The East Carolinian, April 25, 1989






Congratulations to all graduates of 1989 !
(She lEaat GTaroltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b3 No. bS
Thursday April 25,19S9
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
No downtown Halloween celebration for
years to come, Greenville City Council says
B TIM HAMPTON
News Kdltor
Halloween lSS was a riot. Halloween 19$9 will not be.
(Photo byJ.D. Whitmire�Photolab)
ECU Medical School to
research genital herpes
By ADAM CORNELIUS
Stafl Wi let
By further study ot the herpes
implex virus especially theasymp-
omatic effect of its transmission,
Anavateproteor.r. we hope to till in the gaps in or
Medical School has received oneo( knowledge of its spread Adams
the largest sin g le in esti gator grants said.
in the university's history. The The study will involve 1.000
award will support research to find subjectsincludingbothsexuallyand
out how sexual activity and ityle non-sexuallyaetivepersons. Adams
habits affect the spread of the irus Wlllbolook;rctornv-Kiencesotnew
responsible tor genital herpes. intlVtions and patterns of recur-
Dr. Harry F. Adams, the pro r0IV-0 with Spcial attention paid to
ject's chief investigator, was the tK.� tri�,n �f thp virus when
-wtrmer x� fce WXWOO t?mm. The nQ -s.mptoms are shown. The re-
award was funded by the National v0arch wui ajso better determine
Health, the federal gov- h(nvmuchmore susceptible people
r with active genital herpes are to the
The official word: no more
downtown Halloween celebration
in Greenville.
In light oi the drastic increase1
in injuries and arrests last year, the
Greenville City Council voted not
to allow the annual party next fall.
In deciding the fate ot the event,
the council followed the recommen-
dations of the Halloween Activi-
ties Review Committee.
Consisting oi both city and
ECU campus leaders, the commit-
tee reported that the rise in vio-
lence was the overriding factor
considered in making the decision.
According to the report, fifty
persons were arrested an undeter-
mined number oi persons were
treated for injuries in the 1988 street
extravaganza. Some oi these inju-
ries were the result of assaults made
by small gangs oi youths who
evaded police officers bj ducking
into the mass oi people, the report
said.
"The commit tee agreed unani-
mously that Halloween celebra-
re-
peated the following year
tionsindowntownGreenvilleimist when many store front windows
be brought to a halt the report were broken. Tear gas canisters
found. were thrown back and forth be-
In addition, the report con- tween police officers and members
eluded that "an alternative event oi the crowd, a scene which
sponsored by the city of ECU was
ro' desirable now The matter of
replacing the party with a similar
event should not be considered for
at least one year, the report urged.
ECU students were not the
source oi the violence, according to
the report, but they did bring most
oi the outside masses, including
high school students, military per-
sonnel and students from other
universities, to the annual event.
"The way the council mem-
bers are handling this issue shows
that thev recognize that this is not
just a students problem. Students
get the blame when things get out
oi hand, but they aren't the ones
primarily responsible ior the inju-
ries, propertv damage and other
violence Greg Brown, Green-
ville's public information officer,
said.
The 1 lalloween celebration
began in the early 1970's, spilling
into the downtown streets in L'74
reported to committee members
that his officers arrested one man
trving to enter the crowd with an
M-16 assault rifle.
ECU student leaders and
administration serving on the
.(.1 II It IVIIH.H " WC�I � - . .
Reactingtotheevents,thecity committee were Larry Murphy,
council stopped the celebrations
from the period of 1976 to 1979. Bar
owners provided alternative par-
ties out in the county during that
three-year period.
By 1979, the council decided
that the situation had cooled down
enough to permit downtown cele-
brations again. The Police Depart-
president of the Student Govern-
ment Association, Jennifer Vander-
burg, SGA vice president-elect, Ray
Madden, SGA treasurer-elect, Dr.
Alfred Matthews, vice chancellor
for student life and Dr. Ronald
Speier, assistant vice chancellor for
stu lent life.
In an April 5 meeting, Murphy
ment managed to control the situ- said closing downtown bars for
ation tor the next seven years, but ' lalloween would only make sta-
in 1987 the number of Halloween dents angry and would result in
parties grew to more than 2 Parn on the thc ECU canv
Five persons were injuried and Pus- Vanderburg said ECU students
seven others were arrested that still don't understand just what
year, when the city of Greenville
spent 800 man-hours in public
safety employee overtime o isl
between $10,000 to SI5.000.
Although the 19SS I lalloween
had fewer people�n estimated
10,000 people�there were farmore
violent out breaks and arrests.
Police Chief Jerry Tesmond
went on last Halloween and don't
realie how many people were hurt
and how many were arrested.
Dr. Matthews said action
should be taken to prevent a Hal-
loween celebration downtown this
coming fall and that information to
this effect should go out to thc
students in May.
SGA debates annual appropriations
emment's main department
biomedical research. Most of the
study is being conducted with
members
AIDS virus if they engage in inter-
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
being conducted with cmux vllh an HIY-mtected part-
of the Student Health r
ner.
introduced the tentative appropria- Bob Landry, Arnold Air Society, Davis moved to amend an ap-
rions for the upcoming academic the ECU Poetry Forum and Phi proriation for the University Schol-
year based on requests submitted Beta Lambda failed to submit their ars Organization which failed after
by the various campus organiza- constitutions for bi-annual review, debate. According to Davis, the
.ions. The amendment calls for the group's original request was for
The appropriations were ap- three groups to submit their consti- the amount of $1150. Tie total
The Student Government As-
Center, including one nurse. The bulk of the stud v. however, relation approved tentative ap-
'Vf k �� t 1 thedisease when httle or no symp- JJWndV rnade to remove three requests from before their requested funds can be Cooperman said the change
rently being re. toms are shown. According to ot the a tho Ust According to Lies and considered. was made within the committee
" Adaim,tialherpesc�beconta- Jm Judiciary Committee Chairman Legislator Mary Elizabeth because the funds requested cx-
gious in between periods of visual tion ommmet Misun v 1 1 jx ceeded the amount actually needed.
symptom& What will vou be doing this week?
Adams, a specialist in the treat
ment of infectious diseases said that
� nital herpes has become "a prob-
lem of major health importance.
The disease affects roughly 20 mil-
lion Americans, with 500,000 new
cases occurring each year.
Over the past twenty years,
chlamydia and viruses like herpes
There has been a lot oi data
that indicates vou can transmit her-
pes without displaying genital le-
gions Adamssaid. "We know very
little about the period when there
simplexhaveemergedasimportant are nosores. ,
casesI sexually transmitted dis- Adams went on to sa that if a
eases but have received only mod- symptom resembling gential It-
erate attention in recent years Dr. pes goesau ay ���
Admas explained. "In the lWs t might be something that should
AlDShascometotheforfrontasthe be looked into,
major public health concern Tf someone has irritation the
Chlamvdia. is a disease which, should not have mtercourse. Am
although sexually transmitted, is a areaol pain or discomfort should be
bacterial rather than viral infection, regarded as probably caused by
Gential herpes is caused by the vi- herpes.
rus know 1 herpes simplex, also Adams is currently looking; lor
resrxmsibleforfeverblisteVandcold a"181
sore A chief syptom of gential ,ng to volunteer for the survey. He
herpes is a painful infection of the stresses that volunteering does not
genitals that results in the forma- mean that a person has herpes since
uon oi one or more blisters. When the research will require bo h �n-
these blisters 1 �, they become fccted and umnfected subjects,
shallowu. res, disappear- Tl.oseinterestinpartjc.pamgccm
,ng after a few days. Although her- contact Dr. Adams at 551-2550 for
pes is currently an incurable dis- more information,
ease, 11 can be controlled with proper
treatment.
Will you party like these youngsters? (Photo by J.D. Whitmire)
ceeded the amount actually needed.
She said the organization had not
earned the necessary 15 of the
funds requested.
The SGA approved the consti-
tutions reviewed by the Rules and
Judiciary Committee.Constitutions
were established or renewed for
the Chinese Students Association,
ECU College Republicans, Infra-
fraternal Council, ECU Gosple
Choir, Phi Sigma Pi, ECU Honors
Organization and BACCHUS-
' A bill was passed to recom-
mend a billing system be estab-
lished at thc Student Health Cen-
ter. In support of the bill, Legislator
Lee Toler said the system wculd
aid students who car. not afford
prescription drugs at the time of
need.
According to Legislator Jim
1 a ton, the health center now bills
for lab services and x-rays only.
The bill will be mandated to Dr.
James H. McCallum Jr. and Ms.
Kay Y. YanNortwick.
The SGA approved the
See SGA, page 3
Or will you be bagging for that lor � summer in Lizzard Lick? (Photo by J.D. Whitmire)
Or willubedoing as most of us and hitting the tables of Joyner? (Photo by J.D. Whitmire)





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25.1QS�
Wet cement
,pt a 17
12251 arceny of bike southwest
ot Mendenhall.
1500 Threatening phone calls
in Garrett.
1900 Student found in posses-
sion ol pellet pistol adapted tor use
of firing paint pellets.
; 151 arceny ot keys and wal-
let in Jarvis.
2220 Worthless check sum-
mons given in lams.
2300 Criminal summons tor
non-support given in Belk.
Vonl 18
H9 Assault with a bottle in
vk person given citation tor
littering and damage to property.
145( Breakingandenteringand
larcenv ot VCR
1712
arrested tor trespassing after tarn- sdlodulo A drug and paraphema- fourth ot 229 Fletcher was arrested
pering with tire alarm pull box. jia
2145 Student in juried during
Intramural Softball
2225 Knife found in Fletcher
dorm room.
2326 Assault reported.
2340 Six males communicated
threats to Scott resident.
2541 Larceny ot money from
Fleming.
2545 Underage Alcohol lola-
tion in Aycock.
2357 1 larassing phone calls in
Clement.
1725 Student in possession of
open beer on mall.
April 22
for DVV
1440 Damage to hood of ve-
hicle west of Scott.
1515 Larceny of license plate
west of Jenkins
1710 Brett Matthew Murphy of
244 Garrett was arrested for pos-
session of schedule one drugs and
paraphernalia.
0410 Winterville man banned
for trespassing 3rd floor of Clem-
ent.
1102 Larceny of Real Fstate
am booklet from 242 Sp ight.
320 Student given citation of j
obstruction and delay and failure J
0005 Aycock resident given to obey a law enforcement officer j
tion for underage drinking and and an one way street violation. �
2240 Susan Elise Gilmore of
256 Umstead, Aimee Lee Leob of
rfinMingcs. .oScot.den Nooblecause was found �S�H
i
clc
1550 Underage Alcohol Viola-
tion by a 16 year old Greenville
female r� ported.
1650 Two unidentified subjects
writing in wet cement north ot o
Raw:
5 Persons unknown broke
April 20
236 Two High Point males
Suspicious male subject found creating a disturbance at the citation tor underage drinking
he thud floor ot oyner. handicapped entrance ot Slay. possession of another person's N(
1745 v . ng machine door 1745 Worthless checks sum-driver's license
2 ; R test for entrance to 1823 Vehicle creating nuisance by the Magistrate
basi � �: McGinnis. southeast of Aycock.
1845 Terry Lenn Honeycutt of fames Wayne French ol 117
prill9 400LewisSt -pt. 4 was arrested Debussey Court, VA Beach was
, t on female north for first degree trespassing in Qem arrested for possession of drug all arrested for possession for drug
�yi : hall by unknown nales. �ni paraphernalia, DWI and no opera- possession and possession of drug j
; torn reported in 2045 Worthless checks sum- tor's license. paraphernalia
monsinaement No probable cause found in
25 � iy Ray von Brown ol 2045 Driving with license re- DWIcharge.
Co ;ted for break- yoked on College Hill Drive.
g an automobile. 2240Tyler resident transported April 23
Kevs found unsecured in lohospital. 0045 James Scott White of 1113
Glendale Or. Raleigh was arrested
�pnl 21 anc annc from campus for in-
0115 Possession and consump- toxication and disruptive south of
tion of alcohol on mall area. held.
234 Bernald David Cerra oi 0050 lampcring with and
14 Palona 1 ane, Springfield VA, damage to a tire alarm in Scott,
arested tor DWI and DWI R. 0235 Marble partitions in bath-
430 Unauthorized use of vc- room of Belk damaged,
utof window frameonsec- hide west of Umstead. 0239 Screen torn Belk.
945 larcenv of tools from 0330 Gregory Dewayne Col-
Mendenhall work sight. Kcr of 339 Garrett was arrested for
,3ted Q23 Student transported to 1)UI
GPD. student Health Services. 4" Assisting GPD on auto
2012SamuelRobinVickofl311 0745 Two Garrett found in Greeny at 12th and Forbes.
Forrest Mill Road m Wilson was possession ot what appears to be 30 lames Robert Bryant the
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey I Keith Pearce
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blankenship
Guy Harvey
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$495 Local Open Rate $4 7
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 5 Insertions in $4.
200-299 col. inches$4.40 (12-251 $4.50
300-399 col. inches$4.30 10 Insertions" 11 U '
400-499 col. inches$4.2.0 (122"V)$4.4
500-599 col. inches$4.10 15 Insertions ill S4 45
600 and above$4.00 (12" 251 $4.40
Classified Display 20 Insertions (4 11") . $4.4
Open Rate$5.00 (122H $4.3
Color Advertising 25 Inserttions (4 11 $4.3
One Color and black$90.00 0225") $4.2i
Two Color and black$155.00
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
E
th and Col-
CV VD ars�
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See US for all Your
Automotive Needs
2616 EAST 10TH STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
758-7676
ROUND TRIP FROM GREENVILLE, NC
ON AMERICANOR PIEDMONT
NEW YORK$198 CHICAGO$223
ATLANTA$188
ST. LOUIS$218
SEATTLE$358
MIAMI$240
DENVER$278
EL PASO$298
WASH DC$188
SALT LAKE$318
MEMPHIS$218
CINCINNATI$206
BIFF 0
SAN MO
DALLAS$276
BOSTON$221
Tl'LSA$238
ORLANDO$220
PHOENIX$318
PITTSBURGH $168
HOUSTON$258
NASHVILLE$198
NEW ORLEANS. $238
CLEVELAND$168
$198 JACKSONVILLE . $190
$258 TUCSON$318
LOS ANGELES $338 MINNEAPOLIS $238
(ALL IS FOR THE LOWEST FARE TO YOUR CITY
REXDTHF day Mtvana booking required Scats are limited Off peak travel rates sub
inge Once paid tW tores are not refundaWe'oonchangeaWe Mini
I
KINK
PRINT
mum la requirement-
TRAVEL CENTER
ZENITH DATA SYSTEMS PRESENTS A
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your test anxiety with this unbelievable personal com-
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With a Zenith Data Systems personal computer and
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So. before you pull another all-nighter, stop in at
your nearby Zenith Data Systems Campus Contact and
pick up this amazing personal computer package now
yours at our incredibly low special student pricing.
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� Fast 40MB hard disk to store thousands of
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� 3.5" 1.44MB floppy drive that reads and
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� 286 speed and power in a compact.
4high cabinet design
� MS OS 2� capabilities
� MicrosoftR Windows Software
� Supports thousands of AT peripheral cards
� Runs virtually all MS- DOS software
� 1MB RAM with EMS support � expandable to
6MB without using an expansion slot
� One parallel and two serial ports
� Handles heavy-duty word processing,
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� Color and monochrome monitors available
1 M MM is J i- a rtiMrredlradrmark nl Microsoft i rp
Mh rosofl and Ms DOS aft reijiMered trademark- t Mu rate. I
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Keith Pearce
Student
Representative
830-6924
Myra Mills
Of Computerland
355-611 o
VISA. MasterCard And Zenith Data Systems Credit Cards Accepted
data
systems
THE QUALITY GOES IN BEFORE THE NAME GOES ON
Special pricing offer good only on purchaies through Zenith ConUct(j) lited tbove by �ti ent�. faculty and staff for their own use No other diacounU apply Limit one pertonal computer and one
monitor per individual in any 12-month period Price lubject to change without notice
C1988 Zenith Data Systemi Form No 1362






r
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25,1989
Wet cement
April 17
1225 Larceny of bike southwest
of Mendenhall.
1500 Threatening phone calls
in Garrett.
1900 Student found in posses-
sion of pellet pistol adapted tor use
of firing paint pellets.
2045 Larceny of keys and wal-
let in Jarvis.
2220 Worthless check sum-
mons given in Jarvis.
2300 Criminal summons for
non-support given in Belk.
April 18
0019 Assault with a bottle in
Aycock, person given citation for open beer on mall,
littering and damage to property.
140 Breaking and entering and April 20
larceny of VCR. 236 Two u& Poir
1712 Suspicious male subject
on the third floor of oyner.
1745 Vending machine door
improperly secured in Minges. mons given to Scott resident.
2040 Request for entrance to 1823 Vehicle creating nuisance
basement of McGinnis.
arrested for trespassing after tarn- scheduie drug and paraphema- fourth of 229 Fletcher was arrested
pering with fire alarm pull box. lia
2145 Student injuried during
Intramural softball.
2225 Knife found in Fletcher
dorm room.
2326 Assault reported.
2340 Six males communicated
threats to Scott resident.
2341 Larceny of money from
Fleming.
2345 Underage Alcohol Viola-
tion in Aycock.
2357 Harassing phone calls in
Clement.
1725 Student in possession of
for DW1
1440 Damage to hood of ve-
hicle west of Scott.
1515 Larceny of license plate
west of Jenkins
1710 Brett Matthew Murphy of
244 Garrett was arrested for pos-
session of schedule one drugs and
paraphernalia.
April 22
0005
0410 Winterville man banned
for trespassing 3rd floor of Clem-
ent.
1102 Larceny of Real Estate
?xam booklet from 242 Speight.
320 Student given citation of
obstruction and delay and failure
Aycock resident given to obey a law enforcement officer
and an one way street violation.
2240 Susan Elise Gilmore o
256 Umstead, Aimee Lee Leob of
No probable cause was found 262 Umstead, William Walter
by the Magistrate. McClanan of 415 Harding St. were
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey I " Pearce
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blankenship
Guy Harvey
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate $4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 i Insertions(4-
200-299 col. inches$4.40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 0225")$4.21
Two Color and black$155.00
(12251$4-50
10 Insertions(4in$4.50
(l225-)$4 45
15 lnsertions(4ii")$4.45
(1225-)$440
20 Insertions (4in$4.40
(1225-)$4.35
25 Insertions (4lT)$4.35
southeast of Aycock.
1845 Terry Lenn Honevcutt of James Wayne French of 117
April 19 400 Lewis St Apt. 4 was arrested Debusscy Court, VA Beach was
0010 Assault on female north for first degree trespassing in Q em- arrested for possession of drug all arrested for possession for drug
of Mendenhall by unknown males. cnt paraphernalia, DWI and no opera- possession and possession of drug
2045 Worthless checks sum- tor's license. paraphernalia,
mons in Clement. No probable cause found in
2045 Driving with license re- DWI charge.
voked on College Hill Drive
0547 Peeping torn reported in
Belk.
0625 Antony Rayvon Brown of
Cove City was arrested for break-
ing and entering an automobile.
220 Keys found unsecured in
vehicle.
1550 Underage Alcohol Viola-
tion by a 16 year old Greenville
female reported.
1650Two unidentified subjects
writing in wet cement north of
Rawl.
1915 Persons unknown broke
glass out of window frame on sec-
ond floor of Joyner.
2000 Accident at 10th and Col-
lege Hill Drive, ECU PD assisted
GPD.
2012 Samuel Robin Vick of 1311
Forrest Hill Road in Wilson was
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
2240 Tyler resident transported
to hospital.
April 21
0115 Possession and consump-
tion of alcohol on mall area.
234 Bemald David Cerra of
9214 Palona Lane, Springfield VA,
arested for DWI and DWLR.
430 Unauthorized use of ve-
hicle west of Umstead.
945 Larceny of tools from
Mendenhall work sight.
1023 Student transported to
Student Health Services.
April 23
0045 James Scott White of 1113
Glendale Dr. Raleigh was arrested
and banned from campus for in-
toxication and disruptive south of
Beld.
0050 Tampering with and
damage to a fire alarm in Scott.
0235 Marble partitions in bath-
room of Belk damaged.
0239 Screen torn Belk.
0330 Gregory Dewayne Col-
lier of 339 Garrett was arrested for
DWI.
0345 Assisting GPD on auto
0745 Two Garrett found in larceny at 12th and Forbes,
possession of what appears to be 0430 James Robert Bryant the
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See US for all Your
Automotive Needs
2616 EAST 10TH STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
Z5Sr2676
FINALS
t-
ROUND TRIP FROM GREENVILLE, NC
ON AMERICANOR PIEDMONT
NEW YORK$198 CHICAGO$223
ATLANTA$188
ST. LOUIS$218
SEATTLE$358
MIAMI$240
DENVER$278
EL PASO$298
WASH DC$168
SALT LAKE$318
MEMPHIS$218
DALLAS$276
BOSTON$221
TULSA$238
ORLANDO$220
PHOENIX$318
PITTSBURGH $168
HOUSTON$258
NASHVILLE$198
NEW ORLEANS. $238
CINCINNATI$206 CLEVELAND$168
BUFF 0$198 JACKSONVILLE . $190
SAN A �MO$258 TUCSON$318
LOS ANGELES $338 MINNEAPOLIS. $238
CALL US FOR THE LOWEST FARE TO YOUR CITY
READ THE 14 dav advance booking required Seals are limited Off peak travel rates sub-
FINE jeel � change Once paid tWe larc are not refundable nonchangeable Mini
PRIVT rnum stay requirements
TRAVEL CENTER
355-5075
MONDAY FRIDAY 9:00 AM 5:00 PM
ZENITH DATA SYSTEMS PRESENTS A
SPECIAL PC PRICE BREAK THAT'LL MAKE
FINALS A LOT EASIER TO TAKE!
We know you're cramming for those intense career-making,
career-breaking final exams, so we'll make this announce-
ment brief. Zenith Data Systems would like to help relieve
your test anxiety with this unbelievable personal com-
puter offer.
With a Zenith Data Systems personal computer and
monitor, chances are you'll sail through finals week with
flying colors. No wonder they're fast becoming the PC's of
choice in college and in business taking you all the
way from campus to career.
So, before you pull another all-nighter, stop in at
your nearby Zenith Data Systems Campus Contact and
pick up this amazing personal computer package now
yours at our incredibly low special student pricing.
Get A Break During Finals At Your Nearby Zenith
Data Systems Campus Contact:
� Fast 40MB hard disk to store thousands of
pages of information
� 3.5" 1.44MB floppy drive that reads and
writes 720K floppy disks
� 286 speed and power in a compact.
4high cabinet design
� MS OS 2� capabilities
� Microsoft Windows Software
� Supports thousands of AT peripheral cards
� Runs virtually all MS- DOS software
� 1MB RAM with EMS support � expandable to
6MB without using an expansion slot
� One parallel and two serial ports
� Handles heavy-duty word processing,
spreadsheets and many more programs
� Color and monochrome monitors available.
TM MS OS 2 is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corp
? Microsoft and MS-DOS are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corp
Keith Pearce
Student
Representative
830-6924
or
Myra Mills
Computerland
355-6110
VISA MasterCard And Zenith Data System Credit Crdt Accepted.
data
systems
THE QUALITY GOES IN BEFORE THE NAME GOES ON
Special pricing offer good only on purch�e� through Zenith Contact(i) toted above by ah- enta, faculty and itafT for their own me. No other dtacounu apply. Limit oik personal
monitor per individual in any 12-month period. Meet subject to change without notice.
C1968. Zenith Data System
Form No 1362

t





T IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25.1989 3
Industrial tech commemorates new programs
in manufacturing research and development
By DAVID HKRRING
AnliUnt �wi Editor
for testing. The R& DCellispartof nology along with the departments
a larger concept which will eventu of Biology, Chemistry, Geology and
allv lead to the development of the Physics are holding an open house
Faculty and administrators Computer Integrated Manufactur on April 26 from 4-6 p.m.
from ECU and manufacturing ing Center of Excellence whichis 'n recognition oi the week,
managers from Black and Decker, being developed by through a part- Chancellor Richard Eakin stated.
Inc held a ribbon cutting ceremony nership between IBM and the School "At East Carolina University, we
Monday officially opening the of Industry and Technology and the are concerned about a general
ECUBlack& Decker Research and School of Businessat 1VI . decline of interest in the study oi
Development tR & D) Work Cell. The R & DCell is located in the science,mathematics,and technol
The ceremony commemorated department of manufacturing's �gy ,n mis nation. The number of
the grand opening of two major Robotics Laboratory, enabling stu college students majoring in sci
stepping stones to the creation ota dents to work toward improving encc in the United States has fallen
Computer Integrated Manufactur- productivity in manufacturing
ing Center of Excellence by ECU's through automation. Planning is
School of Industry and Technology, now underway to use two robots in
"East Carolina University is
currently meeting this challenge in
a number of ways With existing
strengths at ECU, and with our
strong commitment to scientific,
mathematical, and technological
fields of study, we can �- and will
be a force tor progress in science
and math education in North Caro-
lina
�z
Congratulates It's Graduating Seniors:
Tanya Hull
Lisa McDonald
EUl Rice
Tfve Stegmonds This Tuesday!
Renting Dag Partg!
the past tw
b a thud during
decades.
"Moreover, the scores of
Equipment has been donated or the Cell. twelfth-grade American students
loaned by Black & Decker for use on The ceremony also commemo �n international s ience and math
the R & D Work Cell. rated the grand opening of the Achievement tests are a source of
Students in the department of department of manufacturing's embarrassment At the same time
manufacturing work as line opera- Robotics Laboratory. The lab, con that we are seeing such a decline in
tors and supervisors � responsible taining five operating industrial achievement, advances in technol-
for the pilot lot production of new robots, was made possible through ogy are demanding a workforceoi
products released tor research and donations from Consolidated Die- individuals with sound training in
development bv the Black & Decker so, black & Pecker, Proctor and science and mathematics.
Corporate Office in Towson, MD. Gamble,andN(
Although no products are sold, they
are transported to Underwriter's
Laboratory and Black & Decker for
product life cycle testing.
During the Spring semester, two
products were produced in the R &
D Cell, both of which were sent on
n Corp.
rt to enhance pu
tt ch;
hli
In an t
awareness oi science an
ogy, the U.S. National Science Foun
dation is sponsoring National Sci
ence and Technology Week from
April 23-29. In recognition ot this,
the School oi Industry and Tech
Also, theextcnt mu complex-
it) oi public issues in the area of
technology miA science demand a
highdegreeoi scientific know ledge
among all American citizens.
Obviously, the situation is critical,
:hallenge tor an institution
i education is great
i o
SGA
Continued from page 1
constitution for Amnesty Interna-
tional, an organization which
works to tree political prisoners
through social action.
Legislator Karen Smith intro-
duced a bill to form a group called
the Ecstasy Dancers. A majority of
the legislators approved oi the es-
tablishment of the group but be-
cause the submitted constitution
was not in acceptable form, the leg-
islature voted to postpone the bill
indefinately.
It approved in the fall, the
erou
P
will perform at various introduced new Attorney General
campus functions as do the Golden Brian Stevens to the legislative
Girls and the Pure Gold Dancers, body. According to Roakes, Stc-
Although its constitution will not vens served as assistant attorney
be considered until th
groupcan still nv I ai
all, fee
?anizi d
general this past year.
activities.
SGA
'resi
dent Tri
A bill ' i ban smoking from ail
classroom buildings tailed in the
Roakes student Welfare Committee.
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Sije iEaat (HatalMan
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PETE FERNALD, CwiIMf
STEPIIANIE FOLSOM, Ifcit Wr
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Advertising
Tim Hampton, � eo� Brad Bannister, g M�0r
Chris Siegel, sporh Ed.�w )efe Parker, staff 111�
Chip Carter, rre uu Tom Flj rr, c.rcuLifwn Manager
SUSAN HOWELL, Prod Manager DEBBIE STEVENS, Secretary
Dean Waters,o Manager Stei'i ianie Emory, t� sup�
Stephanie Singleton, c, um Mac Clark, ���m�
Apnl25, 15S9
OPINION
Pa
ge
Scruples
Scruples � Part II
It has been a tradi tion at The East
Carolinian for the masthead edito-
rial to provide an alternative voice
for the unheard students at ECU.
Editors, since the beginning, have
fought university injustice, student
discrimination and the Inter-frater-
nity council.
Two years ago, however, then-
Managing Editor Dan Mauer began
a new tradition: the Scruples edito-
rial.
The Scruples editorial comes
around twice a year, during final
exams. It is a reminder that, as stu-
dents and gentlepeople, we have an
obligation to obey the honor code
here or face the penalties.
Some students, inevitably, will
take their chances. The end of the
semester, and especially the end of
the school vear, is also time for some
oi the best campus parties, both pri-
vate and public. Some students will
attend all these parties, and then try
Lo pass exams using cheat sheets or
pilfered copies.
DON'T DO IT!
The penalties are tough (possible
expulsion) and the benefits aren't
worth the risk. Why go through an
entire semester of work for nothing?
Go ahead, take a social risk and pay
attention in class. Answer a few
questions. Ask a few.
First, of course, you must re-
member to attend class. We realize
that the sun is great, but skin cancer
is much 'ess attractive on a resume
than good grades. Besides, you're
paying for all these classes, so why
not go?
Anyway, the point of the
Scruples editorial is this: Be good,
study hard, and good luck on your
exams. Have a boss summer.
L
fcflTftAMcF
fWN'CWPS
PSANDTS
PtASMkMTH
cmnFims
4
t SUM tWrtm'tinOOaWHA
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Mail
or drop them by our office in the Publications Building, across from the
entrance to Joyner Library. For purposes of verification, all letters must
include the name, major, classification, address, phone number and the
signature of the author(s). Letters are limited to 300 words or less, double-
spaced, typed or neatly printed. All letters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal attacks will be permitted.
Students, faculty and staff writing letters for this page are reminded that
they are limited to one every two weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday
editions.
4Er-f!ltfc - $TAY�V UP ALL NIGHT hM�TWG. TILL 1MB LAST MIMTE
5TUPYIW6- Trie i0M6- MATERIAL B C J B?M 2M$ I Jc&3
Expressions wins the best media award
To the editor:
As manager of Expressions
Magazine, I would like to thank the
ECU Media Board for selecting the
magazine as "Most Outstanding
Medium 1988-89 I would also like
4o congratulate Joe Campbell and
staff for the Rebel being chosen as
'Most Improved Medium
Expressions would also like to
thank Pete Fernald and The East
Carolinian, Yvonne Moye, Michael
Daughtry, Raymond Royal (ECU
Purchasing), Gloria Chance, Dr. Gay
Wilentz, and especially Greenville
Printing Company for assisting us
with the production of such a merito-
rious magazine.
Expressions' statement of pur-
pose states that we "strive to provide
an alternate voice to address the spe-
cial concerns and problems of minor-
ity groups. Our definition of "minor-
ity" is any group of students that feels
outside the "mainstream Ths sense
of isolation may be due to belonging
to a specific ethnic group, such as
Afro-American, Native American,
Hispanic, Jewish, etc. or groups such
as international students, handi-
capped students, veterans, women,
or non-traditional students. Our job
is to present these opinions and atti-
tudes so as to entertain, inform, and
effect social change. Since we are not
a publication solely for minorities,
we try to cover issues of importance
to all students at ECU
This concept is what I feel that
Expressions is worthy to be selected
for the award. Again, I say thank you
to all of the previously mentioned
people and the 1988-89 Expression's
Staff.
Reginald L. Dillahunt
Expressions Magazine
1988-89 General Manager
Communications
To the editor:
I'm furious!
I'm a graduating senior from the
Communications Dept. and I've been
known to express my negative opi-
nons openly about the department
I will use this opportunity to do
so again.
I can't make my self understand
why a department that is growing in
large numbers of students would
continue to have money and facilities
taken away.
I understand that cut-backs are
often necessary in all departments of
the univeristy, but obvious under-
spending is gross negligence.
The instructors are to be highly
commended. They use their profes-
sional knowledge and teach it to us.
Who can blame the instructors for
teaching us on equipment that is of-
ten 20 years or older and is often
donated equipment anyway?
Let's get with it. In the television
world, a communications degree
from ECU is almost a joke.
On the other hand, the radio
department is well respected.
ECU's radio courses are not all
theory. You do actual hands-on exer-
cises that will benefit your career.
The opportunity for students to
work at VVZMB is a major plus.
What the hell happened to the
television courses?
Introduction to television is ac-
ceptable, except the ever-so nagging
problem of out-dated equipment.
Advance television is the biggest
joke of a class on this campus.
I hope that advanced TV classes
will be broken down to specific duty
classes so that the students will be
allowed to operate the necessary ca-
reer entry equipment more than just
one day in their four-year college
stay.
It is stupid to allow students to
graduate with a degree in broadcast-
ing (Communications) and not allow
them to learn how to edit for televi-
sion. This is the most basic and neces-
sary skill one must possess for a ca-
reer in television.
Let's offer a semester class on
editing alone.
Let's also concentrate on offering
effective television writing courses.
I also ask that graduating stu-
dents that go into broadcasting fields
consider donating equipment back
into our program. This will benefit
future students and keep the valu-
able instructors here that are slowly
leaving the department.
If it wasn't for past donations
and the dedication of many broad-
casting instructors, we wouldn't
have what we do have.
My best wishes for the srudei I
and instructors.
Paul Dunn
Communications
Se;
Bad review
To the editor:
Scott Maxwell's review of Agnes
of God (18 April 1989) left me he
ously disappointed. I feel certain that
we saw the same plav � the titles
match, after all. However, could he
have dozed off and had someone else
write the review.
Certainly, Agnes is a compelling
play and ECU's ensemble of your
actresses did move their audience to
a "standing ovation" � those that
had the emotional energy left at the
end of the play The ensemble
worked well together. Right on there,
Scott.
it"
But Scotty, did a part of your
brain get beamed up? Candace
McKenzie as Agnes was "stunninglv
good?" Certainly, Candace worked
hard and gave the part a tough work-
out, but Candace is young and has a
little work to do before she is "stun-
ningly good
Ms. Schreibcr disappointing"
Manipulative? Ms. Schreiber's role
was the play, Scott. The compelling
play and standing ovation rested
with all the actresses, but substan-
tially relied on Ms. Schreiber's expe-
rience and skill. Manipulative? Scot:
did you read your program? The pla y
was taking place inside the brain
Ms. Schreiber's character, the psy-
chiatrist Of course she is manipulat-
ing the audience; that is a primary
motivation of the character.
And Scott, what about the direct-
ing, the set design, and the lighting?
These were integral to the plav. No
comment? The play and the reader-
deserve more, Scott.
But, not to worry Scott. ECU has
some fine theatre courses you can
take. I suggest the "Introduction
to
John Hutchens
MA 1974
-
march
By HENDRIK HERTZBERG
The New Rr pub lie
A really big, really successful march on Wash-
ington is always preceded by a characteristic
rumble. The rumble, which becomes increasingly
audible in the week before the march, consists of
millions of conversations and telephone calls. Quite
suddenly, people are asking each other if they're
going to go, telling each other they've decided to go,
urging each other to go, and calling around to make
arrangements of travel, kids, dogs and cats, and
places to stay. It's an agreeable sound, this rumble,
because it announces a break in routine, an adven-
ture in serious citizenship, and the imminence of a
concrete experience of solidarity � the last, espe-
cially, being something our broad land of shopping
malls and cable hookups rarely affords.
The recent march for abortion rights was her-
alded by the loudest rumble I'd heard since the
Nixon years. The march itself was an extraordinarily
impressive event. It was huge � 300,000 people by
the Park Police's estimate, double that by the organ-
izers but even the lower figure would mean that
one out of every 800 Americans was present. And it
was carried off with a calm dignity that was entirely
appropriate tc its political task, a task as delicate as
the demonstration was massive. The great throng,
perhaps two-thirds women and one-third men,
moved down Constitution Avenue without jostling
or excessive noise. In imitation of the suffragists of
old, many tens of thousands had dressed all in white.
Older men and women were surprisingly numer-
ous. Betty Friedan marched with her daughter and
new born granddaughter, one of many intergenera-
tional tableaux.
The marcher's task was delicate because abor-
tion, unlike peace or civil rights, is not a positive
good. The message the marchers sought to convey
was therefore a rather complicated and sophisti-
cated one. It was that while the decision to end a
pregnancy by abortion is always in some sense an
unhappy one, there are times when it is preferable to
the alternative, and that in any case such a decision,
especially in the early months of pregnancy, should
properly be made by the women concerned and not
by the state. It's hard to get that on a bumper sticker
W even a picket sign.
The march would have been nowhere near as
big if the Supreme Court hadn't agreed to hear a case
that might result in the reversal of Roe vs. Wade, the
1973 decision that legalized abortion. The marchers,
of course, fervently hope that Roe vs. Wade will be
affirmed. They do not want to have to expend their
energies fn a state-by-state war of attrition over an
issue they had assumed was settled. But there is
another group that shares their hope, or ought to: the
Republican politicans who have made such a skillful
(and cynical) use of the passions of the "pro-life"
movement.
For more than a decade the political stalemate
over abortion has worked in the Republicans' favor.
The bargain was simple. The "pro-lite" activists
gave the Repbulican Party votes, money and legions
of volunteers. In return, the party gave them an echo
chamber for their views. President Reagan gave
many speeches about the sanctity of fetal life, keep-
ing the "pro-life" pot boiling while not unduly
alarming people who disagree but vote Republican
for other, more pressing reasons. Reagan and his
successor have given the "pro-lifers" little beyond
rhetorical support, except in one area: the appoint-
ment of judges sympathetic to their cause.
These judicial chickens are now coming home to
roost. If Roe vs. Wade is junked, the "pro-choice"
forces, diffident until April 9, will mobilize them-
selves as never before. The Republican presidential
"lock" will suddenly be vulnerable, especially in the
solid West, where bureaucratic meddling is little
more welcome in personal than in economic matters.
As long as abortion was safe and legal, it was a
voting issue mostly for its opponents. That mav be
about to change.
Pollsters agree that a vast majority of Americans
thinks abortion should remain legal and the choice
left to individual women and their doctors. An
equally large majority, however, deplores the use of
abortion as a substitute for contraception. This
would seem to arm both sides equally in a straight
fight, but actually it favofs the "pro-choicers be-
cause they can accommodate a variety of views
about the morality of abortion itself without com-
promising their support for individual choice. The
"pro-lifers" are shut off from their most potent argu-
ments by their refusal to allow abortion even in the
most extreme circumstances, such as rape, incest or
potentially serious birth defect. They must therefore
fight on precisely the ground where their popular
appeal is weakest. And as the big march showed the
"pro-choice" side has found the right lancuaee to
make its case, the language of liberty
V





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25, 1989 5
Beijing University students protest communism
calling for democracy, human rights, free press
Or 1 lCiAP)�Tonsotthnii- PiKtiT r.illinc nn shiffortte tn u�ar-rtlH �nirr InnHor i� trtrt r1rl tn rnrn Knrnian ainrroc in rinnnLh
VC
BEIJING (AP) Tens of thou- Posters calling on students to vear-old senior leader is too old to men. Foreign sources in Changsha
Kids of students at Beijing's uni- strike, satirical cartoons of govern- run the country. said the looting continued there for
ities went on strike today, call- ment leaders, and essays decrying On Friday and Saturday, about a second night Sunday, but on a
tor democracy, human rights official corruption covered the 150,000 students and supporters smaller scale.
and a free press in the largest stu- walls ofmany universities through- spent the night at Tiananmen Smaller protests in Shanghai,
rttboycottinCommunistChina's out Beijing. Square, defying a government Chengdu,CantonandTianjin were
history. Student leaders said they order to clear the vast expanse. The peaceful.
At Beijing Uni versiry, the coun- planned to strike until the govern- demonstration � one of the big- At Beijing University Monday,
� s most prestigious, students for ment agrees to opens talksand that gest since the 1949 Communist about 5,000 students, one-third of
the first time produced an inde- they believed students in other cit- victory � was the students'clear-
pendent newspaper, ies were ready to join the boycott est challenge yet to the ruling
The class boycott today "Premier Li Peng, step down monopoly. the student body, flocked to the
"ought into a new phase pro-de- now read one poster at Beijing Students who gathered Satur- athletic field for a meeting of the
racy protests that were sparked Normal University. "DengXiaop- day on the square to mourn llu newly formed student union.
1 - the April 15 death of ousted ing, your time has come read shouted "Down with dictatorship"
mmunist Party chief Hu Yao- another in a reference to wide- as senior officials arrived for an
. a popular reformer. spread student belief that the 84-
Government begins initiative
to map the human genome
official memorial service at the "We come here together for a
adjacent Great Hall of the People, common purpose: democracy and
Protests also occurred in other science a student leader told the
cities.InXianandChangsha,bands crowd. "Seventy years after our
of young toughs entered student first student movement, China is
ranks, burning cars and buildings, still poor and behind the rest of the
looting stores and beating police- world
By DAVID HFRRlNd
AtsNiant Nfwi Editor
human genome has around 3billion
base pairs of genes, containing in-
rhe US government has begun formation coding tor 50-100 thou-
ear. S3 billion nationwide ini- sand proteins arranged in 24 DN'A
tiative to attain the holy grail of molecules. "If we could writedown
medical research � mapping the the information contained in the
an genome (genetic informa- human genome, it would take 200
n contained in chromosomes), books 1,000 pages each he said.
The National Institutes of Su "� information would help
,
aawne'b
Lfouz Jlatnond lt i�
lit
�1
N'HP and the Department b.ot
uologists find disease-caus-
rgy (DOE) are the two princi- ing gem � �, understand genetic proc-
federal agencies involved in the esses be Uer, provide services to drug
ttive. In conjunction with the companies and even design drugs.
federal program. Dr. Michael S. According to Esposito, the short-
Esposito, of DOE. conducted a term goals of DOE are to complete
minar last week at the School of restriction maps oi chromosomes
Medicine entitled, "The Human 21 and 22 'the site of genes which
�me Projects: Problems and cause Downs'Syndrome), develop
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I A fragments of each human DOE's long-term goals are to
chromosome and correlate locations complete a human gene map, ac-
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develop computation capa- genome, and develop tools to use
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7
I
(i

V
V
"u
Beijing University students protest communism
calling for democracy, human rights, free press
BEIJING (AP) � Tens of thou-
sands of students at Beijing's uni-
versities went on strike today, call-
ing for democracy, human rights
and a free press in the largest stu-
dent boycott in Communist China's
history.
At Beijing University, thecoun-
try's most prestigious, students for
the first time produced an inde-
pendent newspaper.
The class boycott today
brought into a new phase pro-de-
mocracy protests that were sparked
by the April 15 death of ousted
Communist Party chief Hu Yao-
bang, a popular reformer.
Posters calling on students to
strike, satirical cartoons of govern-
ment leaders, and essays decrying
official corruption covered the
walls of many universities through-
out Beijing.
Student leaders said they
planned to strike until the govern-
ment agrees to opens talks and that
they believed students in other cit-
ies were ready to join the boycott.
"Premier Li Peng, step down
now read one poster at Beijing
Normal University. "Deng Xiaop-
ing, your time has come read
another in a reference to wide-
spread student belief that the 84-
Government begins initiative
to map the human genome
year-old senior leader is too old to
run the country.
On Friday and Saturday, about
150,000 students and supporters
spent the night at Tiananmen
Square, defying a government
order to clear the vast expanse. The
demonstration � one of the big-
gest since the 1949 Communist
victory � was the students' clear-
est challenge yet to the ruling
monopoly.
Students who gathered Satur-
day on the square to mourn Hu
shouted "Down with dictatorship"
as senior officials arrived for an
official memorial service at the
adjacent Great Hall of the People.
Protests also occurred in other
cities. In Xian and Changsha,bands
of young toughs entered student
ranks, burning cars and buildings,
looting stores and beating police-
men. Foreign sources in Changsha
said the looting continued there for
a second night Sunday, but on a
smaller scale.
Smaller protests in Shanghai,
Chengdu, Canton and Tian jin were
peaceful.
At Beijing University Monday,
about 5,000 students, one-third of
the student body, flocked to the
athletic field for a meeting of the
newly formed student union.
"We come here together for a
common purpose: democracy and
science a student leader told the
crowd. "Seventy years after our
first student movement, China is
still poor and behind the rest of the
world
By DAVID HERRING
Assistant Newt Editor
The US government has begun
a 10-year, $3 billion nationwide ini-
tiative to attain the holy grail of
biomedical research�mapping the
human genome (genetic informa-
tion contained in chromosomes).
The National Institutes of
Health (NIH) and the Department
of Energy (DOE) are the two princi-
pal federal agencies involved in the
initiative. In conjunction with the
federal program, Dr. Michael S.
Esposito, of DOE, conducted a
seminar last week at the School of
Medicine entitled, "The Human
Genome Projects: Problems and
Perspectives
Esposito noted that the DOE
program has three main objectives:
develop maps of linearly ordered
DNA fragments of each human
chromosome and correlatelocations
of known genes for each of the frag-
ments, develop computation capa-
bilities for handling mapping and
sequencing data, and develop auto-
mated sequencing technology �
including robotic-based devices.
"Only five to 10 percent of the
mapping will get done with pres-
ent-day technologies Esposito
said.
According to Esposito, the
human genome has around 3 billion
base pairs of genes, containing in-
formation coding for 50-100 thou-
sand proteins arranged in 24 DNA
molecules. "If we could write down
the information contained in the
human genome, it would take 200
books � 1,000 pages each he said.
Si) i information would help
b'otechnologists find disease-caus-
ing geiv � understand genetic proc-
esses bciier, provide services to drug
companies and even design drugs.
According to Esposito, the short-
term goals of DOE are to complete
restriction maps of chromosomes
21 and 22 (the site of genes which
cause Downs' Syndrome), develop
software for automated map con-
struction, and begin development
of structure-based sequence com-
parisons.
DOE's long-term goals are to
complete a human gene map, ac-
quire capability to clone the human
genome, and develop tools to use
DNA sequences for a variety of
biological and medical applications.
Esposito is currently employed as
the deputy head of the Cell and
Molecular Biology Division of the
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory,
University of California.
m
awne
4
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25,1989 5
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.j
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OP
PREGNANCY
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED: May � July 1
3 rent & utilities. Will have own large
room. Call 752-5886.
APT. FOR RENT: Starting May 12th, 2
bedroom. Tar River Estates. Call 830-9393
and leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For Fall semes-
ter. Female, non-smoker to share furnished
apartment. $90 a month 14 utilities.
Call 752-9482.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouse available May 1st $325.00mo.
utilities. Call Julie from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
S 551-2477 or Jamie evenings � 758-1427.
1 BEDROOM EFFICIENCY APT: For sub-
lease. Crawling distance from downtown.
Cheap, AC only $200 a month plus util.
May to Aug. Call 752-3244.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: "O unit for May
1st � July 31, sublease, bigger than effi-
ciency apt. Furnished incl. stereo, 20" color
TV. $285.00 mo. Warren 752-7792.
TWO FEMALE ROOMATES NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY: To share 4 bedroom 2
12 bath townhouse. Own rooms. $125
monthly and 14 utilities. Wildwood vil-
las. Fun people. Call 752-2571.
FEMALE ROOM ATE NEEDED: 139.50 a
month 12 utilities, own room. 756-8897.
Classifieds
NEED TO SUBLEASE? Law students
interested in subleasing furnished apart-
ments for summer (May � August). Want
to make arrangcmcn ts as soon as possible.
Call Bert Speicher at 355-3030.
STUDENTS WELCOMED! 4 months sea-
sonal rentals availalbe. Housing 4 to 12
students each. Call Seagate Realty 441-
3127.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: First
sum mcr session to share 3 bedroom house,
private bedroom, share bathroom with
one person, S175mo, 13 utilities. Call
Pam 758-7142.
2 BR. 1 B. HOUSE: Available to sublease
for the summer. One block from campus,
please call 758-0061 for more information.
ROOM IN SEDGEFIELD TOWNES:
Tollhouses for sublet during the sum-
mer Must be a non-smoker. If interested
or want more information contact 355-
9183.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER: Needed to
share 12 rentutilities in a 2 bed
Townhouse aprox. 2 miles from campus.
Call 756-7797 or leave message.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouse available May 1st. $325.00
mo utilities Call Julie from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. @ 551-2477 or Jamie evenings @ 758-
1427.
HATE CLIMBING STAIRS? On May 5, a
first floor apartment with dishwasher, cen-
tral air & heat, laundrv hookups is avail-
able. 2 blocks from ECU and only $230
mo. Call Sarah at 756-7444 or 758-9507.
LEAVING FOR SUMMER Need room-
mate starting in May. FURNISHED at Tar
River ONLY 135mo, 12 utilities.
Tlease call Dan. 752-9235.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
2 bedroom apt. if possible for one vear
$150mo 12 utilities. Spacious rooms.
If interested call Mike 830-0771.
ROOMMATE WANTED: to share 3
bedroom 1 12 bath house located five
blocks from campus. Furnished with
Jacuzzi Hot Tub & all the Amenities. Call
Wiley 752-4614 after 700 p.m 524-5790
davs.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED From
May 8 to Aug 1 S131 mo plus 1 3 utilities
at tar River Estates. Washerdryer in
apartment and close to campus. If inter-
ested call 758-8801 anytime.
ROOM TO SUB-LEASE: For summer
May 6 � August 15. Wildwood Villas
$100.00 a month 14 utilities. Furnished or
unfurnished Details call 758-7727 ask for
Dave
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
2 bedroom, 112 bath townhouse. Pool,
washerdryer, microwave, furnished
except bedroom. 12 utilities 160.00
month. Call Mike 830-4094 leave message
anytime.
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL: Sub-
lease a fully furnished apartment at
Ringgold Towers. 2 bedroom, living room,
kitchen, all appliances included. On cam-
pus at ECU, close to downtown. Need to
rent bad $350.00 or best offer. Call day or
night Kara Smith or Gay Piner 752-2502.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Apt. tosub-lease
for May. Ringgold Towers on campus.
Rent $200mo. pr. br. Call Chris or Jeff �
758-4134.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom luxury apt. avail-
able May 4 � July 31 wlease renewal
option. Pool, tennis, laundry fac, ceiling
fan, fireplace, AC, dishwasher, & deck.
PetsO.K.OnlyS95,sec.dep$349monthly.
Call immediately 355-3364.
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT
AVAILABLE: For 1st session summer
school only. Wilson Acres. Call Lori and
Tanya at 830-3664.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For 1st and 2nd
summer sessions. Brand new Sandi Villas
Apts; private room, fully furnished. $170
mo. 12 utilities. (Rent negotiable). Pref-
erably female, non-smoker 752-5230.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 10 band stereo frequency
equalizer with IMX expander spectrum
analyzer, lake new $85 Call 752-3432 and
ask for Dave
FOR SALE: Entertainment Center to fit
Clement, White, or Greene dorms. Very
spacious, includes shelves for a TV. large
refrigerator, books, etc Call today! 758-
4507 Amv or Kathleen
FOR SALE: 1T2 Karmann Ghia-Convert-
able. Good condition. $2000 firm. Call lav
at 830-5157.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES
From SI00 Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chevvs. Surplus buyers Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S-1166.
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Windy Ridge,
3 bedroom, 2 12 baths. Completely re-
modeled With initial down payment of
$4,000.00 and $402.00pcr month or rent-
ing for $500.00per month. Swimming
pool, tennis courts, and clubhouse. Call
756-1180 or 756-4747.
IS IT TRUE: You can buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the
facts todav'CaU 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-
A
FOR SALE: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 In
good condition with only 5,252 miles. For
more information call 355-3253. Ask for
Eric Moscn.
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom unit at Ringgold
Towers on edge of campus New modern
and completely furnished Priced for quick
sale. $42,500. 704-376-8415
FORSALE:SubarulQ80CLWagon $1,800
Exc. condition. Call 752-5274.
CARGO FURNITURE FOR SALE! Sofa,
loveseat. chair, 2 lamps. Good shape Best
offer Call 355-3080
SERVICES OFFERED
PANTANA'S CONGRATULATES IT'S
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Margo JulUr Wttit XoCBert
Stacy Johnson Track Odcm
Mikz tlpchurci Shtri Wesster
YOUR OWN BUSINESS Sell unique T
shirts. Must Apply now for Fall '89. Call
Toll free 1-800-842-2336.
HELP WANTED: Counselor needed Resi-
dential Summer Camp for Adults and
Children with Autism. May 21st through
July 22. Work and live on campsite in
Chapel I Lill Area. $130.00 per week. Call
Autism Society of NC @ 821-0859.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships
$10,000 � $105,000yr! Now I liring! List-
ing! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ�1166.
WANTED: Individual to provide day care
in our home for 2 children, ages 7 and 3 1
2, this summer, 3 days a week. Prefer
someone who enjoys spending time at
pool, with own transportation. Early child-
hood or parks and recreation education
background a plus. Please call 756-517;
after 5:00 p.m.
FOOTBALL MANAGERS NEEDED:
Come to Minges Coliseum. Contact Fred
Sponhaltz.
PERSONALS
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper
up to 20 hand written pages. We repair
computers and printers also. Lowest
hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage.
WORD PROCESSING: Reports, Resu
mes. Laser Printing. Rush jobs and reser-
vations accepted. Call 752-1933 before 5
pm.
CATERING SERVICE AVAILABLE: For
private party, senior show & graduation
party. Make reservation in advance. Call
Joe 757-1278.
HELP WANTED
ATLANTIC BEACH SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT NEEDED: Bartenders,
Kitchen Personnel, Waitresses at the newly
remodeled Jolly Knave Restaurant it
Lounge. 726-8222.
HELP WANTED: Female non-smoker to
assist with household duties in exchange
for room and board. Near ECU 757-1798.
HELP WANTED: Part-time help needed
with local Law firm. Need good commu-
nication &c typing skills. Marketing or
communications major with interest in at-
tending law school preferred. Call Carla
756-6300.
COLLEGE STUDENTS: Wanted at Kitty
Hawk NC Beach� live-in nannies. Room
and board plus salary. Plus opportunities
to work in retail shop for extra income.
References required. Call Kathy Koplen
919-261-3546.
AOPI: VNould like to congratulate: Bar-
bara Hill, Delvnda Carter, Laurie Guth-
crie, Sharon Kotl, Donna Wilkinson and
Laura Wood. We wish you the best of luck
and we'll miss you all! Love your sistors
and pledges of AOI'i.
ALPHA PHI'S: Thanxs to a great secret
sorority. We liked everything! Good Luck
in exams and have a wonderful summer.
Love�the sisters and pledges of Alpha
Omicron Pi.
DELTA ZETA: The seniors would like to
thank Karen Prevost and all the sisters &
pledges for the awesome banquet. We'll
miss you! You are all the greatest! Jam next
vear � keep in touch! DELTA ZETA
LOVE: TI IE SENIORS.
REWARD OFFERED: If you witnessed
the car accident Saturday night of April
8th approximately 9 p.m. Please call Kristie
at 752-2616. This information is ital for
court purposes.
BAHAMA MAMA: Is coming. Time to
party ECU. If you party to hard to drive
away from the party, Ride will be pro-
vided. I lave fun but be safe! Kappa Sigma
says Don't Drive Drunk.
EAST CAROLINIAN EMPLOYEES: It
was a great year and I appreciate all of
your efforts. 1 wish I could spend more
time with you and I'll miss you. Good luck
and I'll visit soon. Pete Fernald, Former
General Manager. PS I lelp Dave out he's
a good guy.
PHI TAU'S: It seems like I've been here
forever but now it's time for me to go. 1
couldn't have asked for a better circle of
friends. Our relationship helped me to
develop in many different ways If I can be
of any service in the future, do not hesitate
to call. Thanks again and may you ever
retain the spirit ot youth. Pete Fernald,
Beta Phi Pledge Class.
BIRD: You said I couldn't do it the first
time, but I graduated in 3 1 2 years. Now
I'm about to recieve mv second degree
and you were not any more encouraging.
You're pessimism motivated me from the
first day that I met you. You truly are a
blessing in disguise. Good luck with the
business and ease up on those Tipporillos.
Thanks again. Pete Fernald, BSBAMBA.
THETA CHI: Would like to welcome the
new brothers of Theta Class. John SloL
David Russell, Tommy Goodin, Paul Pal-
ermo, Mike Brown, Luke Fisher, Jay
Hollingsworth, Tripp Little, David Pureza,
Donald Sawyer and David White. YaTl
made it, but don't let up now! Keep up the
great work! Roll Chi!
THETA CHLStarted a tradition here again
four years ago after being the first fater-
nity on the ECU Cuinpus at the recolonina-
tion, many guys gathered to become Theta
Chi pledges not knowing the impact the
pledges and fraternity would have an each
other. Here it is four years later. We are
now a chapter, we are reastablished and
those first pledges are now men facing
graduation. The brothers and pledges that
are remaining at ECU would like to wish
Greg Lucas, Chris Jones, Patrick Moye
and Clay Walker the best of luck. We
thank you all for everything you've put
into Theta Chi and we'll always remem-
ber you. Theta Chi for life!
LOST: Brown & black calico cat, 6 months
old, missing Thurs. 4-20 from Georgetown
Apt. area. Call Carlene at W � 756-0315
H � 355-5360. Answers to Bridgette.
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Downtown Mall)758-3025
ABORTION
"Personal and Confldenlinl Caic"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call f r ippolntment Mon. thru Sat. Low
Coat T miduon to 20 weeka of pregnancy
r - "�
1-800-433-2930
ALL CAMPUS PARTY: Tuesday 25th.
9th annual Bahama Mama beach partv
with the IIADMATTERS BYOB, no glass
30 kegs until they last. At Kappa Sigma
house 3-9.
BIGCISTPAKTYOFTML YEAR: Is here!
We will start you off with 30 kegs of beer.
3:00 to 900 on the last day ut class BYOB
is permitted, but please no glass I IAD-
MATTERS is the band plus BIKINI con-
test in the sand. Sober rides will be pro-
vided, win the trip to the BA11AM AS vou
uil 1 be excited. See vou at the Kappa Sigma
1 louse for the 9th annual Bahama Mama
Beach Party. If it rains we'll party on
Reading Da v.
$150, 1ST PLACE: S75,2nd and $50, 3rd
place. Not everybody can enter, only the
ladies. 1 lawiian Tropic Tan Bikini Contest
is coming this Tuesday, 23th, at the Kappa
Sigma Bahama Mama Beach Party Call
Tuesday. 752-541
CHERl VVESSI.FR: Congratulations on
finally graduating It is going to be strange
being here without vou Good luck in the
REAL WORLD! Love, Julie.
A PHI PSlBFGINMNG:Veat Phi Kappa
Psi announce with great pleasure that we
have colonized at ECU. With our strong
start, we are anxious to build this summer
and next semester. Good luck to all on
exams and have an enjoyable summer.
We'll see you in the fall. For info call Dan
and Jim at 72 1651.
ADPI: Life is sweet because f the friends
we have, it is rich because of the love we
share, what vou give to others comes back
tenfold and brings happiness to everyone
� Love, Your sisters
KAPPA ALPHA: Starting the vear with
Pref night was great, ending it with you
was even better Thanks tor the Luau -
vou guys are the best. ADPI.
PI KAPPS: Good luck on your exams' It
has been an overall great semester and
this has been the start of the rise to the top
WOMEN OF ECU: We look forward to
seeing you for the Fall Rush. Come back
ready to meet alot of girls and have a lot of
fun. The sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL: Initi-
ated brothers of the fraternities of E U
We know you all worked hard, but wasn't
it worth it' Love, the Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD
LUCK TO THE FOLLOWING: Sigmas
on their graduation: Natalie Clewis, Amy
Dickerson, Tammy Ellis, Alice Harden,
Noelle Hogan, Susanna Hudson, Kris
Kelly, Melissa Moore, Natalie Moore,
Holly Parker, Yerderv Ransome, Debbie
Torik, and Kelly Walker! We will miss ail
of you Love, the sisters of Sigma Sigma
Sigma.
ALPHA PHI: Would !iV to congratulate
our graduating seniors Petrina Bowie, Liz
Lee, Rcnce' Hoffman, Bebe Ryan, Meg
Conrad, Heather Bachmann, Christy
Bennett, Beth 1 lawn, Brvstal Nolan, and
Karen Shcpard. We wish you all the best
of luck in the future! Wo sure are going to
miss you guvs' Love � The Alpha Phis
GREEK! GREEK! GREEK Alpha Phi
would like to welcome all ECU women
interested in Fall Rush. Greek life is it
girls' It's the only way to go! Go Greek!
PI KAPPA PHI: Tanks for coming over
to our house for the cookout. We're al-
ways guaranteed a great time with vou
guys! We definetly have to get together
next semester and see the new house!
Love � The Alpha Phis.
TO ALL MY CHILDREN: Nanster, Pippa
(hey girl), Bobbi Gayie. Bothmas, the Nick-
ster, Lisa, Rei.ee Dana, Kym, Daniale,
The Horosmen, Porn, Allan Jimbo, Wii-
lam, Greg, Ed, Jim, Dougie, Toobe, Jucr-
gen, Scott, Will, Constantino, Pvt. Paul,
Wyatt, Eddie, Rager, Dwayne, Sweetness,
Natnan, Bubba, and Albert. You're the
greatest family I oculd ask for I'll never
forget the parties, fun times, and laughs.
Good luck with exams. Ill miss you all
this summer. I love you all. Love, Mama.
IHFTA CHIS: Thanks to those special 7
that headed for New Bern early (including
David R) After dinner & awards to the
dance floor wo went Some dirty danced
and other hung out while one changed
dates. Then room to room we tried to go,
Blackie kicked us out so to 318 we headed.
Hie night was fun filled because we swam,
mediated, and put fomeone to bed 5 times'
The formal was super, thanks a lot, you're
the best. Love, your 6 Alpha Phis.
TO THE THETA CHI BROTHERS: Sec
saw mania was great even though some
bottoms were bruised. Also the houselooks
awesome, the pledges did a super job.
Thanks Love, the Alpha Phis.
CHRISTOPHER: Good luck sweetheart
i- ouhave a great future I'm very proud oi
vou. i ou'll always have a special place in
my hear Love Nifer.
GRFFKS: Alpha Phi would like to wish
everyone good luck on exams and to have
a great summer. But most of all, get ready
for Fall' Love � the Alpha Phis
BUCKY BOY: Happy birthday, you sa-
ber-tooth tiger' You have to sing the song
to us before graduation ("L. and A are
great) Too bad you arestaying hereaway
from us. come on, just admit it � you like
us' 1 lave a great 21st B day, you are The
Boy! Love, anet and Chrissy.
SHANNA: Good luck in the real world!
You've been the "perfect" roommate for 3
years' Thanks for everything, Love,
Stephanie.
KRIS I IN, CHRIS, STEPHANIE, fc THE
EAST CAROLINIAN STAFF: Thanks for
taking me in! I've learned so much al-
ready, and I know there's a lot more to
learn. Your patience has been unreal 1
hope to work with all of you again next
vear, and God knows, I'll need it' Good
luck 8t see you in August' Mike � As-t
Sports Editor P.S.C lay Deanhardt, thanks
for all the help with the "big" story! P.S.S.
Big Knee, 1 mean "L you owe me a pack
of cigarettes!
TO THE TYPFSETTERS AND LAYOUT
AR nSTS:OfThe East Carolinian, thanks
for all of your time and effort. 1 will not
forget it! Susan � Production Manager.
DEAR IRATE: This shirt will remind you
of the forget-joe-aot Yes, it might have
been better with bucea shots. We arrived
late, but we were good to go. I now con-
sider vou the Formal Potato' Of course, we
had dew rags in our hair. That should tell
you, that you had the baddest date there.
The view was great and so was that bed.
But I think we could have done without
the pig head OK: vou, looked sharp in
your peach tie and coat. But remember
next time, you better bring a boat. We
thought one another would be shv by
much, but once we started drinking we
be;an to touch. The fun wasn't even over
Sunday at noon, because wo didn't even
have any party balloons. 1 ley, don't va
even think that I am still cling'n I just
wanted to see this in the East Carolinian
Maybee this rhyme doesn't compare but
what can you say, you had the baddest
date there. I don't know, maybe this is
farewell. But there is summer coming up
oh what the hell! OK, 1 have said enough
and made it all rhyme. 1 lust wanted vou to
know I had a wonderful time Well (
I guess we will wait and see, signed j�
your buddy of your favorite sorority
ECU: Exams are upon us and we lu
you're stressed' But try your hardest, ai
just do your BEST' I lave a great sun I
and just keep in mind The fun w
have in the Fall of '89! See vou her.
the A XI D's.
TKE: The social was thrashin It was r,
ally wild' With a shoe in the punch, it
tastefully, ummm mild! Thanks for t! ,
fun, it was definatcly rcai' Let s d
again. We can't wait' Love, the A
ALPHA XI DELTA: A Xi D Pink R. �se E
was such a blast' The Holidome i
and it ended too fast' We'd liki
gratulate some outstanding membei
Who recieved an award for their si i
rendered Most outstanding offii � -
nifer Vandcrburg, Most outstandir
lor: Barbara Lamb, Most outstanding sis
tor Stephanie Pcna, Most (Xitsta:
big sister: Mary Anne Leslie, Most
standing intramurals: Angela St
I lighestG P A . Kathv Moore, and tl
one more whom everyone knows Mist
AlphaXi Delta, unanimously yours R.
Rose! Congratulations, we love y
A Xi D sorority.
ALPHA XI DELTA: Pres-
lngmembers Laura Bermant. Sue B tl
Patti Demn, Tanya Hull, Paula '
Mary Anne Leslie, Maria Panta
Amanda Roberts, Whitney Smitl
Steen, Angela Storch, Catherine St
and Karen Edgerton' dxd luck � w .
miss vou' Love in Alpha Xi Delta �
sisters
MARK ROBERTS: Here's to you u I
job well done You kept us rockin' tl
a tone! Love, Alpha Xi Delta
JULIE "BAREFOOT ON THE MAI I
WESSLER: A standing ovation is
you've earned' For the cokes you sen
and dogs that weren't burned' Thanks I
your time, and all your effort, too' It was a
great success, thanks to you! We lo � .
Your A Xi D sisters
A I D:To my A Xi D sisters. who' i
with glee, the rhymes I wrote for tl
personals each week This job has
tun, it's been total bliss�but it's all I
that I'll really miss' 1 love you! Mar
GINAIERNIGAN:WeUi! stimeforusl
graduate (again) rou know we hae t
stop doing this and get a job There an
many memories 1 can't begin to list I
Thanks for always being there when I
needed you Summer is here again a
now it is time to spend weekends at A
with the old group again I want : .
the best of luck in the real world llov ya
Susan
To Creek Diver,
From Madonna to Malcolm i
one must agree that you are the shit And
look what you had to put up with inces-
sant smoke, sexist statements, mindless
psycho-babble about media law, scr&m-
mg nightmares, mindless psychobabble
about sentence construction and inces-
sant hunger.
And still you retain vour sanity ev en
if you do speak with a flickering tongue.
Your sanity although will slowly demise
after you inherit this crown of drudgery
and sit in the throne of edit First Costa
Rica you must go. Miss vou, one fat ole
man will. I'll have to think of sheep under
the ah, uh sh-eets just to got to sloop
El Guapo de Verdeville.
See PERSONALS, page 7
LIGHT, BRIGHT, FUN
JEWELRY
By Dale Jenssen
Allinglm (&(all
355-2426 An Gallery & Fine Crafts
690 Arlington Village
Mon-Fri
10-5pm
Sat
11-4pm
SUMMER JOBS-
$1200MO SALARY!
Spend your summer in VA.
BEACH turn your summer
into a rewarding experience!
CARRTBEAN TRIPS!
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM!
VA. BEACH
(804) 499-4123
RINGOLD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER '89. EFFICIENCY I
A 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS.
FOR INFO. CALL HOLLIE SI-
MOXOWICfl AT 752 2863
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Aak ui about our ipeclal rates to change leases, and discounts for April rentals
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet one bedroom furnished apartments,
energy efficient, free water and sewer, optional wash-
ers, dryers, cable TV. Couples or singles only. $215 a
month. 6 month lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles, apartments and.mobile homes In
Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club. Con-
tact J.T. or Tommy Williams.
756-7815
GRADUATE RN
Manufacturer of Specialty
Beds has a full-time career
opportunity in the Greenville
area for a quailed RNGRN.
Product knowledge andor
sales experience helpful. (On
Callj Flexibility a Must. Ex-
cellent benefit package.
Please send resume to :
District Sales Managei
6260 Frankford Ave.
Baltimore. Maryland
21206
PIRATES LANDING
remco east, inc.
� t P.O. Box 6026
� GreenvUe, NC 27834
919-758-6061
REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT
Diamonds - Jewelry - TV's
VCR's - Watches - Guns -
Musical Instruments
BILL'S
We Buy Sell, ft Trade
PAWN SHOP
'Strictly Confidential Transactions
INSTANT CAStilQAMS
480 N. Greene Street
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)830-6828






THE CAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25, 1989 7

Announcements
IIO i STUDENTEX-
CHANCE
i low would you like u spend a semester
� r two jt a I rother or sisters house at one
I iniversities? swap a brother or sister'
tephanie at 757 6769 National Stu
d rtl 1 whang
CHRIS. IAN I I I 1 OWSHIP
�han 1 ellowship v. ill be held every
rhurs at 6 pm in the ulture Center
LOST?
miss ng in youi lit We' e
d it and .w want to shart t w ith you
nkins Art Auditorium EVER Fri
K . Dl PAR l MIX I QJ
HUMAN R spi IU I s
1 no on the Hoi ausl will
ralli lo� aust Memorialix i via on
I Ma) 8 .it 7 M)pm a! tin K ileigh
� r K, note sp� al er 11 be
luthoi lecturer
al � .r d S yn an Heis
" ! � merica and
'� and also the
moot on Ma 25 at 7 pm m the Council
Chambers of the Municipal Building lo
i ated on die coi nei ol I nth and Washing
ton Streets
DC AREA SUMMER JOB
Summei position available in the Wash
ington, DC, office of a North Carolina
Congressman I pine, skills necessary
and shorthan i desirable I ocal interview
SKIN CANCER SCREENING
Tho Creative Living Center, an adult day
health care center operated hv tho I ast
Carolina University School of Medicine, is
ottering a free skin cancer screening on
Personals
Thursday, Mav 4, from 11:00 am until
HHlp.m 1 is. John I lendrix and Cameron
Smith will be providing this service at the
( . nter, lot ated at 2000 E Sixth Street (St.
James United Methodist Church) Any
interested adult over the age of fity-five is
Sec ANNOUNCE. , page 8
Continued from page 6
AOPI'S & THEIR DAItS: lor those ot pher. Who knows? Ihc pictures might be
available For further details contact: Ruth you who �.an't remember, heio's some a blur. Zinc was adorned on people's noses,
Petersen Co op 2028 (ICB, (757 6979) as I uau memories to last til September. We we rocked the cabin with Guns N Roses
took the bus to th camp, the cabin all Diana and Greg's wjterguns weren't the
decorated, it wasn't that damp. Then only thing shot, who's that dirty dartdn'?
Michael came who's kid is that'Angle's Oh it's Tim Slavin and Sharon Kott It
gut a new 'do�her hair isn't flat! The wasn't mandatory to have a date�Luau
chicken wasn't the only thing eookinPam
and the picture man were definitely
s i ii .1- possible
SI MMI K IN IFRNSHIPS
I dmin, Marketing or Economi
n.i. is needed fix a variety of summer
internships in logi tics related positions
with private industry Location atul pa)
van A i. su
kin' Caroline was the new photogra
1989 was vv'ild. awesome and thanxs to
Angle, it was great! Have a fantastic
summer!
MEMORIAL COINS
& PAWN
�BASEBALL CARDS
�STAMPS
�COINSUPPLIES
�DIAMONDS
�TELEVISIONS
�VCR's
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
�COINS
INSTANT CASH LOANS-WE BUY
COLD & SILVER
All Transactions Strictly Confidential
752-7736
�d
655MEMORIAL DRIVE
CRH.NVII I I
( o
lion d
i. su - necessan to apply. Lor
1 x : Ruth Petersen,
2 28 ,( :
�) for a; pll i
CO-OP
l
.1
GREJ III I ENVIRON-
MEN I Al ADVlSOR COM-
MJ F !l;l
. nmental Ad ior
: n ursda Ma) !
a or Confci en e Ro rn
Iding on the corner
ind � treets
SUBDIVISION KI VII
BOARD
� i v- - I will meet
and May 24, at
I ' ' : . � nference
� � ' ' mn itv hiig icated
urth and i ireene
ts
( ;rh 1! 1 I PI ANNING
ND ZONING COMMISSION
iceu a summoi oi
help Oil l'� a!c a
h. mic t. iwn oi in I
ill the Co op office
I out how we may
mmet job in your
nville.
I I I I KI s 11)1
I RS
I rEACH
Oj nrl
d� : I .
I ducati n
teach in tl
eligible 1.1
v of Si
and thi '
!� ns ar
April 2
E Miir v
V 1 1 I X I.
"he i .
. �
Ma) 16 al 7 "
rsof V ' '
rnerof I iftl
GR1 I W il I I BOARD Ol l)
JUSTMENT
. i Adjustmoi I
v a ai le toi stu
in Pu lexico le.i- hei
is planning to student
i g ster, 1990, are
. ions are in the
: i . Speight 109,
fice ol Interi itional Studies
i � tited post
e '� p li ati-n deadline
info call Marianne
Yi 6271 or (h) 631 � 1 � I
1 MPLOYMENT
Employment opportunities are available
to students who are int� rested in becom-
ming PERSONA1 CAR1 ATTENDANTS
to stud nts in lirs RE M I RS,
Pasl i cp� rience is desired
but not : tired Applications will be
taken for empl yment during the Sum
ma Session .vA 1 al 1989 and Spring Se
ted contact OF
E OF HAN D STU1 I VI
ES Hi VVI rd Annex I as!
Unh ersity Greenville NC
: - - ; - �. � ' - '�
t !81
Qet your 'Team
'Together
Register Now For Your 6 Person Team. At Least 2 Girls Per
Team. There Will Be a $20.00 Sponsor Fee.
Players Do Not Have To Work For Their
Sponsor. Please Pick A Head Coach or Manager.
Volleyball Will Start The 2nd Week in May.
Teams Need To Be Signed in By The 10th of May.
Contact Casey Jones at CJ's - 355-3543.
There Will Be Beer Specials.
fCfTJi i Ul fi
Gfc
ID �w nL FT C i i ID L ffO i
tit r i. WN
!�
Student Union
Coming Attraction
w� 2 I
r O 1 U) I l en I (D II y I ljQJ
uO ioIIo
f oPPnian we're also
interested in your future.
Let's Deal With The Basic Suit
so you can get the most out
of that very important interview.
The navy or charcoal suit Is basic
to any wardrobe, especially in
the desirable dacron wool blend
which is the best all-year fabric.
We highly recommend these
suits for the about-to-yraduate
senior and the young Profes-
sional Businessman. Normally
priced at $325.00. this very spe-
cial group of Austin Reed suits in
their Westminster series will be
priced at
$285.00
(For a limited time only)
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall, Rocky Mount
(Inquire about our college charge account for this event )
J





i
8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25,1989
Announcements continued from Page
eligible for the screening, but registration
will be limited. Call the Creative Living
Center at 757-0303 to pre-register for this
free screening.
B.A.CC.H.U.S
B.A.C.C.H.U.S stands for Boost Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning the Health of
University Students. If you want to be
involved in a group that promotes respon-
sible decision-making regarding the use
or nonuse of alcohol, this is it! We meet
each Wednesday, at 6 p.m. in 305 Joyner
Library. We're beginning to make plans
for Fall activities. Call 757-6791 for more
info.
COLOR GUARD AUDITQNS
Color Guard Auditions for the ECU
Marching Pirates will be April 15, 29 and
May 6,12 p.m. - 4 p.m. Please pick one day!
Flags are provided - rifles, bring your
own.
rUBLIC SERVICE AN-
NOUNCEMENT
Are you a Pitt County resident, 60 years
old or older and need a ride to your medi-
cal appointment? The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the eldcrlv for medical appointments
within Pitt county such as doctors, den-
tists, clinics, therapies and the Health
department. Arrangements for the service
must be made at least 24 hours before the
scheduled appointment. Call the Creative
Living Center, 757-0303 to reserve your
ride.
FITNESS INTRUCTOR TRY-
OUTS
Individuals interested in trying out for
intramural recreational services fitness
class instructors are encouraged to sign-
up in 204 Memorial Gym. Try-outs will be
held April 26. Up to seven individuals will
be- selected and hired. For additional in-
formation contact Kathleen I hll in 204
Memorial Gym or call 757-6387.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEST
The Physical Education Motor and Physi-
cal Fitness Competency Test is scheduled
as follows: Place: Minges Coliseum Time
and Date: 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 26,
1989. A passing score on this test is re-
quired of all students prior to declaring
physical education as a major. 1. Main-
taining an average T-score of 45 on the six-
item test battery. 2. Having a T-score of 4
on the aerobics run. Any student with a
medical condition that would contraindi-
cate participation in the testing should
contact Mike McCammon or Dr. Gav Is-
rael at 757-6497. A detailed summary of
the test components is available in the
Human Performance Lab (Room 113,
Minges).
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Amnestv International meets every
fourth Wednesday at 8 p.m. at St. Pauls
Episcopal Church, 401 E. 4th St in the
upper floor - enter from the 4th street
entrance. Next meeting: April 26. Stu-
dents welcome.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Department of University Unions is
now accepting applications from student
organizations who are interested in serv-
ing on the Usher Corps. This is an excel-
lent fundraising project for your organi-
zation and a great way to be seen on
campus. For details, call Lynn at 757-6611.
ECU FRISBEE CLUB DISC
SALES
!11AT� discs arc in! You can get an IRATE
frisbee now for only $6.00 or S7.00 for a
glow in the dark disc, and help the
1RATES to their third consecutive appear-
ance in the National Collegiate Untimate
Championships. Call Gary Hurley @ 752-
7538 or Randy Allen @ 758-5348 to get
yours now.
FACULTY-STAFF-STUDENT-
SOCIAL
The ECU Decision Sciences Society will
conduct their spring Faculty Staff-Student
social for all graduate and undergraduate
business students. A brief program will
include a speaker presentation, a presen-
tation of membership certificates, an
awards presentation, and a farewell for
graduating seniors. Dress is semi-formal
and the cover charge is $3.00 to help de-
fray expenses. The social is scheduled for
4:00 to 6:00 PM, Tuesday, April 25, in GCB
room 3122. Please sign up bfore i jpril 21 in
the Decision Sciences office and come join
a friendly atmosphere. Guests are wel-
comed.
CQLQR GUARD
A short "equipment routine" will be
taught and rehearsed at the Color Guard
auditi rr after several hours of practice
this routine will be performed before a
few of the Marching Pirates staff for
evaluation. All of those auditioning will
perform in groups, no one will be asked to
perform individually. Equipmen' will be
provided for those auditioning for a flag
position, those auditionaing for a nfle
position should bring their own rifle. For
further information contact: Thomas W.
Goolsby, director Marching Pirates 757-
6982; 6331.
RECYCLE TEXTBOOKS
If you can't resell your textbooks how
about donating them to a needy school in
Puebla, Mexico? Just drop unwanted
books in the bookbox at the ECU Student
Store or deliver them to Room 311,
Speight building. Thank your for your
generous contributions.
PHI ALPHA THETA
Will hold it's Spring cookout on April
26th. The cookout will be catered by
Parker's BBQ Restaurant. It will be $5 per
person and this will include the price of
the meal and beverages. The deadline to
sign up for the cookout is April 21st The
sign up sheet is located on the Phi Alpha
I i ieta bulletin board near the Hist. dept. in
Brewster. All interested persons are wel-
come to attend.
y roHQT irs ANONYMOUS
AA will meet every Wednesday at 5:30
p.m. in Room 210 in the Ervin Building.
I or more infomation please call 757-6793.
DELTA SIGMA THETA SO-
RORITY
I Vita Sigma Theta Sorority will be having
an end of the semester jam on Friday,
April 28, from 10 pm-2 pm at the Cultural
( enter. Admission is $1. Come on out and
let's "pump it up
Moving
Home
No Place
ThereTb
StoreMxir
Belongings?
CAROLINA MINI STORAGE
Mm
It's cheaper than
Rent or Moving
Costs
J275 LANDMARK ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
355-3000
GRADUATES
BEEF
BARN
In Honor of the Graduating
Seniors and their families.
we will be open for a
special Graduation Lunch,
Saturdday. May 6th
(11:30am 2pm)
Call for Reservation
400 St. Andrews I)r
Greenville
756-1161
Mrs
MnnThurs 6-10 pm
Fri. fi Sat. 6-10:30 pm
Sun. 5:309pm
� -5r -�
.jrit
GREENVILLE HISTORIC
PRESERVATION
The Greenville Historic Preservation
Cvmmission will meet on Tuesday, April
25, at 7 pm in the third floor City Council
Conference room of the Municipal Build-
ing located on the corner of Fifth and
Washington Streets.
THERE IS N'T MUCH TIME
There still is time to sign up for the Na-
fonal Student Exchange study at one of 83
universities like Oregon IState, California
or Boston and pay ECU tuition! Call
Stephanie at 757-6769.
Economy Mini Storage
USE YOUR STUDENT DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1 - AUGUST 31
300 Farmer Street 757-0373
Greenville, NC
lui
3f
ATTENTION RETURNING STUDENTS
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time,
and possibly money.
The following are available to you:
Reminder: A cut on service charge will be included in your first billing.
OPTION A: NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED
At your parents' jeqjiest. utility service can be w
put in their name. Jifet picK up an application
in room 211 in the Off-Campus Housing Office,
Whichard Building or at Greenville Utilities'
main office, 200 W. Fifth Street.
Have your parents complete the application
(which must be notarized) and mail it to
Greenville Utilities, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
NC 27835-1847, att. Customer Services.
?Remember to attach a 'letter of credit" from
their power company.
OPTION B: DEPOSIT REQUIRED
If you wish to have the utility service put in
j&ux name, a deposit will be required. Deposit
are as follows:
Electric Only
Electric & Water
Electric, Water & Gas
Electric & Gas
with electric or vout electric
gas space or has space
heating heating
$100.00 $75.00
110.00 85.00
110.00 85.00
100.00 75.00
�You can save time by mailing the deposti in advance. Be sure to
include:
a. Your Name
b. Where Service will be Required
c. When Service is to be Cut On
d. A phone number where we may reach you prior to your arrival
at the service address.
Request for Utility Service
(Please Print)
Name
Home address
I
Phone No.
wish to have utility service put in my name at
, effective
(DATE)
Enclosed is a credit report of my utility account with.
(NAME OF UTILITY CO.)
I realize my credity with my utility company that serves me must be good (for more than twelve months)
before a deposit with Greenville Utilities can be waived. This service will be utilized by my (son or daughter).
If a move from one location to another is necessary in the future, I do or
to transfer the utility account. Please
(NAME)
do not give my permission for
have the monthly billing mailed to
I agree to be responsible for all utilities in my name. If there are any questions, yu may phone me at
. or write me at
STATE OF
I
Signed
COUNTY OF
, A Notary Public of the aforesaid County and State,
personally appeared before me this date and duly
certify that
acknowledged the execution of the foregoing intrument for the purposes therein expressed.
Witness my hand and Notarial Seal on theday of. 19.
My commission expires:
�REMINDER THIS FORM MUST BE NOTARIZED IF THE PARENT
DOES NOT SIGN IN THE PRESENCE OF A GUC REPRESENTATIVE.
Notary Public
For further information, contact Customer Assistance
2mZ5fc7i�2.
V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25.1989 9
r
V

�Beer
Kappa Sigma & Busch Beer
Z :UD91 3Cf III7 Ti20�TS� � .?IT
Present the 9th Annual
BAHAMA MAMA
BEACH PARTY
r � � �����, -1" -4
� ,i y '�- - ' i-M
Date: April 25, 1989
Time: 3:00 p.m.
Tickets: $3.00$4.00 at door
Tickets sold in front of Student Stores
ECU. Greenville, N.c
Hawaiian Tropic Tan Bikini Contest
A
Mexican Bestauianl
2?
RAFFLE GRAND PRIZE:
Trip For Two To The BAHAMAS, 4 days,
3 nights. Sponsored by Pantana Bobs
Entries for contest accepted until 3:00 p.m April 25, 1989
To Enter: Phone 752-5543
$1000 of Proceeds to Benefit
Leukemia Foundation and Children's Hospital
COLDSCYM,
ill � �� al G�M � Gr-� t"�
409 Evans Mall
C-eenvilk. North Carolina 27134
(919)75I-4JJ9
to ejr m �� ,4 cultural exptritnct
oports
Pad
foV FAMOUS
T�t Out
�a- 'if
Mb ft ��
)o
COMPARE
OUR
Rwces-
MIMMI M
ocuvca i�( m�im�
TRAVELS, INC.
- -4jt Wh- �� � " " '






I
THEEASTCAROUNIAN
Features
APRIL 18, 1989 PAGE 10
Council
hosts
Festival
By SUZANNE SLACK
St aff Write r
For anyone who has ever been
frustrated by the absence of cul-
tural life in the Emerald City, re-
lief is on the way. The Pitt-Green-
ville Arts Council is hosting the
ninth annual Eastern Carolina Arts
Festival. Daily events are sched-
uled for this week.
According to council member
Debbie Vargas, "Greenville is full
of artistic talent, and this week,
some oi it will be recognized
The festival incorporates the ef-
forts of locals students, patrons,
businesses, and ECU students in a
series oi theme-oriented events.
Each year, a local artist's work
signifying the spirit of Eastern
Carolina and the Arts Festival is
chosen to represent the festival.
This year's print, "Flowers in Blue
Bowl' by Emmy Whitehead, will
be unveiled at a public reception
on Wednesday at the ArtsCouneil
oiikc.
Different themes and loca-
tions are scheduled for each day
oi the festival week. At Pitt Plaza
on Tuesday evening, the "Make A
Joyful Noise" gospel sing is sure
to rock the mall. On Thursday
night the Greenville Dance Com-
pany students will have a recital
at Avden-Grifton High School.
Possibly the most exciting
event oi the week will be on Fri-
day evening, the Gallery Flop.
Several Greenville galleries will
participate in entertaining the
public with displays and refresh-
ments.
"All Species Day" is sched-
uled for Saturday at River Park
North. There will also be an out
Vain goes to L.A
gets No Respect
Vain, a San Francisco-based rock band, finally gets its big break. Their first album, No
Rennet, should appear in record stores in July.
made
By DAVE McCREARY
Staff Writer
We all know the scene. We
make our way to the local video
store, only to spend most of our
time trying to figure out which
movie to rent. With a surplus of
available rentals, making a selec-
tion seems impossible.
Now the decision-making for
Greenville video renters begins
before we even leave home, as we
try to decide which of the more
than half a dozen video stores to
visit.
For you less-than-decisive
video renters, here's a synopsis of
Greenville's three largest video
stores:
Sunshine Video
Sunshine Video isGreenville's
oldest video store, having been in
business for almost six years. The
also has a good selection oi clas-
sics, foreign films and titles that
are more unusual. The store also
carries a large variety oi the com-
mercial hits known as "A titles
"Action films are really popu-
lar right now Dodson said.
'People want to see a lot oi shoot
University students want, espe-
cially since we are the business
closest to the campus said Devin
Frith, video manager at East Coast
Music and Video.
Fast Coast, located at 1109
v. harles Blvd is within two blocks
of the campus and thrives on the
ingsorcarsspinningoutandblow- business that the students provide.
ing tip. The tough guys, like Ar
nold Schwarzenegger, have been
really hot this year
Box-office s-iiv cess seems to be
a reliable barometer for determin-
ing future video hits. "As tar as
what we ought to have, it depends
on what's done good at the box
office. We get six to 10 copies ol
the 'A titles Dodson said.
Sunshine also offers an exten-
sive reservation system. Custom-
ers sign a reserve list for a specific
video, and they are called to come
pick it up when it comes in
"We have established a good
relationship with the faculty and
students ol ECU, mainly because
oi our location Frith said. "The
combination of current music and
videos is also a key factor to our
success
Frith said that he tries to gauge
the types of videos that will be
popular among studentsand other
clientele. Fast Coast stocks six to
10 copies of the more popular
movies, such as "Bull Durham"
and "Die Hard
"I trv to diversify as much as
North. There will also be an out- business tor almost six years, l ne p� � � �k � ���� � " � �: - ��
dPorlrirzronrcrt. -ftt�fl5rat�sWredrflfron - -mi iWU�Pt��MI 'f , ?uTid
� , ni i . . L i Mk (nr him nr mnro rAnrk anfl tit OS tO ChOOSC trOIU, illinsaia.
Rock Springs 4 miles north of
Greenville on Hwy. 43.
Anyone interested in purchas-
ing Afro-American Art is invited
to a sale and exhibit on Saturday
evening at the Comfort Inn on the
Hwy 2b4 By-Pass.
More information can be ob-
tained by calling the Pitt-Green-
ville ArtsCouneil.
Blvd stocks over 6,000 titles and
rents individual videos on an
overnight basis.
"We offer a lot of customer
service said Vicky Dodson,
each for two or more rentals aha
$3.25 for individual rentals.
The one-year membership at
Sunshine is prorated. At the be-
ginning of the year a membership
manager of Sunshine Video. "Our cost$19.95,butthatpricedecreases
employees are very knowledge-
able about ute films on our shelves
and can recommend choices for
our customers
Dodson said that Sunshine
$5 every three months. A lifetime
membership is $35.
Fast Coast Music and Video
"We are committed to pro-
titles to choose from Frith said.
"I'd like to provide the opportu-
nity tor people to explore as many
types ol films as they can
East Coast provides an exclu-
sive "We Recommend" sticker on
certain titles. Frith originated the
idea to otter a special service to the
store's customers.
"Statistics show that at least
By CHIP SWARTZ
Stiff Writer
Vain is a heavy rock outfit
based in San Francisco, and it has
been creating more than its share
of excitement in recent years. Vain
first came to my attention in 1986
when I received their two-song
demo tape. When I learned that
Vain signed a recording contract
with Island records, 1 took the
opportunity to contact Rebel Pro-
ductions and schedule a phone
interview with the band's name-
sake and singer Davy Vain.
Vain has dominated the San
Francisco area almost from their
inception and has been a heavy-
weight in L.A. for several years,
having played with such L.A.
powerhouses as Guns 'n' Roses
and Poison. The band consists of
Vain on vocals, Jamie Scott on
guitar, Ashley "one punch" Mitch-
ell on bass, and Tommy Rickard
on drums. The band has been
together for three years and there
have been no line-up changes.
"The only difference is that
Jamie was going by the last name
Rose and he changed it to Scott,
his old last name, to avoid any
mistaken connections with Guns
'n' Roses Vain said.
The group's debut release is a
twelve-song effort called No Re-
spect and is scheduled to hit rec-
ord stores July 10.
"The title No Respect comes
from playing clubs so long and
wondering if we'd ever get a deal.
We've played with so many bands
that have gone on to sign mapr
record deals. There were times
when we questioned ourselves
Vain said.
Songs on No Respect include
"Laws Against Love "Beat the
Bullet "Ready and "Secrets
"The song "Secrets" deals with
the cut-throat attitude that exists
ontheL.A.clubcircuit,butitcould
applv to any highly Competitive
-stofrcifraftw piiopig � WfW
engineering credits include the
Rush album A Show of Hands, and
Queensryche's Operation Mind
crime. Vain confided that
"producing No Respect was the
hardest thing I've overdone in my
life
Vain's lead guitar work in past
bands gained him early attention
in San Francisco but the bulk of
guitar chores on their island re-
lease were handled by Jamie Scott.
Vain plays guitar on two tracks
out of the twelve.
This video fan checks out the tapes at Sunshine Video. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, Photolab).
viding videos that East Carolina 60 percent of the people who walk
into the store haven't necessarily
made up their minds about what
they want to see he said.
"1 label certain movies so if
someone isn't sure what they want
to see, thev can try one out that 1
have seen and that I found had
something different to offer
Frith said comedies, action
features and horror films are the
most popular rentals from East
Coast
"Movies like 'Blues Brothers'
and 'Animal House' will always
go out oi here every night he
said.
East Coast offers a free life-
time membership and most vid-
eos rent for $3 a night.
Blockbuster Video
Imagine a store with 10,000
videotapes,about6,000 square feet
of shopping space and at least 30
different categories of titles to
choose from.
Blockbuster Video, located
near the intersection of Greenville
Boulevard and Red Banks Road,
See VIDEO, page 12
were really down on us when we
wereworkingourwayupbutnow
that we are signed to a major label
they tell people they're our best
friends. "Beat the Bullet" is just
about praying to the Lord wedon't
catch anything from the girls we
meet
1 asked Vain if being the band's
namesake and sole song writer
made him the band's leader.
"Yes, I think every band needs
a leader he said. "The guys jok-
ingly refer to me as El Presidente.
It's cool when everything is going
rightbutitcanbea realdrag when
things go wrong. The guitar player
says, 'you handle it, you're El
Presidente. I'm going back to the
hotel
Vain seems to be one band
that's always in the thick of things,
but Vain was quick to point out
thisdoesn'tincludedrugs. "We've
all outgrown drugs. Besides, I'd
rather fuck than get high
In addition to singing, Vain is
well known around the Bay area
forhisproductiontalentsandlead
guitar work. Vain produced Frolic
Through the Park in 1988 for Death
Angel, arguably the classiest speed
band around.
Both Vain and Death Angel
share the same manager, Kat Sir-
dofsky, and both bands are big
fans of the other's music. Vain
also co-produced No Respect with
the help of Paul Northfield, whose
"Island records is a label that
is more concerned about signing
bands with quality material rather
than just signing the most popular
bands. They also emphasize rcp-
resentingbandsthat cover a broad
rangcof genre. U2 is their political
band, Tone Loc is the rapper,
Anthrax is their speed metal band,
and we fill the hard rock cate-
gory Vain explained. "The
people at Island have been real
easy to work with. They have a lot
of new blood.
Many of the new people
worked for Elektra back when
bands like Motley Cnie were get-
ting signed
"But getting signed is only
part of it Vain added. "You have
to have a stockpile of good songs.
Manybandsget signed on the basis
of their popularity in the clubs,
but some of these bands have been
together less than seven months.
They don't have a great deal of
material built up. The material on
No Respect was chosen from over
fifty songs.
"Our problem was that we
were a San Francisco band. We
didn't want to sell out and move
to L.A. but we couldn't get any
record executives to come down
and check us out on our home turf
because they could see three or
four popular acts all within a few
became necessary to work I
necessary to work me
clubs in L.A. to make a name so
that record executives would
travel down to San Francisco and
check us out in front of our home
crowd
With No Respect awaiting re-
lease Vain is setting its sites on
making their first video and fill-
ing the opening slot for a major
national tour.
"We're presently in limbo,
writing material for the next rec-
ord and practicing but we're care-
ful not to overpraetice. When we
go outand play we want people to
know we care about the songs. We
don't want to seem like we're
playing a song for the millionth
time
Sadly, as Vain breaks into the
big time they will be increasingly
confronted with the politicsot rock
and roll.
"Getting an opening slot on a
major tour is kind of like running
for President. It's who you know,
not so much what you can do
observed Vain.
For the time being these San
Francisco rockers will just take
things one step at a time and stick
to what thev know best, writing
and performing some of the best
street-wise hard rock in the busi-
ness, secure in the knowledge that
their future is bright.
An employee at East Coast Music and Video gets a rental tape for a customer. (Photo by J.D.
Whitmire, Photolab).
Many video stores like Video Views offer rental specials to attract customers. (Photo by J.D.
Whitmire, Photolab).






THE FAST CAROLINIAN
APRJLlSiVL
BLT's is no sandwich shop
STUDY EXAM STUDY EXAM �
1 EXAM STUDY EXAM STUDY
STUDY
? EXAM
Bv ADAM BLANKENSHIP
Suff Writer
The question is, where can
someone go to get a sarong from
F n hand died shorts from Guate-
mala. Tarns from Jamaica, and
hind tied sweaters from Ecuador
in a city where eating Oriental
food is taking a walk on the wild
s de of ethnicity? The answer is
PI 1 -
No, BLT's is not an abbrevia-
tion for a sliced pig sandwich, but
rather the initials of a most inter-
esting shop in downtown Grcen-
ville. BLT stands for, Richard
Bramley, Lcs Franck, and Bill
Troll" Overman, who all are
students with the exception oi
Troll' who is an alumnus of our
more than fine institution.
1 "he trio began printing shirts
in a rented mini storageveritable
sweatbox with no thing but a single
printer and radio. In March of
$8 with $7500 in their pockets,
they took the big step into the
screenprinting market of Green-
. illo to stake their claim and es-
lablish a toehold. Thev rented the
old Apple Records store down-
town, bought another printer, and
threw away the radio and bought
a stereo. At this time the store was
still primarily printing only, with
a small record rack thev used to
sell misprinted shirts for their retail
customers.
In the late summer of 1988,
the store found itself evolving into
an outlet for third world clothing
featuring wear from such exotic
locations as Guatemala, Fiji, Peru,
Indonesia, Bali, and countries from
almost every continent on our
round world. The store sells these
fashions not only for their looks,
but primarily for the unparalled
comfort of natural materials that
is characteristic of third world
fashions, onlv one oi the reasons
why the store has caught on so
well in the area. The uniqueness
of the products has to be another
as well as countless other little
traits that make the store a treat to
visit.
The corporate name of the
shop is Bl.T's and Troll's luxe-
does. As one might deduce from
the name, the store also rents for-
mal wear for most any occasion.
They offer group rates to fraterni-
ties, sororities, and any organiza-
tion that requires formal wear as
well as the individual who might
require a tuxedo at more than
competitive rates.
"Yippies which is another
BIT'S, has just opened in theGhent
area of Norfolk Virginia. The store
is owned and operated by BLT's
and carries an extensive selection
oi the same products that the
Greenville store inventories. Fu-
ture expansionary plans include
stores in Chapel 1 lill, Nags Head,
and if druthers were to be consid-
ered, globally.
Denise White, who is the
store's retail manager, further
expanded the store's concept to
include such specialty items as
incense, crystals, exotic stones,
fnsbee and golf disks, scented oils,
and other out of the ordinary
merchandise. The store has a
unique and always jovial atmos-
phere which gives it personality
all the way down to its own parrot
Tinkerbell (who is not always
jovial).
3WptrTfWai��WWMK
BLT's � not the sandwich but the store � carries a variety of weird and exotic items.
Check 'em out. (Photo by Gretchen Joumigan.)
'ft
�"�
V1 II
"
.
'r.
v "i
vv�,A

.





East Carolina's vast collection
of talented artists have been fea-
tured at the shop and are con-
tracted for their prints. The store
also supports active groups for
global preservation and encour-
ages all of its patrons to be glob-
ally and environmentally aware.
For information on how to
become more active in the preser-
vation of our only home, or how
you can save our cohabitants from
our not-very-neighborly activities,
go down and talk with them and
there vou will find information
J
and phone numbers or addresses
(whichever the case may be).
BLT's is located on fifth street
across from Rafters, in between
Omar's and Quicksilver Records,
and their phone number is 757
1007. If you have never been, give
yourself a break from the walls of
Babylon at the Malls and treat
voursclf to Greenville's own bit of
third world culture.
TAKE A BREAK FROM THE ROUTINE.
FROM EARRINGS ($7 & UP) TO WASHABLE SILK
SUNDRESSES & SEPERATES, WE'VE GOT WHAT
YOU NEED TO REWARD YOUR HARD WORK.
919 A. Redbanks Rd.
Arlington Village
756-1058
Mon-Sat. 10-6
Thurs. 10-8
Maurice will
snub you, then he'll
rob you.
No need for a social regis-
tration or gold card at Annabelles
We've got what you want �
an enjoyable, delicious variety
of food, fair prices and attentive
service by friendly people Its
the taste of American casual
Come to Annabelles You'll
love us for what we are You ll
love us for what we aren't
nnabdle's
" � RESTAURANT & PUB �
The Plaza
Greenville B
'56-0315
Congratulations Seniors 1989
STUDENT STORES
'One stop shopping at the heart of campus
35:
j
W
O
a'
W
nQi


7
n
�e2'4
?e-
V
Of
eQt
10 Discount
On Any Regular
Priced ECU
Imprinted Item,
to Seniors Who Show
Their Receipt for
Paying Their
Graduation Fee
XP
&s
Sf)
sv
v
Pktfjd
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S


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c
o

&
April 24th
thru
May 5th
D
NEWBURN NISSANl
636-1000
BOOKSTORE
Wright Building
Hours:
MonFri. 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Telelphono: 757-6731
SODA SHOP 1
Wright Building
Hours.
MonFrl. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Telelphone: 757-6731
"THE CROAT AN"
Hours.
MonThurs. 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Frl. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sat .A: 30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.
Telephone: 757-6477





I
mm
PHMI JMlff JflW ' r r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JkERIL 25,1989H
BLT's is no sandwich shop
STUDY EXAM STUDY EXAM STUDY
U EXAM STUDY EXAM STUDY � EXAM
?
By ADAM BLANKENSHEP
SuH Writer
The question is, where can
someone go to get a sarong from
Fiji, hand died shorts from Guate-
mala, Tarns from Jamaica, and
hand tied sweaters from Ecuador
in a city where eating Oriental
food is taking a walk on the wild
side of ethnicity? The answer is
BLTs.
No, BLTs is not an abbrevia-
tion for a sliced pig sandwich, but
rather the initials of a most inter-
esting shop in downtown Green-
ville. BLT stands for, Richard
Bramley, Les Franck, and Bill
"Troll" Overman, who all are
students with the exception of
Troll" who is an alumnus of our
more than fine institution.
The trio began printing shirts
in a rented mini storageveritable
sweatbox with nothing but a single
printer and radio. In March of
1988, with $7500 in their pockets,
they took the big step into the
screenprinting market of Green-
ville to stake their claim and es-
tablish a toehold. They rented the
old Apple Records store down-
town, bought another printer, and
threw away the radio and bought
a stereo. At this time the store was
still primarily printing only, with
a small record rack they used to
sell misprinted shirts for their retail
customers.
In the late summer of 1988,
the store found itself evolving into
an outlet for third world clothing
featuring wear from such exotic
locations as Guatemala, Fiji, Peru,
Indonesia, Bali, and countries from
almost every continent on our
round world. The store sells these
fashions not only for their looks,
but primarily for the unparallcd
comfort of natural materials that
is characteristic of third world
fashions, only one of the reasons
why the store has caught on so
well in the area. The uniqueness
of the products has to be another
as well as countless other little
traits that make the store a treat to
visit.
The corporate name of the
shop is BLTs and Troll's Tuxe-
does. As one might deduce from
the name, the store also rents for-
mal wear for most any occasion.
They offer group rates to fraterni-
ties, sororities, and any organiza-
tion that requires formal wear as
well as the individual who might
require a tuxedo at more than
competitive rates.
"Yippies which is another
BLTs, has just opened in theGhent
area of Norfolk Virginia. The store
is owned and operated by BLTs
and carries an extensive selection
of the same products that the
Greenville store inventories. Fu-
ture expansionary plans include
stores in Chapel Hill, Nags Head,
and if druthers were to be consid-
ered, globally.
Denise White, who is the
store's retail manager, further
expanded the store's concept to
include such specialty items as
incense, crystals, exotic stones,
frisbee and golf disks, scented oils,
and other out of the ordinary
merchandise. The store has a
unique and always jovial atmos-
phere which gives it personality
all the way down to its own parrot
Tinkerbell (who is not always
jovial).
East Carolina's vast collection
of talented artists have been fea-
tured at the shop and are con-
tracted for their prints. The store
also supports active groups for
global preservation and encour-
ages all of its patrons to be glob-
ally and environmentally aware.
For information on how to
become more active in the preser-
vation of our only home, or how
you can save our cohabitants from
our not-very-neighborly activities,
go down and talk with them and
there you will find information
and phone numbers or addresses
(whichever the case may be).
BLTs is located on fifth street
across from Rafters, in between
Omar's and Quicksilver Records,
and their phone number is 757-
1007. If you have never been, give
yourself a break from the walls of
Babylon at the Malls and treat
yourself to Greenville's own bit of
third world culture.
TAKE A BREAK FROM THE ROUTINE.
FROM EARRINGS ($7 & UP) TO WASHABLE SILK
SUNDRESSES & SEPERATES, WE'VE GOT WHAT
YOU NEED TO REWARD YOUR HARD WORK.
919 A. Redbanks Rd.
Arlington Village
756-1058
MonSat. 10-6
Thurs. 10-8
Maurice will
snub you, then he'll
roby011-
r a social regis-
id at Annabelle's.
'hat you want�
licious variety
s, and attentive
iy people It's
ican casual,
nabelles. You'll
veare. You'll
ve aren't.
die's
JtANT & PUB tm
s ll 30 AM- ll OOPM
11 30 AM Midnight
12 Noon - 11 00 PM
BLT's � not the sandwich but the store � carries a variety c. mm
Check 'em out (Photo by Gretchen Journigan.)
� �.� ctfOtic icens.
Congratulations Seniors 1989
STUDENT STORES
'One stop shopping at the heart of campus
P- PC �;��: -
;v-N
�6
�;
tf
W?5
ca
fo
ntf

2to
7
rot.
Sw
10 Discount
On Any Regular
Priced ECU
Imprinted Item,
to Seniors Who Show
Their Receipt for
Paying Their
Graduation Fee
,a
V
o
G
9
Sto
Y.
t
v�

oP1 V �P
&


o
o9i
'�,
'
4&W
k
�to3re
Of,
"
�t,
j9
April 24th
thru
May 5th
C
frs ?,

r
o�
'
i
BOOKSTORE
Wright Building
Hours:
MonFri. 8:30 t.m. - 5 p.m.
TsWphons: 757-3731
SODA SHOP 1
Wright Building
Hours:
MonFri. 7:30 s.m. - 5 p.m.
TtMphons: 757-S731
THE CROATAN"
Hours:
MonThurs. 7:30 m. - 9 pjn.
Fri. 7:30 m. - 5 p.m.
SstASO mm. -12:30 p Jn.
TiltphOfW: 757-6477
, ��





12
THE EAST v AROIINIAN
APRIL 25,1W
Video
Continued from page 10
is Greenville's first video super-
store.
"We offer a terrific selection,
providing more variety by add-
mgnew tapeseverv month tokeep
ourinventorv fresh said Rebecca
Chapman, director of marketing
at WBJ Video of Spartanburg, S.C
Chapman's company owns
the franchise rights to Blockbuster
stores in North Carolina. With (-2t-�
stores throughout the United
States and Canada, Blockbuster is
the largest video chain the the
United States.
One attractive feature of
blockbuster stores is the three-
night rental svstem, instead of the
usual one-night policy- For ex-
ample, if someone rents a movie
on Tuesday, it would not be due
until midnight Thursday.
"We've found that most
people are pushed (for time) when
thev have to return a video the
day after renting it Chapman
said.
Chapman said Blockbuster
has a very sophisticated tape
management system. For the
commercial hits, a minimum of 10
copies are available. In cases of
higher demand, 20 to 30 copies are
kept on hand.
Blockbuster is open from 10
am to midnight 365 days a year.
The chain offers free memberships
and rents each video for $3.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily
available for sale in each Kroyer Store e.rept as
specifically noted in this ad If we do run out ot ar
advertised item, we will otter you your choice ot
comparable item, when available reflecting the same
savings or a raincheck which will entitle you to pur hase
the advertised item at the advertised price with JO yb
Only one vendor coupon will be KOepted pel �
purchased.
COPYRIGHT 1989 THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND
PRICES GOOD SUNDAY. APRIL 23. THROUGH SA f UH
DAY, APRIL 29, 1989. IN
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIl . I
SOLD TO DEALERS
Citizens adopt roads
RALEIGH lAH � just one
vear after the program was started
almost 2,500 groups from across
the state are helping keep thou-
sands ot miles of North Carolina
roads clean.
"We have found that people
are really interested in makingour
roadsides better said JeanDodd
director of the state Department
of Transportation's project keep
North Carolina Clean and Beauti-
ful.
"It has spurred the. local
groups in trying to change atti-
tudes about littering she said.
Businesses, such as bottling
companies, civic groups, home-
maker s clubs. Boy Scout sand Girl
Scouts, and fraternities and so-
rorities are walking the roadsides
and picking up trash in the state's
Adopt-A-Highway Program.
"We're averaging over three
new adoptions a day, and we
expect that to increase as the signs
go up announcing a segment ot
road is being cleaned by an or-
ganization Dodd said.
"North Carolina has allowed
its program to grow faster than
some of the other states she said.
It has grown like wildfire
Adopt-A-Highway is mod-
eled after a successful program in
Texas � the first state to recruit
private residents to tight road-side
litter.
"We got calls and letters from
North Carolinians who had trav-
eled through that state. Dodd
said.
Yirginia,West Virginia, Geor-
gia and South Carolina are among
other states that have similar pro-
grams.
In North Carolina, nearly
2,500 groups represent 5,500 miles
of adopted highways in 90 ot the
states's 100 counties, Dodd said.
"We ask volunteer organiza-
tionsand businesses to take a two-
mile section of highway and keep
it clean for at least one year she
said. Groups can adopt more miles
but are asked to clean them up at
least four times a year.
The transportation depart-
ment provides orange safety vests
and trash bags, and DOT crews
pick up filled bags. A white sign
bearing the words " Adopt a High-
wav ' and the name of the group
or business is erected when a vol-
unteer is found.
Raleigh-based First Citizens
Bank recently made a commitment
statewide to get all their North
L a rolnu branches involved,Dodd
said, adding that the company
already has adopted more than
300 miles of highways.
The Moose Lodge also has
committed at the statewide level
and main- others have signed up.
"We really started this pro-
gram with groups and businesses
in mind Dodd said. "But lots ot
families and neighborhoods and
individuals have become in-
volved
Last year, New Hanover led
the state in the program, followed
by Gaston, Wake, Moore, Dareand
Forsyth counties. The ranking is
based on the number of miles
adopted and volunteer groups per
county, plus the ratio of the groups
to the county's population.
Earlier this month, Gaston
County groups held an Adopt-A
Highway luncheon to motivate
volunteers. And a big cleanup
planned for May 13 will include
all volunteers in Wake County
who will celebrate afterward at
the State Fairgrounds.
"We really believe that this
program is going to clean up the
roads and save taxpayer money
and will renew citizens' pride
Dodd said. "The state can never
pick it all up, because people just
throw it back down
Buy 1 pizza, get 1 free.
Buy 10 pizzas, get 10 free.
Buy 15 pizzas, get 15 free.
�AVE WITH IHEE.C-QTjepNl,
i cheap Date 2 Medium I
p Small Pizza's I I
1 w Cheese & J J
I One Topping & j
I 2 12oz. Drinks
I $6.4 � ! I
Pizzas
1 Topping
Special
$Q 00
-� tax
Now Hiring Positions
For the Summer.
If you can write, we
need you. Stop by The
East Carolinian,
located across from
Joyner International
Library and apply
today!
I Party Pack 1
2 LARGE PIZZAS I
Hearty Hearty a
Covered w Pepperoni, I 1 f Large Pizzas I
loaded w Italian Sau- I I
sage, Heaped w I
Ground Beef, Topped
w Bacon I f
I
I
I
I
L
$1 O 99
I I
tax
I
w cheese &
One Topping I
$1989
tax
Call or Come by these Locations:
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69








VHFtASTC AROIINIAN
Sports
APRIL 25, 1989 I'ACE 13
Winners eat steak
Offense explodes in game
By CHRIS SIEGEL
port Fditor
In Saturday's Purple Gold scrimmage, Gold quarterback Jeff Blake looks for a running back to hand
the ball off to. Blake and the Gold team won 27-14 (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photo Lab).
Purple quarterback, Charlie Libretto, could not break free from the grasp of Anthony Thompson.
"This play and others by Thompson and fellow defenders, impressed the coaching staff (Photo by
Thomas Walters, ECU Photo Lab).
After a Saturday afternoon of
sun, signing autographs and ex-
amining bikinis, the Pirate foot-
ball team settled down to play
their season-ending spring game.
Pride and dinner were on the line.
That's right dinner. The winners
of the game would eat steak, while
the losers would have to suffer
through hot dogs and pork n'
beans.
Intensity and enthusiasm
were the words of the afternoon.
So much that the Purple team
taunted the Gold team as they took
the field, but in the end, it would
be the Gold team who got the last
laugh as they went on to win, 27-
14.
"We have the most exciting
weekend of spring football in the
country head coach Bill Lewis
said following thegameSaturday.
"The fans were great and sup-
ported the team well. The players
appreciate and got caught up in
it The over 8,000 fans who came
out to see the game were treated to
an exciting game and great
weather for the weekend activi-
ties.
Offense was the name of the
game as 600 yards were compiled
by both offenses. Red-shirt fresh-
man Eric Booker led the way on
the ground as he gained 96 yards
on 20 carries. While quarterback
Jeff Blake was the leading passer
of the game, as he connected on 5
of 14 attempts for 155 yards and
one touchdown.
"1 thought today (Saturday)
was productive said Lewis. "It
put the team in a game situation
and gave them a feeling of a game
environment. It also gave the
coaches a taste of what it's like to
be a game environment
The Purple team took the
opening kick and appeared to be
ready to back up their taunting.
Rising-seniorCharlie Libretto took
the Purple team and led them on
12 play, 80 yard drive. Pave
Daniels was the work-horse of the
drive, as he carried the ball live
times and gained 21 yards. The
last yard capped off the drive, as
Daniels bulled in from the one to
make the score 6-0. Kirk
McGuinn's extra point made the
score 7-0 Purple.
After the two teams traded
punts, the Gold squad had the ball
at their own 39. Junior transfer
Chad Grier came out firing as he
hit tight end Charles Freeman
twice for 34 yards. Then Freeman
took the ball on a reverse and
gained 14 yards to put the ball at
the Purple nine. From there Mi-
chael Rhett rushed the ball twice
and capped the drive with a three
yard touchdown run. Robb Im-
perato's extra point knotted the
game at seven.
Libretto and the Purple team
would start anothger drive fol-
lowing the kick off, but on third
and five, defensive back Ricky
Torain dove and broke up Li-
bretto's pass attempt for Bojack
Davenport, jett punted giving the
Gold team the ball at their own 20.
The Gold rode the passing of
Blake and the running of Booker
all the way down the field. Booker
carried the ball five times for 23
yards on the drive, but Blake and
Al Whiting accounted for most of
the yards on a 54-yard pass plav.
Blake then hit Frank Smalls on a
18-yard touchdown pass, but the
play was called back for illegal
man down field. Smalls fumbled
two plays later and Tim Wolter
recovered for the Purple at their
own 10.
After three plavs and a punt
by the Purple offense, the Gold
took over at their own 3b. On third
and three, Blake hit Freeman on a
30-yard completion for a first
down. Freeman fumbled the ball,
but teammate Hunter Gallimore
recovered. Booker capped the
seven play, 64 yard drive off as he
pushed the ball in from the four.
Imperato's kick put the Gold
ahead 14-7.
The two squads each had one
more attempt to put the ball in the
end zone before half. Neither team
could do so and the first half came
to a close with the Gold leading
14-7.
Half time was highlighted by
a group of future pro football
players showing their stuff. Actu-
ally, it was the finals of the Punt,
Pass & Kick competition for kids
8-13. Also, former ECU great and
All-Amcrican Terry Long of the
Pittsburgh Steelers was honored
bv the Pirate Club for all he has
J
accomplished.
Gold continued to dominate
play in the second half. Darren
Bynum took a short kick off 35
yards and gave the Gold team
great field position at the Purple
46. After three rushing plays net-
ted the Gold 10 yards, walk-on
quarterback Carrell connected
with Whiting for a 36 yard touch-
do wn. Jake Fine's kick wasblocked
and the Gold led 20-7.
The two teams traded punts
and the third quarter came to an
end with the Gold leading, 20-7.
After each team failed on
fourth down attempts and the
Gold punted the ball, the Purple
had the ball at their 29 knowing
they had to score. Trying to make
a comeback, the Purple squad
were led by Blake at quarterback.
Blake switched to the Purple
squad in the second half, due to an
injury to Travis Hunter in the last
scrimmage prior to the spring
See PURPLEGOLD, page!6
Jacobs throws no-hitter; defeats ACC
B KRISTEN H MBI KG
-j1: . t I
Senior lake Jacobs pitched his
tirsi no hitter of his college career
and increased bis record to 6-1 in
pen game oi the double-
lder against Atlantic Christian
as the Pirates went on to sweep
theBulld( gs Sunday at Harring-
ton Field.
East Carolina shut out the
�t; mtichristian 6-0 in the first
game while winning the second
game 11-4.
Jacobs faced 23 batters the first
game and was throwing a perfect
game until William Chatman
reached on an error in the sixth
inning. But, Chatman was only
oneof two to reach base, and they
werebothduetoerrors.I le pitched
se eninningsand had eight strike-
outs.
Calvin Brown opened the
-coring for the Pirates in the first
game with bis 11th home run of
the season to centertleld in the
second inning. Brown had the
ime winning RBI'sinboth games
. nst the Bulldogs.
lCJ scored two more times
in the third inning when David
Ritchie singled and Iommv Ea-
son slammed his seventh home
run of the season. The Pirates were
up by three, 3-0.
The Pirates added two more
in the fourth inning when Steve
Godin singled. After two Pirates
went down, Kevin Riggs doubled
to drive in Godin. Dave Ritchie
then reached on an error which
enabled Riggs to score.
Chris Cauble closed the scor-
ing for Fast Carolina with a solo
homer in the fifth inning. This was
Cauble's first home run of the year.
Brien Berckman was the win-
ning pitcher for the Pirates in the
second game of the doubleheader
as he increased his record to 3-0.
He pitched seven innings for the
Pirates, had three hits, two errors
and four runs for his victory.
The Pirates wasted no time
getting on the scoreboard in the
second game when, in the first
inning, John Adams led off with a
base hit, went to second on an
Eason hit and was driven in on a
hit bv Brown.
ECU increased their lead to 4-
0 in the second inning. Godin went
to first when he reached on a hit to
the infield. I le then stole second
and was driven in by Cauble's
double. Kevin Riggs then went to
first on an error and David Daniels,
Riggs' courtesy runner, scored
csscored on a hit by Adams.
Atlantic Christian tried to
threaten in the third but only
managed to close the Pirate lead
momentarily to 4-2. Chatman
singled and Paul Zimmerman hit
a home run to right field.
But the Pirates exploded in
the sixth by scoring four more runs
and wraped up the loss for the
Bulldogs. Cauble led off the in-
ning with a walk and his courtesy
runner, Daniels, went to second
when Riggs singled. Daniels
scored on a sacrifice fly by John
Thomas and Adams singled in
Riggs. Eason then scored Adams
on a double to leftfield but came in
himself on a Bulldog throwing
error. The Pirates had control of
the game and an 8-2 lead.
Atlantic Christian managed
one run in the bottom of the sixth
but the Pirates tacked on three
more to their already bloated score
when Riggs singled, stole second
and was hit in on a sacrifice fly by
Thomas. Adams then stepped to
the plate and belted his fourth
home run of the season.
The Bulldogs tried a late rally
in the seventh inning. Wayne
Sullivan, with one out, went to
first on an error. But, Berckman
then walked to Chatman and Jeff
Dover. With the bases loaded,
Summerlin hit a sacrifice fly to
drive in Sullivan. Berckman re-
loaded the bases again when he
walked another Bulldog batter.
But, in a tense moment, Berckman
struck out the next batter to secure
the Pirate victory.
Adams was the Pirate leader
in hitting as he went four for four
in the game, with one of those hits
being his fourth home run of the
year. Eason and Riggs were both
two for three.
The Pirates take to the field
tonight against the Eagles of
Winthrop in a doubleheader
scheduled for 6 p.m. East Carolina
will beat homeat Harrington Field
to take on this nonconference
opponent. They will be at home
again Friday to play a double-
header against Mount Olive.
Game time for that matchup will
See PIRATES, pagel6
Offensive standout Eric Booker gets a lift from one of his
lineman after scoring a Gold touchdown. Booker and his
Gold teammates enjoyed the win, eating steak and watching
the Purple team eat hot dogs and beans (Photo by Thomas
Walters, ECU Photo Lab).
Lewis has high expectations for 1989 season
By MICHAEL MARTIN
��� Sport liiitor
understands that the team is in the
midst of change, but they have
desire and they want to win.
The spring practices were
carried out over the NCAA maxi-
mum 36-day period, and he feels
Head football coach Bill Le
wis held a press conference Mon
day afternoon to discuss the re- that the team had a good start.
suits of spring workouts and the Lewis commented on the team's
Purple and Gold game. Although "chemistry in a tough situation
Lewis was not completely satis-
fied with the spring practices, he
was impressed by the team's de-
sire to win and their abilities to
pick up the new formations, both
on offense and defense.
"We (the coaching staff) put to the point that we are today
the guys through a tough spring
practice Lewis said. "It was a
long, hard, tough spring. They got
totallv involved and made the
commitment to work hard on the achievement that each
lewis was tremendously player or squad had attained
impressed by the team's attitude, throughout the spring games and
He said that he likes the team, and the Purple and Gold scrimmage,
he has made it a point to get to Offensively, the Pirates have
know each of the players. He caUght on quickly to drastic
changes that were made in the Lewis also contends that their size made their adaptation a bit easier
game plans. Traditionally, the and strength makes them good than that of the rest of the team.
Pirates have been a running team, football players. The tight end spot is currently
However, Lewis has installed the "You've got Grant Lowe, occupied by Charles Freeman,
passing game in conjunction with Stuart Southall and Todd Drugac, This position is critical to the of-
the I-formation. guys that have played football for fense in that the tight end must
Individually, the biggest a while Lewis said. "You've also have the ability toblock,yetat the
change has fallen under the role of got Chad Martin and Billy
the fullback. His primary job will Maxwell, guys that have already
; the new coaching be blocking instead of running the been in the battle. So what you
staff and its philosophies. ball. have is ,a lot of PIayers P
'� I feel that there was a good Michael Rhett currently leads nence
give-and-take between the play- the pack for contention at this valu- Lewis also commented on the
ers and the coaching staff Lewis able spot. Coach Lewis was im- semor leadership of Drujac and Wilson, Bojack Davenport and Al
said. "That has allowed us to get pressed with his statistics and Southall. He felt that since they Whiting are a group that Lewis
consistency during the spring, had already been through several called "productive
same time be able to catch the ball.
Lewis feels confident with Free-
man and boasts that he has "the
capability of playing big time
football
At wide receiver, Walter
Lewis con-
Lewis then turned the atten- However, David Daniels is right seasons of play, they could help siders Wilson a "big time player,
tion of the conference to the depth behind him, and is expected to
of the team at individual posi- make a move during the summer
tions. His comments were based and the early fall.
The one squad that Lewis was
most impresed with was the of-
fensive line. Heconsidered the line
the "most consistent part of the
game" thus far. The experience
that the line has is beneficial, and
the other players out.
Lewis made reference to of-
fensive line coach Steve Shank-
weiler. Since Shankweiler is the
only coach remaining from the Art
Baker staff, Lewis felt that his
impact on the offensive line has
been invaluable. The older play-
ers already knew him, and that
but doesn't discredit Davenport
or Whiting. He feels that the two
"are capable of being big play
makers but continued that all
three still have to get their timing
down and their depth for the
routes correct.
The tailback position is new
under the offensive scheme. The
tailback will have the duties of
running the ball in almost all plays.
Willie Lewis, Dencll Harper and
Eric Booker are all looking for the
starting role, but Lewis has an-
other idea foreach. Heconsidered
Lewis and Harper the top pros-
pects because oi their day-in and
day-out practicing habits. But
Booker's performance at the
Purple-Gold game, his best of the
spring, has caught the eye of Lewis
and his staff.
"We'll have to take two, and
look to find a third and even a
fourth tailback and by rotating
them, and knowing what they do
best, then playing them at their
strengths, I think that we can be
adequate at that position Lewis
said.
Travis Hunter currently has
the lock on quarterback duties.
However, Chad Grier and Jeff
Blake arc both pressing Hunter,
See LEWIS, page 17





f
f
14
TT IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25,1989
Jacobs pitching gains honor
(SID) � East Carolina senior
pitcher Jake Jacobs, who tossed a
no-hitter in defeating Atlantic
Christian Sunday, joins Tommy
Adams of UNC-Vilmington as the
co-player of the week in the Colo-
nial Athletic Association, it was
announced today.
Jacobs, a right-hander from
Mount Oliye, NC, struck out eight
and walked non in route to ECU'S
6-0 victory over Atlantic Christian
Sunday. Jacobs is the first Pirate
hurler to throw a no-hitter since
April 18,1987.
Jacobs raised his record to 6-1
on the year Sunday while lower-
ing his earned run ayerage to 2.91
� fourth lowest in the Colonial.
Jacobs, who owns a 23-5 record in
his four-year career, has struck
out 61 batters in 58 and two-thirds
innings.
ECU is 29-7 overall and 12-3
in the CAA. The Pirates have fin-
ished the Colonial regular season
in second place, behind UNC-
Wilmington, 26-12 and 14-1.
Adams batted .455 last week
(10-22) and hurled a seven-hit
shutout at Davidson. His 10 hits
included three-run home runs and
a double with 14 RBI on the week.
Adams raised his batting average
49 points to .400 to take the lead in
the CAA. He also notched
UNCW's first shutout of the year
while improving his record to 8-2.
Ladv Pirates ink recruit
Signee brings talent to Greenville
(SID) � Keeneya Wilson, a 5-
toot-8 guard-forward from Roane
State Community College in Har-
riman. TN, has signed to plav
basketball for the East Carolina
women's team next fall, Lady
Pirate head coach Tat Pierson
announced this morning.
Wilson, a rising junior, led
Roane State to the National Junior
College Tournament in Tyler, TX,
this season. The Kingsport, TN,
nativcaveraged 15 pointsand four
assists per game last season and
was named to theall-Toumament
team at the National Tournament.
Roane State won the junior
college Region VII championship
last season. Region VII includes
Tennessee and Kentucky, and
Wilson was named to the all-Re-
gion team.
Wilson ownsa3.7grade-point
average (on a 4.0 scale) in pre-op-
tometry. She is the daughter of
Ken & Frankie Wilson.
"Keeneya is just an outstand-
ing young lady said Pierson, who
begins her third season at ECU
this year. "I think she will fit in
well to our team concept.
"She is a good shooter, de-
fender and an excellent student
Wilson joins Toni LynnThur-
man of Hallsboro, N.C as ECU's
two signees thus far. Thurman
signed during the November sign-
ing period.
ECU track shines in Florida on ESPN
By MICHAEL MARTIN
st Sports Fditor
The ECU men's track team
traveled to Florida over the week-
end to participate in the Tampa
Gatorade Track and Field Invita-
tional. The Pirates fared well as
they finished third in the 4 X 100
meter relay with a time of 40.50
seconds .
Team members Eugene
McNeill. Brian Iryin, Kelyin
Wrighton and Ion Lee ran well,
but problems with the exchanges
of the baton hurt the team's conti-
nuity and time. Coach Carson
attributed the problems with the
baton hurt the Pirates.
"Eugene (McNeill) ran as
good a first leg as he has run this
year, but the exchanges weren't as
smooth as I would like Carson
said.
In the 2ai-meter dash,McNeill
sprinted his way to another third
place victory with a time of 20.74
seconds. Just short of the NCAA
qualifying time, it was his best
time of the year in the event. Car-
son also thought that McNeill time
could have been faster.
"They (the event organizers)
decided to move the 200 up to two
events, so Gene had to run the 200
just 10 minutes after running the
relay Carson said. "He had no
time to cool down. He might have
won the event if he could have
rested
ECU also competed in the
James Madison Invitational, and
Ike Robinson placed third in both
the 100- and 200-meter dash
events. He had a time of 10.95 in
the 100 and 21.86 in the 200. The
Pirate relay teams placed fourth
in the 4 X 100 with a time of 41.50
and also placed fourth in the 4X
400 with a timeof 3:15:83. Hurdler
Brian Williams placed third in the
110-meter hurdles with a time of
15.20 seconds. Teammate Jeff
Shumake was sixth in the 400-
meter intermediate hurdles with
a time of 55.60 seconds.
The next outing for the Pirates
will be the prestigious Penn Re-
lavs in Philadelphia, Pa on April
28-29.
Pirate skiers take fifth in SEC tournament
The ECU ski team traveled to Senior captain Tommy Lewis
Georgia to participate in the SAC capped off a fine preformance for
Championships The team placed the team by taking second in the
fifth out of 12 schools falling to tricks division. Yates Perry had a
champion Alabama, runner-up personal best of 71 feet in the
Auburn, then Clemson and Geor- jumping, finishing in fifth place.
gia. Jackie Rollins placed second
in the slalom and tricks for the
iadies team. Rollins was accom-
panied by new team member Lynn
Miller, who also had a good out-
ing.
Lewis summed up the year in
the following way:
"The team had a great year.
We started to come around at the
end of the season, I just wish it
could have lasted longer. The team
looks great, and I hope they have
a good season next year '
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(

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
t
APRIL 25, 1989 15
MAYDAfc
FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY ONLY!
TAKEANHQOjQpp
E-X-T-R-A
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICES ON ENTIRE STOCK OF LADIES, MEN'S &
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GREENVILLE BUYERS MARKET GREENVILLE BUYERS MARKET
MEMORIAL DRIVE MEMORIAL DRIVE
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MEMORIAL DRIVE
ECU'S ace pitcher lohnathan Jenkins struck out 11 batters and went the distance as the Pirates
defeated VCU, 7-4 (Phot by Angela Pridgen, ECU Photo Lab).
Jenkins strikes out 11 in victory
B KRISTIN HALBERG
Stafl Writer
Jonathan Jenkins had 11
strikeouts in Saturday's game
against the Rams of Virginia Com
monwealth University to give
ECl the clincher they needed to
ill their out � : lhree-game
slump and split the ECU-VCU
�-came series at Harnneton
The Pirates won the battle 7-4
but lost against a hot-hitting, na-
tionally ranked VCU team Friday
14-7. VCU is a member of the Sun
Belt Conference and are the reign-
ing champions.
"We needed the big win
head coach Gary Overton said.
They wore ranked 2?rd coming
into this series. They are the best
team we've ever played
Friday's game proved to be a
field day tor the Rams. They had
13 base hits, three home runs.
including a grand slam by Eddie
Miner, 14 RBI and 22 total bases.
'All arc -av n highs by ECU op-
ponent South Carolina has also
hit three home rur. against the
Pirates earlier in the N.aon.
Heiner ended the game going
two tor five with five RR1 and
Adamknicek and fohnCallisboth
hit homeruns tor VCL. Ken
Qqgcrvhart came - t oi the bull
per. t( earn hi- second win for the
Rams in reUel 1 te is now 2-0.
But Saturdav's loss moves the
Rams to 23-� tor the ear while the
Pirates, m ho have lost the last five
out of six games, stand at 27
"They put pressure on usearly
and .Jonathan enkins blew us
away VCL . d coach. Tony
Guzzo said - ontrolled the
game mosl
Guzzo had previously been
an assistant coach tor the Pirates
under George Williamsand Monte
Little from 1976-78.
lenkins. who has a 1.32 earned
run average, has now won 10
games for the Pirates while only
recording one loss. "Tonight was
a big win'Jenkins said. "We were
in a slump and needed the vic-
torv. We just want to be hot going
into the tournament
The Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation tournament, scheduled
May 12-13. will be held in
Wilmington, .C. Tito Pirates,
who finished theCAA season with
a 12-3 record, will be seeded sec-
ond. L'C-Wilmington, who beat
the Pirates in extra innings last
weekend in the conference finale
to decide theCA A champions, will
be seeded first.
The Pirates scored first in the
game winner against the Rams
when John Thomas led off with a
base hit in the first innning. He
then stole second, went to third
when the catcher went to the out-
field, and scored on a passed ball.
SteveGodin added ECL'ssecond
run when he walked and stole
second. Chris Cauble then came
to the plate and bunted, but the
pitcher threw it away and Godin
was able to score. Cauble then
moved to third on a Mike An-
drews ground ball and scored on
a John Thomas ground ball to give
the Bucs a 3-0 lead early in the ball
game.
East Carolina's lead was chal-
lenged in the third inning when,
with one out and the bases loaded,
Tim Barker singled to score David
Ziara and Juan Serrano hit a sacri-
fice flv to drive in Daryl Howard.
VCU "had closed the ECU gap to
withmone at 3-2.
But the Pirates would add two
more to the scoreboard in the bot-
tom of the fifth. Thomas singled to
centerfield, then went to third on
a John Adams single. Adams
advanced to second on a Tommy
Eason ground out and Calvin
Brown was intentionally walked
to load the bases. John Gast hit a
single to score Thomas and Godin
hit a single to score Adams. The
Pirate lead opened once again to
3-2.
ECU added runs in the sixth
and eighth innings. Andrews
walked. went to second on a David
Ritchie bunt in the sixth inning,
advanced to third on a Thomas
ground out and scored on a wild
pitch. In the eighth, Godin scored
when he walked and was hit in on
a single to centerfield by Andrews.
The Rams tried to come back
in the ninth inning when they
added two runs to their score, but
it would not be enough as the
Pirates would win 7-4.
Bands This Summer
(To Name A Few)
4 Who Dared
Snatches of Pink
Blue Note Special
Mind Over Matter
Fariing-Stairs-
Badeaob & The
Rockin Horses
Mike Edwards
Banned
� , �
Jo Jo Ex-Mariner
Amateurs
Lightin' Wells
Modern Logic
The Big Kids
Roily Gray &
Sunfire
Jello
The Mood
For More Information Call 758-0080
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
11am 9pm llam-9pm 11am 2am Ham-lOpm llam-2am 12 -2am
CHOOSE A COMBO AND SAVE!
CHEESE CHOICE
Ai b s Cheese C hoke Combo features two of our delicious roast beet
sandvt iches, large fries and a medium soft drink at a special, low price
You ma) choose either our Beef n Cheddar topped with tangv cheddar
t heese sauce on a fresh onion roll, or the Philly Beef n Swiss with
n tasted peppers and onions. Swiss cheese and a fresh poppy seed bun.
Combined with crispy french fries and a soft drink, it's a meal with a
mone u ing dif terence'
Greenville Square
Shopping Center
Across from K-Mart
IRTC71RVED
CLASS RINGS
9:00 am -
Prices Siart at $84.96
Student Store
Wright Building
April 27lh and 28th 4:00 pm East Carolina University
Dale
C 1WUt jK.arcdH��ttir)p
rime
IMai
$20.00 Deposit Required
FREE!
SINGLE VISION LENSES IN ONE HOUR FROM GREENVILLE'S FINEST
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VaM only at Arbys in Greenville
Square Not valid with other offer
With Purchase of Frame
Rx up to or - 3.00 sph - 2.00 eyl
TINTS, OVERSIZE & SCRATCH RESISTANT-EXTRA
EXPRIES MAY 5, 1989AD MUST BE PRESENTED AT TIME OF PURCHASE
THE EXAM
We can make arrangements to
have your eyes examined by an
eye doctor ndjacent to Clear-Vue
today
Note We mrifl tiil any eye doctor's
presenpton
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
COUPON MUST M
�f Sf h'EO AT
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752-1446 TOLL FREE 800-343-8533
NEW
OFFICE HOURS
30 AM to 7 00 PM Mon -Fn
i at- Appointments
Available By Request







16
Tl E EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL25 IJ�9
IRATESNn. 1
Defeat UNC-W in final
ECU'S IRATE Ultimate Team
captured their third consecutive
UTA Collegiate Ultimate Sectional
Tournament Championship this
weekend in Winston-Salem. The
campus of Wake Forest Univer-
sity was the site of the 1RATES
victory over the held of collegiate
teams from NC and 'A. and was
the first step toward a third con-
secutive appearance in the colle-
giate nationals.
Even after their Scenic route"
tnp to Winston Salem on Friday
night, the 1 RATES were ready to
play on Saturday.The first contest
pitted the NC State Airwolves
agains the IRATES, and was an
easy victory, 15-5. Duke edged in
a point at 14-0. but could score no
more as the IRATFS romped 15-1.
The host team. Wake Forest, also
proved an unworthy opponent as
they fell to the IRATES 15-5.
After an uncharacteristically
calmSaturday night, the ECU men
arrived at the fields Sunday hun-
gry for victory. William and Marv
PurpleGold
Continued from page 14
came. Lewis said this was done to
even the teams and give the
coaches the chance to get alookal
Blake.
Blake showed the coaches a
lot on the drive as he went three
for four for 72 yards A big chunk
of that yardage came on a 58 yard
touchdown pass to Luke Fisher.
McGuinn's kick pulled the Purple
to within six, 20-14.
But Booker and the Cold
scjuad put it out of reach on their
very next possesion. Hooker car-
nod the ball six times and gained
29 vards, the last seven rounded
out theday'sscoring. Booker burst
around n;ht end and scored eiv-
ing the Gold a 2t-14 lead. Chuck
Komegav's kick made the final
score 27-14.
The game rounded out the
Pirate's pnng practice schedule,
one which Coach Lewis is rela-
tively pleased with. "We accom-
plished most of the things we
wantQtj � do-Eoj jthejriost par
we made satisfactory progres
Lewis said.
Lewis said that one of the
game's big positives is that it gives
the coaches a chance to evaluate
an individual plaver's perform-
ance. "It givesusa chance to evalu-
ate individual performances. It is
a verv positive part of spnng prac-
tice
Lewis did comment about one
problem that he has noticed
throughout the spnng and that is
the Tirate lack of depth. "Some
positions we feel good about the
talent, but some areas are more of
a concern than others. 1 think the
area of most concern would be the
defensive down linemen Lewis
said.
Firate fans were treated to a
team that should be exciting and
more wide-open in 1989. Although
the team does have some areas to
work on, Lewis and his coaches
seem pleased for the most part.
And according to Lewis, a key to
Saturday's game was the fact that
there were no significant injuries.
The two hour and 10 minute
game was just a showcase of some
of what the Pirate's have to offer
in 1989. With an incoming group
of talented freshmen, the Pirates
look to be a strong team in the year
to come. But for now, the Gold
team will continue to savor their
victory and the steaks they en-
joyed on Saturday night.
Pirates sweep
Continued from page 14
be at 6 p.m. All fans are encour-
aged to attended. Tickets are free
with an ECU student ID and $2.00
for all other fans.
quickly fell by a 15 4 score. The
IRATE victory sel up the team to
face arch-rival UNC-W s seamen
in the finals.
A strategic timeout called by
ECU with Wilmington ahead 6-2
sparked the IRATES on a come-
back that saw a 6-6 tie and an 8-7
Seamen lead at hah 1 he IR HES
stormed to three straight points
after the half and took a 10 8 lead.
But the Seamen came back to
tiethe match at 14 11m game that
is supposed to go to 15, but must
be won by two w ithout the score
surpassing 17, according t- for
matcontestTheIRA 1 ESprompl
scored the next tw o points to take
the game. Sectional Champion-
ship. o. 1 ranking in NC and Vir
ginia Collegiate I itimate and a
probable No. 1 ranking in the (
legiate Ultimate Regional Ibur-
nament (including teams from 1
Maryland, Pennsyivar Del
ware. New crse N and
Virenina) Ma � 1 R ' igh.
This tournament title was the
first step to a third straight colle
giate nationals tournament .
pearance for the IF 1 ES With a
12th place finish at Penn State in
1987 and a 5th place finish at UC
SantaBarbarainl988 thelRAI S
have their sights set higher tor this
year's National G jiateCham-
pionships to be hosh d by I C-
WilmingtonMemorial Day week-
end.
Tar Landing Seafood
A VAlj Or A MAt
Student Special
Shrimp Lover Feast
Boiled, Broiled. Fried & Steamed
Shrimp all on one plate.
Served with French Fries oi Baked Potato
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Banquet Facilities Available with this ad
ft.
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Sharky's
of Greenville
Daily Specials
Monday $2.25 Margarita's
Tuesday - $1.75
Bourbon
FAST COPIES
FOR FAST TIMES
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� open early, open late
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THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown St
Wednesday - $2.00 Kamikaze
Thursday - $1.00 Imports &
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free admission
Fridav $1.75 Highballs
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Present This Ad At Door For
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21 year old guests.
Located by Sports Pad on 5th Street
ENTER THROUGH ALLEY
WU don't want
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I just want
sc )metlling I
can count on.W
So what if there, are
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then write about it
in
rfie
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Ti ie right choice.
V





)
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 25,1989 17
J'

Men finish season by placing fifth in CAA's
JOBS
Last Thursday, April 20, the
men's tennis team traveled to An-
napolis, Maryland to compete in
the CAA championship tourna-
ment. Here East Carolina played
against William and Mary, Navy,
James Madison, Richmond, UNC-
W and George Mason. After a long
day of competition the Pirates
pulled fifth place.
Coach Bill Moore said, "The
team finished well, although it's
pretty much where we expected
to place. Over all our performance
was strong, with everyone play-
ing competitively
Moorecontinuedtosay'John
Hudson had a strong day beating
his opponent, a number one
ranked player. AndrcMoreau,and
our doubles team of David Shell
and Todd Sumner both won their
consolidation matches
Moore commented, "this has
been a frustrating season. Last
years program was undisciplined,
off the cuff, so the team had some
difficulty getting accustomed to
this years routine. Next year we're
expecting an even stronger pro-
gram
Moore is expecting some ca-
pable talent to be joining the team
next season with recruiting al-
ready beginning this month, two
strong players have already
signed, and many others are ex-
pected to follow.
Lewis press conference
Continued from page 14
and Lewis was impressed with
their abilities, saving that "each
quarterback had days that they
did well Lewis plans to treat the
quarterback just like any other
starter, and will replace him at
any time during the game.
"For 19 days Lewis said, "he
(Hunter) was our number one
quarterback. He was involved in
four scrimmages at number one,
came out of each at number one,
and he enters our preseason fall
camp in that capacirv
Defensively, Coach Lewis has
attempted to develop an attitude
for the team, an attitude of aggres-
sion. The key to the 1989 Pirate
football defense is the ability to
get 11 people that "want to "hit"
and get a "wave" o: people to go
to the ball when it is run or passed.
"About the fourth week, they
finally got the idea tlat we wanted
a wave going to thf ball Lewis
said. "You'vegot toave 11 people
going to the ball, playing hard and
with lots of emotioi and enthusi-
asm
The line currently consists of
Mike Applewhite, Jre Holms and
Greg Gardill. Holmes had an ex-
ceptional spring, worked hard
every day, and leirned the de-
fense very quickly- Applewhite is
a player that has "i great deal of
talent" and will ad the defense
tremendouslv. Ganiill is a little
"undersized" according to Lewis,
but that problem should be cor-
rected this summer �t the strength
complex. The depthon the line is
dangerouslv shallow, but Lewis is
expecting several payers to come
around in the fall.
The defensive ends, James
Singletary and Anthony Th-
ompson are expected to be very
solid in the fall and should have a
lot of foot speed. Singletary has
the capability to be a "big time
football player" and his spring
exemplified it. Thompson, once a
linebacker, has come on strong
and is expected to add a lot of
speed to the position.
Robert Jones, Ken Burnette
and Compton McCurry are all
fighting for the linebacker posi-
tions. Jones currently has an ankle
injury that has been persistent
through the spring practice.
Burnette and McCurry were both
rated at first place for the other
position.
The defensive backs are also
full of leadership. At free safety,
lunior Robinson currently holds
the top spot. The cornerbacks,
Ricky Torain (right) and Chris Hall
(left) currently have the top spot,
but both have work to do on tim-
;ng and coordination. The strong
safety position is still open be-
tween Brian McPhatter and Der-
rick Fields.
The kicking game remains the
big question for the Pirates. Punt-
ing apparently will be handled by
ohnJett,but place kickingisopen.
xv Honor of State Employee
yluareness Week,
Iprtt 23 thru 29, wz thank you
I ECU employees Jor your
t dedication, loyalty, antC
�faithfulness In the performance
� of your duties
SEEING District 97
Executive Committee
Student & Faculty Savings At
Overtoil's
Fresh Lean Extra Nice
Spare Ribs
5-7 lb. pkg.
H.49 lb-
Heavy Western
Sirloin Steaks
$2.29 ib.
Frosty Morn
Franks or Bacon
12 oz. pkg.
99
Ground Beef Patties
Ground Fresh Daily 3 lbs. or more
s1.39 ib.
Chicken Breasts
$1.79 ib.
Fresh Whole Pigs
79$ lb
Call by Thuraday iprU 27 by 5pm to place your order.
Heavy Western
T-Bone Steaks
$2.59 ib.
Natural Light Beer
$4.99
Carton of 12 12 oz. cans
Green Cabbage
12 ib.
Fresh Beef
Spare Ribs
99$ ib.
Bonele Whole
Top Sirloins
Cut Into Steaks free
$1.99 ib.
Richfood Eggs
Extra Large
79dozen
Golden Bananas
29
lb.
Coke-Coke Classic-Diet Coke
99
2 Liter BottleLimit 2
Bounty Paper Towels
Giant Roll
69
Richfood Charcoal
99'
10 lb. bag
East Carolina's location in the
Southern States and being close to
the coast is an attraction to future
tennis players with a stronger
program on the way, the only
problems facing the staff - is a
need for facilitiesand scholarships.
Coach Bill Moore hopes that with
the building of the new sports
complex, and the increased inter-
est in the tennis team, next year
will be a winning season.
At this time, Lewis said that in-
consistency was the cause for no
rue place kicker. Robb Imperato
.vill be handling the kickoffs.
Closing the meeting, Lewis
called this year's schedule "com-
petitive and challenging He also
stated that the team could not do
everything by themselves.
"ECU has a sense of spirit. We
want the first game to be a sell-
out, standing room only Lewis
said. "1 think we'll give them (the
fans) something that they will
want to come back and see again
SUMMER
Work Available .Days, Weeks
Weekly Pay .Visit Any Office
and inquire about opportunities
awaiting you at Manpower.
Listings:
�Typists �Warehouse
�Secretaries �Assembly
�WPData Entry �General
Industrial
�MANPOWER
TEMPORARY SERVICES
Raleigh. RTP. Cary Durham. Zebulon. Rocky Mount.
Greenville. Oxford. Chapel Hill. Fayetteville. and
Laurinburg
Advertise
ROYAL JEWELERS
ECU STUDENT
SPECIALS
First 25 ECU Students
with Student ID Will
kEceive your Choice of
�Free Watch Battery
or
�Free 14 Karat Gold
Chain Repair
(Herringbone & Serpentine Only)
Carolina East Center
(Beside Plitt Theatre)
756-8963
Today
With
The
East
Carolinian
757-6366
Call Today to Advertise tn our
Summer Issues!
Deadline For The First Issue is
Friday, Hay 12th
ftftJeep
to aca' tnVts- te
35ff,5J-5i-2S�a�
COLLEGE
GRADUATES
�ET AN ADDITIONAL
CASH
BACK
Clip and Save1
Richfood Su7ar7ibTbTgwith this coupon & $10.00 food order excluding
advertised specials99$
Without coupon$1.79. One Coupon per customer per order
Expire April 29. 1989
Apple Juice
Ketchup
Mayonnaise
Peanut Butter
Macaroni & Cheese
Pork-N-Beans
Frozen Orange Juice
Margarine
Richfood Brand Truckload Sale
12 gallon bottle
Quart
Quart Jar
18oz. Jar
7 oz. box
10 oz. can
12 oz. can
lb. pkg.
(BO� 'BJZJ&OUHl
Store Hours:
Open Sundays, 1pm - 6pm
Monday � Saturdays, 8am - 8pm
Prices Effective:
Wednesday, April 19 thru
Jeep
Eagle
355-7200
GREENVILLE. NC






)
18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ArRlLI5,1�S0
S.
.
&
s�
1l


II
thgtfc
Don't forget, at the end of the semester
UBE pays more tor textbooks. That's right,
UBE will buy back your textbooks and
you 11 leave with extra cash to spend over
the summer. So remember, The One For
The Cash is UBE.
The One For The largest Used Book
Inventory
Since UBE pays more for
your textbooks, wre have
the largest used book
inventory in the area.
And we also buy used
books from all over the country
so that means even more selec-
tion and savings. We also stock
new books on every subject imaginable.
Our access to so many books means
you save money. Just think, that means a
little something left over for a rt
night out, the apartment, the
dorm room or the bank account.
UBE is The One For The Books.
If

li
A
The One For ECU
While you buy your books at
UBE, make sure you browse
I through our large selection of
ECU apparrel and ECU items.
Choose from shirts and sweats to
backpacks and coffee mugs. As a
matter of fact, we
have the largest
selection of quality JL
sweat pants and
sweat shirts in
Greenville. And all at
great UBE prices.
UBE For ECU
So stop by UBE.
We re located in
downtown Greenville across from Chicos
restaurant. We re the one for the books
and so much more. Everyone meets at
UBE because we re the one for savings
and we re for ECU.
Regular Hours
9:00AM-5:30 PMM-F
10 AM -5:00 PM Saturday
Largest Select ion Of gr?
in
s
I I
516 Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville 758-2616





IMPORTANT DATE TO REMEMBER!
April 26, 1989
IBM PERSONAL SYSTEM2 FAIR
At
the ECU Bookstore (Snackbar)
from
8:30 AM TO 2:30 PM
Great discounts for students,
faculty and staff
Plus - the Bookstore is waiving the
delivery and support charges thru the 30th of April.
Immediate delivery while supply lasts
Drawing for 18 speed all terrain
bicycle at 2:30
Free popcorn!
See you there





System One:
� Model 30-286
12' Color Displas
80286 Processof I0MHZ
1MB Memorx
20 MB Hard Dm c
- 1 44 MB Diskette Drive
IBM Move
- VGA Graphics
6179147
IX )S 4 0
Microsoft W indjow v '2�h
Microsoft Word 4 0
hDC Windows Express
Svstem Two:
Model 50
12 Color Display
80286 Processor I0MHZ
1 MB Memor
30 MB Had Drive
1 44 MB Diskette Drive
IBM Mouse
VGA Graphics
6179148
DOS 4.0
Microsoft Windows286
Microsoft Word 4.0
Microsoft Hxcel
hDC Windows Uxprcss
System TKree:
Model 10 BS1
12' Color Displax
80386 Processor 16MH
2 MB Memorx
60 MB Hard Drive
1 44 MB Diskette Drive
IBM Mouse
- VGA Graphics
6179149
DOS 4.0
Microsoft W indows386
Microsoft Word v4.0
Microsoft Hxcel
hDC Windows Hxprcss
�S�(�N�a��$S!SSNvS
W
M 'srsMM tltUlta :�' i

w
Retail Price: $4,437
Sale Price:
Savings of:
Retail Price:
Sale Price:
Savings of:
Sale Price:
Savings of:
$2,399 3
$2,038
$5,372
$2,799
D
HECK
$2,573
Retail Price: $8,412
$4,449
D
Hf.CK
$3,963
Sub Total
No Delivery and Support Fees Tax
Through April 30,1989 Dd,eri.&SupponFee
o
See Mike Coston at
the Student Store
Grand Total





r?�"
r $5.99 SPECIAL!1!
Enjoy delicious 12" original pizza with one
topping and two cans of Coca Cola classic
for (Price includes tax.)
Iicipating stores only One coupon per piz2a
Not valid with any other offer
I
Name
Address
Phone
L united delivery area
SF9CS
I
r LATE-NIGHT SPECIAL 1
9 p.m. 'til closing
Enjoy any delicious 16" original pizza for the
same price as a 12" original pizza with the
same toppings.
At participating stores only One coupon per pizza
Not valid with any other offer
� . ; � �de name address phone number BEFORE driver arrives
Name Phone
I
Address
� . . lammo sPuza Inc Ou' dnverscarry lesstnanS20 Limited delivery area
SF9CS
I
I
I
J
Serving
Central Greenville
and ECU Campus
I btf-bbbl
1201 Charles Blvd
Serving East Greenville
752-6996
Rivergaie Shopping Center
Serving West Greenville
-���' 0 i" yi.
2405 W Dickinson Ave
Serving Ayden
and Winterville
746-4042
106 N. Lee St.
Hours
11 00am-1am Sun -Thurs
11:00am-2amFri. & Sat.
(Hours may vary from store to store)
feW





Title
The East Carolinian, April 25, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 25, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.674
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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