The East Carolinian, November 14, 1989






�he lEafit (ftnraltnran
Serving the 'Last Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 103
Tuesday November 14,1989
Greenville, NC
Circulation 12,000
16 Pages
Students protest city
By SHANNON BUCKLEY
Staff Writer
i�i
The blue lights ot police cars
flashed asthe led over 1,500 ECU
students in a march to Greenville
City 1 fall on Thursday
The "Stop the Nonsense"
march protested theCity Council's
recent decision to eliminate noise
permits issued in Greenville. The
purpose of the march was to hand
deliver a petition asking the City
Council I abolish the new noise
ordinance amendment.
The petition with 1 ,n7S signa-
tures was hand delivered bv SGA
President Tripp Roakes to Citv
Manager Greg Knowles. "I will
make sure that a copv of this peti-
tion is presented to every council
person knowles said. 1 will do
this tor the very next council
meeting, which is Monday night
The main entrance ot campus
served as the starting place oi the
march which continued down
Fifth Street and i nded atCity t lal
ECU Public Safety and the Green-
ville police Mocked each entrance
to Fifth Street to ensure the safety
of the students, according to James
DePuy, director of ECU Public
Safety.
The protesters gained support
as they moved along the march
route. Both students and faculty
lined Fifth Street cheering as the
students passed by.
Studentsand citizens were not
the only ones supporting the
march. Businessownersalso lined
thestreetsand even joined in with
the crowd as they chanted "ECU,
ECU The marching crowd went
into an uproar as they passed
Cubbie's where employees held
signs backing the students.
"ECU is a big part oi
Greenville's success Richard
Bramley, co-owner ot Bl Is, said
as he participated in the march.
"You can't have a tree without a
root added Bramlev in reference
to the importance oi the univer-
See MARCH, page 3
Fifth Street and ended atCity Hall. See MARCH, page 3
Weekend rape adds
to the list of victims
and a moustache, according t
By SHANNON BLCKLLi
Stall Vntrr
Another ECU student was
added to the list of rape victimson
Sunday night.
A 20-year-old student was
abducted from her king's Row
apartment sometime around
midnight on Sunday, according to
Detective ohn Nichols, oi the
ill ' olice Department.The
rator, who was wearing a
mask, broke into the victim's
apartment bv crawling through a
window.
Nichols said that during a
struggle with the attacker, the
victim managed to remove the
mask worn bv the perpetrator. The
police found the mask at the crime
scene.
Police are searching for a white
male in his late 20s with blond hair
md a moustache, according to
Nichols. The suspect is approxi-
mately h feet tall with a stocky
build. He was last seen operating
an old model two-door hatchback
vehicle that is brown or rust col-
ore i
According to Nichols, the at-
tacker awoke the student and
threatened her with a knife forc-
ing her to leave the apartment
through the window. I le then took
the victim to a wooded area where
he phvsicallv and sexually as-
saulted her.
After the assault, the perpe-
trator took the victim to his car
which was parked near the en-
trance to River View Estates Trailer
Park where he released her,
Nichols said. The victim then tied
to a friend's apartment nearby.
The student contacted police at
2:5 a.m according to police re-
ports.
Over 1,500 ECU students participated in the "Stop the Nonsense" march Thursday afternoon. The purpose of the march was to
protest a noise ordinance passed by the Greenville City Council in October. Marchers were led by student government President Tripp
Roakes and members of the organizing committee (Photo by J.D. Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab).
Drilling presents some risks
Officials review Mobil Oil's drilling plans
By DONNA HAYES
St�ft Writer
The U.S Department of tJ
Interior Minerals Management
Service released the "Draft Envi-
ronmental Report on Proposed
Exploratory Drilling Offshore
North Carolina" on Nov. 1, indi-
cating that the environmental
impact from a proposed explora-
tion well by Mobil Oil would be
"temporary, local and minor
The more than 800-page re-
port outlines Mobil's plan to drill
a single well 45 miles east-north-
east of Cape Hatteras, N.C in
2,670 feet of water. Mobil officials
say there may be as much as five
trillion cubic feet of natural gas in
the area known as "the Manteo
Project and there is a possibility
of discovering oil as well.
The report is part of the
Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) signed on July 12,1989, by
representatives of the State of
North Carolina, the Minerals
Management Service (MMS) and
Mobil Oil If North Carolina and
the MMS approve the report,
Mobil will be able to begin gas and
oil exploration off the Outer Banks
as early as Mav 1990.
If North Carolina and MMS
reject Mobil's proposal, then Mobil
can appeal to the U.S. Secretary of
Commerce to receive permission
to begin the exploration process.
Student government elects new members
By SAMANTHA THOMPSON
Staff Writer
Twelve new members oi the
Student Government Association
were announced in Monday
atternoon'sS meeting after the
Screening and Appointments
Committee held interviews and
made recommendations for can-
didates
After the Screening and Ap-
point men ts Commit tee Chairman
Marty Helms announced the new
members, the body passed bv
consent to approve all the new
legislators.
The new dav representatives
are Donald Morns, Marsha Ware,
Dean Wilkins and David Pureza.
The following students will
serve as dorm representatives:
Bruce Bellamy, Fletcher; Darek
McCullers, Aycock; Sherry Price,
Clement; Kevin Hooks, Jones;
Chris Hargrave, Scott; Kendra
Williams, Greene; Greg Harmon,
Slay; and DeWanda Marlow, Ty-
ler
Several other dorm represen-
tative positions are still open tor
Aycock, Gotten, White and Belk
residence halls. Applications for
these positions will be received
and will be voted on next semes-
ter.
Legislator Tripp Hogg sus-
pended the rules for the appro-
priation approval of both the ECU
Men's and Women's Mag Football
Champions. The legislature
passed bv consent tor SI ,371 to be
given each team to travel to New-
Orleans, La. and compete against
the University oi Southern Flor-
ida in the Sugar Bowl for college
flag football. The appropriation
covers the cost of the hotel, regis-
tration, travel and jerseys for both
teams.
The $1,137 budget request for
the ECU International Student
Association passed by consent.
The funds will be used for letters
to the 50 members, postage, sta-
tionary and the international din-
ner, "Asia Night to be held at
Mendenhall Student Center. The
group orientates people from other
countries who come to ECU as
visitors.
The body also passed bv con-
sent theappropriation of the basic
fall budget to the Allied Blacks for
Leadershipand Equality, formerly
the Minority Student Organiza-
tion. The $1,384 will be spent on
the upcoming Christmas party for
retarded children, a lip svnc con-
test, a banquet and advertising.
The floor was yielded to Resi-
dence Hall Association President
Fred Rector as the body discussed
the bylaws of the RHA Service
Board. Helms reminded the legis-
lature that approval of the bylaws
was the final transaction between
the RHA and the SGA regarding
the refrigerator, microwave and
copy machine rentals. The bylaws
were passed by consent, giving
the RHA Board full power of
managing the rentals.
in other business, the $675
appropriation for the International
Language Organization was
passed by consent for future work-
shops with international guest
speakers to attend. The group is
open for all to leam about differ-
ent cultures and languages. The
constitution of the Organization
of Native American Student Or-
ganization was also passed by
consent.
SGA President Tripp Roakes
reported the success of the "Stop
the Nonsense" rally and march
and thanked the members oi the
body for their support Roakes said
hewillnotreopennoiseordinance
discussions until after the new
members of the Greenville City
Council take office on Dec. 14.
Donna Mofitt, director of the
North Carolina Outer Continen-
tal Shelf Of fice, said last month at
a public meeting on the ECU
can.pus that she did not know
what would happen in that situ-
ation, and she was unaware of any
qualifications the Secretary of
Commerce has for making an
environmental decision.
According to the report,
"exploratory drilling poses some
degree of risk to theonvironment
The "unavoidable adverse envi-
ronmental impacts include some
increasein suspended solids, trace
metals and hydrocarbons near the
drillship; localized and minor
decreases in planktonic commu-
nitiesin the vicinity of operational
discharges; localized decrease in
benthic invertebrate populations;
and some short-term exclusion of
fishing activities in the vicinity of
"the Point
Mobil presents four different
exploratory scenarios in the re-
port. The first is the "Exploration
Only Scenario" in which a single
test well is drilled with no evi-
dence of a commercial amount of
gas or oil. Statistics show Mobil
has a 10 percent chance of finding
See MOBIL, page 3
Jones Residence Hall and student property suffered approximately $1000 in damages after a
cooking appliance caught on fire Sunday morning. Greenville Fire Department and ECU Public
Safety responded to the call (Photo by Garrett Killian � ECU Photo Lab).
ECU journeys back to
the French Revolution
By DIANE JACOBS
Staff Writer
Imagine, a day in 1953 with a
panel of three french historians,
Lefebrre, Tocqueville and Palmer,
discussing their own views about
the French Revolution. The host
of this panel is a graduate student
at Universite de Toulouse, Robert
Forster.
With humor and imagination,
Forster,a history professorat Johns
Hopkins University and guest
speaker for the eighth annual
Brewster Lecture in History, ex-
plained the legacy of the French
Revolution. He entertained and
informed a full house of profes-
sors and people in the community
who had a common interest in the
history of France. Forster pre-
tended to be all three of the men,
and each debated against each
other about the legacy of the
French Revolution.
Palmer said circumstances
such as the nobles of the church
resistingef forts to build a republic
privileging royalty forced the
revolutionary government to cen-
tralize. "The will to win against
forbidding odds was also a part of
the legacy of the French Revolu-
tion
"It was not a revolution
achieved on the cheek; it had its
victims and it had its martyrs
Lefebrre said. He said that in or-
der to understand the importance
of the French Revolution, one must
understand the meaning of the
words of the French Revolution,
liberty,equality and fraternity. He
told his audience to look beyond
the struggle and the despair and
todctermine what was lasting and
enduring about the revolution in
1789 and if it was worth the price.
Lefebrre said the words lib-
erty and equality were placed in
See FRENCH, page 3
Emsndl�
Editorial4
Students finally join
together for a common
cause � Don't let it go!
State and Nation5
1501000 march for
women s abortion rights
Classifieds
�������������
Bonham and REM
reviews
Life in Hell�
Sports.
����������
����������-L3
Pirates defeat Temple
in final home game





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14, 1989
ECU participates in national exchange program
By KATHERINE ANDERSON
suit Vnt�r
In December of 1988, ECU was
invited to become the third North
Carolina campus to hold mem-
bership in the National Student
Exchange program.
The focus ot the program here
at ECU is to offer students from
this region, and in particular those
from eastern North Carolina a
chance to broaden their honons.
especially those who have never
had an opportunity to travel out-
side ot their home state.
Under the NSE program, stu-
dents from 87 campuses in the
IS may study for up to one vear
at another NSE-affilia ted campus.
Expenses include the cost of tui-
tion .it tbe home campus, plus
travel and housing costs.
In order to participate in the
program, students must be a
sophomore, junior or senior and
have a minimum GPA of 2.5. All
credits earned during the ex-
changeare transferred and applied
toward completion of degree re-
quirements at the student's home
campus.
ECU is presently hosting five
students. They are Beth A. Nor-
nsh from the University of Massa-
chusetts, Patricia A. Padilla and
Ian Fste-s Schmidt of the Univer-
sity of Now Mexico, Carrie Lock-
wood of the University of Wyo-
ming and Renee Chessa from
Trenton State College, N.J.
ECU's exchange participants
and their hosts are Roger Farp of
Shallotte at Towson State Univer-
sity, Md Jennifer L. House of Cary
at New Mexico State University
and James McPherson of Green-
ville at the University of Maine-
Orono. McPherson and House
plan to continue in the program
for the spring semester.
The NSE program at ECU is
RHA sponsors two-day blood drive
coordinated by Dr. Maunce Si-
mon, director of the ECU Office ot
International Studies. Simon said
he feels that the program holds
several benefits for students. "The
program offers students great
opportunities to experience new
academic programs at other insti-
tutions. It also gives students the
chance to experience different
American cultures, as well as al-
lowing them to make new friends
and establish contacts with other
academic experts said Simon.
Several other ECU students
will be participating in the pro-
gram in the spring. Thev are
George R. Horvat of Morehead
Citv the University ol Northern
( olorado; KatieLeeginsof Wilson
University of (leorgia; (.�� rgi
Eberle of Raleigh Universirs �
Maine,Orono; Amy BarrofGretn
ille IndianaPurdue Univet
sity; Holly Riddle ol Plymouth
Sonoma state University; I ra
Siska otiainesville, Va , enn �� r
Pleniak ol Manalapan, N ! .
il Hobson ol Medford, N.J
University ol New Mexico ai �
Kevin Pigg of 1 telmar, Md
I niversiry i 1 Man. land
I or m re information i
NSE program, students can -�
StephanieEvancho at theOffici I
International Studies in the (
orallassroom Building Ro -
Bv VALERIE TOU Ol MBADII.W
SKtl Wntrr
A blood drne, sponsored by
the Residence Hall Association
and conducted by the American
Red Cross will be held on Wednes-
day and Thursday in the multi-
purpose room at Mendenhall
Student Center.
The drive, chaired by Fred
Rector, Rl 1A president, is ol cru-
cial importance to the Red Cross.
Ihev (Red i. ross) really need
blood this time. They have been
making phone (.alls almost e erv
claw" '
1 he Red Cross expects at least
500 people a dav. 1 heir goal is 350
pintsol blood a day. ' I hev rel (�n
i c I students tor their blood
According to Rector, thedrive
was particularly successful last
year. "We went over our goal. We
would like to go over our coal
again this vear The members of
the Red Cross are concerned about
this vear's drive, Rector said. This
is a high demand period and the
organization is apprehensive
about not getting enough blood.
Rector stressed the signifi-
cance of the blood drive for ECU.
It is a wav to show that ECU
students are vital to the commu-
nity after Halloween. It would be
nice it the ECU students get bo-
hind the Red Cross and give blood
with the same enthusiasm thev
had when they marched down-
town about the noise ordinance
House council leaders and
resident advisors are organizing
contests in the residence halls in
order to get as many donors as
possible. In Mendenhall Canteen,
Domino's will be giving awav
pizza to those who donate blood.
Ihe Red Cross also needs
volunteers. Anyone interested can
call Fred Rector at 931-7501.
Philosophy adds religion to curriculum
Students preregistering for the
spnng semester who are search-
ing for a minor course of studv
now have a new option to choose
from�the Religious Studies mi-
nor
"What we've done is take the
religious studies courses in the
various departments, added an
introductory course and a senior
seminar and organized them all
into a minor program oi studv .
said Dr. Calvin Mercer, who
teaches the religious studies
courses in the Philosophy Depart-
ment and is the coordinator of the
new program.
"A number of faculty mem-
bers from several departments
have worked hard for about a vear
and a half and we feel we'vecome
up with a quality program that
will be a valuable component in
manv students' total program
Mercer said.
Like other minors at ECU, the
Religious Studies minor consists
oi 24 semester hours ol c iurs s
and includes courses drawn from
six different disciplines in the
Family Medicine
Department
sponsors speaker
Dr. William F. acott, trustee
for the American Medical Asso-
ciation and assistant vice presi-
dent tor health services at the
University oi Minnesota in Min-
neapolis, will deliver the annual
family medicine lecture Nov. Is at
the ECU School of Medicine.
His talk, titled "Rumbles in
the House of Medicine begins at
12:30 p.m. in Bnxiv Auditorium
on the medical school campus
Jacott, whose participation in
the American Medical Association
is wide-ranging, was elected to
the organization's board of trus-
tees in June. His involvement with
the AM A includes posts as chair-
man of its Council on Medical
Education and representative for
its Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education.
Before assuming his current
position at the University of Min-
nesota, Jacott wasa private family
physician for 22 years in Duluth.
His dual post at the university
includes a faculty appointment as
associate professor of family prac-
tice and community health.
The annual lecture, sponsored
bv the ECU Department of Family
Medicine, highlights relevant is-
sues in the specialty and the entire
medical profession.
Organization
holds canned
food drive
The Reformist Party will spon-
sor a canned food drive on Thurs-
day and Friday. Boxes will be
placed in the lobby of residence
halls and in various classroom
buildings throughout campus.
College of Arts and Sciences,
which houses the new minor pnv-
gram.
1 he courses explore religion
from a variety ol perspectives
Mercer explained. "Many ECl
studentscome from ba kgrounds
w here religion pla san imp irtant
role. 1 his program oi studv will
enable them to have greater in-
sight into their religious heritage,
as well as gam a broader under-
Standing ot religious phenomena
around the world
Mercer pointed out that the
countries oi the world are becom-
ing increasingly intertwined po-
litically and economically and that
understanding another's religion
helps prepare one for living in this
"smaller' world. The Religious
Studies minor supports well
ECl - increasing emphasis on
international studit s and cultural
diversitv.
"We have, I believe, about six
courses in the minor being offered
in the spring, and some ot them
have more than one section.
Mercer said. "S there's plenty of
opportunity to begin work on this
minor which we feel will be a
desirable complement to manv
majors, especially in the social
scietK es and humanities
Mercer said that many stu-
dents interested in the minor may
have already taken a number of
the courses listed as electives and
may be further along in fulfilling
the requirements than thev real-
ize. Religious studiescourses have
enrolled well in the past and
Mercer savs he thinks the minor
could be popular with manv stu-
dents.
The Religious Studies minor
is governed in the College of Arts
andSc iencesbyacommitteewhich
will also seek to sponsor quality
cultural programs on religious
topic s tor all members oi the uni-
versity community, as well as the
community at large. To formally
inaugurate the new program, the
committee is currently planning
an event or series of events to be
held in the spring semester.
Qo (Pirates!
THE CAREER OF
A LIFETIME
BEGINS WITH A
COLLEGE ELECTIVE.
Vi Force R TC is defined
� .hi elective But it's far more
than that - it's .iareer development
program that teaches you to be a leader,
that devi � ui managerial skills, that
helps you grow into a well-rounded and self-
isured individual
Foi those who qualify, - i r Force ROTC can even
help pa ti it college through different scholarship pro-
grams hen v hi graduate, you'll be an Air Force officer
Proud And confident Contact
LTCOL BILL PATTON
757-65)7
Thanksgiving
Dinner
Worship followed by a simple meal of soup, salad, &. bread.
Tonight, 5:15 pm Promptly
Baptist Student Union
(l()lh St. next in Wendy's)
Sponsored By: fy JqI
ECU Campus Ministers Assoc.
-and the-
Inter - Christian Council
A meeting of the Inter - Christian Council will
take place alter the meal.
"Thoseofuswho teach in and
govern this program are very clear
about the notion of separation of
church and state, which is a fun-
damental principle in our
country's history Mercer ex-
plained. "We are not out to advo-
cate tor a particular religion or
even tor religion in general. One
wav it's been phrased is that in a
public university, we don't teach
religion, we teach about religion.
Our aim is to educate, not indoc-
trinate
Students interested in learn-
ing more about the new program
should refer to the 1988 90 Cur-
riculum Supplement, pages 3�4, or
contact Mercer in the Philosophy
Department.
SHE) (Bast Carolinian
Director of Advertising
James 1 I. McKee
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V.Cope
Kelley O'Connor
Patrick Williams
(�11 liarvejk
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.757-1666
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Zenith355-6110
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14,1989
ECU participates in national exchange program
By KATHERINE ANDERSON
Staff Writer
In December of 1988, ECU was
invited to become the third North
Carolina campus to hold mem-
bership in the National Student
Exchange program.
The focus of the program here
at ECU is to offer students from
this region, and in particular those
from eastern North Carolina a
chance to broaden their horizons,
especially those who have never
had an opportunity to travel out-
side of their home state.
Under the NSE program, stu-
dents from 87 campuses in the
U.S. may study for up to one year
at another NSE-affiliated campus.
Expenses include the cost of tui-
tion at tjie home campus, plus
travel and housing costs.
In order to participate in the
program, students must be a
sophomore, junior or senior and
have a minimum GPA of 2.5. All
credits earned during the ex-
change are transferred and applied
toward completion of degree re-
quirements at the student's home
campus.
ECU is presently hosting five
students. They are Beth A. Nor-
rish from the University of Massa-
chusetts, Patricia A. Padilla and
Jan Estes Schmidt of the Univer-
sity of New Mexico, Carrie Lock-
wwod of the University of Wyo-
ming and Renee Chessa from
Trenton State College, N.J.
ECU's exchange participants
and their hosts are Roger Earp of
Shallotte at Towson State Univer-
sity, Md Jennifer L. House of Cary
at New Mexico State University
and James McPherson of Green-
ville at the University of Maine-
Orono. McPherson and House
plan to continue in the program
for the spring semester.
The NSE program at ECU is
RHA sponsors two-day blood drive
coordinated by Dr. Maur.ce Si-
mon, director of the ECU Office of
International Studies. Simon said
he feels that the program holds
several benefits for students. "The
program offers students great
opportunities to experience new
academic programs at other insti-
tutions. It also gives students the
chance to experience different
American cultures, as well as al-
lowing them to make new friends
and establish contacts with other
academic experts said Simon.
Several other ECU students
will be participating in the pro-
gram in the spring. They are
George R. Horvat of Morehead
Citv � the University of Northern
Colorado; Katie Leeginsof Wilson
� University of Georgia; George
Eberleof Raleigh University of
Maine, Orono; Amy Ban-of Green
ville IndianaPurdue Univer-
sity; I lollv Kiddle of Plymouth
Sonoma State University; Tr
Siska of Gainesville, Va Jennifer
Pleniak ot Manalapan, N.J and
Jill Hobson oi Medford, N.J.
University of New Mexico and
Kevin Pigg of Delmar, Md
University ot Maryland.
For more information on the
NSE program, students can see
Stephanie Evancho at theOffk i t
International Studies in the Gen-
eral Classroom Building Room
1002.
By VALERIE TOULOUMBADJIAN
Stiff Wrirrr
A blood drive, sponsored by
the Residence Hall Association
and conducted bv the American
Red Cross will be held on Wednes-
day and Thursday in the multi-
purpose room at Mendenhall
Student Center.
The drive, chaired bv Fred
Rector, RHA president, is oi cru-
cial importance to the Red Cross.
"They (Red Cross) really need
blood this time. They have been
making phone calls almost every
day
The Rev! Cross expects at least
500 people a day. Their goal is 350
pintsofbloodadav. "Thevrelvon
ECU students for their blood
According to Rector, thedrive
was particularly successful last
year. "We went over our goal. We
would like to go over our goal
again this year The members of
the Red Cross are concerned abou t
this year's drive, Rector said. This
is a high demand period and the
organization is apprehensive
about not getting enough blood.
Rector stressed the signifi-
cance of the blood drive for ECU.
"It is a way to show that ECU
students are vital to the commu-
nity after Halloween. It would be
nice if the ECU students get be-
hind the Red Cross and give blood
with the same enthusiasm they
had when they marched down-
town about the noise ordinance
House council leaders and
resident advisors are organizing
contests in the residence halls in
order to get as many donors as
possible. In Mendenhall Canteen,
Domino's will be giving awav
pizza to those who donate blood.
The Red Cross also needs
volunteers. Anvone interested can
call Fred Rector at 931-7501.
Philosophy adds religion to curriculum
Students preregistering for the
spring semester who are search-
ing for a minor course of studv
now have a new option to choose
from�the Religious Studies mi-
nor.
"What we've done is take the
religious studies courses in the
various departments, added an
introductory course and a senior
seminar, and organized them all
into a minor program of studv
said Dr. Calvin Mercer, who
teaches the religious studies
courses in the Philosophy Depart-
ment and is the coordinator of the
new program.
"A number of faculty mem-
bers from several departments
have worked hard for about a year
and a half and we feel we've come
up with a quality program that
will be a valuable component in
many students' total program
Mercer said.
Like other minors at ECU, the
Religious Studies minor consists
oi 24 semester hours of courses
and includes courses drawn from
six different disciplines in the
Family Medicine
Department
sponsors speaker
Dr. William E. Jacott, trustee
for the American Medical Asso-
ciation and assistant vice presi-
dent for health services at the
University of Minnesota in Min-
neapolis, will deliver the annual
family medicine lecture Nov. 15at
the ECU School of Medicine.
His talk, titled "Rumbles in
the House of Medicine begins at
12:30 p.m. in Brody Auditorium
on the medical school campus.
Jacott, whose participation in
the American Medical Association
is wide-ranging, was elected to
the organization's board of trus-
tees in June. His involvement with
the AM A includes posts as chair-
man of its Council on Medical
Education and representative for
its Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education.
Before assuming his current
position at the University of Min-
nesota, Jacott was a private family
physician for 22 years in Duluth.
His dual post at the university
includes a faculty appointment as
associate professor of family prac-
tice and community health.
The annual lecture, sponsored
by the ECU Department of Family
Medicine, highlights relevant is-
sues in the specialty and the entire
medical profession.
Organization
holds canned
food drive
The Reformist Party will spon-
sor a canned food drive on Thurs-
day and Friday. Boxes will be
placed in the lobby of residence
halls and in various classroom
buildings throughout campus.
College of Arts and Sciences,
which houses the new minor pro-
gram.
"The courses explore religion
from a variety of perspectives
Mercer explained. "Many ECU
students come from backgrounds
where religion plays an important
role. This program of studv will
enable them to have greater in-
sight into their religious heritage,
as well as gain a broader under-
standing oi religious phenomena
around the world
Mercer pointed out that the
countries of the world are becom-
ing increasingly intertwined po-
litically and economically and that
understanding another's religion
helpsprepareoneforliving in this
"smaller" world. The Religious
Studies minor supports well
ECL's increasing emphasis on
international studies and cultural
divcrsitv.
"We have, 1 believe, about six
courses in the minor being offered
in the spring, and some of them
have more than one section
Mercer said. "So there's plenty of
opportunity to begin work on this
minor which we feel will be a
desirable complement to many
majors, especially in the social
sciences and humanities
Mercer said that many stu-
dents interested in the minor mav
have already taken a number of
the courses listed as electives and
may be further along in fulfilling
the requirements than they real-
ize. Religious studiescourses have
enrolled well in the past and
Mercer says he thinks the minor
could be popular with many stu-
dents.
The Religious Studies minor
is governed in the College of Arts
and Sciences by a committee which
will also seek to sponsor quality
cultural programs on religious
topics for all members of the uni-
versity community, as well as the
community at large. To formally
inaugurate the new program, the
committee is currently planning
an event or series of events to be
held in the spring semester.
"Those of us who teach in and
govern this programare very clear
about the notion of separation of
church and state, which is a fun-
damental principle in our
country's history Mercer ex-
plained. "We are not out to advo-
cate for a particular religion or
even for religion in general. One
way it's been phrased is that in a
public university, we don't teach
religion, we teach about religion.
Our aim is to educate, not indoc-
trinate
Students interested in learn-
ing more about the new program
should refer to the 1988-90 Cur-
riculum Surrplement, pages 3-4, or
contact Mercer in the Philosophy
Department.
� � �� ��� . � ��
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I





Mobil
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14 1989
Continued from page 1
natural gas and a one percent
chance of finding oil in "the Man
teo Project
In this scenario, the environ-
mental impact on water quality
would be localized and temporary.
"Drilling discharges and hydro
carbon input from small opera
tional fuel spills would be diluted
immediately by large volumes or
receiving water"
1 he environmental impact on
air quality, planktonic communi-
ties, hsh, estuaries and wetlands is
expected to be very low.
Commercial and recreational
fishing could bo affected by the
exclusion of fishermen from areas
of the coast, and marine mammals
may be adversely affected bv
underwater noise and small op-
erational spills.
Sea turtles within the dnli ig
area are not expected to be affected,
but there is a possibility of a coll.
sion problem with the turtles and
vessel traffic.
c oastal birds may be affected
by aircraft noise and hydrocarbon
spills that could taint prey species.
French
The ingestion of tainted prey could
be lethal.
Also, prehistoric and historic
archaeological resources in the
area such as woien shipwrecks
could be adversely affected bv oil
contamination.
The second scenario pre
sented is the "ExplorationDeline-
ation Scenario in which the single
test well indicates there may be a
commercial amount of oil or gas
in the area. A total oi six addi-
tional wells would be drilled be-
tween 1991 and 1993without find-
ing oil or gas
In this scenario, the environ-
mental impart would be expected
to be similar to the previous sce-
nario because only two wells
would be drilled a ear.
The third scenario is the
"ExplorationDevelopment Pro-
duction Scenario" in which the
single test well and six additional
wells discover a commercial
amount ot gas or oil.
It natural gas or gas and oil is
discovered, 103 wells will be
drilled over a 15 year period us
Continued from page 1
the French Declaration ot Rights
ot man which is equally as impor-
tant as the American bill ot Rights.
"Perhaps the French Declaration
of Rights was less legalistic than
the American's Bill of Rights in its
content and wider in its claims tor
all humankind. We spoke on natu-
ral, inalienable and sacred rights
tor all individuals, that all indi-
viduals can claim as rational
human beings
Tocqueville said Lefebrre put
too much emphasis on liberty,
according to Forster. He said lib-
erty was one thing, but equality
was the most important aspect.
"Equality is a passion, a popular
passion, and it knows no limit.
The French Revolution released
this passion which is with us still
today in the Western World and
indeed in the entire world He
said equality is so strong a passion
that people will sell their individ-
ual hbcrtv to obtain it.
According to Forster the
Trench Revolution did not create
equality, but monan hy made the
Frerw h w ant it. The Frenc h wanted
to show loyalty to the state and
not to the ro altv.
1 orster received a B.A.degree
from Swarthmore College, iin
MA. degree from Harvard Uni-
versity and l'h D. from the lohns
1 lopkins University. 1 lealsostud-
ied at the I niversite de 1 oulouse
in France.
1 le has written three bookson
lth Century France and has ed-
ited fi e other books, three in col-
laboration with his wife He has
researched the social and eco
nomic history ot peasants. Euro-
pean elites and French family
history. 1 orster is now research-
ing the Society ot Saint Domin
ique il laiti) in the 18th Century.
1 orster has been the chair of
the planning Committee tor the
Commemoration ol the Bicenten-
nial oi the 1 rench Revolution since
1987.
SCA President Tripp Koakes presents petitions to City Manager
Greg Knowles (center) while Police Chief Jerome Tesmond (left)
watches on (Photo by Angela Pridgen � ECU Photo Lab).
mg tour platforms. Oil and gas
transportation would bv pipeline
to either Morehead City or Cape
Henry, Va.
Pipeline landfall in Morehead
City would bo expected to create
between 130 and 2,(XX) jobs for
North Carolina, and landfall in
Capo I lenry would be expected to
create between 30 and 1,170 jobs.
The environmental impact in
this scenario would be higher than
in the previous scenarios, but
Mobil says the impact would still
be' minimal.
rhe fourth scenario presented
is the "Cumulative Scenario" in
which the discovery of gas or oil
leads to an additional discovery of
gas or oil nearby.
In this scenario, the environ-
mental impact is higher than in
the previous scenarios. Mobil says
the impact will only be "moder-
ate butofficialssay tounsmcould
suffer.
A series of public hearings is
scheduled for the first week of
December to monitor public com-
ments on the environmental re-
port. Two hearings are scheduled
for the (ireenville area on Dec. 6.
The public comment period
ends on Dec. 15, 1989. The MMS
will then prepare a final environ-
mental assessment to be released
in February 1990.
CLIFF'S
�F
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N C 33 ExtGraenv.lla North Carolina
Phone 752 3172
The news department
of The East Carolinian
would like to thank
WZMB for a great game
of flag football and
formally challenge them
to a game of volleyball.
We await your reply.
Expressions Magazine
now has salaried positions
available for Managing Editor,
Features Editor, Copy Editor,
assistant graphic design artist,
and computer layout artist.
Contact us in the Office located
in the Publications Bide, or
" Call at 757-6927
DAY STUDENTS
DO YOU WANT TO
MAKE A DIFFERNCE?
Apply now for position of
Day Student Representative
on the ECU Media Board.
Help set policies for operation of
WZMB, The Rebel, Buccaneer,
The East Carolinian, Expressions
& The Photo Lab.
Apply in the media Board Office 757-6(X)9
2nd Floor Publications Building
Filing Dates: Nov. 9, 1989 thru Nov. 27,1989
March
Continued from page 1
sitv to the Greenville community.
Upon receiving the petition,
Knowles said, "I think that ECl
students have shown a good effort
in re-addressing a wrong-doing
According to Knowles, the city is
looking forward to mending things
by working with the students and
university officials.
Dean Ronald Sprier said that
he did not know what had pro-
voked the city to take away the
noise permits. Ihie council took
the permits away from the ones
who were obeying the law. Ac-
cording to Speier, alMmiversitv
organizations are held accountable
tor their actions where the noise
permitsare concerned. "Our regu-
lations for obtaining noise permits
were stricter than the citv's
According to Greenville's
Police Chief Jerome Tesmond, the
students who participated in the
march did so in a mature, respon-
sible manner The police depart-
ment had no problems with the
protesters both during and after
the march.
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Novembc! 1 1 I'
OPINION
'jy;e 4
And united we stand
Issues die away;
awareness continues
ECU students have made more
than one good point this semester.
The Reformist party arose and stood
up tor what they believed. They saw
a problem, took a stand and pro-
moted awareness on student gov-
ernment issues. Then, when theCity
Council made decisions affecting
campus life, ECU students came
together to oppose them. What
we've seen this semester is encour-
aging.
Awareness has increased greatly
among the students of this univer-
sity. They finally seem to be realiz-
ing how many things are happening
in and around the ECU community
that directly affects them.
The temptation now, though, is
to leave the involvement and inter-
est by the wayside as specific issues
are resolved. The danger of giving in
to that temptation is that the student
body will revert to its former com-
placent ways.
When looking at how few turn
out for elections or seem the -east bit
interested in what's going on
around them, it s eas) to take a dis-
mal view oi student involvement
The Student Government Associa-
tion .uxd Stud rtl Union i eceive a
surprising lack oi support, consider-
ing they receive a large chunk ot tees
and work to program for and govern
the entire student body.
We have to continuously watch
our Student Government Associa-
tion and the Greenville City Coun-
cil, to keep track of who's in power
and what they're doing. They're
using our tax dollars and student
tees and, if for no other reason than
that, we need to be concerned about
and actively involved in the issues
they speak of and the decisions they
make.
The student body's unyielding
support would do more than a thou-
sand Image Task Forces to over-
come 1-CU's negative, chaotic im-
age. We've proved to ourselves and
to onlookers that we care about the
people in control oi this university.
Once an issue no longer directly
affects your life, don't give up on
staying in touch with the politics
and news a fleeting ECU.
When we quit taking precau-
tions, there is another rape; when we
quit keeping on top oi city issues,
there is another suppressive ordi-
nance passed; when we quit caring
about or watching the SGA, there is
less diverse representation; and
when we quit being involved, there
is less oi a chance that each small
voice will be heard among the
masses who only look out for them-
selves.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view
Mai. or drop them by our office in the Publications Building, across from
the entrance to Joyner Library. For purposes of verificat ion, all letters must
include the name, major classification, address, phone number and the
signature ot the author(s) I .etters are limited to 30(1 words or less, double-
spaced, typed or neatly printed.
Spectrum Rules
In addition to "The Campus Forum" section of the newspaper, The
East Carolinian features "The Campus Spectrum This is an opinion
column by guest writers from the student body and faculty. The columns
printed in "The Campus Spectrum" will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation. The columns are restricted only with
regard to rules of grammar and decency. Persons submitting columns
must be willing to accept byline credit for their efforts, as no entries from
ghost writers will be published.
The pendulum swings in Greenville
By Adamornelious
Ldttunai olumnsal
"Enemy cited, enemy m i I'm
laJJrctsinx the real politic"
-R.l M
We see it in the national and
world news dailv in revolutions
outside the government, in China
. and South Africa. Internal changes
within Soviet Bloc countries dem-
onstrate the human instinct tor
change just as profoundly. Wars
in the Middle East, in Ireland, and
in Latin American countries are
'examples of people dissatisfied
with a particular system and tor
better or worse, are making an
effort to change it
Every revolutionary incident,
no matter how small, escalates
from a swinging pendulum of
conflict and change. Conflict that
'continues until one side or an-
other has been satisfied. Unfortu-
nately, satisfaction promotes
complacency and the pendulum
sv ings back again, until once again
stopped by the gravity of a re-
pressed population.
Now we have a display of
repression, for better or for worse,
in Greenville.
fhe Iar River incident was
rooted in the mounting anger of
students that saw a city intent on
divorcing itself from the school
that is so much a part of it. It
erupted as a result of that anger.
Students acted in the he�t of the
moment. But to say the police were
no less responsible for overreact-
ing to the incident would be clos-
ing one's eyes to a blanket arrest.
There are lsi) stories to tell. There
is only one for the police, who
were supposed to be acting as a
unit responsible for the welfare of
the public Who were thev defend-
ing Halloween night?
Even before the "riot" stu-
dents were planning formal pro-
tests with a specific goal - - to
restore noise permits. For the first
time in the three years I've been
here, a rally has been held with a
concern that has united rather than
divided the campus. "Purple
Monday" was intended to address
the noise ordinance. But it seemed
to represent all grievances the
students have with the city.
A rally has none of the vio-
lence of a riot and certainly isn' t as
anticlimactic. For a whole year
everyone knew what was going to
happen on Halloween. What they
didn't know was that petitions
would be signed and students
organized Something was done
productvely.
The desire for change is there,
and the numbers increase its
strength. ECU students were in-
telligent enough to get into col-
lege. They are intelligent enough
to recognize when freedoms are
taken away from them, and intel-
ligent enough to organize and
react. Thursday's march proved
that ECU students can act respon-
sibly. Without it, the pressure
valve the police had tightened may
have never been released and the
pendulum may have swung back
and hit the town of Greenville
where it hurts.
TrlEWlMF
Students are unconcerned until
their right to party is taken away
To the editor:
Do we come to college to get
drunk or to improve our opportu-
nities by getting an education? It's
interesting that hundreds of stu-
dents get fired-up about losing
their right to party, while real is-
sues go unnoticed. Students sit
around idly by, while the campus
continues to go awry. The major-
ity of ECU students could careless
about the real issues, such as re-
duced racial prejudice, better se-
curity' and extended library hours,
just to name a few .
The disturbingly low level of
social, economic, and political
awareness on this campus was
demonstrated at the rally- and
march last week. Only when the
"all important" nght to have very-
load and very large parties is
threatened, do the students be-
come concerned. The boycott and
March were well intended and
demonstrated that the students
here do have a voice. But, please,
couldn't we use our voice for
something more important?
Jack K. Jennings
Art Major
Reformist Party
Frustrated
To the editor,
I am sick of East Carolina stu-
dents being treated like they are
not a part of this community � it's
simply ridiculous! If Greenville
officials haven't noticed lately, we,
thestudents,all 16,000ofus, make
up one-third of this town's popu-
lation � and I think that we need
to be treated with the same re-
spect as everyone else. After all,
we pay electric bills, phone bills,
rent, buy groceries, spend money
and are taxed five percent on the
dollar too.
Citizens, with the help of the
media, have labeled us drunk,
rowdy, unruly, lawbreaking,
"partying" teenagers � who I
might add are here to have a good
time. Unfortunately, only a small
percentage of us uphold this im-
age, therefore leaving the remain-
ing of us suffer the consequences.
For starters, the incident that
occurred Halloween night at Tar
River Estates apartments. The
Greenville police were just look-
ing for something, anything, to
respond to � they had over 100
officers strolling the sidewalks of
downtown Greenville in riot gear.
So when a noise disturbance was
reported in a student area, they all
showed up � ready to arrest any
and every student that was in the
vicinity. Despite that people were
in their own apartments, and stand-
ing in their own courtyards �
didn't matter � the police only
saw students and assumed the
worst. And of course local televi-
sion crews were capturing the
policemen's heroic conquest over
the "threatening" students. I mean
really � who were they kidding
� there were 100 armed police-
men with tear gas and handcuffs
�and they felt threatened? Please!
Also this town has completely
ignored the amount of money that
we do spend. They seem to have
forgotten that the majority of
apartments are rented by students,
that we probably, make the larg-
est percentage of Carolina
Telephone's long distance calls,
and that we too are sucked dry bv
Greenville Utility company so
why weren't we taken into con-
sideration when the "new " plaza
expansion was being designed
For once I thought our town was
finally going to get some decent
stores, but no � we didn't. There
still aren't stores catered to the
college students. Sure we have a
new Belk and Brodys, , but their
fashions consist of last year's styles
with this year's prices. It's pathetic
that investors spent all that money
for a "nice-looking" mini mall,
with glittering lights and marble
floors to have the most profitable
store be �The Dollar Store f only
market researchers would have
taken into consideration that stu-
dents do have and spend money
also, and would have put in a Gap
Limited, Thalhimers or Tweeds, then
it would look as if we were at least
recognized -instead we have
department stores which are
trying to sell $h(Kl shoos
It's been said before but I feel
that it needs to be said again- it it
weren't for the students and the
university, this town would not
be where it is today and people
would still think that there was
only one Greenville, the one in
South Carolina. 1 think that Green-
ville citizens should re-examine
their behavior and start treating
students like citizens, not
childercn. The Monday boycott
may not have affected retailors
drastically, but if we were pushed
far enough, and banned together
� we could nuke a difference.
Think about it!
Kellv Easterling
Senior
Condom sense
To the editor:
After a long, hard night in the
dorm I woke to read in November
9th's paper that our beloved chan-
cellor has waged us to "please help
fight this battle" against AIDS. As
a past member of the SGA there
have been several bills sent to the
chancellor about this. This same
man who has sounded the battle
cry against AIDS has turned down
every recommendation for plac-
ing condom vending machines in
the dorms. I may not be the most
perceptive person on campus, but
something here seems screwv:
How can you wage the stu-
dents to prevent the spread of
AIDS when you don't have any
condom sense. More and more
every school in the state system
has started to put condom ma-
chines in the dorms and yet we are
impudent in our action to score as
well. Mr. Eakin, I believe that it
you are going to come on to us, the
student body, about the preven-
tion of AIDS, you had better use
a condom.
Jim Jay ton
Junior
History
Freedom theft
To the editor:
I am very angry now. I am
angry because I saw the petty arm
of authority strip a man's rights
from him in full view of a hundred
people and not one person,
including myself, tried to stop the
theft
On Friday November 9, al
about 11:30 a.m. in front of the
Student "store, an older man. net a
student, was orating to a group of
students about religion and the
Old Testament. The crowd was a
skeptical one, and made its skep-
ticism known. It was not, how
ever, a violent, angry, or even
restless gathering. Everyone was
interested in what the man had to
say, whether or not thev agreed
with his works. I grew in a very
short time to respect this man who
obviously believed in what he said
and who had no qualms about
making his beliefs known, unlike
so many o( us who lead quiet.
apathetic lues This man was
exercising his right to tree speech
His right to tree speech was
then stolen from him. A campus
officer walked up and after two or
three minutes of discussion sent
the man on his way. To give the
otticor credit, he was very calw
about the whole thing and it ap-
peared that he knew he was doing
a dirty job I do not believe he was
acting on his own, since 1 could
hear a call on his walkie-talkie
asking whether the situation at
the student store had cleared up
He max not have had a choice in
the matter. Nevertheless, what he
did was wrong.
Several minutes later,a group
of about fifteen official-looking
people walked up to and entered
the Student Store. Thev were
ambassadors (from where I don't
know) touring the campus. It
struck me then that the orator had
been cleared our of the way so that
these people would not see him.
He hadn't been removed because
he was disturbing the peace, incit-
ing a riot, burning the Hag, or,
God help us, breaking the noise
ordinance. He was brushed aside
for the convenience of the campus
administration.
How abominable, how cal-
lous, these administrators! That
these lofty old men in their
starched shirts, wrapped in their
white-bread view of the world
should think themselves above the
law enough to strip a man of his
Constitutional rights simply to
avoid embarrassment is reprehen-
sible. Rights are not bestowed to
us to bo removed for someone
else's convenience. 1 choke when 1
think about it. I choke, too, when 1
realize that we, the people watch-
ing, did very little to prevent the
crime. A single man walked into a
crowd of a hundred and robbed a
man as surely as if he had ripped
the coat off his back, yet we did
nothing. Mark my words: we on
this earth have only those rights
that others allow us or that we
fight for and win. On this day we
did not fight as free people; we
stood bv as drones.
I promise you, I will never just
stand bv again Never.
, Lawrence S. Graham
Graduate Student
Biology-
There is no guarantee that all
letters will be printed in the
Campus Forum if an excess of
mail is received on one particular
topic. Due to limited space, writ-
ers are urged to remember that
letters exceeding 300 words and
not written or typed neatly may
not be used in future forums.





i
THE EASTCAROUNIAN
State and Nation
NOVEMBER 14,1989 PAGE 5
Thousands attend rally
Pro-choicers march in Washington
Reports estimated 150,000 people turned out for the pro-choice rally on the Washington Mall this
Sunday. (Photo by Angela Pridgen �ECU Photo Lab)
By DEBORAH DIXON
staff Writer
More than 150,000 women and
men gathered in Washington, D.C.
Sunday afternoon in support of
abortion rights for women.
Among the supporters were
about 70 women and men from
Greenville. Through a trip organ-
ized by the local National Organi-
zation for Women (NOW) Chap-
ter, the group attended the rally
which began at noon with a march
to the Lincoln Memorial. The ac-
tivities in Washington were initi-
ated by NOW.
Political activists who spoke
in favor of the pro-choice move-
ment included Molly Yard, presi-
dent of NOW; Eleanor Smeal,
president of the Fund for Feminist
Majority; Dorothy Height, presi-
dent of the Black Leadership Fo-
rum and the National Council of
Negro Women; Sen. Howard
Metzenbaum (D-Ohio); Rep. Steny
Hoyer (D-Md.); Rep. Louise
Slaughter (D-NY) and D.C. City
Councilmember Hilda Mason.
The combination of women
and men at the rally included col-
lege students, senior citizens, and
teenagers. Some carried signs and
banners, while others sang or
chanted.
National organizations pres-
ent at the march included the
National Rainbow Coalition,
Catholics for Free Choice, Ameri-
can Federation of Teachers and
the International Ladies Garment
Workers Union. Independent or-
ganizations included Women's
Studies from the University of
Kentucky, D.C. Department of
Justice Workers, the Young So-
cialist Alliance and Mountaineers
for Choice.
College students from New
York said they came because they
were afraid of regression in the
legal system and of seeing "young
girls being butchered Jean
Gillette,66,ofOrange,N.J.said "if
they take a way our right to choose,
women will not be in control of
their bodies
Aesthetic support for pro-
choice was in the form of shirts,
buttons, bumperstickersand most
vividly, the signs and banners.
Pro-choiccrscarriedsignscxclaim-
ing messages such as "Contra-
ceptives, Not Contra-Aid" and
"Dan Quayle Thinks Roe versus
Wade is a Debate on How to Cross
the Potomac
About two dozen pro-life
su pporters were present; however,
they were not allowed within the
rally's boundaries.
Berlin mayors shake hands Sunday as the Wall comes down
ByNESHA STARCEVIC
The Assoi mrd rrrs�
BERLIN (AD East Berlin's
mayor strode through a new
breach in the Berlin Wall and shook
hands with thedividedcity'sother
mayor at rotsdamerPlatz, Berlin's
radiant hub before the folly of
Hitler, of world warand Cold War.
Sunday's handshake, after
three days o heady reunion for
millions of Germans separated for
four decades by a now collapsing
order, was as symbolic a gesture
of the new era as anv since East
Germany's leaders let their people
go. The country's embattled
Communist leadership, struggling
with a peaceful popular revolt
launched just five weeks ago, was
expected to begin today to act on
the sweeping democratic reforms
it promises last week.
Parliament, an increasingly
assertive body through long a
runner stamp tor Lommunist
policy, convened Monday to con-
firm as premier a leading reformer,
Dresden party chief Hans
Mod row.
Also Monday, the party's 163-
member governing Central Com-
mittee was expected to set a date
in December for an emergency
party Congress, at which monu-
mental leadership and policy
changes could be approved. The
meetings follow an intoxicating
weekend of rediscovery for Ger-
mans.
Millions of East Germans,
acting on Thursday's opening of
long-sealed boarders, swarmed
through the Berlin Wall and other
frontier crossings into West Ger-
many for shopping, sightseeing
and celebration. To accommodate
the human crush, East German
soldiers at the Potsdamer Platz on
Sunday morning created another
in a series of new openings in the
wall that was built in 1961 to stop
an earlier westward exodus.
After the troopers removed
concrete slabs at Potsdamer Platz,
Mayor Erhard Krack walked
across what had long been a no
man's land to West Berlin and
shook hands with Mayor
Wolfgang Momper of West Ber-
lin. The area, where playwright
Bertolt Brecht caroused in the
1920s, was once the equivalent of
the Times Square or Piccadilly
Circus of central Europe.
In contrast to the quiet, or-
derly crowd of about 1,000 on the
eastern side, the 10,000 or so in
West Berlin were in noisy high
spirits.
"Let us in! We want to co and
have breakfast on the Alex they
yelled, referring to the Alexander-
platz in downtown East Berlin.
Elsewhere Berliners cele-
brated their new unity with mu-
sic. About 12,000 Berliners heard
singer Joe Cocker perform at a
marathon rock concert that went
into early Monday. Exiled Rus-
sian cellist Mstisla v Rostropovich,
conductor of the National Svm-
J
phony Orchestra in Washington,
played a 10-minute program of
Bach at the wall's Checkpoint
Charlie.
Guenter Schabowski, East
Berlin's Communist Party chief
and a member of the ruling Polit-
buro, said the lifting of travel re-
strictions showed that the East
German leadership was serious
about reforms.
"We took the correct and nec-
essary steps in a complicated situ-
ation, and it has helped win back
trust the state-run news agency
ADZon Sunday quoted Schabow-
ski as saying.
Indeed, all but a small frac-
tion of the more than 3 million
East Germans who visited the
West over th.e weekend returned
hom DN reported that East
Ge jfficialshad issued nearly
43 i n visas for travel to the
West between Thursday and late
Sunday.
The country's leaders opened
the borders and pledged freeelec-
tionsand other reforms demanded
by the hundreds of thousands of
people who have taken to the
streets since October. They were
also plagued by the flight to the
Westthisyearofmorethan200000
refugees, a phenomenon draining
their workforce that had also
showed no signs of abating.
Egon Krenz, who became East
Germany's leader Oct. 18 and met
in Moscow with Mikhail S. Gor-
bachev two weeks later, appears
to have at least partially stanched
the flow by opening the borders.
The man he replaced, hard-liner
Erich Honecker, oversaw con-
struction of the Berlin Wall.
The rush of events of the past
fourdayshavetouchedoffaflurry
of speculation about reunification
of the two German states created
at the end of World War II. About
1,000 leftists marched through
West Berlin on Sunday shouting
slogans against reunification.
GIVE BLOOD,
PLEASE.
' t T � flf (
.1 A J
BLOODMOBILE
MENDENHALL SIT DEM CENTER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1989
And
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1989
12:00 Noon - 6:00 pm
Sponsored By
RESIDENT HALL ASSOCIATION
American Red Cross X
BKkk Services Tidewater Reei(n
Zenith Data Systems
Congratulates
bmorrow's Innovators
The Class of 1989
Myra Mills Computerland
355-6110
I





1
THKKAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 14. 1989
Classifieds
ior ri i
FOR SALL
FEMAL1 ROOMM M I eeded
M be n. at. Ca M : 102 anytime
ROOM FOR Kl N 1 street 5125
in lie CallLuki
M MM 1 ROOMM 11 ible &
considi rate. 5 - 13 utih
ties Privati - Si Available
now jtf S.S8I
R(HM FOR REN1 ouple s
ROOM (OR Kl 1
Ig d -l.i!
MUMP ROOMMA II
. utilities
-
. kdavs
KIM t-hool
1 1 D M l 1 RO IMMA n
house Pi Washer ai
Need attfre�erfjpfl Ava
I
FEMALI ROOMMATI WANTED
Noi

:

MM! ROOMM I 1 NEEDED
� ; ' ' . ��
Fast Copies For Fast Times
ACCU SSCOPY
758-2400
fcJC.C REGISTERED: Golden Retriever
puppies 4 male-lett 8 weeks old Call
757 M"0 i come bv 201 Memorial Gym
A-k tor udy Baker
I AND C OMPUTER: Monitor, Printer,
and internal disk drive Price neg. Call
alter 5 (XI .1! " 8 J22 1
FISH TANK Salt Water, deluxe model,
Kl gallon with all accessories Already
established $240 Call 758-5962 leave
message
K Rl II RI :c ouch 2chairs 2endtables
& coffee table Full size hardwood Per
eel condition Call alter 5:00 at 355 SiW2
and or leave message
HK cnp mw: 1 ighl blue 12' x8 12 '
wear dated carpet Never used Wrong
rforownei home Call Cheryl at 551
290 before 5:00 oi )55 2539 alter 5:30 to
come by and look !V-t offer
t OlH WD C HAIR: S50or best otter
Musi sell! Call 752 w24" Day or night
A I 11 NTION: (.Government seized ve
' M !rom Slim Fords, Mercedes, Cor
vettes Chevys Surplus Buyers Guide 1
. ; - . ,�
l liis s it true vou can buy jeeps for
544 through the I S Government? Bet the
facts todav! all 1 312-742 1142 Ext 5271
A
1981 NISS VN ZOOSX: 5 speed, stereocas
i'v llent iondition
S140I . t855 and leave message
MllKUs v an vou bin eeps Cars 4
Sei edii drugraidsforunderSlOO.OO?
� r facts toda s "� f44 9533 Depl
oi IK KM: roseetheRollingStonesal
nson t rh da) after . hanksgi
. 2' � rS If interested. Call 931
siKiHOVRD. ���' Town and Country
enes I iw less i mdition S2
: Light travel boardbags
Rituals Wori cmwa)h. n
- - �. 1 .i . t g. ftURMv
�. � .� .i4 Itti.c
- � undvai
n . ���
itvhrn -i � mm if
� . v ��
��
LMKMJX,
.
Sti
I
� i . Near KCI
Near M � v '� i lei
� 1 i I ! is Service
I .lull
7436
BEST USED TIRES
I SALES FROM S15& UP
! SIZES WM1 U1 1-
�� U KR & WHITE WALLS
TifhiiffJh ifrCN. Green Si
i The Suntana i
I $212 S Memori J Di
I 5 visit plan 15
I 10 visil plan 25
I 15 visil plan 30
I I
Wolfe Tanning System
756-9ISO ;
� rhis t . eood thru Dee. 15, 198 I �
Both tit up to abb hoard SlOOapiece. Call
lay at 752 7043.
WET SUIT: Fathom, 14 inch, Farmer
John sie L 7 Excellent condition, Ongt
nal owner Call Bob at 732 4s1 lb
FOR SALE: Two leather skirts one beige,
one black, sie 12 Length and inch pass
knee, straight cut. Never worn, given as a
gift Each � 575 Call "31 s�i atter 5 M) to
see skirt or tor more into
FOR SALE: Voikl Wehcupskies F.ssVai
proline bindings; high denary core: Also
Vh win high Sierra 18 spd mountain bike,
Shimano decore Ms equipped Call tor
prices 931 8710
FOR SAI F: foss Cruiser! Warth Cruiser
w gears) S'lls new 5270 2vrs old, Ex
eond , SlO V1ust sell graduating Call
Nicole 758 5565
FURNITURE: 2 yrs old dresser, chest,
headboard Goodcond 5125or best offer
( all Nicole at 758 5565
S4 RENAULT AI L1ANCE: DL, 4 door,
cassette, air Navy with beige interior
Asking S3200 Must see make an otter
Moving to Italy call 758 6701
WHISTLER SPECTRUM RADAR
DETECTOR: super compact, top of the
line digital protection Retails 5340 Will
sacrifice $175 months old Nights 355
7(4
WET SUIT: fathom 316" farmer lohn
w Beaver Tail top Bargain $75 Nights
355 7004
FOR SAIL 1983 HONDA CIVIC: 5 speed,
air, $1200 19" color tv used 3 months $150
Antique loveseat with coffee table 52(H)
Patio table and chairs with cushions us�d
indoors only 52l) No reasonable offer
refused Call 355 0526
FORSA1 F : searselectnctypewriter. Good
condition 540 neg 931-7891
MINI CONDITION So fresh you'll slap
its race' 1 londa 50 motorscooter Never
ndden. won in contest Black and purple,
of a mile mileage Great for univer-
sity parking 100mpg $600. call Greg at
757 tx' das ,ir 758 s7 atter 5.
FOR SAIL Handcrafted iewelrv ear
rings hiairclips anklets and more Over
I5 s to v ose From can custom
make sororit) colorshristmas is ust
around the corner! Call todav' sandv931-
sAsi leave message
SERVICES OFFERED
rYPING SERVICI Papers resumes,
thesis, etc thatneod t. typed please call
756 B934 between 5 30pm 9 30pm. 17yrs
tvping experience Ipng is done on
"sWiputeT with letler quality printer
REPORTS RfSU'lTT'?-TtfTNT,rTTK-
TOPPL'BI ISHING,LASERPRIN IINC;
Designer typ 2 1933 We take reserva-
tions : r tvping n ;rts
WORD PR0 ESSlNGfc PHOTOCOPY-
ING SERVICES: We offer typing and
photocopying ser ices We aiso st-ll sott
ware and computers 24 hrs in & out
guarantee typing on paper up to 20 hand
written pages SI F Professional comput-
ers 106 E 2nd St (beside Cubbies) Green-
vule, N C 752 3694
GET ABOARD: Pirate ride 3 routes on
the hour around campus Call 77 4724 tor
more details
HELP VVANTtl)
DAYTIME: Ihe Hilton is seeking full
part time employees in the hd dept All
positions available Minimum 54 per hour
Excellent benefits Please eall or come bv
the Milton in Greenville 155 5000 ask for
Matt Zak
INTERIOR DESIGNER: Apply in person
at Larry's carpet land 3010 E 10th St
ATTENTION- HIRING: Government
jobs vour area Manv immediate open
ings without waiting list r test $17,840
Si9,485. Call 1 602 838-8885 1 �t R5285
HOLIDAY JOB OPPORTUNITY: The
Monev Baked 1 lam Co is in sean h of sia
stnal help to fill our sales counter and
production positions We have stores U
cated in the following markets Raleigh,
Durham, Greensboro, Winston Salem,
Wilmington. Charlotte, and Atlanta Please
check the white pages or information tor
the store nearest vour home
EARN $2,000 - $4,000: searching tor
employment that permits working ur
own hrs , but still challenging enough for
your entrepreneurial skills' Management
programs for Fortune 500 companies (all
1-800-932-0528 ideal for grad students
GROWING BUSINESS: Need help I ight
secretarial work, phone and handle I I
shipping & receivingHhceis lOmilesout
of town Must have own transportation
Flexible hrs 1230pm 5:30pm Monday
- Friday. Send resume to Bea ei I lam, Kt
4 Box 97 M, Greenville N I 27834
GOVERNMEN I OBS: S16,040 559,230
yr. Now hiring Call 1 so n t���i Exl
K 1 lt tor current federal list
EXCELLENT SUMMER i( Rl l R op
PORTUNITILS: Nowavailal le tor col
lege student & graduates � resort ho
tels,cruisiTini's,airlines,ami . .rks
and camps For more information and an
application : Write Nationalollegiate
Recreation Service, P.O Box si�74 Milton
HeadS.C 29938
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart
men I is recruiting tor 12 to 16 parl lime
youth basketball ooaches . . ter
youth basketball program apphi ants must
pissess some knowledgi oi basketball
skills and have ability and patiei el ork
with youths .Applicants must N al � I
.wich young people, ages 9 18 tibaskel
ball fundamentals ti ursan pmto
" 7pm with some night and we kend a I
ing This program will run from Novem
ber27. to mid February s,iiar r.it. irt-
at S 3.85 per hr tor more information.
please call Ben lames .it 830-4543 or S30
47
BASKEIBALL OFFICIALS MEETING:
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department will be holdinc their ftrrt
rJn't?rWanfrgih n ThufVflirv Vo
vember2, 1989 at 7:30pn it thi Elm St
Gym All interested fl als should at
tend this rius-ting For more information,
please call Duane i Iroon s al 8 - 4:0 or
830-4567
BRODY'S : Now s the time to earn si
extra spending money tor �� i-
Hrodv s tor men is accepting applicatu
tor part time sales asso Apply HriKh s
ThePlaa M W, 1-4 pn foramon
convenient interview appt
BRODY'S: Christmas
vou know it ou can start preparing tor
Layout Artist
Wanted!
Now Hiring
at
Z)z titast Carolinian
apply al the Publications
Building
Monday - Friday
McBudget
Office
Furniture
We Have.
�Desks Chairs
�Files 'Safes
�Computer 'Storage
Furniture Cabinets
We Buy, Sell, Trade, & Lease
1212 N. Grcdc St.
752 OS34
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy
Testing
M-F8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call lor jppointrrvn Mon thru Sol
,� C .i�d Ifrm.r.jiinn In.1 Ami.
1-800-433-2930
Who has the
most unique
selection of
contemporary
accessories
Present itm coupon
� for 10r l)ise�int i
I on Any Accessory �
I expires 123189 j
Certain
things
652 I: Arlington
Greenv ille, NC
(91) 756 3320
ail thise CTinstnus bills by applying lor a
part time pinion in sales or customer
service with Brody's. Enw a merchandise
discoufll even Santa's elves would enjoy
apply with Hnxly's , The plaza. M W 1-
4pm or call tor a more convenient inter-
view appt
RAVELFREE: Eamcash MogulsSkiA
Sun Tours. Is hiring campus marketing
representatives for spnng break Jamaica,
Bahamas, BarbadosicCancun thoseinter-
i-stc-ii should N' motivated outgoing, and
organised C all Mathew Eynon at 1-800-
()l IU SHOP: Part time sales it stock
boy need�sj Mondav, Wednesday, and
Fndav , also ever v other Saturday For the
Youth Shop Boutique, Arlington Village
Apply in person
LOOKING : For a fraternity, soronty or
student oraniation that would bke to
make $500- SI,(XX) for a one week on -
campus marketing project Must be or-
ganized and hardworking Call Jenny or
Myraat MX))-52-2121
RIPRLSINTATIVE NEEDED: Earn
$2500 and FREE tnp selling Bahamas,
Mono, lamaica. spring break trips Spring
Break Travel 1-800-638-6786
MODELS: Needed part-time for lingerie
and exercise production Send photo and
resume to Models, CO DR. P O. Box
ls7 drawer 1446,Greenville,N.C 27834
S HOLD CARPENTER: To work 30 hrs.
a week Must have bask knowledge. S5
hr Also need laborer to do variety at
work, $4 hr. 758-0897.
HI I V WAN LTD: Dependable cab co
drivers needed, afternoons, evenings and
weekends. Full and part- time apply in
person, 2X)VV 4th St 757-0288
.i) I KNMI N f JOBS: $16,040 -
$59,231 vr Now hiring. Call (1)805-687-
6000 Ext K I lrtor current federal list
AIRI IMS NOW HIRING: flight Atten-
dants, travel agents, mechanics, customer
service Listings Salaries to SI 05K Entry
level positions Call (1) 80S 687-WXX) Ext
A 1166
U 1 IN lDMMIRCIALS: Highpav
No experience ail ages, kids, teens,
j ung adults, families, mature people,
animals etc Call now'Charm Studios -1-
- � 837 1700
EXPRESSIONS MAGAZINE: Now has
k sit ns ,n ailabte for a computer layout
st and an assistant graphic design art-
ist c ontact us at the office located in the
Publications Bldg across from Jovner Li
bran or call at 757-6927 or 757-6009.
KliH DESPERATELY NEEDED: From
R.D. L airport atter 7pm Thursday, Dec.
4th (the day before school) I will pav for
H�s Sia Pleasecail fill at 931-7642s
A1TIN I ION: earn monev reading Nxiks'
$32,000 yr income potential. Details. (1)
NC s"ss 8885 Ext Bk5285.
MT I NT ION: Hiring' government fobs-
our area Manv immediate openings
without waiting list or test. $17,840 -
$69,485 Call 1-602-838-8885. Ext R5285.
MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR:
Needed tor morning, afternoon and week-
end work Average of 2 hrs per week.
Apply in person Greenville Athletic Club,
140Oakmont r
IMAGE FASHION: Color consultant with
Americas Premier Image Co full or Part -
time call Barbara 'sheipe 804-421-7919 for
;ntor tew and or tree color Analysis.
W VN TIT): lull and part time help Above
minimum wage to start. Must haveKahd
drivers licence Apply m perstJn at Adam's
Auto Wash Mon. -Wed, 8-6pm. Corner
of Ked Banks Kd and Greenville Blvd.s
PERSONALS
CA) WHITE MALE: Seeking other gay
male students tor friendship, companion-
ship and to trv and form a gav male stu-
dent support group (which can be either
formal or very informal) When you write
please indicate how to get in touch with
you either by phone or by mail. As there is
a lot of "homophobia" here at ECU all
replies will be kept confidential � indicate
how discreet you need for me to be in
contacting vou as 1 respect vour right to
privacy It interested please write to :
Frank, P.O Box 4091, Greenville, N.C
27836-2091
DEAR BETSY: I know I'm the luckiest hi'
sis in the world to have vou as mv big sis!
Thank ou for all the wonderful gifts and
the scavenger hunt was the best! Susan,
Betsy and Tnsh what a terrific family! I
love you guvs bunches!
SIG TAU PLEDCES: s, Dave, Greg, Eric,
johnny, Bill, Buddy, Leo, Scott, Danny,
Kenny, Brian, start prayingfor Thanksgiv-
ing because the easy (art is almost over
You've been walking on rose petals tor the
last few weeks but its time to wipe youi
feet, cu its a walk on thin ice from m w
until ' Brothers
NANCY JENKINS: Congratulations'
were going to throw a party in vour hon. .r
but the cops came over with a noise metet
instead so we fust decided to skip it Theta
Chi
ZETATAU ALPHA PI EDGES: Youj
are doing a great )ob' Keep it up
the best! Love, the Sisters
BRENDA GEISLER: all around Greei
ville you did go, your big sis vou did i i
know At the end of your quest you wen
put to the test, from which vou dni
rust a little undone You're as cool as
be, this we did see - probably K .
you're alot like me Love, your big s;s
CONGRATULATIONS CATHERINE
CARROLL: On winning Delta . fa -
tery
MICHAEL MELVIN: So you �
over thehill now, old enough toshow you
real Id in a bar Congrats on being
bartender Thanks for feeding me a: :
taking care of me all thes tears 1 lere 5 I
Christmas caroling, walks in rhesr i u
those pink carnations Happv Bird :
and manv more' Love va, Joy
REWARD: To anyone who tinds m get
man - shorthaired pointer Hooks like
hound dog) lost oct 5 on 5th St
liver white spotted male with bro
and docked tail Had on blue collar H
verv important' Call758 1794or7 I
with any info
ALICIA: You did a fantastic Kb j- n
bership chairman Thanks tor �
hard work in bringing us together
The pledges of ZTA
SANDRA: We know that No II
a special day for vou Hope you
great 22nd buthdav and a blast at fJ � I
mal. Love, The pledges for 271
PI KAPP: Great pb guvs in infra-
We're kicking some butt, lets keep up tr.
good work.
PI KAPP: Congrarulaf sgoet
"sexton" King on being name brother
the month Guvs don't forget Lottin is
sober chauffeur this weekend, so lets
responsible and call if we need a no
but not least eongratulanons goes
Randv R on being named "October fest
Queen. It's onlv a oke
PI KAPP PLEDGES! The time
Thisis vour true test Itsgi
believe me, but if vou stick it o
hard vou shall be rewarded
THETA CHI PLEDGES:
say this Roll Chi-
lot
KAPPA SIGMA: We were all looking
forward to partvln' with vmi guv . 4orrv
about the mix-up' Lets try it again so
Love the ADPi's
TARA MCCLURE: Here's vet another
compliment to vour stage debut at New
Deb. - you sounded great Looking for-
ward to seeing vou again on open M �
night! Love vour ADPi siMers
ALPHA DELTA PI PLEDGES: did
have fun sleeping in our beds1 Hope!
this past weekend meant as much �
it did to us when we were plecio's
your sisters
AOPI'S: We wanted to put in a "pers
for vou guys today, but gee What
for? Alpha Sig
ALPHA SIG: Wishes everyone a
Thanksgiving and a sate trip home
AOPI'SANDDATES: Yesit'slatel
to remind vou "Move this bus' V
becan to yell on the Kinston bus
straight to hell We made a pit stop in the
middle, everyone dropped their drawers
to peediddle. The Elks lodge was
destination It was the AOPi cod
should mention We danced and w
the guys shoot pool. The Beta Mu s
dancing - Oh how cool. The night encJ.sj
all to soon, how could we wake up N I -i
noon? We had to see the Homecoming
Game, Gretchen Joumigan represented
AOPi name What a weekend what a
blast, these memories were meant to last
AOPI'S: Hope vou had a great weekend
Get ready for Thanksgiving dinner
Gobble, Gobble
THE "LIVE POET'S SOC1ETV
Bizarro's3840spnngdass' We want to get
together for a reading Contact Pat and tell
him when's a good bme Between No 2
- Dec. 8
GLORIA, LISA, JILL, AND TRACY Om
times together are Limited, but it makes
them even more special' You gins mean
the world to me- 1 love vou, Laura
ANNOUNCEMENTS
A I ILMION IU ALL
The Fast C arolir iai
policy concerning tart
ing in Januar. mi ements will now
be free I the 1st week of publication,
after that wei k there will be a charge of
Kt 25 words tor student organizations
i: i fornon student organizations
S3 any additional words will be $.05.9
CREAT1V1 LIVING CENTER
. u a Pitt unt) resident, 60 years
old or older ai I a ride to your meeH
j! appointn � � Creative 1 i ing
� enterist ffei . fi � sportation service to
the elderly tor medical appointments
within Pittounty such as doctors, den-
therapies, and the Health Dept
Nrr.ini'i -pen(s for tbes�tv!ee most b�'made
at least 24 hours before the scheduled
appointment Call the Creative Living
� Q903 to reserve your ride.
QUALIFY TO BE MR FORCE
OFFICER
The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test will
he administered on Nov 9 and 30 in rm
308oi Wright Annex Testing will begin at
1 (K)both dates Successful testing can lead
to a challenging )ob as an Air Force Officer
pilot, navigator, engineer, computer
scientist, manager and a variety of others
C all757 6S97orstopbyroo�n306ofWright
Annex to sign up for the test and discuss
your options
ARE YOU A PERFORMER?
higglers. Mimes, matonans and other Elia
bethan characters, the Student Union
would like to talk to vou about performing
in the Madrigal Dinners Call 757-4711 and
ask for Ron Maxwell.
SOPHOMORES
ECU Sophomores interested in a career in
government service at the federal, state, or
Ux-al level are invited to apply for a 1990
1 latTvS Truman Scholarship In April 1990,
the Foundation will award 92 scholarships
nationally The DEADLINE for all 1990
applications is DEC. 1, 1989 ECU can
nominate 3 students for the 1990 competi-
tion. The scholarship award covers eli-
gible expenses up to S7.000 per year for the
jr sr. and two years of graduate study. To
be eligible, a student must be a full-time
sophomore working toward or planning
to pursue a baccalaureate degree, have a b
average or equivalent, stand in the upper
4th of the class, and be a U S citien or U S.
national heading toward a career in gov
ernment Interested students should sub
mit a letter of interest to Dr Maurice Si-
mon, Truman Scholarship Faculty Rep ,
1002 GCB by Nov. 3
FREE SELF-DEFENSE CLASS
Do you ever practice at the music bldg. late
at night? Do you walk home or to vour car
after night classes' If you do. . . then vou
should attend the FREE self defense classes,
sponsored by Sigma Alpha Iota. Rick Clark
of Washington will be teaching the self-
defense techniques for females and males
on the following Tuesdays: Oct. 17, 24,
Nov. 7and 14. Classes will be held on those
dates at 700 p m in the lobby of Fletcher
Music Bldg Please wear comfortable
clothes
SNCAE
Membership is still open for all interested
persons Our next meeting will be on
Tuesday, Nov. 14th from 5-6pm in 203
Speight Members who have not picked
up information packets may do so in Dr.
Martin's office.
ECU EACRQSSE
The ECU Lacrosse team is looking for any
interested staff or faculty member to coach
in the spring 1990 season. If interested
please contact John or Kelly at 757-1537
SPAN
The student Planning Asso Network
(SPAN) is sponsoring a panel entitled
Alumni Perspectives Employment in the
Private Sector" on Wed Nov 1? from
9:50am in rm D-208, Brewster Bldg All
interested persons are invited to attend
For additional Info contact left Gilen
SPAN president or Professors Hankins
Stephenson or Wubneh, Dept of Geogra
phy and Planning,ECU
RJGISJRAT1QN FOR C-EN-
Timxis
CONTINUED ON PAGE 7





ANNOUNCEMENTS
CONTINUED FROM PACK 6
l n. Mlollege students should contact
then advisers the week i v f 0 to
make arrangements foi a ademk jd isine
��' I WO Earl registra
tion � - ,n

uc; vvi Knr I RAINING
�ers i es r.ill titm-ss.
� ' ' " i ling discus
� - i Utrom 12
�� v lav Omai t1
� � � coach will Jis
ues to help pre
�lost .mi! ol vour
tei b Mondav v
n facu �. stall
KL IQR UKM
I� vheldo tal
1 . sums u ll re,
ind . pkin Pu
g, Services
, �' ir il ' � vs '
' � cr V1COS
i ci vn K
deon �
'������ i
-
fcl Kcjsi n NLTKITION
v U FQR SPRING
BRI Ks
A ' '
� .r. i
W1M RIGHTS
ment of
ieda

! NTS
towards graduation, while paving tc U
tuition It s not too early to begin gearing
upfoi next fall! Don't miss this rare oppor
tunit) to challenge your skills in a new
college setting foi more information con
tad Steph inie Evan ho in GCB 1002 oi call
t7b9
l'Hl UPSILON QMICRON
Phi Upsilon OmiCTon Home Economic
1 lonorar) Societ) will have a fall initiation
of new members Dec 4 Musi have "U)
GPA completed 40 hrs, HE mapi We
want you! Contact Dr Brohannon or Br
Farrkir, I lome Economices I iepartment or
MW tor more information
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
Ml I TI(J
O ; is having a special m.N ting on
� it ; WpminCC B 1025 rhismeetingis
leode on the project we must adopt and
. ii for our fundratsing dinner Please
attend it vou are a member ot our group
and picas feel free to attend it vou arc
rested in helping those in third world
ii ti ies
AMNEST INTERNATIONAL
rhen will ,i special Amnesty mei �;��;
Wed Nov 13at 8pm in St Paul's Episco
� ' icatedon4thSt Tnismeetmg
be I ,sv our special even) for
� ts Week ihis event will
conci rn the situation .Her in t hina We
i rs to attend and invite
�'� � " r inti rested indiv idu
I MA
il Management As. M ,
' Wed No )4 at 1 ()pm in nn 3009
� item include making plans
� ' . wine and i heese
s01 ' " ' mooting and the fund
UND1 RCRAPUATE FCQ.
NOMJCS SOCIETY
ivean eetmg at 7pm
'� � � Mi 'i i. nhalIRm 221 . omeand
� ' allabc il E ryoneis we!
IHANKIVlNt, DINNER
A simple rhanksgiving dinner and wor
�' sponsored jointly be the II
is ministries will be observed to
. m at the Baptist student
I nion Ii thSl n. U to Wend s) Anoffer
� � �� ' i collected tor the poor of( Jreen
I.NTLR - CHRISTIAN COUN-
OL
ntei Christian council will meet
toda shortly after the Thanksgiving din
it the Baptist Student Union
IMPROVING STLTin SKILLS
I earning how to in ; rove your stud skills
tor greater success in college The follow
mrse and workshops an help
.�- for th idd I worV ad
f help I ncri � . u � a, :� point
v sessions will be held in
Wright building Mon Tue, Nov. 27 28,
lest taking from 3- 4 30pm.
P,L, MAJORS CLUB
Tnere will be a meeting on Thurs Nov 16
atSpmin MingesCol rm 143 All maors
and intended mayors are welcome don't
forget!
LARLY CHILDHOOD CJJJI
i omeone! come all! The Early Childhood
Club Meeting will be held in Speight, 308
at 4pm on Nov 15,1989 Flannel Boards
will be available, so bring your money
Book i Tub order forms will also bedistrib
uted don't forget Candy money! Hope to
see vou there"
NATIONAL INTERNA-
IlONALSaiMNTLX-
CHANCE
U l students' it sa new concept' ntema
tional stud) programs through the a
tional Student Exchange tlioos- to spend
a challenging semester or year at one of 87
colleges and universities in the l's or
gi ar up foi studies m r x countries in
the world through one of the NSE sites tor
more information contact Stephanie Evan-
choin G( B 1002 or call 757 6769
NATIVE AMERICAN RITU-
workshopwith Eustace Cohwa Sunday
Nov 19 1 5 pm at river Park North,
ivilie CostofS21 eustace,agradu
ate in anthropoli ;v from Appal.uh St
I niv has traveled all over the continent
and has dyed extensively with Indians in
Mex Alaska, An , and N C As well as
having Nvn a naturalist for c State
Parks, he has kavaked lOOOmi along
Alaska hiked the entire Appalach Trail.
and served as leader of a Miss river canoe
. ipedition from St ! ouis to New Orleans
tor more information call 7h 0449
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
1 he iI Gospel ' hoir will sp�,ils,r a
anetv Show featuring comedy music and
drama on Nov 28 Along with the show
a rattle will beheld to win prizes All inter
ostod parties who would like to participate
. please contact a member of the choir The
show will beheld in rm 244 in Mendenhall
student center price is $1
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
LVLNTS.NOV, 14-27
Instrumental Chamber Music, student
recital fNov I5,7pm, fletcher Recital Hall,
free Percussionists Doug Walker and
Scotry Sells, Senior recital I Nov. 15, Qpm.
Fletcher Recital HalLfree), Final Round of
Concerto Competition (Nov 16, 3pm,
Hot. her Recital Mall, free) Bill Mitchell,
tuba Senior recital (No 16 7pm Fletcher
'�� talhall,free) Michael Hart saxophone.
Graduate Recital (Nov lt ym, Hetcher
Recital I iall, free); rtennis klophaus, trom
bone. Junior Recital (Nov 27 "pm Hetcher
Re. � Hall fre. �gma lpha Iota and
PhiMu Alpha stn , M isicale Nov
�: rr Hetcher Kevital I Iall, tret I
presen ts
Wednesday Nov. 15th
" Biggest Beer Gut11 Contest
1st prize-$100.
2nd prize -$50.
3rd prize - $25.
$1.00 Kamikazes
$1.00 Tall Boys
S2.50 Pitchers
$50.00 To Fraternity with most members
Doors open at 9:00
To enter call or come by Bogies
752-4668
She Swiss Colony
Open House Nov. 18th
featuring:
Free Mailings!
10 off Petifors& Torts!
$3.00 off 31b Beefrolls!
Cheeseballs 2 for $6.00!
Tray orders 10 off
Carolina East Mall
756-5650
provocative, zany celebration of saffer
MISSISSIPPI
BURNING
Wed Nov 15,1989
Tuesday
November 14th
Hendrix Theatre
Starring
Suzi
Landolphi
Sponsored by:
Student Union
Forum Committee
I!
h

UNKNOWN
AFRICA
(Travel - Adventure Film)
Theme Dinner at 6:30pm
Hot. Sexy and Safer, Inc. is Dedicated to AIDS
and Safer Sex education and aw eness.





V
ANNOUNCEMENTS
General College students should contact
their advisers the week of Nov. 6-10 to
make arrangements for academic advising
for spring semester, 1990 Earlv registra-
tion will begin Nov. 13 - 17.
BEGINNING WEIGHI
TRAIN LNCT
As j part ol im R� Sen ices tall fitness se-
ries, a beginning weight training discus-
sion will be held Tuesday, Nov. 14 from 12
1 pni in Memorial Gym. lav Omar , ECU
strength and conditioning coach will dis
cuss proper lilting techniques to help pre-
vent injuries and get the most out of your
workout Please register bvMondav, Nov.
1"�in 204 Memorial Gym AU faculty, staff,
and students welcome
RUN FOR A TURKEY
A : mile Turkey trot will be held Nov. Nat
4pm at Bunting Track KesterNov 13 at
opmm Bio 103 Winners in men's, women's
and co re team divisions will receive
Thanks � mg ! urkeys and Pumpkin Pies
sponsored K E U lining Sorvicvs For
additional info .all Mary at 757-h.W or
stopb) 207 Memorial Gym. Event spon
s)red K Intramural- Rev Services.
CHALLtNCEWEEK
� v hance to redeem you or vour
�� in flag football, tennis, racquet-
tx �� ; �� - ccer, badminton, beach
vi Deyball and i list goes on and on
Intran aa participants can challenge the
dual ot ther choice during
week t o 13 17 1m - Kiv services
provides equipment, facility and officials
a; provide the spirit ot revenge For
additional into call 757 rv87 or stop by 104
Memorial t o m.
EXERCISE AMI NUTRITION
Tracv M.irton a Greenville spa fitness in-
structor will d;sv uss nutritional incentives
and it getting the most trom your
workout Tue vn2s trom 12 - pm in
Mem ill. p. session in Im-RecServ
! ' � ssenes welcomes all faculty,
J students to attend Please rcgis
ter.Mon . 27 For more info, call 757
8vs7
CANCUN FOR SPRING
BREAKS "
Last available apartment Sheraton
oceanfront 5 stllr luxury apartment.
days and 7 nights (March 4-11). Sleeps 10
comfortably S200 per person. 3 full baths
lacuzzi Completely furnished kitchen with
microwav e Contact 35S 6500.
ANIMAL RIGHTS
ECl Students for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals nil have a meeting on Tuesday,
No 14 at 5pm in Flanagan 201 wewillbe
planning for our upcoming fur demon-
stration All members and interested indi-
viduals are strongly urged to attend
ECU STUDENTS
T.iMi real road trip' spend an ex citing se-
mester or year at one t over 87 colleges
and univi rsities in the US and earn credit
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6
towards graduation, while paying ECU
tuition. It's not too early to begin gearing
up for next fall! Don't miss this rare oppor-
tunity to challenge your skills in a new
college setting for more information con-
tact Stephanie Evancho in GCB1002 or call
757-6769.
PHI UPSILON OMICRQN
Phi Upsilon Omicron Home Economic
1 lonorary Society will havea fall initiation
of new members Dec. 4 Must have 3,0
CPA, completed 40 hrs, HE. major We
want you! Contact Dr. Brohannon or Br.
Farrior, 1 lome Economices Department or
call 355-7408 for more information.
QYEMSrjEVELCjPMENI
MEETING
ODN is having a special meeting on Nov.
1 hat 530pm in CCH 1025. This meeting is
to decide on the project we must adopt and
to plan for our fundraising dinner. Please
attend it you are a member of our group
and please feel free to attend it you aie
interested in helping those in third world
countries.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
There will be a special Amnesty meeting
Wed Nov 15 at 8pm in St. Paul's Episco
pal; church located on 4th St This meeting
will be to discuss our special event for
Human Rights Week. This event will
concern the situation over in China. We
urge all old members to attend and invite
anv other interested individuals.
FMA
The Financial Management Asso. will
meet Wed Nov. 14 at 330pm in rm. 3009
GCB, Agenda items include making plans
for our Held trip. The wine and cheese
social for the last meeting and the fund
raiser
liXDERGRADLLATE ECO-
NOMICS SOCIETY
The L'ES will have a meeting at 7pm Tue
Nov 14inMendenhallRm.221. Come and
see what were all about Everyone is wel-
come'
THANKSGIVING DINNER
A simple Thanksgiving dinner and wor-
ship service sponsored lointly be the ECU
campus ministries will be observed to-
night at 5 15pm at the Baptist student
Union 10th St. next to Wendy s). An otter-
ing will be collected for the poor of Green-
ville.
INTER - CHRISTIAN COI TV-
C1L
The Inter - Christian council will meet
today shortly after the Thanksgiving din
ner at the Baptist Student Union.
IMPROVING STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your stud y skills
for greater success in college. The follow-
ing mini course and workshops can help
you prepare for the added workload of
coUegeorhelp to increase your grade point
average All sessions will be held in 313
Wright building. Mon. - Tue, Nov. 27 -28,
Test taking from 3- 4:30pm.
P.E. MAJORS CI Up
There will be a meeting on Thurs. Nov. 16
at 8pm in Minges Col. rm. 143. All majors
and intended majors are welcome, don't
forget!
EARLY CHILDHOOn CI jn
Come one! come all! The Early Childhood
Qub Meeting will be held in Speight, 308
at 4pm on Nov. 15, 1989. Flannel Boards
will be available, so bring vour money.
Book Club order torms will also be distrib-
uted don't forget Candy money! Hope to
see you there
NATIQNAJLZJNTERNA-
ILQNAL STUDENT EX-
CHANGE
ECU students! It'sanewconcept! Interna-
tional study programs through the Na-
tional Student Exchange. Choose tospend
a challenging semester or year at one of 87
colleges and universities in the U.S. or
gear up for studies in over 34 countries in
the world through one of the NSE sites, for
more information contact Stephanie Evan-
cho in GCB 1002 or call 757-6769.
NATLYE AMERICAN RITU-
�L5
workshop with Eustace Cohwav. Sunday,
Nov. 19, 1 - 5 pm at nver Park North,
Greenville. Cost of $21. eustace, a gradu-
ate in anthropology from Appalach St.
Univ has traveled all over the continent
and has lived extensively with Indians in
Mex Alaska, An , and N.C. As well as
having been a naturalist for N.C. State
Parks, he has kayaked lOOOmi along
Alaska, hiked the entire Appalach. Trail,
and served as leader of a Miss, nver canoe
expedition from St. Louis to New Orleans.
tor more information, call 756 - 0449.
ECJJGOSfEJLCHOJR
The ECU Gospel Choir will sponsor a
Variety Show featunng comedy, musicand
drama on Nov. 28. Along with the show,
a rattle will be held to win pnes. All inter-
ested parties who would like to participate
,pleasecontactamemberofthechoir. The
show will be held in rm. 244 in Mendenhall
student center, pnee is $1.
ECLISCHQOL OF MUSIC
EyTNTiNQvaiii?
Instrumental Chamber Music, student
recital (Nov. 15,7pm, fletcher Recital Hall,
free); Percussionists Doug Walker and
Scotty Sells, Senior recital (Nov.15, 9pm,
Fletcher Rental Hall, free); Final Round of
Concerto Competition (Nov. 16, 3pm,
Fletcher Recital Hall, free); Bill Mitchell,
tuba. Senior recital (Nov. 16,7pm, Fletcher
Recital hall, free), Michael 1 lart,saxophone,
Graduate Recital (Nov. 16, 9pm, Fletcher
Recital 1 lall, free); DennisKlophaus, trom-
bone. Junior Recital (Nov. 27,7pm, Fletcher
Rental Hall, free); sigma Alpha Iota and
Phi Mu Alpha Christmas Musicale (Nov.
27, 9pm, Fletcher Recital I lall, free).
Tuesday
November 14th
Hendrix Theatre
Starring
Sim
Landolphi
Sponsored by:
Student Union
Forum Committee
presents
Wednesday Nov. 15th
" Biggest Beer Gut" Contest
lstprize-$100.
2nd prize -$50.
3rd prize - $25.
$1.00 Kamikazes
$1.00 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$50.00 To Fraternity with most members
Doors open at 9:00 f
To enter call or come by Bogies
752-4668
750
Draft!
9he Swiss Colony
Open House Nov. 18th
featuring:
Free Mailings!
10 off Petifors& Torts!
$3.00 off 31b Beefrolls!
Cheeseballs 2 for $6.00!
Tray orders 10 off
Carolina East Mall
756-5650
JNION �
STUDENT UNION
MISSISSIPPI
BURNING
Wed Nov 15,1989
UNKNOWN
AFRICA
(Travel - Adventure Film)
Theme Dinner at 6:30pm
All Movies Screen 8pm, Hendrix Theatre
Hot, Sexy and Safer, Inc. is Dedicated to AIDS
and Safer Sex education and awareness.
Suzi
Landolphi
3x91 iSepy and i$fei
TM
A provocative, zany celebration of safer sex
Tues Nov. 14,1989 8pm
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the Student Union
Forum Committee
STUDENT UNION i
STUDFNT UNION





)

THE FAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 14,1989 H
College enrollment of blacks
increases within UNC system
CHAPEL HILL, N.C (AP)
University ot North Carolina offi-
cials say the are taking "consid
erable satisfaction" in the news
that black enrollment increased
3.3 percent at the U I N institu
tions growing taster than ttt.i 1
enrollment
"UNC has again set an exem
plarv record that we would hope
the rest of the countn, would tol
low UNC Vice President Ray
mond Dawson told the Board of
Governors on Friday- lotal en-
rollmentgrew 2 9percent,accord
ing to his report.
However. Fayetteville Mate
University Chancellor Lloyd
Hackley said he was concerned
because the graduation rate gap
between blacks and whites has
widened in recent years 1 le noted
that in 1984 tin graduation rate
among white students who en-
rolled in 1977 I �� percent.
For blacks the rate was 13.7 jxr
cent � a difference of about 11
points.
Four years latei the differ
ence had grown to about I per-
centage points. Of whites who
entered in 1981 54 2 -pen rut had
graduated b) l"ss Onl) 36.8
percent of blacks had graduated.
"We were doing a better job a
tew years ago at getting black
students and graduating them
1 lacklev told board members.
Dawson said blackenrollment
reached a record 25,660 students,
while the total enrollment of
141,317 was also a record.
Most of the growth in black
enrollment (4.2 percent) came on
the five traditionally black cam-
puses N.C. A&f State, Win-
ston-Salem State, Elizabeth City
State, Fayetteville State and N.C.
Central, but Dawson said the tra-
ditionally white campuses also
recorded increases (1.8 percent).
On traditionally white campuses,
however, the percentage of blacks
stood at 8.25 percent.
As part oi the resolution of a
federal desegregation lawsuit filed
against the university system
UNC officials pleaded to work
harder to more completely inte-
grate the h universities and im-
prove the historically black cam-
puses. White enrollment on the
traditionally black campuses con-
tinued, to rise, totaling a record
3348 students, or 17.29 percent of
those enrolled on those campuses.
For the system as a whole,
blacks make up 18.16 percent of
those enrolled, a slight increase
from 1988.
"The rise in black enrollment
is good news for all North Caro-
linians UNC President CD.
Spangler said. "1 am heartened
that our efforts to encourage them
to continue their education is
paying off Spangler said he
expects campus officials to im-
prove their racial diversity in the
future.
The enrollment report also
showed that the SAT scores of
entering freshmen increased
slightly � from 998 in 1988 to 1001
this fall. The best possible score on
the standardized exam is 16(X). The
highest scores were posted by
freshmen at UNC-CH, where the
typical in-state student scored
1(H0, and the typical out-of-state
student scored 1202.
Addressing other enrollment
data, Dawson said the system's
growth in students came entirely
from North Carolina residents,
noting that out-of-state enrollment
declined slightly this fall.
Educators ask Congress for reforms in
college science education programs
WASHINGTON (AD With
the supply of scientists and engi-
neers quickh dwindling, state
college officials are urging Con-
gress to double the St ien e ediK a
tion budget with halt the new
monev to be used to upgrade
undergraduate science instruc-
tion.
"America will be a second
rate nation, wai rtedl loi id i A& V
University president I red rick A
Humphries, pointing to predic-
tions that there will be a shortage
of 700,000scien cn. technology
professionals by 2000. Science
education, he sa s is inrisis
"We have to start channeling
more of our resources into pro
grams improving undergraduate
science education and offer more
support to college instructors
committed to teachii !nce to
college and universii lents
said Allan Ostai pi lent of the
American Association of State
Colleges and Unb i rsities
Humphries, chairn an of the
association'scon i n science
and technology, a I other c m
mittee members liscusscd a) a
briefing last w i n the results of a
report to b released at the
association's annual meeting in
San Franc isco later this week
The report, partly funded by
the National Science Foundation,
predicted that channeling funds
to undergraduate science educa-
tion has the "potential to be the
catalyst tor reforming the total
science education pipeline of the
nation
'We must raise the quality oi
science education at every level,
expand participation in science by
all students and encourage more
students to choose careers in engi-
neering, science and science teach-
ing and to do all that we need
more money Ostar said.
The report, "Formula for Re-
form: The Role of the Comprehen-
sive University in Undergraduate
Science and Engineering Educa-
tion offered three recommenda-
tions:
-Double the National Science
Fou nda tion budget within the next
!iveyears,bringihgit to about $3.6
billion. � ?
�Divide all new appropria-
tions tor the foundation equally
between science and engineering
education and research and re-
lated activities.
Developa broad geographi-
cal base for the nation's research
and science education activities.
The report noted that Presi-
dent Bush has proposed that the
budget for the National Science
Foundation be doubled and, while
enabling legislation has been
passed by Congress and signed
into law, the actual appropriations
have not been approved. The
universities pleaded to work for
the monev.
Scientific research and science
education are mutually suppor-
tive and dependent on each other,
the report said. Since the founda-
tion was established, the report
noted, the distribution of monev
between the two obligations has
varied widely.
The association said its more
than 375 public colleges and uni-
versities nation wide produce one-
third of the nation's baccalaureate
degrees. Yet, as a group these in-
stitutions receive only 1 percent of
the research funding.
"The current practice of limit-
ing research support to a few uni-
versities underutiliz.es the nation's
scientific talent and does not as-
sist effectively in the crucial need
to integrate research with science
instruction the report said.
Can you take
piotureS?
card
xax
BOS
tori
ECUs photo iab
I
i
is looking for
reliable photographers
to take shots
for use in a variety
of campus media.
Contact J.D. Whiimire
or Yvonne Moye
at the Media Board
757-6009.
Pure Gold Dancer Tryouts!
There are three J.V. positions open!
Tryout will be held November 16th at
7:00 in the Strength Complex on 14th
Street. For information call 757-4533
r

0$
Sharky's
of Greenville
Daily Specials
Monday - $2.25
Margarita's
Tuesday - $1.75 Bourbon
Wednesday - $2.00 Kamikaze
Thursday - $1.25 Imports &
LADIES NITE Coolers
free admission selection of twelve
Friday - $1.75 Highballs
Saturday $1.75 Highballs
$1.75 Fireballs
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 year old guests.
Located by Sports Pad on 5th Street
ENTER THROUGH ALLEY
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to be readily available foi sale in each � I �cept a
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FRESH MADE DAILY
Glazed
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22 oz. Dozen
DONUTS AVAILABLE 7am DAILY





1 HI t SIAROI IM W
Features
NOVEMBER 14, . � I
Zeppelin drummer's son
continues family legacy
hegroup
� . , , .
md
�� m theii recenth
I he 1 'isregard ol
� i k ing the rowd s
� A-hen
i ing lassii ed
ines Ro k n Roll'
1 o e were
iioN proximit with
�i inalh bv
elli i i ed feature
i - lason Bonham's
highlighted
his di umstn ks
. a ith his hands
: � wasmit, the
'
1 he so ond encore tea
band's manager w ho
ned A DC, pla ing bass
eft the stage again
� � . I lowing this and
' turned, at
� i heavy Brit
influ-
I thi
1. i Hi IXHAV1 on page 10
R.E.Ms live performance
can't beat the recording
By JEFF PARKER
Stall Knt�r
Daniel Mac Master, lead singer for the band "Bonham performed
tor a tuli crowd in the Attic Thursday night. The band featured
drummer Jason Bonham, son of the legendary John Bonham of Led
Zeppelin. (Photo bv Terri A very � ECU Photolab.)
VIiINs classic rock
Stegmonds cater to students
Yawn. Oh, excuse me, I was
jusl musing about the R l; M
icertl ridav night in tin,rn ns
boro Coliseum Let me splash
some cold water on my face and
I'll try to say more about it
The concert didn't start on a
goodnoteb Pylon opened
up for the band I hat s enough
about them.
1 lowever, it at least wasn't a
long wait for Berry, Buck, Mills
and Stipe, and they launched into
the d a-pearl swinging song,
'S1 AM it is good thai thev
mostly did music from REEN, or
the audience (almost all of whom
were brought to the show bv their
parents) wouldn't have known
wh.it was going on.
It it sounds like dus re iew is
heading somewhere downhill, let
me clear up one thing - there was
nothing wrong with the music at
all. R.E.M. is about as polished an
actasyoucanget,sounding)ustas
good or better live as thev do
reproduced. But unless you're ust
a die-hard worshipper of theirs,
you do not need to pay $18.30 to
see them.
This is due to their lack of
showmanship, or specifically,
Mu hael Stipe s la k of it. 1 he
may try to o impen ate f r it bv
using a big j T iei tii m s reen with
interesting images on it but noth
ing is a n a live
t.hedid
come alive and tart mo ing
around a few time? pecially i in
et I p w hu h he pn � laimed as
his favonte song it would have
been nice if I
up a bit b lettin) � � ultra tal-
ented Mike ' '
lightsome,be ,von't
happen anv time n the
and "Superman" in.e. i
sung again until si � i
i overs it
1 he n ppened was
that Stipe did a ti � - like
singing throuj
(f is wailing od as
usual, and hi
ultimati i
At times the go 1 num-
fcx rs ouid poj � nfuse the
young audii c as Begin
the 14. iOUl
and "Hank i t '� n � ri( a
1 icept for those tunes, (ireen-
peaci got mon i I � than the
classic s, ngs th it I elpod R E M
build its name. It is a j - ' thing
th.it music 1
while tans, s at their erts be
See R ! 1 in page in
�� I viid
are still p I
� : � � � - bat k into
ms to
� � -� , t the
nel
t Ol Its
nvi � � hu h the
e place to j . -
ft � �
K
sv mpathi a .th !
currentissueol
Beeause�
� impSOd
�.
�'1.
ionis
�1is
: '� N �:
performance at Greenville's Rio,
but thev will misstheopportunitv
ti i plav .it outdoor e ents.
The Stegmonds have clear
goals tor the future. "We would
like to plav seme new tunes and
originals said Cooper. Thev
w ould also like to plav places out-
side ! ireenville such as Raleigh
and hapel Hill f"he band enjovs
travel and wants to be more in
the public ev -
We re a better than average
band said Earnhardt, and a re-
freshing change trom the progres-
sive bands college towns seem to
� etting these davs rhevwillbe

dav, November lb and at Dreams
in Raleigh on November"he
Stegmonds are definitely worth
seeing
I he Stegmonds, a band consisting almost entirely of LCL' students, has plaved in a number of
concerts for Greenville residents. The band's music consists of cover tunes with .m emphas
classic rock -n-roll. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire � ECU Photolab.)
ECU Gospel choir earns
recognition for hard work
M
Lexicon
ushroomiii"
te
Babylon, a band trom Oakland, (A, plavs hard driving heavy metal with a finesse most bands miss.
Band members are Rob Reid, bassist, Ron Freschi and Danny Delarosa, guitarists, Jamey Pacheco,
drums and Derek, lead vocalist.
Metal band rocks with finesse
Bv CHIP SWARTZ
-� VNntrr
(
.1.1! -
omplied by Matt Ri liter
rtl ol Los Angeles and
th Ba fn im San 1 ram is o
� laklandut glitzed
� � � � . its neighbors
. best known
� . t sui essful sporting
t the least of n hie h
i - md s w ho trouni ed
� the V i I
I ol 'his is that a vi-
� titivc must, al
�. ften getso erlooked
md that has suci eeded in
�!hs disadvantage is
A D I five man land . t
ipstarts whoaddress
nol prettv' realities of life
� � . ity
ip ti i ther in the
t i al land s I ast Ba .
t R b Reid, guitarists Ron
1 res, hi and 1 anny 1 elarosa,
drummer lamev I'a he o.and lead
vik .ihst I Vrek turned their backs
on the prevalent "shopping mall
mentality" av. invested their time
,wA i nergy into the positive force
of hard rock'n roll. The end result
was white hot. and Babylon A.D.
ultimately inked a deal with Arista
Records, making them the tirst
hard ro. k a t to ever sign with the
label.
Babylon A i . s sell titled
debut is a ten-song of feting that s
hock full of the stuff that has
brought fame and fortune to
groups like Dokken, Tesla, and
White Lion. It's one of those rare
mi ords w here anv and every song
is a potential single.
I he lead track, "Bang (.o the
Bells, coupled with their first
single. 1 lammer Sw ings 1 town
serves as a good introduction to
the band Both songs are heavy
but melodic, with a power guitar
stv le reminiscent of the Scorpions.
"Sally Danced" isan instantly
memorable tr.n k that gives celeb-
rity status to an erotu B movie
actress of old. The song is high
lighted bv s� uneexceptional .n i ius-
ticguitarlines that helpdistanee 11
trom the straight-ahead roc kerson
theLP
Back In Babylon" points a
linger at the Big (but decaying)
Apple, New York City. Angry and
accusing, it sparks interest in the
Hast Coast rock mecca.
Babylon A D. even gets some
help from headbangin'comic Sam
Kinison, who graciously belts out
,i v. uple lint ol tour letter gunk
towards Mil end i i he Kid Goes
Wild
eah, I'd viv these guvs have
all the bases covered. Thev can
plav, thev can write, and anv one
of the five members is a prime
, andidate tor replacing Kip Win-
ger as next year's pre teen heart-
throb
1 should warn you though,
there's not much originality float-
ing around this disc From the
candy-coated choruses to the
obligator) ballad "Desperateit's
all been done a million times be
tore. Babylon A D. just does it so
well and withsu hconviction that
vou find vourself pressing the
plav button i ; j time you turn
around.
Pans of the heavier metal-sect
won't be impressed in the least
and shouldn't waste their money.
I lowever, it vou prefer your metal
with a little finesse and a whole lot
ot attitude, div boyz are for vou.
By JAMES THOMPSON
Sp�cul to The fci Carolinian
The East Carolina University
Gospel Choir proved why thev
are recognized as one of the finest
college choirs in North Carolina
on Sunday afternoon. The choir
performed the 1989edition of their
annual fall concert in Hendnx
Theatre.
Dressed in black and white
and marching a two-step, thechoir
filed into Hendnx Theatre pre-
pared to give the audience what it
expected: a good time filled with
singing and music.
Parents, students and faculty
joined in as the choir ot about V
members thrilled the audience
with inspiring and uplifting songs
that brought smiles to some faces
and tears to others.
Performing such popular
gospel tunes as "(It Will Be) Al-
right "Magnify Him "What
Shall 1 Do "KeepThe Faith" and
a rapidly rising fast paced compo-
sition, "Ezekiel Saw The Wheel
the choir's 1989 edition worked
hard to maintain its gixxi reputa-
tion.
i Iregorv. I lorton, direc tor
thechoir, said after thencerl
thought (the- concert went well.
The crowd was receptive and i
think that people were much
happier when the It ft than when
thev came. '
Terrell Wor n irtmajor
at ECU, said, "It was uplifting and
encouraging V w Iknowevery-
Uungwillb alright KarenSand-
ers the sister olne choir mem-
ber, said, "They all sang reallv
well and the sound was incred-
ible Alto section leader Patricia
A Edwards also said that the
performers did ��� and were
excited about the performance.
l'he E( I v spel C hoir open
to all students ol the university,
has been doing a lot to keep Hselt
going as the largest student or-
ganization on campus W ith fund
raisers and other activities on
going the choir will record its
sec ond album in : i and be
gin a performing tour in March
I he choir w ill a Is, perform a vari-
ety show aft r - . v ing to
show ofl the talent ot choir mem
hers and others who want to par-
See CHOIR page 12
Barbecue restaraunt serves
guests regional favorites
By NORA HEADLEY
v;ft'i. �� The t At Carolinian
Tired oi the same old burger
and tries slung a ross the counter
ol your favorite fast tocvl haunt"
Drive right on bv those unimagi-
native burger barns and head
down Rt. 43 south to B's Barbecue.
B's offers genuine Carolina
pork barbecue at itsfinest. B's may
seem only a hole in the wall at first
glance, but step inside he rustic
atmosphere and Carolina-stvle
cuisine are sure to tv charm B s
patrons
Four booths and thirteen
tables adorn the paneled interior
ol B's Ihis is the pitome of a
down homo restaurant In hom-
age to the producer ol barbecue
there are pigs e en. w here There
are pig postcards, ceramic pigs
pig aprons and even a I logs Are
See BARBECUE on page 10





THh EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
NOVEMBER 14,1989
Zeppelin drummer's son
continues family legacy
ByTLRRI AVERY
V"al 0 TSr latl Carolinian
Two hours before the doors of
the Attic were scheduled to open,
people gathered around in antici-
pation for the Bonham concert.
Most of those waiting to see
the show knew little about the
band except that the drummer,
ason Bonham, is the son of late
ohn Bonham, the drummer tor
the legendary rock group Led
Zeppelin By the end o, the show,
he band had proved tothecrowd
that they could play quality heavy
metal music
Other members of the band
include Daniel Macmaster, the
oodTooking vocalist, Ian Hatton
n guitar, and )ohn Smithson, the
ersatile musician who played the
lin, keyboards, and bass gui-
tar
dee-jay from . 103 intro-
lu ii thcopeninga t, a band from
Minneapolis called The Front.
� energetic lead singer kept
� � crowd's attention tor a short
. . m d performance.
Bonham came on stage and
in by performing their cur-
renthit, "Wait for You The group
then went on to play other songs
such as Bringing Me Down and
"Dreams from their recently
released CD, "The Disregard of
Timekeeping
Already rocking, the crowd's
noise rose a decibal higher when
Bonham began playing classic Led
Zeppelin tunes. "Rock-n-Roll"
and "Whole l.otta Love" were
played in close proximity with
"Come Together originally bv
the Beatles.
Another well received feature
ol the show was Jason Bonham's
drum solo which he highlighted
by dropping his drumsticks and
playing only with his hands.
Before the night was over, the
band returned to the stage for three
encores. The second encore fea-
tured the band's manager, who
also signed AC DC, playing bass.
The band left the stage again
immediately following this and
only Jason Bonham returned, at
first, Kir the third encore.
Jason spoke with a heavy Brit-
ish accent about his father's influ-
ence on him and told the crowd
See BONHAM on page 10
R.E.Ms live performance
can't beat the recording
By JEFF PARKER
Staff Wri��r
Daniel MacMaster, lead singer for the band "Bonham performed
for a full crowd in the Attic Thursday night The band featured
drummer Jason Bonham, son of the legendary John Bonham of Led
Zeppelin. (Photo by Terri Avery � ECU Photolab.)
Local band plays classic rock
Stegmonds cater to students
Yawn. Oh, excuse me, I was
just musing about the R.E.M.
concert Friday night in theGreens-
boro Coliseum. Let me splash
some cold water on my face and
I'll try to say more about it.
The concert didn't start on a
good note because Pylon opened
up for the band. That's enough
about them.
However, it at least wasn't a
long wait for Berry, Buck, Mills
and Stipe, and they launched into
the add-a-pearl swinging song,
"STAND It was good that they
mostly did music from GREEN, or
the audience (almost all of whom
were brought to the show by their
parents) wouldn't have known
what was going on.
If it sounds like this review is
heading somewhere downhill, let
me clear up one thing� there was
nothing wrong with the music at
all. R.E.M. is about as polished an
act as you can get, sound ing just as
good or better live as they do
reproduced. But unless you're just
a die-hard worshipper of theirs,
you do not need to pay $18.50 to
see them.
This is due to their lack of
showmanship, or specifically,
Michael Stipe's lack of it. They
may try to compensate for it by
using a big projection screen with
interesting images on it, but noth-
ing is a substitute for an active
front man. To Stipe's credit, he did
come alive and start moving
around a few times, especially on
"Get Up which he proclaimed as
his favorite song. It would have
been nice if they had broken things
up a bit by letting the ultra-tal-
ented Mike Mills take the spot-
light some, but that probably won't
happen anytime in this century,
and "Superman" may never get
sung again until someone else
covers it.
The most that happened was
that Stipe did a few gimmicks like
singing through his megaphone.
His wailing voice was as good as
usual, and he still would make the
ultimate Country singer.
At times the good old num-
bers would pop up to confuse the
young audience, such as "Begin
the Begin "South Central Train
and "Bank of America
Except for those tunes, Green-
peace got more notice than the
classic songs that helped R.E.M.
build its name. It is a good thing
that musicians promote worth-
while causes at their concerts be-
See R.E.M. on page 10
Jy MICHLLLE WALLACE
�j" Writri
We're kind of like the Os-
m nds, but louder than 70 deci-
said Peter Frederick, gui-
instof theStegmonds a Raleigh-
ased band. He was joking of
ourse. rhe 'stegmonds are noth-
ng like Donnie and his brothers.
The Stegmonds .ire a self-
rofcsscd . id time band The
� ����-��- i ir.e mov four of
3m in ECl "Undents, whoplay
issic ro�.k. "We love the Rolling
� nes stressed bassist Sam
Earnhardt. "We give the people
� they want, not a cheap imita-
added Martin Sledge, the
d s load singer.
Tie Stegmonds was formed
winterof'87.0riginally they
,i couple of guys "just mess-
ng around recalled 1 hernias
n per, guitarist and keyboard
for the group.
"We just liked to get together
jam he explained. Evcntu-
thev were dubbed the
I . monds by a friend, and the
band was born.
A hen their first bassist left for
California, they broke up. They
soon regrouped with Earnhardt
n bass guitar However, the band
had not evolved into it's present
form. A month ago. Sledge joined
the group as the new ocalist. The
Stegmonds are now a positive.
infident band with a bright out-
look on the future.
We're doing really goodsaid
Earnhardt. The guvs are still put-
ting all of their profits back into
the group, but no one seems to
mind. All of the members of the
Stegmonds appear to genuinely
love what thev are doing.
The band plays most of it's
gigs in Greenville, which they say
is their favorite place to play. "We
really appreciate Greenville and
the students here said Freder-
ick.
Thev sympathize with ECU
students and the current issue of
the noise ordinance. Because of
the 70 decibel limit imposed bv
the Greenville City Council, the
Stegmonds will not be able to plav
outdoor parties anymore. This is
definitely a loss to the Stegmonds.
Thev enjoyed their Halloween
performance at Greenville's Rio,
but thev will miss theopporrunity
to play at outdoor events.
The Stegmonds have clear
goals for the future. "We would
like to play some new tunes and
originals said Cooper. They
would also like to play places out-
side Greenville such as Raleigh
and Chapel Hill. The band enjoys
travel and wants to be "more in
the public eye
"We're a better than average
band said Earnhardt, and a re-
freshing change from the progres-
sive bands college towns seem to
begetting these days. They will be
playing at the New Deli Thurs-
day, November 16 and at Dreams
in Raleigh on November 25. The
Stegmonds are definitely worth
seeing.
BBBHHR&�BBHST1A '1
fcv�.m
�KLi s . .5
tfittS.11
t 0
The Stegmonds, a band consisting almost entirely of ECU students, has played in a number of
concerts for Greenville residents. The band's music consists of cover tunes with an emphasis on
classic rock -n-roll. (Photo by J.D. Whitmixe � ECU Photolab.)
Lexicon
Mushrooming
Answers will be printed in
Thursday's paper.
I. Expiate: A. leave hastily; B.
rub off; C. apologize; D. to
explain
2. Jejune A. lacking interest; B
iungboy;C youngboy;D.
sickly
13. Pervade: A. spread through-
out; B. to intrude; C. convince;
D. wander around
4 August: A. hot; B. wise; C.
dignified: D. sad
5. Indigenous: A. plant like; B.
surrounded bv water; C desti-
tute; D. native
6, Repast: A. meal; B. fond
memories; C peacefulness, P.
pass time sleeping
7. Fruition: A. fulfillment; B.
frustration; C collection; D.
citrus fruit
8. Fealty. A. pnvilage; B.
nationalism; C. loyalty; D.
unfaithfulness
9. Ccrvlean: A. sky blue; B.
multicolored; C clear; D.
peaceful
10 Astral: A. superiority; B.
lazy person; C. frail-lankey; D.
starlike
� Complied by Matt Richter
ECU Gospel choir earns
recognition for hard work
Babylon, a band from Oakland, CA, plays hard driving heavy metal with a finesse most bands miss.
Band members are Rob Reid, bassist, Ron Freschi and Danny Delarosa, guitarists, Jamey Pacheco,
drums and Derek, lead vocalist.
Metal band rocks with finesse
BvCHIPSWARTZ
Slaff Writer
North of Los Angeles and
across the Bay from San Francisco
is the city of Oakland. Out glitzed
and glamorized by its neighbors,
Oakland is probably best known
for its string of successful sporting
franchises (not the least of which
are the Oakland A's, who trounced
San Francisco in the '89 World
Series).
A result of this is that a vi-
brant and competitive musical
community often gets overlooked.
One band that has succeeded in
overcoming this disadvantage is
Babylon A.D a five-man band of
hard rockin' upstarts whoaddress
the "not so pretty" realities of life
in the big city.
Growing up together in the
suburbs of Oakland's East Bay,
bassist Rob Reid, guitarists Ron
Freschi and Danny Delarosa,
drummer Jamey Pacheco, and lead
vocalist Derek turned their backs
on the prevalent "shopping mall
mentality" and invested their time
and energy into the positive force
of hard rock'n roll. The end result
was white hot, and Babylon A.D.
ultimately inked a deal with Arista
Records, making them the first
hard rock act to ever sign with the
label.
Babylon A.Ds self-titled
debut is a ten-song offering that's
chock full of the stuff that has
brought fame and fortune to
groups like Dokken, Tesla, and
White Lion. It's one of those rare
records where any and every song
is a potential single.
The lead track, "Bang Go the
Bells coupled with their first
single, "Hammer Swings Down
serves as a good introduction to
the band. Both songs are heavy
but melodic, with a power guitar
style reminiscent of the Scorpions.
"Sally Danced" is an instantly
memorable track that gives celeb-
rity status to an erotic B-movie
actress of old. The song is high-
lighted by some exceptional acous-
tic guitar lines that help distance it
from the straight-ahead-rockerson
theLP.
"Back In Babylon" points a
finger at the Big (but decaying)
Apple, New York City. Angry and
accusing, it sparks interest in the
East Coast rock mecca.
Babylon A.D. even gets some
help from headbangin' comic Sam
Kinison, who graciously belts out
a couple lines of four-letter gunk
towards the end of "The Kid Goes
Wild
Yeah, I'd say these guys have
all the bases covered. They can
play, they can write, and any one
of the five members is a prime
candidate for replacing Kip Win-
ger as next year's pre-teen heart-
throb.
I should warn you though,
there's not much originality float-
ing around this disc. From the
candy-coated choruses to the
obligatory ballad "Desperate it's
all been done a million times be-
fore. Babylon A.D. just does it so
well and with such conviction that
you find yourself pressing the
play button every time you turn
around.
Fans of the heavier metal-sect
won't be impressed in the least
and shouldn't waste their money.
However, if you prefer your metal
with a little finesse and a whole lot
of attitude, deez boyz are for you.
By JAMES THOMPSON
Special IB Ttw Eaai Carolinian
The East Carolina University
Gospel Choir proved why they
are recognized as one of the finest
college choirs in North Carolina
on Sunday afternoon. The choir
performed the 1989 edition of their
annual fall concert in Hendrix
Theatre.
Dressed in black and white
and marching a two-step, the choir
filed into Hendrix Theatre pre-
pared to give the audience what it
expected: a good time filled with
singing and music.
Parents, students and faculty
joined in as the choir of about 70
members thrilled the audience
with inspiring and uplifting songs
that brought smiles to some faces
and tears to others.
Performing such popular
gospel tunes as "(It Will Be) Al-
right "Magnify Him "What
Shall I Do "Keep The Faith" and
a rapidly rising fast paced compo-
sition, "Ezekiel Saw The Wheel
the choir's 1989 edition worked
hard to maintain its good reputa-
tion.
Gregory Horton, director of
the choir, said after the concert I
thought (the concert) went well.
The crowd was receptive and 1
think that people were much
happier when they left than when
they came
Terrell Wort hem, an art major
at ECU, said, "It was uplifting and
encouraging. Now I know every-
thing will be alright Karen Sand-
ers, the sister of one choir mem-
ber, said, "They all sang really
well and the sound was incred-
ible Alto section leader Patricia
A. Edwards also said that the
performers did well and were
excited about the performance.
The ECU Gospel Choir, open
to all students of the university,
has been doing a lot to keep itself
going as the largest student or-
ganization on campus. With fund
raisers and other activities on-
going the choir will record its
second album in February and be-
gin a performing tour in March.
The choir will also perform a vari-
ety show after Thanksgiving to
show off the talent of choir mem-
bers and others who want to par-
See CHOIR page 12
Barbecue restaraunt serves
guests regional favorites
By NORA HEADLEY
Special to The East Carolinian
Tired of the same old burger
and fries slung across the counter
of your favorite fast food haunt?
Drive right on by those unimagi-
native burger barns and head
down Rt. 43 south to B's Barbecue.
B's offers genuine Carolina
pork barbecue at its finest. B's may
seem only a hole in the wall at first
glance, but step inside. The rustic
atmosphere and Carolina-style
cuisine are sure to be charm B's
patrons.
Four booths and thirteen
tables adorn the paneled interior
of B's. This is the epitome of a
down home restaurant. In hom-
age to the producer of barbecue
there are pigs everywhere. There
are pig postcards, ceramic pigs,
pig aprons and even a 'Hogs Are
See BARBECUE on page 10






!�THH -AST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14. 1989
TV gets attention for sex, violence
By LISA FAYL KAPLAN
(.annctt Newt srvtte
H.irrv Stem, a Now York
writer who marched against the
war in Vietnam and has always
believed in free speech, is sick-
ened by the sex and violence he
sees on television
Stein, who is shocked to hear
the words trip off his tongue. wants
someone to do something to stop
it.
"You don't want to be ac-
cused of being in conflict with the
1 irst Amendment saysStein, the
former ethics columnist tor Es-
quire magazine and a registered
Democrat
Hut, "1 think the harm being
done by some oi the stuff that is
running amok through our popu-
lar culture has to be stopped. It has
to be limited
Television's offenstveness is
prompting action from not just
the usual complainers C hris-
tian fundamentalists butpeopk?
who would never describe them-
selves as conservative.
"It isn't ust the crazies that
are concerned, savs Peggy Char-
ron, president ot Action tor
Children's Television, which seeks
to broaden the selection of
children's programming on tele-
vision. "A lot ot people who liok
at television .ire saving, I don't
like it
"I think they don't reallv
know what to do about it Char-
ren savs. "People who are First
Amendment-sensitive don't want
to say, lake it oft the air '
George Gerbner, former
dean of the Annenberg School of
Communications at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, studies sex
and violence on television, and
his resean. h shows that prime-time
television viewers can count on
See VIOLENT TV on page 11
Americans lie more than before
ByLISAFAYE KAPLAN
(�tnnett Net Scrvue
1 lonestly, we all tell lies.
At times v e tib. fabricate and
fudge. We tell white lies and halt-
truths. We he through our teeth,
like a trooper or a dog.
We've always lied.
Adam and I've tried to squirm
out oi the apple incident bv em-
ploying the-devil-mado-me-do-it
excuse Richard Nixon lost his
presidency bv hiding the truth
about the Watergate break-in.
It's impossible to know just
how much we lie. or it e fib more
todav than vesterdav.
Dr. Michael lohnston, an as-
sociate professor at Colgate
University in Hamilton, NY who
taught a course titled "Lving,
Cheating and Stealing believes
Americans are becoming more
truthful because more eves are
watching.
Bryce Christenscn disagrees.
Chnstenson, director of the
Rockford Institute Center on
Family in America, a Rockford,
111 center that studies family is-
sues and trends, suspects that
Americans are King more than
they used to.
Barbecue
"Wedding vows have become
a ho Chnstenson said, citing ris-
ing divorce rate as indications of
increasing dishonestv. "A person
who will not live up to a wedding
vow will find all kinds ot excuses
tor not living up to less solemn
vows and covenants
In 1987,a U.S. News& World
Report-CNN poll found that 54
percent of respondents believe
people are less honest than they
were 10 years ago.
When this reporterasked tour
friends to keep a record ot lies
they told in two days, the talk
ranged from one white lie told to
avoid a long explanation to five
lies designed to save a person
money. Both the white-liar and
the five-fibber said truth is a value
they hold dear.
f most of us treasure honesty,
why do we lie?
Could personal relationships
survive if nothing but the truth
were told?
Can a free society survive it
less than the truth suffices1
Lying is "fascinating said Dr.
Taul Ekman, a California psy-
chologist who has studied King
for 20 years and who recently
published the book, "Why Kids
Continued from page 9
Beautiful' poster, but it really does
not matter what B's looks like
becauseeating is the reason people
come here
B's biggest seller is the barbe-
cue sandwich. This item is served
on a hamburger bun with slaw tor
$1.30. A barbecue plate, sand vich.
side order of slaw and cornbread,
is $3.30. A barbecue dinner, sand-
wich, side of slaw, potatoes and
cornbread is$4. The barbecue can
also be purchased by the pound at
$5 and B's sped il barbecue sauce
is sold for $1.35 a bottle.
If barbecue is not your style,
B'salso featureschicken, pork ribs,
hamburgers, hotdogs and fries.
t ome hungry and thirsty because
B's has great iced tea with free
refills.
Next time you are in the mood
tor something different, stop by
B's Barbecue, get a sandwich and
sit down at one ot the tour picnic
tables around back. B's is open
from 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Tues-
day through Sunday.
R.E.M.
Continued from page 9
causes at their concerts because it
pursuades the fans to get involved
with their environment. But that
sort of thing should be extra, not
wrapped up into the show to the
point that it sounds preachy.
Once again, R.E.M. ended bv
without doing "Radio Free Eu-
rope They're very good at not
doing that song.
Wait a minute. All of this does
have a happv ending. After the
concert, many people went over
to Fuzzv Ducks where Sex Police
was plaving. Sex Police was a lot
of fun, playing some good funky
stuff. Two of the members wore
former Pressure Boys hornmen,
and thev belted out Mime lively,
Mexican-stvle rhvthms, almost
like a hip Tijuana Brass.
Sex Police are reminiscent of
The Red Hot Chili Peppers and
Roval Crescent Mob, and thev do
the best cover of "Brick House"
I've ever heard. It thev overcome
to Greenville, go see them. And
listen to R.E.M. on your stereo at
home.
Bonham
Continued from page 9
that "he taught me everything I
know
The Band then ended their
concert with Jason himself appro-
priately dedicating the last song
to his dead father, lason said that
his father was "the greatest rock
and roll drummer and began
playing the drums as the rest of
the band joined him playing their
song "Wait For You for the sec-
ond rime.
I FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
while vou wait
Froe & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The I?e Building
Greenville, NC
Etouxs
M-F 9 am - 5 pm
Read The
East
Carolinian
A
ATLANTIC
PERSONNEL SERVICES
OF GREENVILLE
� Term Papers
Typed
� Professional
Resume' Service
209 Commerce St.
Suite B
355-7931
Lie
"Once vou begin looking, vou
tind he occur in every part oi
life
A successful lie creates "an
enormous change in the power
situation with parents, said
Ekman. "Some kids get very
hooked on that
"There are many situations
where the socially approved thing
is to lie said fohnston. 'When
vou go to a friend's house and he
serves you a horrible dinner, you
don't tell him that
In some situations, people are
expe un.1 to li�v For instance, most
peopleaccept that theaskingprn e
for a house is not whal the seller
reallv expects to get. I he lie is
built-in.
"The cultural standard re-
volvers around what is at stake.
ohnstonsaid. "( onsider what life
would be1 like if we were onlv
capable of telling the unvarnished
(truth) It would Ix1 difficult to
taki
I ying is fun tor 100,(100
members ol the Burlington Liars
Club, based in Burlington, Wise
I ounded in 1929, the club solicits
tall tales and names "the world's
champion liar each Mew Year's
Eve
"Send in a lie and a dollar, and
we'll send vou a membership
card said Don Reed, vice presi-
dent of theclub. "The only people
whoarebarred 'nun membership
are politicians. They're profes-
si mal liars We're amateurs
Lving has increased sales tor
Amen, an Isuu Motors, which
employs that lving scoundrel, oe
isuu, to hav k cars.
"Sales have been great said
c harlesCoch, account supervisor
at the Delia lemma McNamee
advertising agency that created the
See LILS on pae11

Grog's Wants You In November
Thursday November 2nd- (irog's Sih Anniversary
Party
Come Help Celebrate Grog's Xih Birthday with those Spct ials
$2.08 Grog's $1.08 Bottle Beer
XHe Grog's Thermo 88J Wine Coolers
Mugs 8f Memberships
Thursday November 9th-1 hunks for Voting I s
"Greenville's Best Ail-Around Bar"
$1.00 Highballs
$5.00T-Shirts
$2.00 Ice Teas
75Z Bottle Beei
Thursday November 16th- Grog's 5th
Annual Mug Slide
Come see it Mike from Chico's will retain his Champn
it a new upstart from your favorite bar will claim tl
$1.25 Highballs 7.V Highballs
$1.50 Grog's Mugs $1.00 Bottle Beer
1 Is" E 5th Street Greenville, ' "52 v I
GENE
WILLEM
HACKMAN � DAFOE
1964. WHEN AMERICA MAS AT WAR WIFH ITSELF
PLAYING
Wednesday,
Nov. 15, 1989
8:00 PM
IIENDRIX THEATRE
I RII W I I II SDENT ID �
spi.iis � i d I I1 Student l niiin
MISSISSIPPI
BURNING
R
ok on
School and Community
Health Education
A Career in Promoting Good Health
Health educators plan, develop, and manage strategies to
promote healthy lifestyles for individuals, groups �.
enure communities.
Hospitals businesses and industries, schools, health clubs.
and community agencies provide gainful
employment for these professionals.
To learn more about a career where the rewards ii
improving the lives ol other coi
Dr. Rick Barnes, Health Education
Memorial Gym, Room 205,
Phone 757-423S
or
Dr. Donald Knsle, Department of Community
Health Belk Building Room 312.
Phone 757-4422
Under New Ownership
Now Associated With
A-l Quality Cleaners
Owners Wayne & Betty Pollard
and sons
StCLOtiUStl
mm t, , , , j
r
L
20 Off on All
Men's Shirts
& Women's Blouses
siud.nl & Sufi D Required
When Brought In
NEW TIMES KI :
Mon-f ri ?�m bpm " Hm 4pm
r�pi-r� 11 :i x�
1
J
KSii
"rsa
111111

We're moved
to our new
location at
417 Eikuls St Mall
Downtown
There's plenty of FREE
parking at our rear
Give
Hianl!
(We're Doing The Cook in')
Enjoy a delicious Thanksgiving Buffet prepared
with all the homemade touches
ONLY $1 "295 Seniors M2.95 Children 6.95
Vl Under 6 FREE
k
entrance off
('otanche
�p 10-4 1
Ml MAI HAST HAM
207 S.W. Greenville Blvd.
11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.






IflTHE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14.1989
TV gets attention for sex, violence
By LISA FA YE KAPLAN
Glnncn Nt� Service
Harry Stein, a New York
writer who marched against the
war in Vietnam and has always
believed in tree speech, is sick-
ened by the sex and violence he
sees on television.
Stein, who is shocked to hear
the words trip of f his tongue, wants
someone to do something to stop
it.
"You don't want to be ac-
cused of being in conflict with the
First Amendment says Stein, the
former ethics columnist for Es-
quire magazine and a registered
Democrat.
But, "I think the harm being
done by some of the stuff that is
running amok through our popu-
lar culture has to be stopped. It has
to be limited
Television's of fensi veness is
prompting action from not just
the usual complainers � Chris-
tian fundamentalists�but people
who would never describe them-
selves as conservative.
"It isn't just the crazies that
are concerned says Peggy Char-
ren, president of Action for
Children'sTelevision, which seeks
to broaden the selection of
children's programming on tele-
vision. "A lot of people who look
at television are saying, 'I don't
like it
"I think they don't really
know what to do about it Char-
ren says. "People who are First
Amendment-sensitive don't want
to say, 'Take it off the air "
George Gerbner, former
dean of the Annenberg School of
Communications at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, studies sex
and violence on television, and
his research shows that prime-ti me
television viewers can count on
See VIOLENT TV on page 11
Americans lie more than before
g&
Grog's Wants You In November
Thursday November 2nd- Grog's 8th Anniversar
Party
Come Help Celebrate Grog's 8lh Birthday with these Specials:
$2.08 Grog's 1.08 Bottle Beer
88tf Grog's Thermo 88tf Wine Coolers
Mugs 8g Memberships
Thursday November 9th-Thanks for Voting Us
"Greenville's Best All-Around Bar"
$1.00 Highballs
$5.00T-Shirts
$2.00 Ice Teas
75tf Bottle Beer
By LISA FAYE KAPLAN
Cuinctt Newt Service
Honestly, we all tell lies.
At times we fib, fabricate and
fudge. We tell white lies and half-
truths. We lie through our teeth,
like a trooper or a dog.
We've always lied.
Adam and Eve tried to squirm
out of the apple incident by em-
ploying the-devil-made-me-do-it
excuse. Richard Nixon lost his
presidency by hiding the truth
about the Watergate break-in.
It's impossible to know just
how much we lie, or if we fib more
todav than yesterday.
Dr. Michael Johnston, an as-
sociate professor at Colgate
University in Hamilton, N.Y who
taught a course titled "Lying,
Cheating and Stealing believes
Americans are becoming more
truthful because more eves are
J
watching.
Bryce Christensen disagrees.
Christensen, director of the
Rockford Institute Center on
Family in America, a Rockford,
111 center that studies family is-
sues and trends, suspects that
Americans are lying more than
they used to.
Barbecue
"Wedd ing vows have become
a lie Christensen said, citing ris-
ing divorce rateo as indications of
increasing dishonesty. "A person
who will not live up to a wedding
vow will find all kinds of excuses
for not living up to less solemn
vows and covenants
In 1987, a U.S. News & World
Report-CNN poll found that 54
percent of respondents believe
people are less honest than they
were 10 years ago.
When this reporter asked four
friends to keep a record of lies
they told in two days, the tallv
ranged from one white lie told to
avoid a long explanation to five
lies designed to save a person
money. Both the white-liar and
the five-fibber said truth is a value
they hold dear.
If most of us treasure honesty,
whv do we lie?
J
Could personal relationships
survive if nothing but the truth
were told?
Can a free society survive if
less than the truth suffices?
Lying is "fascinating said Dr.
Paul Ekman, a California psy-
chologist who has studied lying
for 20 years and who recently
published the book, "Why Kids
Continued from page 9
Beautiful' poster, but it really does
not matter what B's looks like
because earing is the reason people
� here.
B's biggest seller is the barbe-
cue sandwich. This item is served
on a hamburger bun with slaw for
$1.50. A barbecue plate, sandwich,
side order of slaw and cornbread,
is $3.50. A barbecue dinner, sand-
wich, side of slaw, potatoes and
cornbread is $4. The barbecue can
also be purchased by the pound at
$5 and B's special barbecue sauce
is sold for $1.35 a bottle.
If barbecue is not your style,
B'salsofeatureschicken, pork ribs,
hamburgers, hotdogs and fries.
Come hungry and thirsty because
B's has gTeat iced tea with free
refills.
Next time you are in the mood
for something different, stop by
B's Barbecue, get a sandwich and
sit down at one of the four picnic
tables around back. B's is open
from 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Tues-
day through Sunday.
R.E.M.
Continued from page 9
causes at their concerts because it
pursuades the fans to get involved
with their environment. But that
sort of thing should be extra, not
wrapped up into the show to the
point that it sounds preachy.
Once again, R.E.M. ended by
without doing "Radio Free Eu-
rope They're very good at not
doing that song.
Wait a minute. All of thisdoes
have a happy ending. After the
concert, many people went over
to Fuzzy Ducks where Sex Police
was playing. Sex Police was a lot
of fun, playing some good funky
stuff. Two of the members were
former Pressure Boys hornmen,
and they belted out some lively,
Mexican-style rhythms, almost
like a hip Tijuana Brass.
Sex Police are reminiscent of
The Red Hot Chili Peppers and
Royal Crescent Mob, and they do
the best cover of "Brick House"
I've ever heard. I f they ever come
to Greenville, go see them. And
listen to R.E.M. on your stereo at
home.
Bonham
Continued from page 9
that "he taught me everything I
know
The Band then ended their
concert with Jason himself appro-
priately dedicating the last song
to his dead father. Jason said that
his father was "the greatest rock
and roll drummer and began
playing the drums as the rest of
the band joined him playing their
song "Wait For You for the sec-
ond time.
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville, NC
M-F 9 am - 5 pm
Read The
East
Carolinian
A
ATLANTIC
PERSONNEL SERVICES
OF GREENVILLE
� Term Papers
Typed
� Professional
Resume' Service
209 Commerce St.
Suite B
355-7931
Lie
"Once you begin looking, vou
find lies occur in every part of
life
A successful lie creates "an
enormous change in the power
situation with parents' said
Ekman. "Some kids get very
hooked on that
"There are many situations
where the sociallyapproved thing
is to lie said Johnston. "When
you go to a friend's house and he
serves you a horrible dinner, you
don't tell him that
In some situations, people are
expected to lie. For instance, most
people accept thattheaskingprice
for a house is not what the seller
really expects to get. The he is
built-in.
"The cultural standard re-
volves around what is at stake
Johnston said. "Consider what life
would be like if we were only
capable of telling the unvarnished
(truth). It would be difficult to
take
Lying is fun for 100,000
members of the Burlington Liars
Club, based in Burlington, Wise.
Founded in lu29, the club solicits
tall tales and names "the world's
champion liar" each New Year's
Eve.
"Send in a lie and a dollar, and
we'll send you a membership
card said Don Reed, vice presi-
dent of the club. "The only people
who are barred from membership
are politicians. They're profes-
sional liars. We're amateurs
Lying has increased sales for
American Isuzu Motors, which
employs that lying scoundrel, Joe
Isuzu, to hawk cars.
"Sales have been gTeat said
Charles Coch, account supervisor
at the Delia Femina McNamee
advertising agency thatcreated the
See LIES on page 11
Thursday November 16th- (iron's 5th
Annual Mug Slide
Come sec if Mike from Chico's will retain his Championship or
if a new upstart from your favonte bar will claim ihe crown.
$1.25 Highballs 75c Highballs
$ 1.50 Grog's Mugs 1 .(X) Bottle Beer
119 E 5th Street Greenville, NC 752-X711
P"
GENE WILLEM
HACKMAN � DAFOE
194. WHEN AMERICA WAS AT WAR WITH USE If
PLAYING
Wednesday,
Nov. 15, 1989
8:00 PM
IEATRE
IDENT ID �
jdim I niun
i
School and Community
Health Education
A Career in Promoting Good Health
Health educators plan, develop, and manage strategies to
promote healthy lifestyles for individuals, groups, and
entire communities.
Hospitals businesses and industries, schools, health clubs.
and community agencies provide gainful
employment for these professionals.
To learn more about a career where the rewards includes
improving the lives of other contacts:
Dr. Rick Barnes, Health Education
Memorial Gym, Room 205,
Phone 757-4238
or
Dr. Donald Ensley, Department of Community
Health Belk Building Room 312,
Phone 757-4422
Undei
now
A-l
H
E
20 Off on All
Men's Shirts
& Women's Blouses
Student & Staff II) Required
When Brought In.
NEW TIMES ARE:
Mcm-Kri 7am 6pm ni ftam 4pm
Kip Irci It - 21 -OT
L
G3�dtf&r
.asaa
EVUI IE
I AN-
l intagt 'lathing,
Ji )�( � (i tilth s.
.�t )tnjiii s, !� ari,nun
1
H't i step infn ths past!
We 've moved
to our new
location at
417 Evans SL Mall
Downtown
There's plenty of FREE
parking at our rear
entrance off of
IL Cotanche -
MyjEg '�� 752-1750JJ
Give
Hanl4�!
(We're Doing The Cookin')
Enjoy a delicious Thanksgiving Buffet prepared
with all the homemade touches
ONLY �1 1QC Seniors 12.95 Children 6.95
LJ Under 6 FREE
X
HILTON INN
uimvhwi h
207 S.W. Greenville Blvd.
11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.





Violent TV
. ontinued from page 10
w ah hing six to eight violent in i
dents an hour, a figure that has
remained stable tor about 20years
hen it i omes to sex, how
( ierbner has found that
have heated up by 10 t
in the past decade. Sexual
ind talk about sexual a
a oa urs 11 times even
v me hour
Sex sells and television is a
less that depends on sales,
ent mergers of commit-
mpanies with corpo-
ints lk is now owned
i Klectru for example
nting ompetition
. ideo has fon ed
rse pi ' � more
� sa s
ath in reased bot
�� ,i setol
I tniple to be
� sational.bizarreand
� I inter a L'CI A ;
' :� who ll.ls
ramming de
� � i three major net
vivs sex and violence has
a dramatic staple.
Life
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14. 1W9 11
. thi cdc person
d the
v and v has
g tactor in getl
� ' SIW
Moll
� atch.

hris 1 nej
il �
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it �
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it up shot,

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. murders and
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pretens '

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BETAMAXCWEEBLITE BEES!POSTMODERNT.G.I.F.
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i T
UI wasn't rubbing
it in-1 just wanted
Eddie to know
the score of
last night's garnet
' M'ti 1 OM.iiOVl .1X1 i �
t

it t s appt .
i parl - me
. �
� if i it makes pe
is and the kind of
to be on the air in a
that makes a lot of
n i s e x ec u I
� � savs
f ompeting
s will t reati a natural
hon among television show s
- � ill die.
" rhe most tasteless mati
:� the air " says Dennis, (it
ereci tdert iseofthe wildh
rhe M rton Dow i
ir SI
ays the : il i
television as a
i at tn. : .m un
quantit) that should not
ft ilone a ithhildren
sot is no longer nec-
ilv a friend of the family all
l harren says.
Lies
iued from page it)
. . . �ign
, � ' irti la - iatinj i
� st with tl i
d giving them tin
� t Its not just
t) be funny
1 V man believes that truth
t a the time is theonly soil
in which personal relationships
. imeonehashed to you
lething that matters, it's
i j to trust them again
1 km.m said ' It we want to have
11 lationships with our
' trn mis and our family, we hae u �
. ih ut what it's like if people
; t trust us, what a disaster it
i -
I . ryrigktBm.USA TOOA Vr1'
i olltf tmfmmmtim fu

JSK-
Alex Sum � I niversity of Washington � Class of 1990
�tX � 1
Go ahead and gloat. You can
nib it in all the wa toChicag
with AT&T U ng I )istance Sen ice
Besides, your best friend Eddie
was the one who said your team
could never win three straight
So give him a call. Ii costs a
lot less than you think to lei him
know wh 's headed f r the 1 li i iff?
Reach out and touch someone"
If youti like t() kiii w m ae ah ut
AT&T products and sen ices, like
International Calling and the AI,T
Card, call us at 1 800 2220300.
AT&T
The right choice.





,
Violent TV
Continued from page 10
watching six to eight violent inci-
dents an hour, a figure that has
remained stable for about 20years.
When it comes to sex, how-
ever, Gerbner has found that
things have heated up by 30 per-
cent in the past decade. Sexual
activity and talk about sexual ac-
tivity now occurs 11 times every
prime-time hour.
Sex sells, and U 'evision is a
business that depends on sales.
Recent mergers of commu-
nications companies with corpo-
rate giants � NBC is now owned
by General Electric, for example
,ind mounting competition
from cable and video has forced
networks to nurse profits more
than ever, Gerbner says.
The greatly increased bot-
tom-line pressure putsa setof con-
straints on creative people to be
ever more sensational, bizarre and
provocative, " he says.
Lew Hunter, a UCLA pro-
fessor of screen writing who has
worked in the programming de-
partments of the three major net-
works, says sex and violence has
always been a dramatic staple.
"Since the cave person
started telling stories around the
campfire, sex and violence has
Ken the drawing factor in getting
an audience Hunter savs. "It's
done tor commerce
Such programming is turn-
ing some parents into television
cops who monitor and control the
shows their children watch.
"I never let them watch net-
work TV says Chris Finnegan, a
San Francisco homemaker who
allows her 4-vear-old son and 2-
vear-old daughter to watch only
public television. "It seems like on
every (network) show someone is
getting either beat up, shot,
stabbed
Stein forbids his 8-vear-old
daughter and 5-year-old son to
watch MTV, which he thinks is
sexually "wavoff and heseverelv
restricts their diet of prime-time
shows.
"You flip the channels and
see the most callous murders and
the most psychopathic individu-
als with often )tist the pretense of
a redeeming social message at the
end " Stem savs. "I think it's par-
are Watching stuff that has to
deaden them emotionally
Although some parents are
outraged bv television, many are
loath to censor broadcasts.
"It's a dilemma that people
like me have savsCharrenl tell
the public that it's appropriate to
respond to what they see on tele-
vision. But there is a part of me
that hopes they won't organize a
big campaign.
'Where do you draw the line
between stuff that makes people
like me nauseous and the kind of
stuff that has to be on the air in a
free country that makes a lot of
people very unhappy?"
Everette Dennis, executive
director of the Gannett Center for
Media Studies in New York, says
the sheer number of competing
programs will create a natural
selection among television shows:
The weak will die.
'The most tasteless material
goes off the air says Dennis, cit-
ing the recent demise of the wildly
combative 'The Morton Downey
)r. Show
Charren says the solution
lies in viewing television as a
"stranger at the door an un-
known quantity that should not
be left alone with children.
'The TV set is no longer nec-
essarily a friend of the family all
the time Charren says.
OCopynght 19�9, USA TODAY Applt
ColUgt Information Setwork
Lies
Life
Continued from page 10
Joe lsuzu campaign.
"People started associating us
with being more honest with the
consumers and giving them the
benefit of the doubt It's not just
lying, (but) being funny
Ekman believes that truth �
most of the time � is the only soil
in which personal relationships
can grow.
"Once someone haslied to you
about something that matters, it's
very hard to trust them again
Ekman said. "If we want to have
close relationships with our
friends and our family, we have to
think about what it's like if people
lon't trust us, what a disaster it
s
OCopyright 19�, USA TtlDAVAfyk
ColUgt Information Nttwork
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14.1989 11
FORBIDDEN WORDS OF THE 1990s
A-LIST
AUTO SHADE
BABy BOOMER
BATMAN
BETAMAX
BICOASTAL
BIG CHILL
GENERATION
BIMBO
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JUST SAy NO
KINDER, GENTLER
NATION
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AND FAMOUS
LIPOSUCTION
LITE BEER
LOTTO
MAKE My DAy
MALE BONDING
METALHEAD
MINDSET
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you DROP
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TAIF.
A THOUSAND
POINTS OF LIGHT
TOFUTTI
TRANCE
CHANNELING
TRIVIAL
PURSUIT
TUBULAR
ULTRA
ANyTHING
VERNACULAR
VIDIOT
WACK
WACKO
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WIRED
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ANyTHING
IN HELL
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IS HELL
441 wasn't rubbing
it in-I just wanted
low
$ame.
viaai
,flIK'i liliim
I
1 .(niiirrir.it
.jijii i
I,
- JSfcv
Go ahead and gloat. You can
rub it in all the way to Chicago
with AT&T Long Distance Service.
Besides, your best friend Eddie
was the one who said your team
could never win three straight.
So give him a call. It costs a
lot less than you think to let him
know who's headed for the Playoffs.
Reach out and touch someone.�
If youd like to know more about
AKfcT products and services, like
International Calling and the AT&T
Card, call us at 1 800 222-0300.
Alex Sum � University of Washington � Class of 1990
AT&T
The right choice.





12 THE EAST CARPI INIAN NOVEMBER 14, 1989
Quiz on movie quotes tests viewers
By LISA FAY E KAPLAN
Gannett Newi Scnut
"Frankly, my dear, I don't give
a damn
"I'll get sou, my pretty, and
your little dog, too
'I could'a been a contender
You've hoard those Holly-
wood pearl before. But do you
know where and when1
John P. Fennell, who teaches
high school Drama and English in
Santa Fe N.M has assembled
501 unforgettable linos from fa-
mous and not-so-famous mo ios
in his now Nxk "Y ou Ain't Hoard
Nothin Yet
The book collects those memo
rablo moments in movie historv
and states who. said what, to
whom, where and when. As most
movie butts know, Clark Gable
Gray Art
Gallery hosts
exhibition
ECU News Bureau
Gray Art Gallon located on
thecampusof ECU, is hosting two
exhibitions during the month of
November. "Jim Melchert
Abstract Drawing" and "Earl
Cunningham lisCarefreeAmeri-
can World" areondisplay through
Dec. 1.
Internationally known artist
Jim Melchert is presently on the
art faculty at the University ol
California at Berkeley.
Melchert is exhibiting large
abstract drawings Karen 1 .
Churchill gallery director, said,
"His stark black and white draw
ings posess a wild energy. The
lines ot his drawings have been
drawn and redrawn many times
The viewer feels Melchert's ex-
citement in the physical act ol
drawing and the urgency he felt to
record his subjects on paper
He has given exhibitions, let
hires, and workshops throughout
the United States Melchert's art-
work is part of the collection at the
National Museum of Modern Art,
Kyoto; the Victoria and Albert
Museum, I ondon; the Museum of
Modern Art. San Francisco; and
the Museum of Contemporary
Crafts, New York.
1 lis exhibition, "Abstra t
Drawing was organized by the
Wiegand Art c iallery at tin
lege of Notre Dame in Belmont,
California.
The second i thibition "Earl
Cunningham: His( arefree Ameri-
can World in Iudes41 paintings
from the collection of Marilyn and
Michael Mennello The exhibition
is touring under the auspices of
EXHIB1 IS L SA, Mid-America
Arts Alliance a private, non-profit
regional arts organization.
Cunningham, who died in
1977, grew up in Edgerwood
Maine, and left home at the age ol
13. He supported himself by sell-
ing paintings created on boards
from boxes carried in by the tide.
and collecting junk. 1 le graduated
from the Hamlin-FosterC ompany
Academe of Automobiles Engi-
neers in Portland, Maine, and
sailed the East Coast as a seaman.
"Cunningham continued to
paint throughout his life, record-
ing pleasant, brightly colored
memories of ships, people, Indi-
ans, and colorful sunsets said
Churchill. "Through his work, he
(Cunningham) has revealed his
love for America and the Ameri-
can flag
Choir
Continued from page 9
ticipate.
Horton explains the fall con-
cert as, "an event to say thank you
to the university and the commu-
nity for coming out and support-
ing the choir over the years
Executive Board Members for
the 89-90 season are Kiplan S.
Clemrnons, president; Terrence
L. Kearney, vice-president; Lisa
M. Finch, secretary; Linda M.
Brooks, treasurer; Bothena A.
Jones, sergeant-at arms; Gregory
Horton, choir director; and Dr.
Dennis E. Chestnut, advisor.
Clemrnons and other choir
members extend an open invita-
tion to anyone interested in join-
ing the choir next semester. "We
have a lot of events planned and
hope that you will join us he
said. For more information, call
James Thompson at 931-9877.
brushed off Vivien Leigh in "Gone
With The Wind" with the
Frankly, my dear line. Marga-
ret Hamilton threatened Judy
Garland with "I'll get you, my
pretty in "The Wizard of Oz
And Marlon Brando whined about
being a contender in "On The
Waterfront"
It those quotes were too easy
to challenge your movie memory,
"You ain't heard nothing yet (Al
lolson in 'The Jazz Singer )
Who said:
1 Thecalla lilies are in bloom
again
2. 1 don't know nothin' bout
birthin' babies, Miss Scarlett
3. "If only I had been made of
stone, like you
4. "Some day, when things
are tough, maybe you can ask the
boys to go in there and win just
one for the Capper "
5. "Yes, I killed him And I'm
glad, 1 tell you. Glad, glad, glad
b "My mother thanks you.
My father thanks you. Mv sister
thanks you. And I thank you
7. "Your mother can t be with
you anymore
Answers:
L Katharine 1 lepbum, "Stage
Door 137
2. Butterfly McQueen to
Vivien Leigh, "(lone With The
Wind 1939
3. Charles Laughton to gar-
goyle, "The Hunchback Of Notre
Dame 1939
4 Ronald Keagan to I'at
O'Brien, "Knute Rockne Al
American 1940
5. Bette Davis, "The Letter
1941
b Jimmy Cagney, "Yankei
Doodle Dandy 1942
7. The Great Prince to Bambi,
"Bambi' 1942
CCopfrifkt 1989 Us H H A Apple
College Information etu ri
TALK ABOUT IT.
M
GORDON'S
XX) (i
"Vikings Discovering the .New World by harl Cunningham, from the exhibit, "Larl Cunningham:
His Carefree American World will be on display at Cra An Gallery through Dec. 1. Also on display
at the art gallery is the exhibit "Jim Melchert � Abstract Drawing
Hillcrest Lanes
Memo e
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yfrvt(ccz.
1
Before you get snowed under with work this year, get an IBM Personal
System2�. Choose from five different packages of hardware and
software - now at special low special low student prices. Each system
comes with easy - to - use software loaded and ready to go!
What's more, when you buy your PS2�, you will get a mouse pad, a
3.5 - inch diskette holder, and a power strip - all free. All that's not all.
You're also entitled to a special low price on the
PRODIGY� service, too.
And aside from all this, three of the most popular IBM Proprinters�
are available at special low prices. ,
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H � M
�� r
��
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See DARRIN SCOTT, TIM HESTER or SI BASS (IBM's Collegiate Reps),
Monday - Friday (10:00 - 2:00) at the Student Stores.
They'll be glad to answer any questions you might have and help you make the right choice
�'� sotfef is limited to qualified students, faculty and staltAho order an IBM PS2 Model 8530 E21 8550 031 8555 061 or 8570 E61 througl ��: u I 19
precondgured IBM PS2 Model 8525 001 is available through December 31 1989 only Orders are sublet to availability Prices are subjei t tochangi
may withdraw the promotion at any time without written not ice
� IBM Personal System, 2 and PS2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation PRODIGY is a registered service mark ,i I
ot Prodigy Ser ,ices Company a partnership o IBM and Sears
-� printer is a trademark of international Business Machines Corporation IBM Corp 1989







'
12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 14,1989
Quiz on movie quotes tests viewers
TALK ABOUT IT.
By LISA FAYE KAPLAN
Caniwn N�an Service
"Frankly, my dear, I don't give
a damn
"I'll get you, my pretty, and
your little dog, too
"1 could'a been a contender
You've heard these Holly-
wood pearls before. But do you
know where and when?
John P. Fennell, who teaches
high school Drama and English in
Santa Fe N.M has assembled
501 unforgettable lines from fa-
mous and not-so-famous movies
in his new book "You Ain't Heard
Nothin' Yet
The book collects those memo-
rable moments in movie history
and states who said what, to
whom, where and when. As most
movie buffs know, Clark Gable
Gray Art
Gallery hosts
exhibition
ECU News Bureau
Gray Art Gallery, located on
the campus of ECU, is hosting two
exhibitions during the month of
November. "Jim Melchert �
Abstract Drawing" and "Earl
Cunningham: His Carefree Ameri-
can World" areondisplay through
Dec. 1.
Internationally known artist
Jim Melchert is presently on the
art faculty at the University of
California at Berkeley.
Melchert is exhibiting large,
abstract drawings. Karen L.
Churchill, gallery director, said,
"His stark black and white draw-
ings posess a wild energy. The
lines of his drawings have been
drawn and redrawn many times.
The viewer feels Melchert's ex-
citement in the physical act of
drawing and the urgency he felt to
record his subjects on paper
He has given exhibitions, lec-
tures, and workshops throughout
the United States. Melcherfs art-
work is part of the collection at the
National Museum of Modern Art,
Kyoto; the Victoria and Albert
MUseum, London; the Museum of
Modern Art, San Francisco; and
the Museum of Contemporary
Crafts, New York.
His exhibition, "Abstract
Drawing was organized by the
Wiegand Art Gallery at the Col-
lege of Notre Dame in Belmont,
California.
The second exhibition, "Earl
Cunningham: HisCarefree Ameri-
can World includes41 paintings
from the collection of Marilyn and
Michael Mennello. The exhibition
is touring under the auspices of
EXHIBITS USA, Mid-America
Arts Alliance, a private, non-profit
regional arts organization.
Cunningham, who died in
1977, grew up in Edgerwood,
Maine, and left home at the age of
13. He supported himself by sell-
ing paintings created on boards
from boxes carried in by the tide,
and collecting junk. He graduated
from the Hamlin-FosterCompany
Academy of Automobiles Engi-
neers in Portland, Maine, and
sailed the East Coast as a seaman.
"Cunningham continued to
paint throughout his life, record-
ing pleasant, brightly colored
memories of ships, people, Indi-
ans, and colorful sunsets said
Churchill. "Through his work, he
(Cunningham) has revealed his
love for America and the Ameri-
can flag
Choir
Continued from page 9
ticipate.
Horton explains the fall con-
cert as, "an event to say thank you
to the university and the commu-
nity for coming out and support-
ing the choir over the years
Executive Board Members for
the 89-90 season are Kiplan S.
Clemmons, president; Terrence
L. Kearney, vice-president; Lisa
M. Finch, secretary; Linda M.
Brooks, treasurer; Bethena A.
Jones, sergeant-at-arms; Gregory
Horton, choir director; and Dr.
Dennis E. Chestnut, advisor.
Clemmons and other choir
members extend an open invita-
tion to anyone interested in join-
ing the choir next semester. "We
have a lot of events planned and
hope that you will join us he
said. For more information, call
James Thompson at 931-9877.
brushed of f Vivien Leigh in "Gone
With The Wind" with the
"Frankly, my dear line. Marga-
ret Hamilton threatened Judy
Garland with "I'll get you, my
pretty in "The Wizard of Oz
And Marlon Brando whined about
being a contender in "On The
Waterfront
If those quotes were too easy
to challenge your movie memory,
"You ain't heard nothingyet (Al
Jolson in "The Jazz Singer )
Who said:
1. "The calla lilies are in bloom
again
2.
'I don't know nothin' 'bout
birthin' babies, Miss Scarlett
3. "If only I had been made of
stone, like you
4. "Some day, when things
are tough, maybe you can ask the
boys to go in there and win just
one for the Gipper
5. "Yes, I killed him. And I'm
glad, 1 tell you. Glad, glad, glad
6. "My mother thanks you.
My father thanks you. My sister
thanks you. And I thank you
7. "Your mother can't be with
you anymore
Answers:
1. Katharine Hepburn, "Stage
Door 1937
2. Butterfly McQueen to
Vivien Leigh, "Gone With The
Wind 1939
3. Charles Laughton to gar-
goyle, "The Hunchback Of Notre
Dame 1939
4. Ronald Reagan to Pat
O'Brien, "Knute Rockne � All
American 1940
5. Bette Davis, "The Letter
1941
6. Jimmy Cagney, "Yankee
Doodle Dandy 1942
7. The Great Prince to Bambi,
"Bambi 1942
CCofryngkl !M9, USA TODAVAppk
CoUet Information Nttwork
B GORDON'S.
200 E OwnvilW Blvd 7V lum
"Vikings Discovering the New World by Earl Cunningham, from the exhibit, "Earl Cunningham:
His Carefree American World will be on display at Gray Art Gallery through Dec. 1. Also on display
at the art gallery is the exhibit "Jim Melchert � Abstract Drawing
I
I
I
L
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0"j) 1
ytUcd$zo
Before you get snowed under with work this year, get an IBM Personal
System2�. Choose from five different packages of hardware and
software - now at special low special low student prices. Each system
comes with easy - to - use software loaded and ready to go!
What's more, when you buy your PS2�, you will get a mouse pad, a
3.5 - inch diskette holder, and a power strip - all free. All that's not all.
You're also entitled to a special low price on the
PRODIGY� service, too.
And aside from all this, three of the most popular IBM Proprinters�
are available at special low prices.
Don't get left out in the cold! Offer ends February 15, 1990.
Come in today.
How're you going to do it? PS2 it!
See DARRIN SCOTT, TIM HESTER or SI BASS (IBM's Collegiate Reps),
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�This offer is limited to qualified students, faculty and staff who order an IBM PS2 Model 8530-E21.8550 031 8555 061 or 8570 E61 through February 15 1990 The
preconfigured IBM PS2 Model 8525001 is available through December 31,1989 only Orders are subject to availability Prices are subject to change and IBM
may withdraw the promotion at any time without written notice
��M. Personal System2 and PS2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation PRODIGY is a registered service mark and trademark
of Prodigy Services Company, a partnership of IBM and Sears
Proprmter is a trademark of international Business Machines Corporation � fBM Corp 1989





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ECU punter
enjoys new
atmosphere
Bv STEVE ALLEN
Sports
NOVEMBER 14, 1989 PAGE 13
Staff HnMi
The first year of a new coach-
rig era in ECU football history is
almost complete. For team mem-
bers the ringing in of the new has
brought much success; tor Pirate
punter ohn lett. this success has
oosted his game and created a
family" type environment which
has given him a lot of confidence.
lett has been the Pirates'
number one punter throughout
� he 1989 season and has up pod his
punting average to over 40 yards
per kick, as opposed to a 39.7
iveragein 1988. However, he was
not overlooked during the 188
e ison.
He received several rewards
�or his punting efforts in 1988,
collecting player of the week
honors three times. Theserewards
. ombined with his performance
during the 1989 season, have many
people marking him as ,m All-
american candidate lett said he
is not expecting to be named All-
American this season, because he
feels there is still a lot of improve-
ments that can bo made.
Another honor Jett snagged
came during spring scrimmages.
He punted 14 times during five
scrimmages for a 43.4 average. 1 le
, is named Outstanding Special-
st bv the coaching staff.
Success has followed lett
throughout high school. He was a
four-year letterman in football and
baseball at Northumberland 1 ligh
School in Heathsville, Virginia. He
excelled in both spirts, but de-
cided to pursueonly football while
in college. "1 wanted to play both
football and baseball, but when 1
came here, 1 started sucking with
football
1 felt 1 could contribute a lot
�;ist bv punting so I stuck to that
"hat was probably my best
h e
in 1987, he was redshirted as a
rn shman punter, butonc year later
� n he began punting for ECU,
he clinched vet another award.
. Sporting News named him third
best redshirt freshman in the na-
ti tn
In order to have a winning
season, the team needs to win only
:v of their two remaining games.
if they do come out with a win-
ning season, it will bo the first for
.i Pirate football team since 1983.
lett experienced several of those
smg seasons, and said he now
feels more comfortable punting
I am a lot more consistent now.
We've been through some tough
times. I feel a lot more relaxed
I u k there now
He said another thing that has
See Jett, page 14
Pirates hold off late Owl
surge for a 31-24 victory
By DAVE McCREARY
Sf�ff Writer
Temple's Lorenzo Square hits ECU'S fullback Michael Rhett as Stewart Southall looks on durirg
the Pirates final home game of the season. (Photo by Garrett Killian � ECU Phoiulab!
Student Pirate Club has coaches,
athletic director at first meeting
By LISA SPIRIOOPOLLOS
Staff writer
As a student at ECU, do you
feel you are thoroughly involved
in Pirate athletics? Well if not, you
should be a member of a new club
called The Student Pirate Club.
The Student Pirate Club held
its first meeting last Thursday to
get the ball rolling and inform the
members just what the club is, and
director Cabell 1 awtonexplained,
"We are a club designed to pro-
mote student interest in the ath-
letic department.
The first meeting also gave
the new members a chance to meet
and talk with head football coach
BUI Lewis, head basketball coach
Mike Steel, athletic Director Wwc
Hart and Pirate Club Director
Charlie Carr.
Other executives of the club
including left Barber, Lee Work-
man. Jennifer 1 ittle, Troy Waller
and Tripp Roakes addressed the
members.
Ihe Student Pirate Club has
been in the works for the past two
years and has now begun holding
meetings, "This is a start and we'll
let it grow from here said Hart.
TheClub, whichis.i non-profit
organization, will provide schol-
arships for athletes. They will have
projects and activities that will
raise the intended $4.(MX) scholar-
ship money.
Steel said that the Student
Pirate Club is going to bo impor-
tant at ECU. "Everybody (the
coaches) appreciate the support,
we understand that the students
are important and bv being a part
in the club vou are willing to do a
little something extra
The club has two functions,
sx:ial and service and consists of
four committees, membership,
project, social and spirit. The
membership committee will trv
and solicit new members. The
protect committee will perform
various activities throughout the
year. The spirit committee will
design different programs for
games and plan activities before
games, for example a "pig-pick-
mg" before a basketball game.
Being a member of the Stu-
dent TirateClub will pose several
advantages, Lawton explained
that they are working on priority
seating for members at the basket-
ball games. Members will be able
to gather before several of the
games and have social gatherings
to boost spirit
Carr explained about the Pi-
rate Club and its more than 4,(XX)
members, "We raise monev that
goes to wards athletic scholarships
and sending young people to
school Thegoal, started bvCarr,
tor this year is to raise $2 million.
Graduating seniors are eli-
gible to be members of The Pirate
Club, all they have to do is sign up
and they are allowed a one vear
membership. 'They are able to be
a part of The Pirate Club and
understand what we are about, "
Carr said.
According to assistant direc-
tor Barber, the Pirate Club has 38
chapters from as far south as At-
lanta to as far north as Washing-
ton DC Each spring the PirateClub
travels to each oi its chapters for
banquets. At the banquets a spe-
cial film showing various Pirate
teams is shown and coaches ad-
dress the audience.
After receiving the job of head
football coach, Lewis made the
tnp to all 38 chapters, "There is a
verv special feeling and spirit
among the people that identify
with this University noted Le-
wis.
There is also a Junior Pirate
Club which consists of over 400
members. The lunior Club is tor
children who are 12 and under.
The Student Pirate Club will
be holding meetings once every
two weeks. Membership dues are
$5 and will bo good until Mav.
"We just want to get people to
know what theStudent PirateClub
is, just spread the word, that's the
key said Waller.
The next meeting is going to
bo held Wednesday, November
15 at 4:(X1 in the social room of the
Pirate Club.
A 24-point final half surge
lifted ECU past a determined
Temple team Saturday that en-
sured the Pirates their first non-
losing season since 1983.
The 31-24 victory snapped a
four-game second half scoring
drought and upped the Pirates'
record to 5-3-1 on the season. At
worst, the Pirates could finish the
season at 5-5-1.
Travis Hunter returned as
starting quarterback and with a
variety of scores led the Pirates
past the struggling Owls, now 0-
10. Running for one score and
passing for two others, Hunter also
grabbed his first career reception
for another touchdown.
"I'm happv with the way our
team came back and took charge
of the third quarter and earlv part
of the fourth quarter Piratecoach
Bill Lewis said. "I'm disappointed
that we let the lead slip away, but
I give Temple and Coach Jerrv
Borndt the credit for fighting hard
until the last play of the game.
"We struggled offensively in
the first half Lewis continued. "
I was pleased that we were able to
put some points on the board in
thesecond halfbecause that's verv
important to our confidence as a
team
Both teams struggled earlv,
but Temple found the end zone
first on its third possession. The
Owlsdrove40yards in eight plavs
before tailback Sam Jenkins ran
up the middle for a 4-yard touch-
down. Bob Wright kicked the PAT
giving Temple a 7-0 lead with 4:55
left in the first quarter.
The Pirates struck back
quickly, scoring just seven plavs
later at 2:38 in the quarter. Junior
Robinson returned the kickoff 35
yards to mid field. The next plav,
Hunter, tight and four from the
five, pitched the ball to Cedirc Van
Buren, who then threw back left to
a wide open Hunter for the touch-
down. Rob Imperato added the
PAT and knotted the score at 7-7.
"Van Buren threw a really
good pass Hunter said of the
halfback option play. "I knew 1
was going to be open for the touch-
down
Lewis said: " It's hard to ac-
count for the quarterback in a
coverage scheme oi a goal-line
defense. We felt this would be an
effective plav at the time
Neither team scored again in
the first half as Hunter completed
just two of ten passing attempts.
Sophomore back-up Jeff Blake saw
limited action as quarterback, but
was unable to help the sluggish
Pirates in the first half.
We made a derision to put
eff in for one series Lewis said.
"Travis looked really tired and he
needed a break
ECU shrugged oft their first
half performance and came out
fired up in the second half. Robin-
son returned the kickoff 39 yards
to start the Pirates near midheld.
On tour of the next five plays.
Hunter completed passes, two in
a row to wide receiver Walter
Wilson.
The Pirates failed to convert
tor a touchdown after three op-
portunities from inside the 7-vard
line. On third and goal from the
one, Hunter slipped down and
ECU was forced to kick a field
goal. Phillip Brener split form 22
yards out and gave the Pirates a
10-7 lead with 9:03 left.
Temple fullback Scott McNair
recovered the ball. McFatter
gained three vards before lateral-
ing to Kicky Torain, who picked
up four more vards to the Temple
42.
Five plays later, the Pirates
scored another touchdown when
Hunter scampered in from 14
yards out. Imperato's extra point
gave the Bucsa 17 lead with 6:35
left in the third quarter.
Earlv in the fourth quarter,
the Pirates continued to roll. At
the ECU 31, Michael Rhett ex-
ploded up the middle for a 26-
yard gain and several plays later
the Pirates reached striking dis-
tance at the 12-yard line. Hunter
completed a pass to David Daniels,
but a holding penaltv pushed the
Pirates back 10 vards
Hunterhit 1 sherfora22-vard
touchdown on the next play, and
Imperato's TAT made it 24-7.
One play after the kickoff,
Temple quarterback Anthony
Richardson passed to Kevin
McCoy for a 49-yard gain, This set
up a 30-yard field goal bv Wright,
cutting "the lead to 24-10.
Robinson again put the Pirates
in good field position, returning
the kickoff 37 vards on the first
plav from scrimmage, but a hold-
ing play moved Bucsback lOyards
to the 32. On first and 20, Hunter
connected with Wilson in the right
See Pirates, page 14
Kobe pleased with team's performance
Swimmers rebound for big conference victory
By KATHERINE ANDERSON
St�tf Wntrr
JOHN JETT
The ECU Swimming and
Diving team picked up speed on
Friday in their meet against Wil-
liam and Mary.
Coach Rick Kobe was ex-
tremely pleased with the total
performance of both the swim-
mers and the divers. When com-
menting on the men Kobe said,
"Wecompletelv dominated them.
(William and Mary) The guvs
really shared the wealth of this
win with a total team effort
The ECU women scored a
victory as well. It was a tough
meet tor them and Kobe said, " It
was an outstanding win, they
swam verv well
For a look at the statistics: In
the men's 400-yard Medley Relav
� 1, Walters, Kennedy, Holsten,
Herndon, ECU,3:38.69. 2, W & M,
disqualified. 3, O'Brien, Springer,
Chnstenson, Lewis, ECU, 3:44.94.
Women's 400-yard Medley Relay
� 1, Smith, Bridgers, Muench,
I lolt, ECU, 4:04.16, (a varsity rec-
ord). 2, Harms, Brooks, Wilcox,
Newham, W & M, 4:06.01.
Men's 1000-yard Freestyle �
1, A. Jeter, ECU, 10:09.17' 2, J.
Lambrakis, ECU, 10:13.28. 3, G.
Rubel, W & M, 10:24.46. Women's
100-yard Freestyle � 1, S. Olivo,
W &M, 10:45.72. 2, Ellerson, W &
M, 10:56.43. 3, C. Morns, ECU,
11:07.94.
Men's 200-vard Freestyle -
1, R. Kennedy, ECU,1:47.65. 2, S.
Benkuskv, ECU, 1:47.96. 3, S.
Holec, W'& M, 1:50.16. Women's
200-vard Freestvle � 1, N.Duke,
ECU, 1:59.38. 2,K. Armstrong, W
& M, 2:00.68. 3, L.
Wilson,ECU,2:00.75.
Men's 50-yard Freestvle� 1,
J. Farrell, ECU, 23.15. 2, N. Weis,
ECU, 23.39. 3, C Donnelly, W &
M, 2342. Women's 50-yard Frees-
tyle � 1, E. Hughes, W& M, 25.82.
2, H. Wilcox, W & M, 25.91. 3, T.
Pardue, ECU, 26.01.
Men's 200-vard Individual
Medlev � 1. f. Holsten, ECU,
2:00.00. 2,T. Christensen,
ECU,2:02.54. 3, L. Najera, W & M,
2:03.09. Women's 200-yard Indi-
vidual Medlev � 1, M. Bridgers,
ECU, 2:14.41. 2, J. Wilhelm, ECU,
2:17.03. 3, M. Brooks, W & M,
2:17.05.
Men's one-meter Diving � 1,
M. Lawrence, ECU, 169.t points.
2, P.Smith, ECU, 153.6 points.3, D.
Young, W & M, 134.6 points.
Women's one-meter diving � 1,T.
Griffin, W & M, 127.2 points. 2,
J.Fov, ECU 125.95 points. 3, J.
Grove, ECU, 108.6 points.
Men's 200-vard Butterfly �1,
C. Hinton, W & M,2:05.07 2, B.
Kemp, W&M,2:12.51. 3,J.Muench,
ECU, 2:15.12. Women's 200-vard
Butterfly � 1, R. Newman, W &
M, 2;12.51. 2, H. Wilcox, W & M,
2.14 2S. 3,J. Muench, ECU,2;15.12.
Men's 100-vard Freestyle �
1, D. Nelson, ECU, 49.91 2, S.
Benkuskv, ECU, 49.95. 3, A. Jeter,
ECU, 50.00. Women's 100-vard
Freestyle � 1, P. Holt, ECU, 55.32.
2, N.Duke, ECU, 55.47. 3, K.
Armstrong, W & M, 55.84.
Men's 200-vard Backstroke �
1, O'Brien, ECU, 1:59.58. 2, G.
Walters, ECU, 159.85.3, L. Najera,
W & M, 2:09.82. Women's 200-
vard Backstroke � 1, L. Smith,
ECU, 2:14.38. 2, E. Hughes, W &
M, 2:lb.42. 3, J.Wilhelm, ECU.
2:17.88.
See Swim, page 15
J
WZMB falls to the 'News Hounds'
12-0 in co-rec flag football Sunday
Once again, the pen proved
mightier than the microphone.
The staffs from The East
! I'oliman and WZMB battled
Sunday in a co-rec, flag football
ame for media bragging rights.
Led bv James F.J. McKee's six
interceptions, the Black-and-
IVhite-and-Read-All-Overs shut
;ut (and up) the College Music
f Mer'sl2-0.
The game was an intense,
defensive battle, with the only
X)ints being scored at the end of
he first and the very end of the
a me.
After trading posessions sev-
ral Umcsjhe East Carolinian's
juarterback, Matt Ricther, found
'hil Cope open close to the side-
ines.JustasCope'sflagwasabout
obe pulled, he pitched the ball off
o John "Skeoter" Tucker, who ran
40 yards for the touchdown.
VVZ MB countered with a drive
of their own, led bv quarterback
Mike Chiazze, Kns Adams and
Herman Towe. Facing fourth
down and short, Chiazze hit
Adams tor a first down. He then
found Towe open for a 20-yard
gain that put the New Rock-91
team in their first scoring position.
However, led by the rushing
of Lon Martin, Pam Cope, Art
Nixon, Lisa Spindopoulos, and
Shannon Buckley of TEC, the fre-
quency modulators were stopped
and turned the ball over on downs.
"We drove on them a couple
of good times Chiazze said. "We
just couldn't punch it in. Their
girls rushed real well, and they
forced us to get rid of the ball
With darkness setting in and
time running down, it was
McKee's final interception that
halted any hopes the 'Rockers had
of a tie. Catching the ball near his
own goal line, McKee returned
the ball to the one yard line, set-
ting up the Paper-People's final
score.
Mike Martin, TEC's staff big-
man, took a reverse from Pat
OBryant and crushed ZMB's Mike
Zakely (accidentally, of course) as
he crossed the goal line for the
touchdown.
WZMB's Trey Burley said, "It
was good for us to get together,
and wecongratulateTTie Easf Caro-
linian on their win. We'll be look-
ing forward to the rematch
By the time a rematch isagreed
to, WZMB will have a theme song
for their football team: "Pray for
Rain" by Guadalcanal Dairy.
Thanks guys!
Action was intense Sunday afternoon as the staff from The East Carolinian defeated WZMB 12-0 in
flag football. The women of both teams lost their composure and brawled at midfield over a
controversial call. Actually, they were going for a flag. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire � ECU Photolab)





f
14
IHl EAS1 CAROI INIAN
NOVhMBl-K 14, m�M
Sports Briefs
Pirates
NBC gets rights to NBA games
The NBC network has acquired TV rights to the next four years of
National Basketball Association games in a $t-AY) million deal an-
nounced Thursday. League players will receive 53 percent oi the
revenue from the games, carried on CHS in recent years.
Hammond leads at Kapalua
With a 5-under-par 67, Donnie Hammond took a three shot lead
Thursday at the $650,000 Kapalua (Hawaii) International. He goes into
the third round Frida) . I lammond could collect13d,(XX) for a victory
Sunday at the event. He has earned $294,400in the last month.
Baja 1000 gets going with 289
Hie field at the 22nd annual PresidenteScore Baja 1000off-road race
included 289 participants when it began Thursday morning al the
Ensenada t Mexico) Convention Center. A 1 riday arrival is expected for
the race's first finisher.
Three move to quarterfinals
Winning their Thursda) matches at the Wembley tennis champion
ships in London, top three seeds lohn M Enroc, Michael Chang and
Brad Gilbert, moved into Friday's quarterfinals. No. l McEnroe beat
! Ercelen6-4,6l;No.3CillxrtbeatLeifShiras7-5,6-3;andNo.2Chang
heat Paul Annacone6-2, 1 6, 0.
Pitcher wins golden spikes
Bon McDonald, pitcher for the Baltimore Orioles and a No. 1 draft pick
from Louisiana State University, was chosen top amateur baseball
player Thursday for his performance before going professional this
year. The Golden Spikes Award i presented by the VS. Baseball
Federation.
Tracks on watch for stun gun
An ultrasonic stun gun capable of afl I races from the stands
is being watched for at British racetra ks The gun, which hides a high-
powered ultrasonic trai side what look like binoculars was
corner of the end zone, humping
the score to 1-10 with just over
nine minutes remaining.
11 a vis got us into a position
to win the game Wilson said.
"He proved that he could move
the ball well and he performed
like a true leader
A few plays later, Robinson
intercepteda Richardson pass and
retui ned it seven yards to the Owl
29 I lunter was then sacked by
Alfonso Taylor for an 11-yard loss,
and after several small gains the
Pirates were unable to capitalize
on .mother scoring opportunity
temple then marched down
the field in 14 plays and scored
with 4:4 remaining in the game.
A 10 yard pass trom Richardson
to Leslie Sheperd trimmed the
Pirates' lead to II 17.
Senior quarterback Charlie
1 ibretto then saw his hist action
of the season as he dro e the Pi-
rates down helci to within range
fora held goal attempt by Brenner
Continued from page 13
m took over with l:2s left.
Temple charged toward the
etui one once again and scored
another torn hdown, thistimeona
34-yard strike trom Richardson to
Chris Chambers. The lead now-
stood only at 31-24 with 22 sec-
onds left.
Wright then attempted an
onside kick,but Hunter Gallimore
fielded the ball at the ECU 4 as
the Pirates held on for the win.
"We didn't take Temple
lightly coming into the game
1 lunter said "In the first half we
really didn't have our minds in
the game, hut were ahle to come
out in the second half and concen-
trate Better on what had to be
Lewis noted, "We are 4 0 1 at
home this year, and 1 hope we can
v ontinue to Build on that mark
The Pirates will travel to Pitts
burgh next weekend to face the
Panthers in the first ot two final
road games.
described at a recent
acy trial. I he Racecourse
Association is attempting to devise a method of stopping such a stun
trun.
Sunnyvale makes Giants offer
On the heels of San Francisco's defeat Tuesday of a proposal to Build
at$l 15 million Ballpark, the m.n orofSunny ale,alif , has said he can
negotiate the same stadium deal that San Francisco made with the
Giants. Tuesday's rejection of the ballpark measure clears the way tor
the team to leave San Francis o as -on as next year
Deaf player cut from team
Willie Brown's attempt t �' � me the first J.( person to play profes-
sional basketball was sidetrack hursday when the Albany, N.
Patroons oi the Continental Basketball S! i ition � tit Brown from
their team.
Brown defends IBF title
In a fight Thursday night at Spi Id Mas v r� Browns reda
unanimous I2-round �� n . aii �; . tSantana foi :N sixth suc-
cessful defense oi Ins Ini rnal I
title.
Players still on free agency
Pitcher Dave Drevecky. designate i hitter Jim Ri c and reliever Boh
Stanley arc among the 17 bast bail players who have until 1 p.m
Monday to decide whether to file for free agj nc forth 1990 season. A
record 89 players have decided to Bo free a nts
Coodv wins Senior Classic
With a 5-foot Birdie putt on the second playoff hole, Charles Coody
defeated Chi Chi Rodriguez and Boh Charles Sunday in the$300,000
PGA Senior Las Vegas Classic. The three qualified for the playoff by
finishing the regulation 54 holes at ll-under-par205.Theplayoff began
on the par-T 16th hole with all three gaining pars. Coody earned
$45,000, Rodriguez and Charles each $24,625.
Texan wins Ohio Marathon
El Paso, Texan Sam Ngatia won the Columbus, Ohio, Marathon
Sunday in 2 hours, 11 minutes and 5( seconds on his fourth attempt at
the 26.2-mile fiat race. Julie Isphording, Cincinnati, won the women's
division in 2:30:45 a course record and her personal Best. Each of them
won $20,000.
Orioles pay city $5.1 million
The Orioles will pay Baltimore $5.1 million tor use of Memorial
Stadium this yea r - $3.5 million for rent and $lri million from admission
taxes from the sales of tickets. Under'an agreement that links the
stadium rent to the Orioles' profits, the highest the team had paid in the
past was $2.3 million in 1984.
Sports shift to cable examined
A hearing is planned Tuesday by a Senate judiciary subcommittee to
examine the increasing shift of televised sports programming from
"free" television to cable TV. Witnesses ate to include Baseball Com-
missioner Fay Vincent(it) (ro)and NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue.
Under-table rewards surveyed
A survey dealing with under-the-table paymentsto college football
players from agents and Boosters is to ho realeased Friday at a sports
psychologist conference In Washington, DC. The report surveys ac-
tiveand retired NFL players.
eCnpyriH Htf) UM TXDA.AfpU Cof.Vjr hforimutmm fttuk
rein pie
Easf Carolina
7
7
0
0
0
10
17
14
24
31
Temple - Jenkins 4-yard run (Wright kick)
ECU - Hunter 5-yard pass from Van Buren
(hnperato kick)
ECU - Brenner 22-yard field
ECU - Hunter 14-yard run (Imperato kick)
ECU - Fisher 22-yard pass from Hunter (hnperato kick)
Temple - Wright 30-yard field goal
ECU - Wilson 32-yard pass from Hunter (Imperato kick)
Temple - Shepard 10-yard pass from Richardson
(Wright kick)
Temple - Chambers 34-yard pass from Richardson
(Wright Kick)
�.IK AM ST VMS ncs
First downs
Total offense
Rushing
Passing
Fumbles
Penalties
Punts
Possession time
Attendance
Temple
21
452
208
22-37-305-1
2-1
11-106
6-39.0
27:28
ECU
21
364
175
15-27-200-0
2-0
7-76
7-31.1
32:32
24,112
.left
ATTENTION FRESHMEN & SOPHOMORES
Have College Expenses Overwhelmed you?
Research indicates there is approximatel) S4 Billion in financial assistani
available to students annually. You are eligible lor a number ot these
resources even though you mav not be familai with them all
Hie Educational Opportunities Match is a nev. service in eastern North
Carolina which has computer access to data regarding these resoui
giving freshmen and sophomore college students the opportunity tobe i
lamilar with the various resour.es foi which the) are ligiblc
Our service is guaranteed
lor more information you are invited to complete and marl the reqi
form below to :
Educational pponunities Match
P.O. Box 547
(Ircenviltc, N 2 IX 5
Student Name:
Student Address:
Student Telephone Number:
College Attending
Please mail to :
Educational Opportunities M
P.O. Box 5 17
(ireenville. NC 27835
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i d from page I 3
ides his
s, js his taith in tl
I ' � eali t i 't confident e in m
napper, line and (�a hes.
I feel it home in the back
field onfident .� is a must foi
ly w lule prepar-
� ii k
tt said oi
prej aring to punt is di
� w ind. I le said, "In
ind a lotofol
im: i wind swirls
' an I � ,i behind ou one
nd .in.i in our face the next
I � ' � tagood tailwind,
it -� ill take t'ne ball and i arry it a
j i distant e. It there is a head-
ind and ; ou ki k the ball low . it
will i hi dow n ondistancebut will
in rea: e hang tin
pares himself mentall) b think
; - hen the ball should b
place d dmiiv the kick "I picturt
in my mind tl e perfect drop and
the perfect kick, over .ind over
aga n I le also oneentrates on
where the ball should kind after a
punt, so he does not give the
i ipi 'Sing team gi i d held posi
lion.
A lot of ECl team members
had toad thems Ives tcfa new
sti le ct workouts and playing
when Bill Lewis became head
h fett said the new mode of
intensity gave the team a spark
"Coach Lewisdemandsa lot from
ea h individual. 1 le has created a
lot of enthusiasm and motivation
V hen (. each lewis first
came, he brought us together and
explained things differently to us
It really wasn't that hard ot an
adjustment for me lett said the
intense environment benefited his
game.
lett, a unior majoring in An
counting said he hopes to some
d.w punt tor the Los Angeles
Hams. "I'll )ust have to wait and
see. If any other otters come up
I'll take them But I'd like to kick
for the Rams
Read The
East
Carolinian
It's a veritable
cornucopia of
information.
:iini
'mil
Mi i tin
ALL CAMPUS
MALE
STRIP OFF
Wednesday Night
$100. 1st Prize
$50. 2nd Prize
$25. 3rd Prize
Doors Open at 8:30
Ladies Only until 10:00
Ladies Only -$1.00
Men: $2.00 Guests
$ 1.00 Members
$1.50 Pitchers All Night
$ 1.00 Domestics
$2.00 Bar Specials
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniTiiniiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii





f
Swimmer overcomes burnout
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 14, 1989 15
Martinez applies 'positive attitude' to life
I
Bv CATHERINE ANDERSON
NUtf Wnltt
After swimming competi-
tively tor 13 years you would think
it might get boring and monoto-
nous. Not so, according to junior
Danny Martinez, who otten won-
ders what he will do when the
competitive life is over.
Martinez joined the ECU
Swimming and Diving team this
year as a transfer student from
Miami Fl He attended high
school in Sarasota, Fl where he
grew up. 1 lis family then moved
to Miami and there he attended
Miami Pade Community College
where he received an Associate
degree in criminal justice.
Martinez began swimming for
tun in a summer swim league
whenhewaseightvearsold. later,
when he began swimming ve.ir-
round his parents were suppor-
tive. "They never pushed me and
they never told me not to do it.
The only thing thev asked was
that 1 do my best, and that goes tor
anything 1 do said Martinez.
Ira Klein, the coach at the
Sarasota MCA had a big impact
on Martinez. "He taught me a lot
about the importance of technique,
and also about the mental aspects
of doing well. You alwavs have to
keep a positive attitude, if you
start thinking bad about it (swim-
ming), you get burned out
Reed and Pete, as Martinez
refers to his coaches at Miami
Hade, had onlv a small team of
eight but were able to give very
individualized attention to each
swimmer. Thev spent a lot of time
working on technique as well.
Although swimming isa large
part of Martinez's daily life, there
was a point when he almost gave
it up �� a point in his swimming
career when he was feeling
burned out Martinez, saidI
was wondering if it just wasn't
worth the effort anymore because
1 did not feel like my times were
dropping fast enough. You go
from swimming in a club where
you are paving to swim, to the
reverse situation where thev (col-
leges and universities) are sup-
porting you to swim for them. 1
did not think it would be fair to
sign an and then decide 1 didn't
The men's basketball team held their last intrasquad scrimmage
Saturday, in preparation of tonight's exhibition game with the
ugoslavian Nationals. (Photo by Angela Pridgen, ECL Photolab)
Swim
Continued from page 13
Men's 500-vard Freestyle
1, M. Cook, ECU, 4:05.51 2, 1.
�Ftfrrell ECl ,451.11.3,C.Schnei-
der, ECU, 4:58.42. Women's 500-
yard Freestyle � 1, K. Laslo. W &
M. 5:11.28. 2, S. Olivo, W & M,
5:15.04. 3, L. Wilson,ECU, 5:25.62.
Men's 3-meter Diving � 1, M.
Lawrence, ECU, 18b points 2,P.
Smith, ECU, 160 points. 3, J.Gilson,
W k M, 144 points. Women's 3-
meter Diving 1,1. Foy,ECU, 152
punts. 2, T. Griffin, W & M, 134
points. 3, J. Grove, ECU, 1 is points
Men's 200-yard Breaststroke
1. W Lappenbusch, W&M,
2:1674.2J.Springer,ECU,2:18.99.
3, A. Lewis, 'ECU, 2:22.93.
Women's 200-yard Breaststroke
1,M. Bridgers, ECU, 2.22.S. 2,
Brooks, W&M, 2:30.72. 3, B. Sun-
delin, W&M, 2:3353.
Men's 4(X)-vard Freestyle Re-
lav � 1, Lambrakis, Carawan,
Carstarphen, Kennedy, ECU,
3:19.95.2 Jeter, Holster, Hemdon,
Seaver, ECU, 3:2057. Women's
400-yard Freestyle Relay 1,
Hughes, Ellerson, Armstrong,
Wohlust, W&M, 3:43.1 5.2, Wilson,
Baldridge, Wilhelm, Duke, ECl .
3:43.07.
Outstanding performers in
Fridays meet were diver Matt
Lawrence and Meredith Bridgers.
Lawrence took tirst place in both
the one-meter and three-meter
events and Bridgers won the
Medley Relay, individual medley
and the 200-yard breaststroke.
Overall, the teams swam well
and everyone seemed pleased by
the results.
The results of Sunday's meet
will be printed in fTiursday's
paper.
m
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want to do it. 1 ended up just
waiting and thinking, and it turns
out it was a year before 1 began
swimming again
Martinez said that during the
vear he took off swimming his
studies floundered and he was
otten bored. "1 had Ux� much time
on mv hands he said. When
Martinez is swimming he said he
is much more disciplined in every
aspect of his life.
Martinez is on track now and
decided on ECU with the advice
of former coaches. He wrote a
letter to Coach Rick Kobe and then
visited the campus on a recruiting
trip. Martinez said that he had
visited this area on several meet
trips and liked what he saw.
To keep an eve on his own
progress Martinez said, " 1 keep
track of mv times each season and
look at what 1 am doing now
compared to this time last vear. It
the times are the same, 1 am doing
okay. It the times are better then I
am doing just tine, but if 1 am
doing worse then 1 know 1 reallv
have to get on the ball Martinez
admits that he started this vear a
little out ot shape but is confident
that he will be up to his best per-
formance fur conference.
During meets Martinez said
he tends to get very "unsocialble"
and draws inward. Before each of
his events he spends a few min-
utes thinking about how he will
swim it. " Whether 1 want to go
out fast or start a little easier and
build into the race. Also while
you are swimming the event, it is
really dangerous to think about
getting tired. I just try to think
about mv technique, or preferably
keep my mind blank said Marti-
nez.
Besides being a good swim-
mer, Martinez is also a good stu-
dent. Presently he has a maor
minor combination in philosophy
and political science, but intends
to change that to a double major in
the near future. His plans are to
attend law school at either Stetson
University or the University of
Miami after graduation.
Enjoy
your travel
a lot more
because
you paid
a little less.
You outsmarted em. You called
Travel Express. And you better
bet, it's not too late to rnxk those
reservations lor Thanksgiving and
Christmas. But. a better hurry,
space is limited lor the best tares
So. for a look at all the airlines
with the best rates to numerous
cities, call Travel Express. And
w hile your in, check out our
specials for Spring Break. But re-
member, our ser ices are free. The
airlines pay our fee, not sou.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
4
L� �:�.�TrKlvci r�j�ric v
7"J Ibbi
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Accommodations to 50 People
Pepsi Presents
THE PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Travis Hunter
Quarterback
�'��:�'�'�'�'�:� '��'� :�'�:��:�'�
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'Had 1 st career re-
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1
Photo bv Gam't Killian





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With Their Families
We Will Be Closed ThansgivingDay
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 14, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 14, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.709
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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