The East Carolinian, January 16, 1990






�ij� �aHt (Earalttttan
sYn iiuj tin' �' asl 'arolina campus i ammunitii ituc �.
ol l-l t
I iif-il.n him n In lH
(irocnville. Northiirolin.i
( in illation IT,000
Ih Pages
Greek Council sponsors Rape Awareness Vigil
l' 1,1 eh hen iiitin111
' h( I .1-1 .1 ml m i.i n
i nlts pailu i pa nl � -In ii UI I'M in" i and Irs Knox said
1(1 i nnn i.a ention i Mn whuh will be lit to signify the seri Mv job i li
, Kno and Health Contel Ollsness ot this problem p .is sate a � p.
t tat. a .land i, p man .� Su.miu keliet Rape isacontinuing problem form all studoni
it rap, is a man will be .peakers at acm , the nation However, re the most open po
tinning problem Wednesday s vij ; i ordmg ti
1 t Keith Kn hatot t riv � I i uncil rep
abiMit the pii'b
!i ,lid � in
III one ol
ports of rape are not always in the the country So mo imiversitu �
media spotlight ccording to withhold campus crimi .tatistics
n(1,Ul, I will repre Knox.awarenossisnotatit'shigh Irom the public but not us knox
sent rape victim i I all potential est and most people assume that s.�id
i a i i k i i Mini il is victims
a Rape Awareness Mthough th vigil is being
women an not likely Ui be .is
-anlli.l OUS1V
iii ! lacing tlie m
ii
I Ung igil Ian 1 ' it - (1 sponsoredb
ampus mall I he pui pose all stud
to promote rape Clreenvilli
� uulnuit the i ai'fP ace ' Ittei
i . ,iilMm,il Ml females are potential rape lirststepsmpn
.mi.itions and victims at anv time and any place k"Ui
nis are niu'in
Not onl di ies Il have this prob
In l"s" Ii
ind pa I lit
H It in but mi do othei universities, reported two acquaintance i ip
one stranger rap 24 attempted
rapes and eight arrests Hut the
greatest number of rap' victims
are those that areunreported mly
10 to ir percent ol all rap's arc
� ; rted Knox said
No one knows the horrifying
li rroi unless uui are a vi dm
h Imis sutler their entire lives
leeling helpless Knox said
1 here is noad i ethat isguar
an teed, but the best - i e is to
trust vi ith , aution , trust your
11 instiru ts, K rw �. sail I
I i I c rune Prevention offi
� i , are working toward elunm.it
. ampus rap's and providing
i ounseling programs for vi tuns
Sim e last semester, the II
i rime Prevention committee has
i m pro vi l the v isibility i �n i ampus
� i tig the � hrubben pruned
i nt'H ghtmg
. � n that should be installed by

Kp � irkine with a budeet
lmpn a t-these i end 11 ions Thisalso
im ludesexpanding the blue light
emergent y phone system
"Preventing the problem is
only part of the solution Provid-
ing help anil tree lounsrhng for
v h tuns is es -4 ntial, knox said
I he prevention committee is
referring people to use the (ireen-
Vlllel risisl enter, I OUnSel
mgenter and Pitt ounty Me-
morial Hospital counseling cert
ter
Vii !ims shi tuld not blame
themselves t.r being raped, in
stead they should seek, help
through these tree counseling
programs, Knox stressed
According to s hater, rapists
have not vanished ITiey will con-
tinue to inflict harm and rap-other
�. men until ihe ire aught Yes.
: I happen I inyone lake a
stand against this invasion and
show �ui i em b parti( ipat-
ing in the igil Wi im lav night.
WZMB expands
studio facilities
l I ori Martin
MartJiiinu I ihfur
Students participate in vigil
� lenti ' I � ���"��' ; � Martin Luther King Jr vigil tor leadership and equality Photo by Garretl
Kithan-1 : I ab
� taking I �
'Ml radio stu
� I in M lei

li i lor tin studio ongi
r tivi vears ago n
rdingi R lolph Me inder as
sistant v H e i hancellor tor Uni er
� mm measunt
pproxii � ' ' square fet I
ind built inti th
new Mei lenhatl edition, which
MR w uo alter internal
Telefund raises
more than $167,000
By Mind) Mclnnis
st.itt Writei
was the fratermt that won thoSO
i pne b rai ang overi ' KH
1 ita eta . a me in 'nd plai e and
I all lei. ' ird
i u � thanks to the Sus.ii rd n itoi
nniandolherfnendsth.it ol telel I she is plea -ed
bvithl ; �' i pat ion
' '
� II II
me
mi �
constnn tion is
lhe F I M ird budg-
eted $35,00(1 for �� nstruction
whii h will provide larger studios
than those now being used in the
old part of lower Library The
studio will also tree library space
and ill ��� the radio station to
op-rate mi ire efficiently
Informal bidding was origi-
pened ii ' ecember Ap
pr" imatelvsn contractors placed
bids.u tii.it 'une however,all bids
� li I budgeted funds.
Little and Associates, an archi-
tectural turn from Charlotte, ongi
nalK designed the studio Andv
Forbis, VMH general manager;
Macon Pail. WZMB s chief engi-
neer and Alexander, revised the
plans to accomodate the budget.
ccordii ;�, ti orbis, the station
had hoped to incorporate sliding
glass doors into the design, but
these had to be deleted in order to
reduce projected onstructioncost
lu nsti ' �� ' � the stu
die was i- tpari f thu Mendenhall
project bi - aus, mat .vould have
meant mixing monev trom differ
ent sources, Alexander said The
Mendenhall edition as funded
throueji student fees and food
sen u e pi tits Media Board
will fund the radi � studio
i i � irding to Alexander, con-
strui tion willbegm within Uldays
rh stud pefullv K' fin-
ished b the end i �t the acadcemk
. ii Ma AK indi r said
a I

mil mm il
i ottice in Kawl nne
lamia .in i -dl ind i in at
�(lahi Aloha lor mo. information
New East Bank celebrates
grand opening in Mendenhall
ed School students
particpate in rotations
By Samantha Thompson
Staff Writer
B) pril Draughn
-i.ut Writer
w hit h in i i ated in the West I he
Indian I lealth Sir ii es is super
Vised K the I S Publi I lealth
( i Medical School has Services
lucting shident medical One F( 1 .indent Bill Parks
ib 'rain"ti w ith the
liunlii'
ed in the t t. r.i.im at a row
Indi Healt ervici for five Indian r servation in Montana
lb' program presentl) S1U the health can services ol
t I ! .tudents who are fred to the reservations are de
I, mg then primary i are r�ta signed in miu h the same wav as
� � �� ment-owned hos the socialized medical systems in
. �� ated close to Indian reser Furopean countries fhe medical
o i "� kuthwest and services and met! nations on these
AI asl. a Student rotations last for a reservahonsareofnochargetothe
peri ' ' me month patients
I hi rotation program is ai While Parks served his rota
itates, the majority ol See Rotations, page 2
ew Fast Bank of Greenville, E( U's first com
plete .etue on i .uiipus bank will celebrate its
n i i nt open inc. toda at Mendenhall student V enter
Although the bank officially opened Ian the
I as Monolub Kick-off celebration is schedulevl
tor 11 mk m until 1 lOp.m today WRDl FM will
broadcast live as prizes from local businesses will be
given aw a I ive $100 Easy Monevlub i h.ei king
ao ounts and five sets ol Rodney Dangerfield video
lilm libraries w ill also be givi'ii awa
New Fast bank ot (.reenville open to students
faculty ami staff, took over EC1 shanking office as
a limited sen ii e fa ilitv (The bank will provide the
samescrv i es as other banks, but they are not able to
make loans i oan applications .ire accepted at the
Mendenhall bank yet the advancement of monc)
would have to be made at the ew East Hank s
second location at the corner oft liarles Street and
Red banks Road
rhe bank does provide more banking services
than previous!) ottered at the student bank In our
I asv Monev lub account vm- ye (rcated a pai kage
designed -pe. itnalh for the needs of ECl sstudents
that combines a checking account with unlimited
, he K w nting discounts other bank services and
a tew extras' suchasfreekey loss protection, acciden-
tal death insiiram e and discounts on travel and rev
reation said President Jerry Powell of the New last
bank ol l acem ille
itei becoming a member of the Easy Money
( lu'o pat in ipants recene discounts on satotvdepisit
boxes free notary service, tree traveler's checks, an
automatic savings plan and an overdraft protection it
the apply and qualify
( hecking services are available at $4 a month.
which is a spe ial offer just for students. Powell said
Services foi bounced checks are $18 pr overdraw,
though the overdraft protection policy for qualified
applu ant is available to avoid the inconvenience
lhe new office will otter Mastercard and Visa
an ounts as well as Automatic Teller Machine! ATM
seiv ie with Relay and c irrus ionnections Phere is
no sen ii e harge tor the unlimited use of the AIM at
am lo,ation including Relay and Cirrus ATMs
Since all New last banks are located east of
Intel state 95 the bank was termed specifically to
Sec New l ast. page 2
Inside
Editorials4
Where we stand with
racism today
State and Nation 5
States require back-
ground checks for hand-
guns
Classitieds 6
Features 9
Red Hot Chili Peppers
are smoking
Sports13
Pirates lose to JMU in
double overtime





�fte iEaat (Earalttrian
Sennny the 'East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 64 No. 3
Tuesday, January 16,1990
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
16 Pago
Greek Council sponsors Rape Awareness Vigil
By Gretchen journigan
Special to The East Carolinian
"ECU needs to take a stand
and show others that rape is a
serious and continuing problem
across our nation Lt. Keith Knox
said when asked about the prob-
lem of rape.
The ECU Greek Council is
sponsoring a Rape Awareness
Candlelighting Vigil Ian. 17at 5:30
on the campus mall. The purpose
of the vigil is to promote rape
awareness throughout the Green-
ville community.
ECU Crime Prevention Offi-
cer, Lt. Knox and Health Center
representative, Suzanne Keller-
man will be speakers at
Wednesday's vigil. According to
Heidi Schafer, Greek Council rep-
resentative, the vigil will repre-
sent rape victims and all potential
victims.
Although the vigil is being
sponsored by ECU Greek Council,
all students, organizations and
Greenville residents are encour-
aged to attend and participate. All
participants should bring candles
which will be lit to signify the seri-
ousness of this problem.
Rape is a continuing problem
across the nation. However, re-
ports of rape are not always in the
media spotlight. According to
Knox, awareness is not at it's high-
est and most people assume that
women are not likely to be as-
saulted.
All females are potential rape
victims at any time and any place.
Not only does ECU have this prob-
lem but so do other universities,
Knox said.
"My job is to make this cam-
pus as safe as possible and to in-
form all students. We are one of
the most open police agencies in
the country. Some universities
withhold campus crime statistics
from the public but not us Knox
said.
Being honest, facing the seri-
ousness of the problem are the
first stepsin preventing rape, Knox
said.
In 1989, ECU campus police
reported two acquaintance rapes,
one stranger rape, 24 attempted
rapes and eight arrests. But the
greatest number of rape victims
are those that areunreported. Only
10 to 15 percent of all rapes are
reported, Knox said.
"No one knows the horrifying
terror unless you are a victim.
Victims suffer their entire lives
feeling helpless Knox said.
There is no advice that isguar-
anteed, but the best advice is to
trust with caution and trust your
own instincts, Knox said.
ECU Crime Prevention offi-
cers are working toward eliminat-
ing campus rapes and providing
counseling programs for victims.
Since last semester, the ECU
Crime Prevention committee has
improved the visibility on campus
bv having the shrubbery pruned
and proposing a new lighting
system that should be installed by
next fall.
Knox is working with a budget
of approximately $578,000 to
improve these conditions. Thisalso
includes expanding the blue light
emergency phone system.
"Preventing the problem is
only part of the solution. Provid-
ing help and free counseling for
victims is essential Knox said.
The prevention committee is
referring people to use the Green-
ville Crisis Center, ECU Counsel-
ing Center and Pitt County Me-
morial Hospital counseling cen-
ter.
"Victims should not blame
themselves for being raped, in-
stead they should seek help
through these free counseling
programs Knox stressed.
According to Schafer, rapists
have not vanished. They will con-
tinue to inflict harm and rapeother
women until they are caught. Yes,
it could happen to anyone. Take a
stand against this invasion and
show your concern by participat-
ing in the vigil Wednesday night,
stressed Schafer.
WZMB expands
studio facilities
By Lori Martin
Managing Editor
Students participate in vigil
Students show their concern by participating in last nights Martin Luther King Ji
Killian- ECU Photo Lab)
ECU will begin taking bids
today for a new WZMB radio stu-
dio to be constructed in Menden-
hall Student Center this Spring.
The idea for the studio origi-
nated four or five years ago, ac-
cording to RudolpH Alexander,as-
sistant vice chancellor tor Univer-
sity Unions. A room measuring
approximately 1000 square feet
was designed and built into the
new Mendcnhall edition, which
M 1 WZMB will occupy after internal
Telefund raises
more than $167,000
By Mindy Mclnnis
Staff Writer
ECU'S 9th Annual Fall Tele-
fund was a success thanks to the
3,000alumni and other friends that
contributed donations totaling
more than $167,000. These dona-
tions are to be used for scholar-
ships, excellence awards, forums,
alumni and campusbeautification.
Ovef 300 student volunteers
from different campus organiza-
tions participated in the fund drive.
Mondays through Thursdays,
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m volunteers
contacted past and potential do-
nors.
The telefund awarded cash
prizes to the following top three
callers: 1st place , jay Haverty -
$ 150; 2 nd place, Terri Storms - $100;
3rd place Hunter Clark - $50.
The Interfraternity Council
and Panhellenic donated $50 to
the telefund and declared a "Greek
Challenge Lambda Chi Alpha
was the fraternity that won the $50
cash prize by raising over $19,000.
Delta Zeta came in 2nd place and
Chi Omega came in third.
Susanna Hudson,coordinator
of the telefund, said she is pleased
with the enthusiastic participation
toward the lelcfund. She especially
wanted to acknowledge the out-
standing participation from the
ECU Surf Team.
Hudson said the spring tele-
fund, which is scheduled to kick-
off in early February, will help the
fund drive reach its goal that was
set at $200,000. She added that
there will be more incentive in the
spring telefund since the students
will be getting paid to make calls.
Cindy Callaway will be in
charge of coordinating the spring
telefund. If anyone is interested in
working, go by the Telemarketing
office in Raw! Annex, room 205 or
call Cindy Callaway at 757-4215
for more information.
Med School students
particpate in rotations
This new Automatic Teller Machine is one of the new services offered by New East Bank. (Photo by
J.D. Whitmire-ECU Photo Lab)
New East Bank celebrates
grand opening in Mendenhall
construction is complete.
The ECU Media Board budg-
eted $35,000 for the construction
which will provide larger studios
than those now being used in the
old part of Joyner Library. The
studio will also free library space
and allow the radio station to
operate more efficiently.
Informal bidding was origi-
nally opened jn December. Ap-
proximately contractors placed
bids at that time; however, all bids
exceeded budgeted funds.
Littleand Associates, an archi-
tectural firm from Charlotte,origi-
nally designed the studio. Andy
Forbis, WZMB general manager;
Macon Dail, WZMB's chief engi-
neer and Alexander, revised the
plans to accomodate the budget.
According to Forbis, the station
had hoped to incorporate sliding
glass doors into the design, but
these had to be deleted in order to
reduce projected construction cost.
The construction for the stu-
dio was not part of the Mendenhall
project because "that would have
meant mixing money from differ-
ent sources Alexander said. The
Mendenhall edition was funded
through student fees and food
service profits. The Media Board
will fund the radio studio.
According to Alexander, con-
struction will begin within 30days.
"The studio will hopefully be fin-
ished by the end of the acadcemic
year (May) Alexander said.
By Samantha Thompson
Staff Writer
By April Draughn
Staff Writer
The ECU Medical School has
been conducting student medical
rotations in collaboration with the
Indian Health Services for five
years. The program presently
consists of 12 students who are
satisfying their primary care rota-
tions in government-owned hos-
pitals located close to Indian reser-
vations of the Southwest and
Alaska. Student rotations last for a
period of one month.
This rotation program is ac-
tive in 32 states, the majority of
which are located in the West. The
Indian Health Services is super-
vised by the U.S. Public Health
Services.
One ECU student, Bill Parks,
involved in the program at a Crow
Indian reservation in Montana,
said the health care services of-
fered to the reservations are de-
signed in much the same way as
the socialized medical systems in
European countries. The medical
services and medications on these
reservations are of no charge to the
patients.
While Parks served his rota-
See Rotations, page 2
New East Bank of Greenville, ECU's first com-
plete service, on-campus bank, will celebrate it's
recent opening today at Mendenhall Student Center.
Although the bank officially opened Jan. 5, the
Easy Money Club Kick-off celebration is scheduled
for 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. today. WRDU-FM will
broadcast live, as prizes from local businesses will be
given away. Five $100 Easy Money Club checking
accounts and five sets of Rodney Dangerfield video
film libraries will also be given away.
New East Bank of Greenville, open to students,
faculty and staff, took over ECU's banking office as
a limited service facility. The bank will provide the
same services as other banks, but they are not able to
make loans. Loan applications are accepted at the
Mendenhall bank, yet the advancement of money
would have to be made at the New East Bank's
second location at the comer of Charles Street and
Red Banks Road.
The bank does provide more banking services
than previously offered at the student bank. "In our
Easy Money Club account we've created a package
designed specifically for the needs of ECU's students
that combines a checking account with unlimited
check writing, discounts on other bank services and
a few 'extras' such as free key loss protection, acciden-
tal death insurance and discounts on travel and rec-
reation said President Jerry Powell of the New East
Bank of Greenville.
After becoming a membeT of the Easy Money
Club, participants receive discounts on safety deposit
boxes, free notary service, free traveler's checks, an
automatic savings plan and an overdraft protection if
they apply and qualify.
Checking services are available at $4 a month,
which is a special offer just for students, Powell said.
Services for bounced checks are $18 per overdraw,
though the overdraft protection policy for qualified
applicants is available to avoid the inconvenience.
The new office will offer Mastercard and Visa
accounts, as well as Automatic Teller Machine(ATM)
service with Relay and Cirrus connections. There it
no service charge for the unlimited use of the ATM at
any location, including Relay and Cirrus ATMs.
Since all New East Banks are located east of
Interstate 95, the bank was formed specifically to
See New East page!
Inside
Editorials4
Where we stand with
racism today
State and Nation5
States require back-
ground checks for hand-
guns
Classifieds6
Features9
Red Hot Chili Peppers
are smoking
Sports13
Pirates lose to JMU in
double overtime






2 The East Carolinian January 16, 1990
ECU Briefs
Fraternity holds ritual ceremony
On Thursday, January W beginning at hik) p.m the brothers of
Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity will be holding a ritual ceremony on
campus This ceremony, known as the Black Lantern Processional, is
enacted In memory of deceased brothers who have passed into the
Omega chapter, signifying that, although they are no longer with us,
their spirit remains forever in the minds of the brothers.
This solemn march across the EC 11 campus will originate from the
Mendenhall Student Center. The processional calls for the brothers of
Alpha Sigma Phi to be dressed in black robes with the leader wearing
a white rolxv The members will also be carrying lanterns. The Black
lantern Processional is one of the oldest traditions of our fraternity
dating back to Yale University in the mid-1800s. This fraternity wishes
to stress to the student body that this ritual has no racial overtones. It
should not be interpreted as any type of supremacist act. The brothers
of Alpha Sigma Phi request that those observing the act please show
respect to the solemnity of this ceremony.
Med School dean resigns post
Paul K. Mehne, a veteran administrator at the ECU School of
Medicine, has resigned his post as associate dean of student affairs,
curriculum and informatics to join the medical school at the University
of Pennsylvania.
He will be associate dean of student affairs at Pennsylvania with
responsibility for a student body of W7 1 ie will also coordinate curricu-
lum development and the application of computers to education and
medical research at the school.
In July 1qK1, he was named ECU assistant dean for curriculum and
student affairs and seven years later in 1988, he was promoted to
associate dean.
The position has been restructured with responsibilities to be
divided into three new positions: assistant dean of student affairs,
assistant dean of informatics and associate dean of curriculum.
National Campus Clips
Ministries ask students to give up
meals during last Observance Days
The 1 rake I IniversJtyampus Ministries designated two days in
December as Fas! Observance Days to help relieve hunger around the
world
Students m Des Monies, Iowa with university meal contracts were
asked to give up at least one meal during the two days. Students could
have as many as two meals a day under the contract.
The $1,900 saved on declined meals was donated to four hunger
projects two local projects, one project that will send funds to Africa,
Asia. Latin America and the Caribbean and one that will aid the San
1 ransisco earthquake victims.
Fraternities look for black members
Art gallery features
three exhibitions
By Katherine Anderson
Staff Wriler
beginning today, ECU'S
Wellington B. Cray Art Gallery
features three different exhibi-
tions.
The ceramic artworks of
leanee Redmond, the paintings of
Cham Hendon and a showcase
titled "Fiber: FabricationRevela-
tion" by four nationally recog-
nized women.
Karen 1 Churchill, gallery-
director, describes Redmond's
wall pieces as, "brightly colored
and highly patterned Churchill
also stated, "She (Redmond) cre-
ates vessel-oriented environ-
mental settings that suggest a life-
like, gestural presence
Cham Hendon's work has
been inspired by paint by -num-
ber kits, calendar doggies, and post
cards of deluxe motel rooms.
( hun hill said, "hispaintingsplay
with bad taste "
This is 1 tendon's third exhibi-
tion at Gray Gallery, and his paint-
ings recently appeared in the New
Museum of Contemporary Art.
both Redmond and Hendon
are visiting artists this spring in
the ECU School of Art.
Mary Hero, Faith Ringgold,
I ilian Tyrrell and Shan Urquhart
are the women responsible for
"Fiber: FabricationRevelation
The exhibit, funded by a grant
trom the North Carolina Arts
( ouncil and the National F.ndow-
ment for the Arts in Washington,
D.C. opened at the University of
Iowa last fail,
Bero creates embroidered self
portraits which Churchill says,
"portray the individual as having
universal personality traits, atti-
tudes, and emotions
See Art, page, 3
presents
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
The
WZMB
progressive dance night
Ladies FREE
r
$1.00 Tall Boys
Sl.OOKainaka.ee
$2.50 Pitchers
(Try the All New Squeeze Teas!)
3ttje (Bast Carolinian
Business student receives
annual scholarship
ECU N(
Mm can
In an ettort to combat racism, predominantly white fraternities at
the University of Missouri Columbia plan to actively seek minorities
for membership.
"We've started a big education program IFC president eff Car
rett said.
With fall rush coming up, we're going to have a big push for our
membership to diversify and we're going to try to recruit minority
students
In its push for diversity, the university's Interfraternity Council
will advertise in newspapers and visit minority schools and organiza-
tions, such as the Black Business Association.
The action was sparked by a National Interfraternity Conference
advertisement that read: "Racism has no place in the fraternity expert
ence" The ad also promotes racial diversity and education on racism in
houses.
But one black member of a predominantly white house said he
doesn't think the campus campaign will work.
"It's a good step Mike lackson said, "but the tradition is so strong
in our fraternities that don't think it'll make a big difference, especially
pynfM 1WI USA IHP-O
'�rv i. oifavf fujlniinfdpi Nttwoit
Tara L Williams, a senior ai
East Carolina I lniverstty,hasbeen
chosen as tin- 1989 recipient tl
lirst American Savings Bank's
annual School ol Business schol-
arship.
Williams is studying business
with a concentration in ontropre-
neurship to receive the BSBA
degree in May 1990. She is trom
Conwav, North Carolina.
"It is an honor for me to re-
ceive the lirst American Savings
Hank scholarship available to
business students said Williams.
Don Barnes, area execu11 ve tor
lirst American, said, Tara was
an outstanding candidate tor the
First American scholarship. I thank
all of the students who applied tor
New East
the scholarship and wish them
�- ell in i ontinuing their education
:t East Carolina
The $400 scholarship is ad-
ministered and recipients an1 se-
lected by the E !1 School of Busi-
ness Students interested in ap-
plying lor next year's scholarship
should contact the dean's office at
the School of Business.
First American's Greenville
office is at 100 East Arlington Blvd.
Based in Greensboro, the bank
operates J3 other community
banking centers across North
i arolina. 1 irst American otters its
i ustomers a wide range ot com-
petitive financial services, includ-
ing checking accounts, money
market deposit accounts, IRAs,
tax-deferred annuities, securities,
and consumer loans.

Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
Phillip V.Cope
kelle O'Connor
Patrick Williams
Advert is i tig Representatives
(iin Harvej
Sh;i Sttlinger
Adam 1. Biankenship
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National RateS5.75
Open Rate$4.95
local Open Rate$4.75
Bulk cv Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Business Flours:
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10:06 - 5:00 pm
Phone:
757-636n
� .�� iii.if.Mvihsi . � � ���
;v

Crime Report
Public Safety uncovers
illegal drug possessions
JANUARYS
214S- Officer responds to Aycock Dorm in reference to a reported drug
violation.
0721 Officer cheeked on alarm at Student Health, cause unknown.
JANUARY r
0827- Officers responded to alarm at New Hast Bank. Alarm was due to
equipment malfunction.
0048- Officer checked out a report of drugs at Aycock Dorm. Two white
males were written campus citations for possesion of drug paraphan
eha and underage possession and consumption of alcohol.
JANUARY 10
142 Officer checked out to take a hit-and-run vehicle report
1HIX) Officer responded to White Dorm in reference to the larceny of a
pocketbook.
JANUARY 11
2234- Officer responded to area of Harrington field in reference to a
report from the Greenville Police Department of shots fired.
0317- Officers checked out in area ot Belk Dorm in reference to a large
disturbanceriot. Crowd dispersed on arrival of officers.
JANUARY 12
1109- Officers checked out a bookstore in reference to a larceny of
newspapers.
1432- Officer checked out at Flanagan Building in reference to a larceny
of a monitor.
JANUARY 13
0036- Officer issued a campus citation to intoxicated student for urinat
ing in public at 5th and Reade Streets.
JANUARY 14
0211 - Officer checked out in Garrctt Dorm in reference to arresting two
students. One female student was arrested after being warned not to
enter a male dorm, charged with first degree trespassing. One male
student was arrested after being warned not to allow a female in the
dorm, charged with aiding and abetting and first degTce trespassing.
JANUARY 15
0720- Studentemployee admitted into radio station at WZMB. Radio
station was advised that they needed to issue some type of identifica
tion for their employees.
Continued from page 1
serve eastern North Carolina and
promote it's economic develop-
ment "Wehope mat students from
C.oldsboro and Fayetteville will
look for New East while at home,
and with New East Banks open
ing throughout eastern North
Carolina, ECU students can easily
continue banking with New Fast
after graduating said Kaye
Raper, vice president for products
and services development for New
Fast Bancorp. Eventually. New
East Banks will open in New Bern
and Wilmington, Powell said.
The bank's intention is to
provide financial counseling tor
students while they are in school
and after graduation, Powell said.
Asan ECU graduate, Powell wants
the bank to establish a special rela-
tionship with both the students
and the university.
Guide,
Rotations
Continued from page 1
tion he noticed that most cases at
the hospitals dealt with teen age
pregnancy,diabetes, cirrhosis and
shigellia, a type of diarrhea. Stu-
dents presently involved include
Ed Rampersaud who is now at a
reservation in Yuma, Arizona and
Rick Bare, presently at 1HS in
Bethel, Alaska.
According to the ECU News
Bureau, Rampersaud said, "re-
membering instances in my life
where medical care was not really
readily available, 1 somewhat feel
compelled to share what I have
attained with those who are living
in a situation I have experienced
firsthand
Rotations will also be served
in reservations in New Mexico and
Wyoming. According to the ECU
News Bureau, Dr. Paul Mehne,
the associate dean of student af-
fairs at the ECU Medical School,
said "the students' decision to
participate in the program reflect
our mission to prepare doctors to
work in medically undcrserved
areas and their commitment to
work in those areas "
Alpha Phi Omega931-7036
Aquarium Design 830-0372
BACCHUS757-6793
Bogies752-4668
Carolina Pregnancy Center757-0003
Chicos757-1666
Coastal Fitness756-1592
David's Automotive830-177S
Fosdick's756-7011
Garris Evans752-2106
Greenville Utilities752-7166
Hair Loft355-5980
IBM830-3507
IFC757-4706
IXG�355-5075
International Student Exchange757-6418
Josten's841-8500
Kappa Alpha757-0128
Kroger756-7031
Mendenhall757-4700
Mererith CollegeL829-8353
New East Bank821-1085
On Campus1-800-932-0528
Pi Kappa Alpha830-1256
Pi Kappa Phi756-2149
Rack Room355-2519
Raleigh Women's Health832-0535
Research Information1-800-351-0222
Student Union757-4715
Summeiiield Apts355-6187 or 756-8060
Tracks756-7118
Triangle Women's Health1-800-433-2930





1
'
Medical School joins natioi
only medical honor society
The East Carolinian January 16,1990 3
t:CL' News Bureau
The East Carolina University
School of Medicine has been ac-
cepted as an affiliate institution of
Alpha Omega Alpha, the nation's
only medical honor society.
Comparable to the Phi Beta
Kappa honor society at the bacca-
laureate level, AOA was organ-
ized in 1902 to foster academic
integrity, professional responsibil-
ity and individual achievement in
medicine It has chapters at every
medical school in the country.
The current national president
of AOA will visit ECU later this
semester for the installation ot
members in the new chapter, to be
known at "Delta of North Caro-
lina
"Our affiliation with Alpha
Omega Alpha will provide man)
of our students with important
additional recognition for their
achievements said Dr. lames A.
Hallock. dean ot the medical
school. "We consider it a distinct
honor to be associated with such
an eminent organization
Hallock and a committee of
six ECU faculty who hold mem-
bership in AOA petitioned the
organization for a new charter at
ECU last year. The effort has been
coordinated by Dr. lames I
Mathis, chairman and professor of
psychiatric medicine and an AOA
member.
Representatives (if the society
conducted a site visit at ECU last
tail, inspecting classroom and li-
brarv facilities and interviewing
the petitioners and members of
the student body.
Members of AOA can be
elected as medical students, gradu
a tes or faculty of an.if tiliated insti-
tution by the individual chapters,
which are student-run. Chapters
elect medical students from the
third and fourth-year classes, with
membership from any given class
not to exceed one-sixth the num-
ber expected to graduate.
Unlike some honor societies,
AOA does not base membership
on scholastic achievement alone;
integrity, capacity tor leadership,
compassion, and fairness in deal-
ing with one's colleagues are con-
sidered to be equally important.
New chapters are also allowed
to induct graduates retroactively
for up to five years.
Mathis said the benefits of
AOA include prestige that accom-
panies a physician throughout his
ot her career, a source oi valuable
contacts and other tangible and
intangible advantages. All stu-
dents profit from the scholarly
programs that the organizations
sponsors, he added.
Membership serves as an
entreeintoanyresidcnc) ogram
in the country said Math's. " It
doesn't guarantee you .i position,
but it does guarantee thiil I ev will
take a look at you
AOA was founded by a medi-
cal student at the University of
Illinois College of Medicine in an
era when medical education was
largely unregulated and of dubi-
ous quality. Indeed, the founder
viewed the society as a protest
against "a condition which associ-
ated the name medical student
with rowdyism, boorishness,
immorality, and low educational
ideals
IT'S STILL NOT TOO LATE FOR NEXT FALL SEMESTER
TO STUDY ABROAD!
i Wall's ! i Igiui
( .in Rrpul . ' e
IV. 1 . .i
rv I :
i'jisivc? f'i be
. iagc? Or uould
Does a year of study in England '� ll
Mexico, Costa Rica. Argentina lumbia
Ncathcriands. Finland Sweden Mall . i
or Hong Kon Interest you?
Sounds fantasuci ist stud) abr ad is
impossible bc ause oi la k of fluent-) in .
result in delaying graduation?
The truth of the matter is that nstttuti ns rfei
English: OI com � ��. you do ifficici
the t he nee of study sites ts even gi aterl
fhe cost? The iust of attending each partM iiing ins
INTERNATIONAL STUDEN EX HANOI � AM '
same as attending ECU. ind
taken abroad transfci back lo tO and ca 'a
is indeed true th.it. through ISI
V RLO are ava lal le at E ;
If you wish additional infoniial iboul . the
universities thai form the ISEP ; I�'� irk, pleas i ntael
IMMEDIATELY:
Dr. R. J. Hursey, Jr. ISEP Coordinator
Office: 222 Austin Phone: Office 757-6418
Home 756-0682
in
mguage
:n the
. c isely the
he i out sc
legrec ll
in the
Teachers conference gives forum for ideas
" . . r- ParnlinaUniversitV.alleducat
E U News Bureau
Future Direction ot Language
Instruction will be the theme tor
the annual Mary LoisStaton Read-
ing-Language Arts Conference
Fob. 1-2 at East Carolina Univer
sit)
Or. Patrick Shannon profes
sor of education at the University
ot Minnesota-Duluth, a noted
author and researcher in the field
ot literacy, will bo the speaker at
two general sessions ot the center
once.
A session tor parents and
graduate students will be hold at
Wahl-Coates School on Thursday
evening with Shannon addressing
the audience on "From Parent to
Parent At the same session, Bar-
bara Johnson, a teacher at Winter-
green Elementary School inGreen-
ville, will present Grade two pu-
pils in a presentation "Spotlight
(ii Children's Literature.
1 he purpose ot the conference,
named in honor of an EC L Profes-
sor-emeritus of education, is to
provide a forum for ideas, issues.
trends and strategies in the teach-
ing of reading and Middle C.rades
Education, School ot Education,
Fast Carolina University.
The annual Mary LoisStaton
Art
Reading -language Arts Confer-
ence has become one ot the best-
known and most popular of such
events featuring topics of appeal
to the concerns and interests of
teachers at all levels and to admin-
istrators and readinglanguage
arts supen isors.
Shannon's general session
address I ridav at l� a.m. in I len-
drix rheatre will be The Future:
Teachers and Students in control
Concurrent sessions also are
scheduled tor the conference with
Dr. Patricia c unnigham ot Wake
Forest University, Dr. James Cun-
nigham ot UNC-Chapel Hill and
Dr. Lester Laminack ot Western
Continued from page
Carolina University, all education
professors, as speakers. Dr. Mary
Lois Staton of Fast Carolina Uni-
versity will address theconference
after the morning concurrent ses-
sions.
Information on the conference
and registration requirements ma v
be obtained at the School ot Edu
cation, East Carolina University,
Tel. (919)757-6833.
Faith Ringgold creates story
quilts that pertain to people, fig-
ures, and events which have influ-
enced her. Ringgold ha& been
honored with nunrousawards
�4�r her work.
According to Churchill. "Her
(Ringgold) quiltscommunicate the
power of the individual to change
as well as to transcend "
Influenced bv disasters,
Terrell's tapestries weave terror-
ists, klansmen. and horrifying
plane crashes into blankets. Tyrrell
contract. nakH-dist1 -imd
impHed security Wankers give.
Urquhart chooses to create
tapestrv expressing the various
struggles of being a women. Her
work resembles comic book illus-
trations giving humor to real prob-
lems.
1 ectures and slides will be
presented bv leanee Redmond on
Ian. 22. Cham I lendon on Jan. 29,
and Shan Urquhart on Feb. 5. All
iecnires will be held in Jenkins
Auditorium, beginningat 7:30p.m.
and are free and open to the pub-
lic. A reception will follow each
lecture at 8:30 p.m. in Gray Art
Gallery.
If you've heard
something you think
would make a good
news, features or
sports story.let us
know!
Call 7S7-6366. or
stop by our office
across Trom Joyner
Library - ' �
Late Night
Specials
12
Pizza Grande '
Nacho Grande Price
Sun - Thurs after 10pm
Fri - Sat after 11pm
ike taste of oU ffiiSdfi�
757-1666
mervdith
college
Interested
in a Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
Meredith College
'GSZldT
SkSa
� A certificate program open to qualified women
who have a baccalaureate degree
� Approved bv the American Bar Association
� Intensive summer schedule May - August,
or part-time evening schedule September - August
Our placement service tor graduates is without tee to
employer or graduate.
Applications Deadline for the WO Summer Program March 15, 1' FordeUifa
contact I egal Assistants Program, Continuing 1 dotation Mereditholfc ge,
SHOO 1 lillsborough Street. Rah igh, M 27607 5298(919) 829 8 15 I
I 11 I I I
I AN
!�)�
).
I, , Vly. I () � t lllll S.
III i.jli, S, � �( )i l II II
��� lit ;f �.
� in i.i' ' liandiai
Indents without regard to race, creed mti Hal i
if jn
GUC Warns Heating Customers:
Prepare for Highest Bills Ever!
" me wood4 "irC1?0
K,n9ll �ment. � m frc0?' Wj fee ��
mvivlI' �Vf ,oqo Hmtk
It.1 tif intu the past'
Start offour 9eu' ftOf
cht 'By 'I tsi'um llsl
'Buii � Sett � 'Trade
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown
There's plenty of FREE
parking at our re;ir
entrance off of
, Cotanche ,��
�:�-� '�'��:wi 750 J g
While we all enjoyed the K-auty of a
white Christmas, none of us will enjo paving
for it. The cold weather that produced and
preserved the snow unfortunately has caused
some of the highest utility bills our heating cus-
tomers have ever seen seen.
Usually our coldest month is January, but
this year the cold weather came early - and
stayed for a long time. It was the coldest
December since wc began keeping records 16
years ago. There were 24 days when the tem-
perature dipped below freezing and six days
when it never went above freezing. For a
simple comparison, December was 149rr colder
than November.
Since the extended period of bone-chilling
cold occuired during the Christmas holiday, many
people did more cooking and entertaining than
usual. And compan ova the holidays put an in-
creased burden on water heaters.
U is impossible to predict how high your
utility bill w ill be. but because of the combintion of
low temperatures, high winds, and holidax enter-
taining chances are it w. ill be much higher than
usual.
We hope that the w armer temperatures w e' ve
experienced so far m Januan w ill continue, and
that the cold winter chill is behind us.
IS:
Greenville
Utilities

L" r. ?
�"����"� i
a
-M-f"��, V
jiDonilricn
WhenBigAl
took his first step,
Iknewthe Air Force hac
been my best step �
"Big Al was bom at 26 weeks' gestation, a one-and-a-half-pound premature
mite whose any frame reflected his small chance of survival. But today, he's a
two-vear-oki rascal.
"Many nursing professionals are simply not aware of the advanced Air Force en-
vironment. Thev don't know about a place where wu can learn and grow . . where you
can move up quickly. My best career step was the U.S. Air Force, where a big future
was born � abng with some very small wonders
1
The Air
goals,
Air
Force is seeking more clinical nurses � whatever your career
you'll find you can meet them in the Air Force. Discover the
Force opportunity. Call
TSGT DAVK LEONARD
919-483-7856�Stalion-To-Slalion Coiled





�ire itast utaraltman Bushgate:
i Avin I It
1 VI jnix-r
1 1 !l MAK1IN 'i
I i I Nh Ki i . Hrei tor i�j MrcrfisiKg
It's worse than you think
� � �
Si IANNON Bl)CKl.E
Adam Corni 1.111s 1 1
Carch ini Gusk k, J il
OHN TUCKER, 4ssi I eafi
Mk hah Martin, �'
Joseph I Jenkins 1: 1
Carrie Ajrmstw 1
Scott Maxwh 1,
I lie I-ast Carolinian has l nsei in
formation most iliici ily affecting I
Carolinian reserves the right 601
creed or national origin I he last (
and htevit) .The East Carolinian
Carolinian. Publications Bldg.
I �;� Phonc; I UONG, Credit Manager
1 � SrUARI ROSNER, Business Manager
�, I iUti � 1MI V ! His, Ad Tech Supervisor
1 MATTHEW RiCHTER, Circulation Manager
�� � FRAO WEED, Production Manager
��� Steve Reid, Staff illustrator
MlCHAEL CARNES, Darkroom Technician
BETH LuPTON, Secretary
Eastt an 1 ma campus lommuiiiiy since 1925, with primary emphasis on m-
l I ludcnts. It is published twice weekly, with a circulation of 12,000. The East
. , , discontinue an) adv rtisentcnls that discriminate on ihc basis ol age, sex,
,u linianwcU ixncs letters expressing all points of view. For purposes of decency
scrvi . the right to edit any letter for publication. Loiters should be sent to The Easl
i Greenville, NC, 27834; or call us at (919) 757-6366.
By Nathaniel Mead
Editorial Columnist
The coming months�and this
one in particular�promise to
bring George Bush much excite-
ment. John Poindexter goes to trial
this week, again for Irangate, and
will say that Reagan knew about
thearms-for-hostagesexchangeall league politics has never been in
along. This attempt to scapegoat short supply. In 1980, according to
reditary! of thearms-for-hostagesdeal.But
Thcoilconnectionaccountsfor anyone who has read Men of Zeal
Bush's taciturn bias toward fossil (an in-depth account of Irangate
fuels and his behind-the-scenes by the bipartisan team of sena-
role as a leading scion�alongwith tors, William Cohen and George
RichardNixon�of the Rockefeller Mitchell) or The Iran Contra Con-
establishment and Trilateral Com- nection (by members of
mission. It also explains, in part, Washington's International Cen-
why monetary support for Bush- ter for Development Policy) will
see strong evidence that Bush
o
�'l
PINION
lurstiay January 16, 1990
Still striving for racial equality
Yesterdav was rtfPttfflhday of Dr Martin
Luther King r.
Last year, the United States government
froze his memori in time along with
Washington'sand 1 ineoln - � hen theVsel asidi
a da) to commemorate I r King's work and his
dream, What's more theda bet jme a national
holiday.
Some don'I support the hoiidi Somethink
that in his fighl tor the hi i - ing ! I
sock equality for everyone
Whether you are for or igair he holiday
it nevertheless makes von think. U here � ;actl
are we in our ability to relate to eui h other? How
much closer art" we to that common denomina
tor w huh maki s .ill peopli ti,
liv nature w i �rt prone to i il
those most like ourselves ind in the proo s
isolate those who are different � aii e ol
this n.it
th
msi
passive, and many of those who commit it
aren't aware King's dream called on people to
recognize their nature and try to change it.
But is the dream fulfilled (doesn't everyone
asked that question)1 Take a look around cam
pus Or where you work. Take a look in student
go el mm nt, where everyone is supposed to be
represented While the law says that everyone
is equal, there's still an imaginary line separat-
ing us all.
While racial issues haven't surfaced in the
campus rows much this past semester, they
ertainly haven't disappeared. They've just
become overshadowed by other news. Racial
problems are a symptom of our own segrega
lion from each other. Until we broaden our
minds to understand how and why we separate
ourselves from each other, we will never be-
-i ��� united
Reagan could draw the heat off
Bush, who appears to have been
more deeply involved in the scan-
dal than he admits. However,since
Poindexter's new line fully contra-
dicts what he, Secord and North
told Iran-Contra investigators last
year, this month's revised testi-
mony could renew suspicions
about Bush's role as well.
In the meantime, Manuel
Noriega, Bush's long-time buddv
from the CIA days, stands trial in
Miami for selling drugs. Many
observers suspect that Bush's for-
merly cozy ties with Noriega could
well have involved some lucra-
tive form of corruption, like drug
smuggling. If Noriega spills the
beans on Bush, the president's
image could be severely tarnished,
and his so-called war on drugs
will seem absurdly hypocritical. It
could also put vet more heat on
Bush since Noriega is linked with
the Iran-Contra arms scandal as
well.
Bevond his uncanny public
image, what can we sav about
Newsiveek, the Rockefellers funded
Bush's presidential effort to the
maximum legal ceiling; other hefty
contributions came from his bud-
dies in the CIA and fellow Yale
Skull & Bones (fraternity) alumni
with notesof encouragement writ-
ten in their secret code. Bush's
funding for the 1988 campaign sur-
passed Dukakis by fourfold. Some
cartoonists depicted him as "Little
George Fauntleroy "
knowingly supported the ex-
change, documents show he was
briefed at least three timeson this
particular aspect of the plan
The list of potential scandals
extends to China as well. Orville
Schell, an authority on China's
reform movement in the '80s, has
written extensively on why Bush
failed the freedom-loving heroes
of Tiananmen Square. Schell says
the Bush administration is blinded
by the strong influence of US. big
Bush appears to have had a business interests in China,
role in Watergate. According to George's own brother, Prescott
the Boston Phoenix (Oct. 7, 1988), Bush,madea multimillion-dollar
Richard Nixon was George Bush's deal for construction of a hotel
political godfather After Bush lost and golf course in Shanghai
the 1970 race for senator of Texas, shortly before the massacre oc-
Nixon made him ambassador to
the United Nations and then ap-
pointed him chairman of the Re-
publican National Committee
With Watergate looming on the
horizon, and the Republican partv
faced with the possibility of heavy
political abasement, Bush launched
a counteract on Senate Watergate
investigator Carmine Belhno on
trumped-up charges of wiretap
George Bush as a man and leader? ping. This ploy helped delay the
fti iai Pm vts
� m � �
A60
0 ' 4i
M.
Letters
Both theories are compatible
lei �
op
Col
prii
jet I
i i the editor
I his seme t
. t t .km � the rectum . i
mrse h toi trw
.�� t ne ol the fund
iph s in ti � i �' lh
that ol I � lution fhisi u
can be confusing and perplexing
tor those who hold txliet in a
supreme being One has to n
to terms with the age ildque tio
of I Hd (.od create Ihi 3 plan � �i
did it just evolve be ause ol th
laws f Evolution and e itura
Selei rion? In making a determina-
tion the individual must weigh
the scientific principles ami evi
dence that they have been pre
sented versus the teachingsof youi
religious faith In this paper, 1
would submit to you tli.it based
on these discriminating factors
several conclusions can be made
First of all, these iheoriesof r- volu
tion and Natural Selection only
constitute one description ot i ox
tain events that have for certain
occurod Secondly that the biWi
cal or scriptural description dots
not claim that the time of God is in
keeping with the time of man
astly, one can learn about these
scientific principles without com
promising their beliefs or faith
When I was assigned to read
the second chapter of mv biology
book, I leased to see the
1 here it stated that
r i ilution do not
. ; lud iiv n ligious tx Ik fs or
i nth. Rather, it simply provides a
cientifk explanation within the
kno � ledge ol man that is limited
to that which they can tangibly
experience These theories are
I ascd on the collection ot suen-
;iti. data thai prei ludes the super-
natural. However, there is still a
r isonable doubt of these theo-
ri� � Forin tance, the evolutionist
theory is hampered by the lack of
intermediate fossils.
I Mr win stated that intermedi-
ate tossils should appear that
would bridge the gap between the
munalsi f iheseaand theanimals
of the land Such evidence has vet
to be found in a substantial meas-
ure Evolutionists also use such
methods as carbon dating to
measure the dates of collected
materials However, there have
been numerous incidents where
this method has shown inaccura-
cies This reasonable doubt leaves
the scientific principles of evolu-
tion with the appropriate name, a
theory.
A legitimate defense of the
s nptual presentation of creation
is that it does not claim to corre-
spond with the tuning of the logi
cat man. One should note that the
sequenceof biblical creationsgoes
with the creation of the Universe,
the Earth, the lands and the seas,
the animals of the sea, air, and
land, and then man and woman.
A not her crucial link is that the fact
that the Bible does not deny any
natural laws of existence or sur-
vival. The simple and fundamen-
tal premise is that there was one
divine creator.
After having examined both
the claims of the men of science
and the scripture, there is merit in
both of them. I recall a conversion
with my biology teacher where
she stated her belief that God did
create all things in the earth in his
own evolutionary processand this
reconciles her science with her
faith. 1 think that the information
and arguments that I have pre-
sented on both sides are critical in
the decision making process on
this question of evolution or crea-
tion. It is important that the young
student follow the example of that
teacher. It is vital that we examine
all sides of a relevant issue and
then reconcile them into our own
conclusion. As for me, I choose to
believe in creation.
Darek McCullers
Freshman
General College
And what is kinder and gentler
about our government since he
took office7 The popular press has
surely examined the 41st presi-
dent from everv conceivable angle.
Or have thev? Brace yourself for a
few tantalizing facts.
Among the more intriguing
biographical detailson Bush ishis
membership with the "Skull &
Bones the highly secret Yale fra-
temitv open onlv to selected sen-
iors and allegedly linked with sa-
tanic rituals. According to Stan-
ford economics professor Antony
Sutton, author of America's Secret
Establishment, each member's
sworn purpose is to aid other
members in attaining greater po-
litical power. It's no accident that
James Baker, William F. Buckley,
and other high-level Bush devo-
tees arealsocut from Skull & Bones
cloth.
Bush's father, Prescott Shel-
don Bush, was a Skull & Bones
man too. A wealthy wheeler-
dealer with a Wall Street invest-
ment banking firm, Prescott gave
George millions to start his Texas
oil business while also financing
many politicians. Professor Sut-
ton, a former senior research fel-
low of the prestigious Hoover
Institute and author of The Best
Enemy Money Can Buy, says
Prescott was also one of the direc-
tors of New York's Union Bank
ing Corporation, which sent
money through a Dutch bank to
the Tyson Bank in Nazi Germany
This money-laundering linkage
transferred money directly from
Wallstreet to fund Hitler's war
efforts. One can only hope that
such imbccilic values are not he-
Watergate probe, and mav have
averted public attention from
Operation Townhouse, an illegal
Nixon campaign fund that chan-
neled $100,000 into Bush's 1970
Senate race.
cured. Beijing's Kentucky Fried
Chicken restaurant, as shown in
the U.S. news, was onlv one of
manv American enterprises in
( hina. The color of money is
indeed blinding especially to
members of the Bush clan
Equally disturbing was
Bush's staunch refusal to com-
ment on the hanging of three
( hinese students, survivors of the
1 lanenmen massacre who pub-
licly upheld their democratic
convictions. At the time, as main
ol U i mav recall, Bush was heav-
ily involved in a campaign to pass
a Constitutional amendment to
guard the American Hag against
desecration What can we sav
about such behavior when placed
in the immediate context of the
Chinese government's horrific
behavior and in the wake of
heated suspicions toward hisrole
in the Iran-Contra arms scandal?
Soon after Watergate, the CIA
was under fire for its terrorist ac-
tivities around the globe. President
Gerald Ford hired Bush as CIA
director in 1976 with the aim of
preserving the agency's right to
launch covert operations. To this
end. Bush sought to curb ail nega- It seems clear that Bush's
tive information about the CIA vacuous display of patriotism
According to a report in Mother during this time was a deliberate
Jones (Oct. 1988), Bush refused to attempt to distract the American
cooperate with justice department people from matters of profound
investigations into the assassma- moral and political significance.
tions of former Chilean diplomat Realizing this, most of usresort to
Orlando Lctelier and the bombing either painful silence or, perhaps
death of 73 civilians aboard a more sanely, some profane utter-
Cuban airliner. The same report
details Bush's misleading state-
ments to Congress about illegal
arms shipments to rightwing reb-
els in Angola, and his desire to
prosecute Washington Post report-
ers for divulging official secrets It
was in 1976, by the way, that Bush
had his first private meeting with
Manuel Noriega. In the dubious
interestsof "national security" (sic).
Bush has declined to reveal what
the meeting was about.
Speaking of arms shipments,
let's turn back to the Iran-Contra
arms scandal. We know that Bush
scheduled all of Oliver North's
trips, was briefed at least seven-
teen times on the arms deal, and
participated in two meetings in
which Reagan authorized the plan.
(Reagan, bless his brain, managed
to forget both meetings.) Still, he
claims he was only vaguely aware
ance. A rare few smash their T.V
sets or throw darts with Bush's
lace as the target.
Bush's vehement position on
"the flag-burning thing" along
with his acquiescence toward the
Chinese massacre suggest that,
for him. real freedom, the gem of
democracy, is anything but
sacred. In light of these disturb-
ing facts, the answer to the ques-
tion, "What does it take to make a
kinder, gentler nation?" seems to
extend beyond U.S. politics.
Certainly the answer is not to be
found in the strange and clouded
vision of George Bush Then
again, Quavle's opinion isn't
likely to be worth much either.
Tlai is the first of a four-part Bush-
burning senes. Next: The Bush
Sonega-Drug Connection





I
(She iEafit (Sarflltmanj
Page 5
State and Nation
January 16,1990
States ttgh��n gun control Uw. VgE
By Jake Henshaw
and David Judson
Gannett News Service
SACRAMENTO, Calif In
the vear since Patrick Furdv
Sprayed death across a Stockton,
Calif schoolyard with an assault
rifle, California is still the only
Mate to ban the paramilitary weap-
ons.
But since President Bush has
canned the import of 43 kinds of
issault guns, more than two dozen
ities and counties have restricted
ales, and several states have or-
dered background checks for gun
myers and gun safety laws for
hildren.
"Last vear was unprece-
dented said Gwen Fitzgerald of
landgun Control Inc who like
rther gun control ad vocates hopes
to keep the momentum going into
:he 1990s, rhev hope states will
Snact assault gun bans and more
child safety laws and Congress
will pass a national seven-day
waiting period on handgun sales
rhursda) the handgun con
krol forces ;ot a nior.il boost from
tn unlikely source retiredC hie!
ustice Varren burger "he con
ervative burger, in remarks in
he anuary l� Parade magazine,
ays he supports a 10-day waiting
period tor handgun purchases.
keep and bear arms tor
unting today is essentially a roc-
eational activity and not an im-
perative of survival as it was 2W
ears ago he said.
But last vear'sassaultgunbans
pre under legal attack in several
-tates, including California. And
Eun owners, led by the National
itle Association, believe the tide
partieu-
s turning their wav
arlv in an election year.
think a lot of the willing
KSS to grab for an easy solution
as died down' said Wayne
aPierre. director of the NRA's
legislative institute. In fact, the
NKA, weary of being the fall guv
in the emotional aftermath of
massacres, is on the ol tensive. The
group is launching an unprece-
dented anti-crime and gun-safety
campaign, including a big push
for more pnsonsand national tele
vision advertisements promoting
firearms safety to children
The growing frustration with
crime found an ideal target last
vear when Purdy and Joseph
Wesbecker in I ouisville, Ky
killed a total of 13 people and
wounded 42 others with AK-47
rifles Lawmakers in 18 states in-
troduced bills placing restrictions
on the rapid-firing AK-47 and
similar weapons that police said
were showing up with increasing
frequency in criminal hands.
i. mly California enacted a ban.
Three other states passed laws
affecting the sale of those guns
and Massachusetts approved a
Boston ban on assault-gun sales in
that city.
Maryland added assault guns
to the list of weapons covered by
its seven-da) waiting period Flor
ida adopted a package ol bills to
begin work on a statewide back-
ground check for all gun purchases
and to put a proposal for a three-
day waiting period tor these pur-
chases on the ballot.
Virginia is the only state to set
up an instantaneous background
check for residents buying easily
concealed handguns and assault
guns. A gun dealer calling a toll-
free number can get a report in an
average of one minute and 20
seconds, state police said
The Justice Department .has
proposed a similar national pro
stnarri. While appki ucuvt in .tibooKW
the plan is given little chance of
quick adoption because of a $100
million price tag to computerize
all criminal records nationwide.
See GUNS, page 8
Gun violence and the law
Cycles ot gun violence long have been part of U.S. lite, with each
series ol episodes bringing new efforts to rein in the lawlessness
enrollment drops
Gun violence
Gangsters gun down JB
seven rivals in m
Chicago in St. Valentine's
Day Massacre.
Gunman in Miami
attempts to kill
president-elect Franklin D
Roosevelt; kills Chicago
Mayor Anton Cermak
The law
1929 Congress passes the
first federal gun regula-
tion � National Firearms
Act � to ban ownership
of machine guns, sawed
off shotguns and
f silencers without a
federal permit
By Dennis Kelly
Gannett News Service
fT1933
1934
Puerto Rican nationalists
attempt to shoot Pres- JKp
1938
1950
ident Harry Truman.
President John F
Kennedy killed in
Dallas.
T
1963
Rev. Martin Luther King
Jr. killed in Memphis.
jp�1968
" 1968
Sen Robert F.
K viedy killed in
Los Angeles
"
Assassination attempt JBr
made on President m
Gerald Ford in San
Francisco.
Attempt made to kill
President Ronald
Reagan in Washington,
DC.
Sr Congress follows
with the Federal
Firearms Control Act.
making it a federal crime
for felons and fugitives
to receive firearms in
interstate commerce
Congress passes the
Safe Streets Act and the
tEEJ Gun Control Act
lj Restricts explosives,
toughens penalties for
federal firearms violation,
1968 establishes regulation of
firearms industry.
California voters defeat
1975 a handgun control
measure � Proposition
15 �on the state bailot.
Defeat by 63 percent of
the measure to control
handguns is seen as
? having national
significance.
1982
Gunman kills 21 in
San Ysidro. Calif
McDonald's restaurant
0
1984
1986
:ii 'i Gunman fcHMh"
children on
Stockton, Calif
schoolyard
Resea'C David Jjdson. GNS
�r
1969
Congress passes
I�7 McClure-Volkmer
I Act. easing restric-
tions on interstate sales
of firearms required by
1963 Gun Control Act
Amendments on bill ban
manufacture of new
machine guns, and Dan
import of machine guns.
College enrollments of low-income and middle-income blacks and
Hispanics have dropped dramatically since the mid-1970s, "an educa-
tional failure rate of intolerable magnitude says a study out Monday.
The eighth annual report on minority college participation by the
American Council on Education shows that enrollment of dependent
18- to 24-year-olds since 1976, regardless of family income, hasnsen3.6
percent for whites while dropping 12 percent for blacks and eight
percent for Hispanics.
But the trend, a reversal from the gains made in the early 19US,
paints an even bleaker picture when broken down by income groups.
College enrollment rates since 1976 have:
- Dropped from 53 percent to 36 percent for middle-income
blacks, and from 53 to 46 percent for Hispanics.
- Dwindled from 40 to 30 percent for low-income blacks, and from
50 to 35 percent for low-income Hispanics.
Another concern is the disproporbonately low number of minori-
ties earning degrees. Blacks made up 9.2 percent of the undergraduate
populabon in 1987, but earned just 5.7 percent of bachelor's degrees;
Hispanics were 5.3 percent of the population, but collected only 2.7
percent of the degrees.
"Since the mid-1970s, the college participation rate of African
Americans and Hispanics has been a picture not of progress, but of
major regression the report says. Among reasons suggested at a
bnefine were the shift from outright grants to student loans higher
entrance standards and, anecdotallv, a reported increase in middle- to
hieher-income minorities choosing the military as a career option.
Blandina C. Ramirez, director of the council's Office of Minority
Concerns said the problem demandscompTehensiveefforts toincrcase
minontv participation by both universities and federal and state gov-
ernments. Savs Ramirez, "The successful efforts being earned out on
college campuses are spotty and short-lived, and they are of recent
jSborah ). Carter, who wrote the report with Reginald Wilson,
adds It doesn't say the efforts aren't working. It says not enough effort
has been made"
OCpyrifta 1�0. USA TODAY
Military presence in
drug war may be moot
Jo� CorOitl. Gannett News Servce
By Richard Whitmire
Gannett News Service
Gorbachev receives domestic disfavor
Satellite nations 'spin out of orbit'
, , . wi k�rxr. i4�rici�tri ithiinia Amid been strangely silent"
a major increase in military sup-
port is unlikely to significantly
reduce drug consumption in the
United States
Drawing on the Rand Corpo-
ration, its own studies, and the
General Accounting Office, the
By John Omicinski
Gannett News Service
WASHINGTON Mikhail
Gorbachev's dramatic mission to
Lithuania this past week brought
him face to face with the same
voices, postersandaspirationsthat
toppled Berlin's Wall, Romania's
Ceausescu, Bulgaria's Zhivkov
and East Germany's Honecker.
But for the Soviet leader, there
was a vast difference.
Gorbachev went to Lithuania
appearing to have won over West-
ern leaders to his goal of keeping
the Soviet empire's 15 republics
from crumbling away m blood-
shed and anarchy.
"He's turned out tobe the best
thing in the Kremlin since Russian
pumpernickel said Michael
Sodaro, a George Washington
University analyst of Fast-West
relations. "Except among rock-
ribbed conservatives, the enemy
is gone"
Gorbachev's world impact, if
anything, has grown larger than
his image in his own country
"His charisma is a Western
fascination rather than a Soviet
reality savs Vladimir Tismane-
anu of the Foreign Policy Insti-
tute.
Word that Gorbachev can-
celed his public schedutefoT Janu-
ary sent the Tokyo stock market
into a one-day spin last week. His
aides explained that the Soviet
leader was simply too busy this
month to see visitors.
That calmed Japanest specu-
lation, but built the stakes for his
Helms plans running
for fourth Senate term
RALEIGH(AP) - Republican
U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms announced
Saturda night he will run for a
fourth tcrmafterlayinga platform
opposing abortion, decrying
homosexuality and praising
America's role in deposing
Panamanian Gen. Manuel
Noriega.
Helms, flanked by family
members, told a crowd of about
1,700 at the State Fairgrounds that
he will file for office with the state
Board of Elections next week.
In introducing Helms,
Republican Gov. Jim Martin
reminded those gathered of
Helms' controversial stands,
particularly his long-standing
opposition to selling the Panama
Canal.
"You don't have to wonder
where Jesse stands, because we
know he was right all along
Martin said
Helms as the "conscience of the
Senate
Helms picked up the refrain,
recounted many of his stands in
18 years in Washington, but first
he appealed to religion.
"Never has America needed
the prayers of all of us more than
now he said. 1 submit to you
that a nation that forgets God
commits suicide
Then Helms went on the
attack, accusing liberal Democrats
three-day visit to Lithuania. Amid
great expectations, Gorbachev
tried to convince the republic's
breakaway communists that, in
his words, 'There will be a trag-
edy" if the nation of 3.7 million
cuts its ties to Moscow.
Conventional wisdom has it
that if Gorbachev soothes the
Lithuanians, that may lay the
groundwork for settling ethnic
and nationalist disputes in other
cornersoftheempi re. Meanwhile,
a not-SO-Subtle shift is evident in
U S. attitudes since the Malta
summit and Gorbachev's deci-
sions to allow Fast Bloc satellites
to spin out oi Moscow's orbit.
"To the man's credit said
President Bush at his last news
conference, "he has been the big
advocate of peaceful change.
"Give the credit that I don'f
think any of us a year ago from
thisday would have given in terms
of Soviet adherence to �
Gorbachev's adherence to �
change given the dynamic up-
heaval in Eastern Europe
"It's like a closed account
said the Brookings Institution's
been strangely silent
Now that Bush has thrown in
WASHINGTON � With the
capture of alleged "narco terror-
ist" Manuel Noriega and the air-
craft earner Kennedy looming in
the Caribbean, it appears the De- Defense Department overthe past
fense Department is finally taking two years has constructed a de-
on drug traffickers. tailed argument showing ant
Now that Bush has thrown � Next week, the Defense De- dng money wouM be fm better
M rnrharhev Questioning the partment plans to announce its spent on reducing demand not
srdxss: SSSf 3Sg
The Defense Department is still stands, except now Congress
setting up a third outpost at Fort has forced the military into the
Bl iss, Texas, to monitor trafficking
across the Mexican border, a move
that has angered the Mexican
government. But there are two
things to remember about this
congressionally ordered enthusi-
asm: the Defense Department has
always maintained it can't make a
who after the Malta summit noted
that the Soviet Union still has a
"non-free government
The next day, the
administration emphasized that
Bush and Quayle did not disagree
about Gorbachev's ability to
facilitate change.
Still, articles critical of Gor-
bachev are starting to resemble a
kind of "underground" in the
American press. The New York
Times published January 4 an
assessment of Gorbachev's Russia
� signed by an anonymous "Z
"The system cannot be restruc-
tured or reformed writes "Z
but can only stagnate or be dis-
mantled and replaced by market
institutions over a long period of studies to prove that throwingthe
time.
war. The first order came in the
1989 budget, which gave the De-
fense Department $300 million to
carry out the task of monitoring
drug traffickers using air and sea
routes.
For 1990,Congress upped the
ante to $450 million and the White
"Any aid the West might ren-
der to the Soviet state to save or
presidential analyst Stephen Hess, improve the existing system
'Wrcproceedingintandcmwith would be futile concludes L.
Mr Gorbachev. Even the right has See GORBACHEV, page 7
aiwavsmainidint-u�w �� - - ��� k�
denun the crack supply on the House ordered the Pentagon to
streets, and the Pentagon only got get senous, which prompted De-
senous about this war when its fense Secretary Dick Cheney to
budget wasthreatenedbvehanges declare drugs a d.rec threat to
in Eastern Europe. the nation's national security.
For the past two years, the Cheney ordered each major corn-
Defense Department and its con- mand to produce drug fighting
sultants have been cranking out plans, which will be revealed next
studies to prove that throwing the week.
military into the interdiction fight But nowhere along the way
wiILaibesLpushupthepnceofa did the Pentagon ever repudiate
street user's crack only by a dime its earlier stand. In a recent 21-
ZZo. Concludes the Rand Cor- page pro drg-fighting speech
ration, a Pentagon consultant, delivered by Stephen Duncan, the
in a study completed in 1988: See DRUGS, page 7
Mr Gorbachev.tventnengninas 3eeouiBn.nLi,K.6v.
Azerbaijanis, Armenians near open war
� n.iiiwi Cnn�� mm4ia said. At least 1C
MOSCOW (AP) � Azer-
baijanis and Armenians appeared
on the verge of open warfare
of making a political issue of Monday after a spasm of ethnic
abortion in a desperate bid to win clashes and pogroms in the south-
elections ern republic of Azerbaijan claimed
They chant pro-choice but at least 32 lives, Soviet media re-
what they really mean is 'pro- ported.
lection' of their own political The Kremlin flew remforce-
hides Helms said. ments of internal secunty troops
He defied liberals to explain to Azerbaijan to try to stop the
thesenseofdestroyingmillionsof bloodletting, the worst between
unborn babies when millions of the two ethnic groups since their
Americans stand in line to adopt, long-simmering feud in the Cau-
But he said he doesn't want a casusboiled over nearly two years
U Got Jim Gardner lauded "Luting match" on the issue. ago. High-level troub.eshooters
, K A witness in Baku described a Soviet media said. At least 100
weredispatched to the Azerbaijani A witness m o�u massed at the Yere-
SlE-sr ������ 2S&
YeLan, capital of he neighbor- �ItT�� SSllSm!mZ
Li t a� vwiot Azerbamms and Armenians uu)tn to aemw uuici�-ib �r
,ng republic of Armenia, Soviet �eroa �a � shakhbazyan.
radio reported Monday. are Uxked ,n a rf Shakhna2aryan, a
- Armenia.s.n a state of battle ��SZmKm journalist at the republics official
readiness Karen Shakhbazyan, 1ronedby �Us agency AJnenpresa, and
an Armenian activist, said Mon- of 160,UW peopie cu fvakian an editor at
day by telephone from Yerevan. A-�tae1� MtAa; FeMa AWata, - -
Igor Kudrin, a commentator -eruans are C��ans most HmIiMiI.
for state-run Soviet TV, sajd ina �� SrSple tad risen to 32. Others were killed
news broadcast Mondahat the ���n�& in other part, of Aaerbaijan. the
zjzzzzzz 2KrS2 m-
front" action to ProteCt th6r brethren' wim�utg,v,n�fi8ures-





r
Page 6
Sthe tEaot (ffarnltnianT
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January, 16,1990
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ROOMMATK NEEDED: For spring
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Asslss BhAM mi Km MS I'onn T�
CMS1 I T WMlisoa o' Tonsny Wtliaiw
TS4.7H!
ARE VOC A WORK-STUDY
STUDENT: If so, The Pirate Club m-eds
you Must enjoy working with the
public and have a ple.iint phone voice
Phone 757 4540 for interview, ask for
Owen
HELP WANTED: Part time Saks Stock
help trom l to 6 pm Monday thru
Friday, and 10 am to 6 pm Saturday.
Apply at the Youth Shop Boutique
Arlington Village, Greenville
PART-TIME SITTER : For 6 year old
after school 2 "W -5:30 Anv or all week
davs Call 355-7271 after pm
MODUS: If you would like to model,
PromotkM .Mod ' ngAgency a � fee
agency needs males and females of all
igos Mso no I Ian � � I r pri ate
parties all 155-0919
mT u
IMMEDIA II OPI N1NG: Foi
persons position ; i � I
; .pm al 'I i ' omputers 106 t th i
i Irci nvdle 752 � I
t IRA MONEY: Start immediately al
S4 per hour with opportunity I i
bonuses Part-time (20hrs per week)
only l all 355 '��
BABYS1ITER NEEDED n M
ruesday and Thursday afternoons N i
smoker, muM have own transport i
Call 752 1421
S l is- Natii : il M aketing I irm
mature student to manage mi campus
promotios to tap copanies this sth.xil
year I' ib! hours with
potential ta 52 W ' sen ester Musi be
organiredyjtardworkiri ' and mom
Micheli or enn al QfJ
mo tiva t. -vl C
GOVERNMENT OBS: sin me
559230 vr Now Hiring Call (1) -
CLASSIHEDS
&
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DEADLINES
MONDAYS AT 5:00
FRIDAY AT 5:00
COMMUTER FROM KINSTON:
wants to carpxil with other commuters
from Kinston Please call 527-7103 after
4 pm
HEY D.J! WHAT TIME IS IT? It's time
for ECU to have a D) for parties, socials,
cocktails and formals at reasonable
prices Chris Gregory DJ service 757-
1561
DEAR TWIT: bury vour pnde for the
next couple of weeks and then we can go
back to the "war of the rtses " 1 have a
supreme opportunity which even you
ran not pass up It is a sream come true
i lope you are interested, find me If not.
al least you'll b reading about mem the
paper rhe Prince
PI KAPPS jrarulations to our new
brothei En robin. Bill Thomlinson,
Craig McNairy, I 'inn Ik-tt. Mik- Mala
it) 'rbv fed McVickers, Doug
PI KAPPS Well its one week late, but
ike ta welcome everybody back
pe you had a great break
PI KAPPA PHI: We support you,
�, liters (Buecaneerer Editor)
Nelson Scott Cood luck with the
si, �� we're with you-guys!1 Plus lets
��� read) fora kick assRlll" PS Rich
�hat piece of )unk von call a car or
�ing in the lake'
ATTENTION AIL STUDENT PIRATE
CLUB MEMBEI& We will have a
meeting on Wed Ian 17at4pm The
ting wifl be in the PtorateGub soaal
� on Everybody please attend!
�l PDA SIC: The animal house rocked
once agate! I lappv hour was a blast'
Can't wait till next Friday night
I OST: Bdvkpack Book,Hitchhikers
iuide to the Galaxy, pervinal items
inside Turn in at campus police or
: letcher Music Center Ottice REWARD
I I A TAU ALPHA: Wishes to
congradutiate Aille Lloyd, Brenda
( lsler, Tnsh Pctnllo, Ginger Mauney.
i indv Alleshire, Cyndi Jackson, Deena
I logs, Lisa Rartield, Michelle Turner
hi guvs will make wonderful sisters'
f T A PLEDGES: Chnsty, Audra, Erica,
Kristen, Luan Keep up the good work
Vi' love you gir' - The sisters
Announcements
Al IIM'ION It) ALL
� ist arolinian will be changing its
: . concerning announcements start
l n lanuary, announcements vyill now
e free tor only the Ist week of publica
�: liter that v eek then' will be a charge
l 1st . words tor student organia
re 52.00 and for non- student organi
itlon kl "0 any additional words will
eS.05
NATIONAL COLD SERVICE
FRATERNITY
v.I! have rush lor prospective members
in 17-19 Diop in for information night
H 10 pm at Mendenhall in Ian 17 or Call
K athy al 7"8 Ml 3 Alpha Phi Omega
SENIORSGRADUATE STU-
DENTS
Now is the time to be registered with the
areer Planning and Placement Service in
the Morton House Located between
Mendenhall Student (.enter and Greene
Residence I lall. this is, i place where gradu-
ating students nviv put resume and estab
hsh a credentials tile Interview signups
lxgin soon and vou must be registered to
4gn up General Information meetings
will be held on an 11,12 and 16at2pm in
the Career Planning room of the Bloxton
I louse
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and HacrmcntScrv
i m the Bloxton 1 louse is offering these
.ne hour sessions to aid vou in developing
better Interviewing skills A film and
lisi'ssion of how to interview on and off
ampus will be shared These scossions
ire held in the Career llanninp nxim on
Ian 12, lb and 22 at 1pm and at 7pm on
Ian lb
RECRTJOJJ)AyjL95Q
I ooking for a Summer )ob? Would you
like to be a t the beach? In the mountains'
Then consider Recreation Day On Feb 8,
IW0 in Memorial Gym, over 50 recrea
tional emplyers will interview ECU stu-
dents for summer positions I'ostions are
available for all majors. For more infor-
mation and to sign up for interviews,
i ontact Cooperative Education, 2028 GCB.
BASKETBALL TOURNAr
MENI
Intramural-rec services will be hosting a
pre season
; I m Mem
tb.ill tournament Ian 1 '
1 mnasium Mens and
womens teams are enci uraged to enter al
5M p� ti-am i ontact Mar) Malone at
b75 hS7 tor mote information Be sure
to register art 16 at 5pm in Bio 101
AEROB1C1ZERS
Persons interested in aerobic fitness classes
including toning beginning fitness, inter-
val, hi lo. circuit wd low impact classes
should register Ian lt 19in204Memorial
Gymnasium Classes are offered daily at
a wst ot 510 student and $12Faculty-
staff for a 12 class session Drop in classes
are als tvailavte in 55 increments Call
757 6387 tor details
EXPRESSIONS
Ex pressions is now act epting poetry, short
stones, and articles for the spring semes-
ter issues Offices are located in the Pub-
lications Bide, across trom loyner I ibrarv
We would also like to thank all contribu-
tors who helped us to receive "First Place
� and "Best Magazine tor Ethnic Diver
sitv" awards form the American Scholas-
tic Press Association tor our Spring 1989
magazines
PEER HEALTH EDUCATORS
Interested in learning more about your
own personal health and helping to edu-
cateothcr students? Becomes Peer I leaJth
Educator iA learn more about AIDS,
llealthv Fating Habits, Weight Control,
Cancer, Exercise and Drug, and Alcohol
Awareness Attend training sessions and
begin teaching programs If interested
attend an orientation meeting on Wed.
Jan 17 at 3pm in the Student I lealth Cen
ter Resource room! Call 757 6794 for more
information
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
TO TEST FOR SUMMER
UFEGU ARU JOBS
The US Dept of Interior National Park
Service has announced that applications
are being accepted for summer lifeguard
positions at several National Park Service
sites in the eastern US Depending on
experience and work locations, the sum-
mer lifeguards may earn salaries ranging
from $497 63 to $857 38 every two weeks
They must meet appbcalbe Civil Service
regulations and pass all parts of a preem-
ploymenl performance test in one test
session by rrril 22,1990 For an applica-
tion and information about the test and
other requirements for these hfequardobs,
applicants should call toll free 1-800 NP 8
SWIM or in New York City, 1-718-338-
3670
5 - ON - 5 BASKETBALL
SEASON
lm rec services will be holding registra-
tion tor mens anil woment's basketball
teams Jan 16 at pm in Bio 103 Individu-
als with a team are envouraged to attend
for placement on a squad Call 757-6387
for details or stop be room 104 Memorial
C.m
OUTDOOR SQRGASBORD
Ilie ECU outdoor recreation center will be
sponsoring this special event Weil an 24
at 7pm in 113 Memorial Gymnasium. Teh
outdoor smorgasbord is an event featur-
ing outdoor cooking techniques and food
sampling, equipment display and utiliza-
tion, video presertations and trip package
giveaways For details call 757-6911 or
7i7 6387. The event if Krec of charge for
all ECU faculty, staff and students.
NJLKE5PQRYTS SPECIAL
EVENT
Nike Sports will be sponsoring a 3-pint
shoot out for all East Calolinians Jerseys,
Socks, shoes , gymbags etc. will be
awarded to participants Tegistration will
take place Jan 23 at 5:30 in Bio 103 Don't
M iss you chance Call 757 6387 for details
or stop by 20-1 Memorial Gym. Home of
Im-Rec Services.
CChREC BOWLERS
Registration for Im-Rec Services spring
co-tec bowling league will take place Jan.
23 at 5pm in Bio 103. 2 men and 2 women
are required Individuals interested in
participation that have no team allegiance
are welcome to attend the meeting for
placement of a team. Call 757-6387 for
details or stop by room 104 Memorial Gym.
STOP SMOKING
Need help kicking the habit? The Student
1 lealth Center offers the American Cancer
SodetyTresh Start" Smoking cessation
program free of charge to all ECU stu-
dents. The program consists of four one
hour sessions The program starts Thurs-
day Jan 25 and will continue for four
consecutive Thursdays Class time willbc
1 10 2 10 pm and the program is held in
the Student I lealth Center Resource Room
Call now to sign up 757-6794 since space is
limited Keep your New Year's Resolu
tion'l
CHOLESTERQLSCREENING
Your cholesterol number may be the key
to living a healthey lifestyle1 Cholesterol
screening is available to all students, statt
and facultv at the Student I lealth Center
Screenings conducted every Monday
through Friday from 8 am to 12 noon For
best test results, don't eat or drink any
thing after supper the night before! Cost is
as follows: Cholesterol, triglycendes,
blood sugar Students $4, Staff and Fac-
ulty S7 Cholesterol, triglycendes, 1IDL
- Students$7, staff and facultv $10. NC)
appointment necessary For more info
call 757-6841.
EPllCATIOJiMAJORS
The department of speech-Language and
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be pro-
viding the speech and hearing screening
for all students eligible for admission to
the Upper Division of Teacher Educaiton
on Monday, Jan 22: Tue Jan. 23 and Wed
Jan. 24. The department will be testing
from 5 to 6:30 each day. No Appointment
is nccded(first come basos). The SLAP
department is located in Belk Annex on
Charles Street.
BIG KIPS
The issue of Adult Children of Alcoholics
is becoming more recognized today on
college campuses. If your life has been
affected past or present by having been
raised in a home or environment where
alcoholic or other dsyfunctional behav-
iors were present. Big Kids, may be the
group for you. This information and shar-
ing meeting will begin meeting Tuesday,
Jan. 16, in 242 Mendenhall Student Center
at 5:30pm For more info contact: Office of
Substance Abuse Prevention and Educa-
tion, 303 Erwin Hall, 757-6793.
A.C.C.H.U.S.
Get incloved with BACCHUSfBoost Alo
hoi Consciousness Concerning the Gealth
of University Students). We meet each
Tue. at 4pm, in 307 Erwin Hall to discuss
alcohol issures, preview new video
tapes,and plan alcohol awareness activi-
ties for the campus. See you at the Wel-
come H.u k �� l.il '
the Mendenhall Social :i��' a '
netmeeting! Formoreinfoconta I Offi
of substance Abuse Prevention and Edu
cation303 Erwin Hall, 757 6793
OM1CRON DELIA KAPPA
The first meeting of the semester will e
held on Tuesday, an 16 at 6pm in the
( ounseBng Center Wright Annex It i-
importanl that all members attend Pie ise
contact Anita at931-7534 it you are unable
to be there
HONORS SEMINARS
All faculty members are reminded ot their
opportunity to design an honors Seminar
The Honors Committee makes the final
selection. Please submit proposals (at least
bv phone) to David Sanders (77 h37) at
the I tenors Office, GCB 10G2A by Thurs
dav, Jan.18, 1990. See David Sanders in
the Honors Office for more information
ALL PARENTS
Need parents who would be willing to
wolunteer their children, between the afs
of 6 -15, for testing, as training for Clinicj
Psychology students. Department of Psy-
chology, ECU. If interested, please call the
Testing Center.ECU, 757 6811
WEIGHT CQNTROECLASSES
The SI IS offers information about healthy
eating habits, weight control, behavior
modificationa dn fitness programming
Classes held: Every Fndav from 10 11 am
. Beginning Jan,19 At the Student I lealth
Center
rnMTKACEPTIVECLA SSES
Student Health Center , Every Monday at
2pm and Every Thursday at 3pm
PjmilESIEQiS OMIC&ON
Important meeting: l'hi Up professional
project MTG Monday, Jan 22 at SIS Van
Landmgham Room, HE Bldg Please
attend all members!
: il herp�
nng tu
Askew R
If vou are interested in
onformatton call lean
; 2578
YJQL
ERSNEmmFQR
The Sectin of Infectious Diseases ECU
School of Medicine in conjunction with
the Student Health Center is conducting a
study on the sexual spread of herpes vi
ruses We are looking for men and women
18 years and older who have never had
ECU LACROSSE
Students who plan on playing Lacrosse
during the spring 19s() season must attend
i meeting in the basement of Memorial
, m at 3 30 on Thursday, Jan It Statis-
ts, ians also welcome
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLI-
CANS
College Republicans will meet this Thurs-
day at 7-30 pm. in room 20 of Joyner
I ibrarv
early childhood edu-
Cationclub
Welcome back1 (EQ2 will meet on Jan 17
at 4pm in room 308 Speight We will
discuss the homework club, nominate for
a new historian, and discuss a new officer
position. The club sill have refreshments
and loor proes All education majors are
welcome and may join the club See you
there'
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville - Pitt conuty Special Plym-
pics will be conducting a training school
Feburary 10, 190 at Pose High school for
an vone interested in volunteering to coach
Track and Field for special athletes. No
experience is needed. We are also looking
for coaches for the following sports:
bowling, swimming gymnastics, tennis,
and rollerskating. All interested persons
should contact ConnieSappenfieldor Greg
Epperson at the special olvmptc office,
B304551.
N.C. TEACHING FELLOWS
The junior class of N.C. Teaching Fellows
will meet in Speight 129 on Jan. 22 at 5pm
A closed general meeting for all Fellows
will be held on Jan.29 in Speight at 5pm.
Dr Henderson will address the Junior
class meeting.
WES2FEL
Wes2fel is a Christian fellowship which
welcames all students, and is sponsored
jointly by th ePresbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries. Come to die Method-
ist Student Center (501 E. 5th st.
See page 7





I he I asl.11 olini.iii, ,mii.ii !��. Iv'
Drugs
( nntinued from p.ut'
�. �� � i' i he most lucrative cash crop toi VV AC S radar surveillance plane-
i vaniplo thopeas.ints nd for political and toi inti-iii
1u i hundreds o! environmental ri isons the n I ;h1 n ultcl n nl � i
( di'llai ; �� m ; -I, �, iii dean nations are unhkelv to allow and 10 arrests he et tort i
i-twork usuii; vvulespread aei pravu to million
lal i ' radicati the � o� a i rops
them lt. radai sui . � illance lso m ! the k!
ma heen planes trom the Kei ' " i-nlnru-nu-nl i I lard
I I � � i nspicioiis ' , mil : : � �' rcl il ;
plain hut th� �� to stop la I
' - ' ' � In i , l(mhia tore.ini ha � � : � � ' to i - :
a tin n.n ith onh three cti
1 � ' i tl illdesti indsonn ri I ted in
I � � � ,� md irresi � - �
lars � Itli � ' thf V,t I ' :
problem � � . i � � i I ��
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 1 i to IX weeks at additional cost Pregnam )
lest. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnant) Counseling
For further Information, call m 0444
(toll free numbei ! 800-532 5384) Between 9 am and 5 pm
weekdays General ane .thesia av lilable
I OW COS! AUOkllONS t P o 12TH WEEK Or PRE(,NAN
Gorbachev
t nntinued from pag
�,� i repean leaders I
i ,bai k .
� ' � � � lured
r lead 11
75c
Wash
n
mz-mm
'PM
75c
Wash
Announcements
i ontiiuied I
1i
i.
ni
LADIES NIGHT
EVERY II I SI) Y
FREE WASH- 7 PM
"Ij You IL lo I)
)�urh 'i I ;
Do It In S
Ailo i u 1 i I
i I I
Your I:a r i t c H
Si
I .
COMPLETE FLUFF & FOLD SERVICE
EARLY BIRtf SPECIAL
BRING BEFORE 10AM - ONLY 35 PER LB!
75c
Wash
752-5222
Wash
i
i1PR i li. N
SKII
HELP
Erase
Crime at your
University
ECU Public Safety: 797-6150
701 West 14th 7S2-2106
Extended Suitimci Hou- �
Mon. Fri. 7:30 am 6 00 pm
Saturday 0 00 am 4.00 pm
I it ()ne of (ur Reliable Salespeople
Ser ic eou I ocla!
GdRRIS
EjMltS
Lumber Co Inc
l a
Sale I uds Januars ?
' M
US
112

Put Your Personality In It!
If
1
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;tr (�u .in h,i c the mom
ou y r 11 wavs t tinted
ithout '� In) distiureeinu.
-1
I
4
V
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YOUR SPECIAL PRICES
Treated Lumber
( wv see us tor your BUNK Hi I)
iiiid LOFT building materials, and
i�ive your room the room it needs
Plywood
4 x 8 Sheets
Other Good Values
? c & hi "�
ALSO
SALE
PRICED
Travel Values at ITG ate
Running Hot An
pn
t
t
si pf R URI ARI SPE( IA1 s
�. .
��. a
N 1
I N

I
r ANSA ! I rv
St A1 '
SAN FRANCISCO
LOS ANGELES
CHARLOTTE
INDIANNAP0US
WASHINGTON
M58
'238
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t
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i
SPEC IAl VACATION PAC KA(,J s
,f ,AS mr NEW YORK r
s289 - - s259
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SAN JUAN
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FREEPORT
�"l 4.4 la I r� .i rNOTMS ���� : .��- �
tl ' �li I l . i �. .
355-50'J





The East Carolinian, January 16, 1990 7
Drugs
Continued from page 5
Pentagon's top drug fighter, there
was onlv one mention of this:
there is still insufficient evidence
to conclude that the recent m�)or
increase in military support will
Significantly reduce drug con
sumption in the United Static
At issue is the question ot
cutting supply s cutting demand
In 1977, the IS drug fighting
pohcv began emphasizing inter-
diction, rather than counseling and
encouraging Americans to aban
dondrugs. Ten ears later, in P�87,
the United States was spending$3
billion a year on interdiction,
compared to $1 billion on reduc-
ing demand and vet there was
no evidence that interdiction had
art) impact on the soaring amount
of drugs smuggled into the United
States, concluded the General
Accounting Office in 1988.
Americans want drugs, and
the) are willing to pay a high price
to get them, said GAO analysts,
cautioning against giving the
Defense Department a bigger anti-
drug mission
Aside from the question of
whether the I nited States should
continue the strategy ot empha-
sizing interdiction over demand
reduction, there's also a question
Announcements
Continued from page 6
from Carrett dorrrO (his Wedftesda) night
at pm and every Wednesday night tor .1
dehciors, all von can oat home cooked
meal ($2 25) with a short program after
wards Signed for the heating Impaired
Call 7SS-20M for more info
BLOOD MOBILE
The Blood mobile will be at Mcndenhall
Student( enter Wednesday, Jan 17,199012
noon to hpm I; is sponsored by the E l
Biologylut 1 live Blood, please
ECU BIOLQGVjCLUB
All Riologv club members who signed up
at a particular time to help with the
Botkbnobtle on Ian 17 are remanded to
please be there promptlv Thank You
ODVOVl KSLAS DEVELOP'
MENT NETWORK
PPN will resume their meetings on ian
18 ofl Thtirsd.lv at rpm in CCB 102 We
will be discussing our plans u-r a regional
nfeferH e II cm are interested In help
tog others in third world countries pi, .1.
of how successful the Defense
Department can be For example:
Much of the hundreds of
millions of dollars spent piecing
together a radar network using
tethered aerostats � radars on
balloons to monitor southern
I S borders m.iv have been
wasted, found the General Ac-
counting Office test year. The aer-
ostats have difficulty picking out
the lov flying smuggling planes.
In countries such as Bolivia
and Peru, the Pentagon-proposed
mountaintop radars will do little
to solve the basic problem Coca is
Gorbachev
the most lucrative cash crop for
the peasants. And for political and
environmental reasons, the An-
dean nations arc unlikely to allow
widespread aerial spraying to
eradicate the coca crops.
� The radar surveillance
planes from the Kennedy might
sort out suspicious ships and
planes, but then who's to stop
them? Colombia, for example, has
a tinv navv with only three cor-
vettes (small destroyers)and some
smaller patrol boats.
In 1987, the Air Force set
aside W1 flying hours of its
On this score, Mr Gorbachev is
beyond our help
The article, said Tisma-
neanu, is having a major impact
in Washington and the Rrook-
ings' I less said the article "is tern
bl) significant
Gorbachev sealed his accep-
tance in the West bv encouraging
some East European leaders to exit
and turninghisbackon Romania's
Nlicolae Ceausescu last month
before revolutionaries captured
and executed him
US cheerleading for Gor-
bachev is cheap, too
"Gorbachev's turned out to
AW ACS radar surveillance planes
for anti-drug missions, but those
flightsrcsultcd monly six seizures
and 10 arrests The effort cost $2 6
million.
� Also in 1987, the Navy had
drug enforcement Coast Guard
people aboard its ships for 2,500
ship davs. The Coast Guard is
empowered to make drug arrests
of civilians, but all those ship hours
resulted in onlv 20 vessel seizures
and 110 arrests. Cost: $40 million.
r'Mr tffO.USA TODAY,
ryf C.Mjr tafBnBBtaRl Vl'ik
Continued from page 3
be for real said Sodaro of George
Washington University. "But at
the same time, there is a cold-
blooded realization that the So-
viet Union's an economic mess
and the United States is not going
to sink a lot of money into it
� rvnil I-W0 MA TODAY 1
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Pregnancy
Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling
For further Information, caJl 738-0444
(toll free number: 1-800-532-5384) Between 9 am and 5 pm
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12TH WEEK OF PREGNANCY
75tf
Wash
75
0 Wash
LADIES NIGHT
EVERY TUESDAY
FREE WASH 6 - 7 PM
"If Yon Have To Do
Your Own Laundry,
Do It In Style
Air Conditioned Lounge
Video Games
Your Favorite Cold Beverage
Snacks
Television
COMPLETE LUI-F& FOLD SERVICE
EARLY BIRD SPECIAL
BRING BEFORE 10AM - ONLY 35(2 PER LB!
750
Wash
752-5222
2510E. l()th St.
Greenville, NC
75c
Wash
lirtfi
I
AMNESTY INT'L
Atnnett) Int'l vvlll bo having in monthly
meeting on n 24 Wed night .it 8pm .it St
Paul's Episcopal church on 1th 51 It von
�re interested in world issui. and btatc
human rights please ioin u
SH�A�
Welcome back! We re Luting the �-('ring
Mm ester with j groat speaker t)r I hnig
ins The topic will bo The Tejoher and the
Law The data tor this hrst mooting is
Tuesday Ian 23 at S b pm in Spoight 201.
We 11 see va there!
IMPROVING VptlB STUDY
SKILLS
I earning how to improve vcnir'�tuil v skills
for greater aUCCtaa in cllege The follow-
ing mini course and workshops can help
von prepare for the added workload of
college or help to Increase vimr (PA All
sossions will bo held in 313 Wright Butld
ing Jan 22 .Monday, Time Management
3 110 pm Jan 23 , Tuesday, Making and
using notes, 3 4 30pm Jan 24,Wedsday,
Efficient Reading, 3-4 30pm. Jan 23 ,
Thursday, Test Taking, 3-4 30pm You
mav attend all the topic sessions or choose
the ones where vou need the nost im-
rovemenl.
HELP
Erase
Crime at your
University
ECU Public Safety: 757-6150
� �� '� m �i m m
m �
701 West 14th 752-2106
Extended Summer Hours
MonFri. 7:30 am-t:00 pm
Saturday 8:00 am 4:00 pm
Lei One of Our Reliable Salespeople
Service You Today!
Sale Ends January 31, 1990
Put Your Personality In It!
Now you can have the room
you've always wanted
without Mom disagreeing.
Mm
'mm
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The East Carolinian January 16,1990 8
Guns
Continued from page 5
Other state action List year in-
cluded Oregon's extension of i
five-day wait tor handguns to 15
days, and Florida's requirement
that adults to keep loaded fire-
arms away from minors the
first ever enacted in the United
States.
Cities and counties in nine
states passed some type of ordi-
nance on assault puns, including
Atlanta Denver; Cincinnati;
Cleveland, Columbus, Ohio; Al-
bany N A , and Gary, Ind.
But a Georgia judge threw out
the Atlanta ordinance, ruling that
only me state Legislature can regu-
late gun sales In Ohio, Columbus
won one legal challenge and is in
court on another, as is Cleveland.
California's ban. which police
claim is starting to produce re-
sults, has been challenged by a
gun maker, and the NRA plans to
join the legal fray.
While advocates are hoping
for more gun legislation in states
like Georgia, Michigan, Wiscon-
sin and New lersev, proponents
also are focusing on Congress,
which may vote on some kind of
assault-rifle ban as early as next
month. The toughest bills, spon-
sored bv Sen Howard Moten
baum. D Ohio, and Rep Pete
Stark, D- alit . would irtually
ban sales ot new assault rifles and
place tight restru tions on sales of
existing ones
Put the bill with the greatest
chance ot passage is bv Son. Den-
nis DeConcini, D-Ariz which
would ban five imported and tour
domestic types ot guns tor ust
three years. The measure is ev
pected to reach the Senate floor in
February as part ol the debate on
crime legislation
The NRA's I aPierre is opti
mistk but gun-control advocates
believe the gun lobby's heyday is
over
"The total momentum has
changed said Fitzgerald of
Handgun Control. "We're on the
offensive. They're on the defen-
sive
CDC C SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
rnCC STUDENTS WHO NEED
MONEY F0RC0LLEGE
Every Student is Eligible for Some type of
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(800) 346-6401
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510N. Greene St. Greenville, NC
830-1779
KAPPA
ALPHA
Dear Rushee,
As you are contemplating rushing a fraternity
this spring, a number of doors will be opened to
you. Here at Kappa Alpha, we offer the door like
no other.
As a rushee, you must choose the organization
which you wish to join. A fraternity of men with
whom you will live for the next four years, and
whom you will call your brothers for the rest of
your life.
We believe that you will agree that, in fact,
Kappa Alpha is the most unique and traditional of
any college fraternity. We strive for both unity and
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Won't you come by and sample a bit of South-
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Good Luck Rushees!
RUSH
7- 11
The Brothers of Gamma Rho Chapter
of Kappa Alpha Order
Monday
Jan. 22
Come Meet the
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Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Jan. 23 Jan, 24 Jan. 25
Come Meet the Come Celebrate Invitation Night
Ladies of A All Robert E. Lee's B- Day
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AOViRTISED ITEM POIICV Each of these advertised items is required
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we will otter you your choice of a comparable item when
available reflecting the same savings or a ramcheck which will
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within 30 days Only one vendor roupon will be accepted pei item
pun hased
COPYRIGHT 1990 THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND PRICES
GOOD SUNDAY IAN 14. THROUGH SATURDAY JAN 20.
1990 in Greenville, NC
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TO OEAIFRS
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12oz. �
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? Cottage Cheese
24-oz.





�lj� 4�n$t (Earolfnfan
Page 9
Features
January 16,1990
Cholesterol intak
concerns dieters
Fats contribute to problems
BOSTON (AP) Consider the
cholesterol-free banana.
Since the beginning of time,
�his fruit has never contained
cholesterol. Unless evolution takes
an unexpected turn, it never will.
Recently, however, some
hanana importers pasted "choles-
terol tree labels on their produce.
The stickers seem to imply that
this is new banana. A better
banana A healthier banana.
But in truth, it's just a banana.
Whv point out the biological
truth that bananas � like every
ether fruit and vegetable under
the sun don't have cholesterol?
IVrhaps for the same reason that
makers of vegetable oil margarine
buy rV ads that say "no choles-
terol at all
I � sell their pn k!u t foo i
m imes pla to Americans'
. oncern or obsession about
what the) eat But main health
experts v orrv that the "nocholes-
tcrol olnmibe.it an go bevond
� i marketeeringand tint with
outright deception
Everyone knows that choles-
terol is bad for the heart. So if
: od - got no cholesterol, it must
be OK. right?
Wrong
People can say something
n t i contain an cholesterol.
But it van still be a product that
raises your cholesterol substan-
tially That's the problem said
r i ar! Orringet of the Univer-
sity of Michigan.
High levels of cholesterol in
"ii bloodstream can clog up the
aMenes and lead to heart attacks.
( Triner and others believe that
the no-cholesterol pitch takes
advantage of public confusion
ever the difference between cho-
lesterol m tood .md cholesterol in
the blood
Contrary to popular belief.
cholesterol in food has a relativelv
minor impact on cholesterol in the
blood. The part of food that really
raises blood cholesterol is satu-
rated fat. Being cholesterol free,
however, is no guarantee that
something isalso low in saturated
fat.
The saturated fat level in no-
cholesterol foods depends largely
on the tvpe and amount of vege-
tablooil that goes into them. These
oils contain widely varying com-
binations of saturated, monosatu-
rated and polvunsatura'ed fats.
Thev range from canola oil which
is six percent saturated fat to palm
oil which is 51 percent saturated
fat and coconut oil which is 2
percent saturated fat
lots of foods are cholesterol
tree In fact, only animal foods,
such as meat and eggs, contain
cholesterol. Anything made en-
tirely from plants does not
i ndeed. cant n havecholesten 'I
Many people are obvioush
confused about all of this a recent
I S. Food and Drug Administra-
tion survey found that 4? percent
of the American public believes
that if a food is labeled cholesterol
free, it is also low in saturated tat.
Despite its relative unimpor-
tance, the "no cholesterol' claim
sings out from every aisle of the
supermarket. Popcorn, bread,
crackers, sahiddrcssingand silted
peanuts often carry it.
"labels like that are mislead
ing and frequently dishonest
contends Dr. John LaRosa of
George Washington University.
"They beg the real issue, which is.
This is a food that can raise your
blood cholesterol
Dietary experts say the key to
"prudent" eating is holding down
consumption of fat � all fat. It's
implicated in some kinds of can-
See Cholesterol, page 11
GarrettKillian enters the ECU Photo Lab, located m the basement of Fleming Hall. The far door displays
a sign reading "CAUTION CAUTION: ASBESTOS CONTAMINATED AREA RESPIRATORS AND
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING REQUIRED FOR ENTRY " The adjoining wall is not air tight However,
university officials say the photo lab is a safe work environment (Photo by J.D. Whitmire�ECU Photo
Lab)
Absenteeism report shows
most no-shows near weekends
By Barbara Nachman
Gannett News Service
It's 7 i in. on I rid.n morning and thehipper
voice of the radio weatherman fills vour kit hen.
! welve inchesofnew powder heannounces
All majoi ski resorts are reportingex client condi
tions
With a clang you drop your spoon of Oat
roasties ba k into the bowl Your mind rushes for-
ward there y on ares hussingdovi n those slopes, a
golden sun at your ba K Before you, the new snow
sparkles hke dozens of diamonds
but alas, there is one minor matter standing
between you and snowv nirvana. Wortc
1 Inless immediate action is taken, in just tWO
hours you'll be chained to your desk and drowning
in paperwork
But wait All is not lost. You could do some
thing
You rush to the telephone, grab the receiver
and BANG! slam it down again.
Let's face it. calling m "sick" is not vour forte.
Hack at the kitchen table you i in le your spoon
in the now-SOggy Oat To.eties as vour thoughts
turn to Don Reed ol the Burlington (Wis.) Liars
Club
Reed, who's something of an expert in this
matter, ranks the calling in-sick "fib" second onlv
to the one about "the check is in the mail There,
Reed even calls it a "fib not a "bit fat lie
Maybe there are no statistics cm how many
peoplefudgeflus,coidsand toothaches to go skiing,
fishingor just to stav in cozy beds watching "I Love
Lucy" reruns But everybody knows that every
body does u, even if everybody doesn't admit it.
If vou still doubt the scope of this particular
fib, vou might peek at a report on absenteeism
compiled bv The Bureau of National Affairs in
Washington. PC The report says companies re-
port more no-shows on Mondays and Fridays than
any other day
Making nwUwf�-wn wore iotuiUm�-im,
potential "sick" callers is the fact that much of the
United States is sneeing and wheezing its way
toward the peak of cold and flu season, which The
National Center for Disease Control pinpoints as
late January through mid-February. That means
more than 100 million cases of flu and almost 70
See Sick, page 10
Chili Pepper
break comes
with work
(AP) The Red Hot Chili Pep-
pers inspire writers. They've been
called "a rock 'n' roll version of
Hurricane Hugo "punk-funk-
rap-rock party boys" and "a musi-
cal juggernaut that combines
earthy funk and hip hop with a
cockv attitude
This band, part of the Los
Angeles underground rock scene,
released albums in 1984, '85 and
'87. None sold more than 75,000
copies nor got higher than No. 143
on the best-selling charts. But
"Mother's Milk out on EMI in
1989, quickly sold 150,000 and got
into the top 100 in September.
The Red Hot Chili Peppers
launched into touring America
' and Japan in fanuary, and Europe
through February into March.
"Taste the Pain" will soon be re-
leased as a single.
"I still consider us under
ground says lead singer Anthony
Kiedis. "1 wouldn't categorize us
as top 40. We like to think of our-
selves as the king i t underground
bands
During a stopover in New
York, Kiedis explains how the
band began. I le intended to be an
actor like his father, known pro-
fessionally as Blackie Dammett.
"He's been doing IV shows,
five a year for the last 10 years
He's most recognized as the guy
with theblack-and-red-checkered
shirt in 'Lethal Weapon
"When 1 was a teen-ager, I
adopted the name Cole Dammett,
in keeping with Blackie, but I
didn't spell it Coal After a vear
of college, "the following summer
1 i?nt a uh wnrLint' in m.ill hire.
company and started making a loP
of money. I realized 1 was better
off teaching myself. I didn't take
well to the university environ-
ment.
See Chili Peppers, page 12
Psychopaths kill for attention
The Stegmonds electrify Saturday night's crowd at The New Deli once again The band members spend
their days as ECU students (Photo by JD Whitmire�ECU Photo Lab)
By Marco R. della Cava
Gannett News Service
Dead eves. Unnatural calm.
No conscience.
These are but some of t he wa v s
psychologists describe psycho-
paths, deceptively normal people
capable of plotting unthinkable
deeds.
Peot le not unlike Charles
Stuart, who killed himself after
being implicated in his wile's
murdci
For and one halt months he
played the wounded husband
.she had bravely summoned po-
lice as his pregnant wife died.
But last week police found
potential motives for murder
almost $200,000 from his wife's
insurance policies, debts and a
girlfriend � and were closing in
on Stuart, 29
Exports say such a killer would
fit the classic profile of a psycho-
path.
When normal people consider
doing something morally wrong,
they feel anxious, says Darwin
Dorr medical psychologist at
Duke University. Psychopaths,
however, can stalk their human
prey with the calm of a cat hunting
a bird An icy, focused demeanor
reigns.
It there was (such a man) at
work here, he had an emotional
system that was very underreac-
tive Dorrsavs "Anti-socialscan
be ex tremel v cool a nd u n flappable
in situations that would make a
normal person break out into a
sweat at the mere thought of it
Other dominant traits include
extreme narcissism, to the point of
justifying the deaths of others
because the world revolves around
the psychopath, and an obsession
with maintaining appearances.
lust how a pvchopath devel-
ops these alien traits is a subject of
debate
Experts agree that abusive
childh(xxls can stoke aggressive
psychopathic fires, but add that a
bad upbringing alone cannot be
blamed.
"Many studicsof these people
See Killer, page 10
Zevon prefers to sing
unexplainable lyrics
NEW YORK (AP) - In rock
n' roll, there's the Beatles expert
the kind of guv who plays "Sgt.
Pepper's Lonelv Hearts Club
Band" backwards looking for
hidden messages.
There's also the Dylanologist,
who will pick through garbage if
necessary to find the "meaning"
of the master's music. And don't
forget the Springsteen fanatic,
proudly singing along through-
out the Boss' four-hour concerts
ButwhataboutWarrenZcvon
fans call them Excitable Boys
who must still be scratching their
heads over "Werewolves of Lon-
don" and "Roland the Headless
Thompson Gunner 'Just what did
he mean by "I saw Lon Chancy
walking with the Queen?"
Zevon doesn't know himself.
Search through his garbage,
and you'll find egg shells, milk
cartons and a shopping bag from
the local video store. Play his rec-
ords backward and you'll wind
up with nice, big scratches. Sing
"Lawyers, Guns and Money" in
public, and you'll likely be
dragged away.
�'fit alwavs saving, the lyrics
I'm tne happiest with are the ones
I can explain least said Zevon,
whose new album iscalled 'Trans-
verse City "
"When 1 hear a lot of mean-
ings read into them I don't object
because there must have been a lot
of stuff bubbling subconsciously
to come out so quick and seem
magical. I don't think it's an im-
portant enough job in the world
where God is sending me light-
ning bolts and I'm just his vessel.
It's a little lofty
Zevon's view of the world is
as even as his deadpan style of
speaking. He sees himself as just
another song and dance man who
doesn't get upset by the evening
news.
"I'm not a big 'sides taker I
See Zevon, page 12
An Ideal Vine
Soaps contribute to moral breakdown
By Caroline Cusick
Features Editor
Shortly after I made my Now
Year's resolution never to watch a
soap Open again, I sat wondering
what made me watch them for so
long. Whv did it take ten years for
me to realize those programs wore
loss than edifying and my time
could bo bettor spent elsewhere?
I cannot deny that there is
something in human nature which
is magnetically drawn to gossip
and scandal And I alone am at
fault for allowing myself to be a
victim of daytime television Soap
operashavogradually affected the
way I think and the way 1 view
crime, they ha vochanged the way
I idealize relationships and ro-
mance.
1 realize soap open prognnv-
ming is intended to provide ontor-
tamment and an advertising mar-
ket. They are produced solely for
profit. However, the implications
and messages they send out af-
fect, too often in negative ways,
the moral standards of their view-
ers through a distorted presenta-
tion of society.
Picture the world as a soap
opera filled with poor acting, B-
ratod directing, junior-high level
dialogue and below average set
design.
For the sake of this mental
diversion, wo live in Bubblcland.
Bubblcland is in up-state New
Yawk. The city boasts twelve
undercover cops, eleven cheezy
nurses, ten cheating husbands,
nine missing murder suspects,
eight corporate nullionaires, seven
night club singers, six drooling
teen-agers, five innocent by-stan-
dcrs, four perfect Pollyannas, three
evil stepsisters, two crooked law-
yers and one Partridge County
Hospital which is across the street
from The Pea r Tree Shopping Mall.
Standards of living in Bubblc-
land are set by the stars. Astro-
logical consultations, palm read-
ings and tarot cards determine
who sleeps with whom and which
company takes over what assets.
Religion has little influence be-
cause people go to church for
weddings, funerals, to hide from
the government and for little else.
God is only mentioned in phrases
like "Oh my and If you'll
just get me out of this one I'll
neveragain
The gods of society are the
people with money, flawless faces
or 250 I.Q.s. If these super-heros
steal, lie, kill, cheat or have plastic
surgery to obtain their idollic
status, it's ok. This is Bubbleland.
Saturdays are four days long
and Monday through Friday lasts
one hour-long episode (minus
commercial time). Although each
person has a job, work never takes
precedence over relaying the lat-
est juicy gossip. There is always
time for chatting and eavesdrop-
ping. There is always a scandal in
Bubbleland.
Children drop their parents
in rest homes and mental institu-
tions Very few senior citizens live
in this sudsy society. Only the
filthy rich can afford to live be-
yond 45. Youth is fashionable.
Senility is not.
If a person becomesold�we'll
say 49�euthanasia is acceptable.
Murder is pardonable in cases of
revenge, greed and general dis-
like. No death penalties are
handed out in Bubbleland.
See Soaps, pagell





10 The East Carolinian fanuari 16,1990
Student Profile
Manager of Expressions carries
responsibilities of school and work
By Doug Morris
Statt Writer
- general manager of Hpressions, the
minority magazine on campus, Reginald Dil-
ahunt carries a great deal of responsibility. He
� i s that the magazine comes out on rime and
coordinates its publication, including content,
'� ind business affairs
ihun) overseesevety aspect of the maga-
Heginaid , s tosinesscontracts, purchasesand
DllldnUnt prepat irion ol the fiscal budget along with the
business managei ! le also M is tl e liaison between the Expressions
statt and the puW
Dtllahuntis haltcchi ogy major, but he said that writing
has always been rt. He said that his major helps him as
a manager and as he b w ith the magazine. "It gives me
t chance to becomt right here on campus by dealing with
different people he said
Diilahunl fcels tl M bis hands on style of management isimpor-
tant to the publication oi the magazine He said he wants all the staff
members ol Expressions to ha e i oice in the running of the magazine.
We trv to urock i gethet tnd get different ideas, he explained,
"instead of it beingjifst lvpit-r swaj of thinking. Iguessthatlhave
been responsible few mam
tine said Dillah
Daytona prepares for
spring break rush
The Daytona Beach resortarea
will once again welcome throngs
of students to Us shores during
Spri ng Break 1 WQ. The resort area.
located on the central east coast of
Florida, isoneof: the most popular
parent among visiting collegians.
Several popular events will
return to Daytona Beach in 1990
including the beachfront Spring
Fest, March 12-24; Rolling Stone
Magazine Expo, March 14-21;and
&SS&
spring break destinations in the Expo America, March 16-23. The
he h inges that have affected the maga-
i mphasized that there are many
others who were.ir " j ihc isHn that he has made He said he has
tried todrawont
large scale pub
According
sentath eol all
to be the leu)
communu
In add
taryand pled
fratemitx
Befon .
ArtsandS
from Lent rt
!vis tntn �
addition ft
Atte; gi
possibility
thing lik� :
said he ht ;
Expressions h.
� aw ard u inning magazinesand
igaine to be more repre-
tH . i. npus We as students aregoing
Mink we need to be able to
- . malities at d i ices
no. Diilahunl is also secre-
I tOrnega the only interracial social
r
S ss,vuteo!
. ildi ndd� sign technology
ton He s.r.d that last Carolina
ha enced him in
�.� go to work in industry. Itisa
� printing industry or some-
nanager in that role Dillahunt
i nee being general manager of j
s tuturt in mdustrx
United States
Canadian college students
will begin arriving at the end of
February. Then, in early March,
the American schools come to
town. According to tourism offi-
cials and tour companies, the
peak weeks will be March 3-24,
but smaller groupsot students will
continue to come to Day tona Beach
through April 22, the week after
Faster
Anticipating a more organ
ized event in 1990,anewly-fonned
task force has been working since
last Spring Break to coordinate
events and activities during the
yearly influx of college students
to the "World's Most Famous
Beach " The task force is the event
management group for spring
break and is addressing such top-
ics as traffic control, hotel over-
crowding, public facilities and
alcohol management
For instance, the task force has
endorsed the national Tarty
Smart' project for 1990. This alco-
hol education campaign spon-
sored bv the Beer Drinkers of
America in vosta Mesa, Caltt
encourages responsibility and
moderation among adults who
choose to drink
The task force has chosen A
ew Wave of Fun for its slogan,
hoping to capture the festival
Miss Hawaiian Tropic Interna-
tional Pageant is planned tor
March 14 in the Bandsheil, the
city'soutdoor amphitheater on the
beach. The rock group Molly
1 latchett isoneof the first concerts
throughout the Daytona Beach
Marriott, March 9-10.
Accommodations are still
availableduring Spring Break. For
a visitor's guide and calender of
events, call DESTINATION
DAYTONA the Convention and
Visitor's Bureau tor the Daytona
Beach resort area, at 1-800-854-
1234 or o04) 255-0415
Crue to
Freeport;
299"
o
ply tO
Nassau.
� '
� � '
. .�
ft.
Gall
1-800-622-4262
Killer
Feature Briefs
Cruise learns, to appreciate
iwaiKing tnrough acting role
Wheelchair heros see life differently
NEWYORK V -V : i rom Cruise, who plays a paralyzed war
veteran in I - savs those who can walk take
too much tor gram
He told I s mag . I r its an. 22 issue that tor someone who is
paralyzed, "Just tying ir shoes is like be�ch-pressing250poundsor
like running a maral
Cruise, 27, wh K ric in the movie, says he interviewed
paralvzed people at . at as n habtlitation centers to prepare himself
for the part.
"We take a lot for granted getting out of bed in the morning,
putting our shoes on running into the shower, washing our hair,
running down the stairs, he said.
Paula Abdul plans to choreograph
1990s Academy Award ceremony
LOS ANC.I
smgmgand dar � . �
Hollywi �
Herexcitu rary style
show asweei
Cates said
Although pi � know n .b,i -n
was the I movies "G
Running Man Sh . ni
"The rracey � "�
The Av adefov tN tun r
year'ss ars I
Chandler !r i i Mai V -
h
� igh energy
� a irds .is the glitzy
ifticials said.
mpjement this unique
tun ProducerC albert
�r ind dancer. Miss Abdul
America and The
her vork on television's
i S ien. es v ill present this
t m film .it the Dorothy
ill. am the program live.
Quarterback gives money to church
CAMDEN N. l' Quarterback Randall Cunningham
didn't get his Philadelphia Eagles to the Super Bowl, but members ol
one church think he's just super. 1 le stunned them by showing up at
Sunday's services with a $10 00d 'nation.
"Thev were rejoicing ' said I lvaSmith,whohasbeenamernberof
St ohn Baptist Church in East . amden for JO years. "They started
clapping and singing and pra) ing and thanking the lord for someone
being so nice
Cunningham, whost team ksl in the first round of the National
Football Leagueplayoffs,isn'tamemberofthechurch He often attends
services along with teammatehrisarter, according to Melvin R.
Pnmas Sr thechurd asurer
Dallas star supports annual concert
honoring his mother, Mary Martin
OAl.l AS (AP) l.arrv 1 lagman, star of the television show
"Dallas has given $150,000 to the Dallas Symphony to support an
annual concert honoring his mother, actress Mary Martin.
Ms. Martin, a native of Weatherford, Texas, is best known for her
starring roles in the Broadway musicals "Peter Pan" and "TheSound of
Music"
She is expected to attend the first Mary Martin Annual SupcrPops
Concert with her family on May 4 at the Morton H. Meyerson Sym-
phony Center
Dallas-ana disadvantaged youth will be given complimentary
concert tickets as part of the endowment agreement.
Continued from page 9
pointtoagenetic deficiency Don-
says. "It's scary
If psychopathic behavior is
particularly horrifying, it is be-
cause it can be carried out in our
midst.
These people usuallv are
verv bright and can cover them-
selves very well says Bob Heckel.
psychologist at the University of
South Carolina, Columbia.
"If anything, they may look
like the model of a decent, up-
wardly mobile person says
David Silber, psychologist at
George Washington University,
Washington, DC. "It's impossible
to know them psychologically
because often they don't betray
themselves
Author Joe McGinniss says the
Boston case is hauntingly similar
to his current best seller "Blind
Faith " the story of a Toms River,
NT man who plotted his wife's
murder for months while continu-
ing his role as loving father of
throe
When it conies to defining a
psychopath,all youcandoispomt
to the normalcy of surface appear
ance savs McGinniss, whose
"FatalVision" wasa similar taleof
family murder
McGinniss says psychopaths
think the bigger the crime, the
better. Attention is much of what
such people seek, he says, at the
cost off considering human beings
disposable objects.
He says, "In the end, their
true nature was beyond my abil-
ity to comprehend
eCjpyifta 1990. USA rOC.AY, �r� Colkf
Sick
Continued from page 9
million cases of the common cold.
And that means a heap of folks
calling in sick. For real.
Medical Self-Care magazine
reports that 30 million work days
are lost each year due to colds
alone.
So who's to know if yours is a
bogus bug?
Before we go any further, let
us say that, of course, we do not
encourage or condone the break-
ing of the sacred attendance con-
tract entered into by you and your
boss.
We' re simply stating the facts.
The rest is up to you.
CCynfto !M0.USA TOPAYi.t, LMr
Order your college ring NOW
J( )STEXS
A M t W A
Date: Jan 17, 18, & 19Time: 10-4 Deposit Required: $20.00
Bookstore
Wed, Thurs, Fri
Place:
Meet with vxur Josteiis representative for hill details S4f mm i �mJ�-t�- rmi; sHd tum .m ilispl.i in votir. ol�s,v t�.kstor�'
t�l�
.� V ��





4
10 The East Carolinian January 16,1990
Student Profile
Manager of Expressions carries
responsibilities of school and work
By Doug Morris
Staff Writer
Reginald
Dillahunt
Daytona prepares for
spring break rush
The Daytona Beach resortarea parent among visiting collegians,
will once again welcome throngs Several popular events will
Of students to its shores during return to Daytona Beach in 1990
Spring Break 1990. The resort area, including the beachfront Spring
located on the central east coast of Fest, March 12-24; Rolling Stone
As general manager of Expressions, the
minority magazine on campus, Reginald Dil-
! lahunt carries a great deal of responsibility. He
insures that the magazine comes out on time and
coordinates its publication, including content,
polk) and business affairs.
Dillahunt oversees every aspect of the maga-
zine including business contracts, purchases and
preparation of the fiscal budget along with the
business manager. 1 le also acts as the liaison between the Expressions
staff and the public.
Dillahunt is an industrial technology major, but he said that writing
has always been important to him. He said that his major helps him as
a manager and as he relates to his job with the magazine. "It gives me
a chance to become a manager right here on campus by dealing with
different people he said
Dillahunt feels that his "hands-on" style of management is impor-
tant to the publication of the magazine. He said he wants all the staff
members of Expressions to have a voice in the running of the magazine.
"We try to Mroik together and get different ideas he explained,
"instead of it bei ng jdst age pflsqns way of thi nking I guess that I have
been responsible for many oi the changes that have affected the maga-
zine said Dillahunt However he emphasized that there are many
others who were a f art o.t.Uy d� isions that he has made. He said he has
tried to draw on the good pointsofotheraward winning magazines and
large scale publications.
According to Dillahunt, he wants the magazine to be more repre-
sentative of all mmoritv group on campus. "We. as students, are going
to be the leaders of tomorrow, and 1 think we need to be able to
communicate with pVtfpfcVol other nationalities and races"
In addition to working with the magazine, Dillahunt is also secre-
tary and pledge captainxl Chi Alpha Ornega, the only interracial social
fraternity on campus 1 lc also works at the library.
Before coming to East aroitria, Dillahunt received his Associate of
Arts and Sciences degree in mechanical drafting and design technology
from Lenoir Community College in Kinston. He said that EastCarolina
has introduced him to main people that have influenced him in
addition to giving him an education.
After graduation Dillahunt plans to go to work in industry. "It isa
possibility thai 1 ma someday, be in the printing industry or some-
thing like that, but ! would want to lea manager in that role Dillahunt
said he hopes he can apply the experience being general manager of
Expressions has given him to his future in industry.
Florida, is one of the most popular
spnng break destinations in the
United States.
Canadian college students
will begin arriving at the end of
February- Then, in early March,
the American schools come to
town. According to tourism offi-
cials and tour companies, the
"peak" weeks will be March 3-24,
but smaller groupsof students will
continue to come to Daytona Beach
through April 22, the week after
Easter.
Anticipating a more organ-
ized event in 1990, a newly-formed
task force has been working since
last Spring Break to coordinate
events and activities during the
yearly influx of college students
to the "World's Most Famous
Beach The task force is the event
management group for spring
break and is addressing such top-
ics as traffic control, hotel over-
crowding, public facilities and
alcohol management.
For instance, the task force has
endorsed the national "Party
Smart" project for 1990. This alco-
hol education campaign spon-
sored by the Beer Drinkers of
America in Costa Mesa, Calif
encourages responsibility and
moderation among adults who
choose to drink.
The task force has chosen "A
New Wave of Fun" for its slogan,
hoping to capture the festival
Magazine Expo, March 14-21; and
Expo America, March 16-23. The
Miss Hawaiian Tropic Interna-
tional Pageant is planned for
March 14 in the Bandshell, the
citsoutdoor amphitheater on the
beach. The rock group Molly
Hatchett is one of the first concerts
throughout the Daytona Beach
Marriott, March 9-10.
Accommodations are still
available during Spring Break. For
a visitor's guide and calender of
events, call DESTINATION
DAYTONA the Convention and
Visitor's Bureau for the Daytona
Beach resort area, at 1-800-854-
1234 or (904) 255-0415.
Killer
Feature Briefs
Cruise learns to appreciate
walking through acting role
Wheelchair heros see life differently
Actor Tom Cruise, who plays a paralyzed war
Fourth of July savs those who can walk take
NEW YORK (AP)-
veteran in "Born on th
too much for granted
He told US magazine for its Jan. 22 issue that for someone who is
paralyzed, "Just tying your shoes is like bench-pressing 250 pounds or
like running a marathon
Cruise, 27, who plays Ron Kovic in the movie, says he interviewed
paralyzed people at various rehabilitation centers to prepare himself
for the part.
"We take a lot for granted: getting out of bed in the morning,
putting our shoes on, running into the shower, washing our hair,
running down the stairs he said. ��
Paula Abdul plans to choreograph
1990s Academy Award ceremony
LOS AM ,11.1 S I AP) Paula Abdul will bring her high-energy
singing and dancing style to this year's Academv Awards as the glitzy
Hollywood celebration's choreographer, Oscar officials said.
"Herexcitingand contemporary style wiHcomriemeni this unique
show as we enter the last decade t the 20th Century Producer Gilbert
Cates said Tuesday.
Although perhaps best known as a singer and dancer. Miss Abdul
was the choreographer for the movies "Coming to America" and "The
Running Man She also won an Emmy for her work on television's
"The Tracev Unman 5how
The Academy ot Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present this
year's Oscars for outstanding achievement in film at the Dorothy
Chandler Pavilion on March 2K ABC-TV will carry the program live.
Quarterback gives money to church
CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) � Quarterback Randall Cunningham
didn't get his Philadelphia Eagles to the Super Bowl, but members of
one church think he's just super. He stunned them by showing up at
Sunday's services with a $100,000 donation.
"They were rejoicing said El va Smith, who has been a member of
St. John Baptist Church in East Camden for 30 years. "They started
clapping and singing and praying and thanking the Lord for someone
being so nice
Cunningham, whose team lost in the first round of the National
Football League playoffs, isn't a member of the church. He often attends
services along with teammate Chris Carter, according to Melvin R.
Primas Sr the church's treasurer.
Dallas star supports annual concert
honoring his mother, Mary Martin
DALLAS (AP) � Larry Hagman, star of the television show
"Dallas has given $150,000 to the Dallas Symphony to support an
annual concert honoring his mother, actress Mary Martin.
Ms. Martin, a native of Weatherford, Texas, is best known for her
Starring roles in the Broadway musicals "Peter Pan" and 'The Sound of
Music
She is expected to attend the first Mary Martin Annual SuperPops
Concert with her family on May 4 at the Morton H. Meyerson Sym-
phony Center.
Dallas-area disadvantaged youth will be given complimentary
concert tickets as part of the endowment agreement.
Continued from page 9
point toagenetic deficiency Dorr
says. "It's scary
If psychopathic behavior is
particularly horrifying, it is be-
cause it can be carried out in our
rnfrTst.
"These people usually are
very bright and can cover them-
selves very well says Bob Heckel,
psychologist at the University of
South Carolina, Columbia.
"If anything, they may look
like the model of a decent, up-
wardly mobile person says
David Silber, psychologist at
George Washington University,
Washington, D.C. "It's impossible
to know them psychologically
because often they don't betray
themselves
Au thor Joe McGinniss says the
Boston case is hauntingly similar
to his current best seller "Blind
Faith the story of a Toms River,
N.J. man who plotted his wife's
murder for months while continu-
ing his role as loving father of
three.
"When it comes to defining a
psychopath, all you cando is point
to the normalcy of surface appear-
ance says McGinniss, whose
"Fatal Vision" wasa similar taleof
family murder.
McGinniss says psychopaths
think the bigger the crime, the
better. Attention is much of what
such people seek, he says, at the
cost of considering human beings
disposable objects.
He says, "In the end, their
true nature was beyond my abil-
ity to comprehend
eCapynfta ISM. USA TOOAYIAfrk Crifcft
Sick
Continued from page 9
million cases of the common cold.
And that means a heap of folks
calling in sick. For real.
Medical Self-Care magazine
reports that 90 million work days
are lost each year due to colds
alone.
So who's to know if yours is a
bogus bug?
Before we go any further, let
us say that, of course, we do not
encourage or condone the break-
ing of the sacred attendance con-
tract entered into by you and your
boss.
We're simply stating the facts.
The rest is up to you.
�Offrifta tf0, USA TQOAYIAU Caflfff
Order your college ring NOW
JOSTENS
AMERICA
C O
G t
Date: Jan 17, 18, & 19Time: 10-4Deposit Required: $20.00
�Vw� �W-� VIM'
Race:
Bookstore
Wed, Thurs, Fri
Meet with your Josteas representative for full details See our complete rtng selertton � display in your ratjege rxkstore
�� x�cf m an
�J





Cholesterol
Continued from page 9
The East Carolinian, January 16,1990 11
cer It's far more fattening than
sugar and starch. And some com-
ponent of it is alwavs saturated.
In fact some of the most dili-
gent no-cholesterol labeling is on
high-fat baked goods.
For instance, Duncan Mines
cake mixes boast: "No preserva-
tives No palm oil No cholesterol
The tine print on the back, how-
ever, discloses that once a devils
food cake is baked, 47 percent of
its calories come from fat.
Cholesterol content must be
included on the label only if some
claim is made about it. However,
packages that boast of no choles-
terol needn t mention saturated
fat.
The American Heart Associa-
tion and other health organiza-
tions generally recommend that
people limit their fat consump-
tion to 30 percent of their total
daily calories. No more than 10
percent of thedav'scalonesshould
come from saturated fat.
Since it's next to impossible
tor ordinary people to figure out
the percentage of fat and other
nutrients in their own diets, many
health experts recommend put-
ting this information on fixxi l.i
bels.
Connor urges use of the cho-
lesterol-saturated fat index,orCSl,
to make comparisons between
foods even easier This index uses
a mathematical equation to arrive
at a single number for each food.
The higher the number, the greater
the food's potential to cause heart
disease.
For instance, theCSI for half a
cup of baked beans is zero. So is a
cup of apple cider, an unbuffered
English muffin, an ounce of jelly
beans, a cup of rice and a cup of
spaghetti with marinara sauce.
A cup of sherbet is 3; half a can
ofsardinesis4;halfacupofmixed
nuts is 6; 3 ounces of dark meat
chicken with skin is 7; 3 ounces of
hamburger is 11; a slice of frosted
carrot cake is 14; 3 ouncesof calves
liver is 16; 3 ounces of cheddar
cheese is 24; two scrambled eggs
are 27; a half cup of butter is 71.
The banana, like most fruits
and vegetables, earns a healthy
zero on this index. So why dwell
Soaps
on the impossibility of it having
cholesterol Pan I Yoder, a spokes-
man lor Pole, the fruit company,
said the no cholesterol stickers
were part ot a banana industry
campaign to improve the fruit's
image
Because bananas are smooth
and buttery, he said, some people
actually think they contain butter
and are fattening (which, at 90
calories apiece, they are not very).
While the stickers might seem to
imply that less desirable fruits are
full of cholesterol or that these
particular bananas arc somehow
better than competing brands,
Yoder said the stickers were meant
to clear up public confusion.
"When cholesterol is consid-
ered not good for you, and you
don't have it, then I see no prob-
lem in saying von can eat this and
not worry about getting too much
cholesterol he said.
However, 1.a Rosa has another
view of all the no-cholesterol la-
beling
"It's ust silliness he said. "1
hope the public catches onto it
Continued from page 9
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
Deadline: January 19,1990 &
STUDENT UNION COMMITTEE
CHAIRPERSONS
Deadline: February 23, 1990
For the 1990 -1991 Term
Any full - time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall Student Center's
Information Desk and Room 236 - Student Union.
VNvVAvVAv
Petty theft is a no-no, but
embezzlement is glamorous and
talents in espionage are coveted
by all Community service is con-
sidered �� severe punishment tor
criminal activity
The other lady's husband and
the other man's wife are also ob-
jects ol covetousness. To be with
out a tainted past of affairs and
forbidden romances is a disgrace
to the amoral population, and
remaining married to one person
til death do you part is consid-
ered abnormal.
Yes we are still in RubHeland,
New Yawk. If this were the real
world. planet Farth, people would
take a breather from bed-hopping
and consider the implications and
health risks of promiscuity and
sexually transmitted disease. But
don't worry, this is fantasy land
The only people who get sick are
the ones wh6sc Con tracts expire.
Relationships are to be
avoided at all costs. Commitment
is the foulest oi vocabulary words
to be uttered Responsibility fol-
lows m second place. Personal
gratification is the only important
issue
I here is one law in Bubble-
land it you break the law, don't
get caught
Ok Enough ol the nonsense.
We live in (ireenville, not in a TV
fantasy. The morals daytime tele-
vision try to convince us to accept
are far from realistic Reality,
however, is a relative concept.
We all want to be beautiful
and wealthy Many of us hope to
be happily married with 2.4 chil-
dren, a station wagon, two cats
and a dog Living in the Bible-belt
of the United States, we have a
difficult time ignoring the pres-
sure to be law abiding, morally-
upright citizens.
The influence of daytime, or
nighttime, soaps lea vesa filmover
our eves that encourages this real-
lite culture to reach for the often
unobtainable
Genetically, we are not per-
fect The beautiful people are out-
numbered by the average For
most oi us. employment is not
optional. And crime, well, lefs say
it is frowned upon. Relationships,
between friends or lovers, are
about commitment, through the
good, bad and average times.
Many people insist soaps are
harmless entertainment. But tele-
vision has a great power over us; it
dictates what life should be like.
I don't expect one less viewer
will cause thesoapopera industry
to change. 1 do expect a gradual
change in myself a change back
to romantic reality, self acceptance
and attainable goals.
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For Information Call 830 - 1256





12 The- East Carolinian, January 16,1990
Chili Peppers
Continued from page 9
M friends lack Irons, I title
Slovak and Flea, great musicians,
really as fake, deckled to play
one song with me as singer at a
club Our chemistry was power
tul We were warmly accepted by
the audience and asked to come
Mk k with two songs
Kiedis started with a rap. "I
was ata ays fairly adept with pen
and paper. 1 didn't have musical
training. The easiest way forme to
ge, into a band was on the rhyth-
mic level, not the melodic level. I
think l had a good voice,a spirited
vph e. Since then. I've taken vocal
lessons to learn to control my
breath
Kiedis N.ns that the band
'quick!) became one ot the most
popular club acts m Hollywood.
Five months later, we got a record
contract. I lillel and lack left to be
faithful to the band thev had been
in We employed two to record
with. 1 lillel and lack came back
1 lea, the bassist, savs, "What
we were doing was creating the
toughest tunk group we could
possibly muster up and being
excited about playing a groove
I le adds, I think we've matured
as songwriters
Kiedis says: "A friend came
last night who hadn't seen us for
tour years. I le was amazed at how
professional we had become
"Last night?" Flea shrieks
"We hada tot of technical difficul-
ties last night. When things are
going wrong, the momentum and
tlow ot theconcert gets broken up
You realize little fighting sounds
are coming out instead of beauti-
ful bass notes.
"I've been trying not to get
upset about things on stage. It
messes things up for me, to lose
mycool.lxistnightl wasenraged
Some fans of a band that most
people never heard of turn a way if
wider recognition comes "Our
audience has grown a lot over the
years Flea says. "No matter how
popular we become, I don't think
we'll ever alienate people who
liked us when we were less popu-
lar. People recognize we haven't
altered our music for the sake of
success.
In the summeroMHH, Slovak
died ot a drug overdose. John
Frusciante, who had tried out for
Zevon
Thelonious Monster and been
accepted, was lured into the Red
Hot Chili Peppers. He had been a
tan, his guitar style influenced by
Slovak. After many had audi-
tioned, Chad Smith became the
drummer.
The cover of "Mother's Milk"
isa painting by Slovak. "Hisdeath
is reflected in our music Kiedis
says. The first single. Knock Me
Down contains the line, "It you
see me getting high, knock me
down
Kiedissays: "Personally, it has
given me the inspiration to live
my life in a better way. I think it
has made the whole band more
aware of the miserable possibili-
ties that drugs can bring upon a
person. Hard drugs are definitely
not a part of this band any more,
and 1 don't think thev ever will
be
Flea is married and has a
daughter, Clara. He looks around
a bleak New York hotel lobby and
smiles.
"I'm going to see her tomor
row he says.
Continued from page 9
n indi i . i' the bad guy did it
it s haul for me to see good and
had gu) s
1 le va once idealistic, even
Napoleonic dreaming ot the
unification 't rock songs and
modern classical music Blame it
n 60s superstars such as the
Beatles and the Rolling stones.
rhosc groups made it seem simple
! Zevon Make great musk and
people w ill buy your records.
Blame Bob Dylan, too.
c ertainl) Dylan is the big
gest the all time influence for me,
nd Zevon, born in Canada in
h'47 and raised in Arizona and
California. I heard him and
thought, That's the job He in-
vented it. 1 le writes them and he
sings them
"He was the undisputed,
imnossible to comj rehend, mas
lor i't that form I le was like an
astonishing folk guy. It was awe-
some, seeing a guy with a guitar
and a harmonk a was really, really
amazing
So Zevon left his symphony
unfinished and played rock'n' roll.
With some help trom his friend
fackson Browne, who got a him a
deal with Asylum Records,Zevon
released his self-titled debut al-
bumin I976,a time when Browne,
the Eagles, Linda Rons tad t and
others had struck gold in Califor-
nia.
But Zevon was different, his
comedy a little too dark for those
sunny skies, his rock 'n' roll loo
tough. Critics admired him, Ron
Stadt covered "Poor, Poor Pitiful
Me and others, and Eagles Don
I lenlev, C.lenn Frev and Joe Walsh
appeared on his albums. But onlv
a handful ot listeners could bo
bothered with gleeful songs ot
murder, floods and hair) headed
gents.
After his 1982 album. "The En-
voy Zevon didn't releaseanother
record tor five years. The shop
closed down for a while" is how
he remembered thai period of his
life. Now signed with Virgin Rec-
ords, fame is still something to be
written about, not experienced.
"1 can certainly go to the market. I
can certainly go get cheeseburg-
ers he said "Occasionally, I meet
Somebody who savs. Aren't you
?' 'I sawyouat 'Whatarevou
doing here?' I tell them I'm buy-
ing a cheeseburger. It's nothing
that keeps me from going to get
one
Wednesday
9:00 - 1:00am
Lyp Sync Contest
Admission $1.00 members $2.00 Guest
$1.75 Pitchers
$1000.00
First Prize for
Each Division!
$50. 1 st Prize
This Week 1st Round Dorm Division
Top Three
Return to the
Finals to Compete for
$25. 2nd & 3rd $1000.00
Sign Up at the
Elbo or Call 758-4591
Tnurs:
Ladies Nite with KA's
9:00 - 1:00am
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(Delta Sigma Phi
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800 R 11th Si
Kappa Sigma
700 E. lOthSl
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Sigma Pi
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(Jfratmtity Jixit . . .
To be in a fraternity Is not merely to be in a social
club Fraternities are a way ol lite We snare e
penses as well a enperlences. and we are responsi
ble to each other lor our own actions Me live oft
campus lor the most pan. yet we are very active on
campus We enoy a good relationship with oui
university s administration and. in the past tew
decades, have become a maior part ot the univer
sity s student lite
JBill fratmtirif� Ipirt irqi grair�?
� No, there's every evidence that joining a fraternity
improves your chances ot graduating
� 33H ot men on campus without fraternities will
graduate, ard
� 47H ot non members on campuses with fraief
ntties graduate, but
� 65 of ell fraternity members graduate
� Scholarship programs ot fraternities produce
greater academic success, and belief achievement
lor you
Snruil tiff . . .
It never can be said that fralernity people don't en
toy a good social lite Getting to know many different
people is only natural among such a close knit
group One seems to fall into a wealth ot oppor
lumt.es le things to do with his spare time Events
such as Greek Week is jusl an eiample ol some ot
the activities mat fraternities plan during the year
Athletics . . .
Fraternity men enioy an active athletic enstence
Whether it be track meets field events or in
Iramurais. we enioy competing against one another
In one sport or another





Page 13
She JEaat Carolinian I
Sports
January 16, 1990
Lady Dukes
end streak
in Minges
Bv David Reichelt
Staff Writer
Irish Hamilton summed it up
best for the Lady Pirates: "It feels
great to beat Madison
11.mill ton spoke for just about
everyone on the Lady Pirate bas-
ketball team as they celebrated
ECU'S 70-68 victory over the Lady
Dukes of lames Madison last Mon-
day night
The win was the first tor the
Lady Pirates in the past eight
meetings between the two teams.
The loss also shut the door on
a 4b game CAA winning streak
for 1MU.
"I'm so excited about the win
that I'm still nervous and I don't
know why sophomore Tonya
1 largrove said following the ga me
Hargrove put 22 points on the
board for the l.adv Pirates. .nd
had seven rebounds and tour
Steals for the night. A steal bv
1 largrove in the final minutes ot
the game helped clench tin- vic-
tory tor the ECU team
A strong defense bv the ECU
squad pressured the Lady Pukes
into 31 turnovers which the 1 ady
Pirate offense could only turn into
24 points. The team also kept CA A
Plaver-of-the-Week Vickie Harris
to just two points in the first half
Put the Lady Pirate offense
struggled, shooting only 4h per
cent from the floor and 43 percent
at the charity stripe. Lady Pirate
head coach Pierson noticed the
�teams performance from the tree
t -L-j .ii �'� s.ti.1 ii ii ��
iriv'dfw1irh � " '
ECU put the first two points
on the board just four minutes
into the game with a lavup bv
center Sarah Cray. For the rest of
the first half, the Lady Bucs played
a controlled up-beat game lead bv
Hargrove. With 8:31 left in the
half, ECU fell behind the lady
Dukes 18-20 Farlv in second half,
the Ladv Pirates regained a shaky
lead of 41-40. ECU and lames
Madison would trade leads four
more times with no more than
three points separating the two.
"It was a very physical game
for us Pierson said Madison
has always been a physical team
for us and there was a lot of con-
tact out on the court
At the 444 mark ot the first
halt, the Lady Pukes led E( U by
four baskets I be two teams traded
basket,s but the JMU lead was cut
to two points bv the half thanks ti i
a Iband a 17-footer by Hamilton,
an 18 footer bv O'Donnell. and
underneath shots from Hargrove
and Tonia Colev.
Entering the fray from the
bench was Kim Pupree who fin-
ished the first half with six points
and 10 points for the game Pier-
son put Dupree in as(. irav ran into
foul trouble late in the first halt
See Celebration, page 16
Pirates lose in
double-overtimt
Richardson leads way with 22
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
fonya Hargrove puts m the extra effort to make two of her 22 points as the I ady Pirates defeated the Lady
Dukes of .lames Madison 70 68 m CAA act-on last night ,n Mmges Coliseum fne Pirates claimed their
mmu.uiu.Mu ���iuLlJUUJi.lgiH)juLaUyl1ii.JUB5WUli63 33. rrnoto by Angela Pndgen - ECU Photo

Eagles topple Pirates 60-50
Head basketball roach Mike
Stoele and the Pirates closed out a
long weekend last night as they
lost an exciting double-overtime
battle to lames Madison, 67-63 in
Harrisonburg, Va.
"I'm proud of the kids Steele
said. "We played hard enough to
have won the game, but we had
too many turnovers inside and
too many offensive fouls
Freshman guard Steve
Richardson led the wav tor the
Pirates, posting a game high 22
points in ECU'S tenth loss on the
season His pivotal plav on both
offense and defense forced sev-
eral crucial MU turnovers and
dutch shotsatthe end o the game.
"We knew he I Richardson)
was ,1 good shooter said lames
Madison head coach Lefty Drie
sell "I give the kid credit, he hit
some really tough shots
The Pirates entered the game
looking top stop the Huke's pow-
erful guard stee Hood, who
averages over 22 points per game.
His offensive prowess led MU in
the first halt as he made ti ur of ten
field goals and two three-point-
ers
With iist over five minutes
plaved in the game. 1 food ignited
the Dukes ottenso with a fast break
three pointer to cut ECU'S lead to
one He followed with a field goal
to give IMU a one point lead.
Alter exchanging several baa
kets, ECU'S senior guard Reed
Lose answered with a pair of three
pointers to regain the lead for the
Pirates at tlv S 40 in.irk
Following a ten point defi �
with five minutes remaining
the half, Ku hardsoni onnected i i
a three pointer that started � "
ECU run that lasted until the fin
34of the first half. Freshman guai I
Paul Childless took the final si
of the halt, but it i ame up hoi
and the 1'irates entered the I�k k
rooms trailing 25-24.
"I was very concerned about
tonight's game DrieseH said. 'Ii
was a great win tor us great foi
the tans, hut hard on a COa h
The Dukes opened rhesecond
halt with twoquick baskets total
a five-point lead Dries, ti
called for a full-court press ri
forced three H 1' fouls and
eral turnover
i or almost ight minutes th
Pirates hit another shooti
drought that led toa sizeal le lv
lead. However Ri hardson
damper on the slump when hehii
four three pointers in i row to .
the Pirates back in the game.
With :T9 remaining in regula
tion. K I tact i a four point d. I
cit and the Pirates looked U
Richardson tor the shot. I le con
nected for one of his seven thn
pointerofthenighi mdwasfouk I
on the play. His free tl row, rtedrJ �
score at 4, and th� . ��� i '
into over tune.
Plagued bv fouls and tail
overs, both reamsevrbanpoct st i
in the first o rtii � K I lool a
five point lead "v 5' H the I ON
mark when I hi km sank two
tree throws
See Richardso pa r 15
Bv Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
I ed bv Ron Draper's 22 point
performat � and a nine minute
shooting drought b ECU mcn
can I Em versity captured their tenth
win of the season Saturday night
as they toppled the Pirate � 60 fl
in Washington I! (
!�'( ! 's last Held goal of the
game came at the9-35 m irk when
Gus Hill hit a t, r � pointer from
the baseline, which gave the Pi
rates a one point lead the Eagles
then took contn l ol thi ir and
gaim d as rmH h i in 11 point
,uh antage, handing I l fheii
ninth loss of the season in front of
over 00f) fans in Bender nn.i
In the first half, the Pirates
executed a patient offensive game
against an aggressive I tgte zone
ECI attacked first
when freshman center Ike
Copeland made a turnaround
jumper. opcland, along v ith
junior guard eflre V hitaker k d
the team in scoring with lOpoints
' I he difference m the game
was the defense American plaved
in the second half head coach
Mike Steele said "It was a combi-
nation of their defense and our
offense. Nobody could finish any
plays for us "
r WO back to Ki. k three point
ers gave Amerii an a iuick four
point lead at tf L but the Pirates
retaliated and took the lead with
two buckets from I tm Brown anil
a three pointer In Reed Lose.
W hitaker then stepped up and hit
two three pointers of his own
giving the Pirates a five point lead
with w 34 k it in the first half.
We i ame out ready to play
said i ose We were all talking
and we handled their pressure
We ended uy being in the right
spots, and got some really wide
open shots
Eor the next lew minutes, the
teams exchanged several buckets
before American threatened tocul
the Pirates lead to one with under
a minute remaining to plav in the
half. I lowever, sparked bv a fircd-
up ECU defense, the Pirates stim-
led the Eagles bv forcing the 45
second shot Hock to run out, pre-
serving ECI 's three point lead.
After a baseline jumper from
Copeland, the Pirates footed to
take a five point lead into half time.
Put with one second on the clock.
Draper made a n easy shot, and cut
the lead to three at 37 34.
"Thev completely outplayed
us in the first half fd
American's head coach Ed Tap-
scott. "I told them at halftime to
take the challenge that thev (ECU)
have laid down
The Eagles responded to
Tapscott's crv mm shut down the
Pirates outside game bv plaving a
erv intense man to man defense
ECU was held lo three second
halt field goals! 12 I Land finished
the game 18-92 (34.6.
(ius Hill, who finished with
eight points, ' nen tnrv
picked up on defense, we needed
to pick up on offense Hut we didn't
execute the wav we wanted to and
we became impatient
The Eagles came out hard,
scoring first and cutting the Pirate
lead to one R .kotsbv Brown and
Copeland increased ECU'slead to
four, which was their highest and
See American, page 16
Lady Bucs hold on against American
By David Reichelt
Staff Writer
A follow-up basket by Tonya
Hargrove, and a four foot baseline
shot by Keynna Wilson helped the
Lady Pirates overcome a late
American rally Saturday night as
they defeated the l.ady Eagles 7
73 in Minges Coliseum.
Hargrove led the I-ady Bucs
with 21 points(8-13 from the field,
5-6 from the free throw line) and
seven rebounds to improve the
team's record to 8-6.
In the first half, the lady Pi
rates could do nothing wrong, as
they jumped out to a 20-8 lead
with just over eight minutes hav
ing been played. Head coach Pat
Pierson decided to give her
younger players "valuable play
ingtime and experience and
substituted all of the starters.
"Mavbe it was my fault tor
looking ahead to (James) Madi-
son Pierson said "But I felt our
intensity level reallv slipped and
we were fortunate to come away
with a win
Paced by Mechelle ones' eight
first half points, the I adv Pirates
increased their lead to sixteen
points. 30-22, at half time.
The second half started out at
the same pace as the first, with
Hargrove leading the charge With
12:52 to go m the game, the ladv
Pirates built their lead to 21 points
Pierson began substituting her
startersagain, but ECU'S intensity
level dropped and American's
picked up, causing a big scare on
the Ladv Pirate bench.
The I m Pirates would only
score eight more points the rest of
the half as American, led by re-
serve Debbie Shocklev's 14 sec-
ond half points, steadily climbed
back into the contest.
"It was a real tough one to
lose, said American's head coach
leff Thatchers "But the fact we
came back gave our team much
needed confidence
Pierson, seeing the comeback
by American, put some of her
starters back into the game to
prevent any further setbacks
However, the lady Bucs missed
two front ends of a one and one,
and Danielle Blackburn hit run-
ning four foot jumper with one
second left to tie the game 63-63 at
the end of regulation.
In the overtime period, the
lady Pirates fell behind for the
first time in the game when Black-
burn hit two free throws with 4:38
left to go. ECU traded baskets until
Elargrove followed up a Sarah
Gray miss to put the I .ady Bucs up
73-71 with 32 seconds to play.
However, led by Blackburn (six
points in overtime) American tied
the score at 73 with a driving 4-
foot jumper with 15 seconds to go.
The Lady Pirates came up the
court and passed to Wilson on the
baseline, and she hit the shot to
give ECU a 75-73 lead with only
seven-ticksrcmainingon theclock.
American's Debbie Shockley
took the ball the length of the court
and tried a desperation three-point
shot. However, the ball was just
off the mark and the Lady Pirates
won it 75-73.
You make the call!
ECU'S Reed Lose gets fouled as he drives to the basket for another
Pirate bucket Lose and the Pirates dropped two CAA games on the
road, losing to American and James MadisonPhoto by Garrett
Killian � ECU Photo Lab)
Intramural Sport Calendar
Activity
Pre season Basketball
Basketball
Co-Rec Bowling
Nike 3 Point Shooti ut
Inner Tube H20 Polo
Kacquetball Doubles
Free Throw Contest
Basketball Slam Dunk
Pre season Softball
Home Run Derbv
Softball
Tennis Doubles
Co-Rec Volleyball
Indoor Soccer
Putt Putt Golf
Challenge Week
Golf Class
Fnsbee Golf
Bvach Volleyball
RegistrationMeeting Official's Clinic
116 Spm Bio 103
116 Spm Bio 103
1 23 spm Bio 103
123 5 30pm Bio 103
130 Spm Bio 103
24 Spm Bio 101
28 3pm M(,
213 Spm Bio MB
313 Spm Bio MB
13 Spm Bio 103
313 Spm Bio 103
313 S30pm Bio 103
320 Spm Bio 103
320 S30pm Bio 103
327 Spm Bio 103
4 llam-opm MG 104 A
410 Spm Bio 103
410 S30pm Bio 103
4'10 6 0Opm Bio 103
116
1 rw
131
313
313
3 :i
3 :i
For more Information, call 757-6387





Paw I i
5lie �afit (jtarolintanl
Sports
limitary lb, I'1
Lady Dukes
end streak
in Minges
B n.iv ui Rcichell
st.ill Wtil.i
I imilton summed it tip
IujI' I' '� els
i M Madison
� � ;m t .lb i it
� i ! i ' � i
- � the I .ids
� ' Ion
i the lirst t,t the
n thi past i ir.iii
� n the two I'Min �
. � � shut the doot on
I i n 10 C A A w t n i I roa l
ii � ibout the win
Mr- and I .1. Ml t
'
1
I
ids Pirates ,im1
Is .md loin
neht I
tlv id
rs whi
Mild, I ' '
I ho first
.ids Pira
I
Pirates lose in
donble-oveitin
Richardson leads way with
liv I isa Spiridopoulos
Stall Writ ,
(load I i I thill roach ! like
look and the Pirate � !� � ' I
, nt; wi ek last I as tin
(�sl an exciting doul � l iv i thn
i,ittlo to Jann f 1 i i ;i K I runl
H-n � nl n, . �
"I mproud ifthokids
,n, We played hard on igh t I tho hall
i.r.r won tl � ;�� but we had � ' I
I en mam turnovei m le ind
t(.i in m often! ive fouls
I �, , h m a n guard 11
Ki hai Ison led tho wj
U.ltt i, postIH i,i
pointi in I ' the
His pivotal pla
i 'tti'iiso and � forced a tisv-
oral cruei il I Ml ' tin iovi ind I I
i h hoi it thoond ' " une
U , i �� v he Rn hard

I
II
A nmn lit ���
III nil"
.w� Mull ill !�! M I
,� � -mn- � � mi I �
k action last night in M � ePiral itmedtl en
�n.rtrrtitrates won 63 w tnotoo. mi. Mai ridgen bCUPhoto
Eagles topple Pirates 60-50
ivorae
lsottensivo pi ' ' '
thefu ' ill made I �
i i � � three-point
� . ' I IIVI' '
plaved in I ted
thel 'uki's nth use '��� itl � ' � ' : ll
three pointiM to cut HC I s li .id li i
one Hoi I with a I
to Rive iMi .i xiu point Hui
Aftei � i evcra
! i I � � i a r d
.oseanswei I witl i pa I ;
poii erstoi
overs bothfeamsi � hanpert sfv

behind th
f 41-1
il
'
il team
then i t of con
. . . . i t � I �
traded
. � ,
i. i isa
� I 1 II IS
his (i it
Mi i in- punpiT from
md the Pirat � I '
fivo point lead into I
;� it v. ith imhnd on tin '� � V
� ' hot,and
load to I �� s 1
utpl.i
j the first hall lid
i i i I'd lap
tt. "I told � Ittime '
� . i � iUi � ;othal the �! l L'l
i
I he F.agh n ponded to
, . m � I shut down the
� itesout idi name bs pi i n
nn lull I i
: hlit ! � �
.md tmishi l

I
pnv whol
I lus Mill imi ! ' '
ht point � Mid Wl
ked up on dofensi �
to pick up i tfonso But v didi I
. cute the w.i � � mted to and
ith undci .e bei ame impatu
I ,in the I he I igl cai 'ill hai i
si niv first md i ntting the Pirate
load tooni basket I I ' n an I
Ills WIO
11 cut
I ifired
i ito -inn

S�elebration, page In
the I � t'oj leland increase .IT1 � '� ad t
in out, pic four, win. li was theii higln t and
md! lead See American page in
Lady Bucs hold on against American
By David Ken hell
Stall Write!
A follow up basket by lorn i
I larerove andafour foot baseline
shot by Key nna Wilson helped the
, ady Pirates oven umi i late
American rails Saturday mghl .1
they defeated the lads I agle
�! in Minges oliseum
Hargrove led the I ady I
a ith . , i" 'in! �(8-13 from the held
6 from the free throw, lit 1 and
seven r�h�"in.1 to improve th
team � recir.l to 8 o
w it 11 1 ii,
Paced '
hi � ' 1 ' ;
1 . � t then li
IXMIll
the ami pan 1 I
I largrov l idingthi 11 Witl
12:32 to 1 in the '� ��
l'it1, .builtthi ir l 1 11 I p ml 1
I .ids Pirates fell behind tor the
II ulv I'irai ild onh first time in the game when Black
scoreeiehti ' the rest ol burn hit two free throws with 4:38
the half a ed by re left to go. ECU traded baskets until
rv i,i! , shotklo � 14 soe Hargrove followed up a Sarah
ond half points st idih climbed Gray miss to put the Lady Bucs up
. , , jntotheconte I 73 71 with 32 seconds to play
11 was . real tough one to However, led by Blackburn (six
lose snd merii an s head coach points in overtime) American tied
lofi matchers 'But thi fact we the score at 73 with a driving 4
came back gave out team much foot jumper with 15 seconds to go
� � , needed confidi n. e
IVrson �� thecomeback rhe Lady Pirates came up the
h.utat I. lerican put some ol her court and passed to Wilson on the
starters back into the e.ame to baseline, and she hit the shot to
prevent any further setbacks give ECU a 75-73 lead with only
You make the call!
ECUs Reed Lose gets fouled as he drives 1 M isketl
Pirate bucket Lose and the Pirates dropped two 1 Aga
road, losing to American and James Madu on I to by 1
Killian ECU Photo Lab)
M.idi
t on
M 111 � . 1 1
Ii. I ,ld Pii.it
In the first hall tl e a I) Pi
r.it.s, uld d nothing wronj; a �
they jumped out to a 20 8 load
Aith just over cighl minutes has
mg been played Head coach Pal starti 1 1 iin buthi U iint. nsity
the lads Bucs missed seven-tkksremainingontheclock
i Sl, froni . nds o! a one and one. American's I tebbie Shockley
.md Danielle Blackburn hit run u�ktheballthelengthofthecoui1
I � , titui 1 ning four foot jumper with one and tried a desperation three-poinl
Intramural Sport Calendar
Activity RegistrationMeeting Official's Clinii
Pre season Kisk.cib.ill 1 1 'Tm B,
Basketball I r "r H,�"
1 K Bowling I M -I1 'i
Nik 5 PointShootl 'ut 1 � "� P'11 1"
Inner lube H20 Polo I W pn. Bio It
Racquetball DoubUs 2 h pm
Free rhrovs 1 ontesl 2 8 H,n S1(
1
Pier son dr ided to give her
younger players "valuable play pu k
econd left to tie the game o3 f�3at shot However, the ball was just
the md ol regulation ofl the mark and the I ady Pirates
CdU 1m, 1 in .Mi lii the overtime period the wonit75-73.
T
Basketball Slam Dunk 2 1 I 5pm
Pre season Softball ' Hl '
Home Kim Derb I ' Hm Bio l
Softball ; 1; r,l,m B
renras Doubles 'I1 :v
i o K Vollevl 1 ' i
Indoor Soccei s 30pm Bw
Putt-Putt Coll r'11
i hallengi Wee "� ' tlam-�m MC. UVt
Colfl lass I ' sPni BmlM
FnsbeeGoll s V Bio 103
IV Vollevhall ' ' V"1 H It"
lor mine Inl.irmjli.m , all 757-6187





She lEast (Earolrotan
Page 13
V
Sports
January 16,1990
Lady Dukes
end streak
in Minges
By David Reichelt
Staff Writer
Irish Hamilton summed it up
best for the Lady Pirates: "It feels
great to beat Madison
Hamilton spoke for just about
everyone on the Lady Pirate bas-
ketball team as they celebrated
ECU'S 70 68 victory over the Lady
Dukes of James Madison last Mon-
day night.
The win was the first for the
Ladv Pirates in the past eight
meetings between the two teams.
The loss also shut the door on
a 46-game CAA winning streak
forlMU.
"I'm so excited about the win
that I'm still nervous and 1 don't
know why' sophomore Tonya
Hargrove said following the game
Hargrove put 22 points on the
board for the Lady Pirates, and
had seven rebounds and four
steals for the night. A steal bv
Hargrove in the final minutes of
the game helped clench the vic-
tory for the F.CU team.
A strong defense by the ECU
squad pressured the Lady Dukes
into 31 turnovers which the Lady
Pirate offense could only turn into
24 points. The team also kept C A A
Player-of-the-Week Vickie Hams
to just two points in the first half.
But the Lady Pirate offense
struggled, shooting only 46 per-
cent from the floor and 45 percent
at the charity stripe. Lady Pirate
head coach Pierson noticed the
�teams performance from the free
JJlULtf linf ar SfH h3 ' "n"XA
�iwpnui UiujULaliy�r"
ECU put the first two points
on the board just four minutes
into the game with a layup by
center Sarah Cray. For the rest of
the first half, the Lady Bucs played
a controlled up-beat game lead by
Hargrove. With 8:31 left in the
half, ECU fell behind the Lady
Dukes 18-20. Farlv in second half,
the Ladv Pirates regained a shaky
lead of 41-40. ECU and lames
Madison would trade leads four
more times with no more than
three points separating the two.
"It was a very physical game
for us Pierson said. "Madison
has always been a physical team
for us and there was a lot of con-
tact out on the court
At the 4:44 mark of the first
half the Lady Dukes led ECU by
four baskets. the two tea ms t raded
basket,shut the JMU lead was cut
to two points bv the half thanks to
a 16 and a 17-footcrby Hamilton,
an 18-footer by O'Donncll, and
underneath shots from Hargrove
and Tonia Coley.
Entering the fray from the
bench was Kim Dupree who fin-
ished the first half with six points
and 10 points for the game Pier
son put Dupree in asCiray ran into
foul trouble late in the first half.
See Celebration, page 16
Pirates lose in
double-overtime
Richardson leads way with 22
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
Tonya Hargrove puts in the extra effort to make two of her 22 points as the Lady Pirates defeated the Lady
Dukes of James Madison 70-68 m CAA action last nig hi in Minges Coliseum The Pirates claimed their
J �o(WIHB,ulUMUuiiiuu iJU(iU!).UUm bV An9ela P"dQen- LCU Photo
"Td
Eagles topple Pirates 60-50
Head basketball coach Mike
Steele and the Pirates closed out a
long weekend last night as they
lost an exciting double-overtime
battle to James Madison, 67-63 in
Harrisonburg, Va.
"I'm proud of the kids Steele
said. "We played hard enough to
have won the game, but we had
too many turnovers inside and
too many offensive fouls
Freshman guard Steve
Richardson led the way for the
Pirates, posting a game-high 22
points in KCU's tenth loss on the
season His pivotal play on both
offense and defense forced sev-
eral crucial )MU turnovers and
clutch shots! the? end of the game.
"We knew he (Richardson)
was a good shooter said lames
Madison head coach Lefty Dne-
sell "I give the kid credit, he hit
some really tough shots
The Pirates entered the game
looking top stop the Duke's pow-
erful guard Steve Hood, who
averages over 22 points per game.
His offensive prowess led MU in
the first half as he made four of ten
field goals and two three-point-
ers.
With just over five minutes
played in the game. Hood ignited
the Dukes' offense with a fast break
three pointer to cut F.CU's lead to
one. He followed with a field goal
to give JMU a one-point lead.
After exchanging several has
kets, F.CU's senior guard Reed
Loseanswered with a pair of three
pointers to regain the lead for the
Pirates at the 8:40 mark
Following a ten point defi� i
with five minutes remaining ii
the half, Richardson connected oi
a three pointer that started a l! 0
ECU run that lasted until the final
:34 of the first half. Freshman gua i I
Paul Childress took the final shot
of the half, but it came up short
and the Pirates entered the lix k i
rooms trailing 2-24
"I was very concerned about
tonight's game DrieseH said. "II
was a great win for us - ere.it foi
the fans, but hard OH a coach
The Dukes opened the second
half with two quick baskets to take
a five-point lead Dricsell then
called for a full court puss ih il
forced three EK U fouls and a
eral turnovers
For almost eight minute th-
Pirates hit another shoot in j
drought that led toa sizeable JMI
lead. However Richardson put i
damper on the slump when he hit
four three pointers in a row to pul
the Pirates back in the game
With :lc remaining in regula
tion, ECU faced a four point deli
cit and the Pirates looked t�
Richardson for the shot. He con
Reded for one of his seven thn
pointer of the night and was fouta I
on the play. His free thro v. tied th
score at 49, and the game went
into overtime.
Plagued bv tools and turn
overs, both teams exchanged stw t
in the first overtime ECU took a
five point lead, s 53, at the 1:09
mark when Childress sank two
free throws.
See Richardson, page 15
Bv Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
I ed bv Ron Draper's 22-point
performance and a nine minute
shootingdrought by K Ameri-
can University captured their tenth
win of the season Saturday nighl
as they toppled the Pirates 60-50
in Washington D.C.
ECU'S last field goal of the
game came at the 9:35 m li k whin
Cus Hill hit a three -pointer from
the baseline, which gave the Pi-
rates a one-point lead. The Eagles
then took control of the game and
gained as much as an II-point
advantage, handing E U their
ninth loss of the season in front of
over 2,000 fans in Bender Arena
In the first halt, the Pirates
executed a patient offensi ve game
against an aggressive Eagle zone.
ECU attacked first
when freshman center Ike
Copeland made a turnaround
jumper. Copeland, along with
Junior guard Jeffrey Whitaker,led
the team in scoring with 10 points.
"The difference in the game
was the defense American played
in the second half head coach
Mike Steele said "It was a combi-
nation of their defense and our
offense. Nobody could finish any
plavs for us
Two hack to back three point
ers gave American a quick four
point lead at 8 4. but the Pirates
retaliated and took the lead with
two buckets from Tim Brown and
a three-pointer by Reed Lose.
Whitaker then stepped up and hit
two three-pointers of his own
givingthe Piratesa five point lead
with 9-34 left in the first half.
"We came out ready to play
said 1 ose. "We were all talking
and we handled their pressure.
We ended up being in the right
spots, and got some really wide
open shots
For the next few minutes, the
teams exchanged several buckets
before American threatened to cut
the Pirates lead to one with under
a minute remaining to play in the
half. However, sparked by a fired-
up ECU defense, the Pirates stim-
ied the Eagles by forcing the 45
second shot clock to run out, pre-
serving ECU's three point lead.
After a baseline jumper from
Copeland, the Pirates looked to
takea five point lead into halftime.
But with one second on the clock.
Draper made an easy shot, and cut
the lead to throe at 37-34.
"Thev completely outplayed
us in the first half said
American's head coach Ed Tap-
scott. "1 told them at halftime to
take the challenge that they (ECU)
have laid down
The Eagles responded to
Tapscott'scry and shut down the
Pirates outside game by playing a
very intense man to man defense.
ECU was held to three second
half field goals( 12), and finished
the game 1S-52 (34.6).
Cus Hill, who finished with
eight points, said, "When they
picked upon defense, we needed
to pick up on offense. But we didn' t
execute the way we wanted to and
we became impatient
The Eagles came out hard,
scoring first and cutting the Pirate
lead to one. Baskets bv Brown and
Copeland increased ECU's load to
four, which was their highest and
See American, page 16
Lady Bucs hold on against American
By David Reichelt
Staff Writer
A follow-up basket by Tonya
Hargrove, and a four-foot baseline
shot by Keynna Wilson helped the
Lady Pirates overcome a late
American rally Saturday night as
they defeated the Lady Eagles 75-
73 in Minges Coliseum.
Hargrove led the Lady Bucs
with 21 points (8-13 from the field,
5-6 from the free throw line) and
seven rebounds to improve the
team's record to 8-6.
In the first half, the Udy Pi
rates could do nothing wrong, as
they jumped out to a 20-8 lead
with just over eight minutes hav-
ing been played. Head coach Pat
Pierson decided to give her
younger players "valuable play-
ingutime and experience and
substituted all of the starters.
"Maybe it was mv fault for
looking ahead to (ames) Madi-
son Pierson said. "But 1 felt our
intensity level reallv slipped and
we were fortunate to come away
with a win
Paced by Mechelle ones' eight
first half points, the lady Pirates
increased their lead to sixteen
points, 38-22, at half time.
The second half started out at
the same pace as the first, with
Hargrove leading thecharge. With
12:52 to go in the game, the Lady
Pirates built their lead to 21 points.
Pierson began substituting her
startersagain,but ECU's intensity
level dropped and American's
picked up, causing a big scare on
the Lady Pirate bench.
The Udy Pirates would only
score eight more points the rest of
the half as American, led by re-
serve Debbie Shockley's 14 sec-
ond half points, steadily climbed
back into the contest.
"It was a real tough one to
lose said American's head coach
Jeff Thatchers. "But the fact we
came back gave our team much
needed confidence.
Pierson, seeing the comeback
by American, put some of her
starters back into the game to
prevent any further setbacks.
However, the lady Bucs missed
two front ends of a one and one,
and Danielle Blackburn hit run-
ning four foot jumper with one
second left to tie the game 63-63 at
the end of regulation.
In the overtime period, the
Lady Pirates fell behind for the
first time in the game when Black-
burn hit two free throws with 4:38
left to go. ECU traded baskets until
Hargrove followed up a Sarah
Gray miss to put the Lady Bucs up
73-71 with 32 seconds to play.
However, led by Blackburn (six
points in overtime) American tied
the score at 73 with a driving 4-
foot jumper with 15 seconds to go.
The Lady Pirates came up the
court and passed to Wilson on the
baseline, and she hit the shot to
give ECU a 75-73 lead with only
seven-ticks remaining on theclock.
American's Debbie Shockley
took the ball the length of the court
and tried a desperation three-point
shot. However, the ball was just
off the mark and the Udy Pirates
won it 75-73.
You make the call!
ECU'S Reed Lose gets fouled as he drives to the basket for another
Pirate bucket. Lose and the Pirates dropped two CAA games on the
road, losing to American and James Madison.Photo by Garrett
Killian � ECU Photo Lab)
Intramural Sport Calendar
Activity RegistrationMeeting Official's Clinic
Pre season Basketball1165pm Bio 103116
Basketball1165pm Bio 103116
Co-Rec Bowling123Spm Bio 103
Nike 3 Point Shoot Out1235:30pm Bio 103
Inner Tube H20 Polo1305pm Bio 103131
Racquerball Doubles265pm Bio 103
Free Throw Contest283 pm MG
Basketball Slam Dunk2135pm Bio 103
Pre season Softball3135pm Bio 103313
Home Run Derby3135pm Bio 103
Softball3135pm Bio 103313
Tennis Doubles313530pm Bio 103
Co-Rec Volleyball3205pm Bio 103321
Indoor Soccer3205:30pm Bio 103321
Putt-Putt Golf3275pm B�o 103
Challenge Week49llam-6pm MG 104-A
Golf Classic4105pm Bio 103
FrisbeeGoH4105:30pm Bio 103
rVach Volleyball4106 00pm B�o 103
Far more Information, call 757-6387





11 1 ho last Carolinian, January 16, 1990
Sports Briefs
4l)ers face Broncos in Superbowl
l In- San f rands 49ers made lamb stow out of their I os Angeles
rivals with their 30-3 win over the Rams The 4�ers wore projvl led by
an awesome Joe Montana who completed 26 of 30 passes for 262 yards
and two touchdowns, the 49ers will face the Denver Broncos In
Suporbowl l an 28 I ho Broncos defeated the Cleveland Browns
17 l to win their rbui th appearance tor the NIL crown.
Glanville named to Falcon post
Atlanta Falcons owner Rankin Smith lr named former Houston
Oilers' coach jerry Glanville his now coach Sunday Glanville, 48,
1 istheOilers coach Jan. 6 Marion Campbell quit as Falcons
coach in November llanvitle had been on the defensive staff ol the
ns from 1977-1982.
Aussie wins in sudden death
Australian Rodgei 1 a is beat defending champion Curtis Strange
in tin i ond hole ol sudden death at the Palm Meadows Cup golf
� i in Australia Strange had a three-stroke lead going into the
bui i i i - managed to catch him, posting a under-par 69
lei 71 total Strange finished with a 72
Foreman prepares for battle
li av � I eorge Foreman 11 tipped the scales at ?r I 4
his opponent yeai old Gerry Cooney, weighed in at
231 dm . iSundav night weigh-in Phe two will meet Monday night
at( at mrs Atlantic ii where a crowd ol I l,0tX) is expected to watch
the fight Fach fighter is guaranteed Si million, The bout will be shown
on i� i pet v iew and i losed circuit television.
New Hall of Fame executive named
Inti rnational Swimming Hall of Fame Inc. named Frank McK
ne ir formei chairman and i hid executive ol Bank One Indianapo-
lis hail m.m ol the the boarjj. McJCinney, 51. who won two Olympic
i mevials becomes the Bungesl person named to head the 1 lall ol
��� I orl 1 anderdale 11)
Indy gets new safety director
Ri tired I S Marine C orps Col. Robert C. Mclnteer was named
dirc� toi ol safer) ol the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Mclnteer sue-
' m o Neal who retired after spending two years as the
" - tv directoi
Stallings named new Alabama coach
� N. coacheneStallings was named football coach of the
Phursdav, taking over from Bill Currv, who
J Sunda Stallings was both a player and assistant coach to
ch Paul Beai Bryant who coached at texasA&Mand
I had Ixvn fired as head coach ol the Phoenix
Leary and Yanks come to terms
Pit hei l im I oarv agreed to a raise ol $155,000 from the New York
� fheright handerwillnowcarn$825,0(X).TheSeattleMariners
Mike h� kson agreed to a contract that would raise the right-
salan to$400,000 an increase of $190,000.
Mets refuse outfielder's raise
tl Meb rtikaals m4 tbey v�Jl not tntrease outfieldet
�� .i.Ti s silan t ma ten incinnati Reds outfielder Bri
i last Sundas to a three year contract that would p.n
team official s.m.1 such an increase would moan
would earn about $1 million more than am of his team
Falcon's coach is hospitalized
Atlanta 1 alcons interim coach Inn I lain tan was taken to an Atlanta
hospital foi treatment ol head injuries and hold for observation there
I hursda I he i I coach had been arrested early Thursday ior inves
tigation ol drunken driving and investigation of battery ol a police
offio r Authorities said Ham tan w as stopped about 4 am in north
Atlanl i �� � driving without headlights.
Noah to retire at season's end
i rench tennis star Yannick Noah will retire alter the 1990 season,
according to a french tenms magazine. The 29-year-old Noah has
suffered a number ol injuries and accidents since winning the French
t, '�pen in I 83
Babe Ruth's bed-ridden friend dies
1 he bed ridden little boy who legend says Babe Ruth visited and
promised to hil a homerun lor in the 1928 World Series died Monda)
at theagi i'i 74 ohnny Sylvester became famous through the 1948 film
il Ruth Story starring William Bendix, who as babe Ruth
a home run lor ailine Sylvester. Ruth then hit three

pro
home i uns
hil
In the Locker
Associated Press releases top 25 poll
I ircnlhcsos records through Jn 14, totil points baaed on 25-24-23
- 16-1 5-14-13-12-1 t-10-9-8-7-6-54-3-2-1 and List week i renting:
Record
viv i 6)ISO
1 .1 I IT ;� tl IVS '1.1-0
l)12-0
"15-1
1st'12 1
� M hi in11-2
7 .lllii12-1
8 Duki12 2
� Nl V10-3
; Louis i12-2
rgia !nh11-1
12 rkansas12-2
1 Ind it
' '14-3
h UCLA11-2
17. La Salic10 l
18. Orvj � �12 2
l ii rta St12 1
ill
21 1 � �. ola Man mount11-3
� t10-3
21 Arizona9
24 r trd 112
2 i Alabama12-3
1.344
1317
1,420
l 319
1,296
1 222
1,203
1,132
995
4K8
956
906
B43
547
584
.si
466
)96
370
307
21
277
273
217
167
Tv
1
(
3
8
10
11
9
12
14
13
IS
19
22
17
25
23
16
IK
24
Possible probations may
tarnish reputations
RALEIGH (AP) Ihethre.it
ol having three oi the eight teams
in the Atlantic Coast Conference
on probation for NCAA violations
is not going to help or Kinder the
league's image, commissioner
Gene Corrigan s.iul
North Carolina Stateisaiready
on probation lor problems in its
basketball program. Clemson is
being investigated tor irregulari-
ties in its football program and
Maryland tor violations In its
basketball program.
"Sure, it's unfortunate. Bui
you've got to look at the circum-
stancesofwhat'shappened. I don't
think it hurts the ACC's image, as
long as you consider the other
schools that we have in the league.
They're the reputation of the eon
terence in many ways, anyway
Corrigan said in an interview with
The Sao and Observer of Raleigh
at the NCAA Convention in Pal-
las.
1 hate that this happened
he said. We all hate that this
happened
"Does it help us" No. Does it
ruinour image? Sto.Doesitchange
the way die big Ien or Notre Dame
feel about us" No
A recent NCAA report re
vealed that Clemson had Ken
accused of more than a dozen ille-
gal recruiting contacts in its foot-
ball program. Hie Tigers also were
Cited for giving players as much as
$150 in cash from 1984 to 1988.
11 a severe punishment were
le led by the NCAA, it would not
bea tirst tordemson or head coac h
Danny ford.
We've had Clemson on pro-
bation Ivlore Corrigan said "It's
not like this is something brand
new
In l982,Qemson was hit with
a two year probation for 70 viola-
tions that occurred under both
former head coach Charley Pell
and l oid In its aftermath, athletic
director Mill Mel ell.in was fired
and president Mill Atchiey even
tually resigned under pressure
Bobby Robinson, then an as-
sistant athletic director, succeeded
Mcl ellan. promising to run the
department completely above
board nd Max I.ennon echoed
that commitment when he was
named president.
I know the public perception
willlv bad Corrigan said "i in e
Seo Reputation, page IS
The Hair Loft
( ict a quick Tan Without Burning in )ui
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(Wolff Beliarium "S" Lamps)
$1 per visit J5 for 10 visits
Wet cms $8.00
Perms $33.00
Walk ins Welcome
112 v Mill St.
w intcrville, NC
hptn
28590
Mon In IOam
S.it 9am lpni
evenings by appointmcni
i.k mss li.nii 1 ixic Queen
only ' miles south ol Carolina Fast Mall
$55-5980
Fosdick's
Fresh Floundc
& Shrimp
Special fc
Two
Coupon
Immunity denied to
former Clemson coaches
Two Combinations of
Flounder & Shrimp
Two Small Platters $9.50
Two Regular Platters $11.50
Two Large Platters$13.56
Special (i(M)d Monda) Through Thursday
Dine In Or
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Beverage not
Included
I EMSON,S. (AP) Nei
ther Clemson nor three former
assistant football coaches report
edlyinvolved in NCAA violations
are immune from sanctions nist
because the coaches let t theschooi,
officials say
In a letter dated Ian. 4, the
NCAA alleges 14 rules violations
against (. lemson's football pro-
gram between 1984 and 1988,
ranging from cash payments to
players Of up to $150 to improper
recruiting tactics
On Friday, the Anderson
Independent Mail reported that
an unidentified source said for
mer assistant head coach Pom
1 larper, former quarterback coach
lack Crowe and tenner graduate
assistant coach Steve Shaughnessy
all were named in the list ol al-
leged rules violations.
Crowe now is quarterback
coach and offensive coordinator
at the University ol Arkansas
Shaughnessy is now head football
coach at South Mecklenburg High
School in Charlotte, N.C Harper
died May 23 in Savannah, Ca .
while on a speaking trip.
Arkansas athletic director
frank Broylesconfirmed Crowe's
inclusion in the allegations and
said he is. onvinced Crowe is not
in violation oi any rules Shaugh-
nessy lias denied involvement in
any wrongdoing as claimed by
former i "lemson offensive lineman
Andrew Walker
I lowever, it a coach who has
moved within the NCAA system
is found in violation after Sept. 1.
1985,theCommitteeon Infractions
could impose sanctions that would
limit hisettectivenessasa recruiter
or a coach at the new institution,
said i. buck Smrt, an assistant di
rector ol enforcement for the
NCAA.
It a coach who has gone into
high school coaching is found m
v lolation while at an NCAA msti
tution. the Committee on Infrac-
tions can not take action while he
remains at the high school. It could
impose sanctions, howeve it the
eo.u h returns to the Ct giate
ranks at an NCAA institution
withm an undisclosed period of
time
It you go to an NCA school
w ithin a certain number ol years,
we'd want you and that next
school to come m before us and
we'll talk whether we're going to
appb any restrictions against you
in that next war Smrt said
All three coaches named Fri-
day by the source left the football
See Immunity, page lb
lOSDICK
i
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2903 S. Evans St.
(all 756-2011
OPEN for LUNCH
Sun -Fri at 11:00
STUDENT UNION
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Three Men And A Cradle
Wednesday. January 17. 1990
Parenthood
Thurs Sun Jan. 18- 21
1990
All Movies Screen 8 pm Hendrix Theatre
Amnesty International
Artist For Human Rights
In Mendenhall Gallery
through Jan 27, 1990
Sponsored by "The Student Union Visual Arts Committee
Other receiving votes NewMexkoSt 133, Memphis St 108, Michigan S I0H,
SW Louisiana 56 Colorado Si 28, Mississippi 22, Clemson 21, Texas IS,
Mary Ian I I i, illanova 10,1 ouisiaM Tech 8, Connecticut 7, Massachusetts 7.
Hon. l.i 6 Holy c rossS, VanderbiH r Ohio St. I, North Carolina 3, Providence
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ii
STUDENT UNION
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i





The East Carolinian, January 16,1990 15
Richardson
Continued from page 13
But (Ml rallied and cul Ihe
lead to two on a Billv Coles three
pointer with 54 remaining, lull
court pressure by the Dukes
, tused the Pirates to turn the ball
over, and gave MU a chance to
win With eight seconds remain
-r, I ess It ing drove the lane and
hit the tying basket to send the
game into double overtime with
the s ore knotted at 58
Reputation
The second overtime was just
as intense, as the two trams battled
tor the load until the final 31, when
MU hold a five point edge, 65-60.
Richardson hit a three pointer to
cut the lead to two with :22 rv-
maining, but that was all tor the
Pirates as they toll 67-63.
I was really disappointed
Steole satd. 'The game shouldn't
have gone into overtime they
should have won. Hut the game
shouldn't have gone into double
overtime we should have won "
The loss dropped the Pirates
record to 7-10overall. l-3inCAA
play. The team will be in action
again Saturday night, when they
host William and Mary in Minges
Coliseum. Tip off is at 7 p.m.
Continued from page 14
jgain.everybod) seesthe fV.sees
the paw up on the screen, and
they II say, Yep, Clemson's at it
again ' lh.it makes it tough, but
Oil O gOt to sUi k it lip
That s u hat I hate about it I
hate it toi Bobbv Robinson, for
Ma I ennon, for all those people.
1 know how hard they have
worked and everybody respects
Bobb) rhey don t want a cham
pionship; the) want respectabil
ity, and this sets that back
Corrigan called Maryland's
NCA i ise unusual because of
the behavioi ol former head bas-
ketball coa h Bob Wade
In i tobei the NCAA a
! the s iii' 'I ol I" iolations
ling ot compli
1 ir tu kets b five pl.w crs at
'ho b'ss i i loin n.unont and a
ii ;ivonto formet guard
� rheN( Aalsosaid
'� i I ilh pro kHI false
� imi 1.1 their investigators
sed his staff to Jo the
It'll bo interesting to see how
. s itsell out Cot rigan siul
it hod to thee
' � i have been differ
� � he tl V ade lied to the
Man land people too
The Sports Editor and
Asst Sports Editor of
The East Carolinian
are looking for
Sports Writers!
Call one or tbeml
757-6366
It's (list a different, unique
case.
Corrigan is still hopeful the
penalties tor Clcmson and Mary-
land won'tbeoverly harsh. Intact,
he said they could be similar to the
sanctions levied against N.C. State,
which was given a two-year pro-
bation and prohibited from play-
ing in the 1990 NCAA tournament
alter an investigation of the
Wolf pack basketball program.
"If 1 didn't feel that Clemson
and Max 1.ennon and Bobby
Robinson and the whole Clemson
group wasn't totally committed
to doing things right, yeah, I'd be
upset he said. It I didn't feel like
Maryland had control ot their situ
ation.l'd be very upset and proba-
bly wouldn't even be thecommis
sioner or even want to be. But all
those people have got their priori
ties right
Fishy
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803 Hooker Rd.
o
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especially for ECU. New East is making banking
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WRDU-FM106 is helping us celebrate the
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January 16th from 11:30 a.m-1:30 p.m. D.j. Bob
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broadcasting live!
Come register to win one of five $100
checking accounts, and join us for lunchtime
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You can win great WRDU-FM giveaways,
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The East Carolinian, January 16,1990 15
Richardson
Continued from page 13
But IMU rallied and cut the
lead to two on a Billy Coles three
pointer with 54 remaining. Full-
court pressure by the Dukes
caused the Pirates to turn the ball
over, and gave JMU a chance to
win. With eight seconds remain-
ing, Fess Irving drove the lane and
hit the tying basket to send the
game into double-overtime with
the score knotted at 58.
Reputation
The second overtime was just
as intense, as the two teams battled
tor the lead until the final :31, when
JMU held a five point edge, 65-60.
Richardson hit a three pointer to
cut the lead to two with :22 re-
maining, but that was all for the
Pirates as they fell 67-63.
"I was really disappointed
Steelc said. "The game shouldn't
have gone into overtime � they
should have won. But the game
shouldn't have gone into double-
overtime� we should have won
The loss dropped the Pirates
record to 7-10 overall, 1-3 in CAA
play. The team will be in action
again Saturday night, when they
host William and Mary in Minges
Coliseum. Tip off is at 7 p.m.
Continued from page 14
again, every body sees the TV, sees
the paw up on the screen, and
they'll say, Yep, Clemson's at it
again That makes it tough, but
you've got to suck it up.
"That's what I hate about it. I
hate it for Bobby Robinson, for
Max l.ennon, for all those people.
1 know how hard they have
worked, and everybody respects
Bobby. They don't want a cham-
pionship; they want respectabil-
ity, and this sets that back
Corrigan called Maryland's
NCAA case unusual because of
the behavior of former head bas-
ketball coach Bob Wade.
In October, the NCAA ac-
cused the school o( violations,
including the selling of compli-
mentary tickets by five plavcrs at
the 1988 ACC tournament and a
courtesy car given to former guard
Rudy Archer. The NCAA also said
Wade intentionally provided false"
information to their investigators
and advised his staff to do the
same.
"It'll be i nteresti ng to see how
it plays itself out Corrigan said.
If Wade hadn't lied to thee
NCAA, it may have been differ-
ent The thing is Wade lied to the
Maryland people, too
"It's just a different, unique
case
Corrigan is still hopeful the
penalties for Clemson and Mary-
land won'tbeoverly harsh. In fact,
he said they could be similar to the
sanctions levied against N.C. State,
which was given a two-year pro-
bation and prohibited from play-
ingin the 1990NCAA tournament
after an investigation of the
Wolfpack basketball program.
"If I didn't feel that Clemson
and Max Lennon and Bobby
Robinson and the whole Clemson
group wasn't totally committed
to doing things right, yeah, I'd be
upset he said. "If I didn't feel like
Maryland had control of their situ-
ation, I'd be very upset and proba-
bly wouldn't even be the commis-
sioner or even want to be. But all
those people have got their priori-
ties right
Fishy
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16 The East Carolinian, January 16,1990
Celebration
Continued from page 13
I uprce said she was nervous stole pass to JMU'sJeanine M�ch-
vvhen she entered the game but ealscn do points). Hargrove
Kidrd, I reel more confident with missed the tront end of the one
mv shot mnv� and said she was so nervous at
Witlvssoeondslettmthegame the line that I fust missed it "
.nd!ad.ondounbvtwopoints, Hamilton, who had described
u as fouled after she the feeling of the I adv Pirate'svk-
American
last lead of the game. ECU's offense never got
1 ose, who was guarded bv moving in the second halt, and
American sired Tillman. was shut after Hill s basket, the penmeter
down in thesecond halt. Tapscott's game was non-existent Freshman
game plan wasto guard Lose tight guard Paul Childress said. "We
and said. I've got a lot of respect just couldn't hit a shot, it wasn't
that kid can shoot it " anv one thing we just couldn't
Immunity
torv sv well, put into words the
desire the team has tor the rest ot
the season 'We're definitely going
tor the (CAA) championship
The I adv Tirates take on I Via
ware St this Thursdav at 7:00 p.m
in Minges Coliseum.
Continued from page 13
hit-
Lose added. "We played
pretty well tor 30 minutes and
then the guysgot discou raged and
hesitant about shooting. We need
to find a way to get away from
those stretches
Continued from page 14
program without administrative
action Harper was moved into an
administrative assistant position
within the program a tew months
before his death, but that appar-
ently waste fill an opening left by
the retirement of Don Wade
If the coaching start is no
longer there, that may be a correc-
tive or punitive action, or nothing
at all Smrt said.
University president Max
! ennon has said he wouldn't bo
surprised to see seme of the
charges dropped Hut if anv of the
allegations involving the former
coaches are found to he true, the
school still can be penalized.
� rhe institution isresponsible
tor the ,uts ol its employees,
whether they are �ir nt or tor-
mer employees Smrt said.
Rich Johanningmeier. a for-
mer NCAA enforcement represen-
tative who investigated the Tigers
before leaving the division last
week, said Clemson officials co-
operated "totally within the letter
and the spirit" of their obligation
to NCAA enforcement proce-
dures. That also may work in
Clemson s favor, Johanningmeier
told the Independent-Mail.
Clemson athletic director
Bobby Robinson said the possibil-
ity of receiving lesser sanctions
was not the underlying reason for
the university's cooperation.
"It was the right thing to do,
he said.
University officials haveuntil
March 12 to respond to thecharges.
Sharky's
of Greenville
Located by Sports Pad
on 5th Street
Enter through Alley
Monday - $2.25
Tuesday - SI.75
Wednesday - $2.00
Thursdav - $1.25
LADIES MTE
FREE admission
Friday - $1.75
Saturday - $1.75
$1.75
Margaritas
Bourbon
Kamikaze
Imports &
Coolers
Highballs
Highballs
Fireballs
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 years old guests.
rn
FREE SHARKY'S MEMBERSHIP"
I
Leader.
Friend
Information Night
TONIGHT
Interviews - Wed.
Jan 17.8 - 10
Mendenhall
Be of
Service.
Induction of
Pledges
(by invitation)
Thurs
Jan. 18,8- 10
Mendenhall
RUSH
Any ?'s
call
758-6313
or
931-7036
rheComrnittee on Infractions then
isexpected to review the case at its
April 20-22 meeting in Kansas
City. Mo and the university is
expected to loam of anv sanctions
within two to tour weeks follow-
ing tho meeting.
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Who knows, with this IBM PS2,1 may be so organized
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I
16 The East Carolinian, January 16,1990
Celebration
Continued from page 13
Dupree said she was nervous
when she entered the game but
iddedI feel more confident with
my shot now
With 8 seconds left in thegame
and Madison down by two points,
Hargrove was fouled after she
American
stolea pass to JMU's leanine Mich-
ealsen (16 points). Hargrove
missed the front end of the one
and said she was "so nervous at
the line that I just missed it
Hamilton, who had described
the feeling of the Lady Pirate's vic-
tory so well, put into words the
desire the team has for the rest of
the seasonVVe'redefinitely going
for the (CAA) championship
The Lady Pirates takeon Dela-
ware St. thisThursday at 7:00p.m.
in Mingcs Coliseum.
Continued from page 13
last lead of the game.
Lose, who was guarded by
American's Fred Tillman, was shut
down in the second half. Tapscott's
game plan was to guard Lose tight,
and said, "I've got a lot of respect
for Reed, that kid can shoot it
Immunity
program without administrative
action. Harper was moved into an
administrative assistant position
within the program a few months
before his death, but that appar-
ently was to fill an opening left by
the retirement of Don Wade.
"If the coaching staff is no
longer there, that may be a correc-
tive or punitive action, or nothing
at all Smrt said.
University president Max
I.cnnon has said he wouldn't be
surprised to see some of the
charges dropped. But if any of the
allegations involving the former
coaches are found to be true, the
school still can be penalized.
"The institutionisresponsible
tor the acts of its employees,
whether thev are current or for-
ECU's offense never got
moving in the second half, and
after Hill's basket, the perimeter
game was non-existent. Freshman
guard Paul Childress said, "We
just couldn't hit a shot, it wasn't
any one thing � we just couldn't
hit
Lose added, "We played
pretty well for 30 minutes and
then the guys gotdiscouragedand
hesitant about shooting. We need
to find a way to get away from
those stretches
Continued from page 14
mer employees Smrt said.
Rich Johanningmeier, a for-
mer NCAA enforcement represen-
tative who investiga ted the Tigers
before leaving the division last
week, said Clemson officials co-
operated "totally within the letter
and the spirit" of their obligation
to NCAA enforcement proce-
dures. That also may work in
Clemson's favor, Johanningmeier
told the Independent-Mail.
Clemson athletic director
Bobby Robinson said the possibil-
ity of receiving lesser sanctions
was not the underlying reason for
the university's cooperation.
"It was the right thing to do
he said.
University officials have until
March 12 to respond to thecharges.
The Committee on Infractions then
lsexpected to review the case at its
April 20-22 meeting in Kansas
City, Mo and the university is
expected to learn of any sanctions
within two to four weeks follow-
ing the meeting.
COMING SOON
i
i
COASTAL FITNESS
SUPER SPA!
$79
FOR WOMEN ONLY
ONLY 3 DAYS LEFT
TueThur& Fri.
First 100 new Members Only
Full Use of Facility, Limited Hours
SUPER SPA OFFERS: 'Low Impact Cardio Center
�Babysitting �Equipment by Global
�Diet Center -Step up by Reebok
�Pro Shop �Stair Climbers by Apex
L
per year
I
l
I
I
I
I
I
I
l
J
Sharkyfs
of Greenville
Located by Sports Pad
on 5th Street
Enter through Alley
Monday - $2.25
Tuesday-$1.75
Wednesday - $2.00
Thursday - $1.25
?LADIES NITE
FREE admission
Friday-$1.75
Saturday-$1.75
$1.75
Margaritas
Bourbon
Kamikaze
Imports &
Coolers
Highballs
Highballs
Fireballs
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 years old guests.
JFREE SHARKY'S MEMBERSHIP"
Bca
Leader.
Bea
Friend
Information Night -
TONIGHT
Interviews - Wed.
Jan 17,8- 10
Mendenhall
Be of
Service.
Induction of
Pledges
(by invitation)
Thurs
Jan. 18,8- 10
Mendenhall
RUSH

This year
Fll get organized?'
:�
� vxv w ��,�?
i. ummwu
M�ijWiiiwiM4iW�"�'�;XMi. � - �ww.VMvAv.v.v.v.yY.v.vvAv
�V JMfcyvW � '� v
isps
And this year I really mean it. So Fm buying myself
an IBM Personal System28 computer to help me do everything
from organizing notes and revising papers to creating high-quality
graphics, and more. And not only is this IBM PS2 easy to learn
and use, but if Fm eligible, I'll save up to 40 with my discount.
Who knows, with this IBM PS2,1 may be so organized
even my socks will match.
"Visit With One Of IBM's PS2 Reps
Monday - Friday, Between 10 and 2
at the Student Store
or
Call the Student Store at 757-6731"
New! Ask about the IBM PS2 Loan for Learning
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 16, 1990
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 16, 1990
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.717
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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