The East Carolinian, November 7, 1989






�he 3:ast (Earaltnum
Serving the 'East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. hi No. 101
Tuesday November 7, 1989
Greenville, N'C
Circulation 12,0(X)
12 Pages
A crowd of over 1000 students turned out for the "Stop the Nonsense" rally on the Mall Monday
afternoon. The rail) served to plan a march through downtown Greenville that is to take place
on rhursday at 3 p.m. (Photo by J. D. Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
'Purple Monday' pressures businesses
Reactions to boycott differ
By IOHN II (MR
�uy, � � � the employees
: businesses in
lownl � � K' "Purple
M ' ' ' ident sponsored
bi . t. had a small but signifi-
itecl n a tv pi( ally slow
nnj Put pie Monday all
' . � encouraged
' retran h i pur hasing items
al merchants and from
� � 'vein ille's eating es
htments 1 he boycotl was a
: � i ireenville City
� � decision to abol-
� ' si he new noise
prohibits any campus
rtunity inti i ! ual or or-
i- r�n from having parties or
that exceed a 70 decibel
� se level.
dav - are alv a s slow,
but I could definitely tell that today
was .i little slower than usual
Stop Shop manager lav Long
stated.
assar Sabra, ow ner ol a
mous Pizza also noticed a slight
ip
dl
eln erv rnismess.
It's a
slow dav arid the orders we are
; ttinp .ire onlv in the city and
: i the dorms
Mi st businessmen felt the
student had valid reasons for
reacting to the it of Greenville's
re enl Ha i � n rac kdown and
tion II owner hm Sullivan felt that
it was his duty to the students to
stav open and that the forced clos-
ing of mostofdowntown'srestau-
rants and bars was unjust.
'When the police came and
asked me to close down for Hal-
loween, 1 talked to a lawyer friend
ol mine and my wife Carol and
decided someone had to stick their
nose out Sullivan said.
"We've had more trouble on
weekend nights than we've ever
had on 1 lalloween. Weappreciate
the college students and we've
gone to great lengths to establish
credibility with them. This is our
living, whv should thev ask us to
close?'
Omar's was another business
that at first planned not to close
down but eventually locked the
doors at 10 p.m. because of the
lack oi business.
1 had to close down owner
OmarChahid said. "Mv business
is with the students. There was no
one downtown except police, and
it you aren't making any money
then you might as well close1
Beau LaPrade, co-owner of
two downtown nightclubs, Pan-
tana Bob's and & Rockefellers.
said. "Even though the boycott
does not reallveffoc t me right now,
1 can see where there might be
other things happening down the
road
"The problems students are
having right now are much more
deeply rooted than inst Hallow-
een. A lot ol businesses through
out Greenville, and not only
downtown, rely on students and
want the student money, but not
someof the problems that go along
with it LaPrade added.
�tall downtown businesses
felt the effect ot the boycott. Ac-
cording to Bunnv s restaurant
owner Ed Baker, it was business
as usual. It was a typical Mon-
day, Baker said "It'sa slow dav
and we weren't really hurt I didn't
even know then- was a boycott
Most businessmen agreed that
the boycott was something that
could have been avoided.
"The police, the( ity of Green-
ville and the students all need to
bend a little. LaPrade said. "Some
sort of liaison needs to be estab-
lished between the students of
ECU and the city so something
ike this w ill never go this tar
i '
ance but felt
as a i a so of
"It wi ti open
' .� i ei ��� e definitely would
have dme il said 1 lanagan's
� � lurant i nerieorge Martin.
1 can see what the students are
doing, but then again, 1 think it's
unfair to boycott the businesses of
� enville
Not all downti wn businesses
closed Halloween night SubSta-
Arnold Air and
Angel Flight
honor MIA's
By Kf II) LANGDON
v, n j
fhr 1 M i inihnian
Arnold Air Society, an ECU
chartered service organization
sponsored nationwide bv Air
Force ROT( , and -ngel Might are
Irving to increase the awareness
ol Prisoners of War Missing in
Action on the ampusof 1(1 and
in the surrounding � immunity.
National POWM1A Aware-
ness Week is November h 12
� i!a. rivitieswillbeconducted
during this week including sell
n .� I iW MIAbracelctsinfront
of the Student Store (proceeds
going to further the awareness of
TOW MIA and the plight that
these men face), distribution of
yellow ribbons tor all concerned
persons to pla eon the antenna of
their t ars and the placement of
yellow ribK nson the trees�round
campus
.Also.al' )VVMIAcandehght
vigil will be conducted on Thurs-
day at 9 p m in front of Minges
See VIIA's, page 3
Members of AFROTC's Angel Flight and Arnold Air Society
honor those who are prisoners of war and missing in action
by tieing yellow ribbons around the trees across campus.
(Photo by J.D. Whitmire � ECU Photo Labi.
Greenville citizens march
Students plan march on City
Hall to protest noise ordinance
By SHANNON BUCKLEY
Stiff Writer
Over 1,000 ECU students
signed a petition in protest oi the
Greenville Citv Council's decision
to eliminate noise permits at the
"Stop the Nonsense" rally on
Monday
"This is one of the greatest
things I've seen at ECU; the stu
dents are unifying under one
cause Tripp Roakes, president
of ECU'S Student Government
Association, said. The "Stop the
Nonsense" rally's main focus was
to organize the students who plan
to participate in a march on city
hall which will be held Thursdav
afternoon.
"This is not a Greek issue or a
minority issue. This is an ECU
issue and we are voicing our
opinions as mature, respectable
ECU students Roakes said. Ac-
cording to Roakes, when the city
council eliminated noise permits
at its Oct. 23 meeting, thev took
away part oi the social life at the
university.
Students were not the only
people concerned about this is-
sue. Elizabeth Carroll, a 20-year
resident of Greenville and a
member of the Tar River Neigh
borhood Association, said, "I am
here to support the students and
to march down to city hall I think
that the students have rights and
have been treated unfairlyar-
roll showed her concern tor the
students by display ing a support
banner on the port h of her Third
Street home.
William Earl Shephard (Shep),
a 16-year resident of Greenville
and lead singerof the Amateurs
said, "I'mhereinsupportofC ireen-
v ille, both the students and the
community. I think the main prob-
lem is a lack of communication
between the students and the
community. 1 lowever, I dohavea
personal interest in this issue. Asa
musician, I can no longer pla
outside, and that hurts mv liveli-
hood
lour members of the "Stop
the Nonsense Committee spoke
to the crowd to explain their pro-
posed course of action According
to Scott Makev, member of the
committee, the organizers of the
demonstration obtained a permit
to march which was issued bv
Greenville's Police (. hiel Jerome
M Lesmond.
The protestors will gather on
the Mall al l p.m , with thea tual
march beginning, at 10 p.m
Makev asked students �
along protest signs that are no
more than three-tenths ot an inch
thick and that are not atta hed to
metal posts. Ihe main enti
campus will serve as a start
place tor the man h 1 he pn test
ers will pro eed dow n 1 ifth ' ti
and end the mar h in trout i it i
Hall
According to lav Hav h
member of the "Stop th Not
sense c ommittee, the n �
only stressed the negative i peel
of the students "We are
ting the emphasis placed on any
positive things that wea
do here at this university i lav
erty emphasized thai th .
is the students chan � I
positive impression on th com-
munity and the news m
only it it is carried out pi
1 he petit n v
throughout campus, a
( arne Armstrong i
the "Stop the Nonsense
tee. i hese petitions
to be circ ulated unti
she said.
1 he rallv and tht purpos�
See Rallv. page
V
s
s
111
HAVE
FhTS
Greenville resident Elizabeth Carroll shows her support for the students at LCL bv dipiaying a
banner on the porch of her home located several blocks from campus. (Photo by Angela Pridgert
FCU Photo Lab)
Progressive Alliance group
obtains constitution from SGA
By SAMANTHA THOMPSON
Staff Writer
In the Monday afternoon
meeting of the Student Govern-
ment Association, the constitution
for the Progressive Alliance of
University Students was passed,
appropriations tor three groups
were approved and a new mem-
ber for the elections committee was
chosen.
The Progressive Alliance of
University Students President
Darek McCullers was yielded the
floor to describe the club's inten-
tions at FCU. "The group will
provide an opportunity for stu
dents to work cn and develop skills
in leadership McCullers said.
There is no encouragement now
to develop talents to the fullest
According to McCullers, the
club will sponsor leadership pro-
grams, including communication
and interaction workshops, guest
speakers and a field tnp.
The amendment was passed
by consent after clarifications were
made to the constitution by Legis-
lator Marty Helms.
The $1,456 appropriations to
the Overseas Development Net-
work was passed in a voice vote.
The club, which helps develop ties
with third world countries, re-
quested funds tor future lectures.
an upcoming regional conferent e
-travel and advertising tor the
conference.
the Student National 1 i�vi-
ronmental Health Club was ap-
propriated $100 for members to
attend a conference.Gasand hotel
expenses will be covered by the
appropriations. Ihe group stud-
ies the effects of man on the envi-
ronment.
The body passed bv consent
the $3300 appropriations to the
LCL lacrosse Club tor the ex-
penses of travel, referees and halt
of their equipment.
Legislator Bieu Io was ap-
proved as the seventh member of
the Flections Committee since the
previous member recentlv re-
signed as an SGA representative.
Ihe rules were suspended by
legislator Alan Thomas tor ap-
proval iif additional appropria-
tions ot $1310 tor the SGA Execu-
tive Council. Funds for substitute
SGA tacultv secretary will be
needed Nov. 20 thru a
appropriations were passed
consent of the bod
I lelmsannounced ii
will continue tor the oj
tionsonthebody rental
new members w ill K a
by Nov 27
Se eral Legis itoi
members of the bod t .
Election Da and to pai I pal
the man h through (.re; i
I hursdav.
bv
;ed
on
Pro-choice supporters travel to D.C.
Greenville National Organi-
zation for Women (NOW), in
conjunction with the FCU
Women's Studies Alliance, will
participate in the Mobilize for
Women's Lives Rally in Washing-
ton, D.C. on Nov. 12.
Buses will leave from Eighth
and lames streets at 5 a.m. on that
day, taking concerned citizens and
students to protest the recent
Webster vs. Reproductive Health
Services decision by the Supreme
Court, and to show that the major-
ity of Americans are, in fact, pro-
choice.
According to a memo from
NOW President Molly Yard, "the
fundamental right oi every
woman to determine her own
future indeed, to save her own
life is at risk. Unless we act
NOW, abortion and effective birth
control will be lost and abortion
services for women will be a dirty
coat hanger or a back alley butcher
shop
On April 9,1989, over 600,000
women and men � the largest
march ever in Washington, D.C.
turned out for the march for
Women's Lives. For the Nov. 12
event, NOW and other organiza-
tions expect over one million par-
ticipants. NOW will also be re-
cruiting for Project Stand Up for
Women, to protect women's health
clinics and their patients from
assaults bv anti-choke agitators.
Here in North Carolina, sev-
eral pieces of legislation have been
proposed which would restrict a
woman's right to choose. The most
far-reaching, according to NOW,
is a bill from Representative Paul
"Skip" Stam (R-Wake) which
would, like the Missouri statute
used in the Webster case, state
that "life begins at conception
effectively outlawing abortion as
well as several methods of birth
See NOW, page 2
UnsDvi
Editorials4
Is this the beginning
or the end?
State and Nation5
U.S. ranks law in
voter turnout
Classifieds6
Personals, For sale.
Help wanted, For rent.
Services offered
Features8
Than gd d ploys EC If
Life in Hell9
Sports10
Hurricanes sink
Pirates





W$z HuBt (HawlMmx
Serving the "East CaroCina campus community since 192$.
Vol. 63 No. 101
Tuesday November 7,1989
Greenville, NC
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
A crowd of over 1000 students turned out for the "Stop the Nonsense" rally on the Mall Monday
afternoon. The rally served to plan a march through downtown Greenville that is to take place
on Thursday at 3 p.m. (Photo by J. D. Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab)
Turple Monday' pressures businesses
Reactions to boycott differ
By JOHN TUCKER
Assistant Features Editor
According to the employees
and owners of businesses in
downtown Greenville, "Purple
Monday the student sponsored
boycott, had a small but signifi-
cant effect on a typically slow
weekday.
During "Purple Monday all
ECU students were encouraged
to refrain from purchasing items
from local merchants and from
dining in Greenville's earing es-
tablishments. The boycott was a
response to Greenville City
Council's recent decision to abol-
ish noise permits. The new noise
ordinance prohibits any campus
or community individual or or-
ganization from having parties or
bands that exceed a 70 decibel
noise level.
"Monday's are always slow,
but I could definitely tell that today
was a little slower than usual
Stop Shop manager Jay Long
stated.
Yassar Sabra, owner of Fa-
mous Pizza also noticed a slight
dip in delivery business. "It's a
slow day and the orders we are
getting are only in the city and
none in the dorms
Most businessmen felt the
students had valid reasons for
reactingto the Cityof Greenville's
recent Halloween crackdown and
revised noise ordinance, but felt
that the boycott was a case of
misplaced anger.
"If wecould have stayed open
Halloween, we definitely would
have done it said Flanagan's
restaurant owner George Martin.
"I can see what the students are
doing, but then again, I think it's
unfair to boycott the businesses of
Greenville
Not all downtown businesses
closed Halloween night. Sub Sta-
Arnold Air and
Angel Flight
honor MIA's
By REID LANGDON
Special to The Last Carolinian
�� mil-ill M � i �����mm
Arnold Air Society, an ECU
chartered service organization
sponsored nationwide by Air
Force ROTC, and Angel Flight are
trying to increase the awareness
of Prisoners of War Missing in
Action on the campus of ECU and
in the surrounding community.
National POWMIA Aware-
ness Week is November 6-12.
Se vcra 1 acti vi ties wil 1 be conducted
during this week including sell-
ingof TOWMI Abraceletsin front
of the Student Store (proceeds
going to further the awareness of
POWMIA and the plight that
these men face), distribution of
yellow ribbons for all concerned
persons to place on the antenna of
their cars and the placement of
yellow ribbonson the trees around
campus.
Also,aPOWMIAcandelight
vigil will be conducted on Thurs-
day, at 9 p.m. in front of Minges
See MlA's, page 3
tion II owner Jim Sullivan felt that
it was his duty to the students to
stay open and that the forced clos-
ing of most of downtown's restau-
rants and bars was unjust.
"When the police came and
asked me to close down for Hal-
loween, I talked to a lawyer friend
of mine and my wife Carol and
decided someone had to stick their
nose out Sullivan said.
"We've had more trouble on
weekend nights than we've ever
had on Halloween. We appreciate
the college students and we've
gone to great lengths to establish
credibility with them. This is our
living, why should they ask us to
close?"
Omar's was another business
that at first planned not to close
down but eventually locked the
doors at 10 p.m. because of the
lack of business.
"I had to close down owner
Omar Chahid said. "My business
is with the students. There was no
one downtown except police, and
if you aren't making any money
then you might as well close
Beau LaPrade, co-owner of
two downtown nightclubs, Pan-
tana Bob's and CRockefellers,
said, "Even though the boycott
does not really effect me right now,
1 can see where there might be
other things happening down the
road
"The problems students are
having right now are much more
deeply rooted than just Hallow-
een. A lot of businesses through-
out Greenville, and not only
downtown, rely on students and
want the student money, but not
some of the problems that go a long
with it LaPrade added.
Not all downtown businesses
felt the effect of the boycott. Ac-
cording to Bunny's restaurant
owner Ed Baker, it was business
as usual. "It was a typical Mon-
day Baker said. "It's a slow day
and we weren't really hurt. I didn't
even know there was a boycott
Most businessmen agreed that
the boycott was something that
could have been avoided.
"The police, theCity of Green-
ville and the students all need to
bend a little LaPrade said. "Some
sort of liaison needs to be estab-
lished between the students of
ECU and the city so something
like this will never go this far
Members of AFROTC's Angel Flight and Arnold Air Society
honor those who are prisoners of war and missing in action
by tieing yellow ribbons around the trees across campus.
(Photo by J.D. Whitmire � ECU Photo Lab).
Greenville citizens march
Students plan march on City
Hall to protest noise ordinance
By SHANNON BUCKLEY
Staff Writer
Over 1,000 ECU students
signed a petition in protest of the
Greenville City Council'sdecision
to eliminate noise permits at the
"Stop the Nonsense" rally on
Monday.
"This is one of the greatest
things I've seen at ECU; the stu-
dents are unifying under one
cause Tripp Roakes, president
of ECU's Student Government
Association, said. The "Stop the
Nonsense" rally's main focus was
to organize the students who plan
to participate in a march on city
hall which will be held Thursday
afternoon.
"This is not a Greek issue or a
minority issue. This is an ECU
issue and we are voicing our
opinions as mature, respectable
ECU students Roakes said. Ac-
cording to Roakes, when the city
council eliminated noise permits
at its Oct. 23 meeting, they took
away part of the social life at the
university.
Students were not the only
people concerned about this is-
sue. Elizabeth Carroll, a 20-year
resident of Greenville and a
member of the Tar River Neigh-
borhood Association, said, "I am
here to support the students and
to march down to city hall. I think
that the students have rights and
have been treated unfairly Car-
roll showed her concern for the
students by displaying a support
banner on the porch of her Third
Street home.
William Earl Shephard (Shep),
a 16-year resident of Greenville
and lead singer of the "Amateurs
said, "I'm here in support of Green-
ville, both the students and the
community. I think the main prob-
lem is a lack of communication
between the students and the
community. However, I do have a
personal interest in this issue. As a
musician, I can no longer play
outside, and that hurts my liveli-
hood
Four members of the "Stop
the Nonsense" Committee spoke
to the crowd to explain their pro-
posed course of action. According
to Scott Makey, member of the
committee, the organizers of the
demonstration obtained a permit
to march which was issued by
Greenville's Police Chief Jerome
M. Tesmond.
The protesters will gather on
the Mall at 3 p.m with the actual
march beginning at 3:30 p.m.
I Makey asked students to bring
along protest signs that are no
more than three-tenths of an inch
thick and that are not attached to
metal posts. The main entrance to
campus will serve as a starting
place for the march. The protest-
ers will proceed down Fifth Street
and end the march in front of City
Hall.
According to Jay Haverty,
member of the "Stop the Non-
sense" Committee, the media has
only stressed the negative aspects
of the students. "We are not get-
ting the emphasis placed on any
positivethingsthatweasstudents
do here at this university Hav-
erty emphasized that the protest
is the students chance to make a
positive impression on the com-
munity and the news media, but
only if it is carried out properly.
The petition will be circulated
throughout campus, according to
Carrie Armstrong, a member of
the "Stop the Nonsense" Commit-
tee. "Ihese petitions will continue
to be circulated until Thursday
she said.
"The rally and the purpose of
See Rally, page
��.S-
Greenville resident Elizabeth Carroll shows her support for the students at ECU by diplaying a
banner on the porch of her home located several blocks from campus. (Photo by Angela Prideen
ECU Photo Lab)
Progressive Alliance group
obtains constitution from SGA
By SAMANTHA THOMPSON
Staff Writer
In the Monday afternoon
meeting of the Student Govern-
ment Association, the constitution
for the Progressive Alliance of
University Students was passed,
appropriations for three groups
were approved and a new mem-
ber for the elections committee was
chosen.
The Progressive Alliance of
University Students President
Darek McCullers was yielded the
floor to describe the club's inten-
tions at ECU. "The group will
provide an opportunity for stu-
dents to work on and develop skills
in leadership McCullers said.
"There is no encouragement now
to develop talents to the fullest
According to McCullers, the
club will sponsor leadership pro-
grams, including communication
and interaction workshops, guest
speakers and a field trip.
The amendment was passed
by consent after clarifications were
made to the constitution by Legis-
lator Marty Helms.
The $1,456 appropriations to
the Overseas Development Net-
work was passed in a voice vote.
The club, which helps develop ties
with third world countries, re-
quested funds for future lectures,
an upcoming regional conference,
travel and advertising for the
conference.
The Student National Envi-
ronmental Health Club was ap-
propriated $100 for members to
attend a conference. Gas and hotel
expenses will be covered by the
appropriations. The group stud-
ies the effects of man on the envi-
ronment.
The body passed by consent
the $3300 appropriations to the
ECU Lacrosse Club for the ex-
penses of travel, referees and half
of their equipment.
Legislator Bieu To was ap-
proved as the seventh member of
the Elections Committee since the
previous member recently re-
signed as an SGA representative.
The rules were suspended by
Legislator Alan Thomas for ap-
proval of additional appropria-
tions of $1310 for the SGA Execu-
tive Council. Funds for substitute
SGA faculty secretary will be
needed Nov. 20 thru Jan. 5. The
appropriations were passed by
consent of the body.
Helms announced interviews
will continue for the open posi-
tions on the body. Tentatively, the
new members will be announced
by Nov. 27.
Several Legislators urged
members of the body to vote on
Election Day and to participate in
the march through Greenville on
Thursday.
Pro-choice supporters travel to D.C.
Greenville National Organi-
zation for Women (NOW), in
conjunction with the ECU
Women's Studies Alliance, will
participate in the Mobilize for
Women's Lives Rally in Washing-
ton, D.C. on Nov. 12.
Buses will leave from Eighth
and James streets at 5 a.m. on that
day, taking concerned citizensand
students to protest the recent
Webster vs. Reproductive Health
Services decision by the Supreme
Court, and to show that the major-
ity of Americans are, in fact, pro-
choice.
According to a memo from
NOW President Molly Yard, "the
fundamental right of every
woman to determine her own
future �indeed, to save her own
life � is at risk. Unless we act
NOW, abortion and effective birth
control will be lost and abortion
services for women will be a dirty
coat hanger or a back alley butcher
shop
On April 9,1989, over 600,000
women and men � the largest
march ever in Washington, D.C.
� turned out for the march for
Women's Lives. For the Nov. 12
event, NOW and other organiza-
tions expect over one million par-
ticipants. NOW will also be re-
cruiting for Project Stand Up for
Women, to protect women's health
clinics and their patients from
assaults by anti-choice agitators.
Here in North Carolina, sev-
eral piecesof legislation have been
proposed which would restrict a
woman's right to choose. The most
far-reaching, according to NOW,
is a bill from Representative Paul
"Skip" Stam (R-Wake) which
would, like the Missouri statute
used in the Webster case, state
that "life begins at conception
effectively outlawing abortion as
well as several methods of birth
See NOW, page 2
Unnsfldl�
Editorials4
Is this the beginning
or the end?
State and Nation5
U.S. ranks low in
voter turnout
Personals, For sale,
Help wanted, For rent.
Services offered
Features.
������������
.8
Thorogood plays ECU
Lire in riciiv
3 poris. �������.��.���.����� it)
Hurricanes sink
Pirates





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 7,1989
ECU boasts new communications department
ByJOYNEWSOME
Spmil to The t.at C anihnian
Hard work with much coop
eration has brought together the
new Department of Communica-
tions at HCl'sooner thanexpected.
According to Dr. Mane Farr,
acting associate dean for the
Communications Department, the
faculty has been extraordinarily
cooperative and fast at bringing
the units ot the program together.
She said, "They are extremel) ,
knowledgeable in their field and
adds "Die department is going to
be a great success due to the fac-
ulty
The designated time tor the
department to begin was July,
1990. Instead, the department
began in October ot '89.
The main changes in the aca-
demic program are centered in
the broadcasting department. The
new tour track system to be fol-
lowed includes the following:
�General college requirements
tor Baccalaureatte degree pro
grants.
Si semester hours of foreign
language or word processing or
statistics.
The required core courses for
broadcasting
'students will have to �. hoose
a concentration in either Media
Production, Media Performance
BroadcastCable Management or
Broadcast News.
Other changes in the broad-
cast program include an applica
turn for admission to the depart-
ment and an interview similar to
that of the Theatre Arts Depart-
ment. Majors will also have to
maintain a "C" or better in all
required courses.
Due to the recently updated
journalism curriculum, only mi-
nor changes will occur in the
course discipline, rhe requirement
changes will take effect in the
summer oi 10.
Some of the primary goals of
the new department are aimed to
give students a technical educa-
tion within a liberal arts philoso-
phy. Farr explains that the faculty
wants to teach students how to
listen, learn, analyze and critique
Another important! goal of the
department is to teach social re-
sponsibility bv developing the
individual student's abilitv to
discover, evaluate, communicate,
make informed decisions and
recognize their ethical implica-
tions.
Dr. Beverly Merrick, a visit-
ing assistant protessor ot journal-
ism, said that there is the behet
that journalists should have strong
ethics and be the best kind of citi-
zen. Merrick explains that this
involves a strong component of
responsibility because journalists
filter information, affecting the
lives of others. She said that this
responsibility may sometimes
involve questioning ethics ot ba-
sic freedoms, such as privacy.
r-?i
Farr savs the department
wants to emphasize ethics. "Oth-
ers schools do not do this
enough she said.
Before becoming a depart
ment, there were approximately
200 communications majors total,
rhere is expected to be an increase
ot interest m the held because it is
now more visible as a degree
possibility Dr. lames Cox, broad-
casting professor at ECU, explains,
"We have needed to be on our
own tor some time. We were get-
ting to big too be housed with an-
other department 1 leadds, "This
"IfYouHaveTo
Do Your Own
Laundry, Do It
In Style
Wash
COMPLETE FLUFF &
FOLD SERVICE
EARLY BIRD SPECIAL
BRING BEFORE 10:30 AM
ONLY 35tf PER LB!
Get A Free Wash
With This Ad!
Air Conditioned Lounge
Video Games
Your Favorite Cold
Beverage
Snacks
Television
752-5222
2510 K. 10th St.
Greenville, NC
will give us higher visibility in
hopes that it will translate into
better funding for the depart-
ment
Because of the increase in in-
terest, there are no problems of
limited space for the department
and limited class size.
Professors hope that one of
the priorities oi the new chairper-
son will be to deal with the lack of
facilities. The department cur
rently has about four different
locations on campus. "This makes
it really difficult to get together for
reference Merrick said.
Merrick explained that with
the class sizes being limited, it also
is limiting the growth of the newly
established department. She said
there are classes that are prerequi-
sites for others, but because of the
filtering, students are unable to
move on.
Professors agree that there isa
need to expand the number of
beginning courses.
The screening process to fill
the chair position of the ECU
Communications Department
began Nov 1 The search is an
external one.
UNC System grants funds for lighting
By fORIEMUNNS
Sp. 1,1 to The 1 aM . jmhnian
Students at ECl will soon see
the light.
ECU has been granted
$500,000ofemergency funding tor
safety-related lighting on campus.
Dr. Richard Eakin, ECU chancel
lor. encouraged I niversitv of
North Carolina President CD.
Spangler to request the allocation
from the I NC Board of Gover-
nors, llie money will come from
,i $6 million repair and renovatii n
fund in the I NCsvstem.ECl will
provideanadditionalS '8 "from
parking revenues and indirect cost
accounts.
The money will be spent to
add more pole-mounted lighting,
install building mounted th od
lights, and re-lamp existing mer-
cury vapor lights with high pres-
sure sodium vapor lamps. The
high pressure sodium vapor lights
have an orange tint and put out
more light. According to City
Manager Greg Knowles, these
lights give an effect that is pretty
close to daylight
Lights will be placed in high
risk areas on and near campus.
Withtheallocatedtunds.HC L will
place lights at parking lots behind
joyner 1 ibrary and Mcndenhall
Student Center, by residence halls,
bv academic buildings, and alone
frequently trav eled pathways. The
city of Greenville will provide
additional lighting in the areas
around Ninth Street and htth
Street, near the athletic complex,
and by sorority and fraternity
houses
The reason forincreased light
mg is tor safety purposes. Eakin
NOW
control. Other proposed legisla-
tion before North Carolina law-
makers include more cuts in or
deletion of the state abortion fund,
and a parental consent law tor
minors. These bills will come up
before the 1990 short session.
which begins May 21.
ard, however, says that citi-
zens cannot let this issue be de-
rided s;ate by state "lust as we
learned m the battle tor racial
equalic) thai a nation cannot exist
halt slave and halt tree, we simi
larly cannot accept women's re-
productive lives being enslaved
anywhere. We must keep fighting
lor.i national response to guaran-
tee women's right to abortion
Greenville NOW Executive
Officer Tracy Sykes agrees. "We
must maintain women's funda-
mental right to choose that was
guaranteed in 1973 with Roe vs.
Wade She says that this is the
first time that Greenville NOW
has taken such a strong role in
mobilizing area citizens and get-
ting buses together "but 1 can't
think ot a more important reason
to do it. she adds.
Buses will leave from the cor-
ner of Eighth and lames streets (in
front ol Mendenhall Student
( enter)at5a.m. Nov. 12, and will
C D C C SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
rilCC STUDENTS WHO NEED
MONEY FOR COLLEGE
Every Student is Eligible for Some Type of
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades or Parental Income.
� We have a data bank of over 200.000 listings of scholarships, fellow-
ships, grants, and loans, representing over $10 billion in private sector
funding
� Many scholarships are given to students based on their academic interests,
career plans family heritage and place of residence
� There s money available for students who have been newspaper carriers,
grocery clerks, cheerleaders non-smokers etc
- ResullsOUARANTEED
CALL
ANYTIME
For A Free Brochure
(800) 346-6401
"E
BSN
STUDENTS.
yHF Kilter the ii Korei
W immediately after gradua-
tion � without waiting for the
results of your State Hoards. You
can earn great hem-fits as an Air
Force nurse officer. And if selected
during your senior year, you may
qualify for a five-month internship
at a major Air Force medical facili-
ty To apply, you'll need an overall
2 "ill GPA. Get a head start in the
u Forceall
MSGTNK KNKRO
919-850-V549
COLLECT
explained that "several unfortu-
nate developments as of late have
sharpened our awareness of some
sped fie needs for added crime pre-
vention measures Richard
Brown, vice chancellor for busi-
ness affairs, said. "Much of the
lighting on campus is old technol-
ogy using more energy to pro-
duce the same light. The high
pressure sodium lamp produces
between 33 percent and 50 per-
cent more light
Work for the project is being
contracted, and advertising is in
progress tor engineering. Brown
said, "It will begin as soon as
possible and we estimate that it
will be completed bv the end of
spring, semester Eakin stated
the school is "deeply appreciative"
of the "genuine concern" shown
by Spangler and the emergency
funds tor lighting at ECU.
Continued from page 1
DAVID'S AUTOMOTIVE
Is Now Open In Greenville!
Wc sell import and domestic parts and
accessories at wholesale prices.
We also have a complete service center.
Make Is Your One Stop!
For Parts. For Sen ice
Remember We Have It All!
We Specialize in German Cars.
AUTOM
510 N Greene Si � . e. NC
830-1
return at around midnight the
same day. Cost for the bus ride is
$20. Checks made payable to
Greenville NOW can be brought
to the Student Store table on
Wednesday and Friday of this
week or to the Women's Studies
office in Brewster A-204 from 1
p.m. until 5 p.m.
Sfje (fcast Carolinian
Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V. (ope
Kellev O'Connor
Patrick Williams
Gu .1. Harvej
Stephanie R. I.morv
Adam I. Blankenship
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National RateS5.75
Open RateS4.95
Local Open Rate$4.75
Hulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours:
Monday - Friday
10:00 -5:00 pm
Phone:
757-6366
i' � � l -
Accu copy758-8400
Best Used Tires830-9579
Boulevard Garb830-9480
Carolina Pregnancy Center757-0003
Certain Things�756-3320
Chico's757-1666
Cliff's752-3172
Comprehensive Computing355-2814
Dapper Dan's752-1750
David's Automobile830-1779
E,b0 758-4591
Fosdtck's756-2011
Gr�g's752-8711
!TG355-5075
Jiffy Lube756-2579
Kroger756-7031
Malpass Muffler758-7676
McBudget Office Furniture752-9834
Pantry752-7671
pePS758-2113
Ri�355-5000
Sharky's757-3658
Sports Fan Attic 756-7487
Stadium Cleaners758-2701
Travel Express752-1663
Triangle Women's Healtht-800-433-2930
Wash Pub752-5222





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 7,1989
ECU boasts new communications department
ByJOYNEWSOME
Npc nl to The Last Carolinian
Hard work with much coop-
eration has brought together the
new Department of Communica-
tionsat F.CL' soonerthanexpected.
According to Dr. Marie Farr,
acting associate dean tor the
Communications Department, the
faculty has been extraordinarily
cooperative and fast at bringing
the units ot the program together.
She said, "They are extremely
knowledgeable in theirfield and
adds "The department is going to
be a great success due to the fac-
ulty
The designated time tor the
department to begin was lulv.
1990. Instead, the department
began in October ot '89.
The main changes in the aca-
demic program are centered in
the broadcasting department. Hie
new tour track system to be fol-
lowed includes the following:
�General college requirements
tor Baccalaureatte degree pro
grams.
Si semester hours ot foreign
language or word processing or
statistics.
The required corecourses tor
broadcasting.
�Students will have to choose
a concentration in either Media
Production, Media Performance,
Broadcast Cable Management or
Broadcast News.
Other changes in the broad-
cast program include an applica-
tion tor admission to the depart-
ment and an interview similar to
that ot the Theatre Arts Depart-
ment. Majors will also have to
maintain a "C" or better in all
required courses.
Due to the recently updated
journalism curriculum, only mi-
nor changes will occur in the
course-discipline. The requirement
changes will take effect in the
summer of 1990.
Some of the primary goals ot
the new department are aimed to
give students a technical educa-
tion within a liberal arts philoso-
phy. Farr explains that the faculty
wants to teach students how to
listen, learn, analyze and critique.
Another important goal of the
department is to teach social re-
sponsibility by developing the
individual student's ability to
discover, evaluate, communicate
make informed decisions and
recognize their ethical implica-
tions.
Dr. Beverly Merrick, a visit-
ing assistant protessor of journal-
ism, said that there is the belief
that journalists should have strong
ethics and be the best kind of citi-
zen. Merrick explains that this
involves a strong component ot
responsibility because journalists
filter information, affecting the
lives of others. She said that this
responsibility may sometimes
involve questioning ethics of ba-
sic freedoms, such as privacy.
??rt
Farr savs the department
wants to emphasize ethics. "Oth-
ers schools do not do this
enough she said.
Before becoming a depart
ment, there were approximately
200communications majors total.
There is expected to be an increase
of interest in the field because it is
now more visible as a degree
possibility. Dr. lames Cox, broad-
casting professor at ECU,explains,
"We have needed to be on our
own tor some time. We were get-
ting to big too be housed with an-
otherdepartment 1 leadds, "This
"IfYouHaveTo
Do Your Own
Laundry, Do It
In Style
75�
Wash
COMPLETE FLUFF &
FOLD SERVICE
EARLY BIRD SPECIAL
BRING BEFORE 10:30 AM
ONLY 35tf PER LB!
Get A Free Wash
With This Ad!
Air Conditioned Lounge
Video (iames
Your Favorite Cold
Beverage
Snacks
Television
752-5222
25101 l()th St.
Circcnville, NC
will give us higher visibility in
hopes that it will translate into
better funding tor the depart-
ment
Because of the increase1 in in-
terest, there are no problems of
limited space for the department
and limited class size.
Professors hope that one of
the priorities of the new chairper-
son will be to deal with the lack of
facilities. The department cur
rently has about tour different
locations on campus. "This makes
it really difficult to get together for
reference Merrick said.
Mernck explained that with
the class sizes being limited, it also
is limiting thegrowth of the newly
established department. She said
' there are classes that arc prerequi-
sites for others, but because of the
filtering, students are unable to
move on.
I rofessors agree t ha 11 here i s a
need to expand the number of
beginning courses.
The screening process to fill
the chair position of the ECU
Communications Department
began Nov 1. The search is an
external one.
UNC System grants funds for lighting
By ORIE MUNNS
Npr. ul to 1 hf lull jnthnian
Students at ECU will soon see
the light
ECU has been granted
$50X),000ofernergency funding tor
safety-related lighting on campus.
Dr. Richard Eakin, ECU chancel
lor. encouraged I niversity ot
North Carolina President CD.
Spangler to request the allocation
from the UNC Board ot Gover-
nors. The money will come from
a $6 million repair and renovatu n
fund in the I NCsystem.ECL will
provide an additional $78,200 from
par king re ven lies and indirect COSt
accounts.
The money will be spent to
,d more pole-mounted lighting
install building-mounted flood
lights, and re-lamp existing mer-
cury vapor lights with high pros
sure sodium vapor lamps 1 he
high pressure sodium vapor lights
have an orange tint and put out
more light. According to City
Manager Greg Knowles, these
lights give.in effect that is "pretty
close to daylight
lights will be placed in high-
risk areas on and near campus
With the allocated funds, ECU will
place lights at parking lots behind
joyner Library and Mendenhall
StudentC enter, by residence halls,
b a ademic buildings, and alone
frequently tra eled pathways. The
city ot Greenville will provide
additional lighting in the areas
around Ninth street and 1-ifth
street, near the athletic complex,
and by sorority and fraternity
houses.
1 he reason forincreased light-
ing is tor safety purposes. Eakin
NOW
control Other proposed legisla
lion before North Carolina law-
makers include more cuts in or
deletion of the state abortion fund,
and a parental consent law tor
minors These bills will come up
before the luu0 short session.
which begins May 21.
Yard, however, says that citi-
zens cannot let this issue he de-
rided s)te by State, "lust as we
teamed in the battle tor racial
equality that a nation cannot exist
half slave and halt tree, we simi-
larly cannot accept women's re-
productive lives being enslaved
anywhere. We must keep fighting
tor a national response to guaran-
tee women's right to abortion
Greenville NOW Executive
Officer Tracy Sykes agrees. "We
must maintain women's funda-
mental right to choose that was
guaranteed in 1973 with Roe vs.
Wade She sivs that this is the
first time that Greenville NOW
has taken sir h a strong role in
mobilizing area citizens and get-
ting buses together "but 1 can't
think ot a more important reason
to do it. she adds
Buses will leave from the cor-
ner ot Eighth and lames streets (in
front of Mendenhall Student
Center)at5a.m. Nov. 12, and will
Seafood House aid Oyster D
Washington H.ghway (N C 33 E�tGreenville North Carolir
Phone 752-3172
Won. thru Thurs. Night
Shrimp
Plate jpc$-
u
CDCC SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
rnCC STUDENTS WHO NEED
MONEY FOR COLLEGE
Every Student is Eligible for Some Type of
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades or Parental Income.
� We have a data bank of over 200.000 listings ot scholarships, fellow-
ships, grants, and loans, representing over S10 billion in private sector
funding
� Many scholarships are given to students based on their academic interests,
career plans family heritage and place of residence
� There s money available for students who have been newspaper carriers,
grocery clerks, cheerleaders non-smokers etc.
- Results GUARANTEED
CALL
ANYTIME
For A Free Brochure
(800) 346-6401
SJ !
BSN
STUDENTS.
l ntei the ii Kon
? immediately after gradua-
tion � without waiting for the
results of your State Boards. You
can earn great benefits as an Air
Force nurse officer. And if seleeted
during your senior year, you may
qualify for a five-month internship
-it a major Air Force medical facili-
ty To apply, you'll need an overall
2 50GPA Get a head start in the
Air Force Call
MSGT NICK NERO
COLLECT
explained that "several unfortu-
nate developments as of late have
sharpened our awareness of some
specific needs for added en me pre-
vention measures Richard
Brown, vice chancellor for busi-
ness attairs, said, "Much of the
lighting on campus is old technol-
ogy using more energy to pro-
duce the same light. The high
pressure sodium lamp produces
between 33 percent and 50 per-
( ent more light
Work for the project is being
contracted, and advertising is in
progress tor engineering. Brown
said, "It will begin as soon as
possible and we estimate that it
will be completed bv the end of
spring semester F.akin stated
theschool is "deeply appreciative"
of the "genuine concern" shown
bv Spangler and the emergency
funds for lighting at ECU.
Continued from page 1
DAVID'S AUTOMOTIVE
Is Now Open In Greenville!
We sell import and domestic parts ami
accessories at wholesale prices.
We also have a complete service center.
Make Us Your One Stop!
For Parts. Inr Sen. ice
Remember We Have It All
We Specialize in German Cars.
510 N Greene Si
- � 17 '9
return at around midnight the
same day. Cost tor the bus ride is
$20. Checks made payable to
(.reenv llle NOW can be brought
to the Student Store table on
Wednesday and Friday of this
week or to the Women's Studies
office in Brevvster A-204 from 1
p.m. until 5 p.m.
�je (fcast Carolinian
Director of Advertising
James F.J. McKee
Advertising Representatives
Phillip V.Cope
Kellej O'Connor
Patrick Williams
Guj .1. Harvej
Stephanie K. Emon
Adam T. Blankenship
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National Rate$5.75
Open RateS4.95
Local Open RateS4.75
Hulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours:
Monda - I- rida
10:00-5:00 pm
Phone:
757-6366

����758-8400
830-9579
M830-9480
�757-0003
756-3320
�757-1666
�-��?752-3172
Corripiv omputing355-2814
Dapper Oan's752-1750
David's Automobile 830-1779
Eib0758-4591
Fosdick's756-2011
Gr�9's752-8711
ITG355-5075
-My Lube756-2579
Kr�ger756-7031
Malpass Muffler758-7676
McBudget Office Furniture752-9834
Pantry752-7671
PePS758-2113
Ri0355-5000
Sharky's757-3658
Sports Fan Attic756-7487
Stadium Cleaners758-2701
Travel Express752-1663
Triangle Women's Health -800-433-2S30
Wash Pub752-5222






THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 7,1989
ECU boasts new communications department
By JOY NEWSOME
Special to The East Carolinian
Hard work with much coop-
eration has brought together the
new Department of Communica-
tionsat ECU sooner than expected.
According to Dr. Marie Farr,
acting associate dean for the
Communications Department, the
faculty has been extraordinarily
cooperative and fast at bringing
the units of the program together.
She said, "They are extremely,
knowledgeable in theirfield and
adds "The department is going to
be a great success due to the fac-
ulty
The designated time for the
department to begin was July,
1990. Instead, the department
began in October of '89.
The main changes in the aca-
demic program are centered in
the broadcasting department. The
new four track system to be fol-
lowed includes the following:
'General college requirements
for Baccalaureattc degree pro-
grams.
Six semester hours of foreign
language or word processing or
statistics.
The required core courses for
broadcasting.
Students will have to choose
a concentration in either Media
Production, Media Performance.
BroadcastCable Management or
Broadcast News.
Other changes in the broad-
cast program include an applica-
tion for admission to the depart-
ment and an interview similar to
that of the Theatre Arts Depart-
ment. Majors will also have to
maintain a "C" or better in all
required courses.
Due to the recently updated
journalism curriculum, only mi
nor changes will occur in the
course discipline. The requirement
changes will take effect in the
summer of 1990.
Some of the primary goals of
the new department are aimed to
give students a technical educa-
tion within a liberal arts philoso-
phy. Farr explains that the faculty
wants to teach students how to
listen, leam, analyze and critique.
Another important goal of the
department is to teach social re-
sponsibility by developing the
individual student's ability to
discover, evaluate, communicate,
make informed decisions and
recognize their ethical implica-
tions.
Dr. Beverly Merrick, a visit-
ing assistant professor of journal-
ism, said that there is the belief
thatjoumalistsshouldhavestrong
ethics and be the best kind of citi-
zen. Merrick explains that this
involves a strong component of
responsibility because journalists
filter information, affecting the
lives of others. She said that this
responsibility may sometimes
involve questioning ethics of ba-
sic freedoms, such as privacy.
Farr says the department
wants to emphasize ethics. "Oth-
ers (schools! do not do this
enough she said.
Before becoming a depart-
ment, there were approximately
200 communications majors total.
There is expected to be an increase
of interest in the field because it is
now more visible as a degree
possibility. Dr. James Cox, broad-
casting professor at ECU, explains,
"We have needed to be on our
own for some time. We were get-
ting to big too be housed with an-
other department" 1 leadds, "This
will give us higher visibility in
hopes that it will translate into
better funding for the depart-
ment
Because of the increase in in-
terest, there are no problems of
limited space for the department
and limited class size.
Professors hope that one of
the priorities of the new chairper-
son will be to deal with the lack of
facilities. The department cur-
rently has about four different
locations on campus. "This makes
it really difficult toget together for
reference Merrick said.
Merrick explained that with
theclass sizes being limited, it also
islimitingthegrowthof the newly
established department. She said
' there are classes that are prerequi-
sites for others, but because of the
filtering, students are unable to
move on.
Professors agree tha t there i s a
need to expand the number of
beginning courses.
The screening process to fill
the chair position of the ECU
Communications Department
began Nov 1. The search is an
external one.
UNC System grants funds for lighting
ByJORIEMUNNS
Special to The taat Carolinian
Students at ECU will soon see
the light.
ECU has been granted
S500,000of emergency funding for
safety-related lighting on campus.
Dr. Richard Eakin, ECU chancel-
lor, encouraged University of
North Carolina President CD.
Spangler to request theallixition
from the UNC Board of Gover-
nors. The monev will come from
a$6million repair and renovation
fund in thoL NC system. ECU will
provide an additional $78,200 from
parking revenuesand indirect cost
accounts.
The money will be spent to
add more pole-mounted lighting,
install building-mounted flood
lights, and re-lamp existing mer-
cury vapor lights with high pres-
sure sodium vapor lamps. The
high pressure sodium vapor lights
have an orange tint and put out
more light. According to City
Manager Greg Knowles, these
lights give an effect that is "pretty
close to daylight
Lights will be placed in high-
risk areas on and near campus.
With theallocated tunds,ECU will
place lights at parking lots behind
Joyner Library and Mendenhall
student Center, bv residence halls,
bv academic buildings, and along
frequently traveled pathways. ITie
citv of Greenville will provide
additional lighting in the areas
around Ninth Street and Fifth
Street, near the athletic complex,
and by sorority and fraternity
houses.
The reason for increased light-
ing is for safety purposes. Eakin
NOW
explained that "several unfortu-
nate developments as of late have
sharpened our a warenessof some
specific needs for added crime pre-
vention measures Richard
Brown, vice chancellor for busi-
ness affairs, said, "Much of the
lighting on campus is old technol-
ogy using more energy to pro-
duce the same light. The high
pressure sodium lamp produces
between 33 percent and 50 per-
cent more light
Work for the project is being
contracted, and advertising is in
progress for engineering. Brown
said, "It will begin as soon as
possible and we estimate that it
will be completed by the end of
spring semester Eakin stated
the school is "deeply appreciative"
oi the "genuine concern" shown
by Spangler and the emergency
funds for lighting at ECU.
Continued from page 1
DAVID'S AUTOMOTIVE
Is Now Open In Greenville!
We sell import and domestic parts and
accessories at wholesale prices.
We also have a complete service center.
Make Us Your One Stop!
For Parts, l;or Service
Remember We Have It All!
We Specialize in German Cars.
510 N Greene Si Greenville, NC
HM) 1779
DAVID S AUTOMO'IVE
Foreign & Dom�it.c Parts
mpoM A WV P�r-a Specialists
For ��
import & VW Parts Spar a
control. Other proposed legisla-
tion before North Carolina law-
makers include more cuts in or
deletion of the stateabortion fund,
and a parental consent law for
minors. These bills will come up
before the 1990 short session,
which begins Mav 21.
Yard, however, says that citi-
zens cannot let this issue be de-
rided tate by state. "Just as we
learned in the battle for racial
equality thai a nation cannot exist
halt slave and half free, we simi-
larly cannot accept women's re-
productive lives being enslaved
anywhere. We must keep fighting
for a national response to guaran-
tee women's right to abortion
Greenville NOW Executive
Officer Tracy Sykes agrees. "We
must maintain women's funda-
mental right to choose that was
guaranteed in 1973 with Roe vs.
Wade She says that this is the
first time that Greenville NOW
has taken such a strong role in
mobilizing area citizens and get-
ting buses together "but 1 can't
think of a more important reason
to do it she adds.
Buses will leave from the cor-
ner of Eighth and James streets (in
front of Mendenhall Student
Center) at 5 a.m. Nov. 12, and will
sss
CLIFFS
Seafood House and Oyster B
Washington Highway (N C 33 ExtGraenville North Carolir
Phon� 752-3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Shrimp
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Activist says animals are somebodies
Animal rights speaker visits ECU
By MEGAN KEANE
pci�l to The tai Carolinian
"We are the voice of the voice-
less. " opened Dr. Tom Regan, a
professor at North Carolina State
University, in his speech support-
ing animal rights.
Regan spoke Thursday at 7
p.m. in the General Classroom
Building, located on ECU campus.
I he speech, "Animal Rights,
1 hi man Wrongs was sponsored
by the East Carolina Honor's
Organization.
Regan is known as "the Intel-
lectual Leader of Animal Rights
and has written manv books in-
chiding "The Case of Animal
Rights This book is considered
by manv to be the most significant
in contribution to animal rights.
There are two dimensions to
this topic of unethical treatment
of animals, according to Regan.
First, the question of fact: "What
are these animals, we as human
beings, use to eat and wear on our
backs?" The second being the
ethical side: "How we ought to
live Regan went on to point out
that "the mental life of these ani-
mals differ from ours in degree,
not in kind They have a range of
emotions including fear, anxiety,
happiness and excitability.
In answering the first ques-
tion Regan said, "Animals have
preferences in which they make
choices. They are not biological
clocks, they are biological some-
bodies - not somethings He
said he feels in being somebody
one will have a biographv, and
animals are like this. Regan said
that "there is a quantum leap
between us and animals
On the ethical or moral side,
Regan described how humans
should behave. He said he believes
thevshould treatoneanotherwith
respect and never use force, co-
hersion or deceit in order for one-
self to benefit. "Weareall the same
in biographical state he said. "We
cannot be rational to denv this
right to animals
Regan said he feels that all
non-human animals should have
these rights and that humans can
no longer refuse them this right.
The first step would he to stop
eating animals, Regan said.
Regan said he feels today's
generation holds the key to help
idealism will bo reborn. The
number of people committed to
this ethical service is growing
rapidly, according to Regan.
Maritime History restores cannon
By VALERIE TOULOUMBADJIAN
Stall Wntrr
After a four year period of
restoration, what first appeared to
a be a large rustv colored rock
turned out to be a four-centurv-
old English cannon. It could be the
oldest English piece ever found in
the U.S according to Brad lev A.
Rodgers, an archeologist in the
Maritime History and Underwa-
ter Research Program at ECU.
The cast-iron gun, dating back
to the late lMh century, was re-
stored aftera long process of peel-
ing its layers of calcium carbonate
and stabilizing its metal. The deli-
cate operation was directed bv
Rodgers. "The process was pains-
taking he said. "You have to be
very patient
The gun was donated to ECU
in 1983 after it had been dredged
out of the Atlantic Ocean bv a
fishing trawler years before.
The cannon is a four feet six
inches long land piece, weighing
300 pounds. Its main accessories
� a grape shot and wadding
are well preserved The gun was
"ready to tire" when the restora-
tion was completed. C.J.N Trol-
lope, an ordinance expert trom
England, identified it as an Eng-
lish Falcon because of its unusual
moldings and muzzle. This spe-
cific category of weapon connects
the piece to the earliest English
settlements of the east coast.
According to the researchers,
onlv an archeological survey of
the original site area could give
valuable information which
Rally
would solve the mystery of the
cannon's origins bv providing
other artifacts. Rodgers said he
hoped an expedition would get a
funding for such a survey and that
"it would be great tor ECU
However, he added that it would
cost a great deal of money and
"it's way bevond our capacity.
We're looking for grants trom
national agencies
The restoration for this his-
torical treasure has drawn inter-
national attention to the Program
in Maritime History and Under-
water Research at ECU.
The cannon will be displayed
at the end of the month in the new
Maritime building (previously the
Leisure Studies Building ton Ninth
Street, behind lovner Library.
Continued from page 1
the march has nothing to do with
1 lalloween, simply the noise ordi-
nance AmieCullipher, member
oi the "Stop the Nonsense" Com-
:a member of the Ameri-
can Civil Liberties Union, said.
However, there were 140 people
arrested and those of you that were
arrested and are filing a law suit
please contact me after the rally.
We're compiling a letter to the
ACLU
According to Kit Kimberly, a
graduate student within the Eng-
lish department, there are other
issues that concern students that
need to be addressed. "The main
problem I see with the "Stop the
Nonsense" organization is that
they offer no long term solutions
Kimberly said. "Students need to
get involved in this town's politi-
cal structure by voting. If not, we
are at the mercv of the citv coun-
cil
SGA President Roakes
stressed the importance of student
political participation in the com-
munity. According to Roakes, if
students registerand vote, thecity
will be forced to listen to what
they have to sav.
Ronald Speier, dean of Stu-
dent Life, said, "I'm impressed
with the way the students have
handled things. I think that thev
have the right to ask the city to
reconsider the noise ordinance
decision, because I think it was
handled poorly
According to James DePuy,
director of ECU Public Safety, the
students at the rally were well
behaved and professional. "I be-
lieve tha t this is the way that things
get done within the city govern-
ment DePuy said.
The "Stop the Nonsense" rally
and march is being supported by
ECU's student government, the
Panhellenk Association and the
Inter-Fraternity Council, accord-
ing to Jennifer Vanderburg, SGA
vice president.
The Panhellcnic Association
contributed $70 to the "Stop the
Nonsense" Committee to pay for
the required march permit and
the purple material used tor arm-
bands said Barbara Lamb,
Panhellenic president.
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Continued from page 1
Coliseum. The two AFROTC or-
ganizations request support in
their efforts. Arnold Air Society
and Angel Hight will pass out
ribbons every day this week in
front of the Student Store.
According to the National
League of Families of American
Prisoners and Missing in South-
east Asia, "nearly 2,400 service-
men and civilians are still unac-
counted for in Indochina
These men must not be forgot-
ten. The Arnold Air Society and
Angel Right encourage all stu-
dents to show their dedication
and concern in order to see that
these men return to their families.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 7, 1989
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THE
PANTRY





�Ic iEaHt (Ear0ltnfan
� w ��- .tmmmumttif urn IW
David Herring, cwwuiy
STEIM 1ANIE FOISOM, MMf,nS ��
AMES F.J. MCKEE, Orertdr oMdorriMmf
Lori Martin, Nta�E
CARCM INECUSICK, rmmmmim
Mi haei Martin,smE�
Scott Maxwell, m� ux�
Carrie Armstrong, ehihm�r a�w
STEPl IANIE SlNOl ETON, Qm&ttw
Si S KKI ss, q-� Uf
ART NlXON,CnriitMaMai
STLIART ROSNER, B�.�a Mm�ga
Pamela Cope, m r� s�pm��
MATTIIEVV RlC'l ITER, Cmirftim Moxjo
TRACY VVEED, l�iw.in Mjnagf
Jeff Parker, suihamam
Beth Lupton, s
November 7. hsu
OPINION
Page 1
Where will we go from here?
Our next step begins
with Thursday's march
Visions of purple were scattered
sparsely around the ECU campus
yesterday. lather a lot oi people
didn't buy their fushia sweaters this
weekend or they weren't hip on
dressing to suit "Purple Monday"
For those who forgot, though,
purple strips oi cloth were hanaed
out at various central points on
campus.
Despite the dress, posters were
hung on various walls and doors as
a reminder that Monday was the
day ECU students were going to
take a stand against the city- Univer-
sity students, a part of Greenville,
were setting themselves apart from
the community. We stood as a sepa-
rate entity at the afternoon's rally.
The idea oi students taking an
interest in city politics is one long-
overdue. Greenville has accomo-
dated a growing university much to
the delight oi businesses, but to the
dismay oi residents not tolerant
with the college mentality.
These residents are the same
who were likely to be the most vocal
at city council meetings when the
topic of lailoween came up. They
were also likely to be the ones push-
ing for a noise ordinance planned
specifically to do away with any
sizeable gatherings or outdoor
bands.
This won't be the end of at-
tempted restrictions on the college
lifestyle, but it can be the end of
students paying little attention to
what's going on in the city. It's time
to shed ourselves of the inconsis-
tency we'e shown Greenville. Ei-
ther we care or we don't. Either this
is the beginning oi something or it's
just a momentary hysteria.
It's too bad we had to wait until
bad relations between students and
Greenville power hit a climax, but at
least we're starting. As the march to
city hall begins on Thursday, it's
important to remember that we
need to stand up for rights we feel
are violated. But we also need to
remember that the confrontation
between officials and students
needs to be one that brings the city
and university closer together, not
farther apart.
Our representatives at this Uni-
versity, namely the executive mem-
bers of SGA, need to start represent-
ing us at the city council meetings.
What's happened so far is in the
past. There may be a possibility for
change, but even more importantly
this march and yesterday's rally
need to be the start of a continuous
attempt to be involved in citv poli-
tics.
We can't drop this thing after
Thursday and we can't concentrate
soley on issues gone by. If we do,
then the city is given no reason to
respect us. Our actions now need to
be a statement of the interest ECU
has in bridging the gap between
students and the community in the
future.
We're on our way to something
better. Perhaps one day we can be
looked upon as the University we
are, instead of the image of chaos
we've become.
WITH AJ0R(�6A
W0H RDWNP
exm OIL SPILL
WITH THE
PEKIN6 RICfTS
mume
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(OMTHeH0NECeS6
Spectrum Rules
In addition to "The Campus Forum" section of the newspaper, The
East Carolinian features "The Campus Spectrum This is an opinion
column by guest writers from the student body and faculty. The columns
printed in "The Campus Spectrum" will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation. The columns are restricted only with
regard to rules of grammar and decency. Persons submitting columns
must be willing to accept byline credit for their efforts, as no entries from
ghost writers will be published.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the Publications Building, across from
the en trance to Joyner Library. For purposes of verification, all letters must
include the name, major, classification, address, phone number and the
signature of the author(s). Letters are limited to 300 words or less, double-
spaced, typed or neatly printed.
p.t v l :t i
H-LA K t �
Greenville Vice versus Don Johnson
To the editor:
Tonight 1 opened up the East
Carolinian and a headline read
"Officials say not at Tar River was
handled with precision As I read
the article I became quite amused
and began to chuckle to myself
thinking, "that partv at Tar River
was a riot?" I don't think so.
I am a freshman at ECU but
have lived in Miami, Florida all of
my life. As a resident of Miami I
have lived through real riots and 1
am fully aware of the danger they
possess. In my opinion, what
happened at Tar River was not a
not. It was merely a massive, so-
cial party.
Granted, Greenville has had
its rough times and has had nots
in the past, but I believe the police
went overboard in their accusa-
tions on Tuesday night's affair.
Our city council and the Green-
ville police are good examples of
what can happen when the wrong
people are given authority. Maybe
they should stick with giving stu-
dents dailv parking tickets. This is
not TV. If it was we could name
this little affair "Greenville -
Vice
The students should have the
right of where to go, who to go
with and when to go. We are not
children, vet the authorities treat
us as such. I think that if the cops
around Greenville really want
some action they should transfer
to Miami or some other high crime
area. We do not need babv-sitters,
we need police officers. I doubt
they could handle a real not ana 1
challenge them to. It is ridiculous
tocart 140innocent students off to
jail just for ttying to have a good
time. What do they expect us to do
when thev close up the town, lock
the dormitories and allow no visi-
tors? Where arc we to go and what
are we to do?
I believed that Greenville was
a little more peaceful, but the sour
cops and bad publicity has made
me feel right at home in Miami.
I am all for the retaliation against
Greenville and hope that every
student arrested in Tuesday
night's party will take the city to
court and win. Just because some-
one is given a badge does not
entitle them to play bangstick tag!
Greenville is a bad joke and as
of Tuesday night I have lost all
respect for the city. Worst of all,
my trust and admiration for the
ECU and Greenville police has
been shattered. To have a good
community we need fair law en-
forcers and Greenville is far from
that. Greenville needs more Andy
Griffith's than Don Johnson's!
Thomas Barry
J
Freshman
Maritime History and
Underwater Research
Arrested for
going home
To the editor:
I'll get right to the point and
keep this short and sweet. On Oct.
31, my roommate and I were ar-
rested at Tar River Estates for al-
legedly being in a group of three
or more people and failing to dis-
perse when told to do so by au-
thorized officials.
1. When we were approached
there were only two of us � my
roommate and I � who were
walking in the specific area. We
were not with or close to the larger
group.
2. NO ONE EVER told me to
leave, go home, evacuate the area,
etc.
3. We had arrived at Tar River
to visit a friend, and after only five
minutes or so we realized there
was too much confusion at the
end of the street, so we turned to
leave.
4.1 made up my own mind to
"disperse not even knowing that
people were being ordered to do
so. As I was attempting to "dis-
perse something resembling a
Star Wars clone ran towards me,
grabbed mebvthearmand shoved
me into a bus. No one offered any
explanation as to why this was
happening to me.
- my point is this:
I was sober, I had no alcohol
on me, I was not veiling, I was not
throwing anything or damaging
property. I had no intention of
causing anv trouble, I was only
trying to go home.
Yet, this Halloween 1 was
"treated" to an arrest, a mug shot,
and 3 12 hours in the Pitt County
Courthouse. Being the daughter
of an ex Highway Patrolman, 1
have always respected law en-
forcement officers and have never
had anv conflict with the authori-
ties. But I'm sorry fellas - inno-
cent people were arrested Tues-
day night. People say that we
"were in the wrong place at the
wrong time But that doesn't
bnngback my $30 bond fee, or the
time I wasted at the Pitt County
jail, or the classes I'll miss when 1
have to appear in court for some-
thing I didn't do.
Suzanne Fleming
Senior
Communications Major
The Gestapo
To the editor:
The Gestapo is the brainchild
of Nazi Germany it doesn't be-
long in Greenville.
Jeff Campagna
Senior
Communications Art
Third party
To the editor:
The circus has come to town.
The Reformists and SGA arc put-
ting on the show in center ring.
Now all we need arc the fire mating
man and snake handler.
The debates over Reformist
Party constitution and the SGA
elections no longer concern the
student body at large. Both sides
have whined so badly that we do
not care anymore.
First of all, for a group with so
much political potential, the Re-
formist Party has lost its credibil-
ity and respect from those who sa-
lute the democratic process. If they
were all they were cracked up to
be, then they would have run a
second time and won again rather
than pulling out. That remindsmc
of a child pouting after not getting
hisher way.
Secondly, by pullingout, they
showed their disconcern for all
those that voted for them the first
time. Then there is the "Don't
Vote" movement. Sure. Let's just
forget about freedom, democracy,
and apple-pie. This sounds like
pro-anarchy to me. Believe it or
not, Anarchy is NOT good. Plus,
in this kind of display, often indi-
viduals such as Noriega, Kadafi,
Castro, & Khomeini came into
power on the national levels. What
concern does such a group have
for the student body. Not much
obviously.
But, don't get me wrong. 1
have no love for a predominately
Greek, self-serving SGA, either. 1
understand the need for a "watch
dog Notice I never said a Re-
formist couldn't call a spade a
spade.
What EC I really needs is a
third partv A partv that u ill listen
to the most vital part of this ul
lege, the student. Itdoesn't matter
if it's a Greek student, a Reformist
student, or an unconcerned stu
dent. We need a partv for ALL
STUDENTS. Then, and'only then,
will Student Government do the
job that its name implies
I wek omeany new party that
will concern itself with the issues
concerning the student and avoid
pouting and name calling.
Lee 1 lowering
Math Major
Sophomore
Racial Equality
I o the edit i
What is equalityI he term
equalit) is one that America is
based on yet cannot define or
decide the best method of achiev-
ing it. I he definition oi equality
could be several things it can be
economic, social, or physical par
ity.
Equality is something that has
particular!) eluded the African
and Indian American These
groups have been unduly sub
jigated,oppressed and tormented
bv the White Anglo Saxon ProtCS
tant (not all ol them, only some
demented ones
The American Indian had
peacefully existed on this conti-
nent for main centuries prior to
the age ol exploration. After
America's discovery by Colum-
bus in 14s2, herds oi somewhat
unwelcomed foreigners began
Hocking lo this new land. Because
ol their own selfishness and de-
sire for gain and profit they began
exploiting and or eliminating
these pre vtously happy and peace-
ful people in order to take their
commodities and their land.
I lowever, that wasn't enough
for these new settlers. They needed
some means of cheap labvor to
fuel their agrarian society. They
decided to go over to Africa and
see what they could come up with
there. They were able to brain-
wash and manipulate the African
leadersandkingsintoselling them
their prisonersof war A s stem of
oppressive, abusive, and inhu
mane treatment of African (now
African-American) people that
was called the slave trade had been
born.
The descendents of these
people who have been oppresed
still feel the effects in a mightv
way. I shudder to think that any
compassionate individual can say
thay the job of working to obtain
equality for all Americans is fin-
ished. The fact of the matter is that
this type ol systematic mistreat-
ment cannot be easily erased. It
lingers in the hearts and minds of
the oppressors and the oppressed
for centuries to come and it will
not be ended with a few decades
of "moderate progress.
It is the intent of this special
column to address and focus on
an issue that is oftentimes painful
to deal with. This will be done in a
fair and hopefully objective man-
ner. It is my intent to engage in a
meaningful dialogue of the fact-
findingand solution seeking proc-
ess. This column will examine the
topic of "Equality of the Races" in
light of the events of the distant
history, recent past, present, and
future periods of time in terms of
East Carolina University and the
United States of America.
Darek McCullcrs
Freshman
General College





I HI EAST CAROLINIAN
State and Nation
NOVEMBER 7,1989 PAGE 5
Voter turnout
worldwide
1
Proposed voting plan gets mixed signals
Participation ot eligible
voters In elections'
Country
Australia
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key
. � e
Hv DeWAYNE WIC MIAM
(.jnnrtt rm Sitsu ��
i 1
United States
'�� turnout
94 1 7
93 69
92 59
9? 27
89 00
88 44
�� !
80 19
:
50.15
RICHMOND Va. In this
city, the former capital ot the
i. onfederai . Virginia's gubema
tonal race is a contest for the hearts
and minds ot a select group ot
people
1 ierc as inevt rv other so tjon
ot the state campaign workers
scramble to get registered voters
to the polls I uesda It the) are
luckv (SO percent mav vote less
than halt Virginia's voting age
population
- . MCBCWi
SOI.T3W �
lna natu �n that
its di ratu

tself on
lie Old
I iminion is not alone. The nation
ranks last among the world's
democ racies in voter turnout.
turnout in the past five presi
dential elections has fallen l l
percent. Only halt the nation's
voting age population casf ballots
last year a problem blamed on
restrictive, confusing and intimi-
dating registration procedures.
It's been difficult to get poor
blacks and working class whites
registered in this state says
i fiarles Duncan, who directs the
let v Hit Hie Vote" campaign tor
I Vmocrats seeking statewide of-
fice
It's the people who have the
most to gam from the election
process who are not registered
saysDuncan, who is seeking votes
tor Democrat I. Douglas Wilder,
the front runner to become the
nation's first black elected gover-
nor.
To solve that problem. Con-
gress and civil rights leaders are
wrangling over a plan that would
make it easier to register, but also
would purge nonvoters every two
years.
The bill, called "the most
important piece of voting legisla-
tion since the Voting Rights Act ot
1965 by C urtisians, director of
I he Committee tor the Study of
the American Electorate, would
allow registration:
Educators attempt to upgrade schools
I Vy'I TEVILLI A State
ators sa the v eicome the
state I egislarure s latest attempt
lent ai hit a ted
administra
: tor the
.ements I to in-
I i s see
to reach the
i fii reas identai hieve-
t must be sent to
nl of Public
ti hoi by March 1 and, it
i b the State board ot
ation, put into effect for the
ol vear
Since the time is so rushii.
raid that rather than being
inits will (fashion
' ' ' reases aftei the . areer
Idei in which we over-
mingh oppose said erry
director of the
t Educatorsand
Cumberland
turn, le.e, t
indi idual

hov
-
idgi ts as
nal
uip
and dri i
cided loi lead ol
date '
: ' ��bill.
In scl intai
accept the in reased flexil
ottered bv the bill, legis
holding teachers and print
accountal
i ontinues.
tlexibilitv in
sources nd
Allowing school:
how they use re
enabling schools t
request �� i vers from regulations
and Mluies that inhibit sound
practices make good
business sons
( ei tain state reporting re-
quirements will be waived tor
rtici mtsol SB 2, and adminis-
e welcome the pros-
pect i � ii duction in paperwork.
I he (ieneral Assembly also will
allow the State Board of Educa-
tion to wai e state laws nd poli-
cies regulating (.lass sio, assign-
ment of teacher assistants, the use
ot state-adopted textbooks and
teacher certification it the local
�1 board can show that to d
so will help them reach accounta-
bility goals.
Ivo Wortman, superintendent
of Harnett County schools, said,
"I believe in some basic uniform
standards that apply statewide, in
curriculums specifically. But I
think the local school units need
some flexibility,and SB-2 provides
that. Needs in Harnett are differ-
ent from needs m Cumberland.
See EDUCATION, page 7
Bv mail.
- At libraries, schools, public
assistance and unemployment
offices and other such government
offices.
Where driver's, marriage,
hunting and fishing licenses are
sold.
The congressional plan is lan-
guishing while civil rights leaders
tight over an amendment ottered
bv William Thomas, R-Calif.
Under his proposal, people
who have not voted tor two years
would be purged from the rolls it
they do not respond to letters
seeking to determine whether thev
have moved out ot the jurisdic-
tion. Using a similar system, Vir-
ginia dropped more than 160,000
voters this vear
Late last month, representa-
tivesof the three groups met in the
offices of House Majority Whip
William Gray. They were joined
bv Eddie Williams, president of
the Joint Center for Political Stud-
ies; (ireg Moore of the Rainbow
Coalition's Citizens Education
liind, and Democratic National
CommitteeChairman Ron Brown.
lor five hours thev tried, unsuc-
cessfully, to reach a compromise.
Williams pressed for a vote,
even it it meant leaving the purg-
ing provision intact. The others
told (i ray and Brown the bill, with
its purge provision, would not get
their support.
The compromise limits the
purging to convicted felons, the
mentally ill, the deceased, those
who acknowledge moving out of
a jurisdiction and those the Postal
Service confirms have moved.
"The essential framework of
this bill has to remain intact or you
don't have theconsensusyou need
tor passage, or the likelihood of it
getting the president's signature
saj sJans.
All sid agree that without
this legislation election turnout
will continue to drop. And candi-
dates hke Wilder and his GOP
opponent, J. Marshall Coleman,
can look forward to having their
political fortunes decided bv the
dwindling number of voters who
make their way to the polls in the
world's leading democracy.
'� ' tgt wru.� eti rk
House considers delegating
oil spill controls to states

a
itate
ion c
I
pate theScl pi
tvAct ' ��
- : c E liffusi
� �. b extendii
il superintendents.
�mentand
89 known
s state ,iu-
iptions to
1 he, in
i Si � r Bicak" this
'�. this institute n
textbt k �k.s and n i
�n;ses just a
ilum filled v it Ii
�s Vi mtests, prizes,
mtain
�:ing
Sol � is HO if i iur
red b sn v
ire r lilts (i
.nut " trail; I
Plus mn nn re
down in the
ance. lest -� i -
: :
ratio of high schoi
proceed to college will ga
well schools and tea
done thi �
C iood det isioi
� st to the pt
in the cas�
to the c hildn
paper comp
the C. Schi . , �.
tion, � Publi v-
and sv hool administratt n s
InNorthCai
systems and neai �
there are profound differences in
needs and c hallengt s the :
By DIANE DUSTON
The v'ik jTt; Ptcm
WASHINGTON (AP) rhe
power of states to set stiff liabilitv
for oil spills is the focus this week
as the I louse votes on a measure
that became a t ip priori ty after the
massive Exxon spill in Alaska's
Prince William Sound last spring
Months oi wrangling have
produced a bill praised widely for
moving the federal government
forward on oil spill prevention and
reaction to spills, btit criticized for
banning the states from enacting
liability laws that go further than
the proposed federal limit. That
issue, plus the question of when
brochure
s I .11
txt. ISl
WlOil It !If U1U
I he niotini.ilii itui 1ms up to its name
TYROUA
4 BLIZZARD
ELPkN
Ski By Day.
Party By Night.
(And You
Thought School
Was Hard Work.)
BUSCH BARDtNoMHE OmCflLJ
1 mm
�)C
M Stars ftaE Out Rll Dav
. :
� -

:� tertan
r x

udition Dates:
GR1 1 NSRORO
OKIH CAROl 1
I lies ov 14 1US1'
� '� p m
I ni ersit ol
North C arolina
� 1 ni ersit t enter
leander Re�om
WILL1 VMSBURG
VIRGINIA
Sat De� 4 984
11 "oii p m
i h lardens
Busch
GAfUXNS
, tvX THCU)COUrsmTrr
s�.� .MIIU'SMl. .4
� �
dfma V B "1 J .1 -y Irom Ne 1 ngland
�, � N nthern N I m � . la (11(8021 4M 8S01
fo, Ski QnK�t - HI MU) 4M ?I5I
COLLEGE GRADl ATES
Put your education to work�become a
Lawyer's Assistant
The Career for the 90s"
at The Nationaleater for Paralegal Training
� oldest ind largest graduate level HA approscd
program in the Southeast
� Employment issisijiuc over 1 (too employers in sH
stales have hired uir graduates
� s month i.las pruuram wiih housing aailahlr
� " month rsemng program
� Diversified urruulum speiialir in Litigation
' orporations or Real Fstate aruf I'rohatemi hiding
omputcrs in the Hrailut ol lass
Meet with our representative
Monday, November 13, 9 am-5 pm
Coiit.nl ('nllrgr Placement (Iffice foi an appointment
The National (enter for Paralegal Training
�ot Pr.hirrc Id M shinu &A (05�
800-223-2618 InCeorgta call 404-266-1060
I lease send mr intormaimn aNui a career as a !a�ser s Assistant
Same
ddress
( its Mate .ip
t ollegr S.r t.rad
Phone l)A J EVENING!J
er ir �� i�i ��u.i i � �mi,ninn�w�wwi�
unlimited liability shmild bc im-
posed tor negligence, is expected
to be addressed during final ac-
tion on the bill, scheduled for
Wednesday.
In other business this week,
party leaders will continue seek-
ing agreement on a crucial debt-
limit extension, a deficit-reduction
bill and other measures. The gov-
ernment has reached its borrow-
ing limit of $2 s trill'on, and de-
fault will occur unless the ceiling
is extended early in the week.
1 he Senate also plans to de-
bate legislation that would ban
smoking on virtually all domestic
airline flights Senate passage
See LEGISLATION, page 7
Espirit Has Arrived!
Check it out along with Betsy Johnson. Area Code,
California Ivy & Pepe Jeans and More
oaav
fc0Ncd





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
State and Nation
NOVEMBER 7,1989 PAGE 5
Voter turnout
worldwide
Proposed voting plan gets mixed signals
Participationof eligible
voters In elections
Country turnout
Australia94 17
Belgium93 59
Austria92 59
Turkey92 27
Italy89.00
W Germany8857
Denmark88.44
Venezuela87 75
Greece80.19
France78 29
Canada7566
Japan71 40
India5690
United States50.15
"Rep'tbl5 intxniduor- on turnout in
vm rnosf r�cent wectoni In rr� 1900s
Solos Corjfcrisiona Rewarcfi S�rvH�
Catty Mi s.avH7 News Sw'V'Oe
By UeWAYNE WICKHAM
RICHMOND, Va. In this
city, the former capital of the
Confederacy, Virginia's guberna-
torial race is a contest tor the hearts
and minds of a select group of
people.
1 lere, as in every other section
of the state, campaign workers
scramble to get registered voters
to the polls Tuesday. If they are
lucky, 60 percent may vote less
than halt Virginia's voting age
population.
In a nation that prides itself (in
its democratic process, the Old
Dominion is not alone. The nation
ranks last among the world's
democracies in voter turnout.
Turnout in the past five presi-
dential elections has fallen 11
percent. Only half the nation's
voting age population cast ballots
last year � a problem blamed on
restrictive, confusing and intimi-
dating registration procedures.
"It's been difficult to get poor
blacks and working-class whites
registered in this state says
Charles Duncan, who directs the
'Get Out The Vote" campaign for
Democrats seeking statewide of-
fice.
"It's the people who have the
most to gain from the election
process who are not registered
says Duncan, who is seeking votes
for Democrat L. Douglas Wilder,
the front-runner to become the
nation's first black elected gover-
nor.
To solve that problem, Con-
gress and civil rights leaders are
wrangling over a plan that would
make it easier to register, but also
would purge nonvoters every two
years.
The bill, called "the most
important piece of voting legisla-
tion since the Voting Rights Act of
1965 by Curtis Cans, director of
The Committee for the Studv of
the American Electorate, would
allow registration:
� By mail.
� At libraries, schools, public
assistance and unemployment
offices and other such government
offices.
� Where driver's, marriage,
hunting and fishing licenses are
sold.
The congressional plan is lan-
guishing while civil rights leaders
fight over an amendment offered
by William Thomas, R-Calif.
Under his proposal, people
who have not voted for two years
would be purged from the rolls if
For five hours they tried, unsuc-
cessfully, lo reach a compromise.
Williams pressed for a vote,
even if it meant leaving the purg-
ing provision intact. The others
told Gray and Brown the bill, with
its purge provision, would not get
their support.
The compromise limits the
purging to convicted felons, the
mentally ill, the deceased, those
who acknowledge moving out of
a jurisdiction and those the Postal
Service confirms have moved.
"The essential framework of
they do not respond to letters thisbill has to remain intactoryou
seeking todetermine whether thev don't havetheconsensusyou need
Educators attempt to upgrade schools
FAYETTEVILLE(AP)�State
educators sav thev welcome the
state legislature's latest attempt
to upgrade education by giving
local school unitsa louder voice in
the way students are educated.
But some school administra-
tors sav the timetable for the
improvements is too strict to in-
sure the most creative ideas see
light. Plans on how to reach the
goal of increasing student achieve-
ment must be sent must be sent to
the State Department of Tublic
Instruction bv March 1 and, if
approved bv the State Board oi
Education, put into effect for the
1990-91 school year.
"Since the time is so rushed,
we are a f raid tha t ra t her tha n being
innovative, units will (fashion
merit increases after) the Career
Ladder Plan, which we over-
whelmingly oppose, " said ferry
Winberry, a state director of the
VC. Association of Educatorsand
president of the Cumberland
Countv chapter.
i or those who opt to partici-
pate. theSchool Improvement and
Accountability Art of 1989, known
as Senate Bill 2, diffuses state au-
thority by extending options to
local superintendents. Thev, in
turn, leave some decisions up to
individual school principals, par-
ticularly on such judgments as
how state money is spent.
Expenditures for instructional
materials, supplies and equip-
ment, textbooks, testing support
and drivers education can be de-
cided locally instead of by man-
date from Raleigh as in the past.
according to provisions of the bill.
In school units that voluntarily
accept the increased flexibility
offered by the bill, legislators are
holding teachers and principals
accountable for student perform-
ance, lest scores, school atten-
dance, parent involvement and the
ratio of high school graduates who
proceed to college will gauge how
well schools and teachers have
done their job.
"Good decisions are made
closest to the point of production
� in the case1 of education, closest
to the children says a briefing
paper compiled tor members of
the VC. School Boards' Associa-
tion, VC. Public School Forum
and school administrators.
n North Carolina's 134 school
systems and nearly 2,000 schools
there are profound differences in
needs and challenges the report
continues. "Allowing schools
flexibility in how thev use re-
sources and enabling schools to
request waivers from regulations
.ud policies that inhibit sound
educational practices make good
business sense
Certain state reporting re-
quirements will be waived for
participants of SB-2, and adminis-
trators sav they welcome the pros-
pect of a reduction in paperwork.
The General Assembly also will
allow the State Board of Educa-
tion to waive state laws and poli-
cies regulating class size, assign-
ment of teacher assistants, the use
of state-adopted textbooks and
teacher certification � if the local
school board can show that to do
so will help them reach accounta-
bility goals.
EvoWortman, superintendent
of Harriett County schools, said,
"1 believe in some basic uniform
standards that apply statewide, in
curriculums specifically. But 1
think the local school units need
some flexibility, and SB-2 provides
that. Needs in Harnett are differ-
ent from needs in Cumberland.
See EDUCATION, page 7
have moved out of the jurisdic-
tion. Using a similar svstem, Vir-
ginia dropped .r.re than 160,(X)()
voters thij year
J
Late last month, representa-
tivesof the three groups met in the
offices of House Majority Whip
William Gray. They were joined
by Eddie Williams, president of
the joint Center for Political Stud-
ies; Greg Moore of the Rainbow
Coalition's Citizens Education
Fund, and Democratic National
CommitteeChairman Ron Brown.
for passage, or the likelihood of it
getting the president's signature
says Cans.
All sides agree that without
this legislation election turnout
will continue to drop. And candi-
dates like Wilder and his GOP
opponent, j. Marshall Coleman,
can look forward to having their
political fortunes decided by the
dwindling number of voters who
make their way to the polls in the
world's leading democracy.
Zfopynfht ltMt. USA TOO AW
Applr ColUgr lofvrmmtutn Sttuork
House considers delegating
oil spill controls to states
Welcome to the USA
In 19S8,12.46 million
foreigners visited the
USA. Where they
came from:
t Victors (in
oT
omie
'SIS
Take a SnowBrcak" this
winter. At this institution
there arc no textbooks and no
required courses. � just a
5 d.i curriculum filled with
parties, races, contests, prizes,
and li ts i il big nic aintain
Vermont skiing.
V t only is 80 of our
m tuntam c rvered by sn( v
making, there arc 17 lifts to
take u up mk t rails t(
get d n i Plus even m re
a s u i get down in the
evenings I
Fi �� free brochures, call
1 (800) 343-4300 exi li
The mountain that lives up to its name
TYROUA
4 BLIZZARD
EZ.AV
Ski By Day.
Party By Night.
(And You
Thought School
Was Hard Work.)
Syyce
By DIANE DUSTON
The Aft�ociJted Pros
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
power of states to set stiff liabilitv
for oil spills is the focus this week
as the House votes on a measure
that became a top priority after the
massive Exxon spill in Alaska's
Prince William Sound last spring.
Months of wrangling have
produced a bill praised widely for
moving the federal government
forward on oil spill prevention and
reaction to spills, bfit criticised fbr
banning the states from enacting
liability laws that go further than
the proposed federal limit. That
issue, plus the question of when
tataiNs The Ol
unlimited liability should be im-
posed for negligence, is expected
to be addressed during final ac-
tion on the bill, scheduled for
Wednesday.
In other business this week,
party leaders will continue seek-
ing agreement on a crucial debt-
limit extension, a deficit-reduction
bill and other measures. The gov-
ernment has reached its borrow-
ing limit of $2.8 trilhon, and de-
fault will occur unless the ceiling
is extended early in the week.
"The Senate also plans to de-
bate legislation that would ban
smoking on virtually all domestic
airline flights. Senate passage
See LEGISLATION, page 7
Espirit Has Arrived!
U
M
The Stars Ore Out Hll Hay1
America s premier theme
p.irk in Williamsburg,
,i is conducting audi-
tions for over 250 singers
dancers musicians,
.ini't artists actors
technicians and super
visors i on i ould be
part of the magic that
tmlv makes Bum h
Gardens an entertain
ment "experieiH
so get your .u t
together and
'shine' at our
1990 auditions
XlulltlKlls 1 tl�
1' � mins I or
additional infer
mation all
1 boo 253-3302
Audition Dates:
GRI FNSBORO
NORTH CAROLINA
I ties . No 14. 1989
12:00 3:00p.m
University of
North Carolina
lliott University Center
Vlexander Room
WIl I IAMSBURG
VIRGINIA
sat Dec 9, 1989
12:00 5:00 p.m.
Busch Gardens
DUSCH
MOtbgQUNTKr
WH 11 MW �V V
An Attirm.ihw' A.nn
I qu.il Opptxiunitx Employer M 1 H
for Area I odfinf. call 1 (800) 444 9404 or from Ne t ngljnd
NY Northern NJ and Canada rail (80?) 464 8501
for sii 9�port rail (�0?) 464 PIS1
COLLEGE GRADUATES
Put your education to work�become a
Lawyer's Assistant
"The Career for the 90's"
at The National Center for Paralegal Training
� ()'dcst and largest graduate level ABA approved
program in the Southeast
� Employment assistance�over 1.000 employers in 8
states have hired our graduates
� 5 month da program with housing available
� jnonth evening program
� Diversified Curriculum�specialize in litigation.
Corporations, or Real Estate and Probate�including
Computers in the Practice of Law
Meet with our representative
Monday, November 13, 9 am-5 pm
Contact College Placement Office for an appointment
The National Center for Paralegal Training
800-223-2618 mGeorgia caii404-266-1060
Please send me informal ion about a career as a Lawyer's Assistant
Name
Address
Oly
253
State
Zip
College
Phone DAY LL
Vr drad
EVENING IL
Check it out along with Betsy Johnson, Area Code,
California Ivy & Pepe Jeans and More
�,vB,M7'r,lWl'illkJJglJl'g
4
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JT
4
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etas
rtcVW
�o
CON?





THE EAST CAROLINIANNOVEMBfr 7 109
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE. Reeded ASAP
Must bo neat Call 830 1302 anytime
BEST USED TIRES
TIRE SALES FROM $15 4 I p
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WHITE LETTER A WHITE WALLS
Two Kvatuiv ik, N (;ri.(.n s,
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Furniture
We Have:
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�Computer 'Storage
Furniture Cabinets
i
We Buy, Sell. Trade, & Lease
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752 9H34
ROOM FOR RENT: Biltmorestreet SI 25
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FEMAL1 ROOMMATE: Responsible
considerate $135 per month 13 utili
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now 830-8880
FOR RIM: two room apartment with
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ROOM FOR RENT: In young couples
home Private bathroom i kitchen pnvi
leges $2001 l 4 utilities Prefer graduate
student or young professional nonsmoker
Call 355 5078
ROOM lOR RENT: Walking distance
from campus 5135 month Call Carolyn
at 77 3027
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: By
Dec l 14utilities Call752 8520before
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NEEDED ROOMMATE : For spring
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� Near Major Shopping Centers
� KIT Hus Service
� Onsite laundry
C.IJJ I WOlaKuo r�onj m
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A.K.C REGISTERED: Golden Retriever
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sk foi ud ik r
ATTENTION: I here will he a group
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near Charles HKd
TANDY COMPUTER: Monitor. Printer
and internal di-k drive Price neg Call
atter 5:00 at 758 5227
FISH TANK: Silt Water deluxe model,
5 pallor with ail accessories Already
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FURNITURE: Couch, 2 chairs, 2 end tables
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BRAND NEW: Light blue 12 x 8 12 '
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PAIR OF FEMALE BIRKENSTOC KS:
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ATTENTION: Government seized ve
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355-6723 after 6pm s
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written pages SDF Professional comput
ers 106 F 2nd St (besideCubbies)Green
ville. N.C. 752 W4
GET ABOARD: Pirate ride. 3 routes on
the hour around campus.ill 757 472 f, ,r
more details
HELP WANTED
TYPINC SERVICE Papers, resumes,
thesis, etc. mat need to be typed, please call
7 56 8934 bet ween 5 30pm 930pm 17yrs
typing experience Typing is done on
computer with letter quality printer
REPORTS, RESUMES, TYPING , DESK-
TOP PUBLISHING, LASFR PRINTING
Designer type, 752 1933 We take resen a
tions for typing reports
WORDPROCESSING& PHOTOCOPY-
ING SERVICES: We otter typing and
photocopying services We also sell soft
ware and computers 24 hrs in & out
guarantee, typing on paper up to 20 hand
Who has the
most unique
selection of
contemporary
accessories?
Present tht$ (Mipori I
I lor lO'V Discount I
� on Am Accessory
I expires 123189 I
Certain
things
652 E. Arlington
Greenville, NC
(919) 756-3320
I would like to take this opportunity to express on
behalf of the Fonville Family our deepest and most
sincere thanks to the members o' East Carolina Uni-
versity Dept. of Public Safety for their expression of
sympathy in the "Home going" of my mother, Mrs.
Birdie V. Fonville, who passed from this world Octo-
ber 14, 1989. It is in these times of deepest sorrow that
such acts of kindness is overwhelming.
Special Thanks to Captain Charles I Lawlerand Lt.
Joseph Pollock for attending and conducting the escort
to Washington's Cedar Hill Cemetery.
Most Sincere Thanks,
Ptl. A. Fonville &
the entire Fonville Family
ABORTION
"Perjr-a: nd Confidant . ��
E��� Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 - 4:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
CjII for appointment Mon thru Sal
! owCoa Trrmin!ionto20wecksol Pre�I4RC)
��'� �������
1-800-433-2930
rCU STUOSMT!
rfiill
DAYTIME: "he Hilton is seeking full
part time employees in the food dept All
positions available Minimum 54 per hour
Excellent benefits Please call or com by
the Hilton in Greenville 355 JOOOaskfor
Matt ak
INTERIOR DESIGNER: Apply in person
at Larry's carpet land 3010E 10th St
ATTENTION- HIRING: Government
jobs your area Many immediate open
ings without waiting list or test 517840
569,485 CaD 1-602-838-8885 Ext. R5285
HOI IDA i OB OPPOR I UNITY: The
1 loney Baked ! lam o is m sear h of sea
sonal help to fill our sales counter and
production positions We have -tore- lo
cated m the following markets Raleigh,
Durham. Greensboro Winston Salem!
Wilmington, Charlotte, and Atlanta Pleas
i heck the white pages or information tor
the -ton' nearest your home
EARN $2,000 - 54,000: searching for
employment that permits working your
own hrs, hut -til challenging enough for
your entrepreneurial skills? Management
programs for Fortune 500 companies I lall
I 800-932-0528 Ideal for grad students
GROWINGBUSINESS:Needhelp Ught
se. retanai work, phone and handle 1 l
shipping & receiving OfficeislOmiiesout
of town Must have own transportation
Flexiblehrs. 1230pm 5:30pm Monda)
-Friday Send resume to Beaver Dam, Rt
4 Box 97-M, Greenville N.C 278"(4
GOVERNMENTJOBS 516 U 559,1
vr Now hiring Call 1 31 i-687-600 Ext
K - 1 ltvi tor current federal list
IXC El I INI SUMMER & CARI f R OP-
PORTUNITIES: Now available for col
lege -Indent & graduate- with resort ho
tels, cruiselines,airline- amusementpark-
and camps For more information and an
application Write National Colli giate
Recreation Service, P.O Box 8074 Hilton
HeadS.C 29938
YOUTH BASKETBALI COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart
men! is recruiting tor 2 to 16 part-time
youth basketball coaches tor the winter
voufhhaskethall program applicants must
possess some knowledge ot basketball
skills and have ability and patience to work
with youths Applicants must he able to
coach young people, ages 9 Is, m basket
ball fundamental- 1 lour-are from 3pm to
7 pm with some night and weekend coach
ing This program will run from Novem
her 27 to mid February Saiar rate starts
at S 1 85 jvr hr tor more information,
please call Ben fames at 830 4543 or B30
47
convenient interview appt
BRODVS: Christmas will be here before
you know it You can start preparing tor
all those Christmas bills bv applying for a
part time position in sales or customer
service with Brodv's Enjoy a merchandise
discount even Santa's elves would enjoy
apply with Brody's . The plaa, M-W 1
4pm or call tor a more convenient mter-
low appt
TRAVEL FREE: Earncash MogulsSkifc
Sun Tours. Is hiring campus marketing
representatives for spring break Jamaica,
Bahamas, Barbados it Cancun those in
terested should he motivated outgoing,
and organized Call Mathew Evnon at 1
S(il 666-4857
YOUTH SHOP: Part time sales & stock
boy needed Monday, Wednesday, and
fridav , also e ery other Saturday For the
Youth �hop Boutique, Arlington Village
Appl) in person
MAIN I I NANCE PERSONNEL
Nil DID: At Greenville Athletic Club
Apply in person
LOOKING : For a fraternity, sorority or
student organization that would like to
make $500 S1,000 tor a one week on -
campus marketing project Must be or
ganized and hardworking Call Jenny or
Myra at (800) 592 2121
REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED: Earn
$2500 and FREE trip selling Bahamas,
Mexico amaica, spring break trips Spring
Break Travel 1 800-638 6786
MODI I S: Needed part time for lingerie
and exercise production Send photo and
to Models CO DR. P.O Box
1967 drawer 1446 Greenville, N.C 27834
NEEDI D CARPENTER: To work 30 hrs
a week Must have basic knowledge $5
hr Also need laborer to do variety of
work. S4 ' hr 758 0897
SENIORS: SENIORS: SENIORS
be left out' Have your portrait ma.
6 - Nov 10 from 9am 5pm in the � . ,
the student store- Be a part of youi
book' Sign up sheets are out-
caneer offices in the publications 1
across from the librarv
SIC EPS AND AIPMA PHI PI EDGES
Thanks so much for the surphst
Pledges mil eouldn (havepi, ki bettei
fraternity to have it with' Si. Eps
Uxiking forward to a 3rd annual ! �
rick's Day social? Love Thesistet � '
Phi
TO: A certain Ad per in it a �
newspaper ! y ��- are �
listen well Someone here
Pam hiT Iim
CHI OS: Were really exated I �
secret sorority It's a
ourselves to vou We an : w i �
Your Secret Sorority
LAURA SWEET: IT it
Maggie and supporting our '
program' You're the best 1 c
sisters and pledges of 1 Vita . � ,
PIKAS: Why we had to ,r
didn (know But off to!
did go A surprize so ial was
store And the Pikas Who could as!
more' Pika pledges started it �� .
we all thought it was quite the sight
night was so much tun we an t wait I
the ne�t one Pha � for a real I
Love- the Delta etas
BROTHERS Of PHI KAPPA I At
had a great time with y all as always
do it again real soon 1 ove
pledges ot Qii imega
TKE-SIG EPS-XO-ADPI Socia
blast' What a combination. It wa i -
time We 11 ha e to do this 4
soon Love � The Chi O-
TO OCR SECRETSOROKI I Y
wait to find out who vou r.
Chi O-
HELP WAN I ED: I spendable cab co
Jri er- needed afternoons, evenings and
weekends Full and part time apply in
person, 200 W 4th St 757 0288
OOV ERNMEN1 JOBS: $16,040
559,230 yr Now hiring Call (1)805-68
� - Exl K lit tor current federal list
AIKI INTS NOW HIRING: flight Atten-
dants, travel agents, mechanics, customer
service Listings Salaries to SI05K. Entry
level positions Call 111 805-687-6000 Ext
A-1166
A I IN rVCOMMl RtlAIS- High pay
No experience all ages, kids, teens,
young adults, tamihe mature p ople,
animal- et Call now! Charm Studio - 1
"i�� 837-1700.
COLTY, ANIt STAI- AK AHOIIT
'�H1'� �" KDlirATIDNAI DISCOUHT
Arche Tccfanoiosies
Introduces The New
Triumph 286 P
For Quality sake
t't Pt s " A -r '
- Ait -JfcPl Blgl
H PtJClir �arviaroi m � j S A
( y sy�t DttMt t 'iQOriXS �P1
� 'eVi anc S(MCIiort3 -nctodtng a
wo 3�y turn-rf( � jvw 'OC degrees
e�D�r3 lc 0M flH� s �(fo0ufior
-iS aQajn if�iliM AftCMfc f�CH
VX0GCS' �tpu'MO 'or Xwty
Ascv U � n�ttary :om(jaiirwv
rc aetliyjr-f
1395
� ;��
� - ��iuMi'cim � .
� .� �w i n oc
�: �vtm : s-i n
� t'wuy, sw�
� Mono GiacK: rjta
� MS DOS i�ASr ;�MMS look lor our Aa
� m��i .nPCMagai-ne
starting Ocl ?4tf I
Win me! at the Store
Listed Below
TWO YEAR
WARRANTY
� - �� csHnuDnasivi
8 Srll- Fork Squrv. CreenvilU- N
South nt FCU oa W 41 (919
;���. 1 Ml If.
�l4(�OOnV, 89,
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS MEETING
The Greenville Recreation and Park-
Department will be holding their first
organizational league on Thursdav No-
vember 2, 1989 at 7:30 pm at the Qm St
Gym All interested officials should at
tend this meeting For more information.
please call Duane Grooms al S30 -1 -
830-4 567
MATH (GEOMETRY) TUTOR: For
bright 15-yrsold boy Seeking knowledge
able person with good personality Pay
hrs. neg Call evenings 72 4086
. BRODY'S: Now's the time to earn some
extra spending money tor the holidays
Brody's tor men is accepting applications
tor part time -ales asso Apply Brady's
The Plaa M-W, 1 4 pm or call tor a more
IAS I CAROLINIAN: Typers needed!
Need to have flexible schedule Call 757-
6366 ask tor Tracy and; or leave message
PERSONALS
CAY WHITE MALE: Seeking other gay
male students tor friendship, companion-
ship, and to try and form a gay male stu-
dent support group (which can be either
formal or very informal). When vou write
please indicate how to get in touch with
v ou cither be phone or be mail As there is
a lot of homophobia here at ECU all
replies will be kept confidential - indicate
how discreet vou need for me to be in
contacting vou as I respect vour right to
privacy If interested please write to
Frank, VO Box 4091, Greenville NIC
27836-20SU '
CHIOMECASISIIKS NDPI UK,Is
Everyone did such a good job at tl
val I couldn't have done it all witho
your help. Thanks so much11 .
CHI OMEGAS BUND DAT! BAMi
Meres j story, of some girts on 5th strei i
they were gTeetedhv some untarr
They were all headed, down : -
To have the best parts on their lives!
blind date Bash, The Blind date Basr
the night that we had The Blind date Bast
Now these strangers, had a night i I
times, and they were sorry, when then
came to an end. But there's next year, an
we won't forget it cause those C hi-
you can depend on them'
LOST:Cravtabbv catinWilson A i
29. Has white stomach and four �
paws, bushy tail. Indoor cat a: d
healthv looking Reward offered
757-0352
TO THE ALPHA XI DELTA PLFDt.I -
Closed weekend was a blast W
and sang as hours past the: fina
sleep at last too bad it had to I
TO THE VICTIMS OE THE ALPHA XI
DELTA KIDNAPPERS: We thank you
for being such co-operative victims
scam You can not deny it was I
plan. However, there ua- no rea
fear, for several hours we let you drink tree
beer. Even more thanks goes out to your
friends who posted bail To the one- w h
brought the check its you we want to hail
We wish time didn t have to fly so fa
from the bottom of our heart we hop
you had a blast Love the AZD pledges
HALLOWEEN: night wa- another
forthenotonousbullyingotthet.r
police dept Write or Call our local Con
gressman Rep Walter B fonesinWash
ington: 202-225-3101, 241 Cannon i
office Bldg, Washington, DC 20515, orin
Farmville: PC) Drawer 00 Farmv
27828
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOVVHSiP
Christian FeDowshipandBibleStudvevorv
Thurs night at 6 pm in the Cultural Con
ter
CREATIVE LIVINC. Cf VTFR
Are you a Pitt County resident, h0 years
old or older and need a ride to vour modi
cal appointment' The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service to
the elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt County such as doctors, den
fists, clinics, therapies, and the Health Dept
Arrangements for theservice must fx made
at least 24 hours before the scheduled
appointment Call the Creative Living
Center, 757-0303 to reserve your ride
SLRROGATE MOTHERS,
Married or single woman with children
needed as surrogate mothers for couples
unable to have children. Conception to be
by artificial! semination. Please state vour
fee All responses confidential Contact
Noel P Keane, Director of Infertility Cen-
ter of New York, 14 East 60th Street, Suite
1204, New York, NY 10022. 1-800-521-1539
or 1-212 371-0811, may call collect.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FFI -
LOjVSHJf
Every Wed. at 7 p.m CCF would like to
invite you to join us in a very special time
of sharing through song and God's Word.
This is a great opportunity to make new
fifends who really care The place is Rm
212 in MSG See you there.
It vou are interested in alcohol aware-
ness and concerned about helping prevent
alcohol abuse on campus, B A C C 11.U.S.
(Boost Alcohol Consciousness Concerning
the Health of University Students) is the
-tudent org for vou. We meet each Tues. at
4pm in 210 Erwin 1 all For more info
contact the Office ot Substance Abuse
Prevention and Education, 757-6703, 30.3
Erwin 1 (all
hone �7"7 6979
QUALIFYTOBEAIR
FORCE OFFTCFtt
The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test
will be administered on Nov 0 and 30 in
rm 308 of Wright Annex Testing will begin
at 1 00 both dates Successful testing can
lead to a challenging )b as an Air Force
Officer pilot, navigator, engineer, com-
puter scientist, manager and a variety of
others Call 757-6507 or stop by room 306
of Wright Annex to sign up for the test and
dis uss vour options.
CAMPUS GIRL SCOUTS
This could be an organization for you
Meetings will be the 2nd and 4th Thurs. of
each month at 6 pm. in Mendenhall lounge
No previous Girl Scout experience neces-
sary. If you are interested in working with
younger Girl Scouts, Pitt County needs co-
leaders with Carl Scout program back-
grounds Formoreinfo aboutcampusGirl
Scouts or being a co-leader, contact Nancie
Ludwigat 551-2810.
INTER-VARSITY CHKISJIA v
FELLOWSHIP
Join us for a great time of Christian teach
ings, fun, food, and wonderful fellowship
Every Wed night at 7:00 p.m. in Rawl 130
Everyone is welcome
AVTHROPOI pCV CJ Iffl
Lambda Alpha, East Carolina's Honor
Society and club, would like to invite all
Anthropology majors and interested fac-
ulty, staff and students to its meetings
Come by and find out what is going on
Brewster D-302 Wed. afternoons 4 5 It
you havean v questions, feel free to contact
Stephen at 752-9320
BIG KIDS
Every Tues. at 5:30 in 210 Erwin I lall. Big
Kids meet to discuss common concerns If
your life has been affected past or present
by having been raised in a home or envi-
ronment where alcoholic or other dysfunc-
tional behaviors were present, this group
may be for you. For more info, call 757-
6793, Office of Substance Abuse Preven-
tion it Ed
ARE YOU A PERFORMFR?
Jugglers, Mimes, magiaansand other Elia
bethan characters, the Student Union
would like to talk to you about performing
in the Madrigal Dinners Call 757-4711 and
ask for Ron Maxwell.
SOPHOMORES
ECU Sophomores interested in a career in
government service at the federal, state, or
local level are invited to applv tor a 1000
1 larry S Truman Scholarship In April 1900,
the Foundation will award 02 scholarships
nationally. The DEAFJLINE for all 1990
applications is DEC. 1, 1980. ECU can
nominate 3 students tor the 1990competi-
tion. The scholarship award covers eli-
gible expenses up to S7,000 per year for the
jr , sr and two years of graduate study. To
be eligible, a student must be a full time
sophomore working toward or planning
to pursue a baccalaureate degree, have a b
average or equivalent, stand in the upper
4 th of the class, and be a U S citizen or US.
national heading toward a career in gov-
ernment Interested students should sub-
mit a letter of interest to Dr Maurice Si-
mon, Truman Scholarship Faculty Rep
1002 GCB by Nov. 3.
FREE SELF-DEFENSE CLASS
Do you ever practice at the music bldg late
at night7 Do you walk home or to your car
after night classes7 If you do then you
should attend the FREE self-defenseclasses,
sponsored by Sigma Alpha Iota. Rick Clark
of Washington will be teaching the self-
defense techniques for females and males
on the following Tuesdays: Oct 17, 24,
Nov 7and 14 Classes will be held on those
dates at 7:00 pm. in the lobby of Fletcher
Music Bldg Please wear comfortable
clothes.
PERFORMING ARTISJ
CLINIC
If you have an injury or illness vou feel is
due to your activities as an artist you can be
treated at the Student Health Center at a
special clinic tor performing artist. This
clinic is open to all music, dance and drama
majors and will be held the second and
fourth Fridav ot the month starting Oct.
27th Call 757-6.317 tor an appointment or
questions' This clinic is held in addition to
the perforating art clinical the ECU School
of Medicine Musicians bring vour instru-
ments.
CHOLESTEROL ED7
HEALTHY EATING HABITS
The student health service offers a choles-
terol ed healthy eating habits class every
Tues from 12 p.m. in the Health Ed. 2nd
floor Resource Rm Info, on cholesterol
reduction and healthy eating will be pro-
vided Call 757-6794 for more info.
MUSIC EVENTS
Junior Boice Recital by Bndgette Cooper
and Loretta Moore (Oct. 26, 7:00 pm ,
Fletcher Recital Hall, free); NEXUS per-
cussion quintet on Chamber Music Series
(Oct. 31, 8:00 p.m HendnxMendenhall
Student Center, 757-4788 for ticket infor-
mation); 1'ercussion Ensemble, Mark Ford,
Director (Nov 1,8:15 p.m Fletcher Recital
I lall, free); "A German Requiem" bv Johan-
nes Brahms featuring combined ECU cho-
ruses with orchestra, Rhonda Fleming,
conductor, with soloists Antonia Dalapas
and Jay Picrson (Nov. 4, 8:15 p.m Wright
Auditorium, no admission charge but
seating in reserved section is available by
call School of Music 757-6331).
LNIERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSH
The ISA next meeting will be held on Fn
day, Nov i Oat 4 pm in the coffee hous
Mendenhall All students and facultv ar.
welcome
GEFVILLE PARKING
AJJIHQRJIY
Will hold its regularly scheduled monthh
meeting on Wednesday, Nov 8at9:15an
in the third floor conference rtxim ot citv
hall, located at 201 W. 5th St Greenville
NC.
SNCAE
Membership is still open tor all interested
persons. Our next meeting will be on
Tuesday, Nov 14th from 5-6pm in 203
Speight. Members who have not picked
up information packets mav do so in Dr
Martin's office
VVES2FE1
For all Christian organizations on campus,
there will be a meeting of the Inter - Chris-
tian Council meeting today in Brewster B-
104at530 Please send up to 3 representa-
tives so that we may coordinate the Chnv
ban organizations on campus Call 752-
5898 for more information
�J
hi
M
a
n
V
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1
i

Continue to page 7





Legislation
THF EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 7,1989
Continued from page 5
would mean final congressional
approval for the measure which
contains $1? billion tor transpor
tation and $3 1 billion tor anti
drug programs for the tiv al yeai
On the oil spill legislation,
leps George Miller D-Calif. and
Gerry Studds, D Mass are co
sponsoring an amendment that
would allow statestocontinueset-
ting stiffer limits than the federal
government requires.
"The amendment protec ts the
rightsol states to set higher levels
o( financial responsibilit) said.
M; Her It leaves the state court ju
risdiction intact It makes state
standards apply to i leanups and
:j es the governors an equal say
w ith federal authorities as to when
that cleanup is really complete
Miller said Alaska's unlimited
liability law is the major reason
Exxon spent nearly $2 billion
cleaning up the damage created
w hen the Exxon Valdez tanker ran
aground and spilled 11 million
gallons ol crude oil into Prince
William Sound on March 24.
I nder the bill. Exxon's liability
tor the Valdez spill would have
been limited to $114 million.
I he measure sets liability at
$1.21)0 per gross ton, with a $10
million minimum tor large tank
ers and a $2 million minimum tor
small tankers.
The amendment, opposed by
the Bush administration, would
match legislation already passed
bv the Senate. It is supported by
environmental groups, the Na-
tional Governors' Association and
state government organizations.
Education
Those who oppose it say a single
nationwide law is needed toavoid
the confusion created by varying
state laws.
Miller also is offering an
amendment that would set un-
limited liability if a spill is caused
by any kind of negligence. As
proposed, the bill drops the limits
only in cases of gross negligence.
Bush has threatened to keep
the slashes in effect unless law-
makers send him a bill cutting $14
billion off the government's short-
fall this fiscal year, which congres-
sional experts expect to reach
about $140 billion. The fiscal year
lasts until Sept. 30,1990.
Continued from page 5
To the extent they are different,
we should have flexibility in how
to apply the budget
A provision for a form of merit
pay increases for teachers and
other certified personnel is ex-
pected to be one of the more con-
troversial aspects of SB-2, officials
say. Participation in the pay dif-
ferential plan requires majonty
approval in a secret vote by those
affected, the bill states.
Teachers, who are now paid
on the basis of years of experience
and degrees earned, generally give
a cool reception to former attempts
at merit pay, including the Career
Ladder Plan. This plan is now in
its fourth and final year of a test
program in 16 school units, in-
cluding Harriett County.
Winberry said he believes
teachers will accept pay differen-
tial in SB-2 as a trade-off for what
thev consider positive aspects of
the bill.
"We are excited about it
Winberry said. "It gives us an
opportunity to have a say at the
grassroots level. On the pay dif-
ferential, I think with proper
implementation and planning,
something could be worked out
that we would agree to
Announcements
Continued from page 6
OVERSEAS DEVI LOPMEN1
NETWORK
. ing a vei ii portant
lav, f �
10pm "heorganization urges all
� rs to attend because en in
ss will be discussed su
ng efforts We also encourage
terestei m helping those unfor
MOBILIZE I OR WOMEN'S
1 1 1 s
rgam
PROGESSIVE ALLIANCE
rogessive alliance of university tu
�. I hold a meeting on Wed Nov 8
21 � M ; '� nhall student center .it
focus wi I . I ad( rship tcr the
( ome and leai n how vou
LCI LACROSSE
I a rosse team is looking foi .mv
ffoi facult) membei toe oa
' � season li intei
BAPT. STUDENT UNION
tapi I -��� i) will be hold .it the
I t asl 'i :n.t ti -
ridav. Nov.
itheastei
I western.) ivailavlefoi
esanduuesl
Al
i i each represei tal �� w i I



SCHQQI O! MI s'
EV1 in

,
- -�
��




SPAN
N (work
nsoring .i panel enl
i -1 . iiveson Employi
- tor' on Wed No
208. Brewster Bldg Mil
persons are invited to al
tact eft I

lept of Gei

No
lssi i . . IK
i.ui' .n advance; sj �
ster'
CAMPFIRE
:� ores and sh ui
imphn " ii
.� - � . � terbehindl tchei
nstur
. �- dresswarmly
d be WV
i npus Ministries ' - .
Wit KK M AKKI I INC,
A ISO,
� ' ivea meeting! n I uesd i �
� akei will be ish Rog rs of P
Inert will be j FREE piu part
after the meeting
REGISTRATION FOR GEN-
ERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS
Genreal College student should contact
ihoir advisers the week of Nov f 10 to
make arranements tr academic advising
I n spring semester, 10 Early registra
tion will begin Nov 13 17
CAROLINA MINORITY LAW
DA
Ilu- I N school of 1 aw, the Black 1 aw
Students Vss� and The Student Bar Asso
invite interested minority students to par
tiop.ite in .i 1 aw School Information Dav
on Friday Nov 17 The day long confer-
, rewi I . I at the I INK School ot Law
inhapel 1 loll beinning at 8 4" am and is
to anyone who is thinking about
attending law school
ALL GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
� i. ndicated a desire to major in
Speech Language and Auditory Pathol
ii i e R Muzzarelli a their advi-
� � to meet on Wed Nov8at5pm in
vster B-2 Advising for early regis-
tratioi ill take place at that time Please
prepare a tentative class schedule before
the mei ting
L( 11 BIOLOGY CLUB
ere will be a meeting of the ECUBC in
No 7 at 5pm in rm BN 10 Everyone is
rgedtojoinus Guestspeaker Dr Lvtle,
a be presenting "Where the jobs are in
'd.i and Tomorrow" Also,
aft � �� eehng (approximately 630) we
will be eating dinner at
Quincy's Anyone interested should sign
up at the Biology Club bullontin board
beside BN 102
TOE KWON DO CLUB
fhe I K i K will have a demonstration and
registration meeting on Tuesday, Nov 7 at
9pm in Memorial Gymnastics room. Any
person, beginneror experienced, interested
m soli defense or the Korean Martial arts is
welcome tor a ride , or any questions
please call Rob Thompson at 830-5183.
BEGINNING RUNNING
As a part of the fall fi tness scene sponsored
bv Intramural- Recreational Services, Kyle
Sullivan and Charles Justice will discuss
proper running form, warm up, cool-down
and running shoes Nov 8 in Memorial
Cvm from 12-lpm All faculty, staff, and
students are invited Please register by
noon Tuesday, Nov 7 in 204 Memorial
Cvm. Sullivan and Justice are associated
with the ECU Cross Country Team
PRE-MED AND PRE-DENTAL
STUDENTS
The Alpha Epsilon TXMta pre - med and
pre dental honor society is having a meet
ing Nov 7 in Flanagan 201 at 7pm All
students interested in (otning be at the
meeting at 6-30 pm
HELP
The office of Substance Abuse Prevention
and Education can help. The office otters
counseling, assessment, support groups,
and educational programs Comeseewhat
new information is available in the re
source librarv. The office is open M-Ffrom
8 - 5 in 303 Erwin Hall Call 757-6793 tor
more info.
ECU FORENSIC SOCIETY
"Closer to Dead Poets than vou think '
We're a societv based on writing debate
and individualism with a touch of cha
nsma� not a society based on U ing in a
cold mortuary with a tag on your toe. So,
get involbed in the live action competition
of the ECU Forensic Society. We meet
weekly in the GCB, rm 1001 at 7pm rues
days.
BEGINNING WEIGHT
TRAINING
As a part of Im - Rec Services fall fitness
series, a beginning weight trainging dis
cussion will beheld Tuesday, Nov 14 from
12-1 pm in Memorial Gym Jay Omar .
pr ducts that can
rh Coi in
: i icadi
hr Smith Corona
or is tna tselr. Ii mpact
: �h im Yet, thai
ord
s ti
i �
i built indisl drive, 1(X),000 charactei
itaDisl apa ity, and .1 r stal leai display, it
�, it transform B's into A
' 11 thi isc- v hi 1 prefei an electronu
, - riter,
:nith( orona XI) i'1'1" 1 thi I pewntei "I
1 ith us 16 chara tci display and ap
K)( haracters 1 t editable menv �r
vnu can have the convenience of word processing
features with the simplicity of a typewriter
t course, the pocket-size Spell-Right" 300P
also comes with impeccable references. In this
case, a built-m electronic dictionary; a thesaurus.
a calculator, even a collection ol challenging
wi ird games
S 1 if v u're thinking Magna Cum Laude at
the end of this year, �. ciuTM
CORONIV
don't torgct to think
Smith Corona al the
beginning ol this yeai
TOMORROWS TECHNOLOGY
AT YOUR TOUCH
l-l
'
ECU strength and conditioning coach will
discuss proper lifting techniques to help
precenl injuries and get the most out of
your workout Please register bv Monday,
Nov 13 in 204 Memorial Cvm All faculty,
staff, and students welcome
THE VVAY CAMPUS FELLOW-
SHIP
You are welcome at the way campus fel-
low ship, biblical research, teaching and
fellowship Fellowships are available at
2007Tiffany W in Greenville every Thurs-
day' night at 7 30pm and at Mendenhall
Student C enter everv Fndav Morning at
11 30am. Contact Chuck Black at 355-5164
for details Cod Bless You!
RUN I OR A TURKEY
A 2 mil Furkev trot will be held Nov 14 at
4pm at Bunting Track Register Nov 13 at
5pm in Bio 103. Winners in men's, women's
and co-rec team divisions will receive
Thanksgiving Turkeys and Pumpkin Pies
sponsered bv FCU Dining Services. For
additional into call Mary at 757-6387 or
stop bv 207 Memorial Gym Event spon-
sered bv Intramural- Rec. Services.
CHALLENGE WEEK
1 lere's your chance to redeem you or your
teams loss in flag fcxitball, tennis, recquet-
ball, bowling, soccer, badminton, beach
volleyball and the list goes on and on.
Intramural participants can challenge the
team or individual of their choice during
the week of Nov 13- 17 Im - Rec Services
provides equipment, facility and officials.
You provide the spirit of revenge" For
additional info call 757-6387 or stop by 104
Memorial Cvm
EXERCISE AND NUTRITION
Tracy Morton a Greenville spa fitness in-
structor will discuss nutritional incentives
and info, about getting the most from your
workout Tue, Nov28 ffrom 12 - pm in
Memorial Gym. A session in Im-Rec Serv-
ices fal 1 fi tness series, welcomes all f acul ty,
staff, and students to attend. Please regis-
ter Mon Nov. 27 For more info, call 757-
6387
RESERVE NQW FOR CAN-
CAN
Last available apartment Sheration
oceanfront 5 - star luxury apartment. 8
days and 7 nights OMarch 4-11) Sleeps 10
comfortably: S200 per person. 3 full baths.
Jucqu.i Completely furnished kitchen
with microwave. Contact 355-6500.
Notice
It is illegal
to place any kind
of advertisement
in the plastic
windows of
The
East Carolinian's
newsstands!
Violators will be
prosecuted
o the fullest exten
of the law.
1
WED.
A
GOLDFISH VH
EATING CONTEST!
$100. First Prize
$50. Second Prize
$25. Third Prize
Admission
$1.50 Members
$2.50 Guest
$1.50 Pitchers All Night
$2.00 Teas
$1.00 Domestics
A
THURS.
THIRSTY THURSDAY
Ladies In Free
$1.80 Pitchers ALL Night
$1.00 Imports
$1.00 Domestics
$2.00 Teas
$2.00 Frozen Drinks
l





I HI 1 As I CAROI INIAN
Features
NOVI MBl.R 7, 14S4 PACI s
Thorogood wakes up audience
Hv ADAM CORNLIUS
Vs N'jnt New I iiit.tr
Although thee rovvd wassmall
and slow to warm up a five
member band from Delawaregav e
Minges Coliseum a night of rex k
and roll music with a bo diddlev
beat
1 or two hourseorge I'horo
good and the Delaware Destroy-
ers pla ii their traditionally loud
hard driving musii to 1,300 ECl
studentsand i Ireenv illeresidents
I ho Destroyers pumped up the
Sundav e ening audience during
their o 1 lall 1 . v Small o Bar
i oo Far tour
rhorogood s music consistsot
old songs plaved to appeal to a
contemporary audience. But thev
don t sound like vour dad's old
43s rhesebov spla hardball with
classu rhythm and blues �� i
written around the late -1
earh ?0s
With I lit ist hi- shou
i � bandai n ind his head
rhorogood resembled an Ameri
can Indian as ho walked onstage
and broke into his version of I nw
i ione
1 hoIreenv lllo i rowd stav ed
put
Even attor his rhythm and
blues rendition of V ho Do You
1 ove the audience was not re
sponsive One or two arms ho
ered hesitantlv above the crowd
Isolated lighters flared and a tow
tans pla ed air guitars as 1 horo-
giXH.1 wont into Born to Bo Had
oung girl in a w hite dress
sat per hod on her father s shoul
di rs
t. heers wont up as tho Band
thumped out ight rime and
even !I sancient 1 rooperspot
lights got into the light show,
converging on rhorogood while
he s,mg t.)ne Bourbon i )ne
S OU h and l ne Boor
I onight, this i row d is sav in
somethin he shouted to the
audience
Mi mborsol the band i rat ked
their kniuklos and started i I
Madison Blues " "hose in the
front stat ted i lapping
Bo, it wasn't until
i horogood �- slide a tion on Bad
to the Bone" that the audience full v
woke up And not a moment too
soon 1 le followed w ith a guitar
solo on.oar lammer w ith the
lightsinastrobeeffot ton theband
I he song w t the mood t r Move
it .mi h er w hn h finalh got the
tloor p . i I!
tter I � � � i : � � pio
i le v hi 11 un 1 hi
goi �d asked the en w d 'Are von
withme, Ireenville?"ashest
into Willie I land
t tliis point thi
wren' 1
werehti 'rally tin eopleml
tl i lii
I I I
I wil - � Much
people t thi � � '
w as the music or t ur i
unkm rial
in and
-
im his
bum

iall I hi'
drums
I Mil
I r than di
-

� � -
hand
ll .It's

thing �

-
� '
New bands hit market
George rhorogood and the Destroyers
��� �� 1A c�eorge l norogoou aim me iestrovei
Scandinavian musicians rock America �ds�-��
bv I D. Whitmire 1 i I I'hotolab
ByDEANNA NEVGLOSK1
St
With a surgiil 1 nd
� out thest da s th� :i s
;� � � � id ii I heavy n i
"� � rted Iron S �� lei
� a iv : nmark and I
Offering a diverse selection
bands lie metal to black
itu tal St indii in roi kers
taking tho I s bv storm with th i
creative breed of rock n roll and
picking up awards f r theiri I
busting albums.
One of tho newest and heavi-
est exports from Scandinavia is
I ' A D. 1 his group ot metahsts
hail trom Copenhagen, Denmark.
With two albums already under
their belt, D.A.I und ubt-
edh hit hard vI i
lease oFu rl grin
which came out this veai
arner Brothers il �
Originalh called nd
Attor Park this Danish, quarl I
finalh settled for 1 ifter tl
extended versii i fth name went
through mam legal difficulties
D.A.I itoughmel tl outfit that
ffers a string of powerful songs
like the first ideosingle "Slei :
ing M I )av Aw a
Demonic Dan. King 'ia
mond, ex-screamer for the i
defum fMei I ba k ��� tl
a new 1 P entitle i i i -�. ii i �
that contii thi frightening
storv told in ' i bom Bon ind
raised ii � pel igen as Kin
Peterser King
hitting I S sh res this month in
support of his latest mast, rpie
The first video, single Slet
Nights which was set in a gra i
yard i an be seen on M I s
Headbanger s Ball.
Two othor important Danish
contributions to the metal indus
tn are drummer Bars I Irich ot
Metallica and load vocalist Mike
1 ramp of W hite 1 ion
i openhagen born I Inch
)s
at the age of 17. Hi
� n (ruited as drummer i i
Mi � i . i, a speed metal band that
is dwelling in the underground
i San 1 ran. isco
however, the band proves ti :� i
intluen e to othor Ba an a
,ud international Bands
White lion's Miko I ramp
moved to ow i ork trom
mark in hopes oi being a ro kstai
While there, he hooked up with
the rebtot the Lie"s m.J signed on
w votahst tor tho band. Their
latest work .an be hoard on tl
( lame" IB. which has
d thetwo hitsingles
� ghter and a remake of the
irring classu Radar
( oming trom the winterv
md f S andinavia, Einland i '
fersMu hael Monroe as their i
n-roll export Former load singer
: r glam outtit Hanoi Rocks
Mi mroe enturedoff asa sol i artist
following tho death ot drummer
Kalo in 1984. Monroe shows
that he s Not 1 akin It on his
killer debut. "Dead, ail or Rock-
n-Roll" is the first video single
Monroe will be starting a L .S club
� ir in the months ahead
Other northern lights invad-
ing ' v- arc two killei
oi av: I i and Sta
Dolls
Stage 1 'oils, a trio from I roi :
heim, has made big waves via tl
self-titled debut. "LoveCries w is
thotirst video single for theband.
cess.
. . .
� till
' � ' ' ' '
dreadv ind
rd i
Students support juvenile
rehabilitation program
By( HKIS Ml (.1 I
See S VND1N IAN on page
ir men ai
usai ticipal
and the sec
ungle st:i
is sure to aehiev e the same
Shotgun Messiah members, Zinny San, Harry ' ody, Mix Galoie
ami I im I im, hav e just issued their American self-titled debut; n
Relativity Records. I he band is one of the latest exports trom
Scandinavia. Watch tor their first viedo, "shout It Out on 11 V.
r a deti ' - enl
. t appi temenl
it �
ilkwil : �
rdei 1 cm

� m enter is si
. children ag
! here are onh threv othei enl i
t in Mori
n responsibilirv
ranlv care foi Iren n
restnt ted � until thev .
. ourt or are transfen
fat iht or agency.
1 was ner ous when ���
d in, but i was als excited to
-
kid Mc rean. :
. :hi Alphah
said McX rt arv and other �
bers of the frati i ivi boon
volunteering their time al
center since C tober.
is really surprised when 1
got there McCrean, sa I
bv - e kidi
would never figure the .
ha o done somethii
them in ht n
I he v oungsters are pi
� for a w idt? ranj
such as breaking and i ntenng,
larceny, first degree rape and drug
offenses. But the center's director
. harlos Hough, said, ' Probation
violation is probably the number
Lexicon
Mushrooming
1. Torpor A frame oi mind; B
sluggishness heat. 1 drought
2 Perambulate A ramble in
speech; B stroll, think ahead
11 . ontemplate
; larion A distinguished
mark, B loud and lear; (
multicolored; D sign of wis-
di �m
4 Ponderous: A slow in
doi ision making; B heav v. (
powerful; 1' bulky
5 Evoke: A to beseech; B. to
callforth; to entangle, D to
anger
Foment A become sour; B
stir up; radiate, D absorb
( nsuing. A. surrounding; B
following, moving toward, D
sentimental
8 en. orb A rot k n-roll; B
agreement; C draining effort; I
vield
9 Myriad: A mysterious; B.
innumerable, vision; D.
heavenly
10. Transient A superfii ial; B
quickly out of sight, a liaison;
D shadowy
� Compiled by Matt Richter
Jukebox cops stop copyright crimes
By Kl I Li P. K1SM 1
Ihr Am � I't.s.
HUNT1NGTON, W.Va (AP)
o sirens. o flashing lights
Nio guns or billy clubs ust a note-
book and a pen and an oar for
popular music "hese are the
jukebox police
I hey are undercover spies,
actually, private citizens backed
b� civil law. Their dut is to find
people who make money trom
musu without paving rights fees
to thi'art ist sand composers. Some
people don't take thorn seriously
until they find themselves in ourt
being sued h�r thousands ot dol-
lars
" 1 hev think y mi re kidding
says And) Kropelak,anex-school-
to.it her who patrols West Virginia
and western Pennsylvania for
Broadcast Music Inc.
BM1 and the American Soci-
ety ofomposers, Artists and
I 'ublishers are the original enf in
ers of music copyright laws The
organization collects license tees
trom establishments that use
musu in nearly every form
whether it lx' a bar, a bank or a
brothel.
" Ihev are not onK the uike-
bo v p ilii e thev are the In ensers
ofmusicthroughoutanan i avs
Jonathan Zavin, a private lawver
forBMI
It it wi ren t tor BM1 or S
( B. ever) Bar ,m I irant
would have to onta t each -
writer individualk togt t permis-
sion to pla his musii - . � lak
says
I or jukeboxt s, the L s- c
right i ffii e ollects S6 ! for regis-
trations and splits the mone
among the composers and pub
lishers agencies In addition to its
bold representatives, BM1 uses a
network ot people who log the
songs the) hear played on the
ubiquitous jukeboxes
Oneloggerhit oey s Bar and
(.nil in C harlestiMi, W Va last year
alter a Steppenwoll fan dropped a
few quarters in the ukebox and
played "Bom ro Be Wild" and
"Magic arpetRide Acountry-
and western fan pun hod "D-l-
0-R- 1 and Ro k I op and a
nostalgic soulplayed i leartbreak
I lote! ' and "Wipeout
Unknown to owner Joseph
Minardi, the BMI logger made a
plavlist that became the basis for a
federal .ourt lawsuit Minardi
settlt � - , 1 in
damat .even
� hine
- ; � hall the
from .
profits
"I didn idea that a
as supposed to be on it
Minardi savs 1 le made no
tion that there had to be a
license on it.
Minardi nov has a current
license for a now machine he pur-
chased himself A full) author
ized version ot 'She Dines Me
t. ra" b) I ine i oung Cannibals
was pla
When I bought m own juke-
bo the sent me information
saving this machine had to be
tered with BMI and all that
he savs ' That was the first I'd
heard of it
1 he suit was based on songs
played before Minardi obtained
his license He says he forwarded
cease-and desist request to the
owner of the jukebox, who has
sint o died
BMI files up to 200 suits a year
against bars, restaurants and
nightclubs generally seeking be
tweei - � md $1 tHi tor each
song title heard
I ik Minardi, most violators
suet umb quietly, agreeing to pa
BMI a few thousand dollars for
past violations and agreeing to
purchase the $63 jukebox license
kropelak sas he has often
had trouble in West irginia and
hisboss, BMI general licensing vi e
president lorn Annastas, says it s
because many people resent being
asked to pay for what they al-
ready consider theirs
lor that reason BMI loggers
ask to remain anonymous tor tear
bar owners will retaliate
The loess logger was a local
musician who was upset thatsome
people would use music tor free
BMlofficials say they look forother
musicians to make the ob eas) as
possible.
Kropelak has turned his at-
tention to West Virginia and Bonn
sylvania banks, listening for mu
sic routed through recessed loud-
speakers in the ceilings or walls
1 he idea, Kropelak says, is to
otter an education in addition to
raising more money for their
clients.
"What we tell them is this
We're teaching you about what
you have to do to comply with this
federal law i on have to di it
-
timi
� l
mils'
ma
bV
'
wart said
go t '
ha e so tl
the rest of tl
1 h ' �
fighting, prol
counselor or
When tin - kid
hav e to go t.
Stewart -
don t cause I
There an
youcan to nti
behaved for the most part
majorit) of thi m ai
know that the) are n,
streets ar '
them in trouble
Each child in tl r has a
different ston
tor different reas are
Willing tO dls, ss rt �
See fUVENILl on page s





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
NOVEMBER 7,1989 PAGE 8
Thorogood wakes up audience
By ADAM CORNLIUS
Assistant Newi Editor
Although the crowd was small
and slow to warm up, a five-
member band from Delaware gave
Minges Coliseum a night of "rock
and roll music with a bo-diddley
beat
For two hours, George Thoro-
good and the Delaware Destroy-
ers played their traditionally loud,
hard driving music to 1,300 ECU
studentsand Greenville residents
The Destroyers pumped up the
Sunday evening audience during
their "No Hall Too Small, No Bar
Too Far" tour.
Thorogood'smusicconsistsof
old songs plaved to appeal to a
contemporary audience. But thev
don't sound like your dad's old
45s. These boys play hardbal 1 wi th
classic rhythm and blues songs
written around the late 40s and
early 50s.
With hair past his shoulders
and a bandana around his head,
Thorogood resembled an Ameri-
can Indian as he walked onstage
and broke in to his version of "Long
Gone
The Greenville crowd stayed
put.
Even after his rhythm and
blues rendition of "Who Do You
Love the audience was not re-
sponsive. One or two arms hov-
ered hesitantly above the crowd.
Isolated lighters flared and a few
fans played air guitars as Thoro-
good went into "Born to be Bad
A voung girl in a white dress
sat perched on her father's shoul-
ders.
Cheers went up as the band
thumped out "Night Time and
even ECU'S ancient Trooper spot-
lights got into the light show,
converging on Thorogood while
he sang "One Bourbon, One
Scotch, and One Beer ,
"Tonight, this crowd is savin'
somethin he shouted to the
audience.
Members of the band cracked
their knuckles and started into
"Madison Blues Those in the
front started clapping.
But it wasn't until
Thorogood's slide action on "Bad
to the Bone" that the audience fully
woke up. And not a moment too
soon. He followed with a guitar
solo on "Gear jammer" with the
lightsinastrobeeffectontheband.
The song set the mood for "Move
it on Over which finally got the
floor people dancing.
After his first encore piece,
"New Boogie Chillun Thoro-
good asked the crowd, "Are you
with me, Greenville?" as he started
into "Willie and the Hand Jive
At this point the people on the
floor weren't just dancing. Some
were literally throwing people into
the air.
Thorogood's second encore
started with "Talk Too Much
which even brought the bleacher
people to their feet (whether it
was the music or the hour is still
unknown). That number was fol-
lowed bv "Reelin' and Rockin
originally a Chuck Berry song and
the same finale as was on his
"GeorgeThorogood Live" album.
All in all, for a rhythm and
blues band, the group was tight,
both musically and visually The
baekbeai of Jeff Simon's drums,
while definitely prevalent, com-
plemented rather than drowned
out the rest ot the band. Sax solos
bv Hank "1 lurru ane" Carter as he
jumped into the spotlight playing
a lone note would make any rock-
n-roll purist flick his bic.
The main appeal, of course,
was to the audience. But the band
did have some professional aes-
thetic qualities to appreciate. For
instance, the Destroyers plaved as
one band, not as (leorge Thoro-
good playing his own thing with
some other musicians in the back-
ground. Also, the entire show was
packed with energy, building with
each song to break the audience
out of an under-70-decibel-Sun-
day-night stupor.
Thorogood fans seemed to like
the concert. As one patron put it,
"George was jammin
New bands hit market
Scandinavian musicians rock Amei'a
By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Staff Wntcr
With a surge oi metal bands
coming out these days, there's
plenty of loud and heavy music
being exported from Sweden,
Norway, Denmark and Finland.
Offering a diverse selection of
bands from melodic metal to black
metal, Scandinavian rockers are
taking the U.S. by storm with their
creative breed of rock-n-roll and
picking up a wards for their chart-
busting albums.
One of the newest and heavi-
est exports from Scandinavia is
D.A.D. This group of metalists
hail from Copenhagen, Denmask
With two albums already trnder
their belt, D.A.D. has undoubt-
edly hit hard with their third re-
lease "No Fuel For The Pilgrims
which came out this vear on the
Warner Brothers label.
Originally called Disneyland
After Dark, this Danish quartet
finally settled for D.A.D. after the
extended version of the name went
through many legal difficulties.
D.A.D. is a tough metal outfit that
offers a string of powerful songs
like the first videosingle "Sleep-
ing My Day Away
Demonic Dane King Dia-
mond, ex-screamer for the now-
defunct Mercy ful Fate, isback with
a new LP entitled "Conspiracy
that continues the frightening
story told in 'Them Bom and
raised in Copenhagen as Kim
Petersen, King Diamond will be
hitting U.S. snores this month in
support of his latest masterpiece.
The first videosingle "Sleepless
Nights which was set in a grave-
yard, can be seen on MTV's
Headbanger's Ball.
Two other important Danish
contributions to the metal indus-
try are drummer Lars Ulrich of
Metallica and lead vocalist Mike
Tramp of White Lion.
Copenhagen-born Ulrich
moved to California with his
family at the age of 17. He was
soon recruited as drummer for
Metallica, a speed metal band that
was dwelling in the underground
clubs of San Francisco. Now,
however, the band proves to be a
big influence to other Bay area
and international bands.
White Lion's Mike Tramp
moved to New York from Den-
mark in hopes of being a rock star.
While there, he hooked up with
. the rvstot the Lions and bigned on
"�-as- vfccaks for the- band. Their
latest work can be heard on the
"Big Game" LP, which has
spa wned the two hit singles "Little
Fighter" and a remake of the
Golden Earring classic "Radar
Love
Coming from the wintery
lands of Scandinavia, Finland of-
fers Michael Monroe as their rock-
n-roll export. Former lead singer
for glam outfit Hanoi Rocks,
Monroe ventured off asa solo artist
following the death of drummer
Razzle in 1984. Monroe shows
that he's "Not Fakin' It" on his
killer debut. "Dead, Jail or Rock-
n-Roll" is the first videosingle.
Monroe will be starting a U.S. club
tour in the months ahead.
Other northern lights invad-
ing the U.S. are two killer acts
from Norway: TNT and Stage
Dolls.
Stage Dolls, a trio f romTrond-
heim, has made big waves via their
self-titled debut. "LoveCries" was
the first videosingle for the band,
and the second single "Still In
Love" is sure to achieve the same
success.
TNT is perhaps the biggest act
out of Norway, achieving both
American and international suc-
cess. Vocalist Tony Harnell. a
native of California, came to Nor-
way after his demo tape landed in
the hands of his three Norwegian
cohorts. With two successful LPs
a'readv under their belt, the
quartet's third release "Intuition"
has been getting many rav e-
views statewide and internation-
ally. In Norwav, TNT was voted
best heavy metal act of last vear.
Building on a strong melodic
metal foundation, TNT recently
returned from a sold-out tour in
(apart A live album has been
recorded tor a Japanese release.
And last but not least. Scandi-
See SCANDINAVIAN on page 9
George Thorogood and the Destroyers performed for a Greenville
audience Sunday night in Minges Coliseum. Thorogood is famed
for songs such as "Bad to the Bone" and "Move it on Over (Photo
by J. D. Whitmire � ECU Photolab)
Students support juvenile
rehabilitation program
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Stiff Writer
Shotgun Messiah members, Zinny San, Harry Cody, Stix Galoie
and Tim Tim, have just issued their American self-titled debut en
Relativity Records. The band is one of the latest exports from
Scandinavia. Watch for their first viedo, "Shout It Out on MTV.
Four men arrived with nerv-
ous anticipation. Thev were about
to enter a detention center. They
felt apprehension and excitement
even though they were about to
talk with 13-and 14-year-old kids,
not hardened criminals.
The Pitt Regional Juvenile
Detention Center is state-run,
housing children ages b to 15.
There are only three other centers
like it in North Carolina. The
center's main responsibility is to
temporarily care for children in a
restricted facility until they go to
court or are transfered to another
facility or agency.
"I was nervous when we
pulled in, but I was also excited to
have a chance to talk with these
kids Dave McCreary, president
of Chi Alpha Omega fraternity,
said. McCreary and other mem-
bers of the fraternity have been
volunteering their time at the
center since October.
"I was really surprised when I
got there McCreary said. "Just
by looking at these kids, you
would never figure they could
have done something that could
put them in here
The youngsters are placed
here for a wide range of offenses
such as breaking and entering,
larceny, first degree rape and drug
offenses. But the center's director,
Charles Hough, said, "Probation
violation is probably the number
Lexicon
Mushrooming
1. Torpor: A. frame of mind; B.
sluggishness; C. heat; D. drought
2. Perambulate: A. ramble in
speech; B. stroll; C. think ahead;
D. contemplate
3. Clarion: A. distinguished
mark; B. loud and clear; C.
multicolored; D. sign of wis-
dom)
4. Ponderous: A. slow in
decision making; B. heavy; C.
powerful; D. bulky
5. Evoke: A. to beseech; B. to
call forth; C. to entangle; D. to
anger
6. Foment: A. become sour; B.
stir up; C. radiate; D. absorb
7. Ensuing: A. surrounding; B.
following; C. moving toward; D
sentimental
8. Concert: A. rock-n-roll; B.
agreement; C. draining effort; D.
yield
9. Myriad: A. mysterious; B.
innumerable; C. vision; D.
heavenly
10. Transient: A. superficial; B.
quickly out of sight; C. a liaison;
D. shadowy.
� Compiled by Matt Richter
Jukebox cops stop copyright crimes
By KELLY P. KISSEL
The Auociated Prcst
HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP)
� No sirens. No flashing lights.
No guns or billy clubs. Just a note-
book and a pen and an ear for
popular music. These are the
jukebox police.
They are undercover spies,
actually, private citizens backed
by civil law. Their duty is to find
people who make money from
music without paying rights fees
totheartistsand composers. Some
people don't take them seriously
until they find themselves in court
being sued for thousands of dol-
lars.
"They think you're kidding
says Andy Kropelak, an ex-school-
teacher who patrols West Virginia
and western Pennsylvania for
Broadcast Music Inc.
BMI and the American Soci-
ety of Composers, Artists and
Publishers are the original enforc-
ers of music copyright laws. The
organization collects license fees
from establishments that use
music in nearly every form -
whether it be a bar, a bank or a
brothel.
"They are not only the juke-
box police, they are the licensers
of music throughout an area says
Jonathan Zavin, a private lawyer
for BMI.
"If it weren't for BMI or AS-
CAP, every bar and restaurant
would have to contact each song-
writer individually to get permis-
sion to play his music Kropelak
says.
For jukeboxes, the U.S. Copy-
right Office collects $63 for regis-
trations and splits the money
among the composers and pub-
lishers' agencies. In addition to its
field representatives, BMI uses a
network of people who log the
songs they hear played on the
ubiquitous jukeboxes.
One logger hit Joey's Bar and
Grill in Charleston, W.Va, last year
after a Steppenwolf fan dropped a
few quarters in the Jukebox and
played "Bom To Be Wild" and
"Magic Carpet Ride Acountry-
and-western fan punched "D-I-V-
O-R-C-E" and "Rocky Top" and a
nostalgic soul played "Heartbreak
Hotel" and "Wipeout
Unknown to owner Joseph
Minardi, the BMI logger made a
playlist that became the basis for a
federal court lawsuit. Minardi
settled out of court for $12,000 in
damages and attorneys' fees even
though he only leased the machine
from a man who kept half the
profits.
"I didn't have any idea that a
license was supposed to be on it
Minardi says. "He made no
mention that there had to be a
license on it
Minardi now has a current
license for a new machine he pur-
chased himself. A fully author-
ized version of "She Drives Me
Crazy" by Fine Young Cannibals
was playing.
"When I bough t my own juke-
box, they sent me information
saying this machine had to be
registered with BMI and-all-that
he says. "That was the first I'd
heard of it
The suit was based on songs
played before Minardi obtained
his license. He says he forwarded
ceasc-and-desist request to the
owner of the jukebox, who has
since died.
BMI files up to 200 suits a year
against bars, restaurants and
nightclubs, generally seeking be-
tween $500 and $1,000 for each
song title heard.
Like Minardi, most violators
succumb quietly, agreeing to pay
BMI a few thousand dollars for
past violations and agreeing to
purchase the $63 jukebox license.
Kropelak says he has often
had trouble in West Virginia and
hisboss,BMI general licensing vice
president Tom Annastas, says it's
because many people resent being
asked to pay for what they al-
ready consider theirs.
For that reason, BMI loggers
ask to remain anonymous for fear
bar owners will retaliate.
The Joey's logger was a local
musician who was upset that some
people would use music for free.
BMI officials say the lookforother
musicians to make the job easy as
possible.
Kropelak has turned his at-
tention to West Virginia and Penn-
sylvania banks, listening for mu-
sic routed through recessed loud-
speakers in the ceilings or walls.
The idea, Kropelak says, is to
offer an education in addition to
raising more money for their
clients.
"What we tell them is this:
We're teaching you about what
you have to do to comply with this
federal law. You have to do it
one reason they're here
The center, which opened in
1985, houses up to nine young-
sters. The Pitt Regional facility
serves a 23 county area including
and surrounding Pitt county. It is
one of two facilities in eastern
North Carolina. The other center
is in Fayetteville.
The centers stru hire would
lead one to believe it is like being
in jail. Although t)-JMrW wt
confined to a MrraH living area. rbc
life of the kids is not ('no of press-
ing license plates or working on
rock piles.
Their average day begins at 8
a.m. when the children wake up.
Breakfast follows and then school
begins. In this case, school is con-
ducted within the facility and lasts
until 3 p.m. During that time, stu-
dentsare taught and given oppor-
tunities to go outside for physical
activity.
After school, the kids have an
hour of quiet time and then the
rest of the day is tree-time. The
kids'sonlv requirement during the
evening is watching the news.
Brian Stewart, a counselor-techni-
cian, said, "We only have them
watch a half-hour, but if they cause
trouble or cut-up, we'll make them
watch an hour
The evening hours offer op-
portunities for the children to be
involved in other activities. They
can watch films or participate in
small group discussions about
various topics. They a re also given
time in the evening to make phone
calls, if thev wish, to talk with
their parents.
After the news and more tree-
time, the kids are off to bed. At 10
p.m. the students are put in their
individual rooms, which each
consist of a mattress, sheets and a
window. All lights and radios
must be off at 10:30 and the chil-
dren are off to sleep.
For some children, bedtime
may come earlier. One way the
counselors discipline the kids is
by taking time from them. "The
only thing we have to control them
is to take time from them Ste-
wart said. "None of them want to
go to bed early, so they usually be-
have so they can stay awake with
the rest of the kids
The child will lose time for
fighting, profanity, back-talking a
counselor or other such activities.
When time is taken away, the kids
have to go to bed earlier.
Stewart said: "They really
don't cause that much trouble.
There are things that happen that
you can't control, but they are well
behaved for the most part. The
majority of them are good. Thev
know that they are not on the
streets and they can't do what got
them in trouble in the first place
Each child in the center has a
different story. The kids are there
for different reasons, and they are
willing to discuss what they did.
See JUVENILE on page 9






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBFR 7, 1 M
U.S. Sneaker urtu
sales double
in five vears

NORTH PA1 1 BEACH, Ha.
(AP) We all know th.it every
kid on the blink owns sneakers,
indeed lives in them, and it'smajor
w arfare to gel them into loafers or
Mary laneseven on Sunday. Now
comes the news that 9 5 percent ot
.ill Americans over .iv;e 2 - men
and women own .it least one pair
�t sneakers, nd " percent wear
them regularlv.
In addition, with an average
ot 2 5 pairs in each American's
closet, sneakers make up nearly a
quarter ot our shoe wardrobe,
according to a national study
conducted tor the Athletic loot
w ear Association
The majority of sneakers -
percent are white or at least thev
re w hen thev were bought. Blue
accounts tor 18 percent and is
tading while black with 13 per-
cent, is gaining Knur.
In the five vears from 1983 to
�ss according to the Sporting
Goods Manufacturers Associa
tion, ot which the AI A is a mem
bt r, retail sales 0 athletic foot-
wear in the L S have more than
doubled - from $4 -1 billion to Sq ?
The f sure ot 1 OOOcon-
irkets w as
li ted bv I isidns enter ln
HOW TO GET BEYOND STRESS
LET'S FACE IT uOE A�E ZlU
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STCSC.
Ffc3 OF 05 Pmou) KOu)T0 66T
fetotoo Sreess. wiE Saeu. err
THE TV, U)E HOKifc. Ik TRAFFIC,
10E R-iP OP OOC. LOIiriG u5H"Ee
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EM006H,
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Pufpimg 0 Soothing CibAttTTtS,
P6i�ifcl�JG PEi-lClOiS AtCOH0LC
BEJteofaEs OC SmociiJG BtiA"
SPORTS FAN ATTIC
OIMCHI l.CKSII
MIOIUICtH IISiHU'
Pro and College Sports '
Apparel and Novelties
NCAA
:c Officially
Licensed
Product
Carolina East Mall
756-7487
K1
AKTC y�T u)E 0�T�- �.0 Up
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SlT OtO A COiMFy SOA liO A
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TOG.J OFF TH& TV, oe AT L�&ST
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La
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SUXj)L AfOP C?e�PL. �ACW TIM6
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"STCtSS" TO youfcSECF THIS
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"srtiSS
visoau2� aooC &ooy as the
Rcsrr holloa hu. of a
Suot.fe0 OCEAiO FR-El&HTEC,
ato h� wJoet? 'sxets1?" as a
jnA�OT ECi. &Vdt�MtiJ6 HO A.Otf
OUT OF yoofe PoeTW0LE5.
CO�0T.K0f S��AThiN)C-D�EP(-y
UOvUl-E THE EEuSulTUteS
THeOOGH bOJ& OCPTHS. SOOtO
THE- C.e.1- -OiC SoOim QuOO; A�Jp
boo u)ill PtEw etLAicexp am
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JUST uOOt AT ALL THE POOE-
SOtctfc9 AaooisJC MOU uHC AC�
liJvtOG 11O CONS,TAKrr iEfTL.
TuewoiL. eerr �oot oj ' you
HAVt ACHVEEC7 iWiER- PtACE.
yoo Should 8E v�Ca PutASEg
y.TH yoOtSEiF
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
Fosdick's Rom;nns Open
During Evans St. Closing
Use Red Banks Rd
2903 S. Evans SI
Antiques inspire furniture market
By BARBARA MAM R
I S� sso. Med Preu
1 henation'sattic - rheSmith-
in Institution - and antique
�-tores and museums around the
� I inspired many o( the deci-
� - at the tall furniture market
in High Point, N (
At .1 difficult time for the fur-
niture industry, w hen business is
spottv and several of the country's
two department stores are on the
s.ile block, manufacturers chose
to emphasize tr.uiition.il pie.es
that bear.i well knov n designer's
name or recall another era
The American lo eaffair with
a romanticized representation of
ourpast continues unabated. New
American country pieces that
borrow from the past but don't
Scandinavian
reproduce it were among the most
popular at the market. Copies of
styles from the last three centuries
ot English and American designs
are a close second. 1 rench themes
ativi neoclassical styles such as
Biedermeier are minor themes
Indicative of the pragmatic
nature of design today, two ot the
major new furniture groups com-
bine several English periods
Continued from page 8
(Century and Drexel). Another is
ontemporary with many refer-
ences to the past" in designer
Charles Pfister's words (Baker).
1 he Lexington group "combines
French, English and Italian influ-
ences in every piece according
to designer 1 ynn 1 lollyn.
Upholstery fabrics moved in
two mam color directions: Jewel-
like emerald, brilliant blue, red
and eggplant, and clear bright
florals in sunny yellow and blue
or other flower-like colors used
with white.
Scot
Call 756-2011
(I(IiIhiii.iI P.11 km
Niiu a 11.1 l'i
FREE
MEAL
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At Regular Menu p
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Monday Thru Thursday.
Dine-In Or Take-Out j
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Expires Nov lMh 1989 I
I
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1 Regular$6.25
t Large$ 7.25
. ia wouldn't be complete with
: the rockers from Sweden
� lodic rockers Europe leaped to
bal success with their second
' I he Final Countdown
which issued many top hits in-
ling "The Final Countdown
Rock the ight and the ever-
melodic ballad ' Carrie
! lowever, their latest release "Out
i M 1 his World" unfortunately did
not follow that chart success. No
problem there, joey Tempest and
mpany are in a Los Angeles
studio right now working on a
follow up that promises to be
heavier, but still melodic, and
possibly out of this world.
Swedish-bom guitarist Yng-
wieMalmsteen, formerly of Steeler
and Alcatraz, left his homeland to
move to Los Angeles m lUs?
ti hing a huge I .S following.
id Swede ispcrhaps
� first I �introduce the classical
speed srvleonguitar. Malmsteen's
newest release is a live album that
was recorded during last year's
I S.S.R. tour. This release is ap-
propriately entitled "Live In Len-
ingrad Rightnow. Malmsteen is
living in Honda and looking tor a
new vocalist to replace oe Lynn
Turner tor the next LP.
The most colorful and unique
band to come out of Skovde,
Sweden these days is Shotgun
Messiah, a shocking foursome that
poundsoutsomeoi the most hard-
hitting metal to date in their na-
tive homeland. This streetwise
quartet, that relocated to Los
Angeles a year ago, has just re-
cently released their self-titled
debut LP. Their first videosingle
'Shout It chit" definitely proves
that this band is a strong candi-
date tor future success.
Other northern lights to keep
a close watch on are Sweden's 220
Volt, Pretty Maids and 1 eviticus,
all of whom have released albums
or .ire preparing to do so in the
months ahead.
Juvenile
Two young men were in tor
violating their probation Thev
were originally tried tor breaking
and entering and larceny fTietwo
openly talked of their escapades
I hey talked of how thev had snuck
into a pool at 3 a m. and how they
were going to go out and partv
when thev were released.
One voting lady was in the
enter for assaulting her mother,
she talked about not having any
plan' to live and about her tem-
per, She said if the courts would
let her go home, she would like to
ivork things out with her mother
Another young man was in
tor armed robbery. He had held a
v;un to a taxi driver's head while
I iking his money.
Regardless of their enmes, the
children looked no different than
any other children their ages. They
are ust kids who were on the
streets, lacking someone to disci-
pline, Itxik after and care about
them The center dix-s this and
more.
Stewart said, "A lot of times
they are not used to someone being
there to discipline them or tell them
what to do. Once thev get used to
that, they are usuallyagood group
of kids to work with
The center offers the kids a
chance to change and become
better individuals. But the center
is just a holding area, and the chil-
dren are usually not there for long
Continued from page 8
And so a few years ago, in tht
tar north of Europe, the voices ot I
heavy metal were seldom heard.
1 lowever, this is all changing now
and Scandinavian metal can bo
heard throughout the world.
Scandinavia has finally found it
place in rock-n-roll!
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
i
while vou wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina l'regnaney Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville, NC
STUDENT UNION
When Harry Met 8ally La MarieillaiSe
Thurs. - Sun Nov. 9 - 12, 1989 Wed Nov. 8, 1989
All Movies Screen 8pm, Hendrix Theatre
' We have them 'till thev go to
court, which is not very long, it
thev get bound over for superior
court, thev could be here tor three
to tour months Stewart said
"Once the superior court hears
their cases, they cannot come back
here
Following that, the children
can be sent to prison or to another
adult facility. If thechildren'scases
are heard in juvenile court, they
can be sent to a group home or a
training school.
Training schools are less re-
stricted than the centers and are
often like camps. The children st iv
there tor a period of time that is
determined by their behavior. The
schools operate on a point system.
I he children earn points for good
behavior, and when thev earn
enough points, they are released.
The four young men, who
were nervous when they arrived,
left the center with a better under-
standing of its operation and of
the kids who were there. They left
with a changed attitude and sev-
eral new-found friends.
McCreary said, "They were
lust a group of kids who were in
with the wrong crowd, who had
no one to look after them or disci-
pline them. They are really not a
bad bunch of kids.
"I will keep coming back, and
I hope that I can help them when
they get out, if they ever need it
Hams
M-F 9 am - 5 pm
Come Out and Hear the
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Fusion Sounds of
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Enjoy
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while your in, check out our
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Sun Nov. 12,1989 8pm
Mendenhall Student Social Room Free Admission and Refreshments
Sponsored by Student Union's Coffeehouse
4
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7521663
HOl, SEXY, & SAFER
A Zany, Provocative Lecture on
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TuesNov. 14, 1989 8pm
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the Student Union Forum fen-
Aids Awareness Week
�Ui-STUDENT UNION STUDENT UNION
1101h.irlo Blul Greenvilk Nt 278 8





I
THh EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBI R 7, iws4 P (, K)
Pirates fall to 4-3-1
Hurricanes roll in
Orange Bowl win
By MICHAEL MARTIN
Sport Iditor
The ECU football team went
to the Orange Bowl in Miami. Fla
over the weekend with one
thought in mind quell the
Hurricanes 6-1 record.
However, the upset conten-
tions slowly taded awav as The
Associated Presses number seven
ranked teamdominatod thegame,
posting a 40-10 victory over the
Pirates.
Sophomore quarterback lett
Blake, substituting tor a sidelined
Travis Hunter, had a fine prefor-
mance in the Pirates' third loss
1 le completed 14 of 26 passes tor
1M yards, a touchdown and one
interception.
Wc.d coach Bill lewis said
Blake went intoa "toughsituation"
and played well. 1 le also said Blake
would, 'continue to grow and
become a good quarterback tor
us according to an interview with
The Associated Press.
Lewis said the decision to not
start Hunter was because of
(Hunter's) failure to uphold his
responsibility toa very important
team policy
The 1 hurricanes jumped to an
early lead when fullback Alex
ohnson carried the ball in from 2
yards out. Place kicker Carlos
Huerta added the first of his five
extra points to put Miami up 7-0.
ECU, led by a key 13-yard
pass from Blake to wide receiver
Walter Wilson and another 15-
yard gain by Blake, marched down
the field into scoring position.
Freshman Anthonv Brenner.
making hiscollegedebutasa place
kicker, booted a 22-yard field goal
to close the' gap to 7- J.
Miami would not be denied
ontheirsecond possession, as they
drove down the field 84 yards on
twelve plays to go up 14-3. Fresh-
man fullback Stephen McGuire,
making his first start, went
through the middle from one yard
out for the touchdown.
The Pirates would strike next
as Blake found Wilson wide open
tor a 42-yard bomb early in the
second quarter. Robb Imperato
added the extra point, and the
Miami lead was cut to tour
Wilson, slowly making his
way up the ECU career reception
and yardage hook, reinjured his
shoulder late in the quarter. He
Cavaliers
win, take
ACC lead
By DAVID DROSCHAK
�(Kijted Prt-M
RALEIGH - In an Atlantic
Coast Conference showdown in
which both quarterbacks figured
to star, one ended up in the hospi-
tal and the other completed only
three passes
And in a game in which statis-
tics usually don't lie, they did
Saturday as No. 24 Virginia
downed No. 18 North Carolina
State 20-9 to take the ACC lead.
The high-powered Cavaliers
lost almost every offensive cate-
gory but the final score. The
Wolf pack ran 79 plays to Virginia's
49, and had 2h first downs to PI
NC State also held the ball for
more than 3o minutes.
Virginia's Shawn Moore and
NC State's Shane Montgomery are
considered by many two of the
best quarterbacks in the South. But
Montgomery wasn't given the
opportunity to prove it, while
Moore was less than impressive,
completing onlv three of 10 passes
for 113 yards.
Still, Moore had reason to
smileaftcr Jason Wallace returned
an interception 40 yards for a
touchdown and Jake Mclnerney
extended hisconsecutivefield goal
streak to 14 for the victory.
"Things were pretty dull at
that point (before the intercep-
tion) Moore said. "We weren't
getting any field position. That
was the biggest momentum switch
didn t play in the second half,and
finished thegame with five recep-
tions for P1 yards and a touch-
down
1 Inert.) added a Ml yard field
goal at the 2 mark to increase
the score to 17-10. Quarterback
Craig Erickson found wide re-
ceiver Pale Dawkins open tor a
21 vard field goal with remain-
ing in the hall Erickson finished
the day 11 ot 17for 173 yardsand
no interceptions
1 he kev to the came was
th se last 2:30 ol the first halt
I ewis said aftei the game. Thev
did a great job of going down and
See Miami, page 12
ECU'S Anthonv Thompson looks for another tackle against Miami's Wesley Thompson in the Pirates
40-10 loss to the Hurricanes Saturday in the Orange Howl. (Photo bv Cliff Hollis)
hates lake third place
'Worm Burners' capture Ultimate tournament
Hv GAR" Ml Kl 1
1 he EC I men s frisbee club
hosted tht ir 14th biannual I In-
mate! risbee tournament this past
w eekend D. club team,
"Worm Burners, 'finished as Ulti-
ma XIV i hampii
Fourteen men's teams and
foui women's teams from all over
the easl coast arrived Saturday
moi ning tor the e ent. EC I 's
women's frisbee team "Helios
hosted the Raleigh area team
"GRITl NC VV; and a Gainesville,
Florida team
"1 lelios" did not have a good
first .la- as the lost all three of
their games. "GRIT" was the
undefeated first place team a
Wilmington took second place
with a 2-1 record. G linesvilleonly
topped "1 lelios" giving them third
place.
The men's teams were divided
into tour pools. The pool champi-
ons were East Carolina s 'hates' .
King of lire Columbia's
Hugo and the "Worm Burn-
ers All four teams were 3-0 on
Saturday

a tin
I ourteen men and toiu ouien s Lltiuidic teams congregated on
the intramural field this weekend for the Ultimax XIV tourney.
(Photo by Gariett Killian - LCL' Photolab)
Cross country teams finish
seventh in conference
By CAROLYN USTICE-HINSON
Mjlf Vlntrr
W1LLIAMSBURG, Va.
E( I 'scrosscountry teams met up
with tough competition at the
Colonial Athletic Association's
1989 crosscountry championships
on Saturday in V illiamsburg, Va.
and finished the regular season
with a seventh place finish in the
CAA.
For the men's team, it was its
second consecutive seventh place
finish .it the CAA while the U.S.
Naval Academy recorded its sev-
enth first place finish.
ECU was k?ad by senior Matt
Schweitzer who bettered his 1988
27:12 time and 27th place finish to
26:51 and nth place The winning
time was recorded bv James
Madison's I'ete Weilenmann who
finished the five mile race in 25:15,
for his third CAA title
For the Lady Pirates, seventh
place was a disappointment after
hoping to improve upon their fifth
place finish in 1988.
Sophomore Ann Marie Welch
improved upon her 1988 finish of
13th place by running her way
into the top ten, finishing ninth in
the five kilometer race in 14:01.
Senior Terri Lynch finished in
20:17, placing her at 32nd and
Dawn Tillson placed 36th in 20:39,
improving her 1988 CAA time of
21:06.
George Mason's sophomore
Lauretta Miller took top honors at
the CAA finishing in 17:18. The
win marked the third straight year
a GMU runner has won the event.
Miller helped pace the Patriots to
a victory over defending champi-
ons, William and Mary.
"We had good performances
out of our top runners this week-
end said assistant crosscountry
coach, Charles Justice. "Lack of
depth really hurt us in the long
run
The coaching staff was pleased
with the entire 1989 season and
looks forward to the 1990 season.
"Our guys had probably the
best season ever. We had only a
few veterans returning and they
mixed very well with our new-
comers. Our women had a great
season and every one improved
from the beginning of the year.
See Cross country, page 11
Kistar �
day against St M
learn "SMI I
shutSt.Marv soul
one pomt t,
them, that on
second hall
The Iitcs �
sity of Virginia
had an easy timt, w n
The Easl l
ol the da) wa � tl I rate
rate mat
conglomerate team composed ol
Irate Alumni.

n tall-
I
,
:
iti . aln M st
only
n . linsl
I
game
The Xrati
could nc i
ing by foui I
A'late gam
had thecrow�
Irates Kept th
won m- 1.
Commenting v et-
eran Ke m iid
placed our : � I
semester on was
important for - ;ood at
home and wi did
According I ive Kelly,
another team ii wasi
ies such as Chad and
Chuck Pent wh thediffcr-
ence. "We om have six veterans
this year so w exj I i �t ol the
rookies, rhey cam said
Kelly.
I he Post-Play L Itimate P irl.
lasted lateand the tournament did
not start on Sunday until IT :
L N( W's men's team won the
party and the coveted par
trophy.
reams wcredivided int
brackets on Sunday, rhetopi
teams qualified tor the A bra � I
and the rest battled for tl
bracket title.
The Irates wen their first gai
on Sunday against Wilmingl
"Twist and Burn I ins advai
East Carolina to the semi-fii
rhey were then elimil
"Worm Burners" 17-13 Thelratc
finished the tournament in third
place.
I he finals were bet w �
"Worm Burners' and Rail
team, "RingofFire "Worm
ers" took the lead earH and nev r
stopped, winning 16-12
In women's play the home
team "Helios' captured second
place and a trophy. The w
division champion was I V
Ot the tournament. E I
DeMan an ex-Irate team captain,
said, "It was a great weekend
weather was awesome, the com
petition tough, and the party was
great
Swimmers fall in CAA
action over weekend
ByKATHERINI ANDERSON
SHI! V tl
I he LCL Swimming and
Diving Team wasdf feated twice
List weekend when they faced
ames Madison I niv rsitx on i ri
day and American I nivi rsity n .
Saturday.
Friday's meet featured the
men swimming against IML
Head coach Rick Kobe stated, "It
was a close meet that i ame down
to the final relay, and they were
just a little bit quicker i he final
points were MU ! J3, EC I 1 10.
The ECU women faced MU
later in the afternoon, and they
swam hard, vet the final points
reflected a big victory for IML'
with lh2 and EC I I J8
"We swam well but the best
team won; we have some work to
do stated Kobe
ECU was somewhat discour-
aged when thee left Minges Fri
oa night but still had hopes ' i
Saturday's meet against Amen
can. Saturday's loss was a hard
one to swallow for both team mem
bers and coaches alike The men
finished with American 1 J8 and
ECU 105, and the women with
American 133, E( I 108. When it
was all over Kobe said. " rhey an
a much, much better team they
kicked our butts and we've got a
long way to go before Conference.
Although the team was dis
heartened by the events of the
weekend, they plan to pull to-
gether and be reads tor William
and Mary on November 10. Kobe
expects the men to dowell in
Friday's meet, but he savs it will
be a tough meet for the women
JMU rolls in
CAA tennis
tournament
HvH

lh
I'll-
wit I '
-
' '
'
-
w ith
find i
moi
ut
player

wa vs i
you :
EC1 .
S, ,� i
iJgttHV �
a
The 1989 men's and women's cross country teams competed in the Colonial Athletic Association
championships inWilliamsburg, Va. over the weekend. Both teams captured seventh place, with
Matt Schweityer and Ann Marie Welch leading the way. (Photo courtesv of Sports Information)





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 7,1989 11
Clemson rolls past Tarheels, 35-3
By Al Bovce
The �MHited Pre�
( HAPEL HILL, NC (AP)
No. 21 Clemson outgained North
Carolina 474-114 Saturday, but
Coach Danny Ford gave his de-
fense a lot ot the credit tor a 35-3
Atlantic Coast Conference victory.
Senior tailback loe Hender-
son ran for a career-high lh3vards
and three touchdowns as the Ti-
gers (8 2,5-2) ran tor 332 yards
tar above their league leading
rushing average ot 210.S vards.
Hut when Clemson's Levon
Kirkland intercepted Tar Heel
quarterback Todd Burnett early in
the second half, it seemed to pump
up the Tigers
"At halt time, it was real dan-
gerous with just a 14-3 lead, espe-
cially since it could just as easily
have been 14-10 said Ford. "But
ACC
Continued from page 10
ot the entire game
"It was a real big play because
our offense was sputtering Wal-
lace said.
lhe ictory puts the Cavaliers
3 2 and 5-1) in position to capture
their first Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence crown ever. Virginia's final
V V contest will be in two weeks
against rival Maryland. The
VVolfpack fell to 7-2 and 4-2 and
� � r the fourth straight time to
the c avaliers
e still have a game left and
so doesNC State so we can't over-
look anybody (for the conference
title � Moore said.
1 don't think that 'disap-
poin ted' isa strong enough word
'C State coach Dick Sheridan said
alter the loss which six bowl game
scouts attended. "We've disap-
pointed ourselves, and we've dis-
appointed our tans. No one likes
to fail, and that's what we did.
We've lost the opportunity to
compete for the conference cham-
pion-hip. and it hurts
Montgomery broke the
school's all-time passing mark
with 42 yards on the game's open-
ing drive but left with a concus-
sion and was taken to a hospital.
The Wolfpack actually domi-
nated the first quarter with backup
Preston Poag handling the quar-
terbacking duties. Two Damon
Hartman field goalsgaveNCState
a 6-0 lead.
1 don't think thequarterback
change was a big factor Sheri-
dan said. "Preston played well.
Virginia played well on both sides
o( the ball, and 1 think you have to
recognize the quality of their ball
club
But two key turnovers late in
the second quarter turned the
game in Virginia's favor after
Mclnerney had narrowed the lead
to 6-3 with his 13th straight field
coal.
Cross country
Continued from page 10
Fhev were very successful with
their three overall wins
The season is not over yet tor
four ECL runners as Matt
Schweitzer, Kyle Sullivan, Ann
Marie Welch and Kim Giffiths will
mpete this weekend at the
( A A Division III Regional
Championships in Greenville, SO
"The field at theRegionals will
be as fast and good as we've seen
all year fustics said. "We'll see
me of the top teams in the coun-
try which come from here in our
a-ea. NC State's women's team
will be competing and they have
been ranked asoneof the top teams
in the nation
Men's results:
1-Navy 26, 2- William and
Mary47, 3-LC-Wilmington83,
4-James Madison 86,5-Richmond
155,6-American 183,7- East Caro-
lina 185, 8- George Mason 187.
ECU finishes:
30-MattSchweitzer-26:21,45-
Kyle Sullivan-27:20, 53-Tony
hadwick-28:38, 4-Matt Morris-
2857,6f Calvin Grave-2952,61-
Rickv Chann-29:58, 65-David
Levet-30:31, 67-Pete Higgins-
34:30
Women's results:
1 -C ie wge Mason 28,2-William
and Marv 33, 3- James Madison
101, 4-L'( -Wilmington 118, 5-
Richmond 141,6-Amencan 148,7-
East Carolina 151.
ECU finishes:
9-AnnManeWelch-19:01,32-
Tern Lvnch-20:17, 36-Dawn
Tillson-20:39, 42-Kim Griffiths-
20:59, 44-Denise Wehrenberg-
21 (W, 58-ennifer Hough-22.31,59-
Sus,3nHu-22:33,60-RoseyDaniels-
23:06.
I guess the big play ot the game
had to be the interception early in
the third quarter
Clemson blanked North Caro-
lina (1-8, 0-6) in the second half
and held the Tar 1 leek to minus 6
yards rushing and 114 yards of-
fense tor the game
North Carolina coach Mack
Brown said his team suffered from
mistakes, including a penalty that
brought back an apparent 97-yard
touchdown run bv Eric Hlount.
"It changes the momentum in
the ball game Brown said. "It
gives our young guvs who need
confidence some confidence and
the official told me we had our
split end lined up in thebackfield.
That's a very, very critical play.
Then we turn the ball over to
start the second half, thev squirt
onethroughand it's21-3 he said.
"When vow get down like that
against their defense, it's very
tough to protect with the inexperi-
ence we've had this year
� K
ECU'S Sammy Tounsi prepares to return a volley from JMU's Matt
Goetz in quarterfinal action of the CAA Pirate Invitational.
(Photo bt Angela Pridgen - ECU Photolab)
Tennis
Continued from page 10
An individual standouts tor
the team, Davis said, were junior
McLamb and Tounsi. "Mcl.amb
grubbed through a couple of
matches .Tounsi didn't play as well
as we wanted but he came up
against a tough player from MU
McLamb commented on the
team's performance saying "we've
pointed out that the plavers the got a voung team and 1 think those
Pirates faced in the tournament guvs need to get a few matches
would be the same ones they under their belts
would play against in the regular The Pirates begin their regu-
season. lar season of play this lanuary.
Readthenewspaper,Ms free
the team's results
Davis said that through tour-
naments such as the Invitational,
team members and coaches have
a chance to fee! out their oppo-
nents "It's excellent preparation
to see how the other teams are
doing and how we match up
Davis said about the tournament.
"We match up very well Davis
STUDY BREAK
CAMPFIRE!
Tonight, Tuesday,
Nov. 7
8pm - until
Amphitheatre
(behind Fletcher Dorm)
Sponsored by:
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WesHcl is sponsored bj Presbyterian and Methodist Campus Mirrisieries! Rev.
Michelle 'Mike' Butcher, 752 7240; Kc Dan Earnhardt, 758 2030.
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LTCOL BILL PATTON
757-6597
B-ma �
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12
I HI- EASTCAROl INIAN
i A EMBHR 7 mm
Sports Briefs
Miami
Continued from page 10
Fraud figured at Florida
Florida University's decision to aV bask tball coach N'crm Sloan
to retire was influenced by the the possibilit) ol a federal indie tment
against him. according to Charles Reed, chancellor of Florida's state
university system. 1ji! fraud charges were lobebroughl against Sloan,
according to newspaper accounts. Sloan resigned "uesday
Marcum's lawsuit settled
Bob Marcum, former athletic director .it the University t South
Carolina, vas awarded neari) $25(1 OOOby a federal jur) in Columbia,
SC The ur- in his bn?ach-of- ontract lawsuit found that he was fired
unjustly. Marcum was fired alter an inquiry into testing for anabolic
steroid iw at USC
Henderson files as free agent
Rickey Henderson filed for free � ��-�� on I hursdav reportedlyis
seeking $3 million a year Henders I , said he hopes to return to the
World Series champion Oakland Athlcti s butm o, return to the New
York Yankees, the team that traded him to the Athletu - in une
Makarov gets NHL award
The Calgary Flames Soviet ika . was named
National Hockey Li � ttoberon rhurs-
day. Thirty-one-year-old Makarov had I - I IS assists for 21
points
Garvey's ex-wife is released
The former CyndyGarvey Cynthia Truhan hashadher 126-
day jail sentence suspended. Theev vvifeol former major leaguer Steve
Garvey spent one night in jail inO I erfi r violating a child visitation
order. A Superior Court judge reir U d probation for Truhan. The
judge said she would make a final ruin f i . on the sentence.
Deadline set in horse events
After talks between the Intemation il Equestrian Federation and
InternationalCMympicCommittee presid nt uan Antonio Samaranch,
a deadline ol the end of 1991 has been set for the federation to
recommendwh tl r equestrian events a I 92Bai elonaOlympics
shouldbemov lt anothersitebecaus th . g African horse
sickness in Spain
Ikangaa wins N.V. .Marathon
un Panza " k Citv Mai ithon on
Sunday n2hours,8minut ndlse I �� thrunnei ipKcnMartin,
of Santa Fe N M just behind at 2 - Martin's til as a break-
througl USA men, - e 1983
Lewis wins after low blow
Canadian heavyw ighl Leni v : ewis won his : fth consecutive
professional bout after Mi h yn Epps of the L SA was d squalified for a
low blow early in the second round of a match in I ondon, Ontario,
Sunday.
Casper wins Senior tourney
At the International Senior tournament in tchihara, apart, Sunday,
Billy Casper shoi "W for nine holes and won the tournament by two
strokes with a 167 total for 2 i -2 n ui ds. C asper won $38,5 K)
Pete Rose breaks exile
Pete Rest omes out of hisexile this week sell imposed since his
banishment fn rn baseball in August to promote his new book "Pete
Rose: MyStory He will appear on 'Donahue" and "2020 Release
oi the book v. .is tu coinc ide with the Phil Donahue interview Wednes-
day, but copies mistaki rth were distributed to Qncinnati bookstores
Friday.
Reggi plans tennis return
Italian tennis pro R .�. ill le �ve the I SA Monday lora
temporary period outside tht country in order not to violate her visa
and jeopardi to pi ly in the ' o 13-19 Virginia 'slims
Champions ps rs are a wed ni 119 days a year in the
USA, and Reggi has spent I day? If sheplayi d this weel she would
noi he ible to compete in tl rney.
Team wins show awards
The American Equestrian ft am look the top two awards during
Sunday's competition at the National 1 forsc Show at 1 ast Rutherford,
NChris Kappler,St. Chark iii, and DebbieShaffner Ambler, Pa
won the International and Open lumpers Pair Relay.
Ex-pro Barnes to be sentenced
Marvin Barnes, 37, a former pro basketball player is to be sen-
tenced Jan. 5 after pleading guill
Diego adult book store Ge� -
Barnes fates a maximum sentence ol two years in state prison and a
$10,000 fine.
US yacht wins race and title
Theoverall title and fourth and final race at the 1990 International
50-Foot World Cup went to the USA yacht Windquest, with America's
Cup tactician John Bertrand at the helm Sunday at World Cup in
Sajima, Japan.
Dallas beats Washington
The Cowboys got their first wmol the season Sunday nighl ina!3-
3 decision over the Washington Redskins Also: Falcons 30, Bills 28;
Packers 14, Bears 13; Browns 42, Buccaneers 31; Oilers 35, Lions 31;
Dophins 19,Colts 13; Vikings 23, Rams 21,jets27. Pau lots 26;Chiefs20,
Seahawks 10, Raiders 28, Bengals 7; Giants 20,Cardinals 13; Chargers
20, Eagles 17; Bronco 34, Steelers 7; Cowboys 13, Redskins 3.
sconng.
rhat set the stage tor things
to opt n up in the second half, and
thev played extremely well in the
third quarter "
I he I lurricanes tightened the
grips on the Pirates in the second
half, not allowing E I to score
the fourth straight game the Pi
rates have failed to score in the
second halt.
Miami's tight end Rob
( hudzinski, recovered a lohnson
tumble and s rambled 16yards to
the E U 25 Ihree plays later,
McGuirebolted in from 11 ards
out to extend the I lurricanes' lead
to 31-10
1 lunterthenentered thegame
for ECU, but could offer little 1 le
completed three passes tor 26
vards and rushed tour times tor
another is yards.
Miami's final scores came
when Blake was tackled in the
endone by Iimmie lones tor a
safetv in the fourth quarter
Met .uire added the final blow to
the 1'irates when he reached the
endone after a spactacular 55
card sprint down the right side
line. He tamed one more time
trom three vards out.
1 he Hurricanes dominated
the game, racking up 47 total
yards ol offense, while limiting
the Pirates to only 269.
I eading the Pirates wasfrcsh-
man tailback Cedric Van Huron
who rushed nine times tor 21'
yards. Senior Willie Lewis suffered
a season-ending blow to the knee
uist before the halt, and finished
with 21 vards on su carries.
1 or the Hurricanes, Mc iuire
finished with 1 16 yards on 14ar
nes and three touchdowns
lohnson tallied 111 yards while
only rushing 15 times, one tor a
tout hdown Miami'sbackupquar-
terba k I who started in the game
threw 7 ot lb tor 96 vards
We ran the ball better than
w e e run it all year Miami head
1 oaHi IVnnis Erickson said. "The
offensive line was blocking and
the backs were really running
hard
I he loss dropped the Pirates'
record to4- V 1 on theseason, while
the Hurricanes improved to 7-1
E L will be at home Saturday, as
thev face a tough (0-7) Temple
team in Ficklen Stadium
Go
Pirate
East Carolina
Miami
14
10
0
0
10
40
leotapes from a San
puty district attorney, said
MIAMI - Johnson 23-yard run (Huerta kick)
ECU - Brenner 22-yard field goal
MIAMI - McGuire 1-yard run (Huerta kick)
1 CU - Wilson 42-yard pass from Blake (Imperato kick)
MIAMI - Huerta 30-yard field goal
MIAMI - Hawkins 21-yard pass from Erickson
(Huerta kick)
MIAMI - McGuire no-yard run (Huerta kick)
MIAMI - Safety, Blake tackled in endzone by J Jones
MIAMI - McGuire 1-yard run (Huerta kick)
TEAMsi 11sncs
ECUMIAMI
First downs1729
Total offense269547
Rushing79278
Passing 17-32-190-118-33-269-1
Fumbles4-13-1
Penalties7-527-65
PunLs7-365-40
Possession time30:4929:11
Attendance35,159
a
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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 7, 1989
Sports Briefs
Miami
Continued from page 10
Fraud figured at Florida
Florida University's decision to ask basketball coach Norm Sloan
to retire was influenced by the the possibility of a federal indictment
against him, according to Charles Reed, chancellor of Florida's state
university system. Mail fraud charges were lobe brought against Sloan,
according to newspaper accounts. Sloan resigned Tuesday.
Mareum's lawsuit settled
Bob Mareum, former athletic director at the University of South
Carolina, was awarded nearly $250,000 by a federal jury in Columbia,
S.C. The jury in hisbreach-of-conrract lawsuit found that he was fired
unjustly. Mareum was fired after an inquiry into testing for anabolic
steroid use at USC
Henderson files as free agent
Rickey Henderson filed for free agency on Thursday, reportedly is
seeking $3 million a year. Henderson, 30, said he hopes to return to the
World Series champion Oakland Athletics, but may return to the New
York Yankees, the team that traded him to Ihe Athletics in June.
Makarov gets NHL award
The Calgary Flames Soviet import Sergei Makarov was named
National Hockey League Rookie of the Month for October on Thurs-
day. Thirty-one-year-old Makarov had three goals and 18 assists for 21
points.
Garvey's ex-wife is released
The former CyndyGarvey � Cynthia Truhan � has had her 126-
day jail sentence suspended. The ex-wife of former major leaguer Steve
Garvey spent one night in jail in October for violating a child visitation
order. A Superior Court judge reinstated probation for Truhan. The
judge said she would make a final ruling Dec. 8 on the sentence.
Deadline set in horse events
After talks between the International Equestrian Federation and
International Olympic Committee presiden t j ua n An tonio Samaranch,
a deadline of the end oi 1991 has been set for the federation to
recommend whether equestrianeventsat thel992 Barcelona Olympics
should be moved to another site because of the prevailing African horse
sickness in Spain.
Ikangaa wins N.Y. Marathon
Juma ikangaa, of Tanzania, won the New York City Marathon on
Sunday in 2 hours, 8 minutes and 1 second, with runner-up Ken Martin,
of Santa Fe, N.M just behind at 2:09:38. Martin's time was a break-
through for USA men, who haven't broken 2:10 since 1983.
Lewis wins after low blow
Canadian heavyweight Lennox Lewis won his fifth consecutive
rofessional bout after Melvyn Epps of the USA was disqualified for a
ow blow early in the second round of a match in London, Ontario,
'Stffiday.
Casper wins Senior tourney
At the International Senior tournament, in Ichihara, Japan, Sunday,
Bifly Casper shot 34 for nine holes and won the tournament by two
strokes with a 167 total for 21-2 rounds. Casper won $38,500.
Pete Rose breaks exile
Pete Rose comes out of his exile this week � self imposed since his
banishment from baseball in August � to promote his new book "Pete
Rose: My Story He will appear on "Donahue" and "2020 Release
of the book was to coincide with the Phil Donahue interview Wednes-
day, but copies mistakenly were distributed to Cincinnati bookstores
Friday.
Reggi plans tennis return
Italian tennis pro Raffaella Reggi will leave the USA Monday for a
temporary period outside the country in order not to violate her visa
and jeopardize her chance to play in the Nov. 13-19 Virginia Slims
Championships. Foreigners arc allowed oniy 119 days a year in the
USA,andReggihasspentllOdays. Ifsheplayed thisweek,shewould
not be able to compete in the Virginia Slims tourney.
Team wins show awards
The American Equestrian Team took the top two awards during
Sunday's competition at the National Horse Show at East Rutherford,
NJ. Chris Kappler, St. Charles, 111 and Debbie Shaffner, Ambler, Pa
won the International and Open Jumpers Pair Relay.
Ex-pro Barnes to be sentenced
Marvin Barnes, 37, a former pro basketball player, is to be sen-
tenced Jan. 5 after pleading guilty to stealing videotapes from a San
Diego adult book store. George Beall, a deputy district attorney, said
Barnes faces a maximum sentence of two years in state prison and a
$10,000 fine-
US yacht wins race and title
The overall title and fourth and final race at the 1990 International
50-Fbot World Cup went to the USA yacht Windquest, with America's
Ctip tactician John Bertrand at the helm Sunday at World Cup in
Sapma, Japan.
Dallas beats Washington
The Cowboys got their first win of the season Su nday night in a 13-
3 decision over tine Washington Redskins. Also: Falcons 30, Bills 28;
Packers 14, Bears 13; Browns 42, Buccaneers 31; Oilers 35, Lions 31;
Dophins 19, Colts 13; Vikings 23, Rams 21; jets27, Patriots 26;Chiefs 20,
Seahawks 10; Raiders 28, Bengals 7; Giants 20, Cardinals 13; Chargers
20, Eagles 17; Broncos 34, Steelers 7; Cowboys 13, Redskins"3.
�Owl, J�9. UMTCOATArrhColUgthfmmmtHmNttwo
scoring.
"That set the stage for things
to open up in the second half, and
they played extremely well in the
third quarter
The Hurricanes tightened the
grips on the Pirates in the second
half, not allowing ECU to score -
the fourth straight game the Pi-
rates have failed to score in the
second half.
Miami's tight end Rob
Chudzinski, recovered a Johnson
fumble and scrambled 16 yards to
the ECU 25. Three plays later,
McGuire bolted in from 11 yards
out to extend the Hurricanes' lead
to 31-10.
Hunter then entered the game
for ECU, but could offer little. He
completed three passes for 26
yards, and rushed four times for
another 18 yards.
Miami's final scores came
when Blake was tackled in the
endzone by Jimmie Jones for a
safety in the fourth quarter.
McGuire added the final blow to
the Pirates when he reached the
endzone after a spactacular 55-
yard sprint down the right side-
line. He carried one more time
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from three yards out.
The Hurricanes dominated
the game, racking up 547 total
yards of offense, while limiting
the Pirates to only 269.
Leading the Pirates was fresh-
man tailback Cedric Van Buren
who rushed nine times for 29
yards. Senior Willie Lewis suffered
a season-ending blow to the knee
just before the half, and finished
with 21 yards on six carries.
For the Hurricanes, McGuire
finished with 136 yards on 14 car-
ries and three touchdowns.
Johnson tallied 111 yards while
only rushing 15 times, one for a
touchdown. Miami's backup quar-
terback (who started in the game)
threw 7 of 16 for 96 yards.
"We ran the ball better than
we've run it all year Miami head
coach Dennis Erickson said. "The
offensive line was blocking and
the backs were really running
hard.
The loss dropped the Pirates'
record to 4-3-1 on the season, while
the Hurricanes improved to 7-1.
ECU will be at home Saturday, as
they face a tough (0-7) Temple
team in Ficklen Stadium.
East Carolina
Miami
14
10
0
0
10
40
MIAMI - Johnson 23-yard run (Huerta kick)
ECU - Brenner 22-yard field goal
MIAMI - McGuire 1-yard run (Huerta kick)
ECU - Wilson 42-yard pass from Blake (Imperato kick)
MIAMI - Huerta 30-yard field goal
MIAMI - Dawkins 21-yard pass from Erickson
(Huerta kick)
MIAMI - McGuire 110-yard run (Huerta kick)
MIAMI - Safety, Blake tackled in endzone by J Jones
MIAMI - McGuire 1-yard run (Huerta kick)
Mmm. statistics
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Pepsi Presents
THE PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Walter Wilson 5SWW
�cs
Is
Wide Receiver
vs. Miami
'Had five catches
in the first half
for a total of 105
yards.
Reinjured his
shoulder and
did not return
for the second
half.
PEPSI PROFILE
Sr. Criminal Justice
5-10" 181lbs
Baltimore. Md.
Southern HS
40 yard dash: 4.59 seconds
Pirate's leading receiver
this season with 24 catches
for 441 yards (18.4 avg.)
Second in career recep-
tion yardage withl ,340
yards.
1 Tied for 3rd in career
catches with 72
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 7, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 07, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.707
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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