The East Carolinian, November 28, 1989






iHift iEaHt (Earaltman
Serving the 'Last Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 105
Tuesday November 28,1989
Greenville, NC
Circulation 12,000
16 Pages
SGA reviews Sexual
Harassment Policy
By SAMANTHA THOMPSON
Staff Writer
The Student Government
Association, in Monday
afternoon's meeting, passed bv
consent die revisions to the Sexual
Harassment Policy and the
constitution for ECU Student
Volunteers of REAL.
The student welfare commit-
tee made three changes to the
Sexual Harassment Policy and
Grievance Procedure for com-
plaints oi sexual harassment,
which was previously modified
words "at least to the statement.
Men and women on theboard
will also be equally represented,
"insofar as possible during each
term The committee realized
the number of men to women
cannot always be equal each term
and opted to have the majority of
a different sex each term.
The last change reduced the
number of years a complaint can
be brought to the board from two
vears to one year legislator Will
Barker, member of the student
welfare committee, said the com-
mittee felt "two vears was too
Iongofa time for someone to come
back and say they were assaulted
The policy does allow for conflicts
where a student may make an
anonymous complaint, and action
taken bv the board could be post-
poned bevond a year's time until
the student is ready to be identi-
fied.
The policy will have to be
passed through the Faculty Sen-
ate and Chancellor Richard Eakin
before it can go into effect.
The legislature also passed by
consent the constitution for the
ECU Student Volunteers for
REAL. The purpose of the group
is to recruit students, faculty, staff
and alumni as volunteers to an-
sored bv the United VV.iv, the
organization is funded bv area
contributors and is open to every-
one in the university. For more
information contact Laura Bnggs,
president of the ECU group.
In other business, four bills
were introduced to the legislature,
including a bill to instate the Stu-
dent Advocacy Program. Legisla-
tor Derek McCullers moved to
suspend the rules, which was
denied bv a two-thirds majority
vote of the rxxlv. The bill will be
discussed in the next Monday's
final SGA meeting of the semes-
ter. A resolution to increase rela-
tions with the Greenville Police
Department was also introduced.
1�
-11
Expanding artistic horizons
Art student Mark Sylvester works on a long-term project near Jenkins Art Building (Photo by Angela Pridgen - ECU Photo Lab).
r.r River Neighborhood Association explains its purpose
By ELIZABETH MOORE
Stiff Writer
"We are not anti-student; it's
the furthest from the truth. We are
anti-slumlords John Anema,
president of the Tar River Neigh-
borhood Association said .
The association was founded
in 1980 by seven concerned neigh-
bors who wanted to improve the
look and value ot their surround-
ings.
Their focal point is the slum-
lord, a landlord whose interest lies
in making money rather than
improving the property. A large
part of the slumlord's money
comes from college students.
TRN A wants to alleviate this prob-
lem bv going directly to the inves-
tor. "Studentsdon't have to live in
slun. housing Anema said.
Thenoiseordinanceisanother
issue Anema addressed. The
TRNA was "involved in the in-
ception in 19H4, but we do not
advocate the revocation of the
permits. We had no representa-
tive at the committee meeting this
year, although we were asked to
review it and make comments
Anema stated The people in this
neighborhood "� xpect noise he
added.
When asked about the Hal-
loween inadent, Arvc ma said, "The
association was not on the com-
mittee to abolish Halloween, but
they were concerned and asked
tor police control
related topic, the zoning laws,
also concerns many students. The
TRNA does try to enforce the
regulation that no more than three
unrelated people can live in a
house. Fouror more related people
can live in a house. Four or more
unrelated people living in a house
is considered a boarding house by
the City of Greenville. The owner
must acquire a permit for a board-
ing house. "We don't go around
lookingin windows Anema said.
Thev look for indicators such as
the number of cars and amount of
noise.
Anema said that he "wished
thev could work moreclosely with
the students and close the com-
munication gap by concentrating
on more important neighborhood
issues such as enme
Environmentalists warned against
the dangers of over-pollution
Striving for excellence
These Pi Kappa Phi associate members study to fulfill their academic responsibilities (Photo by
Angela Pridgen - ECU Photo Lab).
Former professor passes away
By JENNIFER JOURNIGAN
Special to The tail Carolinian
Dr. Francis Speight, a well
known landscape painter from
Bertie County in Eastern North
FRANCIS SPEIGHT
Carolina and former artist-in resi-
dence at ECU, died Nov. 14 at his
home in Greenville. He was 93.
Mr. Speight retired from ECU
in 1976 after serving the university
for 16 years as a professor of fine
arts. He was more than just a
professor. His paintings, mostly
realistic with a touch of touch
impressionism, won him national
and international recognition.
The artist's paintings are in
the collections of the Metropoli-
tan Museum of Art in New York,
the Boston Museum of Fine Arts
and the Philadelphia Museum of
Art. Many of his large landscapes
reached the prices of $35,000.
During his life, Mr. Speight
received many honors including
honorary doctorates from Wake
Forest University and Holy Cross
College, the Academy Gold Medal
of Honor from the Pennsylvania
Academy of Fine Arts, and the
N.C. Medal for Achievement in
the Fine Arts.
Accompanying the North
Carolina Award was a citation
which described Speight's paint-
ing: "Although his work is based
in realism touched with impres-
sionism, Francis Speight is very
much his own master. The spirit
which permeates his pictures, the
superb techniques, are his alone
Although hedid not complete
all requirements for high school
graduation, he did college pre-
paratory work. In 1915, heenrolled
at Wake Forest College which was
then located in Wake Forest. His
early ambition was to become a
writer, and his interest in art ap-
parently arose from a desire to
See SPEIGHT, page 3
By JANET HUDSON
Special to The Laat Carolinian
Pitt County is running out of
landfill space. In fact, by 1994 half
the cities in the United States will
run out of landfill space. Accord-
ing to Earth Dm11990, theaverage
American throws away four
pounds of garbage a day.
ECU generates 30,000 pounds
of solid waste per dav, 70 percent
of which is paper. Paper is an
environmentally valuable prod-
uct. Consider the fact that it takes
75,(XX) trees, every week, to pro-
duce the Sunday edition of the
New York Times.
Recycling aluminum saves 95
percent and recycling paper saves
60 percent of the energy it takes to
make these products from raw
materials. Energy usage contrib-
utes to acid rain, global warming
and air pollution.
Due, also to rising costs and
more stringent environmental
requirements, use of landfills is
becoming a less viable alternative
for waste management. Soon,
people will be charged a fee, called
a tipping fee, for recyclable mate-
rial found in their garbage. In
August, the General Assembly
passed North Carolina's "Act to
Improve the Management of Solid
Waste This act requires that state
agencies, like ECU, be recycling
25percentoftheirgarbageby 1992.
To get a jump on the state
mandate, early in 1989 Chancellor
Richard Eakin appointed the Uni-
versity Task Force on Recycling
headed by Dr. Trenton Davis. The
UTFR has planned a recycling
demonstration project to take place
in Rawl, Austin, Graham, and
Coastal and Marine Resources
buildings.
The faculty iscollecting mixed
paper which housekeeping will
pick up and take to a container, on
campus, provided by the county.
The county will then pull the
container to the Eastern Carolina
Vocational Center where it will be
bailed and sent to Italy for recy-
cling. The United States has few
recycling plants, most are over-
seas. The demonstration project is
currently six to eight weeks be-
hind schedule because the unat-
tractivecollectioncontainer would
detract for campus beautification
efforts.
On Monday, in another cam-
pus project, the Department of
Housing, along with the Students
for a Cleaner Earth and Inez Fri-
dley, a member of the UTFR,
placed recycling containers for
aluminum cans in the bathrooms
of Jarvis dorms. The SCE hopes to
soon place these containers in all
the dorms.
Now, what can you do about
recycling while these projects are
being organized? You can take
newspaper, mixed paper, card-
board, clear and colored glass,
aluminum cans and aluminum
scrap to Greenville Public Works
Recycling Center at 1500 Beatty
Street, the parking lot of Overton's
Supermarket on Jarvis Street and
the Eastern Carolina Vocational
Center on Stanton Road. Reprinted
below is a list from the Earth Day
1990 Fact Sheet.
Purchase and consume ac-
cording to the 3 "R's Reduce,
Reuse and Recycle. Reduce the
amount of garbage you generate
by purchasing products with
minimal packaging (about half of
all waste is packaging).
Purchase foods in bulk.
"Precycle" by purchasing
products in recyclable containers,
such as aluminum, glass, paper
and cardboard.
�Avoid plastic and Styrofoam
products that are neither reusable
nor recyclable, such as disposable
diapers, lighters, razors, and plas-
tic utensils.
Use white paper � It is eas-
ier to recycle than colored paper.
Bring vour own paper bags,
or better yet, cloth bags, to the
supermarket.
Use a coffee mug rather that
styrofoam cups.
Reuse is the most efficient
form of recycling, requiring no
new natural resources or energy.
See RECYCLING, page 3
Unnsfidl�
�����
Editorials
ft took too long for
Washington's water
crisis to be noticed
State and NationMMm,S
El Sahadors gov't
suspends ties with
Nicaragua
Classifieds.
a
jr eatures���.���������" g
Anofe&a$rife$ c$fcgi
students
Life in Hell��
.12
ECU falls one short of
a winning Season





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 28,1989
Dean of nursing
school resumes
research in June
ECU News Bureau
Dr. Emilie D. Henning, dean
of the ECU School of Nursing since
1982, has resigned her post to re-
turn to teaching and research full-
time effective June 30, 1990, ac-
croding to university officials.
After seven years as dean,
Henning indicated that it was
"time for a change in leadership"
at the school, adding that she was
proud of the accomplishments of
the school's faculty and staff.
"I really feel that the School of
Nursing has increased the expo-
sure of ECU and that is the result
of the efforts of everyone she
said.
Henning is credited with
strengthening the school in three
major areas: the academic creden-
tialsof the faculty, the quality of th
educational programs wi th respect
to accreditation, and the facility
with which the school has kept
abreast of changes both in the
nursing profession and in the types
of students who choose nursing as
a career.
Dr. Alastair M. Council, vice
chancellor for health sciences, said
Henning leaves her post with the
school forward-looking and well-
situated to enter the 1990s.
"Nursing has gone through
significant change and Dean
Henning has served the school
well,guiding i t period of growth
Connell said.
Connell said that Dr. Trenton
G.Davis, acting dean of the School
of Industry and Technology, will
chairasearchcommitee which will
idenhlfy a successor to Henning
by June 30.
Henning said she will con-
centrate on teaching and research
in her specialty area, maternal-
child nursing.
She came to ECU in 1982 after
six years as dean and professor of
nursing at Honda State Univer-
sity. Prior to that, she spent 10
years in faculty and administra-
tion positions with the College of
Nursing at Rutgers � the state
university of New Jersey in New-
ark, N.J.
She earned her undergradu-
ate degree in nursing from Seton
Hall University and her master's
degree and doctorate in nursing
education from Columbia Univer-
sity.
During her tenure as dean,
Henning focused a great deal of
attention on faculty development.
While the number of nursing fac-
ulty remained fairly constant at
about 40 over the last seven years,
the number of faculty members
possessing doctorates increased
from eight to 19. Three more are
schedule to complete doctoral
studies soon.
Henning has supported edu-
cational leaves which provide
faculty members the opportunity
to pursue advanced studies of the
conduct research. She also ap-
pointed a director of research to
assist faculty and graduate stu-
dents in the design of research
studies and theses.
"I believe that research and
scholarship result in better teach-
ing said Henning. "I'm proud of
our accomplishments in these
areas. We've come a long way
Teh fruits of this emphasis on
facluty scholarship in 1989 had
included four books, five book
chapters, 37 journal articles and
other publications and 162 pres-
entations to professional and
scholarly groups.
Another milestone under
Henning came with the accredita-
tion of he school's baccalaureate
and master's programs by the
National League tor Nursing for
an eight-year term, the maximum
period.
Sophomore and
Junior business
majors:
Take advantage
an opportunity
for experience.
Apply now at
The East Carolinian
for the position of
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'
ECU organization helps physically
and mentally handicapped adults
ECU News Bureau
Despite a lack of funding, an
innovative service organization
started one year ago at ECU has
proven successful in its goal �
improving the quality of lite tor
people with special needs.
Thanks to ECU's Design
Group for Populations with Spe-
cial Needs, the 48 physically and
mentally handicapped adults who
train daily at the Roanoke Devel-
opmental Center (RDC) in Ply-
mouth as part of the Adult Devel-
opmental Activity Program
should soon have a brand-new
building in which to leam.
Architectural plans for the
buildi ng were designed by an ECU
professor and a group of environ-
mental design students who con-
ducted interviews and surveys
with RDC clients and staff. The
result is an attractive, functional
tour-unit complex designed spe-
cifically with their needs in mind.
"The fact that they camedown
and talked to our staff and clients
has made a great deal of differ-
ence in the design of the build-
ing said Jimmy Webster, RDC
executive director. "I've never
seen a design like this. It has a
courtyard, a good number of
windows, and activities can go on
in all four buildings without dis-
turbing the others. I think our
people will really enjov coming
here
The next step for Webster is a
big one - finding $500,000 to fi-
nance construction of the build-
ing. But he is confident the money
can be found- he's already con-
vinced the Washington County
Board of Commissioners to do-
nate a piece of property on which
to locate a building. "We're ex-
cited about this Webster said.
"We can't hardly wait for it to be
built
ECU's Design Group for
Populations with Special Needs
was established in 1988 to utilize
teams of experts from the univer-
sity and community in solving
specific problems for the elderly,
incarcerated, developmentally
and physically impaired, head
injured, and hearing and visually
impaired.
"Although the group isn't
designed to provide money or
equipment, we do provide re-
sources and assistance to help find
funding, "said Dr.Cynthia Nixon,
an assistant professor in the School
of Education who serves as direc-
tor.
The organization was the
brainchild of Dr. Edward R. Lev-
ine, former dean of the School ot
Arts, who believed that univer-
sity faculty should also provide
services to the community.
Levine left ECU in June to
accept an administrative post at
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology (MIT), but the Design
Group has continued to function,
thanks to the dedication of Abdul-
Shakoor Farhadi, an associate
professor in the School of Art.
Farhadi, who serves as coor-
dinator of ECU's environmental
design program, has directed
every project the Design Group
has undertaken thus far. "Abdul
has been absolutely wonderful
'ixonsaidHehasbeenthemain
person involved because we
haven't gotten requests tor any-
thing other than architecture For
example, if we got a request tor
clothing design we could pull in
our home economics representa-
tive, Dr. Diana Cone
In addition to the RDC project
in Plymouth, Farhadi has pro-
vided architectural drawings for
the renovation of a day care center
at Agnes Fullilove Community
School in Greenville and outdoor
playgrounds for St. Peter's Catho-
lic School and the ECU School of
Education's Remedial Education
Activity Program (REAP), also in
Greenville.
In designing the REAP play-
ground, which will be used by
handicapped children, several
studies were conducted by Farhadi
to determine what activities inter-
ested the children as well as those
which caused problems. Farhadi's
architectural drawings have been
passed on to ECU's Department
of Construction Management,
which will actually build the play-
ground as a class project.
Garhadi is also in the process
of completing plans for the reno-
vation of a women's residential
unit at Caswell Center in Kinston.
He has spent many hours at
Caswell over the past year observ-
MEDIA BOARD
is now accepting
applications for
General Manager
of Expressions Magazine!
Please apply at the
Media Board Office,
2nd Floor,
Publications Building
Phone: 757-6009
Filing Deadline:
December 6,1989 5:00pm
ing and talking with the residents
in order to determine what kind o
setting will best benefit and pleas-�
them.
"The existing wall is white
ceramic tile Farhadi said. "I want
to change it to another material
that is more attractive, durable,
and will absorb sound
Farhadi's most recent IX'sin
Croup project will invoke work
ing with the Roanoke-Chowan
Human Services Center in Ahoskie
to design a recreational facility at
a school in Woodland that can he
used bv children with and with
out disabilities
Seniors who are majoring in
environmental design at ECU have
assisted Farhadi with all of the
DesignGroup projectsand receive
class credit for their efforts. "My
students work with me Farhadi
said. "I direct and design the
projects, but they do most of the
drawing and construction of the
models
See DESIGN, page 3
snje �ast Carolinian
Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V. Cope
Kelle O'Connor
Patrick Williams
Guy J. Harvej
Stephanie R. Emory
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Open Rate$4.95
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Phone:
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uyer's Quids.
Adam's Auto Wash355-7515
Atlantic Personnel 355-7931
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Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
Cental Book & News 756-7177
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Chicos757-1666
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Triangle Women's Health1-800-433-2930
UBE�758-2618





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 28,198?
Business student receives scholarship
ICU Nw� tamo
i Ann Anderson, a sen-
Jormajfcetinebuainess education
major �& JsCU School of Educa-
tion, �the recipient of the 1 Q89-Q0
William H Durham Marketing
Teacnar Education Scholarship at
ECU.
The $500 award is presented
each ytf$x by the Department ot
Business, Vocational and Techni
cal Educinon to an outstanding
undergraduate student who ex-
cels m academic achievement,
demonstrated and potential lead-
ership ability and dedication to
the field of marketing education
The award was established at
ECU in 1985 to honor a longtime
faculty member at ECU In grate-
ful appreciation for his untiring
efforts in the field of marketing
education.
Anderson is an active mem-
ber of Pi (.mega li honor society
in business education and is cur-
rently serving as historian of
Design
Continued from page 2
Michaei McKiernan, a student
from Stone Mountain, (.a who
worked on the RDC and Agnes
Fu Hi love School projects believes
the experience will help him get a
fob when he graduates in Decem
ber. "When I d"signed things be
tore in class it was purely trom
imagination McKiernan said
"This was for real
Although donations to cover
the cost of materials are a
the es!grtC�rovipdoe not charge
for any of the services it proi id s
"The purpose of this group
serve, not to make money
Farhada said.
Oniy one of the group pi
s rS Bflls fesafted m a dona!
weva which has prompted
Nixon to applv for assista
"We're getting
we do neti some Kind of fund-
mg shesaid. "We're hopingthis
spring we can get a few small
grants
. ixon plans to travel to N
Bern and San Francisco, Calif to
make presentations on the De
( .roup to conferences of the East
em Gajmtina Developmental Pis
abilities 'University Affiliated Pro
gram and the National ss
on for Perse ns with Seven
Handicaps. "It's a means
t:ng people knyw we re out there
aja riuwffifr information v.
one wnb Is Interested in replicat-
ing thm5erv-Jc " Nixon said.
Speight
ECU's Beta Kappa chapter. She
will be student teaching during
the spring semester. Upongradu
ation, she plans to pursue a teach-
ing career and continue her busi-
ness education studies at the
master's degree level.
Her parents are Mr. and Mrs
Woodrow Anderson of Vance
boro.
Manufacturing engineers
hold video conference
New Frontiers in Materials
Research" was the topic of a vide-
oconference on Mondav at ECU.
The program, demonstrating
five ot the latest discoveries in-
eluding a new superconductor
and ultrahigh strength polvmers,
will be held from 1130a.m. to 1:30
p.m. in Room 244 of Mendenhall
Studenl Center The public is
invited to attend
Hosted bv the Society of
Manufacturing Engineers Student
( hapler in the ECU School of
trv and Technology, the
videoconference is a live telecast
from the Materials Research
Society's National Conference
The program is being earned bv
the Public Broadcasting System
(PBS) Adult Learning Satellite
Service.
Sponsors of the program say
materials research is the "hottest
field in physical sciences and
engineenng today. The topic will
be of interest to industrial research
professionals, facultvand students
in physics, chemistry, materials
science and electrical engineering
and investment specialists in the
sciences.
A $3 donation will be re
quested to cover the conference
site fee and refreshments.
Students form Chemistrv
Professional Society
! I Sfwi Bureau
Ccnti�ud from page 1
illustrate bis writings.
After service in World War ! .
he studied at the Corcoran School
of Art fnd for five years at the
Pennsylvania Academy where he
later taught from 1925 to li In
123 and again in 1925, he held
European traveling scholar-hips
During his tenure on the facult)
the academy, Mr. Speight was
granted leaves of absence for tem-
porary l�ftcrt�igass�gnrnentsat the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel HiH. Shnvenham Amen
cais University m England, Lehigh
Univertity d DePauw Univer-
sity.
In 1961, Mr Speight returned
home to m native eastern North
Carolina to take a position as art-
lst-m-tfeatdence and joined the
faculty ofthe School ot Art at EC U
Hecoarttireied Ws work asa teacher
and palter, focusing more upon
scenes of hm boyhood in rural
BertijeQaonty, capturing features
of lard gape which he said speak
to ffW�ff rwvgth and endurance
the tflNtorlcal buildings and
house, trees, rivers, fields and
wategt? . - -
Ay�re who has seen Francis
Spts&p� �wrk recognizes that he
was ��inter of extraordinary
ability, His colleagues at Fast
Carolina alc remember him as a
dedicated teacher who enriched
the work of his students bv his
instruction, his concern and his
inspiration said Or. Erwin
Hester, acting dean of the School
Of Art.
Survivors include Ms.
Blakeslee; two children, Thomas
B. Speight of Albany, NY and
Elizabeth S.Speight ofPhiladei-
phia;andtwo nieces, Medgelena
Speight Of Whispering Pines, and
Mary Walker of Burlington.
Memorials may be made to
the Republican Baptist Church, in
care of Reddick Wright, 301 Ster-
lingworth, Windsor, N.C 27983
"Francis Speight has left a
beautiful legacy. His paintings and
his influence on generations of
students will hve on through the
years. We were most fortunate to
" have Prancte with us in Greenville
for 28 yea�. We will miss him,
said ECU ChanceUor Richard
EakhV
f ECl 's Depart-
I Chemistr) have organ-
ized a new alumni group, the ECU
nal Society.
- eithD.HolmesofGreen-
ville a chemist at Burroughs
WellcomeC ompany, waselected
chairperson of the newly-formed
group. Heisal8 last Carolina
ite Other officers are also
residi Ms of Greenville and env
. I by Burroughs Wellcome.
Vice president is Jesse Edward
Gil - 'r . who received a
s of science degree from
Recycling
; inued from page 1
�Use products that are made
to i many time, such as
cloth iiapers cloth napkins, tow-
els and rags sponges, dishes and
silverware, rechargeable
batteries etc
Use the blank hack sides of
ip rto take notes and do scratch
v ork
' Mend clothes and repair
ken appliances
' lake care of belonging to
help them last longer.
look into purchasing used
goods at second hand stores and
junk vards to eliminate unneces-
sarv production.
ECU in 1976. William Christopher
kidd.a 1986graduate,wasele ted
secretary. Jo AnnG. Deal, Class ot
1978, waselected treasurer.
The purposes ot the FCC
Chemistry Professional Society are
to support the recruitment of
highly qualified high school stu
dents into the department, to en-
courage ECU chemistry under-
graduates to further their educa-
tion in the field and to strengthen
ties between alumni, the commu-
nity and the university
The new society pins other
ECU alumni groups, representing
15 departments and professional
schools on campus.
r
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
while you wait
Fre & Confidential
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NEWS






3Jje iEaat (tooltnfan
V'V. HV�M ��. HW .HiMn�l "�' iw
David. 1 erring, crhimmi
STEPHANIE FOLSOM, MouHf EAta,
)AMES F.J MCKEE, : � i um�
LOR Martin, ����
Caroline Cusick, r���iei
Mici iael Martin, k im
Sc cm Maxwell, s� u�
Carrie Armstrong, EiMnm m
Stephanie Singleton, owe!
Susan Kress, c�iii.
Art Nixon,C'�i,wCT
Stuart Ri"�sner, h�,��m�.
Pamela Cope, m r� s
M ATTl 1EVV RltT 1TER, C�ni�m. Mm
Tracy Weed, Pr-cw m��
Jeff Parker, aBMt��
Beth Lupton, s,���y
Novomlu-r 28. 1W
OPINION
Little Washington's
big water crisis
"Water, water everywhere but
not a drop to drink " As the silent
threat of water pollution creeps
across the American landscape,
municipal water supplies are com-
ing under increasingly sharp scru-
tiny. Fortunately, Greenville's wa-
ter seems secure. Only two years
a,o, Greenville's drinking water
was declared the third cleanest of
any municipal water supply in the
U.S. Just down the river a ways,
however, in the little city of Wash-
ington (known to many as "Little
Washington"), the situation is dra-
matically different.
Although the critical condition
oi Washington tap water had raised
some eyebrows for several years, it
took some major news leaks by local
agencies to attract serious govern-
mental concern. On September
16,1989, the Washingtow Daily News
trumpetted the ominous headlines:
"Tests Reveal High Quantity of
Chemical According to scientists
from the State I iealth Services Divi-
sion, measurements ot tnhalonv
ethanes (THM's), chlorinated
chemicals linked vvitn cancer, were
some nine times higher than
deemed sate by the EPA
The scientists tested water from
ten locations in the city and showed
an average oi about L'b4 parts per
billion (ppb) of THM's in tap water.
The EPA sets THM limits oi 100 ppb
for cities of more than 10,000 people
� municipalities under 10,000 are
not required to test for Tl IM's. The
highest reading � 1400 ppb � came
from the city's main water treatment
plant in nearby Tranters Creek
Ironically, the next highest levels
were reported in tap water from the
City Hall and the Department oi
Environment, Health and Natural
Resources. No wonder Washington
Mayor J. Stancil Lilley conceded,
"We are more upset than the public.
The city and I would like to cooper-
ate in any way we can to make the
water safe to drink
A week later, State Health Direc-
tor Dr. Ronald Levine declared wa-
ter from the Tranters water treat-
ment plant unsuitable for drinking.
Levine stated that the cancer risk
from THM's in the city tapwater was
one in 4,000 � not the one-in-10,000
figure quoted throughout the pre-
ceding week bv city officials. The
THM's formed from the reaction
between chlorine and organic mat-
ter in the murky creek that had been
the city's main source ot drinking
water Evidently, too much chlorine
had been added
On September 23, the U.S. Ma-
rine Corps moved in to provide
water from mobile tanks located
throughout the city. This included
one 5,000-gallon water tank and five
500-gallon water tanks filled at a
nearby well Hospitals and schools
cut off drinking water and began
using disposable plates and uten-
sils. Students were encouraged to
bring bottled water from home and
to use prepackaged foods that could
be served without city water.
Washington public officials now
believe the best course for treatment
will be ozonolysis � using ozone to
kill disease-causing organisms in
the water. The city has already
begun building a pilot treatment
plant using this method.
SomeWasningtonians are suspi-
cious about all the fuss over Tl IM's.
Alter all, it was a totally different
water crisis which had drawn the
Environmental Protection Agency's
attention earlier in the year. Ken-
nedy Creek, just upstream from
Washington on the I amlico River,
had shown dangerously high con-
centrations oi arsenic, cadmium,
chromium, copper, lead, mercury,
nickel and zinc � all dubbed "pri-
ority pollutants" (highly toxic) by
the EPA. An old landfill and a Super-
fund site, which served as a 20-year
pesticide dump, sit on the
floodplain oi the creek.
ECU groundvvater specialist
Richard Spruill says that either of
these si tes may be contaminating the
shallow groundwater and the
deeper Castle I Iayne Aquifer. Most
Washington residents get their wa-
ter from wells which are fed by the
Castle Hayne Aquifer. Perhaps they
would be better off drinking the
highly chlorinated water from the
City I all. Or turn to collecting rain-
water. Then again, what was that I
read about acid rain the other day
THriS
$rOQX CLBAtf JATCT?)
tr
S0METIME5 WHAT VU DpNT SEH WILL HURT Y&U
Freshman gets the registration blues
To the editor
It's now the Saturday before
rhanksgiving, 8:30a.m . and I feel
like giving many thanks to the
administration ot 1-ast Carolina
University
I thank you:
"tor wasting so mu h money
on nonessential items sue h as the
walk way in front of oyner Li-
brary that may actually be com-
pleted in the year 2(XXJ and the
new building signs such as the
one in front ot Flannagan that
probably costed "only" a tow
hundreddollarspersign c nuldn't
this money be used to bu essen
tial items such as more terminals
to be used during registration?
"tor giving the students hell
bv not hiring more professors to
teach the classes that always seem
to be "closed" when we register
Wepay to come to this school, and
we should I e able to take the
clashes we need without havim�to
go through this hassle I Vn't tor-
get the fact that we also pay your
salaries. Can't you do anything
about this situation? .
tor having the students run
all over campus in order to get
"special permission" to take a
class. Many times, the class will be
closed by the time you get this
"special permission but do they
care?
for having terminal opera-
tors that look as it the) would be
more comfortable with a " I'emv.
The Tutor Computer "some ot
the terminal operators looked as it
thev were linger-tvping the sched-
ule in. Couldn't you hire some
better typists?
"tor having the current type
ot registration process in which
the students have to skip classes
in order to register, but I did not
get a chance to do so. l'heretore.
two of the classes 1 paid tor and
had to skip in hopes of registering
were wasted. I finally got to regis
ter that alternoon, but in order to
do so, 1 had to postpone my chem-
istry lab from 2-? p.m. until 7 ! I
p.m. Isn't there a better way to
register lor i lasses1
( hbo that felt so good VVhv
don't you w rite a letter as well? It
you dt, as dope mam ot vou
will, please send it to our SGA
president, rripp Roakcsso we an
see it he knows what his job is
really ail about. It only took me .in
hour to write this letter, but you
r.in w rite him a few short lines in
no time 11 you really care about
this situation. Now is the time tor
oi to prove those people who
say weonlv care about our right to
party WRONG.
Ronald Mercer
Freshman
C hemistn
Come see for
yourself
To the editor
Throughout this semesl
there have been a large number oi
complaints made by students w �
feel "trapped" between the a ti
ot the Student Government Ass
ciation .reeks and the Reformist
Party. Besides complaining, these
students show no willingness I
do anything else. How man)
these complainers have bothered
to attend a Reformist party or S
meeting, or attempted to formth ii
own group?
The complainers don'l s
to have the initiative to base th
opinions �.n anything other tl
media reports rhese reports ha . �
vet to give a total account of the
happenings on this campus this
semester rheonl) wavtoforman
a. i urateopmion istoj lit isi
know ledge possible on a subje I
The students on this" ram pi is'l u
failed to educate th�!vM- on
the politics oi ECl And are en
� ouraged to do so. S .A meets in
221 Mendenhali. Mondays at
p.m. Reformist Party meetings i
I uesdavs .it 5 p.m. in the c len i
( lassroom Building Room 1014
both are open to all members i I
the student bodv and the faculty
Lisa Daniel
Senii n
Art
Reformist Pai t
PICK "WE LONELIEST W H THE WRU��
Spectrum Rules
In addition to "The Campus Forum" section of the newspaper, The
East Carolinian features "The Campus Spectrum This is an opinion
column by guest writers from the student body and faculty. The columns
printed in "The Campus Spectrum" will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation. The columns are restricted onlv with
regard to rules of grammar and decency. Persons submitting columns
must be willing to accept byline credit for their efforts, as no entries from
ghost writers will be published.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points ot view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the Publications Building, across from
the entrance to Joyner Library. For purposes of verification, all letters must
include the name, major, classification, address, phone number and the
signature of the author(s). Letters are limited to 300 words or less, double-
spaced, typed or neatly printed.





l"Hl- EAST CAROLINIAN
State and Nation
NOVEMBER 27,1989 PACE 5
El Salvador breaks relationship with Nicaragua
H CANDICE HUGHES
SAN SAI VADOR, El Salva
dor (AP Accusing Ni aragua
i I sending surface to air missiles
to leftist rebels the rightist gov
ernment has suspended diplo
mark and commercial ties v ith its
Central merican neighbor.
President Alfredo Cristiani
made the announcement in a tele
vised addressSundax a da after
�.aid the dis
ht planes m 11
Salvador that were delivering
shoulder fired missiles to the reb
els
Nicaragua denied involve
ment and suggested suchan accu
sation could endanger regional
peace. The Nicaraguan president,
Daniel Ortega, said it gave his
people honor and pride that a
government ot assassins it
priests and religious workers
broke relations IK1 urged other
countries to break ties with 11
Salvador's I S backed govern-
ment until it has punished the
assassins
Ortega s reference was appar
ently to the Nov. 16massacre in El
Salvador of six Jesuit priests, their
housekeeper and her daughter at
a university. Other esuits at the
school say witnesses saw army
troops enter the residence before
the killings.
Cristiani has ordered an in-
vestigation into allegations the
military was involved I he mur
dersoccurred in the heat ot a rebel
offensive that turned the eapital
into a eonib.it one and was the
largest ol the dec ade-oldci il war.
i he go ernment has ac( used
church leaders ot sympathizing
with and even aiding the
rebels. On Sunday, authorities
arrested an American church
worker and accused her ot storing
weapons.
One of the planes that alleg-
edly carried weapons from Nica-
ragua i rashedSaturday in eastern
El Salvador and troops recovered
mostlySoviet weapons, including
2 shoulder-fired surface-to-air
missiles. Three crew men died, and
the fourth committed suicide,
authorities said. The other plane
apparently had its, argo unloaded
after landing in the southern part
of the country and was torched by
the crew, who fled.
The arrested American was
identified as Jennifer Jean Casolo,
ot Thomaston, Conn. She is a rep-
resentative of Christian Educa-
tional Seminar, a San Antonio-
based ecumenical group.
Maj. Mauricio Chavez Cac-
eres, an armed forces spokesman,
said 40,1100 rounds of ammunition
tor LSmade M-lh rifles, 40,000
rounds of of ammunition for So-
viet-designed AK-47 rifles, 203
blocks of TNT and 403 detonator-
caps were found at Ms. Casolo's
house during a 2 a.m. raid and at
other locations he did not specify
John Blatz, a spokesman tor
the Christian Educational Semi-
nar, said bv telephone that Ms
Casolo has been in El Salvador
since 1985. He called the accusa-
tions "ridiculous" and "part of
their (the government's) persecu-
tion of the churches That'sclear
More than a doen churches
and refugee centers have been
raided bv security forces since the
rebels launched their offensive
Nov. 11.
Fundamentalist party questions Ghandi's leadership
In 1 AKl EEN1 Mil R
NEW DEI HI. India (AP)
eMinisf � .andhi I
- Monda - M �
ment
te results from the
irliament
ed the i art w ith
� han anv single oppo-
ir short ot a
mand vem-
Thcfund Bharativ a
on a rise
ippeared
destined to be the pivotal pi
ider said Mondav he would
see '
' � as
a ide-
id and i
limed
tine
in modem India s42 yearhiston
� for seats in
Pa i ment'si - owei
house starti d � � and
I

State telev i
nnus-
� ss Part1. I . I
. Ifl ats. Its part allit s had an
I " maji � it in the new
and with it '
mandate to term a new govern-
ment requires 26 1 seats
I he centrist National 1 rent, a
five-party alliance led by former
deti nscand linaru eminister ish
vs anath PratapSingh, had 71 seats
Singh, an e Congress Parts
member, w as on e t iandhi s a
but is now the prime mmistt r s
most outspoken political toe.
I he Bharatiya Janata, whu h
w on ust two seats in the last elec-
tions ' -vi. had bb. The rest ot
the seats went to smaller parties
and independents.
Main ol the undet lared seats
are in states where the National
Front was expected to do well.
i heongress Party's poor show-
! hurt it in the s anh tor
coalition partners or trigger a
revolt againsl the prime minister
sin his ew n party.
itongress wants to win
� thi prime minister must
Bhabani Sen Gupta. "With Rajiv
Gandhi, very few things are pos-
sible. Without RajivGandhi, many
things are possible
The departure of Gandhi
would herald an end to the family
dvnasty that has governed India
tor all but five years since it be-
came independent from Britain in
1947. Gandhi, 45, the grandson of
India's tirst prime minister,
Jawaharlal Nehru, was plunged
said independent analyst into the leadership (if the world's
most populous demcx r.n when
his mother, Prime Minister Indira
(.andhi, was assassinated in 1984
His party then took an unprece
dented 415 o( the 4" seats in the
lower house.
The initial euphoria �. er a
young, seerrungl)
was soon tarnished bv allegations
of government corruption and
ineptitude rhe trouble came home
to roost in Ciandhi's own election
See INDIA, page 7
Time runs out for N.C. amnesty program
Rl ! NSBORO P1 Thou
sandsof North Carolina tax evad
ers ha e fi e davs to a I , rose
r bacl
plusefore b
th a Clasr
rhe thesai
down fci ' nal 5
to meet tl
i �
tax-amnesty campaign began
three months ago. I he amnesty
expires at midnight Friday.
I r people who think they can
hi at the system, the N.C. Depart-
ment of Revenue amnesty slogan
� mises "Unless you make ti me
tor it now you could do time tor it
later ' Effe tive Saturday, people
w ho e ade state income taxes can
face up to five years in prison and
a $25 CHX1 fine.
Nortli C arolina began its
est period Sept. 1 with the
t raising bat k taxesand mter-
: vinds of people and
Re enue Depart-
nv nt has collected $10.7 million
s far, said CharlesC tollins spokes-
man tor the1 amnesty campaign.
"We think that we will get at
least halt of what we receive in the
last week Collins told the (Ireens-
boro News & Record.
'oil ins bases his optimism on
the common taxpayer practice of
waiting until the last minute to
pay and on the experiences of
states with similar campaigns.
Kentucky and New York, for ex-
ample, exceeded amnesrv goals
and collected the majority ot the
money in the last week of their
campaigns
Kentucky, with a 51 million
goal, received 81 percent ol its
$61.1 million total in the last w eek
New lork, with a $2 - million
goal, received about hi pen ent of
See AMNESTY, page 7
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Meel with your lostens representative (or full details See our complete ring selection on display in your college bookstore
I s� ���(





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
State and Nation
NOVEMBER 27,1989 PAGE 5
El Salvador breaks relationship with Nicaragua
By CANDICE HUGHES
The Auociated Pm
SAN SALVADOR, El Salva-
dor (AP) � Accusing Nicaragua
of sending surface-to-air missiles
to leftist rebels, the rightist gov-
ernment has suspended diplo-
matic and commercial ties with its
Central American neighbor.
President Alfredo Cristiani
made the announcement in a tele-
vised address Sunday, a day after
military authorities said they dis-
covered two light planes in El
Salvador that were delivering
shoulder-fired missiles to the reb-
els.
Nicaragua denied involve-
ment and suggested such an accu-
sation could endanger regional
peace. The Nicaraguan president,
Daniel Ortega, said it gave his
people "honor and pride" that a
government "of assassins of
priests and religious workers"
broke relations. He urged other
countries to break ties with El
Salvador's U.Sbacked govern-
ment until it has "punished the
assassins
Ortega's reference wasappar-
ently to the Nov. 16 massacre in El
Salvador of six Jesuit priests, their
housekeeper and her daughter at
a university. Other Jesuits at the
school say witnesses saw army
troops enter the residence before
the killings.
Cristiani has ordered an in-
vestigation into allegations the
military was involved. The mur-
ders occurred in the heat of a rebel
offensive that turned the capital
into a combat zone and was the
largest of the decade-old civil war.
The government has accused
church leaders of sympathizing
with � and even aiding � the
rebels. On Sunday, authorities
arrested an American church
worker and accused her of storing
weapons.
One of the planes that alleg-
edly carried weapons from Nica-
ragua crashed Saturday in eastern
El Salvador and troops recovered
mostly Soviet weapons, including
25 shoulder-fired surface-to-air
missiles. Three crewmen d ied, and
the fourth committed suicide,
authorities said. The other plane
apparently had itscargounloaded
after landing in the southern part
of the country and was torched by
the crew, who fled.
The arrested American was
identified as Jennifer Jean Casolo,
of Thomaston, Conn. She is a rep-
resentative of Christian Educa-
tional Seminar, a San Antonio-
based ecumenical group.
Maj. Mauricio Chavez Cac-
eres, an armed forces spokesman,
said 40,000 rounds of ammunition
for U.Smade M-16 rifles, 40,000
rounds of of ammunition for So-
viet-designed AK-47 rifles, 203
blocks of TNT and 403 detonator-
caps were found at Ms. Casolo's
house during a 2 a.m. raid and at
other locations he did not specify.
John Blatz, a spokesman for
the Christian Educational Semi-
nar, said by telephone that Ms.
Casolo has been in El Salvador
since 1985. He called the accusa-
tions "ridiculous" and "part of
their (the government's) persecu-
tion of the churches. That's clear
More than a dozen churches
and refugee centers have been
raided by security forces since the
rebels launched their offensive
Nov. 11.
Fundamentalist party questions Ghandi's leadership
Bv EARLEEN FISHER
The tHijrtcd Pre��
NEW DELHI. India (AP)
Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi faced
thedifficult task Monday of trying
to form a coalition government
after voters deserted his Congress
Party tor a new centrist alliance
and .i fundamentalist 1 lindu party.
incomplete results from the
election for a new Parliament
showed the Congress Party with
more seats than anv single oppo-
sition group but far short of a
mandate to form the next govern-
ment alone.
The fundamentalist Bharatiya
Janata Parry, capitalizing on a rise
in Hindu nationalism, appeared
destined to be the pivotal player.
Its leader said Mondav he would
"see to it that they (Congress) fall
from power
Gandhi's leadership also was
called into question bv the wide-
spread vote fraud and violence in
the election that claimed 137 lives,
making it the bloodiest balloting
in modern India's 42-year history.
The election for seats in
Parliament's policy making Iowct
house started Wednesday and
ended Sunday By this morning,
winners had been declared in 314
of the 325 races.
State television, compiling
results from the Election Commis-
sion, saicl the Congress Party had
138 seats. Its party allies had an-
other 17. A majority in the new
Parliament - and with it the
mandate to form a new govern-
ment � requires 263 seats.
The centrist National Front, a
five-party alliance led by former
defense and finance minister Vish-
wanath Pra tap Singh, had 71 seats.
Singh, an ex-Congress Party-
member, was once Gandhi's ally
but is now the prime minister's
most outspoken political foe.
The Bharatiya Janata, which
won just two seats in the last elec-
tions in 1984, had bo. The rest of
the seats went to smaller parties
and independents.
Manv of the undeclared seats
are in states where the National
Front was expected to do well.
The Congress Party's poor show-
ing could hurt it in the search for
coalition partners or trigger a
revolt against the prime minister
by colleagues in his own party.
"If Congress wants to win
anything, the prime minister must
go said independent analyst
Bhabani Sen Gupta. "With Rajiv
Gandhi, very few things are pos-
sible. Without Rajiv Gandhi, many
things are possible
The departure of Gandhi
would herald an end to the family
dynasty that has governed India
for all but five years since it be-
came independent from Britain in
1947. Gandhi, 45, the grandson of
India's first prime minister,
Jawaharlal Nehru, was plunged
into the leadership of the world's
most populous democracy when
his mother, Prime Minister Indira
Gandhi, was assassinated in 1984.
His party then took an unprece-
dented 415 of the 543 seats in the
lower house.
The initial euphoria over a
young, seemingly dvnamic leader
was soon tarnished by allegations
of government corruption and
ineptitude. The troublecamchome
to roost in Gandhi's own election
See INDIA, page 7
Time runs out for N.C. amnesty program
GREENSBORO (AP) � Thou-
sands of North Carolina tax evad-
ers have five days to avoid prose-
cution bv paving their back taxes
plus interest before being faced
with a Class I felonv.
The sta te faces the same count-
down for collecting the final $9.3
million to meet the $20 million
goal set when North Carolina's
tax-amnestv campaign began
three months ago. The amnesty
expires at midnight Friday.
For people who think thev can
beat the system, the N.C. Depart-
ment of Revenue amnesty slogan
promises, "Unless you make rime
for it now, vou could do time for it
later Effective Saturday, people
who evade state income taxes can
face up to five vears in prison and
a $25000 fine.
North Carolina began its
amnestv period Sept. 1 with the
goal of raising back taxesand inter-
est from thousands of people and
businesses. The Revenue Depart-
ment has collected $10.7 million
so far, said Charles Collins, spokes-
man for the amnestv campaign.
"We think that we will get at
least half of what we receive in the
last week Collins told theGreens-
boro News & Record.
Collins bases his optimism on
the common taxpayer practice of
waiting until the last minute to
pay and on the experiences of
states with similar campaigns.
Kentucky and New York, for ex-
ample, exceeded amnesty goals
and collected the majority of the
money in the last week of their
campaigns.
Kentucky, with a $10 million
goal, received 81 percent of its
$61.1 million total in the last week;
New York, with a $200 million
goal, received about 60 percent of
See AMNESTY, page 7
3heSiuiss Colony jCoifpO
t Save $4.00 on Gift 6l8
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Save $3.00 on Gift 245 Save $3.00 on Gift 2
Great Go Togethers Smokev Sensation
fSa?e $3.00 on Gift 6ll
p Colony Collection
I
h
h
i
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Save $2.00 on Gift ty
Incredibly Good
Save $2.00 on Gift 240
Cheese Fiesta
If
Save $2.00 on Gift 562
Petits Fours
Carolina East Mall
756-5650
IT'S CRAZY! IT'S NUTS!
I Tom Togs
Factory Outlet
ITS A SALE OF A LIFETIME
ITS A SUPER SALE
ITS TOM TOGS OUTLETS BUY AT WHOLESALE SALE!
NOTHING OVER $8
SHORT SLEEVE T'S, LONG SLEEVE TS, SWEATSHIRTS, SHORTS,
SWEAT TOPS, AND MANY OTHERS WE CANT MENTION THE LABELS.
DON'T MISS IT, ITS THE GREATEST SALE IN TOM TOGS HISTORY
2-4-6-8
You're the one
we APPRECIATE.
1900 DICKINSON AVE. 3525 S. MEMORIAL DR.
830-0174 355-3785
'NO NEWLY ARRIVED CHRISTMAS MERCHANDISE OR FULL PRICE MERCHANDISE INCLUDED.
Order your college ring NOW
JOSTENS
AMERICA S COLLEGE RING
Date Nov. 29,30 & Peel Time: 10" 4Pm Deposit Required: $20.00
Place: Bookstore Wed Thurs& Fri.
Meet with your Jostens representative lor hill details. See our complete ring selection on display in your college bookstore.
m-xactcummi





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 28, 1989
Classifieds
McBudget
Office
Furniture
We Have:
�Desks 'Chairs
�Files 'Safes
�Computer 'Storage
Furniture Cabinets
We Buy. Sell. Trade, & Lease
1212 N Irtent St.
7B2 0834
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed ASA
Must be neat. Call 830-1302 anytime.
ROOM FOR RENT: Biltmore street S125
a month- male or female Call Luke at 752
4464 Leave a message
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Responsible &
considerate S135 per month13 uhli
ties Private bedroom & bath Available
now 830-8880.
ROOMS FOR RENT. Walk to school
I'tihties furnished. $137.50 month. 757
3543
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
$150 month plus 1 2 utilities Non
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
� AI1 NF.W : BEDROOMS �
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2SW E. 5th Street
Vxi � Rbam .ui s� � � r. to chinfc ik� tnd
JtK.mit f�w Ni'mbcr tennis)
� Located Near ECU
� Near Major Shopping Centers
� ECU Bus Service
� Onsite Laundry
CootadJ.T iiiimi (v Tomrm WSUmi
756-7815 or 758-7436
� A7.AIKA GAKOSNS
(1 FAN V� Ql Ir"T onr badnnr famuttad ("Tdii awu
dT.iarti. tv - � ��.�.� CftMri �aatea dry m - TV
. � mi t 0 ������ leaac
icOMLEHOMSRBfTAU ApBurma ad mo�lr tnm r
r �� nttm nrc flroqfc aiir Country (T4
Cmuu ! T WitJumn � Tammy 'ilts�nt
-WI15
BEST USED TIRES
TIRK SALES ("ROM $15 A UP
ALL SEES AVAILABLE
WHITE LETTER A WHITE WALLS
Two locations: 1600 N (la-en St
830-9579 1009 S Memorial Dr.
i The Suntana i
3212 S. Memorial Dr.
5 visit plan 15 I
10 visit plan 25 I
15 visit plan 30 I
I
'J1 bCft 'Tan nirnj Sys 11 m
756-9ISO
This coupon good thru Dee 15, 1UKU
smoker and no pets 1 ocated dose to
eampus off 10th street Apartment is
completely furnished except for bedroom
Seeking fun and energetic individual
Please eall 758-0676 after l()pm
FEMAl E roommate WAN TED: $160plus
utilities convenient to ECU eampus Call
752-4959 ask for Kerry
FEMALE ROOMMATE : Needed 2nd
semester cheap rent t 13 utilities Lo
cated nevt to eampus behind Chico's
Brand New Apts. Call Liz 758-3094
TWO BEDROOM 1RA1I1R: Good con
dition 4 miles east ol Greenville, Near
Simpson Call 758 579
WAlKiBUKK: loECU 2bedroom, 1
bath Available De� 20th Call 752 2Ms
after 5pm
FOR SALL
A.K.C. REGISTERED: Golden Retriever
puppies. 4-males left 8 weeks old Call
757-6452 or come hv 201 Memorial Gym
Ask tor Itidv Baker
TANDY COMPUTER: Monitor, Printer,
and internal disk drive Price nee, (. all
after 5 00 at 758 5227.
FURNITURE: Couch, 2 chairs, 2 end taWes
& coffee table Full sie, hard wood Per
feet condition Call alter 5 00 at 355 "2
and or leave message
COUCH AND CHAIR: 550 or best offer
Must sell! Call 752 9245 Day or night
AUTOS: Is it true you can buy, (eeps tot
$44 through the U.S Government? '�
facts today! Call 1-312 742 1142 Ext
A
ABLE
BACK TO LIFE
BACK TO REALITY!
November 30
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Rm 1032
General Classroom Building
For More Information or a Membership
Application, Contact
Dr. Larry Smith (Advisor)
W hie hard 204
757-6495
or
Carla Hooker (President)
Mendenhall Student Center
757-4715
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
i Eof appointrrvrv Von thi. Sdt
rCori ' rrmir. jtior to 2i fcweks A Prfgnanc
1-800-433-2930
VEHICLES: Can vou buv Jeeps, Cars, 4 x
4's Seized in drug raids for under SI 00 007
eal for taets today 805-644-9533 Dept
711.
ONE TICKET: To see the Rolling Stones
.it C lemson U The Sunday after Thanks
giving, Nov 2b for $60 It interested. Call
951-9205
84 RENAULT ALLIANCE: DL, 4 door,
cassette, air Navy with beige interior
Asking S3 2 00 Must see make an offer
Moving to Italv call 758-6701
FOR SALE: Handcrafted Jewelrv, ear
rings, 1 lairelips, anklets, and more CX'er
150 items to choose from ean custom
make sorority colors Christinas is pist
around the corner' Calltodav' sandy 911-
7839 lea�e message
FOR SALE: Modem 2 bedroom, 2 Kith
Rollinwood cluster home Fireplace,
washer dryer space, endosed, patio, much
storage space Pool A steal at S47,0O0!
SPRING BREAK VACATIONS: To
lancun, Bahamas, etc At the guaranteed
lowest prices! Earlv bird spedal and
chances for a free trip' Call Michelle at
"s 3154 t,)r in formation
SCUBA EQUIPMENT: Top of the line
diving gear from wetsuits to computers
�ill brand new and going fast Call Adam
at 758-2 for more info )iist m time for
mas
BY OWNER: Belvedere Subdivision, 302
Belvedere O Attractive, brick home, 5
bedrooms 1 12 bams well landscaped,
with nice pnv.it backyard and storage
building in established, desirable neigh-
borhood $79300. Call atter 6pm and
weekends, 756 1892
ATTENTION: Government seized ve
hides from $100 Fords, Mercedes, Cor
vettes, Chevys Surplus Buyers Guide 1
� 2-838-8885 Ext A 5285
ATTEN LION: Government homs trom
Si (u-repair) Delinquent ta property
Fast Copies
For Fast Times
758-2400
Who has the
most unique
selection oi
contemporary
accessories'
Present this 1 oupon
� for I0r� Discount I
I on An Accessory '
I expires 1231 89
Certain
things
62 E. Arlington
Greenville. NC
(919) 756-3320
Domino's Pizza Offers
"End of the Semester Specials"
Now through Dec. 15th
LUNCH SPECIAL: 11 am to 4pm M-F Order a 12" one item pizza
with 2 cokes for ON LY $5.99
MONDAY MADNESS: Order a 16" Pepperoni after 5pm for ONLY $7.99
2 - 4 TUESDAY: Order two 12"One item pizzas for ONLY $9.99
wacky Wednesday: "Play Beat the Clock"
Order a 12" pizza, between 5 and 8 and
the time you order is the price you pay. (limited toppings)
CALL 758-6660
Repossessions Call 102-838-8885 Ext
CM 5285
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE Papers, resumes,
thesis, etc that need to be typed, please
eall 756- H�34 between 5 30pm -9 30 pm
17 yrs typing experience Typing is d ne
on computer with letter quality printer
REPORTS, RESUMES, Ti PING, DESK-
TOP PUBLISHING, I ASER PRINTING:
Designer type, 752-1933. We lake reserva
tions for typing reports
WORD PROCESSING 4 PHOTOCOPY-
ING SERVICES: We offer typing and
photocopying services We also sell soft
ware and computers 24 hrs in A out
guarantee typing on paper up to 20 hand
written pages SDF Professional comput-
ers. 106 E 5th St (beside Cubbies) Green
ville, N C 752 3694
GET ABOARD: Pirate ride, 3 routes on
the hour around campus (all 757 4724
for more details
LONELYNEED A DATE' Meet that
special somi-one today! Call Datetimc at
(405) 366-6335
DEPENDABLE, PROFESSIONAL
TYPIST: With state of the art word
processing equipment and 1 jser printer
Will meet your typing needs Call eve
nings 7V 1837
NEED A PICK - UP: for a small or me
dium load' Moving locally' yui naui
furniture, household items, brush piles,
mist Call V'ernon atter 5pm at 757-0462
HELP WANTED
ATLENTION- HIRING: Government
�obs- your area Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test $1 7 S40
$69,485. Call 1-602-838 B885 Ext R5285
HOLIDAY OB OPPORTUNITY: The
Honey Baked I lam Co is in search ol
seasonal help to fill our sales counter and
production positions We hje stores
located in the following markets Raleigh,
Durham, Greensboro, Winston Salem
Wilmington, Charlotte, and Atlanta
e check the white pages or intorma
� or the store nearest your home
o v'ERNMENT JOBS: $16,040
$59.230yr. Now hiring Call 1-805-687
6000 Ext K - 1166 for current federal list
YOUTH BASKFTBALl COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16 part time
vouth basketball coaches tor the winter
youth basketball program applicants
must pss�ss giome Knowledge of basl i��
ball skills and have ability and patience to
work with youths Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages 9- 18, in
basketball fundamentals 1 lours are trom
3 pm to 7 pm with some night and week
end coaching This program will run from
November 2" to mid February Salary
rate ,tarN at S 5 pr hr for more intor
mation please call nVn lames at 830 !M
!
Read
(E6e (East
Carolinian
A Veritable
Corniucopia of
Information
or 830 4567
MODELS: Needed part tame I
and exercise production '�-n.i pi
resume to Models I � t 1 H I
l7,drawer 1446 Cr.vnvi ' .
AIRLINES NOW HIR IN. Righl
dants, travel agents mei i
service Listings Salaries to $1
level positions (all (1) 80S68 6 -
A 1166
ACT IN TVOMMER I AI s
pay No experience all ages �
young adults, families mature ;
animals etcall now1harmSru I
800-837-1700
ATTENTION eammor �
$32,000 vt Incorrw
ffC SK HAH Ext � . "
MAINTENANC si D H ,
Needed for morning iff
end work A
Apply in person Greeny eticQ
140 Oakmont Dr
IMAGE FASHION I
Americas Premier Image (
time call BarbaraSh pe804-4
interview and fat fre
WANTED: full and part Smehel '
minimum wage to start Must ha
driver'sK ��nee Appl) in ;�rsi
Auto Wash Mon Wed, I
of Red Hanks Kd andIreeny
PART-TIME llll P: Vidci tap
Proficient with 34 vuii Rexil
News oriented work
McDamel. News Direi tor, V
946 5151 W1TN is an Vu.il i : .
Fmp
PERSONALS
im LIAS. Wi
ey ervone had a gri'at Tha: giving
Luck to the volleyball team'
gratulataons to the rs �. . .
SIGMA PI: one- It
Brad Nick, Matt. Mik
Steve Tm shane Dustan & tt
their initiation
a giMu group lit guvs Rememberv
still ntssjis-i to be done
QUAUm MEN WAN II D
Epsilon fraternity is ha.
information meeting on Wed N
torm 7 -9 pm at Mendenha
Center (Multi purposi I
find out what ig f
ALL SPECIAL EDL C ATTON MAJORS
The Studer �' rid II i
dren will have a short n inst
mas Party N,n 2s at 5 1 pm
welcome Great things planni
s�v flyers m Speight tor details
ALL ORGANIZATIONS
chas�d a block in trom of the St
to paint Logo The time to pa
Friday Dec 1 at 200pm
757 4726
Write
What we have to otter
'MONEY
'SCHOOL CREDIT
(through Co-op tor English
and Journalism majors)
EXPERIENCE
(a plus on any resume)
apply at
The East Carolinian
Announcements
ATTENTION TO ALL
The East Carolinian will be changing its
policy concerning announcements, start-
ing in January, announcements will now
be free for only the 1st week of publica
tion, after that week there will be a charge
of 1st 25 words for student organia
tions - S2 00 and for non- student orgam
zations S5.00 any additional words will
be S 05s
QUALIFY TO BE AIR FORCE
OFFICER
The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test will
be administered on Nov 9 and 30 in rm
308 of Wnght Annex Testing will begin at
1 00 both dates Successful testing can lead
to a challenging fob as an Air Force Officer
pilot, navigator, engineer, romputer
scientist, manager and a variety of others
Call 757-6597 or stop by room 306of Wright
Annex to sign up for the test and discuss
your options.
ARE YOU A PERFORMER?
Jugglers, Mimes, magicians and other
Elizabethan characters, the Student Union
would like to talk to you about perform-
ing in the Madrigal Dinners Call 757-4711
and ask for Ron Maxwell
ECU LACROSSE
The ECU Lacrosse team is looking for any
interested staff or faculty member tocoach
in the spring 1990 season. If interested
please contact John or Kelly at 757-1537
EXERCISE AND NUTRITION
Tracy Morton a Greenville spa fitness in-
structor will discuss nutritional incentives
and info about getting the most from your
workout. Tue, Nov28 from 12 - pm in
Memorial Gym A session in lm- Rec
Services fall fitness series, welcomes all
faculty, staff, and students to attend Please
register Mon Nov. 27 For more info call
757-6387
CANCUN FOR SPRINC
BREAK
Last available apartment Sheraton
oceanfront 5 - star luxury apartment. 8
days and 7 nights (March 4-11) Sleeps 10
comfortably: $200 per person. 3 full baths
Jacuzzi. Completely furnished kitchen
with microwave. Contact 355-6500.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir will sponsor a
Variety Show featuring comedy, music
and drama on Nov. 28 Along with the
show, a raffle will be held to win prizes
All interested parries who would like to
participate , please contact a member of
the choir. The show will be held in rm 244
in Mendenhall student center, price is SI
THE REFORMIST PARTY
The Reformist Party holds meetings every
Tuesday at 5pm in the GCB, rm 1032. Ail
factions of campus are welcome and en-
couraged to attend
ATTENTION DISABLED
STUDENTS
Computer science, math, chemistry, and
physics majors are needed for Co-op posi-
tions in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Very
accessible work environment and com-
munity.) Please contact the cooperative
education office, 2028 GCB, 757-6979.
PERFORMING ARTS
Performing Arts company in Virginia has
Co-op positions available in media rela-
tions, advertising publications, technical
theatre, and education. Please contact the
Cooperative Education office, 2028 GCB,
75706979
The school of Education wishes to invite
all students, faculty and staff and their
spouses andor dates to attend the annual
Christmas Social on Nov 29, The Wednes-
day atter Thanksgiving It will be held at
Courtney square in the social rm from 7
until 11 There will be food and dancing
and a whole lot more. Dress well be nice
casual We hope to se you there Any
questions call Michelle at 757-1039 or
Cindy at 758-9278.
The FMA will have an FMA FacultySocial
Wed Nov 29 at 4pm on the 3rd floor of the
GCB Members can bring a guest and are
asked to wear professional attire. Gradu-
ating Seniors will be recognized and Na-
tional I lonor Society certificate presenta-
tion. This well be the last meeting of the
semester.
ECU CQLLEGE.RETUBU-
7
IANS
We will meet Thrus. Nov 30 in rm. 305
Joyner Library.
PIG KIPS
Every Tue. at 5:30pm in 210 Erwin Hall,
Big Kids meet to discuss common con-
cerns If your life has been affected pastor
present by having been raised in ahomeor
environment wheTe alcoholic or other
dysfunctional behaviors were present, this
group mav be for you For more info,Call
757-6793, Office of Substance Abuse Pre-
vention Education.
ECU HOLIDAY CONCERT
"Deck the I lalls" with ECU's Symphonic
Wind Ensemble, thecombined ECU choirs,
brass choir, and St. Nicholas in wnght
Auditorium at 7:30pm on Monday, Dec. 4.
The program offers a collage of sounds
and sights, with music ranging from
"Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire" to
Dello Joio's "Variations on a Medieval
Tune St. Paul's Episcopal Church choir
will be featured, singing "Silent Night as
it was heard the first time, and the audi-
ence will be invited to join in the singing of
familiar carols This old-fashioned cele-
bration of the holidays is sponsored by the
Friends of the ECU School of Music and is
a wonderful time for the entire commu-
nity to begin a festive season. The pro-
gram length is planned to allow children,
of all ages, to be home at a reasonable
hour. The Holiday Concert is free and
open to the public.
SURVEY
During the week of Nov. 27 - Dec. 1, a
survey of student opinion of instruction
will be conducted at ECU. Questionnaires
will be distributed in every class with
opportunity to express opinions on the
teaching effectiveness oi their instructors
in those classes
PITXCiUNTXMEDICAL
SOCIETY
Invites you and your family to the lighting
and dedicanon ceremonv of the Lights of
Love tree at Pitt County Memorial 1 loepi
tal on Dec. 1 at 7pm Lights may be pur
chased in memory or honor of a fnend or
loved one for $5. Their name will be place
in a Book of Honor which will be dis
played year round at the hospital Vout
tax deductible monies will go for commu
nity health education projects Call 756
7129 for further info.
If you are interested in alcohol awareness
and concerned about helping prevent
alcohol abuse on campus
B. A C.C.H U S (Boost Alcohol Conscious
ness Concerning the Health of University
Studentsis the student organization for
you Every Tues at 4pm in 210 Erwin
Hall For more info contact the Office of
Substance Abuse Prevention and Educa
Continued on page 7





THE HAST CAROLINIAN NOVEBFR 27, 1989 7
Winds delay shuttle landing another day
edlv denloved ,i snv catoilita Jnr- "TU� �i xl- . .
B LAURA TOLLE
I he torn i�ted Press
STAC! CENTER, Houston
(AP Blustery winds that sent
small "dust devils" whipping
ss the space shuttle's desert
landing site forced NASA to keep
the ! v� over) astronauts in spaee
another da
flans to end the secret mili-
ision with a rare night
. Sunday at Edwards Air
Rase v .iht were scrapped
he persistent winds,
ted to nearly 30 mph.
e astronauts, who r vrt
edlv deployed a spy satellite dur
ing their classified mission, were
scheduled to return to Earth
Monday with a 2:S2 p.m. PST
touchdown at Edwards.
Sunday's postponement
marked thesixth timein32shuttle
flights that a landing has been
delayed by weather.
NASA initially rescheduled
the landing tor 4:32 p.m. PST
Monday, but Mission Control de-
cided to bring the shuttle back at
2 52 p.m. PS 1 to reduce sun glare.
About an hour before landing, the
erew was to ignite the shuttle's re-
entry rockets tor the fiery dive
through the atmosphere.
Announcements
"The change to the earlier
landing opportunity takes ad van-
tage of higher sun angle, thereby
red uci ng sun glare on Discovery's
windows during landing Mis-
sion Control commentator Billie
Deason said Sunday night after
NASA announced the landing
delav.
Skies wereexpected to be clear
and winds were predicted to be
within landing limits Monday
afternoon. Mission rules dictate
that a shuttle not land during the
dw if crosswinds are more than
about 17 mph; 12 mph for night
landings. The delav does not pose
li.ill
a threat to the astronauts because
Discovery carries enough fuel and
other supplies to remain in orbit at
least through today.
Discovery'scommander is Air
Eorce Col. Frederick D. Gregory.
His crew members are Air Force
Col. John Blaha, the pilot, and
mission specialists Navy Capt.
Manley Carter Jr F. Story
Musgrave and Kathryn C.
Thornton.
In announcing the delav,
Mission Control also said the astro-
nauts "continued to be in excel-
lent condition But a military-
imposed news blackout that has
shrouded most of the mission kept
Continued from page 6
INI
M
I RNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSD,
ui p ,i Night' .in eve
b the International stu
(heme Christmas in
x tx he in Mendenhall .n
� '� - n sale at the door
AMPUS CRUSADE FQR
CHRJSI
1 l weokI meeting, is jt
stet �. I G ,ini us
� '��' biblical input th.it s
� �� ampus i k-eryone
M ST n KNATIONAL
3 peti
SPANISH CLL'B
Homj 1 he Spanish dub will tv h.i ing
a Christmas party Wed Dec 6 at 4pm. 3rd
floot i .C H foreign language department
lounge There vvili be tvi, refreshments
and sonjjs
FOSTER CHILDREN FIITMn
ovner 1 .ibrar) is accepting monetary
donations to provide C hristmas e,itts in
� � foster children .t Pitt Countv from
No 2" to 8 Your tan deductible
contribution can be made .it loyner Li
br.irc Administrative Dept trom 8am till
India
5pm iveekdays Make your check payable
to ECU foster children fund Show the
children that you care this holiday season
GAMMA BETA PHJ
Attention (lamma Beta I'hi members
There will be a meeting on Thnis Nov 30
at 7pm This is the last meeting of the
semester and point cards are due He sure
to .1K how the convention went
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSJC
EVENTS NQV28DEC4
( oncert Band Concert (Nov 29, 8:15pm,
Wright Auditonum, free); a. Ensemble
difference
ecause their
Amnesty
district ot Amethi, where the out-
comc ol his race tor re election is
still in limbo.
I he 45 ear-old prime minis
tor was expected to win easily
when the remote area ol dusty
illages voted on Wednesday. But
the National Front complained ot
widespread fraud bv Congress
Party activists, and another vote
wasordered for Monday in about
percent ot the district.
Turnout was low in Amethi.
; million total in the last
I" : tu k spent about
1 in advertising tor its
nth campaign; New York
arolina's campaign,
� les radio, television
papei advertisements.
� il ut $585 000, Collins
ughGov.JimMartinhas
tii same high-profile
i to advertising tax am-
concert (Nov 30, B:15pm ,Wright Audito
num. free), Chris Holliday, percussion,
and Mary lav, voice, Senior Ktviul (Dec I
,7pm,Fletcher Keritai I lali, free); c harles
Hildebrandt and Carol Metger, Voice,
Senior RecitaKDec 1. 9pm, Fletcher Ke-
atal Hall, free); ECU Symphon) Crch
tra with North Carolina Dance Theater,
ECU Performing Arts Series! I ��v3pm,
Wnght Auditorium, Call 757 4ss tor
ticket info); ECU New Mush Camerata
(Dec. 3,8:15pm, Fletcher Recital Hall,free);
ECU Wind Ensemble Holiday
ConcertfDec. 4. 7 JO . Wright Auditorium
free).
Continued from page 5
Polling officer Uday Raj Pandey
estimated just 20 percent of the
voters had showed up by earlv
afternoon. There were few issues
in the campaign, apart from being
tor or against Gandhi and the
Congress
Continued from page 5
nesty as did governors in Ken-
tucky and New "i ork - one ap-
peared in a commercial, the other
held numerous news conferences
I im Pittman, Martin's director
of communications said the gov-
ernor has been committed to the
project trom the start.
"He has been nght there with
it supportive and involved
Pittman sud.
Martin hasn't been very vis-
ible because of his recent travels.
which included a trade mission to
Europe, Pittman said, but he has
stayed informed throughout the
lifeoi the program, which is oper-
ated bv the Revenue Department.
So tar, Collins said, the majority of
the amnesty applications has come
from individuals, but the majority
of money has been from busi-
nesses.
Collins declined to furnish
details, citing the confidentiality
promised bv the program. Hut he
did say many who had been put-
ting off paving their back taxes
filed multiple-year returns early
in the program.
"They were wanting to do the
right thing, but the) were a tra id of
what would happen to them le-
gally he said. "The amnesty
program is a method bv which
they could go ahead and get caught
up
With Macintosh
you can even do this:
Macinn sh computers haw always been easy to use. But they've
never been this easy t) i wn. Presenting The Macintosh Sale.
Thr ugh January 31, y u can save hundreds of dollars on a variety
()i Apple Macinu sh a )mputers and peripherals.
s) n ay theres n) reasc n t) settle ft r an (rdinary PC. 1th The
Macintc sh Sale, you can wind up with much more of a computer.
Without spending a lot m re monev.
space agency officials from dis-
cussing the crew's reaction to the
delav.
If bad weather persisted at
Edwards, other available landing
sites included White Sands, N.M
or Cape Canaveral, Fla. The Na-
tional Aeronautics and Space
Administration prefers Edwards
because of the long, wide-open
runwavs.
Discovery's flight began
Wednesday with a dazzling night-
time liftoff at Cape Canaveral. It
was the third shuttle launch after
dark, and Sunday's landing was
to have been only the third at night.
The after-dark blastoff was dic-
tated by the shuttle's cargo and its
mission.
Sources close to the project
have said that the astronauts
achieved their main goal Thurs
day when they released the $31XI
million satellite to eavesdrop on
communications in the Soviet
Union, Europe, Africa and the
Middle East.
Theastronautsalso report edlv
conducted experiments connected
with the "Star Wars" missile de-
fense system. It was believed the
astronauts also conducted
search into how people can se
as military observers in space
Attention
art majors
lor anyone with illustrative
endor cartooning abilities!
The East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for
staff illustrator
VWW&K4
2)Poptfopo
material
3) a job.
File
(apply in
person at
The East
Carolinian)
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Now through January 3L
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From Cable Adnet &The Pantry
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Ki 1 ll
Features
V A
dent discusses the problems f anorexia
hi ,� .in to notice her
il loss ! told them
tomach wouldn t hold
hatever 1 ate either
- up or unit right
anine said
it's and her manager
� here she taught aero-
�wed mt reasing concern
isked to teach more
� ad taught at least
sses .) j.n and members
mmenting on her
- ranci hen not
' more 1 lasses lanine
1 's .1 da so she (ould
herself, she wi re
� � i er-
treme thi
meh under-
�Iki
i- � 1! e en
king
i all mv
�� t n
itives
y s stems
1 ssibl
n she
n her
('onvin ed that she was help
ing her bodv instead of hurting it
lanine was helplessin thisunend
ing cycle Oneday, while tea hing
an aerobics class, members told
her that her face had turned
'this was later found to be dix-
from lack ot oxygen)
She ignored this warning and
continued her dangerous lifestvle
She suffered from loss . I
several rimes before h art j alpita
lions during an aerobu s
scared her ba k to reaht
"I realized that mv bodv was
suffering and that I 1 uld die,
lanine said 1 ike ah 1 -
ting their problem Ian
knowledgement ot hei .
w as the tirst step to reo erv
Alter admitting she neodi
help, dev tor hdnot a
1
tors thoi.
ine said i I ildn t �
me to the hospital until I was so
weak i couldn � ��� ut o( bed
dthough � rexi
has become
�. � �
f � n Cai
pentorha: ed 1
ot the publu
Now lanine rests safcIV in a

' ret very Her b dv is totally
� ' � machis raw and
nd is
not capabh ot noi mal J �� stu
Sorm
le aying due to stomai
her mouth fi mitini
uno I
;
ai i �1 k t 11
hermt- th.
-
i� . r ten
r h! I splet
dan iaged
fhe doctors are doing tests women than mei but there are
n
lanine maki s straight A s in
" . t Mv grade;
have alway - � . - 1 to
i'bei
- � � � -
nehf
w
n rt
mysti
te 1 -

and report
out , �
' �� atment v ill consist
total liquid diet
.
i swalh � �� burnss bad !i 1 �( s. ��
� -1 � t d n anin
Wliki
� atista
1 pai
(
i the bi
-
eating, mi i .exua :� -
lisord
� ; - '
f am �
-
' 1 girl I went ti 1
� hool with sav me and told an '
ked mini
mam
'
ered ; em of ps
Lidents host
mas sale
� �. sufferer
w holi gi al �
�ngin It is a way of obtaining rexia nervosa is the sufferer's fear
conti � ne's life. f regaining a normal weight and a rar lei
effort to avoid don 1 1
" ' � ' � � � �
w here the feel thev ha exercise instead ot sittini lowi �'�
er their lives When they even when their appearances
discoverthattheycanconti I eir suggests they are at the point I �' '
weij ey become obsessed collapse Physn 1 itv ' � '
rhis obsession leads t i may also distra f anorexia rvosa
body image leading the anorexic hunger. Mental activity � � proport etermn
elieve they are fat no matter serve this purpose Ifth'eanoro ' '��'
how much they weigh "My is a student, studies 1 �
friends told me I was too skinny loss may become his or hi � See VN( K1 IA on page I'
-
-
-
1 . - it
lents She
lents the
�v tl 1 rk will
is inter-
ma
�heir work
I � dmatelv
ts will ean
r their work with a
. . .
lents earn a
lunng thi i
� � ' � . the Tea
� . � �� �. studi
I - nsoror a
�. se
Nov
- to b
� � s Fine
- 1 great a
� �
ii friend r n . :
- u will
�� hai w rk
- � ind it
Electric cars
are released
for research
u i i)on k
Adam's Car Wash, located on the corner of Ked Banks Road and Greenville BUd . is a quick and easv
way for college studens to Jean their cars. Washes take only 15 minutes mJ on I uesdays, a full wash
costs $3.95 with a student activities card. (Photo by Angela Pridgen LCT Photolab)
Car wash offers student specials
� -�
Men
-s is
Ford Es-gtts ak the
dull whirni
The cat' A�
thereleas � tl
and he's ft a1 . .� �� � ?
bab :i 'lec-
trie car
Hi�. ��1 - �
' ihift.ea.
� ' '
Boulevar 1the r
d'd smt' SiNo
fumes y- ne nos.

1s.1d v �
By( AKOI !1 LSK k
� ide tlie d m ts is a v
and
. r' � to a
tunnel of brushes nsto
tvitni
The carwash takes fit
isstru
tured like an assembh line
� nx'i s .md vacuun thi
quick
Anothi r set of 1
� � � p re pa r 1
: ' r the
tunnel Manager ol Adam s.0
Wash ' ghes said Tl 1
� �'
: in but il ne a
1
human
' hi peoj Ii who
iren't afraid ot
about vs ha
kind
th
e

ab Mt what kmd of customer sat
ist ticm they can give
;1 aid thekev toj
1-
ing
Student art exhibit shows
life in a modern world
! l Ni' w �. Bureau
re lallerv will open
hibitior Manifest An
lintings " featur
� � young ECU
onyersjac k ennings,
11 : Mark Phil
� � bitii ti. whu h enthu-
� - 1 the collabo
; ' f the pi fessional,
1 ' � ' itionalci mmu-
. lev. from Nov
igh 1 Vi " re eptn m
� I will be held Nov. 29,
hit is sponsored by
illerv and Accu (. opy
fre to the publii All are
nvited to attend
�sin the modern era have
Ii ; ublu dei larations of
pies They have not
. ki penly abitut their
md ideasbut, have also
festos and organized
. t their works
I 'ting te prodiii e an
ite body of paintings Da
� rs, l.u k lennings, Craig
' ind Mark Phillips
explore the essence of their ideas
rhey each attempt to understand
themseK esasaspiringartists v ho
respond to the tradition of paint-
ing and as human beings who live
within a complex modern world
In I )a(onyers'sbright,semi-
figurative painted collages on
canvas, he is concerned with the
issues ot being a Bla k American
artist 1 le attempts to convey the
universal truth that every human
being has a desire and need to be
loved, cared tor and understood
Through a series of experi-
mentations and repetitive experi
ences, lai k lennings probes the
nature (if his inner self in order to
better understand the relationship
between the subconscious mind
and conscious roahtv In these
dark abstract dripped oil paint
ings, he is a. lively engaged in the
cognizant pn es? of invi tigation
In a simila 1 w a . 1
Klmedinst shugeacryli paintings
question how we perceive the
experienceswhii hwehaveof our
being" and "our world But, by
only minimally intervening in the
making of an image whi hi cists
See STlI)iM ART on page 10
Atu r the ma( nine washes the
cars, ' detailers tmish the job
ITiey get inti thi nofk �- nd �
the windi v s insidt and
thecarofi and apply the finishing
touches 1 lughes said
fhe employee turn-over rate
nc
. e
� s mak�
limg. 1 lughes said.
1 he employees arc easih n
ognized. rhey look hkeclor.es jn
� � 1 � pie shirl
ssaid
he rarely hires students.
Hughes said Adam s Car
See CAR WASH on page 11
I �
floraI ' � . � : : -
4 mph.
I take me I
very niceb he said
bout I � -
The F- �
five battery - 1
for research
instructional purp - ' he wt n
given to the F k H
the US Departn rgs
The : � uded its
initial 1 - 11 � . ��� ts 1 large
fleet of electric cars an I
farm Iu ihonal
institutions for fui - resean h
ork TV � r:rst two year
school then
No stnnj itt hed to
the deal whkh was fashioned b
enterpi - v irk Tech's
ia preside nent
See c AK on p.e 11
ECUstudents Mark Phillips. Craig Klined icG ij era eni a�.k lenningsare the tturartists featured
in "Manifesto: An Exhibition of Paintings 1 h exhibitii n begins Nov. 2S at the I ncore Callerv located
at the corner oi evans ak ith Street 1a I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
NOVEMBER 28,1989
PAGE 9
Student discusses the problems of anorexia
By JAMI LEE MARTIN
Sp H to Th� bal Carolinian
lanine sits in her hospital bed,
looking at hor observer through
listless eyes. Hor complexion is
paled from exhaustion as bones
show through her skin that is
absent of fat.
I'm just so tired she said. "I
feel like I can't even lift my arms
lanine, an ECU student, put
herself through a year of self-tor-
ture to finally get help and end up
in the hospital Doctors diagnosed
her as suffering from a disease
called anorexia nervosa, which she
openly admits.
"I know I m sick. I just don't
know how to help myself
It all began a year ago when
lanine (not her real name) suf-
fered from gastritis. The sickness
caused her to lose her appetite,
and she began to lose weight.
lanine works as an aerobics
itructorand is very conscious of
her weight. When the gastritis
cleared up. lanine liked her thin-
her appearance. Although never
� � friends complimented heron
her recent weight loss
Soon lanine found herself
skipping meals. She felt guilty for
the meals she did eat, and made
herself throw up. Gradually, she
became obsessed with her weight,
exercising to the point of exhaus-
tion to keep from gaining any
weight
Friends began to notice her
drastic weight loss. "I told them
that my stomach wouldn't hold
food, and whatever I ate either
came back up or went right
through me Janine said.
Employees and her manager
at the spa where she taught aero-
bics, showed increasing concern
when Janine asked to teach more
classes. She already taught at least
two classes a day, and members
had been commenting on her
unhealthy appearance. When not
assigned to more classes, Janine
ran three miles a day so she could
get enough exercise.
To hide herself, she wore
baggy clothing, sometimes layer-
ing it, to hide her extreme thin-
ness. Although extremely under-
weight, Janine still believed she
was fat. Her body image became
distorted and nothing anyone said
changed her view of herself.
"I thought I was fat, even
though the bones were sticking
up on my shoulders and all my
clothes were falling off of me she
said.
When her weight loss slowed
down, Janine took laxatives. She
destroyed all her bodily systems,
making it virtually impossible for
her body to digest food. When she
quit eating altogether, the laxa-
tives drained the fluids from her
system.
Convinced that she was help-
ing her body instead of hurting it,
Janine was helpless in this unend-
ing cycle. One day, while teaching
an aerobics class, members told
her that her face had turned blue
(this was later found to be due
from lack of oxygen).
She ignored this warning and
continued her dangerous lifestyle.
She suffered from loss of oxygen
several times before heart palpita-
tions during an aerobics class
scared her back to reality.
"I realized that my body was
suffering and that I could die
Janine said .Like alcoholics admit-
ting their problem, Janine's ac-
knowledgement of her problem
was the first step to recovery.
After admitting she needed
help, doctors did not admit her to
the hospital until she could hardly
walk. "I was really sick, but the
doctors thought I was fine Jan-
ine said. "They wouldn't admit
me to the hospital until I was so
weak I couldn't get out of bed
Although anorexia nervosa
has become widely known, the
severity of it is still not realized.
The death of singer Karen Car-
penter has helped to open the eyes
of the public a little.
Now Janine rests safely in a
hospital bed and faces a hard road
to recovery. Her body is totally
wrecked. Her stomach isJaw and
red inside from vomiting and is
Art students host
Christmas sale
not capable of normal digestion.
Some of her teeth were lost to
decaying due to stomach acid in
her mouth from vomiting. Janine's
once thick and beautiful hair be-
came brittle and lifeless. Her thy-
roid gland and spleen are both
damaged.
"The doctors are doing tests
right now to find out just how
much damage I've done to my-
self Janine said. "When they find
out, then they're going to treat
� "
me.
Treatment will consist of a
total liquid diet starting with intra-
venous injections. The stomach is
to be given a full week of rest
before food enters it. " Whenever
I swallow anything it burns so bad
I can't keep it down Janine said.
What could make someone do
all this damage to their body?
There is no certain answer, but
anorexia nervosa is now consid-
ered a problem of psychological
origin. It is a way of obtaining
control of one's life.
Psychologists believe that
anorexics usually live in situations
where they feel they have no con-
trol over their lives. When they
discover that they can control their
weight, they become obsessed.
This obsession leads to a distorted
body image leading the anorexic
to believe they are fat no matter
how much they weigh. "My
friends told me I was too skinny
and I knew it, but I just couldn't
get it into my head Janine said.
Janine is 20 years old, putting
her into the prime age group of
anorexia patients (14-24). She is
from a moderately wealthy fam-
ily who set high standards for her.
Anorexia is more common in
women than men, but there are
men who suffer form the disor-
der. Most people who have ano-
rexia nervosa are perfectionists
and report a sense of satisfaction
from suppressing their hunger.
Anorexics often recall a par-
ticular event or comment about
their weight which seems to have
set them on the path that leads to
the disorder. "I remember after I
lost some weight, a girl I went to
high school with saw me and told
me how good I looked Janine
said. "She said that I'd lost my
chubby cheeks. This immediately
made me think I was fat before
The core of established ano-
rexia nervosa is the sufferer's fear
of regaining a normal weight and
her effort to avoid doing so. Some
take it to such extremes that they
exercise instead of sitting down,
even when their appearances
suggests they are at the point of
collapse. Physical over-activity
may also distract attention from
hunger. Mental activity can also
serve this purpose. If the anorexic
is a student, studies and weight
loss may become his or her main
By JENNIFER SWENSON
Special to The Cm! Carolinina
Christmas is right around the
corner and it is time to fight the
massive crowds trying to find the
perfect gifts for those close to you.
You might want to stay out of the
holiday traffic, and buy your gifts
on campus at the ECU School of
Art Annual Christmas Sale.
ECL studentsand alumni will
be selling their one-of-a-kind
works. You will be sure to find
new and exciting twists in gift
giving.
Different groups will be in-
cluded in the sale. Each will con-
tribute different types of work
depending on the group they hail
from. Groups included are Crafts-
men East, Ceramic Guild, Design
Associates, and Art Education.
Students will be selling pot-
tery, jewelry, T-shirts, silk scarves,
Christmas cards, wrapping paper
and much more.
Students make most of their
projects for the sale in their spare
time. Occasionally, a teacher will
give an assignment that can be
sold in the sale.
Blanche Monroe, an ECU
alumna, will set up a marbleizing
booth. This involves and ancient
process in which the dye takes on
a translucent swirl.
Kristin Sauer, president of
Craftsmen East, said popular items
sold last year were scarves, silver
jewelry and woven purses. This
year Sauer plans to sell scarves,
earrings, men's ties, and hair ac-
cessories.
Sauer feels this is a great
opportunity for art students. She
said, "This gives students the
chance to see how their work will
sell and what the public is inter-
ested in buying. They can also get
a good idea of pricing their work
Price range is approximately
$5 to $25. Art students will earn
the money for their work with a
percentage going to their particu-
lar group. Some students earn a
lot of money during the sale.
Come out and enjoy the crea-
tivity of your fellow students.
Craftsmen East will sponsoror a
bake sale while you browse.
The sale will take place Nov.
30 and Dec. 1, from 8 a.m. to 6
p.m and Dec. 2, from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m in the foyer of Jenkins Fine
Arts Building.
The sale will be a great alter-
native for new and exciting con-
cepts for that special friend orrela-
tive. You can be be sure you will
get an original gift with hard work
and dedication behind it.
Adam's Car Wash, located on the corner of Red Banks Road and Greenville Blvd is a quick and easy
way for college studens to clean their cars. Washes take only 15 minutes and on Tuesdays, a full wash
costs $3.95 with a student activities card. (Photo by Angela Pridgen � ECU Photolab)
Car wash offers student specials
By CAROLINE CUSICK
F��un-Editor
Inside the doors is a waiting
room decorated in burgundy and
grey. Down a hall, windows to a
tunnel of brushes allow patrons to
witness the heartbeat of the busi-
ness, the car wash chamber.
The car wash takes fifteen
minutes and the business is struc-
tured like an assembly-line.
Vacuum attendants greet
customers and vacuum the cars
quickly and thoroughly.
Another set of employees, the
"brush men prepare cars that
have excess dirt or mud for the
is high because the work's hard
said Hughes. "The people who
stay are those who aren't afraid of
hard work and care about what
kind of job they do. They care
about what kind of customer sat-
Lexicon
Mushrooming
For the week
of 102789
1. Mores: A. virtues; B. cus-
toms; C. tears; D. fields
2. Hodgepodge: A. medley; B.
chorus; C. skirmish; D. noise
3. Hackneyed: A. old-fashion;
B. quite; C. common place; D.
uncommon
4. Oblivious: A. total destruc-
tion; B. heedless; C. deviously;
D. second life
5. Gritty: A. textured mud; B.
messy; C. uncomfortable; D.
persistant
6. Forbearing: A. warning; B.
giving; C. farsighted; D. patient
7. Onerous: A. mean; B. wild;
C. threatening; D. burdensome
8. Wheedle: A. small insect; B.
chip wood; C. to pry; D. coax
9. Wanton: A. unrestrained; B.
greedy; C. Chinese soup; D. fox
fairy
10. Irreverent: A. disrespectful;
B. holy rule; C. banded from
priesthood; D. trivial.
�Compiled by Matt Richter
Student art exhibit shows
life in a modern world
ECU New Bureau
explore the essence of their ideas.
They each attempt to understand
themselves as aspiring artists who
The Encore Gallery will open respond to the tradition of paint-
the exhibition, "Manifesto: An ing and as human beings who live
Exhibition of Paintings, " featur- within a complex modern world,
ing the works of four young ECU
artists, Dae Conyers, Jack Jennings, In Dae Conyers's bright, semi-
Craig Klindinst and Mark Phil- figurative painted collages on
!ips- �, canvas, he is concerned with the
This exhibition, which enthu- issues of being a Black-American
siastically embraces the collabo- artist He attempts to convey the
rative spirit of the professional, universal truth that every human
business and educational commu- being has a desire and need to be
nities, will be on view from Nov. loved, cared for and understood.
28 through Dec. 15. A reception Through a series of experi-
tunnel. Manager of Adam's Car isfaction they can give
Hughes said the key to giving
quality customer service is having
only full-time employees. "This is
where our employees make their
living Hughes said.
The employees are easily rec-
ognized. They look like clones in
They get into the nooks and era- uniforms of purple shirts and
nies under wheel wells. They clean khaki pants. The a tire, shows ECU
the windows inside and out, dry Pirate pride although Hughessaid
the car off and apply the finishing he rarely hires students,
touches Hughes said. Hughes said Adam's Car
"Theemployee turn-over rate See CAR WASH on page 11
Wash, Ron Hughes, said, "The ma-
chine will wash more cars than a
human can, but it's a machine and
it won't do as thorough a job as a
human
After the machine washes the
cars, "detailers" finish the job.
preoccupation.
Janine makes straight A's in
her nursing classes. "My grades
have always been important to
me, but ever since I've been sick, I
find myself reading and reread-
ing my school books until I know
it by heart Janine said.
Anorexia nervosa remains a
mystery despite research. Obvi-
ously, i t i sa disorder that begins in
the mind and results by damaging
to the body.
The problem originates in the
hypothalamus of the brain. The
hypothalamus controls appetite,
eating, mood, sexual feeling and
menstruation. Malfunction of the
hypothalamus is the main cause
of anorexia nervosa. All the effects
are secondary. Problems exist in
defining the exact cause of ano-
rexia and treatment is difficult.
Psychological treatment helps the
sufferer gaina perspectiveonbody
image.
Anorexia nervosa is no longer
a rare disorder. This disorder is
increasingly recognized, talked
about and studied. In a society
where beauty and thinness are of
prime importance, reports of
anorexia increase.
College campuses report cases
of anorexia nervosa in epidemic
proportions. Determining if the
condition has become more com-
mon or if the increased rate of
See ANOREXIA on page 11
Electric cars
are released
for research
By AL DOZIER
ROCKHILL,S.C. (AP)-When
Dennis Merrill turns the ignition
on York Technical College'? 182
Ford Escort, he gets a dick, ten a
dull whirring hum.
The car lurches forward with
the release of the emergency brake
and he's off and running in his
baby-blue, battery-powered elec-
tric car.
He shifts gears with a stan-
dard, straight shift, easily moving
through the traffic on Dave Lyle
Boulevard, but the road sounds
and smells are not the same. No
fumes. No engine noise.
"The only vibration you're
getting is off the road said Mer-
ill, president of York Tech. He
accelerated to a top speed of about
47 mph.
"This would take me to work
very nicely he said. "I only live
about five miles away
The Escort is part of a fleet of
five battery-powered electric cars
Tech will use for research and
instructional purposes. They were
given to the Rock Hill school by
the US Department of Energy.
The DOE has concluded its
initial research with its won large
fleet of electric cars, and now is
farming out the cars to educational
institutions for further research.
York Tech is the first two-year
school to receive them.
No strings were attached to
the deal, which was fashioned by
enterpriseof Ed Duffy, York Tech's
vice president for development.
See CAR on page 11
for the artists will be held Nov. 29,
from 6 to 8 p.m.
The exhibit is sponsored by
mentations and repetitive experi-
ences, Jack Jennings probes the
nature of his inner self in order to
Encore Gallery and Accu Copy better understand the relationship
anH ic froo in tVio nuHli- All Kot� �U. � "
and is free to the public. All are
cordially invited to attend.
Artists in the modern era have
often made public declarations of
their principles. They have not
only spoken openly about their
between the subconscious mind
and conscious reality. In these
dark, abstract dripped oil paint-
ings, he is actively engaged in the
cognizant process of investigation.
In a similar way, Craig
s r I � ������ " � .�.j,
paintings and ideas but, have also Klinedinst's huge aery lie paintings
written manifestos and organized question how we perceive the
exhibitions of their works. experiences which wehaveof "our
jr�sssskz yyifflff.rr.yg e�2?is
Conyers, Jack Jennings, Craig making of an image, which exists m �an"8fc: An Exhibition of Paintings The exhibition begins Nov. 28 at the Encore Gallery located
Klinedinst and Mark Phillips Set STUDENT ART on page 10 at the corner of evans and 5th Street Mall.





10
TH1- FAS1 i AROI IN1AN NOVEMBER 28.1989
Personal gifts add to holidays
NEW YORK (AP) (Tie gifts
one tends to cherish most .ire of-
ten those that are made hv hand
and reflect the tastes and interests
of the recipient a needlepoint
pillow with .i special phrase a
Hand-hewn treasure box, an ever-
lasting wreath themed to a spe-
cific decor, homemade jams and
jellies, cakes and cookies.
Although life's pace leaves all too
few with time to turn a practiced
hand at hobbies or c rafts, there are
wavs to show creativity without
spending a lot of time or money.
For family orfriends, consider
gifts that can become heirlooms.
Gifts of brass.�. hina, r stal, jv
ter,sUverplateor sterling en her
neworfromyourcollei tion can
be appreciated foi generations.
Choose from vai � tei is such as
perfume bottles, atomizers, pow-
der boxesand picture frames;desk
accessories such as letter openers
and paperweights; flower vases
and candlesticks; silver flatware
parceled out piece by piece.
Start a child with a sterling pattern
and continue with individual
paves for birthdays and holidays.
Towle is among silversmiths who
make infant spoons and training
sets in traditional flatware pat-
terns.
Antiques also make good gifts for
family as well as friends. Spool
boxes, cameos, pens and inkwells
are among affordable choices.
Akin to these and available in all
price ranges are coyote doorstops,
contemporary quilts, one-of-a-
kind sweaters, hand-made furni-
ture.
Or commission a local artist to
do a portrait of family or a render-
ing of the family home. To intro-
duce succeeding generations to
their roots, transfer old home
moviesofgrandparentsontovide-
otape, compile a photo album, start
a family tree.
Pamper a loved one. For her,
give a day of beautv or a weekend
at a spa; for him, a health club
membership or a chance to im-
prove his serve at a tennis camp.
Send newlvweds on a hot-air bal-
loon trip, complete with picnic.
Give the voung gourmet a course
in wines taught bv a prominent
oenophile. Finally, don't underes-
timate the impact on new parents
of theater or movie tickets and a
paid-tor babysitter.
For truly successful gift giv-
ing, the package is as important as
what's inside and should be a re-
flection of your stvle. Developing
a signature look can be a fun and
time-saving approach. ac vour
initials printed on ribbon, designer
stvle, or restrict yourself to solid
glossy paper with multi-colored
ribbons and seasonal touches such
as flowers, hollv and autumn
leaves. Keeping a consistent look,
and a supplv of wrappings on
hand, will save time in the future.
And don't forget the card Trv
to give yourself as much time to
write your thoughts as to select
your presents Honest sentiments
from the heart are still the most
touching expressions of affection
and friendship.
ealood House and Oyster Ban
Washington Highway (N C 33 EtGreerw.il North Carolina
Phone. 752 3172
Mon. thru Thurs Night
Shrimp
Camcorders expand photo industry
ByJOHN DINGMAN
Every photographer amateur
and professional al ke hopes that
Christmas will brim - pedal
photographv gifl
A survey ol ston ; in I il� igh,
N.C. area indicates l big
items this year will
ders, despite their re! iti ely high
price.
Russ Stames ma ol the
WolfCamera Store in Raleigh sa s
that demand tor v i de cameras
which range in pri i i om $f(Xl to
over $3,000 has i built
up.
The rush has hoe;1, building
for the past three vears Main
families are hu ing i am orders as
gifts for the home and using them
to shoot videos ol the children
Most buyers a re in their 2l sor v Is,
although some grandparents are
buying, too.
Starnessavvth.it in th long
run. video cameras are not as
expensive as thev seem two-
Student art
hour tarn.1 cassette costs around $5
and can be recorded over. Film
and processing for SuperS home
movies costsaround $12 to $15 for
a throe-minute reel.
yIncidentally, if vou have a
Super-8 movie camera, shop for
film before vou will need it. Star-
nes says his store, which he claims
is part of the second-largest retail
chain in the country, carries Su-
per-8 film only on special order.)
It vou don't go the video
camera route, the next biggest
sellers are point-and-shoot still-
picture cameras, which cost from
around $40 up to $400.
Needless to sav, the more vou
spend, the more elaborate the
camera. The cheapest ones usu-
ally featureonly a semiwide-angle
lens, while the more expensive
ones have zoom lenses, autofocus
and autoflash units. The more
serious the photographer, the less
likely he is to be satisfied with a
simple camera.
The next step up is the single
lens reflex, or SLR, cameras. They
range from $350 or so, with lens,
to just over $2,lXXl for a deluxe
outfit such as the Nikon F4.
You might consider giving a
lens. Zoom lenses, frequently in
the 35mm-70mm range, are the
most popular, and vou can expect
to part with at least $150 tor one.
Lenses can cost thousands o dol-
lars for the more sophisticated and
rare models.
Hash units make ginni gitts
and are available in a wide range
of prices. Also worthy of consid-
eration are such items as tripods
and filters, and camera bags, which
can cost as little as $25.
You might also consider photo
books, darkrexim equipment and
film � especially film, which will
be used up quickly at holiday time.
Starnes offers two warnings
when shopping tor photography
gifts.
First, know your photogra-
pher and his interests. For ex-
ample, there is no point in buying
an expensive camera and tele-
photolens outfit for someone who
wants to shoot only family snap-
shots. A decent point-and-shoot
Continued from page 9
in space and tin ips by
painting a gesture such as a coil),
he claims that he d il with the
idea of the coo si i � ol the
"perceptual real which
exists between "experience" and
"chance
Mark Thillips search is tor
the essence of man's existence
through the idea ol the "self In
making symbols and gestures
within a visceral arena ol paint, he
attempts to address the issues ol
British-bom
painter shows
work in Gray
British-born painter rony
Moore, visitingarrist-in-residence
at ECU this semester, is exhibiting
some of his most re ent work at
theGreenville Museumof Art this
month. The exhibition, entitled
"Made in Greem ille " will be on
view in the museum's Upstairs
Gallerv through i ember 3.
Moore is a native of
Northamptonshire who grew up
in Derbyshire, but made New York
his home in 1971 He received the
Bachelor of Fine Artsdegree from
the College ol Art in Wales and
the Master of Fine Arts degree
from Yale University.
In 1983 Moore was presented
the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award
in painting, one of several awards
and fellowships he has received.
His work has been displayed in
the Brooklyn Museum Collet turn
and the Solomon R. Guggenheim
Museum Collection.
As ECU's fall semester visit-
ing artist, Moore has been show-
ing his work in Gray (.allerv and
teaching graduate level painting
classes.
HisGreenville Museum show
includes works done in various
painting styles, among them sev-
eral tnptychs (three panel com-
positions). Moore attempts to
emphasize peacefulness, nature,
world unity and humanity in his
art,and stresses the symbi dk alue
of color.
"The paintings ol"Ibny Moore
speak of sometimes si mple, some-
times profound truths, com-
mented Karen Churchill, director
of ECU'sGray Callerv "1 he works
in this installation exemplify
See BRITISH ARTIST on 12
the constant metarnorphosis of life
experience. His ideal, like several
of the other artists in this exhibi-
tion, is to paint contemporary
spiritual icons.
To quote the abstract Expres-
sionist painters Mark Rothko and
Adolf Gottlieb's 1943 manifesto:
"There is no such thing as a
good painting about nothing
The Encore Gallerv is located
at 426 Evans Street, at the corner of
the Evans and 5th Street Mall. The
gallery is open Tuesday through
Friday, 11 a.m. through 6 p.m. For
more information, call lo-l.inda
Sandersat(919)830-0105,orTony
Moore at (919) 757-5570.
Do You Have High Blood Pressure?
Would you Participate in the study of a
New Drug Therapy?
Qualified Participants (21 years of age or older)
receive:
� Free Screening Physical lixam
� Free Laboratory Blood Work & EKG
� Up To $90 Travel Expenses
� Free Blood Pressure Medicine
If interested in more information, please call
551-4611 and ask for Hypertension Studies.
Study is sponsored by ihe ECU School of Medicine Family Practice Center
and the Lederle Company and supervised by the FDA.
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See Us For All
Your Automotive Needs!
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
758-7676
model will serve his needs better
and cost hundreds of dollars less
Second, it vou are buying
accessories, know the exact tvpe
oi camera tor which vou are buy-
ing them. Itisn'tenough to tell the
salesclerk, "It looks like that one
MostSLR'slook pretty much alike.
Lenses that tit Canon autofocus
cameras, tor example, will not tit
earlier models, and vice versa
Similarly, Hash units designed for
Minolta cameras will not work
properly on Nikons.
It you don't know. ask. It's
better to buy an appropriate gift
than one that doesn't work, even
it asking beforehand spoils the
surprise.
Generally, the more vou pav the
better quality vou receive. Mv
experience has been that a cheap
unit will not provide lasting satis-
faction, and it won't generate
much trade-in value when its
owner steps up to what he really
needs. It's better to buy halt a
dozen rolls of good film than a
camera that won't last long.
.
&
d$
f
w
Sharky's
of Greenville
Daily Specials
Monday - $2.25 Ma
Tuesday - SI.75
Wednesday - $2.00 Kan
Thursday - $1.25 Imports &
LADEES NITE
free admission
Friday - SI .75 1 hghl
ers
Saturday SI .75
$1.75
Fir
Sharky's is a private club for membi rs and
21 year old guests.
Located by Sports Pad on 5th street
ENTER THROUGH ALLEY
RUSH
Rl'SH
SIGMA
PHI
EPSILON
a lifetime experience
1989 Buchanan Outstanding National Chapter
Chancellor's Cup Champs 5 years Running
1987 - 88 Inter - Fraternity Council's
"Most Outstanding Chapter Award" Recipient
1988 Winner of "ECU Spirit Award"
2 Houses and a Party Room
$90,000 in Scholarships Awarded Annual 1
Pre - Rush
Informal Information Meeting
Tomorrow; Wed Night
November 29th
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi - Purpose Room - 7:00 - 9:00pm
All interested males welcomes to meet and learn about
Sigma Phi Epsilon
For Information Call 757-0487
"The House With The Heart"





?
10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 28. 1989
Personal gifts add to holidays
NEW YORK (AP) The gifts
one tends to cherish most are of-
ten those that are made bv hand
and reflect the tastes and interests
of the recipient � a needlepoint
pillow with a special phrase, a
hand-hewn treasure box, an ever-
lasting wreath themed to a spe-
cific decor, homemade jams and
jellies, cakes and cookies.
Although life's pace leaves all too
few with time to turn a practiced
hand at hobbies or crafts, there are
ways to show creativity without
spending a lot of time or money.
For family or friends, consider
gifts that can become heirlooms.
Gifts of brass, china, crystal, pew-
ter,silverplateor sterling either
new or from your collection - - can
be appreciated for generations.
Choose from vanity items such as
perfume bottles, atomizers, pow-
der boxes and picture frames; desk
accessories such as letter openers
and paperweights; flower vases
and candlesticks; silver flatware
parceled out piece by piece.
Start a child with a sterling pattern
and continue with individual
pieces for birthdays and holidays.
Towle is among silversmiths who
make infant spoons and training
sets in traditional flatware pat-
terns.
Antiques also make good gifts for
family as well as friends. Spool
boxes, cameos, pens and inkwells
are among affordable choices.
Akin to these and available in all
price ranges are coyote doorstops,
contemporary quilts, one-of-a-
kind sweaters, hand-made furni-
ture.
Or commission a local artist to
do a portrait of family or a render-
ing of the family home. To intro-
duce succeeding generations to
their roots, transfer old home
movies of grand parents onto vide-
otape, compile a photo album, start
a family tree.
Pamper a loved one. For her,
give a day of beauty or a weekend
at a spa; for him, a health club
membership or a chance to im-
prove his serve at a tennis camp.
Send newly weds on a hot-air bal-
loon trip, complete with picnic.
Give the young gourmet a course
in wines taught by a prominent
oenophile. Finally, don't underes-
timate the impact on new parents
of theater or movie tickets and a
paid-for babysitter.
For truly successful gift giv-
ing, the package is as important as
what's inside and should be a re-
flection of your style. Developing
a signature look can be a fun and
time-saving approach. Have your
initials printed on ribbon, designer
style, or restrict yourself to solid
glossy paper with multi-colored
ribbonsand seasonal touches such
as flowers, holly and autumn
leaves. Keeping a consistent look,
and a supply of wrappings on
hand, will save time in the future.
And don't forget the card. Try
to give yourself as much time to
write your thoughts as to select
your presents. Honest sentiments
from the heart are still the most
touching expressions of affection
and friendship.
CLIFFS
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N C 33 Eat) Greenvill. North Carolma
Phonm 752 3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Shrimp
Plate
$3.75
Camcorders expand photo industry
By JOHN DIN CM AN
A�HHiatrd Prr��
Every photographer, amateur
and professional alike, hopes that
Christmas will bring some special
photography gifts.
A survey of stores in the Raleigh,
N.C. area indicates that the big
items this year will be camcor-
ders, despite their relatively high
price.
Russ Starnes, manager of the
Wolf Camera Store in Raleigh, says
that demand for video cameras �
which range in price trom $KX1 to
over $3,000 has already built
up.
The rush has been building
for the past three years. Many
familiesare buvin camcorders as
gifts for the home and using them
to shoot videos oi the children.
Most buyers are in their 20s or 30s,
although some grandparents are
buying, too.
Starnes says that, in the long
run, video cameras are not as
expensive as they seem. A two-
Student art
in space and time, (perhaps bv
painting a gesture, such as a coil),
he claims that he deals with the
idea of the coexistence of the
"perceptual realization" which
exists between "experience" and
"chance
Mark Phillips' search is for
the essence of man's existence
through the idea oi the "self In
making symbols and gestures
within a visceral arena of paint, he
attempts to address the issues of
British-born
painter shows
work in Gray
British-born painter Tony
Moore, visiting arrist-in-residence
at ECU this semester, is exhibiting
some of his most recent work at
the Greenville Museum of Art this
month. The exhibition, entitled
"Made in Greenville will be on
view in the museum's Upstairs
Gallery through December 3.
Moore is a native of
Northamptonshire who grew up
in Derbyshire, but made New York
his home in 1971. He received the
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from
the College of Art in Wales and
the Master of Fine Arts degree
from Yale University.
In 1983 Moore was presented
the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award
in painting, one of several a wards
and fellowships he has received.
His work has been displayed in
the Brooklyn Museum Collection
and the Solomon R. Guggenheim
Museum Collection.
As ECU's fall semester visit-
ing artist, Moore has been show-
ing his work in Gray Gallery and
teaching graduate level painting
classes.
HisGreenville Museum show
includes works done in various
painting styles, among them sev-
eral triptychs (three-panel com-
positions). Moore attempts to
emphasize peacefulness, nature,
world unity and humanity in his
art,and stresses thesymbolic value
of color.
"The paintings of Tony Moore
speak of sometimes simple, some-
times profound truths com-
mented Karen Churchill, director
Of ECU'sGray Gallery. "The works
in this installation exemplify
See BRITISH ARTIST on 12
hour tape cassette costs around $5
and can be recorded over. Film
and processing for Super-8 home
moviescostsaround$12to$15for
a three-minute reel.
(Incidentally, if you have a
Super-8 movie camera, shop for
film before you will need it. Star-
nes says his store, which he claims
is part of the second-largest retail
chain in the country, carries Su-
per-8 film only on special order.)
If you don't go the video
camera route, the next biggest
sellers are point-and-shoot still-
picture cameras, which cost from
around $40 up to $400.
Needless to say, the more you
spend, the more elaborate the
camera. The cheapest ones usu-
ally featureonly a semi wide-angle
lens, while the more expensive
ones have zoom lenses, autofocus
and autoflash units. The more
serious the photographer, the less
likely he is to be satisfied with a
simple camera.
The next step up is the single
lens reflex, or SLR, cameras. They
range from $350 or so, with lens,
to just over $2,000 for a deluxe
outfit such as the Nikon F4.
You might consider giving a
lens. Zoom lenses, frequently in
the 35mm-70mm range, are the
most popular, and you can expect
to part with at least $150 for one.
Lenses can cost thousands o dol-
lars for the more sophisticated and
rare models.
Flash units make good gifts
and are available in a wide range
of prices. Also worthy of consid-
eration are such items as tripods
and filters, and camera bags, which
can cost as little as $25.
You might also consider photo
books, darkroom equipment and
film � especially film, which will
beused up quickly at holiday time.
Starnes offers two warnings
when shopping for photography
gifts.
First, know your photogra-
pher and his interests. For ex-
ample, there is no point in buying
an expensive camera and tele-
photo lens outfit for someone who
wants to shoot only family snap-
shots. A decent point-and-shoot
Continued from page 9
model will serve his needs better
and cost hundreds of dollars less.
Second, if you are buying
accessories, know the exact tvpe
of camera for which you are buy-
ing them. It isn't enough to tell the
salesclerk, "It looks like that one
Most SLR's look pretty much alike.
Lenses that fit Canon autofocus
cameras, for example, will not fit
earlier models, and vice versa.
Similarly, flash units designed for
Minolta cameras will not work
properly on Nikons.
If you don't know, ask. It's
better to buy an appropriate gift
than one that doesn't work, even
if asking beforehand spoils the
surprise.
Generally, the more you pay the
better quality you receive. My
experience has been that a cheap
unit will not provide lasting satis-
faction, and it won't generate
much trade-in value when its
owner steps up to what he really
needs. It's better to buy half a
dozen rolls of good film than a
camera that won't last long.
i
I
9
5
Sharky's
of Greenville
Daily Specials
Monday - S2.25
Margarita
s
Tuesday - SI.75 Bourbon
Wednesday - S2.00 Kamikaze
Thursday - $1.25 Imports &
LADIES NITE CooT
free admission
Friday - $1.75 Highballs
ers
Saturday - SI.75
$1.75
Highball
Fireballs
s
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 year old guests.
Located by Sports Pad on 5th Street
ENTER THROUGH ALLEY
the constant metamorphosis of life
experience. His ideal, like several
oi the other artists in this exhibi-
tion, is to paint contemporary
spiritual icons.
To quote the abstract Expres-
sionist painters Mark Rothko and
Adolf Gottlieb's 1943 manifesto:
"There is no such thing as a
good painting about nothing
The Encore Gallery is located
at 426 EvansStreet, at the corner of
the Evans and 5th Street Mall. The
gallery is open Tuesday through
Friday, 11 a.m. through 6 p.m. For
more information, call Jo-Linda
Sanders at (919) 830-0105, or Tonv
Moore at (919) 757-5570.
Do You Have High Blood Pressure?
Would you Participate in the study of a
New Drug Therapy?
Qualified Participants (21 years of age or older)
receive:
� Free Screening Physical Exam
� Free Laboratory Blood Work & EKG
� Up To $90 Travel Expenses
� Free Blood Pressure Medicine
If interested in more information, please call
551-4611 and ask for Hypertension Studies.
Study is sponsored by the ECU School of Medicine Family Practice Center
and the Lederle Company and supervised by the FDA.
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See Us For All
Your Automotive Needs!
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
758-7676
RUSH
SIGMA
PHI
EPSILON
. a lifetime experience
1989 Buchanan Outstanding National Chapter Aw ard
Chancellor's Cup Champs 5 years Running
1987 - 88 Inter - Fraternity Council's
"Most Outstanding Chapter Award" Recipient
1988 Winner of "ECU Spirit Award"
2 Houses and a Party Room
$90,000 in Scholarships Awarded Annually
Pre-Rush
Informal Information Meeting
Tomorrow; Wed Night
November 29th
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi - Purpose Room - 7:00 - 9:00pm
All interested males welcomes to meet and learn about
Sigma Phi Epsilon
For Information Call 757-0487
"The House With The Heart"





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 28.1989 11
Rating report judges rock music
By CHUCK HARROW
i .an nett N'rws Service
lTus is nt censorship. That's
not what I'm about, not what this
ix about
So insists 27 year-old Tom
Marchione ot I'enndel, Pa pub-
lisher ot the new monthly ncws-
letter, the K(Kk Rating Report.
"I'm not against popular
music I'm a musician myself.
And I'm opposed to any kind of
censorship,and 1 have no social or
political agenda
Instead said Marchione, he's
simply tilling a need for an "unbi-
ased view ot rock n' roll, some-
hing parents can use to let them
know what influences are at work
on thru children's psvches.
i will be blunt and say 1 do
believe in censorship within the
famih I believe parents have the
nght to censor what their child
vatt hes.
'I'm not the one doing the
censoring. It's up to (parents) to
le what's censorable and
hat's not
'o help parents make those
of calls. Marchione devised
. k Rating Report and its 10-
ategory judging system by which
reviews the rock videos
ned on M I'Y and similar
Anorexia
outlets.
For each of the video clips
included in the report, there is a
written analysis of a video's con-
tent and a numerical chart that
tracks scores in a variety of cate-
gories from violence and sexual
content to grammar and appear-
ance of the musicians.
A typical comment is the one
pertainingtodreat White's "Once
Bitten, Twice Shy video:
"Great White proves itself to
be yet another hard rock band
whose message is nothing more
than 'sex and rock 'n' roll Once
Bitten, Twice Shv' is an anthem in
veneration of sex between mem
bers of touring rock bands and
young groupies '
In his review of "Glamour
Boys" he castigates the members
of Living Colour for their "some-
what bizzare" clothing and
hairstyles, and also gives the song
dements for its prominent use ot
the grammatically incorrect
phrase "I ain't no "
But Marchione, who holds
engineering degrees from Prim e
ton and Penn State universities,
also gives credit.
InhisnotesonElvisCostello's
"Veronica video, he praises the
British singer-songwriter for
demonstrating the "talent and
. nition has brought more at-
�. nrion to the disease is difficult.
. ases are reported around the
d and statistics have deter-
mined that the problem of starv-
neself seems to occur most
commonly in the richer countries
r the world.
I'm really scared ot what's
going to happen to me Janine
Car
ffy learned about theavailabil-
� if the cars and did some elabo-
rate tracking to find the correct
contacts and make the right tele-
phone calls to see if Tech could
have a few of the cars.
Rockwell International, which
has m interest in the opera-
� ons of electric cars, shipped the
tol ei h for tree. The cars
lifferentpartsof thecoun-
trv, where thev had boenoperated
b) the Navy.
The plans for the vehicles are
formulation stage. So far, only
has been put into operation.
The others are being unpacked,
tired and painted. Duffy said
of the five probably will be
annibalized for parts for the oth-
rs
lech plans to mark the cars
appropriate decals identify-
ng them as electric vehicles in
ng with a plan to generate
aw areness.
rhe Escort already is a curios-
al Tech's car ship. Under the
;as jp door is an electric recep-
tor recharging the 12 batter-
in the � ar, half of them under
hood and about half in the
rtk.
In the back ot the car is a
� risome electrical meter, used
� testing purposes rather than
York lech officials foresee
� initial use of the cars for
tine campus security patrol and
iliarizing their engineering
students with the components of
n electric vehicle, but they sense
iter things for the future of
se tars, which now will go
�bout 41) miles or 50 miles on a
single charge.
Reduced air pollution and
in urban areas, decreased
Car Wash
Continued from page 9
ash realizes Greenville is a col-
ge town To serve the student
pulation, Tuesdays have been
lesignated as "student day The
special offersa full servicecar wash
for S 4S to students when they
present their student activity
ards.
(Hherspecialsarcgentlemen's
lay on Mondays and ladies day
�n Wednesdays.
Editor's note:
In the November 16 issue o
The East Carolinian, the article
leadlined "Students tell wha
cally happened on Halloween'
was written by Joy Newsome
The article headlined "Student?
ay police overreacted" was
written by Van Fahenstock anc
John Haar.
said. "1 don't know it I'll ever be
normal again Her family has
finally accepted that (anine has
problem. "Thev denied it for a
long time and tried to force me to
eat. They thought 1 was just doing
it for attention
Now that she has admitted
the problem to herself mS to her
tamilv, she works toward reco
Continued from page
dependence on imported oil, and
cheaper energy for all consume s
are stated goals oi DOE, whi h
already has established electric
vehicle technologv as a practical
alternative to the internal com
bustion engine technology.
Being on the cutting edge of a
technology has Tech officials ex-
cited.
"We are the first two-year
institution in the country to gel
these cars said Merrill. "We hope
it will give us a step up
maturity of an artist in his prime
and lauds the clip's "sensitive
camera work and thoughtful edit-
ing
That, said, Marchione, is
where he differs from the more
determined types like Tipper Gore
and membersof her Parents Music
Resource Center (PMRC), who
advocate both warning labeling
and outright banning of certain
groups and music.
ThePMRC tries to lump good
and bad into this big, ambiguous
category he noted.
"A video might have a lot of
sex, but it also might have a lot of
artistic content 1 don't think it's
fair to lump everything into one
category and sav, 'lt'sheavymetal,
so it should be banned
"This wav, (parents) can see
that a song might have violence,
but no reference to drug use, which
might bo very important to them,
or that this video might have a
really materialistic attitude, but
that every thing else about it is all
right.
"My job is to point out where
the negatives come in to play and
let parents decide whether or not
thev want their children.exposed
to them
An informal survey of some
membersot the national rockscene
Continued from page 9
ering. ihe outlook is good for
lanine, although most anorexics
u vett to their old behaviors sev-
eral times before leaving them
completely.
Complications of anorexia
nervosaoften lead to death. Heart
problems as well as dehydration
are the main causes of death in
anorexics. Sometimes after a pa-
tient recovers, the heart fails.
"1'mbored anine says. "This
i ital is lonely Janine was
ed to withdraw from all her
i lasses to concentrate on getting
well. She restlessly watches tele-
lsion and thinks about her prob-
lem all day. "I'd reallv love to go
md take an aerobics class nght
now, but I know I am too weak
she said 1 have to have complete
rest '
lanine is PyU'ng ufo into a
logical perspective me way I
see it, I can either get well now or
1 might not be around for another
chance she said.
LOOKING FOR COLLEGE
ASSISTANCE? LOOK TO
AIR FORCE ROTC.
You ma be eligible for a
olarship that can pay full
college tuition textbooks, tees
ami $100 each academic month.
Best of all, youi future will get a boost
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This can be youi world through Air force Hi TC
Contact
C API SHANNON CROWLEV
518-793-3343
Leadership Excellence Starts Here
found conflicting opinions about
what Marchione is doing with the
Rock Rating Report.
Surprisingly, Kelly Nickels,
bassist for the hard rock band L.A.
Guns, whichoften writesand sings
about the sleazier aspects of their
home base, Los Angeles, doesn't
find anything objectionable.
"1 don't have a problem with
it he said. "They put the ingredi-
ents on a box of Corn Flakes, don't
they? People want to know what's
inside 'em
Taking the counterpoint,
however, was Brian Kushner,
whose Pennsauken, N.jbased
Power Star Management handles
the career of the "glam-rock" band
Britny Fox.
"If a video gets a low rating,
parents arn goin
kids shouldn't see it he said.
"But what happens on Sun-
day when the kids watch the cheer-
leaders at the football games?
"They shouldn't be rating
videos. They should just let them
be
A subscription to the Rock
Rating Report is $14.95 for 12 is-
sues. To subscribe, send a check
for the amount to Rock Rating
Report, PO Box. P-91, Penndel, Pa.
19047.
CCorvrtfht 1W9. UM TOUAVAppU CnlUt
Information Wfwork.
DAVID'S AUTOMOTIVE
Is Now Open In Greenville!
We sell import and domestic parts and
accessories at wholesale prices.
We also have a complete service center.
Make Us Your One Stop!
For Parts, For Service
Remember We Have It All!
We Specialize in German Cars.
DAviD S AUTOMOT,vfc
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Typed
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209 Commerce St.
Suite B
355-7931
RPP Inr
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from
Recycled Paper Products, Inc.
Available at:
QU�
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Limit One Per Item
i$1.00 off any calendartj
or boxed X-mas cards i
i i
void 12-24-89
CONTACT
LENS
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Daily Wear
00
Extended Wear
00
The
Includes most
name brand
lenses
703 Greenville Blvd.
(Acros From The Plaza)
Gary M. Harris, Licensed Optician
Open 9-6 MonFri 10-2 Sat.
I OPTICALlli PALACE 756-4204
ffep trim Our
Christmas Tree
At the Student Union's
annual tree trimming party.
Monday, December 4th
at 7:00pm in the
Mendenhall
Student Center
Featuring the ECU Gospel Choir and Santa Claus. Refreshments will be served and each
organization invited is encouraged to submit an ornament. Be Creative - you could be the
winner of one of three cash prizes.
Sponsored by the 1989 - 90 Student Union Productions Committee





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 28,1989
UFtrtsJ
HEIL
British artist
Moore's facile ease with manipu- diehotomous nature ot the sub- "healing message
ating the painted surface ject In another painting express- The Greenville Museum of
ing the battle of the alienation of Art, located at 802 S. Evans St is
Ms. Churchill pointed out man" from the environment, open Tuesdav through Friday
Moore's use of color in several splashes of red suggest human from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and on
works on view. In one work vel- blood,shesaid.andinotherworks, Saturday and Sunday from 1 to4
low banding unites the "seemingly "warm, pastel colors" convey a p.m.
When the going gets tough, the tough
turn the page �
of the East Carolinian.
$ ratimjs!

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Wilson sets school records
Panthers sink Pirates 47-42
Sports
NOVEMBER 28,1989 PAGE 13
ByDAVl McCREARY
- ifl Writrt
IU quarterback Travis
i said there's no consola-
1 on in hearing that the Pirates
I .i good game or kept the
nre close against Pittsburgh, a
nt favorite. Hunter wanted
ton and s-� did head coach
w is and the rest of the team.
Rul ona windy,bone-chilling
lay that featured occasional
tries, EC1 came up short
igain Alter a 60-minute
. esaw battle with the 19th-ranked
rs the Pirates were handed
ss that produced tears of
appointment from one team
rid sighs of relief from another.
disappointed for our
allteam ! ewissaidfollow-
;ame I'm proud oi them.
mk the fought as hard as they
howtofight. Ihurtforthem,
just feel . . empty
h ir ites seeking their first
rung season since 1983, came
i mpt) -handed after two
is 1 lunter passes in the final
ids tell incomplete.
, 2 yards from the end zone,
k s were unable to score a
i hdown needed for a
� ill told, the Pirates put to-
rn impressiveperformance.
r wide receiver Walter
auled in seven receptions
iareer-high 172 ards which
him school records oi 85
?s and l 587 yards. He also
I four TD passes from 50,12,
irdstogivehimaschool-
vst 15careertou( hdown catches.
inter, the Pirates' all-time
pass completions, pass-
irdage and total yardage,
'� for 4 yards with one
wn and passed tor 205
r is He completed 18 of 33
iv ith tour touchdowns �
V ilsor
i : Waiter's per-
day Hunter said.
time he goes out on the
ield ! know he gn es 100 percent,
ind i enjoy playing with guvs like
tt scored on us first posses-
a 67 yard bomb from
- Mex Van Pelt to split
Henty Tuten produced a
Pitt's driveonly ttxik
ind 1 7 seconds as F.d
Frazier's PAT gave the Panthers a
7- 0early lead
ECU struck back as Junior
Robinson returned the kickoff 31
yards.On third and eight from the
35, Hunter passed to fullback
David Daniels for a 15-yard gam
and two plays later, Hunter found
Wilson all alone tor a 50-yard
touchdown strike. Kobb Imperato
added the extra point to even the
score at 7- 7 with 10:13 remaining
in the tirst quarter.
I he Pirates then got some
extra help from the Panthers as
sophomore tailbackurvin
Richards tumbled on the next plaj
from scrimmage Pirate corner
back Ricky Torain recovered the
ball and ECU took over on the Pitt
30-yard line.
Following a Hunter sack
Daniels exploded up the middle
24 yards to the 12. Hunter then
tired again to an outstretched
Wilson, who found the end one
and put the Pirates ahead.
Imperato's kick made it 14-7ECU
with 8:13 remaining.
Pitt then drove all the way to
theECU I3beforethey wereforced
to attempt a 31-yard field goal.
Just as the ball left Frazier s foot,
the Bucs' Charles Freeman bk cked
the kick with his facemask.
The omnipresent funior
Robinson recovered the ball mv'i
dashed hi yards untouched tor a
third Pirate touchdown
Imperato's PAT was perfect nd
II led 21 -7attheend of the first
quarter.
The ensuing kickott led to an
other Pitt tumble, .ntd this time
ECU'S lerrv Dillon recovered on
the Panther 33 Three plays latei.
Hunter dropped back passed and
was picked off by Pitt strong safety
Dan c rossman, w ho raced 67
yards tor a score Frazier's PA I
was good and K I I's lead was
trimmed to 21 -14 v ith thesei ond
quarter iist underway.
Meither team s ored again in
the first halt although Pitt threat-
ened in the final seconds oi the
period.
Pitt came out tired up in the
second bait and tailback
"Swervin" Curvin Richards went
into high gear as he roared inside
and outside gaining 39 yards on
three straight carries. Richards,
who finished the day with a ca-
reer- high of 2r4 vards on 38 car-
ries, generated most of the leg-
work as Pitt moved into scoring
range to the EC 2 v mi line
Panther tailb.u k Adam
Walker tumbled over the tup and
scratched out enough turt tor the
touchdown. A bad snap on the
PAT kick allowed ECU to main-
tain a slim 21-20 lead with 11 44
left in the third quarter
I he second halt scoring on-
slaught was ust beginning as the
1 inthersstopped the Pirates next
drive and more outbursts from
Richards sot up another touch
down opportunity Walker rolled
�our yards around the left side
into the end zone and boosted the
count to 26-21 Pitt. An attempted
two-point conversion pass tell in-
complete with 7 i4 remaining.
See Pittsburgh, page 15
ECU's free safety Junior Robinson looks to tackle Southern Mississippi's fullback Reginald Wamsley
in the Pirates 41-27 season-ending loss to the Golden Eagles in Hattiesburg. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)
Lewis, team falls short of winning season
Bucs fall to Southern Miss in finale
HvlOti JENKINS
Altstlnt sports Iditor
I or seventeen seniors, last
Saturdays game against Southern
Miss u as more than just the end
�t the season, but also the last time
thee will ever wear the Pirate
uniform
i he i irates entered Roberts
Memorial Stadium Saturday 5 4
1 tor the season and on the verge
t ,i winning record a record
that has eluded the Pirate pro-
gram since 1983. But the Eagles'
41-27 victory over the Hues soured
ill hopes ot i nding the season as
( oach Lewis had planm d
"I'm disappointed tor this
football team ! ewis said follow-
ing the game. "I'm disappointed
that we had an opportunity in the
last two weeks to have won a
football game i ,ilotf� occasions,
to put this j rogram (1f a higher
le el a le el sa) ingthat u e have
a w inning record "
I thought we would .lav with
more intensity Lewis added. "I
told our football team at halttime
what we had at stake. I ust thought
ive would have an intense effort
Pirate quarterback Travis
I lunter showed his intensity as
the senior accumulated 9 yards
rushing and 266 yards passing for
the day. "It tears at you, but you
trv and put it all behind Hunter
said. "I think the seniors tried to
give a lot to the program. Now its
time for us to step aside and the
program to go on
At 5:40 into the first quarter,
the Eagles had already struck
Within 11 plays, HeismanTrophv
candidate Brett Favre had hit
Michael Jackson with a 32-yard
pass to put the Eagles within strik-
ing distance of a touch down. On
the 7-yard line, Favre pitched off
to Rickev Bradlev who slipped
down the left side and into the
endone for 6 poi n ts Kicker 1 .anee
Nations' point after was no good
and left the score 6-0, USM.
On the Pirates' first posses
sion, the team gained only 15 yards
in 5 plavs and at 4-7, ECU punter
John left was forced to boot the
�ball a wav.Three plavs later, at 4-3,
USM was also forced to punt.
On the Pirates' next posses-
sion, quarterback Travis Hunter
completed a first down pass to
receiver Walter Wilson for lh
vards. But anv momentum gained
on the play was lost as Hunter's
next pass landed in the arms oi
USM's free safety Kerry Valrie.
Valrie raced for 45 yards to the
Eagles' 30 before being brought
down bv receiver Hunter Galli-
more.
EC U's Junior Robinson coun-
tered with an interception of his
own five plays later as he snagged
Favre's pass on the USM 2-yard
line. Favre was scrambling under
pressure from defensive end An-
thony Thompson.
The first quarter ended with
the Pirates scoreless, the first time
the team had been in that position
si nee the Cincinnati game on Sept.
16.
Southern Misss win Satur-
day gave them a 12-3 lead in the
ECU-USM series.
"For four years those guvs
have beat up on us senior re-
ceiver Walter Wilson said of the
series. "They just come out and
attack and attack, and keep put-
ting points on the board
The Pirates started their drive
at i0:28 in the second quarter with
a -yard pass by Hunter to Walter
Wilson and a 17-yard pass to Gal-
limore. At the 8:08 mark, the Pi-
rates were 3-5 and called on fresh-
man walk-on field goal kicker An-
thony Brenner. Brenner split the
uprights from 45 vards out, and
cut the USM lead by half, 6-3.
USM's drive was bolstered by
Favre's three first down passes,
one an 18-varder to Darrvl Till-
man putting the Eagles at the 10-
vard line. Tony Smith and Rickey
Bradley combined for the remain-
ing ten yards and put the Eagles
up 12-3. Nations' PAT brought
the score to 13-3 with 4:26 remain-
ing in the half.
Robinson took the ensuing
kickoff on the 8-yard line and re-
turned it 18 yards. Hunter
scrambled for 27 yards on the
keeper to the 47 before being
stopped by USM's Brian Wood.
Denell Harper, who nearly missed
the game due to a rib cartilage
injury, carried the ball for 15 to the
32. Michael Rhctt then carried for
four yards setting Hunter up for a
28-yard touchdown pass to Char-
lie Tyson. Robb Imperato added
the point after to keep the Pirates
within three at 10-13.
On the ensuing kickoff, Smith
returned the ball 82 vards, effec-
tively negating in twelve seconds
the effort the Pirates had put into
the previous touchdown. With
Nations' PAT, the score stood USM
20-ECU 10.
"Anytime you trade a score
like that Lewis said, "you haven't
gained a thing. We had the mo-
menrumofbnningback thegame
within within a touch down �
within a matter of seconds you
See Finale, page 15
Perna leads golfers to fifth place finish in Augusta tourney
I AUL GARCIA
rhe EC1 Pirategolfteamtrav-
ugusta, Ga. last week to
ete in Augusta College's
ir lassie where they finished
ut of the fifteen team
I
We really didn't play our
Steele, team
drop first
two games
best, but then no one did, ECU
coach Hal Morrison said. 'This
wasa very difficult course and the
scores show it
The Pirates had their worst
total oi the season but still man-
aged a respectable finish with M0
� just 18 shots out oi first C on
ference rival University oi
Richmond came back from an 18
shot deficit after the first day to
beat the heist team Augusta Col-
lege by three shots. Richmond
had the lowest total tor the tour-
nament with a JOOon Tuesday.
"Richmond's 300 on luesday
would be an average round for
most tournaments but this course
was playing really tuff said
Morrison.
One bright spot tor the Pirates
was the play t freshmen, Ryan
Perna.
Perna posted a 158 (79,79) total
which wasgexvi fora tie tor twelfth
and ECU's lowest total. Chris
Turner of Jacksonville University
won the individual honors with a
148 (73,75) total and was followed
bv three players tied for second at
151.
Also playing for the Pirates
were juniors, Simon Move tloO),
lohn Maginnes (162), Frances
Vaughn (163),and freshman Mich-
eal "worm" Teague (166).
"Overall this was a disap-
pointing finish for us, but we did
manage to have some good things
such as the play of Perna and
league's second round in his first
college tournament" Morrison
said. "It was good experience for
both of them and could be very
useful to us later in the season
added Morrison.
The Pirates don't travel
again until December 16-18 when
they go to Charleston, S.C and
compete in the Kiawah Island
Intercollegiate. The Pirates need a
good finish there to finish a good
fall season and prepare them for
the spring.
Hy LISA SPIRIDOPOULOS
ith two losses on the season
i ad) men's basketball coach
Mi ke Sti rle sa vs he plans to take a
rl ok it his team before next
eek's match up against UNC-
.reensboro.
"We're going to have to make
some difficult decisions as to who
e're going to play Steele said
as he reflected on last night's69-70
s to NC Weslevan
As 2,950 fans in Minges Coli-
seum looked on, NC Wesleyan
edged the ECU team by one point
in the final seconds to give the
team its second loss in regular play.
NC Wesleyan, a Division III
school, came into the game with a
2-0record. Head coach Bill Cham-
bers said the game wasa "tremen-
dous win for the team and play-
ers, to knock off a Division I team
is tremendous
The Battling Bishops shot an
impressive 62 from the field and
made fi ve th ree poi n tors compared
to ECU who shot 48 and made 6
important three pointers to keep
them in the game.
See Basketball, page 15
Both swim and diving teams sweep
UNC-Charlotte over Thanksgiving
ECU freshman center Ike Copeland goes around a N.C. Wesleyan
defender Monday night in the Pirates second loss of the season in
Minges Coliseum. (Photo by Garrett Killian� ECU Photolab)
By KATHERINE ANDERSON
Maft Wntr
The ECU Swimming and
Diving Team went on the road
one more time before settling
down for the Thanksgiving Holi-
day.
On Saturday, November 18,
ECU's swimmers and divers met
the UNC-Charlotte team that
ended with a victory for the Pi-
rates.
Coach Rick Kobe stated, "It
was an easy meet, so we were able
to do some event mixing to allow
swimmers to try other events.
Everyone swam well
The Final scores are as fol-
lows, men's 200-yard medley re-
lay� 1. Holton, Bremen, Kennedy,
Hand, UNCC, 1:55.50.2, Wilhelm,
Bridgers, Wicks, Wilson, ECU,
1:55.55. 3, L. Smith, W. Simms,
Duke, Pardue, ECU,1:57.45.
Men's 1000-yard Freestyle �
1, Lewis, ECU, 10:06.59.2, Farrell,
ECU, 10:07.30.3, Lambrakis, ECU,
10:11.19. Women's 1000-yard
Freestyle �1, Baldridge, ECU,
1105.40. 2, Green, ECU, 11:08.43.
3, Duke, ECU, 11:24.22.
Men's 200-yard Freestyle �1,
McNary, UNCC, 1:46.53. 2,
Benkusky, ECU, 1.47.35. 3, Roun-
tree, UNCC, 1:48.48. Women's 200-
yard Freestyle � 1, Holt, ECU,
2:00.13.2, Luckey, UNCC, 2:00.37.
3, Teany, UNCC, 2:01.80.
Men's 50-yard Freestyle �1,
Martelle, UNCC, 22.46. 2, Ken-
nedy, ECU, 22.76. 3, Jeter, ECU,
22.97. Women's 50-yard Frees-
tyle� 1, Hand, UNCC, 25.28. 2,
Pardue, ECU, 25.74. 3, Kennedy,
UNCC, 26.31.
Men's 400-yard Individual
Medley�l,Holsten,ECU,4:19.80.
2, Christensen, ECU, 4:21.78. 3,
Lambrakis, ECU, 4:29.11.
Women's 400-yard Individual
Medley �1, Cox, UNCC, 4:50.13.
2, Muench, ECU,4:55.22.3, Wicks,
ECU, 4:56.78.
Men's One-meter Diving �1,
Ruff, UNCC, 220.3 points. 2,Smith,
ECU 217.95 points. 3, Stewart,
UNCC, 169.25 points. Women's
One-meter Diving �1, Epplev,
UNCC, 175.7 points. 2, Grove,
ECU, 160.8 points. 3, Raukin, ECU,
139.55 points.
Men's 200-yard Butterfly�1,
Christensen, ECU, 2:02.42. 2,
Lewis, ECU, 2:05.46.3, Weis, ECU,
2:07.41. Women's 200-yard But-
terfly 1, Smith, ECU, 2:13.89. 2,
Wicks, ECU, 2:16.6. 3, Kennedy,
UNCC, 2:17.10.
Men's 100-yard Freestyle�1,
Farrell, ECU, 48.91. 2, Benkdsky,
ECU, 48.97. 3, Martelle, UNCC,
49.36. Women's 100-yard Frees-
tyle �1, Hand, UNCC, 55.85. 2,
Holt, ECU, 56.23. 3, Cox, UNCC,
57.08.
Men's 200-vard Backstroke�
1, OBrien, ECU, 1:58.74. 2, Wal-
ters, ECU, 2:ol.25. 3, Rountree,
UNCC, 2:0238. Women's 200-yard
Backstroke �1, Duke, ECU, 2:17.7.
2,Wilhelm, ECU, 2:20.93. 3, Mor-
row, ECU, 2:23.35.
Men's 500-yard Freestyle�1,
McNairy, UNCC, 4:49.70. 2, Jeter,
ECU, 4:49.95. 3, Nelson, ECU,
4:54.09. Women's 500-yard Frees-
tyle �1, Smith, ECU, 5:19.97. 2,
Baldridge, ECU, 5:25.30.3, Smith,
ECU, 5:27.34.
Men's Three-meter Diving �
1, Smith, ECU, 213.55 points. 2,
Ruff, UNCC, 201.45 points. 3,
Kennedy, 188.75. Women's Three-
meter Diving�1, E ppley, UNCC,
186.35 points. 2, Grove, ECU,
162.45 points. 3, Raukin, ECU,
149.15 points.
Men's 200-yard Breastroke�
1, Bumgarner, UNCC2.18.84. 2,
Guerin, UNCC, 2:30.24. Women's
200-yard Breastroke �1, Bridg-
ers, ECU, 2:20.27. 2, Brenner,
UNCC 2:33.00. Green, ECU,
2:36.40.
Men's 200-yard Freestyle Re-
lay �1, Mannion, Scott, Holton,
See UNCC, pagel5





14
1H1 r AM v AKOl 1!
NPVIA1HIK 2H 1989
Finale
Continued from pg� 13
r
Thompson tops postseason list
Anthnnv rhompson, Indiana running back and the nation's rush-
ing leader, topped the list ot players named Thursday to the 100th
edition ot the collegiate Walter Camp Ail-America football team
Thompson and � ammates will be honored al the 100th anniversary
dinner ot tin Walter Camp Foundation at Vale University in New
Haven, Conn Feb. ly.
Soccer called off after murder
Atter the murder List week of a rvieroe in the drug-plagued rityol
Mod. v � mbia h.i canceled the remainder of its soccer season
Therct'eree. H are- Ortega, was Kii!ti aft ra game and an anon) mous
cal! r to n radio station he had been killed because his calls
had not f, they were belling on.
Ex-Sooners found guilty
Former Oklahoma football players Nigel Clay and Bernard Hall
were returned to jail Wednesday after being sentenced to 10 years in
prison Md I d to pay $10,000 fines for raping a woman in the
Sooners' athletic dot mitory Clay and I lall waived their righl to wait 10
days bef �rt starting their sentence.
Cuba wins volleyball match
The Cuban volleyball team, unbeaten this year, chalked up its fifth
consecutive victory rhursdayinamatch Lgainstwinless ameroonlS
9, 15 4,15-4. The ktory moves the team one step loser to its first men's
World Cup volleyball championship in Hiroshima, Japan. l;ra.i! de
feated the USA team 15-11, 13-15, 15 6,6-15, 15-13.
Strange wins Skins game
Curtis Strange sank a 25-foot birdie putt on the last 1 �� � e Sunday .it
La Quinta, Cali! . to win the Skins Game golf match and $2f5,000. ,
Nicklaus was runner-up tor the second y ar in a row and took home
Olympic track coaches named
Mel Rosen, 61, of Aubum : no rsity m;J Barbara acket, 53, ol
Prairie View A&M were elected Sunday to coa h the USA s men s
women's track jiid field teams tor the 1992 Olvmpic C lames at Bai i
lona, Spain. Fhe two, who held the same posts for the I 8 World
Char ps, each were picked from fields of 24 candi i es
Sampson put on injured list
The v ramento Kings have placed center Ralph -
has had three knei perations, including one last sea nthe
listt ; n a chance to rehabilitate his knees. Veteran Gi . I js
lose the momentum Those kinds
ot plavs are devatating to a fool
1 team i ewis added
! he Pirates' final drive ot the
halt started at the(Hard line and
nine plavs later the team had
struggled r yards up field to the
2! Facing 44 Brenner hit a 18
yard field goal with less than thirtv
seconds left until halftime.
As took the held in the
third quarter, they tailed to pick
up the momentum thev nerxled to
gel the team on a winning track
USM s John Nichols sacked
Hunter tor a loss ol six, and the
Pirates were eventually forced to
boot the ball out ol 1 M territory
Pi king the ball nv at the 4
yard line, the I agles combined f i
1H ards pers nal I ,1 penalt
against the Pirates thirteen min
utes into the quarter pushed the
I SM team another 15 vards closer
to their goal two plavs later, I avre
io h d with Mn hael a ks
17 ards out tot the I l �v n
Nations hit thel'A I and thel a
moid to 2
In the rema II minutes,
both teat : anv
M ' he teams
swapped control tour times At
the seven minute mark USM guard
Peter Antcniou found Hunter
scrambling in the backfield and
I inded the Pirate OB his second
sack ol the game tor a loss ot eight
vari is
I lunter almost connected with
a touchdown pass as the final
seconds of the third quarter ran
out, but the pass was broken up by
Ben Washington at the goal line
I iunti r c ame ba k two plavs later
to connect with Walter Wilson for
an 18 yard touchdown pass in the
hrst tew seconds ol the fourth
quarter Imperato's point after put
the Pirates trailing 1 SM 20 27
USM scored on their next
drive ofl a ten yard touchdown
pass to F.ddie Rav Jackson on third
and goal the team i ombined tor
irds in 14 plavs, and Nations
p 'int atter e.av c the 1 agles a 4 20
lead.
OnE I snext possession, the
'irates ombined lor 64 yards with
Hunter throw me, 5 and rushing
r24 Onset ond and goal, 1 lui ter
pitched to I i i r; m r he rushed tor
tivevardsand the tout hdown The
PA1 b Imperatoedgded the team
closer H the USM teA,MmM-27.
USM retaliated eight plays
later with a touchdown of thtir
own as F-avre hit M. Jackson with
a 31-yard touchdown pass With
Nanons PAT parting the uprights,
the 1 agles put the final points ol
the game on the board tor a score
ol 41-27.
Missing from the Pirates' fi-
nal game were Erik Booker (knee
sprain), Compton McCurrv (ab-
dominal strain), Derrick Fields
(anklesprain),Clayton Driver' leg
stress t racture � .Willie Lewis (knee
i artilage)and Donald Porchknee
cartilage)
The Pirates finish the season
with at 5-5-1, the best sincel983
when the Pirates were H-3
RAPr
? �-
IS
REAI
REAI
IS FOR
HELP
ace him
Aoki wins Casio World Open
Isao oki ot fapan won the $694,000 Casio World Open .
tournament Sunday at Ibusul . apan defeating I arryMizcot 'the USA.
274-275. Marka . hia was fourth at 277. Third round leader
Hubert Green shol 75foi a total of 279and was tied in sixth place with
Maine McCallister and Scot! Simpson.
Bay breaks records last race

Four-year-old buv colt Ma tts Scooter ended his racing career Sarur
day, winning th $25i M ' V illiam laughton Memorial Pai c at Yonkers
Raceway In doing so, the colt also tied the track record in l:5345and
broke the mark for 4 year-olds
Lady Vols beat Stetson
TheN � I-ranked Tennessee Lady Vols beat Stetson l l2-39Sunda
night, with eight players scoring in double figures, fonya Edwards led
the scoring w ith game high 20 points In the team's, season! opener at
Knoxvilli
Mare takes Japan Cup
The six-year-old mare Horhcksof New Zealand broke away from
the pack in the stretch Sunday and won the (apan Cup invitationa
horse race at Tokyo. The mare, ridden by L A. (Sullivan, wins $1.77
milliv'Ti for h- r eff its.
Florida interviews Spurrier
Duke football coach and former Gators quarterback Steven Spur-
rier was interviewed by three University of Honda officials, including
interim president Robert Bryan, Saturday. Bryan said Sunday he will
tmke the final choice oi who gets the job coaching for Florida.
Bucs defeat Cards 14-13
Vinny 1 estaverde threw a 5-yard touchdown pass to Mark Carrier
with 43 seconds remaining Sunday, giving the Buccaneers a 14-13
victory over the Cardinals. Also: Jets 27, Falcons 7, Bills 24, Bengals 7;
Colts 10. Chargers 6, Packers 20, Vikings 19; Chiefs 34, Oilers 0; Steelers
34, Dolphins 14; Broncos 41, Seahawks 14; Raiders 24, Patriots 21;
Redskins 38, bears 14; Rams 20, Saints 17.
tXnrfngkt. rm. USA TJt�VSrr'� CMfcp Ikfnrautui VrtmwrJt
The East Carolinian is looking
for SPORTS WRITERS
Do YOU enjoy:
mrv
w:irn;ng
volleyball ba! �
inti .iinui .tls mi ri
Apply in person:
Publications Building
2nd floor, fist door on right).
East
S M
USM
ECU
USM
ECU-
USM
ECU
I SM
ECl
I SM
ECU
USM
(Carolina
ississippi
0
y
14
0
"7

14
27
14 41
Bradley 7-yard run (kick tailed)
Brenner 4-yard field goal
- Bradley 4-yard run (Nations kick)
I yson 28-yard pass from Hunter (Imperato -k;
- S2rd kickoff return b) Smith (Nations k k)
Brenner 38-yard field goal
- Jackson 17-yard pass from 1 avre (Nations kick)
Wilson 18-yard pass from Hunter Umper o kick)
- fackson 10-yard pass from lavre (Nations kick)
Harper 5-yard run (Imperato kick)
- Jackson 31-yard pass from Favre (Nations kick)
TF M STATISTICS
Peps
THE PEPSI PLAYER OF
ECUI SM
1 irst downs2429
Total offense390579
Rushing181198
Passing20-42-266i26-35-286-1
Fumbles0-01-0
Penalties2-204 -30
Punts5-433-40
Possession time 23:3736:23
ttendance11,IS9
ys, soul tern Misi.
'Rushed for 99
is with his
longest for 27
yards
'Completed 20
passes for 266
yards and 2 touch-
downs
'Named Team
Captain by his
team mates
I






14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 28,1989
Sports Briefs
Finale
Continued
pig W

Thompson tops postseason list
Anthony Thompson, Indiana running back and the nation's rush-
ing leader, topped the list of players named Thursday to the 100th
edition of the collegiate Walter Camp All-America football team.
Thompson and teammates will be honored at the 100th anniversary
dinner of the Walter Camp Foundation at Yale University in New
Haven, Conn Feb. 19.
Soccer called off after murder
After the murder last week of a referee in the drug-plagued city of
Medellin, Colombia has canceled the remainder of its soccer season.
The referee, AJ varo Ortega, was killed after a game and an anonymous
caller told a Medellin radio station he had been killed because his calls
had not favored the team they were betting on.
Ex-Sooners found guilty
Former Oklahoma football players Nigel Clay and Bernard Hall
were returned to jail Wednesday after being sentenced to 10 years in
prison and ordered to pay $10,000 fines for raping a woman in the
Sooners' athletic dormitory. Clay and Hall waived their right to wait 10
days before starting their sentence.
Cuba wins volleyball match
The Cuban volleyball team, unbeaten this year, chalked up its fifth
consecutive victory Thursday in a match against winiess Cameroon 15-
9,15-4,15-4. The victory moves the team one step closer to its first men's
World Cup volleyball championship in Hiroshima, Japan. Brazil de-
feated the USA team 15-11,13-15,15-6,6-15,15-13.
Strange wins Skins game
Curtis Strange sank a 25-foot birdie putt on the last hole Sunday at
La Quinta, Calif to win the Skins Game golf match and $265,000. Jack
Nkklaus was runner-up for the second year in a row and took home
$90,000. ,
Olympic track coaches named
Mel Rosen, 61, of Auburn University and Barbara Jacket, 53, of
Prairie View A&M were elected Sunday to coach the USA's men's and
women's track and field teams for the 1992 Olympic Games at Barce-
lona, Spain. The two, who held the same posts for the 1987 World
Championships, each were picked from fields of 24 candidates.
Sampson put on injured list
The Sacramento Kings have placed center Ralph Sampson - who
has had three kneeoperations, includingone last season -on the injured
list to give him a chance to rehabilitate his knees. VcteranGreg Kite was
sighed to replace him.
Aoki wins Casio World Open
Isao Aoki of Japan won the $694,000 Casio World Open golf
tcaernarnent Sunday at Ibusuki, Japan, defeating Larry Mize of the USA,
.274-275. Mark Cakavecchia was fourth at 277. Third-round leader
Hubert Green shot 75 for a total of 279 and was tied in sixth place with
BJaine McCallister and Scott Simpson.
Bay breaks records last race
jj Four-year-old bay col t Marts Scooter ended his racing career Satur-
day, winning the $250,000 William Haughton Memorial Pace at Yonkers
Riceway. In doing so, the colt also tied the track record in 1:53 45 and
bnoVe the mark for 4-year-olds.
Lady Vols beat Stetson
The No. 1-ranked Tennessee Lady Vols beat Stetson 112-39 Sunday
night, with eight players scoring in double figures, Tonya Edwards led
the scoring with game-high 20 points in the team's season! opener at
Krtoxvilie, Tenn.
Mare takes Japan Cup
The six-year-old mare HorHcks of New Zealand broke away from
the pack in the stretch Sunday and won the Japan Cup invitational
hotse race at lokyo. The mare, ridden by L.A. O'SuHivan, wins $1.77
million for her efforts.
Florida interviews Spurrier
t)uke football coach and former Gators quarterback Steven Spur-
rier was interviewed toy three University of Florida officials, including
JtrterjfcwVent Robrn Bryan, Saturday. Bryan said Sunday he will
the final choice of who gets the job coaching for Florida.
Bucs defeat Cards 14-13
Vinny Testa verde threw a 5-yard touchdown pass to Mark Carrier
with 43 seconds remaining Sunday, giving the Buccaneers a 14-13
victory over the Cardinals. Also, lets 27, Falcons 7; Bills 24, Bengals 7;
Colts l0,Oafgm6;Packm20,ViWngst9;Ch
34, Dolphins 14; Broncos 41, Seahawks 14; Raiders 24, Patriots 21;
Redskins 38, Bears 14; Rams 20, Saints 17.
The East Carolinian is looking
for SPORTS WRITERS
Do YOU enjoy:
-football -X country -volleyball -baskrlball -goif
-soccer -swimming -tennis -intramurals -money
Apply in person:
Publications Building
2nd floor, (1st door on right).
lose the momentum. Those kinds
of plays are devatating to a foot-
ball team Lewis added.
The Pirates' final drive of the
half started at the 20 yard line, and
nine plays later the team had
struggled 59 yards up field to the
21. Facing 4-4, Brenner hit a 38
yard field goal with less than thirty
seconds left until halftime.
As ECU took the field in the
third quarter, they failed to pick
up the momentum they needed to
get the team on a winning track.
USM's John Nichols sacked
Hunter for a loss of six, and the
Pirates were eventually forced to
boot the ball out of USM territory.
Picking the ball up at the 49
yard line, the Eagles combined for
18 yards. A personal foul penalty
against the Pirates thirteen min-
utes into the quarter pushed the
USM team anotherl5 yards closer
to their goal. Two plays later, Favre
connected with Michael Jackson
17 yards out for the touchdown.
Nations hit the PAT and the Eagles
moved to 27-13.
In the remaining 11 minutes,
both teams failed to convert any
fourth downs and the teams
swapped control four times. At
the seven minute mark USM guard
Peter Antoniou found Hunter
scrambling in the backfield and
handed the Pirate QB his second
sack of the game for a loss of eight
yards.
Hunter almost connected with
a touchdown pass as the final
seconds of the third quarter ran
out, but the pass was broken up by
Ben Washington at the goal line.
Hunter came back two plays later
to connect with Walter Wilson for
an 18 yard touchdown pass in the
first few seconds of the fourth
quarter. Imperato's point after put
the Pirates trailing USM 20-27.
USM scored on their next
drive off a ten-yard touchdown
pass to Eddie Ray Jackson on third
and goal. The team combined for
80 yards in 14 plays, and Nations'
point after gave the Eagles a 34-20
lead.
On ECU'snext possession, the
Pirates combined for 64 yards with
Hunter throwing 35 and rushing
for 24. On second and goal, Hunter
pitched to Harper who rushed for
fiveyardsand the touchdown. The
PATby Imperatoedgded the team
clomtt�USMIwii�W,H-27.
USM retJiitc4 eight plays
later with a touchdown of their
own as Favre hit M. Jackson with
a 31-yard tniirhrtawii pi With
Nations' PAT parting the uprights,
the Eagles put the final points of
the game on the boejri for a score
of 41-27.
Missing from the Pirates' fi-
nal game were: Erik Booker (knee
sprain), Compton McCurry (ab-
dominal strain). Derrick Fields
(ankle sprain), Clayton Driver (leg
stress fracture), Willie Lewis (knee
cartilage) and Donald Porch (knee
cartilage).
The Pirates finish the season
with at 5-5-1, the best sincel983
when the Pirates were &-3.
RAPE
IS FOR
REAL
REAL
IS FOR
HELP
758-HELP
1 2 3 4 F
East Carolina013O1427
S Mississippi61471441
USM
ECU-
USM-
ECU-
USM-
ECU-
USM-
ECU-
USM
ECU-
USM
Pepsi Presents
THE PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Bradley 7-yard run (kick failed)
Brenner 45-yard field goal -
Bradley 4-yard run (Nations kick)
Tyson 28-yard pass from Hunter (imperato K.vk)
82-yard kickoff return by Smith (Nations k: k)
Brenner 38-yard field goal
� Jackson 17-yard pass from Favre (Nations kick)
Wilson 18-yard pass from Hunter (Impeo kick)
� Jackson 10-yard pass from Favre (Nations kick)
Harper 5-yard run (Imperato kick)
� Jackson 31-yard pass from Favre (Nations kick)
TEAM STATISTICS
First downs
Total offense
ECU
24
390
USM
29
579
a Southern Mlu.
'Rushed for 99
yards with his
longest for 27
yards
'Completed 20
passes for 266
yards and 2 touch-
downs
'Named Team
Captain by his
team mates
PEPSI PROFILE
Sr. Special Education
59 12' 183 lbs
Winter Garden. Fia.
West Orange HS
40 yard dash 470 sec :
�Rated as 15th bes' A
Purpose QB in the nal
THE SPORTING NEWS
'ECU career leader m pass
completions (2803 pass
yardage (3.928) ana fa
offensive yaras (5.804)
m
m
J
MX
J
A
3bANh
L&Lfr
pa.s(
' i i step int(
We yve moved
to our new
location at
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown
There's plenty of FREE
parking at our rear
L
entrance off of
Cotanche
752-1750 Ifl
Under New Ownership
Now Associated With ,
A-l Quality Cleaners
Owners: W�yn� A Batty Pollard
and son
Stculuurv
r
20 Off on All
Men's Shirts
& Women's Blouses
1
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When Brought In.
NEW TIMES ARE:
. Mon-Fli 7im-�pnv'S�l Urn 4pm
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SUFTUES
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Electronic Calculators . For All Your
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Great Selection, PnHoe, and Service!
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M-F 9:30 - 6:00
SAT 9:30 - 5:00





Pittsburgh
IH1- EAS1 CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 28, 1989 15
Continued from page 15
� responded
iimed the lead
drive of 57 yards
I luntei � outed in from theoneon
osscd a pass tr
I ' end Charles
. s led tor the
i at 29 26
�d as Richards
Idle for 13 yards,
' nd for a gain
threw a 4
iss to tight end
� I gave Pitt a
Sled on their
' were forced
ntinucd the
k tor Pitt and
a rD of
ip the
-
ther
k ; quarter-
i ' vard
� returned
nnected with
� Hie
Basketball
Pirates failed to convert the two
point pla and trailed 40 15 with
y M left in the game
After Pitt's (llenn Deveaux
returned the ensuing kickoff 15
ards to the 42, V an Pelt dire ted
a 9 plaj drive in whk h he ran an
8 yard bootleg tor the Panthers
final touchdown. Frazier added
the kuk tor a 47-35 lead
Hut the Pirates boun (i ba k
again aided In a holding, fat e
mask penalty against Pitt which
moved the ball 15 yards to inside
thePitt20 I ivepla) slater, I lunter
completeda 5-vard pass to Wilson,
whogTabbed the bail in the corner
ol the end one Imperato s PA 1
cut the lead to v ith 13
remaining in the contest
EC I got one last t hanco to
pull ott the upset when Pitt was
ton ti to punt on a fouth and -one
situation near midfield.
i ollovving the punt, the Pi
rates mo ed from their own 14 to
within striking distance in the final
seconds first Hunter completed
a 12 yard pass to Charlie fvson,
and three plavs later on fourth
Continued from page 13
and 10, Hunter scrambled for 14
yards to keep the Pirates' hopes
alive.
Hunter then found tailback
I Vnell 1 larper tor an 8-yard gain
before hitting Wilson on the next
plaj with a 26-yard stnke. The
ball then rested on the Pitt 22 with
only seven seconds showing.
On the tirst down, Hunter
looked tor Wilson, then threw a
pass to the center of the end one,
but the ball fell to the ground with
two seconds left.
Hie route 1 had was an out-
side pattern Wilson said Travis
shim Id have thrown to the back of
the end one but he might have
gotten pressure. I'm not sure what
happened, but we had a touch-
down it he had gotten it out there
Hunter then attempted tofwl
the Pitt defense as all eyes were on
Wilson. On a play designed for
Tyson, Hunter was supposed to
throw to the right corner of the
end zone. But Pitt'sdefenseplayed
deep, Hunter was forced to throw
short, and his pass landed out of
bounds near the 2-vard line.
"We're disappointed because
of the loss Huntorsaid. "Wecame
into the game with a positive atti-
tude and we felt like we weren't
going to be denied. Pitt plaved a
good game and I have to take my
hat ott for thewav thev came back
and found a wav to win
"But we need to win these
games against the so-called favor-
ites Hunter continued. "Ciames
like this hurt more than games
when we get blown out
Hair By �ycke & Co
Tom Jones
Amy Hardee
"Wet Cuts"
$10.00
Tanning Bed
"NEW BULBS"
10 Visits at
$30.00
201 E. 5th St.
752-6060
w matrix
East Carolina
,1 Pi
I N't
tl

ath All
hots
irrell
; 'a as
Hill

ve point
i fender
' t 4 b
her!


'i and

M d �
field


66 tie
'n the
ne-out
rati stried
ill court,
neath
m the
� left EC I
� t to tie the
,hot by Lose
I 'C Wesleyan
� I, fon ing I li
UNCC
( ontinued from page 13
� - i I J0.09 2,
Benkusky,
nedy,Nelson,
II I 32.20.
rd : � � st) le 1
( ;reen, Holt,
; my, romartie,
1 uckey I ' I 44.6fi
1 he final s "re tor the men
wasE, ( 99 and tor
the women it was 1I 144
he team will compete
the Uni ersity of
mondonl ridayat in Virginia.
to intention,ill foul oodw in f r
two foul shots . n missed
both shots but i in re-
tained Xsstss; i.
dvvin n imsell
b stepping up to the I
.nd this time sinkinj
tret1 throvs s givn i ps a
� point load witl
onds left to plav.
1 hoso four s ' e not
igh for EC1 as tl
the lead to one on a I � inter
Whitaker.
rhePiratesopened their
lar season against ' hian
State, and lost to tin M
unior : i irrell
Overton led the on
Saturday s game with 17 points
followed bv senior Reed
I ose with 11 Steele s ti
from 2 ; points di vn t
the lead to 8 with I
inthegame. I low "ailed
to pet themomentur
harge the lean ind wit
'ids left in tl
Pt is two foul si ed the
win for Sl
I he Pirates
ord into Greensboro on iiVedties
dav to face LNC-G
Pittsburgh
21
0
8
19
13
14
42
47
Pitt-
ECU
ECU
ECU
Pitt-
Pitt -
Pitt -
ECU
I'itt -
Pitt -
ECU
Pitt-
ECU
Tuten 67-yard pass from Van Pelt (Frazier kick)
- Wilson 50-yard pass from Hunter (Imperato kick)
- Wilson 12-yard pass from Hunter (Imperato kick)
- Robinson 61-yard EG returnOmperato kick)
Grossman 67-yard int. return (Frazier kick)
Walker 2-yard run (kick failed)
Walker 4-yard run (conversion failed)
- Hunter 1-yard run (Hunter to Freeman for 2)
Van Pelt 47-yard pass to Moore (Frazier kick)
Richards 5-yard run (Frazier kick)
- Wilson 6-yard pass from Hunter
(conversion failed)
Van Pelt 7-yard run (Frazier kick)
- Wilson 5-yard pass from Hunter (Imperato kick)
TEAM STATISTICS
KCUPitt
First downs 1921
Total offense 390579
Rushing 134316
Passing 19-35-256-111-21-263-0
Fumbles 1-03-2
Penalties 10-704-45
Punts 7-42.74-35.3
Possession time 28:4331:17
Attendance 21,862
The Loved One
Wednesday, No v29
Thursday, ov.30 - Sunday, Dee. 3

Movies Screen Spin in Hendrix Theatre
FREE Admission to ECU Students with valid ECU ID
Help Trim the Tree
at the Student Union Christmas
Party Monday, December 4th
at 7:00pm in the Mendenhall
Student Center Lobby
Make Fun Things Happen!
Join the Visual Arts Committee Stop
by Room 234 Mendenahall lor an Ap-
plication





I
i
Pittsburgh
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 28,1989 15
Continued from page IS
ECU'S offense responded
quickly as they reclaimed the lead
on an eight-play drive of 57 yards.
Hunter scooted in fromtheoncon
the keeper, then tossed a pass for
two points to tight end Charles
Freeman. The Pirates led for the
last time in the game at 29-26.
Pitt answered as Richards
darted up the middle for 13 yards,
and around the left end for a gain
of 18. Van Pelt then threw a 47-
yard touchdown pass to tight end
Dave Moore and PAT gave Pitt a
33-29 lead with 2:53 left.
The Pirates struggled on their
next possession and were forced
to punt. Richards continued the
strong ground attack for Pitt and
ultimately scored his only TD of
the game, a 5-yard run up the
middle. Frazier tacked on the PAT
as Pitt padded its lead to 40-29.
The Bucs put together another
scoring drive as backup quarter-
back Jeff Blake launched a 51 -yard
bullet to Wilson. Hunter returned
to the lineup and connected with
Wilson on a 6-yard TD pass. The
Basketball
Pirates failed to convert the two-
point play and trailed 40-35 with
9:31 left in the game.
After Pitt's Glenn Deveaux
returned the ensuing kickoff 35
yards to the 42, Van Pelt directed
a 9-play drive in which he ran an
8-yard bootleg for the Panthers
final touchdown. Frazier added
the kick for a 47-35 lead.
But the Pirates bounced back
again, aided by a holding, face-
mask penalty against Pitt which
moved the ball 15 yards to inside
the Pitt 20. Five plays later, Hunter
completed a 5-yard pass to Wilson,
who grabbed the ball in the corner
of the end zone. Imperato's PAT
cut the lead to 472 with 3:33
remaining in the contest.
ECU got one last chance to
pull off the upset when Pitt was
forced to punt on a fouth-and-one
situation near mid field.
Following the punt, the Pi-
rates moved from their own 14 to
within striking distance in the final
seconds. First, Hunter completed
a 12-yard pass to Charlie Tyson,
and three plays later on fourth
Continued from page 13
and 10, Hunter scrambled for 14
yards to keep the Pirates' hopes
alive.
Hunter then found tailback
Denell Harper for an 8-yard gain
before hitting Wilson on the next
play with a 26-yard strike. The
ball then rested on the Pitt 22 with
only seven seconds showing.
On the first down, Hunter
looked for Wilson, then threw a
pass to the center of the end zone,
but the ball fell to the ground with
two seconds left.
"The route I had was an out-
side pattern Wilson said. 'Travis
should have thrown to the back of
the end zone but he might have
gotten pressure. I'm not sure what
happened, but we had a touch-
down if he had gotten itout there
Hunter then attempted to fool
the Pitt defense as all eyes were on
Wilson. On a play designed for
Tyson, Hunter was supposed to
throw to the right corner of the
end zone. But Pitt'sdefenseplayed
deep. Hunter was forced to throw
short, and his pass landed out of
bounds near the 2-yard line.
"We're disappointed because
of theloss Hunter said. "Wecame
into the game with a positive atti-
tude and we felt like we weren't
going to be denied. Pitt played a
good game and I have to take my
hat off for the way they came back
and found a way to win.
"But we need to win these
games against the so-called favor-
ites Hunter continued. "Games
like this hurt more than games
when we get blown out
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"We played poorly and
Wesleyan plaved well said Pi-
ratecoachMikeStecle. "They were
more competitive, executed bet-
ter and just out played us�they
deserved to win
The Pirates started off the
game falling behind 5-0 before
junior Tim Brown, who led the
team with 15 points, hit an eight
foot jumper putting ECU on the
board. Freshman Paul Childress
followed with a turnaround
baseline shot making the score 5-
4.
The Bishops began looking
inside for their big man Marvin
Macklin. who turned in 20 points
for the game. The Pirates pres-
sure defense was unable to stop
the Bishops from shooting the high
percentage shots underneath. All
but two of NC Wesleyan's shots
came from outside of the perime-
ter.
With the score tied at 30, ECU
doubled up and junior Darrell
Overton stole the ball and finished
off the play with a bucket under-
neath. On their next possession
Brown took a shot from outside
which circled off the rim and was
tipped in by a leaping Ike
Copeland. NC Wesleyan
promptly called a time-out as they
saw themselves falling behind by
four points.
Macklinquicklvtied the game
with two baskets, and with 12
seconds left NC Wesleyan, off a
Travis Saunders' shot took the lead
39-37 at the end of the first half.
ECU began the second half
with a new look as Lose, Stanley
Love, Jeffrey Whitaker, Gus Hill
and Robin House took the floor.
House gave the Pirates a five point
lead when he faked his defender
and hit an outside jumper. At 46-
41 the Bishopscalled another time-
out.
For the next two minutes, both
teams threw the ball away and
had several sloppy possessions.
By the 13 minute mark, ECU had
fouled six times.
NC Wesleyan's John Good-
win shot five for six from the field
and was four for five from three
point range. He led his team from
a five point deficit to a 66-66 tie
with only 1:08 left to play in the
game.
The Bishops called time-out
and on the in-bounds play ECU
looked to trap. As the Pirates tried
to hold the ball at half court,
Macklin was left open underneath
and easily scored a two from the
paint.
With 17 seconds left ECU
needed just one basket to tie the
game at 68, but a shot by Lose
came up short and NC Wesleyan
yanked the rebound, forcing Hill
UNCC
Continued from page 13
McNairy, UNCC, 1:30.09. 2,
Jeter, Farrell, Weis, Benkusky,
ECU, 1:30.90.3, Kennedy, Nelson,
Lewis, Hopkinson, ECU, 1:32.20.
Women's 200-yard Freestyle �1,
Pardue, Baldridge, Green, Holt,
ECU, 1:44.31.2, Teany,Cromartie,
Luckey, Cox, UNCC, 1:44.68.
The final score for the men
was ECU 135 - UNCC 99, and for
the women it was, ECU 144 -
UNCC 93. The team will compete
against the University of
Richmond on Friday at in Virginia.
to intentionally foul Goodwin for
two foul shots. Goodwin missed
both shots but NC Wcslevan re-
tained possession of the ball.
Goodwin redeemed himself
by stepping up to the line again
and this time sinking both of his
free throws giving the Bishops a
four point lead with only 4 sec-
onds left to play.
Those four seconds were not
enough for ECU as they only cut
the lead to one on a three pointer
by Whitaker.
ThePiratesopened their regu-
lar season against Appalachian
State, and lost to the Mountainers
69-59. Junior forward Darrell
Overton led the Pirates on
Saturday's game with 17 points
followed by senior guard Reed
Lose with 11. Steele's team came
from 23 points down to narrow
the lead to 8 with 1:55 left to play
in the game. However, ECU failed
to get the momentum they needed
to charge the team, and with :28
seconds left in the game, Rodney
Peel's two foul shots sealed the
win for ASU.
The Pirates' take their 0-2 rec-
ord into Greensboroon'Wedttes
day to face UNC-G.
East Carolina
Pittsburgh
21
0
8
19
13
14 47
Pitt - Tuten 67-yard pass from Van Pelt (Frazier kick)
ECU - Wilson 50-yard pass from Hunter (imperato kick)
ECU - Wilson 12-yard pass from Hunter (Imperato kick)
ECU - Robinson 61-yard FG rerurndmperato kick)
Pitt - Crossman 67-yard int. return (Frazier kick)
Pitt - Walker 2-yard run (kick failed)
Pitt - Walker 4-yard run (conversion failed)
ECU - Hunter 1-yard run (Hunter to Freeman for 2)
Pitt - Van Pelt 47-yard pass to Moore (Frazier kick)
Pitt - Richards S-yard run (Frazier kick)
ECU - Wilson 6-yard pass from Hunter
(conversion failed)
Pitt - Van Pelt 7-yard run (Frazier kick)
ECU - Wilson 5-yard pass from Hunter (Imperato kick)
TEAM STATISTICS
First downs
Total offense
ECU
19
390
Rushing 134
Pitt
21
579
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 28, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 28, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.711
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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