The East Carolinian, November 16, 1989






�he iEaat Carolinian
Sewing the 'Last Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 104
Thursday November 16,1989
Greenville, NC
Circulation 12,000
18 Pages
Greenville fires city manager
By SHANNON BUCKLEY
Staff Wrrtr
City Council member Lor-
raine Shinn came forthon Wednes-
day announcing the reasons for
the citv council's decision to fire
Citv Manager Greg Knowles.
The Citv Council decided by a
four to three vote in an executive
council session on Monday to tire
Knowles. Knowles was the city
official who accepted thestudent's
petition which asked the city to
abolish the new noise ordinance.
"I feel that the public has a
nght to know why the City Coun-
cil elected to dismiss the City
Manager Shinn said. "I ask that
each concerned citizen consider
the facts and weigh them care-
fullv
According to Shinn, Knowles
was fiscally irresponsible. One
complaint lodged by Shinn was
that Knowles shifted funds that
had been originally authorized to
move the Greenville Police De-
partment to the Brown Building.
These funds were used to pay for
unauthorized renovations to City
Hall.
"I disagree with what she's
said both in content and context
said Knowles in regard to Shinn's
accusations. "She doesn't give all
the information According to
Knowles, some of the things she
said that he was unauthorized to
do the council had approved.
According to Knowles, an
example of a false accusation
stated bv Shinn was that Knowles
had shifted $100,000 in funds to
outside agencies which were to be
used for already approved staff
positions. Knowles stated that
Shinn had voted to approve the
shifting of these funds in Monday
nights council meeting. "1 never
took a dime from the approved
positions to fund this, in fact, I
added positions without a tax
increase.
Although Shinn said that the
council and Knowles were well
aware of the problems that had
come about with the city man-
ager, Council member Rev. Wil-
liam J. Hadden Jr. said, "we had
no idea that Greg Knowles' resig-
nation would be called for. Ac-
cording to Hadden, three of the
council members (himself, Nancy
Jenkins and inez Fridley) were
unaware that Knowles resignation
would bediscussed, however, the
other three council members
(Rufus Huggins, Mildred Council
and Lorraine Shinn) knew that
Knowles resignation would be
called for. Hadden added, "it was
a retaliation against the City
Council, the city and everyoneelse
involved
Another reason given by
Shinn for the firing of Knowles
was that he was insubordinate,
nonresponsive and that he with-
held information from the coun-
cil. According to Shinn, Knowles
"violated protocal" by failing to
notify the council on major city
issues. One issue that Knowles
alledgely did not notify the City
Council about was the ECU
student's march to City Hall on
Nov. 6.
Knowles, in response to this,
said, he had contacted Mayor Ed
Carter on a daily basis, keeping
him informed on what the stu-
dents were planning. However,
he did not inform each council
member because he assumed that
the student march was basically
common knowledge.
In regard to Knowles insub-
ordination, Shinn stated, that
Knowles consistently refused to
follow up on an investigation
about problems within the police
department, as requested by the
mayor. "Asa result, the concerned
police officers expressed their
grievances tothe media
See CITY MANAGER, page 2
University upgrades Student Store
ANGIE L1NEBERRY
Npeiial to The Kant Carolinian
For those of you who are used
to going into the Student Store
Si via Shop between classes for that
quick drink or crackers, you're
going to be in for a big surprise
next fall. The Soda Shop, along
with the Croatan, is going to be
turned over to the dining services
at the end of spring 1900 for reno-
vations and a slight change of
format.
Dr. Alfred Matthews, vice
chancellor for Student Life, has
been looking into thechange since
he came to ECU. He said he saw
that the services the Soda Shop
and Croatan provide are not ade-
quate and need to be upgraded.
Neither the Soda Shop nor the
Croatan have a restaurant permit.
This means they are only allowed
to sell pre-packaged foods. Mat-
thews said he felt that students
and faculty would be better served
if changes were made, especially
with the continuing increase in
the student population.
At this point, the plans are to
convert theCroa tan into a full gnll
operation, much like the opera-
tion at Mendenhall. The Soda Shop
decor will be improved, and some
of its changes will include putting
in a salad bar and a made-to-order
deli shop. It will still offer the
crackers and candy bars it does
now,and it will beopenall through
the day. Matthews said that he
hopes the Soda Shop's hours can
be extended through night classes.
Since the two locations will be
considered a part of the dining
services, studentson the meal plan
will beable to use their cards, with
both the declining balance and the
cash balance in effect.
Both places will close at the
end of school in Mav, but they will
reopen for operation by fall 1991),
possibly sooner.
Matthews said that the final
details will not be made until mid-
spnng when the new contract is
worked out.
Speakers lecture about AIDS
By JAMES HOY
Special to The Last Carolinian
ECU sponsored two very dif-
ferent lectures on Tuesday in ob-
servance of AIDS Awareness
Week. The programs were de-
signed to teach students about the
dangers of AIDS and the need for
safe sex.
The first lecture, "Caring for
the AIDS patient was given by
Father Joe Jones of St. Peter's
church in Greenville. The second
lecture was given bv Suzi Lando-
phi and was called "Hot, Sexy and
Safer
Landophi used outrageous
and sometimes embarrassing
humor to get the point across. She
made fun of the misconceptions
people have about members of
the opposite sex and the different
views which men and women
have about sexuality. Landophi
did thisby talking about how men
hav� names for certain body parts
and women do not. She also joked
about how women are supposed
to not have as big a sex drive as
men.
At one point, she went into
the audience at Hendrix Theater
looking for a "super-stud She
pulled a man onto the stage and
calling him a "gay super-stud
She asked him questions about
nskv behavior for a gay man.
The point of the skit was to tell
the audience that there are many
misconceptions by people about
who can get AIDS. Too often,
Landophi said, people put AIDS
into groups. We tend to think that
quizzed him about what makes gays,intraveneousdrugusersand
nsky sexual behavior for a hetero- Haitians are the only people that
sexual male. She then pulled an- can get AIDS. That is not true,
other male from the audience, $ee AIDS, page 3
�lM I
Cramming for exams before Thanksgiving break
The colorful scenery on the Mall provides a perfect setting for these ECU women to study. With the mild weather extending well
into the fall semester, many students have been able to take advantage of the outdoors (Photo by Garrett Killian�ECU Photo Lab).
Former city manager Greg Knowles was fired by a narrow margin
at the Greenville City Council meeting Monday. (Photo by Angela
Pridgen � ECU Photo Lab)
Health fair offers a
variety of services
By KELLY SHANNON
Stalf Wntcr
The Wellness Improvement
for State Employees (WISE) pro-
gram of ECU and the Office of
State personnel is sponsoring a
Health Fair on Monday in Memo-
rial Gvmnasium from 11a.m. until
3 p.m. All state employees from
eastern North Carolina are invited
to attend.
The fair offers several health
screenings including tests for
cholesterol levels, blood pressure,
body fat and visual acuity. Facts
and information on heart disease,
cancer, nutrition, htnessand stress
management will bo on display.
The WISE committee here on
campus, in its fourth year of exis-
tence, consists of facultv, staff and
ECU holds
seminar on
construction
How fluctuations in the con-
struction industry are influenced
by national and local economic
factors will be examined at a
seminar, "Economic Development
in North Carolina: Implications
for the Construction Industry at
ECU on Nov. 29.
The seminar leader will be Dr.
James W. Kleckley, president of
Problem-Solving Research Inc a
consulting firm that specializes in
econometric modeling, regional
development problems and re-
lated economic issues.
Kleckley will describe the
mechanics of the economic devel-
opment process including how
economic data is incorporated into
a business plan and his firm's
forecasts to December, 1991 asthey
relate to the nation, state and re-
gion.
The seminar is sponsored by
the Department of Construction
Management, School of Industry
and Technology, ECU, and will be
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. No fee will
be charged but seating is limited.
ECU medical school personnel.
Thecommitteefocuseson promot-
ing personal health awareness of
state em plovees. ECUand the state
WISE office are funding the event.
Volunteers organizing the
Health Fair represent the Ameri-
can Heart Association, the Ameri-
can Red Cross, the March of Dimes,
the Pitt County Health and Men-
tal 1 lealth departments and many-
other organizations. Local busi-
nessesdonatedgiftcertificatesand
sportswear to be given away at
the fair.
Kathleen Hill of the ECU Intra-
mural-Recreational Services staff
and chairperson of the ECU WISE
committee says she expects about
1,000 state employees to attend.
A shuttle bus will leave the
Brodv Building on the hour and
return from Memorial Gvmna-
sium on the half hour. All are
welcome to attend. For more in-
formation contact Hill at 757-6387.
HunsM�
Editorial4
Whom does AIDS
affect?
State and Nation 5
Radioactive waste
leaks near Duke.
Classifieds6
Features10
Students speak out on
Halloween in Greenville
Comics14
The Law goes to La
La Land.
Sports15
Pirate Cagers beat
Yugoslav team.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 16,1989
Family counseling program formed
By J AMI MARTIN
�pr ul fit The t�taroliman
The ECU Marriage and Fam-
ily Fherapy Program and a steer-
ing committee of family service
professionals in the area are lead-
ing the development oi a Family
Service Network in eastern North
Carolina.
Dr David Dosser, director of
the program, said the program was
formed last month And is part of
theECl School of Home Econom-
ics Department of Child Develop-
ment and Family Relations.
Dosser said organizing a net-
w ork could result in improvement
ol the present referral process,
involvement ot specific religious
counseling services with other
types ol family service, profes-
sional development opportunities
for therapists and establishment
of a speaker's bureau.
A consistent and well func-
tioning familv service network
would enhance the collaborative
effort between family service pro-
fessionals over time, improve the
quality of family services in this
area Dosser said.
Dosser said a network of pro-
fessional contacts is particularly
effective in family therapy and
other related services since per-
sons working in this field seldom
operate alone
It is rare for a family to be
involved with just one profes-
sional or agency he said. "The
more common situation, espe-
cially with multi-problem fami-
lies would he for the various
family members to be involved
with several professionals. This
City manager
Continued from page 1
Finally, Shinn accused
Knowles of addressing actions
without council authorization.
One accusation was that Knowles
informed the media that the new
council would review the noise
ordinance.
According to Shinn, the City
has a responsibility to
-1. in an t ffk it nt, economical,
and responsive cit management
at all times Shinn said, she be-
lieves that it was the current City
C ouncil s responsibility to deal
with the Knowles problem. "We
had a decision to make and we
made it, she added.
Nancy Jenkins, mayor-elect
and current City Council mem-
ber, said, "I'm saddened about this
situation becauseit makesGreen-
ille iook as if it is not stable and
progressive, which we are
Mayor Ed Carter and Council
members Rut us Huggins and
red Council were unable to
b� reached tor comment.
HTTErmon
UJe qv & loohing
for a feuu good
men lor
Luomenl to fill
the positions
of managing
Editor and
Staff IMustra-
tor, Hpply in
person at The
East Carolinians
situationcreatesaneed for careful
and systematic attention to col-
laboration with other profession-
als
The network's steering com-
mittee is made up oi area profes-
sionals and chaired by Dosser and
Dr. Lou Everett of the ECU School
of Nursing faculty.
On the collaboration between
school and community Dosser
said, "We believe that by working
cooperatively we can accomplish
more to improve the quality of
family services in this area than
we ever could by working inde-
pendently
Members of the steering
committee are Trudy Bowen, a
graduate student in the ECU
Marnageand Family Program; Dr.
Ray Evans, a Greenville psychia-
trist; Maurv Frieman, a social
worker in the Pitt Memorial Psy-
chiatric Unit; Rev. Dr. Patrick
Welch of Medical Park Associates,
Greenville; Greenville attorney
Richard Cannon; Dr. Sue Ehrlich,
a resident in the ECU School of
Medicine psychiatric medicine
department; Gerald Peterson, a
family life specialist with with the
Methodist Home for Children
Family Service; Beverly Scheaffer
of Child and Familv Therapeutic
Services, Greenville; and Dr.
Shelley Green of the ECU Mar-
riage and Familv Therapv pro-
gram.
Center offers fellowships
Expressions Magazine
now has salaried positions
available for Managing Editor,
Features Editor, Copy Editor,
assistant graphic design artist.
and computer layout artist.
Contact us in the Office located
in the Publications Bide, or
Call at 757-6927
1
The ScienceMathematics
Education Center, ECU, is offer-
ing $500 professional develop-
ment fellowships for public school
science and math teachers in
grades K-9. Applications must be
received by Nov. 20.
Teachers must agree to obtain
at least three semester hours oi
college credit in science or mathe-
matics during the 1990 spring
semester and to teach in a North
Carolina public school for one full
academic vear beginning in the
fall of 1W0. Teachers will be re-
quired to use a portion oi the fel-
lowship to pav tuition, purchase
matenalsand booksand pav trans-
portation expenses. The fellow-
ships are being offered through
the center in conjunction with the
N.C Department ot Public Instruc-
tion and the MathematicsScience
Education Network.
The Center may be contacted
for further information at (914)
757-6885.
ECU professor publishes textbook
Book looks at environmental crisis
By PATRICK O'BRVANT
Stilt Writer
Dr. William Mangun, direc-
tor of Public Administration,
brings his views about the envi-
ronment to ECU through his re-
cently published book. 'Manag-
ing the Environmental Crisis.
Mangun has spent the greater
part oi his life trying to better the
policies, laws and plans that affect
the nation's environment. He has
had an effect on these policies and
laws through his work with the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and
as an advisor for the President's
Commission on American Out-
doors in Washington, D.C.
Mangun and co-author of the
book. Prof. Daniel Henning oi
Eastern Montana State College,
express their views in their new
378 page book. The book empha-
sizes comprehensive and concep-
tual approaches to environmental
administration.
Both national and global is-
sues are examined and character-
ized, along with environmental
problems of industrialized and less
developed countries. It discusses
all the major areas of public ad-
ministration and policy in envi-
ronmental affairs. The book is
designed for use as a basic text-
book in environmental policv and
administration, as well as a refer-
ence work tor government offi-
cials and others with a professional
or personal concern about envi-
ronmental management.
The authors point out that
despite numerous new laws, regu-
lations, programs and movements
to protect the natural environment
in both industrialized and non-
industrialized nations, govern
ments meet "severe resistance
when they attempt to implement
environmental policies and pro-
grams.
A recurring problem in envi-
ronmental administration is that
"public and private interests are
frequently in direct competition
Henning and Mangun explain.
"The people must recognize that
there isa problem. They must gain
knowledgeand then make actions.
Whenever people do respond it is
always after the problem has be-
come a crisis Mangun expresses
Mangun has received tour
degrees and has taught at over
seven colleges and universities.
He has received five different
awards for his dedication to envi-
ronmental causes.
� -� 1 W&z �ast Carol in im
Director of Advertising James FJ. McKee
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V. Cope Gu .1. Harvej Keiley O'Connor Stephanie R. Emory Patrick Williams Adam T. Biankenship
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National RateS5.75 Open RateS4.9
Local Open RateS4.75 Hulk & Frequency Contract Discounts Available
Business Hours:
Monda - Friday 10:00-5:00 pm Phone: 757-6366
School and Community
Health Education
A Carter in Promoting Good Health
Health educators plan, develop, and manage strategies to
promote healthy lifestyles for individuals, groups, and
entire communities.
Hospitals businesses and industries, schools, health clubs
and community agencies provide gainful
employment for these professionals.
To learn more about a career where the rewards includes
improving the lives of other contacts:
Dr. Rick Barnes, Health Kducation
Memorial Gym, Room 205,
Phone 757-4238
or
Dr. Donald Enslev, Department of Community
Health Helk Building Room 312,
Phone 757-4422
GIVE BLOOD,
PLEASE.
BLOODMOBILE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1989
And
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1989
12:00 Noon -6:00 pm
Sponsored By
RESIDENT HALL ASSOCIATION
American Red Cross JU
Bl u k Services Tidewater Reei n
Above Par355-6725
Army Reserve756-9695
Annabelies756-0315
Attic752-7303
Barbados756-4789
Batter's Box756-7525
Bogies752-4668
Buccaneer Movies756-5235
Campus Suites830-8882
Carolina Pregnancy Center757-0003
Charley O's355-5000
Chicos757-1666
Eibo758-4591
Fabricate Too756-1058
Feather Rest752-333
Gary Reynolds1 -800-447-8560
Gordon's Golf & Ski756-1003
Harris Teeter758-6800
IBM830-3507
Malpass Muffler758-7676
Merle Norman756-8404
Mothers Nightclub1-736-4145
New Deli758-0080
Quality Oil Company756-3145
Rack Room355-2519
Raleigh Women's Health832-0535
Rio355-5000
Sports Fan Attic756-7487
Student Stores757-6731
Swiss Colony756-5650
Tracks756-7818
Tom Togs830-0174
Triangle Women's Health1-800-433-2930





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 16,1989
Smokers should consider kicking the habit
There is no doubt that ciga-
rette smoking is a serious hazard
to one's health. The Surgeon Gen-
eral described smoking tobacco as
"the single most preventable cause
of death in the United States
Many health conditions are
caused or aggravated by cigarette
smoking, such as heart disease,
several forms of cancer, emphy-
sema, chronic bronchitis and a host
of other conditions.
Many smokers feel ambiva-
lent about quitting smoking. Thev
want to quit but they also want to
keep smoking forever. Reasons
individuals smoke and want to
stop smoking will vary from one
person to the next, but the ulti-
mate decision to quit must be
made by one person, the smoker.
Whatever reasons a person
smokes, it is obviously a good
idea to try to kick the habit. Cur-
rent data suggests that the two-
pack-a-day cigarette smoker can
expect to die seven to eight years
earlier than his and her nonsmok-
ing peers. Recent evidence sug-
gests that the seven to eight year
reduction in life expectancy may
be a grossly underestimated inter-
pretation of the impact of smok-
ing.
There are three ways that a
person can be hooked to cigarettes
� chemical addiction, habit and
psychological dependency. Some
without one, you are probably
addicted to the nicotine in the
cigarettes.
Many smokers have habits
To Yeur Health
By Suzanne Kellerman
Student Health Center
smokers may be hooked in one or
all of these ways.
Nicotine is an addictive sub-
stance. If you crave cigarettes and
can't stand to go a couple of hours
they have formed with their ciga-
rettes. Most of these habits were
formed unconsciously and by
association. For example, many
smokers associate drinking an
alcoholic beverage with smoking.
Others associate it with their
morning coffee, watching televi-
sion or talking on the telephone.
Most successful ex-smokers
quit cold turkey. This is abrupt
cessation from smoking. If you
smoke twenty cigarettes today,
you will smoke zero cigarettes
tomorrow. Other smokers quit by
gradually cutting down the
amount of cigarettes they smoke
so there will be different ways for
people to quit.
For more information on to-
bacco and cigarette smoking visit
the Student Health Center. A
smoking cessation program is
offered to all students who desire
to quit. To sign up, contact the
Student Health Center.
"To Your Health" is3 weekly
health education and information
column. Pleasedirect all questions,
comments or suggestions to 757-
6794.
SAI sponsors self-defense classes
By DAVY FUTRELL
Special to TTw la�t Carolinian
Sigma Alpha lota sponsored a
free self-defense class each Tues-
day night for the past four nights
in the lobby of Fletcher Music
Building.
The class was taught bv Rick
Clark, of the Clark School of Self
Defense in Washington, N.C The
classes were directed mainly to-
wards women, but men were also
AIDS
welcome. Clark, who has been
involved with martial arts for 17
years, explained how to defend
against some common attacksand
to use whatever it takes to get free
and away from your attacker.
The system Clark uses is
called Jop Kune Kenpo, which
means "combination first law
and involves karate, judo and tae-
kwon-do. Each week Clark and
his assistants demonstrated dif-
ferent attacks that a person might
Continued from page 1
encounter.
The class primarily teaches the
street use of self-defense, using
whatever one can do to fend off
theattacker. It also involved a little
conditioning work. Clark stressed
that the classes were not to learn
the techniques, as much as it was
to learn how to literally "tight"
your way to freedom.
Susan Cooperman, a member
of Sigma Alpha Iota, described
the classes as informa ti ve and very
helpful. She says she felt more
comfortablebeing out at night after
taking these classes.
Although participation was
low,Clark said, "if one person can
benefit from these classes, if a
person learns how to protect them-
selves and comes out unharmed
or unscathed, I will be satisfied
Anyone can get AIDS, including
college students.
At ter talking about AIDS fcr a
while, Landophi began to discuss
safe sex. She made fun of the dif-
ferent ways men and women see
their bodies and how hard it is for
a man and woman to talk about
sex.
To demonstrate this, she sat
onthelapofamanin the audience
and began asking him what mov-
ies he had seen and what kind of
food he liked to eat. After he an-
swered these questions she asked
"What do you like sexually?" The
man only laughed. She made her
point that people do not commu-
nicate.
If people communicated more,
Landophi said, we would enjoy
sex more because we would be
able to tell our partner what we
wanted and enjoyed. Communi-
cation is an important part of a
relationship, she said. It builds
trust and honesty, which, along
with communication, make up the
cornerstones of what she thinks
safe sex really is.
After all of the humor and
frank talk, she got serious for a
moment. She told theaudience that
the college student generation
could be the first one with a real
sexual revolution. Wecould be the
generation that is not afraid to
communicate what we want and
need from sex.
The second lecture was given
by Father Jones, a Catholic priest
and a member of the Greenville
AIDS Task Force. In his lecture, he
detailed how he got involved in
the AIDS ministry and what we
can do to help. He also showed an
Emmy award winning video made
by the AIDS patients in a prison.
Father Jones got involved in
helping AIDS patients through a
television show he was involved
with. The show broadcast a series
of specials designed to educate
people about AIDS. Through his
relationship with the program, he
came to know an infected person
in Boston who had lost his job and
his apartment because of his ill-
ness. Gradually, through word of
mouth, his ministry grew to where
he has taken care of over 125
people.
Through his ministry of car-
ing for AIDS patients, he began to
work with infected inmates at Sing-
Sing prison in New York. He found
he related to the men and he began
to work thereas well. Every month
now, he travels to the prison for a
couple days to offer friendship and
support.
The message that Father Jones
wants to get across to us is that
AIDS patients need help. When
people leam they have the dis-
ease, they become frightened that
they will be abandoned by their
friends and family and that no one
cares.
The best thing we can do to
help them is to be there for them
and let them know we are avail-
able to listen and to offer friend-
ship. "They need acceptance and
compassion, not sympathy Fa-
ther Jones said.
Father Jones said that since
the disease can be acquired by
anyone, people need to realize that
it is a part of all of life and stop
"judgmental nonsense By not
judging the person on his past, we
can gi ve the person w ha t he need s,
according to Jones.
In the video, several AIDS
patients in Sing-Sing prison told
of the pain they endure and the
fear they experience. The video
showed the men in the prison
hospital, some with lesions from
Karposi's Sarcoma, the cancer
people get with AIDS and others
with the characteristic drastic
weight loss.
When asked what an average
person could do for an AIDS pa-
tient, Father Jones said, "You can
listen. You can be the most thera-
peutic thing that came down the
pike if vou onlv listen
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4









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�t?e iEaHt �ar0ltman
vn 111' t ' i iw
. �r. � , ���.�(, �
David Herring, cmm
STEI'I IANIE FOLSOM, M�ur-4 Ute
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, IVKtorafAiinrrlumj
Li"ri Martin, mmta
Caroline Cusick, r��.s a.
Michael Martin, s,�ri�ru
Scott Maxwell, s.� (j,
Carrie Armstrong, i�Tm�i m-
STEP! IANIE SlNCLETON, Qry UUm
Susan Kress, c� ��
Art Nixon,cm Mwto
Stuart Rosner, nu.n�MMF
Pamela Cope, aj t� sup�,
M ATTI1EW RlCI HER, Cmkkm M�r
Tracy Weed, m m�y.
Jeff Parker, sra�
Beth Lupton, s�rr��y
November lb. 1W
OPINION
Page 4
Don't be a fool
Become educated about
the dangers of AIDS
This week is AIDS Awareness
Week and if you've been the least bit
interested in learning more about
AIDS but haven't yet gone to any of
the information sessions through-
out the week, then don't distress.
There is still one event left on Friday,
a speech on "AIDS in the
Workplace from 1:30p.m. to 3 p.m.
in General Classroom Buildin
room 1028.
There are many reasons why an
average college student might avoid
discussing or learning more about
AIDS, most of which stem from fear.
Every heterosexual student would
like to think AIDS is something that
onlv "other people" catch. The
frightening reality is that if you're
sexually active at all you're at risk.
While so many people have a list
oi jokes about "those homosexuals"
and "those drug users who've
contracted AIDS, they're denying
the fact that they or someone close to
mem could die from the disease one
day. It's not just "them" anymore.
The only way to cope with the
realities AIDS has forced upon our
society is to dispel the myths and
understand this disease. Even if it
doesn't cripple our own body, it's
unrealistic to think we'll never have
to deal with the disease. We all have
seen children shunned from
schools, have had to work with, or
been a friend or family member of
someone carrying the AIDS virus.
We have all heard the horror stories,
but perhaps we still don't know
enough to help us cope with the
emotional trauma accompanying
AIDS.
If you haven't yet participated in
this week's events, then try to take
part in the closing talk on Friday or
drop by the Student I lealth Center
for more information. This is disease
is nondiscriminatory- No amount of
homophobia or aversion to heroin
needles will protect you. The only
weapon here is knowledge.
fM60IN6
torn?
PAN QUAYLF
ASM
STROM
RIGHT
HANP.
Thanksgiving means
� �
By CAROLINE CUSICK
Editorial (olumnut
'i
Thanksgiving is next week. For some
people, it means Christmas shopping. For
others, it means football games and food.
There arc many sides to turkey day that
distract Americans; aside from the obvious
advantage of Thanksgiving, classes are
canceled for the entire week.
To find the real reason for this All-
American holiday, we have to turn back the
clock and travel to colonial New England.
The pilgrims of that day were disillu-
sioned campers. Sure, they were thankful
for Tanto and his friends, who taught them
to plant corn instead of shoot them with
arrows.
Of course, they had no clue what the
winters in Massachusetts were like. Let me
tell you, February is mighty cold. People
still freeze to death every winter on the
streets and park benches of Boston and the
bay region. It isn't a pretty picture.
Had the colonists realized what they
started, they could have written a solution
to the problems of the homeless into the
constitution. No, 1 don't havca solution. I'm
just pointing out the faults of people who
lived generations ago assuming it will do
some good.
They were slightly deluded individu-
als. I know, they did their best, and they did
have their redeeming characteristics.
The colonists were thankful for the free-
dom that came with their new home. Fortu-
nately, the freedom continues. What hap-
pened to the attitude of thankfulness?
Who has time to be thankful? We are
preoccupied by parades, gluttony and
rocks. Yes, rocks.
Plymouth rock is the reason for this All-
Americas holiday that is about to overtake
us. The rock receives so much credit and
appreciation, someone tried to blow it up.
Our precious rock, the historical monu-
ment, displayed on a pile of sand, sur-
rounded by white-washed columns and an
iron rail, is cracked.
My guess is thai an angry pilgrim came
back to get even. He or she probably saw
MacGiver on television, learned how to
makca bomb, and decided hundreds of tiny
rocks would be better than one big rock.
Hmm. There might be some logic to this.
What does a damaged rock have to do
with the American dream of turkey and
stuffing once a year with the people you
love most but could never live with peace-
fully? Our view of turkey day is a bit
cracked. This cracked American attitude is
in the good company of the liberty bell,
Humpty Dumpty and the Berlin wall.
What are we really thankful for? The
cars we drive? The homes we live in? The
food on our tables every day (or when we
feel like cooking)? Cable television? Quad-
rophonic stereos? My theory is, if it will
burn, it's not worth my love. That elimi-
nates everything 1 own.
So, we say we're thankful for family,
friends and freedom. That's easy to say, but
to value people more than possessions
would alter the entire economic structure of
this country.
Why do we suddenly, when holidays
arise, tune in to these appreciations buried
deeply in our subconscious minds? If we
genuinely appreciate our families, our
friends and our freedom, why do we forget
to tell them so the other 364 days in the year?
What makes November 23, 1989 spe-
cial? We have a week without classes, foot-
ball games and parades take over network
television, mom gets to cook all day and we
get to overeat without guilt.
What is the real issue?
To the editor:
In response to a letter in the
Nov. 14 issue of The East Carolin-
ian, I have a few things to say to
Mr. Jack K. Jennings.
You say we aren't concerned
with "real" issues. Well, what do
you consider a real issue? Refus-
ing to have a new election because
of the fear that the Reformist Tarty
won't be legally elected?
I agree that there is a problem
with racial prejudice on campus,
but that will take time and more
effort towards awareness than the
so called "Reformist Party" can
muster. The university is working
on its security and, I must say,
deserves a lot of congratulations!
And the library is open long
enough, leam to study in your
own residence. But I, along with
the majority of students, am here
to leam. Not to get drunk all the
time, not to destroy property, not
to be treated like a high school
child from Greenville.
The noise ordinance was ri-
diculous! If 1 could say this to you
face to face it would be well above
70 decibels. A car driving down
the street makes more than 70d. of
noise. A football game at Minges
makes more than 70d. of noise.
You tell me, what is the real issue?
Robin Geddie
Sophomore
Technical Writing
Accusations
unfounded
To the editor:
In a recent letter to the editor
(a response to a letter by ECU
Students for the Ethical Treament
of Animals), Dr. Richard H. Ray of
ECU's School of Medicine makes
the charge that the acquisition of a
video by animal rights activists
was an act of "terrorism" and
argues that the decision to discon-
tinue using animals in some labs
will adversely affect the quality of
physicians produced by the
school. I find both of these asser-
tions unfounded.
First of all, the video was
mailed to People for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals (PETA)
anonvmously, most likely by an
outraged student of an employee
of the medical school. This consti-
tutes stealing, but "terrorism?"
Come on!
The reason that animal rights
groups use illegally acquired vid-
eos to educate the public is that
such videos are about the only de-
pictions of the cruelty that some-
times goes on in the animal labs.
The fact is that a great deal of
suffering does take place in ani-
mal labs, and the public has a right
to know.
Er. Rav then assorts th.it the
medical students will be denied a
valuable educational experience
and, as a result, may provide a
poorer quality of care for their
initial patients. The evidence,
however, doesn't support this
Many medical schools have aban-
doned using animals as teaching
"tools and they continue to pre
duce physicians of equal quality
In fact,Great Britainoutlawed the
use of animals for tea, hing sur
gery well over a hundred years
ago. The British new use human
cadavers, high-tech simulation
models, and apprenticeships
under experienced surgeons to
instruct their aspiring surgeon
To teach microsurgery, they in
human placentas, which arehighh
vascular and can be connected t.
pumps for pressurized flow. This
system is in no way inferior to
using animals.
Dr. Ray also makes the point
tha t the meJicaTschPPPIiWidSl
was voluntary, which is true af�
thatraisesaninterestingquestion.
If discontinuing to use animals in
physiology and pharmacology
labs will do so much harm, as Dr.
Rav asserts, why would a sensible
medical school like ECl s make
such a decision voluntarily?
Craig Spit,
President
ECU SETA
Reformist Party hasn't
achieved goals thus far
Campus
Spectrum
By
Bob Landry
'To organize and train mem-
bers in student politics; to become
active in community projects; to
run a slate of candidates for Stu-
dent Government positions; and
to act as a watchdog to the Student
Government Association and
campus activities to assure fair,
equal, and ethical treatment of all
students This is the stated pre-
amble of the Reformist Party that
many of you have read about on
these pages. President Robin
Andrews has claimed that the
Reformist Party "is run more ef-
fectively and achieves more
things" than the SGA legislature.
This letter will show that the Re-
formists have actually achieved
none of the goals stated in their
preamble, and what this observer
has seen the Reformist Party ac-
complish.
The first clause of the pre-
amble states the Reformists will
organize and train members in
student politics. By looking at their
actions and letters to the newspa-
per, anyone can sec these goals
have not been met. First of all, the
Reformists urged students not to
vote in the recent fall elections.
Since a student's voice in any
government is his vote, the Re-
formists have actually organized
students not to participate in stu-
dent politics. As for training
members, the Reformists have
time after time distorted and mis-
led students about the way SGA
works. Among the many ways the
Reformists have displayed their
ignorance include not knowing the
nomination procedure for the SGA
Attorney General, and that the
judiciary branch of SGA has noth-
ing to do with approval of consti-
tutions.
As for being active in commu-
nity projects, the Reformists have
yet to publicize any community
projects they have undertaken.
When and if they decide to have
one, I'm sure many students
would be interested.
Have the Reformists carried
out the third clause in their pre-
amble? Again, we only need to
look at the Reformists own words
at their rally on Sept. 28 concern-
ing the fall election: "If they have
the election, we will boycott it
When it came time to vote for the
Reformist "slate the slate was
blank. Membersof the party stated
at the same rally they did not have
enough time or monev to run a
second election, yet they have time
to organize a boycott, attend SGA
meetings, and organize their own
party.
We now come to the final
clause in the Reformist Partv pre-
amble, that concerning tair and
ethical treatment for all students.
We once again onlv have to look at
Reformist Party actions to expose
the hypocrisy of this statement
The Reformists have male racism
charges and verbal and wntten
attacks on students, faculty, and
student organizations without
researching any facts behind their
charges. Is this fair or ethical treat-
ment for all students? Also, the
published letters and statements
made by party members reveal
that rather than being a watchdog
of SGA, they are conducting a
witch hunt against the SGA.
By reading these statements,
it should be obvious the Reformists
have not carried out any of their
goals as stated in their preamble. 1
believe this group has the poten-
tial to be a positive force on this
campus; however, until they
demonstrate the ability todomorc
than conduct negative attacks on
the SGA, I do not think any stu-
dent will take the Reformists seri-
ously.
Bob Landry is the speaker for the
Student Goivrnment Association.
r
i
In addition to "The Campus Forum" section of the newspaper, The
East Carolinian features 'The Campus Spectrum This is an opinion
column by guest writers from the student body and faculty. The columns
printed in "The Campus Spectrum" will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
1
J






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
State and Nation
NOVEMBER 16,1989 PAGE 5
Durham dump leaks low-level radioactive waste
DURHAM (AP) � A dump
site for low-level radioactive gar-
bage used during the 1960s is leak-
ing chemicals into groundwater
near Duke University and officials
say they are taking steps to stop
the leakage.
President
evaluates
Eastern
Europe
By TERENCE HUNT
The A��oc tared Prtu
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Bush administration is trying to
decipher how the "fantastic
change" in Eastern Europe will
alter the shape oi the Soviet em-
pire and force Western Europe to
revamp its economic, political and
military structures.
I am delighted with the new
move toward democracy in East-
em Europe President Bush said
Tuesday. "We're all caught up in
this
Bush, who will meet Soviet
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev at
a summit Dec. 2-3, declared him-
self unconcerned about the dizzy-
ing pace oi change � most re-
cently the opening of East
Germany's borders and the eas-
ing of travel restrictions by
Czechoslovakia.
"1 don't think it's moving too
fast and I don't know of anybody
in mv administration that feels that
it's moving too fast the presi-
dent said.
Even so, administration offi-
See CHANGE, page 9
"We're very concerned said
Pat DeRosa, an environmental
chemist with the State Solid Man
agement Division "Theredoesn't
appear to be any immediate threat
to human health. But it does have
a potential to leak and to move,
and that's what we need to pre
vent
The quarter-acre site in Duke
Forest was used for disposal ot
Duke University's low-level ra
dioactive waste from 1961-70.
Since 1970, Duke's low-level ra
dioactive waste has been handled
bv a commercial waste-disposal
firm.
Monitoring bv the university
and the state has shown that ele-
vated levels of the chemical para
dioxane are present in water
samples taken at the dump site
But state tests reveal no para-di-
oxane in well water at the nearest
residences about a quarter ot a
mile trom the site.
Para-dioxane, also known as
diethvlene dioxide, diethylene
ether or dioxan is considered a
probable human carcinogen. It can
affect the body if it is inhaled,
swallowed or comes in contact
with the eves or skin. Overexpo-
sure can also damage the liver and
kidneys and cause skin disease
and irritation of the eves, noseand
throat.
State and Duke officials said
the situation posed no threat to
nearby suppliesof drinking water
or to those who use the torest, an
8,300-acre woodland that draws
thousands oi hikers and picnick-
ers each year.
"We are confident the mate-
rial has not wandered off Duke
property Dr. Wayne Thomann,
director ot environmental safety
for Duke University Medical
( enter, told reporters at an a news
conference.
The nearest homes are a quar-
ter mile away from the now-de-
funct dump.
"The concern is drinking
water. We don't want migration
of para-dioxane" into drinking
water, Thomann said.
The level of radioactivity
found in monitoring wells near
thesite remained low, at one-tenth
the legally permitted level for
drinking water, officials said. But
levels of para-dioxane in the area
exceeded state standards by as
much as 410 times.
Thomann said Duke is com-
mitted to doing whatever is neces-
sary to keep para-dioxane or any
other waste from migrating from
the site.
"Although there is no evi-
dence that para-dioxane has
reached water supplies in anv
residential area, the mere pres-
ence of para-dioxane at the waste
disposal site necessitates that we
take steps to prevent it from doing
so Thomann said.
There are no federal or state
drinking water standards for para-
dioxane. The state, however, re-
cently established 0.007 milli-
grams per liter as a maximum al-
lowable level in groundwater.
The para-dioxane is buried 14
feet underground and in up to 19
trenches that are 20 feet long. The
chemical isin hundredsof 50 cubic
centimeter glass vials, which are
in lots of 11X) in egg crate-like
containers. Duke officials do not
know how much actual para-di-
oxane is at the site.
Also buned at the site is low-
level radioactive waste disposed
of by the medical center until the
dump site was closed. Fourteen
barrels of leftover chemicals also
are buned there. The trenches did
not have a liner and conformed to
federal standards of that time,
Thomann said.
The site is on a cleared space
on a rocky knoll. It is surrounded
by an eight-foot hih chain link
fence topped by three strands of
barbed wire. Signs warn that r I
dioactive material is on the site
According to a release from
Duke, in February 1978, seven
small trees on the site were found
to have excessive radioactivity
Thev were disposed oi.
In 1987, four wells were dug
around the site to monitor the � I
fects on ground water. The well
farthest from the dump site is ! r'i I
feet away.
Periodic tests of thr ground
water followed. Para-dioxane did
notshowupuntil April I989,when
the state Supertund Section tested
for radioisotopes and a wider
range of chemicals than in pre i
ous EPA tests. The tests showed
traces of para-dioxane at dej I
of up to 150 feet. I he solution is
very water soluble, according
scientists.
Pennsylvania tightens abortion regulations
By MICHAEL BLOOD
The AMMiatrd Prr�
HARRISBUKG. Pa ' AIn
The state Senate has passed legis-
lation that would impost the
nation's strictest abortion controls,
prompting abortion foes to claim
"a big win" and pro-choice activ-
ists todecrv "a national disgrace
Thebiil passed by a 33-17vote
Tuesday night. Before being sent
to Gov. Robert P. Casey tor his
signature, it was returned to the
House for final approval, which
was expected Wednesday The
House passed the bill last month.
The Democratic gov ernor has
said he would sign it. If he divs.
Pennsylvania would become the
first sf.ite to enact controls on
abortion since the U.S. Supreme
i. ourt ruling in July opened the
wav for further state-level regula-
tion
Among the legislation's pro-
isions, women would be required
to notify their husbands of abor-
tion plans; abortions because of
the fetus' sex would be banned, as
would those after the 24th week of
pregnancy, except in cases where
the mother faces death or irrevers-
ible harm. The bill also would
establish a 24-hour wait from the
time a woman asks for an abor-
tion
"What the bill does is put some
sensible guidelines into law to try
to protect the life oi an unborn
child said Republican Sen.
Edward Helfrick. "It doesn't pre-
vent abortion, it just restricts it
But Republican Rep. Stephen
Freind, who drafted the bill and
guided it through the House, said:
"It's a big win; it's a big margin,
it's great
Abortion-rights advocates,
after watching attempts to dilute
the bill fail, warned that the Legis-
lature was out of step with na-
tional sentiment on abortion.
"It's a shame, a national dis-
grace said Sen. Vincent Fumo, a
Democrat.
Some predicted abortion
opponents would be voted out of
office.
"Having failed tochange their
minds, we will seriously commit
ourselves to changing their faces
on Election Day said Chris
Niebrzydowski, president ot the
state chapter of the National Or-
ganization for Women.
In addition to the other re-
strictions, the legislation would
require doctors to inform a woman
of the likely age of the fetus before
performing an abortion and ex-
plain the risks and alternatives. It
also would regulate the medical
use of tissue from aborted fetuses.
Passage of the bill comes after
a series oi victories elsewhere by
the abortion-rights side. Two
weeks ago, voters in New Jersey
and Virginia elected governors
with pro-choice positions. A spe-
cial session of Florida Legislature
With Macintosh
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never been this easy to own. Presenting The Macintosh Sale.
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of Apple' Macintosh computers and peripherals.
So now there's nc) reasc )n t) settle f r an (ordinary PC. With The
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Without spending a lot more money.
last month ended withlawmaki rs
rejectingeverv proposal to rest! �
abortions.
The biggest anti-abortion vie
tory since the Supreme Court's
Missouri ruling in a uih' known
as "Webster vs. Reproductive
Health Services' came last montl
:n Michigan, where the Senate
approved a bill requiring parental
consent for a girl under the agL' i t
18. That proposal is under House
consideration.
The Pennsylvania vote cam
as no surprise in the state's tradi
tionalry anti-abortion Legislature
The Senate debated the bill tor
more than five hours, but the nine
amendments offered to weaken
or revise thebiil tailed by no fewer
than five votes.
File
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Print98 P
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r-i
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Student Stores-Wright Building
tfk HUn �� �� . . mputtr, K





THE FAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 16, 1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed ASAP
Must be neat. Call 8301302 anytime.
ROOM FOR RENT: Biltmore street SI 25
a month- male or female. Call I uke at 752-
4464 leave a message
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Responsible &
considerate. S135 per month 13 utili-
ties. Private bedroom & bath Available
now 830-8880
ROOM FOR RENT: In voung couple's
home Private bathroom kitchen privi-
leges S200 14 utilities. Prefer graduate
student or voung professional - nonsmoker
Call 355-5078.
ROOMS FOR RENT: Walk to school
Utilities furnished S 137.50 month. 757-
3543
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
$150 month plus 1 (7 utilities Non
smoker and no pets Located dose to
campus off 10th street Apartment is
complete! v furnished except tor bedroom.
Seeking fun and energetic individual.
Please call 758-0676 after 10pm
FEMALE roommate WANTED: SIMlplus
utilities convenient to ECL' campus Call
752-4959 ask for Kerry.
FEMALE ROOMMATT : Needed 2nd
semester - cheap rent t 1 3 utilities Lo-
cated next to campus behind Chico's -
Brand New Apts Call Liz 758 3094.
FOR SALE
A.K.C. REGISTERED: Golden Retriever
puppies 4 - male lett 8- weeks old. Call
757-6432 or come bv
Ask for Judv Baker
TANDY COMPUTER:
and internal disk driv�
after 5:00 at 758 5227
!01 Memorial Gym.
Monitor, Printer,
Price neg. Call
FISH TANK: Salt Water, deluxe model,
50 gallon with all accessories. Already
established. $240 Call 758 5962 leave
message.
FURNITURE: Couch. 2chairs, 2end tables
St. coffee table Full size, hard wood. Per-
fect condition Call after 5 (.XI at 355-8092
andor leave message
BRAND NEW: Light blue 12' x 8 12'
wear dated carpet Never used. Wrong
color for owner's home OH Chervl at 551-
Native American Rituals Workshop
with Eustace Conway
Tfau � -vi r �i: � 1W- Injun dn r t �t ��� ft
pfertKjpaxm r -l-i �nQ help -� li�e � �.��� A h�jBKe
wim Nature A ciuicrvm
Whan xi Nm ; t 5pm
2900 before 5:00 or 355-2539 after 5:30 to
come by and look. Best offer.
COUCH AND CHAIR: $50 or best offer
Must sell! Call 752-9245. Day or night.
ATTENTION: Government seized ve-
hicles from $100 Fords, Mercedes, Cor-
vettes, Chevy s. Surplus Buyers Guide. 1-
602-838-8885 Ext. A5285.
AUTOS: Is it true you can buy jeeps for
$44 through the U.S. Government? Bet the
facts today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext 5271
A.
VEHICLES: Can you buy Jeeps, Cars, 4 x
4's. Seized in drug raids for under $100.00?
cal for facts today. 805-644-9533 Dept
711.
ONETICKET ToseetheRoUingStonesat
Clemson U. The Sunday after Thanksgiv-
ing, Nov. 26 for $60. If interested. Call 931 -
9205.
WET SUIT: Fathom, 14 inch. Farmer
John size L - 7. Excellent condition. Origi-
nal owner. Call Bob at 752-4916.
FOR SALE: Two leather skirts one beige,
one black; size 12. Length - and inch pass
knee, straight cut. Never worn, given as a
gift. Each - $75 . Call 931-9961 after 5:30 to
see skirt or for more info.
FOR SALE: Voikl Weltcup skies Ess Vaiz
proline bindings, high density core: Also
Schwin high Sierra 18 spd mountain bike,
Shimano decore SIS equipped Call for
prices 931-8710.
FOR SALE: Boss Cruiser( Earth Cruiser
w gears) Sells new $270. 2vrs old, Ex.
cond $150. Must sell graduating. Call
Nicole 758-5565.
FURNITURE: 2 vrs. old dresser, chest,
headboard Good cond $125 or best offer.
Call Nicole at 758-5565.
84 RENAULT ALLIANCE: DL, 4 door,
cassette, air Navv with beige interior.
Asking $3200 Must see make an offer.
Moving to Italy call 758-6701
MINT CONDITION So fresh you 11 slap
its face! Honda 50 motorscooter. Never
ndden, won in contest Black and purple,
710 of a mile, mileage. Great for univer-
sity parking. 100mpg S600. call Greg at
757-6009 davs or 758-7887 after 5.
FOR SALE: Handcrafted Jewelry, ear-
rings, Hairdips, anklets, and more. Over
150 items to choose from, can custom
make sorontv colors Christmas is just
around the corner! Call today! sandy 931-
7839 leave message.
SMALL DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR:
$35. Call 756-4514.
FOR SALE: Modem 2 bedroom. 2 bath
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
� AI I NEW2 BEDROOMS
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
28sN E. 5ih Street
(Ask us i - � om :� � raid to hangp kctfjtS, and
d�wunu fin November rental.)
� i treated Near ECU
� Near Major Shopping Centers
� ECU Bus Service
� Onsite Laundry
( aMad J T Wuiiams nr T.Jinrm William
756-7815 or 75K-74J6
� AZALEA GARDENS �
Cl F.A AM) J 1KT one bedrotar fun-tuned ajafauaa. energy
r'h lenl -nr � r rand � � r- � .u ��-� m tfvk TN
i a - � � 6 month leaae y
MOBILE Mi-MF RENTAl 5 Apamwi� anri moctlc how m
-Vaja-a Oafdom near Brae V alley Caunry Hub
Canua J T " � � or ! i � - -
ABORTION
�:ier srr.a 1 tnd Cor.f ilent ta i Car�"
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Cll for ippointmrnt Mon. thru Sit
I.iw Coat Ttrminjtior. tn 20 wttks o( Pirgruncy
Rollinwood cluster home. Fireplace,
washer - dryer space, enclosed, patio, much
storage space. Pool. A steal at S47,(XX)!
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE Papers, resumes,
thesis, etc. that need to be typed, please call
756-8934 between 5:30pm 9.30pm 17 vrs
typing experience Typing is done on
computer with letter qualitv printer
REPORTS, RESUMES,TYPINC, DESK-
TOP PUBLISHING, LASER PRINTING:
Designer type, 752-1933 We take reserva
tions for typing reports
WORD PROCESSING & PHOTOCOPY
ING SERVICES: We otter typing and
photocopying services We also sell sott
ware and computers 24 hrs in & out
guarantee tvping on paper up to 20 hand
written pages. SDF Professional comput-
ers. 10f E 5th St (beside Cubbies) Green-
ville, N.C 752-3694
GET ABOARD: Pirate nde, 3 routes on
the hour around campus Call 77-4724 tor
more details.
LONELYNEED A DATE? Meet that
special someone today' Call Hatetime at
(405) 366-6335
DEPENDABLE, PROFESSIONAL
TYPIST: With state of the art word
processing equipment and I aser printer
Will meet your typing needs. Call eve
nings: 756 - 18.37
NEED A PICK - UP: fur a small or medium
load' Movingltxallv? Will haul furniture
household items, brush piles misc Call
Vemon after 5pm at 757 042
HELP WANTED
DAYTIME: The Hilton is seeking full
part time employees in the food dept All
positions available Minimum S4 per hour
Excellent benefits Please call or come by
the Hilton in Greenville 355-5000 ask for
Matt Zak
INTERIOR DESIGNER: Apply in person
at Larry's carpet land 3010 E l!)th t.
ATTENTION- HIRING. Government
jobs- vour area Many immediate open
ings without waiting list or test S17.S40
$69,485. CaBl-602-838-8885 Ext R5285
HOLIDAY JOB OPPORTUNITY: The
I lonev Baked 1 lam Co is in search of sea
sonal help to till our sale, counter and
production positions We have stores Kv
cated in the following markets Raleigh.
Durham, Greensboro, Winston Salem,
Wilmington, Charlotte, and Atlanta Please
check the white pages or information tor
the store nearest your home
EARN $2,000 - $4,000: searching for
employment that permits working your
own hrs but still challenging enough fur
vour entrepreneurial skills7 Management
programs for Fortune 500companies. Call
1-800-932-0528 Ideal for grad students
GROWING BUSINESS: Need help Light
secretarial work, phone and handle I PS
shipping & receiving Office is 10 mile, out
of town Must have own transportation
Flexible hrs 12.30 pm -3.30 pm Monday
- Friday Send resume to Beaver Dam, Kt
4 Box 97-M, Greenville N 27834
GOVERNMENT JOBS: Slo,iV40 $59,230
vt. Now hiring. Call 1-805 687 6000 Ext
R - 1166 for current federal list.
EXCELLENT SUMMER & CAREER OP
1-800-433-2930
�a0t
Carolinian
and
ATTIC
(Presents
Thursday
WZMB X-Mas
in Nov.
Night
99 Imports
99tf Hi Balls
99 Memberships
BARBADOS
in the sun
or
Steamboat
OPPORTUNITIES: Now available for
college student At graduates with resort
hotels, cruisolines, airlines, amusement
parks and camps For more information
and an application Write National Colle
giate Recreation Service, P.O. Box 8074,
I hlton I lead S C. 29938
YOUTH BASKET BALL COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart
ment is recruiting tor 12 to 16 part time
youth basketball coaches for the winter
youth basketball program applicants must
possess some knowledge of basketball
skills and have ability and patience to work
with youths Applicants must be able to
coach young people, ages 9 18, in basket
ball fundamentals Hours are from 3 pm to
7 pm with some night and weekend coach
ing This program will run from Novem
ber27 to mid February Salary rate starts
at S 3 85 per hr tor more information,
please call Ben James at 8304543 or 830
4 7
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS MEETING:
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
I Vpartment will be holding their first
organizational league on Thursday, No
y ember 2, 1989 at 7 30 pm at the Qm St
Gvm All interested officials should at
tend this meeting For more information.
please call I .hiane irooms at 830-4550 or
830 4"67.
BRODY'S : Now's the time to earn some
extra spending money tor the holidays �
Brody's tor men is accepting applications
for part time saks asso Apply Brody's,
The I'laa M W, 1 4 pm or call for a more
convenient interview appi
BRODY'S : Christmas will be here before
vou know it You can start preparing tor
all those Christmas bills by applying tor a
part time pisition in saU or customer
service with Brody's Enjoy a merchandise
discount even Santa's elves would enjoy
apply with Brody's The plaza M W 1
4pm or call tor a more convenient inter
y lew appt
IRAVH FREE: Earncash M.�gulsSki&
Sun Tours. Is hiring campus marketing
representatives for spring break Jamaica,
Bahamas, Barbados Cancun those inter
ested should he motivated outgoing, and
organized Call Mathew Eynon at 1 800
6r" 4857
YOUTH SHOP- Part time sales & stovk
boy needtd Monday Wednesday, and
Friday , also every other Saturday For the
Youth Shop Boutique, Arlington Village
Apply in person
LOOKING : For a fraternity, sorontv or
student organization that would like to
make $500 $1,000 tor a one week on
campus marketing project Must he or
ganized and hardyvorking Call lennv or
Myra at (800V592-2121
REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED: Earn
$2500 and FKEE trip selling Bahamas,
Mexico. lamaica. spring break trips Spring
Break Travel 1-800-638 f-786.
MODEl S: Needed part-time for lingerie
and exercise production Send photo and
resume to Models C 0 DR, P.O. Box
1967 drawer 1446,Greenville, N C 27834
NEEDED CARPENTER: To yvork 30 hrs
a week Must have basic knowledge $5
hr Also need laborer to do variety ot
work,$4 hr 73. 0897
HUP WANTED: Dependable cab CO
drivers needed, afternoons, evenings and
weekends. Full and part time apply in
person, 200 W. 4th St 757-0288
GOVERNMENT JOBS: S16.040
$59,230 vt Now hiring. Call (1)805- 687-
6000 Ext. R- 1166 tor current federal list
AIRLINES NOW HIRING: flight Atten
dants, travel agents, mechanics, customer
service listings Salaries to S105K Entry
level positions. Call (1) 805-687-6000 Ext
A-l lKh
Thiring 'ECU
Sprinj 'Breaks
For More Information Call:
Jeffrey Shen
ACT IN TV COMMERCIALS: Highpav
No experience all ages, kids, teens,
voung adults, families, mature p�ople,
animals, etc Call now1 Charm Studios I
800-837-1700.
RIDE DESPERATELY NEEDED. From
K.D.U. airport after 7pm Thursday, Dec.
4th (the day before school) I will pav for
gas t $10 Please call ill at 911 7642 s
ATTEN TION: earn money reading books'
$32,1)00 vt income potential. Details (1)
602-838 8885 Ext Hk5285
ATTENTION: Hiring' government jobs
vour area Many immediate openings
without waiting list or test si7,840 -
$61.485 Call 1 602 838 8885 Ext RS285
MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR:
Needed for morning, afternoon and w�ek
end work Average of 2 hrs per week
Apply in person Greenville Athletic CTub,
140Oakmont Dr
IMAGE FASHION: Color consultant with
Americas Premier Image Co full or Part
time call IiarbaraSheipS(4,42i7sl'J tor
interview and or tree color Analysis
WANTED: full and part rime help Above
minimum wage to start Must have valid
driver's licence Apply in person at Adam's
Auto Wash Mon Wed 8 6pm Comer
of Red Banks Rd and Greenville Blvd s
HELP WANTED: Receptionist needed at
Greenville Optician Apply in person to
manager at Doctor's Park Building � 1 on
Stan'onsburg Rd (,xxi working condi
lions No phone calls please
PART -TIME HELP: Video tape editors
Proficient with 34' video Flexible hrs
New, oriented work. Call Chris McDanuT.
News Director, WITN - TV, 146 3131
WITNisan EqualOpportunity Employer
C'llK
756-4789
COPIES 5t
(Sell sop. ice 81 2 11 v. hite bond)
rz
sS-24110
1.1st lupus I or I jst 1 nut's
cosintheG irgetgi t I
r
A B
L E
BACK TO LIFE
BACK TO REALITY!
November 16
7:00 pm
Rm 1032
General Classroom Building
For More Information or a Membership
Application, Contact
Dr. Larry Smith (Advisor)
Whiehard 204
757-6495
or
Carla Hooker (President)
Mendenhall Student Center
757-4715
TOTHESIGMAS. VN.
hnd out that you were our secret sorority
thanks for all thecutepfta you s� nt! Low
the AZD's
TO ALL FHATEENITIES ND
SORORITIES: Hop you havi a great
Thanksgiving vacation, but be n id) to
celebrate the end of the semester when
get back' Love the AZD s
TOTHE Al PHA PHI'S: Hop.
vour presents last weei
your secret sorority Lovetlv Ds
ALPHA PHI PI FIX.is Vou all are worth
amillionSSS' Keep up the good work! It's
going to pay off! 1 ove the sisters
PHITALS: Such creahvi things ou all
wrote'7" The graffiti social
tun' Let's do it again real sooi � he
Alpha Phi's
CREEKS: )i a r laxing n � � .
break Don't stutt yourselves loo much!
And get ready tor the Christmas parl
and cocktails coming uj Ipha
Phis
LAMBDA C HI: !
Football weekend We'll have t
aam next season Lool
Cosby love the AI �Pi s
WE HOPI EVERYONI afe
and exciting Thanksgiving breal
the Alpha Delta Phi s
K) IHt AWI SOM1 DP1 BOWLERS
Autumn, Becki,nun ei if and �
a ob well d me
AI PH OMH K()S PI S
brunch was ,� - ' �'�� I
you had a good time ll s ust -
remember everything Stephanu
your videotape recordei next turn Wt
ntsvi an " '
PtRSONALS
CAY WHITE MALE: Seeking othei .
male students tor friendship, companion
ship, and to try and torm a gav male stu
dent support group (which can be either
tormal or very informal) When you write
please indicate how to get in touch with
vou either bv phone or bv mail As there is
a lot of "homophobia here at ECU all
replies will be kept confidential indicate
how discreet vou need tor me to be in
contacting you as I respect your right to
privacy If interested please write to
Frank, PC). Box 4W1, Greenville, N.C
27ST6 2IN1
GOBBLE GOBBLE! The student Union
wishes you a sate and happy Thanksgi
ing Gobble Gobble!
HAPPY 22NDBIRTHPAY: ToTkeflythe,
the best big brother a gir! ouldhavi ! Love
vou hi sister Lynn
WHITE, HRIST1AN,SENIOR,MAI 1
seeks strict!) casual friendship v.ith non
smoking white female Am sott spoken
butnotshy first priority is school Enjoy
opera, soft rock, dancing, photography
Handy man type Only serious replies
please Givedass major, and3paragraph
description of yourself. Reply 10Q5S Elm
St Box 4.
ZETA'S: At spin we all arm sj dressed to
kill and hay e the time ot our iiyes The
country club yas defiantly groovm' Out
on the dance Boor everyone was movin
In the bathroom all night, Jane yvas seen
and soon later Mandy was crowned queen
As the night rolled on, the drinks kept
flowing and we lett the club - everyone
knowing The 1 89 Crown Ball was really a
treat, one that we know will never be beat!
You freaks M; too cool!
PI KAPPS : Congratulations gin out to
the new members of Executive Council
Archon - Tommy Walters. Vice Archon
will Barker; Sec - Keith Zito, Tres Rich
ard Lithhen; Historian Nelson Scott
Chaplin Mark Roberts; The past Exec did
a hell of a job. lets keep up the good work
PI KAPPS: 1 lope everyone has a sate and
happy Thanksgiving Remember don't
drink and drive.
HEY STRANGER! Sigma stranger dates
git ready, once again tor another eventful
evening!
STEVE "BLOWCHUCK"
SCARBOROUGH: Congratulations on
the hail marv Boy can you toss! ThetaChi
TO THE AZD SISTERS: 1 lave a great
Thanksgiving break! We'll miss you' The
AZD pledges
ALPHA SIG: It's a conspiracy Don't let
Joey have the "Fred" award. To Riggan,
Buzz � Buzz" Paul's dog is a homosexual.
Next pridential is in Gary's .xi (Sorry
Beckeith) Mike Daly, if you don't get a
date for formal, we're going to fake a pic
ture of vour belly
TO ALL ECU STUDENTS: 1 lave a nice
Thanksgiving and don't forget exams
coming up! Love the AZD's
IHI I C HI PI I IK .1 s
. ��
got a little oul of hand �'
guy- be gr at broi
understand tr
dj The brothers '
AR
for a wl � �
all started with a ttl
dass Anyhow I hop
man) many moi
1 love .a' Blondie P I
are doing an a ives
KARYN HENDERSON
to know I'm think
you're doing a great job pledg esl
isonly yet to conn
ZETA TAU ALPHA
sate and happy ai � -
Al 1 CRT IKS Wjv a .
Thaniss-A mg r ng .
Sl(. 1 Al PI 1 IK.is r breal
wisely hinl r you
1990 rhe I -� mers
GRAHAMI
our 1st dati
make it forever .
harm
RA RA: Blame it or the Ra
Sweet
MRE: (1 lum I lai
I lappv Birthday !
dear Mark Happy Birthday to
Hope it's a great one! Love always SRS
KIM & AMY: rhanks toallol
work the formal was a great success
Thanks again The Ngmas
CONGRATULATIONS: Marta nei
The Sigmas
I AH S & OHN M v
exhibition Saturday
DANA AND s.),
both of you! I guess �� � .
runs m the family' 1 love ya
CONGRATULATIONS
"sigma Award Winners for
semester Best Pledge Sonya H ming
way Most Spirited pit Igi
dennin, Best Scrapbook an
Best pledge sister sonva ivay,
Best Sister Da
Hightst GPA Shephanie Quini Most
Improved GPA Stej hame Quinn
JOHN MCCUISTION . � il ihons
onwinningthe"Best( -
us weknoys whatwi
The Sigmas
ROBiNsmoi ryti heal
about your room We'reherefoi
Sigmas
IT AIN'T OV1 R YET SCARLETT,
goeig to get mv pound ot flesh ye: Rhett
Continued on p;njt 7
Annual
Christmas in 9ppemBer
TONIGHT at the Attic
�Wear Red or Green
and Receive
Reduced Admission!
�FREE Tapes & CDs Will
Be Given Out!






1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 16,1989 7
Announcements
i"ht
ATTENTION TO ALL
East Carolinian will be changing its
x v concerning announcements, start-
� in lanuary, announcements will now
. �r.vloronlvthelst week of publication,
after that week there will be a charge of
I� 25 words for student organizations -
S2 i1 and for non- student organizations
v 00 anv additional words will be $.05.s
CKEAILYEAIVING CENTER
v. �.oii a Pitt County resident, 60 years
. rider and need a ride to your medi-
a! appointment? The Creative Living
i is offering transportation service to
elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt County such as doctors, den-
tists dinks, therapies, and the Health Dept.
� r.i n eemen ts for the service must be made
isl 4 hours before the scheduled
itment Call the Creative Living
tei 757 -G303 to reserve your ride.
0 U AUIY TO BE AIR FORCE
OFFICER
n e ir Force Officer Qualifying Test will
administered on Nov. 9 and 30 in rm.
. if Wnht Annex. Testing will begin at
1:00 both dates. Successful testing can lead
to a challenging job as an Air Force Of ficer.
. pilot, navigator, engineer, computer
scientist, manager and a variety of others.
Call 757-6597 or stop by room 306of Wright
Annex to sign up for the test and discuss
your options.
ARE YOU A PERFORMER?
Jugglers, Mimes, magiciansand other Eliza-
bethan characters, the Student Union
would like to talk to you about performing
in the Madrigal Dinners. Call 757-4711 and
ask for Ron Maxwell.
SOPHOMORES
ECU Sophomores interested in a career in
government service at the federal, state, or
local level are invited to applv for a 1990
Harry S.Truman Scholarship. In April 1990,
the Foundation will award 92 scholarships
nationally. The DEADL1N E for all 1990 ap-
plications is DEC 1,1989. ECU can nomi-
nate 3 students for the 1990 competition
The scholarship award covers eligible ex-
penses up to $7,0U) per year for the jr sr.
and two years of graduate study. To be
eligible, astudent must be a full-timeNopho-
more working toward or planning to pur-
Salvadorian rebels look for
popular support in uprising
Bv DOUGLAS GRANT MINE
Dw AMOctaMd Fro
SAN SALVADOR, El Salva-
dor (AP) � Leftist rebels Wednes-
day tned to tan the flames of their
4 -dav-old offensive into a popular
insurrection. President Alfredo
v nsriani called the insurgent push
the acl of "a desperate beast
Both Cristiani's rightist ad-
ministration and the Marxist-led
arabundo Marti National Libera-
tion Front claimed widespread
popular support. More than 500
people have been reported killed
in the lighting.
Rebel commander Ana
uadalupe Martinez, speaking
early Wednesday on the insur-
ants' clandestine Radio Vencere-
los, said the guerrillas had de-
sired more than a quarter of the
Massachusetts-sized country
iterated She said revolution-
try committees had been set up in
ens of towns.
"We call on the popular com-
mittees to give priority to the task
of supporting the combatants
to form militias, to construct work-
shops of popular armament, to
collect food, medicine and ban-
dages and organize the means of
getting them to the combat zones
she said.
Cristiani said the offensive,
begun Saturday night, "has been a
failure" for the guerrillas.
"The harshest blow to them
has been the repudiation of the
people he said in a speech broad-
cast nationwide Tuesday night.
"This (the offensive) is the act of a
desperate beast
The combat, a state of siege, a
dusk-to-dawn curfew and a guer-
rilla-imposed road transport ban
made circulation difficult, at times
impossible. These conditions
hampered efforts to gauge the
degree to which the general popu-
lation was being swayed toward
See SAN SALVADOR, page 9
sue a baccalaureate degree, have a b aver-
age or equivalent, stand in the upper 4th of
the class, and be a U.S. citizen or U.S.
national heading toward a career in gov-
ernment. Interested students should sub-
mit a letter of interest to Dr Maurice Si
mon, Truman Scholarship Faculty Kep,
1002C,CBby Nov. 3.
PERFORMING ARTIST
CLINIC
If vou have an injury or illness you feel is
due to your activities as an artist vou can be
treated at the Student Health Center at a
special clinic for performing artist. This
clinic is open to all music, dance and drama
majors and will be held the second and
fourth Fnday of the month starting Oct.
27th. Call 757-6317 for an appointment or
questions! This clinic is held in addition to
the performing art clinic at the ECU School
of Medicine. Musicians bring your instru-
ments
ECU LACROSSE
The ECU Lacrosse team is looking for any
interested staff or faculty member to coach
in the spring 1Q90 season. If interested
please contact John or Kelly at 757-1537
REGISTRATION FQR GENr
ERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS
General College students should contact
their advisers the week of Nov 6-10 to
makearrangements for academic advising
tor spring semester, 1990. Early registra-
tion will begin Nov. 13 - 17.
CAROLINA MINORITY LAW
DAY
The UNC school of Law, the Black Law
Students Asso and The Student liar Asso.
invite interested minority students to par-
ticipate in a Law School Information Dav
on Fndav, Nov. 17. The day long confer-
ence will be held at the UNC School of La w
in Chapel Hill beginning at 8:45 am and is
poem to anyone who is thinking about at-
tending law school.
ECU FORENSIC SOCIETY
"Closer to Dead Poets than you think"
We're a societv based on writing, debate
and individualism with a touch of cha-
risma� not a society based on lying in a
cold mortuary with a tag on your toe. So,
get involved in tht live action competition
of the ECU Forensic Society. We meet
weekly in the GCB, rm. 1001 a. 7pm Tues-
days.
EXERCISE AND NUTRITION
Tracy Morton a Greenville spa fitness in-
structor will discuss nutritional incentives
and info, about getting the most from your
workout. Tue Nov28 from 12 - pm in
Memorial Gym. A session in lm-Rec Serv-
ices fall fitness series, welcomes all faculty,
staff, and students to attend. Please regis-
ter Mon. Nov. 27. For more info, call 757-
6387.
CANCUN FOR SPRING
BREAK
Last available apartment. Sheraton
oceanfront 5 - star luxury apartment. 8
days and 7 nights (March 4-11). Sleeps 10
comfortably. $200 per person. 3 full baths.
Jacuzzi. Completely furnished kitchen with
microwave. Contact 355-6500.
EXPRESSIONS
Now has positions available for a com-
puter layout artist and an assistant graphic
design artist, for further details please
visit the office located in the Publications
Bldg. across from Joyner Library or call at
757-6927 or 757-6009.S
PHI IJPSILON OMICRON
Phi Upsilon Omicron Home Economic
1 lonorary Society will have a fall initiation
of new members Dec. 4. Must have 3,0
GPA, completed 40 hrs, HE. major. We
want you! Contact Dr. Brohannon or Br.
Farrior, Home Economics Department or
call 355-7408 for more information.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
MEETING
ODN is having a special meeting on Nov.
16 at 5:30pm in GCB 1025. This meeting is
to decide on the project we must adopt and
to plan for our fundraising dinner. Please
attend if you are a member of our group
and please feel free to attend if you are
interested in helping those in third world
countries.
Learning how to improve your study skills
for greater success in college. The follow-
ing mini course and workshops can help
you prepare for the added workload of
collegeor help to increase your grade point
average. All sessions will be held in 313
Wright building. Mon. - Tue, Nov. 27 -28,
Test taking from 3- 4:30pm.
PJLMAIQRSXUJB
There will be a meeting on Thurs. Nov. 16
at 8pm in MingesCol. rm 143 All majors
and intended majors are welcome, don't
forget!
Phi Mu Alpha Christmas MustcaJe (Nov.
27, 9pm, Hetcher Recital Hall, free).
THE REFORMIST PARTY
The Reformist Party holds meetings every
Tuesday at 5pm in the GCB, rm 1032. All
factions of campus are welcome and en-
couraged to attend.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention Gamma Beta Phi member:
There will be a mandatory meeting at 7pm,
Thursday at 244 Mendenhall. Attend or
die!
IMPROVING STUDY SKILLS
NATIVE AMERICAN RITUr
ALS
workshop with Eustace Cohway. Sunday,
Nov. 19, 1 - 5 pm at river Park North,
Greenville. Cost of $21 eustace, a gradu
ate in anthropology from Appalach St.
Univ has traveled all over the continent
and has lived extensively with Indians in
Mex Alaska, Ariz and N.C As well as
having been a naturalist for N.C. State
Parks, he has kayaked lOOOmi. along
Alaska, hiked the entire Appalach Trail,
and served as leader of a Miss, river canoe
expedition from St. Louis to New Orleans,
for more information, call 756 - 0449.
ECUJQOSPELCIHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir will sponsor a
Variety Show featuring comedy, music and
drama on Nov. 28. Along with the show,
a raffle will be held to win prizes. All
interested parries who would like to par-
ticipate , please contact a member of the
choir. The show will be held in rm. 244 in
Mendenhall student center, price is $1
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS NOV. 14 - 27
Instrumental Chamber Music student
recital (Nov. 15,7pm, fletcher Recital Hall,
free); Percussionists Doug Walker and
Scotty Sells, Senior recital (Nov 15, �pm,
Fletcher Recital Hall, free); Final Round of
Concerto Competition (Nov 16, 3pm,
Fletcher Recital Hall, free), Bill Mitchell,
tuba. Senior recital (Nov. 16,7pm, Fletcher
Recital hall, free); Michael 1 lart, saxophone.
Graduate Recital (Nov. 16, 9pm, Hetcher
Recital Hall, free); Dennis Klophaus, trom-
bone. Junior Recital (Nov 27,7pm, Fletcher
Recital Hall, free); sigma Alpha Iota and
ATTENTION DISABLED
STUDENTS
Computer science, math, chemistry, and
physics majors are needed for Co-op posi-
tions in Charlottesville, Virginia, (very
accessible work environment and commu-
nity.) Please contact the cooperative edu-
cation office, 2028 GCB, 757-6979.
PERFORMING ARTS
Performing Arts company in Virginia has
Co-op positions available in media rela-
tions, advertising, publications, technical
theatre, and education. Please contact the
Cooperative Education office, 2028 GCB,
75706979.
ECU MODEL
EPNA-
Tjommm
TheECUMUNC is going to have an organ-
izational meetingat 7pm on Monday, Nov.
27. For location and or more information
please call Dr spalding at 757-6130
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLI-
CANS
WE will meet Thurs. Nov. 16 at 730pm in
rm. 305 JoyneT Library.
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
The school of Education wishes to invite
all students, faculty and staff and their
spouses andor dates to attend the annual
Christmas Social on Nov. 29, The Wednea-
day after Thanksgiving . It will be held at
Courtney square in the social rm. from 7
until 11. There will be food and dancing
and a whole lot more. Dress well be nice
casual. We hope to see you there Any
questions call MicheUeat757-1039 or Cindy
at 758-9278.
Classifieds
Continued from page 6
BROTHERS OFS1G EPS: Bring the noise!
Pledges
AOPI'S: The sub went fast and the cham-
pagne didn't last This was our second
brunch and everybody had a blast. And
don't forget the superbowl where getting
drunk will be our goal. We would like to
thank you all. All of the guys had a ball
Theta Chi
THETA CHI BOWLING: Congrats for
winning all campus. To Ted Fogelmans
coming alive at the end of the season. To
Phil Palermo's instrumental leadershipand
beating hes man in both championship
games. To Jere look's fouling in the tenth
frame and losing to his guv twice. To Jeff
White's 384 series and we'll be back next
year. Theta Chi
TO THE NEWLY ELECTED A2D
OFFICERS: Congratulations, We can't
wait to see you in action! The AZD pledges
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
YouVe seen it.
You're curious.
Now's your chance to find out more.
The Ultimate Student Living Experience.
Showing Weekday Afternoons
from 2pm - 5pm
BOOK BUY - BACK
or
can 830-8882
Now Leasing For Spring Semester
Lighten your load!
Carry cash instead of books!
BRING ALL YOUR USED TEXTBOOKS TO:
BOOKSTORE
Wright Building
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30am - 5:00pm
Telephone: 757-6731
Cloth or paper! Whether Used On This
Campus or Not!
We buy all titles having national
resale value!





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STUDENT STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING

Student Kelly Matheson
Course Anthropology 101
Instructor Professor A Osserman
The Neanderthals:
A New Look at an Old Face
rganic Chemistry jot
Professor E Snuth
figure �
1924), theP?-
njori MoMtMB
lowito stud
t-jjiv�to M
UlLl� MffM
hat �M �
ttt
btoodirtjor.

if beginning
Anthropologists crawl around on their hands and knees,
sifting through piles of rubble, slate, and bedrock looking for
bits and pieces of ancient human bone. After collecting hun-
dreds of bone fragments, some barely larger than small rocks
or pebbles, these scientists make broad, sweeping assertions
about how this, that, or the other part of human anatomy
looked one, two, or three million years ago. Understandably,
considering the amount of evidence that they have to work
with, anthropologists occasionally make mistakes. In the case
of Neanderthal man, they made a doozy. For, unlike the com-
mon representation, Neanderthal man was not a beetle-
browed, hunch-backed, knuckle-dragging, muscle-bound
savage at all. In fact, if recent findings prove correct, he
more closely resembles a broad-foreheaded, long-armed,
buff mental midget like those found in todays weight rooms.
Granted, it's not a heck of an improvement but it's one that
warrants further discussion and research.
H. sapiens�Myth or fiction?
At one time, before the theory of gravity existed, it was
thought the earth (being flat as a pancake) was supported in
mid-air on the shoulders of a giant, who in turn stood squarely
on�you guessed it� the back of a tremendous tortoise.
The point being, human progress is based on scientists righting
the intellectual wrongs of the past. In which case, today's
anthropologists have their work cut out for them. For, as scien-
tist Jim Avery recently stated in the Weekly National Star "Our
4�
FjCH . KBf. I
.Ml H
Above: A Neanderthal skul! Notice the
targe cranial capacity and massive jaws
�the
��nd

c.
�A
ti







Research finds direct link between
drinking and heart enlargement
NEW ORLEANS (AP) � For
those who enjoy a drink or two
each day, tho latest news from
medical research is bad espe-
cially it they are over age 50.
I tu research suggests that
drinking causes dangerous en-
irgemcnt of the heart. And the
rs w ho conducted the study
.n it convinces them that older
people should give up booze en-
tor the Nike of their hearts.
rhe stud) found an associa-
� tween alcohol consumption
nlargement of the left ven-
� ' heart's main pumping
San Salvador
tr�
i were deserted
tor the third straight
ropped by heli-
erthe Mejicanos
d and tracer-laced
thegunships' JO-cali-
guns sporadically
rking-classdistrict.
�s was pne of several
i ds on the capital's
where insurgents were
hod
fighting hasbeen the fierc-
rebels' "final offen-
� !�� 1981 tailed to win
vei : least 500 people
� ported killed in the
5ah ador, with nearly
M number reported
I according to the mill-
Change
( Fast West rela-
( -Warsaw i act's
ontinued from page 5
ledge they have been
ised by the rapidly changing
hite 1 louse press secre-
larlin Fitzv atersaid experts
State Department, Na-
mcil and other
were evaluating devel-
� ewakeof last week's
� �� Berlin Wall.
said that, rather than
I by the idea ot the
� � lermany, "there
Trre;i
status of the Soviet
�untries change
Kip with Moscow.
II of those issues and ques-
msidered by the
vernment at this
I said Obviously the
ill for inswers that will
relationshipsand
� - ind programs
hangesin Europe will be
' the agenda when
:� hev in the ship-
it in the waters of the
ofl the coast of
heightened expec-
nited States is trving
ah the summit.
till sv it as an informal
. �vhere no decisions will
said one administra-
ial insisting on anonym-
� some political leaders are
ssing concerns about the
meeting. Sen. Sam unn,
hairman of the Armed
ommittee, has warned
Bush should expect a pro-
Gorbachev to with-
ill I S and Soviet armed
fi m E urope within a few
� idministrationalsohas
varned that Gorbachev may
� dismantling NATO and
�" irs ivs Pact,
ish spike oi the develop-
: Eastern Europe during a
i to a gathering of foreign
ters from Latin American
sure the people in every
i re are caught up in this
ntastu change that's taking
�. aid '
� rats are pressing Bush
�!d more strongly to the
s � ping Eastern Europe.
!�� Majority Leader George
D Maine, said it was
� � that Bush had rejected
li i ! going to Berlin to ex-
ss American satisfaction with
mbolic destruction" of the
r to normalize trade rela-
� ith the Soviet Union.
ile the president has re-
i all ot these, he has reversed
himself on issues before and I hold
nt hope he will do so again
Mitchell said.
for his part, Bush hailed the
lecision byechoslovakia, one
f the last hard-line Soviet bloc
i itions, to ease travel restrictions
n its citizens, calling it "a very
� n ouraging first step
"Even the smallest doses of
alcohol seem to have some effect
on left ventricular mass said Dr.
Ten A. Manolio of the National
Institutes of Health in Bethesda,
Md.
The findings were based on
information from 1,968 men and
2,505 women who took part in the
Framingham Heart Study in sub-
urban Boston.
"Age is also a factor said
Manolio, "and our conclusion is
that anyone past the ageof50or so
� and certainly anyone who al-
ready has an enlarged heart �
would be better off not drinking at
all-
Left ventricular enlargement
is associated with dangerous ir-
regular heart rhythms. The more
ventricular size increases, the
greater the risk of heart failure
and death.
The link was most pro
nounccd in men. While women's
hearts appear to be less suscep-
tible to the bad effects of alcohol,
the researchers said this may
simply be because women typi
cally drink less than men.
The research was presented
Tuesdav at the annual scientific
meeting of the American Heart
Association.
Continued from page 7
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 16, 1989 9
tary hospitalsand morgue reports.
Fighting was reported in east-
ern provinces, to which travel is
restricted. A 10-year-old civil war
between the rebels and a succes-
sion of U.Sbacked governments
has claimed an estimated 70,000
people, most of them civilians.
Rebel leaders ordered the of-
fensive after announcing they
would not participate in peace
talks scheduled for next week in
Venezuela. They said Cristiani's
government was not negotiating
seriously and blamed it for the
Oct. 31 bombing of a union head-
quarters that killed 10 people and
wounded 29.
Two leftist political leaders
who had been operating publiclv
since late 1987 took refuge in the
Mexican and Venezuelan embas-
sies. The leaders, Guillermo Ungo
and Ruben Zamora, have not
asked for asvlum and are de-
scribed by their hosts as "guests
Many leaders of union, pas
ant and student organizations
considered guerrilla fronts by the
government have gone under-
ground this week. Cristiani, a
rightist who took office une 1,
said government forces h.ui
"neutralized" insurgents on San
Salvador's southeastern, southern
and western periphery, but that
combat continued with dug -in
rebels on the northern outskirts.
"The armv is advancing, but
advancing slowly he said. He
accused the guerrillas of holding
civilians "hostage" and of using
them as "screens" against armv
counterof fensi ves.
"There is no danger whatever
of the government being toppled
he said.
igma Pi Fraternit;
International
is Proud to Announce our Colonization at
East Carolina University
Congratulations to Our Colony Members
Kenny Acord
Larry Bennett
Todd Bingham
Calvin Bowman
John Bullard
Bruce Campbell
Steve Campbell
Robert Childress
Jim Chiperfield
William Clay
Chuck Dant
Nick Dicandio
Craig Dodson
Todd Griffin
Scott Hall
Layne Harris
Brad Herald
Rob Lashley
Pat Landry
Neill McKay
Dustin Miller
Matt Morris
Joe Murphy
Tom Musselman
Edward Nylen
Bill O'Connor
Worth Paschal
Shane Ray
Barry Reese
Chris Riley
Mike Rubinosky
JefTSkillen
Dylan Talbot
SteveWalser
Up to your ears ?
Dig yourself out with a
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What's more, when ycu buy your PS2�, you will get a mouse pad, a
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How're you going to do it? PS2 it!
See DARRIN SCOTT, TIM HESTER or SI BASS (IBM's Collegiate Reps)
Monday - Friday (10:00 - 2:00) at the Student Stores.
They'll be glad to answer any questions you might have and help you make the right choice
'nron Wed IRM PJr ?� 5! "H2Z? " ' 8�� E21 855� 031 8555 061 � 857� E61 ,hn uy 15 1Q90 Fhe
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of Prodigy Services Company a partnership of IBM and Sv. a k ana trademark
"Proprmter is a trademark of international Business Machines (� �; ral n IBMi rj 1989





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Thanksgiving Day
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
NOVEMBER If 1989 PAGE 11
Students tell
happened on
Hv VAN FAHNESTOCK and
JOHN HAAR
Special H The laj�tjnihnun
Some of those arrested in the
Iar River Estates vicinity on Oct.
were interviewed bv ECU stu-
dents in Dr. Beverly Merrick's
reporting class The information
was verified bv police reports.
Most students willingly talked
and wanted to express their opin-
ions against what they sav was
unethical behavior bv the citv
police, including verbal and phvsi-
al abuse.
Nearly 140 people were ar-
rested on the charge of failure to
disperse. None were told their
i barge at the time of their arrest.
One student said, "Nothing was
said to me. 1 asked and was told
that all my questions would be
answered downtown
Another said, of the police,
rhey did not tell us what was
going to happen to us or what the
charges were.
"When asking the officers
what the charge was or what was
going to happen, 1 was told that
the charge mav be trespassing or a
minor traffic violation. Then it
became failure to disperse at the
magistrate's office one said.
One student was "detained
on one particular charge, then
actually charged with another.
Richard C. Giddens, 21, a junior
taking a semester off from ECU,
,s as on his way home to Tar River
apartments when a policeman
walked up to him and told him he
was being "detained" for trespass-
le was taken downtown with
the other arrestees and told he had
been arrested for failure to dis-
(. liddens later asked what the
lition of failure to disperse
as and he was told it was being
in a group of three or more. Gid-
J ns was not.
Several arrestees said they
alking in groups ofthree or
because1 of the recent rape
rrences.
Many of those arrested state
. were walking home from
Lexicon
Mushrooming
Answers from
Tuesday's paper
1 Expiate. C. apoligize
2 Jejune: A. lacking
interest
3 Pervade: A spread
throughout
A August: C. dignified
5. Indigenous: D native
6. Repast: A. meal
7. Fruition A. fulllfill-
ment
8. Fealty D. loyalty
9. Cervlean: A. sky blue
10 Astral: D. starlike
- Compiled by Matt
Richter
Coming
up
Thursday
NEW DELI
Stegmonds
0' ROCKEFELLERS
Uncle Green
ATTIC
Johnny Quest
Friday
NEW DELI
Crystal Sky
0 RfXXEFELLERS
Boogey Monsters
ATTIC
The Comedy Zone
Saturday
NEW DELI
Blue Note Special
0" ROCKEFELLERS
Phil and the Blanks
ATTIC
The Showmen
what really
Halloween
otheraroasand were not involved
in the Tar River party. According
to a letter to the editor of The East
Carolinian" in the November 7,
1989 issue, a person arrested 1 lal-
lo ween night, wrote, "1 was sober,
1 had no alcohol on me,I was not
yelling, 1 was not throwing any-
thing or damaging property. 1
had no intention of causing any
trouble, I was only trving to go
home
One man peeked out of his
apartment door to get a glimpse of
the action and was seized. He
expresses, "1 feel I was unjustly
arrested because I was just stand-
ing in my doorway
Everyone was fined $200 for
bail.
Many feel the situation was
not handled professionally. A
student said, "Plastic handcuffs
were put cn me, which later had to
be cut oft with a pocketknife. This
See related story
on page 12
wa s not very professional. 11 seems
to me that thev were not trained to
handle the situation thev brought
on
Another man, who is not an
ECU student, said, "It was ridicu-
lous. It was not handled very
professionally. I heard the police
were told not to chase people. It
thev ran, to let them go. But they
(police)did not 1 leadded, "They
(police) went hog-wild
There were complaints of
verbal and physical abuse A stu-
dent claims his arresting officer
told him laughing, "If you move
I'll break your f ing arm The
man says, I was never hand-
cuffed, but 1 was picked off the
ground and earned to the bus. I le
also broke my watch
An ECU freshman, Michael
K. Yarsamis, 19,proclaims, "I was
verbally abused by thepolice. One
of the arresting officers told me,
"hist shut upd head Yarsamis
said. "I did not do anything to
provoke it
Yarsamis added the opinion
that the cops acted like thev were
having a good time.
Another explains, "I was
grabbed by the shirt and put on
the bus She continues, "The
officers acted obnoxious, like they
were on an ego trip. Thev had a
terrible attitude. Rude
Several persons questioned
the officials'actions and were told
to "sit down and shut up
Four out of ten people re-
sponded that thev were treated all
right.
In court, many said thev re-
ceived rude and unfair treatment.
There were opposing views
on whether the crowd in Tar River
noted or if the police caused riot-
ing behavior.
Thomas Barry, a freshman at
E U, has seen riots before and in
his opinion, "What happened in
Tar River was not a not. It was
merely a massive, social party
Other arrestees were not at
the party, they were walking home
near the area on side streets so
they could not completely sav that
there was not a riot, but thev did
not hear a riot in the area.
"Police caused the onlv riot in
See RIOT onpagel2
13
For the week of
1 11689
1. Primitives
2. Mighty Lemon Drops
3. Alarm
4. Wonderstuff
5. 7 Seconds
6. Psychedelic Furs
7. Screaming Blue Messi-
ahs
8. Uncle Green
9. Joe Strummer
10. IanMcCulloch
11. Voodoo Gearshift
12. Smithereens
13. Jesus and Mary
Chain
Registration
reates
problems
By JOHN TUCKER
�- �� ' rf tr tdltOT
These ECU students celebrated Halloween at last veas's non-riotous block partv with open ears. The
1988 block party showed few similarities to this year's festivities. About 25,0(X) people turned out for
last year's party, and although people had fun, there wasn't a riot. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire - - ECU
Photolab)
Tipper Gor is more than an act
Thrash band believes in its music
BvCHIP SWARTZ
Vllt Wr.trr
Since their inception just over
a year ago, Tipper (lor has tanta
lized (terrorized? I local rock and-
roll clubs with its lethal speed
metal stylings. Bassist and vocal
ist Andy Bedrosian, drummer
ohn Kinlaw, and guitarists ohn
West and Stacy Little have been
given the enviable distinction of
being able to turn any civilized
night ilub into a primal sauna
where law and order fly right out
the window.
Aside from the fact that Tip
per (ior isoneof only a handful of
North Carolina thrash bands, w hat
separates Bedrosian and cohorts
from the endless sea of local reck
acts is that thev actually belie eiri
the music they c reateand j lerform.
i ipper( .or is one band that seems
tohavetruh s!d itssoul fori
and roll and the ex id( nee is in the
band s material. Songs like " o
came Wars" md "Smell the c of-
tee" function asan integral part i
each member.
A quick debugging is neces-
sarily in order here for some people
due to the large quantities of mis-
information that has been (in u-
lated about this , ategorv of rock.
Yes, the material Tipper (r
plays is aggressive. At times it
even borders on bleak vnicism. it
is not, heer, in anv wa an
electri li to Satan. These boys
mere (Hunt iy the blatant fail-
of sot iety that can be w it-
sst.vi daih on anv local street
corner and express them in terms
that capture the shocking nature
of the problems If de ofend, de is
so wry.
Insight into the group'sbrand
of dark humor can be seen in their
very name, ripper I lore, the
overzealous wife of ex-Senator
Albert( .ore. hashe omeinfamous
tor her censorship assaults on the
rock-and-roll industr 1 lermox es
to impose a mandatory record-
rating system and to restrict the
sales of certain releases to minors
have made her fair game for
counterattacks, it seems onlv fit-
ting that she be associated with
one of the most illicit bands
around.
Being based in Greenville has
had some built-in advantages but
the overriding effects have been
negative. With a very limited
market and virtually no ompeh-
tion ripper Cor has had to turn
See T1PPPR COR on page n
Pick iff the bones:
Feel like you need to rip your
hair out, bang your head against
the wall and cry or punch some-
one Let me guess, you must be
trying to pre register for classes
next semester
Yep, it's that time of the year
when students, faculty, and staff
are inundated with the tvpical
hassles that go along with trving
to register so vou can graduate
sometime before vou die.
The first step in the process of
pre-registration is to at least try to
pick some classes vou feel are
neccassary in furthering vour
academic career. Of course al-
ways pick at least 27 hours be-
i auseyou know that you will onlv
get nine hours of classes that vou
chose, before the pr w ess is tinallv
over
I he next step is to track down
the perpetually elusive advisor
who has the magic pre-registra-
tion form. It you're lucky you
know who he or she is, and vou
tar, walk into their office finding
them ex ited and ready to assist
VI IU
But most likely you will walk
all the way out to Minges Coli-
seum and find that vou have a
new advisor that has an office
located in Whichard Annex When
vou do somehow manage to track
your advisor down and finally
( Itch them during office hours,
the actual meeting that you've
worked so hard to arrange is usu-
ally anti-climatic.
walk into their office and
thev look at you and ask, "Do vou
know what classes you need to
SeeKFGISTFR on page 12
BoneheacTs Inferno
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Proftuiunal Tutanst
"Nel mezzo del carnrnin di
nostra vita mi ritrovai per una
seJva oscura "
� some Italian stutf from the
real "Inferno"
When I came through three-
quarters of mv college career, I
found myself in a huge wooded
area and 1 didn't know where 1
was. 1 looked over and saw some
strange looking creature in the
darkness.
Was it the Squirrel Man? An
obese writer of bad poetry? Pat
Benatar? It beckoned me forward
and said unto me, "flurry, man.
We only ha ve 20 colu mn inches or
so to parody 34 cantos of Dante's
'Inferno Get a move on, cool
Thus 1 followed the shadowy
figure. We found a steep and sav-
age path, went down it and thus
found the Gate to Hell. Not sur-
prisingly, it looked a lot like High-
way 2M.
There was an inscription
above the gate and lor the sake of
having my mysterious friend
converse a little more, I had him
translate for me. With a visagelike
death and a voice like canned
salmon, he said, "It readcth,
'Greenville, a great place to work
and grow Anv more questions,
O Dense One?"
"But whdt does that mean?
What is its significance? Does it
have anything to do with those
Rocky Mount commercials?" 1
asked, fearing my Boneheadcd
ignorance would cause my guide
to become pissed off.
"It means 'Abandon every
hope, who enter here Look, man
I'm trying to get through this in a
hurry. I have three other poets to
escort through the nether worlds
today, and I've got a cold six-pack
at home, so if we could just save
the questions till the end' of the
tour? Thank you he said and
strode off at a quick pace.
In the matter of a paragraph
space we arrived at the First Circle
of the Inferno. It was a vast park-
ing deck, paved with warm as-
phalt and many fine new automo-
biles were parked there. Inside
each car was the car's owner and
they were screaming frantically,
clawing at their doors.
"O My Master 1 seid, "For-
give me, but I must ask another
question. Why are these people so
unhappy'Granted 1 don't want to
spend eternity in a car, but if 1
have to, it might as well be a
Porsche
My guide's face became sol-
emn. "They fear the Key Demons.
Watch Fen as he spake, a horde
of waist high devils can re screech-
ing out of the asphalt. They all had
car keys in their hands, f hey be-
gan scratching furiously at the
paint job oi each shiny automo-
bile.
1 gasped in horror. "Then this
must be the Circle of
'Ares mv guide said. "Those
Who Take Up More Than One
Parking Space At A Time We
wound down to the next level,
sobered by our first glimpse of
hell.
The next ring was a huge lec-
ture hali, hi gger than anything ever
seen on "The Paper Chase" or in
the General Classroom Building.
Giant speakers adorned the walls
at regular, acoustically tested
intervals. Metallica, not my favor-
ite group, but still tolerable, was
being played at a high volume.
"Who suffers here?" I yelled.
My mentor pointed at the door.
As it opened, people came in,
clutching their ears in agony and
sat at their desks and began copy-
ing down the song lyrics, I iecog-
nized some of tlwm.
"Theman in front! He wasmy
Philosophy of Science teacher 1
screamed.
"Was he boring and monoto-
nous in his lectures?" my guide
yelled back. 1 nodded. "Then you
see why he is in the Circle of Bor-
ing Teachers In Love With the
Sound of Their Own Voice
Onward we trekked. To save
time and column inches we
skipped over Circles 3,4,5 and b,
the Circles of Sulky Fast Food
Cashiers, Sorority Chicks Who
Leave Lipstick on Your Cigarettes
if They Bum A Drag, Editors Who
Write Bogus Stories About Foot-
ball Games in Which They Cheated
Anyway and the dreaded Circle
oi Female Bartenders Who Try To
Keep Your Date From Being
Groped bv Spiking Your Drinks,
respectively.
Circle Seven was a smelly-
place. Piles of rotting waste and
gusts oi rotting doggy breath
abounded. 1 saw people chained
to the stakes in the ground with
only a bowl of water and bits of
bone for sustenance.
One poor woma n lifted up tier
leg and urinated. "O Guide. !
moaned. "How can any just God
allow this degradation of the
human spirit?"
"Do not blame the Creator
he said. "They have brought this
on themselves. Thisis theCircleof
Dog Owners Who Insist Their
Precious Babies are Human 1
thought about it and realized thev
had the right of it. 1 kicked the man
nearest me, and my guide ap-
proved.
The Eighth Circle was a terri-
fying grey wasteland. Purplemists
blew about on freezing winds. The
winds seemed to howl with great
anguish. All theinhabitantsof this
Circle looked exactly like Don
Knotts.
"Guide, what is this cold,
wretched place, so scarv and Don
Knotts-Iike?"
"This is the Circle of Those
Who Starred m Any Syndicated
Television Series. They who made
theirliving from their cosmetically
enhanced faces, no longer have
real faces at all, only the visage oi
the most hated man in Hollywood.
A most fitting end
TheNinthCirclelookedlikea
giant prison. I heard screams echo-
ing from every cell. Most frighten-
ing was the legion of guards whose
faces dripped with mascara and
false eyelashes. Demon bodies, yet
the heads of Tammy Fay Bakker!
1 fainted. My guide woke me
and helped me stand. "WTio
who ends up here?" I stammered.
This is the Circleof Religious
Fanatics. Those who used religion
for their own personal ends, or
could not tolerate any other be-
liefs are imprisoned here forever
What happens to them?" I
j hesitantly.
They talk my guide said
simply.
"That's it?" I could not be-
lieve my ears. The most heinous
cnminalsof all time, and they were
to spend damnation chatting?
"You misunderstand. Thev
have to talk about only two thing;
and only to each other my mys-
terious host said. "They can eithei
discuss The Importance of the
Dead Kennedys' Lyrics in ar
Open-Minded Society, or the
Constitution I sat and listened tc
the screams, and the sound of thei i
eternal torment filled my osseous
heart with glee.
A mighty blast of cold an
knocked us down. The freezing
winds generated by the wings oi
the Master oi the Inferno, Satar
himself, announced hisarrival. Mv
guide said, "That's my cue. Prr
outta here, dude He began tr
fade away.
"Wait I cried. "Who are
you?" His tinny, echo of a voice
cried out, "First Amendmenl
Lad He evaporated and 1 turnec
to face the Lord of Hell.
"So. urn who you got ir
your hands?" Lucifer gnppec
three people in three of his mon-
strous hands. Every so often, he
would bite their heads off anc
chew it up as their bodies magi
catty regrew another head.
The Prince of Da rkness spake
"In this hand I hold the Greatcsi
Threat to Freedom, lesse Helms
In this hand 1 hold the Creates
Threat to Artistic Expression, Ste
ven Speilberg. In this hand 1 hole
theCreatestThreat to Decency
He paused dramatically. "The
Bonehead His voice thunderec
across the valley of Hell, as 1 sav
myself squirming in his grasp !
"Bonehead! Wake up! You're
having a nightmare My latest
casual sex partner woke me up
"You kept babbling about Hell
and Satan having a special seal
reserved for you there
"Uhf f I said, struggling back
toconsoousness. "Maybe hedoes
But it was all a dream. And there's
no place like home, right Auntk
Em?"
She smiled. "Why don't you
just show me wha t you did to earr
your reservation in Hell?"
But that's another story. Til
next time, may the hangovers kx
gtmtle, but the buzzes intense anc
don't forget the WZMBAtti
Xmas party tonight.





(
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
NOVEMBER 16,1989 PAGE 11
Students tell
happened on
By VAN FAHNESTOCK and
JOHN HAAR
Special to The Last Carolinian
Some of those arrested in the
Tar River Estates vicinity on Oct.
31 were interviewed by ECU stu-
dents in Dr. Beverly Merrick's
reporting class. The information
was verified by police reports.
Most students willingly talked
and wanted to express their opin-
ions against what they say was
unethical behavior by the city
police, including verbal and physi-
cal abuse.
Nearly 140 people were ar-
rested on the charge of failure to
disperse. None were told their
charge at the time of their arrest.
One student said, "Nothing was
said to me. 1 asked and was told
that all my questions would be
answered downtown
Another said, of the police,
"They did not tell us what was
going to happen to us or what the
charges were
"When asking the officers
what the charge was or what was
going to happen, I was told that
the charge may be trespassing or a
minor traffic violation. Then it
became failure to disperse at the
magistrate's office one said.
One student was "detained"
on one particular charge, then
actually charged with another.
Richard C. Giddens, 21, a junior
taking a semester off from ECU,
was on his way home to Tar River
apartments when a policeman
walked up to him and told him he
was being "detained" for trespass-
ing. He was taken downtown with
the other arrestees and told he had
been arrested for failure to dis-
perse.
Giddens later asked what the
definition of failure to disperse
was and he was told it was being
in a group of three or more. Gid-
dens was not.
Several arrestees said they
were walking in groups of three or
more because of the recent rape
occurrences.
Many of those arrested state
they were walking home from
Lexicon
Mushrooming
Answers from
Tuesday's paper
1. Expiate: C. apoiigize
2. Jejune: A. lacking
interest
3. Pervade: A. spread
throughout
4. August: C dignified
5. Indigenous: D. native
6. Repast: A. meal
7. Fruition: A. fulllfill-
ment
8. Fealty: D. loyalty
9. Cervlean: A. sky blue
10. Astral: D. starlike
- Compiled by Matt
Richter
Coming
up
Thursday
NEW DELI
Stegmonds
0' ROCKEFELLERS
Uncle Green
ATTIC
Johnny Quest
Friday
NEW DELI
Crystal Sky
0' ROCKEFELLERS
Boogey Monsters
ATTIC
The Comedy Zone
Saturday
NEW DELI
Blue Note Special
0' ROCKEFELLERS
Phil and the Blanks
ATTIC
The Showmen
what really
Halloween
othcrareasand were not involved
in the Tar River party. According
to a letter to the editor of "The East
Carolinian" in the November 7,
1989 issue, a person arrested Hal-
loween night, wrote, "1 was sober,
1 had no alcohol on me,l was not
yelling, 1 was not throwing any-
thing or damaging property. 1
had no intention of causing any
trouble, I was only trying to go
home
One man peeked out of his
apartment door to get a glimpse of
the action and was seized. He
expresses, "I feel I was unjustly
arrested because I was just stand-
ing in my doorway
Everyone was fined $200 for
bail.
Many feel the situation was
not handled professionally. A
student said, "Plastic handcuffs
were put on me, which later had to
be cut off withapocketknife. This
See related story
on page 12
was not very professional. It seems
to me that they were not trained to
handle the situation they brought
on
Another man, who is not an
ECU student, said, "It was ridicu-
lous. It was not handled very
professionally. I heard the police
were told not to chase people. If
they ran, to let them go. But they
(police)did not HeaddedThey
(police) went hog-wild
There were complaints of
verbal and physical abuse. A stu-
dent claims his arresting officer
told him laughing, "If you move
I'll break your f�ing arm The
man says, "1 was never hand-
cuffed, but I was picked off the
ground and carried to the bus. He
also broke my watch
An ECU freshman, Michael
K. Varsamis, 19, proclaims, "I was
verbally abused by the police. One
of the arresting officers told me,
"Just shut upd�head Varsamis
said. "I did not do anything to
provoke it
Varsamis added the opinion
that the cops acted like they were
having a good time.
Another explains, "I was
grabbed by the shirt and put on
the bus She continues, "The
officers acted obnoxious, like they
were on an ego trip. They had a
terrible attitude. Rude
Several persons questioned
the officials' actions and were told
to "sit down and shut up
Four out of ten people re-
sponded that they were treated all
right.
In court, manv said thev re-
ceived rude and unfair treatment.
There wpre opposing views
on whether the crowd in Tar River
noted or if the police caused riot-
ing behavior.
Thomas Barry, a freshman at
ECU, has seen riots before and in
his opinion, "What happened in
Tar River was not a riot. It was
merely a massive, social party
Other arrestees were not at
the party, they were walking home
near the area on side streets so
they could not completely say that
there was not a riot, but they did
not hear a riot in the area.
"Police caused the only riot in
See RIOT onpagel2
Top 13
For the week of
1 11689
1. Primitives
. Mighty Lemon Drops
3. Alarm
4. Wonderstuff
5. 7 Seconds
6. Psychedelic Furs
Screaming Blue Messi-
ahs
8. Uncle Green
9. Joe Strummer
10. IanMcCulloch
11. Voodoo Gearshift
12. Smithereens
13. Jesus and Mary
Chain
Registration
creates
problems
By JOHN TUCKER
A�tmtirtt features Editor
These ECU students celebrated Halloween at last yeas's non-riotous block party with open ears. The
1988 block party showed few similarities to this year's festivities. About 25,000 people turned out for
last year's party, and although people had fun, there wasn't a riot. (Photo by J.D. Whirmire � ECU
Photolab)
Tipper Gor is more than an act
Thrash band believes in its music
By CHIP SWARTZ
Staff Writer
Since their inception just over
a year ago, Tipper Gor has tanta-
lized (terrorized?) local rock-and-
roll clubs with its lethal speed-
metal stylings. Bassist and vocal-
ist Andy Bedrosian, drummer
lohn Kinlaw, and guitarists John
West and Stacy Little have been
given the enviable distinction of
being able to turn anv civilized
night club into a primal sauna
where law and order flv right out
the window.
Aside from the fact that Tip-
per Gor is one of only a handful of
North Carolina thrash bands, what
separates Bedrosian and cohorts
from the endless sea of local rock
acts is that they actually believe in
the music thev create and perform.
Tipper Gor is one band that seems
to have truly sold its soul for rock-
and-roll and the evidence is in the
band's material. Songs like "Co-
caine Wars" and "Smell the Cof-
fee" function asan integral part of
each member.
A quick debugging is neces-
sarily i n order here for some people
due to the large quantities of mis-
information that has been circu-
lated about this category of rock.
Yes, the material Tipper Gor
plays is aggressive. At times it
even borders on bleak cvnicism. It
is not, however, in anv wav an
electric ode to Satan. These boys
mereh point up the blatant fail-
ure of society that can be wit-
nessed daily on anv local street
corner and express them in terms
that capture the shocking nature
of the problemsIf de otend, de is
sowry
Insight into the group's brand
of dark humor can be seen in their
very name. Tipper Gore, the
overzealous wife of ex-Senator
Albert Gore, has become infamous
for her censorship assaults on the
rock-and-roll industry. Hermoves
to impose a mandatory record-
rating system and to restrict the
sales of certain releases to minors
have made her fair game for
counterattacks. It seems onlv tit-
ting that she be associated with
one of the most illicit bands
around.
Being based in Greenville has
had some built-in advantages but
the overriding effects have been
negative. With a very limited
market and virtually no competi-
tion Tipper Gor has had to turn
See TIPPER GOR on page 13
r
i � . � �
�� v
Feel like you need to rip your
hair out, bang your head against
the wall and cry or punch some-
one? Let me guess, you must be
trying to pre-register for classes
next semester.
Yep, it's that time of the year
when students, faculty, and staff
are inundated with the typical
hassles that go along with trying
to register so you can graduate
sometime before you die.
The first step in the process of
pre-registration is to at least try to
pick some classes you feel are
neccassary in furthering your
academic career. Of course al-
ways pick at least 27 hours be-
cause you know that you will only
get nine hours of classes that you
chose, before the process is finally
over.
The next step is to track down
the perpetually elusive advisor
who has the magic pre-registra-
tion form. If you're lucky vou
know who he or she is, and you
can walk into their office finding
them excited and readv to assist
you.
But most likely you will walk
all the way out to Minges Coli-
seum and find that you have a
new advisor that has an office
located in Whichard Annex. When
you do somehow manage to track
your advisor down and finally
catch them during office hours,
the actual meeting that you've
worked so hard to arrange is usu-
ally anti-climatic.
You walk into their office and
they 1 wk at you and ask, "Do you
know what classes you need to
SeeREGISTER on page 12

Inferno
!�
re
I
ir'sbV.ner and
mgsjfrantically,
xrs�
r'Isvid, "For-
lSt ask another
thige people so
n'twantto
ir, but if 1
tlH well be a
CjUdnt3 S�.x!�aa��a�.�.v. �a , �
found myself in a huge wooded
area and 1 didn't know vhere I
was. I looked over and saw some
strange looking creature in the
darkness.
Was it the Squirrel Man? An
obese writer of bad fJoetry? Pat
Benatar? It beckoned me forward
and said unto me, "Hurry, man.
Weonly ha ve 20 column inchesor
so to parody 34 cantos of Dante's
'Inferno Get a move on, cool
Thus I followed the shadowy
figure. We found a steep and sav-
age path, went down it and thus
found the Gate to Hell. Not sur-
prisingly, it looked a lot like High-
way 264.
There was an inscription
above the gate and for the sake of
having my mysterious friend
converse a little more, I had him
translate for me. With a visage like
death and a voice like canned
salmon, he said, "It readeth,
'Greenville, a great place to work
and grow Any more questions,
O Dense Oner
"But what does that mean?
What is its significance? Does it
have anything to do with those
Rocky Mount commercials?" 1
asked, fearing my Boneheaded
ignorance would cause my guide
to become pissed off.
"It means 'Abandon every
hope, who enter here Look, man
I'm trying to get through this in a
hurry. I have three other poets to
escort through the nether worlds
today, and I've got a cold six-pack
at home, so if we could just save
the questions till the end" of the
tour? Thank you, he said and
strode off at a quick pace.
In the matter of a paragraph
space we arrived at the First Circle
of the Inferno. It was a vast park-
ing deck, paved with warm as-
phalt and many fine new automo-
biles were parked there. Inside
came sol-
leTCey Demons.
WatchEen as he spake, a horde
of waist high devilscame screech-
ing outof the asphalt. They all had
car keys in their hands. They be-
gan scratching furiously at the
paint job of each shiny automo-
bile.
I gasped in horror. "Then this
must be the Circle of
"Yes mv guide said. "Those
Who Take Up More Than One
Parking Space At A Time We
wound down to the next level,
sobered by our first glimpse of
hell.
The next ring was a huge lec-
ture hall, bigger than anything ever
seen on "The Paper Chase" or m
the General Classroom Building.
Giant speakers adorned the walls
at regular, acoustically-tested
intervals. Metallica, not my favor-
ite group, but still tolerable, was
being played at a high volume.
"Who suffers here?" I yelled.
My mentor pointed at the door.
As it opened, people came in,
clutching their ears in agony and
sat at their desks and began copy-
ing down the song lyrics. I recog-
nised some of them.
"Theman in front! He wasmy
Philosophy of Science teacher I
screamed.
"Was he boring and monoto-
nous in his lectures?" my guide
yelled back. I nodded. "Then you
see why he is in the Circle of Bor-
ing Teachers In Love With the
Sound of Their Own Voice?"
Onward we trekked. To save
time and column inches we
skipped over Grcles 3,4,5 and 6,
the Circles of Sulky Fast Food
Cashiers, Sorority Chicks Who
Leave Lipstick on Your Cigarettes
if They Bum A Drag, Editors Who
Write Bogus Stories About Foot-
ball Games in WhichThey Cheated
Anyway and the dreaded Circle
of Female Bartenders Who Try To
Keep Your Date From Being.
Groped by Spiking Your Drinks
respectively.
Circle Seven was a smelly
place. Piles of rotting waste and
gusts of rotting doggy breath
abounded. I saw people chained
to the stakes in the ground with
only a bowl of water and bits of
bone for sustenance.
One poor woman lifted up her
leg and urinated. "O Guide I
moaned. "How can any just God
allow this degradation of the
human spirit?"
"Do not blame the Creator
he said. "They have brought this
on themselves. Thisis theCircleof
Dog Owners Who Insist Their!
Precious Babies are Human I
thought about it and realized they
had the right of it. 1 kicked the man
nearest me, and my guide ap-
proved.
The Eighth Circle was a terri-
fying grey wasteland. Purplemists
blew about on freezing winds. The
winds seemed to howl with great
anguish. AH the inhabi tantsof this
Circle looked exactly like Don
Knotts.
"Guide, what is this cold,
wretched place, so scary and Don
Knotts-iike?"
"This is the Circle of Those
Who Starred in Any Syndicated
Television Series. They who made
their li ving from their cosmetically
enhanced faces, no longer have
real faces at all, only the visage of
the most hated man in Hollywood.
A most fitting end
The Ninth Circle looked like a
giant prison. I heard screams echo-
ing from every cell. Most frighten-
ing was the legion of guards whose
faces dripped with mascara and
false eyelashes. Demon bodies, yet
the heads of Tammy Fay Bakker!
I fainted. My guide woke me
and helped me stand. "Who
who ends up here?" I stammered.
"This is the Orcleof Religious
Fanatics. Those who used religion
for their own personal ends, or
could not tolerate any other be-
liefs are imprisoned here forever
"What happens to them?" I
asked hesitantly.
They talk my guide said
simply.
"that's itr 1 could not be-
lieve my ears. The most heinous
criminalsof all time, and they wen
to spend damnation chatting?
"You misunderstand. Thej
have to talk about only two thing
and only to each other my mys-
terious host said. "They can eithei
discuss The Importance of the
Dead Kennedys' Lyrics in ar
Open-Minded Society, or th
Constitu tion I sat and listened tc
the screams, and the sound of then
eternal torment filled my osseouj
heart with glee.
A mighty blast of cold ail
knocked us down. The freezing
winds generated by the wings o
the Master of the Inferno, Satar
himself, annou need hisarrival M)
guide said, "That's my cue. I'rr
outta here, dude He began tc
fade awav.
"Wait I cried. "Who are
you?" His tinny, echo of a voice
cried out, "First Amendmen
Lad He evaporated and I tumec
to face the Lord of Hell.
"So, urn who you got ir
your hands?" Lucifer grippec
three people in three of his mon
strous hands. Every so often, h
would bite their heads off anc
chew it up as their bodies magi-
cally regrew another head.
The Prince of Da rkness spake
"In this hand I hold the Greates
Threat to Freedom, Jesse Helms
In this hand I hold the Greates
Threat to Artistic Expression, Ste
ven Speilberg. In this hand I hok
the GreatestThreat to Decency
He paused dramatically. "Th
Bonehead His voice thunderec
across the valley of Hell, as I saw
myself squirming in his grasp!
"Bonehead! Wake up! You'w
having a nightmare My lates
casual sex partner woke me up
"You kept babbling about Hell
and Satan having a special sea
reserved for you there
"Uhf i I said, struggling back
to consciousness. "Maybe he does
But it was all a dream. And there'
no place like home, right Auntfc
Em?"
She smiled. "Why don't you
just show me what you did toearr
your reservation in HeB?"
But that's another story, til
next time, may the hangovers b
gentle, but the buzzes Intense anc
don't forget the WZMBAttt
Xmas party tonight





12
I HE EASTCAROl INIAN NOV1 MHEK 16,
Students say police overreacted
By 0 NEWSOME
Sp� 1a! hi The mt I r)linln
At tirst there was just a bunch
of people having a good time;then
the police arrived. When the po-
licearrived, confusion broke out
Fhis was one person s opinion ot
what happened at far River Es-
tates on Halloween night.
Ninety-three out ot h) East
Carolina I niversiry studentsintcr-
tewed felt that the police overre-
acted Halloween night at I arRh or
Estates Eighrv percent expressed
their beliefs that the police were
looking tor trouble, jnd S2 per-
cent said that the police did not
have proper cause to he at lar
Rier Estates.
I hese and main other un-
usual facts and statistics were
discovered in a random survey ot
1 10 East Carolina students
Although onlv 55 percent of
the students questioned were in
the i initvot far River Estates, s
pen ent personallv knew someone
who was Of thai p rcent felt
the treatment ot the students was
verv unfair" and almost 411 per-
cent ri ported unfair' treatment
Riot
Continued from pae 11
the area it that is w hat they wish to
call it one pro laimed.
Another said. I think ;t was
carried too tar bv saying it was a
riot rhere was not a riot! I was
v ne ot the many that got caught in
the wrong place at the wrong
time
Soi igi that a select tew
; � ut � h md md should have
been arrested "hey also believe
� . indled the circum-
� it i � � va and wen?
loo fa plains ! heir
- up ihe party and
: � � . . - pie, but they got
it � a � and arrested every-
one in si
Varsamis said lice
went about it in the wrong i.iv i
; : n i ��� . ,vh �� lid it (ai
v (nt leu
� ir
Most participants said 'here
was nothing done to antagonize
ior
rhemaji r t agrees there was
� ng things. "Stu-
: nts - � � ed . er cooperative
arse there was verbal argu
ing but the- ivere just standing
. ' � 'tieexplained
A few said they witnessed
people thn w ing things after the
polio irri ed rhey said people
wen � r ��. ng bottles at the po
lice in their riot garb
Only one interviewed, Kelly
H. Long, an III sophomore, said
she saw a bottle thrown before the
polu e arrived.
generalcon ensussaid thev
saw no shattered glass r broken
bottles
Ama ion 1 se arrested
aid '� � �� � � ent of anv
chargi�'� n El nior said.
think�uTi of circum-
stance� because 1 was not even
ned in the big partv The
� ruilty evacuated
and rin awa while others who
werejust standing there, com-
plete!v innocent of any violence,
i y.srd l liddens added. "I
feel 1ke there were people that
should have been arrested, but
therere innocent people ar
One out ot ten said that the stu-
dents were treated "fairly
One student mentioned that
no one was dome, any damage,
the police rust showed up ,nd
started harassing people
In addition to theone hundred
and thirt plus students arrested
tor failure to disperse, two stu
dents that lived at lar Rivei I s
tates were irrested tor failure to
disperse from their own resi
dences ne student was even
charged with failure to disperse
from the magistrate's office.
One oi the reasons tor ban
mm; the lowntown Hallowe� i
partv was the extensive cost ol
man hours r the Jean up the
debris the following w Arrest
reports show there nffi
cers involved with the arrests ,u
ar " er I lallowei n night work-
ing . rtim rsoi timeand
a halt pa
In � the
suuh - ed � � re in fa or i
restoring the Jowntown Hallow
een celebrati i
v )ne indn idual who w as at
lar River estates said that it was
"very hecti He was with one
friend inanapartment when ci ps
beating on tl door, t ame in and
took him awa Another student
was arrested tor filming the inci-
dent with a portable video cam-
era.
ccording to the police re-
ports, ot the people that were ar-
rested, notall werestudents. hheir
ages ranged from 17 to 26 with 95
of the 1 34 arrestees aged betw een
18 . nd 21 years old Roughlv 70
percent were males and all were
i ,iu, asian
One student has said thai there
wili be no cooperation until the
students and the ireenvilleit
( oun ilin �me to terms and
ta'k about the situation. As one
student said A - I has spirit,
an 1 voucan t take the spirit awav
from the school
ST


� �
M
This ECl grounds staff is doing some landscaping work to further the asthetu beauty
campus. Note the outdated building sh�n. (Photo bv Matt Bulley I C L Photol
Continued fron
tak. ' Of .ours, hein
�o: student know ing exa tly
w h.i
cludi ' stu
head and n
'vet oi signs i ur
; � ion form and v u re
i
luckv ones, vou'll arrive at the
find �
but - itflevoui
irse I lor was
h
ne' rni vou
re in
� the real fun imlesslv you
andci the campus scarchingfor
� t, rminal in the most
place where v
ti - wail in line two hours to
�� gistei Once found vou onlv
ha e to w ait in line one h �ui be
. inallv t tinal
�:� �. - e but v u re
;ed due ti a parking
i ket tuition owed and
brary fines, trie ni( e oung
avs
"What you shoul a
hloo.i rushes to vi mr head u
uir liu k dav, you
mean ! w aited an h ui an
ter
"I ,f, ijd � � wanted
politeh Ah '
ij-j isses vou asl I need them t i
. . iduat
ing in oth i ive to get special pel
(lasses, and writii ubber mission for thosi Bui
� II sir she says this is
-
ter
l mi walk bai K

ten . � ratorand
hand her vour pre n gi: ti �
form � -
lasses
id I oi
-
Seriously foil id but it figur
uld be ��� i �rse II i ould -
Eastlar ilinian vU1 i . 'Tili
ne x isemestei -ppl publication:n in ihe
� Music . � Video � Accessories
Too G o o ti
restt d � �
Vnother student said. "My
rights were i iolated, and I plan to
I he r- iu i. were looking for
uble mm. should have been
more mature P �lice should have
md asked win stums.
instead of assuming. I heard no
official warning to disperse. The
arrested pc ple w ere half wild and
nt '
Many people arrested may
take legal action against the city.
(liddens is considering an
unlawful arrest suit against the
city and has contacted the AC 1 .L
( me person said, I might file
suit, but I would be satisfied with
dropping the charges "
The current (i mrt date tor the
arrested is November 29, 1989
E U students are concerned
about the blame the school is re-
� riving tor the violence occurring
in the city when many ot those
arrested were not ECU students
and several were out of town resi-
dents.
The information was pro-
vided bv Wendy Klutz, William
Harris, Tony I'age, Daw I-utroll,
and Kim Brothers of Dr. Beverly
Merrick's reporting class.
Turn Down!
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in Front of the Plaza
756-7818
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December 13, 1989
RECORD BAR
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Carolina East Mall





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 16, W89
Students
say police overreacted
ByJOYNEWSOME
Special to Tlw Imt Carolinian
"At first there was just a bunch
of people having a good time; then
the police arrived. When the po-
lice arrived, confusion broke out
This was one person's opinion of
what happened at Tar River Es-
tates on Halloween night.
Ninety-three out of 100 East
Carolina University students inter-
viewed felt that the police overre-
acted Halloween night at Tar River
Estates. Eighty percent expressed
their beliefs that the police were
looking for trouble, and 82 per-
cent said that the police did not
have proper cause to be at Tar
River Estates.
These and many other un-
usual facts and statistics were
discovered in a random survey of
100 East Carolina students.
Although only 35 percent of
the students questioned were in
the vicinity of Tar River Estates, 58
percent personally knew someone
who was. Of that 50 percent felt
the treatment of the students was
"very unfair" and almost 40 per-
cent reported "unfair" treatment.
One out of ten said that the stu-
dents were treated "fairly
One student mentioned that
no one was doing any damage,
the police just showed up and
started harassing people.
Inaddition to theone hundred
and thirty plus students arrested
for failure to disperse, two stu-
dents that lived at Tar River Es-
tates were arrested for failure to
disperse from their own resi-
dences. One student was even
charged with failure to disperse
from the magistrate's office.
One of the reasons for ban-
ning the downtown Halloween
party was the extensive cost of
man-hours for the clean up the
debris the following day. Arrest
reports show there were 30 offi-
cers involved with the arrests at
Tar River Halloween night work-
ing on overtime hours or time and
a half pay.
Incidentally, 82 percent of the
students polled were in favor of
Register
Riot
restoring the downtown Hallow-
een celebration.
One individual who was at
Tar River estates said that it was
"very hectic He was with one
friend in an apartment when cops,
bearing on the door, came in and
took him away. Another student
was arrested for filming the inci-
dent with a portable video cam-
era.
According to the police re-
ports, of the people that were ar-
rested, not all were students. Their
ages ranged from 17 to 26, with 95
of the 134 arrestees aged between
18 and 21 years old. Roughly 70
percent were males and all were
Caucasian.
One student has said that there
will be no cooperation until the
students and the Greenville City
Council can come to terms and
talk about the situation. As one
student said, "A school has spirit,
and you can't take the spirit away
from the school
This ECU grounds staff is doing some landscaping work to further the asthetic beauty of the ECU
campus. Note the outdated building sign. (Photo by Matt Bulley � ECU Photolab)
Continued from page 11
Continued from page 11
the area if that is what they wish to
call it one proclaimed.
Another said, "I think it was
carried too far by saying it was a
riot. There was not a riot! I was
one of the many that got caught in
the wrong place at the wrong
time
Some agree that a select few
got out of hand and should have
been arrested. They also believe
the police handled the circum-
stances the wrong way and went
too far. A student explains, "Their
job was to break-up the party and
arrest rowdy people, but they got
out of hand and arrested every-
one in sight
Varsamis said, "The police
went about it in the wrong way. I
understand why they did it (ar-
rested people), but they went too
far
Most participants said there
was nothing done to antagonize
the police behavior.
The majority agrees there was
no one throwing things. "Stu-
dents seemed very cooperative.
Of course there was verbal argu-
ing, but they were just standing
up for their rights one explained.
A few said they witnessed
people throwing things after the
police arrived. They said people
were throwing bottles at the po-
lice in their riot garb.
Only one interviewed, Kelly
H. Long, an ECU sophomore, said
she saw a bottle thrown before the
police arrived.
A general concensussaid they
saw no shattered glass or broken
bottles.
A majority of those arrested
said they were innocent of any
charge. An ECU junior said, "I
think I was a victim of circum-
stance because I was not even
involved in the big party. The
people that were guilty evacuated
and ran away while others who
were just standing there, com-
pletely innocent of any violence,
got grabbed
Richard Giddens added, "I
feel like there were people that
should have been arrested, but
there were innocent people ar-
rested, too
Another student said, "My
rights were violated, and I plan to
sue. The police were looking for
trouble and should have been
more mature. Police should have
come up and asked questions,
instead of assuming. I heard no
official warning to disperse. The
arrested people were half wild and
half innocent
Many people arrested may
take legal action against the city.
Giddens is considering an
unlawful arrest suit against the
city and has contacted the ACLU.
One person said, "I might file
suit, but I would be satisfied with
dropping the charges
The current court date for the
arrested is November 29,1989.
ECU students are concerned
about the blame the school is re-
ceiving for the violence occurring
in the city when many of those
arrested were not ECU students
and several were out of town resi-
dents.
The information was pro-
vided by Wendy Klutz, William
Harris, Tony Page, Davy Futrell,
and Kim Brothers of Dr. Beverly
Merrick's reporting class.
take?" Of course being an in-
formed student knowing exactly
what courses you need to con-
clude your education, you stu-
pidly nod your head and reply,
"yes Your advisor signs your
pre-registration form and you're
good to go.
It you are one of the really
lucky ones, you'll arrive at the
conference with your advisor and
find that they know who vou are,
but somewhere in the shuffle your
course folder was lost. Ooops!
When you do finally attain
the form vou need, then you're in
for the real fun. Aimlessly you
wander the campus, searching for
the computer terminal in the most
obscure place, where you won't
have to wait in line two hours to
register. Once found you only
have to wait in line one hour be-
fore you finally get to the terminal
and receive another srtock.
"I'm sorry sir, but you're rec-
ords are tagged due to a parking
ticket, tuition owed, and 17 over-
due library fines the nice young
terminal operator says.
"What you shout as the
blood rushes to vour head, "vou
mean I waited an hour and I can't
register?"
"I'm afraid so sir she replies
politely. Back to the drawing
board.
After rushing around, wait-
ing in other long lines, skipping
classes, and writing 12 rubber
checks, you are once again ready
to register.
You walk back into the ob-
scure office with the nice young
terminal opera tor and victoriously
hand her your pre-registration
form. She smiles and types your
classes in.
"Well sir she says, "this is
your lucky day, you got 11 of the
17 hours you wanted
"What about the other two
classes you ask, "I need them to
graduate
"You have to get special per-
mission for those she says. But
that's another story.
Seriously folks, it's bad but it
could be worse. It could be like
mass
the good old days, when
students converged on Memorial
Gym and MingesColiseum, wait-
ing in a dozen linesovera hundred
yards long to get classes.
At least now the lines are
spread out in a hundred different
places over the campus, and we
have these reliable computers to
figure out for us that none of the
classes we want are open.
The East Carolinian will need a Stall Illustrator
next semester Apply in person in the
publications building
eo � Accessories
o o a
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And Save
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a
A�Y AMHIXl
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TRACKS
714 Greenville Blvd.
in Front of the Plaza
756-7818
Any
Cassette
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(Except those already on sale!
� $7.69 or higher. One item per coupon.
Multiple sets count as one item.
Coupon Good Through
December 13, 1989
RECORDBAR
Carolina East Mall
twSBWejta .�� � . m ��,





I
Massage clinic relieves stress
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBFR 1. 1QRQ 1?
By CHAD ALLEN
Sp�cUI t. rh, E�l i tniliiuan
Ooooo. Ahhhh. and be-
fore 1 knew it the stress which
accompanies a rapidly ending
semester all but vanished Under
the skillhil hands of Kim Bnggs, a
senior physical therapy student. I
came out of the Allied Health
Building feeling better than when
I entered.
last Thursday, October, the
Physical Therapy Club held the
second of its fall semester Mas-
sage Clinics from 5:30 till 9:30.
The clinics, which are held
twice a semester, have been a part
of the Physical Therapy program
since it was started.
All proceeds raised are halved:
one half goes to the United Cere-
bral Palsy Center in Greenville
while the other half goes into
funding club activities.
Over $3tX) wse raised bv the
first clinic held this semester, ac-
cording to Club Treasurer, Shelley
Teriinden. She also said that the
clinics ha veseen a gradual increase
of popularity, therefore, a 30-
minute limit has been placed on
all massages.
"We have a lot of return visi-
tors, which make up the majority
of our customers, "said Teriinden.
She also noted that the rates are
have limited massage experience,
I found no complaints from any of
the customers.
"Relaxing, you feel different
when you come out, worth it, I'll
quite a bit cheaper than other get a longer one next time " were
places; $1.00 for lOminutesor $1.50
for 10 minutes when tickets are
purchased at the door.
The massages are given by
junior and senior Physical Ther-
apy students. The technique is
learned in a class called Physical
Agents which is usually taken
during the junior year.
Although most of the students
mutual sentiments spoken by two
ECU freshmen.
"Everyone should come, it's a
great stress reliever commented
another student.
Two more Massage Clinics
will be held during the spring
semester. The first will probably
be held in January, although a date
has not yet been set.
Kidsjise computers, not books
lands Elementary. fnrcoc umrL �k� �i .
By PAT ORDOVENSKY
Gannon .��� srvue
S1LVERDA1 1 .Wash Shaun
Bonham, age b, doesn't use text-
books to learn to read, add or
subtract at Cougar Valley Elemen
lary School. He uses software.
Hedoesn'tget report cards with
letter grades A. B C, and so on.
1 he teacher sends home written
des riptions of his progress.
1 iedocsn't have to worry about
.in unfamiliar teacher when he
returns from summer break
teachers stay with students for
two, three, even four years.
Shaun, like the 317 other Cou-
gar Valley students, gets every
Wednesday afternoon off. Teach-
rs use the free hours to plan and
epare Students make up the
tune bv starting 30 minutes early
the ether four days of the week.
But Shaun, unlike 6-year-olds
across the United States, is not in
first grade. Gradelevelsdon texisl
n his school. Studentsareassigned
toclassesb) age,and they move at
their own pace.
"Do you really think we're
ing something new" asks
Warren Olson, assistant to the
superintendent of Central Kitsap
School District, on the western
reel Puget Sound across from
Seattle.
It doesn't feel new because the
mges happened gradually.
iugar Valley, which opened
ir NptemKT adopted manv in-
itions already tried in some of
district's 10 other elementary
s hools. Other changes have been
discussed and debated some
for almost six years � by commit-
tees ot teachers, administrators
.eid parents.
"We said we're going to change
because what we've been doing
isn't successful saysSuperin-
ident Eugene Hertzke. "We told
m, 'If you want to be a part of
change, this is your chance "
It's called Strategy 2020, which
eans we're koking at the year
20 with 2020 vision Olson
s.
The changes are built on the
idea that students learn by doing,
not by listening. In reading it's
called the "whole language" ap-
proach.
" ni leam to read bv reading
learn to write by writing, and the
more you do it, the more you
improve says Debbie Blickhan,
who has been teaching that way
tor several years at nearby Wood-
lands Elementary
Teachers make manv or the
der. isions. Working in teams, thev
design curricula to reach assigned
goals.
The teachers who volunteered
for Cougar alley spent the 1988-
89 school year deciding, with Prin-
cipal Steve Anderson, which of
the recommended changes to
adopt and how the school would
operate.
Traditional textbooks irc re
placed with software called an
integrated learning system thai
diagnoses students' skills and
produces nvith and reading les-
sons that allow students to pro-
ceed at their own pace. This rein-
Tipper Gor
inward for inspiration. "It used to
tx that Greenville had two live
rock-and-roll clubs. The Attic and
Susie's Treehouse remarked
Kinlaw ' A lot ot times we'd play
Susie'sfourtimesina month. Now
that it's closed, it's really reduced
the number of shows were able to
play in Greenville
'I he forced outcome is that
Hpper Gor has been, tor the most
part, confined to their rehearsal
room, not unlike a child being
punished for an accident it had no
control over. But rather than
irown in self-pity, they have put
together a competent demonstra-
tion tapealong with a promotional
package and are in the process of
capturing the interest ot several
large management companies
forces work in the classroom.
Teachers get daily reports on their
computerized progress.
Central Kitsap School District,
dominated by a submarine base
and surrounded bv other Navv
installations, began innovations
when a task force recommended a
hard look at computers.
"The whole community has a
background in technology says
Hertzke. "You can't run a subma-
rine without technology
Twelve of the le schools now
have computer labs, like Cougar
Valley's, with integrated learning
systems. Dozens of other comput-
ers are scattered through the dis-
trict for various uses.
Continued from page 11
along the east coast.
11 pper C or fans will have two
opportunities to see their heroes
in action this month. On Nov. IN,
the band will be moshing it up at
Lisa's Bar and Cnll in Atlantic
Beach and on Nov. 23 thev will be
appearing at The Attic in Green-
ville.
fortunately, Greenville's
home-boys from Hell have cho-
sen to work towards future possi-
bilities instead of focusing on
current problems. In a business
where success is as much a prod-
uct oi luck as it is skill, the four
talented rockers who comprise
Tipper Gor are demonstrating the
determmationand work ethic that
should make themodds-on-favor-
ites to succeed.
Student Stores
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share the
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NO NEWLY ARRIVED CHRISTMAS MERCHANDISE OR FULL PRICE MERCHANDISE INCLUDED
Strategy 2020 moves next to
junior high and high schools,
where teachers "are under a great
deal of stress' says Harmon.
"The elementary schools are
creating a new type of student
that the secondary schools will
have to prepare for says Ron
Cillespie, 2020coordinator. "In the
past, the high school teachers told
the junior highs and elementary
schools. This is the kind of stu-
dent we want "
That new type of student is
Shaun Bonham, who, as he lines
up to leave his classroom, bubbles:
"I'm so excited. We're going to
computer lab
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i -
Read TheEast
Carolinian
It's a varitable
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information.
r
i
i
i
i
forffltfA.is�m
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R&N inc.





The Law
By Reid
Hazardous Waste
By Manning
Rex, Wonder Pig
Rtx3 ft'
ft ITSTE
Ooc'
- C4
TWKC tCu Aftt! lE3USTMA0e
A Pecsioj Xc mo LOoor
Goiwg to Pte.foe.nn tests
Such asv'uhat ujill ac�t
LArtC o�j if HC HAS MO
FEEf MO! THAT'S AU
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KCom a)ou pa), my iote
TASK 15 To TOR(0 VOf
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t&'
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PFFlCf AT
MIAJE T0rtv�ev
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1 HI �J K T� AT
IKK0' V C iOgSIM
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Adventures of Kemple Boy
By C hris (Da Hamme
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ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR STAFF ILLUSTRATOR POSlTinv
CAN YOU draw like it's nobody's business?
CAN YOU boss cartoonists around and offer them sound, sage advice?
CAN YOU pick out new talent and hire people on the spot?
CAN YOU win the admiration and respect of everyone at the paper, even
though they'll resent you for not being the old Staff Illustrator?
THEN brother (or sister), this job is yours! Apply in person and ask for either
Parker, or Stephanie "Freckles" Folsom today! Portfolios will be requested





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 16, 1989 PAGE 15
Wilson looks
toward ECU
:cord books
B CARAVALLAS
Mill Wrrt�t
ithei ECU athelete is on
� setting career records.
mor Walter Wilson, finish-
� fourth year as a wide re-
'irate football team,
1 two receptions and 2
reak the record tor most
; tions and most career
l orrada, who played for
between 1968 and 1970,
holds the record for
I tionswith 79. Terry
who played be-
i and 1978, holds the
lage mark at 1,441.
n will have the chance
marks this weekend
travel to Pittsburgh
ionally ranked Pitts-
nthers
- ii about theupcom-
nnpl replied, "It I
� i it wouldbegrcat.
I . i imes nd it it
l interested in
�. ne for the team
i n pla er, and
on and off the
i fidenceinboth
self.
g I'm not short of is
Walter said, "1 have
If, the quarterback
ei and the team.
tl kev and I'm not
irly on we could
� w ith what
n the field, rhe
nld win it we gave
.on attributed thenumer-
� nsive and defensive
i, the i oa hing staff
� members to show their
: the n woffensiv(
Pirates edge Red Stars 96-95
By VAN FAHNESTOCK and
LISA SPIRIDOPOULOS
S��ff WrTtrn
Tim Brown tries to block Slobodan Nikolic's shot during the
cagers 96-95 overtime win against the ugoslavian Red Star team
in exhibition play. (Photo by Garrett Killian ECU Photolab)
Swimmers set pace with
big wins over Navy, VCU
Third year ECU head coach
Mike Steele said prior to Tuesday
night'sexhibition'l think ourfans
will be impressed with the enthu-
siasm of this team
He was right.
There were no doubters in the
1500 screaming fans that wit-
nessed the young Pirate team come
from behind several times to earn
a 96-95 overtime win against the
touring Yugoslavian Red Star
team.
The Yugoslavian team is in
the midst of and eight game series
against all of the teams in the
Colonial Athletic Association. The
Red Stars are a mixture of sea-
soned veterans and young play-
ers ranging from age 16 to 30.
So far in the tour, the Red
Stars have defeated James Madi-
son and UNC-Wilmington, but
have lost to American University
and Richmond and now stand
with a 2-3 record against CAA
teams.
"It has been a lot of work (on
this tour) but it has been fun too"
noted Yugoslavian assistant coach
Marin Sedlacek. He added that
his plavers have enjoyed this time
despite playing eight games over
a ten dav period. Both teams
started out playing an aggressive
man-to-man defense, but a taller
Red Star team controlled the
boards and utilized the fast break
to jump out to an 11 point lead in
less than seven minutes of play.
After exchanging points for
almost five minutes, senior for-
ward Reed Lose hit the first of his
three three pointers of the night
and junior center Stanley Love
made a lavup that cut the lead to
seven. Following that streak, the
Pirates could get no closer in the
first half. They went into the locker
room trailing bv 10 at 44-34.
Freshman guard Paul Chil
dress said, "Wedidn't know what
to expect, we were really intimi-
dated by their size
The first half saw a strong
shooting performance by the Red
Star team, as they hit 63 percent of
their shots, compared to 39 per-
cent by the Pirates.
The second half started with
the Pirates playing tenacious de-
fense. Junior guard Tim Brown
started the offensive drive by
banging a 14-footerand tipping in
a missed shot. Love scored on a
tip-in seconds later to cut the Red
Star lead to four.
After a Slobodan Nikolic three
pointer, several fastbreaks and a
Slobodan Jankovic four point play,
the Red Stars were up by 1 " with
11 minutes to play, less than 20
seconds later, sophomore guard
Taro Knight hit a 14-footer.
Jankovic hit the fourth of his six
three-pointers to put the Yugo-
slavians up byl4 at 67-53, their
biggest margin of the night.
The Pirates then clamped
down on defense. With about
seven and a half minutes remain-
ing, Lose canned a three pointer,
juniorforward DarrellCh erton hit
two shots in the paint, including
Bv KAI til KIM ANDERSON
M Ml Vtkll t K
n
i �
WA1 UK WILSON
� EC I. sw imming and
Diving team competed separately
on Sundav vet still pulled dual
ictories in the end
I he men faced the Na al
Academy at 1 p.m. in what i
Kick Kobe . nsid nei the
greatest victories in 1 C I hist
The FCl men have never W aten
a v before in a dual meet. Kobe
tated that, The icton was
a total team effort 1 he men
dominated in the 200-yard back
stroke taking first, second, and
third pla e. The final points were
!I 125 Navy 118.
At y. K)p m it wastimeforthe
women to take on Virginia Com-
monwealth University. It was a
tough meet, and only the second
time FCL and VCU have faced
one another. The Lady Pirates
defeated V( I in the 1980-81 sea
son by forfeit.
Assistant coach Max Ober-
nuller says, "I'm really pleased
that the girls are jelling together
on the team We began the season
w ith 111 rcshmanand now they're
becoming m -rev onfident because
each girl is finding her place on
the team. 1 odaysmeet was a very
positive note or us The women
deteated VCU 155 145.
1 he stats tor the EC I men vs.
a ai a: follows: 400-yard
. Relay 1 Walters, Ken-
l Moisten Benkusky, ECU,
L5.40 2 Pestorius,Braulich,Ball,
h r, av I J6 50. 3, O'Brien.
Springer, Martinez, lewis, ECU,
� 73
1000 vard Freestyle 1, J.
Farrell, EC I 1:46.69. 2, A. Jeter,
ECl 46.78 3,M.Pestorius,Navy,
1:47
1 Freestyle 1, C.
Choate, Navy, 2250.2, A. Weber,
Nav 22 60.3, S. Benkusky, ECU,
22.85
200-yard Individual Medley
1,K. Kennedy, ECU, 1 59.02.2,
C . Naylor, Navy, 2:00.02. 3, T.
Christensen, ECU, 2:01.85.
one that was turned into a three
point plav following a foul. This
cut the lead to two with six min-
utes remaining
The Red Star team slowly
pushed the lead to six with 1:27
left to play. Junior guard Jeffrey
Whi taker sank a three-pointer that
made the score 81-78 with about
ine minute remaining.
E L began fouling Srdjan
Dabic to force him to hit the cru-
cial free throws to win the game.
I) ibic went one for three in the last
' including a miss of the front
end of a one-and-one, which en-
abled l.( �se to burv a three pointer
to send the game into overtime.
A fired upECU teamboltedto
a six-point lead before two min-
utes expired in the period. The
teamsexi hanged basketsuntil two
consecutive Jankovic three point-
ers tied the game with :32 remain-
ing.
Knight hit the first end of a
critical one and one with nine
seconds left to ice a Pirate victory,
6 95
( oach Mike Steele said, "I'm
not as excited about winning the
game as 1 am pleased when we fell
Nhmdbvl4, and made a couple
of runs, and cut it to ten. They
came back and we cut it to six, but
our guy s didn't told and that was
good. '
Some players agreed on what
� a. hSteelestressedatthehalf�
defensive aggressiveness
1 ose said, "Defense is the
Pirates Pride if vou're slow on de-
fense then you'll be sluggish on
See Overtime, pagelri
��

� � �
4ju 44J
; IVTTUi tkU�Ui ' r$
4
4
� �
k i �
l I i � i
t i 4 AJJ
See Swimmers, page 18
The men's swim team defeated CAA powerhouse Navy for the first time ever in a dual meet Sunday
in Minges Coliseum 125-118. Head coach Ri :k Kobe thf feat "one of the greatest victories in ECU
history (Photo by Angela Pridgen -� ECU Photolab)
An inside look
Pittsburgh facts:
Home: Pittsburgh, Pa.
Nickname: Panthers
Mascot:
i nrollment: 12,865
Colors: Blue and gold
Stadium: Pitt Stadium (56,500)
1988 Record: 6-5
1989 Record: 5-2-1
Head Coach: Mike Gottfried
4th year)
Pitt Record. 29-18-3
Career Record: 73-56-4
Offense. Multiple Pro
Defense: 4-3
NCAA Affiliation: NCAA
sion I-A (Independent)
Returning Lettermen; 40
Returning Starters: 16
Series: Pitt leads 1-0
Last meeting: Pitt 17 - ECU 10
Oct. 6,1984 in Pittsburgh
East Carolina vs Pittsburgh
1989 Schedule and Results
Pacific38-3 W
Boston College29-10W
Syracuse30-23W
W. Virginia31-31 T
Temple27-3 W
I Navy31-14 W
; Notre Dame7-45 L
; Miami, Fla.3-24 L
ECUNov. 18
Rutgers �Dec-2
Mik�'� Prediction: Pitt 24-ECU17
-f
Even though the ECU football
team was guaranteed a non-losing
season Saturday with a 31-24 win
over Temple, the team and coaches
are not satisfied. Both want to win
the rest of the games on the sched-
ule. And they start by traveling to
nationally ranked Pittsburgh this
weekend, hoping to knock off a
bowl-bound Panther team.
ECU head coach Bill Lewis will
have to overcome a recurring prob-
lem before his upset hopes come
true - injuries. Regular starters
Derrick Fields (strong safety), Wil-
lie Lewis (tailback), and Donald
Porch (comerback) are lost for the
season, while Dennell Harper and
Cedric Van Buren (tailbacks) and
Walter Wilson (wide receiver) are
probable for Pittsbugh.
ECU visits Pitt Stadium for the
second time, playing Mike
Gottfried's 5-2-1 squad. The Pan-
thers, looking to rebound from
back-to-back losses to Miami and
Notre Dame, will try to sink the
Dirates upset hope.
Freshman quarterback Alex
Van Pelt -will utilize a Multiple Pro
formation, a large, strong line and
fast receivers to test ECU'S tough
defense.With40
lettermen returning, 16ofwhich
were starters, Van Pelt has fit into
the program very well. He has
completed 135 out of 233 passes
for 1738 yards, 11 touchdowns
and 10 interceptions.
Sophomore tailback Curvin
Richards has gained 636 yards
on 122 carries for four touch-
downs to get the start for the
Panthers. His speed and agility
will be complimented with so-
phomore fullback Ronald
RedmoiKl'sbkxking ability. Both
runners are also excellent receiv-
ers, tallying 362 yards on 40 re-
ceptions for two touchdowns be-
tween the two of them.
The receiving corps is ted by
seniorsplitend Henry Tuten who
has 27 receptions for 555 yards
and 4 touchdowns. Sophomore
Enc Seamon is scheduled to start
at tight end, but is being pushed
by junior Lionel Sykes. The two
have combined for 9 receptions
for 115 yards.
Senior Dean Caliguire spear-
heads the Panther offensive line
at guard with versatility, strength
and knowledge. Seniors Roman
Matusz and Chris Goetz also pro-
vide experience at the tackle and
guard positions.Thelineaverages
6-4,268 pounds.
Defensively, Pittsburgh will
use a 4-3 scheme. They will count
on the tremendous size and
strength of the line to stop the
running game, and the experience
of the linebackers and secondary
to counter the Pirates' passing at-
tack.
Defensive tackle Marc Spin-
dlerleadstheteamintacklingwith
61 .FreshnMmKeithHain8t�a,a6-
7,275 pound defensive end lines
up beside Spindler, making & dif-
ficult for teams to run to the right
side of the line. They average 6-3
23,266 pounds,
The linebackers have the abil-
ity to play the run as well as the
pass very effectively. Sophomore
Ricardo McDonald is the team's
second leading tackier with 56,
while sophomore Curtis Bray and
junior Craig Gob have combined
fox 85 tackles and one intercep-
tion.
Senior cornerbacks Alonzo
Hamptonand Robert Bradley give
the secondary experience and
speed. They have taflied 54 tack-
les and five interceptions. Junior
free safety Louis Riddick has 35
tackies and rwo interceptions thus
far.
Freshman Ed Frazter is the
placekkker, and has only mined
one PAT on the season. HeislOof
13 on field goals, his longest being
a 43-yaider. Jutiior Brian Green-
field handles thepunting, averag-
ing 425 yards per,o�i
Students get in shape
IRS offers fitness classes
By NORM A CORBETT
Stff Wn�r
When you reach into your
pocket do you find extra money or
extra lint? If you are like most
college students chances are you
don't ha ve a lot of money to spend
to join a fancy health club or gym.
All you need to do is open your
eyes to what East Carolina has to
offer you. East Carolina's Intra-
mural-Recreational Services otter
both formal and informal recrea-
tion to satisfy every students'
needs.
For the aerobics nut, there are
33 aerobics classes offered each
week. Experienced ECU students
each classes that will meet
everyone's ability. There are low
impact and high impact classes.
For those of you who want that
washboard stomach try the 30
minute belly busters class. If you
missed the registration at the
beginning of the semester, don't
worry. All you have to do is go to
the office in Memorial Gym be-
fore the class and buy a drop-in
pass for one dollar. You must
purchase five passes at a time.
The Intramural department
provides a variety of sports for
you to participate in. Softball,
soccer, volleyball, basketball, and
flag football (to name a few) are
offered throughout the year. Just
grab a few of your friends, go to an
organization meeting and join in
the fun of competition.
If you're one of those people
who likes to work at your own
pace, stop in one of the three
weight rooms on campus. You do
not have to pay a dime, just pres-
ent your valid ECU activity card.
W irking w ith weights is the per-
fect way to tone your body and
shed some unwanted pounds. If
you' ve never worked wi th weights
before, but would like to try, never
tear There is always someone
working in the weight room who
will be more than happy to help
you. Don't be intimidated by
people who look like they really
know what thev'redoing,andyou
don't Everyone has to start some-
where. Garrett Residence Hall,
Memorial Gvm,and Minges Coli-
seum otter nautulus equipment,
free weights, and exercise bikes.
Stop in and take look around.
How about swimming? It's a
refreshing wav to spend some
time. Swimming is an excellent
body toner and a great way to
relieve some stress. It will defi-
nitely get your cardiovascular
system in top-notch shape. There
is a pool located in Memorial Gym
and one located in Minges Coli-
seum.
If vou're one oi those people
who thinks you don't have time to
get a little exercise, you're wrong.
All it takes is between 20 minutes
and an hour a couple of times a
week. Once ou realize the value
of exercise for fat-fighting, health,
and good looks, you'll think of all
sorts of ways to fit activity into
vour schedule. East Carolina pro-
vides every opportunity to pre-
vent fat, get some exercise, and
make some lasting friendships. Try
it, you might like it!
For additional information on
the intramural activities and the
hoursof operation call 757-691 lor
stopbv 115 Memorial Gym to pick
up your schedule and activity
calendar.





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 16, 1989
Dravecky calls it quits
Dave Dravecky, the San Francisco Giants pitcher who returned to
baseball after cancer surgery on his left pitching arm only to break the
arm in a later game, said Monday he is retiring (gombaseball Dravecky
said another lump in his left arm is being watched by doctors and he
does not want to risk fun her injury.
IOC bans Johannesburg players
The International Olympic Committee confirmed a ban Monday
on all tennis players playing this week in a grand prix tournament at
Johannesburg, South Africa. The players may not compete at the 1992
Barcelona (Spain) Olympics, in accordance with the lOCs anti-apart-
heid stance. Among those competing are Australia's Wally Masur,
Israeli Amos Mansdorf and American Kevin Curren.
Player's rape trial begins
In the first-degree rape trial of four Oklahoma football players
Tuesday in Oklahoma City, a 20-year-old Oklahoma City woman
testified for four hours, telling ju rors she couldn't identify her attackers
but said she was raped at least three times in the Oklahoma football
dormitory Jan. 21.
Jury sides with NU in firing
The jury in the suit filed against the University of Nebraska by
Mary l.inv Visser, a 19-year employee fired by the school, has ruled in
favor of the university. The fired academic advisor claimed she was
tired for investigating the records ot student athletes.
Swimmer dies after accident
Victor Davis, 25-year old Canadian swimmer who won a gold
medal in the 1984 Olympics, died Monday from injuries received in a
Saturday car accident in Montreal. Davis won a gold medal in the 200-
meter breasistroke and a silver in the 100-meterbreaststroke.
Senior league players honored
Amos Otis, former outfielder with the Kansas City Royals, and
former San Diego Padres right-hander Juan Eichelbcrger have been
named player and pitcher of the week in the Senior Professional
Baseball Association. Otis hit .444 with nine home runs for the Fort
Myers Sun Sox. Eichelbcrger threw 16 innings without allowing an
earned run for the West Palm Beach Tropics.
Davis wins Cy Young Award
Mark Davis, the 29-year-old San Diego lefthander, won the Cy
Young Award Tuesday with 19of 24 first-place votes. All but one voter
among the Baseball Writers Association of America included Davis on
their ballots. Houston's Mike Scott came in second in the balloting.
Davis saved 44 games of a possible 48 last season for the Padres He
struck out 92 with an ERA of 1.85.
Virginia Slims winners qualify
Nu. 2 seed MartinaNavratiiova, No. 5 Zrna Garrison and No. 7
Helena Sukova qualified for quartertinal berths Tuesday at the $1
million Virginia Slims Championships tennis tournament in New
York. Navratilova beat Mary Joe Fernandez 6-2, 6-3; Garrison beat
Helen Kclesi 6-3,6-1; and Sukova beat Raffaella Rcggi 6-3,7-5.
Darville found in contempt
Luther DarviUc, on trial for allegedly stealing about $186,000 from
the University of Minnesota for his personal use, was cited for con-
tempt of court Tuesday in Minneapolis after he refused to name
Minnesota athletes to whom he claims to have given money before his
firing.
US has five at Nabisco Masters
For the first time since 1981, the USA will have five qualifiers
competing in the eight-player $750,000 Nabisco Masters round-robin
tennis tournament Andre Agassi, Michael Chang, John McEnroe, Brad
Gilbert and Aaron Krickstein will join Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and
Ivan Lendl in the final Masters event Nov. 28 at New York.
Sunday Silence to have surgery
Kentucky Derby and Breeders' Cup winner Sunday Silence is
expected to be out of action until late spring, recovering from arthro-
scopic surgery to remove a bone chip from the right knee. A complete
recovery is expected for the colt - a favorite for Horse of the Year honors
- after surgery Thursday at Inglewood, Calif.
Ohio junior out for one game
Trcg Lee, a 6foot-8 Ohio State junior, has received a one-game
suspension from the NCAA for playing in an unsanctioned summer
basketball league game. Lee will miss the Buckeyes' season-opener
Wednesday night against DePaul in the preseason National Invita-
tional Tournament.
Hurdle to manage in Jackson
In baseball, 10-year ma jor leaguer Clint Hurdle has been appointed
manager of the Class A A Jackson (Miss.) Mets, a farm dub for the New
York Mets. Former manager Steve Swisher has beenassigned to replace
Mike Cubbage as manager at the Mets' Class AAA Tidewater club at
Norfolk, Va.
Baseball negotiation postponed
No new date has been set for the first negotiating session between
major league baseball players and owners on a new basic agreement,
postponed from Wednesday in New York because Milwaukee Brew-
ers' President Bud Selig was unable to attend.
�OwrfjM, im. USA lOOAXIApfk (Mtgt Inpmmia Nmurk
M9i
(a small amount)
SEX
(a very tinv amount)
All this and more (or
less)at The Fast Carolin-
ian
Apply in person at TFC
in The Publications Build-
POWER
Steele inks another recruit
(SID) Kevin Armstrong, a
6-5, 190 lb. senior at Hunter Huss
High School in Gastonia, N.C has
signed a national letter-of-intent
to play men's basketball at Fast
Carolina University, announced
head coach Mike Steele Wednes-
day.
Armstrong , an All-South-
western 4 A Conference pick last
season, averaged 15 points and
nine rebounds per game forCoach
G. C. Hamll's Huskies as a junior.
As a second-team all-conference
pick two years ago, he averaged
14 points and seven rebounds.
Both years, he led his squad in
storing and rebounding.
Last season, he was also MVP
of the Belmont Abby Tournament
and the Florence Invitational. The
Huskies were 21-7 last year.
Armstrong chose ECU over
Western Carolina, Appalachain
State, UNC-Wilmington and (in
cinnati. He is projected as a for-
ward for the Pirates.
Vice chancellor Matthews makes guest
appearance at annual IRS Turkey Trot
(IRS) Over 65 runners took
part in the annual Turkey Trot 2
mile race this week sponsored bv
the Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services in coopera-
tion with ECU Dining Services.
David Kramei the director of
Dining Services and Dr. Allied
Matthews, vice chancellor tar
Student 1 ife were on hand for the
festivities and sen ed as honorary
award presenters.
Charles "Choo" justice
crossed the tape in the first spot of
the men's division with a time of
9:54. Justice, an avid runner and
coach of the ECU cross country
team ran asan individual thisyear
alter perennial Turkey Trot pow-
ers Yuk disbanded.rossing the
line in the second spot was Air-
borne runner Sam Bass with a time
of 10:45.
Individual female finishers
were led by udith WilsonofSigma
Sigma Sigma with a 14:04 time
followed by Carrie Cook. Each of
the individual winners in the
men's and women's di isions a.s
well .is winners in the team com-
petition received free Thanksgh
in turkeys from ECU Dining
Services.
The men's team finalists with
a total time of 48:02 wasSigmaPhi
Epsilon B. Louis Presuitt led the
Sig Ep surge with a 11.14 time
followed bv teammates Zamir
Siddigi (11:17), Andy Rosoff
(1233) and Joel Saunders (13:08).
The men's second place finishers
were Airborne led by Sam Bass.
Alan Shumate, Willie Kopti and
Jay Gilliard will each receive
pumpkin pies for their second
place efforts.
The women's team first place
finishers were the ladies of Sigma
Sigma Sigma with sisters Melissa
Matthews, Julian Man Nicole
Adams and ludith Wilson each
receiving the prizes with a total
score of 63:06. In the second place
team place was Zeta Tau Alpha
with team members Tnsh Petril-
lio, Brenda Geisler, Kelly Jones
and Virginia Maunev receiving
pumpkin pies for their efforts.
1 hey crossed the line 20 minutes
behind the Tri Sig squad.
�The alley cats have left
Mendenhall Bowling Center as
Intramural bowling came to a
screeching halt this week. A few
surprises and upsets befell the
lanes this year as top-picked The
Pi rites fell to Theta Chi Ain the all-
campus championship. After a
resounding win in the men's inde-
pendent gold division finals, the
Pintes looked to be a shoe-in for
the championship but tell by only
36 pins in final plav.
In other action, the Allev Cats
defeated Sigma Phi Epsilon B1297-
1278 to take the all campus putple
Ticket guidelines set for all
home basketball games
(SID) Guidelines for East
i arolina University students to
pick up tn kets for the upcoming
college basketball season have
been set.
Students can pick up their
tickets with a alid IDand activity
card the day befon a game from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m at the Ming ,Coli
seum ticket office.
Forgameson Monday nights
ticket pick u will be on Friday.
For gan.es during ! hanksgiving
break Nov. 25) tickets can be
pickivi up on Frida) Nov. 17.
When students pick up the
tickets the day before the game,
they can also pick up one extra I
2 price ticket foi a guesl with a
valid ID. Arc, additional tickets
are full-price After the supply of
guest tickets are gone, all tickets
become full-price. Also, students
can use an extra student ID to get
Overtime
offense
Tim Brown felt the same wax-
saying the defense' was better in
the second halt and that, "if we
(defense) could get the ball, then
we knew we could score
Coach Steele said that right
now many players have been sick
a free ticket for another student
theday before thegame. Only one
extra ID per person is allowed.
When students pick up their
tickets the day of the game, only
one ticket can be given out. Also
on theday of thegame, all remain-
ing stu lent tickets will be avail-
able tor anyone to Ou , students
im luded.
Student sections are colored
purple, gray and green. Thereare
three entrances for student tickets
Minges Lobby (purple & green)
and the south side of the coliseum
(graj I. Pui pie and green are floor
level seats while grav is second
le. el seating
I r information about the
availability of student tickets
throughout the season, contact the
ECU Athletic Ticket Office at 757-
4500.
Continued from page 15
or hampered by injuries, but the
best thing is that the Thanksgiv-
ing break iscomingup. Steele will
use that time to fine-tune his club
for the start of regular season on
November 25I he Pirates will host
Appalachian State in MingesColi-
seum at 7 p.m.
(even less)
The ECU cheerleaders take a break during tb? half time of
Saturday's win over Temple, the last home game of the 1989
season. (Photo by J.D. Whitnure � ECU Photolab)
playoff title. Zeta Tau Alpha
ousted all their sorority hopefuls
for the championship win. In
women's action, the Scrags cap-
tured the title of the women's
independent division with a nar-
row defeat over Alley Oops II,
who surprisingly made it into the
final match-up. Congratulations
top bowlers and look for further
highlights in A Break In The Ac-
Go Pirates
Pay for college,
the smart way.

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An inside lookM
�� mc Em� tmfft Tim Em OwiWn �M
1mmtmttmmu)rpttkiiSotai�rmUim
nbersitj of Southern Miss,
facts:
Home. Hattiesburg, Miss.
Nickname: Golden Eagles
Mascot- ????
Enrollment 13,000
Colors: Black and Gold
Stadium: Roberts Stadium
1988 Record: 10-2
1W Record: 4-5
Head Coach: Curley Hallman
2nd season)
CSM Record: 14-7-0
arcer Record: same
Of tense: Multiple Pro-1
onse 50
JNCAA Affiliation: NCAA
-tor, i-A (Independent)
-urning Lettermen: 42
urn ins? Starters: 8
-M leads 11-3
.net-ting: USM 45 - ECU 42
' 24, 1988 in Greenville
East Carolina v9 USM
Schedule, arid .Results;
irida State30-26 W
s State23-26 L
Auburn3-24 L
� as Christian17-19 L
lltM14-31 L
: Tulane30-21 W
isville16-10 W
j Southwestern21-24 L
rrtphis State31-7 W
INov. 25
The Pirates will travel to Hat-
tiesburg, Mississippi over Thanks-
giving to face the Golden Eagles of
the University of Southern Missis-
sippi on Saturday, Nov. 25.
The Eagles, under the direc-
tion of head coach Curley Hall-
man, play fourth-ranked Alabama
this weekend. Coming off a three
week rest since their last game
beating Memphis State 31-7, the
Eagles go to Tuscaloosa in hopes of
securing their last chance at a non-
losing season. The USM team is4-5
for the season.
Against the Pirates, USM will
be looking to chalk up another win
in the 14 game series between the
two schools, of which USM leads
11-3. Last year, USM edged the
Pirates 45-42.
Hallman's team this year con-
sists of 42 returning lettermen from
a 10-2 Independence Bowl Cham-
pion squad, including eight of-
fensive starters.
Leading the team's Pro for-
mation willbequarterback Brett
Favre. Favre, a junior, has com-
pleted 162 of 305 passes (or 2002
yards,10 touchdown passes and
thrown interceptions this season-
However, Favre's running game
is lacking, losing an averaging of
-0.6 yards per game.
Senior split end Darryl Till-
man leads the Eagles' receivers
with 371 yards, snagging 22 re-
ceptions so far this season.
Flanker Eugene Rowell, also a
senior, is tied with Tillman in
receptions with 356 yards. Regi-
nald Wamsley, a possible starter
at fullback, is another favorite
target for Favre, catching 22
passes for 201 yards.
Theoffensivelineboastsboth
size and strength with an aver-
age height of 6-5 and weight of
Just over 260 pounds. Senior tackle
Buddy King leads the group, with
junior guard Ben Crimm and
sophomore tackle Chris Rylas
adding size.
USM relies on a 50-defense
with multiple schemes and is ted
by senior linebacker William
Kirksev- Kirksey has racked up
122 tackles, 69 solo and 53 assisted,
and one sack for the season.
Kirksey has recovered 3 fumbles
and one interception. The Eagles
havegivenupl88points this year.
The Eagles' secondary fea-
tures free safety Kerry Valrie, a
junior, who has 84 tackles (41 solo
and 43 assisted), five pass break-
ups, one interception, and two
fumble recoveries. Senior Pat
Jackson has accumulated 64 tack-
les (35 solo and 29 assisted).
Kicker Chuck Davis is 9 of 20
on the season in field goals with
his longest being a 45 yarder. In
PAT duties, Davis is 20 of 21.
In special teams, Tillma n leads
in kick-off returns with 19 for 440
yards, averaging 23.2 yards. So-
phomore Tony Smith has 11 re-
turns for 340 yards, with his long-
est return being an 82-yander.
Sophomore punter Scott
Bryanthas51 punts for 2175 yards,
averaging 42.6 yards this season.
Bryant has no blocks this season
and his longest punt has been for
73 vards.
flMSStoiA
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Nov. 19th
1 - 5pm
Please join Fabricate Too
& the other
Arlington Villaee
Merchants for a toast
to the upcoming
Holiday Season.
Please Come
Mon � Sal 10 - 6
Thurs ID - X
756-1058
Red Banks kd
Arlington Village
m
0�
nJ
Mexican ftwiauicmi i
Tarkanian looks for old chemistry in new team
vNLDDON
New -wrvice
- The Univer-
is Vegas basket-
for its run-
- rated No I
� r itings,
trkanian said
n try rea-
�'
dyear as
i , i said it
is better
l his team man when
17-2 and reached

w hether
te the
lub.
these
to the
: : stoi 1 ar-
; , 823) is
. i r Bee in all-
. rming per-
i tion sbest
i Hympk
igm n - and
is new team-
legetrans-
� �� n . he coring
ea run at
T.
no ot the
11 David
; academically
suspending him. He suffered a
setback last December when the
Supreme Court ruled that the
NCAA isn't required to give due
process to coaches. Still, it hasn't
taken action against him, and his
district court injunction remains
in force
The Rebels' basketball pro-
gram has a 51 2 million budget
and generated $5.1 million annu-
ally in revenues, the largest return
in major college basketball, Roth-
ermel said. Basketball provided
62.5 percent oi all the athletic
program's revenue and is expected
to generate close to $b million this
season.
What the tans will see this
ear is defense � lots of defense.
"1 think it could be the best
defense we've had Tarkanian
we get Butler in the lineup, it could
be. Ou r guards are so good defen-
sively
The defense sets up the of-
fense, which averaged 85.3 points
to its opponents 74.5 last season.
"This could bo a really good
team, it could be because we have
such good quickness Tarkanian
said. "One question mark is our
outside shooting
But that question mark didn't
look so imposing when sopho-
more guard Anderson Hunt,
doing most of his scoring on deep
perimeter jump shots, scored 36
points in the Rebels' 107-102 vic-
tory over the Soviet Union in an
early-November exhibition game.
iunior Greg Anthonv returns
at point guard. He's not an out-
side shooter, but that might be his
Inside, there's Butler, who
needs to complete ,n anthropol-
ogy class to be eligible, Augmon.
Johnson and durable 6-7 enforcer
Moses Scurry. Butler was the
Rebels' leading scorer at 15.4 last
season; Augmon was close behind
at 15.3.
The fate ot Ml shot blocker
George Ackles is uncertain. He
has a broken wrist and could re-
turn around Christmas, but be-
causeof the Rebels' inside strength
he probably will be red-shirted.
"We have one or two guvs
out lohnson said. We're ust
trying to hold the fort until they
get back. Once all our pistons are
hitting. vou'U be able to see what
we can do
CCopvnght !� I SATOI5AX ppl
( re lntormit-ion Srtwork
521 Cotanche St.
LET'S PARTY �
For Birthdays, Anniversaries, Reunions. �
Bon Voyage Parties Or Whatever The Oc- NX
casion Call Us To Make Reservations For f)
Your Next Party.
757-1666
Accommodations to 50 People k
kz
r cat!? �
a
k
! CDCC SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
! rilCC STUDENTS WHO NEED
I MONEY FOR COLLEGE
Every Student is Eligible tor Some Type of
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades or Parental Income.
. We have a data bank of over 200.000 listings ot scholarships, fellow-
ships, grants and loans, representing over S10 billion in private sector
funding
� Many scholarships are given to students based on their academic interests.
I career plans family heritage and place of residence
� There s money available for students who have been newspaper carriers.
grocery clerks, cheerleaders non smokers etc
- Results GUARANTEED
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ANYTIME
For A Free Brochure
(800) 346-6401
neverthinks
innin ional title
ire you can be a great
vin a he said.
i be lu ky to win it. 1
be a very
� Is were 29 H last sea-
nson
ssa
ist vear.
.mi want to
ohnsonsaid.
unior ollege
ir, averaged 28.3
rebounds while
Texas, to a 33-2
SPORTS FAN ATTIC
m
�TkX Pro aml College Sports :y
Apparel and Novelties
amciii i,ci�sfi
mioi uicm tisiitu
jk Officially
Licensed
Product
incredible kid Tar-
joodaplayer
ricipated This won't
. . isition for him
I ne worry that I Nl V appar-
won't have as it drives tor a
rnal title is the NCAA step-
nine ' path before the 1990
iur at i '?�nver
. athletic director Brad
iclsaid it's too early to tell
. A A will take ac-
the 1986 UNLV recruit-
� ' ! loyd Daniels, but that
there will be no impact this sea-
That's new business with the
A
old business is
Tarkanian s 12-year legal battle
that Ngan with the NCAA plac-
ing the program on probation for
I vv i vti rs a rtd i ordering the school
t.�si i spend the coach for two years.
INLV served the probation, but
rarkanian continued to coach af-
ter getting a district court injunc-
tion to prevent theuniversity from
Carolina East Mall
756-7487
FREE EAR PIERCING!
With the purchase of ear piercing stud
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Sculptured Nails: $45 a set.
Two week fill $18 repairs
For Appointment Call
757-8404
fvo5m
Carolina East Mall
Greenville .N.C.





I
An inside look
University of Southern Miss,
facts:
Home: Hattiesburg, Miss.
Nickname: Golden Eagles
Mascot ????
Enrollment 13,000
Colors: Black and Gold
Stadium: Roberts Stadium
(33,000)
1988 Record: 10-2
1989 Record: 4-5
Head Coach: Curley Hallman
2nd season)
USM Record: 14-7-0
Career Record: same
Offense: Multiple Pro-I
Defense. 50
NCAA Affiliation: NCAA
Division I-A (Independent)
Returning Lettermen: 42
Returning Starters: 8
Series: USM leads 11-3
Last meeting: USM 45 - ECU 42
Sept. 24,1988 in Greenville
East Carolina v� USM
r
19J893�hed.ulti
Florida State
Miss. State
Auburn
Texas Christian
Texas A&M
Tulane
Louisville
Southwestern
Memphis State
ECU
30-26 W
23-26 L
3-24 L
17-19 L
14-31 L
30-21W
16-10 W
21-24 L
31-7 W
Nov. 25
The Pirates will travel to Hat-
tiesburg Mississippi over Thanks-
giving to face the Golden Eagles of
the University of Southern Missis-
sippi on Saturday, Nov. 25.
The Eagles, under the direc-
tion of head coach Curlev Hall-
man, play fourth-ranked Alabama
this weekend. Coming off a three
week rest since their last game
beating Memphis State 31-7, the
Eagles go toTuscaloosa in hopes of
securing their last chance at a non-
losing season. The USM team is 4-5
for the season.
Against the Pirates, USM will
be looking to chalk up another win
in the 14 game series between the
two schools, of which USM leads
U-3. Last year, USM edged the
Pirates 45-42.
Hauman's team this yeaT con-
sists of 42 rerurrdngleltermen from
a 10-2 Independence Bowl Cham-
pion squad, including eight of-
fensive starters.
Leadingtheteam's Pro-I for-
ma tkm willbe quarterback Brett
Favre. Favre, a junior, has com-
pleted 162 of 305 passes for 2002
yards,10 touchdown passes and
thrown interceptions this season.
However, Favre's running game
is lacking, losing an averaging of
-0.6 yards per game.
Senior split end Darryl Tffi-
man leads the Eagles' receivers
with 371 yards, snagging 22 re-
ceptions so far this season.
Flanker Eugene Roweu, also a
senior, is tied with Tillman in
receptions with 356 yards. Regi-
nald Wamsley, a possible starter
at fullback, is another favorite
target for Favre, catching 22
passes for 201 yards.
TheofferveBneboastsboth
size and strength with an aver-
tttf fe aaitaBaa BM aW TbbbbbbbbbbIbbbb aaaaaWBm ibm aawta
age Height of 6-5 and weight of
Jijstover260pounds.Senk)rtackle
Buddy Kingleads the group, with
junior guard Ben Crimm and
sophomore tackle Chris Ryias
adding size.
USM relies cm a 50-defense
With multrpte schemes and is ted
by senior linebacker William
Kirksey. Kirksey has racked up
122 tackles, 69 solo and 53 assisted,
and one sack tor the season.
Kirksey has recovered 3 fumbles
and one interception. The Eagles
ha ve given up 188 points this year.
The Eagles' secondary fea-
tures free safety Kerry Valrie, a
Junior, who has 84 tackles (41 solo
and 43 assisted), five pass break-
ups, one interception, and two
fumble recoveries. Senior Pat
Jackson has accumulated 64 tack-
les (35 solo and 29 assisted).
Kicker Chuck Da vis is 9 of 20
on the season in field goals with
his longest being a 45 yarder. In
PAT duties, Davis is 20 of 21.
mspedaltean�,Tfllmanleads
in kick-off returns with 19 for 440
yards, averaging 23.2 yards. So-
phomore Tony Smith has 11 re-
turns for 340 vards, with his long-
est return being an 82-yarder.
Sophomore punter Scott
BryanthasSl punts for2175 yards,
averaging 42.6 yards this season.
Bryant has no blocks this season
and his longest punt has been for
73 yards.
1tfaf
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Nov. 19th
1 - 5pm
Please join Fabricate Too
& the other
Arlington Village
Merchants for a toast
to the upcoming
Holiday Season.
Please Come
Mon - Sal 10 - ft
Thurs 10-X
756-1058
919-A Red Banks Rd
Arlington Village
Tarkanian looks for old chemistry in new team
By STEVt SXEDDON
Wanr.rtt New service
AS � The Univer-
I Nevada-Las Vegas basket-
am - known for its run-
offense � is rated No. 1
t major preseason ratings,
. h 'errv Tarkanian said
e may he the primary rea-
nnmg his 17th year as the
Rebels' oach and his 22nd year as
najor college coach, he said it
� hisbest team defensively.
nd he aid he has better
�rs on this team than when
ie Rebels wore 37-2 and reached
.c Final Four in 1987.
What must be seen is whether
r not this team can duplicate the
chemistry of that club.
It's easy to see why these
ire bringing a smile to the
� e normally stoic Tar-
who at 530-114 (.823) is
. � nd onl to Gair Bee in all-
ime major college winning per-
ke perhaps the nation's best
player � U.S. Olympic
orward Stacey Augmon � and
ntroduce him to his new team-
te 6-foot-7 junior college trans-
r Larry Johnson, the scoring
hine who might make a run at
teing the player of the year.
And don't forget one of the
nation'sbetterbigmen, 6-11 David
Sutler, who becomes academically
HgibleDec. 17.
Tarkanian said he never thinks
ut winning a national title �
ven this season.
"I'm aware you can be a great
:am and not win it he said.
"You ve got to be lucky to win it. I
hmk we're going to be a very
good team
I he Rebels were 29-8 last sea-
son
"If vou're No. 1, you want to
go out and prove it Johnson said.
lohnson, the junior college
tyer of the year, averaged 28.3
points and 17.3 rebounds while
ng Odessa, Texas, to a 33-2
record last year.
"He's an incredible kid Tar-
kanian said. "He's as good a player
is 1 ever anticipated. This won't
be a big transition for him
One worry that UNLV appar-
ently won't have as it drives for a
national title is the NCAA step-
ping in its path before the 1990
Final Four at Denver.
UNLV athletic director Brad
Rothermel said it's too early to tell
whether the NCAA will take ac-
tion on the 1986 UNLV recruit-
ment of Lloyd Daniels, but that
there will be no impact this sea-
son.
That's new business with the
NCAA
The old business is
Tarkanian's 12-year legal battle
that began with'the NCAA plac-
ing the program on probation for
two yearsand ordering the school
to suspend the coach for two years.
UNLV served the probation, but
Tarkanian continued to coach af-
ter getting a district court injunc-
tion to prevent the university from
suspending him. He suffered a
setback last December when the
Supreme Court ruled that the
NCAA isn't required to give due
process to coaches. Still, it hasn't
taken action against him, and his
district court injunction remains
in force.
The Rebels' basketball pro-
gram has a $1.2 million budget
and generated $5.1 million annu-
allv in revenues, the largest return
in major college basketball, Roth-
ermel said. Basketball provided
n2.5 percent of all the athletic
we get Butler in the lineup, it could
be. Our guards are so good defen-
sively
The defense sets up the of-
fense, which averaged 85.3 points
to its opponents 74.5 last season.
"This could be a really good
team, it could be because we have
such good quickness Tarkanian
said. "One question mark is our
outside shooting
But that question mark didn't
look so imposing when sopho-
more guard Anderson Hunt,
doing most of his scon ng on deep
program'srevenueandisexpected perimeter jump shots, scored 36
to generate close to $6 million this points in the Rebels' 107-102 vic-
tory over the Soviet Union in an
early-November exhibition game.
Junior Greg Anthony returns
at point guard. He's not an out-
side shooter, but that might be his
season.
What the fans will see this
vear is defense � lots of defense.
"I think it could be the best
defense we've had Tarkanian
Inside, there's Butler, who
needs to complete an anthropol-
ogy class to be eligible, Augmon,
Johnson and durable 6-7 enforcer
Moses Scurry. Butler was the
Rebels' leading scorer at 15.4 last
season; Augmon was close behind
at 15.3.
The fate of 6-11 shot blocker
George Ackles is uncertain. He
has a broken wrist and could re-
turn around Christmas, but be-
causeof the Rebels' inside strength
he probablv will be red-shirted.
"We have one or two guys
out Johnson said. "We're just
trying to hold the fort until they
get back. Once all our pistons are
hitting, you'll be able to see what
we can do
CCopyhght 1�l�, LSA TODAY Appte
College Information Network
SCHOLARSHII
STUDEN
MONEYFORC
521 Cotanche St.
LET'S PARTY
For Birthdays, Anniversaries, Reunions,
Bon Voyage Parties Or Whatever The Oc-
casion Call Us To Make Reservations For
Your Next Party.
757-1666
Accommodations to 50 People
Every Student is Eligible tor S
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades o
We have a data bank ot over 200,000 listing
ships, grants, and loans, representing over Si
funding
Many scholarships are given to students based o
career plans, family heritage and place of residci
There s money available for students who hav�
grocery clerks, cheerleaders, non-smokers et
Results GUARANTEED
CALL
ANYTIME
For A Free Brochure
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SPORTS FAN ATTIC
OHICIIL HCHSIt
dT-1
� llOIUiCIH IISlllll
Pro and College Sports
Apparel and Novelties
Officially
Licensed
Product
Carolina East Mall
756-7487
FREE EAR PIERCING!
With the purchase of ear piercing stud.
Prices range from $8-15.
Sculptured Nails: $45 a set.
Two week fill $18 repairs.
For Appointment Call
757-8404
Carolina East Mall
Greenville .N.C





f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 16, 19H9 18
Fearless Football Forecast
ECU at Pittsburgh
ECU at S. Mississippi
Notre Dame at Tenn State
Notre Dame at Miami, Fla.
Oklahoma at Nebraska
Washington at Washington St.
Auburn at Georgia
Virginia at Maryland
Virginia Tech at N.C. State
Clemson at South Carolina
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week-(8-1-1)
Overall - (66-20-4)
Pittsburgh
ECU
Notre Dame
Notre Dame
Nebraska
Washington State
Auburn
Virginia
N.C. State
Clemson
CHIPPY BONEHEADDr. RICHARD I AKINMICHAEL MARTINSTEPHANIE FOl SO?
WZMBECU ChancellorSports EditorManaging I ditor
Last Week-(9-0-1)Last Week-(7-2-1)Last Week -(9-0-1)Last Week - (4-5-1)
Overall - (59-27-4)Overall - (50-29-4)Overall - (65-21-4)Overall - (45-41-4)
ECUECUPittsburghECU
ECUECUECUECU
Notre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre Dame
MiamiNotre DameNotre DameNotre Dame
OklahomaNebraskaNebraskaOklahoma
WashingtonWashington StateWashington StateWashington State
GeorgiaAuburnAuburnAuburn
MarylandVirginiaVirginiaMaryland
N.C. StateN.C. StateN.C. StateN.C. State
ClemsonClemsonClemsonSouth Carolina
Dl BlH
ECU Spur ts Information
Last Week - (5-4-1)
Overall -(63-23-4)
ECU
ECU
Notre Dame
Miami
Nebraska
Washington
(Georgia
Virginia
Virginia Tech
lemson
Swimming
Continued from page 16
1. R.
d.
3, C.
200-yard Butterfly l,).Ball,
Navy, 1:59.42. 2, T. Chnstensen,
ECU, 1:59.78. 3, T. Holsten, ECU,
2:04.44.
One-meter Diving � 1, P.
Fetuchak, Navy, 205 points. 2, B.
Bell Navy, 192 points. 3, S. Ruther-
ford, Navy, 182 points.
100-yard Freestyle - - 1, S.
Btafcusky, ECU, 59.43.2, M. Cook,
Navy, 49.51. 3, B. Herndon, ECU.
49.82.
200-yard Backstroke - 1, M.
O'Brien, ECU, 1:59.13. 2,
G.Walters, ECU 1:59.58. 3, . Far-
rell, ECU, 2:00.75.
500-vard Freestyle -1, A. Jeter,
ECU,4:51.16. 2, E. Winton, Navy,
4:51.24. 3, M. Ccrvarich, Navy,
4:51.29.
Three-meter Diving-1 ,P. Bell,
Navy, 214 points. 2. P. Fetuchak,
Navy, 207 points. 3, S. Ruther-
ford, Navy, 189 points.
200-yard Breastroke
Kennedy, ECU, 2:14.29
Lravlion, Navy, 2:16.55
avlon, Navy, 2:17.99.
" 400-yard Free Relay -1, Whit-
ney, Cook, Ball, Weber, Navy,
3:13.99.2, Herndon, leter. Nelson,
FarreB, ECU, 3:19.65
Theoutstanding swimmer for
the Pirates was senior Raymond
Kennedy, a triple event winner.
His win in the 200-yard Individ-
ual Medley was a very close and
important race for the men.
The women won a very close
meet, their stats are as follows:
200-yard Medley Relay -1, L.
Smith, Bridges, .Muench, Holt,
ECU, 153.80.2, Paulson, Kuskow-
ski, Crumplev, Kroplin, VCU,
1:51.63. 3, O'Brien, Simms, Par-
due, Wilson, ECU, 1:59.28.
100-vard Freestyle - 1, T.
BorgHso'n, VCU, 10:50.45. 2, D.
Reed, VCU, 11 KB.34. 3, C. Green,
ECU, 1106.70.
200- vard Freestyle - 1, N.
Urn, VCU, 1:59.17. "2, N. Buke,
ECU, 15959. 3, L. Wilson, ECU,
202.97.
100-vard Backstroke - 1, L.
Smith, ECU, 1U2.90. 2, C. Shep-
erd, VCU, 1:03.53. 2, J. Wilhelm,
ECU, 1:03.79.
100-yard Breastroke - 1, M.
Bndgers, ECU, 1:06.07. 2, .
Mue�ch, ECU, 1:12.50. 3, M.
Kuskowski, VCU, 1:12.97.
200-vard Butterfly - 1, R.
Wieks, ECU, 2:14.49. 2, T. Crum-
plev, VCU, 2:15.01. 3, L. Smith,
ECU, 2:18.73.
50-yard Freestyle -1, C. Shep-
erd, VCU, 25.77. 2, C. Copcland,
VCU, 25.98.3, P. Holt, ECU, 26.18.
One-Meter Diving - 1, K.
Kehoe, VCU, 146 points. 2, D. Milis,
Read
�&e (East
Carolinian
A Veritable
Comiucopia of
Information
sM
Go
Pirates
VCU, 144 points. 3, J. Foy, ECU,
142 points.
100-vard Freestyle - 1, C.
Copeland, VCU, 55.72.2, C. Shep-
erd, VCU, 55.80.3, N. Duke, ECU,
55.88.
200-vard Backstroke - 1,
LSmith, ECU, 2:15.33. 2, . Wil-
helm, ECU. 2:18.08. 3, C. Morns,
ECU, 2:21.73.
200-yard Breastroke - 1, M.
Bndgers, ECU, 2:25.64. 2, J.
Muench, ECU, 2:35.39.3, C.Green
ECU. 2-36.96.
500-yard Freestyle-1, N. Lam,
VCU, 5:20.66. 2, T.Borgerson,
VCU,5:21.24.3,K.Baldndge.FCU,
5:23.73.
100-vard Butterfly - 1, J.
Muench ECU, 1:01.70.2, I.King,
VCU, 1:02.40. 3, T. Crumplev,
VCU, 1:02.71.
Wilson
plavs allow him a little more time
to catch the hall, run better routes
and generally play a better, more
relaxed game.
" 11 (the offense) proved to be a
difference in a lot of the games
Wilson said. "The offense is per-
fect for me. I feel relaxed and it lets
me do mv job
"Anytime he's (Hunter) in
there. 1 feel comfortable and I think
he feels comfortable throwing the
ball to me
Wilson said that when he and
1 lunter are on the field, they rally
around each other, and the whole
team. Although he is a confident
senior, he says that the move from
Maryland caused a great deal of
culture shock. Moving from a
large, metropolitan area, the
change was different for Wilson.
Compared to his home in Mary-
land, Greenville was "slow mo-
tion
"I came here without a cam-
pus visit oranything Wilson said.
"I just made my choice ECU re-
cruited me harder than anyone
else
Attempting a degree in Crimi-
nal Justice, the senior has always
taken his school seriously, and he
currently supports a 3.0 grade
point average.
On the field, the transition was
just as difficult. He felt he had to
prove himself to his teammates.
"I had toget acceptedWilson
said. "After a while, when I got on
the field and proved myself, things
were okay
Since then, Wilson has proven
himself time and time again on
the field. Entering the season, he
was one of the few certain starters
for the Pirates. He has plaved in
more than 34 games since his ca-
reer began at ECU.
Being his senior year, Walter
felt his playing has become more
consistent than ever, despite two
injuries he's endured over the past
year. Wilson suffered a slight ankle
injury in spring of last year, in
Three-meter Diving - 1, K.
Kehoe, VCU, 154 points. 2, J. Fov,
ECU, 145 points. 3, J. Grove, ECU,
138 points.
400-vard Individual Medley -
1, T. Crumplev, VCU, 4:49.932,
N. Lam, VCU, 4:50.79.3, L. Wilson,
ECU, 451.46.
400-yard Free Relay - lj
Copeland, Sheperd, King, Lam,
VCU, 3:44.22. 2, Duke, Wilhelm,
Pardue, Holt, ECU, 3:46.02.
There were two outstanding
Ladv Pirates on Sunday. Both
Meredith Bridgers and Linda
Smith were crucial triple event
winners.
It was a victorious weekend
for the ECU Swimming and Div-
ing team and they are looking
forward to the ECU vs. UNCC
meet in Charlotte on Saturday.
Continued from pa
page 16
w hat he described as "not being to
bad However, the injury did
keep him out oi practice for about
two weeks.
This year, a reoccurring shoul-
der injury has hampered Wilson
physically, but he continues to
plav. He said that when he gets
Wt, he really feelsit in hisshoulder
more than anywhere else.
Wilson's dream, like most
co I legate football players, is to play
professional football.
"I definitely like to plav in the
N EL Wilson said. "It not, I'll take
my experience in criminal justice
and work with that. Maybe I'll go
into law and be a lawyer, but I'll
probably go backup north
As football plaver and a stu-
dent, Wilson said that perform-
ance is the kev to his success.
Write
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LADIES FREE ALL NIGHT





INSIDE:
Bush takes
credit for
Berlin Wall
opening
page 5
A at Loyal 'Jcader:
. ' i wishes to an
noum i that it Has been bought
Mat tin '1 nterprises. 'Martin
� � rvrises national con
glomerate u hu h on m ai most at
many other companies as
� it rite.
�.v ever we (tope that an
i Hanges in editorial policy, such
as increased favorable cov-
erage o I senior t ecu lives in
tartin 'Enterprises, articles
about hcrwgreat 'Martin 'Enter-
prises products arc, orjuU-page
ads saying things like- "Martin
'1 ntervrises � we didn t spill
oil all o tr Alaska " wilt not in-
terfere with your pleasure in
reading this newspaper.
'IXewant'ECU'Ii �:��'� tocon-
tinue to be the newspaper with
:�: personal touch.
tLU SjWPnHU It:
a idok at statistics tnat
INSIDE:
Bush takes
credit for
Red Sea
parting
page 6
Thousands flee to freedom
Students continue cyJails
exodus from citv
v
thousands more E( L students
fled ireenville this week, as thit' un-
precedented exodus from the totali-
tarian regime continued
Students had l ng been prevented
from leaving the city b) the infamous
Greenville Wall, a massive dough-
nut -and-coffee c up stru ture erected
across 3th Street by local police Hut
new citv ordinances passed in the
wakeof recent elections eased restri
tions on travel permits ur students.
paving the way tt�r thos' who vL
freedom and opportunity in other
Kinds
Most refugees cited the repres-
sive nature of the . ity as their reason
for leaving
1v reason for leaving? I'd have
to cite the repressive nature of the
i itv viid V Rolled, business major
snape our carrpus
We're Ousting More Mayors!
�a
o
c5
o
Year
Most said the noise ordinary eand
the cancellation of the Halloween
celebration were their pnmar rea-
sons lor leaving. Hut the citv s policies
had been growing mi reasinglv restric-
tive tor vears, according to Rolled.
1 mean, the Halloween thing and
the noise ordinance, those're ust the
straws that broke the camel's ba k
But the real problem is a lot deeper
than that the incessant flow of
parking tickets, the ignorance and
intolerance ot so many of the local
residents, th.it kind of thing Rolled
said
Rolled cited another reason tor
leaving: ECU's recent policy chances
which nude it illegal to "knowingly
mutilate, burn, deface or poke tun at
the logo of E I
"That logo-burning law Rolled
said, shaking his head "That's what
did it tor me
Some local businessmen, like
Pack-Em Advertising owner Scott
Robertson, applaud the students tor
their daring
"1 only wish I'd had that kind of
chance at Iheir age said Robertson.
'To be a free man in a free country
or at least a country without less.1
1 lelms hasalwaysbeen mydream
Others are also glad the students
are leaving, but for different reasons.
"Good riddance to the noisy
peacenik scum growled uan Fraidy,
head of the anti-student Association
of Elderly Greenvilleitizens Who
Ha veNothing Better To Do With Their
lives "Rotten, scuzzv little (censored
bv managing editor). Why, with them
out of the way, the
AEGCWHNBTDWTL can make
(ireenville what it on e was a dirty
little (arming community without a
hundred IQ points total
By midnight, Rolled was aboard
the "I reedom Train which, thanks
to special pontoon attachments, will
i arrv him .ill the wav across the At
lantK Ocean, through Hungary, and
finallv toEast lermanyandcompara
live freedom
noisv
infants
Till A.MA1 C.AMATHD PRKS
Babies in jail?
Well, that s one result of
Greenville's new noise ordinance.
In a massive stin operation I ues-
dav.braveC.reenvillepolicedonned
not gear and arrested seventeen ba-
bies tor wailing tm loudly.
"We've got to show these lids
that they can't get away with break-
ing the law Police Chief Cordon
OHara told The Amalgamated Press
during a break in the action. "If you
don't teach em voung, they grow
up and cause tro .He like students
at a certain college I'm not going to
mention
"(.(xi gw gah gah protested
four-month-old "Jenny whose
name was withheld bv police be-
cause she is a minor. "Pah dah
Independent reports confirm
lenny's story.
"I confirm her story said eye-
witness I Witness shortly before he
was clubbed bv a particularly selt-
important officer "I saw the cops
run up to thebabv carriageand pinch
her tivs
"Of course she cned. Id have
cried, in her sihiation It's only �
ow' Stop clubbing me he added
"Babies? Good riddance to 'em
chortled Slv Mee, chairman of the
Noise Monitors For The Association
of Elderly Greenville Citizens Who
ac othing Rette- To Do With
Iheir Lives "We like it nice and
quiet 'round these parts
According to O'Hara, targets ot
future anti-noise operations include:
� People who mow their lawns
� People who sing in showers
� lgs All dogs.
In additurn. O'Hara said
"people who like to travel in groups
of thr�v or more had better watt h
out we're gonna start busting
heads tor suspicious activities like
th.it starting Monday.





INSIDE:
Bush takes
credit for
Berlin Wall
page 5
'Dear Loyal leader:
ECU lovxy wishes to an-
nounce that it has been Sought
by Martin 'Enterprises. Martin
'Enterprises is a national con-
glomerate which owns almost as
many other companies as
'Beatrice.
However, we hope that any
changes in editorial policy, such
as, say, increased favorable cov-
erage of senior executives in
'Martin Enterprises, articles
about how great Martin Enter-
prises products are, or full-page
ads saying things (if&: "Martin
Enterprises � we didn't spill
oil all over Alaska' will not in-
terfere with your pleasure in
reading this newspaper.
(WewantEdLcTomorto con-
tinue to Be the newspaper with
the personal touch.
Thousands flee to freedom
Students continue
exodus from city
The Amalgamated Press
Thousands more ECU students
fled Greenville this week, as the un-
precedented exodus from the totali-
tarian regime continued.
Students had long been prevented
from leaving the city by the infamous
Greenville Wall, a massive dough-
nut-and-coffee cup structure erected
across 5th Street by local police. But
new city ordinances passed in the
wake of recent elections eased restric-
tions on travel permits for students,
paving the way for those who seek
freedom and opportunity in other
lands.
Most refugees cited the repres-
sive nature of the city as their reason
for leaving.
"My reason for leaving? I'd have
to cite the repressive nature of the
city said N. Rolled, business major.
a loo it statistics tint shape our campus
We're Ousting More Mayors!
1
8
8000
6000-
4000-
2000-
1983 1984
1985
1986
1987
1968
Year
Most said the noise ordinance and
the cancellation of the Halloween
celebration were their primary rea-
sons for leaving. But the city's policies
had been growing increasingly restric-
tive for years, according to Rolled.
"1 mean, the Halloween thing and
the noise ordinance, those're just the
straws that broke the camel's back.
But the real problem is a lot deeper
than that � the incessant flow of
parking tickets, the ignorance and
intolerance of so many of the local
residents, that kind of thing Rolled
said.
Rolled cited another reason for
leaving: ECU's recent policy changes
which made it illegal to "knowingly
mutilate, bum, deface or poke fun at
the logo of ECU
"That logo-burning law Rolled
said, shaking his head. "That's what
did it for me
Some local businessmen, like
Pack-Em Advertising owner Scott
Robertson, applaud the students for
their daring.
"I only wish I'd had that kind of
chance at their age said Robertson.
'To be a free man in a free country �
or at least a country without Jesse
Helms�has always been my dream
Others are also glad the students
are leaving, but for different reasons.
"Good riddance tc the noisy
peacenik scum growled Juan Fraid y,
head of the anti-student Association
of Elderly Greenville Citizens Who
HaveNothing Better ToDo With Their
Lives. "Rotten, scuzzy little (censored
by managing editor). Why, with mem
out of the way, the
AEGCWHNBTDWTL can make
Greenville what it once was�a dirty
little farming community without a
hundred IQ points total
By midnight, Rolled was aboard
the "Freedom Train which, thanks
to special pontoon attachments, will
carry him all the way across the At-
lantic Ocean, through Hungary, and
finally to East Germany and compara-
tive freedom.
Bush takes
credit for
Red Sea
parting
page 6
City jails
noisy
infants
The Amalgamated Press
Babies in jail?
Well, that's one result of
Greenville's new noise ordinance.
In a massive sting operation Tues-
day, brave Greenville police donned
riot gear and arrested seventeen ba-
bies for wailing too loudly.
"We've got to show these kids
that they can't get away with break-
ing the law Police Chief Gordon
OHara told The Amalgamated Press
during a break in the action. "If you
don't teach 'em young, they grow
up and cause trouble like students
at a certain college I'm not going to
mention
"Goo goo gah gah protested
four-month-old "Jenny whose
name was withheld by police be-
cause she is a minor. "Dah dah
Independent reports confirm
Jenny's story.
"I confirm her story said eye-
witness I. Witness shortly before he
was clubbed by a particularly self-
important officer. "I saw the cops
run up to the baby carnage and pinch
her toes.
"Of course she cried. I'd have
cried, in her situation. If s only �
ow! Stop clubbing me he added.
"Babies?Good riddance to 'em
chortled Sly Mee, chairman of the
Noise Monitors For The Association
of Elderly Greenville Citizens Who
Have Nothing Bette To Do With
Their Lives. "We like it nice and
quiet 'round these parts
According to OHara, targets of
future anti-noise operations include:
� People who mow their lawns.
� People who sing in showers.
� Dogs. All dogs.
In addition, O'Hara said,
"people who like to travel in groups
of three or more had better watch
out � we're gonna start busting
heads for suspicious activities like
that, startinftMonday





2 � November 16, 1989 � ECU TODAY � It's only a joke; please don't write or phone. Thank you.
Reader:
Martin Enterprises wishes
to announce that it has just
been bought by Holden Hold-
ings, a multi-national con-
glomerate of companies that
owns virtually everything on
the planet. We hope, however,
that any sudden and unex-
plained changes in editorial
policy will not interfere with
your pleasure in reading this
newspaper.
We want ECU Today to
continue to be the newspaper
with the personal touch.
FCC cuts radio rights
By Chippy Bonehead
ECU Today
Managers of four radio stations
have been "literally castrated" by the
FCC this weekend for their resistance
to new FCC obscenity regulations. In-
cluded in the four is Pansy Voice,
manager of ECU's student radio sta-
tion, WZMB.
The FCC sent out notices two
weeks ago to all active broadcasters,
Voice told ECU Today. The letters
told station managersand owners that
if anv on-air comments referred to
sex, sexual activity, sexual diseases,
sexual positions, sexual education,
sexual people, sexual abstinence,
Emerald City
cops go fishin'
By Stuart Maxwell
ECU Today
Emerald City police took time out
from their strenuous schedules this
Sunday to participate in the first an-
nual Greenville Police Officers' Fish-
ing Competition. Off-duty Greenville
City Police took to the Tar River,
equipped only with scuba gear, elec-
tric stun guns, spears, tear gas, dyna-
mite, heavy rocks, cattle prods, large
clubs, medium-sized household ap-
pliances, waterbeds, paper shredders,
and Super Bass-O-Matics, in a fishing
frenzy that the fuzz found fun.
"This is a hell of a great time
said one Emerald Enforcer. 'This is
just what the guys needed � a break
from the drudgery of everyday law
enforcement
"We're gonna eat good tonight
beamed another off-duty officer, as
he climbed, dripping wet, from the
Mighty Tar. Licking his lips, he dis-
played the bloody remains of three
minnows he had bagged just moments
before.
Turning the city cops into piscene
patrolmen was the brainstorm of lame
duck Mayor Ed Grimley. "After los-
ing the election, some reporter yelled
at me, Hey, Ed! Whatchya gonna do
now?' And, quick as a flash, without
even thinking,you know, 1 yelled back,
'I'm gonna go to Disney World! And
then maybe I'll go fishing
"And then it just hit me. Fishing!
Yeah.
"The rest you can see for yourself,
right here between these two massive
nets we brought in to corral the fish
for this competition
In all, 37 amateur anglers augured
140 fish from the river in the 30-min-
ute tournament. The all-out competi-
tion was won by Captain E. Buzz
Miller, a former ECU campus police-
man. Captain Miller collared an amaz-
ing 27 finned creatures, an average of
almost one per minute!
When asked how he was able to
reel in so many fish, the Captain re-
plied, "I don't know. 1 don't askques-
tions. 1 just do it
Not everyone, of course, was
lucky enough to get even one fish. But
they all agreed that the event was a
success, and they vowed to come back
next year.
However, a few unfortunate inci-
dents may put a damper on the troop-
ers' dreams of an annual fish-fest. A
few of the fishes netted in the bass
battle are pressing charges against the
police, seeking redress for what they
feel was a totally unfair incident. One
fish, who refused to be named, told
ECU Today that he tried not to get
involved in the finny fracas, but was
hooked in nonetheless.
"Hey, man, I was just on my way
home from school, and look what
happens said the disgruntled fish.
Another unfortunate victim
claims that he isn't even a fish at all.
"I'm a crab! I had outgrown my shell
and was trying to find another one
when, BAM! I'm sittin' on the end of
some guy's spear! That's justice?"
Well, what's next for the fun-lov-
ing cops? According to Grimley, "I
think next month we'll have a Com-
edy Competition. The guys are going
to dress up in Laugh-Riot gear and try
to break each other up
� See related story, page 4
bodily functions (sexual or otherwise),
or ferret juggling, that station manag-
ers and owners would be "mercilessly
emasculated or the feminine equiva-
lent
Voice felt this was more than
unfair, and also unrealistic. "We're a
college radio station. Sex, bodily func-
tions and ferret juggling are the only
things we know. What do they want
us to do, talk about classes?"
Unfortunately for Voice, he found
out the hard (no pun intended�we're
not about to mess around with the
FCC) way that the FCC was serious
cuttingly serious. Asseriousasa huge,
ultra-sharp knife. That serious.
"When I wasgerting ready to leave
Friday, someone called my name. I
turned around and these two big guys
said, 'Mr. Voice. You were warned
The next thing I knew, I was in inten-
sive care and talking in a higher regis-
ter than Tweety Bird Voice squeaks.
Voice is the only local victim,
though national personalities Dr. Ruth
Westheimer and Howard Stern were
also surgically reprimanded.
Voice feels he and his station were
singled out by North Carolina senator
and general buffoon Jesse Helms.
"Helms sent tapes of our deejays to
the FCC. The most damaging was the
infamous 'Pearl Necklace Trivia
Question Voice explained witha pig-
like squeal.
WZMB ran a contest in which
callers responded to the question,
"How many pearls are in Wilma
Flintstone's necklace?" "An innocent
enough trivia question Voice said,
wincing as his vocal chords adjusted
to their new two-octave range.
"It wasn't until someone came up
with the correct answer (eight), that
one of the deejays made the comment,
'Guess Fred was low on fuel that day
Voice mewed. "That was whatdid it
Helms is pleased with the FCC's
actions. "It's about time somebody
did something to protect our children
from the garbage that infests our soci-
ety
"We can't let our innocent babies
leam that sex exists. We must keep
this hidden from them until they are
old enough to handle it. If they find
out before they are, say, 28 or so, they
will grow up to be sicko perverts
Being a kid isn't easy
these days.
Take Zsa Zsa:
Last year, she was buying
diamond necklaces at
Tiffany's with all the other
washed-up, old, fat
ex-celebrities.
This year, she slapped
a cop � and she might
be going to jail.
At Brynne-Marre, we can
"fix" your kid. Think about it





It's only a joke; please don't write or phone. Thank you. � ECU TODAY � November 16, 1989 � 3
To whom it may concern:
Holden Holdings wishes to
announce that it has just been
bought by Mega-Market, an inter-
planetary conglomerate which
owns over eighty percent of all
businesses in the solar system.
We hope that any seemingly
bizarre or inexplicable changes
in editorial policy will simply be
ignored.
We want ECU Today to con-
tinue to be the newspaper with
the personal touch.
Big G counsels insomniac
Class report
By Stuart Maxwell
ECU Today
Here's a quick rundown of what's
happening in the classes you skipped
today:
� Logic: the professor was late to
class today, and spent most of the
remaining class time apologizing and
explaining why he was late. The
bleached-blond bimbo in the front row
just kept repeating: "Oh, that's hor-
rible
� Art Appreciation: more slides
of paintings you've never seen, by
people you've never heard of, with
names you can't pronounce.
� English Composition: your
professor finally broke down and
admitted that English is a stupid
major, "but hey � it pays the rent
� Computer Science: the profes-
sor spent theclassdescribing the inter-
nal operation of dual-phase hard-
wired multiplexers. See me for notes.
Dear Big G,
I have a problem. I can't seem to
fall asleep at night. No matter how
hard 1 physically or mentally tire
myself during the day, 1 can't fall
asleep at night.
I've tried everything. I've watched
endless reruns of "Punky Brewster
I've tried those "Crackling Fire" cas-
sette tapes designed to reduce stress
and induce relaxation and I even made
a tape of my 8 a.m. philosophy
teacher's droning voice during a class
lecture. Is it insomnia, or what? What
should I do?
Signed,
B.gZ
Dear Night Light User,
You obviously suffer from the fear
of the dark. You are no doubt one of
those anal-retentive wimps who al-
ways crawled into bed with your
parents whenever you got scared, thus
keeping your parents from enjoying
any type of sexual congress through-
out those stressful child-rearing years.
This is vour divine punishment,
and you will never be able to sleep at
night again until I have decided that
you are really sorry and are able to
come back down and play nicely. Now
get upstairs and think about your
actions, young man!
Dear Big G,
My two favorite media played a
game of flag football this past week-
end. I love both media, and yet my
loyalties are divided. I heard that the
newspaper team cheated like hell to
win. But I also heard that the radio
station team had no game plan.
ECU SNAPSHOTS
a look at statistics that shape our campus
We're Misspelling "Excellence" More Often!
re
-
8000
Times Misspelled
I don't know who to support now.
I love a winner, but do the ends ever
justify the means? To whom should I
devote my attention and potential
consumer dollar? Help!
Signed,
First Amendment Lad
Dear Two-Faced,
Obviouslv, vou don't understand
ethics very well. Winning is every-
thing. What more do you need to
know?
Firestarter
Dear Big G,
I am in serious trouble. I never
thought anythinglike this would ever
happen to me.
My girlfriend was at the CD store
buying lots of cool CDs for us to tape
illegally for personal and commercial
use. The store clerk accosted her and
said, "1 can't believe you're not buy-
ing the new Billy Joel CD with the hit
single 'We Didn't Start the Fire' on it
Well, in a moment of sheer neurologi-
cal disruption, she purchased it.
At first, I ignored it. It sat at the
bottom of her expensively-finished
wooden CD rack. But I kept hearing
snatches of that song on the radio.
Finally, one day, when no one else
was around, I put it on and listened to
that dumb song.
Help, Big G! Now I'm hooked. I
can't stop humming and singing that
stupid little ditty about how the fire's
been burning since the world's been
turning � see? There I go again! Is
there any treatment or counseling for
this?
Signed,
Didn't Mean To Light The Match
Dear Pressurized,
There is hope! Send for my FREE
booklet, "Teenagers and Billy Joel:
This Is Your Brain, This is Billy Joel,
and This Is Your Brain on Billy Joel
Withgraphicillustrationsof Billy Joel-
inspired freakouts and heartwrench-
mg stories of teens gone astray under
the influence of Billy Joel, this pam-
phlet is a must for anyone suffering
from this disease.
You're worried.
You know that you or
someone you care about
may be a nonconformist.
At Brynne-Marre Hospital, we
want to butt into your
personal life and give you
irritating advice for which
we'll charge you lots of
money, and then we'll have
the gall to counsel you on
how to cope with being
broke.
Think about it.





4 � November 16, 1989 � ECU TODAY � It's only a joke; please don't write or phone. Thank you.
Occupant:
mega-market
LiJisties ic arrcLrcE
ttiat it tias just been
fccLEri tLj Ealacticere
a par-dimersieral ccr-
C lEi7 E l a IE Llj iE r ,
ttireugti tricktj mathe-
matical fiddling, eeues
EtEi I DQ percent Df all
businesses ever cre-
ated in all nt space anrj
time.
LJe ncpe tnat any
apparently ccmputer-
prnrJucerJ charges in
erjitnrial policy uuill be
seen as totally neces-
sary.
LJe Luant EEL Taunt
c ccntinue tu be tbe
neujspaper ujitb tbe
persnnal tcucb.
News reporter dies
while writing column
Bv Stuart Maxwell
ECU Today
In a bizarre incident, an ECU
Today reporter died while writing a
news column in which he reported
his own untimely demise. Today, at
a little after let's see, what time is
it? At a little after 6 p.m an enraged
member of the Association of Eld-
erly Greenville Citizens Who Have
Nothing Better to Do with Their
Lives entered the offices of ECU To-
day, brandishing a mighty impres-
sive-looking submachine gun.
Referring to the gun, the
AEGCWHNBTDWTL member,
who refused to identify herself, said,
"My husband keeps this around the
house until duck-hunting season.
But today she continued menac-
ingly, "it's reporter-hunting season
With that, she proceeded to humili-
ate the reporter, forcing him to listen
toan old Barry Manilow tape played
at a barely perceptible volume. Then,
muttering something about "one
down, 15,999 to go and "East Caro-
lina Bible College the lady pointed
the weapon at her intended victim
and pulled the trig
The reporter valiantly staggered
back to his terminal and continued
typing, desperately trying to finish
his story. The reward for his efforts?
Another round of gunf
But he wasn't done for yet, for
this reporter had lived with pain, he
knew pain, and he wasn't afraid.
But neither was the lady with the
gu
HF. LP
Lame duck
G'ville mayor
considering
acting jobs
The Amalgamated Press
Greenville Mayor Ed Grimley lost
his bid for re-election recently. But
that doesn't mean he's out of a job
come Inauguration Day.
Quite the opposite, in fact. Grim-
lev faces more job prospects than you
can shake a resume at.
The reason for his sudden popu-
larity?
"If he can fool anyone into think-
ing he's competent to be a ma vor, he's
a damn good actor. Better than Sir
Laurence Olivier quips ace ABC
sitcom casting exec Moe Ronne.
Some of the job opportunities
Grimley is rumored to be consider-
ing:
� "Mr. Ed a remake of the 1950s
television show, starring the former
mayor in the title role.
Tlayinga horse shouldn'tbe such
a stretch for him quipped a former
associate who asked to remain name-
less, "since he's been such a horse's
ass all along
� "Ed of the Class in which
Grimley would play a teacherof gifted
students.
� "Eddy's Nightmares starring
Grimley as a razor-clawed teen-
slasher.
� Related story, page 2.
Pay North!
By Chippy Bonehead
ECU Today
Believe it or not, there is still the
slightest chance that hero and patriot
Oliver North may not get his $23,000-
a-year pension reinstated!
Those bleeding heart liberals in
the House actually want The Ameri-
can Martyr to finish out his distin-
guished career life without the bene-
fits he worked, lied and shredded so
hard for. Sen. Jesse Helms, R-NC and
All-Around Demigod of Things
Moral, said in a speech to members of
the House today, "Let there be light
and an end to this petty vendetta. "
And, there was light. And there
was an end to this petty vendetta.
And Jesse saw this, and he saw it was
good.
And then he said, "Let there be
naked pages sent to my Senate cham-
bers. And let them be slathered with
vinigrette and cheese fondue, so that
I may indulge in someearthly perver-
sions And there were naked pages
slathered, and he did indulge. But
that's another story.
The problem with
being healthy: you
can't win a huge
settlement in an
injury lawsuit.
If you suffer from being healthy,
we want to help. Call:
Hardee, Hardee &
Harhar.
Lawyers helping
injure people





Title
The East Carolinian, November 16, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 16, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.710
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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