The East Carolinian, April 13, 1989






Editorial4
Classified6
Clearly Labeled Satire 10
Comics11
ECU takes on UNC-Wilmington
in a triple-header this weekend.
Catch the action on pagel2.
Radio star Trey Bien says muy
bien to The Cult's latest release.
Check out page 8.
(She itaat (fJarolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since i1
Ol. b 'o. s
I hursdav April 13, 14N4
Greenville, C
ill' . s
( irculation 12,000
Coach Kay Yow to speak at commencement
By Ml BOTI WO
an
Olympic basketball
md FCl graduate, will be
r tor the 1989 com-
� ceremony Gradu-
i remonicsfbrSpringgradu-
Ma f, 1989.
.) member of the North
a I lall of lame and the
rts 1 lall of Fame, is
n as an inspirational
1 motivational speaker. Weare men I ceremony will take place in
ighted that Kav Yow one ot Minges coliseum. Because ol the
wn distinguished graduates, limited seating arrangements
has consented to deliver the com- 'here will be two ceremonies, one
mencemenl address Chancellor held in the morning and one in the
iftemoon.
For the morning commence-
stance, v(ui ma'
I r Ri hard Fakin said.
v. )i iginal graduation planare
ment,beginningat9:15am people
attaining their Masters degrees
and graduates of the College of
rts and Sciences receive their
'rogramsat 10a.m. In the ease ot diplomas. Afternoon commcnce-
inclementweaiherthecommence- ment, beginning at 1:30 p.m in-
a follow s a band concert a! 9 15
a m followed b procession forms
at 9:45 and concluding with the
distributing ol C mmencement
volvcs granting Baccalaureate commencei ommittec, said
Degrees in the Schools of Allied s niors mvd to be aware of tlu- how mat
Health alternative mmencement plans, andifth
Phrase two of the plans will Cradiiatmj -eniorshavebcenscnl
go into action only if it rains, but ining the alternative
hopefully the sun will shine and sights Kowesaid Ro we welcomes ? � need i
commencement will proceed as all futu
originally planned Seniors tune
in to your local TV and radio si i
lions, nameh Kiss 102 or VVZMB,
on May 5, to find out about weather
conditions
C.C. Rowc, chairman of the
ij ii
Hies

� lual 'S who have yet many ;
the memo to pu k one gradual n
I Whichard Build-
� ii
ire full i it in
: tn inswer the
ti us For in-
-
�i: . � . �
prepare � � �
spring (i immi ncemei
fa be it's not too early to go swimming after all This furrv friend has the right idea but in the
wrong temparures. (Photo b .P. Whitmire � Photolab)
Some students are more involved in class than others, while others are just more coi
(Photo by LD. Whitmire - Photolab)
Competency tests to be replaced by basic skills tests
I S E en as critics are
standardized tests with
- �; ore colleges sav they'll
nn uir studentsto passeom-
test to take upper-level
�� s or to graduate.
Student at Texas public col-
g s will have to pass basic skills
in September. Indi-
v idi lal s h �ls, su h as Northern
Kentu ky University and Metro-
litan State College in Denver,
ill start testing students next
fall.
�llegians and not a few
trators seem to hate the
a
I .ecturer to speak
on the history of
medical quacks
A humorous lecture-demon
I listoryofQuakcery
� ill be presented by
it Thursday, April
stration,
in Medi
iKa i
13, a
"Why aren't our grades an
accurate relection of what we've
learned asked Roger Adams, a
Northern Kentucky student.
"It doesn't bode well tor
higher education said Sarah
Slot kwell of Fairtest,a Massachu-
setts test waU hdog group
But, fueled by the six year-
old s hool reform movement, the
idea seems to be gaining speed.
Florida, Tennessee and some col-
leges in Georgia already make
students take standardized tests
that purport to measure what
they've learned. A survey of 7
colleges by the IVniver-based
Education Commission of the
Mates S) found that half ot the
schools imposed some sort of as-
sessment test.
In recent years students at
Wayne State and Northest Mis-
souri State universities and the
univeristies of South Dakota and
Maryland have had to pass as-
sessment test to gef their degrees
or to take higher-level classes.
"There hasn'f been a lot of
positive reaction to assessment
exams admitted Chris Paulson,
an E S policy analyst.
Critics argue such general
tests often are "culturally biased
that they more accuragely meas-
ure how thoroughly students have
adopted middle-class values than
how much they have learned.
"Blacks and 1 lispanics, quite
frankly, get killed said Renee
GArcia, testing coordinator at
Miami-DadeCommunity College
in Florida.
1 �Int more schools are impos-
ing the tests, if only because poli-
ticians see them as a way to guage
how well colleges are educating
students.
The higher students score on
the test, the better the schools must
be doing at teaching.
"We think it's important for
institutions to set priorities and
goals, and then be able to show
how they are meeting those goals
explained lames Rogers of the
Southern Association of Coll .
and Schools, one of seven regional
accrediting agencies
"These tests are great for poli
ticians Garcia said. "They are
something they can understand
very easily
Since 1983, with the release ot
several reports bemoaning the
state of American education, some
reformers � mostly notables tor
mer U.S. Secretary of Education
Wiliam Bennett regularly called
tor schools to be more account
able for their actions.
Bennett annually displayed a
"wall chart" of average Scholastic
Aptitude Pest scores in the states
saving their results reflected how
good or bad the high schools in
those states were.
And college admissions offi-
cers themselves, frustrated by the
number of college freshmen la k-
ing such kills, pressured high
schools to make students take
compete ncv tests before gradual
ing.
But the initial reform wave
hasn't alwavs improved educa
tion a half completed study re-
leased March 28 il the San Fran-
cisco convention of the American
Education Research Association
found
"States have focused on more
manageable reforms Rutgers
University researcher William
Firestone told the conference. "I
mean reforms that weren't too
expensive or complex. Most re-
forms seemed to come out of a
poilitical dealmaking process
"Politicians are using the
scores to make some critical deci
sions" about funding Garcia said.
s a result, "there's a lot of
pressure on the teachers" to
change their (lasses to teach stud
nets how to do well on the tests
not necessarily about thecourse's
subject
Nevertl
are string i
high scl
i he tests n �
r to a com
charged I a rt� st'sSi
Somcl � . .
re thev gel .
1 lulbert, pn - lent of I
Assoi
xas in Au . mal
up for the 12 vi
tion befoi g�
All I exas olleg u -
to passa three-part basic sk si -
before thv can tak
�. lasses fhev an lak
many timesasthev v ai
tmi will c
Schoi
ha e been mak .
competence U sts
oxer havt be
In 11 nnesset
freshman must pass �
See fESTS page 3
l
le lure will begin at 8p.m.
in Room 244 of Mendenhall Stu-
d i ter on the main campus
and is tree and open to the public
Featured speaker is I )r Le
land Keller professor emeritus of
bi 1( gy at Pittsburg State 1 Iniver
Sty, ks He will explain some of
the medical gadgets and potions
of the 1800 and early 190O's,trac
ing their origin, use, endorsement
and ultimate outlawing.
Widely noted for his humor
ous presentations on medical
i harlatans, Keller has assembled a
private collection ol more than
1,000 devices, some of which he
demonstrates at his lectures.
Keller's ECU presentation is
sponsored by the campus chapter
of Sigma Xi scientific research
honor society.
Women Administrators
forum held on campus

You didn't dream it It was real. Maybe not this real, but winter did come back for a second (third,
fourth) time around. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire � Photolab)
1I .r�� Bureau
E 1 will host the 10th anni-
versary spring forum ot Women
Administrators in North Carolina
Higher Education (WANCHE)
une 1 2
I he purpose ot WANCHE
organized in 1977 under sponsor-
ship ot the American Council on
Education (ACE), is to increase
tin- number of women in posi-
tions of leadership in colleges and
universities.
The two dav program in-
cludes addresses by Or. Cynthia
yson, president of Mary Bald
win College, Staunton, 'a . Or
Patri ia Sullivan, vice president of
academic at fairs at Texas Woman's
I niversitv, Or. Marilyn Haring-
Midore, dean of the School of
Education, University off Massa-
chusetts at Amherst,and Dr. Bettv
Siegel, president of Kcnnesaw
State i
1 r i ielcn Grove dean ol
ECU S hool of 1 lomc I . i n n i -
will present a program or
ing organizational chance x
plaining four mod � i
c oaxum associate vice chancel
lor tor a ademii affairs at a
etteville State Universitv 'C
will present a 10th war retrospec
live for W WMF
1 he organization uses Mak
based networking involving
women and men holding admin
istrative position in higher educa
tion 3nd women who aspire t,
such roles It holds two formal
meetings each year
For reservations and registra
turn information,contact Dr. Bots
II. Harper director ot Coopera-
tive Education, 1028 General
Classroom Bldg , East Carolina
University,Greenville T( US





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iiii.iiiiiiiiim.i iii
� - � � � ��.
Editorial?
Clearly Labeled Satire10
VOm�C8 �?����������������������������� ��Jt jl
'���;
msssi
mzz
Catch the action on pagel2.
i �
M-llM.i.i.Hi.iiJMiMU'n�'
BW"WIII.HHHII
I
Radio star Trey Bien fays muy
Wen to He CitttVUtiease,
Check out page 8.
2Hte Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 65
Thursday April 13,1989
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Coach Kay Yow to speak at commencement
By CATE BOTTANNON
Staff Writer
Kay Yow, Olympic basketball
coach and ECU graduate, will be
the speaker for the 1989 com-
mencement ceremony. Gradu-
ation ceremonies for Spring gradu-
ates will be May 6,1989.
Yow, a member of the North
Carolina Hall of Fame and the
Women's Sports Hall of Fame, is
widely known as an inspirational
and motivational speaker. "Weare
delighted that Kay Yow, one of
our own distinguished graduates,
has consented to deliver the com-
mencement address Chancellor
Dr. Richard Eakin said.
Original graduation plans are
as follows, a band concert at 9:15
a.m. followed by procession forms
at 9:45 and concluding with the
distributing of Commencement
Programs at 10 a.m. In the case of
inclement weaiher the commence-
ment ceremony will take place in
Minges coliseum. Because of the
limited seating arrangements
there will be two ceremonies, one
held in the morning and one in the
afternoon.
For the morning commence-
ment, beginning at 9:15 am people
attaining their Masters degrees
and graduates of the College of
Arts and Sciences receive their
diplomas. Afternoon commence-
ment, beginning at 1:30 p.m� in-
volves granting Baccalaureate
Degrees in the Schools of Allied
Health.
Phrase two of the plans will
go into action only if it rains, but
hopefully the sun will shine and
commencement will proceed as
originally planned. Seniors tune
in to your local TV and radio sta-
tions, namely Kiss 102 or WZMB,
on May 5, to find out about weather
conditions.
C.C. Rowe, chairman of the
commencement committee, said
seniors need to be aware of the
alternative commencement plans.
Graduating seniors have been sent
a memo explaining the alternative
sights, Rowe said. Rowe welcomes
all future graduates who have yet
to receive the memo to pick one
up at 111 or 211 Whichard Build-
ing.
These memos are full of in-
formation and can answer the
most minor of questions. For in-
stance, you may be wondering
how many guests you can invite
and if they need passes. Guests do
not need passes and however
many people want to see you
graduate are welcome.
All seniors get on the ball and
prepare yourself for ECU 1989,
spring commencement?

'���& - � �� ; ���-� t
m
�4
Maybe if s not too early to go swimming after all This furry friend has the right idea but in the
wrong tempatures. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire � Photolab)
Some students are more involved in class than others, while others are just more conscious.
(Photo by J.D. Whitmire � Photolab)
Competency tests to be replaced by basic skills tests
(CPS) � Even as critics are
attacking s' ndardized tests with
fervor, mc 2 colleges say they'll
soon require students to pass com-
petency test to take upper-level
courses or to graduate.
Student at Texas public col-
leges will have to pass basic skills
tests starting in September. Indi-
vidual schools, such as Northern
Kentucky University and Metro-
politan State College in Denver,
also will start testing students next
fall.
Collegians and not a few
administrators seem to hate the
idea.
Lecturer to speak
on the history of
medical quacks
ECUNtMtuMi
A humorous lecture-demon-
stration, "The History of Quakcery
in Medicine will be presented by
a Kansas scientist Thursday, April
13, at ECU.
The lecture will begin at 8 p.m.
in Room 244 of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center on the main campus
and is free and open to the public
Featured speaker is Dr. Le-
land Keller, professor emeritus of
biology at Pittsburg State Uni ver-
sty, Ks. He will explain some of
the medical gadgets and potions
of the 1800' and early 1900 trac-
ing their origin, use, endorsement
and ultimate outlawing.
Widely noted for his humor-
ous presentations on medical
charlatans, Keller has assembled a
private collection of more than
1,000 devices, some of which he
demonstrates at his lectures.
Keller's ECU presentation �
sponsored by the campus chapter
of Sigma )6 scientific research
honor society.
"Why aren't our grades an
accurate relection of what we've
learned asked Roger Adams, a
Northern Kentucky student.
"It doeWt bode well for
higher education said Sarah
Stockwell of Fairtest, a Massachu-
setts test watchdog group.
But, fueled by the six-year-
old school reform movement, the
idea seems to be gaining speed.
Florida, Tennessee and some col-
leges in Georgia already make
students take standardized tests
that purport to measure what
they've learned. A survey of 367
colleges by the Deniver-based
Education Commission of the
States (ECS) found that half of the
schools imposed some sort of as-
sessment test.
In recent years students at
Wayne State and Northest Mis-
souri State universities and the
uni veristies of South Dakota and
Maryland have had to pass as-
sessment test to get their degrees
or to take higher-level classes.
"There hasn't been a lot of
positive reaction to assessment
exams admitted Chris Paulson,
an ECS policy analyst.
Critics argue such general
tests of ten are "culturally biased
that they more accuragely meas-
ure how thoroughly students have
adopted middle-class values than
how much they have learned.
"Blacks and Hispanics, quite
frankly, get killed said Renee
GArcia, testing coordinator at
Miami-Dade Community College
in Florida.
But more schools are impos-
ing the tests, if only because poli-
ticians see them as a way to guage
how well colleges are educating
students.
The higher students score on
the test, the better the schools mu st
be doing at teaching.
"We think if s important for
institutions to set priorities and
goals, and then be able to show
how they are meeting those goals
explained James Rogers of the
Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools, oneof seven regional
accrediting agencies.
"These tests are great for poli-
ticians Garcia said. "They are
something they can understand
very easily
Since 1983, with the release of
several reports bemoaning the
state of American education, some
reformers �mostly notabley for-
mer US. Secretary of Education
Wiliam Bennett�regularly called
for schools to be more account-
able for their actions.
Bennett annually displayed a
"wall chart" of average Scholastic
Aptitude Test scores in the states,
saying their results reflected how
good or bad the high schools in
those states were.
And college admissions offi-
cers themselves, frustrated by the
number of college freshmen lack-
ing such skills, pressured high
schools to make students take
competency tests before graduat-
ing.
But the initial reform wave
hasn't always improved educa-
tion, a half-completed study re-
leased March 28 at the San Fran-
cisco convention of the American
Education Research Association
found.
"States have focused on more
manageable reforms Rutgers
University researcher William
Firestone told the conference. "I
mean reforms that weren't too
expensive or complex. Most re-
forms seemed to come out of a
poilitical dealmaking process
"Politicians are using the
scores to make some critical deci-
sions" about funding, Garcia said.
As a result, "there's a lot of
pressure on the teachers" to
change their classes to teach stud-
nets how to do well on the tests,
not necessarily about the course's
subject.
Nevertheless, such reforms
are string to spread up form the
high school to the college level.
The tests "are simplistic an-
swer to a complicated problem
charged Fairtesf s Stockewell.
"Something needs to be done
before they get here said Mike
Hulbert, president of the Student's
Association at the University of
Texas in Austin. "You can't make
up for the 12 years of poor educa-
tion before college
All Texas collegians will have
to passa three-part basic skills test
before thy can take upper-level
classes. They can take the test as
many times as they want, but each
time will cost $24.
School officals in states that
have been making students take
competency tests already, more-
over, have become fans.
In Tennessee, where entering
freshman must pass a basic skills
See TESTS, page 3, col. 1
Women Administrators
forum held on campus
You didn't
fourth) time
it It was reaL Maybe not this real, b�t winter did come back for
around. (Photo by I.D. Whitmire�Photolab)
wttmmmwmm
ECU will host the 10th anni-
versary spring forum of Women
Administrators in North Carolina
Higher Education (WANCHE)
June 1-2.
The purpose of WANCHE,
organized in 1977 under sponsor-
ship of the American Council on
Education (ACE), is to increase
the number of women in posi-
tions of leadership in colleges and
universities.
The two-day program in-
cludes addresses by Dr. Cynthia
Tyson, president of Mary Bald-
win College, Staunton, Va Dr.
Patricia Sullivan, vice president of
academic affairs at Texas Woman's
University, Dr. Marilyn Haring-
Hidore, dean of the School of
Education, University of Massa-
chusetts at Amherst, and Dr. Betty
of
State College in Georgia.
Dr. Helen Grove, dean o( the
ECU School of Home Economics,
will present a program on manag-
ing organizational change, ex-
plaining four models. Dr. Callie
Coaxum, associate vice chancel-
lor for academic affairs at Fay-
etteville State University, N.C
will present a 10th year retrospec-
tive for WANCHE.
The organization uses state-
based networking involving
women and men holding admin-
istrative position in higher educa-
tion and women who aspire to
such roles. It holds two formal
meetings each year.
For reservations and registra
tkn information, contact Dr. Betsy
H. Harper director ot Coopera-
tive Education, 1028 General
Classroom Bldg East Carolina
Imiversiry, Greenville, NC 27858.

mm
� � �� . a' ��-?�- �'�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13,1989
'Be realistic about weight loss'
The fascination with a thin
physique has become a preoccu-
pation of most young men and
women. Due to this situation,
"Magical Alternatives better
known as "Fad Diets are mo-
nopolizing the market. The over-
whelming desire to lose unwanted
pounds in a short amount of time
entices people. The producers of
such "Magical Alternatives" count
on our lack of good nutrition
knowledge. They capitalize on our
desires to fit into the societial mold.
An enlightening fact, however, is
that for many their enthusiasm
with "Magical Alternatives" is
short live they lose, they gain.
The cruel fact is to lose weight
one must consume fewer calories
(energy input) than heshe uses
(energy output). Consideration
must be placed on life long nutri-
tional goals. The key is to adopt an
"Eating Plan" asopposed to going
"On" a diet, which ultimately leads
Health Column
by
Lvnne Dixon
to the temptation of going "Off" a
diet.
The body weight is composed
of approximately 60 percent fluid.
"Fad Dieting, using severe calorie
restriction, results in rapid weight
reduction due to increased fluid
loss. Another result of severe calo-
ric restriction is that the body finds
it easier to breakdown lean tissue
(muscle) to fuel activity instead of
fat. Out oi the need to survive, the
body will conserve its energy
requirements, thus protecting
muscle and vital organs, by de-
creasing the metabolic rate. There-
fore fewer calories are needed to
support bodily functions. Conse-
quently, if old eating habits return
faster weight gain results (the
body's now operating at a slower
metabolic rate).
Weight reduction can be ac-
complished without wreaking
havoc by moderate reduction in
calories consumed. A hard, fast
rule to remember when calculat-
ing an "Eating Plan" is that in
order to lose one pound, you must
deprive your body of 3500 calo-
ries. This should be done by sub-
stracting 500 to 1000 calories per
day from your dietary intake.
However, it is NOT RECOM-
MENDED to consume less than
1000 calories per day.
Avoid skipping meals to re-
duce calories. Small, but regularly
scheduled meals arc best to re-
duce hunger sensations, thus re-
ducing the urge to cheat. One must
remember to be realistic about
weight loss. A slow, but steady
weight loss reduces total body fat
instead of reducing body fluids
and lean tissue.
Expert to speak on civil rights
ECU Niwi Bwii v.
One oi the country's leading
experts on civil rights and the
experiences of blacks in American
politics will speak at ECU April
13.
Dr Charles V. Hamilton, a
professor of government at Co-
lumbia University will present the
lecture "Dual Agenda: Social Poli-
cies of Civil Rights Organizations,
New Deal to the Present" at 7:30
p.m. in Room 1031 of the General
Classroom Building.The program,
sponsored by the ECU Minority
Presence Initiative Program and
Department of Political Science, is
free and open to the public.
Hamilton, currently on leave
from Columbia to teach at Smith
College, is the author of five books,
the best known oi which is "Black
Power, co-authored withStokely
Carmichael. His other works in-
clude "The Black Experience in
American Politics "The Bench
and the Ballot "Southern Fed-
eral judges and the right to Vote
"The Black Preacher in America
and "American Government
Considered one of America's
most distinguished black political
scientist, Hamilton has received
numerous academic honors in-
cluding two awards for teaching
excellence. He has taught at
Roosevelt University, Lincoln
University, Rutgers University,
Tuskegee Institute, Albany State
and Miles College.
He received his BA degree
from Roosevelt University, his law
degree from Loyola Univeristy
and his MA and PhD from the
University of Chicago.
The East Carolinian
James FJ. McKce, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey I Keith Pearce
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blankenship
Guy Harvey
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BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
Satanic cult of Mexican smugglers
kills student from Texas University
MATAMOROS, Mexico (AP)
� A satanic cult of drug smug-
glers who sacrificed and appar-
ently cannibalized humans
slaughtered 12 people, including
a U.S. college student on spring
break, authorities sav.
Five people were arrested in
connection with the killings and
on drug charges by Mexican Fed-
eral Judicial Police, which found
the dozen bodies in graves at a
ranch � just south of the U.S.
border.
Police said they planned to
resume digging today at the Santa
Elena Ranch, searching for two
more bodies.
"It was horrible Cameron
County Sheriff Alex Perez told a
news conference Tuesdav in the
Texas border city of Brownsville.
"It was like a human slaughter-
house
The suspects were U.S. and
Mexican citizens, said Sheriff s Lt.
George Gavito, who did not iden-
tify them further.
The dead included 21-vear-
old University of Texas student
Mark Kilroy, who vanished last
month in Matamoros. Gavito said.
Kilroy apparently was chosen
at random by drug smugglers who
had hoped human sacrifices
would protect them from harm,
Gavito said.
Kilroy was grabbed after the
cult members "were told to pick
one Anglo male that particular
night Gavito said.
The cult had been involved in
human sacrifices for about nine
months, he said, and praved to the
devil "so the police would not
arrest them, so bullets would not
kill them and so they could make
more money
Authorities found candlesand
kettles full of body parts and ani-
mal bones, said Oran Neck, chief
U.S. Customs agent in
Brownsville.
Also found were bowls and a
caldron from which brains, hearts
and other organs of victims were
eaten, Perez said.
"They were cooking bodv
parts in a big pot there on that
ranchsaid Texas Attorney Gen-
eral Jim Mattox.
Felipe Flores, spokesman for
the Mexican attorney general's
office, said he knew nothing about
reports of cannibalism. But he
added that during the ritual kill-
ings victims' brains were cut out
and put on a fire, mixed with
blood, herbs, rooster's feet, goat's
heads andturtles.
Maitox said investigators be-
lieve the cult had 10 members.
The Mexican attorney gen-
eral's office said the voodoo-prac-
ticing cult's leader, a Cuban-
American, is believed to have fled
into the United States. He is known
as "Godfather" to the sect's mem-
bers, officials said.
Police reported finding the 12
bodies in nine graves, Mattox said.
Perez said the cult members
removed some of the victims'
vertebrae "to use them for neck-
laces
Authorities would not iden-
tify the other victims, but said all
were males.
Some victims were shot in the
head, and others appeared to ha ve
been slain with machetes or
sledgehammers, Neck said.
The bodies ere found Tues-
dav morning in a field about 20
miles wet of Matamoros. Gavito
said.
Anthony Padilla, a photogra-
pher with The Brownsville Her-
ald, said he saw Kilroy'sbodyata
Matamoros funeral home. 'There
was nothing inside the skull
Padilla said.
In some forms of witchcraft,
removal of the brain signifies a
sacrifice of the- victim's soul.
Padilla said Kilroy'slegs were
cut oii at mid-calf and his spine
was severed and twisted.
Kilroy, a premedical student,
vanished from a crowded Mata-
moros street shortly after 2 a.m.
on March 14 while drinking with
a group oi friends in the city of
180,000 just across the Rio Grande
fromBrownsville.
The 3-foot-deep grave con-
taining his body was found after
federal police alerted U.S. officials
early Tuesdav they had obtained
confessions from the suspects,
officials said.
At least one of the suspects
admitted involvement in Kilroy's
death, said Neck.
Advertise
in
The East Carolinian
757-6366
Arlington Village
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OF A GOLDEN
OPPORTUNITY
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KARAT GOLD JEWELRY.
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And The Hub LTD.
All Chains and Bracelets Are 14K Gold
And Come With A Lifetine Guarantee
ECU Students Receive An Additional 107c OFF
14 KT. Bracelets ONLY
7" Herringbone$14.95
7" Herringbone$29.95
7" Herringbone, engraved with I Love You. $29.95
7" Herringbone$49.95
7" Herringbone$54.95
7" Heringbone$69.95
7" Herringbone$74.50
7" Herringbone$149.95
8" Herringbone$172.95
8" Heavy Herringbone$324.95
Only
7" Herringbone, solid rope diamond cut$34.95
7" Herringbone$49.95
7" Herringbone $54.95
7" Herringbone $57.50
7" Herringbone$84.95
7"Heringbone$109.95
Only
7" Herringbone$182.50
7" Herringbone$294.95
14kt. adjustable cuff 11mm wide$212.95
14kt. bangle$324.95
T Heavy Nugget 11.5mm wide$634.95
8" Heavy Nugget 15.5mm wide$1,134.95
7" Nugget I.D$199.95
8" Nugget I.D$219.95
7" Two tone Heavy Link$574.95
14 KT. Chains Only
18" Herringbone$35.00
20" Herringbone$36.95
16" Herringbone, engraved with I Love YouS69.95
18" Herringbone, engraved with I Love You$74.95
18" Herringbone, engraved with I Love You$154.95
18" Heringbone, V-Neck Herringbone5157.95
18" Herringbone,V-Neck Herringbone$159.95
20" Herringbone$161.95
20" Herringbone$178.95
20" Herringbone$189.95
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18" Heringbone$215.95
18" Herringbone$265.95
20" Superflex Herringbone$288.00
20" Wide Herringbone$309.95
20" Wide Herringbone$349.95
18" Heavy Link Figaro$479.95
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18" Solid Rope$89.95
20" Solid Rope$98.95
18" Solid Rope$122.50
18" Solid Silky Rope$278.00
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Major Credit Cards
Payne's Charge
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�Free Gift Wrapping
�Free Ring Cleaning
and inspection
355-5090
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H
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13,1989
'Be realistic about weight loss'
The fascination with a thin
physique has become a preoccu-
pation of most young men and
women. Due to this situation,
"Magical Alternatives better
known as "Fad Diets are mo-
nopolizing the market. The over-
whelming desire to lose unwanted
pounds in a short amount of time
entices people. The producers of
such "Magical Alternatives" count
on our lack of good nutrition
knowledge. They capitalize on our
desires to fit into the socierial mold.
An enlightening fact, however, is
that for many their enthusiasm
with "Magical Alternatives" is
short live they lose, they gain.
The cruel fact is to lose weight
one must consume fewer calories
(energy input) than heshe uses
(energy output). Consideration
must be placed on life long nutri-
tional goals. The key is to adopt an
"Eating Plan" as opposed to going
"On" a diet, which ultimately leads
Health Column
by
Lynne Dixon
to the temptation of going "Off" a
diet.
The body weight is composed
of approximately 60 percent fluid.
"Fad Dieting, using severe calorie
restriction, results in rapid weight
reduction due to increased fluid
loss. Another result of severe calo-
rie restriction is that the body finds
it easier to breakdown lean tissue
(muscle) to fuel activity instead of
fat. Out of the need to survive, the
body will conserve its energy
requirements, thus protecting
muscle and vital organs, by de-
creasing the metabolic rate. There-
fore fewer calories are needed to
support bodily functions. Conse-
quently, if old eating habits return
faster weight gain results (the
body's now operating at a slower
metabolic rate).
Weight reduction can be ac-
complished without wreaking
havoc by moderate reduction in
calories consumed. A hard, fast
rule to remember when calculat-
ing an "Eating Plan" is that in
order to lose one pound, you must
deprive your body of 3500 calo-
ries. This should be done by sub-
stracting 500 to 1000 calories per
day from your dietary intake.
However, it is NOT RECOM-
MENDED to consume less than
1000 calories per day.
Avoid skipping meals to re-
duce calories, small, but regularly
scheduled meals are best to re-
duce hunger sensations, thus re-
ducing the urge to cheat. One must
remember to be realistic about
weight loss. A slow, but steady
weight loss reduces total body fat
instead of reducing body fluids
and lean tissue.
Expert to speak on civil rights
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey J. Keith Pearce
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blankenship
Guy Harvey
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate$4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 5 Insertions(4lD
200-299 col. inches$4.40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 (12-25")$4.20
Two Color and black$155.00
0225")$4.50
10 Insertions(4in$4.50
(1225")$4.45
15 Insertions(4in$4.45
(1225")$4.40
20 Insertions (4in$4.40
(1225")$4.35
25 Insertions (4n )$4.35
ECU Xiwi Buuau
One of the country's leading
experts on civil rights and the
experiences of blacks in American
politics will speak at ECU April
13.
Dr. Charles V. Hamilton, a
professor of government at Co-
lumbia University will present the
lecture "Dual Agenda: Social Poli-
cies of Civil Rights Organizations,
New Deal to the Present" at 7:30
p.m. in Room 1031 of the General
Classroom Building. The program,
sponsored by the ECU Minority
Presence Initiative Program and
Department of Political Science, is
free and open to the public.
Hamilton, currently on leave
from Columbia to teach at Smith
College, is the author of five books,
the best known of which is "Black
Power co-authored with Stokely
Carmichael. His other works in-
clude "The Black Experience in
American Politics "The Bench
and the Ballot "Southern Fed-
eral Judges and the right to Vote
"The Black Preacher in America
and "American Government
Considered one of America's
most distinguished black political
scientist, Hamilton has received
numerous academic honors in-
cluding two awards for teaching
excellence. He has taught at
Roosevelt University, Lincoln
University, Rutgers University,
Tuskegee Institute, Albany State
and Miles College.
He received his BA degree
from Roosevelt University, his law
degree from Loyola Univeristy
and his MA and PhD from the
University of Chicago.
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
Satanic cult of Mexican smugglers
kills student from Texas University
MATAMORUS, Mexico (AP)
� A satanic cult of drug smug-
glers who sacrificed and appar-
ently cannibalized humans
slaughtered 12 people, including
a U.S. college student on spring
break, authorities say.
Five people were arrested in
connection with the killings and
on drug charges by Mexican Fed-
eral Judicial Police, which found
the dozen bodies in graves at a
ranch � just south of the U.S.
border.
Police said they planned to
resume digging today at the Santa
Elena Ranch, searching for two
more bodies.
"It was horrible Cameron
County Sheriff Alex Perez told a
news conference Tuesday in the
Texas border city of Brownsville.
"It was like a human slaughter-
house
The suspects were U.S. and
Mexican citizens, said Sheriff's Lt.
George Gavito, who did not iden-
tify them further.
The dead included 21-year-
old University of Texas student
Mark Kilroy, who vanished last
month in Matamoros. Gavito said.
Kilroy apparently was chosen
at random by drug smugglers who
had hoped human sacrifices
would protect them from harm,
Gavito said.
Kilroy was grabbed after the
cult members "were told to pick
one Anglo male that particular
night Gavito said.
The cult had been involved in
human sacrifices for about nine
months, he said, and prayed to the
devil "so the police would not
arrest them, so bullets would not
kill them and so they could make
more money
Authorities found candlesand
kettles full of body parts and ani-
mal bones, said Oran Neck, chief
U.S. Customs agent in
Brownsville.
Also found were bowls and a
caldron from which brains, hearts
and other organs of victims were
eaten, Perez said.
"They were cooking body
parts in a big pot there on that
ranch'said Texas Attorney Gen-
eral Jim Mattox.
Felipe Flores, spokesman for
the Mexican attorney general's
office, said he knew nothing about
reports of cannibalism. But he
added that during the ritual kill-
ings victims' brains were cut out
and put on a fire, mixed with
blood, herbs, rooster's feet, goat's
heads andturtles.
Maitox said investigators be-
lieve the cult had 10 members.
The Mexican attorney gen-
eral's office said the voodoo-prac-
ticing cult's leader, a Cuban-
American, is believed to have fled
into the United States. He is known
as "Godfather" to the sect's mem-
bers, officials said.
Police reported finding the 12
bodies in nine graves, Mattox said.
Perez said the cult members
removed some of the victims'
vertebrae "to use them for neck-
laces
Authorities wpulcLjpt .iden-
tify the other victims, but said all
were males.
Some victims were shot in the
head, and others appeared to have
been slain with machetes or
sledgehammers, Neck said.
The bodies vere found Tues-
day morning in a field about 20
miles west of Matamoros. Gavito
said.
Anthony Padilla, a photogra-
pher with The Brownsville Her-
ald, said he saw Kilroy's body at a
Matamoros funeral home. 'There
was nothing inside the skull
Padilla said.
In some forms of witchcraft,
removal of the brain signifies a
sacrifice of the victim's soul.
Padilla said Kilroy's legs were
cut off at mid-calf and his spine
was severed and twisted.
Kilroy, a premedical student,
vanished from a crowded Mata-
moros street shortly after 2 a.m.
on March 14 while drinking with
a group of friends in the city of
180,000 just across the Rio Grande
fromBrownsville.
The 3-foot-deep grave con-
taining his body was found after
federal police alerted U.S. officials
early Tuesday they had obtained
confessions from the suspec
officials said.
At least one of the sus
admitted involvement in Kilroy7
death, said Neck.
Tonight
i
ake It
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Enjoy one of Chico's delicious
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'uch As
ajitas San Antonio For two or Four
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in
The East Carolinian
757-6366
Arlington Village
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OF A GOLDEN
OPPORTUNITY
SAVE ON REAL
KARAT GOLD JEWELRY.
Behind C. Heber Forbes
And The Hub LTD.
All Chains and Bracelets Are 14K Gold
And Come With A Lifetine Guarantee
ECU Students Receive An Additional 10 OFF
14 KT. Bracelets QNLY
7" Herringbone$14.95
7'Herringbone$29.95
T Herringbone, engraved with I Love You. $29.95
7" Herringbone$49.95
7" Herringbone$54.95
7" Heringbone$69.95
7" Herringbone$74.50
T Herringbone$149.95
8" Herringbone$172.95
8" Heavy Herringbone$324.95
Only
7" Herringbone, solid rope diamond cut$34.95
7" Herringbone$49.95
T Herringbone $54.95
7" Herringbone $57.50
7" Herringbone$84.95
7" Heringbone$109.95
Only
T Herringbone$182.50
T Herringbone$294.95
14kt. adjustable cuff 11mm wide4212.95
14kt. bangle4324.95
7" Heavy Nugget 11.5mm wide4634.95
8" Heavy Nugget 15.5mm wide41,134.95
T Nugget I.D4199.95
8" Nugget I.D4219.95
T Two tone Heavy Link4574.95
14 KT. Chains Only
18" Herringbone$35.00
20" Herringbone$36.95
16" Herringbone, engraved with I Love You$69.95
18" Herringbone, engraved with I Love You$74.95
18" Herringbone, engraved with I Love You$154.95
18" Heringbone, V-Neck Herringbone$157.95
18" Herringbone,V-Neck Herringbone$159.95
20" Herringbone4161.95
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18" Heringbone$215.95
18" Herringbone$265.95
20" Superflex Herringbone$288.00
20" Wide Herringbone4309.95
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18" Solid Rope$89.95
20" Solid Rope$98.95
18" Solid Rope$122.50
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ONE DAY SERVICE





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13, 189 3
Kappa Sigma put on probation at Mississippi S
members caught playing outdoor nude volleyball
(CPS) - Mississippi State Uni-
versity has put its Kappa Sigma
Fratemirs house on social proba-
tion because several members
outdoor nude
avoi
a.m
a me.
� :v can't really laugh it of! "
Kapp ! Sigma President Phil Atte-
berrj tol I the MSU Reflector the
student newspaper. Kappa Sigs
are not trying to promote the
Animal I louse' image
"It was definitely the first
incident of nude athletics at our
house omplained Atteberry,
v h ' I a unfair foi MSI to
pui ' ie whole hi for the
mo " icti is of a few.
Rats
nts at two I niversity oi
M ami residential i ollegessay rats
in aded their comple Some
ha u nted cei tain rooms tor
�r exl
lown up, the
Miami 1 lurricane reported.
Perhaps hoping to set a gcxd
example tor coping with life's little
difficulties, UM officials have
remained reassuringly calm in
assessing the gravity of the stu-
dents' conflicts with their four-to-
six-inch-long roommates:
'We've had a few rats, veah
allowed Rich Yovanovieh, hous-
ing coordinator for one of the col-
leges, but 1 wouldn't call it a
problem
Riots
A bestselling t shirt in Palm
Springs, Calif the spring break
mecca that has become something
� �� .i police state as it tries to pre-
vent a repeat of the terrible riots of
1986: "Spring Break. Come on
vacation, leave on probation
Breakers
State police in southern Indi-
ana said they couldn'tset up speed
I raps for students heading south
along 1-65 this year because
schools in the state scheduled their
spring breaks at different times.
"We don't have the overflow
of students we used to when ev-
eryone was out the same week-
end sighed State Police Sgt.
Marvin Jenkins, who added his
troopers did make themselves
visible at highway rest stops
where, by the way, Anheuser-
Bush sponsored "responsible
drinking" get-togethers � "just
to let (the students) know we were
out there
Across the border, the Ken-
tucky State Police didn't let a little
thing like staggered spring breaks
stop them from having 15 troop-
ers work over time to write speed-
ing tickets each weekend through
March, Trooper Jackie Strode told
the Indiana Dailv Student.
Drunk
Bv April 3, Davtona Beach
police said they had arrested about
300 people on the beach, mostly
on drunk and disorderly charges,
and had closed three hotels for
violating terms of their lodging
licenses by failing to replace miss-
ing balcony railings or clean up
vomit in their hallwavs.
Five people had fallen off
Florida balconies. One, Christo-
pher Kominski, 22. of Burbank,
111 died after overreaching to catch
a frisbee thrown from the pool
deck below.
The "fun" continued back
home,too. Three more dorm rooms
were burglarized while Michigan
Tech students were off on spring
break, and an estimated $6,000
worth of stereos, compact disks,
di �k players and televisions were
stolen.
1
O'ROCKFELLERS IS PROUD TO PRESENT ONE OF
VIRGINIA BEACH'S BEST BANDS
FOR LOCALS ONLY
THIS THURSDAY NTTE
APRIL 13,1989
COME EARLY AND BEAT THE CROWD
SATURDAY MTE 180 PROOF
Bowman Gray to conduct first lung transplant
WINSTON
tragk shootii
en new hope to a
insti
sur man C Irav Medi-
cal Center to pei state s
first single lung ti -
( ih n Wooti ' ' I
it executive, is still
ndi-
n after
Sundav morning. VVooten who
was ih abou
months to livi Ibei fcri

redand ned

. . 'at
day v
rtii evera i


� - Pat
d dead eai
ur ' ' � im-
lonal
than the heart or kidneys and the
tnxiy's rejection of thelungismuch
more c immon than in heart trans-
plants.
Mills also said it is difficult to
find healthy lungs for transplant
purposes. 1 his operation is one
that israpidl) developing Mills
said. "There will be many more
pie who we feel will be suit-
le candidates for it. It really will
be limited by the number of do-
�rs
Both ot Wooten's lungs were
� h ted by a condition that strikes
about one in 10.0W people. Doc-
tors believe Wooten inhaled dust
from old carbon lights while work
ing years ago in a printer's shop.
Onlv one lung was trans-
planted, doctors said, because thai
is all Wooten needs to live a rela-
tively normal lifestyle. Bowman
Cray doctors nave been working
for two years to perfect the lung
transplant procedure.
Since 1983,only 62 such trans-
plants ha ve been done world w ide
Of that number, 35 patients are
still alive.
The first single-lung trans-
plant was done in 1963, but the
procedure wasdiscontinued years
later because few transplant pa-
tients left the hospital alive. Bow-
man Gray doctorsare following a
to hnique developed by Canadian
di torsin whichomentum a fatty
tissue taken from the patient's
abdomen is wrapped around the
site where the new lung joins the
patient's existing airway.
laisl ,1 'aiplina
PTavnou
sc
presents
lohn Pielmeier's
AGNES OF GOD
That night, murder was the least of the sins.
April 14, 13. 17 & IS
8:13 p.m.
McGinnis Theatre
(. leneral Publit S 00
11 L
�� . ��-
CALL 757-6829
RACK ROOM SHOES
'

nt t
ent
o ti wab senl� i i: his
k .ot �- wert used �� Bwwman.rvK'i- husftmri
i s a e. ta kiT,Carole
lesday. "It
has helped
t'ive peo elped some
;� nail this
a Ii
1 ues-
man � ould
k tors
said was
- first single-lung trans-
xiurc that is some-
fn m othei trans-
usually involve both
md lungs.
� only I6su h trans-
trmedinthe
ites a( cording to Bow-
� rs Many patiei its
ase often have
rt and SO tl f '�'
Have You Joined The Club Yet?
What Club?
Around The World Beer Club
Free Memberships
All You Need To Do Is Complete Our
List Of Beers And Get A T-Shirt
And A FREE Case Of Beer
What Kind Of Specials Does CJ's Have?
MONDAY a�d.y, TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
1.00 import CJ's Secretary Day Humpday Special
'PLUS DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS
60 Oz. Pitchers 350
WE NOW HA VE THE COW
6 Oz Ribeye Steak Sandwiches
BRANDED SHOES
-Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN EXTRA
U
Open
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sundav 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Aigner. Nike and Reebok)
I I
tlu
man ; .ray
rin �.
dan .
need
W
Remember Everything
We Have Is TO GO
355-3473
CALL US
Hours Of Operation
MonThur. 11-10:30
Fri & Sat. 11-11
Sunday 11-10
&
Come And Relax
And Get That Outdoor
Dining Experience
On Our Deck
A Dinmg Alternative'
We Are Located
At 103 E. Greenville Blvd.
In Front Of The
Eveready Plant
said
� was healthy,
cardiotlv r i ic surgeon Dr.
p. Mills, .md so less exten-
I low-
Mills said, a lung transplant
ore fragile
Tests
Continued from page 1
r taki non- redit remedial
� i Imi P. the test
McGee SO
Reprographics and
Drafting Supply Co.
jm
i)tr
i -ir�-
I
� "o- Av� &
sai
Pete Consa ro the state B an
of Reg i t
r- iscd retention
ng that those stu-
"it has
and vv �
dents are performing at least as
well as those who needed no
rem
a , igi im, in place
sin. 1984 has resulted in in
tion
nti rt I ommunica-
uting skills in the
curriculum, said Patrick Dallet
of the Florida Postsecondar)
Edu ation Planning Commission.
Some beleive student in Ken-
tucky will get used to the tests,
too.
"Reforms almost alwaj s start
hard and tough because they're
usually coming down on some-
one, in this case students and
teachers said fohn Good lad, a
University of Washington educa-
tion, at the San Francisco reform
meeting m late March.
"But then the soft and tender
side comes back on stage he said
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13,1989 3
Kappa Sigma put on probation at Mississippi S
members caught playing outdoor nude volleyball
(CPS) - Mississippi State Uni-
versity has put its Kappa Sigma
Fraternity house on social proba-
tion because several members
played in a 3 a.m outdoor nude
volleyball game.
"We can't really laugh it off
Kappa Sigma President Phil Atte-
berry told the MSU Reflector, the
student newspaper. "Kappa Sigs
are not trying to promote the
'Animal Vlouse' image
"It was definitely the first
incident of nude athletics at our
house' complained Atteberry,
who felt it was unfair for MSU to
punish the whole house for the
independent actions of a few.
Rats
Students at two University of
Miami residential colleges say rats
have invaded their complex. Some
have frequented certain rooms for
as long as five days before exter-
minators have shown up, the
Miami Hurricane reported.
Perhaps hoping to set a good
example for coping with life'slittle
difficulties, UM officials have
remained reassuringly calm in
assessing the gravity of the stu-
dents' conflicts with their four-to-
six-inch-long roommates:
"We've had a few rats, yeah
allowed Rich Yovanovich, hous-
ing coordinator for one of the col-
leges, "but 1 wouldn't call it a
problem
Riots
A bestselling t-shirt in Palm
Springs, Calif the spring break
mecca that has become something
of a police state as it tries to pre-
vent a repeat of the terrible riots of
1986: "Spring Break. Come on
vacation, leave on probation
Breakers
State police in southern Indi-
ana said they couldn't set up speed
traps for students heading south
along 1-65 this year because
schools in the state scheduled their
spring breaks at different times.
"We don't have the overflow
of students we used to when ev-
eryone was out the same week-
end sighed State Police Sgt.
Marvin Jenkins, who added his
troopers did make themselves
visible at highway rest stops �
where, by the way, Anheuser-
Bush sponsored "responsible
drinking" get-togethers � "just
to let (the students) know we were
out there
Across the border, the Ken-
tucky State Police didn't let a little
thing like staggered spring breaks
stop them from having 15 troop-
ers work over time to write speed-
ing tickets each weekend through
March, Trooper Jackie Strode told
the Indiana Daily Student.
Drunk
By April 3, Daytona Beach
police said they had arrested about
300 people on the beach, mostly
on drunk and disorderly charges,
and had closed three hotels for
violating terms of their lodging
licenses by failing to replace miss-
ing balcony railings or clean up
vomit in their hallways.
Five people had fallen off
Florida balconies. One, Christo-
pher Kominski, 22, of Burbank,
111, died after overreaching to catch
a frisbee thrown from the pool
deck below.
The "fun" continued back
home,too. Three more dorm rooms
were burglarized while Michigan
Tech students were off on spring
break, and an estimated $6,000
worth of stereos, compact disks,
disk players and televisions were
stolen.
OROCKFELLERS IS PROUD TO PRESENT ONE OF
VIRGINIA BEACH'S BEST BAND'S
fOR LOCALS ONLY
THIS THURSDAY NITE
APRIL 13,1989
COME EARLY AND BEAT THE CROWD
SATURDAY NITE 180 PROOF
TasI Carolina
Playhouse
Bowman Gray to conduct first lung transplant
John Pielmeier's
presents
WINSTON-SALEM(AP) � A
tragic shooting death in Greens-
boro has given new hope to a
Winston-Salem man by allowing
surgeons at Bowman Cray Medi-
cal Center to perform the state's
first single-lung transplant.
Calvin Woo ten, a 63-year-old
retired account executive, is still
listed in critical but stable condi-
tion after a lung transplant early
Sunday morning. Wooten who
was given only about three more
months to live had been suffering
from a rare condition for the past
20 vears that scarred and inflamed
his lungs.
The lung donor was 26-year-
old carpenter James Roger Pat-
rick, who was shot Thursday while
escorting several patrons from the
Partners night club at 221 Summit
Ave according to Patrick's wife.
Carole Jones-Patrick. James Pat-
rick, pronounced dead early Sat-
urdav morning, had told his fam-
ily that he wanted to donate his
organs to others.
Carol Jones-Patrick said her
husband's heart was sent to Duke
University Medical Center, his
Uv-wabsent to Chicago, and his
two lungs and kidneys were used
was a giver, not a taker Carole
Jones-Patrick said Tuesday. "It
eases us to know that he has helped
five people live. He helped some-
one. Some good came from all this
pain. To me, he is alive in all those
people
At a news conference Tues-
day, Bowman Gray doctors would
not identify the donor. Doctors
announced what they said was
the state's first single-lung trans-
plant � a procedure that is some-
what different from other trans-
plants that usually involve both
the heart and lungs.
Since 1983, only 16 such trans-
plants have been performed in the
United States, according to Bow-
man Gray doctors. Many patients
suffering lung disease often have
damage to the heart and so they
need both organs.
Wooten's heart was healthy,
said cardiothoracic surgeon Dr.
Stephen Mills, and so less exten-
sive surgery was required. How-
ever, Mills said, a lung transplant
is trickv because it is more fragile
than the heart or kidneys and the
body'srcjectionofthelungismuch
more common than in heart trans-
plants.
Mills also said it is difficult to
find healthy lungs for transplant
purposes. This operation is one
that is rapidly developing Mills
said. "There will be many more
poop! who we feel will be suit-
able candidates for it. It really will
be limited by the number of do-
nors
Both of Wooten's lungs were
a f fectcd by a condition that strikes
about one in 10,000 people. Doc-
tors believe Wooten inhaled dust
from old carbon lights while work-
ing years ago in a printer's shop.
Only one lung was trans-
planted, doctors said, because that
is all Wooten needs to live a rela-
tively normal lifestyle. Bowman
Gray doctors nave been working
for two years to perfect the lung
transplant procedure.
Since 1983, only 62 such trans-
plants have been done worldwide.
Of that number, 35 patients are
still alive.
The first single-lung trans-
plant was done in 1963, but the
procedure wasdiscontinued years
later because few transplant pa-
tients left the hospital alive. Bow-
man Gray doctors are following a
technique developed by Canadian
doctors in which omentum - a fatty
tissue taken from the patient's
abdomen is wrapped around the
site where the new lung joins the
patient's existing airway.
Have You Joined The Club Yet?
What Club?
Around The World Beer Club
VFree Memberships
All You Need To Do Is Complete Our
List Of Beers And Get A T-Shirt
And A FREE Case Of Beer
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Fri. & Sat. 11-11
Sunday 11-10
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Tests
Continued from page 1
test or take non-credit remedial
courses before admission, the test
has worked "tremendously said
Pete Consacro of the state Board
of Regents.
"It has increased retention,
and we're finding that those stu-
dents are performing at least as
well as those who needed no
remediaiton at all
The Floria program, in place
since 1984, "has resulted in in-
creased attention to communica-
tions and computing skills in the
curriculum said Patrick Dallet
of the Florida Postsecondary
Education Planning Commission.
Some boleive student in Ken-
tucky will get used to the tests,
too.
"Reforms almost always start
off hard and tough because they're
usually coming down on some-
one, in this case students and
teachers said John Goodlad, a
University of Washington educa-
tion, at the San Francisco reform
meeting in late March.
"But then the soft and tender
side comes back on stage he said
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I
AGNES OF GOD
That night, murder was the least of the sins.
April 14, 15, 17 & 18
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Qftlt iEaat (Eartfltman
Pete Fernald, n, � m ,�
STEPFIANIE FOLSOM, MihT Ettar
1 AMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Advertising
Tim Hampton, N��fj.
CHRlsSlEC,EL,Spc�.5!J.
G up Carter, r���r� r.
Susan Hovvell, prod, m
Dean Waters, cm w�-�rr
Stepi ianie Singleton, c rj,�
Brad Bannister, c ror
Jeff Parker, sufr muor
TOM FURR,Circl�fum Manager
Debbie Stevens, $���
Stephanie Emory r� .supem-
Mac Clark, ru�b M��ug�T
April 13, l�iSQ
OPINION
Page 4
Alaska Spill
What if guaranteeing that the
Alaskan wilderness remained un-
spoiled meant that we would all
have to do without the benefits of
oil: heating in many homes, trans-
portation, electricity? It is certain
that most would choose oil at the
expense of ecology, albeit reluc-
tantly.
Fortunately, that is not the
choice. It is this: we balance a reason-
able risk of damaging the environ-
ment against the larger ben,c; fs � as
we se c n � of keeping tht com-
forts to which we have grown accus-
tomed.
It can be argued that Exxon took
reasonable precautions. It had a
plan to deal with what was gener-
ally thought to be a worst-case sce-
nario of a two and a half million
gallon spill. It was slow in mobili' -
ing equipment to deal with the spiil
that occurred, but was further de-
layed by the Navy. Exxon did all it
legally could to ensure that the
tanker's captain, Joseph J. Hazel-
wood, had no record of drunken-
ness.
Exxon's policies prohibit the
consumption oi drugs and alcohol
by any member of a tanker's crew
while on ship. At least one employee
had noticed that the captain had
been intoxicated on board at least
once before.
Predictably, Congress is now
besieged with proposals to tighten
still further restrictions on drug and
Evil Twins abound
By SCOTT MAXWELL
alcohol use for, as Bush put it,
"people who are fulfilling impor-
tant functions, like taking crude oil
through straits These proposals
would almost certainly have
prevented this spill. But will they
prevent others? Not likely.
What would help is far more
radical and more sensible, which is
why it's far less likely to happen. It's
simple: Exxon should train its em-
ployees to report dangerous behav-
ior to their superiors.
The Captain Hazelwood should
never have been drunk. But, given
that he was, anyone who was aware
of his inebriation should have re-
ported it. The third mate, Gregory
Cousins, should have refused to pi-
lot the ship; he should have gotten in
touch with Exxon corporation and
made damn sure that they flew a re-
sponsible pilot to the tanker and had
Captain Hazelwood arrested.
This does not apply only to
Exxon. It applies to all businesses. In
fact, the concept applies to everyone
� we are all responsible.
We're responsible in another
way, too. Exxon's tankers wouldn't
have been out there in the first place
if there weren't such a demand for
oil. What Exxon and its employees
did to Alaska is unforgivable. But
Exxon deserves only part of the
blame. The rest lies with its custom-
ers.
� ��
Editorial Columnist
Is it just me, or does anybody else think
that there must be two Lt. Col. Oliver
Norths?
The OUie North who testified at the
Iran-contra hearings was asked to justify
lying to the Congress. He replied forcefully
that the United States must have covert op-
erations. There were, he said, people whose
very lives would be endangered if informa-
tion about these covert operations was
available to our enemies.
The other Ollie North, I deduce, must
be the evil twin of the first. This North at-
tempted to have tens of thousands of pages
of classified documents detailing covert
operations introduced as evidence at his
trial. Had this been allowed, the documents
would have become a matter of public rec-
ord and, therefore, "available to our ene-
mies
� � �
Is it just me, or does anybody else think
that there must be two George Bushes?
One George Bush held a press confer-
ence to discuss how the federal government
would deal with the Alaskan oil spill. He
said the accident was "a major tragedy" and
that as with other serious disasters, we
must work together at all levels, public and
private, to remedy the damage that's been
done and to safeguard the precious envi-
ronment for the future He also gave "top
priority" to cleaning up the spill.
George Bush's evil twin then took over
the press conference, announcing that the
federal government would send neither
personnel nor equipment to help with the
cleanup.
The good George Bush later tried to
send troops to the area. The evil twin
thwarted that plan: he decided not to send
in the troops; instead, he allowed Exxon to
hire several hundred more workers. Not
only that, the evil twin is allowing Exxon to
write off the additional hirings, which
means that the taxpayers end up paying for
it anyway.
For that matter, there appear to be two
Prince William Sounds.
One, according to Coast Guard Com-
mandant Paul Yost, is so wide that "chil-
dren could drive a tanker up through it
Its evil twin is apparently too treacher-
ous for a person who is trained in piloting
tankers by a major multinational corpora-
tion.
� � �
Or is it just me?
The campaign issue of financial aid
To the Editor:
I read with interest the com-
ments of the two candidates for presi-
dent of the Student Government
Association in your April 4, 1989,
edition. Needless to say, I applaud
the recognition given to the issue of
financial aid on the part of both can
didates. Their comments indicate an
appreciation for the critical role that
financial aid plavs in the lives of a
great many ECU students. Indeed,
approximately 43rr of the full-time
undergraduate student bodv re-
ceived some type of financial assis-
tance totalling over Sib million last
year. It is certain that without such
assistance, many students would be
unable to attend ECU. At the same
time, I would like to respond to the
issue raised by both candidates inso-
far as the financial aid application
process is concerned.
First, both candidates were right
on target in reference to the complex-
ity of the process � it is extremely
bureaucratic, confusing, and cum-
bersome! 1 can, without hesitation,
state that there is not a group anv-
where on campus that would wel-
come a simplerprocess mj?ttihji"thc �
staff oi the aid'frf FH e. The application
process which students are required
to negotiate is not a creature of our
making � it has been established bv
the Congress and regulated bv the
United States Department of Educa-
tion. Although we do attempt to keep
the process as simple as possible (for
example, we do not require anv type
of "institutional" aid application as
many schoolsdo), our ability to do so
is severely limited by the federal
requirements. Regrettable, based on
developments currently underway
in ' Vashington, it appears likely that
the application process for the 1990-
91 academic year will be even more
confusing, fragmented, and complex
(and time consuming) than the proc-
ess now in place. Considering the
impact that voting constituents can
exert on the political process, I would
urge all students who are concerned
with the complexity of the financial
aid process to become involved by
expressing those concerns to their
Congressional delegations.
Second, I would take issue with
the statement that "many students
find out on the first day of class thai
their applications have been denied
Determination and notification that
students are ineligible to receive fi-
nancial aid is made quite quickly
once processing is underway (typi-
cally in mid-March). Indeed, deter-
mination of ineligibility is one of the
least time consuming components of
the process. However, it is also true
that some students do experience
delays in the processing of their ap-
plications and notification oi their
awards. Such delays are caused bv
anv number of variables
Many students (approximately
25-30) must document the infor-
mation on their applications through
a federally mandated process called
"Verification This process, which
requires the submission oi such in-
formation as copies of federal income
tax returns, Verification Forms, and
other documents, must becarned out
on a case-by-case basis and typically
results in significant processing de-
lays. Other students experience de-
lays for a host ot reasons ranging
from imcomplete applications to a
need for financial aid transcripts
from institutions previously at-
tended.
As far as processing delays are
concerned, such delays do not occur
primarily during the initial review of
applications and mailing of follow-
up requests to students, but in the
area of award notification. 1 would be
dishonest if I sidestepped this issue
by failing to acknowledge the need
for increased efficiency in this area
Unfortunately, this office currently
relies on essentially manual means to
process financial aid applications.
determine eligibility, and award ti
nancial aid. That is. all applications
are individually reviewed and aid
awards are made bv hand C .n en the
extreme complexity and paperwork
involved in the aid process, it i sim-
ple impossible to accomplish this
process and notify all eligible appli-
cants within the time frame available
(mid-March to mid August). Never-
theless, nearly 3000 students had
been notified oi their eligibility prior
to last Fall's registration. For that, I
can only applaud the staff oi this
office, espe'cially considering the
demands under which they work.
On a much more positive note, 1
am extremely pleased to say that a
significant improvement in the entire
administrative efficiency of the fi-
nancial aid process at this university
is under way. This office, in conjunc-
tion with the Student Data Rise sec-
tion of Computing and Information
Services, is currently in the process of
developing and implementing an
entirely new financial aid computer
system. 'Fhis system will include
automated tracking and processing
oi applications, as well as computer
packaging of financial aid awards.
When fully implemented, this sys-
tem will provide dramatic positive
benefits for all student aid applicants
served by this office. For example,
computer packaging will allow this
oii'wc to do in weeks what now takes
months to accomplish. All of us in the
aid office look forward to the comple-
tion oi this move into the twentieth
centurv. We will continue to seek
ways to improve the service we pro
vide to the students of FCU which,
after all, is the reason d'etre oi this
ottice.
Ray Edwards
Director
Foreign
languages
To the Fditor:
A recent antcle and headline in
The Fast Carolinian creates the im-
pression that I or the Department of
Foreign Languages and I iterature-
have endorsed the concept ot ex-
panding our laboratory services b
"adding foreign language tapes h
the Mendenhall Music Listening
Center and the Jovner Librarv Au-
dioVisual Center
The article further states that the
bill to authorize this concept was
"mandated bv Chancellor Fakin.
I'rofessorGarv Ambert, Deanot Arts
and Sciences and the director ot
lovner Li bran Srvaking-torrrn seli
and our department, I must point our
that we have not received any uch
"mandate" or suggestion from the
chancellor, the Dean ot Arts and Sci-
ences, or the director oi lovner Li-
brary. We have not met or corre-
sponded with Legislator Carol! or
C.ilbert to discuss or plan tor the
availability oi language tapes at the
Music Listening Center.
Our language lab facility was
recently expanded and nKdernici
with new equipment installed in
Room 2003 oi the new General Class-
room building. The new Tandberg
recorders in that lab provide the
unique capability for students to
control their own individual tape,
record their own voices, etc features
which are essential to serious foreign
language laboratory practice. Those
activities would not be available to
students using cassettes in the Music
Listening Center or Jovner Library
Our new lab is centrally located
on campus and is open 42 hours per
week, including evening hours
(Mondav � Thursday 7-9 p.m.)
We do indeed look forward to
"expanding our facilities but that
expansion will likely involve com-
puter and video equipment for Room
2009 in our lab complex. Videos for
language instruction and cultural
enrichment could be made available
for student use in that area, close- to
the faculty and staff who work in our
department.
Garv J. Ambert
Associate Professor of Spanish
Director of Foreign language
Laboratory







t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13.1989 5
Environmental destruction
Campus Spectrum
By
Craig Spitz
Over 97.5 percent of Ameri-
cans eat meat in one form or an-
other. Today, most people are
aware of the health problems as-
sociated with excessive meat con-
sumption. Few are concerned
about ethical drawbacks of the
practice, but at least the facts on
that subject are rcadilv available
to those brave enough to face
them. And, of course, just about
everyone knows of the hazards
meat consumption causes to one's
pocketbook. But few are aware of
the environmental effects oi rais-
ing animals for meat on the mas-
sive scale presently employed in
the U.S. The practice is extremely
wasteful of food and land re-
sources, and it is the root of such
serious environmental problems
as deforestation, the water short-
age, and soil erosion.
According to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, 950 million
acres oi land are utilized for live-
stock raising, while 444 million
acres are used for growing crops.
But since two-thirds oi the crops
are sued to feed livestock, the total
acreage used for livestock pur-
poses comes to 1,243 million, or
roughly 90 percent oi all agricul-
tural land in the U.S. This land is
largely wasted because raising
animals for meat is far less pro-
ductive in terms of food than the
growing of crops. One acre used
to raise beef yields about 110,000
megacalories (one million calo-
ries: abbreviated MCal), whereas
that same acre could produce
2,760,000 MCal of oats. No one
can can dispute that livestock
agriculture is vastly inefficient
compared to plant food agricul-
ture. But even if the resources
were available to sustain this inef-
ticicnt use oi land, there would
till be manv other problems.
v lonopolizing land the wav it
does, livestock agriculture de-
First Lady
undergoing
treatment
serves most of the blame for de-
forestation. Of the 70 million acres
oi forestland cleared between
1967 and 1975, 47 million were
converted to grazing land, which,
of course, prevents reforestation.
And if the U.S. were not using950
million acres for livestock it
would be possible to grow forests
on this land, thus eliminating the
need to clear natural forests. Also,
this reforestation would elimi-
nate America's need to import
wood and, thus, the economic
incentive to destroy rain forests,
which has proved overpowering
to most South American coun-
tries, would be gone. In other
words, if the U.S. were not using
so much land for livestock, there
would not be a need to clear any
more forests at all, anywhere!
The shortage of water is an-
other problem that can be traced
to the meat industry. Of the 55.1
cubic km of water used in the U S
agriculture, according to the
USD A, claims 221.8 or just over 40
percent. But it is important to dis-
tinguish consumptive uses and
nonconsumptive ones. Con-
sumptive uses evaporate the wa-
ter, returning it to the hydrologi-
cal cycle. Nonconsumptive uses
keep the water available for fu-
ture use. Only 147 cubic km of
water are actually consumed in
the U S but of this, 122 cubic km,
or S3 percent, are consumed by
agriculture. Eighty-five percent
of the total agricultural use of
water is for livestock. While one
pound of beef has fewer calories
than a pound of wheat, it requires
forty to fifty times as much water
to produce. With water tables
continuing to fall at the alanming
rate that they are, the U.S. cannot
afford such an incredible waste of
such a valuable resource for much
longer.
Another environmental
problem that meat production
contributes to in a big way is soil
depletion. Now some soil erosion
is natural, but this natural erosion
should be balanced by soil forma-
tion. The average rate of soil for-
mation in the U.S. currently is 11
2 tons per acre per year. Unfortu-
nately, the U.S. is losing its soil at
the alarming rate of 12 tonsacre
year. Both livestock agriculture is
by far responsible for a greater
amount. In particular, cattle
ranching is the worst culprit. The
grazing and trampling of cattle
remove the protective vegetation
covering of the soil which makes
it susceptible to wind and water
erosion. For each MCal of range-
land beef produce, 800 pounds of
soil arc lost. In comparison, each
MCal of oats depletes only 5.2
pounds of soil. When the topsoil
of an area is gone, the land is vir-
tually useless. Incidentally, the
majority of land rendered useless
for agricultural purposes
throughout history was ruined by
tope il depletion. If the U.S. were
to adopt a vegetarian agricultural
system, then enough land could
be set aside to grow forests, which
produce a great deal of soil, and
the entire problem of soil deple-
tion would be solved.
This article is not meant to be
a bad omen. It is meant to bear
good news. The problems of food
scarcity, deforestation, water
depletion, and soil erosion, which
sometimes seem overwhelming,
do have a solution. The solution is
certainly a humanly possible one,
but one that will meet with a great
deal of resistance. The situation is
summed up in the saying, "We
have met the enemy and he is us
If these problems stamp us out
before we do them, we know
where the blame will lie. We
humans will simply have to ask
ourselves whether our craving for
the taste of meat outweighs our
desire to have a future.
This Campus Spectrum is being
reprinted due to a layout mistake in
its last publication. We are sorry for
any confusion.
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian wel-
comes letters expressing all
points of view. Mail or drop
them by our office in the
Publications Building, across
from the entrance to Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verifica-
tion, all letters must include
the name, major, classifica-
tion, address, phone num-
ber and the signature of the
author(s). Letters are limited
to 300 words or less, double-
spaced, typed or neatly
printed. All letters are sub-
ject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no
personal attacks will be per-
mitted.
Students, faculty and
staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they
are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for edi-
torial material is 5 p.m. Fri-
day for Tuesday papers and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thurs-
day editions.
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Cam-
1 pus Forum" section of the
paper, The East Carolinian
i features "The Campus Spec-
trum This is an opinion
I column by guest writers
from the student bodv and
faculty. The columns printed
j in 'The Campus Spectrum"
I will contain current topics
of concern to the campus,
community or nation.
WHICHARDS BEACH
GrRND opening
OVER 14 MILE OF BEACH BATHING
The Best Place
for that
Early Summer Tan
GameroomSnackbar�Waterslide
Parties Welcome!
Location: WASHINGTON, N.C.
For Details Call 946 0011
IP
50 OFF ON
SUMMER
MERCHANDISE
We're Open Daily
& Sundays 1-6
j- 1900 Dickinson Ave
- Greenville
a 830-0174
;VUtt Our Budge
Section v
Tom Togs
Factory Outle
I
fe. Nothing Over
1900 Dickinson Ave Greenville
830-0174
Trocadero Tom Togs Fashions
is Running a 50 off Sale
Also!
Conetoe
j Hwy. 64 East
Trocadero Tom
Togs Fashions
Memorial Drive
J
I Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
WASHINGTON (AD � Bar-
bara Bush is undergoing radioac-
tive treatment to destroy her thy-
roid gland because it is producing
excess levels oi hormones, a con-
dition that has irritated her eyes
and caused her to lose 18 pounds
in recent months.
A White House statement said
the procedure "has no significant
side effects" and has been a stan-
dard treatment for 40 years for
people suffering with her condi-
tion, known as Graves disease. It
was to be administered today at
Walter Reed Army Medical Cen
ter.
Once her thyroid gland has
stopped operating, probably in
two to three months, Mrs. Bush
will have to take daily medication
to maintain adequate hormone
levels, according to her press sec-
retary, Anna Perez.
Mrs. Bush consulted doctors
last month because of swell ing and
irritation in her eyes, causing them
to tear, and the sudden weight
loss.
For several weeks, Mrs. Bush
has been treated with methima-
zole, a drug that blocks produc-
tion of excess hormones in the
thvTOid, a butterfly-shaped gland
in the neck.
Ms. Terez said the use of drugs
was an interim therapy and that
the destruction of the thyroid
through radiation was a more
permanent treatment.
"She's feeling great. She's
feeling just fine Ms. Perez said.
She said the first lady still was
experiencing some problem with
tears but that the condition was
much improved.
Wednesday's procedure, an
alternative to surgery, was to be
carried out with radioactive io-
dine in an oral solution. Once
ingested, it seeks out the thyroid
and begins destroying it.
Mrs. Bush was expected to be
at the hospital for about two hours,
including time for observation.
Left untreated, Graves disease
can be life threatening, but it gen-
erally responds quickly to ther-
apy.
The disease is more apt to
occur in older women.
FREE
GAME
r
i
i
i
i
BOWL ONE GAME & RECEIVE J
ANOTHER GAME FREE J
WITH THIS COUPON. j
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person. j
yy
Sharky's
of Greenville
Daily Specials
Monday - $2.25 Margarita's
Tuesday -$1.75 Bourbon
Wednesday - $2.00 Kamikaze
Thursday - $1.00 Imports &
LADIES NITE selSSooVTwclve
free admission
Friday- $1.75
Highballs
Highballs
Fireballs
Saturday - $1.75
$1.75
Present This Ad At Door For
FREE Membership
Sharky's is a private club for members and
21 year old guests. ,
Located by Sports Pad on 5th Street
ENTER THROUGH ALLEY
APPLICATIONS
ARE NOW BEING
ACCEPTED
FOR
REFRIGERATOR
AND
MICROWAVE
RENTALS
DIRECTOR
AND
SGA COPIER
MANAGER
DEADLINE TO APPLY IS APRIL 14, 1989
APPLY IN ROOM 222
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTLR





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13,1989

Classifieds
FOR RENT
NEED TO SUBLEASE? Law students
interested in subleasing furnished apart-
ments for summer (May � AugustV Want
to make arrangements as soon as possible
Call Bert Speicher at 355-3090.
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath
townhouse at Twin Oaks. Family man-
aged � $525 month Fireplace, Appli-
ances. Paho. r ol Year's lease required.
Opens Augusi .5, in hme for Fall semes-
ter Call 752-2851
APARTMENT AVAILABLE TO SUB-
LEASE: Beginning after May 8. 2 bed-
room, 112 bath Rent 5370mon. plus
utilities. Close to campus Lease ends after
2nd summer school session For details
call 830-5138 � ask for Trish, Susan or
Tammv
FEMALE ROOMMATE: To share 3 bed
room apt. (on bus line) 1 ,3 rent � 125.00
? unities Available Mav 5th Nice people.
Call 752-3678.
STUDENTS WELCOMED! 4 months
seasonal rentals availalbe. 1 lousing 4 to 12
students each Call Seagate Realtv 441-
3127.
FEMALE: Non-smoker needed to share
apartment with me and my 5 year old son.
Private room in two bedroom, one bath
duplex Fireplace, dishwasher Rent
SI 10.00month in exchange for taking mv
on to dav-careM-F mornings Call Vickv,
732-0576 M�TH between 11-2 p.m.
Available by May 1, 1989
LEAVING FOR THE SUMMER: Need to
find female roommate(s starting m Au-
gust If interested please call 830-6912 ask
for Carrie.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: First
summer session to share 3 bedroom
house, private bedroom, share bathroom
with one person. SI75mo, 13 utilities.
Call Pam 738-7142.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For Mav � July
13 rent & utilities. Will have own lg.
room � 752-3886.
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED: Female non
smokers. Mav until Fall semester Own
bedrooms Furnished. No pets. 2 blocks
from campus. S133.00utilities. Call Jen-
nifer (758-5362), Rana (758-8307t or
Gretchen (752-9469)
2 BR. 1 B. HOUSE: Available to sublease
for the summer One block from campus,
please call 738-0061 for more information.
FEMALE ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED:
For the summer months. 1 3 rent, 1 3
utiltities. Call Becky at 758-1161
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: For
Fall semester to share a 3 bedroom house
private bedroom, share bathrooqj �u
one person 5175.00 mo. 1 3 utilities. Call
Pam 758-7142.
ROOM IN SEDCEF1ELD TOWNES:
Townhouses for sublet during the sum-
mer Must be a non-smoker If interested
or want more information contact 355-
9183
FEMALE NON-SMOKER: Needed to
share 12 rent utilities in a 2 bed
Townhouse aprox 2 miles from campus.
Call 736-7797 or leave message.
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE: Near
university, for female non-smoker �
work exchange. 757-1798.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. For Fall &
Spring of '89 & '90 � Oakmont Apts. � 2
br, big kitchen � 1 12 baths. Pool &
clubhouse. Rent S16000 a month. Call
732-2151
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share 2 Bd apt. Beginning May. Non-
smoker, dean, studious. $165.00mo 1
2 utilities. Available for sublease during
summer mos Stratford Arms. 355-3081 �
Jennifer
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouse available May 1st. $325.00
moutilities Call Julie from 8 a.m. to 5
p m. � 551-2477 or Jamie evenings � 758-
1427
FOR SALE

I
I
FOR SALE: 10 band stereo frequency
equalizer with 1M expander spectrum
analyzer. Like new $85 Call 752-3432 and
ask for Dave
RECLINERS FOR SALE: Brand new, no
joke! Excellent prices' For more informa-
tion, call Mike at 752-6823
FOR SALE: 1086 Toyota MR2 Black, fully
loaded with sunroof: Call 756-8720. Leave
message.
FOR SALE: Entertainment Center to fit
Clement. White, or Greene dorms. Very
spacious, includes shelves for a TV. large
refrigerator, books, etc. Call today! 758-
4507 Amv or Kathleen
MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE: '85 Honda
Nighthawk 450 cc Excellent condition,
low milageplus 2 helmets for only
SW.00Call Kevin �758-5667 or 758-0710.
GOVERNMENT HOMES: From S1.00.
"U Repair" Also tax delinquent property
Call 805-644-9533 Ext. 1052 for info.
FOR SALE: Bed and dresser � excellent
condition � S100 Reclining chair � $20
Call Leslie at 752-6219.
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS, CARS, 4 X 4'S:
Seized in drag raids for under SI 00.00?
Call for facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext 711
FOR SALE: Large dorm size refrigerator.
S100.00 or best offer Gray carpet S60 00
Both only used for 9 months Call 758-9204
and ask for Mickelle
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages We
repair computers and printers also Low-
est hourly rate in town SDF Professional
Computer Services. 106 East 5th Street
(boide Cubbies) Greenville, NC 72
3694
M � F 1 p m. to 5 p.m. No phone calls
please.
LIFE GUARDS AND RENTAL ATTEN-
DANTS NEEDED: Atlantic Beach area
Memorial Day throuRh Labor Dav. Con
tact Beach Bums Beach Service P O Box
1342 Atlantic Beach, NC 28512
TELEMARKETING: Good phone voice
and outgoing personality helpful 9 - 2
p.m. 5 -9 p.m. shifts weekdays, great dailv
bonuses. Call Dottie 5 - 9 p.m. at 355-8910.
SUMMER JOBS: Were you able to save
the money you needed last summer? Can
you relocate? Can vou handle money? Are
vou independent? Interviews today at
3:00 and 700 Rm B 04 Basement of Joyner
Library.
SECRETARY: Immediate opening for
temporary Secretary, possibly leading
into permanent position. Efficiet typing
required. Attractive offices. Part-time or
full time. Apply at First Executive Finan-
cial Corporation. 310 Evans St Greenville.
PERSONALS
CHI�O'S: "Straight�up" now tell us
who has the best socials There's nothin'
better than when Chi�O and Alpha Sigs
get together. Once again you guys proved
vou know how to throw down! Thanks for
Saturday night � it was crusher! Love,
The Alpha Sigs.
ATTENTION ECU: Spring Break for
Children's Hospital" � The Eccentrics,
The Bash, & The Embers; at the Pitt
Countv Fairgrounds Tickets only S5,
advance; available ECU Central Ticket
Office (Mendenhall) & all fraternities.
TO ALL THE SENIORS OF ALPHA
DELTA PI: Kim Bailev, Kim Cauthen, Jan
Copley, Robin Havekost, Lisa Parrott,
Kirstin Peterson, Angie Smith, Kim
Miller, Lisa Woodard � We will miss you
guvs! Love your sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO TRIP
ROAKES: For greek man of the year and
SGA President � we know you'll do a
great job. Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
WE HOPE EVERYONE HAS HAD FUN:
At greek week so far, and will continue to
have fun until the end � Love Alpha
Delta Pi.
SIGMA NU: Thank you so much for
painting our house! Y'all did a great job!
Love, Delta Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS TO TRIPP
ROAKES: The new SGA President. Good
luck! Love, Delta Zeta.
guys for tne dedication and hard work.
PIKA.
ALL CREEKS! The annual Phi Kappa Tau
raft race party will begin Friday, April
14th at 4 p m. The river is too high but we
can still jam! Come out and hear the tunes
of special guest Treble Maniax!
BETA'S: Our thoughts and prayers are
with you and Dave. With love, Alpha Xi
Delta'
TRIPP ROAKES: Congrats on SGA presi-
dent. We were behind you all the way. The
Sigmas.
TKE: We had a great time Thursday night.
Boxers and around the world we did go.
Sigma and TKE always. Love, the Sigmas.
PHI MU ALPHA: We loved the song ya
sang, and hope ya have many more happy
trails. The Sigmas.
GREEK WEEK: Has been a blast even
though it has a rough start. Hope every-
one had fun and remember, we're all 1!
The Sigmas.
WILLIAM, JIM, & KRISTIN: Camping
this weekend was a lot of fun especially
with the rain, wind, squating stump, & the
streaker from hell We must do it agains!
Luv, Nicki.
JIM: You're one special guy and I'm one
lucky gal. Thank you. � Nicki.
NEWS FLASH: Iota class enters the estab-
lishment. The pledges are pledges no
more. These new brothers did it and did it
wstyle. Alpha thru Theta extend con-
gratulations to lota spring '89 pledg class
of Pi Kappa Alpha.
SCAVENGER HUNT RELOCATED
LAND PARTY: Was a blast. Sincere love
and thanks to the PIKA Lit Sisters from
the brothers.
HAPPY HOUR(S). The Fizz Thursday 9
p.m. until Also, new pike happy hour at
Grog's 9 � 11 Wednesday. Come out one
or both of these nights and see why Pi-K-
A is "Chillin' on the mike
GREEKS: TheSig Tau bash has been post-
poned because of lack of sun. But come
out next Monday � it's guaranteed fun.
The band will be raging, the pit will await
and now the teams have some time to
decide their fate.
WILLIAM: Smile
ster.
I love you! � Nick-
GREEKS: Greek week is here and get
ready for Pi Kapp field day It is going to
be better than ever
DAVID: Today you've turned 21 But,
hey, the fun has just begun! We'll grab the
liquor, mixer, and the brew and party the
whole night through! � We'll be getting
"Buck Wild" in Greenville! Love, Audrey.
JEFF: 1 lere's a couple of lines for a baby of
mine: Just a few short days 'till you're 21
Grab a bottle, we'll have some fun! Of
course we'll have a party but remember,
don't party too hardy 1 love you sweetie
Happy Birthday � Love Always, Kat
ATTENTION: The Sheraton in Newbern
is ready to rock with the Alpha Phis and
their dates once again. So get psyched for
formal weekend cuz it will definetly be
unforgettable! Ladies � don't forget
those bikinis!
THETA CHI: Would like to congratulate
their new officers: President � Mike
Rosenblatt; V.P. � Charles "Jug" Heath;
Secretary � Tim Peed; Treasurer � Paul
Jones; Pledge Marshall � Buddy
Seargent; Ass Pledge Marshall � Bryant
Powell; First Guard � Lee Byerly; 2nd
Guard � Brian Mclntosh, Historian -
Jordan Wrenn; Chaplain � Allen Man
ning, Librarian; Tim Gomez.
THETA CHI'S SEE-SAW MANIA: Top
ten moments. 10 � The number of wrecks
we caused? 9 � Debbie's wonderful hot
chocolate. 8 � Alpha Phi's cookies &
hookies & � John � Cheryl � Cindy
Busbn' Bottoms 6 � Steve Laymon �
Marathon see-sawer. 5 � Pfautz � A now
show. 4 � Falermo put the bull horn
away 3 � Donald � How was that waffle
house? 2 � PJ � You look sick up there 1
� Donald � pledge of the week � way to
go!
THETA CHI: Wishes to thank everyone
who helped make see-saw mania for spe-
cial Olympics a success Special thanks go
out to Burger King, the Alpha Phi's, and
you too Deb'
AZD'S AND DATES: Even if our formal
is at 1 lolidav Hell it's gonna be a blast (in
case you couldn't tell!) With our garters
and top hats we're gonna be set Pink
Rose Ball '89 you will never forget! Here's
to us, and those like us, Damn Few Left!
SIG EPS: Thanks for a great time on
Wednesday night � AZD's and Sig Eps
are always an awesome sight
PHI TAU: Pre-downtown was too much
fun and as always � the pool was gTeat'
Thanks, the AZD's
CONGRATULATIONS: To Tripp
Roakes on his SGA presidency! We're
behind vou all the way' Love, the AZDs
ECU: All-sing is gone, but it was such a
blast! Everyone was great, from the first to
the last! Congrats to the Alpha Sigs and
the ZTA's too! Your acts were the best and
original too! Thanks to everyone who
came to the show � we appreciate your
support more than you know! Love, the
AZD's.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO DJ. Call
eaily and honk for y� formal or.party
758-1700 ask for Dillon or leave a mes
fsaap
( l
Ion
&FW.PUUPFA AlSHVflmrFRS.
Cabell Lawton � Pre, Tvlor Riggs � VP,
If I Pal WiMiEs � Treasurer. Mike Davi -
� � rltJflRob Wooten � Sarceanf Jt
ABORTION
Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
WORD PROCESSING Reports. Resu
mes, Laser Printing Rush iobs and reser-
vations accepted Call 752-1933 before 5
pm.
CATERING SERVICE AVAILABLE:
For private party, senior show & gradu-
ation party Make reservation in advance
rrStaW, Rob Wooten � Sargc
arms. Kick tail like we know you will
GREAT WORK: IMC award winner �
Kevin Plumb and the President's cup
GREAT WORK: IMC award winner �
Kevin Plumb and the President's cup
award recipient Tim Sheehee. Thanks
TrianglAlRrfiej.
Health Center
Ci! for appointment Mon. thru Sat. Low
Cost Trnnmauon to 20 week of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
Now accepting
application for
The East Carolinian
Circulation Manager.
To apply for this position
bring your resume to
The East Carolinian
Jocaled onlhe second floor of
atfiWftpblication building across from
Joyner Library.
(Salary plus commision, no phone calls please)
Call
-1278.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
HELP WANTED
RESIDENT COUNSELOR: Interested in
those with human service background
wishing to gain valuable experience in the
held. No monetary compensation, how-
ever room, utilities and phone provided
Marv Smith REAL Crisis Center 758-
HELP.
HELP WANTED: Full or part-time desk
clerk and relief audit positions available at
the Ramada Inn. Some experience is pre-
ferred. Apply in person at the front desk
PIRATES LANDING
remco east, inc.
IS
� r�j� P.O. Box 6026
� V GrcenvUe, NC 27834
919-758-6061
REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT
ATTENTION:
PANHELLENIC ANNOUNCES:
Registration April 3rd-6th
& 10th-13th
Student Stores
Croatan
Bottom of Hill
10am - 3 pm
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6 p m. in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7.00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If vou are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of Cod.
Every Fri. night at 700 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
���
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a nde or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Flours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 pm. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
F,n I NAVIGATORS
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 7:30-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
ments served. No ticket required; just
reserve your time.
HFI.P FIGHT CANCER
A 24-hour Run Against Cancer will be
sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed
National Fraternity, and the American
Cancer Society on April 14th St 15th at the
ECU track. Contestants are not required
to jog or walk the entire 24 hours, but
instead will be taking turns with nine
other team members for 1 2 hour periods.
Find out about entering a team or donat-
ing moneymaterials. For more info call
Rose Richards (752-2574) of the American
Cancer Soc, Bryan Haskins (756-9665) of
Alpha Phi Omega or David Overton (830-
6785) of Alpha Phi Omega.
SEASON TICKETS
Season tickets for the 1989-90 Performing
Arts Series at ECU are now on sale. This
outstanding season includes ITZHAK
PERLMAN, THE NC DANCE THE-
ATRE. SHALON '90, THE CANNES
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with RAN-
SOM WILSON, THE NC.
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, CARMEN
sung in English, DREAM GIRLS, and
much more, Patrons are cautioned that
initial season ticket sales are brisk. Al-
though individual event tickets will go on
sale 3 weeks prior to each event, it is
highly possible that the series will sell out
in season sells. Don't miss out on the best
Performing Arts Series, order your tickets
today. Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC, 757-6611, Ext. 266.
If your life has been affected, past or pres-
ent, by having been raised in a home or
environment where alcoholic and other
dysfunctional behaviors were present,
Here's Something You Should Know.
Each Tues. at 4:30, in rm. 312 of the Coun-
seling Center, there is a discussion and
learning group meeting for those with
common concerns. Newcomers are en-
couraged to come at 4:15. Call 757-6793 for
additional info.
BALLOON RIDES
Come join the Down East Balloon Society
on April 15 from 4-7 p.m. at Vemon Park
Mall (Kinston) for hot air balloon rides
and help us raise funds for Children's
Hospital of Eastern NC (weather permit-
ting�rain date. April 29,4-7 p.m.). Watch
the Children's Miracle Network Telethon
on W1TN-7, June 3-4.
WORLD RENOWN VIOLIN-
IST NADTA SALERNO-SON-
NENPERG
World Renown Violinist Nadja Salemo-
Sonnenberg will perform in Wright Audi-
torium at 8pm on April 20th. 1 ler appear-
ance will conclude the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series at East Carolina Univer-
sity. Her scheduled prOgram will in-
clude. SONATA No. 2 in A Major, Op. 12,
No. 2 by Beethoven, SONATA No. 2 ink D
Major, Op. 94a by Prokofiev, Intermis-
sion, SONATA No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 108
by Brahms. Ms. Salerno-Sonnenberg will
be acompanied by Sandra Rivers on the
piano. Tickets for this "vent are now on
sale, they can be purchased through the
Central Ticket Office at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center by calling 757-6611, ext.266.
Office hours are 11 am-6 pm, Monday
through Friday.
kr, "Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
BjGjeffiS
TheStudent Council for Exceptional Chil-
dren is proud to present Ms. Wheelchair
NC 1989 on Aprill3at8pm in the Nursing
Bldg. Auditorium. She will be discussing
current legislation on the rights of dis-
abled persons as well as stories for her ex-
periences. Everyone is welcome to attend!
1989 BUCCANEERS
The staff of the 1989 Buccaneer is looking
for your photographs to go in the book. If
you have taken pictures of your friends,
Fall Break, Spring Break, Campus Activi-
ties or anything dealing with East Caro-
lina University, send them into the Bucca-
neer Office to be used in the 1989 Bucca-
neer. We need negatives, along with a
photo and if your photo is chosen we will
give you the photo credit in the book.
Dealine for submission is April 10, so send
them in soon. We are located on the sec-
ond floor of the publications building in
front of Joyner Library. Bring photo-
graphs in and slide under door if no one is
here. Remember: it's not your yearbook
until you're in it.
DC AREA SUMMER IOB
Summer position available in the Wash-
ington, DC, office of a North Carolina
Congressman. Typing skills necessary
and shorthand desirable. Local interview
available. For further details contact: Ruth
Petersen, Co-op, 2028 GCB, (757-6979) as
soon as possible.
SlGMAJa
"The History of Quackery in Medicine"
will be the subject of a presentation on
April 13 at 8 p.m. by Dr. Leland Keller,
Professor Emeritus of Biology of Pittsburg
State University in Kansas. This program
is a humorous look at the origins, use, and
outlawing of some of the unbelievable
medical gadgets and "snake oil" of the
ISOO's and early 1900's, including demon
strations and illustrations of some of the
apparatur. Sponsored by the ECU Chap-
ter of Sigma Xi, the talk will be held in
Mendenhall 244 and is open to the public
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS
Bus. Admin Marketing or Economics
majors needed for a variety of summer
internships in logistics related positions
with private industry. Location and pay
vary. A resume is necessary to apply For
a list of companies contact Ruth Petersen,
Co-op, 2028 GCB (757-6979) for applica
tion details.
CO-OP
Need a summer job? Call the Co-op office
� 757-6979 � to find out how we may
help you locate a summer job in your
home town or in Greenville.
GOLDEN GIRLS
ECUGolJen Girl (Dance line) auditions
for 1989 to be held April 15th and 16th in
the A.J. Fletcher Music Bldg Be there at 10
a.m. dressed comfortably, ready to dance
For more information call 7524369.
STRATEGIES FOR STAN-
DARDIZED TESTS
Are you planning on taking GRE, LSAT,
MAT, MEDCAT, or other standardized
tests? This workship will cover basic info.
about these test, test taking strategy and
sample item. April 17 from 4-5 p.m. in 313
Wright Bldg. If you are planning on taking
the GRE for admission to grad school, this
workship can help you prepare � types of
items , test taking strategy, scores and
sample items will be discussed. April 18
from 4-5 p.m. in 313 Wright Building.
STRESS MANAGEMENT
Do vou become increasingly "jittery" as
finals approach, have trouble concentrat-
ing while studying, avoid studying, or
feel like studying won't help your test
performance, because you'll go blank
anyway? You're not alone and there is
hope' This workshop will include relaxa-
tion training, getting "psyched up" in a
positive way for finals and strategies of
preparation and test taking to reduce
stress. April 17, 19, and 21 in room 329
Wnght Bldg, 3-4 p.m. It is important to
attend all three meetings We will be prac-
ticing and building relaxation skills.
PHI ALPHA THETA
Dr Donald Sutherland of the University
of Maryland will present a lecture on
"Ten-or and Counter-TeiTor in the French
Revolution at 3 p.m. April 14 in Brewster
206 All interested persons are urged to
attend Free.
PHI ALPHA THETA
There will be a meeting in the Todd rm at
Brewster on April 17 at 12:45 p.m. Sec-
tions will be held at this time All members
please try to attend.
SCEC
Student Council for Exceptional Children
meeting April 17 at 5:15 in Sp 103. Elec-
tions will be held. Attendance is impor-
tant
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MAJORS CLUB
To all HPERS faculty, staff, & students:
You are cordially invited to attend a
plaque dedication ceremony in honor of
Mrs. Gay Blocker. It will be held in the PI-





I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13, 1989 7
Announcements
RATE CLUB on Aprill3 at 7 p.m. Refresh-
ments will be served. This function is
sponsored bv the Phvsical Education
Mains Club of ECU We would appreci-
ate vour attendance The dress for stu-
dents is semi formal Thank you PEMC
tficers.
OMEGA PSI PHI
The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity 4th annual
All Crock Step Show" competition will
be held April 13 at Sportsworld of Green-
v ifie An after partv will immediately fol
low the competition and door prizes will
be given to luckv ticket holders All pro-
ceeds will be used for our Achievement
Week program
N1ETHOP1ST STUDENT
CENTER
Tic Methodist Student Center is now
lvxvpting application for Fall 1989 for
rooms call 738-2(B0 or come bv 501 East
Fifth Street tor more information There
are a tow spaces loft for first session of
Summer scruxil Apply now
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
There will bo a full membership mooting
of East Carolina Friends on Tuesday.
pnl 18, in biolog N102 from 7-830pm
this is a verv important mooting which
will include elections and final prepara-
kms for Barefoot on the Mall Please call
our gToup loaders if in case of work.
rlass or illness you cannot attend
FUTURE STUDENT TEACH-
Opporrunities are now available for stu-
dent teaching in Puobb Mexicao Teacher
Education maors planning to student
teach in the spring semester, 1990, are
eligible to apply Applications are in the
Office of Student Teaching, Speight 109,
and the Office of International Studies,
Genera! Qassroom 1002 Limited posi-
tions arc available. Application deadline:
April 21 For more info call Marianne
! um (w) 57-r�271 or (b) 830-450.
EMPLOYMENT
Employment opportunities are available
to student who are interested in becorn-
ming PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS
to students in wheelchairs, READERS,
and TUTORS Past experience is desired
but not required Applications will be
tjVen for employment during the Sum-
mer Session and Fal 1S9 and Spring Se-
mester 199Q it intorostod contact: OF-
FICE OF HANDICAPPED STUDENT
SERVICES 111 Whkhard Annex East
Carolina University Greenville NC
27858-4353 PHONE: 919757-6799 or 757-
t $81
.Sfl.fiXCtK SCREWING
The Creative Living Confer, an adult da
health care center operated bv the Ea'
Carolina University School of Medicine, is
offering a tree skin cancer screening on
Thursday, Mas 4, from 1100 am until
1 10 p m. Drs John ! lendnx and Cameron
Smith will be providing this service at the
Center, located at 2000 E. Sixth Street (St
Jaies United Methodist Church) Any
interested adult over the age of titv five is
eligible for the screening, but registration
will be limited. Call the Creative Living
Center at 757-0303 to pre register for this
free screening.
So what if there are
more reasons not
to
Just Do It!
, then write about it
in
I Tfic
'East Carolinian
Now Accepting
Applications.
BACCHUS stands for Boost Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning the I tealth of
University Students. If you want to be
involved in a group that promotes respon-
sible decision-making regarding the use
or nonuse of alcohol, this is it! We meet
each Wednesday, at 6 p.m. in 305 Joyner
Library We're beginning to make plans
for Fail activities. Call 757-6793 for more
info.
CQIQR GUARD AUPITQNS
Color Guard Auditions for the ECU
Marching Pirates will be April 15, 29, and
May t, 12 p.m4 p.m. Please pick one day!
Flags are provided - rifles, bring your
own.
PUEUC SERVICE AN-
NOUNCEMENT
Are you a Pitt County resident, 60 years
old or older and need a ride to your medi-
cal appointment7 The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt county such as doctors, den-
tists, dimes, therapies and the Health
department. Arrangements for the service
must be made at least 24 hours before the
scheduled appointment Call the Creative
Living Center 757-0303 to reserve your
nde
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting is Monday, April 17 at
6:00 in GC 1019 There will be a social af
terwards
FITNESS INTRUCTOR TRY-
OUTS
Individuals interested in trying out for
intramural recreational services fitness
class instructors are encouraged to sign-
up in 204 Memorial Gym. Try-outs will be
held April 26. Up to seven individuals will
be selected and hired. For additional in-
formation contact Kathleen Hill in 204
Memorial Gym or call 757-6387.
PIRATE PIGSKIN SOFTBALL
TOURNAMENT
The third annual ECU IntramuralRental
Tool Company softball slugfest will be
held April 21-23 on the campus of ECU.
There are no eligibility restrictions for the
event. Men's and women's teams are en-
couraged to enter. A $50 entry fee will be
charged to pay for officials and equip-
ment. For additional information call 757-
6387 or drop by room 204 Memorial Gym.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
NETWORK
The Overseas Development Network
(ODN) is sponsoring a MASSIVE YARD
SALE on Sat April 15 to help support a
development project in Central America.
Any used articles in good condition will
be welcome donations. Please join us at
the Catholic Newman Center, 953 E. 10th
St from 8-11 a.m. For more information,
call Marianne Exum (h) 830-9450 or (w)
757-6271.
PASSOVER
Hillel, A Jewish Student Organization
will be sponsoring a Passover Sedar. The
Sedar will be on Thursday April 20th at
700p.m It will be held at Congregation
Boyt Shalom.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEST
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See US for all Your
Automotive Needs
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
758-7676
Wte developing
big savings
on soecial moments.
uj.iii 1 3
Kodak Colorwatdr
quality at special savings.
,2Exp.H97 24Exp.387
15Exp.259 36Ep.4"
C-41 process for 110, 126, Disc, and 35mm full frame.
Student Stores East Carolina University
Come see for yourself
The Physical Education Motor and Physi-
cal Fitness Competency Test is scheduled
as follows: Race: Minges Coliseum Time
and Date. 10.00 am Wednesday, April 26,
1989. A passing score on this teat is re-
quired of all students prior to declaring
physical education as a major. 1. Main-
taining an average T-score of 45 on the six-
item test battery. 2. Having a T-score of 45
on the aerobics run. Any student with a
medical condition that would contraindi-
cate participation in the testing should
contact Mike McCammon or Dr. Gay Is-
rael at 757-6497. A detailed summary of
the test components is available in the
Human Performance Lab (Room 113,
Minges)
CAMPUS CRUSADE) OR
CHRIST.
Looking for fun, fellowship and hearing
God's word? Come and check it out at
"Prime Time" at Rawl room 130 - every
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. We are looking
forward to seeing you there. Refresh-
ments served.
PRE-PROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The Pre-PTofessional Health Alliance will
hold a meeting Thursday April 13 at 6:30
in 247 Mendenhall. All members are en-
couraged to attend.
The Stegmonds 12-12:45
Upper Level 1-230
�Magic Show 245-3:45
�The ConneU 4-530
And Lott MorFin
Soap Opera Stars from Guiding Light
Carnival Games � Robotic Boxing �
Face Painter � Caricaturist kj L
mi0
lir ON THE MALL
8:15 ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19
12:00 noon till6-00Pm
No Alcohol or Coolers Allowed
�to
n
50,000 DRIVERS A DAY TRUST
THEIR CARS TO THE J-TEAM
In 10 minutes with no appointment
Here's what the J-Team can do for you:
jiffy lube
�Change your oil with a major brand!
�Add a new oil filter!
�Lubricate the chassis!
�Check and fill transmission,
differential, brake, power steering.
window washer and battery fluids!
�Check air filter!
�Inflate tires!
�Check wiper blades!
�Vacuum the interior!
�Wash your windows!
PLUS FREE car wash
with full service!
AraerlC. F.Yorite $2.00 Off (with tWS ad)
OH Change' T '
126 Greenville Blvd. Phone: 756-2579 Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8 am - 6 pm Sat. til 5
Student & Faculty Savings
At Overton's
First Cut 99 &b.
Chuck Roast limit 2
Heavy Western
Shoulder -Q
Trout
Fillets $l-49lb
CLIP AND SflUE
Heavy Western
Whole N.Y. Strips
cut into steaks free q)� JLlb.
Richfood Eggs
X-Large
79C
per
dozen
Fresh Ground Beef
5ll9 lb.
Charmin Tissue
4 roll pkg
limit 2
89i
5 lbs. or more
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
,rt

cN



cs
Now Hiring Delivery Drivers
DOUGHBOY
PIZZA � SUBS � WINGS
1011 Charles Blvd. (Behind Krispy Kreme)
O �.
'w
COUPON
3Q;M0.0.
imm mtrn mm mm mmi �BjUikW��
I One Large Two Item Pizza I One Large Two Item Pizza
� and Double Order of Wings j pQr Only
I
I
I
I
I.
I
I
I
I
I
I

I
I
For Only
$9.99
830-9400 FHEJ?1EIE.42(9J
Two Lasagna Dinners
For Only
$4.25
$7.99
(Pinners Inc. Salad and Garlic Bread)
FREE DELIVERY
830-9400 Exp4-30-89j
I
I
I
Pick-up Only
i 830-9400
Coupon Exp. 4-30-89
r'FREE
LUNCH SPECIALS
(Mon-Fri l!K)0-200pm)
Any Large Sub.
2.99
Single Order Wings1.99
Any Dinner3.25
Small Sub, Side Order, Drink1.99
I Buy one Spaghetti Dinnner and
Receive Second Dinner Free
Pick-up Only
830-9400
i
i
i
i
i
i
(Dinners Include Garlic Bread and Salad)
Dine-in or Pick-up Only . Coupon Exp. 4-30-89
Fresh Ground Beef
Patties
Pride of the Farm
39S
size 303 can
Cut Green Beans or
Whole Kernel Corn
3 lhf �- mnrP
$1.39
lb.
Smithfield Bacon
Regular only (�-1 -1 Q
Folger's Instant Coffee
8oz.Jar $2.9
lb.
Smoked Picnics
Whole Only D�
Crisp
Celery
59 2
bunch
Fresh Spareribs
Green t f
Cabbage �ZC
lb.
Red or Golden
Delicious
5-7 lb. pkg
4l49lb. Apples 3 lb. bag
991
Store Hours
Open Sundays, 1 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Monday-Saturday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
OVEBTON'a
Prices Effective
Wednesday April 12 - Saturday April 15,1989
�jtf-v
i






THfc EASTC AROl INI AN
Features
APRIL H, 1W PACE 8
New Cult album combines best of old Lps
ByTREYBIEN
S��ff KnUt
It's been about a year and a
half since The Cult's last album.
Electric which showed an en-
tirely different side of the band.
Drummer Les Warner has left the
band since the last album, and the
band moved to LA. � purport-
edly to get a more "metal sound
Sonic Temple their latest disc,
lea ves no doubt that The Cult is on
the way to becoming one of the
biggest bands to explode from col-
lege radio.
"Sonic Temple" bears traces
oi the harder "Electric" as well as
the psychedelic "Love "Sonic
Temple" is a disc for Cult lovers of
all types, certain to capture even
more fans with the release of the
single tirewoman which de-
buted at 27 on the album rock
charts.
Even though the original
drummer, Les Warner, left the
band, session drummer Mickey-
Curry does a remarkably strong
job pounding through the cuts
with no problem. "New York
City track number seven, even
features guest vocals by Iggy Pop.
One of the most diverse songs
on the disc is "Edie which has a
combination of violins that builds
into a blistering Cult rhythm with
Duffy on lead guitar. "Sonic
Temple" also features more key-
boards than the past discs. For
example, "Sweet Soul Sister"
opens with some eerie mystic-
sounding keys thatblend perfectly
with the lead guitar.
"Soldier Blue" and "Auto-
matic Blues" are the main drum-
oriented cuts on the disc. "Soldier
Blue" has one of the better break-
neck drum beats on the disc. Both
of these songs have a free-flow
sound that appears to have no
organization, but this is only be-
cause the breaks and leads hap-
pen so fast.
"Sonic Temple" will satisfy
even the most particular Cult lis-
tener. It is full of strong cuts that
showoffTheCult's unique sound.
Billy Duffy's lead guitar licks get
your attention during the first
chords of the disc, and Ian Ast-
bury's bone-jarring vocals lead
you through thi
Curry does a fii g in
as drummer
Putsimply Sonii fei
brilliant. Possibly the rrw com-
forting fact about this disc is th it
The Cult, though on tin- i rge
breaking big, haven't compro
mised their sound in any
"SonicTemple" will, nodoul I
a long way ust rem
vou heard them first " '
Germany celebrates 40 years
The weird Greenville weather has strange effects on people, as
this photo shows. Perhaps she thinks she is the Squirrel Woman?
(Photo by J.D. WTiitmire, ECU Photolab)
BONN, West Germany (AP)
�Historian Karl-Deitrich Bracher
likes to compare West Germany
to a young man just out of college,
shaking of f protective parents and
plunging headlong into a world
full of opportunity and danger.
Youthfully vibrant and eco-
nomically strong, West Germany
has let go of the apron strings of
the United States, which gave it
political guidance and physical
nourishment in the first hard years
of statehood founded on the ruins
of the Third Reich.
Now engaged in a flirtation
with the Kremlin that its elders in
the NATO alliance fear may be
naive or dangerous courtship, the
nation has been rebelling against
the familial bounds of bloc diplo-
macy and the burdens of a shared
defense.
From its ambivalent realtions
with East Germany, a land of ideo-
logical enemies and blood broth-
ers, to the stubborn defensivcness
exhibited during a recent scandal
over hazardous exports, West
Germany has lately shown itself
to be a nation undergoing pro-
found change.
The occasional defiance of
the NATO partner long viewed as
the ideological twin oi the United
States is seen by some as a phase in
development that the nation will
eventually grow out of.
But as the 40th birthday of the
Federal Republic of Germany
approaches this spring, both West
German and foreign observers are
fretful that Bonn may be trying to
chart its own course through
changeable international waters
without the experience and ma-
turity needed to guide its deci-
sions.
At the center of those fears is
the question of whether West
Germany'scommitment to the 16-
nation North Atlantic Treaty
Organization is strong enough to
temper its attraction to the East.
Chancellor Helmut Kohl
wants a decision on short-range
missile replacements put off for
two or three years so as not to
anger the Kremlin � or West
Gcrmn voters � amid the pro-
vocative lure of arms control.
West Germany's greater will-
ingness to trust Soviet President
Mikhail Gorbachev has been a
worry to the Western alliance,
which prefers to keep its nuclear
options open until the Kremlin
shows its sincerity by cutting
conventional forces in Europe.
More swayed bv the Kremlin
overtures than other NATO
members, West Germans ha vc al so
put pressure on the leadership to
reduce the number of low-level
training flights and military war
games conducted on their terri-
tory� a sentiment that hasstirred
an angry response in Washington
and brought suggestions that Bonn
pay a bigger share of the alliance
costs.
"We're seen as tremendously
ungrateful, and that's at the heart
of the trouble in our relations with
the United States observes I lein-
rich Vogel, director of the federal
Institute for Eastern and Interna-
tional StuCologne.
Strains bet ween the tradition-
ally close allies have become more
visible since American officials
accused West Germany compa-
nies of helping Libya build a sus-
pected poison gas plant. Kohl and
others which initially reacted with
disbelief and irritation at the U.S.
claims, which investigators now
admit appear to be grounded in
truth.
West Germans are increas-
ingly willing to speak out against
alliance policies, but historiansand
officials who claim
geron their nation'
say the new tou him is ii
way a rejection of the alii �
the democratic print i
which West I
founded.
"The younger
Germans is rebelli .
establishment, voting f i
tives, looking to makt
the world, says Brat I
the nation's rnosl prominent
tonans.
Refering to i h �.
growing appeal ami
Germans, he says, "V hat we are
seeing isa kind of emoti nter-
est for a new situtatii
looking Russian is a i �n
a sensation il tra I
will wear off as i pie : iIizj
basic situation bet East a
West has not changi I
Bracher md other h -
such as Chris 1 la :ke i I
burg German d�
tie to 'A PO is th �
past 40 years have b
stable and succesfu
ever known.
See WEST, page 9
Coming
This
Week
Thursday
New Deli:
The Mood
Susie's:
Brother X
Mendenhall:
U2 Rattle & Hum
(through Sunday)
Friday
Attic:
The Back Doors
New Deli:
Valence
Saturday
Attic:
Code Blue
New Deli:
The Boomers
Sunday;
Attic:
The Rhythm Persuaders
Monday:
New Deli:
Doctors of Hoyland
(reader's theater
� free admission
� through Tuesday)
Tuesday.
Susie's:
Bud Brothers
Wednesday;
Attic:
Comedy Zone
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
Susie's:
Free Beer
Dewey decimal
system working
ALBANY, N.Y. (AD � When
Melvil Dewey envisioned how a
librarv should be organized more
than a century ago, he couldn't
have guessed how his system
would be tested in the future.
He could hardly have fore-
seen in 1873, for example, the
invention of computers, or the
spread of AIDS and advancements
in medical science such diseases
engender.
Or the high-speed, low-cost
printing presses that turn out so
very many books each year. Since
1979, over a million volumes have
been assigned Dewey Decimal
numbers.
And with the publication this
year of the 20th edition of Dewey's
revolutionary system � the first
complete update in a decade �
just about the only constants of
the Dewey Decimal Classification
are its basic structure and its
publisher, Albany's Forest Press.
But that, after all, was Dewey's
vision. The strength and popular-
ity of the system lie in its adapta-
bility.
From a slant toward subjects
a white, middle-class American
male in the 19th centry might study
� European literature, the Bible
and classical philosophy, Ro-
mance and Germanic languages,
the natural sciences and history �
the system has assimilated other
literatures and cultures to become
the most popular method of or-
ganizing libraries in the world.
See DEWEY, page 9
Another side effect of this wiggy weather is the abundance of mud everywhere. And it seems to
have inspired these folks to hold an impromptu mud wrestling bout. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire,
ECU Photolab)
Pickin' the Bones
1) Raunch Hands � "Payday"
2) Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper
� "Root Hog or Die"
3) The Dickies � "Second
Coming"
Robyn Hitchcock � "Queen
Elvis"
4) Thelonius Monster �
"Stormy Weather"
5) drivin' 'n' cryin' �
"Mystery Road"
6) The Connels � "Fun and
Games"
7) XTC � "Oranges and
Lemons"
Four Who Dared � "Kids
With Dynamite"
8) Run Westy Run � "Run
Westy Run"
Green on Red � "Here
Comes the Snakes"
9) The Cowpokes � "Zamfir
Ain't No Guru"
10) Swamp Zombies �
"Fink"
11) Goo Goo Dolls � "Jed"
12) Lyres 1983 � "Lef s Have
a Parry"
13) The Crowd � "Big Fish
Stories"
Bonehead wages fine war
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Bibliophile
You know, I've been threat-
ening to slam the school library
for some lime now. They've fi-
nally pissed me off beyond be-
lief.
I went to the cashier's office
a full two weeks before registra-
tion. My purpose was to find out
if I had any library fines or tick-
ets so I could pay them before
getting tagged come registration.
They said, "Oh, no Mr. Bone-
head. You are clear. You may
resgister at any time, secure in
the knowledge that you will not
suffer the embarrassment of ha v-
ing the terminal operators turn
you away from that all-impor-
tant class you need to graduate
from this hell-hole of a school
I went home, happy and
pleased that I was so responsible
that I was thinking of these things
in advance. Registartion day
came. I turned in my schedule
form. She typed in my social
security number
The computer started blink-
ing "Tagged by Joyner Library
In an embarassed rage, I stalked
across campus to find out what
this madness was.
At the desk, a most un-
friendly librarian told mc I had a
book out from 1987, and that all
attempts to mail me a notice had
failed. I explained that I did move
quite a lot.
I asked why they hadn't
tagged me at the beginning of
last semester, or why this didn't
show up on the cashier's com-
puter two weeks ago. She told
mc in a rather snotty voice that
they hadn't "gotten around to
it" until last week.
When 1 asked what I could
do, since I had no idea where the
book might be, she told me,
"Nothing. We have no assurance
you will return the book
1 calmly asked if there were
not some method of paying for
the book, or was she just being
obtuse to aggravate me. Before
she burst into tears she said that
I owed $22, and that I could pay
one of the other librarians.
She ran off and I paid the li-
brarian. I vowed never to use the
library again.
Then last week, a professor
who shall remain nameless be-
cause he can still affect my grade,
insisted that I do a book report,
complete with Xeroxed ex-
amples of other book reviews
from such magazines as New
York Review of Books.
Knowing that I didn't have
the cash to purchase such a thing,
I broke my vow and headed for
that literar)' den of iniquity. My
pal, the Slackster, and I used the
InfoTrac computer to look for
reviews.
The computer neglected to
have a section for reviews of
short stories, the item we were
searching for. It had reviews of
biological surveys, reviews of en-
tomological hygiene, reviews of
every play Bill Shakespeare had
ever written, but no short sto-
ries.
We decided to ask a librar-
ian. The first one we asked
couldn't be torn away from his
homework. The next one kept
giving us directions to Shepard
Memorial Library over on Evans
Street.
The next one deigned to
speak with us. She told us to go
up this flight of stairs, to the left,
press the button in the secret
panel, say the password, go
down two flights and look on
the third shelf from the botti
Two hours later, in .i de-
serted section oi the librar
I'm sure 75 of the rapes on I
campusoccur in, we found a one
-paragraph review of The (
lected Works of Nathaniel I la
thorne arguably the most boi
ing writer in the history of
world. 1 looked at Slack in de
spair.
Later that afternoon, at-
the paramedics revived us, we
headed home. Apparently
were suffering from a comn
ailment on this campus, l&n i
anus fastfltus, or a complete lack
of library social graces, which
inflamed librarians.
I mean it this time. I'm never
going back in there. And you
know, 1 advise all not to either
We pay their salaries, (in tact, on
this campus, whose sala
don't we pay?) and the least the
could do is be merciful with us
ignorant college kids.
After all, what good will all
those Library Science skills do
us anyway? After we get out of
here, we'll never write another
paper on Hawthorne. So, until
next time, may the hangovers r
gentle, but the buzzes intense.







I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13.1989 9
East Germany lags behind West
BERLIN, (AD�That quarter
of Germany claimed by the Sovi-
ets after World War II today boasts
the best economy the East bloc has
to offer, but East Germans still
look wistfully to the West.
They could brag about the
cleaner shops run by kinder clerks
than their ideological comrades in
the Soviet Union can claim. They
could compare the foodsand cloth-
ing available here with the con-
sumer's sorry lot in Romania or
Bulgaria.
But television, tourism and
trade have drawn the compara-
tive glances of East Germans to
the West, and impressed upon
them how much less they have
achieved in 40 years of statehood
than their West German brothers.
Nowhere is the contrast be-
tween capitalism and socialism,
West and East, have and have not,
so stark as in the divided city of
Berlin.
The bright lights and buzzing
commerce of the Western sector
fade abruptly beyond the graffiti-
splashed Berlin Wall that has stood
as a symbol of restriciton since its
erection in 1961.
DAN'S
rome Shop With Us in 89
VINTAGE c KM MINI
JLVVLLRY. COLLLC IAIU rs
AND FURNITURE
212 East htthSt
Crcvnvillc, NC
919 7S2 17S0
Dewey Decimal System is being modified one more time
Continued from page 8
Familiar to most grade school
children, the Dewey Decimal sys-
tem is used to organize libraries so
books can be found easilv. And
reports written, languages
learned, curiosity quenched.
A book is assigned a number
to the let t of the decimal, placi ng i t
in a general category. To the right
of the decimal, it is assigned
numbers that describe the paticu-
lar book. By adding or subtracting
numbers, a person can find other
books on more specific or general
topics. New books can be squeezed
into the library's catalog in the
same way.
The system is sophisticated
enough to catalog millions of vol-
umes and simple enough for a
child to quickly learn. So simple
and sophisticated, in fact, that its
editor, John Comaromi, says it will
"stand for all time
Comaromi is head of the
Decimal Classification Division at
the Library of Congress in Wash-
ington, D.C where the Dewey
numbers are actually assigned.
Translated into 34 languages,
from German to Gujarati, the
Dewey system is now used in 95
percent of the world's libraries.
It stands in near-constant tran-
sition, with differences in the two
most recent editions illustrating
its changing face.
For example, work began on
the 19th edition in 1972. When it
was published, in 1979, crack co-
caine was unknown and there was
little published about drugs in
general. But as the next decade
passed, information piled up and
social attitudes changed, pro-
mpting major changes in the 20th
edition. AIDS had the same effect,
with its impact on epidemiology,
biochemistry, even sociology,
Comaroi says.
The rapid rise of computer
technology even prompted a sepa-
rate, between-editions edition.
"We have this tension be-
tween stability in libraries and then
advancement and progress for
people using the classification as
the window into knowledge, to
the whole world of knowledge
Comaromi says. "If it's going to be
a window into knowledge, it's got
to be current
That's the sole purpose of
Forest Press�keeping the Dewey
in line with what's being pub-
lished, says excecutive director
Peter Paulson.
Paulson, like Melvil Dewey,
West Germany is 40
Continued from page 8
"If German history was
marked bv schisms and catastro-
phes before 1949, since then it has
certainly been characterized by
exceptional continuity and stabil-
ity Hacke observes.
The 40 vears prior to West
Germany's founding in 1949 saw
the fall of the Prussian monarchy,
two world wars, the ill-fated
Weimar Republic, the Nazi dicta-
torship and four years of Allied
occupation.
Haunting every change in
West Germany's course today is
the Nazi specter and the anxious
watch from all sides for any signs
that history could be repeating
itself.
Economic chaos and a politi-
cal inferiority complex following
the World War I defeat fueled the
nseof national socialism and Adolf
Hi tier's dictatorship, leading to the
collapse in 1933 of the Weimar
Republic, Germany's first, short-
lived democracy.
"The changes occurring now
are not anything that can be com-
pared seriously to the anti-demo-
cratic movements of the Weimar
Republic Bracher contends, He
notes that despite 8.5 unemploy-
ment, West Germany has one of
the world's strongest economies.
Nationalist sentiments have
been stirred by the influx of for-
eign workers, needed because of
the declining birthrate among J
West Germans and a shortage of
willing hands for manual labor
jobs. But the legacy of Adolf Hitler
and the Holocaust prevents any-
broad resurgence of ethnic hostil-
ity, Bracher says.
While officials and academics
downplay the significance of the
government's rebalancing of pol-
icy toward East and West, stu-
dents and young workers who will
be tomorrow's opinion-makers
appear to give the changes more
weight than their current leaders.
Students such as Arne Poep-
pel, an 18-year-old at Bonn's
Beethoven Academy, retain a
healthy skepticism over the likeli-
hood of overnight disarmament
progress or full mending of the
East-West fences.
But they see the arms issue as
one over which frontline states
such as West Germany should
have a louder voice in the NATO
alliance.
"America is far a way from the
territory where a war would be
likely to break out Poeppel says.
"It's clear why Germans want to
goaheadmorequicklywithdisar-
mament while the USA hangs
back. The short-range missies
don't fall on American heads
Opinion polls taken over the
past six months show that 75 per-
cent of West Germans favor re-
moval of all nuclear weapons from
Europe, and that most see no seri-
ous threat to their security from
the Soviet-led East bloc.
Arms control and environ-
mental concern have drawn many
younger voters to the left-of-cen-
ter opposition Social Democratic
Party and the far-left Greens.
The political swing has
prompted Kohl's traditionally
conservative Christian Demo
craric Union to take a serious in-
terest in the economic and politi-
cal overtures of the new Kremlin.
But that trend itself has
spawned a resurgence on the right
illustrated by the recent success ol
the Republicans party in Berlin
legislative elections and public
rallies by na tionalist and neo-Nazi
groups.
The ultra-right Republicans,
who campaigned on a platform
that included a call to oust for-
eigners from Berlin, will send two
representatives to the national
Parliament next year � the first
far-right membership in the Bun-
destag since 1953.
The Republicans' surprising
appeal among voters has encour-
aged more visible activity among
other right-wing radicals, includ-
ing the estimated 1,500 neo-Nazis
in West Germany. About 1,000
members of the National Demo-
cratic Party rallied in the city of
Rahden in February, drawing four
times as many protesters, and the
inflammatory calls of neo-Nazi
Michael Kuehnen prompted the
Bonn government to outlaw his
Nationale Sammlung organiza-
tion.
Kohl, in a recent speech kick-
ing off observances of the 40th
aniversary that will culminate on
the May 24 founding date, attrib-
uted West Germany's economic
and political stability to the secu-
rity it enjoys within the NATO
alliance.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
v
752-0322
CORNER OF 10th & DICKINSON
�DIAMONDS
�BICYCLES
�TELEVISIONS
�GUNS
�JEWELRY
�GUITARS
�DORM
REFRIGERATORS
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�VCR'S
GREENVILLE
FALL RUSH
is your
SfOW
to
SORORITY LIFE
REGISTER FOR SORORITY
RUSH
Monday-Thursday, 10 am-3 pm
April 3-6 and April 10-13
Croatan � Student Supply � Bottom of Hill
$15.00 Fee
RUSH INFORMATION NIGHT
Monday, April 3 at 6 pm
Wright Auditorium
Rush is scheduled before classes begin in the
Jail: August 19-23
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
August 10, 1989
Call 757-4235 if any questions
is a former director of the New
York State Library, one of the first
libraries to adopt the system.
Dewey developed his system
in 1873 whilea studentat Amherst
College in Massachusetts and
worked on it the rest of his life.
In 1911,after resigning hispost
and moving to Lake Placid, N.Y
he founded Forest Press, housing
it at the Lake Placid Club. In the
early 1970s, the press moved to
Albany, and earlier this year it
was purchased by private infor-
mation-systems giant OCLC of
Dublin, Ohio.
Plaza Cinema
Plaza Shoimtriu Ctr. 75fi OOKH
NQW SHQWWG
m THE RESCUERS
-G- 7:00
Summer Positionsl
now available for:
CHANCES ARE
-PG-
-PG-
LEAN ON ME
9:00
7:10-9:15
THE DREAM TEAM
t- 7:00-9:15
layout artists
typesetters
copy editor
assistant news editor
sports editor
assistant sports editor
Tark Theatre
NOW SHOWING
$1.50 ALL TIMES
MISSISSIPPI BURNING
R 7:00 & 9:00
Apply in person at The East Carolinian
no phone calls please
SEAN HAYES
will perform Friday April 14, 1989
From 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
In The Coffeehouse
FREE ADMISSION
&
REFRESHMENTS
'Sponsored by ECU
COFFEEHOUSE
COMMITTEE
mttrnx. ou' ro �vt �ou
I .very Sunday ll:(M)a.m . 3:(X)p.m
The NewTaste
Of Greenville
JAZZ BRUNCH AT CHARLEVOS
"Oh what a brunch
"And the five piece jazz Iand is
so enjoyable"
"You should see the spread-
there s tender carved Ixvf. fresh
scafcxxl. pastas and fresh salads
()h. and those made-to-ordcr
omelettes and crepes"
"There's such a selection of deli-
cious fcxxls- and the deserts are
just fabulous"
"It sure is nice to have a satisfying
dining alternative"
Sundays at CM AUl.l.NOs-
.no the brunch alon with a
touch of live jazz music from
Spiral Join us.
You' Peto"Ti,rg A'ts Se"e
O'lii Discoo"i Ca'd
M WAN I hU
X HILTON INN
GREENVILLE
207 S.W Grvenville lilvd ' Cirvvnvillc. NC 27854 � (H!))v"iK)





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Brought to you by: Jeff Parker � Paul Friedrich � Tom Gurganus 'Micah Harris � Richard Haselrig Steve Reid Rik Elliott Special thanks to Alan Cm
mics






I
f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13.1989 11

i
The Clearly Labeled
(SsuroSflsiflasi
�ftSs?'
Quote o' the week:
"Don't start up witn
ME
� Edgar Locssin
Big E advises on matters of etiquette
C�J Var Bit?ev. Vis. how do we nicely tell Sie
Big E is arrested on charges of Impersonating a Bard. To see why, read the column.
Contests abound in area
GREENVILLE, NC (BP) � In
response to the controversial Gold-
fish Swallowing Contest being
held at the Elbo Room bar in
downtown Greenville, other
nightclubs have scheduled simi-
lar contests for this weekend.
The Attic will be havinga Shad
swallowing Contest. This will tie
in with this weekend's Grifton
Shad testi val. The shad, a member
ot the herring family, isa salt water
fish which swims upstream to
spawn much like the more cele-
brated salmon.
The shad to be used in the
contest will be of the more corn-
iron Hickory Shad. The shad usu-
allv run about one pound The
winner of the Shad Swallowing
contest will be determined by tlu
amount ot live shad anv one con
testant is able to consume
�e"Ncv Deli 1i sponsor an
Octopi Swallowing Contest Sat-
urday night. The Octopus, a
member of the mollusk familv
has a bulbous head, eight legs and
is verv big and disgusting.
The winner ot thiscontest will
be the contestant who manages to
touch a raw, live octopus without
vomiting profusely.
Grog will sponsor a Clam
Swallowing Contest. Clams, an
other member of the mollusk
family, are not nearly so disgust-
ing as octopi, and are the basic
unit of money tor certain prirrv
tive cultures.
It is not known whether clams
actuall) have legb, as has been
long rumored. The winner of this
contest will be the person who can
swallow th. most clams, shell and
all.
Rafier'swill sponsor a Sponge
Swallowing C"pntest 3 be sponge,
a member of the family Porifera,
can be purchased at around four
for a dollar at any grocery store.
The winner ot the Sponge
SwallowingContest will be deter-
mined by the number of sponges a
contestant ingests. Contestants
will be disqualified if they die
painfully when the sponges en-
large as they absorb the fluids pres-
ent in the digestive system.
Perhaps the most grueling test
will be held at The Sports Pad, a
manly sort of bar. Friday night
Lhey will hold the Freshman Swal-
lowing Contest, wherein contest-
ants will compete to see how many
freshmen they can swallow whole
in one sitting.
Not to be outdone, Rio The
Club will hold a Fly Swallowing
Contest, open to female only.
Scantily clad female contestants
will race to see who can cOffiSume
the most fly juices in one night.
This contest has the highest pro-
jected turn-out of the weekend.
Dear Biggy,
People who purposely forget
to screw the cap on the tube of
toothpaste are repulsive and
should drown in a huge vat of
Crest. There is nothing more dis-
gusting than to enter a stranger's
bathroom and witness the capless
tube just lying there on the nasty
sink like a oozing banana. But, I'll
tell you, what really triggers my
gag button is when dangling hairs
get all trapped in the semi-crusted
ooze.
E, how do these curs brush
their teeth with such nastiness?
Signed, Plague Meister
Ye Crusty Crest,
Prithee, Plaque Knave, hear
me out. Thy problem must needs
warrant The Earls' attention.
Unknit thy fettered brow � 'tis
but a paste. And the hairs but
strands, combed yet not reap'd,
upon thy vessel of a sink. Thy
contempt dost reek of insecuri-
ties, harbored in the mind of inso-
lent youth � mayhap a youth that
has naught consummated t' earn
his manhood? Thou should'st
keep thyself from the toiletries of
strangers, anyway.
Vis, how do we nicely tell
Quinny he has to put the seat down
and get the other seat off the rack?
Signed, Two Roommates of
Quinn
Signed, just Wondering
Hark, loaf of Wonder,
I don't know well, guess I
better go. (Alarums. Exeunt.)
ffmsfc Ask
E
Hark, ye Two Gentlemen of
Corona, 'twould seem a most
wretched villain to commit such
base deeds! The uncharitable cur
must be told, and 'twere well it
were done quickly. Woe is he who
must wipeth eye with so foul a
garment! Here is thy remedy: go
to his bed and commit drudgeries
and defecations upon his sheets;
when Quinn tries to round his
little life with a sleep, he will a
lesson have learned. Tis what The
Earl calls The Bed Trick.
Sheet
Seat
The Satire Page That
WaSIl' t: The Inside Story
Originally, the Loyal Readers of the Clearly Labelled
Satire Page were to have enjoyed a Comics Page take-off.
However, due to a confusion of deadlines and such, only
one of the comic artists who were aware that they were
supposed to do this actually turned in a satire version of
their strip on time: Paul Friedrich. (What follows below
is overflow from the actual Comics Page, not Satire Page
stuff. Jeez!)
Earl o' Vis,
Me and my roommate were
so desperate for a third roommate
to share our house with us that we
took in this guy, Quinn, to help
pay rent. Quinn was pretty cool at
first � he cleaned up after himself
and wasn't too much of a slob �
but recently his bathroom etiquette
has well gone to pot.
Quinn never puts the toilet
seat down and I and my room-
mate Bcthy are getting pretty tired
of being rudely surprised when
we go to sit down.
Another thing Quinn does in
the bathroom is always leave his
underwear hanging on the towel
rack. I realized this the other day
when I got soap in my eyes and
blindly reached for what I thought
was a towel.
Overkill
Dear Earl,
Once again the question arises:
how do you tear more than one
sheetata time from the toilet paper
dispensersincampusbathrooms?
Signed, Sheetless
Yea Fair Sheets,
Good morrow, lad. I know
how 'tis to have one's arse sheets
untimely ripped. In faith, a noble-
man could bring his own sheets,
but 'twould cost many ducats,
even gratis. Upon yon dispenser
'tis a small plastic protrusion
which impedes the rotation.
Whack upon't, 'til either you or it
breaks. And damn'd be him that
first cries, "Hold, enough
Euphemism
Dearest E,
Why do they call bathrooms
in England water closets or W
C's?
'N'
SUCH
Tequila toast o the
week:
"I wish you joy of the
worm
� Bill Shakespeare
Song quote o' the
week:
"I wanna be your
dog
� Iggy Pop and The
Stooges

Clay Deanhardt quote
o the week:
"No, really, we're not
dating any more re-
ally
� Clay Deanhardt
Bv Friedrich
The Avatar
arris and Ha
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;

rHE EAST CARCH INI AN
Sports
APRIL 13, 1989 PAGE 12
Winnina streak ends
Errors plague Pirates in loss
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Sports I iiiHr
In ,1 game plagued by errors,
ECU dropped its t i rst game in over
three weeks. The Pirates lost a hard
fought struggle to Virginia, 3-2.
The loss brought to end the Pi-
rates 15 game winning streak, the
longest in school history.
ECU made four miseues in
the field that led to two unearned
runs, which was the deciding fac-
tor in the Virginia win. Virginia
also got a solid pitching perform-
ance from Keith Seikr. Seiler
pitched a complete game, giving
up only two runs on five hits. I le
struck out 10 while only walking
one.
Sophoi ?nsation lohn
White took hi irst loss oi the
season coming in relief. White
pitched ton' � gs, giving up
two hits and striking out five.
White gave up no earned runs,
but two unearned runs scored
while he was on the mound. The
two unearned runs pushed the
score to 3-2, and collared White
with the loss. White now has a 6-1
record on the season, and since
the runs were unearned, White
still has a 0.00 ERA.
One bright spot for the Pirates
was their continued power from
the plate. Of the five hits the Pi-
rates collected against the Cava-
liers, two oi them were round trip-
the bottom of the eighth. The Pi-
rates tried to come back, but could
only come up with one run in the
top of the ninth to make the final
score 3-2.
With the loss, the series be-
tween the two schools became
even closer. ECU still holds a slight
lead over the Cavaliers, 13-11.
Virginia also beat the Pirates in
1988,6-5.
The loss moved the Pirates to
25-3 on the season. ECU will be
back in action this weekend in a
series with rival UNC-Wilming-
pers. Freshman Tommy Eason hit ton. The three-game series with
a solo shot for the Pirates and John
Cast collected his seventh home
run oi the season. That pushes the
team total to 31 home runs.
Virginia started the scoring
bv putting a run up in the first
the Seaha wks will be for the league
championship. ECU enters the
weekend series with an 11-1 mark
in the CAA, while the Seahawks
are 12-0. Whoever wins two of the
three games this weekend will be
But in Wednes-
U the game, as they
inning. ECU came back to tie the theCAA regular season champion
score by pushing a run across in and the first seed in the CA A tour-
the eighth, but Virginia took the nament to be held at Wilmington
lead for good by talking two in on May 12-15.
In earlier action, Steve Godin hauls this one in as teammate Kevin Riggs watches,
day's action against Virginia, the fielding wasn't quite as easy. Four errors cost EC
were defeated bv the Cavaliers, 3-2 (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photo Lab).
Battle of North Carolina
ECU battles Seahawks for title
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Sport Fditor
Graduate assistant Dean Ehehalt prepares the field for the Pirates in a game played at Harrington
Field this season. The fieU and the Pirates will be ready for the Seahawks who invade Greenville
this weekend (Photo bv J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photo Lab).
East Carolina squares off
against UNC-Wilmington this
weekend and the three-game se-
ries will hold more than just the
usual rivalry. The Pirates and
Seahawks will be meeting for the
Colonial Athletic Association
regular season title.
The Pirates enter the week-
end action with a 11-1 mark in the
CAA and a record of 25-2 overall.
While Wilmington enters the cru-
cial series with an unblemished
12-0 mark in conference and an
overall record oi 20-9. Hie team
that wins two oi the three games
will be the regular season cham-
pion oi the CAA and will be the
first seed in theCAATournament.
ECU enters this weekend lead-
ing the CAA in both batting and
pitching. The Pirates have a team
batting average of .299, which is a
full 20 points higher than James
Madison. ECU has also shelled
opposition pitchers for 29 home
runs, which leads the conference
Calvin Brown and John Gast lead
the Pirates in the dinger category,
hitting nine and six home runs
repectivelv. To go with all that
power, Brown is second in the
CAA in batting average hitting
.407 for the season and leads the
league in runs batted in, knocking
in 36. The Pirates have four other
hitters in the top 19 in batting in
the CAA.
In pitching, the Pirates claim
the best ERA in the conference.
The Pirate team ERA is a dazzling
2.29, more than a point and a halt
better than James Madison. Jon-
athan Jenkins leads theconference
in ERA and wins : i per-
fect 8-0 mark and a .43 ERA. ohn
White and Jake Jacol are in
the top five in victories with marks
oi 6-0 and 5-0 repe' bs
and 1 mi Langdon rank sixth ai
11 thin ERA
ECL has faced i fi igainsl the
Seahawks 54 times in Pirate base
ball historv Wilmington holds a
slight advatnj � r the I
with a record oi 29-25. In their last
meeting, the Pi rati byascore
ot 4. In th
1988, Wilmington kr kedoffi
Pirates V 5
1 he gar
Saturday and Sui
will sec the Piratt sand
square of! in a doublcheader be-
ginning at 6 p.m. and Sunday v
be a single g inn
The games v
1 larrington Field.
Ex-ECU Coach Odom and ACC look to recruit
(AP) - - Wake Forest basket-
ball coach Dave Odom has just
one grant to give, and he wants to
make sure if he's going to use it,
that he'll get that one blue-chip
athlete that could help him right
away.
1 have giv en some thought to
recruiting Odom said, "but right
now my major c: rteem is the play-
ers who are on the team. After
evaluating them, 1 feel very good.
I don't think we have to rush out
and sign someone just to fill the
15th spot on the roster.
"But that's not to say 1
wouldn't take a backup point
guard, if 1 can find one, or a 6-10
center who would help us inside
he said.
Everyone in the Atlantic Coast
Conference, and across the nation
as well, will be looking for that
special player today as the NCAA
opens its spring signing period.
Odom said he knows of Tim
Shaw, the 6-foot-4 guard from
South View High School in Hope
Mills who had been offered a grant
by Bob Staak, the former Wake
Forest coach. Odom said that he
wanted to look into the situation
before deciding on Shaw.
North Carolina coach Dean
Smith, who has signed two play-
ers and received a commitment
from a third, says he wants as
many as three more players. He is
concentrating on the frontcourt,
and the object of his attention is
Kevin Sal vadori, a 6-11 center from
Pittsburgh.
Salvadori is the son of Al Sal-
vadori, who played at South Caro-
lina from 1965-67. He helped Scion
LaSalle High School to a 32-6 rec-
ord in 1988 and the state Class 3-A
championship, but drew only
meager recruiting interest in tne
fall because he is underdeveloped.
1 le weighs only 200 pounds and
has just turned 17.
Salvadori didn't turn a lot of
heaps, according to Seton LaSalle
athletic director Chuck Rutter,
See RECRUITING, page 13
Pirate's Booty
The Olympic Games:
Amateurs or Pros?
Bv CHRIS SIEGEL
ti Editor
This ruling has now opened the
door to making the Olympics
nothing but another arena for
professional athletes to show their
� stuff
On Friday, April 7, theOlym- Through the years, the Olym-
pic Games underwent a change pics have been oneof the last major
that could bring the end to ama- events in which US amateur ath-
teur status of the Games. The in- letes could compete. Now these
temational basketball federation, athletes will be taking a back seat
FIBA, mled m favor of allowing to professionals once again. Bas-
professional basketball players to ketball may not be the first sport
participate in all of its tourna- to allow pros in, but it is one of the
ments, including the Olympics most noticeable. Tennis, an Olym-
and the World Championships. pic exhibition sport, also allows
After years of crying about professionals to compete,
having to compete against coun- I don't deny the fact that the
tries who plav athletes of a profes- competition we have been com-
sional level, the United States will peting against in recent years is
nowbeable to play itsbestplayers tough. In fact I'd go as far to say
in the Olympics. No longer will that we have been competing
.ve be limited to just college ath- against professionals for years. But
letes. The NBA will be able to the nature of the Olympics, from
supply its best players to assure
the United States a huge advan-
tage over the rest of the competi-
tion.
What does the ruling mean in
the United States perspective, was
for it to be an amateur competi-
tion. This ruling endangers not
onlv the reputation but the integ-
rity of one of the world's most
terms of Olvmpic competition? It respected athletic competitions,
means t' z losses that the United There is some hope. At least
States sfered against the Soviet the NBA is not all excited over the
Union in 1972 and 1988 won't be ruling. In a survey done by the
repeated. Dave Gavitt, veteran Associated Press, 63 percent of
coach and president of the USA NBA players surveyed favored
Amateur Basketball Association, open eligibilty and only 58 per-
summed it up best when he said, CCnt said they would be willing to
"Inallmyyearsofcoachingldon't piav. tWo of those noticably ab-
think I've guaranteed many wins, sent from the list of players in
but I feel safe with this one favor were Isiah Thomas and Larry
The ruling opens up a very Bird,
touchy question � are the Olym- Many of the NBA All-Stars
pics for professionalsor amateurs? WCre willing to compete in Barce-
The nature of the Olympics was to 0na in 1992. With a possible start-
pit the best amateur athletes from ing lineup of Karl Malone of Utah,
around the world in competition. Charles Barkley of Philadelphia,
Patrick Ewingof New York, Magic
Johnson of the Los Angeles Lak-
ers and Clyde Drexler of Portland,
what would be the use of the
competition showing up? The
United States, for the most part,
has dominated w orld competition
with its college players, why
bother completely humiliating the
rest of the world by using profes-
sionals?
The 1988 loss to the Soviet
Union was not necessarily due to
a lower level of talent. I believe the
Soviets were fired-up and were
on a roll which made it difficult
for the Americans to stop them.
There has also been some discus-
sion that Olympic coach John Th-
ompson was out-coached. What-
ever the case, there is no doubt in
my mind the United States had
superior athletes. Just take a look
at the members of the team Th-
ompson took to Seoul. Players
such as J.R. Reid, "Bimbo" Coles,
and Charles Smith (who was the
Big East Player of the Year) were
on the 1988 team. Players like that
will be NBA stars and there is no
doubt that they have more basket-
ball talent than 90 percent of the
international players they compete
against.
Recent history proves that the
Americans have dominated the
world in basketball. They have
done it for years without the aid of
professional players, why no w has
it become so important to include
the pros? Does losing one gold
medal make that much of a differ-
ence that it costs the amateur ath-
letes their chance to compete?
Another factor the FIBA needs
to realize is that this ruling now
opens up all events to profession-
als. With baseball now being part
oi the Olympics, are we going to
take our Major League Baseball
All-Stars to compete? Are the
National Hockey League stars, like
Wayne Gretzky, going to be able
to compete? What about all the
professional skiers and ice skat-
ers? The United States has done
well in Olympic competition with
its amateurs and has set an ex
ample for the rest of the world
While they may use athletes con-j
sidered to be pros in our eyes, we!
have continually fielded teams
with amateur athletes. Now wej
are doing just what the rest of the
world has been doing and what
we have been complaining about.
I want to see the United States
win gold medals just as much as
everyone else, but I would like to
see us stick to our initial goal of
doing it with amateurs. I hope
that the ruling is limi ted to basket-
ball and that the rest of the Olym-
pic Games be saved for amateurs.
I hope also that if the United States
finds it easy-going in world com-
petition in basketball, that the FIBA
considers reversing their decision.
There are many different ways
that this ruling could possibly
effect the Olympics. I pray that the
one fear some people have does
not come true � that the Olym-
pics become just another profes-
sional showcase. Let's keep the
Olympics what it should be � an
athletic competition in the spirit
of good will among all the coun-
tries of the world.
� UL
Sophomore John Maginnes led the Pirates to an 11th place finish in
the Tar Heel Intercollegiate tournament. The team will travel to Hot
Springs, VA, this weekend to try to defend their CAA title (Photo
by Lori Martin).
ECU Golfers
third straight
The Pirate golfers had their
third disappointing finish this
season with an 11 th place stand-
ing in the Tar Heel Invitational
April 8-9.
The team took 11 th place out
of the 14 teams participating in the
tournament. With a two-round
total of 781, the Pirates finished 32
strokes over the first place team
from Duke University.
NCSU came in second with a
total of 738, and UNC-CH rallied
for a third place finish with a 739
total.
In the individual standings,
ECU'S John McGinnis led the Pi-
rates with a two-day score of 152.
Shooting 158, Francis Vaughn, Tee
Davies and Greg Powell tied for
second place in the team scores.
Duke's John Karcher won the
�o for
CAA title
tourney with a score oi 1;
The Pirate golfers play their
last tournament of the season April
13-1 The team will travel to Hot
Springs. Va. to defend their title as
two-time Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation conference champions.
'Wo had one bad finish at
Duke, and after that we lost alot of
confidence Coach Hal Morrison
said.
According to Morrison,
McGinnes and Davies have suf-
fered back injuries which have
effected their games; however,
both golfers will be playing in the
conference tournament this week-
end.
Morrison said the Pirates'
toughest competition will come
from the University of Richmond.
Y





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13,1989 13
i
Odds against them
Lady Pirates to face
The Lady Pirate's tennis sea-
son is coming to a close. Today the
ladies are in Harrisonburg, VA to
compete in the CAA tournament.
There they will be up against such
opposition as William and Mary
and Richmond University.
Assistant coach Lynn Gorski
said, "Our big focus at'the confer-
ence will be on our doubles teams.
I expect them to be highly com-
tough competition
petitivc, with a strong perform-
ance coming from the team of Ellen
Harrcll and Susan Mattocks
Gorski continued, "1 would
like to sec the girls go out and do
their best and 1 want them to enjoy
themselves. Since this will be the
last vcar for Hollv Murrav, Susan
Mattocks, and Ellen Harrell, 1 want
them to leave on a good note, and
I want our returninc olavers to
acquire some valuable experience
for next year
Reflecting on this season, the
girls have had some bad breaks,
being hindered constantly by poor
weather. Gorski continued, "It has
been a hard season, contributed to
by the lack of time for develop-
ment. I was impressed though by
how hard the team worked, and
the way our doubles teams have
pulled together
Despite theoddsagainst them,
the Lady Pirates played the best
they could, winning some strong
games. Although they accepted a
few losses, the ladies did give some
strong opposition, showing their
true fighting Pirate spirit, v � . wish
them luck this weekend at t) econ-
ference.
ACC recruiting
Continued from page 12
until he averaged 18 points, 11
rebounds and 12 blocks a last
season. He helped the team to a
26-7 record and the Western Penn-
sylvania regional championship.
South Carolina, North Caro-
lina State, Nevada-Las Vegas,
Temple and Texas are recruiting
Salvadori, Rutter said, but Salva-
dor! isn't close to making a deci-
sion.
"The poor kid's head is spin-
ning Rutter said. "He and his
family are trying to sort out things
and see what's best for him. 1
talked to him (Monday), and he
said he was not ready to get down
and commit
The Tar Heels and Virginia
are in the final decision of George
Lynch, a 6-7 forward from
Roanoke, Va via Flint Hill Prep
School in Oakton, Va. Lynch vis-
ited North Carolina last weekend
and is scheduled to visit Virginia
this weekend.
North Carolina is also look-
ing at Douglas Edwards, a 6-9
forward from Miami. N.C. State
remains in the hunt for Edwards,
along with Louisville, Florida, and
Florida State. Edwards will proba-
bly not make his decision until
May, according to Shakey Ro-
driguez, his high school coach.
N.C. State signed five players
in the fall, and hasone grant left. If
it misses on Edwards, it might
land CraigTyson, a6-4 guard from
Baltimore, Md. The Wolfpack did
lose 6-3 Jerome McDuffie of
Barnwell, S.C, who committed to
Jacksonville and followed in his
brother's footsteps.
Clemson received two com-
mitments Tuesday, signing Larry
McCloud, a 7-foot center from
Anderson Junior College in An-
derson, S.C, and Sean Lastinger, a
6-1 point guard from high school
in Atlanta.
Virginia hopes to sign 6-4
wing guard Chris Havlicek of
Dedham. Mass and 6-1 point
guard Doug Smith of Fayetteville,
Term today. Both committed last
week, giving the Cavaliers five
players.
The Cavaliers landed Shawn
Wilson, a 6-10 forward fromNash-
ville, Tenn in the fall, and will
have 6-2 Terry Kirby next season.
Kirby has signed a football grant
but says that he wants to play
basketball in college also.
Virginia also has a commit-
ment from Cornel Parker, a 6-7
forward from Norfolk, Va but he
is still attempting to meet the
NCAA's minimum academic stan-
dards. He has not made 700 on the
college board examination in six
tries and has only two attempts
left.
Duke and Georgia Tech are
the only ACC teams that are not
expected to sign any players. They
finished their recruiting in the fall.
Goes down swingine
Rose Jr. makes pro debut
DURHAM (AP) � Pete Rose
Jr. says he doesn't plan on living
off his father's career as he tours
the Carolina League.
"My dad is not going to play.
It's me out there he told The
News and Observer of Raleigh.
That's the way I want it, from
here on out, the rest of my career
Rose is playing for the Freder-
ick Keys of the Carolina League,
who began their season last week
against the Durham Bulls.
The older Rose hustled his
way to a major-league record 4,256
hits and now manages the Cincin-
nati Reds. When he hit the single
that put him ahead of Tv Cobb on
the all-time hit list, first out of the
dugout was a 15-year-old batbov
for the Reds - Pete Rose jr.
"That was a great moment for
me and my dad Rose said. "I
can't describe it
It's a record that he'll never
chase, he said Sunday.
"I'm never going tobreak that
record; it's too many damn hits
Rose said smiling.
To save himself further prob-
lems with being compared with
his father, he aked for uniform
No. 21, not the No. 14 that his
father made famous.
"The Orioles tried to give No.
14 to me, but ! didn't want it he
said. "I'm not my dad. I'm a hus-
tler, and I'm going to give 110
percent, but I want to have my
own identity
As the son oi a legend, Rose
gets more than his share of heck-
ling.
"I've been hearing it since I've
been a Little League piaver Rose
said. "But I just try to thrive on it
Rose was drafted in the 12th
round last year bv the Baltimore
Orioles out of high school in Cin-
cinnati. He was expected to be
drafted earlier, but teams passed
on the vounger Rose because thev
assumed that the Reds were going
to make the pick.
When Rose couldn't reach an
agreement with Baltimore, he
played American Legion baseball
and helped lead his team to the
national championship. He signed
with the Orioles Sept. 1 and went
to the instructional league during
the winter.
Prior to Sundav's debut, Rose
admitted being nervous.
"Yes, mv stomach hurts. Mv
knees are shaking. My first at-bat,
I'll probably drop the at. But it's
going to be fun.
"I'm just going to play hard
and trv and hit the ball where it's
J
pitched. When I don't have fun
playing, I'll get out of the game
Rose didn't drop his bat. The
score book reads "K a swinging
strikeout, one of 21 outs in a per-
fect game thrown by Durham
right-hander Dennis Burlingame.
Support
Pirate
Athletics
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ECU track and ESPN
Pirates to air on national TV
(SID) � The East Carolina
Pirate track team will make an
appearance on national television
April 22 when they run in the
Tampa Gatorade Track and Field
Invitational. ECU will run the400-
meter relay against a field that
will include teams from Florida
State, Florida, Miami (Fla.) and
George Mason.
The meet will be televised live
from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on ESPN
and is part of a Florida state-spon-
sored series of meets.
The meet will be run in Pepin-
Rood Stadium in Tampa, on the
same track where All-American
Eugene McNeill set his school-
record in the 200-meter dash. That
time of 20.35 seconds is a Peppin-
Rood Stadium as well. McNeill,
ECU will travel to Knoxville,
Tenn April 14 and 15 for the
Dogwood Relays. There, the Pi-
rates will run three relay events,
intermediate hurdles and 100
meters.
Brian Irvin, Jon Lee and Kelvin
Wrighton will run for the Pirates.
Irvin and McNeill will run 200
meters, Lee will run the 400-meter
dash and Wrighton will sprint in
the 100-meter dash, and the four
will team together in the relay
event.
One side note to the upcom-
ing Tampa meet, former Pirate Lee
McNeill, Eugene's older brother
and former ECU All-American,
will run unattached in the 100 me-
ters.
Bo names Fisher coach
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) �
America's favorite nobody is the
Michigan somebody now.
Steve Fisher, a little-known
assistant who won the NCAA
basketball championship one
week earlier, won the Wolverines
coaching job Monday on a perma-
nent basis.
"I went from someone who
very few people knew, and even
those who knew me, very few
knew me well, to one who every-
body in America felt they knew
Fisher said. "For that, I'm tremen-
dously indebted to our players
The 44-year-old Fisher took
over the team March 15 when
Michigan athletic director Bo
Schembechler angrily banned Bill
Frieder from coaching the team
after Frieder accepted a job with
Arizona State.
The talented Wolverines had
finished third in the Big Ten. They
responded to the tumultuous situ-
ation by winning all six tourna-
ment games, including an 80-79
overtime victory over Seton Hall
for the title in Seattle.
"I went to all of those games
Schembechler said at a news con-
ference Monday during which he
confirmed Fisher's appointment.
"I watched him operate. I was very
much impressed. That was an
entirely different team.
"They got into tough situ-
ations. In past times, those players
just wouldn't have responded the
way they did
"1 know we'll give Bo the kind
of program Michigan can be proud
of Fisher said. "We will stress
winning on the floor. An NCAA
title may never happen again, but
it won't be from lack of effort
Terms of the contract weren't
disclosed, but Fisher is expected
to receive a one-year contract,
which is standard for all Michigan
coaches. Fisher probably will be
paid about $85,000 a year, but an
expected shoe contract worth
about $100,000 plus money from
basketball campsand radio shows
could push Fisher's income to an
estimated $450,000 annually.
Economy Mini Storage
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Don't forget the Pirate Purple-
Gold Pigskin Pigout April 22!
An
East Carolina Special Performance
the
1989 Fantasy Music Awards
nominies include: "Straight Up-Best Choreography
�Parents Just Bon't Understand- Best RapSoul
"The Dentist- Best Soundtrack
The Right Stuff- Best Male Vocalist
�Wine Beneath My Wings: Best Female Vocalist
Fantasy is a performance group created by and for both hearing and deaf cultures. They
perform unique, fun-filled lend of acting, comedy, and popular song expressed through the
beauty of sign language am. mime.





!
f
14
TT IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13,1089
Former Seahawk coach makes push
Pro football may come to the Carolinas?
M ' 1J , . �. iiU t-l i � mv 1 Tf" . � . � . . i . - lw. 1k' w�� �rvi ja-v r- l I w 1
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Mike
McCormack sat in the stands at a
sold-out Charlotte Hornets bas-
ketball game and became con-
vinced that the Carolinas will also
support an NFL team.
"The fans were screaming and
nw wife turned to me and shouted
'This sounds like Seattle the
former Seahawks coach and ex-
ecutive said prior to his announce-
ment Tuesday that he will join
forces with South Carolina busi-
nessman lerry Richardson in his
bid to bring professional football
to the Carolinas.
"Jerry showed me the demo-
grapnicsof the area and 1 was very
impressed McCormack said.
1 m enthused. 1 think if wedoour
Basketball
recruit
signed
homework, it's very possible that
we'll get an NFL franchise
McCormack said the NFL
"could not find a better expansion
market or a more ideal ownership
group tor an expansion team.
The NBAs Hornets, in their
first season, are leading the league
in attendance by selling out game
after game at the new 23,500-seat
CharlotteColiseum. Hornets prin-
cipal owner George Shinn also is
trving to bring an NFL team to the
Charlotte area.
Richardson, who played for
the NFL's Baltimore Colts, is a
native of Raleigh and currently
livesinSpartanburg,S.C. He heads
TW Services, Inc one of the na-
tion's largest food service compa-
nies.
He said McCormack � a vet-
eran of 32 years in the NFL as a
Hall of Fame player, coach and
team president � will be active in
all aspects of developing the plan
to acquire a franchise. The plan
includes the design and construc-
tion of a 65,000-seat football sta-
dium somewhere in the Charlotte
vicinity.
"(McCormack) will send a
strong signal to the management
and ownership of the NFL that we
are committed to providing them
with every reason to select our
market as the first choice among
the many national markets com-
peting for a franchise Richardson
said.
THE
COMPETITIVE EDGE
MAY BE ,
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Heading for the beach
Men to play in Azalea Classic
(SID) � Taro knight, a 6-3
point guard from Tarboro, NX
has signed a national letter of in-
tent to play men's basketball at
Fast Carolina University, an-
nounced Pirate head coach Mike
Steele Wednesday.
Knight played last season at
Chowan Junior College, where he
averaged 7.4 points, 2.1 rebounds
and 6.1 assists per game for the
Braves. He also shot 4b percent
from the floor and 66percent from
the free throw line.
Knight signed with the Uni-
versity of Tennessee after gradu-
ating "from Tarboro High in 1987,
but never practiced with theVols.
As a senior at Tarboro High,
knight averaged 19.4 points and
5.1 rebounds per game.
He was a two-time All-Fast
selection in North Carolina and
was a two-time Tar-Roanoke 3A
A! 1 -Conference choice. Fie also
lettered in football at Tarboro
High.
Knight played just one season
at Chowan Junior College and has
three years eligibility remaining
at East Carolina.
The men's tennis team ac-
cepted a defeat against James
Madison on Saturday, 5-2, and to
the University of Virginia, 9-0 on
Sundav.
In part, the team's losses were
contributed toby the weather. Two
of the games against James Madi-
son were completed outside, but
the next five were moved to inside
courts.
On these factors, Coach Bill
Moore commented, "The men
were playing well, winning both
of the single matches outside, but
once the games moved indoors,
things changed. The tempos of the
games were increased by the fast-
paced courts, and James Madison
was able to adapt being used to
their home courts Moore contin-
ued, "In both our matches, against
James Madison and the Univer-
sity of Va the men were quite
competative. Jon McLamb and
Andre Morcau,both had good per-
formances each day
On Friday the men travel to
Wilmington to compete in the
Azalea Tennis Classic. The tour-
nament, which will last through
Sunday, will consist of teams from
UNC-Wilmington, UNC-Greens-
boro and Furman. Moore said, "1
expect the team to do well, we
defeated most of the teams earlier
in the season
FAST COPIES
FOR FAST TIMES
� 24-hour service available
� open early, open late
� open six days a week
THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
Qwffo
Baseball '89:
For the CAA regular season championship
Saturday (DH)
at 6 p.m.
� Under The Lights �
�UNC-Wilmington:

Single game
Sunday 1 p.m.
Individual Game Ticket
$2.00
Riverbluff
Apartments
SUMMER SCHOOL SPECIAL!
June & July 12 Rent Special
with the Signing of a 1 year lease
April 1 through June 30.
�Recently Renovated
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
�On Site Management & Maintainence
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
APPLICATIONS
FOR
HONOR BOARD
AND
REVIEW BOARD
NOW BEING ACCEPTED
DEADLINE TO APPLY IS APRIL
APPLY IN ROOM 222
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER





Title
The East Carolinian, April 13, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 13, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.671
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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