The East Carolinian, April 20, 1989






Editorial4
Classified6
Clearly Labeled Satire 12
Comics13
Bones goes barefoot through
the mall, avoids glass and Connells.
Check out page 10.
3P�3?$�
Dolphin fans will flock to
see the Zonk at this weekend's
Pigout Party.
Catch the action on page!4.
She i�ust (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. t3 No. 67
Thursday April 20, 1989
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Lecturer re-lives Iran hostage experience
By K1RSTIN' FAKES
Stif! Writer
s metal ricocheted through
the building, 1.eland Holland
closed his eyes and crouched on
the floor. It's gonna he another
Vietnam he thought.
The date was February 14.
1979 and Iranian rebel forces were
attacking the U.S. Embassy in
Tehran 1 lolland, who was the L$.
rmv Attache defended and
helped liberate the embassy. He
knew anti-American feelings were
strong after the Shah found exile
in the IS. What he expected was
that the problems would worsen.
The situation did worsen. On
November 4. 1979, Holland and
other embassy personnel were
taken hostage
Holland shared his 444-dav
ordeal oi being blindfolded and
having guns up to my head" with
guests at the ECU ROTC Military
Ball. Fridav. When the now re-
tired colonel stood on his tip toes
to reach the microphone he said:
tons fell off I demanded some-
thing to sew them on with' Hol-
land said. "The guards brought
me dental floss
"Then they took awav all our
Oh I'm used to it. Weshort people belts because one oi the guys had passed the test
feels if students stay awake in
their military classes they will
survive in terrorist situations.
Holland said: "You gotta remem-
ber to hold up your own end. 1
always get picked on. And Iran
wasnodifferent-theyused to slam
me against walls all the time
1 lolland continued his speech
with the use of a visual aid. Out of
a plastic bag he pulled the pair of
pants in which he was taken hos-
tage. 'These give my wife a little
heartburn he said. "It was two
years after 1 was released before
we took them out and cleaned
them. To me they're a novelty; to
a dagger in his. When you'reblind-
folded with your hands tied the
last thing you want to worrvabout
is keeping your pants up
"You have to understand
these terrorists Holland empha-
Holland will be involved in
an upcoming CBS television spe-
cial on terrorism. He will stress
"whenever you can gain an edge-
take it "Americans can hang
tough Holland said. "They Ira-
sized to the audience. "If they tell nian guards were damn glad tc
you to jump-jump. You don't pick
a fight with someone who's liable
to blow your brainsout he added.
Holland said the hardest thing
to deal with is the moment oi ter-
get rid of us. We terrorized them
Moslems are sensitive to
solitary confinement. There was on "re-
only one bathroom, though, and Although the hostages found
the'guards would not enter with vva's to communicate, they had
prisoners. "So they put a camera n0 way to send messages h me.
in there Holland'said and we "M' family knew 1 was alive be-
wouldsitonthethroneandwave. cause they saw me on T.V. at
"Then one time I mooned the home Holland said Then at
camera he added. The guards Christmas of 1979 a black Protes-
took the camera down, so the tant named Rev. Howard visited
hostages had a place to exchange the hostages. "I'd vote for him for
messages. President any day Holland said
These messages, in forms of "He handed me a card and said
knocking on the walls, were how 'You gotta pray The card was
thehostagesiound out Americans the first mail Holland's wife and
had died in a rescue attempt in
her a reminder of unpleasant ror "when the guard has a gun
times against your head and you are
pants, which Holland asked to sign an espionage form.
Sometimes you got tired to the
point where you'd sav pull it He
Tin
hich Holland
wore for 444 days, were mended
with dental floss. "When my but-
nudity and burping, according to April 1980. Holland said: "Three
Holland. "We had a sergeant who
could belch better than anyone in
Hollywood he said. "And we
would si t naked just to make them
angry
At one place the hostages
were held, each person was in
U.S. Army helicopters met in the
desert. One helicopter was ma-
neuvering and kicked up dust and
collided with another copter.
Meanwhile a fella selling black
market fuel fired, thinking we
were Iranians. So all three were
six children received
"If I had todo it all over again
I would have had a series of com
ments that meant I'm alive and
well Holland said. Holland
wishes they had had a secret code
for the State Department.
Holland said theStateDepart-
See IRAN, page 5
Vietnam Veterans remember Tet
Bv I ORI MARTIN"
Stiff V � ��
"Rockets were falling all
ad us, a: � -My buddies just
started dropping It's probably
the most helpless feeling I've ever
had in mv life former U.S. Air
� Sgt 1 larry Kelly 111 recalls.
Veterans Kelly and former
I .S Marine Corps Cpl. Don Lun-
degard constantly relive their
experiences in Vietnam as do most
of the survivors oi the war. The
Vietnam War has taken its toll on
the millions oi Americans who
have faced rejection and ridicule
since their return.
Kelly, who worked with top
secret military information, was
in Saigon during Tet Offensive, a
period oi the war in 1968 when a
temporary truce was declared in
order to observe a Buddist holi-
day. When the American troops
had relaxed theirdefensiveefforts,
the opposition launched a mas-
sive of tensive which some con-
sider to be the turning point of the
war.
Kelly recalls the night the Viet
Cong attacked Saigon during Tet:
"The night Charlie (Viet Cong)
hit, everything was pretty quiet.
They caught us with our pants
down. The chief-of-Staff of the Air
Force at Tan Son Nhut had or-
dered that we rip open our sand
bags and fill in our bunkers be-
cause they figured that Saigon was
secure. When they hit us with Tet,
we didn't have anywhere to go�
no line oi defense what-so-cver.
We started grabbing mattresses
and forming bunkers inside our
barracks
"Those of us in the Air Force
had no experience in ground
combat, and we had no protection
from the Armv because their
General Westmoreland had pulled
the troops out of Saigon Kelly
said the Viet Cong remained in
Tan Son Nhut until the Armv ar-
rived with tanks over a week after
the initial attack.
According to Kelly, his unit
secured its compound four weeks
after Tet began. "It seemed like
two yearsIt felt like forever he
said.
The war dealt Kelly a double
blow. While in Vietnam he re-
ceived a letter from his wife's
la wyer saying she wasleaving him
and taking their three year old
daughter. The letter advised Kelly
never to attempt to find them.
When Kelly returned from
See VIETNAM, page 2
Barefoot on the Mall '89 was a big success - a big crowd, great bands and it didn't snow! (Photo by
Gretchen Journigan � Photolab)
Student enrollment in the sciences declining
By DAVID HFRRIN'G
Assistant News Editor
By the year 2010, the United
States will have more than half a
million fewer people trained in
the fields of science, math and
technology than will be required
to fill jobs in those areas, accord-
ing to a presidential report.
Two years ago the Federal
Legislature mandated, bv law, a
study to determine the projected
situation in the L .S. with regard to
science, math and technology. In
September of '88 a presidential
task force published its report,
Changing America: The New Face
of Science and Fngineering, stat-
ing, "The percentage of young
Americans preparing for careers
in science and engineering has
been steadily declining.
"We must find ways to bring
many more young people � par-
ticularly those from underrepre-
sented groups into engineering
and science the report contin-
ued. Today, 47 percent oi the
people available to enter the work
force are white males, however.
by the year 2000 only 15 percent
will be white males � 85 percent
of the people entering the nation's
workforce will be women, minori-
ties and handicapped, according
to Dr. Charles Bland, chairman of
the ECU biology department.
"This is a critical factor be-
cause these are groups (women,
minorities and handicapped)
which typically don't go into sci-
ence, math and technology- re-
lated fields Bland stated. "To
accentuate the problem, in recent
international tests involving high
school seniors from 13 countries,
the U.S. students scored 13th in
biology and calculus; 12th in alge-
bra; 11 th in chemistry and geome-
try; and ninth n physics
The problems begin with ele-
mentary education, Bland said.
"According to a study done in
North Carolina, the subject ele-
mentary school teachers least like
to teach, and felt least prepared to
teach, is science he noted.
The departments of science,
math and technology plan to in-
crease activities in these areas
such asoutreach programs involv-
ing high school teachers � to
improve public awareness oi the
sciences. Steps are also being taken
to strengthen teaching and re-
search programs in the sciences,
math and technology at ECU, and
to facilitate efforts by faculty and
administrators to obtain increases
in funding in these disciplines.
Last week the science and
math departments sponsored an
"ExploringScieneeand Math Day"
in which 75 high school students
and their teachers attended. The
students were exposed to a vari-
ety oi specially selected, high-in-
terest areas of science and math.
Demonstration sessions in-
cluded: Microspace, Magic of
Chemistry, Scientific Glass Blow-
ing, Antimatter, Mathematical
Sciences Smorgasbord. You Are
What You Eat and Drink, Compu-
terized Genes, The Egg &I, Have
You Hugged Your Snake Todav
Test Tube Tobacco, Endangered
Estuaries and N C. Fossils.
The ECU sciencedepartments
are also taking steps to reverse the
negative trend by observing the
National Science and Technology
Awareness Week, April 23-29. On
April 26 the science departments
See SCIENCE, page 5
Comparison of Students in
Biology, Physics and Chemistry
5
o
C
O
c
O
is
4 �
6 �
8
10
12 �
Australia
Canada
� England
E Finland
? Hong Kong
� Hungary
H Italy
? Japan
E2 Norway
? Poland
� U.S.
? Singapore
? Sweden
Now don't blink This fly was photographed with a scanning electron microscope.





,4 1
!
Saia&dl�
Editorial4
Clearly Labeled Satire 12
Comics13
rmrmiimmimmmm�
�w
Bones goes barefoot through
the mall, avoids glass and Connclls.
Check out page 10.
������
Dolphin fans will flock to
see the Zonk at this weekend's
Pigout Party.
Catch the action on page 14.
Mt
(Eamltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 67
Thursday April 20,1989
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Lecturer re-lives Iran hostage experience
By KIRSTIN EAKES
Staff Writer
As metal ricocheted through
the building, Leland Holland
closed his eves and crouched on
having guns up to my head" with
guests at the ECU ROTC Military
Ball, Friday. When the now re-
tired colonel stood on his tip toes
to reach the microphone he said:
tons fell off I demanded some-
thing to sew them on with Hol-
land said. "The guards brought
me dental floss
'Then they took away all our
feels if students stay awake in solitary confinement. There was
their military classes they will only one bathroom, though, and
the floor. "It's gonna be another "Oh I'm used to it. We short people belts because one of the guys had passed the test
survive in terrorist situations.
Holland said: "You gotta remem-
ber to hold up your own end. 1
Vietnam he thought.
The date was February 14,
1979 and Iranian rebel forces were
attacking the U.S. Embassy in
Tehran. Holland, who was the U.S.
Armv Attache, defended and
helped liberate the embassv. He pants in which he was taken hos
always get picked on. And Iran adaggerinhis. Whenyou'reblind-
wasnodifferent-theyusedtoslam folded with your hands tied the
me against walls all the time last thingyou want to worry about
Holland continued his speech is keeping your pants up
with theuseof a visual aid. Outof "You have to understand
a plastic bag he pulled the pair of these terrorists Holland empha
Holland will be involved in
an upcoming CBS television spe-
cial on terrorism. He will stress
"whenever you can gain an edge-
take it "Americans can hang
the guards would not enter with
prisoners. "So they put a camera
in there Holland said and we
would sit on the throne and wave.
"Then one time I mooned the
camera he added. The guards
took the camera down, so the
on fire.
Although the hostages found
ways to communicate, they had
no way to send messages home.
"My family knew I was alive be-
cause they saw me on TV. at
home Holland said. Then at
Christmas of 1979 a black Protes-
tant named Rev. Howard visited
hostages had a place to exchange the hostages. "I'd vote for him for
messages. President any day Holland said.
These messages, in forms of He handed me a card and said,
knew anti-American feelings were
strong after the Shah found exile
in the U.S. What he expected was
that the problems would worsen.
The situation did worsen. On
November 4, 1979, Holland and
other embassv personnel were
taken hostage.
Holland shared his 444-day
ordeal of "being blindfolded and
tough Holland saidThey (Ira
sized to the audience. "If they tell nian guards were damn glad to knocking on the walls, were how 'You gotta pray The card was
you tojump-jump. You don't pick get rid of us. We terrorized them the hostages found out Americans the first mail Holland's wife and
a fight with someone who's liable Moslems are sensitive to had died in a rescue attempt in
to blow your brains out he added, nudity and burping, according to April 1980. Holland said: "Three
Holland said the hardest thing Holland. "We had a sergeant who U.S. Army helicopters met in the
to deal with is the moment of ter- could belch better than anyone in desert. One helicopter was ma-
her a reminder of unpleasant ror "when the guard has a gun Hollywood he said. "And we neuvering and kicked up dust and
times against your head and you are would sit naked just to make them collided with another copter.
asked to sign an espionage form, angry Meanwhile a fella selling black for the State Department
Sometimes you got tired to the At one place the hostages market fuel fired, thinking we Holland said the State Depart
tage. 'These give my wife a little
heartburn he said. "It was two
years after I was released before
we took them out and cleaned
them. To me they're a novelty; to
The pants, which Holland
wore for 444 davs, were mended
six children received.
"If I had to do it all over again
I would have had a series of com-
ments that meant I'm alive and
well Holland said. Holland
wishes thev had had a secret code
with dental floss. "When my but- point where you'd say pull it He were held, each person was in were Iranians
So all three were
33F
See IRAN, page 5
Vietnam Veterans remember Tet
Bv LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
'Rockets were
all
falling
around us, and my buddies just
started droppingIt's probably
the most helpless feeling I've ever
had in my life former U.S. Air
Force Sgt. Harry Kelly III recalls.
Veterans Kellv and former
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Don Lun-
degard constantly relive their
experiences in Vietnam as do most
oi the survivors of the war. The
Vietnam War has taken its toll on
the millions of Americans who
have faced rejection and ridicule
since their return.
Kelly, who worked with top
secret military information, was
in Saigon during Tet Offensive, a
period of the war in 1968 when a
temporary truce was declared in
order to observe a Buddist holi-
day. When the American troops
had relaxed theirdefensivcefforts,
the opposition launched a mas-
sive offensive which some con-
sider to be the turning point of the
war.
Kelly recalls the night the Viet
Cong attacked Saigon during Tet:
"The night Charlie (Viet Cong)
hit, everything was pretty quiet.
They caught us with our pants
down. The chief-of-staff of the Air
Force at Tan Son Nhut had or-
dered that we rip open our sand
bags and fill in our bunkers be-
cause they figured that Saigon was
secure. When they hit us with Tet,
we didn't have anywhere to go�
no line of defense what-so-ever.
We started grabbing mattresses
and forming bunkers inside our
barracks
"Those of us in the Air Force
had no experience in ground
combat, and we had no protection
from the Army because their
General Westmoreland had pulled
the troops out of Saigon Kelly
said the Viet Cong remained in
Tan Son Nhut until the Army ar-
rived with tanks over a week after
the initial attack.
According to Kelly, his unit
secured its compound four weeks
after Tet began. "It seemed like
two yearsIt felt like forever he
said.
The war dealt Kelly a double
blow. While in Vietnam he re-
ceived a letter from his wife's
lawyer saying she was lea ving him
and taking their three year old
daughter. The letter advised Kelly
never to attempt to find them.
When Kelly returned from
See VIETNAM, page 2
Barefoot on the Mall '89 was a big success
Gretchen Journigan � Photolab)
a big crowd, great bands and it didn't snow! (Photo by
Student enrollment in the sciences declining
By DAVID HERRING
Assistant News Editor
By the year 2010, the United
States will have more than half a
million fewer people trained in
the fields of science, math and
technology than will be required
to fill jobs in those areas, accord-
ing to a presidential report.
Two years ago the Federal
Legislature mandated, by law, a
study to determine the projected
situation in the U.S. with regard to
science, math and technology. In
September of '88 a presidential
task force published its report,
Changing America: The New Face
q( Science and Engineering, stat-
ing, "The percentage of young
Americans preparing for careers
in science and engineering has
been steadily declining.
"We must find ways to bring
many more young people � par-
ticularly those from undcrrepre-
sented groups � into engineering
and science the report contin-
ued. Today, 47 percent of the
people available to enter the work
force are white males, however,
by the year 2000 only 15 percent
will be white males � 85 percent
of the people entering the nation's
workforce will be women, minori-
ties and handicapped, according
to Dr. Charles Bland, chairman of
the ECU biology department.
"This is a critical factor be-
cause these are groups (women,
minorities and handicapped)
which typically don't go into sci-
ence, math and technology- re-
lated fields Bland stated. "To
accentuate the problem, in recent
international tests involving high
school seniors from 13 countries,
the U.S. students scored 13th in
biology and calculus; 12th in alge-
bra; 11 th in chemistry and geome-
try; and ninth in physics
The problems begin with ele-
mentary education, Bland said.
"According to a study done in
North Carolina, the subject ele-
mentary school teachers least like
to teach, and felt least prepared to
teach, is science he noted.
The departments of science,
math and technology plan to in-
crease activities in these areas �
suchasoutreachprogramsinvolv-
ing high school teachers � to
improve public awareness of the
sciences. Steps are also being taken
to strengthen teaching and re-
search programs in the sciences,
math and technology at ECU, and
to facilitate efforts by faculty and
administrators to obtain increases
in funding in these disciplines.
Last week the science and
math departments sponsored an
"Exploring Science and Math Day7'
in which 75 high school students
and their teachers attended. The
students were exposed to a vari-
ety of specially selected, high-in-
terest areas of science and math.
Demonstration sessions in-
cluded: Microspace, Magic of
Chemistry, Scientific Glass Blow-
ing, Antimatter, Mathematical
Sciences Smorgasbord, You Are
What You Eat and Drink, Compu-
terized Genes, The Egg &I, Have
You Hugged Your Snake Todav,
Test Tube Tobacco, Endangered
Estuaries and N.C. Fossils.
The ECU sciencedepartments
are also taking steps to reverse the
negative trend by observing the
National Science and Technology
Awareness Week, April 23-29. On
April 26 the science departments
See SCIENCE, page 5
�jjgpp iH �, '
"S'JJL'Jj rW 1
��� " Aj I
Comparison of Students in
Biology, Physics and Chemistry
Now don't blink This fly was photographed with a scanning electron microscope.
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Australia
Canada
England
0 Finland
? Hong Kong
� Hungary
M Italy
? Japan
E3 Norway
? Poland
� U.S.
? Singapore
Q Sweden







9
Tl L EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20, IIS)
Speech program to help correct stuttering
(
ByROBPEARSALL
Suit VVnlcr
Dr. Rich Shine, a professor
with the ECU Department of
Speech Language and Auditory
Pathology, introduced theCAFET
(Computer Assisted Fluency Es-
tablishment Training) for stutter-
ing at the National Stuttering
Project Meeting Wednesday eve-
ning.
"Stuttering is a handicap that
frustrates the stutter bv garbling
his efforts at communication
Shine said. "The National Stutter-
ing Project tNSP) is a self-help
group for individuals that stut-
ter
"The CAFET is the first com-
puterized fluency training proce-
dure for treating stuttering Shine
said, adding "by monitoring dia-
phragm breathing and focusing
on maintaining natural-sounding
speech patterns
"IT produces faster results
than traditional methods. Shine
said. "The CAFET extends short
term results into long term suc-
cess
"Stuttering is not a learned
behavior, neurosis, psychosis,
emotional problem or nervous
condition Shine said.
"Stuttering is a coordination
disorder Shine said. "Whenever
you speak it requires the use of
2(K1 muscles
"Individuals that stutter have
difficulty coordinating and inte-
grating their breathing, turning
their voice box on and off and
articulating speech sounds. In
order to speak the right hemi-
sphere controls rhythm and mel-
ody while the left hemisphere
controls the language. To speak
fluently, the left and right hemi-
sphere have to integrate he said.
"In the history of the world
there has never been a stutterer
who was not totally fluent when
singing Shine said. "When a
person sings they modify their
speaking pattern
"Mel Tilhs, Marilyn Monroe
and Bruce Willis are famous
people that have have a stuttering
problem Shine said.
Bill Kellam, who organized
the NSP for Washington, NC, said
"They tried to keep me out of the
Army for stuttering Armv offi
cials called in a doctor who made
Kellam read a rhythmic tongue
twister, "Peter Piper
"I read it with ease bet .his.� it
was iist like sinking The doctor
said there wasn't a thing vs
with my speech
The NSP will hold t
meeting on Wednesdav V 1
7:30 pm at The East ar
Speech and Hearing Clini
is better hearing and sp
month.
Read
Vietnam
f
Continued from page 1
When Kelly returned from
Vietnam in April of 19t8, he tried
to locate his daughter with no luck.
Then in 1981, with the help oi a
friend who had access to social
security information, he found her
living with her mother and step-
father in Oregon.
"I called her up at the high
school Kelly said. "Ilearned that
her mother had told her that I was
killed in Vietnam, and that's why
she didn't have a daddy
Kelly and his daughter were
reunited and she moved to North
Carolina. She lived with her fa-
ther until the time she went to
college.
In 1972 Kelly remarried, and
his second wife began to feel the
effects of the war. "There s no one
on thisearth that would have stood
bv me and gone through what
she's gone through he said.
"I've always had problems
sleeping he said. "1 had flash-
backs and 1 could hear the rockets
still coming in; I could still hear
the kids screaming; I could see the
guvs burning to death and pieces
oi bodies on the ground
C i. one oi his flashbacks
in his sleep, Kelly broke his wife's
jaw. "When 1 woke up, she was
laving beside me crying, and she
was all black and blue and she
was bleeding. I've never felt so
bad in mv life
After three suicide attempts,
Kelly is finally trying put his life
back together. Three years ago he
joined a rap group" at the Veter-
ans Center in Greenville. "It's
helped me learn to control the
anger and the hurt Kelly said.
A Look at
College
Prejudice
(CPS)�"Racism, sexism, vio-
lence, heightened conflicts be-
tween faculty and administrators,
poor living conditions in the dor-
mitories" are among the subjects
they expect students will cover,
Atwell said at the press confer-
ence announcing the study.
Students will probably grouse
about money, too, predicted Fred
Azcarate, president of the U.S.
Student Association, which rep-
resents student body presidents
in Washington, when he heard ot
the effort.
"We hear comments like, 1
can't afford (college), ' ' It's not
worth it anymore 'How am 1
going to pay them back,
Azcarate said.
"Some students he added,
"are facing the choice of making
their loan payment or buying food.
The only way to get education is
to get loaned up
Robert Hochstein of the Car-
negie Foundation guessed there'll
be other topics brought up, too:
fraternity excesses, fear of crime,
class section shortages and too
many courses taught by grad as-
sistants, among others.
"Colleges have gone from in
loco parentis' (meaning that col-
leges looked after students liter-
ally 'in place of the parent') to
'loco nothing Hochstein ob-
served in speculating why college
life might have come unhinged .
"Thereisachangingstudentbody;
alcohol, drugs
The study results will be pre-
sented to the ACE's januarv, 1990,
meeting.
After that, however, Hoch-
stein only hoped its results will
remain "visible
"It will represent a step to-
ward consciousness raising on
issues like racism and date rape,
as well as creating an awareness
of good practices on some cam-
puses. We hope it will stimulate
reform and improvement
Veteran Don Lundegard has
strong feelings regarding the
government's actions during the
Vietnam War. "The government
sent kids to fight but didn't back
them up he said.
Lundegard said the troops
were sent in and told not to make
any aggressive actions. The Viet
Cong could do anything and eve-
rything they wanted, and we had
our hands tied he said.
Like Kelly, Lundegard re-
members specific incidents from
his service in Vietnam. "We en-
countered 'sappiers' which are
suicide squads he said. 'They
would jump into our bunkers and
detonate themselves According
to Lundegard. the sappiers sot up
compounds identical to those ot
the United States troops in order
to practice their attacks.
"When I was in Quang Nam
Province, the North Vietnamese
ran into our camp Lundegard
recalled. 1 le said he knew he had
to kill them or be killed. "It was
really hard to fire the first round,
but I knew if 1 didn't they would
get behind me to the bunkers
Lundegard said he had never
killed any one before that nic,ht.
The following day his unit looked
at the dead bodies and realized
the sappiers had been teenaged
boys. "These 15 and lb year old
bovs were so drugged that they
didn't even feel the bullets. They
just kept running toward us even
after they had been shot
Upon returning to the United
States after his tour in Vietnam,
Lundegard's unit had to change
their destination at the last minute
to avoid predicted confrontations
with Vietnam protesters. "The
night before we returned home, a
MATS (Military Air Transport
System) flew a unit to Trevis Air
Force Base Lundegard said.
"Protesters threw human waste at
them and called them baby-kill-
ers
The actions of the war pro-
testers shocked Lundegard. "1
think the protesters had a right to
voice their opinions but not a right
to burn the American flag he
said. "The flag is a symbol of the
country�not the government
Lundegard said he never
again wants to see the United
States go to war without 100 per-
cent support from thegovemment.
"Thegovernment fought with halt
an effort he said. "The politi-
cians lost the war in Vietnam, not
the guys who fought
Hundreds of thousands ot
Vietnam veterans are still strug-
gling to overcome the effects of
the war, according to many oi
those who visited The Moving
Wall on the Greenville Town
Commons this week. The Ameri-
can public is finally beginning to
sympathize with their plight, and
these men and women are getting
the help and understanding they
have needed for so long, Lunde-
gard said.
The Moving Wall, which has
been on display on the Greenville
Town Commons since April 13,
has helped some of the veterans
confront their feelings about the
war.
"We've got to realize that the
war was just a segment in our
lives and not live for the past
Lundegard said. "So many vets
came back and tried to hold it
within. The wall allows Vietnam
vets to let out their emotions
"We can't bring the dead back
but what we can do is make sure,
God forbid, it never happens
again Lundegard said.
The East Carolinian
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Scott Makey I Keith Pea
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989 3
Schools lack services for disabled
EktPDEU
210 E. 5th St
Greenville, NC
919 752-1750
(CPS)�A Florida Atlantic
University freshman who has
cerebral palsy will be forced to
move out of his dorm this summer
if he can't find a roommate to help
him bathe, feed and clothe him-
self.
Fred Nisen says he has placed
ads "all over campus" with no
luck. His present roommate,
Douglas "Dutch" Mann, is gradu-
ating this spring. Nisen's compan-
ion would get free room and board,
but apparently that hasn't been
enough to lure qualified students.
"It's not a lot of work, but it's
enough to keep most students
away said Dee Davis, director of
FAU's Disabled Student Services.
"There are people willing to
do the job, but they can't get ac-
cepted into school Davis said.
Several FAU women nursing stu-
dents also are interested, but
housing regulations forbid "co-
habitation
But if no one else volunteers,
Davis said, she will push the
administration for an exception to
the cohabitation rule. "Let's face
it. It would be a hell of a prac-
ticum
If Nisen can't find a room-
mate , he will have to move back in
with hisparents, which says Davis,
is the "worst possibility" because
of the tremendous amount of time
and money that would be re-
quired.
Disabled students at other
campuses also are encountering
obstacles.
There's been a "shocking ero-
sion" in school services nation-
wide to handicapped and disad-
vantaged students, Mary Hat-
wood �Futrell of the National
Education Association (NE A) said
at a Washington, D.C press con-
ference April 4.
Futrell called for $10billion in
new federal spending for school
services for the handicapped, bi-
lingual education and for Pell
Grants for college students.
At North Carolina State Uni-
versity, two student groups plan
to blockade a pedestrian tunnel
during exam week the end of April
to protest the lack of a handi-
capped-accessible tunnel.
Protest organizers have given
the university until April 20 to
announce a construction date that
would provide at least one wheel-
chair accessible runnel by the 1990-
91 school year.
In a letter to the protest organ-
izers, NCSU Chancellor Bruce
Poulton said "I am committed to
work toward a barrier-free cam-
pus as budgetary guidelines per-
mit
MOVING AGAIN" 8RLE
EVERYTHING 20-75 OFF
Sale Starts April 3rd
Vintage clothing. Jewelry. Antiques. Furniture & Collectables
Mon-Sat 12-6pni
NEW LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED
A
Schools claim computer first
Clarkson U. offers software vending machines
(CPS)�Clarkson University
in New York say s it's the first cam-
pus in the country to offer stu-
dents "software vending ma-
chines
New this semester, the dis-
pensing machines actually are
microcomputers that can access
libraries of PC softword stored in
Clarkson's central computing
system. All software is written by
the university community, is dis-
tributed for sharing or is site-li-
censed to Clarkson.
Students can get to the cam-
pus phone directory, a course
registration program and software
needed for various classes on the
vending machines.
Clarkson � along with Ste-
vens Institute of Technology in
New Jersey � six years ago was
one of the first schools in the coun-
try to equip students with per-
sonal computers.
"I would say Clarkson stu-
dents are pretty well ahead of any
university our size, or even the
much bigger ones, in the way of
computers boasted junior Pete
Wargo.
Those are fighting words on
some campuses.
In late March, for example,
Northwest Missouri State Univer-
sity launched a publicity effort
claiming it is the first "electronic
campus" in the country. It has a
computer in every dorm room and
faculty office. The computers are
networked.
Arguments about which
school was the first true "com-
puter campus" may seem purely
academic, but colleges believe the
claims attract top-notch students.
Clarkson's computer system
"was definitely a big selling point
Wargo admitted.
Other computer "firsts" are
claimed by Drexel University in
Pennsylvania, which dubs itself
the first to require that all students
have personal access to a micro-
computer. The University of
Richmond in Virginia last year
hailed its application process �
which allows students to apply on
an IBM computer disk, eliminat-
ing the application fee � as the
first of its kind.
On March 29, Stanford gave
$400,000 to scientist Douglas
Engclbart, the first to invent the
computer mouse, for new re-
search.
"Anything that sets them
apart from their competition, sure,
they'll use said Laurie Robinson
of the American Association of
Collegiate Registrars and Admis-
sions Officers in Washington, D.C.
"College counselors are al-
ways looking for things to say that
make them unique and look
good agreed Frank Burtnett,
director of the Virginia-based
National Association of College
Admission Counselors. "But I
don't think it's important
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Memorial Drive
Americans polled on college athletics
(CPS)�Most Americans be-
lieve the colleges that regularly
field the best teams sneak illicit
payments to their athletes and fix
their athletes' grades in order to
keep them eligible to compete, a
Media General-Associated Press
poll found.
Fifty-four percent of the
people polled believed schools pay
their athletes in defiance of sports
rules that prohibit colleges from
giving their athletes anything
except scholarships.
The poll, conducted in mid-
March and released April 3, the
day the University of Michigan
nipped Seton Hall to win the
NCAA Division I basketball cham-
pionship in front of a worldwide
tv audience, also found that a
majority of Americans believed
colleges fix grades.
Get Ready For "HU1" Times
o-
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mmmmm
They'll have this card
in their hands.
Accept originals
only - no
photocopies.
Form He 1362
CLOTHES
Shorts - $2.95 (2 for $5��)
"T" Shirts - 98 and up
Short Sleeve Knit Shirts - $3.95 and up
Summer Skirts - $5.95 (2 for $10��)
Vests - $2.95 (2 for $5��)
Blouses & Tops - $3.95 (2 for $7��)
Tuxedo Jackets - $19.95
And If You Are Moving, Leaving, Or Need Cash
We Are Buying
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Electric Irons
Waffle Irons
Furniture (only if very nice)
Stereos
T.Vs
(Only Large ft Up ft Other
iliei If new or like new)
V.C.Rs
Nikon-Canon 35 MM
Clothing
10-5 Mon-Fri
10-3 Sat
The Coin & Ring Man
On the Corner Below Fizz
400 S. Evans Street
752-3866
Fa cry Sunday ll:(X)a.mr3:(K)p.m
The NewTaste
Of Greenville
JAZZ BRUNCH AT CHARLEOS
"Oh what ahrunchf
"And the five piece jazz land is
so enjoyable"
"You should see the spread-
there s tender carved beet fresh
seafood, pastas and fresh salads
()h. and those made-to-order
omelettes (nd crepes"
"There's such a selection of deli-
cious foods- and the deserts are
just fabulous"
"It sure is nice to have a satisfying
dining alternative"
Sundays at CHAULiAOs-
Knjoy the branch alon with a
touch of live jazz music from
Spiral 'loin us.
You' Pettoming Arls Se'es
s k:omd here
HIMU KM hW
X
HILTON INN
GREENVILLE
2()7 S.W Greenville lilvd Greenville. NC 27834 � Gm&ft&lOO





Bift East Qlarolinian
Smm ?i .�Af i a'dita immt iammtimtk'it'Kr I9?9
PETE FERNALD, GotJMmpt
Stephanie Folsom, MM(.n f
lAMES F.). MCKEE, Dmctorof AJctrUmnf
Tim H ampton, �. am- Brad Bannister, c &
Chris Siecel, s,w, W Jeff Parker s s
Q iip Carter, ��� e Tom Furr, ��. mm.
Susan hovvell, m. m Debbie Stevens, ���,
Dean Waters, c� m- Stephanie Emory m s�m�
Stephanie Singleton, oy m� Mac Clark, ����MMpr
April 20, 1989
OPINION
Page 4
Nuclear fusion
A chen.lstry professor rocked
the world's scientific community
recently when he held a press con-
ference claiming to have experimen-
tally conducted a nuclear-fusion
reaction in a glass flask.
After three decades oi experi-
ments, costing billions of dollars,
physicists have been unable to pro-
duce what Dr. B.Stanley Pons, chair-
man of the chemistry department at
the University of Utah, claims to
have produced in a freshman level
laboratory setting. "Now it ap-
pears he said, "that chemists have
come to the rescue
However, in any freshman sci-
ence laboratory class setting, stu-
dents are expected to have a thor-
ough understanding of all proce-
dures to be used and to compile the
obtained data into an easily under-
standable scientific journal format
before they are tested on the mate-
rial. Were Pons to have been tested
by his peers on his highly publi-
cized, if unorthodox, press confer-
ence according to freshman stan-
dards, he would have done poorly.
First, Pons was unable to re-
spond satisfactorily to in-depth
questions concerning his experi-
ment procedures, measurements
and results. For example, only now
are autopsies being conducted on
the palladium electrodes used for
the presence ot certain "daughter
products" which would be present
if this were actually a nuclear fusion
reaction.
One such daughter product, and
a distinguishing characteristic of a
deuterium fusion reaction s he-
lium, for which Pons totally ne-
glected to test. They also found a low
number of neutrons emitted, as
compared to what is expected.
Perhaps this is not a fusion reac-
tion after all; perhaps its simply a
good fuel cell. But if such were the
case, the same experiment should
work in plain water (H20), as well as
deuterium (D20) � also known as
heavy water. Yet, Pons also ne-
glected to conduct this test.
Fusion, the power source of the
sun, is the energy-releasing process
by which atoms from light elements
combine to form heavier elements.
Physicists have not been able to
duplicate this process economically
because more energy is required to
cause nuclear fusion than is released
by the reaction.
However, if Pons' claims were
true, then hydrogen-rich seawater
would become man's energy source
in the future � a virtually unlimited
one. One liter of deuterium could
supply enough energy to burn a
lightbulb for approximately one
year. He maintains that he receives
four times the amount of energy
from the reaction that goes into it.
Even if Pons' claims can be sub-
stantiated, his methods of releasing
his test results were questionable
and did little to endear him with his
colleagues. It is customary to release
ones' findings to a small group sci-
entists in the same field so that they
can duplicate the experiment and
verify ones' results. Pons failed to do
this.
It is standard practice among
scientists to release their publica-
tions in a creditable, well-respected
journal so that scientific information
is openly interchanged, and readily
available to the science community
so that the experiment is easily re-
produceable. Pons chose a little
known publication in Great Britain
to publish his papers and a big tele-
vision media splash to set it off � a
move that can only be perceived as
arrogance.
In short, before a scientist goes
public with experimental informa-
tion, it is mandatory that a compre-
hensive database be obtained on all
the systems involved. And it should
be expected that this database must
be thoroughly checked, repro-
duced, and verified by other scien-
tists. Pons' methods, so far, have
disallowed this.
Given his position at Utah and
his well-respected reputation in the
field of chemistry, Pons is obviously
very intelligent and understands the
impact such a discovery would have
on the public. Obtaining seven- or
eight-figure research grants would
suddenly become easy.
But, after all, Pons is an honor-
able man. Surely he would never
consider unethical behavior simply
to give chemistry � especially at the
University of Utah � a boost. Still,
one cannot help wondering.
A BUSINESS ETHICS COURSE?
HAH? WE KIDS NMSSCHOOL
ARE RESftWSlBlE WuNSfUGt
vafrUEEPASiuLi'Hi m
ETHICS COURSE!
ijfji1 mi �ii
Rower upset about Starkie article
To the editor:
Here we go again � The East
Carolinian loves to print articles
concerning racial issues. This paper
seems to promote racism of all kinds,
even issues not involving ECU stu-
dents.
The Tuesday article which ap-
peared on the front page of the The
East Carolinian entitled "Rower says
club practiced racism" was, in my
opinion, not news and it only served
as a plea for a non-Olympic rowing
hopeful Preston Starkie to obtain
sponsorship � if Mr. Starkie wanf s
to get sponsorship he shouldn't be
looking for it from a university pub-
lication (especially if he is not an ECU
student). It is my opinion that this
article was a waste of space and coin-
cidentally it appeared on the same
page that the SG A had announced its
approval for the ECU Rowing Club.
The article about Mr. Starkie not only
took glory from our achievement but
in addition added some controversy.
Tom Allan, mentioned in the
article as one person accused by Mr.
Starkie, is my coach and he does not
put up with people who don't abide
by the rules � whether they're black
or white! Coach Allan gave Mr.
Starkie an opportunity to row. If
there was any racial tension � he
wouldn't even have helped Mr.
Starkie in the first place. It seems to
me when someone had been given
numerous chances to cxcell, he or she i
would follow the set rules or guide-
lines. Well, it is obvious Mr. Starkie
did not follow the rules and in my
opinion he should have been re-
leased from the club. If I were to
disobey structured rules the Pamlico
Rowing Club would not have hesi-
tated in expelling me also, and I'm
white. So if the paper and Preston
Starkie want to turn Mr. Markie's
inability to follow rules into a racial
issue, they should think again.
Remember how this article ended �
"If the members decide to uphold
their decision, Starkie will be forced
to either relocate or find sponsors to
buy him a boat, fund his tavel and his
entry fees In my opinion this article
was a story a fable in fact, therefore
I feel that fables don't belong on the
front page of The East Carolinian.
Preston Starkie is arguing about a
racial issue so he can find someone
who will support his cause to pro-
mote sponsorship.
Forum
Rules
Andy Rosoff ,
ECU Rowing Captain
Senior
Broadcasting
The East Carolinian wel-
comes letters expressing all
points of view. Mail or drop
them by our office in the
Publications Building, across
from the entrance to Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verifica
tion, all letters must include
the name, major, classifica-
tion, address, phone num-
ber and the signature of the
author(s). Letters are limited
to 300 words or less, double-
spaced, typed or neatly
printed. All letters are sub
ject to editing for brevity
obscenity and libel, and no
personal attacks will be per-
mitted.
Students, tacultv and
� staff writing letters for thi
� pagearerwihdedthatthpy
are limited to one every two
weeks.
Offering the fruits of months of introspection
25fT
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Editorial Column!
Exposition:
Normally, this column would be
filled week after week with ha-
rangues against the intolerant and
the stupid. Instead, it's been dealing
mainly with "safe" items � the
Exxon spill, the Tower nomination,
and so on.
Every time I sit down to write a
column about something more seri-
ous, less transient, it never gets done.
I've been asking myself why.
It seems I've been indulging in
self-censorship. Strange as it may
seem, fear of criticism from the very
people I knew I would insult has kept
me silent.
So, rather than vilify Oliver
North, which was my original plan,
I've decided to get a bit more per-
sonal.
Nouement:
This column is about racism, and
it is written by a young white male. I
tell you this so that anyone who
wants to do so can go ahead and turn
the page.
Anyone still reading? Good.
Then we'll begin.
For the past few months, I've
been engaged in some soul-search-
ing. Is it true, as I've been told over
and over lately, that by virtue of the
fact that I am white and male and that
I live in the American South, I'm rac-
ist?
There was no question in my
mind that I feel no prejudice toward
most minorities � American Indi-
ans, Hispanics and such � but I've
heard so much about white-black
racism recently that I didn't feel that
I could be so sure about it. And so I set
myself to the task of considering just
my attitudes toward blacks.
I may be racist. Maybe. But I
know I'm not consciously so. If any-
thing, I go out of my way to ensure
that I don't treat any person differ-
ently because he's black. This, I find,
is self-defeating: in an attempt to
treat everyone the same, I end up
treating some people differently. I
know without a doubt now, though,
that I don't treat blacks worse.
However, because I've been
trying consciously to avoid being
racist, I'm getting rather annoyed
with those who keep insisting that 1
am. I've noticed that there's a bit of
reverse racism going on here: it is
stated that because I am white, I am
racist. This is as offensive to me, and
probably as unjustified, as saying
that because Jane Smith is black, it
follows that jane Smith is poor (or
lazy, or shiftless, or whatever).
Further, it is implied that any
denial that I am racist is evidence that
I am. This presumption of guilt is as
ridiculous today as it was in early
Salem. Then, you were a witch if you
said you were one, and you were a
witch if you said you weren't.
Don't blacks have a right to say
that they feel oppressed? Yes, they
do, and it's one of few rights I'd de-
fend to the death. Don't they have a
right to be free from prejudice? Yes,
they do, and it's another of the few
rights I'd defend to the death. Don't
they have a right � even an obliga-
tion � to speak out when they see a
wrong they think they should right?
Yes, and that's yet another right I'd
defend et cetera.
So whaf s my problem?
Climax:
I have mixed feelings about those
blacks who go to what I think are un-
reasonable extremes in pursuit of
their admirable goal of equality. I
refer to those who propose that in
matters of racism there should be a
presumption of guilt, that freedom of
speech should be restricted where it
offends sensibilities, that overreac-
tion is the only rational reaction to
racism in short, those who propose
to limit freedoms in a way that would
ultimately hurt more than help.
I fervently hope that these people
do not represent the views of blacks
in general. If they are not, this has not
been very much in evidence. Because
they have an obligation to stop ra-
cism, the more responsible blacks
should be speaking out against the
excesses of the few who are, if
unintentionally, destroying that
which they ostensibly support.
Denouement:
I feel less comfortable around
blacks now. I find myself avoiding
them lest I be accused of being racist
in my interactions with them. Far
from making me less racist, the cur-
rent ambience ot racial paranoia I is
perhaps made me more so.
The more distant a relationship
is, the more readily racial prejudi e
influences it. Friendships begin w
distance and grow closer; since I a
no longer comfortable forming even
the more distant types of relation-
ships with blacks, I'll probably i
form closer relationships with them
either.
I feel that I should do my pan to
stop racism. But it does not follow
that 1 must support anyone who
claims to be working against it. Don I
I, in fact, have a right even an
obligation � to speak out it 1 think
their methods are morally wrong?
I would have to be an idiot to
suggest that racism does not exist
and I like to think I'm not an idiot
And I can't fault anyone for wanting
to eliminate it � quite the contran, I
praise them. But extremism in the
defense of liberty is a vice.
Should the more fanatical anu-
racism groups have their wav, racial
equality will be established at the
price of freedom of expression it it
is established at all. More likely, the
dogged insistence that racial equality
must be assured at any cost, coupled
with the growing lnsensitn itv of the
extremists towards any views that
differ from their own, will succeed
only in further entrenching racist
attitudes.
Conclusion:
I'm still searching my soul, and 1
haven't yet come to any but the most
tentative conclusions. Valeria Las-
siter, a wise woman who is my
bodhisattva in these matters, assures
me that racism is predicated on fear,
insecurity and a general lack of
understanding, and that it is impor-
tant to understand why a person is a
racist � as she put it, "What brings
them to that point? 1 agree, but with
the added condition that even if a
person's attitudes are understand-
able, they are not necessarily justi-
fied.
I surmise, in sum, that what I've
said strikes a chord with others in my
position, and 1 hope that it clarifies
for blacks what most whites are feel-
ing (or what I hope they're feeling, at
any rate).
Here's hoping you're both
shaken and stirred.
I
V






AIDS cases to increase on
campuses around nation
(CrS)�"Significant num-
bers" of college students will be
suffering from AIDS in the 1990s,
the head of the American College
I lealth Association's AIDS task
force told a health conference in
Seattle the first week of April.
"This is not a potential prob-
lem on campuses Dr. Richard
keeling, who also heads the Uni-
versity of Virginia's health serv-
Iran
ices department, told a regional
meeting of doctors, nurses and
hospital administrators in Seattle.
"It's and established problem
About three out of every 1,000
collegians carry the HIV virus,
which causes AIDS (acquired
immune deficiency syndrome), a
preliminary Centers for Disease
Control report estimated last fall.
AIDS is a fatal disease that
Continued from page 1
breaks down the body's immune
system. It is often spread through
certain kinds of sexual contacts.
At that point. Keeling expects
campus health services to be over-
whelmed. "We're still in the in-
fancy of providing the range of
medical and psychological serv-
ices" needed to treat AIDS pa
tients.
rnent's performance in the hos-
tage crisis was disappointing.
' rhe v wouldn' t use force he said,
and they wouldn't send the Shah
Kk. 'We (the hostages! heard
tapes to the rebels which meant
well but were misunderstood
1 lolland said. "They would have
understood, Tou got 48 hours to
let them go or we'll blow your
damn oil field off the earth better
than In the name of humanity,
don't harm
One time Holland asked the
guards to take him outside. He
demanded to see 'the boss" and
told them: "You want your king
Shah back. I'll stay here. You let
the rest go
But the hostages were not
freed. Holland spent seven and 1
2 months in solitary confinement.
One place was a storeroom with
broken windows and bars. "I
remember a mama dove was
building her nest outside my
window Holland said, "and
everywhere they moved me after
that there were doves. It was like
a symbol
Science
Continued from page 1
a ill hold open housefrom4-6p.m.
ind refreshments will be served
in the Biology Building lobby.
Among its recommendations,
the presidential report cites the
goal: 'The Nation should adopt
the goal that all children born
today, from all backgrounds, have
a quality mathematics and science
education and the opportunity to
participate in the science and
engineering workforce to their
fullest potential.
The Nation should increase
the number and diversity of stu-
dents graduating in science and
engineering. By the year 2000 we
-hould produce enough profes-
sionals, including more from
underrepresented groups, to meet
the demand for faculty and indus-
try and Federal personnel
A child born today will be in
the sixth grade in the year 2000,
will graduate from high school in
2006 and from college in 2010.
"Thesechildren will live in a world
in which science and engineering
will be crucial to the workplace
and theeconomy according to
the presidential report. "Ignorance
of mathematics and science � or
fear of it � will hinder these chil-
dren as workers and citizens
In accordance with the up-
coming weeks events. Chancellor
Richard Eakin will make a public
statement concerning ECU's
committment to excellence in the
fields of science, math and tech-
nology.
"Once 1 spent three days in
the back of a truck, tied and blind-
folded Holland said. "Then I was
transferred to a dungeon with
bugs galore. At night I woke up
because something was crawling
across my face Holland killed it
and discovered in the morning it
was a three-inch cockroach.
Holland produced a small
plastic bag and proudly showed it
to the audience. Inside were sev-
eral huge Iranian cockroaches.
On this note, Holland ended
his speech and urged everyone to
read Tim Wclls's 444 Days The
Hostages Remember. "The press
really blew up some things after
we were released Holland said.
"This book tells the real story
Colonel Holland was
awarded the Defense Meritorious
Service Medal for the hostage
ordeal, and the Distinguished
Service Medal whichisthe Army's
highest peacetime award.
r
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989 5
Gordon's Golf & Ski Shop
for
FINE GOLF EQUIPMENT & APPAREL
Burton Nike
Footjoy Ping
Head Izod Spalding
Hogan Wilson
264 By-pass (Next to McDonald's)
756-1003
MALPASS
�MUFFLER
See US for all Your
Automotive Needs
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville. NC 27834
758-7676
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
752-0322
�DIAMONDS
�BICYCLES
�TELEVISIONS
�GUNS
�JEWELRY
�GUITARS
�DORM
REFRIGERATORS
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�VCRs
CORNER OF 10th & DICKINSON
GREENVILLE
Economy Mini Storage
USE YOUR STUDENT DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1 - AUGUST 31
300 Farmer Street 757-0373
Greenville, NC
STUDENT STORES
"One stop shop-ping at the heart of campus.
BOOKSTORE
Wright Building
Hours:
MonFri. 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Telelphone: 757-6731

' '
s
1
X.
SODA SHOP 1
Wright Building
Hours:
MonFri. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m
Telelphone: 757-6731
There May Be Prizes
In Your Textbooks
When you sell them for cosh
of a participating bookstore.
Bring your course books to the
bookstore at the end of the term
and sell them for cash. For each
book you sell, you'll receive a
sweepstakes game piece You'll
know immediately if you're a
winner. See participating bookstore
for details.
'While supplies last No purchase necessary to win
f,THE CROATAN"
Hours:
MonThurs. 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Fri. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.
Telephone: 757-6477
Look whot you could win,
� Volkswagen Cabriolets
� Hawaiian Vacations
�Tandy 1000 TX PC's
� Windjammer "Barefoot" Cruises
� 19 inch Color TV's
� 4'2 inch TVs with AM FM
Stereo & Cassette
� Seiko Wrist Watches
� Portable Radio Cassettes
.(over200W0 prizes)
� AM FM Stereo Clock Radios
� AM FM Portable Stereos
� Personal Stereo Cassette
Players
� LED. Watches
� Sport Wallets
� Soap Opera Challenge
Card Games
Windjammer
-T
EL
� �'�;
-A iVvVv.
UMVV���'�� �
4

ALOHA HAWAII LTD
i





1

THE EAST CAROLfNlAN
APRIL 20,1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
NEED TO SUBLEASE? Law students
interested in subleasing furnished apart-
ments for summer (Mav � August") Want
to make arrangements as soon as possible.
Call Bert Speicher at 355-3030
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath
towrthouse at Twin Oaks. Family man-
aged � S525 month. Fireplace, Appli-
ances, Paho, Pool Year's lease required
Opens August 15. in time for Fall semes-
ter Call 752-2851
APARTMENT AVAILABLE TO SUB-
LEASE; Beginning after Mav 8, 2 bed-
room, 1 12 bath Rent $370mon. plus
utilities. Close to campus Lease ends after
2nd summer school session For details
call 830-5138 � ask for Trish, Susan or
Tammy
STUDENTS WELCOMED! 4 months
seasonal rentals availalbe. Housing 4 to 12
students each. Call Seagate Realty 441-
3127.
LEAVING FOR THE SUMMER: Need to
find female roommateis) starting in Au-
gust If interested please call 830-6912 ask
for Carrie.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: First
summer session to share 3 bedroom
house, private bedroom, share bathroom
with one person, S175mo, 13 utilities
Call Pam 758-7142.
2 BR. 1 B. HOUSE: Available to sublease
for the summer. One block from campus,
please call 758-0061 for more information.
ROOM IN SEDCEF1ELD TOWNES:
Townhouses for sublet during the sum-
mer Must be a non-smoker If interested
or want more information contact 355-
9183.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER: Needed to
share 12 rent utilities in a 2 bed
Townhouse aprox. 2 miles from campus.
Call 756-77)7 or leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For Fall it
Spring of 39 & 90 � Oakmont Apts. � 2
br, big kitchen � 1 12 baths. Pool it
clubhouse Rent S160.00 a month. Call
752-2151.
ROOMMATE NEEDED Female Non-
smoker for Fall it Spnng of 89 & '90-
Oakmont Apts 2 Br, 11 2 bath. Pool. Rent
S160mo. Call Stephanie 758-9910.
HATE CLIMBING STAIRS? On May 5, a
first floor apartment with dishwasher,
central air & heat, laundry hookups is
available. 2 blocks from ECU and onlv
$230mo. Call Sarah at 756-7444 or 758-
9597.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom 1 12 bath
towrthouse available May 1st $325.00
mo.utilities. Call Julie from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. @ 551-2477 or lamie evenings @
758-1427.
LEAVING FOR SUMMER Need room
mate starting in May FURNISHED at Tar
River. ONLY 135mo, 12 utilities.
Please call Dan, 752-9235.
FEMALE, NON-SMOKER To rent 12
of a 2 bedroom apt at Kings Row. Mav,
June, Julv it Aug $157.50mo. Call Kim
758-4754
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share 2 bedroom apt. if possible for one
year. S150mo12 utilities. Spacious
rooms. If interested call Mike 830-0771.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3
bedroom 112 bath house located five
blocks from campus. Furnished with
Jacuzzi Hot Tub it all the Amenities. Call
Wiley 752-4614 after 7:00 p m 524-5790
days.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED. For summer school, fall, and
spring semesters. Two bedrooms, 112
bath at Tar River Estates. Will include
sharing cost of rent, utilities, phone and
cable. Call Jenna 758-2856.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: From
May 8 to Aug 1. $131 mo plus 13 utilities
at Tar River Estates. Washerdryer in
apartment and close to campus. If inter-
ested call 758-8801 anytime.
FEMALE ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED: 1
3 rent, 1 3 utilities private room 752-8197.
ROOM TO SUB-LEASE: For summer
May 6 � August 15. Wildwood Villas.
$100.00 a month 14 utilities. Furnished or
unfurnished. Details call 758-7727 ask for
Dave.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Entertainment Center to fit
dement. White, or Greene dorms. Very
spacious, includes shelves for a TV. large
refrigerator, books, etc. Call today! 758-
4507 Amy or Kathleen.
MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE: '85 Honda
Nighthawk 450 cc. Excellent condition,
low milageplus 2 helmets for only
$999.00 Call Kevin � 758-5667or 758-0710.
FOR SALE: 1972 Karmann Chia-Convert-
ab,83a COndihon $200� m Call Jay
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES
From $100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chevvs. Surplus, buvers Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S-1166
GOVERNMENT HOMES: From $1 00.
"U Repair Also tax delinquent property.
Call 805 644-9533 Ext. 1052 for info.
CAN YOU BUY: Jeeps, Cars, 4 X 4's seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
FOR SALE: Large dorm size refrigerator.
S100.00 or best offer. Gray carpet $60.00
Both only used for 9 months. Call 758-9204
and ask for Mich?Ue.
BED AND DRESSFR: Excellent condi-
tion � $100.00 RecUngin chair, S20.00 Call
Leslie 752-6219.
R.E.M. TICKETS FOR SALE: April 23 �
Charlotte. Call 758-7805.
NEED APARTMENT ACCESSORIES?
Going west sale � must sell everything
from plants to furniture to kitchen stuff.
Real cheap prices, call soon Tom. 830-
3822.
FOR SALE: Dresser $15 Kitchen table
$40, Bed $100. Prices are neg. Please call
752-2898.
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(Reside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage.
WORD PROCESSING Reports, Resu
mes, Laser Printing Rush jobs and reser-
vations accepted Call 752-1933 before 5
pm.
CATERING SERVICE AVAILABLE:
For private partv, senior show it gradu-
ation partv Make reservation in advance
Call Joe 757-1278.
NEED A BABYSITTER or someone to
clean vour house? I have experience in
both. Call Kim 758-4754.
FREE MAKEOVERS: Matrix Design
Team is coming to town If you would like
a FREE custom cut, color or perm give me
a call at 355-2666, ask for Rachelle Staz-
zone.
HELP WANTED
LIFE GUARDS AND RENTAL ATTEN-
DANTS NEEDED: Atlantic 3each area.
Memorial Day through Labor Day. Con-
tact Beach Bums Beach Service P O. Box
1342 Atlantic Beach, NC 28512.
HELP WANTED: 2 part-time positions
available for light secretarial work. Mon-
Fri and week-ends. Will work around
student schedule. Call 756-9876.
ATLANTIC BEACH SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT NEEDED: Bartenders,
Kitchen Personnel, Waitresses at the
newly remodeled Jolly Knave Restaurant
it Lounge. 726-8222.
HELP WANTED: Advertising Display
Assistant position available to creative
hard-working individual. Experience in
graphic arts and display background
desirable. Portfolio is required with inter-
view. Apply with Brady's Carolina East
Mall M-VV 12-4 or call 756-2224 for inter-
view appointment.
HELP WANTED: Female non-smoker to
assist with household duties in exchange
for room and board. Near ECU 757-1798.
HELP WANTED: Part-time help needed
with local Law firm. Need good commu-
nication & typing skills. Marketing or
communications major with interest in at-
tending law school preferred. Call Carla
756-6300.
COLLEGE STUDENTS: Wanted at Kitty
Hawk N.C Beach� live-in nannies.
Room and board plus salary. Plus oppor-
tunities to work in retail shop for extra
income References required. Call Kathv
Koplen 919-261-3546.
ATTENTION � HIRING: Government
jobs � your area. Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. SI 7 840 �
$69,485. Call 1-602-838-8885.
YOUR OWN BUSINESS Sell unique T-
shirts. Must Apply now for Fall '89 Call
Toll free 1-800-842-2336.
HELP WANTED Counselor needed
Residential Summer Camp for Adults and
Children with Autism. May 2lst through
July 22 Work and live on campsite in
Chapel Hill Area $130 00 per week. Call
Autism Society of NC @ 821-0859
.r YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT:
Looking for part-time employment, ned
a good solid respectable job to begin now
and continue through the summer7
Through Fall semester' And even throuth
graduation? Brodv's ami Brady's tor Men
are accepting applications for dedicated
conscientious people who show enthusi-
asm to be a part of a qualitv retail
envirnoment. Apply with Rrodv's Caro-
lina East Mall Mon. it Tues 12 � 4
PERSONALS
ATTENTION ECU: "Spring Break for
Children's Hospital" � The Eccentrics,
The Bash, it The Embers; at the Pitt
County Fairgrounds. Tickets onlv $5, ad-
vance; available ECU Central Ticket Of-
fice (Mendenhall) it all fraternities.
ALPHA PHI FORGET-ME-NOT BALL:
Dinner was an interesting sight, Michelle
screamed "big chicken" and ran track all
night. Traci's date's face was flat in his
plate, so she ran to Ellen to borrow a date
(two of them Ellen!) Megan's date was
clueless of her award, little did he know
there could be another man aboard.
Shortly after dinner, we move the scene to
the hall, where Shen and Mike had one
heck of a brawl! But the juicv part was
down the other end, cuz Scott West came
around the bend (shame on you!). So this
leads to the big ending, hev Sheri �
When's the wedding?! Thanks to every-
one for the wonderful memories' What'a
ball!
NO NEED TO DRIVE Buses running
from Mendenhall for "Spring Break for
Children's Hospital" � 3 bands on Sun
23rd. Get tickets now.
AMANDA, KRISTIN, MISSY: The 3
vagrants who have been the best room-
mates. Thanks for all the 'killer" times
and party fouls that were committed mv
senior semester. Be nice Fndav at Chi
Omega's Senior Burn Party Cramer.
WORTH: Had a great weekend in
Florence. Sorry 'bout the license plate
Was that you in Stuckevs Cooley.
ECU GREEKS: Onlv one more gig before
we leave for the summer; Sun 23rd 9 Pitt
Co. Fairgrounds � 3 bands only S5
ticket. Buses funning from Mendenhall.
Get tickets from anv 1FC fraternity.
BETAS: Our thoughts, wishes and
prayers are with you and Dave. Love the
Alpha Phis.
ZETA TAU ALPHA SOFTBALL
PLAYERS: Best of luck in the playoffs. We
know you will do a great job. Love, the
sisters and pledges of ZTA.
THETA CHI: Presents formal awards.
Chris J. gets the milli-vennili dance
award )enny and Jeff get the take the ham
and run award. Chris P. gets the I wanna
smoke award David R and date get the
stagger, stagger, roll, stagger, crawl
award. Allen M. gets the back-stabber
award Tim G gets the yo MTV raps dance
award Clayton W. gets the doo from hell
award. Porter G. gets the pig on the brain
award Tommv G. gets the you're the best
lookin thang here award. Last but not
least, Mitch E. gets the pancake, roll,
sugar, butter, sausage, bacon toss award.
REWARD OFFERED: If you witnessed
the car accident Saturday night of April
8th approximately 9 p.m. Please call
Kristie at 752-2616. This information is
vital for court purposes.
THETA CHI FORMAL: Was a success
because of the planning by Mitch and Tim,
so special thanks go out to you two as well
as the brothers, pledges and their classy
dates! It was a blast and we're lookin'
forward to next year!
GREEKS: The Pi Kapps would like to
thank the ones who came out to field day.
The rest of you missed a good time, but
next year will be a time to redeme your-
selves.
PI KAPPS: The playoffs are here and
exams are near let's do our best and show
we have no fear!
DEAR KATHY: I know it's too late to
change what's already been done. It
seems typical of me to do something in
haste and try to make amends later. What
I once thought would be easy to take I later
found too painful to accept. It wasn't fair
for me to try and hurt you because of my
inability to cope. You can never think less
of me, than I do of myself right now. I'm
sorry Not only have I lost you completely,
but your friends as well. If I had it to do
over again Well, you know the rest. I
only hope that someday you'll under-
stand what I was going through and for-
give me Unitl then take care. I Love You,
Ray.
NANCY CRABTREE: Congratulations
on your Phi Beta Lambda Award. Good
luck this summer Love, the sisters and
pledges of ZTA.
ZETA IS PROUD OF ITS LEADERS:
Deena Niewiadomski, Kelly Jones, and
Jane 1 luggins. Congratulations on 6mi-
cron Delta Kappa leadership Society.
PIKES: Gotta love it.
CHI OMEGA: Looking forward to an
exciting day of sun n' suds. Pikes.
CREEKS: Thanks to everyone who came
out and participated in Greek week. The
Pikes.
HAPPY HOUR: The Fizz 9 pm until
Drink specials, etc. Grab a picnic table and
soak it up. Pi Kappa Alpha.
COME TO THE ALPHA DELTA PI CAR
WASH: On Saturday, April 22 at the Pan
try on 10th street � onlv $2
AOPI'S: And their dates, two days adorn
your Hawiian clothes. It's not a rumor
everyone knows. Greenville won't matter
cause we're going to rock the nation
Why? you ask � It's an AOPi celebration
We girls know how to end the vear now
It's what we've been waiting for � The
1989 Luau! Bank on it!
LAST PARTY OF THE YEAR: Spnng
Break for Children's Hospital" 3 bands �
$5 advance, available in Mendenhall and
all fraternities �Sun 23rd, 12 till � Buses
running from Mendenhall
BAHAMA MAMA: Is coming Time to
party ECU If you party to hard to drive
away from the party, Ride will be
proveded. Have fun but be safe! Kappa
Sigma says Don't Drive Drunk
ACREDD: This is it � what you've been
waiting for Do you get high' Let's fly on
pilings, Cotty's Cooter Repair. Stais What
do ET it Z28s have in common, sweet
butterflys, I never, walk much, poot, pic-
tures, talk about others � never! Your
mama's best light, Myrtle Beach one cast-
later, neighbors, DC. � they are my sis-
ters, drunk phone calls, The Club, lank, J r
it Trolls, Da na da na na na na na �
tequila, who's bed am I in7 Swimming at
midnight, my pocketbook puppv, subtj
tion, roadtrips, you might find a rat under
those clothes, waking up earlv is fun,
steamrollers, all day hangovers, I'll hold
your hair back, candy cane� vou what
two buzzing babes, 1 broke a nail, I spv �
super sleuths, I don't remember that
Take care of my record contract, I'll mis;
you! Love ya bunches! H-head
ATTENTION ALL MAEGGUILLIC-
CUTTIES AND FRIENDS! In case
you've forgotten what todav is, here are a
few clue 82088 � Soccer had invas-
sion, Jenn's B-day, our window and banis-
ter will never be the same. 92088 � "I
never did it with a . toothbrush " 1020
88 � A 6:30 a.m. partv still going strong.
112088 � Frankister � Your B-day?
You buy! 12088 � Plaved suck-n blow
LIGHT, BRIGHT, FUN
JEWELRY
By Dale Jenssen
n
355-2426 Ait Gallery & F.ne Crafts
690 Arlington Village
Mon-Frl
10-5pm
Sat
11-4pm
PAINTERS NEEDED
This Summer at ECU
May 15 through July 31
Call Now:
757-6167
Diamonds - Jewelry - TV's -
VCR's - Watches - Guns -
Musical Instruments
BILLS
Wc Buy Sell, & Trade
PAWN SHOP
Strictly Confidential Transactions'
INSTANT CASH I PANS
480 N. Greene Street
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)830-6828
ABORTION
"Personal, and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call f.r i pj:ointment Mon. thru Sat Low
Cost TnuuHon to 20 weeks of pregnancy
cssn
1-800-433-2930
for hours Boa fight before and after pic
lure 52088 � Blank � face, may
Micky, "You must perform themaegguil
Ikcuttie dance upon request 42088 �
Yes, that's right, it's another 20th' We
expect you to drink vour share See vou
tonight1 � Love the girls in No 5
This Summer at
The East Carolinian
we're working on
our "Bylines
as well as our
"Tan Lines"
Now Accepting Applications!
(2nd Moor Puhlfc aaons Hldg
!at rnss from Jovr.cr Library)
SUMMER JOBS
$1200MO SALARY!
Spend your summer In VA
BEACH turn your summer
into a rewarding experience'
CARRIBEAN TRIPS!
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM!
VA. BEACH
(804) 499-4123
ECU BUSES
Will Not Be Running
Alter 4:50 pm
This Thursday,
April 20th
(Buses will not be
returning to Menden-
hall after 4:50)
Buses wiU resume
their normal schedule
Friday, April 21st.
Hey Art Majors
& Creative
Individuals!
Interested in
experience fit building
that portfolio?
The East Carolinian is
looking for Communication
Arts Majors for
help in the
Advertising Department.
Apply in Person
(2nd Floor Publications Bldg.
(across from Jeyncr Library!
No Phone Calls Please
GRADUATE RN
Manufacturer of Specialty
Beds has a full-time career
uppottunily.iu the Greenville
area for a qualified RNVC5RN
Product knowledge andor
?ales experience helpful. On
Call Flexibility a Must. Ex-
cellent benefit package.
Please send resume to :
District Sales Manager
6260 Frankford Ave.
Baltimore, Maryland
21206
PIRATES LANDING
remco east, inc.
MVM p � Box 6026
� � Grecnvllc, NC 27834
919-758 6061
REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change lease, sad discounts for AprU rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet one bedroom furnished apartments,
energy efficient, free water and sewer, optional wash-
era, dryers, cable TV. Couples or singles only. $215 a
month. 6 month lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couple or singles, apartments and.mobile homes in
Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club. Con-
tact J.T. or Tommy Williams.
756-7815
Announcements
NATIONAL STUDENT EX-
CHANGE
How would you like to spend a semester
or two at a brother or sisters house at one
S3 universities? Swap a brother or sister!
Call Stephanie at 757-6769. National Stu-
dent Exchange
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOSE
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7 00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you And hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God
Every Fri. night at 700 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
OB
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every I uesday at p.m. in Rawl 13U.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 pm. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 am to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
ECU NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 730-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
ments served. No ticket required; Just
reserve your time
SEASON TICKETS
Season tickets for the 1989-90 Performing
Arts Series at ECU are now on sale. This
outstanding season includes ITZHAK
PERLMAN, THE N.C. DANCE THE-
ATRE, SHALON '90, THE CANNES
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with RAN-
SOM WILSON, THE N.C.
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, CARMEN
sung in English, DREAM GIRLS and
much more, Patrons are cautioned that
initial season ticket sales are brisk. Al-
though individual event tickets will go on
�ale 3 weeks prior to each event, it is
highly possible that the series will sell out
In season sells. Don't miss out on the best
Performing Arts Series, order your tickets
today. Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC, 757-6611, Ext. 266.
BICJKILIS
If your life has been affected, past or pres-
ent, by having been raised in a home or
environment where alcoholic and other
dysfunctional behaviors were present.
Here's Something You Should Know'
Each Tues. at 4:30, in rm. 312 of the Coun-
seling Center, there is a discussion and
learning group meeting for those with
common concerns. Newcomers are en-
couraged to come at 4:15. Call 757-6793 for
additional info.
'
I
y





f
i
Summer Qreeze
Vol. l.No. 1
A Laboratory Production of Journalism 3200
April 1989
Sororities rush to fall rush
By Kelly Boyle
There is a change in the way
ihat sorority rush will be held in the
upcoming fall semester, according to
panheUenk president Barbara Lamb.
Instead of conducting rush
activities during the first week of the
new semester, women interested in
pledging a sorority as well as
sorority members will have to return
to school a week early for rush.
Rush will be held Aug. 19-23, with
classes starting Aug. 23.
According to Miss Lamb, rush
takes approximately four to five
hours a day for rushees and seven to
ten hours a day for the sorority
women. The svstem used in the
past caused a lot of conflicts with
night classes, class assignments and
jobs. "Rush before school will
allow both rushees and Greek
women to have more time to prepare
and enjoy rush Miss Lamb said.
This system will help new
students at East Carolina who are
interested in going through sorority
rush to better adjust because they
will not have to worry about at-
tending to juggle classes their first
week in college and a busy week of
rush.
Another positive aspect of this
new system is that it will weed out
the girls who are not seriously
interested in pledging a sorority.
This is the first year that East
Carolina will be using this system
so the turn-out may be low. Miss
Lamb seems to think that this may
be beneficial to the Greek system
right now because at the rate many
sororities are growing, (a few are
numbering close to or over 100
members now), most sororities can
afford one small rush.
Many larger universities have
this pre-school rush and it has been
very successful. It was inevitable
that East Carolina would have to
move to this system sooner or later
because of the growth in its Greek
system and according to Miss Lamb,
this is a good time to do it.
There has been a mixed reaction
among sorority women about this
new system. Many members feel
that it cuts into their summer
vacation too much because they not
only have to come back a week early
for the rush activities, they must
also be here a week before the
activities begin to participate in in-
dividual sorority rush workshops.
Kathy Melnick, a member of
Alpha Xi Delta sorority, is not
happy with this new procedure. She
said, "In my opinion, it is not fair
to require us to come back to school
two weeks early from our summer
vacation to participate in rush when
I think that it worked just fine when
wc did it the first week of school
Elizabeth Moore, a member of
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority dis-
agrees. She said: "I think that
moving rush to before school starts
is a good idea. It will take a lot of
pressure off of us and the rushees. I
remember going through rush and
being loo excited and too tired to
want to even think about school as-
signments when I got done and I got
really behind in all of my classes the
first week of school
Many potential rushees attended
a Convocation ceremony on April 3
in Wright Auditorium to familiarize
themselves a little more with
sorority life at East Carolina
University. All of the sororities,
which will be holding rush in the
fall, contributed slides of many
special events and everyday fun for
the enjoyment of all.
Whether this change is a good
idea or not is yet to be seen, but
come August when the girls start
pouring back into town and ex-
citement is in the air, many girls
may realize that it docs not really
make a difference as long as their
rush is a successful one.
Few exceptions available
for meal plan In summer
a
� ���
k �� -�- -m �� � ���- �� ' � J i AlftV ! -rf - - m
Mandatory meal plan at Mendenhall. Good or bad idea?
(Photo by Patty Anderson)
By Beth Bass
Eating at ECU will take a
different twist during the 1989
sessions of summer school.
All students desiring on-campus
housing will participate in the
combined room and board
program. "There will be no
exceptions for regular students
except in some situations con-
cerning handicapped students
said Carolyn Fulghum, assis-
tant vice chancellor and direc-
tor of housing.
The University Dining
Program will operate in
Mendenhall Student Center
through a declining balance cash
card with a $100 minimum to
be paid per term. This required
fee will be paid in addition to
the regular tuition and room
rent.
The Declining Balance Plan
is a cash card providing each
patron complete control of his
account as to where, when and
how much is spent on meal
purchases. The price of each
meal eaten is deducted from the
balance in the account by means
of a card reader. After each
transaction, the balance remain-
ing in the account is displayed
on the card reader for customer
information. Meal cards for
summer school students must
be obtained from the Vali-Dine
office on the first floor of
Mendenhall.
The $100 required deposit
is a minimum amount and is
not designed to totally meet the
dining needs of a student for
five and one-half weeks of
school. All additional deposits
must be made to the Vali-Dine
office in Mendenhall in $25 in-
crements. The $100 required
deposit is nonrefundable and
cannot be carried over to the
second term; however, any
additional deposits can be carried
over to be fully utilized during
summer school.
Dining services at ECU are
managed by Canteen Company.
Current plans call for the new
400 seat dining hall and snack
bar being added to Mendenhall
to be operational in time for
summer school. This will en-
able dining services to operate
both the "all you can eat" din-
ing hall and the a la carte snack
bar during the summer terms.
According to Dean Ful-
ghum, over the last two or three
summers, it has been a losing
proposition to offer dining ser-
vices. "If students pay the
money, they will use the facil-
ity. I feel, however, the stu-
dents will be quite pleased with
the new services Dean
Fulghum said.
The primary reason for the
installation of this dining pro-
gram is to enable the Food Ser-
vices a chance to correct any
problems such as traffic flow or
machinery malfunctions before
the fall semester.
Students are to remember
that this particular program will
only be in effect during the
summer school sessions.
"Eventually, a similar system
may be in effect, but the pro-
cess of incorporating this type
of meal plan will be filtered in
over a period of years Dean
Fulghum said.
Any questions concerning
the summer school dining pro-
gram can be directed to Frank
Salamon, director of dining
services or to Janice Ellis, ad-
ministrative and Vali-Dine
coordinator at 757-6382.
Interest in teaching
on the rise; but still
short of demand
By Clejetter Pickett
Freshman interest in teaching
careers has increased by more than
two-thirds since 1982. In the fall of
1987, 8.1 percent of students
entering college planned to pursue
careers as elementary or secondary
school teachers, up from 7.3 percent
in 1986 and the low of 4.7
percent in 1982. This is according
to the 22nd annual survey of
entering freshmen conducted jointly
by UCLA's Higher Education
Research Institute and the American
Council of Education.
Although the interest in
teaching careers is increasing it still
falls short of the projected demand
and is far below the all-time high
recorded in 1968 when 23.5 percent
of the entering freshmen (and 37.5
percent of freshmen women)
expressed an interest in the teaching
profession.
Although the interest in
education careers is encouraging the
1987 data suggest potential
problems with future supplies of
certain technology and health career
professions. The interest in nursing
careers fell by more than half in four
years.
Engineering and technology
continue to show sharp declines:
freshman interest in engineering fell
by more than a fourth since 1982,
while preference for computing
careers declined by more than two-
thirds during the same periods.
In 1987, nearly equal
proportions of men and women hope
to become physicians (3.6 percent
for men and 3.3 percent for women.)
This is a big change from past
years. In 1977, 3.9 percent of the
freshman men and 2.5 percent of the
freshman women hoped to become
physicians, compared to 6.4 percent
of the men and only 1.3 percent of
the women in 1967.
There are more women now
interested in engineering and
computing than 10 years ago. The
recent declines in tresnman interested
in these careers occurs among both
sexes.
As one may have guessed,
business continues to attract more
students. The most preferred among
college freshmen, business, reached
another all-time high in fall 1987.
The rising popularity of busineess
among freshmen is in part due to the
growing number of women who
plan to pursue business careers.
New
places
for
new
faces
By Mike Geraci
East Carolina University is
growing. Student enrollment in-
creases each year and construction on
campus is booming.
As students return to classes
next fall there will be two new
facilities finished and ready for use:
the Sports Medicine and Physical
Education building, next to Minges
Coliseum, and an addition to the
Mendenhall Student Center.
Directors of the construction
say the projects will definitely be
open and ready for use by the begin-
ning of the Fall '89 semester.
The three-level addition to the
Mendenhall Student Union will add
needed open space, offices and a new
cafeteria.
The basement of the addition
will have a party room and a larger
multi-purpose room to be used for
such things as blood drives. The
Minority Student Organization of-
fices along with the offices for
black fraternities and sororities will
be housed in the basement also.
The university's radio station,
WZMB, will move its broadcasting
equipment, control room and offices
to the basement and will have the
media board's photo lab as a neigh-
bor. Room has also been made for
the food service to store their sup-
plies.
The main floor will feature a
400 seal cafeteria and snack bar ca-
pable of serving 1,000 people at
lunch and dinner. Offices for the
managers will also be located on
this floor.
The third floor will have 11 of-
fices to be used by the student gov-
ernment and other groups. A grate
room twice the size of the multi-
purpose room will be there accom-
panied by another multi-purpose
room.
If all stays on schedule the
building will be furnished in April
and in business by fall.
Fall at East Carolina means
football, and when the 1989 season
kicks-off the Pirates will have a new
home, The Sports Medicine and
Physical Education Building.
This 82,095 square foot addition
to the athletic department will house
almost every aspect of sports needed
for a competitive program.
The Pirate Football team will
have its lockers moved in along
with the coaches and their offices.
Men and women basketball teams
also will move their offices into the
building.
The Sports Information De-
partment plans to follow suit and
transfer its offices into the spa-
cious building along with the ad-
ministrative offices of the athletic
department.
A new human performance lab-
oratory will be stationed in the
complex. The new lab will offer fit-
ness, blood, oxygen and stress test-
ing facilities to student athletes,
students and the community.
The Sports Medicine Depart-
ment will move into the complex
and establish what directors call one
of the finest programs in the coun-
try.
Doctor and dental offices,
rehabilitation and therapeutic
facilities and hydro-therapy
equipment will be housed there.
Sports Medicine students will
attend classes in a 208 seat audito-
rium . To complete the facility, a
new strength center will be added
saving athletes the trip down Evans
Street.
Directors say the facility is
scheduled to open July 1.
Teenagers to
camp at ECL
An addition to Menenhall Student Center is one of the major
construction projects taking place on campus. (Photo by
Patty Anderson)
By Jill Conti
Hundreds of young people are
scheduled to invade the East
Carolina University campus this
summer.
There are approximately 23
camps being held at ECU, ranging
from athletics to academics. ECU
does not sponsor all of these. Some
are established by separate organiza-
tions, but ECU is involved in at
least an administrative position.
Almost all of the campers will re-
side on College Hill and West
Campus.
June 25-July 8, approximately
125 high school students
exceptional in science and mathe-
matics will participate in Summer
Ventures. Students attend classes,
travel on weekend trips, and partici-
pate in recreational activities. This
is the only camp that allows stu-
dents to do research at the ECU
Medical School.
June 18-June 27, close to 150
young people ranging from grades
8 through 12 will attend the
Legislators' School for Youth
Development. These students
attends classes on communication
skills, leadership training and
enviromental affairs. They also
travel to listen to the North Carolina
legislators, and they take a weekend
camping trip.
250 students on July 16-July 28
in grades 7 through 10 will attend
the ECU Science Camp. These
academically gifted young people are
offered classes in computers,
photography, astronomy, chemistry,
ecology and geology. The
instructional curriculum is based on
expressed interests of each student.
Recreation is offered as well as an
evening lecture series.
Other camps include the North
Carolina Suzuki Workshop on June
9-14. Choral and keyboard camps
are being offered June 18-24.
Softball and basketball camps for
males and females will be June 18-
July 20. A cheerleading camp will
take place June 27-June 30.
Six orientation sessions for
incoming freshmen will begin June
11. These three-day sessions will
consist of placement testing, college
life discussions and some recre-
ational time. For the second year
now, parents will be able to attend
subsequent sessions at the same
time as their children. They will at-
tend discussions on financial aid,
residence life, intramural services
and the counseling center. The par-
ents and students are kept separated
throughout the three days.
The camps offered at ECU
during the summer allow students
the chance to spend a few weeks
living in a college atmosphere.
So ECU summer school
students beware. There will be lots
of smaller students on campus this
summer living in the dorms, eating
cafeteria food, and having a great
time.






4?
features
Summer Breeze April 1989 Page 2
� . . x ���'� - V'�
A radio, sunglasses and suntan oil are among the essential items needed for those who are
set on getting that serious summer tan. But many sun worshippers are now thinking twice
before spending hours in the sun. (Photo by Patty Anderson)
UV rays harmful
Tanning is summer sickness
Bv Lvnn Jovner
Summer is in the air and many
of you will be heading to the beach,
your own backyard, or a tanning bed
to work on a healthy-looking tan.
As you have probably heard before,
the glorious bronzed look may not
be so "healthy" after all.
Each year about 300,000 new
cases of skin cancer are reported.
More than 90 percent of the cases
are believed to be caused by overex-
posure to ultraviolet rays which
come from the sun or tanning beds.
Doctors had formerly believed that
only older people who had spent
years in the sun could develop skin
cancer, but recently an increasing
number of people in their twenties
have suffered from the same disease.
Another risk from this overexposure
is premature aging of the skin.
Sunlight does have some bene-
ficial effects. A moderate amount ol
sun helps clear up mild cases of
acne; lowers blood pressure; pro-
motes high energy and endurance,
utilizes the body's Vitamin D and
maintains biological rhythms and
the secretion of hormones.
If you plan to be in the outside
sunlight, here arc some hints to
protect your skin. Choose an SPF
(Sun Protection Factor) sunscreen
that is right for you. Even if you
alreads have a tan, you still need to
protect your skin. If you are fair-
skinned and burn easily use an SPF
of 8-15; if you tan gradually and
burn some use an SPF of 4-8; if
you tan easily and usually never
burn use an SPF of 2-4. Be sure to
reapply the lotion often, especially
after swimming or perspiring.
Your risk of sunburn is greater
when affected by these factors: if
you are exposed to sunlight between
the hours of 11 a.m. and 2 p.m if
you are taking certain drugs such as
antibiotics, oral contraceptives, sul-
Stay cool with movies
5ummer greeze
Copy Editors
Layout Artists
Editor
Assignment Editor
Graphics Editor
Chief Photographer
Kirstin Eakes
Lynn Joyner
Patty Anderson
Beth Bass
Hamilton Holloway
Tracie Clark
Davin Jackson
Caroline Kendrick
Constance Ward
Jim Hoy
Elizabeth Moore
Kelly Boyle
Key Writers
Faculty Adviser
Clejetter;
Jill Conti
Lisa Pittman
Tracye Larkin
Mike Geraci
Brenda Sane
Summer Breeze is a laboratory exercise by students in Journalism 320C
presented are those of the individual writers and in no way reflect views or"
Journalism Program, the Department of English or East Carolina University
fonamides, antipsychotics, diuretics
or some antihistamincs; and if you
are near water or sand. Be sure to
protect your eyes from cataracts by
wearing effective sunglasses and to
protect your lips from sunburn with
an SPF emolient of 15 or higher.
If you are planning to use a
tanning bed, it is important to know
that this method is not necessarily
any safer than the sun. Mary
Flesha-Adams of Student Health
Service said: "Some people think
tanning beds are better, but the
complications are the same.
Problems that result are due to
overexposure in the sun or tanning
beds
The difference between tanning
by the sun and tanning by beds in-
volves the amount and types of ul-
traviolet radiation found in each.
Two types of ultraviolet rays found
in sunlight are UVA and UVB.
UVA radiation is 1,000 times less
effective in causing burns than UVB
radiation. Most sunlamps give off
mostly either UVA or UVB rays.
Some sunlamps give off as much as
10 times more UVA rays than the
sun.
In order to protect users against
many of the hazards of indoor tan-
ning, the FDA sets certain regula-
tions on the tanning bed industry.
The FDA requires that manufactur-
ers follow standards for technical
performance, labeling (including in-
structions and warnings to the user)
and testing to see if the products
comply with the set requirements.
Some guidelines to follow
when using a tanning bed are re-
move contact lenses; wear the pro-
vided eye goggles; cover skin areas
not normally exposed to sunlight for
half the tune during the first tanning
session; very gradually increa c j our
lime spent in the tanning bed; and
be aware that the same medicaii
that cause skin sensitivity in sun
light will also cause sensitivity in
the tanning bed.
Using these suggestions you
can work your way to a safer tan
But if you do happen to gel a nast)
burn, some ways to ease the pain are
take a cool bath mixed uith three
teaspoons of baking soda; take as
pirin lo minimize pain and swelling
and use rich lotions to repla.
moisture loss
More information on safci tan-
ning and free hollies of SPF 4 sun
tan lotion are available at the
Student Health Service.
So while you are building youi
way to a golden tan be sure to
protect your skin.
By Patty Anderson
Greenville has a lot going for it
in the summer, but just not enough
to fill those long, dog days of
summer; so we escape to the cool,
dark movie theater or to our handy
VCR's.
This coming summer seems to
be the summer for sequels at the
theaters.
Trekkies should be thrilled at
the release of Star Trek V. Let's
hope movie lovers and Trekkies will
not be disappointed in another
chapter of this never-ending space
saga.
Action-adventure fans will
receive their share of films next
summer also. The movie studios
are releasing "Robocop II" and
"Indiana Jones and the Last
Crusade the second sequel to
"Raiders of the Lost Ark
People looking for a good laugh
might find it in the long awaited
sequel to "Ghostbusters
"Ghostbusters H" retains most of the
original cast including Bill Murray,
Dan Aykroyd and Sigourney
Weaver.
Movie-goers not happy with the
offering of sequels might iry ihe
"Batman" movie. Recent previews
for the movie have proved extremely
popular among audiences. The cast
includes Michael Keaton as Batman
and Jack Nicholson as the evil
Joker.
Those who cannot afford the
soaring prices of theater tickets
might turn to video stores. There is
an excellent selection of movies for
summer viewing.
Shelves are well stocked with
recent action releases. One of ihe
choices is "The Presidio" with Sean
Connery and Mark Harmon. Even
though it did not do well at theaters,
it is popular with renters. It
involves a brutal murder at a
military compound which the two
men are paired together to solve.
Another action movie popular
with video renters is "Shoot to
Kill Sidney Poitier plays an FBI
agent sent to the Pacific Northwest
to find an escaped murderer. He
enlists the aid of an expert tracker
played by Tom Berengcr.
Comedy lovers will enjoy a
great variety this summer. It you
haven't seen "Big this summer is
the time to rent it.
A slightly older movie to rent
is "The Natural" with Robert
Redford, Glen Close and Kim
Basinger. The cinematography in
this baseball movie is spectacular.
Redford plays an older player
returning to the game after a
shooting incident had ended his
career earlier in his life.
Romantics will find ihe rece
video release "Two Mcxm Junct
to be a very erotic adult drama.
In ihe movie, a very steamy
romance develops between a carnival
worker and an uppercrust Southern
debutante. The loner, played by
well-built Richard Tyson and the
beautiful debutante played by
Sherilyn Fenn come together in
some very explosive scenes.
The plot is unoriginal, but just
looking ai Tyson and Fenn and all
the beautiful scenery make this a
video to rent on one of those sultry
nights in Greenville.
Enjoy a movie this summer.
Greenville summer
getaways cheap,
easy and nearby
By Lynn Joyner
It's summer again and time to
pack a suitcase and head out for va-
cationing fun. But most college
students on a budget cannot afford
that costly cruise to Mexico or a
European holiday. Never fear be-
cause plenty of nearby, affordable
summer escapes are available.
The first place that may come
to mind for a summer vacation is
the beach, and North Carolina has
plenty of golden sand and ocean
waves to offer. The closest beach to
Greenville is Atlantic Beach, which
is less than two hours away. After
sunning here for a few hours, you
may want to visit Fort Macon, the
Civil War Fort surveyed by Robert
E. Lee in the early 1830s. Within
the Fort is a museum commemorat-
ing Civil War battles. Before leav-
ing Atlantic Beach be sure to stop at
nearby Beaufort, the third oldest
Employment Security Commission
Assistance available for
difficult job search task
By Beth Bass
Trying to find a job is often a
troublesome task. Pounding the
pavements to find openings, filling
oui applications and being inter-
viewed are just a few of the more
time-consuming processes of seek-
ing employment. Furthermore,
there always seems to be more
prospective job seekers than avail-
able openings.
Employment often seems to be
even harder to find during the sum-
mer months. Young people are
anxious to earn extra money and
wiih school's hassles behind them,
they are the primary candidates for
summer jobs.
The Employment Security
Commission offers a helpful service
to those persons seeking summer
employment opportunities. To Like
full advantage of this service,
prospective workers should first
register with the ESC. This regis-
tration involves making an ap-
pointment with the agency during
which the seeking worker provides
his age, interests, education and any
other pertinent information.
According to Placement Supervisor
Bill Pate, the appointments enable
the ESC to match the worker with
an available job as soon as possible.
The Odds System is another
way the employment agency finds
jobs for interested persons. This
process allows the ESC to match
worker's qualifications with job
openings as they become available.
The commission is also cur-
rently working with ECU lo form a
job placement system with the Co-
operative Education Program. In
this system, ESC representatives
would be in the Co-Op oiiic on
ECU's campus two days a week in
order for students to register with
them. Representatives would be
on campus on a year-round basis,
including ihe summer months.
town in North Carolina (1709).
Some of the town's 18th century
homes are open for tours. The
Beaufort waterfront harbor is home
to beautiful yachts and some fine
restaurants and shops.
Moving further down the coast
are several more beaches - Emerald
Isle, Surf City, Topsail Beach,
Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach
and Myrtle Beach. A special attrac-
tion in Wilmington, near
Wrightsville Beach, is the USS
North Carolina Battleship
Memorial. The World War II ship
earned 15 batUestars and participated
in every major naval offensive in the
Pacific Ocean.
To the north of and about three
hours from Greenville is one of
North Carolina's favorite beaches,
Nags Head Major attractions in the
Outer Banks area include the Wright
Brothers Memorial at Kill Devil
Hills and, on Roanoke Island, The
Among the day and week-
end getaways accessible
to ECU students on a
budget are the mountains
in the western part of the
state. (Photo by Caroline
Kendrick)
Lost Colony, which is America's
oldest outdoor drama.
Farther north in our neighbor-
ing state of Virginia is Virginia
Beach and the charming waterfront
cities of Norfolk and Hampton.
Another popular Virginia tourist at-
traction is Colonial Williamsburg, a
town that makes you feel like you
are walking through 18th century
America. Its cobblestone streets are
lined with rows of colorful flowers
and berry bushes. The shopkeepers
are dressed in colonial attire.
Also in Williamsburg is the
theme park Busch Gardens, "The Old
Country where you can imagine
you are in Europe for a day. The
park has more than 30 rides and a
variety of live entertainment all
suited to the particular "country"
you are visiting. Another popular
fun park is Kings Dominion, located
in Virginia's capitol, Richmond.
This park resembles Busch Gardens
but without the European flavor.
If you are looking for a change
of pace from summer heat and hu-
midity, you may want to head west
to the breathtaking mountains of
North Carolina. Here, you will find
thousands of acres of parkland filled
with the colors of summer. Nestled
in this part of the state is the city of
Asheville, home to the incredible
Biltmore Estate. Built for George
Vanderbilt, this house took 1000
workers five years to build. The
house was formally opened in 1895
and was recognized as the mosi
spectacular mansion in America.
The estate consists of a 250-room
chateau, gardens and a winery.
Other fun places to visit while
in the mountains are the Cherokee
Indian Reservation in Cherokee,
Tweetsie Railroad (a wild west
theme park) in Blowing Rock and
Ghost Town (an old western saloon
town park) in Maggie Valley.
So hop in your car and have an
exciting, fun-filled summer.






i
entertainment
Summer Breeze April 1989 Page 3
smokin Students get in super shape this summer
Summer
Theatre
Hv Kirstin Eakes
Fast Carolina University's
' IcGinnis Theatre will be smokin'
lias summer as star performers heat
up the stage.
Famous actors and
ictresses, along with university
students and staff, will form the
.its ot four summer theatre
productions. Gary Faircloth, head of
ihe ECU summer theatre said,
"We've talked to someone from
i A 's 'Young and the Restless' but
parts haven't been chosen yet
The shows, which are all in
July are: the musical "Pump Boys
and Dinettes July 3-8; Tennessee
Williams' "Summer and Smoke
iulv 10-15; "Foxfire July 17-22;
Mass Appeal July 24-29.
Tickets will go on sale
tcmnning June 19. The musical
, osis SI5. the other shows cost SI2.
Reason tickets are S35 for Monday
night performances and 540 for
Tuesday through Saturday nights.
All evening shows are at 8:15.
Wednesday and Saturday matinee
tickets are also available for 2:15
shows: SI2 for the musical and S10
for the plays.
In the summer, the theatre
is self-supporting so students do not
eel a discount.
ECU Bar
By Lynn Joyner
Summer is almost here and it's
time to retrieve those packed-away
shorts and swimsuits for the warmer
weather. If you feel that your body
is not quite ready for the skimpier
clothes of the season, there is a co-
ed Greenville health club that can
help get you into shape for the
coming months.
One good choice is the Spa, lo-
cated at Southpark Shopping Center.
It has approximately 1,000 members
with 50 percent men and 50 percent
women. The average age of mem-
bers ranges from 20 to 40. The Spa
is open Mondays through Thursdays
from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m Fridays from
7 a.m. to 7 p.m Saturdays from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 1
p.m. to 5 p.m.
The Spa has machine weights
and free weights, seven types of ex-
ercise classes, a sauna, a stcamroom,
a whirlpool, a tanning bed, a nurs-
ery, lockers and a bath area. A nu-
tritionist and masseuse are also
available by appointment.
This club offers free and ma-
chine weights, four types of exercise
classes, a basketball and volleyball
gym, eight racquetball courts, a car-
diovascular center, an indoor running
track, an outdoor swimming pool, a
nursery, a sauna, a steamroom and
Jacuzzi, a bath area, lockers, a tan-
ning bed, a pro shop, a juice bar and
lounge. A masseuse and fitness
consultants are availaole by ap-
pointment only.
The exercise classes are offered
an average of 60 limes each week
and include high-intensity aerobics,
low-impact aerobics, toning and
children's rhythm and movement.
The exercise instructors have had
special training in teaching. Heart
rates are checked four times during
each aerobic session. Other types of
classes are offered at certain times
during the year such as "Stop
Smoking" and "Managing Stress
The club's cardiovascular center
monitors heart rates on exercise ma-
chines such as Stairmaster and
Liferower and are used mainly for
heart and lung workouts.
The seven types of exercise
classes are offered 50 times a week
and include low-impact aerobics,
high-impact aerobics, choice-impact
aerobics, aerobics rush (for more ad-
vanced members), advanced toning,
abdominalflexibility and supraclass
(advanced toning plus aerobics).
Owner James Stallings said pulse
rates are checked periodically in each
aerobics class because The Spa
"treats evervone as if they are at a
coronary risk All aerobics
instructors arc CPR certified, and the
aerobics floor is made of floating
wood which helps to cut down on
joint injuries.
The Spa belongs to the
International Physical Fitness
Association (IPFA) and the
American Health Association (AHA)
which means the memberships are
transferable to other health clubs
that belong to these two organiza-
lions. For example, if a member
moves from Greenville to another
town that has a health club that is a
member of the organizations, he or
she can transfer the membership to
that club. The organizations have
approximately 3,000 members na-
tionally with other clubs such as
Living Well, Spa Lady and Holiday
Health and Fitness. Stallings
pointed out that members can also
use the other clubs for a small guest
fee if they are traveling, "If you are
on the road, you don't have to stop
your fitness program
Stallings said The Spa is bene-
ficial to members because: "Here
we try to find out what the person
wants to accomplish and then
monitor his progress. We keep a
chart on him and evaluate every two
weeks to 30 days his weight loss or
weight gain or toning or whatever
his goal is
Whether you need to get your
body in shape or keep your body in
shape, this nearby health club
should be able to help you reach
your goal. A regular fitness
program can make you look and feel
better about yourself. So start the
summer with a healthy and
trim new you.
Festivals add diversity
Review
The Greenville Athletic Club is another of the many health and
fitness clubs in the area where you can go to lose those few extra
pounds before bathing suit time. (Photo by Kelly Boyle)
Hv Kelly Boyle
After a rough day of summer
hool classes and laying out, what
do students at East Carolina do to
unwind? They go downtown!
There are a variety of bars in
Jowntown Greenville to suit almost
everyone's taste.
Here is an urxiate on the down-
�own scene for those of you who
have been watching television every
weekend this semester and for those
i f you who are looking for a change
of scene and don't know where to
go.
To begin the night of partying,
many students like to start off early,
somewhere a little mellow and laid
hack Two favorite early hangouts
are Chico's and Fizz. Both of these
bars feature live music on selected
Acekends and tables where you can
sit down, relax and enjoy a drink
with friends before a hard night of
partying begins.
If the mellow atmosphere does
not suit you and it is dancing that
vou are interested in, the Elbo and
Rafters are two good choices. Both
of these clubs allow 18-year-olds to
enter, but at the Elbo you mtfst be a
member or a guest. Both clubs have
.i large dance floor and plenty of
room to mix and mingle while
scoping out the opposite sex and
listening to your favorite tunes.
Live bands are what some stu-
ients prefer and Greenville can sat-
isfy that preference too. The Attic,
The New Del! and Susie's Treehouse
are some of the bars you can go to
to hear bands. The Attic is ranked
as one of the top rock and roll clubs
in the Southeast and for good rea-
son. Every Thursday through
Sunday, they host a wide variety of
bands ranging from The Chairmen
of the Board , The Usuals,
Nantucket and Rolling Stones and
Led Zeppilin tribute bands. In addi-
tion, the Attic has the Comedy Zone
every Wednesday night.
Other popular hang-outs are
Grog's, with their Sunday night
SI.00 imported beer, O'Rockefellers
and their SI.10, 30 ounce draft beer
and then there is the old stand-bv,
Pantana Bob's.
The new kid on the block in
downtown Greenville is Sharkey's.
It is located where the Tequila bar
used to be, (for those of you who
have been here that long), right next
to The Sport's Pad, (which, by the
way, is the place to go to drink
long-neck beers and play cheap
pool). Sharkey's offers a selection
of 12 imported beers and wine
coolers to satisfy anyone's taste.
Sharkey's is a private club for
members and their guests, over 21
years of age.
By Beth Bass
Festivals are almost a way of
life in North Carolina. However,
they come out in full force during
the spring and summer months.
Across the state, a large
variety of festivals take place, such
as Fayetteville's Dogwood Festival.
One of the more recognized mid-
April festivals is the Azalea Festival
in Wilmington which includes a
street fair.
The fair features more than 100
arts and crafts booths, food booths
and commercial booths. In addition,
an Azalea queen is crowned. Enter-
tainment for all ages is provided in
the form of bands and dance groups.
Darryl Hall and John Oates were the
feature performers at the 1989 festi-
val.
Grifton's Shad Festival is also a
crowd drawing festival held in mid-
April. Activities include the Spring
Shad Run, fishing contests, a fish
fry and the popular "fishy tales"
contest. This storytelling competi-
tion gives contestants a chance to
tell their biggest lie, tallest tale, or
fishiest tale.
Late April brings the Kite Fes-
tival in Topsail Beach, the Sclma
Ham and Yam Festival and another
favorite, Washington's Tulip Festi-
val. The five day Tulip Festival in-
cludes a parade, museum tours, a
Teen Tulip Dance, a Tulip Ball.
Miss Tulip Pageant, a statewide
high school band competition and
concludes with a finale featuring lo-
cal talent.
The Annual Pow-Wow pre-
sented by the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe
is held in Hollister. This late April
festival features the crowning of a
tribal princess, Indian arts and crafts,
native American foods and dance and
drum competitions.
The month of May does not
slow down. Early May brings Hen-
derson's Beach Music Festival
which is followed by another Beach
Music Festival at Emerald Isle
around mid-month. The White Lake
Water Festival and Kinston's Day in
the Park take place in mid-May.
The month ends with the Old Time
Fiddler's and Bluegrass Festival in
Union Grove.
Early June brings Canton's
Strawberry Festival and Wil-dear's
Festival of Fun held in Nags Head
near the month's end.
July bursts out like a firecracker
with the Annual Roasting of the
Hog in Beech Mountain. Another
beach music festival is held at Car-
olina Beach, along with Nags
Head's own Land Hermit Crab Race
Murfreesboro's Watermelon
Festival in late July.
Local festivals are also in
abundance. Greenville is the loca-
tion for one of this area's most well-
known fcstivals-The 17th Annual
Greenville Fourth of July Festival
will be presented once again by the
Greenville Jaycees.
The primary goal of the
Greenville project, according to Fred
Keith, the festival chairman, is to
incorporate a family atmosphere
around a day of celebration. The
Jaycees solicit manpower from other
civic organizations. The Greenville
Ronald McDonald House, for exam-
ple, is responsible for games for the
children, which will help raise
money for their organization.
This year's activities will in-
clude a 5K road race, arts and crafts
show, carnival rides and pony rides.
Area fire departments will hold the
annual Fireman's Competition.
Live afternoon concerts, featuring
bands such as the Chairman of the
Board, are also scheduled.
However, the highlight of
the day will feature a choreographed
fireworks show at the Town
Commons. Keith said, "I can
promise it will be one of the best,
if not the best in North Carolina
Schreiber demands student attention
By Kirstin Eakes
"Now people , don't think
you'll get away with sleeping
hrough my lectures says the
smiling, short-haired Cher look-
.ilike. "You'll get the toothpick
treatment
The toothpicks are for
"propping your eyelids open and
Ian ice Schreiber, a speech and the-
atre arts professor at East Carolina
University, won't hesitate to slap a
box on the desk of a droopy-eyed
student.
For many of Schreiber's stu-
dents, listening, is not a problem.
"Who can ignore someone who en-
tertains while she teaches?" said Les
Thomas, one of Schreibers speech
students. "Mrs. Schreiber demands
attention, and her attention grabbers
show she has a sense of humor
Thomas said. As she moves across
the front of the room, her hands il-
lustrate her speech , and her facial
expressions constantly change. "It's
like she's performing for an audi-
ence Thomas added.
Janice Shreiber will be
performing this summer in an ECU
Summer Theatre production. She
will play a Spanish lady, Rose
Gonzalez, in "Summer in Smoke
It will not be the first time
Schreiber has performed in McGin-
nis Theatre. She began as a per-
former. The Jersey City Italian fol-
lowed her boyfriend (now husband)
to ECU, where she studied drama
and speech and was involved in
many of the theatrical performances.
Schreiber said: "I sang and acted in
"Hair It was a hippie show real
relevant to the times.
"And I thought that was all I'd
ever do - act and sing
After marrying, she moved to
Nebraska where she starred as Mary
Magdelan in the musical "Jesus
Christ Superstar Then her hus-
band, Tony, was offered a position
as director of the hearing impaired at
ECU. Schreiber found herself back
in Greenville.
"At that time Schreiber
saidthere was a shortage of voice
and diction teachers at the univer-
sity. The head of the department
asked me to teach - and it opened a
whole new door for me. I love it
Although she stays busy teach-
ing, Schreiber still finds lime to act
Amazingly, beneath this
teacheractresssinger is also a wife
and mother. Schreiber said: "I re-
ally admire Meryl Streep, not only
because she comes to mind as a fa-
vorite actress, but she keeps her
family separate from her work. She
has three children and maintains
their privacy
Next fall Mr. Schreiber will be
doing a lot more laundry. From
Tuesdays to Thursdays Janice will
be working on a masters in theatre
at UNC-Greensboro. "Then I'll be
able to teach more acting she said.
So more students will hear the
toothpick lecture and even more.
Restaurant Review New Deli Lunch, Dinner & After Hours
voila: a hero. I can't forget the specialties for
The typical lunches are served in weight watchers, health food nuts
baskets, with assorted cookies which and vegetarians. The Sprout Special
are delivered fresh each morning. A (alfalfa sprouts and veggies on bran
favorite of the regulars is the Classic bread) is not only healthy, but eco-
Club. This triple-decker sandwich is nomical for $2.85. Picky eaters can
a deal at $3.65. For those on a college even have the PBJ, peanut butter and
By Kirstin Eakes
I stepped through the door and
felt as if I were back in the late 60's
at a corner deli. I was in a spa-
cious, dimly lit room full of simple
wooden chairs and tables. Old
rock whispered softly from the budget, the Reuben: pastrami, swiss home made strawberry jam on bran
radio as a long-haired girl smiled cheese, and two-inch deep sauerkraut bread,
from behind the cash register. On piled high on rye bread- $2.75.
the wall behind her I noticed a hand Customers who are tired of the
written sign which said, "S1000 same old while bread, have no fear,
service charge on all returned The Deli has a wide selection of
breads, some of which are baked
daily. And, no, it's not microwaved.
As the menu says, "It does funny
People aren't just hungry at lunch
hour, they're thirsty. The Deli has
Dr. Brown 's old-fashioned sodas,
along with regular soft drinks. Those
who need something stronger can
have a Corona import or something
plain and lighter, like a Bud Light
things to bread Diners can choose Those who aren't interested in
from white, wheat, bran, rye, pita eating at the Deli can still drop in at
Umveruy students, to satisfy their pockets and even bagels. The pizza night to enjoy the casual, laid back
checks, or first-born child It's
not a place you would expect to
find business men and women. But
at lunchume they hurry to the New
Deli, along with East Carolina
The outdoor theatre at the
Town Commons on First
Street will be the site of
nine concerts throughout
the summer for all to en-
joy. (Photo by Caroline
Kendrick)
Sunday in the park: June to August
and dessert bagels are a tasty treat. atmosphere; whether you sit at a
If a sandwich is not enough lunch- booth sippin' suds, or join friends in
goers can have Eagle brand chips or a game of pool at one of the four pool
soup as a side order. Don't be fooled tables. Live entertainment, usually
by the cheap plastic bowls the cream in the form of bands, is not uncom-
of broccoli soup is served in. It s rich mon on Thursday through Saturday
fromham turkey,bologna,knock- taste is incomparable. And everyone nights,
wurst hverwurst, salami, chicken can make room for dessert. Assorted So if you want to please your pal-
andtuna Then they combine one chocolate-covered cookies, cream ate at noon, or just want to plain relax,
or more of the meats with favorite puffs, and other tantalizing goodies step back like I did and join the regu-
cheeses, toppings and bread, and are kept in a glass case for all to see, lars at the New Deh.
grumbling stomaches.
Any stomach will be satisfied
after a hero or specialty sandwich
from the Deli menu, which boasts
"only the best meats are served
Hungry customers can choose
By Patty Anderson
The sun is surrounded by an
orange-red aureole. The air is heavy
with humidity. The smell of grass
gently wafts about the nostrils. The
muffled sounds of conversation and
laughter blend with the chirps of the
crickets. Blankets and chairs dot the
landscape. Suddenly music burst
forth.
No, this is not a description of
a scene in a paperback novel. This
is Sunday in the Park.
For the first time in its history,
this year Sunday in the Park will
feature nine concerts. The concerts
cater to every taste ranging from
down-home countryrock to the
whimsical sounds of a wind
ensemble.
hor those not familiar with
Sunday in the Park, it is a weekly
outdoor concert sponsored by the
Greenville Parks and Recreation.
And it is free.
The concerts are held every
Sunday at 7 p.m. at the Eugene
West Amphitheater which was built
two years ago at the Greenville
Town Commons. The audience
members bring their own blankets
and chairs to sit on .
Another first for the event is the
attraction of the Charlotte
Shakespeare Company. The
theatrical group from Charlotte will
perform on July 9.
The season will also feature a
Greenville speciality. Wind
Machine, on July 23. The 50-piece
wind ensemble will be conducted by
East Carolina University's Barry
Shank.
Other performers include: the
Tar River Community Band, the
Rutabaga Brothers and the Lemon
Sisters, the Eastern Syrr.phonette,
the Monitors, the Super Grit
Cowboy Band and New Blue Grass.
Country, blue grass, classical and
rock add variety to each performance
of Sunday in the Park.





I
sports
Summer Breeze April 1989 Page A
Frisbee golf: it's a toss up
By Tracye Larkin
Some call it "frisbee" golf and
others call it disc golf. It's true the
game is played with a frisbee, but
"frisbee" is the registered trademark
name of the Wham-0 Company. It
is technically called disc golf.
Dr. George Sappenfield, a
leisure Systems Studies professor at
ECU attended Fresno State in the
late 1960's.
In his spare time he worked as a
playground leader at a park.
Sappenfield and co-workers used
their imaginations and created a new
garre. They set up hula-hoops on
poles throughout the park area.
Tee-off places were marked near
each hoop, indicating where players
would stand to throw frisbces. Each
attempt to land the frisbee through
the hoop counted as one stroke.
Each hole had a par measuring the
degree of difficulty.
Sappenfield graduated from
Fresno State with a degree in recre-
ation and landed his first job at
Thousand Oaks park where he started
a disc-golf tournament. Sappenfield
wrote to the owners of the Wham-0
Company and asked for frisbee and
hula-hoop donations for the tourna-
ment. Wham-O supported the new
game and eagerly donated the equip-
ment.
In 1978, the general manager of
Wham-O, Ed Headrick designed
metal buckets to replace the hula-
hoops. The sides of these buckets
were made of flexible chains.
Wham-0 then started marketing
1989
Football Schedule
Sept.9Bowling Green
16Cincinnati
23Illinois State (Pa rents Day)
30Louisiana Tech
Oct.7South Carolina
14Open
21Virginia Tech (Homecoming)
-28Syracuse
Nov.4Miami
11Temple
18Pittsburgh
25Southern Miss.
Borne Games
Vince Smith, former linebacker for the East Carolina foot-
ball team has recently been signed by the Pittsburgh Steel-
ers. (Photo by Kelly Boyle)
frisbcc-golf courses.
There are approximately 300
disc or frisbee-golf courses across
the country today and arc a rave on
college campuses. On sunny days
ECU's course averages 60 players
throughout the day.
Some community recreation
programs make money from this
sport. They have disc-golf club
houses and pro-shops like the one
located in Lamirada,Calif.
The only equipment needed for
this sport is a "frisbee There are
specially designed discs for the
game. They come in different
weights, with the heavier discs trav-
eling further than the lighter ones.
These discs are usually only used by
the more serious and dedicated disc-
golf player.
The game of disc-golf , com-
bined with a good marketing strat-
egy, has the potential to become a
competitive sport. Sappenfield de-
scribes the game as, " a good
wholesome family type activity
With the hopeful future of disc
"frisbee" golf, don't you think it's
time to introduce yourself to the
sport? The disc golf course on cam-
pus is located next to the women's
softball field and Bunting field
(track).
The course winds through the
woods and explores the open grassy
areas. The instructions and rules are
posted; so don't hesitate- frolic with
your frisbee today.
Frisbee Golf is one of the many
that students may participate in
(Photo by Hamilton Holloway)
intramural
here at East
activities
Carolina.
ECU clubs splash into spring
By Michael Geraci
The inevitable springtime sun
and heat of Greenville has returned
and it's time to get wet!
The East Carolina Intramural
department offers several outdoor,
water-oriented club sports to take
advantage of Greenville's tropic-like
climate.
A hobby to most people, the
ECU Water Skiing Club takes its
skiing seriously. The club was
founded in November and already has
joined the South Atlantic
Conference and scheduled four
tournaments for this semester.
Competitions include three
events: slalom, tricks and jumping.
The 14-member club travels to Ze-
bulon and Bath, to practice at their
facilities, any free moments they
Smith leaves Falcons
have.
Members own their own boats
and skis and receive money from the
school. Club members have a
feeling this support will increase
because of a team member named
Jackie Rollins. Jackie is capable of
setting new SAC slalom and jump
records.
If you are interested in joining
the club contact Tom at 830-0137 or
the Intramural office
Anothei new club to join ECU
is Crew. The sport associated with
the Ivy Leagues has washed into
Greenville.
Tom Allen, of Washington,
N.C started the crew club in
September 1988 with two members
and has expanded it to 10.
Races are called regattas and the
club enters one, four-man boat with
coxswain in each regatta.
The club has several regattas
scheduled for the spring including
The Duke Invitational, at Lake
Michie, and the Augusta Invitational
in Georgia, featuring more than 100
teams.
The Crew Club practices four
days a week on the Tar River in
Washington.
Anyone interested in Crew-
should contact Andy at 757-0305 or
the Intramural department.
If your idea of fun in the water
goes a little faster and has more ob-
stacles then the Kayak Club might
be of interest to you.
The Kayak Club paddles all year
round, including the summer, and has
their own equipment. Most of the 40
members are beginners.
Club President Ray Irvin
stresses they only take people on
rivers they are ready for. Pool prac-
tice sessions are designed to develop
the skills necessary tor running a
river.
The Club meets every other
Monday night in Memorial Pool an!
takes trips every weekend. Irvin says
there are ten people that go on the
trips every week and others join
when possible.
Unlike the other clubs there are
no competitions in Kayaking onl
the personal challenge. The club
runs rivers like the Chattoogo,
where the movie Deliverance was
filmed, and the Nowachukee in
western Carolina.
Club dues are S5 a semester and
those interested should contact Rav
at 757-6380 or Jim Hix at 756-
2970.
W�.n�r�i mw w��i�. �MMMM
Former ECU linebacker signs
with the Pittsburgh Steelers
By Lisa Pittman
Vincent Smith, a graduating
senior at East Carolina University
and also a defensive linebacker, has
signed a contract to play football for
the Pittsburgh Steelers.
Smith, who had played for the
Atlanta Falcons, had several reasons
for signing with the Steelers.
One reason was the free agency
rule. Under this rule, Smith could
have been picked up by any team in
the National Football League.
According to Smith, he didn't have
any protection from this rule at
Atlanta.
He said he sees the switch as
an opportunity and a chance for
more playing time on the field.
Smith said he's not speculating as to
whether he will be happier, but he
does sec it as another chance to do
something he likes. Smith says
he's going to go with the flow,
calling the switch "another job
However, Smith did say he was
a Pittsburgh fan when he was very
young. He recalled the "Steel
Curtain" defense for which the team
was popular at the time.
Smith said that his mom is
very excited about the change. He
said she knows football is
something he enjoys and she
wants to give him support. He
also said that she watches his
games, evaluates his plays and
questions him about them.
He said the types of teams ECU
played against while he was a team
member, gave him good preparation
for the pros, especially since a lot of
the players on those teams arc now
in the pros. He added that he might
have been overlooked for the draft,
because he played for ECU.
Smith knows that there will be
a big change from Atlanta with
warm weather to Pittsburgh with
colder weather. He bought himself
a new jeep with four wheel drive for
the harsher conditions.
He said since Pittsburgh is one
of the five best cities in the United
States to live in, he is optimistic
about the change in locale, although
he said he did like living in Atlanta.
He said that the impact of all
this hasn't hit him yet, and that he
had not imagined that some day he
would be in the pros. It was, how-
ever, his dream to compete with the
world's best athletes.
Smith said that the athlete with
the biggest impact on his life has
been the Chicago Bulls basketball
star Michael Jordan. Aside from
Jordan, Smith's mother and his 4-
year-old daughter, Jayme have been
his support and inspiration. He said
that even though she is young, she
tries her best to be there for her
daddy.
Smith is a former resident of
Statesville, N.C which is located
near Charlotte. Looking back at his
high school years, he recalled being
an honor roll student and a footbali
star, along with his brother who is
now attending the University of
North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
Superstitions:
sports and rituals
go hand-in-hand
Scholar athletes receive rare recognition
By Lisa Pittman
Six East Carolina University
football players were recipients of
the Carolina Telephone and
Telegraph Athletic scholarship for
die 1988-89 academic school year.
On behalf of an academically
outstanding athlete, the amount of
$3,500 is awarded at each home
game to the university. Charlie
Carr, ECU's associate director of
athletics said, "a gesture like this one
by CT&T and its president Wayne
Peterson, stands out as an illustra-
tion of corporate commitment to
excellence with regard to our pro-
gram The players who received
this scholarship have around an
overall "A" or "B" average.
The players feel that the schol-
arship is a deserved reward for their
efforts. Willie Lewis and Tod
Creech, two of the recipients, said
that receivr j, the award has gained
them posiu.e recognition among
some of ECU's faculty. Another
recipient, Terry Bennett said that he
"was glad to be able to give some-
thing back to his school
Football players usually have
busy days during the season. In
general they go to their classes and
at 2 p.m. they head to the field
house for meetings and practice that
end some time around 6:30 p.m.
Tired and sometimes bruised, they
have dinner and the time thereafter to
study.
The players had different reac-
tions as to whether they had enough
time to study. Most of them wished
they had more. Creech compared
football and classes as having two
jobs.
R.L. Beeman Jr also a recipi-
ent of the award, said that he man-
aged to have enough time to study,
but paying attention in class was
most important,
Beeman and Bennett also said
that because they don't have as much
study time as most students, foot-
ball gives them more motivation to
study and do well. They said this
motivation has helped their grades.
Creech, who has 18 hours this
semester said it was difficult for a
player to have more than 12 to 13
hours, since football takes a lot of
their time.
The players said that the
coaches do show interest in their
grades. The coaches make sure the
players attend class and they keep a
watch on their grades. The players
below a 2.0 grade point average are
required to attend study hall.
Overall, the players believe they
are stereotyped for being trou-
blesome. Usually they are given a
negative outlook in the classroom,
almost always having to prove that
they are intelligent. Lewis said,
"When one of us gets in trouble it
makes headlines, but one of my
teammates has a 4.0 GPA and he is
rarely recognized
Beeman saidThe majority of
college athletes work hard on and off
the field and do better than a lot of
students who don't have as many
extracurricular activities Bennett
added, "People shouldn't categorize
us as dumb jocks; it's hard to excel
in sports and school, but our re-
quired motivation is the key to our
success
Other athletes such as Bill
Maxwell, Walter Wilson and Frank
Compton McCurry have also re-
ceived the CT&T academic scholar-
ships. After putting in what they
consider a tough school year, these
players are looking forward to the
summer. Some of them plan to
take classes, but all of them plan to
continue to work out and enjoy the
"long-awaited summer They will
also wait to see what the new season
and new coaching staff will bring
By Tracye Larkin
It's a tie game in the bottom of
the ninth inning, the bases are
loaded, and there is a 3-2 count on
the batter. The pitcher reaches into
his back pocket to touch his "lucky"
rabbit's foot for good luck. Much
to his dismay, it is not there. He
hasn't played a game without this
good-luck piece since little league.
He feels he is doomed without this
meaningful piece of fun.
Call them procedures, rituals or
traditions, they all mean the same
thing - superstition. Superstitions
are practiced in all athletic competi-
tions ranging from professional
sports to little league.
Webster's dictionary defines su-
perstition as a belief or practice re-
sulting from fear of the unknown.
Athletic competition is filled with
uncertainty; therefore it is natural
that most athletes turn to rituals.
These rituals range from lucky
charms to a certain mental prepara-
tion.
East Carolina University ath-
letes like all others follow these rit-
uals. Kim Corwin, first-baseman
on the softball team said "Our team
stands in a circle with our hands held
high and yells at the top of our
lungs for five or six seconds, then
with a signal the entire team pushes
their hands down with an even
louder yell. The echo heard from
this chant not only gets our team
going but also intimidates the other
team
Donna Weller, another member
of the softball team confesses to not
stepping on the chalk lining the
field. Ms. Weller also makes sure
there are no bats crossed before
stepping in the on-deck circle.
Charlie Libretto, a quarterback
on the football team goes into the
shower, puts a towel over his head
and runs over the different plays in
his mind before each game.
Irish Hamilton, a member of
the women's basketball team lies
on her bed for two hours before each
game listening to music and men-
tally preparing herself. Ms. Hamil-
ton also has a pair of lucky socks
she likes to wear in ever)- game.
Davy Willis, a pitcher on the
baseball team admits to picking out
a pet rock and keeping it in his hat.
The team has a designated spot in
the dugout for each player's glove,
and they always warm up with the
same person.
These traditions may seem
silly, but to athletes, they are im-
perative in order to play well. It is
important to know what supersti-
tions mean to athletes, and just as
important to respect them.
,

x





t
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20, 1989 7
Announcements
WORLD RENOWN VIOLIN-
IST NADTA SALERNO-SON-
World Renown Violinist Nadja Salerno-
Sonnenberg will perform in VVnght Audi-
torium at 8pm on April 20th 1 lor appear-
ance will conclude the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series at East Carolina Univer-
sity Her scheduled program will include.
sONATA No. 2 in A Major, Op. 12, No. 2
by Beethoven, SONATA No 2 ink D
Maor, Op 94a by Prokofiev, Intermis-
sion, SONATA No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 108
by Brahms. Ms Salerno-Sonnenberg will
be accompanied by Sandra Rivers on the
piano. Tickets for this event are now on
�vile thev can be purchased through the
Central ticket Office at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center by calling 757-6611, ext.266.
Office hours are 11 am-6 pm, Monday
through Friday.
DC AREA SUMMER JOB
summer position available in the Wash-
ington, DC, office of a North Carolina
Congressman. Typing skills necessary
and shorthand desirable. Local interview
available. For further details contact: Ruth
Petersen, Co-op, 2028 GCB, (757-6979) as
oon as possible.
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS
Bus Admin Marketing or Economics
m.nors needed for a variety of summer
internships in logistics related positions
with private industry. Location and pay
vary A resume is necessary to apply. For
a list of companies contact Ruth Petersen,
Co-op, 2028 GCB (757-6979) for applica-
tion details.
CO-OP
Need a summer job7 Call the Co-op office
� 757-6979 � to find out how we may
help vou locate a summer job in your
home town or in Greenville.
FUTURE STUDENT TEACH-
ERS
to students who are interested in becom-
ming PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS
to students in wheelchairs, READERS
and TUTORS. Past experience is desired
but not required. Applications will be
taken for employment during the Sum
mer Session and Fal 1989 and Spring Se-
mester 1990 If interested contact: OF-
FICE OF HANDICAPPED STUDENT
SERVICES 111 Whichard Annex East
Carolina University Greenville NC
27858-4353 PI IONE: 919 757-6799 or 757-
6881
SKIN CANCER SCREENING
The Creative Living Center, an adult day
health care center operated by the East
Carolina University School of Medicine, is
offering a free skin cancer screening on
Thursday, May 4, from 11.(X) a.m. until
1:00 p.m. Drs. John I lendnx and Cameron
Smith will be providing this service at the
Center, located at 2000 E. Sixth Street (St.
James United Methodist Church) Any
interested adult over the age of fity-five is
eligible for the screening, but registration
will be limited Call the Creative Living
Center at 757-0303 to pre-register for this
free screening.
B.A.C.C.H.U.S
BACCHUS stands for Boost Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning the 1 lealth of
University Students. If vou want to be
involved in a group that promotes respon-
sible decision making regarding the use
or nonuse of alcohol, this is it! We meet
each Wednesday, at 6 p.m. in 305 Joyner
Library. We're beginning to make plans
for Fall activities. Call 757-6793 for more
info.
COLOR GUARD AUDITONS
Color Guard Auditions for the ECU
March .ng Pirates will be April 15, 29, and
Mav6, 12 p.m4 p.m. Please pick one day'
Flags are provided - rifles, brine vour
Individuals interested in trying out for
intramural recreational services fitness
class instructors are encouraged to sign-
up in 204 Memorial Gym. Try-outs will be
held April 26. Up to seven individuals will
be selected and hired. For additional in-
formation contact Kathleen Hill in 204
Memorial Gym or call 757-6387.
PASSOVER
1 lillel, A Jewish Student Organization
will be sponsoring a Passover Sedar. The
Sedar will be on Thursday April 20th at
7:00 p.m It will be held at Congregation
Boyt Shalom.
PHI SIGMA PI
Congratulations to the new brothers of
Phi Sigma Pi National I lonor Fraternity:
Kim Aichinger, Richard Andrews, 1 lope
I larrcll, Lisa Mimre, Carolina Orth, Linda
Rogosich, Jani Rossi, Tania Schilling,
Savecna Singh, Jennifer Spain, Rick Wal-
ters, and Natalie Young VVe look forward
to having you serve with us next Fall See
you at Beach Week.
PHI SIGMA PI
Opportunities are now available for stu-
dent teaching in Puebla, Mexico. Teacher
Education majors planning to student
teach in the spring semester, 1H1, are
eligible to apply. Applications are in the
Office of Student Teaching, Speight 109,
and the Office of International Studies,
General Classroom, 1002. Limited posi-
tions are available. Application deadline:
April 21. For more info call Marianne
Exum, (w) 757-6271 or (h) 830-9450.
EMPLOYMENT
Employment opportunities are available
PIJBIIC SERVICE AN-
NOUNCEMENT
Are you a Pitt County resident, 60 years
old or older and need a ride to your medi-
cal appointment? The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt county such as doctors, den-
tists, clinics, therapies and the I lealth
department Arrangements for the service
must be made at least 24 hours before the
scheduled appointment. Call the Creative
living Center, 757-0303 to reserve vour
ride.
FITNESS INTRUCTOR TRY-
OUTS
Congratulations to Jenny Campbell, Brin-
ley Vickers, Tracy Lyle, Steve King, Drew-
Covert, Leslie Nemet, and Marjoric McK-
instry, the newly elected officers of Phi
Sigma Pi. Cood'luck in '89 - '90 sduxil
year.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Amnesty International meels cverv
fourth Wednesday at 8 p.m. at St Pauls
Episcopal Church, 401 E. 4th St in the
upper floor - enter from the 4th street
entrance. Next meeting: April 26. Stu-
dents welcome.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Department of University Unions is
now accepting applications from student
organizations who are interested in serv-
ing on the Usher Corps. This is an excel-
lent fundraising project for your organi-
zation and a great way to be seen on
campus. For details, call Lynn at 757 6611
ECU FRISBEE CLUB DISC
SALES
IRATE discs are in! You can get an IRATE
frisbee now for only 56.00 or S7.00 for a
glow in the dark disc, and help the
IRATES to their third consecutive appear-
ance in the National Collegiate Untimate
Championships. Call Garv I lurlev'� 752-
7538 or Randy Allen @ 758-5348 to get
yours now.
COLOR GUARD
A short "equipment routine" will be
taught and rehearsed at the Color Guard
audition: after several hours of practice
this routine will be performed before a
few of the Marching Pirates staff for
evaluation All of those auditioning will
perform in groups, no one will be asked to
perform individually Equipment will be
provided for those auditioning for a flag
position: those auditionamg for a rifle
position should bring their own rifle For
further information contact: Thomas W
Goolsbv, director Marching Pirates 757-
6982; 6331
BIKINI CONTEST
The Great PurpleGold Pigskin Pigout
Party Bikini Contest will be held Saturday
April 22 at 2:00pm. First prize will be S300,
second prize $100, and third prize S50 A
male contest will also take place with the
winner taking home S50 and prizes Call
757-6178 or 757-6491 for more details or to
enter.
RECYCLE TEXTBOOKS
If vou can't resell your textbooks how
about donating them to a needy school in
Puebla, Mexico? Just drop unwanted
books in the bookbox at the ECU Student
Store or deliver them to Room 311,
Speight building Thank your for your
generous contributions
PHI ALPHA THETA
Will hold it's Spring cookout on April
26th. The cookout will be catered by
Parker's BBQ Restaurant It will be S5 per
person and this will include the price ot
the meal and beverages The deadline to
sign up for the cookout is April 21st. The
sign up sheet is located on the Phi Alpha
Theta bulletin board near the I list dept in
Brewster. All interested persons are wel-
come to attend.
FACULTY-STAFF-STUDENT-
SOCIAL
The ECU Decision Sciences Society will
conduct their spring Faculty Staff-Student
social for all graduate and undergrat
business students. A brief program
include a speaker presentation, a prex.i.
tation of membership certificates, an
awards presentation, and a farewell for
graduating seniors Dress is semi-formal
and the cover charge is S3.(X) to help de-
fray expenses The social is scheduled for
400 to 6:00 PM, Tuesday, April 25, in� B
room3122 Please sign up bfore April 21 in
the Decision Sciences office and come )oin
a friendly atmosphere Guests are wel-
comed.
THE
COMPETITIVE EDGE
MAYBE
YOUR RESUME
Don t get ignored in the paper shuttle Have your resume
professionally typeset and reproduced at AccuCopy1 Our
resume packages produce results by making you look
your best on paper.
High quality, fast service, and low prices are all part of
our resume packages available to you at AccuCopy
FAST COPIES
FOR FAST TIMES
� 24-hour service available
� open early, open late
� open six days a week
THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
Riverbluff
Apartments
SUMMER SCHOOL SPECIAL!
June & July 12 Rent Special
with the Signing of a 1 year lease
April 1 through June 30.
�Recently Renovated
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
�On Site Management & Maintainence
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
DOWNTOWN
Dickinson Ave. & Reads Circle
Hours:
Mon-Thur 9:30-5:30
Fri&Sat 9:30-6:00
EAST GATE PLAZA
Across From Hwy. Patrol Station
Hours:
Mon-Sat 9:00-8:00
Sunday 1:00-6:00

Mens Hush Puppies
Sale
priced at only
$26.88
Ladies
Hurraches
�Leather
Sandals
�Made in
Brazil
ONLY $12.99
3 Subject
Theme Books
Mens Dexter Shoes
Tassel
or
Penny Loafer
Sale
34.88
Ki
fflgffl
Athletic
Socks
6 pairs
Reg. $10.50
Sale $4,49
200 Ct
Notebook
Ruled
Paper
UO pkg.
Ladies Rain Slicks
$5.99
Assorted Pastel Colors
JuniorMissy
Camp Shirts
$9.99





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989 7
Announcements
WORLD RENOWN VIOLIN-
IST NADTA SALERNO-SON-
NENBERp
World Renown Violinist Nadja Salemo-
Sonnenberg will perform in Wright Audi-
torium at 8pm on April 20th. Her appear-
ance will conclude the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series at East Carolina Univer-
sity. Her scheduled program will include:
SONATA No. 2 in A Major, Op. 12, No. 2
by Beethoven, SONATA No. 2 ink D
Major, Op. 94a by Prokofiev, Intermis-
sion, SONATA No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 108
by Brahms. Ms. Salerno-Sonnenberg will
be accompanied by Sandra Rivers on the
piano. Tickets for this event are now on
sale, they can be purchased through the
Central Ticket Office at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center by calling 757-6611, ext.266.
Office hours are 11 am-6 pm, Monday
through Friday.
DC AREA SUMMER JOB
Summer position available in the Wash-
ington, DC, office of a North Carolina
Congressman. Typing skills necessary
and shorthand desirable. Local interview
available. For further details contact: Ruth
Pctersen, Co-op, 2028 CCB, (757-6979) as
soon as possible.
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS
Bus. Admin Marketing or Economics
majors needed for a variety of summer
internships in logistics related positions
with private industry. Location and pay
vary. A resume is necessary to apply. For
a list of companies contact Ruth Petersen,
Co-op, 2028 CCB (757-6979) for applica-
tion details.
CQ-QP
Need a summer job? Call the Co-op office
� 757-6979 � to find out how we may
help you locate a summer job in your
home town or in Greenville.
FUTURE STUDENT TEACH-
ERS
Opportunities are now available for stu-
dent teaching in Puebla, Mexico. Teacher
Education majors planning to student
teach in the spring semester, 1990, are
eligible to apply. Applications are in the
Office of Student Teaching, Speight 109,
and the Office of International Studies,
General Classroom, 1002. Limited posi-
tions are available. Application deadline:
April 21. For more info call Marianne
Exum, (w) 757-6271 or (h) 830-9450.
EMPLOYMENT
Employment opportunities are available
to students who are interested in becom-
ming PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS
to students in wheelchairs, READERS
and TUTORS. Past experience is desired
but not required. Applications will be
taken for employment during the Sum-
mer Session and Fal 1989 and Spring Se-
mester 1990. If interested contact: OF-
FICE OF HANDICAPPED STUDENT
SERVICES 111 Whichard Annex East
Carolina University Greenville NC
27858-4353 PHONE: 919757-6799 or 757-
6881
SKIN CANCER SCREENING
The Creative Living Center, an adult day
health care center operated by the East
Carolina University School of Medicine, is
offering a free skin cancer screening on
Thursday, May 4, from 11:00 a.m. until
1:00 p.m. Drs. John Hendrix and Cameron
Smith will be providing this service at the
Center, located at 2000 E. Sixth Street (St.
James United Methodist Church). Any
interested adult over the age of fity-five is
eligible for the screening, but registration
will be limited. Call the Creative Living
Center at 757-0303 to pre-register for this
free screening.
B.A.C.C.H.U.S
B.A.C C.H.U.S stands for Boost Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning the Health of
University Students. If you want to be
involved in a group that promotes respon-
sible decision-making regarding the use
or nonuse of alcohol, this is it! We meet
each Wednesday, at 6 p.m. in 305 Joyner
Library. We're beginning to make plans
for Fall activities. Call 757-6793 for more
info.
COLOR GUARD AUDITONS
Color Guard Auditions for the ECU
Marching Pirates will be April 15, 29, and
May 6,12 p.m. -4 p.m. Please pick one day!
Flags are provided - rifles, brine vour
own.
PTJBTTC SERVICE AN-
NOUNCEMENT
Are you a Pitt County resident, 60 years
old or older and need a ride to your medi-
cal appointment? The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt county such as doctors, den-
tists, clinics, therapies and the Health
department. Arrangements for the service
must be made at least 24 hours before the
scheduled appointment. Call the Creative
Living Center, 757-0303 to reserve your
ride.
Individuals interested in trying out for
intramural recreational services fitness
class instructors are encouraged to sign-
up in 204 Memorial Gym. Try-outs will be
held April 26. Up to seven individuals will
be selected and hired. For additional in-
formation contact Kathleen Hill in 204
Memorial Gym or call 757-6387.
PASSOVER
Hillel, A Jewish Student Organization
will be sponsoring a Passover Sedar. The
Sedar will be on Thursday April 20th at
7:00 p.m It will be held at Congregation
Boyt Shalom.
PW SIGMA PI
Congratulations to the new brothers of
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity:
Kim Aichinger, Richard Andrews, I lope
HarreU, Lisa Moore, Carolina Orth, Linda
Rogosich, Jani Rossi, Tania Schilling,
Saveena Singh, Jennifer Spain, Rick Wal-
ters, and Natalie Young We look forward
to having you serve with us next Fall. See
you at Beach Week.
PHI SIGMA PI
FTTNFSS INTRUCTOR TRY-
OUTS
Congratulations to Jenny Campbell, Brin-
ley Vickers, Tracy Lyle, Steve King, Drew
Covert, Leslie Nemet, and Marjorie McK-
instry, the newly elected officers of Phi
Sigma Pi. Good luck in '89 - '90 school
year.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Amnesty International mecs every
fourth Wednesday at 8 p.m. at St. Pauls
Episcopal Church, 401 E. 4th St in the
upper floor - enter from the 4th street
entrance. Next meeting: April 26. Stu-
dents welcome.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Department of University Unions is
now accepting applications from student
organizations who are interested in serv-
ing on the Usher Corps. This is an excel-
lent fundraising project for your organi-
zation and a great way to be seen on
campus. For details, call Lynn at 757-6611.
ECU FRISBEE CLUB DISC
SALES
IRATE discs are in! You can get an IRATE
frisbee now for only $6.00 or $7.00 for a
glow in the dark disc, and help the
IRATES to their third consecutive appear-
ance in the National Collegiate Untimate
Championships. Call Gary Hurley'� 752-
7538 or Randy Allen @ 758-5348 to get
yours now.
COLOR GUARD
A short "equipment routine" will be
taught and rehearsed at the Color Guard
audition: after several hours of practice
this routine will be performed before a
few of the Marching Pirates staff for
evaluation. All of those auditioning will
perform in groups, no one will be asked to
perform individually. Equipment will be
provided for those auditioning for a flag
position: those auditionaing for a rifle
position should bring their own rifle. For
further information contact: Thomas W.
Goolsby, director Marching Pirates 757-
6982; 6331
BIKINI CONTEST
The Great PurpleGold Pigskin Pigout
Party Bikini Contest will be held Saturday
April 22 at 2:00pm. First prize will be $300,
second prize $100, and third prize $50. A
male contest will also take place with the
winner taking home $50 and prizes. Call
757-6178 or 757-6491 for more details or to
enter.
RECYCLE TEXTBOOKS
If you can't resell your textbooks how
about donating them to a needy school in
Puebla, Mexico? Just drop unwanted
books in the bookbox at the ECU Student
Store or deliver them to Room 311,
Speight building. Thank your for your
generous contributions.
PHI ALPHA THETA
Will hold it's Spring cookout on April
26th. The cookout will be catered by
Parker's BBQ Restaurant. It will be $5 per
person and this will include the price of
the meal and beverages. The deadline to
sign up for the cookout is April 21st. The
sign up sheet is located on the Phi Alpha
Theta bulletin board near the 1 list. dept. in
Brewster. All interested persons are wel-
come to attend.
FACIII TY-STAFF-STUDENT-
SOCIAL
The ECU Decision Sciences Society will
conduct their spring Faculty Staff-Student
social for all graduate and undergrac
business students. A brief program
include a speaker presentation, a prestu.
tation of membership certificates, an
awards presentation, and a farewell for
graduating seniors. Dress is semi-formal
and the cover charge is $3.00 to help de-
fray expenses. The social is scheduled for
4:00 to 6:00 PM, Tuesday, April 25, in GCB
room3122. Please sign up bfore April 21 in
the Decision Sciences office and come join
a friendly atmosphere. Guests are wel-
comed.
THE
COMPETITIVE EDGE
MAY BE ,
YOUR RESUME
Don t get ignored in the paper shuttle. Have your resume
professionally typeset and reproduced at AccuCopy! Our
resume packages produce results by making you look
your best on paper.
High quality, fast service, and low prices are all part of
our resume packages available to you at AccuCopy.
FAST COPIES
FOR FAST TIMES
� 24-hour service available
� open early, open late
� open six days a week
THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
Riverbluff
Apartments
SUMMER SCHOOL SPECIAL!
June & July 12 Rent Special
with the Signing of a 1 year lease
April 1 through June 30.
�Recently Renovated
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
�On Site Management & Maintainence
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
DOWNTOWN
Dickinson Ave. & Reads Circle
Hours:
Mon-Thur 9:30-5:30
Fri&Sat 9:30-6:00
EAST GATE PLAZA
Across From Hwy. Patrol Station
Hours:
Mon-Sat 9:00-8:00
Sunday 1:00-6:00
Mens Hush Puppies
Sale
priced at only
.88
Ladies
Hurraches
�Leather
Sandals
�Made in
Brazil
ONLY $12.99
3 Subject
Theme Books

Mens Dexter Shoes
Tassel
or
Penny Loafer
Sale
$34.88
Athletic
Socks
6 pairs
Reg, 10.50
Sale$449
200 Ct
Notebook
Ruled
Paper
68e.
Ladies Rain Slicks
$5.99
Assorted Pastel Colors
JuniorMissy
Camp Shirts
$9.99






8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989
Student life across nation in question
(CPS)�Just as a high-pow-
ered group of national college
leaders announced a project in
New York April 4 to see if it could
measure the "quality of student
life" on campuses nationwide, a
group of students took over a
building at Morris Brbwn College
in Atlanta to complain about the
quality of student life there.
In a tape recording played to
students and police gathered out-
side the building, the protesters at
MorrisBrowncomplained officials
had done nothing to treat their
complaints about bad dorm con-
ditions, course shortages and
"substandard" cafeteria food.
"This in not an irrational
temper tantrum freshman An-
toine Chancellor told the Associ-
ated Press. "We have filled out the
papers. We have gone through
the process. The process has
failed
Several of the country's most
dramatic student protests of re-
cent months � over political and
racial issues at Howard and Penn
State universities, for example �
included pleas to otticials to cure
"other" quality of life issues like
dorm overcrowding and inade-
quate campus security.
Student anger had nothing to
do with officials' decision to study
such issues, said Robert Atwell,
president of the American Coun-
cil on Education (ACE), one of the
two erouDS that unveiled the plan
for a nationwide look at the qual-
ity of campus life.
Instead, the idea came from
college presidents who "expressed
concern at what they perceive as a
decline in the quality of campus
life and in the character of rela-
tionships among members of the
college community Atwell said.
To probe it, ACE and The
Carnegie Foundation tor the
Advancement of Teaching.
headed by former U.S. Commis-
sioner of Education and college
scholar Ernest Boyer, said thev
would visit "18 or 20" colleges
during the next year, interview
ing students, administrators and
faculty members about how they
feel about their campus lives.
Rights groups raid research lab
(CPS)�Animal liberationists
"freed" more than 1,000 Univer-
sity of Arizona research animals
in a lab raid April 3, but in the
process may have released some
mice carrying a contagious dis-
ease.
The Animal Liberation Front
claimed responsibility for the raid,
which included two arson fires
that caused an estimated $10,000
worth of damage, in a statement
left with Tucson police soon after
the blaze.
ALF members conducted the
raid, the note said, to save the
animals "from certain torture and
death
Thirty of the mice, however, I
were infected with a "Third World
disease" by veterinary science
Prof. Charles Sterling, who had
been tracking the disease'sbehav-1
Compact
ior.
Sterling said the disease �
caused by a bacterium called
cryptosporidium�causes severe
diarrhea for two-to-four weeks,
and can be fatal to people with
immune system illnesses.
"1 don't know how (the re-
search mice) can ever be recov-
ered Sterling said, unless ALF
members have kept them and
would return them.
A month earlier, two dogs
were stolen from a Virginia Tech
veterinary medicine class, an
anonymous caller told the Colle-
giate Times, the student paper.
The caller explained vet stu-
dents were to perform surgery on
the dogs � which would eventu-
ally be destroyed � as part of
their class project, but that the
students grew attached to them
and stole them before they were
harmed.
Such experiments may be-
come unnecessary if Auburn
University veterinary medicine
Prof. Charles Branch succeeds in a
project, announced in March, to
develop video disks to teach stu-
dents surgery they leam now by
using live animalc.
rjt27f:W$:win-irHWl


Mud. These guys are wrastlin not wrestling, but wrastlin' in the ah, uh mud. (Photo by J.D.
Quagmire�Photolab)
,iiH!&
promote
i -j
ATTENTION RETURNING STUDENTS
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time,
and possibly money.
The following are available to you:
student
Reminder: A cut on service charge will be included in your first billing.
involvementl option a: no deposit required
(CPS)�A coalition of Michi-
gan college and university presi-
dents formed a first-in-the- Mid-
west "campus compact" March I
29.
The Michigan compact, affili-1
ated with the national Campusl
Compact organization, is the thirdI
state organization to join with the
national group of college presi-
dents that promote student volun-
tarism.
Pennsylvania and California)
also have state compacts.
"This is not a new trend
maintained Terry Denbow ofj
Michigan State University, where
the compact will be headquar-l
tered. " It was formed to betterl
promote what alreatiy exists
Students are on waiting lists!
for volunteer opportunities at
MSU, Denbow added.
Under the new compact, stu-l
dents at Albion, Hope, Alma and I
Lansing Community Colleges, as
well asat Western Michigan State, I
and Wayne State universities and
at the University of Michigan
would tell the group they want tol
volunteer, and the group will place!
them in community service jobsl
around the state.
Meanwhile Sen. Ed ward I
Kennedy, D-Mass announced!
March 20 that a Senate committee!
will try to refashion the current!
proposed volunteer legislation
into a new idea to encourage
community service among stu-
dents nationwide.
Kennedy added he wanted tol
avoid legislation requiring public
service as a prerequisite for fed-
eral student aid, citing "seriousl
reservations" about its viability.
The hotly debated proposal, spon-l
sored by Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga1
would require students to serveatl
least a year in either the military or I
a "Citizen Corps" before beingj
eligible for federal aid.
Now Hiring Positions
For the Summer.
If you can write, we
need you. Stop by The
East Carolinian,
located across from
Joyner International
Library and apply
today!
At your parents' request, utility service can be
put in their name. Just pick up an application
in room 211 in the Off-Campus Housing Office,
Whichard Building or at Greenville Utilities'
main office, 200 W. Fifth Street.
Have your parents complete the application
(which must be notarized) and mail it to
Greenville Utilities, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
NC 27835-1847, att. Customer Services.
?Remember to attach a 'letter of credit" from
their power company.
OPTION B: DEPOSIT REQUIRED
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
are as follows:
Electric Only
Electric & Water
Electric, Water & Gas
Electric & Gas
with electric or wout electric
gas space or has space
heating heating
$100.00 $75.00
110.00 85.00
110.00 85.00
100.00 75.00
You can save time by mailing the deposti in advance. Be sure to
include:
a. Your Name
b. Where Service will be Required
c. When Service is to be Cut On
d. A phone number where we may reach you prior to your arrival
at the service address.
Request for Utility Service
(Please Print)
Name
Home address
I
Phone No.
wish to have utility service put in my name at
, effective
(DATE
Enclosed is a credit report of my utility account with.
(NAME OF UTILITY CO.)
I realize my credity with my utility company that serves me must be good (for more than twelve months)
before a deposit with Greenville Utilities can be waived. This service will be utilized by my (son or daughter).
If a move from one location to another is necessary in the future, I do or
� to transfer the utility account. Please
(NAME)
do not give my permission for
have the monthly billing mailed to
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STATE OF.
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certify that.
, A Notary Public of the aforesaid County and State.
personally appeared before me this date and duly
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My commission expires:
�REMINDER THIS FORM MUST BE NOTARIZED IF THE PARENT
DOES NOT SIGN IN THE PRESENCE OF A GUC REPRESENTATIVE.
Notary Public
For further information, contact Customer Assistance





I
THE EASTCAROl INI AN
Features
APRIL 20 1909 PACE9
Jaycees host Spring Break for hospital
By ALICIA FORD
Sliff Writr
The Greenville aycees and the
ECU Interfraternity Council are
working together to present
"Spring Break a top forty and
beach music festival on Sunday,
April 23 at the Pitt County Fair-
grounds.
"This is going to be an excel-
lent opportunity for college stu-
dents to help the Children's Hos-
pital and end the last few days oi
the semester with an event we are
hoping is going to be similar to
Mosier's Farm said Clifton
Dixon, Project Director.
The Embers, The Eccentrics,
and The Bash are being featured
along with the Miss ECU Hawai-
ian Tropk Bikini Contest. The
Embers are famous for their oldies
and beach music, but the Eccen-
trics and The Bash perform a vari-
ety oi cover tunes from bands like
U2, REM. The Clash, and INXS.
Fifteen fraternities will each Miracle Telethon on WITN-TV.
sponsor an entrant in the bikini The Children's Hospital is a
contest, and the winner will walk division oi Pitt County Memorial
away with a $500 prize and the andhasbeeninoperationforthree
opportunity to represent Green-
ville at the national contest in
Daytona Beach.
The Interfraternity Council
purchased 1,000 tickets in advance
to pav for the bands, and all pro-
ceeds will go to the Children's
Hospital of Eastern North Caro-
lina. The money will be donated
on June 4 during the Children's
ECU professor of anthropology
edits book on Southern women
years. It consistsofa newborn unit,
a pediatric unit, and a rehabilita-
tion unit. The money will go to-
ward the purchase oi special
equipment badly needed bv the
hospital.
"We couldn't have put this
day together without the help of
all our sponsors said Dixon. "We
are hoping to raise SI0,000 for the
Children's Hospital
WSFL will be broadcasting
live from the fairgrounds and
coolers are welcome, but leave the
glass at home. Concessions, Coca-
Cola, and Domino's Pizza will also
be provided.
The gates open at 10 a.m. and
the first band will start at 12 noon.
Tickets are $5 in advance or $8 at
the gate. Tickets can be purchased
at the ECU Central Ticket Oiiicc.
or vou can order a pizza from
Domino's and have your tickets
delivered.
Student Transit will be avail-
able from Mendenhall to the fair-
grounds. "Our main concern is
that no one has too much fun and
tries to dnnk and drive We are
trving to target the ECU students
and that's why we are providing
transportation said Dixon.
Dixon hopes to help the Chil-
dren's Hospital and the images of
fraternity parties at ECU. "This
will be a chance to help some very
sick children and at the same time
install some oi the aycee spirit
into the students oi ECU. Many
people don't realize that these
students are the future leaders and
laycees oi Greenville
Bv DEANNA XEVGLOSKI
Sta; Wntrr
The book includes 12 essays
on ways in which women of the
South have been affected by
changes in traditional, social, po-
Dr. Hollv Matthews, an asso
ciate professor of anthropology litical and cultural patterns.
here at ECU. just completed edit-
ing a new book called "Women in
the South: An Anthropological
Perspective
The focus oi this new book is
the changing roles and images of
Southern women.
The 176-page book has been
released in hardcover and paper-
bound editions by the University
oi Georgia Tress, its publisher.
Changes in the lives of women
in the South include the feminist
movement, the civil rights move-
ment and the boom in the region's
economy during the past decade.
Dr. Matthews contributed the
book's introductory essay.
The essavs take a look at the
Southern women in traditional
and professional roles and from
various classes, age groups and spokesman.
backgrounds.
The "new" Southern women
is analyzed in two contrasting
functions: as part of a changing
region and as an important force
in maintaining the traditions and
culture of the Old South.
The essays were originally
presented at a meeting of the
Southern Anthropological Society.
The main purpose of thisbook
is "to stimulate a critical reassess-
ment of women's roles in and
contributions to Southern cul-
ture said a University of Georgia
Graduate show at Gray
Bv KAREN MANN
Stiff Writer
Grav Art Gallery's latest ex-
hibit, a Graduate Thesis Exhibi-
tion, continues this year's series oi
exceptionallv strong shows. The
works oi three painters, one metal
designer, and one fabric designer,
all MFA candidates, will be on
displav untiKMay 5.
Fabric designer Blanche
Kammer-Monroe begins theshow
with the collection of handmarblcd
scarves, buttons, paper, and Ki-
monos. Marbelizingisa technique
in which paint or dye is swirled to
create intricate designs. The best
examples of this technique are
Kammer-Monroe's Kimonos.
Made of silk, these four Kimonos
are interesting for their colors �
two are bright, two are more sub-
dued � and their symmetry of
Coming
This
Week
Thursday
Attic:
Gibraltar
Susie's:
Arrakis
Mendenhall:
Cocoon: The Return
(through Sunday)
Friday
Attic:
The Usuals
New Deli:
Mercyland
opens for
Slurpeeeee
Saturday
Attic:
Gibraltar
New Deli:
Liquid Sound
Susie's:
Suspects
Tuesday.
Susie's:
Food of the Gods
Wednesday;
Attic:
Comedy Zone
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
Susie's:
Rosebud
marbelized design.
However, it becomes appar-
ent that almost everything m
Kammer-Monroe's section is
marbelized, even the drawings.
There is one non-marbelized paint-
ing but it seems out numbered
and doesn't really fit with theother
works. Kammer-Monroe is obvi-
ously an expert at Marbelizing,
but it would have been nice to see
what else she can do.
Linda Darty also displays
intricate and swirling motifs in
her metal designs. Darty's works
are divided mainly into jewelry
and lamps. However, the most
interesting piece is a tea set of
silver and rosewood decorated
with blue enamel fish.
The jewelry consists of gold
and silver. Some of the necklaces,
mooches, and earrings are high-
lighted with jewels and cloisonne.
The lamps, which are made of
aluminum, wood, and sterling sil-
ver, are more colorful and a little
more fun.
The paintings of John Han-
cock are massive, horizontal wa-
ter colors and acrylic on Unryn
paper. Reminiscent of Monet's
water lilies, they utilize the coarse
texture oi the paper to create a
liquid, stained glass effect.
Maria McLaughlin also works
on a massive scale. However, her
oil paintings evoke more somber
emotions. Using a predominantly
dark palette, McLaughlin layers
shapes to create a pattern of shad-
owy figures. When viewed from a
close angle, the intricate patterns
in these paintings can be fully
appreciated.
McLaughlin attempts the
same effect with three drawings.
Because of their brighter colors,
they aren't as successful as the
paintings, but they are interesting
nonetheless.
The finest works in the show
are those of Trudv Laudouceur.
Ladouceur's bright, realistic paint-
ings feature portions of figures,
often viewed from behind. "The
Bride and her Double presents
an incredibly detailed rendering
of lace, seed pearls, and satin folds.
The shoulder-to-hip view of the
figures creates an almost abstract
composition. It is an excellent
example of Ladouceur's work and
the best piece of the show.
The Embers, who are my mom's favorite group, will be playing at the Jaycees' Spring Break
festival this Sunday. Check it out.
Laura Soles, a pianist, will close out the Alumni Week festivities with a concert. Also performing
will be Rich Holly, a percussionist.
Pianist concert closes Alumni weekend
ECU Press Release
East Carolina University's
Alumni Weekend closes Saturday
with the Fourth Annual Alumni
Concert which will feature Laura
Soles, pianist, and Rich Holly, per-
cussion, alumni of the East Caro-
lina cchool of Music, in perform-
ance.
The 7:30 p.m. Saturday con-
cert will be held in the A Fletcher
Music Hall at the School of Music.
A reception will follow in adjoin-
ing Room 105. Seating will be on a
first come, first-served basis. The
concert is free and open to the
public.
Holly will perform works for
marimba by Leonard Bernstein
and Toshi Ichiyanagi and a tim-
pani piece he composed himself.
Joining Holly for the closing pro-
gram will be Paul Tardiff oi the
East Carolina University piano
faculty for a jazz number by Chick
Corea.
Soles will play two selection,
Chopin's "Ballade in G Minor
Opus 23, and "Sonatine" by Ravel.
While on campus, Holly will
also present master classes for stu-
dents. For more information, con-
tact Mark Ford, coordinator of
percussion, at 757-6851.
The annual alumni concert is
sponsored by the East Carolina
University School oi Music
Alumni Professional Society to
honor outstanding alumni.
Hollv is currently professor
oi percussion at Northern Illinois
College and president of the Illi-
nois Chapter of the Percussive Art
Society.
1) The Dickies � "Second
Coming"
2) Raunch Hands � "Payday"
3) Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper
� "Root Hog or Die"
4) Robyn Hitchcock �
"Queen Elvis"
5) Thelonius Monster �
"Stormy Weather"
6) drivin' 'n' cryin' �
"Mystery Road"
7) The Connels � "Fun and
Games"
8) Four Who Dared � "Kids
With Dynamite"
9) Run Westy Run � "Run
Westy Run"
10) Green on Red � "Here
Comes the Snakes"
11) The Cowpokes � "Zamfir
Ain't No Guru"
12) Swamp Zombies �
"Fink"
13) XTC � "Oranges and
Lemons"
Pipkin' the LVl Bones
Bonehead too
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Stiff Sir
J
The last column of the se-
mester. It's always a tough one
to write. Even though the lucky
elite who stay in Greenville this
summer will be able to enjoy my
weekly missives, the masses
won't.
So I always feel a little pres-
sured to produce something bril-
liant to wind up the semester
with. I want to leave something
sticking in the readers' minds. I
want to make them anxious to
rush back to school after sum-
mer and hang out by the news-
paper stands, waiting breath-
lessly for my words of wit and
wisdom.
Sometimes I give awards.
Sometimes I count down the im-
portant events of the semester in
an amusing way. This time, I
don't really have a whole lot to
say. I'm burned slam out.
The key word this semester
was stress. I don't know if it was
�H the caffeine pills I did at the
apathetic to write a real column this week
of mv satiric pal Big E and his so-
rority chick girlfriend. Though
this is a relationship with the
beginning of the year, or the sex-
ual misadventures 1 kept getting
involved in. Could be both.
So now I'm drained. I can
barely keep my eyes open. Even
my hormones are comatose. I
watched two porno flicks this
morning and couldn't even work
up the strength to unzip my
pants.
1 briefly considered writing
a sort of parody of Dante's "In-
ferno A column called "Bone-
head's Inferno consisting of
horrible tortures for frat boys,
bad fiction writers, anal-reten-
tive professors, sorority girls
who line up to have their pic-
tures taken with soapopera stars
it had vast humor potential,
but I just couldn't concentrate.
Maybe this summer.
I thought about a column
espousing the joys of pornogra-
phy. But I'm too tired to try to
defend myself from the tons of
hate mail I'd receive from the
feminists on campus. Maybe in
August.
1 said to myself, "Why not
just write a bunch oi personal
messages to all my friends?
Everyone likes to see his name in
print. It could be like 'Bonehead's
Personals?
That idea almost fired me
up. It's easy to write things like:
"ASHLEY: Killer date! Let's 'Rio'
again next week But then I re-
alized I'd probably forget some-
body and they'd be mad. Plus,
the Personals are so foolish any-
way.
I thought about writing an-
other installment in my popular
"Why Bonehead Hates Green-
ville" scries, but since everyone's
pretty much heard that song
enough, I'll let it lie until some-
thing particularly aggravating
comes along.
I toyed with the notion of
composing an epic love poem
based on the budding romance
dramatic potential oi, say, Bill
Shakespeare's "Romeo and Ju-
liet I'm just too tired to write it.
Maybe next semester, when
some more juicy aspects of this
sordid affair have been brought
to light.
So, since I didn't have any-
thing funny to write about, I fig-
ured I just wouldn't write a col-
umn at all this week. Then I real-
ized, "Hey! That's 20 bucksdown
the drain! I'd be foolish not to
write something! Plus, being the
role model that I am, I don't
want to add to the already ram-
pant apathy on this campus
So, here it is. Y'all have a
good summer, don't drink and
drive, be kind to all living crea-
tures, don'teat so much red meat,
and take 'ong walks after din-
ner. Until next time, may the
hangovers be gentle, and the
buzzes intense.





k
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
APRIL 20. 1989 PACE 9
Jaycees host Spring Break for hospital
By ALICIA FORD
Staff Writ�r
TheGreenvillelayceesand the
ECU Interfraternity Council are
working together to present
the semester with an event we are
hoping is going to be similar to
Mosier's Farm said Clifton
Dixon, Project Director.
The Embers, The Eccentrics,
and The Bash are being featured
"Spring Break a top forty and along with the Miss Ecu Hawai-
beach music festival on Sunday,
April 23 at the Pitt County Fair-
grounds.
"This is going to be an excel-
lent opportunity for college stu-
dents to help the Children's Hos-
pital and end the last few days of
lan Tropic Bikini Contest. The
Embers are famous for their oldies
and beach music, but the Eccen-
trics and The Bash perform a vari-
ety of cover tunes from bands like
U2, REM, The Clash, and INXS.
Fifteen fraternities will each
sponsor an entrant in the bikini
contest, and the winner will walk
away with a $500 prize and '
opportunity to represent Gn i
ville at the national contest in
Daytona Beach.
The Interfraternity Council
Miracle Telethon on WITN-TV.
The Children's Hospital is a
division of Pitt County Memorial
and has been in operation for three
years. It consistsof a newborn unit, be provided,
a pediatric unit, and a rehabilita-
tion unit. The money will go to-
ward the purchase of special
live from the fairgrounds and
coolers are welcome, but leave the
glass at home. Concessions, Coca-
Cola, and Domino's Pizza will also
purchased 1,000 tickets in advance equipment badly needed by the
The gates open at 10 a.m. and
the first band will start at 12 noon.
Tickets are $5 in advance or $8 at
grounds. "Our main concern is
that no one has too much fun and
tries to drink and drive. We are
trying to target the ECU students
and that's why we are providing
transportation said Dixon.
Dixon hopes to help the Chil-
dren's Hospital and the images of
fraternity parties at ECU. ' This
to pay for the bands, and all pro-
ceeds will go to the Children's
Hospital of Eastern North Caro-
lina. The money will be donated
on June 4 during the Children's
ECU professor of anthropology
edits book on Southern women
hospital.
"We couldn't have put this
day together without the help o(
all our sponsors said Dixon. "We
are hoping to raise $10,000 for the
Children's Hospital
WSFL will be broadcasting
the gate. Tickets can be purchased will be a chance to help some very
sick children and at the same time
install some of the Jaycee spirit
into the students of ECU. Many
people don't realize that these
students are the future leaders and
Jaycees of Greenville
at the ECU Central Ticket Office,
or you can order a pizza from
Domino's and have your tickets
delivered.
Student Transit will be avail-
able from Mendcnhall to the fair-
By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Stiff Writer
Dr. Holly Matthews, an asso-
ciate professor of anthropology
here at ECU, just completed edit-
ing a new book called "Women in
the South: An Anthropological
Perspective
The focus of this new book is
the changing roles and images of
Southern women.
The 176-page book has been
released in hardcover and paper-
bound editions by the University
of Georgia Press, its publisher.
The book includes 12 essays
on ways in which women of the
South'have been affected by
changes in traditional, social, po-
litical and cultural patterns.
Changes in the lives of women
in the South include the feminist
movement, the civil rights move-
ment and the boom in the region's
economy during the past decade.
Dr. Matthews contributed the
book's introductory essay.
The essavs take a look at the
J
Southern women in traditional
and professional roles and from
various classes, age groups and
backgrounds.
The "new" Southern women
is analyzed in two contrasting
functions: as part of a changing
region and as an important force
in maintaining the traditions and
culture of the Old South.
The essays were originally
presented at a meeting of the
Southern Anthropological Society.
The main purpose of this book
is "to stimulate a critical reassess-
ment of women's roles in and
contributions to Southern cul-
ture said a University of Georgia
spokesman.
Graduate show at Gray
By KAREN MANN
St�ff Wnm
Gray Art Gallery's latest ex-
hibit, a "Graduate Thesis Exhibi-
tion, continues this year's series of
exceptionally strong shows. The
works of three painters, one metal
designer, and one fabric designer,
all MFA candidates, will be on
display until'Mav 5.
Fabric designer Blanche
Kammer-Monroe begins the show
with the collection of handmarbled
scarves, buttons, paper, and Ki-
monos. Marbelizingisa technique
in which paint or dye is swirled to
create intricate designs. The best
examples of this technique are
Kammer-Monroe's Kimonos.
Made of silk, these four Kimonos
are interesting for their colors �
two are bright, two are more sub-
dued � and their symmetry of
Coming
This
Week
Thursday
Attic:
Gibraltar
Susie's:
Arrakis
Mendenhall:
Cocoon: The Return
(through Sunday)
Friday
Attic:
The Usuals
New Deli:
Mercyland
opens for
Slurpeeeee
Saturday
Attic:
Gibraltar
New Deli:
Liquid Sound
Susie's:
Suspects
Tuesday:
Susie's:
Food of the Gods
Wednesday:
Attic:
Comedy Zone
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
Susie's:
Rosebud
marbelized design.
However, it becomes appar-
ent that almost everything in
Kammer-Monroe's section is
marbelized, even the drawings.
There isone non-marbelized paint-
ing but it seems out numbered
and doesn't really fit with the other
works. Kammer-Monroe is obvi-
ously an expert at Marbelizing,
but it would have been nice to see
what else she can do.
Linda Darty also displays
intricate and swirling motifs in
her metal designs. Darty's works
are divided mainly into jewelry
and lamps. However, the most
interesting piece is a tea set of
silver and rosewood decorated
with blue enamel fish.
The jewelry consists of gold
and silver. Some of the necklaces,
mooches, and earrings are high-
lighted with jewels and cloisonne.
The lamps, which are made of
aluminum, wood, and sterling sil-
ver, are more colorful and a little
more fun.
The paintings of John Han-
cock are massive, horizontal wa-
ter colors and acrylic on Unryn
paper. Reminiscent of Monet's
water lilies, they utilize the coarse
texture of the paper to create a
liquid, stained glass effect.
Maria McLaughlin also works
on a massive scale. However, her
oil paintings evoke more somber
emotions. Using a predominantly
dark palette, McLaughlin layers
shapes to create a pattern of shad-
owy figures. When viewed from a
close angle, the intricate patterns
in these paintings can be fully
appreciated.
McLaughlin attempts the
same effect with three drawings.
Because of their brighter colors,
they aren't as successful as the
paintings, but they are interesting
nonetheless.
The finest works in the show
are those of Trudy Laudouceur.
Ladouceur's bright, realistic paint-
ings feature portions of figures,
often viewed from behind. "The
Bride and her Double presents
an incredibly detailed rendering
of lace, seed pearls, and satin folds.
The shoulder-to-hip view of the
figures creates an almost abstract
composition. It is an excellent
example of Ladouceur's work and
the best piece of the show.
be playing at the Jaycees' Spring Break
Laura Soles, a pianist, will close out the Alumni Week festivities with a concert. Also performing
will be Rich Holly, a percussionist.
Pianist concert closes Alumni weekend
ECU Press Release
East Carolina University's
Alumni Weekend closes Saturday
with the Fourth Annual Alumni
Concert which will feature Laura
Soles, pianist, and Rich Holly, per-
cussion, alumni of the East Caro-
lina School of Music, in perform-
ance.
The 7:30 p.m. Saturday con-
cert will be held in the A.J. Fletcher
Music Hall at the School of Music.
A reception will follow in adjoin-
ing Room 105. Seating will be on a
first come, first-served basis. The
concert is free and open to the
public.
Holly will perform works for
marimba by Leonard Bernstein
and Toshi Ichiyanagi and a tim-
pani piece he composed himself.
Joining Holly for the closing pro-
gram will be Paul Tardiff of the
East Carolina University piano
faculty for a jazz number by Chick
Corea.
Soles will play two selection,
Chopin's "Ballade in G Minor
Opus 23, and "Sona tine" by Ravel.
While on campus, Holly will
also present master classes for stu-
dents. For more information, con-
tact Mark Ford, coordinator of
percussion, at 757-6851.
The annual alumni concert is
sponsored by the East Carolina
University School of Music
Alumni Professional Society to
honor outstanding alumni.
Holly is currently professor
of percussion at Northern Illinois
College and president of the Illi-
nois Chapter of the Percussive Art
Society-
42089
1) The Dickies � "Second
Coming"
2) Raunch Hands � "Payday"
3) Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper
� "Root Hog or Die"
4) Robyn Hitchcock �
"Queen Elvis"
5) Thelonius Monster �
"Stormy Weather"
6) drivin' 'n' cryin' �
"Mystery Road"
7) The Connels � "Fun and
Games"
8) Four Who Dared � "Kids
With Dynamite"
9) Run Westy Run � "Run
Westy Run"
10) Green on Red � "Here
Comes the Snakes"
11) The Cowpokes � "Zami ir
Ain't No Guru"
12) Swamp Zombies �
"Fink"
13) XTC � "Oranges and
Lemons"
pjrlpn' th LVl Bones
Bonehead too apathetic to write a real column this week
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Sir
The last column of the se-
mester. It's always a tough one
to write. Even though the lucky
elite who stay in Greenville this
summer will be able to enjoy my
weekly missives, the masses
won't.
So I always feel a little pres-
sured to produce something bril-
liant to wind up the semester
with. I want to leave something
sticking in the readers' minds. I
want to make them anxious to
rush back to school after sum-
mer and hang out by the news-
paper stands, waiting breath-
lessly for my words of wit and
wisdom.
Sometimes I give awards.
Sometimes I count down the im-
portant events of the semester in
an amusing way. This time, I
don't really have a whole lot to
say. I'm burned slam out.
The key word this semester
was stress. I don't know if it was
the caffeine pills I did at the
beginning of the year, or the sex-
ual misadventures I kept getting
involved in. Could be both.
So now I'm drained. I can
barely keep my eyes open. Even
my hormones are comatose. I
watched two porno flicks this
morning and couldn't even work
up the strength to unzip my
pants.
I briefly considered writing
a sort of parody of Dante's "In-
ferno A column called "Bone-
head's Inferno consisting of
horrible tortures for frat boys,
bad fiction writers, anal-reten-
tive professors, sorority girls
who line up to have their pic-
tures taken with soap opera stars
it had vast humor potential,
but I just couldn't concentrate.
Maybe this summer.
I thought about a column
espousing the joys of pornogra-
phy. But I'm too tired to try to
defend myself from the tons of
hate mail I'd receive from the
feminists on campus. Maybe in
August.
I said to myself, "Why not
just write a bunch of personal
messages to all my friends?
Everyone likes to see his name in
print. It could be like 'Bonehead's
Personals?
That idea almost fired me
up. It's easy to write things like:
"ASHLEY: Killer date! Let's 'Rio'
again next week But then I re-
alized I'd probably forget some-
body and they'd be mad. Plus,
the Personals are so foolish any-
way.
I thought about writing an-
other installment in my popular
"Why Bonehead Hates Green-
ville" series,butsinceeveryone's
pretty much heard that song
enough, I'll let it lie until some-
thing particularly aggravating
comes along.
I toyed with the notion of
composing an epic love poem
based on the budding romance
of my satiric pal Big E and his so-
rority chick girlfriend. Though
this is a relationship with the
dramatic potential of, say, Bill
Shakespeare's "Romeo and Ju-
liet I'm just too tired to write it.
Maybe next semester, when
some more juicy aspects of this
sordid affair have been brought
to light.
So, since I didn't have any-
thing funny to write about, 1 fig-
ured I just wouldn't write a col-
umn at all this week. Then I real-
ized, "HeyThaf s20bucksdown
the drain! I'd be foolish not to
write something! Plus, being the
role model that I am, I don't
want to add to the already ram-
pant apathy on this campus
So, here it is. Y'all have a
good summer, don't drink and
drive, be kind to all living crea-
tures, don'teat so much red meat,
and take long walks after din-
ner. Until next time, may the
hangovers be gentle, and the
buzzes intense.





I
r
10
TT IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20. !�9
Max Able able to rock, doesn't
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Staff Writer
"Somebody Spent Their Whole
Life There" is the title of Max
Abie's second album. Sky Records
promotes it with the phrase "Max
Able is Back but who knew that
he had left, or was even here in the
first place? Has he ever been a
guest VJ on MTV? No. Have any
of his songs been listed under "Col-
lege Music" in Rolling Stone? No.
Has he even made the WZMB top
thirteen list? No. Does this mean
that his music really reeks? No.
Abie's music falls into the broad
category of "progressive It has
an upbeat pulse and a melodic
rhythm � like a hybrid of pre-
sellout REM and The Sugarcubes.
Each track is distinctive, but the
overall sound is a blend of classic
rock, blues, folk, and rockabilly.
The lyrics are as diverse as the
music itself. The lyrics range from
sweet, watery love poems such as
"I'm a-needin' to tell you your
love cures my blues" to the bi-
zarre "There are statuesof pigeons
with people sitting on them The
themes of his songs follow their
lyrics � from an ex-soldier lost in
Viet Nam to a confused traveller
in Europe.
Abie's variety also shows in the
instruments which accompany
him. Along with the standard
drums, bass, and electric guitars,
there is a grand piano, a Ham-
mond organ, a slide guitar, tabia
drums, maracas, a steel guitar, and
an accordion. Also listed under
musical credits is a car skid and
eight Brittany Spaniels.
Perhaps the only thing that
remains the same throughout the
album is Abie's voice. His vocals
have the raw, nasal quality which
has become common in progres-
sive music. Although his vocal
range seems limited, his voice is
pleasant except for a few songs in
which he whines like Randy
Travis.
Producer Michael Harris writes,
"A Southern-born artist whose
songs possess the uncanny ability
to annihilate distances and differ-
ences between cultures and
people, Max Able writes and sings
from a distinctly late-century
vantage point While this maybe
an overstatement, Abie's music is
worth a second listen � it shows
talent and variety.
There is one problem with an
artist who displays so much vari-
ety: a person who buys "Some-
body Spent Their Whole Life
There" because they heard one
track on a radio station may be
disappointed with the rest of it.
This may be the one thing that is
keeping Max Able on the shelves
and out of Rolling Stone.
Summer Theater opens 1989
season with 'Pump Boys'
R I �,
m Peace Presbyterian
' t S x v
A Canng. Lovemg Fellowship Open To All Age
Rac� Ari Bachgound. Empowered By Chnsi
In The Presbyterian Tradtjor.
Pastor BUI Goodnight. 3S&-2273
Sunday, April 23 Cunt Preacher
Michelle Mike Burcher.
Preibytertan Campus Minister
SIGNED for the
HEARING IMPAIRED
Todav. onlv the names ot
Colonial-era villages remain,
along with remnants ot the
Tinev lifestyle. Few still follow
the traditional way, harvesting
cranberries, pine cones, clamsand
sphagnum moss to live off the
land.
"The Pinelands heritage is
going to die off ver) soon says
Kenneth Yates, a Tabernacle blue-
berry farmer who grew up among
generations of Pmevs. "We don't
even have much ol a historical
society anymore. The young
people don' t wa nt to get invol ved.
"Older homes are getting torn
down, because the younger gen-
eration is not about to live primi-
tive. And people are still living in throughout America.
That robot boxing sure was something! I'm the Bonehead. Catch
MY trip to Barefoot on the Mall, with my very own pictorial
essay, right on the next page.
Pinelands in Jersey are
being slowly developed
EAGLESWOOD TOWN-
SHIP, NT (AP) � To the nature
buff, New Jersey's Pinelands are
milesoi pvgmv pines, deep forest,
creeks and bogs.
To romantics, the Pinelands
might be symbolized by the Ware-
town cabin where fiddler George
Albert once played through the
night, or the general store in
Chatsworth that still offers a table
for coffee and gossip.
In folklore, it's the birthplace
of the Jersey Devil, a place where
men live in caves and marrv their
sisters
But to some landowners,
"Pinelands, is only a title, an
annoying federal designation that
stifles development and profit.
In reality, the more than 1.1
million acres constituting the Pi-
nelands in southern New lersev
are a unique medley of tremen-
dous historical and environmental
significance.
Ringed by the urban sprawl
that gave New Jersey a bad name,
the region gained national recog-
nition in November 1978 when
President Jimmy Carter signed the
National Parks and Recreation Act
that included the creation of the
Pinelands National Reserve.
Carter's act stopped any talk
of a supersonic jetport in the
middle of this vast space, a fright-
ening prospect for an area already
being invaded by the rush of
metropolitan housing developers.
Ten years ago. it seemed that
nothing within two hours of New
York City would be left un-
touched.
But the Pinelands reserve, the
largest remaining open tract in
the mid-Atlantic states, was saved.
In a unique arrangement, the
state of New Jersy manages the
federal reserve, keeping large-
scale development in outlying
areas and maintaining the undis-
turbed nature of thousands of
acres in the middle. The state, with
federal financial help, is slowly
buving property to add to the to-
tal reserve, most of which is still
privately owned.
The state Pinelands Commis-
sion now operates with a manage-
ment plan that is both com mended
and condemned. In addition, 56
municipalities within the Pine-
lands are involved in modifying
their master development plans
to make them conform with the
goals of the protection effort.
"When the Tinelands plan
developed, there had to be accom-
modations, and some people were
hurt and some people were
helped says Pearl Schwartz of
Toms River, a member of the
Ocean County Environmental
Agency and the Ocean Nature
Society.
"But the overall picture that
has emerged in 10 years has been
on the side of good. We have been
able to control growth, which is
not happening in the rest of the
state
More than 100 years ago, the
parts of Atlantic, Burlington,
Camden, Cape May, Cumberland,
Gloucester and Ocean counties
that are now the Pinelands made
up a proserous ring of charcoal
and glass industries utilizing the
bountiful raw materials. In later
years, sawmillsand wineries flour-
ished.
Summer Thcaler Press Release
When the East Carolina Sum-
mer Theater opens its twenty-sixth
season in Greenville on July 3, the
McGinnis Theater stage will once
again come alive with actors,
dancers, and singers.
Past seasons have brought an
impressive list of stars to this ar-
eas, including Michael Learned,
Catherine Bach, Kim Hunter,
Orson Bean, Kim Zimmer, Grant
Goodeve, Jerry ver Dorn, and
William Christopher, and this
season will be no exception.
Pump Boys and Dinettes"
features nineteen down-home
tunes, twelve of which were writ-
ten by North Carolina's Jim Wann
of "Diamond Studs The Pump
Boys sell the high octane on High- da�y 10 amto 4 p.m or tickets
way 57 in Grand Ole Opry coun- may purchased bv writing the
try and the Dinettes, Prudie and General Manager, East Carolina
RhettaCupp,runtheDoublcCupp Summer Theater, ECU, Greenville,
diner next door. Together, they North Carolina, 27858-4353.
fashion a night of songs that has
received unanimous raves from
New York and other critics
idealism is basically right, and
while she is still in love with him,
it turns out that neither time nor
circumstances will allow the two
ultimately to come together. "By
all odds Tennessee Williams' Best
Script, it is eloquent, searching and
moving state the N.Y. Times.
Susan Cooper and Hume
Cronyn's play, "Foxfire is a
gentle and loving as well as a
staunchly affirmative tribute to the
country folk whose sturdiness and
J
character it celebrates. Annie
Nations, an indominitable Ap-
plachian widow of 79, lives on her
mountain farm with the sarcastic
ghost of her dead husband, Hec-
tor.
Tickets may be reserved, with
a Mastercard or Visa, by telephon-
ing 757-6829, Monday thru Fri-
MEMORIAL COINS
& PAWN
�BASEBALLCARDS
�STAMPS
�COINSUTLIES
�DIAMONDS
�TELEVISIONS
�YCR's
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
�COINS
BUY

INSTANT CASH LOANS-WE
GOLD & SILVER
All Transactions Strictly Confidential
752-7736
655M1 Ml)RIAL DRIVE
GREENVILLE
the woods, but with all the mod-
em conveniences.
Some southern Nxw lersev
natives are flattered to be called a
"Pinev But no! others.
"A Piney is a three-headed
incestuou idiot that can't walk or
talk savs )oc Homer, a member
of a Pinelands band. "We are
'indigenous' residents � born
here, raised here, growed up here
and will die here. Pineysare people
who moved here from Brooklyn
to live off the land
Russ Homer, picking on a
guitar nearby, chimes in: "The
whole thing is a hoax. The idea of
people stumbling around the
Pinelands picking sphagnum
moss for a living is nice, but it's
not hardlv real anymore
Homer points to his Uncle oe,
who builds wooden boats in
Waretown and was dubbed a
"Pinev" bv newspaper reporter
who wrote about him and hiscra ft.
"Joe turns out classic garvey
made out of Atlantic white cedar,
but he ain't no Piney" Homer
says.
Ask Joe Reid himself, and he
somewhat bashfully agree.
"Summer and Smoke a
simple love story of a somewhat
puritanical Southern girl and an
unpuntanical young doctor is one
of Tennessee Williams' most
highly regarded works. Each is
basically attracted to the other but
because of their contrasting atti-
tudes toward life, each over the
course oi years is driven away
from the other.
Not until it is too late does the
doctor realize that the girls' high
Plaza Cinema
II.17.1 Shopping Or 756-OOH8
NOW SHOWING
DISORGANIZED CRIME
7 05 ft 9:10
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NOW SHOWING
$1.50 ALL TIMES
MISSISSIPPI BURNING
R 7:00 & 9:00
CHRYSLER
MOTORS
COLLEGE
GRADUATES
GET AN ADDITIONAL
If
Lunch Specials
$395
Won. Fri. 11 a.m. til 3 p.m.
Dinner Specials
$595
Sunday-Thurs after 5 p.m.
Late Night Special
$425
Mexican Pizza Grande
SunThurs. after 10 p.m.
FriSat, after 11 p.m.
Hungry Pirate Special
$325
Mon.Fri. 2-5 p.m.
SatSun. 11 a.m. til 5 p.m.
Drink Specials � Sun. & Thurs.
Always Something Special At rg
CASH
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m
This $400 is in addition to already existing cash incentives on Jeep
Cherokes, Eagle Premiers, and Summits. For Further details on this
tremendous savings for college graduates contact:
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521 Cotanche Street
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757-1666
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GREENVILLE. NC






Tl IE CAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20. 1989 11
Mall

m
1 got to the Barefoot on the Mall thing right before the Connel's concert. I remember seeing lob
i dogs there. (Photo by Gretchen Journigan, ECU Photolab).
s u ondering where all those decorative facial tattoos were coming from. I got one that says,
dto y Angela Pridgen, ECU Photolab).
il
Student & Faculty Savings At
Overtoil's
Fresh Whole
Pork Loins
$1.19ib
Rich food Fully Cooked Tenderized
Hams
Whole or Half
99C lb.
Old Virginia
Apple Juice
12 Gallon Jug
79
Quarter Pork Loins
7-9 Chops
s1.59
Country Cane Blended Sugar
4.4 lb. bag QTV��
Limit onr ba� ntr customer orr order wl S10 food order
lb.
Center Cut
Pork Roast
$1.89 ib.
Rlchfood Eggs
Extra Large
79' dozen
Frosty Morn
Franks or Bacon
12 �. pkg.
99
Jamestown Sausage
lb. roll pkg-
Tender Fresh Broccoli
79'
bunch
Yellow Onions
5 lbs. for $1.00
Fresh Spare Ribs
5-7 lb. pkg.
$1.49 ib
Green Cabbage
12' lb.
Fresh Center Cut
Pork Chops
$1.99 ib.
Boneless Pork Loin Roast
$2.79 ib
5 to 6 lb average
Fresh Whole Pigs
69 ib
24 Hour Notice Needed
Crisco Oil
$1.99
48 oz. Bottle
Coke-Coke Classic-Diet Coke
99c
2 Lite' EottleLimit 2
Fresh Ground Hamburger Patties
$1.39
3 lbs. or more
Mitchum � PoUlo Chlpt
Ripple Regular Barbcquc
S1.49 6.5 oz. bag
Buv One Get One Free
Cottonelle Tissue
89
4 roll pkg. Limit 2

Store Hours:
Open Sundays, 1pm - 6pm
Monday - Saturdays, 8am - 8pm
Prices Effective:
Wednesday, April 19 thru
Saturday, April 22,1989
OVEKTONS
I also remember lots of drinks and food available at low, low prices. I had pizza and virgin
daquiris. Am I hip, or what? (Photo by one of those ECU Photolabpeople).
The famous people from "Guiding Light" were a bighit. People actually paid good money to have
their pictures taken and get autographs. I think I need to get in on this scam. (Photo by Gretchen
again, ECU Photoplace). �
Congratulations Seniors 1989
6
Ov
'pr,
?
ntc
?a
Q
C
Wen
ni r
?osh

fQss
V
10 Discount
On Any Regular
Priced ECU
Imprinted Item,
to Seniors Who Show
Their Receipt for
Paying Their
Graduation Fee
trt
S
0
)

s
rn.
k


Co
A
C
Pe
n:
CQfn
ed
-Ac

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cat
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Urne
v
y
A
a
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-
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ft
April 24th
thru
May 5th





1
I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989
The Clearly Labeled
i.
���
CS) T3
fl
�iiaSlJicai
�U
SI
aftflff-
D
Quote o' the Week:
"It's better than
working for a living
� Steve Reid,
Visual Editorialist
The Atf- Quotes Satire Page
Li'l tidbits o' wisdom for all who are leaving ECU
Deep Quote o' the
Week:
"In the summer of
your life, you will feel
the heat under your
collar and conscious-
ness will strike like an
afternoon squall, burst-
ing the womb of your
spring
� Mac Clark,
Business Manager
Red Herring Quote o
the Week:
"Does your dogma
bite?"
Everybody Com-
plains About The
Weather But Nobody
Does Anything About It
Quote o' the Week:
"Life's a bitch and
then it snows
� David Herring,
Assistant News
Editor
the
Personal Philosophy High Standards Dukes Quote o' the McKay Quote o the
Quote o' the Week: Quote o the Week: Week: Week:
"Follow your dream. "No, I don't expect "Little kumquat "It wasn't the read-
And if you can't follow you to be perfect just jm supposed to be the ing that got them in
your dream, follow as close as possible sheriff trouble. It was the stop-
someone who looks like � Stephanie Single- � Sheriff Roscoe P. Ping
your dream ton, Coltrane McK�y Sundwall
Cranial Damage
Quote o the Week:
"I feel like I'm pok-
ing my head with the
Empire State Building
� Chippy Bonehead
it
� Stuart Maxwell
(Former) Layout
Artist
Shay Stadium Quote
the Week:
"Don't bitch, just do
it is your job
� Shay Sitlinger,
Ad Layout Artist
its
Apathy Quote o'
Week:
"What the hell;
just a story
� Chris Siegel,
Sports Editor

Medical Quote o' the
Week:
"Everyone should
live for infection in the
right direction without
a terminal infection
� Mindy Mclnnis,
Staff Writer
Taking Flak Quote o'
the Week:
"Don't take @$
from anyone, no matter
how many harassing
phone calls you may
receive
� Michael Martin,
Assistant Sports
Editor
Very Odd Quote o' the
Week:
"Don't let your belly
make you smelly
� Adam Blanken-
ship,
Senior Ad Represen-
tative
Quote o' the Week
About the Chancellor
"I think its rubbing
offwhatIdidtoDick
� Susan Howell,
Production Manager
Really Exasperated
Quote o' the Week:
"Jimmy's playing
golf again?"
� Stephanie Emory,
Advertising Techni-
cal Supervisor
Enlarging Quote o
the Week:
"Nothing that a can
of WD-40 and a wrench
won't fix.
� Peter Eames
Fernald,
General Manager
Curse o' the Week:
"Darn you to the
seventh level of heck
� Angela Raper,
Prospective Staff
Cartoonist
Far Too Many Initials
Quote o' the Week:
"Organization is the
key to success
� James F.J.
McKee,
Director of Adver-
tising
Pretty Darn Sugges-
tive? Quote o the Weef
"Have you hugged
your snake today?"
� Stephanie
Folsom,
Managing Editor
Subtle Rebuke Quote
o' the Week:
"Having this job
doesn't mean I now
know what it's like to be
an editor. It means I'm
now thoroughly trained
to be a mother
� Stephanie
Folsom,
Managing Editor
Copy Editor Ex-
traordinaire
Ripped Off From
"Alice" Quote o' the
Week:
"You're jumpier than
a long-tailed cat in a
room full of rocking
chairs
� Brad Bannister,
Copy Editor Ex-
traordinaire
Quote o the
Pun
Week:
"Time dies when
you're not having fun
Font o Wisdom
Quote o' the Week:
"Love children. Be
kind to animals. Toler-
New Relationship
Quote o the Week:
"I'm in a state of pre-
a hole-discovery bliss
� Rinny Farver
From My Mom Quote
o' the Week:
"Well, you just better ate others. And for Har
� Micah Harris, scratch your mad place ian�s sake, send me
Staff Writer and get glad moneyl"
� Tom Gurganus, � Scott Maxwell,
Scatological Quote o staff Cartoonist Satire Page Editor
the Week:
"A man bears the
sight of his own turds
better than those of a
stranger
� Micah Harris,
Staff Writer
Amazingly Profound
Quote o' the Week:
"Don't take life too
News Layout seriously. You'll never
get out of it alive
� Richard Haselrig,
Staff Cartoonist
Incantation Quote o
the Week:
"Lizards and giz-
zards, bugs and ants;
now you're in a big fat
trance
� Elfle Ryan,
Rinny's roommate
Living Dangerously
Quote o' the Week:
"It's possible for a
man to love two women
� as long as neither one
finds out. Yup, yup,
yup
� Jim Shamlin,
Staff Writer
About My Supervisor
Quote o the Week:
"James Ward I
started working with
him in 1984. He's a nice
tr
Staff Illustrator Jeff
Parker rots in Hell for
being such a sexist pig.
And here is his pal F,
who doesn't offend anyone
BigE
to-be graduates
iv
soon-
Brain On Holiday ST'JSl
Quote o the Week:
Dear Big E,
After a long time at ECU, I am
finally graduating � iI pass my
exams. What happens if I flunk
my exams?
Signed, Greg Roache
Dear Roache Clip,
According to graduation con-
cession chairman Jefferson Davis
Hogg, "You will not graduate, on
account of not fulfilling the neces-
sary requirements But J.D. has a
plan to suit you.
For the low, low, low price of
$19.95, Mr. Hogg will sell you an
"I can't think of a
quote
� Lori Martin,
Staff Writer
Couldn't Resist This
Quote o' the Week:
"I didn't live in this
century
� Dan Quayle,
Court Jester
Almost Too Esoteric
Even For Us Quote o'
the Week:
�I never sleep I just 7� eU walk away
dream about the �ad, ,come back ��
explain to you what he
Bl F doesn't like. If you're
" having problems at
Mother. May I? Quote homc or anything, hell
give you time off, let
you go home and solve
your problem. He's a
est man, and if you've imitation, simulated-wood-grain
got any problems he'll framed, full-textured diploma to
sit down and talk with han& over y�ur firePlace
It will
impress the most simple of minds.
you and solve your prob- Women will flock to your fire-
lems with you. If you've place. Men will prance around
got a problem on the job y�ur hearth- But' belter yet' Par"
he's not a violent man,
he'll sit you down and
talk with you about your
problem, and if you ever
need help on the job
when you're working, he
will never cuss at you;
he never has, not since
I've been here. Just like
I said, if he gets worried
ents will think the piece of crap is
real.
So, go ahead, flunk all those
finals and don't officially gradu-
ate but say you did anyway.
Ollie would make you look like a
Little E and embarrass you in front
of the people that hate you and
want to see you fall in a creek.
Signed, Justin Bearcat
Dear just in Ollie,
If you want to hear some ex-
citing graduation speakers, here
is a list:
A1 Capone � University of
Chicago
CozzeI McQueen � North
Carolina State
�Dick Crum (no bottles please)
� University North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
David Duke � University of
Alabama
John Poindexter � Ameri-
can University
FawnHall�Secretary Tech-
nical Institute
George Bush � "I am going
to do that speech thing for some
school in that state thing.
having any fun for my whole life,
I learned a little too late when to
have fun and when not to. E, wh it
am I going to do when I go to worV
for 1MB in May?
Signed, Business Major
Dear Big Buz,
Ah well, blow it off.
Major
Dear Biggest E,
A lot of people, like that Bibbv
Conehead guy, talk junk about
Greenville, but, you know, E, 1
kinda like this town. I can trulv
say I will miss the Emerald Citv
when I leave in two weeks.
I was initially supposed to
Big E � Sheets University in graduate in the Spring of 1985 and
Malcolm, GA.
tasft Ask
BigE
Ollie
Partier
sheets
o' the Week:
"Stand aside, every-
body; I take large steps
� Angela Raper,
Prospective Staff
Cartoonist
Incredibly Offensive
Male Chauvinist Sexist
Pig Quote o the Week:
nice man and I've never
had a problem with
him
� Alton Ray Harris
A Force For Good In
Our Times
Dear Ear,
Honor Roll in high school.
Shattered North Carolina I.Q.
records. Scored the highest SAT
score possible. Dean's List first
three and a half years in college.
Various honors and univeraal
recognitions as probably the great-
est student ever. And then came
the final semester of my final year
American like Ollie come to guide of in college.
our graduates into the 1990s with After never imbibingany thing
his zest for ethics and the Ameri- but water for my whoIe llfe' a
wicked friend made me drink a
Dear E,
Why are graduations so bor-
ing? I attended one Liberty Uni-
versity graduation last year and
who of all people gave the gradu-
ation speech but Oliver Twist
North, that great Marine Lt. Col.
who is the greatest American who
ever lived.
Why can't ECU have a great
I would have done so Cum on
Laurels, or what ever. But at the
last minute I changed mv major
from Quantitative Micro Chemi-
cal Analysis to Leisure Systems
Studies. This happened again in
the Spring of 1986, Spring of 1987
Spring of 1988 until finally my
folks were getting a little upset
with all this change of major thing
at the last minute kind ot thing.
So after majoring in Geneal-
ogy, Philosophy, Water Fountain
Science and � oh jeez � Journal-
ism, I will finally graduate with a
degree in Industrial Hygiene. My
question is: how longdo you think
it'll take me to finish grad school7
Signed, In Love With ECU
Dear Major Major,
At this rate 1 project yon will
be taking Gerontology classes
can Way? This would be a great wicked tnena maae me annx a while minoring in Arthritic Pains
time for Ollie to come and talk, eer�a cool, wet, throat-tickling, by the time you finish grad school.
especially after the end of his burp causing beer. Come on, dude, ECU is a good-
grossly exaggerated trial where Now, lam desolate and down time place and an all right place to
Then again, maybe he proved he was innocent by not and out From a theme "g of walk to class in, but grad school?!
"Boy, I'd like to drink I'm wrong saying anything. "Do do and do' I went toAh Leave the G city forever or end up
fcK-?fc�r- rl. v��� I am just writing to ask why well, blow it off like one of our fnends who shall
her Datn water. � CnrlS Norman, the hell Ollie doesn't come down E, I am just barely passing my go unnamed (except to say that
� Jeff Parker, Darkroom Techni- here and dose down your com- last semester full of crips. I have a he's Clay Deanhardt) and live in
dan mie-oriented newspaper. Yeah, -D average. It seems, after never Greenville forever (f n
Staff Illustrator
�� �
Y





i

Overkill
By Friedrich
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By Harris and Gurganus
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-9
-x JSLTHaTVASNTA
ilPER.OO HAT WAS i
To our editors, Shelton Branl (vho gjve us a job�
and ttr TarWcr ivsho ran editorial interference
jjaxe art asvistjnce andmost importantlv got
l.s j raise) To Chris Norman !ohn Heath and I tl
Mt-jJir who gjve us teedback and technical
Had u'f.
! To Stevr and Angela Reid, who showed us all thr
(apanesc animation jnJ Rat us ood taiks or
j music and books To V kkj thank ou for ail youi
, pj'�nL� and -nJtrstandms To Michelle thanks
tor rutting up with all our cartoonist meetings
; Toai! the girls �nr �r loved before who wandered
in and ouf our door. To all of vou we dedicate this
J final episode ot ORPHEUS
The Law
By Reid
r S l,
Gambda Gambda Hey!
By Elliott
��. X T?l K,
�K A"V SC HHA
'�� JOHH
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i'
WHAf'KE W f5�AA
y
WCUT CBKjUNrT GET'
TC TRy ANY CcPEHAtjEAi
il BEST ,Wl�
Some Good Quotes That Didnt Get Used
B,f i-S USCU DCPtCATF-a Tt TWE. UTTUfc t�UPfy WHO CAe- IN t OUT OP T4�- UVE� OF TC CHAMPA cAHaaA HKY SKTWEWa SO a,0iCNy-
F9
Bye Paul!
i or the last week of this semester, the last week o' college for many of you (sniff, sniff) we end
with a last cartoonist biography. Sure, ifs a narcisstic thing to do, but cartoonists are
interesting people, and need all the publicity they can get This last bum is Jeff Parker, the
. ditor (haw) of the comics page and staff illus-writer. He started doing the Undercover Cats in
985, and since then it has evolved into Tails of the Undercover Cats, presenting almost
everything but the cats. Parker has also been known to draw lots of women, which for some
eason makes women mad. At least he doesn't slap his face all over the page every week any
more. You oughta get to know him, he's a nice guy. Even if he does talk about himself in the
third person. And there you are.
THE INTERVIEW THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD
Who or what influenced you in your comics work? Steve Rude, Harvey
Kurtzman, Alan Moore, Dave Stevens, Norman Rockwell, Hank
Ketcham.
What is your greatest achievement? once started a lemonade stand it
became very profitable and grew, and grewtoday you know it by the
more popular accolade: Trump Industries
Greatest failure? Nor becoming an English major sooner. And selling my
Irmonade stand.
Career ambitions: To write and illustrate comics, then write novels, turn
the novels into screenplays, and direct them. And I can do it, too.
Favorite books: TTie Lord of the Rings trilogy, Huckleberry Finn, The
rower of Myth, To Kill a Mockingbird, Burroughs stuff, and various
comics like Nexus and Watchmen.
Favorite movies: James Bond flicks, It's A Wonderful Life, Cat People,
Roger Rabbit, Hitchcock films, Jaws, Superman, Raiders of the Lost Ark,
The Blues Brothers. TV shows: Andy Griffith and Star Trek
Mission in Life: To destroy the Honeycomb Hideout
Favorite wrestlers: Jesse The Body Ventura, Nature Boy Ric Flair
Interests, favorite pastimes: Eating at Bojangles, Doin' the beach thing,
scuba-diving, part-time wrestling on the pro-circuit, talking like Floyd
Tum-ons: Blonde women, seafood, good vibes
Turn-offs: Pollution, cigarette smoke, French animation and comics,
Boston (the group), Jacksonville and Kinston (the cities).
Favorite music: The Police, INXS, The Beatles, Sinead O' Conner Elvis
Everyone should be my friend because: I just might save your life one day
'But Hell ain't half full
�Flaming Carrot
"You're a headstrong young man
�Eros, Plan 9 From Outer Space
"F . fiiiiiivve
�Floyd, The Andy Griffith Show
Pull my finger
�Paul Friedrich
"I thought we'd walked in on a couple
of smooth boys"
�Larry, from Newhart
"Did everybody get a sheet?"
� A teacher
"See that you do
�Micah Harris
I'll smack ya again�And you'll like it"
�Humphrey Bogart, TJte Maltese Falcon
Yeah-huh '
�Angela Reid
'We don't do things that way in Mayberry7
�Andy Taylor
'I thought I told you to SHUT UP
�Reid Fleming
"I'm not totally dim. After all, 1
am the Supreme Being"
�The Supreme Being,
Time Bandits
Bon Uoyage, Paul
This is the end of an era. Paul Friedrich is currently the longest running
cartoonist (he can go three miles without cramps) on the Pirate Comics page,
and is now going to graduate after all this time. Overkill began in 1984 as a
small strip with such oddities as the Prophet Sheepdog and other characters
with great big eyes. For a very short while it sort of became a strip called
Zimmy, with characters who were almost nothing but eyes. And then came
the Bluetowelskis, a lovable family that all died off except for Uncle Lou,
Hubie, and the occasional Steve Scary. Paul has had an incredibly funny strip
every week now for a long time, and he always made his deadlines. No one
can ever forget Surfin' with the Lizard King, The Return of Henry Ford,
Uncle Lou's 29 Things To Do On the Toilet, What if Uncle Lou and Hubie
met Other Cartoon Characters, and tons more. He showed up to every
cartoonist meeting, too� but that had something to do with free beer. He's
one of the nicest guys in the world, and a pleasure to work with. We wish
him a lot of success in the real world, and this page will not be the same
without him. Thanks, Paul, we'll miss you more than class.
�The East Carolinian, The Comics Page
I'd like to take this remaining space to thank my good friends and co-workers, the cartoonists of
this fine page. Special merit goes to Tom Gurganus and Richard Haselrig, who have often
laboured long into the night to finish their respective comics, and consistently turn out great
work. Rik, the frat boy strip is really coming along well, and its funny. I don't even bother
censoring it anymore. Paul, you've got enough praise for one lifetime, you're deified now. Steve,
thanks for the entertaining Laws, and letting us all live in your home now and then. And
Micah, thanks for all the good counsel and writing�your plan ultimately worked, you do
control most of this page. We'll be famous someday. Though I may stay up incredibly late
putting this darn page together (especially that EPIC last week), its alwavs worth it because
of the quality of people I get to weak with. Thanks, friends, for making this a page to be proud
of. �Parker





n

THE EAST C ARCH INI AN
Sports
APRIL 20, 1989 PACE 14
Young hurlers find going rough
Monarchs nip Pirates with five big runs in second inning
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Sports Kiitur
Following the heartbreaking
losses to UNC-Wilmington last
weekend, ECU had the unenvi-
able task o traveling to Norlfolk,
Va to take on Old Dominion
University. ECU threw a trio of
young pitchers at the Monarchs,
who pitched well for the Pirates,
but not well enough to win. The
Pirates fell 7-5 to ODU.
The Pirates jumped on the
Monarchs early scoringone run in
the first inning. John Adams
singled with one out in the first
and scored on Calvin Brown's
double to left center.
The Monarchs weren't to be
held quiet for long. In the bottom
of the second, ODU pushed five
runs across freshman pitcher Tom
Moye. With one out, Scott Th-
ompson singled and came in to
score on Dan Barbara's home run.
The round-tripper put the Mon-
archs up 2-1.
ODU continued to push runs
across off Moye. Chuck Lane
singled and Hafling followed with
a base hit. Lane scored on a drive
by Pat Evangelista. The run
pushed the the lead to 3-1 and
chased Moye from the game
Rodney Colvin came in to
relieve Moye and struck out the
next batter to get the second out
He then hit Ty Dawkins to load
the bases. Barry Miller drove a
double off Colvin to plate Hafling
and Evagelista. The two runs fin-
ished off the Monarch's five-run
second inning and gave them a 5-
1 lead.
ODU tacked on single runs in
the fourth and fifth to push the
lead 7-1. With David Willis on the
mound, Curt Schaffer doubled,
then scored on a wild pitch later in
the fourth inning. Hafling would
hit an RBI single in the fifth that
scored ODU's seventh and final
run.
The Pirates would try to rally
late in the game pushing two runs
across in the seventh and two in
the eighth, but that would be all
they could do. In the eighth,
Adams would get a bunt single
and Tommy Eason walked. After
advancing, both runners scored
on a single by Chris Cauble.
In the ninth, ECU put two
more runs on the board. Mike
Andrews led off with a single, but
was erased on David Ritchie's
infield grounder. Ritchie stole
second and scored when John
Thomas reached on an error.
Adams walked, but he was also
forced at second on Eason'sgroun-
der. There was an error on the
throw to first which allowed
Thomas to score. That made the
score 7-5, but the Pirates could get
no closer.
ECU was lead by Adams who
was three for four with two runs
scored. Andrews also had a mul-
tiple hit game as he collected two
hits for the Pirates.
The loss moved the Pirates to
26-6 on the season and the Mon-
archs went to 21-15.
Pigout Party highlights weekend
(SID)�It's about that time of
year again for the Great Pirate
PurpleGold Pigskin Pigout Party
at Hast Carolina University.
This year's party, the sixth
life
,
Miller Lite All-Star
Larry Csonka
Former polphin
m i
Miller Lite All-Star
Ben Davidson
Former Raider
annual, will take place April 20-22
in Ficklcn Stadium on the ECU
campus. The event will include all
the fun activities of the past and
some new happenings. It all adds
up to a weekend of fun and excite-
ment that should make this year's
Great Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin
Pigout Party the best yet.
The activities get started on
Thursday, April 20 with the Pig-
Out Golf Classic Social and Auc-
tion. Persons participating in the
golf tournament are invited to the
social and auction as part of the
$150 donation.
The golf tournament gets
underway Friday at 8:30 a.m. The
entrv deadline is April 10 and
golfers wanting to play should get
their names in early since the tour-
nament was full last year.
The carnival activities, a fa-
vorite with people of all ages,
begins at 6 p.m. on Friday at Fick-
len Stadium.
The Pig-Out Banquet startson
Fridav at 7 p.m. in the Greenville
Hilton. Past ECU letterman Terry
Long, an All-America offensive
tackle and Pittsburgh Steeler, wfll
be honored. Also,oneof theMiller
Lite All-Stars will sav a few words.
The banquet is open to the public
with admission being $50.
The Band of Oz, one of the top
beach music bands in the South-
east, will perform at Ficklen Sta-
dium Friday at 9:30 p.m. A large
fireworks display will be set of f at
10 p.m.
1 he pig cooking contest be-
ginsat 10:30 p.m. with40entrants
trving to see who can cook up the
best pork. There are forms still
available to enter the pig-cooking
contest. For more information call
Phil Hatch at the Pirate Club (757-
6178). The first place winner re-
ceives a $500 cash award and a
$500 membership in the Pirate
club. There are awards for the top
five places.
One of the new events at this
year's Great Pirate PurpleGold
Pigskin Pigout Party will be the
Punt, Pass and Kick Competition,
sponsored by Converse. The pre-
liminary competition begins at 9
a.m. on Saturday with finals at
halftimeof the annual spring foot-
ball game.
The annual softball slugfest
tournament, sponsored by the
ECU Department of Intramural
Recreational Services, begins at 9
a.m. and the carnival opens for a
second day at 10 a.m. Saturday.
Barbecue plates start being
soldat 10 a.m. Tickets for a plateof
barbecue and the spring game are
$5.00 in advance and $6.50 on Sat-
urday (Plates will be $4.00 and the
game ticket is $2.50.)
ECU fans will also get a chance
to get autographs with Miller Lite
All-StarsBen Davidson and Larry
Csonka and the Pirate football
team during the Saturday festivi-
ties. There will also be a bathing
suit contest for men and women
and many games for people of all
ages. You'll also get a chance at
the dunking booth, an annual fa-
vorite of everyone.
Then, at 3:30 p.m the Pirates
take to the field for the annual
spring football game. This will be
the first chance to view Bill Lewis'
football squad and everything
looks promising for this year's
Pirate squad.
Also, remember that Gary
Over ton's Pirate baseball team
hosts Virginia Commonwealth
during the weekend with single
games played at 7 p.m. both Fri-
day and Saturday nights.
The 6th Annual Great Pirate
PurpleGold Pigskin Pigout Party
is sponsored by CO. Tankard
Miller Lite, in conjunction with
Converse and the Hilton Inn.
Wendy Tonker awaits a pitch form UNC-Wilmington in Wednesday's doubleheader. Tonker and
the Lady Pirates had a rough day as the Seahawks swept a pair from ECU (Photo bv Angela
Pridgen, ECU Photo Lab).
Defense gains scrimmage honors
(SID) � The East Carolina
Pirate football team held their final
scrimmage of the spring season
Wednesdav before the scheduled
J
spring game April 22. First-year
head coach Bill Lewis said he "was
pleased with the way the defense
performed" during the one hour
and 45 minute workout
"Today was the first time this
spring that I saw the defense re-
ally flying to the football. That's
the kind of intensity I want from
the defense and I was very happy
to see it Lewis said.
Linebacker Anthony Th-
ompson had a standout perform-
ance with four tackles for losses
totaling 26 yards. Lineman Joe
Holmes had a pair of sacks for
minus 16 vards.
Lewis was pleased with the
performance of transfer quarter-
back Chad Grier. "He (Grier) has
had two very good scrimmages,
this one today and the one on Sun-
day, where he looked very good
Lewis said.
Grier was 20 of 36 passing for
193 yards with one touchdown
and an interception in Wednes-
day's practice. Running back Wil-
lie Lewis was also a standout
performer, gaining 78 vards on 17
carries and scoring one touch-
down.
One injury of note occured on
Wednesday Three-year letterman
quarterback Travis Hunter suf-
fered a knee injury that was to be
evaluated Wednesday night.
Lewis said that Hunter is doubt-
ful for Saturdav's PurpleGold
game.
ECU will end its spring drills
with the PurpleGold game Sat-
urday, April 22. The game is part
oi the 6th annual Great Pirate
PurpleGold Pigskin Pigout
Partv.
Football's unsung heroes: managers' role invaluable
By STEVE ALLEN
Staff Writer
When East Carolina's football
team takes the field for a game ev-
eryone notices the coaches, the
quarterbacks, the defensive line-
men and the offensive linemen.
But, when one looks at the equip-
ment the playersare wearing, they
hardly notice who is responsible
for repairing jerseys, helmets and
shoulder pads; the football man-
agers.
A lot of people think that
football managers have an easy
iob. Manager Judd Crumler will
argue that they don't just show up
at games with no idea of what to
do. He said, "Our fall season starts
during the furst of August. We
work all day, every day until
school starts, and then it eases off
slightly. He continued, "I think
that when people say this job is
easy, they don't realize what we
have to do
Manager Joe Liggett said it
takes a of of dedication for this job.
He said, "It's a lot of hard work.
You have to love this job to suc-
ceed It takes a person with a
tough hide to make it as a man-
ager, and as Liggett added, any-
one who doesn't want to work
and put in the time won't make it.
Football managers endure
hours of practice, just as the play-
ers do. They have to set up the
field 30 minutes before the play-
ers are supposed to practice. Prac-
tice dummies have to be set up,
and any broken equipment must
be fixed. Also, meetings must be
held with coaches to see what is in
store for that practice.
When game time rolls around,
players must have clean helmets
and jerseys, new stickers on their field, and when he was ten, he was
helmets, and the helmets must be taken to an away game at N.C.
waxed. The managers are respon- State.
sible for all of these chores, and as People who want to become a
Liggett said, sometimes things get manager ususally are very at-
not fixed, and the player is injured
responsibility would probably fall
on the managers shoulders.
Not all managers have as
much experience as Edwards and
crazy, and he has to stop and re- traded to sports. Sponhaltz said, Crumpler. There are some young
gain control of himself. He said, "The responsiblity is great, but if guys who are managers, but they
"Sometimes there is serious stress- you love athletics, it's beautiful, don't have to worry about com-
ing out. When this happens, I take We enjoy what we do Sponhaltz peting against each other for sta rt-
For first time manager George
Lee, the fact that he is one of the
young guys doesn't bother him.
He is anxious to learn from the
more experienced guys. He said,
"When I am on the job, I do as
much as I can , and learn as much
as I can Lee knows the challenge
All o the ECU football man-
agers havea big responsibilitv that
is somewhat overlooked bv many.
As Crumpler said, these manag-
ers are "the people being the
scenes They can be credited for
hanging in there when things are
frantic, and can also be rewarded
a deep brea th, step back and evalu-
ate everything
With all of the responsibilities
Liggett and other manager endure,
many people would think it is all
bad. Head manager Dal Edwards
said the work is hard, but said, "I
enjoy the challenge
As head manager, Edwards
has to relate to a lot of people each
day. He is responsible for talking
to coach Lewis about what the
next job is for the other managers
and himself.
When the ECU. football play-
ers hit the road for an away game,
the managers have to really take a
deep breath, because that is when
things can get really frustrating.
Equipment manager Fred
Sponhaltz said the pace becomes
frantic on the road. He said,
"Things have to be done ina hurry.
We have to make arrangements
for the weekend, and be at the
airport at a specific time
Sponhaltz said the association
with this coworkers is what keeps
him going on the job, especially
during away games.
Crumpler said the managers
are at a disadvantage during the
away games because they are out-
numbered. He said, "When we
have home games, we use nine
people, but when we have an away
game, only three managers can
go He is used to being around
lots of action, because he grew up
living across from ECU'S practice
added that if someone's h'lm't is ing positions.
is tough, but said he is ready for for keeping the players' uniforms
the responsibilitylooking clem.
Pirate's Booty
Football fan support starts with spring game
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Sport Editor
Saturday marks the beginning
of a new era in Pirate football.
First year head coach Bill Lewis
and his Pirates will bring to an end
their spring practice by playing
their inter-squad scrimmage in
connection with the 6th Annual
Great Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin
Pigout Party.
The team will take to the field
on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. in what through a lot of hard work and
many hope will be the start of a
winning Pirate program. With a
new head coach and a new look
for the Pirate team, their is a lot of
enthusiasm about thisyear'steam.
Pirate fans have seen a de-
cline in Pirate football since the
successful 1983 season. Since going
8-3 in 1983, the Pirates have not
been able to gain a winning record
in five seasons. Attendance for the
most part has been down since
1985 and fans have been scarce at
some contests the past few years.
Lewisbringsaget-after-it style
seasons will be more wide-open as the fan support it receives. If a
under the new coaches. Scrim- lot of people come out and seethe
mages played so far this spring Pirates play, it will help the confi-
have shown an offense that is not dence of the team,
afraid to throw the ball, which The thing we have to remem-
will please a lot of Pirate fans. ber is if you haven't seen the Pi-
After compiling a 12-32 over rates play and haven't been an
the past four seasons, fan support active supporter, what right do
has been slowly dwindling. But you have to complain. Since I have
one thing we as fans have to re- been here, there has been nothing
member is that programs take a but negative comments made
while to develop. The success of about the football team. But what
the 1983 team didn't just happen right do we have to complain, if
over night. That record came about we are not out there to support
them.
dedication. This year's team has With a new coach and a dif-
performed well this spring and is ferent attitude and outlook on
deeper than teams that the Pirates football, the Pirate program has
have fielded the past several years undergone a lot of change. Fans
and could be the base for future now have to realize that the pro-
Pirate success. gTam ny no he immediately
The one thing this team needs successful. Teams like Miami (Fla.)
now is support. Support from the and Syracuse didn't become win-
students and the community. The ners over night. It took years of
more people that come out on hard work and fan support to
Saturdays to see the team play the make those teams what they are
better. Screaming fans and a today. With that kind of backing, people and there is no reason why
packed stadium will always help the Pirate program could take the we, cant flH evry game. But
to pump up the team. And what first step to building a winner this lels start mis Saturday with the
better time to start then right now season. PurpleGold scrimmage. Show
of play and a young coaching staff at tne spring game. It's time for we as Pirate sup- the team tha there are fans who
that should add a lot of excite- Even though the game is in- porters to takealookatwhatbeing care about Pirate football and its
ment to the 1989 Pirates. A team ter-squad, fansarestill important a fan is all abouUlt means putting success. Go out and watch it �
that has been conservative for the The PurpleGold party and Pi- up with the losing seasons and the you may be surprised at what you
most part over the past several rate football is only as successful heartache. It also means going to see!
every game, even if you have to
suffer through some losing sea-
sons. The more the fans stick with
it, the better the chances are that
the team will be motivated to come
out on Saturdays and play hard.
But it has to start now. You
can't just wait till later and say
"Well, I'll go to the games when
the season starts The season has
started. Spring practice is very
important to a football program
and the spring scrimmage is the
culmination of that hard work.
They make it open to the public to
get the fans excited about what
lies ahead for Pirate football. It is
now up to the fans to support the
team.
Let's face the facts folks, win-
ning takes a lot of hard work and
time. We're just going to have to
stick with it, so that the team knows
there is fan support behind them
Ficklen Stadium holds 35,000
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ECU bows to Pack in finals
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STUDENT STORES
r at
BOOKSTORE
Wright Building
Mon -Fri 8 30 a.m. - 5 p m.
Telelphone. 757-6731
SODA SHOP1
t Building
D a.m - 5 p.m.
phone 757-6731
"THE CROATAN"
MonThurs. 7:30 a.m. -
Fri. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m. - 12 30 p m
Telephone 757-6477
� ick
our
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989 15
Reid gets 10.000th
Hornets win 20th ECU golfers finish second in CAA
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP) � Winning a 20th game in a
season usually doesn't mean much
on a night a player scores his
10,000th career point, but it does
in the case of the Charlotte Hor-
nets expansion team.
Dell Curry came off the bench
to score 31 points and Robert Reid
added 16, including point No.
10,000, as Charlotte continued to
surprise the experts this season
with a 121-105 victory over the
New Jersey Nets Tuesday night.
"Twenty was the big figure
because no one picked us to win
more than 10 or 12 Hornets coach
Dick Harter said. "But we have
good people, who take real pride
in their effort. There isn't a team
in this league that has pU �d
harc �" 'ast two or three week;
of the season
Reid, 33, was just as happy
with the team's accomplishment
as his personal success.
"It's a tremendous feeling but
it's especially nice because we
won said the 10-year veteran,
whoaveragesl4.8 points pergame
this season. "You have to remem-
ber this is a team made up of a
bunch of castoffs that nobody
wanted. But I think we showed
tonight that we have the aggres-
siveness, technique and ability to
win
Tripucka, who earlier this year
scored his 10,000 career point,
added 18 for Charlotte and Earl
Cureton had 16.
Charlotte is 20-60 with two
games left in the regular season.
The ECU golf team finished
its season with a second place
finish in "trie Colonial Athletic
Association conference tourna-
ment in Hot Springs, Va.
The Pirates finished with a
936 total at the end of the three-
day tourney, 20 strokes under the
winning mark set by the Univer-
sity of Richmond. William and
Mary took third place with a total
of 945.
In fourth place with a three-
round total of 969 was the team
from George Mason. Other teams
participating in the championship
tournament were UNC-Wilming-
ton (970), James Madison (974),
Navy (975) and American (1014).
Although a second place fin-
ish is admirable, the outcome of
the tournament was a disappoint-
ment to the golfers. They lost their
two-year titleof conference cham-
pions.
ECU'S Francis Vaughn faired
well in the tourney. Vaughn took
first place honors with a three-
round total of 222. In second place
individually was captured by
Richmond's Andy Brock. Third
and fourth honors also went to
Richmond golfers.
In team scores, ECU'S Simon
Move took second with a 234 fin-
ish. John McGinnis finished with
a 237 stroke totalAlso playing for
the Pirates were Tee Davies and
Paul Garcia.
All three days of the touma
ment were played in favorable
weather at Cascades Golf Course
which played to a par 71.
"We choked. It was a very
disappointing end to the season
co-captain Paul Garcia said.
Co-captainTee Davies played
in his last college tournament and
was a big asset to the team. 'Tee
was a great influence on the team,
and he was a consistent player
Garcia said.
'EAST CAEOILUNHAN
EveryTuesdav
and Thursday
Offense keys victory
The East Carolina Lacrosse
Club defeated Cape Fear on Sun-
day, by a score of 17-6. This high
score of goals was unprecedented
by the offense.
The victory over Cape Fear, a
UNC Wilmington based club,
began immediately with two goals
by Jay Black. The heavier, slower
defensemen were no match for
the quick speed of Black. After
outrunning his defensemen, Black
had no problem with the one
goalie. Next to score was Pete
Gibbsanother attackmen. Hisout-
side shot was deadly, banging
two in back to back. Midfielder
Tom Banks scored on a feed from
Bl. ck, and Hank MaCracken
sc u-ed, leaving the score 6 to 1.
This was the closest the match
would get.
These starting three attack-
men would account for 11 of the
17 goals. For midfielders Branin
Thorn and Drew Bourque out,
each had two for the day. The
midfield line made up of Ken
Zeilman, J .D. Carpenter and Banks
played excellent on face-offs and
clears.
The defense for East Carolina
also played well, although the
ball was rarely on their side of the
field. This was due to John Mc-
Cauley and Mark Henderson's de-
livering it back to the offense.
The Pirate Lax player of the
week went to Jay Black who had
six goals and four assists for the
day. When asked about the game
afterwards, Black replied, "All in
a day's work for coach Duke
Whelan's well oiled machine
The ECU lacrosse team next
plays Saturday, their last game.
Game time is 12 p. m during the
Pigskin Pigout.
d cover or paperback whether used on this campus or not
5 market value!
J.T. Gibbs fires one past the Davidson goalie in previous action. Gibbs and his teammates found the
goal often and easily, as they defeated Cape Fear, 17-6. The Pirates will play their final game of the
season on Saturday (Photo by Mar Startari).
Pirates second in state
ECU bows to Pack in finals
The East Carolina Rugby
Team traveled to Greensboro over
the weekend to play in the North
Carolina Rugby Union State Tour-
nament. There they defeated
Duke, and the No. 1 seed North
Carolina, only to lose to NCSU in
the finals, giving ECU a season
mark 8 9-1.
In the first round on Satur-
day, the Pirates defeated a less
than impressive, but highly talka-
tive Duke team, 14-0. The wet
conditions hampered the usually
high scoring Pirate backs, with
both teams tied at zero at the half.
ECU came out strong the secondd
half, as senior Greg Roche took a
Philip Ritchy pass in from five
meters for the game's first score.
Bob Eason, another senior, fol-
lowed suit with another score
minutes later. Dave "Red Bash"
Bowman added the game's 3rd
try after running through several
helpless Duke defenders. Frank
Cutler made the conversion to
push the margin to 14-0.
ECU faced theNo. 1 seed NC
Tar Heels in the 2nd round Sun-
day morning. After falling to a 0-
7 halftime deficit, the ruggers ral-
lied to beat UNC 9-7. ECU came
out in the second half showing no
mercy as two Carolina players
were carried off the field. Blair
Byrd scored the game's only try
making the score 6-7. Ritchy was
credited with his second assist of
the weekend. With only seconds
remaining, Frank Catler kicked a
30 meter penalty kick to give ECU
a 9-7 lead and the victory.
ECU faced NCSU in the finals
Sunday afternoon, The comeback
win over Carolina only one hour
before seemed to hamper the Pi-
rates as they were beaten for the
state championship. ECU attacked
for the majority of the first half but
after three missed kicks and two
scores (trys) called back for penal-
ties, the Ruggers lost the intensity
that had characterized their play 3rd annual Allumni Game this Sat-
all season. One player was quoted urday at 1 p.m. behind the Allied
as saying "we just didn't have Health Building. This will be the
enough left after the Carolina final game for Bob Eason, Greg
game Roche, Scott Daniels, and Philip
The Ruggers will play in the Ritchy.
STUDENT STORES
'One stop shopping at the Heart of campus
BOOKSTORE
Wright Building
Hours:
MonFri. 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Telelphone: 757-6731
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Hours:
MonFrl. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Telelphone: 757-6731
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Hours:
MonThurs. 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Fri. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
� Sat. 8:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.
Telephone: 757-6477

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It took Galileo 16 years to master the universe.
You have one night. jL
It seems unfair. The genius had all that time. While you have a few
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989
ECU heads south
Pirate skiers take fifth in first outing
By MICHAEL MARTIN
AsM. Sports Editor
The ECU Ski team traveled to
Angier, N.C this past weekend
to participate in their first ever
tournament, a National Collegiate
Water Ski Association (NCVVSA)
sanctioned tournament. The Pi-
rates fared well in their first out-
ing, as thev came home with a
fifth place finish.
ECU is a member of the South
Atlantic Conference, which is
composed of 21 teams from North
Carolina, South Carolina, Geor-
gia, Alabama, Kentucky and Ten-
nessee.
Team members Tommy Le-
wis, Yates Perry, Jackie Rollinsand
Brian Smith combined for 1210
points to out-distance the teams
from Georgia Tech, Wake Forest,
South Carolina and the Univer-
sity of North Carolina. Auburn
came in first place with 1560 points,
followed by Clemson with 1480,
Georgia with 1360, and fourth
place North Carolina State with
1320 points.
The tournament was divided
into three events: slalom, tricks,
and jump. The scores on the sla-
lom course were determined by
the number of buoys that each
skier completed. Tricks were
scored by a set value according to
the difficulty of the trick. The
winner of the jump was deter-
mined by the farthest distance off
of a five foot ramp.
"In just six months, the team
has come so far said team cap-
tain Tommv Lewis. "1 have a lot of
expectationsof what thisclub will
do in the future
Rollins finished first in the
slalom with four buoys at 28 feet
off, which almost set a conference
record (two at 32 feet off). Lewis
placed second in the tricks cate-
gory with a combined score of
1050, just under the winners mark
of 1110. Overall, the team had an
excellent meet, even though they
were undermanned.
The next tournament, the SAC
Championships, will be hosted by
Clemson University and held in
Milledgeville, Ga on April 22-23.
Jackie Rollins, who is currently
ranked as one of the top women
skiers in the country, will be at-
tempting to break the ladies' trick
and slalom records at the tourna-
ment. The team is hoping for a top
three finish in the tournament.
Anyone interested in joining
the team or finding out more in-
formation should contact Tommy
Lewis at 830-0137.
KiNSWN
INDIANS
1988 Carolina League Champions
COLLEGE NIGHT
Kinston Indians vs. Durham Bulls
Thursday, April 20th, 7:00 pm
M&
$1 50 admission with valid studetn I D
Z 103 Thirsty Thursdays all 12 ounce beverages 50 cents
For further information call 1-800-334 5467
UNC coach to stay
Smith denies rumor of leaving Tar Heels
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina basketball coach Dean
Smith says he is "flabbergasted"
at rumors of his impending retire-
ment, and says he has no plans to
step down after 28 seasons on the
Tar Heel bench.
"There's absolutely no truth
to it Smith told The News and
Observer of Raleigh. "There's no
truth to it all. I plan to coach next
season and beyond next season
Rumors intensified Tuesday,
the day before the team's annual
banquet at the Smith Center. Re-
ports of health problems related
to heavy smoking, and a recent
blurb in Sports Illustrated that he
might retire fueled the specula-
tion.
Smith, 58, had to miss practice
after developing nosebleeds in No-
vember 1987. Doctors said the
bleeding was related to Smith's
frequent smoking, and he was
advised to stop.
Smith announced last Oct. 15
that he had put away the ciga-
rettes after more than 30 years of
smoking - quitting "cold turkey"
on the first day of preseason prac-
tice. And he said Tuesday that the
inevitable nicotine withdrawal
was not an unbearable problem
during the season.
"I got used to it (not smoking)
pretty quickly he said. "The first
30 days were the hard part. After
that, it wasn't bad.
"I'm pretty healthy. In fact, 1
might be too healthy after going
six months without smoking. I had
my blood pressure checked the
other day, and it was pretty good
UNC, 29-8 last season, won its
first Atlantic Coast Conference
Tournament championship since
1982 before being eliminated in
the NCAA Southeast Regional
semifinal by Michigan, the even-
tual national champion. And some
close to the UNC basketball pro-
gram said it had been a particu-
larly stressful year for Smith.
"I think it was an excellent
season Smith countered Tues-
day. "The first season certainly
was more stressful than the 28th
Late in the season, Smith,
always cautious about his public
comments, surprised many people
by saying that the "J .R. Can't Reid"
signs crafted by opposing fans
were a racial slur and that the SAT
scores of Reid and UNC's Scott
Williams were higher than those
of Duke's Danny Ferry and Chris-
tian Lacttner.
He also cirticized the NCAA
Basketball Committee for placing
the Tar Heels in the southeast
Regional - in the same bracket wi th
Michigan and putting Duke in the
East.
"But I've always been outspo-
ken Smith said.
After the loss to Michigan,
Smith was on the verge of tears in
the postgame news conference, a
display of emotion that shocked
manv longtime Tar Heel follow-
ers. That also added to the talk
about Smith retiring, as did the
mention in Sports Illustrated.
"That's probably how it all
got started - the SI article Smith
said.
UNC assistant coach Bill
Guthridge, who has served as
Smith's chief aide since 1967, said
Tuesday he expected Smith to
continue coaching for several
years.
Asked Tuesday if Smith might
retire, Guthridge said: "I'd be
shocked
"It has never been a topic of
discussion, and I believe I'd
know Guthridge said. "Coach
Smith enjoys basketball. I would
think he would coach until his
70s
Smith wouldn't go that far.
"As I've often said, I'll know-
when it's time to quit coaching
Smith said. "That'll be when it
gets to be Oct. 15, and I'm not
enthusiastic about the upcoming
season
CHOOSE A COMBO AND SAVE!
CHEESE CHOICE
'Get the fires burning again'
Strahm to rebuild at Western Carolina
mm m tVl
CULLOWHEE (AP) � West-
ern Carolina coach Dale Strahm,
newly named replace the reas-
signed Bob Waters, says he wants
to "get the fires burning again" in
the Catamounts' football program.
"We have the man to continue
a tradition Athletic Director
Bobby Setzer said Tuesday at a
news conference.
Strahm, 46, a former assistant
football at Georgia, will assume
duties immediately at the South-
ern Conference school.
"He comes to us as a known
quantity with outstanding creden-
tials as a teacher, motivator and
recruiter Setzer said.
Waters suffers from amyorro-
phic later sclerosis, better known
as Lou Gehrig's disease. He was
reassigned March 30 to fill the
newly created position of associ-
ate athletic director.
"lam extremely excited about
coming to Western Carolina
Strahm said. "It has been my aspi-
ration for years to become a head
football coach, and I look upon
this appointment as a great op-
portunity and, at the same time, a
tremendous challenge
Strahm was defensive line-
backers coach at Georgia under
former coach Vince Dooley, but
was not retained by Ray Goff, the
new Bulldog head man. He was
the only assistant coach not re-
tained by Goff.
"In my 25 years at the Univer-
sity of Georgia, I never have had a
better coach than Dale Strahm
Dooley said. "He has all the quali-
ties we look for in a coach as he is
an excellent technician, motivator
and organizer, as well as a superb
recruiter
Equally important, Dooley
said, Strahm, "is a man of integ-
rity with high principles and val-
ues. Dale relates to the players
extremely well and has a genuine
interest in their welfare
CAA ticket
information
Tickets for the 1989 Colonial
Athletic Association baseball tour-
nament are now on sale at the
ticket office in Minges Coliseum.
The double elimination tourna-
ment will be held at UNC-
Wilmington Friday, May 12 thru
Monday, May 15.
A four-day pass will cost $10,
and that will cover all of the games
being played. Individual tickets
will be sold at game time at the
UNC-W gate for three dollars.
Strahm came to Georgia from
Navy in 1981. Before that, he was
defensive coordinator at Bowling
Green.
"We have some very good
things to build on a good tradi-
tion, fine facilities, the best 1-AA
football conference in the nation,
and an outstanding school
Strahm said.
"We have a lot of work to do
in a very short time before we
have to play the most difficult
schedulcin I-AA football he said.
"I have been assured by the ad-
ministration that the university-
wants to move the football pro-
gram forward and regain the
competitive edge of past years.
Our theme going i n will be 'a great
tradition with a new beginning
Strahm said his first order of
business will be to "get a coaching
staff in line and meet with our
players
"Next he said, "I want to get
the fires ' burning again about
Western Carolina football by
meeting with and selling the pro-
gram to the alumni, students,
friends and supporters of the uni-
versity
Western Carolina will have
14 starters returning from last
season's 2-9 team and will face a
schedule that includes four NCAA
1-AA playoff teams along with
South Carolina and Georgia Tech.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20,1989 17
!
I



Hopes of international league
Tex leaves NFL for springtime football
Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
(AP) � A springtime football before? -and commissioned
league? What a swell idea, even Schramm to run the operation.
it it does sound a tad familiar. This was convenient because
The difference is that Tex Schramm needed an operation to
Schramm's International Football run. After 29 years, he felt a little
League is being launched with the squeezed in Dallas by "Socks and
blessings of the NFL, something Jocks" Jerry Jones, the new owner
the last spring league-may it rest of the franchise,
the opportunity to be innovating,
to march ahead
Tex's parade comes at a most
opportune moment. NBC and
ABC, cut out of major league base-
ball by CBS's billion dollar deal,
And the support of the NFL
won't hurt cither. Schramm made
it clear that, unlike its predeces-
sors, the IFL plans no player war
with the big guys.
'We will not be in an adver-
m peace-lacked.
Eat your heart out, Donald
Trump.
It wasTrump, remember, who
was the major money man for the
late USFL, which began the con-
cept of flipped football seasons.
Alas, the art of that deal was
something less than a masterpiece.
The USFL eventually was steam-
rolled into oblivion, buried by an
who includes
among his duties turning out all
the lights at night, since he is the
guy paying the electric bill
just might be in the market for a ry position with the NFL he
spring-summer sports package. If d. "We will work with the NFL
as much as we can. I would not do
something to injure something that
means as much to me as the NFL
Then trying to sound slightly
sinister, he added, "I might com-
Tex could sell Kevin Sweeney and
Kelvin Edwards to Dallas fans
Schramm is perfect for the job during the strike, he can sell the
of creating a league. He did virtu- Munich Minutemen and Frank-
ally the same thing when the NFL furt Fish. One wag suggested if
players had the audacity to go on the league goes to a canal setting pete with them a little
army of NFL attorneys for a mere played on
53, a most economical funeral. Now, at age 68, he faces a
Now after an appropriate new, intriguing challenge, start-
mourning period, the NFL has ing a league from scratch and
decided that, in the right hands- spreading the NFL gospel across
its own-springtime football might the sea. He can't tell you whal
not be such a bad idea, after all. In
tact, it might be too good an idea
to restrict it to this country. So it
has created a world football
league-where have we heard that
strike almost two years ago. They in Italy, they can call the franchise
figured, no players, no games, the Merchants of Venice.
They figured wrong. Schramm
found players and the league
Enough jokes. The NFL is
serious. "This is a major undertak-
ing Commissioner Pete Rozclle
said.
And the chances for its suc-
cess?
"1 think Tex doesn't have
cities, or even what countries, will many losses Rozellesaid. "I don't
be involved. But he can tell you think this will be one. His creativ-
he's excited about the concept. ity and energy gives them the
"My juices are flowing he opportunity to make a success of
said. "I like to start things.
I like the IFL.
Very little.
Schramm bristled a bit when
his baby was described as a devel-
opmental league, sort of a step-
child of the NFL.
"It will be operated at arm's
length he said. "This league will
stand on its own feet. It will not be
a developmental league and it will
not be a minor league. It will have
the best players we can have,
within financial limitations. The
main thing is it must be sound
financially
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Ethiopians continue dominance
9f
Sharky's
of Greenville
BOSTON (AP) � Abebe
Mekonnen had plenty of confi-
dence. Ingrid Kristiansen had no
competition. Joan Benoit Samuel-
son had tears in her eyes and an
uncertain future.
Mekonnen's 50-second vic-
tory in Monday's Boston Mara-
thon continued the Ethiopians'
domination of the sport and was
his sixth triumph in his last seven
marathons.
Samuelson, once the queen of
the same roads that Kristiansen
woman.
Marathon in 1979 and 1983 and of of the top five times by a female 20 marathons. "I was by myself
the Olympic marathon in 1984 said marathoner - Samuelson has the the whole race. 1 saw no other
she plans to suspend her work- other two and won her fourth
outs and hopes her ailments will consecutive marathon. Her time
subside. of 2 hours, 21 minutes, 6 seconds
She said her left knee, sub- in London in 1985 is the best by
jected to an arthroscopic proce- any woman,
dure in February, didn't bother "If you don't call Ingrid Kris-
her. It was her right hip that gave tiansen the world's best runner,
her problems 11 miles into the you're kidding yourself Samuel-
race and forced her to change her son said.
Her winning time Monday in
stride.
"It did come back somewhat,
but I was never able to run at my
now reiens over, lost the women's full stride again Samuelson, 31,
race by more than 13 minutes.
Kristiansen took the lead at
the start and never was threat-
ened seriously in beating run-
nerup Marguerite Buist of New
Zealand.
But Samuelson, who finished
ninth, didn't lose the gritty deter-
mination that drove her, at one
time, to become the world's top
female marathoner.
Plagued by physical problems
and committed to her husband
of FreeportMaine, said. "I think a
lot of people arc expecting me to
say this is it. They were expecting
me to say that in '84 and '85. But
it's not it
She won't run another mara-
thon before next year's competi-
tion in Boston and she may not
run that either, she said. "I'll let
Mother Nature da her healing
she said. 'It may take one year or
it may take five years
And by then Kristiansen, 33,
and 18-month-old daughter may not be as strong as she is now
her first victory in three meetings
with Samuelson was 2:24:35. She
had hoped to be the first woman
to break 2:20, but said the weather
"was a little too hot The.race
started at noon when the tempera-
ture was 62 degrees.
Buist finished in 2:29:04. Kim
Jones of Spokane, Wash was third
in 2:29:34. Samuelson finished in
2:37:52, more than 16 minutes
slower than her best time.
"Four years ago she (Samuel-
son) was a really great runner, but
I don't think she's been training
enough to be as good as me now
said Kristiansen, the 1986 Boston
Mekonnen, 25, had company
until he pulled away from his fi-
nal challenger with 1 12 miles
left in the 26-mile, 385-yard run
through eight communities.
His winning time was2:09:06,
well off Rob de Castella's course
record of 2:07:51. Juma Ikangaa of
Tanzania, the runnerup in 1988 in
the closest finish in Boston his-
tory, was second again, this time
in 2:09:56.
"He doesn't have a good fin-
ish Mekonnen said of Ikangaa.
"That's why I was confident
John Treacy of Ireland, with a
time of 2:10:24 was third for the
second year in a row. Kenya's Ibra-
ham Hussein, who beat Ikangaa
by one second last vear, was fourth
in 2:12:41.
Mekonnen and Kristiansen
each won $45,000 for their victo-
ries.
Daily Specials
Monday - $2.25 Margaritas
Tuesday - $1.75
Wednesday - $2.00
Bourbon
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Thursday - $1.00
LADLES NITE
free admission
Friday- $1.75
Imports &
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selection of twelve
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Abigail, the winner of the Boston The Norwegian flyer has three champion who has won 12 of her
Fuzzy sticks with K mart
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: y
GREENSBORO (AP)� Some Club professionals in North
golf professionals say Fuzzy Zo- Carolina and South Carolina, most
eller was slapping his fellow pros of whom run pro shops at private
in the face and pocketbook by tell
ing people in an advertisement to
buy their equipment at K mart,
but Zoeller says he's just promot-
ing the sport.
"It's a free world he said.
"They have their own opinion. I
have mine. I'm encouraging
people to play golf
and public courses, are unhappy
with Zoeller. Earlier this month,
Zoeller appeared in golf maga-
zine ads trumpeting the K mart
GGO. The ad urged readers, after
viewing the tourney, to go to K
maia buy some golf equipment
and head for the golf course.
"They don't look at it from a
long-range standpoint he said.
Partly in protest of Zoeller's
position, the Carolina PGA pros
who usually help with the K mart
GGO youth clinic sponsored an
alternative clinic this year.
Will Mann, head pro and
owner of the Quarry Hills Coun-
try Club in Graham and vice presi-
dent of Carolinas PGA, said he
understod Zoeller's position, but
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The Carolina PGA section, the
Zoeller said Friday he wasn't largest of the 41 PGA sections in
worried that the Carolina PGA the U.S sent Zoeller letters of s organization wishes "he would
golf pros are upset with him. protest. But Zoeller said he s help- m�e 53 t0 the goif pros'
"Idon't mind. I'll take the heat ing the home pros. position. There are 16,000 golf pros
for it he said on the practice tee "What's going to happen g� d d in j t on
at Forest Oaks Country Club when these peope (who buy their shop f for their incorne
Monday while warming up for clubs at K mart) get to the golf
the $1 million K mart Greater course he asked. "They're going He g he has heard from
Greensboro Open. to go into the pro shop. What are goif pros an over the country
The former U.S. Open and they going to do? They might buy supporting the protest against K
Masters champion then drove a shirt. They'll pay green fees, n a(jSi He said the pros don't
home his point by effortlessly They'll rent a cart mind Zoeller promoting Kmart in
swinging a fairway wood and He appeared puzzled that the general, only his urging golfers to
smahing a ball 250 yards down home pros don't understand that buy first at k mart,
the practice range. chain of events.
Soviets take swing at boxing
MFW YORK (AP) - The The first group of Soviet box- As for Momentums agree-
RussSrTare coming to profes- ers will come here by October, ment with Sovvntersport and the
sStoxme A first group of six although two could arrive in June, Soviet Boxing Federation Faicigno
W texerf soon win train and according to Faicigno. They will said, "There is a confidentiality
train in the New York area under clause in the contract, but I can say j
American trainers, although the it is for 10 years, world-wide, ex-
eroup will be accompanied by a elusive and a joint venture
Soviet trainer. Roman Daeyshn, executive
As for the selection process, Yjp� president of the Intercan, the
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Layaway
fight as pros under a 10-year con-
tract between Momentum Enter-
prises Inc the Soviet Boxing Fed-
eration and Sovintersport, which
is responsible for the commerciaili-
zation of Soviet sports.
Currently, there is a Soviet
Faicigno said, "The Soviets will North American agent for Soviet
offer fights. We will probably sports, said Momentum was se-
playerintte NHL and there has concentrate on higher weights - lected after 30 to 35 proposals were
been talk about Soviets playing in 150 pounds and up considered,
the NBA There also are profes- One Soviet boxer he expressed Faldono said Momentum
sional cyclists in the U.S.S.R. The interest in is Alexander Miro- WOuld have full authority and
Soviet Union is a leading amateur shnichenko, a super heavyweight, responsiblity to operate and man-
boxine rower who wasoutpointed by American age the joint venture, which will
"Wehopetogetafightinthis Riddick Bowe in the Olympics at be based in New York and incor-
vear or veryiearly next year, but Seoul. porate the management, merchan-
we mieht wait and have all six Faicigno said the boxers will dising, sponsorship and endorse-
f Jhts on the same card Louis be signed to individual two-year ment rights of Soviet fighters.
Falrieno president of Momentum contracts,butwillbepaidbySoviet He also said he hopes to show-
ed at news conference also at- authorities. case the boxers on all forms of tele-
nded bv Victor Galaev, director- Once a fighter is under con- vision, including televising their
�1 of Sovinterpsort, and offi- tract, "if they don't want to fight bouts to the Soviet Union, where
rofuleSetingFedera- they can go home Falcmgo said, eventually some of their fights will
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 20,1989
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Present the 9th Annual
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Date: April 25, 1989
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 20, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 20, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.673
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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