat Uruguay 2-0on goals by Sal-
vatore Schillaci and Aldo Serena.
Ireland, in its first appearance at
the world soccer championships,
survived 120 minutes of scoreless
plav and won a penalty kick shoot-
out over Romania 5-4.
The teams meet in the quar-
terfinals in Rome on Saturday.
"This is the World Cup and
every game is hard, every team is
hard Schillaci said of the
matchup with the lnsh.
It will be hard for anyone to
beat Italy's defense, which has an
unblemished record so far. The
Italians have beaten Austria and
the United States 1-0, Czechoslo-
vakia and Uruguay 2-0.
"1 think our midfield is our
real sourceof strength said Luigi
De Agostini. "We have mobile
playersand never give other teams
a fixed point of reference that they
can attack
Italian coach Azeglio Vicini
almost seems to take the impene-
trable defense in stride.
"It is something we depend
on he said. "We always attacked
and created quite a few plays. In
the second half, we were able to
break the tie. It was an important
step against a very difficult oppo-
nent
The next opponent not only
will be difficult but inspired. It has
been 19 months since the Irish were
beaten and, even though they have
not won in regulation time here,
nobody has defeated them, either
"Just think Coach Jack
Charlton said, "we are through to
the quarterfinals in our first World
Cup. I promised them at the start
that we would take them to Rome
and we've made it
Barely. The heroes this time
were the goalie and the gunner.
Goalkeeper Paddy Bonne:
guessed nght, dived nght and
stopped the fifth penalty kick in
the shootout, by Daniel f imotte
"I read the way he walked up
to the ball Bonner said.
David O'Leary, known as
"Gunner" with Arsenal of the
English first division, then walked
up to the ball and put it into the
right comer of the net for the vie
tory.
'To walk on and score the
winner, it was a dream OLearv
said. The lads said: Takethetifth
one So I did
"I left it completely to them
Charlton said. "There were plenty
of willing takers. David O'Leary
has had to wait a long time to get
on to the team, but he accepted
without hesitation the responsi-
bility of scoring the final goal. He
did Ireland proud
When O'Leary scored, the
players surged onto the field and
mobbed him, while nearly 20,000
See World Cup page 12





The East Carolinian, June 27,1990 11
Sports Briefs
Czyz KO's Maynard in seventh round
Bobby Czyz , the one-time light heavyweight champion defeated
up and comer Andrew Maynard Sunday with a seventh-round knock-
out at Atlantic City. Czyz (36-5, 25 KOs) floored Maynard with a right
hand Maynani, his left eve swollen shut, appeared able to continue but
let referee Frank Cappuccino count him out. Two judges had the fight
even at that point; the other had Czyz comfortably ahead.
Andrctti wins Indy race in Portland
Michael Andretti held off a challenge from his father, Mario, to win
the Budweiser-G.I. loo's 2(X) lndy-car race Sunday at Portland, Ore.
ndretti finished 3�2 seconds ahead of his father for his second victory
m two weeks. His average speed of 110.673 mph is a track record,
heating the 103 qS4 by Emerson Fittipaldi last year.
Spinks announces another comeback
Former world heavy weight boxing champion Leon Spinks said he
auncha comeback inSeptembei by lighting a kick-boxer in South
i Afterward, he will return to the USA for the real thing. His last
i omeback ended in 1988 with a 1-8-1 record and 33 second loss tolast-
second substitute opponent Tony Morrison. Spinks, 3b, is refereeing
wrestling matches
Giants may rent land for new stadium
1 he Santa Clara, Calif City Council will discuss Tuesday a pro
al b cit) manager Jennifer Sparacino that would force baseball's
I ranciscot iiants to pay Santa Clara rent it the team builds a stadium
�,t land The team wants to uy 120 acres ot municipal property
ent free to build a 45,000 seatstadium Sparacino has proposed a $5.4
k n annual rent
Fastest time of the year set in Minnesota
, Monica Track Club 4x100 relay ot Mark WithdSpOOn,
Burrell, Floyd Heard and Carl Lewis had the fastest time in the
rid this year, 38.56, in Saturday'sSika Bram International Track &
Id Meet at Blaine Minn The mark came in a rerun, alter Santa
, and Arizona each dropped batons in the first race, won by the
� da W 26).
Secret wins cross-country bicycle race
Hornets' pick to
be based on talent �IjfS
si Mr
so ret finished the "Race Across America" in a
2 hours and 16 minutes. Secret, 37, ol Scottsdale,
de ut ot 1 luntington Beach,Calif une 16. The 2Ji6 mile trip
lay at Atlantu City.
Bullets, Kings, J azz make three-way trade
a three wav deal with the Washington Bullets and "vcramento
. the Utah azz got Washington's leff Malone The Bullets sent
Mai ne and a 1991 second round pick to the Kings forb-lOcenter Pervis
rhe Kings then dealt Malone and a second-round pick ir.
Inesday's draft to the la tor guard Bobby Hanscn, center Eric
. ier and Utah s first and second-round picks Wednesday.
, Flay ers Association files antitrust suit
rhe NFL Players Association, seeking to protect itsgrowing licens-
business, has filed an antitrust suit against the National Football
. the NF1 Management Council, and NFL Properties. THE
�t i king $40 million in damages. They charge NFL properties
. trying to sign star players to licensing agreements.
NCAA investigates UTEP basketball
( A is investigating recruiting practices at Texas-hl Paso
' involving a star high school boys basketball player who was brought
� I IIT s program without a diploma. In his senior year at Los
Angeles jenshaw I ligh, ohn Staggers had so many unexcused ab-
sences that he failed to graduate. Staggers said UTEP coaches, in 1988,
� meed free housing, meals and transportation for him
( HARLOTTE (AP) � The
Charlotte Hornets' No. 5 pick in
the upcoming NBA draft will
depend on which player will help
them improve on a disappointing
second season in which they won
just 19 games.
The Hornets management has
vowed to take the best player
available regardless of need.
"We'll be taking a guard or a
small forward said Allen Bns-
tow, vice president of basketball
operations. "We won 19 games
last vear.That'snot a delicate mix.
We're going to raise our talent
level with this year's draft
Hornets coach Gene Littles
concurred.
"We need a player who will
make us more competitive, who'll
help us win a few more games
he said-
Charlotte played it coy Mon-
day, giving low hints about the
player they hope to select.
"Did 1 give it away? Can you
read between the lines Bnstow
joked after discussing some of the
college stars in Wednesday'sdraft
with reporters at the Hornets' of-
fices.
Most basketball experts pre-
dict 6-foot-9 Syracuse forward
IVrnckC oleman will go first when
the New jersey Nets pick.
Until recently, Georgia lech
swingman Dennis Scott was
touted as the No. 2 pick. But con-
cerns about his weight have come
up and his stock has gone down in
some circles.
Should Scott be around when
the Hornets pick, there's a good
chance he'll be their pick.
He'sby far the best offensive
talent in the draft Bnstow said.
1 ot the Hornets, there's an
obvious need that likely won't be
tilled by this draft center.
So the attention turns primar-
ily to a strong slate of guards.
including Gary Payton, Kendall
GUI, Chris ackson and Rumeal
Robinson.
"This isn't a marquee draft
said Littles.
Bnstow spent a lot of time
Monday talking about GUI, a 6-
foot-5 guard out of Illinois, and 6-
foot-8 LaSalle forward Lionel
Simmons.
"A guy like Kendall Gill will
find his minutes Bnstow said.
"1 le's that kind of competitor
As for Simmons, the Hornets
official said: "1 like his toughness.
He can put the ball on the floor
and he sa good shooter. He's also
an unselfish player and hisconsis-
tencv is superb. He's done the
same things for four years at La-
Salle.
"Perhaps he is the safest pick
in the draft. He doesn't do any-
thingspectacularHe'snotsuper
quick. He's like a decathlon ath-
lete
Both Littles and Bnstow said
Jackson, who averaged 29 points a
game in his two seasons at ISU,
would probably not fit into the
Hornets mix.
"He'll be a big draw at the
gate and he's going to sell tickets
Bnstow said. "We don't need to
sell tickets
Jackson is one of five point
guards who figure to go high in
the draft.
Besides JacksonandGill, other
potential picks at that position
include Oregon State's Payton.
Michigan's Robinson and Travis
Slavs out of Texas.
Bnstow listed his top three
point guards in Wednesday'sdratt
as Payton, Jackson and Robinson.
Hornets officials were tight-
lipped about possible second-
round selections, but said there
may be some good talent left when
they pick .Wth.
This draft is as deep as an)
I've been associated with said
BristowAlotofplayersaregoing
to stick with their teams '
TTiebigquestion mark is Scott,
who tore up the Atlantic Coast
Conferenceafter losing JOpounds
Some observers sav he's put a lot
,t weight back on during the off-
season.
1 he fact that he gamed
weight doesn't bother me but it
should bother Dennis Scott said
Bnstow, who added that the Hor-
net- were unable to bnng the 6-
foot-8 (-eorgia Tech star in for an
interview-
He's the one guy we can't
find he said.
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Every
Thursday
Night
Johnson wins $50,000 in dunk contest
oey Johnson, brother of Boston Celtics guard Dennis Johnson, won
the vertical dunk contest in Monday's One-on-One Collegiate C hal-
lenge .it the Convention Center in Atlantic City. The b-4 Johnson
Junk �n a basket that was raised to 11 feet, 7 inches to win the $50,000
firs! prizi
Leonard-Hearns fight may be delayed
A proposed third Sugar Ray Leonard-Thomas Hearns tight tenta
lively set foi November is bogged down in negotiations because
1 eonard insists 1 learns weigh no more than 160 pounds. Leonard won
their first meeting in 1980; the rivals fought to a controversial draw last
lune.
Tj
jela barred from running in marathon
Ernest Tjelaof Lesotho, who won the 1989 San Francisco Marathon,
has been barred from the uly 1 race because he ran in a cross-country
ra e in south Africa. In 1988, Tjela wasbarred from the Seoul Olympics
because he ran in Sou Africa earlier that year.
In the Locker
Grand Slam winners
Players who have won all
four Grand Stem events
'Wimbledon, French Open.
Australian Openin the
same year:
Player
Steffi Graf

J
Margaret Smith Court
Rod Laver
Maureen Connolly
Don Budge
Country
West Germany
Australia
Australia
USA
USA
Year
1988
1970
1962
1953
1938
Source Raquetball Manufacturers Association
Rod Little, Gannett News Service
Winners need
to fight to win
at Wimbledon
WIMBLEDON, England (AP)
Ivan Lend! won ugly. Boris
Becker won dirty.
The top two seeds survived
surprisingly tough challenges in
Monday's first round at Wimble-
don And they weren't particu-
larly concerned about the lack of
beauty in their efforts.
Lendl, the top seed, lost four
ot the opening five games against
22-year-old Christian Miniussi,an
Argentine ranked 116th in the
world. Though he recovered to
win 3-6,6-4,6-3,64, he seemed to
struggle at times with the low
bounce ot the ball off the carefully
manicured grass courts.
"I just had a terrible time with
the timing' said Lendl, beginning
his annual quest for the only ma-
jor title that haseluded him. "Every
court plays differently and 1 just
couldn't get any rhythm on the
return of serve
Lendl skipped the clay-court
season and has concentrated on
grass for the past few months to
prepare himself for Wimbledon.
Bu t he seemed to be suffering from
his traditional aversion to grass in
the opening set.
"I was a bit nervous at first
he said. "1 was not feeling com-
fortable with the low bounces I
was getting. But I got used to it a
little bit and I hit some good re-
turns
While Lendl was battling the
See Wimbledon page 12
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I





Sports Briefs
Czyz KO's Maynard in seventh round
Bobby Czyz , the one-time light heavyweight champion defeated
up-andomer Andrew Maynard Sunday with a seventh-round knock-
out at Atlantic City. Czyz (36-5,25 KOs) floored Maynard with a right
hand Maynard, his left eye swollen shut, appeared able to continue but
let referee Frank Cappuccino count him out. Two judges had the fight
even at that point; the other had Czyz comfortably ahead.
Andretti wins Indy race in Portland
Michael Andretti held off a challenge from his father, Mario, to win
the Budweiser-G.l. Joe's 200 Indy-car race Sunday at Portland, Ore.
Andretti finished 3.92 seconds ahead of his father for his second victory
in two weeks. His average speed of 110.673 mph is a track record,
beating the 103.984 by Emerson Fittipaldi last year.
Spinks announces another comeback
Former world heavyweight boxing champion Leon Spinks said he
will launch a comeback in September - by fighting a kick-boxer in South
Korea Afterward, he will return to the USA for the real thing. His last
comeback ended in 1988 with a 1-8-1 record and 33-second loss to last-
second substitute opponent Tony Morrison. Spinks, 36, is refcreeing
pro wrestling matches.
Hornets' pick to
be based on talent
CHARLOTTE (AP) � The tency is superb. He's done the
Charlotte Hornets' No. 5 pick in same things for four years at La-
the upcoming NBA draft will Salic.
depend on which player will help
them improve on a disappointing
second season in which they won
just 19 games.
The Hornets management has
vowed to take the best player
available � regardless of need
"Perhaps he is the safest pick
in the draft. He doesn't do any-
thing spectacular He'snot super
quick. He's like a decathlon ath-
lete
Both Littles and Bristow said
Jackson, who averaged 29 points a
We'll be taking a guard or a game in his two seasons at LSU,
Giants may rent land for new stadium
The Santa Clara, Calif City Council will discuss Tuesday a pro-
posal by city manager Jennifer Sparacino that would force baseball's
San Francisco Giants to pay Santa Clan rent if the team buildsa stadium
on city land. The team wants to use 120 acres of municipal property -
rent-free- to build a 45,000-seat stadium. Sparacino has proposed a $5.4
million annual rent.
Fastest time of the year set in Minnesota
The Santa Monica Track Club 4x100 relay of Mark Witheispoon,
1 eroy Burrell, Floyd Heard and Carl Lewis had the fastest time in the
world this year, 38.56, in Saturday's Sika Bram International Track &
Field Meet at Blaine, Minn. The mark came in a rerun, after Santa
Monica and Arizona each dropped batons in the first race, won by the
Florida Clippers (39.26).
Secret wins cross-country bicycle race
Bicyclist Michael Secret finished the "Race Across America" in a
record seven days, 23 hours and lb minutes. Secret, 37, ol' Scottsdale,
An ,rt Jo out of Huntington Beach, Calif June 16. The 2,8i 6-mile trip
ended Sunday at Atlantic City.
Bullets, Kings, Jazz make three-way trade
In a three-way deal with the Washington Bullets and Sacramento
Kings, the Utah jazz got Washington's Jeff Malone. The Bullets sent
Makmeanda 1991 second-round picktotheKingsfor6-10centerPervis
Ellison. The Kings then dealt Malone and a second-round pick lr.
Wednesday's draft to the Jazz for guard Bobby Hanscn, center Eric
I eckner and Utah's first- and second-round picks Wednesday.
Players Associatdojn filesantitrust suit
The NFL Players Association, seeking to protect its growing licens-
ing business, has filed an antitrust suit against the National Football
League, the NFL Management Council, and NFL Properties. THE
NFLPA is seeking $40 million in damages. They charge NFL properties
with illegally trying to sign star players to licensing agreements.
NCAA investigates UTEP basketball
The NCAA is investigating recruiting practices at Texas-El Paso
involving a star high school boys basketball player who was brought
into UTEP's program without a diploma. In his senior year at Los
Angeles Crenshaw High, John Staggers had so many unexcused ab-
sences that he failed to graduate. Staggers said UTEP coaches, in 1988,
arranged free housing, meals and transportation for him.
Johnson wins $50,000 in dunk contest
Joey Johnson, brother of Boston Celtics guard Dennis Johnson, won
the vertical dunk contest in Monday's One-on-One Collegiate Chal-
lenge at the Convention Center in Atlantic City. The 6-4 Johnson
dunked on a basket that was raised to 11 feet, 7 inches to win the $50,000
first prize.
Leonard-Hearns fight may be delayed
A proposed third Sugar Ray Leonard-Thomas Hearns fight tenta-
tively set for November is bogged down in negotiations because
Leonard insists Hearns weigh no more than 160 pounds. Leonard won
their first meeting in 1980; the rivals fought to a controversial draw last
une.
Tjela barred from running in marathon
Ernest Tjela of Lesotho, who won the 1989 San Francisco Marathon,
has been barred from the July 1 race because he ran in a cross-country
race in South Africa. In 1988, Tjela was barred from the Seoul Olympics
because he ran in South Africa earlier that year.
irWy 1990. UiA KXMVMff Cslltp InprmMxm Ntlmtrk
In the Locker
small forward said Allen Bris-
tow, vice president of basketball
operations. "We won 19 games
last year. That's not a delicate mix.
We're going to raise our talent
level with this year's draft
Hornets coach Gene Littles
concurred.
"We need a player who will
make us more competitive, who'll
help us win a few more games
he said.
Charlotte played it coy Mon-
day, giving few hints about the
player they hope to select
would probably not fit into the
Hornets mix.
"He'll be a big draw at the
gateand he's going to sell tickets
Bristow said. "We don't need to
sell tickets
Jackson is one of five point
guards who figure to go high in
the draft.
Besides Jackson and Gill, other
potential picks at that position
include Oregon State's Payton,
Michigan's Robinson and Travis
Mays out of Texas.
Bristow listed his top three
"Did 1 give it away? Can you pointguardsinWednesday'sdraft
read between the lines Bristow as Payton, Jackson and Robinson,
joked after discussing some of the Hornets officials were tight-
college stars in Wednesday's draft lipped about possible second-
with reporters at the Hornets' of- round selections, but said there
Grand Slam winners
"Players whcXhave won all
fbir Grand S�m events
(Wimbledon, Rench Open,
Australian Qpenin the
same "year:

s




Player
Steffi Graf
Margaret Smith Court
Rod Laver
Maureen Connolly
Don Budge
A ,4" Country
r West Ge
Germany
Australia
Australia
USA
USA
Year
1988
1970
1962
1953
1938
Source: Raquetball Manufacturers Association
Rod Little, Gannett News Service
fices.
Most basketball experts pre-
dict 6-foot-9 Syracuse forward
Derrick Coleman will go first when
the New Jersey Nets pick.
Until recently, Georgia Tech
swingman Dennis Scott was
touted as the No. 2 pick. But con-
cerns about his weight have come
upand his stock hasgonedown in
some circles.
Should Scott be around when
the Hornets pick, there's a good
chance he'll be their pick.
He'sbv far the best offensive
talent in the draft Bristow said.
For the Hornets, there's an
obvious need that likely won't be
tilled by this draft � center.
So the attention turns primar-
ily to a strong slate of guards,
including Gary Payton, Kendall
Gill, Chris Jackson and Rumeal
Rebtnson.
"This isn't a marquee draft
said Littles.
Bristow spent a lot of time
Monday talking about Gill, a 6-
foot-3 guard out of Illinois, and 6-
foot-8 LaSalle forward Lionel
Simmons.
"A guy like Kendall Gill will
find his minutes Bristow said.
"He's that kind of competitor
As for Simmons, the Hornets
official said: "I like his toughness.
He can put the ball on the floor
and he's a good shooter. He's also
an unselfish player and hisconsis-
Winners need
to fight to win
at Wimbledon
WIMBLEDON, England (AP)
� Ivan Lendl won ugly. Boris
Becker won dirty.
The top two seeds survived
surprisingly tough challenges in
Monday's first round at Wimble-
don. And they weren't particu-
larly concerned about the lack of
beauty in their efforts.
Lendl, the top seed, lost four
of the opening five games against
22-year-old Christian Miniussi,an
Argentine ranked 116th in the
world. Though he recovered to
win 3-6,6-4,6-3,6-4, he seemed to
struggle at times with the low
bounce of the ball off the carefully
manicured grass courts.
"I just had a terrible time with
the timing said Lendl, beginning
his annual quest for the only ma-
jor title tha t haseluded him. "Every
court plays differently and I just
couldn't get any rhythm on the
return of serve
Lendl skipped the clay-court
season and has concentrated on
grass for the past few months to
prepare himself for Wimbledon.
Bu t he seemed to be su f f ering from
his traditional aversion to grass in I
the opening set.
"I was a bit nervous at first
he said. "I was not feeling com-
fortable with the low bounces I
was getting. But I got used to it a
little bit and I hit some good re-
turns
While Lendl was battling the
See Wimbledon page 12
may be some good talent left w hen
they pick 39th.
"This draft is as deep as any
I've been associated with said
Bristow A lot of players are going
to stick with their teams
The bigquestion mark isScott,
who tore up the Atlantic Coast
Conferenceafter losing 30 pounds.
Some observers say he's put a lot
ol weight back on during the off-
season.
"The fact that he gained
weight doesn't bother me but it
should bother Dennis Scott said
Bristow, who added that the Hor-
nets were unable to bring the 6-
foot-8 Georgia Tech star in for an
interview.
"He's the one guy we can't
find he said.
The East Carolinian, June 27,1990 11
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UPCOMING
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Bruce Frye 8t
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relaxed dress code





12 The East Carolinian, June 27,1990
Flutie to sell fax machines and play for CFL
VANCOUVER, British Co-
lumbia (AP) � Doug Flutie will
be throwing footballs and selling
fax machines for British Columbia
Lions owner Murray Pezim.
Flutie, the 1984 Heisman Tro-
phy winner, signed a one-year
contract with an option year with
the CFL team that includes a two-
Clemson
year personal services contract
with Pezim.
worked some unique con-
tracts in the past, especially with
the USFL Flutie said. "We have
another unique deal here
Terms of the contracts were
not disclosed, but Pezim said his
business deal with the former
Boston College star would include
the marketing of a product that
allows personal computers to
function as fax machines.
Pezim said the two contracts
could make Flutie, released by the
New England Patriots in the off-
season, the highest-paid player in
the CFL.
"Murray made it happen
said Flutie.
Flutie, who played for the
New Jersey Generals in the USFL
in 1985 and played for the Chi-
cago Bears and New England in
the NFL, was not interested in
beinga second-stringer in theNFL
anymore.
Continued from page 10
ball. "From our information, the
case is still under investigation
Dave Winn, director of stu-
dent development at Clemson,
said the school has no other infor-
mation about the incident.
"We would expect to receive
a complete report when the city
police investigation isconcluded
Winn said. "We will then examine
this incident thoroughly and take
whatever action is appropriate
Eric S. Freshwater, 22, who
graduated fromClemson this year
with a mechanical engineering
degree, said he was walking away
from the tavern when he was hit
from behind.
"I didn't see it coming' Fresh-
water said. "Atnotimedid I curse
or shout at Chester. 1 just asked
him what wasgoingon, and he hit
me two more times until some
people pulled him off
Freshwater, who is 6-foot-2
and weighs 165 pounds, went to
the hospital after suffering head-
aches and becoming nauseated
and dizzy. He said doctors diag-
nosed a concussion.
Three of his friends were also
assaulted, as well as another man
not with his group, Freshwater
said. He said he and his friends
were at the tavern for about two
hours but never saw or spoke to
McGlockton.
McGlockton "was just going
crazy Freshwater said. "We were
attacked. It wasn't a fight
McGlockton, who was listed
behind Otis Moore at left tackle
going into spring practice, tied for
the Atlantic Coast Conference lead
in sacks with seven last season
despite playing in just 32 percent
of the team's plays.
Overall, McGlockton had 31
tackles in just 280 plays, including
10 stops for losses. Perhaps his
biggest play of the season came
against West Virginia in the Gator
Bowl when he knocked the ball
loose from quarterback Major
Harris at the 9-yard line and re-
covered in the end zone for at
touchdown.
Intramurals
Continued from page 10
down to the final matches as Lara-
lyn Turk defeated Donna Fowler
to win the women'sdivision, while
Boyce Hudson swung past Ken-
neth Fanner to take the men's
championship.
Twelve tnsbee launches took
to the ECU course in the disk golf
tournament and Larry Leonard's
44 and Sam Nicholson's 50 were
the leading scores. Dee Orndorff
(61) and Kristi Bahr (66) had the
top women's scores.
HTi presents
�Tr if EVERY THURSDAY
W Studei
Student Budget Night
Summer Specials
$2.50 Frozen Dacquiris $2.50 Ice Teas
$1.00 Imports � $2.50 Pitchers
� $1.00 TALLBOY CANS
FREE PIZZA
LADIES FREE
Time to split
These cheerleaders relax while watching their fellow campers cheer in
leading camp Be sure to notice the girl soaring at tree level at the top
J D. Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
the heat at ECU'S annual cheer-
center of the picture Photo by
This Week's Entertainment:
Wed.27 th
Fri. 29th
SEC
Continued from page 10
director Doug Weaver attempted
to get Tech back into the SEC.
Tech joined the ACC in 1978.
"Football would be the big-
gest lure (to the SEC) Rice said.
World Cup
"But would it outweigh the bene-
fits of being in the ACC? That's the
big question
Ross cited logistical reasons
for rejoining the SEC.
"We recruit against more SEC
schools than ACC he said. "Our
location creates natural rivals with
great tradition � Tennessee,
Auburn, Alabama, etc
Open Mic Night Modern Logic
$1.10 Long Neck
Sat. 30th
Large Hour
Bad Bob & The Rockin'
Horses
Every Friday
The Extremely Large Hour
4 pro till close
$2.00 Pitchers
$1.10 Longnecks
$1.25 Imparts
513 Cotanche St.
(located across from UBEi
Each Wed. Night
Open Mic Night
Sign up
starts at 3pm
758-0080
Irish fans sang, waved flags and
hugged each other in celebration.
The Romanians played well
under the most difficult of circum-
stances � unrest back home.
Wimbledon
Continued from page 10
"it could be that the events cited about us
had some effect on the players The excitement of the second
Coach Emerich Jenei said. "Foot- round concludes with Yugoslavia
ball also helped keep the calm at against Spain at Verona and Eng-
home because everyone was ex- land playing Belgium at Bologna.
Continued from page 11
bounces, Becker was simply trying
to stay on his feet. The three-time
winner repeatedly slipped and
skidded on the grass, often while
charging the net.
"It was very, very wet and
soft Becker said after his 7-6,7-6,
7-5 Centre Court victory over Luis
Herrera of Mexico. "The first
round is always difficult, but on
such a court it is more difficult
Becker made his task more
complicated by getting off to a
slow start with lOdoublefaultsin
the opening set. But he came
through in crucial moments, cap-
ping the first tie-breaker 7-2 with a
pair of aces and claiming the sec-
ond tie-breaker 7-4.
The second seed got so used
to flopping on the slick grass that
he even took an extra dive late in
the third set to mimic Herrera,
who had lunged for a shot.
Herrera, 18, ranked 199th in
the world, displayed fine touch
but did not have the power to
contend with Becker.
Lendl and Becker were not
the only men who struggled
Monday. Former champion Pat
Cash recovered from a 2-1 deficit
in sets and a leg injury to defeat
253rd-ranked Dimitri Poliakov of
the Soviet Union, while seventh
seed Brad Gilbert of Piedmont,
Calif overcame a similar deficit
against Yugoslavia's Bruno Ore-
sar.
Frenchman Yannick Noah, the
No. 16 seed, was not as lucky,
losing in three quick sets to quali-
fier Wayne Ferreira. Noah, who
has always had trouble on grass,
said he was not able to move well
on the slippery surface.
"Wimbledon isn't really a
place where I feel comfortable
he said after falling 6-4,6-3,6-2 to
the 18-year-old Ferreira. "This yea r
I tried to block out all the negative
thoughts I have about playing on
grass
Several other men's seeds had
easier afternoons. Ninth-seeded
American Jim Courier, No. 10
Jonas B. Svensson of Sweden and
two Frenchmen, No. 11 Guy For-
get and No. 15 Henri Leconte, all
won in straight sets.
V U I :�
Teachers,
Take Note
Student
Vehicle
Preregistration
Otflcw of Traffic Services
Department of Public Safely
E
Era
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
JUNE 15TH
DEADLINE
EXTENDED
AVOID THE LINES
AT MENDENHALL
NIE Workshops
Region Date
PL-ce
July 16 1" Elizabethit ollege t Mot-mark
July 30-31 Jacksonville. Southeast Regional inter
June 19 Jo Raleigh. Athens Drive High School
June Jo 2" Durham Brogden Junior High
ul 24-25 larboro, Martin Middle School
ul 10-11 Laurinburg. Central Priman School
August 2 3 Greensboro Wo' Guilford High
lulv is jo Charlotte.hariotu Mecklenburg Ed. tr
Jury 24-25 Blowing Rock Mowing Rock Elementan
ul 17-18 Ashcvilte. I'niversin Botanical Gardens
The N.C. Newspaper in Education (NIE) Foundation and
State Department of Public Instruction are planning
programs for you!
II
NOT DELAY
SEND IN
RIGHT AWAY
Find out how newspapers can be used m m youi classroom needs.
In summer workshops NIK Coordinators from the state's
newspapers present various approaches for using newspapers as a
teaching tool. You. the teachers receive a guide thai covers
newspapering, communications skills, social studies, math, health.
science, cultural arts, and vocational education. You earn one unit ot
credit for attending the 10-hour workshop. Registration is limited.
Make plans now to attend the workshop.
To register, send the $15 registration fee and the coupon below to
N.C. NIK Foundation. (Send S20 it registering for the Region 8
workshop: the extra $5 covers the cost of a catered lunch It you
have questions about any workshop, call Patti Hardawav or Angela
Kills at 787-5181 in Raleigh. NIK Coordinators who will conduct the
workshops are Sandra Cook. Jim Cnbbs. Nancy Culp. Robin Daniel.
Campbell Haigh, Jean House, tiinny Swtnson. Joy Tadlock. Carolyn
Thomae. (iigi Walter. Diane Williams and Linda Wilson
Name
Address
City
State
Zip
Newspapers
In Education
Telephone
School
Grade
Place
Subject
on (dates)
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4101 Lake BooneTrail
Suite 201
Raleigh. N.C. 27607
(919) 787-5181
The workshop Is In the following region (circle one)
12 3 4 5 6 7 8





INSIDE:
House
Republicans
insist:
"we're not
politicizing
flag issue"
S
Ml.iifc llii
-s
INSIDE:
House
Republicans
plan
flag-based
campaign
ads
page 6
Obscenity ruling spawns imitators
The Amalgamated Press
"Oh, yeah? Well, then, 'La Bamba'
is obscene federal d istrict Judge Ray
Diculous ruled Monday. 'Take that,
Gonzo
Diculous was referring to Fort
Lauderdale federal district Judge Jose
Gonzo, who touched off a firestorm of
judicial reaction when he ruled that 2
Live Crew's rap album Nasty As They
Wanna Be was legally obscene, de-
spite contrary testimony provided by
several expert witnesses.
Judges in thirty-eight states have
issued similar rulings in the wake of
Gonzo's pronouncement, leaving the
record industry in a state of total
confusion.
For example, Massachusetts fed
eral district Judge Whitebread Yup-
pie ruled that country music was
obscene, pointing out that "most of it
talks about wife-beating, adultery, a I
coholism, and so on � hardly the
kind of thing we can allow young
children to listen to
However, Yuppie's ruling did not
longgo uncontested,asGangof Sena
tors' Wives Who Unfairly Use Their
Unelected Positions to Squash Free
Speech (G5WWUUTUPSFS) high
priestess "Tipsy" Gore quickly rushed
to country music's defense. "Country
music is not obscene; it's simply a
glorification of good old-fashioned
American values said Gore. Things
like wife-beating, adultery and alco-
holism. I'rnagainstdirty language and
sex being mentioned in any song �
unless it's in a country music song, of
course. But that couldn't be because
my husband is a senator from Tennes-
see or anything like that. No way
Her disagreements with Yuppie's
ruling aside, Gore, who has long
advocated banning or labelling al-
bums she personally thinks others
shouldn't listen to, considers Judge
Gonzo's ruling "a big plus. How can
we teach our children how to decide
for themselves what music to listen
to, other than by taking away from
them anything we don't like? How
can we produce thinking and reason-
ing adults who resist censoring others
and who resist censorship imposed
by others, except by teaching our kids
ECU SNAPSHOTS
meaningless statistics that shape our campus
We're Wasting More Time Declaring Stuff Obscene!
I oooo -A
5000-
1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990
Year
a 11 he ea rhest possi ble age tha t i f you' re
bigger than somebody else, you can
tell them what to do? Face it: any
music that discusses sex and violence,
promotes sex and violence. Except
country music, of course. Country
music is different. I like it. So do my
husband's constituents
Gore and the GSWWUUTUPSFS
were also very pleased by an Ala-
bama court ruling in which federal
district judge Gud Olboy mandated
that any records sold in the state would
have to have all the lyrics printed on
the outside of the album. Also in the
ruling, judge Olboy used much the
same reasoning to declare that movie
theaters would have to print all the
words to all the movies being shown
on the back of each ticket sold, that
television shows would have to print
to the screen all the words that would
be spoken in each show immediately
before the show aired, and that pub-
lishers would have to print all the
words to everv book on the outside of
the book. "No way anybody in this
state is gonna be exposed to anything
that might offend em read part of
Olbos ruling � or, at least, that's
what it looked like it said; it's hard to
read crayon.
The spate of rulings has resulted
in several albums besides Nasty As
They Wanna Bebeingdeclared obscene,
as intolerant judges, law enforcement
officialsand community groups work
together to use their newly discov-
ered ability to ban whatever they don't
like or understand Among the more
prominent artists whose works have
been outlawed were Barry Manilow,
whom judge Robin Wrights accused
of "pandering to the questionable
tastes of white, middle- to upper-
middle-classcity dwellers and Milli
Vanilli. The ruling that Milli Vanilli
was obscene was the only such decla-
ration contested by no one.
2 LiveCrew hasprofited from the
widespread controversy, both
through increased record sales and
through their newfound martyr status.
But perhaps the performer who has
most benefited is Madonna, whose
recent sexually explicit dancing in
Toronto was only a prelude to the
smut-peddling she now engages in.
Her new album, Nasty As A Madonna
Wanna Be, contains several songs
alreadv deemed obscene by anti-free-
speech groups, even though the al-
bum hasn't yet been released. The
song that most offended the
GSWWUUTUPSFS and other groups
is titled "Vague which contains os-
tensibly objectionable lines like
Obscenity's where you find it
Scientific discovery
yields important insight
Thf Amalgamated Prkss
Shortly after researchers made the
disquieting discovery of the first hard
evidence of the huge black hole at the
centerof our galaxy, scientistsat FCU's
Center for Ascertaining Things ascer-
tained the reason for t he ongoi ng state
budget crisis that has been plaguing
education.
It seems that, just as the great
concentration of stars at the center of
the galaxy creates a black hole into
which surrounding stars are drawn,
the great concentration of wealth in
the hands of incompetent state legis-
latorscreates a fiscal black hole which
drains off money that might other-
wise be used for worthy causes. Like
providing scholarships for the poor,
for example, or improving ECU'S li-
brary, or even funding Chancellor
Bach Hurtm's little campus beautifi-
cation project
The Center's director, Dr. Hi
Brow, says the fiscal black hole is a
serious problem, but is doubtful that
anything can be done about it.
"As far as we can tell, this fiscal
black hole has existed put-near for-
ever, like bureaucracy" said Dr. Brow.
"And it'll probably last until incom-
petence and stupidity cease to exist,
and I think we all know when that's
likely to happen





i
DEBATE
Plain Talkin'
By Alvin Newhart
ECU Today founder
I just finished listening to that
rap album that got banned, whad-
dayacallit � Nasty As A Saibr, or
somethin' � and I get the feeling
that if I coulda understood a word of
it, I'da been really offended.
Okay, as soon as that ruling was
passed, I ran out and got a copy of
the album. I'm not ashamed to admit
it. Don't tell my wife, of course, but
thaf s different. Ethel � that's my
wife � she don't know nothing
about music.
Anyways, 1 bought the album
because I heard on the TV that it had
lotsa offensive lyrics and graphics
depicting sex, and I thought, hey, if
j if s bad enough to piss off the au-
thorities, it's good enough for me.
But Nasty As Can of Beans wasn't
dirty at all. At least, not so I could
tell. I wasn't really sure there was
anything obscene until I read the
lyric sheet. And there it was, plain as
day: about a hundred million times
these guys talk about sex and what
they're gonna do when they screw
these chicks and whatnot. Boy, I
spent a lot of time holding that thing
with one hand, it you get my drift.
But the issue is, should this al-
bum be for sale at all? I say no. It's a
real disappointment, you wanna
know what I think. In my opinion,
those guys should either describe
the sex clearly and distinctly, so we
can use both hands for whatever we
happen to be doing while we're lis-
tening, or they shouldn't go around
getting federal judges to call it ob-
scene.
Bill 0 Rights
An opposing view
Judge's ruling
was wrong
Banning Nasty As They Wanna
Be is nothing short of ludicrous. It's
not as if the album's listeners
(Hi!lt'susagain! Wejust thought
we'd cut in to say that this time, we're
going to print the opposing viewpoint
in itsentirety. Really. )ust thought you 'd
like to know)
symptoms, not the disease. Af-
ter all, who is it hurting? Who has
been harmed as a result of listening
to
(Oh, by the way wejust wanted
to let you know, if you win some money
in one of those Coke� Cool Cans, don't
drink the stuff inside!)
obscene, but if 1.7 million people
bought it, doesn't that lead the judge
to question his decision? Suppose
(By now, you have of course grasped
the awful truth. We are cutting off the
opposing view. But hey � if a federal
judge can do it, we can do it.)
Published by Offense Unlimited
� a division of Mapplethorpe
Manuscripts�.
Published every other week,
unless there are more pressing
considerations. Like, for
example, if The Simpsons is on.
Just to dispel the rumors, Jesse
Helms has never lifted a finger
to help.
ECU Today is a satirical
publication which has been
shown to cause cancer in lab
rats. It has also been declared
legally obscene in Broward
County, Florida, where police
and judges apparently have
nothing better to do than forcibly
shut off outlets for young
people's frustration and anger at
a system which spends most of
its time shutting off outlets for
their frustration and anger.
CORRECTION! Due to our lax fact-checking standards and
relentless disregard for the truth, yesterday's issue was completely wrong
about absolutely everything. We reluctantly apologize for the resultant stock
market crash and ensuing worldwide panic.
HUOTELINES
"U can't touch this
� Federal district lud$e lose Gonzo,
Explaining the effect of his ruling on the 2 Live Crew album
"Man, that's some lousy f�ing bulls�! That obscenity s�, like, im-
pinges on my f-ing First Amendment rights and s� like that. That a�hole
judge better f�ing 'pologize, or me and my boys are gonna f him up
� 2 Live Crew's lead vocalist.
Articulating his response
"The fighting in Palestine grew worse today, as protesters pelted Israeli
soldiers with rocks and garbage. Soldiers responded by oh sorry,
wrong page
� One of our reporters,
Soon to be fired
Is the album Nasty As They Wanna Be obscene? And, by the way, have you heard a word of it'
M. Pact, 32
Rich executive
Greenville, NC
Well, I'll tell you one thing. They
shouldn't be allowed to say all that
disgusting stuff. I mean, I'm revolted
by their language, and if disagree
with it, why should you be able to
listen to it?
No, I haven't heard a second of
the album. Why, do you think it mat-
ters?
T. Vortwo, 32
Camel trainer
Crifton, NC
I'll teil you what'g obscene. It's
human beings forced to sleep in the
streets ot our country It's children
and druggies being used as excuses to
strip us of our freedoms. It's a school
system whose graduates can't read.
It's � what? I'm under arrest? Damn
� I knew I should have moved out of
Broward County before I said this.
X. Kated, 32
Hit man
Ay den, NC.
b'h freedom ol speech! No?
Free press! Net that, either? Urn
did I sav "freedom of speei li"I did ?
Okay, I already said "free speech"
how about "free press"? I said that,
too,huh? No unreasonable search and
seizure' No? Well, okay then, I admit
it: I can't think of a single constitu-
tional right that I think is safe today.
V. Amihere U
I Ivis biographer
Chocominity M
I think Broward ounty, Florida,
would be.i great place to live because
I know that my friends the police
would keep me safely cocooned in my
little artificial world, far removed from
thetroublesof life, securein the knowl-
edge that nobody was hearing any-
thing that might offend me. At least
until someone shot me in the head
c
c
I
s
3
a
-
I






s
c
s

T
S

c
�a
a
i
It's only a joke; please don't write or phone. Thank you. � ECU TODAY � June 27, 1990 � 3
Comic-style films multiply
Tm Amalgamated Pklss
With the recent spate of success-
ful films like Batman. Vho Framed Roger
Rabbit Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,
and, most recently, Dick Tracy, comics
and cartoons are back with a venge-
ance. And filmmakers are rushing to
crassly exploit them.
Though studios are traditionally
reluctant to talk about projects under
development. The Amalgamated
Press, m the finest tradition of investi-
gative journalism, managed todigout
of its files several compromising
photos which persuaded studio heads
to overcome their reticence.
First, the sequels: various studios
will be releasing sequels of their hit
films, such as Batmen; Oh, So THAT'S
Who Framed Roger Rabbit! (to be fol-
lowed by So Who Framed Roger Rabbit
THIS Time?); Teenage Mutant Ninja
Snapping Turtles: This Time, They're
Mad; and Dick Tracy 2: Electric Bugaloo
(which may instead be titled Dick Tracy
2: Madonna's Naked!).
However, several original mov-
ies are also planned, like Try-Stair's
What's-His-Name � You Know, The
Little Black And White Dog Who Talks
Funny, and Pairofmounts' Jessica Rub
bit: The Early Years, When She Needed
the Money. Each of these films will be
released after about eighteen years i t
saturation advertising, and each will
haveitsownlineofdollsanda related
game at McDonald trumps.
Disney Studios wouldn't tell us
about most of its upcoming releases,
which means vou'll soon be seeing
some very interesting photographs
involving studio officials, jungle gyms
and underage horses. However, we
did manage to get them to reveal the
titles to their The Little Mermaid sequels
The Even Littler Mermaid, The Even-
Littler-Than-That Mermaid, The Micro-
scopic Mermaid, and The So-Darn-Small
We-Could-Hardly-Find-Her-ln-Order-
To-Make-This-Film Mermaid.
Other studiosare pondering more
"quiet" films � like Divided Artists'
ScoobyDoo Reunion. Insider gossip has
it that Fred is now totally bald, and
that Scooby Doo is developing cata-
racts and kidney problems and may
sxn have to be put to sleep. In a
similar vein, Touchrock Pictures is
considering The Flintstones Check Into
a Nursing Home.
The Oscar for "Most Honest Title
if the Academy gives such a thing,
will ha ve to go to Orison's God's Gift to
Merchandising.
The most surprising story of all
came from Cosmological Studios.
Studio head Lois Commondenomi-
nator, who asked not to be named,
revealed that the studio plans to re-
lease a detective comicfilm called
Trick Dacy, starring Tom Hanks as the
title character and Roseanna Arquette
asa lovely femmefatale by the name of
Breathless Maloncy Detective Dacy
will have an assortment of innovative
gadgets in his crime-fighting arsenal,
such as a three-way wnst radio (which
Commondenominator describes as
"kind of like a two-way wrist radio,
but with conference-call capability").
Commondenominator further
stated that Dacy "will wear a trench
coat and hat which look yellow, but
areactuallya kind of of-yellowCom-
mondenominator describes the film
as "nothing at all like Dick Tracy,
honest and has already announced
plans to "think of some pretext to rip
the film brutally out of the director's
hands and mangle it beyond recogni-
tion, like we did with the television
release of Brazil
This season's TV shows go nuts with cliffhanger finales
By Chippy Bonehead
ECU Today
In the tradition of such great net-
work television cliffhangers as "Who
shot JR.? syndicated shows arc now
enticing audiences with season fina-
les that hinge on life-or-death situ-
ations for the characters, hoping to
boost ratings and win fall renewals.
Star Trek: The Next Generation
ended its 89-90 season with Captain
Picard facing certain death aboard an
alien vessel. Fox Network off icialsand
producers of other shows have re-
leased teasers of other shows' cliff-
hangers to watch for this week.
The Simpsons' Bart will dream
about his sixteenth birthday, when
Marge and Homer go out of town and
he hires a hooker to open a brothel in
the Simpson home for the weekend.
The series will end as Bart drives
Homer'scaroffthedockoftheSpring-
field pier.
Superboy will finally bed girl-
friend Lana Lang. Just as they are
about to consummate their relation-
ship, they will discover arch-enemy
Lex Luthor has embedded kryptonite
in her diaphragm.
America's Most Wanted Home Vid-
eos has a double treat in store for view-
ers. As the sea rch for f(xtagc of George
and Barbara Bush in the shower con-
tinues, host Bob Saget will be bludg-
eoned to death by the studio audience
for telling them to "enter those votes"
just one time too many.
Small Wonder's adorable robot
Vicki will turn out to be a renegade
Fembot from the old Bionk Woman
series. Her programming will go be-
serk and she'll try to rip the faces off
the adorable family she lives with.
And finally, the wacky New
Munsters will seeaClive Barker movie.
The show will fade out as Heman,
Lily and the gang realize their true
calling as tcrnfying creatures of the
night and start hanging out behind
Fast Fares across the nation, killing
and violently brutalizing teenagers.
ECU SNAPSHOTS
meaningless statistics that shape our campus
We're Restricting More First Amendment Freedoms!
1
!
1982 1984 1986 1988
Year
1990
1992
Got a normal and healthy interest
in sexually explicit material
that certain brain-damaged
federal district judges
might declare obscene?
Do you share the rest of the
American public's inexplicable
and downright nosy interest in
the private lives of celebrities?
Then tune in to:
Rob Lowe's Sexiest
Home Videos
onlv on ABC, 9 PM Sundays
And if seeing Madonna in lingerie
in Dick Tracy just isn't enough
for you, then you'll want to tune in
Sean Penn's Sexiest
Home Videos
at 9:30!





iii i mm'in� � r
4 � June 27, 1990 � ECU TODAY � It's only a joke; please don't write or phone, hank you
1
House holds scintillating debate
n .r I r.nW not lh.it I mi I
I ill AV1AI (.AMAH I) Pi
This past week, the HoUM "I
RepinrnltHvfi vv.is thi scene of on
of the most original, thought provok-
ing, �cintillating debates in all of time,
even better than the Lincoln Douglas
debates of more than a century be-
fore. Let's listen in:
Rep. Barney Flagg, D-SC, took
the floor in support of the amend-
ment, saying, "We ha ve to protect the
flag Veterans support this, and we all
know that the fact that they fought in
a war means they have the right to
restrict other people's freedoms. Little
children pledge allegiance to the flag,
and if we vote against the amend-
ment, they'll be permanently brain-
damaged and they'll all end up like
Barney Frank, not that I mean any-
thing by that. Most important, the
voters are for it � and if the majority
of people thinks something, then it
must be true, even if they think that
slavery is okay or that the Earth is flat.
Uh, could I have thirty more seconds?
Now, I don't intend to make this a
political issue. Patriotic Americanscan
disagree. But not unless they're actu-
ally commie subversives
Rep. PatSchredder, D-Colo then
took the floor to argue against the
amendment, saying, "The flag is a
piece of fabric; the Constitution is the
Attention, foreign
governments!
If you need help
locating dangerous
fugitives from justice,
you'll want to try the
CIA's Activist Location
Program!
ClA-ALP's courteous
staff will take your call
and locate your
fugitive within 30
minutes, or you
get the service
absolutely freel
Guaranteed!
Fast service, fully
guaranteed, and all for
the low, low price of
just 30 pieces of silver!
Well, we did a pretty
good job with Mandela,
didn't we?
fabru ofotircountry When lla; burn
en deface the flag, they're really Jusl
(Ida. ing them selves (r wmethtng
like that. Uh,C�uW I have thirty more
seconds? Anyway, vote against the
flag amendment, bet ause if you don't
you're obviously for censorship, and
you're probably also a commie sub-
versive
Minority Whip "Salamander"
Gingrich, R-Ga , then took the floor in
support of the amendment, saying,
"We have to protect the flag. Veterans
support this, and we all know that the
fact that they fought in a war means
they have the right to re�trict other
people's freedoms. Little children
pledge allegiance to the flag, and if we
vote against the amendment, they'll
be permanently brain-damaged and
they'll all end up like Barney Frank,
not that I mean any thing by that. Most
important, the voters are for it � and
if the majority of people thinks some-
thing, then it must be true, even if they
think that slavery is okay or that the
Earth is flat. Uh, could I have thirty
more seconds? Now, 1 don't intend to
make this � plit� al issue Patrioti
Americans can disagree. Bill not un
less they're m tually commie wbver
sives
I It m te Speaker I nm f ooley then
took the floor to argue against the
amendment, saying, "The flag is a
piece of fabric; the Constitution is the
fabric of our country. When flag-burn-
ers deface the flag, they're really just
defacing themselves. Or something
like that. Uh, could I have thirty more
seconds? Anyway, vote against the
flag amendment, because if you don't
you're obviously for censorship, and
you're probably also a commie sub-
versive
Rep Bill Shootme, R-Mich then
took the floor in support of the amend-
ment, saying, "We have to protect the
flag. Veterans support this, and we all
know that the fact that they fought in
a war means they have the right to
restrict other people's freedoms. Little
children pledge allegiance to the flag,
and if we vote against the amend-
ment, they'll be permanently brain-
damaged and they'll all end up like
Barney Frank, not th.it I mi i i �
thing by that. Most important the
voters are for it and if themajonty
of people thinks something, then it
must be true, even if they think that
slavery isokay or that the Earth is Hat
Uh,could I have thirty more seconds7
Now, I don't intend to make this a
political issue. Patriotic Ameruans( an
disagree. But not unless they're actu-
ally commie subversives
Rep. Tim Christmascard, R-N.C,
then took the floor to argue against
the amendment, saying, "The flag is a
piece of fabric; the Constitution is the
fabric of our country. When flag-burn-
ers deface the flag, they're really just
defacing themselves. Or something
like that. Uh, could I have thirty more
seconds? Anyway, vote against the
flag amendment, because if you don't
you're obviously for censorship, and
you're probably also a commie sub-
versive
RepG. V. Montgomery wards, Li-
Miss then took the floor in support of
the amendment, saying well, you
get the picture.
Arnold Schwarzenegger
is
Ronald Reagan
in the hyper-mega-blockbuster hit of the century:
TOTAL LACK
OF RECALL
"It's a movie
� Gene Shallit
'Two thumbs
� Siskel & Ebert
"Unintelligible
Arnold Schwarzenegger
"Yes, I believe I may have seen that
film at some point but I'm afraid
I don't recall any specifics at
this time. You know, I think I'd
remember a lot more if Nancy
didn't always talk so damn much
it's really hard to concentrate
� Konald Reagan
Directed by Arnold Schwarzenegger. Produced by Arnold Schwarzenegger. Filmed by Arnold
Schwarzenegger. Kdited by Arnold Schwarzenegger. Popcorn popped by Arnold Schwarzenegger.
Written by some sociopathie jerk who evidently doesn't mind bastardizing the hell out of one of
Philip K. Dick's many brilliant works.





Title
The East Carolinian, June 27, 1990
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 27, 1990
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.749
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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