The East Carolinian, March 13, 1990






She
Ht (Earnltmati
(.rci . .

Study s prl
of renewing
interest in
don ntown
Course teaches
women basics
of self defense


Award recognizes service to retarded

Inside
ECU gets $50,000 endowment
11 i
Canon to bo displ lyed
James H Mjynard






�to lEaat (Eartfltmatt
Sewing the 'Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 64 No. 17
Tuesday March 13,1990
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
14 Pages
Study is part
of renewing
interest in
downtown
By Mindy Mclnnis
Staff Writer
Evergreen of Greenville is
organizing a local retail survey to
be conducted in the later part of
March.
Lynne James, executive direc-
tor of Evergreen, said the survey
will consist of questions and sam-
pling techniques to be sent at ran-
dom to students, staff and faculty
members of ECU, downtown
businesses and neighborhoods
adjacent to the downtown area.
"We hope the survey will
enable us to more effectively pro-
vide in the terms of retail activity
said James. "We would like to have
input from people so that we
(Evergreen) can make downtown
Greenville what people would like
for it to be
In aduition to renovation.
Evergreen works with new con-
struction projects to increase the
economic base downtown, said
James. Evergreen also provides
business expansions for people
who like the downtown area but
need more space, she added.
"We would like to do a lot
more but resources are limited so
that limits what we can do Ever-
green is planning to do a study of
thefringeareasurroundingdown-
town. James calls the area, "inside
ieade Circle
The results of this land use
study will be used to help encour-
age residential development,
which will generate a variety of
services such as dry cleaners,
drugstores, etc. in the downtown
area, said James.
"Another element that we've
been discussing is the renovation
of Evans Street Mall. We have been
trying to figure out a way to get
business back into this area said
James.
See Evergreen, page 2
Course teaches
women basics
of self defense
By Samantha Thompson
Staf f Writer
A student of Mark Murrell and Jean Moores rape prevention class disables her "attacker" giving herself time
to escape from a potentially deadly situation. The "attack" is the final exam in course which emphasizes
awareness of possible situations as well as self defense. (Photo by Joey Jenkins � The East Carolinian)
Several concerned women
gathered in Greenville on March
4, to pass their final examination
�an exam where they were physi-
cally attacked by a "rapist
After a five-week rape preven-
tion course, six women success-
fully graduated from the course
that teaches not only physical self
defense, but mental awareness and
response to rape situations.
Through the Charles June
Karate Institute, karate instructors
Mark Murrell and Jean Mooreof fer
the $25 course to women of all
ages. "We started the course be-
cause there recently has become a
need in Greenville for it Moore
said. "We felt there wasa need for
women to be more aware of their
surroundings not only at home,
but while leaving downtown
bars
The two instructors teamed
together after Murrell convinced
Moore of the importance of self
defense. Passing through flyers
and by word of mouth, many
women have become involved in
the course. Several of the women
have continued with advanced
rape prevention classed also of-
fered by Murrell and Moore.
In order to complete the class,
students must first complete four
weeks of instruction with meet-
ings on Sunday nights. On the fifth
and final Sunday night of the class,
the students must use the learned
self defense techniques to avoid
being raped by an attacker, who is
actually a course instructor wear-
ing padding and protective gear.
The students are taught to
defend themselves by attacking
certain areas of the attackers body
including poking and scratching
the eyes, popping the ears drums
by slapping the ears and kicking
and hitting the groin area.
"We don't use martial arts
techniques Moore said, "but we
instill awareness in the women by
teaching them defense methods
beyond street fighting
During the final examination,
the "attackers" use full force on
the women so they will be better
prepared for an actual attack. The
students are attacked four to five
times by the attacker, yet if they
get pinned once, equivalent to a
rape, they do not pass the class.
"My biggest fear is that these
ladies fight back too much said
rape prevention instructor Landry
Gray. "They try to go for the vital
areas. They're all real tough
One student said: "By the third
knock down, vour adrenaline gets
going. Even though they've been
our friends throughout thecourse,
you still want to hurt them
The women leave the course
with something other than rape
prevention. Gray said. "We instill
in them awareness of their sur-
roundings, they learn situations
when they go walking alone at
night, or leaving bars. They learn
to use devices as weapons such as
their keys or a flashlight
Graduate of the course, Anita,
27, took the course because she
was concerned with the recent
rapes in the area. "I wanted to gain
more self-confidence in myself
she said.
The main thirty Anita said she
learned from the course was to not
let the attacker get her on the
ground. "I just remember to go for
the eyes. You just have to hurt
them enough so you can get away.
You don't want to send them to
See Rape, page 3
Award recognizes service to retarded
ECU News Bureau
Several individuals who have
given of themselves to help the
mentally retarded were recognized
at an appreciation awards cere-
mony at the ECU Lambda Chi
Alpha House.
The ECU Chapter of Lambda
Chi Alpha, along with the Knights
of Columbus, a service organiza-
tion of Catholic men, established
the awards in memory of the late
Dr. Burton Blatt, who was dean of
Special Education at Syracuse
University.
Blatt was responsible for vast
changes within the field of mental
retardation during the post-World
War II era. He believed in the
goodness of man and that "life's
design for all of us holds nothing
but good chapter officials said.
Award recipients include
Boots Mills, a social worker at
REAP, Remedial Education Activ-
ity Program, Department of Spe-
cial Education for pre-school aged
children at ECU. Mills who livesin
Greenville, received one of the two
Love Awards for her work with
mentally retarded children.
The second Love Award was
presented to Mrs. Terry Connor of
Washington. She is the executive
director of the Beaufort County
Association for Retarded Citizens
in Washington.
Leory Battsof Kinston, retired
director of staff development at
the Caswell Center in Kinston,
received the Daniel Peifer Human-
ness Award. This was in apprecia-
tion for more than 32 years service
Batts devoted to an institution for
the mentally retarded.
John Organ of Wilmington is
state chairman of the Knights of
Columbus operation LAMB (Least
Among My Brethren) which dis-
tributed candy to raise $485,000 to
help improve quality care of the
mentally retarded. Organ received
the Optimism Award for his part
in making the program successful.
The Washington, N.C chap-
ter of the Knights of Columbus
presented the ECU chapter of
Lambda Chi Alpha with an Ap-
preciation Award for their help in
the candy distribution.
Dr. James R. (Jim) Taylor,
Director of REAP at ECU, said,
"The purpose of these awards is
not only to give recognition to these
special people but to also serve as
a reminder of those who each day
continually give of themselves in
order that a better life is possible
for people with mental retarda-
tion and other special needs. "
"Working with the Knights of
Columbus and learning of these
award recipients has helped the
brothers realize the reality of
mental retardation that others
See Lambda Chi, page 3
ECU gets $50,000 endowment
ECU News Bureau
Canon to be displayed j
A15th century cannon found off the coast and restored at ECU will
go on display in �he Display Hall of the ECU Maritime History Building
beginning Thursday, March 28.
The much publicized cannon has been identified as an English
field artillery piece. Most of the speculation about the artifact has
focused on its possible connection with the first attempts to establish
an English colony at Roanoke Island in 1585 and 1587.
While the cannon was being restored it was discovered that it was
loaded with powder, a 2" iron ball and about a dozen pieces of iron
"grape shot (Photo by Tony Rumple � ECU News Bureau)
A University Scholars Award
has been established at ECU to
honor James H. Maynard of
Raleigh, an alumnus who is chair-
man and co-founder of Golden
Corral Corporation.
The $50,000 endowment was
funded by more than 100 friends
and business associates as a 50th
birthday gift for the Jacksonville,
N.C, native.
Maynard learned of the gift at
a surprise birthday party given for
him last month in Raleigh. Theo-
dore M. Fowler JrCEOand presi-
dent of Golden Corral, spear-
headed the scholarship drive and
made the presentation.
"James Maynard seizes the
opportunity to make people's lives
better by providing them with
opportunity Fowler said. "Your
friends and associates at Golden
Corral wanted to take this oppor-
tunity to do something special
and perpetuateinanon-goingway
an opportunity for others in your
name at your alma mater
The University Scholars
Awards, ECU's most prestigious
scholarship program, was estab-
lished in 1984. University Scholars
are chosen on the basis of aca-
demic achievement and leadership
potential receive full tuition and
expense-paid scholarships for four
years of undergraduate study.
Each privately-funded scholarship
is valued at more than $12,000.
This scholarship is a reflec-
See Maynard, page 3
Inside
Editorial4
What exactly is made
in the USA all about?
Classifieds6
Personals, For Sale,
Help Wanted, For Rent
and Services Offered
State and Nation8
The Soviet Union
considers Lithuania's
declaration of independ-
ence
Features10
The ECU Playhouse
prepares for "Blue
Leaves" production
Sports12
Pirates wrap up their
season at the CAA
Tournament in
Richmond, Va.
James H.Maynard





I
2 The East Carolinian March 13, 1990
ECU Briefs
ECU Ambassadors
Joyner Library puts books up for $npYr COP fPYPYLCE
Hardcover and paperback booksof all types will be sold in the main VtllCI IXA LL I VJ S I U WV-
lobby of ECU'sJoynerLibraryonMarchMand 15.The books being sold
were donated by members of the Friends of the ECU Library. Sale hows
are 9 am to l p m on Wednesday and am. to 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Biomechanics lab to hold open house
An open house for the Biomechanics and Human Performance
Laboratories uid the Sports Medicine teaching and clinical programs
will be held atp m. in the Sports Medicine Building on Thursday. The
three areas have been equipped with the latest scientific equipment for
the use in tea hing and research and will be demonstrated at the open
house
Red Cross looks for new blood
1 tie Redress w ill hold a bleed drive today m Mendenhall Student
Center from noon until 6 p m.
Debate will focus on civil rights
lve experts onivil Rights laws and issues will debate "Affirma-
tive Action 'Reverse Discrimination: lust or Unjust?" Thursday at 7
p.m. in the auditorium of the Jenkins Fine ArtsCenter.Sponsored by the
ECU Committee to "ommemorate the Bicentennial of the Constitution,
the debate will feature crome M c ulp of the Duke University 1 aw
School and 1 lenrv 1 Abraham et the L nivcrsityol Va. A reception will
follow at the home et I hancellor Richard 1- akin The public is invited to
both events.
Reptile devotees gather at ECU
A group of hobbyisl and scientist who study snakes -n other
reptiles will meet Saturday al ECU for the spring conference ol theN.C
1 lerpetological Society and the Eastern Seaboard 1 lerpetological League.
The conference will be held at the M In ienceC implex beginning with
registration atll a.m Activities will continue throughout the day with
a show and-tell at 5:30 p.m.
National Campus Clips
By Michael Carey
Staff Writer
hIv
eb
Student president arrested for DUI
William (Trcv) Blackwoodlemson University student 1
president, was charged v. ithdrix ing under the influence of alcohol
16, three A. s alter he signi d a new campus alcohol polu v.
black wood was stepped by a university police officer after making
a fast turn A liter breathalizer test showed that his blood-alcohol level
was 0 16
nhisn � - lavs ago, I made a stupid mistake
Thankfully, no one v as injured as a result ol my lack ol judgment. 1
am particularly embarraassed that thisoccurred so soon after implem-
entation of the university's new alcohol policy.
The n i ious i onsequem cs I lace dramatically point out the need
tor students to be responsible in their use ol alcohol I hope that a
Sitive result of my experience will be the message to mv fellow
ECU Ambassador Wes Bovd
was elected to the position of Pis
tnct Representative at the 1990
Student Alumni Association
Student Foundation (SAASF)
District Three Conference al Car-
son New man College in lefferson
City, lenn.
Nineteen ambassadors and
fotlf staff members attended the
conference, making ECU the larg-
est delegation.
At the conference, four FCU
Ambassadors conducted seminars
on topics relating to creating and
maintaining a successful organi-
zation Holly BattS, the teletund
coordinator, gave a presentation
Oil how to plan a teletund. K I
Ambassador Membership Chair
man David Hall gave a how-to
seminar on membership drives.
Vice president Wes bovd y.wv a
scminaronorganizationalbv laws
and constitutions, and Michael
Carey, president, discussed ways
to run a general meeting.
As district three representa
tive, Boyd will serve as a liaison
between the universities and col-
leges m thedistrn t and theSAA
SF national network. District three
consists ot r,3 universities and
colleges from Florida to Missis
sippi. and from Kentucky to V ir
guua Boyd will be responsible for
programming of seminars and
conferences, organizing member
ship drives, overseeing the dis-
tri t budget and all policy-making
tor the organization
It is an extremely important
position. Boyd said, "onethat will
bring prestige to both the Ambas-
sadors and our university
The ECU delegates traveled
by bus tor eight hours to attend
bouisburg College traveled with
the FCU delegation. Over 320
delegates from 32 different uni-
versities attended, including the
University of Alabama, the Uni-
versity of South Florida, the L'ni
versity of Louisville and James
Madison University.
In addition to seminars, the
delegates attended a country
"hoedown" dance, an evening of
ice skating and a semi formal
banquet.
The FCU Ambassadors were
chartered in 1979 They serve as
representatives of the university
by giving tours of the campus,
helping with Chancellor events
and speaking to high school sen-
iors interested in coming to E 1
In order to become an Ambassa-
dor a student must have an over-
all C.PA of 2.2, fill out an applica-
tion and go through an interview.
A membership drive will he held
in September and all interested
students should apply. For more
information, contact Michael
Carey at 758-1793 or Wes Boyd at
752-4254.
iafit
(Director of Advertising
James FJ. McKee
Advertising 'Representative:
(Earnltman
(;uy J. Harvey
Shav Sitlinger
AdamT. Flankenship
Phillip V. (Ope
Kellev O'Connor
per column inch
National Rate$5.75
Open Kate$4.95
Local Open Rate$4.75
Hulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts ailable
Business Hours:
Ph()ne: Monday - Friday
757-6366 10:00-5:00 pm
N
po�
students

tn
iMaki
ill it lakes to jeopardize their future
AUni crs I I
Middle A.
ancient and medic
fames Man h i
tive literature u �
the conference Fight delegates
from I INhapel 1 till, five from
( howan College, and four from
Evergreen
Learn how to start your own business in a one - day seminar
HOW TO START
A SMALL BUSINESS
Sat March 17 9am - 5 pm Ramada Inn
203 W. Greenville Blvd. (Hwy. 264 B - Pass), Greenville
pl7 Includes seminar materials and light refreshments.
There will he a one hour lunch hreak at niton.
Learn every aspect of starting a small business, from da one of planning to opening da?
Step by step, you will set up a working model of a business. You will learn proven techniques
to forming your business plan, including product service identification, finance, market-
ing, competitive analysis, management and operation. You will also learn about interest
ing business and investment opportunities. The instructor, James D. Scott, hasstarted and
operated several successful businesses, and mm assists others with business management
problems through his management consulting firm, Insight Management Services.
To reserve your seat at the seminar, call Insight Management Services al (919) 778 - 8700
Technology reveals medieval sciences
hi � pi �� rhasbmughttheSpaceAgeandthc
lern tc hnology to shed light on
il t( vl i
teaches ierman, linguistics and eompara-
ulti ivi let photography, digitizing cameras and
computers to uncover the text ol previously illegible Gothic and Old
HighIcrman religious manus ripts.
Since paper was extremely scarce during the Middle Ages, texts
often were 's raped out and written over he said, leaving only traces
ol the original text.
Man hand takes ultraviolet photographs ot these multi-layered
manuscript some dating from as far back as A.I). 500, in order to
expose as mut h tevt as possible I k scans the ultraviolet photographs
using a digitizing camera and runs them through a process called
contrast stretching 1 hs omputi i program allows him to peel layersot
the original ink apart and it can distinguish more than 230 levels ol
gra
I le can then collci t m analyze data from the text he has uncov-
ered Marchand'sgoalistosetupa national archive of holographs and
photographs ol the world's manuscripts and artifacts at the university.
He also believes his procedures could be applied to even older docu-
ments including clay tablets and rum-stones
'The theory is there, the technology is there he said. "We need
to bring the two together "
Crime Report
Police foil spring break bike theft
March 8,1990
2 fhree officers observed a vehicle and person near the bicycle
racks at (larrett Rcsiden e I fall Two more officers were dispatched to
the area to investigate report ol suspicious activities around the bike
racks
1237- Hue liners responded to the larceny ol a bike in progress,
proceeded by a haseand a hit and run west of iarrett Residence Hall.
124 Officers questioned a suspect from a vehicle that had been
stopped by (Ireenvillle Police officers nd identified as the vehicle
involved in the bit y le laro n) Hher officers searched for driver ol
vehicle
0156 I tfficer retrieved the bolt cutters on the corner of Fourth and Elm
Street used in the hike l.n. env
0312-1 xiuer escorted another officer to the Emergency Room ot Pit!
County Memorial Hospital because ol injuries to his hand in bike
larceny incident
0403 I ntuerspio l ). . ortforbikelarcenysuspectstothemigistnile'a
office
March 9.1990
09 � Offi( cr attempted to serve a subpoena on a subject In the Student
Supply Stores but could not contact the person.
212S (Miners dispat bed to onos Residence Hall in reference to two
student trespassers
March 10, liSfi
1747 (ttticer checked the blue light phone at Hetcher Music Building
and found rei civer itf the hook
March 12, 10
0112-Mticer secured and checked the )enkins Fine Arts Building and
escorted two students from the building because they did not have
Continued from pae 1
According to sources, the mall
was constructed intheearly 1970s
and had a regular two way street
running through the middle ot it
"One of the suggestions that our
board is( onsideringistotakesome
ol the sidewalk out and re con-
struct a one way street through
the mall.
'Some ol the businesses that
are located on the mall are m tavor
ot the changes, others are not
lames added that no decisions
concerning renovations have been
made by Evergreen's board of
directors
Business people, property
owners, merchants, volunteers
and local government representa
tnes from Greenville make up
Evergreen's Board of Directors.
Evergreen became a member-
ship organization in lanuary of
1989 when it merged with the
Downtown Greenville Associa-
tion iIK.A) and the Downtown
Property Owners Association
(DPOA).
Funding for Evergreen is
provided substantially by the city
and the rest comes through mem-
bership tees.
According to lames, Ever-
green is planning to sponsor sev-
eral events in the future.
"One dav per week concerts
will be presented on the mall
during lunch said lames. "Right
now we are still in the process of
getting entertainment
Next fall, Evergreen plans to
sponsor a cultural diversity fair
(Buuers Guide
green i
ards
L
IV 1 n�l Htr�' l� ��� f"mafft,tml fl UISlir S�frty lofl
Fhere will be food, exhibits and
entertainment fromothorcultures I
at the fair. We haven't decided on '
the location yet but we are looking
a the Town Commons.
A holiday celebration is an-
other future event that Evergreen
will sponsor "It will be along the '
lines of a mini March Gras in re-
spect to Christmas and Hanuk-
kah lames explained.
The present and future proj-
ects that Evergreen is working on j
will insure the survival of down-
town Greenville, James said. "If I
events are offered that people are
interested in, it'll bring them
downtown. Soon people's atti-
tudes toward downtown will
change to a more positive note
Carolina Pregnancy Center355-3473
Chicos757-1666
Dapper Dan's752-1250
Darryl's752-1907
Fosdick's756-2011
Geo Imports756-5253
Insight Management778-8700
Josten's841-8500
Kroger756-7031
McBudget752-8834
Methodist Student Center758-2030
New Deli758-0080
Pack N Mail756-5099
Parrot Canvas752-8433
Rack Room355-2519
Raleigh Women's Health832-0535
Research Information1-800-351-0222
Rio�355-5000
Ringgold Towers752-2865
SGA757-4726
Sharky's757-3881
Student Stores757-6731
Student Union757-4715
Suntana756-9180
Triangle Women's Health1-800-433-2930





I
2 The East Carolinian March 13,1990
ECU Briefs
Joyner Library puts books up for sale
1 lardcover and paperback booksof all types will be sold in the main
lobby of ECU's oynerl.ibrar on March 14 and 1?. The books being sold
were donated by members of the Friends of the ECU Library. Sale hours
are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Wednesday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday.
Biomechanics lab to hold open house
An open house tor the Biomochanics and 1 himan Performance
Laboratories and the Sports Medicine teaching and clinical programs
will be held at 3 p m in the Sports Medicine building on Thursday. The
three areas have beer equipped with the latest scientific equipment for
the use in teaching and research and will he demonstrated at the open
house
Red Cross looks for new blood
The Red Cross will hold a Mood drive today in Mendenhall Student
Center from noon until t p.m.
Debate will focus on civil rights
TWO experts on Civil Rights laws and issues will debate " Affirma-
tive ActionReverse Discrimination: hist or Unjust?" Thursday at 7
p.m. in theauditorium of the Jenkins Eine ArtsCenter. Sponsored by the
ECU Committee to Commemorate the bicentennial of the Constitution,
the debate will feature erome M Grip of the Duke University Law
School and I lenrv . Abraham ot the University of Va. A reception will
follow at the home oi Chancellor Richard lakin. The public is invited to
both events.
Reptile devotees gather at ECU
A group oi hobbyist and scientist who Study snakes and other
reptiles will meet Saturday at ECU for the spring conference of the NIC.
HerpetologicalSx letvand the Eastern Seaboard 1 lerpetological League
The conference will be heldat the ECU Science Complex beginning with
registration at 9 am Activities will continue throughout the day with
a show-and-tell at 5:30 p.m.
National Campus Clips
ECU Ambassadors
attend conference
By Michael Carey
Staff Writer
Student president arrested for DUI
William A. (Trey) Blackwood, Clemson University student bodv
president, was charged u ith driving under the influence of alcohol Feb.
lo, three days after he signed a new campus alcohol policy.
Blackwood was stopped by a university police officer after making
a fast turn. A later breathalizer test showed that his blood-alcohol level
was 0.16.
In his resignation, he said, I wodaysago, 1 made a stupid mistake
Thankfully, no one was injured as a result oi my lack of judgment. 1
am particularly embarraassed that this occurred so soon after implem-
entation of the university's new alcohol policy.
The serious consequences 1 face dramatically point out the need
for students to be responsible in their use of alcohol. I hope that a
positive result of my experience will be the message to my fellow
students that one mistake is all it takes to jeopardize their future
ECU Ambassador Wes Bovd
was elected to the position of Dis-
trict Representative at the 1990
Student Alumni Association
Student Foundation (SAASF)
District Three Conference at Car-
son Newman College in Jefferson
City, Tenn.
Nineteen ambassadors and
four staff members attended the
conference, making ECU the larg-
est delegation.
At the conference, four ECU
Ambassadors conducted seminars
on topics relating to creating and
maintaining a successful organi-
zation. Holly BattS, the telefund
coordinator, gave a presentation
on how to plan a telefund. ECU
Ambassador Membership Chair-
man David Mall gave a how-to
seminar on membership drives.
Vice president Wes Bovd gave a
seminar on organizational by-laws
and constitutions and Michael
Carey, president, discussed ways
to nin a general meeting.
As district three representa
tive, bovd will serve as a liaison
between the universities and col-
leges in the district and the SA A
SI"national network. District three
consists of 53 universities and
colleges trom Florida to Missis-
sippi, and from Kentucky to Vir-
ginia Bovd will be responsible for
programming of seminars and
conferences, organizing member-
ship drives, overseeing the dis-
trict budget and all policy-making
for the organization.
"It is an extremely important
position Bovd said, "one that will
bring prestige to both the Ambas-
sadors and our university
The ECU delegates traveled
bv bus for eight hours to attend
the conference. Eight delegates
from UNC-Chapel Hill, five from
Chowan College, and four from
Louisburg College traveled with
the ECU delegation. Over 320
delegates from 32 different uni-
versities attended, including the
University of Alabama, the Uni-
versity of South Florida, the Uni-
versity of Louisville and James
Madison University.
In addition to seminars, the
delegates attended a country
"hoedown" dance, an evening of
ice skating and a semi-formal
banquet.
The ECU Ambassadors were
chartered in 1979 They serve as
representatives of the university
by giving tours of the campus,
helping with Chancellor events
and speaking to high school sen-
iors interested in coming to ECU.
In order to become an Ambassa-
dor a student must have an over-
all GPA of 2.2, fill out an applica-
tion and go through an interview.
A membership drive will be held
in September and all interested
students should apply. For more
information, contact Michael
Carey at 758-1793 or Wes Boyd at
752-4254.
3l?e
East
(Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
Advertising presentatives
(Eanrlfman
Guy J. Harvey
Shay Sitlinger
Adam T. Blankenship
Phillip V. Cope
Kellev O'Connor
per column inch
National Rate$5.75
Open Rate$4.95
Local Open Rate$4.75
Hulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
'Business 'Hours:
Phone: Monday - Friday
757-6366 10:00-5:00 pm
Learn how to start your own business in a one - day seminar
HOW TO START
A SMALL BUSINESS
Sat March 17 9am - 5 pm Ramada Inn
203 VV. Greenville Blvd. (Hvvv. 264 By - Pass), Greenville
r Includes seminar materials and light refreshments.
There will he a one hour lunch hreak at noon.
Learn every aspect of starting a small business, from day one of planning to opening da.
Step by step, you will set up a working model of a business. You will learn proven techniques
to forming your business plan, including product service identification, finance, market-
ing, competitive analysis, management and operation. You will also learn about interest-
ing business and investment opportunities. The instructor, James D. Scott, has started and
operated several successful businesses, and now assists others with business management
problems through his management consulting firm. Insight Management Services.
To reserve vour seat at the seminar, call Insight Management Services at (919) 77S - X700
Evergreen
Technology reveals medieval sciences
A University oi Illinois professor has brought the Space Ageand the
Middle Ages together, using modem technology to shed light on
ancient and medieval texts
fames Marchand, who teaches German, linguistics and compara-
tive literature, uses ultraviolet photography, digitizing cameras and
computers to uncover the text ot previously illegible Gothic and Old
High Gorman religious manuscripts.
Since paper was extremely scarce during the Middle Ages, texts
often were "scraped out and written over he said, leaving only traces
of the original text.
Marchand takes ultraviolet photographs of these multi-layered
manuscripts, some dating from as far back as AD. 500, in order to
expose as much text as possible. 1 le scans the ultraviolet photographs
using a digitizing camera and runs them through a process called
contrast stretching. I iscomputer program allows him to peel layers of
the original ink apart, and it can distinguish more than 250 levels of
gray.
He can then collect and analyze data from the text he has uncov-
ered Marchand'sgoal is to sot up a national archive of holographs and
photographs of the world's manuscripts and artifacts at the university-
He also believes his procedures could be applied to even older docu-
ments, including day tablets and rune stones.
"The theory is there; the technology is there he said. "We need
to bring the two together
CCopyrtght ISM UA UIDAY, Apple College Information Network
Crime Report
Police foil spring break bike theft
March 8,1990
1235- Three officers observed a vehicle and person near the bicycle
racks at Garrett Residence I lall. Two more officers were dispatched to
the area io investigate report of suspicious activities around the bike
racks.
1237- Three officers responded to the larceny of a bike in progress,
proceeded by a chase and a hit and run west of Garrett Residence Hall.
124K- Officers questioned a suspect from a vehicle that had been
Stopped by Creenvitlle Police officers and identified as the vehicle
involved in the bicycle larceny. Other officers searched for driver of
vehicle.
0156- Officer retrieved the bolt cutters on the corner of Fourth and Elm
Street used in the bike larceny.
0312- Officer escorted another officer to the Emergency Room of Pitt
County Memorial Hospital because of injuries to his hand in bike
larceny incident
0403- Officers pro vided escort for bike larceny suspects to the magistrate's
office.
March 9,1990
0955- Officer attempted to serve a subpoena on a subject in the Student
Supply Stores but could not contact the person.
2125- Officers dispatched to Jones Residence Hall in reference to two
student trespassers.
March l(L1990
1747- Officer checked the blue light phone at Fletcher Music Building
and found receiver off the hook.
Mjxckli 1290
0112- Officer secured and checked the Jenkins Fine Arts Building and
escorted two students from the building because they did not have
I green cards.
TV Crime Heport i Mb from official TCU Pimtie Safety loft
Continued from page 1
According to sources, the mall
was constructed in theearly 1970s
and had a regular two way street
running through the middle of it.
"One of the suggestions that our
board isconsideringistotakesome
of the sidewalk out and re-con-
struct a one way street through
the mall.
"Some of the businesses that
are located on the mall are in favor
of the changes, others are not
lames added that no decisions
concerning renovations have been
made by Evergreen's board of
directors.
Business people, property
owners, merchants, volunteers
and local government representa-
tives from Greenville make up
Evergreen's Board of Directors.
Evergreen became a member-
ship organization in January of
1989 when it merged with the
Downtown Greenville Associa-
tion (DGA) and the Downtown
Propcrtv Owners Association
(DPOAl
Funding for Evergreen is
provided substantially by the city
and the rest comes through mem-
bership fees.
According to James, Ever-
green is planning to sponsor sev-
eral events in the future.
"One day per week concerts
will be presented on the mall
during lunch said James. "Right
now we are still in the process of
getting entertainment
Next fall, Evergreen plans to
sponsor a cultural diversity fair.
"There will be food, exhibits and
entertainment fromothercultures
at the fair. We haven't decided on
the location yet bu t weare looking
at the Town Commons
A holiday celebration is an-
other future event that Evergreen
will sponsor. "It will be along the
lines of a mini-Mardi Gras in re-
spect to Christmas and Hanuk-
kah James explained.
The present and future proj-
ects that Evergreen is working on
will insure the survival of down-
town Greenville, James said. "If
events are offered that people are
interested in, it'll bring them
downtown. Soon people's atti-
tudes toward downtown will
change to a more positive note
355-3473
757-1666
752-1250
752-1907
Fosdick's756-2011
Geo Imports756-5253
Insight Management778-8700
Josten's841-8500
Kroger756-7031
McBudget752-8834
Methodist Student Center758-2030
New Deli758-0080
Pack N Mail756-5099
Parrot Canvas752-8433
Rack Room�355-2519
Raleigh Women's Health832-0535
Research Information1-800-351-0222
Rio355-5000
Ringgold Towers752-2865
SGA757-4726
Sharky's757-3881
Student Stores757-6731
Student Union757-4715
Suntana756-9180
Triangle Women's Health1-800-433-2930





The East Carolinian, March 13,1990 3
Pacesetters generate funds for arts series
ECU News Bureau
total of nearly $20,000 has
been raised in a community sup
port campaign for ECU'S Perform
ing Arts Series The funds were
raised by the Pacesetters, a recently
organized support organization
headed In llene I- CoxofGreen-
llle
. ontributors of significant
amounts to the Pacesetters' inau-
gural Plaque Fund Drive will have
their names engraved on a large
plaque to be mounted in a promi-
nent location in thelobb) ol Wright
Auditorium The campaign began
in late November and is scheduled
to end lune 30 SO the plaque can be
prepared for display in Wright by
tlu' opening of the 1990-91 Per-
forming Arts Series
Donors to the drive, as ol the
beginning ol March, were
i .oid Circle l$l 000 or more
s Rudolph Alexander, Drs Diane
( ampbell and Theodore
Mm hiteni Pr and Mrs. Eric b
Carlson, Dr and Mrs. William B.
Cox, the ECU Student Stores,
Empire Brushes, Inc Dr.and Mrs.
D. Frank Remingand Mr.and Mrs.
Walter R. Poole r.
Silver Circle ($500-$999): Mr.
and Mrs Phillip R. Dixon, Chan-
cellor and Mrs. Richard Eakin, Pr.
and Mrs. Donald 1. 1 iardee. FTG
I ravel Center, Mr and Mrs Phil-
lip A lewis, Sherryl Mercer, Pr
DennisO'Neal, ProctorA t .ambel
Co lames L. and 1 ranceme Perry
Rees, Mr. and Mrs Stuart Secttor,
Pr and Mrs Robert A Shaw. Pr
and Mrs Donald II linker, Pr.
Pauline A. Vincent and Mr and
Mrs H m Wilkerson lr
Bronze ircle($250-$499):Mr.
and Mrs Donald B, Boldt, Capt.
and Mrs lames R bruner. Pr. and
Mrs W.R. ChitWOOd lr Pr. and
Mrs. Richard W. c roskcry, Ralph
and Nano Pudlev, Mr. and Mrs.
W. Russell Duke Jr First Union
National Bank, Greenville Morn-
ing Rotary Club, Hilton Inn of
Greenville, Pr and Mrs. Donald
R. Hoffman, Mr. and Mrs. J. Reid
Hooper, Sydney Keniston-Cun-
ningham, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse W.
Lilley, Pr. and Mrs. Robert H.
Maier, Patricia Pertalion and Dr.
and Mrs. Rafael C Sanchez.
While only donors or at least
$230 or more will be recognized on
the Pacesetters's plaque, contribu-
tions of any size are welcomed,
said Stuart Secttor, marketing di-
rector for the ECU Department of
University Unions, Performing
Arts Series sponsor. Gifts to the
fund are tax deductible, he said.
One of the primary goals of
the Pacesetters organization is to
help develop interest in and sup-
port tor the ECU Performing Arts
Series throughout the region,
Secttor said.
The Performing Arts Series
brings nationally and internation-
ally acclaimed musicians, dancers
and actors to campus each year. A
highlight of the 1989-90 series is a
sellout performance by acclaimed
violinist Itzhak Perlman on April
1.
Gifts and pledges may be sent
or delivered to Secttor's office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Checks should be made payable to
PacesettersHCU Foundation.
Maynard
Continued from page 1
tionofhowjames'scolleaguesfeel
about the opportunities that he has
provided for them said James L.
lxinier Jr ECU vice chancellor for
institutional advancement. "The
years of thoughtful, dedicated
service that James has given to
North Carolina and the university
are an indication of his concern for
the quality of life for all of us. ECU
is proud to number him among its
alumni
Maynard is a former member
of ECU's board of trustees and his
nine years on the board included
one term as vice chairman. The
1963 graduate has also held lead-
ership roles in the PirateClub, ECU
Foundation and Alumni Associa-
tion, which presented him with its
Outstanding Alumni Award in
1980.
The scholarship is Maynard's
fourth at ECU He and his wife,
Connie, established the Benn D.
and Ruby Ennis Maynard Univer-
sity Scholars Award in 1988 to
honor his parents. A 1989 endow- .
men! honoring his late brother,
Benn, supports a series of scholar- '
ships forOnslow County students '
in the School of Music. An addi-
tional series oi scholarships hon-
ors Mavnard's mother-in-law.
REMEMBER
TO RECYCLE
immmmn
Rape
Continued from page 1
the hospital
Moore s,ud that within the last
five lasses offered, the agesol the
students have ranged from 1! to
60. The attacker knows no age
barrier Moore said. Iheaerage
� student is Ml a ording to
Moore though she said she has
seen mam ECl studentspartici
pate in the course
The next course offered will
begin Man h 25and willmeete en
Sunday from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p m
lor r,i
LnnoiiT ARTIST
�UmitedH
Apply Today at
(lite Itast (Uitnjlmtart
2nd Floor Publications Building
I VI I II
I AN-S
. ourse
RATE

Si
re information on the
call 756 $571 or 7-KA-
r s,pb the Charles lune
Institute on 11J.
s
ans
�&
START YOUR CAREER
BEFORE YOU
START COLLEGE.
Lambda Chi
Cdntmued from page 1
don t see. We hope that our con
i em and services will change the
publu view of what fraternities
stand tor. It s not all parties and
socials. We are here to serve arid
help people rhat's what counts
said i arry Hudson, president ot
ECU's I ambda Chi Alpha.

5
W pos,
�n I
Hefi�!(� vm even begin yui
! st ti.lss M u i ,in sci lire ,(
in i it leadership after gradua-
11 'ii juin Ah rirv�: n ' 1 As you study
and vork toward graduation, well get
u read foi the responsibilities of an
i e offi ei
Vsan ur Force ROTC cadet you'll also be eligi-
ble foi various scholarship programs thai can help you
paj for college When graduation day arrives, you'll be
i areei read) and totally i onfident
To get snti' call
IT( Ol Bill PATHN
757-6597
' � �! step into the pnst.
Start off-your Cen fear
'Ryfit 'By '1 'Lai tiny 11s!
�Buy � Sell � Trade
ill Eixms St. Mall
Downtown
There's plenty of FREE
parking at
entrance
L Cotar
bi
ur rear
iff of
anche
752 17 So
ifll
NEW MENU SAMPLER
Lunch
Grilled Cheese Sandwich $3.95
A grilled cheese sandwich on pumpkin
.seed bread stuffed with a slice of mild
oretega pepper and served with a cup ol
our own homemade chili
Chicken Salad Sandwich S4.95
with a bowl of soup
757-1666
I rshipKxi elience Starts Hen
Hottest Tan Contest
PATRICK'S l)AY,SAIl RDAY MARCH 17, 1990
ROCK'N REGGAE
THE AMATEURS
THEjAMATEURS
12(H) noon 4:00pm
FOOD BEER � CONTESTS' PRIZES
YOU BELONG AT DARRYI 'S.
S(M) I 10th St.
si Admission Proper ID required � No carry-ins
$1.25 HIBALLS
(jeans allowed)
TUESDAYS
Over $1,000.00
in Cash & Prizes
to be Given Away!
Beginning March 13th
- Every Tuesday -
with the Finals April 17th
Two winners will compete in
Regional Action at the Emerald
Isle Beach Festival with a
chance to compete in Florida in
the National Finals!
1&0

The Club
Hilton Inn Greenville355-5000





QJJte �a0t CJar0ltntan Who fed the Soviet Bear?
X
mm
I


m
m
I
David Herring, General Manager
Lon Martin, Editor
fAMES F.J. McKef, Director of Advertising
foSEPH L JtNklNS Jr News F.ditor
Adam Cornelius, Ass. News Editor
CaROI iNt- CUSICK, Feature Editor
John Tiaker, Ass. Features Editor
MlC'llW.l MaKTIN, Sjrts F.ditor
Thomas H. BaRR VI, Ass. Sports F.ditor
CARRE ARMSTRONG, Entertainment Editor
S OTT Maxwell, Satire Editor
PHONG LUONG, Credit Manager
STUART ROSNER, Busings Manager
PAMEI A COPE, Ad Tech Supervisor
Matthew Richter, Circulation Manager
Tracy Weed, Prodttcfiow Manager
STEVF REID, Staff Illustrator
CHARLES Wu.LINGHAM, Darkroom Technician
BETH LuiTON, Secretary
rho Lat Carolinian has heen serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925, with primary emphasis on in-
formation most directly affecting ECU students It is published twice weekly, with a circulation of 12,000 The East
Carolinian rescres the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex,
creed or national origin I he East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. For purposes of decency
and bre uv. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit any letter for publication. Utters should be sent to The East
Carolinian, Publicauons Bldg ECU, Greenville, NC. 27834; or call us at (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
What's in a label, anyway?
Forget about the rest oi the world
and come back to America. Forget those
foreign cars and Gucci bags. Buy American
That's what President Bush has been telling
the nation. But is it realistic, practical ad-
vice?
The situation isn't that cut and dry-
In attempting to make himself look good in
the eves of Americans by promoting domes-
tic trade, Bush is overlooking something.
we're moving toward a global community,
especially with the strides toward democ-
racv that Huropean countries have made in
recent years. It's time the United States rec-
ognize this movement.
Promoting patriotism by attempting
to domesticize trade has been a popular
trend for politicians. They try to get Ameri-
cans to look inward, but, in doing so, they
are ignoring the trade which ties so many
nations to the United States.
Trad itional borders are falling. Much"
of what is supposedly American-made is
really made overseas. Japan now has com-
panies in the United States which emplov
American citizens. The automotive indus-
try is a good example. Foreign-based com-
panies such as Nissan, Honda and Toyota
now have factories here in the United States
where Americans make their livings.
The theme of the global community
can even be seen in a single car, the Pontiac
Le Mans � designed in Germany, built in
Korea, named after a french road race and
sold by an American company named for a
native American.
Trade between the United States and
other countries has become so intertwined
that its hard to sav what's American-made
and what's not. Companies are steadily
moving a wa v from their roots in the interest
of good business. Consumers need to be-
come better aware that a product goes be-
vond what the label savs.
By Nathaniel Mead
Editorial Columnist
The Pcrestroika inspired re-
forms now occuring in many Fast-
bloc countries have made history
in a very big way. Some will call it
the triumph of capitalism over
Communism; others will call it
the beginning of a new brand of
socialism � Gorby's democratic
socialism. Whatever the
outcome(s), the cold war has
clearly come to an end. Conse
quently, the Soviet and U.S. gov-
ernments need no longer subject
themselves to the unbearable fis-
cal strains of an unlimited arms
race. The Soviets can afford to
reduce their defense burden be-
cause they have maintained nu-
clear parity and moreover because
they clearly recognize there is no
such thing as a winnable nuclear
war. Perhaps the U.S. government
also realizes as much. In any case,
the time is ripe for military reform
on both sides � for channeling
monev into more meaningful
democratic concerns such as edu-
cation, housing, and environ-
mental protection.
Now that the cold war is over,
it's interesting to look back on how
the Soviet Bear onginallv devel-
oped into such a formidable mili-
tary power. Ihis subject is
broached in exquisite depth by
Antonv Sutton in his book 'The
Best Enemv Monev Can Buy
(Liberty House Press, Billings,
Montana. 198b). A former senior
research fellow of the prestigious
Hoover Institution, Sutton's inter-
pretation of Soviet history comes
as a real shocker to most Ameri-
cans, who have assumed that the
Soviets had the resources to build
their own technologies and bol-
ster their own military might. In
fact, however virtually all of the
Soviet Bears strength was devel-
oped with the essential aide oi
international businessmen, whom
Lenin called "thedeat.mutebhnd-
men "
The Soviets' bid for Western
aide began with Lenin in 1922,
shortlv before his death. "In a
remarkable about- face Lenin tnoi
introduced the New Economic
Policy, a return to limited free
enterprise and a prelude to a long-
lasting cooperation with Western
capitalists -the deaf, mute blind-
men. This policy was repeated by
Communist China in the early
1980s (p. 1) By Sutton's esti-
mates, about 95 percent of today's
Soviet strength has been derived,
either directly or indirectly, from
the West � mostly from the United
States � while the other five per
cent has involved indigenous
weldingentcrpnses,surgical tech-
nology, and various chemical
applications.
Sutton, a former Stanford
economics professor, is a leading
authontvon the dynamicsof inter-
national finance. For the past 25
years he has sought to unveil the
secret arms trade between the
Soviet government and Western
financiers whom, he says, "will
break any rules to make a profit
Upon publication of his 1974 book
"National Suicide Dr Sutton
promptly lost official recognition
by the Hoover Institution. Since
then he has spoken on numerous
radio broadcasts, risking both his
life and his scholarly reputation to
expose Soviet-American arms
trading.
Throughout the 1930s and
1950s, according to Sutton, heavy
infusions of Western capital and
technology quickly relegated the
USSR to Superpower status.
Replicatable technology and
"transfer technology" (technology
readily transferred from civilian
to military sectors) have reaped
immense profits for such interna-
tional financiers as Armand
Hammer and Norman Rockefeller,
as well as their emissaries Henry
Kissinger and Alexander Haig.
I ne technology transferscontmue
even to this day.
A prime example of transfer
technology is the automotive in-
dustry Sutton documents the
construction of automotive plants
using IS. technology and Amen-
can engineers and planners super-
vising the construction (if these
facilities in the Soviet Union. The
largest automotive plant (Kama
River Plant) in the Soviet Union
was built through U.S. technol-
ogy and funding direct from
the U S. taxplayers' pocket during
the Nixon era. Henry Kissinger
and Richard Nixon knew in ad-
- vUTiee that this plant would be
used for military applications,
producing not onlv cars and
trucks, but also tanks and armored
cars Thus virtually any Western
transfer of automotive technology
can b' converted by the Soviets
into military technology and the
To the Editor
deaf, mute blind men" know this
The baffling crux of the mat
ter is this: many of the same West
ern financiers providing fundsand
materials either directly or indi
rectly to the Soviet military are
those supplying the US military
The financiers know that theycan t
have US. defense contracts unless
the US. government has an en
cmytocontend with "If wele.e
the Soviets alone, we would n't
have an enemy, because they're
not a viable system by them
selves says Dr. Sutton "So we
or rather Western businessmen
transferred the technology to build
up the USSR in order to have an
enemy " In short, it is pragma-
business in its most extren
amoral form.
The Soviets now represent i
greatest military adversary th. ,
were the primary reason for our
whopping $395 billion defense
budget in 1989. Moreover,
rise in the US. deficit is aim
exactly the same as the rise
military spending during the la
eight years In buving our enen
we or rather, the deaf, mute
businessmen �created a militan.
and economic crisis of raghtmar
ish proportions.
"Having an enemv gives us a
reason to have a defense budgi 1
savs Sutton "So these peoj
Western financiers) are work,
on both sides of the street
They're completely amoral The)
pnde themselves on pragmabsn
but pragmatism can be misd
rected and unprincipled, flu
actions are motivated bv gro I
the bottom line is always profit
Since political differences are i
obstacle to making a fat profit, tl
international businessmen wil
continue to support Communist
Russia even if it means our owi
suicide.
The implications of this mill
tarv-industnal suprastructurean
staggering. Without the ehti
support, the Soviets would not
have infiltrated Afghanistan
Angola, Mozambique, Nicaragua
Vietnam, or anywhere else. With-
out the elitists' support, we would
not have failed so miserably in
Vietnam and the nudeararms race
might have been constrained to i
walk rather than a spnnt, assum-
ing there had to be anv race in the
first place.
The massive defense budgets
See Soviet, page 5
Student questions fiery opinions
To the Editor
Computer labs fail to suffice
To the editor:
This letter is concerning the
decision Science Department of
Il. I am a sophomore and
completed Decision Science 2223.
The computer room that I was
instructed to use is the business
lab on the third floor of the Gen-
eral Classroom Building. My ex-
periences in this lab have all been
unpleasant ones, the reason being
the lab assistants are very uncoop-
erative when it comes to helping
me with my questions about the
computer I have talked to manv
other students, and I am not the
only one who feels this way. Many
times when I have been in the lab,
the lab assistants have been very
unwilling to help, and therefore
made me feel like a burden to
them
I realie these1 assitants work
long hours in the lab, but this does
not justify their poor attitudes
towards helping the students of
ECU. I feel if they cannot conduct
themselves in a pleasant profes-
sional manner, they should not be
put into a job position which re-
quires working with others.
When I was taking DSCI2223,
iiw professor made it very clear to
us if we needed help while in the
lab, the assistants would be more
than glad to assist us. I have NOT
found this to be the case When I
called the Decision Science Depart-
ment to make mv complaint about
the poor attitudes of the lab assis-
tants found thedepartment heads
were very unwilling to listen to my
complaint. In my opinion, the
Decision Science Department is
very tactless.
Because of mv unfavorable
experiences with this department,
and with the obnoxious lab assis-
tants, 1 would never consider ma-
joring in Decision Science at FCU,
no matter how good this program
is supposed to be. If vou are a lab
assistant, learn to treat people as
people, not as problems.
Susan Terrell
Sophomore
Accounting Major
Marine is
innocent in
downtown
argument
To the editor:
I am writing this letter to clear
up a few misunderstandings that
occurred on the weekend of Feb.
24 at the Elbo. Rumors ha ve spread
that I was beaten up bv Marines.
The .truth is that I was caught in
the middle of a fight started bv a
college student. The Marine, who
is mv fnend. attempted to avoid
conflict; however, the student
persisted in provoking him. When
the fight broke out, the ensuing
action happened so quickly that I
was unable to escape and was ac-
cidentally struck by my friend.
Local authonties automatically
assumed that because he was a
Marine, my friend was the insti-
gator.
1 feel that since Military
personnel's appearance is radi-
cally different from the average
downtown patrons' they are eas-
ily singled out and blamed for
any misconduct Marines, as well
as other members of the armed
forces, have been the frequent
targets of police, townspeople,
and college students. As with any
prejudice, it is always easier to
blame those who are different
from ourselves.
If we can leam to overlook
our differences then possibly fu-
ture conflicts like the altercation
downtown can be avoided.
Kelly Swisher
Senior
Physical Education
To the editor:
I've been going to school here
a long time and I've read a lot of
things in The East Carolinian that
really got my dander up. Many
times it occured to me to send
some searing fireball letter to the
editor. Ranting and raving, 1
would pace, looking for just the
right words to set people straight.
No letters ever got written 1
usually just went out and goofed
off.
In hindsight I'm glad I had so
little initiative to actually write at
a time when I would rather have
seen heads roll than hard hearts
changed.
Where does readingand writ-
ing those fireball letters get its ap-
peal?
"The Psyche of the masses
wrote the author of Mew Kamph,
"is not receptive toanything weak.
The Masses love a commander,
and depise a petitioner
Jesus said, "Blessed are the
meek, for they shall inherit the
earth There's more
David Cherry
Graduate Student
Art Dept. Printmaking
G.E. promotes
the making
of nuclear
weapons
To the editor:
Although recent political de-
velopments have greatly reduced
the risk of nuclear war between
the superpowers, the production
of nuclear weapons continues, fu-
eled in part by defense contrac-
tors' relentless pursuit of corpo-
rate profits. How can private citi-
zens express their opposition to a
nuclear arms race fueled more by
the pursuit of profits than by na-
tional security requirements7
One method which has been
effective in the past is a public
boycott of of fendingcorporations.
Such a nationwide boycott was
organized several years ago
against General Electric (G.E.)
products. Thisbovcott isdesigned
to pressure G.E. to live up to its
slogan "We bring good things to
life" by ending its participation in
the nuclear weapons industry.
Few consumers know that G.E. is
a critical hub of the nuclear weap-
ons industry � it makes parts to
more nuclear weapons systems
than anv other corporation, includ-
ing the neutron generator, "the
trigger that primes the reaction
within every nuclear weapon. By
means of this boycott, each of us
can urge .G.E. to redirect its ener-
gies to more peaceful pursuits. The
next time you need a light bulb or
appliance, please consider joining
millions of Americans in using
your purchasing power to redi-
rect our national priorities.
John C Moskop
The Writing
Center offers
flexible hours
out, the Center provides valuable
help to students and facult)
throughout the university
I would, however, like to clar-
ify two minor points about the
Grammar Hotline. First, the 1 l I
line is open onlv during the Writ
ing Center's regular hours M-F
Kpm -4 p.m. and Tuesday Thurs-
day evenings from 6 p.m. - 9 p.m
Also, there is at least one other
hotline in North Carolina at
Methodist College in Fayettevilk
In addition. I want to stress
that while we do offer a special
tutorial program during the fal
for students with basic writing
problems (narrowing a topic, pro-
viding supporting details, organ
izing the work, etc.) and during
the spring for research skills (writ
ing a synthesis, summary,and en
tique; avoiding plagansm; han-
dling quotations; and preparing a
list of works cited), we also pro
vide these same workshops on an
individual or group basis in alter
nate semesters.
Thus, if a student wants addi-
tional help with basic writing skills
in the spring semester, or wants
help with research skills during
the fall semester, we will gladlv
offer individual workshops or the
entire series to that student.
Again, thanks for helping us
publicize our free services
Jo Allen
Director
The Writing Center
To the editor:
Thanks for the fine coverage
The East Carolinian gave the Writ-
ing Center in the Feb. 27 edition.
As your writer Joe Horst points
Recycle
The East
Carolinian





IhclidSl Cjiyiiniajn, Un� 13,1990 5
Soviet
Continued from p.i�f I
Ihe NOs have primarily been Space Shuttle came from. After
red t match merican with .ill the Soviet space shuttle is a
tary might While this carbon copy of ours, as are all ol
ahne is aitficient grounds for their most advanced aircraft
calling the Soviets oui enerm Lenin considered the 'deaf
thetechi transfers continue mute blind men' the ultimate
in administration byproducts of capitalism unwit
admitted that .it least 1 0 Soviet ting slaves ol deep seated greed
mil
�terns have been dc
ult.
the
final
io aeencv of thetr own hanging I � Y
6 !

and nan issism I le also knew that
the board directors presidingo er
i m.ill the these same corporations were
nable to dis gradual!) strengthening the very
unethical and rope that would someda bet ome
nv t the I S tl
he sad part about about it ,i
i that the ' S eo ernmenl for all
il . Keaganesoue rhetorii against
! nem the I il Empire has never
sought to intei vene I hankfull).
mill now that the Soviets are cutting
down their militan burden the
intern.itiiMi.il game il deadh de
. oming ti' an endlonget
must the two superpowers kei p
s mg tot nuclear supei loritN ind
makingour planet an im reasmgl
nre arious plat e to live i i ihan
i imics 'ii both sii le stand to
: . .tit but so i.u there is little
:i th.it this will hold true foi the
S est 1 or instead ol feeding the
ii t Bear, the intern.ition.il
� lessmi n .lie i hanneling their
�. ist sums of mone into SDl ($4.7
billion i ourtess olleorge Bush i
and stealth bomb- i 1 million
apie e ndlorb ii A k i ps
smiline
Sharky's
of (Jrecnv ilk
l ocated l. Sports Pad an 5th Street
I ttter through lle
Thurs.
ft
ttej
UI
I IKS.
2 For
liies(l;i
Sun.
Domestics
SI.00
Shark) 's is a private eluh ftr members and
21 wars old guests.
�free sh krkys membership'
With I his ('oupon
�. '�'�
AL
Fosdick's)
V
j March
Special
M m � � � � �coupon �����!
'i 2 Shrimp Dinners For .
� 1 Low Price ��
! �
� 2 Small Shrimp Platters $7.50 it

Jl 2 Regular Shrimp Platters $9.50
i 2 Large Shrimp Platters $11.50
I )ine In nt 1 .ike hit
Jw Expires March 2(. 1991 rf
FOSDICK'S
I890 SEAFOOD ;
2903 S. Evans St.
Call 756-2011 f
n
rji -
k.

� iti
n

id r iii.i iii I
d e 1
i the
The East
Carolinian
is always
looking
for good
writers for
the
following
sections:
NEWS
FEATURES
SPORTS
SATIRE
I N I ERTAIN-
MENT
APPLY IN
PERSON
THIS WEEK
to clcJork y SH
IS ?�&�' tii
TO �tf YORg C� ni
To pfftAS Ny �l
To PPJU "
TO ptlNY
TO EpLA
pa :71-
pa $$'
Ny J-
fe V
3
inri0 r
,s?? r
fa
Pa
Cf
2?.
3
An0UvT
,s-so
33-LO
10-014
M-5i
Q�NTINUEJ

You'd like vour roommates
a whole lot better if they didn't
show up on your phone bill.
Mm called hicago ix calkxl 1 H was thai rVte?
1 v mi sweat it s (Ttingoiu n n miniates iseus when you ,uci l'r-7 'aUManirSenia
Ikvausewith it. voiK an .ill gel your h nig distance charges listed separately even th ugli
v hi sliaretlie sitme pin ne nuhilx'i ikI it ixstsv( u n ithing.
ortndoul nioiv.ilxuii the live IAall Manager Service, dull 1 S00 111 -Q30Q.ext.60a
li II makeb h vour bills aixl i n� n k miniates much easier u live ith.
AT&T
The right choice.
� r. �.





The East Carolinian. March 13.1990 5
Soviet
Continued from page 4
of the '80s have primarily been
geared to match American with
Soviet military' might. While this
alone is sufficient grounds for
calling the Soviets our "enemy
the technology transferscontinue.
Even the Reagan administration
admitted that at least 150 Soviet
military systems have been de-
pendent on Western technology.
Like Iran-Contra Scandal, the
government seems unable to dis-
tinguish between unethical and
ethical. But, according to the U.S.
Constitution, giving aid and com-
fort to an enemy is treason � the
ominous title for Sutton's final
chapter in "The Best Enemy
Money Can Buv"
Our country's growing mili-
tarv expenditures are closelv re-
lated to the steady sapping of our
economic strength. As the na-
tional debt nears$3 trillion, nearly
everything normally handled bv a
responsible, modernized democ-
racy health services, education,
environmental protection, and
public transportation has been
forsaken. And as international
businessmen continue to feed the
Soviet bear, American taxpayers
must continue to maintain an al-
ready obese Pentagon budget.
Nuclear madness and monetary
madness are inseparable.
Sutton says the Washington
bureaucracy's view of "peaceful
trade" is hampered by a serious
blindspot: much of our exported
technologies, while ostensibly
peaceful, are actually being con-
verted tor war purposes. 'The
Soviet Union needs � and receives
� U.S. technology, not foodstuffs
and raw materials No econo-
mist will deny that our technical
transfers release Soviet domestic
resources for armaments produc-
tion It is not a blindspot but more
accurately a disease - a disease
called moral bankruptcy.
Today, State and Commerce
officials argue that exports of
equipment for the automobile
industry is "peaceful trade" �
even when military vehicles pro-
duced" bv previously exported
t'erKBlofy arT photographed,
among other places, in Vietnam,
Afghanistan, Angola, and Nicara-
gua. "Obviously no amount of
hard evidence can shake these
people I the deaf mute blind men
from their illusions writes Sut-
ton. Thepohcvmakersare locked
into a brand of totalitarianism
which, to them, is morally and
strategically acceptable
Space technology is another
example of Soviet- American over-
lap, lt'snoaccident that the USSR's
launch of Sputnik in 1957 was the
first manned spacecraft. The tech-
nology behind Sputnik came di-
rectly from Germany, courtesy of
the Rothschilds and Armand
Hammer. One might wonder
where the technology behind the
Space Shuttle came from. After
all, the Soviet space shuttle is a
carbon copy of ours, as are all of
their most advanced aircraft.
Lenin considered the "deaf
mute blind men" the ultimate
byproducts of capitalism: unwit-
ting slaves of deep-seated greed
and narcissism. Healso knew that
the board directors presidingover
these same corporations were
gradually strengthening the very
rope that would someday become
the agency of their own hanging.
The sad part about about it all
is that the U.S. government, for all
its Reaganesque rhetoric against
the "Evil Empire has never
sought to intervene. Thankfully,
now that the Soviets are cutting
down their military burden, the
international game of deadly de-
cei t is coming to an end. No longer
must the two superpowers keep
vying for nuclear superiority and
making our planet an increasingly
precarious place to live. Civilian
economies on both sides stand to
benefit, but so far there is little
sign that this will hold true for the
West. For instead of feeding the
Soviet Bear, the international
businessmen are channeling their
vast sums of money into SDI ($4.7
billion, courtesy of George Bush)
and stealth bombers ($531 million
apiece). And Gorby just keeps
smiling.
Sharky's
of Greenville
Located by Sports Pad on 5th Street
Enter through Alley
Thurs.
Import Night
lues,
2 For
Tuesday
Domestics
$1.00
i
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 years old guests.

�FREE SHARKY'S MEMBERSHIP1
! With This Coupon,
Fosdick1
March
Special
i � � � � �coupon � � � � i
2 Shrimp Dinners For
1 Low Price
Small Shrimp Platters $7.50
Regular Shrimp Platters $9.50
Large Shrimp Platters $11.50
Dine In or Take Out
Expires March 29, 1990
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
2903 S. Evans St.
jt�-
Call 756-2011
The East
Carolinian
is always
looking
for good
writers for
the
following
sections:
NEWS
FEATURES
SPORTS
SATIRE
ENTERTAIN-
MENT
APPLY IN
PERSON
THIS WEEK
s
la SSKm
to BSt� ec
' rS "Sii6J
' as?
of
lT�l2l
U c
pa
GC
1?:
3$
efi
York
ifHUNT
13.Ill
SI
C�NTINUEP
bu'd like your roommates
a whole lot better if they didn't
show up on your phone bill.
John called Chicago. Andy called LA. Or was that Pete?
'Don't sweat it. Sorting out roommates is easy when you get AIU CallManagerService.
Because with it, you can all get your long distance charges listed separateK; even though
you share the same phone number And it costs you nothing.
' To find out more about the free ATTCaUManarSenice, dial 1800 222-0300, ext. 600.
Itll make both your bills and your roommates much easier to live with.
AT&T
The right choice.
C1990AFKT





(Sttg jEaat (Earnlttuan
Page 6
Classifieds
March 13,1990
FOR RENT
ROOMMATES NEEDED: Couple pre
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
McBudget
Office
Furniture
We Have:
�Desks � (hairs
� Files � Sales
� Computer � Storage
Furniture Cabinets
We Buy, Sell, I rade, A I ease
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Serv es & (Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Centei
757-0003
111 E. 3rd St.
The Lee Building
Greenville, NC
Hams
Ml 9 am- 5 pm
(erred to share two Kir apt tor summer
and next school year Please call Leigh 931-
B297
MAI I ROOMMATE WANTED: upper-
class men to share 2 bedroom in Village
t ,recn $165 mo 12 utilities. Call 758-
15506 1 eave message
WANTED. Female upper classman or
graduate student to hare 1 '4 rentutili-
ties Will have own room and share bath
w' 1 person Call 756 0857 after ipm
APARTMENT TO SUBLET: at Scottish
Manor this summer Fullv furnished , 1
hodnxim, air conditioning, onlv 5 min
walk from ECU $260 per month Call
Tracey 931 7543or Bemadctte 931 685
DURHAM, NC: Artists space -SI 50mo
Darkroom, gallerv Progressive, innova-
tive atmosphere O Slidesresume) Info
Ferdelance. POB 3589, Chapel Hill, NC
27515 or oiQ �:o 6629
LOR SALE
FOR SAI F:ikon A1S- Tokina 28-70 mm
zoom F2.8 8100.00 Sears ll?mm F2 8
S.3 00 and Albmar80 2(10mm zoom F3.9
$30 00 Call Cairett at 031 7409 or 757-
f,0Q4
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
CRl LSK LINE OPENINGS
HIRING NOW!l
Year round A summer jobs available1, 5 '00
S6O0 per week Steward. Svial Director!
lour Guides, Gift vhi cashier1 etc B�itf
skilled and unskilled people needed Call
7)l hl7 - 66h2
The Suntana
5 Visit Plan $15
10 Visit Plan $25
15 Visit Plan $30
Wolfe Tanning System
756-9180
Coupon Good Thru 3-31-90
U2 S. Memorial Dr.
IS ITTRUE YOU CAN BUY JEEPS: For
$44 through the U S Government? Gel
the facts roday! Call 1 708 742 1142 Fxt
5271-A
FOR SALE: I foot Hall Python with
aquarium and hot rock I'all 355 0091
after o pm
AKC REGISTERED Bl ACK IABRA-
DOR PUPPIES: Champion BtoodMncs
Wormed and Healthy 8150 1 793-9205
Excellent quality for both pet and pint
ing stock
ATTENTION: Government homes from
SI (urepairi Delinquent tax property
Repossessions Call 1 602 838 8885 Ext
28
ATTENTION: Government seized ve-
hicles from SI(XI Fords, Mercedes. Cor
vettes,chews SurplusBuyersGuide 1
H)2 838 8885 Fxt A -285
SERVICES OFFERED
PIRATE RIDFI PIRATE RIDE' Stu
dentsdon't forget to use Pirate Ride Sun
Thurs 8 pm 12 15 jm The route now
includes Slav and Umstead fWms For
more information call 757 472h
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: Weoffertyping
ancl photocopying services We also sell
softwares � computers 24 hours in and
out (Guaranteed t ping on paper up to
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
PARROT I( AW AS CO. j
n
Large Selection of Bookbags,
Travel Hags c Accessories.
We Repair
508 W 14th si 752 8433
WIN il WAll AN VACATION OK BIG SCREENIV
PLUS RAISE IT lO $1,400 IN JUST 10 DAYS
Qbjective: Fundraiser
Cjunmilnunt: Minimal
Moiu: Raise $1,400
(jst: Zero Investment
Campus organizationss, clubs, fraLs, sororities call
()( 1( :1(800) 92-0528 1(800)950-8472, ext 10
20 hand written pages SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 E 5th St (fbeside
Cubbie'si Greenville,NC 752 594
DEPENDASLE, PROFESSIONAL TYPIST
wstate of the art word processing equip
stent and laser printer Call Brenda after 6 00
pm 756-1837 or leave message
NEED SOMETHING TYPED? (all me
Reasonable rates 75t555
HELP WANTED
NEW ENGLAND BRO THFRSISTFR
CAMPS - MASSAC UUSETTS: Mah Ken
Nac tor BoysDan bee tor (iris Counselor
positions for Program Specialists All Team
Sports, especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
Hockey, Softball Soccer and Volleyball, 25
Tennis openings, also Archery. Kitflerv,
Weights Fitness and Biking other openings
include Performing Arts, Fine Arts, News
paper. Photography, Cooking. Sewing,
Roller skating. Rocketry, Ropes and Camp
(ran, All Waterfront Activities (Swimming
�"�knng, sailing. Windsurfing, CanoeKay
aking) Inquire Mah-Kee-Nai (Boys) 190
1 inden Ave C.len Ridge , N 07028 Danbee
(Girls), lb Horseneck Road, Montville NJ
07045 Please Call 1 809-776-0520
Ell F (1 FRK: Needed tr local professional
office Hours s 30am I 00pm Monday Fn
day Please call office for interview 355
0300 Vk for 1. aria
PROMOTIONS MODELING (,ln
Low fee agency 1902 S Charles St Across
from Pirates Chest Office hours Mon Fro
1 pm Jpm 135-19
Wl I I SHIRT CONTEST: S2 Is) . �
' � � � '� � � . 'or inter
w. 355 � �
IRllls sov HIRING! Flight Mten
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
SUMMER JOBS
c: 50, 000 lumma ob opounn : Reborns.
Cnript kfflutonaii Pukx Itoidi Sauorul P�rk�,
Businesses. (rsr i ex Rmm SMi A: �-�-re � ��
( s Canute, Auatnlia and 2d ithcr comma
Campteu DtncUH) only Soos Don't wni
,r: � j . SarwlloSummerJabi r- �
Colorado Spr.r.j. Colorado i 1937
I 1-800-433-2930
rransform Youj Mind Into A
"Mi'nmn Machine" with the Most
Practical Ways lo FasiU Improve
Your Memory:
. . 1 n,r.� ��: Monr Rk r: i . V
�v . II,�� Hi H�fip n �� f(Hioal Mm.
baa mdfcfc � '�� � : .� w- K
. toim reaatd �-� .( � �
Sc 25 mlt udrN lax r S)i V f.r hlh ric �j
S. �s '�' � '� ��' tORDERTOOAV
Landwood Distributing Co
I'd Box 443 "
Greenville. NC 2 243 '
dants, many other positions' $17,500
$58,240 Call (1)602 838-8885 E�t X 5285
ATTENTION' EARN MONEY WA TC H-
ING TV! $.52 000 vt-ar income potential
Details (1)602-838-8885 Ext TV 528
ATTENTION HIRING' Cruise ship ca
sino, hotel jobs' Free travel benefits' De
tails (1)602-838-8885 F.tt r 5285
CHEERLEADINC; INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED: for Summeramps in N If
you love cheering this is the summer ob
for von' COIlegeexperience not ne essary
but must have strong High School back
ground Flexible scheduling and great pay!
Call collect for more information c-�lQ�
383-0886
WAFFLE HOUSE:� expanding and lo i
ing for dep�-ndable individuals Now ac
cepting applications for full and part time
positions all shifts cixik, waitress, h"tss
management No experience necessary
Apply between 7am 5 p m
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,040 $59,2
vr Now hiring Call (1) 805-687-60001
K 1 1m tor current federal list
AIRl INFS NOW HIRING: Right V
dants. Travel Agents,Mechanics.( ust I
Service. Listings Salaries to $105K Entn
Level positions Call (1) 805-687
A 1166
SALES: National Marketing Firm � -
maturestudent to manage on campii .
motions tor topi ompaniesthis I
Flexible hour with earning
$2 ' per semester Must tx
hard working, and morn . ��
Micheleor enn at (80
ATTENTION-HIRING:
jobs yourare i v n
without waiting! t or test i ' � � - Us
i all I 602 sss ,� :
F RN MOM) IROM HOM1
circulars tor more info smi 5;
stamped self-addressed i
2320Roslyn Ave IMst Hgts Md "1 '
III -N riON I as)
issemble products at hi mc
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
Every Thursday is Dog
Dav at ills- Mclhoaiisl
Student Center.
501 E. 5th Street
H l s sS
.t w
rn N I 0 fN I in
�ills ill
WT2-85H-8HH Ext. BI 28
II MM I DAN ERWANTEDrl rl
. � ime and mbei
. . �� � ��
30
i0
2 Dogs. ('hips. & Drink
$1.50
PI KSONAl S
I OS I
with white nest and paws and
! ;he still has .i � i ' "
she was spayed isl
vicinity of i Ireen Mill Run '�: I
plea- all- -� - - �
David
BII I I RU5 H)l KN- VMl v I
bean I
the Mendenh all Stud
� v.istrati.m .� 6 �
� ' inh 21 in I
KM
: i
Mar: . -
SIGM s

I! I IHBI V-K t i

� � � -
e Mod Mavis
Pi H R M
MI
I Kli CLAPTI i I I' KM
: If
H VPPi BIR IIIIUMi RI

DISPI i t I ss EDS
KIN(,(,()1 1) 1()M Ks
. i ipts I all '52 2Si
RESEARCH WORMATlOf
- c �
1 800 351 0222
Announcements
EXPRl SSIONS MAGAZINE
� pres
ns I
i i pting fiction and
i as arti les, and po
r the pni issvie Dead
� ' i- Mar. h : at
�� d m the Publi
�� fn m lvner l.ibrar
( OOPLRATIVL EDUCATION
� r. -� ntal f the Walt 1 teney World
rogi im will K" on campus re
g students to work in (. Wando Spring
� ' '�. required presentation will be
I on Mai �' : m General
issroom Build n l1 and inter
. � .vs ill tx icr luled March 1 For
moremf � �' � u I ipphcationmateri
ate contact � itive Education, 2028
eral Cla root . ling
OtnitS-COLDILS" DANCE
District 97, SI N will be sponsor
Ing an 0 i oldies" fiance, on 'xitur
.�. March 11 1990, at the Greenville
try 3:00 p.m 1:00 a.m
h aDJfeal musicfri tt the 50s
�js and 7Cs herewillbedoorpri7.es,
ght h � and cash bar as well
isa pni es) tressed couple rep
� � � �ch era kel for the event
be56person and I. � obtained bv
ting Pi � ' � ' � Mail I ampus
'� 12) David H.i h 5choi I of Medicine
" a ai n ' the 1 hstnet
utix e Bi iri I ei utn e ommit

UN1VI RSin STUDENT
MARSHALS
ny student interested in -��rmg as a
� .versify Marshal for the 1990 1991 sdMd
ar may obtain application from 211
.hard Student must be classified as a
'iniorbv the end of Spring semesfet loo
and have a J.fl academk average to be
eligible Return completed application to
211 Whichardby March 15
KLUSTRA i ltjN I OR GJiN:
LRAi. COLL LG�TLID �NTS
(neral College StudanH should antact
their advisers the week of March 19 2") to
make arrangements for academic advising
for summer terms and fall semester, 1990
Farlv Registration will begin March 26and
nd March 50
BCCXAJSjtER
The '89 Huccaneer is available' You may
pick up a copy outside the Buccaneer of-
fi .� located on the second floor of Publica-
tions Building across from lovner Library
HOME RUN DERBY
A Home Run Derby will be held on the
Lady Pirate Softball Diamond March 11
Men's and women's divisions have been
developed Consistent hitting mav win the
contest1' Register March 13 at 5p m in Bio
103 For additional information call 757
h.587
RECREATIONAL SOFTBALL
Men's and women's sottball teams are
encouraged to attend a registration meet
ing held March 13 at 5 IK) p m in Bio KB
For additional information call 757-6387
Sponsored bv Intramural Recreational
Services
TENNIS DO LB LES
Pairs interested in plavmg tennis doubles
are asked to attend a registration meeting
at "iVIpm March 15in Bio 1(15 Men sand
women s pairs welcome' For additional
information call 757 h"W7 Sponsored bv
!M RFC Services
OUTDOOR GOURMET
WORKSHOP
t ipenence the creativity of outdoor cook
ing March Mat 5 00 p m in Memorial (.vm
room 115 (Home of ROC Recreational
(Xitdxr (enter) Dutch Oven Cooking,
Trail Lunches and More will be demon
strafed For additional information call 757
n5K7 Sponsored by Intramural Recrea
tional Services
FITNESS CLASS REGISTRA-
TION
Intramural Recreational Services Fitness
Class Registration will be held February
27 March 15 in Room 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium Costis$10forstudentsand$20 00
for Faculty Staff for a 12 dass session Get
your class schedule in room 204 Memorial
Gymnasium Call 757-6387 for more infor
mation
A canoe 'kayaking workshop tor begin
ner and advanced oarsman will be held
March 17at 9a m tor a dav trip along the
Tar River Registration must be made
through March iMn 113 Memorial Gym
Take to the Tar tor a river of tun and
adventure' Call the Recreational (.Hit
door Center at 757-6387 tor additional
information
PRE
SHOP
E A SON SOFTBALL
TOURNEY
A pre season softball tournament spon
sored bv Intramural Recreational kerv
ices will beheld March lhand 17 Kegis
tration will be held March 1.5 at 5 00 p m
in Bio 105 For additional information
call 757 6,587
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
Announcing a Wednesday night dinner
special' Fun, fellowship and all the home
cooking vou can eat It all starts at 5.50
p m Come Bring a friend
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
We invite you to be with us every Wed
night at 7 p m in Rm 212 Mendenhall
for prayer and Bible study Everyone is
welcome to be a part of this growing
fellowship Fur more info, call 752-7199.
IMPROYJNGJlQUB stu d y
SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college The
following mini course and workshops
can help you prepare for the added
workload of college or help to increase
your grade point average All sessions
will be held in 513 Wnght Building
March 19, Monday and 20, Tuesday Test
Taking 3 4:30 p m You may attend all
the topic sessions or choose the ones
wheTe you need the most improvement
CQUNSELINGjCENTEB
Coping with stress A free mini class
offered by the East Carolina University
Counseling Center for students You can
idenhfy sources of stress, make positive
changes, manage your response to stress-
ful situations, learn to relax-improve self
confidence Two programs Choose the
program you wish but plan to attend all
three meetings! Program 1 Thursdays:
March I 5, 22. & 2 in 512 Wright Building, 5-
4 pm Program 2 Thursdays April 5, 12, ft
19 in 512 Wright Building, 5 4pm No ad-
vance registration is required Call or stop by
the Counseling Center for further informa-
tion (516 Wright Building 757 el
ECC SCHOOL QF MUSIC
EVENTS MARCH 13-19
Guest Recital bv Paul Stewart, pianist (March
1.5, 8 15 pm, Fletcher Rental Hall, tree),
"Scholarship Showcase Recital' of Friends
of School of Music, featuring students Brad
Langhans and Fran Parnsh, trumpet Clau-
dia Chalmers, piano, Susan Durham, so-
prano, Chris Hollidav, percussion, loel
Mauger, guitar, and Diane Lambeth, saxo-
phone (March 14, 7:00p.m Fletcher Recital
I lall, tree). Faculty REcital bv selma (. .okcen,
cello, and Paul Tardit, piano (March 15,8 15
pm, Retches Recital Hall, tree), Bndgette
(. oopar, voice, Senior Recital (March 17,8 00
pm, Fletcher Recital Hall, free); Student
Composers Concert (March 19, H 15 pm,
Fletcher Recital Hall, free) DIAL 757-4370
FOR THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC'S "RE-
CORDED CALENDAR OF EVENTS "
SPEECH-LANGUAGE & AUDI-
TQRYJ?ATHQLQGY
All General College shidents who intend to
ma)r in Speech Language and Auditory
Pathology and have R Muarelh as their
advisor are to meet on Wednesday, March 21
at5 00p.m in Brcwster C 101 Advising tor
earl v registration will take place at that time
Please prepare a tentattve class schedule
before the meeting
SCJ1QLARSHIPANDFELLOW
SH1P ANNQUNCEMENIS
Applications are now being accepted for the
David B and Willa H. Stevens Scholarship
for undergraduates enrolled in theSchoolof
Social Work, and the Herman G and Marian
5 Moeller Fellowship for M S W students
Two Stevens Scholarships will be awarded
for the fall semester of 1990 ($500 00 for
Soaal Work and $500 00 for Criminal Jus-
tice) The recipients will be selected on the
basis of academic excellence, financial need,
good cituenship, and dedication to the So-
cial Work andor Criminal Justice
professions Moeller Fellowship for $250 00
will be be awarded at the end of spring
semester 1990 The recipient will be selected
on the basis of academic excellence, leader-
ship activities, qualities of good citizenship
and dedication to the Social Work and Crimi-
nal lustice professions Applications are
available from and should be returned u
Ms Nancv Corhett. School ofScx :al Work
Room 206 Ragsdale Hail Di -
March 19, 19)) For more informal
7574199
SPECIAL OLYMPICS V()LL N-
TEERS NEEDED
The 1900 Greenville-Pitt Count) Speeia
Olympics Spring Games will be held on
Tuesday. April 10, at E B Ayoock r High
School in Greenville (Rain Date, fhursdav
April 12) Volunteers are needed to help
serve as buddies chaperones tor the Spa
cial Olympians Volunteers must beable to
work all day from 9 in' a m 2:00 pan An
orientation meeting will be held on Wed
Apnl4, in Old lovner Library Kiom 221 at
5 00 p m for all volunteers who are inter
i-sted in helping Free lunches and t shirts
will be provided the dav of the games to all
volunteers who attended this orientations
session For more information contact the
Special Olympics office 830 4551 or 839-
4541
ANIMAL RIGHTS
The time and place of ECU SETA s March
15 meeting have been changed to 5 30 at
Noura's Kitchen (downtown) For more
information and directions pteasecaK raig
at 931-8054.
FMA
The Financial Management Aworiltinw
will meet on Wednesday, March 14 at 5 (X)
in room 3009 GCB Mr Terry Taylor from
First Citizens Bank will speak on commer
cial lending in Greenville
EMA
The Financial Management Association is
giving you the opportunity to try your
luck at predicting the Dow Jones Indus-
trial Average on April 23 Contact any
FMA member or gobu the Finance office to
buy your $1 00 luckv chance Last dav to
make your prediction us Apnl 9 The clos-
est estimate will win $50 00
GAMMA BETA PHI
A meeting will be held March 14 at 9 p m
in Jenkins Auditorium Officers meet at
830 p.m. Your attendance at this meeting
is very important
PRE PHYSICAL THERAPY
STUDENTS
R psstration advising fo sumn
mester will '��
March 20th and Wed
from 7-9j
V!

Ibyaph)
. � ised abseni
NEWATEG ls
'
ing a chap!
member
meetii -
pm ir M
757 M32 : I
pm
PHI LSP1LON OMICRON
HOME ECONOMICES
HONOR SCH 1ETY
Thi I meeting and msl f new
members Moruiav March 19
Van I andu tan) all
members attend'
PHI U-DET rOKNOW i
SOCIAL
For
�� Itl
da M u h 15
5 15 Vanl andin
STUD i- IN GREAT BRITAIN
Fast Carolina University is exploring the
possibility of xchange opportunities tor
student and faculty with Leicester I niver
sitv in the United Kingdom Two repre
sentativos from Leicester wiii he on am
pus march 14 16 to learn more aNmt ECU
and fo provide information about pro-ams
on their campus We would like to ex
change Students as earlv as tall semester
so it vou might be interested in spendinga
semester or vear in England vhiie paving
ECU tuition please attend one of the in for
mation sessions which will be held
Wednesdav Mar 14 at 4 00 pm in GCB
1028, and Thurs Mar 15at4.a)pminCCB
1028 The representatives will be happv to
Announcements, See page 7





The East Carolinian. March 13,1990 7
Announcements
Continued from page 6
answer am questions you m.it h�VC It you
are unable to attend at either of these tinn-s
Please contact Ms Stephanie Fvaiuho,
67($, to arrange a spcdrk time to meet
rhis is a wonderful opportunity n don't
miss your chance to learn about I semester
in England'
BIG KIDS
New Matting time' The issue ot adult
children oi alcoholics is becoming more
rev ognized today on ooBege campuses It
youg lite has Nvn affected past or present
bv having been raised in I home or envi
i on men t where alcohol kor nt her ds tune
tional behaviors were present. !i� Kids,
mav he the group tor you The new meet
mgs will he held each Wednesday at S pm
in 242 Mendenhall student center tor
more information contact Office of Sub
stance Abuse Prevention and Education,
KB Erwin Mall. 757-6793
DRUG AWARENESS WtLK
l v U will observe National Collegjate Drug
Awareness Week, March 1" 23 Watch tor
additional publicity with � schedule ol the
week's events coming stxin For more
information contact Office of Substance
abuse Prevention and Education 303
Erwin HaJl 757-6758.
LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOT-
ERS
The league of Women Voters of Green
ville Pitt County is sponsoring a presen
tatton titled "A Pence Economy" bv Mr
Roger Manus, Vice President and Educa-
tion chair ot the Raleigh chapter ot SANE
FREEZE a Campaign for Global Security
The event will take place on Tuesday,
March 20, ls�i. at 7 30 pm in ihe Cedar
1 ane Community building (I C Park) A
question and answer period will follow
the presentation For more information.
contact Edith Webber at 758-4906
THE PHYSICAL EDUCTION
MOTOR AND PHYSICAL
FITNESS COMPETENCY TEST
Mingcscoliseum Mam Friday March lb, SPANISH CLUB AND ILO
1990 The passing score on this test is
required of all students prior to declaring-
physical education as a maor 11 Main
tainingan average T score ot 4 ion the six
item I'M battery and I laving a T score ot
�t on the aerobics run Any student with
a medical condition that would contrain
dicate participation in the testing should
contact Mike McCammon or Or Gay Is
rael at 757 4b8tf To he exempted from any
portion of the test, you must have a phvsi
cians' excuse A detailed summary of the
test components is available in the 1 luman
Performance laboratory (Room 113,
Mingcs Coliseum) Your physicians ex-
cuse must specifically state from which
items you are exempt
SEAN1SHXLUB
The Spanish I Tub will elect new officers at
its Wednesday meeting. Fhosc members
w ho are unable to ttend the 3 pm meeting
can drop by the Foreign 1 anguage Dept t.
vote
The Ft l! Spanish club, along with the
International Language Organization, wiB
sponsor the 2nd annual Fiesta on Friday,
March lb The fiesta will be held at St
Peter'schunhon 4th street It will begin at
h 30 pm and tickets can b purchased in
advance from member of the Spanish club
and ILO The cost for the fiesta is S5 (X)
Tickets will not be sold at the door
AFROTC
To all interested students The air Force
Officer Qualifying Test (AF(XT will be
administered on March 15,1990atl pm It
will he given in Wright Annex Koom W8
(. omc sign up in Room 308 For any ques-
tions come to the Air Force ROTCOIf ice on
the 3rd floor of Wright Annex
PACK'N1 MAIL
Package & Mailing Center
v
Mon. - Fri 9 - 6
Sat 10 - 5
Greenville Square
(K - Mart Shopping Center i
One Place
That Handles
756-5099
ALL Your Mailing Needs
Child abuse and effects discussed
By Susan fernigan
Staff Writer
rheECUSchooIofSocialWork
and Criminal justice will sponsor
,i symposium on ihe issue of child
abuse on March 1i and 16 in
Mendenhall Student Center
The seminar is titled Child
buMV Impact on Families, Schools
and Criminal Justice Systems
1 rans National Perspectives
"The issue of child abuse was
i hosen tor the seminar because ot
its relevance in this country and
throughout the world, said Dr.
ohn Powell, an ECU Assistant
Professor in the School of Social
Work and Criminal lustiee.
The event is co-chaired bv
Powell and Dr. Vickie Causby,
isistant Professor, School ol
' i i ial Work and Criminal lustiee
Features of the symposium
include a dramatic presentation,
w, wkshops, and several renowned
speakers
The dramatic presentation.
Many Facesof(!hild Abuse will
be performed Thursday
Ihe presentation has been
organized by rheatre Arts instruc-
tor, "racy Donahue and will be
performed by students from the
School of Social Work and the
Theatre Arts Department
During the second day of the
seminar, participants will be able
to attend one of nine workshops.
" Ihe workshops will give the
participants the opportunity to dis-
cuss child abuse issues in detail
said Powell.
Topics of the workshops in-
clude "Helping Children With
AIDS and the Parents Who Infected
Them "TheRelationshipotChild
Abuse to Substance and Chemical
Abuse in Parents" and ' The Role
of the Criminal Justice System m
Child Abuse Cases
ohn Niblock, Executive Di-
re tor lit the North Carolina Child
Advocacy Institute, will speak
Thursday on the prevalance ot
child abuse in North Carolina
Hedy Cleaver, Research As-
sociate, University ol Bristol, Eng
land, will speak Friday on the
impact child abuse has on fami-
lies.
(leaver was a member ot a
group ot researchers from Eng-
land who visited E I last tall The
British researchers exchanged in-
formation with professors from
North C arolina and South Caro-
lina in order to enhance each
school's program
Dr. Alan Keith 1 ucas, Profes
sor Emeritus at the I niversity ot
North Carolina at Chapel Hill will
speak on tin' issue ot whether
people have become overly suspi-
cious ot child abuse.
Previous subects ot the an-
nual event have been The I lelp-
ing Process' and "Family Vio-
lence
Students and Faculty are in-
vited to attend the symposium.
For more information contact the
Division of Continuing Education
at 757-6143.
Summer Sales
Internship
available:
I cirn how you can join
the No. I salos force in
Sales and Marketing
Magazine.
Send Resume' to
2!7 Commerce Street
Greenville, N.C 27834
� Fax Service
� Notary Public
� Copy Service
� Passport & ID Photos
� Greeting Cards
� Gift Wrapping
� Packing Supplies
� Prompt, Friendly
Professional Service
�UPS
� US Mail
� Federal Express
� Airborne Express
� Express Mail
� Stamps ��.� OfEa Run)
� Mail Drop
� Mail Box Rentals
50? OFF
l PS Shipping
Charge
vwih this loupon One
� nHipon per customer p!c ic �
Goaddmfaa M�ith V m
II
ATTENTION ECU GROUPS:
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Annual Funding Planning Sesssions
Are Scheduled for:
March 20 - 4:00 pm Rm 221 Mendenhall
March 22 - 4:00 pm Multipurpose Room
Mendenhall
A Representative of Your Organization
Must Be Present At One Session
In Order To Obtain 1990 - 1991 Funding
All Groups With SGA Funded
Status Are Eligible
For Further Information Call
Allen Thomas 757-0157
Barb Lamb 758-6334
If You Are Unsure If You Are Eligible
For Funding - Please Call
Millie Murphy at 757-4726
LONDON$510
BERLIN578
AMSTERDAM558
VIENNA578
TOKYO749
AUCKLAND1,376
SYDNEY1,071
Taxes not inciuckd Restrictions
apply One ways available
Wort Study abroad programs Intl
Student ID EURAIL PASSES
ISSUED ON THE SPOT!
FREE Student Travel Catalog
Council Travel
i4
Upcoming March Entertainment:
Fri. 16th
Crystal Skv
Hours ut Operation
lon 11 am - 8 pm
Tues 1 lam-lam
Wed 11 am 1 am
Thurs ' 11 am -pm
Fri 1 1 am - 1 am
Sat 1 2 noon 1 am
� If Band Night -
Sal. 17th
Bad Bob & The
Rockin' Horses
513 Cotanche St.
(located across from I BE l
Each Tues. & Wed. Nijht
Open Mic Nighl
Sign up
starts at 3pm
758-0080
Order your college ring NOW.
J( )STENS
AMFRICA S COllfGt RING
Date: March 14, 15, � 16Time: 10 -4
Deposit Required: $20.00
'Zefl
Place: Bookstore Wed Thurs Fri.
Meet with vow fastens rcnresenUtiw for hill details See our complete ring setedtaa on display m your college bookstore
r H �,
AD SIZE- 6 716 x 8 34
These ads ,n ollated Mother in different sizes to allow your printer to determine whu h
size will Ix-st reproduce in vur particular paper according to column width Gtac vnur
printer all three sizes ol your ad. but you Ml !ST designate which sue ad you wish to boy
i ' page. I�page. 2 column. 3 column, etc )
It one ol these ads is not exactly the size you need, haw wmi printer enlarge an ad to the
final size rather than reduce a larger ad to a smaller size





r
Page 8
She iEaat (garglinfan
State and Nation
March 13,1990
Gorbachev reacts to Lithuanian autonomy
VILNIUS, U.S.S.R. (AP) �
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev
Monday called Lithuania's decla-
ration of independence "alarm-
ing but gave no indication he
plans any action to prevent the
Baltic republic from breaking
away.
As he opened a new ssion of
the Congress of People's Deputies
in Moscow, Gorbachev noted that
the chairman of the Lithuanian
delegation was absent from his
chair on the stage with other
members of the Presidium.
"The information coming
from Lithuania is alarming, and
momentous decisions are being
made there that will affect both
Lithuania and the Soviet Union
Gorbachev told more than 2,(XX)
deputies.
The lawmakers had as-
sembled toconsider constitutional
amendments that would create a
new, extraordinarily powerful
Soviet president and revoke the
Communist Party's monopoly on
power. )ust two weeks after pro-
independence candidates won a
two-third majority in Lithuania's
legislature, the body voted on
Sunday to restore the Baltic
republic's sovereignty after 50
years of Soviet rule. Lithuanian
lawmakers acknowledge, though.
that true independence can only
be won after long, difficult nego-
tiations with the Kremlin.
The hasty vote to secede was
prompted by the convening of the
Congress to consider giving a new
president extraordinary powers,
including authority to dissolve
republic parliaments and nullify
their actions The newly elected
legislature of the Baltic republic of
3.7 million people voted 124-0 with
six abstentions to secede. It also
chose VytautasLandsbergis, chair-
man oi the nationalist Sajudis
movement, as president.
"Expressing the will of the
people, the Supreme Council of
the Republic of Lithuania decrees
and solemnly declares the resto-
ration of the exercise of the sover-
eign powers of the Lithuanian
state, which were annulled by
foreign force in 1940 the legisla-
ture decreed.
"And from this moment,
Lithuania again becomes a sover-
eign state
The Lithuanian decree pro-
claims that the local KGB and
police, for most of five decades
instruments of Soviet terror and
repression, must now obey Lithu-
ania rather than Moscow.
After it was approved, legis-
lators stood and pined hands,
chanting "Lietuva, Lietuva
(Lithuania). Outside, a small
crowd broke into wild cheers.
Earlier, people tore down a metal
Soviet hammer-and-sickle seal
over thebuilding'sdoorand some
stamped on it.
By itself, the decree effects
little change in the relationship
between the Baltic republic and
the Kremlin. But it was the first
crack in the union of 15 Soviet
republics and more than 100 na-
tionalities as a result of the bur-
geoning demands for autonomy
fostered by Gorbachev's reforms.
In Washington, White House
press secretary Marlin Fitzwater
said the United States would urge
the Kremlin to "respect the will of
the citizens of Lithuania The
United States has never recognized
the forcible 1440 annexation of the
three Soviet republics � Estonia,
Latvia and Lithuania.
Lithuania's declaration of
independence represents perhaps
the biggest crisis yet for Gor-
bachev, who marked his fifth
See Declaration, page 9
Haitian opposition groupis pressure
former ruler to leave the country
PORT-AU-PRINTF Haiti
(AP) - - In a climate ot taw u -iiesa
and bloodshed. opposition groups
intent on forcing a swift transition
to civilian rule called for a general
strike Mond.iv it Haiti's ousted
ruler does not leave the country.
A coalition of opposition lead-
ers, keeping to a timetable set when
Lt. Gen. Prosper Avril relin-
quished power on Saturday, an-
nounced its choice for an interim
president Monday. At least 24
people had been killed in the seven
days of protests and clashes that
have left this Caribbean nation
teaderlessand in turmoil. Most of
the victims have been civilians
slain by soldiers or police.
"The people have shown how
much they love democracy by
dying for it the Rev. Bertrand
Aristide. a Roman Catholic who
has been a staunch critic of the
government, said in an interview
on Radio Antilles.
Avnl handed power to Maj.
Gen. Herard Abraham, who is to
transfer power to a civilian today
But many Haitians fear continued
violence unless Avnl, who still
commands loyalty from many of
the country's soldiers, leaves Haiti.
Residents of the capital re-
treated behind shuttered windows
after sundown Sunday and the
streets were deserted. Soldiers in
pickup trucks drove around the
city and gunshots were heard
occasionally.
"I'm afraid for my husband
and I fear the Macoutes will come
out of the walls said the wife of a
well-known politician, speaking
on condition of anonymity. The
Tonton Macoutes were the teared
secret police of the Duvalier fam-
ily, which ruled 1 laid tor 29 years.
Numbering about 30,000, the
Macoutes were disbanded after
jean laude Duvalier fled to exile
in France in February 1986. After-
wards several hundred were in-
tegrated in the army and police as
special agmts lole-Haiti. a pri-
vate television station, urged view-
ers to stay indoors Sunday night
because 'there are gangs ol ma-
rauding gunmen in the streets'
and politic iansand religious lead-
ers urged citizens to form neigh-
borhood defense groups.
The state hospital said it
treated about 100 people, mostly
for gunshot wounds, over the
See Haiti, page 9
Where women work
Areas with the highest
percentage of women
16 and older in the
Prince George's Co Md 62.6
?
Arlington, Va 62.2
Bloomington. Minn 62.2
Southwest Houston, 62.0
North Dallas. 62.0
Source: 1988 Congressional District Fact Book
Gannett News Service
New leader calls for an end to Chilean violence
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) �
President Patrick) Aylwin called
for an end to violence and hate as
he took over from long-ruling Gen.
Augusto Pinochet, hut street dis-
turbances marred the celebration
of democracy's rebirth.
"Chile doesn't want more
violence, it doesn't want more
war Aylwin declared Sunday
night from the balcony of the presi-
dential palace after his inaugura-
tion earlier in the day.
Thousands below him
cheered the end of Pinochet's 16-
year rule.
"This infant being born, this
liberty we are reconquering, we
have to take care of it said the 71 -
year-old Aylwin. He said that
would require "knowing how to
respect one another, never again
having Chileans divided into
enemies
Aylwin's first official act was
to pardon all political prisoners
under the Pinochet regime His
government also restored diplo-
matic relations with the Soviet
Union, East Germany, Yugosla-
via, Czechoslovakia and Poland
Chile is the last in a series of
South American countries to re-
store elected civilian rule in the
last decade, ending thedominance
of authoritarian military leaders.
But Pinochet, 74, who seized
power in a Mood 1973 coup that
toppled Marxist President Salva-
dor Allende, plans to stay on as
commander of the powerful
60,000-man army and has rejected
Aylwin's requests that he retire
from the military.
Aylwin, who won in Decem-
ber with the backing of centrist
and moderate leftist groups, as-
sumed office to thunderouscheers
and applause in a half-finished
congressional building in the sea-
port of Valparaiso, 70 miles north-
west of Santiago. Beside him dur-
ing the ceremony was Pinochet,
his dark blue military uniform
bedecked with gold medals. The
right-wing general shook
Avlwin's hand after Aylwin, a
centrist Christian Democrat,
slipped on the presidential sash.
Aylwin has vowed to restore
respect for human rights and civil
liberties and put more emphasis
on social services for the poor. But
he plans no major changes in
Pinochet's largely successful free-
market economic program.
A newly elected congress,
dominated by foes of Pinochet,
also took power Sunday. Vice
President Dan Quayle said Pino-
chet assured him he will obey the
new civilian government.
A U.S. arms embargo placed
on Chile since 1976 because of
human rights violations remains
in effect. The embargo was pro-
posed by Sen Edward Kennedy,
D-Mass who also wasat the inau-
guration.
After the ceremony, Aylwin
returned later in the day to San-
tiago, thecapital, and hundreds of
thousands of people lined the
route into the city to cheer him as
he passed in an open car. As dark-
ness approached, bands of leftist
youths who set up bamcades of
burning trash and threw rocksand
sticks at police.
Helmeted anti-riot squads
responded with water cannons
and harsh tear gas, which spread
through the downtown streets.
The clashes persisted for several
hours before calm returned, leav-
ing the streets full of debris, in-
cluding pulled-up street signs and
overturned police barricades.
Several people were seen
bleeding or overcome by the gas,
and the national news agency Orbe
reported 20 policemen were in-
jured, two of them stabbed and
seriously wounded
Police were seen hauling off
several of the youths, some of
whom wore emblems of the
Communist of other leftist par-
ties. Orbe reported a "large quan-
tity of arrests but a police spokes-
man said they had no exact arrest
total.
Hostages in Lebanon
Eight Americans and at least seven citizens of other
Western nations remain held in Lebanon. Many
groups, most ol them affiliated with the Shiite Moslem,
pro-Iranian Islamic Jihad, claimed responsibility for
the kidnappings. Those who remain hostage:
Americans
Terry Anderson (Batavia, N.Y.) � The Middle East bureau chief for
The Associated Press was kidnapped March 16, 1985.
Thomas Sutherland (Fort Collins, Colo.) � The acting dean of
agriculture at American University of Beirut was kidnapped June 9,
1985
Frank Herbert Reed (Maiden, Mass.) � The director of Lebanese
International School in Beirut was kidnapped Sept. 9, 1986.
Joseph James Ciclppio (Norristown. Pa.) � The comptroller of the
American University of Beirut was kidnapped Sept. 12, 1986.
Edward Austin Tracy (Rutland, Vt.) � The author's kidnapping was
reported Oct. 21, 1986
Robert B. Polhill (New York City) � The assistant professor of
business and accounting lecturer at Beirut University College was
kidnapped Jan. 24, 1987.
Alann B. Steen (Boston) � The Beirut University College journalism
professor was kidnapped Jan. 24, 1987.
Jesse Jonathan Turner (Boise, Idaho) � The visiting professor of
mathematics and computer science at Beirut University College was
kidnapped Jan. 24, 1987.
Other Western Hostaqes
Brian Keenan (Ireland) � The English teacher from the American
University of Beirut was kidnapped April 11,1986.
John McCarthy (Great Britain) � The producer for London based
Worldwide Television News agency was kidnapped April 17, 1986
Terry Waits (Great Britain) � The Anglican Church envoy, seeking
the release of foreign hostages was kidnapped Jan. 20, 1987.
Helnrich Struebig and Thomat Kemptner (West Germany) �
The two workers for the relief organization Asme-Humanitas were
kidnapped May 16, 1989.
Marcel Christen and Elio Erriquez (Switzerland) � The two members
of the International Red Cross were kidnapped Oct. 5, 1989.
Source U S S�� Department Research- Lynn Davta. Gannett News Service
Supreme Court rules on death penalty
RAl.HICIKAP) Last week's
ruling bv the US. Supreme Court
that North Carolina's death sen-
tence guidelines are unconstitu-
tional is another example of the
high costs of capital punishment,
death penalty opponents say.
Since the enactment of the
death penalty statute in 1 977, three
people have been executed At the
same time, the state has incurred
millions of dollars in legal costs
tor lengthy trials and appeals.
Uist week, the Supreme Court
struck down a requirement that
all members of a jury agree on the
existence of a mitigating circum-
stance before weighing it in a
defendant's favor. The court said
that requirement in effect gave a
lone hold-out juror a veto over
mitigating evidence and
amounted to an unconstitutional
limit on jurors' ability to consider
mitigation.
The state's death penalty stat-
ute does not specifically say that
jurors must agree unanimously on
mitigation. But juries have been
instructed that way based on a
1983 ruling by the state Supreme
Court, which held that unanimity
was required.
The decision came in the case
of 70-year-old Dock McKoy. On
death row at Central Prison, ex-
cited inmates congratulated
McKoy, whose appeal of hisdeath
sentence for killing an Anson
County deputy resulted in the
ruling. Victims' families were
frustrated, death penalty oppo-
nents pleased, and lawyers pre-
pared for a new round of litigation
over which inmates would be af-
fected.
"What McKoy brings to the
surface as a public policy issue is
whether it's worth the effort,
whether it's worth the enormous
resources we put into trying to
maintain the death penalty sys-
tem said Louis D. Bilionis, a law
professor at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A
former assistant appellate de-
fender, Bilionis was McKoy's
lawyer before the state Supreme
Court.
North Carolina is going
through what other states have
experienced as the U.S. Supreme
Court addresses specific death
sentencing procedures, Joan H.
Byers, a special deputy attorney
general and specialist in capital
litigation, told The News and Ob-
server of Raleigh.
Ms. Byers, who defends the
state's death penalty law against
legal challenges by inmates, said
thecourtsstillweregrapplingwith
issues stemming from a 1976land-
mark ruling by the U.S. Supreme
Court. That was when the court
said the Eighth Amendment,
which bans cruel and unusual
punishment, requires individual-
ized sentencing, with jurors al-
lowed to consider mitigating evi-
dence of a defendant's character
before deciding whether to im-
pose death.
"The law is starting to get
settled in she said. "1 think it's
going to be a lot easier to admini-
ster our capital punishment poli-
See Ruling, page 9
Members of Mongolian Politburo resign
Frank Pompa. Gannetl News Service
MOSCOW (AP) Thecntire
Politburo ot Mongolia's Commu-
nist Party resigned Monday and
the leader of the longtime Soviet
client state said the ruling party
must renew itself to head off cri-
sis, Tass reported.
The Soviet news agency said
the country's leader, Zhambyn
Batmonh, made the announce-
ment at a meeting of the party's
policy-making Central Commit-
tee. The meeting had been moved
ahead eight days in response to a
demand by the hunger strikers.
He also proposed holding an ex-
traordinary party conference April
10, apparently to make further
changes in top party personnel.
The moves were obvious
concessions to protesters who
crowded the central square of the
capital, Ulan Bator, on Friday to
demand change in the party's
leadership and an emergency
party congress. Batmonh told the
nation on television that evening
that theCentral Committee would
consider both demands.
The demonstrations, broad-
cast on Soviet television, showed
that the winds of democratic
change that swept through East-
ern Europe last year had reached
Asia. Mongolia is a sparsely popu-
lated nation on the Soviet-Chinese
border.
The Mongolian Democratic
Union, an organization similar to
the grassroots citizensgroups that
have sprung up in the Soviet
Union, isdemandingan end to the
Communist Party's monopoly on
power, a mutiparty system and
resignation of the premier, Cabi-
net and legislature. It has also
called for new elections and for
the withdrawal of Soviet troops.





The East Carolinian, March 13,1990 9
Duke, UNC-CH rank as top j
graduate schools in nation
&SH1NGT0N (AD �
ke I nnrrsitv'sschools of law,
Itcine ind business and the
niversit) of North Carotins at
hapel Hill's business and law
ols arc ranked in .i survey of
� iduate schools releised Mon-
! larvard has the ration's top
dical school Stanford offers the
t business training, Yale has
premium law school, and
issachusetts Institute of Teeh-
isthcbesl place foragradu-
degrec in engineering, the
, s,n s
s hoot's reputation among
a tors and in the uitside world
i-asa major subjective factor, said
' . . & World Report in re-
ng the results of a survey
iating l 5. graduate educa-
n in its March 1� issue. The
izine emphasized that the
itions receiving top ranking
survey "do not exercise a
inopoly on quality education
Nevertheless, institutional
� itions matter; in some pro-
tons theyma) be crucial the
amesaid Fairly or unfairly,
value ol a degree from that
htution depends n part upon
, I n eptions
n professional programs
surveyed business, engi-
lav and medicine. 1 lar-
ind Stanford placed in the
Declaration
. � rsan as Soviet leader on
outgoing president of
mia s parliament Commu-
Party chief Algirdas
mskas, said before the vote
� at approval of secession could
v ontagiouseffecf on other
blics. 1 eaders of Sajudis,
h dominates the new Lithu-
in legislature, acknowledged
full in Mendcficewould have
be won rflTotlgT difficult iWg
� ns
top five in three of those catego-
ries, more than any other institu-
tions. No North Carolina colleges
placed in the survey for engineer-
ing
I
I
I
I
Although the rankings were
dominated by institutions with
established reputations, the sur-1
vey also identified the "dark
horse" institutions in each field by fl
RACK ROOM SHOES
GREENVILLE BUYERS MARKET - MEMORIAL DRIVE
10

Harvard, in addition to being giving them a "best-up-and-com-1
tops in medicine, ranked second
in business and fifth in law. Stan-
ford ranked second in engineer-
ing and third among law schools
in addition to its top rating for
business.
Duke's medical school ranked
third in the nation, while its law
school ranked eighth and its busi-
ness school was ninth in the sur-
vey North Carolina's business
school ranked 17th in the
magazine's survey, while its law
school ranked 21st.
The magazine developed its
rankings after interviewing fac-
ulty members and deans across
the country since last fall. The
survey used objective standards
quality of students accepted,
value of the degree in the job
market and research spending �
along with subjective measures
such as a school's reputation.
The subjective survey was
done by the Washington office of
Market Facts Inc. The magazine
says it polled "thousands of aca-
demic and professional authori-
ties to determine how the experts
on and off campus perceive a given
institution
ing" designation. 1
Those were Washington Uni-1
versity in St. Louis for business
George Mason University in!
Fairfax, Va, for law; University of
Alabama at Birmingham for I
medicine; and University of Call-
fornia at Santa Barbara for engi-
neering.
U.S. News annually ranks
undergraduate colleges, but this
was its first gTaduate-level evalu-
ation.
The top schools in each cate-
gory were:
Business: Stanford; Harvard;
University of Pennsylvania;
Northwestern; and Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
Engineering: MIT; Stanford;
Illinois at Champaign-Urbana;
California Instituteof Technology;
and the University of California at
Berkeley.
Law: Yale; University of Chi-
cago; Stanford; Columbia; and
Harvard.
Medical. Harvard; lohns
Hopkins; Duke; University of
California at San Francisco; and
Yale.
Continued from page 8
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
OFF OUR EVERYDAY LOW.LOW
PRICES ON ENTIRE STOCK
Must present coupon at time of purchase.
Not valid with any other offer.
Famous brand shoes at affordable prices
I
I
I
I
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
For the 1990 - 1991 Term
Any full - time student can apply
Applications available at Mendcnhall Student Center's
Information Desk and Room 236 - Student Union
Deadline has been extended to Tuesday, March 20
Gorbachev has said Lithuania
will have to pay the Kremlin $34
billion tor the factories and other
infrastructure built during a half-
century of Soviet rule. Lithuani-
ans say their bill for decades of
Soviet repression � including
mass deportations to Siberia un-
der Stalin will be even higher.
I.andsbergis, a 57-year-old
music professor, received 91 votes
for the presidency fn Sunday's
vft, wtfh 42 agaifstBr7fsis�
got 38 votes, with 9S against.
Haiti
He had led Lithuanian Com-
munists into splitting off from the
Soviet party in December and join-
ing the drive for restoration of the
independence. But he favored a
more gradual approach.
Stalin absorbed Lithuania,
Latvia and Estonia all inde-
pendent between the world wars
� under a secret agreement with
Germany an the eve of the Nazi
ttckiLoIaru that stftrted1
World War II.
Continued from page 8
kend Radio reports said sol-
� firing from a speeding truck
I five pedestrians on Sunday.
In another incident, witnesses
poli e looking for the killers
: Mai Renaud St. Bert Stopped a
: ist by shot him four times and
it under a tree for more than an
Mir watching him die.
Radio Metropote said St. Bert
. as killed by unknown assailants
a lottery booth in the suburb of
vlmas but gave no details.
"My men were very shaken
upbv themajor'sdeath said Maj.
Jean Robert Rene, who said he
knew nothingabout police watch-
ing a man die.
Avril was brought to power
in a September 1988 revolt by sol-
diers who professed disdain for
political killings and other abuses
by the previous military ruler, Lt.
Gen. Henri Namphy. Namphy
had ruled the country � among
the poorest in the hemisphere �
for most of the two and a halt
years since the popular uprising
that ousted Jeanc-Claudc Duval-
ier.
The Caribbean nation of 6
million people has been ruled
mainly by the military since it
gained independence from France
in 1804, and opposition leaders
said after a January crackdown
that they did not trust Avril to
oversee presidential elections he
promised for the fall.
Ruling
Continued from page 8
ies in the future because we are
getting complete rules from the
turnabout whafsOK and whafs
�( K I'he arespelling out with
larity what you can do and what
u can't do
Attorney General Lacy H.
lomburghassaidhewillaskthe
neral Assembly to re-examine
� death penalty statute. The
gislature probably will look at
� law when it convenes for a
imrt sesskttl in May, said state
p Roy Cooper, a Rocky Mount
a ver and House judiciary chair-
man.
By the estimate of Appellate
tender Malcolm R "Tye"
Hunter Jr who represented
� Koy before the U.S. Supreme
urt, the state has spent $20
ullion to $30 million on death-
enalty trials and appeals in the
ist 13 years.
"A lot of talented people are
pending a lot of time and money
n something that 1 really don't
think is accomplishing anything
� r the people of North Carolina
he said.
Resentencing hearings, which
.vill require prosecutors to pres-
ent evidence to juries in each case
and the hiring of court-appointed
lawyersformostofthedefendants,
will cost the state $3 million to $5
million, said Franklin E. Freeman
Jr, director of the state Adminis-
trative Office of the Courts
News Writers
There will be a meeting
today at the office at
5:00 p.m.
Please make plans to attend.
�Your Boss
ECU Student Store
W right Building
Yvoto Center
SUPER SAVING COUPON FOR A
FREE
I
SECOND SET OF PRINTS
j with every disc or roll of color print
film brought in for processing.
I
offer good thru March 12-26. 1990 j
4x6 Prints Not Included
Coupon Must Accompany Order
A -N C " Oit 1"� SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAM
J 4 Session I: May 21-June 26
Session II: June 28-August 3
Fees and Tuition per Session:
Undergraduate: $100 plus
Graduate. $100 plus
NC Resident Nonresident
$25 per credit hour $200 per credit hour
$35 per credit hour $210 per credit hour
UNC-CH offers, during two 5 12 week sessions, one of the largest summer programs
in the United States Over 800 courses are scheduled in 40 disciplines. A typical course
load per session is two classes of three semester hours each.
Students from any college or university, teachers, rising high school seniors and
others who are not enrolled at UNC-CH may apply as Visiting Summer Students.
Pleas� send me a catalog and application form:
Name
Street
City
State
Zip
Mail to The University of North Carolina at Chapal MB, Summer School. CB 3340. 200 PeWgrew Hal. Chapel
H�. NC 27599-3340 Phone: (919) 962-1009
(aaeeo Institution)
ECU
Didn'ttbuGet
The Mess
IntroducingMessageLine" From CarolinaTelephone
There is a hetter way to get the message! MessageLine uses computenzed equipment at
our central office to turn your telephone into a 24-hour-a-day personal message center tor as
little as $4.95 per month. And if you have roommates, you can each have your own voice
mailbox tor complete privacy. . i t
MessageLine automatically answers your calls if you cant wtth your personal greeting
which encourages callers to leave a complete and detailed message. Plus, your messages are time
and date stamped and can be retrieved from any touch-tone phone
To order MessageLine or get more information.call 1-800-682-5670. Youll Get The Message!
PmSSSSSvISSSv
I United
I telephone
j. System





Page W
Slftc iEafit (Earflltman
Features
Mnr:hl3J990
Playhouse prepares for
'The House of Blue Leaves'
Fast Carolina Playhouse
Ann Bean (Bananas Shaughnessy). Kate Erwm (Bunny Flingus). and Greg Watkins (Artie Shaughnessy)
rehearse for the East Carolina Playhouse production of John Guare's "The House of Blue Leaves March
21 -24 at 8 15 p m in the McGmnls Theatre. (Photo by Doug Ray � East Carolina Playhouse)
Tears for Fears expects more
success from their new album
"The House of Blue Leaves" by John Guare, the
comedy-drama that the New York Drama Critics'
Circle chose as the best play of the 1970-71 season
and which won four Tony awards during its revival
in 198b, will be presented at the Fast Carolinia Play-
house. Fourperformancesarescheduled from March
21-24 at 8:15 p.m. in the MeGinnis Theatre on the
ECU campus. The New York Times wrote, "From the
moment the curtain goes up on the set the play
begins to weave its intricate mixture of the weirdly
comic and the tragic, shuttling back and forth so
deftly that the split-second switches are breathtak-
ing in their impact
The plav outrageously yet responsibly depicts
the doomed career of Artie Shaughnessy, a middle-
aged zoo attendant who aspires to be a writer of
popular songs. Guare has personified in Ante the
American dreamofsuccessand the destructive forces
unleashed by the frustration of never achieving it.
Artie's wife, Bananas, has gone mental; his draftee
son, Ronnie, is so anxious to become famous that he
plans to blow up the Pope, who is visiting New York
City on the day the play takesplace; and his mistress.
Bunny Flingus, has a seemingly excessive faith both
in the Pope's power and n Arties's impending
triumph out in Hollywood.
Mix these characters with a pretty movie star,
whose hearing aid conks out, a tno of very venal
nuns, a big-time Hollywood producer who's Artie's
oldest friend, and you have ,m uncommonly imagi-
native play both laughable and heartbreaking
Tickets tor the Fast Carolina Playhouse produc-
tion of "The House of Blue I.eaves" will go on sale
March 14. For VISA and Mastercard reservations
and ticket information, call (914) 7S7-h829. Ticket
prices are $6 tor the general public, S-i for groups of
10 or more, and $3 for ECU students. The box office
is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m except for performance nights when the box
office is open until 830 p.m.
Man shuts pet's leash in car door
Basset hound runs 25 miles per hour
(AP) Fears for Fears is back
with mi album, "The Seeds ot
I ove four years after its largely
synthesized "Songs From the Big
Chair" propelled the group to
stardom.
Two No. 1 singles in America.
Shout" and "Everybody Wants
To Rule the World cam, out of
the earlier album.
It definitely won't be tour
more years until the next says
singer-songwriter-guitarist Ro-
land Orzabal. I think the new
album is absolutely teeming with
influences and ideas think it
wouldn't be hard to refine it and
structure it a little more. There's
an element of look what I can do
novs
Currently, they're touring,
until the end of lime. "Then we
decide if we want to go any fur-
ther or not says singer-bassist
( urt Smith.
The new Fontana Records
album, he says, was the result of
"us being tied down by machines
The material on this album
didn't sound any good pro-
grammed up Orzabal says. "It
needed to be more alive.
"We used the piano as the
basis for the music instead of
complex sequencers and synthe-
sizers 1 heard a bar band playing
in Hawaii. They played 'Shout'
and 'Fvervbodv Wants To Rule
the World Shout'sounded worse
than anything else thev did.
Effable
Oddities
lor the week of 31290
1 Edacious: A. boisterous; B.
I ot nutritional value; C. edible
plant-life; D. gluttonous
2. Mange: A. edge, protrud-
ing rim; B. fat; C. ancient
digging tool; D. excessive
3 (,am: A. herd of whales; B.
�oint; C. pause in music; D. to
dispatch
4 (.amhrel: A. tranquilitv; B.
horsehock; C. addicted
gambler; D. parade leader
5. Gleg: A. Alert, quick re-
sponse; B. sip of beer; C. ship
deck; D. impure iron
6 Ivied: A statement; B.
ivory handle; C. overgrown
m ith ivy; D. building truss
7. Meal: A. thatch hut; B.
catlike animal; C. feathershaft;
D. guttural laugh
8. Licit: A. unlawful; B. legal;
C. pure; D. impure
9. Ligature: A binding,
constricting; B. bone-ligament
connector; C. language
barrier; D. lower leg
10. Xenc: A. moon rock; B.
ccclectic; G phobia of noise;
D. dry habitat.
� Compiled by John Tucker
"It you're going to writesongs,
you might as well write songs bar
bands can plav - mat sound good
on piano. 'ITiis album is complex
overdubs and overlays, but you
can plav the songs on piano and
thev work
After "Songs From the Big
Chair "and its yearlong 1485 tour,
the two men from Bath, England,
took a year oii. Then they started
recording with two producers,
scrapped that and started with one
producer, and scrapped that,
having chewed up much time and
money. They started a third and
final time, producing themselves
with David Bascombe. engineer
on the previous album, as co pro-
ducer.
In the midst of it thev flew to
Kansas City to meet pianist-singer
Oleta Adams, who's on the album
See Tears, page 11
TACOMA, Wash. (AP)
Tattoo the basset hound went for
an unplanned run when hisowner
shut one end of his leash in a car
door and tixk off tor a drive -
with Tattoo on the leash's other
end still outside.
Motorcvcle Officer Kerry Fil-
bert was on patrol when he no-
ticed a vehicle that seemed to have
something dragging from it, po-
lice spokesman Mark Mann said.
As Filbert passed the vehicle
Wednesday evening, he saw that
the car was dragging a basset
hound on a leash, picking them
up and putting them down ust
about as fast as he could Mann
said.
filbert thased and finally
stopped the car, but not before the
dog reached a speed ot 20 to 25
mph and "rolled several times
Mann said.
The car's occupants, a man
and a woman, lumped out and
Filbert told them thev were drag-
ging a dog. The couple became
distressed and began calling
"Tattoo! Tattoo Mann said.
The couple from Renton had
been visiting friends in Tacoma,
and the man had taken Tattoo
outsidebefore the trip home, Mann
said. When the woman called the
man to hi lp her carry something,
he shut Tattoo's leash in the
driver's door so thedog wouldn't
wander away, but apparently
forgot the animal was there before
driving off, Mann said.
The s-month-old dog .tp-
peared uninjured, but Filbert
suggested the couple take him to
an animal clinic.
Garlic has medical uses
NEW YORK (AP) - Mighty
enough to keep vampires at bay,
garlic has for thousands of years
been considered a wondrous sub-
stance, used to treat all sorts oi
ailments.
Its real powers arc less cer-
tain, though studies continue into
the possibilities that garik can help
lower blood pressure and choles-
terol, act as a painkiller and an
antibiotic, and help fight cancer.
Some studies of garlic and
heart disease included too few
people, said Nancy Ernst, a nutri-
tionist with the National Heart,
Lung and Blood Institute of the
National Institutes of Health.
She also noted that because of
garlic's odor, it's hard to do a
"double-blind" study in which
participants don't know whether
they're getting the real thing. And
some studies used high doses of
garlic, 10 or more cloves a day.
Several researchers are study-
ing the effects on cancer of garlic
and onions, or allium vegetables.
"Animal and in vitro experi-
ments indicate that compounds in
allium vegetables inhibit several
types of tumors and decrease
tumor growth and proliferation
according to a study in the Journal
of the National Cancer Institute
last year, which found a reduction
in stomach cancer risk among
people in a province of China who
regularly ate garlic and onions
compared with those who did not.
Michael Wargovich of the
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in
Houston said the research so far
"clearly supports that the protec-
tive chemicals (from foods) will
have to be part of the diet through-
out life
Eventually, he said, food
manufacturers may produce
"designer foods" that include high
doses of food components found
to prevent cancer. But for now, he
said, he and his wife "just try to
follow the guidelines that are out
there right now
"We don't know even as re-
searchers how much is enough
he said.
Regardless of medical uses,
garlic enhances the flavors of many
foods. A raw clove has just four
calorics. Garlic contains almost no
sodium or fat, but has some fiber
and protein.
Folk medicine and lore long
have depended on garlic to fight
vampires,cholera, scorpion stings,
leprosy and much more.
The journal Preventive Medi-
cine noted that a 35-century-old
Egyptian document considered
garlic useful for treating heart
disorders. Slaves building the
Egyptian pyramids were said to
have eaten great quantities of
garlic. Romans thought it an aph-
rodisiac. Garlic juice was used on
bandages to fight infections dur-
ing World War 1.
"Part of it is just myth. You
could see if someone had garlic
around their necks to ward away
colds, maybe people just didn't
get in close enough contact" to be
susceptible, Ernst suggested.
But much of it is not myth.
Eric Block, an organic chemist
at the State University of New
York, has been researching garlic
and onions as possible agents in
the treatment of heart disease and
has found and patented a com-
pound from garlic called ajoene
that is "a pretty potent inhibitor"
of the formation of blood clots, as
effective as aspirin, he said.
His laboratory work has yet
to be tested on animals or people,
but Block said he has no doubts
about garlic's power.
Debbie Booth (front) and Melani Wells (back) enjoy Monday's warm
weather as they study together for a lab. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire �
ECU Photolab)
An Ideal View:
Spring break inspires appreciation for school
By Caroline Cusick
Features Editor
We have returned. Spring
Break is over and classes are back
in session.
Although I am glad to be back
to my semi-normal life, I am
somewhat distressed by the ab-
sence of a daily top ten list. What
do top ten lists have to do with
anything? I'm glad you asked.
During spring break, I trav-
eled southward with several
friends. Our destination was
Daytona Beach and a conference
called Operation Sonshine. Yes, I
left my happy home at ECU and
my 11 o'clock classes to vacation
where I would have to crawl out
of bed every morning at 6:45 A.M.
Why so early? I'm not really
sure. Nevertheless, someone
scheduled the meetings for Op-
eration Sonshine to begin at 8 a.m.
and at each morning meeting, our
almost-funny emcee presented a
top ten list.
I have concluded that semi-
humor is addictive because when
sitting down to write all 1 could
think of were top ten lists. To get
this spring break subject off my
mind and out of The East Carolin-
ian for another year, I have com-
piled a list of my favorite and
fondest memories of my week in
Florida's famous Daytona Beach.
Beginning at the bottom and
working my way up The tenth
best thing about spring break was
the wonderful drive south to Flor-
ida during which we drove past
several hundred obnoxious neon
colored "South of the Border "bill-
boards.
Following close behind in
nineth place was escaping from
cafeteria food. Hoorah Unfor-
tunately, themightymealsof Jones
Cafeteria and the micro waved
boxesof macaroni and cheese were
replaced by peanut butter and jelly
sandwiches, peanut butter and
jelly sand wichesand more peanut
butter and jelly sandwiches. I love
the All-American PBJ, but it gets
boring fast.
Eight. I love the beach. The
sand is soft. The water iscold. The
sun is hot. And the traffic is ter-
rible. North Carolina's beaches are
a little different than Daytona
Beach. One of the first things 1
noticed when I set foot to sand
was a create-a-space parking lot
and two lanes of traffic. Maybe 1
live a sheltered life, but I don't
expect to see speed limit signs
standing in the tide. I expect to
look both ways when crossing the
street. In Daytona, you have to
look both ways when you cross
the beach.
That brings me up to my sev-
enth favorite vacation memory.
Not only is Daytona a hot spot for
many biker-type individuals.
Six. Does it make any since
that people dnve all day to arrive
at a beach and then lay in the sun
beside a pool because they don't
want to fight the sand? Why go to
the beach? It doesn't make much
since but even I am guilty of this
one.
My fifth favorite pastime
while in Daytona was reading my
spring breakers, it is also a favor- management textbook. It was fol
ite vacation spot for "bikers In lowed by a close fourth of work-
early March, every year, Harley ing on a midterm exam that is due
Davidson hosts "Bikers week Wednesday after classes resume,
and bikcrsfromaround the world The third most wonderful
gather to loiter and chat in the thing 1 did while in Florida was
streetsanddriveonthesidewalks. call home. My parents live in New
In general, 1 have nothing against Hampshire. 1 joyously told them
bikers. However, this mild man- about Florida's 70 and 80 degree
nered reporter is not accustomed temperatures which were accom-
to the flowery vocabularies of See Top Ten, page 11





Sire iEaat (Earolfman
Page 10
Features
March 13,1990
Playhouse prepares for
'The House of Blue Leaves'
� .�1 . U U ,�nlll hli. ilr.
jst Carolina Playhouse
Ann Bean Bananas Shaughnessy), Kate Erwin (Bunny Flmgus). and Greg Watkms (Artie Shaughnessy)
�� ' � irsetoi the ar! Carolina Playhouse production ot John Guare's "The House of Blue Leaves March
21 24 al 8 15 p m in the McGinms Theatre (Photo by Doug Ray � East Carolina Playhouse)
Tears for Fears expects more
success from their new album
"The 1 louse of Blue 1 eaves" b) ohn (iuare, the
comedy-drama that the New York Drama Critics'
C'inle chose as the best play of the 1970-71 season
and which won four fony awards during its rev ival
in 1986, will be presented at the East Carolinia Pla
house. FourperformarK esare scheduled from March
2! - ?4 at 8:15 p.m. in the Met linnis rheatre on the
ECU campus I fie New York Times wrote, "From the
moment the curtain goes up on the set the play
begins to weave its intricate mixture of the weirdly
comic .iiul the tragic, shuttling back and forth so
deftly th.it the split second switches are breathtak
mg in their impact
fhe play outrageously yet responsibly dcpi ts
the doomed career of Artie Shaughnessy, .i middle-
aged zoo attendant who aspires to be a writer ol
popular songs. Guare has personified in Arite the
American dream of su cessand the destructive forces
unleashed by the frustration of never achievii
Artie's wife, Bananas, h.is gone mental; his draftee
son, Ronnie, is so anxious to become famous that he
plans to blow up the Pope, who is visiting New York
( ityon the day the play takesplacc; and his mistress,
Bunny Flingus, lias a seemingly excessive faith both
in the Pope's power and in Artics's impending
triumph out in I lollywood.
Mix these characters witr a pretty movie star,
whose hearing aid conks out, a trio of very venal
nuns, a big time I lollywood producer who's Art
olde t friend, and you have an uncommonly ima
native play both laughable and heartbreaking.
Ii. ketsfor the Eastarolina Playhouse produc-
tion ot "The I louse ot Blue I eaves" will go on sale
March 14 For VISA and Mastercard reservations
and ticket information, call (919) 757-6829 Hckel
esare$6for the general public, a4 for groups of
rmore,and$3forE I student; rheboxi I
is open Monday through Friday from 10a.m. until 4
p.m except for performam e nights when the box
office is ipen until rt Jl' p m
Man shuts pet's leash in car door
Basset hound runs 25 miles per hour
P) Tears tor t ears is ba( k
with .n album, I he Seeds of
! ove, tour years after its largelv
synthesized Songs From the Big
. hair propelled the group to
stardom
rwoNo. 1 singles in America,
Shout" and ' Everybody Wants
l'o Rule the World, camt out ol
earlier album.
It definitely won't be four
more vears until the next savs
singer songwriter-guitarist Ro
land Orzabal. I think the new
album is absolutely teeming with
influences and ideas. 1 think it
wouldn t be hard to refine it and
structure it a little more. There's
an element ol I ook what I can do
i. urrently, they're touring,
until the end ol une Then we
.lev ide ii we want to go any tur
ther or not says singer bassist
I urt Smith.
The new Fontana Records
album, he says, was the result ot
usbeingtieddownby machines.
The material on this album
didn t sound am good pro-
grammed up Orzabal says. "It
needed to be more alive.
We used the piano as the
basis tor the music instead ol
complex sequencers and synthe-
sizers 1 heard a bar band playing
in Hawaii They played 'Shout'
and 'Everybody Wants To Rule
the World ' 'Shout' sounded worse
than anything else they did.
It ou'regoingto write songs,
you might as well write songs bar
bandscanplay thatsoundgood
on piano This album is complex
overdubs and overlays, but you
can play the songs on piano and
they work.
Alter "Songs From the Big
t hair" and itsyear-long 1985tour,
the two men from bath, England,
took a year ofl I hen they started
recording with two producers,
scrapped th.it and started w it hone
producer, and scrapped that.
ha ingchewed up much time and
money. Ihev started a third and
final time, producing themselves
with David Bascombe, engineer
on the previous album, as CO pro
ducer.
In the midst of it they flew to
Kansas City to meet pianist-singer
Oleta Adams, who son the album
See Tears, page 11
rACOMA, Wash (AP)
Tattoo the basset hound went tor
an unplanned run when hisowner
shut one end ol his leash in a i ar
door and took ofl tor a drive
with Tattoo (mi the leash's other
end still outside
MotorcycleMiner kerrv i il
bert was on patrol when he no
ticed a vehic le that seemed to have
something dragging from it p
lice spokesman Mark Mann said
As Filbert passed the vehicle
Wednesday evening, he saw that
the car was dragging a basset
hound on .i leash, 'pi kil
up and putting them down just
about as last as he i ould Mann
said
I ilbert i hased and finally
stopped thecar,but ; re the
dog reai hed a speed I t. 25
mph and n illei : everal rimj s
Mann said
I he . ar s , � ,i mar
and a woman, jumped out and
Filbert told them the were drag
ging a i lienuple be ame
distressed and began calling
"Tattoo' tattoo Mann said an animal
rhe �uple from Kent n had
been isiting friends in Ta
and the Mian had taken la"
outsidi
�iid IVlf ii the woman, i I
man to ht Ip her i irr) imething,
he shut Tattoo's leash in the
driver's jooi I log wou
but apparently
i inimal wastheretx
dri ing off, Mann said
1 he - month old dei; ap-
; � ired uninjured, but Filbert
� couple take him to
linu
Garlic has medical uses
Effable
Oddities
lor the week of 31290
I da ious: A. boisterous, IV
i'i nutritional value, C edible
plant lite; P gluttonous
2 I lange: A edge, protrud-
ing rim, B tat, C . ancient
digging tool. D. excessive
) �im A. herd of whales, B.
joint; pause in music; D. to
dispatch
4 .ambrel: A tranquility; B
horsehock; C addicted
gambler; P parade leader
c ,1. lert, quick re-
sponse; B sipofbeer;C ship
deck; IX impure iron
t Ivied: A statement. B
� handle; C. overgrown
. ith ivy; D. building truss
' lacal. A thatch hut, B.
catlike animal; feathershaft;
1) guttural laugh
8. I k it A unlaw tul, B legal;
( pure, D impure
l Ligature A binding,
constricting; B bone-ligament
i onnector; language
barrier, I) lower leg
10 Xeri A. moon rock, B.
ecclectic;( phobia of noise;
1) drv habitat.
- Compiled by John Tucker
NEW YORK (AP) Mighty
enough to keep vampires at bay,
garlic has tor thousands ot years
been considered a wondrous sub
stance, used to treat all sorts ol
ailments
Its real powers are less cer-
tain, though studies continue into
the possibilities that garlic can help
lower blood pressure and choles-
terol, act as a painkiller and an
antibiotic, and help fight cancer.
Some studies of garlic and
heart disease included t(o lew-
people, sud Nancy Ernst, a nutri-
tionist with the National Heart.
Lung and Blood Institute of the
National Institutes of Health.
She also noted that because of
garlic's odor, it's hard to do a
"double blind study in which
participants don't know whether
they're getting the real thing. And
some studies used high doses ot
garlic, 1(1 or more cloves a day.
Several researchers are study-
ing the effects on cancer ot garlic
,nd onions, or allium vegetables.
"Animal and in vitro experi-
ments indicate that compounds in
allium vegetables inhibit several
types ot tumors and decrease
tumor growth and proliferation
accordingtoa study in the Journal
ot the National Cancer institute
last year, which found a reduction
m stomach earner risk among
people ma province ot C hina who
regularly ate garlic and onions
i ompared with those whodid not
Michael Wargovich ot the
M P. Anderson t ancer c enter in
Houston said the research so tar
"clearly supports that the protec-
tive chemicals (from foods) will
have to be part (t the diet through-
out lite
Eventually, he said, food
manufacturers may produce
"designer foods" that include high
doses of food components found
to prevent cancer. Hut for now . he
said, he and his wife "just trv to
follow the guidelines that are out
there right now
"We don't know even as re-
searchers how much is enough
he said.
Regardless of medical uses,
garlic enhances the flavors ot many
foods. A raw clove has just tour
calories. Garlic contains almost no
sodium or fat, but has some liber
and protein.
Folk medicine and lore long
have depended m garlic to light
vampires, cholera, scorpion stings,
leprosy and much more.
The journal Preventive Medi-
cine noted that a 35-century-old
Egyptian document considered
garlic useful tor treating heart
disorders. Slaves building the
Egyptian pyramids were said to
have eaten great quantities ot
garlic. Romans thought it an aph-
rodisiac. Garlic juice was used on
bandages to fight infections dur-
ing World War I
Tart ot it is just myth. You
could see if someone had garlic
around their necks to ward away
colds, maybe people )ust didn't
get in close enough contact" to be
susceptible, Ernst suggested.
But much of it is not myth.
Eric Block, an organic chemist
at the State University of New-
York, has been researching garlic
and onions as possible agents in
the treatment of heart disease and
has found and patented a com-
pound from garlic called ajoene
that is "a pretty potent inhibitor"
ot the formation of blood clots, as
effective as aspirin, he said.
His laboratory work has yet
to be tested on animals or people,
but Block said he has no doubts
about garlic's power.
Debbie Booth (front! and Melani Wells (back) enjoy Monday's warm
weather as they study together for a lab (Photo by J D Whitmire -
ECU Photolab)
An Ideal View:
Spring break inspires appreciation for school
By Caroline Cusick
Features Editor
We have returned. Spring
Break is over and classes are back
m session.
Al though 1 am glad to be back
to my semi-normal life, I am
somewhat distressed by the ab-
sence of a daily top ten list. What
do top ten lists have to do with
anything? I'm glad you asked.
During spring break, I trav-
eled southward with several
friends. Our destination was
Daytona Beach and a conference
called Operation Sonshine. Yes, I
left my happy home at ECU and
my 11 o'clock classes to vacation
where I would have to crawl out
of bed every morning at 6:45 A.M.
Whv so early? I'm not really
sure. Nevertheless, someone
scheduled the meetings for Op-
eration Sonshine to begin at 8 a.m.
and at each morning meeting, our
almost-funny emcee presented a
top ten list.
I have concluded that semi-
humor is addictive because when
sitting down to write all 1 could
think of were top ten lists. To get
colored "South of the Border" bill-
boards.
Following close behind in
nineth place was escaping from
cafeteria food. Hoorah Unfor-
tunately, themightymealsof Jones
Cafeteria and the microwave
boxesof macaroni and cheese were
replaced by peanut butter and jelly
sandwiches, peanut butter and
and two lanes of traffic. Mavbe 1
live a sheltered lite, but I don't
expect to see speed limit signs
standing in the tide. 1 expect to
many biker-type individuals.
Six. Does it make anv since
that people drive all day to arrive
at a beach and then lav in the sun
took both ways when crossing the beside a pool because they don't
this spring break subject off my jelly sandwichesand more peanut
mind and out of The East Carolin-
ian for another year, I have com-
piled a list of my favorite and
fondest memories of my week in
Florida's famous Daytona Beach.
Beginning at the bottom and
working my way up The tenth
best thing about spring break was
the wonderful drive south to Flor-
ida during which we drove past
several hundred obnoxious neon
butter and jelly sandwiches. 1 love
the Ail-American FBI, but it gets
boring fast.
Eight. I love the beach. The
sand is soft. The water is cold. The
sun is hot. And the traffic is ter-
rible. North Carolina'sbeachesare
a little different than Daytona
Beach. One of the first things 1
noticed when I set foot to sand
was a create-a-space parking lot
street. In Daytona, you have to
look both ways when you cross
the beach.
That brings me up to my sev-
enth favorite vacation memory.
Not (nly is Daytona a hot spot for
spring breakers, it is also a favor-
ite vacation spot for "bikers In
early March, every year, Harley
Davidson hosts "Bikers week
and bikers from around the world
gather to loiter and chat in the
streetsanddrivconthesidewalks.
In general, I have nothing against
bikers. However, this mild man-
nered reporter is not accustomed
to the flowery vocabularies of
want to fight the sand? Whv go to
the beach? It doesn't make much
since but even 1 am guiltv of this
one.
My fifth favorite pastime
while in Daytona was reading m
management textbook. It was fol-
lowed by a close fourth of work-
ing on a mid term exam that is due
Wednesday after classes resume
The third most wonderful
thing I did while in Florida was
call home. M y parents live in New
Hampshire. I joyously told them
about Florida's 70 and 80 degree
temperatures which were accom-
See Top Ten, page 11





Faculty Profile
ECU criminal justice professor
to run for Superior Court Judge
By Leondias Edwards
Special to the Hast Carolinian
An EC I professor of criminal justice, Albert Kirby, has combined
his knowledge of law and teaching abilities to continually provide
services to the the university community as well as the pubiic
1 hestorvot Albert K.rbvandh.saccomplishmentsinlifeisnothing
less than remarkable. According to Kirby, he was born in abject poverty
and encountered and overcame numerous obstacles in his life. Kirby
us taken adversity, absorbed it, meditated on it, learned from it and
invanabl) moved on to higher ground.
Kirby is a graduate of Wake Forest University with a degree in
history After graduating from Wake Forest, Albert entered Campbell
I niversjty School of Law in Buies Creek, NIC.
At the end of his first year of law school, he was selected by the
(,o ernor's Intern Committee as an intern assigned to the Department
rt Natural Resources and Community Development Administrative
I leanngs I his internship was served under the Urn Hunt administra-
tion
t v ampbell, Albert was a member of the Phi Delta law fraternity
and also was a case summary writer for the Campbell Law Observer.
I pon graduation from ampbell University School of Law, Albert was
appointed Assistant District Attorney in Cumberland County and later
ssistanl District Attorney in Pitt County. Almost simultaneously,
Albert began working as adjunct professor of criminal justice at ECU.
fter i ompleting his duties with the District Attorney's office in Pitt
ount) Albert became a full-time associate professor of criminal
justice at EC1 where he is currently employed.
In the future Kirby hopes to attain the position of Superior Court
ludge a jobfoi which he is currently campaigning. Formerly an assis-
tant distri t attorney in both Pitt and Cumberland counties, Kirbv said
topes to bring fresh new energy to Pitt County judicial system"
i le attributes all 0� his accomplishments to his dedication to hard
work the love and support of his family, and his unyielding faith in
s a devout Christian and a member of Red Hill Missionary
taptisthurch inlinton, North Carolina. He was brought up in the
h and never tails to understand the paramount importance of the
( hurt h in all of his daily activities.
Bits and pieces
More students are applying
to attend medical colleges
Me. lu al s hool applications are up this year, already by more than
� impared to last year. They could reach 29,000 by October when
nal numbers are announced Nearly 27,000 applied for the class of
American Association of Medical Colleges says the increase
likeh due to disenchantment among undergraduates with business
Divorce statistics drop slightly
m v marital trend is brewing. Unhappy couples are working
ingsouf (nc indication divorce statistics are inching downward.
ites arejdown t.ur percent from Ns. Experts sav aging baby
niers are giving up needs for instant gratification. New marital
u. h as divorce prevention courses where couples learn to
. � ten and talk to each other are popular.
Frito-Lay introduces light snacks
I rito-Lay plans to become the king of light munchies. The snack
;iant will spend an estimated $150 million to introduce a new line oi
lighl sna k products The products, such as Ruffles Light, Doritos Light
andf hee rosl ight, have less fat and calorics. Full national distribution
is expected by May.
Radio ads grow in popularity
Radio advertising is making a small comeback. Forbes magazine
reports that revenues tor radio's 14 networks rose 12 percent to $427
million last year Add in the money national advertisers spent on radio
outside the networks, and the total came to $2 billion, up over 10
percent 1 ocal radio stations pulled in nearly $7 billion.
Groups cause record labeling
Major companies brand explicit albums
I he nan mi's six major re. ,rd companies have agreed on an indus-
try wide labeling sticker for albums This is in response to citizens'
groups whii h have voiced concern over explicit lyrics about sex and
drugs I he major labels .ire meeting to determine the size, placement
and v, ordingol the sticker About Instates have record censorship bills
pending
Ideal family resort should provide fun
for whole family, magazine poll says
The ideal family resort should provide fun for the whole family,
n (ording to 5 700 readers of family Circle magazine. The April issue
lists 4 resorts from islands to theme parks. They include Walt Disney
World; Hilton ki. Island, South Carolina; VailBeaver Creek Resort,
Vail, i olorado, and I one Mountain Ranch, Big Sky, Montana.
Power line placement in question
Electromagnetic radiation causes cancer
A buzz is going around about power line placement. New ques-
tions about the risks of electromagnetic radiation have fueled the
concern Recent studies suggest radiation from high voltage power
lines can increase cancer risk particularly among children. The latest
study comes from Johns Hopkins University, which found abnormal
levels ot leukemia among New York telephone workers.
Hotline provides physician credibility
Now vou can do a check-up on your doctor. Starting Tuesday, con-
sumers can dial 1-800-776-CERT for help from the American Board of
Medical Specialties. The hotline is part of a new Yellow Pages ad
i impugn to verify doctors who claim to be "board certified It checks
with the American Medical Association's listing of doctors in the
I foiled States.
eOprtgr 1990. USA TODAYApr Collf InformaMmm Network
Tears
and tour. "We heard her in 1985,
bv accident Orzabal says. "We
were doing a show in Kansas City
and went back to the hotel after-
wards and she was playing piano
and singing, with a drummer and
bass player, to her fans � 20 or 30
people. She had her own scene
going. She was blues, gospel, jazz,
soul.
"About seven of us sat at the
bar having a drink and unwind-
ing. She had us in tears. Si nee tears'
Top Ten
panted by cool ocean breezes. They
thanked me for that information
and ever-so-sweetlv told me that
the high temperature of the day
was zero (not including the wind
chill factor).
The second best thing about
vacation in Florida is trying, with
out success, to stop looking like a
tourist and laughing at the other
students who are trying, without
The East Carolinian, March 13,1990 11
Continued from page 10
is part of the name of the group,
we thought, There's something
here She could do, with piano,
bass and drums and her incred-
ible voice, a lot more than wecould
do with two No. 1 singles and all
the techniques of a seven piece
band.
Orzabal also has produced a
solo record bv Adams that should
come out in April.
Smith gave Tears for Fears its
name, from Arthur lanov shook.
"The Prisoners of Pain and its
theory about getting rid of neuro-
ses or fears through expressing
emotion or tears.
The name of Janov's first
book was Primal Scream Ther-
apy an attention seeking name
Orzabal says He practicesa form
of psychotherapy.
"I've been doing it for three
and a half years I couldn't afford
if before Smith hasn't tried it.
Continued from page 10
success, to stop looking like tour
ists. We ail carried cameras and
sunscreen and wore tourist cloth
ing announcing "Spring Break
1990" and "Davtona Beach I
guess this was to remind us where
we were on the off chance that we
would forget.
And of course, Number One,
the best thing about spring break
was its end Thank (,od it lasts
only one week and comes only
onrea year. If nothingelse,Creen-
ville is home.
Now we can look forward to
mid-terms, research papers and
finals The somoster is almost over,
and we'll soon be at our parents'
homes "for the summer wishing
break will end so we can return to
the Fmerald City Welcome back
and good lurk on mid-terms.
The song "Sowing the Seeds
of Love Orzabal says with a
broad smile, "says political
granny Everyonethinksit'sabout
Margaret Thatcher. I don't know
why.
"It's about theopposite stance
to the climate in the '80s, a very
dry period when there was a
massive amount of pressure to
make capitalism and materialism
the only vocabulary that we use
What the song does is try and
keep things open and human. It
talks about love and evokes
memories of a period of love and
idealism � the '60s � 'All You
Need Is Love
"Woman in Chains Orzabal
says, was inspired by his feelings
toward his mother. "It's about the
oppression of women in society,
on one level. I think it's about the
repression of the femininity in
men. Carl Jung says that's the
man's link to his soul. I kind of like
that, really
Lower
prices on higher
education.
3w lower prices on the Macintosh SE
and Macintosh Plus.
If vouci like to enhance your education
and your budget, take note. We just lowered
prices on two powerful members of our
Macintosh family, the Macintosh SE and
the Macintosh Plus.
They'll put a work! of possibilities at
your fingertips. Like graphing the economic
impact of Japanese expansionism Analyz-
ing Freud. Or just organizing that stack of
notes. Better yet, once you've mastered one
application you can use them all, because
all Macintosh software works the same way.
And since everv Macintosh runs the same
software and is expandable, it can grow
with you as your needs change.
Considering all this, you should have
no doubts about which course to take. Give
a Macintosh a try and save.
r
ThepowrtobepirbesC
For further information, visit the
Student Stores
Wright Building
C NS0 Apple (onvxiler Im Appk the Appfc logo and Macintosh are registered trademarks n( Apple Uwipmer Im The pewwr lo he w�ir hes is a trademark of Apple Oompmrr Inc





Page 12
Sports
March 13,1990
Pirates end season in Richmond
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
The Pirates season came to an
end last weekend in the first round
Of the CAA Tournament in
Richmond, losing to the George
Mason Patriots66-62 for the fourth
time thisseason.
"1 thought we worked realty
hard getting ready to play Mason
and 1 thought our kids were read)
to play said head coach Mike
Steele.
The Pirates were able to get an
early tirst halt lead behind the
scoring of Ike Copeland( 14 points)
but were unable to hold on to it in
thesecond halt. I he Patriots went
up by 11 with iust 4 2t- left to play
in the game and E l could only
cut the lead to four.
Steve Smith led CMP with 19
points and tour assists, followed
bv Mike Hargett with 14 points.
The Patriots were playing with-
out their leading scorer Robert
Dykes and head coach Ernie
Nester said, Mike (Hargett) and
Ste e (Smith) were going to have
to give us a big punch and they
did '
Seniors Reed 1 ose (11 points)
and (.us 11ill (8 points) got into
foul trouble early and never really
established the kind of game thee
would have liked 1 didn't play
very smart. I puked up a couple
ol touch fouls that 1 shouldn't
have s,ud 1 ose.
The Pirates finished the sea-
son with a 13-18 overall record.
Both Pose and Hill were able to
leave their name in the Pirate rec-
ord books bv reaching the 1,000
point plateau
Pose led ECU in scoring with
12.7 ppg, he was second in steals
with 35 and second in free throw
percentage at 74.4 percent.
Hill averaged 8.5 points per
game and set a new ECU record
for career three-pointers made
with 89.
Assistant coach Chns Benetti
said. "We're onlv graduating two
seniors. And. the brightest part is
that next year seven of our top
nine players will be returning
Copeland (8.9 ppg) and Steve
Richardson (8.0 ppg) were named
to the CAA All-Rookie squad
Copeland started all butonegame
and had 14 games scoring in
double figures. "1 did a lot more
than I expected' said Copeland.
Richardson hit 55 three-point-
ers, a new Pirate record, and his
125 attempts were the most in
school historv. Hewasalsonamed
CAA Plaver of the Week tor his J6
point game against Navy.
Assistant coach Scott Lewis
said, "Our underclassmen re
cieved a good amount of playing
time this year which should bene-
fit our program next year. We
grew up a lot and matured to the
point that we now see the level oi
See Season, page 13
ECU baseballers railroad Providence, 20-2
. � JI�l MMilumt
Bv Frank Roves
Staff Writer
The E P Pirate baseball team
increased their overall record to
17-1 by demolishing, the Pro i
dence Friars 20 2 Sunday aftei
noon at 1 larrington I ield.
fhe Pirates were led by junior
Kevin Riggs 21 1 1 RHP with a
homerun two hits, two runs and
five runs batted in. With EC!
ahead ; 1 after three innings, the
Bucsscored nine runsin the fourth.
1'he inning lasted more than 40
minutes when SteveGodin walked
to load the bases with one out.
Shortstop Berr) Narron re
spended with a single to score a
run. making the lead 4-1 in favor
of the Pirates Providence's start
ing pitcher Marc Manglatuo.
walked lomnn Yarborough tor
.mother run
1 hemassai recontinuedinthe
fourth inning when Providence
brought in rebel pit� h� r Jeff Smith.
I le ea c up a grand slam hom-
erun to Riggs, increasing the Pi-
rate lead ' l Smith gave up two
� � ins in the inning when he
� rew a wild pit hand allowed an
RBI sa rifice fl With two outs,
t lodin grounded out to end the
inning. E I � ored nine runs on
tour hits.
While the Pirates were scor-
ing runs the 1 riars batting of-
fense went silent, thanks to EC I s
starting pitcher lohn White 1 le
only gave up six hits in five in-
nings White was also credited
with five walks and three strike-
outs.
I lead( oa h( iaryOvertonhad
mixed feelings about White's per
formance.
"(White) was shaky Over-
ton said. "He didn't pitch as well
as his other games. He threw a lot
of pitches
ECU's Jamie Bell, who has
only pitched in one game this
season, came in relief for White.
Bell set down eight consecutive
oatters before giving up a run 1 le
pitched three strong innings, al-
lowing two singles and one run.
rhe Pirate sluggerscontinued
to smash Providence's pitchers by
scoring seven more runs in the
fifth inning. ECU led 19-1 thanks
to Godin's three-run homerun.
( ,odm had three runs batted in,
one hit, and a walk in three at bats.
After the final score of 20-2.
Providence head coach Paul
Kostacopoulos surpisingly was
not disappointed or embarrassed
of the outcome.
"I'm not disappointed in our
team because thisisonl) our third
game of the year Kostacopoulos
said. "Past Carolina is probably
the best team we're going to play
this season
The Pirates post a 17-1 mark
overall and remain undefeated at
1 larrington Field with a 16 0 rec
ord. EC L is 1-1 on the road.
The Providence Friars, who
were 27-16 last season and win-
ners ot the northern division of
the Big East, drop their record to
1-2 on the season.
The next game tor the Pirates
is against Virginia Common-
wealth today at 3 p.m. at 1 larring
ton Field.
Phe Lady Pirates defeated UNC Wilmington in the first r&i
CAA Tournament held in Richmond over spring b' -
later fell tcJMU 72-49 m the second round (PhotobyGan
� ECU Photo Lab)
Lady Pirates fall to
JMU in semi-finals
By David Reichell
sutt Writer
Jenkins, Eason lead
sluggers over break
nsl
I v harlott
chum St il
By Frank Reyes
Staff Writer
The Pirate sluggers ended
their nine-game winning streak
by spliting a doubleheader with
the Auburn Tigers on the road at
Plainsman Tark March 2-3.
ECU won the first game 5-4,
with the help of starting pitcher
Jonathan Jenkins spinning a nifty
complete game. In seven innings,
Jenkins allowed nine hits and tour
runs. He was also credited with
four strikeouts and two walks.
With Auburn leading the score 3-
2 in the last inning, the Pirates
scored three runs to pull out the
victory. Tigers' starting pitcher
rommy Carter wiffed eight Pirate
batters in six innings. Auburn's
relief man Mike Perrv (2-2) was
the losing pitcher, giving up the
winning runs in the seventh in-
ning.
The second game featured an
Auburn win 9-6, which ended the
undefeated seas.mi for the Pirates.
The Hues lead the game 2 0 in the
fourth inning but lost it when the
Tigers scored five runs m the in-
ning. Pirate starting pitcher fim
Langdon(2-l I had a dreary pitch-
ing performance, giving, .p seven
hits and six runs With Auburn
leading9-4 in the sixth inning, the
Pirate offense could only salvage
two more runs, making the final
score in favor of the ligers. 9-6.
With the Auburn victory, the Ti-
gers posted an overall record ol 6-
6 for the season, while the Pirates
recorded a 9-1 mark
On March 5, the Buc'sbatting
offense clobbered Fairfield pitch-
ing for eleven runs, giving the
Pirates the win 11-5.
ECU'S David Willis and
Howard Whittield combined
pitching performance to savor the
victory. Willis faced 2l batters
See Tigers, page 14
night in
Richi

!he ECU Lad) Pirates 1m-
ketball team ended their season
with a loss in Richmond Saturday
night in a semifinal came against
the lames Madison Dukes 'hv
team suffered their worst dete.it play M1
of the year as the I ady Pukes Wiimingt
cruised by them 71 49
"We didn't shoot well and our
intensity iust wasn't there head
coach Pa tPierson said. 'However.
I'm real proud ol our team this
year, and I thought we had a real
good season
The Lady Pirates struggled
from the field all game shooting
only 36 percent from the field and.
hi percent from the line.
ECU started the game leading
by six with just over eight minutes
played.The Lady Pirates were led never looked back
by all-tournament team players 24athalftime
Tonya Hargrove (19 points' and
Sarah (,rav I 17 points'
Over the following five min-
utes, fames Madison went on a 10-
4 run to lead lr 14. and would
piavt rs in double '
terSandi
15 points ,ra. and
1 lamilton �
I largri �ve a ling I
ECl mlv trailed oi
contest after Wilmington s
Makowski scon I tl
ol thegame
v. � t on an 11 to ;���
In the game a linsl
Madison, the Lady I -
leadbv guard
points rhe Lady 1 ki
had threi
not give up the lead for the rest of figures helping th
the game
"1 think we just weren't read)
to play Gray said "1 also think
we were a little tired after placing
all these games
Gray was referring to games
I Ml also shot 55 pen enl I
floor.
IMP had two pi.i. '
all tournament team
McC xacken and - rnsi
See Pads Pirates page 1 t
Freshman cenlerfieider Cindy Ritter went three-for-three in the Ladv
Pirates second win over UNC-Wilmington of the season (Photo
courtesy of Sports Information)
Softball team fares
well during break
Ultimate team opens promising spring season
� . . . . n t I :l � Uf, lU !r i�.�t uor.i hir.Ml Puirn iovnf �� tn) kjii
Bv John Tucker
Assistant Features Editor
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
The Lady Pirate softball team
ended their week-long road trip
Sunday, taking two games from
UNC-Wilmington.
Ihe first game pitched by
freshman fenny Parsons, waswon
in the first inning with six runs
being scored. They allowed just
one run to be scored in their h 1
victory
In the second game treshman
Cindv Ritter led the Pads Pirates
at bat, going three for three in
eluding a triple E U scored two
runs in both the sixth and seventh
innings to add to their 5 2 win
"I've been very pleased with
the team's performance said
head coach 'sue Manahan.
I he Lady Pirates now hold a
record of l� overall, with their
fosses coming against Georgia
State, 1 (land two losses at Coastal
Carolina, 5-3 and 6-2.
Senior Kathy Schrage noted,
Ihe three games we lost could
have easily been won, we just
seemed to have a little problem
defensively It was a long week
and we got a little worn out by the
efld and that probablv hurt us
Schrage (.400' along with
seniors.hris Byrne P.W) and
lenniferSagK W4) have led F.CU
at the plate Manahan said, 'They
worked hard m the off season and
I think it's showing They all have
hit safely in every game
See Schrage, page 13
The ECU men's Ultimate Fris-
bee team opened up its season
over spring break competing in
two oi the largest open east coast
tournaments. The ECU 'Irates'
first saw play at the polo grounds
in West Palm Beach, Fla on
March 3 and 4 at the Ultimate
Beach Bowl. 26 teams competed
in this tournament for the first
place prize of $2,000. The next
weekend lead the Irates to
Cainsville, Fla where the play-
ers competed in a smaller tourna-
ment that hosted only twenty
teams.
"The trip to Florida really
allowed us to come together as a
team. We were given a chance to
compete with club teams from
many different places that play a
higher level of ultimate than most
college teams we play against
Irate veteran Lee Walston said.
On the first day of play in
West Palm the Irates played four
games, all against club teams. The
Irates ended the day beating the
Orlando based team Bunch-a
dudes IK 15-3) and the pickup
team SPEW(15-11). Poses were
suffered at the hands of the team
MGus(8-15) and TurmoilO-15), a
solid club team with players from
as far away as Arizona and Cali-
fornia.
Because of thier 2-2 record
the Irates were seeded against the
number one ranked team from
Miami, Fla the Refugees. In a
high intensity game the Irates
were eliminated when the Refu-
gees barely evaded an Irate come-
back and left the field with a 15 to
11 victory.
The Refugees continued to
win and eventually made it to the
finals of the tournament, where
thev meet last yearsopen national
winners from New York, named
of course, New York -New
Fla where the Irates were forced
to relv on new blood because of
injuries to team captain Gar)
1 lurlev and starting veteran Dave
Kelley. "The team suffered quite a
few injuries and a lot of rookies
were forced to make some ke
plays under pressure Hurley
said.
Bv the end of the da v the Irates
placed tour games and had n
uncharacteristic record of one win
and three lossesWe placed as a
comeback team almost every
game, we barely lost almost ev-
ery game and showed a lot ot
poise and character because we
never gave up veteran Ken Early
stated.
The Irates lost badly to the
club team Pangead In), but
played fiercely against the
Orlando, Fla. club team Dogs of
York.With the help of last years War and a Michigan based club
ECU Irate team captain Bob team Ann Arbor, losing to both
Demand, New York-New York after making two incredible
was able to beat the number one comebacks with a score of 9
seeded Refugees by a score of 17- The only victory of the day was
10, and clinch the $2,000 purse. also a comeback victory as the
The following weekend lead Irates faced Florida State Univer-
therecovcringtcamtoC.ainsville, sity,theonly college team meet in
tournament pia. and beat tl
with a score ol 11 S.
rhe overall record lead
Irates on Sunday to be placi
the B pool. First round pla ii
pool lead the Irates to a -
whateas) victory overShorl
C iuys b) a score o( 11 B
In the second round -
the Irates were once again I
tomakf a comeback Playii gthe
club team lampa the Ira: - w i re
down 10 6 before the were abb I
gam momentum and outs, ore the
lampa team 7 to 1 clinching the
game with 13 to 11 victor) Kej
plays in this game were made in
dutch situationsby rookies Chuck �
Dant lonv Quill, and Patrick
Davenport.
Ihis k tor allowed theteam
lobe placed ironically in the exact
same p� sition as the pre tons vcar
at Gainsville, m the finals tor the
B pool title
Phe team once again showed
its intensity however, outsconng
the opponent 10 to 5 and bringing
the 9CO(e to 13-11 before PA D
was able to once again maintain
control and clinch a 1S-11 victory





The East Carolinian, March 13,1990 13
Sports Briefs
Flayers reject Vincent's lockout plan
l ommissioner Fav Vincent proposed that team owners end their
22 d.n spring training lockout if the players made a no strike pledge
Hie owners accepted the terms But the players union, employees
without a contract, immediately rejected the idea Salary arbitration
eligibility remains the hurdle
Swenson saddled by moose attack
i Ytondmg champion Joe Runvan was first to reachOphir, 47h miles
trom Anchorage. Alaska, near the halfway point of the 1,18 mile
Ulitafod ! rail Sled Pog Race. Rick Swenson, the leader on Wednesday,
I had 10 turn b.uk after starting Thursday due to a moose attack lie
turned lo the race, but is now in 11th place
Capriati advances to quarterfinals
!tnmter( "apnati advanced to the quarterfinal of the Virginia Slims
I of Florida, defeating No 8 seed Nathalie Tauiat of France 6 4, 6 2
( apriati played No 4 HetenaSukovi Friday Capriati. 13, could become
voungesl l S player to win a professional tournament it she wins
fee mofe matches
Roche maintains lead in Tour de France
I ormef lour de France winner Stephen Roche ot Ireland main
j tained his overall lead In the Tans to Nice race. Two tune lour dc
w inner l.regl eMondof the United States, trailed by almost t WO
inutes
Raiders consider move to Oakland
Dotl Perata, chairman of the Alameda County board ot Supervi
� . said he expected to hear from I os Angeles Raiders owner M Davis
in on whether Davit will bring the football team back lo Oakland
Daisslill has to get approval from thecitv, county and stadium board
hoard ol the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum voted Friday on
financial package to lure the Raiders
Norway needs money for Olympics
The site ot the 1994 Winter Olympic Games is in jeopardy. Prcsi
� i lerhard l leibergofthel lllehammer(Norway)OlympicOrganiz
i i immittee said the 14 Winter (lames might have to be scrapped
ison Die Norwegian parliament must act by next month to provide
billion tor arenas and other costs
Soviets lead ice dancing competition
Soviets Marina Klimova and Sergei Ponomtrenko, 1988 Olympic
1 impions lead the ice dancing competition In the World I Igure
tine t hampionships at Halifax. Nova Scotia, atter the original
;ram US champions Susan Wynne of Syracuse, N. , and Joseph
il ol Buffalo N i . are tourth
IRS offers unique fitness clinics
By Jeannette Roth
IRS
Cd fit for the spring! Recrea-
tional Services invites all faculty
staff and students to take part in
two unique fitness opportunities
happening in March.
On Thursday. March 22, a
Fitness Walking Clink will be
offered at Bunting Track. The
newest, and yet easiest fitness
Schrage
I he team has been paced
behind the pitching of Renee
Myers(1 I),Sag!(2 l),Parsons(3-
0) and Ir.icve l.arkin (3-1). "Our
pitching staff has a lot ot talent
this year and should do really
well snd Sagl. who pitched a
shut out against Campbell.
Manahan also feels that this
years freshmen have had an
immediate impact, with Hitter,
Parsons and Stephanie 1 lobsonall
having significant playing tune.
Having played all ol their
games on the road, ECU will have
their first home game against
Season
craze, each of us walk daily to
learn to improve your technique,
form endurance and speed.
Nance Mize, Director of ECU
Recreational Services and an ex-
pert walking clinician, will pro-
vide instruction. The clinic takes
place at 5:15 p.m. and is free of
charge. Participants are asked to
wear comfortable, non-restncting
clothing and supportive shoes.
Continued from page 12
Campbell, March 14 at 2:00 p.m.
And, on Saturday and Sunday the
Lady Pirates will host the l.ady
Pirate I lolulay Inn (lassie featur-
ing George Mason, UNC-W, Vir-
ginia. Coastal Carolina, Ohio
University, Monmouth College
and UNC-C.
"We're very determined to
win said Schrage. "We've got
some tough gamescomingupand
finally at home on our own field
Manahan said, "We've won
on the road, now hopefully we
can wm at home
Continued from page 12
On Saturday, March 24, Mark
Brunetz, Exercise Training Direc-
tor at Jane Fonda Workout in Los
Angeles and Execuhve Director
of Exerfit USA, will combine hi�
lo impact aerobics, plyometrics
and Cardio Funk in a 90�minute
state�of�the�art fitness affair
beginning at 11:00 a.m.
Brunetz, a former fitness in-
structor at ECU Recreational Serv-
ices will show participants an
exclusive workout done only in
L.A.
The session costs $5.00 per
person and will be offered only at
this time. Tickets are available in
204 Memorial Gymnasium. Door
prizes and refreshments will be
available as Recreahonal Services
welcomes one of it's own back.
For details call 757�6387.
Outdoor Recreation work-
shops dig in after Spring Break
with several unique recreahonal
opportunities. On March 14, an
Outdoor Gourmet workshop will
be held at 5:00 p.m. in Memorial
Gym room 113.
Open fire, trail and dutch oven
cooking will be demonstrated as
well as types of foods, cook kits
and more. The c st is set at $3 for
students and $4 for facultystaff.
Committee approves bill on steroids
he Senate judiciary Committee approved a bill to go alter the
il steroids market The measure, sponsored bv Sen Joseph Biden
won praise from the tS Olympic Committee, the Nl I and
pi st.ir i. arl I ewis.
(lathers' death affects Marymount's rank
yola Mat v mount's No 11 seed in the West was lower than
oxpei ' 1 and lower than it would have been had star center I lank
� not died last week Officials said they did consider his death,
did have an effect, as an injury to a star player has effected other
teams rankings
Hie, ten places record seven in field
The Big Ten placed more teams in the NCAA tournament than am
othei league A record seven big Ten teams made the 1990 NCAA
tournament field defending national champion Michigan, this year's
hampion. Teams Michigan State. Purdue, Illinois. Ohio State,
Minm Ota and Indiana
Houston wins Busch Grand National
fomm) l louston passed Elton Sawyer on a restart with 16 laps to
and won the 20flap Busch Grand National portion ol Sunday's
! Mill, t -�h N Va AK racing tnplchcader it Martinsvillc (Va I Speed
' vv.u Reggie Ruggiero won the 200-lap Modified race and David
Blankenship was first in the 100-lap Late Model Stock.
In the Locker
A glance at the past and
present number one teams
of the NCAA in 1989-90
competitiveness we need
I he team suffered several
close losses including one to Ml
mover time I hrvalsocameawav
with some big wins over
Richmond. UNC w and Ameri-
can at home
It was halt how we played
and halt our scheduling said
Benetti, We were never really
able to establish a winning streak
Richardson added, "We really
didn't live up to cur potential, we
played pretty well but we were
jusl too inconsistent we would
play real good one game and bad
another
Next year's team will feature
four seniors in hm brown (9.7
yy, i Stanley I ove (5.5 ppg),
DarrelK bcrton Ii 8ppg) and let
frev Whitaker(5.1 ppg).
"We should defmetlv ha ve the
experience next year noted fresh-
man Paul Childress, who led the
team in assists with 104. "1 think
wo matured over the season which
will hopefully prepare us to win
the close games that we didn't
win this year
In the (A A finals last week-
end, the second seeded Richmond
Spiders deteatedthe first seeded
James Madison Pukes.
Senior Ken Atkinson was
named the tournament MVP and
teammate Kenny Woods was
named to the All-Tournament
team.
The Spiders will face Duke in
the tirst round of the NCAA
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Pregnancy
Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling
For further Information, call 738-0444
(toll tree number: 1 800-532-5384) Between 9 am and 5 pm
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS HP TO 12TH WEEK OF PREGNANCY
Tracking No. 1
WoaK'y WftttnOI ?� N� I 'we1 � uS TOOAY CNN
trg taMiwtwili pen firougnovji tr� 1W� M vmten.
COi.it.OE BASK�ftM
BSN
STUDENTS.
lKp I the u 1'on
? immediately after gradua-
tion � without waiting for the
results of your State Boards. You
can earn great benefits as an Air
Force nurse officer. And if selected
during your senior year, you may
qualify for a five-month internship
at a major An Force medical facili-
ty To apply, you'll need an overall
2.50 GPA. Get a head start in the
Air Force (all
TStiT DAVE LEONARD
919-850-7856
Station-To-Station Collect
NEW GRADUATE
NURSES
pfiiiiwaiimii w
� I 10 11 12 13 1� '� I6
At -
nn -
COUNTY -
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL,
Nl IRSES
arc valuable
professionals
and invaluable
individuals.
���i i �'�"��i
You have invested many years ot hard work, dedication
and commitment to becoming a nursing protessionai
Now you are tacing one ot the toughest decisions
vou'il ever have to make where to practice your
profession And. what better place �o Jan your pro-
tessionai career than at PITT COUNTY MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL & MEDICAL CENTER
� � bu can attll apply lor NurM Internship position.
Application deadline la March 20th.
Opportunities are available in the following areas
. Critical Car � ObGyn
. Medical Surgical
. PsdlatrlcsNsonatal � Psychiatry
. Opsratlng Room � Rehabilitation
� Emergency Department
It you think that PITT MEMORIAL is the place tor you
to grow professionally and personally, wed like to talk
with you To find out more, call or send your resume to
Director, Nuralng Rssourcss. PITT COUNTY
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL a MEDICAL CENTEROO
Stantonsburg Road. �"M&US!�
FREE) 1-800-342-5155. (COLLECT) (�19) 551-4M3.
Information Session
for
Undecided and Pre - Business Students
'Tuesday, March 13
3:30 - 5:00 pm
generalClassroom 'Building
gom 1031
Sponsored by General College
PCMH
M
;v-
PtTT COUNTY
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
& MEDICAL CENTER
J
v I ,
I �r VtKM rmrTTT
Mexican Restaurant
NEW MENU SAMPLER
RppcH��r�
Chicken Fingers Basket $4.25
Lightly breaded chicken tenderloins
fried golden brown, served with a
zesty honey mustard sauce and
garnished with celery
Beer Battered Onion Rings
A hardy basket of beer battered
onion rings fried golden brown
$2.25
Fried Cheese Sticks $4.25
Fried fingers of mozzarella cheese
served with zesty honey mustard sauce
757-1666
COLLEGE GRADUATE
FINANCE PLAN
An individual six months
prior to or 1 year after
graduation qualifies
See Full Details At
GVO Tmports
205 E. Greenville Blvd
Greenville, NC
756-5253





1 I I he I .ist Carolinian, March 13, IWO
Tigers
Continued from papo I!
and gave up eight hits and strui k
nii six Whittuld pitched to sax
hatters and allowed nohits Pirate
lefthelder ohn Mams had two
hits and two runs in four at hats to
spark the offense lunioi ohn last
feasted on Fairfield pit hing hit
ting twodouhlesand scoring three
runs in tour .n bats, rhe Pirate
offense tagged st.it tins pitcher
Steve Becker (0 H tor eight runs
and seven hits in onh three in
nings rhree Fairfield pitchers
gave up si w.iiks and one wild
pitch
rhe win for ECl 'boosted thru
overall mark to 10 1 w hile 1 aii
field dropped to an i1 1 ret ord
Hir stv ondganieagainsl .u
field featured a batting clinu for
the Pirates winning b .i wide
margin 16 7 at Harrington 1 ield
f airfield jumped out to , 5 0
earl lead in the second inning
But the E I scored six runs in the
gi ing the Pirates the
lead � � three innings Itus
designated hitter loin Move was
the star ot tin- show collecting
foui hits in five .it Kits
km
II
IS v two
111.
homeruns Seve
batters had two
contest
I airfield s� �i
i Bnei i kman i
low iin six 1 :�� Be re I
man faced onh eight batter
1o r u h is .i ; tl � I I pitch
pitched si sti ti
i c rms
. ii
thevicton H�
hits and two runs
�� three
credit
ere fburstrikeoutsand nr walks
1 his Pirate victory gave ECU
i M 2 overall record against Fair-
field
On March 6, the Pirates es-
caped with a dose victory over
Radford University 7-6atl tarring-
ton Field.
ECU'soffense scored all seven
tuns against Radford's starting
pitcher RussSichellhase (2 1). He
pitched seven innings, gave up
seven runs on seven hits. Sich-
ellhase also walked tour batters
and threw one wild pitch.
With ECU leading �- 4 in si
innings, the Pirates increased the
load by scoring another run in the
seventh But Radford threatened
the Pirate lead when they scored
two more runs in the ninth, rhanks
to ECU S starting pitcher lohn
White and rehet pitcher Owen
Pa is. the Pirates came out with
the victory. White threw eight
strong innings, giving up tour runs
on 10 hits
He was also credited with
eight strikeouts while walking
three batters rhe offense was led
b Pirate shortstop Corey Short
with Hso hits in tour trips to the
plate The win lor ECU kept the
undefeated record at home alive
w ithmnewinsatl larrington Field
On March 7 s. adoubleheader
sweep went in favor oi the Hues.is
ECU scored 23 in the two games
against the Western CarolinaCata
mounts
EC I won the tirst game 7-1
with the help ot a solid pitching
Lady Pirates
performance by Langdon. Out of
the 32 Catamounts he faced, only
throe were able to salvage a hit
One hit was a homcrun by Mark
Poarch. langdon lost his shutout
bid in the ninth inning as the Cata-
mounts scored two runs While
the Western Carolina offense was
dead, the Pirafeesscored seven runs
on 12 hits. ECU'S Kiggs. Adams.
and Brown sparked the offense
with two hits each
ECU's lenkms shutout West-
ern Carolina in seven innings,
giving the Pirates a 12 0 win at
Harrington Field.
lenkms increased his record
to 3-0 when he allowed only seven
hits. While the Catamounts were
missing lenkms fastball, the Pi-
rate offense was connecting on
four different Catamount pitch
ers. Western Carolina's starting
pitcher lewis fortes was demol-
ished tor eight hits and tour runs
in five innings.
The Pirate offense was led by
catcher Tommy Eason. He belted
three homerunsand had five runs
batted in. Sophomore fohn t.ast
also had three hits As a team,
ECU collected I7hitsand 12 runs.
With ECU's victory over Western
Carolina, the Pirates now post a4-
1 overall record against the (. at.i
mounts.
The Hues extended their rec-
ord to 16-1 when they swept two
games against State University of
New iork. 3-2 and 6 1 Frida in
1 larrington Field
Continued from page 12
resent a"
� ! ad
pla Ri
on Saturdav
:o��: M
tournament
'm a
1 ad

V I
ukes went on to
in the finals
;ht
tour-
in n . Malkon
vtcton i
(
I
VA teat nod
an
ment
ECU finished the season at
18 10 alter losing its last two
regular season games to NCAA
tournament-bound Appalachian
State and UNC Charlotte
ECU finished second in the
regularseasonCAAstandingsand
had theirbest season under Coach
Pierson
The I ady Pirates had tour
players represented in the CAA
AH c onfercnee selections.
Gray and 1 largrox e made the
tirst teams ,)s Gray scored 17 ppg.
and grabbed 6.6 rebounds per
game Hargrove scoredl5 ppg
and grabbed 7 1 rebounds per
game
Freshman GaynorO Donnell
made the third team with 5.5 ppg
and 154 assists tor the season
Senior Insh Hamilton made the
all defensive team with 4" steals
Women on the
Verge of a
Nervous
Breakdown
Fred Steck
Wednesday, March 14
Movies Screen at H pin in llendrix Theatre
I Kl I Admission v alid ECU ID or Faculty, Staff Film Pass
Student Union Member
of the Month
" I enjoy being
involved with the
Student Union because
I'm able to have an
active voice in
campus activities.
teadline for Applications for Student
Union president is March 20.
Apply in Room 236 Mendenhall
STUDENT UNION
Program Hotline
757-6004
ADVERTISED ITEM POUCV Each ot these advertised items is
required to be readily av�Me�e tor sale m each Kroger
Store, except as specifically noted m thts ad If we do run
out ot an advertised item, we will otter you your choice of a
comparable item when available reflecting the same
savings or a raincheck which nfj entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the advertised price within 30 days
Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per iten.
purchased
COPYRIGHT 1990 THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND
PRICES GOOD SUNDAY MARCH 11 THROUGH
SATURDAY MARCH 1 1990 IN
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE
SOLD TO DEALERS
ST. ramicffs
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Kroger
English Muffins
BUY ONE-
GET ONE
f
MINI PACK
Dannon
Yogurt
IN THE DELI PASTRY SHOPPE
Deli Fresh
Pepperoni Pizza
6 Ct.
$129
6 Pak JL
Crest
Toothpaste
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE
Caffeine Free Diet Coke.
Diet Coke or Coca Cola Classic
2-Ltr.
DIET COKE OR CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE 6 PAK 12 OZ CANS II 59
25
$109
4.6-oz
Tube





Title
The East Carolinian, March 13, 1990
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 13, 1990
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.731
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy