The East Carolinian, January 9, 1990






W$z lEaHt (ftaralmtatt
Utvity tfie Tiist Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 64 No. 1
Tuesday, fanuary 9, 1(�0
Creenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
28 ?
1,750 ECU students
graduate at the 1989
fall commencement
By Thorn .is Barry
St.ifr Writer
One of ECU'S top academic
officials spoke to 1,750 graduates
at the fall commenc ement Situr
dav, December c, in Minges Coli
scum
Pr.Marlene Springer, ECU
vice chancellor tor academic at
fairs, said that education will lead
"into a nevorending cycle IM
change in .) rapidly changing
world.
Springer said the basic pTCfll
ise of being educated is that "we
muttbecurtotisbeings and that
to love a life Woffh In ing we mut
have curiosiU She added this
premise assume th.it human
beingsafeessentially imaginative,
sell motivating.in,h uriotisbcings
who are capable 'I i outinual de
vclopment
Springer, who is also a profes-
sor ot English and a scholar in
literature, quoted from the works
ofShakospe.irr I HckcrfS, Keatsand
other literary figures in defining
an educated person
Springer Mid "the first symp-
tom is intellectual cunosstv and I
need for continual growth She
also spoke about Shakespeare's
( aliban yearning for a life of the
imagination, a life of the mind, for
something to keep him alive as a
person "
According to Springer, any
student can have more informa-
tion processing power than the
entire British Isles did in 10. "If
we are to nurture an intellectual
curiosity, if we are to survive the
world as it changes, we must be
tolerant people
VVe are coming to know more
and more as educated people, of
two i ultures, the world ot science
and the world ot the arts, and that
they .ire inextricably intertwined
and must be it the human spirit
is not only lO endure but to
triumph
This commencement was the
third fall commencement at ECU.
This commencement was for
graduates who completed degree
requirements in the summer ses
sions or during the past fall semes-
ter
Interior Design m,iors Jackie RekJ and Cwyn Setter, along with 1 750 other graduates at ECUS Dec 9 Commencement exercise,
trumpet the end of their college years Photo -Tony Rumple (ECU News Bureau)
Mobil
By Donna Haves
St.iff Writer
The concerned testimonies of
hundreds o! Northarolina resi-
dents at a series ot public hearings
and a negative report trom a panel
of the National Academy of Sci-
ences have helped delay the drill
ing timetable tor Mobil Oil's pro-
posed gas and oil exploration off
the North Carolina coast
North Carolinians attended a
senesof public bearings across the
eastern half Of the state in Dei em
ber to provide the Minerals Man
agement Service (M MS) with both
positive and negative feedback on
Mobil Oil's draft ot the "Inviron-
mental Report on Proposed Ex-
ploratory Drilling Offshore North
Carolina The report was pub-
lished bv the MMSon Nov. 1.
Congressman Walter B, Jones,
chairman tor the IS. House of
Representatives' Committee on
Merchant Marine and Fisheries,
was one of the speakers at the first
heannginManteoonDec.4 Those
who testified presented concerns
that were echoed throughout the
hearing process: Mobil Oil's envi-
ronmental report does not ade-
quately evaluate the environ-
mental impact OR the North Caro-
lina Outer Hanks
Greenpeace; the international
environmental organization, and
other environmentalistssponsored
a "Concerned Citizens Rally" be-
fore the second hearing in Beaufort
on Dec. 5. Dome Smith, an ocean
ecology expert and a national
campaign tor Greenpeace, aid
Greenpeace was completely
against offshore drilling m North
Carolina "There is an alternative
tooffshoredrilling((. .reenpeace)
feels that the issues ot energy
conservation and research devel-
opment on workable alternatives
are answers to this hasty develop
mentofoffshorcresounes, Smith
stated
Members ot Students tor a
Cleaner Earth (SCI), an ECU envi-
ronmental organization, spoke at
the third hearing in Washington
on IXc. 6. Annette (iilchnst, co-
founder of S(T said she opposed
offshore drilling in Northaro-
lina because "drilling is contradic-
tory to the coast's established his-
tory ot protection
An environmental rallv pre-
cluded the final hearing in Raleigh
on I Vi 7. As the hearing's sched-
uled at II p m. closed, about half
ot the people who turned out to
express their views on offshore
drilling had spoken.
I he public hearing coincided
with the release of an offshore
drilling report by a panel of the
National Academy of Sciences. The
panel, appointed by President
Hush, concluded that the U.S.
Government has insufficient in-
formation for determining the
environmental impact of explora-
tion leasing off the coasts of Flor-
ida and California.
Under the present terms, fed-
eral waters are available for lease
to industry. Mobilhi and its part -
nersleased a nine square mile area
of the Atlantic Ocean 44 H miles
northeast of Cape Hatteras in W81
for 103 8 million
Environmentalists say North
Carolina could havebeen included
in the National Academy of Sci-
ences study if political opposition
to offshore exploration had been
stronger before the public hear-
ings.Opposition from Republicans
and Democratsalike in Florida and
California is forcing the Bush
Administration to reconsider fu-
ture offshore leasing in those two
states.
The panel determined that the
available information is not
enough to accurately predict the
environmental effect of oil devel-
opment and production. Senator
Pete Wilson of California said: "It
would be rash, imprudent and
unforgivable to allow anv leasing
off California to occur given these
findings. The experts agree that
we rust don't have the information
we need to assess the nsks involved
in outer continental shelf develop-
ment
interior Department spokes-
man Steve Goldstein stated: "We
don't think the American public is
willing to put the entire continen-
tal shelf off limits California and
Honda do not ha k e property rights
to that land (off the coast). It is
owned bv all L .S. citizens. A farmer
in Ames, Iowa that needs that oil
See Mobil Oil, page 2
City drops 80 'failure to disperse' charges
s "V
II
By Samaittha Thompson
Staff Writer
Ellen Nora Kerr speaks with local television reporters about her conviction on Monday She is charged
with 'failure to disperse (Photo by J D Whitmire � Photolab)
Eighty 'riot' defendants re-
ceived letters stating their charge-
from the Halloween incident a!
I'ar River Estates had been
dropped, and the remaining 54
cases were scheduled for Monday.
Only two cascs were tried on
Monday. However, presiding
judge lamesG. Ragan allowed 14
students to enter pleas withdraw-
ing their ponding charges.
Three of the 54 students ne-
glected to show in court, and Ragan
ordered the arrest of each with a
$500secured bond.
District Attorney Tom
Haigwood said it was impossible
to hear all cases on Monday, so the
remainder of the cases were spread
over a three day period on Jan. 4-
10.
The 80 students who received
dismissal letters had previously
had their cases delayed by Judge
W. Russell Duke, Jr. to Jan.8. The
other 54 students had previously
requested that their cases be con-
tinued to Ian. 8.
Two students were found not
guilty of failure todispersecharges.
Paul Pisoni and Michael OBnant
pleaded not guilty, saying they had
been arrested when returning trom
the ECU sponsored concert and
costume contest.
Ellen-Nora Kerr, who was also
charged with failure to disperse
was found guilty even though the
videotape of her arrest at Tar River
Estaies was ruled not substantive
evidence. Despite Kerr's plea of
not guilty, she was convicted of
failure to disperse. Her sentencing
will be held today.
Assistant District Attorney
Betsy Warren used five witnesses
against Kerr, including Manager
of Tar River Jessica Donald, Green-
ville Police Chief Jerry Tesmond,
Capt. Nelson Stateman, Officer
Craig Overby and Officer R.C.
Broadway, who arrested Kerr.
Kerr's attorney used several
defenses, including the fact that
the officer's name on the ticket
See Court, page 2
Inside
Editorials4
Moving forward into
the '90s
State and Nation5
Volunteers aid in
cleaning up
Panama
Classifieds6
Features11
Past decade affects
future
Sports15
Pirates fall to George
Mason in Minges
Decade Review19
The East Carolinian
takes a look back at the
1980s





2 The East Carolinian January 9,1990
5CU Briefs
Conference to examine the corporate role of blacks
The Black Manager and Corporate America" is the theme for a conference Jan. 17 at ECU.
Sponsored by the ECU Division of Continuing Education, the conference program will examine several
issues related to blacks in management positions.
Presentations by invited speakers will be made during the morning session at the Ramada Inn Green-
ville. In the afternoon participants will view a satellite transmission, ion campus, of the Second Annual Black
Managers Forum presented by the American Managers Association.
The keynote speaker for the morning is Dr. Valeria Lovelace, director of research for the TV show Sesame
Street. Her presentation, "Sources of Inspiration for Black Managers will begin at 9:40 a.m. and will follow
opening remarks by ECU officials and Mayor Ed Carter of Greenville, an administrator for Burroughs
Wellcome Company.
Jocelyn D. Evans, director of Banking and Finance at Johnson C. Smith University and Janice D. Sinclair,
the state president of the Bankers Educational Society and the personnel representative for United Carolina
Bank of Raleigh will speak at 10:45 a.m. Their presentation will be about "Mentoring and Role Modeling
Robert Grif fen, manager of the Proctor and Gamble paint in Greenville will be the luncheon speaker on
"How a Program to Develop Black Managers Really Works He will be followed by Joseph C High, director
of Human Resources for Consolidate Diesel Company of Tarboro who will speak about 'The Multicultural
Workforce
At 3 p.m. the conference participants will attend a live videoconference of the second annual Black
Managers Forum. The forum will feature five speakers who will focus on problems unique to black male and
female managers.
A registration fee of $130 will be charged to those attending the program. The fee covers instruction,
New Hampshire professor speaks on environment
Dr. John E. Carroll, professor and coordinator of the Environmental Conservation Program at the
University of New Hampshire, will deliver a lecture on "International Studies and the Global Environment"
as part of the ECU Thomas Rivers' Distinguished Chair in International Studies Lecture series Jan. 11.
The lecture is scheduled at 730 p.m. in Room 1032 of the General classroom Building on the ECU campus
and is open to students, faculty and the general public.
The Rivers International Studies lectures at ECU arc sponsored bv the College of Arts and Sciences.
Mobil Oil
Continued from page 1
have at least temporarily delayed
Mobil Oil's exploration timetable
to allow for additional study.
Many of those who testified at the
public hearings stated that they
were concerned about the "tem-
porary, local and minor" environ-
mental impact Mobil Oil's draft
report implied.
"The enviornmental report
says that the environmental im-
pact on the North Carolina coast is
expected to be very low said Ben
Kearns.co-founderof SCE. "I want
to know what 'very low' means
In the initial timetable, Mobil
would have been eligible to begin
gas and oil exploration on Mayl.
However, the delay imposed by
North Carolina of ficials pushes the
timetable back long enough to
prevent Mobil from drilling dur-
ing the May-August 1990 drilling
season.
Geologic evidence indicates
Mobil Oil has a l-in-10 chance of
discovering natural gas and a 1-
in-100 chance of finding oil off the
North Carolina Outer Banks.
DAVID'S AUTOMOTIVE
Is Now Open In Greenville!
We sell import and domestic parts and
accessories at wholesale prices. We also have
a complete servu ; center.
Make Us Your One Stop!
Welcome Back Students!
DAVIDS AUTOMOTIVE
Forttort & OomMIIC Ptrtl
DAVID 5 AUTOMOTIVE
FrxM" A OQrtm' �"�
import i VW P�r� SOAK'
National Campus Clips
Chancellor intends to get
students 'internationalized'
Chancellor Robert Hemenwav has made "inter-
nationalizing the University of Kentucky-Lexing-
ton campus part of his agenda.
Hemenwav is proposing that all students re-
ceive international exposure in order to prepare
them tor the emerging global economy.
"We need to think about whether or not the
content of our courses reflects the international con-
text in which we live
The university has also set up The Cosmopolitan
Club, a club designed to bring U.S. and international
students together.
Caroline Holmes,club advisor said, "There needs
to be a greater understanding of the cultural differ-
ences students bring with them
SMU organizes bookswap
The Southern Methodist University Shident
Senate has organized a bookswap that it says will
save students money.
Students wanting to sell books can register
through the senate's computer system. In turn, a stu-
dent wanting a particular book will receive names
and phone numbers of students wanting to sell from
the system.
Nate Crain of the Student Senate said the idea
evolved from complaints about the high cost of
booksat the local bookstoresand the stores' low buy-
back rate.
Pitt students design majors
If students at Pittsburgh University can't find a
major to suit them, thev can create their own.
This program � called the self-designed major
� offers students the opportunity to assemble their
own personal 36-credit major in Pitt's College of Arts
Court
For Parts, For Service Remember
We Have It All!
For�Oft & DomrNtK PArtl
import Svwi'A.uspAttAi! Wc Specialize in German Cars.
510 N. Greene St. Greenville. NC
830-1779
tt&e �ast Carolinian
Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
and Sciences.
Students select the courses that will comprise the
major and submit them to a dean of the college for
approval.
Stress of finals shouted out
Residents in two dormitories at Oklahoma State
University have found a loud way to relieve finals
week stress. They scream at each other.
One night during finals week, the students
propped open the windows that face the other dorm,
hunt; their heads out and yelled for five minutes. It's
just an organized chaotic break in the imposed 22
hour-a-dav study silence.
"Everyone is so stressed out with finals said
Steve Beatic, hall director in the Kerr-Drummond
dorms, "It's basically a stress reliever
Resident assistants and floor presidents quiet
residents down after the screaming session.
"A little noise is good, but too much is bad
Beatie said. "Finals aren't going to go away. People
still need to be able to study
Ball State frat halts pledging
A fraternity at Ball State University in Muncie,
Ind has eliminated the pledge period for new
members in an effort to help end hazing
The Ball State chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa re-
cently voted to do away with pledging � an 8-to-20�
week period when potential members leam frater-
nity history and prove themselves worthy of mem-
bership. It is during the pledge period that hazing,
including physical and mental abuse, can take place,
university officials say.
"We've taken the pledge process completely
out said Milch 1 lagan. Ball State Phi Sigma Kappa
"Hazing makes obedient pledges but not strong
members
New Phi Sigma Kappa brothers now become
active members immediately and hold equal status
with other members of the chapter, Hagan said.
Continued from page 1
Judge Ragan established the
opportunity for the fourteen 'riot'
defendants to enter a choice of
plea bargains. Ten students chose
Plan A, which consists of a Prayer
for Judgement and payment of
court costs. Four students chose
Plan B, which involves 25 hours of
community service at a cost of
$100. All 14 students will still have
an arrest record, unless they go
back to court to have the arrest
removed from their record.
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V. Cope
Kelley O'Connor
Patrick Williams
Guy J. Harvey
Shay Sitlinger
Adam T. Blankenship
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National Rate$5.75
Open Rate$4.95
Local Open Rate$4.75
Bulk & Frequency Contract
;scounts Available
business Hours:
Monday - Friday
10:00 - 5:00 pm
Phone:
757-6366
Crime Report
Kidnapping incident and sexual assault
in Jarvis dorm reported over holidays
Acheson's
Adam's Auto Wash.
Amoco
Animai House
Art & Graphics
BACCHUS
j Benetton
j Best Used Tires
BLTs
��-��� , slant Replay355-5050
.355-2172 ! Intramural Dept757-6443 !
355-7515 j ITG355-5075
.758-9976 j J T Williams756-7815 j
.756-7202 Jetters Beer & Wine758-1515!
.752-4620 Jewelry Designs355-0808
.757-6793 Kingston Place758-5393
.355-7473 Mad Hatter Muffler758-2306
.830-9579 Malpass Muffler758-7676
757-1007 McBudget758-9834 I
DECEMBER 16
0540- Officers respond to alleged sexual assault at
Jarvis Hall.
0540- Officers escorted a female from Jarvis Hall to
the Pitt Countv Memorial Hospital Emergency Room.
DECEMBER i 7
1811- Report of broken glass door at Minges, main
entrance on North side.
DECEMBER 18
no incidents reported
DECEMBER 19
1215- Fire alarms activated in Belk, Aycock, Urn-
stead, Jarvis, Garrett,
Fletcher, White and Clement Halls. The cause was a
power failure on Central and West campus.
DECEMBER 20
1315- Three suspicious Hispanic subjects reported in
area of College Hill.
DECEMBER 26
0539- Broken water line reported in the southeast
comer of Ragsdale.
DECEMBER 27
1653- Suspicious subjects reported outside Jenkins
Art Building. Subjects gone on arrival.
DECEMBER 30
1702- Fire reported in room 217 of Jenkins Art Build-
ing. Fire department was already on hand.
JANUARY 3
2307- Report of possible drug violations in Umstead
Hall. Campus citation issued for underage possesion
of alcohol
JANUARY 4
0924- Kidnapping and assault of a female reported at
Jones Hall. Incident turned over to detectives.
1131- Officer escorted a female from Jones Hall to
police department.
JANUARY 6
2224- Several students given campus citations for
underage possesion of alcohol in Jarvis Hall.
JANUARY 7
0027- Report of three male intoxicated subjects in
White Hall.
0107- Report of breaking and entering and larceny of
a vehicle at Fifth and Reade Street.
0129- Officer checked out report of possible drug
offense in Aycock. Drug offense was unfounded.
The Crime Column is taken from the weekly logs of
ECU'S Public Safety Departmant.
At The East Carolinian, when we're not:
experimenting with DNA,
babysitting the Ayatoilah
or exposing corrupt government officials,
we listen to WZMB-FM � ECU'S radio station
Bogies752-4668
Bunny's830-5126
Carolina Pregnancy Center355-3233
Campus Marketing1-800-9504472
I Campus Suites800-365-3615
Champions757-0544
Charley as355-5000
Chico's757-1666
I Cliffs Seafood752-3172
iCrusry-s758-2233
I Crystal Connection756-
I Dapper Dan's752
David's Automotive830-1779
JEbo758-4591
j Fosdidcs Restaurant756-2011
Gary Reynold's1-800447-8560
George's Hair756-6200
George's Gulf752-2135
Grace Church355-3500
Greenvile Athletics Club756-9175
Greenvile Opticians752-4018
Greenvile Utifties Commission752-7166
Gordon�756-1003
Hair By Rycke752-6060
I Hair Loft355-5980
Ron�355-5000
import Car Service 756-9434
Memorial Coin & Pawn756-16661
Nature Goodness355-0556
New Deli758-0080
New East Bank821-1085 I
Omar's Express830-0588
Optical Palace756-4204
Overton's Sporting Goods355-7600
Payne's Jewelry355-5090
Professional Body Works756-3471
Rack Room Shoes355-2519 j
Raleigh Women's Health Center1-832-0535
Real Crisis Center758-4357
RemcoEast758-6061
Research Information1-800-351-02221
Rio355-50001
Wverbkitf758-4015
Sharkys758-2701
Stuart James Company1-800-666-01991
Student Stores757-6731
Student Union Public Relations757-4715
Southern Eyes355-7695
Summerfield Apartments355-6187
Swiss Colony756-5650
Total Eclipse355-3531
UBE758-26161
Western Sartn758-27121
WZIfB757-69131
�MHM





'
3 The East Carolinian January 9,1990
Brower speaks at second
annual chancellors forum
on economic enhancement
By April Draughn
Staff Writer
I he second annual
Chancellor's Forum was hold in i
two part sonos on. Ian.3 4 in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Tho thomo of the forum was
Economic Enhancement: The
Delicate Balance
The keynote speaker, Or. John
Costlow, professor or zoology at
1 hike University, opened the first
general session. Costlow debated
the possibility of a balance between
economic growth and preserva-
tion ot the environment. hs solu-
tion to the problem focused
around his theory of "The Ivorv
Towers ot Society in which the
towers ot academia,bureaucracy,
industry and commerce work
together to achieve a balance.
The second speaker, Dr. Bruce
Karrah, vice president tor Safety
and Environmental Affairs at Du
Ponl vie Nemours, pressed the
issue of corporate environmental-
ism. Corporate environmentalist
is the strategy ot industries issu-
ing their own clean up and waste
policies in an effort to preserve the
environment .while, at the same
time ScittsiS ing the needs ol soci-
et
1 avid Brov er, the first execu-
ti cdtrectorol the Sierra c luband
founder ol 1 riends ot the Earth,
ended the opening session with
the question ol how man could
continue .it his present rate and
�-till preserve the earth 1 le spoke
of how there must be a coopera-
tive ability in order to save the
earth and mankind In addition,
Brower posed the question, "What
kinds of growth must we have,
what kinds of growth can we no
longer afford?"
The closing session was a fo-
rum conducted by state leaders
and educators from eastern N.C.
rhissession debated the problems
that had been posed in
Wednesday's session.
The second session began with
a synthesis of the problem of bal-
ance. Dr. Michael Orbach, profes-
sor of anthropolgy at ECU, began
this session. In his synthesis, Or-
bach st res sod that Ainericansmust
keep our water clean, educate
children and adults about the
growing problems, increase pen-
alties for violation of environ-
mental laws and encourage more
volunteerism
The perspectives ot the vari-
ous leaders were started bv Dr.
Stanley Riggs. professor of geol-
ogy at East arolina According to
RiggS, the U.S. is a technological
society that taxes its natural re-
sources.
Mr William Cobey, lr secre-
tarvot thcNorthC arolina Popart
ment ol En imnment, 1 lealth and
Natural Resources, said, we need
public support . encouragement
and guidance it we want to move
towards the right direction.
The final perspective was
given by Dr. William R. Mangun,
professor ol political science at
f AN
iitni ' lolhinq,
,)i li 11 If. 'n'll7lWl'S.
ilwin v lurtnturf
Chancellor Richard Eakin chats with Environmental forum's speak-
ers. (Photo bv Tonv Rumple-ECU News Bureau
ECU. According to Mangun, citi-
zens need to form policies for the
environment and obey thorn.
ft I i tti'p into thf pn.it'
Start off'our tyw year
�Kiht 'By 'Visiting Us!
�Buy � Sett � 'Trade
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown
There's plenty of FREE
parking at our rear
entrance off of
, ("iitanche r�
�"�-� �752 1750J J
Chancellor Richard Eakin
adjourned the forum's closing
session. Eakin spoke ol the diffi-
cult task that citizens have ahead
of them His statements ended
with, "What we receive in the way
of resources will depend on what
we give in the wa) ol care and
stew ardstup
! ort) 1 i I faculty leadersand
20 student leaders were involved
m the forum. Ilus forum i,is
organized hv Dr. (earing ol the
English department at East Caro-
lina
New East Bankcorp offers students
full-service checking and savings
By Samantha Thompson
Staff Writer
I students, faculty and
wiatt now havetheoptionofbafik-
jAn; with a ttjil ser iae,in-campu
rank, which took over ECU's
banking office at Mendenhall on
an 5.
New East Bank of Greenville
will provide more banking serv-
ices than previously offered at the
student bank.
In cur Easy Money Club
Account we vecreated a package
designed specifically for the needs
of EC I students that combines a
checking account with unlimited
theck writing, discounts on other
bank services and a few 'extras'
such as tree kev loss protection.
accidental death insurance and
discounts on travel and recrea-
tion, said President Jerry Powell
ot the New Hast Hank of C.reen-
ville.
Once a student becomes a
member of the club they are of-
fered discounts on a satetv de-
4 dollars a month, while services
for a bounced check are $18 per
overdraw.
Vice president tor products
and services development for New
fcast Bank Corp, Kaye C. Raper
said the new office will offer
Mastercard and Visa accounts and
an Automatic Teller Machine
(ATM) service with Relay and
Cirrus connections.
"We are excited about being
able to offer the students, as well
as the university faculty and staff,
all these services right here on
campus' Raper said. "We hope
that students from Gold sboro and
Fa vetteville will look for New East
while at home, and with New East
banks opening throughout east-
ern North Carolina, ECU students
can easily continue banking with
New East after graduating
As a member of the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation
(I I)1C), the New East bank will be
open from u a.m. until 5 p.m
Monday through Friday in both
the Mendenhall office and the
Celebration at the Mendenhall
bank office Fuesday, fanuary Ik
From 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m
lunch will be served as WRQU-
1 M broadcasts live, awarding
giveaway prices fjornjocal byjj t
nesses. Five $100 Easy MoncvClub
checking accounts and five sets of
Rodney Dangcrfield video film
libraries will be given away at I JO
p.m.
ADAM'S
more (fun just a car wash"
COLLEGE
STUDENTS!
FOR YOUR
EYES ONLY!
i '
(every Tuesday)
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Service & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Iee Building
Greenville, NC
Late Night
Specials
1D
Pizza Grande '
Nacho Grande Price
Sun - Thurs after 10pm
Fri - Sat after 11 pm
tke taste of old mSXie�
757-1666
' I ����
Hours
M-F 9 am - 5 piu
95
FULL SERVICE
� All Cloth
� Windows Cleaned - Inside & Oui
� Complete Vaccuum
� Hand Dry
� Undercarriage treatment
Every Wash Includes
FREE Rain Check Takes 15 Minutes!
Giue tjoat Cat Thai Aiujef Face!
Adam's Auto Wash
Corner of Red Banks Rd & Greenville Ilk J
Hours: Monday - Saturday Sam - V ttfym
Phone: 355-7515
iLL-l.1
K
d
5
$
BACK TO SCHOOL
J
When:
Where:
Time:
Price:
BOOGIE!
January 12, 1990
Mendenhall Social Room
10pm - until
$3.00
BACK TO LIFE,
BACK TO REALITY!
Jl
C'Ya
Ai





albx a0t (Earnlituan
Shannon Bucki ey, News Editor
Carolinf Cusick, Failures :iitr
Michael Martin, Sports EMtot
Carrie Armstrong, Entertainment Editor
Scott Maxwell, Satire Editor
Steve Reid, Staff Illustrator
MICHAEL Carnes, Darkroom Technician
1 AV!D I ERRING, General Manager
LOW MAKTIN, Editor
JAMES F.J. McKf.E, Director of Advertising
Pi lONC LlJONG, Cmii'f Manager
STUART ROSNER, Business Manager
Pamela Cope, Ad Tech Supervisor
Matthew Richter, Circulation Manager
TRACY WEEP, Production Manager
BEIT I LUITON, Secretary
Trie East Carolinian has been serving (he Fast Carolina campus community since 1925, with primary emphasis on in
formation most directly affecting ECU students. It is published twice weekly, with a circulation of 12,(XM). The East
Carolinian re serves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements thai discriminate on the basis of age, sex, creed
or national origin. The Last Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. For purposes of decency and
brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit any letter for publication. Letters should he sent to The East
Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. NC, 27834; or call us at (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, January 9, 1990
A farewell to the '80s
We're changing with the decade
For ottr nation, the ll,Hlk hold drastic
changes economically, politically and so-
cially. As the decade began, our new presi-
dent was faced with political turmoil in Iran
with United States citizens demanding the
release of the IJ S. hostages who wore being
held in Tehran Controversial issues such as
abortion, AIDS and inflation surfaced in
these 10 years, and the country stirred with
emotion. Changes were also seen in tech-
nology and medicine. The F.ast Carolinian
dedicates a special section of today's paper
in order to touch on these and other land-
mark events of the decade.
But even more important than remem-
bering the past is setting goals for the future.
The vear 1990 marks not only a new year,
but a new decide as well. For many of us,
the next 10 years will hold significant
changes with prospective careers, marriage
and families.
In keeping with this idea of positive
change, The Fast Carolinian is altering its
layout style. Our idea is to produce a news-
paper that will not only inform, but will
also be pleasing to the eve and interesting to
the reader. In the next year, expect to see a
wider variety of articles reflecting the di-
verse events and lifestyles oi the Fast Caro-
lina community.
As we move into the '90s, it is important
for us to remember to use what we' ve learned
in our past experiences.
Practical ways to save the Earth
By Nathaniel Mead
Editorial Columnist
Imagine Manhattan under 20 feet of seawater.
Imagine massive plagues of dying plants and ani-
mals in our nation's forests and grasslands. Imagine
all the farmers in eastern North Carolina impelled to
take up fishing. Imagine heavy droughts searing the
Corn Belt every other summer and food shortages so
severe they make Mozambique look like Beverly
Hills.
These are just a few of the scenarios predicted to
occur as the global climate changes. Through such
activities as burning fossil fuels, razing forests and
producing certain synthetic chemicals, humankind
is releasing vast quanities of greenhouse gases into
the atmosphere. These gases tend to absorb infrared
radiation (heat), preventing it from leaving theatmo-
phere. As more heat is trapped in, global warming
begins to take place.
Climatic chaos may be imminent. As the green-
house-heating engine whips into high gear, the fre-
quency of droughts, floods, blizzards, tornadoes and
hurricanes, is likely to increase. This, in turn, could
result in the greatest mass extinction since the last
major ice age, when most of North America was
encased in a mile-thick sheet of ice. And unlike
nuclear war, which dependson the push of a button,
the climate crisis is happening now; it is already in
motion.
No wonder the Environmental Protection
Agency considers global heating to be the most
critical problem facing the human race.
While the nuclear industry seems impenetrable
from the common citizen's point of view, the climate
crisis is probably more amenable to the impact of
consumer power. But what do you, personally, have
to do with such threats to global survival?
All of our global crisesare fundamentally rooted
in human activities. The destiny of the ecosphere is
determined by the daily, seemingly petty decisions
of the millions of individuals who consume Earth's
resources. From the foods we eat to the garbage we
generate, each of us makes choices that either pre-
serve or harm the environment upon which our sur-
vival depends. Thus, we arc at once cause and solu-
tion.
Consider these five points as powerful ways to
support the process of planetary healing:
1. Abstain from Imported Beef. We are all in-
creasingly aware of the devastation taking place in
the rainforests of South and Central America. Hun-
dreds of species are becoming extinct each year, and
the rainforests are essential to the stability of global
climate. Though poverty plays a role to some extent,
the largest tracts of Latin American rainforest are
being burned to graze cattle the cheapest way pos-
sible so that America's fast food chains can charge
five cents less for each hamburger. Boycotting the
fast-food chains may be among the most effective
means of halting the suicidal, largely irreversible
burning of the rainforests.
2. Eat Organically-Crown Foods. Our conven-
tional agricultural svstem. while productive in the
short run, destroys more land and consumes more
oil than any other U S. business; it is therefore one of
the greatest burdens on our climate svstem. Organic
farming, by contrast, conserves land and avoids
petroleum-based chemicals by employing ecologi-
cal methods of food production. Unless we begin
eating in wavs that help stabilize the climate system,
we nay verv soon have no food left at all.
3. Plant a tree. In China, every able-bodied
citizen is required to plant three to five new trees per
vear. Imagine how beautiful the towns and cities of
the United States would be if we began such a public
policy! More importantly, beyond their inherent
beauty and manv practical benefits (maintaining
groundwater tables, aerating soils, and providing
paper, cardboard, lumber, medicines, etc.), trees are
among Earth's primary means of maintaining the
balance of carbon and oxvgen in the atmosphere.
4. Recycle Your Waste. Each of us probably
generates enough trash to fill our entire house in one
year, and most of this is recyclable. Recycling our
paper, cardboard, glass and metal products will
stem the tide of pollution, save energy and raw
materials, and help us maintain a g(od standard of
living. Recycling also affects the climate control sys-
tem. Once trees are harvested, it is critical that they
not be allowed to rot or burn, for the balance of the
atmosphere requires that their fixed carbon stay
fixed. Aside from using timber for building pur-
poses, harvested wood can be used and saved in the
form of recycled paper and cardboard. When you go
to the supermarket, ask for a paper bag and reuse or
recycle it!
5. Drive Your Car Less. It is an inescapable fact
that automobiles are contributing to the four biggest
environmental crises of all time: the Greenhouse
Effect, smog, acid rain and destruction of the ozone.
A major byproduct of automobile exhaust (as well as
airplane exhaust and farm fertilizer production) is a
common gaseous compound called nitrous oxide. If
you must drive, at least avoid using a gas guzzling
car. Whenever possible, walk, bicycle, rollerskate,
lcvitateorusesomeothernon-pollutingmeanstogct
around.
At this point, you may have some irksome ques-
tions to ask. To begin with, like "Why me?" Why
can't we rely on the Establishment to make the
necessary changes? And why, for that matter, given
the awesome magnitude of this problem, aren't all
nations moving headlong toward renewable, non-
polluting technologies and mandatory, multilateral
conservation of the rainforests?
Part of the problem lies in the scientific process of
fact-seeking. Today, most climatologists agree that
the world will warm, but they often disagree on the
timing, location, and intensity. The complexities of
global climate models are such that virtually any
model can be criticized. There are simply too many
variables to analyze and integrate even using the
most powerful computers Earth. This leads to public
confusion, denial, and apathy toward the climate
crisis.
M
1 �

Campus Spectrum
Recollections of a senior
It was a glorious day, that first
day of drop add registration at
East Carolina University, as I had
finally reached my senior stand-
ing. No longer did I have to deal
with the signing of forms by advi-
sors that did not exist, or standing
m mile-long linesonly to discover
that I was in the wrong depart
ment, or to find out, "sorry, your
schedule has been tagged due to
parking violations" that's
everyone's favorite. Never before
attending ECU had 1 realized the
impact parking has on one's edu-
cation
Being the humble, restrained
person that 1 am, I engaged in the
well-known senior sport of "rub-
bingitin I think that in the height
(if my bliss, ! may have even low-
ered myself toademea in ring"Na-
na-na-na-na But it truly was
glorious to know that never again
would I be faced with these under-
classmen tribulations!
It was well into the semester
that some omniscient freshman
avenger brought retaliation upon
me. It all started when one of mv
professors informed me that after
accomplishing all class assign-
ments, exams, and the like; that 1
was not registered for her class.
There must have been some mix-
up in the infallible university
computer system. Yes, my days of
gloating were over indeed. This
meant real trouble. I immediately
began to search for a solution. The
first step, a visit to every confused
student's savior, my advisor.
As I entered her office and sat
before her warm, understanding
smile, I knew from experience that
this was only the beginning of a
series of visits. After describing
my ill-fated situation, I obtained
an official "add form" and began
my plight. And what a plight if
would prove to be. The first step
was to find my professor and ha ve
her submit written proof that I
had been participating in her class.
Of course this was no easy task, as
this particular day was one of her
designated "research days" and
she wasnowhere to be found. After
tracking her down, I was then to
visit thedean and make her under
stand mv dilemma and ho granted
permission to receive credit for a
missing class. I spent a frustrating
21) minutes trying to make a well
established college Jean under-
stand why my name was missed
by the computers. After several
explanations, pist when I thought
she was beginning to grasp an
understanding of my situation, she
gave her watch a glance and in
formed me that she had to leave to
go to lunch. 1 couldn't believe uv,
ears as she quickly initialed nu
term and vindictively sent me
acrosscampus, in the pouring rain
nonetheless, to the registrar's ot
tice.
By
Stephanie Emory
It's quite a chore to battle your
way across our campus on a rainy
day, simultaneously jugglim;
forms, books, an umbrella and
dodging 15,000 other.students
with the same. Upon entering the
registrar's office, I was given a
second form to complete and then
took mv place in line with other
students, no doubt in the same
predicament as me. When 1
reached the terminal and my turn,
1 had been given the wrong form.
Once again, I was told to fill out an
additional form and sent to Room
105. i reached Room 105, with my
completed form, only to be sent
back to the room I originally en
tered because the people in Room
105 didn't know how to handle
mv problem. It was at this point
that I realized that no one in that
building had any clue as to what
anyone else there did. So, I de-
cided to just randomly pick a room.
What, at this point, did I have to
lose? Well, mv choke started out
well.
The secretaries called nn
schedule up on the computer and
entered the class I had K-en lack
ing. Finally! 1 had found help
comfort relief! Could it be that
my mind boggling plight that had
now been ongoing since morning,
was finally resolved? Ot course
not. Just as I saw my class being
entered and the dark i loud that
had been following me all morn
ing begin to disappear, I realized
that I was only entering the eve of
the hurricane. I he secretary's
as; istant returned from searching
for tm file only to inform me thai
i mid not be graduating tin
semester because they had not
received my file. At that particu
lar moment I actually considered
tcirorist actions. Nothing would
have given me more joy than to
jump on top ot the nearest desk.
grab the largest staple gun 1 could
find, and threaten every employee
in the building with their lives
unless my wishes tor graduation
ere granted. Hut as I rationally
considered the consequences, 1
calmly requested a second look
instead And sure enough my
file was miraculously found.
1 m sure by now you fnust be
wondering it I ever did manage to j
solvemysc hedulingproblems, let j
alone graduate. The answer is yes
Mut not until alter I stood m ap-
proximated eighty more lines,
paid one hundred and eightv tour
more dollars and seventy-seven
cents in various parking tickets,
library tines, and graduation tees,
and lost two class rings in the U.S.
Mail. And now, as my diploma
hangs proudly in its solid oak
frame over my desk, I often pon-
der over M hat 1 truly learned from
my college experience. 1 realize
now, that I probably could have
gained the same experience from
a d,v. .it Wall Disney World. The
only difference is that I would
more than likely have mouse ears
in that oak frame hanging over
my desk instead oi a college di-
ploma. Oh well, I've heard mouse
ears,ire on their wav out am wav
Another problem is conflicting economic inter-
ests. Fossil fuels are by far the biggest source of
greenhouse gases. Oil companies, automotive in-
dustries, and other big businesses pay top scientists
to do research which contradicts the more serious
climate findings. The result is endless, relatively
fruitless debate.
What about the White House? Can we expect the
Bush administration to save us from this mess?
Reagan dissolved the budget for solar energy re-
search, which would have been (and still is) among
the most sane alternatives to fossil fuel burning.
President
Bush, for his part, has made some motions to-
ward cleaning up the atmosphere, but his proposed
Clean Air Act reflected excessive lenience toward
automobile manufacturers. (Thankfully, it was heav-
ily revised by a senate subcommittee.) And there are
other ominous indications that thisadministration is
tix) weak to move.
For instance, it took Bush, a former Texas oilman
and long-time scion of the Rockefeller oil monopoly,
two whole weeks before he even on the tragic Alas-
kan oil spill. Given his pre-election promises to in-
crease offshore oil drilling and open the entire Alas-
kan Wildlife Refuge to the oil industry, we can expect
little if anything from this administration. Indeed,
far from being the environmentalist he claims to be,
Bush's bottom line sounds as oily as ever. Don't
bother reading his lips, read his mind.
Of course, there are many things a responsible
government could do. It could, for example, convert
our hefty military expenditures into research funds
for establishing energy -efficient, non-polluting tech-
nologies. It could work to phase out coal and oil
altogether, in favor of solar, wind, and hydroelectric
power. But let's face it, at best we're talking about the
next administration (assuming Bush doesn't get re-
elected). And by then it may already be too late to
turn the situation around.
Rather than waiting tor our government to set
the agenda, we must begin to .U it ourselves.
ust as every tree counts in fixing atmospheric
carbon, so does every human count in regenerating
the ecosphere. In this free market system, collective
consumption is the ultimate driving force behind
economic and environmental policy reform. It is up
to each ot us to determine our society's orientation,
whether or not it will be ecologically supportive, and
whether future generations will have anv future at
all.
One last parting image: immense cloud sof nasty,
buzzing mosquitoes If you think North Carolina
alreadv has a mosquitoe problem, wait until the
Greenhouse Effect really takes hold. And this is only
the tip of the iceberg. I low will the world deal with
the myriad new plant pests, tlies carrying encephali-
tis and malarial mosquitoes as thev multiply in
warmer, increasingly irrigated areas? Massive aerial
spraying7 Better bug ropellant?
These are not fanciful notions but verv real con-
cerns. Think about how voiuou Id help prevent them
from coming about in the first place. The starting
point for change is voluntary conservation in a
wasteful society. It is time to change our careless,
irresponsible ways. Pollution is not the problem. We
are. By adjusting our life styles, we can support
those ecologically oriented business enterprises
which maintain ei onomic growth even while reduc-
ing the pressure on our natural environment.
The time to act sensibly and responsibly is now.
And doing it again and again, each day. If you aren't
living ecologically, that is, in ways which minimize
pollution and help preserve natural habitats,
you are part of the problem, and you are making
the situation steadily worse. Rather than drown
yourself in guilt and denial, be active in the process
of planetary healing You are the solution.





�i lEaBt Qtaroltnfan
Page 5
State and Nation
January 9, 1990
American volunteers aid
in Panamanian cleanup
By Juan . Walte
(jnnolt News Sen ice
�;
Danish
Phe
WASHINGTON A peace
tut invasion of Panama is under
way .is the United States winds
dovs n its military campaign.
Nearly 140 IS Amu civil
affairs specialists doctors and
nurses firefighters and police
historians and lawyers an- in
Panama to help rebuild thatcoun-
trv And they an- all volunteers
private citizens serving in the I 5
Armv s Civil Affairs C ommands
ihit-s answered the call that weni
out from the Pentagon within
hours after the first soldiers landed
in Panama
The response has been tre
Reserve Command at ion Bragg,
i
More than 700 have volun-
teered since the United States
invaded Panama Dec 20 fhefirst
?? specialists were dispatched lo
ima during thehristmas
kend mother 1 1 left Mon
da Mun ot them know some
Clean air bill
greets Bush's
Earth Day
celebration
call went out tor emcr-
workers, veterinarians,
gency
business managers public admin
istrators. construction engineers,
public health, agricultural am)
sanitation experts. Also, a mili-
tai y historian was found In River-
dale Md. A memberof l louston's
cit council tilled a need tor a
Spanish speaking municipal e-
pert
The mission tor all ot them
according to itts:
"Go to Panama quickly and
work with the IS. military and
Panamanian civilians to helpthem
m restoring normal health and
human services The civil affairs
specialists will be in Panama in
11 and 139 days.
"It's up to (.en (Maxwell)
fhurman to decide who and what
more he needs We have a list ot
people on standby said I itts,
refet ring to the general w ho om
mands all I s troops in Panama
i 'in1 person inv olv ed in the
effort to rebuild all aspects ol
Panama's civilian life is I t i ol
Mike Nicholson, attached h the
352nd Civil Affairs( ommand in
Kiverdale. Md.
"When Panamanians can
stand on their feel winch we
hope will be in the short term
we'll lust pick lip and go home "
Nicholson said
in addition to the 352nd, there
are two other Armv Civil Attairs
Commands nationwide the
3 1st in California and the 53rd
in New York. They alsowerecalled
on tor the Panamanian operation
as have two other reserve units:
the 360th in Southarolma and
the 3hlst in Honda.
" lTus is the tirst time in 20 or
so years that civil affairsunits have
States said Nicholson Ihe last
time was in Vietnam.
Some I v civil affairsspet ial-
ists were snt to t irenada in ll,s S,
but not until militarv operations
there were finished
; � write? foi USA f
DA
i pyMgfel ; m US U iimi
Wounded soldiers land at Hunter Army Airfield in Savannah. Ga The soldiers returned to the United
States on Christmas Eve. four days alter the American invasion of PanamafPhoto by Charles Hoskinsor
Slavs protest in Bulgarici
Todorov calls for 'social forum'
Hod l ittte Gannett New, St
By Richard Benedetto
Gannett News Sin ice
Environmental issues on
the ha. k burner tor a decade
moved to the forefront last
W ednesday with a bane.
President bush proclaimed
April 22 as Earth Day 1990 and
supported nationwide activities
that call attention to environ
mental protection He also urged
ongress to quickly passclean-air
legislation, a top Bush priorit)
bush was reported to be con
sidering taxes on manufacture ot
paper, glass and plastics to en-
courage recycling. New orkGov.
Mario Cuomo proposed a $1 u
billion bond issue to buy land to
Coming to
the USAX
Nearly a
quarter of a
million legal
residents
became
US JH
citizens
in 1988.7
y
The memo by the Clean Air
Working Group, was composed
ot 1,950 oil. gas, auto, chemical
and other companies affected by
tougher clean-air rules The memo
says the bill is too costly and would
impose too strict pollution-reduc-
tion requirements.
It expresses a tear that bush
will be so anxious to eel a bill
help local governments deal with passed that he'll sign anything
garbage, and tailed for limits on
burying recyclable trash
Bush's Earth Day ceremony
w as greeted b a blast in an Indus-
try memo mappinga gamcplan to
stall efforts to railroad i I emo
i rat sponsor d i lean air bill
through i oner �
Congress hands him ust for the
political gains, but bush, at the
proclamation ceremony, warned
that he would veto any bill that's
not "carefully balan ed" to pro
tect the nation's economii interest
as well as the en ironment.
White Mouse spokesman
Steve 1 lart calls ridiculous" the
notion that Bush traded economic
interests tor n environmental
feather in his cap
"Our (bush administration)
bill provides the best alternative
to achieve environmental benefits
in the most cost -effective way he
says.
Earl Mallick, chairman of the
( lean Air WorkingC iroup.denies
it plans a stall
"We want to make sure it's a
well-thought-out bill he says.
Richard Benedetto writes foi USA
roo )
By Terrence Petty
1 he ssin iated Press
soil A, Bulgaria (AD
Angered by the restoration ol
ethnic and religious rights to the
country's large l urkish minority,
thousands ol ethnic Slavs rallied
in the capita and shouted down
the premier and interior minister
In apparent response, Parlia-
ment President Stanko lodorov
vailed lor a week long "social to-
rum to open today on "several
i p, ts ol the national question
In an evening radiobroadcast
atter Sunday's protests, Todorov
united members of the public,
'aYtfamenV bppfcsition 'gYrups
and the ruling C ommumst Party
as well as orthodox Christian and
Moslem religious leaders Some
Bulgarians' anti-Turkish senti-
ments are fueled by their Ortho-
dox religion and anger over cen-
turies Ol Turkish rule.
News media controlled by the
two month old leadership that
11 plat ed hard-liner doi
Zhivkov reported that I I tl
i ial - who are hold i from the
old regime appear d to be usn
the ethnic issue to try to �tall r
form, but the media also reported
a resurgence ol I urkish national
Mil in some areas, quoting wit-
ncssesassa) ing I urki h flags ha e
been seen flyingoverpublu build
ings in one southern cit Premier
Georgi Atanasso said the pra
tice was illegal
1 he demonstrators demand
therepealol a I ei 29order allow
mg Bulgaria's 1.5 million ethnic
lurks aa Moslems to use their
� million
1 hi go eminent ol I urkey,
.�. hi ; I'lile, ina ssoutheast
, in � rder, as well as some Bul-
garian lurks ha e blamed
Zhivkov'shard 'met ommmunisi
followers tor instigating the un
rest, which included work stop
b) thousandsol peoplemat
least five cities on Friday.
Bulgaria a one national
uvt ountn read banners carried
by someot the 10,000 ethnic Slavs
.sho demonstrated in Sofia on
Sundav outside Alexander Nevski
( athedral. Standing m ero-de-
e.ree w eat her. the protesters boKHi.
hissed or chanted "Resignation!
(estimation a AtanassovVfjid
Moslem names and pi a. tice their Resig
FoliijiojwwifhiiiirestrirtiiWii tli.il InteiidVh fatv.ttr 1 u
so vflu
nls Y
decision n versed the assimilation
polic) introduced by Zhivkov,
who forced ethnic rurks to change
their names to Bulgarian onesand
barred them from speaking 1 urk-
ish in public Nationalists among
the Slav majority tear the 1 urkish
minority is growing too fast and
Doses a threat to the country ol
merdzhiev tried to address them.
In an apparent attempt' to
appease the protesters, Atanassov
said Bulgarian would remain the
official language. But both his and
Semerdzhiev's speeches were
drowned out
See BULGARIA, pag� 7
Low incomes are tax-exempt
r,rtf t
f�N fflfbttntii�ii NrftfoHk
Judges ask for court reform
RA1 EIGH(AP) District Court judges around
the state are circulating a petition urging legislators
to takea second look at n stru turing North Carolina's
court system, a task which was last undertaken m
l2 when the lower i ourt was created.
I he resolution, passed last fall by the state Asso-
ciation ol District t ourt judges, has set off debate
and some hard feelings within the judiciary.
The mam thing the judges are kicking about is
that wearesori ol treated likesecond-classcitizensin
the iudic iar salary-wise, primarily Elton Glenn
Tucker, a Pistrii t Court judge In New Hanover
County, told The News and Observer of Raleigh
� We do a lol ol hard work, and we handle most ol the
l . s in the court System, and we feel like we are
underpaid ,no looked down on
The resolution asks tor the appointment ot a
study commission to look into abolishing the two
( xnirt judges the resolution calls for raising District
c ourt judges' pn to the level ot Superior Court
judges, and making their terms of office the same.
District ourt judges are elected tor four-year terms;
superior Court judges tor eight.
Ihe restitution also opposes a legislative pro-
posal to replaee the election of appellate judges with
appointment by the governor while retaining elec-
tions for other judges. All judges should be chosen
the same way, either by appointment or election, the
resolution says.
Advocates of the resolution sav the duties of
Districtourt judges are not different enough from
those ot the state's78 SuperiorCourt judges to justify
the difference in salary. District Court judge's base
salary is $60,240, while a Superior Court judge gets
$70,992.
"It is a subject that the District Court judges want
By JIM LUTHER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) in-
flation adjustments to the tax sys
tem have freed many lower-in-
come workers from having to file
a 1989 tax return.
Whether you must file a re
tumdcpendsonyourfamil) status
and your income. A $511 boost in
the personal exemption and auto
matic increases in the standard
deductions to offset inflation have
raised the maximum amount ot
gross income that a person may
earn without filing a return
I he general filing thresholds
are determined by adding the
number of $2,000 personal exemp-
tionsand the standard deduction
to which an individual or couple
is entitled. Ihe additional deduc
lion permitted a blind person is
not considered in the calculation.
I lore are the basi tiling
thresholds tor each type o return:
SINGLE: You mus� h!c a re-
turn it your 1989 gross income
subject to tax was $5,100 or more.
It you were 65 or older last year,
the threshold is$5,850
M RR1ED, I II ING
IOINTLY: It both spouses are
under 65, the threshold is $9 200
I he i oupie must have been living
together at year end and neither
iii.iv be claimed as a dependent on
another person's return
MARRIED, 1II ING SEPA
RA I'Fl i You must file it income
was $2,000 or more.
HEAD OF HOI SEHOI D: it
you are under 65, file it income
was at least $6350; it older, the
threshold is $7300,
The lower tax rates of this til
ing status are open to any person
who was unmarried on the last
.ay ol 1989 and who paid more
than halt the COSt ot maintaining
tor the full year the principal home
ot .it least one qualified relative.
That includes a hild, grandchild,
parent grandparent, aunt, uncle,
niece, nephew or in-law. Cousins
don't count
QUAI IFY1NG WIDOW: You
must tile it you are under 65 and
income wasatk i'C ?(V. $7,800
II our spouse died m 1989
and you did not remarry during
the year, you are entitled to file a
regular joint return. The same is
true it your spouse died in 1990
before filing a return
A separate set of rules applies
t i a taxpayer v ho can be claimed
as a dependent by another. In that
case you must file a return if:
i ou had mi unearned in-
come (such as interest and divi-
dends) and your earnings were
$3,100 or more.
See TAXES, page 8
Cristiani announces involvement of
Salvadoran soldiers in priests' deaths
separate trial divisions, District Court and Superior to be addressed publicly, and thev want to be told
t ourt in favor of a one-tier system. That, proponents why there is any difference in salary said George
sav, would bo more efficient, because judges could Bason, chief District Court judge tor Wake County
be assigned w herever thev are needed regardless ot "Thev want somebody to answer what is the magic
the type of case. transformation that takes place upon a change from
(Opponents sav, however, that under a one-tier one court to the other
system, the courts would be bogged down in jury The number and complexity of cases in the Dis-
tnals for even minor misdemeanors, most of which tnct Court have grown since the court was estab-
cused of sympathizing with leftist
rebels, the ass.ul.ints killed the
clergymen's housekeeper and her
15-year-old daughter.
Cristiani did not specify who
was implicated or indicate the
units, rank or number Of those
responsible. 1 lowever, the head
of the joint Chiefs of Staff said
earlier Sunday night that 47
members of an elite battalion
now are heard by District Court judges without
limes A change, too, would buck a national trend
away from I single trial division.
Saving that matters handled by the state's 1
hshed in Wh2. In fiscal 1987-88, more than 2 million
cases were filed in District Court, compared with
105,704 m Superior Court.
While the Superior Court handles felonies and
District Court judges "are as Important, as difficult major civil suits. District Court judges hold non-jury
and as complex as matters handled by Superior See JUDGES, page 10
By Douglas Grant Mine
The Associated Press
SAN SALVADOR, El Salva-
dor (AP) President Alfredo
Cristiani has announced that mili-
tarv men committed the Novem-
ber massacre of six Jesuit priests
Olte oi the most heinous pohti
cally motivated crimes of the 10-
vear-old civil war
"It hasIvendetermined there including two officers, had been moveaheadanditlwkshkethat's
wasinvc4vemerttof some elements confined to base and were being the course he is on said Fitzwa-
quesHoned in connection with the ter, w ho was traveling with Prcsi-
slavings. dtrrt Bush to Honda. Fitzwater
No militarv officer has been was non-committal on whether
convicted of a politically moti- Cnstiam's announcement affects
vatedslayingsincecivil warbroke prospects for continuing U.S. aid
OUt in late 1979, though the army to Fl Salvador
has been linked to right-wing
death squads blamed tor the
murders of thousands ot sUS
pected leftists m the early RSOs.
White House spokesman Martin
Fitzwater Monday praised the
Salvadoran Investigation and
hailed the "greatcourage" of Cris-
tiani.
We asked the investigation
ho thorough and the prosecution
oi the armed forces" in the slay-
ings, Cristiani said Sunday night
in a brief broadcast address.
In addition to the priests,
educators at a Jesuit-run univer-
sity whom the far right had ac-





age 6
oHie SaBt (Hamlinian
Classifieds
January 9, 1990
WIN Ml AW MIAN
At A I ION OR BIG SCREEN TV
IM.l SRMSK l'l�TO$l.400l
JUST 10DWS!
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Commitment: Minimal
Money: Raise J.1.400
L��st: Zero Investment
( .impus organizations, clubs, frats,
sororities call Ot MO at 1 (800)
932 8S2& I (800) 950-8472 ext 10
FOR RENT
RESEARCH HFORMAIMIN
I jrj�sf Library ol information in U S
all suneels
WANTED; Female roommate needed to
share two bedroom apt rout and utilities
will be split m hall I o ited ofl 10th st
close to campus ' �fl 62 ,s
IU I'll l' VRTMI I fr hpaint 2bi
I 1 2 bloi ks iron imi i tent
Prefer graduate student . lllMrNUi iw
horn .it 752 2435
II MAI EROOMMAT1 WANTED Own
bedroom, sl2i' month plus i t utilities
In Tar River Estates on bus route and
close to campus i all '58-12 leave
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FOR si l
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The East
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News.
Features.
Sports.
SUMMERFIELD
APARTMENTS
3209 Summerplace
New
1 and 2 bedrooms
� located across from
Parker's Barbecue
on Memorial Drive
� available Feb.l
contact Aaron Spain
355-6187
756-8060
l Ids, i .in you buv loop cars 4 x 4's
! : Imi � aids foi under S100? .ill
i � today SOS 644 9533 depl 711
kFTENTION: Government seized ve
In m S100 tor�- Mercedes or
�� i hevys Surplus Buyers Guide I
rUI2 SV4 HK85 Exl A 5285
(o i I RNMI M siiHi I HH I I s
Irom 5100 Fords Mercedes Corvette!
Chevvs, Surplus Buyers Guide (1) SOS
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FOR SALE; I lerculow sleej et sofa, $125
I OR SAI I Bookcase w iti � �
design drawing board '� .
I I KM1 I Rl FOR SALE
furniture (couch i I �'�
� i i I Jri at fi i ollege students .ill
'58-8777
HELP WANTED I '
infants and toddlers rime rhursdav
from 9 11 30 am
Oakmont Baptist church Musthavetrai �
�� � ���
KI lot VVOKK sit 1)1 sl DI M
"he Pirate . � . �
enjoyv - vith the public and have a
j mtpl � Phono 757 454 foi
intcn � w ask tor t .wen
tSSISTAN I SOt t IKo H Mai ii
student to .v � i i t yourl
soccer lean ' " Musi
beexporiei edplaver with goodcommu
n -kills and ablility to den onstrate
nics Must atti nd Iw
iveel . md travel with team I
: I
i Neg Etabh how
before 10pm or on wi � I
BUDDY'S FOR Ml N
ii' time sal I Enthu
mdi iduals wh : have ,i
tlexibli : '�
� Ihi PI ii Moi da . '� ri I . I
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HI SI It NDRAISI KsN ' Wll'l s
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t? You must be well
. : I ha
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HELP V v I I 1)
McBudget
Office
Furniture
We Have:
�Desks 'Chairs
�Files -Safes
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Furniture Cabinets
We Buy, Sell, Trade, & Lease
1212 N. Orctnt 8t
INTERESTED IN PAYING OFI IIU �SI
I IIKIsiM s Bll i s

irt
livid :
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1KI INESNt N HIRISC,
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122 Arlington Blvi
�v 55 353
Make Us Your New Year's Resolution
Announcements
ATTENTION TO ALL
asl Carolinian will be changing its
ncerning announcements start
. un announcements will now
� nl) the ist weel ol publication
�- it week there will Iv .1 charge of
� vords for student orgaruzationa
. : for nor student organizations
i t additional words wiil K 5
NATIONAL COLD SERVICE
LRATLRNITV
ill h.r e i ish tor prospective members
mentsin everyday situah
toothers Earn th.it feelin
menl Real crisis center i
unteer (lists i ounsetors
ii g training classes in thi
beginning January J2 '
oi come bv 112 E II t
useful
(,iirs mm
in
II
17 H i 'rop in for information, niht
pn at Mendenhall in Ian 17 or C .ill
sathv al 758 M'i
HI Rt'S YOUR CHANCE
Jain valuable experience sharpen youi
�adershipand communication skills, plan
�ntortainment for the FCl1 campus ami
'je lots of fun nieStudenl Union is now
i � , 'in; applications l.tr tho following
ositions: Minority ArtommitttvChair
erson Coffeehouse' mmitteeChairper
�on, and Assistant to Bte President If vou
hink you're Interested, we want to talk to
on .ill us at 757-4715 or stop bv 236
.letulenhall for more information (thelast
lav to applv is Tuesday, Ian 16. 1090)
�tudent Union Making tilings Happen at
CL
1 LLNS
'ail a teen is interested in vour valuable
imc We are looking for special tc-ens.
et ween the ages of 15 and 18, who would
ike ot volunteer their invaluable listening
�kills to help other teens in crisis We are
iffering training classes for our teen hot
line beginning )an 22,1990 for more infor
nation i all MarleneTSK 176or758 HELP
VOLUNTEER CRISIS COUN-
SELORS
We need vour axperianoBJ Your achieve
PRE-OT STUDI Nls
Attention Pre-otstudentsapplicationd ad
line for admission is I l590forinforma
lion call 757 4411
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MAJORS CLUB
All Physical Education Majors and in
tended majors welcome Semester plans
to be discussed jan 11 19908pm MC 144
RESUME WORKSHOP
Lhci'areer Planning and Placements n
ice in the Mlovton I louse tters these one
hour programs on beginning a resume tor
vour ob search Handouts and samples
will be piven out to the first 2" people to
ome to each session No sign up required
The next sessions will beheld in theCareer
Planning Kixim on .m 8,9 and 11 at 3 pm
and o jan 9 at 7 pm
FLA.CCHLS.
I idavat4pm in Km 307 Erwin Hall the
1st BACCHUS meeting tor the new year!
And out more about this group that stands
tor Boost Alcohol Cons iousnesaoncern
ing the I lealth of University Students, and
promotes responsible division making
regarding the use or non use ot alcohol
I lelp plan the welcome back sodal for the
i amua and other events for the semester
For more info contact Office of sub-tic.
Abuse Prevention and Education. 303
Erwin Hall, 7S7 67n
BIG KIDS
hig Kids will meet today at
I rwin Hall If our lif
I, in ZK
has been affecte
lot pres ntbyhavingbeenraisedinan
alcoholic environment or where other
dsyfunction behaviors were present, this
croup can help We will be deciding on a
�� eular meeting time and location al the
�� . of Substance buse Prevention and
Education 303 Erwin Hall 757-6793
CAMPUS A.A.
Contact the Office ol Substance Abuse
hvolition and Education, 757-6793, 303
Erwin hall, it you want ol establish a
campus fellowship of alcoholics Anon)
mous Community meeting listings are
also av ailable through this office
LASAGNE DINNER
vVes2fel Christi m i llowship invites vou
to our tirst fellowship supper tor the se-
mester, lasagne for onl) SI' Wednesday,
an 10, 5 pm .it the Methodist Student
enter, ;01 E 5th St, across from Garretl
I form Sponsored by Presbyterian and
Methodist ampus Ministries
ANIMAL RIC.HTS
ECU Students foi the Ethical treatment ol
Animals will hold a meeting on Tuesday,
I.m 9, at 5pm in O B 2016 to plan our
activities for the semester New members
are welcome For more information call
Craigat931 8954
(AMPUS CHRISTIAN ILL-
LOWSHIP
We invite vou to be with us every Weil
night at 7pm in Km 212 Mendenhall for
praver and Bible study Everyone is wel
come to be a part of this growing fellow-
ship For more info caH752-7199
SENIORSGRADUAIETU-
DENTS
Now is the time to be registered with the
( areet Planning and Placement Service in
the SoXion House Located between
Mendenhall Student (enter and Greene
Degtn
sen
Residence 1 lall, this is a place where gradu
ating students ma put resiune and estab
lish a credentials file Interview sign ups
n .md vou must be registered to
t I. Information meetings
wi beheld on ' in 11 12 miJ It-at 2 pm in
the . arecr Planning room ot the Bloxton
I louse
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
Hie career Planning and Placement Serv
Ice in the Bloxton 1 louse is ottering these
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills A film and ds
cussion of how to interview on and ott
campus will be shared Thcso soessions
are held in the Career Planning room on
Ian 12 16 and 22 at 3pm and at 7pm on Jan
16
STUDENT UNION TRAVEL
COMMITTEE
Now is the time to make those plans tor
spring Break The Student Union Travel
Committee is sponsoring a Bahamas
Cruise, March 3-9. Contact the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-4788, tor
trip details.
ECLLPERIORM1NG ARTS
SLRIES
The ECU performing ArtsSt ries continues
itssuccessiiuo 1990 with the tirst perform-
ance Of the new vear The Cannes Cham
her Orchestra, with quest flutist Ransom
Wilson, will appear in Wright Auditorium
on Saturday. Ian 27,8pm Tickets are now
on sale at the Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall. 757-4788
WZMB-FM
WZMB-FM is now accepting applications
for Disc jockeys, Newscasters, sportscas-
ters, and executive staff positions Applv
at the WZMB studios on the second floor of
old joyner Library The application dead
line Is Tuesday Ian 16 WZMB is an Equal
lpportuniiv Employer an I
dents .no w el ome t i a; r
IMA
Ihe Fin in. �
will meet Wed. Ja I rm
J009 J B
SFECIA1. OLYMPICS
he Greenville Ptfi ountv Special CHym
pics is recruiting for volunteer coai hesfone
hour per week i tor winter and spring
�-ports Noexpenencetsnei cssarv although
some sports background is helpful. Also a
desire to work with children and adults
with mental retardation Coaches are
needed tor the following sports bowling,
swimming, track and field, gymnastics,
tennis, anil roller skating It's a great expe
rience! For more information call the
Special Olympics at B30 4551.
ACT ASSESSMENT
The Act Assessment will be ott. red at li I
on Sat , Fob 10,1990 Application hlanks
are to be completed and mailed to A T
Registration,P.O.Box414,Iowat ity Iowa
"224 Applications must be postmarked
no later than fan 12, H) Applications
may beobtamed from me Testing Center,
rm 105, Speight Building. ECU
SCHOOL Ol ARTS
Models needed for figure drawing classes
spring semesterontact Connie Follmer
7s7-6665, School of Art office or Tran
Gordlev 757-4259, lenkins Bldg 1307
RECREATION DAY 1990
I ooking for a Summer job? Would vou
like to be a t the beach' In the mountains?
Then consider Recreation Pa On Feb 8,
1W) in Memorial Gym over V) rocTea
tional emplyers will interview EC U stu
dents for summer positions Posuom are
available for ail majors For more informa-
tion and to sign up for inttn lews contact
ui ativn -i
�8GCB
1
N
o
h
s
c1
MEDICAL STUDENTS
Medt rtts or others using the lock
it the Health Science 1 ibrary are sub
rk kersilligally sear bed
ul their knowledge and authoriza
md having their personal propert
� ,t bv library personnel
BASKETBALL TOURNA-
MENT
Intramural tec services will be heating a
pre season basketball tournament Jan l'
20 in Memorial Gymnasium Mens and
�� omens teams are encouraged to enter at
per team Contact Mary Malone at
b757 6387 far more information Be sure to
register Ian 16 at 5pm in Bio 103
ALRObMCIZERS
- interested in aerobic fitness class��
including toning, beginning fitness, inter
� hi !o circuit, and low impact classes
should register Ian 16-19in 204Memorial
) ymnasium 'lasses are offered daily at a
cost of $10 student and S12Facultv-staff
tor a 12 class session Drop-m classes are
also availavle in S5 increments Call 757-
S7 tor details.
DEADLINES
FOR
CLASSIFIEDS
&
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FRIDAY & MONDAY
AT
5:00 PM





I he I astarolinian, anuar k, 1jm) 7
Noriega has 'variety of defenses' for upcoming trial
1 1 Oll 1.1lil O
(�jnnetl News Scrvi r
A SI IINiC .TON
;trmgman Manm I
; ivai
thai . ' �
� �
!ii its lha


ites to ha� 1-
r it hi ' : '
'
.�

'
I

'
� �'
Bulgaria
H
'
By Rycke
Tanning AvaiCaSU
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i 1 i ' A ri � � � possible said his
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1555000





If
The East Carolinian, January 9,1990 7
Noriega has 'variety of defenses' for upcoming trial
By Tony Mauro
Gannett News Service
WASHINGTON � Deposed
Panamanian strongman Manuel
Noriega has at his disposal a vari-
ety of defenses that might save
him from conviction or from even
standing trial at all, some legal
experts say.
But it isn't two years of mas-
sive, adverse publicity that might
be Noriega's salvation. Instead,
legal experts cite constitutional
questions over the U.S. methods
of capturing Noriega, and the
threat that vital government se-
crets could be divulged in open
court.
Yet Attorney General Dick
Thomburgh declares, "There's
nothing that's come to our atten-
tion that would indicate that this
tnal can't go forward
Noriega, the erstwhile, self-
proclaimed "maximum leader" of
Panama, was whisked to Miami
before dawn Thursday, two weeks
after 24,000 U.S. troops invaded
his nation. President Bush said the
No. 1 goal of the Dec. 20 invasion
was seizing Noriega.
After eluding U.S. forces for
five days, Noriega sought refuge
with the Vatican Embassy in Pan-
ama City on Christmas Eve. Alter
Bulgaria
days of behind-the-scenes deal-
ing, Noriega gave himself up.
He was indicted Feb. 4, 1988,
by federal grand juries in Tampa
and Miami on charges of drug
trafficking, racketeering and con-
spiracy. Total charges carry pen-
alties of 290 years in prison and
$2.2 million in fines.
Noriega's strongest legal strat-
egy, most experts agree, would be
to force the United States to back
off or drop charges rather than
release at trial classified or poten-
tially damaging material about his
years as a paid informant for the
Central Intelligence Agency.
"His best hope is that there's
enough information in that file
that'sembarrassing that a deal will
be made said University of
Michigan law professor Yale
Kamisar.
"We may well find that he'll
walk away with a not-guilty ver-
dict said Cherif Bassiouni of
DePaul University Collegeof Law.
Such an outcome could permit
Panama to bring him back for trial
on other charges or might enable
Noriega to seek exile elsewhere.
Whatever the outcome, the
prosecution of Noriega will be
unlike any other in U.S. legal his-
tory.
"The Noriega case will pres-
Continued from page 5
ent some novel issues our courts
have never faced before says Ellis
Rubin, a noted Miami defense
lawyer. "We've never before had
an invasion of another country
aimed at apprehending a criminal
suspect to bring him to trial
Other possible defense tactics
for Noriega include a number of
citations of the Constitution:
� Claiming that evidence
against him was improperly ob-
tained by invading U.S. troops, in
violation of the Fourth Amend-
ment prohibitions against im-
proper search and seizure. The
Supreme Court is considering a
case that would test whether simi-
lar constitutional guarantees ap-
ply to defendants captured out-
side the country.
But the Justice Department,
Kamisar says, could easily argue
that "this was a military opera-
tion, and they came upon the evi-
dence only incidentally
� One of Noriega's former
lawyers, Neal Sonnett, says Nori-
ega is "entitled under the law to
'head of state immunity a dip-
lomatic tradition that protect
government leaders from prose-
cution by enemies. But Justice
Department officials dismiss that
argument.
� The entire way in which
Noriega finally surrendered could
be cited in a general "due process"
defense. He could claim the U.S.
invasion deprived him of Consti-
tutional guarantees.
Noriega's lawyers might try
to force the government to drop
charges against him rather than
disclose government secrets that
might prove politically embarrass-
ing about U.S. ties to Noriega in
the 1970s and early 1980s.
Noriega lawyer Steven Kollin
said, "We're going to request cer-
tain pretrial discovery requests,
including certain sensitive docu-
ments � and those documents
will get to the truth of this matter
Victoria Toensing, a former
Justice Department lawyer now
ii. j. nvak piuiuii, f.c�j.�.ii ical
problems should Noriega's law-
yers seek to uncover secret docu-
ments.
"When people are saying he
was on the CIA payroll, then you
are going to have the more com-
plicated level that some of these
things regarding sources and
methods are classified she said.
The most obvious claim Nori-
ega can make is that the massive
U.S. campaign against him poi-
soned the impartiality of any ju-
rors. Noriega's Florida lawyers
said they will raise that issue to
have the charges dismissed.
But legal experts say the im-
pactof pretrial publicity has weak-
ened as a weapon against prose-
cution, especially in an age when
instant notoriety is common.
Among those who have gone to
trial after enormous pretrial pub-
licity are John Hinckley, who shot
President Reagan in 1981; and
automaker John DeLorean, tried
in 1984 cm drug charges.
Hinckley was found not guilty
by reason of insanity. A jury
cleared DeLorean even though
damaging videotapes and other
statements were repeated end-
lessly in the media.
"The DeLorean trial showed
that even with intense publicity, a
fair trial is possible said his
lawyer, Howard Weitzman of
Santa Monica, Calif. "But who-
ever gets involved in the defense
has to work hard at neutralizing
the publicity
Tony Mauro writes for USA TO-
DAY. Anne Sakerand Paula Schwed
ofGNS contributed to this report.
cconrtght im usa todav
AffU ColUfl Imftrmution Nttwotk.
BTA said residents from the
southern town of Kardzhali, where
almost half the 50,000 inhabitants
are ethnic Turks, reported seeing
Turkish flags on public buildings.
Atanassov, in a television address
Sunday, said it was "inadmissible
to raise the flag of a foreign state at
demonstrations and rallies in
public and private places
He said the interior minister
had been told to maintain public
peace and "neutralize any anti-
constitutional and extremist acts
under the framework of law
A leader of the independent
trade union Pcxikrepa, Nikolai
Kolev, called for members to "fight
against all destructive forces In a
statement broadcast on state tel-
evisionhe saidhe thought nation-
alistic protests were being spurred
by local officials
While Petar Mladenov, who
took over from Zhivkov as party
leader Nov. 10, has moved quickly
to put new people in the leader-
ship more likely to support demo-
cratic reform, few changes have
been made at the local level.

.
J
HAIR
By Rycke
'Fanning Available
752-6060
loin Jones . v , Amy Hat dec
th & C otancne
( Douniow n Greenville I
I
a��
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Wash
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EVERY TUESDAY
FREE WASH 6 - 7 PM
"If You Have To Do
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Do It In Style
Air Conditioned Lounge
Video Games
Your Favorite Cold Beverage
Snacks
Television
( ol' III II I I :& l-OI lSI !YK I
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Accommodations
� 141 guests rooms and suites are tastefully
appointed, warm and comfortable in design.
� Individual climate control, remote
controlled television with news and movie
channels and AMFM clock-alarm radio.
Meeting and Banquet Facilities
� Meeting space for up to 650 people.
� Carolina Ballroom can be adapted to
fit any size meeting, banquet or reception.
CharleyO's Restaurant
You'll find that reading CharleyO's menu is an
experience in itself. Specialties created by our
chef in the tradition of great American
cuisine are receiveing rave reviews.
Rio! The Club
Greenville's most exciting bar offers drink
specials, dancing and holiday celebrations
every day of the year in an upbeat atmosphere.
HILTON INN
GREENVILLE
752-5222
2510 E. 10th St. YVaM1
Greenville, NC
VARIETY
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8 The East Carolinian, January 9, 1990
N.C. doctors avoid malpractice suits
RALEIGH (AP) Physicians
in North Carolina may be doing a
better job of policing themselves
than their counterparts across the
country, helping to keep state
malpractice insurance from sky-
rocketing and litigation to a mini-
mum, experts sav.
In a recent article in the lour
nal of the American Medical As-
sociation, Peter jacobson, a re-
searcher at The Rand Corp con-
cluded that it is equally important
for doctors to police themselves
better and to improve the quality
of care that they give
Medical Mutual Insurance of
North Carolina, a physician-
owned insurance company that
primarily offers malpractice insur-
ance, has a three-person consult-
ing staff. The consultants review
the administrative aspects of a
doctoi practice, looking closely
at the various systems that can
lead to lawsuits when thev are not
working properly, said Dianne
Reinoso, Medical Mntual's loss-
prevention manager.
"For example, we look at the
flow of paperwork that's gener-
ated from lab tests and diagnostic
tests to make sure that the patient
IS actually tested that the spe. i
men goes to the lab, that a test
result is generated, th.it it comes
Kick to thi' doctor is put on his
desk and in the patient record and
that the patient is informed she
said A breakdown anywhere in
that process means the potential
for somebody to get hurt
The risk-management con-
sultants also closely monitor
claims that Medical Mutual and
other insurers pay and the types
of errors that lead to those claims,
hen we go into physician of-
fices looking tor those kind of
things she told The News and
Observer of Raleigh.
Also, a national computer data
bank 1 i xpected to begin operat-
ing this year, alerting hospitals
and licensing boards about doc-
tors with bad records.
From the W70s through he
mid-1980s, medical-malpractice
lawsuits rose sharply in the United
States with specialists Mich as
surgeons, obstetricians and gyne-
cologists most likely to be sued
Nationally, claimsagainst each 100
doctors more than doubled be-
tween 1975and 1985,whileclaims
against obstetricians and gyne-
cologists tripled between 1976and
1981, according to the JAMA ar-
ticle.
In North Carolina, few medi-
cal malpractice suits go to trial
and most face long odds against
winning, according to a study bv
the Duke University Private Ad-
judication Center. The study, re-
leased in the fall, found that the
average juryaward in NorthCaro-
lina was $48,063, far below the
multimillion-dollar verdicts that
insurance companies sometimes
cite when thev raise their premi-
ums.
Since 1987, all North Carolina
hospitals have been required bv
the state to have a nsk-manage-
ment program. As the name sug-
gests, "risk management" involves
taking steps to limit a hospital or
doctor's potential exposure to lia-
bility. For example, malpractice
insurance companies are provid-
ing consultants to help doctors
identify and correct problems that
could get them in trouble.
Pamela kirks, the director of
risk management and underwrit-
ing for the North Carolina 1 lospi-
tal Reciprocal Insurance Exchange,
said hospital risk-management
programs attempt to identify ar-
eas of potential "nk exposure" in
which a patient could be harmed
Such efforts might include ensur-
ing that opera ting rooms are prop-
erly equipped to monitor a
patient's blood oxygen level or
drafting procedures to make sure
that patients are stabilized and
accompanied bv proper medical
personnel when transferred to
another facility.
Patricia Hodgson, director of
communications for the N.C.
Medical Society, said the state's
doctors arc acutely aware of how
important risk-management pro-
grams and sanctions are in reduc-
ing malpractice.
The Federation of State Medi-
cal Boards, a national association
of state medical-licensing boards,
has recommended that state
boards be more effective in
"watch-dogging the medical
profession, she said.
In North Carolina, Bryant
Paris, executive secretary of the
state Board of Medical Fxaminers,
said the board disciplines a num-
Eft
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
urac�0Mw
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 912 E.
10th Street: or call 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counseling or
Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. a day, year around,
in order to assist you in virtually any problem area you might have.
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance the
quality of life for you and our community.
Licensed And Accredited By The State of North Carolina
� .��� i��� rr&
Taxes
Continued from page 5
You are married and 65 or
older and had unearned income
of at least $1,100. If you are un-
married and 65 or older with some
unearned income, you must file
once total income tops$1,250. Anv
person under age 65 with any
unearned income must file if total
income is $500 or more.
There are still more its, ands
and buts Regardless of all those
thresholds, you still must tile a
return it
You had net self-employ-
ment earnings of at least $400.
You received anv advance
earned-income credit in vour
paychecks.
You owe any special taxes,
such as the alternative minimum
tax. a tax (n premature withdraw-
als from an Individual Retirement
Aoount, or Social Security tax vou
did not report to your employer.
Even if your income is low
enough that you do not have to
file,you -till must file if taxes were
withfv I and you want a refund.
You a � mist file to receive the
earned-income credit.
UNIVERSITY AMOCO
We have moved from
University Exxon on
1101 East 5th St. to
University Amoco on
101 East 10th St.
( Across from Famous Pizza)
All Complete Muffler Shop
� 24 Hour Towing
Any Kind of Repair Service
101 Kast lOthSt.
Greenville, NC 27858
Telephone:
(919) 758-9976
Greenville Square - next to Kmart
919-355-0556
nature's goodness
Health Food & Grocery
� Vitamins � Cosmetics � Organic Produce
� Macro Biotic Foods � Home Products �
� Bulk Grains � Herbs � Spices �
703 Greenville Blvd SE
Greenville, NC 27858
ber of physicians every year In
1988, seven of the state's 19,438
medical doctors had their licenses
suspended or revoked; another lit
voluntarily surrendered their li
censes and ?4 others were dis. i
plined, usually by being put on
probation.
Last year, 12 doctors had their
licenses suspended or revoked; 15
voluntarily surrendered their li
censes, and 20 were disciplined
Beginning this year, these actions
will be recorded in a national
computer database, the National
Practitioner Data Bank, whu !i
hospitalsandlicensingbo.irdsu ill
use to screen doctors who appK
for privileges.
Hospital and licensing offi-
cials say the new data bank w ill be
of obvious use in weeding out
doctors who get in trouble in one
state and then set up practice in
another.
ROFESSIONAL
BODY WORKS
ONE OF NORTH CAROLINA'S
I AR( iESTBODY REPAIR I AC IIII IKS
- 1 Yk. J6.000 WARRAN IV
� GUARAN1 liD PAIN! MATCHING
� l PQ' M in REPAIRS FOR Al I
MAkl-S VH M )i)l I S
� 1IIIM) PAIN ll. fcNDREFINISHING
rECHNICIANS
BINK'S "BAKED ON PAINT FACIIJTES1
24 HOI R WRlKIR SERVICE
756-3471
NIGHT W RECKER SERVICE DIAL 756-7595
4(X) Greenville Boulevard � Greenville, NC
756-7202
11
ANIMAL HOUSE
rlington Blvd. "Greenville,
(
� Full Line Of Pet Supplies � Marino & Tropical
Fish � Birds, Reptile & Small Animals � Pond Fish
& Supplies � Live & Frozen Food � Hills & IAMS
� Aquatie Plant & Tank Decorations � Aquarium
Installation & Maintenance
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications lor
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
Deadline: Januar) l(. 1990 A:
STUDENT UNION COMMITTEE
CHAIRPERSONS &
PRODUCTION COMMITTEE
CHAIRPERSON
Deadline: February 23, 1990
For the 1990- 1991 Term
Anv full - time student can apply
Applications available at Meiulenhall Student Centers
Information Desk anil Room 236 - Student Union.
WELCOME BACK
AAITs
From Your Friends at the
Thanks For Your Support






8 The East Carolinian, January 9,1990
N.C. doctors avoid malpractice suits
RALEIGH(AP) �Physicians ooiog mt iikeiy to sued.
in North Carolina may be doing a NaHonally.claimsagainsteach 100
better job of policing themselves doctors than doubled be-
than their counterparts across the tween 1975and 1985, whileclaims
country, helping to keep state agains, obstetricians and gyne-
malprachce insurance from sky- cologiststripled between 1976and
rocketing and litigation to a mini-
mum, experts say.
In a recent article in the jour-
nal of the American Medical As-
sociation, Peter Jacobson, a re-
searcher at The Rand Corp con-
cluded that it is equally important
for doctors to police themselves
better and to improve the quality
of care that they give.
Medical Mutual Insurance of
North Carolina, a physician-
owned insurance company that
primarily offers malpractice insur-
ance, has a three-person consult-
ing staff. The consultants review
the administrative aspects of a
doctor's practice, looking closely
at the various systems that can
lead to lawsuits when they art not
working properly, said Dianne
Reinoso, Medical Mntual's loss-
prevention manager.
"For example, we look at the
1981, according to the JAMA ar-
ticle.
In North Carolina, few medi-
cal malpractice suits go to trial
and most face long odds against
winning, according to a study by
the Duke University Private Ad-
judication Center. The study, re-
leased in the fall, found that the
average jury award in North Caro-
lina was $48,063, far below the
multimillion-dollar verdicts that
insurance companies sometimes
cite when they raise their premi-
ums.
Since 1987, all North Carolina
hospitals have been required by
the state to have a risk-manage-
ment program. As the name sug-
risk management and underwrit-
ing for the North Carolina Hospi-
tal Reciprocal Insurance Exchange,
said hospital risk-management
programs attempt to identify ar-
eas of potential "risk exposure" in
which a patient could be harmed.
Such efforts might include ensur-
ing that operating rooms are prop-
erly equipped to monitor a
patient's blood oxygen level or
drafting procedures to make sure
that patients are stabilized and
accompanied by proper medical
personnel when transferred to
another facility.
Patricia Hodgson, director of
communications for the N.C.
Medical Society, said the state's
doctors are acutely aware of how
important risk-management pro-
grams and sanctions are in reduc-
ing malpractice.
The Federation of State Medi-
cal Boards, a national association
gesta, "risk management" involves of state medical-licensing boards,
taking steps to limit a hospital or
doctor's potential exposure to lia-
bility. For example, malpractice
insurance companies are provid-
flow of paperwork that's gener- ing consultants to help doctors
ated from lab tests and diagnostic identify and correct problems that
tests to make sure that the patient
is actually tested, that the speci-
men goes to the lab, that a test
result is generated, that it comes
back to the doctor, is put on his
desk and in the patient record and
that the patient is informed she
said "A breakdown anvwhere in
J
that process means the potential
for somebody to get hurt
The risk-management con-
sultants also closely monitor
claims that Medical Mutual and
other insurers pay and the types
of errors that lead to those claims.
"Then we go into physician of-
fices looking for those kind of
things she told The News and
Observer of Raleigh.
Also, a national computer data
bank is expected to begin operat-
ing this year, alerting hospitals
and licensing boards about doc-
torswun
could get them in trouble.
P.imela Kirks, the director of
has recommended that state
boards be more effective in
"watch-dogging" the medical
profession, she said.
In North Carolina, Bryant
Paris, executive secretary of the
state Board of Medical Examiners,
said the board disciplines a num-

FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not come bj the MEAL Crisis Interrentita i
10th Street; or call 75 HELP, For Free Confide
Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. a I
In order to assist you In virtually any problem area
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve
quality of life for you and our community.
Licensed And Accredited By The State of Ms
tedsjaau
mid-1980s, medical-malpractice
lawsuits rose sharply in the United
States, with specialists such as
surgeons, obstetricians and gyne-
Taxes
Continued from page 5
�You are married and 65 or
older and had unearned income
of at least $1,100. If you are un-
married and 65 or older with some
unearned income, you must file
once total income tops$l ,250. Any
person under age 65 with any
unearned income must file if total
income is $500 or more.
There are still more ifs, ands
and buts. Regardless of all those
thresholds, you still must file a
return if:
�You had .net self-employ-
ment earnings of at least $400.
-You received any advance
earned-income credit in your
paychecks.
�You owe any special taxes,
such as the alternative minimum
tax, a tax on premature withdraw-
als from an Individual Retirement
Account,orSocial Security taxyou
did not report to your employer.
Evrn if your income is low
enough that you do not have to
file, you still must file if taxes were
withhri and you want a refund.
You a" o must file to receive the
earned-income credit.
UNIVERSITY AR
We have moved from
University Exxon on
1101 East 5th St. to
University Amoco on
101 East 10th St.
(Across from Famous Pizza)
� All Complete Muffler Shop
� 24 Hour Towing
� Any Kind of Repair Service
101 East 10th St.
Greenville, NC 27858
Telephone:
(919) 758-9976
Greenville Square - next to Kmart
919-355-0556
nature's goodness
Health Food & Grocery
� Vitamins � Cosmetics � Organic Produce
� Macro Biotic Foods � Home Products �
� Bulk Grains � Herbs � Spices �
703 Greenville Blvd SE
Greenville, NC 27858
ber of physicians every year. In
1988, seven of the state's 19,438
medical doctors had their licenses
suspended or revoked; another 10
voluntarily surrendered their li-
censes and 24 others were disci-
plined, usually by being put on
probation.
Last year, 12 doctors had their
licenses suspended or revoked; 15
voluntarily surrendered their li-
censes, and 20 were disciplined
Beginning this year, these actions
will be recorded in a national
computer database, the National
Practitioner Data Bank, which
hospitalsand licensing boards will
use to screen doctors who apply
for privileges.
Hospital and licensing offi-
cial s say the new data bank will be
of obvious use in weeding out
doctors who get in trouble in one
state and then set up practice in
another.
ROFESSIONAL
BODY WORKS-H
ONE OF NORTH CAROLINA'S
LARGEST BODY REPAIR FACILITIES
� 3 YR36.000 WARRANTY
� CilIARANTFFD PAINT MATCHING
� TOP QUALITY RHPAIRS FOR ALL
MAKFS AND MODELS
� CERTIFIED PAINTING AND REFFNISHING
TECHNICIANS
BINK'S "BAKED - ON" PAINT FACIUTES
24 HOUR WRECKER SERVICE
'
f
756-3471
NIGHT WRECKER SERVICE DIAL 756-7595
4(X) Greenville Boulevard � Greenville, NC

756-7202
ANIMAL HOUSE
422 Arlington Blvd. � Greenville, NC
� Full Line Of Pet Supplies � Marine & Tropical
Fish � Birds, Reptile & Small Animals � Pond Fish
" t& Frozen Food � Hills & IAMS
& Tank Decorations � Aquarium
lation & Maintenance
arolina University's
Board of Directors
iking applications tor
r UNION PRESIDENT
idline: January 19, 1990 &
STUDENT UNION COMMITTEE
CHAIRPERSONS &
PRODUCTION COMMITTEE
CHAIRPERSON
Deadline: February 23, 1990
For the 1990 -1991 Term
Any full - time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall Student Center's
Information Desk and Room 236 - Student Union.
WELCOME BACK
AAn's
From Your Friends at the
Thanks For Your Support
MM





4
The Hast Carolinian, January 9, 1990 9
Opposition groups question dissolution
of East Germany's secret police force
ion) t
Mted l'i
iuczka
�s IVnti'i
la . icstioned
t load
tanv s
sov ret
md al
id in �Od ,i
'tins.
p emo
pj iition
ispt lui.Mr,
- � tuture
Mil ofti
i ocurit
were
�n

cptancc
nor t tan
Modrow's transitional Cabinet by
the opposition, which has boon
unable to present a unified front
t pposition groups earlier had
threatened to leave the talks over
w hat they charge are government
efforts to preserve a domestic in-
lelligence network that could stitle
the reform movement
Roll Henrich of New Forum,
the largest opposition group, dis-
closed what he said was a draft
telex prepared by secret police
agents in thecity of l.era on Dec. 9,
urging authorities in Fast Berlin
to 'paralyze" the opposition.
1 lenrich said he was uncer-
tain it the telex was ever dis-
patched, but contended it "called
tor a coup" to end the democratic
reform movement. Communist
Partv chief t.regor Gysi and rep-
resentatives ol other traditionally
Communist allied parties said
they were unaware o the mes-
sage
Democratic A w a k en l n g
leader Wolfgang Schnur de-
manded that the national
prosecutor's office and the Inte-
rior Ministrv appear before repre-
sentatives ot the opposition and
government.
The Mod row government.
formed after a peaceful popular
October revolution toppled hard-
line Communist leaders, has
promised to create the conditions
tor free and tair elections on May
b.
Astalksresumed Monday,the
opposition demanded that the
government disarm agents ot the
formerStateSecuriryOfticeby Ian
14 and drop plans to set up a new
agency to succeed it before the
May elections. Peter Koch,an offi-
cial named by the government to
oversoe dissolution ot the sci ret
police, said authorities plan to
confiscate all ot the former
agency's arms by the end ot this
month.
Former agents are already
barred fromaccessto weapons lie
said. Reports last month by the
official ADN news agenc) said
the force had been disbanded.
Modrow said in an interview
Sunday with Austrian television
that a security tori, e is need d to
prevent the spread ot right wing
extremism in East C lermany.
Bunny's Grill
Open 7 Days A Week
Mori - Sat 1 hint - 2am
Sun 5pm - Midnight
Lunch Specials
M - Chicken &. Cheese on Pita ($3.50)
T- Turkey Sub ($3.50)
W - Fajita - Chicken or Heel ($4 25)
Th - 6" Steak & Cheese ($3.50)
F - 6" Chicken Cheese Sub ($3.50)
60oz Pitchers $1.99
Student Special Monday Night
6pm 9pm all Sands iches (lc
FREE Deliver) (min.ordci 55.00)
No I vlici) mi Spe. ials
Located Next to Stop Sho
1 owntown Greenville
830-5126
Authorities arrest cult leader
close to the Mexican border
D,i id Sedeno
� ijted Press
ill leader
' i :iih of five was
ithori ties who
. i f v � found in his
: former Sunday-school
�� Ri rganized . hurchoi
its inc )hio, was ar-
1 i btederal agents
r old wife,Mice, and the
i ! )amon, alsi were arrested
� n childrenKristen, 10,
� takeninto protective
poi ialagent incharge
1 ICCOand Firearms
t of apprehension Kirt-
:�: maid K Andolsek said
I rens arrests In recent
days, Kirtland police had been keeping close watch
ot the homes ot residents who w ere once threatened
by 1 undgren.
I he I .undgrens were scheduled to appear Monday
m a state court tor extradition proceedings to Ohio,
w here they face charges including aggravated mur
der and kidnapping.
1.undgren broke away from the Reorganized
Church and persuaded other members to follow
him, officials said. The group once lived on a 15 acre
farmnear the Cleveland-area town, where investiga-
tors last week unearthed five bodies. Authorities
believe the five are Dennis Avery, his wife,heryl,
and their three young daughters.
Investigators believe the Avervs were killed in
mid-April and buried in a common grave under the
bam. Searches of the Southern California motel room
and a nearby storage area rented by leftrev Lund-
gren uncovered numerous weapons, including an
AR-15 assault rifle, as well as ammunition, knives
and gas masks, Vita said.
"They had camping gear, web gear that the
military would wear � things that can sustain you
up m the mountains he said.
The East
Carolinian
Because
reading
is funda-
mental.
(and the paper is
free)
EAR
it '
W
' 1
11
't o
-
W
ii

"?"V
NX " II

Welcome Back! Check Out
Second Semester Skiing!
200 E. Greenville Blvd. 756-1003
Registration for all trips and workshops begin Wednesday, January 10 at 3:00pm In 113 Memorial Gymnasium.
Registration will be held through the pre-trlp meeting date for each trip and through the day of each workshop. A
minimum deposit of $10 Is required for all trips unless otherwise noted.
Spring 1990 Workshop Information Outdoor Adventure Trip Schedule

sea
��
i
L
Outdoor Smorgasbord: A special event fea-
ttr rig outdoor cooking techniques and food sam-
pling, video presentations and trip package give-
aways1 Wednesday, January 24 at 7pm in 113
Memonal Gymnasium Free of Charge
Outdoor Photography. Learn how to get
that perfect outdoor photo' Wed Feb. 7 in 113
' rtorialGymnasium $2. Students, $3 Faculty-
staff-guest
C anoeing I: Basic instruction on types, care,
equipment, safety and canoe strokes Thurs ,
Feb 15 at 7 30pm In the Memorial Gym Pool $2
Students. $3 Faculty-staff-guest
Kayaking I: Basic instruction covering equip-
ment safety, wet exit & Eskimo roll Thurs, Feb
22 at 7 30pm in the Memorial Gym pool $2
ctudpnts. $3Faculty-staf1 guest
Outdoor Gourmet: Experiment with open
fire trail and dutch oven cooking Acquire a taste
'or this unique activity1 Wed , March 14 at 5pm at
picnic area adiacent to Memorial Gym $3Stu-
� � ts $4 Faculty statf-guest
CanoeKayak II: Take a trip on the Tar and
learn river navigation, water exit, safety and
-troKos Meet at Memorial Gym at 8 30am $3
ludents, $4 Faculty-staff-guest
Backpacking: Introduce yourself to wilder-
ness manners, types of boots, packs, costs and
meal planning Tues March 20 at 5pm m BD101
$2'Students, $3Faculty-staff guest
Bicycle Touring: Begin instruction in week-
end and long distance touring, basic repairs and
more Wed . March 28 at 7pm in D101 Brewster
(2 Students, $3Facutty staff guest
Windsurfing I: Beginning instruction includes
nqqing, terminology, equipment and practice
Thurs April 5 and Tues , April 10 at 7 30pm in
Memorial Gym Pool $27Students. $3Faculty-
statf guest
Ski Wintergreen, Va. Two days of prime downhill skiing highlight this winter adventure in the Blue Ridge
Mountains. Wintergreen offers a challenge to the expert and novice skier with elevation of 4,450 feet and
over a thousand foot drop. Cost includes transportation, lodging, lift tickets and Apres ski party. $20day ski
rental and food are additional. Tnp takes place February 3-4. Enrollment limit of 14 participants. Pre-tnp
meeting will be held Wed Jan. 31 at 5pm in BD101. $99Students. $110Faculty-staff-guest.
Spring Break Beach Extravaganza Find yourself in sunny Key Largo and Key West, Florida March
3-10. You'll enjoy some of the Southeast's finest beach and nautical locations including camping at John
Pennekamp Coral Reef, snorkelmg, sailing and windsurfing. Don't miss the famous Key West sunsets'
Costs include transportation, equipment, most food, lodging and special activity fees. $275Students.
$300Faculty-staff-guest.($100 deposit required.) Attend the pre-tnp meeting Wed March 21 at 5pm in
BD101.
Canoeing Spend two days of canoeing down 16 miles of the Cape Fear River and enjoy diverse plant
and animal life as well as a few class II rapids.Evenings will be spend around the campfire at the Raven
Rock State Park, March 23-25. Cost includes equipment, food and transportation. $20Students, $25
Faculty-staff-guest. A pre-tnp meeting will be held Wed March 21 at 5pm in BD101.
Backpacking Tip-toe through the Rip Rap Trail in Shenandoah National Park, Va. March 30-Apni 1 The
two days of moderate hiking feature spring blooms, water falls and excellent scenic views. Cost includes
equipment, food and transportation. $20Students, $25Faculty-staff-guest. A pre-tnp meeting will be held
Wed March 28 at 5pm in BD101
White Water Rafting A weekend in Hot Springs, NC is a wonderful way to open the month of April
rafting down the French Broad River One day will be spent hiking through the Pisgah National Forest You
can be rockin' and rollm' at a cost of $55Students. $65Faculty-staff-guest. Cost includes transportation.
equipment, food and special activity fees A pre-tnp meeting well be held Tues, April 3 at 5pm in BD101
Bicycling Tour the county roads on a loop trail from Greenville to Grimesland park and then return to
Greonville for an exhilarating 25 miles. Cost includes food and sag wagon. Trip takes place April 7 at a cost
of $7Students, $10Faculty-staff-guest. A pre-tnp meeting will be held Wed April 4 at 5pm in BD101
Beach Camping Enjoy the 892 acre Hammocks Beach State Park. You'll have ample time for hiking.
fishing, swimming, sun bathing, and interpretive study. Cost includes equipment, food and transportation
This beach bonanza takes place April 21-22. Costs are $20Students. $25Faculty-staff-guest. A pre-tnp
meeting will be held Wed Apnl 18 at 5pm in BD101.
For additional information regarding all outdoor recreatton programs, v.sit the Outdoor Recreation Center in 113 Memonal Gymnasium
Monday & Friday from 11:30am-1 30pm or 3 OOpm-6 00pm and Tuesday-Thursday 3 OOpm-6 00pm Call 757 6387 or 757-6911





r
The East Carolinian, January 9, 1990 9
Opposition groups question dissolution
of East Germany's secret police force
By I ony Czuczka
Asstn. fated Press Writer
ami
crat
rcpn
talks
vs ith
ic
EAST BERLIN (AP) Oppo-
sition groups Monday questioned
assurances byommunisl lead-
ers tli.it (� ist v Germany's secret
poli c is being disbanded and iil-
leged th.it one unit had urged i
o stop demo r.itR- reforms.
n- opposition group Dertto-
cning s.iul opposition
i n: itives were suspending
on i ist i iermany's future
the overnmcnl until offi-
cialsexplain thedomestic security
ituation Mondav s t.ilks wore
covered on national television.
A i nllapsc o( the talks could
endanger the tenuous acceptance
(it Communist Premier Hans
Mod row's transitional Cabinet by
the opposition, which has been
unable to present a unified front.
Opposition groups earlier had
threatened to leave the talks over
what they charge are government
efforts to preserve a domestic in-
telligence network that could stifle
the reform movement.
Rolf Henrich of New Forum,
the largest opposition group, dis-
closed what he said was a draft
telex prepared by secret police
agents in the city of Geraon Dec. 9,
urging authorities in East Berlin
to "paralyze" the opposition.
Henrich said he was uncer-
tain if the telex was ever dis-
patched, but contended it "called
for a coup" to end the democratic
reform movement. Communist
Party chief Gregor Gysi and rep-
resentatives of other traditionally
Communist-allied parties said
they were unaware of th� mes-
sage.
Democratic Awakening
leader Wolfgang Schnur de-
manded that the national
prosecutor's office and the Inte-
rior Ministry appear before repre-
sentatives of the opposition and
government.
The Modrow government,
formed after a peaceful popular
October revolution toppled hard-
line Communist leaders, has
promised to create the conditions
for free and fair elections on May
6.
As talks resumed Monday, the
opposition demanded that the
government disarm agents of the
former State Security Office by Ian.
19 and drop plans to set up a new
agency to succeed it before the
May elections. Peter Koch, an offi-
cial named by the government to
oversee dissolution of the secret
police, said authorities plan to
confiscate all of the former
agency's arms by the end ot this
month.
Former agents are aheadv
barred from access to weapons, he
said. Reports last month by the
official ADN news agency said
the force had been disbanded.
Modrow said in an interview
Sunday with Austrian television
that a security force is needed to
prevent the spread of right-wing
extremism in East Germany
Bunny's Grill
Open 7 Days A Week
Mon - Sat 11am - 2am
Sun 5pm - Midnight
Lunch Specials
M - Chicken & Cheese on Pita ($3.50)
T - Turkey Sub ($3.50)
W - Fajita - Chicken or Beet ($4.25)
Th - 6" Steak & Cheese ($3.50)
F - 6" Chicken Cheese Sub ($3.50)
60oz Pitchers $1.99
Student Special Monday Night
6pm - 9pm all Sandwiches 99c
FREE Delivery (mm. order $5i�)
No Delivery on Specials
Located Next to Stop Shop
Downtown Greenville 830-5126
Authorities arrest cult leader
close to the Mexican border
By David Sedeno
1 he Associated Press
lllvl
1
tcac
lesu
n .il�t I W A cull leader
gs ol an c hio family ot five was
i m border by authorities who
survivalist gear were found in his
�1 room and a storage locker.
effrcv 1 urtdgfen, 39, a former Sunday-school
I tour guide in the Reorganized Church of
� ' i .liter Day Saints in Ohio, was ar-
uts de the motel Sunday by federal agents
heriffs.
underen's 8-ye
com
ar-old wife. Alice, and the
yearn ld st m. Damon, also were arrested
therl undgren children - Kristen, 10,
Caleb. 9,ai n, 15 were taken into protective
i ustody said ndrewV'ita.thespocialagentincharge
� tl reau ol Wcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
office in 1 os ngeles.
relieve a lot of apprehension Kirt-
c officer Ronald K Andolsek said
� II the Lundgrens' arrests. In recent
days, Kirtland police had been keeping close watch
of the homes of residents who were once threatened
by Lundgren.
fhe Lundgrens were scheduled to appear Monday
in a state court for extradition proceedings to Ohio,
where they face charges including aggravated mur-
der and kidnapping.
Lundgren broke away from the Reorganized
Church and persuaded other members to follow
him, officials said. The gToup once lived on a 15-acre
farm near the Cleveland-area town, where investiga-
tors last week unearthed five bodies. Authorities
believe the five are Dennis Avery, his wife, Cheryl,
and their three young daughters.
Investigators believe the Averys were killed in
mid-April and buried in a common grave under the
barn. Searches of the Southern California motel room
and a nearby storage area rented by Jeffrey Lund-
gren uncovered numerous weapons, including an
AR-15 assault rifle, as well as ammunition, knives
and gas masks, Vita said.
"They had camping gear, web gear that the
military would wear � things that can sustain you
up in the mountains he said.
The East
11
7
' � � y

? � s 0
'
- -
Welcome Back! Check Out
Second Semester Skiing!
DRDON'S
Greenville Blvd. 756-1003
Outdoor Recreation Opportunities � Intramural-Recreational Services
Spring 1990 Workshop Information

a
Outdoor Smorgasbord: A special event fea-
turing outdoor cooking techniques and tood sam-
pling, video presentations and trip package give-
aways1 Wednesday, January 24 at 7pm in 113
Memorial Gymnasium. Free of Charge
Outdoor Photography. Learn how to get
?hat perfect outdoor photo! Wed Feb. 7 in 113
Memorial Gymnasium. $2 Students, $3 Faculty-
staff-guest
Canoeing I: Basic instruction on types, care,
equipment, safety and canoe strokes. Thurs
Feb. 15 at 7:30pm In the Memorial Gym Pool $2
Students, $3Faculty-statf-ouest.
Kayaking I: Basic instruction covering equip-
ment safety, wet exit & Eskimo roll Thurs Feb.
22 at 7:30pm in the Memorial Gym pool. $2
Students. $3Facutty-staft-guest
Outdoor Gourmet: Experiment with open
fire, trail and dutch oven cooking. Acquire a taste
for this unique activity1 Wed , March 14 at 5pm at
picnic area adjacent to Memorial Gym $3Stu-
dents. $4Facutty-staff-guest
CanoeKayak II: Take a trip on the Tar and
learn river navigation, water exit, safety and
strokes Meet at Memorial Gym at 8 30am. $3
Students, $4Faculty-staff-guest
Backpacking: Introduce yourself to wilder-
ness manners, types ot boots, packs, costs and
meal planning Tues. March 20 at 5pm in BD101
$2Students, $3Faculty-staff-guest
Bicycle Touring: Begin instruction in week-
end and long distance touring, basic repairs and
more Wed , March 28 at 7pm in D101 Brewster.
$2Students.$3Faculty-statf-guest.
Windsurfing I: Beginning instruction includes:
rigging, terminology, equipment and practice.
Thurs , April 5 and Tues , April 10 at 7:30pm in
Memorial Gym Pool $2Students, $3FacuRy-
staff guest
Your Passport to Adventure
Registration for all trips and workshops begin Wednesday, January 10 at 3:00pm In 113 Memorial Gymnasium.
Registration will be held through the pre-trtp meeting date for each trip and through the day of each workshop. A
minimum deposit of $10 Is required for all trips unless otherwise noted.
Outdoor Adventure Trip Schedule
Ski Wintergreen, Va. Two days of prime downhill skiing highlight this winter adventure in the Blue Ridge
Mountains. Wintergreen otters a challenge to the expert and novice skier with elevation of 4,450 feet and
over a thousand foot drop. Cost includes transportation, lodging, lift tickets and Apres ski party. $20day ski
rental and food are additional. Trip takes place February 3-4. Enrollment limit of 14 participants. Pre-trip
meeting will be held Wed Jan. 31 at 5pm in BD101. $99Students, $110Faculty-staff-guest.
Spring Break Beach Extravaganza Find yourself in sunny Key Largo and Key West, Florida March
3-10. You'll enjoy some of the Southeast's finest beach and nautical locations including camping at John
Pennekamp Coral Reef, snorkeling, sailing and windsurfing. Don't miss the famous Key West sunsets!
Costs include transportation, equipment, most food, lodging and special activity fees. $275Students,
$300Faculty-staff-guest.($100 deposit required.) Attend the pre-trip meeting Wed March 21 at 5pm in
BD101.
Canoeing Spend two days of canoeing down 16 miles of the Cape Fear River and enjoy diverse plant
and animal life as well as a few class II rapids.Evenings will be spend around the campfire at the Raven
Rock State Park, March 23-25. Cost includes equipment, food and transportation. $20Students, $25
Faculty-staff-guest. A pre-trip meeting will be held Wed March 21 at 5pm in BD101.
Backpacking Tip-toe through the Rip Rap Trail in Shenandoah National Park, Va. March 30-April 1. The
two days of moderate hiking feature spring blooms, water falls and excellent scenic views. Cost includes
equipment, food and transportation. $20Students, $25Faculty-staff-guest. A pre-trip meeting will be held
Wed March 28 at 5pm in BD101.
White Water Rafting A weekend in Hot Springs, NC is a wonderful way to open the month of April
rafting down the French Broad River. One day will be spent hiking through the Pisgah National Forest. You
can be rockin' and rollin' at a cost of $55Students, $65Faculty-staff-guest. Cost includes transportation,
equipment, food and special activity fees. A pre-trip meeting well be held Tues April 3 at 5pm in BD101.
Bicycling Tour the county roads on a loop trail from Greenville to Grimesland park and then return to
Greenville for an exhilarating 25 miles. Cost includes food and sag wagon. Trip takes place April 7 at a cost
of $7Students, $10Faculty-staff-guest. A pre-trip meeting will be held Wed April 4 at 5pm in BD101
Beach Camping Enjoy the 892 acre Hammocks Beach State Park. You'll have ample time for hiking,
fishing swimming, sun bathing, and interpretive study. Cost includes equipment, food and transportation.
This beach bonanza takes place April 21-22. Costs are $20Students, $25Faculty-staff-guest. A pre-tnp
meeting will be held Wed April 18 at 5pm in BD101.
For additional information regarding all outdoor recreation programs, visit the Outdoor Recreation Center in 113 Memorial Gymnasium
Monday & Friday from 11:30am-1:30pm or 3:00pm-6:00pm and Tuesday-Thursday 3:00pm-6:00pm. Call 757 -6387 or 757-6911





?
10 The I .ist Carolinian, January 9, i�wn
Greensboro's smoking ban
provokes angry smokers
By Paul Nowell
Associated Press s ritci
GREENSBOW X W ind
Barton lit up hei so� ind. igii
ot the luin h hour and .no rod r
the 'Non Smoking Seel
just across the r mal '
dov ntovN n ciroonsl i
rant
1 think it sstupid It � i joko
lu' said about the ctt now
smoking regulation il� to
est in the nation s No ; ti
st.itr It w.i passed
hypocritu al
shoes who are no better I
body else
I lei co-workei i
agreed
" rhe go ernntcnt ii .u k-
down on little bitt) things thai
don't amount to a i �l b
said NN. tkin m '
smokes five cigai
lunch It jusl irk mi
rwotablesaw i h e�pP "�'
stein wasenjo ingaci ��.��.� iii
his coffee and newspapti ' nttki
his fellow diners th ttori
didn't seem to boi
I think it s i � �� m I �ik
thing Ik il
Uvlk out
rhe smokine, : i � .vi �t into
effect on New 1'eai Kv in tht
iit ot nearh .v"
Judges
trials of i nmin il
orsand presideo i
non jury trials �l
ing Ic-s than 1
domestic cases also at
to Distrii t c ourl i ifti � �
as ,i 'people s court
the nature ol fhe
there.
Hut such casescai
ing nd legally diffu ull
Court judges cnusl v r al
i ated in the lnirt ol North C arc
lin�a tobaci o country
I v spiii- vocal opposition from
t hi' tobacco industry, the contro
ci sial measure passed by a slun
l73-ote margin out ol nearly
' AX) cast in a November refer
dum
In subseout nt months, meet
" � were held between (ity offi
ialsandbusinessownersso there
wore Hi' surprises Many restau
rantsand iit.nl stores already were
1 .�, w ith the restrictions,
id cit :kosman lack lard-
Mot i i them w ere glad they
didn t have to alienate their i us
wr were he said
hile i ircensboro doesn't
rank up there with tobacco towns
like Winston Salem or Durham, it
th homeol I orillard Inc whic h
. iwport. Kent and True
ic irettes and employs 2, MH)
pie.
North Carolina produces
labout two thirds ol the nation's
flui n 11 ba co v tin h is used
ettes With 14,000
� tai mcrs, the 1 ar I leel
' ; I . lluod It
i i t!i v itilin,i S
turers prod in e
, � if all domestu
ran h
It this was Indiana oi some
other state where tobacco isn't
grown there would be farless t iti
i ism (lardner said
I he ordinani e bans smirking
in elevators grocery and depart
monl stores and requires n itau
rants seating f0 or more I" � t
aside al least 25 percent foi non
smokers. Alter a one yeai grace
period, customers w ho ignore the
warnings can be lined $2 ' I he
grace period dor .n't apply to busi
nesses, who can bi fined immedi
atoly for failing to i ost the no
smokine, signs or asking i us
tomer to extinguish a lit (igarette.
According to a brochure
mailed out last month to atlei ted
businesses, it will be up to the
owner ot the business to enforce
the law
"That person will ask the ol
tender to comply the brochure
says It the offender docs not
comply the person in charge ma
ask the person to leave. It the per
son does not leave when asked to
do so the person in charge mam
call the appropriate publi offi ial
to issue a civil citation or ill the
police to charge thi pet i ith
trespassing
Tie enforcement i �� isi�n
are con fu sine to some business
Continued from page 5
ft
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Open
Monday - Saturday 10 - 9
I Sunday 1 - 6
I
Our Everyday Low Price
(Except, Aigncr, Nike, and Reebok)
tribution in which
lei! eciuall) and referee emo
fights o or c hild supj oi:
ilc i .i -os once were
died so mtetmally that court
il ed thi m hearing
S ju � niles hae law-
ors and tht ir i i . require full
attention to due proi ess
VII ol these pressures have
been big topics .it meetings ol the
I district C ourt judge
tor years. Restructuring ol the
courts mas be among the firsl is
sues taken up by a judicial confer
ence proposed by i hiel lustice
lames Exum Ir
Thent i onfi rent to in luch
all the states judges would be
long, would make recommenda
tions on policies relating to the
judiciary.
tt&S CONDENSED
VACATION GUIDE
- �
J
JUST ADD WATER
BAHAMAS CRUISE
3 4 days from '455
CARIBBEAN CRUISE
7 davs from ' 1(195
New York
2 nts. from
GET THINGS STIRRING
$259
Ski Colorado
5 nts ti
Atlantic City
2 nts. from
$
279
$589
HEAT UNTIE WARM
trorn
Key West
3 nts from
Orlando
3 nts from
$459
$289
Daytona Beach
3 nts. from .
Kree Port, Bahamas
3 nts from
-389
$331
COME ANO GET IT
ITG lias these and many more winter vacations for you All rates above
from Greenville and'or Kinston and'or Raleigh Advance bookings and i
details All rates pr person based on two sharing
355-5075
The Plaza
Greenville
,fjr
� '
r- r
eenville I Athletic Club
lyBTTmrudi TjT4Tr-niiriiiJtrnTi
TUJ
140 OAKMONT DRIVE � GREENVILLE, N.C. � TEL. 919756-9175
The Ultimate Athletic Club
?Steam & Sauna
?Hot Tubs
?Juice Bar
?Tanning Studio
?Cardiovascular Center
Racquetball
Nautilus
?Gymnasium
?Indoor Track
SPECIAL
STUDENT
RATES
&�
�?
�j
i�KJ&
�-
Call or visit us today!
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�CORPORATE
�INDIVIDUAL
�STUDENT
�GUEST RATES
�FAMILY
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?Swimming Pool
?Pro Shop
?Free Weights
?Aerobics Excercise
Nursery
per
semester
M
Open 7 Days A Week
Mon.Fri. 6 am- 10 pm
Sat & Sun. 8 am - 9 pm
vSJiL,







10 The East Carolinian, January 9,1990
Greensboro's smoking ban
provokes angry smokers
By Paul Nowell
Associated Press Writer
GREENSBORO (AP) Cind
Barton lit vip her second cigarette
of the lunch hour and sneered at
the "Non-Smoking Se tion" sign
just across the room at Donnic S l
downtown Greensboro restau-
rant
"1 think it'sstupid. It sa joke
she said about the city s now
smoking regulations, the tough
est in the nation's No I tobacc
state. "It was passed b) a I �l oi
hypocritical goody-good) two
shoes who are no better than am
body else
Her co-worker. Sheila Ktkins,
agreed.
"The government cracks
clown on little bittv things that
don't amount to a hill of pearls
said Ms. Atkins, who said she
smokes five cigarettes during
lunch. "It just irks me
Twotablesawav. Tosop'rYHorn
stein was en joying a dJrfWwJth
his coffee and newspaper ' Jrtfrke
his fellow diners the restrit tkms
didn't seem to bothct him
"1 think it's a gii� and take
thing, he said I think it will
work out.
The smoking rules went into
effect on New Year's Da in this
city of nearly 200,000 people lo
cated in the heart of North Caro-
lina tobacco country.
Despite vocal opposition from
the tobacco industry, the contro-
versial measure passed by a slim
173-vote margin out of nearly
W),000 cast in a November refer
endum.
In subsequent months, meet-
ings were held between city offi-
i ialsand business owners so there
were no surprises. Many restau-
rantsand retail stores already were
complying with the restrictions,
said city spokesman lack Gard-
ner.
"A lot of them were glad they
didn't have to alienate their cus-
tomers we were he said.
While Greensboro doesn't
rank up there with tobacco towns
like Winston-Salem or Durham, it
isthehomeofLorillard Inc which
makes Newport, Kent and True
cigarettes and employs 2,3(H)
people.
North Carolina produces
(about two-thirds of the nation's
flue-cured tobacco, which is used
to make cigarettes. With 14,000
tobacco farmers, the Tar Heel
state's annual imp is valued at
sn! million. North Carolina's
cigarette manufacturers produce
about 36 percent ot all domestic
brands.
Judges
"If this was Indiana or some
other state where tobacco isn't
grown there would be fartess criti-
cism Gardner said
The ordinance bans smoking
in elevators, grocery and depart-
ment stores and requires restau
rants seating 50 or more to set
aside at least 25 pen ont tor non-
smokers. After a one year grace
period, customers who ignore the
warnings can be fined $2. The
grace period doesn't apply to busi
nesses, who can be fined immedi
ately tor failing to post the no
smoking signs or asking a cus-
tomer to extinguish a lit cigarette.
According to a brochure
mailed out last month to affected
businesses, it will be up to the
owner ot the business to enforce
the law.
"That person will ask the of-
fender to comply the brochure
says. "If the offender does not
comply the person in charge may
ask the person to leave. If the per-
son does not leave when asked to
do so the person in charge many
call the appropriate public official
to issue a civil citation, or call the
police to charge the person with
trespassing. '
The enforcement provisions
are confusing to some business
Continued from page 5
trials of criminal misdemean-
ors and preside over bi tl rj
non-jury trials of civil suit im ol
ing less mart $10,000. juvenile and
domestic cases also arc assigned
to District Court, often described
as a "people s court because ot
the nature ot the cases that go
there.
Bat such cases can It v n nch-
mg and legally difficult. District
Court )udges must wroMle. with
equitable distribution in which
a divorcing couple's property is
divided equally and referee emo-
tional tights over child support
and custody.
uvenile cases once were
handled so informally that court
officials called them "hearing-
cttes Now juveniles have law-
yers, and their cases require full
attention lo due process.
AU of these pressures have
been big topics at meetings of the
District Court judges association
for years. Restructuring of the
courts may be among the first is
sues taken up by a judicial confer-
ence proposed by Chief fustice
lames Exum r.
The new conference, to which
all the state's judges would be-
long, would make recommenda-
tions on policies relating to the
judiciary.
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
I Open
Monday - Saturday 10 - 9
I Sunday 1 - 6
n
to OFF I
I Sunday 1-6 Our Everyday Low Price
I (Except, Aigner, Nike, and Reebok)
I�' i
I
I
I
I
I
ITGfS CONDENSED
VACATION GUIDE
New York
2 nts. from
JUST ADD WATER
BAHAMAS CRUISE CARIBBEAN CRUISE
3-4 days from �455 7 days from '1095
GET THINGS STIRRING
$279
$
259
Atlantic City
2 nts. from
$589
HEAT UNTIL WARM
Ski Colorado
5 nts. from
Key West
3 nts. from
Orlando
3 nts. from
$459
$289
COME AND GET IT
Daytona Beach
3 nts. from
Free Port, Bahamas
3 nts. from
$389
$331
.�;�, (nr ,� ra(es ahove iude airfares, room & m I
ings and other restrictions apply tali for
The Piaza
Greenville
r i
eenville
tl
r
m
i v.
LI
GTlJ
140 OAKMONT DRIVE � GREEN, -3756-9175
The Ultimate Athletic Club
Steam & Sauna
?Hot Tubs
?Juice Bar
Tanning Studio
Cardiovascular Center
�Racquetball
�Nautilus
�Gymnasium
�Indoor Track
SPECIAL
STUDENT
RATES
Call or visit us today!
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giic iSaat QIarultntan
Pave II
Features
Gadgets
influence
markets
of the '80s
H Michelle Walker
st.ttt V ritor
. .
�nd
I
ndlessa
. �

I -Mir-
i I i

PEOPI I
ick?
priot

�� � , .
itivefema
made t fa
� e in pub
Srr I V &4e e.M't' 1 i
Lexicon
Mushrooming
ittd in
I I ipatiate ' to leai nut;
H be r.� iinnn l �(' I '
1 Pontificate join h pun
i develoj I) speak an
k i memoi ies B
, i history I' i11
i Abstinence reluctance
H indifference had
attitude; i self denial
. i �b rinth tunnel; B
bridge t road; 11 mae
f. onstam redundant;
it lnde� ision agreeable;
D faithfulness
� Portend make belies ��
h hollow opening; i pledge
.in- v. ord; P indu ate
-itt rehand
s ritivate to flirt; I.
laugh; clean; D drew up
9. Titillate A spruce up; B
shiver; C tease D. oxi it�
pleasantly
10 Abrogate A. to abolish;
B to judge to enter; D
cross examine
Compiled by MaH Richtei
rno band wtWbe moving to Calil �rnia
a mu weei on the west coast
� �� the Attic on Friday
Band plays farewell show
fipper (lor roc ks the Attic again
Bj I H)iin,i gloski
II
� � . :� . I plays with a lot of
in plavers .ant match without

nd not I � i � ' nger Kinlaw on drums. Heproba-
tartixi 'Id walk Sure,hehashis
own style, but u'� pri i last, rhythmic thrash beats that
it � �'� it
ti, � i, � ktckin � ms, ripper Gor got the crowd
I , ian ve. Many even dared to jump on stage
thrasl . picaltl ' th, ba d lefinit. ourages the performances of tfie
p returned to the crowd by doing stage dives and flip. It s
: � an fun with their
� I I ippei i � � �
i
get tl tarted . i r t are Andy Bodi
.ittli guitar ol i '�'� esl rhvt
n pla ing musu at it-
� � ir ear.n ll
i �
I atet on in I
I Mi't.i

I

i
tarewell how may have to
i he ill be moving to
: ipul ited I os Angeles
:
t s vocais �
les is San 1 rancisco, �.wd de-
- - the homeboys
theit by the Bay.
hv r iwd that I ipper (lor will be
� rthCa ilina out West And. of course

� the best o( luck!
January 9, 1990
Cool
marches
on
A decade of
fashion:
By Jill Conti
SUM Writer
urKi k
i u ma ns
I . rtv
: shirts,
-S. deck
When we look at our parents'
old photographs, weal way s laugh
and say "You wore that? Ha! Ha
Bat, jost take a look at some oi
your own old s hod pictures and
see what von wore in the past 10
years
If vou thought bell-bottomed
jeans and big collars wentout with
the '70s. think again Believe it or
not. the early '80s saw is in much
the same shape as the late 7 te
did.
But, we did not sufferin those
groovy threads tor long lothes
became tailored neater Sud-
.��� have
KTOSSy

� n. a breed i I
� ' pre
; �-� : ���-����
monogrammed sweat i
shoes, and called itself Biff or
Muttv it became important to the
preppy creature to look like ev-
eryone else And evi ryone did
The day shoulder pad- burst
onto the scene r uldered
people everywhere st d up and
cheered- The bigger nd broader
your shoulders, the better. Some
found this look flattering: others
felt like a caricature of Arnold
bchwarzennager
It became a real treat to watch
some girl with size nine thighs
shoved in a size five mini-skirt rr
to climb a set of stairs gracefully
The short-trends or "bee-
boppingfashion ' were around for
a quick time but left a lasting
impression. Who can forget those
wonderful: luorescent green pink,
and orange materials that were
used to make everything from t-
shirts to mittens?
And how many young
women today will admit to, at one
time, owning a piece oi clothing
that made vou a Madonna wan-
nabe
The end oi the '80s saw influ-
ence from our past returning to
haunt us, bet we did not seem to
care. Tie-dyed shirts, longer skirts
and vests once again appeared on
the scene, thus time with an '80s
tlair to them
Expressing indi iduality
through clothing became impor-
tant. IheonK complicated factor
is that everyone did it the same
w,n
i hroughout the 80s, labels
were important. From Gloria
Vanderbilt to cola companies.
What names can we look forward
to in our clothing in th '90s? An
example Pee Wee Herman.
Enough said God help us.
Time shapes the lives of our generation
By ohn I uckci
.sf.t.ini 11 .lititfs I liitoi
s thede ide a me to a do ��
I i. Mind m sell reflei to on the
I is is and the igml ml enl �
m lifedui ing this period I omost
urrentl) attending E ' the
80s have easily h ei th n
infiui nti.il period ol ir livi
I Hiring the H0 out growth
as human beings rea hod i phy i
cal and mental zenith 1 he ev nts
t these impressionable e irs
.�� i.i IK propelled us into a world
At- are continually forced to face
ind ai i ept In the future, V hat we
experienced will have a major
etttt t tn the continuing develop
men! of our generation as a viable
force in the world ol the 1990s
In the early years ol the de
ade we encountered the impoi
tant transition from childhood to
pre Uvns and teens No longer were
we allowed to eniov the simple
t a hi ��� ithoul orry
r parent ire w
irned foi (he first turn
, � i: � . �! I. � , � P Ollltv
and how omplic ited it i ould
ii In es
v, i n din in the w orst
Iii! .1 On e loonage years,came
the appe.tr.tiv e ol body hair in
iinlamih.n places a phenomena
we were l itei told was called
puberty Kl hrst this majoi life
, hange '�� a � aiuithei stu k throw n
into th fiery tin moil ol our lues
during teenagegrov th Buteven-
tuallv, this phenonn na lead us to
an een more impoitanl discov
ery of human nature sexuality
s the endless problemscon-
nev ted w ith the tide of puberty
ebbed away, events in our lues
became easier to handle .nd eas
lit to understand 1 he ovcrbur
dening early teens ga e way to the
evcitmg late teens
Wo moved from the lows of
the i Id blues and b ing
� � . � .
t, . to the big leaguese
thougl i' ind lifi i ;1 � iool.
"In the not decade
we'll be the ones
making things
happen. The !cl)0s
.iro ours, and wo
own them
During this alteration ot teen-
age life we discovered that living
could actually bepleasurable We
had our lust important relation-
ships outside of the family, and
we realized the importance of
friends Most of us fell in love tor
the titst tune and for many, with
love, came our first sexual encoun-
ter.
s we grew, we gradually
accepted out roles in American
culture, defining our interests and
developinga omfortaWe niche in
i iidav social structure. Foot-
ball, hot dogs, apple pie and, espe-
cially, Chevrolet played important
roles in our lives as we began to
enjoy luxuries of the adult world,
such as the freedom that came
with a driver s liscence.
Not to say things were all
peaches and cream. Many of us
had our tirst brush with one of
life's most somber events. We
understood death, as a relative
pa ssed a wa v or the beau ty of you th
was nipped in the bud as someone
close died in an accident.
Then we were seniors in high
school. We were registering to
vine, going to the prom, register-
ing for the draft, and making the
big decision on what course our
life would take when the big day
finally came, and we graduated.
For all oi us here at ECU, our
choice was to attend college and
further our education Today, we
are still learning and growing,
existing on the edge of the true
adult world.
A dose friend summarized the
past and the importance our lives
will have in the 1990s. He simply
stated. 'The eighties are over. In
the next decade we'll be the ones
making things happen. The 1990s
are ours, and we own them
In all. our lives continually
changed in the 1980s, as we grew
in the most important era in our
lives. As citizens of the most
powerful nation on earth, the
nineties bring to us the possible
beginning of a bright future. A
futurethatisourstomakeorbreak,
bend or shape, in a fashion we
deem reasonable. Hopefully, we
will have the strength to grasp it,
and make the best of the limited
time we have.





She iEagt (garolmtan
Page 11
Features
January 9,1990
Gadgets
influence
markets
of the '80s
By Michelle Walker
Staff Writer
People, gadgets, games and
crazes. Multitudes o tads
bloomed, nourished and fizzled
during the '80s.
Remember the people we
dressed like, laughed at, envied
and adored? And all those inno-
vations that made our lives easier
bv enhancing our social hours?
What about all the fashions we
just had tohaveand couldn't wait
to slip our bodies into?
Spend rig endless amounts of
money on things to keep us enter-
tained, we indulged and bought
every gameand gadget we could
get our hards on. Finding our
attention spins to be quite short,
we ended up stuffing our closets
and attics witi all those crazes tor
which we had so eagerly emptied
our pockets.
We became cellulite and cho
lesterol conscbus, and decided it
was time to whip ourselves into
shape, lane Fcnda and Richard
Simmons, becowingquite wealthy
in the process, were among the
first to lead us inour battle against
the bulge. We jogged, walked,
aerobicized, pumped, tanned,
sweated and fretted ourselves to
death. However,even though we
had our new, sew, thin bronzed
bodies, AIDS decided that we
needed to be medest with them
and that casual tea. wasn't cool,
condoms were familous.
Along with our healthy frames
of mind, we also grew aware of
sivial needs and pulled together
to help starving children and des-
titute farmers Remtmber
PEOPLE
�Michael Iack�on. with his
white glove and dazhng perform-
ances, had a pnvafc life that was
a mystery to us. Sc we imagined,
pried, and fabricated until he
wrote the autobiographic Moon
walker, which filled to reveal
anything wedidn t already know.
�Madonna, tHe most popular
and provocative female singer of
the '80s, made t fashionable to
wear lingerie in public.
See Decade, page 14
Lexicon
Mushrooming
Answers printed in
Thursday's paper
1. Expatiate: A. to clear out;
B. be generous; C. ignore; D.
discoursee
2. Pontificate: A. join; B. punj
ish; C. develop; D. speak au-
thoritatively
3. Repast: A. memories; B.
peace; C. history; D. meal
4. Abstinence: A. reluctance;
B. indifference; C. had
attitude; D. self denial
5. Labyrinth: A. tunnel; B.
bridge; C. road; D. maze
6. Constancy: A. redundent;
B. indecision; C. agreeable;
D. faithfulness
7. Portend: A. make believe
B. hollow opening; C. pledge
one's word; D. indicate
beforehand
8. Titivate: A. to flirt; B.
laugh; C. clean; D. dress up
9. Titillate: A. spruce up; B.
shiver; C. tease; D. excite
pleasantly
10. Abrogate: A. to abolish;
B. to judge; C. to enter; D.
cross�exam ine
�Compiled by Matt Richter
Tipper Gor band members John Kinlaw, Andy Bedrosian Stacey Little and John West played their tarewell show at the Attic on Friday.
The band wiH be moving to California, as they try to further a musical career on the west coast
Band plays farewell show
Tipper Gor rocks the Attic again
By Deanna Nevgloski
Staff Writer
On Friday night, Tipper Cor, the notorious "homeboys from
hell played their farewell show at the Attic.
To get things started. Tipper Gor tags are Andy Bedrosian on
vocals and bass, Stacey Little on lead guitar, John West on rhvthm
guitar and vocals and John Kinlaw on drums.
Tipper Gor is a band of metalists who play no-nonsense and
poseur-free thrash. Yeah, they are a typical thrash band that takes
pleasure in playing music at its loudest, fastest and heaviest forms,
but they are one of the tew and fiercest thrash bands to invade
Eastern North Carolina.
Together for a year and toe months, 1 ipperGor put on a rousing
two-hour set that had the rowdy Attic crowd entertained all night.
Hie Greenville bashers kk ked the night ott at 11 p in and rocked
the night away with some killer original tunes like Letter !o
James a song to lames iettiek! t Metallica. and their new effort
"Bugs In A Jar which is about the recent breakdown of the Berlin
Wall.
Later on in the showcase, rhvthm six-stringer. West, belted (nit
the raw sounds of Metallica's "Seek and Destroy West's vocals
were tough and raw, yet not scratchy like most thrash vocalists.
Little's lead guitar playing is cut and dry; he plays with a lot of
speed and brilliance that most young players can't match without
extensive practice.
And not to leave out mosh-monger Kinlaw on drums. He proba-
bly started playing the dm ms before he could walk. Sure, he has his
own style, but it's probably the very fast, rhythmic thrash beats that
lead me to believe that.
After a few kickin' slam anthems, Tipper Gor got the crowd
headbangin' harder than ever. Many even dared to jump on stage
with the band who definitely encourages the performances of the
pit. Tney returned to the crowd by doing stage dives and flip. If s
easy to see that ripper Gor enjoys good, clean fun with their
audiences.
Tipper Gor fans who didn't catch the farewell show may have to
wait two or three years to see Upper Gor. They will be moving to
California this month to take on the over-populated Los Angeles
music scene
However, just north of I s Angeles is San Francisco, and de-
pending on how the scene in Los Angeles looks, "the homeboys
from hell" may take their show to the City by the Bay.
Bedrosian said to the hvper crowd that Tipper Gor will be
representing .room ilk North Carolina out West. And, of course,
we would all like to wish Tipper Gor the best of luck!
Cool
marches
on
A decade of
fashion:
By Jill Conti
Staff Writer
When we look at our parents'
old photographs, we always laugh
and say "You wore that? Ha! Ha
But, just take a look at some of
your own old school pictures and
see what you wore in the past 10
years.
If you thought bell-bottomed
jeans and big collars wen t ou t wi th
the '70s, think again. Believe it or
not, the early '80s saw is in much
the same shape as the late '70s
did.
But, we did not suffer in those
groovy threads for long. Clothes
became tailored�neater. Sud-
denly, it became important to have
a designer's name across your back
pockets.
A new breed of humans
evolved known as the preppy. The
preppy wore pink and green shirts,
monogrammed sweaters, deck
shoes, and called itself Biff or
Muffy. It became important to the
preppy creature to look like ev-
eryone else. And everyone did.
The day shoulder pads burst
onto the scene, round-shouldered
people everywhere stood up and
cheered. The bigger and broader
your shoulders, the better. Some
found this look flattering; others
felt like a caricature of Arnold
Schwarzennager.
It became a real treat to watch
some girl with size nine thighs
shoved in a size five mini-skirt try
to climb a set of stairs gracefully.
The short-trends or "bee-
bopping fashion" were around for
a quick time but left a lasting
impression. Who can forget those
wonderful fluorescent green pink,
and orange materials that were
used to make everything from t-
shirts to mittens?
And how many young
women today will admit to, at one
time, owning a piece of clothing
that made you a "Madonna wan-
nabe
The end of the '80s saw influ-
ence from our past returning to
haunt us, bet we did not seem to
care. Tie-dyed shirts, longer skirts
and vests once again appeared on
the scene, this time with an '80s
flair to them.
Expressing individuality
through clothing became impor-
tant. The only complicated factor
is that everyone did it the same
way.
Throughout the '80s, labels
were important. From Gloria
Vanderbilt to cola companies.
What names can we look forward
to in our clothing in th '90s? An
example�Pee Wee Herman.
Enough said. God help us.
1
By John Tucker
Assistant Features Editor
As the decade ca me to a close,
I found myself reflecting on the
1980s and the significant events of
my life during this period. To most
of uscurrently attending ECU. the
'80s have easily been the most
influential period of our lives.
During the '80s, our growth
as human beings reached a physi-
cal and mental zenith. The events
of these impressionable years
socially propelled us into a world
we are continually forced to face
and accept. In the future, what we
experienced will have a major
effect on the continuing develop-
ment of our generation as a viable
force in the world of the 1990's.
In the early years of the dec-
ade, we encountered the impor-
tant transition from childhood to
preteensand teens. No longer were
we allowed to enjoy the simple
freedom of a life without worry
under our parents care. As we
grew, we learned for the first time
the importance of responsibility
and how complicated it could
make our lives.
And then, during the worst
part of these teenage years, came
the appearance of body hair in
unfamiliar places, a phenomena
we were later told was called
puberty. At first, this major life
change was another stick thrown
into the fiery turmoil of our lives
during teenage growth. But even-
tually, this phenomena lead us to
an even more important discov-
ery of human nature � sexuality.
As the endless problems con-
nected with the tide of puberty
ebbed away, events in our lives
became easier to handle and eas-
ier to understand. The overbur-
dening early teens gave way to the
exciting late teens.
We moved from the lows of
the middle school blues and being
pimply unwanted (we felt) young
teens, to the big leagues (we
thought), and life in high school.
'In the next decade
we'll be the ones
making things
happen. The 1990s
are ours, and we
own them
During this alteration of teen-
age life we discovered that living
could actually be pleasurable. We
had our first important relation-
ships outside of the family, and
we realized the importance of
friends. Most of us fell in love for
the first time, and for many, with
love, came our first sexual encoun-
ter.
As we grew, we gradually
accepted our roles in American
culture, defining our interests and
developing a comfortable niche in
everday social structure. Foot-
ball, hot dogs, apple pie and, espe-
cially, Chevrolet played important
roles in our lives as we began to
enjoy luxuries of the adult world,
such as the freedom that came
with a driver's liscence.
Not to say things were all
peaches and cream. Many of us
had our first brush with one of
life's most somber events. We
understood death, as a relative
passed a way or thebeauty of youth
wasnipped in the bud as someone
close died in an accident
Then we were seniors in high
school. We were registering to
vote, going to the prom, register-
ing for the draft, and making the
big decision on what course our
life would take when the big day
finally came, and we graduated.
For all of us here at ECU, our
choice was to attend college and
further our education. Today, we
are still learning and growing,
existing on the edge of the true
adult world.
A close friend summarized the
past and the importance our lives
will have in the 1990s. He simply
stated, The eighties are over. In
the next decade we'll be the ones
making things happen. The 1990s
are ours, and we own them
In all, our lives continually
changed in the 1980s, as we grew
in the most important era in our
lives. As citizens of the most
powerful nation on earth, the
nineties bring to us the possible
beginning of a bright future. A
future that isours to makeorbreak,
bend or shape, in a fashion we
deem reasonable. Hopefully, we
will have the strength to grasp it,
and make the best of the limited
time we have.





r
j.
12 The East Carolinian, January 9,1990
Music creates more than atmosphere
By David W. Trevino
Staff Writer
Nothing, absolutely nothing,
conies dose to recreating the magic
of live music.
Discussions about the alleged
superiority of digital technology
or questions about the varying
levels of harmonic distortion be-
t ween different electronic compo-
nents become ridiculously irrelc-
v ant. In comparison to the experi-
ence of seeing people , just like
you and vet vvondrouslv differ-
ent, who can vibrate the air you
breathe into, it becomes something
bewitchingry divine.
The space age technology of
the most complex, sophisticated,
expensive, quadriphonic system regularly offers opportunities to
seeks only to reproduce sound. warm humanity at the hearth of
But even the most magnificently jve music. And, unlike the pol-
engineered compact disc does not ished, processed, packaged, pro-
show human intensity burningon
the face of an alto saxophonist
blazing through a hot jazz solo.
The passionate precision ot a
symphony orchestra weaving
together all the themes of Mozart's
"lupiter" until one takes command
and brings the piece to its soaring
finale is invisible on the finest
cassette tapeor the best long-play-
ing record album. The dickering
images broadcast by MTV are
shadows of the energy radiated
by a percussion ensemble as it
ignites "The Barbarian
The ECU School of Music
motcd products which ooze from
the radio in your car, the public
address system at the mall or the
two-inch speaker on your televi-
sion, each live performance is an
individual, unreproduciblc treas-
ure.
A power failure on the night
of Lynn Booth's graduate saxo-
ington, opened that evening's
program with a Mozart concerto
performed on a stage illuminated
by flickering candlelight.
That kind of enchantingexpe-
nence resonates in your heart for-
ever.
The students and faculty of
the School of Music have spent
years practicing to master the in-
tricate incandescence within each
instrument, and each public per-
formance is preceded by hours of
Ski lintergreen zvitfi
Overtoil's
tyo
frfr
phone recital on March 22, 188 exacting private rehearsal. These
left the A Fletcher Music Center talented people labor for some-
shrouded in gloomy darkness, but
in the recital hall, the show went
on.
After a brief delay, Booth and
her accompanist, Alisa Weather-
Professor acts in major movie
CUl LOWHEE�Western
Carolina University theater pro-
fessor Stephen Avers soon will be
acting alongside a couple of the
biggest names in show business�
Ibm Cruise and Robert Duvall.
Avers, assistant profeor of
speech and theater arts at West-
ern, has won a role in the major
motion picture "Days of Thun-
der and will spend the first 12
vecks ot 1990 portraying a mem
vt ot a NASCAR racing team pit
i rew.
In 'Daysof fhunderCruise
will star as an ambitious young
Indianapolis-style race car driver
who breaks into the NASCAR
circuit. Duvall will portray the pit
crew chief,and Randy Quaid will
play the race team owner. Austra
lian aaress Nicole Kidman, in her
American him debut, has the role
ot a doctor who treats Cruise after
an accident and falls in love with
directed extensively in WCU the- short period of time that it you
atrical productions will be work- went for popcorn, you' would have
turn.
Avers, who has acted and
ingprimarily with Duvall in "Days
of Thunder
"This is an enormous oppor-
tunity for the university's theatre
department he said. "During
some of those 12 weeks, we'll be
working side by side for 12 hours
adav,sixdaysa week. We'll either
hate each other or like each other
when were working together in
tho conditions
U ers hopes to persuade pro-
ducers o( Days of Thunder" to
allow WCU theatre arts students
(Mi to the set to watch the movie
being made. "I want them to sen?
that it takes three or four or five
hours to get one shot lasting 10 to
20 seconds. I want them to get to
see the way that acting for the
camera works and to see why
acting for the camera can be such
a pain.
"When I've been in movies in
the past I was on screen for such a
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probably missed me. That's not
the case in this movie
Ayers has appeared in four
othermovies, including small roles
in "NashvilleThe Bermuda
TriangleWest of Hester Street"
and "Destination America He
See Professor, page 13
thing more than the opportunity
to provide background music at
football games; they do it to enrich
the texture of the world in which
we all live.
The gift they offer is available
to all; not just those with fine arts
degrees in music theory or ma-
trons from distinguished Boston
families or the residents of Eight-
eenth Century Vienna. The treas-
uresof Beethoven, Pat Mewthany,
Shostavich, Illinois Jacquet, Bach,
Billy Joel, Mahler and all the other
hues of the musical spectrum are
available to anyone.
All you have to do is attend
one of the many concerts offered
bv the ECU School of Music.
Sign Up Today For Overton's Sports Center's
One Day Snow Ski Trip to Wintergreen, VA.
Trips are scheduled for each Wednesday
through February.
$55.00
Includes Rental
Equipment, Lift Tickets, Round Trip
Transportation, and Continental
Breakfast.
Sign Up Early for Best Availability!
Call 355-7600 for more information
Hours
M - F
.9'
9-7
Sal. 8 - 6
Overtoils v
111 Red Banks Rd.
Greenville,V
The ECU Campus Ministers and The
Inter- Christian Council
invites you to participate in these
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
OPPORTUNITIES
Baptist Student Union
511 E 10th St. (next to Wendy's)
Monday 5:30 (meal & meeting)
Thursday 7:00 worship
Provide an opportunity personal &
community spiritual growth
Contact: Bob Clyde
Baptist Campus Minister 752 - 4646
Kelley Brame, Campus Ministry Intern, 752-4646
Mitch Wright. President. 931-9902
r
Episcopal Campus Ministers
5:30pm Wednesdays.St. Paul
Episcopal Church 401 E. 4th St.
Weekly Eucharist, supper, programdiscus-
sion after supper, retreats, service, projects
Contact:
Mrs. Marty Gartman. Episcopal Campus
Ministeries, 752-3482
Dr. Jim Smith, ECU Deacon & advisor to
group, 757-6936
Sarah Poulos, ECU student, 757-0366
The Navigators
Every Thursday Night 7 - 9prn in
Biology 103
Singing, sharing. Bible Study and leaching
in a family atmosphere
Contact:
Kenny Jenkins 757-60520523
Cheryl Rogers 931-9297
Dave McCreary 355-4941
Campus Crusade for Christ
7:30pm Brewster C - 103
teaching, singing, fun,
refreshments
Contact:
Jeff Brannon 752-9630
Hope Hughes 752-8139
Tommy Dove 757-1273
ECU Christian Fellowship
Every Thursday Night at 6pm in the
Cultural Center
a great time for Prayer, praise, singing, and
teaching the word
Contacts.
Waymonn Burton , Chairperson, 931-7157
John Lemon, Vice Chairperson, 931-8176
Stephanie Pearson, secretary, 931-8566
ftjtes fat
Wesfel Christian
Fellowship
5:00 Wednesday. Methodist
Student Center 501 E. 5th St.
Fellowship meal, worship, programs. Bible studies,
retreats
Contact:
The Rev. Dan Earnhardt,
Methodist Campus Minister. 758-2030
The Rev. Michelle "Mike" Burcher,
Presbyterian Campus Minister, 752-7240
Rhonda Wooten, President. 931-8560
Newman Catholic
Student Center
953 E. 10th St. 757-3760757-1991
Mass: Sunday - 11:30am Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center;8:30pm Newman Center
Religious, social and community - oriented
programs to enrich college life
Contact
Rev. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain 757-1991






I
Social skills open doors for kids
The East Carolinian, January 9,1990 13
DES MOINES, Iowa (AD
She teaches telephone manners to
businessmen and social graces to
college grads. but etiquette expert
Marjebelle Young Stewart says
teaching hard-luck kids at a juve-
nile home where she once lived
gives her the most satisfaction.
"These social skills will take
them places that money or power
won't go she says. "You don't
have to have a good upbringing,
but you have to have the look of
it
Stewart, 52, left the home in
Council Bluffs, now called Chil
dren Square USA, at age 10 and
never looked back until appear-
ances on talk shows to promote
her books or talk about her work
made her realize she needed to
face her past.
1 had all those feelings of
desertion, loneliness she recalls.
At age r, she and three sib-
lings were removed from their
parents' custody and placed in
wha t was then know n as the Chris-
tian Home Association. Their fa-
ther had walked out and their
mother, a songwriter and inven-
tor, couldn't afford to keep the
children, she said.
They were in the juvenile
home for four years. Stewart,
remembering the place as "grim
didn't return until threeyearsago.
"1 was a basket case when I
first went back. 1 remember being
so frustrated and embarrassed
when Donahue or Griffin would
say, 'Oh, I'm sure you must have
had a wonderful upbringing So 1
went back there and confronted
my feelings
She offered to teach a short
course in manners and etiquette,
and school director Andy Ross
accepted. So residents � thereare
about 80 who stay an average of 18
months � learn the fine art of
holding a fork correctly, sending
thank-you notes to the hostess,
tucking in shirts and closing
mouths while chewing.
"Wehave troubled kids Ross
says. "Some are abused, some get
into trouble with the law
By the time they arrive at
Children Square, their expecta-
tions of life are at rock bottom, he
says. "But we have high expecta-
tions, and kids will respond to
that
Now that the etiquette pro-
gram is well underway, Stewart
leaves the teaching to local people,
but she attends the graduations.
"Manners will take you any-
where says Stewart, who now
lives in Kewanee, 111 and has
written numerous books on the
topic, the most recent "Can Mv
Bridesmaids Wear Black?"
"Etiquette is a set of traffic rules,
how to get from one point to an-
other gracefully she says. "And
they love it. We give them a high
that's healthy
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Game cards discourage drug use
2903 Tenth St.
758-2712
Astern
Sizzun
COLUMBIA,S.C(AP) Fans
attending the Clomson-Marvland
basketball game Saturday after-
noon will get more than just a seat
to watch the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference teams battle at Littlejohn
oliseum.
rhcy "vn. 111 also recei e a sol ol
In trading cards featuring color
pictures ot eat h Figer player and
coach on the trout and an anti-
drug message and a short biogra-
ph on the Hip side
'We are ust trying to send a
message tor all our kids lor
everybody to stay drug free
said John Seketa sports promo-
Professor
Continued from page 12
also appeared in numerous TV
commercials. But he says none ol
those previous roles holds a candle
to his part in Pavs of Thunder
Avers originally auditioned
tor the part of the highway patrol-
man, a scene in which he would
hare hadvnk three or four lines.
Bm Pirecwjjuyitt, vho4i
reRed "Top"fkin" an'cl "Poverty
HillsCop was so impressed with
Avers audition that he wanted him
tor the role oi a pit crew member.
As news of Avers' role has
spread across the VY(T campus,
faculty members and students
have asked him, "Aren't you
scared? Afterall,thisisTom Cruise
and Robert Duvall
"I'm not scared, but I'm not
going to go down there and give
Robert Duvall acting lessons, ei-
ther. I'm a good actor, and it will
bea pleasureand an honor to work
with people like that, but I'm not
scared. I am excited
tions director at Clemson. "We
know there is a problem in his
country, and we want to help try
to solve it. We feel this is one way
to help solve it
The cards also are a promo-
tion device.
With classes not resuming
alter Christmas break until next
week. Clemson hopes the cards
and other promotions will help
bring fans to the game, which
begins at 4 p.m.
"1'irst, our students are still
off campus. It's a good drawing
card for us Seketa said. "Second,
we have approximately 200 high
school cheerleaders coming to the
game who will be the cheerlead-
ers for the game.
"Third, because our student
body is not on campus, we did a
mailing to all high schools in a
two-hour radius of Clemson, in-
viting them out Seketa said
during a telephone interview Fri-
day.
The first 2,000 high school
students will be admitted free to
the game, he said.Seketa estimated
some 300 high sch(Hls received
the mailing.
"With these high school stu-
dentscomingin Seketa said, "we
thought it would bea good idea to
hand thecardsout because they're
the ones the message is for
The cards feature head-and
shoulder pictures oi the plavers,
with their name, number, year and
position. On the back, a short bi-
Ography of the player or coach is
included along with "Tips from
the Tigers which feature various
anti-drug messages.
A total of 2,500 sots of the cards
will be given out Saturday.
This is the second year
Clemson has handed out the cards.
The idea started throe years ago
when the ACC's four North Caro-
lina schools handed out similar
cards at games.
Last year, all eight conference
schools � at the request of the
league office � gave out the cards,
Seketa said.
"1 haven't heard of anv other
conference doing this he said.
"But I have heard of individual
schools doing it
Seketa said he received 15 to
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20calls after Clemson gaveout the
cards last year from people who
didn't go to the game but wanted
to get a set of the cards. They
weren't the only ones who wanted
the cards.
"1 �ist year, cill the guys on the
team wanted some ot the cards
Seketa said. "They would ask the
manager or the trainer It's such a
unique idea. It's sort of like having
your own Topps baseball card
Seketa has heard from the
Tigers this year mainly because he
just got the cards late Thursday.
Along with giving the cards
out at the Maryland game,
Clemson will give the cards to its
plavers when they go to local high
schools to talk about staving a wav
from drugs.
This year, Carolina Pride, a
meat company that paid for the
printing of the cards, will pass out
an additional 2,501) sets of the
cards, Seketa said.
But do the cards actually do
anv good? Seketa believes so.
"If you do help just one per-
son he said, "1 think it's worth-
while
Upcoming January Entertainment:
Jan. Thurs. 11
Naugahyde
Chihuahua's
Jan. I-n 19
Left Wirm Facist
Jan. Fri 12
Bad Bob & The
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Jan.Sat 20
Left Fxit
Jan. Sat. 13
The Stegmonds
Jan. Fn 26
The Mood
Jan. Sat. 27
TheNcw Deli's 8th Anniversity Bash
Featuring:
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The Popes
Flat Duo Jets
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I





14 The East Carolinian, January 9,1990
Prototype shatters public perception
Electric car outpaces Nissan model
. . r-i . � 11 nnn. TVin Imn-irt tvimltl uspa n
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Gen-
eral Motors Corp. unveiled a
prototype electric car it says out-
paces some �as-burning sports
cars and runs twice as far between
charges than previous electric
models
The two-seater Impact, which
tapers at the rear like a Citroen,
can travel 120 miles at 55 mph
before recharging and zooms from
0 to 60 mph in eight seconds, GM
Chairman Roger Smith said at a
news conference Wednesday.
"The public perceives electric
vehicles as golf carts Smith said.
"The Impact absolutely shatters
that perception
GM showed a film in which
the Impact outpaced a Mada
Miata and a Nissan 300 ZX on a
level-ground acceleration test.
John Zwerner, GM's execu-
tive director of advanced product
engineering, said the prototype
has never been crash-tested or
passed other government tests and
would go into production only if
extensive tests find a market for it.
Boasting a top speed of 75
mph, the Impact can be charged
halfway in as little as half an hour
and almost fully recharged in six
hours, GM said. Most electric
vehicles need up to 12 hours for a
full recharging.
Decade
Electricca ire virtually non-
polluting and are under close scru-
tiny in Los Angeles by environ-
mental officials who are enacting
stringent air quality rules.
He declined to reveal how
much GM had spent developing
the vehicle or to estimate a price,
although he said it would have to
be competitive in price with exist-
ing, internal combustion-powered
cars.
A person driving a gas-pow-
ered car in Los Angeles 10,000
miles a year might now spend
about $30 a month on fuel and
another $10 on maintenance,
Smith said.
Continued from page 11
The Impact would use a maxi-
mum of12 per month in electric-
ity under the same conditions, but
would still cost about twice as
much to operate because the bat-
teries must be replaced every
20,(KX) miles, adding another $70 a
month to operating costs, Smith
said.
Zwerner said that withinthree
years, improvements in batteries
may make it possible for the Im-
pact to double its battery life to
40,000 miles, which would make
operating costs nearly equal to
those of gas-powered cars.
The 120-mile range is not
expected to be improved much,
officials said.
?Eddie Murphv, master of stand up comedy,
made us laugh until we cried on "Saturday Night
live' and then divided hecould act and singas well,
�loan Rivers, who was obnoxiously funny for a
while, co-hosted "TheTonight Show was fired and
now can get on vour nerves during her very own
daytime talk show Could you shut up. Tlease?"
Trine-ess Di and Fergi helped us believe in fairy
tales, while showing us that princesses and duch-
esses are human too.
Stephen King, alias Richard Bachman, was such
,i prolific writer of honor novels and screen plays
that he needed two identities to get the work done.
�William lVrrv. alias The Refrigerator" was
he a defensive lineman, a ninningb.uk. a tight end or
a back-up singer"
Mke lYson. the undisputed, heavy weight
boxing champion of the world, made multitudes of
newspaper and magazine headlines when he lost in
a game of hearts to actress Robin Givens.
MORE PEOPLE? Freddy Kruger. lason
Spuds Mckenzie. Garfield. E1 .Mr. T .Rambo.
. .Max Ileadroom 1 he Keatons. TheCosbys. .bat
Man. . Noriega.
HEALTH
Health spas and gymnasiums abounded.
� Aerobics became the first and most popular
way lo shape up, with tast paced walking coming in
dose second.
�First there was the lane Fonda Home Workout
video and then a rash of videos began to appear on
the video Stores' shelves, lanet lones, Elle McPhear-
son and numerous others homed in on this profitable
enterprise.
�Reeboks stepped into the athletic shoe limelight
followed bv Avia, L. A. Gear and others.
�Weight Watchers and Nutra System� basked
m the benefits from the health-crazed decade.
'People no longer had to wait for the summer
sun to get that golden skin. With the invention of the
tanning bed came the year-long tan, tanning salons
and premature wrinkling.
And if vour teeth were boring or weren't white
enough, you could always decorate them with intri-
cate gold caps or whiten them with Epismilc.
�The incurable AIDS virus tragically claimed
thousands of lives and caused all human beings to
rethink their morals. However, the condom business
flourished.
ENTERTAINMENT
�Video games and arcades became extremely
popular among all age groups and served as plots
and scenes for several movies.
�First there was Atari�. Do you remember what
it looked like? And those wonderful games: Break-
out, Space Invaders, Asteroids, and Tank. Then came
lntelevision�, Nintendo�and most recently,Sega�.
�Nintendo�. Everybody had to have one. If you
didn't have one or you couldn't afford to buy the
game cartridges, no problem, you could just pop
over to the nearest video rental store and rent them.
As VCRs became more affordable, video rental
stores nourished, and the movie industry protited
enormously You could rent movies from grocery
stores convenience shops, and just about anywhere
merchants could pack them in
�MTV revolutionized the music industry and
became the largest, most popular cable program
worldwide Its first broadcast was on 8-8-81.
'People lost interest in the mind boggling, multi-
colored puzzle, Rubik sC ube. which spawned sev-
eral similar puzzles, )ust as quickly as they had
become fascinated with it.
?Dungeonsand 1 Wagons, .1 board and dice game
that required in-depth participation, captured and
ignited the imaginations of every pla ver, sometimes
failing to release them.
MORE INNOVATIONS AND FADS�Com-
pact Disk players. . Fax machines. Personal Com-
puters. . Cordless telephones .Mini televisions,
recorders and telephones. Walkman radios. . .Car
signs "Baby on Board . .Cabbage Patch dolls. .
.Break (.lancing. . .Punk rock. .Swatch watches. .
.lzod and Polo everything. . San Fernando Valley. .
.Disposable cameras.
MORALS
�After the drug tilted '70s, a burnt-out America
adopted the "Just siv no motto and decided to try
to go drug free.
�MADD, Mothers Against Drunk Driving,
SADD, Students Against Drunk Dnving,andRADD,
Rock Against Drunk Driving, were organized and
most everybody started to listen. Even Beer compa-
nies such as Budweiser and COOTS began to partici-
pate in the fight and aired commercials promoting
wise drinking habits.
�The AIDS vims deterred sexual promiscuity.
What will the '90s bring? Probably more expen-
sive things for us to waste our money on, and more
fashions for us to fill our closets with. Will fat and
pale be in? Will we find a cure for cancer and AIDS?
Who will we laugh at and who will we model our-
selves after?
Investigation
brings truth
to a Florida
legend
1 AKFCITY. Fla.(AP) �Old
less may lust be more than a leg-
end
A skeleton wearing old shoes
discovered in an underwater cave
is believed by many to be the
remains of Jess Preston, the sub-
ject of 50-year-old lore in this north
Florida town.
While investigators have yet
to confirm an identity, they be-
lieve a tale of a man drowning in
the spring may prove true, Sheriff
TomTramel said Thursday.
Two divers in "Old Jess Hole"
near the Sante Fe River found the
skeleton
Shoes found on the skeleton
are about 50 years old, said Co-
lumbia County sheriff's Lt. Jim
Wells.
Some residents say the man
disappeared near the spot where
the skeleton was found. His coat
was found nearby, and relatives
and friends held a funeral service
by the deep spring.
Investigators arc awaiting a
report from forensic anthropolo-
gist William Maples. A prelimi-
nary report indicated the skeleton
was that of a white male 5-foot-7
to 5-foot-8 who may have suffered
from Down's syndrome or a re-
lated disease.
A Pair &
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Gary M. HarrU. Llc�n��d Optician
Opm 9-6 MoB-Frt 10-2 Srt
oos-
Read The
East
Carolinian
Serving ECU Students & Faculty
� custom framing
� dry mounting
� student matts
� ready made
frames & matts
� posters
� limited editions
� original art
� jewelry
UNIVERSITY
Frame Shop
Art Gallery
I
2-462
� rtwsiwilte. NC 27866
located behind UBE
lT'5
Clothing and Jewelry from Around the Worlds � Best
Selection of tic - dyes in Greenville � Large assortment of
unique crystal: and semi - precious stones � Unusual books.
exotic incense and the work of a different
Greenville artist each month
'Don't loofilikg everyone else -
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Welcome Back Sale 25 off All clothing!
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757-1007
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
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(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
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�ECU Bus Service
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Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
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756 4204
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and mobile homes in Azalea Gardens near
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Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
&





(jjfoe East Glaroltnian
Page 25
Sports
January 9,199C
Turnovers
cost ECU
big win
By kristen Halberg
Staff Writer
1 Msappointment lingered
throughout Minges Coliseum
Monday night as the Pirates fell to
lv'S� A champion George
Mason, 63 56 in front of a crowd of
near!) 4,500
fhe Pirates had hoped to rec
oncile .in embarrassing loss to
(leorge Mason earlier in the sea
son a 79 o 1 final .it the
Chaminade Christmas Classic.
its .i game we needed to win
it home, ECU coach Mike Steele
satd We re taking it very badly.
It s a game we should have won.
1 urnovers were .i major fac
tor in the outcome .is George
Mason scored 17 ol 63 points ofl
tumov ers (AH v om
ttiM onl nine total turno ers
I r w as tlir different e in the
in Steele said
' Vsptte the score, the Pirates
I an intense game hustling
� minating the boards
;houtthegame ECl had JO
unds on the night 18 of them
being in the first half, rhe Patriots
ih managed seven rebounds in
the first hall as the) ended with 19
� the game
It wasanawful game to lose
Steele commented. "We did eve-
� thing we needed to do. It was .i
frustrating game because we
I laved hard enough and played
mpetitively
' he Pirates showed potential
tor a victory in the first half, when
Lady Patriots
fall to ECU
Gray carves path with
24 point performance
By Dave Reichelt
Staff Writer
led the Patriots V 25
halftime I ho Pirates took a
�it
ECU'S TimBrov i to the basket a
action in Minges im
the CAA Phol by Angi i I :�"
I i rgeM i i
lost � � 'ati
ECU PI �
ith inM � la) sCAA
8 overall 1-1 m
J
Strong defensive play in tho
final minutes helped tho Lady
Piratos of ECU to their first CAA
victory Monday night as they
defeated the Lady Patriots of
George Mason 78-68 in Patriot
Center.
unior forward Sarah Gray
poured in 24 points (12-20 from
the field) and nine rebounds to
pace the Lady Pirates to their
seventh win ol the season. Gray
led all scorers, but suffered an
injury with five minutes remain
ingand wastakenoutof thegame
� I'm happy to win our fr
conference game head coach Pat
Pierson said following the game
"Especially when it came on the
road
(iray had 14 first halt points
that helped the 1 ady Pirates build
a 33-21 lead with 4:51 remaining
But a 16-4 run by the 1 ady Patri-
ots, and several key turnovers by
the 1 d Pirates led to a loss ol
momentum just before halftime.
Antoinette Johnson sank a three-
pointer tor GMU withonesecond
remaining to end the GMl rally
and tie the score at 37 during inter-
mission.
After trading several baskets.
Sarah Gray
the 1 ady Pirates regained the lead
at the 17:25 mark ol the second
halt when Iray made two ol her
ten second half points ECL gained
a comfortable67 57 lead as senior
guard Irish 1 lamilton hit a short
jumper with just under 10 min-
utes remaining in the game.
1 lowever, the Lady Patriots
staged yet another comeback
when Karen Bruining and fresh
man forward I auraTetersparked
See Cray, page 17
rnnd tor mrrrrer time with a little
o er 14 minutes remaining in the
first halt when senior Heed 1 ose
hit a three point jump shot 1 ose
had 11 points in the game, and
needsonlv 105 more points before
reaching the 1,000 point mark in
his tour vear career with the Pi
rates
1 he Patriots rallied late in the
first half as they regained their
' id with a littleovor tour minutes
� pla) Robert Dykes stole the
ball scored on a layup and was
fouled by rim Brown Aftersink-
ine the tree throw, the Patriots
The votes are in; Miami wins championship
Bv Kick Warner
1 he Assiu iated Press
supporters ol loot
broad astei
1 lurrii anc: piel 1 th
team.
'lt'svet v lepn
moments after le
Dame finished se
tvau: heat the Irish 27-10. puter he said. "You get so many
'� .�� tennisErickson points for even game you win
and so many points for every game
he
lt �
1 feel
were up.1: 21
he two teams exchanged the
see Mason, page 17
ball playofl couldn't have asked
fora finer finish 1 wo great teams
Miami and Notre Dame triggered cxceptionallybadforo
one great debate over the No 1
team and how it should be s
lee ted
Miami won the national cham
pionship in the Associated Press
poll, but otre 1 ame 11 ach Lou
1 loltz thinks the sports n ritersand
SinccMiamiand Notn I' tme
each lost one game Holtsaid the
Irish should ave won the national
title because the played the most
difficult schedule in the country.
But Miami supportt rs argue that
the Muni, a nes deserve to be No 1
says the debate w ill a i derate the
nun el rd a championship
of! in 1 i ision i
o question about it he
said. I realh believe down the
road there w ill be a playofl sys-
tem
a
your opponent wins
I loltz said the national title is
mythical because it isn't decided
on the held.
"There isn't a best team he
said. "There isn't a best team on
dto sa) whether each play. We weren't better than
he favored a playoff, but he oi- Colorado on evervplay. It's an up
tered another alternative. and down thing, but you look at it
" rhe national championship over the long run, who was the
should be determined by com- most consistent. That'show I look
at it.
Miami won its third national
championship in six years by
beating Alabama 33-25 in the
Sugar bowl on Monday night.
Notre Pame defeated No. 1 Colo-
rado : 1 -6 in the Orange Bowl, but
it wasn't enough to boost the Irish
to the top even though it was their
eighth victory over a bowl team.
Miami also was chosen No. 1
in United Press International's
coaches pill, and bv I ISA Today-
See Irish, page lb
Pirates sink Navy
fo r ft rstco nfe re nee
win of season
Bv Dave
Staff
MeCreary
Writer
A stolen in boundspassand a
layup by E( U's lettrev Whitaker
proved to be what the Pirates
needed to spark tire Saturday
night at Minges Coliseum.
Whitaker's basket at the
buzzer gave the Pirates a 37-30
halftime lead and set the momen-
tum as the Pirates sank Navy's
Midshipmen 75-55 in their first
i olonial Athletic Association
game this year.
"I thought Whitaker's play
was the biggest of the game
Pirate coach Mike Steele said. "It
was probably as big a play at the
end ol .t bait as we've had this
season
l sing team effort with tour
players m double figures, E I
snapped a two game losing streak
and evened their overall record to
7-7 on the season.
Navy led by as many as seven
points early in the game, but the
Piratespiinedmomentumandthe
Midshipmen flew into a tailspin
ECU extended their lead to 12 in
thesotond half when IkeC opeland
cored underneath and Gus Hill
((inverted a three point play.
Navy followed w ith a buckel but
EC I scored two more tunes to go
ahead b) 1 and from that point,
never relinquished a comfortable
lead
It was our besl game so tar
c opeland said, following a 14
point performance, including a
team high sex en rebounds
"We ve worked reall) hard in
practice the List few days and it
paid off
Navy started the game with
tire in their eyes, hitting seven oi
nine from the field, in luding a
pair ol ; pointers, to take a 16 9
lead at the 15 13 mark ol the first
halt.
"I was lootemed at first be
cause we really pra ti ed hard this
week Steele said "We knew
they'd shoot the ball well, but our
guys plaved consistently and
didn't panic (when the) fell be
hind) "
I he Pirates indeed did not
panu as the) found their range
with a timely 17 footer from Reed
Lose, a short jumper from
Gopeiand and some tenacious
See Tailspin, page 17
IRS plans ski trip
in early February
By jeannette Roth
IRS
Oh, how time flies!
t (;u head i ich Mi
Pirates 55 &A �
seum I heleambroke a
by Garret! KiMian t i (
� ete checks the scoreboard during the
� N ivy Saturday night m Minges Coh-
�game losing streak with the win (Photo
� ib
The Department ol Intramu-
ral Recreational Services is offer-
ing you a "Passport to Adven-
ture" with a variety of workshops
and adventure trips highlighting
the spring of 1990.
To start out the semester of
activities, and Outdoor Smorgas-
bord will be offered free of charge
for all faculty, staff and students
Wednesday, January 24 at 7:00 pm
in 113 Memorial Gymnasium. This
special event will feature outdoor
cooking techniques and food
sampling.
TheORC (Outdoor Recreation
Center) workshop schedule is
highlighted by several unique
sessions. An outdoor photogra-
phy session will be held Feb. 7.
Canoeing and kayaking
classes will also be offered during
the month of February. These
workshops are designed to intro-
duce participants to basic skills
needed to further enjoy the sport.
I'he workshop also serves as a
prerequisite clinic for an ORC
excursion on the Cape Fear River
during the month of March.
Outdoor Cooking, Backpack-
ing, Bicycle Touring and
Windsurfing round out the work-
shop schedule. It interested in any
oi these sessions, IM-REC Serv-
ices distributes information re-
garding these workshops in 204
Memorial Gymnasium.
� To begin the 1990 dven-
ture ripSeries, IM REC Services
is sponsoring an ORC Come and
Ski Weekend Snowskiing excur-
sion to Wintergreen, Virginia.
February 3-4 are prime ski days
presenting a challenge tor every
level ol skier Costs tor this trip
include transportation, lodging,
lift tickets, and an Apres ski party.
Ski rentals are $20 w hile food
will be additional, The package
will be $99 tor students m $110
tor faculty staff, guests ITiere is
a limited numberof spaces. If inter
ested,call 757-6387 or 757-6911 for
more details.
� Begin the new decade with
fitness run through IRS array of
wellness programs tor faculty
staff and students. Aerobic fitness
classes areoltered daily, geared at
full body maintenance Classes
include: aerobics, circuit training,
low impact aerobics, beginning
fitness, Hi-lo. Interval training,
toning and bellv busters.
Supra Class is making a re-
turn appearance in 1990 each
Monday and Wednesday from
6:30-800 pm Twelve classes cost
$10 for students and $20 for fac-
ultystaff.





r
16 The East Carolinian January 9, 1990
Sports Briefs
Baltimore set to host 1993
All-Star game
Baltimore will be the sito of the 1993 All-Star
Game, officials said Thursday. Team officials hope to
have the midsoason baseball classic played in Camden
Yards, the city'sproposed stadium, which isexpected
to he ready bv the QIJ2 season Baltimore last hosted
the major league's all-star event in 1958.
USA prepares for World
Cup soccer
The U.S. National Soccer team opens training
camp Friday at La folia, Calif as it prepares tor its
tirst appearance in 40 years at the World Cup. The
team will practice through Ian IS and compete next
at the Marlboro Cup in Miami Feb. 2 and 4.
Dravecy undergoes surgery
Irish
22b4 seconds broke the almost 10-year-old mark of
15:345 held bv Margaret Groos. 1 lor time at the three-
mile mark was the second fastest time indoors by a
woman at that distance.
Coghlan win streak
continues with third win
Irishman Eamonn Coghlan won his third race in
nine days since coming out ot retirement. Coghlan,
37, who returned to racing last week after he retired
in 1987, took the lead in the final 100 meters ot the mile
race at the Dartmouth Relays in 1 lanover, N.l L,after
he and Bill Mullanev had run stride tor stride Cogh
Ian finished in 4:05.9. Mullanev finished in 4:07.58.
Race horse auction begins
Goodbye I lalo. one ot horse racing's leading fe-
males, willbcauctioned at kt.vnoland'sanuar I iorsc
ot All Ages Sale, which begins today I lu- throe da)
sale also includes Wishing Well, dam ol the 1989
Pave Dravecky, 33, the former San Francisco Kentucky Derby and Breeders Cup Classic winner
Giants player who staged a remarkable comeback Sunday Silence. Goodbye Halo is one ol the 1,048
after cancer surgery on his pitching arm, has under- horses and five stallion shares catalogued tor the
gone surgery again to remove another tumor from his auction,
left arm. Dravecky retired in October alter doctors
found the tumor. Officials said it will be several days
before they know if it is cancerous.
South Africans meet with
Olympic Conmitte
International OrrtpTfEomniittee officials will
UVA's O'Brien interviews
with Navy for new job
Navy officials met with I niversityol irginia as
sistant coach Tom O'Brien, the fourth candidate inter-
ested in the job, according to published reports
Navy officials have already met with former
Detriot Lionscoach Darryl Rogers, William and Mary
coach Jimmye Laycock and Marshall coach George
Chaump. Navy's head coach Elliot Uzelac was fired
last month.
U.S. swimmers win at
Australian meet
Three L ,S. sw iminers took tophonois.it antntei
national meet at Perth, Australia Sunda) ulie Koli
won the women's 400-meter individual medle in 4
minutes 54.57 seconds and Summer Sanders won t lu
women's 200-meter butterfly in 2:13.60. Teammate
The committee will meet with 22 stadium and arena Bert Pippengerwon the men's 200-meter butterfly in
officials around the country. The world governing 2:01.59.
body will choose 8 to i? s.tos May fair wins golf pro-am
Zephyrs get minority Owner pro golfer Bill Mayfairand his amateur partner
Denver Zephyrs owner John Dikeou got a boost Mark Sollenberger won the Bob SimondsPing Pro
in his bid to bring major league baseball to Denver Scratch Invitational tournament at Scottsdale, An;
when theCoors Brewing Co. became minority owner The two shot 9-under par 63 in the final round to
of the team. The agreement will also makeCoorsthe finish at 20-under lat Troon Goll Qub. In second
minority owner of any futureexpansion team. The place were pro Bob lord and Ins amateur partnei
Zephyrs are a Milwaukee brewers Class AAA farm Kevin King, who combined tor a 65 198.
Hall of Famer hospitalized
"BasebalfHall ot Famei Roy Campanella was in
serious but stable condition Sunday at Northridj
Hospital in Northridge, Calif, fhe 68-year-old former
catcher is being treated for complications from diarx
tes and respiratory problems from a cold
meet with South African (jrmpicCommittee mem
bcrs on Tuesday in Paris &w South African group
has been unrecognised by the lOt tor 20 years. Offi-
cials hope the meeting will result in relaxing the
sports boycott and posSmlv speed up removing apart
heid.
World Cup officials tour
USA for future sites
The World Cup Organizing Committee begins a
10-week tour of the 0SA tor possible sites to hold
soccer matches for the 1994 World Cup tournament.
team.
Glaffveotinnoo Fifteen
vacancy in Atlanta
Houston Oilers coach Jerry Glanville met Thurs-
day with the Atlanta Falcons to discuss their coaching
vacancy. Glanville, whose job is in jeopardy with
Houston, has one year left on his contract with Hous-
ton. He met Wednesday with Oilers owner Bud
Adams. Glanville earlier met with Falcons president
Rankin Smith r. and other club officials.
Dolphins owner Robbie
dies in Miami
foe Robbie, 73, owner ot the National Football
League's Miami Dolphins, died Sunday at a Miami
area hospital. Robbie's death was confirmed by his
son Paul and Dolphins coach Don Shula. Robbie,
despite denials by himself and management, ap-
peared to be in ill health and, was reportedly seen at a
Dolphin home game in a wheelchair.
5,000-meter record broken
The women's5,000-meters world indoor record
was shattered bv almost 12 seconds Sunday bv Lynn
Jennings of Newmarket, N.H. at the Dartmouth Re-
lays at Hanover, N.H. Jennings' timeot 15minutes,
Continued from page 15
coaches' poll, and by USA
roday-CNN. Notre Dame was
dropped to third, one point be-
hind Florida State,by URL
I lolt saidWebeat the ACC
champ, we beat the Big Ten champ,
we beat thePac- I0champ,webeat
the Big Eight champ and we beat
the top two independents in the
Fast.
"I don't think anybody has
ever played a tougher schedule
than we did this season
The 1 lurricanest 11-1) jumped
from No. 2 to No. 1, Notre Dame
(12-1) rose from fourth to second
andv"olorado(lM)felltoNo.4in
the final poll.
Miami received 39 first-place
votes and 1,474 points, with Notre j
Dame getting 19 first-place votes
and 1,452 points. The other two
first-place votes went to No. 3
Honda State.
The 22-point margin was the
second-closest since the A?began
its postseason poll in 19f8.
Brigham Young edged Washing-
ton by 20 points at the end of the
1C�S4 season.
"There is no doubt in my mind
that we re the best team in the
country Ericksonsaid. "Regard-
less of what an vono else says, we're
No. I
I lorida State, which won 10
straight after starting the season
with two losses, moved up two
spots alter routing Nebraska 41
17 m the Fiesta Howl Michigan,
w hichentered the Rose Bowl with
an outside shot at the national title,
dropped from third to seventh
atter losing 17-10 to Southern Cat.
Tennessee, which beat Arkan-
sas Jl-27 in the Cotton Bowl, fin-
ished fifth in the final poll. Round-
ing out the Top 10 were Auburn,
Michigan, Sou thorn Cal, Alabama
and Illinois
Nebraska was Hth, followed
by Ctemson, Arkansas, Houston,
Penn State, Michigan State, Pitts-
burgh, Virginia, Texas Tech, Texas
A&M, West Virginia, Brigham
Young Washington, Ohio State
and Arizona.
! JIUUU II1U1JI
COPIES 52
(Self Service 8 12 x 11 white bond)
758-2400
Fast Copies For Fast Times
(Next toChico's in the Georgetgown Shops)
Lakers' take home the cash
Grace Church
Welcomes
EVERYONE
Back!
We Wish You a
Happy & Safe
New Decade!
Grace Christian
Fellowship Meets Even
2nd Monday Night
at Mendenhall
HWJI MV9 UMU
"�CTrWHT1
4ma
In the Locker
Associated Press
releases top 25 men's
basketball poll
The Top Twenty Five teams in the Associated
Press college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Jan. 7, total pointsbased
on 2S-24-2S-22-21-20-19-18-17-16-15-14-13-12-11-10
9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 and last week's ranking:
Here's a New Year's :
Resolutions
You Can Live With
If You Choose To Drink
Be Responsible
RecordPtsI'vs
1 Kansas(45)15-01,5682
2 Georgetown l Id)11 01,5323
3 Michigan (1)10-11i
4 Oklahoniid)10-0�6
t Missouri ' 1 in i1,2807
6 Syracuse10-11,2731
7 UN .�l 15610
8 Illinoisii 11.1274
1 Georgia TechJ(M)12
0 Duke10-295313
11. Louisville102949-
12. Arkansas10 2s7714
.1 Indiana10-1-9
14 LSU8278711
!s St John'sB268616
i6 Minnesota10-164224
17 N Carolina St11254718
18 ArizonaB 254111
19 UCLA42373IS
20 Memphis St.9 135721
21 LaSalle8-128717
22 Oregon St.11 22b423
23 Loyola Marymount) "�2s22s
24 Alabamaia-12322
25 Xavier,()hio9 177
Southeastern slopes report
skiing conditions
As of January 6, 1996
North Carolina
Appalachian 40 inch base Fight -lopes open Groomed surface
Night skiing.
1 atalixher 14 inch base Five slopes open Machine-groomed
surface Night skiing
Wound lar- 1 inch base Two slopes open Granular surface
sY.iiy Mountain 30 inch base Three slopes open Wet granular
surface Night skiing
'kilieech 40inchbase 13 slopes Open Wet granular surface Night
�-knng.
StifUmkuuM 26 inch base Sixatopesopen Ckanutafsurface-Nighl
skiing
Siejar Mountain 48 inch base 16 slopes open LOOM granular
surface Night skiing
Wulf laurel 23 inch base Five slopes open Wat Granular oondl
tions Night skiing
Virginia
Hryce Rrv-rt 22 inch base Four slopes open Granular surface
Night sknng.
Ma-inuttrn 30 inch base Seven slopes open Machine-groomed
surface Night skiing
West Virginia
Canaan Valley 38 inch base Eleven slopes open Machine-groomed
surface New machine made snow Night skiing
SilverCrtek: 29inch base Twelve slopes open New machine -made
snow Groomed surface
riainuftir 44 inch base Thirty three slopes open. New machine
made snow Machine groomed surface
Winterplace 23 inch has Seventeen slopes open Wet granular
surface NUlht skiing
Don't Drink and Drive
Join B.A.C.C.H.U.S.
First Meeting for Spring
Semester Tuesday, January 9
at 4:00 pm 307 Erwin Hall
"FREE"
Campus Wide Welcome Back Social
January 16.1990
Mendenhall Student Center
Social Room
For More information contact:
Office of Substance Abuse Prevention and Education
303 Erwin Hall 757-6793





Tailspin
Continued from page 1
defense The Navy lead was trimmed to two, and
! ose gave the Pirates the 17-16 edge with a crowd
pleasing Vpointer
lose led all scorers in the game with 18 points
( opeland was next for the Pirates with 14, while F fill
added !3 and Tim Brown finished with 11
"Tim and Ike have been getting more aggressive
inside our last few games Steele said
The two teams traded leads several times late in
the first half, but the Pirates held on to a slim lead
thanks to several treys from I ose and 1 hil and solid
plav in the post from Copeland
The Pirate defense allowed onlv one Midship-
man to reach double figures, Nick Maruskh, who
was good tor 13 points. "Every game starts on the
defensive end torus Pirate Reed I ose said "That's
where our pnde is "
last Carolina played a steady game in the sec
ond half, stietching the lead by as many as 23 points
Mason
when Steve Richardson hit back-to-back 3 pointers.
Navy, however, never could get back on track, shoot
ing 10 for 28 in the second half and turning the ball
over 15 times.
"This is the poorest we've played Navv coach
Pete Herrman said "I thought we plaved well for the
first 15 minutes, but we just didn't sustain at all in the
second half '
Navy entered the game a 1-8 mark on the season
But in their first eight games, the Midshipmen only
lost bv more than 10 points on one occasion, a 14
point loss 10 Auburn
Coach Steelc said he was pleased with the Pi-
rates' performance but quickly focused on the next
task at hand: "We're not celebrating this win until
after Monday's game against George Mason he
said "We need to be 2-0 (in the conference) when we
go on the road "
Continued from page IS
lead two more times before the Pirates, with 1:28
remaining in the halt, went on a scoring binge and
scored six more points two of them by Lose with
three seconds remaining in the half.
Hut the Patriots would come out fighting in the
second period of plav as they slowly began to shut
down the Tirate offense GMU outscored ECU N-8
in the last 9:57 of the game and did not allow the
Pirates to score a point tor over five minutes in that
time. ECU lost their lead for good with four minutes
left to play
We outplayed them tot the most part ot Ihe
came except for a stretch there. I ose said. Thev
couldn't cover our inside guys btitm the second half,
thev were getting pushed up
hinior Tim Brown led the Pirates in scoring and
mding as he had It points and eight rebounds
torthemghf Freshman Ikeopeland sank 13 points
and had three boards, while senior (.usl 1 ill added 12
points and six rebounds to the Pirates losing effort.
Meanwhile, on the (Ml bench. Mike Hargett
Gray
was the leading scorer for the Patriots as he was able
to score 21 points against the Tirate defense. Sieve
Smith had 15 points and two rebounds tor the night,
and Mitch Madden added 11 points and three re
bounds to the GMU statistics
"This was a very big win for us GMU Coach
Frnie Nestor said "We are pleased with the effort
ECU is now 7-8 overall, 1-1 in the conference
George Mason moves to 9- on the season and 2-0 in
the conference, defeating UNC-Wilmington earlier
in the season
George Mason continues its strong lead in the
K U (.Ml' series as thev have compiled 1m wins in
the 19 times the two teams have met. The Patriots
have also won the last nine games straight in the
series
K begins rf two game conference road trip
Saturday when thev face American and lames
Madison Thev return to Minges Ian 20 to battle
William & Marx-
Continued from page IS
with 44" remaining to play I'eter finished with
points, two shy of Brummg s team high of 17.
The GMU tun was ended .is sophomore guard
Toina Coley sank four of EC U's eight straight free
throws to give the Lad) Pirates a 76 68 lead. Sopho-
more forward lonva Hargrove made two of her 12
points on a layup that ga e the 1 ady Pirates the ten
point win
Hamilton finished with 13 points for ECU, while
freshman guard (.avnor O'Ponnell had 12. C'olev
and junior guardforward Kenneva Wilson both
( 1 with six tor the l-ady Pirates.
During the Christmas holidays, Ihe I .ady Pirates
toppled Winthtop 105-61 in Minges Coliseum, led by
lonva Hargrove 9 22 points (9 of 9 from the field)
She received the ("AA Player oi the Week tor the
second time this season for her outstanding effort in
the win.
Theldv Pirates also traveled to( ireenville S (
to plav in the Furmar. Christmas (. lassie In the
opening round, ECU toppleci Princeton 86-78, led b
Hargrove s 24 point performance. But lurm.m
proved to be too strong in the championship mn
with a 78-63 defeat over the Lady Pirates. 1 largrove
ami Sara Crav were both named to the all-tourna
ment team
Coach Piers�on and the team return home to
MingesCoIiseum Saturday night with a 7-3 record as
thev host C AA toe American University in a 7 p.m.
matchup. WZMB will begin coverage at r 4 p m
1fic jNfoit Company
of (jrccnviik: Ltd.
"GREEN) 11.LI'S 11 RSI II 1.1 SI R ICE
NAIL CARE SALON"
2408 S. Charles Suilc 5
(919)355 4S
TANNING SESSION
$2.00 Per visit
Limited Time Only
River Bluff
Apartments
Welcomes Students To Come By And See
Our 2 Bedroom Townhouses and
1 Bedroom Garden Apartments.
� Fully Carpeted
� Large Pool
� Free Cable
� Bus Service 1.5 miles from campus
� Under New Management
� On Site Maintenance
10th St. Ext. To Rivcrbiuff Rd.
758-4015
1
The Fastarolinian, January 9, 1990 17
flheSunssCotorfy
Welcome Back!
We have selected Sausage &
Cheese's from 35 to $2.95!
Carolina Easl Mall
756-5650
205 E. 5th St
FORMAL WEAR
830-9409
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
Rebel Without A Cause
Wednesday, January 10,1990
What's Up?
PROGRAM HOTLINE
757-6004
TJPpplications are now being
accepted for the following positions:
Chairperson, Minority Arts
Committee
� Chairperson, Coffeehouse
Committee
� Assistant to the President
Interested? Call us at 757-4715 for more
info or stop by 236 Mendenhall to pick up
an application.
The deadline to apply is Tuesday,
Jan. 16,1990-5:00pm
STUDENl UNION






Tailspin
Continued from page IS
defense. The Navy lead was trimmed to two, and
Lose gave the Pirates the 17 16 edge with a crowd-
pleasing 3-pointer.
Lose led all scorers in the game with 18 points
Copeland was next for the Pirates with 14, while Hill
added 13 and Tim Brown finished with 11.
'Tim and Ike have been getting more aggressive
inside our last few games Steele said.
The two teams traded leads several times late in
the first half, but the Pirates held on to a slim lead
thanks to several treys from Lose and Hill and solid
play in the post from Copeland.
The Pirate defense allowed only one Midship-
man to reach double figures, Nick Marusich, who
was good for 13 points. "Every game starts on the
defensive end for us Pirate Reed Lose said. That's
where our pride is
East Carolina played a steady game in the sec-
ond half, stretching the lead by as many as 23 points
Mason
when Steve Richardson hit back-to-back 3-pointers.
Navy, however, never could get back on track, shoot-
ing 10 for 28 in the second half and turning the ball
over 15 times.
"This is the poorest we've played Navy coach
Pete Herrman said. "I thought we played well for the
first 15 minutes, but we just didn't sustain at all in the
second half
Navy entered the game a 1-8 mark on the season.
But in their first eight games, the Midshipmen only
lost by more than 10 points on one occasion, a 14-
point loss to Auburn.
Coach Steele said he was pleased with the Pi-
rates' performance but quickly focused on the next
task at hand: "We're not celebrating this win until
after Monday's game against George Mason he
said. "We need to be 2-0 (in the conference) when we
goon the road
Continued from page 15
lead two more times before the Pirates, with 1.28
remaining in the half, went on a scoring binge and
scored six more potato two of them by Lose with
throe seconds remaining in the half.
But the Patriots would come out fighting in the
second period of play as they slowly began to shut
down the Pirate offense. GMU outscored ECU 19-8
in the last 9:57 of the game and did not allow the
Pirates to score a point for over five minutes in that
time. ECU lost their lead for good with four minutes
left to play
Wo OUtpltycd them tor the most part of tho
game except for a stretch there lose said. "They
couldn't cover our inside guvs but in tho second half,
thov wore getting pushed up
Junior Tim Brown led tho Tiratos in scoring and
rebounding as ho had 14 points and eight rebounds
tor tho night Freshman Iko Copeland sank 13 points
and had throe boards, while .senior (.Jus 1 hll added 12
points and six rebounds to the Pirates' losing effort.
Meanwhile, on tho GML bench. Mike Hargett
Gray
was the leading scorer for the Patriots as he was able
to score 21 points against the Pirate defense. Steve
Smith had 15 points and two rebounds for the night,
and Mitch Madden added 11 points and three re-
bounds to the GMU statistics.
This was a very big win for us GMU Coach
Ernie Nestor said. "We are pleased with the effort
ECU is now 7-B overall, 1-1 in the conference.
George Mason moves to 9-6 on the season and 2-0 in
the conference, defeating UNC-Wilmington earlier
in the season.
George Mason continues its strong lead in tho
ECU-GMU series as they have compiled lb wins in
the 19 times the two teams have met. The Patriots
have also won tho last nine games straight in the
series.
ECU begins a two-game conference road trip
Saturday when they face American and lames
Madison. They return to Minges an. 20 to battle
William it Mary.
Continued from page 15

with 4:47 remaining to play. Tatar finished with
15 points, two shy of Bruining's team high of 17.
The GMU run was ended as sophomore guard
Toina Coley sank four of ECU'S eight straight free
throws to give the Ladv Pirates a 7b-bS load. Sopho-
more forward Tonva Hargrove made two of her 12
potato on a layup that gave the Lady Pirates the ten
point win.
Hamilton finished with 13 points for ECU, while
freshman guard Gaynor O'Donnoll had 12. Coley
and junior guard forward Konnoya Wilson both
tJnhhff with six for the Lady Pirates.
During the Christmas holidays, the Lady Pirates
toppled Winthrop 105-bl inMingesColiseum,ledby
Tonya Hargrove's 22 points (9 of 9 from the field).
She received the CAA Player of the Week for the
second time this season for her outstanding effort in
the win.
The Lady Pirates also traveled to Greenville. S C
to play in the Furman Christmas Classic. In tho
opening round, ECU toppled Princeton 8b-78, led by
Hargrove's 24-point performance. But Furman
proved to be too strong in the championship game
with a 78-63 defeat over the Lady Pirates. Hargrove
and Sara Gray were both named to the all-tourna-
ment team.
Coach Piarson and the team return home to
Minges Coliseum Saturday night with a 7-3 record as
they host CAA foe American University in a 7 p.m.
matchup. WZMB will begin coverage at 6:45 p.m.
Irve CiC Qmvpmy
of Qrtawiik Ltd.
GREENVILLE'S FIRST FULL SERVICE
NAIL CARE SALON
2408 S. Charles Suite 5
(919)355-4596
TANNING SESSION
$2.00 Per visit
Limited Time Only
River Bluff
Apartments
Welcomes Students To Come By And See
Our 2 Bedroom Townhouses and
1 Bedroom Garden Apartments.
� Fully Carpeted
� Large Pool
� Free Cable
� Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
� Under New Management
� On Site Maintenance
10th St. Ext. To Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
1
The East Carolinian, January 9,1990 17
Welcome Back!
We have selected Sausage &
Cheese's from 350 to $2.95!
Carolina East Mall
756-5650
0-9409
STUDENT UNION
Rebel Without A Cause
Wednesday, January 10,1990
What's Up?
PROGRAM HOTLINE
757-6004
4
applications are now being
"accepted for the following positions:
� Chairperson, Minority Arts
Committee
� Chairperson, Coffeehouse
Committee
� Assistant to the President

Interested? Call us at 757-4715 for more
info or stop by 236 Mendenhall to pick up
an application.
The deadline to apply is Tuesday,
Jan. 16,1990 - 5:00pm





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Title
The East Carolinian, January 9, 1990
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 09, 1990
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.715
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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