The East Carolinian, January 30, 1990






�te East (ftawltman
Sennng the 'last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. m No. 7
Tuesday, January 30,1990
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
14 Pages
SGA presidents
share problems
with recent cuts
By oe Jenkins
News I dilor
Gene Davis, president ot the
Association of Student Govern-
ment called together the presi
dents of all ot the student govern-
ments in the North c arolina uni
versitv s stem Monday to assess
ts recent statewide budget
cuts have had on the individual
: � les
i 'h group met" through an
elaboi Hi' teii' conference network
that linki ; I aether five unn ersi
ind the stat� includ-
ing in Uni ersitv ol North
v arolina at . hapel I lill, North
arolina A&l UniversityofNorth
I lina at Ashevilleand Western
lina l 'niversitv.
I hi- group discussed several
key affe ts that have become
comr � und the UNC system's
mm ersities since the budget i uts
ezes of new
tion in student
i : a indling supply
tional materials.
n, thegroup
. ld inert with
m Martin this 1 riday
I I ive him i all an
ssion ol the state
uIdn ss th, prob-
�� m the i nts.
that .1 meeting with
been i heduled for
� idents indi
; that n. . mild attend the
meeting ' tl vemor
in the meeting ask
. igea h president to evaluate the
it university theeight
� state dollars has had.
ECU Student Government presi-
dent "Tripp" Roakes, speaking
from the tele-conference room in
ECU'S Brodv Building, told the
group of the mandates Chancellor
Richard Fakin has made in re-
sponse to the budget cuts.
UNC-Asheville SGA presi-
dent Chris Eberhart indicated that
the cuts seem to be a disturbing
trend. "In the first quarter, we lost
a hundred thousand he said. "In
the second quarter, we lost a
hundred thousand. In the third
quarter, we'velost nowa hundred
thousand for a total of roughly
$300,000. The fourth quarter is up
in the air. we don't know what's
going to happen
Ebcrhart said that professors
at UNC-Asheville have resorted
to buying their own teaching
materials, such as copying paper
tor exams and other handouts. He
added that funding tor the repair
and upkeep of photocopy ma-
chines has also suffered from the
budget reductions.
Davis said Fayetteville State
University is facing many of the
same problems other UN( system
schoolsare with the loss of $480,000
from their $20million budget. He
added that many student services
have been cut, the volume of in-
structional materials has been
reduced, a hiring freeze has been
put in effect and orders for unde-
livered equipment have been
cancelled.
Davis said that although the
FSU chancellor has said he is
committed to the teaching part of
the university and cut student
See Conference, page 3
Endowment funds
children's series
K I News Bureau
Nellvena Duncan Eutsler
Emeritus faculty member
Nellvena Duncan Eutsler (MA.
i thi I nglish depart-
ment at E l $5 000 and has
I'd another I � 000 to endow
ture tor one of the annual
mferences sponsored bv the
irtmi nt
fne earnings from the 510,000
endowment will be used to bring a
'� ijor children's literature figure
as the keynote speaker for fhe
( hildn n'sl iteratureConference.
English department Chair
Sparrow said that the gift
will help the department attract
j � ikers of national and interna-
tional acclaim to cur Children's
I iterature C onference.
The gift adds to our growing
; endowments that are dm
f n ! tic allvenb uicing the quality of
�In departmental programs and
ai ii ifies " he added.
Etttster was a faculty member
I s6K until her retirement in
I and included children's lit
i itnre as one of her teaching
i laities. Since her retirement,
if has con tinned her professional
activities and remains active in a
number of professional organiza-
tions, including the Modern I.an-
lage Association and tin Mel
ville Society. Eutsler serves as
editor for thea ward-winning jour-
nal Carolina Literary Companion and
has published a number of articles
dealing with such figures as la-
make 1 lighwater, David Macaulay
and 1 lerman Melville.
Recently, Eutsler established
two specialized libraries at ECU.
She gave her late son Stuart's pro-
fessional library to the psychol-
ogy department to serve as the
reading collection for Psi Chi, the
psychology honorary fraternity.
Eutsler also donated her own ex-
tensive collection of children's lit-
erature books to the English de-
partment to serve as a resource for
students studying children's lit-
erature.
In making the gift, Eutsler
explained that she has always
believed the primary role of a
university educator is to enrich
students. "My intent in establish-
ing the endowed lecture and the
two libraries is to arrange a con-
tinuing means of teaching, broad-
ening and enriching students she
said.
The Children's Literature
Conference evolved from the Lan-
guage Arts Conference and has
been sponsored by the English
department since its founding in
the early 1970s. Early conference
directors include Janice Hardison
Faulkner.DotMjllsHicksandC.W.
Sullivan. The current director is
I.eeAnna Lawrence. The confer-
ence is held on campus in the late
spring of each year.
See Eutsler, page 2
Okay, here's the situation
Chancellor Eakin m?� with the SGA Monday to talk about the statewide budget cuts and how they will affect ECU. (Photo by Angela
Pridgen �ECU Photo ! abi
Chancellor addresses SGA about budget cuts
By Samantha Thompson
Stjtf VVrilr
Chancellor Richard Eakin in
formed the Student Government
Association abou t ret ent sta te wide
budget cuts and the effect it
have at FCl , while 1 t. Keith Knox
of ECU Public Safety urged legis
la tors to support funding for addi-
tional blue light phones during
Monday afternoon's me tii g
Eakin discussed E( I s re-
sponse to the North �
percent budget cut, which would
limit spending state-wide into the
fourth quarter, ending on une 30
The chancellor is planning a five
percent cut in operations, an en-
ergy conservation program and a
managed hiring freeze.
Hakin said class availability
and faculty spending will not be
affected, but he did sav the budget
cuts could affect house keeping
and clerical statt position- We
don't evpci i an) one I
employed to lose their posil
Eakin said.
However, statt members who
leave their current position could
have problems getting rehired tor
the same position any timebefi re
June 30, according to Eakin I:
added this policy will not affect
staff members who are on mater
nity or sick leave Eakin also said
that any vacated positions will
have to remain open until the new
budget is made for next vear.
Eakin alsodiscussed his plans
tor a Budget Review Committee,
which will focus on energy con-
servation throughout the campus.
The committee will be comprised
ol faculty members and student
who reside both on and off cam
mis, will be appointed to the
committee. Members will deter-
mine how conservation can effec-
tively be made in each departmen t
on campus.
"We must respond and spend
money asbest we can Eakin said.
After participating in
Monday's teleconference with 8
other student body leaders, S( .A
President Tripp Roakes told the
legislature that heand several other
I C system SC.A presidents will
meet on Friday with Gov. fim
Martin. Roakes said the group
Mans to discuss the budget cut
and urge Martin to call for an
emergency North Carolina legis-
lative session.
Following the chancellor's
speech, Knox urged legislators to
pass th pi priation tor
an expanded blue light system on
campus "he legislature later
passed b onsent to give the
needed money from the general
reserve account o $2M)00. The
ii tusly sot aside
for ,i special protect on campus
when the refrigerator rental serv-
ices wa� transferred to the Resi-
dence 1 fall Association.
" I here is no wa to measure
the effectiveness ot the phones
Knox told the legislature. "The
mere presence of the phones is as
good as having an officer there.
It's a direct line to Public Safety
In other business, legislator
Michael Had ley suspended the
rules for the appropriation of $315
tor the student Leader Reception
to be held i eb. 5. The appropria-
tion passed by a voice vote, vet the
remaining $400, which was previ-
ously promised by S( .A Treasurer
Ray Madden, will be paid for by
the i hancelloi
Since the S .A does not fund
tor tood, organizers of the Student
leader Reception turned to the
executive council for the money.
SC.A Treasurer Ray Madden ap-
proved the $400 needed, yet
Roakes refused to sieji the pur
chase order. "1 didn't want to do it
unless the legislature as a whole
approved it
The reception is open to all
student leaders of ECU organiza-
tions. Presidents, vice presidents
and advisors are invited, though
an RSV'P must first be made with
the SO A office secretary.
The legislature denied con-
sideration of the Constitution for
the Students for Unit) and Aware-
ness, The group, which split from
the political Reformist party, is not
political and wants to unify
student's awareness of social is-
sues through education on social
issues. The group is sponsoring
the 'Rock Against Rape" to be held
Feb. 13 at the Attic.
The group can be reconsid-
ered by the legislation if they
change technicalities in their
constitution.
The rules were suspended bv
Legislator Susan Cooperman for
the approval ot $900 tor the 1( U
Student Chapter of the National
Music Educators to attend a na-
tional conference in Washington,
DC. The appropriation passed
with a voice vote ITie estimated
15 members of the organization
See SGA, page 2
Eakin implements 'strong
measures' for university
FCU N'ows Bureau
ECU plans to cut non-personnel operating costs
by five percent, turn down thermostats in campus
buildings and impose a "managed" hiring freeze on
non-faculty positions because ol the shortfall in stale
revenues.
Dr. Richard Fakin, ECU chancellor, announced
in a campuswide memorandum Ian. 23 that a series
of cost containment measures applying to statc-ap-
propiated funds would go into effect immediately.
The measures were announced in the Jan. 23 Faculty
Senate afternoon.
"I truly regret the need for such strong meas-
ures Eakin said, but thev will make it possible
for us to ensure that the essential missions of the
University continue effectively as we approach the
fourth quarter.
"Despite the cutbacks, wo must maintain a strong
commitment to the academic integrity of the cam-
pus Eakin said. He said the measures are tempo-
rary spending reductions, not permanent budget
cuts.
Among the cost containment measures:
�a "managed" hiring freeze for state-appropri-
ated positions with the exception of faculty posi-
tions for the 1900-1 academic vear and positions
directly related to health and safety functions.
�a utility conservation program to be put into
effect with the cooperation oi the university commu-
nity.
-a five percent across-the-board reduction in
operating budgets (supplies, communications, equip-
ment, etc.).
�a Cost-Reduction Advisory learn will be estab-
lished to develop other ideas to reduce expenditures
during the next six months
Eakin said the Office of State Budget and Man-
agement has reduced the university's third quarter
allotment bv $3 million, or 8.2 percent for the quarter.
"While this reduction will be difficult to achieve,
projections for the fourth quarter indicate the poten-
tial for even a more severe problem he said. "We
must begin to reduce spending now, in order to be
able to manage through the fourth quarter
On the hiring freeze, Eakin said ail vacant posi-
tions must be justified on the basis of absolute need
before recruitment will be authorized. He said almost
all of the personnel savings will be in operational,
administrative and support units where turnover is
more frequent.
The chancellor said that the utility conservation
See Budget, page 2
Inside
Editorial4
ECU athletics� does
the crowd count?
Classifieds6
Personals,For Sale,
Help Wanted, For Rent
and Services Ottered
State and Nation8
Unemployment is on
the rise in North Carolina
Features10
New Deli celebrates its
8th anniversary.
Sports14
How ECL's Pirates
hung the Seahawks of
UNCW
The Entertainer
A closer look at The
Amateurs





2 The Eastarolinian January 30, 1990
ECU Briefs
Students help apprehend thieves
1l Publk Safety received a report on the afternoon of Ian. 25 of
two stispK ious malt's ni the commuter lot at the bottom of College 1 fill
Drivepi M W. Ionian otic I Publk Safely observed two Mack males
leaning inside a vi hu le I he two Mack males fled as the officer ap
proa bed and lordan followed the two on toot to I .11. Rose High St hool.
notheii student saw two males fitting the general description
m ing Ihe opposite side o( Rosel ligh School and relayed the informa
tin lo officers (ireenville police officers helped to apprehend the two
suspects who were carrying portionsof their clothes they had removed
in an attempt to throw the off� efS olf tr.u k
CarltOfl i Mmol Harris. IS (� 1 H orcott Circle, (recnvillo, (
hart s cr foyner iof i(nn Norcott Circle, c.roonvillo. NC
vetc charged with breaking and entering an auto (a felony) and placed
in the ittountv I.ni under $5,000 bond each.
Teachers go back to school at ECU
A group el 28 publk si hool le,u hers are enrolled part time at ECU
" -spring i n,i program that pays math and science teachers to sharpen
their skills and broaden their knowledge.
I be teachers have been awarded rrofessKin.il Development Pel
up (� ki pi, t(, lake an afternoon or evening course in cither
science or math While the leacheTS can use the course for renewal
i rcdit, they must agree to continue lo teachscience or math in the V(
public schools for another vear.
I he fellowship program is administered through the Il S lence
and Mathematics Education(Cuter and the N C Department of Public
I ducat ion
Seminar focuses on concrete making
More than fl nnstl iction contractors attended a Jan lf-17semi
t it fi � ���: ! i the lab 9t t i hniijik s m producing and finish
i quality here! Parti ulaf emphasis was placed on the mixing
F concrete in cold weather,
the evi t Di I 'ouglas K nigi r
a I suc ss in that it provided "valuable
the business community and (exposed lonstriK lion
real wotld of i onsirik lion
red by Ihe the School ol Industry and
ni Managemnent and thearolinas
i ssck iation
I n'ironmental committee set to meet
1 In' l �!�' n i lie I n tronnicnl.il d iserv (. ommitteo w ill meet on
p.m in the third floor City Council Conference Room ol
, � Building
tvillclisi us .i ireenwavs a pilot program that would
� � ii ' ill ireenville as public parks. City Council
. � I hi committee's council liason, will be intto
National Campus Clips
N.C. State revamps parking system
li" N. �'� Dept of Transportation (DOT) plans to restructure
the university s 12 vear-otd parking system in the fall According to
ILXJI I'in . � lanis Rhodes, N SI is changing from a straight one
I svstem to i new alpha-system, in which the parking stickers will be
� ling to the alphabet
I.Kiiu and staff will have first chono ol parking stickers, and
ilready have stickers will have second choice. Once the
� : It-nts have the new parking, stu kers, thev will be able to
� long as Ihey attend i si According to Rhodes, the
; I to end the confusion created by sectioned parking
�with h re than one sticker designation,
Textbook theft causes testing prob-
lems tor both teachers and students
Dpi ei-t a sociology K'nk disappeared from the hands of Kevin
iM ' u Mill textbook salesman, on Jan 22 those teaching and
taking SO ! at NCSU will have a more difficult semester. The test
i � � forth la i would have come from the book, "Sociology,
but now they will ha ve to be designed by the professors teaching the
; nurse ording to Robert Wendt, asociotog) professor, this creates
! � dra work I r professors as well as students, who w ill now be tested on
her i I questions from both class notes and the text
Universities build telescope in Chile
University i North Carolina- hapel Hill and v nlumbia lm er
sits ; : l itrtict a $15 million teleseopeon a mountaintop in the
I iins of northernhile The telescope tsan integral part ol
, knit hern Observatory for Astrophysical Research
to I 11 professor of physics and astronomy Bruce
I i p. � it d to lake about five years to com-
imical observatory on a U.S college
Local customers must wait
Crime Report
i , , i vehicle east ol Spilman, Student charged
w ith I ' I
II Officers n p nded to the ECU Photo Lab, basement of
i li nung Resident c I l.ill in rcfcreiHe to a subjet t refusing to leave the
in a � ! i' tw is gone upon officer's arrival
� em tponded to the area west of Jones Residence Hall to
take a report of a subject calling a female and communicating a threat
ii�v Officei stopped vehicle tor a stop sign violation Student
issued ' ampus nation for DWI stop sign violation and underage
onMimptii n �l all i hi l
I N ii �erved a warrant for communicating threats to a
-ul'iei i in i .i k Residi hi e 1 tall
0t�5J i iti� ers responded to the third floor central area of Umstead
Residence Hall in reference to .i loud part) and subjects throwing
obio ts i nil of the window ftui campus citations Issued to occupants
of fhe room
WOO Kficcr�hoi ked out at Mendcnhall Student Center m refer-
ence to a b,u ked up smk plumber was called out to fix same.
1019 v ltii orv responded to a lick student in I ones Residence Hall.
same was transported b) rescue 10 Pitt Counts Memorial Hospital
emergency poom
(anuarv 28
o,Mt i Mtneis responded to clement Residence Hall reference to
damage to a pay phone Stale citation Issued tonon student tor damage
ton ai propcrt)
0443 I fffk responded to Wright Circle to a female calling Public
� i' tv K blue i ighl Phone, stating that she was alone and scared
transportation given to king-ton Apis Subject was unable to gam
ici to apartment rransportation given to Publk Safety where
i m ted a friend
i , i "i i v ins. Wed out mailroom in reference to a call b) Aycock
Ulvisoi '�� I "ik Plumber called out.
Phone technology hinges on issue of privacy
By Adam Cornelius
Assistant News Fditor
Caller Identification, the con-
tnnersial service used to monitor
and record phone numbers, will
most hkelv not be coming to the
(ireenville area anytime soon.
Although Carolina Telephone
and Telegraph has the technology
in place, the service will not be
offered ifi fhe near future until the
issue of privacy has been resolved
bv Noftharolinas utility Com
mission, .it i ording to local CTfcT
officials
Caller ID has received mixed
criticism since Nynex, a New York
telecommtinn ationscompanv, in
troduced it in 1986 fhe service
consists (it a small s reen display
ing the number ot the call's origin
�ind a recording device that mom
lots between 20 and SOcalls.
Proponents ot Caller IP sav
that it reduces crank calls, helps
emergency agencies respond to
riss situations as well as deters
ialsv ilarms and provides busi
nesses with an easily accessible
bank of clients' phone numbers. It
also serves as .in answering serv-
iceand a screening device to weed
out undesirable callers
Critics contend that the serv-
ice provides the opportunity for
tele.Marketers and government
agencies to infringe on an
individual's privacy, since the
Service will reveal otherwise um
listed numbers Callers may be
less willing to use hotlines for
AIDS and abuse centers
I li Noam, a member of the
New York State Public Service
Commission, suggested that the
service could also permit instance
of discrimination.
"With this new technology,
the public telephone network is
K'l ominga lot krsspublii Noam
have unlisted numbers
In a lx$ Angeles Times edito-
rial, Gary T. Marx, professor of
sociology at MIT, referred to Caller
ID as "a small eddy in a torrent of
new information-gathering tech-
nologies that are turning us into a
transparent or surveillance soci-
ety
A spokesman for Bell of Penn-
sylvania, however, said in The Wall
Street lournal that "Caller ID actu-
ally enhances privacy with a called
party. You can make it analogous
to someone knocking on your
door. Caller ID is like looking
through a peephole
New Jersey Bell was the first
to use the program when it began
a two vear testing program in
1987. At the time over a quart, r
its subscribers had unlisted teh
phone numbers. By the summer
1989, The Wall Street journal r.
ported the number t oh' �
in Hudson County, N hi : I
49 percent.
Thedevice itself. ostsbetwei �
$40 and $80. The sen tee rent
$6.50 a month and the cost I
first year totals $12h
Depending on the n ,
caller ID comes with a
featuresdesignedtogivt'tht
privacy Abl kingfeaturedi ��
oped bv allows the persi n
ing the call to keep his or
number anonymous bv I I
code. Instead of the caller s
See Caller, page 3
told The
VerA ,
"H
consequences ol Caller iD could
result in discrimination it some
one decides not 10 receive tele
phone tails from an entire ex
t hange or it it results in an mv a
sion ot privacy for people who
r
W$z Cast Carolinian
'Director of advertising
James FJ. McKce
SGA
( ontinued from page J
will learn hands on expericrx �
ol Ih "� ' ' ' a hing
legis,i!T Alan rhomasalso
suspended the rules lor the ap
pt, ipi i.iii. �' to the National Tan
1 Icllcnii ' i' il, whi h passed
bv ,i i i. e vote. I he group uas
ttet laion
ft en. v ii ptot VA, on fr�i
temit ii I � rit) hazing Eight
ol the bid I ' irei k ol sanitations
en campus siil send two reprc
sentatn es to the inference
it in � �ed by
11 institution ol the
'student Atiiliateot the American
Chemical Society, which organ
icd to help students become es-
tablished ith careers in the
I brumal field
I he$ ��' � appropriation to the
Financial Management Associa-
tion also pass d b) i onsent. Ihe
funds will be spent on honorari
unis, educational supplies, office
supplies, advertising and punt
ing vests
i he Water kilub vs.is ,)y
propriated 2f�5 to attend a i on
ferenee in Atlanta on Ieb 9 lb
1 he group 8 ICC president, a n.i
tionalh recognized uater skier,
will be bidding K a position on
the American Water Ski Assocta
tion board w hile at Ihe i enter
i in i'
1 egislati r Marty I lelms an
noum i-d that applii atii �ns for five
(X'n positions ol day rep � - Id
ti , will bed epti luntilFri
I inal int i i a . v ill be held on
Mond he seven available
,i i" � presentativepttsitionswill
bl . p. n until a week fn m this
lridav Representatives are
needed from ones, IV-lk, larvis,
yCOCk, ot ten and White dorms.
V therrv vtingadjourned, th
U gislatureielded the fliwr t,
I a ton, a member ol the Student
i nion l ilms Committee, who
announced Coin- With the Wind'
will be show ing, at 1 iendrin Ihea
ter on I eb 14.
Phillip V. Cope
Kelle O'Connor
Patrick Williams
advertising gpnsm tatives
(iiiy J. Harvej
Shay Sitiinger
Adam T. Hlankenship
�1) ISTLXf)' i '1H 'DJi'riS I: Q
per column inch
National RateS5.75
Open RaleS4.(5
Local Open RateS4.75
Hulk cv Prequenc) Contract
Discounts Available
'Business "Hours:
Monda - Fridaj
10:00 - 5:00 pm
Phone:
757-6366
Budget
Continued from page I
program could result in "much
needed savings over the next few
months but beyond saving on
heating . n its furthet details were
n I a iiilabli' I uesdax 1 ak in said
un reasesin utilit rates make util
it conversation 'evenmorone
i u
,m. hard brown. ice chancel
lot lor business ttaiis, said the
utilit) conservation program
might im hide lowering tempera-
tures m offices at night and on
weekends
Ihe utility conservation pro
gram w ill no doubt Create phvsi
cat discomfort tor all but will at
the same tune preserve resources
tor other pnoutcs Brownsaki
I hough sacrifices will be
not essarv to respond to budget
rcdui iions we are committed t
Buyer's Guid
Eutsler
Continufd from page 1
ihe Eutsler I ecture in
Children's Literature is the sec
ond lecture series to lv endowed
in the department In 11S, an
anonymous friend ot the depart
ment gave $7.chx) to endow the
annual Pr and Mrs Ella lag I iv
turein Literature. Under the spon-
SOrship ot the department's
(Graduate English t. oIKxnnum. the
tust lag I ecture will be given on
March 29,1990, by Michael A.
Lofaro s specialist in early Ameri-
can literature from the University
ot rennessec
ihe first ' msiei i ecture will
nnlat rins 1990
Aquarium Design830-0372
Best Used I ires830-9579
Bogies752-4668
Campus lours1-800-6-BAHAMA
Carolina Pregnancy C enter757-0003
Central Hook & News756-7177
ChicOS757-lhbb
Cfa355-3543
Dapper Dan's752-1750
David's Automotive830-1779
Discovery Dive1-728-2265
HR Block756-9365
Hail I oft355-5980
ITG355-5075
Kroger703-563-3662
McBudgel758-9834
The Nail Company355-4596
New Deli758-0080
Public Safety757-6294
Rack Room355-2519
Raleigh Women's I ealth832-0535
Rep305-252-4922
Research Information1-800-351-0222
Ringgold lowers752-2865
Riverbluff758-4105
Sharky's757-3881
Student Union757-4715
Summcfield Apartments355-6187
Sunchase Tours303-226-0226
Suntanna756-9180
T. Ventures830-4034
Triangle Women's Health1-800-433-2930
Wash Pub752-5222
WZMB355-6098





The East Carolinian January 30,1990
American Medical Women's Association
establishes award for ECU medical students
in �s�
urrju
Pr Malene Irons the iirst
woman physician in Greenville
and i pioneer in Addressing the
medical needs c4 childfen in this
region h.i been honored with ,m
vd established in her name at
the EC! School ot Medicine
Developmentoftheawardisa
jo � � effort ol the eastern Nvuth
lirwi student and physician
chapters o( the American Medical
Women's sstxiation I v.
both based at ECU
Pr losh r Mega, ECUasw
ciate professor ol Psychiatric
Medicine and coordinator ot the
award program said the award
will be presented each year to .�
senior ECU medical student who
has been active in school and
community extracurricular pur
suits and who particularly dcm-
onstrates interest and involvement
in issues concerning women and
children
Mega said the award includes
a 51 tW vv holarship to be funded
through a $20,000 endowment.
.WHY A members will be working
to raise money for the endowment
in the coming months, she said
AMWA is.i national network
ot women phystciansand medical
students dedicated to improving
the personal and professional well
being ot women in medicine and
to act on health issues, partial
i.u u those pertaining to women
and children.
Pr Irons, who moved to
Grecm ille in 1946 and has retired
from practice, was instrumental in
the establishment ot the Develop-
mental Evaluation Clinic, a re-
gional center addressing the needs
ot handicapped children. She
sen ed as the center's first medical
director.
"Pr Irons epitomizes the
qualities that we hope to recog-
nize with this award, said Mega
"In naming it tor her, we are sot
ting a very high standard tor
medical students and physicians
to emulate "
LAST CHANCE!
Caller
v ontinued from page 2
her the screen would indicate that
the call is private
s ol March a hill requiring
phone companies to otter the
hi. stem was under con
sideration in the California legis
lets the caller
i n he or she is calling a
numbei that subscribes to Caller
� . . would let the filler
know w hile the phone is Mill ting
New lerse Bell s
ityCi red caller IP
" . nbi ' - s- w ith the ptv i
king services would
� ided to � imesti iolence
. cntion agem ies and law-
em ies tor free
New erse V.u land ii
and West irginia however
ha i restru ted plans
serice
Conference
tinuedfrom page I
� s just .is s
� M services such .is
and 'M.Kement
aid
� is 5 i president .it
UNt v �. Jl is university faces
an ss s million dollar budget ut
What we re looking at is prett
much the same as v hat e en one
else is getting as tar as supplies
and incentives to attr.u t
iuate students ' 1 ev� is said.
We ils - �n our (urrent fis al
. $80(( X X)
� he 1 ist fiscal
pets started
he added
think one th It '��. e ha e to
I ivis said is w hat s
�st important is stri ing tor e
cellence in higher education and
that we shouldn't settle tor medi
rib
We should only he satisfied
with serving the students to the
h-st qJ lMir abilities b) offering
cssary student services And
until we have done that, we are
nga crisis in ourSC A 5) stem
1 .n id Miller North Carolina
& P's SGA j resident indicated
that bla� k s hools have been
among the hardest hit by the
budget cutbacks
1 he Appalachian State S A
president said that his university
has implemented energy conser-
ation polk ies, placed a treee on
hiring and cutback on materials
TODAY!
I IX)NT hANr
TO BE STUCK IN
GnEENVlLUEV

That's the third shovel pass
1 hese ladies see n to I . rig themselves watching TV on a Super Bowl Sunday s. Photo by
Angela Pridgen I Phol ab)
frorr

ioi
127
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alto �aHt (Earolfman
David I Ifrrinc, General Manager
Low Martin, Editor
Joseph L Jenkins, Jr News Editor
Adam Cornelius, test. News Editor
Caroline Cusick, Features Editor
John TUCKER, Asst. Features Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Carrie Armstrong, Entertainment Editor
Scott Maxwell, Satire Editor
Steve Reid, Staff illustrator
James F.J. McKff, Director of Advertising
Phong Luonc, Credit Manager
Stuart Rosner, Pusmess Manager
PAMELA COPE, Ad Tech Supervisor
MATTHEW RlCHTER, Circulation Manager
TRAC Y WEED, Production Manager
MlCHAEI CARNES, Darkroom Technician
BETH LUPTON, Secretary
The Hast Carolinian has been serving the Hast Carolina campus community since 112! wiih primary emphasis on in-
formation most directly affecting ECU students. It is published twice weekly, with a circulation of 12,000. The Fast
C arohnian reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements thai discriminate on the basis of age, sex,
creed or national origin. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view For purposes of decency
and brevity, Tr ' East Carolinian reserves the right to edit any letter lor publication. 1 etters should he sent to The East
Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, NC, 27834; or call us at (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page4, Tuesday January 30, 1990
Remember those high school days
when evefybod v wo?e school colors on game
clay, and more important than winning was
proving to the other side that von had more
spirit. Team spirit isn't something we out-
grow; we just sometimes forget to show it.
Pirate tans showed their pride and spirit
at Saturday night's basketball game against
Wilmington. It's the first time the Pirates
have defeated theSeahawk teamsince 1985.
The team came out strong, but they were
strenthened even more bv a sell-out crowd
or screaming Pirate fans.
Efforts on the part of ike Student Pirate
That active support really helps!
Club have also played a part in the boosting
the spirit of the team and the tans. The or-
ganization, which was termed last semes-
ter, serves to involve students who are inter-
ested in the athletic program and want to
see the athletic department grow.
It goes to show that team support can
really make a difference in winning or los-
ing. There are a lot of people who constantly
criticize Pirate athletics. Needless to say, the
Pirates aren't always winners But when
they have enthusiastic fans backing them,
it's a lot easier to get out there and tight.
Uncovering the Japanese myths
It goes without saving that
however thev do it in lapan is the
right wav to olt it But how, ex-
actly, do they do it in lapan1 two
myths about this are popular right
now that the Japanese have lower
taxes, and that Japanese corpora-
tions have the unfair advantage of
lower capital costs - access to
cheaper money
Tax svstems are hard to com-
pare But few American business
executives would happily trade
either their personal or their busi-
ness tax bills for what they'd face
in Japan. After standard deduc-
tions that are about equal to ours,
the Japanese national income tax
goes as high as 50 percent, on
incomes over about $140,(XK). A
second tax for local government
hits a top rate of 16 percent at
about $35,000. That's frb percent,
combined Bv comparison the
American income tax peaks at 33
percent on incomes of about
$75,000 (for a married couple) and
actually drops to 28 percent after
$15,000. Addingevena highstate
income tax, the American top rate
fore than a third less.
Japan gives Special trreatment
to capital gams There is an annual
exempt ion of about $3,500. Profits
on investments held more than
five years get taxed at half the
ordinary rate (which still means
rates up to 33 percent, the current
top American rate). But publicly
traded Stocks are taxed .it a mere 1
percent of the total sale pn e
1 Ifectivc corporate tax rates
depend crucially on things like
depreciation rules. After much
juggling on both sides of the Pa-
cific, Iheoffk al corporate tax rates
are similar: 37.5 percent in lapan.
34 percent here. The experts figure
that the effective tax rate faced bv
corporations contemplating new
investments is about the same as
well
the bottom line the Japanese
tax system I which has a higher
inheritance tax, too) is more pro-
gressive than ours. Although it
contains a few special breaks for
investors (notably the token tax on
Mock profits), overall it taxes capi-
tal, and the affluent in general,
more heavily.
The compaint that Japanese
corporations have access to cheaper
capital is peculiar on Ms face.com
ingata time when Japanese money
is flooding into the L mted States (a
fact about which some of the Mine
peoplealso complain) It's certainly
true that the Japanese save more
money than we do, giving them
more capital to invest.
It's also certainly true that in
terest rates in yen are lower than
interest rates in dollars. That's
because there is less inflation in the
yen. Low inflation is nice, but it is
no special advantage in borrow-
ing: Money borrowed in yen must
be paid Kuk in ven, too. when
their value will have increased
compared to the dollar.
Among economists, the con-
sensus seems to be that lapanese
businesses can indeed borrow
more cheaply, even after figuring
for inflation, but the difference is
shrinking, lapan used to have
Iimitson theexport of capital and
artificial restraints on what sav-
ers could be paid. This created a
captive pool of cheap capital. But
over the past decade, these rules
have been eliminated.
Fhey have been eliminated,
not as Mime kind of favor to
America, but because dusts good
for lapan The wav to maximie
the value of a high savings rate is
to invest it for maximum return,
not to lend at discount. Japan's
capital markets, like its other
markets, may still reflect tradi-
tional relationships (between
corporations and their banks, for
example) that give the local boys
an advantage. But this rust redis-
tributes money within Japan,
f rom savers to borrowers. It leaves
Japanese society as a whole
poorer.
A second aspect of the capital
costs controversy concerns "eq-
uity raising money by selling
stock shares instead of borrow-
ing. If there are two identical fac-
tories being built, one in Osaka
See Japan, page 5
Unveiling the information monopoly
Does government control the media?
By Nathaniel Mead
t ditorijl Columnist
Recently a friend ot mine
asked me why I put so much en-
ergy into my "Bush-burning" se-
ries in the last few weeks Muchof
the material, he siiJ. sounded
almost outlandish. I responded
that it was onlv outlandish be-
cause he hadn t read about the
president s dark side before
about Bush's apparent support for
drug traffickers during hisIA
days and his covert (illicit) arms
deals with the Iranians and ua
raguansduring the Reagan vears.
lad such information been more
mainstream, mv editorials would
have been easier to digest People
would understand mv aloofness
toward news ii Bush getting shot
(hvpotheticallv speaking, of
course), and there might even be a
letter or two I iroliniai
thanking me tor giv ing the presi-
dent his just desM'rts on paper
Most Am. ru ans are shocked
to learn that there s more propa-
ganda in the I nited States than in
the Soviet i nion We tend to as-
sume that the I S. newsbusinesses
.ire fair and objective. We tend to
assume that the 1 irst Amendment
tacitly guarantees the widest and
most accurate distribution of in-
formation, and that it gives us the
edge wr any other country K
enabling tree and easy access to
information The problem is not
the information itself, but the
market and publishing houses
which control the information.
Any breaches of our democratic
rights, such as freedom of the
press, are simply byprodui I
this more4 basic problem
Our present information,
tem is becoming increasing!) in
tegrated astimegoesi r as an
of high-powerbusinessdeals
past twodet adeshaveseena
rise m the number ot mi
acquisitions among the nation's
newspapers, magazines, I -
cast properties and book ; ubhsh
ers. I ho taken . ers and atten
take-overs of media
finally .ukl up to this sin �
the power to shape the nati
news and popular culture
tor lale to the high I Idei !i
shori, those who ha.
i ve us the new S.
According to Professor I
Bagdikian in I � u ' � �
irporattons i ontrol
than half of the media bu
1982; bv December 198 this
number had shrunk t� . � r�i: � �
tions si months later,
Bagdikian w rot anarl e)
media pub
number was down to I
Street m� tspredicl
b) the- 1991 Is, six giant fi i
control most of our med
than 15d r; rati i i I most
of thev ountry S new spa; .
lation, and Iful of I
control the television broadcast
ing network
� listingo( thedirectorsi I
three man ir networks
i-H and BS �
interlocking of bank .
dustnalconnections Haven I
ever wondered why ot the
ally thousands of interesting
vital news items from all ovei tl
world available to the netwi -
To The Editor
i � ning 'news pn igrams �i l t
or tv eke sd (lies ! I � 111
era e is restricted b i i
fulelite, whit h,indd i
tall : reason I
the news is fa
morev I n ichli
.
I hough the media nu �� i
iunue at break k speed
� itedly assured that the
lit.
all the news that rmt
� : � v. - that s Wi rth k I
s assun
rality oi
itrahtv ners
hresh nduh
int. ind entertain
nu nt.l lil thisassump
i in illusion without
� rv or human na-
tun . � : .
inn Iikepr fit
ns, asm ent
f tl tii with local v iper
. . � ; md
It

i their p ri i
feel t
� - - . ' �
ionatetnteri �� ti
Soviet I olitbui
ut the of I ul
t ' �
generates torn
�� � pe 'pie regard
I I or rtarrowi I
� ire gettingi
on the mi! ir .
see Propaganda, page 5
Columist is socially unaware
To the editor:
last week the East
Carolinian's "staff pornographer"
Chippy Bonehead wrote a story
concerning the social stigma fac-
ing appreciatorsot pornography.
Unfortunatelv, his article A refer
ence to homosexuals exhibited a
careless lack of social awareness.
AccordingtoChippyThe) think
if you lxk at too much of it,
you'll go completely round the
bend and become a necrophiliac
homosexualdogmolester "While
soliciting sympathy tor the por-
nography huff, Chippy seems
comfortable in slinging his own
brand of prejudice. I lis compari-
son smacks of bigotry and is con-
sistent with many propaganda
statements currently being issued
by organized hate groups nation
wide. The same groups that sup
port former grand wizard of the
KKK, David Duke's infiltration
into mainstream poll tics. The same
groups that call themselves skin-
heads and adhere to a Hitlenstic
standard of what is normal.
Maybe ECU should offer a
Homosexual 1000 course for
people like Chippy It might help
them realize that gay and lesbian
people function much like every-
one else. Theveat, sleep love,work
and usually go through life never
feeling the need to have sex with
corpses or dogs be them dead
or alive.
Actually, the only spe ializ d
concern that gays and lesl
have is to avoid Boneheads like
( hippy'
Steve Randolph
English
Mankind has
grown uncaring
To the editor:
Some people in this world
have become so uncaring tor oth-
ers and their feelings, whetherit's
because they are stuck up or be
cause they think they are more
important than others Many
employees of this university fed
this way, but this group is largely
made up of higher-up people in
the various facilities found on
campus.
One prime example 1 can come
up with in regard to this situation
occurtxi last semester at Menden-
hall. The television system was
d when one of the w i -
ersdiscoN red this, he in turn told
of the workers at the informa-
tion desk, a male 1 ie came do n
stairs to the television room .vrA
remarked. Well they'll fust have
tosul in a ver smart
assed manner Vhat a )erk' He
acts as it we, the students, don t
;i his salary But terks can be
found on the individual level as
well
No matter ho nice you are to
some people here, thev act as if
you don t exist Say hi to some
people on this campus, and thev
' � �li at you as if thev need a laxa-
tive Will people ever be kind to
one another as some people still
are. or is this place going to turn
mto a major "me-world?"
I ven the school officials are
turning theirbackson theirschool
newspaper How cowardly and
shanuful of them! Thought tor
today and beyond: No matter who
you know, how much you know,
or how much money your parents
have, you can go to hell just as
easily as a "poor nobody
Ronald Mercer
Freshman
Chemistry





Propaganda
l: � Ion i) n iffau . hul tins
1,1 ' ' �" ' so ! it, i ,iM monorm
"sts (i i isc (he i on nsus
lp ik i rn.ii h � '� i nitctl
it s Wicldinj �'
tlucti. i' lb publi I � (u
��!lv atU Hum, il . ,
in i rop u�.11 i i n i� , i
" I ' � � ' I ' ill t !�
li:i v i tuild in -nil fo .i ,ii.i ti i i
i b) cmphd
�'�r, iolcncv on I pivscntinu
t.ni i, i( loi n h inc Ol
� " I) undoi mining Iho capj
UN Ol Huh p, nt Ol , IimIi �
thought(� nlloqiiMth !� n i na� thi
Knb t�tbv tii. i
shrinking numhci ol l.n ri
, � itionsmodi tl it the
ratH , i . i ,
� ii tlu � ii � .
� ' ; . md opinn . ha .ill I
' ippeai � ; -l in . : �y i
nun h tin i uc hiw i
that v i pie i utMdc thi
; � �' i othoi it nt to v In, h
I thi media m inipu
' ' ' i
itinued from pae 1
I a pa ii
u hal are implu ationsof su h
manipulation of information hr
ik let) I'hn ugh the media mo
ii"v, the i "i potato elite can
I lei to i I bu political candi
eleetive ad ertising) and
tij ihi balance of pessimism and
nptimi in (i littn new sw ise t � to
lock market trends 1 he)
,in manipulate mass ps) holog)
I get avi i s itli subverting thi'
nunei iti into 1A cesspoolsil
drug addiction and the lulls ol
government into sewers ol inter
national espionage and corrup
tnn (kay okay ou get my mt
ml whatcvei happened to
ihe liberal press? fhev are now
altem iti c press" t He Na
tu n I He v e Ulne Readei
I Wet etiand a few mam
n publii ations hkethe IVo h
� i Po and Bo I m f I ' Th
York i rni � and I ttnes
iav� theii o� i asional spin is ol
! eral thought, hul tin. are more
often described a- neoconserva
live i he ultimate interc t of the
new media piants is to maintain
tatus quo an interest tin i:
itinued from page t
news coverage is sure to reflect
Its not th.it the chief executive
officer of each media-making or
poration personally makes news
assignments or edits stories it
would lv impractical and unnet
� � .u to do st) Owners could not
kill every piece of news tlat dis
pleases them lv, ause 11 ude cen
sorship would damage theii tt pu
' itions 1! ' ' i tomes t i tin
owners ke) interests, manage
ment sill always override tl"
policies or convictions of emplti)
ivs in this case, the manager
merely hue .m,t fire the editors
whofailtoadhcretotheconsorva
live line
But let s not � ondemn th
popular media altogether t ei
i.imK it would be erroneous t
blame tin1 reporters, most of whom
�till regard themselves as liberal
Main reporters are ineffectual in
expressing liberal views simpl)
because their editors are devouth
conservativeand don't takekindh
to Bush bill niii ntn ism Sum
times, (n ,1 matter of pi in, iple
both editors and reporters will tak
risk; And while conservatives do
nut, i ,l dominate the mainstream
media the IV news shows still
reporti ritii ally on military spend
ing and the effcx ts of cutbacks in
� � i.il programs tor the poor
Problem is, we're only seeing the
tip of the n eberg of what's realh
happ ningin the world like the
,ut w.irs and terrorist opera
lions sanctioned b) the US go
inn . nt in Ni aragua, El Salva
iloi and 1 londuras
�m be t. .u, tul about whi h
p ij, is von select and which chan
in Is you i hoosc to tune into For
.i t about reading i leorge Hush's
1 I � l urge! Ins whole t.�, e, tor
ittir 11 cam toread between
r1. son out thefac tsfromas
tions, and think, riti ally on
� I p, 'inn ,il ,iik1 so, nil issui's
iltemativ e press is growing
Ih and u ill reinfon e your
. . ii tuitions .il iul what s ro
ills going on out there Above all,
hud peace amidst tin- noise of
s new s As i horeau once
iid I kin't read the I imes, read
i mil, s
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ORGANIZATIONS
Aboi turns from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost Pregnancy
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For further Information, call 738 0444
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weekdays General anesthesia available
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L
�msmiw iiuoim w & um m com
Double Feature
Wed Jan. 31, 1990
8:00 I'M
She's (iotla Have l!
Also Joes Bed
Styy Barbershop
iSpike I �V t'irsl Kealurt- �
I rnylli Film)
IIINDKIX THEATRE
� I KM WITH SI 1 01 N I iD �
Sponsored l siuilrnl I illn
I ilinsuiumillt't'
: heapei to t,n mone h boi
d e mki� im ng than h issuin ; stv
torv 1tin 1Ivcause ov� ning a share is riskii �
d o 11 a i oven !an ovini .i h, nd, and share Idi rs must be 11 impensated foi
,risli Yet traditionalh l.ip.i
:�. � mpanies had more deb
.id equit than American .mipanies 1 nt.m ' If so it's no
r trin- 1 hanks ti the explo
!�ii of Vii ii an , orporate debt
�iand the huge i isi in the fokvo link market (re� ent studii s con Ii i Japan lm s debt iuit
Hio is now lower tl nerica
� �� t inii s in an cvenl this , ultural anomalv hardh justifies a l t i i
�pa v i;� . tment tax breaks since irnniti 11 is ' lon'tdoit il w,i in i.ip.m � . i � '
� . i
Do you have a burning
desire to express your
opinion about an issue?
If so, why not write a
letter the editor?
Send it to:
Letters
The East Carolinian
ECU Publications Building
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i day
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ATTENTION:
Financial Aid
Applicants!
Annual Financial Aid
Information
Orientation meeting
Wednesday,
January 31, 1990
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
4:00pm
SPIKE LEEWFEK
DOUBLE FEATUI
She's
eorrA
iT
- i i si Bad i il
Wednesday. Jan 3 I!
Thursday � Sunday. heD 1
All Movies Scr en 8 p:n. Hendi � itri
FREE Admission with Valid I CU ID
What's Up?
Program Hoth
757-6004
Call for latest information on Campus Entertainment
Student union committee
member of the month
Gary Dudley
Junior
Business
Marketing
Major
Major
Concerts
Committee
"I like getting behind the scenes
with Major Concerts!
STUDENT UNION






4
Propaganda
Continued from page 4
issue or on foreign affairs, but this
just isn't so. The media monopo-
lists comprise the "consensus-
making machinery" of the United
States. Wielding the power to in-
fluence the public to believe virtu-
ally anything, they are creators of
American propaganda par excel-
lence. In their most corrupt form,
they could instill fear and frustra-
tion in the population by empha-
sizing violence on TV, presenting
fantasies of modern living, or
severely undermining the capac-
ity of independent or creative
thought (colloquially known as the
"boob-tube" effect).
A shrinking number of large
media corporations means that the
usual democratic expectations for
the media�the diversity of own-
ership and opinion�have all but
disappeared. Freedom of speech
is very much an issue here�it's
just that few people outside "the
press" realize the extent to which
this is so. And the media-manipu-
lating corporate execs and opin-
ion-keepers in governmont seem
set on keeping it this way.
Japan
What are implications of such
manipulation of information for
society? Through the media mo-
nopoly, the corporate elite can
effectively "buy" political candi-
dates (selective advertising) and
tip the balance of pessimism and
optimism (ditto, newswise too) to
sway stock market trends. They
can manipulate mass psychology
and get away with subverting the
universities into CIA cesspools of
drug addiction and the halls of
government into sewers of inter-
national espionage and corrup-
tion. Okay, okay, you get my point.
And whatever happened to
the liberal press? They are now
the "alternative press" (The Na-
tion, The Progressive, Utne Reader,
LA. Weekly, etc.) and a few main-
stream publications, like the Wash
ington Post and Boston Globe. The
New York Times and LA. Times
have their occasional spurts of
liberal thought, but they are more
often described as "neoconserva-
tive The ultimate interest of the
new media giants is to maintain
the status quo�an interest their
Continued from page 4
news coverage is sure to reflect.
It's not that the chief executive
officer of each media-making cor-
poration personally makes news
assignments or edits stories � it
would be impractical and unnec-
essary to do so. Owners could not
kill every piece of news that dis-
pleases them because crude cen-
sorship would damage their repu-
tations. Bu� wtmi it comes to the
owners' key interests, manage-
ment will always override the
policies or convictions of employ-
ees. In this case, the managers
merely hire and fire the editors
who fail to adhere to the conserva-
tive line.
But let's not condemn the
popular media altogether. Cer-
tainly it would be erroneous to
blame the reporters, most of whom
still regard themselves as liberals.
Many reporters are ineffectual in
expressing liberal views simply
because their editors are devoutly
conservativeand don't take kindly
to Bush-burning criticism. Some-
times, on a matter of principle
both edi tors ar" reporters will take
risks. And while conservatives do
indeed dominate the mainstream
media, the TV news shows still
report critically on military spend-
ing and the effects of aitbacks in
federal programs for the poor.
Problem is, we're only seeing the
tip of the iceberg of what's really
happening in the world � like the
secret wars and terrorist opera-
tions sanctioned by the US. gov-
ernment in Nicaragua, El Salva-
dor, and Honduras.
So be careful about which
papers you select and which chan-
nels you choose to tune into. For-
get about reading George Bush's
lips. (Forget his whole face, for
that matter.) Learn toreadbetween
t he 1 i nes, sort ou 11he facts from as-
sumptions,and think critically on
major political and social issues.
The alternative press is growing
rapidly and will reinforce your
own intuitions about what's re-
ally going on out there. Above all,
find peace amidst the noise of
today's news. As Thoreau once
said, "Don't read the Times, read
the Lternities
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional coat. Pregnancy
Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling
For further Information, call 738-6444
(toll free number: 1 -800-532-5384) Between 9 am and 5 pm
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH WEEK OV PREGNANCY
L
Double Feature
Wed Jan. 31,1990
8:00 PM
She's Gotta Have It
Also Joes Bed -
Styy Barbershop
(Spike Lee's First Feature -
Length Film)
IIENDRIX THEATRE
� FREE WITH STUDENT ID �
Sponsored by Student Union
Films Committee
and one in Chicago, investors will
demand a greater stake in the
Chicago factory than the Osaka
one for every dollar or yen they
put up. One recent study con-
cluded that during the 1980s
American companies had to earn
twice i�s much as lap.inese compa-
nies k . each dollar thev attracted
in new equity.
Is this an unfair advantage for
the Japanese? It'sanadvantage, to
he sure. But, sadly, it is a conse-
quence of America's relative in-
dustrial performance, not a cause
of it. Investors simply feel that, in
the long run, that factory in Osaka
is a better bet than the one in Chi-
cago, and arc willing to pay more
for a piece of the action
A third question about capital
costs concerns the mix of debt and
equity. In both societies, it is
cheaper to raise money by bor-
rowing than by issuing stock,
because owning a share is riskier
than owning a bond, and share-
holders must be compensated for
the risk. Yet traditionally, Japa-
nese companies had more deb1
and less equity than American
companies. Unfair? If so, it's no
longer true. Thanks to the explo-
sion of American corporate debt
and the huge rise in the Tokyo
stock market (recent studies con-
clude), Japan Incs debt-equity
ratio is now lower than America
Incs. In any event, this cultural
anomaly hardly justifies a lot of
new investment tax breaks since
(drumroll, please) they don't do it
that way in Japan.
(Michael Kinsley is a senior editor of
The New Republic, in which this ar-
ticle first appeared.)
Do you have a burning
desire to express your
opinion about an issue?
Fiy to
J3A9-
��
t�4�
kUSaSsssC
.MO"
M I Call 1-800-62
r
S
ATTENTIC
UlJt
IVI
Financial
Applicants!
Annual Financial Aid
Information
Orientation meeting
Wednesday,
January 31, 1990
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
4:00pm
1 I
SPIKE LEE WEEK
DOUBLE FEATURE
it
Joe's Bed Styy Barbershop
Wednesday, Jan 31, 1990
Thursday - Sunday, Feb. 1 - 4, 1990
AH Movies Screen 8 pm, Hendrix Theatre
FREE Admission with Valid ECU ID
What's Up?
Program Hotline
757-6004
Call for latest information on Campus Entertainment
ITUDENT UNION COMMITTEE
MEMBER OF THE MONTH
Gary Dudley
Junior
Business
Marketing
Major
Major
Concerts
Committee
I like getting behind the scenes
with Major Concerts





Page 6
gllie Sagt Carolinian
Classifieds
January 30, 1990
i omc see! v in mi�� .1 11
more info i .ill � � �I il
I OR RENT
lOH SAI I
11 MAW ROOMMATE WANTED '
there a I bedroom apartmenl $1 -o .1
month plu�. 1 3 utilities Own room
(low to campus
ROOMS FOR KtM sharest room
house with male student; oil street
parking, five minute walk from Ml
campus rheaddress is W2LewtsSl
i .ill (919) '48 1280 and ,1-W foi 1 ewis
KllnT.1
II MAI I. NONSMOKING, ROOM
MATE NliDll): roshare2 bedroom
112 bath apt at . ourtiu-v square
M.ituri' responsible person prefern l
Ki'nt 5190 a month l2uuhtie quiet
nul nearly (ill ;i 2752 pic
message
ROOMM 11 WAN11 D
furnished centrally located lownhomc
si IS a month plus I i utilities Musi
(,m t 11 uits
ild � �
Made In
� i .mi II'i 11 In i m ill cut 11 'in lit '�! sJ K)
Negotiable i .ill Ray .it ' W82 after
6pm
i iki rosNow ski?
i Xei me ft si" ' ' 'Black
with stirrup- m. � .ill
$550172 � � �
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
RESfARCH WHJRMAT10N
Largest Lihrgry ot mtormition in U S
311 suhiects
i ni t I! VNDIOVESI i ' � � ind
Drown i ood condition I b lop
table and har. � ' pi i blki c i
S U K ES Ol I TRIP
Itl Mil M'l! Ml KS i Win S
DISP1 A l I Asii li
layout fraternity Sorority or dub
interested in earning SI ,000 � for a one
weed on campus marketing project'
ion musl be well organised anil hard
working (.all li'imvor Myraat (Hun
592 2121
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO
i OPTING SERVICES! Weoffet typing
and phottM opylng servh as We also sell
softwara i computers 21 hours in and
.nit (luaranteed typing on papei up to
10 hand written pages SDF Professional
1 ompntor Services 106 E 5th Si (beside
i ubbic's) Greenville N 752 J694
NEED AD) why nol hire Ihebest!
' upertence is what counts Currently
working .it the Elbo and previously
worked al Rio' the dub 5pe� ialimg in
lanceprogressive 'rock and beet h
� ill Mark Roberts-752 6927
$59 10yi
list
tin ' � Ml HO
fot ' urrent fish-rat
I'la.i
SAI is National Marketing firm seeks
mature student hi manage on i am pus
promotions fot topi ompanies this
�.( hool � �r I lexlble hours with
earning potential to $2,VH1 p-r semester
Mnt i' . �, �� i � irdworking, and
monev motivati '� ' ill Mtiheleor lenny
.ii (8001 51
MRI IMS NOW HIRING Flighl
Attendant i i '� Mei h.nu. s,
i ,iii i tings ' - itarles to
0 ii lions I .ill (1)
I I I I It I l MOM
i;i tu- CROOKS' $3 000 ��i
Incomepoti nti il Details (1)602 �38
sss 1 . i : .
TOIL FREE
HOTUNE
800 351 0222
Hpicaich Intoonjtion
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M V 8:30 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
1-800-433-2930
The Suntana
5 Visit Plan �M i
HELP WAN II D
moim I S Ii you would like to modi I
� tmotions Modeling Agent v, �� low fi
� I'm y needs males and females o( all
ii'i'i. Also need dancers for prv ite
parties all 355 0919 to sel up an
mtcn lew
(.mi KNMI NT JOBS $16,040
PiM'l ViI ASSI1II !S
KKHP1 S'� 'PI
part dm. �i! .
sht, enthu i 1
��� ran give
tnendh ervice Flexible
HI I P WANTEO: Fashion Merchan
ditng Majors Want a great way to gain
valuable experience' Brody's is
accepting applications for a clerical
assistant to Buying Staff Interviews will
be held 2 days onlv Tuesday and
Wednesday. Jan 50 51. From 12 4 pm
Brody's, The Plaza
WANTED fashion consultant Premier
Modular Career clothing company seeks
qualified person to direct and market
Perfect for college girls, work your own
hours to earn extra money ave SWhr
( all 77 1044 for more details after 5 00
p m
MANAGERS WANTEO: Call 7S7 402
Ask for Fred or Todd
PERSONALS
15 Vl
Wolfe
756
H'sJO
s
BEST USED TIRES
TtRK SAI.F.S FROM $15 A UP
All SCJ-S AVAILABLE
WHTTB LETTER A WHITS WAUS
TwotoeMteM 1600N. GneaSi
IOO-9579 1009 S Memontllh
! . i iblo Intil it ws ivill N'
held .1 days onl i md Wednes
, . an 50 m 12 I pm Brody's
Ihcl'l.ii
BRODY'S FOR Ml N is searching for
i' nt hm lies ! nlhiisiastic
individuals whoenjo fashkwt and have
� . n "��-
From 12 � 4 pm
KDVERIISINt I ISP1 v- SS1S
I M :����
'ihe :iul c vtnpany
Special� v
(U ' td.
y First Sei it e Nailare SaU m"
I X' ' ol .ills $22.50 rcj! S45.00
I mini; Session 2405 S Charles 5
isil
(i)H! ;ss 45
i-
.i.l 9 'P .
I
nisei
c �' md
. ,1 nyjth
e held 2
Wednesday ' in
lvs
1 ss Uiv
ECU ROWING COXSWAIN NEEDED:
12dlhs or less Athletic and Energetic If
interested contact MikeSnipes 752-1596,
or Kelly Skinner 752 8002
OlT.TA ZETA: Thank you for everything'
Phi I'm
CONGRATULATIONS: To the Skate
ho.mlfrnti-rnitv and its nw members Pr
1 ram is Md Hire. V Pres Potsey W ebbet
rreas Tim Faceman. Pledge Educator
N.l.im Toxic. S,x.ial Chairman ClubTonv
Personnel uboandScotty Burger Keep
wording on the 160degreeOlliekick Rip
for tin.il initiation love von nish ihur
man lilt and Ronnie
IRU PUPPIES: LabRotwkes Owneris
going broke wnth so many puppies call
Mariaswa at 74rh�i
'HI OMEGA : Susan Ambrose. FJiaSth
llan-s. ' BtkySpoelto, Kathryn Bazemon
hang m there' Weloveyou ' Voursisten
and ptedgea of CM omega
CONGRATUl ATIONS: To the new hi
Omega Committee Chairmen I listori m
1 jsa Thompkins, Spirit Christy (' Hn
Intramurals lnlie Pope, special Proyw �
Kendra Curtis. Greek oundl r I
Kamenski, ORl-spondent s.s ret B !� i
roll Waldron, Alumnae en sncll and ik I
1 lelms, SK-ial I leathericrpu k I
Courtnew Mauldin, song Daniell
l.iMonn.1. Activities Ashkry Hendri�
anter Devdqjmenl Windy Spell ai I
Ashley Bagenhart, Scholarship Tracy
Lewis and House BitsySquiresan I
Meinders We know you ail will d
job' 1 ove you r sitters and pledge;
ADP1. HIOMK.A.AMAI PHA PHI
Thanks for helping usduring Spring R
You ladies did i ;wm (ob Good Luck
agreatjob Good luck on a great semi
I ove The TiV.�-
lUFO Kl HI RMANj '� I i
with spring rush! Your hard work n �
paid of i Thanks for all you did - '�
PIKE S IU DRIVING
rtiRoi'ii r
MM
CONGRATULATIONS I
ptedgedassof PI Kappa Alpha
are awesome! Get ready ton ettl
friends you'll ever havt A
.ill the wav' The Brotl � r
rf)AI 1 f( UFRATERNITll
lations i"
better than
ir.it fhi Vlpha Pi
M Ml Mils . odlucl
tor th�� next I yeel
big 4.0" tl let ��� �
doit! I ove I �
t ONCRA III VI los
'ii hos. m tor hew 'i
UNCG Keej � ip! N
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
Darkroom
Technician
Wanted
Experience Needed
APPLY
TODAY
Apply al
Qli? itast (liiniltni;ui
2nd Floor Publications Building
i
$2500.00
Credit line
guaranteed!
�No credit Check
�No Security Deposit
You cannot be turned
down for a
(�old Credit Card
BANC 1 INI-
AMI-RICA
$ 1500 Instant line ol
credit
('ash withdraw al up to
$1250.00
830-4034
bi vcnici i'i t t
. AIJ N A BI DROOMS
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
Street
. . . , . -
. - 'a. t'
� I (Hated Near K( l
� Nn M.ijoi Shupplnfl elltris
�Ml Hun Sti ii c
� i tnsltt I iiiihIi j
' � : � V � KHr n
. �� fMI -�� t-ri�
� . . �- . . i t Mha ttm f
t � . . i � -aae
. �ii I It- M) RIOT At J A;aj-nn'� ��J rtfciN. -����� r
alr� . t. - . -� '� al n i an tl1
taj I - i � - �
�ia. �
SUMMERFIELD
APARTMENTS
3209 Summerplace
New
1 and 2 bedrooms
� located across from
Parker's Barbecue
on Memorial Drive
available Feb. 1March 1
contact Aaron Spain
355-6187
756-8060
St SI'�
illed wttl ' � ����
s�k i.r . �.��� � . i �i.t '�
! ll'IIM' .It t V�
mid wi lak Piney 1 ii �
lith hv �it that 'itiderweai
1 lill is comingup Mxm11 !e i � �
howling at theNeedwe s.i
more
REWARDOFFF.RED
brown stutiod inin i
dropp� d near Croatai
oallT'lttlQ
DISPI At C I VSSIFll Ms
RINGGOLD rOWERS
Now Taking I eases for 1 all
1990 Efficienc) l bedrm & 2
bedrni apis. Call 752 .
Listen To
The College Music FM
McBudget
Office
Furniture
We Have
�Desks
�Files
�Computer
Furniture
�Chairs
�Safes
�Storage
Cabinets
We Buy. Sell. Trade. A Lease
753 ��.��
Announcements
AIL NURSING STUDENTS
GRADUATiNG SPRING
SEMESTER
In order to receive voui Nursing Pin in
April Orders must be placed in the Stu
dent Store, Wright Building no l.itrr than
February 2,1990 Orders should be placed
at die Service Desk Orders mustb"
in full when placed
EAST CAROLINA UNIVER-
SITY GOSPEL CHOIR
tlte East Carolina University t. lospei hoii
is now accepting members for the 1990
semester until Jan Kt Please come nil
and join us on Wednesday .it 5 .it th
Ledonia I Wright Cultural i .va i i,r
more intoriiution contact President kip
plan C leninion .it 830 5391 or any mem
lx-r of the choir
LAST CAROLINA L'MVLR-
SIT'(it)SPI. CHOIR
rheEastC arolina University Gospelhoii
will sponsor j Variety Show on ruesday
me.ht .it P:30 pm fan mHIi .it Hendrix
rheater Please come out and join us a � !
present Showtime Jt Mendenh.ill 2 A
fun time is guaranteed! Admission is SI
QUTIK)()K PHOTOGRAPH
WORKSHOP
PtacMcal tips for taking action, wildlife
and scenic photographs fat natural settings
will highlight this meeting to he held Wed
Feb 7 in B010I Registration is required
prior to the workshop Cost is $2 student
and $.TfacuIty staff For additional infor
mation call 757 6387 or 757 6911
IAS! CAROJ lA FRIENDS
� v membi
a pUcabons Ihi
noii' iga Big friend to
an u. .i � lerm ntan cl d si Id onta I
nckept of so
YounuM '
ter hours.aid : ave .1 2 2 GPA APROTC
Attentionto all thoe interestex1 inbecom
ingairroneoffkt rs fne Mi l.1 V iOfficei
Qualifying1 tt : 1 QTheid mini
stored in iih'iii 08 tlAnnei
Come -in up .it i �
�-Inns' upi essicaMirt Wed :� k t PXCLUfl. i
Enjoy a massage on us an J0199O5J0
(tj'm SI10mm in advance and 2 al
thedoorlstftooi Mliedl lealthBldg (Bell
Bldg) by Phys alTI i py lub P
will go 1 I H il �
PHI ETA SII .MA
Phi 1 la Sigma wi hold it monthly meet
ingonjan 30iiom( pn in room 1022 of
theOC �
mi 111
I lillei i having .� Resta movie night
Wed I.in II .it 7 pm it Mike's house (2
Chesterfield Court) Comemakeyouxown
burritosand t.iro and wewU watch some
movies loi more Information or rides,
piw . .ill Sue .it 757 l�h29
ORGANIZATION OFMATLYE
AMIKKANS
Will be meeting on Wed Ian "M We will
meet at Maria 1 lai ris Apt 2021 !m -i �
River Estates 5 Begmsat 530 pm Please
attend!
I As I CAROLINA I ARIA
CHILDHOOD CH H
On an 11 the (EO" club will have it's
meeting at 4pm in Speight 308 t.ur guest
speaker will he Fumey lames 1 le will K-
talking to us about Career Day We will
ilso settle our business about the T shirt
and sweat shirts candy sales, our librarian
and new I listorian Please come and join
in the fun! We'll see you there'
DECISION SCIENCE SOCI-
m
Meeting Thur Feb I at 4:30 in GCB 3012.
I lolding elections foi iv offices MemKr
hip dues SS to all students eligible to
; � ome memlvr
HONORS PROGRAM
r student graduating spring semester
1990 who has completed with r.ide ot B
or better 24 hours in honors courses (in
i hiding upper level research courses In
the major) will he a graduate ot the I lonors
Program and should have that notification
ttamped on his or her transcript Todoso,
submit the list of 1 lonors courses taken (bv
-emester.) with gtadesearmxl, toDr David
sinders, 10u2GOB(7S7 M73) beforeThurs
day. Feb 15, l�sH)
GAMMA JlETAIHI
Hie first Ciamma Beta Phi meeting of the
semester will be Tuesday, Jan 30at 9 pm in
lenkins Auditorium. All members are
encouraged to attend There will be an
officers meetir . at 1 ffl pm
GRE1 Wll II RECR1 AITQN
AND l'ARKS DLPARTMLNT
rhe Cireenville Recreation and Parks de
partment needs volunteers tor the River
Part North Souvenii shop 1 lours are 1
pmtoSpm ruesday thru Sunday If you
enjoy meeting pople and waking with
nature oriented items, this opportunity is
for you Call C aroly n Smith atHi0 45hl for
information
CQASIA1 FITNESS CENTER
. mi i stic I ihrosis will
be '� lclat o ' i il itness Colter on Feb 3,
according to Rhonda Kallam. chairman ol
thi i nt it: :� pants will begin exercis-
ing .it s .mi All funds t.iiM-d will he used
to h Ip fight y " Rbrosea. Participants
will bi raising dollars for CFFby obtaining
pledges from friends relatives, and neigh
1-ois tor each hour they exercise during the
.vent For more information about the
Shape Up on in t Rhonda kallam at 75v
! 92
AM.I 1 I LIGHT
Rush Angel llie.ht. Mon Ian 2�, Inland
Wed .m 11, I990al 7pm AFROTC De
tachment 600 and Thurs Feh latfcSOpm
at home of t aptain Minnick
ECLLEQW1NG
Coxswain needed I204ba.orlesa Athletic
and energetic If interested contact Mike
Snipes: 72 15, Kelly Skinner 752 8002
CHRISTIAN fBAT�RNra
On Alpha Omega will hold Rush on Jan 29
and Ian 31 from 8 - 10 pm in room 221
MendenhaB. Contact Ion at 931 04 or
Reggie at 752-0545 if you are interested
SQCCEJ
.NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks de
partment is recruiting for 12-16 part-time
soccer coaches for the spring program
Applicants must possess some knowledge
in soccer skills and have Xitienoe to work
with vou. Applicants must be able to
coach young people, ages 5-18 in soccer
fundamentals Hours approximatielv 3-7
pm Monday thru Friday Some night and
weekend coaching Program will begin in
March Salary rate is $3.55 to $4 25 per
hour Applicants will be accepted starting
Ian 2 Contact Ben lames at 830-4567
AUEA
AHEA meeting Mon. Feb 5 at 3 pm in the
Van Landingham room Come and learn
how to build your professional wardrobe
New members welcome!
SOCWCjAPiLJIlQNS.
FOR SPRING SEMESTER 1990
Applications to the major must be filled
out and returned by Feb 1 First inter
views must be completed by Feb 23 Sec-
ond interviews (group meeting) will be
held on Feb 27and 28 at 5 pm in Ragsdale
218 Appbcants who have completed the
first interview must attend one of the group
interviews with Mr. Cartman.
Esucm
Psi Chi "Rush" party - Jan. 31 at 430 in the
Psi Chi Library. Current members and
prospective members are invited for FREE
Pizza. Become Psycho -active - Join Psi
i hi. the Psychology Honor smi-i Kv
pboabons available in Raw! 104 V
tion deadline is Feh 2
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN 111
LOW SHU'
We invite you to he with us every
night at 7 pm in rm 212 Mendenhall tor
prayer and hihle study Everyone is ����
come to be a part of this growing �
ship For more info call 7"2 7199
NCSL
North Carolina Student b ii
vou read v tochange the M
vou If you enjoy debate havingfu
having a purpose come by M
at 7 pm in 248 Mendenhall
CAMPUSCRUDAOLI OR
CHRIST
Check out pnmetime Campus Crusade
for Christ's weekly meeting We meet at
7 30 every Thurs night in 1026X Ii f I
great Bible teaching, skits refreshments
FUN" Everyone welcome
SJS:QVVSKIING CHEAP!
Im Rec services will be ottering a ski trip
to Wmtergroen. VA the Weekend ot Feb
3-4 Two da vs of prime downh ill skiing fot
beginnersand advanced skiers alike Cost
includes transportation, lodging, left tick
ets and on apres ski party No better
package around $99 student, $110,
faculty.staff and guests Enrollment is
limited so please register early and attend
the pre trip meeting to be held Wed Ian
31 at 5 pm in BD101 For additional infor
mation call 757-6387





I
Page 6
(She ffaat Carolinian
Classifieds
January 30,1990
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED. To
share a 3 bedroom apartment $150 a
month plus 1 3 utilities. Own room,
close to campus.
ROOMS FOR RENT: share six-room
house with male student, off-street
parking, five minute walk from FCU
campus The address is 302 lewis St
Call (919) 748-4280 and ask tor Lewis
Kucera.
FEMALE, NONSMOKING, ROOM-
MATE NEEDED: To share 2-bedroom,
112 bath apt, at Courtney square
Mature, responsible person preferred
Rent - $190 a month. 12 utilities, quiet
and nearly Call 355-2752, please leave
message
ROOMMATE WANTED: Nicely
furnished centrally located townhome.
$118 a month plus 1 3 utilities Must
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
come see' Only need bed dresses. For
more info, call 355-4143
FOR SAFE
GOLF CLUBS: 112 year old set of
Taylor Made Irons 1 pw, newly
regnpped in excellent condition, $2"0
Negotiable. Call Ray at Ji ' MH after
6pm.
LIKE TO SNOW SKI? Ladles'
Obermever stretch pants for sale Black
with stirrups, size 10. Brand new. Call
355-0172$ 35 or best offer
COUCH AND IOVESEA I: IVige and
Brown Good condition $100. Glass top
table and chairs $50 12 speed bike $75
Call 758-9264,
SERVICES OFFERED
BEST FUNDRAISERS ON CAMPUS:
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
I Larqost Library ol information in US -
3ii subjects
opr Cdtatoq T'1lv A'in tftuMf ci con
800-351 -0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
Or � ,sh $2 i "o Research Information
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appoint nvr.t Mon thru Sit
Low Co Termination to 20 wrtW of EVlgMacy
1-800-433-2930
The Suntana
5 Visit Plan 415
10 Visit Plan $25
15 Visit Plan $30
Wolfe l aiming System
756-9180
Coupon Good i luu 3-31 -90
3212 S. Memorial Dx
Is your fraternity, Sorority or club
interested in earning $1,000 � for a one-
weed, on campus marketing project?
You must be well organized and hard
working. Call Jenny or Myra at (800)
592 2121.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
softwares computers. 24 hours in and
out Guaranteed typing on paper up to
?0 hand written pages SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 E 5th St (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752 3691
NEED A D: whv not hire the best'
Experience is what counts. Currently
working at the Elbo and previously
worked at Rio! the club Specializing in
danceprogressiverock and beach
Call Mark Robert - 752 6927
HELP WANTED
MODELS: If vou would like to model,
Promotions Modeling Agency, a low fee
agency needs males and females of all
ages. Also need dancers for private
parties Call 355-0919 to set up an
interview.
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,040
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
BEST USED TIRES
TIRE SALES FROM $15 UP
ALL SIZES AVAlLABlJi
WHITE LETTER A WHITE WA1 J.S
Two locations: i�� N. Green Si
00-9579 1009 S Memorial l
V The Caif Company
ofQrctnviOe Ltd.
"Greenville's First Full Service Nail Care Salon"
Special Offer: Full Sei of Nails $22.50 reg. $45.00
Ask for Angk Tanning Session 2405 S. Charles 5
offer good lor .i limited time $2.m � ��� 1QIU1 ISSlSWi
S59,?i0yr Now Hiring Call (1)805-
687 6000Ext K 1H6 for current federal
list
SALES National Marketing Firm seeks
mature student to manage on-campus
promotions for top companies this
school year Flexible hours with
earning potential �o $2,500 per semester
Must be organized, hardworking, and
monev motivated 'all Michele or Jenny
at (800) 592-2121
A1RI1N1S NOW HIRING. Right
Attendants, 1 ravel Agent. Mechanics,
Customer Service Listing Salaries to
5105K Entry level porittom Call(l)
805-687-60(10 Ext A 116
ATTENTION EARN MONEY
READING HOOKS' S.32.000vcar
Income potential lvt.uk M)n2 838-
8H85 Fvt MV 285
BROPY'S is acv opting applications for
i.irt timesalr a sociatcs for rhespring
semester We want bright, enthusi.istic
artd energetic people who can give
friendly courtesy service. Flexible
schedules available. Interviews will be
held 2 days only Tuesday and Wednes-
day . Ian 30 - 31, From 12 - 4 pm Brodv's
The Haa
BRODY'S FOR MEN is searching for
Part time sale associates Enthusiastic
individuals whoenjov fashion and have
a flexible school s, hedute Interviews
will beheld - days only luesday and
Wednesda, an 30 M. From 12 - 4 pm.
or'xiN s , ! he ii.
AI)V III ISI(: DISPLAY ASSIS-
TANT peeatkei a ulabte to creative,
hid worming di i lual experienced in
graohk arts kground
ihrsirsHf Portfolio is i.quired with
interview. Interviews will be held 2
davsonly Tuesday and Wednesday, Ian
30 .11, From 12 1 pm Rrody's, The
Plaza.
HELP WANTED: Fashion Merchan-
dizing Mayors. Want a greet way to gain
valuable experience? Brady's is
accepting applications for a derical
assistant to Buying Staff. Interviews will
be held 2 days only Tuesday and
Wednesday, Jan. 30-31, From 12 - 4 pm
Brody's, The Plaza.
WANTED fashion consultant: Premier
Modular Career clothing company seeks
qualified person to direct and market.
Perfect for college girls, work your own
hours to earn extra money ave. $30hr
Call 757-1044 for more details after 5:00
p.m.
MANAGERS WANTED Call 757-4602.
Ask for Fred or Todd.
PERSONALS
DISPLAY CI ASS1HEDS
ECU ROWING COXSWAIN NEEDED.
1201bs. or less Athletic and Energetic. If
interested contact. Mike Snipes: 752-1596,
or Kelly Skinner: 752-8002.
DELTAZETA: Thank you for everything!
PhiPsi.
CONGRATULATIONS: To the Skate-
board fraternityandirsnewmembers Pres
Francis McCuire. V. Pres - Potscy Webber,
Treas Tim Faceman, Pledge Educator
Adam Toxic, Social Chairman GubTony,
Personnel - Julio and Scottv Burger. Keep
wording on the 160 degree Ollie kick flip
for final initiation Love you rush chair
man - Jill and Ronnie.
FREE PUPPIES: Lab Rotwkes Owner is
going broke with so many puppies - call
Mahanna at 746-6580.
CHI OMEGA: Susan Ambrose, Dizabeth
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
Hanes, Cathy Sposito, Kathryn Baemore
hang in there! We love you! Your sisters
and pledges of Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS: To the new Chi
Omega Committee Chairmen: Historian
Lisa Thompkins, Spirit - Christy OBnan.
lntramurals - Julie Pope, special Pro)ect
Kendra Curtis, Creek Council Krista
Kamenski. Correspondent secretary - Ter
rell Waldron, Alumnae - Jen snell and Beth
Helms, Social - Heather Cierpick. Food
Courtnew Mauldin, song Danielle
LaMonica, Activities Ashley Hendnx,
Career Development Windy Spell and
Ashley Bagenhart, Scholarship Tracy
Lewisand I louse BitsySqiaresand Angela
Meinders We know you all will do a great
(ob! Love you r sisters and pledges.
ADPL CHI OMEGA, AND ALPHA PHI
Thanks for helpingusdunngSpnng Rush
You ladies did a great job Good Luck on
a great )ob Good luck on a great semester
Love, The Pikes
FRED REHERMAN: You did a great job
with spring rush! Your hard work realK
paid off Thanks for all you did Pi K A
PIKES ARE DRIVING
THROTTLE!
FULL
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
� ALL NF.W 2 BEDROOMS �
UNIVERSITY
a ��� a WT1 ajTXTnrO
Darkroom
Technician j
Wanted j
Experience Needed a ppj r
TODAY
SUMMERFIELD
APARTMENTS
5209 Summerplace
New
1 and 2 bedrooms
located across from
Parker's Barbecue
on Memorial Drive
available Feb. 1March 1
contact Aaron Spain
355-6187
756-8060
CONGRATULATIONS: To the Lambda
pledge class of Pi Kappa Alpha You guys
are awesome' Get ready to meet the best
friends you'll ever have We're behind you
all the way! The Brothers
TOALLECUFRATERNini gratu
lations on your new members' ot rung i-
better than tK greet) experience! Con
grats! The Alpha Phis
ALPHA PHIS �h.1 luck on vonr exam
for these next two wtt-ks Let aim forth
big "4 0" thiN m mutu! We know .u can
do it! Love Fxec
CONGRATULATIONS: Co to Leslie
Nicholson for hew successful resolution at
UNCG. Keep it up' NCSL
NiCSL: The UNCCK was great Pavs
illed with debate Shaffer man with me
social" van And road trips to Wattle
House at 4 When we thought no more
could we take. Came the night tournev to
Piney lake "Jason" had to be out there'
Beth, how 'bout that underwear7 Chapel
Hill is coming up soon We'll leave them
howling at the moon Need we say any-
more
REWARD OFFERED: For lost. v. tv won.
brown stuffed animal dog Possibl)
dropped near Croatan if found, please
call 7Vl410 ,
disFlayclassTfieds
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for Jail
1990. Efficiency 1 bedim & 2
bedrm apts. Call 752 - 2865
To
Apply at
(ftp ni fflaroltnian
2nd Floor Publications Building
�'i
$2500 Instant line of
credit
Cash withdrawal up to
$1250.00
830-4034
The College Music FM
McBudget
Office
Furniture
We Have:
�Desks 'Chairs
�Files -Safes
�Computer 'Storage
Furniture Cabinets
We Buy. Sell. Trade, & Lease
miii.oiwM at.
7S2M34
Announcements
ALL NURSING STUDENTS
GRADUATING SPRING
SEMESTER
In order to receive your Nursing Pin in
April Orders must be placed in the Stu
dent Store, Wright Building, no later than
February 2,1990 Orders should be placed
at the Service Desk Orders must be paid
in full when placed
EAST CAROLINA UN1VER-
S1TY1GQSPEL CHOIR
The East Carolina University Gospel Choir
is now accepting members for the 1990
semester until Jan 31st. Please come out
and join us on Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Ledonia J Wright Cultural Center For
more information contact President Kip
plan Clemmons at 830-5391 or any mem
ber of the choir
.EAJ
T CAROLINAJJNJVER-
The East Carolina University Gospel Choir
will sponsor a Variety Show on Tuesday
night at 7:30 pm Jan 30th at Hendnx
Theater. Please come out and pin us as we
present 'Showtime at Mendenhall 2 A
fun time is guaranteed! Admission is SI
OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY
KStrnKSHCit
Practical tips for taking action, wildlife
and scenic tographs in natural settings
will highlight this meeting tobeheid Wed
Feb 7 in BD101. Registration is required
prior to the workshop. Cost is $2student
and 11facuity staff For additional in for
matton all 757-6387 or 757-6911.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
ECUF il! be accepting new membership
applications through January 31, 19990
Anyone interested in being a Big friend to
an ,irea elementary child should contact
Carrie Armstrong at 752- 7325 or In. Linda
Mooney, Dcpt of sociology, BA 409, 757-
6137, You nust have completed 12 semes-
ter hours and have a 2.2 GPA.
AFROTC
Attention to all those interested in becom-
ing air force officers. The Air Force Officer
Qualifying test (AFOQT) will be admini
stered in room 308 in the Wright Annex
Come sign up at nxm 308 or you can just
show upon Wed. for any questions call
Jessica Mitchell at 756-7128.
ICJJPXCLUB
Enjoy a massage on us Jan. 30 1990 5:30 -
9:30pm. SIlOmin in advance and S2 at
the door 1st floor Allied 1 lealthBldg. (Belk
Bldg) by Physical Therapy Club Portion
will go to charity!
MI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will hold its monthly meet-
ing on Jan. 30i;om 5-6 pm in room 1022 of
the GCB.
H1LLEJL
Millet is having a Resta movie night
Wed. Jan. 31 at 7 pm at Mike's house (28
Chesterfield Court) Come make your own
burritosand tacos, and we wiU watch some
movies. For more information or rides,
please call Sue at 757 0629.
3N OF NATIVE
AMERICANS
Will be meeting on Wed. Jan. 31. We will
meet at Maria I larris, Apt. 202 Flm St Tar
River Estates 5. Begins at 5:30pm. Please
attend!
EASTCjQLINAJARLI
CHILDHOOD CLUB
On Jan 31, the (EC)' club will have it's
meeting at 4pm in Speight 308. Our guest
speaker will be Furney James. 1 le will be
talking to us about Career Day. We will
also settle our business about the T-shirt
and sweat shirts, candy sales, our librarian
and new Historian. Please come and join
in the fun! We'll see you there!
DECISION SCIENCE SOCI-
Meeting Thur Feb. 1 at 4:30 in GCB 3012.
I folding elections for six offices Member-
ship dues $5 to all s.udents eligible to
become member.
HQNQRSJRQGRAM
Any student graduating spring semester
1990 who has completed with grades of B
or better 24 hours in honors courses (in-
cluding upper - level research courses in
the major) will be a graduate of the Honors
Program and should have that notification
r.tamped on his or her transcript. Todoso,
submit the list of Honors courses taken (by
semester,) with grades earned, to Dr. David
Sanders, 1002 GCB (757-6373) before Thurs-
day, Feb 15,1990.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The first Gamma Beta Phi meeting of the
semester will be Tuesday, Jan. 30at 9 pm in
Jenkins Auditorium. All members are
encouraged to attend. There will be an
officers meeting at 830 pm.
GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPARTMENT
The Greenville Recreation and Parks de-
partment needs volunteers for the River
Park North Souvenir Shop. 1 lours are 1
pm to 5 pm. Tuesday thru Sunday. If you
enjoy meeting people and working with
nature oriented items, this opportunity is
for you. Call Carolyn Smith at 830-4561 for
information
CQAST A lJUM ES&JCENXEI
A Shape Up to benefit Cystic Fibrosis will
be held at Coastal Fitness Center on Feb. 3,
according to Rhonda Kallam, chairman of
the event Participants will begin exercis-
ing at 9 am. All funds raised will be used
to hflp fight cystic fibroses. Participants
will be raising dollars for CFFby obtaining
pledges from friends, relatives, and neigh-
bors for each hour they exercise during the
event. For more information about the
Shape I lp, Contact Rhonda Kallam at 756-
1592
ANGEL FLIGHT
Rush Angel Right, Mon. Jan 29,1990 and
Wed. Jan. 31, 1990 at 7pm - AFROTC De-
tachment 600 and Thurs Feb. 1 at 630 pm
at home of Captain Minnick
ECU ROWING
Coxswain needed 120-lbs. or less. Athletic
and energetic. If interested contact Mike
Snipes: 752-1596, Kelly Skinner 752-8002.
CHRISTIAN FRATERNITY
Chi Alpha Omega will hold Rush on Jan 29
and Jan. 31 from 8 - 10 pm in room 221
Mendenhall. Contact Jon at 931-9604 or
Reggie at 752-0545 if you are interested.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks de-
partment is recruiting for 12-16 part-time
soccer coaches for the spring program.
Applicants must possess some knowledge
in soccer skills and have patience to work
with you. AppUcants must be able to
coach young people, ages 5-18 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours approximatiely 3-7
pm Monday thru Friday. Some night and
weekend coaching. Program will begin in
March. Salary rate is $3.55 to $4.25 per
hour. Applicants will be accepted starting
Ian. 29. Contact Ben James at 830-4567
AHEA
AHEA meeting Mon. Feb. 5 at 3 pm in the
Van Landingham room. Come and learn
how to build your professional wardrobe.
New members welcome!
FOR SPRING SEMESTER 1990
Applications to the major must be rilled
out and returned by Feb. 1. First inter-
views must be completed by Feb. 23. Sec-
ond interviews (group meeting) will be
held on Feb 27 and 28 at 5 pm in Ragsdale
218. Applicants who have completed the
first interview must attend one of the group
interviews with Mr. Gartman.
ESJXffl
Psi Chi -Rush" party -Jan. 31 at 430 in the
Pai Chi Library. Currant members ami
prospective membera are invited far FREE
Pizza. Become Psycho -active � Join Pat
Chi, the Psychology Honor Soactv Ap
plications available in Rawl 104 Apphca
rion deadline is Feb 2.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FFJ-
LgWSHlf
We invite you to be with us every arad
night at 7 pm in rm 212 Mendenhall for
prayer and bible study Everyone is wel
come to be a part of this growing fellow
ship. For more info, call 752 7199
NCSL
North Carolina Student Legislature: Are
you ready tochange the world' NCS1 toft
you. If you enioy debate, having tun, and
having a purpose come bv Monday nights
at 7 pm in 248 Mendenhall
CAMPUS CRUDADE FOR
CHRIST
Check out primetime - Campus Crusade
for Christ's weekly meeting We meet it
730 every Thurs. night in 1026 GCB for
great Bible teaching, skits, refreshments
FUN Everyone welcome
Im - Rec services will be offering a ski trip
to Wintergreen. VA. the Weekend of Feb
3-4. Two days of prime downhill skiing for
beginners and advanced skiers alike Cost
includes transportation, lodging, left tick
eta and on apres ski - party No better
package around. $99 student, $110
facultystaff and guests. Enrollment is
limited so please register early and attend
the pre - trip meeting to be held Wed Jan
31 at 5 pm in BD101 For additional infor-
mation call 757-6387.
i






Grant may help put dent in 'stroke belt'
ECU News Bureau
Researchers .it ECU have re-
ceived a grant that mav help put a
deni m the Southeast region s
reputation as the "stroke belt'
The $23,000 grant from the
Kate B. Reynolds Health (are
1 rust, will support a study of the
effectiveness of different tvpes of
follow-up efforts in assuring that
patients diagnosed with hyperten
sion in hospital emergency depart
ments seek appropriate treatment
tor their condition.
rhe project is a joint undertak-
ing of the ECU Schools ol Allied
Health Sciences and Medi ineand
I'm County Memorial Hospital,
under the direction of Dr Christo
pher ! Manstield. ECU assistant
professor oi community health.
Other Faculty participants in lude
Drs. F fackson Allison Jr Evelvn
A. Knight, Heramba Prasad and
1 heodore W. Whitley.
A leading cause of stroke,
hypertension can go undetected
tor long periods because it has no
major symptoms. One in five
Americans has the disease, but
many are not aware of it. For these
and other reasons, the condition is
frequently discovered in patients
visiting hospitals for emergency
care.
Unfortunately, Mansfield said,
patients do not always follow the
emergency physician's advice to
seek further treatment for their
hypertension. Mansfield and his
colleagues believe hospital person-
nel could improve patient compli-
ance with more aggressive follow-
ups such as reminder letters or a
telephone call from a physician or
lay hospital volunteer.
"We do know that anv effort
to follow-up increases patient
compliance Mansfield said.
"What hasn't been adequately
determined is the best way to fol-
low-up
The project will compare the
cost-of fectivenessof different types
of follow-up in getting patients
into long-term treatment. An
important emphasis will be the
relatively low-cost use of volun-
teers to makecontact with patients.
With its focus on the hospital
emergency department, the study
promises to have a significant
impact on the problem of hyper-
tension and stroke in eastern North
Carolina, particularly among
blacks. Statistics indicate that
blacks in the region have a greater
incidence of hypertension than
other population groups, and thev
use hospital emergency services at
twice the rate of whites
Once the study is completed
and the best approaches to the
follow-ups are determined, the
researchers hope to share their
findings with hospitals and other
health care providers throughout
the state, Mansfield said
The Kate H. Reynolds Health
("are Trust is a private foundation
located in Winston-Salem. Ap-
proximately $10 million is
awarded annually in grants to
nonprofit organizations through-
out the state
ECU Police search for suspect
On Jan 24 a suspect, seen nere in an police artist's rendering,
entered 103b Belk Hall through an unlocked door The suspect
removed $23 from the victim's wallet and turned to leave the room
As he did. the victim woke up to catch a glimpse of the suspect
leaving the room
The suspect is described as a 6 0 tall male between the age of
18 and 20 His hair is dark m color and is slightly over the ears His
mustache is thick and dark
Anyone having information concerning this case or any crime on
the ECU campus is asked to call ECU Crime Busters at 757-6266
Callers do not have to give their names and rewards are offered for
information that leads to an arrest
If you ve heard
something you think
would make a good
news, features or
sports story, let us
knowl
Call 7S7-B366. or
stop by our office
across from Joyner
Library.
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
Deadline lias been extended to Friday, February 23
STUDENT UNION COMMITTEE
CHAIRPERSONS
For the 1990- 1991 Term
Any full - time student can apply
Applications available al Mendenhall Student Center's
Information Desk and Room 2.6 - Student Union
A greeting card makes
a birthday happier!
Local and Out of Town Newspapers
BALLOONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
CENTRAL BOOK
& NEWS
GreenvtHe Square Shopping Center � 756 7177
Open Til 9 30 P M Sovon Days A Week
UVEBTiSED ITEM POLICV-tdch of these Mhwrti�d Mmt
to be reddily avdiUnle for sile r a r. Kroger StOTS ��� �
specifically noted m this dd If we do run out of anadvwrtiw
we will offer you your choice of d comparable iff"1 when
ivailabte, raflectin (ha same savings a ramcl � �
entitle you to purchase the advertised rttt M th� a &�� �� : ,
within 30 dds Only one vendor coupor a I be I ����:�
purchased
COPYRIGHT 1990 THE KROGfco CO ITEMS �
GOOD SUNDAY jAN 28 THROUGH SATURDA
1990 IN fy
orecnvillc, N(
WE RESERVE THE RlGH f TO LiMlTOu TITIl NOW
TO DEALERS
Save During
With Low Prices. And More.

�fe
'
r 0 &
m
�i
j-
�fV2
j.
- 0� &J &
IN THE DELI PASTRY SHOPPE
SHOPPE DELI FRESH
Pepperoni
Pizzas
12 Inch 20-oz.

��

'4t- && ;
, mtr- -
3
�ur
I
129
PS
CHILLI D
Sealtest
Orange Juice
Gallon
x j
lOO PUPF
GRANGE JUICt
CZJ
KROi � ��
18
A LARGE f ,
tip

Ivory Shampoo
or Conditioner
FROZEN
Banquet Meat
Pot Pies
Kroger
Tomato Soup
fcl5oz O
07o, JL
4 $1
� 10.5 oz Jm
BUY ONE
24 OZ. LOAF
Kroger
Sandwich Bread
GET ONE
FREE!
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE CAFFEINE FREE PEPSI,
CAFFEINE FREE DIET PEPSI.
Diet Pepsi
or Pepsi Cola
2-Ltr.
78
HYGRADE
Grillmaster
Chicken Franks
Mb. Pkg.
113 SIZE
California
Navel Oranges
Each
10
V






I
Grant may help put dent in 'stroke belt'
ECU News Bureau
Researchers at ECU have re-
ceived a grant that may help put a
dent in the Southeast region's
reputation as the "stroke belt
The $23,000 grant from the
Kate B. Reynolds Health Care
Trust, will support a study of the
effectiveness of different types of
follow-up efforts in assuring that
paticntsdiagnosed withhyperten-
sion in hospital emergency depart-
ments seek appropriate treatment
for their condition.
The project is a joint undertak-
ing of the ECU Schools of Allied
Health Sciences and Medicine and
Pitt County Memorial Hospital,
under the direction of Dr. Christo-
pher J. Mansfield, ECU assistant
professor of community health.
Other Faculty participants include
Drs. E. Jackson Allison Jr Evelyn
A. Knight, Heramba Prasad and
Theodore W. Whitley.
A leading cause of stroke,
hypertension can go undetected
for long periods because it has no
major symptoms. One in five
Americans has the disease, but
many arc not aware of it. For these
and other reasons, the condition is
frequently discovered in patients
visiting hospitals for emergency
care.
Unfortunately, Mansfield said,
patients do not always follow the
emergency physician's advice to
seek further treatment for their
hypertension. Mansfield and his
colleagues believe hospital person-
nel could improve patient compli-
ance with more aggressive follow-
ups such as reminder letters or a
telephone call from a physician or
lay hospital volunteer.
ECU Police search for suspect
On Jan. 24 a suspect, seen here in an police artist's rendering,
entered 103b Belk Hall through an unlocked door. The suspect
removed $23 from the victim's wallet and turned to leave the room
As he did, the victim woke up to catch a glimpse of the suspect
leaving the room.
The suspect is described as a 60" tall male between the age of
18 and 20 His hair is dark in color and is slightly over the ears. His
mustache is thick and dark.
Anyone having information concerning this case or any crime on
the ECU campus is asked to call ECU Crime Busters at 757-6266.
Callers do not have to give their names and rewards are offered for
information that leads to an arrest.
"We do know that any effort
to follow-up increases patient
compliance Mansfield said.
"What hasn't been adequately
determined is the best way to fol-
low-up
The project will compare the
cost-effeenvenessofdifferenttypes
of follow-up in getting patients
into long-term treatment. An
important emphasis will be the
relatively low-cost use of volun-
teers to make contact with patients.
With its focus on the hospital
emergency department, the study
promises to have a significant
impact on the problem of hyper-
tension and strokein eastern North
Carolina, particularly among
blacks. Statistics indicate that
blacks in the region have a greater
incidence of hypertension than
other population groups, and they
use hospital emergency services at
twice the rate of whites.
Once the study is completed
and the best approaches to the
follow-ups are determined, the
researchers hope to share their
findings with hospitals and other
health care providers throughout
the state, Mansfield said.
The Kate B. Reynolds Health
Care Trust is a private foundation
located in Winston-Salem. Ap-
proximately $10 million is
awarded annually in grants to
nonprofit organizations through-
out the state.
r
If you vt heard
something you think
would make e good
news, features or
sports stori
know
Cell 7S7-R
stop by our
ecross frm
Librar
-w
���
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directoi
is taking applications for m
STUDENT UNION PRESIDEN'
Deadline has been extended to Friday, February 23
STUDENT UNION COMMITT
CHAIRPERSONS
For the 1990 -1991 Term
Any full - time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall Student Center's
Information Desk and Room 236 - Student Union.
J
eting card makes
a birthday happier!
Local and Out of Town Newspapers
BALLOONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
CENTRAL BOOK
& NEWS
QrMnvilc Square Shopping Cantor � 756-7177
Qtojj Til 9 30 P M Seven Dtog A jjwj
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY-Each of these advertised items is required
to be readily available for sale in each Kroger Store, except ds
specifically noted in this ad. If we do run out of an advertised item,
we will offer you your choice of a comparable item, when
available, reflecting the same savings or a raincheck which will
entitle you to purchase the advertised item at the advertised price
within 30 days. Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item
purchased.
COPYRIGHT 1990 THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND PRICES
GOOD SUNDAY. JAN. 28. THROUGH SATURDAY. FEB. 3.
1990 IN Greenville, NC
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD
TO DEALERS.
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With Low Prices And More.
&.
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IN THE DELI-PASTRY SHOPPE
SHOPPE, DELI FRESH
Pepperoni
Pizzas
12-Inch 20-oz.
or Conditioner
FROZEN
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Pot Pies
Kroger
Tomato Soup
3 $1
4 $1
� 10.5-oz dh
BUY ONE
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Sandwich Bread
GET ONE
I
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CAFFEINE FREE DIET PEPSI,
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or Pepsi Cola
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Mb. Pkg.
113 SIZE
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Navel Oranges
Each
10
0





gllfc gain (gqrollnfan
Page 8
State an d Nation
January 30,1990
Romanians rally against leaders
BUCHAREST, Romania (AP)
� More than 15,000 Romanians
mounted the largest anti-govern-
ment rally since last month's revo-
lution, breaking through a line of
soldiers and threatening to "come
get" the new leader from his head-
quarters.
Interim President Ion Iliescu,
struggling to tree his government
from any association with Com-
munism and the ousted Ceaus-
escu regime, said later Sunday that
opposition parties had agreed to
broad talks.
During the rallv outside gov-
ernment headquarters in Victory
Square, protesters said the ruling
National Salvation Front should
resign because of its decision last
week to compete in elections.
Manv called for opposition par-
ticipation in the interim govern-
ment, claiming the front is not, for
example, allowing its political
competitors enough access to
broadcast media
was in the revolution
!
protected Iliescu and the front
because 1 thought they were good
people. But they arc not, they are
liars said Mihai Gheorghescu,
an official with the opposition
National Peasants Party.
The protesters had rushed
through a line of armed soldiers
and assembled at the doors of the
government headquarters Some
scurried atop a half-dozen tanks
guarding the building.
The crowd booed Iliescu when
he appeared on an upper floor of
the building and tried to speak.
The protesters chanted "Resign!
Resign and "Get out, or we'll
come get you out
Iliescu was named head of a
loose coalition of disaffected
Communists and intellectuals
who assumed power after the
revolt ousted the 24-year regime
of Nicolae Ceausescu, who was
executed with his wife, Elena, on
Dec. 25. But the front has come
under intense criticism since an-
nouncing its intention to compete
in free elections set fi
against newlv formed
parties.
Critics say the fi
fairlv compete in hallo
also administer lhe i
contains some formi
Communists and i rtnti
ports a return to one
Pro-government
tors also crowded
building Sunda) ch � �
We are with y i
were outnumbt r�
shouted bv the opposii
The two skJ
hissed at each other I
no violence. No ii
reported as the line
about 75 yards from ll
gave way to the cr v
diersthenre formed th
deep .it the building
Alter nightfall tr.
pro-govern men I d n
were brought to the
shouting that thi op
testers were prove
I After the reinforce
m r�ti irn d Iliescu reappeared
, ,i u 11 ted over a microphone
front had i m t r presenta
of th three pai ties sponsor-
I th protest
� II tin political parties
ii. Looperate including the
hre that sp nsi u this demon
' Next wee!
. . ntintH Mm dialogue
, id all of the more than 20
king to run candidates
U, iions i(niKi meet with
. , is rhursd i
ii hi i i spokesman w iih the
i isants Party said that
met w ith liies. u to
I thefi nt gi e w ay to
i ��� I interim uin n
. I ��. Id a separate
il'i headquarters t the
id i ion build
' inded a cess to the
ill r. i ;h. m stgnationof
� nment
Shevardnadze cautions seceding republics
MOSCOW (AP) Foreign
Minister Eduard A Shevardnadze
says secession by some independ-
ence-minded Soviet republics
would cause military, political and
economic problems for them, and
also could "result in a major des-
tabilization of the existing inter-
national structure
"It is in no one's interest to see
this happen he said in a written
response to questions submitted
before a rare i me-on-one interview.
Shevardnadze's home repub-
lic, Georgia, is among those with
an active nationalist movement.
"The problems of inter-ethnic
relations are so delicate and sensi-
tive that one should avoid any
outside interference in the process
of their development he said
when asked if U.S. support for the
independence of the Baltic repub-
lics of Lithuania, Latvia and Esto-
nia contributes to separatist feel-
ings there.
"I should say that on the whole
we see that responsible politicians
are aware of this he said, noting
the United States has reaffirmed
its recognition of the territorial
integritv of the Soviet Union
The interview in
Shevardnadze's wood-paneled
office on Thursday and the text of
the written exchange with The
Associated Press were released bv
mutual agreementon Sunday. The
Soviet foreign minister acknowl-
edged widespread concern in the
West for the survi vability of Presi-
dent Mikhail S. Gorbachev but
ascribed it more to a popular de-
sire that Gorbachev's reforms
succeed than to any real threat to
the Communist Party chief's po-
litical power
Asked about
nes in the Wcsl !
chaos in the So i i
causea backlash tha
Gorbachev from pow
nade replied "lb
particular pro
from sincere feelu
cere support tor tl �
percstroika that is �
the Soviet L nion
The soft-spoken, v
(Georgian, a (iorba 11
ruling Politburo r
Gorbachev �� hi �s n
arduous but holy sti i
" here is some s.
population that is di
appointed by( lorba
at reform, he said Bui
"Gorbachevand lrn r
ershipofthiscoui ti.
support f the bulk I
(xopl n pite ol the
�fit .it
. :��. mpt h . i 5
. � have a h �st i if other
: mil ter ethnic
: � . . � � a longtime
ut bo: sm .eorgia
i rtvii he i ippod him to
ei tl i I n ign Ministry
. i i i - agi � said the
hier'sopp inents do tv it
constitute significant
� � . u
� Miners expected to
i . toi,(rl iche1
�. . i � ��� national
il Com " �'� �-�
�� I eb 5 proj n s
j . v ardnadze, pae 9
N.C. jobless
rate rises to
3 percent in
December
Unemployment rate
100 counties
RALEIGH (AP)
North
Carolina's unemployment rate
rose slightlv to 3 percent in De-
cember 1UH4 from 2.8 percent in
November 1989, the state Employ-
ment Security Commission said.
The number of counties with
unemployment ratesat or below 5
percent stood at 88 in December
PW,compared lo81 in December
1988. ESC analysts regard 5 per-
cent as a near full-employment
situation.
Three counties � Tyrrell at
14.6 percent, Graham at 13.2 per-
cent and Swain at 11.7 percent �
had unemployment rates above
10 percent in December. Orange
County, at 13 percent, had the
state's lowest unemployment rate
in December.
The unemployment rates for
metropolitan statistical areas for
December ls84 compared to De-
cember 1988 were: Asheville, 2.4
percent, down from 2.6 percent;
Burlington, 2.6 percent, down
from 3.1 percent; C harlotte-Gas-
tonia-Rock Mi II, 2.6 percent, down
from 2.9 percent.
Favetteville fell to 3.5 percent,
down from 4 percent; (ireensboro-
Winston-Salem-I ligh Point, at 2.7
percent, were unchanged; Hick
orv fell to 2.7 percent, down from
3 percent
Jacksonville, 2.6 percent, un-
changed; Raleigh-Durham, 2 per-
cent, down from 2.1 percent; and
Wilmington, 32 percent, down
from 3.8 percent.
CountyNovDec
Alamance2.52.6
Alexander2.62.5
Alleghany3.52.9
Anson3.63.4
Ashe3.23.7
Avery3.03.1
Beaufort4.03.9
Bertie2.83.3
Bladen4.94.9
Brunswick5.96.0
Buncombe2.32.4
Burke2.52.4
Cabarrus2.62.8
Caldwell3.03.0
Camden2.12.1
Carteret3.64.6
Caswell3.23.4
Catawba2.32.9
Chatham2.11.9
Cherokee4.54.3
Chowan3.74.0
Clay5.25.1
Cleveland3.23.4
Columbus3.73.7
Craven3.12.8
Cumberland333.5
Currituck1.82.5
Dare2.55.3
Davidson2.32.4
Davie2.62.5
Duplin3.73.6
Durham2.12.1
Edgecombe3.43.6
Forsyth2.83.0
Franklin3333
Gaston2.82.8
Gates2.82.8
Graham12.013.2
Granville3.03.4
Greene2.22.2
Guilford2.62.6
Halifax3.94.0
Hamett3.03.0
Haywood4.66.6
Henderson2.12.2
Hertford4.03.9
Hoke4.24.6
Hyde7.69.5
Iredell2.83.2
Jackson2.93.9
Johnston2.83.4
I incoln
Macon
I
Martin
M I ov i
Meek il i
Mit. hell
Mon tgi niH'i v
'� foore
Nun
North.
(nslow
( i
Pamlki
I ,ls,j!t
h 1 r
Perquii
Poi
Poll
Ran ' .i
Ri hmoml
Robi
Rock i am
Rom a i
Rutfierford
Sampsoi
Scot I an i
Stanh
Stokes
r
Sa i
Iransvl
I i
S.
,i
w
v Uingtn
ataug i
� �
I
v 1I91
Yam
S 1 A 1 I

m
Pec
5.1
n
h33
3.53.5
2.533
t 1 ;
: n
- )5.7
2. -2.3
0u
1J.7
1J8
� 23.2
3.13J2
V4.1
2.5L6
I 11.5
1.92.1)
IS3.7
:J.
2 3.5
"vl5.2
2 5Z.b
13
UQ7 1
1 41.0
5J4
8II
2 h2H
5J3.h
.23.h
1 '4 5
2 h r.
5(�
�� 1
s II 7
1 Q2.2
11.111 6
I 11 9
Jh. -�
' M1 9
. I�o
) 6H
1 42 1
3.33.3
h3.0
3.944
u34
2.32.H
2H30
Flight 52
Avianca Flight 52 iBoe g 707 crashed in Cove Neck, N r . an
affluent area of Lonq Island Thursday evening Avianca Airtines said
the plane was circling JFK Inten ' nal Apon and apparently ran out
of fuel But airport officiate said the plane made a wrong approach
and crashed
2t m ii yM1 m �T7tiiH!
m rakeofl rhel� i e
originati i� '
Colombia's 1 Dorado International A rport H� Ra � Pa � �� �
made a stopover in Medeflin bel ���
� Destinat�. �
11 K
no
� � Pa .engei . a
�v More �' than 150 �'
��
i-� , �
Ul.
New
York
Medellm �
Bogota
Ht .
Covp
IFK
Ai' port
J Neck Avianca Flight 52 crash
4
Fort Bragg to be
included in cuts
nand
hed re
Fort Braj is ami !
man
ports, and othoi M rth i irolin �� nee cuts in their
t ivilian v ork i rces
B !���. cl -i' e,s and trooj duel rt ot the budget ri:
ish d� livet ed Monday to Con . major
bases where Army ol date programs. The
Was) . � - ' � .
face n er cutsi
Fort Bragg ami Defense Dej � I mment
.�ii hv rep -t-
'I cannot comment prior to I �:� i mentot
Defense portion of the 1 ' rth,aFbrt
Bragg spokesman.
Cap! Brian Irvinj � I Vir Fbi
Base, jI-m declined toccn il officials
s.nd the important mi; 1 I � � . i d Airborne
and Army special operatioi tl rastii cuts.
'What we are � to tu
typeof ?n' kelytose� am stn
cuts said lo Anne Conoly of fIh Fa I '� 11 licCorp.
It Defense So retan Ri cs significant man
pov er cuts or pi lal I I it will be ir
contract v ith pronounci n � � il m In November, Gen
Edwin H Burba lr inder I I � '� inta based Forces
Command, told Tht �. be subject to
budget cutting Butl irneunilsarethemilitary'sleast
Sfoonsoiidatiu i, page 9
Poorer counties
want Channel One
RALEIGH (AP) Roughly
o.ilr the83 Niirthc arolina s hools
th.it have signed up for the h.m
nell ?ne" news show are kx ated in
poor ounties a Ih ,i student '
,i. In emenl ! igs behind tin ir
peers .
A list ol tht schools was re-
leased Kn 1.i bv program execu
ti-es w h,i vt-rt' mi K,i. igh lo t ul
the lek i isii m � how
rhe 12-minute slv .� s bed
uU"i ti begin airing N'arch wil
feature U minutes of news and
two minutes of commercials ' u-
geted at teen-agers !� has been
banned in at least two states, v here
officials believed it amounted to
an inappn ipriate comn ier iali' i
turn oi pubik v hools
"Channel One" executives sa
the SViXX! in video equipm nt
loaned t� schools that agree lo
show the program will be a kvh
nological boon to less affluent
� ms.
Rural schoolsare more apt to
be pro( hannel One' simply K
cause those are the ones that are
having the hardest lime potting
equipment ' Ml Wienberry ol
It iiiivi ommunica
said ! ler firm is handing
local ubln relations for "Chan
I Kit-1 Bra mback, director of
media and tov hnotogy services for
the siatc Department of Public
Instruction, s.n.1 she w as not sure
why I hannel One" representa
had focused on the state's
small di tin ts.
Verj few et moseon this list
See Channel One, page 9





The East Carolinian January 30,1990 9
Consolidation
andidatcs foi drasti rv
�aid Burba ommandci
�'� iir, s hichci hr.uKiu.ir
Continued from page 8
1

11 bt the last outfit 1
il want to tou h in the
i or far term Burba said
da) isit to the pst
most iik, k wars we re
r.it invoh ed in .in- the
best prepared for
ui ,�t the i ' 000 sv1h't
�id deploy ment units
about 4 (X10 Fort
were sent to Panam i
i the I S invasion th.it
namanian di tator Man
' � '111 p rr
�� r 1188, no North
1 ir installations
�v. "1 Kisox that a
nssion targeted tor
lilt t status urt
Bragg spttkesnttin at tlv In � iui next di '
tlic choices indi it' i I thai f-orl ro prepare lor 11�� expected
Bragg .tin) Pope would I sate hudgot reductions, most bases in
from inclusion on simtl.it li -t into Northarolina began eliminating
the 21st centun i obs through attrition late
Hut the u'limii in n last vear and stopped hiring civil
mendatunsweremadi I �� ft re up ians rhose hiring freezes applied
heavals in Eutope that saw the to "appropriated fund" workers
opening o( the Berlin Wall and whose salaries are paid from base
dramatic hanges in several r.ist operating funds
em I uropean governments nd
thebudgt t iilstn mild spell tr uible
But on l.in 11 heney made
tor some ol tin more than 20,0tX the civilian hiring freeze ottn ial
civilian workers al Nortlaro and included non-appropriated
Una military bast's fund" employees fhose workers
1 m quiti' mhi tin ic will ire employed at service clubs,
recreation facilities, ommissaries
and post exi hanges and are paid
i i i nues produi ed bv the
� tin v pro ide
So far th appropriated fund
cuts in N'oi th arolina havee
ii ir. 'in Marine( orps install.)
� hern 1int Marine oi ps
- �me redui lion in civilian)�bs n
nount t�.i en Monda -n. i Vlexis
ain, a militai hudgct analv si
w ith the 1 h fense Budget l'r �
inashingtin.( nn told '� �
an i l �� ' � � ol Raleigh thai I
ci v ili,in h 'h i i Id be the first
i't many that will tvem � i I
Air Station near Havel(M"l has
eliminated 10 )bs over the pa; �
11 months, bringing the numhoi
of appropriated fund workers to
1 199, a Marine spokesman s.m)
I here arc r'il nn-appro i �' I
fund employee at the air: tation
There have been no C'h i uts
among the 1,259 civilians work
ing at hi ti Pt lint's higgi t i1 v i'
ian empli n ei the N � il V v i itii n
Vi
�t New Rii'i Marine ' ips
Air Statii n neai a ! nville five
temporary- employees lost theit
jol an 12, and otfii
ing tor word on the future ol thi
remaining 99 tull timi ci' lians p
"We are still waiting foi fui
ther guidam e from M eC'orp
headquarters lunni i � gl 1 �n
( allvrt said I here i i
appropriated fund : I
station, h� said
The Hair Loft
Get a quick Tan Without Burning n Oui
Brand New Tanning Bed
(Wolff Bellarium "S I amp- i
$4 per visit vS for 10 vi
w i Cms S8 00
Perms S; 5 00
Walk In Welcot
Mi hi hii lO.iii � '
S.ii 9ain
e
IS Mill Si
V. intervtlle, NC 28590 ' : lrom :
oiiK miles south of Camlina Fast Mall
omi v s vb'i'ivi rtnr�T�Ttnr6 inra'B 8 8 srtrvtrTBTtnrnnr mnnrrivntj
��
t R A ISi r - v -
v hiinnel One
�'I-ii media vr en e
't level Ms Brum intei said
' ' . ethat had noth lohn si rmersit
it on iist start bx shtiwn I
wati hi ,1 ti
th the state
asked local
efrain from
m am
Restaurant
� Our oik year annivei sary is here to thank you and
� tor your patronage we offer you these spe ials:
�ir
C j HI ()l (.1.1 ONK I Il I
I
I
I
3
in
i ' 11. i inir, rn r. i. . "
immiinmh ' All Appetizers
i Half Price After id
.vided l
about
'
ami
m
(Continued from page H
could divide what timi 1 da
show it and that s h(K�ls would be
required to shov 2 percent of the
i I . least each vear. �
lents wl parent
im or it
� . t 'jir Tu Sal 11-11 ' 1
ha vi ,igiu1 tr in 11 10
shovN t hanm I jjuLajLajitiajLitttJLiuuLroj
mm
: 9:00pm
"5
i
i
,iow npla ed to lohi
t ts during thi � � �
, - � .

� �
� said V hi I dm
denttal man, Haworl
;�; mmercials
� � equal I I
mnelnom tudenl
reetoshowthi endj
t broadcast I publt
l'students
ii ��
� - .i � � : int a
no than intl
lid
� re rvai !
lassroom
� , �. tn �
� tl its, hoob
hevardnadze
� , m attack A R
the party's mv fne
a I mo nor
.
ides of totalitai '
truli rhesrrengtl he two a re to mi vl
; diffit ulttomea 1 eb 7 for a tv
� Moms tor I
eeks I P' Ttr.r
.i . i mounti
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
v hile you wait
1 ree & (!ontldential
Sei v ices & c !ounseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 1 3rd Si.
'1 he Lcc Building
(ircctn ille, NC
ivas ' i
� . � , � �
Central'
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M 1 9 am-5 prn
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ist month in
This
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;
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� ah: hu I isitnuf iis
fiuu � s' � 'Trade
i 17 Evan St. Mall
Downtown
. , . � �. � I- REE
part" � it ,r pir
� �' i i
iff of
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WZMB
Progressive
Dance Nighl
LADIES FREE (til 10:30)
MANY DRINK SPECIALS AVAI1 ABLE
PARKING AND TRAFFIC APPEALS HOARD
Beginning Februar) 1, 1990, students, staff, and facultv will
have the right to appeal, in writing, a eampus citation issued
iolationsofthe E( I Parking and Traffic Regulations. Appro
priate forms and information regarding the Appeals System
v ill be furni shed to the appellant by Traffic Serv ices. The form
must be completed and returned to Traffic Services within ten
(10) business days ol the citation date.
Further information regarding the Appeals System is a ailable
at the Traffic Service Office located at 609 East 10th Streel oi
h telephoning 757-6294
River Bluff
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� Full Carpeted
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� lUis Service 1.5 miles from campus
� Under New Management
� On Site Maintenance
10th St. Ext. To Riverblult Kd.
758-4015





The East Carolinian January 30,1990 9
Consolidation
Continued from page 8
likely candidates for drastic re-
ductions, said Burba, commander
of Fort Bragg's higher headquar-
ters.
"This will be the last outfit 1
think we'll want to touch in the
near term or far term Burba said
during a two-day visit to the post.
"The most likely wars we're
going to get involved in are the
ones they're best prepared for
Burba said of the 40,000-soldier
post's rapid-deployment units.
On Dec. 20, about 4,000 Fort
Bragg troops were sent to Panama
as part of the U.S. invasion that
forced Panamanian dictator Man-
uel Noriega from power.
In December 18, no North
Carolina military installations
were listed among 91 bases that a
federal commission targeted for
closing or reduced status. A Fort
Channel One
Bragg spokesman at the time said
the choices indicated that Fort
Bragg and Pope would be safe
from inclusion on similar lists into
the 21st century.
But the commission recom-
mendations were made before up-
heavals in Europe that saw the
opening of the Berlin Wall and
dramatic changes in several east-
em European governments. And
the budget also could spell trouble
for some of the more than 20,000
civilian workers at North Caro-
lina military bases.
"I'm quite sure there will be
some reduction in civilian jobs an-
nouncedon Monday said Alexis
Cain, a militarv budget analyst
with the Defense Budget Project
in Washington. Cain told TheNai't
and Observer of Raleigh that the
civilian job cuts would be the first
of many that will occur over the
next decade.
To prepare for the expected
budget reductions, most bases in
North Carolina began eliminating
some jobs through attrition late
last year and stopped hiring civil-
ians. Those hiring freezes applied
to "appropriated-fund" workers
whose salaries are paid from base
operating funds.
But on Jan. 11, Cheney made
the civilian hiring freeze official
and included "non-appropriated
fund" employees. Those workers
are employed at service clubs,
recreation facilities, commissaries
and post exchanges and are paid
with revenues produced by the
services they provide.
So far, the appropriated-fund
job cuts in North Carolina havee
come from Marine Corps installa-
tions. Cherry Point Marine Corps
Air Station near Havelock has
eliminated 105 jobs over the past
11 months, bringing the number
of appropriated-fund workers to
1,499, a Marine spokesman said.
There are 561 non-appropriated
fund employees at the air station.
There have been no job cuts
among the 3,259 civilians work-
ing at Cherry Point's biggest civil-
ian employer, the Naval Aviation
Depot.
At New River Marine Corps
Air Station near Jacksonville, five
temporary employees lost their
jobs Jan. 12, and officials are wait pi� Mill OTTVm �I �TWa IB � �IU Bid IIIIII�III 111
ing for word on the future of theC x-v1 CK
remaining 99 full-time civilians.
"We are still waiting for fur w,
ther guidance from Marine Corps
headquarters Gunnery Sgt. Don Z
Gilbert said. There are 133 non-
appropriated-fund jobs at the air
station, he said
Restaurant
I Our one year anniversary is here to thank you and
for your patronage we offer you these specials:
Continued from page 8
have full-time trained media per-
son at the system level Ms. Brum-
back said. "Maybe that had noth-
ing to do with it, but vou just start
looking for clues
The equipment provided bv
Whittle Communications, the
Knoxville, Term company that
markets the program consists of a
satellite dish, two VCRs and a TV
set for each classroom Once the
three-year contract expires, the
equipment reverts to Whittle. Ed
Winter, the founderand president
(it "Channel One downplaved
its commercial aspects during the
news conference.
"Commercially sponsored
pn igramming is not new to a class-
room Mr. Winter said. "When
they run the presidential inaugu-
ration, there are commercials.
Channel One' with commercials
is better than channel none
Schools that agree to show the
program must broadcast to a
majority of students nearly every
day mi the producers can guaran-
tee advertisers a significant audi-
ence.
Winter said studies at St.
John's University in lamaica, NY
had shown that students who
watched the show knew more
about current events than those
who did not.
Channel One' students
know more, arc more motivated,
and thev will tell vou with regard
to commercials that they're not .i
threat to them Winter said. "We
had girls with spiked hair in the
cafeteria debating what happened
to John Tower. North Carolina
students will act differently if thev
are exposed to 'Channel One I
can assure vou
J
Top state education leaders
take a different viewpoint. How-
ard H. Haworth, chairman of the
state Board of Education, has
equated the program to 'selling
students' minds Bobby R. Eth-
eridge, state superintendent of
public instruction, has said he
disapproves of the program but
believes it's a matter that local
school officials should decide for
themselves.
Earlier this month, the state
Board f Education asked local
superintendents to refrain from
signing contracts for the program
until the panel had a chance to
study it further.
Winter said the program
addressed two critical needs:
upgrading technology in the class-
room and providing "relevant
programming" for students.
"A typical student has more
technology in his home than in the
schoolroom he said. "That's
unacceptable. What we're really
trying to do is make the classroom
a more relevant and interesting
place
He said that teachers would
be able to preview the show be-
fore students saw it, that schools
Shevardnadze
Continued from page 8
sive (action also has formed, and
sources say it may stage an attack
11 the same meeting on the party's
constitutional monopoly on
power, and demand a virtual
apology for decades of totalitar-
ian Communist rule. The strength
of either group isdifficult to meas-
ure, but the problems for Gor-
bachev, who seeks to portray
himself asa centrist, have mounted
in recent weeks.
I ithuania'sCommunistParty
broke with Moscow last month in
a campaign for independence. This
month, long-simmering ethnic
hatreds and territorial disputes
burst into open warfare in the
southern Caucasus.
higgling foreign policy issues
and domestic problems, which he
said can't be entirely separated
from each other, Shevardnadze
predicted "the most important
event of this year" will be the June
summit meeting in the United
States between Gorbachev and
President Bush.
1 te expressed confidence that
heand US.Secretary of State lames
A. Biker, whom he referred to as
"my friend will make further
progress toward an agreement to
halve the superpowers' strategic
or long-range, nuclear arsenals
The two are to meet in Moscow on
Feb. 7 for a two-day session that
was put off a day at the Kremlin's
request to prevent its overlapping
with theCentral Committee meet-
ing.
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i
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�Ityht 'By Visiting Us!
3uy � Sett � Trade
417 Evans St Mall
Downtown
There's plenty of FREE
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could decide what time of day to
show it and that schools would be
required to show 92 percent of the
180 programsbroadcast each year.
Students whose parents object to h
the program or its commercials
could be excused from watching.
About 2,000 schools across the
country have signed contracts to
show "Channel One "
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EZ
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� Fully Carpeted
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10th St. Ext. To Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
. MM






Page 10
(Bile gast Olaroltmanl
Features
liuuuin30,1990
Deli celebrates eight years
Bv Suzan I.awler
Matt Writer
rhe New IVh celebrated its sth anniversary
Saturday night with a three hand bash. In Limbo,
rhe Popes, and the Flat Duo lets entertained the
crowd ol loyal customers and curious first-timers.
Patrons also enjoyed Ivor specials and door prizes
throughout the evening
When the New Deli tirst opened its doors, it
became known as a hangout tor alternative music
! vers On Saturday night, the New Deli hosted a
w ide variety ol peorle Preppily clad students danced
side b suK- S ith guy s in leather jackets and girls in
Indian skirts 1 hei row d wasa high-spirited melting
pol
rhe Popes are a talented quartet with I dean,
crisp sound I heir quiet, unsmiling singer gave an
air ol solemnity to their music.
By contrast the Flal Duo lets were loud and
brash. The singer greeted the crowd with, "Hey,
mother ers I he mother erscheered.
tu r plugging their t shirt which a couple of
people already had en, the band launched into some
fast paced music. The inspired crowd up front imme-
diately began jumping up and down
They soon tired of this and began a milder ver-
sion ot slam dancing bump dancing. One bump
dancer, caught up in the frenzied bumping, lifted his
can of boor over his head.
The people behind him moved back, expecting a
torrent of beer to ricochet off his head. The young
man obviously forgot that he had finished the drink
since only three or tour drops hit his head (. "out used
and disappointed, he peered into the can and then
tossed the can to the fl�or.
The dancers and the onlookers were very re-
sponsive to the Flat Duo lets. The band's play list
included Mv Life, Mv Love "Chiquita "Ma-
dagascar cna "Sing, Sing, Sing
The close dancing might have been a form ot
silent protest l"he dance floor is small so it probably
wouldn't have been for people to dance any other
way. Perhaps the dancing was their way of saying,
See Deli, page 11
Patrons of the New Deli helped Greenville's kite mative music dub celebrate its eqh?h birthday
Saturday night Three bands played throughout the nighl (Phot I Photo Lab)
Shroud of Turin leaves fascinating mystery
B C an ie Armstrong
ntrrtJinuirnl Editor
Since itsdisco very, the Shroud
ol 1 nnn has remained a fascinat-
ing mystery. Many believe the
ghostly, life-size image ot the
N arded man with longhair is that
ol esus( hrist i ieorge( 'arl is one
ol them.
(. ,n i w hi i is w i irking on his
masters degn e at ECU, claims to
have the evidence to prove that
the shroud really Is the burial cloth
olbust
Although carbon dating tests
have shown the shroud's fabric to
be ol medieval age, Carl defends
his position. "There are two things
about the shroud that are scientifi-
cally unique, a negative image that
can be reproduced and the 3-D
effect just one picture ol the shroud
produces Carl said.
Carl is looking at the shroud
from a theological and historical
perspective rather than trom a
scientific angle, and he thinks that
because becomes from a non-reli-
gious background his opinion is
less biased than thatotother schol-
ars.
He bases his research on
physical characteristics of the
shroud that are visible to the naked
eve and concentrates on several
different images: a curved blood
mark on the forehead, crossed
hands at the pelvis and images
that appear on the chest.
Carl said the indications of a
curved blood mark cm the tore
head could only have formed in
such a manner it there had been an
object on the forehead to divert
the stream ol blood. Hecreditsthe
object as being the "seal of conse-
cration a small, flower-shaped
metal plate that was worn by high
priests
Carl said theEssenesbelieved
that when the Messiah came, he
would come as high priest and so
the regalia of a high priest was
, msign d to him Already in the
Gospel, lesus is walking around
in a seamless robe Carl said. "A
seamless robe to the I it brew mind
can onlv mean one thing thei �
the high priests wore
"The hands were crossed at
the pelvis he said i nly the
Essenes buried their AA that
way esus was an Essen
arl s contention is that jesus
was buried as high priest, not in
an exa 11 opy ol the priestly rega
ha .but with the same symbols ' Ie
says this� an Iv seen reflci ted on
the shroud.
( arl pointed out that there isa
sharp crease on the neck that has
goneune � entists.Hi
contends that this 1 me be! one1 a
piece ot clothing known a "the
breast pie c ol judgement
i
i i I i i
land i .
Hesaid n
version ol the bo
judgment' w ith
granate and you v an see
I'u i u .i m th '� It he s
w anng thai
the high pr;i f consecra
lion
t arl went on to say I
entists do ki shroud ion
tams the actual
tied man. It illy perfect
it s anatomically perfei I in
blo d flows are perfei t, he
There s no way it'sa f �rgery
I le first became interested in
the shroud in 1978 w hen the loth
a as publi ly shown in theathe-
dral ol San Giovanni Battista in
I urm tor onlv the third time this
.i 1 or the past 11 ears.c arl
has (ven researching the shroud
i arl's resean h is going t
reviewed hv the Association ol
ScicntistsofS holars International
for tl ud ol ! urm Ltd 1 Ie
has also written a manuscript with
the contention of getting his
torical research published
Film festival kicks
off in Hendrix
By Rob William;
sum W riter
Inspiration attacks from the left
These students seem to have spotted something awe-inspiring They are seated in front of the art building and look toward Fifth Street on
�K and dreary day (Photo by J D Whitmire�ECU Photo Lab)
1 he EC I films coi
spons tine, a Spike 1 ee him festi
val N ginning an 11 mA lasting
through Fob 4
i la) ing l dm - la) at 8 j
will be slu- s�.tta 1 lav
5 bed Stin Bad W e
( ut I lead:
Thursda) v, illh ature Do! he
Right i hing at p m
Spike Lee's I
have earin d him - rable
tame over the last tew ears
young artist mak ii . � i
black tilu
film Do i he Rij was
nominati ire at this
year 5lolden t llobi V. ards
i ee is considt reda lex al I
in the Brooklyn, New York com
muni ties ol Bedfi rd-St ��� '
.io 1 oi te .reein w hi hact as the
settings for most ol his film fTiese
predominantly Na kand 1 Ii ipanu
neighborhoods where Lee him
M'lt works and li es pro ide u
th a realistii di n ol
inner city life, something that 1 ei
strives lor in his tilms.
i. onsequently,I ee sfilmsdeal
with race relations and social
struggles, tackling such confron
tational issues head on through
humor, wit and delicacy. His
a- al o! this � pe ol subje t
ttei s jh i king, espei iall) in
i 'o rhe Right lhing where the
ii n e ol New i ork s 1 toward
� ich incident is seen
. s t.lms have bee n a pai t ol
an enduring effort by Lee to be
taken seriously in the motion pk
ture film industry His own
sti uggli to receive strong ba king
tor the marketing of his films by
maji i � ompanies such asColum
bia Pictures nd Universal Stu
dios lias been a hard one.
Although "IV i he Right
1 hing has been given substantial
rei ognition already. main critic s
believe it's only a matter ol tin
before I ee hits it big with a box
ottu e burner
Lexicon
Mushrooming
lor the week
of 1 : vo
1 1 ilung A depressing. B
ik; C lifting; I rhythmic
? Mnhsh . stubborn; B.
vandcr; inniving; I1 touchy
;ma fantasy; H
! n e i" pule; D flam
l kreade: A circus; B theater;
C covered passageway; D
parade
5 Spindly A long, slender; B.
airhcaded; C old aged; D odd
6 11,ilk A green monstei. B
broken down ship. (' weight-
hii r; D. pile ol debris
7 Cos� i A se ure. H pamper;
io hind. I) protect
3 Parla double down; B
increa i I negotiate; D. pick hi
or low
9 Inituile A push; B. roll
alone. C short person. D. unable
to speak clearly
1" (vrcu; A. foresight; B
insight; C. fruit; P. appetizer.
An ideal view:
Divorce breaks apart more than homes
By Caroline Cusick
Features Editor
Last year, 1 lived on campus.
One of my dorm neighbors was in
the process of getting a divorce.
The divorce made her very happy
and left me equally confused.
1 fail to see why she derived
such pleasure from her divorce.
Her husband didn't hit her, abuse
her, drink excessively or, as far as
she knew, participate in infidelity.
She said that he was kind. Her
reason tor requesting the divorce
was that she simply "didn't love
him anvmore"
4
In my eyes, love Is more than
a mushy feeling. Feelings fluctu-
ate like tides. They can neither be
predicted nor depended on. The
type of love that leads to marriage
is, or should be. a matter of com-
mitment.
Marriage is a decision of the
will to remain with another per-
son till death do you part. It is not
an event to be entered into "as
long as love endures which, 1
have been informed, is currently
the most widely versed version of
the wedding vows.
Divorce is powerful and can
be devastating. Many people go
through divorce claiming they
are the only ones affected. 1 dis-
agree.
Divorce affects everyone. It is
indisputable that marriage part-
ners share friends. They go the
same places and know many of
the same people. Divorce makes
those who are friends of both the
husband and wife uncomfortable.
When two people enter into
marriage, they tie together two
families. They bring together two
sets of parents, siblings, cousins
often creating lifelong friendships.
When a marriage is terminated,
these friendships receive pressure
through finger-pointingand side-
taking. Too often, the friendships
that began around a marriage,
crumble with the divorce.
When families go through
divorces, the results can be tragic.
In many cases, children blame
themselves for their parents' lack
of hindsight and inability to com-
municate effectively It's easy for
parents to say, "We don't love you
any less, we just can't live to-
gether But it can be hard for
children to understand.
According to Fred Rogers of
"Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood"
divorce is one of the dominant
fears in children today. In 1989,
one of every four children in
America lived in a single-parent
familv.
In my eyes, it is fortunate the
girl I know had no children.
However, that fact does not de-
tract from the extreme sadness of
the event. At one point, she cared
for her husband, excuse me, ex-
husband, enough to give him her
heart and hand.
1 assume he did not receive
with those two several other in-
gredients which, which blended
together, make a good marriage.
Respect, honor, trust, charity, faith,
servant hood, kindness, commu-
nication and a degree of reverence
are all vital to the survival of any
relationship.
Divorce is a type of death; it's
the death of a way of life. It is the
official termination of a promise.
At one point in the history of
America, births, deaths and mar-
riages that were recorded in fam-
ily Bibks were of fie ial, perma nent,
unalterable documents. Today,
many people feel it's alright to
tear the page out if marital bliss
recorded loses its fairy-tale
glamor.
Marriage certificates were
once permanent official docu-
ments. I have been told that is no
longer the case.
Little is left in our society that
is sacred and unchanging. Aside
from the teachings of the Bible, I
can think of nothing to label per-
manent. That is genuinely tragic.
Sk, what ami tryingtosay?To
those who are happily committed
10 another person�keep up the
good work. Yes, I realize main-
taining a successful reiarionship is
work. It's not always fun. It's not
ahvayseasy. But like employment,
if you can find work (hat you like
to do, you'll probably be happy.
See Divorce, page U





Page 10
gltrc jEaat (ffamlttrian
Features
January 30,1990
Deli celebrates eight years
By Suzan Lawler
Staff Writer
The New Deli celebrated its 8th anniversary
Saturday night with a three-band bash. In Limbo,
The Popes, and the Flat Duo Jets entertained the
crowd of loyal customers and curious first-timers.
Patrons also enjoyed beer specials and door prizes
throughout the evening
When the New Deli first opened its doors, it
became known as a hangout for alternative music
lovers. On Saturday night, the New Deli hosted a
wide varietyoi people. Preppily clad studentsdanced
side-by side with guvs in leather jackets and girls in
Indian skirts The crowd wasa high-spirited melting
pot
The Popes are a talented quartet with a clean,
crisp sound. 1 heir quiet, unsmiling singer gave an
air of solemnity to their music.
By contrast, the Mat Duo lets were loud and
brash The singer greeted the crowd with, "Hey,
mother era The mother ors cheered.
tter plugging their t-shirt which a couple of
people already had on, the band launched into some
fast paced music. The inspired crowd up front imme-
diately began jumping up and down.
They soon tired of this and began a milder ver-
sion of slam dancing�bump dancing. One bump
dancer, caught up in the frenzied bumping, lifted his
can of beer over his head.
The people behind him moved back, expecting a
torrent of beer to ricochet off his head. The young
man obviously forgot that he had finished the drink
since only three or four d rops hit his head. Confused
and disappointed, he peered into the can and then
tossed the can to the floor.
The dancers and the onlookers were very re-
sponsive to the Flat Duo Jets. The band's play-list
included "My Life, My Love "Chiquita "Ma-
dagascar and "Sing, Sing, Sing
The close dancing might have been a form of
silent protest. The dance floor is small so it probably
wouldn't have been for people to dance any other
way. Perhaps the dancing was their way of saying,
See Deli, page 11
Patrons of the New Deli helped Greenville's alternative music club celebrate its eighth birthday
Saturday night Three bands played throughout the night (Photo by �Photo Lab)
Shroud of Turin leaves fascinating mystery
By Carrie Armstrong
Fntertainment t-ditor
Since itsdiscovery, the Shroud
it Turin has remained a fascinat-
ing mystery. Many believe the
ghostly, life-size image of the
bearded man with long hair is that
oi Jesus Christ. George Carl isone
ot them.
Carl, who is working on his
masters degree at ECU, claims to
have the e ideiue to prove that
the shroud reallv is thebunal cloth
ot Christ.
Although carbon-dating tests
have shown the shroud's fabric to
be of medieval age, Carl defends
his position. "There are two things different images, a curved blood
about the shroud that are scientifi- mark on the forehead, crossed
cally unique, a negative image that hands at the pelvis and images
can be reproduced and the 3-D that appear on the chest,
effect just one pictureof the shroud
produces Carl said.
Carl is looking at the shroud
from a theological and historical
perspective rather than from a
scientific angle, and he thinks that
because he comes from a non-reli-
gious background his opinion is
lessbiased than thatof other schol-
ars.
He bases his research on
physical characteristics of the
shroud that are visible to the naked
eve and concentrates on several
Carl said the indications of a
curved blood mark on the fore-
head could only have formed in
such a manner if there had been an
object on the forehead to divert
the stream of blood. He credits the
object as being the "seal of conse
crahon a small, flower-shaped
metal plate that was worn by high
priests.
Carl said the Fssenesbelieved
that when the Messiah came, he
would come as high priest and so
the regalia of a high priest was
consigned to him. "Already in the
Gospel, Jesus is walking around
in a seamless robe Carl said. "A
seamless robe to the I lebrew mind
can only mean one thing, the robo
the high priests wore.
"The hands were crossed at
the pelvis he said "Only the
Fssenes buried their dead that
way. Jesus was an Essene
Carls contention is that Jesus
was buned as high pnest, not in
an exact copy of the priestly rega-
lia, but with the same symbols. He
savs this can be seen reflected on
the shroud.
Carl pointed out that there isa
sharp crease on the neck that has
gone unexplained by scientists. I le
contends that this line belongs to a
piece of clothing known as "the
breast piece oi judgement
He said: " I hire is a modified
version of the breast piece ot
judgment' with a bell and a pome-
granate, and you can see it re
fleeted on tin shroud It he's
wearing that, he must be wearing
the high priest seal ot consecra-
tion
Carl went on to say that so
entists do know the shroud ton-
tains the actual image of a cruci
tied nun. "It's medically perfect,
it's anatomically perfect and the
blood flows are perfect he said
"There's no way it's a forgery "
I le first became interested in
the shroud in 1978 when the cloth
was publicly shown in the Cathe-
dral of San Giovanni Battista in
Turin for only the third time this
century. For the past 11 years,Carl
has been researching the shroud
Carl's research is going to be
reviewed bv the Association of
Scientistsof Scholars International
for the Shroud of Turin, Ltd. He
has also written a manuscript with
the contention of getting his his-
torical research published.
1
-

Film festival kicks
off in Hendrix
Inspiration attacks from the left
These students seem to have spotted something awe-inspiring. They are seated in front of the art building and look toward Fifth Street on
a dark and dreary day (Photo by J.D. Whitmire� ECU Photo Lab)
By Rob Williams
Staff Writer
The ECU films committee is
sponsoring a Spike 1 ee film festi-
val beginning fan. M and lasting
through Feb 4
Playing Wednesday at 8 p.m
will be "She'sGotta lax It" and
"Jiv's Bed-Stuv Barbershop We
Cut Heads
Thursday will feature "Do! he
Right Thing" at 8 p.m.
Spike Lee's motion pictures
have earned him considerable
fame over the last few years as a
young artist making waves in the
black film industry His feature
film "Do The Right Thing was
nominated for best picture at this
year's Golden Globe Awards.
Lev is considered a local hero
in the Brooklyn. New "iork com-
munities of Bedford Stuyvesant
and Forte Greene, u Inch a�J as the
settings for most of his films. These
predominantly black and I hspanic
neighborhoods, where Lee him-
self worksand lives, provide view-
ers with a realistic depiction ot
inner-city life, something that Lee
strives for in his films.
Consequently, Lev's films deal
with race relations and social
struggles, tackling such confron-
tational issues head on through
humor, wit and delicacy. His
portraval of this type oi subject
matter is shocking, especially in
lt The Right Thing where the
influence of New York's Howard
Beach incident is seen.
Lev's films have been a part of
an enduring effort by Lee to be
taken seriously in the motion-pic-
ture film industry. His own
struggle to receive strong backing
tor the marketing of his films bv
major companies such as Colum-
bia Pictures and Universal Stu-
dios has been a hard one.
Although "Do The Right
Thing" has been given substantial
recognition already, many critics
believe it's only a matter of time
before Lee hits it big with a box
office burner.
Lexicon
Mushrooming
For the week
of 12990
I Lilting: A. depressing; B.
weak; C. lifting; D. rhythmic
2. Mulish: A. stubborn; B.
wander. C. conniving; D touchy
3. Enigma: A. fantasy; B
nonsense; C. puzlc; D. flaw
4. Arcade: A. circus; B. theater;
C. covered passageway; P.
parade
5. Spindly: A. long, slender; B.
airheaded; C. old aged. D. ixki
6. Hulk: A. green monster; B.
broken down ship: C weight-
lifter; D. pile of debris
7 Cosset A. secure; B. pamper:
( to hind; D protect
I. Parity A. douhledown; B.
increase. C. negotiate: D. pick hi
or low
9 Trundle: A. push; B. roll
along. C short person; D. unable
io speak clearly
10. Apcrcu: A. foresight; B.
msifctht; C. fruit; D. aDDCtizer
An ideal view:
Divorce breaks apart more than homes
By Caroline Cusick
Features Editor
Last year, I lived on campus.
One of my dorm neighbors was m
the process of getting a divorce.
The divorce made her very happy
and left me equally confused.
1 fail to see why she derived
such pleasure from her divorce.
Her husband didn't hit her, abuse
her, drink excessively or, as far as
she knew, participate in infidelity.
She said that he was kind. Her
reason for requesting the divorce
was that she simply "didn't love
him any more
In my eyes, love is more than
a mushy feeling. Peelings fluctu-
ate like tides. They can neither be
predicted nor depended on. the
type of love that teads to marriage
is, or should be, a matter of com-
mitment.
Marriage is a decision of the
will to remain with another per-
son 'till death do you part It is not
an event to be entered into "as
long as love endures which, 1
have been informed, is currently
the most widely versed version of
the wedding vows.
Divorce is powerful and can
be devastating, Many people go
through divorce claiming they
are the only ones affected. I dis-
agree.
Divorce affects everyone. His
indisputable that marriage part-
ners share friends. They go the
same places and know many of
the same people. Divorce makes
those who are friends of bom the
husband and wife uncomfortable.
When two people enter into
marriage, they tie together two
families. They bring together two
sets of parents, siblings, cousins
often creating lifelong friendships.
When a marriage is terminated,
these rriendshipsreceivepressure
through finger-pointing and side-
taking. Too often, the friendships
that began around a marriage,
crumble with the divorce.
When families go through
divorces, the results can be tragic.
In many cases, children blame
themselves for their parents' lack
of hindsight and inability to com-
municate effectively. If s easy for
parents to say, "We don't love you
any less, we just can't live to-
gether But it can be hard for
children to understand.
According io Fred Rogers of
"Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood
divorce is one of the dominant
fears in children today. In 1989,
one of every four children in
America lived in a single-parent
family.
In my eyes, it is fortunate the
girl I know had no children.
However, that fact does not de-
tract from the extreme sadness of
the event. At one point, she cared
for her husband, excuse me, ex-
husband, enough to give him her
heart and hand.
I assume he did not receive
with those two several other in-
gredients which, which blended
together, make a good marriage.
Respect, honor, trust, chari ty, faith,
servanthood, kindness, commu-
nication and a degree of reverence
are all vital to the survival of any
relationship.
Divorce is a type of death; it's
the deaih of a way of life. It is the
official termination of a promise.
At one point in the history of
America, births, deaths and mar-
riages that were recorded in fam-
ily Bibles wereofrfcial, permanent
unalterable documents. Today,
many people feel H's alright to
tear the page out if marital bliss
recorded loses its fairy-tale
glamor.
Marriage certificates were
once permanent official docu-
ments. I have been told that is no
longer the case-
little is left in our society that
is sacred and unchanging. Aside
from the teachings of the Bible, I
can think of nothing to label per-
manent That is genuinely tragic
So, what am i trying to say? To
those who are happxmrrttaed
to another person�keep up the
good work. Yea� i realize main-
tainirtgasuccessful relationship is
work. It's not always fun. It's not
atwayseasy. Butlikeernpkjyrnent,
if you can find Work that you like
tocto.you'Uprojbttehagjpy.
See Divorce, page li :





The East Carolinian January 30,1990 11
Faculty Profile
English professor teaches, counsels,
publishes and never stops smiling
Pr hm lolte is one ot those r.irr professors
you see on camp is who is always smiling. He
spends his time between freshman composi-
tion, film classes ainl other lassos that "some-
bod) has to teach I le is also found frequently
solving the problems of frustrated students
When he is not bus) with leaching and
counseling, he immerses himself in tin- world of
writing I hs most recently published book is
Remarkable i on ersions.
It trail's the hes ot people who have hail
religious onversions like I mi Bakker and Pat Robertson. Heeven goes
as far back asthi Puritan times hi i xplorethe livesof religious converts.
1 lolte uses these people's a tual autobiographies to do his writing.
I le finds almost .ill fheindn iduals are firm in their religious beliefs, but
they aKo seem to contradict themselves. im Hakker measures Ilod's
love bv the amount of nn'in In- is given. Pat Robertson has de ided
people who do not agree with him an-demon possessed.
Before this book Holte w rote 1 he Sovereignty andloodness (H
( whkh also uses the autobiography as a focal point. Ibis hook
explores the liv� sol immigrants who came to America, and ' made it
� Irrtota niw su linthestates, manyof them had to give up
ethnic traditkms to melt in with the mainstream One Italian student
had to give up Ins t.n orite sandw k hes in the early 1900s. I lis favorite
f(Hxls are now a part ol American ulture, and you are just as likely to
� a Spanish Amei it an eating them as well as au Italian-Amcrk an.
Holte enjoved I k; this book because it was interesting to see
it first generation Americans thought the United States was all
�s tor the autobibliographk slant to his writing, Holte thinks it
ore W'l � ; vrite about themselves tells us more about
them than hi! I or I lion
Prevention steps lower risk
Benefit concert against
rape raises concern
Feature Briefs
Theaters use special effects
Regional Iheati �� ay from the intimate dramas of the
IM80S and using new lev hnolog) toexpand their productions. hi ago's
SteppenwoH "heatei has created onstage floods and tiros. San Diego's
Old Gl ve rhcater and Miami s C oconut Grove Playhouse recently
ha c presented major n iush als
Interest rates affect home sales
I ligh interest rates are afn i ling home sales, u i ording to the Na
honal sscx iationof Realtors. In IV89, sales ol existing homesdropped
4 b pert ent to ; 4million units That was the lowest level ol sales since
In � �- t � i� 111j in units were s 111
Global lifestyles emerging
l he international swapping l fi � d musi and fashion is increasing
and a global lifestyle is emerging I SA Weekend reports Examples:
, , vicxdisl ible in Israel sushi is becoming popular in Des
i Moines and Famous mo! cookies are being sold in royko.
Colleges working together
� � king I ether to meet the needs of minor-
loricall) black colleges in Georgia,
outh Carolina, Alabama and Mississippi
I New York! niversit) s Faculty Resource Network. Facult)
etoauditNYl courses.uselibrariesandcomputers
and parti : I in i pi ects
Soviet fast food hits America
, � t relat hips are expanding - via fast foods. I he
first Russian fast fcuxl franchise will open in about a month in the
itcrside Festival Marketplace in Norfolk, Va It will offer soups.
� � doughnuts, pancakes and teas Phe first McDonald's in the
� ss r will open W( Incsdai in Moscow's Pushkin Square A "Bol-
By Matt King
Special to The East Carolinian
The Attic and the Students for
Unity and Awareness will be
conducting "Rock Against Rape"
benefit concert on Feb. 13.
Admission for this concert is
five dollars, and the bands that
will be featured are Subtle Dis-
tinction. In Limbo, Bad Bob and
the Rocking I lorses, the Amateurs
and the Bad (hecks. The music
will start at 8 p.m.
Each person involved, from
the band members to the club
owner, has volunteered his or her
time, talent or facilities to the
evening.
Rohm Andrews, prime organ-
izer and member of the Students
tor Unity and Awareness, said,
"We know that trying to do away
with the rape problem by doing
something like this is impossible.
Our mam objective is to raise the
public's conscierM eness about the
problem The more aware we
make people ot the situation, the
more we can let people know that
there are preventative steps that
tan be taken to avoid dangerous
situations
According to Andrews, there-
are too many potential victims
who aren't doing anything to
minimize their chances of being
raped.
"People don't take precau-
tions because they think it can't
happen to them Andrews said,
"but it can and that's something
they have got to face and deal
with
Of the 30 rapes reported to
Crcenvillepoliccthat occurred last
year, two happened on campus
and one of those was in a dorm
room, according to the Greenville
Police Chief ferome Tesmond.
Proceeds from thisbenefit will
go to the Pitt County Real Crisis
Center which Andrews said is the
only facility on or off campus that
helps women after a rape or at-
tempted rape.
Of the proceeds, $500 will go
into a fund that is being started to
get guest speaker Fredric Storaska
to cinne to Greenville.
Storaska is director of the
United States Rapt- Prevention
Center and author of the book,
"1 low to Sav No to a Rapist and
Survive
The hind to get Storaska to
visit Greenville is being managed
bv Chancellor Richard Eakin an J
(.reonville's City Manager
Talking dog wins
commercial role
Mai wi
about $4.8(1
Diners dabble in exotic appetizers
American restaurants are experimenting with exotic appetizers,
reports I S Weekend Some samples taquitos, baby tacos tilled with
dxu k and (rah carpa ios raw sli esol thinly shaved meat or fish; and
chapatt, fried Indian bread topped with herb goat cheese, rhetidbitsare
ivailable at Eui isia and Spiaggia inhicago and .it trendy West Coast
restaurants
Fitness buffs strive for long life
I itness I in iti - will be taking a new approach in the lHK. reports
USAWeeken lb driving for a long life, rather than trying
to run marathons the m igazinc sax s Predii lions more walking; less
fascination with liquid diets; more use ot treadmills rowers, computer-
ized bicy i les and stair�. limbing ma hines.
Ads target Asian-Americans
American advertisers will target Asian Americans in the lljuis, re
ports USA Weekend Reasons stan Americans are loyal to brands,
are increasing!) affluent and politically powerful and are the country's
fastest growingcthnk group. Expect to see more Asians in mainstream
ads marketing consultants sav
Gadgets marketed for adults
In the lWOs and b ond marketers will target 'grown-up mature
people, ! v Weekend predicts Likely products tor advertising
campaigns motorized grocery carts; houses w ith wide halls and lower
fixtures; cars with eas) to exit swivel seats; and first-class campsites
With private baths
Rental cars retire quicker
Rental iar i ompanies are retiring their fleets at taster rates, reports
1 SA Weekend Budget has 100 sales lots, a 25 percent increase in five
years Hertzhas I13salesktsandplansa 10 percent increase this year.
Some vehk les on the lots still are under warranty.
Funeral homes offer videos
Funeral homes are ottering six minute ideos to families ot the
deceased, reports USA Weekend. Relatives can choose any of 2,500
musical selections to accompany the video. The videos are available
through funeral homes in 28 states that carry National Music systems.
CHARLOTTE(AP) Barney,
the Valdese dachshund who gar-
nered national media coverage
with a humanlike utterance that
sounds like. "I'm hungry will
make his first tele ision commer-
cial next week, his owner says.
Barney's owner, Mable Wiles,
said the two will fly Wednesday
to 1 os Angeles to make five 30-
so ond spots for the LittleCaesar's
pizza i ham The commercials are
expected to run beginning in
March, she said.
Wiles said she will receive a
flat teeot $10,000, plus additional
payments tor subsequent airings
,u, personal appearances at Little
( aesar's outlets around thecoun-
trv
Wiles told. The Charlotte
I Ibscrvei that halt her pet's earn
ings will go to help teed hungry
people She said part of themoney
would go to Saint Peter's Episco-
pal Church in c harlotte to help
run its soup kitchen tor the home-
less
"1 ve always wanted to do
something tor other people, but I
did n't know what to do. One night
last year I prayed to God to tell me
what he wanted me to oo with my
life. Then 1 opened my bible to
read. and it said: 'Feed my sheep
(lodbold said Wiles probably
will appear in the commercials
with Barney.
"The Air Force taught
me that golden
opportunities are really
made of silver
W. I � o V: I ' � � ' �� � ' ' I I '
�����
'�.�.�. � � � �
� - '
����
I !� IlllllltV I '
I
Isi.l llWt I H KI
Station- In-si.itioii uiii 11

Divorce
Continued from page 10
fa those who are presently
unattached" be grateful. You
have one loss stress factor. Single-
ness has its advantages.
And finally, to those who are
not so blissfully "involved" �
don't give up. What you're fight
mg is not tangible. You can't sweep
it under the rug. And you can't
wish your problems sway.
Problems ot the heart and
promises must be talked through.
Pont talk to friends, talk to the
person with whom vou have the
problem
There is nothing more deserv-
ing of time and attention than a
relationship, especially a marriage.
It it was worth commitment once,
it probably still is.
Deli
Continued from page 10
"Expand to the management.
Nevertheless, everyone
L
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
ORIENTATION
STAFF
Pick Up Application Packet
209 Whichard
Deadline: Feb. 21,1990 � 12:00pm





Stic East (Earolfntan
Pave 12
Sports
Pirates hammer
Seahawks 72-56
End 10-game losing streak
By Michael Martin
spirt- 1 ditoi
It was once said that streaks
an made to be broken and brad
coach Mike Steele, nA the ECU
i train icrtainly v ill
. �
�n 1 lome 1 cam
Pu it � ended a 10-
ireak to intra state
' � il U VN ilmineton
� I IVV ks
wk-
'
ntotasold
� Ad
i : 1 d
ratel psters
� me-l gn - 1
� �

I
ked I
said I

t for Reed
: the gai
i'd out to a 1
� . � - three minutes
. I over the next sev en
it ites went on a 17-
� - � utended their lead, to
n in guard Steve
I the was ���� I three
"his was 1 best I veseenan
E: pl l I 'C-
Wilmington head coach Robert
Mt Pherson said. "This is a much
better team without Blue Edwards.
i'hev are more athletic than a year
ago, and thevdid a great job on the
boards
1 he Pirate defense stifled the
Wilmington scoring attack in the
first halt, holding thcSeahawks to
s percent from the field (6-of-21)
,td O-for-7 from three point land,
for a 7 IS halttime lead.
The lead took usby surprise,
Steele said but 1 knew thev
weren t going to just lav down
and die
Soi ' " re guard Brannon
istei I ' Seahawks leading
scon ; was held to - lor 12 from
Held and finished the game
� tal of five points
I bv �� ore Bryan
VVtthvi nl second halt
I : formal tl Seahawks
way back
me.1 he Pirates i" pi i I
was i lit to 12 by the
17-minutemarkot the second halt
I'm disappointed in the
outcome, said Seahawks guard
Adam Porter. We can compete
with anybody in the league we
plaved Americandow ntothew n
(Ian. Is).but wejust hav � ' out
and play two solid halves of
See Pirates, page 13
January 30,1990
Pep rally
motivates
students
By Thomas Barry
Staff Writes
( ool temperatures and !
ti run w inds t liled to ke p th
sands of spirited i ! students
from parti. i I 'iral
firstail k. p p rally of thi
Fridav infronti I thi tu lentSl
1 he event itarti d at I
and lasted until !
of tl
basketball game. It is the I i
three ; � : rallies I
rail) '� ran betwt
was to help gain
� .� E ithlel
Lynetl i ' tant
Athh ' ' ' - tin
ol �: e i I
raduate of I � '
ralh
student ioI irket
en. I thai throuj
iw u
lent :
ls
"he � � i ' '
. nn tl
studi � ' t onlv


��
, . . . (eight tn tl n the final minuti I ive I
�. "��.���� ' ;����
l -ECUPhol il
. � �
M �
Predictions come true as 49ers crush Broncos 55-10
irst said. "1 et's go gel another.
wav it's plaved
. three peat.
It s tough to repeat added tana s.
rancis �49erstook Matt Millen, a Super winner with
eirsei nd straight Super theRaidcrsand the 49ers. 'it's got
at.
IK
ltW(
hi re I'euei in
leaeue s Most
� n
in the
� i
w helming stvle to be really tough to 'three pea
tion Who is going to step them who earned a record third Su
� Mi. os. W ith that when: Bov I MM trophy I
f hi t( ry in tl i Montana is throwing for 29 I r 297
ifterthethird thewayheis. rDs to fern Rice
omething nobodv has. rhe defense is stifling faylorandoni Brcnl
rhn -peat, that's our slo- opponents Montanawasl �for 83 for 80
. Mclntvre said. Everything else is in sards and 11 touchd �wns in the
Montana, ol as tai
� . �
to i�hn 1 le was just tl and
he set eight Sut r Bowl r rd i kev
sthecn � I uarterbacl

more fingers to wear svneh.
postseason. : had his hest per- who won his first
a:
itter three as an assis
I mores Pen Mi
wasn t quite as heroic tl
ist, whei
won the Su per Bowl as a touchd I seconds
Bui he did hav yard
ntana I i I " real
"Thev i an be stopped, but it formance under I nosl trv i
, �. � � ive four rings in as lakes a perfect game by whoever circumstances after sion tant
, � tvii g the reci i I held is doing it. Broncos linebacker report that three wl '� luarter afl
tsburgl Bui thi Stcelers, Simon Fletcher said. backs had tested five for ci
ins and Green Bay Instead, it was the 49ers who caine use and the league had cox
1 past two con- were nearly perfect Sunday, s ered it w
.�: wl wins "hat is thev were all season, particularly "Wewereverv � �'�"��
easoi s goal for these world- in the playoffs. him Mclntvre said, meaning on of 20 58 and 28 yards, settinj score that made it 13 after om
"It would be hard for any team the field Montana was not one-game record tor scoring pei
tloe Montana to be better than this team, the sacked for a loss in the playoffs catches He has Roger Craig who See Montana, page 13
time arouiui I
dontan
m aught fl 'pass
,asa -vard
a m p u
IVaS On pli I iOl '� �'� I
: � I � lav ra
ter-1
.� icil, the . anhi �
� lent Pirati
Cheerl lei ind Pui
Dancers and the ECU P
remi ' illv

� 11 h e ra 11 v.
. . ted ul tartn ii ti I
� � ,nd 1 hope that a
led crowd w


I e r, sa i d I
. . . .


v
However, tl cl i
i
sup; rl I feed
studentbodv isi cessarv
moriv il
Sec spirit, page 1 I
Retrievers bow to
tough ECU defense
Bv Lisa Spiridopoulos
St jt t Writer
th even player s oring,
n-n defeated the
. � �� Mars land Baltimore
� �. R trievers last night 71-49
befon onlv 1,155 fans at Minges
a um
' h t im, ridinghighofl their
� w m ovei UNC-
gti m led the game by as
; points A very patient
rate I � reel 4 1 second half
I grabbed 47 rebounds,
; � � m coming from Ike
� ! tnd I mi Brow n.
I Ian wasto keyon
their rimeter players -i crash
ird Brown said.
�. � � : lefense had 11
steals and scored 25 points off
Retriever turnovers n the
offensive end, the Pirates had tour
players s� oring in double figures
and saw very balanced scoring
from the rest of the team
' I wasproiidot thekids. said
Pirate head coach Mike Steele,
'Thev came out and went to
work defensively and on the
boards thee never let down
E U allowed only one I MB
player to score over 10 points.
Larry Simmons, who averages 20.2
ppg, led the Retrievers with 19
points on the night and hit three,
three pointers,
UMBC head coach bar!
Hawkins said, "We really got out
of character tonight "We weren't
being patient. 1 knew thev wire
very patient and physical
In the early going, ECU'S
offensive boards killed the
Retrievers, and gave the Pirates
six baskets off second shots, and
,n 8-6 lead with 14:10 to plav in
the first half.
Paul Childress, who had seven
assistson the night, led a fast break
down the left side and dished off
to Brown who hitthequick jumper
increasing the Pirate lead to four.
Darnell Overton then ignited the
Pirates with two authoritative
See Retrievers, page 14
Lady Pirates fall to
Wilmington 90-86
junior
78-49
forward T im Brown shoots trom the chanty stripe in the Pirates
win Monday mqht (Photo by Garrett Killian � ECU Photo Lab)
By David Reichelt
SUfi Writer
t.w coach Pat Pierson and
the ! ady Pirates suffered their
second loss in c A A action as thev
felltothel adySeahawksol UNC
Wilmington Saturday night 90-86
in lYask Coliseum.
A poor shooting effort by ECU
led tt i the defeat, as t he 1 w Pirates
shot :s percent trom the field I
of-91) and 50 percent from the free
throw line(14-of-28) Wilmington
countered by shooting 2 percent
trom the field (31-of-60) and 81
percent from thecharity stripe (25
il).
! ailing behind 18-17 eight
minutes into the game, the team
was paced b a balanced scoring
attaek from sophomore Tonya
Hargrove junior Keenya Wilson
and senior Irish r lamilton.Wilson
had an outstanding outing as she
tallied a season high w points.
Hargrove finished with 22, while
1 lamilten had thn e
1 he Lad) Seahawks, led bv
junior guard F"ressa Reese, went
on a 19-2 run that lasted until the
4 09 mark of the first ha I � ce,
who grabbed seven retv
s ored .s p tints befon I
out with eight minutes remaii
in the game, was one of five
Wilmington st. rtcrs that finished
the game in double figures.
iunier forward Sarah Grav
scored 11 points in the last 4:45 of
the first halt to cut the i adv
Seahawks lead to 2 at
intermission, 53-41. Grav led all
scorers with 23 points and pulled
down 19 rebounds, 14 ol which
were offensive
The 1 ady Seahawks entered
the second halt with as much
intensity as thev had the first as
they went on an eleven to tworun
at the 16:10 mark. Sophomore
guard Cindy Makowski led the
spurt w ith five points, and finished
the game with ly.
A balanced scoring attack by
Wilmington held the 1 adv Pirates
at bay, with their starting five
accounting tor all but nine of the
team s total points
IThe 1 adv Pirates would not
die though Led by Hargrove's
See LNC-W, page 14





glfre iEafit (foflliman
Page 12
Sports
January 30,1990
Pirates hammer
Seahawks 72-56
End 10-game losing streak
By Michael Martin
Sports Editor
It was once said that "streaks
are made to be broken and head
coach Mike Steele, and the ECU
basketball team certainly will
agree.
Televised live on 1 lomeTeam
Sports, the Pirates ended a 10-
game losing streak to infra-state
and CAA rival UNC-Wilmington
as they defeated the Seahawks 71-
56 Saturday night in front of a sold
out Minges Coliseum crowd.
Seniors Cus Hill and Reed
lose enjoyed their tirst win over
the Seahawks as Pirate hoopsters.
1 fill finished with a game-high 21
points, nine trom the three-point
ranee, to lead tour Pirate players
with double figures.
The team worked together
as a whole Hill said following
the game "(Thegame) wasreally
important tor Reed and I, but the
team needed the win. We played
close m beat them
ECU took control ot thegame
early as they moved out to a 5-1
lead with just over three minutes
played. And over the next seven
minutes, the Pirates went on a 17-
3 run that extended their lead to
2? 4 Freshman guard Steve
Richardson led the way with three
consecutive three-pointers.
" Phis was the best I've seen an
ECU team play UNC-
VVilmington head coach Robert
McPherson said. "This is a much
better team without Blue Edwards.
Thev are more athletic than a year
ago, and they did a great job on the
Kurds
The Pirate defense stifled the
Wilmington scoring attack in the
first half, holding theSeahawks to
28 percent from the field (6-of-21)
and 0-for-7 from three-point land,
for a 37-18 half time lead.
The lead took usbv surprise
Steele said. "But 1 knew they
weren't going to just lav down
and die
Sophomore guard Brannon
Lancaster, the Seahawks leading
scorer, was held to 2-for-12 from
the field and finished the game
with a total of five points.
Led bv sophomore Bryan
Withers' 15-point second half
performance, the Seahawks
started to battle their way back
into the game. The Pirates 1-point
halftime lead was cut to 12 by the
17-minute mark of the second half.
"I'm disappointed in the
outcome said Seahawks guard
Adam Tortcr. "We can compete
with anvbodv in the league�we
played American down to the wire
(Jan. 13), but we just have to go out
and play two solid halves of
See Pirates, page 13
Freshman point guard Paul Childress hit seven of eight free throws in the final minutes to give ECU
a 72-56 win over rival UNC-Wilmington Saturday night. The win ended a 10-game losing streak to the
Seahawks. dating back to the 1985 season. (Photo by Garrett Killian � ECU Photo Lab)
Predictions come true as 49ers crush Broncos 55-10
NEWORl EANS(AP) First
repeat, but will they "three-peat?
I he San Francisco 49ers took
care of their second straight Super
Bowl in overwhelming style
Sunday with a 55-10 humiliation
ot the Denver Broncos. With that
sizable piece of history in their
pockets, they can go after the third
in a row, something nobody has.
"Three-peat, that's our slo-
gan guard Guv Mclntyre said.
' I ve got a lot more fingers to wear
rings
I he -Pvrs have four rings in as
many tries, tying the record held
bv Pittsburgh But the Steelers,
Miami Dolphins and Green Bay
Lackers never got past two con-
sei utive Super Bow I wins. That is
nex t season 9 goal tor these world-
beaters
i ach is sweet Joe Montana
said. "Let's go get another
"It's tough to repeat added
Matt Millen, a Super winner with
the Raiders and the49ers. "It's got
tobereallv tough to 'three-peat "
Who is going to stop them
when:
� Montana is throwing
the way he is.
� The defense is stifling
opponents.
� Everything else is in
synch.
"They can be stopped, but it
takes a perfect game by whoever
is doing it Broncos linebacker
Simon Fletcher said.
Instead, it was the 49ers who
were nearly perfect Sunday, as
they were all season, particularly
in the playoffs.
"It would be hard for any team
to be better than this team, the
way it's played this year Mon-
tana said.
It would bealmost impossible
to be better than Montana, the
league's Most Valuable Player
who earned a record third Super
Bowl MVP trophy bv going 22-
for-2 tor 297 yards, with three
TDs to lerrv Rice, one to lohn
Taylor and one to Brent Jones.
Montana was 65 tor 83 for SlX)
yards and 11 touchdowns in the
postseason. I le had his best per-
formance under the most trying
circumstances after a television
report that three white quarter-
backs had tested positive tor co-
caine use and the league had cov-
ered it up.
"We were very supportive ol
him Mclntvre said, meaning on
the field � Montana was not
sacked for a loss in the playoffs �
and off it. "You see him year-in
and year-out going out there and
playing sore, or beat up or what-
ever. So, when something like this
happens, you have to stand be-
hind your player
Montana, oi course, was far
from the only 4er standing tall.
He was just the most visible, and
he set eight Super Bowl records.
"He's the greatest quarterback
ot all time said George Seitert,
who won his first Super Bowl as
head coach after three as an assi
tant. Onlv Baltimore's Don Mc-
Caffertv won the Super Bowl as a
rookie coach.
Montana has one oi the great
offenses of all time around him.
He has Rice, who caught TD passes
of 20, 38 and 28 yards, setting a
one-game record for scoring
catches. 1 le has Roger Craig, who
scored on a 1-yard run, giving him
tour career touchdowns in the
Super Bowl, tied with Franco
Harris and Rice. Craig also set a
career record with 20 pass recep-
tions in his three Super Bowls
I le has Inm Rathman, a full-
back with the hands of a surgeon
whoserushinuand receiving were
a key element in the unstoppable
onslaught He had two short rush-
ing touchdowns.
He has lohn Taylor, who
wasn't quite as heroic this year as
last, when he caught the winning
touchdown with 34 seconds to go.
But he did have a 35-yard TD re-
ception.
Montana has Brent lones,
whose only reception was a 7-vard
score that made it 13-3 after one
period.
See Montana, page 13
Pep rally
motivates
students
By Thomas Barry
Staff Writer
Cool temperatures and blis-
tering winds failed to keep thou-
sands of spirited FCU students
from participating in the Pirates'
first all-day pep rally of the season
Friday in front of theStudent Store.
The event started at 11 am.
and lasted until 3 p.m on behalf
of the FCU vs. UNC-Wilmington
basketball game. It is the first of
three pep rallies scheduled tor
ECU'S basketball programs. The
rally, which ran between classes,
was to help gain more support
towards ECU athletics.
Lvnette Johnson, Assistant
Athletic Marketing Director, coach
of the Pure Gold Dancers and a
graduate oi FCU, organized the
rally and said that it was a great
success. She also said that the
students have not been marketed
enough and that through these
tvpes of activities, students will
become more aware ot the impor-
tance oi student support at ath-
letic competitions.
The purpose of this type of
function is to gain the support of
Students not only in basketball
games Johnson said. "But in all
oi the sports on campus Johnson
was very pleased with the turn
out of last Fridays rally.
The rally was supported by
manv campus organizations, in-
cluding the FCU Inter-Fraternity
Council, the Panhellenic Council,
the Student Pirate Club, the ECU
Cheerleaders and Pure Gold
Dancers, and the FCU Pep Band.
Hot 104 FM conducted a live
remote at the rally.
Crystal Clark, a Pure Gold
dancer, felt there was a good turn-
out at the rally. Clark said, "I am
excited about starting a new tradi-
tion at FCU. and I hope that a
spirited crowd will fill Minges so
we can all rock the Seahawks
Chris Penhollow, a innior
cheerleader, said that it is impor-
tant to get the student body get
involved in upcoming games
"This is the most important
basketball game of the year and 1
hope that the pep rally will bring
everyone out to the game to show
their support for the Pirates in
their crushing victory over the
Seachickens PenhoHow said.
However, the cheerleaders be-
lieve, as a group, that a little more
support and feed back form the
student txn.lv is necessarv in crowd
motivation.
See Spirit, page 14
Retrievers bow to
tough ECU defense
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
With every player scoring,
Ft I soundly defeated the
University of Marvland-Baltimore
County Retrievers last night 71 -49
before only 1,155 fans at Minges
(Coliseum.
The team, riding high off their
emotional win over UNC-
Wilmington, led the game by as
much as 23 points. A very patient
Pirate team scored 41 second half
points and grabbed 47 rebounds,
with 24 of them coming from Ike
Copeland and Tim Brown.
"Our game plan was to key on
their perimeter players and crash
the boards Brown said.
A strong ECU defense had 11
steals and scored 25 points off
Retriever turnovers. On the
offensive end, the Pirates had four
plavers scoring in double figures
and saw very balanced scoring
from the rest of the team.
"Iwasproudofthekids'said
Pirate head coach Mike Steele,
"Thev came out and went to
i
work�defensively and on the
boards thev never let down
ECU allowed only one UMBC
player to score over 10 points.
Larry Simmons, who averages 20.2
ppg, led the Retrievers with 19
points on the night and hit three,
three pointers.
UMBC head coach Earl
Hawkins said, "We really got out
of character tonight "We weren't
being patient. I knew they were
very patient and physical
In the early going, ECU's
offensive boards killed the
Retrievers, and gave the Pirates
six baskets off second shots, and
an 8-6 lead with 14:10 to play in
the first half.
Paul Childress, who had seven
assistson the night, led a fast break
down the left side and dished off
to Brown who hit the quick jumper
increasing the Pirate lead to four.
Darrell Overton then ignited the
Pirates with two authoritative
See Retrievers, page 14
Lady Pirates fall to
Wilmington 90-86
junior forward Tim Brown shoots from the charity stripe" in
78-49 win Monday night. (Photo by Garrett Killian � ECU
the Pirates
Photo Lab)
By David Reichelt
Staff Writer
Head coach Pat Picrson and
the Lady Pirates suffered their
second loss in CAA action as they
fell to the Lady Seahawks of UNC-
Wilmington Saturday night 90-86
in Trask Coliseum.
A poor shooting effort by ECU
led to the defeat, as the Lady Pirates
shot 38 percent from the field (35-
of-91) and 50 percent from the free
throw line (14-of-28). Wilmington
countered by shooting 52 percent
from the field (31-of-60) and 81
percent from thechanty stripe(25-
31).
Falling behind 18-17 eight
minutes into the game, the team
was paced by a balanced scoring
attack from sophomore Tonya
Hargrove, junior Kecnya Wilson
and senior Irish Hamilton. Wilson
had an outstanding outing as she
tallied a season-high 19 points.
Hargrove finished with 22, while
Hamilton had three.
The Lady Seahawks, led by
junior guard Trcssa Reese, went
on a 19-2 run that lasted until the
4:09 mark of the first half. Rcece,
who grabbed seven rebounds and
scored 20 points before fouling
out with eight minutes remaining
in the game, was one of five
Wilmington starters that finished
the game in double figures.
Junior forward Sarah Gray
scored 11 points in the last 4:45 of
the first half to cut the Lady
Seahawks lead to 12 at
intermission, 53-41. Gray led all
scorers with 23 points and pulled
down 19 rebounds, 14 of which
were offensive.
The Lady Seahawks entered
the second half with as much
intensity as they had the first, as
they went on an eleven-to-two run
at the 16:10 mark. Sophomore
guard Cindy Makowski led the
spurt with five points, and finished
the game with 19.
A balanced scoring attack by
Wilmington held the lady Pirates
at bay, with their starting five
accounting for all but nine of the
team's total points.
The Lady Pirates would not
die though. Led by Hargrove's
See UNC-W, page 14





Sports Briefs
Coaches investigated by NCAA
I he University of Illinois is expecting a letter next week from the
c A A Mying the schcxl's basketball program will be investigated on
charges that the coaching staff offered $80,(XX) and a Chevy Blazer to
freshman center Deon Thomas, Mid athletic director John Mackovic.
School officials siid Wednesday that Thomas won't play for the lllini
this season
Strawberry identified as father
Blood tests have determined baseball superstar Darryl Strawberry
is the father ot a child Kirn in 188 to a St. Louis woman, the woman's
lawyer sa,d Uaa Clayton is seeking $11,(XX) in monthly payments.
Strawberry, an outfielder for the New York Mets, didn't dispute the
finding
Owner accused of embezzlement
Detroit federal magistrate issued an arrest warrant Thursday tor
Philip I Breetl, mortgage executive and owner of the Orlando luice, a
Senior I eagtie baseball team. Breen, 43, is accused of embezzling $10
� million from the company.
Astros' owner buys out partner
Ihe majority owner ol the Houston Sports Association. ohn
Mullen, must pay $8 million to buy out minority owner Don Sand-
ers, according to The 1 louston Post" The 1 louston Sports Association
owns baseballs' Houston Astros
Auriol wins Monte Carlo rally
I renchman Didier Auriol won the Monte Carlo auto race rally
rhursday by edging Carrloe Sainof Spain by 52 seconds. Didier, who
drove a Lancia, led .ill 1.2(H) miles ot the race. Sam drove a Toyota.
Rams assistant is interviewed
I ritz Shurmur, defensive coordinator ol the Los Angeles Rams has
ninten iewed for the Phoenix Cardinals' head football coaching job.
�hurmur is the sixth ol seven finalists for the job. Team officials hope to
j new coa( h by Feb. 1.
Berger to play for Davis team
lay Berger. ranked No. 8 in the world, will take Aaron Knckstein's
place on the U S. Davis i up tennis team, when it faces Mexico Friday
.t Carlsbad, Calil . m a first-round match. Kriekstein, ranked No. 8 in
the world, decided against plaving after testing a groin muscle injury
Sunday suffered during the Australian Open in Melbourne.
Douglas says Tyson will lose
I lea vw eight boxer lames "Buster" Douglas predicted Sunday he
will defeat champion Mike Tvson at their bout Feb. 11 in Tokyo.
I ouglas, who is 2-4-1. said after a yvorkout he will yvm either bv
decision or a knockout. Tvson, yvho also worked out Sunday is 37-0.
Sunday Silence voted top horse
Kentucky Derby and I'reakness winner Sunday Silence yvas voted
the l"x Horse ol the Year by race writers and track secretaries,
ei ing 22; ol 242 votes. Easy Goer, who denied Sunday Silence the
! riple C rown by winning the Relmont Stakes, came in second in the
ting Ihe 4 year-olds will meet later this year. Charles Whittingham
won the Trainer ol the i ear.
Athlete tests positive for drugs
n athlete at the Commonwealth Games in Auckland, New Zeal
ind, tested positive tor steriods, said officials, who declined to identify
athlete Ihe Indian news agency named Calcutta's Subratakuman
ml who won two silvers and a bronze medal in yveightlifting. Under
rules, competitors who use drugs can be disqualified, forced to
return any awarded medals and expelled.
Mota wins women's marathon
Portugal's Rosa Mota, gold medalist in the 1988 Olympics, led all
the way inwinning the International Ladies Marathon by nearly two
nutes Sunday irtOsaka, Japan. She finished in 2:27:47. Japan's Katsuyo
I tyodo, running her thirdmarathon. was second in 2:29:3b. Third was
the Soviel Union's Valentma Egorova in 2:29:47.
Ct .tv1" '�" USA UAt rrfc IMltp lt"m)um Xttk
In the Locker
,j.ce Te;ev iiof Bjfeau o Aclve si'g lrc
Rod lime GNS
Super Bowl, super ads
The average 60 second TV ad on Super Bowl XXIV costs more
than six times the average 60-second ad during prime time:
Montana
Continued from page 12
There is that solid offensive
line, which took nearly all season
to come together, then was a for-
tress in the playoffs.
Montana also had a defense
that shut down everybody
"It's always, 'our offense, our
offense ' Montana said, hut
nobody is getting any points on
us
lohn Elwaycan testif) to that
In three Super Bowls, IT way has
had three decent periods. None of
them came Sunday. when he was
10-for-2b tor 108 yards, with two
interceptions, a fumble and lour
sacks.
"It's disappointing, said
El way, who came of I hisbesl play
off outing in the 1 title game
Pirates
"You start to question why you
can't play better in the Super Bowl,
why you always lose in it and play
so awful
Dan Reeves had no answers,
either. Why should he � Reeves
has st six of his record eight Super
Bowl appearances, including three
as broncos coach?
"We couldn't match them
he said. "We've got a long ways to
go to get to the level to win cham-
pionships
"When you come up with
performances like this, life is aw-
ful cruel and it'sdif ficult to handle.
but we're grown men and we have
to handle it, we have to move for-
ward "
Continued from page 12
basketball
But it was 111U that kept the
Piratesontop I lenaili tree
pointers and an eight foot jumper
to extend E I 's It ad to 16 p 'Hits
with 6:36 left in the game
"I tried to tell the guv s to keep
on Lose said about the closing
minutes I hey N '� I
lighting b.n k, but it was a I
for us. It was gr at to beat them,
but now we just have t' put it
behind us and look ahc id
unior forward i im Brown
ignited the crowd and the Pit lie
bench when he broki I � � for a
slam dunk at the five minute mark
1 le finished th � ime with 15
points, foursti al - b unds
and twoblcn k. � l � � nalso
was seven of�
throw line on tl
"1 m a real i mi tional player
Brown said i didn t feel the
intensity for the rivalry until we
started to warm up and I saw allot
the tans in the erowd. We came
together as a ham and won
1 heSeahawkscut the Pirates'
lead to eight following a three-
pointer by Porter, who finished
tin' game with 11 points. Then
Wilmington started to foul, and
the Pirates were hitting from the
free throw line.
1 reshman guard Paul
Idn s sank seven of eight free
throws in the final three minutes
to give the team their ninth win of
the season. The win improved the
Pirates record to9-11 onthe season,
Mm the C A A
Childress finished with 11
points, while Lose added 10.
"I give E I a lot of credit
said Wilmington forward Major
Wiggins, who finished with two
its ' When it comes to a big
rivalry like It I and Wilmington,
you can throw therecordsout and
it will comedown to who wants it
the most. ECU wanted it more
tonight
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The Attic





M The East Carolinian lanurary 30, 1990
Spirit
Continued from page 12 1 J I C-W
Oneohhea h vines at the rally
which received quite a bitofatten
tkm was the "Shoot to Win" has
ketball challenge. Hundreds ol
students lined up to take tree
throws and hopefully win a prize
I here was no charge to shoot
Among the winners were
1 eslie White, , hrisri I larris, and
Daron In num hite, .i senior,
successfully made seven shots in a
row, while Harris successfully
made six shots m a row Hunum
made .ill eight shots in a row and
won a tnp t�r two to the 1 lolida)
Inn .it AtLintiv Bea h However,
because he is a varsitx football
pi.nor he was unable to i laim Ins
prize due to N rules
Sophomorehip Bartlett said
the event was gtxxl to get the
students involved to show more
support tor the tram Bartlett
also said that it would be preat it
ECl could have rallies before
everv home game
Sophomore Shem smith
showed her support and was
happj with what was taking place
"The pop rally was a great idea. It
showed a lot ot s� hool spirit from
the students and participants .t
ECU
Main ot the prizes were do
nated from neighboring stores
such as Ir.nks Peelers, Marshs,
Roses, Cold s Gvm Parr 1 i,
Annabi "ho Spa, and main
others
1 lot I ; �' Mojo
sports w ear s red th lam
min rates I shirts
Mark VI pol from
Hot 104 and a i
EC! felt it wa ' ; rtant tor
everyone to pet n � Ived Moore
said We tr to do a lot ol work
with the chcei i aders and dan.
ers. A- a former i heerleader, 1
respe t their � Iicatii�n hard
work and long hours ol commit
iiu nt rogetl r I . ; a a ital
role in uni ei rvandi mi nunitv
life
Retrievers
r
� i cu students battled the elements f riday afternoon � II
participated in the first pep rally of the year One of the event's ki
� action was the Shoot to Win contest (Photo by Garretl Killian
U Photo i ab
( ontinued from page 12
offensi ve prowess, they utthe load
to tour. 71 67, during the next six
minutes as theoutscored the lady
Seahawks 24 6.
I he teams traded baskets
duringa five minute stretch before
Wilmington pressed ahead on a
M ikowski three pointeratthe5:15
mat k
I he battle waged on as
Hargrove, Gray and sophomore
Foinia oley combined to tie the
score at 82 with 3:55 remaining ti
h played But the Lady Seahawks
vered with a pair of baskets
trom 1'rac) Bradshaw and a bucket
from I i-a Williams to extend the
le.ul ti four at so 82. Bradshaw
� I the game with six points,
Williams finished with 22.
Hargrove andoley added
i . tor ECU, but Makowski
I tl win tor Wilmington with
a jump shot and two free throws
mds remaining in the
SS dropped the 1 ,u
�� to 11 "�. m the season, 4-2 in
the while Wilmington
� i their o erall record to 5-
the A
� ! ad 1 'irati's will be in
ij nn Saturday night when
host Appl.uhian State at 7
I in in Minges Coliseum. WZMB
will broadcast the game live,
at 6 ! p m
Sharky's
of Greenville
Located hv Sports Va on 5th Street
Enter through llc
Sharky's is a private club lor members and
21 years old guests.
FREE SHARKY'S MEMBERSHIP1
i With This Coupon
i
COntinued from page 12
tionsand ade two foul
shots at I r end
� � � � � .� nn a 10-2
their intonsit and
lead to nine with
i before halftime.
r tl ,n kit I
irst
mper.
� I shooter,
run in. � -
boosted tl
onl ; 1 �
effre '�'� I tak i tl
of li' points off .i Ki
The Retrievers
Simmons, hit a three pointer with
onl) 25 seconds to plav cutting
the Pirate lead to se en at the half.
In the second halt 1 (. I came
out aggressiveand hot39 percent
trom the field, Whitaker said. "1
think we realh took it to them in
the second halt offensively and
defensh el
The Retrievers were held to
iust ;? percent shooting nd
e ond half
pert ent
committed 1 I
turnovers
1I went
start off the s,
included si i
on a 17 2 run to
I half, which
nt fr 'in Brown.
to ei? yRr hY 5i
2 To ?SICant
TO ptfANy
TO hP.ILa
e
!��s g

�Ptt
Pa
Gf
1?.
lL. so
33-bO
10-Dq
v.s
C�NTINue�
' �
points, with a fast break lay up
and a thn � pointer
With the m ore 52 J I the
Retrievers tried to take the ball
inside,on!v to be rejected by
Brown In the same scries, they
decided to trv it again, but were
met bv Overton who swatted the
ball out of bound
I w o b.u k to bat k three
pointers trom Whitaker gave the
Pirates a commanding 22 point
lead with 10 10 left to play m the
game. Steve Richardson then hok
al MB rebound the length of the
floor and lobbed to a flyingasey
Mote wl promptly laved it in,
scoring his first of two buckets
I fell we didn't give up any
eas shots noted Steelc, "We
played pretty sharp especially
defensively "
1 he lasl pomt ol the game
carrx ofl .i t. ml sh I I . eff Perli h
with 05 seconds left giving the
Piratesa 71 49 win,and improving
their overall re. ord I i 10-11.
EC1 . " 5 on the road this
weekend as they pla) the Naval
Academy on Saturday and( ieorge
Mason I niersih �n Minda)
We're playing a lot better.
we've in1- gol to keep it going
Steele said, fhis weekend we
need to nist gi i in ,v. go to work "
You'd like your roommates
a whole kit better if they didn't
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14 The East Carolinian Janutary 30,1990
Spirit
Continued from page 12
Oncof the activitiesat the rally
which received quite a bit of atten-
tion was the "Shoot to Win" bas-
ketball challenge. Hundreds of
students lined up to take free
throws and hopefully win a prize.
There was no charge to shoot.
Among the winners were
Leslie White, Christi Harris, and
Daron Bynum. White, a senior,
successfully made seven shots in a
row, while Harris successfully
made six shots in a row. Bunum
made all eight shots in a row and
won a trip for two to the Holiday
Inn at Atlantic Beach. However,
because he is a varsity football
player, he was unable to claim his
prize due to NCAA rules.
Sophomore Chip Bartlett said
the event was "good to get the
students involved to show more
support for the team Bartlett
also said that it would be great if
ECU could have rallies before
every home game.
Sophomore Sherrv Smith
showed her support and was
happy with what was taking place.
"The pep rally was a great idea. It
showed a lot of school spirit from
the students and participants of
ECU
Many of the prizes were do-
nated from neighboring stores
such as Tracks, Peelers, Marsha,
Roses, Cold's Gvm, DarrvTs,
Annabolle's, The Spa, and many
others.
Hot 104 together with Mojo
sportswear sponsored the "Jam-
min' with the Pirates" T-shirts.
Mark Moore, a spokesman from
Hot 104 and a recent graduate from
ECU. felt it was important for
everyone to get involved. Moore
said "We trv to do a lot of work
with the cheerleaders and danc-
ers. As a former cheerleader, i
respect their dedication, hard
work, and long hours of commit-
ment. Together they play a vital
role in university and community
life
Retrievers
Continued from page 12
rejections and then made two foul
shots at the other end.
The Pirates, riding on a 10-2
run increased their intensity and
boosted their lead to nine with
only 3.10 to play before halftime.
(effrey Whitaker then hit his first
of 10 points of fa baseline jumper.
The Retrievers' sharp shooter,
Simmons, hit a three-pointer with
only :25 seconds to plav cutting
the Pirate lead to seven at the half.
In the second half ECU came
out aggressive and shot 59 percent
from the field, Whitaker said, "I
think we reallv took it to them in
the second half offensively and
defensively
The Retrievers were held to
just 32 percent shooting and
committed 10 second half
turnovers.
ECU went on a 17-2 run to
start off the second half, which
included six points from Brown.
Reed Lose added five of his 10
points, with a fast break lay-up
and a three-pointer.
With the score 52-33 the
Retrievers tried to take the ball
inside,only to be rejected by
Brown. In the same series, they
decided to try it again, but were
met by Overton who swatted the
ball out of bounds.
Two back-to-back three-
pointers from Whitaker gave the
Pirates a commanding 22 point
lead with 10:10 left to play in the
game. Steve Richardson then took
a UMBC rebound the length of the
floor and lobbed to a flying Casey
Mote who promptly layed it in,
scoring his first of two buckets.
"I felt we didn't give up any
easy shots noted Steele, "We
played pretty sharp especially
defensively
J
The last point of the game
came off a foul shot by Jeff Perlich
with :05 seconds left giving the
Piratcsa71-49 win,and improving
their overall record to 10-11.
ECU goes on the road this
weekend as they play the Naval
Academy on Saturday and George
Mason University on Monday.
"Were playing a lot better,
we've just got to keep it going
Steele said, This weekend we
need to just go in and go to work
Many ECU students battled the elements Friday afternoon ds they
participated in the first pep rally of the year. One of the event's key
attraction was the "Shoot to Win" contest. (Photo by Garrett Killian �
ECU Photo Lab)
UNC-W
Continued from page 12
offensive prowess, they cut the lead
to four, 71-67, during the next six
minutes as the outscored the Lady
Seahawks 24-6.
The teams traded baskets
du ring a five- minute stretch before
Wilmington pressed ahead on a
Makowski three-pointer at the5:15
mark.
The battle waged on as
Hargrove, Gray and sophomore
Toinia Coley combined to tie the
score at 82 with 3:55 remaining to
be played. But the Lady Seahawks
answered with a pair of baskets
from Tracy Bradshaw and a bucket
from Lisa Williams to extend the
lead to tour at 86-82. Bradshaw
finished the game with six points,
while Williams finished with 22.
Hargrove and Coley added
baskets for ECU, but Makowski
sea led the win for Wilmington with
a jump shot and two free throws
with 23 seconds remaining in the
game
The loss dropped the Lady
Pirates to 11 -5 on the season, 4-2 in
the CAA, while Wilmington
improved their overall record to 5-
8, and 1-5 in the CAA.
The Lady Pirates will be in
action again Saturday night when
they host Applachian State at 7
p.m. in Minges Coliseum. WZMB
will broadcast the game live,
starting at 6:45 p.m.
Sharky's
of Greenville
Located by Sports Pad on 5th Street
Enter through Alley
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 years old guests.
1
'FREE SHARKY'S MEMBERSHIP'
iyit!lX'lis Coupon
I
�tft
-is �
In"izi
li c.
pa
GC
'n
is wM
i?.
is at"
8 $fa
j!J?-so
33 .o
g'�$L,
J-S3
CONTINUE
�)u'd like your roommates
a whole lot better if they didn't
show up on your phone bill.
John called Chicago. Andy called L.A. Or was that Me?
. Don't sweat it. Sorting Kit R x mimates is easy when you get AT&T Call Mcmager Sen ice.
Because with it, you can all get y mr long distance charges listed separately; even though
you stale the same phone number And it costs vou nothing.
To tind out more about the free Ati&FCallManagerSenice, dial 1800 222-0300, ext. 600.
It'll make both your bills and your roommates much easier to live with.
AT&T
The right choice.
�1990 AT&T





A Monthly Arts and
Entertainment Supplement
to The East Carolinian
In This Issue:
ii
O The Amateurs play for Greenville
? Local museum offers peanut art
0 The Lost Colony' looks for summer actors
Volume 2
No.l
Februarv '90
Taking the leap
into snow skiing
I
fe
s





Contents
Winter skiing 2
Film series3
ECU Playhouse4
Local museum4
'The Lost Colony5
International folk group5
February Calendar of Events6&7
Broadway musical8
Concert pianist8
WZMB weekly schedule9
'Three For One9
School of Music February Calendar9
Three hits9
Emerson String Quartet10
The Amateurs11
Hhi EntirtainiT
Editor: Carrie Armstrong
Art Director: Steve Reid
Advertising Director: James P.J. McKee
Darkroom Technician: Michael Carries
Contributing Writers: Beth 1 lassell,
Hamilton Holloway and Marv Anne
Ullery
The Entertainer is an arts and entertain-
ment supplement to The Last Carolinian pub-
lished the last week of the month. The Enter-
tainer welcomes all comments and story ideas.
Address correspondence to Entertainment
Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C.
27834, or call us at 757-6366.
Winter skiing can be
an exhilarating activity
By Carrie Armstrong
Entertainment Editor
Winter is upon us and it is once again time
tor th.it exhilarating winter activity that most
Americans seem to adore. Already manv pimple
have been trving out the slopes some for the
first time, and others who make the trip every
year without fail.
Never mind the cold air that freezes your
insides and makes your noso run; snow skiing
has become one of the favorite winter pas
times one that can he enjoyed bv all ages So
bundle up we're off to the slopes!
let's start off with a basic check list tor our
skung adventure:
�thermal shirtT-shirt
� long Johns
�turtleneck
�sweater or flannel shirt
biborstretch sk pantsor nvlonv.arm-up
pants
�winter jacket or parka
�right-knit hat
� gloves or mittens with long cuffs
�non-nbbed light or medium-weight
socks
�sunglassesgoggles
�scarf or face mask for those very cold,
windv days
credit card and driver's license for rental
equipment deposit
Remember that a few layers of relatively
light clothing will keep vou much warmer than
a single bulky layer. layering traps warm air in
and draws moisture away from the skin and
you can always reduce the number oi layers if
you become too warm. Also, because vour head
is an escape valve tor more than SO percent of
your body heat, it is important to keep it ar.J
your ears covered!
Don'tbeputoff if you've never skied b tore
Snow skiing d(H'sn't take youth or strength m
can learn to ski at any age. Start off with a tew
lessons. There are classes designed for begin-
ners that introduce you to gentle slopes and
make learning the basics simple and fun And,
according to Ski It to Behnr It after four or five
lessons you will be able to ski 50 percent I the
ski runs in the United States.
Under the guidance of an instructor vou
will learn how to keep your balance and how to
walk and slide on your skis. You'll then learn
how to use a gliding wedge for turning and
stopping. After those basics have been iealt
with, it's off to the gentle slopes where y a can
continue to practice your newly acquired skills.
Remember y�weworking at your own pace,
making the experience of skiing your ver iwn
and not a contest.
There are two main types of recreational
skiing, alpine and cross-country. Alpin also
known as downhill skiing, is the most um-
monly recognized of the two. The skiing is done
on slopes where the snow is vsell packed
rolled bv flat machines A beginner can usu
handle these slopes after a tew less,ins -
country skiing can be done iust about an) ��� � -
there is snow and is considered the most
plete fitness exercise. Sometimes spei i lI tr
are made tor this particular type of skiing
nice thing about cross county skiing i- � l
one who can walk can cross-countr. �
Now that we have some of the fc I
the way, you're probably wonderir
nearest ski resorts are located. The Unit I
claims over 650 chairuf t-served ski an i
are 10 resorts in North arolinaandl thr
out irginia and West irginia.
Appalachian Ski Mountain in Blown
is open seven days a week with eight tr �
six lifts. The number tor both the snow ;
and the office phone is (704 . r
Fars also at Blowing Rock, is open Frid
Sunday with two trails and two lifts :� � in
ber for the snow phone and office phone is 7 4
963-4321. Ski Beech, ski fiawksnest, Suj it
Mountain and Mill Ridge are all located at Ban-
ner Elk and open seven days a week
Ski Beech has 14 trails and nine lifts The
snow phone number is (8(H)) 438-2093 and the
office phone is (704) 387-2011. Ski Hawksnest
has seven trails and tour lifts fhe snow phone
is (704) 963-6563 and the office phone is f704
963-6561. Sugar Mountain has Is tnals and 9
lifts. The number for the snow phone is (7 - �-
s256and the office phone is (701)8984521 Mill
Ridge has seven trails and three lifts The num-
ber for both the snow phone and the office phone
b(800333-USKL
Wolf Laurel, located at Mars Hill, is open
seven davsa week with 12 trails and three lifts
The snow phone number is (800) THE-WOLF
and the office number is (704) 689-4111 Scah
Mountain, located at Scalv Mountain is also
open seven days a week with four trails and two
lifts The snow number and the office number is
(704) 526-3737
CatalcKKhee, located in Maggie Valle
open seven days a week with eight trails and
three lifts The snow phone number is (704 u
0285 and the office number is (704) 926-3588
And the last resort in N.C, Fairfield Saphire is
located in Saphire. It is open seven davsa week
with four trails and two lifts The number for
both the snow phone and the office phone is
(800)438-3421.
West Virginia resorts are Alpine Lake(304)
789-2481, Cannan Vallev (304) 8664121, O&t
bay Park (304) 242-3000 Silver Creek (304) 572-
4000, Snowshoe Mountain (304) 572-1000 and
Timberline (.104) 866-4801.
Virginia resorts are: Brvce Resort (703) BSfc-
2121, The Homestead (703)839-7721, Massanut-
ten (703)289-441 and Wintcrgreen (804) J25
2200.
So there you have it� what to take, what to
wear and where to go. All that's left for you to do
is enjoy yourself and your skiing adventure!
The Entertainer February 1990





Film series takes you to Greece
Theme dinner featuring regional cuisine set for Feb. 15
Greece, the cradle oi civili-
zation, is the next stop on the
ECU Travel-Adventure Film
Series Narrated by l.ynn
Hramkamp, "Greece: Apollo to
orba will be presented Feb.
15At8p.m. in Hendnx Theatre
The residents of Greece's
modern cities are embracing
the future, eager for all the
innovation and change it
promises. However, ancient
crafts such as cmbroiderv,
weaving, potterv and carving
are still practiced in the tradi
tional villages
Hramkamp presents ,i
panoramic view of the past and
present in thiscolortul and fas-
cinating country from Mete-
ora, where 14th century her-
mits retreated to imposing
monasteries perched on top of
pinnacles, to Athens,a thriving
modem city.
Some of the historic places
visited in the film include Ml.
Olympus, home of Zeus; IV-
los, the birthplace of Apollo;
and I'atmos, the sacred island
where St. John wrote the
Apocalypse.
A theme dinner, featuring
foods of the regions visited in
the him, will begin at 6:30 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Student
207 SW Greenville Blvd
Greenville NC 27834
355-5000
Ml SIM HAN I RAM
Tenter Multi-Purpose Room
Tickets for the dinner are $8 qtv
Students on the meal plan mav
use one of the evening meals i hi
their Vali-Dine cards and pay
an additional $2. All tickets tor
the dinners must be bought
two business davs prior to the
dinner. Tickets for the film are
now on sale at the Central
Ticket Offlce in Mendenhall
For more information call 757-
4788, or toll-free, 1-800-ECU-
ARTS. Tickets are $4 for the
public and XV l.n ultvstaff
ECU students can pick up one
tree film ticket with valid ECU
student I.D.
Breakfast Lunch & Dinner
6am 10 p m
The Ski Place to Be!
tf&
The Slopes and trails
arc the place to be for winter
fun. Take time now to gel
ready so you can lake off
when the snow Hies
I vine in today and check
out our full line of ski
equipment and apparel.
Your Place for Complete Ski
Kepair!
25 Sale In Progress
u
GORDON'S.
200 E. Greenville Blvd. 756-1003

8pm -1am T-S
Sun & Mon Closed
The Club Available lor private parlies
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Ja.IaRI GkaS Celebration At CHARLEYO'S
Two weeki of niiun delights featuring blackened snapper, seafood
etouffee, jambalaya au! blackened prime rib. Enjoy Nen Orleans
favorites like seafood gumbo, cajun oysters, bayou spiced crayfish
and that's only the beginning February 14th - 27th
c
e
e
e
e
SUNDAY T
JAZZ BRUNCH
at CHARLEYO'S
Enjoy the brurn h
along with a
tom h of live "
jazz tnusu
I! i m to 2 p m
Join its every
Sunday
Rio! is 5
available for
PRIVATE PARTIES
on Sundays
and Mondays.
Special food 12
& beverage
packages
available for
every occasion.
Roc.
RoLt
PRESI2EN1 S ,TA
19
CHARLEYO'S 18
)�? s ii menu of
FRESH DAILY SPECIALS
made from the freshest ingredients available
TUESDAYS
he best i assU
ru-R dance hits
evet made, art
played in RIO!
every Tuesday
night!
Rrhixctl dtess c i'tii
13
20
$125
Hibatts
Ml NIGH! LONG
MARDI 25 �7 26 MARDI GRAS 27
rMoTct ?� i XA GRANDE BALL
GRAS festival WELCOME in RIO'
in CHARLEWS
w r a w ri Costumes
J gj fjj and Masks are
welcomed.
'i delu iom awi
. (Hiking hch 14 if
WEDNESDAY
MIGHT FEVER
IN RIO!
ST VALENTINE S DAY
�Dining 'Dancing
�Romancing
EXPRESS 1
LUNCH-
In A Hurry?
CharleyO's
is Waiting!
Monday through 8
�7
GREAT PACKAGES
ARE AVAIL ARl E
MARDI t.KVS
I r- nvitit-s bfum'
F
E
B
Wednesday
Night rnci.
Boogie i )opt
Oogie to
the trashiest
28
disco fhis side
oj flic 70 v sen
Wednesday Nigfcf!
ASM WEDNESDAY
Friday you can enoy a
bountiful lunch buffet
ot eight hot entrees
11am
to 2 p m
$450
Ladies' Night '5
in Rio!
DRINK SPECIALS
AL L NKiHl I ONG
WELCOME
AMERICAN LEGION
We
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PROFESSIONAL
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Dance, aw
Dance, Dance
the night away
Rio!
in
Join us in RIO1 for the 9 )Q
FRIDAY NIGHT
M �' XX. MM M I M M T-J M f
FirStlt'S Enter the FREE
College STYLE DASCE
Wight! 76 C0STEST 17
D4fl'V SCr CASH �
OU ,V���U� iW(S
m AU0N8 'S 4 .P M
DANCE CONTEST EINA1S
Indav February 23 I CaUh lhr SM �, v
JVER HOOO iN CASH H0 PHIZES "Ml 800-326-0759 � - :�
Catch the 22
23
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SKI BUS
Leaving from Km' at I am Even Friaav.
Call 1-800-326-0729
A 24
Welcome
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DiningDancing & Romanring
Open Your Wean to the Hilton for a Special Vfakfttmt's Week
TAKE ADVANTAGE Of OUR VALENTINES PACKAGES INCLUDING Ft'PrUtfrY 9 � I 4.
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Ti it Entertainer Ffrruary 1990





ECU Playhouse brings back Jimmy Dean
Kevin Frady and Candace McKenzie. Joe and Mona in the year 1955. (bacK
ground) and Marilyn Molloy. Mona. 1975 will appear in the ECU Plavhouse
production ot "Come Back to the Five and Dime. Jimmy Dean Jimmy Dean "
Local museum
offers art variety
Hv Mary Anne Ullery
Staff Writer
humorous "My Queen loober Each
pure ! tils exhibited art is precisely
drawn in a caricaturist style rhis ex-
hibit is a must see!
Upstairs, you can find paintings by
the ECU visiting artist from Boston,
Kuss 1 lorrinrks. Horrocks is best known
for his landscapes and bridge paintings.
Most of these are oil on
canvas and acryhc and
silica on paper. Many
of the scenesGrccn villc
inhabitants may find
familiar. Among some
of the finest of these
Do you teel as it you're lacking
cultural ideas? Does it seem like you arc
completely illiterate when it comes to
the arts? Wouldn't you like to be an
artistic tnvia whiz? Well, how about a
trip to the Greenville Museum of Art,
located at 802 S. Evans St.? They have
interesting art exhibits that everyone
can appreciate, and after a browse
through the museum, you'll be able to
impress your friends with your new
found wisdom on the subject!
From now until Feb. 19, you can ex paintings are the Tar
amine three visiting art exhibits. In the River Bridge" and
South Gallery, you can find large oil and
charcoal paintings by Donald Ander-
son, a visiting artist from Florida. These
paintings are done on both canvas and
paper, with genuinely figurative sub-
ject matter.
You can see Anderson's "Leaving
Home a wall size oil on canvas paint-
ing that contains swirly images of birds
in a confusion of colorful shapes and
figures. Another fascinating piece by
Anderson is "Fair Weather a mer-
gance of colors and an outline of the fair
weather sky
By Beth Hassell
statt Writer
Thereit- i rank Fain loth,cigarette
in hand, n taxed in a swi el office( hair.
Production posters from pas; perform-
ances lirw his office walls man)
.vhu h he designed him II
air loth ii the general m inager of
the East Carolina Playhouse and has
been for the pas three ears
do all t promotions all the
publicity, all the graphic designs, all the
news releases, and I m in charge of the
box office ticket sales ' Faircloth said.
Rehearsals and preparations for
"Come Back to the live and Dime
limmv Dean, immy Dean are already
weii under way.The East Carolina Plav-
house will present this production Feb
7 through Feb. 10. There are a total ot
nine cast members
"This comic-drama is about the
reunion of a James Dean fan club, set
deep in the heart of Texas, close to
where Dean's last movie, 'Giant was
filmed Faircloth said. "The club is
meeting 20 years after Dean's fatal acci-
dent
The plav's action is divided be-
tween 1955and the 1975reunion.Seven
of these roles are leads with two sup
porting roles The lead roles ot SisS)
(now). Sissy (then), Mona (now), Mona
(then), loanne. joe and luanita are
played by Khsta Conti, Kelly Haw
thorne, Candace McKensie, Marilyn
Molloy, Angela Michel, Kevin Frady
and Brinlev Vickers, respectively.
� atn lot
upp r ti itronage
I that tin �
.�� i lai
� livid - :
rt dsed over
� n ticket -� � an I
ally he said
'hi. manv pt pie reali;
hours thai v tilling a prod
together to tne I urtain i I
The stud nts d everyl
the directing, Fain loth said
th�. sts lighting and on-stage pen i
ances
Faircloth also pointed out thai the
affordable ticket price is a Strong ��
(t the I'la housi
Faircloth, a Fayetteville native re
ccived his master s degree in English
from ECU. He teaches an introdix I
to theater class as Wcll as a class .
theater management.
Tickets for Playhouse productions
may be purchased from the box office in
the lobby of MoGinnis Theatre or by
phoning (919) 757-6829.
Future events include the March
production of "The House of Blue
leaves" and the April performance ol
the East Carolina Dance fheatre
Are you afraid of the dark?
No? Then we have the perfect job
for you! Tlte East Carolinian is
now hiring for a Darkroom
Technician. Call 757-6366.
"Plank Road Trestle,
Dickenson Ave
From Feb. 20 to
March 30, Peggy Cox's
art exhibit will be on
display at the Green-
ville Museum of Art.
Cox is a graduate of
Louisville and received
her masters at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylva-
nia, and now she is a
professor at Westmin-
The name has been changed
to protect the customer.
Art & Camera Shop is now Art &, Graphics Discount Supply. And
the accent is on discount so you save money We're a great source for
illustration board, photo
processing products, and tools
for any medium.
ster in the Gallery Dc-
!n the North Gallery is an exhibit by partment of the Art
Kevin McCloskey, a professor from School. Much of her
Kutztown, Penn. His subject matter is work is of the realist
(believe it or not) PEANUTS, done in and landscape tradi-
pen and watercolor. Some of his most tion and is mostly in oil
interesting pieces are titled, "The
Roaster "Home of Jimmy C" and the
See Museum, page 10
& Graphics
DISCOUNT SUPPLY
520 Cotanche Street. Greenville
752 0688
The Entertainer February 1990





"The Lost Colony" celebrates its 50th production season this year on North Carolina's Outer
Banks
'The Lost Colony' drama
searches for performers
By Both Hassell
Stjft Writer
This summer s production
of Paul Green's, "The 1 ost Col-
ony" marks the 50th season oi
America's longest running
Outdoor drama
Annual auditions will be
held all day Feb. 24. at the
Roanoke Island site and on the
campus of the University of
N.C at Chapel Hill on March
24 Resumes and photographs
are required for all who plan to
audition
Actors and singers plan-
ning to attend the Feb. 24 audi-
tion should report at 10 a.m.
with a prepared two minute
dialogue or song. At 3 p.m.
dancers will be auditioned by
the company's choreographer.
Rehearsals will begin on
May 21, in preparation for the
first performance on June 8.
Performance time is 8:30 p.m.
nightly except Sundays.
The salary for the more
than 170 member company
ranges from $110 to $200, per
week. According to a company
spokesperson, "housing is pro-
vided at a minimal fee and is
within walking distance of the
theater
There are positions open
for actors, dancers, singers,
technicians, costume assistants
and several children.
"The Lost Colony" plays at
the Waterside Theatre, which
seats 2,000. The Waterside The-
atre, on Roanoke Sound, is
contained in the Fort Raleigh
National Historic Site, three
miles north of Manteo, (
BACKGROUND HISTORY:
"The Lost Colony" de-
buted on July 4, 1937, to com-
memorate the 350th anniver-
sary of Virginia Dare's birth
She was the first born English
child in the New World on
Aug. 18, 1587. The play was
originally intended to run for
one season.
According to production
officials, "Although the Eng-
lish colonists who inspired
The Lost Colony' vanished
mysteriously more than 400
years ago, the show itself has
endured and thrived for more
than five decades, despite a
fire, a 4-year blackout during
World War II and a hurricane
in I960
The play was to be a simple
pageant but playwright Green
created a new form of Ameri-
can theater�Symphonic Out-
door Drama. A native North
Carolinian, Green brought to-
gether song, dance and drama
to re-enact this historical event
on its actual site
Theonginal cast was made
up of professional actors from
New York, students of the
Carolina Playmakers from
UNC Chapel Hill and mem-
tion Corps stationed in the
( hiter Banks area.
Waterside Theatre, de-
signed by A.Q. "Skipper" Bell,
has changed little except tor
occasional refurbishing ci the
seating and public facilit es.
MYSTERYLEGEND:
"The Lost Colony's" en-
durement seems symbolic of
the brave colonists who be-
came a part of North Carolina's
heritage.
What happened to those
first English colonists has al-
ways added s sense of mystery
and suspense to historians of
all ages. The play includes
scenes from Elizabethan Eng-
land and Indian villages com-
mon on the Outer Banks.
There still has been no
concrete explanation to answer
the question of the Roanoke
colonist's disappearance.
Officials of The Lost Col-
ony" say, "It might be raining
elsewhere on Roanoke Island
but legend has it that a magical
doughnut-shaped ring sur-
rounds the skies above Water-
side Theatre, protecting The
Lost Colony' from Rain
"Morrison Doughnut as
the actors call it, is named after
Fmma Neal Morrison, a long-
time benefactor of the show.
They say it has only rained
See Drama, page 10
International folk
group appears at
Wright Auditorium
Folk troupe Shalom '90
brings the native music and
dance of Israel to the stage of
Wnght Auditorium on Feb. 22
at 8 p.m. as part of the ECU
Performing Arts Series.
Shalom '90 performs in
Israel and represents the coun-
try throughout the world.
Annually, the group changes
its repertoire and dancers. The
company's name expresses the
hope in the heart of every Jew
in Israel, and around the globe,
for peace in a nation that knows
war's suffering, yearns for
peace, tranquility and security
on its land.
Gavn Levi is the initiator,
the organizer, the choreogra-
pher and the group's natural
father. He selects dancers from
the various Kibbutzim through-
out the country, where folk
dancing has played an impor-
tant part in the cultural life o
the community. Shalom '90
comprises 50 dancers from
every corner of the country,
among them soldiers, farmers,
teachers and professionals
from all walks of life. These
individuals are engaged in
their work during the day and
in the evenings meet for prac-
tice and performances. The
troupe has performed
throughout the world, includ-
ing South America, the United
States, Europe and South Af-
rica. The most astounding
achievement for the group was
an invitation from the Egyp-
tian government to appear in
Cairo at the signing of the
Peace Treaty between Israel
and Egypt. In addition, the
group is a regular guest on Is-
raeli television, and TV net-
works around the world.
In every place where Sha-
lom '90 performs, it brings with
it the story of a country whose
roots are thousands of years
old, a country that united its
people from every part of the
world, a country that calls to its
sons and daughters to return
home, and a country that
knows how to preserve its rich
and varied culture.
Viewing a performance of
Shalom '90, one witnesses a
blaze of multi-colored cos-
tumes, musicians playing vari-
ous instruments that sweep the
dancers in beat and singers of
songs of Israel.
Tickets for this unique per-
formance go on sale Feb. 5 at
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendcnhall. For more infor-
mation call (919) 757-4788.
Advance tickets are $15 for the
public, $12 for ECU faculty
staff and $8 for ECU students
youth. All tickets will be$15 at
the door.
ARLINGTON
VILLAGE
Behind C Heber Forbes
355-5090
No other love
is like yours.
No other diamond
is like this
Classic
Solitaire
Engagem 'id Diamond
SALE Triced
1.03 ct Oval 5,995
1.02 ct. Round 4,375
.62 ct. Round 2,450
58ct Marquise 1,995
42ct. Round 1,050
Student Accounts Welcome
The Entertainer February 1990





The Lost Colo
Banks
'The
sean
By Beth Hasscll
Staff Writer
This summer's production
of Paul Green's, "The Lost Col-
ony" marks the 50th season of
America's longest running
outdoor drama.
Annual auditions will be
held all day Feb. 24, at the
Roanokc Island site and on the
campus of the University of
N.C. at Chapel Hill on March
24. Resumes and photographs
are required for all who plan to
audition.
Actors and singers plan-
ning to attend the Feb. 24 audi-
tion should report at 10 a.m.
with a prepared two minute
dialogue or song. At 3 p.m.
dancers will be auditioned by
the company's choreographer.
Rehearsals will begin on
May 21, in preparation for the
first performance on June 8.
Performance time is 8:30 p.m.
nightly except Sundays.
The salary for the more
than 170 member company
ranges from $110 to $200, per
week. According to a company
spokesperson, "housing is pro-
vided at a minimal fee and is
within walking distance of the
theater
There are positions open
for actors, dancers, singers,
technicians, costume assistants
and several children.
"The Lost Colon' plays at
the Waterside Theatre, which
seats 2,(XX). The Waterside The-
atre, on Roanoke Sound, is
contained in the Fort Raleigh
National Historic Site, three
miles north of Manteo, N.C.
BACKGROUND HISTORY:
"The Lost Colony" de-
buted on July 4, 1937, to com-
memorate the 350th anniver-
sary of Virginia Dare's birth.
She was the first born English
child in the New World on
Aug. 18, 1587. The play was
originally intended to run for
one season.
According to production
officials, "Although the Eng-
lish colonists who inspired
The Lost Colony' vanished
mysteriously more than 400
years ago, the show itself has
endured and thrived for more
than five decades, despite a
fire, a 4-year blackout during
World War II and a hurricane
in 1960
The play was to be a simple
pageant but playwright Green
created a new form of Ameri-
can theater�Symphonic Out-
door Drama. A native North
Carolinian, Green brought to-
gether song, dance and drama
to re-enact this historical event
on its actual site.
The original cast was made
up of professional actors from
New York, students of the
Carolina Playmakers from
UNC-Chapel Hill and mem-
tion Corps stationed in the
Outer Banks area.
Waterside Theatre, de-
signed by A.Q. "Skipper" Bell,
has changed little except for
occasional refurbishing of the
seating and public facilities.
MYSTERYLEGEND:
"The Lost Colony's" en-
durement seems symbolic of
the brave colonists who be-
came a part of North Carolina's
heritage.
What happened to those
first English colonists has al-
ways added s sense of mystery
and suspense to historians of
all ages. The play includes
scenes from Elizabethan Eng-
land and Indian villages com-
mon on the Outer Banks.
There still has been no
concrete explanation to answer
the question of the Roanoke
colonist's disappearance.
Officials of 'The Lost Col-
ony" say, "It might be raining
elsewhere on Roanoke Island
but legend has it that a magical
doughnut-shaped ring sur-
rounds the skies above Water-
side Theatre, protecting The
Lost Colony' from Rain
"Morrison Doughnut as
the actors call it, is named after
Emma Neal Morrison, a long-
time benefactor of the show.
They say it has only rained
See Drama, page 10
International folk
group appears at
Wright Auditorium
Folk troupe Shalom '90
brings the native music and
dance of Israel to the stage of
Wright Auditorium on Feb. 22
at 8 p.m. as part of the ECU
Performing Arts Series.
Shalom '90 performs in
Israel and represents the coun-
try throughout the world.
Annually, the group changes
i ts repertoire and dancers. The
company's name expresses the
hope in the heart of every Jew
in Israel, and around the globe,
for peace in a nation that knows
war's suffering, yearns for
peace, tranquility and security
on its land.
Gavri Levi is the initiator,
the organizer, the choreogra-
pher and the group's natural
father. He selects dancers from
the various Kibbutzim through-
out the country, where folk
dancing has played an impor-
tant part in the cultural life of
the community. Shalom '90
comprises 50 dancers from
every corner of the country,
among them soldiers, farmers,
teachers and professionals
from all walks of life. These
individuals are engaged in
their work during the day and
in the evenings meet for prac-
tice and performances. The
troupe has performed
throughout the world, includ-
ing South America, the United
States, Europe and South Af-
rica. The most astounding
achievement for the group was
an invitation from the Egyp-
tian government to appear in
Cairo at the signing of the
Peace Treaty between Israel
and Egypt. In addition, the
group is a regular guest on Is-
raeli television, and TV net-
works around the world.
In every place where Sha-
lom '90 performs, it brings with
it the story of a country whose
roots are thousands of years
old, a country that united its
people from every part of the
world, a country that calls to its
sons and daughters to return
home, and a country that
knows how to preserve its rich
and varied culture.
Viewing a performance of
Shalom '90, one witnesses a
blaze of multi-colored cos-
tumes, musicians playing vari-
ous instruments that sweep the
dancers in beat and singers of
songs of Israel.
Tickets for this unique per-
formance go on sale Feb. 5 at
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall. For more infor-
mation call (919) 757-4788.
Advance tickets are $15 for the
public, $12 for ECU faculty
staff and $8 for ECU students
youth. All tickets will be $15 at
the door.
ARLINGTON
VILLAGE
Behind C Heber Forbes
355-5090
No other love
is like yours.
No other diamond
is like this
SMaire
Engagement Diamond
SALE Priced
1.03 ct. Oval 5,995
1.02 ct. Round 4,375
.62 ct. Round 2,450
.58ct. Marquise 1,995
.42ct. Round 1,050
Student Accounts Welcome
The Entertainer February 1990







FEBRUARY 1990
�HaC Calendar of Events
mn( fn'i.i! student � � B � � � -
K�MOu' 'OUM �OU
SUNDAY
DO THE RIGHT
THING
Hendrix Theatre
8:00pm
11
THE ABYSS
Hendrix Theatre
8.00 pm
18
SEA OF LOVE
8:00 pm Hendrix
Theatre
Performing Arts
Series
SHALOM 90
8:00 pm
Wright Auditorium
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Women's Basketball:
ECUvs
George Mason
7:00 pm
Minges Coliseum
12
Men's Basketball.
ECUvs
James Madison
7:00 pm
Minges Coliseum
13
25
Chamber Music
Series
THE EMERSON
STRING QUARTET
300 pm Hendrix Theatre
SHOCKER
8:00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
19
Opening Reception
for Illumina
Art Show
7-9pm
Mendenhall Gallery
20
26
27
WEDNESDAY
I.D. cards made,
2:30 - 3:30pm
Mendenhall
THE SEVENTH SEAL
8:00pm
Hendrix Theatre
Ash Wednesday
THURSDAY
DO THE RIGHT
THING
Hendnx Theatre
800pm
FRIDAY
DO THE RIGHT
THING
Hendrix Theatre
8:00pm
8
THE ABYSS
Hendrix Theatre
8 00 pm
Bloodmobile
12 pm -6 pm
Mendenhall
THE ABYSS
Hendrix Theatre
8:00 pm
14 ID cards made,
2:30 - 3:30pm
Mendenhall
QONE WITH THE WIND
Hendrix Theatre 8:00 pm
VALENTINES DAY
Entries tor ILLUMINA
accepted in Mendenhall,
room 221, 2 - 5 pm
21
I.D. cards made,
2:30 - 3:30pm
Mendenhall
VOICES OF
SARAFINA
Hendrix Theatre
8 00 pm
1TTraYffl Arlvpnture Film:
GREECE
Hendrix Theatre 8:00 pm
Theme Dinner at 6:30 pm
Mendenhall
Multi - Purpose Rm
Entries for ILLUMINA
accepted in Mendenhall,
room 221, 2 -5 pm
28
I.D. cards made,
2:30 - 3.30pm
Mendenhall
22
SHOCKER
8:00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
Hendrix Theatre 8:00 pm
KISMET
8 00pm
Wright Auditorium
16
SEA OF LOVE
8.00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
Entries for ILLUMINA
accepted in Mendenhall,
room 221, 2 - 5 pm
23
SHOCKER
6:00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
SATURDAY
DO THE RIGHT
THING
Hendrix Theatre
8 00pm
Women's Basketball
ECUvs
Appalachian State
7:00 pm
Minges Coliseum
10
THE ABYSS
Hendnx Theatre
8 00 pm
Men's Basketball.
ECUvs
Amencan
7:00 pm
Minges Coliseum
17
SEA OF LOVE
8:00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
24SHOCKER
8:00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
Dinner Theatre
TRIPLE PLAY
6.30 pm Mendenhall Great Rm
Women's Basketball:
ECUvs
UNC-W
7:00 pm Minges Coliseum





Broadway
musical set
for Feb. 18
Dreamgirls, the dazzling Broad
vva musical by Michael Bennett I
i horus Line"), is the next event ot the
East Carolina University Performing
Arts Series, rhe rony Award-winning
pla) will be performed in Wright Audi-
torium on Feb.18 at 3 pm.
Set in the years 1963-1970,
Dreamgirls" tells the story ot Deena,
I orrell and Effie throe spirited black
singers whose turbulent careers boar a
strong resemblance to the lives of the
Supremos "Dreamgirls" capturesboth
glory and sadness as these three friends
from the Chicago projects are trans-
termed into the singing superstars
known as The Incredible Dreams
The striking scenesin "Dreamgirls"
art' enhanced by high-tech light towers,
capturing the mood ot the late '60s. i'he
music scort charts all the trends in a
major decade ot black musical expres-
sion v ith the mellow sounds of falsetto
bal i rocking soul of rhythm and
blues and the'tu pnoticbeal ofdisco. All
this combines in what inspired he New
�� ; in to all 'Dreamgirls "A
beautifuland heart breaking musical in
hI a history is made
I ickets for this event are now on
sale it the Central Hcket (fficc at
Mendenhall. I or more information call
57 1788, or toll-tree. I 800-ECU-
AR rS. Advance ticket prices are $15 for
the publii , $12 tor E U facultystaff
and $8 tor ECL studentsyouth All
tickets at the door will be $15.
At
Ihr Izxel (Larnlininn
when we're not
experimenting with
cold nut tear fusion,
babysitting heat u
metal bands,
calling the plays
for ot' Montana,
or satirizing (orrupt
government officials,
we're listening f
9l.J hn
'The college tin'
The Broadway musical. "Dreamgirls " will be perlormed in Wright Auditorium on Feb
18 The 1990 national tour of this Tony Award winning his is presented by Daedalus
Productions of New York
Opera Northeast presents 'Kismet'
Kismet will be presented as a
special ,uivd attrai tion to the l
Performing Arts Series on I eb 28 at &
p m. in Wright Auditorium
Kismet mean late in the lurk
language. I sed as a title, the word I
had .1 wonderful fate in the the �� �
culminating in the musical Kismet
which introduced the memorable and
haunting song Stranger in Paradise,
to sav nothing ot the- almost equally
successful And rhis Is M Beloved"
and "Baubles. Bangles and Beads
"Kismet first appeared as the title
tor a plav in bM 1 when the late I dw
Knobloi. k so named his violent Victo
nan melodrama about a� rrnpt beggar
named Wu rhe play toured the Eng
ush-speaking world tor mam vears,
tan � the lateMis Skinn � 11 I
formed the basis tor thn � n les
Kismet will be presented b
(pera Northeast, an affiliate ot the na-
tional Savoyards Founded in lw
early Opera Northeast productions in
New York ity experienced immediate
acceptance with the public and the
press, and a national touring program
- estabhsl

� �
I I ubhc
with both traditional and inn
productions Highlights ol I first 15
, ns includ

the National ards currently offer
a v ide vanetA I ; 1 du hons in I
field ' ;��� peretta and Amencan
musical theater
Opera Northeast has been called
unusually successful bytheNfu I ��
See Kismet page 11
Award winning pianist to play at ECU
Jose Carlos Cocarelli Silver Medalist of the fcigntn Van Cliburn International
Piano Competition will appear in concert at Wright Auditorium on Feb 10
lose Carlos Cocarelli, Silver Medal-
list ot the Eighth Van Clibum Interna-
tional Piano Competition, will appear
in concert at Wright Auditorium on
Feb 10, at 6 p.m. as the East Carolina
University Performing Art. Series con-
tinues into 1990.
t 'ocarelli was born in Riode Janeiro
and currently resides in Pans Prior to
his studies at the Rio de laneiro Music
School University, he was taught by his
mother and gave his first public per-
formance at the age of nine He has also
studied with Adele Marcus m New
York.
Cocarelli has concertized through
out Europe, where he appeared with
the Salburg Mozarteum c hrhestra, the
Netherlands Chamber Orchestra and
the Emilia Romagna Symphony Or-
chestra in Salso Maggiore.
( ailed the "lion of the piano" bv the
renowned Claudio Arrau, Cocarelli
was also awarded the Steven Dei Jroote
Memorial Chamber Music Award tor
his performance with the Tokyo String
Quartet in the semifinal round ot the
Eighth Van Cliburn International Piano
1 Competition.
For his performance at ECU, co-
carelli will perform "Sonata, Op 1" by
Berg, "Ballade Op 19" t Faire, "So-
nata No. 7 in H flat Major, tp 83 by
Prokofiev and Preludes Op 28 by
Chopin
Celebrating Van CHbum's sensa-
tional victory at the first Tchaikovsky
mpetition in Moscow in 1958 a
group of illustrious teachers and citi
ens in Fort Worth, iA , created the an
Cliburn International Piano Competi
tion in 12 Repeated every- tour years
the competition has demonstrated
See Pianist, page 11
x The Entertainer February l'Wi)





Broadway
musical set
for Feb. 18
"Dreamgirls the dazzling Broad-
way musical by Michael Bennett ("A
Chorus Line"), is the next event of the
East Carolina University Performing
Arts Series. The Tony Award-winning
play will be performed in Wright Audi-
torium on Feb.18 at 3 pm.
Set in the years 1963-1970,
"Dreamgirls" tells the story of Deena,
Lorrell and Effie�three spirited black
singers whose turbulent careers bear a
strong resemblance to the lives of the
Supremes. "Dreamgirls" captures both
glory and sadness as these three friends
from the Chicago projects are trans-
formed into the singing superstars
known as The Incredible Dreams
The striking scenes in "Dreamgirls"
are enhanced by high-tech light towers,
capturing the mood of the late '60s. The
music score charts all the trends in a
major decade of black musical expres-
sion with the mellow sounds of falsetto
ballads, the rocking soul of rhythm and
blues and the hypnotic beat of disco. All
this combines in what inspired The New
York Times to call "Dreamgirls "A
beautiful and heart-breaking musical in
which Broadway history is made
Tickets for this event arc now on
sale at the Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall. For more information call
(919) 757-4788, or toll-free, 1-800-ECU-
ARTS. Advance ticket prices are $15 for
the public, $12 for ECU facultystaff
and $8 for ECU studentsyouth. All
tickets at the door will be $15.
T
1
Ptoaucuons oi incw tuik
eb
us
At
(TFje Uast Carolinian
when we're not
experimenting with
cold nuclear fusion,
babysitting heavy
metal bands,
calling the plays
for foe Montana,
or satirizing corrupt
government officials,
we're listening to
WZMB
9l.J fm
The college fm'
Opera Northeast presents 'Kismet'
"Kismet" will be presented as a
special added attraction to the 1990
Performing Arts Series on Feb. 28 at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Kismet means "fate" in the I urkish
language. Used as a title, the word has
had a wonderful fate in the theater,
culminating in the musical "Kismet
which introduced the memorable and
haunting song "Stranger in Paradise
to say nothing of the almost equally
successful "And This Is My Beloved"
and "Baubles, Bangles and Beads
"Kismet" first appeared as the title
for a play in 1911 when the late Edward
Knoblock so-named his violent Victo-
rian melodrama about a corrupt beggar
named Hajj. The play toured the Eng-
lish-speaking world for many years,
starring the late Otis Skinner, and
formed the basis for three movies.
"Kismet" will be presented by
Opera Northeast, an affiliate of the na-
tional Savoyards. Founded in 1972,
early Opera Northeast productions in
New York City experienced immediate
acceptance with the public and the
press, and a national touring program
was established in 1974.
Artistic Director Donald
Westwood serves as a broad public
with both traditional and innovative
productions. Highlights of the first 15
seasons include several world and New
York premieres. Opera Northeast and
the National Savoyards currently offer
a wide variety of productions in the
fields of opera, operetta and American
musical theater.
Opera Northeast has been called
"unusually successful" by the New York
See 'Kismet page 11
Award winning pianist to play at ECU
Jose Carlos Cocarelli, Silver Medalist of the Eighth Van Cliburn International
Piano Competition, will appear in concert at Wright Auditorium on Feb. 10.
Jose Carlos Cocarelli, Silver Medal-
list of the Eighth Van Cliburn Interna-
tiona! Piano Competition, will appear
in concert at Wright Auditorium on
Feb. 10, at 8 p.m. as the East Carolina
University Performing Arts Series con-
tinues into 1990.
Cocarelli was born in Rio de Janeiro
and currently resides in Paris. Prior to
his studies at the Rio de Janeiro Music
School University, he was taught by his
mother and gave his first public per-
formance at the age of nine. He has also
studied with Adele Marcus in New
York.
Cocarelli has concertized through-
out Europe, where he appeared with
the Salzburg Mozarteum Orchestra, the
Netherlands Chamber Orchestra and
the Emilia Romagna Symphony Or-
chestra in Salso Maggiore.
Called the "lion of the piano" by the
8 The ErTERTAiNER February 1990
renowned Claudio Arrau, Cocarelli
was also awarded the Steven DeGroote
Memorial Chamber Music Award for
his performance with the Tokyo String
Quartet in the semifinal round of the
Eighth Van Cliburn International Piano
Competition.
For his performance at ECU, Co-
carelli will perform "Sonata, Op. 1" by
Berg, "Ballade, Op. 19" by Faire, "So-
nata No. 7 in B-flat Major, Op. 83" by
Prokofiev and "Preludes, Op. 28" by
Chopin.
Celebrating Van Clibum's sensa-
tional victory at the first Tchaikovsky
Competition in Moscow in 1958, a
group of illustrious teachers and citi-
zens in Fort Worth, Tx created the Van
Cliburn International Piano Competi-
tion in 1962. Repeated every four years,
the competition has demonstrated
See Pianist pay 11





'Three For One' opens season
1on. S-lOpm Al I FURLS IN MODERN RECORDING
10 p m. : a m MONDAY NIGHT LIVE (All Krone
By Mary Anne Lllery
statt Writer

t DIO FR11 JAMAICA
2 n i V ROCK 91
Wed v lOp.m LASER WARS (All Compact Dis
Op.n 2a.m PERMANENT WAVE
hur- 8 ;
RADIO FREE JAMAICA
10p.m2a.m NLWROCK91
Fri6 p m. midnight ROCK OUTLET I All Request)
midnight 4
METAL MAYHEMnil 4 a.m.
Sat 8 9 am UP L LOSE AND CLASSICAL
9 a.mnoon THE SOUNDS OF JAZZ
5 8 p m. INDUSTRIAL DANCE
8 p.m. midnight CLUB 91 (Soul)
midnight-4 am METAL MAYHEM (till 4 a.m.)
Sun 8 11a.m. CROSSOVER
11 -1130a.m. PIRATE TALK
ll:30-noon INSIGHT
noon-3 p.m RADIO FREE JAMAC1A
3-6 p.m. BLUES MUSIC WITH A FEELING
6-S p.m. THE SOUNDS OF JAZZ
8-midnight CLUB 91 (Soul)
midnight am NIGHT DREAMINGSou!)
WZMB Request Line: 757-0913
fechnicallv, it all began
u md W 0 � Ital) as medie-
val mystery m d mrality
�i.w s 'hrough th� ears the
opera has changi d vt les back
and forth from Apollonian to
' riaonvsian element Slowly
but surely. the opera has crept
it- wav into the East Carolina
curriculum and on Feb. 16 ana
17 the public can see the
"Three For One Comedy: The
King WhoSaed Himself From
Being Saved, The Proposal and
The Darlings of Society" in A.I.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
"The King Who Saved
Himself From Being Saved" by
Philip Hageman, is a 20 minute
representational opera with a
contemporary theme It is a
combination of all the fairy
tales of the hero coming in and
trying to save the princess In
this case, the king doesn't want
to be saved said Dr. Clyde
Hiss, director ot the Opera
Theatre.
In The Proposal" by Mil-
ton Granger, a young woman
lecides she must hold a board
meeting to decide :t she will
marry oi net rhis 'board"
onsistsoi the different aspects
: her personality i �� h
opera is the dichotomy of the
different elements that work in
all oi us. n the play, th-1
board" consists I a 5-year-
old to signify the child in all t
us a security officer tor cau-
tion, a Statue ol Liberty to ex-
press women's iib. a sensual
woman and Mother Theresa to
represent all the good in the
world.
"The Darlings of Society
with music by Jacques Offen-
bach is contrived by the ECU
Opera Theatre in a purely en-
tertainment tashion. The opera
boasts a computer like ma-
chine to materialize people
from history, then the machine
turns them into contemporary
figures. "It would be as if we
conjured up Homer from an-
cient Greek times and turned
him into Robert Frost ex-
plains Hiss
School of Music February Calendar
Fob. :
Feb. 3
Feb. 5
Feb. 6
Feb. 9
Feb. 10
Ja Ensemble and
Wind Ensemble Concert, 8; 13
Wright Auditorium
Eastern District High School and
Junior High Honors Band Concert, 7:30
Wright Auditorium
SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT GALA of the
Friends of the School of Music featuring
ECU symphony Orchestra
Hilton Inn, 7:30
For details and ticket information call 757-6851
Janet Warren Wright, voice
Senior Recital, 7:00
Janeue Fishell, organ
Faculty Recital
First Presbyterian Church, 8:15
"Young People's Concerts"
ECU Symphony Orchestra
10:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Johanna Wnght, cello
Senior Recital, 9:00
Performing Arts Series:
JOSE CARLOS COCARELLI-SILVER
MEDALIST THE EIGHTH VAN CLIBURN
INTERN ATIONAUPIANO COMPETITION
Wright Auditorium, 8:00
For ticket information call 7S7-4788.
Feb. ion EC! Siring Workshop, All Da)
A.J. Fletcher Music Center
Feb. 11 Antonia Dalapas. saprano
John B. O'Brien, pianist
Faculty Recital, 4:00
Feb. 12 Dwight Lawing, percussion
Senior Recital, 7:00
Feb. 16-17 ECU Opera Theatre Productions, 8.00
Three One-Act Operas:
"The King Who Saved Himself from Being Saved"
by Phillip Hagcmann
"The Proposal" by Milton Granger
"The Darlings of Society" by Jaques Offenbach
For ticket information call 757-4788
Feb. 19 Sally Moseley, pianist
Junior Recital, 7:00
Feb. 20 Concert Choir with Loonis McGlohon
Wright Auditorium, 8;15
Feb. 24 Solo Ensemble Contest, All Day
Feb. 28 Young Artist Competition Finals, 7:00
All events arc free to the public and in the AJ. Fletcher
Music Center Recital Hall unless otherwise indicated.
. his Thre I er One Com-
edy" is thefirst full lengthwork
i the vear and these particular
ones wen because ot
their different styles and peri-
?ds : he shovv w . elected r
uditions and
oa the cast h I ecember.
� 'txt heatrc consists
i smallrchestra of students,
faculty .ir.ii townspeople and a
cast ot all ECU students from
theater opera classes The Op-
ew Theatre cast consists of:
Penny Adams, Calvin Braxton.
Angela Burns. "iff any
Campbell, Kelly Chaiaire,
Susan Durham, Lisa Edwards,
Amee Fbrster, Rebecca How-
ell, Michael Johnson, jonjolley,
Lori McLclland, Suzanne
Marsden, Loretta Moore, Ju-
dith aisang, ason Page,
Christopher Puckctt, Domin-
gos Pereira. Dawn Routszong,
William Sharpe, James Shock
and Eric Shine.
Tickets are S3 for adults
and S2 for students. Purchase
them at the Central Ticket Of-
fice in Mendenhall Student
Center, or call 737-4788.
Three hits
set for
February
Three hits by two famed
playwrights combine to make
an exciting evening of dinner
theater when the Department
of University Unions presents
the Alpha Omega Players in
'Triple Play on Feb. 24 at 630
p.m. in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Great Room.
From the play, TheTwo of
Us playwright Michael Frayn
takes a hilarious look at a
young couple spending their
second honeymoon with their
colicky baby. Creator of the
well-known broadway hit,
"Noises Off Frayn once again
entertains with his inimitable
style. The evening is complete
with Robert Anderson's
charmingly confused elderly
couple who comfortably mix
up their memories.
Tickets for the dinner thea-
ter are now on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Menden-
hall. For more informantion
call (919) 757-4788, or toll-free,
1-800-ECU-ARTS. Tickets are
$15 for ECU students and $20
for all others.
The Entertainer February 1990 9





Musicians celebrate 10th anniversary
Emerson String Quartet entertains at Hendrix
The Fmerson String Quartet will perform as part ot the tCU
Chamber Music Series on Feb 25
Drama
The Emerson String Quar-
tet will perform .is part oi the
ECU Chamber Musk Series in
a matinee concert on Feb. 25, at
3p.m. in I fendrix Theatre. The
Chamber Music Series is co-
sponsored by the Department
ot University Unions And the
School of Music.
Internationally heralded
as one oi the most eminent
quartets of our time, the Emer-
son String Quartet excels bv
virtue of an extraordinarily
rw h and elegant musicianship,
enlivening performances with
its vitality and technical
aplomb Itsenterprisingspirit,
exemplified bv the two violin-
ists alternating first chair posi-
tions, has gained the Emerson
.1 reputation as a unique and
creative American ensemble.
For their concert here, the
Quartet will perform "String
Quartet in C major p ; V
o " i The Birds i b
1 laydrt "Quartet No 11 in E
mi nor c )p. I . by
Schostakovich, and "Quartet
in C' sharp minor. (p 131" by
Continued from page 5
twice in the past 136 perform-
ances.
The Colony's Professional
Theater Workshop has proved
to be a training ground for
young talents to hone their
skills. This workshop enables
cast members to study with
Museum
prominent guest artists like
Geoffrey Holder, loeNamath,
1 inda Lavin, Coleen Dewhurst
and Kim 1 hinter
Mam past performers of
"The Lost Colony" have gone
on to become successful actors
and actresses. Andy (.ninth,
the most notable, got his first
major role on stage .is Sir Wal-
ter Raleigh 11949-1953.)
Each summer thousands
othiter Banks tourists art-
entertained by the delightfully
amusing and historical pro-
duction of " The Lost Colony
Continued from page
or watercolor.
She is greatly concerned with com-
position in art and her work exempli-
fies the beauty of nature This preserva-
tion of nature through art ranges in size
from seven inches to seven feet, she
hopes to bo in town on the 1 eh. 20 for a
reception in her honor from 5:30-7:30
p.m. It is free and open to the public,
and anyone interested in meeting her is
welcome.
The Greenville Museum of Art is
open Tuesday thru Friday trom lOa.m
to 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday
from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. So if you're feeling
a bit clueless in the held of art, scurry on
out to the town museum and browse
around heck, it's FREE! What can
vou lose'
Do you have any of
these characteristics?.
� an uncontrollable urge to go out and
do something exciting, and then write
about it;
� an unquenchable thirst for knowledge
� more time spent developing your
bylines than your tan lines;
� an irresistable pull any time you get
near a typewriter or computer;
� can't seem to remember what money
looks like.
If so. you d probably make a
good writer for �
'The 'Entertainer. I
For more info call 757-B3BB. �
Beethoven.
The New York-based
Emerson stnng Quartet- Eu-
gene Drucker and Philip Set-
zer, violins, Lawrence Dutton,
viola; and David Finckel. cello-
are celebrating their 10th anni-
versary season as resident
quartets of the Smithsonian
Institution and continue a
longtime teaching and per
formance residence at the
Hartt School ot Music at the
University ot 1 iarttord
The quartet has pert rmed
frequently tor Performing Art-
ists tor Nuclear Disarmament
(PAND) and for the Union of
Concerned Physicians. In
June, 1988, the Emerson gave a
recital as part ot the events
accompanying the United
Nations' Special Session on
Disarmament. They have also
Performed to benefit CARE in
the fight against world hunger
I lckets tor this event go on
sale Feb. 5 at the C entral Ticket
Office in Mendenhal! For
more information call (919)
757-4788, or toll-free. 1-800-
E I -ARTS. Advance Ticket
prices are $8 tor the publu . $
tor E T facultystaff, and K5
tor ECU studentsvouth All
tukets at the door are
The East Carolina University
Alumni Association
Proudly Presents
� �
For Seniors Only
The Attic
Tuesday, February 6
4:00pm - 6:00 pm
No Cover Charge, just bring your
I.D and join the rest of the
Class of 1990
For a
"Senior Send Off "
Refreshmemts! Raffles!
Sponsored By:
Champions Health Club
ECU Student Store
BLT'S
Harris Teeter
East Coast Music &. Video
Pizza Transit Authority
Carolina Imprints
The Attic
10
I Enteri uner Fi bruary IWD





Pianist
bers Ol Hie Amateurs as pk lured from le't to righl William Shepherd. Vince Stout. Ayinde Olniyar
Muddy Alcorn and Mike Davis
Mike Canale
The Amateurs play to Greenville
and other audiences statewide
By Beth llassell
start Writer
i ireenville is the luc ky homeol one
ol the hottest reggae bands around
The Amateurs. Ihcv have come a lone,
vvav. and one look at their concert
schedule tells On- storv. I heir lirst gig
was ct The New Deli, onotanche St
in March 1983
i Her the last month, tin- band has
traveled to South (. arohna, Raleigh,
I urham, hapel I fill. Ashevilleand the
i. rystal Coast, packing in crowds lhis
seven-member band performs their
unique brand ot reggae, withcollabora
tion by everyone.
The Amateurs is a ood name tor
us, said William Shepherd. "Wc were
ted by each others encouragement
Amateur is defined as vi non profes
sional who engages in some art, tor the
pleasure ot it rattier than the money
Seems appropriate'
(luitarist Mike I a vis met Shepherd
m 198 J and thev put the band together
from there with Buddy Alcorn
Each member plays a handful of
instruments, does stage setups, pro
duction, lighting, accounting and man
aging
Shepherd, Vince Stout, Ayinde
Olaniyan, Mike c anale, Alcorn, Davis
and Bill Lynch have taken this local
land and made it into a much sought
atter regional group. " Hie popularity
oftheband has been phenomenal said
Davis.
Main may remember the old Roxy
Iheatre but tew mas know this led to
inspirations later used to form the
band. From 1975 to 1979, Alcorn and
Shepherd ran the Roxy Music, Arts, and
( raits, en Albermarle Avenue.
The Roxy bridged the black and
white community Shepherd said "It
was an outlet tor graduate students, ot
art and theater, who were in need ot
public exposure By spotlighting local
talent, the Row was a good way to add
cultural value to the community.
Everyone in tin- band seems to
agree that they are strengthened by
each other's talent. "We're all commit-
ted to the concept ot The Amateurs
said Alcorn
"When people come to see us, we
like toi them to have a good time and to
say they saw something unlike any-
where else adds 1 avis
Shepherd credits the members tor
keeping the band tresh by putting
something ot themselves back into the
music.
"We'roa product ot I .reenville and
that creative energy, and the embodi-
ment ot our music comes from Green-
ville he said
"We've got a good organization
said Alcorn. "and if we keep on doing
what we do. we'll keep getting better
Members agree that their ability to
grab and relate to an audience has
always been one ot their strongest
Mmts Shepherd said, 'The band has
Kvn a continual experience; each time
we perform, we grow "
With the support from their tans
and friends, lusw proved to be the best
year for The Amateurs. Fortheupcom-
ing vear, the band hopes to work on
individual projects write mere nevs
music and do more recordings
Fans wish the best ol luck to rhe
Amateurs As thev say, TEA F AND
COOLRl NN1NGS
Continued from page 8
again and again the tremendous impe
tus th.it winning a major competition
lends to an international career. It pro
ides an opportunity ior the most
gifted and communicative musk ians to
rise to the top and gam recognition. In
opening doors tor these outstanding
men and women by prearranging con
certs tor its winners throughout the
world, the competition fulfills its secon-
dary purpose ot bringing the highest
quality ot music and musicianship to
audiences everywhere
The competition itseli is one ot the
most rigorous and comprehensive ex-
aminations ot ever) facet ot each
contestant's musicianship and techni-
cal proficiency. Not only are the com-
petitors heard in recital, but semifinal-
ists are further heard playing specifi-
cally commissioned works, pcrtorm-
aix es ot c hamper music with the most
eminent string quartets ol our time,and
the finalists are heard in two concerts
performed with the Fort Worth Svm-
phony Orchestra led by major interna-
tional conductors
rickets tor this performance are on
s.ile now at the Central Ticket Office.
1ft more information call (Q1M) 757-
4788 Advance ticket pnces are $15 tor
the public, H2 for the ECU faculty
Staff and 'fS for ECU srudentsvouth.
All tickets at the door will be $15.
'Kismet'
Continued from page 8
Times and "very special" by the New
)ork Post, c pera News has recognized
the company as "a dynamic alternative
to the giants at Lincoln Center " Chi
tour, Opera Northeast has Kvn called
lirst rate" by the New Haven Register
and "a real treat" by the Baltimore News.
Tickets are now on sale at the Cen
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center For more information call
757-4788 or toll-free 1-800-ECU-AKTS
Advance ticket prices are $20 for the
public, $1750 tor ECU faculty and staff
and $15 for ECU students and youth (IS
years ot age and under). All tickets at
the door will be $20.
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
CONCERNING
ADVERTISING IN
THE ENTERTAINER
CALL 757-6366
Tin: Entertainer February 1990
11





Members of The Amateurs as pictured
Buddy Alcom and Mike Davis.
I
The Amatei
and other a
By Beth Hassell
Staff Writer
Greenville is the lucky home of one
of the hottest reggae bands around�
The Amateurs. They have come a long
way, and one look at their concert
schedule tells the story. Their first gig
was at The New Deli, on Cotanche St
in March 1983.
Over the last month, the band has
traveled to South Carolina, Raleigh,
Durham, Chapel Hill, Ashevilleand the
Crystal Coast, packing in crowds. This
seven-member band performs their
unique brand of reggae, with collabora-
tion by everyone.
"The Amateurs is a good name for
us said William Shepherd. "We were
fed by each other's encouragement
Amateur is defined as a non-profes-
sional who engages in some art, for the
pleasure of it rather than the money.
Seems appropriate!
Guitarist Mike Davis met Shepherd
in 1983 and they put the band together
from there with Buddy Alcom.
Each member plays a handful of
instruments, does stage setups, pro-
duction, lighting, accounting and man-
aging.
Shepherd, Vince Stout, Ayinde
Olaniyan, Mike Canale, Alcom, Davis
and Bill Lynch have taken this local
band and made it into a much sought-
after regional group. The popularity
of the band has been phenomenal said
Davis.
Many may remember the old Roxy
Theatre but few may know this led to
inspirations later used to form the
band. From 1975 to 1979, Alcom and
Shepherd ran the Roxy Music, Arts, and
Crafts, on Albermarle Avenue.
The Roxy bridged the black and
white community Shepherd said. "It
was an outlet for graduate students, of
art and theater, who were in need of
public exposure By spotlighting local
talent, the Roxy was a good way to add
cultural value to the community.
Everyone in the band seems to
agree that they are strengthened by
each other's talent. "We're all commit-
ted to the concept of The Amateurs
said Alcom.
"When people come to see us, we
like for them to have a good time and to
say they saw something unlike any-
where else adds Davis.
Shepherd credits the members for
keeping the band fresh by putting
something of themselves back into the
music.
"We're a product of Greenville and
that creative energy, and the embodi-
ment of our music comes from Green-
ville he said.
"We've got a good organization
said Alcom, "and if we keep on doing
what we do, we'll keep getting better
Members agree that their ability to
grab and relate to an audience has
always been one of their strongest
points. Shepherd said, "The band has
been a continual experience; each time
we perform, we grow
With the support from their fans
and friends, 1989 proved to be the best
year for The Amateurs. For the upcom-
ing year, the band hopes to work on
individual projects, write more new
music and do more recordings.
Fans wish the best of luck to The
Amateurs. As they say, "PEACE AND
COOL RUNNINGS
'Kismet'
Pianist
Continued from page 8
again and again the tremendous impe-
tus that winning a major competition
lends to an international career. It pro-
vides an opportunity 4ot the most
gifted and communicative musicians to
rise to the top and gain recognition. In
opening doors for these outstanding
men and women by prearranging con-
certs for its winners throughout the
world, the competition fulfills its secon-
dary purpose of bringing the highest
quality of music and musicianship to
audiences everywhere.
The competition itself is one of the
most rigorous and comprehensive ex-
aminations of every facet of each
contestant's musicianship and techni-
cal proficiency. Not only are the com-
petitors heard in recital, but semifinal-
ists are further heard playing specifi-
cally commissioned works, perform-
ances of chamber music with the most
eminent string quartets of our time, and
the finalists are heard in two concerts
performed with the Fort Worth Sym-
phony Orchestra led by major interna-
tional conductors.
Tickets for this performance are on
sale now at the Central Ticket Office.
For more information call (919) 757-
4788. Advance ticket prices are $15 for
the public, $12 for the ECU faculty
staff and $8 for ECU studentsyouth.
All tickets at the door will be $15.
Continued from page 8
Times and "very special" by the New
York Post. Opera News has recognized
the company as "a dynamic alternative
to the giants at Lincoln Center On
tour, Opera Northeast has been called
"first rate" by the New Haven Register
and "a real treat" by the Baltimore News.
Tickets are now on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. For more information call
757-4788 or toll-free 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
Advance ticket prices are $20 for the
public, $1750 for ECU faculty and staff
and $15 for ECU students and youth (18
years of age and under). AU tickets at
the door will be $20.
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
CONCERNING
ADVERTISING IN
THE ENTERTAINER
CALL 757-6366
The Entertainer February 1990 11





Coming To The
Elb
in February!
Wednesday Night Lvp
Sync Contest
Feb. 7 Open Division
Feb. 21 Greek Division
Feb. 28 Greek Division
Don't Miss Your
Chance at $1000.00
Every Tuesday in Feb. is
Draft Night
$1.50 Pitchers All Night
FREE Admission
Everv Thursday is
Ladies Night!
Ladies FREE $1.75 Pitchers
$1.00 Domestics & $2.00 Teas!
Wed. Feb 14th All
Campus Male Strip Off!
Prizes
Every Friday is Rush Hour
FREE Admission til 9:00 pm
FREE Domino's Pizza,
$1.75 Pitchers & 2.00 Teas &
$1.00 Jello Shots
1st $100.
2nd $50.
3rd $25.
Sunday FREE Admission &
$1.50 Pitchers All Night
mmm





Title
The East Carolinian, January 30, 1990
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 30, 1990
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.721
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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