The East Carolinian, December 7, 1989






�lie i�uBt (HatQixxixnn
Senting the 'Exist Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 108
Tuesday, Decmeber 7,1989
Greenville, NC
Circulation 12,000
28 Pages
English department
arranges more sections
Animals rights demonstration
Students for the tthical Treatment of Animals turned out Tuesday at Pitt Plaza to protest the killing of animals to make fur garments.
(Photo by Carrett Killian � ECU Photo Lab).
By SHANNON BUCKLEY
St.fl Wnt�r
Anv students wishing to reg-
ister for English courses taught
during the spring semester may
now do so.
All numbers of English sec-
tions needed by students are cur-
rently being offered. "All they
(students) have to do is attempt to
register for these courses Dr.
Keats Sparrow, chairman of the
English department, said. If a
desired English course appears to
be full the student may return to
the registrar's office at a later time
to obtain the needed course, ac-
cording to Sparrow.
"There has been a lot of mis-
informatioi spread throughout
campus concerning cutbacks
within the English department
Sparrow said. However, "there
have been no permanent cutbacks
in teaching positions
According to Sparrow, tem-
porary teaching positions are
loaned to the English department
based upon student need. The
English department has made
arrangements to rehire 11 out of
13 temporary instructors who
taught English coursesdunng the
fall semester. If student need
arises, the English department
may be re-hiring the two tempo-
rary instructors who they were
forced to dismiss.
Each department must antici-
pate the number of students regis-
tering for courses within its field
of study. According to Sparrow,
courses are allotted based upon
estimated figures. Perhaps these
estimates are what has caused
misinformation to be spread about
theavailibihtv of English courses
and the number of instructors,
Sparrow said.
"We have been given the staff
positions for the spring semester
that we need to accomodate the
students Sparrow said "The
university is working very coop-
eratively with our department,
keeping the students' best inter-
ests in mind
According to Sparrow, any
student who has completed or is
currently enrolled in Fnghsh 11(X)
who wnshes to take Fnghsh 121X1
during the spring semester may
now register for this course As of
Tuesday there were It' ma t ns of
this course which had not been
filled.
Painting begins in
front of Student Store
Strategic Planning Committee reports
faculty Senate approves curriculum changes
By THOMAS BARR
Stiff Vknttr
By SAMANTHA THOMPSON
SUM Vlnfrr
In the final Faculty Senate
meeting of the semester, the body
approved 3r curriculum changes,
passed five resolutions to the Stra-
tegic Planning Report and heard
an update on the current fresh-
man clas
were made for
minors in the following areas:
gen ntolog � men's studies,
math, statisl ho! and drug
Studies and nutrition. Deleted
minors include theatre arts and
speech, frican studies, Asian
studit - ' itudies, Latin
Americastuti nsumer man-
agementand interior design. Inter-
national Studies minor was also
added.
Bachelor oi arts revisions were
made in journalism and mass
communications, community arts
management, theatre arts, math,
math with option in computer
science, math with option in sta-
tistics, and computer science. The
B.A. in theatre arts and speech
wasdeletej
Revisions of bachelor of sci-
ence degrees were made in broad-
casting, theatre arts, computer
science, math (teaching), medical
record administration, science
education, merchandising, cloth-
ing and textiles and interior de-
sign. A bachelor of science degree
in dance education was added and
a new option was added in the
B.S. degree for CDFR. The con-
sumer and management option
for the B.S. degree in CDFR was
deleted.
Other revisions were made in
the bachelor of fine arts in theatre
arts and home economics major in
child development and family-
relations. Bachelor of music revi-
sions were made in theatre arts,
church music (option A- organ,
option B- vocal) and organ per-
formance. The NVHM major with
dietetics option was also revised
as well as the hospitality manage-
ment major.
The final report fu�n i the Stra-
tegic Advisorv Group was re-
viewed and several senate mem-
bers made resolutions to the Stra-
tegic Planning Report. The first
resolution passed was made by
the chair of the Tc-aching Effec-
tiveness Committed. She stated
that in the report, effective teach-
ing is barelv mentioned as an ele-
ment of distinction for ECU. The
resolution basically said teachers
should be rewarded and evalu-
ated more effectively, and that
ECU should be an institution
which supports quality teaching.
Dr. George Bailey made three
minor resolutions to the report,
See FACULTY SENATE, page 3
Student organizations now
have the go ahead to start painting
theirinsignias on the street in front
of. the Student Store. After two
years th. street has finally been
paved and is now ready for the
final touch-up.
Last Friday some student
orgamzationsbegan splashing the
sidewalk with paint in an effort to
leave, what they hope will be, a
long-lasting impression of their
organization.
The idea for paving and paint-
ing of the street came about from a
Student Government Association
resolution authored last year by
legislators MartvHelmsandTripp
Roakes. After being bounced
around by the Campus Solicita-
tion Committee, Chancellor Rich-
ard Eakin gave the go ahead for
the plan earlier this year.
A seven and half foot by eight
plot can be purchased for groups
to place their insignias on ft r only
$30. So far over 50 spots have been
purchased; however, a tew spots
still remain. Any student regis-
tered organization is eligible to
purchase a spot. The rules are
simple, just stay in your lines
Although eight to ten groups
began painting last Friday, stu-
dent organizations can begin
painting again this Fridav after 2
p.m. and also on Saturday morn-
ing. The same schedule will be in
effect for next week as well.
It is not known for sure when
the street will be completed but
Roakes, now president of SGA,
said "1 would love tor it to be
completed by Christmas break
Organizations interested in
reserving a spot should contact
Roakes at the SGA office located
in the U-wing of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center or by calling the SGA
office at 757-4726.
Pacesetters begin fund drive
By THOMAS BARRY
A major fund-raising cam-
paign began n Nov. 28 and will
continue running through June 30,
190 on behalf of Fast Carolina
Universitv s Performing Arts Se-
ries.
The campaign was officially
kicked-oft at the homeof Chancel-
lor and Mrs. Richard Eakin and is
thefirst formal activity undertaken
by the Performing Arts Paceset-
ters Mrs. Fakinisa member of the
Pacesetters board of directors.The
board is chaired by Ilene Entin
Cox, and ECU liaison for the group
is Stuart Secttor.
The Pacesetters is a new com-
munity-based support group
which serves as an auxiliary of
ECU's Performing Arts Series. It
was founded in midsummer by
community volunteers and will
function in a variety of ways to
assist the Performing Arts Series
in fund-raising, subscription
drives and social activities.
Some projects already under-
way this year include the opening
night reception preceding the per-
formance of the Beaux Arts Tno, a
progressive dinner following the
February performance of "Dream
Girls a gala accompanying the
Itzhak Perlman concert in April,
the allocation of funds for the
purchase of several items tor
Wright Auditonum,and theinau-
gural plaque fund-raising project.
An inaugural plaque, which
displays the names of individuals
or organizations which contrib-
uted funds, will be permanently
placed in the main foyer of Wright
Auditorium at the beginning of
the 1990-1991 Performing Arts
Series season.
The three categories are Gold
Circle (contributors of $1000 or
more will have their name en-
graved on a gold plate), Silver
Circle (contributors of $500-$999,
will receive their name engraved
on a silver plate) and Bronze Circle
(contributors of $250-$499 will
receive their name on a bronze
plate).
All contributors will receive a
10 percent discount at the Paceset-
ters boutique, first priority and
early seating choice on Perform-
ing Arts Series season tickets and
other specified benefits. All gifts
to the Pacesetters campaign are
tax deductible.
All season subscribers to
ECU's Performing Arts Series are
automatically granted member-
ship in the Pacesetters organiza-
tion but are not eligible for all of
the privileges that belong to the
members of Pacesetters.
Seventy percent of the funds
raised in this campaign will be
placed in a interest-bearing en-
dowment account. Only the inter-
est will be made available for use
to benefit the Performing Arts Se-
ries. The remaining 30 percent will
remain inan lnterest-bearingfoun-
darion account which will be avail-
able to the Pacesetters for their
discretion and operating capital.
"The Performing Arts Series
has presented quality perform-
ances for many, many years, but
with the costs continually on the
rise, the ability of the Department
of University Unions to maintain
and enhance the offerings has been
stretched Cox said. "It will be
the main focus of the Pacesetters
to alleviate the strain in this area
The aid derived from the Pace-
setters organization is invaluable,
but it also guarantees that the cul-
See PACESETTERS, page 3
Unnsfidl�
Editorial
C'est la vie by
Stephanie
Classifieds
���������
Stephanie Folsom has resigned from her position as managing
editor of The East Carolinian. All the staff would like to wish her
all the best in her future endeavors (Photo by J.D. Whitmire).
State and Nation9
Statistics show
background of cocaine
users
Features15
Interview with Coach
Mike Steel
Comics��20
Welcome new
cartoonist, Joey
Robinson
Lady Pirate
basketballers
loose to Wolfpack





THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 7,1989
Governor's
program funds
Pitt Memorial
' i l NtHj Bureau
Pitt County Memorial Hos-
pital has received a $188,500 grant
from the North Carolina
, Governor's 1 iighway Safety Fro-
gram to establish a traffic injury
prevention program in Pitt
County.
Initially, the program will
focus on traffic injurv prevention
in Pitt Count) and then will possi-
bly expand to surrounding coun-
ties served bv Pitt Memorial's
Trauma Service, according to
Bailey, trauma program
manager at Pitt Memorial.
"This program stems from a
borative effort among the
trauma service and the depart-
i - f medicine and surgery at
ist Carolina University
�� h iol ol Medicine Bailev said.
gram plans include form-
g the Pitt County Memorial
Injury Prevention Advi-
ncil identifying existing
i prevention programs
� in the community .
� : ' � the potential re
. ; rogran
r�s also call for an area-
wide assessment of the traffic in-
jury problems that have not vet
ir ssed. This effort will
i ity wide repre-
from lavs enforcement,
traffi engineers health care pro-
ils, educators, local and
stat . I itors i mmunity and
and the media.
itl v ounty and the sur-
nties programs for
i denl revention are
active and can benefit from
net orking so that efforts are
than needlessly
dupli a ted 1( y.
Pitt Memorial President
DaMcRae is pleased the hospi-
making a commitment to
ion
1 listorically, hospitals have
been more involved in the treat-
ment and rehabilitation of acci-
dent victims McRae said. "We
J to working with
istn programs to
n n i Ived in injury
'�' ; � veh le crashes are the
.a of death in the
tati - among people ages
� � U years In Pitt County
re has been an increase
ilities since 1987. In 1986, the
: ath toll due to motor vehicle
rashi a as 19 The toll rose to 21
- and 22 in 1988.
Research indicates that rural
populations are at greater risk for
morbidity and mortality from
a idents than urban popu-
lations. A number of factors are
thought to contribute to this in-
creased risk such as delayed vic-
tim discovery and transport to
trau ma i enters, seat belt and safetv
seat use, agricultural vehicles,
travel speeds, and alcohol and
drug use. Bailey said the
r .ram's multidisciplinary,
community approach will allow
U r stud v of these factors to deter-
mine which have a more signifi-
cant effect.
Members of Delta Zeta sorority participated in Wednesday nighfs candlelight vigil at Jarvis
Methodist Church. The event was sponsored by Mothers Against Drunk Driving as part of Red
Ribbon Day, an effort to reduce drunk driving (Photo by Garrett Killian � ECU Photo Lab).
fa �ast Carolinian
Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V. Cope
Kellej O'Connor
Patrick Williams
Guj J. Harvej
Stephanie K. Emon
Adam T. Blankenship
Manufacturing engineers
plan January conference
A conference to explain how
industries and agencies can com-
ply with state and federal envi-
ronmental laws will be held Jan.
25 at ECU.
The Environmental Compli-
ance Conference will feature guest
speakers on environmental and
safety regulations. Special atten-
tion will be given to the regula-
tions and disposal problems asso-
ciated with hazardous waste ma-
terials.
Sessions will be held in the
Willis (Regional Development
Institute) building beginning at
8:30 a.m.
The conference is sponsored
by the Coastal Plains Chapter and
the ECU Student Chapter of The
Society of Manufacturing Engi-
neersand is presented bv the ECU
School oi Industry and Technol-
ogy and the Division of Continu-
ing Education. A registration fee
of $40 will be charged to partici-
pants.
For more information contact
the Division of Continuing Edu-
cation, East Carolina University,
Greenville, N.C. 27858 or phone
757-6143 or 1-800-767-9111.
Health center gives stress
management tips for exams
Every day on college cam-
puses you hear people comment
about how much "stress" thatthev
are under. But what actually is
stress and what is the best wav to
deal with it?
Stress is described as "the non-
specific response of the bodv to
any demand made upon it Stress
results after one is exposed to
change or to a situation that may-
be dangerous, confusing, irritat-
ing or boring. Stress is a part of
your everyday life and it can be
considered positive or negative.
Positive stress, also called
"eustress can enhance produc-
tivity and even longevity. Eustress
is the euphoric feeling you experi-
ence while exercising or when you
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"STUDENT BUDGET NIGHT"
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Every Thursday Night
$1.00 Imports
$1.00 Cans
$1.25 Highballs
$2.50 leas
$2.50 Pitchers
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Vims, Lavish Dessert Table, and all of the trimmings!
Monday, December 25 � 11:00 a.m3:00 p.m.
$13.95
Children 12 to 6 $6.95
Children 6 and Under Free!
Mt
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207 S.W. Greenville Blvd.
For Reservations Call: 355-5000
Merry
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DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National Rate S5.75
Open RateS4.c5
Local Open Rate$4.75
Hulk & Frequence Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours:
Monda - Friday
10:00 - 5:00 pin
Phone:
757-6366
SunSational
Tanning and Toning Center
Get started on your base tan now!
Spring Break is just around the corner!
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Colposcopy clinic opens at Student Health
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 7,198H
The pap smear examination is and if not treated, some cases may
inducted to detect any abnoram- lead to early cancer. Pap smear
lities of the cells on the cervix. By
performing pap smear examina-
tions routinely health care provid-
ers may be able to detect evidence
of dieases years before any dam-
age is done.
A pap smear is a microscopic
examination of cellsobtained from
both the endo and ecto cervix. The
cervix is at the end of the uterus
and is composed of two types of
cells, squamous and endocervical
cells. These two types of cells are
important in the pap smear evalu-
ation. These cells can take on a
different appearance under a
microscope which can mean sev-
eral things. Pap smears can detect
some infections such as yeast,
genital warts, herpes and cellular
changes such as atypia, dsyplasia,
and cancer.
Dsyplasia is a term used to
describe abnormal cells which are
not malignant. Left untreated these
cells continue to grow multiply,
exams can also detect changes that
may indicate early invasive can-
cer of the cervix. Dsyplasia of early
invasive cervical cancer does not
opsy and it will be sent to a lab to
be analyzed.
The colposcopy and biopsy
will help your health care pro-
vider to determine what was
abnormal about your pap smear.
To Your Health
By Suzanne Kellerman
Student Health Center
cause discharge, itching or pain,
therforc it is important to have a
yearlv pap smear examination.
If cells that are not normal are
found during your pap smear
examination a special exam called
a colposcopy may be performed.
Your health care provider will use
the colposcope to look more
closely at the normal cells.
During the colposcope exam
if your health care provider ob-
serves any thing that does not look
normal a tiny sample of tissue
woll be taken from vour cervix.
This tissue sample is called a bi-
Stress
Then the best treatment can be
determined.
If your pap test is not normal
and you require a colposcopy
remember before your appoint-
ment : do not douch for three days,
do not have sex for 24 hours, and
plan to have the exam when you
are not having your monthly pe-
riod. After the colposcopy and
biopsy do not have sex for three
days so that the area can heal. If
you have not had a pap smear
examination conducted or have
not had the exam in the past year
you should have this exam con-
Continued from page 2
ducted. Pap smear examinatinsare
performed at the Student Health
Center for $15. This fee includes
screening for chlamydia, gonor-
rhea and the pap smear. Try to
schedule your appointment ap-
proximately three weeks in ad-
vance.
For more information on pap
smears and colposcopy contact the
Student Health Center.
'To Your Health" is a weekly
education and information col-
umn. Please direct any questions,
comments or suggetions to 757-
6794.
1st Annual Christmas Party
with
The Amateurs
Friday Dec. Sth
Santa will be there to pass out
presents
Don't forget Friday after noon dinner
The Pass The Hat W MotUfays
Feature Artist & BeSafe'
4:30- until
receive an A on a mid-term. Nega-
tive stress, also called "distress
can cause harmful, unpleasant
effects. This type of stress is com-
monly associated with diease and
illness.
Everyone would like to avoid
distress nd only experience
distress. Obviously this is impos-
sible. Since we can't avoid stress it
is best to think about stress posi-
tively. Life would be dull without
it!
Faculty Senate
Most college students will
experience some type of stress at
exam time. This is to be expected,
but it is best to learn to accept
what you cannot change and at-
tempt to deal with exam stress
productively.
Ways to Reduce Stress
-Organize vour time bv set-
ting priorities. Make a list each
day of what you need to accom-
plish.
Continued from page 1
which specified certain terms in
thedocument. Dr. Robert Schellen-
berg proposed a cultural plurism
resolution for the development of
human diversity at ECU.
Dr. Thomas Powell, director
of the of the admissions depart-
ment, reported the admission sta-
tisties of the current freshman class.
With 8,800 applicants to ECU,
Powell said that 6,700 enrolled.
Within this group, 14 are Indians,
41 are Asians, 202 are black, 18 are
ter of their class.
Patricia Anderson of the
Admissions Committee reported
three catalog changes in the soci-
ology, communications and fash-
ion merchandising departments.
Director of Athletics Dave
Hart explained the current drug
policy to the senate with positive
reports. The athletic department,
which implemented the manda-
tory drug test policy in 1985, has
been commended bv the UNC
1 spaTvc sntMHr- resfarFSfflrrW ' "BhaWcCBvenibf irfnslooV
ing at the policy as a model pro-
gram for the other 16 state cam-
puses.
Hart also said that the ECU
football team had no positive re-
ports of drug or alcohol this vear.
The resolution to the UNC
Faculty Assembly on Intercolle-
giate Athletic Reform was denied
approval by a 27 3 vote by the
senate.
The aveaee SAT score,
weighted, was �73. Out-of-state
students reported having higher
average scores of 53 points than
in-state students. The scores were
up 11 points from last year's class.
Seventy-seven percent of the
class was in the top half of their
high school class, while 23 percent
were in the bottom half. Eight
percent were .n the bottom quar-
Pacesetters
Continued from page 1
tural climate of our community
will remain the same in its level of
quality.
The Performing Arts Paceset-
ters auxiliary operates in conjunc-
tion with the ECU Foundation,
Inc. The Foundation receives and
manages private gifts to the uni-
versity.
Share the Holidays
with those you love
Pdv'ihy
Cards and Gifts
from
Recycled Paper Products, Inc.
Available at
- Limit One Per Item -
i1.00 off any calendar i
i i
i or boxed X-mas cards i
i i
Jfojdl 2-24-89
-Eat a balanced diet. Too much
alcohol,caffeine, and sugar can
contribute to irritability or fatigue.
-Plan to spend some time
alone each day to clear your mind
,nd relax!
-Study on a regular basis.
Procrastination and cramming
will only increase your stress.
-Take study breaks every
hour, Go for a walk down the hall
or exercise! This should re-ener-
gize you for more studying.
-Get enough sleep and rest.
-Don't be afraid to say no.
Don't overextend yourself and try
to do too much.
-Lastly, keep your sense of
humor. Learn too accept what you
cannnot change. Good Luck!
For more informationon stress
contact the Student Health Cen-
ter "To Your Health" is a weekly
health and education information
column. Please direct any ques-
tions, comments, or suggestions
to 757-6794
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Every Night At
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RESTAURANT � BAR
V
We Tend To Get A Little Fresh!
Yes. Our restaurant is quite pleasant, but we do know oui boundarii -
except when it comes to serving the fieshest selections each evenii .
livery night there is a new menu of fresh specials, ChickenBeef
SeafoodPasta All prepared fiom the freshest ingredients avail
BroiledSauteedBakedAll are specially seasoned.
If we don t offer the entree to please vour personal laste, just ask, we'll try to satisl. youi
palate with yout very own personal favorite.
ivory night inluilryO's, there is a now menu nl fresh specials The following is a sampling ol dw i h
STARTERS
BUCKET" Ol SHRIMP
i I hoik I dirimp Served with lemon and cocktarl sauce
( Hi I S AND HUH I I'l All
BAKED HRir. (I OR I WO)
Petit w heel i'l biip w i ipped in I.
;i mil with (: in li bread an I
il almonds Raked and
i scives
SOUPS
ROASTED CORN-CRABMEAT CHOWDER
I iesh raisted corn with crabmeal green unions, eclen herbs
and .i lemon ctlanlro lopping
SOUP OF THE DAY
( 11of s daily creation
SALADS
GREENVILLE SALAD
Garden liesh greens lopped �illi chopped turkey bam, i it
mushrooms Iwocheeses, bacon, lomato, andcroulons served
illi cheese loasl
CHARLEYO'S CLUB SALAD
ci n- Garden fresh gre is lopped vilh chunks ol
avocado bacon i gg
vinaigreltc dressing Served with chcesi
CAESAR SALAD (TOR rWO)
$6.25 dM
ENTREES
BLACKENED PRIME RIB
Generous porlion ol prime lib �� as ; � d vilh
Jiz.Vr spices and gulled
JACK DANIELS RIBEYE
c. �r (.hoke cul ribeyesleak seasoned with oui lack Pamcls uw
GRILLED CHICKEN
Boneless breast of gulled chicken served over lomali
� pasta wilii garlic, shallots, mushrooms and sun -Irmi lorn
$5.95 COCONUT SHRIMP
umbo shrimp deep fried in our coconut batter l-
,i i niiv sawe
5
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She East (Earnlfman
-( tkr f �l ���
�ity ume I9?9
David Herring, cawm�y
Stephanie Folsom, UMpicto
lAMESF.J. K Kit. i�k.MM�
Lori Martin, m�ui�
CAROI lt: Cl SK K, latfyreLAi �
Michael Martin, sta.
Scott Maxwei i , s-n� ��
Carrie Armstrong, ummm .
SlEI'l I.AME SlNGI ETON, &� Ettb�
Susan Kress, i �. u.
Alvl NlXON,i�
S'U AK! ROSNEJ
Pamela Cope,
Matthew Rici
Trao Weed
U ff Parker, ,
BtTli 1.UPTON,
December 7 1989
OPINION
'ace 4
Steffsays goodbye
The party's over
The stress is high this last pro-
duction night, but possibly not as
high for any other staff members as
it is for those of us leaving The East
Carolinian. It's the final newspaper
of the semester and for a few oi us,
it's our last. Tears are being shed and
tempers are easily flared this eve-
broke and stopping production.
One addition will be made to the
advertising staff, but aside from that
the same Jimmy F. . Mckee will be
in control of his advertising repre-
sentatives. He may exceed Jett
Parker in being the one person to
stay in the same job position for the
ning for the managing editor and longest time. It's hard to imagine
Staff illustrator. Too many emotions TEC without jimmy,
are escaping as we prepare Circulation and the business de-
Thursday's paper for our favorite partment are staying intact Matt
audience � the students of ECU. Richter and Stuart Rosner are too
But aside from the sappiness, new in their positions to consider
you need to know what you can taking flight. And of course the illus-
expect from The East Carolinian trious general manager, David Her-
next sememster. Lori Martin, the ring, will again be here to corral us
current news editor, slides into my into our prospective corners.
spot as managing editor. She's As my name fades into the past
worked since June to create one oi with such greats as Bonehead and
the best news sections ever and is the Harvard-roaming Deanhardt, I
enthusiastic about her next chal- can only hope you've noticed some
lenge, so you can expect an even oi the extra hours we've put into
better product next semester. No
news, vet, as to who's taking her
place.
Jeff Parker graduates this semes-
ter, and although he'll be here for
TEC over the past year. New com-
puter equipment taught me to get
over my repressed comp-phobia
and design a better looking layout.
I've also heard numerous compli-
graduate school, he's passing his ments concerning the improved
position to the editorial cartoonist content, but I'd be egotistical it I
and creator, ofr'The Law Sevtsr-diiin't note the real reason why.
Reid Sretfe- filieti "m -for" jt-ft"thfs
summer, so it should be an easy
transition.
Our other two editors, Mike
Martin and Caroline Cusick, are
both fairly new and are sticking to
what they do best � sports and fea-
tures. Our tabloid editors, Scott
Maxwell and Carrie Armstrong,
DifrmgirH' rWCPyCar sentence here,
I've been blessed with three new
editors. Lori, Mike and Caroline
brought a lot oi enthusiasm and
renewed dedication to your news-
paper and it's been a payoff tor the
erUire staff and you. They've made
me look good.
But most oi all I need to thank
Progress continues with involvement
will also stick around to give you the you, the students. Mv editorial page
best in entertainment and satire al- has been graced with many oi your
ternatives. names and I appreciate you sharing
The other biggest change is in the your ideas and criticism. Without
credit department. Art Nixon you I would not have known this
graduates this semester and is relin- experience and been pushed to t'ol-
quishing her throne to Phong low the convictions laved on my
Luong. She's worked a long time to heart. May this truly be a great holi-
find out who's paying their bills to day season for you and God bless.
TEC, so there's no chance of us going � 30�
Flexing muzzles
Free speech is being attacked from the Left
By NAT HENTOFF
Playboy Columnist
as many restrictions on freedom versity Law School, among oth-
of speech as we should ers. The codes that have been
A quarter of a century after adopted are not limited to epi-
The EVER-SMILING jerry the free-speech movement began thets. On most campuses, a stu-
Falwell,inclosingdown the Moral d th-1 University of California at dent can be disciplined � oreven
Majority, explained that its work Berkeley, helping fuel the antiwar expelled � for words that create
had been accomplished�its val- and civil rights campaigns, some an intimidating, hostile or de-
of the brightest of today's students meaning environment for educa-
are marching in the other direc- tional pursuits,
tion. The codes that have been
Thisneoconservatismamong adopted are not limited to epi-
liberals and radicals, blacks and thets. On most campuses, a stu-
feminists, and even a number of dent can be disciplined � oreven
law professors, has its roots in the expelled � for words that create
verv real racism that does exist on an intimidating, hostile or de-
a number of campuses. At Brown, meaning environment for educa-
tional pursuits.
Or a student may be put on
ucs had become part of the Amen
can mainstream. He was right, in
one respect. For years, the Moral
Majority worked zealously to
banish "bad speech targeting
"offensive" books in school librar-
ies, as well as "socially harmful"
magazines on newsstands
Now, on American college
campuses, there is a new, rapidly h)r instance, fliers were distrib
growing legion of decency that is "ted reading: "Things have been
also devoted to punishing bad
speech. Its list of indefensible
words is different from Falwell's.
Expressions of racism, sexism,
homophobia, anti-Semitism and
prejudice against the handicapped
are to be outlawed. But the basic
principle is precisely that of Fal-
well: A decent society requires lim-
its to free expression, and if that
means diminishing the First
Amendment, the will of the ma-
jority must rule.
Accordingly, on a number of
prestigious campuses, a majority
of students and faculty have con-
cluded that censorship must be
integral to higher education. As
Canetta Ivy � one of the heads of
student government at Stanford
University � says, "We don't put
going downhill since the kitchen trial for "racist or discriminatory
helpmovedintotheclassroomAt comment or other expressive
Smith, four black women received
vicious racist letters. At Yale, the
Afn -American Cultural Center's
bu lding was emblazoned with a
WHITE POWER sign and a swas-
tika.
In reaction, black students and
many white students have joined
to insist on the creation of codes
not only of student conduct but
also ot student speech. Adminis-
trators. oftenenthusiastica!ly,have
yielded to those demands.
There are now various codes
of forbidden speech at Emory
University, the University of
Wisconsin, the University of Call
behavior directed at an individ-
ual" � if the speaker "intention-
ally" set out to "demean the race,
sex or religion" of the aggrieved
complainant (University of Wis-
consin).
These thou-shalt-not-speak
codes are so vague and broad that
just a disagreement on such issues
as affirmative action or an inde-
pendent Palestinian state can lead
to a verdict that a particularly
vehement student is guilty of dis-
criminatory harassment against
blacks or Jews.
Who will judge the defen-
dants? Administrators will, or a
fornia. the University of Buffalo Panel of administrators and stu-
Law School and New York Uni- See FREE, page 5
To the editor:
The spring semester luu0 will
culminate the ever-increasing in-
volvement of students at ECU.
Never before have I witnessed a
more vocal interest in campus
affairs; this semester proved ECU
students do play a significant role
in Greenville. 1 would like to see
this progress continue, because
apathy stunts growth possible at
ECU I urge everyone to seriously
consider taking part in a campus
activity, be it academic, recrea-
tional, religious, social, political,
etc make vour voice heard and
count The seeds ot change are in
our hands - let's help to make
ECU grow and prosper
Robin M. Andrews
Junior
Anthropology
PresidentReformist Part)
Christ in X-mas
Christmas time should be a
time of laughter, joy and spend-
ing time with frttTids. Wtththr
hustle and bustle of the Christmas
season, we should stop and reflect
what Christmas is really all about
Americans have really gone
the distance, trying to start Christ-
mas two weeks before Thanksgiv-
ing.
Economic powers have com-
mercialized Christmas by placing
trees, lights, and other accessories
along with the 1 lallo ween decora-
tions. There is also a common ten-
dency of cutting unnecessary
writing. ButChristmasshould not
be based on shiny packages, a fat
man in a red suit, or even on a
twenty pound turkey in the oven.
Christmas should remind us of
the Savior, Jesus Christ and his
birth in Bethlehem. Also, if you
stop to consider what the Savior
did for the world, 1 don't believe
that the "Christ" before "mas" is
unnecessary writing. If the world
doesn't care enough to even put
christ where he belongs now, what
will future generations know of
the infant Jesus?
I feel that each person should
take a better look at themselves
and reflect on the true meaning oi
Christmas.
Everybody should begin a
GREAT campaign to "Take the X
our of X-mas and replace it with
Christ (Matthew Chapters 1& 2)
Joseph Brent 1 loggard
Graduate Student
Industry and Technology
Axe tradition
To the editor:
When I was a kid, I read the
story of the little fir tree; one De-
cember it was cut and taken by a
family to be a Christmas tree. It
was decorated, danced and sung
around, and celebrated. When
Christmas was over, the family
took down the little fir tree, put it
in the attic, and forgot about it.
All year the little fir tree waited
until he would be decorated and
celebrated again. But the next
winter, when the family remem-
bered him, they pulled him out
into the yard, chopped up hisdead
branches, and burnt him up. And
that was the end of his dreams.
Every Christmasl think about
that story. And in the current con-
cern about dwindling natural re-
sourcesandtheexploitationofour
environment, I have begun to view
the killing of trees� or buying of
already dead ones� at Christmas
time in a new light. Massive de-
forestation around the world,
particularly in the Western hemi-
sphere, has already created such
problems as topsoil erosion and
loss of animal habitats, and con
tributes tooone depletion, global
wanning, and the Greenhouse
effect. When we are losing a spe-
cies or more a day in the Amazon
ram forests, and environmental
groups tight daily battles to save
our own Old Growth Forests in
the Pacific Northwest, it seems
ludicrous to continue to support
an industry which kills trees
merely for the sake of human
decorations
Now, the economic argument
tor the Christmas tree industry is
clear: these farms provide eco-
nomic opportunit) for tin- people
who run them However, coca
plant farms provide a living tur
the producers and sellers it co
came, selling drugs provides a
living tor drug dealers, i he pro i-
sion ol economic opportunit)
-alone is not a pnvincina argu
irfbnrfofarfV inchistrV. " " � "
But, you sav, these trees are
grown specifically lor harvesting
and selling. We are not cutting
virgin forest or ram forest or in
any way depleting a natural re-
source We are simply har esting
a crop Bui the crop we are bar
vesting is not one which fulfills
any biological or even emotional
need; a dead tree in our living
room during the month ot Decem-
ber is simply a monument to
human vanity, a memorial to a
perspective of the Earth which is
completely self-centered and an-
thropocentric.
This last term is a recently
coined on which expresses thee
human particularly Western
human view of the world and
its creatures as being here solel)
for human benefit It is a perspec
live which many environmental-
ists feel have led us to where we
currently stand on the brink ol
environmental disaster. A recent
article in the UTNE READER
outlines 133 ways to save the Earth;
12, under the heading oi "Phi-
losophies suggests that we
"never use life-forms merely as
means. Remain conscious of their
intrinsic value and dignity Now,
killing a tree )ust to decorate it in
your living room does not, it seems
to me, recognize the intrinsic alue
of that tree. It isobjectificationofa
once living creature � to be looked
at, garnished, and perhaps even
celebrated, but objectified none-
theless.
And a tree is not an object. It is
not a television, a store' or even a
piece of art. It is a living, respi-
rating creature with a beaut) and
value and joy and yes, perhaps
even a soul, all its own. And 1
don't see how killing such an
unassuming, innocuous creature
can add to a celebration of any-
thing especially the and life
Christians are supposedly cele-
brating on December 25.
None of which is to sav that
von should not have a Christmas
tree � oreven that you must have
an artificial one. Several alterna-
tives exist to the dead Douglas Fir
or Red Spruce, chopped down
weeks before and already shed-
ding its needles. There are Christ-
mas tree farms and sellers which
offer live trees, dug rather than
chopped, which can be planted in
your yard after the holiday season
is over. Through this alternative,
you can add living tree to vour life
each year, as opposed to killing
one
(. r you i an bu a lai
tree, such as a ort. I
decorate it Alter Chnsti
ha e a beautiful I ml
round
Or v. u can di I i
which alti ad stai
yard or plant one
pose 1 he traditi i
trees began in this
rating trees outsid
them and bringing tl
Perhaps it isa tradil
return to and in d
the joy of the sea
and ncightx irs' liv esas
i ��. n
At this tn
the world r gatl
lies and friends ' i
(elebrate the end
comi
rather than a dnt I
a dead creatun
living ti
grow th
tion
le perl
:
kjH rv r.f
i Iradu
!
Apathy is lost
I o the edit

is the worst of tin s Sol
hits u-t befon lav
dav and I real .
been M e es Op II to see A
partv, the Reformists
The groups' activities I i
blood back to m brail
move and see I am i
I hisseiru stt r'sa B
opened the sleeps e I i
res eh. e m. ;
of a ote I hssine sl
dent CH.KJ) COI t
to put an effective n
office Howevei
over sets in as tin. i It i tn i
tied.
C ampus then throw -
Reformists tall out and
the next election Sickei thai
dog, a new s ,A deals i ith issu
that continue to throl
'0 a
;
sues like campus lighting seu.
harassment, police brutalits
begin to clear mv eyes But iss
like campus rai ism rai
community awareness cleai
head
ith a pulse now w e spi
at the abuse o( Edai ter ak h
anti-hallowecn ordinances V1
rail) and surge forward to n
our foe downtown Again I . tl
power ol a vote, w� .
ress, change. But we an
finished. l"hissemesterisovei bi
there is a new ear bt ginnin
Full) aware ol our responsibilil
we must never kiss the porceia
goddess again
lim I a) t
Histo
unn i
Reformist Pai
The letters printed in 1
Campusl orutn" will contain
rent topics of concern to tl
campus, community or rtatio
The letters are restricted on
with regard to rules ot gramm
and decency. Send letters to:
Campus ForumSpectrum
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Old South Building
Greenville, NC 27834





dents. And ii they are ideologues
and find the controversial politi-
cal views of the defendant repel-
lent, the student can miss a semes
;er or more for being under the
illusion that the university is a
place oi tree inquiry
While the presidents ot the
universities ol Michigan and
Wisconsin, among others have
haik-u their codes of prohibited
speech. Donald Kennedy, prvst
dent 01 Stanford, is resisting the
notion that studentsare best taught
u think tor themselves b being
told wh.i they can't saj When
you tell people what they cant
say Kennedy has emphasized
they will begin to suppress what
they think.
Already in classroomsat some
merican colleges where Ian
guage is monitored as it is at
czechoslovakian and Chinese
colleges there are students
ifraid to explore certain lines et
�hought lest they be considered
racist or sexist t New i ork I ni
versiK Law School, tor example
where heresy hunters abound in
the student body the atmosphere
in some classes is hke that ol the
old-time House I n American
ActivitiesC ommituv Onestudent
describes "a host ot watchdog
committees and a generally hos
tile classroom reception regard-
ing any student comment right et
center
At Stanford, the student or-
ganizations insistently demand-
ing a code ot forbidden language
include the Asian I av Students
Association, the Black Law stu
dents Association the lew ish Law
Students Association and the
sian-American Students Asso-
ciation. From these groups and
from V U Law School will come
some et the judges et the next
decades and maybe even a Su-
preme Court ustice or two
The First Amendment is al-
way s fragile w itnes: the frenzy
to amend the Bill et Rights alter
the Supreme c eurt ruled m une
that the 1 irst Amendment pro
tected flag burning, but with stu-
dents at prestigious colleges now
intent on limiting spec h tor a
greater social good, the 1 irst
amendment will become even
more vulnerable to attack in the
years ahead.
But shouldn't there be omc
punishment of especially hurtful,
insulting, mturiating words?
When he was mayor of Chicago,
Harold Washington was asked to
punish those responsible for in-
flammatory language that had
gone out over a citv radio station
According to his former press
secretary, he refused, saying, "111
scratch one word, where do 1
stop?"
The current college codes
began in response to crude racial
and sexist scrawls. But now the
language being scratched out ex-
tends to any words that create a
hostile atmosphere or any lan-
guage that "involves as express or
implied threat to an individual's
academic efforts" what ever
that may mean.
1 lecture at colleges and uni-
versities around the country ev-
ery year, and 1 intend to sav what
1 think about these shameful
speech codes. At some schools, 1
may thereby be creating a hostile
atmosphere in lecture halls w here
there are students who sav they
crave censorship.
And that is precisely my in-
tention: to create an atmosphere
hostile to suppression ot speech
lor any reason.
Recently, friends of the First
Amendment were given reason
tor hope when a Federal district
court in Michigan struck down
the University of Michigan's re-
striction on student speech as
unconstitutional. They are too
vague and overboard, said Judge
Avern Cohn, and therefore in
violation of the First Amendment.
The suit was brought by the
A.L.I .1.
1 his i the lirst court decision
on university suppression ot
speech, and since it is so clear, it
mayinfluenceothercourtsinother
parts of the country to remind
colleges and universities that they
are in the business ot free though,
not regulated thought.
This article was reprinted with
permission from Playboy magazine
CANCUN
YOUR TRIP INCLUDES:
G Roundtrip airfare
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7 nights hotel lodging, based
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Special College Week Events
On location tour escort
All taxes and gratuities, except
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The staff of the East Carolina University National Telefund thanks
the individuals in these organizations who volunteered their time
to call ECU Alumni, friends, and
parents for ECUfs Annual Giving Program.
Thanks to you, gifts and pledges totaled $168,800 to
University Enrichment programs.
Alpha Delta Pi Gamma Beta Phi
Alpha Omicron Pi Garrett Hall
Alpha Phi Greene Hall
Alpha Phi Omega .(.hm Jarvis Hall
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Xi Delta
Ambassadors
American Marketing Assoc.
Belk Hall
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Omega
Clement Hall
Cotten Hall
Delta Sigma Theta
Delta Zeta
Fleming Hall
Kappa Alpha
Lamda Chi Alpha
Phi Eta Sigma
Phi Kappa Psi
Pi Kappa Alpha
Sigma Nu
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Sigma Pi
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Surf Team
Theta Chi
White Hall
Special thanks to the Greenville area merchants who donated prizes
for winning callers.
Cubbie's Restaurant � Kerr Drugs � King Sandwich � Zacks' Yogurt � Sweet Caroline's � Regional
Limousine & Transport � TCBY � University Book Exchange � Frank's Pizza � Hank's Homemade
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� ECU Student Stores





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Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOM FOR RENT: Biltmorestreet. S12?
a month male or female Call Luke at 72-
44M leave a message
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: S160
plus utilities convenient to ECU campus
Call 752 4s5s j,k tor Kerry.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: SI 15
month share utilities Private homeclose
to campus 931-8312
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
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ROOMMATE NEEDED: (Male) 1 utili-
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9643
BEAUTIFUL PI ACL
� LI NEW 2 BEDROOMS �
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. V�k � itsi our ipeciAi rMcs lo change ieajci. and
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� Located Near ECU
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� ECU Bus Service
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756-7815 or 758-7436
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ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female ASAP1
3 bedroom house (w own bedroom 1 walk
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looking for sociallv and environmentally
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MALE ROOMMATE: Nonsmoker, sen
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FOR
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ROOMMATES WANTED: For large
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FEMALE : To share apartment on Lewis
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Only $59.88 j
iiih this coupon)
r -1
I 4 - Wheel Computer
Balance & I
Tire Rotation
I Only $19.88
(with this coupon)
II
Used Tire Special $5 & Up
For any of your Aum Service Needs
Gulf, B.P. & All Major Credit
Cards Excepted
Gulf Oil &
Atlas Products
FURNITUREFORSALECouch.loveseat
chair Navy blue and tan, fair condition
Must sell immediately Call 758-4924.
FOR SALE: Burgandvwine colored car
pet sied to fit Clement, Greene and white
dorms. Curtains that match carpet in
eluded. Good condition used only one
semester - $40 Call 830-0265 leave
message it no-one is at home
FOR SALE: Small round table I'sod a,
dining area in dorm room tor one semes
ter. Good condition Takes up a small
area. Light and portable - S30 Call 830
026s Leave message it no - one is at home
MOVING TO FLORIDA: Must sell sofa,
dining room set, and Mattress box
springs Very cheap Will take best offer
Mitch H30-82
FOR SALE: 1965 10 X 55 mobile home,
newly remodeled washing machine, re-
fng, ac, turn Nice location, 3 mi from
campus - $2800 - 7's 7989
FOR SAFE: Spa membership 3 vrs S180
- will divide - 758 7989
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE Tapers resumes,
thesis, etc that need to be typed, please call
756-8934between 5:30pm 930pm 17yrs
tvping experience Tvping is done on
computer with letter qualit) printer
REPORTS, RESUMES, TYPING, DESK-
TOP PUBLISHING, I ASER PRINTING:
Designer type 7 1933 We take reserva
turns tor t ping reports
WORD PROCESSING PHOTOCOPY-
ING SERVICES: We offer tvping and
photocopying services. We also sell soft
ware and computers 24 hrs in i out
guarantee typing on paper up to 20 hand
written pages SDF Professional comput
?rs. 106 E. 5th St. (beside Cubbies) Green
ville, N C 752-3694
GET ABOARD: Pirate rule 3routeson
the hour around campus Call757-4724i t
more details
DEPENDABLE, PROFESSIONA1
TYPIST: With state of the art word
processing equipment and Laser printer
Will meet your tvping needs Call eve
nings 756 - 1837
NEED A PICK-L'P: for a small or medium
load' Moving locally? Will haul furniture,
household items, brush piles, misc. Call
MORE CASH
FOR YOUR
USED BOOKS
Student Stores
Wright Building
ABORTION
" �" I "�� .)� Id � , "are"
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appotntmrnt Mon. thru Sjt
I .vs Cost Termination to 20 weeks of Pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
Dark Room Technician
WANTED
Experience Required Must Be
Familiar with
Halftones & PMT's
Please Apply in Person at
mz (Bast Carolinian
The Publications Building
(No Phone Calls Please)
Vernon after ipm at 757 0462
SPRING BREAK VA A I loss I
cun, Bahamas, Bermuda el ttheguar
ant(Hi lowest prices! dis ounts available
tor fraternities, sororities and organized
groups Save Money' Reserve before Dec
15 Call Julie at 931 R525 or Cherri at 931
8491
HfcLP WANTtn
ATTENTION- H1RI(. I overnment
jobs youi area Sm immediate
inps without waiting list or test S - ;
569,485 Call 1 602 838 8885 Ext R5285
HOLIDAY JOB OPPORTUNITY: The
1 loney Baked I lam Co 1. in search ol sea
sonal help to till our sale ter and
production positions We hue stores lo
i ated In the I kets Raleigh,
Durham, Greensboro Winston Salem,
Wilmington,Chai tl mta Please
check the white p.) or information tur
the store nearest your home
ACTINTVCOMMER IA1 S
No � �.
young adults families mature
animal- ill now! Charm Studio
800-837 1700
ATTENTION: im
- 2,00 tails. (1
602 838 888: '� �� BV
PART-TIMI (III CLERK
local lavs fin

M.
INVENTORY MER HANDISING
PERSON:
chandimg aiui countii
� tor the sali - � .
bw nthh
themontl
merchandisi
position is ide i I i
a part
dei � � .
isS5 hr. � ern
.n �� - - �� '�
HELP WANTED
typist secretai
puters, 104
phone 7 3694
SUMMER POSITIONS
and leadershi
ing valuable
nmre oi the �
program sp
tics, archer)
boarding art and crafts, rope irse
etc.), nursesJRN and mon 14.
nata offrts thfs ep r .un cuji
' eNrx'nence farHf , �� �� tf i"t�r
plus room and
Assistanl rhrector � an � ta, Rl
Bo 192, Wake Forest N.C27587 -
2661
formal forexecutiv Fl �
Phi Exe
TO All ML DIMS
e�ams and hu.e s.1 �
for spring semeM- r,H
Love the Alpha Phis
IHI IAHI � �� :
spankin' tann K : I
DAVI Pi Kl a ngrai
being eleel - retar
�-pi.�th d
. �
( Hli )M( (.
butt party' IT
, cat saw and y . � -
� that It vs
with you aair
ThetaChi
iAI.KAH I UTIONS
brothers �� I �
and appreciatu
ates .a: � '�'
Pfautz,ChrisWi � � -
Lay man and I I
an insp ral

IHI IAC HI BRiUHl ks
pt tl
I

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1 I i.Kll ks
1H 1 I I I s
CONGRATULATIONS
1 s c. s
apartol
- �
rtYUn ?�: rd
ArrLNrios .
Assembli
602-838 8885 Fit V 5285
ATTENTION: Ean
home' J2,000yr i
tails (1 602-838-8885 Ext.
PERSONALS
WANT TO BLV I sed
GOLFCLl BS Putters woods Irons Call
Drew at 524-4588 Mornings oi �
MFRRY CHRISTMAS TO AI L :
nities and Sororities hopeyoud
your exams and hae a men
1 lapps New ear Alpha Delta Pi
PHI KAPPA I VI inks I
Mexico - it was hot! Love th sistei
pledges ot Alpha D
ALPHA PHI OMEGA: Congratulal
newest brother- Patrie Alexanch i �
Camden. AlidaDaSilva, Alex Fuller,Mich
elle llanchanck, Rlbin Hirsch, Man
Hodge, Adrianne Smoak, David Wayne
and Nannette Williams
AZD'S: Ot we went to Cherry Oaks with
twisting on our minds and though we
never twisted it was a real good time The
night was wild, the Root wa- slick, and
most ot us are -Hire, the mistletoe, the delta
force, and falling on the floor t ou girls are
great' Love the Pikes!
PI KAPPA ALPHA: would like to con
gratulate Tim McNamara, ohn Melhorn,
Danny Hooper, Bill Sessoms David Wood
and Rob Wooten on graduation May the
spint of the Garnet and the (,old live tor
ever in your hearts We will miss you guys
- Once a Pike, Always a Pike'
ALPHA PHI: Alpha Phi Christmas wa-
oozy and sweet! Our Christmas tree is
beautiful' Everyone have a safe holiday
and good luck on exams' Love The Alpha
Phis
ALPHA PHL Sisters get ready for our big
slumber party Friday! Be there no later
than bpm' We're going to have a blast'
Love Alpha Phis
AMI BANNERMAN: You've been the
best fraternity educator' Our shinev pin-
are great' We love you' Love Trie Alpha
Phis
ALPHA PHI AND DATES: What a rockin
holiday mixer at Contentnea on Fnda'
We raged' Love the Alpha Phis
SIGMA PI: Looking forward to your semi

ZET AS
IHI RYAN-PIGS
2
tei - �
� - �

M - '
:
kVi Vu
JS(
PI K A IT
cing on N
5: Mil
Ghsson Alex
Ross enkins hns
Little wood ' v.
or Eric Millet
od) Seymoui V itt
reii Eric Tobin. Bi Marl
Vena .
I Michael Wils
ALL GREEKS Kap
best of luck on exams aM
andKvkm NewYears Seeever
semester Pi kappa Phi
PI KAPP - FALL 14SS"
review Pat King Archon' Neisoi T- ���
Homecoming float with I
ECU footballpi Kappa intran
Millercar Connie Brown having i
to d with the great footl
work any wa) Batman d I
killer pledge t lass Sweet b
ball Halloween Robot
lake Lake mivt Rob
now everybody lean
Waters, Fir Amend
the Press Wonder bread - bab I
liked really sweet "����
the charge throwing .
license Dj Brad Qartu Speak, ha- a
girlfriend; Alex Martin the i
Warden , White diamond Rocking th
dome Doc Oliver graduating The Rands
Royal Durwand Owen Summit It n
interestmgsemcstei tetshavekiUerspring
Your PR buddy Mark
STUDENTS: The Student Union ���
the best or luck to everyone on I i
Have the best Chnsrmas ever' 1 lo I:
REAP THE EAST CAROLINIAN





Anouncements
AIIENIIQRiaALL
The East Carolinian will be changing its
policy concerning announcements start-
ing in January, announcements will now
be tree (or only the 1st week of publication,
after that week there will be a charge of
1 st 25 words for student organizations
$2.00 and for non student organizations
- $3.00 any additional words will be $.05 s
Computer soence, math, chemistry, and
physics ma)ors are needed for Co-op posi-
tions in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Very
accessible work environment andcommu-
nitvPlease contact the cooperative edu-
cation office, 2028 GCB, 757-6)79.
EEBFQRM1XG ARTS
Performing Arts company in Virginia has
Co-op positions available in media rela-
tions, advertising, publications, technical
theatre, and education Please contact the
Cooperative Education office, 2028 GCB
75706979.
m&TERCHILPREN FUND
ovner Library is accepting monetary
donations to provide Chnstmas gifts for
the foster children of Pitt County from
'ov 27 to Dec 8. Your tax deductible
contribution can be made at Jovner Li-
brary Administrative Dept from'Sam till
-pm weekdays Make your check payable
to ECU - foster children fund Show the
children that you care this holiday season.
ECU SCHOOL OF MI ISIC
FENm�Cli
Treva Tankard, voice, senior Recital (Dec.
5 pm, Fletcher Rental Hall, free'); ECL'
!3.z Bonos and Trombone Choir, George
Broussard and Steven Fitts, Directors (Dec
t7pm, Fletcher Recital Hall, free); Steven
ritts. trombone Graduate Recital (Dec
7,7pm, Fletcher Recital Hall, free): Guv
Buck, voice, senior Recital(Dec.7, 9pm,
Fletcher Recital Hall, free); Madrigal din-
ners, Charles Moore, Director()Dec 7-9,
Mcndcnhall Student Center, all perform-
ances sold out); Susan Cooperman and
Jennifer Lay man, Senior Voice Reatal (Dec
8, 7pm, Fletcher Recital Hall, free).
WOMEN'S SOCCFR CI IJfl
There will be a mandatory meeting for all
soccer players who wish to play soccer the
spring semester The meeting will be in
Rm 1031 of GCB from 4 -5pm Thursday
Dec 7 .Ml new players are welcome.
EXPRESSIONS MAr.A7.MT.
Now has positions available for managing
editor, features editor, copy editor, com-
puter layout artist and staff writer. Appli-
cation deadline is Thursday, Dec 7at 5pm
Applications are available in the office of
Media Board secretary's office located in
the Publications Building across from
Jovner Library. Interviews will be sched-
uled shortly afterwards
BACCHUS
The last B AC CH US meeting for fall semes-
ter will be Tuesday, Dec. 5, 4pm in 305
Erwin 1 lall Cook luck on your exams and
have a happy holiday We'll meet again
Jan 9 at 4pm, in 305 Erwin and decide then
about a regular spring semester meeting
time. For more info Call 757-6793
ALLMEMMfiS OF EAST
CAROLINA FRIKNDS
There will be a Christmas party Sunday,
Dec 10 from 2-5pm in Mendenhalfs
multipurpose room for volunteers and their
kids There will be games and goodies for
the children, so please attend!
BKLK1L2S
The last meeting ot Big Kids for fall semes-
ter will be Tuesday, Dec. 5 at 5:30 in 210
Erwin Hall We U meal again Tuesday,
Jan. 9, same time and livtation We'll de-
cide then if that will continue as the meet-
ing time and location Good luck on your
exams! For more info call 757-6793
ATTfc.N HUN ALL tlHU
MEMBERS
All members are remind of a verv impor-
tant meeting on Thursday at 5pm in the
GCB in the Honor's Lounge. All honor
students are also invited to attend.
ASSEMBLY I.INF
Winterguard has a few positions remain-
ing for i ts 1 990 season The guard practices
twice weekly,and performs acr oss thestate
Come join us in a well - established col-
orguard organization An initial meeting
will be held on Friday, Dec. 10. Anyone
interested in participating with this award
- winning guard should contact Jody Jones
at 752 6912 before Sunday, Dec. 16.
JTJALCiffllSI;
-SOCIAL
All ECU district 97 SEANC members are
cordially invited to attend the Annual
Chnstmas social which will be held in the
Multi purpose room, at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, on Tuesday, Dec 5,1989 from
12 noon until 2pm
SEANC CHRISTMAS CANDY
SALE
Finance Committee members of ECU Dis-
tnct 97, SEANC, will be selling "home-
made" peanut bnttle and " homemade"
Chnstmas lollipops the week on Dec. 11-
15, on campus, in the lobby of the Student
Supply Store and in the main corridor
leading to the hospital, at the School of
Medicine, Brody building, from 12 noon -
2pm. The Peanut bnttle will be S2 bag
and the lollipops will sell for $.50 each.
COLPOSCOPY CLINIC
The Student Health Center Colposcopy
clinic opined November 28. The clinic is
staffed by two SI IS health care providers (
Dr John Siegel and Jolene Jernigan, FNP)
and a gynecological consultant (Dr Robert
Dayton). These services are available to all
ECU students who need colposcopy. As
always the SHS strives to minimize cost to
the student 1 lowever, there is a charge for
the coloscopy procedure Most medical
insurance companies provide coverage for
coloscopv.
AM ERlCIMARKEmsC
Attention all AMA members and inter-
ested students: The last AMA meeting of
the semester will be held Thursday, Dec 7,
1989 at 3:30 in room 1032 of the GCB .
Featuring Budweiser as the guest speaker.
FflRMAI WPAD U
FORMAL WEAR OOAAIAA
205 E. 5th St. 830-9409
OFFICE SUPPLIES. SCHOOL SUPPLIES
SOCIAL STATIONERY. GIFTS. GREETING CARDS
422 Arlington Blvd. (Opposite Pitt Plaza)
7564224
GREENVILLE. N. C.
Electronic Calculators For All Your
Resume Papers School Supply Needs.
Electronic Typewriter Ribbons
Great Selection, Price, and Service!
M-F 9:30 - 6:00
SAT 9:30 - 5:00
Art Supplies
T-Shirts
Mues
Student Stores
WRIGHT BUILDING
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
Tote Baas
Class Rings
Knapsacks
!r$2700OFFl
Any Regular
Priced Sweatshirt
j Dec. 1-Dec. 22
I
i
i
i
i
Coupon Must Accompany
L LYLibiMJ
ECU
STUDENT
STORES
Computers anu
Accessories
Wrapping Paper
Briefcases
Art Books
Jewelry
Calendars
Umbrellas
Cards
Reference Books
Best Sellers
Humor
Children's Books
Bibles
Inspirational Books
Travel Books
Literature





Newsmakers of the 1989 fall semester
I RUT KOAkl s
M HI !) M i 1111 Us
RI( li KP BROVN
WELCOME
STUDENTS AND FACULTY!
Smithfield Meat
Bologna
l2oz Pkg99tf
Overtoil's Coupon
( lip this Coupon and Save
Fresh hole Chicken Breast
3 - 5 Ih Familv Pucks

lb 99c
�' fl on purchase of SI0.00
r li
H fl in purchase of $20.00
r ni(
I
on purchase of $30.00 I
I
iple Clip the Coupon Bin the
; ies. ('hoose the 1 )iscount
1(1 ID Required to Qualify
Overton s
Supermarket. Inc
Campbell's
Cream of Celery Soup
Tomato
lOoz can
39
We have a complete variety of
all your Party needs
Plus Greenville's lowest
prices on KEGS!
Cold Power
Detergent
37 oz (iianl Box
99c
I imit one with Sit' �h f.�i nrd�
I
I
I
ust mer phone numbei
l I II) number
I imit 1 c upon per order
! spires 12 1-X(
Busch Beer
� of 12 l2oz cans
$4.59
(Oca Cola 2 Liters
Coke 'lassie, Diet Coke, Regular Coke or
( affeine Free
Limit 4
Fresh Meaty Spare
Ribs
lb 1.39
Sprite, Dr. Pepper or
Ginger Ale
2 liter bottle 79tf
Limit 4
Fresh Green
Cabbage
lb10c
Golden Bananas
lb29Z
White Potatoes
Loose-l -bag-em
lb12c
Yellow Onions
31b bag79
Store Hours:
Open Sundays 1 pm - 6 pm
Monday-Saturday X am - S pm
Quantity Rights Reserved
Corner of Third & Jarvis
Prices Effective:
Wednesday, December 6,
through Saturday, December 9, 1989





I
Newsmakers of the 1989 fall semester
ALFRED MATTHEWS
Chancellor Dr. Richard Eakin
made the news when the semester
began with hiscampusbeautifica-
tion project which is now being
completed. ECU's head football
coach. Bill Lewis, finished his first
season with a 5-5-1 record. While
the Pirate football team was busy
trying to up their 1988 record,
Steve Sommersand the Reformist
Party was making the political
news. The group sparked emo-
tion acrosscampus with their boy-
cott of the Student Government
Association re-elections in early
October. On Oct. 21, Coleen
McDonald became the 1989
Homecoming Queen during the
halftime in the ECU -Virgi ma Tech
East Carolina's new vice chancel-
lor, Richard Brown, along with
vice chancellors Ronald Speier
and Alfred Matthews, became
involved in Greenville's mass ar-
rest at Tar River Estates on Hal-
loween night. The three adminis-
trators were on the scene where
134 student were arrested for fail-
ure to disperse.
SGA President Tripp Roakes
supported 2000 stuents in a march
on City Hall in November to pro-
test a city council noiseordinance.
�V t
WELCOME
STUDENTS AND FACULTY!
$
Smithfield Meat
Bologna
12oz Pkg 990
Overtoil's Coupon
Clip this Coupon and Save
$1.00 off on purchase of $10.00
or more
$2.00 off on purchase of $20.00 j
or more
I
$3.00 off on purchase of $30.00 I
or more ,
I It's simple Clip the Coupon Buy the
I Groceries Choose the Discount i
I ECU ID Required to Qualify
I customer name customer phone number j
I I
I
ECU ID number I
Limit 1 coupon per order
Expires 12-15-89
Store Hours:
Open Sundays 1 pm - 6 pm
Monday-Saturday 8 am - 8 pm
Fresh Whole Chicken Breast
3 - 5 lb Family Packs
lb 990
Overton 's
Supermarket. Inc
Campbell's
Cream of Celery Soup
Tomato
lOoz can
3H
We have a complete variety of
all your Party needs
Plus Greenville's lowest
prices on KEGS!
Cold Power
Detergent
37 oz Giant Box
990
Limit one with $10.00 food order
Fresh Meaty Spare
Ribs
lb1.39
Busch Beer
Pkg of 12- 12ozcans
$4.59
Coca Cola 2 Liters
Coke Classic, Diet Coke, Regular Coke or
Caffeine Free
Limit 4
Sprite, Dr. Pepper or
Ginger Ale
2 liter bottle790
Limit 4
Fresh Green
Cabbage
lb100
Golden Bananas
lb290
White Potatoes
Loose-U-bag-em
lb120
Yellow Onions
1 31b bag790
Quantity Rights Reserved
Corner of Third & Jarvis
Prices Effective:
Wednesday, December 6,
through Saturday, December 9,1989





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
State and Nation
DECEMBER 7,1989 PAGE 9
University grants $5 billion to invest in market
By David Craig
.�nnett Srwi Servu
Ohio State University is gn
me of its students a shot at
' - on stock portfolio manage-
t
Beginning Ian. 2, students
ed in the Columbus-based
k1 s business financeclass will
- i million of the university's
� men! fund to invest in the
Bush
Stresses
Prudence
� A nalvsis
stock market. Other schools, in-
cluding the University of Wiscon-
sin and Texas Tech University,
have similar programs, but Ohio
State's will be the biggest
Not that Ohio State is going
out on a limb. "We had our trial
last year says Stephen A Buser,
the finance professor who U at hes
the course called The Stock Mar
ket. Students managed a "Monop
oly money" fund with an imagi
narvSl million that was intended
to teach them the basics of invest-
ing.
I he students caught on
quickly. During the year ended
Sept V, the Monopoly fund pro-
duced a paper profit between
c apital appreciation and dividend
payments of 22.7
Although that performance
trailed the Standard & Poor's (KV-
stock index's 28.4'T return tor the
same period, the students out-
shone the professional money
managers who handle most of
Ohio State's $301 million invest-
ment portfolio. The pros produced
profits for the year ranging from
1155 to 21.
The program will work this
way: Each quarter the 30-student
business finance class either
undergraduate or graduate, de-
pending on the period will be
treated as a collective money
manager. The student investors
will have to adhere to the same
restrictions imposed on other Ohio
State investments: No foreign
stocks or stocks in companies that
do business in South Africa. Also,
no options or futures. "There are
some circuit breaks Buser savs.
"We don't see them getting into
high-risk situations, so it's unlikely
they'll fare far worse than the
general market
Also, the performance of the
student-managed portfolio will be
examined oncea year by the board
of trustees' investment commit-
tee. If the portfolio does well, Buser
says the program probably will be
extended and may even be allot-
ted more endowment fund money.
If the students' investments turn
out to be dogs, "the funds could be
reduced or withdrawn entirely
Buser says.
Cm orynfkt I9�9. USA TODAY!
AppU CotUgt Information Kttwork
IU RICHARD BENEDETTO
C.annett New� Se�u�
kSHINGTON �Tired but
resident Bush returned
nited states basking in the
iummit with Soviet
� Mikhail Gorbache vet
ibout the course of US
' 'IIS.
a s i onferencein Brus-
H concluded his
rseas trip, a relaxed Bush was
� enough to joke with a
ho teased the president
hotdogging" behavior dur-
tit. Push had been
:d in a small Navy
luring the storm in the
� ranean.
iki w these charismatic,
in guys, they'll do
president qu pped
dart at criticism that
wimpy and lacking in
si part. Bush
ill) cautious
sea e sought to dampen theses-
'� ria bv warning
thaw in super-
. ill mean a ho-
ds from cutting
would rather use
ne) is saved to re-
� lerai deficit and bol-
� my rather than use it
spree.
: � mature he said, "(to)
f money out of defense
ut it into other worthy causes.
. i on down on meeting
� mm-Rudman budget
. � tstherejustisn'talot
i cess money unquote
iround there
h hided that while things
I rosier with the Soviets
- military threat is dimin-
� United States cannot
t down itsguard. Arms
igreements are on the
. vible,hesaid,butthey
been signed. He noted
are still "great differ-
ences" between the superpowers
er problems in Central America
d other Third World hot spots.
"Although this is a time of
eat hope and it is � we must
lot blur the distinction between
promising expectations and pres-
' realities he said. "We must
remain constant with NATO's
traditional security mission. I
dgeti �dav that the United States
will maintain significant military
es in Europe as long as our
allies desire our presence as part
i c i mmon defense effort
I'hi ugh able to "look forward
i Uti piandav" when U.S. troops
might not be needed, he said,
what we don't want to do is send
the signal" of the decoupling of
the United Statcsand Canada from
N TO, particularly at this highly
� � si five time.
Many in Congress, elated by
prospect of a tnmmed-down
militarv establishment, are eager
to spend more in long-neglected
domestic areas housing, health
re, education, drugs, roads and
bridges, and environmental
cleanup.
They've been held in check
over most of the last decade by
escalating defense budgets com-
ing at the expense of domestic
programs, a mounting budget
deficit and a Republican White
House firmly opposed to tax hikes.
S now they feel their time has
come.
High school cocaine
liiilii of high school seniors who have used
cocaine ire vea led:
llieliiare male
llijlplsmoke marijuana weekly or daily
IliPllito drank beer before or at age 13
Questions about
developments in
Philippines analyzed
By DON KIRK
Gannett Newt Service
smoked marijua
at 11 or under A
ial Parents' R
Sa� Wa-c Gannett News Se-vice
Alcohol and tobacco remain drugs
of choice for high school seniors
MANILA, Philippines �
Some questions and answers
about the remnants of the latest
coup attempt against Philippine
President Corazon Aquino:
QUESTION: What's happen-
ing to U.S. citizens trapped bv
mutinous troops in downtown
Manila?
ANSWER: An estimated 215
U.S. citizens wereamongthe2,000
foreigners pinned down in three
luxury hotels in the Makati finan-
cial district. An earlier cease-fire
had allowed scores of others to
leave before, but continued fight-
ing prevented the negotiation of
another cease-fire. However, one
rebel military officer said the
remaining U.S. citizens might not
be allowed to flee because of
unhappiness with U.S. efforts to
prop up Aquino.
Q: What is the status of the
�By DUtttt PA1 TLKbUN
Th� AnortMM Trnn
RALEIGH (AP) A state-
wide survey of school students
shows that alcohol and tobacco
remain the drugs of choice I
children in grades 7 through 12,
with a dramatic increase in the
number of seventh- and eighth-
graders trying alcohol, state offi-
cials said today.
The survey this year of 11,531
students showed that 62.3 percent
of seventh- and eighth-graders
indicated they had tried alcohol at
least once. A 1987survey showed
that only 39.7 percent of those
students had tried alcohol
The survey showed that s" 3
percent of all juniors and seniors
reported trying alcohol this vear,
compared to 75.6 percent in lWs
"We have to have a clearer
message about 'gateway sub
stances said Steve Hicks, the
consultant for the state Depart-
ment of Public Instruction on d ru2
awareness programs. Hicks said
"gateway substances like ciga-
rettes and alcohol, can lead to
harder drugs, such as cocaine and
marijuana. Hicks said the survey
indicated that about 77,000 stu-
dents in grades 7 through 12 are
"problem drinkers" who have had
some difficulty with parents,
friends or other adults as a result
of their drinking.
Both Hicks and state schixl
Superintendent Bobby Ethendge
said the survey shows that more
efforts need to bo made in drug
prevention among elementary
students Those efforts should
concentrate on the use of ciga-
rettes and alcohol, thev said. Eth-
endge said creating networks of
parents and friends to help stu-
dents with smoking and drinking
problems might be more impor-
tant than tougher laws to keep
tobacco and alcohol out of the
hands of young students.
"I'm not sure the issue is leg-
islation, as much as it is educa-
tion Etheridge said "It's going
to take some doing, and some
doing bevond just the schools
Hicks viid the survey indi-
cated a decline in the use of co-
caine and other hard drugs bv
students, despite the increasing
availability of such drugs. Hicks
said the survey showed that drug
and alcohol use by high school
seniors is about the same in North
Carolina as the national average,
with a slightly higher percentage
of N.C. students using manuana.
The survey showed thatabout
5 percent of all students have tried
hashish, 4.5 percent have used
cocaine, 1.5 percent have tried
crack and l.s percent have used
steroids.
Hicks said about ,(HX) N.C.
students have used steroids, with
about half ii those being athletes.
Steroids are commonly used to
build muscles and strength, but
have a number of side effects in-
cluding irrational behavior and
possible sterility.
coup attempt:
financial district, in trsPcond day,
apparently is the last main pocket
of the mutiny. At least 77 people
have died and more than 540 were
wounded since the coup started.
In addition to the estimated 400
rebels in the Makati district, a
similar number still occupied the
Mactan Air Base in Cebu, 350 miles
south of Manila, despite an ulti-
matum to leave the garrison.
Q: What is the current U.S.
role?
A: White House spokesman
Marlin Fitzwater said Aquino has
not requested additional U.S.
military support. But he said Presi-
dent Bush was keeping options
open as he weighs the best way to
protect U.S. citizens. Before the
Malta summit, Bush ordered U.S.
F-4 Phantom jet fighters to
scramble and provide air cover
for loyal government troops,
which kept rebel-flown planes on
the ground.
Q: How did most Filipinos feel
about the sight of Air Force F-4
Phantoms Hying over Manila last
week?
A: Some Manila residents said
the United States was "meddling
Others saw the air cover as dra-
matic evidence of the need for U .S.
military aid.
Q: Has Aquino demonstrated
strength or weakness
A: This insurrection was more
serious than the five earlier coup
attempts. Rightists seem to be
undermining Aquino's power,
though most of the armed forces
support her. It was probably in-
evitable that her image of reform
would fade amid pervasive cor-
ruption and economic difficulties.
Still, she remains a popular figure
and would probably win if an
election were held today.
Q: What are the main com-
plaints against her?
A: The right says Aquino has
done little to bring about real
military security against the com-
munist-led rebel group, the New
People's Army (NPA). Leftists say
she represents U.S. "imperialism"
and is carrying on the exploitative
policies of Ferdinand Marcos �
whom she toppled from power in
1986.
Q: How does Aquino respond
to critics?
A: The nation has improved
economically. The Philippine
gross national product was up 6.8
percent after solid decreases in the
last two to three years of the Mar-
cos reign. The armed forces have
also cut the threat from the NPA.
Q: Where does Aquino stand
on the issue of U.S. bases?
A: She hasremained noncom-
mittal ona treaty to allow the Navy
and Air Force bases to stay after
the current agreement ends in
1991. She is eager, however, for
increased U.S. trade and invest-
ment �along with more economic
aid as "rent" for the bases.
CComyrtgkl I9M, USA TOD A Yt
Amylt Colltgt Information Sttwork
'The military is out of control'
Religious workers say they've been 'harassed' by Salvadorians
By LAURENCE JOLIDON
(iannrtt Newt Service
SAN SALVADOR The
deaths of six Jesuit priests and the
arrest of an American church
worker here have suddenly thrust
El Salvador's communitv of reli-
gious workers to the forefront of
this country's relentless civil war.
U.S. religious workers here
say they've been harassed bv the
El Salvadoran government in the
form of raids, arrests and expul
sions since the current offensive
by Marxist rebelsof the Farabundo
Marti Liberation Front. TheChris-
tianchurch in El Salvador "isbeing
run over said Edgar Palacios, a
Lutheran minister. Another Lu-
theran minister, William
Dexheimer, left the country to
return to the United States after
receiving a death threat
"The military is simply out of
control said a Roman Catholic
priest who closed his parish office
and chapel fearing soldiers and
internal security officers would
invade, as they did several years
ago.
"Anyone's life is on the line"
if they try to help those affected
most by the fighting. The priest,
whose parish is a poor neighbor-
hood hard hit by the fighting,
moved temporarily to a house in a
quieter area.
I S. religious workers sav
they are in El Salvador to work in
the name of Cod and peace. But
the government claims more of
the religious are working in the
name of subversion and revolu-
tion. As proof, the government
points to the discovery of arms
i aches, including one in the office
of a Spanish priest and another in
the back yard of a woman who
arranged tours for visiting church
and congressional groups.
Jennifer Casolo, 28, of Chris-
tian Education Seminars, was
expected to plead not guilty this
week to hiding weapons and
explosives for Marxist rebels. She
has been jailed for more than a
week.
The human rights group,
Americas Watch, reports that
about 25 non-Salvadoran church
or refugee aid workers - - sus-
pected by the government of sub-
versive activities � have been
expelled or detained recently.
Because of such expulsions,
the Nov. In slayings of the six
priests, which church leaders
blame on the military and right-
wing death squads, and raids on
churches and relief offices, many
volunteers have been driven
underground. That only deepens
the government's suspicion of
their activities. Few are willing to
speak publicly tor tear of drawing
even more attention to their ac-
tivities.
"Helping the poor in Fl Salva-
dor is considered a form of poli-
tics said one church worker.
"And these days, it is dangerous
to participate in any kind of poli-
tics critical of the government, or
that questions its programs for the
poor Despite their fears, Bap-
tists, Lutherans, Mennonites, Epis-
copalians,
Jehovah's Witnesses, Seventh-
Day Adventists and evangelistic
churches operate churches, meet-
ing halls and community service
agencies. With money from dona-
tions and their churches, thev
provide housing and food to refu-
gees; distribute food, clothes and
medicine; monitor military actions
and human rights abuses; counsel
See SAN SALVADOR, page 12
Private schools find larger gap between
males and females than public schools
MARILYN EL1AS
Clllnitt rtvt Service
Salary gaps between equally
qualified male and female teach-
ers averaged $1,134 in public
schools,1,670 in Catholic schools
and $2,582 in other private schools,
a new University of Michigan
study says.
"We're not talking peanuts
here says Valerie Lee, an educa-
tion researcher at the University
of Michigan who randomly sur-
veyed 8,894 teachersat 377 public,
private and Catholic schools.
Lee and colleague Julia Smith
say the gap remained even when
accounting for:
� Paycheck premiums favor-
ing men because more of them
teach math and science, and coach
sports.
� Malesaveraging three years
more experience.
� Pay scales tied to cost-of-
living differences.
At private schools, contracts
often are individually negotiated,
which may permit wider salary
variances between teachers, Lee
says.
A key source of the public
school gap could be the practice of
not allowing full credit for past
experience when teachers return
to work after time off to raise a
family. For example, a 15-year
teacher often gets credit for five,
says Keith Geiger, president of the
National Education Association.
That bumps the teacher to a low
salary rung.
"We try to get all the experi-
ence counted, but we usually have
to strike a compromise Geiger
says. "We're going to have to take
a closer look at this, if it's making
a big difference in salaries
I DM USA TODAV
Afrit Cnlmf HfnrmmHen Nitmrnik





THE EAST CAROUNIAN
State and Nation
DECEMBER 7,1989 PAGE 9
University grants $5 billion to invest in market
By David Craig
Gannett Nnm Sivk�
Ohio State University is giv-
ing some of its students a shot at
hands-on stock portfolio manage-
ment.
Beginning Jan. 2, students
enrolled in the Columbus-based
sc-hool's business finance class will
get $5 million oi the university's
endowment fund to invest in. the
Bush
Stresses
Prudence
� Analysis
Bv RICHARD BENEDETTO
Gannett New Scivkc
stock market. Other schools, in-
cluding the University of Wiscon-
sin and Texas Tech University,
have similar programs, but Ohio
State's will be the biggest.
Not that Ohio State is going
out on a limb. "We had our trial
last year says Stephen A. Buser,
the finance professor who teaches
the course called The Stock Mar-
ket. Students managed a "Monop-
oly money" fund with an imagi-
nary $1 million that was intended
to teach them the basics of invest-
ing.
The students caught on
quickly. During the year ended
Sept. 30, the Monopoly fund pro-
duced a paper profit � between
capital appreciation and dividend
payments � of 22.7.
Although that performance
trailed the Standard & Poor's 500-
stock index's 28.4 return for the
same period, the students out-
shone the professional money
managers who handle most of
Ohio State's $301 million invest-
ment portfolio. The pros produced
profits for the year ranging from
11 to 21.
The program will work this
way: Each quarter the 30-student
business finance class � cither
undergraduate or graduate, de-
pending on the period � will be
treated as a collective money
manager. The student investors
j
WASHINGTON � Tired but
satisfied, President Bush returned
to the United States basking in the
triumphant summit with Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev yet
cautious about the course of U.S
Soviet relations.
At a news conference in Brus-
Belgium, that concluded his
overseas trip, a relaxed Bush was
chipper enough to joke with a
reporter who teased the president
: r 'hotdogging" behavior dur-
ing the summit. Bush had been
riding around in a small Navy
launch during the storm in the
Mediterranean.
"You know, these charismatic,
macho, visionary guys, they'll do
anything the president qu.pped
in an obvious dart at criticism that
he is dull, wimpy and lacking in
vision.
But for the most part, Bush
haracteristicallv cautious
"Or
summit euphoria dv warning
those who think a thaw in super-
power relations will mean a bo-
nana in extra funds from cutting
the defense budget.
He said he would rather use
whatever money is saved to re-
duce the federal deficit and bol-
ster the economy rather than use it
a spending spree.
' ltisprematurehesaid(to)
take a lot of monev out of defense
and put it into other worthv causes.
As we go on down on meeting
these Gramm-Rudman (budget
deficit�targets, there just isn't a lot
of quote excess money unquote
floating around there
Bush added that while things
are indeed rosier with the Soviets
and their military threat is dimin-
ished, the United States cannot
afford to let down its guard. Arms
control agreements are on the
negotiating table, he said,but they
have not been signed. He noted
that there are still "great differ-
ences" between the superpowers
over problems in Central America
and other Third World hot spots.
"Although this is a time of
great hope � and it is � we must
not blur the distinction between
promising expectations and pres-
ent realities he said. "We must
remain constant with NATO's
traditional security mission. I
pledge today that the United States
will maintain significant military
forces in Europe as long as our
allies desire our presence as part
of a common defense effort
Though able to "look forward
to a Utopian day" when U.S. troops
might not be needed, he said,
" what we don't want to do is send
the signal" of the decoupling of
the United States and Canada from
NATO, particularly at this highly
sensitive time.
Many in Congress, elated by
the prospect of a trimmed-down
military establishment, are eager
to spend more in long-neglected
domestic areas: housing, health
care, education, drugs, roads and
bridges, and environmental
cleanup.
They've been held in check
over most of the last decade by
escalating defense budgets com-
ing at the expense of domestic
programs, a mounting budget
deficit and a Republican White
House firmly opposed to tax hikes.
So now they feel their time has
come.
High school cocaine
A survey of high school seniors who have used
cocaine re vea led:
lll$$are male :
65 smoke marijuana weekly or daily
i�!iiiil drank beer before or at age 13
illSi smoked cigarettes v:N
IP
life
SsShSSShSW
�ttvKttfittvtty
Alcohol
of choic
k.vs-
r � - 4 � - � - � - - � � � �
�ivftA
�MIII 11
Sam Ward. Gannert News Service
V a v
main drugs
)1 seniors
RALEIGH (AP) - A state-
wide survey of school students
shows that alcohol and tobacco
remain the drugs of choice for
children in grades 7 through 12,
with a dramatic increase in the
humber of seventh- and eighth-
graders trying alcohol, state offi-
cials said today.
The survey this year of 11,531
students showed that 62.3 percent
of seventh- and eighth-graders
indicated they had tried alcohol at
least once. A 1987 survey showed
that only 39.7 percent of those
students had tried alcohol.
The survey showed that 87.3
percent of all juniors and seniors
reported trying alcohol this year,
compared to 75.6 percent in 1987.
"We have to have a clearer
message about 'gateway sub-
stances said Steve Hicks, the
consultant for the state Depart-
ment of Public Instruction on d rug
awareness programs. Hicks said
�gateway substances tike ciga-
rettes and alcohol, can lead to
harder drugs, such as cocaine and
marijuana. Hicks said the survey
indicated that about 77,000 stu-
dents in grades 7 through 12 are
"problem drinkers" who have had
some difficulty with parents,
friends or other adults as a result
of their drinking.
Both Hicks and state school
Superintendent Bobby Etheridge
said the survey shows that more
efforts need to be made in drug
prevention among elementary
students. Those efforts should
concentrate on the use of ciga-
rettes and alcohol, thev said. Eth-
eridge said creating networks of
parents and friends to help stu-
dents with smoking and drinking
problems might be more impor-
tant than tougher laws to keep
tobacco and alcohol out of the
hands of young students.
"I'm not sure the issue is leg-
islation, as much as it is educa-
tion Ethendge said. "It's going
to take -some doing, and
doing beyond just the schools
Hicks said the survey indi-
cated a decline in the use of co-
caine and other "hard drugs" by
students, despite the increasing
availability of such drugs. Hicks
said the survey showed that drug
and alcohol use by high school
seniors is abou t the same in North
Carolina as the national average,
with a slightly higher percentage
of N.C. students using marijuana.
The su rvey sho wed tha t abou t
5 percent of all students have tried
hashish, 4.5 percent have used
cocaine, 1.5 percent have tried
crack and 1.9 percent have used
steroids.
Hicks said about 9,000 N.C.
students have used steroids, with
about half of those being athletes.
Steroids are commonly used to
build muscles and strength, but
have a number of side effects in-
cluding irrational behavior and
possible sterility.
will have to adhere to the same
restrictions imposed on other Ohio
State investments: No foreign
stocks or stocks in companies that
do business in South Africa. Also,
no options or futures. "There are
some circuit breaks Buser says.
"We don't see them getting into
high-risk situations, so if sunlikely
they'll fare far worse than the
general market
Also, the performance of the
student-managed portfolio will be
examined oncea yearby the board
of trustees' investment commit-
tee. If the portfolio does well, Buser
says the program probably will be
extended and may even be allot-
ted more endowment fund money.
If the students' investments turn
out to be dogs, "the f undscould be
reduced or withdrawn entirely
Buser says.
CComjngkt l�t. USA TOOAYI
AppU ColUft Information Nttwork
Questions about
developments in
Philippines analyzed
By DON KIRK
Gannett Newi Service
MANILA, Philippines �
Some questions and answers
about the remnants of the latest
coup attempt against Philippine
President Corazon Aquino:
QUESTION: What's happen-
ing to U.S. citizens trapped by
mutinous troops in downtown
Manila?
ANSWER: An estimated 215
U.S. citizens wcreamong the 2,000
foreigners pinned down in three
luxury hotels in the Makati finan-
cial district. An earlier cease-fire
had allowed scores of others to
leave before, but continued fight-
ing prevented the negotiation of
another cease-fire. However, one
rebel military officer said the
remaining U.S. citizens might not
be allowed to flee because of
unhappiness with U.S. efforts to
prop up Aquino.
Q: What is the status of the
coup attempt?
-otiM�ih�M�kat�
financial (fisftlft, inlWstPPtJMl! diyT
apparently is the last main pocket
of the mutiny. At least 77 people
havedied and morethan540 were
wounded since the coup started.
In addition to the estimated 400
rebels in the Makati district, a
similar number still occupied the
Mactan Air Base in Cebu, 350 miles
south of Manila, despite an ulti-
matum to leave the garrison.
Q: What is the current U.S.
role?
A: White House spokesman
Marlin Fitzwater said Aquino has
not requested additional U.S.
military support. But he said Presi-
dent Bush was keeping options
open as he weighs the best way to
protect U.S. citizens. Before the
Malta summit. Bush ordered U.S.
F-4 Phantom jet fighters to
scramble and provide air cover
for loyal government troops,
which kept rebel-flown planes on
the ground.
Q: How did most Filipinos feel
about the sight of Air Force F-4
Phantoms flying over Manila last
week?
A: Some Manila residents said
the United States was "meddling
Others saw the air cover as dra-
matic evidence of the need forU.S.
military aid.
Q: Has Aquino demonstrated
strength or weakness?
A:Thisinsurrectionwasmore
serious than the five earlier coup
attempts. Rightists seem to be
undermining Aquino's power,
though most of the armed forces
support her. It was probably in-
evitable that her image of reform
would fade amid pervasive cor-
ruption and economic difficulties.
Still, she remains a popular figure
and would probably win if an
election were held today.
Q: What are the main com-
plaints against her?
A: The right says Aquino has
done little to bring about real
military security against the com-
munist-led rebel group, the New
. Leftists say
iausm"
and is carrying on the exploitative
policies of Ferdinand Marcos �
whom she toppled from power in
1986.
Q: How does Aquino respond
to critics?
A: The nation has improved
economically. The Philippine
gross national product was up 6.8
percent after solid decreases in the
last two to three years of the Mar-
cos reign. The armed forces have
also cut the threat from the NPA.
Q: Where does Aquino stand
on the issue of U.S. bases?
A: She has remained noncom-
mittal on a treaty to allow the Navy
and Air Force bases to stay after
the current agreement ends in
1991. She is eager, however, for
increased U.S. trade and invest-
ment�along with moreeconomic
aid as "rent" for the bases.
OComyngU 1�. USA TOOAW
Am,U Colltm- Information Network
le'sArmyUNPA).
'The military is out of control'
Religious workers say they've been 'harassed' by Salvadorians
By LAURENCE JOLIDON
Gannett New Service
SAN SALVADOR � The
deaths of six Jesuit priests and the
arrest of an American church
worker here have suddenly thrust
El Salvador's community of reli-
gious workers to the forefront of
this country's relentless civil war.
U.S. religious workers here
say they've been harassed by the
El Salvadoran government in the
form of raids, arrests and expul-
sions since the current offensive
by Marxist rebelsof the Farabundo
Marti Liberation Front. TheChris-
tianchurch in El Salvador "isbcing
run over said Edgar Palacios, a
Lutheran minister. Another Lu-
theran minister, William
Dexheimer, left the country to
return to the United States after
receiving a death threat.
The military is simply out of
control said a Roman Catholic
priest who closed his parish office
and chapel fearing soldiers and
internal security officers would
invade, as they did several years
ago.
"Anyone's life is on the line"
if they try to help those affected
most by the fighting. The priest,
whose parish is a poor neighbor-
hood hard hit by the fighting,
moved temporarily to a house in a
quieter area.
U.S. religious workers say
they are in El Salvador to work in
the name of God and peace. But
the government claims more of
the religious are working in the
name of subversion and revolu-
tion. As proof, the government
points to the discovery of arms
caches, including one in the office
of a Spanish priest and another in
the back yard of a woman who
arranged tours for visiting church
and congressional groups.
Jennifer Casolo, 28, of Chris-
tian Education Seminars, was
expected to plead not guilty this
week to hiding weapons and
explosives for Marxist rebels. She
has been jailed for more than a
week.
The human rights group,
Americas Watch, reports that
about 25 non-Salvadoran church
or refugee-aid workers � sus-
pected by the government of sub-
versive activities � have been
expelled or detained recently.
Because of such expulsions,
the Nov. 16 slayings of the six
priests, which church leaders
blame on the military and right-
wing death squads, and raids on
churches and relief offices, many
volunteers have been driven
underground. That only deepens
the government's suspicion of
their activities. Few are willing to
speak publicly for fear of drawing
even more attention to their ac-
tivities.
"Helping the poor in El Salva-
dor is considered a form of poli-
tics said one church worker.
"And these days, it is dangerous
to participate in any kind of poli-
tics critical of the government, or
that questions its programs for the
poor Despite their fears, Bap-
tists, Lutherans, Mennonites, Epis-
copalians,
Jehovah's Witnesses, Seventh-
Day Adventists and evangelistic
churches operate churches, meet-
ing halls and community service
agencies. With money from dona-
tions and their churches, they
provide housing and food to refu-
gees; distribute food, clothes and
medicine; monitor military actions
and human rights abuses; counsel
See SAN SALVADOR, page 12
Private schools find larger gap between
males and females than public schools
MARILYN ELIAS
Gannett Ntn Scivkc
Salary gaps between equally
qualified male and female teach-
ers averaged $1,134 in public
schools, $l,670in Catholic schools
and $2,582 in other private schools,
a new University of Michigan
study says.
"We're not talking peanuts
here says Valerie Lee, an educa-
tion researcher at the University
of Michigan who randomly sur-
veyed 8,894 teachers at 377 public,
private and Catholic schools.
Lee and colleague Julia Smith
say the gap remained even when
accounting for:
� Paycheck premiums favor-
ing men because more of them
teach math and science, and coach
sports.
�Males averaging three years
more experience.
� Pay scales tied to cost-of-
living differences.
At private schools, contracts
often are individually negotiated,
which may permit wider salary
variances between teachers, Lee
says.
A key source of the public
school gap could be the practice of
not allowing full credit for past
experience when teachers return
to work after time off to raise a
family. For example, a 15-year
teacher often gets credit for five,
says Keith Geiger, president of the
National Education Association.
That bumps the teacher to a low
salary rung.
"We try to get all the experi-
ence counted, but we usually nave
to strike a compromise Geiger
says. "We're going to have to take
a closer look at this, if if s making
a big difference in salaries
UMTOMW





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEBER 7, 1W
r
Justices debate the right to die issue
By TONY MAURO
and VVILLARD WOODS
Ganiwtl m Scivkt
WASHINGTON � Far from
the marbled, vaulted room where
nine justices will debate the exis-
tence of a constitutional right to
die, Nancy Cruzan spendsanother
day in the nether world of a "per-
sistent vegetative state
Once a lively young woman,
Cruzan was horribly injured in a
anuary 1983 car accident; her
brain was without oxvgen for 20
minutes before she was resusci-
tated. Since then, she has passed
days and nights at a Mount Ver-
non, Mo hospital curled in her
bed, turned by nurses, fed by a
tube in her stomach.
Her anguished parents, Joe
and Joyce Cruzan, believe their
32-year-old daughter would pre-
fer death to her life now. They
want to remove the tube and let
her die, but the Missouri Supreme
Court Stopped them Now the
Supreme Court will hear oral
argumcntsaboutNancvCmzan's
Soviet ship assists U.S.
expedition to Antarctica
ST. rAL'l . Minn. (AP) �The
Soviet Union has agreed to supply
fuel to the Antarctic expedition
led by Minnesotan Will Steger,
preventing an early end to the
4,lXX)-mile ski and sled dog ad-
venture.
Until the Soviets stepped for-
ward Monday, the International
Trans-Antarctica Expedition faced
the possibility of abandoning its
historic journey at the South Pole,
where it is expected to arrive next
week.
It was really senous said
Cynthia Mueller, a spokeswoman
at the expedition's St. Paul head-
quarters.
The expedition has been jeop-
ardized by breakdowns in the air
support provided by Adventure
Network International Inc a
Canadian firm that has a monop-
oly on non-government flight
transportation in Antarctica.
Trans-Antarctica's $1.5 million
logistical contract calls tor Ad ven-
ture Network to place food caches
and provide emergency rescue
from the beginning of the expedi-
tion on the Antarctic Peninsula to
the So let scientific base at Vos-
tok, where the Soviets take over
that responsibility.
However, finicky weatheTand
repeated nm-hanicaMfcircj by ?
Adventure Network's cargo ear-
ner, an aging DC-6, left the expe-
dition wi thou t supplies east of the
Thiel Mountains, which it passed
more than a week ago. Now,
within 22(1 miles and om week ot
the South Pole, the expedition
feared running out ot food tor
Steger, his five companions and
30 sled dogs.
'Without a sufficient supply
of fuel at the pole for resupply and
rescue operations, the expedition
would have been forced to halt
operations next week said
spokeswoman Jennifer Kimball
Gasperini.
The Soviets, who are limited
partners in the expedition, said
Monday thatas much as 12t.nsof
Soviet-owned airplane fuel will
bo waiting for the expedition at
the South Pole, meaning the dot,
mushers will be able to receive
food and have a rescue plane
standing by as thov continue east
across the Area ot Inaccessibility,
a remote stretch ot ice bet v een the
South Pole and Vostok.
The Soviets will sell the expe-
dition fuel already cached at the
South Pole, rather than nsk a flight
across the continent. Although
details are still being negotiated,
the Soviet aid will cost Trans-
Antarctica as much as $200,000.
The expedition, which began
July 27. is making its seven-month
journey to bring world attention
to Antarctica and to demonstrate
thr powv oHniecnaticnal corv i
eration. The expedition's other
members are from the Soviet
Union, France. Great Britain, Ja-
pan and China.
Delicious
CHEAP
Mexican Food
M
includes:
2 Burritos,
Chips & Tea
TONIGHT s - 9 pm
Methodist Student Center
501 E. 5th St across from Garrett Hall
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Sponsored by: Chips & Salsa donated by
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GORDON'S.
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
"right to die" � the first time the
court ha sever ad dressed theques-
tion. Her parents will be in the
courtroom during the hour-long
arguments.
A ruling, not expected before
the spring, could affect at least
10rxX) others nationwide who are
also sustained by varying amounts
Of extraordinary medical meas-
ures. Four times before � includ-
ing the 1976 Karen Ann Quinlan
case � the Supreme Court has
refused to enter the "right to die"
debate. But the justices apparently
accepted the Cruzan case because
the Missouri Supreme Court ruled
completely against the parents,
fully injecting the state's interests
in what seemingly is a most per-
sonal division.
In addition, the Cruzan case
involves not the extraordinary
medical technology often used to
keep alive comatose patients, but
the removal oi the feeding tube
providing nourishment and wa-
ter. Removing the tube would
mean death by starvation and
dehydration.
Dozens of groups have be-
sieged the court with "friend of
the court" briefs on the issue,
which could become as divisive as
the abortion rulings the Supreme
Court has handed down since
1973. Groups that tight for fairer
treatment for the disabled assert
that if the court allows Cruzan to
die, the lives of millions of others
deemed incompetent to make
medical decisions � from victims
oi Alzheimer's disease to the au-
tistic � are in jeopardy.
Former Surgeon General C.
Everett Koop, in a bnef to thecourt,
warned the justices that if a "right
todic" isfound in theConstirution,
its application "would know vir-
tually no limits Abortion oppo-
nents, also in the fray, draw paral-
lels between a state's interest in
death with a state's interest in birth.
"Now is surely not the time
said Dave Andrusko of the Na-
tional Right to Life Committee, to
extend the court's "killer ethic"
that supports abortion rights to
"millions of other helpless vic-
tims
But other organizations say
Cruzan has a "right to die" as a
logical extension of her constitu-
tional protections of her privacy
and liberty.
"Mandating a particular form
of medical treatment to an incom-
petent patient over the objections
of her family is an offensive and
potentially limitless exercise of
governmental power said
Fenella Rouse of the Society for
the Right to Die.
The American Medical Asso-
ciation estimates that 70 percent
of Americans will have some
experience with the issue; an asso-
ciation poll also found that two-
thirds of physicians had been
involved in a decision to with-
draw life-sustaining treatment.
The agonizing debate is not an
abstraction to the Cruzans.
"If they knew Nancy the way
Nancy'sfamily knowsNancv, they
would know that Nancy would be
horrified at this existence that she
is forced to endure said Joe
Cruzan.
University of Pittsburgh pro-
fessor Alan Meisel, an expert on
the matter, said that if the high
court gives states the power to
intervene � a stand the Bush
administration advocates � "The
message it will send to hospitals
and doctors is to err on the side of
caution and keep patients alive
when they might otherwise not
have. That will impose terrible
burdens on families
ClCopyrifkt 19�. USA TOO A Yl
AppU CotUft infonmmtoon Slrttvork
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752-0322
CORNER OF 10TH & DICKINSON GREENVILLE
KINGSTON
PLACE
WE HAVE SEVERAL
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR SPRING
SEMESTER,
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
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an ECU grad!
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I'm Ted Gartman, "arid I'm a
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on the ECU Surf Team!

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a
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dry bags by O'Neill, Billabong, & InstinctTons of Oakley Blades & Frogskins
Marsh's long sleeve tees for $11.95 Over 100 watches in stock- freestyle & town &
country - $25.95 to $81.95 Ask us about ordering
custom boards from Linden or Heatwave





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From Cable Adnet &The Pantry
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2 Cellular Phones
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� 3 - GE Cooktop Stoves
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pack age includes: Headboard, mirror, frame, free flow
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Prize drawings begin December 13th
running through the 12 days prior to
Christmas which ends December 24.
Register at any of the 4 Greenville Pantry locations
� 316 E. 10th St.
� 4000 S. Memorial Dr.
� 2195 S. Evans St.
� 501 S. Memorial Dr.
Visit your Coed "Pantry store today
OPEN 24 HRS. � LOW SUITCASE BEER PRICES � GAS � SNACKS � SOFT DRINKS � ANYTHING YOU NEED IN A HURRY





12
THE EAST CAROIIMANNOVEBER 7, 1W
Meeting
gets mixed
reception
By RICHARD VVHII M1RL
l.annrrt Srwi Servu e
WASHINGTON By setting
an early deadline tor signing a
nuclear arms treaty, President
Bush won a public relations vic-
tory butdamaged the negotiations,
veteran negotiator Paul Nlitzesaid
In a meeting with reporters
Nitzealso warned that the United
States is negotiating with one
person, Mikhail Gorbachev, who
may not accurately represent the
Soviet Union 1 ho United States
made the same mistake in Iran
and China, said N'itze, b invest
ingsomuch confident ein theShah
and (!hiang Kai Shek
Presidt nt (iorbacheii s hold
onpoweriswobbh .warned it.v
"The immediate problem he t.u es
is getting through the winters il
out starvation.
Bush's mistake in Malta was
to opt tor a quick public relations
gam by promising a wrap-up et
the long range nuclear arms treats
by the next summit in une, said
ite. who was the top anus ne
gotiator tor most ot the Reagan
administration. White 1 louseoffi
rials maintain the President plaved
it st right by setting the lune
deadline. It keeps the focus on
pendingarmscontrol agreements,
which pleases the NATO allies,
they sav. rather than promising
future arms control concessions.
El Salvador
and human rights abuses; counsel
and assM Salvadorans to aban-
don, or in some cases return to
their homeland
These activities bring the
church and relief workers into
daily contact with the poorest and
neediest people in Salvadoran
societ And itisfromamongtheir
ranks that the guerrilla mo ement
recruits many of its followers
Thechurch volunteers sav the
eovernment should welcome their
Smaller raises coming
Most owners of
small businesses
have given
raises in 1989,
but the pay hikes
aren't as big as
�6. last year.
Over 10
J
Source. Arthur Andersen & Co. survey of
4,500 owners of businesses wilh annual
revenue of $1 million to $120 mMon
(m
j
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See Us For A11
Your Automotive Needs!
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville. NC 27834
758-7676
The problem said ite is
Hush made the promise while his
ow n administration has still tailed
to agree on .i minimum ot 20 ma-
jor issues There's no agreement
within the White louseon how to
count the cruise missiles carried
aboard lone, range bombers, how
to handle sea-launched cruise
missiles, and how to handle mo-
bile missiles, he said. Arms control
nee "tiatorsconduct theirbargain-
na tu;ht leash from the Presi-
dent, so all President Bush did
was to put himseli on a tighter
deadline
1 he Soviets ha e little in en-
tice to cut into their long-range
missilearsenal,said Nitze,because
it would save them almost no
money. rhe Soviets have about 7
percent ot their military budget
tied up in maintaining their
sprawling conventional forces,
said ite.
� ojrynght IMM USA Iiiimi
KppU ' � ���' Informtim itn ,���
Continued from page 9
ettorts .it a tinu when thev are
hard pressed to offer basic serv-
i es to the people.
The rich in this country are
already looked after said a priest.
"But the poorha e society against
them And the solution is not giv-
ing them money but getting at the
- of their problems, the con-
flict and the poverty
but instead, in recent years
. ivernment has tightened visa
requirements, in the name of na-
tional security, in an effort to cut
the number ot foreign church and
rehet workers.
The current government
crackdown also brought charges
from one volunteer that the U.S.
embassv here tailed to do enough
to prote t the lives and rights of
U S church and relief workers.
If you're making a Christmas list
to be checked twice Don't forget to
add a Bahamas Cruise That might be nice!
Let the Student Union Travel Committee take you to the
Bahamas over Spring Break
(March 3 - 9) for as little as:
$485.00
� Get a head start on you tan
� Eat until your heart is content
� Be treated like royalty
Contact Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office for more information!


n
r;

Thursday:
Thirsty Thursday
$1.00 Imports
$ 1.00 Domestic
$ 2.00 Teas
Ladies Free All Night
BOOKS
Cloth or paper!
Whether used on this campus or not!
We buy all titles having national Resale
Value!
Turn your unwanted books into Holiday
Cash!
Bookstore
Wright Building
Hours:
Mon-Fri 8:30 am- 5:30pm
Telephone 757-6731
$50.
Friday:
RUSH HOUR PARTY
5pm -2am
FREE PIZZA
FREE ADMISSION TIL9
$ 2.00 Teas
$ 2.00 Frozen Drinks
$ 1.00 Imports
$ 1.00 Domestics
Prize to Fraternity & Sorority
with Best Attendence





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEBER7, 1989
Meeting
gets mixed
reception
By RICHARD WHITMIRE
Gannett New Service
WASHINGTON �By setting
an early deadline for signing a
nuclear arms treaty, President
Bush won a public relations vic-
torybutdamaged the negotiations,
veteran negotiator Paul Nitzesaid.
In a meeting with reporters,
Nitzealso warned that the United
States is negotiating with one
person, Mikhail Gorbachev, who
may not accurately represent the
Soviet Union. The United States
made the same mistake in Iran
and China, said Nitze, b) invest-
ing SO much confidence in tneShah
and Chiang Kai-Shek.
President Gorbachev's hold
on poweris wobbly, warned Nitze.
"The immediate problem he fa i s
is getting through the winter with-
out starvation
Bush's mistake in Malta was
to opt for a quick public relations
gain bv promising a wrap-up oi
the long-range nuclear arms treaty
by the next summit in June, said
Nitze. who was the top arms ne-
gotiator for most oi the Reagan
administration. White House offi-
cials main tain the President played
it just nght by setting the une
deadline. It keeps the focus on
pending arms control agreements,
which pleases the NATO allies,
they say, rather than promising
future arms control concessions.
El Salvador
fl'88!f89 4�
Smaller raises coming
t-�ssftn
SS :
riltiiH KB
� j 41 inAJh
39
, 11hi 111
Most owners of
small businesses
have given
raises in 1989,
1 but the pay hikes
amrvt a$ big &$
56 test year.
��AAW XV.
i
�;�;�;�;�;�� ,
illilii
�yyj � � � � ��;�;�;�
Up to 5 5-10Or10p
Source; Arthw Andersen & Co, survey of
4,500 owners of businesses wiih annual
revenue of $1 rrifoon to $120 mMon
CSL
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See Us For A11
Your Automotive Needs!
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
758-7676
The problem, said Nitze, is
Hush made the promise while his
own administration hasstill tailed
to agree on a minimum ot 20 ma-
jor issues. ITiere's no agreement
within the White House on how to
count the cruise missiles earned
aboard long-range bombers, how
to handle sea-launched cruise
missiles, and how to handle mo-
bile missiles, he said. Arms control
negotiatorsconduct the- r bargain-
ing on a tight leash from the Presi-
dent, so all President Bush did
was to put himself on a tighter
deadline.
The Soviets have little incen-
tive to cut into their long-range
missilearsonal, said ite, because
it would save them almost no
money. The Soviets have about 75
percent ot their military budget
tied up in maintaining their
sprawling conventional forces,
said Nitze.
Ci)yrtil ItnV, USA TCDAV
AfU Catttgt Information Srtuork
Continued from page 9
and human rights abuses; counsel
and assist Salvadorans to aban-
don, or in some cases, return to
their homeland.
These activities bring the
church and relief workers into
daily contact with the poorest and
neediest people in Salvadoran
society And itist'romamongtheir
ranks that theguernlla movement
recruits many of its followers.
The church vol unteers sa v the
government should welcome their
ettorts at a time when they are
hard-pressed to offer basic serv-
ices to the people.
"The rich in this country are
alreadv looked after said a pnest.
"Hut the poor have society against
them. And the solution is not giv-
ing them money but getting at the
roots of their problems, the con-
flict and the poverty
But instead, in recent years,
the government has tightened visa
requirements, in the name oi na-
tional security, in an effort to cut
the number of foreign church and
relief workers.
The current government
crackdown also brought charges
from one volunteer that the U.S.
embassy here failed to do enough
to protect the lives and rights of
U.S. church and relief workers.
Cttrpyngtit I'm. USA n�M
AppU Coihgi Infvrmmtutn ttuork
If you're making a Christmas list
to be checked twice Don't forget to
add a Bahamas Cruise That might be nice!
Let the Student Union Travel Committee take you to the
Bahamas over Spring Break
(March 3 -9) for as little as:
$485.00
� Get a head start on you tan
� Eat until your heart is content
� Be treated like royalty
Contact Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office for more information!
Thursday:
Thirsty Thursday
$1.00 Imports
$ 1.00 Domestic
$ 2.00 Teas
Ladies Free All Night
BOOKS
Cloth or paper!
Whether used on this campus or not!
We buy all titles having national Resale
Value!
Turn your unwanted books into Holiday
Cash!
Bookstore
Wright Building
Hours:
Mon-Fri 8:30 am- 5:30pm
Telephone 757-6731
$50.
Friday:
RUSH HOUR PARTY
5pm -2am
FREE PIZZA
FREE ADMISSION TIL9
$ 2.00 Teas
$ 2.00 Frozen Drinks
$ 1.00 Imports
$ 1.00 Domestics
Prize to Fraternity & Sorority
with Best Attendence





DORM RESIDENTS:
Have You Vowed Never To Live
In A Dorm Again?
Then Step Up To .
a
'l
rj
o
Q
11
Full Kitchen
Vanity Sink
,wmm �ihfc � iiim��'i�i� �������-�"�
Personal Computer
Bathroom with commode and shower
Raised Double Bed (5 feet)
Washer and Dryer
Desk with 2 shelves
� Each room is approximately 12.5' x 14 or 175 square feet
� Rooms for the physically disabled are available.
NOW LEASING NOW FOR SPRING
Need a study break? Come by any weekday
afternoon between 2:00pm and 5:00pm for a tour!
Call 830-8882 or
1-800-365-3615





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WOULD LIKE TO TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO
THANK THE FOLLOWING BUSINESSES FOR THEIR
EXTRA SUPPORT THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER
s
Exchange
o
THE
RAMADA
x
HILTON INN
WE ENCOURAGE ALL STUDENTS TO SUPPORT
THESE BUSINESSES THROUGHOUT THE HOLIDAY
SEASON AND THROUGH THE NEW YEAR





I HI 1 s (. ROl IMAN
Features
l)K I 1HI K 7, 1489 PAGI 15
Coach Steele talks about life after basketball
H !� HK V HI M
Hie of
h and
home
-

k mo
hum
- A 4
-
Sieele believes qualilv time is pointed di . .� ' and de
important � thattmv essed He said II
ilwavs eas I el
and '
h� said
it was a lot i
Sieeh wenl
heplaved
� �
rked rl -
i am - t tirst hi - .vit!
� -


is! vou
I hs ib 1st. k lip
ii thev re di � n
said I hi
:
hout 1
-
- I I
lh� r ind ol pla e
believes ;
uk I ever let!
, ' ! ' Ml, 1 rrV
� ndrome
thi tirst time
ited in Spe i.il
. �� � .
, � � All - III
- '
v.is n ii He's a true inlv n iad
around I i le lightens up
e'swith. So, he ti
things Hverv night w hen hi th 1
�vS hen I � e trom work its said he start
� tor a month. tain tl . '�
I ),� ha to tell i ,ervbod tli.o said Fur mi
IT Ml

. I � ;
fa mi In �
t t.nr I le ibi
his
. S tt'
vith his
"haI ;
vith me
net time with
� � �
� id to find
nuv I have
� ��
ltl thi kids
thinksit

ai �
think ,
Hi �

I
Financial aid restrictions
cause problems on campus
t t ISICK


� ' '


'leti
11�


Coming
Up
Thursday
I K
( .ore
K E F E L L E1
. � en
. t A1 I
Dead Poet's Society
Frida
A! IK
( omedy Zone
M WDI LI
Bad Bob and the
Rockin' Horses
ROCKEFI I I ERS
Boogie Monsters
MI NDI SHALL
id Poet's Society
Saturday
All !(
A alanche
NEW 1)111
C hannelats
RO KEFELLERS
Phil and the Blanks
MENDENHA1 I
I )ead Toot's Society
Sunday
MENDENHAL1
Dead Poet's Society
'
kell aid trap.
� -

See I INAN IA1 AID paj
Top 13
For the week of
12480
; Primiti.
2 Might �n

�;
5. 7! nds
6 I
tming Blue
Messiahs

9 oe Stummer
illoch
11 . : - � irshift
12 Smithei
1 3 Jesus and M
Chain
Students say the
Bunny's food
UK

ZAN L AM I K
: ' � '
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ert at
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Students learn lesson of
law in life's classroom
Bv OH I
� .
jsset
it the
everv
t even . r lui
i pi t bet
. � � � � - lex manj
� ri
jded
� it and the
rtroom
� , � . , istomt r is
roem
food and
idents melike at
- ein here and
iv it 1 want to she said
ttes � -vt nt Bunny sti talkU the
See COURT on page 19 m.n.i He said he's
re i :
S9C sand
: sti
to � �
V ednesda
X .�

Pick'ui' the Bones:
Bonehead sets sentimental about Christmas
Lexicon
Mushrooming
For the week
ol 12489
1 Fei ni enthusi
astit
2 Prudent A careful
3 Dormant C inactive
4 Cumbersome C
unx ieldy
5 s uttle D Sinl
6 Canny C : hi ewd
Robusl C i-over: ! ulh
built
8 Jaded C over in
dulged
) Integral B essential
10 ntacl B entire
By CHIPPY BOM Ml AI)
Holidavsmaki
� �
gonna do son
� ri
1 slaii
. .low n th o
nd since hristmas i ill
� us holiday y u ould al-
most feel the frantic tensu �n ii
offi( e '� hen 1 ame up to -Anti- this
colun ' � und
music. su h as found in
made horror films, filled thi
fice
And when 1 announced my
intention to write about the true
meaning ofhristmas, three edi
tors, two layout artists and that
damn partridge in the pear tree
had seizures and hail to be taken
to the trauma center I nderstand
able reactions, given mv reputa-
tion
But I'm feeling pensive
Nostalgic Almost, dare I say it
h lignanl 1 di n't feel like slam
ming anybody Not even bad
p, ierry v rit rs
Alter the semester from hell,
1 m too worn out to slam peo le I
. times. Per
edge that

elusive
hnstmas Spirit.
I n I. I'll be

But just what is this feeling of
eness?an I attribute it to the
(r is it some dark part of
my personality 1 ve tried to su-
i? a.it
1 or , hristmas, ! do feel
nicer. 1 m not particularly chari-
i t go out of my way to
buy people presents On my al
iry they'relu ky it i can afford to
mention them in my oluni:
Butevery hodvi arriesai' and
a ion of emotional Samsomte at
the holidays and writi rs moresc
than others Memories seem
iharper, possibilities seem end-
less and depression seems more
acute. 1 very action and word is
charged up,
Psychologically it's easy to
attribute this undercurrent of
excitement to modem society's
endless media bombardment No
natter where vou t;o, red and
reen atta K your eyes and carols
assault �� ur ars
It s liki aught by a tin-
sel explosion in the middle of a
retail wai a ne and sappy songs
are mi ti nl weapons than
ner -it 1 love it.
tackiness, the commer-
cialism, the vain attempts to re-
turn C hristmas to its true mean-
ing, which everyone seems to think
is the Homecoming episode of
"The Waltons the attempts to
bring religion back into it 1 love
it Humans are so naive some-
times, and ii - touchingina way
People, this is it I his is the
true meaning olhristmas. In a
merchandised society like ours,
this is the ultimate end of a hoh-
d, geared towards giving
In a society geared toward
(.heap sentiment, this is the ulti-
mate expression of our I lallmark
lives. In a society geared toward
religious dogma, thisisoneof our
fewham es to hope tor the future
Christmas, whatever it may
have been in the past, is now this
Commercial cheap, symbolic,
religious, stressful, happy it's
everything our everyday life is,
only intensified
Abstract concepts like giving
sha
th
and caning
ety actual
the most tast
but you j vay
nd tt s alsi low?
Lemn
are g m .v, so l
remembers I
Caroliniai
It VS I
night of last I ��
lotta stressin was
looked an ui i S
ing a good time
Isai ' tomys
It's Christmas
photo guv asid n to
find a big brand ' n
dead tree limb that evt n Uxkcxf
like it could be stood up asily
I iebi ht it e stuck
it in an ash pr"
Debbie the secretary found a box
of ancient and crusty dtx orations
and lights Big E got all the Home
comingourt photos
Parker made a ham ol paper
clips 1 pulled out all my plastic
dinosaurs and Kristen . � sc�me
Exacto blades
We do. i � I'l'i oui �� � Even
the ad rep- to it 1 found nv
See Xmas on pace





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
DECEMBER 7,1989 PAGE 15
Coach Steele talks about life after basketball
By DEBRA BLAKE
Special is Th� East Carolinian
His kids are obviously one of
his major concerns. He is not only
a coach, but a family man.
Sometimes life gets tough, and
it is difficult for him to go home
without his work because coach-
ing is not a 9-to-5 deal. However,
Mike Steele will make it home,
even if he gets there just in time to
put his kids to bed.
At 35, Mike Steele has been
married to his college sweetheart,
Sandy, for 13 years. They have
two sons � Derek, 7 and Drew, 4.
It isobviousafter talking with him
for only a few minutes how im-
portant they are and how valu-
able the time they spend together
is.
Being a coach for 15 years has
affected his family life a great deal.
Steele believes quality time is
important, and getting that time is
not always easy. "It gets harder
and harder as the kids get older
he said. "When they were babies,
it was a lot easier
Steele went to Purdue where
he played basketball for four years.
He got interested in coaching when
he worked at summer basketball
camps. At first he worked with
young kids, later he worked with
older kids. He said his coaches
had dramatically affected his life.
Coaching was something he en-
joyed more as he got more in-
volved.
He is a pragmatic man who
takes care of what is going on
today. "Do as well as you can and
worry about what you're doing
today, then things will take care of
themselves he said. When the
team loses he said he feels disap-
pointed, discouraged and de-
pressed. He said: "The kids feel
the same way. You can't dwell on
the past, you've got to move on
His job is to get them back up
when they're down.
Steele said: "The teams that
are good, when they win, don't
celebrate too long. They try to
move on and get better. When you
lose everyone should feel bad
About his job he said: "Every-
pne wants to do what they want to
do. They want to like it, have fun
with it, and then get a big pay-
check to make them happy He
said the administration has made
this a good job and it would be
difficult if he ever decided to leave.
Beginning his third year at
East Carolina, Steele said: "It's
different here because I've always
lived in the midwest. I've met and
made a lot of close friends here
Greenville is the kind of place
Steele believes he would come
back to if he ever left.
Steele's youngest son, Drew,
wasborn with Down's Syndrome.
This summer was the first time
Drew participated in Special
Olympics. Next year he will begin
kindergarten.
Sandy, Steele's wife, is in-
volved in Parents Supporting
Parents. He thinks the support
group has so much heartache and
depression that he could not deal
with it. At the Children's Hospital
there is a feeling of helplessness
that Steele believes is not fair. He
said he struggles when he is
around these children.
Looking back, Steele said:
"Four years ago it was probably
the worst thing that had ever
happened to me. It was a shock
because we didn't know anything
was wrong. He's a true joy to be
around though. He lightens up
the room no matter who he's with,
and he changes things. Every night
when I come home from work its
like he hasn' t seen me for a month.
He has to tell everybody that
daddy's home
Watching Steele talk about his
son brings tears of happiness to
your eyes. Quality time with his
family is important. That is obvi-
ous. "The biggest change with me
is trying to find quiet time with
them he said.
Steele said: "One of the things
about this job is you need to find
ways to get away. It's nice to have
the opportunity to go to the beach.
It's nice just to be with the kids
and go to the movies He thinks it
is good just to get the chance to
have a vacation.
He feels bad when he is on the
road. "With this job you have a lot
of social commitments he said.
So, he tries not to waste any time
when he is with his family. He
said he starts to worry about cer-
tain things as he gets older. He
said: "For me, I never had any
concerns about flying. Now when
1 hear that plane's engine I start
thinking about those little boys
He realizes being a parent is
not easy. There are many involve-
ments, and it takes effort. He also
appreciates his parents more now
because he realizes that parent-
hood is not an easy job.
The other day was a good
example of how dedicated a fa-
ther he actually is. He took time
out of his day to spend with his
son, Derek. He said they went to
the movies for the a ftemoon. Steele
believes times like these are im-
portant.
Financial aid restrictions
cause problems on campus
By CAROLINE CUSICK
Future Editor
What can students do when
the costs of higher education are
too high for their budgets? Apply
for financial aid.
Any student can apply for
financial aid, but most can con-
sider lost forever the hours they
spent filling out computerized
forms, the postage costs and the
application fees they must pay.
Karen Barbee, associate direc-
tor of student financial aid, said,
"Over half of ECU's students
apply for financial aid. Probably
35 percent to 40 percent qualify
for the aid that we administer
Applying for financial aid isn't
as easy as it sounds. Dana Kelly
(not her real name), a sophomore,
nursing major at ECU said: "I had
to go and fill out a very lengthy
application. Basically it's a lot of
wasted time.
"You have to have income
tax, or an estimated income tax
done, and do all this cost figuring
of what you think you're going to
spend and how much you think
you're going to earn. It's not good
basis, as far as I'm concerned,
because you can never really plan
your life like that
Coming
Up
Thursday
ATTIC
Tipper Gore
ROCKEFELLERS
Uncle green
MENDENHALL
Dead Poet's Society
Friday
ATTIC
Comedy Zone
NEW DELI
Bad Bob and the
Rockin' Horses
ROCKEFELLERS
Boogie Monsters
MENDENHALL
Dead Poet's Society
Saturday
ATTIC
Avalanche
NEW DELI
Channel Cats
ROCKEFELLERS
Phil and the Blanks
MENDENHALL
Dead Poet's Society
Sunday
MENDENHALL
Dead Poet's Society
To receive financial aid, stu-
dents must fill out a family finan-
cial statement that is processed by
American College Testing in Iowa
City, Iowa.
"American College Testing
performs what is called congres-
sional methodology Barbee said.
"That's the methodology that was
approved by Congress to deter-
mine what the family's ability to
contribute is, based on a standard
formula. That's all American Col-
lege Testing does
Kelly said American College
Testing is efficient in processing
the applications. "They're quick.
The schools are slow.
"You send (the application) in
to ACT and you wait. Then they
send you a letter saying the results
have gone to your school Ac-
cording to Kelly, that takes about
four weeks.
ECU'S financial aid required
Kelly to obtain financial aid tran-
scripts from other universities she
had attended even if she had not
received financial aid while at-
tending there.
"If s dumb Kelly said. "If
you haven't received financial aid,
why do you have to go to the
See FINANCIAL AID, page 17
Top 13
For the week of
12489
1. Primitives
2. Mighty Lemon
Drops
3. Alarm
4. Wonderstuff
5. 7 Seconds
6. Psychedelic Furs
7. Screaming Blue
Messiahs
8. Uncles Green
9. Joe Stummer
10. Ian McCulloch
11. Voodoo Gearshift
12. Smithereens
13. Jesus and Mary
Chain
Lexicon
Mushrooming
For the week
of 12489
1
Students say they
like Bunny's food
excited about Bunnv's crowing
By SUZAN LAWLER
Staff Writer
The financial aid office offers assistance to all students who are
willing to put forth a little effort The lines are long and the forms are
many, but if the end results are in your favor, the work is not in vain.
(Photo by J.D. Whitmire � ECU Photolab)
Students learn lesson of
law in life's classroom
on Wednesday, Nov. 29, was sur-
prisingly similar to what students
experiece in everyday life at the
university. The courtroom re-
sembled any student's average day
of classes at ECU. In this class-
room of American law, the judge
was the teacher and the students
learned the nuances of one of the
principle branches of government
in the United States.
See COURT on page 19
By JOHN TUCKER
AMbtut Fcatum Editor
Last week students involved
in the arrests stemming from the
HalloweenTarRiver incident were
given the chance to experience the
American legal system in its pur-
est form. In the District Court of
Pitt County in the college town of
Greenville, N.C the stage was set.
The scenario in the cou rtroom
If you ask the rock group,
Sidewinder, what's their favorite
place to eat in Greenville, they'll
tell you, "BunnsGrill The band
eats at Bunny's before and after
their concerts, and their auto-
graphed picture hangs in the res-
taurant. During a recent concert at
the Attic, the lead singer told the
audience to "Go eat at Bunny's
After hearing this, I decided
to see what all the fuss was about.
I had a steak and cheese sub and a
chicken fajita delivered to my
room. My boyfriend and I imme-
diately ripped the bag open and
started eating.
The chicken fajita was differ-
ent. It was on pita bread instead of
a tortilla, and I thought it was very
tasty. My boyfriend wouldn'tgive
me a bit of the sub, so I had to
wrestle it away from him. (Did I
mention we were hungry?) Any-
way, it was one of the best subs
I've had in Greenville.
I can't say anything about the
other items because I haven't tried
them. However, Tony Hoomani,
an ECU sophomore, has tried just
about every item, and he seems to
love the place.
Hoomani said, "I eat there just
about every day for lunch and
dinner. If s cheaper and a lot bet-
ter than Menden-Hell Hoomani,
who is an RA in Fletcher, recently
held a social at Bunny's. "Every-
one loved it he said. He added
that the fajitas were great and the
portions fill you up.
Another regular customer is
Greenville resident, Lillian Forbes.
She also praised the food and
commented on the homelike at-
mosphere. "I can come in here and
stay all day if I want to she said.
I went to Bunny's to talk to the
manager, Ed Baker. He said he's
excited about Bunny's growing
popularity and he hopes that ev-
eryone will try the food at least
once. He stressed the quality of
the food and said the restaurant
doesn't use processed foods, only
fresh items.
Baker added that the restau-
rant has many regular customers.
"I know them they walk by that
they're coming in here and I usu-
ally know what they're going to
order he said.
The menu at Bunny's is virtu-
ally an ethnic smorgasbord. They
have traditional American items
like the steak and cheese sub and
the cheeseburger. They also have
the Middle Eastern shawerma (a
steak sand wich on pi ta bread wi th
a sesame sauce), the Mexican f a ji ta,
and Greek baklava. For vegetari-
ans, the restaurant serves falafel, a
vegetable burger.
Bunny's cook, Amar, said the
restaurant has a relaxed atmos-
phere and great food. He said the
meat for the shish-kabob and fajita
is marinated for 24 hours. Amar
and Ed are brothers, and they
mentioned that their mother was
also a wonderful cook.
The restaurant has daily menu
specials and $1.99 pitchers. If
you're on a budget, you can get
99 sandwiches on Monday.
Bunny's Grill is located next
to the Stop Shop, on East 15th
Street. Many different restaurants
have occupied that corner before
Bunny's. "Everyone told us that
this was a bad corner Baker said,
"but business is good and we're
going strong
Bunny's is open from 11 a.m.
to 1 a.m Monday through
Wednesday, and from 11 a.m. to
230 a.m Thursday through Sat-
urday. It offers delivery from 1
p.m. until close, and the phone
number is 830-5126.
Pickin' the Bones:
Bonehead gets sentimental about Christmas
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Trw Grindi Traiufonned
Fervent: C. enthusi
astic;
2. Prudent: A. careful
3. Dormant: C. inactive
4. Cumbersome: C.
unwieldy
5. Scuttle: D. Sink
6. Canny: C. shrewd
7. Robust: C powerfully
built
8. Jaded: C. over in-
dulged
9. Integral. B. essential
10. Intact: B. entire
Holidays make the editors up
here nervous. They're afraid I'm
gonna do something wigged out,
like I did for Fourth of July, when
I slammed organized religion up
one wall and down the other.
And since Christmas is THE
religious holiday, you could al-
most feel the frantic tension in the
office when I came up to write this
column. Foreboding background
music, such as found in cheaply-
made horror films, filled the of-
fice.
And when 1 announced my
intention to write about the true
meaning of Christmas, three edi-
tors, two layout artists and that
damn partridge in the pear tree
had seizures and had to be taken
to the trauma center. Understand-
able reactions, given my reputa-
tion.
But I'm feeling pensive.
Nostalgic. Almost, dare I say it �
poignant. I don't feel like slam-
ming anybody. Not even bad
poetry writers.
After the semester from hell,
I'm too worn out to slam people. I
want to be nice. Perhaps I've seen
"Scrooged" too many times. Per-
haps I've lost the cutting edge that
I built my fame on.
Maybe I just have that elusive
and undefinable Christmas Spirit.
So I'm not real worried. I'll be
back.
But just what is this feeling of
niceness? Can I attribute it to the
season? Or is it some dark part of
my personality I've tried to su-
press? Naahhh.
Every Christmas, I do feel
nicer. I'm not particularly chari-
table. I don't go out of my way to
buy people presents. On my sal-
ary, they're lucky if I can afford to
mention them in my columns.
Buteverybodycarriesaiound
a ton of emotional Samsonite at
the holidays, and writers moreso
than others. Memories seem
sharper, possibilities seem end-
less and depression seems more
acute. Every action and word is
charged up.
Psychologically, if s easy to
attribute this undercurrent of
excitement to modem society's
endless media bombardment. No
matter where you go, red and
green attack your eyes and carols
assault your ears.
If s like being caught by a tin-
sel explosion in the middle of a
retail war zone, and sappy songs
are more potent weapons than
nerve gas. But I love it.
All the tackiness, thecommer-
cialism, the vain attempts to re-
turn Christmas to its true mean-
ing, which everyone seems to think
is the Homecoming episode of
-The Waltons the attempts to
bring religion back into it I love
it. Humans are so naive some-
times, and if j touching in a way.
People, this is it. This is the
true meaning of Christmas. In a
merchandised society like ours,
this is the ultimate end of a holi-
day geared towards giving.
In a society geared toward
cheap sentiment, this is the ulti-
mate expression of our Hallmark
lives. In a society geared toward
religious dogma, this is one of our
few chances to hope for the future.
Christmas, whatever it may
have been in the past, is now this.
Commercial, cheap, symbolic,
religious, stressful, happy if s
everything our everyday life is,
only intensified.
Abstract concepts like giving
and caring this is how our soci-
ety actualizes them. It may not be
the most tasteful method possible,
but you gotta love it anyway.
And it's also magic. How?
Lemme tell you. All the old people
are gone now, so no one really
remembers this up here at the East
Carolinian. But I do.
It was the last production
night of last December. A whole
lotta stressin' was goin' on. I
looked around. No one was hav-
ing a good time.
I said to myself, this isn't right.
If s Christmas. I took Chris the
photo guy aside and told him to
find a big branch outside. Any
dead tree limb that even looked
like it could be stood up easily.
He brought it in and we stuck
it in an ashcan filled with papers.
Debbie the secretary found a box
of ancient and crusty decorations
and lights. Big E got all the Home-
coming Court photos.
Parker made a chain of paper
clips. I pulled out all my plastic
dinosaurs, and Kristen got some
Exacto blades.
We decorated our tree. Even
the ad reps got into it. I found my
See Xmas on page 19





b
AIDS becomes more prevalent

PAi ri f
Amei icans
on the
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Porcelaif
Bell
ents

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East Carolina Dining Services would like to make YOUR Christmas
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!�THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 7, 1989
AIDS becomes more prevalent
By MARY BETH HUGHES
Special loThe Em Carolinian
"I'm not too worried about
AIDS, I still go out with my bud-
dies to try and get girls. Most guvs
do Those are the words of a 20-
year-old ECU sophomore.
That kind of thinking is a
major concern of the American
College Health Association. The
ACHA has recently completed the
second year of a five year study of
AIDS on the college campus. In
their survey, the ACHA found that
1 in 500 students on the studied
campuses were HIV positive.
Dr. Richard P. Keeling, direc-
tor of student health services at
the University of Virginia and
president of the ACHA, was the
principal investigator for the
study. He said that the survey
results "establish bevond any
doubt that HIV infection is a cur-
rent problem on college campuses.
In fact, the .2 percent rate of infec-
tion is somewhat higher than what
we had hypothesized at the outset
of the study
Dr. 1 lelen Gayle, the national
center tor disease control's epidi-
miologist responsible for the sur-
vey, said: "This study bolsters the
need for more aggressive efforts
to prevent the spread of HIV on
college campuses. These students
will be important disseminators
of information to their communi-
ties, and what they learn in college
Americans change their
views on the Soviet Union
By AMBER WILSON
Special to Th I ail Carolinian
The recent economic, social
and political changes occurring
inside the Soviet Union and in
Eastern Europe have changed
Americans's opinions of the S.
ets. Although still skeptical, sus-
picions among Americans have
been altered drastically towards
the Soviets, due to dramatic re-
forms in communist countries.
After the shipboard summit
off the coast of Malta between
President Bush and Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev, the American
people have renewed hope in
world peace, harmony, and free-
dom for all.
"Gorbachev has taken domes-
tic and external steps that far ex-
ceed what Westerners thought
possible, even 6 months ago said
Frofessor Maurice Simons, direc-
tor of international studiesat ECU.
Simon explained how imperative
it is for Soviets to seek reforms due
to internal needs.
"Gorbachev has restructured
foreign policy in a way that it will
be a more constructed actor on an
international level explained
Simon. He feels Americans's
changing attitudes are due to
Gorbachev's open willingness to
change government policies and
the Bush administration'sdeliber-
ate and positive approach to the
Soviet's initiative.
Simon feels confident the
social, economic, political and
military goals envisioned by Gor-
bachev will be achieved eventu-
ally. "It will take more than a
decade, a generation, or possibly
even a half century. During that
period, he may be replaced but I
doubt there will be a return to
government policies of
Gorbachev's predecessors
Simon also believes the days
of communism are coming to an
end as individual countries in the
Soviet bloc begin to gain more
control and independence. "1
would like to see a pluralistic and
a more democratic Soviet Union
and Eastern Europe composed of
individual stable nation states.
Bodo Nischan, a history pro-
fessor at ECU, also believes rela-
tions between the US and the
Soviet Union are improving due
to Gorbachev's openness to
change. "After Malta, the 'Cold
War' is finally over. The 'Age of
Superpowers' is also over for
now Dr. Nischan said.
According to Nischan, many
Americans question Soviets's re-
liability. Nischan states, "The
Soviets are as reliable as the
Americans. After all, we are all
human with faults
Nischan is originally from
Germany and travels to Europe
on occasion. He said Americans
should be confident and proud of
the changes that have taken place.
"It is a victory of the American
human spirit�to have Eastern
Europe and the Soviet Union take
values that the US has vindicated
for years
Lawrence Hough, a political
science Professor at ECU, is suspi-
cious, yet hopeful of Gorbachev's
intentions. Hebelieves Gorbachev
has improved life for citizens and
has opened up, but is unsure if the
recent summit meeting accom-
plished anything. "I'm not hold-
ing my breath just yet he said.
Hough said, "Soviet's project an
image of being reliable, but there
is so much suspicion in the United
States. It is difficult to know after
40 yearsof mistrust�peopledon't
expect changes
Even though there is much
suspicion, ECU students also are
optimistic. "Soviet willingness to
cooperate with significant reforms
in Eastern European countries
have shown a dramatic change
from prior policies in Soviet doc-
trine said Locke Monroe, a sen-
ior at ECl . He believes
Americans's positive view and
support will encourage Soviet
reforms
Americans views are chang-
ing towards the Soviet Union.
Americans are beginning to trust
the Soviet people and are optimis-
tic about American and Soviet
relations. There is a high regard
for Gorbachev's dramatic reforms
and openness. The recent summit
hasrenewed Americans's hope for
goodwill, peace, and freedom for
all.
will follow them for the rest of
their lives
An ECU junior said: "1 don't
think about getting AIDS. I have
been in a relationship for the past
couple of years. If my boyfriend
and I ever split up, I guess I'd start
to think about it more often
Another ECU student said, "It
scares me to death. Some of the
girls I know still sleep around a
lot. Usually when they've had too
much to drink and they probably
don't always use protection. I just
keep thinking, it only takes one
time I don't think sex with a
stranger is worth dying for
To continue their studv, the
ACHA plans to survey the knowl-
edge, attitudes and behavior of
college students in relation to the
AIDS virus. The first part of the
study evaluated only the number
of positive AIDS cases.
The ACHA's continuing
study will include the 19 universi-
ties already in the program and
they hope to add several new in-
stitutions. They would like to
study a historically black institu-
tion and an institution with a pre-
dominantly Hispanic student
population. The only southern
school that participated in the
ACHA's study was the Univer-
sity of Georgia at Athens.
Many ECU students want to
know why ECU does not keep
statistical information related to
the AIDSonthiscampus. One male
student said: "My friends that go
to the other big North Carolina
schools know what the percent-
ages are for AIDS on their cam-
puses. We should too
Pitt County holds the onlv
statistical data on AIDS in the area.
but the health department official
responsible for AIDS information
was unavailable for comment
about the specific number of cases
in Pitt County.
According to the Department
of Health and Human Services and
the National Center for Disease
Control, 109,344 cases of AIDS
were reported in the United States
as of October 31, 1989. Of those
cases, 1,822 were among children
less than 13 years old.
An AIDS Hotline supervisor
said, "The figure from the CDC is
approximately 3,000 people short
of the actual figure He encour-
ages students to spread the word
on college campuses: "AIDS is out
there; it will kill you and vou can
do something to prevent yourself
from being the next victim. Know
all that you can about the disease
and use safe sex
To help educate students at
ECU, an AIDS Awareness Week
was held Nov. 13-17. According
to Susan Kellerman, ECU'S Health
Educator, the main purpose of the
week was to provide AIDS infor-
mation and make students aware
that their own behavior is causing
the risk.
The Student Health Center
continues to offer information and
has a video presentation that stu-
dents are able to view upon re-
quest at the center. ECU Iocs not
have an AIDS testing facility on
campus but does offer a referral
service to any one desiring a HIV
blood screening.
For further information about
AIDS,call the ECU Student Health
Service, The American College
Health Association or the National
AIDS Hotline (800) 342-2437.
9�030
Fine
Porcelain
Bell
Ornaments
mmm
k�X�'�'�v
DINNFRS INCLUDE Brunswick Stew, Cole Slaw
Boiled Potatoes or French Fries and Com Sticks
PLATES INCLUDE Cole Slaw and Corn Sticks
t"M'�T�v.�vxwreTL"M�xv�v5
BARBECUE
LARGE BARBECUE DINNER
SMALL BARBECUE DINNER
LARGE BARBECUE PLATE
SMALL BARBECUE PLATE
4 25
3 75
4 25
3 75
CHICKEN
FRIED OR BARBECUED
LARGE CHICKEN DINNER
SMALL CHICKEN DINNER
FRIED LIVER DINNER
COMBINATIONS
LARGE COMBINATION
Barbecue and Chicken (White Meat)
SMALL COMBINATION
Barbecue and Chicken (Dark Meat)
4 50
3 7S
3 ?S
I
FAMILY STYLE DINNERS 'Each, 5 so
INCLUDES - Barbecue. Fried Chicken. Cole Slaw
Brunswick Stew. Boiled Potatoes and Corn Sticks
CHILDREN Through 10 Years Old 3 00
Entire Table Must Order Family Style
No Doggie Bag From Family Style
luxm
SEAFOOD
FISH DINNER
OYSTER FRY
OYSTER STEW
SHRIMP DINNER
ANY TWO COMBINATIONS SEAFOOD
SEAFOOD PLATTER (Fish. Shrimp. Oysters)
COFFEE (Unlimited Refills)
TEA (Unlimited Refills)
SOFT DRINKS
5 50
5 M
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E
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GO
60

PARKER'S WILL CATER ALL YOl R NEEDS
Two Locations To Serve Vou
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East Carolina Dining Services would like to make YOUR Christmas
Shopping easier with our
Fine Porcelain Bell Ornaments.
Great for Stocking Stuffers or
Just to let someone know you're thinking of them.
Boxed, ready for mailing
Visit any of our locations to purchase
YOUR Christmas ornaments.
Low Priced and best of all, you may purchase with you meal card.
9appy Holidays I





European night brings culture
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DE EMBER 7, )M
17
Bv REGINALD DILLAHUNT
Staff Vntr
rho 1 rench phrase "C cst la
that s life) aptly jpplied to
'1 uropean Night sponsored by,
itcrnational Student Associa
n M� ndenhall on December
� I he ov enl featured display s on
untriesot rurkey, Germany
n the Netherlands, Italy .
e and Finland with native
cuisine from sonic ol the coun-
ISA President Shahzaad
: a nursing student from
said that the purpose ol the
Financial
event was to raise money tor a
scholarship tor international stu-
dents.
Students participating in the
event wore Conk Mizrakli, a ti
nance major from lurkos who
served a Turkish yogurt drinkand
manti which is similar to ravioli,
,nd Valerie Touloumbadjian, a
graduate student in English who
works in the Foreign Language
Department who served crepes,
French cheese and bread Others
included RistoTanninen, a gradu-
al student in urban planning from
Finland ;MarkusFuchs, an anthro-
pology major from (Germany; and
Marcos Suitt, an exchange student
from Spain.
Entertainment was provided
by bagpiper Loyal F. Osterlund,
III trom Now Born, NC who
dressed in the traditional kilt and
other appropriate attire. Another
New Bern native, Tom Lowe (who
is Scottish-Lebanese) .seemed to
be captivated by the music Lowe
saidl listen to this all the time.
It s the Scottish in me Osterlund
later said that the bagpipes were
aid
usually made from blackwood
from Uganda, Africa, and that the
early kilts were used as blankets
for the men at night and as cloth-
ing during the dav.
Bamasi said that other events
planned bv ISA are "Asian Night"
in February with proceeds going
towards the scholarship tund and
the annual international dinner in
March. ISA welcomes all students
to become members. Interested
students should contact Bamasi
or faculty advisor Dr. Lucy Wright
in Whichard 211
Continued from page 15
SULt
tting transcripts sa
paid or sell paid
It's a Sot ol papei work and it
�n time
rocess til apply ing for
ts any sl iver, se
; .is w ill N ited. At
. l this semester
' vn notified how
lal aid she was to
application went in in
u and in August,
have paid my
had not received .n
ie said
kellv was told that she re
nancial aised on her
thevearand
� � � lamih was
.
determine
in appropriate
rthestudent,
� deration whether
dependent or sell
lent whether thev
or out ot state and
ration whether
campus
I the financial aidoffict
isl ol budgets, or i ost ol
tmures, tor each of
� I students,
heexpectedfam
�� : itii �! w � uld be only their
re married, the
i � : and the sp � s income
they re a family. F r
rbee explained;
� al-
applica
n terms, is not necessity or
supporting stu
litionsthat
ire fairly Barbee said.
� �- . � �; rv irdsofthe
�� ' ins ol the
� � � � tudents
lentsoft heir own
least halt
� r il they are 25 years
if then thev re auto-
sidered to be self-
Kelly this t. r
� ised when her
. , e 1989-1990
ii was pn
irs old and 1 m
-� �� rsin the financial aid
nk my family should
. . omi rhey takeaway
i lot right there m my family
m� invwhere near their
timate
ie formulas set byongress
ine who is eligible to
fii an ial aid underwent a
al change in lu
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I hetirst ot two major changes
annoum ed that the projet ted stu
dent contributions for the vear
would N' based on their incomes
during the prey ions year, instead
ol their projected income tor the
current vear I his change hurts
students who have worked t nil -
time and quit their jobs to go back
i illeg� and students w ho re-
duced their work tune to port
time w hile attendingollege
I he second major i hange at-
nts with dependentsol
their ow n With the formula
cha tudents w ill no longer
K' permitted to include costs in-
curred while supporting their
children or spouse in their costs ol
college attendance l his vy ill sub
stantialK hinder sing nts,
vet it isexpet ted to profit married
students because the old formulas
expected couples to spend the
majority ol their incomes on the
v. OStS ol . and higher edu a-
tion
E( I s student financial aid
hannels federal aid to stu-
dents, directs students to other
organizations that offer grantsand
student loans and maintains ret
ords of the students who receive
financial assistance trom other
sources. Barbee said: "Over hall
the students at E( I rtx eive some
tvpe ol financial assistance, but
that includes outsider holarships.
Wecountall typesol s holarships.
even those we don t administer
Rav Edwards, dire tor ol fi
nancial aid, refused to disclose
information regarding the exact
number ot students who use the
financial aid office or the number
ol students who receive aid ol
some kind.
Fhe federal government finan-
cially assists many students.
However, the current require-
ments tor obtaining financial aid
are shitting the government's role
to the students and parents At the
same time, the cost ol education is
nsmg faster than the nation's in-
flation rate.
I he new formula is hojx-d to
be more successful than those of
the past. During the Reagan ad-
ministration, attempts to remedy
the problems ol the federal stu-
dent loan program included track-
ing down thousands ol former
-tudents who had not paid back
their loans
In a I985 issue, lime maga
zinereported, "I efaulted student
loans add up to S4.5 billion. Al-
most Id percent ot all student
borrowers become bad debtors
Atter trying to collect through
private agencies, the Education
Department called in the ustice
I department to help
Barbee said: "I'm sure there
are students who have legitimate
financial needs we are unable to
meet This is like any other large
program. It's bureaucratic.
rhe system is not perfect and
it never is going to be when they're
trv ing to assist as niav students as
areassisted throughout the United
States through financial aid
The problems of EC I s (man-
ual aid office are numerous. i"he
office has employment positions
unfilled. Stacks of pa per and forms
abound. And, due to federal regu-
lations, Barber said that the struc-
ture is so rigid than except ions can
not be made lor individuals with
special financial needs.
Kellv said she sees the prob-
lems of ECl s Department of
Financial Aid as a lack of interest.
She said "I made an appointment
and came up hero from Wilming-
ton, NC, to talk with somebody. It
took them about five minutes to
talk to me and toll mo what thev
could have told me over the phone.
Basically, thev didn't want to talk
to me
Although the financial aid
office helps several students at
111, it can't help everyone who
needs financial assistance. Because
of federal budget cuts, the finan-
cial aid provided tor students will
probable decrease in the future as
COStS of attendance steadily in-
creases
What can students do when
the costs of higher education are
too high for their budgets7 Apply
for financial aid and pray.
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thf FAST CAROLINIAN PFrF.MBER 7. 1989 19
180 Proof to play farewell show
By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Tonight, 180 Proof will be
pumping it up tor their farewell
show at CTRockefeller's.
Membership tags are Mike
Little on lead vocals, MarkPomer-
ans on lead guitar, Chad
Richardson on bass and Berrv
Oliver on drums.
The band consists of three
ECU studentsandoneECU gradu-
ate. For tour years, ISO Proof has
been bringing their own breed of
rock-n-roll to most of the clubs in
Greenville and select fraternity
parties
Best known for their live
shows. ISO Proof will rock the
house with some originals, and
plenty of cover tunes from bands
such as Ratt, Guns-n-Roses, 12,
Van Halen, Led Zep and the
Stones.
180 Proof is a band that be-
lieves in entertaining the crowd
with a wide-variety of music.
Pomeransexplained that 180 Proof
avoids being a progressive band
and is not stuck in the 60s and 70s
like mostregional bands. 1 lestated
Xmas
Continued from page 15
copy ofVinceGuaraldi's "Charlie
iwn Christmas Music, and put
it on. We hung a banner up that
said "Merry P Christmas
and everybody signed it.
When it was almost done, I
looked at the people working on
the tree. A bunch of people who
like each other some of the time,
had reallv gotten together and
made something. 1 teared up, but
nobody saw me.
Well, the rest of the night was
pretty stressful as usual, but for a
brief, shining moment well,
something made me cry And 1
think anything that can bring tears
a cynical old Bonehead's eves
is � be some pretty powerful
stun.
Merry Christmas everybody!
especially anybody 1 forgot in last
week's column. And till next
semester, may the hangovers be
gentle, but the buzzes intense.
that its important to give the audi-
ence a "little bit of everything
Another important founda-
tion that 180 Proof builds on is the
audienceband interaction. Pom-
erans emphasized that it is impor-
tant to communicate with the
crowd. "We feel like we're doing
our job if the crowd is going wild
he said.
As for future plans, 180 Proof
has lots ot them, but only time will
tell if they continue to keep rockin'
in the band Pomerans said that
there will be an inevitable separa-
tion as they each plan for their
futures.
Pomerans, a business major,
will be attending a pilot training
school for the United States Air
Force in the summer. Oliver, a
senior majoring in Leisure Sys-
tems Studies, will be graduating
in May after he completes an in-
ternship at Hilton Head, S.C. Little,
a voice major, will be graduating
this semester after he completes
his minor in business. Richardson,
who graduated from ECU in May
with a Psychology degree, is cur-
rently working at the Vincent and
Ward Law Firm in Greenville.
Next year he will attend law
school.
Pomerans said he would like
to continue performing with the
band. He also said he could never
play for another band because of
the "special magic" he has found
in 180 Proof. He went on to say
that 180 Proof is like a family to
him, and that it would be difficult
to find that kind of chemistry with
anv other musicians.
Pomerans, a graduate from
guitar university GIT in Los An-
geles, said that the members of
180 Proof always keep the possi-
bility of going out to try their luck
on the over-populated club circuit
in Los Angeles.
180 Proof has come a long way
Court
since their first gig at an Air Force
ROTC military ball. Their live
show is filled with plenty of rock-
n-roll.
This is 180 Proof's farewell
show. However, there is a chance
that the band will return to play a
few shows next semester.
180 Proof will be playing to-
gether during the summer, includ-
ing plans for a possible four-song
demo of originals. Their last demo
was not marketed, but it has been
sent to various record companies.
Their original song, "Rape My
Buzz which is a huge crowd
pleaser, is getting local radio air-
play in North Carolina.
If you're in the mood for some
down-to-earth rock-n-roll, 180
Proof is the band to see. And like
Pomerans said, "We really care
about the people who come to see
us, and we always give 100 per-
cent so everyone can have a killer
time
Continued from page 15
DAVID'S AUTOMOTIVE
Is Now Open In Greenville!
We sell import and domestic parts and
accessories at wholesale prices.
We also have a complete service center.
Make Us Your One Stop!
$kk tiappyttoCidays! c�
' For Parts, For Service
Remember We Have It All!
We Specialize in German Cars.
In the classroom of American
law students reacted comparably
to how they act everyday when
they go to class. Some were bored
with the action the courtroom
ottered, while others found inter-
est in the law and exactly what
was to become of them. Others
still, were doing what almost every
student inevitably does at least
once in their college career, they
were napping �-� just catching a few
Z's. One student was even listen-
ing to a walkman.
The lawyers for WNCT-TV
and the district attorney's office
also seemed to relate to w hat often
happens at the university. They
resembled guest speakers in an
open campus forum, debating on
the obscure facets of media law
and the availability of evidence
used tor the state.
Rustling and low whispers
were not an uncommon event
when things seemed to drag on.
But you could hear a pin drop
when information pertaining to
students surfaced.
At court last week, students
nxeivveUheir tirst glimpse of lav
in CMNWeille, and many offered
comments on what they experi-
enced .
Student John Hand related
how he felt about his first court
experience. "Honestly, 1 thought
it was interesting to see how eve-
rything worked Hand said, "but
lust sitting there all day wasn't
much fun Hand said he was
interested mainly because he even-
tually plans to become a corporate
lawyer. le said he wonders how
a conviction will affect his chances
at being accepted to a credible law
school.
Student Adelle Goournan was
upset with what transpired in
court and said, "1 took a whole
day off work just to sit in that
courtroom. They had a whole
month to look at the evidence on
the videotapes
Student Ryland Walters
said Having it in traffic court was
ridiculous. They should have had
ourcasesinaseparatecourtroom
Walters expressed mixed feel-
ings on how the law was carried
out in the courtroom. "1 thought
the judge had his stuff together.
The lawver for WNCT-TV and the
lawyers for the district attorney's
office weren't that prepared
Walters also conveyed con-
cern for the tirnespent in the court -
�Toom and the effect the time has
on evervdav events in student's
lives. "Wednesday is my hardest
day of classes he stated. He also
cited upcoming exams and missed
work as other concerns students
involved in the Halloween inci-
dent will face.
Joe Herman, a father of a stu-
dent arrested Halloween night,
came from Chapel Hill to attend
the trials. Herman was upset with
the way the trial was handled and
said, "All today shows is that the
state does not have enough evi-
dence to prosecute. They're say-
ing 'if someone could supply us
with the right pictures then we
would know if we arrested the
right people
As the day came to a close in
the courtroom, the judge told the
students that because of the me-
dia-related aspects of the case, all
the cases involving the arrests on
Halloween would have to appear
once again on January 8 through
January 10.
For those long nights
during exam week
r
vMcOrJM
1 Us-
3&
Sophomore student Chris
Babson summarized most student
feelings about this when he said,
"This means you're going to have
to sit there for three days and wait
for your name to be called
As the students sat there in a
state ot.fa�ck. wondering-adbtft
they should do, the stolid judge
ended the class on the legal sys
tern in America by ironically stat
ing, "youall may beexcused now






WE'RE GONNA TURN THIS MOTHER OUT
ThJL t FRIDAY, DEC. 8th
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The Comics Page is going a little mad this week, because the editor is leaving and can do pretty much whatever he wants. Isn't that crusty? Don't get
mad, gang, just get better! We bid a sad farewell to El Espectro and The Law, true heroes of Pirate Comics, but also welcome a new strip, The Dead
King (which will be spelled correctly since its his first time out). Not a bad way to end, eh? Merry Christmas, you!
I
the Bill
By Reids Rich's Christmas Nuthouse
By Boy Wonder
A FEW MOKE PAYS AW FfTFE ro SK� IhF GZ.IYCU ANP FNiXKE tffXV)
- iTiA. hit-Rt. FKti stfal O'K'srvws. again of thciv lk� to
aATf- NOEL A f KUOOLF 5.u" UWV AM TEACH THE WOLP TO awE T HOT
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f ve5 A�� OK ILit. TUgE
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TX'5 i-tOuPt imJlTHOuT
YOU
The Hussy
By Angelique R.
Gambda Damnda Hey
By Li'l Ricky Elliott
rAT, 'A Mr PrrAt HcH
- Aa PfiW-�rA!JuST.
TAKE. CJT th�. AJOSC S
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w vi
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8c5 CU AV lE' WhouT
Afc MdcK�C75AiAlT76�: -
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TE. t�AJ) C7 2u-r CAN I
rQer5 Tb VVBP4TJ iSTWTnQ , "
S .3
4
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Kibbles and Bits
CHUBS
FOR
EGfff
BRAND TORTILLA
SNACK CHIPS
AMI THtRt ARt
PLEWTI OF
I HM r- VJV6S.
By Mean Dean Shull
f h- THAT
. ARE TRYING TO
PRESIWE lc
tc r j l l a,
-W7
-�: a
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Editor's Note: Chief O'Hairy wins Quote of the Week for his momentous line
in panel five. Congratulations, Rik!
REMIN DIN fOUl
'�' H ALL YC NT,
- : El. NflAKE -�
M i sad ventures of Pimple Boy
Bv Da Hammah
�o.� i 1A�AV,
WE'LL 'ML A'OPE.n
The Dukes of Hazzardous Waste
0000000
By Enos M.
HEbU
-T5
c
Faux Pas, Dude
By Funkmeister Chucky D. Tricks N' Posers
By Andrews and Phillips
WITMYOUR ER5T PURCHS�
�Qftri ELVjaH.Vill. S�MD
YOW FREE AN AUTOiSRAPHED
TRlIE PEW5Y TREF 0?NAhEVFi
OON TO BE A CC.t�CTO?.5
TEh.
P5S5T. EAm OVSWi-tifc
HAvf A SR�AT BPEAK
OW.JUST to LCVC K00
Wl TM SOriET H'M"5 "0
THINK ABOJT . w hEN
J65US WAS A CiD DID ME
KkoTE SNow ANGELS






The Spectre
By the Barbarian Brothers
l5u�S5 It ii
ooaon uaez
aaxtrofcum.
tm
Pirate Comics, Its Been Real
By Parker
Staff Monomial
Warning: this is a subjective, self-indulgent little column by the Staff Illustrator
Comics Editor, that serves no purpose but its own. Don't be surjtrised by this, as it used to be a
fairly common occurence a year ago, often accompanied by pictures of the artist. You don't have
to read it, of course.
This is about sad. I've been in this position for so long, 1 don't think I can function in outside
society anymore. Finally, 1 must pass the baton ol the Comics Page (capitalize it always, you) to another,
and risk losing my identity. I'd like to use this, brief space to trv and re-cap my career at the paper and
thank some people I met on the way.
My break at getting on the comics page came when friend Dan Maurcr, who lived across the hall
at A work and happened to be the Feature. Editor, a-ked me to do a strip. Befuddled, I went back to my
� and the first thing I scribbled were two cats in trenchcoats and sunglasses, lo and behold were
horn� The Undercover Cats.
At first Dan and his roommate Rob Mazzoli assisted me with plotting and inking, and we had
some fun At the time Alan Guv had just given up the Illustrator position and the legendary Shelton
Bryant took over. Alan was doin' Walkiri the Flank, Shelton had Sneed, and I had those darn cats.
It was about this time that I first met someone I was destined to collaborate with, possibly
forever, writer Micah Harris. My interest in comk books came roaring back, and Micah and 1 have spent
the past few vears taking a stab at every genre that can go into comic form, and getting rejected by
pubiibhers. ConfidentiaUv, I think we're gonna make it in 1990.
$ NEED CASH?$
CWT
We Will Fay You
$CASH$
For
Gold Class Rings
Fancy Gold Jewelry
Rings
Chains
Bracelets
Diamonds
Broken Gold Jewelry
Sterling Jewelry
Gold& Silver Coins
Electronics
Stereo
CD Players
VCR
Scanners
TV
Portables
Telephones
Clock - Radios
Electric Irons
Piano Keyboard
Guitars
Electric Typewriters
Heaters
Furniture
Large Size Clothes
When You Need To Buy Anything, Save
On "Like New" at Coin & Ring Man
WE BUY & SELL
cTH(L (EScTmtE S9OV
10-5 M - F
10-3 Sat
("Coin &Ring Man")
400 S. Evans St
The Dead King
By Robinson
l0S
Rex, The Wonder Years
i iMT&ftl PTIONi
v - At &TST'S L ff
RE
JtSl
i SP' UJOULD
ivrRoDyce
r? i vEL�s,t!
C HfckAC'E K. ,
WillCCME TTUt
sictr wtuvs�
. WHY
By Perry Mason
'THE fV5
( (VV C �.yr lE� J '
TLLV PjjWlptyfcfl
Finally Shelton moved on, and I inherited the page. What youthful fun. I have to admit, I got
away with murder, plastering my face everywhere, drawing scantily-clad females, Kill Danny Partrtidge
contests, miffing cartoonists, being cheesy�the good ol' days. After getting all that out of mv system, 1 got
around to doing rewarding things, like having regular cartoonists meetings.
That's probably the best part, the team "fee of the page. With all these old-timers, like Steve,
Rik, (and not to forget the graduated Paul Fnedrich who has a compilation of his Overkill strips out now)
and Richard, 1 feel the page is in good hands, especially under the guidance of new Staff Illustrator Steve
Reid. This cartoon crew is doing very well, and be warned, Steve won't stand for any slacking up, you. And
meetings are now monthly and mandatory like the one at 530 today), heh-heh.
Let me close by thanking my staff and all of the East Carolinian staff, who have been the best
bunch of friends a boy could want. 1 can't name you all, but Move you all Thenpretty schmooy, but 1
said it, darn it. I'll see you in the Comic Pages! �30�
Look
for
EASY
MONEY
in
January
752-3866





orts
DECEMBER 7,1989 PAGE 22
'Lightning' strikes as Pack
downs Lady Pirates 93-74
Bv LISA SPIRIDOPOl LOS
Sufi VVnlri
Andrea "1 ightning" Stinson
with the lay-up. Stinson with the
steal. Stinson with the outside
jumper. Stinson with the assist.
1 ver heard ol Andrea Stinson?! ast
night, the ! adv Pirates faced the
Wolfpack ol N . State in Minges
i oliseum,and they certainly heard
from Stinson
1 he 1 adv Pirates lost ti the
Pack 93-74, but Head coach Pat
Piersonsaid, "1 felt real good about
the game, and I think it was ,i
mu h better game than the score
indicated
Stinson led her team v.ith 3
points, nine rebounds, and seven
assists while onlv playing 29
minutes In her last game, Stinson
had 50 points and Providence
Head coach Bob Foley said,
"Andrea Stinson is without doubt
the closest women's player to a
tern,�le Mu hael Jordan
Every defense we tried on her,
she just slued it to pieces. That
was the greatest individual
women's performance I've ever
seen in my 1? years of coaching
women's basketball hi' added
The I d Pirates, led bv jun-
ior center Sarah (iray, who had ??
points, drop to 4-2 on the season
with loss. They were looking to
upset The sso iated Press' num-
ber nine ranked team in fn nt ot a
i rowd of over 1 - �
TheW olfpack ameout si
,ud jumped to ,i (t-1 lead before
Cray hit a long,outside shot to cut
the score to 6-3 State then turned
up the pressure and began press-
ing tull court, which flustered a
young E U team, and forced sev-
eral tirst halt turnovers
Senior guard insh Hamilton
said, "We had a lot of turnovers.
We )ust didn t tak in
ball "
I he I.adv Pii �
three i1 msei uti
didn't s treagain untilGi
the ball and 1 i
cutting State s lea I I
s. EC I then put the prrssu
ten ed a Wolfpai k tun
scored again
Stinson th n � - trol.and
dominated every phase ot the
See IK,HI NING, page 27
Lewis, team reflect on '89 season,
look to future of Pirate football
Senior guard Irish Hamilton drives around .i State - ndrea I ightning" Stinson in I he I adv
Pirates 93-74 loss last night in Minges Coliseum Stinson led .ill players in s, oring v ith points.
(Photo bv Garrett Killian I CD Photolab)
J
Bv I ISA SPIKIDOPOl LOS
At theondof tl itball
n a mtv excited new hea I
coach took over looking to build a
new Pirate program. rhat c i -
turned around a i-8 team to end
this season 3-5-1.
After his firs) season as 1 i I
head football coach, Hill 1 ewissaid
he feels very good about the team's
future We definitely made prog
ress in the right direction " ! i
said
I ewis soutlookfors asnsto
i omes after his team tailed to live
up to virne of thegi M Is he had set
at thebeginingof theseason i hir
goal was simply to be the best
team we were capable ol King
and .�� c didn't really do that We
could have accomplished much
more he added
In th process of trvmg to be
best the Pirate team did
manage to accomplish setting a
few school records over the sea
I his ear we saw the Pirates
iting Bowling (ireen,im in-
nati, Illinois State, Virginia Tech
and Temple. Thts season we sav
rtv ord setting attendant eb loyal
Piarate tans, with attendee
the Va. Tech game filling 1 ii �
with it's biggest crowd
32,100. This season also saw rec
ord settingperformani esfrom two
�d
Special Olympics offers special kids
a chance to learn sportsmanship
BvHHA WOO UN
Over 22 athletes from 17
Greenville-Pitt County schools
gathered at the 11m Street gymna-
sium Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday of this week to compete
in the Fourth Annual Greenville-
Pitt County Special Olympics
Tournament. The event was an
18-team indoor soccer tournament
and was co-sponsored by the
Sigma Phi Epsilon and the (ireen-
ville Recreation and Parks.
Tommv Spaulding, who is in
charge of external fund-raising
and community involvements tor
the Sig Eps. helped the fraternity
get involved with the event. Spald
ing said his fraternity was con-
tacted bv Connnie Sappenfield,
coordinator for the Greenville
Countv Special Olympics, asking
themfor sponsorship.
Spaulding said, "1 think that
not just the participants benefit,
but we benefit from this as well
Working with these kids brings us
as a fraternity together and gives
us a chance to talk to the kids
"We're also here to pass the
message to ECt students that our
fraternity is not )ust here to party
and have fun but to help people
and the community
Sappenfield explained that the
Special Olympics is here to help
the kids gain self-esteem, to gain
acceptance in society and to give
them something to succeed in.
"Twenty years ago, most of
these kids were not socially ac-
cepted and could not participate
in such events But the Special
Olympics has changed that
"In 18, onlv one thousand
participants existed, but now over
one and a halt million exist " Sap-
penfield also said theSigEps "have
been a great help and have proven
that ECU students can and do get
involved. I'm very happy to have
them and hope to have them back
Clarence Phillip, a participant
from South Greenville Elemen-
tary, said he had learned a lot and
had a lot of fun playing in the
tournament
Travis Robinson, also a South
Greenville Elementary student,
said he thought it was a lot of fun.
Healsoadded, "Those people (Sig
Eps) has been very nice and help-
ful
James Donaldson, a 10-year-
old student from W.H. Robinson
Elementary said, "I enjoyed it a lot
and ! can plav s,s i or re �
The volunteei ls
had a good I nt
approximateh 60hours ��. ith their
respective team and learned i lot
about the kids . men-
tally disabled and the Special
Olympics.
"I heard about it (Spei ial
Olympics) through class, ,ind I've
always wanted to do it. so ! did
said Julie Weinstein, a volunteer
coach and an F( I student. "Hove
it, and I have seen h v. much the
kids have learned
Thekidspicked out the name
(oi the team) all by themselves
during the first practice " she
continued. "When we were tin
isheci. the kid- said We're going
to miss you and it made me feel
really good It gave me the feeling
that 1 had accomplished some-
thing, and 1 did
Taking first place in Tuesday's
action v as Sadie Saulter Elemen
tary, while the team from 1I.H.Sugg
Elementary captured second, and
South Greenville Elementary took
third
(Ireem iUeMiddleSchooltook
hi me firsl pla e honors in
Wednes' � hih Ayden
Middle S hi plac ed soi ond.
All of the plav ers that partici
pated received ribbons, and the
ich division was
� � �
i h ' � � also quite a bit ol
narei tsupportatth tournament.
eronn ii ds �� hos daugh-
ter Kishaisa participant from W.H.
Robinson Elementary said, "It
makes me feel . ery i nd just to
h her
Barbara Johnson, a teacher
from south Greenville High
School - lid the tournament was
good because "it promotes sports-
manship and team plav
William Compton, a member
! Sigma Phi Epsilon, said "1 like
the idea of helping the coummu-
nityand it also gives us a chance to
work together as a whole
There were a total Of 85
members from the Sigma Phi
Epsilon fraternity that were in-
volved in theevent. I hey donated
a lot of time and effort for the
Sped il I Olympics, and their cart
mA d� ion foi tru kids really
helped to make the tournament a
success. Some served food and
refreshments, others refereed,
while the others just made things
run smoothly.
"Working withonnie (Sap-
penfield) and the Special Olvm-
pi s tor the past three months has
See OLYMPICS, page 27

Head coach Bill Lewis led the Pirates to their best record (5-5-1)
since 1983 when ECU went 8-3 under coach Ed Emory. (Photo by
GaiTett Killian � ECU Photolab
E( I seniors.
Quarterl
threw his wa
books bv umulatu , . - -
toupdatethatnui - i
ing 1 ie also ; - idei
areer total
v a rd s
Wide Re ei i � �'
was (in the i thei
those Hunter p :
up to the nui
i areer pass re option list
Wilson also
reer rccej I i
ception yar
"Wereallvrrv
on the offense said
year 1 ra is pla
Although Hunl
rate offense, theoffensi
its three seniors Irani
wart Soufbali and. 'odd :
also plav oil an important irl
the Pirati -
waspleased withtl iveline
as a total unit erv
consist.
"The three sei
ourselves to pave the � iv foi the
younger guvs and I m
achieve success in the r
Lowe added.
The offense ended up with an
average of 363.4 total va-
game on about 5 3yardsperpl
Of those yards, an aver -4
were on the ground and 195
bv air. Lew is said '� i did a
commendable job of thr nd
catching the ball
Quarterbac k 1 luntt r, v
proved to be a vital link in the
Pirate's successful air attack, said
he thought the team needed to
plav with "moreintensity but 11
team reallv stuck together
through all the ups and dovs ns
The Pirate offense ran into
some trouble this season in con-
verting on third down plav s, only
managing to convert 53 of lMhird
downs for 33.1 percent
ECU'S defense was led bv the
big plays of defensive end An-
thony Thompson and trev safety
lunior Robinson, who lewis said
were, "real threats all the time "
Thompson finished second on
the team in tackles with LV he-
See LEWIS, page 27
Sophomore honored
Hargrove named CAA
Player of the Week
Greenville Middle School captured first place in Wednesday's action of the Fourth Annual
Greenville-Pitt County Soccer Special Olympics. The Sig Eps co-sponsored the event and pose
with the winning team. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire � ECU Photolab)
Colonial Athletic Association
Release
East Carolina posted three
victories last week, including two
wins and the btle at the Lady Pi-
rate Classic in Greenville. On
Tuesday, ECU defeated North
Carolina A & T, 76-50. In limited
action, Hargrove scored 11 points
and grabbed five rebounds vs. the
Aggies. In tournament wins over
Fairleigh-Dickinson (74-60) and
Howard (87-68), Hargrove total-
led 45 points and 25 rebounds to
garner MVP honors. After five
games, the 5-9 forward ranks third
in the CAA in field goal accuracy
(56.97c), tied for fourth in scoring
(17.0 ppg) and tied for seventh in
rebounding (7.6 rpg).
Also nominated: Antoinette
Battle, CMC; Pam Bryan! L'R;
Angie Evans, W&M, Cindy
Makowski,UN( W. PaulaSchuler,
JMU asnd Felicia Young, AU.
'4tfe
k
TONYA HARGROVE





orts
DECEMBER 7,1989 PAGE 22
Senior guard Irish Hamilton drives around N.C . State's Andrea "Lightning" Stinson in The Ladv
Pirates 93-74 loss last night in Minges Coliseum Stinson led all plavers in si oring with 33 points.
(Photo bv Garrett Killian � ECU Photolab)
Special Olympics offers special kids
a chance to learn sportsmanship
By HYEN WOO JUN
Sufi Wntrr
Over 225 athletes from 17
Greenville-Pitt County schools
gathered at the Him Street gymna-
sium Tuesday, Wednesdav and
Thursday of this week to compete
in the Fourth Annual Greenville-
Pitt Countv Special Olympics
Tournament. The event was an
18-team indoor soccer tournament
and was co-sponsored bv the
Sigma Phi Epsilon and the Green-
ville Recreation and Parks.
Tommy Spaulding, who is in
charge of external fund-raising
and community involvements for
J
the Sig Eps, helped the fraternity
getinvolved withtheevent.Spald-
ing said his fraternitv was con-
tacted by Connnie Sappenfield,
coordinator for the Greenville
County Special Olympics, asking
themfor sponsorship.
Spaulding said, "1 think that
not just the participants benefit,
but we benefit from this as well.
Working with these kids brings us
as a fraternity together and gives
us a chance to talk to the kids.
"We're also here to pass the
message to ECU students that our
fraternity is not just here to party
and have fun but to help people
and the community
Sappenfield explained that the
Special Olympics is here to help
the kids gain self-esteem, to gain
acceptance in society and to give
them something to succeed in.
"Twenty years ago, most of
these kids were not socially ac-
cepted and could not participate
in such events. But the Special
Olympics has changed that
"In 1968, only one thousand
pa rticipants existed,butnow over
one and a half million exist " Sap-
penfield also said the Sig Eps "have
been a great help and ha ve proven
that ECU students can and do get
involved. I'm very happy to have
them and hope to have them back
Clarence Phillip, a participant
from South Greenville Elemen-
tary, said he had learned a lot and
had a lot of fun playing in the
tournament.
Travis Robinson, also a South
Greenville Elementary student,
said he thought it was a lot of fun.
He also added, "Those people (Sig
Eps) has been very nice and help-
ful
James Donaldson, a 10-year-
old student from W.H. Robinson
Elementary said, "I enjoyed it a lot
and I can pla) saut real g
The volunteer coaches also
had a good time Ea hcoach spent
approximately 60 hours with their
respective team and learned a lot
about the kids, the developmen-
tallv disabled and the Special
Olympics.
"1 heard about it (Special
Olympics) through class, and I've
always wanted to do it. so I did
said Julie Weinstein, a volunteer
coach and an EC I student. "I love
it, and I have seen how much the
kids have learned
The kids picked out the name
(of the team) all by themselves
during the first practice' she
continued. "When we were fin
ished, the kids said "We're going
to miss you and it made me feel
really good. It gave me the feeling
that I had accomplished some-
thing, and 1 did
Taking first place in Tuesdav's
action was Sadie Niulter Elemen-
tary, while the team from I I.B.Sugg
Elementary captured second, and
South Greenville Flementarv hxk
third
Greenville Middle School took
home first place honors in
Wed nesdav's action, while Ayden
Middle School placed second.
All ot the plavers that partici
pated received ribbons, and the
'Lightning' strikes as Pack
downs Lady Pirates 93-74
By L ISA SP1RIDOPOULOS
Sljff Wrilrr
Andrea "lightning" Stinson
with the lay-up. Stinson with the
steal. Stinson with the outside
jumper. Stinson with the assist.
Ever heard of Andrea Stinson? Last
night, the 1 Adv Pirates faced the
Wolfpack of N.C. State in Minges
(bliseum,and they certainly he ird
from Stinson.
The I ady Pirates lost to the
Pack 93-74, but hd coach Pat
Piersonsaid'l felt real good about
the game, and I think it was a
much better game than the score
indicated
Stinson led her team with 33
points, nine rebounds, and seven
assists while only playing 2s
minutes. In her last game, Stinson
had 50 points and Providence
Head coach Bob Foley said,
"Andrea Stinson is without doubt
the closest women's player to a
female Michael Jordan.
Every defense we tried on her,
she just sliced it to pieces. That
was the greatest individual
women's performance I've ever
seen in mv 12 years of coaching
women's basketball he added.
The Lady Pirates, led bv jun-
ior center Sarah (irav, who had 2?
points, drop to 4-2 on the season
with loss. Thev were looking to
upset The Associated Press' num-
ber nine ranked team in front ot a
crowd of over 1,000.
TheWolfpackcameoutstrong
and lumped to a tvl lead before
Gray hit a long, outside shot to cut
the score to 6-3. State then turned
up the pressure and began press-
ing full court, which flustered a
voung ECU team, and forced sev-
eral first half turnovers
Senior guard Insh Hamilton
said, "We had a lot ot turnovers.
We just didn't take .are ot the
ball
The Lady Pirate, tht n misst i
three consecutive la) ups and
didn't score again until (,ra .
the ball and Hamilton scored,
cutting State's lead to eight at 1 J-
5. ECU then put the pressure on,
forced a Wolfpack turnover, and
scored again.
Stinson then took control, and
dominated every phase of the
See LIGHTNING, page 27
Lewis, team reflect on '89 season,
look to future of Pirate football
By LISA SPIKIDOPOULOS
Staff Wnttr
At the enct of the 1988 football
season a very excited new head
coach took over looking to build a
new Pirate program. ITiat coach
turned around a 3-8 team to end
this season 5-5-1.
After his first season as ECU
head football coach, Bill I ewissaid
he feels very good about the team's
future. "Wedefinitely madeprog-
ress in the right direction Lewis
slid.
I ewis'soutlook forseasonsto
comes after his team tailed to live
up to some of the goals he had set
atthebeginingoftheseason(ur
goal was simply to be the best
team we were capable ot being
and we didn't really do that. We
could have accomplished much
more he added.
In the process of trying to be
their best the Pirate team did
manage to accomplish setting a
few school records over the sea
son. This year we saw the Pirates
defeating Bowling Green, Cincin-
nati, Illinois State, Virginia Tech
and Temple. This season we saw
record setting attendance bv loyal
Piarate fans, with attendence at
the Va. lech game filling Ficklen
with it's biggest crowd ever,
32,100. This season also saw rec-
ord setting performances from two
winning U am in each division was
awarded a trophy
There was also quite a bit ot
parent support at the tournament.
Veronica Edwards, whosedaugh-
terkisha isa participant from W.H.
Robinson Elementary said, "It
makes me feel very proud just to
watch her
Barbara Johnson, a teacher
from South Greenville High
Schtxl, said the tournament was
good because "it promotes sports-
manship and team play
William Compton, a member
of Sigma Phi Epsilon, said, "1 like
the idea of helping the coummu-
nity and it also gives us a chance to
work together as a whole
There were a total of 85
members from the Sigma Phi
Epsilon fraternitv that were in-
volved in the event. They donated
a lot of time and effort for the
Special Olympics, and their care
and devotion for the kids really
J
helped to make the tournament a
success. Some served food and
refreshments, others refereed,
while the others just made things
run smcMithlv.
"Working with Connie (Sap-
penfield) and the Special Olym-
pics for the past three months has
See OLYMPICS, page 27
Head coach Bill Lewis led the Pirates to their best record (5-5-1)
since 1983 when ECU went 8-3 under coach Ed Emory. (Photo by
Garrett Killian � ECU Photolab
FC'U seniors.
Quarterback Travis Hunter
threw his wav into the record
books by cumulating 2388 (need
to update that number)yards pass-
ing. He also became the leader in
career total offense with 5,197
yards
Wide Receive! W alter Wilson
was on the other end o many of
those Hunter passes He moved
up to the number one spot in the
career pass reception list with 91.
Wilson also finishes as E I 's ca-
reer reception leader with 91 for
1 .70and the season's lea lennre
ception yardage with 7
"We rea11 v m.)ved the b.111 w i
on the offense said Wilson "All
year Travis played great
Although Hunter led the Pi-
rate offense, the offensive line and
its three seniors (.rant I owe Ste-
vvart Southall and Todd Drugac,
also played an important part in
the Pirate scheme. Lewis said, "I
was pleased with theoffensiveline
as a total unit, thev were very
consistent
"The three seniors took it upon
ourselves to pave the wav for the
younger guys and help them
achieve success in the future
Lowe added.
The offense ended up with an
average of 363.4 total yards per
game on about 5 " vards per plav
Of those yards, an average of 168.4
were on die ground and 195.0 were
by air. Lewis said, "We did a
commendable fobof thro wing and
catching the ball
Quarterback Hunter, who
proved to be a vital link in tht
Pirate's successful air attack, said
he thought the team needed to
play with "more intensity but the
team) really stuck together
through all the ups and downs
The Pirate offense ran into
some trouble this season in con-
verting on third down plays, only
managing to convert 53 of 160 third
downs for 33.1 percent.
ECU'S defense was led by the
big plays of defensive end An-
thony Thompson and free safety
Junior Robinson, who Lewis said
were, "real threats all the time
Thompson finished second on
the team in tackles with 109, be-
See LEWIS, page 27
Sophomore honored
Hargrove named CAA
Player of the Week
Greenville Middle School captured first place in Wednesday's action of the Fourth Annual
Greenville-Pitt County Soccer Special Olympics. The Sig Eps co-sponsored the event and pose
with the winning team. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire � ECU Photolab)
Colonial Athletic Association
Release
East Carolina posted three
victories last week, including two
wins and the title at the Lady Pi-
rate Classic in Greenville. On
Tuesday, ECU defeated North
Carolina A & T, 76-50. In limited
action, Hargrove scored 11 points
and grabbed five rebounds vs. the
Aggies. In tournament wins over
Fairleigh-Dickinson (74-60) and
Howard (87-68), Hargrove total-
led 45 points and 25 rebounds to
garner MVP honors. After five
games, the 5-9 forward ranks third
in the CAA in field goal accuracy
(56.9), tied for fourth in scoring
(17.0 ppg) and tied for seventh in
rebounding (7.6 rpg).
Also nominated: Antoinette
Battle, GMU; Tarn Bryant, UR;
Angie Evans, W&M; Cinov
Makowski, UNCW; Paula Schuler,
JMU asnd Felicia Young, AU.
jLJ
TONYA HARGROVE
L





.
hTS
NFL Hall of Famers inducted
ed mto the National FootbaU Foundation Hall of Fame In
� I : esday were: players Archie Manning,Dontide Anderson,
�. Larry Csonka, Chalmers Bump" Elliott, Roman Gabriel,
1 ed K waLvk, Edgar Manske, BobSchloredtand Aurelius
and coaches Frank James Howard, Sid Gillman and Warren
AP All-America college team
rterback Andre Ware and running back Anthony Thompson
led t�The Associated Press 1989 All-America college football
� d Tuesday. The two were first and second in the Heisman
rate Others on the team include: receiver Clarkston Hines
ntet Michaei Tanks (Florida St.), guard EricStill (Tennessee)
kle fim Mabry (Arkansas).
OU denies NCAA penalties
klahoma officials denied Tuesday that the university faces an
p Tisiun of up to two years after published allegations by a
1 urgla r that the school was still breaking NCAA rules after
� robation last year.
European league names Elway
Ray Willseyand John Idzik, former NFL coaches, were two of six
fad coaches announced Tuesday by the League of American FootbalL
F is scheduled to begin play next spring in eight European
he other coaches named were Jack Elway (John �1 way's father),
M ak Perry Moss and Jim Valek. Coaching assignments were
l revealed.
USTA national team picked
The 11-man national team of the US. Tennis Association, from
I he 1 wo Da vis Cup squad will be picked, has been announced.
�m numbers are: Andre Agassi, Jay Berger, Michael Chang, Ken
h. Brad Gilbert, Aaron Krickstein, Kick Leach, Tim Mayotte, John
roe, fim Pugh and Robert Seguso,
Autopsies planned on horses
Prelimiruryrcportsaretobebaxdcedupbautopsiesontwhijrses
that died during the running of a harness race at Maywood Park in
hicago. The reportsimJicatethatacommonconditloricalied "choking
down" killed judge For Yourself and that Fredericton Nf. died of a heart
attack.
L
- -T . i I
A certain whale will disappear!
Comaneci stays out of sight
itv'd thC f�mWr Sy�� wunderkind who last
ped from hei native Romania, was believed headed for
ilS N !v t"? b0en secn smco a bricf gpse Friday
" New ork's Kennedy Airport. The United dynasties
�ys it is w.llmg to help Comaneci get settled in the USA.
Another tourney discussed
- of attempts to stage the most prestigious finale to the
ason, a third possible tournament to succeed the Grand
�f "vntumcxi Monday. CeneScottsaid he is working on
in ufZ'r th!�n tcam infest to be played late
i West Cermany. Ion Tiriac said Sunday he pUns a $10
irnamcnf next December. F
NCAA panel to discuss cash
- X F cutHeCommitteewinappointaspecialcommittee
�fnTvVuuT t0 spond $1 biion from the ww ven-
on I baskejball tournament contract with CBS television. A
is due in early June.
Johnson honors NBA contract
K-hnson 32,hasendcdhishoidoutandisreportingto
ota Ti mlierwolves, the team announced Monday. The 6-
hnson sa.d he will honor his contract which pays hhn
h.s season - minus fines and lost wages of about $170,000.
Kllison out with tendinitis
1 pick Pcrvifi Ellison has continuing tendinitis problems
foot and likely will miss the next three weeks, Sacramento
s said Monday. Arteran examination, doctors prescribed
' rest for the 6-foot-ll center who had arthroscopic
his right toot in September. v
Tulsa player hurt in wreck
ide receiver for the University of Tulsa, was hospital-
roken lej;s Monday after a head-on auto collision near
' � H,t son, who tied a team record this year with 16 touch-
was listed in serious but stable condition after surgery.
Bullet forward has surgery
'�'� imams, Washington Bullets starting forward, had arthro-
rgerj Monday for torn ligaments in his right knee. He is
js 12 weeks. Originally, Williams was diagnosed with a
tl collateral ligament, but the diagnosis was changed to a
?us injury.
Thirty Soviets fail drug test
Soviet official has confirmed that more than 30 Soviet
sted positive �or drugs this year. The official said the 30
me �ut ot about 4,000 teatoOASwietaiWetesibi&Mw,
ttrick named Penguins coach
rick, grandson of the man after whom the NHL's Patrick
named, was named general manager of the Pittsburgh
esday. He also will serve as coach until he names a
Gene Ubriao, fired along with general manager Tony
uesday. J
Becker, Graff are ITF champs
cr and Steffi Graf, both of West Germany, were named
women's world champions Tuesday by the International
in. Becker is rated No. 2 behind Ivan Lendl in computer
sa id they chose Becker because hebeat Lendl twice this
Charlotte leads hunt
Carolinas to examine
possible NFL sites
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
By RICK SCOPPE
Thl A.tof iatrd PlM�
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) �
While it will be at least late next
year before the NFL announces its
expansion plans, North Carolina
and South Carolina will find out
next week where a stadium will
be built if the states actually land a
professional team.
Four sites are being consid-
ered for the 65,000-seat stadium
� three in North Carolina and
one in South Carolina. The sites
are: downtown Charlotte; York
County near Carowinds; near the
Charlotte Motor Speedway; and
an area between Gastonia and
Kings Mountain in Gaston
County, said Mark Richardson,
who is working with his father,
Jerry, to bring a National Football
League team to the Carolinas.
Several factors are being con-
sidered in the choice of a site, in-
cluding how easy it will be for
fans to drive in and out of the
stadium, Richardson said.
"It's an area that people can
become disenchanted with
Richardson said. "If they become
disenchanted, they may not be
willing to stick with the franchise
until you become a winner
Richardson said the soil and
rock structure also have been
examined at the sites to make sure
the land can handle the weight of
a stadium. Economic concerns also
have been considered, as well as
which site might be the best for
the most fans.
"We've tried to assess what is
best for the fans' convenience he
said. "Not fans in anv one area,
but fans across the Carolinas as a
whole
Richardson said the Caroli-
nas may find out in late 1990
whether the NFL will locatea fran-
chise in either state.
"From what we hear, there's a
good chance there's going to be
anewcollectivebargainingagTee-
mentnegohatedinthenextcouple
months, which means the NFL can
probably can get around to ex-
pansion in the spn ng of next year
he said.
"Iftheycanhitthat timetable,
it would probably take them six to
nine months to determine who
the first expansion markets are tha t
they would take in, which would
mean this time next year � late
1990 � we should find out
whether we're going to be taken
in the first wave of expansion.
"That's our timetable. That's not
the timetablesetby the NFL,cause
they haven't set theirs he said
"But that's the timetable we think
that they're operating under
If the Carolinas get an NFL
franchise in 1990, Richardson said
the team probably would begin
playing in 1992. Richardson, who
lives in Charlotte, spoke at a hast-
ily called news conference after
talking to a sports marketing class
at the Universitv of South
Carolina's Department of Sports
Administration. Richardson has
been working full time with his
father, a Spartanburg husiness-
man, to bring an NFL team to
Carolinas. Although it will be at
least a year before the NFL an-
nounces its expansion plans,
Richardson said it was important
for the Carolinas to announce the
site of its stadium on Dec. 15. "We
can only do so much design on i
facility before we've got a site se-
lected' he said. "We can't do the
specific designs of the faciltv until
we can get site specific
The Richard sons have been
looking for a suitable site for 2 1
2 years.
"It's time for us to get this
decision behind us so that we can
move on and concentrate our ef-
forts and our time and our re-
sources in other areas he said.
Richardsonalsosaidplansare
in the works for an NFL exhibition
game at Williams-Bnce Stadium
next year. An NFL preseason game
between the New York Jets and
Philadelphia Eaglesdrewa crowd
of 52,855 at the 45,000-seat Carter-
FinlevStadium in Raleieh, on Auc
20. W
Richardson said the success
of that game has helped the Caro-
linas not only in their campaign
for an NFL franchise but in efforts
to land a second exhibition game.
"We've had contact with sev-
eral different teams. Nothing is
final vet Richardson said. "We've
had eight games offered to us al-
ready to play in the Carolinas. 1
think that's just a testimonv of
how far the Carolinas have come
in the eyes of the people in the
NFL
Journalism major
find
out what you're getting
yourselt into�work at
The East Carolinian
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24
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 7
ABC takes Treasury Department to court over
the airing of the Cuban Pan-Am Games in 1991
By RONALD BLUM
The Aj�xl�ed PrtM
NEW YORK (AD - Capital
Cities-ABC Inc claiming the US.
government is trying to stop it
from televising the 11 Tan
American Games in Cuba, is suing
The 1980s: a
decade of
change in the
sports world
By HAL BROCK
1 hr ViftOiiafrd Prrst
Sports in the 1980s supplied
abundance and achievement bal-
anced bv division and despair, a
10-year roller coaster ride through
the peaks and valleys of human
emotion. It was a decade that
changed the face of athletics from
front office to field with an eco-
nomic and performance revolu-
tion that left a distinct and perma-
nent imprint.
�It was Mike Tyson, devas-
tating boxing's heavyweight divi-
sion with fire in his eves and rage
in his lists, and Sugar Ray Le-
onard, cutting through layers of
ring rust to stage an electrifying
middleweight comeback.
�It was Magic Johnson and
the Los Angeles Lakers, winning
five championships and playing
for the title three other times to
establish a standard ot continuing
excellence rarely achieved in the
NBA.
�It was Joe Montana and the
San Francisco49ers, claiming three1
Super Bowl titles
� It was Wayne C.retzkv, a
superman on skates, raising
hockey to a level rarely reached
before he came along, and Nolan
Ryan, who began the decade strik-
ing batters out with 90-plus mph
See DECADE, page 25
the Treasury Department to get
broadcasting clearance.
ABC, in a lawsuit filed Mon-
day in IS Pistru t Court in Man-
hattan, says the Treasury Depart-
ment is blocking the broadcasts
and that the government's actions
"violate rights secured to ABCand
the public bv the First Amend-
ment" and "constitute an unlaw-
ful prior restamt on spec h and
related activities
ABC agreed earlier this year
to pay the l uban Tan American
Games Organizing Committee
$8,741,250 tor the L S television
rights to the competition, sched-
uled Aug. 2-18, 1991 at Havana
Under the Trading with the I n
emv Act and the Cuban Assets
Control Regulations, U.S. compa
nies and citizens must apply tor a
license to do business with Cuba
According to Barry Frank ot
Trans World International, the
television consultant tor the Fan
American Sports Organization, the
Treasury Department denied the
license application last Fndav.hut
told ABC that it could purchase
anci air videotapes of the games as
opposed to live coverage.
Frank and ABC said R. Rich-
ard Newcomb, director of theot-
ficeof foreign assets control of the
Treasury Department, was the
official who made the decision.
Newcomb did not return tele-
phone calls Monday and Larry
Batdorf, a treasury spokesman,
said. "We decline any comment at
Ihis time because the matter is in
litigation
In .i letter included in the suit,
filed in U.S. District Court in
Manhattan, Newcomb told ABC
tti.it "because this transaction
would result in a very substantial
pavment to Cuba, it is contrary to
the current foreign policy of the
i Inited States government toward
Cuba "
According to Frank, the U.S.
government said ABC could not
pav the money directly to Cuba,
but would have to place it in a
blocked account that would be
released to the Cubans when rela-
tions between the United State
and Cuba normalize.
"That could be tomorrow oi
never Frank said, "and the Cu-
bans were unwilling to accept
that
"These games will take place
with or without ABC he said.
"The monevtheCubans are spend-
ing is tar in excess of what ABC is
paying. They're building new
facilities and hotels and they're
spending well in excess of $300
million.
"It would be a pitv if the U.S.
team were permitted to go and
Americans wouldn't be able to see
it Frank said. "It would be a
violation of First Amendment
rights
Stephen . Solomon, senior
vice president ot ABC Sports, said
the Omnibus I radeand Competi-
tiveness Act of 1988 allowed the
purchase of informational materi-
als from Cuba. He said the "artifi-
cial distinction" between a live
broadcast and videotape "just does
not make sense to us
Frisbee, or Ultimate as many ECU students call it, has become a very popular sport on the campus
and around the nation. Here, I ee N alston is throwing a pass as the defender, Chad Koos, tries to
shut him down. (Photo bv Garrett Killian � ECU Fhotolabf
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Student Stores-Wright Building





Decade
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 7,1989 25
Continued from page 24
iastballs and finished it the same
way.
�It was a Patrick Ewing slam
dunk and a Mike Schmidt home
run. It was Willie Shoemaker lead-
ing in the stretch at Churchill
Downs and Jack Nicklaus march-
tag majestically down the 18th
fairway at Augusta, swallowed up
on all sides by canyons of cheers.
It was Martina and McEnroe,
Vkeem and kareem. It was Bo and
Coe, Flo o and Fernando.
11 wasCarl Lewis winning tour
gold medals at Los Angeles, and
Ben lohnson giving one back at
Seoul.
The moments and images are
burned in the landscape.
� I'vson. who once chillingly
inured over the prospects of a
perfect punch that would drive an
portent's nose into his brain,
stood triumphantly over the
twitching body of Trevor Berbick
as the heavyweight championship
passed to a new, tnghteninglv
more efficient gladiator.
�For sustained action, how-
e ei nothing Tyson did matched
�ho eight epic minutes of furious
hting in the parking lot of a Las
Vegas casino when Marvelous
Marvin Hagler and Thomas
arns produced one of the most
morable non-heavyweight
;htsin history.
�For emotion, it's hard to top
alie im Craig, wrapped in an
American Hag, frantically search-
he stands for his father to
-hare the moment as all around
Kim a team of young U.S. hockev
avers rolled on the ice. c elebrat-
ing the Miracle of Like Placid, the
I ievabledympic victory oveT
Soiet Union.
� There was injured Kirk C.i-
son, limping around the bases
like a real-life Rov Hobbs after
hitting what was arguably the
st dramatic home run in World
series history, a two-out, two-
trike shot in the bottom of the
ninth inning that turned defeat
into ictory and gave Los Angeles
I ning game over Oakland
1988 Series. There had been
:ious game-ending World
Series home runs � and there
would be another a few days later
by Oakland's Mark McGwire �
but all of them came in tied games
and none reversed a result with
the dramatic suddeness that
Gibson's shot did.
�There was outmanned Villa-
nova in the classic David and
Goliath match, playing virtually
mistake-free basketball for an
unlikelv 66-64 victory over pow-
erhouse Georgetown to win the
NCAA tournament in 1985.
�There was North Carolina
State's Lorenzo Charles dunking
at the buzzer to beat the dunkers,
Houston's TTu Slamma Jamma, in
the 1983 NCAA championship
game.
�There was Joe Montana tak-
ing San Francisco 92 yards in the
final three minutes to beat Cincin-
nati in the 1989 Super Bowl and
claim the49ers' third world cham-
pionship of the decade.
� There was Boston's Bill Buck-
ner, wearing hightop shoes to
protect his fragile ankles, reach-
ing futilev for Mookie Wilson's
grounder that scooted through his
legs, climaxing an unlikely two-
out, two-strike 10th inning rally
that rescued the New York Mets
from almost certain defeat in the
sixth game of the 1986 World Se-
ries, a Series thev would win by
coming from behind again in
Game 7.
The highs, however, were
balanced bv lows.
� All-American Len Bias,
picked second in the NBA draft
just two davs earlier by the Boston
Celtics, being carried out oi his
dormatorv, dead of a cocaine
overdose, the tragic end of a bril-
liant basketball career.
�Nine davs later, NFL star
Don Rogers dving the same way
Bias had, the exclamation point of
a drug epidemic that permeated
sports during the decade.
� The sorrv spectre of Ben
Johnson, forced to surrender his
gold medal at the 1988 Olympics
in Seoul when steroids showed up
in his post-race urine sample,
costing him victory and a world
record in his 100-meter showdown
with Carl Lewis.
� A parade of marquee base-
ball stars testifying before a grand
jury in Pittsburgh about the abun-
dance of drugs in their sport. Be-
fore the trial ended 20 major leagu-
ers, including Keith Hernandez,
Dave Parker, Lonnie Smith and
Tim Raines either testified or were
implicated in what many consid-
ered baseball's darkest episode
since the 1919 Black Sox scandal.
� Disruptive player strikes in
baseball and football, shutting
both sports down during their
seasons. Baseball hungout the "No
Game Today" sign for eight weeks
in the summer of 1981, and the
NFL closed down for 57 days in
1982. The scenario was repeated
later, a two-dav baseball walkout
in 1985 followed in 1987 by a 24-
day football strike during which
the league hired replacement play-
ers and continued to stage games.
� Reciprocal Olympic boycotts
with the best American athletes
forced to pass up the 180 Games
at Moscow and the top Soviet
athletes held out of the 1984 Games
at Los Angeles.
�Pete Rose suspended for life
from the game that was his life.
The Rose affair hung like a dark
cloud over the short administra-
tion of commissioner Bart Gia-
matti, who died of a massive heart
attack eight days after passing
judgment on the man who had
more hits than anybody in the
history of baseball � more hits
and one major miss.
� Rampant abuses in collegiate
sports kept NCAA investigators
working overtime. A number of
high profile programs like Okla-
homa football and Kentucky bas-
ketball ended the decade under
sanctions, and SMU became the
first school to absorb the death
penalty, its football program shut
down for two years because of
repeated violations.
�Roberto Duran, heof "Hands
of Stone maybe the best overall
fighter of the'1970s, saying "No
mas" and quitting in the eighth
round of his rematch with Sugar
Rav Leonard in 1980.
Become a part of the Action
at East Carolina University
S
Become a.
ports
w
riter
Apply
at m �ast
Carolinian
:�,
m-
AlSbrfcwfrft
It's the thought that
counts
So Think Unique
From Handcrafted Jewelry-
to musical socks-
to hand made sweaters-
VVe can help fill your
Christmas List,
Whatever Your Budget.
ECU
Mon-Sat 10-6
Thurs 10-8
756-1058
919-A Red Banks Rd
Arlington Village
ABOVE PAR
Public Driving Range
November Hours
Mon - Fri 11 am - Dark-
Sat - Sun 10am - Dark
I
Sports Writers
i�.ii� � mt ��
needed for the
Spring Semester
Apply at The Fast Carolinian, located in the Publications Bldg. (across from Joyner Library)
112 Miles past D.H. Conley Highj
School on the New Bern Hwy.
(Hwy43S)
355-6725
S K I W E A R
We have the
selection,
the comfort,
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1
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f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 7,1989 27
Lightning
Continued from page 22
game as she scored b first half
points Several times, she lingered
at halt court tor long outlet passes
and lay-ups.
"1 don't know if anyone can
�top her (Stinson) Tierson said.
She is a woman among girls -
hats oft to her
With five seconds remaining
in the tirst halt. ECU found them-
selves down bv 20 points. Gray
narrowed the lead to 18 bv hitting
a 17-foot jumper at the buzzer.
Gray said, I think we were all
a little nervous coming in, but we
were hyped-up and ready
The Wolfpack held the Pirates
to )ust 11 ot 35 shooting in the first
half, and hit l9of 46 in the second.
ECU never gave up though, as
they cut State's lead to ten with
12:58 to plav.
"They (ECU) were a fighting
team N.C State's Head coach,
Kay ow, Mid. "And they really
gave us a run for our money"
The Pirates quickly saw their
comeback fade out of reach as the
Wolfpack once again began
pounding on theboards, and built
a 25-point lead with 4.41 left to
play in the game.
A three pointer by sophomore
Tonia Coley gave the Pirates a
boost with 1:23 remaining. Fol-
lowing a charge on State's Nicole
Lehman, ECU's Laura Crowder
had an impressive play. Tangled
on the floor with two State play-
ers, she saw freshman Toni Thur-
man open under the basket. Crow-
der dished the ball off to Thurman
whose shot kissed off the back-
board for the duce.
Then, with only five seconds
remaining, sophomore Kathy Ad-
dison hit a 14-foot jumper to end
the game, 93-74.
"ECU really played well
Shnson said. "They kept punch-
ing, and 1 respect them for never
i
Lewis
id Robert ones who ended up
with 117.
The biggest concern of this
vear's defensive team was their
iack of sieon the line, Thompson
said We were too small �our
pp nentsalwaysoutweighedus,
metimes bv about 30 or 40
: tunds
The defense intercepted 13
passes tor the season, six of which
were by Robinson. Robinson was
lowed by corner back Ricky
-am who had two.
Robinson, ECU s "all-around
iver' , totaled 1,224 yards in all-
purpose running, averaging 111 3
. ardsper game. In kickoff returns
rtson scrambled tor0? vards
jg returns At tree safety,
5 n had s 3 tackles and broke
pisses
hn lett. the Pirate's punter.
averaged 40.2 vards per kick, and
25 punts perfectly placed under
ponents 20 yard line, lett said.
"1 was happy with my perform-
ance 1 just need to be more consis-
tent
"John did an outstanding job
for us this year Lewissaid. "He'll
only be a junior next year so he has
a chance to be one of the premier
punters in the country
After his first year of coaching
Lewis said he realizes the great
potential the program has, and
the 5-5-1 record of this vear's team
was lust a small step in building a
winning program. "1 think we are
ready to get on the winning track.
It we get the commitment, things
will take care of themselves he
said.
Lewis said the tremendous
support trom everyone at the
home games added a consider-
able boost to the team. An average
of 29,666 tans filled the stands of
Ficklen Stadium.
"I was really pleased how
everyone got behind and sup-
ported us at our home games. It's
nice to know that it is important to
people and it showed in the atten-
dance Lewis said
"I'm excited about where
athletics fits in on this campus
Lewis added. "With the support
ot the students and everyone who
is involved with Pirate athletics,
the excitement and fun is back in
the program
Although the team has fin-
ished its season, they still continue
to work. Last Monday the team
started on its off season program
of weight training. "Probably our
main priontv in the off season is
building up our size Lewis said
echoing the sentiments of Th-
ompson.
As for the coaches, December,
Januarv and the first part of Feb-
ruarv are what's known as "the
one-th-road" part. Coaches go on
the road recruiting high school
students, usually traveling to their
Special Olympics
giving up.
The Lady Pirates were also
content with their performance
and felt the game will help them in
the season.
"This is the best team we're
going to play all year, and this is
only going to help us Pierson
added. "It was a real learning
experience
"If we play everyone like we
plaved State Gray said, "we'll
win all of our games
The Lady Pirates will take a
break for exams, but will be back
in action to face Winthrop on Dec.
16 in Minges Coliseum
Continued from page 22
homes and high schools.
Next year's schedule for the
Pirates includes five games at
home and six games away, which
will be a better balance compared
to this year, Lewis said. "We've
got a very challenging schedule
and we're playing against some
verv outstanding opponents he
said.
This year the team suffered
some heart-breaking losses that
Thompson feels were caused "by
breakdowns And for the seniors
on the team losing games they
should have won "were very
upsetting
"We did a lot ot things we
wanted to and we made some
strides Lowe said. He added that
"Pirate fans are really in store for
exciting things in the future
Wilson said, "Coach Lewis is
a hard coach, he's a winner. No
doubt about it, he's one hell of a
coach
Continued from page 22
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General anesthesia available.
Low Cost Abortions Up to 12th Week of Pregnancy
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Greenville 757-0948
� Upper Deck Factory Sets in stock
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beenreallvgreat, Spauldingsaid. imagined it to be and we expect the new schools with Special Olympics, or just
see the kids sitting on Sappenfield said, "These are that came this vear to come back want to find out more informa-
ips of the brothers and talk- hc best trained teams we've had again next vear tion, call Connie Sappenfield at
vou get a good feeling. It's in the four years We've had a lot 8304551, or stop by the offices at
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Saturday December 9
MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR
SUPER SATURDAY!
The best day to shop for Christmas is Saturday, December 9 at UBE1 UBE
Art & Graphics and the University Frame Shop and Art Gallery are joining
together to bring you incredible discounts ALL DAY LONG from 10 a m to 5 p m
In addition to the spectacular savings, Super Saturday will feature special
guest, Bill Hallberg. from 10 a.m. to 12 noon, to personally autograph his best-
selling novels, "Perfect Lies" and "The Rub of The Green These will make
great Christmas gifts for the avid golfer.
The Upper Crust Bakery will also be there serving up some of their
delectable bakery goods to "sweeten" the day
hampion
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$23.95
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All prints and posters,
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(No original art)
UNIVERSITY
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 7, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 07, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.714
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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