The East Carolinian, January 11, 1990






Qttiz i�uBt GLutalMnn
Sen'tnq the 'East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. M No. 2
Thursday lanuarv II, 1990
C.reenville, North Carolina
Detectives
investigate
kidnapping
ECU student may
press charges
By Samantha Thompson
Staff Writer
ECU Public Safety detectives
are continuing an investigation of
an alleged kidnapping and assault
Of a female ECU student which
occurred fan. 3 on the ECU cam-
pus
According to Chief lohn Rose,
of FCC Public Safety, a ones Hall
resident was physically abducted
from the lobby of lones 1 lall bv her
ex-boyffiend. She was then taken
to a location off campus and as-
saulted
Vo prvti t the u tim. ECU
Public Safety is not speculating on
the location ol the assaull because
detectives an? till investigating
the incident. Police also tailed to
comment on the physical descrip-
tion ol the assaultant.
The victim did not report the
incident to Public Safety until Ian
4 at approximately 9:30. am.
According to Rose, the victim
conta fed Public Safety as soon as
she w as able to get away trom her
kidnapper and return home to get
more clothing
Although there was not
weapon used in the incident, the
victim did report having miner
�� rom both the abduction
a d the assault.
Charges are still pending In
this incident because the vtvtun
has not vet decided whether of not
to press charges against her for-
mer boyfriend.
Vice Chancellor ol Student Life Alfred T Mattews speaks with television reporter Rex Roland following
Halloween trial on Wednesday
Buccaneer editor found guilty
By Samantha Thompson
Stall Writer
During the third day Of trials for the Halloween
incident at lar RiveT Estates, six students entered
plea bargains while three others were found guilty
ol failure to disperse charges.
Among the three found guilt) were Thomas
Walters and Nelson Scott Walters is editor of the
1900 issue o( Buccaneer, w hile Scott is the current
yearbook business manager. The two were arrested
1 lalloween nighl as they attempted to take pu hires
for the yearbook
Walters and Scotl have until Friday to decide
whether the) plan to appeal the decision made bv
District Couri fudge famesG. Ragan III It they do
not appeal they will be sentenced on Friday.
Vice Chancellor of Student Life Alfred T Mat-
thews testified for the state. Commenting after the
trial, Matthews questioned whether the yearbook
could be considered a medium and said that Wal
ters and Soft were simply there as students and
press
'six students pleaded guilty during Wednesday's
COOfl date Three defendants chose Plan A, one of the
two bargains offered late Monday afternoon bv Ragan.
I he plan consists of a Prayer for Judgement and a
payment oi court costs, lohn Spivev, BruceOaklev and
1 David IVlion entered the bargain knowing the
charges will be dropped, but their arrest record will
remain unless thev go back to court to have it removed
trom their record.
The other three students, David Hooper, Richard
c livens and Sarah Miller, chose Plan B, which entails 25
hours of community service hours, at a cost oi $100.
Phese students have until Apr. Q to finish the commu-
nity service and pay the costs.
During Tuesday's court date, 12 students charged
with failure to disperse' also entered plea bargains,
whilel4 defendants on Monday did the same. Five
students, who chose to go to trial, were acquitted on
Tuesday
Several cases remain to be heard and will be tried
tixlav and Fridav.
Expressions receives first place awards
By Kimberly Brothers
Staff Writer
The development of an FCC
minontv publication has pro
gressed from a black newspaper,
The Ebony Herald, to the a ward-
winning minority magazine, Ex
presshns.
Expressh Pisrei cived first place
awards tor the 1989springand tall
editions from the American Scho
lastic Press Asscx ialion and the
Asscn iated Collegiate Press
The literary magazine has
expanded the minority definition
to "anvgroupot students that feels
outside the 'mainstream " which
includes membersof ethnic groups
as well as handicaps, veteransand
non-traditional students
"The tact th.it Expressions)
devoted a way to a definite socio-
logical need showsa sensitivity on
the par! , ; I I i� � � admini-
stration and student body said
( .eorge klawitter. one of the liter-
ary contest judges
Dillahunt accredits the a wards
to the work ot fall 1W General
Manager IX- Bora orris. former
Managing Editor Sheila (.ardner,
to the layouts of Richard I lasolng
and Don Rudedge, to the staff
members, the faculty advisor, Dr.
Cav WikntZ and Tom Stroud of
(.reenville Printing Company.
Achieving award-winning
status took mining from simple
magazine designs, all drawn by
the hands Of an art director, to a
more professional layout, which is
done bv desktop printing, on a
Macintosh computer
The improvement was also
influenced by the opinions trom
staff members anil readers, who
developed the concepts that al-
lowed Expressions to produce a
quality magazine.
Klawitter added in his sum-
mary that "the care Expressions)
has lavished on the artwork and
most of the wnting is a credit to
(Expressions ') human values
The magazine uses this pur-
pose to report on subjects that af-
fect these people in hopesof spark-
ing public reaction, which will in
turn affect social change, accord-
ing to Reginald Dillahunt, general
manager of Expressions.
Dillahunt said, the Expressions
staff is "glad the campus is recog-
nizing and contributing to the
magazine and "encourages all
t( I students to become involved
in Expressions to make it the best,
and to provide a voice for minori-
ties
According to Dillahunt, the
February 1990 issue will focus on
the theme of progression, which
will look back at The Fbony Her
aid, anil lead up to the present
Expressions that caters to all mi-
norities
Circulation 12,000
14 Pages
ECU declares July
4 a legal holiday
for students
By Thomas Barry
Staff Writer
The Student Government
Association began the 1990s with
their first meeting of the spring
semester Monday in which a rec-
ommendation was confirmed
pertaining to a bill that would al-
low the fourth of lulv to become a
legal holiday tor FCU students.
TheSC.A passed a recommen-
dation in the tall semester ques-
tioning whether or not ulv 4
should become a holiday for stu
dents enrolled in the summer
semester .it R I Alter the bill
passed, it was mandated to the
( alendaromnuttee. the ! i. ulry
Senate nA Chancellor Richard
Fakin Chancellor Eakin had the
final approval on the bill and dc
cided in its favor
The bill will go into effect this
coming year. ITienew holidav will
slightly change the schedule for
next summer's semester bv add-
ing an extra Jav . due to the 'tie
lost in its place. The new schedule
tor the second summer semester
will begin une 19and end lulv 29
Four other new bills were also
proposed, one of which includes
the Fast Carolina Occupational
Therapy Association. These bills
will be brought up again for de-
bate in the next meeting.
Yesterday's meeting was very brief
and no old business was con-
ducted.
The body passed the
constitution oi the Student Music
Educators' National Conference,
which had been passed earlier by
consent at the last meeting of the
fall semester. After the body paaaad
i institution it was later found
that a quorum had not been pres-
ent
i h a different note, TYipp
Roakes,S , A president, congratu-
lated Treasurer Ray Madden for
being appointed chairman ot the
media board Roakes also pro-
posed that ECU be allowed to start
its own television station. This
station would promote many on-
campus activities.
Due to the holiday next Mon-
day. the SC.A has cancelled its
meetingand has rescheduled it for
the Ian. 22 .
Two ECU business
administrators resign
By Kirstin Eakes
Staff Writer
Two ECU administrators will
resign Ian. 12 to pursue private
business interests.
lohn S. Bell, assistant vice
chancellor for business atfairsand
Purchasing Director Roddy W
Seymour, are leaving ECU to form
acompany in Atlantic Beach, N C
Bell and Seymour have held
positions with the university for
22 and 16 years respectively. "It's
hard to leave Seymour saidbut
it'sa personal opportunity that we
felt we could not turn down
The two men are returning to
Bell's hometown to establish a
furniture distributing turn called
Institutional Interiors
The loss ot these two out-
standing professionals will bo felt
throughout theorganizatiofi " aid
Richard Drown, vice chancellor
business affairs I have truly ap-
preciated working with them and
I am thankful tor all of their sup-
port" Brown added.
The university will advertise
for the position of purchasing di-
rector, but a committee will also
search internally fora replacement
A national search will be con
ducted to find a new assistant vice
chancellor of business affairs
"Both posihons will be rilled on a
permanent basis Brown said.
Bell received the MBA degree
in 1968 from Fast Carolina and has
held the positionsof business man-
ager tor the Division of Continu-
ing Education, purchasing direc-
tor, and assistant vice chancellor
for business affairs Bell has also
chaired the university's campus
beau titication program for the past
two years.
Seymour, a na ti ve of Chatham
County, VC, majored in business
administration a ECU. After re-
ceiving his B.S. degree he began
working as an university purchas-
ing officer.
Bell said he has enjoyed and
cherished histimeat ECU.and he
will i itinuc to support and fol-
io I . alma mater. "I sincerely
v. tsl l!h i ntti. um sity com-
munity the very best ol success as
this great university continues to
serve its mission
SETA calls charges 'ridiculous'
n'V John Tvson
Stall Writer
Reginald Dillahunt (lell).general managerol Expressions magazine,
poses with his staff as they show oft their literary awards (Photo by
Garrett Killian ECU Photolab)
The Student Government
Association's upcoming in vestiga-
tion of the ECU Students for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals has
raised a lot of unanswered ques-
tions, most importantly how the
campus group became linked to
the theft of a tape from the ECU
Sch(xil of Medicine.
The original two hour instruc-
tional tape stolen in January, 1987
from the ECU Medical School
showed a tracheotomy being per-
formed on an anesthetized dog.
The tape, which was intended
for use by medical students only,
disappeared and turned up in the
hands of the national animal rights
organization, People for the Ethi-
cal Treatment of Animals (PETA).
TETA is not affiliated with the
ECU group SETA, although much
of the information and pamphlets
that the campus group uses comes
from national animal rights organi-
zations, like PETA.
Last semester some members
of the SGA, speculating that the
ECU SETA group might have ac-
tually stolen the tape and showed
it at one of their meetings, passed
a motion to investigate SETA.
Angela Rose, treasurer of
SETA, said thatthechargesagainst
the group are ridiculous. "As an
officer of the group, I have never
heard about or seen the tape, nor
have 1 ever heard about plans to
sec or possess it Rose empha-
sized.
It was also mentioned that
SETA was formed last semester
and that the videotape was stolen
over three years ago.
Dr. Richard H. Ray, head ot
the physiology department at the
ECU School of Medicine, says that
some people might have misinter-
preted his Oct. 31 letter to the edi-
tor in The East Carolinian.
"I made no allegation that
SETA or any other organization
was involved Ray said. "The tape
which was taken by persons un-
known to anyone, eventually
ended up in the hands of PETA
When asked if the ECU SETA
group actually received a copy of
the edited tape, a spokesperson
from the national office of TETA in
Washington, DC. said that TETA
did not keep a record of whom the
tapes were sent to, but she did say
that any group or person could
receive the edited tape for a small
See SETA, page 2
Inside
Editorials4
State versus state
in prosecution of
Thomas Walters
State and Nation 5
Increase in black
population in the South
Classifieds6
Features8
A new odd couple
surprises audiences
Comics11
Sports12
NCAA makes a new
ruling on athletics






2 The East Carolinian January 11,1990
ECU Briefs
GRE offers large-print versions of
Subject Tests for 1990 testing year
As part of an ongoing effort to provide equal access to testing for
disabled examinees, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) program
is making large print versions of the Subject Tests available at all
regular administrations in the 1909-90 testing year.
Although the General Test has been available in this format for
sonuMime Jarge-tvpeSubject Tests wereavailable by special request for
the first time in 1988-89. The level of demand clearly indicated a need
to provide this service on a regular basis for examinees with visual
disabilities.
The large-print exams are"the same tests as those offered at a
standard administration. The only difference is that the type is larger
says Susan Vitella, GRE program director for the new service. Candi-
date registering for the large-type exams may request additional testing
time, a well as other arrangements or aids customarily usedfsuch as a
persdn to record answers). There is no extra charge, and a large-print
answer sheet is also provided. Scores are mailed at the same time as
those of other examinees who tested at the same administration.
To register for a test administered in large-print format, a candidate
must include a letter with the registration form describing the nahire of
his or her handicap and any special arrangements required, and a letter
from a physician or counselor documenting the disability. Registration
deadlines for tests requiring special arrangements are several weeks
earlier than deadlines for regular administrations. Dates are listed in
the GRE Information Bulletin.
Education majors receive awards
Five students in the ECU School of Education have been selected to
receive Prospective Vocational Teacher Scholarships for the 1989-90
academic year. The awards, consisting of $2,000 each, are presented by
the N.C. I Vaprtment of Public I instruction to approximately 45 students
across the state each year.
The awards are renewable for each of a student's four years of
undergraduate study. Recipients are selected on the basis of academic
achievement interest in careers as vocational teachers and participa-
tion in campus and community activities.
The EC I' recipients are 1 ammi 1 on Arnold of Troy, Patrick Neal
faquesol 1 lavelock,Richard Elliot Parkerot Robersonville, Amy Eliza-
1 be EC U recipients are lammi Lou Arnold of Troy, Patrick Neal
Jaqucsol 1 lavekx k, Richard Elliot Parker of Robersonville, Amy Eliza-
beth Terrell of I lillsborough and lanis Taylor Tucker of Dover.
Parker will graduate next May. Patrick lacques and lanis Tucker
will graduate in 1991. Arnold and Terrell expect to graduate in 1993.
National Campus Clips
University of Missouri-Columbia IFC
votes down keg ban for ID checks
Fraternities at the L niversiry of Missouri-Columbia, opposing a
possible beer keg ban at chapter parties, opted for a measure that will
allow them to check the age of guests before serving them alcohol.
The Interfratemity Council had considered a measure that would
have allowed ' Bring Your Own liquor" parties only. The new plan
calls for fraternity party goers toprovideproofthattheyareM years old
legal drinking age
The new proposal, which allows fraternities to continue to provide
kysot Ix-er at parties, was developed because the BYOL measure was
itfVtre'rhe�iaid Tony Duronc, Sigma Chi fraternity member.
�. ,aatkarsvjxe prijpused.tuJbeip cjauifroLdrinking, an campus.
Nurses use videos for simulations
With the help of interactive video equipment, student nurses can
now learn to respond to life-threatening situations without leaving the
classroom.
The video svstem, provided by the Fuld Institute for Technology in
Nursing Education (FITNE), creates real-life simulations and allows
nursing students to actively test their knowledge by solving the simu-
lated patient's problem.
The Helene Fuld Health Trust, through FITNE, recently selected 46
schools of nursing in the United States and Canada to become the first
schools to receive the FITNE Interactive Video Systems.
All participating schools will use the video equipment for three
years and will collect and evaluate data.
Alcohol awareness program sponsored
To combat alcohol-related crime on campus, the Public Safety
department at Bryant College in Smithfield, R.I has implemented an
alcohol awareness program.
According to Chief Richard Wheeler, Public Safety director, 80
percent of college crimes are committed bv intoxicated students. The
program is aimed at freshmen, but Wheeler wants all students in-
volved.
"1 have spent the last 20 years building cases against crimes
Wheeler said "I'd like to spend the next 20 years preventing them, and
the alcohol awareness program is one way to do it
ZC-t�fi1 I'M. IBM TODAY
ppif t olltgt Information Kttwork
Designation of medical center
incorporates PCMH, Med School
Center is to show a unity of serv-
ice between the involved medical
facilities.
"Thedesignation of the Medi-
cal Center actsasan umbrella over
the institutions. However, it does
not replace their individual names
or identities said Dr. James Hal-
lock, dean of the School of Medi-
cine.
Over the years as the medical
facilities continue to grow and
By Susan Jernigan
Staff Writer
The rapid growth of medical
services provided in the Green-
ville area has resulted in a desig-
nation of a medical center.
This medical center has been
named The University Medical
Center of Eastern Carolina � Pitt
County.
"This medical center is a
campus designation which pri- evolve, they will be represented
marily incorporates the Pitt as a unified group under the
County Hospital, the ECU School Medical Center,
of Medicine and some other medi- The key parties involved in
cally related business on the cam- creating a name for the center were
pus said Mr. Dave McCray, members of the Pitt County Ho-
president of the Pitt County si pi tal, members of the ECU School andapprovedbyth ECU Board of
Memorial Hospital. of Medicine, the County Commis- Trusteesata meeting December 8,
The purpose of the Medical sioners and the ECU Board of
Trustees.
The concept of a medical cen-
ter has been an issucof concern for
the past decade.
Thedifferent groups involved
in the decision agreed that there
was a need for designating a
medical center which incorporated
all parties. However, each group
wanted a particular phrase built
into the name.
"The biggest obstacle was
finding a broad definition for the
center that was in agreement with
everyone said McCray.
A unanimous decision was
reached after six monthsof debate
1989.
The East
Carolinian
Because
reading
is funda-
mental.
(and the paper is
free)
ECU requests $117 million
ECU News Bureau
To Your Health
Student Health Center
offers self-care cold clinic
ht-common cold. It is common in that every-
jjk M one will catch a cold sooner or later, but uncommon
M K medical science still has no cure tor it
M SlWL Some common beliefs about cold catching are
C��V no longer accepted by the medical profession. Con-
BCr.jff trarv to popular belief colds are not spread primar-
M, il through coughing or sneezing. Most authorities
SHPH agree that one important way that colds are spread
H is bv hand to hand contact with a cold sufferer, or
By Suzanne hand contact with contaminated surfaces followed
Kellerman by nibbing the eyes or probing the nose. A cold
victim can unwillingly spread the virus by sneez-
ing or touching an object. The next person who
touches any of these objects can pick up the cold virus on their fingers,
then if thev rub their eyes or nose they can become exposed to the virus.
There is no sure way to prevent all colds. Medical authorities do
suggest three measures to control the spread of colds by contact. Wash
your hands frequently. This will eliminate much of the virus that has
been picked up by the hand and fingers. Keep your fingers out of your fee.
ECU's major priority for state-
appropriated funding during the
1990 short session of the General
Assembly is an estimated $17.4
million for an addition to loyner
Library. This is out of a total capi
tal facility plan of approximately
$117 million for the next three
years, ECU officials said.
"The library project isand will
remain our foremost priority
said Dr. Richard Eakin, ECU
Chancellor, in submitting a list of
capital improvement budget re-
quests to the Board of Trustees.
The board approved the list Fri-
day.
Cost of the proposed library
renovation and addition is an esti-
mated $24.4 million of which the
1989 General Assembly appropri-
ated $1 million for planning and
$6 million in construction funds
last spring.
Architects have already been
selected and design work has
begun on a new addition to the
university's main campus library.
In addition to the library proj-
ect, ECU is requesting $10.9 mil-
lion in state funding for major
repairs and renovation of existing
buildings, 11 of which need new
roofs.
Eakin said the university's
capital improvements budget
requests for 1991-93 reflect cur-
rent campus planning and priori-
ties. "We have taken an extremely
critical look at our facility needs
relative to the campus strategic
planning process he said. "We
have placed primary emphasis on
essential infrastructure repairsand
improvementsand the renovation
of our academic facilities The
campus requested $769,400 for
elevators to improve handicapped
access.
Included in the repairs and
renovation requestsare$l ,405,000
for re-roofing buildings, $1.4 mil-
lion for a first phase of renovation
of Flanagan Building and $1 r
million for renovating the interior
of twelve academic buildings.
Other renovationrepairs
requests include $1.6 million for
Graham Building, $1.6 million for
North Tower Biology renovation
and $770,000 for university the-
atre renovation.
Improvements to the campus
steam plant were requested for
$1.4 million, and items totaling
$610,000 were asked for upgrad-
ing the campus electric service to
handle increased loads and pump
station.
Two self-supporting (non-
state appropriations) projects are
being requested during the short
session � $18.9 million for a stu-
dent recreation center and $4.1
million for a new student cafete-
ria will be requested during the
biennium but not during the short
session.
Another proposed major self
supporting project included is
Phase I of an outpatient clinic at
the School of Medicine with an
estimated cost of $19,480,000.
Several other items were in-
cluded in a university-wide facili-
liesplan, along with $250,000 fora
comprehensive master plan. The
11 lajor requests for new facilities to
be funded during the biennium
include:
AcademicStudent Service
Facility, $5,396,900
� Third Floor, Home Eco-
nomicsNursing Building,
$2,812,000.
� East Carolina Center for
Keg io n a 1 A d va n ce me n t,
$11,500,000 ($lmil!ion previously
funded).
Expansion of Life Sciences
Building,$6,273,000 ($364,000
previously funded).
�Technical Services Building.
$5392,000.
� Campus Warehouse, $
2,893,900.
W$z �a0t Carolinian
Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
Phillip V. Cope
Kelley O'Connor
Patrick Williams
Advertising Representatives
(iiij .1. Harve)
Sha Sitlinger
Adam T. Blankenship
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National Rate$5.75
Open Rate$4.95
Local Open Rate$4.75
Hulk & Ircqiicno Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours:
Monda) - Fridaj
10:00 -5:00 pin
Phone:
757-6366
SETA
Continued from page 1
eyes and nose a spray disinfectant on contaminated surfaces
Ifyoudohaveacoldthebestadviceistorest,drinklotsoffluidsand
take aspirin or acetominophen. These measures will not cure but they
can relieve the symptoms. Decongestants make breathing easier by
reducing nasal swelling and analgesics such as aspirin help to relieve
pain. In time the hody will fight off the cold.
If you do get a cold, for best results follow these treatment do's and
don'ts.
Since SETA has asked forSGA
funding, the SGA must investi-
gate the allegations of the stolen
tape because SGA guidelines pro-
hibit funding to any group which
takes any kind of political or social
action.
Alpha Phi Omega 9 i-7036
Attic752-7303
BACCHUS757 6793
Bogies752-4668
Buccaneer757-6501
Carolina Pregnancy Center757-0003
Chicos757-1666
Fabricate Too756-1058
Gary Reynolds1-800-447-8560
HarrisTeeter758-6800
New Deli758-0080
New East Bank821-1085
On Campus1-800-932-0528
Pizza Hut756-9533
Rack Room355-2519
RemcoEast758-6061
Research information1-800-351-0222
Rio355-5000
Student Union757-4715
Szechuan Garden757-1818
Triangle Women's Health1-800-433-2930
University Amoco758 9976






Graduate school
appoints new dean
Hv Kathei ine Anderson
st.il! W . tlei
ki i in ol .1 truly outstanding
i! and i i� In r It was an
ili lit i hoi i'
V ol lanuan I 190 Dr Millan is a vvidcl) known
Douglas I NUMilKi and mthoi His most re
� � cent Mil'li. .itii'ii was .1 work on
I i lu.il Danti published h the Modem
Millai . � � i in '��'�� V ����'i iation Inadditiiin
nounced aftei � irch to these attributes, McMillan 11-
i.ad been conducted Mai national historitin ol the honor
Springi loi society of Phi Kappa Phi and will
icademwrite a volume ol Phi kappa Phi's
i vifl� ring tbf years 198.1
ind in1 r 1 iane a i hs, associate
' 'h �� t llor for resean h and
h il full time. . � the graduate school, said,
�ini am pleased thai Dr Mi Millan
�i 1 � join the graduate
' �ffic .is assistant dean
iIded his reputation as a
. todi and his experience in
i dm ation ill beinvalu
1 �able assets to the graduate school
Ol ! 'v '� Millan is succeeding 1 r
111 isti� i'ullop .i histoi iin. in
.radtiati school pisition
� tanl dean since 1973,
.terand plans

Colds
I he lastarolinian, January 11, 1990 3
l ontinucd from pa;e 2
I 'out treat ui i old with tuj handkerchiefs.
�m antibioth I' �� penicillin tclk(. ,ls,irm or dCe-
Vntibiotics combat bacterial not tommophen, such as Ivlenol, to
k "�ll l ns easeai hesand pains and to lower
Don'tsmoke Smokingwill fever
irritate your nasal passages and rhe Student Health mtorhas
in, reaseyoui n kofgi ttingpneu M.t care Cold link located on
monta or bronchitis the fi-sl floor next to the phar-
Drmk large quantities at miUV that is available to all stu-
liquids to soothe the throat .mi) dents,
relieve nasal congestion Over the counter drugs are
Gargle with sail water to provided free of charge. For more
reduce swelling in the throat informatkmoncoldsandtheCold
Get plenty of rest linn contact the Student Health
i , lisp able tissues in Center at 757-6794
: �
textbook! � li d for the
an l CU Ph I il
Vernick joins Mod School to
direct new chronic pain clinic
i
I I Ill!
lh� East Carolinian
(" s III HI ill l
� 'i on
(NQ Phone Call Pleaw)
I uMiiMtions- ! I �
SdJOIUi i l(H)l
757-6366
appi inl '
BRANDED SHOES
Qjeenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive .
Miami and itei mpleted
mastei s d m at Hefotra Uni- ��" � '
I 1 i v�. i ill � � 11 �� !� .t. i. . i and .1 � '
AFROTC cadets awarded
j Open
Monday - Saturday 10 - 9
Sunday 1 - 6
I
C OFF
Our Everyday Low Price
(Except, Aigner, Nike, and Reebok)

1(1 cw s Bureau
i hngti n, M.ir in Midgetl ol
tt Hawk, Michael R id ol
Isl i � Mil hael Rhi denh
I hgh Point and Paul Innn-r ol
' i itv, all freshman, alone
� i
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d David Sauls of Raleigh enter act I t is Air Force offi
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The East Carolinian, January 11,1990 3
Graduate school
appoints new dean
By Katherine Anderson
Staff Writer
As of lanuary I, I9W, Dr.
Douglas 1. McMillan has held the
position of assistant dean of the
ECU graduate school.
McMillan's position was an
nouneed after an internal search
i.ad been conducted by Or. Mar
lene A. Springer, vice chancellor
for academic affairs.
Dr. W. Keats Sparrow, proles
sor and chairman of the English
department, said McMillan will
be taking full-time leave from the
department to serve full time In
the graduate school.
McMillan has been a member
Of the ECU English faculty since
19b1). He also directed graduate
studies for the English department,
which was the first academic unit
of the university K) offer the
master's degree. .
Sparrow stated, "We regret
vcrv much losing Pr. McMillan's
services in the English department
but we are very plea od about the
selection of a truly outstanding
scholar and teacher. It was an
excellent choice
McMillan is a widely known
scholar and author. His most re-
tent publication was a work on
Dante, published by the Modern
I anguage Association. In addition
to these attributes, McMillan is
national historian of the honor
society oi Phi Kappa Phi and will
write a volume of Phi Kappa Phi's
history covering the years 1983-
1992. Dr. Diane Jacobs, associate
vice chancellor for research and
dean of the graduate school, said,
"I am pleased that Dr. McMillan
has agreed to join the graduate
school office as assistant dean
She added, "his reputation as a
scholar and his experience in
graduate education will be invalu-
able assets to the graduate school
McMillan is succeeding Dr.
Charles P. Cullop, a historian, in
the graduate school position.
Cullop, assistant dean since 1973,
is teaching this semester and plans
to retire in 1W0.
Colds
Continued from page 2
Don't treat your cold with
an antibiotic such as penicillin.
Antibiotics combat bacterial, not
viral infections.
� Don't smoke. Smoking will
irritate your nasal passages and
increase your risk of getting pneu-
monia or bronchitis.
� Drink large quantities of
liquids to soothe the throat and
relieve nasal congestion.
� Gargle with salt water to
reduce swelling in the throat.
Get plenty of rest.
� Use disposable tissues in-
stead of handkerchiefs.
� Do take aspirin or ace-
tominophen, such as Tylenol, to
ease aches and pains and to lower
fever.
TheStudcnt Health Center has
a self-care Cold Clinic located on
the A st floor next to the phar-
macy that is available to all stu-
dents.
Over the counter drugs are
provided free of charge. For more
informationoncoldsand theCold
Clinic contact the Student Health
Center at 757-6794.
Mike Williams searches for one of the textbooks needed 'or the
spring semester (Photo by Garrett Killian ECU Photolab)
Vernick joins Med School to
direct newchronic pain clinic
ECU News Bureau
Pr. Sanford 11 Venw k his
joined the ECU School of Modi
cine faculty .is associate professor
in the Department of Physical
Medicine and Rehabilitation. He
will direct a new clinic for patients
with chronic pain and i new resi
dency program in physical medi
cine and rehabilitation. The clinic
is located .it the Eastern Regional
Rehabilitation Center .it Pitt
County Memorial Hospital.
Vernick specializesin the treat
ment ol several disabling condi-
tions such as spinal cord injury,
developmental disabilities,chronic
pain and probtemsassociated with
amputations.
Preceding his ECU appoint-
ment, Vernick was a private prac-
tice physician in I lalet, N.J. for
six years. He has held academic
positions at Eastern Virginia
Medical School in Norfolk, Long
Island University in Greenvale,
N.Y Georgetown University in
Washington, D.G and Marvmount
College in Tanytown, N.Y.
He received his undergradu-
ate education at the University of
Miami and later completed a
master's degree at Hotstra Uni-
versity in Hcmpstcad, N.Y. and a
doctorate degree at Fordham Uni-
versity, Bronx, N.Y.
In l7l, he received his medi-
cal degree from the University of
Cuidad Juarez School oi Medicine
m Mexico and entered residency
in rehabilitation medicine at
Roosevelt I iospital tnd Nassau
County Medical Center, where he
became chief resident.
I leisa fellow ot the Amencar
Board of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation, a member oi the
American Association ol Electro-
myography and Electrodiagnosis,
and the National Association ot
Disability Evaluating Physicians.
AFROTC cadets awarded
ECU News Bureau
Thirteen cadets in the FCU Air
Force ROTC Detachment have
received awards or promotions in
rank.
Receiving promotions were
Wanda Terry Cook of San Anto-
nio, Texas, and Gerald Mc( ihee of
Hopewell, Va. Moth wen- pro
moled to the rank oi cadet tirsi
lieutenant.
Eleven cadets received Air
Force ROTC Drill 1 earn Participa-
tion Ribbons. They were Daniel
Conway of Winterville, Kenneth
Credle of Engelhard, Charles
Franks of Havelock, lames lee ot
Burlington, Marvin Midgett of
Kitty Hawk, Michael Reid of
Goldsboro, Michael Rhodenhiser
of Fligh Point and Paul Turner of
Morehcad City,all freshman, along
with sophomores ohn Shirley of
Ayden, Pamela Patten of Kichlands
and David Sauls oi Raleigh.
Cadets in campus Air Force
ROTC units take aerospace stud
ios courses along with their regu-
lar studies. Air Force classes in-
clude instruction in Air Force his-
tory, leadership, management and
national defense policy. In addi-
tion, the cadets participate in vari-
ous training activities, both as
individuals and as members of the
cadet corps, to prepare them for
careers in the Air Force.
Upon graduation fro ECU and
completion oi the Air Force ROTC
program, the cadets will be com-
missioned second lieutenants and
enter active duty as Air Force offi-
cers.
Late Night
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NOT GOOD 01 CONJUNCTION WITH ANY OTHER DISCOUNT.
SZECHUAN
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When Opening
MON-THU 11-8:30
FRI-SAT 11-9:00
The Plaza Cafes
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SAT 11:00-900
SUN 1200-9:30
Luncheon Special:
10 platters to choose from:
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Includes:
Egg Roil - Fried Rce - Soup
Tea & Dessert
(Fried Bananas or Fried Pineapple)
1MB





�Jj� iEaHt OIat0ltntan Bush persists with Reaganomics
David 1 ERRING, General Manager
I.oki Martin, Editor
Nathaniel Mead
Editorial Columnist
Shannon Buckley, News Editor
t KcM INE CUSKX, Features Editor
Mk haei Martin, Sports Editor
CaRRI! ARM5TRONG, Entertainment Editor
S on M.vh i, Satire Editor
REID, Staff Illustrator
MlCHAEi CARNES, Darkroom Technician
I AMES F.J McKEE, Director of Advertising
PHONG I.HONG, Credit Manager
SlUART ROSNER, Business Manager
PAMELA Cope, Ad Tech Supennsor
MATTHEW RjCHTER, Circulation Manager
TRACY WEED, Production Manager
BETH Lupton, Secretary
I he Eastaroiiman has been serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925, with primary emphasis on in-
formation most directly affecting FC11 students. It is published twice weekly, with acirculation of 12,000. The East
(arolinian reserves the right to refuse oi discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex,
creed oi national origin. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. For purposes of decency
ami bre ity I he Fast Carolinian reserves the right to edit any letter for publication. Letters should be sent to The East
Carolinian, Publications Hldg ECU, Greenville. NC, 27814; or call us at (919) 757-6166.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, January U, 1990
Media question First Amendment
Its finally happened in Greenville.
n issue on the constitutional level has been
t�r ughi up in a Greenville District Court, and an
ECU student is the focus
It all started with a disturbance at Tar River Fs-
: itts, m I la Ho ween, aftei the i ity police department
id i � ,i't i .1 that evei yone stay at home that night
I he to il police were called in decked in not gear, to
up tin v rowd ot 1 lalloween partiers. When it
is ' ovei i total ot 134 college-age men and
re arrested .nd charged with "failure to
liters, the general manager of the
- vas covering the incident when he,
is taken into custody. Although he identified
lasami nberof the press, he was still arrested
� iken lowntown to the courthouse. Yester-
� wenl to trial and was found guilty oi the
ilteh vision net works, a regional news-
nd .i state paper covered the trial of Mr.
�u is the media, the issue was raised as to
.i .tni ok is guaranteed freedom oi press
ist Amendment. The prosecutors ar-
naree
. anei
i bout
i
mo it the yearbook isn't protected, what
;� ilinian? It so happens that Mr
. i - taking photographs that were to run in
edition ot the newspaper. At ECU, the
I i �V and the newspaper are overseen by a media
fB I .� n ns, The Rebel and the
1 Tni six media continually work in a joint
satisfy the needs of the students.
Waltei s hasa history oi working with the media
i iriety of ways He has held the position of
Photolab general manager, in add ition to his photog-
raphy coverage lor The East Carolinian, and his pres-
ent position as yearbook editor.
From a journalistic perspective, this case is of
particular concern to The East Carolinian. Mr. Walters
was representing a medium which is classified as a
community newspaperby the North Carolina Tress
Association Why didn't he receive the same respect
as the television crews on the scene? Like all
newspapers, The I asl Carolinian attempts to report
news both time!) and accurately. But in this case, a
representative of our medium was arrested for ful-
filling his duties as a media representative.
What's even more disappointing is that one of
ECU'S administrators. IV Alfred Matthews, does
not support Mr Walters m his case. Rather, Mat-
thews testified against him yesterday bv claiming
that members of the ECU media are not employed by
the university rhe payroll stubs tell a different story.
The irony oi this is that ECU'S Division of Stu-
dent Life, ot which Matthews is dean, is paying for
Mr. Walters defense attorney. So in essence, the State
of North Carolina is paving to prosecute Walters and
is also paving to defend him.
( cmld it be possible that the outcome of this trial
was predetermined bv both the ECU administration
and the city? In yesterday's trial, several police offi-
cers testified against Walters, giving conflicting ac-
counts of the actual event The fact that the officers
testimonies were inconsistent, leads one to believe
that the answer to this question is yes.
The East Carolinian, as well as the "Buccaneer is
now left in limbo. Are we to be deprived of our First
Amendment rights lust because we're students?
Gcvernmerit's tactics blind media
To the editor:
Is tin re .i rep
�rter. journalist
editorial writer anywhere that
in set- through the blinding veil
� 't American! hauvinism in regard
to the histause" operation in
'anama? I have read articles m
nist ot the ma jo i and not so major
tewspapers I have seen photos of
ervicemen wives waiting for
heir loved on - to return for the
loliday s photos of children in the
irmsol American soldiers, mug
-hot photos revealing all of
onega s acne scars Along with
he photos have b(vn the Ameri
an death totals Whv do we hear
�nly about Amenc an deaths? The
'anamanian civilians that were
died, should not they also be
h lurned by our media? After all,
'� never went to war with Pan
l iist Noriega. Or would that
nake the total number of deaths
too high to justify the "lust Cause
I he major television networks
think were worse, when thev inter-
ruptod the melodrama of our soap
operas for the melodrama of "The
I hint For Noriega??" You would
think we live in a bad post-apoea-
lyptic B-movie. "The Hunt For
Noriega?" Is there any other sorts
of images we ar suppose to have in
our heads?
The sad tnith of the whole
matter is that top Reagan Admini-
stration officials, includingCeorge
Bush, debated whether or not to
remove Noriega diplomatically but
chose not to because it was an elec-
tion year. They feared the Admini-
stration former ties and especially
Bush's former ties with the Pana-
manian general would prove
embarrassing. Apparently, Nori-
ega is a man easily bought. The
American C.I A. had him on their
pay role at the same time he sup-
posedly had been working as
some sort of drug warehouser.
The all too logical deduction is
that the lives of Americans and
Panamanians were the price tag
Bush and top Reagan officials put
on the 1988 election. And it
worked beautifully! Bush has
never enjoyed this much popu-
larity.
So, when you see the names
and numbers of the American
soldiers who died for the "Just
Cause thinkaboutexactly where
Bush's heart really is. Also expect
our cotton candy media to con-
tinue to spoon feed the sweets to
us, the manipulated and unin-
formed electorate.
Steve Sommers
Senior
Political Science � Philoso-
phy
In 1988 a grinning George
Bush sang out the "good news"
that the U.S. economy would flour-
ish despite our $2.8 million na-
tional debt and despite his prom-
ise not to raise taxes. We Ameri-
cans may not ha ve applauded this
nonsenseless than half of ali eli-
gible voters turned out to vote
but we certainly tolerated it. In a
single collective gesture, we for-
gave and forgot all the sleaze,
waste and debt incurred by the
era of Reaganomics. We heard
about Bush's "flexible freeze" and
decided we could let things slide a
bit more.
According to noted MIT
economist Lester Thurow, U.S.
productivity over the last two
years has been growing at less
than 1 percent a year. During this
time, all other industrialized coun-
tries averaged a 4 percent rate,
with West Germany, japan and
Korea scoring highest. Reagan and
Bush forecasted a significant rise
in the GNP for the 1990s,but these
projections failed to take into ac-
count expected rises in inflation
and interest rates both of which
are determined in large part bv
German and Japanese investors
The Reagan-Bush team's love
affair with big business is part oi
the problem. In 19b0, U.S. corpo-
rations accepted 23 percent ot the
federal tax burden. By 1980 their
share had dropped to 12.5 per-
cent. Reaganomics reduced it to
6.9 percent in 19Hb rhissaved the
corporate sector ,nd cost indi-
vidual taxpayers $120billion in
that vear alone. Despite hefty tax
benefits, corporate debt continues
togrow due to interest rates which
have tripled since the 1960s And
which will probably i reate a tidal
wave of business bankruptcies
during the next recession, accord
ing to Senator William Proxmire
in a letter to the New ork Times
(111088, "American Industry
Doesn't Need More Debt")
One of the more foreboding
signs oi economic decline is our
trade deficit: over $130 billion
owed to foreign investors, primar-
ily the Japanese. This debt makes
our economy extremely vulner-
able to runaway inflation and
recession at the drop of a chop-
stick. It puts us at the mercy of
both Japan and West Germany,
where most of our automobiles.
TVs, and stereos come from. The
Japanese are already eating up the
Big Apple like nobcxlv's business
Though these countries' cor-
porations tend to average more
debt capital, their more produc-
tive industries are newer than in
the U.S thanks to the spectacular
reconstruction after World War I!
during the ls�50s and 1960s
(Similarly, Korea's growth owes
much to the Korean War.) Also.
they have their priorities straight
lower interest rates, better anti-
inflation policies, and a stronger
educational and work ethic have
made key contributions to the
economic success of these coun-
tries.
Let Them Fat Jellybeans
During the Reagan era the gap
between rich and poor families
widened immensely Between
1978 and 1987, the poorest fifth of
American families became 8 per-
cent poorer, and the richest fifth
became 13 percent richer (they
now claim 40 percent of all wealth
in the U.S.). According to the US
Census Bureau, some eight mil-
lion people were added to the
poverty segment of our society
during this time. Today, about 14
percent oi all Americans are clas-
sified as living under the poverty
line ($5,800 or less per person!
America has become the land of
the free, home of the street people.
The wealth of an elite few is
almost incomprehensible. The top
1 percent of Americansownsmore
wealth than the bottom l() per
cent. Changes in family stnn hire,
new federal policies, and more
women in the work force are the
usual reasons cited for Amenta's
growing poverty problem While
such changes have certainly
played a role, their impact is proba
bly secondary to certain changes
in the corporate world which
began during the '60s and '70s.
During this time, according to
theeditorsof Il!ars& Sense (May
1W6)and The New Republic (May
1, 189), corporate profits were
squeezed by growing real wages
and a growing social wage ot
government-provided benefits In
the latter '70s the problem was
compounded bv explosive inter
national competition, which elic-
ited corporate strategies designed
to eliminate many blue-collar and
even white-collar jobs in the
middle-pay range This created
millions of low wage jobs but ac-
tually added to the high paying
professional, managerial, and
technical jobsnecessarv to control
t he prcKess.
The debt poses An additional,
if hidden, burden. To er.ise our
nearly $3 trillion national debt
would cost over $20 ,000 for each
American family oftour I his debt
costs us $150 bilhon in interest
annually, or 14 percent of the
budget, which explains v� hy it is
increasingly harder for American;
to invest in things that reate new
higher-paying jobs It al-
i cnints tor the 1 ed" 5 ii ibilib ��
help finance housing day
college education, legal sen
to the poor, environmental ; i
lection, and just about i vi ry thing
a responsible governmenI usually
does.
Interest payments on the fed
oral budget deficit alone will
undercut all efforts toward r.us
ing the U.S. standard ii living. In
lc'Sl� these interest payments
exceeded the total combined
budgets of the following: the
Departments of Agriculture.
Commerce, Education, Energy
Interior, Labor, And just the
Veterans Administration; the
Environmental Protet tion
Agency; the National Science
Foundation and even NASA Vs
federal funding is squeezed, our
standard oi living is compromised
accordingly.
Education is a kes atka at
fected by the debt crisis The de
dine oi education promotes eco-
nomic decline bv reducing our
aptitude toward sophisticated
technologies and analytical
work- and bv forsaking compe
tency in the workforce Between
1978 and 1987, the average hourly
earnings ot non-supervisorv
workers (adjusted for inflation)
were lower than in any vear since
1966. And even as the real earn-
ings of unskilled workers were
declining, the real incomes of
investment bankers and other
securities industry workers rose
21 percent.
lack ot monetary support
translates into less tune in school
Lester Thurow pointsout that I S
children go to school an avera
of 158 days a yeai ! SOday smu
22 days absent) while Japanese
And European children averaci
240 and 220 days respectively
I nder these circumstances there
is no way that Americanscan keep
abreast with the intellectual de
velopment of their economic
competitors Hie only solution to
bettering the workforce is to pro
vide education and training com
parable to other industrialized
countries.
A Ticking Timebomb
Many Americans are (stall)
anxiously waiting to see what the
Bush Administration will do about
the budget. Unless the deficit is
reduced, the Federal Reserve will
continue boosting interest rates to
support the dollar and a "major
recession many experts say,
would be inevitable. Clearly re-
forms are necessary, certain pro-
grams will need major slashing
But budgetary reforms are diffi-
cult to achieve because they in-
volve powerful interest groups
such as the military, the elderly,
farmers, and numerous financial
institutions.
For the American people, the
military would seem to be the most
logical candidate for spending
cuts. Outlays for last year's na-
tional defense totalled $293 bil-
lion, or 28 percent of the budget
In that vearalone,$75billion went
to purchasing new weapons
amounting to about $300 worth
for every American. Over 60 per
cent of all our taxes are being si
phoned off for past and present
military debts. With enough nu
clear warheads to destroy the
globe 40 times over, one would
think we could sacrifice a lot less
military might.
In his Ixxik, "Day of Reckon-
ing Harvard economics profes-
sor Benjamin Friedman describes
thedeticitasa"rickingrimebomb
which has "made the U.S. econ-
omy vulnerable to inflation and
recession at the call of forces which
we no longer control No one can
predict with certainty what will
happen to our economy over the
next tour years, but the prospects
seem grim indeed. The deficit
� tens to crumble the very
I � i Irock up in whk h our pn isp r-
ity depends a possibility for
which we must all be prepared
But America's free market
svstem is by no means irretrieva-
bly lost Remedial solutions,
ever radical, will push thenv
- Ives ever more forcibly upon us
a j time goes on For instance, we
have recently seen a more pro-
gressive interne tax program es
tablished fi r poor werking Ameri-
cans. But other changes could be
made, such as reversing the outra-
geous Sodal Security amendments
� I 983, through which poor work
ing Americans are now financing
the federal budget deficit, often
paying more- in payroll taxes than
in income taxes
Another tact, as mentioned
before, would be to divert funds
from the military to our education
system teaching American k:ds
ways to attain their dreams re-
gardtessof family income or race.
Along these lines, it will be in-
creasingly important to teach
people how to become computer-
literate in order to increase effi-
(icncv in production jobs and in
personal service-type jobs.
Although George Bush speaks
eloquently of "a thousand points
of light and of the importance of
generosity, his performance thus
tar has been pitiful. A tinv sum
has been budgeted for education,
training, and health care for the
poor. Bu-h says we can't afford
any more. Meanwhile he pushes
tor stealth bombers at $531 mil-
lion apiece and a reduction in
capital gams tax rate � another
boon to the wealthy minority, it
seems impossible for George
berl Walker Bush, a million
from birth, to fathom the
struggle for the good life endured
by most Americans.
I his may actually be the crux
of the problem. As Amenca'smore
fortunate fifth takes in more of the
nation's income, thev seem less
willing to lessen the burden of the
poor As our economic fates di-
verge, the top fifth seems to lose
its sense oi connectedness to the
more needy, bottom half�a sense
that might elicit generosity As a
nation we may be united in prin-
ciple, but we have become divided
in conscience. How wide, I won-
der, can the gap between the needy
and greedy become before all hell
breaks loose?





Page S
State and Nation
January 11,1990
Judge restricts Noriega's movement
MIAMI (AD A judge post
poned a bail hearing tor Manuel
Noriega and ordered th.it the
ousted Panamanian dictator not
be moved from Miami without
the court's permission while he
awaits a drug trafficking trial.
Judge William Hoeveler said
during a hearing that federal
marshals must submit any plans
to transfer Noriega, whom sources
say has been held in a special area
below the courthouse since arriv-
ing in Miami last Thursday I lie
U.S. District judge also set a Ian. 26
bail hearing for Noriega, who at
tended Tuesday's one-hour ses
sion dressed in dark slacks and a
light-blue shirt.
The session was held on a
motion bv the U.S. attorney's of-
fice for a bail hearing after defense
attorneys last week waived an
immediate bail hearing at
Noriega's arraignment on drug
trafficking charges But Hoeveler
postponed the hearing at the re-
quest of defense attorneys, who
saul they needed more time
I he judge said defense attor
neys would be able to respond to
any request to move Noriega. Hut
Kollm saul
Prosccutoi Dexter Lehtinen
did not s.iv if he wanted Noriega
to remain in Miami, noting that
marshals will decide if he should
'This case is at its begining. Ami it is very
important the defendant is entitledto what-
ever time he needs to prepare his defense
� Judge William Hoeveler
requests and responses concern-
ing any move will Ix1 sealed
"This case is at its beginning
Hoeveler Mid, "and it is verv
important the defendant is entitled
to whatever time he needs to
prepare his defense "
Defense attorney Steven
Kollin told Hoeveler he opposes
any move (if Noriega, who was
toppled by the U.S. invasion of
Panama
"I don't want a change, my
client doesn't want a change
be transferred It could not be
determined whether marshals
made any such request after the
hearing because of the order to
keep them confidential.
U S. marshals and Noriega's
attorneys refuse to disclose his
whereabouts, although meetings
with defense counsel have been
held in the courthouse. The New
York Times, quoting an unidenti-
fied source, reported Tuesday that
Noriega probably would be
moved from Miami, most likelvto
the federal penitentiary in Atlanta.
But Angie Sheffer, spokeswoman
for the Atlanta prison. Mid no
preparations were being made for
Noriega's arrival.
Federal officials believe the
Metropolitan Correctional Center,
a federal prison near Miami, does
not offer adequate security to hold
Noriega, the Times said.
Noriega's quarters below the
courthouse reportedly are lavish
compared to the spartan room at
the Vatican's papal nunciate in
Panama City, where Noriega took
refuge for 10 days following the
U.S. invasion.
Sources who spoke on the
condition of anonymity told The
Associated Press that Noriega was
being held in an area principally
used for the federal witness pro-
tection program It includes a
bedroom, living room with a tele-
vision and radio, and kitchen, al-
though Noreiga's food has been
brought from the outside.
The black population
The number of blacks living in the U.S. in March 1988 totaled 29.3
million, an increase of 13.6 percent since 1980 For the first time
this century, the number of Wacks in the South increased by 4
percent from 1980, and those living in the Northeast decreased by 2
percent from 1980.
Blacks by region
ta,5
19
Whites by region
Li Peng lifts martial law in Beijing; says that the
country's 'production and lives are in good order'
BEIJING AP) Premier Li
Peng Wednesday lifted martial
law in Beijing more than Seven
months after imposing it to quell
massive pro-democracv protests.
The move wis largely cosmetic
because strut laws banning dis
sent .ire in force
The expected action appeared
to be aimed at the United States
and Other Western nations that
have said an end to martial law
would help restore relations badly
stra,incJ b the government's
bloodv crackdown on the pro-
democracy movement
Li Mid he represented the
ruling Communist Party and
government in thanking the
People's Liberation Army tor re
storing order, saying, I he people
will never forget.
"C hina is now stable politi
cally, economically and socially.
Production and lives are in rood
order, commodity supplies are
sufficient, people live and w�rk in
peace ami contentment he said
lbs lO-mmute speech, made
this morning, was broadcast on
national radio and television
fuesday night, one day alter an
thorities originally planned to
make the announcement The
reason tor the delay was not
immediately clear The govern-
ment may have been moving
cautiously to gauge public reac-
UNC-Chapel Hill faces
tough spending control s
CHAPEL HILL N.C (AIM
Tough new spending controls and
a temporary hiring freeze at the
University of North Carolina will
have a "serious impact" on the
school's operation, said Pr Bon
Tuchi, vice chancellor for business
and finance.
But Tuchi said it would be
difficult to predict exactly what
problems the university would
face
The school imposed thefinan
cial measures Tuesday aftcf en
tenng the third quarter on fan. I
with a 17.5 percent state funding
gap, The News and Observer
reported The university asked
administrators and educators not
to commit any additional state
funds for travel, equipment pur
chases and utilities.
While salaries and merit pay
to university workers will not be
affected by the spending restric-
tions, the university ordered a
curtail on overtime pav. and lim
its on payments to temporary
employment agencies and consult-
ants
'What we are essentially tell-
ing our deans and directors is that
your first priority has to do with
(the university's) instructional
mission, and the second is health
and safety Tuchi said. "Every-
thing else should be eliminated
Tuchi said the university had
requested slightly moie than $1b
million in non personnel state
funds tor the third quarter, but
has received $1 i.2 million. School
officials warned that fourth quar-
ter allocations also might be cut,
and saul they hoped to minimize
anv future cuts by reducing per-
sonnel expenditures.
last week, state officials said
state revenues had fallen $102 mil-
lion below projections for the first
five months ot the current fiscal
year. That prompted the state
budget office to reduce budget
allocations to agencies by an aver-
age of 23 percent, or $26 million
for the quarter
tion to the news and allow itself
flexibility in case of attempted anti-
government protests.
"We've ust been discussing it
as well a source at a Chinese
newspaper said of the delay.
Nobodyknows" what happened,
she saul.
"It won't have anv effect on
most people s lives said a young
woman. "()t course, they may feel
more light-hearted, to know that
martial law is gone. But that's all
In a bid to quell last spring's
pio democracy protest, authori-
ties declared martial law on May
20. But students refused to quit
their occupation of central Tian-
anmen Square and on June 3-4 the
army shot its way to the square
and dispersed them, killing hun-
dreds of unarmed civilians.
Most people say the end of
martial law would make no dif-
ference to them. Most actions
outlawed under martial law �
such as demonstrations, strikes,
distributing pamphlets and other
"destructive activity" are ille-
gal or tightly constrained under
other laws.China hasa large force
of uniformed and plainclothes
police, and recently issued them
more guns.
"The important reaction will
come from overseas said a West-
ern diplomat in Beijing. He said
there was a clear link to the De-
cember visit of U.S. National Se-
curity Adviser Brent Scowcroft,
who sought an easing oltuna's
hard-line stance toward dissent in
exchange for normalizing U.S
Chinese relations.
President Bush has been
sharply criticized by Congress for
sending Scowcroft and softening
sanctions. Lifting martial law
would allow him to say his con-
ciliatory gesture paid off.
China also hopes for a resto-
ration of loans frozen in June by
the World Bank and mdustnal-
ized nations, and a return of for-
eign tourists who have largely kept
away since June.
Percentage of all blacks
living in the South
1988
1980
Percentage of all whites
living in the South
1988
1980
West
Source U S Census Bureau
Midwest
Northeast
South
F'ark Porrpa. Ga"ier! News Se'v.ce
More blacks move
South, census says
WASHINGTON (AP) "he percentage of American blacks living
in the South is growing for the first time in more than a century,
according to a Census Bureau Study.
After decades of moving orth and West in search ot obs, blacks
are heading back South, to a region that has seen a significant growth
in jobs in recent years, population experts said. The proportion of
American blacks living in Southern states was 55.9 percent as of March
N88, the Census Bureau said in the report released I uesday. That was
up from 52.2 percent in 1980 and the first increase in at least 100 years.
CensusstatisticianClaudette Bennett said that although heragency
did not investigate the reasons for the change in population flow, two
basic factors are likely involved. One is the general movement of all
types of Americans, including blacks, into the Sun Belt states, she said.
In addition, she said. Southern blacks are no longer leaving those states.
William P. O'Hare of the independent Population Reference Bu-
reau noted that the South has had a disproportionate share of the
nation's recent job growth. O'Hare, director oi policy studies at the
private research organization, said that as blacks were drawn out of the
South by heavy industry jobs in the North, most maintained family and
kinship ties in the South. Such ties, O'Hare said, make it easier to return.
However, the current trend is not exactly reversing the original
exodus, O'Hare said in a telephone interview. Historically, blacks
moved from the rural South to the urban North. The flow now is to
urban areas in the South, not back to people's rural roots, he said
The share of blacks in the South grew by 3.7 percentage points
between 1980 and 1988, while the region with the largest loss was the
Northeast, slipping from 18.6 percent to 16.5 percent of blacks. The
Midwest dropped from 20.5 percent to 19.1 percent of blacks over the
period, while the West was nearly unchanged, lipping from8.6 percent
to 8.5 percent.
The 1880 national Census found 90.4 percent of blacks living in the
See CENSUS, page 7
Rally planned for Gorbachev's visit
VILNIUS, U.S.S.R. (AP) - A
grass-roots group favoring Lithu-
anian independence Wednesday
rejected a reported plea from a
Kremlin envoy to cancel a rally on
theeve of Soviet President Mikhail
S. Gorbachev's visit.
Communist Party ideology
chief Vadim A Medvedev, who
was in Lithuania to do advance
work for Gorbachev's visit Thurs-
day, personally asked a leader of
the independent Lithuanian
movement Sajudis to call off the
protest, Sajudis member Riman-
tas Kanapicnis said.
But the rallv. set for Wednes-
J
day on the central Cathedral
Square in Vilnius, was not can-
celed, and the stage appeared set
for a scries of stormy encounters
between Gorbachev and the res-
tive residents of the Baltic repub-
lic. A candlelight protest was
planned throughout the republic
to coincide with Gorbachev's arri-
val Thursday.
According to an of ficial sched-
ule obtained by Sajudis, Gor-
bachev will arrive Thursday and
visit an electronics factory in the
Lithuanian capital. He was sched-
uled to meet on Friday with the
public in the city of Panevyzus
and on Saturday with Communist
Party activists.
Medvedev's visit to the Baltic
republic was intended to help
defuse one of the most serious
political crises facing Gorbachev.
On Dec. 20, the republic's Com-
munist Party voted to rupture ties
with its national parent, the first
such break since the Communists
took power in Moscow in 1917.
Lithuanians, who had their
own country before Josef Stalin
annexed it in 1940 as part of a
secret Nazi-Soviet treaty, say their
next step is a complete political
break with Moscow.
Little Rascals Day Care case continues
Edenton police arrest another suspect
Where Japanese invest
L
L
L
Metro area
New York
Los Angeles
Honolulu
Chicago 1
San FranOakland
Phoenix
Dallas
Seattle L-
Washington. D.C.
Anaheim L.
Atlanta
Boston
San Diego j
$8.6B
$7.6B
$3.0B
$5.7B
$1.9B
$1.7B
$1 5B
$1.18
$1.1B
$0.9B
S0.9B
$0.9B
$0.8B
Real estate
purchases
through '88
Source Kenneth
Leventhal & Co
Gannett News Service
EDENTON, N.C. (AP) � A
seventh arrest was made in con-
nection with an Edenton day-care
sexual abuse case and documents
revealed that at least 70 children
were allegedly abused at the cen-
ter.
The most recent arrest came
Tuesday, nearly a year after an
investigation of the Little Rascals
Day Care Center began.
Robin Boles Byrum, 19, of
Edenton, was charged with 11
counts of taking indecent liberties
with a minor, eight counts of first-
degree sex offense and one count
of crime against nature. She be-
came the seventh person to be
arrested in the case that has re-
sulted in 375 charges being filed,
The Ncwsand Observer of Raleigh
reported Wednesday.
Ms. Byrum, who was being
held in lieu of $500,000 bond, also
was charged with conspiracy to involving children who were
commit indecent liberties with beginning therapy for sexual
other defendants who already are abuse or who likely would not be
facing charges in the case. Two competent witnesses at a trial. A
men and five women from Chowan County grand jury Mon-
Chowan County have been day returned an additional 95
charged. indictments with 163 charges
William P. Hart, an assistant against the seven defendants. Five
statcattomeygeneralwhoishelp- of the seven defendants already
ing prosecute the cases, said in a werefacing212chargesinthecase.
response to a pretrial morion filed District Attorney H.P. Wil-
by one of the defendants, that liams said Monday after a bond
charged in the Little Rascals case,
although shedid face three charges
of sexually abusing a 4-year-old in
a case prosecutors said was unre-
lated to the day-care investiga-
tion.
Robert F. Kelly Jr earlier
indicted on 152 charges, was in-
dicted on 79 new charges Mon-
day. Kelly owned the center with
his wife. Elizabeth T. Kelly. Mrs.
children were referred to thera-
pists after the investigation began
last January.
"Based on the assessments of
these children by their therapists,
over 70 children aged 2 through 7
have been abused in some way,
Kelly was indicted on 28 new
hearing for Darlene Harris, one of charges Monday. She had been
the defendants, that the charges indicted on 19 charges previously.
involved activities with 27 differ-
ent children. Mr. Williams did not
say whether more charges were
coming.
Willard Scott Privott, previ-
ously facing 13 charges, was in-
dicted on 48 other charges Mon-
day. Kathryn Dawn Wilson and
Mrs. Harris, 25, of Chowan
said the response filed in Chowan County was arrested Monday and Shelley Alyce Stone both were
CountySuperiorCourtinNovem- charged with one count of con- indicted on four additional
ber. spiracy and two counts of taking charges Monday. Ms. Wilson was
Hart said in the response that indecent liberties with a minor, already facing 19 charges and Ms.
charges were not prepared incases She had not been previously Stone, nine charges.





Page 6
uJlje gagt (JJarolinian
Classifieds
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
FOR RENT
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
� ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS �
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Aik ui ahuul our qwcll rates to ' han- Icuea, �d
dacounti i'xr lanuiry rcnula)
� Located Near ECU
� Near Major Shopping Centers
� ECU Bus Service
� Onslte Laundry
CaMMj.T WUIUnu ci Tom William
7.Sr7XlS�r 7S874.V.
� AZALEA GAtDEN-
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v
ABORTION
"Prion�l and Confldntll C�r�"
El�e Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call lor appointment Mon. thru Sat.
tow Coat Termination to 20 week of Pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
WANTED: Female roommate needed to
share two bedroom apt. rent and utilities
will be split in half. Located off 10th St.
close to campus 758-6258.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: Own
bedroom, $120 month plus 1 4 utilities.
In Tar River Estates - on bus route and
close to campus. Call 758-1201, leave
message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For spring
semester. $112 month plus utilities.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
�a$t
Carolinian
and
ATTIC
(Presents
Thursday
Largest Library of information in U S
all subjects
On'?' Cdtafcq Vn.iv with Visa'MC cf CCD
mm-oat
.1 jut �? ii-i.v it. K
Or rush S? on to (Useirch Intarmstwn
I j ut a �( A icisAnqHes CA QOpn
TOIL fRfl
HOT UNf
Across from campus on Student St 830-
0323.
FOR SALE
AUTOS: Can you buv leeps, cars, 4 4's
Seized in drug raids for under $1007 Call
for facts today 805-644-0533. dept 711.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Nice. Big, wood
furniture (couch, 2 chairs, $125) Good
condition. Great for college students. Call
after 5pm. 758-8777.
ZOOM ZOOM: 1 londa PA - 50 moped for
sale. 4 your riding pleasure. Call Adam at
758-52. Runs excellent at 30 mph $250
SERVICES OFFERED
THERE'S A NEW D.J. IN TOWN! Han
WIN A HAWAIIAN
I VACATION OR BIG SCREEN TV
PLUS RAISE UP TO $1,400 IN
JUST 10 DAYS!
Objective: Fundraiser
Commitment: Minimal
Money: Raise $1,400
ost: Zero Investment
Campus organizations, clubs, frats,
sororities call OCMC at 1 (800)
932 - 05281 (800) 950-8472 ext 10
CLASSIFIEDS
&
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DEADLINES
MONDAYS AT 5:00
&
FRIDAY AT 5:00
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
your party or social event now with all
your requested music Nightclub and
private experience at a reasonable price
Chris Gregory l) service 757-1 61
HELP WANTED
INTERESTED IN PAYING OFF THOSE
CHRISTMAS BILLS : or beginning to
plan for a new spri.g wardrobe Brodv's
has part- ti me sales associates and customer
service positions available for individuals
who can work flexible hours. Apply:
Brodv's The Plaza , Monday - Friday, 1-
4pm.
HELP WANTED: Fashion Merchandis-
ing Majors. Want a great way to gain
valuable experience? Brody's is accepting
applications for a clerical assistant to Buy-
ing staff. Apply: Brody's , The Plaza,
Monday Friday, l-4pm
ADVERTISING DISPI AY ASSISTANT
: Postion available to creative, hardwork-
ing individual experienced in graphic arts
and display background desirable. Port-
folio is required with interview. Apply:
Brodv's, The Plaa, Monday- Friday, 1-
4 pm
ARE YOU A WORK-STUDY STUDENT:
If so. The Pirate Club needs you Must
enjoy working with the public and have a
pleasant phone voice. Phone 757-4540 for
interview, ask for Gwon.
ASSISTANT SOCCER COACH: Mature
student to assist in coaching select yourh
soccer team (1979 Greenville Star-) Must
be experienced player with good commu-
nication skills and ablilitv to demonstrate
techniques Must attend two practices
January, 11,1990
weekly and travel with team to out-of
town games on Slrudays 22490 - 421
K Salary Negotiable Phone 756-1999
before 10pm or on week ends
BRODY'S FOR MEN: is searching for
Part lime sale associates Enthusiastic
individuals who enjoy fashion and have a
flexible school schedule should apply at
Brody's, The Plaa, Monday Friday, 1 4
pm
PART-TIME BABYSITTER NEEDED
ForTues andThurs afternoons from 2 IS
until 4 30 Must have own car Call 7t6-
6319
FACULTY MEMBER NEEDS RELIABLE
BABYSITTER: For 2 preschoolers, week
day afternoons Call 757-4446, 756
1922(evenings) Ask for Pat
PERSONALS
ATTENTION: All Greeks and Organiza-
tions Sunday jan 14 will be the last day to
have group shots made for the yearbook so
please don't be left out Call Tandy R. now
at 757-6501 for an appointment.
COMMUTER FROM K1NSTON: wants
to carpool with other commuters from
Kinston. Please call 527-7103 after 4pm
THE BROTHERS OF THETA CHI:
Would like to welcome everyone back from
Christmas break and hope that you are
readvforanexvihngsemester Good Luck'
HEYDJ WHAT TIME IS IT? It's time
for ECU to have a DJ for parties, socials,
era Mail, and formats at reasonable prices
Chris Gregory DJ service 757 1561
99? Hi Balls
99 Memberships
Gain Sales Experience &
Extra Money
Sales
Representative
Wanted!
Apply at
The East Carolinian

2nd Floor
Publications Building
(across from Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please
7ne East Carovw
wants Sports NMvWex
f?ush on over o W
r��aOcations &iXvr
and apply tocia
Announcements
ATTENTION TO ALL
The East Carolinian will be changing its
policy concerning announcements, start-
ing in January, announcements will now
be free for onlv the 1 st week of publication
after that week there will be a charge of
1st 25 words for student organizations -
S2.00 and for non- student organizations
- S3.00 anv additional words will be S 05
NATIONAL COED .SERVICE
FRATERNITY
Will have rush for prospective members
Jan. 17 19 Drop in for informabon, night
8-10 pm at Mendenhall in Jan 17 or Call
Kathy at 758-6313. Alpha Phi Omega.
HERE'S YOUR CHANCE
Gain valuable experience, sharpen your
leadership and communication skills, plan
entertainment for the ECU campus, and
have lots of fun. TheStudent Union is now
accepting applications for the following
positions: Minority ArtsCommitteeChair-
person,CoffeehouseCommittee Chairper-
son, and Assistant to the President. If you
think you're interested, we want to talk to
you. Call i is at 757-4715 or stop by 236
Mendenhall for more information.(the last
day to apply is Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1990)
Student Union - Making Things 1 lappen at
ECU!
VOLUNTEER CRISIS CQUN
We need your experience! Your achieve-
ments in everyday situations can be useful
toothers Earn that feeling of accomplish-
ment. Real crisis center is recruiting vol-
unteer crisis counselors. We will be offer-
ing training classes in this enriching field
beginning January 22,1990. Call 758- HELP
or come by 312 E. 10th St.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MAJORS CLUB
All Physical Education Majors and in-
tended majors welcome. Semester plans
to be discussed Jan 11,19908 pm MC144
RESUME WORKSHOP
Ihe Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton I louse offers these one
hour programs on beginning a resume for
your )ob search. Handouts and samples
will be given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session. No sign up required
The next sessions will be held in the Career
Planning Room on Jan. 8,9 and 11 at 3 pm
and on Jan. 9 at 7 pm.
P.A.C.C.H.U.S.
Welcome Back Social! We want you at the
Welcome Back Social, Jan. 16, 8pm till
Midnight, in Mendenhall Social Room
Admission is free, door prizes and refresh
ments will be provided, with music and
live remotes by Dylan Knight, KISS FM
102. An evening of Alcohol-free fun spon-
sored by . BACCHUS Office of Sub-
stance Abuse Prevention and Education,
Pi Kappa Phi, RHA, and KISS FM 102
Contact the Office of Substance Abuse
Prevention and Education, 757-6793, 303
Erwin hall, if you want ot establish a
campus fellowship of alcoholics Anony-
mous. Community meeting listings are
also available through this office.
IHb
We invite you to be with us every Wed.
night at 7pm in Rm. 212 Mendenhall for
prayer and Bible study. Everyone is wel-
come to be a part of this growing fellow-
ship. For more info, call 752-7199.
SENIORSGRADUATE STU-
Now is the time to be registered with the
Career Planning and Placement Service in
the Bloxton House. Located between
Mendenhall Student Center and Greene
Residence Hall, this is a place where gradu-
ating students may put resume and estab-
lish a credentials file Interview signups
begin soon and you must be registered to
sign up General Information meetings
will be held on Jan 11,12 and 16 at 2 pm in
the Career Planning room of the Bloxton
I louse.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
Phe Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton House is offering these
one hour sessions toaid you in developing
better interviewing skills. A film and dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
campus will be shared. These seessions
are held in the Career Planning room on
Jan 12,16 and 22 at 3pm and at 7pm on Jan.
16
STUDENT UNION TRAVEL
assErnoEE
Now is the time to make those plans for
spring Break. The Student Union Travel
Committee is sponsoring a Bahamas
Cruise, March 3-9. Contact the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-4788, for
trip details.
ECU PERFORMING ARTS
SERIES
The ECU performing Arts Series continues
its success into 1990 with the first perform-
ance of the new year. The Cannes Cham-
ber Orchestra, with quest flutist Ransom
Wilson, will appear in Wright Auditorium
on Saturday, Jan. 27,8pm. Tickets are now
on sale at the Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall, 757-4788.
WZMB-FM
WZMB-FM is now accepting applications
for Disc Jockeys, Newscasters, sportscas-
ters, and executive staff positions. Apply
at theWZMBstudioson the second floor of
old Joyner Ubrai y. The application dead-
line is Tuesday Jan. 16. WZMBisan Equal
Opportunity Employer and all ECU stu-
dents are welcome to apply.
EMA
The Financial Management Association
will meet Wed. Jan. 10 at 3:30pm in rm
3009 GCB.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special Olym-
pics is recruiting for volun teer coaches(one
hour per week) for winter and spring
sports. Noexperience is necessary although
some sports background is helpful Also a
desire to work with children and adults
with mental retardation. Coaches are
needed for the following sports: bowbng,
swimming, track and field, gymnastics,
tennis, and roller skating. It's a great expe-
rience! For more information, call the
Special Olympics at 830-4551.
SCHOOL OF ARTS
Models needed for figure drawing classes
spring semester. Contact Connie Follmer
757-6665, School of Art office or Tran
Gordley 757-6259, Jenkins Bldg 1307.
RECREATION DAY 1990
Looking for a Summer job? Would you
like to be a t the beach? In the mountains?
Then consider Recreation Day. On Feb 8,
1990 in Memorial Gym, over 50 recrea-
tional emplyers will interview ECU stu-
dents for summer positions. Postionsare
available for all majors. For more informa-
tion and to sign up for interviews, contact
Cooperative Education, 2028 GCB
BASK
�TMtf
QURNA-
Intramurai-rec services will be hosting a
pre - season basketball tournament Jan. 19
-20 in Memorial Gymnasium. Mens and
womens teams are encouraged to enter at
S10 per team. Contact Mary Malone at
b757-6387for more information Besureto
register Jan. 16 at 5pm in Bio 103
AEROBICIZERS
Persons interested in aerobic fitness classes
including toning, beginning fitness, inter-
val, hi-lo, circuit, and low impact classes
shouid register Ian 16-19 m 204 Memorial
Gymnasium Classes are ottered daily at a
cost of S10 student and 512Facultv staff
for a 12 class session Drop-in classes are
also availavle in $5 increments. Call 757-
6387 for details.
WOMENS SOCCER CLUB
Mandatory meeting Thursday Jan 18th at
3:30pm in GCB 1031 Schedules and forms
will be given out. All new members are
welcame and encouraged to join. Anv
questions call Ann Totaro at 830-1387.
AMNESTY INT'L
A special showing of art donated to Am-
nesty will be on show from Jan. 8-27th in
the Mendenhall Student gallery. Please
come out and see these wonderful words
done by political prisoners of conscience.
WEIGHT MANAGEMENT
GROUP
Interested in losing weight but need some
supportandexcouragement? TheStudent
Health Center offers a Weight Manage-
ment Program that begins Friday Jan. 19
and is offered for 14 weeks. The group
meets every Freday from 10 -11 am in the
second fiooor resource room. Information
on Nutrition, Weight Control, Behavior
Modification and Exercise Programming
is provided. For more information or to
sign up for the program con tact SHS Health
Education 757-6794.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is no w accepting poetrv, short
stones, and articles for the spring semester
issues Offices are located in the Publica-
tions PI Jg across from Joyner Library. We
would also like to thank all contributors
who helped us to neceh e First Place " and
"Best Magazine for Ethnic Diversity"
awards form the American Scholastic Press
Association for our Spring 1989 magazines
PEER HEALTH EDUCATORS
Interested in learning more about your
own persona health and helping to edu-
cate other students' Become a Peer Health
Educator and learn more about AIDS,
Healthy Eating Habits, Weight Control,
Cancer, Exercise and Drug and Alcohol
Awareness Attend training sessions and
begin teaching programs If interested
attend an orientation mcehngonWed Jan
17 at 3pm in the Student Health Center
Resource room! Call 757-6794 for more
information
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
TO TEST FOR SUMMER
LIFEGUARD JOBS
The US Dept of Interior National Park
Service has announced that applications
are being accepted for summer lifeguard
positions at several National Park Service
sites in the eastern U.S. Depending on
experience and work locations, the sum-
mer lifeguards may earn salaries ranging
from $497.63 to $857.38 every two weeks.
They must meet applicalbe Civil Service
regulations and pass all parts of a preem-
ployment performance test in one test
session by Ami 22, 1990 For an applica-
tion and information about the test and
other requiremen ts for these lifequard jobs,
applicants should call toll-free 1-800 NP 8
SWIM or in New York City, 1 -718-338-
3670
m i� v w�





I
The East Carolinian, January 11,1990 7
Grand jury begins investigating
death of pregnant woman Friday
BOSTON (AD - A revolver
fished out of a river fits the de-
scription of the gun used in the
snooting death of a pregnant
woman, according to a police
spokesman who said the find may
be "a major piece of the puzzle
A grand jury on Friday will
begin an investigation and will
hear a "substantial" number of
witnesses, Suffolk County District
Attorney Newman Flanagan said
without elaboration.
Investigators believe Charles
Stuart stood to collect about
SoNllXX") from three life insurance
policies on his wife, Carol, The
Boston Globe reported Wednes-
day. The newspaper, citing un-
identified sources, said the poli-
cies included a $4S0,000check that
had been processed by Prudential
Insurance Co. last Thursday. On
that day, Stuart apparently com-
mitted suicide by jumping off a
bridge after his brother implicated
him in the slaving.
Stuart, 30, told police be and
his wife were shot by a black man
who forced his way into their car
as they iett a childbirth class Oct.
23. A black man was named as a
suspect in the case, but later
cleared. Mrs. Stuart died hours
after the shooting. Their prema-
ture son, Christopher, delivered
bvCaesarean section,died 17days
later.
Stuart planned to use the in-
surance money to open a restau-
rant with friends, theGlobequoted
unidentified investigators as say-
ing. It also said transcripts of tele-
phone conversations on Jan. 2
between two of Stuart's siblings
show that his siblings planned to
tell their parentsof suspicions that
he was involved in the killing. The
transcript was from a call on a line
at Revere Fire Department, where
his brother Michael isa firefighter,
the Globe said.
"We're going to tell Mom and
Dad Stuart's sister, Shelley Yan-
doli, told Michael.
"What are you going to tell
them?" Michael responded.
"We're going to tell them we
know that Chuck was involved.
We're not going to say that he
killed her she reportedly an-
swered. The Globe did not say
whether she told her parents.
Divers recovered the snub-
nose revolver from the Pines River
in Revere on Tuesday, said Larry
Gillis, a spokesman for the Metro-
politan District Commission po-
lice. The gun's registration num-
bers matched those on a pistol
reported stolen from the fur shop
where Charles Stuart worked, the
Globe said, citing unidentified
sources.
"It fits the description said
Gillis. "Hopefully a major piece of
the puzzle has fallen into place
Flanagan said the gun would
be sent to the FBI crime laboratory
in Washington, DC, for tests.
Stuart's brother Matthew told
authorities last week that he met
Charles Stuart at a car on the night
of the shooting. Matthew also told
authorities Charles had passed
him Mrs. Stuart's handbag, which
contained some personal items
and a 38-caliber handgun.
Matthew told his attorney that
he was not then aware that his
brother or Mrs. Stuart had been
shot. He said he took the bag to
Revere and threw it and the gun
separately into the Pines River.
Legislators look for ways
to handle teen pregnancy
RAI EIG11 IAP) A legisla-
tive panel considering ways to deal
with the state's high number of
teen pregnancies heard proposals
that parents be licensed and that
alternative schools be established
for pregnant teen agers.
in Northarolina, 25 percent
of infants are born out of wedlock,
IV Al Hartness, a Fayettevilk
pediatrician, told the legislature's
Commission on the Family in a
hearing ("uesday. Hartness sug-
gested thai neighborhoods sel up
Hhou! progian-ix tor teenagers
t become curyf ted an DafsatinjL
� ' Mi?" .frflW saltf.
We have a license tor driving a
car. planes, cutting hair It would
bring about more accountability
and responsibility
Families, churches, schools
and communities need to become
more involved m preventing
adolescent pregnancy and teach-
ing youths, especially males, to
take responsibility for their ac-
tions, he said
"Somehow or another we're
not getting the moral and ac-
countability factor into the pic-
ture 1 lartness said.
Through Aid To Families With
Dependent Children and welfare
Census
programs, it costs the government
an average of $lh,5tX) a year for
each baby born to a single, teen-
age parent, Hartness said. He said
he was frustrated that teens are
continuing to have babies "be-
cause they know somebody else
will take care of them
"Does the single parent either
willingly or unwillingly see the
AFDC and food stamp programs
as a tacit approval for adolescent
pregnancy?" he said.
Rep. Don Beard, D-Cumber-
land, who co-chairs the commis
sionajked wheerterwatiaqi j
MiMctmaeYfrdT � - '
"That's creating a very strin-
gent, almost totalitarian ap-
proach Hartness replied. How-
ever, he acknowledged that often
the male gets a teen-ager pregnant
and then abandons the girl.
"1 think that our money would
be better spent if there was some
way to temporarily sterilize males
until they take on responsibility
Sen. Fountain Odom, D-Meck-
lenburg, suggested.
But Sen. Helen Marvin, D-
(.aston, who also co-chairs the
panel, said the General Assembly
can't legislate physical drive or
attitudes. Instead, lawmakers
should make sure the programs
are provided in early grades on
parenthood and accountability.
Sen. Richard Chalk, R-
Davidson, suggested the state
might consider imposing penal-
ties on adolescents who become
pregnant, such as banning them
from public schools. Johnnie Ell-
erbe, director of the Division of
Social Services in the state Depart-
ment of Public Instruction, said
she knew of no penalties, but said
there were some alternative
schools in some-counties where
pregnant girls could choose to
attend.
Saying he wasn't trying to be
"cold Chalk suggested pregnant
students be sent to alternative
schools "so they don't stay in
(public school) and be encourag-
ing that kind of behavior
During the 1989 legislative
session, Chalk offered a bill that
would make it a felony for teen-
agers to engage in sexual activity.
No action was taken on the meas-
ure.
Beard sparked a response
from a sociologist in the audience
when he suggested that some teen-
agers were getting pregnant a
second time for more aid.
Continued from page 5
GET IN THE CUUB
South, and a century ago in 1890
that had slipped only slightly to
90.3 percent, according to calcula-
tions based on historical records
kept by theommerce Depart-
ment. By the turn of the century,
the Nuith's share ot blacks de-
clined to su 7 percent It dropped
steadily in tins century as blacks
moved In search of jobs in the
northern and western industrial
centers
The new Study concluded
there were 2.1 million blacks in
the United Statesasof March 1988,
up 13-6 percent since the 1980
Census That represented 12.2
percent ot all Americans, up from
11 7 percent in 1980.
The median age for blacks is
273 years compared with 33.1
years for whites. Thatcompa res to
median ages in I960 of 24.8 for
blacksand 30.8for whites. Among
blacks, there were 88 males for
every 100 females, compared with
lb white males for every 100 white
females.
The large differential among
blacks may be related to the lower
mortality rates for women. The
Census also misses more black
males than females in its counts,
the report said.
The percentage of blacks
completing four years of high
school increased from 75 percent
of those age 25 to 34 in 1980 to 80
percent in 1988. The figure for
whites held steady at 87 percent
over that period.
EXPERIENCE. LEADERSHIP.
GROWTH. INVOLVEMENT.
Be a part of the Student Union
positions available
� Assistant to the President
� Coffeehouse Committee Chairperson
� Minority Arts Committee Chairperson
� Productions Committee Chairperson
If you think you're interested we'd like to talk to you. Call us
at 757-4715 or stop by 236 Mendenhall. Last day to apply is
lues Jan 16, 1990
It's our new Easy Money Club account,
especially for ECU. New East is making banking
extra easy with lots of extra services. A hundred
dollars opens it and the service charge is only
four dollars a month.
Find out how easy money can be-get in
the Club!
WRDU-FM106 is helping us celebrate the
grand opening of our ECU office on Tuesday
January 16th from 11:30 a.m-1:30 p.m. D.J. Bob
Robinson will be at Mendenhall Student Center
broadcasting live!
Come register to win one of five $100
checking accounts, and join us for lunchtime
munchies.
You can win great WRDU-FM giveaways,
and remember Easy Money? You can also win
a Rodney Dangerfield video library.The Easy
Money Gub prize drawing will be at1:30 p.m.
Don't miss the great Easy Money Rock &
Roll Radio eventonly from WRDU-FM 106,
and New East Bank of Greenville.
NEW EAST BANK
OF-GRE EN VI LL E
ECU � MENDENHALL
Telephone 757-4712 � HOURS Mondav through Friday ia m until Spm � Member FDK





Page 8
(Hire fast Carolinian
Features
January 111990
Stallone and Russell
surprise audiences
Acting proves beyond normal
Bv Debia Blake
St.itf Writer
One of them dresses ina oat
and tie everyday, theother in jeans
One is dean and smooth shaven,
the other sweaty with a little
stubble. They try to "be the b"Si
(hey can be They are 'Tango and
Cash
Sylvester Stallone portrays
Tango, an intelligent cop who
looks as if he just walked off the
cover of GQ. At first sight, hi'
appears tobea clean-cut business
man who never gets his hands
dirtv; however, he is one of the
best cops around.
Kurt Russell plays Cash, a
nigged, blunt cop who gets wnal
he wants, no matter what it takes
He is introduced asoncoi rango
competitors;however, the) ire on
the same side of the law
The opening i . iu lets the
audience know this film is going
to be different from others stai
ring Stallone, rango makes it i leai
in the beginning hedoes nol want
to be compared to Rambo
makes one statement and �
creates a whole new imaj i
audience. Is there more fo know
Stallone and Russell ire both
cops who trv to get drug dealers
outof society, but the) never work
together. They h ivea ra t between
them to see who will mak the
front page ot the morning
i angi
illon
toi ill
.mel-
on the same case, they argue over
w ho the case really belongs to and
both end up being accused of
murder
The movie sets its own pace
after Tango and Cash are framed
b a dnig dealer for whom they
are searching. The audience sees
them faced with onlv one alterna-
tive tii become a team. They go
to trial, to prison and eventually to
get the man responsible for it all�
and they go together.
Stallone and Russell do an
exceptional job in their roles. They
each fit their part well and have
tun in the roles they portray. We
see two cops tough it out together
and develop a friendship to treas-
ure. Huddle for life.
I he film is somewhat like
1 i thai Weapon, but it is not a
tilm to he categorized with
k or Rambo With the
iid ol Russell, Stallone develops a
.ii nt side of his character that
he has been unable to unfold in
previous nlms. In Tango and
( ash Stallone shares the lime-
lightand is not always the stronger
party. Russell is tough competi-
tion as an actor, and in the end it
does nol matter that one does not
dominate the other 1 he two ac-
tors have captured a winner with
faneo and Cash" and it is a
first. At one point, whil working winner worth seeing.
Student Union
� ,rsa'�fiB8fcHsa(�.
sponsors cruise
The Student Union "ravel
Committee is sponsoring a Spring
Break Cruise to the islands March
3-9. Imangine starting a day with
morningexercisesori the deck ora
leisurely jog around the ship in
the clean salt air. As the sun rises
high in the skv, passengers can
take their picksof delightful things
to do.
There will bo pinepom sktt t
shooting, pools for splashing
parties to attend and in-shipstores
for browsing. Passengers can tour
the bridge, learn new dam es or
check out best-sellers from the
library. They can take in movies,
plav games ol bridge and ba k
gammon, or relax in ie k . hail
with cool and refreshing drinks
Because of thisai tr. iiv and all
the appetites that will have been
worked up. the Camivale chefs
believe that "Life is a banquet
Plentv of great food and warm
friendlv service will be the order
of the dav.
Passengers can stroll on th
deck at sunrise with steaming cups
ot eottee, enjoy a breakfast buffet
on deck or eat el iborate break-
fastsin the dining room. The stew-
ard can a I so serve complete break-
fasts in bed.
lunch can be a five-course
affair, or a buffet bv the pool for
those who won't miss one minute
of valuable 'sun time
At night, everybody will be
ready to party. They can let their
hair down, attend the Masquer-
ade Ball or go for the big jackpot at
bingo, blackjack, roulette or dice.
The sounds of a band will do it
with flair in the glitter and glam-
our ot the discotheque. Each eve-
nine, can be topped off with a
midnight buffet, followed by a
mini buffet at 1:30 a.m. on the
Promenade Heck.
Ports of call include Nassau
and Freeport. Nassau is located in
the heart of the Bahamas, a color-
ful combination of pirating days
ot old and the modern hotels of
See Cruise, page 10
"The Little Mermaid" is a current movie based on the Hans Christian Anderson story. In
this picture, the sea princess, Ariel, is fascinated by the fork her seagull friend, Scuttle,
has found in the world above her ocean home.
Disney movie charms viewers
Bv Michelle Walker
Staff Writer
Disney animation has outdone itself once again
with the release of its 28th full length animated fea-
ture 'The little Mermaid
Fantastic animation, wonderful new Disney char-
acters and its lively and memorable musical score
make this most recent version of Hans Christian
Andersen's aquatic, fantasy tale a delightful cine-
ma tic experience. The creators tailor Andersen's more
melancholy, emotional story to tit the Disney style,
once again producing a classic tale where good
triumphs over evil.
The story swims you from the depths oi King
Triton's animated ocean to the ships and castle of his
daughter Ariel's beloved prince. Vivid images sharp-
ened by skillful light and shadowing techniques anchor
this production high above any previously animated
feature. With a team of more than 400 artists, using
nearly 150,000 painted cells, 1,100 backdrops, and
1,000 different colors, the film took almost three years
to produce.
The design and variety of lovably cute sea charac-
ters, along with the "wish you were" human ones.
help win audiences' hearts and make the film
endearing. Stealing the show were Ariel's sidekick
Jamaican crab, Sebastian, and the vulgar sea wit h,
Ursula. All the characters combined make tor a
very satisfying whole. It has romance, suspense
and when not laughing out loud, it keeps you
smiling on the inside throughout the duration
Sebastian, with his wisecracks and one-liners,
enriches the films comic potential. He is a trus-
trated musical conductor who, originally spying
on Ariel for her father. King Triton, intends to keep
her out of trouble but inevitably ends up accom-
paning her in her mischievous pursuit of human
legs and love.
Ursula, half octopus and half Drag Queen,
with her jiggling bosom and nauseating cackle,
becomes a classic Disney villainess. She, claiming
to be "practically starving" makes Rosanne Barr
seem a voluptuous sex-goddess. Bargaining a pair
of human legs for Ariel's beautiful singing voice,
Ursula gives her three days to win the prince's love
which has to be sealed with a passionate kiss. If
Ariel fails the conquest, her soul becomes Ursula's
for eternity.
See Mermaid, page 10
Narration
helps the
blind see TV
TIM.SA, Okla. (API For
millions of visually impaired
Americans, televisions are little
more than over-sized radios
worse, really, because of
Hollywood's heavy reliance on
visual images to propel plots.
"I'm about as totally blind as
you can get says Dale Lamar,
vice president of a support group
for the blind in Oklahoma. "Most
shows I can keep up with fairly
well. But when you get into an
action show with lots of car-hases
and shootings, you end up miss
ing half the show
Bu t i ma gi ne a TV sho w where
narrativeissprinkled between the
dialogue, describing the stealthy
movements of a murderer, the
outcome of a chase That's the
vision of im Stovall, president of
Narrative Television Network.
"1 started losing my sight
when I was 17 Stovall said "I'm
Jl now and totally blind About a
year and a half ago, I was watch
ing an old Bogart film ind some
body shot somebod) else and i
was lost 1 thought with a little
bit of narration, thiscould work It
lust kmd of exploded on us"
The network's pn 'grams have
been shown at 1 1 a m and 11 p.m
EST every Sunday sin e ug 20.
! hey can be seen on the v.i st ilgia
Channel, available in about 7 mil
lion homes, and on independent
stations in r,(X) cable markets. The
narrated network uses Nostalgia's
production facilities in Pallas
Nostalgia Network Inc
which sees its prime market as
older viewers, is a natural partner
for NTN. Demographers say 60
percent of the 11.4 million visu-
ally impaired Americansare older
than 45.
"We feel that narrative televi-
sion has enhanced our value as a
See Blind TV, page 9
Jargon creates images for readers
LOS ANGFI.ES (AD - Ccn.
Manuel Antonio Noriega called
them "dignity battalions NBC's
Tom Brokaw said "Noriega's
goons Should "anti-abortion"
replace "pro-life?" Is it "crippled"
or "physically challenged?"
And what about "black?"
Why not "African American?"
In the quick-draw world of
media buzzwords, it's far simpler
to spot a "pro-democracy" move
menl than to find easy answers to
these linguistic dilemmas. After
all, one person's "freedom fighter"
might be another's "terrorist
Even what some consider the
most straightforward labels now
are being challenged. The Rev. Pat
Robertson has objected to being
called a "televangclist Special
Olympics holds that "hearing
impaired" is preferable to "deaf
Why the attention to detail?
Public-relations consultants and
special-interest groups are con-
vinced journalistic shorthand af-
fects public opinion � one word
can shift sympathies in subtle, but
lasting, ways.
If you're fighting for citizen-
ship, it's better to be called an
"undocumented worker" than an
"illegal alien And since "liberal"
has taken on negative connota-
tions, some left-of-center organi-
zations now say they're "progres-
sive
The fight over language, poli-
tics and the media was examined
at length by George Orwell in 1946.
But with the advent of news com-
pression � "Give us 22 minutes,
and we'll give you the world �
the semantic scrap has intensi fied.
'The terminology is extremely
important said Douglas Gould,
vice president of communications
for Planned Parenthood Federa-
tion of America.
"It helps form an impression
in people's minds about what the
different groups are really all
about It is the first step in tram
ing the debate
Nowhere is the fight over
buzzwords more intense than in
the abortion battle. After calling
theopposingsides "pro-abortion"
and "pro-life" for several years.
the media now often refer to the
rival sides as "pro-choice" and
"anti-abortion
Even that description, some
journalistsand media criticsagree.
isbiasedinfavorofabortion-nghts
advocates: The implication is that
anyone who's not "pro choice" is
"anti-choice
"The other side wants to be
for something, and they want us
to be against something said Han
Donehey, director ol public rela-
tions for the National Right to Life
Committee, which opposes abor-
tion. "The public tends to lean
toward a group that is in favor of
something "
Yet if reporters were to re-
See Terms, page II)
Lexicon
Mushrooming
Answers from
Tuesday's paper
1. Expatiate: D discourse
2. Pontificate I). speak
authoritatively
3. Repast. I� meal
4. Abstinence: D. srlt
denial
5. Labyrinth: 1) maze
6. Constancy: 1 faithful-
ness
7. Portend: D. indicate
beforehand
8. Titivate. D. dress up
9. Titillate: D. excite pleas
antly
10. Abrogate: D.
cross-examine
ompiled by
Matt Richter
Pickin the Bones:
Bonehead goes on a quest for credit
By Chippy Bonehead
Staff Card Holder
There once was a lad named
Bonehead. He was a very poor
boy, but he was pure of heart and
he had a big bone besides. One
day before the holiday season
came bearing down upon him like
an enraged crossing guard, he
realized he was too poor even to
buv his aged mother a Christmas
present.
He thought this was a bad sort
of thing, the sort of thing bad boys
such as those who hang outside
the Fast Fare pretendingto be skate
punks would do. He resolved that
this sort of thing should not be his
lot in life, yet he had not a clue as
to how to change his situation.
Lo,and there came anangel to
him, disguised as a Visa applica-
tion. The angel spoke unto him
and said, "Apply now! Enrolled
college students accepted without
credit checks! Visa can help you
buy nice Christmas presents for
your aged mothers
Young Bonehead's eyes lit up
as will cat's eyes do when one
trains a speeding car's headlights
on them. This could save his
Christmas! It could in fact solve all
of his problems. He began to think
of the unlimited benefits he could
experience as a credit cardholder.
No longer would he wistfully
stare at the advertisements in his
porno magazines. Now he could
call beautiful girls, have them talk
of deviant sex practices with him
and have it discreetly billed to his
home as "System 900 Interna-
tional
No longer would he have to
stare wistfully through the win-
dows of record stores, longing to
buy the newest Madonna CD, or
have to wait patiently for a friend
to tape their Madonna CD for him.
He could walk right in and say
proudly, "I'll have that newest
Madonna CD please. I'll put it on
my Visa card
No longer would his aged but
kind mother stare wistfully at the
floor on Christmas morn. Mother's
Day morn, her birthday morn and
just about any other morn that the
Hallmark company had decided
to emphasize with tons of senti-
mental and commercial value,
with tears in her eyes as she re-
ceived the same present again.
No longer would she say,
"Thank you, my darling Bone-
headed son, this roll of toilet pa-
per is exactly the shade and con-
sistency I'd have chosen myself
had I been forced to shop at Food
Lion. Thank you
In fact, there would be a whole
lot lessof this wistful staring busi-
ness going on, if only he could get
this Visa card! He ran to the near-
est Kinko's and offered to lick
envelopes shut for an hour or so in
return for the use of the Xerox
machine.
Later that night, tongue-weary
and nauseous but spiritually buoy-
ant, Bonehead dropped off the
application form with an enclosed
Xerox copy of his current class
schedule into the mailbox. He had
completed all the requirements.
Now he could only wait
The application had stated
that he would receive his card
within four weeks. As the allotted
time span drew to a close, he be-
gan to become slightly neurotic
about the whole thing. He noticed
that if it was raining, the postman
got done with his route thirteen
and a half minutes quicker than he
did on nice sunny days, days in
which any normal person not
waiting obsessively for a piece of
plastic would have been outside
enjoying life.
Time, in its unyielding quest
to get absolutely nowhere but still
recklessly decay everything in its
path on its way there, moved on.
After seven weeks of waiting,
seven weeks of using his lunch
hour to wait for the mailman,
seven weeks of boasting to his
cardholder friends, "Oh, you pay
for dinner tonight. When I get MY
Visa card, I'll take you out after
seven weeks of this behavior, he
gave up.
He realized that the only way
he was going to get his Visa was if
the entire board of directors of
Visa went temporarily insane
See Credit, page 9





The East Carolinian, January 11,1990 9
Mentors help kids set goals
Study on the mall
Student Kimberly Wilson lookOi-rtiv shoulder of Jocassa Russell
as the two enjoy yesterday . int weather on the mall. These
two are getting a head start on studying Photo by Garret! KMIian�
t CU Photoiabi
WASHINGTON (AI' Lil
lian Goldberg spent 15 years as a
teacher and administrator in New
York City schools, but developed
her deepest relationships with
students after she retired.
"For the first time in my life.
I've been able to work with them
on a one-on-one basis and to help
them follow their interests Mrs.
C ioldberg, 70. said of her work
with youngsters in Florida. It
opens up vistas of knowledge for
meand I see the blossoming of the
children
In Salem, Mass 70-year-old
lames Brennan's work helping
voting toughs get jobs and stay
out of trouble keeps him going in
his own battle against cancer
"Undoubtedly this program
has something to do with my
mental and physical health I
would hate to think that when one
becomes a certain age they're dis-
posable. That thought always
plagued me Brennan said.
"The whole idea of linking
vouth and ciders is really gaining
a lot of momentum said Nancv
Uenkin, director of the Center for
Intergenerational Learning at
Temple University's Institute on
Aging "People are finally realiz-
ing that these are two groups that
should get together
Blind TV
cable channel said Ices hramm
Nostalgia marketing duct Km
rhecableoperator hasa commit
ment to the community to pro
vide a service,and thiscertainlv is
a sen ice
I here are tew advertisers in
part because Nostalgia broadcasts
movies uninterrupted. 'We arc
lust now approaching sime na
tional advertisers, said Stovall
Adapting commen ials isn t a
big a problem .is people �� uld
think A lot ot radio common, als
are just television commercials
without the picture "
The w.iv we narrate tfl
program ho said, 'is to try and
determine what is important and
present that to you as unobtm
siveh as possible without mter-
jecting our opinion "
In the premier narrated epi-
sodeol 'Matlock, 'featuringAndy
Griffith as an Atlanta lawyer, a
man stalks a young woman and
stabs her to death I he first dia-
logue, though, comes minutes into
the plot after the stabbing and
just before the woman's boyfriend
is arrested in her death
i he narration tills the void:
I he silver haired man pulls
a long knife from its holder the
narrator says. "His face is
drenched with sweat. As the
young man showers, the silver-
haired man enters the bedroom
holding the knife
" 1 he oung w oman stirs
Coming
Up
Thursday
Credit
awake, sees him and begins to
scream. 1 le puts his hand over her
mouth. He stabs her
Lunar, who rented the epi-
sode on videotape, said that until
the narrated version, the show was
difficult to follow. "There's noth-
ing but music tor the tirst three
minutes or so. It it wouldn't have
had the narration, I would've
missed the fact that 1 ick Van Dvke
J
was thi killer
While the network isa boon to the
blind, supporters point to another
group sure to benefit, Schramm
said. "It's also for the visually
impaired who have a spouse or
family members or loved ones
whose lives have been taxed or
Continued from page 8
O' ROCKEFE1 I ERS
The Farm
A I I !(
I he Pyramids
Fridav
CROCKEFEI i ERS
Subtle Distinction
ATTIC
inx
NEW DEI I
Bad Bob and the
Rocking Horses
FIZZ
Along for the Rule
MENDENHA1 I
Uncle Buck
Saturday
O' ROCKEFEi I bKo
In Limbo
ATTK
Waxing Poetics
and
Left Wing Fascists
NEW DEI I
The Stegmonds
FIZZ
Along for the Ride
MENDFNHAI.I.
Uncle Buck
Sunday
MENDENHAI.I.
Uncle Buck
simultaneously, Hell froze over,
or Greenville experienced that
most improbableof events,a white
( hristmas.
Lo,on December 23,1989, The
i ireat Blizzard arrived in the
Emerald C ity. Young Bonehead
could scarcely believe his eves.
Snow, twodays before Christmas!
nd m iist the last paragraph,
he'd sworn such a thing could
ne er happen.
I his he thought to himself,
i- i ipp ised t i thinking it to some-
'in else a prcxess that usually
pro es to be quite fruitless, "could
be just the s �rt if i mpn ibableevenl
around huh the whole of my
entire Honeheaded life might
revolve! I his could be what I've
waited for! Perhaps this year, my
dear, aged mother will receive a
real present tor Christmas
hen his lunch hour finally
arrived, he left his minimum-
wage paying job and raced home
to his mailbox as fast as the snow-
encrusted tires on his car would
let him. With the sort a breathless
anticipation you can only find in a
good B-mo vie these da j s, he flung
lop 13
For the week of January K
l Blake Babies
2. Smithereens
3 Jesus and Mary Chain
4 I 1 th Dream Day
5 Screaming Blue Mes
siahs
6 Full Fathom 5
7. Creatures
8. Michelle Shocked
() Dresel Parkwest
K) Hitch Magnet
1 1 Pixies
1 2 Psychedelic Furs
13 Indigo Report
open the mailbox, to find
Joy! Rapture! Bliss! All these
emotions flooded hissoulinmuch
the same manner that one strav
stream of water from his shower
nozzle continually flooded his
bathroom floor. Ski much for risk-
ing electrical shock as he blew his
hair dry in the mornings, he
thought, now I can buy a throw
rug for under the sink.
With a light heart and an
immediately-signed card (such as
prevents misuse by non-cardhold
ers. he headed back to work. It
snowed more.
It snowed with passion. It
snowed with intensity. It snowed
like a Visa executive who realized
he'd made a mistake and was
trying desperately to garner the
natural forces of the world to help
him rectify his mistake. It snowed
so much that stores began to close.
Bv the tune voting Bonehead
got off work,Greenvillewasadark
and quiet place. Packed snow
evilly reflected the streetlights'
glare. All around him, cars skid-
ded off the road. A phone call to
the mall revealed to him the hor-
rible ironic truth they were
closed.
"It's not fair he yelled in the
empty parking lot. Such dramatic
yells to the heavens are most ef fec-
tive in open fields away from
people, but as everyone had gone
home to build fires and watch the
snow fall, Bonehead didn't feel as
silly as perhaps he ought.
"I finally get my plastic, and
Fate closes all the stores so I can't
use it! Why? How could this hap-
pen to me, a poor but pure of heart
Bonehead, and one who has a big
bone, besides?" He fell to his knees
in dramatic despair.
A single light caught his eye.
Lo, his salvation gleamed from
the corner of the parking lot. The
Food Lion, bless it, was still open.
Resolutely, Bonehead rose to his
feet, firmly gripped his card, and
headed in. This year, he thought,
at least it will be Charmin.
One (if the latest such ideas is
mentoring,in which older Ameri-
cans are paired with youngsters
in one-on-one relationships.
With the elderly making up
the tastest growing segment of
society and the number of at-nsk
youth at 12 million and growing,
intergenerational match-ups are
"something whose lime has
come 1 lenkin said.
Mentoring is distinguished
from other intergenerational pro-
grams bv the development of
deeper relationships between
adults made wise by a lifetime of
experience and youngsters who
need unconditional love, encour-
agement and strong role models.
Children who succeed against
long odds often are those who
have been able to develop mean-
ingful relationships with adults,
lenkin said.
Temple this month launched
a $3 million linking lifetimes
program, financed bv five foun-
dations, that will help nine com-
munities set up mentoring proj-
ects pairing older people with
young offenders and troubled
vouth. The mentors, paid a small
stipend, will spend at least two
hours a week helping their part-
ners
In Springfield, Mass tor ex-
Continued from page 8
tied to the visually impaired be-
cause they had to interpret these
shows
The Narrative Television
Network is a spin-off of Narrative
Video Network, a 1988 innova-
tion that coupled narration with
popular TV series on videotape.
"We did Matlock 'Big Valley
'Andy Griffith Comer Pyle
Stovall said. The response was so
huge, we couldn't get enough
tapes out or Jo enough to keep
everybody happy
ample, retirees will helpoffenders
aged 14-17 finish schwl and steer
clear of drugs and crime. The
mentors arc in a unique position
to help because they're neither
parents nor professionals, said
John Tansey, director of the proj-
ect there. "Theseeldersdon't have
to prove anything to the kids.
They're there just for these kids
and to listen
In Memphis, Tenn , kinking
Lifetimes will pair low-income
older women with pregnant sev-
enth -and eighth-graders. Other
programs are being launched in
Los Angeles; Miami; St. Peters-
burg, Fla Birmingham and
Montgomery, Ala Hartford,
Conn ; and Syracuse, N.Y.
While intergenerational men-
toring programs are on the in-
crease, projects matching seniors
with troubled youth are rarer, said
Sandra Sweeney, of the American
Association of Retired Persons.
"For the right kind of person it's a
See Mentors, page 10
Bea
Leader.
Bea
Friend.
Information Night
Tues. Jan. 16, 8 - 10
Interviews - Wed.
Jan 17,8- 10
Mendenhall
Be of
Service.
Induction of
Pledges
(by invitation)
Thurs
Jan. 18,8- 10
Mendenhall
RUSH
January 16 - 26,1990
Sign up at the Buccaneer Office
1st week Undergraduates
2nd week Seniors
In Back of the Student Store
9:00am - 5:00pm
757-6501






Study on the mall
Student Kimberly Wilson looks over the shoulder of Jocassa Russell
as the two enjoy yesterday s pleasant weather on the mall. These
two are getting a head start on studying (Photo by Garrett Killian�
ECU Photolabi
The East Carolinian, January 11,1990 9
Mentors help kids set goals
WASHINGTON (AP) - Lil-
lian Goldberg spent 15 years as a
teacher and administrator in New
York City schools, but developed
her deepest relationships with
students after she retired.
"For the first time in mv life.
I've been able to work with them
on a one-on-one basis and to help
them follow their interests' Mrs.
Goldberg, 70, said of her work
with youngsters in Florida. "It
opens up vistas of knowledge for
me and I see the blossoming of the
children
In Salem, Mass 70-year-old
lames Brennan's work helping
voung toughs get jobs and stay
out of trouble keeps him going in
his own battle against cancer.
"Undoubtedly this program
has something to do with my
mental and physical health. 1
would hate to think that when one
becomes a certain age they're dis-
posable. That thought always
plagued me Brennan said.
"The whole idea of linking
youth and ciders is really gaining
a lot of momentum said Nancv
Flenkin, director of the Center for
Intergenerational Learning at
Temple University's Institute on
Aging "People �ire finally realiz-
ing that these are two groups that
should get together
Blind TV
One of the latest such ideas is
mentoring, in which older Ameri-
cans are paired with youngsters
in one-on-one relationships.
With the elderly making up
the fastest-growing segment of
society and the number of at-risk
youth at 12 million and growing,
intergenerational match ups are
"something whose lime has
Come Henkin said.
Mentoring is distinguished
from other intergenerational pro-
grams by the development of
deeper relationships between
adults made wise by a lifetime of
experience and youngsters who
need unconditional love, encour-
agement and strong role models.
Children who succeed against
long odds often are those who
have been able to develop mean-
ingful relationships with adults,
Henkin said.
Temple this month launched
a $3 million Linking Lifetimes
program, financed by five foun-
dations, that will help nine com-
munities set up mentoring proj-
ects pairing older people with
young offenders and troubled
youth. The mentors, paid a small
Stipend, will spend at least two
hours a week helping their part-
ners.
In Springfield, Mass for ex-
Continued from page 8
ample, retirees will helpoffenders
aged 14-17 finish school and steer
clear of drugs and crime. The
mentors are in a unique position
to help because they're neither
parents nor professionals, said
ohn Tansey, director of the proj-
ect there. "These elders don't have
to prove anything to the kids.
They're there just for these kids
and to listen
In Memphis, Tenn Linking
Lifetimes will pair low-income
older women with pregnant sev-
enth -and eighth-graders. Other
programs are being launched in
Los Angeles; Miami; St. Peters-
burg, Fla Birmingham and
Montgomery, Ala Hartford,
Conn and Syracuse, N.Y.
While intergenerational men-
toring programs are on the in-
crease, projects matching seniors
with troubled youth are rarer, said
Sandra Sweeney, of the American
Association of Retired Persons.
"For the right kind of person it's a
See Mentors, page 10
Bea
Leader.
cable channel said loeSchramm,
Nostalgia marketing director
"The cableoperatorhasa commit
ment to the community to pro
idea service, and this certainly is
a service
I here are tew advertisers, in
part because Nostalgia broadcasts
movies uninterrupted. 'We are
usl now approaching some na-
tional advertisers said Stovall
Adapting commercials isn't as
big a problem as people would
think. A lot of radio commericals
are just television commercials
without the picture
The wav we narrate these
programs he said, "is to try and
determine what is important and
present that to vou as unobtru
sively as possible without inter-
jecting our opinion
In the premier narrated epi-
sodeof "Mattock, 'featuringAndy
Griffith as an Atlanta lawver, a
man stalks a young woman and
stabs her to death. The hrst dia-
logue, though, comes minutes into
the plot after the stabbing and
just before the woman's boyfriend
is arrested in her death.
The narration tills the void:
"The silver-haired man pulls
a long knife from its holder the
narrator savs. "His face is
drenched with sweat. As the
yoim� man showers, the silver-
haired man enters the bedroom
holding the knife.
"The young woman stirs
Coming
Up
Thursday
O' ROCKEFELLERS
The Farm
ATTIC
The Pyramids
Friday
O'ROCkllll I IKS
Subtle Distinction
ATTIC
Jinx
NEW DELI
Bad Bob and the
Rocking Horses
FIZZ
Along for the Ride
MENDENHA1 I t
Uncle Buck
Saturday
O' ROCKEFt II I .v
In Limbo
ATTIC
Waxing Poetics
and
Left Wing Fascists
NEW HE LI
The Stegmonds
FIZZ
Along for the Ride
MENDENHALI.
Uncle Buck
Sunday
MENDENHALL
Uncle Buck
Credit
awake, sees him and begins to
scream. I le puts his hand over her
mouth. He stabs her
Lunar, who rented the epi-
sode on videotape, said that until
the narrated version, the show was
difficult to follow. "There's noth-
ing but music for the first three
minutes or so. If it wouldn't have
had the narration, 1 would've
missed the fact that Dick Van Dyke
was the killer
While the network is a boon to the
blind, supporters point to another
group sure to benefit, Schramm
said. "lts also for the visually
impaired who have a spouse or
family members or loved ones
whose lives have been taxed or
Continued from page 8
tied to the visually impaired be-
cause they had to interpret these
shows
The Narrative Television
Network is a spin-off of Narrative
Video Network, a P)88 innova-
tion that coupled narration with
popular TV series cm videotape.
"We did 'Matlock 'Big Valley
'Andy Griffith 'Comer Pyle
Stovall said. "The response was so
huge, we couldn't get enough
tapes out or do enough to keep
everybody happy
Bea
Friend.
Information Night
Tues. Jan. 16,8-10
Interviews - Wed.
Jan 17,8- 10
Mendenhall
Be of
Service.
Induction of
Pledges
(by invitation)
Thurs
Jan. 18,8- 10
Mendenhall
RUSH
simultaneously, Hell froze over,
or Greenville experienced that
most improbable of events, a white
. hnstmas.
l.o.on December 23,1989. The
Great Blizzard arrived in the
Emerald City. Young Bonehead
could scarcely believe his eves.
Snow, twodavs before Christmas!
And in just the last paragraph,
he'd sworn such a thing could
never happen.
" This he thought to himself,
as opposed to thinking it to some-
one else a process that usually
proves to be quite fruitless, "could
be just the sort of improbableevenl
around which the whole of mv
entire Boneheaded life might
revolve! Ibis could be what I've
waited for! Perhaps this year, my
dear, aged mother will receive a
real present for Christmas
When his lunch hour finally
arrived, he left his minimum-
wage -paving job and raced home
to his mailbox as fast as the snow-
encrusted tires on his car would
let him. With the sort a breathless
anticipation you can only find in a
good B-movie these days, he flung
Top 13
For the week of January 8
1 Blake Babies
2 Smithereens
3 Jesus and Mary Chain
4 11th Dream Day
5 Screaming Blue Mes-
siahs
6 Full Fathom 5
7. Creatures
8. Michelle Shocked
9. Dresel Parkwest
10. Bitch Magnet
11. Pixies
12. Psychedelic Furs
13 Indigo Report
open the mailbox, to find
Joy! Rapture! Bliss! All these
emotions flooded his soul in much
the same manner that one stray
stream of water from his shower
nozzle continually flooded his
bathroom floor. So much for risk-
ing electrical shock as he blew his
hair dry in the mornings, he
thought, now I can buy a throw-
rug for under the sink.
With a light heart and an
immediately-signed card (such as
prevents misuse by non-cardhold-
ers), he headed back to work,
snowed more.
It snowed with passion. It
snowed with intensity. It snowed
like a Visa executive who realized
he'd made a mistake and was
trying desperately to gamer the
natural forces of the world to help
him rectify his mistake. It snowed
so much that stores began to close.
By the time young Bonehead
got oif work, Greenville wasa dark
and quiet place. Packed snow
evilly reflected the streetlights'
glare. All around him, cars skid-
ded off the road. A phone call to
the mall revealed to him the hor-
rible ironic truth they were
closed.
"It's not fair he yelled in the
empty parking lot. Such dramatic
yells to the heavens are most ef fec-
tive in open fields away from
people, but as everyone had gone
home to build fires and watch the
snow fall, Bonehead didn't feel as
silly as perhaps he ought.
"I finally get my plastic, and
Fate closes all the stores so I can't
use it! Why? How could this hap-
pen to me, a poor but pure of heart
Bonehead, and one who has a big
bone, besides?" He fell to his knees
in dramatic despair.
A single light caught his eye.
Lo, his salvation gleamed from
the corner of the parking lot. The
Food Lion, bless it, was still open.
Resolutely, Bonehead rose to his
feet, firmly gripped his card, and
headed in. This year, he thought,
at least it will be Charmin.
January 16 - 26,1990
Sign up at the Buccaneer Office
1st week Undergraduates
2nd week Seniors
In Back of the Student Store
9:00am - 5:00pm
757-6501
j





10 The East Carolinian, January 11,1990
Report shows fitness confusion
-� rliufel ri vines for "Ve
NEW OKk (AP) Puritan
Oil 's American Mealtime Survey,
,i poll of 1.000 family cooks, shows
that while Amencans want to eat
healthier, thev haven't figured out
how to do it-
When asked to rank five foods
in order of cholesterol content, not
oneofthe 1 .tXXHamilycookscould
do it correctly, according to the
survey.
The survey also found that
while 87 percent of family chefs
claim that they try to prepare meals
low in saturated fat and choles-
terol. 52 percent actually cook
meals that contain dishes higher
in saturated fat and cholesterol
than is recommended by the Na-
tional Cholesterol Education Pro-
gram.
"Family cooks are suffering
from information overload says
Tom Gougeon, Puritan Oil's
manager of nutrition research.
"The glut of information on cho-
Mentors
lesterol - - and to a lesser extent on
saturated fat - is simply stagger-
ing
The National Cholesterol
Education Program and the
American Heart Association rec-
ommend a well-balanced diet for
adults that contains no more than
30 percent of total calories from
fat, including less than 10 percent
of total calories from saturated fat
and less than 10 percent from
polyunsaturated fat; 15 percent of
total calories from protein; 55
percent of total calories from car-
bohydrates.
According to Puntan Oil, to
stay within the guidelines of 30
percent of calories from fat, the
average man who consumes 2,400
calories a day can consume 80
grams of fat including 27 grams of
saturated fat. The average woman
who consumes 1,800 calories each
day can consume 60 grams of fat
including 20 grams of saturated
fat.
To meet these guidelines, it is
recommended that consumers
choose foods such as lean beef,
poultry without the skin, fish, low-
fat dairy products, whole-grain
breadsand cereals, vegetables and
fruits.
"The Healthy Heart Gour-
met" contains 250 "heart healthv"
eludes recipes for "Veal" Oscar,
Chicken Marengo, Shrimp
Scampi, cheesecake and more.
To order, send $14, which
includes postage and handling,
and your name, address and zip
code to: The 1 lealthy leart Gour-
met, 6001-27 Argyle Forest Blvd
Jacksonville, FL 32244. Florida
residents must add 72 cents sales
tax for each book ordered.
recipes for those interested in good�
health - and good eating. All �Qj Photolab is I
now accepting
applications.
If you are
interested in
photography,
contact Yvonne
Moye at 757-6009.
recipes have been analyzed for
cholesterol, fat and caloric con-
tent.
The cookbook was written by
Tom Mills of Jacksonville, Fla
who underwent heart surgery 3
years ago; Mills' wife, Arlcne;
Mills' son, Steve; Mills' dietician,
Cecilia Henning; and Dr. Kenneth
Adams, a cardiologist.
The cookbook, which hasbeen
endorsed by the Heart and Lung
Institute at St. Vincent's Medical
Center in Jacksonville, Fla in-
Annual Winter
Sale
25 off starting
aturday, Jan. 13
Ml all and Winter Clothing
Selected Jewelry and
Accessories Some Spring
and Summer Merchandise
A'
Mon- Sal iO-6
Thurs 10 - 8
756-1058
91( - A Red Banks Rd
Arlington Village
Continued from page 9
terrific experience, but there are
more barriers to working with at-
risk youth.
1 he may not share some ol
the -xime backgrounds or know
how to approach kids who may
have been in trouble
( )ne success story is the Work
( nnnection, based in Saugus,
Mass in which retirees, paid a
weekly salary based on caseload,
help young offenders fmd and
hold jobs as an alternative to jail.
Over the past four years, more
than v0 people have "graduated"
from the program.
It's amazing how the rela-
tionship evolves and develops
said director Kelly Quinlan. "It
never really stops because our
participants still keep in touch with
their mentors. They've made a
permanent friend
In Michigan, Ann Arbor s 11 C
program Teaching-1 earning
Communities arranges tor sen-
tor mentors to meet at school each
week with junior high school stu-
dents who are in danger of drop-
ping out or having other prob-
lems.
Youngsters tell their mentors,
"just the fact that you're here in
this room gives me courage, said
Carol Tice, who directs the pro-
gram. Elders, meanwhile, "know
Terms
that their life has made a differ-
ence
In Florida, the Senior Mentors
tor Creative Students program
started inBroward County in 1982
and hasspread to 22 districts. Mrs.
Goldberg, the New York educa-
tor, helped a grade schooler re-
search space law by visiting courts
and fudges, and the girl later ex-
pressed interest in becoming a
lawyer.
"To help a youngster realize their
own potential for creativity and
their own ability to do something
Mrs. Goldberg said, "That's the
wonder of it
Continued from page 8
We Want
.r
i
What: Welcome Back Social
When: January 16. 1990 -
Where: Mendenhall Social Roonv

S
You!
Time: 8:00pm til Midnight
FREE Admission
Refreshments, Door Prizes,
Alcohol - Free Fun,
Live Remote with Dylan Knight
KISSFM 102
verse course and describe
Donehey's constituents as "pro-
life the implication would be that
the other camp is "anti-life So
what's to be done?
"The closest that 1 could come
up with, as neutral terms, and I'm
not satisfied with this either, is
abortion-rights advocates' and
abortion opponents said Jeff
Mermaid
Greenfield, a reporter for ABC information said media critic
JJ . Mark Hertsgaard, author of On
' Snappv labels "Star Wars" Bended Knee: The Tress and the
or "pro -democracy" - - mav add Reagan Tresidency.
.J to our understanding of �Z2f��
�eor this is really as an asset, Heaard
television with its short attention said. "It discourages any kindlot
span and to desire to compress nuance or complex understand-
everything into little nuggets of �g 01 po��cal events.

Sponsored by.
OtTice of Substance Abuse Preveiuion & Education, KISS FM 102
B.A.C.C.H.U.S Pi Kappa Phi. and RHA
m
XVSAVWVWVVAA
- IT
.�.�' �. �

Continued from page 8
A truly memorable aspect of
"The Little Mermaid aside from
the color ful characters, is its jingly,
bubblv. sing-along songs. You find
yourself whistling and humming
them during and far after your
viewing. Songs like Sebastian's
Kiss the Carl" and "Under The
Sea sung with a delightful (a
maican flavor, and Ariel's love
ballad TartofYourWorld make
this a most outstanding sound-
track.
"The Little Mermaid' is an
uplifting, comical and musical
animation, filled with morals
about growingup, friendshipsand
making sacrifices. It deals with
the familiar theme of parents
wanting to hang on to their chil-
dren too long and finding out that
they have to let go. As Sebastian
says, "Children got to be free to
live der own lives It is well worth
the money and the 82 minutes of
time

presett ts
Every Thursday Niiiht
�STUDENT BUDGET NIGHT"
With Macintosh
)u can even do this
File
$1.00 Imports
$1.00 Cans
$1.50 Highballs
LADIES FREE ALL NIGH I
Coming Soon: Phe Squeez"
$2.50 Teas
$2.50 Pitchers
R & N inc
New
Open
Close
S�N
3�0
"l
Cruise
Continued from page 8
today. Freeport is a bustling port
Messed with the clearest blue-
green water around.
The price of the trip includes
travel, meals and on-board enter-
tainment. Ground transportation
from Greenville to Cape Canav-
eral and back will be via 46-pas-
sengcr buses. Prices start at $485
per person in a quad-room occu-
pancy. The price does not include
the cost of any on-shore activities.
The itinerary and specific details
of the trip arc included in the res-
ervation application available at
the Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall Student Center. The dead-
line for reservations is February 1.
Upcoming January Entertainment:
Saue Rs
Print
��P
Quit
Ian. Thurs. 11
Naugahyde
Chihuahua's
Jan. Fri 19
Left Wing Facist
Jan. Fri 12
Bad Bob & The
Rockin Horses
Jan.Sat 20
Left Exit
Jan. Sat. 13
The Stegmonds
Ian. Fri 26
The Mood
Ian. Sat. 27
TheNew Deli's 8th Anniversity Bash
Featuring.
In Limbo
The Popes
Flat Duo Jets
Great beer specials
WZMB Live Remote
Door Prizes
Doors open at 6:30 pm
Advance tickets $6.
at the door $7.
Each Tues. & Wed. Night
Open Mic Night
Sign up
starts at 3pm
758-0080
Madntosh'cOmputers have always
been easy to use. But they've never been
this easy to own.
Presenting The Macintosh Sale.
Tlirough January 31, you can save
hundreds of dollars on a variety
of Apple Macintosh computers and
peripherals.
So now there's no reason to settle
for an ordinary PC. With Trie
Student Stores
Wright Building
Macintosh Sale, you can wind up with
much more of a computer.
Without spending a lot more money.
ie Macintosh Sale
Now throui January 31.
CtninWrCal�il :J ����WW-m'1





Adventures of kemple Boy
By Kemple Rich's Nuthouse
By Rich
Quesriors.
ITMAK.e5 F
I He I lead king
By Robinson
Rex, The Wondei Pig
'TO SAV A WO$ &
I utbkJl 3l� TO 5Ay
TMfc F � V KJC
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NfiflsMAWlESS M THt TWBT
By John Shull
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By Angela R.
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By f-Uiott
1 ' muwv up mahA
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PLEttLASE,
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0L�At! LPJ NO LEAD! ND U6AP.1
Faux Pas
By Chucky D.
- y Cm
rr som�Sam that s&�� toor gxtsrs in
kiooms l! I r V6&ID THAT WCOIO HANO A LOAD �0
&UN TO AN �CU CAMPUS CO PI
Apply in person, come by "
for more information on
the positions of cartoonist
and editorial cartoonist.
I Farn BIG BUCKS and be
the talk of the town with
your own work published
jf 12,000 times a week.
Limited n u mber of
positions available so don't
delay.





The Dead King
By Robinson
Rex, The Wonder Pig
UOU, RM, I� 60�M6
TO S�y A W0�C AMft
r u�vrr you to say
THI HRST 1M
TtUT COKUS TO
RUDY?
O.K.
Y�S( I ADMIT
rrj ATE you
TWiKiKlts
3
By Mason
By Swami Peavev
fDAHUNG ZSA ZSA,i?ZC@KK� IKlnUCtHKHgBSISTAaCl"
t&L TSiMZ.XVKCmULV BBS Sb.� ?� ffi�?� J.
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Gambda Gambda Hey!
By Hliott MoLOtt.f Lp! NO LEAD! NO Uftp!
Faux Pas
By Chucky D.
CARTOONISTS WANTED
Apply in person, come by
for more information on
the positions of cartoonist
and editorial cartoonist.
Earn BIG BUCKS and be
the talk of the town with
your own work published
12,000 times a week.
Limited number of
positions available so don't
delay.





�Jk �aBt (Harnlfnfan
Page 12
Sports
January 11,1990
NCAA cuts could cost
schools over $1.5 million
DALLAS(AP)- Athletes will
have more time for studying and
coaches will have more pressure
I i graduate plavers in the re-
formed NCAA Fans on the other
hind, will have fewer games to
attend.
nd it strict drug-testing
measures are adopted by the
N A sH4th annual convention,
steroid users will have a tougher
time staying eligible for competi-
tion.
On Tuesdav, the NCAA fi-
nally launched some of its Presi-
dents Commission reform pack-
age, designed to ease the time
burden on athletes and give them
a better chance to compete in the
i lassroom.
Hut there's a price.
Eliminating three games from
the 28-game limit of the basketball
� tson a move approved by dele-
gates "uesdav, could cost some
schools up to $1 5 million a year
.mil force cutbacks in other sports
'hat don't earn tu ket ales
It s big mone sorely
needed Brad Hovious, athletic
director ol rexas-El Paso. said.
I wo or three basketball games
can pay for three or four non-reve-
nue sports
Indiana athletic director
Haydn Murray estimated the
! foosiers would lose ioO.(XX) per
year Kentucky could lose about
$375,000 for three fewer home
dates, and rexasabout $150,000.
lake Crouthamel, athletic di-
re, tor at Syracuse, which seats
12,000 in its Carrier Pome and
leads the nation in attendance,
wouldn't say how much his school
v uld lose. But a source dose to
trie program estimated threefewer
home games could set Syracuse
back $15 million.
Btvauseathletic directors had
hundredsof thousands�in some
i .ises, even millions of reasons
vote against shortening the
basketball season, the reform
almost topped over the starting
line
It took the NCAA five ballots
and four hours of parliamentary
vranglmgand power struggles to
kill, then revive and finally pass
t lie reduction in basketball games,
which begins with the 1992-93
season.
The measure was labeled a
watershed" in the NCAA Presi-
dents Commission effort to change
big timeathleticsand relieve pics
sure on athletes.
"It was not a pretty victory. It
was a messy victory, but 1 think
we got it done Wake Forest presi-
dent Thomas 1 learn, a member of
the Presidents Commission, said
after the final vote.
Added UCLA Chancellor
Charles Young: "The presidents
stood our ground and fought and
fought
The NCAA still has to decide
whether to stiffen the penal ties for
drug violations and initiate vear
round testing for steroids
Under the proposed drug-
testing measures, first time oi
fenders could lose a year's eligi-
bility, .no those who test positive
a second rime could be banned for
life.
Presently, the NCAA tests
only at championship events and
bowl games. It tested positive,
Psl A athletes now faceonly the
loss of eligibility tor postseason
i ompetition for 90 days.
Delegates also voted over-
whelmingly on Tuesday to make
public each school's graduation
rate for athletes, beginning next
year. With only a handful of dis-
senters, they also agreed that
schools must provide graduation
See Convention, page 13
Changes make season
and practices shorter
DALl S Ignoring n am
ings they'd do more harm than
good, college chiel executives
ruesdayramrodded redm tionsin
playing and practice demands on
football and basketball players
through the National (. ollegiate
Athletic Association convention.
"It is time for the NCAA to
take action on reform Gregory
O'Brien, president of the Univer-
sity oi New Orleans, said. "It is
overdue
"Our athletes have sent us a
clear message that the) need tune
to be students LattieC oor,presi-
dent of Arizona State University,
said. "Weareplacing just too many
demands on our student athletes.
On a series oi votes, high
lighted bv a day-long clash be-
tween college chief executh esand
athletic department officials in
debate over whether the propos-
als actually would do much to
reform college athletics, NCAA
delegates adopted proposals:
� To reduce the number of
days in spring football practice in
Divisions I-A and 1-AA. Under
the proposal, 15 days oi spring
football practice, including lOdays
of contact, will be permitted in a
21-day period. Current rules per-
mit 20 days of practice with 15
days of contact within 36 calendar
days.
� To reduce the ceiling on the
annual maximum number of
mcn'sbasketball games from 28 to
25.
Iditu 'U. delegates vi ted
I givi ill scl "Is an exemption
from that cei nceeven tour
� r exhibition games, for-
eign lours or parti, ipation in pre
eason basketball tournaments,
sih has the Mam Classic, the( Ireal
Alaska Shootout or the preseason
NIT:
Ihe change would have no
impact on postseason conference
tournaments, which are counted
by NCAA rule as one game. Par-
ti, ipation in the NCAA post ra
son tournament is not counted
against the maximum number oi
games allowed.
NCAA officials estimated that
the average number of games to
be played before tournaments
would be about 24 for a school
using Us exemption.
To delay the beginning
dates for conditioning, practice,
and competition in basketball bv
about two weeks, to Nov. 1. Be-
ginning in 1992, most schools
won't begin playing college bas-
ketball games until Dec. 1.
The adoption of the propos-
als, all of which go into effect in
1992,
represents a major victory- for
the NCAA's Presidents Commis-
sion, a 44-member advisory panel
that shocked the athletic estab-
lishment in October bv recom-
mending a variety of changes.
Commission members recom-
mended the changes in response
See NCAA, page 14
�� i . r .wmmm
Summer in January
Temperatures in Gn i le rose above fifty degrees Wednesday afternoon.
advantage 5l the unusually warm weather by playing volleyball on College Hill
� tou Photolab )
so � tudents took
Photo by Garrett Killian
UNC-W coaches investigated
WILMINGTON (AP) Ir-
regularities within the men's and
women's basketball programs at
the University ol North Carolina
at Wilmington do not warrant the
dismissal of the two head basket-
ball coaches, a top official said.
Charles Cahill, the school's
provost and vice chancellor for
academic affairs, said the irregu-
larities were not severe enough to
warrant dismissal of head coaches
Robert McPherson and Manlyn
Christoph.
An athletic fact-finding com-
mittee, appointed by Cahill last
spring, concluded that a UNCW
booster 'palmed $300 to McPher-
son in the hotel lobby where the
Seahawks stayed at last year's
Colonial Athletic Association
tournament in Hampton. Vaand
that the coach distributed that
monev to the players.
The committee also revealed
that Christoph had a "slush fund"
tor her women's program, the
Wilmington Morning Star re-
ported.
"My concern is to insure that
we have a class program Cahill
said. "These findings were not of
the level to warrant a firing. At
this particular point, 1 can't com-
ment on the committee's report.
That information is protected bv
the privacy act. But I think appro-
priate action was taken by me
The committee made five rec-
ommendations, and Cahill said
some were implemented while the
others were being instituted.
C hristoph was i "it ol tow n
ruesda and was unavailable for
comment.
Bill Brooks, the Seahawks'
Athletic Din I I lunched the
probe after two students said that
players received i : lyments
Thecommitteeconcluded that
the players did not seem toha ea
strong ethical sense or what to do
if confronted with improper con-
duct or payment, which led the
panel to suspect that the plavers
probably would not voluntarily
report illegal payments, if they
occur.
The committee's also con-
cluded that the plavers did not
believe McPherson motivated
them to excel and that he cared
little for their welfare
Pirate athletics
receive large gift
from local family
(SID) - The Parker Overton family of Green
ille, N.C. recently gave an unprecedented endow-
ment gift of $50,0W to the Last Carolina University
thletic Department.
The Kristi Overton Athletic Endowment is struc-
tured to provide a full scholarship to a deserving
v rth( arolma female student-athlete entering ECU
each fall.
" Ihis is trulv a landmark gift for our program
said Dave Hart. ECU'S Director of Athletics. "It is
extremely significant in that it represents our first
� ndi iwed gift earmarked for our women's programs.
It is very fitting that Kristi Overton's name be affixed
to this Endowed Scholarship due to the fact that she
is a bonafide illustration of exemplary achievement
by a female athlete right here in our own commu-
nity
Kristi, daughter of Parker and Becky Overton,
has won numerous honors in the sport of water
skiing. She was the recipient of the Dial Award in
1987 as the National High School Senior Athletic
Scholar and she hasalso been named by the Women's
Sports Foundation as one of the top ten up-and-
coming female athletes. She is the 1989 Professional
Water Ski Tour Slalom Champion and was the 188
National Overall Collegiate Water Ski Champion as
well as the 1987 Junior World Champion.
Kristi, a 1987 graduate of Greenville's J.H. Rose
High School, has been featured on the cover of Water
Ski magazineas well asSportsIllustrated, ABC Wide
World of Sports and ESPN.
"We are very appreciative of the Overton family
for the generosity they have demonstrated in becom-
ing F.ndowment members within our athletics pro-
gram said Hart.
Pirates look for weekend sweep
Freshman point guard Paul Childress and the Pirates travel to American and
James Madison this weekend looking tor a pair of conference wins (Photo by
Garrett Killian � ECU Photolab)
Clemson probe
reveals 14 alleged
rules violations
CLEMSON, S.C (AP) �
Clemson officials are expected to
meet this weekend to discuss a
report from the NCAA detailing
14 alleged rule violations in the
football program.
Several of the university's top
officials� including the president
and athletic director � will be in
Dallas for the NCAA convention,
which beganSunday.
"We will all be in Dallas
except (football) Coach (Danny)
Ford said Nick Fornax, vice presi-
dent for student affairs. "Those of
us that will be in Dallas will cer-
tainly be taking advantage of the
opportunity to go over the report
in more detail
Clemson received an official
letter of inquiry Friday from the
NCAA after a preliminary inves-
tigation uncovered thealleged rule
violations, which range from
monetary payments to illegal re-
cruiting contacts.
David Berst, assistam execu-
tive director for enforcement for
the NCAA, said in a letter to uni-
versity President Max Lennon it
appea rs the school viola ted NC A A
rules.
"Based upon a review of the
available information, it appears
reasonable to expect that the
NCAA Committee on Infractions
will find violations of NCAA li
islation concerning these matters
Berst said. "Accordingly, this let
ter constitutes an official in
quiry
The alleged rule violations
occurred from 1964 to 188 and
involved bom plaversand recruits,
according to the school
The violations include the
payment of $15 to $10, gifts ot a
cap and sweatshirt, improper
purchase of meals and auto trans-
portation and violation of recruit
ing rules that limit the number ot
visits and period of time when
visitscanbemadc, the school said
Lennon was out of town and
could not be reached forcomment
Lomax said the school's internal
investigation and its work with
the NCAA had prepared it tor the
NCAA's announcement.
"We pretty well had an idea
of what they were coming up
with Lomax said during a tele-
phone interview. "1 would sav that
See Clemson, page 13





�Ije SaHt Carolinian
Page 12
Sports
January 11,1990
NCAA cuts could cost
schools over $1.5 million
DALLAS(AP)Athletes will
have more time for studying and
coaches will have more pressure
to graduate players in the re-
formed NCAA. Fans, on the other
hand, will have fewer games to
attend.
And if strict drug-testing
measures are adopted by the
NCAA's84th annual convention,
steroid users will have a tougher
time staying eligible for competi-
tion.
On Tuesday, the NCAA fi-
nally launched some of its Presi-
dents Commission reform pack-
age, designed to ease the time
burden on athletes and give them
a better chance to compete in the
classroom.
Put there's a price.
I-liminating three games from
the 28-game limit of the basketball
i n, a move approved by dele-
gates "uesdav, vould cost some
schools up to $1 5 million a year
and force cutbacks in other sports
tliat don't earn ticket ales
It's big mone) sorely
needed Brad Hovious, athletic
director of l'eas-El Paso, said.
I wo or three basketball games
can pay tor three or tour non-reve-
nue portS
Indiana athletic director
Haydn Murray estimated the
! loosiers would lose $600,000 per
year, Kentucky could lose about
$375 (XH) for three fewer home
dates, and Texas about $150,000.
lake Crouthamel, athletic di-
re, tor at Syracuse, which seats
32,000 in its Carrier Dome and
leads the nation in attendance,
wouldn't say how much hisschool
�vi ild lose. But a source close to
the program estimated three fewer
home games could set Syracuse
back Si 5 million.
Because athletic directors had
bundrodsof thousands�in some
cases, even millions - of reasons
t. vote against shortening the
basketball season, the reform
almost tripped over the starting
line.
It took the NCAA five ballots
and four hours of parliamentary
wrangling and power struggles to
kill, then revive and finally pass
the reduction in basketball games,
which begins with the 1992-93
season.
The measure was labeled a
"watershed" in the NCAA Presi-
dents Commission effort to change
big-timeathletiesand relieve pres-
sure on athletes.
"It was not a pretty victor It
was a messy victory, but 1 think
we got it done Wake Forest presi-
dent Thomas Hearn, a member of
the Presidents Commission, said
after the final vote.
Added UCLA Chancellor
Charles Young: "The presidents
stood our ground and fought and
fought
The NCAA still has to decide
whether to stiffen the penalties for
drug violations and initiate year-
round testing for steroids.
Under the proposed drug-
testing measures, first-time of-
fenders could lose a vear's oligi-
bility, and those who test positive
a second time could be banned for
life.
Presently, the NCAA tests
only at championship events and
bowl games. If tested positive,
NCAA athletes now face only the
loss of eligibility for postseason
competition for 90 days.
Delegates also voted over-
whelmingly on Tuesday to make
public each school's graduation
rate for athletes, beginning next
year. With only a handful of dis-
senters, thev also agreed that
schools must provide graduation
See Convention, page 13
.
Changes make season
and practices shorter
�.
DALLAS Ignoring warn-
ings they'd do more harm than
good, college chief executives
Tuesday ramrodded reductions m
playing and practice demands on
football and basketball players
through the National Collegiate
Athletic Association convention.
"It is time for the NCAA to
take action on reform Gregory
O'Brien, president of the Univer-
sity of New Orleans, said. "It is
overdue
"Our athletes have sint us a
clear message that they need tune
to be students LattieCoor, presi-
dent of Arizona State University,
said. "Weareplacing just too many
demands on our student athletes.
On a scries of votes, high-
lighted by a day-long clash be-
tween college chief executi ves a nd
athletic department officials in
debate over whether the propos-
als actually would do much to
reform college athletics, NCAA
delegates adopted proposals:
� To reduce the number of
days in spring football practice in
Divisions 1-A and I-AA. Under
the proposal, 15 days of spring
football practice, including lOdays
of contact, will be permitted in a
21-day period. Current rules per-
mit 20 days of practice with 15
days of contact within 36 calendar
days.
� To reducethc ceiling on the
annual maximum number of
men'sbasketball games from 28 to
25.
In addition, delegates voted
to give all schools an exemption
from th.it ceiling mice every four
vears tor exhibition games, for-
eign tours or participation in pre-
season basketball tournaments,
such as the Main Classic, the Croat
Alaska Shootout or the preseason
NIT
1 he cnange would have no
impact on postseason conference
tournaments, which are counted
by NCAA rule as one game. Par-
ticipation in the NCAA post'i-
son tournament is not counted
against the maximum number of
games allowed.
NCAA officialsestimated that
the average number of games to
be played before tournaments
would be about 29 for a school
using its exemption.
� To delay the beginning
dates for conditioning, practice,
and competition in basketball by
about two weeks, to Nov. 1. Be-
ginning in 1942, most schools
won't begin playing college bas-
ketball games until Dec. 1.
The adoption of the propos-
als, all of which go into effect in
1992,
represents a major victory for
the NCAA's Presidents Commis-
sion, a 44-mcmber advisory panel
that shocked the athletic estab-
lishment in October by recom-
mending a variety of changes.
Commission members recom-
mended the changes in response
See NCAA, page 14
i
t
X
Summer in January
Temperatures in Greenville rose above fifty degrees Wednesday afternoon, so these students took
advantage 3l the unusually warm weather by playing volleyball on College Hill (Photo by Garrett Killian
I � ECU Photolab.)
UNC-W coaches investigated
WILMINGTON (AP) Ir-
regularities within the men's and
women's basketball programs at
the University of North Carolina
at Wilmington do not warrant the
dismissal of the two head basket-
ball coaches, a top official said.
Charles Cahill, the school's
provost and vice chancellor for
academic affairs, said the irregu-
larities were not severe enough to
warrant dismissal of head coaches
Robert McPherson and Marilyn
Christoph.
An athletic fact-finding com-
mittee, appointed by Cahill last
spring, concluded that a UNCVV
booster "palmed $300 to McPher-
son in the hotel lobby where the
Seahawks stayed at last year's
Colonial Athletic Association
tournament in Hampton, Vaand
that the coach distributed that
money to the players.
The committee also revealed
that Christoph had a "slush fund
for her women's program, the
Wilmington Morning Star re-
ported.
"My concern is to insure that
we have a class program Cahill
said. "These findings were not of
the level to warrant a firing. At
this particular point, 1 can't com-
ment on the committee's report.
That information is protected bv
the privacy act. But I think appro-
priate action was taken by me
The committee made five rec-
ommendations, and Cahill said
some were implemented while the
others were being instituted.
Christoph was out of town
Tuesday and was unavailable for
comment.
Bill Brooks, the Seahawks'
Athletic Director, launched the
probe after two students said that
players received illegal payments.
The committee concluded that
the players did not seem to have a
strong ethical sense of what to do
if confronted with improper con-
duct or payment, which led the
panel to suspect that the players
probably would not voluntarily
report illegal payments, if they
occur.
The committee's also con-
cluded that the players did not
believe McPherson motivated
them to excel and that he cared
little for their welfare.
Pirate athletics
receive large gift
from local family
SID) � The Parker Ovcrton family of Green-
ville, N.C. recently gave an unprecedented endow-
ment gift of $50,000 to the Past Carolina University
Athletic Department.
The Kristi Overtoil Athletic Endowment isstruc-
tured to provide a full scholarship to a deserving
North Carolina female student-athlete entering F.CU
each fall.
"This is truly a landmark gift for our program
said Dave Hart, F.CU's Director of Athletics. "It is
extremely significant in that it represents our first
endowed gift earmarked for our women's programs.
It is very fitting that Kristi Overton's name be affixed
to this Endowed Scholarship due to the fact that she
is a bonafide illustration of exemplary achievement
by a female athlete right here in our own commu-
nity"
Kristi, daughter of Parker and Becky Overton,
has won numerous honors in the sport of water
skiing. She was the recipient of the Dial Award in
1987 as the National High School Senior Athletic
Scholar and she hasalso been named by the Women's
Sports Foundation as one of the top ten up-and-
coming female athletes. She is the 1989 Professional
Water Ski Tour Slalom Champion and was the 1988
National Overall Collegiate Water Ski Champion as
well as the 1987 Junior World Champion.
Kristi, a 1987 graduate of Greenville's J.H. Rose
High School, has been featured on the cover of Water
Ski magazineas well asSports Illustrated, ABC Wide
World of Sports and ESPN.
"We are very appreciative of the Overton family
for the generosity they have demonstrated in becom-
ing Endowment members within our athletics pro-
gram said Hart.
Clemson probe
reveals 14 alleged
rules violations
Pirates look for weekend sweep
Freshman point guard Paul Childress and the Pirates travel to American and
James Madison this weekend looking for a pair of conference wins (Photo by
Garrett Killian � ECU Photolab)
CLEMSON, S.C (AP) �
Clemson officials are expected to
meet this weekend to discuss a
report from the NCAA detailing
14 alleged rule violations in the
football program.
Several of the university's top
officials�including theprcsident
and athletic director � will be in
Dallas for the NCAA convention,
which beganSunday.
"We will all be in Dallas
except (football) Coach (Danny)
Ford said Nick Fornax, vice presi-
dent for student affairs. "Those of
us that will be in Dallas will cer-
tainly be taking advantage of the
opportunity to go over the report
in more detail
Clemson received an official
letter of inquiry Friday from the
NCAA after a preliminary inves-
tigation uncovered the alleged rule
violations, which range from
monetary payments to illegal re-
cruiting contacts.
David Berst, assistant execu-
tive director for enforcement for
the NCAA, said in a letter to uni-
versity President Max Lennon it
appears the school violated NCAA
rules.
"Based upon a review of the
available information, it appears
reasonable to expect that the
NCAA Committee on Infractions
will find violations of NCAA leg
islation concerning these nutters
Berst said. "Accordingly, this let-
ter constitutes an official in
quiry
The alleged rule violations
occurred from 184 to 188 and
involved both playersand recruits,
according to the school
The violations include the
payment of $15 to $150, gifts of a
cap and sweatshirt, improper
purchase of meals and auto trans-
portation and violation of recruit-
ing rules that limit the number of
visits and period of time when
visits can be made, the school said
Lennon was out of town and
could not be reached for comnvnt
Lomax said the school's internal
investigation and its work with
the NCAA had prepared it for the
NCAA's announcement.
"We pretty well had an idea
of what they were coming up
with Lomax said during a tele-
phone interview. "I would say that
See Clemson, page 13





13 The East Carolinian January 11,1990
Sports Briefs
Hall of Fame inducts new members
I hree time Cv Young winner Jim Palmer and two-time National
1 eague MVP foe Morgan became the 20th and 21st players to be elected
to baseball's 1 lall of Fame in their first vear of eligibility Tuesday night
Palmer, who won 20 or more games eight times in his 19 years with the
BaltimoreOrioles, received 411 of 444 votes Morgan received 363 votes.
Chattmp named new Navy coach
Marshall University coach George Chaump was hired as the new
football coach of the U.S. Naval Academy Monday. Chaump, who
ra ked up a 33-16-1 record in his four vears at Marshall, is the first Navy
coach without any previous ties to the academy. He replaces Elliot
I zelac, tired after three vears with a record of 8-25.
Clemson to release NCAA report
(. lemson officials will remove any names or references from a 15-
pageN A A report outlining violations in the school's football program
ire n is released by the end of the month. The NCAA letter listed 14
allegations, including payments of up to $150 to football players and
r i nuts
NCAA gives Reagan top honor
The NCAA awarded former President Ronald Reagan with its
highest honor the "Teddy Award" - Monday night in Dallas,
although some administrators complained about it, claiming he hurt
men's athletics by not enforcing equal opportunity. There was no
rganized protest although several women in the audience of 2,000
� fusi d to stand when Reagan was introduced.
Meola, Harkes go to England
1 he I S. national soccer team's training camp in La olla, Calif, on
Wednesday will be minus goalie lonv Meola and midfielder John
; 1 larkes, who have gone to England to trv out with Sheffield. Meola
! started in the team's last four final-round World Cup qualifying matches
! w hile 1 larkes started all eight final-round matches. The twocan plav for
j the United States this summer
Former Giants owner dies
1 loraceOStoneham, who started the professional baseball move to
! the West c oast, died in a nursing home in Scottsdale, Ariz. Sunday.
Stoncham, s was principal owner and president of the Giants for 40
years before selling the team in 1976. He announced in August 1957 the
move from New York to San Francisco, two months before the Brooklyn
Dodgers announced their move to l.os Angeles.
Lemieux scores four goals
Mario I emieux scored four goals and extended his scoring streak
to 1 games a the Pittsburgh Penguins beat the New York Rangers 7-
i Monday night. In other games: Maple I.eafsS, Capitals 6; Jets 4, Devils
Spring training put on hold
Major league baseball's spring training plans were put on hold
until further notice Tuesday by the owners' Plaver Relations Commit-
tee 1 he move comes as a sign that the owners intend to stand firm on
a Feb. 15 deadline tor a new collective bargaining agreement. After that,
a erscould be locked out of Spring training. Talks resumed Tuesday.
Olympic Comm. denies South Africa
Soutl African sports,officials were told they will not be reinstated for
(Ivrfipir events until thev have one legitimate non-racial sports federa-
tion, an InternationalHympic Committee said. South Africa has been
banned from the Olympics because of the country's apartheid policies.
the talks, which are being held in Paris, were the first since the 1970
.impetition ban
Robbie's son may head Dolphins
A private funeral is planned Wednesday for Joe Robbie, 73, the late
wner of the Miami Dolphins. Robbie died Sunday. His son, Tim
Robbie, V4, will probably take over as the head of operations for the
I Jolphins.
Becker and Agassi join McEnroe
I ennis superstars Boris Becker, Andre Agassi and defending cham-
pion John McEnroe are among those who have agreed to play in the U.S.
Men's 1 lard ourt Championships in Indianapolis in August. The prize
money was increased from $425,000 to $1 million for the tournament,
which is considered a warmup for the U.S. Open.
Gervin may join Spanish team
I ormer NBA great George Gervin says he still hasn't decided if he
will join the Spanish basketball team TDK. If the 37-year-old Gervin
joins the club, he will owe the Continental Basketball Association
$10,000, league officials say. Gervin left the CBA Quad City Thunder
after 15 games.
e .Tv"g�il 1�� I1-4 I' )P AY Apple College Infonntlujn Nft-wcrk
In the Locker
Southeastern slopes report
January skiing conditions
Intramurals prepares for
5-on-5 basketball tourney
(IRS) As an opener to the
ever-popular 5-on-5 basketball
season, Intramural Receational
Services will be hosting a pre-sea-
son tournament for all Fast Caro-
linians, the tournament is open to
men's and w ten's five person
squads at a cost of $10. Not only
will this year's tourney provide
practice for intramural officials but
serveas as practice time for teams
registering for the regulsr season.
To register for this year's pre-
season tournament and regular
season play, send a team repre-
sentative to play to Biology 103 on
January 16 at 5 p.m. Individuals
interested in playing with no team
allegiance are encouraged to at-
tend for placement on a team. This
year's tournament will be open to
the first 24 teams that enter and
will be held January 18,19 and 20.
Individuals interested in earn-
ing extra money through officiat-
ing basketball are asked to call
David Gaskins at 757-6387. Indi-
viduals will receive training
through intramural sports with job
hours revolving around officials
class schedules. Basketball games
are held nightly in Memorial
Gymnasium and Mmges Coli-
seum. No experience is necessary.
The Department of Intramu-
ral Recreational Services intro-
duces its newest fitness club pro-
gram for the spring of 1990 called
the Pirate Fitness Club.
The program is an exercise
incentive program where individ-
ual exercise goals and points are
developed and count toward a
team point total. The team exer-
cise concept is new to ECU, and it
allows individuals participating
in any number of activities to form
a team and reap the rewards.
Swimming, weight lifting, rac-
quetball, running and other ac-
tivities that qualify as aerobicor
anaerobic. An organizational
meeting will be held on January
24 at 5:1 0p.m. in Science Complex,
Room 103.
II H III rill S
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IntramuralSport Calendar
ActivityRegistrationMeetingOfficial's Clinic
Tre season Basketball1165pmBio 103116
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Co-Rec Bowling1235 pmBio 103
Nike 3 Point Shoot Out 123530pmBio 103
Inner Tube H20 Polo1305pmBio 103131
Racquetball Doubles265 pmBio 103
Free Throw Contest283 pmMG
Basketball Slam Dunk2135 pmBio 103
Pre season Softball3135 pmBio 103313
Home Run Derby3135pmBio 103
Softball3135 pmBio 10.3313
Tennis Doubles3135:30pmBio 103
Co-Rec Volleyball3205 pmBio 103321
Indoor Soccer3205.30pmBio 103321
Putt-Putt Golf3275pmBio 103
Challenge Week49llam-6pm MG104-A
Golf Classic4105 pmBio 103
Frisbee Golf4105:30pmBio 103
Beach Volleyball4106:00pmBio 103
Rec RepresentativesMeetingK January 17 Bio 103
UNIVERSITY AMOCO
We have moved from
University Exxon on
1101 East 5th St. to
University Amoco on
101 East 10th St.
( Across from Famous Pizza)
Clemson
Continued from page 12
1- of January 111. 1990
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Wintergreen 50 inch base New natural
snow 10 slopes open. Groomed surface.
Night skiing.
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Canaan Valley: 40 inch base. New ma-
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granular surface. Night skiing.
Siktr Creek 2� inch base. A trace of new
natural snow New machine made snow.
12 slopes open Machine groomed sur-
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we didn't have any surprises in
this report
Berst would no! comment on
whether the alleged violations
would be considered major or
minor.
"We won't t.ilk about them it
all until the cas is concluded
Berst said during a telephone inter-
view. "We'll certainly have those
kind of conversations with the
university, but we can't say any-
thing publicly until the case is
concluded
Lomax said he didn't want to
"speculate" on the severity of the
alleged violations.
"I wouldn't want to try to
weigh the violations as to whether
they're major or minor or any-
thing like that because we want a
Convention
Continued from page 12
rates to prospective athletes dur-
ing recruiting.
The NCAA has been under
pressure from Congress, which is
considering legislation to force the
release of the rates.
The disclosure of the gradu-
ation rates was seen as putting
more pressureoncoaches to allow
more time for stud v.
"We either take this action for
ourselvesW we'll have it done tor
us TCU chancellor Bill Tucker
said. "If it's done for us, it will be
done to us
The delega tes approved com-
promise cuts in spring football
practice, reducing practice davs
from 20 to 15, and limiting contact
drills to 10 of those days.
The Presidents Commission
had proposed halving spring foot-
ball to 10 davs and eliminating
contact drills altogether in the
spring.
The basketball cuts finally
J
approved did include a compro-
mise measure that preserved ex-
emptions to the 25-game limit for
preseason tournaments. It also
moved the start of preseason prac-
tice to Nov. I from Oct. 15, and
said there could be no games be-
fore Dec. 1.
"The message (the NCAA
should send) is less time in the
athletics facility, more time in the
library said John Hogan, faculty
representative from Colorado
School of Mines.
program that'sbeyond suspicion
he said. "Therefore, we don't want
infractions. They're all major as
tir as we're concerned at this
point
The university must respond
to the allegations in writing to the
NCAA by March 12.
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14 rhe last Carolinian, lanuarv 11, lllH)
Athlete claims brains, not drugs, build brawn
LONDON(AP) AlOerter
.n s steroids are .ill In the mind
According to a British Broad
casting Corp television program
being screened unl.n he may be
right
1 he tMU documentarv ays
anabolic steroids may have i
greater effect on the mind than on
the bod) ot athletes trying to
improve trtrir performances
QED rhe Steroid Myth
presentsevidence from the I nited
States, Britain and Ital) chatleng
ing the view thai the physical el
fects alone ol steroids can turn
good athletes into world champi-
ons
rhe Idea th,�t steroids en
ha nee performance ma be an
othei damaging myth the pro
gram concludes
Oertei supports thai th� on
Phe tour time (M mpic ili
I h� ch�impion .ml th.it when he
made a�omeba k .it age 40 in 1976,
he was given .1 steroid prescrip-
tion to help him ov or an injury
Because ho h.ul hu;h bloool
best throw sot his career 2 17 feet
"It's not the stutt you are
shooting into your system Vi tor
says in the BBC program It s .ill
mental
I he program lott .i numbei ol
pressure the program lasted jus) key questions unanswered in
two months during which time, eluding whether Canada - Ben
Oerter said, there was no notice Johnson could have won the hi'
able improvement in his perform meter dash In the Seoul)lj mpi� s
ance without being on steroids
ohnson, stripped ol hts )lym
et seven o.irs later and pic gold medal and a world record
'clean of drugs, he had one of the , it tor testing positive tor steroids,
NCAA
Continued from page 12
to the findings ol .1 $1 " million
5urve of college athletes rhose
findings indi ated that ni.m sti
dent athletes were spending n
timeon thou sport than their stud
I Os
� otionof th 1 � pts�ds
appears to reestabli sh
N In RS7 tht commission
suffered .1 major embarrassnv I
whenNC delegates defeated 1
�-i �� t
l" h ' '
ommission

sat I tft
Kit �� �
that reform ol ithletics is
underw a
Cool ind 1
K-rs were forced to light throu
,1 maze ol parliain pro. c
dure after oppotv nts apparent!)
h.ul derailed 1 majoi portion ol
the redui tior p 1 k igi 1 k one
Vote Division ! delegates � �ted
not to considt r .1 redu tion m the
number ol baski tball games but
later relented
lor about half ol the Divi-
sion I schools who pi.i basket
ball to cut games is to cut their
throats financialh 1 homas N. ea
cor commissioner of the( blonial
Athleticonfeti n e said
Most athletic directors said the
reduction in basketball games w ill
cost them mone Most estimates
ranged between $250,000 and
1500 000
thai s ,1 lot ol monc said
Vanderbilt athletic director Roy
Kramers who said the ruling
could cost lus school about
$500,000 Idealism reigned todav
but realism will setback in prettN
SOOtl
i thers ilsosiid that th hope
the Presidi � �
bemoreop itthen iewsin
the future
1 truxl togetanaudieni evs ith
them to talk about these t pes ol
things and I couldn't get one 'ot
one said Frank Broyles who is
athletic director at the I niversity
(t Arkansas Phis is just window-
dressing to s,w they vIkI some
thing To me, it s disgusting to
pass legislation not fully thought
out
Donna 1 opiano women s
athletic director at the l lniversit
ot rexas, said she h irs that coaches
will ro.u t to the reduction by pl.u
ins o en more daily time demand
oil thou athletes She said a limit
on the amount ol time devoted
daily to practice would be more
effective
Yeager said that debate
amouted toashowdow n between
athletu directors,�ndcommission
ors against members ol the
( A s Presidents (bmmission
but that no one is challenging the
chiefexecutives authority or what
they want to do.
but the . hid executives wete
adamant that the changes wore to
be approved
"Todeiay is the deadliest form
ot denial David Palmer, presi
dent ot I S Military Academy,
saul ' Wo must make our mark on
the wall '
-� �m m it
latei testified In- had been on a He said me 10-minute pro
steroid program since 1981 gram, which took 1 12 years to
Whether the Canadian would make, tries to show that the m n
have triumphed without the help tal impact ol taking steroids
equally effe live
' It was nol my brie! to ap
praiseit from a moral standpoint
said Thau, a former Romanian
During a press briefing Tues hammer thrower "But there is
day the program's producer, reason to believe that what is
i In is 1 hau s.ml the muscle build- gained in strength is not necessar
ing powors attributed to steroids ily matched by power
. ould help certain athletes ,u cvt "I know how compulsive the
ol steroids is something we mav
never know tor sure the pro
eram sivs
interested me is what actually
happened to people on steroids.
It s not like taking a pill Every-
thing has to be right "
1 he program cites an experi-
men! at the University of New
Mexico where, tor nine weeks, a
r.n oipol male athletes underwent
tests were injected with a
variety ol treatments, incuding
steroids and placebos sub
stances that have no medical ef-
fei t and are used merely as a test
am times
winning urge can be but what ing device
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 11, 1990
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 11, 1990
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.716
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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