The East Carolinian, January 18, 1990






JP i iU iIj Vimiiiil -l�fttmc rnmtmitlttlJ KttttJ. 1 2 7
Sennnq the 'Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 64 No. 4
Thursday, January 18 ,1990
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
24 Pages
Students 'take a
stand' against rape
By Gretchen Journigan
Special to The East Carolinian
ganized for a more effective means
of protection against crime.
Knox will be working with
Approximately 500 students Roakesand the SGA to expand the
attended the Rape Awareness emergency blue light phone sys-
Members of Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority participate in last night's Rape Awareness Vigil sponsored by the ECU Greek Council. (Photo
byJ.D Whitmire-ECU Photo Lab)
Universities report drug violations
East Carolina addresses problem
By Kirstin Eakes
Stjff Writer
ECU reported more campus
drug violations in the 188-8
school year than any other North
Carolina university.
Of the 162 alleged violations
statewide, ECU reported M Ac-
cording to Public Safety Director
James DePuy, this high number
indicates public safety actively
pursues thedrugproblem. "I think
the statistics talk for themselves
DePuy snd. "We are a leader in
approaching the drug problem
According to The Associated
Press, the state's largest two uni-
versities reported 16 violations
N.C. State reported 10 violations,
while UNC Chapel Hill reported
six.NoviolationscM curredat Eliza-
beth City State, Fayette ille St ite,
the N.C. School of the Arts in
Winston Salem, Pembn keState,
UNC Asheville or Winston Sa-
tan State.
As reported by the Asa x iated
Precs, Nathan Simms, university
system vice president, offered
Wine explanations for the variance
in drug violations. I le said some
campuses, like ECU, are possibly
monitoring drug use more aggres-
sively than others. "You have to
lookut the culture of the campuses,
though SimmsaddcdTncother
thing you could conclude of a
campus that reported no viola-
tions) is here's a campus where
students )ust don't have the money
to indulge in drugs
Fayetteville State Chancellor
Lloyd "Vic" Hackley supported
Simms' explanation of students
lacking money for drugs. Hack-
lev, whose campus reported no
violations, said, "Thekids who live
on our campus are very young
and very broke
According to DePuy, ECU'S
( hanccllor Eakin and the admini-
stration support the fight against
drugs. "Dr. Eakin and hisstaffare
very open and honest about deal-
ing with drugs DePu) said. He
added: "Wetakea very aggressive
approach toward drugs. We have
some compassion for users, but
not pushers
A plan adopted by the N.C
Hoard of Governors in fall 188
mandates students, faculty or staff
caught selling hard drugs, like
i ocaine, must be expelled or fired.
Those selling milder drugs, like
marijuana, are suspended tor at
least a semester.
The faculty or staff � luht
possessing or using hard drugs
are suspended, and those pi issess-
ing or using milder drugs are put
on probation. Students placed on
probation continue their studies
but must refrain from extracur-
ricular and social activities.
Only one of the 162 violations
reported invoh ed cocaine. Sixteen
universities placed 126 students
on probation and suspended 18
tor using or selling illegal drugs.
I M seven cmploveescited for drug
violations, tour were fired, accord-
ins to Associated Press.
Candlelighhng Vigil Wednesday
at 5:30 on the campus mall spon-
sored by ECU Greek Council.
"Women must change their
attitude, 'it can't happen to me
Lt. Keith Knox said.
Guest speakers SGA President
Tnpp Roakes, NOW representa-
tive Kit Kimbcrly and Knox spoke
to promote rape awareness and
the importance of educating
people about the problem.
In llSc, the IU Campus
Police reported two aquaintance
rapes, one stranger rape and one
attempted rape.
Greenville police reported 27
rapes and three attempted rapes;
possibly six of these victims were
ECU students, Knox said
"Rape is not a concern for only
Greenville residents; it not only
can happen in ourcity but a woman
can be attacked anywhere, at any-
time, even in her own home Knox
said.
"A rapist will rape again and
again until he is caught Knox
said.
Women need to learn how to
protect themselves by using com-
mon precautions and by learning
as much as they can about self-
defenseand most of all, "trust their
own instincts Knox emphasized.
Only 10 to 15 percent of all
rapesareeven reported, Knox said.
"We must help each other,
both men and women, to make
ECU safer. We will not stand for
rape at ECU.
tern on campus.
The department of Public
Safety has been working closely in
developing community resources
to assist and aid victims of rape
and other violent crimes, accord-
ing to Knox.
A Campus Crime Prevention
Committee is currently being
formed to address crime preven-
tion needs throughout the univer-
sitv community, Knox said.
rheC rime Prevention Depart-
ment refers rape victims to the Real
Crisis Center and to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, Knox said.
Last semester, the Board of
Governors gave an emergency
appropriation of $500,000 for
upgrading the lighting system on
main campus and $78,000 from
traffic fines, Knox said.
"Rape is a product of a sexist
society and in order to stop it we
need to reevaluate male-female
relationship Kimberly said.
"I'mafeministsandweshould
not blame ourselves when we have
been attacked or raped; we do not
bring rape upon ourselves as
women Kimberly said.
According to the speakers, the
unreported rape victims who need
our help, the victims of attempted
rape who escaped injury and all
women who are potential rape
victims were represented by the
candlelighting of the speakers'
candles.
"Blow out your candles as a
symbol of ending all rape Greek
According to Roakes,Pirate Council representative Kelly Greer
Ride and Pirate Walk will be reor- said.
Vigil honors Martin Luther King Jr.
By April Draughn
Staff Writer
A candlelight vigil in honor
of Martin Luther King was held on
January 15 at 6:00 p.m. in front of
Memorial Gym. The march was
sponsored by Mind Blacks for
Leadership and Equalit) (ABI E).
Carla 1 looker, president oi ABI H,
began the march along with Chan-
cellor Eakin
Approximately 100 people
participated m the march Partici-
pants joined hands as they
marched from Memorial Gym to
Mendenhall Student Center sing-
ing "We Shall Overcome When
the marchers reached Mendenhall
they formed a large circle and
began to light their candles and
sang another verse of "We Shall
Overcome
After the candles were lit, a
prayer was given bv Rev. 1 toward
Parker lr. from Sycamore Hill
Baptist � hurch. In his prayer he
said, "We thank you much for Pr.
Martin Luther King, who gave
much, who taught much, who
loved much The actual vigil was
then ended as most dispersed to
attend the oth annual Martin Lu-
ther King r. leadership Awards
Ceremony sponsored by Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity
The award ceremony began
at 7:15 p.m. and has been held for
the past six years to honor those
minority students who have
achieved. The ceremony was
opened by Anthony Rook, presi-
dent of Alpha Phi Alpha. In the
invocation Rev. Kenneth Ham-
mond said that the struggle had
not ended and that we must con-
tinue to press on.
Dr. Fitch of ECU led the
Faculty Tribute in which she said
that four states still do not honor
Dr. King's birthdate. She went on
to say that all of America had been
affected by the dream and the
dreamer and that he adhered to
nonviolent civil disobedience in
his struggle. She ended her tribute
with, "in this day of unrest and
resurfacing racism, we must be
ever vigilante. No one of us has
achieved until we all have
achieved
The guest speaker, Dr. Sid-
ney Locks, gave a speech entitled,
"African Americans Preparing For
The Twenty-First Century: Insur-
ing The Legacy In his speech.
Rev. Lock stressed the importance
of Dr. King's legacy and of his
committment for the fight for
equality.
Rev. Lock related Dr. King's
commitment to what he feels is a
See Vigil page 2
N.C. joins five-state agreement
By Donna Hayes
Staff Writer
Here are a just few of the blood samples taken during Wednesday s
blood drive at Mendenhall (Photo by J.D. Whitmire-ECU Photo Lab
The state of North Carolina
has entered into a five-state agree-
ment for the disposal of hazard-
ous waste, making the state eli-
gible for a portion of money set
aside by the federal government
toassist states in the cleaning up of
abandoned toxic waste sites.
North Carolina joins Alabama,
Kentucky, South Carolina and
Tennessee in a two-year plan for
disposing of wastes that are con-
sidered hazardous. Any waste that
is ignitable, corrosive, reactive or
toxic is defined bv law as hazard-
ous.
The U.S. government had
previously approved a federal
regulation requiring each state to
devise a 20-year plan for manag-
ing hazardous waste by Oct. 17,
1989 with failure to comply result-
ing in the loss of federal funds
For the state of North Caro-
lina, failure to comply with the
regulation would have resulted in
a loss of approximately $26 mil-
lion for two sites currently under
consideration.
The new agreement, passed in
December, brings North Carolina
into compliance with federal regu-
lation and law; however, officials
said North Carolina may still lose
a portion of the Superfund money
since the agreement was signed
after the Oct. 17 deadline.
North Carolina's chemical and
allied industries generated ap-
proximately 2.8 billion pounds of
hazardous waste in 1988. Officials
maintained that most hazardous
waste is treated on site�90 per-
cent or 2.5 billion pounds -but at
least 300millionpoundsisshipped
out-of-state for treatment.
SouthCarolinahaspreviously
disposed of North Carolina's haz-
ardous waste that could not be
treated on site by the waste's pro-
ducers, but South Carolina hasalso
banned North Carolina from us-
ing the treatment facilities in the
past for various reasons. The new
agreement ensures that North
Carolina will have reliable access
to hazardous waste disposal sites.
Federal law requires that in-
dustries dispose of hazardous
waste within 90 days of the timeof
generation. Without the appro-
priate means of disposal, those
industries producing toxic wastes
would have to close, but the five-
state pact providesN.C. industries
with continuous access to treat-
ment facilities.
Under the terms of the agree-
ment, North Carolina will build
units for combusting hazardous
waste, treating contaminated soil
and treating and recycling haz-
ardous solvents. The state is also
responsible for locating a landfill
for the disposal of incinerator ash.
The Hazardous Waste Man-
agement Commission will actively
seek volunteer host communities
for the new facilities, but officials
said the sites for the long-term
disposal of toxic substances have
not been selected.
Inside
Editorials4
Commending Public
Safety's open policy
State and Nation5
Unrest continues in
Azerbaijan
Classifieds6
Features13
Parker returns to review
art
Comics19
Dead King goes to hell
Sports20
Pirate swimmers lose
to Carolina
i





She l�uBt (Eartfitman
Serving the 'East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 64 No. 4
Thursday, January 18 ,1990
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
24 Pages
Students 'take a
stand' against rape
By Grctchen Journigan
Special to The East Carolinian
ganized for a more effective means
of protection against crime.
Knox will be working with
Approximately 500 students Roakesand the SGA to expand the
attended the Rape Awareness emergency blue light phone sys-
Candlelighting Vigil Wednesday tern on campus
at 5:30 on the campus mall spon-
sored by ECU Greek Council.
"Women must change their
attitude, 'it can't happen to me
Lt. Keith Knox said.
Guest speakers SGA President
Tripp Roakes, NOW representa-
tive Kit Kimbcrly and Knox spoke
The department of Public
Safety has been working closely in
developing community resources
to assist and aid victims of rape
and other violent crimes, accord-
ing to Knox.
A Campus Crime Prevention
Committee is currently being
to promote rape awareness and formed to address crime preven
the importance of educating tion needs throughout the univer
people about the problem.
In lu8c, the ECU Campus
Police reported two aquamtance
rapes, one stranger rape and one
attempted rape.
Greenville police reported 27
rapes and three attempted rapes;
possibly six of these victims were
ECU students, Knox said
"Rape is not a concern for only
Greenville residents; it not only
can happen in ourcity but a woman
sitv community, Knox said.
The Crime Prevention Depart-
ment refers rape victims to the Real
Crisis Center and to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, Knox said.
Last semester, the Board of
Governors gave an emergency
appropriation of $500,000 for
upgrading the lighting system on
main campus and $78,000 from
traffic fines, Knox said.
Rape is a product of a sexist
can be attacked anywhere, at any- society and in order to stop it we
Members of Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority participate in last nights Rape Awareness Vigil sponsored by the ECU Greek Council. (Photo
by J D Whitmire-ECU Photo Lab)
Universities report drug violations
East Carolina addresses problem
time, even in her own home Knox
said.
"A rapist will rape again and
again until he is caught Knox
said.
Women need to learn how to
protect themselves by using com-
mon precautions and by learning
need to reevaluate male-female
relationship Kimberly said.
"I'm a feministsand weshould
not blame ourselves when we have
been attacked or raped; we do not
bring rape upon ourselves as
women Kimberly said.
Accord ing to the speakers, the
By Kirstin Eakes
Staff Writer
ECU reported more campus
drug violations in the 1988-89
school year than any other North
Carolina university.
Of the 162 alleged violations
statewide, ECU reported M. Ac-
cording to Public Safety Director
James DePuv, this high number
indicates public safety actively
pursues thed rug problem. "I think
the statistics talk for themselves
DePuv said. "We are a leader in
approaching the drug problem
According to The Associated
Press, the state's largest two uni-
versities reported 16 violations.
N.C. State reported 10 violations,
while UNC�Chapel I till reported
six.Noviolationsoaurrol at Eliza-
beth Citv State, Fayettovillo State,
the N.C. School ot tin- Arts m
Winston Salem, Pembroke State,
UNC - Ashevillo or Winston Sa-
lem State.
As reported bv the Ass K lated
Press, Nathan Simmv university
system vice president, ottered
some explanations for the variance
in drug violations. He said some
campuses, like ECU, are possibly
monitoring drug use more aggres-
sively than others. "You have to
lookatthecultureofthecampuscs,
though Simmsaddcd. "Theothcr
thing you could conclude (of a
campus that reported no viola-
tions! is here's a campus where
students just don't have the money
to indulge in drugs
I avetteville State Chancellor
Lloyd "Vic" Hackley supported
Simms' explanation of students
lacking money for drugs. Hack-
lev, whose campus reported no
violations, said, "The kids who live
On our campus are very young
and very broke
According to DePuy, ECU'S
Chancellor Eakin and the admini-
stration support the light against
drugs. "Dr. Eakin and his staff are
verv open and honest about deal-
ing with drugs DePuv said. He
added: 'We take a very aggressive
approach toward drugs. We have
SOtne compassion for users, but
not pushers
A plan adopted by the N.C.
Board of Governors in fall 1988
mandates students, faculty or staff
caught selling hard drugs, like
cocaine, must be expelled or fired.
Those selling milder drugs, like
marijuana, are suspended tor at
least a semester.
The faculty or staff caught
possessing or using hard drugs
are suspended, and those possess
ing or using milder drugs are put
ncular and social activities.
Onlv one of the lh2 violations
reported Involved cocaine. Sixteen
universities placed 126 students
on probation and suspended 18
for using or selling illegal drugs.
as much as they can about self- unreported rape victims who need
defense and most of all, "trust their our help, the victims of attempted
own instincts Knox emphasized rape who escaped injury and all
Only 10 to 15 percent of all women who are potential rape
rapesareeven reported, Knox said, victims were represented by the
on probation. Students placed on M seven employees Cited for drug
probation continue their studies violations, four were fired, accord
but must refrain from extracur- ing to Associated Press.
"We must help each other,
both men and women, to make
ECU safer. We will not stand for
rape at ECU
According to Roakes,Pirate
Ride and Pirate Walk will be reor-
candlelighting of the speakers'
candles.
"Blow out your candles as a
symbol of ending all rape Greek
Council representative Kelly Greer
said.
Vigil honors Martin Luther King Jr.
By April Draughn
Staff Writer
A candlelight vigil in honor
of Martin l.uther King was held on
(anuarv 15 at 6:lK) p.m. in front (if
Memorial Gym. The march was
sponsored by Allied Blacks tor
Leadership and Equality (ABLE).
Carla I looker, president of A HI E,
began me march along with Chan-
cellor Eakin.
Approximately 100 people
participated In the march Partici-
pants joined hands as they
marched from Memorial Gym to
Mendcnhall Student Center sing-
ing "We Shall Overcome When
the marchers reached Mendcnhall
they formed a large circle and
begin to light their candles and
sang another verse of "We Shall
Overcome
After the candles were lit, a
prayer was given by Rev. 1 toward
Parker r. from Svcamore Hill
Baptisthurch. In his prayer he
said. We thank vou much for Dr.
Martin l.uther King, who gave
much, who taught much, who
loved much The actual vigil was
then ended as most dispersed to
attend the oth annual Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. Leadership Awards
Ceremony sponsored by Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity.
The award ceremony began
at 7:15 p.m. and has been held for
the past six years to honor those
minority students who have
achieved. The Ceremony was
opened by Anthony Rook, presi-
dent of Alpha Phi Alpha In the
invocation Rev. Kenneth Ham-
mond said that the struggle had
not ended and that we must con-
tinue to press on.
Dr. Fitch of ECU led the
Faculty Tribute in which she said
that four states still do not honor
Dr. King's birthdate. She went on
to say that all of America had been
affected by the dream and the
dreamer and that he adhered to
nonviolent civil disobedience in
his struggle. She ended her tribute
with, "in this day of unrest and
resurfacing racism, we must be
ever vigilante. No one of us has
achieved until we all have
achieved
The guest speaker, Dr. Sid-
ney Locks, gave a speech entitled,
"African Americans Preparing For
The Twenty-First Century: Insur-
ing The Legacy In his speech,
Rev. Lock stressed the importance
of Dr. King's legacy and of his
committment for the fight for
equality.
Rev. Lock related Dr. King's
commitment to what he feels is a
See Vigil page 2
N.C. joins five-state agreement
Here are a just few of the blood samples taken during Wednesday's
blood drive at Mendenhatl (Photo by J P Whitmire-ECU Photo Lab
By Donna Hayes
Staff Writer
The state of North Carolina
has entered into a five state agree-
ment for the disposal of hazard-
ous waste, making the state eli-
gible for a portion of money set
aside by the federal government
to assist states in the cleaning up of
abandoned toxic waste sites.
North Carolina joins Alabama,
Kentucky, South Carolina and
Tennessee in a two-year plan for
disposing of wastes that are con-
sidered hazardous. Any waste that
is ignitable, corrosive, reactive or
toxic is defined by law as hazard-
ous.
The U.S. government had
previously approved a federal
regulation requiring each state to
devise a 20-year plan for manag-
ing hazardous waste by Oct. 17,
1989 with failure to comply result-
ing in the loss of federal funds.
For the state of North Caro-
lina, failure to comply with the
regulation would have resulted in
a loss of approximately $26 mil-
lion for two sites currently under
consideration.
The new agreement, passed in
December, brings North Carolina
into compliance with federal regu-
lation and law; however, officials
said North Carolina may still lose
a portion of the Superfund money
since the agreement was signed
after the Oct. 17 deadline.
North Carolina's chemical and
allied industries generated ap-
proximately 2.8 billion pounds of
hazardous waste in 1988. Officials
maintained that most hazardous
waste is treated on site� 90 per-
cent or 2.5 billion pounds�but at
least 300millionpoundsisshipped
out-of-state for treatment.
South Carolina has previously
disposed of North Carolina's haz-
ardous waste that could not be
treated on site by the waste's pro-
ducers, butSouth Carolina hasalso
banned North Carolina from us-
ing the treatment facilities in the
past for various reasons. The new
agreement ensures that North
Carolina will have reliable access
to hazardous waste disposal sites.
Federal law requires that in-
dustries dispose of hazardous
waste within 90 days of the time of
genera;ion. Without the appro-
priate means of disposal, those
industries producing toxic wastes
would have to close, but the five-
state pact provides N .C. ind ustries
with continuous access to treat-
ment facilities.
Under the terms of the agree-
ment, North Carolina will build
units for combusting hazardous
waste, treating contaminated soil
and treating and recycling haz-
ardous solvents. The state is also
responsible for locating a landfill
for the disposal of incinerator ash.
The Hazardous Waste Man-
agement Commission will actively
seek volunteer host communities
for the new facilities, but officials
said the sites for the long-term
disposal of toxic substances have
not been selected.
Inside
Editorials4
Commending Public
Safety's open policy
State and Nation5
Unrest continues in
Azerbaijan
Classifieds6
Features13
Parker returns to review
art
Comics19
Dead King goes to hell
Sports20
Pirate swimmers lose
to Carolina





2 Tne East Carolinian January 18,1990
ECU Briefs
Enrollment exceeds 15,000 for the
first time in ECU's history
Enrollment at last c aroltna University exceeds 15,000 tor the
spring semester tor the first time, registrar . Gilbert Moore announced
ridav
Moore reported spring semester enrollment at 15,007 students
Spring enrollment in 1989 was 14,745 which was the first tune that tht
numbers had exceeded 14,000.
Official enrollment tor the ll'S fall semester which ended in He
.ember was 16,029.
Moore said spring semester enrollment includes 12,421 under
graduates jnd 2,586 graduate students. ITie spring semester began lasi
week.
Fellowships offered to seniors
The East Carolina University chapter of Phi kappa Phi national
ionor society is inviting applications from outstanding senior student!
for competitive fellowships worth up to $7,000 for first year graduate oi
professional study.
Fifty Phi kappa Phi fellowships will be awarded nationwideand 3(
idditionai honorable mention awards of $500 each will bo made.
criteria used in the selection process include scholastic achieve
nent, high standardized test scores it applicable, honors and enrich
men! programs, leadership and participation in university and com
munity activities expression ol study plans and career goals. Faculty
.valuations will be considered.
The competition is open to graduating seniors with superior aca
.lemic and leadership records
Phi Kappa Phi has 251 hapters on university and college campuse
throughout the nation It is the only major national scholastic honor
society which rei ti i lcmi excellence in all disciplines.
1 or tuthi forma n I � nl I ie fellowship program, ECU sti
ients should in the ounseling c enter
otessort � Brou I of the School of Music at 757-4281
National Campus Clips
Universities across the nation face
shortage of female Biology professors!
A recent report in Research News, a University of South Dakota
publication shows universities are suffering an increasing shortage ol
female biologj professors.
An article in the university's school newspaper cited three reason
colleges are lac king female biology professors:
Low turnover in biolog) departments.
rh ijorityol female biology majors do not choose teaching a:
i career
"1 never considered teaching said USD biology major Francint
VanSambeek Most oi thebiologv majors 1 know are going into modi
ine
� national decline in the number ol male and female scienc
majors According to the National Science Foundation, only half a
rnan) freshmen express interest in a science major as compared to 2t
years ago
UK restrooms display AIDS stickers
Soon grafitti may not be theonly thing on the restroom walls at tin
University ol Kentucky
The Ik Student c Government Association hopes to decorate stall
(with stickers containing information about AIDS. If approved by uni
Kersitv administration, the stickers will be placed in residence hall anc
classroom restrooms
The whole purpose is to try to educate students said SGA
'resident Sean Lohman. It will reach people not normallv reached
Sarahoursey, SGA, said. The principle behind the idea is TrVhal
lse do people do when sitting in the bathroom? What do people havi
to do except read?"
ODAt
By Suzani
Kellerman
To Your Health
Safer sex practices could
reduce the spread of AIDS
and other STD's
hat do safer sex" practices mean?
It isa well known fact that many diseases such
as chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital warts, genital
herpes, .md All S are spread through sexual prac- j
tices i'r k hi ing 'safer sex" means being aware of
hese diseases, showing concern about yourself and
your sexual partner by knowingaboutyour partner's
ii'alt h anil sexual pat terns, and communicating with
each other to reduce your chances ol getting or
spreading a sexually transmitted disease.
Abstinence is the best means to protect against
Sexuall) Transmitted Diseases. Anyone and every-
one who chooses to be sexually active needs to be
aware of "safer sex" practices.
The best ways to plav safe are to get to know your partner's health
ind sexual patterns and to use condoms when having sex. Condoms
fcave long been known to prevent the spread of germs causing gonor
rhea, svphilis. chlamydia, and have recently been shown to aid in
Mocking the passage of the AIDS virus.
Men and women can carry sexually transmitted diseases such as
AIDS, svphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia without looking or feeling
II. Vaginal intercourse is just as likely to transfer these STD's as is ana
ntercourse It is well known that vaginal intercourse without the use ol
i condom can easily pass AIIS, svphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea.
W.ien choosing condoms remember the following guidelines:
I Iseonly latex condoms. Scientists have found the "natural skin'
r "porous" condoms cannot stop some sexually transmitted diseases
I lse condoms that are lubricated. Lubricants lessen the possibil
ty of condom breakage Using a lubricant that contains the spermicidc
(ton-oxynol-9 is very important since non-oxynol-9 has been shown tc
till the AIIS virus in the test tube and gives you extra protection if the
:ondom breaks
Remember, safer sex includes both planning and responsibility. Be
responsible about chou es concerning drugs and alcohol since they car
impair your judgement and reduce your ability to make wise decisions
lesearch also shows that alcohol, marijuana and amphetamines dam
ige the immune system leaving you open to diseases that you mighl
otherwise lx- able to fight off. It makes sense to avoid doing things tha
mpair your ability to overcome infection.
See Safer Sex page 3
Vigil
Continued from page 1
lack of commitment in America
today. He said that committment
is taken too loosely in our society,
that the government has failed to
maintain a strong commitment.
According to Lock, Dr. King tried
toleadacommited hfebecausehe
knew that one commited person
could change empires, nationsand
laws.
Lock maintained that Dr.
King was devoted to the dream
that one day little black girls and
boys could play with white girls
and boys. Lock said, "all of our
lives need to be committed to
something He also posed the
question, "to what are you com-
mitted tonight?"
In ending his speech, Lock
said that everyone must realize
that everbodv is somebody and
that we must havean apprecaitu n
for everyone's self-worth as Di
King did. Lock presented the idea
that the true key to the victory ot
life is love and that if one loves
himself then he must love every
one. Of Dr. King, Lock said, "he
was a special man who responded
to God
The awards w ere presented
after Lock's speech. Among re
cipients, were Caria Hooker and
Juanita Nicholson, who received
the Dr. Martin Luther King Stu
dent Leadership Award. The
Community Service Award was
given to former Mayor Ed Carter
The service ended with the sing
ing of "The Black National An
them" and a benediction by Rex
Kenneth Hammond
These children seem at home in the pediatric center's playhouse.
(Photo byAngela Pndgen-ECU Photo Lab)
ECU pediatric center
moves to new location
���
I he :
Medu ine
has moved its pediatric care clinic
to a new location be a use ot over-
crowded facilities
The general and spe ialtycare
pediatric clinics have relocated to
the first floor of thebiote hnology
building, which is adjacent to their
former clinics in the Brody Build-
ing.
Originally, the two clinics
were across the hall from one
another in the Brod) Building.
Now, they have consolidated in
the new center designated as the
IX I Pediatric Outpatient Center.
Before the move, the doctor's
and nurse s work areas were ex-
tremely congested
The new ll.iHH' square-foot
center, which includes treatment
and c insult tioi oms, exami-
nation rooms and off icesand sepa
rate doctor and nurse stations,
provide necessary work space.
" The flow of patients through
the clinic runs more smoothly,
because we ha e a larger spa e to
work in, said Pat Vore, nursing
supervisor .it the i 'ediatric (. enter.
In addition to providing bet-
ter services to the patients, the
center enhances the teaching of
the students and residents of the
medical school according to Pe-
diatricenter sources
Some ounseling roomsallow
the parents and medical school
students to watch children
through a one v.n mirror while
they are being tested
The mi di al students can
observe d u c a t ionaltesting to
detet t pissible K�ami disabili-
ti s ind . . ,ipportu-
nit)i l arning
behavii �
Parents don't often get a
chant e ,v tin. :rhildren
inter.i. . � . earning testing
said Vor ! he consultation
rooms give them that chance
1 he i enter also provides two
waiting areas tor both the general
and specialty can- patients. The
rooms include toys and educa-
tional television.
The general patient waiting
room has a two story playhouse
called "playscape" forthechildren
to enjoy. "It makes the waiting fun
instead of a chore said Vore.
To help orient the children
while they move through the
WAMTBID
NEWS EDITOR
Do you have good com-
municaton and manage-
ment skills? Do you have
knack for news?
If you answered YKS
to these questions
APPLY TODAY
at The Ftit Carolinian
lii ic, the 'our major areas of the
, linit have been decorated pink.
.reon blue and yellow. In addi-
tion, .i life size doll of Ernie of
Sesame Street" stands in the hall
making the patients more com-
fortable when thev recognize a
familiar face, according to Vore.
The move to the new center !
tiHikthnvfull workdays. During
those davs, the center was offi-
cially closed, but continued to see
patients who were extremely sick.
The move was a joint effort
from the whole department of the
pediatrics said Vore.
The center is planning an open
house in March.
1
ft&e (fcast Carolinian
Director of Advertising
James FJ. McKee
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V. Cope G�J .)� Harvej
Kelley O'Connor
Patrick Williams
Sha Sitlinger
Adam I. Blankenship
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National Rate$5.75
Open Rate$4.95
Local Open RateS4.75
hulk �!C I requeno Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours:
londa - Frida)
10:00 - 5:00 pm
Phone:
757-6366
Able757-4726
Alpha Sigma Phi757-3516
Attic752-7300
Beta758-BETA
Campus Tours1-800-6-BAHAMA
Carolina Pregnancy Center757-0003
CharleyO's355-5000
Chicos757-1666
Cliffs752-3172
Coastal Fitness756-1592
Delta Sigma Phi757-0313
ECU Friends757-4227
Harris Teeter758-6800
Hillcrest Lanes756-2020
IFC757-4706
International Student Exchange757-6418
Jarvis Memorial Church752-3101
Kappa Alpha Order757-0128
Kappa Sigma752-5543
LamdaChi Alpha757-1367
Mendenhall757-4700
Memorial Coin & Pawn756-1666
On Campus1-800-932-0528
Optical Palace756-420
Phi Kappa Tau757-1319
Pi Kappa Alpha830-1256
Pi Kappa Phi756-2149
Rack Room355-2519
Research Information1-800-351-0222
Rio The Club355-5000
Sigma Nu758-6472
Sigma Phi Epsilon757-0487
Student Union757-4715
Taff Office Supply756-4224
Tar Landing Seafood758-0327
ThetaChi752-0232
Triangle Women's Health1-800-433-2930
University Amoco758-9976
WZMB355-6098





Staying healthy at East Carolina
The East Carolinian, January 18, 1990 3
Welcome to East Carolina!
During your stay here at ECU
remember while taking care of
your mind and social life not to
neglect your health and well-being.
The Student Health Service is here
to provide you with services,
information, and education to
htt p you healthy during your stav
here.
The Student Health Service is
a student oriented health careclinic
located between lovner Library
and the Flanagan Building Our
main concern is to provide stu-
dents of ECU with individualized
and quality health care, and to
provide information to live a
healthy lifestyle All ot our serv-
ices are confidential; vour medi-
cal records are not part of your
school record. The following serv-
ices are available at the Student
Health Center: ,
appointment system gives you
the option to schedule a visit with
a health care provider at the time
that is best for you.
medications are dispensed at no
cost by a licensed pharmacist.
Maintenance drugs such as insu-
lin and antibiotics for the treat
To Your Health Special
Compiled by
Suzanne Kellerman and Jolene Jernigan
Student Health Center
Walk-in Clinic- Walk-in clinic
hoursareMonday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. during
the school vear. Weekend clinics
arc held on Saturdays and Sun-
days from 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Urgent Care- The u rgen t care
walk-in area serves as a treatment
area for those students without
appointments and for those seek-
Appointmerrts are available for trw
convenience of students. The
ing emergency care. It is open
Appointments- during Student Health Service
hours.
P ha rmacy Services -
Most
Laurie Sodano takes advantage of a cholesterol screening test at thd
'Student Health Center (Photo by Angela Pndgen-ECU Photo Lab)
Student Health Service offers
colposcopy and androscopy
Mffflsettpy.VAalc Jbrtrters foinyaUable to help
Colposcopv is a big word that
meansexamination of the external
genitalia, vaginal canal, and cer-
vix of a female with a microscope.
Androscopv means examination
of the male genitalia with a micro-
fjpe. Women with abnormal pap
tears may be advised to have a
women with abnormal paps or
men who have genital wafts mav
be advised to have an androscopv
During the colposcopy a small
biopsv may be taken to evaluate
the abnormal areas. The biopsv
ttpofta help determine the treat-
ment.
The Student Health Service
now offers colposcopv and andro-
scopv at one-third the cost of most
outside private offices.
The clinic is staffed by a regis-
tered nurse, a gynecologist (Or.
Pevton) from a local private of-
fice. Student Health physician (Dr.
Siegal), and a Student Health
Family Nurse Practitioner (Jolene
lernigan). The colposcopy clinic is
open three different afternoons a
week during the regular school
year. A Student Health secretary
tudents with
insurance forms and questions
Call 757-6794 for more informa-
tion.
ment of acne are not provided.
Only prescriptions written by
Student Flealth Service health
care providers can be filled. A
reduced charge is made for medi-
cations such as oral contraceptive
agents. The pharmacy isopen from
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 and 1:00 p.m. -
5:00 p.m.
Self-Care Medication Clinic -
This clinic helps you to learn more
about your illness, its symptoms,
and to decide how to treat your-
self. Over-the-counter medications
such as aspirin, decongestants and
antihistammes are available at no
cost.
Allergy Clinic- Allergy vac-
cinesare given during the hours of
8:00a.m. - 12:00and 1:00 p.m. -4:00
p.m Mondav through Friday by a
registered nurse. You must sup-
ply the antigen and an injection
schedule from vour allergist.
1 lealth Education- The promo-
tion of skillscontributing to health
maintenance and vvellness is an
important part oi the Student
Health Service. Educational
classes, programs and materials
on topics such as Freedom From
Smoking, Sexually Transmitted
Diseases, Healthy Fating Habits,
Weight Control, and manv more
are offered through the vear. Bro
chures and other information are
also available, including subjects
such as diet and nutrition, cancer
detection techniques, high Mood
pressure, sexual dysfunctions,
exercise, and alcohol and drugs.
The Health Education Resource
Room which contains videos,
pamphlets and other educational
material is open to all students
Monday through Friday 8:(X) a.m.
- 5:00 p'm.
Women's flealth- Contracep-
tive education and counseling,
breast and pelvic examinations.
Pap smears, lab procedures, and
prescriptions for contraceptive
agents are offered by the Student
Health Service. Pap smears are
scheduled in advance by appoint-
ment. Contraceptive classes are
held every Monday from 2:00 p.m
3:00 p.m. and Thursdays from 3:00
p.m. - 4:00 p.m. in the Resource
Room. Tests for pregnancy, and
sexually transmitted diseases and
the evaluation of other women's
health problems are available at
the Student Flealth Service.
Men's Health Care- Educa-
Fitness Class Schedule
Registration Dates
Jan 16-19
Feb. 27 March 13
Cost Per Session
S10 00�wients
S2I) 00faculty staff
Session Dates
Jan 22 March 1
March 12 April 20
Cost Per Drop-in Class
Sl.(X)siudcnis
S2 00faculty staff
All i !���!� are availarac on t .fr. in si�� with purchWK ni a ticket � � a �� r
punhaaed in minimum increments rf SVatudera and JlCVfacuJiy
AEROBICS
Deyi Tlmet
Mim A Wed I JO-4 U pniOrcuil)
M,� 1 Wm 40S S OSpmfAerohKs)
MoaAWed 5 16 . 5 pml.� Impact)
Man. A Wed 605-7 OSpfntBetin Fil)
i JTk Memtviai '�ti.o, jn Ticket inu� he
tional programs offered to male
students cover a variety of men's
health issues including con tracep-
tion, testicular self-exam, and sexu-
ally transmitted diseases. Contra-
ceptive classes are held every
Monday from 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
and Thursdays from 3:00 p.m. -
4:00 p.m. in the Resource Room.
Tests for sexually transmitted dis-
eases, and the evaluation of other
men's health problems are avail-
able. Condomsare available at the
cost of $2.00 per dozen.
L3boratory and Rad 1 o 1 ogy
services- Manv laboratory testsare
tlone at either no cost or a mina-
mal charge to the student. There is
a charge for x-rays.
Tuej A Thin 6 10-7 30�mrt.n� Impxl)
lueiATmin 1 00-4 00 pmOli lo!
Tue� a Thufi 4-05-5 OS pmflnKrvei)
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Tucs ar ThufS 6 45-7 45 pent I ji� Impact)
Fn 4-05 5 05 pm Aerobics)
Fri 5 15-6 1 5 pnalow Impact;
Sat 11 00am llOOpmllli La)
Sun 100-4 OOpmt Aerobics)
1 � stir
MO 111
Mi 101
MC, 10�
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MO 108
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Tues a Thum 4 in 00 pm MC 1U
Sat 12.05 12.15 pm M(, IM
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fauiti? aafT .r- arq m I 'r 4 V mui purclitar
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F.XPF1IFMi Th� Will SWF.Ir
Y0I A�AY. (HH.HFM UttlM.)

�matM tain
Playing
Jan. 18-21, 1990
8:00 PM
IIKNDRIX THEATRE
� FREE WITH STl DENT II) �
Sponsored h student I nion
I- ilmsiimnullit'
Safer Sex
Continued from page 2
Remember, playing safe is
being smart. No one, unless absti-
nent or mutually monogamous
with an uninfected partner, is
immune to sexually transmitted
diseases. Protect yourself and vour
partner.
Condoms are available at the
Student Health Center Pharmacy
at the cost of $2.00 for one dozen.
For more information on Safer Sex
Practices contact the Student
Health Service, 757-6794 Ot the U S.
Public Health Service, 1-800-342-
2417
"To Your Health is a weekly
health education and information
'Column Please direct any ques-
tions, comments, or suggestions
to 7i7-6794.
Read
C&e (East
Carolinian
A Veritable
Corniucopia of
Information
VARIETY
IS THE SPICE
OF LUNCH.
X
HILTON INN
CharleyO's Lunch Buffet
Our chef has created a lunch buffet
like no other lunch buffet
youve ever seen before! Join us
each weekday for a bountiful
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Specialty Salads. Pasta.
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Tempting Desserts.
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Monday thru Friday, 11 am-2 pm
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355-5000
EXPRESS
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it pays to doyour homewoik
0 35000 Character Memory
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After all, how many comparably priced type
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Fof mxt infoffTutnir. a ala pi�f �'�� Smith"
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or the exclusive fumble bee Correcting Cassrtte on
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Though we've packed all these features into a
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uUje �a0t (Slarulmtan
DAVID 1 li RR1NC, General Manager
I ori Martin, iitor
AMES I I M Ki i, Directoi of Advertising
� ,i N Hi uin News Editoi
Adam Cornelius, 4m N�i� Cttoi
CMt�i ini v iisii k, eatura Editor
foi IN ! i H ki k, i �- Features I
Mh HAEI M kh. Sports Eaftof
osEPM 1 ENKINS Jr test. Sports Editot
Carrii Armstrong, Entertainment Editoi
S on M wi 11 , Satire I ditot
PlloNG I UONG, Credit Managei
Stuari RosNER, Business Manager
Twin Con , Ad lech Supervisor
M riiii v Rl( 111in, Circulation Manager
Trao WEED, Production Manager
Si I VI Kl ID, Stuff Illustrator
Mkiiaii CARNES, Darkroom Technician
BETH 1 ,UITON, Secretary
fhc Kasi I ii. 11 hi,in l,is been sen ingthc i.mi 'arolinat nmpus community since 1925, with primary emphasis cm in-
formation mo.i diicv il affecting 1 (I! students li is publish d iw ice weekly, with � circulation of I2,(XX). The East
Carolinian re erves the right to refuse 01 discontinue an) advertisements mat discriminate on the basis of age, sex,
creed 01 national origin the East 4 aroiinian welcomes letters expressing all points ol view. For purposes of decency
mdbrcvit). I he East! 'aroiinian reserves the right to edit any K iui fot publication I etters should be sent to The East
t 'aroiinian, Publications Blda .hi I, Greenville, NT. 27834; oi call us at pM�) s; 6366.
Opinion
Page4 Thursday January IS 1990
m
ECU faces drugs head-on
Well here we co again back to thai part mon pot than other college students, we need to aak
school reputation fhe 1988 EW .tatistics are in, and a question Are other university officials aggres-
I v. reports has ing over ont third ot th� drug vio
I ition � iniong Ncitii v .lu'lm i universities I H ih�
I o2 reported violations i -t arolina claims I o
these otfensos from this information man ptvpli
,u ti the state are cotv hiding that the I I ha pro
pressed no whore since those nol so lonp agodavsa;
the nation s numbei one p.� 11 st hool
lit.u king the drug problem, or .ire they pre-
tending thai ii doesn't exist'
It r obvious from the statistics that campus
police hereat East'arolina arcon topol the problem.
Kt i Public Safer) should be commended for its
direct approai h to drug violations on campus. Credit
should be given to residence hall advisorsand direc-
mii i, t s look at the statistics from ,i different tors, isweTl nd students deserve mention, too. Al-
igle Perhaps EC I is facing the problem head-on though drug use does occur, students are devetop-
tb.it the best wa) to fight drugs is to ing an awareness ol the increasingly challenging
bung the of tenses out in the open Let's be realisti sen ial problems that face our society. With a mature
it is untikch th.ii ,m tinivei il could hav� andn ponsible approach to the issue of drug abuse,
drugviolati �ns during a full academu yeai Yetsix mam u U students are avoiding drugs and encour-
istitutions in the state reported jus! thai Rathei aging their friends to do the same. That is something
' tan accusing East cat. Itna students foi anoking to be proud ol
Capitol punishment called into question
By Richard Prince
(jnnott Now �. s,i i
Eighty one yeai old lllnois
lohnson, ,ii hun hgoing man who
lives in R(Khester, N nevei did
believe in capital punishment
No! onl) does the Bible say
rhou shall not kill but lu i
-('us thai when societj executed a
man it forfeits itscham etopu ish
him
1 ven it fohnson had enter
tamed the thoughts ol the death
penalty thoughts man in his
city are reviving alter a Spate ot
m ini killings his sons experi-
ence would surrlv change his
mind It should give US p him too.
Samuel Hue fohnson 17 is
alive toda) only because a power
tul Wall Street law firm di voted
two years, 29law vers. 27 summer
interns.Hid �) 7 million to vn ing
his life
I awyer rerrence Monnors
vails it i classic example ol the
adage thai capital punishment is
tor them thai has no capital
( onnors chairs the New Vmk
StateBar'scrimtnal justice section,
and an 18 the bar honors the
ahillGordonacReindellav turn
with what deserves to be the
lavt yet's ()scar.
I he story has .ill tin elements
11 lifl hanging mini ries, the
final a t still to come fohnson still
might die in Mississippi s g.ls
i hamber.
et this is ,i drama many on
death row will never plav As
many as one-third don't have
lawyers ,u all. says tho NAA( P
I egal Defense Fund.
fohnson joined the Air Force
alter high school Soon after his
b'M discharge, he was convicted
in Rochester of second-degree
assault
I Ir told miners the dispute
arose because h� refused to pay a
prostitute the prosecutor harged
that fohnson molested a young
kitchen workci on her w ay to work.
1 ither waj fohnson served a
year in prison paroled tor goinl
behavior.
I aid ofl in 1980 by .ener.il
Motors, he wound up in New
Orleans making $1? 'ban hour at
Martin Marrietta, a contractor on
the space shuttleolumbia I aid
ofl again in 1981, he began passing
bad cheeks
On New Year's Eve 1981,
fohnson and three other Afro-
Americans were stopped by a
white highway patrolman near
rural Collins, Miss
fohnson was i hai ged with
stabbing the policeman in the back
,nd ordering one ot the others to
shoot the officer with his own gun
1 he cop died.
r wo men got life a third 25to
lite fohnson, the Northerner, was
next
I he defense war chest? The
state gave each court appointed
lawyer$i000. fohnson maintained
his innocence but in 1982 he was
convicted of murder. Unlike the
others, he was scnteiii ed to die.
One aggravating circum-
stanco: his Rochester conviction for
a crime the prosecutor repeatedly
called "intent to commit first de-
gree rape and capital murder
Which it wasn't.
Enter dive Stafford Smith, 26,
an Englishman and $s,ixx) a-year
lawyer for the Atlanta based
Southern Prisoners' Defense
Committee He savs he routinely
stx-s cases where "they'll give you
the death penalty for sneezing on
the sidewalk
In WHfv Smith pleaded with a
former Cohimbia Law School class-
mate, Anthony Paduano, then 27,
tor help.
Paduano agreed. It wasguilt
that I had gone to Wall Street,
making 12 times more than he
was he told me.
oneof Paduano's firm's 285
lawyers had any expertise in death
penalty work. But soon, as the
American lawyer put it, "Thecase
tiHk on the fever pitch of a tender
offer The legal team worked 20-
hour days, transcribed "forgot-
ten" tapes and proved the judge
had never advised Johnson of his
right to appeal. They believed his
confession had been coerced.
With 48 hours left before the
scheduled Aug. 4, 1986, death,
Mississippi stayed the execution.
In March 1987, the New York
Court of Appeals unanimously
threw out the Rochester convic-
tions.
But it wasn't the end. Amaz-
ingly, Mississippi's high court
said the work of New York's top
court wasn't credible. Judges
comments took on overtones of
North vs. South. Nine of the 12
states that have recently used the
death penalty are below the
Mason-Dixon line. Just as re-
markably, the two states went to
the U.S. Supreme Court.
In June W88, the justices sided
with New York. They ordered a
new trial to determine whether
lohnson indeed deserves the
death penalty.
lllnois Johnson plans to be at
the new trial. He and Paduano
say his son tried to stop the gun-
man, not encourage him. Thecase
has attracted the attention of in-
ternational human-rights groups.
The elder and younger
lohnson talk by phone about four
times a month. That calculates to
abou 140 more conversations than
either had any reason to expect.
The sobering part: They're
lucky.
Bush-Noriega Connection
How far does it go?
By Nathaniel Mead
I ilitoriai Columnist
During the Reagans
Administration's second term.
Attorney General Edwin Meese
tried to stop the Miami based
contra-CIA drug connection in-
vestigation. It was a fascinating
state of affairs, although for some
reason the popular press failed to
give it much notice. But our pres-
ent situation, with General Man-
uel Noriega of Panama standing
trial in Miami, could prove even
more fascinating. Some believe he
may have the inside scoop on tor-
merQA director George Bush and
his connections to a large-scale
contra-CIA drug smuggling net-
work.
Noriega has been tagged as a
narcotics trafficker, a murderer (he
had killed more than HX) mem
hers of his own military in the
weeks since the failed coup of
October 3, 1989), and a strangler
of democracy. He is suspected of
being at the center of an illicit
enterprise that played on
Panama's strategic location as a
major transfer point for Colum-
bian refined cocaine headed for
the U.S. and a sate haven for the
leading Colombian drug lords. But
the drug-running dictator may
have more big secrets to tell than
simply concern his dealings with
the Colombians Not only did he
have specific connections with our
Drug Enforcement Administra-
tion and Cl A, but Noriega directly
supported the contra cause in
Nicaragua.
Before joining the Reagan
Administration, Bush was CIA
chief and Noriega was a paid CIA
informant The two men had lunch
togetherin Washington in late 147h
when each man directed his
country's intelligence service; their
next recorded meeting was in
Panama in December 1983. Bush
has never disclosed the substance
of his meetings with Noriega, but
Noriega himself has passed on
information regarding the second
meeting. According to Washing
ton Post and former Newsweek
writer Kevin Buckley, an author-
ity on U.SPanamanian policy,
Noriega said that Bush wanted
help for the contras so badly that
the U.S. government would turn a
blind eye to money-laundering
and setbacks in democracy in
Panama.
During the Reagan years,
Bush's close communications with
North, Poindexter, and other
members of the Contra-support
team should have alerted him to
Nonega'sdnigTunningactivities
Noriega had several meetings with
Lt. Col. North, whom Noriega
described as a boastful nait, eager
for the approval of a machismo
guerilla effort to eliminate the
Sandinistas. At one recorded
meeting, Noriega left with a list oi
targets inside Nicaragua which he
had offered to blow up for Col.
North and the U.S. government.
In H86, Noriega offered to use his
numerous assets in Nicaragua for
a campaign of sabotage against
theSandinistas anoffer to which
both Colonel North and Admiral
Poindexter consented. By this
time, Noriega's drug-trafficking
activities were already well-
known, which shows just how
obsessed the Reagan Administra-
tion had become by Nicaragua.
In December 1985, Bush met
with Edward Everett Bnggs, then
ambassador to Panama Bnggs
had already sent many cables to
the State Department recounting
allegations of Noriega's role in
drug trafficking. A memorandum
prepared for Bush prior to the
meeting described its purpose as
to "discuss U.S. relations with
Panama and narcotics matters
But early in 1988, after the memo-
randum was leaked, Bush charac-
teristically denied that any link
between Noriega and drug traf-
ficking had been mentioned.
Bnggs, after initially declining to
comment, backed up his story tor
the New York Times.
Why would Bush try to hide
his knowledge of Noriega? Law-
yers of the Washington, D.C-
based Christie Institute say that
former CIA director Bush not only
knew about Noriega's drug-traf-
ficking activities, but was himseli
instrumental in importing hun
dreds of tons of illegal drugs into
the United States Testimony bv
the Christie Institute's small armv
of lawyers, by convicted drug
smugglers,and by private citizens
on CBS's West 57th Street pro-
gram all provide a startling por-
trait of large-scale drug traffick-
ing under the auspicesof the eon
tras and the U.S. government.
According to the Christie In-
stitute, an interfaith legal founda-
tion, "contra narcotics smuggling
stretches from cocaine plantations
in Colombia, to dirt airstrips in
Costa Rica, to pseudo-seafood
companies in Miami, and finally,
to the drug-ridden streets ot our
society The Institute's extensive
investigation (TheChristic Institute
Special Report, 188) provided
support for allegations that the
contra leadership received direct
funding and other support from
major narcotics traffickers, that
U.S. government funds for the
contras went to known narcotics
dealers, including Noriega; and
that the CIA helped Miami-based
drug traffickers smuggle cocaine
into the U.S. in exchange for the
drug traffickers' help in arming
the contras.
In their 1988 report, the Chris-
tic Institute presents massive
documentation prepared bv more
than 50 volunteer trial lawyers.
The report includes sworn depo-
sitions from nearly 3(X) ev-CIA
operatives, Cuban-American vet-
erans of theanti-Castrocampaign,
Columbian drug smugglers, and
contra civilian leaders. The
Institute's most compelling alle-
gation was that a "secret team of
mercenaries, drug lords, and re-
tired military men has for 25 years
engineered extensivecovert activi-
ties not only in Nicaragua, but in
Cuba, Iran, the Middle East, and
Southeast Asia.
It's great stuff for novels, but
evidently not for court hearings
Even though some of the Institute's
findings were later confirmed bv
the Iran-Contragate investiga-
tions, their civil lawsuit against
secret team members was dis
missed in the summer of 1988 by
federal Judge James King Why
such an abrupt ending to such a
well-presented lawsuit1 The Bo
ton Clobe (June 22, 1988) says the
conservative King dismissed the
suit because it "was too hot to
handle in an election year The
Christie lawyers say that the King
ruling was made to protect George
Bush, because their evidence
raised many heavy-duty questions
about Bush's role in covert illegal
activities his knowledge ol
Noriega's drag-trafficking habits
and his awareness as former C IA
director of illegal arms sales and
political assassination programs
m the Middle Fast. Perhaps there s
an even simpler formula: while
people hire lawyers, politicians
hire judges
If the allegations are tnie, what
interest could our own govern-
ment could have in transporting
narcotics into this country? I can
see only two possible reasons
First, the influential ba kersol the
Reagan-Bush doctrine soek to roll
back communism through cover!
guerilla warfare, and powerful
drug traffickers, like Nori
provide a vehicle for this effort
Second, Bush and his CIA cronies
may have wanted to ensure the
ongoing passage ol big monev
throughU.S banks Forinstance
about SKKI billion worth of co
came is sold eaeh year in the U s
and much ot this money is used b .
our banks. That's enough monev
to keepthe banker friendsofBush
very happy.
Indirect connections may plav
a roleas well. As with the D E
ruetul experience in Mi-xio
I S government seems mail
interested in strong business ties
even it some of the business j
blatantly unethical. In this case
t he bu si ness seems to invol ve sh i p
merits of illegal narcotics by those
sworn to protect and defend our
Constitution
vVhyelscwouldagovcrnmi I
want to sanction the importatii n
ol drugs to the U S.?Tospread the
seeds ot social .n cultural di-
cord? It's not a pretty thought, but
that's not the point. The sad fact is
this: drugs weaken minds and
make this country more unstable
and less productive. Drugged out
teachers can't teach, and drugged
out Students can t learn effectively.
Drugged out missile operators,
pilots, and surgeons endanger
many lives. Drugged out politi-
cians can't tell a bellicose corr.mi
from a peace-loving hippie.
Mv own cynicism in the Nori-
ega affair is rooted in the dicta tor's
long-standing relationship with
the CIA and, bv some accounts,
the eight-member National Secu-
rity Council, of which Bush was a
member It's extremely hard to
believe that Noriega's role as
"narco-dictator" could have
eluded Bush during his high-level
participation with the CIA and
with the NSC later on. Meanwhile
the Christie Institute's case awaits
appeal, and Noriega has vet to be
heard Stay tuned!
Noriega is clearly a trophv for
Bush's "war on drugs a war
which seems to be helping him
erase the "u mp factor" and make
up for his abject failure as drug
czar tor the Reagan administra-
tion . Perhaps Bush is also trying to
convince the American people that
he has been against drugs all along
and that he could not possibly
acquiesce to drug smuggling. The
evidence suggests otherwise. In-
deed, perhaps the most pathetic
point raised bv the Noriega affair
is Bush's proclivity for deception
and hypocrisy. If you're must lie,
as some presidents seem impelled
to do, at least do it well. And if
venire going to fight drugs, do it
without paying lipservice to
known drug lords.
This is the second in a four part
Bush burningsertt's 'ext:Thelran
Contra Arms Scandal Rerisited
AMOTWBR HU6� 50CCES5 Ai
BOSH'S ttAR AGAfAJST PRU65:
OUAM VAtfZ ARRESTEP
M COLOMBIA,





Page 5
(Site EsBt Carolinian
State and Nation
January 18,1990
More troops arrive for AzerbaijanArmenian conflict
MOSCOW (AP)- More than
11 000 newly arrived iroops
struggled Wednesday to end
battles between bands ot Aor
baifanis and Armenians, who
reportedh were armed with eve
rything from submachine guns
and grenades to commandeered
artillery
rhe official death toll from the
i lashes m the southern republic ot
Azerbaijan stood at 56, mostly
Armenians, and new clashes were
reported Azerbaijani staged
protests in their republic's capital,
Baku, and elsewhere to demand
they be armed and allowed to
-K c-d then claim to the disputed
U rritoryol Nagorno-Karabakh, a
predominantly Ai mertianeix lave
m Azerbaijan, newspapers and
officials said Wednesday.
In bordering Armenia to the
vest people were still breaking
into polio stations and other arms
repositories in search of weapons,
said DmitriS le.nvo an Interior
Ministry spokesman in Moscow.
Seleznvov said that in the past
24 hours there had been 64 attacks
on Armenian homes in Baku,
where the bloodletting exploded
Saturday night with mob attacks
on Armenians. "It's a terrible
thing he said.
The Armenian news agency,
Armenpress.said some 1,5tV)rofu
gees were arriving dailv in the
Armenian capital of Yerevan. On
luesda, the official Tass news
agency said 2,000 people armed
with anti-aircraft guns and other
artillery were massing on hills
around Nagorno-Karabakh, the
flashpoint for the neighboring
groups' ethnic hatreds.
President Mikhail S. Gor-
bachev declared a state of emer-
gent in the strife-torn mountain
area Monday night, empowering
the government to deploy units of
the Soviet army, navy and RGB to
protect lives and guard vital in
stallations such as railroads More
than 6,000 additional internal se-
curity troops were sent Tuesday
to reinforce existing Interior Min-
istry detachments, Tass said.
To assist them, more than
5,000 Red Army soldiers, who
traditionally carry heavier weap-
onry, also were dispatched, Tass
said. Soviet media did not say how
many troops already were in the
region.
Tass said that in Armenia,
"demands are being made to arm
citizens and send them to Na-
gorno-Karabakh The govern-
ment newspaper lzvestia reported
lh attacks on weapons depots in
24 hours bv Armenians seeking
guns.
The troops have been in-
structed to get tougher with the
fighters, Seleznvov said, and sol-
diers opened fire Tuesday when
an armed group tried to take five
armored personnel earners near
the village of Tazikcnd.
"Since then, attempts to take
APCs have stopped, because be-
fore this they weren't used to
having weapons used against
them he said by telephone.
Combatants in the Nagorno-
Karabakh region had seized stores
of hand grenades, the Interior
Ministry said.
The flareup is the most vio-
lent between mainly Moslem
Azerbaijanisand mostly Christian
Armenians since their decades-old
feud over Nagorno-Karabakh
erupted in bloody clashes two
years ago. The enclave has been
ruled by Azerbaijan since 1923and
the current troubles were sparked
by its demand in February 1988 to
be annexed by Armenia.
Internal security troops al-
ready in the region have been
incapable of halting the most pro-
tracted ethnic conflict in
Gorbachev's nearly five-year ten-
ure as Kremlin leader.
"We can't bring ourselves to
See UNREST, page 8
Drug lords surrender in Colombia
W C( '1 Colombia (AP)
mt � ige purported to N from
Coloml s drug lords Wednes-
day declared the government the
winiu i in th v.ir on drugs and
ottered to halt illegal activities in
exchange Nr legal and constitu-
tional guarantees
The i ommuniquc was given
to Patricia Echavarria, who was
set tree today after borne kidnap
ped with her daughter Dec 16.
Mrs Echavarria is the wife ol a
prominent doctor in the drug
capital ol Medeilin.
She ,ind her daughter. Oina.
Here released in a neighborhood
HitM W Mvtrl!in cartel leader
I ibl i Escobar Gaviria for the poor
people ot Medeilin
"We accept the triumph of the
state said the communique
signed by The Extraditables, the
armed wing of the nation's pow-
erful drug lords. Thus we will lay
down our arms and abandon our
objectives for the benefit ot the
highest interestsot the fatherland
The communique came in
response to a call Tuesday bv the
Catholic Church and leaders of
political parties tor drug cartels to
release their hostages and end
drug trafficking
The communique said the
cartelsaccepted thecall and would
go further, dedicating themselves
to peace in Colombia and work-
ing to end the activities of all armed
groups operating outside the law
'We have decided to suspend
the shipment of drugs and to sur-
render weapons, explosives, labo-
ratories, hostages, the clandestine
landing strips and other effects
related to our activities at such a
time as we are granted constitu-
tional and legal guarantees said
the communique.
It was not clear what they
meant by "constitutional and le-
gal guarantees
Presidente Virgilio Barco said
Tuesday, for the first time, that he
would not rule out the possibility
of negotiations to end the drug
war, which has led to more than
200 deaths and thousands of inju-
ries since it began in August.
At a news conference, Barco
said in answer to a question about
the possibility of talks, "We in the
government are not inflexible
The crucial elements in the
achievement of a definitive agree-
ment arc the legal guarantees that
the communique requested.
In certain circles it was men-
tioned that the drug lords aspire
to an amnesty similar to that which
the Colombian Congress granted
last month to the guerrillas in
exchange for their laving down
their arms. However, Interior
Minister Carlos LernosSirnrnonds
said Tuesday the law allows no
amnesty for common criminals.
Federal accuracy standards proposed
for drug testing in private businesses
Drug lesting in the
United States
Five ; ;a:es - Montana. Iowa, New
Jetsey, Rhode Island and Vermont-
prot-ibrt random drug testing in the
workplace. Another 11 states have
regulations affecting workplace drug
testing
Regulated
testing
Random testing
prohibited
By Jack Kelley
Gannett News Service
WASHINGTON � The first
plan to encourage drug testing in
private workplaces by establish-
ing national standards for accu-
racy has been unveiled.
The plan comes as 90,000 rail-
road employees Tuesday begin
random drug testing required by
federal regulations.
The timing is right said
former Surgeon General C. Ever-
ett Koop, a supporter of the bill.
"The public is discouraged be-
cause we're not winning this war.
The work place is one of the best
places to start
The bill, sponsored by Sens.
Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and David
Boren, D-Okla
� Protects private businesses
wanting to test workers.
� Leaves i t to employers as to
what action to take if a worker
tests positive for drug use.
- Sets certification standards
for drug-testing labs � some of
which have been accused of being
unfit.
"All clinical labs should be
certified so that tests are accurate
and reliable says Hatch. "Em-
ployees must know that tests will
be done accurately
Critics � like the ACLU �
say the bill encourages increased
random drug testing at the ex
pense o f workers' privacy and plan
to lobby against it. The Bureau of
Labor Statistics says only 3.2 per-
cent of all private businesses now
test for drugs � most because
government contracts require it.
CCvtyntht 1990. US TODAY
AppU Collft Information Network
Global study rates school systems
U.S. education funding ranks low
By Dennis Kelley
Gannett News Service
The U.S. ranks 14th out of 16
industrialized nations in the per-
cent of national income spent on
education from preschool through
high secondary school, a new
study says.
The liberal Economic Policy
I nstiru te, a labor backed economic
think tank, says its survey under-
mines Bush administration claims
that the USA spends more per
pupil than other major countries
Administration officials immedi-
ately attacked the survey's meth-
odology.
Co-authors M. Edith Rasell
and Lawrence Mishel all took 1985
figures, the last year for which all
nations' figures were available,
and compared spending as a per-
cent of the gross domestic; not
national product to find:
�The USA ranks 14th for its
preschool through secondary
school funding, adjusted for sizes
of school populations. That puts it
ahead of only Ireland and Austra-
lia.
�The na tion is in a three-way
tie for second in education spend-
ing, if monies for collegesand other
post-secondary institutions are
included. But higher education
isn't the problem, Mishel says.
"The problem is K (kindergarten)
through 12
�If the U.S. were to increase
spending for primary and secon-
dary schools to the average of the
other 15 countries, it would need
to spend $20 billion more annu-
ally.
An acerbic Education Depart-
ment statement responds that the
report "has mixed apples, oranges
and moonbeams to produce an
indigestible concoction It says
the more accurate view of per-
pupi 1 expenditures shows the US A
second only to Switzerland in
education spending.
The department statement
says, for example, that education
funding was 3.9 percent of
Mississippi's budget in 1986, but
3.7 percent of Minnesota's. Yet
Minnesota spent $4,180 per pupil,
Mississippi just $2,350.
Mishel says per-pupil com-
parisons fail because poorer na-
tions simply can't afford as much.
Looking at spending as part of a
nation's wealth tells more about
its commitment to education.
"We don't say money will
solve the problem Mishel says.
"But we don't think you can solve
it without money
CCmtM 190. USA TODAY
Awrk OWi�j� tnbrmmwm Nrtwi
Additional violence in
Nagorno-Karabakh region
Iran
Gannen News ,�
AT&T computer failure
demonstrates system's
inherent weaknesses
By Paul Overberg
Gannett News Service
WASHINGTON � The com-
puter glitch that cnppled Ameri-
can Telephone & Telegraph's vast
communications network demon-
strates the tenuous webs binding
America's 21st Century technol-
ogy-
From tax returns to petro-
chemical refining to mice needed
for medical research, complex
systems feed the nation's lifeline.
Often a single incident can dis-
rupt millions of lives.
"I was surprised that it hap-
pened, knowing the kind of equip-
ment that AT&T basically had
said Harold Groff, a telecommu-
nications technology specialist at
Penn State.
"But there's no reason that it
can't happen, sometimes with
much worse results. 1 don'� really
know how you ptevent t fr m
happening
Between 2:30 p.m. and mid-
night EST Monday, about half fhc
110 million calls did not go
through. AT&T's 110 switching
centers carry 70 percent ot tnt
nation's long-distance calls. Offi-
cials blamed the problem en a
software bug in an electronic
switchingcenterinNewYorkC irv.
Ironically, AT&T chairman Car-
les Allen told reporters Tuesday
the problem was caused bv in-
stalling an extra safeguard in the
computer program that runs the
network.
Even as he spoke, fog ai
Chicago's O'Hare Airport bedev-
iled theinterconnectinggangliaot
theair traffic net work. With giant!
United and American using
See AT&T, page 9
Lottery may be a big
issue in state elections
RALEIGH (AP) � The likeli-
hood of a shortfall in tax collec-
tions, combined with reluctance
to raise taxes during an election
year, will make the proposed state
lottery a more powerful issue,
several lawmakers say.
"I think it will be pushed to
the hilt said House Minority
Leader Johnathan Rhyne, R-l.in-
coln. "Some would speculate that
some people are happy that we're
in this position so that the lottery
would have a better chance. I think
that's unfortunate
Rep. David Diamont, D-Surry,
House Appropriations Commit-
tee chairman, said the tight budget
year may force some legislators to
support proposals that otherwise
would be unattractive.
"As they begin to realize that
we have to come up with addi-
tional revenue or cut major pro-
grams significantly, they're going
to look for other major revenues
Diamont, who opposes a lottery,
told the Greensboro News & Rec-
ord in an interview published
Wednesday.
Last year, the state Senate
passed a bill to provide a state-
wide referendum to institute a
lottery. The lottery would be ex-
pected to raise about $200 million
for state needs.
The bill is now in the House of
Representatives and could be
taken up during the short session,
which starts May 21.
Earlier this month, Gov. Jim
Martin was forced to cut an aver-
age of 2.5 percent from the money
distributed to state agencies. It was
the fourthconsecutivequarter that
funds to state agencies had been
cut. With nearly all legislators
facing re-election in November,
support for a major tax wcwm
isn't likely.
"It might be easier for them to
vote for a lottery instead of a tax
increase Diamont said
Sen. Bill Martin, D-Guiltord,
one of the primary sponsors of
lottery legislation, said the budget
crunch will make the lottery a
major issue during the short ses-
sion.
"You'll find a lot of folks fight-
ing hard against it, saying if we
want to take care of budget prob-
lems, we should have the gu�s to
raise taxes Martin said. "Bu"
those are the same folks who
always fight increasingany taxes
He said a lottery won't solve
all the state's needs � from edu-
cation to fighting drugs to pris-
ons.
"A lottery will be a significant
part of it Martin said. "We need
to look at other areas (for addi-
tional money), but a lottery is a
very significant part of trying to
get us out of this dilemma we're
in
See LOTTERY, page 8





Page 6
Stlit lEast (garnltnianl
Classifieds
January, 18,1990
FOR RENT
WANTED: Female roommate needed
to share two bedroom apt rent and
utilities will be split in halt I k ated off
10th st close to campus ' s 62 vS
MALE WANTED : To share 2 bedroom
apt at Tar River Estates among
people Rent $136 13 of utilities
Close to campus Bus route Call 830-
5x32 Ask for Han or David
CLEAN, RESPONSIBI T S 1 I 1H N 1
NEEDED: To share 1 bedroom
apartment Ask for Jeff or Rodney r57
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
0485
ROOMMA II Ml IMP: Nicely
decorated townhouse centrally located
Approx $118 month plus i 3 utilities
Prel non smoker tor more info please
call 355-4143
ROOMMATE NEEDED: ASAP
Cannon CtApts Slit- month 830-0382
MAIL ROOMMATE WANTED: $150
month t l2utilities I mi form
campus on bus route Responsible
upperclassman prefered Call 830-0640,
K-ave message
ROOMMA n WAN 11 V. To share 2
bedroom apt at Eastbrook $150
month, 1 2 utilities (. all 758 4667 leave
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
Listen To
message
ROOMMATE WANTED: Eor two
Story, 112 bath, 2br apt with washer
dryer and own vard Completely
furnished except for your room 212 50
plus 1 2 utilities. 10 minute walk to
campus Very new, very nice, must see'
72 7062.
FOR SALF
AUTOS: Can you buy eeps, cars, 4 y
4 s Seized in drug raids tor under $100?
Call for facts today 805 t44 9533 depl
711
1988 IROC-Z CAMARO: 350.5 7 turned
port, fully loaded, Black, new tires, must
sell due to divorce Take payoff, Call
Mr Carroll at 7rvS-6M4
1983 CHEVROLET CELLBR1IV 6 cyl
Tilt wheel, air conditioning, AmEm
cassette stereo, 4 dinir, cruise, high
mileage, $1795 946 4545Washington).
Day or Evening
DISPLAY CLASSIFIFDS
SPRING BREAK 1990 Part Jamaican
stvlo' onebeautifu �� i�� tartingal
$469 1 lot days and '�'�� pgai lights
I r.i el with the best I all Sun plash
fours 1 800 126 710
softwares - computers 2t hours m and
out Guaranteed typing on paper up to
20 hand written pages sF Proles
sional Computer Services, 106 E Mh st
(beside Cubbte's) Greenville, NC 72
3694
Mil Ml( t veint h mes tfm SI in repaii '� � � o tax property Repossessions Call 1-61 SS SS" , CH 2- �START A FRATERNITY: Sure you can Anyone interested call Don at 931 7475
ITI NTION 1 lit rig! i � rnn nl
jobs vour area Many immi ii.it' openings without waiting list oi tesl S17840 569 is i i N 2 ;s S885HELP WANTED
ASHRIM. moIOGRPHt.KV
Want expeneiv e? Test photo needed
Some pa) possible Call David 758 5761
PARl-ITMf MfABEHOUSE
vvoRKTRS Flexible hours Apply in
person I arpet Bargainenter 1009
Dickinson av , Cr nvttle h No
phone calls
PERSONALS
SERVICES OFFERED
A IRI I CUT l SI HR CA1 I INC
Plus raise up to 51 700 m only 10 days
student groups �� it ' ' � � nties
needed foi mark ting pi ect oi
campus For di tails i lus ; ut ' rec i lift
:
, ; i si,i 7 5 S472 I ,t
The College Music FM
RESEARCH WrORMATWN
I Lsrgest Library ot information in U S
all siftecs
TOLL FREE
M0TUNE
800 351 0222
Research tnlormation
HI SI II NDR IM RS ONXMI'i S:
interested m earl ing $1 00for a one
week on campus n arketing project?
Vin must be ��- I ized and hard
WORD PRO ESS1NG AND PHOT
I OPYINi. s( K t s We :��
. � � . � : . � il
HIM'i Ni ssll I! DS
HE1 P WAN ThP: Part time Sales
Stock help from 1 to h pm Monday thru
Friday, and 10 am to 6 pm Saturday
Applv at the Youth Shop Boutique,
Arlington Village, Greenville
PART TIME SI TTLR : Eor 6 year old
after s hool 2 30 5 30 Any or all week
days all 355 7271 after ipm
MODELS. It you would like to model.
Promotions Modeling Agency, a low fee
agency needs males and females of all
ages Also need dancers for private
parties Call 355-0919 to set up an
interview
IMMEDIATE OPENING: Eor
computer Sales persons position Applv
between 3 pm at SDF Computers, 106
E 3th St Greenville, NC 752 3694
EXTRA MONFV: Start immediately at
si pet hour with opportunity tor weekly
uses Part-time (20hrs per week)
onlv . all 355 7637.
COMMUTER FROM KINSTON:
wants to carpool with other commuters
from Kinston Please call 527 7103 after
4 pm
1 OST: Set of key inirog's last Sunday
night If found please call 758-6731 or
757 6501 and ask tor Kelly
SIGMA NC : Would like to thank the
White Rose Society tor their help and
support through out the fa We are
looking forward to a great spring
Semester
SIGMA NL Would like to congratulate
their new officers President � Mitchell
Moore, Vice President � I Km Lumley,
Reorder i larold (line and Treasurer
letf Hill
SIGMA Nl trage all
rush, csi n e I � i all m at 752
��� 7 for information Thank ion
Carolinian
and
ATTIC
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appoirtmrnt Mon thru Sat
I ov Coat TVrmin Jtion to ?0 wtefcf o( Pimiuvm
1-800-433-2930
I NIVERSITY
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.impus organizations, cluhs, frats.
sororities call OCMC at 1 (X00)
�02 - 052 I iKOO) 950-8472 ext 10
(.Rl EKS: Great I rybod) i
� i � � �: another wild Spring semesti i
od with classes The Piks
PIKES ONCE, PIKTS IM T sfR!(.
IS NEAR; IMKis IMKK T Getread)
� � �ge, and hold on tight cause this
st, i lot (ks out of sight! Pike Is It
( )I fh( weekend .� . � rac
Happ) 2! lenn, llappv 20 Letthereeb
flow! Thecrew Ker Will The 5 dogs
Bonnie Rhett and Catherine A are
gomg to make it a night to remember
HappyBirthday! Let the reeb flov rh
or. i .rooks
D IS PL A Y CLASSIHEDS
Present
Thursdays
Wrathchild
America
Admission
9. � �ports
99c Hi-Balls
99 c Memberships
Sales
Representative
Needed
Apply at
The East Carolinian
2nd Floor
Publications Building
Pi Kappa Alpha
"Success Has Its
Privileges
Announcements
ATTENTION TO AI I
The East Carolinian will be changing its
policy concerning announcements stjrt
ing in January, announcements will now
be free for onlv tho 1st week of publica-
tion, after that week there will be a charge
of 1st 2 words for student organiza
tions-S2IX) and tor non student organ,
zations - S3 (X) any additional words will
be05.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Serv
ice in the Bloxton I louse is offering these
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better Interviewing skills A film and
discussion of how to interview on and off
campus will he shared These sessions are
! eld in the Career running room on Ian
12,16 and 22 at Jpon and at 7pmon )an 16
OUTDOOR SMORGASBORD
The ECU outdoor recreation center will he
sponsoring this special event Wed Ian 24
at 7pm in 113 Memorial Gymnasium The
outdoor smorgasbord is an event featur-
ing outdoor cooking techniques and food
sampling, equipment display and utilia
tion, video presentations and trip package
giveaways For details call 757-6911 or
757-6387 The event if free of charge for all
ECU faculty, staff and students
NiKlLSPORTS SPECIAL
EVENT
Nike Sports will be sponsoring a .pint
shoot out for all East Carolinians Jerseys,
Socks, shoes , gymbags etc will be
awarded to participants Registration will
take place Ian 23 at 530in Bio 103. Don't
Miss wiu chance Call 757 6387 for details
or stop by 2tU Memorial Gym I lome of
lm Rec Services
CO-REC BOWLERS
Registration tor InvKec Services spring
00 rec bowling league will take place Ian
23 at 5pm in Bio Hfl 2 men and 2 women
are required Individuals interested m
participation that ha' no team allegiance
are welcome to attend the meeting for
placement of a team Call 757-6387 tor
details or stop by room 1U Memorial Cvm.
STOP SMOKING
Need help kicking the habit1 The Student
1 loalth Center offers the American Cancer
SodetyTresh Start' Smoking cessation
program tree ot charge to all ECU stu-
dents The program consists ot tour one
hour sessions The program starts Thurs
tiav an 2 and will continue for four
consecutive Thursdays Class time will be
1 JG 2 W pm and the program is held in
the Student 1 lealth Center Resource Room
Call now to sign up 77 6794 since space is
limited Keep vour New Year's Resolu
tion"
CHOLESTEROL SCREENING
Your cholesterol number may be the key
to living a healthy lifestyle' Cholesterol
screening is available to all students, staff
and faculty at the Student Health Center
Screenings conducted every Monday
through Friday from 8 am to 12 noon For
best test results don't eat or drink any
thing after supper the night before' Cost is
as follows Cholesterol, tnglvcendes,
blood sugar Students -S4, Staff and Fac-
ulty. S7 Cholesterol, tnglvcendes, IIDL
StudentsS7, staff and faculty $10 NC)
appointment necessary For more info
call 757-6841.
EDUCATION MAJORS
The department of speech Language and
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be pro
viding the speech and hearing screening
tor all students eligible for admission to
the Upper Division of Teacher Education
on Monday, Jan. 22: Tue Jan 23 and Wed
an 24 The department will be testing
from 5 to 630 each day. No Appointment
is neededffirst come basis) The SLAP
department is located in Helk Annex on
Charles Street.
HONORS SEMINARS
All faculty members are reminded of their
opportunity to design an honors Seminar
The Honors Committee makes the final
selection Pleasesubmit proposals (at least
by phone) to David Sanders (757-673) at
the 1 lonors Office, GCB 1002A, bv Thurs
dav, Jan 18, 1990 See David Sanders in
the Honors Office for more information
ALL PARENTS
Need parents who would be willing to
volunteer their children, between the ages
of 6 -15, for testing, as training for Clinical
Psychology students, Department of Psy
chologv, ECU. If interested, please call the
Testing Cen�er,ECU, 757-6811.
WEIGHT CONTROL CLASSES
The SI Is offers information about healthy
eating habits weight control, behavior
modification dn titnoss programming
Classes held Every Friday from 10 U am
Beginning Ian 19 At the Student I lealth
Center
CONTRACEPTIVE CLASSES
Student I lealth Center , Every Monday at
2pm and Every Thursday at pm
PHI UPSILON OMICRON
Important meeting Phi Up professiona
projectMTG Mondav, Ian 22at" 1" Van
landingham Ri-m II E. ESdg Plea
attend all members!
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR
RESEARCH STUDY
rtn Section ot Infectious Diseases ECU
Schixi! ot Medicine m conjunction with
the Student I lealth Center is conducting a
study on the soxual spread oi herpes vi-
ruses We are hxking tor men and women
IS years and older who have never had
genital herpes If you are interested in
obtaining more information, call Jean
Askew. R.N. at 551-2578
ECU LACROSSE
Students who plan on playing Lacrosse
during the spring 1990 season must attend
a meeting in the basement of Memorial
Cvm at 3 30 on Thursday. Jan 18. Statis-
ticians also welcome
NCTEACHING FELLOWS
The lunior class ot N C Teaching Fellows
will meet in Speight 129 on Jan 22 at 5pm
A closed general meeting for all Fellows
will be held on Jan.29 in Speight at Spm
I)r Henderson will address the Junior
1 lass meeting
ODN-OVERSEAS DEVELOP-
MENT NETWORK
ODN will resume their meetings on an
IS on Thursday at 5pm in GCB 1025. We
will be discussing our plans for a regional
conference If you are interested in help
ing others in third world countnes please
join us
Amnesty IntT will be having its monthly
meeting on Jan 24 Wed. night at 8pm at St
Paul's Episcopal church on 4th St. If you
are interested in world Lssues 3nd basic
human rights please join us
IMPROVING YOUR STUDY
NQ1
Skills
I earning how to improve your study skills
for greater success in college. The follow
ing mini course and workshops can help
you prepare for the added workload of
college or help to increase your GPA All
sessions will be held in 313 Wnght Build
ing. Jan. 22 .Monday, Time Management
3-4:30 pm. Jan. 23 , Tuesday, Making and
using notes, 3-4:30pm Jan 24,Wednes
day, Efficient Reading, 3-4 30pm Jan 25,
Thursday, Test Taking, 3-430pm. You
may attend all the topic sessions or choose
the ones where you need the most im
provement.
ECU POETRY FORUM
A meeting of the ECU Poetry torum will
be held tonite at Spm in room 248 Men
denhall Those attending are asked to
bring 6 S copies of poems to be discussed
Students, faculty and staff Ate invited to
attend
LUTHERAN STUDENT.
ASSQCLATIQN
LSA will have its "Spring Miter" on Sun
day, Jan 21 at 6 30 pm It wnil be held at
Our Redeemer Lutheran Church - 1801 S
Flm St All Lutheran Students are wel
come for more info call 355-7983
ECU AMBASSADORS
The ECU Ambassadors will be having a
general meeting on Wed Jan 24,1990 at 5
pm in Mendenhall Student Center's social
room
CiJRISjnNLEBATERNITY.
Chi Alpha Omega social Chnstian Frater
nity will hold Rush on Jan 29-31 from 8 pm
tolOpm Please contact Jonat931 9604or
Reggie at 752-0545 if you are interested.
AMERICAN MARKETING
jJQClATIQN
The 1st AM A meeting of the Spring se-
mester will be held Thur. Jan 18 at 330 in
room 1022 (GCB) featuring Mr Fred Goss
representing "The Pantry "
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
There will be a meeting of the ECU Biol-
SEEPAGE7






II
I
(1
i
It
B
I
5
Bl
n
In
Mobil delays drilling
RALEIGH (AP) � Time is
running out on Mobil Oil Corps
plans to sink an exploratory natu-
ral gas well off Cape Hatteras this
year, state and company officials
say
Mobil had planned to begin
drilling as soon as May under a
"memorandum of understand-
ing" announced last summer be-
tween the company, the state and
the federal government. State and
federal officials since then have
recommended postponing the
project, and a Mobil official said
Tuesday that any significant de-
lays would prevent the company
from drilling this year.
Mobil has proposed search-
ing for natural gas near the edge of
the Continental Shelf, about 4(1
miles off the Outer Banks, under
nearly 3,000 feet of water. William
C. Whittemore, a lawyer with
Mobil'sexploration branch in New
Orleans, said the company still
has not agreed to a p �tponement.
But any significant delays, he said,
would not leave enough time to
drill this year.
Under the memorandum of
understanding,or MOU, Mobil is
scheduled to file an exploration
plan by Jan. 31. rhe company also
must drill its exploratory well
See DRILLING, page 10
RUSH
PHI KAPPA TAU
Duke doctor committed to a
psychiatric clinic wins hearing
RALEIGH (AP) � A former
Duke University professor has
won a new hearing on his charge
that university officials improp-
erly committed him to a psychiat-
ric hospital.
The state Court of Appeals
ruled Tuesday that Kwan-Sa You
deserved a hearing on charges that
several of hiscolleagues and Duke
committed libel, medical malprac-
tice and false imprisonment in
H82. Lower court orders dismiss-
ing his charges of breach of con-
tract, slander, malicious prosecu-
tion and abuse of process were
upheld by the appeals cotfct.
You began working as an
assistant professor of pediatrics in
Duke's Pediatric Metabolism
Laboratory in 1977. But in May
1982, he was told he would be
dismissed in Apnl 1983. After an
administrative appeal, his dis-
missal was delayed until October
1983.
But in September 1982, he was
accused of refusing to reveal the
recipes for some compounds he
was making at the laboratory You
denied the charge, and reported
to work late that month to find a
locksmith changing the locks on
his office door and all the labora-
tory doors. He was told to remove
his belongings from the office la tor
the same av
I is suit against five other
Duke professors and the uni' er
siry said statement- n I
colleagues led l his involuntary
commitment in Duk� - psychial
ric unit on Oct. I, 1982 H� ��
taken to the unit by foui univei
sitv security guards and held tor
three days for observation.
In appealing the dismissal of
the slander charges, ousaid there
was no truth to statements that he
threatened laboi ! i ' �" mem
ber- with acid mad m ne
lab,hadphysicalh il ' hiswifc
or had written letti i thn Honing
Sec DOCTOR, page II
I
,
4 fv r' ����� T-
:
&
in
in
ill HI
!fc ��
ANNOUNCEMENTS
I WANT YOU TO
BE A PHI TAU!
CONTINUED IRON! PAG1
ogy Club on Tuesday, Jan 23 at 5pm in
room BN109 There will be a guest speaker
from the North Carolina Biotecnology
association I hs speech is titledWhat the
1 leek is UioTech This will be very infor-
mative and interesting Everyone is urged
to come oin us.
SELF -1
AVAILABLE
The Department of Political Science seeks
a rebable, conscientious, and efficient
student with strong skills and some expe-
rience to assist staff and faculty in a vari-
ety of activities Good typing, word proc-
essing, copying, and clerical skill are
desired. Please contact Mrs Cynthia
Smith, Brewster A-124 personally or by
telephone, 757-6030, 830 am to 5pm,
Monday Friday We will be hiring as
soon as possible.
REWARD
There will be a reward given for anv knfoi
mation concerning the vandalism of a
white 1967 Chevrolet Camaro parked in
First Federal Bank's parking lot on Salur
day night, Jan 13
SNCAE
Attention .ill mem � rs
spring semester v ith a
- IriT
The topi w ill
and th 1 aw " I h fir
ruesda an 23, 5-6
Refreshmi nts pi
persons welconv
STUDEN1 I NION
i � �� sand the ItudentUni
Committee will be y-
( illeg( �
al spm m th M
admission is I re in I
Mon: 8 - 11
Tues: 8- 11
Wed: cS - 11
Thurs: 8-11
Subs with Sorority Girls of AAY
Come Out & Participate in our Annual
Casino Night Hors d'ouvres will be served
Pizza with the Sorority Girls of XQ
. Meet the Brothers of Phi Kappa Tau
FOR RIDES CALL: 757-1319
U.S. COLLEGE
y
COMPETITION
U.S.I
HNC
Spooanrcd by the
Student Unioa
Special Bvcats (
HOW TO BECOME THE FUNNIEST COLLEGE STUDENT
IN AMERICA IN THREE MINUTES:
Prepare a hilarious three minute comedy routine. (Clean, of course!)
. Win Your Campus Competition .At the time and place listed below)
� Be judged the best in the USA by Jerry Seinfeld, National Judge
THE PRIZES ARE NOTHING TO LAUGH AT:
� Certs Mints will take then tp nal winners on a Trip to Daytona Beach
during Spring Break topei form U a ationmg students, and that winner
will go to New York City to per form at a famous comedy club.
� Get a U S College Comedy T-Shirt.
IF YOU'RE NOT COMPETING, COME BY JUST FOR LAUGHS!
Date: Tuesday, Jan 23. 1990 Competitors Time: 7:00pm
Location: Social Room Mendenhall Student Center Audience Time. 8:00pm





The East Carolinian, January 18,1990 8
East German strikes continue
WEST BERLIN (AP) Pres-
sure on East Germany's C ommu
nist leaders is mounting as more
and more workers walk off the job
in warning strikes. The country's
police chief si vs he fears the insta-
bility could deteriorate into civil
strife.
Inapparent acknowledgment
of the Communist government's
waning support. West Germany
on Tuesday backed off on its drive
to establish closer ties, saying it
would wait until after free elec-
tions promised for May b. East
German workers held more work
stoppages to protest a growing
listof grievances For the first time
in such warning strikes, they pro
tested government-mandated
pnce increases.
The growing tension was
addressed by national police chief
Dieter VVinderlich when he dis-
cussed Monday night's storming
of secret police headquarters dur-
ing a news conference:
"We have to do everything so
that the reform process can go
forward with the peaceful means
that have characterized it to date,
to keep it from resulting in occur-
rences resembling civil war
Since the fall ot hard-line
leader Fnch 1 Eonecker on CVt. 18,
East Germany's leaders routinely
have called tor calm and warned
that violence could hurt efforts to
establish true democracy in the
country Hut Winderlich, also a
deputy interior minister, was the
first top -ranking official to men-
tion civil war
Opposition groups have ac-
cused the government of Com-
munist Premier 1 lans Modrow of
exaggerating security threats in
an apparent attempt togain politi-
cal support and ushfy maintain-
ing a security police force. The
government savs it is dismantling
the secret police, but critics accuse
it ot toot dragging.
Nationwide, protests have
continued by hundreds of thou
sands of people who have de-
manded that theCommunistsgive
up their virtual control of the
government, media, bureaucracy
and economy. The unrest appar-
ently prompted Chancellor
Helmut Kohl of West C .ermany to
scrap plans for negotiating
stronger ties with the Modrow
government. Kohl said the talks
could wait until after free elec-
tions.
Kohl said the East German
situation has become "morediffi-
cult adding that "quick and ef-
fective measures" wcrenetled to
Sec GERMANY, page 9
CDCC SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
inCC STUDENTS WHO NEED
MONEY FOR COLLEGE
Every Student is Ehqibl for Some Type ot
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades or Parental Income
� We have a dala bank ol ov- ?OfK)00 listings ot s-hoiarships Mtow
ships grants and loans rf presenting over $'0 billion n private settc
funding
� Many scholarships are aivento students hased on their academic m'trests
career plans family hetaqe arxi pla C r' residpn. e
� There s money available lo students who have he-n newspaper arriers
grocery clerks heerlete's non smoke's Pit
� Results f.UAHANreEn
CALL
ANY TiMf-
For A Frre Brochure
1800)346-6401

U.N. Security Council focuses on Cambodia
PARIS (AD - The UN. Seen
rirv Council's permanent mem
bers � the United States, the Soviet
Union, China. Britain and France
� have agreed to move quickly to
seek a cease-fire and free elections
in Cambodia under U.N. admini-
stration.
Officials of the five countries
concluded two days of meetings
Tuesday night by setting out a 1r�-
point summary of principles, to-
cusodon "anenhanced U.N role"
in bringing peace to Cambodia.
Representatives of the countries
will meet again in New York in
about two weeks, then again in
late Eebruarv in Tans to push the
peace program ahead as quickly
as possible
"We're at least going to make
a strong try at it said a senior
U.S. official, briefing reporters on
condition ot anonymity. "We're
not talking about a process that
would take several years, but it's
clear it will take several months
Much could depend on China,
which arms and supplies the
powerful Khmer Rouge resistance
(action, and is being counted on to
l nfluence its clients to accept UN
supervised elections rather than
seek military victory.
The five countries said a spe-
cial representative of U.N. Secre-
tary (.eneral la vier Perez deCuel-
lar would be in charge of United
Nations activities in Cambodia
Hugo spurs mini baby boom
GASTONIA (AD Gaston
Countv will undergo itsown little
babv boom in lune and early lulv
� about nine months after 1 lurn
cane Hugo left residents in the
dark with time on their hands,
some doctors sav.
Gaston Gynecologv and Ob-
stetrics, one of the county's two
prenatal practices, reports a big
increase in patients whose likely
date of conception was shortly
after the historic Sept. 22 storm
knocked out power and essentially
shut down the county.
"Anv time there is a natural
disaster or snowstorm or any thing
that keeps people at their homes,
this happens said Deborah
Hudson, business manager lor
Gaston Gynecology.
Dr Joseph Holman ot (.as
tonia Women's Clinic said, "As
sixm as Hugo hit. we all joked
about it
While Gaston Gynecology
started seeing an increase in pa-
tients late last month, Ms I iudson
said she expectseven more women
to start coming in this month be-
cause of a new calendar v ear for a
family's insurance deductible.
Only halfway through the
month, the office in January il
Unrest
read) has surpassed the number
(t new patients m December. Ms.
Hudson expects to have between
90 and 100 new patients this
month, compared with about 50
tor a normal anuary.
"That s a pretty good indica-
tion that Hugo had something to
do with it she said.
Ms I iudson sud Gaston saw
a similar trend in October 1988.
About 14 inches ot snow were
dumped on the Piedmont in Janu-
ary lSS and tust about nine
months from that, we had more
deliveries than you would believe
tor that month she said.
Continued from page 5
pronounce it out loud, but what is
happening now can unambi-
guously be termed a civil war
correspondent O. Shapovalov
wrote in the newspaper Komso-
molskava Pravda.
The Bush administration sup-
ported Gorbachev's use1 of troops
in the region, known as the south-
ern Caucasus, and criticized feud-
ing Azerbaijanis and Armenians
for "revisitingold ethnic hatreds
The Kremlin's emergency
decree empowers local officials to
ban demonstrations and strikes,
impose curfews, censor the me-
dia, confiscate weapons, disband
unofficial organizations and de-
tain people for up to 30 days Inte-
rior Ministry officials said thev
could not recall such measures
being imposed in thecountry since
World War 11
Gennadv 1. C.erasimov, the
Eoreign Ministry spokesman,
denied thedecree wasa backtrack-
ing of Gorbachev's reforms, which
have led to greater openness and
liberalization of society since he
became Soviet leader in March
1985.
"I would not interpret this step
as being at odd s with glasnost and
democracy(.er.isimovs.ud. "On
the contrary, the step opposes
anarchy
Lottery
Continued from page 5
The bill approved last vear bv
the state Senate calls for a state-
wide referendum this November.
If voters approved a lottery, it
would start in July 1991, accord
ing to the bill. Of the money from
a lottery, half would be used as
prize money, and 16 percent
would go to run the lottery The
remaining 34 percent � about $200
million � would go to the state
for education or other state gov-
ernment needs.
Gov. Jim Martin has repeat-
edly said he opposes a lottery
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during an unspecified transition
period leading to elections. They
called in a statement for "an effec
tive U.N. presence" to assure in
ternal security, apparently a refer-
ence to a peacekeeping force.
Elections "must be conducted
underdirect I J.N. administration"
that would assure "a neutral p
litical environment in which no
party would be advantaged the
statement said.
"An enduring peace can onh
be achieved through a compre
hensive political settlement, in
eluding the verified withdrawal
of foreign forces, a cease fire ind
the cessation ol outside military
assistance it said The goal
should be self-determination for
the Cambodian people through
free, fair and democratic elec
tions
Points set out in the statement
do not deal with some of the most
difficult issues � such as whethei
to dissolve Premier Hun Sen's
Vietnamese-backed government
or what to do about Cambodia's
United Nations seat, now held b
the three-party guerrilla coalitioi
led by Prince Norodom Sihanouk
OfFS
INC.
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SUPPLIES, SOCIA1 STATION I K . IFTS,
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The East Carolinian, January 18, 1990 9
Bush, Congress will battle over China
By Marilyn Greene
Gannett News Service
Congress is putting on the
gloves for a brawl with President
Bush over U.S. policy toward
China
Among the first items of busi-
ness when Congress reconvenes
Jan. 23:
A push to override Bush's
veto of a bill extending U.S. visas
tor Chinese students.
Efforts to enact sanctions in
protest over China's continuing
repression, despite the lifting of
martial law in Beijing
Bush imposed sanctions after
the Chinese government's crack
down on students in lune, subse-
quently easing bans on sales of
satellites to China and loans and
guarantees.
Many in Congress believe it's
too early to lift sanctions because
few freedoms arc yet available in
China. Laws against strikes, pub-
lic gatheringsand demonstrations
remain on China's books despite
the end of nearly eight months of
martial law
Chinese authorities' continu-
ing repression of dissent "rein-
forces our argument says Rep
Nancy Pelosi,D-Calif, author of a
bill that would waive a U.S. re-
quirement that Chinese students
return home for two years when
their visas expire.
Passage of the law, vetoed by
Bush in November, will "send a
very clear message to the people
in Beijing that there has to be some
change in the way they treat their
people if there's to be continued
opening up Pelosi says.
Sen. Paul Simon, D-lll says
he "welcomes the end to martial
law, "but it is not satisfactory in
terms of really, substantively eas-
ing and improving relations. We
have to send a stronger signal to
China than we've been sending.
The White House on the whole
Chinese question has been,
franklv, very anemic in standing
up for freedom
He'll also back the move to
extend student's visas: "Whether
it's a veto override or new legisla-
tion, I'll be for it. They (the Chi-
nese) have to understand that
conduct like that in Tiananmen
Square isconduct the international
community � and particularly the
United States - just doesn't toler-
ate
Gerntt Gong, director of Asian
studiesatWashington'sCenterfor
Strategic and International Stud-
ies, fears that the conflict could
end nearly two decades of unified
policy toward China. "My con-
cern is that it not become a parti-
san issue now
Democratic consultant Frank
Mankiewicz predicts the override
vote will be "overwhelming. It's
going to be tough for the presi-
dent. He's going to get rolled on
the override and then there will
be sanctions
Heart disease begins young, study says
Cruise to
Frceport,
Bv Tim Friend
Gannett News Service
SAN ANTONIO A major
new study offers the strongest
evidence vet that heart disease
prevention should begin in early
childhood particularly with
diet
The stud v. presented Monday
at the American Heart Associa-
tion science writers forum here,
firml) establishes high cholesterol
levels and smoking as nsk factors
tor heart disease in people as
voung as 25. The study is the
strongest yet to support the idea
that prevention of heart disease
should begin in early childhood
particularly with diet, says Pr
Myron Weisfeldt, president of the
American Heart Association.
Though restricting fat in kids'
diets at a very early age is contro-
versial, the AHA recommends a
low-fat, low-cholesterol diet be-
ginning at age 3. It also recom-
mends never smoking, getting
regular exercise and avoiding
excessive alcohol.
Among the study's findings,
presented Monday at an AHA
science writers torum:
Bv the late teens, fatty de-
posits are well established in the
arteries of a small but significant
percentage oi people deposits
large enough to begin narrowing
the arteries.
Bv age 23, people who
smoke and have high cholesterol
levels have twice as many artery
deposits as people who don't
smoke and have normal choles-
terol levels.
�By ages 30-34, about 25
percent of white males have fatty
deposits in their arteries.
"This is very important infor-
mation, the best ever to show a
real relationship in voung people
K'tween atherosclerosis (harden-
ing of the arteries) and risk fac-
tors said Pr. Myron Weisfeldt,
Al 1A president
The findings were made bv
examining the arteries ot about
3(X) voung people who died in
accidents and by testing their
blood for cholesterol levels and
evidence of smoking. The nation-
wide study, sponsored bv the
National Heart, Lung and Blood
Germany
Institute, will continue until about
1,800 people have been examined.
"The study is well on its way
to confirming that heart disease
begins in childhood, advances
rapidly in early adulthood and is
profoundly influenced by risk
factors savs study spokesman
Dr. Henry McCill, scientific direc-
tor of the Southwest Foundation
for Biomedical Research, in San
Antonio, a participant in the 15-
center study.
Other studies have shown that
fatty deposits can be found as
young as age three and that these
deposits can change into the
plaques that cause heart attacks
and strokes in adulthood.
Ci.tv1" mi US TODA1
Continued from page 8
Call 1-800-622-4262
jCampus
Tours
shore up the economy.
Mod row s government has
called for scrapping centrally
planned socialism and replacing
it with a free-market system It has
thus started to abolish state subi
dicbby raising pnees tor children s
clothesand related articles. Apart-
ment rents and prices of other
essentials are also expected to rise.
fhe price hikes have sent panic
through a population accustomed
to decades oi rock-bottom prices
for gwds. services and housing.
"The sacred cow has been
slaughtered the Communist
Tartv daily Berliner Zeitung de-
clared.
Modrow, visiting West Ber-
lin, blamed the pro-democracy
opposition for Monday's storm-
ing of the secret police headquar-
AT&T
OI lare as a hub, the airport pins
A r&Tasa potential technological
choke point.
On May 8, 18, a fire at a
telephone switching center out-
side Chicago vividly demon-
strated the vulnerability of both
systems. The fire destroyed com-
puter links between O'Hare and
the regional Federal Aviation
Administration center in nearby
Aurora Forced to switch to a
backup system, OHare's traffic-
was cut bv 80 percent and trig-
gered huge delays in New York,
Denver and Atlanta
Earlier this year, a computer
failure at the I.eesburg, Va FAA
center crippled Fast Coast flights
and rippled delays west across the
country. Fred Farrar, an FAA
spokesman, says because the air
traffic system has fewer major
pieces controlled by computer, it
won Id not be subject to the ki nd of
massive shutdown that hit AT&T.
"We've had problems with
computers failing, but we've got
backups in place so that we can
fall back on them Farrar said
Other recent flirtations with
technological disaster:
New software in 1985 de-
layed millions of tax refunds for
weeks, and disrupted consumer
spending so much that economic
indicators were skewed and the
Federal Reserve temporarily was
forced to adjust its monetary pol-
icy.
� In March a solar storm
creed a huge current surge in
electrical cables feeding power
south from Canada's lames Bay
hydroelectric dams. The surge
overloaded the network and
blacked out eastern Canada over-
night, but alert operators in the
northeastern United States cut
links to Canada and fired up re-
serve generators to take up the
slack.
- In May a fire in Jackson
laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine,
killed 500,000 laboratory mice -
delaving medical research for
months. The lab, largest of its kind,
supplied more than 2 million mice
a year from strains with specific
genetic traits. It may take three
years to restock.
� A 18 explosion in Ne-
vada leveled one of the two facto-
ries making ammonium perchlo-
rate, a crucial component of solid
rocket fuel. The surviving plant
geaal up to make enough to avoid
wholesale delays in vital NASA
ters.
"1 hope the storming remains
a one-time event and isn't any kind
of signal Modrow said during
his visit, the first by an East Ger-
man premier to the Western sec-
tor. I le complained he had been
greeted with shouts of "red pig"
after he rushed to the storming
scene in an attempt to halt the
rampage.
Continued from page 5
and Air Force launch schedules.
The ultimate "what if" con-
cern centerson the interbank trans-
fer system run by the Federal
Reserve Bank of New York, a vital
network that moves billions of
dollars a day across the country.
A spokesman was reassuring
there is a backup, he said, "and
the backup has a backup. We're
well-prepared for anything
CC.Tynfta 1�0. USA TO(M
Local Fast Berlin prosecutor
(ierhard Kruegersaid he had been
assigned by the nation's top law-
enforcement of ficial to investigate
the most serious incidents during
the rampage at the secret police
building. He added he was otter-
ing representatives of opposition
groups "close cooperation" in
tracking down suspects.
Many of the demonstrators
Monday night looted the build-
ing, carrying away clothing,
bottles of wine and various pieces
of equipment
Opposition groups issued
appeals for calm after the storm-
ing. The rampage led the govern-
ment to broadcast a warning thai
the action had put the country'
efforts toward true democracy "ir
gravest danger
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IJo I .ist tuolini.in, Mihi.iiv IS. 1 ��0 10
kiuestas flood hto Europe
Investors around the world, starstruck by the promise of East bloc democracy and
the 1992 economc unifcation of the European Communrty.are flinging money at a
dizzying pace into West Europe investments, particularly West German ones
Investors arc pouring
into European stocks . .
Stock indexes
Europeonly
r World'
Gain since opening
of Berlin Wall
10.6
5.9
U.S. (S&P'SDO index) 3.2
. and sending the
Deutschemark soaring.
Since opening
Currency of Berlin Wall
IW. GermanMark vOtolliT 93
Key currerlcTes 7 vs. Dollar 3
Source Morgan Stanley Capital Markets' EAFE world stock index.
Morgan Guarranty Index of key currencies. USATOOAY research
Bakker-Hahn liasion pleads guilty
Drilling
during "window between May
l and (At 31 to avoid the most
likelv storm seasons
"We're ready to file the explo-
ration plan. Whittemore told The
New$ and Observer of Raleigh in an
interview published Monday. But
it the timetable is extended, he
said, the company will be "pushed
past the 1990 window
Hie state and the Minerals
Management Service, the federal
agency that must approve all off-
shore drilling, have recommended
delaying the project until they can
gather more information on ocean
currents and potential impacts on
offshore fisheries.
Although Mbil must ap-
prove any changes in the time-
table, the minerals service could
decide that the company's explo-
ration plan is incomplete if it
doesn't agree to the additional
studies. That determination, in
effect, would postpone the project
anyway.
"It s prettv clear that the pres-
ent dates arc going to slip and are
not going to be met said Donna
P. Moffitt, director of the state
Outer Continental Shelf Office.
Mobil would need about four
months of lead time before start-
ing the drilling, she said, and
another four months to sink the
well.
"So, that lead time is alreadv
gone for this drilling she said.
"You start adding that all up, and
Continued from page 7
this year is looking less and less
likely"
Ms. Moffitt also chairs the
Governor's Working Group on
Mobil's Offshore Drilling, which
met Tuesday to discuss the
company's contingency plan for
cleaning up potential spills from
drilling At the meeting, state and
U.S. Coast Guard officials ques-
tioned the completeness of Mobil's
contingency plan.
The preliminary plan de-
scribes what procedures the com-
pany would follow and what
equipment it would have in place
in the event of a spill. For instance,
Mobil proposes to have a cleanup
vessel on site 24 hours a day dur-
ing the drilling.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) -
The evangelist who introduced
PTL founder Jim Bakker to church
secretary Jessica Hahn has pleaded
innocent to charges that he lied to
a grand jury about his reason for
setting up the meeting.
John Wesley Fletcher, 49, a
frequent guest on Bakker's TV
show, entered the plea to one
perjury count on Tuesday before
U.S. Magistrate Paul Taylor. The
judge set trial for the court's April
term.
It was the disclosure of hush
payments to Ms Hahn following
her 1980 sexual liaison with Bakker
that eventually led to the demise
of Bakker's multimillion-dollar
PTL empire.
Bakker is serving a 45-year
federal prison term in Minnesota
after being convicted last fall of
fraud and conspiracy. He was
found guilty of bilking followers
who sent him $158 million in ex-
change for free lodging guaran-
tees at his Heritage USA Christian
retreat in nearby Fort Mill, S.C
Another former Bakker asso-
ciate, the Rev. Sam Johnson, did
not appear in court for hisarraign-
ment on perjury charges. Court
officials said Johnson's attorney
had given notice that his client
would waive his nght to appear at
his arraignment
The attorney, Bill Osteen, told
the U.S. District Court clerk's of-
fice that he planned to enter
Johnson's plea today. Last month,
Johnson said he intended to plead
innocent.
Both men are accused of lying
to the special grand jury that in-
vestigated PTL's operations un-
der Bakker's leadership. That
panel met for 17 months before
indicting Bakker and three of his
former associates Fletcher had
met Ms. Hahn when he cond ucted
revival services on New York's
Long Island, where she was a
church secretary.
Fletcher told the grand jury
working part-time with hisbrothrr
in the roofing business in Dur
ham. He declined to comment on
the charges following the hearing
Johnson, former pastor of
HeritageVillageChurchatPTl .is
accused of lying to the grand jun.
about the source of a $10,000 loan
that he made to one of Bakker s
aides. The money eventually was
given to Ms Hahn to keep her
quiet about the 1980 encounter
with Bakker, the indictment said
Johnson gave the money to
former PTL executive vice presi-
dent Richard Dortch in Novem-
ber 1984 Ms Hahn later received
$265,000 in PTL money in ex-
change for her silence, the indict
ment said. Dortch, who was
charged with Bakker, pleaded
guilty to fraud and conspiracy
h iU ' il charges, sentenced to eight years
during one appearance that he LI � B � nnrm
jj tZ- j n ll , ,�� mc m prison and fined $200,000.
didn t introduce Bakker and Ms.
Hahn with the idea that thev
would have sex. But during a later
appearance before the gTand jury,
Fletcher said sex was the motive
behind the introduction and that
Bakker had told him to "Get me a
woman Prosecutors said they
don't plan to call Ms. Hahn as a
witness at Fletcher's trial.
Fletcher told reporters he is
Two other former Bakker as
sociates � brothers James and
David Taggart � were convicted
of evading tax payments on more
than $1.1 million in PTL funds
that they used for personal expen-
ditures. If convicted, Johnson and
Fletcher each face up to five years
in prison and fines of up to
$250,000.
N.C. legislature looks at solutions for overcrowded prisons
Dunne the past two yea
RALEIGH (AP) A legisla
live panel searched for a way out
ol North Carolina's prison crowd-
ing problem and heard from one
lawmaker who suggested the state
might want to abandon its prison
population cap
1 know it wasn't the thinking
iMi anybody's part when we im-
posed the cap that we'd bo letting
them out at the rate we're doing
Rep R Samuel Hunt III. P-Ala-
mance, told the oinl Legislative
Governmental Operations Com
mission Tuesday
The two-year-old limit on the
state's prison population was put
in place by the N.C. General As-
sembly in an effort to avoid a fed-
eral takeover of the crowded sys-
tem But a lawyer for the N.C.
Attorney General's office sug-
gested that such a ma neuvermight
lead to heavy fines from federal
courts, since the state would be
unable to meet space requirements
for inmates
To settle a federal suit, the
state has spent $130 million build-
ing new prisons in recent years to
give inmates more space. But the
construction will not increase the
number of beds, while the state's
growing population and intensi-
fied law enforcement result in
more people sent to prison each
year
Gov im Martin has proposed
a $490.5 million bond issue to add
9,500 beds, increasing capacity
from 18,000 inmates to 27,500.
Sen. Robert G. Shaw, R-
Guilford, suggested "cheap,
wooden barracks" similar to pris-
oner-of-war camps as an interim
solution. Hunt and Sen. J. Richard
Conder liked the idea.
"I'd much rather see some of
them slip out the back door
Conder said, "than to turn a mur-
derer loose out the front door
Because of the 18,000-inmate
limit, the state Paroles Commis-
sion must find about 2,000inmates
a month for release, said Louis R.
Colombo, chairman of the panel.
Thafs about twice the release rate
of five years ago, he said.
Colombo likened the prob-
lem to a dam holding polluted
water
"More and more polluted
streamsarebeingadded he said
"Yet there is one faucet at the dam,
and we are required to use it to
keep the dam's water level even,
and we must assure that the water
from the faucet is pure
Asof Monday, the pnsonshad
17,899 inmates, or 101 short of the
cap, Columbo said.
During the past two years,
inmates released on parole have
included 81 convicted of first- or
second-degree murder and sen-
tenced to 50 years or more, said
Sam Bovd, a paroles commission
staff member. Most typicallv had
served about 15 years of their
sentence, he said
Because inmates receivecTcdit
in the form of reduced time for
good behavior and such activities
as work, a felon sentenced to 10
years will typically face an actual
term of one to four years, he said
RUSH
Sigma Pi
Fraternity
"A Symbol Of Progress"
Rush Week January 22 - 25
Scheduled Events
Monday Jan 22 Meet The Brothers
Sub Night
Tuesday Jan 23 Pizza Night & Meet the
Brothers. - Meet the sisters of AOFI
Wednesday Jan 24 - Meet the sisters of AZ
Thursday Jan 25 - Bid Night Invitation Only
What's behind these letters
Nationally if s a fraternity that's among the
oldest, with over 200 years of tradition. A frater-
nity with over 175,000 initiates and 207 chapters
across the nation, making it one of the largest
college fraternities. If s a fraternity that empha-
sizes brotherhood and leadership through its
Leadership Conference Program and Scholar-
shipLeadership Awards.
� � �
Where: Tar River Estates Clubhouse,
North Oak St.
Time: 8-11 Mon - Wed
6 - 8 Thursday
For Questions or Rides 752-1938
At East Carolina it's a great way to meet new
friends and become involved in campus life. It's a
fraternity that has traditionally held one of the
largest all-campus parties, Bahama Mama. It's a
fraternity that's involved in the Greenville com-
munity with service projects that benefit various
causes. It's a fraternity with one of the nicest
houses on campus.
What's behind these letters?
maybe you.
Kappa Sigma
700 E. 10th Street
752-5543 or 757-1005





(
The Eaat Carolinian, January 18,1990 11
Doctor
Continued from page 7
to kill his family. But the appeals
court said the evidence presented
tended to indicate those state-
ments were true, removing them
from slander consideration.
In another case, the appeals
court ruled that a dozen Harnett
County residents could not be
forced to pay connection fees or
monthly bills for sewer service
because the county had failed to
follow state laws regarding the
collections.
The landowners had claimed
they were not properly notified of
assessments for the Buies Creek-
Coats Water and Sewer District.
The county had contended the
connection fees were not assess-
ments, as defined by state law,
and the notifications were not
needed.
But the appeals court said the
county could not avoid notifica-
tion of the assessments by calling
them something else. It also or-
dered the county to pay attorney
fees for the landowners.
The appeals court also ruled
against the Village of Pinehurst,
which had sought to block the sale
of the town's water and sewer
system to a private company.
The village, once a privately
owned resort town, cited a 1973
agreement with the town's devel-
opers that gave the village the first
N.C. State
lays off
teachers
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina State University is lay-
ing off dozens of instructors and
canceling numerous classes in the
wake of a budget crunch caused
by a drop in state revenues.
The cuts are the result of an
order by state budget officers to
reduce the campus' 1989-90
budget by 5 percent, or $9nillion
est day of my professiona I career,
said William B. Toole, dean of the
College of Humanities and Social
Sciences. His college, the second
largest at the university, has lost
$1 million of its$20million budget.
The layoffs apparently are
confined to non-tenured instruc-
tors and visiting professors who
typically work on year-to-year
contracts. At least six visiting
professors in the department of
sociology, anthropology and so-
cial work were told Wednesday
afternoon that their teaching loads
would be cut in half and their
teachingdutiesdistributed among
full-time professors.
Among them was Charles S.
Warren, a doctoral candidate at
UNC-Chapel Hill who typically
teaches two courses each semes-
ter.
"This is just going to kill edu-
cation Warren said. "I've already
taught three lectures. The kids
have already bought their books
and two weeks of instruction is
going to be shot in the head. It's
happening all over campus.
"No wonder our SAT scores
are the lowest in the nation if this
is the way we treat education in
the elite institutions. This is cut-
ting back all the way to the bone
Dale M. Hoover, head of the
department of economics and
business, said faculty members
there had been forced to drop five
or six class sections.
"We're asking people who
have written contracts to allow us
to disemploy them Hoover said
"We're doing our best not to
hurt the quality of education, but
there's no way we can make the
changes without hurting the qual-
ity. They have not literally asked
us to drop any course and turn
students away, but that's hard to
do. To meet the guidel ines exactly,
you have almost no flexibility
N.C. State's budget crunch is
complicated by the fact that
roughly 320 fewer out-of-state
students enrolled this year than
had been expected. Because those
students pay about $4,600 tuition,
as compared with about $600 for
in-state students, their absence
translates to an additional loss of
$13 million.
option to buy utility systems
owned by developers. But in a
split decision, the court said the
agreement for a 90-day first op-
tion contained no time limit and
could not be held "in perpetuity
Judges Edward Greene and
Charles Becton ruled against the
town, but Judge Eugene Phillips
dissented, saying the option in the
agreement is valid.
In other decisions, the court:
� Upheld a jury decision
which awarded Screaming Eagle
Air Ltd. $109,000 in damages from
the Airport Commission of For-
syth County. The company had
sued the airport commission in
1987 after one of their planes hit a
dog on the runway and the nose
gear collapsed. The appeals court
ruled that the jury correctly could
determine negligence because the
five-mile perimeter of the airport
is only partly enclosed with a
chain-link fence, and because air-
port employees killed an average
of 80 to 100 dogs each year.
� Ruled that the State Board
of Registration for Professional
Engineersand Land Surveyors can
suspend an engineer's license or
fine him $500, but not both. The
board had suspended William E.
Bruce for two years and fined him
$500 after he approved designs
for two schools in Caldwell and
Mecklenburg counties that were
inadequate. The board said Bruce's
approval showed professional
incompetence and negligence. The
court upheld the board's ruling,
but said the board could only
impose one penalty, not two.
� Upheld a lower court rul-
ing allowing the state Department
of Transportation to recover pay-
ments to Thompson-Arthur Pav-
ing Co. for work on two roads in
Guilford County. As part of the
two contracts, the department had
paid the company for "unclassi-
fied excavation" based on DOT
estimates. But when the projects
were completed, DOT re-surveyed
and found less of the excavation
had been done than the estimates.
The company argued that work-
ing with smaller amounts of earth
increased its cost per cubic yard.
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The E.C.U. INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
INVITES YOU TO RUSH '90
RtphaSigma Thi
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RUSH VOCABULARY
Fraternity � The name that applies to all (ireek letter organizations that are
characterized by a ritual, a pin. and a strong tie of friendship
Chapter � The local group of the larger national organization.
Greek � A member of a fraternity, so called because the organizations bear
Greek letters.
Active � A fraternity man who has to mally been initiated by his chapter.
Legacy � A prospective member whose father or brother is an alumnus or
active member of a certain fraternity
Recommendation � A Statement to the fraternity concerning the qualifi-
cations of a prospective rusher
Big Brother � An older hn il het within the fraternity who acts in helping
you in many wavs after you pledge
Rushing � The process of fraternity membership selection consisting oi
carefully planned and scheduled parties so that rushees and fraternities can
become better acquainted.
Formal Rush � A series of parties given bv each traternitv during a
specified period which is scheduled and governed by lnterfraternity Council.
Informal Rush � That period in which any group that is eligible may rush
and pledge a man without scheduled bidding or parties.
Rush Chairman � An active member of a fraternity who plans and
executes rush functions tor his house
Bid � A formal invitation to pledge a fraternity.
Pledge � One who has been accepted as a probationary member of a group.
Pledgeship � A period of training in the history, ideals, and traditions of
the organization
Initiation � The formal ceremony during which a man takes his final vows
for full membership into his fraternity
Illegal Rushing � Rushing out of designated periods in a manner which
does not comply with 1FC regulations.
Alumnus � An initiated member who is no longer in college
jfvatmiihi llife
�iin;il
ICif
c
dteimty la not merely lo (�� a i '
� � , . ' . , ,� A I, ' l� � V 'M ��
. A. , : f d-o reaponai
, ther foi .� , � a We live "
l pan el wi ii� � ' ��
. � � Ship a ii
, � � f ; Ml t, a
, , � . e a maior part ol 'he
llhll fratmutirs rrurl uuj grabes?
� �� the � 9 every evidence lhal joining a fraten ily
. QUI hem 'S Ol graduating
� 13 ol en on i ampus without tratemitiea will
. . � ite a :
� �: ' 'on members on campuses with (rater
' - , , : lie tiut
� bVt ot all lialemity membera graduate
� holershtp programs ol fraternities pi
��� i tdi i 5 d bettei achievement
M said lhal fraternity people don't en
, . . i.ill . � � a n any jitterent
people it � g Mn r a close rmt
' . nlo d wealth ot oppor
lies I lo do with hia apara time Events
� ,�� - � ,i eaami le �' some ot
the activities lhat I He I ea plan during me ea-
Atlilrtics
ii
.1- dtnielr existence
�'i'iH' II be ' dk meets '� ients Ol in
i ' � enOy competing against ore another
in one a port or ani.tne'
RUSH TIPS: DOS AND DON'TS
1. BE CONFIDENT OF YOURSELF. A fraternity will be
affected by your body and verbal language. A firm handshake
U vital to a good first impression.
2. LOOK YOUR BEST AT ALL TIMES. You probably will
not get a bid from a fraternity because of the way you dress and
look, but your appearance can KEEP you from getting a bid.
3. NEVER BE ARROGANT! Try not to act as if you were
already a pledge or brother of the house. If a house plans on
inviting you back, they will.
4. NEVER HESITATE TO INTRODUCE YOURSELF.
When you are introduced to someone, repeat his or her name.
However, with all the people that you will meet, do not feel
like you have to remember everyone's name.
5. ASK QUESTIONS if there is anything that you want to
know about the fraternity: finances, sports, grades, activities,
etc.
6. Just because a lot of guys from your HOMETOWN are in a
certain fraternity, or just because you think one or more of
your FRIENDS are going to pledge a certain fraternity, this
DOES NOT necessarily mean that the fraternity is right for
YOU! Pledge the fraternity that can do the most for you and
where you feel most comfortable.
7 Attend the parties of AS MANY different fraternities as
you can, especially if you are not sure about which f.J
you are interested in. In other words, SHOP AROUND. Be-
sides, it's a great chance to get to know more about the Creek
system which you are about to join.
8. If you have any questions about rush or need advice in a
particular situation, come by the 1FC office in the Mendenhall
Student C�nt�r or call 757-4706 . We are here to help!
6
0
6
R
E
E
K
l





Page 13
(Bile iEafit (Earolfnfanl
Features
January 18,1990
Shoe outlet offers
savings, quality
Store passes savings on to buyers
By John Tucker
Assistant Features Fditor
If you're on that college
budget and get a kick out of find-
ing a good bargain while shop-
ping, then the incredible deals at
"The Shoe Outlet" will give you a
senous shopping rush.
The small obscure shop, on
the corner of West 9th and South
Washington Streets, contains a
variety of high-quality outlet, ir-
regular, factory damaged and
second hand shoes, along with a
few other knick-knacks such as
ties and socks.
ECU student Brian Felton
recently discovered the shop
through a friend by word of
mouth. "I bought two pairs there
Felton said. "1 got a new pair of
Bucks that are $50 in most stores
for $29 and a pair of gortex and
leather Timberline boots that are
usually over $12(1 tor only $25
dollars
According to Leslie Mills,
owner and operator of the store,
the main reason for the low prices
is that the shoes, although in ade-
quate shape, can not be sold on the
shelvesof most department stores
Mills said that he buys his
merchandise straight from facto-
ries and outlets and that about
50 of his shoes are second hand.
"Manv of these shoes were bought
by someone in a department store
and worn only once before thev
were returned because they didn't
tit right, were missing a shoelace
or something like that. The de-
partment store returns them to the
manufacturer and then 1 buv
them Mills also buys many of his
shoes from factories that manu-
facture too many shoes for a par-
ticular order.
According to Mills' wife, Pa-
Coming up
Thursday
a ROCKEFELLERS
Dillon Fence
ATTIC
Wrathchild America
Friday
ATTIC
Sidewinder
NEW DELI
Left Wing Fascists
MENDENHALL
Parenthood
Saturday
a ROCKEFELLERS
Satellite Boyfriend
ATTIC
Jim Zackery
NEW DELI
Left Exit
FIZZ
Paris Red
MENDENHALL
Parenthood
CORRIGAN'S
Bad Bob
&
the Rocking Horses
Sunday
MENDENHALL
Parenthood
tricia, most of the customers who
come in the store return and buy
more shoes. "Our prices are really-
good and most of the shoes will
last as long or longer than good
store bought shoes
Mills opened the shop in
August of 1981, when he gave up
the money he had saved for a
brand new van and bought a large
quantity of outlet shoes. Since then
the shoe shop has onlv been a
sideline family business, as Mills'
wife, mother, and father have all
worked long, hours selling shoes.
Mills compares buyingaused
shoe to buying a new car 'When
vou buv a car, you're better off
buying a used Mercedes than
buying aadillacandtl sthesame
with shot's You're better off buy
ing a used quality shoe than buy-
ing a new cheap one '
Mills, 48, said student busi-
ness has been improving but is
still slow. "Recently, I'vehad more
and more students I appreciate
the university business, but it's
just hard to get (the students) in
According to Mills, custonv
ersof all kinds come into the store.
"Take last Saturday tor example.
a stockbroker came in and Knight
a pair,and a professor came in and
Knight four
Herbert Powell, service man-
ager at Hastings Ford is also a
preferred customer, I shop here
every two to three months; the
prices are extremely cheap he
said.
"At first, me and tun friends
went into the shop miA couldn't
find anything Felton said, "but
after a while we looked around
and we were like little boys in a
See Shoes, page 14
Rush hour m the village c' Kersey is a little different than m Greenville. This and other sights of British culture will be display I in Y
Richters travel documentary 'Pageant of Britain that features England. Scotland and Wales F he film will be screened on Jan
Theater
British landmarks featured in film
ECU News Bureau
GREENVILLE "Pageant of Britain a travel documentary on
manv oi the tamed and lesser-known historic and beauty spots of
England and Scotland, will be screened at Fast Carolina University
Thursdav, an. 25, at 8 p.m. in Hendhx Theater. The film will be narrated
by its Academy Award-winning producer, Kenneth Richter.
Historic places highlighted in the film include prehistoric Stone-
henge, remnants of Roman Britain, places associated with the legen-
dary King Arthur, significant sites of the conquest and rule of William
the Conqueror, and centuries-old cathedrals, manor houses and uni-
versities. Contemporary sites visited via film include London's busy
streetsand institutions:IVcadillvCirais,TrafalgarScuare, BigBen, the
Victoria and Albert Museum and tbx Hou i
Among the film's Scottish segments are vi I rocky shee
country dotted with stone farmhouses, th sand
the 1 lighland (lames at Braemar. Featured is a lesson in kilt
hire, a visit to Edinburgh Castle and the world first railroad the
Stockton and Darlington line.
A theme dinner, consisting of traditional British fare, will be served
at 6c30 p.nv in the Menderthali multi-purpose room; adjacent to Hen
dm Tieati i
Hckets to the film are $4 each for the general public, in i or ;
at the door if available. Places at the theme dinner an : lust
be reserved at least two days prior to the event
Tickets are now available at the ECU Central � tele
phone 757 -iss
ECU artists display work for Beaufort Arts Council
By Jeff Parker
Stjff Writer
Thispast Sunday began the 1990
gallery exhibits for the Beaufort
Countv Arts Council in Washing-
ton, .C. The show featured the
work of four artists, two of whom
arc from Hast Carolina's own
Sch(Hil of Art.
Prior to thf reception, visiting
artists Phil and Beth Stovall per-
formed a short cotnk opera en-
titled "The Telephone The skit
dealt with the presence of the tele-
phone in the modem home as an
omnipresent dictator. Though the
script was no Gilbert and Sullivan
treatment, and more than a bit
predictable, the performers did a
good job with it, making it the
highlight of the reception.
Following the performance,
modest refreshments were served
and viewing oi tin1 works began.
Framed pieces adorned the walls
around the open areas ot the gal-
lery, while scattered throughout
the room and under glass case's
were the sculptures.
The sculpture was done by
Durham artist Chester Williams,
and featured a variety of figures
leaning toward the abstract. The
larger pieces were bronze combi-
nations of space-splitting angu-
larsand decorative elements, per-
haps the most visually appealing
oi which was ' Ussi Art: Mask
I Inder glass were smaller bronzed
heads thai followed an oriental
motif, with "3rd lapanese Figu
nne" standing out quite well.
The oil paintings of Wilmington
artist Harry bee Davis brought a
welcome touch of color to the
exhibit, and focused largely on
the lifestylesof black people across
the world as their subject matter.
"Southern Legacy" is an impres-
sive character study depicting an
older woman in a routine day of
work in the rural South. Vivid
greens accent "After the Drought
and give a good example of the
heightened hues Davis employs
inhisart. Though there is a certain
lack of depth perception in the
works, appealing visuals and
pleasing colors more than com-
pensate.
The two other artists featured
were ECl graduates, and Kith
displayed lithographs as well as
photography. Ihe prints of Ste-
ven Reid focused for the most part
on theblu ithe v, orK
place in i he v orkhouse Scries
Harsh contrasting of blacks and
whites (omplements the scenes of
workers in the world of mass
produi tion, lost in their trade and
defined onlv bv their working
environment. As in "Wood
I tauter decontrolling resources
loom intolerant overhead, mak-
ing the people in each piece a lit-
eral slave to the trade Also shown
was Reid's photo work, which
approached the same subject from
another angle by revealing aban-
doned work buildings oi thisarea,
each bleak and devoid ot any ac-
tivity.
rhe photos of Catherine Walker
went tor a different effect, pre
sen ting recombinations or nudes
that made tor inti n stingly sur-
real imagery. "David l � dout
among these.
e ows domina I the bject
matter ol Wa - - ;ra
successful to a largi � ctentforthe
imposing n iture of the animal in
the wort
cow in a peck led
background a esidi s its
inherent visual appeal, is also
entertainii i I n plai (iv
ot the cow unusual
environmenl most
commandu
depict ing a i tl i I ercalves
with indistinct images inside and
surrounding the animals that de-
lineate them. The invitation card
of the exhibit itself features one of
Walker's works.
All oi the artists works will be
on display in the gallery until
February 22 for all to iew
The above lithograph, Wood Hauler by Steven Reid is on display for
the Beaufort County Arts Council in Washington, N C Reid is a
graduate student, studying fine arts at ECU.
Pickin the Bones:
Bonehead likes pornography
By Chippy Bonehead
Staff Pornographer
I love pornography.
In fact, I love it so much, I'm
willing to utilize my precious col-
umn space to defend it, thereby
risking total public humiliation,
scoffing, mortification,abasement
and a bunch of other neat syno-
nyms I looked up.
Because the minute you start
saying, "Hey, I think it's okay to
sell magazines that contain noth-
ing but pictures of people with no
clothes on in ludicrous positions
that your wife would never get
into, pictured against breathtak-
ing vistas ymir wife would never
visit and even if shedidjt'sdoubt-
ful she'd suddenly succumb to a
clothes shedding mood well,
people start UnAingat your palms
for excess hair.
Religious fanatics, feminists,
your mother, moral upstanding
pillars of the community, anal
retentive school administrators
and girls all think porno is sick.
They think it's nothing but stimu-
lation for all the latent voyeuristic
and exhibitionistic kinks in your
personality, and if you look at too
much of it, you'll go completely
round the bend and become a
necrophiliac homosexual dog
molester.
And you can't even say, "I just
like the photography arhdesads
in the back" because everybody
knows you onlv look at those after
you've spent yourself and you're
too tired to get up and get a towel.
You can't look at pornography for
any reason withou t starting to hear
an urgent cry from Mr. Palmer
and his four caddies� "We want
to come out and pla-a-a-a-a-v
You can't say "1 like pornog-
raphy conceptually, for it provides
release for frustration and edu-
cates the user as ,i, � positions
and performances because
people will think ou arc agcekin'
freshman who's never been laid
and that vou need ti team new
See Bonehead, page 17





14 The East Carolinian January 18,1990
Feature Briefs
Social discourages
campus alcohol abuse
Collector breeds Zonkeys and Zonies
G ASTON1A (AP) Nature doesn't usually throw togethera zebra,
ponies and donkeys, but on the Gaston County' farm of Don Hoover
they run together on about 50 acres. "1 believe in letting nature take its
course said loover, whose exotic animal farm includes a Himalayan
bear,bison,emu and four-homed ramsand includes zonies and zonkeys.
Hoover, owner of Hoover Machine Inc has been collecting exotic
animals for several years to entertain himself and his grandchildren
as well as passing motorists
A zebra, which Hoover bought for about $2,WO, was theonly male
ioining the group ot female ponies and donkevs. About three years,
three mixed -breed offspring showed up. The zonkey. as Hooverdubbed
it, is a tan female with ebra-stnped white legs. The male zony is brown
with a white splotch on itsside like its pinto mom � and black stripes
inherited from dad. The temale zony is light reddish-brownwith darker
brown stnpes.
Hoover said he was pleased to see the unusual offspring, but he
didn't do anything to encourage it. 1 just bought that zebra and threw
it in there he said.
Goliath frogs to jump in Calaveras
ANGELS CAMP Calif. The Calaveras County Jumping Frog
Jubilee since 1 28 has commemorated the Mark Twain short storv 'The
Celebrated lumping Frog ot Calaveras Countv in which a shiftless
stranger bets locals that his trog can beat all comers.
Put for this year's jubilee, Seattle animal trader Andy Koffman is
threatening to escalate matters by entering 10 of his huge, rare Goliath
frogs imported from Africa.
Koffman hopes towin a s 13tXi pnzewith his frogs which can
grow three teet long and weigh S pounds � but more important, he
savs, "It is the destiny ot these frogs to win this contest " The record is
21 feet 5 inches in three jumps bv Rosie the Ribbiter in lSb.
Fair official shave not yet accepted Koffman'sentry tor the May 17-
20 jump.
Satellite sensors detect puzzling data
Puzzling geological quirks have turned up in tnetirst fiveyearsol
results from 28 satellite ranging sensors that were placed around the
world. Most of the results, which allow the measurement in millimeters
per year of the drift of the plates on the Earth's surface, agree well with
predictions.
Ru t a sensor in SimosatoKi pan. is moving north west bv 4 centimeters
a year, which can't be explained, and sensors in Hawaii and French
Polynesia are spreading by 1 - centimeters a year, though they'reon the
same plate.
Weight gained over holidays
A telephone poll of SI4 adults shows that 43 percent said they
gained weight during the holidays. The USA TODAY survey discovered
that those who gained put on six pounds, which took an average of five
weeks to lose. Many chose the tirst fad diet that came their way.
Toothbrush changes advised
Dental experts say toothbrushes should be changed every two to
three weeks, and more often in cases oi cold or flu, says a report in the
Academy of General Dentistry newsletter. Reason: Keeping the same
toothbrushes causes continual reinfection by various viruses.
Dieters lose weight through fad diets
Losing weight, then regaining it, may have negative consequences
on metabolism and health, warns obesity researcher Kelly Brownell
from the University of Pennsylvania. Brownell says it's not a good idea
to begin any diet if the weight will be regained. Honest assessments ot
motivation and commitment are essential before starting a weightless
program.
Minority student enrollment drops
College enrollments of low- and middle-income blacks and
Hispanics have declined since the mid-1970s, according to a survey by
the American Council on Education. Since 1976, college enrollments of
middle-income blacks have dropped from 33 percent to 36 percent, and
enrollments of Hispanics have dropped from 33 percent to 46 percent.
Toaster of the future fueled by butane
Blackand Decker recently teamed up with the Industrial Designers
Society of America to seek the best design tor the toaster oi the future.
The winners: a see-through toaster that can tilt 90 degrees and double
as a mini-toaster oven; an electric napkin that envelops the bread; and
a traveling toaster, a compact unit fired bv a rcfillable built-in butane
fuel tank.
Survey says children's opinions matter
Children's opinions carry weight when it comes to family decisions.
USA Weekend magazine commissioned the Roper Organization to
survey 499 parents with kids ages 7 to 17, and 74 percent said their kids
help decide family leisure activities and 31 percent influence meals.
Drivers want more powerful engines
If drivers could afford only one option on a new car, they would
order a more powerful engine, according a random survey of 320
visitors to the Greater Los Angeles Auto Show. Half of the respondents
said thev wouldn't buy a navigation system to select the best route, a
communication svstem to show traffic tie-ups or an automatic pilot to
steer on the freeway.
Chinese art depicts contemporary realism
Art arriving in the United States and Canada from the People's
Republic of China has a new look. The Chinese are exporting
contemporary realism - bold, western-style oil paintings depicting
contemporary subjects. Galleries in all 50 states and most Canadian
provinces are exhibiting the paintings.
Enzyme could fight AIDS
More than a vcar ago, scientists working to find a better drug to fight
AIDS found a potential weapon: a crucial enzyme in the virus that does
not change, as proteins on the coat of the virus itself do. Writing in this
week's issue of the British journal Nature, scientists report that the
enzyme, protease, can be jammed by the compounds. A dozen
compounds are under study, and within the next year, one is likely to
be chosen for the first tests on humans.
C opynjMI) USA TODAY Appk CoH�g�ln(ormition N�w�k
By Suzan Lavvler
Staff Writer
You can have fun without
drinking alcohol, (list ask any of
the students who attended the
Welcome Back Social Tuesdav
night in MendenhaU'ssocial room.
Students danced and socialized
til midnight and no one seemed
to notice or care that soft drinks
w ere the onlv drinks being served.
BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning the
I lealth of University Students), the
Office of Substance Abuse Pre-
vention and Fducation, Pi Kappa
Phi, RH A,and Kiss 102 sponsored
the event.
Chad Ellis, BACCHUS treas-
urer, is involved with the organi-
zation because he believes that
"you can have fun without alco-
hol Ellis has never drank alco-
holic beverages. When asked how
he resists peer pressure, he replied,
"You have to be choosy about vour
Shoes
friends
Ellis added that he simply did
not like the taste of alcohol But
another strong incentive for a void-
ing alcohol is the fact that his fa-
ther died from the drug
Many people have personal
tragedies as a result of alcohol
abuse. A friend of Marva Sattcr-
field, an ECU senior, died while
driving under the influence. Sat-
terficld said, "I stopped drinking
as my New Year's resolution
Nate Talbert, an ECU senior,
and his wife Lucy attended the
social after hearing about it on the
radio. Nate does not dnnk and
Lucv is a rare social drinker. Nate
said, "It's a myth that you have to
drink to have fun
Students involved with BAC-
CHUS plan events and activities
encouraging more people to real-
ize this.
Manv students would not
even consider avoiding alcohol.
See BACCHUS, page 17
Continued from page 13
GIANT
POSTER
SALE
EUROPEAN
ROCK
IMPORTS!
WHIN Ian 1Mb thru 19th
WHERE? MendeniiaM
Student (enter
candy store
tew ot the better pri es in
tin -hip .ire the sperr I opsiders
that sell for $10 to $25 dollars a
pair new cowbo) txxts that go
tor anywhere from S13 to S2
dollars a pair, Converse high-top
Chuck Taylor's and street skate
shoes that sell tor $10 dollars a
pair md new saddlebucks and
bui k that go for $29.95 a pair
1 ennissruvsareslightlv more
expensive but are all brand new.
Reebok. Diadora, Nike, Avia,
Champions and Puma brand
names are all sold at prices rang-
ing from $25 to 5 J9.95.
According to Mills the best
shoes m the shop are the Allen Ed-
monds brand, which Mills calls
the Mercedes ot shoes. A pair in a
department store does not go for
less than $150 dollars, according
to Mills. He sells them for any-
where between $30 and $50 dol-
lars.
The ladies shoes in the store
areall brand new and a re all priced
below $29.88. Brands found in the
store include Sift Spots, 9 West,
Sensations, Gloria Vanderbilts,
Calico and Frequents.
Also found in the store are 6
pack sock packages that go for$4,
100 percent silk ties that are $5,
Panama lack sweatshirts tor $8,
and golt shoes that run from$10to
$30.
Mills is realistic about the
shoes he has to offer in his store
and states, "I don't have every-
thing for everybody, and many
times people can't find what suits
them in their size, but this is the
kind to store you have to keep
shopping in
Student Bruce Selbv. who has
been a regular customer at the
store for a few years, when asked
about shopping in the store and it
he minded wearing second hand
shoes said, "1 don't mind wearing
worn shoes, I kind of like the lived
in look�plus thev have killer
prices
And Mills is quick to agree,
"You just don't find these1 prices
anvwhere he stated as he picks
up a shoe to sell to a customer. But
if vou're lucky, vou will find a
good price at the unpainted store
with the sign on the front that
reads "Sho Outle and Mills will
have the perfect shoe for you.
ITS STILL NOT TOO LATE FOR NEXT FALL SEMESTE
TO STUDY ABROAD!
in
Di i s ,i i .k
Mcxk
Ncathi 1
or licn� K'�:
Sounds fa
impossible 1i �: .U i
res lit ;n dell)� � i� '
l'he truth' : i' �.�
English! OI

� amt as attending ECU.
taken �bl . : ' I : b�J
is indci 1 true tl ii ihi
� RI.D arc �
IMMEDIATELY:
Dr. R. J. Hursey, Jr. ISEP Coordinator
Office: 222 Austin Phone: Office 757-6418
Home 756-0682
FREE STUDENT LUNCH
BEING HELD AT
JARVIS MEMORIAL CHURCH
12:00 Noon this Sunday January 21,1990
In the Church Fellowship Hall
All ECU Students Invited
For More Information
Call 752-3101
East Carolina
Friends
Full Membership Meeting
Thursday, Jan 18
7pm GCB 1031
Anyone interested in joining
ECF
is also invited to attend
Deadlines for applications
Jan 31
For More Information. Call
Dr. Linda Mooney, 757-6137 or
Carrie Armstrong, 752-7325
ABLE
Meeting For Spring 1990
January 17
January 24
January 31
February 7
February 21
February 28
March 14
March 21
March 28
April 4
April 11
April 18
All Meetings will Be Held In General College Bldg.
Room 1032 Unless Otherwise Posted
(Notice these are Wednesdays)
"Does the ECU Adminstration Care About the Concerns of the
Black Student Population"
"Problems the Black Students Face at ECU'
"Brainwashed, Intimidated and Weak?"
"The Philosophy of Malcom X and ML King Jr
"Great Black Americans"
"Great African Kings and Queens"
"American Businesses that Support Apartheid"
"Meet the Black Faculty and Staff" (Social)
"The Role of the Black Church"
"The Black Family"
"Where do we go from here"
"BLACK UNITY" (Study groups for FINALS)
Please Take Note of These Meetings and be On Time (7pm)!





The East Carolinian, January 18,1990 15
Chamber musicians to play at ECU
Clarinetist Larry Combs pianist Deborah Sobol. violinist Joseph Genualdi and hormst Gail Williams of The
Chicago Chamber Musicians will perform m Hendrix Theater Monday night Tickets for the concert are
obtainable through the ECU Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center
ECU News Burc.m
GREENVI1 1 E rheChicago
Chamber Musicians will perform
at ECL Monday, an 22, in 1 len-
drix Theater, beginning at 8 p m.
The concerl is the second event in
the 1989-90 Chamber Musk- Se
lies.
A new ensemble, formed in
August of 1986, the group is dedi-
cated to the exploration study and
performance o( chamber music
from Haydn and Mozart to
Beethoven and Mendelssohn,
from Brahms and Dvorak to De-
bussy and Ravel, as well as con-
temporary composers.
The CCM core artists are four
internationally-recognized cham-
ber performers: clarinetist Larry
Combs, pianist Deborah Sobol,
violinist loseph Genualdi and
hormst C ,ail Williams. Combs and
Sobol are co-artistic directors.
1 he musicians rehearse and
study selected works several times
weekly throughout the perform-
ing season, and in programming
concerts, the artists select only
those pieces from the working
repertoire which thev feel are
ready for performance. After each
concert, the artists continue to
develop the selected compositions
through frequent reworkings.
Occasionally, the CCM col-
laborates with other artists to plan
programs requiring larger en-
sembles
Since their founding, theCCM
has been named resident chamber
music ensemble of WFMT Radio,
Chicago's tine arts radio station,
and regularly performs live con-
certs for broadcast by the station.
In addition, the ensemble has
presented a series of free monthly
noontime forum concerts in Evatt-
ston, 111 and has conducted resi-
dencies at Kent State University
and the University of Califomia-
Long Beach.
The ensemble's Chicago area
performances have earned praise
from critics of the Chicago Tribune
and Sun-Times. In an interview
with Chicago's Metro magazine,
Deborah Sobol stated that the
CCM functions as "a society of
musicians
"So we have the potential to
expand or contract whenever
necessarv, depending on what
repertoire we want to study and
perform she said.
"If we'd like to prepare a piece
for nine players, we'll just invite
some of our colleagues from
around the world to perform with
us. In this way we have the poten-
tial to perform the whole spec-
trum oi chamber literature"
Admissions to the Chicago
Chamber Musicians' ECU concert
is by Chamber Music Series sea-
son ticket i rbv single ticket, priced
at $8 for the general public. $6 tor
ECU faculty and staff and $5 for
students and youth.
Tickets are available at the
ECU Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, tele-
phone (919) 757-4788.
The Chamber Music Series is
co-sponsored by ECU'S Depart-
ment of University Unions and
School of Music.
MEMORIAL COINS
& PAWN
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Phone 752 3172
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ALPHA
Dear Rushee,
As you are contemplating rushing a fraternity this spring,
a number of doors will be opened to you. Here at Kappa Alpha,
we offer the door like no other.
As a rushee, you must choose the organization which you
wish to join. A fraternity of men with whom you will live for
the next four years, and whom you will call your brothers for
the rest of your life.
We believe that you will agree that, in fact, Kappa Alpha is
the most unique and traditional of any college fraternity. We
strive for both unity and selection.
Wont you come by and sample a bit of Southern Tradition?
Good Luck Rushees!
RUSH
7-11 PM
Monday
Jan. 22
Come Meet the
Ladies of ELL
THE BROTHERS OF GAMMA RHO
CHAPTER OF KAPPA ALPHA ORDER
Tuesday Wednesday
Jan. 23 Jan. 24
Come Meet the Come Celebrate
Ladies of AAn Robert E. Lee's B- Day
For Rides & Info: Call 757-0128
Thursday
Jan. 25
Invitation Ninht





16 The East Carolinian, January 18,1990
Cruise film helps youth understand war
i
By Tom Green
Gannett News Service
The painful storv of a para
plegic Vietnam veteran has stirred
powerful connections in movie
viewers who have hxked to see
the film
Reaction to "Born on the
Fourth of Julv" has been so in-
tense, theater owners are report-
ing scattered incidents ot tainting
among audiences during the film's
most graphic scenes in a veterans
hospital At other showings, bursts
of patriotic hurrahs have greeted
the film's life-affirming message
"It opened mv eves to what
really went on said 20-year old
Boston College student lYbbie
lanacek. "Mv parents told me
about friends who were in the war,
but I never knew thev went
through that
The movie stars Tom Cruise
and was No. l at the box office last
week
1 saw Bom on the Fourth ot
lulv and wept, savsev Braun,
executive producer of tele lsion's
Vietnam war series. "Tour ot
Duty
It blew mr out oi m scat
sa s V i:ii inn.iti Vietnam veteran
RobCiirten Icriedfromhall way
through the movie to the end It
makes vou sit back m yourhair
and sav. Damn
Ron Kovic, whose autobiog
raphv is the basis ot the film, sivs
he is stunned bv the film's reccp
tion 1 le has seen lines form around
the block and his parents, thank
tul enough that their son came
back alive from the war, are now
dumbstruck that his storv is help
ing teach a new generation about
the war.
This is mv moment says
Kovic
Universal Studios was sur
prised bv the strong response to
the movie, though chairman lorn
Pollock had expected potent
Cruise to be the drawing cud
In tact, he was a major rea
son Ifx-ople are) going I'ollik
says, but even more moviegoers
polled by the studio said they were
there because of thestor) People
are hearing it's good
Hiosedirectlvi onnei led v ith
the movie trv In a old labeling it
as a Vietnam movie Sim eOliver
Stone s 1986 'Platoon that i ate-
gorv il film ha mi t produced a box
office winner, irw ludinglasl year's
much ballyhooed i asualties o(
A at
It s about ni.n. i md nol
ictnam, says directoi I
his sciond torav into Vn In mi
connected subject matter "It's
about our historv
But audiences aren't making
such finite distinctions. Thev are
embracing the movie and its Viet
nam storv aseagerlv as ptst Work 1
War II audiences welcomed "Best
Years of Our Lives a classk film
Story ofvets returning from battle
' ITiere's something about the
Vietnam war that's like a crucible
ot what's happened to us in the
last generation or so savs ohn
Sacret Young, executive producer
ot TV's "China Beach
It you arc 18 or so now, vou
think about your parents. It vou're
in your early 40s, it's the crucial
time of vour generation. Anil it
you'reolder, vou reflect on World
War 11
"I thought it was a great
movie s.ivs J1 -year old Chicago
lawyer Terrence VV. 'stein "1 lope-
fully, it will bolster the public's
image of the Vietnam veteran
Whether the war was right or
wrong, vets themselves don't have
to be the brunt ot people's bad
feelings
I.m Scruggs, founder ot the
Vietnam War Memorial in Wash
ington 111 i s 'Born on the
I � Ml! til . 'I llllv VI .Is , , Af! till.
. i I v emotional" mo ie
But noteveryonelikesthelilm
'Stone is a masterful cinema
tographor savs lacklark, a
helicopter pilot during the war
who is now on the board of direc-
tors of the Vietnam Veterans of
America. "But he lets his politics
get in. Once his message sinks in,
it is a pretty hollow one
Graphic scenes have dis-
turbed many viewers, though
most moviegoers seem to be able
to take it. "it was horrific savs
Leedy Van Ravage, a St Louis
attorney. "But that's what war is
about"
Kovic savs he is concerned
about fainting reports
"I wish I could be there to
comfort them. This film had to be
made and had to be told in the
manner we told it so that future
generations would not have to go
through what we hail to go
through
Ed Mint, president ot Cine
mascore, a Hollywood audience
research tirm, savs 15 percent of
moviegoers who attended open-
ing-weekend screenings of "Born
on the Fourth of uly" were under
25. Universal's rcscan h shows .is
man p'i�ple nuclei � i the
movie as po i 'K ovei
ence would be those who lived
through that time savs studio
chairman Pollock, but those who
weren't even bom when the war
ended 17 vears ago an-helping till
cinemas
"This is a film that everyone
can relate to savs Kovic "This is
the boy down the block, the kid
who left home, this is vour news-
paperboy, vour boyfriend who
went off to war, vour son who
joined the Marines
"Because of this film and this
time in history, we have the op
portunity to lake that tragic time
and shape it into something of
beauty and lasting worth
tnbrwmtum n ��
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Ie Building
Greenville, NC
K fours
M-F 9 am - 5 pm
"We Ihotieht thr mam A
lldl
Student comedy contest gives
opportunity for competition
Bv Ocarina Nevgloski
Staff Writer
be selec Ul from ea� h partu ip.it-
ing university I he use of profan-
ity mav result in disqualification
I our regional finalists w ill be
chosen and down to Daytona
Beach, Fla with an all expense-
paid trip tor two during s;
bre.ik in M.iri h I he finalists A ill
The U.S. College Comedy
( ompetition will kick off in the
Mendenhall Student Center on
Ian 23 at 8 p.m.
Students who wish to partici-
pate will have three minutes to perform in front of thousands of
perform their best stand-up roil- vacationing college students
tines Each performance will be The winner ol the Spring
v ideotaped for review by national Break ompetition w ill receivcan
judge Jerry Seinfeld. A winner will all-expense-paid trip tor two to
New i ork i. itv to perform in a
major comedy (lub
Hie competition is produced
bv IS Concepts and Sponsored
bv Certs and the Student Union
Special Evcntst ommittee I here
.sill be samples oi Certs .it the
Student Stores from lOa.m until 2
p m. on an. 22 and 23 while sup
plies last.
For more information, contact
the student Union at 77-471.
The East
Carolinian
is now
accepting
applications
for News
Editor.
Applications can
be obtained in
the publications
building
Upcoming January Entertainment
Jan. 1-ri N
Left Wing Facist
Jan. Fri 26
The Mo
Jan.Sat 20
Left Exit
hn. Sat
heNev Deli's 8th Anniversit Bash
Featuring:
� In Limbo
' The Popes
� 1-Ttt Duo lets
Great beer specials
WZMB Live Remote
1 kxi Prizes
Doors open at 6: K) pm
Each 1 ties. & Wed. N'ijiht
()pcn Mic Night
Sign up
starts at 3pm
758-0(18(1
Advance tickets So.
at the door $7.
RUSH EflSF ClOtlNffS OLOEST AND MUST
mSOO ELIZABETH STKECT CALL FOR WD�S 7S7-Ot7
.





.�,
Flutist Ransom Wilson ot the Cannes Chamber Orchestra will perform
Saturday at 8pm 1 ickets tor the concert can be purchased through the
ECU Central Ticket Office
Chamber Orchestra
to appear Saturday
ECU News Bi in" .hi
rhe anncs 'hambei i rchcs
tra with flutisl w ith flutist Ran
som W il- n as soloist will appear
at East Cai �lina University Satur
da). an 27, at 8 p m as part of
EC1 s 1989-90 Performing rts
Series 1 he on hestra is conducted
b Philippe Bender
1 he on hestra s tentative pre
gram for its EC I concert consists
of the incidental music fromBizct -
1 'Arlesienne a contemporary
flute concerto b Ri� ier, Moart s
Andante and Rondo foi I lute �nd
(. hxhestra and the i lementi Sa n
Bonehead
The East Carolinian, January 18, 1990 17
Continued from page 13
phom No 2 in P Major
I he.1s' member French ch
heron hestra's E I appearance is
part of a 1989 v,0 concert tour ol
North merica its first since 1981
w hi h also featured Ransom
Wilson .is flute soloist
i onducted by Philippe
Bender since its founding in 1976,
the orchestra has earned interna-
tional acclaim, with tours through
out Italy Switzerland. Yugosla-
via, Greece WestGermany, us
tria and the U S as well as its
nativel ranee Among soloists who
have performed with the orches-
tra ire Mstisla Rostropovich,
See I lutist page IS
positions because your equipment
is substandard.
And you certainly can't sav,
"Dammit l justlikepomobectuse,
occasionally, I don't feel like going
downtown and blowing thirty
dollars trying to get some chick
back to my apartment who'll pist
demand a relationship, when all I
really want is to get off quickly,
a nd by God, for thirty dollars 1 can
buy two porno mags AND the
Accu jac
Because then, you are the most
perverse being of all, a sexually
tree person Someone who values
sex over intimate relationships, a
deviant who spends cash money
on erotica, a sick person who
obviously is just one "Playboy"
away from attacking the Labra-
dor next door.
Well, I'm going to say all these
things because I'm a Bonehead,
and 1 really don't know any better.
But I'll also say'em because I know
a secret
This secret enables me to say
anything positive I want about
porno, because this secret is the
truth, and the people who would
have porno wiped out know it to
be the truth. They're all jealous
Ciirls are jealous because
they're not as consistently horny
as guys, and it takes Harlequin
Romances for them to get off.
Religiously-inclined people are
jealous because thev can't buy
porno without guilt. Feminists are
jealous because they don't l(xk as
good as the girls in "Hustler
Your mom is jealous because
she missed the sexual revolution,
and the anal retentive school
administrators and morally up
nght people are jealous since they
can't jeopardize their political
businessacademic careers for a
cheap thrill. And Life, as you no
doubt know by now, is fuh t
cheap thrills.
This irks these people to no
end To them, I say, "Ha ha ha ha
ha Hah ' lb everybody ebe, guys
who use it and girls who want to,
"Go ahead Cet off quickly and
cheaply It's sate, it's effective and
it's protected by the Constitnti m
(no, not the First Amendment
remember the part about 'th
pursuit ot happiness'?)
Till next time, may th hang
overs be gentle, the buzzes ii U nsi
and enjoy those self-indu i r
gasms.
BACCHUS
Continued from page 14
Drinking is very much a part ot
college life and students organize
their weekends around the con-
sumption ol alcohol.
Fraternities on campus are
often regarded as party houses,
but this is an unfair stereotype. Pi
Kappa Phi helped to sponsor the
social and brothers Richard Lit-
tikenand Mark Roberts stated that
their fraternity supports respon-
sible drinking ITiey said the tra
ternity does not buy alcohol, the
people are carded, and thai 103 of
thebrothcrhoodchauffeurat their
parties
For students who do drink
there .ire guidelines you can to!
low to avoid problems The
pamphlet "What You Should
Know About Alcohol On Cam-
pus" (available in the Office of
Substance Abuse Prevention and
Education) lists these tips: Eat a
meal before or along with drink-
ing, sip drinks, space drinks over
time, and limit the number of
drinks to a sensible amount
BACCHUS advisor David
Susina holds a ludidal Alcohol
Workshop tor students who have
an alcohol problem. If you're not
sure if you have a problem, he can
help you to find out. Susina is
available in the Offkeof Substance
Abuse and Prevention.
Susina said students come to
ECU tor an education, and abus-
ing alcohol can interfere with that
goal He promotes individual
decision making based on alcohol
education. Wo warned that tor
students who habituall) use alco-
hol, it can become a lite loin; de-
pendency.
BACCHUS meets every lues
day in Room 303 ot the Erwin
building at 4 p.m. The students
who are invoked are a combina-
tion of drinkers and non-drinkers
who work to promote alcohol
awareness. All students who are
interested are invited to join them.
BACCHUS encouragesevery-
one to evaluate his or her drinking
habits and learn to make respon-
sible decisions regarding alcohol.
Prinking alcohol can be tun on
holidaysand at other social events.
But on Tuesday night. BACCHl S
convinced many students that
parties only need friends, music,
and lauehter not alcohol.
WE WANT YOU
to write for usFeature writeis
apply at The East Carolinian office
j
Cindy's
The Perfect Party 758-4553
Roses for Valentines
Day Must Order Now & Receive 10 off
Reg. $35doz
1306 N. Green Street
We Also Have Adult Novelty Telegrams!
HELP WANTED
DAYTIME WAITRESS NEEDED V
TAR LANDING SEAFOOD
RESTAURANT
Sfc�
APPLY WITHIN
AvAlJOMMCAL
105 Atrporl Rd
Greenville, NC 27834
mf) 738-03:7
J
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
&
V
IL
"With Tte Oitart
a
1987 - 89 Recognized as One Of The Top Sig Ep Chapters In The Country
1987 - 88 Inter - Fraternity Council's " Most Outstanding Chapter Award " Recipient
1988 - 89 Awarded The Sigma Phi Epsilon Buchanan Cup As Most Outstand.ng National Chapter
1988 Winner Of "ECU Spirit Award"
240 Chapters Nationally
2 Houses and a Party Room
$90,000 In Scholarships Awarded Annually
Chancellor's Cup Champs 5 Years Running
. .
Jan. 22
Brothers and Rushees Only
Jan. 23
Meet the Ladies of III
Jan. 24
Meet the Ladies of AHA
Jan.25
Invitation Only
&?
BEST LOCATION ON CAMPUS
(Across from Garrett I lall)
Call 757-0487 or 757-0305 or
830-9647 or 830-9646
For Information or a Ride





18 The East Carolinian, January 18, 1990
Disease brings family together
CHARLOTTE (AP)- For the
second time in seven months,
mourners will file into Myers Park
United Methodist Church on
Sunday to honor the life of a Tay-
lor family member.
Of at least 92 AIDS patients
who have died in Mecklenburg
County, the disease took two
father and then son from the
Taylor household
Samuel Clay Taylor, 40, a lover
of plants, politics and good jokes,
died of complications from AIDS
at 4 a.m. Wednesday. His mother
and sisters were at his side, his
once burly arms emaciated. as the
fluid filling his lungs choked out
his last breaths. He had already
conquered leukemia, but at a cost
blood transfusions he received
during treatment in 184 proba-
bly gave him AIDS.
As they look back, family
members are plain-spoken about
their four-vear war with AIDS.
"If the AIDS epidemic is going
to happen � and our family thinks
it is we should as a community
get ready (or battle Tonda Tay-
lor, a sister of Sam Taylor, told The
Charlotte Observer. I don't think it
is rhedenial is something weean't
afford
"We have been confronted
added her brother Drew, "and
have not been able lo ignore it
"What we learned as a family
is that the label ot the disease is
like a scarlet letter said Tonda
Taylor.
but most family friends
seemed to take if in stride, she
said, and remained loval.
Sam Taylor talked to student
and church groups about safe sex.
And he talked about "anempathy
and understanding and an accep-
tance of people who have AIDS,
no matter how it's transmitted
his sister said
"Sam was one of the first
people in the community who
spoke publicly about his disease
said Les Kooyman, executive di-
rector of the Metrolina AIDS Proj-
ect. He had a real gotnl wav of
conveying that you have to take
Flutist
what life gives you
In June 1984, doctors diag-
nosed leukemia. Later that year,
he underwent explora torv surgery
at Presbyterian Hospital, during
which he had blood transfusions.
The American Red Cross began
testing blood for the HIV virus in
March 1985. Doctorslater believed
the transfusions were contami-
nated.
Doctors at the time said the
leukemia would kill him in three
months.
Instead, after radical treat
ment at the National Institutes of
Health in Bethesda, Md he beat
the disease.
Months later, he developed a
cough. He was diagnosed with
AIDS in January 1986, and started
the experimental AZ7 treatment
that summer.
In public, Tavlor was full of
humor and acceptance, but at
home he was sometimes angry-
He made clear he wanted no ex-
traordinary measures to prolong
his life but never conceded death.
Continued from page 17
Yehudi Menuhin, lean-Pierre
Rampal, Igor c Mstrakh and Vk to
ria de los Angeles.
Besides its full season ofregu
lar concerts in Cannes and the
surrounding areas, the orchestra
takes part in various European
summer music festivals and has
recorded performances of the
works of Mozart, Menotti and
Jolivet.
Conductor Bender has guest
conducted many- of the world's
leading symphony orchestras and
is a former assistant conductor
with the New York Philharmonic,
working under the direction of
Leonard Bernstein and Pierre
Boulez. His honors include the
1970 gold medal at the Dmitri
Mitropoulos conducting compe-
tition in New York and pnes
received as a flute soloist at inter
national competitions in Munich.
(Jenea and Montreux.
Ransom Wilson, acclaimed as
a brilliant virtuoso by critics
throughout the world, is active as
music arranger and guest conduc-
tor, as well as recitalist and fea-
tured soloist with orchestras across
the U.S. His recordings have re-
ceived three Grammy Award
nominations
Wilson appears regularly with
a New York chamber orchestra,
Sohsti New ork which is the
resident orchestra of the OK
Mozart Festival in Bartlesville.
Oklahoma Wilson is artistic di-
rector of the annual summer festi-
val.
He is an alumnus of the North
Carolina School of the Arts in
Winston Salem and the luilliard
School. A "llieh fidelity maga-
zine critic said of Wilson "His
superbly bravura performances
are tonal delight in themselves
Admission to the Cannes
Chamber Orchestra Ransom
Wilson concert is bv Performing
Arts Series season ticket or bv
single tickets which are priced at
$15 each for the general public,
$12 each for ECU faculty and staff
and $8 for students and vouth.
Tickets are sale at the ECU
Central Ticket Office, telephone
(919) 757-4788. Tickets mav be
purchased bv mail or phone with
major credit cards The Ticket
Office is open weekdays from 11
a.m. until 6 p.m.
The ECU Performing Arts
Series is planned bv a campus-
wide committee and sponsored
bv the ECU Department of Uni-
versity Unions.
FOR MORE RUSH
i i i i
1123 MENDENHALL244 8 P.M.
Casino Party with Delta Zeta
124 MENDENHALL 221 8 P.M.
Information Night
125 KING SANDWICH 8 P.M.
14th Street
� r i��� � r aaEacacacaq
SII INFORMATION: 931-7475 .fT'T
'I'l1!1! 'l'l
n iiI I I I I I 1
SIGMA NU
ft
RUSH!
it
Jan 22nd - 25th
Phone
752-9607
For Information
or Rides





�'
18 The East Carolinian, January 18,1990
Disease brings family together
CHARLOTTE (AP) � For the
second time in seven months,
mourners will file into Myers Park
United Methodist Church on
Sunday to honor the life of a Tay-
lor family member.
Of at least 92 AIDS patients
who have died in Mecklenburg
Counrj the disease took two �
father and then son � from the
Taylor household.
Samuel Clay Taylor, 40, a lover
of plants, politics and good jokes,
died of complications from AIDS
at 4 a.m. Wednesday. His mother
and sisters were at his side, his
once burly arms emaciated, as the
fluid filling his lungs choked out
his last breaths. He had already
conquered leukemia, but at a cost:
blood transfusions he received
during treatment in 1984 proba-
bly gave him AIDS.
As they look back, family
members are plain-spoken about
their four-year war with AIDS.
"If the AIDS epidemic isgoing
to happen�and our family thinks
it is � we should as a community-
get ready for battle Tonda Tay-
lor, a sister of Sam Taylor, told The
Charlotte Observer. "I don't think it
is. Thedenial is something weean't
afford
"We have been confronted
added her brother Drew, "and
have not been able to ignore it
"What we learned as a family
is that the label of the disease is
like a scarlet letter said Tonda
Taylor.
But most family friends
seemed to take it in stride, she
said, and remained loyal.
Sam Taylor talked to student
and church groups about safe sex.
And he talked about "an empathy
and understanding and an accep-
tance of people who have AIDS,
no matter how it's transmitted
his sister said.
"Sam was one of the first
people in the community who
spoke publicly about his disease
said Les Kooyman, executive di-
rector of the Mctrolina AIDS Proj-
ect. "He had I real good way of
conveying that vou have to take
Flutist
what life gives you
In June 1984, doctors diag-
nosed leukemia. Later that year,
he underwent exploratory surgery
at Presbyterian Hospital, during
which he had blood transfusions.
The American Red Cross began
testing blood for the HIV virus in
March 1985. Doctors later believed
the transfusions were contami-
nated.
Doctors at the time said the
leukemia would kill him in three
months.
Instead, after radical treat-
ment at the National Institutes of
Health in Bethesda, Md he beat
the disease.
Months later, he developed a
cough. He was diagnosed with
AIDS in January 1986, and started
the experimental AZT treatment
that summer.
In public, Taylor was full of
humor and acceptance, but at
home he was sometimes angry.
He made clear he wanted no ex-
traordinary measures to prolong
his life but never conceded death.
Continued from page 17
Yehudi Menuhin, Jean-Pierre
Rampal, Igor Oistrakh and Victo-
ria de los Angeles.
Besides its full season of regu-
lar concerts in Cannes and the
surrounding areas, the orchestra
takes part in various European
summer music festivals and has
recorded performances of the
works of Mozart, Menotti and
Jolivet.
Conductor Bender has guest
conducted many of the world's
leading symphony orchestras and
is a former assistant conductor
with the New York Philharmonic,
working under the direction of
Leonard Bernstein and Pierre
Boulez. His honors include the
1970 gold medal at the Dmitri
Mitropoulos conducting compe-
tition in New York and prizes
received as a flute soloist at inter-
national competitions in Munich,
Geneva and Montreux.
Ransom Wilson, acclaimed as
a brilliant virtuoso by critics
throughout the world, is active as
music arranger and guest conduc-
tor, as well as recitalist and fea-
tured soloist with orchestras across
the U.S. His recordings have re-
ceived three Grammy Award
nominations.
Wilson appears regularly with
a New York chamber orchestra,
Solisti New York which is the
resident orchestra of the OK
Mozart Festival in Bartlcsville,
Oklahoma. Wilson is artistic di-
rector of the annual summer festi-
val.
He is an alumnus of the North
Carolina School of the Arts in
Winston-Salcm and the Juilliard
School. A "High Fidelity" maga-
zine critic said of Wilson: "His
superbly bravura performances
are .tonal delight in themselves
Admission to the Cannes
Chamber OrchestraRansom
Wilson concert is by Performing
Arts Scries season ticket or by
single tickets which are priced at
$15 each for the general public,
$12 each for ECU faculty and staff
and $8 for students and youth.
Tickets are sale at the ECU
Central Ticket Office, telephone
(919) 757-4788. Tickets may be
purchased by mail or phone with
major credit cards. The Ticket
Office is open weekdays from 11
a.m. until 6 p.m.
The ECU Performing Arts
Series is planned by a campus-
wide committee and sponsored
by the ECU Department of Uni-
versity Unions.
PHI KAPPA PSI FRA1
IMMEDIATE LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITY
BECOME A FOUNDING FATHER
5-WEEK PLEDGE PERIOD
-g�-ll " �� -yfla ft � Aimy Jl v nJLnqin.
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SIGMA NU
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JSH
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2nd - 25th
Phone
752-9607
For Information
or Rides





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Adventures of Kemple Boy
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CARTOONISTS!
THERE IS A CARTOONISTS
MEETING ON THURSDAY THE 25th OF
JANUARY, AT THE EAST CAROLINIAN.
THE TIME OF THE MEETING IS 5:30 pm





Sire iEaat (Earnlfnfan
Page 20
Sports
January 18,1990
Swimmers fall to
North Carolina
Senior swimmers AndyJetei Raymond
afternoon in a loss to North Carolina Abo
I abj
Kennedy, Robin wv i s and Leslie Wilson swam the last home meet of their college career Wednesday
ve, the unidentified I � I swimrnei stretches tor another Pirate win (Photo by Garrett Killian � ECU Photo
Conch K. stuns Duke's student newspaper
PL KM AM, Ml AH Duke
Coach Mike kr zewski gave a
10 minute, profanity laced lecture
to members ot the sports statt of
Duke s student 'newspaper, ac
cusing it ot coverage th.it "de-
grades my basketball team.
RodneyPeele sports editor of
The Chronicle said the
newspaper's sports statt was
under the impression that the
Monday meeting, scheduled by
Krzyzewski's secretary, was ar-
ranged so the statt could meet the
Puke basketball team
?, lustful � Ptfele said.
Krzyzewski berated the statt in
the presence. t the team members
tor "really screwing our basket
ball team" with its coverage of
gamesandopinioncolumnsaboul
the team and its players
Krzyzewski was concerned
about The Chronicle's coverage of
Pukes recent win over Georgia
Tech, an opinion column by statt
writer Brent Belvin in which he
graded theplayersand team and
the stall s lack ot appreciate tor
Puke's successful program.
1 have no objection to people
critiztng our coverage that s part
ot what we do and we have to
accept that said Matt Selafani, a
Puke student and the managing
editor of The Chronicle, the
school's student newspaper. "1
don't think the way it washandled
was very professional.
I think most of things he said
about h;s team being amateur,
equal!) apply to our reportersand
theyareenrjtled to mistakes if they
made mistakes ust like anybody
else lo call them in front of the
team and other people and berate
them and not give them a chance
to respond,hecan'ttreat them like
his basketball team
Krzyzewski said he would not
comment on the incident other
than to say: To me, what 1 do
With the students here in the uni-
versity is a private nutter and it's
something I won't comment on
Krzyzewski's comments dur-
ing the meeting, which was held
in the Duke basketball team locker
room, were released to the Dur-
ham Morning Herald in a tran-
script provided bv The Chronicle
A member of The Chronicle staff
said he tape-recorded the meeting
in which Krzyzewski used pro-
fanity and "raised his voice" on
occasion, according to Peele.
All 10 members of The Chron-
icle sports statt are Duke Univer-
sity students. None is paid tor his
or her wfirk with the newspaper.
Tom Butters, the Duke Uni-
See Duke, page 21
By Kristen Halberg
Staff Writer
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams were no match for the
reigning Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence champions Monday night
But, the final home meet against
the North Carolina Tarheels was
not, according to Coach Rick Kobe,
a total loss despite the final out-
come.
"We swam a good meet
Kobe said. "We are real pleased
with our times. The ACC is one of
the most competitive conferences
in the country
With the loss against the Tar-
heels, the men's record stands at
8-3 on the season while remaining
4-2 in the conference. The women's
overall record dropped to 7-4
while their conference record
remains at 3-2.
Not only was this the last
home meet for the Pirates at
Mingcs Aquatic Center for the
1W-90 season, but this was also
the last home meet for ECU'S
seniorswimmers. The Pirates have
two seniors on the men's squad.
Andy leter and Raymond Ken-
nedy, and two on the women's
squad, Robin Wicks and Leslie
Wilson.
They've put four years in
what was the hardest training
program they could do Kobe
said "They are what student lead-
ers are all about
All four seniors served as co-
captains and, as Kobe explained,
all have, at one time or another,
served on the Dean's List.
In fact, the four seniors were
regarded by Kobeastheoutstand-
ing swimmers in the meet for their
efforts. For the men, Jeter swam
for a third place finish in the 1000-
vard freestyle with his time of
955 40. UNC's David Monasteno
and James Hamrick took the first
and second place spots with their
times of 932.57 and 9:48.04 re
speclively.
Kennedv ended the dav with
both a second and a third place
finish. He earned second in the
100-yard brcaststroke when he
swam a 59.55, right behind UNC's
John Fischetti's time of 59.32.
Kennedy's third place finish came
in the 200-yard freestyle as he
touched the wall in 1:46.83. Steve
Martcl of the Tarheels took first in
that event with 1:47 19 and ECU's
Steve Benkusky swam for second
in 1:46.76.
For the women seniors
Wilson swam away with a third
place in the 400-yard individual
medlev with her time of 4:47.05.
UNC scored in the top two posi
tions. Wicks, who also swam in
this event, ended in fifth place
with her time ot 4:4 84
Despite the overall losing ef
fort ot both squads, the men by gs
145 and the women by 73-167, the
Pirates were not without individ-
ual highlights For the men. junior
Ted Christensen swam an out-
standing time in the 400-yard
individual medlev as he easih
took first place with a time of
4:11.92.
Freshman Michael Seaver
took second in the 50-yard frees
tyle with his time of 22.69 Two
events later, junior Tom Holster,
also swam for second in the 100-
yard butterfly in a time of 53 63
The next first place tmish for
the Pirates would come in the hX1
yard freestyle when freshman ohn
Carawan would swam to a win
ning time of 49.09 Later, in the
100-vard backstroke, junior
George Walters snatched a sec
See Swimmers, page 22
Practice makes perfect
Head basketball coach Mike Steele works with the team during Wednesday afternoons work out.
The Pirates are home in Mmges Coliseum Saturday night as they host CAA foe William and Mary
in a 7 p m matchup (Photo by Garrett Kilhan � ECU Photo Lab)
Jeter, Green carve path as
Pirates swim past UNC-W
Martins future in the Baseball
Hall of Fame remains uncertain
By John W. Fox
Gannett News Service
B1NGHAMTON, N.Y. Billy Martin had his
nine innings as a major-league manager and was
retired nine times
Nine firings four bv a medlev of Minnesota,
Detroit, Texas and Oakland owners and five by the
New York "i ankecs don't build much of a case tor
Hall of lame induction.
But he isn't without offsetting credentials when
he becomes eligible tor candidacy in 1944
But only five finished with better won-lost per-
centages than Martin's .354; Miller Huggins' was
.555.
Casey Stengel is a special case; his .f23 dynasty
with the Yankees, which entitles him, is watered
down to an overall .508 by mediocre-to-abvsmal
National I eague years.
Connie Mack is another; being owner as well as
manager, he sold oft the talent on two different
Philadelphia A sdynasties, suffered at the helmof 17
last-place clubs before finally retiring at age 87.
Tw o whom I question being giants in other than
the Nice Guys IXpartment are Wilbert Robinson
By Katherine Anderson
Staff Writer
Both of the men's and
women's swimming and diving
teams posted victories in their
January 13 meet against UNC-
Wilmington. The men defeated the
Seahawks 127.5 to 115.5, while the
women took a 134 to 101 win.
"It was a tremendous effort
by both the men and the women
said Kick Kobe, head coach for
both themen'sand women's team.
The Pirates had several out-
standing swimmers at the meet,
including: Marc Cook, Ted Chris-
tensen and Andy leter for the men,
and Robin Wicks, Carolyn Green
and Meredith Bridgers for the
women, leter and Green were the
only double event winners for
ECU.
Top performers in the men's
event are as follows with the
winning time:
� 400-yard medley relay-
O'Brien, Springer, Martinez,
Hemdon, ECU, 3:40.32.
� 100-vard freestyle-Marc
Cook, ECU, 9:53.76.
� 200-yard freestvle-Andv
leter, ECU, i:46.83.
� 50-vard freestvle-Nick
Revelas. UNC-W, 22.12.
� 200-yard individual med-
lev-Clifton Perkins, UNC-W,
15756.
� One-meter diving Matt
Garken, UNC-W, 247.65 points.
� 200-yard butterfly-Ted
Christensen, ECU, 1:57.63.
� 100-yard freestyle-Nick
Revelas, UNC-W, 48.88.
� 200-vard backstroke-Mark
O'Brien, ECU, 1.56.31.
� 500-vard freestvle-Andv
Jeter, ECU 4:47.66.
� Three-meter diving-Matt
Garken, UNC-W, 258 points.
� 200-yard breastroke-Ray-
mond Kennedy, ECU, 2:11 97. '
�400-yard freerelay-Schultz,
Lerner, Robinson, White, UNO
W, 3:16.89.
Top performers for the women
with their winning time include:
� 400-yard medlev relay
Wilhelm. Bndgers, Duke, Holt.
ECU, 4:12.87.
� 100-vard freestyle-Carolyn
Green, ECU,10:5t.12
� 200-vard treestvle-WoIc
Duke, ECU, 200.67.
� 50-vard treestvle-Tia Par-
due. ECU, 25 77.
� 200-yard individual med
ley-Amy Lewis, I NOW 2:13.70.
� One-meter diving-Mar)
Beth Mills, UNC-W, 272 points
� 200-vard butterfly-Robin
Wicks, ECU, 2:12.65
� 100-vard freestyle-Amy
Lewis, UNC-W, 54.88.
� 200-yard backstroke-Nicole
Duke, ECU, 2:16.41.
� 500-vard freest vie-Carolyn
Green, ECU, 5:22.58.
� Three-meter diving-Mary
Beth Mills, UNC-W, 272 points
� 200-vard breastroke-Marv
Tarter, UNC-W, 2:34.45.
� 400-yard free relay-Lewis,
Stroupe,Doepp,Tartcr, UNC-W,
3:49.33.
Ima Reck makes preseason picks
The Baseball Writers Association of America
doesn't vote on managers, which could help the (.500) of pre-i�30 Brooklyn and Bucky Harris (.493)
The glory of Harris' 29 seasons was primarily
irascible Martin's case
But the Hall of Fame's Veterans Committee, in
whose hands the division lies, isn't generous either
After 114 years of major league baseball, annual
voting since 1936 has elected onlv 10 for their per-
formance as managers.
Fight were born in the 1 BOOs The exceptions are
Al I oyK whowaschosen in 1977 in his third vearot
eligibility, and Walter Alston, chosen in 1983, his
second
All 10 managed more victories than Martin, not
surprising in light of his truncated careor(s).
achieved by winning two immediate pennants in his
20s as Washington Senators player-manager; of his
last 25 vears only
five weft first-division finishes, and he wasclose
to Martin bv being fired eight times.
Another three who managed more victories than
Martin none since 1920 � are in the Hall of Fame
for other reasons. Cap Anson and Fred Clarke won
niches as plavers and Clark Griffith as a club owner.
But the list is surprisingly thin of non-elected
See Manager, page 23
By Jeannette Roth
IRS
The IM-Rec Services spring
1990 basketball kickoff tourna-
ment will be held this weekend in
Memorial Gymnasium. Twenty
four men's teams will compete for
top honors in this year's battle for
regular-season number one posi-
tioning. Ima Reck sees the pre-
preseason picks as follows:
1.) Winter Heat - Greenville
Utilities beware! These guys will
light up the court without using a
single kilowatt. Look for Terrence
Bryant and crew to take the other
teams to their peak of energy be-
fore slamming them with high
scores.
2.) Air Assault - Bojack Daven-
port leads the attack. These guys
can lead a defensive strike their
opponents will never be able to
combat. And with Colonel Bojack
at the helm.no one will get out
alive!
3.) Boyz in the Hood - Leon
Edwards will lead his squad out
of the hood and onto the wood for
a slammin' jammin' basketball
session. They plan to rock their
opponents chassis and kill their
motors before taking the number
three spot.
4.) Library St. Jazz - Kenny
Maltony will lead this basketball
study session. There will be quiet
on the opponents boards as Li-
brary St. Jazz teaches a lesson in
basketball prowess.
5.) 1-C-Ya - James Godwin's
team will C-Ya-Luz! They round
out the top five but can surelv play
the roundball game!
1990 Dark Horse Pick -
Enema Bandits - Kevin
McGowan and his team are a pain
in the �!�?�! They'll have to rob a
few squads to place in the top five
overall!
�Is your figure fattening?
Does your bathing suit make a
regular appearance in your night-
mares?
See IRS, page 22
P





The East Carolinian, January 18,1990 21
Sports Briefs
Gooden's shoulder improves
ew Vrk Mots pitcher Dwight Gooden continued to show tm
provemenl in his injured pitching shoulder, according to tests Tuesday
1 he right bander injured his shoulder lulv 3. Gooden has been in
rehabilitation during the offseason ream officials believe Gooden will
be back at tull strength by the start of spring training
Sun Devil named best wrestler
rhom Ortiz of Arizona State was named the outstanding wrestler
at the National 1 cam Wrestling Championship at 1 lampion, a .though
Oklahoma State defeated the Sun Devils 24-19 to win the team title
Iowa took third place in the competition.
Green Bay extends Infante's contract
1 indy Infante, who led the Green Bay Packers in 1989 to their best
record. 10-6, m 17 years, was given a two-year contract extension
through the 1�4 season with a raise in pay- The Packers were 4-12 in
Infante's tirst season in 1968.
Sheridan is highest paid coach
North Carolina State football coach Pick Sheridan is the highest
paid coach in the University ot North Carolina system, earning more
money than any other coaches Sheridan, who earns $127,(XX1 a year
earns more than any of the svstems chancellors, according to a list
released by state officials.
USA faces Costa Rica in Miami Cup
Costa Rica will be the first team the IS national wut team w ill
in the first round of the Marlboro Cup of Miami The USA team was
lopla) I ruguay, but instead Uruguay will plaj Colombia in the four
nation tournament which is scheduled Feb. 7 4
Foreman clobbers Cooney
George Foreman continued his quest tor a shot at heavyweight
champion Mike I son by knocking out Gerry Cooney in the second
round of their scheduled 10 round bout Monday night Foreman
knocked Coone) down twice In the second knockdown the reteree
didn't even bother to count he just waved hisarm ending the fight. 1 he
- i kout came almost t w o minutes into the second round
Steinbach signs for $1.8 million
All Star catcher ferry Steinbach signed a two-year, $1 8 million
contract w iththeOakland Athletics Monday rhe27 year old, who was
paid $280,000 last year, hit .273 w ith seven home runs and 42 RBls las!
season. Steinbach, who is in his third ear in the majors, was eligible tor
salary arbitration
Fielder leaves Hanshin for Detroit
Firs! baseman Cecil 1 ieldcr who hit 38 home runs tor the 1 ianshin
1 igers in apan last season, signed a two-year contraq) for an estimated
�f; million with the Petroit figers Monday. I he 26-year-old Fielder
played fourscasons with the Toronto blue (ays but went to play in apan
in I989,u hen Fred Mc( iriff apparently beat him onto! the first-base job
Fielder received 51 million with Hansin.
Reynolds calls for black role models
Seattle Manner Harold Reynolds didn't hesitate when he was
gi en a dinner tab ot $25,000. 1 he dinner was tor more than UXXUMack
athk tes community leadersand politicians he hopes to enlist inefforts
to establish more role models tor black youths Reynolds who grew up
witfiouta tatter, said troubled ouths neevla positive male role model.
Alabama wanted Bowden first
� via State football coach Bobby Bowden was the overwhelming
choice for the University ol Alabama coaching job by the school sboard
of trustees, according to published reports. But school President Roger
Savers killed the 14 1 vote to give Bowden the job because buying out
his contract would cost too much. Gene Stalling? was hired as the
Crimson Tide's new t oach.
Foyt gears up for Phoenix
I Foyt entered the competition tor the 40-mile stock car race at
next month's$17,000Copper World Classic at Phoenix International
Racew ay. Foyt, 55, who has won the Indianapolis 500 tour times, will
drive a custom built 10 Chevrolet Camaro with a 358-cubic-inch
engine.
Hamburg bids to host Olympics
I lamburg, West (lermany will bid on the 2000 or 2004 I Hympics,
according to the city's mayor, who said earlier he would not enter his
City in bidding for the games. In other Olympic news, Greek political
leaders are hoping Athens will be the site of the 1996Olympic Games.
Vatanen wins Paris road race
1 inland's Ari Vatanen won the Paris-Dakar road race rally Tuesday
tor the third time as he beat teammate Bjorn Waldwegaard ot Sweden
by more than an hour in the overall standings. Bom racers drove
Peugeots.
Hi:i ISATCDAY IppteCaHegeMirmaiionNet �
NCAA toughens policy on drug abuse
By Tom VVitosky
(innoit News Service
DALLAS College athletes
who test positive tor improper
drug use will be suspended for
one year and face possible lifetime
banishment tor subsequent viola-
turns, the National Collegiate
Athletic Association decided Ian.
14.
Duke
"Theeurrent penalties simply
aren't severe enough to provide a
sufficient deference Pittsburgh
athletic director Edward Bozik
said. "Penalties must be effective
and harsh to work
His comments followed over-
whelming approval by NCAA
delegates of proposals designed
to continue a crackdown on drug
usage among college athletes.
In addition to the tougher
penalties current penalties are
for 90days � delegatesapproved
a two-year random testing pro-
gram of Division I-A and l-AA
football players throughout the
academic vear for steroid use and
made permanent rules governing
current penalties against teams
with athletes who test positive for
drug use.
The NCAA action imposes a
one-year penalty of inehgibility
for players who test positive, and
a lifetime ban for a second viola-
tion if ihe individual used per-
formance-enhancing drugs. If he
used slreet drugs such as mari-
juana or cocaine, a second viola-
tion and all subsequent ones
would involve further one-year
See Drugs, page 22
Continued from page 20
versitv athletic director, said he
was not aware of the meeting and
had not been contacted by anyone
at Hie Chronicle.
It you are asking am 1 overly
alarmed by it. I am not Butters
said. "Until I have much more
tacts about it than 1 now have, I
wouldn't have anything to offer
to it.
I've never known him
(KrvewskO to do anything that
didn't have a reason for it. If there
is a problem, I'll handle it and
nobody will know any thing about
that
The transcripts show that
Krzyzewski apparently objected
to an opinion piece written by
Belvin on Monday in which he
graded the performance of each
Duke plaver. No player received
lower than a C-plus and the team
graded out at B-plus.
"You can interpret it any way
vou want to because you have
freedom of of the press
Krzvzewski told the sports staff,
according to the transcript pro-
vided by The Chronicle. "But it is
also my freedom of speech to tell
you what 1 think. I think your
article. Brent, is full of OK?
Krzvzewski also appeared to
be concerned about The
Chronicle's coverage of Duke's
victory last Thursday over Geor-
gia Tech in Atlanta.
I'm not looking for puff
pieces or anything like that but
vou'rew hacked out and you don't
appreciate what the -is going on
and it -me off.
Krzyzewski concluded by
saying, according to the transcript,
"I'm not looking for puff stuff.
You're missing something. You're
missing out on the big picture and
that's all I wanted to say. 1 appre-
ciate you coming in. I wanted to
say it in front of my team. Thanks
for coming. That's it
Peele said no one from The
Chronicle staff spoke during the
meeting.
In the Locker
Where
basketball
is king
28,313
5'052 .544
Division I
Southeast
Missouri
Slate
Division 111:
Calvin
(Mich.)
Highest, lowest
attendance in women's
college basketball
Per game or session,
by conference
(1988-89):
o
OX RUSH '90
THE GREEK LEADER OF THE 90'S
MENDENHALL MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
JANUARY 22 - 25
8:00-11:00
MONDAY: MEET THE BROTHERS
CATERED
TUESDAY: CASINO NIGHTPIZZA
WEDNESDAY: THEATA CHI
NIGHT FOOD AND DRINK
THURSDAY: INVITATiON
ONLY PARTY WITH
SORORITY
For More Information and rides Call:
752-8002 or 830 - 6954





22 The East Carolinian, January 18,1990
Swimmers
Continued from page 20
ond place finish with his time of
54.21.
On the boards, the men fared
well against the Tarheels, in one-
meter diving, Matthew Lawrence
and Mike Bennett captured both
the second and the third place
spots. In three- meter diving, it was
Lawrence again as he this time
earned the first place honors. The
Pirates also saw Shawn Kennedy
take third in this event.
Sophomore Chantal Morris
kicked things off for the women's
individual honors as she placed
third in the 1000-yard freestyle
event with her time of 11:08.25.
Next, it was sophomore Page
Holt winning a spot in the top
three as she placed second in the
200-yard freestvle with her time
of 138.50. Holt later also earned
another second place finish for the
Lady Pirates as she swam the 100-
vard freestyle in 55.83.
Tia Pardue, a freshman,
rounded up a third in the 50-yard
freestvle as she touched the wall
in 26.12.
The Lady Pirates' first indi-
vidual victory came in the 100-
vard butterfly when freshman
Nichole Duke swam an impres-
sive 1:02.8 to earn her the first
place time. Not far behind Duke
was team member Pardue as her
time ot 1103.19, which earned her
second place
Freshman lulie Wilhelm kept
the Lady Pirates in the top three in
the 100-yard backstroke as she
claimed third in a time of 1:04.69.
The Lady Pirates ended the
500-yard freestyle in the last three
of six positions, but, in the 100-
vard breaststroke, ECU was able
to make up the lossof points when
no one from the Tarheel squad
had been entered in the event.
unior Meredith Hridgers led the
Lady Pirates with her time of
1:05.44, sophomore fenny Muench
touched the wall in 1:14.01 and
freshman Shawn Morrow settled
for third in 1:16.34.
The women did not fare as
well as the men in thedivingevents
as. Grove and A Rankin placed
fourth and fifth in Kith the one
and three-meter diving events.
The swimmers have one more
meet this season before the con-
ference championships begin in
February. Saturday, the Pirates
will be taemg Duke University in
1 "hirham. and this is one ACC team
that both teams has hopes ot de-
feating
IRS
Continued from page 20
Through January 19, IM-Rec
Services will be holding registra-
tion for first session spring fitness
classes. These 12 class sessions are
available to all facultystaff and
studentsat a nominal price of $10
student and $20faculty staff. In
addition, drop-in tickets are avail-
able in $5 increments These tick
ets may be utilized tor any variety
of classes offered on the semesterly
schedule.
Over seven different types of
fitness classes are ottered includ-
ing: beginning fitness, interval
training, hi-low aerobics,aerobics,
circuit training, low impact aero-
bics, belly busters, toning and
supraclass. Each class offers a dif-
ferent method of exercise. Classes
are held daily from 3-7 p.m. in
Room 108 and 112 Memorial
Gymnasium.
For information regarding
class registration and offerings,
drop by 2(V1 Memorial Gymna-
sium or call 757-6387. Get your
body ready fur spring break and
the tanning season
Lake Slacum, a member ot the ECU lacrosse team, practices his
passes against a wall on College Hill. Slacum and the lacrosse team
will open their season Feb. 16 at home against Appalachian State
(Photo by J D Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
WANTED:
SPORTS WRITERS
to write for The East Carolinian
REWARD�gain valuable writing experience, travel to
foreign places, meet interesting and exciting people, and get paid.
0NCts
�SS&
Drugs
suspensions.
'We have found more viola
tions in the area of trying to gel a
competitive advantage and that is
win the more severe penalty
would be imposed NCAA ex-
ecutive director Pick Schultz said
after the vote.
The approval of the drug test-
ing proposal at an estimated
annual cost of $500,000, to be borne
by the NCAA was the final
major action taken by the 1,(XH)
NCAA delegates prior to the ad-
journment of their three-day con-
vention.
It adjourned amid claims by
officials that progress had been
made in the effort to impose re-
forms on college athletics.
"1 think we are finally all going
in the same direction on a number
of key issues said Eugenc( orri
gan commissionerol the Atlantic
Coast Conference.
" The reform movement is
alive, but the question is whether
we can stay on the same page
"If there is a message from me
convention, it is that we have to go
to work for much of the rest of this
year on how to bring a better bal-
ance to athletics and academics
Oklahoma athletic director Don-
rue Duncan said. "1 don't think the
presidents will allow anything else
to happen
Schultz said the convention,
particularly its approval of reduc-
tions in playing and practice
schedules, has provided a mes-
sage io the general public.
"1 think it tells the general
public we can and we will take
care ot our problems he said.
"here is now a strong and urgent
feeling we need reform and
change, and we have taken very
positive steps in that direction
The new sanctions and new-
testing program were adopted
with relatively little opposition, in
marked contrast to the controversy
the drug testing issue has had in
recent years.
"Clearly this no longer is a
revolutionary step but rather an
evolutionary one Bozik said.
But several delegates com-
plained the new testing program
will create legal problems in some
states. Legal challenges of the
NCAA drug testing policies are
� �
�.
���. ' �-
Beta Theta Pi
150 Years of Tradition
Mon. 22nd
Meet the brothers and
enjoy oysters
Tucs. 23rd
Barbecue
Wed. 24th
Bids are given
Thurs. 25th
Invitations Only
Continued from page 21
under way in Oregon, Washing-
ton, Colorado and California.
"The fact is that we will have
50 applications of these rules be-
causeeach state has different laws
governing this type of testing
said James O'Fallon, faculty rep-
resentative of the University of
Oregon. "That is already what we
have"
Others said drug testing
should be used to educate and
rehabilitate, not punish.
"We've never believed in us-
ing drug testing to punish, said
Charles Theokas, athletic dim tor
at Temple University, who voted
against the new penalties. "It
should be part of the education
process
1 V S , . 0� live
r - world " tlOIrhe�yT .
P,odvKo0 5LoO,S J V.r9� Ube
,og Lol h0 �� Richmond I Ue� ,tt
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ttLa) �" � Donee y
Singe" 'l v spec"3
� ?te2- 9oc' . c��
coorolntoo
Join Sigma Nu
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Sigma Nu Offers:
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Pat Riley
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RUSH: January 22, 23, 24 & 25
TIME: 8:00-11:00 p.m.
CALL: 752-9607
For information & rides





The East Carolinian, January 18,1990 23
Manager
Continued from page 20
eligibles who can equal Martin's
win- and percentage.
Io be exact, one.
The only higher qualifier is
Frank Selee, with a 399 win-lose
and 1,299 victories, mostly with
the Chicago Cubs before the turn
of the century.
Earl Weaver will make it two
u hen he becomes eligible, 1992 at
the earliest.
Sparky Anderson, still active,
also will join the list unless an-
other
Detroit disaster like 1989
drops him below Martin's percent-
age
Bob Broeg, long-time St Louis
sports columnist who is on the
Veterans Committee, said he
sometimes wonders it a separate
category tor managers might bet-
ter never have been created.
I'd like to see use of the
contributor' category, where a
(1 eo)
Durocher, a Charlie Grimm
or a jimmy Dykes, who had long
managerial years maybe seldom
with strong ballclubs, also have a
�: that i,m be mk) about them as
pla ers. "ogether,that trieplayed
more than 6,000 games in the in
field and managed more than

Nol that 1 didn t vote for
Alston . . he said.
but lus vote for lope may
n e been heartier, since he caught
a record 1,918 games m Alston
had a total of one major-league a t-
bat.
By that standard, the early
Martin's seasons as a sparkplug
tor Stengel could rank him ahead
of Anderson, who lasted one year
in the majors, and Weaver, who
never played above Double-A.
Personally, 1 think Durocher
already should be in Cooperstown
for his managing alone (2.010 wins,
540 percentage). But Leo The Lip's
feistiness undoubtedly has cost
him votes.
Rules for election by the
BBVVA specify it be based on
"record, playing ability, integrity,
sportsmanship, character, contri-
bution to the team(s)
Veterans Committee rules
contain no such guidelines.
What isleast impressive about
Martin's resume is certainly his
split personality.
What is the most impressive
is his ability to lift a team immedi-
ately.
The unfailing evidence:
� The first team Martin
managed in the majors, the 1970
Twins, improved by 18 gamesover
their 1P finish, 79-83 to 97-65.
The second team he man-
aged, the 1971 Tigers, rose 12
games (79-83 to 91-71).
�- At his third stop, the 1974
Rangers rose 28 games from the
57-105 he inherited to 84-76.
The 197b Yankees, the first
he managed from the start of a
season, won the first pennant in 11
years tor a franchise that had
plunged to within one game o
.500 tor the decade.
I he fifth learn to which he
moved, the 1980 A's, improved by
28 games over the previous year,
54-108 to 83-79.
In Martin's stormy five New
York terms, the Yankees played
590 ball. Under the rest of George
Steinbrenner's managers, tor those
1975-88 seasons, the percentage
was 549.
Four of the 10 enshrined at
Cooperstown as managers served
at Yankee Stadium.
Muggins, who died at 50, ar-
rived shortly before the acquisi-
tion of Babe Ruth.
loe McCarthy, Harris and
Stengel inherited the helm of a
dynasty.
Martin, who died Christmas
Pay near here in a vehicular acci-
dent, inherited onlv Steinbrenner.
ttryx IJJ0.USATOTM1 VphGiBy
DELTA SIGMA PHI
MCrUfte QmkSfou tyedVo 'Know
RUSH
Mon
8- 11pm
Sub Night
Tues
8- 11pm
Cookout with a
sorority
DELTA SIGMA PHI
Wed
8- 11pm
Cookout with a
sorority
510 E. H)th St.
Thurs
8-11 pm
Invitation onlv
5-03l3
HAS SCHOOL AND HOMEWORK ALREADY MADE YOU SICK?
PI KAPPA PHI HAS GOT THE CURE
ri
X
n
K
.
FOR A SPEEDY RECOVERY WE RECOMMEND THE
FOLLOWING: A PARTY ON OUR BRAND NEW DECK, OR
MAYBE A DIP IN THE HOT TUB. SHOOT A FEW HOOPS
AND SHOW YOUR STUFF ON OUR FULL SIZE
BASKETBALL AND VOLLEYBALL COURTS, OR JUST
RELAX ALONG THE STILL WATERS OF
LAKE PI KAPPA PHI.
YOU SHOULD BK HERE
JAN. 22 - 25
PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY HOUSE
Turn right on 14th Street. Go all the way
down 14 th to Evans. Turn left and go
down to Arlington Blvd. Then turn right.
(Jo down Arlington to Hooker Rd. Turn
left. Pi Kappa Phi is on the left.
DRESS CASUALLY! BE YOURSELF!
; fi .N
MKQ' AW H
��DLLEGC HI 1
' t�tB S S
PU
'ifrMi
.
8-11 Jan 22
8-11 Jan 23
8- 11 Jan 24
6 - 8 Jan. 25
Meet the Brothers
What's In It For You
You're Not Alone
Invitation Only
Meet With AEA
For more information or rides just
Call 756-2149
RUSH THE RESORT
OFFER YOU THE OPPORTUNITY TO
BROADEN YOUR SOCIAL LIFE, BUT IT
GIVES THE INDIVIDUAL A CHANCE
TO EXCEL IN COLLEGE THROUGH A
DIVERSITY OF INTERESTS, AN
EMPHASIS ON VARIOUS SCHOOL AND
COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES, THE BASIS
FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF YOUR
LEADERSHIP POTENTIAL, AND A
STRONG SUPPORTIVE ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION.
n
K
4 V
;
rush mriKE
A FINE PLACE FOR FINE GENTLEMEN.





I
t

The East Carolinian, January 18,1990 23
Manager
Continued from page 20
eligibles who can equal Martin's
wins and percentage.
To be exact, one.
The only higher qualifier is
Frank Selee, with a .599 win-lose
and 1,299 victories, mostly with
the Chicago Cubs before the turn
of the century.
Earl Weaver will make it two
when he becomes eligible, 1992 at
the earliest.
Sparky Anderson, still active,
also will join the list unless an-
other
Detroit disaster like 1989
drops himbelow Martin's percent-
age.
Bob Broeg, long-time St. Louis
sports columnist who is on the
Veterans Committee, said he
sometimes wonders if a separate
category for managers might bet-
ter never have been created.
"I'd like to see use of the
contributor' category, where a
(Leo)
Durocher, a Charlie Grimm
or a Jimmy Dykes, who had long
managerial years maybe seldom
with strong ballclubs, also have a
lot that can be said about them as
players Together, that trio played
more than 6,000 games in the in-
field and managed more than
9,000.
"Not that I didn't vote for
Alston he said.
But his vote for Lopez may
ha ve been heartier, since he caught
a record 1,918 games and Alston
had a total of one major-league at-
bat.
By that standard, the early
Martin's seasons as a sparkplug
for Stengel could rank him ahead
of Anderson, who lasted one year
in the majors, and Weaver, who
never played above Double-A.
Personally, I think Durocher
already should be in Cooperstown
for hismanagingalone(2,010 wins,
.540 percentage). But Leo The Lip's
feistiness undoubtedly has cost
him votes.
Rules for election by the
BBWA specify it be based on
"record, playing ability, integrity,
sportsmanship, character, contri-
bution to the team(s)
Veterans Committee rules
contain no such guidelines.
What is least impressive about
Martin's resume is certainly his
split personality.
What is the most impressive
is his ability to lift a team immedi-
ately.
The unfailing evidence:
� The first team Martin
managed in the majors, the 1970
Twins, improved by 18 gamesover
their 1969 finish, 79-83 to 97-65.
� The second team he man-
aged, the 1971 Tigers, rose 12
games (79-83 to 91-71).
� At his third stop, the 1974
Rangers rose 28 games from the
57-105 he inherited to 84-76.
� The 1976 Yankees, the first
he managed from the start of a
season, won the first pennant in 11
years for a franchise that had
plunged to within one game of
.500 for the decade.
� The fifth team to which he
moved, the 1980 A's, improved by
28 games over the previous year,
54-108 to 83-79.
In Martin's stormy five New
York terms, the Yankees played
590 ball. Under the rest of George
Steinbrenner's managers, for those
1975-88 seasons, the percentage
was .549.
Four of the 10 enshrined at
Cooperstown as managers served
at Yankee Stadium.
Huggins, who died at 50, ar-
rived shortly before the acquisi-
tion of Babe Ruth.
Joe McCarthy, Harris and
Stengel inherited the helm of a
dynasty.
Martin, who died Christmas
Day near here in a vehicular acci-
dent, inherited only Steinbrenner.
COvynfto 1990, USA TODAYApplt Grflrj
DELTA SIGMA PHI
MThe Qreekjybu 9eed(To OQiozu
RUSH
Wed
8- 11pm
'Cookout with a
sorority
510 E. 10th St.
Thurs
8 - 11pm
Invitation only
757-0313
HAS SCHOOL AND r
PI KAPF
DY MADE YOU SICK?
ECURE
RECOVERY WE RECOMMEND THE
RTY ON OUR BRAND NEW DECK, OR
HE HOT TUB. SHOOT A FEW HOOPS
YOUR STUFF ON OUR FULL SIZE
AND VOLLEYBALL COURTS, OR JUST
ALONG THE STILL WATERS OF
LAKE PI KAPPA PHI.
YOU SHOULD BE HERE
JAN. 22 - 25
PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY HOUSE
Turn right on 14th Street. Go all the way
down 14th to Evans. Turn left and go
down to Arlington Blvd. Then turn right.
Go down Arlington to Hooker Rd. Turn
left. Pi Kappa Phi is on the left.
DRESS CASUALLY! BE YOURSELF!
a x � �-�1 HOCEF e-C'At t
.� mcoja 4 & i 1
COTAHCHt ST
t-�- H 1�' CCU.C0C HU tM
rsm �
T I mEfoss

OFFER YOU THE OPPORTUNITY TO
BROADEN YOUR SOCIAL LIFE, BUT IT
GIVES THE INDIVIDUAL A CHANCE
TO EXCEL IN COLLEGE THROUGH A
DIVERSITY OF INTERESTS, AN
EMPHASIS ON VARIOUS SCHOOL AND
COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES, THE BASIS
FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF YOUR
LEADERSHIP POTENTIAL, AND A
STRONG SUPPORTIVE ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION.
8
8
8
6
11 Jan 22
11 Jan 23
11 Jan 24
8 Jan. 25
Meet the Brothers
What's In It For You
You're Not Alone
Invitation Only
Meet With AHA
For more information or rides just
Call 756-2149
RUSH THE RESORT
RUSH IT IKE
A FINE PLACE FOR FINE GENTLEMEN.





Alpha Sigma Phi
Fraternity
AEO
THE MYSTIC CIRCLE
"More Than Just a
Circle Of Friends
SPRING
RUSH
"It's All the Brotherhood
you'll ever need"
Jan. 22 - Pizza, meet the brothers
Jan. 23 - Subs with Alpha Sig little sisters
Jan 24 - Barbeque night, meet the
Alpha Phi's
Jan. 25 - Oral bid night and post rush party
AEO
For Rides and Information : 757-3516
Located Conveniently Close
To Downtown
422 W. 5th Street





Alpha Sigma Phi
Fraternity
AEO
THE MYSTIC CIRCLE
"More Than Just a
Circle Of Friends
SPRING
RUSH
All the Brotherhood
you'll ever need"
Jan. 22 - Pizza, meet the brothers
Jan. 23 - Subs with Alpha Sig little sisters
Jan 24 - Barbeque night, meet the
Alpha Phi's
Jan. 25 - Oral bid night and post rush party
AXO
For Rides and Information : 757-3516
Located Conveniently Close
To Downtown
422 W. 5th Street





INSIDE:
President
orders Panama
invasion "to
safeguard
American
lives-
page 5
INSIDE:
Eighteen
American
soldiers, one
American
civilian killed
in invasion
page 6
The hunt is over � justice is sewed!
Cops nab notorious criminal!
B) i Hippy Bonchcad
E U lolA
I he three month scatl h lor COtl
i ted rioter President I itnmv "Spat"
( ronkite is finally ovet Cronkite
surrendered to authorities i'hursduv
after three works ol political asylum
,n the Brain Mired Mental Health
i linn ind Embassy For Exiled World
I (Mil' I �
i ronkite is being held in 1'itl
mtvl ttland tsi -i� tod to bo Iran �
� . i to tli' o) net I ibrar Stat k
until riiiouiin Honviitvl I ronkiti
iil mc-t likely scrveoul hi � .entono
m i � mall broom i li ���, un the third
ol E( II's ieneral l lassroom
building
� nnkttcdtd noli i mmenlon w In
ho i host to give htm -�!i uj idter hi
ledaulhoriticsona three mi nthi ha
hut unnamed soun � claim he wj �
running tul ol Quai ker Bi ind
( i.k klin v it Wht .it Brar i i ipe Nul
v heal V heal Ml Brai N il Bran I al
Bran Psyllium & Fibre eteal and was
becoming irregular and cranky
Unnamed sources also s ulate
thai the Greenvilteit C ouro il oi
fered him an unlimited suppl) ol his
favorite cereal and other unspet ified
,uul somewhat shad) deals, bul thru,
those unnamed sources are always
i laiming and spin uialing like there s
no tomorrow, and it they don'l gel
one more spei ulationori laim in, their
heads might usl deflate in an unap
pealing mannei
Mi, .in rend i �iim �� u �l da) s
attei his co conspiratoi and en rioter,
harli ' iel on Rcill) r. pli a bai
i� itni d hi .wa dow n In mai hai, iol
I ailure I �� I 'i �pi rsi ' tn Impi i 01
Real I .�i . iting I eleb
nt) Whili lh 11 nail) U i i elobrit)
inip i -onation isn lativet) .tillerthan
thai for failure to I �� I � asti ttion,
pnblii humiltatii�n ind Ihn mil
Joti ntion in j l'i it.i ohn r nV ite
ipparently feel that his lawyers will
be .it li to redin � thi h ti � I ;
ECU SNAPSHOTS
a look at statistics that shape our campus
We're Invading More Tiny Little Countries!
0
�o
1 0000
8000 -
0000 -
4000 -
?000 -
Year
Notorious criminal Tlmmy Cronkite:
n lutinin' who has no connection wit!
finally behind bars. (Photo b) .D.
i Il whatsoever!
tui tint probably to "I la ing rhe
. �� .� i ist Name V t Important
i e-lobntv ' I he lath r i arries a maxi
mum sentence ol I hours of ommu
mt �� i i i t i the ssch iatu n ol
Eldi rly iroen ille itizensV hoi lave
NothingBetter lo Do With fheirl ives
in.I the fon ed a quisition ol i I hi
huahua with j bad attitude
l heronkite saga began fortv
years ago, whin CBS began broad
castingfrom oh Sorry. Wrong saga
rhe I ronkite saga began three
months ago when it was revealed
th.it President "Spa�" Cronkite had
been on the El l payroll for over a
war I r Alfred IVHutler, ViceC ban
ceilorint hargeofStrippingStudcnts
ol Ever) Possible Legal Right, imme-
diate!) tired Cronkite, then denied
thai C ronkite had ever been associ-
ated with the university. He also as-
serted that troublemakers like
(. ronkite would never be associated
with tin university and that he per
sonally had yet to see a problem with
II and weren't those donating
alumni a bun. h ol swell people?
( ronkite reacted to these denials
In declaring that "I�( U has hid its
nose up it- butt for long enough I he
universit) affiliated (but in no way
supported) media are now inastateol
war with the bureau ratk hypocris)
ol the administration
pon hearing I c word
I utl r w nt into i frothing
noid fren. no! unlike the kind
George Bush expcrii �� hen hear
ing the same wi i I when Bart u
wears silk lingerie), and told hancel
br 1 lick i lurtin thai military for �
needed to be marsh tiled in order to
inv aie somew here as a show ol uni
versify strength
I lurtin then ordered the now tn
famous "Operation lust Because'
invasion ol the Mighty far part-
ment complex E I campus security,
Greenville police officers, the more
mobile and lucid members ol the
Association ol Elderly Greenville
Citizens and a tew bored farmers
invaded the Might) tit complex on
I lalloween night
Cronkite evaded capture that
night and fled to nearbv C'hocowin-
itv The lack ol donul shops in that
town prevented police from search
ing tor or extraditing Cronkite It
wasn't until Drippin' DonutsQ an-
nounced the grand opening of their
Chocowinity branch last month that
c ronkite was forced to relocate, even
tually finding refuge at Brain Mired
Cronkite's trial is not scheduled
to be heard until tomorrow, but due to
thetimc warpingsatim magicofEC l
I you the reader, can flip to
page ; and n ad the story ol the trial





2 � January 18, 1W � ECU TODAY � It's only a joke; please don't write or phone Thank you.
DEBATE
Plain TaikiV
By Alvin Newhart
ECU ToDAI tounder
l lev maybe 1 don t know much
but 1 know this Ihe Emerald City is
a great town la gotta figure, any
place the COpS are triggerhapp
donut-chompin morons whose pn
mary goal is to push around the
people who pay their salaries, is a
place you want to live
And hke. ECU. Could a school
be better? it s like my wife says
Ethel that's my wife she says,
"any college where administration
officials are willing to get up on the
witness stand u nuke sure that the
students who pa their salaries are
unfairly judged guilty, is a school
you want to go to
Or its hke this ECV roDAYgets
itsmonev from people like you, right, i
people who like, bus the newspa
per niess u re one of those scum
� , m tx d
i n d
-1 t he
v i ah ECl !s m� n,A
�� mpt : i �'� bu thepapci
wc pushed vou around and i i
prived vou ol oui rights, or il we
got upon the v itnessstand and lied
our heads off to get you convicted,
even it you were innocent, you
wouldn t buy the paper an more.
Sowecouldn tgetaway withscrew-
mg our readers. 'CU2 we'd be look
mg tor a new ton in a damn hurry.
But, see, Tne Emerald City C ops
and the EC l officials can screw you
students over and over and over,
and still keep their obs. Ain't that
great?
Jane H. Student
An opposing view
Stop the
madness
1 have to disagree in the strong
est possible terms Mth the writer
acrossthepage ECl studentshave
as much right to a free press as
anyone else, and for administration
officials to betray Cronkite was
reprehensible
(ECU I I ��� :v saddened Us report
that we found it net essary tot ut the rest
of Ms Sfwlenl s article We have ie
tided to cut if not nly for spaa nsid
�� ns butalso becaust he made i ����
rather good points
As long as we re interrupting this
article though, we may as u ell U U
a few things W g I � ��'�� �� � ' �
bribes 'or censoring all pi ��'��� �"
, ymmentary �� m .�� titth ne i � �� � -
and we'u used tht . ces$ ca -� I � ��
i kase i � � ' ��� ������" �
�� .�. ia Mitsubishi u
. . . ,� � �� � .��
lilll,
. f � ,
� i � � U I
k
n tiav.
QUDTELINES
I � ryotl
unle - � ' re more pn mg
ci nsideratiot I ike, for
example, if we don't fe� I like it
KtT r is a satirical
publication which occasional!)
bother- people who don't have
their emotii OS iufficientK under
control to take a joke ECU
Today is not recommended far
ECU administrators, Jesse
Helms and other thick skulled
racist jerks, or anyone else who
is capable of being offended in
any way whatsoever
�Vell personally, I think I ie entire area d havi been i uk I
� � �.
real 1
mmand of son
1 have an opinion on this one 1 lonesl 1 made it up myself. !t s not like
(leorge'sat all Do you hear that1 m m ov n person,completely c apableol
leading the countrj iflhaveto Right Marilyn?
! Danforth �
Vu e President of the United States of Amei �
'Decision? 1 ton'l want to make one. Wouldn't be prudent loo .Hn to
say. Opinion polls not vet in. Next question?"
� George Bush
President of the Unit States of America
Do vou feel Timmy "Spaz" Cronkite's sentence was harsh enough
. Walker 12
Cat litter maker
farrnnllt NC
o wa 1 think tar sterner meas
ures should lx taken against that
power mad strongman dictator We
should show no mercy to anyone who
subverts thedemocraticelertion proc-
ess in his own country oh, wait a
second Are we talking about Manuel
Noriega? I thought we were talking
about George Bush Sorry
A. Retentive, .
Politician
Crifton NC
Well, 1 think everyone has a good
stdeandthatcivilized societies should
trv to nurture that side ot people And
when people go astray and break the
law, they should bo placed in institu
tions and helped to find better ways
of living their lives. Even it they have
to be savagelv beaten with truncheons
to understand that your way is better.
U.Suk ,32
Farmer
Farmville, NC
1 applaud ludgeObstructa Rights
decision in theCronkitecase. She sent
a message to all who would threaten
our poor, defenseless police officers
with public exposure and accurate
reportage of their illegal activities tt
course, the message was sent by U.S.
mail, so it'll takea whiletoget there -
if it arrives at all, that is � but still
C. Peeyau -�'
CPA
Garner, NC
Absolutely not! 1 think he should
bo thrown into the canal with his teot
tied around his neck'1 think he should
be stomped on until he s mashed to a
bloodv pulp! I think the death sen-
tence is too good tor him! When will
these dangerous criminals learn that
violence and killing are not the way to
solve problems?





It's only a joke; please don't write or phone. Thank you. � ECU TODAY � January 18, 1990 � 3
Newly formed group
tries to change attitudes
Tin- Amai GAMATCD Press
Evening out racial imbalances in
the work force is a matter of great im-
portance these days, so it's not sur-
prising to see another organization
trying its hand at solving the prob-
lem. The new group, North Carolini-
ans for White Janitors, seeks to help
whites break into blue-collar, low-
prestige positions.
"Our research indicates that those
who hire people for blue-collar jobs
are prejudiced said Sue Premacist,
NCWJ's president. "They just don't
believe that whites � who, due to
better opportunity, suffer from hav-
ing more education and better train-
ing than most non-whites � are ca-
pable of doing )obs that have been
traditionally held by minorities.
Minorities take all thclow-prcs-
tige. menial )obs and make it impos-
sible for highly trained, well-quali-
fied Whites to enter the work force at
(hot level, Premacist continues. "Con-
M nit nth whites are forced to tike
gh-paving upper- evel managemer t
positions becon e partners in larg
respi i ted lav firms, that kino i :
�hi � ust not fair
� � ime,? rth arolini-
,� � � r White Janitors is not trying to
(pen uj onlv janitorial positions for
� hites
Despite the name, we're not
trying to open up onlv janitorial posi-
tions for whites explained RavCyst.
president of ECU Students tor VVhnc
janitors I the ECU branch of the larger
organization) "We want to change
employers' attitvides on a wide range
of jobs, to show them that whites can
do them, 100. We want to see more
whitesdnvinggarbage trucks, becom-
ing transient laborers, washing laun-
dry in hotels, etc
NCWJ's campaign for the '90S is
called "Give a WASP a break and
will be a large-scale effort to convince
employers that whitesarequalified to
compete with minorities. Most of the
campaign's methods are predictable
and well-tried - putting up educa-
tional posters wherever people are
most likely to ignore them, taping
public-service messages to run when
nobodv's watching the television
anywav, and generally blowing lots
of federal money on treating the
symptoms without treating the dis-
ease � but there is one fresh twist
"Two words: mental condition-
ing Premacist states proudly. "Since
whites are handicapped er, I mean,
not 'handle apped don't print that
disadvantages by their better edu-
cations, theobvious solution is to retro-
actively de-educate them. We'll be
holding huge classes in which we 11
n wl ;�'�- to forget much of what
they learned in school in an attempt
�. i qua! � the eduational levels i ;
highly educated whites with the less
well educated minorities the. 11 be
i i mpeting against
N 'a ' is a recentiv formed splin-
ter group of a national organization,
Dumb erksWho Are fotall) (Hit Of
Touch With Keahtv And Don t Have
Ahie As I'o What The Real Source
Of The Problem Is
(CJWA1CT IIWRADr 1A( ATWIKSUH11
"We didn't want lobe associated with
them anv more confides Premacist.
"They were bad for our image
ECU SNAPSHOTS
a look at statistics that shape our campus
We're Violating More international Laws!
I
1 0000
8000 -
6000 -
2 4000

2000 -
oUZ
1982
1984
1�
1986
Year
�i�
1988
1990
'Spaz' jailed!
By Chippy Bonehead
ECU Today
justice was served today, as
Judge Obstructa Rights found noto-
rious misdemeanonst Timmy
"Spaz" Cronkite guilty, guilty, guilty
of all the charges against him and
some that were levelled at Manuel
Noriega besides.
The sentence was served on
whole wheat with a mild cheese
sauce. Calling Cronkite "the most
evil criminal to walk the face of the
planet since the inventor of polyes-
ter Rights sentenced Cronkite to
twenty vears' imprisonment in a
small broomcloset on the third floor
of the General Classroom Building.
He will be forced to watch New
Kids on the Block videos for the first
ten vears and, if he is not paroled, he
will be required to recite Dadaist
poetry until the sentence is com-
pleted.
"The trial was a masterpiece of
the American legal system Sena-
tor Jesse Helms aid admiringl)
"I've been following the l ronktte
i ase from the beginning and he got
what he deserved Once a ;ain, Jesse
was right all along
( n trial for Failure lo Ignore
Problems the University fold Him
toignore,ronkite 's defense attor-
ney tried without success to prove
to thr fudge thai the "Hist Because
invasion of the Mighty Tar Apart
ment complex forced Cronkite to
get involved, especially since the
university paid Cronkite's salary.
The prosecution, stunning in its
legal efficiency, proved beyond a
shadow of a doubt that Cronkite
had never been on the ECU payroll,
that the pav check stubs the defense
presented as evidence were obvi-
ously forgeries, and if they weren't,
they certainly weren't signed by
Chancellor Dick Hurhn, and besides,
who reall y needs these radical leftist
commie-pinko journalists running
around free anyway7
Cronkite's defense attorney
thought they had a key witness in
Dr. Alfred DeButler, Vice Chancel-
lor in Charge of Stripping Students
of Every Possible Legal Right
However. DeButler's testimony
worked against them, as he told the
court, "Have 1 ever seen that person
before on campus, or at a university-
sponsored off-campus event, or has
he ever come to Student Fund Ac-
counting to pick up a paycheck? I'm
thinking no way. Uhn-uhn. Neg.
Never. Nada. Non. N-O
The prosecution only fumbled
once, but they quickly recovered. A
slight contradiction in testimony oc-
curred when arresting officer Ronald
Wurst told the court Cronkite had
been arrested, while official police
transcripts and videotapes of the jail
on the night in question showed no
sign of Cronkite.
Judge Rights quickly stepped
and saved the prosecution with the
timely comment, "Obviously, Mr.
Cronkite went back and Whited-Out
the police log and is also a vampire
and, as an undead, is not detectable
bv video cameras The jury ap-
plauded the judge's quick thinking
and promptly went back to sleep.
The defense vainlv tried to prove
Cronkite s association with ECU by
showing the court his many photo-
graphs which have appeared insuch
fine university-sponv red 'but not
support . ' liui such as ECU
- t. � � man, The
Conformist hu lp, and the
fePatch.
� lear-headed ludge Rights
immediately threw thisevidenceout
of court, declaring it inadmissabie
�nce such evidence could possibly
hurt the prosecution s otherwise air-
tight rase. This might torceus to free
this dangerous criminal and allow
him to roam the streets again, trying
10 put integrity back into the me-
dia
Cronkite's defense was sched-
uled to present a closing statement,
but it was already 11:30, and Judge
Rights had a luncheon engagement,
so she wrapped things up early. I
Cronkite was taken away to the
General Classroom Building to begin
serving his sentence.
Dr. DeButler drove off in his
new W) Porsche, a car that most
vice chancellors at state-supported
schools find hard to purchase on
their normal, unsupplemented sala-
ries. Judge Rights had an excellent
lunch, although the shrimp scampi
disagreed with her somewhat. The
media editors went back to their
frustrating existences, forced to
report only alumni-pleasing things
Are you lazy, out of shape and willing to lie under oath?
If so, we may have just the job for you! Why not try an
�2c5ttllinig Mff career as a pHci �InTlScer
right here in The Emerald City?
(Persons who respect constitutional rights need not apply)





I . Januorv 18 1990 � I CU fODAN � it sonly a joke; please don't write or phono. Ihanky-kj
SGA adds yet
another holiday
By Chippy Bonehead
ECU �dai
The 9GA started oft the 1990
semester by ratifying .1 bill that will
nuke lulv 4 a legal holiday tor stu-
dents. This follows their ratifying
previous bills that made Martin La-
ther Kinp Ir. Day, Christmas Day.
Groundhog Day, Mother's Pay,
lathers Day Grandparents' Day,
bosses 1 ty,Secretaries' I Jay and Billy
Joel's Birthday Day legal holidays for
ECU students
"Initially, there was some rests
tame to making Independence 1 ay a
legal holiday SGA president Chip
Cookie said "Afterall, it really has no
religious significance whatsoever, and
therefore the state is hard pressed to
give employees and students unnec
essarv time oft
i. ookioemphasized thattheother
holidays thc honored had religions
or moral worth or were ju -1 1 h� �p
excuse to jive everyone a hi iak fn�m
hool and th sed aininqS 1
IPs
�� ��

1 -
Bui ivl en !
ik
Christum
i thou ;h s � �
Helm I
, on mie pinko 0
felt th it holi I ivw �i o
top
pointed � '� � �
tveekafterthe ��
the �� ihzedw d
by then
ryKd � " '� ' d �v
to visit Mom, Dad ind the randpar
ents "he Bibh clearlj si
tin mother and father, and bu them
expensive i lallmark k brand cards
Cookie admits that getting school
to dose for Secretaries' Day . Bosses
Da and iroundhogDay wasabitof
a coup for him "Most students since
they are still students, don't have
secretaries Cookie said "But they
need to start lea mine, how to function
on those horrible day s your secretary
has ott Closing school services tor a
M will help them learn those valu-
able skills
"Bosses' Day waseasy enough to
slide through once we'd gotten Secre-
taries' Day through. Since we are the
bosses of the school, we tell it was
perfectly reasonable to giveourselves
1 day oft )ust lor our mere existence
he added
Speaker of the House Jesse Helms
lr. still speaks with ass kissing fond-
ness ot the day Cookie swept the
Groundhog Day resolution through
the SGA. "He was so masterful He
lust look charge ol the assembly and
told them that February was a lone,
month lull ol unnecessary Si !A meet-
ingsand sub committoemeetingsand
that to avoid bum out we lust km to
have another holiday Qooo, it was
exciting heooaed
"But us masterpiece was Billy
oel sBirthday l �a 'Helmsjr said as
he spit slimed his master's shot's
(, ookie tousled I lelms hair pl.n lullv
as the lackey re ounted the �tor
I le went in v ith demographit -
ill irl A inanlv e 1
�nine, w hv ve rv edi l
t'liK . � Birthdax iff, ' H 1 �
In kin l ookie s sole 1 lean ol
Bui he ju .1 looked it the 1 � ml l
and nd m no! to plav b thi
� . mi ' is one ; rn � �ng to hu k
md tell mi the truth
Co kte broke in here to � ei lb
�, �' 1 ier ml I think ! said 1 m
k k this tuffandbi straight
witl - less
� M' rs. ol course; 1 m sorry
Master Well he )ust looked the Ex
ecutive ouncil in the eyes and said,
i m just going to say five words. We
didn't st.irt the fire Weil, the whole
assembly just leapt up and gave him a
standing ovation. There were teat sin
everybody s eyes It was magic
1 lelms sobbed
I he new resolution goes into el
tei t this year, and new schedules will
be drawn up when the S( � reconve
nes atter its official holiday breaks,
sometime in 1992.
IIV
dei
Are you easily manipulated?
If you were the head of a government, would you be
willing to waive your country's sovereign rights and hand
over � oh, say, a canal � to the U.S. of A.?
If you answered "yes" to both questions, Uncle Sam may
have an exciting new career for you as the
president of a small, recently invaded country.
Apply in person ar �600 Pennsylvania Avenue,
Washington DC.
(Ugly, acne-scarred personages need not apply.)
06
i pas (DffosaM ; mj�
o
"Quacker� Brand
Cracklin Oat Wheat Bran
Grape Nut Wheat Wheat
Oat Bran Nut Bran Oat
Bran Psyllium & Fibre
Cereal is
Mmmm-mmmm goodV
it
t;
.
Quacker� Brand Cracklin'
Oat Wheat Bran Grape Nut
Wheat Wheat Oat Bran
Nut Bran Oat Bran
Psyllium & Fibre Cereal.
It's the breakfast of
dangerous criminals.
� Mmrun mrnmm good" l� probably a regntered trademark or lomethinj; of ampbrll �
x,up but they re cool enough to appreciate the Joke and not �ue u We hope





The last Carolinian, anuary 1H, 1990 11
Doctor
Continued from page 7
to kill his family But the appeals option to bin utilit systems
court said the evidence presented owned b developers Hut in a
tended to indicate those state split decision, the court said the
ments wore true, removing them agrecmeni tot a ,n da first op
from slander consideration hon i ontainod no time limit and
In another case the appeals could not be held in perpetuity
court ruled that a dozen Harnctt Judges Edward (Ircene and
Count) residents could not he Charles Becton ruled against the
forced to pay connection fees or town lul !lKj0. ugene Phillips
monthly bills tor sewer service dissented saying the option in the
because the count) had failed to agreement is valid
follow state laws regarding the In other divisions the court
collections
rho landou nets had claimed,
thev wore not properly notified ol
assessments tor the Buies Creek
Coats Water and Sower District
The county had contended the
connection toes wore not assess
ments as defined by state lau
and the notifications were not
needed.
Put the appeals courl said the
county could not avoid notifica
tion of the assessments by (ailing
them something else It also or
dcred the county to pay attornc)
fees tor the landowners
The appeals court also ruled
against the Village of Pinehursi
which had sought to block the sale
of the towns water and sewer
s stem to a private compam
The village once a privateh
owned resort town cited a 19 ;
agreement with the town sdevel-
opers that gave the v illage the first
N.C. State
lays off
teachers
Upheld a jury decision
which awarded Screaming Eagle
nl td.$109,000indamagesfrom
the Airport Commission ot lor
sth County !hc compan) had
sued the airport commission in
1987 after one ol their planes hit a
dog on the runway and the nose
gear collapsed I he appeals court
ruled that the jury cornx tlv ould
determine negligent e be ause the
five-mile perimeter ol the airport
is only partlv enclosed with a
chain link fence, and because air-
port employees killed an average
ol 80 to 100 dogs each year.
Ruled that the State Board
ol Registration for Professional
Engineersand LandSurveyofscan
suspend an engineer's license or
fine him 1500, but not both. The
board had suspended William E.
Bruce tor two years and tined him
$500 after he approved designs
tor two schools inaldwell and
Mecklenburg counties that were
inadequate, rheboard said Brw e's
approval showed protossion.il
incompetence and negligence. The
court uphold the board's ruling
but s.nd the board could only
impose one penalty, not two.
Upheld a lower court rul-
ing allowing the state Department
of I ransportation to recover pay-
ments to rhompson-Arthur Pav-
ing Co. tr work on two roads in
Guilfordounty As part of the
two contra ts. thedepartment had
paid the company tor "unclassi-
fied excavation" based on DOT
estimates Hut when the projects
were i mpleted,l xI re surveyed
and found less ol the excavation
had Ken done than the estimates.
I he company argued that work-
ing with sni.il lor amounts of earth
increased its cost per ubic yard.
Harrisfeeter
Fresh Pork Chop Sale
I �V ' Sr ' VxV a w-s. v . .
KAl E1GH (AP) North
Carolina State University is lay
me off dozens of instructors and
canceling numerous classes in the
wake of a budget crunch caused
bv a drop in state revenues.
The cuts are the result ol an
order bv state budget officers to
reduce the campus 1989 90
budget by 5 percent or$9pr�illion
tfcjrVICsaVtfunitfc'o'aTk 'Ji
cst day ot mv professional career
said William H I oole, dean ol the
College ol lumanities and Social
Sciences His college, the second
largest at the university has lost
$1 million of its$20million budge!
The layoffs apparently are
confined to non tenured instruc-
tors and visiting professors who
tvpicallv work on voar to year
contracts. At least six visiting
professors in the department ol
sociology anthropology and so
cia! work were told Wednesday
afternoon that their teaching loads
would be cut in halt and their
teachingdutiesdistributed among
full-time professors
Among them was C harlcs s
Warren, a doctoral candidate at
I'M hapel Hill who typically
teaches two courses ea h semes
tcr
' ITus is just going to kill edit
cation 'Warrensaid I'vealready
taught three lectures "he kids
have already Knight their books
and two weeks ol instruction is
going to be shot in the head It's
happening all over campus
"No wonder our SA1 scores
are the lowest in the nation it this
is the way we treat education in
the elite institutions 1 his isut
ting back all the way to the bone
Dale M Hoover, head ol the
department of economics and
business, said faculty members
there had been forced to drop five
or su class sections
"We're asking people who
have written contra ts to allow us
todisemplovthem looversaid
"We re doing our best not to
hurt the quality of education, but
there's no wav we can make the
changes without hurting the qua 1
ltv Thev have not literally asked
us to drop anv course and turn
students awav, but that's hard to
do. To meet the guidelines exa tly
you have almost no flexibility
N.C. State's budget rum h is
complicated bv the fact that
roughly 320 fewer out-of state
students enrolled this year than
had been expected Because those
students pav about $4 ,NX) tuition.
as compared with about $600 tor
m-state students, their absence
translates to an additional loss ot
$15 million
1.39
1.29
Sirloin Pork
Chop
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Roast
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Mixed
Pork Chops
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Center Loin
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Rib Chops
Boneless Country QQ
Style Ribs it I.S7S7
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Ribs LS�9
HT
Green Beans
Breyers
Ice Cream
White
Potatoes
Pepsi Cola,
Mountain Dew
Campbell's Chicken
Noodle Soup
43
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Green Giant
Canned Vegetables
2
14.5-
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Dinner Bell
Sliced Bacon
telSoft
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119
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 18, 1990
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 18, 1990
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.718
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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