The East Carolinian, January 23, 1990






ttljje lEaat Carolinian
Serving the 'East Carolina, campus community since 1925
Vol. b No.5
Tuesday fanuary 23,1990
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
20 Pages
Guest speaker
SGA brings journalist Charles
Kuralt to spring graduation
By Samantha Thompson
SUM Writer
In Mondav afternoon s Stu-
dent Government Association
meeting, the guest speakers tor
spring graduation were an-
nounced, and four constitutions
and two appropriations were
passed.
Senior class president Fred
Steck announced that journalist
Charles Kuralt and ECU graduate
Lunis McGlohn will speak during
graduation on May 5. McGlohn
helped Kuralt with the production
of "orth Carolina is My 1 lome
Kuralt smother was also a gradu-
ate of ECU. Vice Chancellor lames
lamer is responsible tor recruit
ing the speakers, Steck said
The legislature passed b
consent the constitutions tor the
East Carolina Student Occupa-
tional rherapy Association
(ECSOTA), the East Carolina
Undergraduate Economic Society,
the East Carolina Snow Ski Club
and the East Carolina lae Kwon
Do Club
The East Carolina Snow Ski
Club was organized by students
as a recreational group to broaden
ECU student sawarenessot skiing
The newly formed group plans to
compete with other schools,
namely AppalachianStateUniver-
sitv, Legislator ReneeCundiff said.
The East Carolina Tae Kwon
Do Club also plans to compete
with other schools, including the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill and North Carolina
State I niversity.
The S( �A also passed by con-
sent the Si320 appropriation tor
the East Carolina Occupational
rherapy Student Association. The
funds w ill cover costs for twoguesl
speakers .it the Senior Ceremony,
printingand binding for programs
at the ceremony and travel tor two
representa 11 ves to at tend a con tor-
em c in New Orleans.
The $1,400 appropriation tor
the "senior Class Council also
parsed in consent ol the legisla
ture
I egislator Marty I lelms an
nounced that applicationsare now
being accepted for 13 open posi-
tions in the legislature Six day
representative positions are open,
as well as dorm positions m I ones,
Bolk. jarvis, Gotten and Aycock.
rwo representatives are also
needed for White Dorm.
Applications will be accepted
until the "screens and Appoint-
ments committee have enough
applicants to make good decisions,
I ielmssaid, though the committee
does plans to interview all candi-
dates
Participants t the Feb. 5 re-
ception tor student leaders, presi-
dents and vice presidents ot stu-
dent organizations must RSVP
with the S IA office secretary be
tore the reception.
Leaders ,t all ECU organiza-
tions need to contact chairman ot
See SGA, page 2
This ECU student enjoys the convenience of the new self-service sandwich bar in Mendenhall's re-
modeled snack bar (Photo by Anqela Pndgen-ECU Photo Lab)
Chief of ECU's Public
Safety turns in resignation
ECU News Bureau
johnny R. Rose, a veteran law enforcement offi-
cer and former police c hiel in Washington, c , is
resigning as chiel of police services in the IC L
Department ot Public Safety.
Kom 43, whose career includes si ears on the
EC I campus police force from 1975 to 1981, police
chiel in Washington from 1QS1 to 1986 and police
chiel at ECl since 1986, said he hopes that his future
career "will be related to law enforcement
His exact plans are not vet completed. Rose said.
1 lis resignation will be effective Feb. 28. I niver-
sity Public Safety Director lames DePuy said it was
accepted "with regret.
"I m sure I express all of our feelings in saving
that w � will miss Chief Rose and wish him will in
any endeavors that he should choose to pursue
DePuy said. 1 le said an acting chief will be appointed
during an interim period.
"It is always a difficult period when someone of
ohnny's abilitv and knowledge chooses to go on to
bigger and better things DePuy said.
Rose was a patrol officer, shut supervisor, lieu-
tenant and investigator during his tirst years on the
ECU campus police force and also served as training
officer.
le holds a degree in correctional science with a
law enforcement minor and a master's degree in
public administration earned at ECU. He is certified
in general, intermediate vA dwi:cd law enforce-
ment and is a certified police instructor.
Rose is a native of Pantego, N.C in Beaufort
Countv. I le has served as a lecturer in law entorece-
ment and corrections at Wilson Countv Technical
Institute and in the ECU Schcx'l oi Social Work.
Remodeled
snack bar
opens
Self-service areas
now offered
By Mindy Mclnnis
Staff Writer
The grand opening of
Mendenhall's newly remodeled
snack bar will take place today
and continue on throughout the
following week. More than fifteen
hundred squeeze bottles will be
given awav to patrons on a first
come-first serve basis.
Mondav through Friday the
snack bar will be open for break-
fast lunch, dinner .nd late night
snacks It will not be operating on
Saturday and Sunday. As a con
venience. students are able to use
their Vali-Dine ID card, cash or the
declining balance system that is
offered by the ECU Dining Serv-
ices.
Eor students in a hurry, the
snack bar will feature self-service
areas. Pre-madc salads and sand-
wiches, gnlled food. deli bar, pizza.
ice cream and beverages are a few
of the affordable items available.
David Kramer, director of
Canteen Corp is responsible tor
initiating the changes taking place
in Mendenhall. Kramer gathered
renovation ideas through student
survevs and suggestion boxes. It
was the students' responses that
helped implement the renovations,
said Kramer.
"The food service program is
customer driven now, so what-
ever the customer is willing to pav
See Snack Bar, page 2
rc
Parking presents problems
By John Tyson
Staff Writer
In order to alleviate some of the parking problem, an area resident opened this lot Spaces rent for
$15 a month (Photo by J D Whitmire-ECU Photo Lab)
Council passes resolutions
By Donna Hayes
Stjff Writer
The Western North Carolina
Environmental Council recently
passed resolutions to improve
dean air legislation and to increase
local government power in envi-
ronmental matters.
The 23-member council,
chaired by North Carolina Lt.
Governor im Gardner, met in
Hickory on an. 10 to identify and
to investigate environmental and
economic concerns in western
North Carolina.
Citing the importance of for-
estsand natural resources to North
Carolina's economy and the threat
to the North Carolina mountains
from acid rain and other pollut-
ants, the Western North Carolina
Environmental Council passed a
resolution to support a 10 million
ton reduction in sulphur dioxide
emissions and a two million ton
reduction in nitrogen dioxide
emissions.
Sulphur and nitrogen oxides
are released into the atmosphere
by the burning oi fossil fuels in
automobile engines, ore smelters.
coal-fired power plants and other
sources. When combined with
oxygen and moisture, the chemi-
cals released form sulfunc and
nitric acids, which subsequently
tall to the ground in rain, snow,
frost, fog and dew.
According to Greenpeace sta-
tistics, "In areas severely affected
bvacid rain, treesdecline in growth
or die prematurely, plants and
microorganisms crucial to the
wildlife fixxi chain die and lakes
become too acidic to support fish
and birds
The Western North Carolina
Environmental Council supports
President Bush's proposal to
demand those industries with the
highest emissions make the first
reductions.
The council recognizes that
many North Carolina industries
have already lowered the emis-
sion levels below the levels of
neighboring states. Edith McKin-
ney, of the department of Natural
Resources, helped write the clean
air resolution, and she said that
while the top 107 offenders are
located in the Midwest, North
Carolina needs to assess the envi-
ronmental impact at home.
In a statement to the media,
Gardner said: "Thiscleanair reso-
lution shows that the Western
North Carolina Environmental
Council is in total support of
strong, effective measures to con-
trol the acid ram problem affect-
ing our forests here in North Caro-
lina.
"The council also wanted to
show its support of President Bush
and Congress in theefforts to make
the companies that are polluting
the most, clean up first. We want
our air cleaned up and we want
our neighboring states, especially
the Tennessee Valley Authority
facilities, to be held accountable
under federal clean air legislation.
That is the intent of the resolution
passed by the Western North
Carolina Environmental Council
The council also passed a reso-
lution to give more power to the
See Resolution, page 3
ECU'S lack oi parking spaces
has long been an issue of contro-
versy for both students and fac-
ulty, some blaming the university
and others blaming the students.
The university has been faulted
for not acting to solve the problem,
while the students have been
faulted for not cooperating by
planning their time efficiently and
making use of the transit system.
"I gave up on parking a long
time ago Tim Fernandez said.
"At 8 am cars are lined up all over
the place. It's impossible to find a
parking space"
Fernandez was one of 20 stu-
dents who was interviewed in
different parking lots during a
school day. The majority of the
students complained about wait-
ing in line, missing classes and
having their cars towed.
Angela Bell, whose classes are
at different times during the day,
said that driving to and from
campus several times a day pres-
ents a problem. "The other day 1
waited for an hour and ten min-
utes, I think that's a little long
considering I'm paying $50 for a
parking sticker she said.
Thestudents who complained
about the parking situation think
that more parking stickers are is-
sued knowing that there are not
enough parking spaces.
This statement is true accord-
ing to Pat Gurtz, associate director
of Traffic Services. She said it is
very common for any major uni-
versity system to issue more park-
ing stickers than spaces because of
the constant in and out flow of
traffic, not including the number
of people who graduate or leave
the university for other reasons.
Gurtz said that although it was
difficult to estimate dirt lots, ECU
hasbetween 5,500 to 6,000 parking
spaces and that traffic services has
issued 10,000 parking stickers.
"I'm not surprised by many of
thestudents' attitudes toward the
parking situation Gurtz said,
"but the students don't realize that
parking is not going to be right
where they want it
Offering a solution to the prob-
lem, Gurtz said, 'We're going to
have to get in the habit of parking
in the new Minges parking lot or
in other designated areas such as
the Allied Health lot and then
taking the bus to campus
Several faculty members said
that ECU students are somewhat
spoiled bv being able to park so
close to their classes, an opportu-
nity that manv universities do not
have.
"I think it's a fair assumption
to say that students here are not as
familiar with walking,and indeed
theymavbalkat theidea I.eanna
Laurence said.
Laurence, a professor who
teaches Advanced Composition,
has taught at North Carolina State
University where she said people
knew they had to walk a long way
to class.
Another ECU faculty member,
Festus Eribo, who attended the
University of Wisconsin, said that
most large universities have lim-
ited parking space and that UW
had 9,000 parking spaces for over
47,000 students and faculty.
"Almost all the students
walked, rode bikes or rode the
bus Eribo said. "ECU is a small
campus, the students should learn
to catch the bus
Joanna Titts, who is in charge
of the ECU transit system, said
that most students who live in the
apartment complexes like River
Bluff, Tar River and Wilson Acres
take advantage of the buses, how-
ever she said, "I pick up very few
people from parking lots like the
new one at Minges
It is speculated that this may
be one of the problems leading to
ECU'S many parking problems.
According to Thomas Kunselman,
an analyst at Planning and Institu-
tional Research at ECU, there are
10,968 commuter students at ECU.
Some say these students may be
the ones having trouble finding
parking spaces because other stu-
dents who live closer to the uni-
versity are not using other trans-
portation alternatives.
Most oi the 20 students inter-
viewed said that the Minges park-
ing lot was too far from their
classes, and they would usually
park somewhere close to their
classes, even if it was in a space
they were not supposed to park in
Carla Edwards, a student and
a ECU Public Safety reserve offi-
cer, confirms that students violate
manv parking rules. She said, "1
write up about 35 tickets daily,
See Parking, page 2
Inside
Editorial4
Do budget cuts lower
the quality of education?
State and Nation. 5
Upcoming college
trends
Classifieds6
Features11
Napping techniques add
life to classes
Sports15
Pirates defeat Tribe
72-64





2 1 he East Carolinian January 23, 1990
ECU Briefs
Lunchtime learning focuses on the
contributions of women
Recent investigations into the historical and cultural contributions
of women in all fields of endeavor will be the topic of today's Lunchtime
Learning program at East Carolina University.
IV Marie Farr, director ol the ECU Women's Studies program, will
speak on Making the Invisible Visible: The New Scholarship on
Women at noon inRoom 221 of Mendenhall Student Center.
Interested persons on the campus and local communities are in-
vited to bring a bag lunch or purchase selections from fee student center
snack bar downstairs
Fan will discuss how renewed emphasis on women's studies has
begun to transform all disciplines in general, from the sciences to the
humanities, and describe a new curriculum integration project at ECU.
Ihe E I 1 unchtime Learning series is sponsored by the campus
Committee on the Status of Women. Fall semester sessions have fo-
cused on child care and women in management. Sessions on aspects of
women's health are scheduled for Feb. 20 and March 20.
Wine and Cheese Gala sponsored
benefit Wincand Cheeset .ala has been scheduled for Feb. 9 at the
Greem illel lilton beginning at 8 p.m. Sponsors are the 1990 ECU Club,
whose current project is raising funds for ECU'S current campus
beautification program
A selection ot California wines, including a champagne, will be
presented, accompanied by a variety of cheeses. Serving each wine will
be formall) attired leaders from the local and campus communities.
Campus performers will present appropriate background music.
Ihe evening's events will also feature a "Silent Auction" of gift
items and art works donated by local artists. Wines for the gala will be
donated by the New East Hank ot Greenville and Hannah and Dunn,
Inc.
Hckets to the ECU Club Wine and Cheese Gala are $15 each and are
available from Sarah Bassal 55-0882, Jan Workman, 756-8941 or Nancy
National Campus Clips
Einstein biography gives some new
insight into his writings, personal life
Clinic focuses on chronic pain
ECU News Bureau
Physicians at the ECU School
of Medicine are evaluating unex-
plained and nagging pain in a
variety ot patients in a new clinic
jointly operated by ECU and the
Eastern Regional Rehabilitation
Center at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
"Relief of pain is the chief
reason we visit a doctor; it's the
body's signal that something is
wrong said Dr. �anford H. Ver-
nick, the clinic's medical director
and ECU associate professor of
physical medicine and rehabilita-
tion. "Normally that signal can bo
alleviated with analgesics and in
some cases surgery is required
Unlike acute pain, chronic
pa i n i s resi sta nt toi mmediate t rea t -
ment such as medications and is injury and in patients who have
harder to explain had shingles or experienced am-
"Chromc pain is very real putation, he said
Vornick said. "It starts because of
Parking
lli,U k Albert Einstein's most famous work
special relativity, quantum hypothesis, and brownian motion
hi
a uir
n.
rs call annus mirabiiis, or the
all
uracle
occurred in
ear
In that year according to I niversity of Kentucky philosophy
professor Don Howard i instein was 26 years old, out of college,
married ,nJ had a relativeh undemanding job as a clerk tor the
sw itzerland patent office 'He was not teaching at the time and had lots
of tune in his hands, i loward observes.
Howard, an instructor at I K since 1978, is assistant editor of "The
Swiss N ears: Writings lot Einstein), bHHMlW recently published by
Princeton University Press. According to Howard, the big surprise
about Einstein, discovered during work on Volume I, was that the
scientist ' philosopher and the man who eventually became his wife
had parented an illegitimate daughter who was given up for adoption
.ind has never been identified
Students protest lack of King holiday
S D1E( IO,( .ilit A group ot concerned Point Loma azarene
College students braved the ram last week to protest their campus'
policv ol not observing Martin 1 uther king rs birthday as an official
sc hool holiday.
I nder the direction of Student Relations Director Russell Best and
seniors Ken Abbott and Mike Morrell, students urged their peers and
their school s administration to recognize King's peaceful petition for
world peace and equality
In showing support tor the cause, students signed a petition, later
presente
ne i. onege -
i - iii i � jmi
ts i hot
pn
�seni
,e in
sident, passed out literature and wore
ing King's support ol peaceful nonvio
to
it r
�r 'test signs or use disruptive
dent lim
taken into i
kind sud rhursdav that the students peti-
msidi ration and dealt with in the proper
Crime Report
Alcohol violations and larcenies keep
ECU Public Safety busy
lanuary In
21 33- ()ffi or took larceny report at station.
January t7
1231- Officer responded to ones Residence Hall regarding a hit-and-
run Ihe victim was student Michael Glen Starling of lones.
1751- Officer assisted Don Witham, an R.A in Avcock Residence Hall,
regarding the illegal duplication of room keys.
2328 Offii ers responded on the scene to a disturbance on the third floor
ol iarrett Residence 1 kill and alcohol violation. Citations issued.
January IS
0957 Officer checked out at the Biology building regarding a sick
student c hecked out at the infirmarj to transport staff to the Biology
building
2215- Officers responded to a fire alarm in Avcock Residence Hall
caused by cooking.
January 1l
0008- Officer responded to Garrett Residence Hall regarding a loud
party.
0150-( )fficer responded to arvis Residence Hall regarding loud music.
A Verbal warning was given to residents of room 139.
0214 ("tfticers responded to White Residence Hall regarding unescorted
mail's Subjet ts left.
January 20
1)304- ()fticer arrested one female on the first floor of Jarvis Residence
Hall and transported her to the magistrate.
1714 (Officer removed a dog from Belk Residence Hall.
2123- Officer responded to Belk residence Hall east regarding a suspi-
cious male, done on arrival.
January 21
01 Oh- ()tticer i Kecked out west of Greene Residence Hall regarding an
intoxicated subject The non-student was given a verbal warning for
being intoxicated and disruptive.
0204 Officer checked out at Belk Residence Hall regarding curfew
violations A verbal warning was given to to four non-students and five
students
023�- Officer checked out at Clement Residence Hall regarding males
in the lobby. A verbal warning was given. The officer then went to
White Residence Hall regarding curfew violations. Handled by dorm
staff.
an acute discomfort but after the
original injury or disease heals,
the problem becomes pain ltsolt
He sud patients with chronic
pain often wind up doctor shop-
ping and spending excessively on
medications in search ot relief.
These behaviors, he said, can ac-
tually aggravate the pain because
frustration and distress arise from
not knowing the cause ol the pain.
Vernick described chronic
pain as pain that persists tor two
months or longer and continues
despite repeated doctor visits,
medical testing and even hospi-
talization. It most often afflicts
people with neck and back prob-
lems, paralysis due to spinal cord
Continued from page 1
Patients who have had a limb
amputated often suffer a phe-
nomenon known as a "phantom
pain This type of chronic pain
persists even though the associ-
ated condition has healed, Ver-
nick explained.
"For yearsdoctors ignored the
amputee's complaint of pain be-
cause it was not understood how
pain could exsist in the area of the
removed limb said Vernick. "We
thought it we remove the limb
there would be no more pain
Patients with paralysis , for
example, complain of pain in the
impaired area where doctors as-
sume that senstations no longer
exist. Doctors are still trying to
better understand the pain expen
enced in all of these patients
Vernick si id that patients with
chronic pain have multiple prob
lems that require a multidisctph
nary team approach to their pain
management A team ot phvsi
cians, nurses, psychologists and
physical , occupational and m
reational therapists employ an
assortment of techniques toreduce
and eliminate pain an disability
Patients receive treatment tor
six to eight weeks through a pro-
gram tailored to their needs
Depending upon the patient's
condition, treatment plansinclude
therapeutic exercises, assessments
ot muscle function, muscle re
See Pain, page 3
wfyz Cast Carolinian
most of them at night because of
commuters parking in the staff
parking lots
Each vear the traffic services
gets statistics on the total amount
of money collected for vehicle
registration and parking fees. In
1987 the parking tees alone
amounted to &5,4�) out ot a total
of $368,043. This past vear shows
even higher figures. For the 1989-
90 school year $744390 was col-
lected, and a large amount of that
was from parking fees, according
to .urt.
Ihe idea of ECU taking in so
much money from parking fees
bothers many students, some ac-
cusing the university of collecting
it to meet quotas.
"We are not sitting here tak-
ing in tines C.urtz slid. "The
money is used for purchasing land
for future parking lots, paving and
anything els' that relates to park-
ing and traffic
Curt said that if accusations
against traffic services were true,
the university would have more
parking lots than it does now. She
also explained the costs ol park
mg lots which ran into the thou
sands and the cost ol land hi h
could run into the millions.
Curtsaid that$70,000of this
year's money would go to pay for
extra lighting in parking kits be-
cause of the rape crisis that(.reen -
villeexperienced this year.
With or without explanations.
many students areconcerned with
the daily task of finding a parking
space and getting toclasson tune
However, acCQSding to (urt.
students are going to have to K-
more willing to use other alterna-
tives so that the people who live a
distance from the campus will
have a place to park
Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V. Cope
kelle O'Connor
Patrick Williams
c � 11 Harve)
Sha Sitlinger
Adam I Blanfcenship
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National Kate$5.75
Open Rate$4.95
Local Open Rate$4.75
Hulk & I requeue Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours:
Monday - Friday
10:00 - 5:00 pm
Phone:
757-6366
SGA
Continued from page 1
turns need to contact chairman of
the Rules and ludiciary Commit-
tee, Michael Hadly, in the SGA
office for the bi-annual review ot
their constitutions-
Legislator Barb l.amb asked
all members of the legislature to
"think" before they pass funding
and constitutions for LCLi groups.
Lamb noticed that most every
appropriation and constitution
that passed in Monday's meeting
was done without question or
comment bv anv legislator.
Legislator Earl McAuley
urged the legislators the attend
the all- oa pep rally on Friday in
front of the Student Store. The
pirates will play the Seahawks ot
the University ot North Carolina
at Wilmington on Saturday. The
rally is sponsored bv the Student
Pirate Club.
Snack Bar
Continued from page 1
for weare willing to provide
Kramer added. "Right now we
are in the process of organizing a
food servicccommittee, which will
be responsible for redesigns, menu
changes and food evaluations
The formation of the commit-
tee is to allow open communica-
tion between the dining service
and students to continue, ex-
plained Kramer. "We'll do what
we think they want but we can't
know what they want unless they
tell us
Kramer added that plans for
future renovations are now in
progress. "We hope to continue
making improvements, so I would
like to re-emphasize the impor-
tance of communication between
the dining service and students
News Hounds
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Alpha Sigma Phi 757-3516
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Mad Hatter Muffler758-2306
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Summefield Apartments355-6187
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Amy Pierce and
.veather (Photo
Brent Kilgore bask in the sun taking advantage of the weekend's unusually warm
by J D. Whitmire-ECU Photo Lab)
Resolution
Continued from page 1
local governments. The resolution
asks that "local governments be
allowed to review and comment
on 'high quality water' designa-
tions before the issue is discussed
at a public hearing
McKinney said that the coun-
cil would like for "local govern-
ments to have veto on environ-
mental issues but she said that
some members of the council
abstained from voting on this
particular resolution because of
inherent legal problems. Environ-
mental haards like acid rain in-
volve all of the states and can only
be controlled bv the federal gov-
ernment.
McKinnev said the resolutions
will be given to Go v. im Martin or
the appropriate congressional
environmental committees for
review.
The East Carolinian, January 23,1990 3
Challenge
ResponsibiUty
Leadership
Advancement
First Wachovia means unlimited potential for personal
growth and career advancement for outstanding Fast Carolina
I 'niversity graduates. Individuals who are ready to accept the
challenges of a career in the financial services industry, contact
Career Planning and Placement for an interview or further
information. First Wachovia
recruiters will be on campus p RT
for interviews February 1. AAf HOVIA
Professors publish 'best seller'
ECU News Bureau
A new book "Technical Writ-
ing: Theory and Practice edited
K two members of the Fast Caro-
lina I niversity English faculty, has
been published bv the Modern
1 anguage Association.
Ihe book is edited by Drs.
Bertie F. Fearing and W. Keats
Sparrow, both professors of Eng-
lish at ECU.
Included are essays on the
relativelv new craft of technical
writing -current issues in the field,
the history and theory of technical
writing, the process and product
of technical writing and aspects of
teaching technical writing.
A total oi 1 authors from
across the nation contributed es-
says to the Fearing Sparrow an-
thology, which is available in both
paperback and hardcover editions
tor$17.50and $34.50, respectively.
According to Walter S Ach-
tert, director of publications lor
theMiKlem Language Association,
"Technical Writing: Theory and
Practice" was the "best seller" at
the MLA's annual convention m
Washington, D.C last month.
1 V. fearing said preparation
ot the book was an eight-year
process and involved help from
several IXC colleagues. She and
Dr. Sparrow are both specialists in
the field of technical communica-
tion. Sparrow chairs the ECU
Department of English and Dr.
bearing currently serves as assis-
tant to the chair.
ECU education conference centers
on effectiveness in teaching
ECU News Bureau
faculty committee at ECU
u ill present an innovative "excel-
lence in action" programthis week
designed to focus attention on the
rsity's emphasis upon and
. history of�effective teach-
tg. ��
���ipH�i ��1 i
ulty Ian 24 will feature presenta-
tions bv two members of the fac-
ulty who have received the
university's annual teaching ex-
cellence awards. Videotapes of
their teaching methods will be
shown
Dr. Chnsta Reiser, of the Soci-
ology and Anthropology faculty
and the chief of the Teaching Ef-
fectiveness Committee, said the
program wasdesignod "toincrease
the quality and quantity of fac-
uaalty interactions about teach-
ing
I hope that our workshop,
featuring two of ECU's outstand-
ing teachers, will stimulate dis-
course and action about how to be
better teachers Dr. Reiser said.
Featured at the afternoon
workshop will be Dr. Patricia
Anderson (if the School ot Educa-
tion and Dr. Gerhard Kalmus ot
the Department of Biology in the
College of Arts and Sciences. Both
are past winners (it the annual
Alumni Teaching Excellence
Awards.
Dr. Constance Mellon of the
Library and Information Studies
faculty said one ot the leaching
1?rrlrri'htruBllllltUv'kgM,iis
to "to create an atmosphere of
excitement" about good teaching.
"This program presents a
unique opportunity for faculty to
hear views on teaching from col-
leagues who have been recognized
as excellent teachers and, through
the videotapes, to see them in ac-
tion in the classroom Dr. Mellon
said.
Another member, Jo Ann F.
(ones or the English Department
and the General College, said,
FCU titrs notTiTrrv nuraimcHTrc:
researchers but also outstanding
teachers. This presentation will
focus on the fine teaching which
takes place on our campus
Pain
Continued from page
trainingand relaxation techniques.
Therapeutic recreational activities'
are also incorporated to help pa-
bents redirect their attention from
their pain through participation in'
leisure activities.
Lessening patient dependence
on analgesic medications and'
modifying the work and home)
environment are among the goals,
df the treatment plan.
The clinic, which opened in
November, averages about 40j
patient visits each week. Patients"
are enrolled in the program byj
physician referral or personal in-
quiry. Calls are received at (919)'
-si-4440.
sg�tffi� presents
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(Sift lEaBt (Earolmtan
David I Ierrink
LOW M V
James F.J. McKee,
Shannon Buckley, News Editor
ADAM Cornelius, Asst. News Editor
Caroline CustCK, feature Editor
John Tucker, Ass. Feature Editor
Michael Martin, $jort Editor
JOSEPH L Jenkins Jr Asst. Sports Editor
Carrie ARMSTRONG, Entertainment Editor
SCOTT MaXWEI I , Satire Editor
General Manager
riN, Editor
Director of Advertising
Phong Luong, Credit Manager
STUART Rosner, Business Manager
PAMELA Cole, Ad Tech Supervisor
MATTHEW RichTER, Circulation Manager
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STEVE Ri ID, Staff Illustrator
MlCHAEI CaRNES, Darkroom Technician
BETH Lupton, Secretary
ARMS SCANS
)
ivfct

7
The Fast Carolinian has been serving the East (Carolina campus community since 1925, with primary emphasis on in-
formation most directly affecting ECl' students It is published twice weekly, w ith a circulation of 12,000. The East
Carolinian reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements thai discriminate on the basis of age, sex,
creed or national origin. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points ol view. For purposes of decency
and brevity, The last Carolinian reserves the right to edit any letter tor publication. Letters should be sent to The East
Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, NC, 2 7834; or call us at (19) 7.S7-63h6.
V
tMfOT
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday January 2?, 1990
' less ib euiirfc
lUeVBACBfHANS V7WJSCAML.TL�f ntr, o?,
'AWAKE
MMJJir999t.
tj.
ifi
N.c. chips away at education Iran-Contra arms scandal
Universities suffer from cutbacks George Bush's dirtiest deeds
education? Jbviously, very little, rhebudget
c uts serve only to compound an aggravated
North Carolina is rapidly becoming a
state that is far from ideal for educating
youth. A high illiteracy rate and the recent situation It's understandable that the state
label as the state with the lowest SA1" scores has to make cutbacks somewhere, but per-
in the nation reflect a weakness in education haps the importance of education should be
that begins in grade school and continues
through the high school level
But it cots worse With the recent budget
cuts tor the schools in the UNC System, we
now find that our colleges and universities
are being neglected, too. Several universi-
ties have suffered faculty lay-offs, and as a
result, classes have been combined and or
cancelled. This adds an extra burden to
educators who are already over-worked and
under-paid.
One must ask the question: What prior-
ity do North Carolina leaders place on
re-evaluated. Flu- (General Assembly erases
from the blackboard the three traditional
R's ol education reading, 'ntmg and rith-
metic and replaces them all with one single
K revenue.
Education is the foundation ot our soci-
ety. With the foundation that is being laid in
the educational systems of North Carolina,
what kind ot future does the state intend to
build for itself? It stands to reason that it will
not only be difficult to produce strong lead-
ers, but capable and responsible citizens as
well.
LIK� �ALUNr NOKTH CWUNA MOhC
President states top concerns
Fellow Students,
1 want to welcome everyone
back from the break and I hope this
semester will be a great one tor
ECU.
I would first like to thank eve-
rybody for their support and input
with the "Stop the Nonsense" rally
and march that took place last
semester. We have shown in a �m"mmmm
positive way that our voiccsshould 1 want to look into all areas of
be heard in decisions concerning developing a book rental deposi-
Crecnville. The current status on tory or book trade system at East
the Noise Ordinance remains to be Carolina. There is nothing more
vite you to become part of one of
two committees I am developing
to hopefully make changes on two
issues 1 find very disturbing.
Campus
Spectrum
By Nathaniel Mead
Editorial Columnist
Two years ago an ()regonian
friend of mine phoned to tell me
about a benefit concert featuring
ackson Browne. The money was
to be raised to help the Washing-
ton, D.Cbased Christie Institute
investigate the Iran Contra arms
scandal, which had really become
a nasty story by then. Basically,
Reagan and a group of men had
short-circuited Congress, sub
orned the justice Department, and
debauched the treasury, all in
order to strengthen Iranian terror
ists and to slav Nicaraguans they
had never met or cared about. 1
was unable to attend the concert,
but the tact that a strongorganiza-
tionot lawyers was trying to smash
this major scandal certainly caught
mv interest.
During the 1988 presidential
debate at ake I orest, it took three
pro vocative statements by Michael
Dukakis to get George Bush to
respond on his role in the Iran-
Contra arms scandal. In his pre-
packaged response, our then vice
president showed not the slight-
est hint of humility. Instead, with
braggadocio aplomb more char-
acteristic of Reagan, Bush said he
would "take all the blame for
Irangate and tor dealings with
Noriega it the American people
would give him just hall the credit
tor helping keep the peace over
the past eight years. The smooth,
well-timed one-h ' sparked a
wave of applause, out was it just
emptv rhetoric or rather a tacit
admission of guilt?
An extensive article in The
New Yorker (October 16, 1989)
suggests that Bush may have been
deeply involved in the Iran-Con
tra scandal. Indeed, 2 growing
body ol evidence indicates that he
mav have far more to hide than he
would dare acknowledge. Like
ghosts in a bad dream, the possi-
bility of terminal political embar-
rassment keeps coming back to
haunt him.
One oi those ghosts is Adm.
JohnPomdexter.on trial this week
with the expressed intention ot
portraying Ronald Reagan as an
active and informed participant
in the sale of arms to Iran and the
plan to divert the proceeds to the
Nicaraguan Contras. This por-
trayal contradicts the picture Poin-
dexter painted of Mr. Reagan
during congressional hearingson
Irangate in 1987. Reagan is an
excellent scapegoat, of course,
since he's now in retirement and
hasonlv his reputation to lose. But
for Bush, the new story could also
backfire by rekindling suspicions
of his involvement in the Iran-
Contra affair.
According to a bipartisan
investigation team led by senators
WilhamCohenand George Mitch
evaluations stand now, in my
opinion they are, in most cases,
useless This is done on manv
other campuses and with hard
work, can be done here.
I need your help in order to
accomplish these things. If you ell,documcntsshow that Bush was
want to make a change then you briefed on the arms-for-hostages
can be a part ol one of these com- exchange at least three times. On
mittees All you need to do is one occasion he was briefed by an
come by the SGA office on the Israeli "antiterrorist" official,
second floor of Mcndenhall
within the next two weeks and
sign up to be on one of these
no noise permits. The next step is disturbing than to spend $200 for committees
to ask thecity council to reconsider
their decision. I plan to formally
do this in early February and then
proceed, depending upon their
decision
Secondly, I would like to in
books and then at the end of the
semester find out how little, if any,
you can sell them back for.
The second issue is the pub-
lishing of the results from Teacher
Evaluations on campus. As teacher
I urge you to become a part
Amiram Nir, of the massive trans-
fer of arms to "radicals" in Iran.
Nir referred to the release of hos-
tages at least five times and re-
marked at least once that this was
the primary purpose of the sale
let's work together to make these Allot this was recorded in a memo
changes. taken by Bush's aide, Craig Fuller,
Sincerely, the only other person present at
Tripp Roakes this arms sales briefing. Fuller
Student Body President gave this memo to the Tower
(ommission but th v fail �'
Bush on i!
Hush v. : in
volved, as the North tria ed
establish, in the "qu I pi
agreement to allow the I
construe tc bntra basi sup
pl airstrips m 1 Ionduras.( )nM
4, 1989, bush told reportei I
'the word, ol the prcsidi nl H
United States, �
there was no quid pn i qu
rim; to his met ting I nl
Suazo c ordo a ol I londuras in
Man h 1985. But by that time I
Reagan administration had. al
ready ottered 1 londura
ments" 'economic and military
aid) tor its continue ol
the Contras, A recently re
memo, initialed by Geoi
at a cabinet met. 'tin h Bush
attended,confirms this A related
memo from another moot
been disclosed during thi N i I
trial. I low can Bush, in Ihe I
such e idence, flatly den) tl
was even aware ot the quid pro
quo agreement? Either he is ly ing
through his teeth or so outol u uch
that Pan Quayle should start re-
iewingthe rwenty -fifth Amend
ment.
The only alternative explana -
lion is that poor c leorge �-�
asleep ordrugged whilehesal
in on those briefings and meel
ings. And w hat about Bush'spres
ence at meetings in January 1986
when Reagan was briefed on arms-
for-hostages nd sign� d the Bible
that was delivered as a gifl I the
Ayatollah along with a planeload
of TOW missiles and other arms"
Reagan conveniently forgot these
incidents, ot i lurse, but bush isn't
old enough yet to pie i
He does seem more adept than
Nixon at tits option, but one i.m
only deceive tor so long before the
sheer weight of . ontradu tory o i
dence exposes the truth tor all to
see Documents from the Iran-
Contra committee show that.pi
to when the new s media broke the
storv. Bush attended at least 15
briefings on the set ret arms deal.
1 here is much moreovidencc.
which this spat e an t begin to
accomodate,but perhaps therm re
interesting connections are those
which actually preceded the
known scandal. Bush'sassociation
with Noriega reveals a long stand
ing interest in promoting terror
ism in Central America Accord-
ing to investigative reporters
Howard Kohn and Vicki Monks,
the two former CIA co-workers
teamed up on secret amis ship-
ments to Nicaraguan Contras in
1982, two years before Oliver
North's Supply network was ott
the ground Noriega's role in this
secret project, known as Black
Eagle, was to supply landing strips
for the arms-smuggling planes. All
he asked in return was the use ot
the planes to carry cocaine back to
the U.S. Flis wishes were granted
(Sec "Bush-Noriega Connection
an. 18, 1990 edition of Ibe Fast
Carolinian).
As it this weren't messy
enough. Bush appears to have
had an even earlier and more
devious role in the Iran-Contra
affair than North did. As first
reported in In These Times (June
24, 1987), a source inside the I960
Reagan campaign maintains that
Reagan adviser Richard Allen cut
a deal with Khomeini that ensured
U.S. hostages held in Tehran
would not be released until after
tion 1 hi : �
i �� : ; �� �
� have wnn the eleel n for
limmy Carter t a secrel meel i
iris attended by Bush ai I
William c asey, Iran was i i
� I ; 1 million in weapons I i
i with Iraq Between Iran ti :
Ni aragua, then, our presidi i I
usl had his hands full,
ish sken fortheoil busim
also came into play in the Irai
mdal V rding I
tor 1 ��. former senior fel
ntcrnational( enterl
ment Policy in Washing
� � Busl il interests may ha
.or tor his dealings
. the Iranians. In the earl)
his mam concern was to sta
v falling crude oil prices by
romot i common price pol-
botween the IS. and the oil
� ducers ot the Persian Cult,
. ran and Saudi Arabia.
in taming higher oil prices was,
in fact, an explicit goal of some of
Oliver North's secret amis nego-
tiations with the Iranians in 198t
� e,Dec.21,1987
1 inally, Noriega's close rela-
tionship with the Medellin druc
cartel may in turn have profited
( ontras, the Boston Phoenii
19 1988) reports. A former
Medellin cartel accountant test!
I before a I S. House subcom-
mittee that he tunneled nearly $1
million to the Contras through
ild Gregg, Bush's personal
adviser during the Reagan years
jnd long-time CIA officer friend
Gregg, in turn, supervised Felix
Rodriguez, who ran a massive
arms depot in Nicaragua for Ol-
iver North and who met at leasi
three times w ith Mr. Bush. Bush S
office says Hush and Rodrigu
never discussed the Contra arn
Well, of course not. What else
could they discuss?
In short, bush is either tell
large-scale lies about the specii
of the situation or is hugely exa
eerating when he says he was
abiding by administration ; o
with only a dim awareness of the
Iran-Contra arms deal. Or
course, both are possible. But his
admission to Dan Rather in b
historic heated confrontation
I V seems evidence enough
went along with it because
heard about Mr. Buckley a hos
tage)being tortured to death
it 1 erred, I erred on the side of
trying to get those hostages out of
there (Oops!)
Whv haven't we heard mi
about Bush sdirty secrets? Report-
ers probing the Iran-Contra arms
scandal seemsodetermined to find
the smoking gun that would
directly implicate Reagan that they
often brush over the serious con
stitutional and foreign policy is
suesin volved, such as covert arms
deals, terrorism and drug traffick-
ing. Furthermore, the mainstream
press is a consensus-making ma-
chinery owned bv a corporateelite
with dose ties to Bush and other
high-level politicians. Bush's han-
dlers, like Reagan's in the WSO's,
are skillful in their manipulation
ot the mass media For solid po-
litical coverage of the Bush ad-
ministration, check out The Pro-
gressive. The Nation, LA Weekly
Common Cause, Mother Jones
Harper s, and In These Times.
Fhough Bush still hasn't told
the American people about his
exact role in the Iran-Contra Arms
See Iran-Contra, page 10





SJje JEafit (flaroltman
Page 5
State and Nation
January 23,1990
Lookina ahead
"Look lor surprising improvements " says Bob Olson ol the
Institute lor Alternative Futures Look lor nsing college
enrollment, more women than men earning advanced
degrees and the number of college students older than 35
nearly doubling Predictions
Enrollment (in millions
Averaae classroom teacher salaries
'Baby boomlings' go to college
Experts predict higher tuition
1980 1985$15,970 $23,593
1990$31,221
1995
2000
Bachelor's degrees awarded
$43,400
$59,200
500,000
300.000
100.000
0
Mer Women
i (80
1985
Li I
1990
2000
Classroom teachers tin minions)
1.2
1.0
1.2
1.4
J
1980
1.0
1985
j Elementary
Secondary
14 15
1.0
1990
1.1
1995
1.2
Master s dearees awarded
150.000
100,000
50.000
0
Mpn Women
1980 1985 Vggn ' , - U
! &5 2000
?00Q
PuDil-teacher ratios
Doctorates awarded
?o.ooo r
10.000
By Pat Ordovensky
(.jnnctt News Service
Expect some substantial
changes At colleges and universi-
ties across the United States in the
coming wars
Experts arc predicting that
enrollments will t limb,drivingup
the demand lor everything from
classrooms ,md housing to teach-
ers and textbooks.
Fueling the change is some-
thing demographers are calling
the "baby boomlings" a blip in
the school-age population. High
school enrollment, declining since
1976,will turnaround in bl and
be up is percent by the century's
end, and that means more stu-
dents will be headed to college.
As demographer Harold
1 (odgkinson put it. "That's not a
guess. Those people are already
here
Education in the '90s will
also be affected significantly by
two events this year.
The National Governors As-
sociation meets next month to
hammer out the first national
education goals, completing the
work begun at last fall's education
summit, and Congress will rewrite
the laws governing financial aid
to college students, which expire
this year.
Soaring tuitions and intense
lobbying bv higher education
groups could turn around the
decade-long decline in available
cash. Collegesareanxiouslva wait-
ing the "baby boomlings' " ad-
vance guard in the midsMK. A
larger pool oi potential students is
expected to cool tuition increases,
which will continue at 6 percent to
10 percent a year through the first
half of the decade
The quality ot a college edu-
cation could suffer from a short-
age of professors that's expected
to reach crisispropt wlit nsbv 1 s()5,
says the American Council on
Education. I arger . lasses taught
bv tess-uualified fat ulty would be
the result
An opposite trend more
and better teachers is expected
to continue in high schools and
elementary schools, fueled by
better salaries, unproved working
conditions and a stronger voice in
school decisions
As for now, here's a demo-
graphic look at what's going on at
college and university campuses
around Oh- L nited States. This is
See Trends, page 8
r
�7 Men Women
1980 1985 l-
990
College aid may be easier to
get than many students think
1985 -� SecOrKla
1990 ary
1995
2000
!
1995 2000
X
College attendance 35 years and older (In millions)
Sourc� N��oo�l C�nl�t fcx Educalkxi H�M�n. USA TOOAV r�t��rcH
1980
1.4
19P5
19
1990
2.2
1995
25
2000
2.6
Jul SUo�y. Ganrwtl N�w� S�rvlc�
Survey suggests a trend
toward student activism
By Michelle Healy
Gannett News Service
( ollege freshmen's support
or legal abortions increased
sharply from 1988 to 1989 from
57 percent to 64 7 percent says
a sur e put out Monday
Thechange is notable because
since 1Q77 student support tor
abortion rights had held fairly
stable at 53 to 59 percent, says
UCLA's Alexander W. Astin, sur-
vev director
The 24th annual survey of
college freshmen, conducted by
UCLA and the American Council
on Education, drew 216,362 re-
sponses from 403 two and tour
year colleges and universities I h'
results are statistically adjusted to
represent the nation's 1.6 million
hrst time, full-time college stu
dents
I he survey showed th.it stu
dents are very interested in envi
ronmental issues, are more likelv
to protest and arein reasinglyop
posed to drug use and concerned
about crime.
Environmental issues were
the top concern forfreshmen, with
86 3 percent (up from 83.9 pet ent
last year)agreeing that the federal
government isn't doing enough to
control pollution. One in tour sav
involvement in environmental
clean-up efforts is a "very impor-
tant" life goal.
surev results indicate a
growing tendency toward activ-
ism. A rc (Til 16.7 percent sav they
participated inorganized protests
during the year before entering
college; n 1 percent sav there's a
"very w. chance" they'll par-
ticipate in protests in college, up
Iroin 5.4 pert, ent in 1988 and 4.7
pen ent in 1967.
1 he right issue might galva-
nize some ol this energy says
Astin.
hile -indents' attitudes are
See Students, page 8
By Michelle Healy
C.jnnett Sews Service
One of the most worrisome
aspects of college is how to pay
the bills. But it doesn't have to be.
Students say there is plenty of
financial aid out there; you just
have to know how to go out and
get it.
lennifer Turco is a good ex-
ample. The 22 year-old student at
the University of Colorado at
Boulder turned her clarinet play-
ing ability into a ticket through
school bv winning several music
scholarships.
"Lots ot scholarships want
you to have a good (grade point
average), extracurricular activities
and community involvement the
senior music mator savs "Hut of-
ten those are hard to get because
there's so much competition It
you have any talents or special
skills, l recommend looking into
scholarships related to them
Aid is not nearly as elusive as
many believe, says Francine
Puckly, 22, a senior organizational
communications major at Cornell
University in Ithaca, N.Y.
"Most schools, if you've got
potential, are going to help you
she says.
Nearly $27 billion in aid
from government, private sources
and colleges was awarded in 1988-
89, the College Board reports The
federal government provided 7
percent.
Of all undergraduates 43.5
percent received some financial
assistance with the average total
award being $3,800.
Here is some student advice
for getting help.
Scholarships and Grants:
Most students begin their
search by filing a financial aid
application required bv the col-
lege. But the search doesn't stop
there.
Mae Ran Chung, 19,accumu-
lated $31,(XX) in private scholar-
ships while a senior at Hillsboro
(Ore.) High School. A freshman at
Pomona College in Claremont,
Calif Chung says she applied for
"20ormoreawards" and received
eight, ranging from local and na-
tional Elks Club awards to a
$20,000 scholarship from theCoca-
Cola Foundation.
Pomona officials say Chung's
large award total is unusual but
proves what can be.u compiished
when students w rk hard in sch(ol
and seek financial support.Chung
says she got her best tips trom a
monthly scholarship newsletter
prepared bv her school's counsel-
ing staff.
The searching shouldn't stop
once vou're in college, says Stanley
Younger, 24, a senior at Carnegie-
Mellon University in Pittsburgh.
"Often there are fellowships and
grants specifically torupperclass-
men he says.
Employment and Loans:
Several students say the fed-
erally subsidized work-study
program ione ot thebest temsot
financial aid available.
"You know vou're going to
work, so you might as well get to
work at something that's good
experience and gives a decent or
better hourly rate savs Turco,
who's held a work-studv tob in
the University of Colorado's pub-
lic relations office tor the past
couple of years.
Financial Aid Office:
One wav to get the most from
financial aid is learning to deal
etf" �v with "r college's
See Funding, page 9
SG A president calls NCSU budget cuts 'unacceptable'
RALEIGH (AP) A state that
rankslowestin the nation mScho-
lastic Aptitude lest si ores should
not be making budget! utsatits!6
public universities, the head ot
the University ot North Carolina
Association of Student Govern-
ments said Saturday
Gene Pavis, president ot the
group and a student at UNC-
Chapel Hill, held a news confer-
ence atN.C.State University with
student bodv president Brian
Nixon. The schools have been told
to reduce thetr budgets bv 5 per
cent as the state faces a $285 mil-
lion shortfall in revenue At N.C.
State, some teachers have been
fired and classes have been
cancelled because of the reduc-
tion.
I hesc budget cutbacks are
unacceptable I'avis said. "They
.ire especially unacceptable t"r a
state th.it is trying to lift itself up
from many problems. We are a
state that finds itsell at the bottom
ot rankings in many categories ol
importance, and in order to im-
prove that situation we must Uok
toward our future. We must look
toward education.
It is education th.it will lead
our state out of the dismal pit ot
low SAP scores, awav from a
populous that is undereducated
and illiterate and into a progres-
sive climb that leaves poverty and
homelessness behind
Nixon said he would wait for
the.eneral Assembly to hold an
emergency session to find rebel
tor the state's universities. The
legislature is s heduled to begin
its short session on May 21.
N.C State University has laid
olt II part time instructors and
canceled or merged 31 classes in
its College ot Humanities and
Social Sciences to cope with its
$9.6 million budget reduction.
1 ktailsoi thecutbacks, which have
affected the state's 16 public uni-
versities in varyingdegrees, worry
K Monteith and his 10 academic
deans.
'I he deans have taken every
action to keep the interests ot the
students first in thetr minds
Monteith said.
"Most of the cuts are in areas
which will require our faculty to
come forward and do more than
they would have to do without
the cut, and to do with less � less
paper, less telephone, less travel
he said.
No full-time faculty members
or staff have been laid off. But
doens of part-time instructors,
who are hired on nine-month
contracts, had their teaching re-
duced bva combined total of 4,000
hours.
The specifics were included
in a three-page memo prepared
by the College of Humanities and
in the College of Physical and
Mathematical Sciences. In most
cases, onlv particular course "sec-
tions" were cut, and students were
encouraged to transfer to other
sections taught at different times.
Each college has set up a telephone
hotline to help students arrange
transfers.
"We've got some major prob-
lems over here Nixon said.
Graduate students are among
the hardest hit. Many of them
depend on part-time jobs, known
as assistantships, to finance their
educations. But some of the jobs,
which pay annual salaries of $8,000
to $10,000 for 20 hours of work
each week, ha vebeen cut or scaled
back.
"How is a graduate student
supposed to eat and pay rent if
they have no assistantship sup-
port?" asked Walter . Perry,
president of the university's
Graduate Student Association.
"Many are married and have
families. They have no other schol-
arship or fellowship
The state's 38 community
colleges also are facing lean finan-
cial times.
Last week, Robert W. Scott,
unity college system, said he ex-
pected to lose about $10 million in
appropriated funds. The shortfall
comes at a time when enrollment
at the two-year schools is on the
upswing. Scott says they'll need
an additional $11 million in the
upcoming legislative session to
cover enrollment growth alone.
Washington D.C. mayor faces misdemeanor charges
By Anne Saker
Gannett News Service
WASHINGTON Mayor
Marion Barry, charged with pot-
session of crack cocaine, gave up
day-to-day control of the city Fri-
day.
He plans to devote more time
to the legal battles stemming from
his arrest in an FBI sting that used
a California model as a lure.
Barry, 33, appeared before a
US Magistrate for a 10-minute
hearing on the misdemeanor
charge, which carries a maximum
penalty of a year in prison and a
$100,000 fine.
The mayor was arrested
Kenneth Mundy said his client
plans to plead not guilty and to
ask for a jury trial. The earliest the
case could go to trial is May.
I .ate Friday, Barrv turned over
to City Administrator Carol Th-
ompson all day-to-day operations
giving her authority to run the
city except lor signing budget or
money bills.
"I know 1 have a team of
competent professionals who will
continue to run the affairs of gov-
ernment while 1 devote some time
to my legal case Barry said
Because the charge is a misdc
meanor, there is no wav to remove
Barry from office before the No-
verriberDetection. The mayor, who
has vehemently denied auv con-
tact with drugs, promised to un-
dergo weekly drug testing, start-
ing Monday, as a condition to
remaining tree on his own recog-
nizance blood and urine samples
taken after Barry's arrest turned
up evidence of cocaine, .in EBI
affidavit said.
U.S. Attorney lav Stephens
said the sting, by the EBI and the
Internal Affairs Division of the
D.C. police department, was "scru-
pulously fair" to Barrv, and he
SCOffed at claims that Barry was
entrapped. Stephens said Barry's
alleged drug use has been under
investigation for about a year,
shortly after district police were
called back from a suspected drug
dealer's hotel room when the no-
lice learned Barry was there.
Friday, that suspect, Charles
1 e wis, was sentenced to 15 months
in jail for buyingat least $140 worth
Ol crack. Lewis claims the drugs
were for Barry.
The sting's timing was "tied
directly to the dynamic of the
investigation Stephens said, and
had nothing to do with the fact
that Barry planned to announce
his candidacy for an unprece-
dented fourth term Sunday. The
mayor indefinitely postponed his
candidacy announcement.
At least six candidates are
running for mayor, but the one
person who could be the most
formidable foe � Jesse Jackson �
has said he would not run while
Barry was in the race. In Chicago,
Jackson expressed sympathy for
Barry and his family. Jackson and
Barry were once soldiers together
in the civil rights movement un-
der Rev. Martin Luther King Jrs
leadership.
The mayor's arrest created an
uproar in the nation's capital,
where rumors about his habits
were common. His taste for the
late-night life earned him one
nicknameof "King Nightowl his
ability to surmount frequent po-
litical turbulence led even his crit-
ics to call him "mayor for life
The sting apparently was
launched when FBI agents won
the cooperation of Rashida Hazel
Moore. 38. Ouotine "high-level
sources WUSA-TV reported that
Moore allegedly perjured herself
last year before a federal grand
juryinvestigatingdrugallegations
against Barry.
WUSA reported that on Janu-
ary 1, Moore was arrested in Los
Angeles on a drunken-driving
charge. District investigators then
flew to Los Angeles armed with a
federal arrest warrant for Moore
and a plea agreement to get her
cooperation in the sting to be set
up specifically to nab Barry.
Last Wednesday, the FBI took
a seventh-floor room at the down-
town Vista International Hotel and
put Moore there.
Stephen s sa id Ba rrv pu 1 led u p
See Barry, page 9





Site iEaat (ftarolfnfan
Page 6
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
WANTED: Female roommate needed to
share two bedroom apt rent and
utilities will be split in half Located off
10th st dose to campus 758-6258
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Two blocks
from ECU Great place to live (ie
bedroom, dishwasher and air condi
tioned No problem with parking Call
Tammv at 758 9292
CLEAN. RESPONSIBLE STUDENT
NEEDED: To share 3 bedroom
apartment Ask for Jeff or Rodney 757
0485
ROOMMATE WANTED: For two
stor 11 fl bath, 2br apt with washer
drver and own yard Completely
furnished except for your room 212 50
plus 112 utilities 10 minute walk Jo
campus Very new, very nice, must s
752-7062
MALE ROOMMATE: To share 3
bedroom bnck house, $145month, 1 fi
utilities Call 756-1281 Close to campus
ROOMMATE WANTEI
expenses on a house GrJ
Will have own bedroom I
Call 752-3771 Ask for Doug or lim
Eli To share 11 ,
orftlcxaL I '
m Aid b.iftuJoaf 3
A ONE BEDROOM DUPLEX. Walking
distance to FCl' $27; month stOOpet
to- Brian lone- Broker 153 5444
DISPLAY CLASMHLDS
AUTOS: Can you buy loop i ars, 4 x 4's
Seized in drug raids for under SHX)'
Call for facts today BOS 644 "531 dept
711
1988 1ROC-Z CAMARO: 350,5 7 turned
port, fully loaded, Black, new tires, must
sell due to divorce Take payoff, Call
Mr Canoll at 758 6644
1983 CHEVROIET CELEBRITY: 6 cyl
Tilt wheel, air conditioning, AmFm
cassette stereo, 4 door, cruise, high
mileage, $1795 946 4545(Washmgton).
Day or Evening
SPRING BREAK 1990: Patty lamaican
Style! one beautiful week starting at
$469" Hot davs and Reggae nights
fctravel with the host" Call Sun Splash
Jfeus 1-800 426-7710
A!�$�(TION Government homes from
$1 (u-repair) Delinquent tax property
Repossessions Call 1 602 838 8885 Ext
GH 5285
ATTENTION: Hiring! Government
f Wu area Many immediate
fopAuJJ Without waiting list or test
St 1184- 19,48S Call 1 602 838 8885
Ex. R 5285
QMEMSIZE WA1FRBED: Must m II
Only $M Stove 72 11 56 Call alter 1 (X)
p m
IMSLAY CLASSIFIEDS
Sales
Rep
Needed
Apply aMhe
East
Carolinian
757-6366

WIN A HAWAIIAN
V'AJjATjpN OR BIG SCREEN TV
PLVAISF. IP TO $1,400 IN
JUST 10 DAYS!
Objective: Fundraiser
Commitment: Minimal
M�nev: Raise $1,400
f st: Zero Investment
Campus organizations, clubs, fruts,
sororities call OCMC at 1 (800)
932 � 0521V 1 (800) 950-8472 ext 10
McBudget
Office
Pttriiitttre
We Have:
�Desks 'Chairs
�Files �Sales
�Computer -Storage
Furniture Cabinets
We Buy, Sell. Trade, ft Lease
-?-r
1313 H. Ort�n�X.
753 BSS4
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
� ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS �
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E 5th Street
I Ask ui thou! out special rate to chana? leaaet. and
dacuunu for January fenttll)
� Located Near ECL'
� Near Major Shopping Centers
� ECU Bus Service
� On site Laundry
Contact I T Williamj or Tommy Jhama
7567815 or 758-7436
- AZALEA GARDENS �
CUMM AM)'jnn amhaaraa furrra
rfft, i �� 'vet nrr mi revar. optional �
norm J HOMK aUKTALl lanwiwa 1 nuaili in
uu�. i.irin otar Bra vrlio Caaruj Ouk

CoraaalT wwianiarTa
-win
v Wilan
SUMMERFIELD
APARTMENTS
3209 Summerplace
New
1 and 2 bedrooms
� located across from
Parker's Barbecue
on Memorial Drive
� available Feb.l
contact Aaron Spain
355-6187
756-8060
S The 0ait Company
of QretmnKe Ltd.
'Gnu nville's First Full Service Nail Care Salon"
GOVERNMENT SIZED Vehicles
trom SHX) Fords Chews Surplus
Buyers Guide (1) BOS 687 6000 Ext S-
1166
Is It True You Can Buy Iceps for $44
through the U S Government? Get the
facts today' Call 1-700-742 1142 Ext
271 A
FOR SALE: Speakers Cerwin Vega D3
ex cond 1225.00 obo Call 758-5805 and
ask for Tommy
SERVICES OFFERED
A FREE GIFT (USF FOR CALLING:
Plus raise up to $1,7(10 in only 10 days
Student groups , frats and sororities
needed for marketing projeel on campus
For details plus vour Free Oft, Group
officers call 1 800-765 8472 Ext 50
BEST FUNDRAISERS ON CAMPUS:
Is vour fraternity, Sorority or dub
interested in earning $1,000for a one
weed, on campus marketing protect1
You must he well organized and hard
working Call Jenny or Myra at (H00)
"2-2121
WORO PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
anil photocopying services We also sell
softwarescomputers 24 hours in and
out Guaranteed typing on paper up to
20 hand written pages SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 E 5th St (beside
Cubbies) Greenville i 7 j V694
START A I RAM KM IV Sure you can
Anyone interested call Ism al 931 7475
Mill A DJ: why not hire the best!
Experience is what counts Current!)
working at the Elbo and previously
worked at Kio' the club Specializing in
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
$2500.00
Credit line
guaranteed!
�No credit Check
�No Security Deposit
You cannot be turned
down for a
(rold Creditrd
BANC LINH
AMFRICA
$2500 Instant line of
credit
Cash withdrawal up to
$1250.00
830-4043
danceprogressiverock and beach
Call Mark Roberts - 752 (Q27
HELP WANTED
Mil P WAN IIP: Parl time sales Stock
help from 1 to 6 pm Monday thru
Friday, and 10 am to b pm Saturday
Apply at the outh shop Boutique,
Arlington Village, Greenville
MOOELS: It you would like to model,
Promotions Modeling Agency, a low fee
agency needs males and females of all
ages Also need dancers tor private
parties Call 155 oglg tost-t up an
interview
ASPIRING PHOTOGRAPHERS! Want
experience? Test photos needed Some
pay possible Call David 758 5761
PART-TIME WAREHOUSE
WORKERS: Flexible hours Apply in
person Carpel Bargain Center, KXN
Dickinson ave , Greenville NC No
phone calls
HELP WANTED; Part time position
available answering telephone Call
weekdays between I pm f JO pm
ARE YOU A WORK-STUDY
STUDENT? If so, rhe Pirate Club needs
you Must enjoy working with the
public and ha e a pleasant phone voice
Phone 757 1540 tor inter iew, ask for
Gwen
GOVI KW1I M Ions SI6.040
S 9 230 i Now Hiring I ill (1) N'r
687 6000 I it a urn nl federal
h-t
SAI I s National Marketing Firm seeks
mature student to rn magi on am pus
promotion tor top ivmpanii s this
school war Flexible hours with
earnings potential to s2 per semester
Must be organized hardworking, and
money motivated all Micheleor enny
al fSfJO) 5�2 2121
AIRI IMS NOW HIRING slight
Attendants travel gents. Mechanics,
Customer Service Listings Salaries to
DISPLAY Cl ASSIFIEDS
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library ot information in U S �
all si6ecfs
800-351-0222
Research Intofmjtion
TOi I FMf
MOT UNf
BEST USED TIRES
TIRE SALF.S FROM $15 A UP.
ALL SEES AVAILABli
WHITE LETTER A WHITE WALLS
Two locaaoni: ifX� �. Green St.
�30-9579 1009 S Memorial Dr.
The Suntana
5 Visit Plan $15
10 Visa Plan$25
15 Visit Plan $30
Wolfe Tanning System
756-9180
Coupon ChxhI Thru 3-31 -90
3212 S. Memorial Dr.
250 - 1000 summer camp positions available- Stall'Referral Services
provides a network of camps, now hiring, tuini the "Keys" to Wise.
- Minn. One application reaches all camps via master computer.
Applications at the Career Planning & Placement Office.
Tanning Session
$2.00 a visit
2405 Sa Charles 5
(919)355-4596
Listen To
FM
The College Music FM
S10.SK. Entry level positions. Call (I)
805-667 6000 Ext A 11M.
ATTENTION: EARN MONEY
READING BOOKS! 112,000year
Income potential Details (1)602 818-
888S Ext Bk 5285
BROOY'S s accepting applications tor
part time s ties associates for the spring
semester Ve want bright, enthusiastic
and energ -tic people who can give
friendly nourtcay service Flexible
schedules available Apply Hrodv's The
Vaa Monday Tuesday 1000 4 00
BRODY'S FOR MEN is searching for
Part time sale associates Enthusiastic
individuals who enjoy fashion and have
a flexible school schedule should apply
at Hrody's The Plaa Monday Tuesday
10-00 am 4 00 pm
ADVERTISING DISPLAY ASSIS-
TANT position available to creative,
hardworking individual experienced in
graphic arts and display background
desirable Portfolio is required with
interview Apply Brody's The Plaa
Monday Tuesday 1000 am 4 00 pm
HELP WANTED: Fashion Men han
diing Majors Want a gTeat way to gain
valuable experience' Brody's is
accepting applications for a clerical
assistant to Buying statt Apply
Brody's The Plaa Monday and Tuesday
10 am 4 pm
HELP WAN IT IV Part time telemarket
Ing representatives 5 8 30 pm Monday
through riiursda and ' 1 pm Saturday
Must have a pleasant phone voi c
Phone 758 1112 tor .in interview, ask tor
(icni
WAN I ID: fashion consultant Premier
Modularareei clothing company seeks
qualified person to din t and market
Perfect tor college girls, work vour own
hours to earn extra money ave S10hr
Call 7-7 iiv.4 tor more details after 5 00
p m
PERSONALS
III! Dl I r ZETAS would hke to wish
all fraternities a successful rush
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
DELTA ETA OFFICERS Mehnda
Walker President, Catherine Kult V P
Pledge. Kelly Wells-V p Membership,
Kelley Kane Treaurcr, Kirstin Eake-
-ioaal Chairman, Maggie Carnwath-
xholarship.
PI KAPPS: Chicago gangster was the
home trench coats and guns, ohh what a
�cream Flappers dancing, cigars-a-
mokin , Pi Kapps and DZ's can parts
here's kn okin Thanks guvs we had a
last' Love the Delta Zetas
CONGRATULATIONS to I leather
I jird on her engagement! We Love You
the Delta etas
KELLY JONE: Congratulations on law
school We're really proud of vou
eta Line vour sisd-rs
SIGMA P LS: The World Party was
great' Let's do it again soon' Love, the
sisters and pledges of ZTA
HEY VOU DZ PLEDGES! Keep up the
awesome work vou did a gTeat ob with
the carwash I lang in there tust a little
bit longer' Love the sisters
LAMBDI CHI'S: Thanks to all for the
party last Sunday night it added loK ot
tun to our three day weekend' Love the
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
C�L1 tor tppotntmrnt Mon thru Mt
! tw COM Imunition to 20 wevkt ol IVrnndncy
1-800-433
-293AK
January 23,1990
ADPi's
GOOD LICK to all fraternities during
Spring Rush The Alpha Delta Pi's
AOPi Congratulations to all those
newly elected offices President Lisa
Gale. Vice President Tern Edelen.
Pledge Educator Caroline Haire.
( hapter treasurer Stacey Ccxide,
Corporation Treasurer Amv 1 luber,
Chapter Relations Sarah Metcalf,
Recording Sec Mivsy Ellis, Correspond
ing Sec P am Barbour. I louse Manager
Natalie Brouwn, Rush Chairman
heather Hatch, Asst Ruch Chairman
Amv I luber, Fundraising Lisa Selby,
Scholarship Chairman Jennifer Resca
Songleader Stephanie Sylvester, Social
Chatrman Jody Gear, Public Relations
Shannon Fowler, K of R Patty Glander
Panhellenic Delegate Meredith Crogar
Panhellenic Executive Jo Brooks,
Membership Educator Stephanie
Patton. Alumnae Relations Fay Jon-
Intrsmural Rep Beth Weiler, and
Historian Torry Davidson, Congratu
lations you guvs We all know you'll do
a great ob'
AOPi: (Xir formal is almost here, we 0
party and drink lots of beer, have you
found your date7 It's almost to late, fust
ask him there's nothing to fear
HAPPY BIR rilDAY to the following
AOPi s Shannon Fowler Ian 27, Kim
Ruark Jan 28, Caroline I laire Ian 3
1 lave a r,�H.i one vou guvs'
GENII FMIN OF PI KAPPA PHI
Prep ire I . the tradition ot I
� � : ' .�
out Foo: - ' .� . � Founder ol tl
F A I
IMPOR I M �' c following fan
: � ; i � bers ot Pi Kappa
eargc Bush, Hart Simpson, Robin �� �
Nv wonder Michael Jordan, Nancy
Reagan, Sinnv anil Cher, Judge IrVapner
Pee Wee I lerman, IXan Smith. Bo
Derek, The Bee lees, David Letterman
Godzilla Mrs Garret! Bobby Brady,
I Itr.iman, Mill V antlli, and last but no
iit Buskwheat! In other words, vou
don t have to be famous to be a part ot
the great Pi kappa Experience Rush
l�o
(.RISTAI MICHELLE: You re finally
legal (but you're still a b�') I lappv
Birthday! We love vou' Love, Your
favorite roommates
ALPHA PHI OMEGA: congratulates its
new pled jes- lien me-Drake, Ccii'i
Prior i lien Johnson, enni Maloway
Sonya Sansbury Kevin Schmitt, Stacy
Silvia, and I toward Wixd
ALPHA SIGMA PHI BLACK LAN
FERN was a great success' iul vou
looked tat on the news the rest ot us
looked great as usual.
CONGRA FLLA DONS to Dave Baird
on winning the Alpha Sig weekly pool
championship vou only got lucky'
TO ECL MEN It vou re thinking
about rushing Rush Alpha Sigma
Phi The right choice'
SCO TT M. V ou owe the Alpha Sigs
thirty dollars trom Friday night Kathv
II don t think vou'll get off free either
PiKAPPS - Congratulations to all those
brothers making honor roll - Donnie
Brown, Will Barker, Bill Tomhnson,
Dennis Oliver, Daren Parker, and Rich
Miller Great )ob guvs'
DELTA E TA - Fhanks for the big get
together guys WE'reglad y partied or
we were gonna till VJ full of lead Anv
time a wanna come back to the hide
out. just sa when, okav sweethearts'
Love, the i'i kappa c.ang
Pi KAPPS would like to invite ever)
body out to the bouse b) the lake Come
see what makes I'i Kappa Phi great isee
enclosed add)
SIG EPS Two words Hilton Head
Details to tollow
A ITEN TION ECU MALES: Begin a
new decade and a new life with fraternal
lite Interfraternitv Council presents
fraternity rush Jan 22-25. All men of
Fc L are invited to rush al) of East
Carolina s fine fraternities
SIGMA PHI EPSILON would like to
welcome back all of its brothers to a
great semester and the beginning of a
new decade We would also like to
wish SCA President Tnpp Roakes good
luck for another great semester.
r
Announcements
ATTENTlQNJUALi
The East Carolinian will be changing its
policy concerning announcements, start
ing in January, announcements will now
be free for only the 1st week of publication,
after that week there will be a charge of
1st 25 words for student organizations
$2 00 and for non- student organizations
S3 00 any additional words will be $.05
�QLUNj
RJ
The Section of Infectious Diseases ECU
School of Medicine in conjunction with the
Student Health Center is conducting a
study on the sexual spread of herpes vi-
ruses We are looking for men and women
18 years and older who have never had
genital herpes If vou are interested in
obtaining more information, call Jean
Askew, RN at 551 2578
ECU AMBASSADORS
The ECU Ambassadors will be having a
general meeting on Wed Jan 24.1 "90 at 5
pm in Mendenhall Student Center's social
room
tCUBiQLQGiUJB
There will beameetingof the EC U Riologv
Club on Tuesday, Jan 2.1 at 5 pm in room
BN109. There will be a guest speaker from
the North Carolina Biotechnology associa
tion His speech is tilledWhat the Heck is
BioTech" This will be verv informative
and interesting. Everyone is urged tocome
loin us
SELF H�LF�QSiTlQ
AVAILABLE
The Department of Political Science seeks
a reliable, conscientious, and efficient stu
dent with strong skills and some experi-
ence to assist staff and faculty in a variety
of activities Good typing, word process
ing, copy ing, and clerical skills are desired
Please contact Mrs Cvnthia Smith,
Brewster A-124 personally or by telephone,
737-6030, 8 30 am to 5 p m , Monday
Friday We will be hiring as stxn as pos-
sible.
STUPENXUN10N
Certs and the Student Union Special Events
Committee will be sponsoring the U.S.
College Comedy Com petition on Jan 23 at
Hp.m in the Social Room of Mendenhall
Admission is free For more information
call 757-4715.
EAST � AROLJN AJTAE KQiVN
DO CLUB
Interested in Martial Arts and Self De-
tense' The East Carolina Tae Kown Do
Club meets in Memorial on Tuesdays and
Thursdays I 10 pm in the gvmnashes
room Come by or call Rob 830 5183 for
more information.
EASICARQLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION
there will bean important ECHO meeting
on Thursday. 25 January 1998, at 5 00 in
1004 GCB. We will be finalizing detaiLs for
our participation in ECU'sQuiz Bowl All
members are always welcome Contact
Mary Elizabeth at 931 -8303 for more infor-
mation.
WOJ
The I lebos are looking for new girLs If you
like having fun and playing fnsbee, meet
us at the bottom of the hill. Sun , Tues,
Wed , and Thurs at 3:00
ECU WATER-SKI CLUB
If you are interested in competition water
ski on the collegiate level, please contact
Brian Smith at 931 - 8702 for more informa-
tion.
TIES
ECU students! There is still time to appIV
for National Student Exchange Spend tin
exciting semester or year at one of 87 col
leges and universities in the US Puerto
Rico or the Virgin Islands and earn credit
towards graduation while paying ECU
tuition Don't miss this opportunity Ijb
explore your field of interest in a new
college setting and establish new friend-
ships Applications are being accept
through the end of February Visit Gupta
me at the NSE office in 1002 GCB, or oaf
757-6769, and pick up your application
today '
SEE PAGE 7
i





The East Carolinian, January 23,1990 7
Announcements
Continued from page
PHlETASUiMA
ITii hla Mgma will hold Rl monthly m�t?t
iAgonJw lOfromS 6pm til room 1022 of
the Orteral Classroom Builtfing
AMNf STY INTL
Amnesty lnt'l will have Msfirstmeetingot
the vear on Ian 24 th at 8 (10 p m at Si
Paul't Fpiscopal Church on 4th S� Any
one interested in human rights and other
haste freedoms are welcome to )oin us
OPN
rheOorseas Oevelopment Network will
N- having another meeting on Thursday
Ian 25th at 00 p m in CC1 IflBS This
meeting will he to tie up loose ends
�nvone interested in third world conn
tries is invited to attend
VALENTINE CANDY SALE
ECU District 07. SEANC, will he selling
homemade" peanut brittle and "home-
made" Valentine lollipops on Tuesday and
Wednesday February 13 and 14. on cam
pus m the lobby of the Student Supply
Store and in the main corridor leading to
the hospital, at the School of Medicine,
Brady Building, from 12 00 noon until
2 00pm Thepeanut brittle will beS2bag
and the lollipops will sell for50 and75
each Proceeds will go towards financing
the activities of the District for the upoom
ing vear
"OLDIE-COLDIES" DANCE
ECU District "7. SEANC, will be sponsor
ing an "Oldie Coldies' Dance, on Satur
day, March 31, 1Q0 at the Greenville
Country Club, from 8 00 pm 1 00 AM
with a PI featuring music from the VTs,
bo's and 7(V; There will be dixr prizes,
lightKorsa ocuvrcs ami cash bar as well
as a prize to the best dressed couple repre
scnting each era r�ckotsfor the. enl will
tx 56 pel mi .iiivi ni.i. I b
contacting I'cggv Nobles Mainam pus
6012) David Batch, School of Medicine
551 2471) or an) member oi (he Distrk ')'
Executive Board Executive ommittees
AMNESTY INT'L
�mnestv lnt'l meetsevery 4th Wednesday
.it Bp.rn .it Si Pauls Episcopal Church,
401 F 4th St, in the upper floor enterfrom
4thStreetentr.ino- Next meeting Wodnes-
day anuary24 8p.m Students welcome
For more in formation contactDav id Ames
757 127b
SCHOOL Or ART
Models needed tor figuredrawingclasses
Contact Connie Follmer 757 6563 757
hf- or Tran GoroMlev 6259 or the
School of Art office, lenWins 2000
ALLNLRSINC STUDENTS
GRADUATING SPRING
SEMESTER
In order to receive your Nursing Pin in
April Orders must be placed m the Stu
dent Store, Wright Building, no later than
February 2,19W Orders should be placed
at the Service Desk Olden must be paid
in lull when placed
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STU-
DENT CENTER
Announcing a Wednesday night dinner
�BCdal! Fun, fellowship and all the home
cooking vou can eat It all starts at 5:30 p m
Come Bring a friend
LCU SURF CLUB
Surf Club Meeting Thursday at 7 00pm
at O'mars For further information call
Ted Gartman it Marsh's Surf Shop 155
6680
OFFICE Of STUDENT DEVEL-
OPMENT. DEFT, OF ATHLET-
ICS
Farn Extra Money Support the F( 11 Pi
rate Athletes bv becoming an athletic .ic.i
demic tutor Tutors are needed in a variety
of subject areas, especially in business and
physics Two introductory tutorial meet
ings will be held for your scheduling
convenience If vou are interested, come to
one of the scheduled meetings 2 30 3 VI
on lanuary 24th and 3:38 4 Won lanunrv
2rth at the Study Center located in the
Sports Medicine Building on the ECU
campus The Meetings will be identical,
just pick the one that bests tits into your
schedule For more information, call Lisa
Fdwards ar 757-4551,
ANIMAL RIGHTS
FcT1 Students for the Fthica! Treatment of
Animals will have a meeting Tuesday
lanuary 23rd �� Ti" m GCB 20ib A
Jr ussion ol the irtues oi egetartanism
and tips on making the I ansition will I
low New members arc welcome
CHRISTIAN FRATERNITY
c hi Alpha Omega will hold Rush n at
20th and l.in JOth in room B D, E F Men
denhaUand an Hstinroom221 Mender
hall Contact Ion at 931 onu or Reggie at
752 0543 if vou are interested
WORK STUDY TRIP TO
MEXICO DURING SPRING
BREAK
The School of Education is sponsoring a
trip to Pueblo, Mexico, March 3 11. 1990
An information session will be held on
Wed, Ian 24th, at 4 IX) p m in Speight Rm
1 51 All interested persons are invited to
attend
EAST CAROLINA UNIVER-
SITY GOSPEL CHOIR
The East Carolina University Cos pel C hi ii r
is now accepting members for the 1990
semester until Jan list Please come out
and nun us on Wednesday it 5 00 at the
ledonia I Wright ultural C enter For
more information contact President Kip
planlemmons at 830 5391 or any mem
ber of the choir
EAST CAROLINA UNIVER-
SITY GOSPEL CHOIR
The East Carolina University Gospel hoit
will sponsor a Variety Show on luesda)
night at 7 ' i" ' at I londm
heater Please come out andjotn usaawe
present "Showtime at Mendenhall 2" A
fun time is guaranteed! Admission is SI
WZMH
WZMB is looking tor a Grants Manager
Ihe Grants Manager responsible tor get
ting businesses to donate money toWMH
The position pays a salary plus commas
sion Fam as much ts you want to appK
at Ike WZMB studios second floor, OKI
Jovner library or call 757 6656 Inquiries
should be made to Andy ForMa
INTRAMURAL - RECREA-
TIONAL SERVICES
Co Tubing' Im Rec Services will hold
registration for Spring 10 Inner Tube
Water Polo Competition Men s jnd
women's team as well as individuals are
encouraged to attend registration l.wu.irv.
"thh at 5 p m in Hio 103 lor additional
information call 757 6387 or stop bv 2iM
Memorial Gymnasium
HEALTHY LA TIM,
Every Wednesday from 2 00 3 00 in the
Student Health (enter Resource Room a
class on I lealthv Fating i labiN and Eating
to lower Your Cholesterol will be con
ducted For more information call 757
6794
I AS1 c KOI l I Kll NP-S
I ast i � Un iFrie �����. heattendingi
I Maryland b i - game on
Mondai ' � ' l � i '
Mike Sti - ' ' ed ticket
rkV hicat "
AME YOU OUT GOING
Do vou enjoy talking on the phone' -m
we hae the job lor you! feiemarketUtg
positions open tor spring semester strting
immediately Work tor E I' and gel paid
while vou gain valuable telemarketing
skills HOurs are7-9pm datl) earn extra
spending money without cutting into stud)
time' (all Cindy or Robbie at 757 1215 or
757 HXH. for an appointment
RUSH
PHI KAPPA TAU
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
"Taking Campus By
Storm
Tonight: 8 - 11 Come Out & Participate in our Annual
Casino Night. Game Winners will receive gifts
ranging from 1 yr Membership to The Spa, Dinners
at Annabelles,Darryl's, King & Queen, & etc
Come out & Don't Miss the Fun!
Hots d'ouvres will be served
Wed: 8-11 Pizza with the Sorority Girls of XQ.
Thurs: 8 - 11 Meet the Brothers of Phi Kappa Tau
FOR RIDES CALL: 757-1319
U.S. COLLEGE
CONCEPTS
I by Ike
HOW TO BECOME THE FUNNIEST COLLEGE STUDENT
IN AMERICA IN THREE MINUTES:
� Prepare a hilarious three minute comedy routine. (Clean, of course1)
� Win Your Campus Competition (At the time and place listed below)
� Be judged the best in the USA by Jerry Seinfeld, National Judge
THE PRIZES ARE NOTHING TO LAUGH AT:
� Certs Mints will take the regional winners on a Trip to Daytona Beach
during Spring Break to perform for vacationing students, and that winner
will go to New York City to perform at a famous comedy club.
� Get a U S College Comedy T-Shtrt.
IF YOU'RE NOT COMPETING, COME BY JUST FOR LAUGHS!
Date: Tuesday, Jan 23, 1990 Competitors Time: 7:00pm
Location: Social Room Mendenhall Student Center Audience Time: 8:00pm





Announcements
Continued from page 6
,� fHlETASir.MA
Ph� EU Sigma wiU hold its monthly meet
irtgon an 30from 5 6pm in room 1022 of
the General Classroom Building.
AMNESTY 1TSTT1.
Amnesty Int'l will have its first meeting of
the year on Jan 24 th at 8:00 p.m at St
Paul s Episcopal Church on 4th St Any-
one interested in human rights and other
basic freedoms are welcome to join us
QDN
The Overseas Development Network will
he having another meeting on Thursday,
Ian. 25th at 5:00 p.m. in CCB 1025 This
meeting will be to He up loose ends.
Anyone interested in third world coun-
tries is invited to attend.
VALENTINE CANDY SALE
ECU District 97, SEANC, will be selling
"homemade" peanut brittle and "home-
made" Valentine lollipops on Tuesday and
Wednesday, February 13 and 14, on cam-
pus, in the lobby of the Student Supply
Store and in the main corridor leading to
the hospital, at the School of Medicine,
Brody Building, from 12:00 noon - until
2:00p.m. The peanut brittle will be $2bag
and the lollipops will sell for $.50 and $.75
each Proceeds will go towards financing
the activities of the District for the upcom-
ing year
-OLDIE-GOLDIES" DANCE
ECU District 97, SEANC, will be sponsor-
ing an "CHdie-Goldies" Dance, on Satur-
day, March 31, 1990 at the Greenville
Country Club, from 8:00 pm -1:00 A.M
with a DJ featuring music from the 5Cs,
bo's and TO's. There will be door prizes,
light horv d mini�, MM Ck m js well
J � prirc to the best-dressed couple repre-
senting each era Tickets tor the event will
be Sbperson and ma be obtained bv
contacting lVggv Nobles, Mam Campus
(6012), David Batch, School of Medicine
(551-24711 or an v member of the District W
Executive BoardExecutive Committees
AMNESTlJNT'L
Amnesty Int'l meets every 4th Wednesdav
at 8p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal Church,
401 E 4th St, in the upper floor enter from
4thSrreetcntrance Next meeting: Wednes-
day, January 24,8pm Students welcome.
For more in formation, contact David Ames
757-1276.
SCHOOL OF ART
Models needed for figuredrawingclasses
Contact Connie Follmer 757-6563, 757-
6665 or Tran Gorddley 7577-6259 or the
School of Art office, Jenkins 2000
ALL NVFSING STUDENTS
5EAD1IATING SFRIlST
SEMESTER
In order to receive your Nursing Pin in
April Orders must be placed in the Stu-
dent Store, Wright Building, no later than
February 2,1990 Orders should be placed
at the Service Desk. Orders must be paid
in full when placed
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STU-
DENT CENTER
Announcing a Wednesday night dinner
special! Fun, fellowship and all the home-
cookingyoucaneat. It all starts at iv30pm
Come. Bring a friend
Surf Club Meeting Thursday at 7:00 pm
at Omars. For further information call
Ted Gartman at Marsh's Surf Shop 155-
6680
JjCS
Earn Extra Money. Support the ECU Pi-
rate Athletes by becoming an athletic aca-
demic tutor. Tutors are needed in a variety
of subject areas, especially in business and
physics. Two introductory tutorial meet-
ings will be held for your scheduling
convenience. If you are interested, come to
one of the scheduled meetings: 230 - 3:30
on January 24th and 3:30 -4:30 on January
25th at the Study Center located in the
Sports Medicine Building on the ECU
campus. The Meetings will be identical,
just pick the one that bests fits into your
schedule. For more information, call Lisa
Edwards ar 757-4551.
ANIMAL RIGHTS
ECU Students for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals will have a meeting Tuesday,
January 23rd, at 5p.m. in GCB 2016. A
discussion of the virtuesot vegetarianism
and tips on making the t-anMtion will fol-
low New Members arc welcome
CHRISTIAN FRATERNITY
Chi Alpha Omega will hold Rush on Jar
20th and Jan 30th in room 8 D, E, F Men
den hall and Jan 31st in room 221 Mcnden
hall Contact Jon at 931 9604 or Reggie at
752-0545 if you are interested.
WORK STUDY TRIP TO
MEXICO DURING SPRING
BREAK
The School of Education is sponsoring a
trip to Pueblo, Mexico, March 3-11,1990
An information session will be held on
Wed , Jan. 24th, at 400 pm in Speight Rm.
151. All interested persons are invited to
attend.
EA
Ledonia J Wright Cultural Center For
more information contact President Kip-
plan Clcmmons at 830-5.391 or anv mem
ber of the choir
EAST CAROLINA UNIVE&-
SJTXGOSPELCHOm
The East Carolina University Gospel Choir
will sponsor a Variety Show on Tuesday
night at 7 Ijp SHt at Hendrix
Theater. Please comeout andoin us as we
present 'Showtime at Mendenhall 2 A
fun time is guaranteed1 Admission is SI
WZMB
WZMB is looking for a Grants Manager
The Grants Manager responsible for get
ting businesses to donate money to WZM B
The position pays a salary plus commis-
sion. Earn as much as you want to apply
at the WZMB studios second floor. Old
Joyner Library or call 757 6656 Inquiries
should be made to Andy Forbis.
LRECREAr
lL SERVICES
Go Tubing! Im-Rec Services will hold
registration for Spnng 1990 Inner Tube
Water Polo Competition. Men's and
women's teams as well as individuals are
encouraged to attend registration Januarv
30th at 5 p.m in Bio 103 For additional
information call 757 6387 or stop by 204
Memorial Gymnasium
HEALTHY EATING
Every Wednesday from 2:00 - 300 in the
Student Health Center Resource Room a
class on 1 lealthy Eating I labits and Eating
to Lower Your Cholesterol will be con
ducted. For more information call 757-
6794.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
East Carolina Friends will beattendmgthe
ECU - Maryland basketball game on
Mondav. January Wth, courtesy of Coach
Mike Sleek Members who need ticket
inform . allKirkMi hicat758-
AM�mUjQlIJ GOING
Do you enjoy talking on the phone? If so,
we have the job for you' Telemarketing
positions open for spring semester strung
immediately. Work for ECU and get paid
while you gam valuable telemarketing
skills MOurs are 7-9pm dailv. eam extra
spendingmonev without cuttingmto study
time! Call Cindy or Robbie at 757 4215 or
757-6072 for an appointment
;T CAROLINA UNIVER-
MM.CHOIR
The East Carolina University Gospel Choir
is now accepting members for the 1990
semester until Jan 31st. Please come out
and join us on Wednesday at 5.00 at the
c
Ca
Tw
The East Carolinian, January 23,1990 7
RUSH
PHI KAPPA TAU
' � .Mm. �
"Taking Campus By
Storm
Tonight: 8 - 11 Come Out & Participate in our Annual
Casino Night. Game Winners witt receive gifts
ranging from 1 yr Membership to Tfoe Spa, Dinners
at Annabelles,Darryrs, King & Queen, & etc
Come out & Don't Miss the Fun!
Hors d'ouvres will be served
WrH- 8-n pjzza with the Sorority Girls of Xft
. Meet the Brothers of Phi Kappa Tau
IDES CALL: 757-1319
us
HNC
HOW TO BECOME THE FUNNIEST COLLEGE STUDENT
IN AMERICA IN THREE MINUTES:
� Prepare a hilarious three minute comedy routine. (Clean, of course!)
� Win Your Campus Competition (At the time and place listed below)
� Be judged the best in the U.S.A. by Jerry Seinfeld, National Judge
THE PRIZES ARE NOTHING TO LAUGH AT:
� Certs Mints will take the regional winners on a Trip to Daytona Beach
during Spring Break to perform for vacationing students, and that winner
will go to New Vbrk City to perform at a famous comedy club.
� Get a U.S. College Comedy T-Shirt.
IF YOU'RE NOT COMPETING, COME BY JUST FOR LAUGHS!
Date: Tuesday, Jan 23, 1990 Competitors Time: 7:00pm
Location: Social Room Mendenhall Student Center Audience Time: 8:00pm





8 The East Carolinian, January 23,1990
Azerbaijanis bury dead in Baku
MOSCOW (AP) � Factory
whistles wailed in mourning
Monday and tens of thousands of
Azerbaijanis massed in Baku to
bury scores of countrymen killed
when Soviet troops stormed the
city to put down a nationalist
uprising, witnesses said.
A general strike took effect to
protest theassaultand demand an
end tothe Soviet occupation. Inan
overnight session, the southern
republic's legislature demanded
Soviet troops leave the Azerbaijani
capital.
In fierce fighting to put down
a revolt bom in bloody ethnic
strife, Soviet troops smashed
Students
through barricades and broke
through to the city center on Sat-
urday- The official Tass news
agency said 83 people, including
14 soldiers and members of their
families, were killed in the assault
and skirmishes the previous day.
That brought the toll to 15ft
dead and more than S(X) wounded
in a week of fighting throughout
Azerbaijan that was originally
sparked bv anti-Armenian riots in
Baku, a oil-producing center of 1.7
million people on the Caspian Sea.
In Baku Monday, "people
have been carrying coffins from
all quarters of the city and the
closest suburbs to what was once
called Lenin Square, now renamed
Freedom Square reported Leila
Yunusov, a spokeswoman for the
Social Democratic Group, an in-
formal Azerbaijani political or-
ganization.
She claimed more than 1 mil-
lion people, manv carrying black
flags to show their grief, gathered
on the square to bid farewell to the
dead. She said 119 individual
graves were dug in Baku's Kirov
Lark for bunal ceremonies, and
that police and the Soviet Armv
were not interfering with the n .es.
Anothei Baku resident, Azad
Mula-Zade, reported by telephone
that factory whistles had been
Continued from page 5
liberal in some areas, "when it
comes to matters of crime and
drugs, they're more conservative
than they've ever been he says.
The share of students favor-
ing legalization of marijuana (16.7
percent) and abolishing the death
penalty (21.3 percent) both con-
tinue to decline and the percent-
age favoring employers' right to
require employee drug-testing
grows (77.8 percent).
Other survey findings:
Interest in business careers
declined for the second year in a
row, to 21.8, from a high of 24.6
percent in 1987.
� A record 59.6 percent say
they aspire to advanced degrees;
51.5 percent say preparing for
graduate or professional school is
a major reason for attending col-
lege.
A record 26.5 percent sav
they will need remedial work in
math.
Trends
� Only 10.1 percent (vs. 15b
in 1970) say they did extra reading
or work for a class in the past year;
only 54.9 percent (vs. 71.4 percent
in 1967) say they visited an art
gallery ormuseumin the past year,
both record lows.
"These trends indicate that the
academic problems in our secon-
dary schoolsarc still far from being
solved Astin says.
W.Tyn)ii 1990 14 TOOA1
rr . oJirr itpnnaii'� Set"
Continued from page 5
around the United States. This is
based on a USA TOD A Y survey of
812 four-year colleges for the cur-
rent school year. The survey did
not include Hawaii and Alaska.
� Fraternities and sororities
are most popular in the South.
�Private schools overall have
more fraternitysorority mem-
bers, more on-campus residents,
more students on financial aid and
more students from out-of-state.
� Eastern students are most
likely to live on campus.
� Students leaving their
home state for college tend to head
east or south.
� Black students are the
dominant minority on campuses
in all partsof the United States but
the far West, where they're out-
numbered more than 2-1 by His-
panics and Asian-Americans.
Blacks are more than half the
minority population in the South
and Midwest, 46 percent in the
East but only 15 percent in the
West. Public schools have more
minorities � 17.7 percent than
private colleges � 14.6 percent.
� The Midwest has more
students on financial aid than other
regions of the country. It also has
the highest percentage rate for
accepting applicants at both pub-
lic and private schools.
CCipyngl 1990. USA TOOA1
blowing since early morning to
honor Azerbaijanis killed in the
military assault.
On Sunday, mutinous mili-
tary cadets in Baku reported I v
fired on Soviet troops patrolling
the city, but an announcement by
the local military commander, Lt.
Gen. Anatoly Dubinyak, said the
night had been peaceful. How-
ever, 43 people were detained for
violating the 11 p.m. curfew or not
having proper identity papers,
said thestatement, which was read
on official Baku Radio and moni-
tored by the British Broadcasting
Corp in London.
A political scientist who
teaches at the Azerbaijan Acad-
emy of Sciences, fahun Mulazade,
reported scattered gunfire early
Monday but s.ml Soviet military
forces generally appeared in con-
trol of the city.
Azerbaijani activists claimed
the death toll in the military as-
sault was much higher than the
official figure. Yusif Bagirov, an
attorney and member of an inde-
pendent investigatory commis-
sion created by Baku lawyers,
asserted that LOW civilians were
killed in the district that encom-
passes Baku. 1 le said at least 94
bodies were in coffins borne
through Baku's streets for burial
Monday.
An emergency overnight ses-
sion of the Azerbaijani legislature
demanded the withdrawal of
Soviet armv and Interior Ministry
troops from the republic, with the
exception of border districts with
Armenia, said another Baku law-
yer, Viliyad Mamedov, who at-
tended the 11 12-hour meeting.
Lawmakers also demanded the
lifting of the curfew in Baku, along
with the state of emergency Presi-
dent Mikhail S. Gorbachev de-
clared in much of Azerbaijan one
vvk ago, Maine lov said bv tele-
phone.
See Burial page9
Eagle Cab Co.
Call Us For 24 Mr
Service
Before and after a
festive night. Show us you're
ECU ID and
receive a discount!
757-3687 or 757-1360
I
MAI)
HATTER
MUFFLER
758-2306
& U NKFCFNTFI
1140 Mosk
Welcome Back
ECU Students
Services:
Mufflers
Brakes
Catalytic Converters
Shocks Struts
tit.
Custom I � :
Alignments
U Haul R itals Pick - Up D
State Insp.
not good
10 Students Discount on Services
Excluding State Inspections & l Han F
Located At Greenville Cai Care Center
sM
With Macintosh
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Through January 31, you can save hundreds of dollars on a variety
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Communist leaders defect from E. Germany
HAST BERLIN (AIM In .1 )inn� nmmic (n. KX � ,u . u i i u .1
The East Carolinian, January 2 1990 l
3T BERLIN (AP) hi
move expected to trigger mass
defections, Fast Cermanv's No. 2
Communist has abandoned the
party that ruled last (.ermanv
through intimidation tor -40 years,
and called tor its dissolution.
Sunday's resignations imme-
diately followed aii emergency
meeting ol the embattled v om
munist leadership, which expelled
EgonKrenz, the ousted leader who
opened the Berlin Wall, along with
13 other former Politburo mom
hers, rhey also coincided with a
march by tens ol thousandsofanti
c ommunist protesters across the
border to West German) andba k
Many marchers carried emptv
suitca in the s mbolic exodus
V est c iermanj s AR1) tele i
sion said: 1 he wanted to show
how main people arc read'
leave the country
. ommunist
arc ready to
in case the
'arty remains in
attor parliamentary elec
Funding
power
lions promised for May b.
Wolfgang Berghofer, the
party's deputy chairman since
December and a loading popular
reformer, defected along with 39
other prominent party members
from Dresden, ot which he is
mayor.
In a statement, Berghofer said
the people no longer trust the
( ommunists. "The citizens ot the
German Democratic Republic
mod trust ami courage tor the
future, since tensol thousands are
still leaving their homeland.
I he exodus ot young, skilled
I ast (iermans is leaving the coun-
try short of everything from doc-
tors to factory workers. Some
HI IKX1 East c iermans hav e moved
to West Germany this year, fol-
lowing an exodus of more than
140,000 in 1989.
I hediscreditedCommunists,
w ho dominate the caretaker gov-
ernment that is to step down attor
the Mav vote, are struggling to ottered to change their party's
salvage credibility amid charges name.
thev have resorted to dirtv tricks
in a bid tocling to power. Through
the purges, the Communists ap-
peared to be trying to further dis-
tance themselves from the repres-
sive rule ot Erich Honecker, who
was ousted as party leader on Oct.
18 in a peaceful popular revolt
and replaced by Krenz.
At a day-long meeting that
ended early Sunday thev rejected
demands to disband but offered
the opposition "co-responsibility"
in the government until the May
elections the lirst tree vote in
last German history. It was not
immediately clear whether that
meant the Communists wore ot-
tering the opposition ministen.il
posts mC ommunist Premier 1 lans
Modrow's C abinet. The Commu-
nists also rehabilitated 47 people
punished tor speaking out against
tormcr hard-line leaders and thev
Berghofer, 4b, said in a state
ment broadcast over West (. ,er-
manv's ARD television that heand
theotherdefectors would support
"social democratic" principles I le
is widely reported to be moving to
the opposition Social Democratic
partv.
Three breakaway Communist
(actions are trying to establish
themselves as separate political
forces, and government television
said Berghofer's move put the
party's future in extreme dan-
ger
Berghofer warned ol possible
"de-stabilization" ot the country
and said "wesupport thegrowing
together ol the two( iorman states
within the framework ol European
unity It was unclear whether he
was specifically endorsing (ier-
man reunification.
Continued from page 5
�&

wf
IF YOU'RE MAJORING
IN PREMED, HERE'S
A MAJOR SOURCE
OF SUPPORT.
Uieckuuon Air Von
KUIl - .iiul you'll find tvo- to
�e-ye.ir scholarship programs
that can cover full college tuition, and
most textbooks and fees, while providing
1100 per academic month tax-free
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I KOI BILL PATTON�757-6597
� MJk
Leadership L eBence starts Hen
financial aid office, says Benita
sher 22, a senior at Carnegie
Mellon IW ice she has been bailed
out ol financial crises by her
school sfinam ialaidoffice. In both
cases, the school said department
examined sher sfamilv finances
and assembled aid packages that
v't the financialh strapped stu
dent through sv hool
Learn to use your situation
to our ,o' antage, says Asher, a
French and mathematics major
who w orks part time in the finan-
cial assistance office.
don't be afraid to rcsub-
Barry
mit the aid package ottered it it
diftersfromw hat vou expet t, savs
Jonathan Newton, 21, a senior
historv maiorat Cornell. Just write
a letter explaining the factors vou
think should be considered savs
Newton w ho regularly rcsubmits
Other tips Horn students on
dealing with the finan lal aid ol
fii e and t inane i.il aid forms:
I ook for an aid counselor
with whom you feel comfortable
and who seems knowledgeable
about thesysh m,says I urco. "You
may have to wait longer tor an
appointment but it's worth it
( .et to know your (oun
selor, and let bun or her know
who you are. too. says Younger.
'When scholarships and awards
become available they'll remem
ber vou
lake the time to till out
financial aid terms correctly nd
cet them in early. "Evervhrist-
mas (break1 I take the time to go
over the terms with my parents,
savs Meg Taltv. 21. a senior in
business management and mar-
keting at Cornell "Sometimes it
hike me two. three days
Personally deliver your aid
terms, it possible, as early as pos-
sible and get a receipt showing
they'vebeen received, Furcosavs.
Plan accordingly, savs
Asher Financial aid officescan be
"zoos" during their busiest times
often spring, when thev're fin-
ishing up awards to incoming
freshmen, and summer, when
they're handling awards to return-
ing students
"Remember, noquestion is
stupid says Cornell senior Mi
chael Perry. It you don't under-
stand, "keep asking That's what
they're there tor
��
v- -� .�
Continued from page 5
to the hotel in his limousine with
twobodyguardsaround8 0p m
EST rhursda) and went to the
seventh-floor room to meet with
the woman
I Bl Agent Ronald Stern said
in an affidav it that with a hidden
camera, he saw Barrv buv crack
from the woman, who obtained
thedrugfroman undercover agent
on the scene ! lie mav or then "put
some ot the crack cocaine in a
smoking apparatus, lit the crack
cocaine and smoked it, the affi
davit said.
At that pe Washington
policeand the FBI agents arrested
Barry. 1 le was taken to FBI head
quarters tor court-ordered blood
and urine testing, and he submit
ted hair samples
Attor the hearing, barrv re-
fused to answer questions ,nd
si ply said, "I'm going to leave here
and go about the business of gov-
ernment. '
Barry recently visited public
schools urging students to stav
away trom drugs. (. )n Friday, at a
S hool he visited last month, there
was contusion and anger.
1 know the mayor couldn't
o'o something like that because he
came to our school and told us not
to do drue.s. s.iui tenellc Stubbs,
8, a third-grader at Randle 1 ligh-
lands Elementary School in south-
east Washington.
Car la Davis, 11, a sixth-grader
at Randle, said: "1 letold us that he
didn't use drue.s. and a month
later, he s in his hotel building
USinc them It s sad. I le told us a
I
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SPECIALS
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Served Monday thru Friday
11 am lil 3 pm
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757-1666
Join Sigma Nu
and be on a
Winning Team
in the
Nineties!
Sigma Nu Offers:
� Tradition
� Leadership
� Intramural Sports
� Brotherhood
� Over 200 Chapters
Internationally
� Student Government
� Social Activities
� Greek Life
� No Hazing
� Over 130,000 Members
Internationally
IN
-mm
m
m
mm
mm
Pat Riley
Sigma Nu
RUSH: January 22, 23, 24 &
TIME: 8:00-11:00 p.m.
CALL: 752-9607
For information & rides





Communist leaders defect from E. Germany
The East Carolinian, January 23, 1990 9
EAST BERLIN (AP - - In a
move expected to trigger mass
defections, East Germany's No. 2
Communist has abandoned the
party that ruled East Germany
through intimidation tor 4(1 years,
and called for its dissolution
Sunday's resignations imme-
diately followed an emergency
meeting of the embattled Com-
munist leadership, which expeHed
Egon Kfertl, the ousted leader who
opened the Berlin Wall, along with
13 other former Politburo mem-
ber. They also coincided with a
march by tens of thousands of anti-
Communist protesters across the
border to West Germa ny and back
Many marchers carried empty
suitcases in the sy mbolic exodus.
West Germany's AKP televi-
sion said: They vsanted to show
how many people are ready to
leave the country in case the
Communist Tarty remains in
power" after parliamentary elec-
Funding
tions promised for Mav 6.
Wolfgang Berghofer, the
party's deputy chairman since
December and I leading popular
reformer, defected along with 34
other prominent partv members
from Dresden, of which he is
mayor.
In a statement, Berghofer said
the people no longer trust the
Communists: "The citizens of the
German Democratic Republic
need trust and courage for the
future, since tens of thousands are
still leaving their homeland
The exodus of young, skilled
East Germans is leaving the coun-
try short of everything from doc-
tors to factory workers. Some
0.lXX) East Germans have moved
to West Germany this vear, fol-
lowing an exodus of more than
340,000 in 1989.
The discredited Communists,
who dominate the caretaker gov-
ernment that is to step down after
the May vote, are struggling to
salvage credibility amid charges
they have resorted to dirty tricks
in a bid to cling to power. Through
the purges, the Communists ap-
peared to be trying to further dis-
tance themselves from the repres-
sive rule of Erich Honecker, who
was ousted as partv leader on Oct.
18 m a peaceful popular revolt
and replaced bv Krenz.
At a day-long meeting that
ended early Sunday they rejected
demands to disband but offered
theopposition "co-responsibility"
in the government until the Mav
elections � the first free vote in
East German history It was not
immediately clear whether that
meant the Communists were ot-
tering the opposition ministerial
posts in Commu rist Premier Hans
Modrow's Cabinet. The Commu-
nists also rehabilitated 47 people
punished tor speaking out against
former hard-line leaders and they
offered to change their party's
name.
Berghofer, 46, said in a state-
ment broadcast over West Ger-
many's ARDtelevision that he and
the other defectors would support
"social democratic" principles. He
is widely reported to be moving to
the opposition Social Democratic
partv.
Three breakaway Communist
factions are trying to establish
themselves as separate political
forces, and government television
sud Berghofer's move put the
party's future in "extreme dan-
ger
Berghofer warned of possible
"destabilization" of the country
and said "wesupport the growing
together of the two German states
within theframeworkol European
unity It was unclear whether he
was specifically endorsing (.er-
man reunification.
Continued from page 5
�&

HP I
IF YOU'RE MAJORING
IN PREMED, HERE'S
A MAJOR SOURCE
OF SUPPORT.
RUTC - and you II find two- to
three-year scholarship programs
that can cover full college tuition, and
most textbooks and fees, while providing
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Check M out (all
LTCOL BII.I. PATTON�757-6597
�fch
I etdtnNfi Eacdhnce SMM Her
financial aid office, says Benita
Asher. 22, a senior at amegie-
Mellon. Fwice she has been bailed
out of financial crises by her
school s financial aid office. In both
cases, the school S aid department
examined Asher'sfamil) finances
and assembled aid packages that
got the financially strapped stu-
dent through S heel
learn to Use your situation
to your advantage says Asher. a
French and mathematics major
who works part time in the finan-
cial assistance office.
And don't be afraid to resub-
Barry
mil the aid package ottered it it
differs from what you expect, says
lonathan Newton, 21. a senior
history major at Cornell, lust write
.i letter explaining the factors you
think should be considered, says
Newton, who regularly resubmits.
Other tips from students on
dealing with the financial aid of-
fice and financial aid forms:
1 (Hk for an aid counselor
with whom you feel comfortable
and who seems knowledgeable
about the system, snsTurco. 'You
may have to wait longer tor an
appointment, but it's worth it
Get to know your coun-
selor, and let him or her know
who you are, too. says Younger.
"When scholarships mu awards
become available, they'll remem-
ber you
lake the time to till out
financial aid forms correctly ,nd
gel them in early. "Every Christ-
mas (break) 1 take the time to go
over the forms with my parents
says Meg Tally, 21, a senior in
business management and mar-
keting at Cornell. "Sometimes it
take me two, three davs
Personally deliver your aid
forms, if possible, as early as pos-
sible and get a receipt showing
they've boon received,Turcosays.
Plan accordingly, says
Asher Financial aid officescanbe
"ZOOS" during their busiest times
often spring, when they're fin-
ishing up awards to incoming
freshmen, and summer, when
they're handling awards to return-
ing students.
� "Remember, no question is
stupid says Cornell senior Mi-
chael Perry. If you don't under-
stand, "keep asking. That's what
they're there for
H �pynfta i�M usa roD n
Continued from page
to the hotel in his limousine with
two bodyguards around 8:30p.m.
FST Thursday and went to the
seventh-floor room to meet with
the woman.
FBI Agent Ronald Stern said
in an affidavit thai with a hidden
camera, he saw Barry buy crack
from the woman, who obtained
the drug from an undercover agent
onthescene. rhemayoi .hen "put
some of the crack cocaine in a
smoking apparatus, lit the crack
cocaine and smoked it the affi-
davit said.
At that pofnl Washington
police and the FBI agents arrested
Barry. He was taken to FBI head-
quarters tor court-ordered blood
and urine testing, and he submit-
ted hair samples.
After the hearing, barry re-
fused to answer questions andf
siplv said, "I'm going to leave here
and go about the business of gov-
ernment"
Harry recently visited public
schools urging students to stay
awav from drugs On Friday, at a
school he visited last month, there
was contusion and anger.
"I know the mayor couldn't
do something like that because he
came to our school and told us not
to 3o drugs, s,nd lenelle Stubbs,
8, a third-grader at Randle High-
lands Elementary School in south-
east Washington.
(. aria Davis, 11,a sixth-grader
at Randle, said: "He told us that he
didn't use drugs, and a month
later, he's in his hotel building
using thorn It s s.id. He told us a
lie " .� a- � �'� ii? i top �.�
in
LUNCH
SPECIALS
$3.95
Served Monday thru Friday
11 am til 3 pm
the taste of old flMXlCd
757-1666
Join Sigma Nu
and be on a
Winning Team
in the
Nineties!
Sigma Nu Offers:
� Tradition
� Leadership
� Intramural Sports
� Brotherhood
� Over 200 Chapters
Internationally
� Student Government
� Social Activities
� Greek Life
� No Hazing
� Over 130.000 Members
Internationally
Pat Riley
Sigma Nu
RUSH: January 22, 23, 24 & 25
TIME: 8:00-11:00 p.m.
CALL: 752-9607
For information & rides






10 1 he I .ist Carolinian, l.inu.ir, 23, ll'�0
Iran-Contra
Continued from page 4
Scandal, his apparent support tor
the biggest political scam since
Watergate and the biggest of the
Reagan era, now seems undem
able. It proven guilt he will be
number 111 on the list ol Reagan
Bush otti. i � ti.� e been
charged with ii on i ted ot
unethu i; r ill duct. His
punishnrM nt ' � nothing less
than immediatr imp a� hment
Sadh itkK thai ttor
ne ienihihornburgh
George �'�� rsonal ap
pomteik the use of
classified dotsVfr I'oinJ.A
tor will �rttial to Ins
ilj'N'IlM 1 111! describe the
informal usiti e" to
rev e ilpens, the
charges on the grounds tli.it the
defendant cannot be accofded .i
fair trial (I his is what happened
with Rodriguez forced ihs
niiss.il ot tin- Poindexter i:ase will
lea c North .is the only scapegoat
left bush will be breathing easy
again, .it least for .i while No one
in Congress seems to have the
ha kbone or power to restrain,
mu h lessconv ict, a corrupt presi-
dent
In early 1988, with sights sot
solely on the presidency, Bush
began waxing patriotic on
Ameican flags .hh1 vowed to sign
.i bill requiring teachers to lead
their students in the Pledge of AI
legiance Ibis dramatic promise
indicated th.it bush wasv tiling to
and defend tt�e onstitution 1 ho
bitter irony of the Iran Contra arms
scandal is that George Bush h.is
probably done more to Wemish
the integrity of the Constitution
than .in other president in U.S.
histor
George Bush s mani uis ol
nationalism coupled with his
exoneration ol the � hinese ilu i.i
torship and his willingness to
blithely deceive the America
public,are .ill be p.irt of .i creeping
fascism of the U.S iikIhi.iI and
political system rhe Far Right is
getting too t.ir out I bus t.ir. they
have succeeded in painting the
Ir.m Contra affiar in terms of
whether the .u tions by the Reagan
.niniinstr.ition constituted mis
violate his solemn oath to support takes or crimes Iho Right's con
tompt for democracy and law has
made the U.S. government unac-
countable to either Congressor the
public.
Many Americans seem to have
forgotten the whole Iran-Contra
mess. Others just can't seem to
forget, no matter how hard they
try it's ust too degrading to see
our own government poisoning
foreign policy and telling one
mistruth after another. By his own
ongoing deception. Bush may
unwittingly be sowing the seeds
torhisowndemiseand for another
American revolution. I'll bet 'ole
George Washington is rolling in
his grave.
This B the third of a four part
Biak burning series. Next "George
Push. Anti Environmentalist
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost Pregnancy
Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling
For further Information, call 738-0444
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Iimtuss the ioi.uo nissiMouuio.iui iosuj.im i i.iki's or . rimes i no iio,m s nu � ���
North Carolina faces revenue shortfalls
KM V P) i en
though legislators can expeef to
t.u e i veniu shortfalls totalling
$283 million hen the return tor
the short session in May, a 6fo
increase is not :ioit.ible. top
Km makers sa
Mam the p.ist we
have had shot M i jnd er time
we have dcall w ith them s ihoul
raising the sti state S
president : i ison Bar
nes . I a group ol
now �, : � N 'h
�:i. a ' ' �
Winter Institute on I rul.n
I Jon t think it is .m me i
�table step he said
1 louse Speaker loo Ma retu
IVfcdgtx ombe, also speaking af the
meeting agnvd
Eccmomists working tor Ke
publican (kv im Martin ire
puiii ting a $170 million shortfall
in the General Fund by une 0,
w ith .i $25 million shortfall in the
Highway Fund and .i shortage of
�s"0 million in .i spe ial fund e.ir
marked tor a $q billion r.vul on
mi tion p.i. kage
vfa retu s.iui the state sshare
ot the sales tax h.is not changed
since 1933, despite efforts b) the
I louse and Martin to increase the
tax by one ent List year I he state
Senate,citing the five centincrcase
in gasoline taxes and .i sales tax.
mi rcase on ear sales, rejet ted the
one cent increase.
"On the House, we were e
tremely disappointed with the
Senate position on the one-cent
sales tax uu rease and I thmk what
vou reseeingnoM are theprover
bial . hu kens i oming home to
roost Mavretic said.
House Minority Leader
lohnathan Rhyne, R-Lincoln, said
ho was not sure how the General
Assembly would deal with the
shortfall if the projections prove
correct.
"1 think something is inevi-
table, either big cuts or something
else Rhvne said. "Something is
inevitable, but I'm just not sure
what it is vet
Martin and Republican Lt
( ,ov Iim Gardner were invited to
join the pan but did not respond
to the tn itation
4
yPtmne
c
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Getting the engagement ring she ants is vuihin your
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Lebanese president awarded Syrian honor
� i ' r
. '� �

ianhoi il1 ' : after
� -�n in
1 ebainGen. Mit hel
Aoun �' ' i 1 v'llt
slittis i le led
preN
the I .ebanesegoN ernment requests
to implement an rab i eao.no
spons,red pe.u e plan toend i eba-
non s i year � 'Id i il war I le
did not elaborate bul il was a
i leai � to Syria . idmg
is ami tanks to help 1 haw i
asserl his3 nl s.o.ithont
over the t. hristian n lave con
trolled b) oun
1 he general refuses to rtvog
nan
ni
Ir.m lor hisi
-rnment and
an Arab 1 eague mandate
( emmenl run 1 amas us
Radio said ssad also awardetl
medals to 1 ebanon sprimeminis
tor. Salim HoSS, and Parliament
Speaker (lussein I lusseini during
the ivremonv at the presidi I " il
pai,e It did not s,i whv the
awards were made, but the three
1 ebanese leaders head a Syrian
backed government thai has en-
doTsedthe rabl eaguepeaieplan
Syria's "brotherly" position on
Lebanon and the cooperation be-
tween the two countries and
thanked Svna for "the help it has
ottered to Lebanon
Hnwi aide Mav Kahaleh said
Irawi and Assad discussed how
to tighten control of Lebanon's
borders to prevent non-Lebanese
entering the country. She did not
elaborate, but she was apparently
referring to Yasser Arafat's Pales-
13 ct. Marquise
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Sale SI 200.
iibtaiu
;
effort
I s,)j as has branded them Syrian pup
tSvi pare no pots Syria has an estimated
tance I 000 troops m 1 ebanon under
that shifts political power to the tinian guerrillas, who have rees-
Moslem majorit) taWished bases in south Lebanon,
the radio said Hrawi hailed and are sympathetic to Aoun's
ause
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Behind C Herher Forbes

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Thurs. Jan 25. 1990. 8:00 Hendrix Theatre
FREE Student Tickets Available in Advance
at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
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10 The Fast Carolinian, January 23, l$90
Iran-Contra
Continued from page 4
Scandal, his apparent support tor
tho biggest political scam since
Watergate and the biggest of the
Reagan era. now seems undeni-
able. It proven guilty, he will be
number 111 on the list of Reagan-
Bush officials v ho have been
charged with or convicted of
unethical or illegal conduct. His
punishment should be nothing less
than immediate impeachment.
Sadly, it is likely that Attor-
ney General Pick Ihomburgh
Ceorge Bush's personal ap-
pointee will block the use of
classified documents Mr. Poindex
tor will claim aic essential to his
defense I lu-v will describe the
information , too sensitive to
reveal When this happens, the
judge will have to dismiss the
charges on the grounds that the
defendant cannot bo accorded a
tair tnal. (This is what happened
with Rodriguez.) A forced dis-
missal of the Poindexter case will
leave North as the only scapegoat
left. Hush will be breathing easy
again, at least tor a while. No one
in Congress seems to have the
backbone or power to restrain,
much loss convict, a corrupt presi-
dent.
In early I9&B, with sights set
solely on the presidency, Bush
began waxing patriotic on
Ameican flags and vowed to sign
a bill requiring teachers to lead
their students in the Pledge of Al-
legiance. This dramatic promise
indicated that bush was willing to
violate his solemn oath to support
and defend the Constitution. The
bitter irony of'the Iran-Contra arms
scandal is that George Bush has
probably done more to blemish
the integrity of the Constitution
than any other president in U.S.
history.
George Bush's manic airs of
nationalism, coupled with his
exoneration of the Chinese dicta-
torship and his willingness to
blithely deceive the American
public, are all be part of a creeping
fascism of the U.S. judicial and
political system. The Far Right is
getting too far out. Thus far, they
have succeeded in painting the
Iran-Contra affiar in terms of
whether the actions bv the Reagan
adminstration constituted mis-
takes or crimes. The Right's con-
tempt for democracy and law has
made the U.S. government unac-
countable to either Congress or the
public.
Many Americanssecmtohavc
forgotten the whole Iran-Contra
mess. Others just can't seem to
forget, no matter how hard they
try�it's just too degrading to see
our own government poisoning
foreign policy and telling one
misrruth after another. By his own
ongoing deception, Bush may
unwittingly be sowing the seeds
for his own demise and for another
American revolution. I'll bet 'ole
George Washington is rolling in
his grave.
This is the third of a four-part
Bush-burning series. Next: "George
Bush: Anti-Environmentalist"
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Pregnancy
Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling
For further Information, call 738-0444
(toll free number: 1-800-532-5384) Between 9 am and 5 pm
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH WEEK OF PREGNANCY
f
North Carolina faces revenue shortfalls
DURHAM (AP) Icon
though legislators can expect to
face revenue shortfalls totalling
$283 million when they return for
the short session in May, a Kb.
increase is not inevitable, top
lawmakers s,w
Main times in the past we
Winter Institute on Friday.
"1 don't think it is an inevi-
table step he said.
1 louse Speaker )oe Mavretic,
l&jgccombe, also speaking at the
mxletmg. agreed.
Economists working for Re-
publican Gov. im Martin are
have had shortialls.ando.crvUme. prcting a $170 million shortfall
we hao dealt with them without
raising the sales tax state Senate
president pro temp 1 lenson Bar-
nes. D-Wayne, told a group of
newspaper editors ,it the Nfnth
Carolina Press ssociSffcil V!id�
ini. the General Fund by lune 30,
with a $25 million shortfall in the
lighway Fund and a shortage of
$90 million in a special fund ear
marked tor a $u billion road con-
struction package.
Mavretic said the state's share
of the sales tax has not changed
since 1933, despite efforts bv the
House and Martin to increase the
tax by one cent last year. The state
Senate, citing the five-cent increase
in gasoline taxes and a sales tax
increase on car sites, rejected the
one-cent increase.
"On the House, we were ex-
tremely disappointed with the
Senate position on the one-cent
sales tax increase and 1 think what
you're seeing now are the prover-
bial chickens coming home to
roost Mavretic said.
House Minority Leader
Johnathan Rhyne, R-Lincoln, said
he was not sure how the General
Assembly would deal with the
shortfall if the projections prove
correct.
"I think something is inevi-
table, either big cuts or something
else Rhyne said. "Something is
inevitable, but I'm just not sure
what it is yet
Martin and Republican Lt.
Gov. Jim Gardner were invited to
join the panel, but did not respond
to the invitation.
4
Uouz Alarnona Jbtc &
Jhat aue.i. ijou.
LOVE FOR LESS
Getting the engagement ring she wants is within your
reach. We've got many different cuts and sizes in
contemporary and traditional settings. All of the
highest quality and the best values possible.
Lebanese president awarded Syrian honor
PAM.W I S. svTinf,r
President I late AssadonSunday
awarded I .ebanese I 'resident Elias
Hrawi with Syria's highest civil-
ian honor, the Medal of Merit.after
talks on how to end a rebellion in
I ebanonby ChristianGon. Michel
Aoun
It was 1 Irawi s first visit out-
side Lebanon since he was elected
president in November.
c io ernment spokesman
(ibrane Kourieh quoted Assad as
pledging that Syria "v ill spare no
effort to provide any assistance"
meLebanese government requests
tii implement an Arab league-
sponsored peace plan to end Leba-
non's 14-year-old civil war He
did not elaborate, but it was a
clear reference to Syria providing
troops and tanks to help Hrawi
assert his government's authority
over the Christian enclave con-
trolled by Aoun.
1 he general refuses to recog-
nize 1 Irawior his government and
has branded them Svnan pup-
pets Syria has an estimated
40.1XH) troops in Lebanon under
an Arab League mandate.
Government-run Damascus
Radio said Assad also awarded
medals to Lebanon's prime minis-
tor, Salim Hoss, and Parliament
Speaker 1 lussein Husseini during
the ceremony at the presidential
palace. It did not sav why the
awards were made. But the three
Lebanese leaders head a Syrian-
backed government that has en-
dorsed the Arab League peace plan
that shifts political power to the
Moslem majority.
The radio said Hrawi hailed
Svna's "brotherly" position on
Lebanon and the cooperation be-
tween the two countries and
thanked Syria for "the help it has
offered to Lebanon
Hrawi aide May Kahaleh said
Hrawi and Assad discussed how
to tighten control of Lebanon's
borders to prevent non-Lebanese
entering the country. She did not
elaborate, but she was apparently
referring to Yasser Arafat's Pales-
tinian guerrillas, who have rees-
tablished bases in south Lebanon,
and are sympathetic to Aoun's
cause.
Loose
Marquise
.58 ct
$1995.
13 ct. Marquise
Sale $1250.
13 ct. Pear
Sale $1200.
Loose
Round
.62 ct.
$2695.
13 ct. Oval 12 ct. Round
Sale $1195. Sale $1100.
Student ARLINGTON VILLAGE
Accounts 355- 5090
Welcome Behind C. Herber Forbes
Expert
Repair
Service
STUDENT UNION
and videota
Wednesday, Januan
LRST CRUSH
Fri r- Sun Jan. 26 - 28
All Movies Screen 8 pm Hendrix"
1USH '90
EADEROFTHE90'S
Pageant of Britain
Travel Adventure Film
Thurs. Jan 25, 1990, 8:00 Hendrix Theatre
FREE Student Tickets Available in Advance
at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
U.S. College
Comedy
Competition
How to Become The Funniest College
Student In America In Three Minutes
� Prepare a hilarious 3 minute comedy routine
(clean, of course!)
� Win your campus competition
� Be judged best in the USA by Jerry Seinfield,
National Judge
call 757-4715 for more details
Tuesday, January 23 in Social Room, Mendenhall
Time: Competitors 7:00, Audience 8:00
Sponsored by Student Union Special Events Committee and Certs
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
MENDENHALL MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
JANUARY 22 - 25
8:00-11:00
TONIGHT: CASINO NIGHTPIZZA
WEDNESDAY: THETA CHI NIGHT
FOOD AND DRINK
THURSDAY: INVITATION ONLY
PARTY WITH SORORITY
For More Information and rides
Call: 752-8002 or 830 - 6954





Page 11
Features
January 23,1990
Art exhibits support of
Amnesty International
By Suzan 1 awler
Stafi Wntoi
liVexhibitionisco-sponsored Declaration o( Human Rights,
b the V isual rts ommittee ol signed .it the I nited Nations by
the Student Union and the Ireen- ugoslavia in 1 Hxember ol 1948,
lo lv fully human is to work ville chapter ol I'ho Greenville guarantees to everyone the right
tor the common good Phis chapter is headi II 'avid mes, to fretxlomot expression and opin
i local psychiatrist 'on (Article 19), the right to free
Phe local l chapter along orn � peaceful assembh and
with othei � mnd the association (Article 20) and the
a l.worksto � prisoners ol right to take part in the govern
jonscience men women and ment of his country (Article 21)
hildn � leh tor Approximateh 72 students havi
� � . � signed the petition at n sent
I In ,ii I . vill hi- .it
M e n d en h a 11 u n t i 1 a n ' i. . �
ip vl th the a rt d , t here is infor
� � � live pris mationavailal � t Alandh
� � trom hist lM Ihi In n
. ' � �� �
rrenth Ames encourages all win are
vorkine I liai. a ;nlt rested to join the tin en ille
chaptei roup meets
� � . i . , every 41 h Wed mtl
to sign on 1,st l i,v n ! tu'
. . . . . , , next
phrase ison ,i painting don
mnest International b t. o
I orita along with ' �
international artists , n .tic,
worksofartfor l ! n
graphii s in 1 thi
il n wasawai
Prize
nrrenth it
the second fl I ' ' I
theme rt nl
- art' all
.
bv R nd poi
h depicting i mai
'�'�'� " ��.�.�- ty International art exhibil Mendenhall 1 he
exhibit will be I fl ivailal rmal howl I j il hotob
iflhitmin � � � ii
Naugahydehihuahuas play a the New 1 ejj
Band gives solid performance
l left Parkei
Staff Writer
.
U i
r asK someoni I
� � � mse you miss
hihuahi
i) so that name is a
. , . . , .
� isilvtoui '
clul
. was small th I 11 I
. ! performam e wort
pa(ked house
Rather thai l( f '
� i ith the ii
� i
I
a ith the bassist f'oi
iking each sun strong
- thm w ith a bit ol reserv i I
ipt - � present tin.mghoul In
othei i irds, you an dan i l
evervl ing thehihuahuas plav,
11 : ' '� � .tupid
I hi' fourth mem he i ol
. dehihuahuas is Ion
I oth. hand ke b ardist I oth s
both Minns
� � : �, tent no d iuhl due to hei
trail �� issical Mane �
I rangi I work fits the band well, and never
front man he i : the rest
irgeh to Robvn Hitchcock ments as man kevbcai I i layers
' ' : vim tin- arc prone to do
�� ii departmenl is drummer Naugahvdehihuahuas arc
redd c in during a tight and clean-sounding band,
i m a
If And
Pai Red . � I il f"he Fizz Saturday enticing the crowd with solid hiqh-energy rock and roll The band
an Dave R e Wynn Britt, Michael Jordan and Maurice Mangum Magnum celebrated his
I rthday iturday with the performance
Paris Red rocks The Fizz
with Amazing Grace
��� v � . . 7. mIKi.l,n�.�. ) 4.
By Deanna Nevgloski
Mat t Writer
moved his fingers up and down the fretsol hisguitar
His technique is straight forward, set melodic He
showed the crowd that he could sim as well as play
the guitar, when he shared vocals onhuck Berry's
classic ' 'Johnny H Goode
Rose and Pntt make up the rhythm section ol the
band With a smooth, melodic bass player and a
loud, rhythmic basher, it's no wonder Tans Red can
n Saturday it was a night ol metal, magic and
! ma hem al 1 he I izz v hen Pans Red pumped up the
ir first show in (Ireenville.
fti i their original performance date in Decem-
ber v, is cancelled dwe to bad weather conditions
n.i-isi, .mv inniu l'11ini , ll 1IU' WUIIUCI I a I IS leU CdU
I ans Red proved to the excited Fizz crowd that their pK)v g inkvtl(�js musk thtlt ktv tho maqic
is well worth the wail flowing and the crowds rockin'
1 his Raleigh based spandex ,i quartet is Paris Rod Mmrmxl ollt sonu. heavv cover5 hke
dian Maurice Mangum, "King of Kings" by Barren Cross, "Follow Me" by
��� nnBntt.l isstst Dave Rose and guitar- Massand Makes Me Wanna Sing" by Stryper.Origi-
rdan nals like Tonight which is in heavy rotation on
Red s consisted ol a confec- WZMB, and "All Eyes On Him" proved to be big
' noli er ! Miielodu, hook laden, pop metal tunes crowd pleasers j
" '�T�hP crowd moving all night long. ParisRedended thefun-fillednight withazzed-
Mai . otonh entertainedthehungrycrowd up verskn oi "Amazing Grace They added the
�� dible harmonious vocal range, but he nvtijl touch to he sont, that had the crowd ,
� it his innocent jokesand off- with Mangum in perfect sync.
wM stafic ,mtK s With songs from the heart and down-to-earth
� ted his 20th birthday Sal attitudes, Paris Red had no problems winning over
� night can bell out some of the highest vocal the f .crowd If you like solid, high-energy rock-n-
thissideol Eastern North Carolina. He mllwithalotofvocalharmoniesthenParisRedisthe
ed Stryper s To Hell With The Devil" per- Pilnj tosee
reded in originals In
I . i hmk I'm 1 ailing
displayed Ins ability as he flawlessly
I or information on up-and-coming shows in the
Eastern North Carolina area, call Dave Rose at iuW)
7s 1-7997
Students participate in telethon
thi ' urf1 numbers and did a mean
See Band, page 12
By kirstin lakes
st.it! Writer
A telethon par's Sunda) al
I he Plaza raised - tor I nited
. crebral Palsv, $720ot whu h was
donated b ts o E( I fraternities.
Pi Kappa Phi ga e $6( I to the
charity, and Alpha Sigma Phi
donated $120 the fraternities
presidents presented their dona
tions on RQR whi h bread, ast
live from I he Plaza.
Thomas Walters. 11 Kappa Phi
president,said: "1 think thetrater-
nitv. through helping others will
benefit. It brings out hidden tal-
ents
Another Pi Kapp Randy
Ro al. said 'We lust went around
to the girls dorms and asked for
dnations And lots ot brothers
made personal donations
The fraternities also collected
money from local businesses like
Chico's, Charley-Csand Ratters
W11' televised the L'CPTele-
thon, targeting Pastern North
Carolina as well as Greenville.
David .Allen served as Master of
i eremonies.
1 he telethon part) featured a
variety of entertainment Suzuki
Violins,a magic and balloon show.
folk music, Panama Steeleand the
EC t Pure Cold Dancers
Fund Raising Coordinator
Sybil Shirley commented on the
participation of E( I f's groups: "1
thmk it's wonderful, rhey (frater-
nity members) have been here all
See Palsy, page 14
Lexicon
Mushrooming
For the week
Ol l22f()
' boal mil
spue. I' display
nrk A boast. p
( w himsev. I ' test
ed A e il; B leun.
I substitute. I ' pn � �
4 (.hi.it A register; B l(
rruption; D. Mil
5 Quader A toconfon
starved; C to thrust, D shahb
n Quadriga A i harii ��
rert t, SpOked � ! ' � I. I '
rcprodui Ii -
ran I
lance;
de i e D. to hand
phenoid A a I
, it tin n � i uremen
�.��� dg shap i
9 stob A to hide; B lo tart
( to pierce; I' non i i �
10. I anna A beautiful
. man, H potato stan h I
metal. I' wistful though!
The art of sleeping in class is perfected
hv John I in ker
Assist.ml I iMluris I dilm
� :�� th
ire vai ii us human dis�r
(hat affect behavior (ne
' � thai is often
irra .ing, i an be observ ed
daily I his attln don known by
man � 11 � riem ed it
� � , � � dlv b
of us ittending ECU It is
�: i I � ' � i nlyknownas
Mi. m iremonydiffi n nttyp
�ol- : , an. I
1 � i � �
tiia rii nders oi the ill)
I ttldbntsloi all and under
! this pet ubar infirmity,
pra � i ' � inexpert) ��� ill revi al
i I. , I � � immon i harai teris-
tii s .n different varieties �t this
phen imena
I he tirst type ot napping dis
. ird r t - immon to many ECU stu
dent .is hangover related napping,
w huh usually occurs toward the
end of the weei
i he ommon form this ari
et takes is the red ej ed student
v ho stumbles into . 1 a S .five to ten
minutes late reeking ol alcohol.
Wearinga hat,last night'�rumpled
clothes, and carrying a slightly tom
notebook he or she has jus! found
m the garbage, the student pro
ceedsto his or her normal plai ein
i lass and stumbles into the chair
tin usually oicupy
(iu cMated. most students try
t �save face with the professor and
light the oncoming affliction I or
about 15 minutes an un U( i essful
attempt to a attention and not
let their heads rest on the desk is
made I hen, ust when they think
they've made it, the head falls and
they're oul i old
( Mher .Indents v. a itc n. i tune
in attaining the wanted repose
Immediate!) upon entering the
classn 'om their head, tallsijiiu kly
and iingracelully In the awaiting
desktop, resembling the way thev
often leave E I .
The next tvjx- ot affliction
common in most students is one
usually brought on bv unsuspect-
ing circumstances. A few ot these
i ircumstanccs are a large lunch, a
warm room, a three hour class, or
a dull lecture by a professor speak-
ing in monotone.
All of these circumstances
lead the students to become com-
fortable and drowsy, as their
minds and bodies turn to jeiloand
they become victims of the strange
napping disorder
The resulting phenomena is
more commonly referred to as the
nodding nap I he nodding nap
entails the act ol sitting straight up
with a pen m hand while main-
taining diret I eye contact with the
professor
This direct eve contact with
the professor is broken in a con-
tinuous flow, as the student bends
his or her head toward the desk to
write down notes recorded in a
Special napci de resembling Egyp-
tian hieroglyphics, the student
quickly catches a 4 second nap.
This variety almost always
ends with the student breaching
eyecontact and overex tending nap
time by a minute or more. Most
students are cured of this variety
oi napping when a professor notes
the end ot the shitty-eyed contact
and calls on the student, instantly
embarrassing him or her in front
of the class
Another variety of the nod-
ding nap occurs when students
rests their heads on the palm of
their hands, tutielv attempting to
hold the weight of their heads up.
This is done to fool the professor
and the rest of the class into think-
ing they are awake. The usual
result of this variety is a continual
nodding-type action, as the
student's fare repeatedly slips off
the hand.
The end to napping comes
when the student lapses into a
deep slumber causing the chin to
fall heavily off the palm. The chin
applies a forceful movement to
the arm which then causes the
elbow to knock a stack of books to
thefloor. Thebooksofcourse, were
strategically placed, to hide the
napping student from the profes-
sor.
Following this, immediate
attention is brought to the napper
and the violator more than often
will not display chronic napping
tendencies for at least the rest ot
the day.
Sleeping with the mouth open
is perhaps the most grotesque
form of napping in class disorder.
This form of the disorder is al-
most always aceompained by a
streaming flow of saliva. This
comes to rest in the open book or
on theclothesof an of fender, ready
for inspection and a quick wipe
when the napper awakens.
See Naps, page 12





Site iEaat (Earoltnfan
Page 11
Features
January 23,1990
Ar exhibits support of
Amnesty International
By Suzan Lavvler
Staff Writer
"To bo fullv human is to work
for the common good This
phrase is on a painting donated to
Amnesty International bv Corita.
Corita, along with 1 other
international artists, created 2h
works ot art tor AI Al received the
graphics in 1977, the year the or-
ganization wasawarded the Nobel
Peace Prize.
Since then, the artwork has
toured the country. I he exhibi-
tion is currently at Eastarolina
on the second floor ot Mcnden-
dall.
The theme oi the art exhibi-
tion is "Prisoners ot (. onsciem o "
I'hev are all moving and master
ful creations. "Speech I Jestroyed"
by Roland Topor is anoffset litho-
graph depicting a man whose
mouth is being sledgehammered
oil his face.
rhe exhibition is co-sponsored
by the Visual Arts Committee of
the Student Union and the Green-
ville chapter of At. TheGreenville
chapter is headed by David Ames,
a local psychiatrist
The local Al chapter, along
with other chapters around the
world, works to help prisoners of
conscience, "men. women, and
children imprisoned solely for
their beliefs, rate, or ethnic origin
who have neither used nor advo-
cated violent c
10 date, the I .reenvillc chap-
ter has helped to release five pris-
oners of conscience from hast
Germany, Sudan, South Korea,
andCamaroon. I heyarecurrently
working to aid Avduttah I ohaj, a
prisoner in ugoslavia.
At the exhibition, there is a
petition tor people to sign on
Lohafsbehalf that will be sent to
the government ol Kosovo. I he
petition states, I he Universal
Declaration of Human Rights,
signed at the United Nations by
Yugoslavia in December of 1948,
guarantees to everyone the right
to freedom of expression and opin-
ion (Article 14), the right to free-
dom of peaceful assembly and
association (Article 20), and the
right to take part in the govern
ment of his country (Article 21).
Approximately 72 students have
signed the petition at present.
The art exhibition will be at
Mendenhall until Ian. 27. Along
with the art display, there is infor-
ms tionavailable about Aland how
to join the organization.
Ames encourages .ill who are
interested to )om the Greenville
chapter of Al. The group meets
every 4th Wednesday of the month
atSt. Paul's Episcopal church. The
next meeting is scheduled for an.
24 at s p.m. Everyone is welcome
to attend
'
A student views some of the artworks displayed at the Amnesty International art exhibit in Mendenhall. The
exhibit will be held until Jan 27. Also available is information on how to join the organization (Photo by J D
Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
Naugahyde Chihuahuas play at the New Deli
Band gives solid performance
By Jeff Parker
Stjff Writer
It you were one ot the main
people not at the New Deli this
past Thursday night, then kick
yourself (or ask someone to do it
for you) because you missed the
Naugahyde Chihuahuas.
Okay, so that name is a httk-
hard to digest, but listen for it so '
you won't miss them the next time
they're in town. The Chihuahuas
are a four-man progressive band
from Raleigh with a professional
sound not easily found in the local I
V clubs Though the crowd at the
Deli was small, the band gave a
solid performance worthy of a
I packed house.
Rather than pander to the
audience with the easy appeal of
doing raostiytovver tunes, the
Chihuahtias played Several origi-
nal songs including "Tell Me
Words "Recoil and "Blinding
Time. One of thv most memo
rahle nuuibers was "Empty
Room The Kind did perform a
few covers however, going to reli-
ables like The Cure and Wire for
material.
I he lead sijiger ett Anderson
doubled as guitar player, doing a
good job-with' both positions.
Anderson has kn actual singing
voice, rat her thai a shouting voice,
and shows a good range with it.
I or his influence as a front man he
looks largely to Robvn I litchcock.
Also not to be slighted in the
vocal department is drummer
Freddy fortes, whocamein during
the 'ure numbers and did a mean
lohn I.vdon during a Public Ini
age Limited cover, lones works
well with the bassist Tom Mills,
making each song strong in
rhythm with a bit of reserved
funkiness present throughout. In
other words, you can dance to
everything the Chihuahuas plav,
and not feel stupid.
The fourth member of
Naugahyde Chihuahuas is l.ori
loth, band keyboardist Toth's
keyboards are more than compe-
tent, no doubt due to her lengthy
training in classical piano. Her
work tits the band well, and never
overrides the rest ot the instru-
ments as many keyboard plavers
are prone to do.
Naugahyde Chihuahuas ,ire
a tight and clean-sounding band.
See Band, page 12
Pans Red played at The Fizz Saturday, enticing the crowd with solid high-energy rock and roll. The band
members are Dave Rose, Wynn Britt. Michael Jordan and Maurice Mangum Magnum celebrated his
birthday Saturday with the performance
Paris Red rocks The Tizz
with Amazing Grace
By Deanna Nevgloski
Staff Writer
On Saturday, it was a night of metal, magic and
mayhem at The Fizz when Paris Red pumped up the
night with their first show in Greenville.
After their original performance date in Decem-
ber was cancelled due to bad weather conditions,
Pans Red proved to the excited Fizz crowd that their
show was well worth the wait.
This Raleigh-based, spandex-clad quartet is
comprised of vocalistcomedian Maurice Mangum,
drummer Wvnn Britt, bassist Dave Rose and guitar-
ist Michael lordan.
The Paris Red showcase consisted of a confec-
tion ot over 15nK'lodc;houk-UdentPop-nieUl tunes
that kept the crowd moving all night long.
Mangum not only entertained the hungry crowd
with his incredible, harmonious vocal range, but he
also had them laughing at his innocent jokes and off-
the-wall stage antics.
Mangum, who celebrated his 20th birthday Sat-
urday night, can belt out some of the highest vocal
harmonies this side of Fastern North Carolina. He
performed Stryper's "To Hell With The Devil" per-
fectly
1 hs vocal style also succeeded in originals "In
Your Arms and "I Think I'm Falling
lordan displayed his ability as he flawlessly
moved his fingers upand down the fretsofhisguitar.
His technique is straight-forward, yet melodic. He
showed the crowd that he could sing, as well as play
the guitar, when he shared vocals on Chuck Berry's
classic "johnny B. Goode
Rose and Britt make up the rhythm section of the
band. With a smooth, melodic bass player and a
loud, rhythmic basher, it's no wonder Paris Red can
play good infectious music that keeps the magic
flowing and the crowds rockin
Paris Red jammed out some heavy covers like
"King of Kings" by Barren Cross, "Follow Me" by
Massand "Makes Me Wanna Sing" by Stryper. Origi-
nals like Tonight which is in heavy rotation on
WZMB, and "All Eyes On Him" proved to be big
crowd pleasers . ir-h�vs f
Paris Red ended the fun-filled night with a jazzed-
up version of "Amazing Grace They added the
metal touch to the song that had the crowd singing
with Mangum in perfect sync.
With songs from the heart and down-to-earth
attitudes. Paris Red had no problems winning over
the Fizz crowd. If you like solid, high-energy rock-n-
roll with a lot of vocal harmonies then Paris Red is the
band to see.
For information on up-and-coming shows in the
Eastern North Carolina area, call Dave Rose at (919)
783-7997.
Students participate in telethon
By Kirstin Eakes
Staff Writer
A telethon party Sunday at
The Plaa raised $2600 for United
Cerebral Palsy, $720of which was
donated bv two ECU fraternities.
Pi Kappa Phi gave $H) to the
charitv, and Alpha Sigma Phi
donated $120. the fraternities'
presidents presented their dona-
tions on WRQR, which broadcast
live from The Plaza.
Thomas Walters, Pi Kappa Phi
president, said: "1 think the frater-
nity, through helping others will
benefit. It brings out hidden tal-
ents
Another Pi Kapp, Randy
Royal, said: "We just went around
to the girls' donns and asked for
donations. And lots of brothers
made personal donations
The fraternities also collected
money from local businesses like
Chico's, Charley-O's and Rafters.
WITN televised the UCP Tele-
thon, targeting Eastern North
Carolina as well as Greenville.
David Allen served as Master of
Ceremonies.
The telethon party featured a
variety of entertainment�Suzuki
Violins, a magicand balloon show,
folk music, Panama Steele and the
ECU Pure Gold Dancers.
Fund Raising Coordinator
Sybil Shirley commented on the
participation of ECU'S groups: "I
think it's wonderful. They (frater-
nity members) have been here all
See Palsy, page 14
i
Lexicon
Mushrooming
For the week
of 12290
I Heck: A. boat; B. mite; C.
spice; D. display
2. Quirk: A. boast; B. portion
C. whimsey; D. test
3. Qued: A. evil; B. foundatiot
C. substitute; D. profit
4. Quat: A. register; B. to beat
C. corruption; D. Mike Martn
5 Quader: A. to conform; B.
starved; C. to thrust; D shabb
6. Quadriga: A. chariot; B. to
reject; C. spoked wheel; D.
reproduction
7. Shuttlecock: A. rare bird; B
new dance; C. shooting
device; D. to bandy
8. Sphenoid: A. a bone; B.
clutz; C. time measurement, B
wedge-shaped
9. Stob: A. to hide; B. to start;
C. to pierce; D. nonsense
10. Farina: A. beautiful
woman; B. potato starch; C. a
metal; D. wistful thought.
The art of sleeping in class is perfected
By John Tucker
Assistant Features Fditor
In psychology we learn that
there are various human disor-
ders that affect behavior. One
prevalent disorder that is often
embarrassing, can be observed
daily. This affliction, known bv
many names, is experienced at
least once but often repeatedly bv
many of us attending ECU. It is
the disorder commonly known as
napping in class.
� Thercaremfiny different types
of napping in i lass disorders, and
numerous ways of discovering
habitual offenders of the illness.
TO helpstikfentslocateand under-
stand this peculiar infirmity,
((practically an expert) will reveal
a few of the common characteris-
tics and different varieties of this
phenomena.
The first type of napping dis-
order common to many ECU stu-
dents is hangover related napping,
which usually occurs toward the
end of the week.
The common form this vari-
ety takes is the red-eyed student
who stumbles into class five to ten
minutes late reeking of alcohol.
Wearing a hat, last night's rumpled
clothes, and carrying a slightly torn
notebook he or she has just found
in the garbage, the student pro-
ceeds to his or her normal place in
class and stumbles into the chair
they usually occupy.
Once seated, most students try
to save face with the professor and
fight the oncoming affliction. For
about 15 minutesan unsuccessful
attempt to pay attention and not
let their heads rest on the desk is
made. Then, just when they think
they've made it, the head falls and
they're out cold.
Other students waste no time
in attaining the wanted repose.
Immediately upon entering the
classroom their heads fallsquickly
and ungracefully to the awaiting
desktop, resembling the way they
often leave ECU.
The next type of affliction
common in most students is one
usually brought on by unsuspect-
ing circumstances. A few of these
circumstances are a large lunch, a
warm room, a three hour class, or
a dull lecture by a professor speak-
ing in monotone.
All of these circumstances
lead the students to become com-
fortable and drowsy, as their
minds and bodies turn to jello and
they become victims of the strange
napping disorder.
The resulting phenomena is
more commonly referred to as the
nodding nap. The nodding nap
entails the act of sitting straight up
with a pen in hand while main-
taining direct eye contact with the
professor.
This direct eye contact with
the professor is broken in a con-
tinuous flow, as the student bends
his or her head toward the desk to
write down notes recorded in a
special nap code resembling Egyp-
tian hieroglyphics, the student
quickly catches a 45 second nap.
This variety almost always
ends with the student breaching
eyecontactand overextendingnap
time by a minute or more. Most
students are cured of this variety
of napping when a professor notes
the end of the shifty-eyed contact
and calls on the student, instantly
embarrassing him or her in front
of the class.
Another variety of the nod-
ding nap occurs when students
rests their heads on the palm of
their hands, futiely attempting to
hold the weight of their heads up.
This is done to fool the professor
and the rest of the class into think-
ing they are awake. The usual
result of this variety is a continual
nodding-type action, as the
student's face repeatedly slips off
th hand.
The end to napping comes
when the student lapses into a
deep slumber causing the chin to
fall heavily off the palm. The chin
applies a forceful movement to
the arm which then causes the
elbow to knock a stack of books to
the floor. The books of course, were
strategically placed, to hide the
napping student from the profes-
sor.
Following this, immediate
attention is brought to the napper
and the violator more than often
will not display chronic napping
tendencies for at least the rest of
the day.
Sleeping with the mouth open
is perhaps the most grotesque
form of napping in class disorder.
This form of the disorder is al-
most always accompained by a
streaming flow of saliva. This
comes to rest in the open book or
on theclothesof an offender, ready
for inspection and a quick wipe
when the napper awakens.
Set Naps, page 12





12The East i arotinian. lanuary 23, 190
Faculty Profile
Professor opens doors for studies in
biomechanics and physical therapy
r
H Kob Williams
Staff Writer
Poetry forum gives
critiqe and advice
Writers learn through discussion
ym
By Doug Morris
Staff Wrifcr
John Stevin
arrived at E
similar studt "
Biomet1
"In t.n t whii
countn it s
rhc lab
Medicine 1I
anah sis �;�it
seari b 1 It �-
US .is ell
Dr Ste
evervda lit
fact that bioi
field ol ;
lii fa t
motions ol
chanu al tas His wey
plctedh '
undersl i
people Pr St(
and
perl ��� �
lab
Most
. ,1 � , lor ol East ('arolina I Iniversity
h inn � laboratory, I r ohn Sic-
. �� nine up new frontiers for stu
earn ,n interest in sports medi
pin- K al therapy, exen ise and sport
ms
� i it ics is ttir study ol human
tnd applies to human motion phe
tnd let hniques 1 r Stevenson, w ho
r trimi ihe state ol Michigan, condiu ted
i ihe i ' troil area
, mine field I r Stevenson said
� ns foi biomoi hani s tround Ihe
im.t names tnd fa� es
. third floor iM the novs Sports
i I,) foi Ihe latest motion
� � i nson uses to i ondu t re
ii t ti, hesat lassinbiome han
relath e to mam aspei tsol
it , anl to r.ft a ross it s Ihe
� . w hi Ii po t,n tv ond the
- a ith I hiponl to stud the
ho perfoi m a simple me
� i � r a i i 11 e h c i ' o m
� i . �,��.�! nh
- ' it
r hodih - ' � I hehind
uJ n yago ol -in own
lies team
; � 'heir
� . - ' mil s
� da).but I don t
� � � � � tine and tun
Feature Briefs
Contraceptive stops sperm
Experts sti ted hormone on men
Researt hi
Monthly I
a recent I
- � du � i
dl ' " ' Pi
. ,i ailab e in I years
Designers sprucing up golf styles
1 lesigw '
i la -ii Ii � -
fromtht M
ers, jaunl.
ves t s
S I'll)
lers 1 he sa I
�K ester pan! � �� � it. New h
ii : immei hi � knit k
- . lint'ti pants and hand knit
rhe Poetry Forum gives poets
,i chance to get comments from
others on their work It is .1 stu
dent organization open to the
i ommunity
Phe Poetry I orttm is run b)
Pr Peter Makuck and is spon
sored by Ihe English Departmenl
Mtendance at the Poetry Forum
arics trorn five to sixteen people
It is ,1 wr fluid organiza
tion says Makuck N mi never
know w ho is poing to be here on .1
given night ' Since the English
1 )epartmenl has been developing
its writinp program the number
ol students has gone down Hut .i
large number ol Ihe people who
attend .ire students. Now most
who arc interested in learning
about writingpoolry t.ike.i poetry
class
Ihe Poetn 1 orum allows
' drom the area to rot eivecriti
. ism and en ouragement on their
work ritersbringi opiesof their
w ork
� . 1 huting Ihi - opu
i;ul � � � ir work aiud the
pooplepresent dis nss the poem s
v irtues and how ihey feel it (ould
be impri �vod lso, some people
, ome just to listen Then- are .1
lew listeners,but mostly writers.
Mai � aid
1 he han e to read and 1 n
tique other s work is importanl to
,t t , � ,1 vi U is ha ing his or her
own work critiqued. "It von can
something that some
bod i" doing tli.it is not quite
� lit then vou are less likely todi
that voursell Maku k said
1 heP �otr 1 orum also invites
� he university occa
sionalh Samuel 1 lazo came to
i c I inO lober ol last year, read
: , his 11 w n w 1 rk
! he Pi 'etr 1 orum along ���� ith
�� ��; p.Himentol Women sStud
the English I tepartmenl and
� , Vice han. ellor 5 Minority
itative will be presenting the
lliti r prize winninp poet, Rita
�� adinp her poetry on April
at S i1 m.
Phe Poetry Forum was estal
lished in l8 by Vernon Ward
ani the 1 ngli h 1 Vpattment At
that lime the Poetry I orum pub
lished inih Ii ol its work in the
literary journal Tar Rivet i I
When Makm V took over the Po
etry Forum in ls. he changed
the journal s name to at Rivei
Poetry and began publishing the
work ol poet from all ovei the
country Makm k said, I wanted
to emphasize poetry rather than
uuliv idual pi'ets
Makm k has published
WhereWel iv md Pilgrin
two volume . ol hi i ow n poetry
'Pilgrim his si I time
re eived the Kinkaid I
award for Ihe hi t � olume ol
poetry publish) d by a North �
Imian in ' fheSunl
ship his third volumi
1 . due lit by lune of Ihi mil
addition M iknek 1
lished Breal e

the tirst
ol Mend, nhall n � � � �.
in more ml � � � u
Petei M - '
Sharky's
of (Jreenville
I ocated hv Sports Pad
on 5th Streel
lull r through Vllej
Monday $2.25
Tuesday SI.75
Wednesda - $2.(X)
Thursda) - SI.25
LADIES Mil1
IRI1 admission
Friday $1.75
Saturday SI .75
SI.75
Margaritas
Bourbon
Kamikaze
Imports iSv
( oolers
Highballs
Highballs
Fireballs
Sharky's is a private cluh for members and
21 years old guests.
31 K SHARKY'S MEMBERSHIP'
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive �
Open
Monday - Saturday 10-9
I Sunday 1-6
Our Everyday Low Price
(Except, Aigner, Nike, and Reebok)
Naps
Supermarkets donate computers
� I � . ivimr, s he. �
upen ' � ' hiivt ompul
n return lor $7 I i ! - " i
ivei �� I ' ii I ire hi p
with com ul
ers.it disx
in s.ilc. re
��-s- studi - �
Restaraunts provide free meals
�.� nid ii :��
s to ti ' t American Harvest
�. in a mnth receivi J f
1 , . � � : iit the I lampshin H ns
� � i � 'ple in their parties
Chefs pro ide mixed-culture dishes
n umors demands tor nc
imbining meri an, Mexi
liili � nnpirs Hinj; Knng duck leg with
I ick-eyed t � ilmon with mint honey mustard
and choo
Bars excel in fine dining techniques
� � rfine dining rather than holding
. rii � i es food .it .1 in ular
immer s in !oral (lables, 1 U
Sash in I 'alias (tters ragout ol
� 'US
Lnitti
eltN . are 1
1 .11
Bars ireb
places foi
bar in the n
offers allr it �
braised Ml I ' �
Manufacturers making sweet food low-fat
PootJ n mui � immi l-ciown versions of snack
items II ' '� uptakes and Entemann's has
: jntrodui ed esterol- and fat frei Sealtcsl ha
111 �me out
Ivory soap to give prizes for sinking bars
Srarl l Lamn PriKter and C.amble has nvidi
sinkable
has plai r
ontinued from page 11
� � � t the disorder is
rowd pleaser, a
idents and sometimes even
ifossors p'int out the unsus
ting napp r Most nappers at
tt-d v ith this particular ariety
, aken to laughter and a wel
ition On then t.u es, then tind
I after 1 la s whal exacth hap
ni
� 1 ollegi tudent
� in timeorani thei vs ill m I
perience this strange behavioi
ir.i teristii of life at an institu
�n i't higher learning I he best
w to cope u ith napping isto no
I i aughl It on do, make u
ne point vou think the profes
r was just discussing say Iwai
�t resting mv eves or jusl laugh
: tr lo play it off After all, it s
: the end ol the world I mean it
uld be worse, vou could bedcad
B and
firs! time sini e l1 I he 1 ompany
m store shelves and will award
11 : ; � to ptniple uho buy them I he
advertising "gh May 1
Researchers challenge cholesterol studies
( � Indies that show oaf bran reduces
, holesti 1 ' '��' ; i 1M N,(,n has released a
stud v thai Inoefl ct on lowering cholesterol and
that all fibei - ' � hk iterol
College graduation becomes harder
� igh 1 riuircments for col
. I irtment ol i dui atton have
f all bv heloi - degree re ipicnts l-
. md tha tall be prof u tentincollcge level
math an. I �
ontinued from page n
d wen- a refreshing break Iron
the granola hand we get s
len in this area I he band plan
return neartheendof I ebruary
d that isa night you might wan
set aside it you'd like tt see .
od show that's well worth tin
ver.
Edui
lege r,r 1 '
Yes, The East
Carolinian
Crew beat
WZMB again
winning three
f three volley-
ball games
Sunday.





12 The East Carolinian, lanuary 23.1990
Faculty Profile
Professor opens doors for studies in
biomechanics and physical therapy
By Rob Williams
Suf f Writer
Poetry forum gives
critiqe and advice
Writers learn through discussion
John Stevenson
As director of East Carolina University's
new biomechanics laboratory. Dr. John Ste-
venson is opening up new frontiers for stu-
dents who carry an interest in sports medi-
cine, physical therapy, exercise and sport
science programs.
Biomechanics is the study of human
motion and applies to human motion phe-
nomena and techniques. Dr. Stevenson, who
arrived at ECU this summer from the state of Michigan, conducted
similar studies in biomechanics in the Detroit area.
"Biomechanics is � relatively young field Dr. Stevenson said.
"In fact, whenever 1 go to conventions for biomechanics around the
country, it's easy to remember and recognize names and faces
The lab which is located on the third floor of the new Sports
MedicinePhysical Education building is a stage for the latest motion
analysis equipment-system which Dr. Stevenson uses to conduct re-
search. He works full-time in the laband teachesa class in biomechan-
ics as well.
Dr. Stevenson stressed that his work isrelativc to many aspectsof
everyday life. "If there's one thing that you want to get across, it's the
fact that biomechanics has many applications which go far beyond the
field of sports he said.
"In fact, I just recently signet! a grant with Dupont to study the
motions of workers on an assembly line who perform a simple me-
chanical task with a screwdriver
His work has also creeped into another area. He has just com-
pleted his first stop in the motion analvsisof a young girl with cerebral
Palsy. He said he hopes the completion of the protect will lend an
understanding to the biomechanics or bodily movements behind
people with the disease. It's kind of a maiden voyage of our own
Dr. Stevensmi said.
Dr. Stevenson will also be working with a local gymnastics team
and conducting motion analysis research in an effort to improve their
performance and to provide information on how to prevent injuries.
Everything adds up to many hours of work in the biomechanics
lab.
"Most of my time is spent in the lab during the day, but 1 don't
mind because the work is reallv very interesting and fun
Feature Briefs
Contraceptive stops sperm
Experts study injected hormone on men
Researchers are stepping up efforts to develop a male contraceptive.
Monthly hormone infections could be available in four to six years. In
a recent study of 60 male volunteers, the injections stopped all spei m
production in 68 percent of the men.
Designers sprucing up golf styles
Designers are sprucing up the togs worn by golfers. They say the
classic look is in and knit shirts and polyester pants are out. New looks
from the Men's Fashion Association's spring and summer show: knick-
ers, jaunty caps, saddle shoes, argyle socks, linen pants and hand-knit
vests.
Supermarkets donate computers I c-�
By Doug Morris
SUf f Writer
The Poetry Forum gives poets
a chance to get comments from
others on their work. It is a stu-
dent organization open to the
community.
The Poetry Forum is run by
Dr. Peter Makuck and is spon-
sored by the English Department.
Attendance at the Poetry Forum
varies from five to sixteen people.
"It is a very fluid organiza-
tion says Makuck. "You never
know who is going to be here on a
given night Since the English
Department has been developing
its writing program, the number
of students has gone down. But a
large number of the people who
attend are students. Now most
who are interested in learning
about writing poetry take a poetry
class.
The Poetry Forum allows
poets from the area to receive criti-
cism and encouragement on their
work. Writers bringcopiesof their
work.
After distributing the copies
and reading their work aloud, the
people present discuss the poem's
virtues and how they feel it could
be improved. Also, some people
come just to listen. "There are a
few listeners, but mostly writers
Makuck said.
The chance to read and cri-
tique other's work is important to
a poet as well as having his or her
own work critiqued. "If you can
recognize something that some-
body is doing that is not quite
right, then you are less likely to do
that yourself Makuck said.
The Poetry Forum also invites
guest poets to the university occa-
sionally. Samuel Hazo came to
ECU in October of last year, read-
ing his own work.
The Poetry Forum along with
the Department of Women's Stud-
ies, the English Department, and
the Vice Chancellor's Minority
Initative will be presenting the
pulitzer prize winning poet, Rita
Pove, reading her poetry on April
17, at 8 p.m.
The Poetry Forum was estab-
lished in 1968 by Vernon Ward
and the English Department. At
that time, the Poetry Forum pub-
lished much of its work in the
literary journal Tar River Poets
When Makuck took over the Po-
etry Forum in 1978, he changed
the journal's name to Tar River
Poetry and began publishing the
work of poets from all over the
country. Makuck said, "I wanted
to emphasize poetry rather than
individual poets
Makuck has published
"Where We Live" and "Pilgrims,
two volumes of his own poetry.
"Pilgrims his second volume,
received the Kinkaid-Brachman
award for the best volume of
poetry published by a North Caro-
linian in 1987. "TheSunken Light-
ship his third volume of poetry,
is due out by June of this year. In
addition, Makuck has also pub-
lished "Breaking and Entering a
book of his short stories.
The Poetry Forum meets or
the first and third Thursday of
every month at 8 p.m. in Room 248
of Mendenhall. Anyone interested
in more information can call Dr.
Peter Makuck at 757-6580.
Sharky's
of Greenville
Located by Sports Pad
on 5th Street
Enter through Alley
Monday - $2.25
Tuesday-$1.75
Wednesday - $2.00
Thursday - $1.25
LADIES NITE
FREE admission
Friday-$1.75
Saturday - $1.75
$1.75
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 years old guests.
FREE SHARKY'S MEMBERSHIP
Margaritas
Bourbon
Kamikaze
Imports &
Coolers
Highballs
Highballs
Fireballs
mmmw
Naps
As a new marketing strategy, supermarkets are providing schools
with computers in return for cash receipts. Supermarkets buy comput-
ers at discount and offer them to schools in return for $70,000 to $200,000
in sales receipts. Parents, neighbors, employers and churches arc help-
ing students collect the receipts.
Restaraunts provide free meals
Some restaurants are providing free meals and insider rescrvatioi
lines to frequent diners. People who dine at American Harvest Restau
rant in New York restaurant five times in a month receive a $100
voucher toward future meals. People who visit the Hampshire House
in Boston receive points for the number of people in their parties.
Chefs provide mixed-culture dishes
United States chefs, responding to consumers' demands for nov-
elty, are offering mix-and-match dishes, combining American, Mexi-
can, Italian and Chinese foods. Examples: Hong Kong duck leg with
black-eyed peas; pastrami smoked salmon with mint-honey mustard
and chocolate ravioli
Bars excel in fine dining techniques
Bars are becoming focal points for fine dining, rather than holding
places for diners. Kous Kooz in Phoenix, Ariz serves food at a circular,
bar in the middle of a fish pond. Doc Dammer's in Coral Gables, Fla
offers alligator burgers, and Beau Nash in Dallas offers ragout of,
braised rabbit with leeks and asparagus. j
Manufacturers making sweet food low-fat
Food manufacturers arc making slimmed-down versions of snack
Herat Hostess has introduced "lite" cupcakes and Entemann's has
introduced coffee cakes that are cholesterol- and fat-free. Sealtest has
come out with nonfat ice cream.
Ivory soap to give prizes for sinking bars
As part of a new publicity campaign, Procter and Gamble has made
sinkable bars of Ivory soap for the first time since 1882. The company
has placed 1,101 of the sinkable bars on store shelves and will award I
prizes, including a $100,000 grand prize, to people who buy them. The
advertising campaign will run through May 31.
Researchers challenge cholesterol studies
Researchers are challenging studies that show oat bran reduces
cholesterol. Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston has released a
study that indicates oat bran had no effect on lowering cholesterol and
that all fibers are equal in dealing with cholesterol.
College graduation becomes harder
Educational leaders are demanding higher requirements for col-
lege graduation. Officials in the U.S. Department of Education have
recommended that at least half of all bachelor's degree recipients be
proficient in a foreign language and that all be proficient in college-level
math and science.
eCopyrtgM 1W0.USA TODAYAppkColIitfomiiWon Network.
This form of the disorder is I
i i most always a crowd pleaser, as
indents and sometimes even,
rofessors point out the unsus-l
voting napper. Most nappers af-
I icted with this particular variety I
i waken to laughter and a wet
vnsation on their faces, then find I
�ut after class what exactly hap
x'ned.
Almost every college student
t one time or another will come to
xperience this strange behavior
haracteristic of life at an institu-
un of higher learning. The best
v ay to cope with napping is to not
et caught. If you do, make up
erne point you think the profes-
r was just discussing, say "I was
ist resting my eyes or just laugh
nri try to play it off. After all, it's
ot the end of the world. I mean it
mid be worse, you could be dead.
Band
ontinued from page 11
nd were a refreshing break from
II the granola bands we get so
ften in this area. The band plans
return near the end of February,
d that is a night you might want
set aside if you'd like to see a
xxi show that's well worth the
ver.
Yes, The East
Carolinian
Crew beat
WZMB again
winning three
of three volley-
! ball games
Sunday.
SHOiS
0 OFF
veryday Low Price
t. Aiizner, Nike, and Reebok)
M&,

JOQO
aooo
iooqL

.Ian. Sat. 27
The New Deli's
8th Anniversary Bash
c�
Featuring:
�In Limbo
�The Popes
�Flat Duo Jets
Great Beer Specials!
WZMB Live Remote
Door Prizes
Doors open at 6:30 pm
5)
Advance Tickets $6.
at the door $7.
513 Cotanche Street
(across from UBE)
758-0080






I he J ast i arolinian, January 23, 1990 13
Best-selling reggae band
refuses to conform
DRIVERS A DAY TRUS1
CARS TO THE J-TEAM
n fwonembersol I B4(),
nmcr immy Brcn n .hhI jx-r Norman I lassan, take
lOhasbt� n louring tor is
� prom 1 ind piting its album obabl) w ill lour
i So its now
�11 ihc group s
1 .111.1!i firs! on Virgin,
i 1 � inee antoui in 1 lavvah, i England
1 a two week
: id ourselves, We know it s
1 th min this little
inndow s, l.iss.in go
SAI 1 '
� � hohas been the f(xns
�. stigation of nos
n in Win
rrest on
' ; ' ' I ii bingo is racially moti
Miit Rodnex
sivs Hut it was tun are made up oi songs they've
"It was nice, recording adds known. The new one includes
Brown. "It kept a bit of a vibe
going, I think. We look on the
bright side of things. We're not
ones to complain.
"We sold a million and a half
records of labour of love I We
reggae versions of American
rhythm n' blues hits, including
the Temptations' bb4 "The Way
You Do the Things You Do
Hassan says: "They're all real
famous to us, from when we were
can certainly make a good living 11 and 12 and the first time we
without being the biggest band in ever danced with a girl That's
the world. It would be nice to be why they're all love songs "
the biggest band in the world The first single is "Here I Am,
Says Hassan: "We're the big- an Al Green release in 1973 Weil
gesl selling ree,�ae band in the Diamond song from 1968, "Red
world which is nice Red Wine look off after it was
I WO members write songs, played on a Phoenix radio station
but both "Labourof Love" albums See UB40, page 14
other people, most oi whom were
arrested Thursday night in a sweep
of loeal bingo parlors.
Three non-profit organia
lions of which Sumler is president
also were named in three indict-
ments
Search warrants and indict-
ments allege that the games oi-
m fered prizes ol up to Si 000 and
fraudulently claimed to raise
he iif money tor charities the non-
profit corpora tionscharge while
the operators improperly profited.
Investigators charge that the
irporations were used asa screen
to evade state licensing rtiuire-
ments.
lie ted hi -i : The charges, which carrv a
imantK white maximum penalty ol 10 years in
jail, concern running bingo games
without proper state licenses,
paying prize money in excess ot
gal limits, operating tt�o many
nizance bingo sessions per week, paving
ot the 5 too many people to run the games
I iunt and not turning over all the pro-
iks nai
� i ea n i a I u � n
surrendered t
! w a s re
irned last k
underco ei police
'
inston Saiem
Resources They acknowledge the
non-protit status ot I'A I H tin .
AC Cultural and Educational
Commissionand AtramentoCasa,
and grant the organizations the
authority to operate no more than
two bingo sessions per week Each
license costs $100.
Bonnie Senter ot the Depa
ment ot Human Resources con
firmed that Sumler's licenses had
been renewed s long as the
proper state and federal forms are
completed concerning non profit
status, and yearly audits arc- tiled
and approved, she aid the de
partmenl has no reason to suspe t
illegal activity.
Sumler, who runs a Winston
Salem political consulting firm, has
been of interest to investigators
since August, when his name
surfaced in a federal examination
of possible politic al orruption on
the part ot three Winston Salem
In 10 minutes with no appointment
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ceeds to non-profit organizations aldermen and a Greensboro coun
a- state law mandates. n member
A federal grand jur has been
Sumler produced licenses he reviewing evidence tor months
. ed this week from the North Pllt no indictments have been re
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Dining Service
Announcing:
CANTEEN
GRAND OPENING
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Featuring:
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Serving:
I
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1
The East Carolinian, January 23,1990 13
Best-selling reggae band
refuses to conform
(AP) Two members of UB40,
Irummer Jimmy Brown and per
, ussionist Norman Hassan, take
life cheerfully.
UB40 has been touring for 18
months, promoting its album
I B40 and probably will tour
until September. So its new
! about of love II the group's
ighth album and first on Virgin,
is recorded on tour, in Hawaii,
Italy Prance and Fngland.
1 rtstead of havtnga two-week
reak and enjoying ourselves,
omebody decided, 'We know it's
lawaii. I et'sputtheminthislittle
room with no windows Hassan
says. "But it was fun
"It was nice, recording adds
Brown. "It kept a bit of a vibe
going, I think. We look on the
bright side of things. We're not
ones to complain.
"We sold a million and a half
records of 'Labour of Love I We
can certainly make a good living
without being the biggest band in
the world. It would be nice to be
the biggest band in the world
Says Hassan: "We're the big-
gest-selling reggae band in the
world � which is nice
UB40 members write songs,
but both "Labour of Love" albums
are made up of songs they've
known. The new one includes
reggae versions of American
rhythm 'n' blues hits, including
the Temptations' 1964 "The Way
You Do the Things You Do
Hassan says: "They're all real
famous to us, from when we were
11 and 12 and the first time we
ever danced with a girl. That's
why they're all love songs
The first single is "Here I Am
an Al Green release in 1973. A Neil
Diamond song from 1968, "Red
Red Wine took off after it was
played on a Phoenix radio station
See UB40, page 14
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Bingo scandal erupts
V INSTON SALEM (API A
msuHant who has been the focus
t t federal investigation of pos-
ibl political corruption in Win-
Salem s.ivs his arrest on
harges of running illegal bingo
imes in the city is racially moti-
ited.
Political consultant Rodney
�umior said his corporations .ire
perl) licensed to operate the
;ames and denies th.it they .ire
mited to awarding prizes oi no
ire than $10, as investigators
IS
We run the same type games
the Moose and the Elks have,
nd l don t thmk th.it the Moose
I Elks were indicted he said.
lin-v're predominantly white
rganizations and we're a pre-
dominantly black organization
Sumler, who surrendered to
authorities Friday and was re-
leased on his own recognizance.
was named in seven of the 51
indictments a 1'orsyth County
grand jurv returned last week af-
ter a six-month undercover police
investigation into bingo opera-
tions throughout Winston-Salem
In all. the grand Jury brought
� I charccs acainst Sumler and 1-
other people, most of whom were
arrested Thursday night in a sweep
of local bingo parlors.
Three non-profit organiza-
tions of which Sumler is president
also were named in three indict-
ments.
Search warrants and indict-
ments allege that the games of-
fered prizes of up to $1,(XK) and
fraudulently claimed to raise
money for charities the non-
profitcorporationscharge- while
the operators improperly profited.
Investigators charge that the
corpora tions were used asa screen
to evade state licensing require-
ments.
The charges, which carry a
maximum penalty of 10 years in
jail,concern running bingo games
without proper state licenses,
paying prize money in excess of
legal limits, operating too many
bingo sessions per week, paying
too many people to run the games
and not turning over all the pro-
ceeds to non-profit organizations
as state law mandates.
Sumler produced licenses he
received this week from the North
Carolina Department of Human
Resources. They acknowledge the
non-profit status of PATH Inc
AC Cultural and Educational
Commission and AtramentoCasa,
and grant the organizations the
authority to operate no more than
two bingo sessions per week. Each
license costs $100.
Bonnie Senter of the IXpart-
ment of Human Resources con-
firmed that Sumler's licenses had
been renewed. As long as the
proper state and federal forms are
completed concerning non-profit
status, and yearly audits are filed
and approved, she said, the dc
partment has no reason to suspect
illegal activity.
Sumler, who runs a Winston-
Salem political consulting firm, has
been of interest to investigators
since August, when his name
surfaced in a federal examination
of possible political corruption on
the part of three Winston-Salem
aldermen and a Greensboro coun-
cil member.
A federal grand jury has been
reviewing evidence for months,
but no indictments have been re
turned
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East Carolina University
Dining Service
Announcing:
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I
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Serving:
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Grab & Go Salads & Sandwiches
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Pizza When You Visit Us Pick Up
Snacks Your FREE Squeeze Bottle
Beverages
(While Supplies Last)





f
14 The East Carolinian, lanuary 23. ISM
UB40
Continued from page 13
and became UB40's biggest ha in
America in 1988 five years after
the album it was on, "Labour of
Love 1 came out.
Brown says that when he first
got hooked on reggae, he thought
it would sweep popular music. "I
imagined other people needed to
bo exposed h) it and they would
like it as well. 1 now think it must
bo a minority interest music, like
jazz Hassan thinks that reggae
would have taken over pop musk
if Bob Marlov had lived.
"1 don't want to be disrespect-
ful to Ziggy Marley Brown says.
"What he does I think is good, but
it seems to be old-fashioned. His
stylo of backing tracks have a mid -
1170 fee) to them, to mo. 1 love the
ragamuffin stvle of reggae. We're
trving to fuse different influences,
with a funk tooling
Other torms ot reggae they
talk about arodub.bassand drum-
oriented instrumental, and bh.in
gramuttm, which mixes the reg-
gae of Caribbean immigrants,
primarily Jamaican, in Britain with
the music ot Indian and Pakistani
immigrants.
Reggae is like any other form
of music, it has to change Brown
says. Reggae is, alter all, Jamai-
can pop music. It has to work in a
contemporary manner It's most
popular in cities, especially Lon-
don, with its many Jamaican
immigrants.
Slang is created in reggae lyr-
ics. Brown says, "Raggae is creat-
ing its own language which is
constantly changing, which is true
of any urban music His current
favorite phrase � he can't recall
from which reggae song it comes
is "oversized mampy mean-
ing "fat woman
UB40 named tor the num-
ber on Britain's unemployment
form is the original eight men
A telethon sponsored by student organizations and The Plaza raised $2,600 for United Cerebi al Palsy In this
picture Nelson Scott and a blurred Dennis Oliver rock in the foreground tor the charity benefit (Photo b.JD
Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
Palsy
Continued from page 11
davpartuipatinginarock-a-thon; Hie money raised tor UCP
and 1 think they're having fun supportsaspectslikeresearch and
As the Pure Gold Dancers training of professionals UCP is
arrived. Shirley said, "Now 1 see e only nationwide voluntary
why the group has boon hanging group targeting its services to
around specific needs of cerebral palsy
victims and families. The Green-
ville UCP center is located in
Hooker Memorial Christian
Church, and it serves children
KM ween the ages of 12 months
and five years
from Birmingham. "We added a
brass section six years ago, which
never got unadded says Brown,
"so we're permanently 10. The
nucleus is eight. When the band
was being sorted out 12 years ago,
we had equal friends that became
part ot the road crew
Some of them chose not to
rehearse music, Hassan adds.
"They'd say, 'I'll go down the road
and have a drink
"We still have the same road
crew says Brown. "I wasat school
with oneof them when I was. Wo
did an interview once in an Eng-
lish magazine whore they photo-
graphed everybody and families
There worerrV The band and road
crew must have 30 kids " I lassan
sa. s they take their social life out
of England and oi the road.
When asked the main purpose
ol reggae, Hassan replies, "to
dance to, also whistle when you
feel like it or sing along
Because intellectuals have
tried to make reggae music into
some kind of spiritual or con-
sciousness music, 1 like the reac-
tion against it Brown says. I like
the idea of singing about gibber
ish
"We have no manifesto We're not
trying to raise anybody's con
sciousness. I feel offended by
people trying to raise nw con
sciousness I don't think there is
much Phil Collins can teach me
about living my lite nothing
against Phil Collins in particular.
'We're politically conscious
but we don't attempt to teach
people. All we've ever done in
lyrics is looked around us and
pomted out what we considered
to be wrong, not what should bo
done about it.
"1 think pop music is a me-
dium that is shallow and shouldn't
be protending to bo anything else.
I don't look down on it because it's
not deep
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f
Page 15
Sports
January 23, 1990
Delaware j
State falls to
Lady Pirates
in overtime
B) David Reichelt
Mjtt Writei
lutch free throws b
re 1 oina( olc and.1 last
nd jump shot from junior
� r.n led the 1 .uh Pirates to
("�vertime i torv o er
Delaware State fhursda in
;oliseum 1 hi' win im
. ed the team s o erall ret ord
on the season.
� W minutes ol play t irav
I 23 from the field for 28
nts to lead all scorers in th
� . ilso grabbed tei
� Is and blocked two shots to
� ehead coat h Pat Pierson her
ireer i ton
We were reallv fortunate to
a . av w ith this victon .
� - n lid follow ing the game
. hat to 1 )elaware Mate
I a member
VI .1 Eastern thletit I
pressured the 1 ads Pi
turnoversb terroriz
ba kcourt with a t
i ! .�. . State - Sabrina
I five steals as the ! lor-
-
� �
heir j ressure reall. itighl
ad when they drove d ��� i
�ed on then
See (vertime, page 20
mnp m �� 11 BMpim H � �
ECU picks up second CAA win
Pirates end streak with win
over William & Mary
hi ended up scoring 12 points for the Tribe,
thro � them three-pointers.
E I got on the board first with a 17 foot jumper
By Klisten Halberg
Special to I he I .i-t arolinian
A quickchanj te defense ai I thi id van by Reed Lose, but the Tribe did grab an early lead in
tage of tipbacks helped th cagei hr ik their three thebaligame rhey jumped out in front in the first
game losing streak Saturda i lefeatedai minuteandahalfof the game when Brendon Conner
William & Mary team in Mingi iseum nbe hit a jumper from 11 feet out to make the
William & Man isasi md team so we tried t n I
keep them off balance. E i coach MikeSteele From then William & Mary stretched their lead
after the 72-64 win If you stav in th lefens I is much as three points before ECU regrouped
they run their stufl Wekn. w i uldn'l ,ta inl i nd retook the lead with 16071eft to play. Richardson
same defense and be su hit an 18 foot jumper that secured a Pirate lead they
ripbacksplayedakevroleinEC I shall control mid never relinquish the entire game.
When we tipped ith.uk it e�i . us a chanct to run IkeCopeland was another powerhouse tor the
the clock and then get fouled t. I � �. � I W Pirates as he Mvd 18 points to the scoreboard.
were able to hold on and win th. opeland was also effective on the boards as he had
,n Stevi . ived an impi t rebounds on the night. The freshman leads
c led thi Pirati i � ring witl :� ECI in retxunds averagwig 6.6 per game
. . . � � � , �:� ; �� ii the leader in rebounding against the Tribe
ra . . mior Tim Brown. Brown had 11 total rebounds
, . f that was due to Ea nnst William & Mary and contributed lOpoints to
i � �
� :
lor the Pn
perl
. � i .
lealast-si i dump� hotl ig �� the idyPn ii
- - ���� against De twan I ite Photo by
i
U4
Schools discuss ending series
in aftermath of basket 'brawl'
I NSBORO,N.( �
� bersol the orth an i
: ki tball team v i n
: n probatioi lay foi
� ; irt � i frei I r all in whk h
gled with players and
and the schools agreed that
vould nol be replayed
� ' seven players will be al-
� � play in the next gai
� Ict AA rules il a player is
d nafirsti ff i fighl he
iced on a one-game ptoba
nd fighl results in a
. . ispci n and -i third
. : id I i i
� for an entire seast �n.
, : ichDo: belt
nferei � Fnda y
it ild n
� : i. i p � . "
md

ii
taki I N-� �
It was not (lear .�. hether
ith the
rv or it the V minutes ol ac-
would h
test, rhe game was suspended
with - 41efl andfheAggiesl
.� i ' - - lead. c Ccntraloffi
rials arf seeking the no-contest
ruling to maintain the Eagles
hances tor a bid to the M A
I H ision I! tournament and a di
fei col their national hampi
ship
In i & ihan
tori Iwardl rtann mneed that
discus; oi ild begin imn di
ati ly i '
letic contests between his schwl
and N entral.
� l cl me assure you that this
rid la .sunivt i ' a '� hhas
� this state and fl tion, is not
ing to allow anv sin h mi ident
to mar the good name ol &
11 r! said While the intense and
historic rivalry bi '���� '� '� and
traits well known, we cannot,
nor will we condone any actions
which would tend to in anyway
harm the reputation of this uni-
�. i rsil
f ort said i ampusset urity will
continue its investigation ol the
riot and determine it any other
dist iplinary action is net essary
bout 200 fai bi ke up the
ntnute
I raw! triggei I when N. Cen
tr 'I forw ard Den
,iuied b N � � '� �
lumphnes.
� . � : fl I
pep band ���� en figl
Centra rl itun dire(
� : V. illacel
See lir.ns I pace 17
-
.mm)
� � & 1
. inning efforts.
? also had an effective night as he scored 15
: � ind had tour reboui I
. . im ii Mar) di I : i � ide a throat in tum-
. r is they accumufal I t their 64 points due
� ' 'ir ite turnovers
ii moves �: � rati to 2-3 in the confer-
. � nbe's lossdropsthem to
n thi nference and 4-11 ov erall
� � id - �'� Im -d,i as they travel
� � thi VA's first j iceti am,
� � I :� �
rati � �itel up ��� ill K against
netimeriva '�- �'� In n �� i S itur la) at7p m.
. � : . ; � � � i � Iktut, will be t �
, : : r loam Sp rts
Media War
II: WZMB.
falls in
volleyball
Bv Trey Burley
WZMB Staff
Help!
. �. - � -an outlet pass as he
iscovi �� lb) :� �� '�" � ' - � �" ��' I J'mmy Apple
mS � � � � 64 victory (Photo I .
il
� fi
� u Photo
Fury over 1 ord's resignation still brewing
Hatfield leaves Arkansas to tame Clemson tiger
nal
he
( l EMS V s '�' Kn
Hatfieldisan Arkansasnattvi
I for tl �"�'�� -

hampn mship � � � � i:
. ame head coa h .it his alma
tef
Hatfield ended that seemingly
peffe t mati h Sunday when he
is named the head i oa h at
. � n a program .is troub
I i Arkansas' is clean in a scan
dal-nddenSouthwest onference
Everybody thought w hen I
� h k tO Arkansas this was
job I had dreamed of m) whole
hf Hatfield said ' Hurt's not
true I'veenjoyed !9yea�ofcoaK h
Ing when I wasaway before lever
ame hack to Arkansa Noth
ing stays the same
I luring an houflong nM ���
conference Sundav whore he was
: ; n tally introdut . as the I igers
, ach, I latfield -aid he v as
not - oni erm d aboul the N AA
tigal n, the threatened bt
l(itt or the tans who continue to
support former coach Danny Ford
I latfield said he and his wife,
Sandy fell it was their destiny to
cometo( lemson although he
did not make his fust trip to the
s hool until I Is p rn Sunday
I think more than anything
else, oai Ii person in voiir time has
to de ide v. hat's important lo
sou 1 latfield s,nd Sandy and I
both fell righl now this was the
rtghl thing to do to be part ol the
(nntinued su� i ess flemson's
fine tradition and heritage
"We fell led here Hatfield
said "We understand it's a very
diftn ult situation in lime Hut I
promise you thai things will work
out "
I latfield i omo- te a program
tinder thecloud of an N A A probe
ind a revoll bv lemson players
and some tans, who were upsel
over i iA s resignation, i ord, 41
quit 1 hursda) loss than two
weeks after the N AA told
( lemson it had un overed 14 al-
leged rule violations
( ine day after i ord resigned,
his players called on the univer
sitv lo bring turn bat k or hire one
. .t ii assistants to replai e him or
they would boycott the 1990 sea
�� n fne threatened bo) i oil was
called of! alter the players were
told Sunday morning Hatfield
WOtlld be their new . o,l. h
Meanwhile outside Memorial
Stadium, where llatlield s hum
was announced, about 200 lord
supporters i ailed tor the resigna
tion ol universitv I'reident M.iv
I ennon and thletn I Hrei tor
Hobtn Robin
"Man mu ' �. the tans
veiled Max must
- :mo ol the lanst ai ried signs
supporting I orvi i 'no sign read
"Bring Dann Back Fire Robin
s(n and i em
At one point. I latfield walked
into the (rowd asking them tor
their support rhosein the row d
said the) didn't blame him tor
what had OC urred in the I '
week at the premier football powi �
m the Atlantii oasl onfi i
I he 46 year old I latfield
compiled a 55- IT I record al v
kansas, guiding the Razorbat ksto
a bowl gameinea hoi his �.
coat h His btiwl record .it rkan
sas. however. as 1 -3, im ludil
( ottOP BOW I !��SSes to lenne- - �
27 in 990)and UCLA(17-3 in
1 ls'l I
I he i hoice ol 1 latfield, who
was 27 11 I record .it ir 11 i
�s vould have cre-
ret ontrtiversyaK lemson
� . i thi threatened bow ott.
� det uied as a team in
dedication to all ol our assistant
, oat hes and t oat h 1 ord. the best
� r us and our future would
be to �� . (insider playing tor the
� lotbail season, team
poki man St h v 1 ields, a righl
end -aid We re not 100 pen ent
d but we fell a little better
knowing that evervone out there
. Hd our best to get what
Ui
Defensive bat k Dexter Davis
� were mulling over
it to do nexl
Scime people are ready to
ti msfer, I avis said. "Others
t know what they're going to
We re not happv I hat's the
bottom line
I latfield met with the team
s,t t lemson, page 1�
And in thebeginning there
was football and thepnnt won
WZMB then challenged the mas-
ters the pigskin to a non-contact
outing volleyball And the result
remained the same as the pen
pushers trom The Fast Carolinian
easily defeated the "new rockers
in three straight sets Sunday night
in Memorial Gym.
The game started at 5:15 with
an undermanned TEC crew tak-
ing the first serve Following sev-
� r il intense vollie tne print
si immed their wa - V an earl) 10
3 lead, led in par; by the graceful
placement of serves bv Matt Ri h
ter and oey jenkin -
Tie ZMB'ers had reallv pre-
pared for the game, going as far I
nsult Madam � a local
witi h doctor, tor a voodoo doll
,vhi h wasactuall) ipotato with
a couple of sticks poked in it)
don't think the doll' had much
effect on the EC said I rev The
Mystic" Bien, in reference to his
team's doll.
i he Fast Carolinian pushed
on and won the first came. 15-3.
heset nd gamew isequally
as challenging as the firs! as the
black-and-white-and-read-all-
overs ti ok a commanding 7-2 lead
before an official time-out was
taken tor heat exhaustion
Following the short break the
print charged forth with surpris-
ing speed " Slam master Adam
( ornelius drove over the top
numerous times said David
Herring, explaining TEC's5-0 run
that ended the second game with
a scored 15-5, and a 2-0 game lead
tor the paper
We're playing tor pride
now " cried Andy Forbes to his
teammates before the opening
serve of the final game
Amazingly, Forbes plea was
answered as the two media battled
tor self respect. Trailing 5-7, the
new rockers" brought in Kris da
con' Adams from her weekend
road-trip, as she inspired the team
See WZMB, page 16





I
f
Sltte gas! (EarflUmanj
Page 15
Sports
January 23,1990
Delaware
State falls to
Lady Pirates
in overtime
By David Reichelt
Staff Writer
Two clutch free throws by
sophomore 1 oma Colev and a List
second jump shot from junior
Sarah Gray led the Lady Pirates to
,i 72 70 overtime victory over
Delaware State rhursday in
Minges Coliseum. The win im-
proved the team's overall record
lo 10-3 on the season.
In 39 minutes ot play, Gray
was 14-23 from the field tor 28
points to lead all scorers in the
game. She also grabbed ten re-
bounds and blocked two shots to
to give head coach Pat Pierson her
199th career victory.
We were really fortunate to
come away with this victory
rierson slid following the game.
We didn't deserve to win, and I
tip my hat to Delaware State
The Hornets (9-4), a member
ot the Mid-Eastern Athletic Con-
ference, pressured the Lady Pi-
rates into 24 tumoversby terroriz-
ing the backcourt with a tough
press Delaware State's Sabnna
Alien had five steals as the Hor-
netscapitalizcdonECU'smistakes
b soring21 points of I turnovers
Their pressure really caught
usoff guard Piersonadded. "Our
intensity was a little low coming
off the game (Jan. 15)against James
Madison
Delaware State took an early
lead when they drove down the
court and scored on their tirst
See Overtime, pace 21)
� miipj i i )imm i
�r�
ECU picks up second CAA win
Pirates end streak with win
over William & Mary
By Kristen Hal berg
Special to The East Carolinian
A quick changing Pirate defense and the advan-
tage ot tipbacks helped the cagcrs break their three-
game losing streak Saturday as they defeated a tough
William & Mary team in Minges (!oliseum.
"William & Mary is a sound team so we tried to
keep them off balance EC U coach Mike Steele said
alter the 72-tvl win. "II you Stay in the same defense
they run their stuff. We knew we couldn't stay in the
same defense and be successful
I'ipbacksplavedakevroleinl�( I shall control
"When we tipped it back, it gave us a chance to run
theclock and then get fouledSteele explained. "We
were able to hold on and win the game
Freshman Steve Richardson played an impres-
sive game as he led the Pirates in scoring with 19
points on the night, two shots from the three-point
range. "We lost track ol Richardson Tribe kU
Chuck Swenson said. "Part ol that wasdueto East
Carolina's execution
I he Indiana native leads ECL in three point
plays and has scored in double figures seven times
tor the Pirates I was prettv pleased with Ste ie tor
tie most part 'Steclcsaid, simply because h� came
oil o: i game where he made seven three-pointers
(against lames Madison on Ian. 15) and he Stayed
within himsell tonight
Hut perhaps the most effective Pirate strategy
was the breakdown ot William & Mary's leading
scorer immy Apple, and that was not no cssarily a
coaching strategy, i ven tune Apple got the ball, the
entire rowd ot 4,112 tans screamed simultaneously
until he gave the bail up or took a shot I he fans may
have had something todo with shutting out Applein
the first halt
However. Apple bounced back in the second
Sandra Grace made a last-second ump shot to give the Lady Pirates
a 72-70 overtime win Thursday against Delaware State (Photo by
Garret! Kitlian � ECU Photo l ab)
ttjx
JSL
rzx
Schools discuss ending series
in aftermath of basket 'brawl'
GREENSBORO, N.C(AP)
Seven members of the North Caro-
lina A&T basketball team were
placed on probation Friday tor
their part in a free-for-all in which
tans tangled with players and
police, and the schools agreed that
the game would not be replayed.
The seven plavers will be al-
lowed to play in the next game
Under NCAA rules, if a player is
involved in a first offense fight, he
is placed on a one-game proba-
tion A second fight results in a
one-game suspension and a third
incident would lead to a suspen-
sion for an entire season.
NC A&T coach Don C orbett
said at a news conference Friday
that he would review videotape
of Thursday night's game with
North Carolina Central, and
would determine if further action
is necessary. No action has been
taken against NC C entral.
It was not clear whether NC
A&T would be credited with the
victory or if the 32 minutes of ac-
tion would be declared a no-con-
test. The game was suspended
vith 804 left,and the Aggies hold-
ing a 39-38 lead. N.C. Central offi-
cials are seeking the no-contest
ruling to maintain the Eagles
chances for a bid to the NCAA
Division 11 tournament and a de-
fense oi their national champion-
ship.
In addition, NC A&T Chan-
cellorEdward I" Tt announced that
discussions would begin immedi-
ately on ending the : c:ies of ath
letic contests between his school
and NC Central.
"Let me assure you that this
world-class university, which has
done SO much to serve the people
of this state and the nation, is not
going to allow any such incident
to mar the good name of A&T
Fort said. "While the intense and
historic rivalry between A&T and
Central is well-known, we cannot,
nor will we condone any actions
which would tend to m anyway
harm the reputation ot this uni-
versity
Fort sa id ca mpus seen n t v will
continue its investigation of the
not and determine if any other
disciplinary action is necessary.
About 200 fans broke up the
game with an on court 15-minute
brawl, triggered when N.C. Cen-
tral forward Derrick Leak was
ouled by N A& I center i.mmy
Humphries.
"Even people from the A&T
pep band were lighting NC
Central sports information direc-
tor Wallace Dooiey said in a tele-
See Brawl, page 17
halt as he ended up scoring 12 points for the Tribe,
three of them three-pointers.
ECU got on the board first with a 17 foot jumper
by Reed lose, but the Tribe1 did grab an early lead in
the ball game. They jumped out in front in the first
minute and a half of the game when Brendon Conner
ot the Tribe hit a jumper from 11 feet out to make the
score 4-3.
I rom then William & Mary stretched their lead
to as much as three points before ECU regrouped
and retook the lead with 16:07 left to play. Richardson
hit an IS foot jumper that secured a Pirate lead they
would never relinquish the entire game.
Ike Copeland was another powerhouse for the
Pirates as he added 18 points to the scoreboard.
Copeland was also effective on the boards as he had
eight rebounds on the night. The freshman leads
ECU in rebounds averaging 6.6 per game.
But, the leader in rebounding against the Tribe
was junior Tim Brown. Brown had 11 total rebounds
against William & Mary and contributed 10 points to
the Pirate's winning efforts.
I.oe also had an effective night as he scored 15
points and had tour rebounds.
William & Mary did provide a threat in turn-
over as they accumulated 22 of their M points due
to Pirate turnovers.
I he win moves the Pirates to 2-3 in the confer-
ence and 8-10 overall. The rribe's loss drops them to
0-5 in the conference and 4-11 overall.
I�"( 'U will hit road on Wednesday as they travel
to Richmond, VA. to face theCAA'sfirst place team,
the Richmond Spiders.
The Pirates next home match-up will be against
long time n val UN( -Wilmington, Saturday at 7 p.m.
1 his game, which looks to be a sellout, will be tele-
vised on 1 lome Team Sports.
Media War
UlWZMEL
f alls in
volleyball
By Trey Burley
WZMB Staff
Pirate freshman guard Paul Childress looks for an outlet pass as he
is covered by William & Marys Curtus Pride (left) and Jimmy Apple
in Saturdays 72-64 victory. (Photo by J D Whitmire - ECU F
Lab)
Fury over Ford's resignation still brewing
Hatfield leaves Arkansas to tame Clemson tiger
. . nu a � trnm I m7s�-i w3. could have ere
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) Ken
Hatfield isan Arkansas native and
played for the Razofbacks, help-
ing them claim the lg� national
championship. Six years ago. he
became head coach at his alma
mater.
Hatfield ended that seemingly
perfect match Sunday when he
was named the head coach at
Clemson � a program as troub-
led as Arkansas' is clean in a scan-
dal-ridden South west Conference.
"Everybody thought when I
came back to Arkansas this was
the job Ihaddreamedof my whole
life Hatfield said. "That's not
true.I'veenjoyed 19yearsof coach-
ing when 1 was away before 1 ever
came back to Arkansas. Noth-
ing stays the same
During an hourlong news
conference Sunday where he was
formally introduced as the Tigers'
new coach, 1 latfield said he was
not concerned about the NCAA
investigation, the threatened boy-
cott or the fans who continue to
support former coach Danny Fold.
Hatfield said he and his wife,
Sandy, felt it was their destiny to
come to Clemson � although he
did not make his first trip to the
school until 1:18 p.m. Sunday.
"1 think more than anything
else, each person in your time has
to decide what's important to
you Hatfield said. "Sandy and I
both felt right now this was the
right thing to do to be part of the
continued success of Clemson's
fine tradition and heritage.
"We felt led here Hatfield
said. "We understand it's a very
difficult situation in time. But 1
promise you that things will work
out
I latfield comes to a program
under thecloud of an NC A A probe
and a revolt bv Clemson plavers
and some tans, who were upset
over Ford's resignation. Ford, 41,
quit Thursday less than two
weeks after the NCAA told
Clemson it had uncovered 14 al-
leged rule violations.
One day after Ford resigned,
his players called on the univer-
sity to bring him back or hire one
of his assistants to replace him or
thev would boycott the 1990 sea-
son. The threatened boycott was
called off after the players were
told Sunday morning Hatfield
would be their new coach.
Meanwhile,outside Memorial
Stadium, where Hattield's hiring
was announced, about 2(H) Ford
supporters called for the resigna-
tion of university President Max
Pennon and Athletic Director
Bobby Robinson
"Max must go the tans
veiled. "Max must go
Some of the fans earned signs
supporting Ford. One sign read,
"Bring Danny Back � Fire Robin-
son and Pennon
At one point, 1 latfield walked
into the crowd asking them tor
their support. Those in the crowd
said they didn't blame him for
what had occurred in the past
week at the premier football power
in the Atlantic Coast Conference
The 46-year-old Hatfield
compiled a 55-17-1 record at Ar-
kansas, guiding theRazorbacks to
a bowl game in each of his years as
coach. His bowl record at Arkan-
sas, however, was 1-5, including
Cotton Bowl losses to Tennessee
(31-27 in 1990)and UCLA (17-3 in
1984).
The choice of 1 latfield, who
was 27-31-1 record at Air Force
from 1979-1983, could have cre-
ated more controversy atdemson
because ot the threatened boycott.
"We decided as a team in
dedication to all of our assistant
coaches and Coach Ford, the best
thing tor us and our future would
be to reconsider playing for the
upcoming football season team
spokesman Stacy Fields, a tight
end, said. We're not 1(X) percent
satisfied, but we felt a little better
knowing that everyone out there
knows we did our best to get what
we wanted
Defensive back Dexter Davis
said plavers were mulling over
what to do next.
"Some people are ready to
transfer Davis said. "Others
don't know what they're going to
do. We're not happy. That's the
bottom line
Hatfield met with the team
See Clemson, page 19
And in the beginning, there
was football � and the print won.
WZMB then challenged the mas-
ters of the pigskin to a non-con tact
outing, volleyball. And the result
remained the same as the pen
pushers from The East Carolinian
easily defeated the "new rockers"
in three straight sets Sunday night
in Memorial Gym.
The game started at 5:15 with
an undermanned TEC crew tak-
ing the first serve. Following sev-
eral intense vollies. tne print
slammed their way to an early 10-
3 lead, led in part by the graceful
placement of serves by Matt Rich-
terand Joey Jenkins.
The ZMB'ers had really pre-
pared for the game, going as far to
consult Madam Zooloo. a local
witch doctor, for a voodoo doll
(which was actually a potato with
a couple of sticks poked in it) "1
don't think the doll' had much
effect on the EC said Trey The
Mvstic" Bien, in reference to his
team's doll.
The East Carolinian pushed
on and won the first game, 15-3.
The second game was equally
as challenging as the first, as the
black-and-white-and-read-all-
ovcrs took a commanding 7-2 lead
before an official time-out was
taken for heat exhaustion.
Following the short break, the
print charged forth with surpris-
ing speed. Slam master' Adam
Cornelius drove over the top
numerous times said David
Herring, explaining TEC's 5-0 run
that ended the second game with
a score of 15-5, and a 2-0 game lead
for the paper.
"We're playing for pride
now cried Andy Forbes to his
teammates before the opening
serve of the final game.
Amazingly, Forbes' plea was
answered as the two media battled
for self respect. Trailing 5-7, the
"new rockers" brought in Kris 'da
con' Adams from her weekend
road-trip, as she inspired the team
See WZMB, page 16





I
I
t
16 The East Carolinian, January 23, 1990
Sports Briefs
McCartney named top coach
l nivcrsity ol Colorado football coach Bill NKc artney won Ihe
Boar Bryant award Thursday as the U.Ss top college football coach.
McX artney, whose team was ranked fourth in the nation, heat out
Miami's Dennis Erickson, Notre name's Lou 1 lolt and Bill Curry,
the former coach of the Alabama Crimson I ide.
Indiana swim coach retires
Legendary Indiana University swimming coach lames Hoe"
Counsilman said he will retire ending a 33-year career. Counsilman's
teams won six straight national titles and took 23 Big Ten champion-
ships, including 20 titles in a row "Doc" won't leave swimming I !e
will lecture and rewrite his book, "The Science of Swimming which
has been published in several languages
Warm weather postpones tourney
Warm weather has for ed officials at the 20th annual Polar lee
Cap (. k))i Tournament at I .rand 1 la en Mich . to postpone the
tourney because the ice on Spring I ake was too thin I he tourney
was scheduled tor Saturday No new date for the tournament was
mentioned The weather "hursday was in the 50s
Burke signs for6 million
Right hander Tim Burke, who signed a three year contract worth
about $6 million with the Montreal Expos, w .is oneol several
baseball players to come to terms Shortstop Kurt Stillwell signed a
one year contract with the Kansas City Royals. Financial details were
not available Pitcher Ken 1 Eowell signed a $4 7 million, three-year
contra t w ith the Philadelphia Phillies.
RCA sponsors racing team
The Vince t iranatelli racing team will get RCA ekx tronk s as a
major sponsor in the Indianapolis 500 in May. (.ranatellf s team.
which is based in Phoenix, will have two ears The drivers will be
named later, officials said
Games need security funds
The 1990 C loodwill games ma have to be sealed back from la k
ol funding 1 he international athletic event to be held in Seattle ma
be cut back unless the ashington state legislature pays $6.5 million
tor security, games officials said.
University faces NCAA audit
The National Collegiate Athletic Association will review an
internal audit ol the University ol the Distrk t ol Columbia that said
14 ol its athletes, including five football players, were not enrolled in
school.
Johnson cited in car wreck
( anadian 'sprinter ben ohnson was ticketed tor not ha ing
prool ol insurance when his tar collided with another .ar in
Beams ille, Ontario, ohnson escaped injury in the i rash
and stripped of world records
Johnson S woes continued as the International Amateur Athletic
federation stripped the runner of his world records in the 50 meter and
60-meter dashes, lohnson, who allegedly took large doses of steroids to
enhance his performance, was stripped of his records over the weekend
in Tokyo by the IA AC. the governing body of traek and field.
Jacobsen wins Hope Classic
Peter acobsen ended a five year drought on the PC,A circuit b
winning the Bob HopeChryslerC lassicbyonestrokeSunday.Jacobsen's
Win was worth $180,000ol the total purse ot Si million. He shot a 90
hole total ot 21 under-par J39 t. edge out Scott Simpson and Brian
Tennyson
FBI investigating race track
Bay Meadows Racecourse in San Mateo, c aht is under investiga-
tion In- the I Bl tor possible betting irregularities, according to pub
lished reports At least two Nevada betting parlors are refusing to take
bets on racesat the track The parlors lost as much as $500,000 Dec hi
on bets placed on long shots Ihe FBI has declined to comment
Veldkamp takes skate championship
Bart Veldkamp, competing in his home country of the Netherlands,
wen the overall European men's speed skating championship Sunday.
Veldkamp won the title with his 14 minute. 1.08 second tune in the
10,000 meter race. C lunda Kleeman of East C lermany won the women's
title b) taking the 5,(KK) meter rate in 7:24.76.
U.S. skier beats Italian
Leslie Thompson of the U.S. Ski Team won the final American
Airlines Super Series race in Farmington, Maine Sunday. Thompson
beat out Italy's Gabrtclla Carrel by eight seconds in the two-lap hilly
course at Troll Valley Ski (enter Thompson did the rate in 30 minutes,
34.5 seconds despite steady snow flurries.
-irrlf t allege tn&n
In the Locker
Super Bowl MVPs and
Champs I super Bowl MVPs
1989 l ,ui Francisco
(Mi i 2. . c in i innati
(AllIf-
1988 Washington
(M C 142,Denver(AF I
Id
14H7 N V Giants
(NFC) 39, Denver (AR I
20
(986 hicago (NF )
46 New England (AR I
10
1985 S,m Fran isco
(M( l 58, Miami (AR I
1984 LA Raiders (AH l 58, Wash
ington (NR I 9
1983 Washington (NFC) 27, Miami (NFC)
(AR17
12 Sin Francisco (NFO 26, Cin-
cinnati (AR i 21
1981 lakland (ART) 27, Philadel-
phia r'K t 10
1980 Pittsburgh (AFC) 31, Los An-
geles (NR I 19
1('7cv Pittsburgh (AR?5, Dallas
(NR i 11
Th� breakdown
l?L� ' I12 -
Running bacx
' � '�ce ve' More defensive
iDe'ensve end players have
won the Super
liana e tackle Bow mo
J � abackar valuable player
I award than
It, e!v running backs
Note Two MVPs
were awa'fiod r
STO' Ho XI
Maroa-S�TW. Ganrei Ns Service
(NR i 17
1975 Pittsburgh (AFC) 16, Minne-
sota (NFC 6
1974 Miami (AFC) 24, Minnesota
471 Miami (AFX) 14, Washington
(NFC) 7
1972 Dallas (NFC) 24, Miami(AFC)
1971 Baltimore (AR If Dallas
(NR13
1970 Kansas,tv (All 23, Minne
sot a (Ml7
1969 N l- lets (All I h Baltimore
I97J Dallas (NR )27,)envr(AFC) (Ml.) 7
10 19fK (.reen Bav (Nil) 53, Oakland
1977 Oakland (AR12, Minnesota (Af-l14
(NFC) 14 1967 Green Bay (NFL) 35, Kansas
1976 Pittsburgh (ARj 21, Dallas ('ity(AFl.)lO
IRS turns heat up in Memorial
Gym with basketball tourney
By Jeannette Roth
IRS
The winter cold is hack. But,
Winter I Ie.it burned in Memorial
Gymnasium this weekend during
intramural pre season basketball
play And yes, progrtostkator IM A
RECK actually got one right gang
as top-picked Winter Heat de
teated second ranked Air Assault
57 56 in i hampionship play.
In semi-final action, Sigma Phi
Epsilon were eold against Winter
1 leal as MarcusGoodson lead the
tirst h,ilt attack inside. Goodson
lead all scorers with nine at the
halfway point. Hie Sig Eps fal
tercd with turnovers but displayed
an overall team game with consis-
tent scores from im fernigan,
ferry McNulty and Rob Evans.
foel Sanders led in assists tor the
Sig Eps who promise to make
regular season aetion heat up.
Winter Heat left the Sig Eps eold
SS32.
Air Assault faced a very tough
UK) Proof squad in a true 'battle ot
the boards' match that changed
lead hands' several times. Brian
McPhatter led his team at the half
with s pemts as KX) Prool fol-
lowed an aee inside game to the
tee ECU football player unior
Robinson hit tor 17 points in the
losing effort The Air Assault at-
tack was led by jerry Dillon with
18, Clayton Driver with 13 and
Damn Bynum with 10. In a game
rid with technical fouls, Air As-
sault managed to bomb past the
UK) Proof 'Twin Towers' (Anthony
Thompson & Charles Freeman)
See IRS, page 18
Football players try to
deal with coaching change
- 1 EMSON, S.C. (AP)
Clemson linebacker Kenzil
lackson had never heard ot Ken
Hatlield
I ie has now
I latfield is Jackson's new
i u h
I don't even know him
lackson said I'd never heard ol
him
lackson and his teammates
should get to know Hattield a lot
better soon 1 latfield plans to meet
this week with the players the
same players who threatened to
boycott the 1990 season it their
beloved Danny lord wasn't rein-
stated or one of his assistants
wasn't named to replace him
But with 1 latfield's hiring, the
players backed down, calling off
their threatened walkout.
"Me, personally, it's like the
other coaches said,avetheguya
chance ' lackson said 111 do
that
lhat doesn't mean lackson
and his fellow Tigers ,m' over
)OVll.
"We kind ot already knew he
(Ford) is not going to come back
defensive back Dexter Davis said
Wedidn't get anything out ol the
deal. It doesn't take a genius to
know we aren't happy
lackson and the rest ol the
Tigers were told bv university
See Players, page 20
WZMB
l ontinued from page 15
to knot the score at seven.
I got this burning leehng in
nn head and feet said Herring
as he tried to explain WMB's
newfound strength
However, rising to the occa-
sion, Ihe East Carolinian pulled
away from the frequency modu-
lators and won, 15-13.
"WZMB had decent serves
(heh heh) said Mike Martin,
captain tor Ihe Hast Carolinian.
But we had great team work, and
team work wins
Either way, in the battle of the
two media, the s ore remains. "EC
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k





)
t �

i
jj The East Carolinian, January 23, 1990
Sports Briefs
McCartney named top coach
University of Colorado football coach Bill McCartney won the
Bear Bryant award Thursday as the U.Ss top college ftxitball coach.
McCartney, whose team was ranked fourth in the nation, beat out
Miami's Dennis Erickson, Notre Dame's Lou Holtz and Bill Curry,
the former coach of the Alabama Crimson Tide.
Indiana swim coach retires
Legendary Indiana University swimming coach (ames "Doc"
Counsilman said he will retire ending a 33-year career. Counsilman's
teams won six straight national titles and took 23 Big Ten champion-
ships, including 20 titles in a row. "Doc" won't leave swimming. I le
will lecture and rewrite his book, The Science of Swimming which
has been published in several languages.
Warm weather postpones tourney
Warm weather has forced officials at the 20th annual Polar Ice
Cap Golf Tournament at Grand 1 laven, Mich , to postpone the
tourney because the ice on Spring lake was too thin The tourney
was scheduled lor Saturday No new date for the tournament was
mentioned. The weather Thursday was in the 50s.
Burke signs for6 million
Right-hander Tim Burke, who signed a three-year contract worth
about $(-� million with the Montreal Lxpos, was one of several
baseball players to come to terms Shortstop Kurt Still well signed a
One-year contract with the Kansas City Royals Financial details were
not available. Pitcher Ken Howell signed a $4 7 million, three-vear
contract with the Philadelphia Phillies.
RCA sponsors racing team
The Vince Granatelli racing team will get RCA electronics as a
major sponsor in the Indianapolis 500 in May Cranatelli's team,
which is based in Thoenix, will have two cars. The drivers will be
named later, officials said
Games need security funds
The 1990 Goodwill games may have to be scaled back from la k
oi funding. The international athletic event to be held in Seattle may
be cut back unless the Washington state legislature pays $63 million
for security, games officials said.
University faces NCAA audit
The National Collegiate Athletic Association will review an
internal audit of the University of the District of Columbia that said
14 of its athletes, including five football players, were not enrolled in
school.
Johnson cited in car wreck
Canadian Sprinter Ben Johnson was ticketed for not having
proof of insurance when his car collided with .mother car in
Bcamsvillc, Ontario. Johnson escaped injury in the crash.
and stripped of world records
lohnson's woes continued as the International Amateur Athletic
Federation stripped the runner of his world records in the 50-meter and
60-meter dashes. Johnson, who allegedly took large doses of steroids to
enhance his performance, was stripped of his records over the weekend
in Tokyo by the IAAU, the governing body of track and field.
Jacobsen wins Hope Classic
Peter (acobsen ended a five-year drought on the PGA circuit by
winning the BobHopeChrvslerClassicby one strokeSundav. Jacobsen's
win was worth $180,000 of the total purse of $1 million. Heshota90-
hole total of 21-under-par 539 to edge OUt Scott Simpson and Brian
Tennyson.
FBI investigating race track
Bay Meadows Racecourse in San Matoo, Calif, is under investiga-
tion bv the FBI for possible betting irregularities, according to pub
lished reports. At least two Nevada betting parlors are refusing to take
bets on races at the track. The parlors lost as much 8S$500,000 Dec. 10
on bets placed on King shots. The FBI has declined to comment
Veldkamp takes skate championship
Bart eldkamp, competing in his home country of the Netherlands,
won the overall European men's speed skating championship Sunday.
Veldkamp won the title with his 14 minute, 1.08 second time in the
10,000 meter race. Cunda Kleeman of Fast Germany won the women's
title bv taking the 5,000 meter race in 7:24.76.
U.S. skier beats Italian
Leslie Thompson of the U.S. Ski Team won the final American
Airlines Super Series race in Farmington, Maine Sunday. Thompson
beat out Italy's C.abnella Carrel by eight seconds in the two-lap hilly
course at Troll Valley Ski Center. Thompson did the race in 30 minutes,
34.5 seconds despite steady snow flurries.
In the Locker
Super Bowl MVPs and
champs
14H4 -S.in Francisco
(Nil 20, Cincinnati
(AFC) If,
1ukk Washington
(MO 42, Denver (AFC)
10
1�H7 NY Giants
(NFC) l, Denver (AFC
20
1MH6 Chicago (NFC)
4h, New Fngland (AFC)
10
1VH5�San Francisco
(N FO W, M ia m i (A FC) (N PC) 17
lb lu7 Pittsburgh lAFC) lb, Minne-
I9M I. A Raiders (AFC) 38, Wash- sota (NFC) 6
ington(NFC)9 1974- Miami (AFC) 24, Minnesota
19K3 -Washington (NFC) 27, Miami (NFC) 7
(AFC) 17 1973- Miami (AFC) 14, Washington
1Q�2 Stn Francisco (NFC) 26, Cin- (NFC) 7
cinnati (AFC) 21 1972 -Dallas (NFC) 24, Miami (AFC)
1981 Oakland (AFC) 27, Philadel- 3
phia(NFC)10 1971�Baltimore (AFC) h, Dallas
1980 Pittsburgh (AFC11, l.os An- (NFC) 1.1
geles (NFC) 19 1970-Kansas City (AFL) 23, Mmno-
1979 Pittsburgh (AFC) 38, Dallas sota(NFl)7
(NFC) 11 1969- NY Jets (AFI.) 1b, Baltimore
1978 DallasNFC)27.Denver(AFC) (NFL) 7
10 1968�Crevn Bay (NFL) 33, Oakland
1977-Oakland (AFC) 32, Minnesota (AFL) 14
(NFC) 14 17-Oecn Bay (NFL) 35, Kansas
1976�Pittsburgh (AFC) 21, Dallas City (AFL) 10
IRS turns heat up in Memorial
Gym with basketball tourney
By Jeannette Roth
IRS
The winter cold is back. But,
Winter f leaf burned in Memorial
Gymnasium this weekend during
intramural preseason basketball
play. Andyes,prognosticatorIMA
RECK actually got one right gang
as top picked Winter Heat de-
feated second ranked Air Assault
57-56 in championship play.
In semi-final action, Sigma Phi
Fpsilon were cold against Winter
I feat .is Marcus Goodson lead the
first half attack inside. Goodson
lead all scorers with nine at the
halfway point. The Sig Eps fal-
tered with turnoversbutdisplayed
an overall team game with consis-
tent scores from Jim Jernigan,
Terry McNulty and Rob Evans
Joel Sanders led in assists for the
Sig Eps who promise to make
regular season action heat up.
Winter Heat left the Sig Eps cold
55-32.
Air Assault faced a very tough
1 (X) Proof squad in a true 'battle of
the boards' match that changed
'lead hands' several times. Brian
McPhatter led his team at the half
with 8 points as 10(1 Proof fol-
lowed an ace inside game to the
tee ECU football player Junior
Robinson hit for 17 points in the
losing effort. The Air Assault at-
tack was led by jerry Dillon with
18, Clayton Driver with 13 and
Darrin Bynum with 10. In a game
rid with technical fouls. Air As-
sault managed to bomb past the
1 (X) Proof'Twin Towers'(Anthony
Thompson & Charles Freeman)
See IRS, page 18
Football players try to
deal with coaching change
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) �
Clem son linebacker Kenzil
lacksOfl had never heard of Ken
Hatfield
I le has now.
Hatfield is lackson's new
coach
"I don't even know him
l.ukson said. "I'd never heard of
him
fackson and his teammates
should get to know FJatfield a lot
better soon 1 latfield plans to meet
this week with the players the
same players who threatened to
boycott the 1990 season it their
beloved Danny Ford wasn't rein-
stated or one of his assistants
wasn't named to replace him
But with Haffield's hiring, the
players backed down, calling off
their threatened walkout.
"Me, personally, it's like the
other coaches said, 'Give the gu v a
chance " Jackson said. "I'll do
that
That doesn't mean Jackson
and his fellow Tigers are over-
joyed.
"We kind of already knew he
(Ford) is not going to come back
defensive back Dexter Davis said.
"Wedidn't get anything out oi the
deal. It doesn't take a genius to
know we aren't happy
Jackson and the rest of the
Tigers were told bv universitv
See Players, page 20
WZMB
Continued from page 15
to knot the score at seven.
"I got this burning feeling in
my head and feet slid Herring
as he tried to explain WZMB's
newfound strength.
However, rising to the inva-
sion. The East Carolinian pulled
away from the frequency modu-
lators and won, 15-13.
"WZMB had decent serves
(hen heh) s�ud Mike Martin,
captain for The East Carolinian.
"But we had great team work, and
team work wins
Either way, in the battle of the
two media, the score remains, TEC
2-WZMB 0.
IL.
ITS STILL NOT TOO LATE FOR NEXT FALL SEMESTER
TO STUDY ABROAD!
Docs a year of study in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland. Belgium.
Mcxko, Costa Rica. Argentina. Columbia, dominlcan Republic. The
Neathrlands, "inland. Sweden. MaJla. Cyprus Kenya. Korea. Thailand,
or Hong Kong interest youV
Sounds fantastic! But study abroad is too expensive? Or would be
impossible because of lack of fluency in another language? Or would
result In delaying graduation?
The truth of the matter is that many Institutions oiler programs in
English! Of course, if you do have sufficient fluency in another language,
the choice of study sites is even greater!
I he cost? The cost of attending each participating institution :n the
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM ISEP) is precisely th
ssme ss sttending ECU. arid, in the vast majority ol cases, the courses
taken abroad transfer back to ECU and earn credit toward your degree I
is indeed true that, through ISEPsome of the finest univcrsiUcs in the
WORLD are available at KCU prices
II you wish additional information about ISEP and the particular
universities that form the ISEP network, please contact
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Office: 222 Austin Phone: Office 757-6418
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t
The East Carolinian, January 23,1990 17
UNC council re-evaluates role of student athlete
CHAPE1 Hll I.NC (AIM
The faculty council at the Univer
sity of North Carolina at Chapel
t hll has called tor cutbacks in the
time athletes spend on the p!a ing
field and and added emphasis on
academics
The council approved nine
recommendations designed to
limit the hours athletes spend at
practice and games and to judge
i oaches cn their players academic
progress rather than their winning
percentage Only one professor in
the 77 member council voted
against the proposals
The recommendations were
part ot a report authored b a
special panel ot UNC-CH profes
sens who spent IS months study-
ing athletics after the forced resig-
nation ot football coach Pick
Crum He lett under tire in ll)S7
after several disappointing sea-
sons
the professors' vote Friday
means the faculty council has
adopted nine ot the report's 32
recommendations the rest will
be considered at next month's
meeting but the council has no
power to enact rules, and its deci-
sion won't cause any immediate
changes Itonlysendsa signal that
the faculty wants I NC CH to lead
a campaign for change within the
National Collegiate Athletic As-
sociation.
Any such campaign would
have to be led bv the school's top
administrator, Chancellor Paul
Hardin HI. Hardin said he was
pleased with the professors' ac-
tions.
"I hear the faculty calling for
less pressure on the student-ath-
lete he said in an interview.
I lappilv, the mood of the faculty
and the mood of the chancellor are
compatible
The special commi ttce'sreport
had found that UNC-CH ran a
clean sports program. But it also
said NCAA rules were loose
enough to allow sports programs
including the one at UNC-CH
to become big monev enter-
Brawl
prises that ultimately conflict with
schools' academic missions.
The report said that, if the
university is unable to persuade
the NCAA or the other Atlantic
Coast Conference schools to adopt
reforms within five years, UNC-
CH should consider leaving the
ACC � or dropping intercolle-
giate sports altogether.
But some coaches and athletic
officials think the report goes too
far.
"I think some of them are
outstanding, and some are ridicu-
lous said Moycr Smith, execu-
tive vice president of the Rams'
Club, UNC-CH's booster club. "I
think there's a good bit of dis-
continued from page 15
phone interview ITmrsd.n night
rhey were hittmg people with
�heir instruments. There w as gen-
ral noting throughout the gym
nasium between Central fans and
v- f tans
Seven people two cit) po
i e officers, one campus set urit)
fficerand four students were
treated tor cuts and bruises and
�-leased, said Candy Colglazier a
spokeswoman tor Moses Cone
Memorial Hospital in( Jreensboro
Greensboro cit) police were
led to reinforce NC v; 1' seen
try officers as the approximate!)
6 000 tans were remov ed from the
gym.
Cassundra Morrison a sopho
more from Elkin and a member oJ
the N.C. A&T pep band, was car-
ried out on a stretcher alter appar-
ently being trampled during the
c,hting
The fighting continued out-
side among several hundred spec
tators as players tried to board
buses
There was conflicting infor-
mation about the number ot
people arrested in the melee with
a sheriff's official reporting three
and cit) and campus police re-
porting no arrests
Greensboro police reported
se en arrests shortly before 1 a m.
at a fraternit) parts where stu-
dents had begun fighting, but
police desk sci geant i Jary Wilson
said he v as not sine it the lighting
was related to the earlier braw I.
Both coat lies said none of their
pla ers w as hurt in the basketball
brawl althoughN Centralcoach
Mike Bernard s glasses were bro-
ken.
Sex uritv police, man) ot them
in the far reaches of the 7,500 stat
complex attending toa tight which
earlier brokeout between two fans,
arrived on the floor about two
minutes alter the brawl began.
Security officers used night
sticks to wrestle two individuals
to the floor
Coaches from both teams
worked to restrain their players.
�t least two chairs from the NC
Central bench were removed and
useel as weapons, witnesses said.
NC A&T Athletic Director
Orby Moss pleaded with specta-
tors on the public address system
to remain in their seats. But sev-
eral other tights, apparently in-
volving tans from the two schools,
continued in the stands filled to
near capacity. Moss then sus-
pended the game and the coaches
removed their plavers.
NC Central Athletic Director
t, hris Fisher said the two teams
have been arch rivals since they
were both members of the Central
Intercollegiate Athletic Associa-
tion.
NC Central and A&T have
played 121 basketball gam A&T
holding a 66-55 series lead.
NC A&T is now a member of
the Mid-Eastern Athletic Confer-
ence in Greensboro.
A spokesman for the ME AC
said conference officials were
awaiting reports of the brawl be-
fore deciding whether to penalize
the team
The contest was plaved very
closely from the 4:25 mark of the
tirst halt when A&T took its first
lead, 17-In. Central tied the game
at 34 with 1320 remaining. No
more than two points separated
the teams again.
With nine minutes left on the
clock, at approximately 8:40 p.m
Ian. 22 2S
7S6-2149
x333SXSECCm
Fra
&
OYAE N
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29h
Al AUASE I
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a fight between fans broke out
near the last row of seats in the
upper deck of the Central side of
the gym. Moss, A&T's athletic
director, had accompanied secu-
rity officers there when the fights
broke out on the floor.
When Leak and Humphries
began shoving each other players
and fans quickly swarmed the
court, beginning directly in front
of the NC Central bench.
"My first recollection was
somebody left Central's bench
without a uniform on Moss said.
"I saw the guy leave the bench and
then everybody got involved.
"1 want to look at the game
film to see who ran onto the floor
from each bench because there's a
rule about that
Bernard wasdisappointed the
game ended the way it did.
"It was a hotly contested game
between two rivalsand it'sa shame
that the game couldn't be decided
tonight he said. "It's a shame
their fans didn't get the opportu-
nity to see the whole ball game. It
would have been very exciti ng the
last eight minutes
agreement throughout the cam
pus over them
In addition to limiting prac-
tice time, the measures the profes-
sors approved include
� a "considerable" reduction
m the number of games plaved
� barring freshmen from
playing sports.
� giving coaches contracts
that make them responsible for
athletes' academic progress.
� granting admission only
to athletes who meet the general
admissions standards of the
school.
� cutting the maximum
number ot yearsof eligibility from
four to three, and abolishing red-
shirting except in cases o( injur)
or hardship.
eliminating spring football
practice.
not allowing an) sports
season to last longer than a stan-
dard semester.
�sarar
III111
.DAN'S
l utatft itthiHq,
� ffWrs,
s, � h i a Hurt'
� �), �
Sttirt off 'mr ewyear
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'Buy � Sell � -Trade
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Downtown
There's pient of FREE
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Local & Out of
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Greetingaids
t
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Balloons
(ipen til Wtprti ' I .c s Week'
V
I CEN
(iticm ille Square
Shopping Ccntei
v, -i7 �
iy
CENTRAL BOOK
M NEWS
55223!5!
,� v y -a I
RUSH
Information
Pizza, Meet the Brothers
Subs with Alpha Sig Little Sisters
Barbeque night, Meet the
Alpha Phi's
Jan. 25 - Oral bid night and post rush party
Jan. 22
Jan. 23
Jan. 24
For Information call 757-3516
i





- ,
i
18 The East Carolinian, January 23, 1990
IRS
Continued from page lb
60 S to head into tho champion
ship game
in the final game, Barry Ross
opened the Winter Heat in surge
to victory with points 1 & 2before
the 'perimeter power' Marcus
( loodson hit Air Assault w ith ,i
barrage ot outside shots that led
himtoa ISpointgameNgh Darryl
Summervtlleconnected for 14 and
tops with tenacious defense and
smart plav under the hoards
Air Assault made a tight game
ot it as Clayton Driver and Darrtn
Bynum pumped in 1? each In-
deed, Air Assault led at the halt
way mark ?72r before dropping
50 47 with 2:23 left
Winter Heat stalled tor time
but tailed to connect on a tew tree
throws which gave Air Assault
thehopeol defeating the top pick.
With 11 seconds on the dock,
Darryl Summerville ot Winter
(leat was fouled under the basket
and went to the line tor a free
throw Summervilleconnectedon
one which put the Winter Heat up
?7 4 Air Assault made a iast
ditch effort to score with :04 sec
onds left but found themselves
short b two .it the buzzer and
number two in the tournament.
Regular season play resumes
this week with lma Recks top five
in both the men's and women's
basketball plavbook
Men
1 "he Fellows
Sigma Phi Epsilon A
Priapisms
1 v hairman ol the Board
5 1 au kappa Epsilon A
Dark 1 lorsc Favorite: Winter
� it
W omen
1 Amt it l unky Enough
( luelcss
; Our Perogativc
t Pump Mammas
5 Swish
Park Horse Favorite: Sigma
Sicma Sigma
IvDNEY
(a small amount)
(a verv tinvamount)
Concentration
This ECU student carefully eyes the ball during a ping pong match in the basement of Mendenhall Student
Center The facility also offers bowling, billiards, video games and tables for chess (Photo by J D
Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
All this and more (or
less)at The East Carolin-
ian
Applv in person at TEC
in The Publications Build-
POWER
(even less)
Read the newspaper, ifs free
MEDIA BOARD
Is now accepting applications for General Manager for the
1990 - 1991 academic year for the following:
� The East Carolinian
� WZMB - FM
� Buccaneer
� Rebel
� Photo Lab
� Expressions Magazine
Please apply at the Media Board Office,
2nd floor, Publications Building
Phone 757-6009
Applications accepted through January 30, 1990
I
1 I
Fosdick's
Fresh Flounder
& Shrimp
V; Special for Two ?
Coupon
Two Combinations of
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Two Small Platters $9.50
Two Regular Platters $11.50
Two Large PlattersSI3.50
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Dine In Or Coupon Expires Beverage noti
Januarv 31.WO Included
1
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1890 SEAFOOD
2903 S. Evans St.
Call 756-2011
OPEN for LUNCH
Sun-Fri at 11:00
RUSH
Sigma Pi
Fraternity
" A Symbol Of Progress"
Rush Week January 22 - 25
Scheduled Events
Monday Jan 22 Meet The Brothers
Sub Night
Tuesday Jan 23 Pizza Night & Meet the
Brothers. - Meet the sisters of AOn
Wednesday Jan 24 - Meet the sisters of AZ
Thursday Jan 25 - Bid Night Invitation Only
rwr
Where: Tar River Estates Clubhouse,
North Oak St.
rime: 8-11 Mon - Wed
6 - 8 Thursday
For Questions or Rides 752-1938
What's behind these letters
Nationally it's a fraternity that's among the
oldest, with over 2(H) years of tradition. A frater-
! nitv with over 175,1)00 initiates and 207 chapters
across the nation, making it one of the largest
college fraternities. It's a fraternity that empha-
sizes brotherhood and leadership through its
Leadership Conference Program and Scholar-
shipLeadership Awards.
What's behind these letters?
� � �
At East Carolina it's a great way to meel
friends and become involved in campus life It's
fraternity that has traditionally held one i
largest all-campus parties, Bahama Mama II
fraternity that's involved in the Greenville com
munity with service projects that benefit ai
causes.
(Located next to DarryTs and across
from Umstead Residence Hall)
maybe you.
RUSH
Kappa Sigma
700 E. 10th Street
752-5543 or 757-1005





The East Carolinian, January 11,1990 19
Elway finds comfort zone with Shanahan
Fore!
Matt Harrington finishes a round of fnsbee golf on the course set up
hind I larrington t icld Harrington, as well as other ECU students,
oy takmq pa it o! the day off to play a round with friends (Pnoto
. D Whitmire I CU Photo Lab)
DENVER (AP) � He expects
to receive another NFL head
coaching offer in the future and
probably deserves one. For now,
Mike Shanahan is content with
tutoring one of the game's most
electrifying performers.
Shanahan finds himself back
in the Super Bowl for the third
time in four years, an unlikely
prospect considering he began the
season as coach of the Los Angeles
Raiders.
The former offensive coordi-
nator of the Denver Broncos, Sha-
nahan returned to the Broncos as
quarterback coach after being fired
bv the Raiders in October.
It's a nice ending to a season
of backbiting and dejection that
had Shanahan wondering about
his coaching future.
"This is the toughest year I've
ever been through he said.
"You set goals as a coach, and
I did with the Raiders. Not having
the chance to reach those goals
was demoralizing, because I knew
the Raiders were capable of com-
ing around and maybe making
the playoffs.
"I'm just thankful Dan Reeves
asked me to come back here
Broncos quarterback John
Elway is thankful, too.
"Mike and I are on the same
page he said. "He understands
what 1 go through out there He
understands our personnel, and
he understands other personnel
around the league. He's a great
football mind He's helped us a
lot
Cliven much oi the credit for
the maturation ot Elway during
four seasons as a Denver assis-
tant, Shanahan became coach of
the Raiders in 1988, leading the
team to a 7-4 record.
After a 1 -3 start this season,
Shanahan was fired by Raiders
managing general partner Al
Davis, who said he had made a
mistake in not hiring a coach
versed in the Raider tradition.
Two weeks later, Shanahan
was back in Denver as quarter-
back coach.
"He's one of the finest young
coaches in the game Broncos
coach Dan Reeves said in announc-
ing the rehiring.
Above all, Shanahan, 37, has
helped restore Elway's comfort
zone. Reeves had doubled as
quarterback coach in Shanahan's
absence, but Elway never was
entirely at ease dealing directly
with Reeves. Elway has great
rapport with Shanahan, however.
and the assistant often serves as a
buffer between the strong-willed
coach and quarterback.
"Dan was trying to coach the
quarterbacks, and that put too
much pressure on him Elway
said. "He had so many things to
do, he did n't have the quality time
to spend with us
After some up-and-down
performances since, Elway seems
to be peaking for the Super Bowl.
He passed for 385 yards and three
touchdowns to lead Denver past
Cleveland 37-21 in the AFC Cham-
pionship game, setting up a Super
Bowl matchup with the San Fran-
cisco 49ers on Jan. 28 at New Or-
leans.
RAPE
IS FOR
REAL
REAL
IS FOR
HELP
758-HELP
Clemson
Continued from page 15
� : about 10 minutes before his
tvs onference
i know and I told them
: s a er difficult time in their
- i latfield said. "I told them
usl to go home and pray about it
jnd think what they want to do
and what the) can do best tor
themsch es
1 latfield said he didn't ask the
lyers tor their support.
i left them alone hesaid. "1
think any kind oi support you get
ias to be earned. 1 nist wanted
them to know what we were all
about. 1 have the utmost confi-
dence in their abilities to do what
thev think is right
I latfield, w ho had a base sal
arv ot $75,000 al Arkansas and
had been expected to sign a five-
year contract in the near future,
said he had not signed a contract
w ith i. lemson
Ford's resignation tor
which he will receive a settlement
i fabout$1 million cameonthe
heels ot a second NCAA probe
during his 11-year tenure. The first
one. in 1982, resulted in Clemson
being hit with two years' proba-
tion ITiis time, the Tigersare being
asked to explain 14 alleged NCAA
rules violations, including pay-
ments to players of up to $150.
1 latfield was interviewed Fri-
day in Memphis, Term. He was
offered the job late Saturday night
by Robinson, who said it took a
person oi "great strength and for-
titude and confidence" to take the
Clemson job amid the turmoil that
has struck the school.
Robinson said he talked with
1 latfield about the 'CA A investi-
gation.
"We certainly couldn't give
him any definitive actions that
might be taken Robinson said.
"We didn't know. Basically, he
had to go and make a decision
whether he wanted to accept the
situation that could be - what-
ever that might be
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1
20 The East Carolinian, January 23, 1990
Players
president Max I.ennon and Ath-
letic Director Bobbv Robinson at a
Sunday morning meeting that
Hatfield would be their new coach
"I woke up one morning and
we lost a coach lackson said
Sunday I woke up this morning
and we got a new coach.
I'hev told us there's nothing
we can do Jackson slid. "(Hir
efforts are useless. It's almost like
they don't care what we say It
seems to me our opinion don't
mean anything all all.
I don't see a point in protest-
ing mi longer
After Ford resigned Thursday
amid allegations of NCAA rule
violations, the players called on
the administration to bring Ford
hick or hire one of his assistants
After meeting with Robinson and
I ennon on Friday, the players
strengthened their stance, saying
they would sit out the upcoming
season it their demands weren't
met.
The players felt their views
were not being considered by
school officials and wanted more
ol a voice in what had a direct
impact on their lives
"We're the ones playing,
lackson said We bring all the
tans in
ln is said it all boils dov n
to" a lack ol communications be
tween the administration and the
Overtime
players.
"I'm still looking for answers
Davis said.
So are his teammates. For
some, the answer may be to look
elsewhere to continue their col-
lege careers.
Some people arc ready to
transfer Davis said. "Others
don't know what they're going to
do We're not happy That's the
bottom line
That was still true -although
perhaps to a lesser extent � after
the players met with Hatfield for
about lOminutesat Mauldin Hall.
the school's athletic dormitory.
Hatfield talked briefly with his
new team before being introduced
as their new head coach to the
media
None of the players leaving
the meeting would comment ex-
cept tor Stacy Fields, a tight end
who serves as the team's spokes-
man. Fields said he and his team-
mates weren't HH1 percent happy
but thai the players were happv
( lemson supporters knew "wedid
cur best to gel what we wanted
1 latfield said he felt the meet-
ing wenl well.
"I talked to the C lemson play
ers and I told them how much I
appreciated them coming to the
meeting, Hatfield said "I know
and 1 told them it s a very
difficult times in their lives I told
possession but the Lady Pirates
retaliated by going on a 16 n run
to give them a 16 8 lead just seven
minutes into the game
The 1 .uiv 1 lomets started the
backcourt pressure at the 1 1 nun
ute mark, and cut the lead to two,
lh-14, with iist over eight min-
utes left to play in the first half. By
halftime, the Lady Hornets had
taken a 31-28 lead,outscoring ECU
23-12.
I'hev were a real fast team
said Coley "Since we were a little
flat, their press worked really
well
In the second halt, the 1 adv
1 lornets led by as many as seven
points at 47-40 But, led in part by
( .rav and senior guard Irish
Hamilton, the Lady Pirates
i limbed back into the game.
With iisf over two minutes
left in regulation, freshman guard
t lay nor O'Ponnell hit an 18-foot
lump shot that gave the Pirates
their only lead of the second half.
but Delaware State's Kim Taylor
made a shot underneath to give
the Lady I lornets a two-point lead
w iih 26 seconds remaining.
(.rav took the ball on the en-
suing possession and scored on a
twelve-foot jumper that sent the
Continued from page 16
them just to go home and pray
about it and think what they want
to do and what they can do best
for themselves.
"I thought they were verv
attentive. I thought they listened.
That's all I can hope for at this
time. I didn't expect them to jump
up and clap. 1 didn't expect them
to throw rocks. I thought thev were
receptive
Robinson said theadministra-
tion did consider the players'
wishes when it was looking for a
new coach.
"We gave them a lot of
thought We honestly did. As I
told them this morning, the thing
that's most important in this proc-
ess are the student-athletes
Robinson said. "We told them
just like we told the Clemson
people we wanted to get the
verv best person we could get for
them, and for Clemson Univer-
sity. We understand what thev
were saying
both Hatfield and Robinson
said no disciplinary action is
planned against the players.
"No, no. no. Listen, those.ire
great people. Thev feel, hurt and
thev need some leadership. They
need to be bv themselves to make
their own decisions Robinson
said "They've been a class act,
nd they're a class act now "
Continued from page 15
game into overtime.
In the overtime period, the
Lady Pirates fell behind bv as
many as six points before Tonya
I iargrove and C Iray combined for
the diference to knot the score at
68
but. O'Donnell and Coley
sank four clutch free throws to tie
the score at 70 with eight seconds
remaining in the overtime. Fol-
lowing a traveling violation on
Delaware State, the Lady Pirates
got the ball back, and with one
second remaining. Gray hit a
twelve-foot jumper to give the
team the win.
SIGMA NU
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Jan 22nd - 25th
Phone
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 23, 1990
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 23, 1990
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.719
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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