The East Carolinian, April 6, 1989






2ais&al�
Editorial4
Classified6
Clearly Labeled Satire 10
Comics11
��-�� �����" � I.�� in i i
Madonna's 'Like a Prayer reviewed,
Columnist confesses secrets in the all
Madonna page tribute.
Check out page 8.

Pirate baseball is rolling, rolling,
rolling, take on Wolfpack tonight
at Harrington Field.
Catch the action on page 12.
She �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 63
Thursday April 6,1989
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Roakes wins SGA run-offs
By LOR1 MARTIN
Stilt Writer
President-elect Tripp Roakes
won Wednesday's run-off election
with 57.2 percent of the votes over
opponent, Valeria Lassiter.
Roakes had 991 (57.2 percent)
total votes leaving Lassiter with
741 (42.8 percent). The number of
voters improved over last week's
election with 1 732 students turn-
ing out the cast their ballots.
Roakes won a majority of the
votes at tour oi the six ballot boxes
on campus. The greatest voter
turnout was seen at the poll lo-
cated at the Student Store where
Roakes took 426 (61.2 percent)
votes and Lassiter claimed 270
votes (38.8 percent).
Roakes also won the polls at
Mendcnhall (52 percent), the
Croatan (69.2 percent) and the
Graham building (60 percent).
Lassiter won the polls located at
the bottom of College Hill (55.b
percent) and Cotton Residence
Hall (52 percent).
"I can't wait to get started
Roakes said. His initial concern is
to form a Board of Leaders to
"attack" the problems of unequal
representation in the SGA and
recent concerns about racial ten-
sions.
"I will be in touch with Val-
eria Lassiter and Dr. Larry Smith
(director of minority affairs) be-
fore the end of the week Roakes
said. He said he would like for the
new board to meet at least once
before the end of the semester.
"Before going into office, I
want to familairize myself with
the different groups I will be
working with Roakes said. He
plans to schedule a meeting with
Chancellor Eakin before taking
office on April 18.
Lassiter said she is eager to
co-chair the Board of Directors
w i t h Roa kes at his req u es t. " 11 wa s
See ELECTION, page 2
Hooker elected to MSO post
Bv ROBERT BEARS ALL
Stat Kr
Carla Michele Hooker, the
newly elected president oi the
Minority Student Organization
has a new plan of action.
"The MSO is for all minority
students not just the black stu-
dents said Hooker. "1 would like
to unite all the student organiza-
tions
Hooker, a' communications
major, is also active as chairper-
son of the ECU Special Concerts
Committee oi the Student Union,
the Pirate Crew and the ECU
Gospel Choir.
"The past administrations
didn't use the funds allocated to
them according to SGA satisfac-
tion so they returned them. 1 don't
want this to carry over to this new
administration Hooker said.
According to SGA Documents, the
government requires all unused
funds to be returned.
"Tine past administration was
allocated $840 said Hooker In
addition MSO raised $300 from a
fashion show and donations
"We ha ve man v even ts sched-
uled for the fall oi 1989" said
Hooker.
The schedule includes a Wel-
come Back for all student organi-
zations on August 2t 19S9. The
Hot 104 FM with host DJs Jerry
Fox and Doctor John will be the
star attraction.
'September - A peer Partners
Program its purpose is to serve as
a Big Brother - Big Sister program
for incoming minorities. Tutorial
services will also be offered.
Also in September - A Spec-
tacular Special People Day this is
a benefit for disabled and retarded
people It will be comparable to
the Student Union's barefoot on
the mall said Hooker.
"Dr. Larry Smith is the assis-
tant vice chancellor for minority
student affairs said Hooker. "Wc
are working on a leadership re-
treat and plan to have a specialist
providing leadership skills
'October - A Safe Halloween
Social for needy community chil-
dren.
'November - Adopt a Grand
Parent month for Senior Citizens
& Nursing home patients. Plan to
use SGA transportation to malls
and movies.
'December - Celcbra tion of the
Kwanzaa, this unique American
holiday pays tribute to the rich
cultural roots oi Americans with
African ancestry. Thespeakers will
be the Mayor of Greenville and a
member of the NAACP.
"An awards banquet will be
held to honor outstanding mem-
bers of the M.S.O. and commu-
nity said Hooker. "We also plan
to have food and clothing drives
each month. This all depends on
funding
"We have come along way
with providing funds for the
M.S.O. and I seek investment of
more funds for our new budget
said Hooker.
The M.S.O. proposed budget
for Fall 1989: Other contracted
scrvices$l,450.00;Office supplies
$580.00; Other supplies $250.00;
Travel $600.00; Communications
$35.00; Printing and Binding
$150.00; Advertising $900.00;
Rental of Equipment $900.00 total
of $4,865.00.
Chancellor Eakin, members of the Medical faculty and area State Representatives gathered at the
Brody Building Tuesday to open the new teleconference room which connects ECU with a state-
wide computercommunications network. (Photo by Thomas Walters�Photolab)
Telecommunications link complete, ECU
now part of statewide research hookup
By TIM HAMPTON
News f'ditor
With a Hip of a switch Tues-
day, ECU joined a statewide mi-
crowave communications net-
work established to increase the
sharing of knowledge between
academic research institutions.
ECU Chancellor Richard
Eakin activated the university's
link with the elaborate telecom-
munication computer system
which now allows area research-
ers to confer with colleagues at
Duke, Carolina and Wake Forest
universities.
The hook up with the Micro-
electronics Center of North Caro-
lina (MCNC) was witnessed by
approximately 50 people at the
ECU Medical School s Brody
Building.
Through the use of mounted
cameras and a manned control
room, ECU officials were able to
speak with MCNC officers and a
leading official with the Bowman
Gray School of Medicine in Win-
ston-Salem.
The television svstem will
permit interactive teleclasses,
video seminars and teleconfer-
ences between two or more dis-
tant locations.
For example, graduate nurs-
ing students on another campus
can "attend" a class originating at
ECU. At both sites, the students
seeand hear the instructor and the
instructor in turn will sec and hear
the students via two-way color
television.
Dr. James A. Hallock, medical
school dean, said he is excited
about the opportunities the net-
work presents.
"This technology allows for
transmission of information and
ideas in a highly efficient and ef-
fective manner said Hallock. "I
can see tremendous potential for
exchange among the.universities
and medical schools on the net-
work, and we are delighted to be
active participants
Speaking on the advantages
of the system ability to relay
medical research, Hallock said
"The overall gains will reflect in
future improvements in patient
care
Dr. William E. Laupus, vice
chancellor for health sciences, said
the access to the network will elec-
tronically bridge the state's coast
with its mountains. The computer
communication system is unpar-
alleled "not only in the United
states, but in the entire world
Laupus said.
Beautification chairman answers queries
By LISA WILLIAMS
Stiff Writer
ECU Campus Beautification
Committee Chairman John S. Bell
held a meeting in which he
anwered questions in reference to
what is currently being done to
upgrade ECU's grounds. "I think
you'll see continuing gradual
progress he said.
The committee, which fin-
ished its work after releasing a
report to the chancellor last April,
is responsible for landscape plan-
ning and campus beautification.
Eighteen members make up the
group, including students, faculty,
and alumni.
In April 1988, the committee
released a report which included plantings, utility service struc- Other projects, which have
its policies and goals, ranging from tures, outdoor artworks, fences, already begun, include high-pres-
creating "an atmosphere on the litter, and buildings. sure cleaning of brick buildings,
campus conducive to learning" to Some progress will become painting of some campus build-
establishing "one or several highly noticeable as the temperatures
visible campus landmarks The increase�flowers and shrubbery
report also listed comments re- were planted this past fall. An-
cicved from respondents to the other recent endeavor is the be-
committee's request for sugges- ginning construction of seating
tion, covering such topics as tree areas across from the student store.
Bell said that any major proj-
ect is considered only under ad-
J
visement of a professional land-
scape architect. He said students
should begi n to see improvements
new look for the Wright Building on a periodic basis as money be-
area. Repaying of the campus comes available,
streets also begins this summer.
ings, and the decision to find a
Sun imaging system developed
On the left is a spectroheliograph picture of the upper atmosphere of the sun, and on the right
is a picture of the sun's lower atmosphere, taken with the differential photometer. They illus-
trate two-tenths of the sun's diameter. The black areas are three degrees or more less thato the
average temperature and the white areas are three degrees or more more average temperature.
By DAVID HERRING
Assistant News Editor
An ECU physics professor has
recently developed a new detec-
tion and imaging system which
produces high-contrast images of
our sun's photosphere � its per-
ceived optical disk.
The system, developed by Dr.
E. J. Seykora, is called a differen-
tial photometer and allows solar
physicists to draw surface tem-
perature maps of the sun with a
sensitivity of within .2 degrees
Kelvin. The average temperature
of the sun is 6,000 degrees Kelvin.
According to Seykora, tem-
perature variations within the
solar photosphere play an impor-
tant role in energetic phenomena
which occur on the sun. With his
instrument, scientists can investi-
gate the phenomena � solar con-
vection (large-scale movement of
solar gases), solar flares and sun
spots.
"When there's a small tem-
perature variation on earth be-
tween Farmville and Greenville,
for example, it can cause violent
storms Seykora explained. "It's
the same, in principle, with the
sun
"With this instrument he
said, "we can actually see struc-
tures on the sun which are due to
small temperature variations.
"Solar flares are the most
energetic storms on the sun and
can have an effect on the earth
Sevkora said. "Within one day
northern lights, also called aurora
borealis, occur as a result
See SUN, page 3
Students, faculty ask Adelphi head to quit
(CPS) � Students and profes-
sors at Adelphi University in New
York have asked their president
to resign.
And as if there was an epi-
demic of troubles at the top, the
University of Maine, Pima Com-
munity College, Sangamon State
(in Illinois) and Georgia State uni-
versities also had presidents,
board members and officials fall
into trouble the last week of March.
At Adelphi, various factions
are trying to force President Peter
Diamandopoulos, who repeatedly
had been censured by students
and faculty members while presi-
dent of Sonoma State University
in California from 1977 to 1983, to
quit.
"There is a great feeling of
turmoil said Ronald Feingold of
Adelphi's Faculty Senate. "There
has been mismanagement of the
university in all different areas.
Each department has its own Dia-
mondpoulos story to tell
Students at many of the
women's colleges around the
country that have gone co-ed dur-
ing the eighties have reacted with
anger and resentment. In recent
years, such protests marked the
conversion of Randolph-Macon
Women's College, Mississippi
University for Women and, in
1988, Whcaton College in Massa-
chusetts.
Colby-Sawyer is one of 95 all-
women's colleges left in the United
States down from 140 in 1970, said
Peter Mirijanian of the Womens
College Coalition in Washington,
D.C.
At Colby-Sawyer, about a
fourth of the population at the
450-student school sang "I Am
Woman" at a sit-in, and then met
for four hours with campus Presi-
dent Peggy Stock and board Chair-
man Peter Danforth, claiming they
had shut them out of the decision-
making process.
"A lot of people are against
See COLLEGE, page 2





I
(
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6,1989
Plastic money goes for grads
(CPS) � American Express,
known as a company for business
executives and yuppies, unveiled
a plan in mid-March to woo col-
lege undergrads.
With bait like cheap airline
fares and magazine subscriptions,
the huge financial services firm
says it will start trying to tempt
students at the 1,000 biggest cam-
puses in the country to carry its
credit card.
The move is emblematic of a
larger trend, various consumer
advocates say, of students being
able to get credit more easily dur-
ing the last three years.
And rrunv ot the consumer
advocates don't think the credit
loyalties. The credit card compa-
nies make their money by claim-
ing three-to-seven percent of each
purchase made with their cards,
and by charging customers inter-
est on the unpaid interest on their
bills.
As anyone who's had a bro-
chure slipped into bookstore pur-
chases or seen booths set up at
student unions can attest, Ameri-
can Express's ambitious new ef-
fort is onlv the most recent foray
onto campuses for credit card
companies, which until just a few
years ago considered students as
risky and probably incapable of
repaying loans regularly.
For example Bank of Amer-
ica, which ownsa big part of VIS A,
card companies' new invasion of ben aggTCSSlvclv marketing to
Americancampusesisa very good studcnts in 1986 when, B of A
idea.
"(Students) arc acquiring
credit at a time when they are
poorly suited to use it wisely
said Mike Heffer of Consumer
Action, a San Francisco lobbying
group, when told of the new
American Express effort.
"Credit cards got me into fi-
nancial trouble agreed Univer-
sity of Houston senior Scot Fox. "I
charged too much, and didn't have
the money to pay for (it). I am in
spokewoman Susan Clevenger
said, students "became more re-
sponsible
Of course, there was nothing
magical that happened in 19S6 that
suddenly changed students into
more responsible credit users,
observed University of Florida
J
finance Prof. Arnold Heggestad.
The answer to why credit card
companies abruptly decided they
wanted to start signing up stu-
dents had more to do with demo-
now
the process of paying them off graphics-there are fewer credit-
worthy adults to be wooed these
days � and the economy, he said.
"If the economy is strong
Heggestad noted, "it's a safe bet
seniors will get jobs when they
But the student market "is the
right place to be now" to sell credit,
said Celine Gallo of American
Express (Amex), adding under-
grads probably will prove a good graduate
source of business for the com-
pany in the future.
"It's important to start early
with people who will be better
earners she said, noting students
"And to be futuristic for a
moment he added, "10 years
from now the paper society �
checks � will be gone. The com-
panies that can put their plastic in
winners. The college market is
more receptive to change, so they
may be the best group to grow
into
"Their purpose Consumer
Action's Heffer believes, "is to
crca tea population of adults tuned
into the credit world
So Citicorp in New York,
which started asking student to
carry credit cards in the mid-eight-
ies, has issued about 1.5 millon
VISAs to students, a company
spokeswoman reported.
By contrast, "only" some
500,000 students carry American
Express cards now. To catch up to
VISA and Mastercard, "we're
proposing an integrated market-
ing program that includes the
cards, along with benefits and
services tailored to the needs of
students Gallo said.
Students "accepted" by Amex
get a $600 credit limit.
Some students and camus
advisers, however, wonder if it's a
good thing for students.
Thirty-five percent of the stu-
dents who asked University of
California at Los Angeles (UCLA)
for extra financal aid from 1986 to
1988 said they need it to repay
credit card debts, UCLA counselor
John Hoyt said.
Iowa State University finan-
cail counselor Ann Swift said she's
seen an increase in the number of
students suffering from high credit
card debts in recent years, and
that some contemplate bank-
ruptcy.
"Only 40 percent of credit card
holders nationally pay their
monthy bill. The other 60 percent
have an average monthly balance
of $1,600" said Swift.
Credit card abue has become
so common that the University of
Southern Maine holds a session
about students and credit cards at
its freshmen orientation. Indiana
University hosts budget planning
workshops in its dorms.
University of Texas students
get a written warning about in-
curring credit card debts when
they pick up their financial aid
applications.
There are victims aplenty.
University of Houston senior Rich-
elle Williams said, "I was always
in the hole. I cut (the cards) up,
and kept jaying on them to get
my financial situation together
The credit card companies, of
course, see their efforts differently.
"We're extending the notion
of fianancial responsibility con-
tended Amex's Betsy Ludlow.
"Students have needs for a finan-
cial instrument just like anyone
Gallo maintained the Amex
cardsgivestudents"lessopportu-
ni ty to overspend " becau se they' re
required to pay off their balances
each month.
"I believe they are good in
emergencies Houston's Fox
agreed.
Sandy Lee, a junior at the
University California at Santa
Barbara, applied for a card "so
that I can start to build a credit
rating
Consumer Action's Heffer
also thought the new credit card
campaigns can help student get
credit while they can.
"As soon as they graduate,
it's harder to obtain a card even if
the person is working Heffer
said.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey
Phillip V. Cope
Guv Harvey
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate $475
Keith Pearce
Adam Blankenship
Bulk Rate (Contracts)
100-199 col. i
200-299 col.
300-399 col.
400-499 col.
nches$4.50
nches$4.40
nches$4.30
nches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Frequency (Contracts)
5 Insertions(4-in$4.55
(12251 $4.50
10 Insertions' in$4.50
(12251 $445
15 Insertions(4-in$4.45
(12 -2V) $4.40
20 Insertions (4 in $4.40
(12251 $4.35
25 Insertions (4 -11 ) $4.35
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 02 -23. . $4.20
Two Color and black$15500
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
arc just starting to form brand people's pockets will he the big
FBI uncovers bribery scheme
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) � by one of four FBI bugs placed on
Unaware that the FBI was eaves- Parkins' home and cttice tele-
dropping, a defense consultant in phones in 1987 and 1988, was on
the government's "111 Wind" in two hours of tapes played for ju-
vestigation of Pentagon procure- rors at the trial of three Teledyne
mentfraud pke&yth,a&MSnes& Electronics Inc. executivesaccuscd
associate about what would hap- of participating in a bribery
pen if ordinary Americansdiscov- scheme to get a $24 million Navy
ered their bribery scheme. contract. Lackner's remark drew
"If the farmers in Indiana hearty laughter from Parkin.
i plannedto play another two hour:
knew what you sons of bitches
were doing with their money, they
would come up there and kill you
with their pitchforks Fred Lack-
ner told defense consultant Wil-
liam L. Parkin on a tape of their
telephone conversation. The tape
was played Tuesday by prosecu-
tors at the first trial resulting from
the two-year investigation.
Lackner's comment, recorded
Colleges
Both men pleaded guilty last
month to participating in the
scheme to bribe Navy procure-
ment official Stuart E. Berlin to
obtain inside information for the
California-based company. Assis-
tant U.S. Attorney Joseph Aronica
said he expected the prosecution
would rest its case by Thursday.
Parkin was expected to testify
Wednesday, and prosecutors
planned to play anotner two hours
of tape recordings. The tapes in-
cluded numerous conversations
between Lackner and Parkin, de-
tailing their efforts to obtain confi-
dential bid inf orwuiio n t hal would
help Teledyne in its negotiations
with the Pentagon.
They also provided evidence
of repeated requests for such in-
formation by Eugene R. Sullivan,
one of the three Teledyne execu-
tives on trial in U.S. District Court
in this suburb of Washington.
During a conversation June
19,1987, Lackner furnished Parkin
with details sought by Sullivan
about how much the Army, Navy
and Air Force were prepared to
spend to procure hand-hpld radar
testing devices. "The deal is just a
Continued from page 1
tad over $4.2 million Lackner
reported. "Always helpful to
know when you're negotiating
he said with a laugh.
'Since it's sole souroeT vou
should have much more than
enough to take care of our little
pets Parkin told Kaub, referring
to hiscontacts in Washington who
helped get information. Kaub said
he wasn't sure the contract was
that lucrative but concluded by
saying: "I understand
Complaining also to Sullivan
that the money had not been paid,
Parkin threatened to use his influ-
ence to get the Defense Depart-
ment to cancel its options to buy
additional equipment. "The only
thing we can do is cancel next year
by making sure it's not exercised
he told Sullivan.
�&
vm
Sharky's
of Greenville
Daily Specials
Mondav - S2.25
Margarita's
Tuesday - SI.75 Bourbon
Wednesdav - S2.00 Kamikaze
Thursday $1.00 Imports &
Coolers
selection ol twelve
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free admission
Friday - SI.75
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Saturday - SI.75
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Present This Ad At Door For
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Located by Sports Pad on 5th Street
ENTER THROUGH ALLEY

s
going co-ed said student Janice
Johnson, "and a lot more need to
be more vocal about it
While the trustees consider
opening the school to men, Mir-
ijanian reported enrollment at
women's colleges nationwide has
increased 15 percent since 1970.
He said Colby-Sawyer's prob-
lems are more typical of those
facing small, private colleges, not
women's colleges.
"Women's colleges are doing
quite well, and we're encouraged
about the future he said.
Elections
Continued from page 1
a good race and I'm glad it's over,
but the students haven't seen the chairman of the election commit-
last of me she said. tee,nocomplaintshavcbeenfilcd
According to Paul Puckett, concerning the run-off election. "I
very pleased with the turnout
Puckett said. "It almost triples last
years run-off election figures
prTst
WE
WANT
YOU
To be a part of
East Carolina's nationally ranked
PURE GOLD DANCERS.
Tryouts will be held April 11th & 12th
from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m. at the
ECU Strength complex on 14th Street.
For more information call 757-6178.
I a cry Sunday ll:()()a.nvc3.00p.m
The NewTaste
Of Greenville
JAZZ BRUNCH AT CHARLEVDS
"Oh what a brunch
"And the five piece jazz land is
so enjoyable
"You should see the spread-
there s tender carved Ikvt. fresh
seafood, pastas and fresh salads
()h. and those madc-to-order
omelettes and crepes
'There's such a selection of deli-
cious foods- and the deserts are
lust fabulous
"It sure is nice to hae a satisfying
dining alternative"
Sundays at CHARI I.YO s-
Knjo) the brunch aJont w ith a
touch of liw zz music from
Spiral Join us.
pe,i0. m ng As Se es
s aveiccved ne'e
Ml M VI H N I KAH
X
HILTON INN
GREENVILLE
207 S.W Grvenvillo Blvd. � Grvenvillo. NC 27Hv4 � Gmn&tf-ANMI
I.






Tl IE EAST C AROLINIAN
APRIL b. 1989 3
Military pollutes Pamlico Sound
RA1 I IG1 l(AP) More than
pounds ol radar toiling de-
bns dropped from jets into the
Pamlico Sound last year is part oi
a broader problem ot military lit
tei being dumped in the fragile
- thedirectorof the Pamlico
! lealth i Apartment said.
1 Baluss said 1 uesday
i i d documentation
k Tomt Marine Air

u hi
�ii
onducts
had r
rps ��.
: g er the sound off
and Carter i counties,
� ng that 1,175 cartridges
45 I pounds of glass
�won . . d over Pamlico
tnt last vear.
"h
e .iiunuiuim-
ted fibers know n as chaff, are
nfusei nem radar
it one example of a
i h and volume or stuff
is discharging into
� '� l v il rs Baluss said
in a telephone interview with The
News and Observer of Raleigh.
His department has been examin-
ing the environmental effects of
military practices in the area in an
effort to predict what might occur
it a proposed Mid-Atlantic Elec-
tronic Warfare Range is approved
there.
Baluss said that while the
amount of chaff that falls into the
water in the form of inch-long,
hair-like fragments was relatively
small, the casings containing the
material also end up in the water
along with the other items
dropped as jets fly over the air
corps' BT-9 and BT-11 bombing
targets, around Pinev Island in
the Pamlico Sound. Is 400-plus
pounds oi this stuff going to shut
down the sound?" heasked. "No.
But its a piece of a larger total
Lynn R. Muchmore, assistant
secretary for administration and
intergovernmental relations for
the state Department of Natural
Resources and Community De-
velopment, Mid water qualify
specialists with the agency had
investigated the chaff and con-
cluded that the amounts ben
used were not a threat to the cnvi
ronment. However, he said, he
agreed with Baluss that long-term
dumping oi military training
devices into the sound could
damage marine life.
Officials are trying to deter-
mine whether such discharges are
allowed under the federal Clean
Water Act, he said. Col. G.T.
Schmidt, director of operations for
Cherry Point, said the military' had
addressed in public hearings the
issue of discharges into the water,
including chaff.
"Chaff isextremclv fine Col.
Schmidt said. "If you saw it being
.ropped from an airplane travel-
ing 400 or 500 miles an hour, you
would probably never find the first
strand again once it was dropped.
It is done quite irregularly. We do
it from time to time
Concerning more permanent
objects, such as bomb casinos and
parachute cords that fall into the
water, Schmidt said, "We'vebeen
using that target at Pinev Island
for many, many vears. The bombs
that are dropped in there are basi-
cally iron, and over time, they
would rust away
Toxic dioxin found in Pigeon R.
� v; ' nn P1
al a: - found
- to prompt the
tmenl to warn
cai ght in the
r in c ocke "ounty.
�rotection
kin as a
� of i aneer in hurting I Tues
�tii . miles
n North
Make. Paul iti � tion con-
� : fish 1 tken ; i
ch the onsidered safe. ilvzii ' Pigeon kin in anuary
iaid
nt war rang nake citizens otcn-
tial health threat by not eating fish
m the Pigeon River
1 le said the Pigeon River di-
oxin is believed to present no
hazard to swimmers, waders and
or to other forms of skin contact,
including any that occurs while
hatching and releasing fish. When
the fish .amples were taken, pol-
lution levels of the river in Cocke
County were being measured by
the state and EPA in connection
with Tennessee's efforts to force
Champion International Corp. to
clean up discharges from its Can-
ton, N.C mill.
The cot fee-colored discharge
from the mill into the river, the
subject ot vears oi lawsuits, led
i Ned McW nerter last vear to
deny the paper mill the right to
o ntinue to pollute the river in
ke Count v. Tenn. This led EPA
to set a three-year deadline tor the
paper mill to clean up the river or
phase down its operations.
This order called for stringent
controls and monitoring for di-
oxin. Champion, in the meantime,
announced it would close its plant.
The warning issued bv Davis
on Tuesday did not mention
Champion. However, it said "the
most noted sources (of dioxin)
have been bleached kraft pulp and
paper mills
Davis said the warning re-
sulted from a cooperative study
bv the Health Department, the
Tennessee Wildlife Resources
Agency, the Tennessee Valley
Authority and EPA. Davis said
the Health Department, TV A and
TWRA collected additional fish
from two locations in the river last
November.
Thirty-nine fish were ana-
lyzed under contract with Wright
State University in Davton, Ohio.
Dioxinlevelsrangedfrom4.5parts
oi dioxin per thousand parts of
water to 29.3 parts per thousand
(ppt).
Seventeen fish had levels ex-
ceeding 20 ppt, which prompted
the advisory. Under criteria used,
Da vis said, nursing mothers, preg-
nant women and children younger
than six should avoid fish with
dioxin levels between 5 and 10
ppt.
It levels of dioxin are between
10 and 20 ppt, he said, adults
should limit consumption to half
a pound per month and avoid it
completely for levels exceeding
20 ppt.
Sun
Continued from page 1
t- ' i 1-h h be contm-

�lar tiare
irrcd and was
. the ECl imaging
nt. The i . aurora
i as far south as
i rgia, but was
rain clouds
- ra, high
I .i to 1-nvcr
r a solar tiare
excess
ire - irescan
� � irgc p w� r grids,
� : ures and can be
. tlites, he said.
iv tba� kground in opti-
he ex-
� . � entati m
plained, "and saw the need for a
data base on lio sun � at this
temperature it has been difficult
to take pictures with good tem-
perature resolutions
Built on the ECL' campus,
Seykora said his instrument uses
modern optical fibers, special
modern electrical equipment and
cc mpu ters to sense very small light
intensity variations and are able
to derive temperature from this
data. The instrument is used at the
Sacramento Peak Observatory, in
New Mexico, where Seykora has
been a member of the visiting
astronomer program since 1981.
The East Carolinian
(Publications Bldg across from Joyner Library)
Read the classifieds
Mass this Sunday
will be at the Center out in our back yard at
11:30 am.
(If we have inclement weather Saturday eve-
ning or Sunday morning, we'll have Mass at
our usual place. Biology Bldg. 103).
The Newman Catholic Student Center
953 E. loth St.
v (Next to the tke house)
Ft, Paul 757-1991
Center 757-3760
quipm ran m mia �
MARK

JOHNSON
FRIDAY APRIL 7
Summer Positions Available
Copy Editor, Assistant News Editor, Features
Editor, Sports Editor, Assistant Editor, and
Writers.
Apply at The East Carolinian
2nd Floor Publications Bldg.
Apply now for a great summer job and
valuable journalism experience.
rynl-al Too) 'Jo.ii'JU .n'iru.wruJ -3-oftiiiJl oJ-ijl
In association with the ECU Purple Pirate Pigskin
Pigout Party
April 21-23
No eligibility restrictions Entry form must be postmarked by
April 12
$50 entry fee
� :
vv
cc
For additional information call: 757-6387
3rd Annual Purple Pirate Pigskin Pigout
Softball Slu-ftst
sponsored b Rental Tool Co. and Intramural-Recreational Services
��pon
Name:
ddress:
'�l:lrj i:o
Phone
Team Name:
Karliest Possible Playing lime Krida. April 21:
take checks payable to Department of Intramural-Recreational Services
For additional information call 757-6387
Carolina east mall
greenville
Your Latest Bonus: Clinique Heaven
Yours at no extra charge whatever with am
t Unique purchase oi 10.00 oi more
� �� �-
v �
CLINIQUt
llergv rested
UV I raerame 1 re�
)
. 756-BELK
SHOP CAROT a EAST MALL, GREENVILLE Monday - Saturday 10 am - 9 pm (7562355)





r
Military pollutes Pamlico Sound
RALEIGH (AP) � More than
400 pounds of radar-foiling de-
bus dropped from jets into the
Pamlico Sound last year is part of
a broader problem of military lit-
ter being dumped in the fragile
waters, the director of the Pamlico
County Health Department said.
James R. Baluss said Tuesday
he had received documentation
from Cherry Point Marine Air
Corps Station, which conducts
flight training over the sound off
Pamlico and Carteret counties,
indicating that 1,175 cartridges
containing 451 pounds of glass
fibers were dropped over Pamlico
County last year. The aluminum-
coated fibers, known as chaff, are
used to confuse enemy radar.
"Chaffisjustoneexampleofa
large variety and volume of stuff
that the military is discharging into
public-trust waters Baluss said
in a telephone interview with The
News and Observer of Raleigh.
His department has been examin-
ing the environmental effects of
military practices in the area in an
effort to predict what might occur
if a proposed Mid-Atlantic Elec-
tronic Warfare Range is approved
there.
Baluss said that while the
amount of chaff that falls into the
water in the form of inch-long,
hair-like fragments was relatively
small, the casings containing the
material also end up in the water
along with the other items
dropped as jets fly over the air
corps' BT-9 and BT-11 bombing
targets, around Piney Island in
the Pamlico Sound. "Is 400-plus
pounds of this stuff going to shut
down the sound?" he asked. "No.
But it's a piece of a larger total
Lynn R. Muchmore, assistant
secretary for administration and
intergovernmental relations for
the state Department of Natural
Resources and Community De-
velopment, said water quality
specialists with the agency had
investigated the chaff and con-
cluded that the amounts being
used were not a threat to the envi-
ronment. However, he said, he
agreed with Baluss that long-term
dumping of military training
devices into the sound could
damage marine life.
Officials are trying to deter-
mine whether such discharges are
allowed under the federal Clean
Water Act, he said. Col. G.T.
Schmidt, director of operations for
Cherry Point, said the military had
addressed in public hearings the
issue of discharges into the water,
including chaff.
"Chaff is extremely fine Col.
Schmidt said. "If you saw it being
dropped from an airplane travel-
ing 400 or 500 miles an hour, you
would probably never find the fi rst
strand again once it was dropped.
It is done quite irregularly. We do
it from time to time
Concerning more permanent
objects, such as bomb casinos and
parachute cords that fall into the
water, Schmidt said, "We've been
using that target at Piney Island
for many, many years. The bombs
that arc dropped in there are basi-
cally iron, and over time, they
would rust away
Toxic dioxin found in Pigeon R.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) �
A new chemical analysis found
enough toxic dioxin to prompt the
State Health Department to warn
against eating fish caught in the
Pigeon River in Cocke County.
The Environmental Protection
Agency has classified dioxin as a
probable cause of cancer in hu-
mans. The warning issued Tues-
day affects fish caught in 26 miles
of the Pigeon River from North
Carolina line to Douglas Lake. Paul
Davis, state water pollution con-
trol director, said fish taken from
Douglas Lake, into which the
Pigeon flows, are considered safe.
EPA began analyzing Pigeon
River fish for dioxin in January
and Februarv of 1988. Davis said
the Health Department warning
was issued "to make citizens
aware that they can avoid a poten-
tial health threat by not eating fish
from the Pigeon River
He said the Pigeon River di-
oxin is believed to present no
hazard to swimmers, waders and
or to other forms of skin contact,
including any that occurs while
hatching and releasing fish. When
the fish samples were taken, pol-
lution levels of the river in Cocke
County were being measured by
the state and EPA in connection
with Tennessee's efforts to force
Champion International Corp. to
clean up discharges from its Can-
ton, N.C mill.
The coffee-colored discharge
from the mill into the river, the
subject of years of lawsuits, led
Gov. Ned McW nerter last year to
deny the paper mill the right to
continue to pollute the river in
Cocke County, Tenn. This led EPA
to set a three-year deadline for the
paper mill to clean up the river or
phase down its operations.
This order called for stringent
controls and monitoring for di-
oxin. Champion, in the meantime,
announced it would close its plant.
The warning issued by Davis
on Tuesday did not mention
Champion. However, it said "the
most noted sources (of dioxin)
have been bleached kraf t pulp and
paper mills
Davis said the warning re-
sulted from a cooperative study
by the Health Department, the
Tennessee Wildlife Resources
Agency, the Tennessee Valley
Authority and EPA. Davis said
the Health Department, TVA and
TWRA collected additional fish
from two locations in the river last
November.
Thirty-nine fish were ana-
lyzed under contract with Wright
State University in Dayton, Ohio.
Dioxin levels ranged from4.5 parts
of dioxin per thousand parts of
water to 29.3 parts per thousand
(ppt).
Seventeen fish had levels ex-
ceeding 20 ppt, which prompted
the advisory. Under criteria used,
Davis said, nursing mothers, preg-
nant women and children younger
than six should avoid fish with
dioxin levels between 5 and 10
ppt.
If levels of dioxin are between
10 and 20 ppt, he said, adults
should limit consumption to half
a pound per month and avoid it
completely for levels exceeding
20 ppt.
Sun
Continued from page 1
11 'in earjjl M$rciv"� 11 SontinP
ued, "one of the largest solar flares
ever recorded occurred and was
recorded by the ECU imaging
instrument. The resulting aurora
borealis was seen as far south as
Texas and Georgia, but was
blocked here by rain clouds
According to Seykora, high
altitude planes are told to lower
their altitude after a solar flare
due to the possibility of excess
radiation exposure. Solar flarescan
also disturb large power grids,
cause power failures and can be
disruptive to satellites, he said.
"I have a background in opti-
cal instrumentation he ex-
plained, "and saw the need for a
data base on Htecriru� at this
temperature it has been difficult
to take pictures with good tem-
perature resolutions
Built on the ECU campus,
Seykora said his instrument uses
modern optical fibers, special
modem electrical equipment and
computers to sense very small light
intensity variations and are able
to derive temperature from this
data. The instrument is used at the
Sacramento Peak Observatory, in
New Mexico, where Seykora has
been a member of the visiting
astronomer program since 1981.
The East Carolinian
(Publications Bldg across from Joyncr Library)
Read the classifieds
MdggB an m �m ���
MARK
JOHNSON
FRIDAY APRIL 7
7:00-9:00 PM
A
Sponsored by ECU Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6,1989 3
Summer Positions Available
Copy Editor, Assistant News Editor, Features
Editor, Sports Editor, Assistant Editor, and
Writers.
Apply at The East Carolinian
2nd Floor Publication Bldg.
Apply now for a great summer job and
valuable journalism experience.
TWWWWWWWIW
S&mtal T��! ���U Intframsaraa SofttaH �kites'
In association with the ECU Purple Pirate Pigskin
Pigout Party
April 21-23
No eligibility restrictions Entry form must be postmarked by
April 12
$50 entry fee
- ' "
&3
For additional information call: 757-6387
3rd Annual Purple Pirate Pigskin Pigout
Snfthall Slugfest
sponsored by: Rental Tool Co. and Intramural-Recreational Services
Name:
Address:
Phone
Team Name:
Earliest Possible Playing Time Friday, April 21:
vlake checks payable to: Department of Intramural-Recreational Services
For additional information call 757-6387
Carolina east mall
greenville
Your Latest Bonus: "Clinique Heaven"
ours at no extra charge whatever with anv
Clinique purchase of 10.00 or more
Bisque Wurkoul Makeup
(Veen Lih Different I ipstick
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l.ucrteEvebcow Comb Bruh
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CLINIQUE
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100�o Fragrance Free
,� 756-BELK
SHOP CAROLINA EAST MALL, GREENVILLE Monday - Saturday 10 am - 9 pm CT923W
'� i �I





�l?e izaat (Ear0ltman
i'ETE FERNALD, c��iM�r
Tim Hampton, ?���
Cl IRIS SlECEL, p�i� �Jior
Cmr Carter, f�.��, &i.(.
Susan Hovvell, .��� m
Dean Waters, m�.��t
Stephanie Folsom, m�r-� e
James F.J. McKee, Pwttor,A�r���i
Brad Bannister, c caw
effParker, si bmm�
Tom Furr, cmumMiMitr
Debbie Stevens, ���
Stephanie Emory �u t� sypr�
Stepi ianie Singleton, oy &�.�
Mac Clark, b��m m�ujc
ApnI6, 1989
OPINION
Page 4
Roakes
Congratulations are in order for
Tripp Roakes, the SGA's new presi-
dent-elect. After a hard fought cam-
paign and two elections, Roakes
won Wednesday's runoff and will
head the SGA for the 1989-90 school
year.
He has an enormous task ahead
of him. Roakes based his campaign
on three basic issues � the rein-
statement of the "drunk bus the
revitalization of Firate Walk and the
development oi a student guide to
teacher performance � and he
must act quickly to make good on
his campaign rhetoric.
In addition, Roakes faces an SGA
beset with apathy and bitter in-
fighting. It will be a crucial part of
his job to see that the legislature gets
off on the right foot next vear and
continues to serve the student inter-
est, not self interest.
There is one more task facing
Roakes, and it may be his toughest
assignment.
Roakes won the election, but his
win cannot be considered a mandate
or a landslide by any stretch of the
imagination. Forty-two percent of
the voting students � in the election
with the largest voter turnout of any
in recent memory � voted for Val-
eria Lassiter. That means 42 percent
of the students believe in Lassiter's
platform �faster financial aid, de-
velopment of new financial aid
sources, a better SGA screenings
procedure and an emphasis on aca-
demic excellence in the classroom
and through public relations.
Roakes now has the job of meet-
ing those students' needs. He must
incorporate at least some of Las-
siter's platform into his own if he
truly wants to represent the entire
student body.
If Roakes really wants to be ac-
cepted by the students, and remem-
bered as a progressive president, he
should also offer Lassiter some posi-
tion of leadership within the SGA,
possibly as the chairperson of his
proposed Board of Leaders. Lassiter
has a lot to contribute to the SGA,
and Roakes would be wist to enlist
her aid in dealing with campus is-
sues next year.
Beautification
The Campus Beautification
Committee finished its report last
April and thus its job was com-
pleted. It' too bad one report won't
make the difference these campus
grounds cry out for.
In the report, suggestions about
projects such as utility services and
memorial structures were made, but
there was never a specific budget to
do anything. Small steps in the way
oi planting flowers and cleaning the
brick buildings are currently being
undertaken as money becomes
available, but this "bit-by-bit" proc-
ess will take much longer than this
growing university should have to
wait. There are other resources to be
tapped into in order to get a large job
done in a shorter amount of time.
Such as
The alumni. Those who call ECU
their alma mater still care about how
it looks. The visual appearance of
our school is important not only to
those of us who are here now, but
also to the graduated of the past and
potential students of the future. The
active alumni who make contribu-
tions would more than likely want
to take a part in making this univer-
sity what it has the capability of
being. Their ideas ought to be hoard
also. Plans Tor projects were made
by the committee which included
representatives from faculty, staff,
students, and alumni, but a few ob-
viously cannot bring about all the
possibilities. Perhaps an alumni
andor student forum could still be
of value through their contributions
and ideas.
The community and campus
groups. Different organizations on
campus and in the community
could also be contacted for their
contributions. If small donations
from many are gathered, whether
they be monetary or items needed
(such as plants and labor) then per-
haps progress would be noticeable
sooner than projected. Again, sug-
gestions should still be laken note ot
and perhaps groups would be will-
ing to work toward one of their own
personal interests in the way of
beautification.
or campus f AS y N $&
Our new Motif is a MfxrvRM
Op BARLi AMeRICAN DCSERT
ANP P57 HOOCRNKTiC
CONSTRUCTIVISM � �� AN&
H�RS SbMCte THAT
655 X �AS T�U l�tr
ypu ABOUT !
"l
5
-4
s -

yn
�sn � f
v 45
A
& A
Ky w 9 & �

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-� - - ���
Administration � students are listening
To the editor
1 am black student here at ECU
.11 id i an i . I upsol Why am I upset?
Well on the 31 si f March I was dehu-
manized for 1 was spit up m by hite
students
I i th 31 ' I v c � iting the art
building ingl iyroomin( larrctt
when a classmato tit mine, who was
standing underneath a second-story
window talking to a group of white
students asked me to come over and
discuss with him seme ideas he had
for our next assignment As wc
talked, I showed him some of my
ideas I had lust recently completed
on a (ompuh r, suddenly it began to
rain. Now I'm quite sure that the
young gentlemen who were in the
second store window were very
aware of our presence below them
for they wert previously speaking to
mv classmate and could ha e clearly
heard our voices several drops of
saliva landed on mi' art work, not to
mention myself I became, as one
would expect, ver angry
Mow my initial reaction was to
go up there and voice my anger to
them hut as I started to enter the
building one namecam to mind that
stopped me: I eddy White. I thought
what if 1 go up there and stand up for
my rights, the same outcome rnr�ba- '
hie would occur. Someone would
undoubtedly be hurt and 1 would be
expelled from campus without any
actions being taken against the truly
guiltv individuals.
So 1 left in anger, choosing to
remain silent, .is the thought of being
dehumanized kept reoccuring. 1
even went up to the second floor to
"discuss" what happened, but as 1
approached the second floor Teddy
White told me not to; not to become
another victim. So 1 left again feeling
even worse.
Then 1 thought, well maybe it
wasn't racially motivated. Maybe
they were just that ignorant and
nasty to spit out of a second-story
window.
But what it it was racially moti-
vated, and even if it wasn't, the over-
all effect oi the "Teddy White Inci-
dent" was made apparent to me as a
black student. I'm not sure if the
administration realizes what mes-
sage they have sent out to the stu-
dent blacl and white, but 1 see it as a
message to the white students that
they can do what they want to a black
student and not worry about any-
thing being done to them.
Why do 1 feel this way? Because
I hesitated to stand up for my rights,
not only mv rights as a black student
but my human rights, 1 believed at
thai moment if I did, I too would be
expelled based on the campuses un-
fair handling of prior events and that
made me very upset, and I'm not
about to throw away my education
for anvonc. For not only myself but
we have come too far. Example, the
incident that occured involving
Teddy White has been labled the
"Teddy White Incident Now we all
know Teddy White didn't have an
"incident" with himself. Why isn't
the name of the other parties men-
tioned?"
I've lived all over this country
and abroad and proudly served in
our armed forces, but never have I
felt so oppresssed as a black citizen
until I arrived here at ECU. Yes, I
understand and know that racism
exists everywhere. I've even condi-
tioned myself to overlook racism as
ignorance and that they just don't
know anv better. But since I've been
here, I've been constantly shown that
racism is in abundance ai4 my atti-
Uictcs oi donrmwrrhitl-rarW now and
forever changed.
Now don't misunderstand what
I'm trying to say or what I'm feeling.
I have met whites who have not dis-
played racism and I have white
friends whose friendship I value, but
enough is enough and something
must be done about it.
So to the administration I urge,
be careful in what you say and do be-
cause wc are listening very intently.
And to Teddy White, words of
strength! You won't be forgotten.
And finally to my fellow black stu-
dents, sta on your path of dreams
and achieve your degree for through
knowledge comes understanding,
and with understanding comes re-
spect, respect as a human.
Arthur C. Rogers, Jr.
Art Major
Sophomore
Constitutions
To the editor:
The Rules and udiciar)
Committee of the Student (.over-1
ment Association is now in the pro.
2SS of conducting its bi-annual re
view of all student groups' constitu
tions that have not been reviewed in
the past two years. A letter has been
mailed to all groups in need of re-
view; however, many groups have
yet to submit their constitutions. Fail-
ure to submit will mean that the
groupwillnolongerbcrecogniA d.i-
anofficialECUgroupnd willnoth1
allowed to hold official meetings on
rampus or receive anv SGA funds
The deadline for all groups to submit
their constitutions and a list �f offi
cers to the SGA office is Wednesd.n
April 12. If your group is not sure it it
is up for review, contact Millie
Murphrev at 757-6161 before April
12. Thank you.
Bob I jndr
Chairm.H,
Rules and ludiciarv Commute-
Justin's back
To the editor:
If any city can claim to be the
testing track for liberalism. -i sh
ington, DC. is it.
With Washington as its show
piece, liberalism has proved itsell
at best a costly failure, at worst a
primary cause and collaborator in
thesocialdisentegrationof the late
20th century.
In Washington, liberals ha
had everything their way. Lauda
bly, D.C. schools were desegre-
gated back in 1955. However since
then the track system was thrown
out, progressive ideas were
trucked in, busing was begun, the
teachers' union took over and
expendihuestookorf�from $250
per student in 1950 to some $6,000
today.
Results: the white and black
middleclass have tied to private
and suburban schools; test scores
have plummeted to four years
below the national average; and
violence against students and
teachers is pandemic.
See LETTERS, page 5
How to fix the U.S. educational system
By SCOTT MAXWELL
(.iitorial Columnist
As my fellow columnist Russell Baker
once pointed out, ours is a nation in which
every single citizen is an expert on politics,
the economy and education � or so they
claim. With that caveat in mind, then, I
humbly present my closely interrelated
proposals for fixing the primary and secon-
dary public education system.
Spend more money on the students.
This is a big one. What we don't spend
on a student today, wc usually spend on a
criminal a few years down the road. It's
worth it.
Spend more money on the teachers.
Money should be spent on teachers in
two ways. First, obviously, is to increase
their salaries.
Many of the same persons who rail
against the poor education system are also
against raising teacher salaries. They say
that we shouldn't raise teacher salaries, that
teachers should teach because they love to
teach.
Certainly teachers should teach be-
cause they love to teach. And firefighters
should fight fires because they love to fight
fires, a nd baseba 11 players should play base-
ball because they love to play baseball, and
computer programmers should program
computers because they love to program
computers. But that's irrelevant to salary.
The point is that there arc many who
would be good teachers but don't become
teachers because they can make more
money in another job. It does not follow that
if these same persons became teachers, they
would not be as dedicated as those who are
teachers now.
In fact, they might surpass many ot"
those who are currently teaching. Some
teachers teach because they cannot get a job
in their intended profession in the public
sector. These are not, generally, dedicated
and highly qualified individuals.
Money should lso be spent to improve
teacher training. Most teachers have sum-
mers off; they should be required to spend
part of their summer vacation every few
years in refresher courses designed to keep
them current in their field.
Spend more money on the school buildings
and materials.
A pleasant environment is conducive
to learning. So arc overhead projectors that
work. Toward those ends, parents should
find it in their pockets to do such small
things as planting flowers and repainting
walls. They should also set up community
funds from which schools can draw to
purchase needed teaching aids
More computers should be available,
not only for high school students but also
for students in the lower grades. With the
computers, of course, should go teachers
who know how to usp them.
Where it exists, end corporal pumsnment.
The deliberate association of pain with
learning fails to induce a student to learn.
Rather, it tends to make students more
defiant. It is also often applied unfairly;
minority students are its most frequent
recipients.
Very few p rsons and, therefore
verv few students cannot be dealt with
J
rationally. Corporal punishment should
not be available even as a last resort, since it
can be seen that, when corporal punish-
ment is available as an option, school ad-
ministrators often do little else to try to help
a student solve his problems.
Besides, what is a student to make ot a
society which claims that its children are its
most precious resource (when talking
about drugs) and that it is perfectly all right
for an exasperated principal to beat a child
for disrupting a class?
Start teaching critical thinking.
Regardless of what politicians say, the
political system's biggest problem is voters
who don't think critically. If thev were
faced with a public which was willing and
able to thoroughly, logicallv examine their
positions, politicians would be forced to
improve or give up.
Help students respect themselves.
This means more than teaching them to
"just say 'no in Health 101. It means teach-
ing them to gather information and make
decisionsor themselves Think for yourself.
Just say 'no translates to 'Think for your-
self. Do what we tell you This is not teach-
ing self-reliance; it is thinly disguised
dogma.
Expose students to more culture.
Students should take classes not only in
Western culture, but also in other cultures.
A populace which was reasonably conver-
sant with foreign cultures would not be so
susceptible to the xenophobic justification
of foreign policy that has been prevalent
throughout America's past.
Also, schools should ensure that his-
tory teachers emphasize the importance of
events, their causes and their effects, rather
than simply when they happened. It is true,
as Santayana said, that those who do not
remember the past are condemned to re-
peat it. Condemned, too, are they who
remember but do not understand.
Get students to read.
Forcing a student to read is the best way
to make him hate reading.
It is important to start by allowing stu-
dents to read what they like to read. Pre-
high school students should be required to
read � not to read some particular book,
just to find something and read it.
They can be "moved up" to the tradi-
tional works (Silas Marner, Hamlet, Wuth-
ering Heights, etc.) later. Even then, it is
important' to teach not just long, tedious
novels but also contemporary work to
which students can better relate � Camus,
Faulkner, Salinger.
Ignore the censors.
There have been school systems which
have tried to do exactly what 1 just de-
scribed. However, their efforts have been
crushed by outraged citizens who c.nnot
imagine that the schools would be "forcing
children" to read "smutty" books � like
those written by, say, Camus. Faulkner i
Salinger.
The censorship attempt would b
temporary problem � they would
pear within a generation or so -� but tl
arc dangerous while they exist. Frank
though, the censors should be ignoi
They have consistently lost in lawsuits ai
probably will continue to lose, even give
the anti-rights bent of the Supreme C our
In the meantime, we would be breeding i
whole generation of persons who respect I
the written word and the value of ideas � .
commodity sorely lacking in certain range -
of the political spectrum.
Prize creativity.
Nearly everything that the school s
terns emphasize is oi the one-nght-answ i
variety. A student's SAT score figures
largely in his future education possibilities
and the SATs depend on a student's picking
the correct answer from the choices avail
able Memorization takes precedence over
actual thinking.
Granted, having only one right answer
to any given problem makes a teacher's lite
easier. But that's simply irrelevant: the
problems that face the country and the
problems that a person faces in life cannot
often be solved simply by memorizing and
then repeating a correct answer.
See EDUCATION, page 5
Y





J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6,1989 5
Education
Continued from page 4
What is important is develop-
ing the ability to solve real-life
problems, and strategics to tackle
new kinds of problems. Simply
having knowledge is not usually
enough to solve a problem: prob-
lem solving requires the creative
application of knowledge. It is a
crucial skill, but students are usu-
ally left to develop it on their own
� if they develop it at all.
The percentage of U.S. pat-
ents granted to U.S. citizens is
declining. This must be at least
partly a result of the school sys-
tem's hostility toward creativity.
Also, a school system that
rewards skills like sitting quietly
and following directions unques-
tioningly produces voung adults
who sit quietly and follow direc-
tions unquestioninglv. This is not
good: America is in desperate need
of persons who aren't afraid to
speak up and who think for them-
selves.
Prize all kinds of intelligence.
Math and science skills are
good. So are artistic and musical
skills. The school system prizes
the former, does all but ignore the
latter, and fails to realize that ar-
tistic thinking must be coupled
with logical thinking to generate
insight. Students must be taught
how to develop all the facets of
their intelligence and how to use
them together.
Treat students like people.
This is perhaps the most im-
portant. Nearly all teachers tiy to
care about their students, but
many simplv cannot care about
them all. Like it or not, teachers
are often forced to treat most of
their class as a mass, which means
that they can't pay as much atten-
tion to the individual students as
he needs.
To solve this requires more
than lowering teacher-to-student
ratios. It requires that teichersbe
encouraged to relate to students
person-to-person, not just teacher-
to-student. Also, the Socratic
method of teaching should be
employed � teachers should lead
students in a process of inquiry
and discovery.
Mean it.
None of the above measures
will work as long as students are
processed like cattle. The meas-
ures described must be whole-
Letters
heartedly accepted and followed,
or they mean nothing. But if they
are carefully considered and im-
plemented, they could make a
world of difference.
Continued from page 4
Washington was also a
proving ground from public hous-
ing, urban renewal, and rent con-
trol. Today Washington has home-
less lying in the streets, gutters,
doorways and subway entrances
in record numbcis.
Washington long ago out-
lawed the death penalty and
imposed the toughest U.S. gun
laws, yet boasts the highest mur-
der rate in the West. D.C. has the
highest taxes in the area, but the
worst delivery of services; it has
twice as many bureaucrats per
capita as any state, but Mother
Nature has to handle snow re-
moval. Affirmative action and
racial quotas are mandatory, yet
public discourse is poisoned with
constant charges of racism.
Washington boasts NINETY
open-air drug markets. The D.C.
government isat all levels rife with
lethargy, incompetence, and cor-
ruption.
Libleralism, the idea that the
public sector can best improve the
quality of life, has taken a fearful
beating in Washington, the kind
oi beating Marxism has taken in
Poland.
Justin Sturz
2nd Annual Bikini Contest
THURSDAY, APRIL 6TH
1 st Prize
2nd Prize
3rd Prize
$100.00
$ 50.00
$25.00 Cash
& Prizes
TO ENTER CALL OR COME BY RAFTERS
752-4668 (leave message)
Doors Open at 8:30
Computer phone program
checks on elderly people
COON RAPIDS, Minn. (AD
� A self-taught computer wizard
is attracting the attention of police
from around the nation and Scot-
land Yard for a computer dialing
program that checks on elderly
people who live alone.
"Good morning the re-
corded message announces. "Arc
you O.K.?"
If the recipient of the call ut-
has blossomed into a full-time
business for Johnson, a former
Armv and National Guard offi-
cer. Only Osage, Charles City,
Iowa, and Sutherlin, Ore are on
line with the system, but inquiries
and purchase orders have been
pouting in from all over.
"We had a call from Scotland
Yard on it said Robert O Keefe,
the onlv other officer in Johnson's
ters a response, the computer as- home-based company, Northland
sumes the answer is yes and moves
on to the next person. If there's no
answer or the telephone is busy,
the computer repeats the call.
But if there's no answer a
second or third time, the computer
sounds an alert to law enforce-
ment officials who dispatch a
squad car to see if anyone is in
danger.
"It's a good deal all the way
through said Clyde Ritter, 73, of
rural Osage, Iowa. 'They say it
saved my life
Ritter had gone into a diabetic
coma one morning in August at
his home five miles northwest of
Osage. The town's "Are You
O.K.?" computer at police head-
quarters alerted authorities that
Ritter failed to answer a second
call, and a deputy sheriff was sent
to the home.
He found Ritter comatose and
summoned an ambulance. "I
guess 1 credit the system for sav-
ing at least one life said Osage
Police Officer Michael DeKruif.
"We've had tremendous success
with it
Besides Ritter7s rescue, the
system has alerted Osage police to
an elderly man whose hands were
caught in a window � trapping
him inside his own home � and
to three elderly people who had
fallen in their homes and needed
police to help them. "I haven't
seen anything like it said Retha
Jefferson, a police department
desk officer in Belhaven,N.C "It's
just that officers respond to calls
all the time of neighbors not see-
ing their neighbors for two or three
davs and then it's too late
Jefferson, who manually calls
about 45 elderly people each day
to check on them, said Belhaven is
raising $7,000 to buy a system.
The 41-year-old Johnson said he
developed the program about a
year ago for Osage "more or less
as a public service" while he was
living in nearby Austin, Minn
Johnson had video stores in Austin
and Osage and was considered a
computer guru by friends.
Members of the police depart-
ment had heard of a computer
dialing system in Carthage, Mo
and they wanted Johnson to im-
prove on it. "I foolishly told the
city, 'Til write it for you Johnson
said. "It took me 14 months
Thanks to publicity in law
enforcement journals, the project
SowhSlftlriere are
more reasons not
to
just Do It!
then write about it l
in
The
"East Carolinian
Now Accepting
Applications
Innovations. Johnson, a two-time
University of Minnesota dropout
who has lived in Brazil, Germany
and the Bronx, started to teach
himself about computers in 1982
when he was bedridden tor six
months with a back injury.
He said "Are You O.K.?"
Programs arc flexible and easy to
operate. The service is free to the
residents where a s stem is based.
Riverbluff
Apartments
SUMMER SCHOOL SPECIAL!
June & July 12 Rent Special
with the Signing of a 1 year lease
April 1 through June 30.
�Recently Renovated
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
�On Site Management & Maintainence
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
A RESUME
IS A TERRIBLE
THING TO WASTE
At AccuCopy we realize the importance of clean,
professional-looking resumes. Our resume packages let
you choose between phototypesettmg, laser printing, or
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In addition, we offer the widest range of paper and
envelope choices in the area.
FAST COPIES
FOR FAST TIMES
� 24-hour service available
� open early, open late
� open six days a week
&
THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
�3PCC
DAN'S
Come Shop With Us in '89
VINTAGE CLOII IINCi. 212 East Fifth St
JEWELRY, COLLECTABLLS Greenville, NC
AND FURNITURE 919 752-1730
CHOOSE A COMBO AND SAVE!
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1988 Zenith Data Systems
Form No 1374 588
Arby in Greenville
aid with other offers





j
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6,1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
NEED 2 SUB LEASERS: For May
through August. House 2 blocks from
campus. 170 month plus utilities. Lyle
752-0444.
NEED TO SUBLEASE? Law students
Interested in subleasing furnished apart-
ments for summer (May � August). Want
to make arrangements as soon as possible.
Call Bert Spekher at 355-3030
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non-
smoker to sub-let May � August, 13 rent
�c utilities at Wilson Acres. Fully fur-
nished, private bedroom, pool, cable,
laundry, walking distance from ECU. Call
Dawn at 758-7368.
ROOM FOR RENT: 2 bdroom house non-
smoker. $150 mnth, plus utilities. Close to
campus. Call Luke after 3 pm at 758-7952
or 355-3543.
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath
townhouse at Twin Oaks. Family man-
aged � $525 month. Fireplace, Appli-
ances, Patio, Pool. Year's lease required.
Opens August 15, in time for Fall semes-
ter. Call 752-2851.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non-
smoker, May � December, 13 rent St
utilities, at Wilson Acres, private bed-
room, pool, cable, laundry, walking dis-
tance from ECU. Call Dawn or Karen 758-
7368 or 757-6611 ext. 210.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE TO SUB-
LEASE: Beginning after May 8, 2 bed-
room, 1 12 bath. Rent $370mon. plus
utilities, dose to campus. Lease ends after
2nd summer school session. For details
call 830-5138 � ask for Trish, Susan or
Tammy.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share 2 bd
apt. beginning May. Non� smoker,
dean, studious, female, no pets. $165.00
month, 12 utilities. 355-3081 Jennifer
(5�6 or after 9:30 pm.)
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For summer
mos. Female, non�smoker. 3 bdrm at
Eastbrook. Own room, ECU bus service,
pool. $127 a month plus 1 3 utilities. If
interested call 830-6646
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share apt
during summer (possibly till May "90)
S142.00monthutilities. Male, non-
smoker, and responsible! 756-6023 Jeff
(after 5 p.nO
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Great location,
$112 rent, low utilities, prefer females, bus
service to ECU, call for more information
756-6883 or leave name and number.
FOR SALE
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
From $100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chevys. Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S�1166.
FOR SALE 10 band stereo frequency
equalizer with IMX expander spectrum
analyzer. Like new $85 Call 752-3432 and
ask for Dave.
FORMAL GOWN: Size 5-7 only worn
once, black with white taffeta. $90.00 or
BO. call 830-3806
RECLINERS FOR SALE Brand new, no
joke1. Excellent prices! For more informa-
tion, call Mike at 752-6823.
FOR SALE: 3ft. x 1 12 ft. hotpoint dorm
refrigerator. Almost brand-new. Asking
$150 � price neg. Call 752-9743.
FOR SALE: Single brass head board with
single mattress and box spring included!
Sheets available also Only $50 If inter-
ested Call 8306646
FOR SALE 1966 Toyota MR2 Black, fully
loaded with sunroof: Call 756-8720. Leave
message.
FOR SALE: Entertainment Center to fit
Clement, While, or Greene dorms. Very
spacious, includes shelves for a T.V. large
refrigerator, books, etc. Call today! 758-
4507 Amy or Kathleen.
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS, CARS, 4 X 4'S:
Seized in drug raids for under $100.00?
Call for facts today 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
COMPACT DISC PLAYER: Like new
call 830-6676 and ask for Tripp.
2 GOODYEAR EAGLE GT TIRES:
P23570 Hr 15 $150.00 CaU 830-6676 ask
for Tripp. Brand new.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties. Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 335-
2781 and ask for Morgan
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
0eside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party.
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage.
WORD PROCESSING: Reports, Resu-
mes, Laser Printing. Rush jobs and reser-
vations accepted Call 752-1933 before 5
pm.
HELP WANTED
RESIDENT COUNSELOR: Interested in
those with human service background
wishing to gain valuable experience in the
field. No monetary compensation, how-
ever room, utilities and phone provided
Mary Smith REAL Crisis Center 758-
HELP.
CABIN COUNSELORS &
INSTRUCTORS: (Male and Female) for
western North Carolina 8 week children's
summer camp. Over 30 activities includ-
ing Water Ski, Tennis, Heated swimming
pool, Go-Karts, Hiking, ArtRoom,
meals, salary and travel. Experience not
necessary. Non-smoking students writt
for applicationbrochure: Camp Pine-
wood, 20205-1 N.E. 3 Ct. Miami, Florida
33179.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING: Flight Atten-
dants, Travel Agents, Mechanics, Cus-
tomer Service. Listings. Salaries to S105K
Entry level positions. Call (1) 805-687-
6000 Ext A-1166
HELP WANTED: Full or part-time desk
clerk and relief audit positions available at
the Ramada Inn. Some experience is pre-
ferred. Apply in person at the front desk
M � F 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. No phone calls
please.
TELEMARKETING RAMADA INN,
GREENVILLE: Good phone voice and
outgoing personality helpful. 9 � 2 p.m. 5
� 9 p.m. shifts weekdays. Great daily
bonuses. Call Dottie 5 � 9 p.m. at 355-
8910.
ATTENTION SUMMER SESSION
STUDENTS: Will you have extra time on
your hands this summer? Will you need
extra spending money? If you answered
yes to either question we have some good
news for you. Brody's and Brody's for
Men is currently accepting applications
for part-time sales and customer service
positions. Please apply at Brody's Caro-
lina East Mall Mon. St Tues. 10 a.m. � 4
p.m.
LOOKING FOR A FRATERNITY, SO-
RORITY OR STUDENT
ORGANIZATION: That would like to
make $500 � $1000 for a one week on-
campus marketing project. Must be or-
ganized and hardworking. Call Jill or
Corine at (800) 592-2121.
HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STU-
DENTS: Who enjoy cooking we have
opening" for cook s helpers and kitchen
aids at childrens summer camp in the cool
mountains of North Carolina. Experience
not necessary, we will train You receive
room, meals, laundry, plus $900.00 �
$1000.00 salary and travel expenses. Non-
smoking students write for App.bro-
chure; Camp Pinewood 20205-1 N. E. 3
Court, Miami, Fl. 33179.
PERSONALS
SEE-SAW MANIA: Is coming this Satur
day. Theta Chi is see-sawing for 24 hrs at
Burger King to raise money for Special
Olympics. So come by, listen to Z�1103
live and help up raise money for a worthy
cause.
THETA PRESENTS: The first annual see
saw mania to raise money for Special
Olympics. Starting at 2:00 p.m. Saturday
at Burger King we will see-saw for 24 hrs
so come by and get a free set of Ginsu
knives and also help some special ath-
letes.
CHI� O'S: The past few weeks have been
great fun!Thesecret isoutand the charade
is done! We hope you've enjoyed the gifts
we gave because we meant for them to
bring a brighter day! We'll see you at
Greek Week! Love, the Delta Z's.
DELTA ZETA: Only 2 days left, this one
will be the best! You know where to go, it's
Williamsburg that will rock n-rMl So get
psyched cause it's time for Dream girl '89.
AN: Too bad!tLovc, Kelley and Mclinda.
PIKA APRIL FOOL'S FORMAL TOP
TEN LIST: Of totall v trashed things to do
10) Swim in the ocean. 9) Get an intense
shoulder burn from spending countless
hours sitting on the cooler 8) Leave your
cooler for a mere ten minutes 7) Keep
looking for a Holiday Inn sign even
though you're in North Carolina again. 6)
Follow your fraternity brother to an ob-
scure seafood place. 5) Buy your date
dinner. 4) Swim in the ocean at 3 am. 3)
Ask for a bar tab when it's already paid
for. 2) Lose your date 1) Lose your date on
purpose.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Would like to con
gratulate and thank the graduating sen
iors of '89 for their hard work and loyatly:
Matt Hermes, Danny Hooper, Tim
Shectee, Kevin Plumb, Rich Geibert,
Kevin Thompson, Chad Beauchamp, Jon
Melhorn, John Henderson, John Jenkins
PRESERVE YOU RIGHT TO CHOOSE:
For you and future generations. March in
the Pro choice rally Sunday April 9 in
Washington D.C
RLE: Right now things are stressed, but
I'm wishing you the best, birthday you
ever had, since mine ended up so bad. I
hope someday you'll see what your
friendship means to me, and you'll be
ready once again to be my brother and my
friend. JEM
TODAY IS THE DAY! Go get your
friends and come to the KA house to see
THE USUALS and THE TRBEL MA-
NIAX. The streets are being blocked as
you read Beers are being cracked and the
party is about to start Go get your cooler
and come now because the bands start at
4:00. Over 600 tickets have already been
sold
ZETA TAU ALPHA GIRLS: Congratula-
tions on the service award. Thanks to Barb
Froio. You deserve an award yourself.
Also � Congratulations outstanding sis-
ter Many Marlowe!
ZETA SOFTBALL IS THE BEST: The
others know and it will show that we are
number 1 Also � how about that swim
team7 Nice bellv flop Huggins!
ADPi'S: And their formal dates: I lope ev-
eryone had a great time in Wilmington �
for those who love beach music. We know
you really enjoyed it. 1 lope all the bicker-
ing couples made up � oh, and thanks
Emilv. Love Alpha Delta Pi.
TO: Player Miller, Shay Sitlinger, Julia
1 lodge, Lisa Creech, Kristy Baker, Eliza
beth Black, Jocelyn Gasque, Lisa
Gonalex, Alisa Turner, Melanie
Simpson, and Maria Denoiz � you guys
are doing great � hang in there and re-
member that we are all pulling for you �
Love A D Pi
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Encourages and
welcomes all interested girls to RUSH. It
will be a blast!
ALL GREEKS: The house is painted � no
longer looks like but now there's a
new problem: THE TUG O WAR PIT The
time is now to Rock and Roll, but its gonna
be messy if you fall in the hole. So get set
to get wet all boys and men � where two
are seperated when one of them wins �
Monday afternoon at the Sig Tau house �
kegs welcome.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: The Party
Table" The formal was choice along with
our dates. The dinner began early and
partied late. A day at the beach to catch up
on rest until we put Bobby's jeep to the
test. We departed with memories that will
never rest � Thanks Guys, Thanks Girls it
was "The Best" Squirrel.
ALPHA XI DELTA: We've had a lot of fun
being your secret sorority � get ready for
Greek Week and good luck on exams!
NO TAP BOWLING TOURNAMENT:
T shirts St trophies will go to the highest
male 6c female bowlers in a no tap bowling
tournament to be held in MSC Bowling
Center. Tuesday April 11th at 730 p.m
Registar at the bowling center.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
Love, Sigma Sigma Sigma.
GREEK WEEK FANS: Get ready for
Monday's event. The Alpha sigma Phi
Alpha Phi Mexican standoff It'll be a Phi-
esta to remember! Pedro's word of advice:
"Quil-er! But be Kerful amigos � those
guys and gals are loco
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
CHI ALPHA OMEGA BROTHERS:
Michael, Jonathan, Rekay, David, Jim,
and Allen. In Christ we are Brothers. �
Your brothers.
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care'
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru St tow
Cost Termination to 20 weeks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
ECU Biology Club
Thursday, April6
Friday, April 7
8:00am - 1:00pm
at the
Biology
Greenhouse
Room Sill
MYRTLE BEACH
OCEAN
1$26
OCEAN FRONT MOTEL
Pars
- Two Double Bads � Mb �
Jun, slightly higher �
W�e�nds sightly higher
.4
� Swimming Pool � Cable
TV � R�trig. � Private Bal-
conies 2 min. walk to
Pavilion, amusements,
night dubs, restaurants
Diamonds - Jewelry - TV's -
VCR's - Watches - Guns -
Musical Instruments
BILLS
6cScb
PAWN SHOP
Strictly Confidential Transactions
INSTANT CASH LOANS
480 N. Greene Street
Greenville, NC 27834
I (919)830-6828
JUST S Mil I S SOU I II )�
MYRTLE BEACH
Now accepting
application for
The East Carolinian
Circulation Manager.
To apply for this position
bring your resume to
The East Carolinian
located on the second floor of
the publication building across from
Joyner Library.
. . �

(Salary plus commision, no phone calls please)
J
r
Ocean Lodge
S 604 X Ocean. Blvd.
� NyrUe Beach. SC 29577
1-800-448-8261
SPRING CONDOMINIUM SPECIAL
$
48
N Available Options
I �toohftN(Uicorae
" � Elevator � Mfcrowave
t � Fireplaces � 2 & 3 BR
Slwps i � Thru Maj S, 19 � Onaort
Mi � (aaj same pm � lap n a�L
Floyd & Stewart
Rentals Sales � 640-B Hw?
ITSouta. SurhWeBeach.SC
1-800-334-6671
SCCall 803-238-1457
PIRATES LANDING
remco east, inc.
ll�j� P.O. Box 6026
� Vss. Grecnvile. NC 27834
919-758-6061
REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT
ATTENTION:
PANHELLENIC ANNOUNCES:
Registration April 3rd-6th
& 10th-13th
Student Stores
Croatan
Bottom of Hill
10am - 3 pm
PART TIME JOB
with apartment Included!
�Lite work for rent
�Other work w pay
�flexible night schedule
�rotating weedend's off
If Interested Contact Robert Wilkerson at
752-2101
Wilkerson Funeral Home
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
IDLED
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7.00
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncotn promised word of Cod
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Ra wl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrew. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security PostJon. must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hour Mon. 2 pjn to 5 p.m. Sat 10 am to
5 pjn. and additional hours during the
(10 to 15 hours per week) If inter
4eaae call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TlflDRS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
ECU NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 7:30-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
ments served. No ticket required; just
reserve your time.
HELP FIGHT CANCER
A 24-hour Run Against Cancer will be
sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed
National Fraternity, and the American
Cancer Society on April 14th St 15th at the
ECU track. Contestants are not required
to jog or walk the entire 24 hours, but
instead will be taking turns with nine
other team members for 1 2 hour periods.
Find out about entering a team or donat-
ing moneymaterials. For more info call
Rose Richards (752-2574) of the American
Cancer Soc Bryan Haskins (756-9665) of
Alpha Phi Omega or Dsvid Overton (830-
6785) of Alpha Phi Omega.
SEASON TICKETS
Season tickets for the 1989-90 Performing
Arts Series at ECU are now on sale. This
outstanding season includes 1TZHAK
PERLMAN, THE N.C DANCE THE-
ATRE SHALON '90, THE CANNES
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with RAN-
SOM WILSON, THE N.C.
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, CARMEN
sung in English, DREAM GIRLS, and
much more, Patrons are cautioned that
initial season ticket sales are brisk. Al-
though individual event tickets will go on
sale 3 weeks prior to each event, it is
highly possible that the series will sell out
in season sells. Don't miss out on the best
Performing Arts Series, order your tickets
today. Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC, 757 6611, Ext 266.
PUBLIC INFO.
The League of Women Voters of Green-
ville-Pitt County is sponsoring a public in-
formational meeting about present and
future solid waste mgmt. in Pitt County.
The meeting will take place on March 21 at
730 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church
in Greenville.
CCE
Campus Christian Fellowship would like
to invite you to our Bible study every
Tues. at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130. Bring your
Bible and a friend as we study the book of
Hebrews. Call Jim at 752 7199 if you need
a ride or further info.
If your life has been affected, past or pres-
ent, by having been raised in a home or
environment where alcoholic and other
dysfunctional behaviors were present.
Here s bomething You Should Know.
Each Tues. at 4:30, in rm. 312 of the Coun-
seling Center, there is a discussion and
learning group meeting for those with
common concerns. Newcomers are en-
couraged to come at 4:15. Call 757-6793 for
additional info.
BALLOON RIDES
Come join the Down East Balloon Society
on April 15 from 4-7 p.m. at Vernon Park
Mall (Kinston) for hot air balloon rides
and help us raise funds for Children's
Hospital of Eastern N.C (weather permit-
ting�rain date: April 29,4-7 p.m.). Watch
the Children's Miracle Network Telethon
on WITN-7, June 3-4.
PLANT SALE
The ECU Biology Club will be sponsoring
a plant sale April 6-7. The sale will take
place in the Biology Greenhouse, room
BS-111 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
iQVF'S LABOUR'S LOST
The Acting Co. will present Shakespeare's
Love's Labour's Lost on April 10th at 8
p.m in Wright Aud. Founded by the late
John Houseman, The Acting Co. is one of
the leading regional theatrical companies
in America. This delightful evening of
comic fun is part of the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series. Tickets are now on sale at
the Central Ticket Office in MSC (757-
6611, ext. 266).
HPERS
The HPERS department announces the
Childrens's learn to Swim Program for
faculty and staff, starting April 10th For
more information call Melrose Moore 757-
6441 or 6442.
WORLD RENOWN VIOLIN-
IST NADTA SALERNO-SON-
NENBERG
World Renown Violinist Nadja Salemo-
Sonnenberg will perform in Wright Audi-
torium at 8pm on April 20th. Her appear-
ance will condude the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts �ries at East Carolina Univer-
sity. Her h ivduled prgram will include
SONATA No. 2 in A Major, Op. 12, No. 2
by Beethoven, SONATA No. 2 ink D
Major, Op. 94a by Prokofiev, Intermis-
sion, SONATA No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 108
by Brahms. Ms. Salerno-Sonnenberg will
be acompanied by Sandra Rivers on the
piano. Tickets for this event are now on
sale, they can be purchased through the
Central Ticket Office at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center by calling 757-6611, ext.266.
Office hours are 11 am-6 pm, Monday
through Friday.
MS. WHEELCHAIR NC 1989
The Student Council for Exceptional Chil-
dren is proud to present Ms. Wheelchair
NC1989on April 13 at 8 pm in the Nursing
Bldg Auditorium. She will be discussing
current legislation on the rights of dis-
abled persons as well as stories to her ex-
periences. Everyone is welcome to attend!
frftSKTHFKAPYTIIJB
Massage Clinic � April 6. This is the last
one ths year. 6-9 pm at the Belk building.
Rates: $1minute in advance; $1.25min-
ute at the door We can massage your
back, feet, arms or legs Don't miss it!
CHALLENGE WEEK
Do you hold a grudge?! Get rid of it at the
expense of intramural recreational serv-
ices. The registration deadline for Chal-
lenge week is April 10, from 11 am to 6 pm
in MG 104-A. Intramurals provides the
playing site, equipment adn officials. You
provide the players and pick the sport.
STUDENT SERVICE
AWARDS.
The Departments of Residence Education
and Housing sponsor yearly service
awards for students serving as Head Resi-
dents and Resident Advisers in ECU resi
dence halls. Any resident may nominate a
student staff member they fed has done
an outstanding job this year. Nomination
forms are available in each residence hall
office and the deadline to submit nomina-
tions is April 10 Completed nominations
can be turned into each residence hall
office, and selection will be made by a
committee of professional and student
staff







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6, 1989 7
Announcements
EERFORMANCF AND OPFN
HOUSE
Students, faculty and staff are invited to
attend the final performance of a five-day
"Characterization Workshop" to be pre-
sented April 3-7 by acclaimed opera direc-
tor Talmage Fauntleroy. The performace
of opera scenes will begin at 4 pm, April 7,
in Fletcher Recital Hall followed at 5 by an
Open House for Mr. Fauntleroy in foom
105 of the School of Music. A resident of
Florence, Italy, he is Artistic director of
Studio Lirico and director of Opera Stud-
ies at the Conservatory "PietroMascagni"
in Livorno He is a 1975 graduate of the
ECU School of Music. His visit is spon-
sored by the Offices of the Chancellor,
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs,
and Equal Opportunities Programs as
part of the Minority Presence Initiative,
v.hich brings minority scholars to cam-
pus
1989 BUCCANEERS
The staff of the 18 Buccaneer is looking
for your photographs to go in the book. If
vou have taken pictures of your friends,
TjII Break, Spring Break, Campus Activi-
ties or anything dealing with East Caro-
lina University, send them into the Bucca-
neer Office to be used in the 1 MB Bucca-
neer We need negatives, along with a
photo and if vour photo is chosen we will
give you the phot credit in the book. Deal-
ine for submission is April 10. so send
them in soon. We are located on the sec-
ond floor of the publications building in
?rant of Joyner Library Bring photo-
graphs in and slide under door if no one is
here Remember: it's not your yearbook
until you've in it.
STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your studv
skills for greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your grade
point average. All sessions will be held in
313 Wright Building April 10, test taking 3
� 4:30 p.m.
DISC GOLF
Curious7? Come by the registration meet-
ing for disc golf. April 11 at 5 p.m. in Bio N
102. You'll be glad you did. It's fun and
tew! from Intramural�RecreationalS-
ervices.
GOLF
Linksters should attend the golfintra-
mural registration meeting April 11 at 5:30
p m in Bio 103. Men's and women's
loamsindividuals are encouraged to at-
tend.
ESLCHl
The East Carolina Chapter of PSI CHI
1 lonor Society will hold a meeting Apr.i 6
at 5 p.m. in Rawl 302. All members are
urged to attend. National Certificates will
be distributed at this meeting. Notify offi-
cials if you will not be able to attend (A
note in PSI CHI mailbox will be fine.)
ANIMAL RIGHTS
Dr. William 11. Prvor. chairman of the De-
partment of Comparative Medicine, will
speak to ECU SETA on the use of animals
in research on Aprill 11 at 5 p.m. in GCB
1012. The public is welcome Afterwards,
ECU SETA will have a business meeting.
;rusape
Looking for fun, fellowship, and hearing
Cod's word? Come and check it out at
"PrimeTime' every Thurs at 7:30pm in
Rawl rm. 130 We are looking forward in
meeting vou there. Refreshments served.
Sing, eat s'more and share good fellow-
ship around a campfire, April 6 from 8 -
930 in the Amphitheater behind Fletcher
Dorm. Bring instruments, blankets, flash-
light. Sponsored by Wesfel (Methodist
and Presbyterian Campus Ministries),
758-2030 or 752-7240. In the event of rain,
we will meet at the Methodist Student
Center, 501 E. 5th ST.
prARFASIIMMERTOB
Summer position available in the Wash-
ington, DC, office of a North Carolina
Congressman. Typing skills necessary
and shorthand desirable. Local interview
available For further details contact: Ruth
Peterscn, Co-op, 2028 GCB, (757-6979) as
soon as possible.
CATliQLJCTJDENT�EN
IER
Mass this Sunday will be outside at the
center at 11:30 a.m. We are located just off
campus, 953 E. 10th St. next to the TKE
house If we have inclement weather Sat.
evening or Sun � Mass will be in Bio
BLDG 103 at 11:30 a.m. Any questions
concerning Mass or programs � please
call Teresa 830-3835 or 757-37b0.
STFC! at OLYMPICS
Special Olympics volunteer meeting
cancelled thanks to a terrific job done by
our recruiting committee, all of the Special
Olympics volunteer positions have been
filled. Therefore the volunteer orientation
meeting scheduled for April 11 at 5 p.m. in
old Joyner 221 has been cancelled. We en-
courage everyone to come out and cheer
the Special Olympians on. Date: April 14,
9:30 � 2 p.m at FB Aycock Jr. High
School track.
CAREERS SEMINAR
All students are encouraged to hear Phil
Hanson, Personnel Staffing Specialist,
with the U.S. Office of Personnel Manage-
ment discuss careers with the federal
government and the federal employment
process, including co-op, summer )obs,
volunteer opportunities, and permanent
careers The session will be held on April
11 from 2 to 4 p.m. in Rm. 2019 GCB.
KAPPA ALPHA
presents an
ALL CAMPUS CLASSIC
featuring
THE USUALS
and
TREBLE MANIAX
TODAY
FOUR O'CLOCK UN1TL
ADMISSION $4.00
(The Bands will jam at OgtodcngrsifAPtoOTj j
THE LEO JENKINS MEMORIAL
our
gains
CANC
JOIN THE FIGHT
APRIL 14-15
Starting Time: 6 p.m.
Registration begins at 4:30 pm at East Carolina
University track
Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk,
run or jog against cancer.
Team members run in half hour shifts for 24 hours.
For more information call 752-2574
FUN FOOD AND EXERCISE
GUARANTEED FOR ALL!
A
HOSTED BY:
Alpha Phi Omega
Amercian Cancer Society
WRQR-FM
AMERICAN
CANCER,
SPONSORED BY:
Easern Carolina Coca-Cola
Domino's Pizza
Greenville Athletic Club
University Book Exchange
AFTERNOON
DELIGHT
AT GROGs
Reggae and Progressive Music
Beverage Specials
Doors OPEN at 5:30
Every Friday
FREE ADMISSION
Underage Welcome
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
FREE
GAME
r
i
i
i
i
L
BOWL ONE GAME & RECEIVE
ANOTHER GAME FREE
WITH THIS COUPON.
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person.
STUDY BREAK
CAMPFIRE!
Tonight, Thursday,
April 6
8 p.m. - 9:30
Amphitheatre
:hind Flctck

(behind Fleeter lfcfmi� -Ringing fWnr mnre
rain place: Methodist Student Center
Sponsored by:
wes2fel Is sponsored by Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministeries! President: BUI Stanley. 830-9527; Rev.
Michelle "Mike" Burcher, 752-7240; Rev. Dan Earnhardt.
758-2030. Communion and fellowship supper; Wednesdays
5 p.m. Methodist Student Ctr.
Applications for Student Union Productions
Committee Members
are now being accepted:
Job Description:
�Serve on Productions Committee
�Plan and promote the Annual Student Union Banquet,
Casino Night, Cookouts, Parties, etc.
�Select and Plan Decorations and Ideas tor Events such as Barefoot
on the Mall, and the above list of events-
It you, or anyone you know might be Interested In the Productions Committee, and you have
time to get Involved we need you!
For more information call
757-6611
or go by
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 236
Come-Be a part of STUDENT UNION!
FREE�ONCERTI
An "Evening of Jazz
ivith
SPIRAL
Thursday, April 6
on the mall
6:00 p.m.
Bring a Blanket-Bring Your Friends
Just Go!
It's free
Sponsored Cy tfu Special Copncerts CornmittU





THE EAST C'AROI INI AN
Features
r
APRIL 6, l989PA(.rH
Madonna reviewed
By CHIP CARTER
Madonna now has four al-
bums to her credit, numerous 12-
inch remix singles, an Lp of re-
mixed singles, three movies and
more videos in heavy rotation than
she can shake her navel at. Her
newest album, "Like a Prayer
follows the trend she established
with her previous release, "True
Plue Combining personal state-
ments, political realities and pop
fluff into a fifty-minute compact
disc, she has come up with an al-
bum that rivals her first one in in-
tensity and danceability.
Her self-titled debut back in
1983 (has it been that long?) was
nothing more than a resurgence of
synthesized disco butdisco with
a freshness and power that
stunned the music industry and
the public. Disco died, but Ma-
donna lifted it Lazarus-like fiom
the grave and rechristened it
"dance pop
She followed that success with
the highly commercial but criti-
callv disappointing album, "Like
a Virgin Its prefabricated songs
and emptv lyrics could have killed
her career, if it hadn't been for her
strong public persona and vari-
ous other projects she dabbled in.
The next release, "True Blue
was shipped out after her media-
scrutinized wedding to Sean Penn
and after considerable delays. She
did record three times during the
hiatus, all three tracks for motion
pictures. For "Yisionquest she
wrote the ballad "Crazy for You"
and "Into the Groove" came from
her movie debut, "Desperately
Seeking Susan
"Groove" was arguably the
best dance song she'd done to date.
She followed this with "Live to
Tell a haunting ballad crafted
tor her husband's film, "At Close
Range This song appeared on
'True Blue" as well.
These in-between projects
suggested that Madonna shone
brightest when not trying to fulfill
a 10-song-per-album quota. In-
deed, her first release was com-
posed almost entirely of singles
she had previously released.
"Like a Pravcr" suffers from
the same sort of punch-the-clock
mentality, but also breaks free in
several places to reestablish Ma-
donna as a pop artist in league
with Prince and John Cougar
Melleneamp. The title song is not
very controversial in itself, but the
accompanying video has caused a
huge stir.
Madonna plays an innocent
bystander who sees a girl brutally
attacked by a gang. A black man
who tries to help the girl is ar-
rested and before going to the
police, Madonna finds refuge in a
church where she dreams about
having the stigmata and kissing
the feet of a statue of a black saint
above the altar. The saint looks
suspiciously like the wrongly-ac-
cused bL. k man, and when he
comes to life, it becomes apparent
they are the same.
Catholics and other fanatical
groups have tried to ban the video
without trying to understand the
implications oi the video � that
not getting involved is more dan-
gerous than breaking a few ta-
boos.
Ironically enough, the song
breaks no new ground for Ma-
donna, taboo or otherwise. It's the
same old groove, but pleasant
enough, especially the back-up
singers and the choir during the
chorus. The intersplicingof church
music with the body of the song is
no new trick in the world oi pop �
ACDC and many other heavy
metal bands have done it foryears.
The strongest tracks on "Like
a Prayer" are the ones where Ma-
donna explicates her personal life
into universal experiences. Til
Death Do Us Part" is obviously
about her break up with Penn. It
Coming
This
Week
Thursday
Attic:
WZMB Battle of the Bands
Susie's:
NRG
Mendenhall:
Tucker
(through Sunday)
Friday
Attic:
Chairman of the Board
New Deli:
Bad Bob and the
Rocking Horses
Susie's:
Tipper Gor
Saturday
Attic:
TX Boogie
New Deli:
Jello
Tuesday:
Susie's:
Day For Night
Wednesday;
Attic:
Comedy Zone
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
Susie's:
The Beam
contains startlinglv frank situ-
ations and language. Nothing
dirtv, but whenever the word
"bruise" is used in connection with
Penn, it's usually not a joke.
"Oh Father" and "Promise to
Try" deal with Madonna's rela-
tionships with her parents. "Fa-
ther" is almost too sugary with its
violins and happy memories, but
the song succeedsanyway. "Prom-
ise" is much stronger. Madonna is
not Bruce Springsteen, who is ba-
sically the short stoi y writer of the
pop scene. I lis songs overflow
with fully realized charactersand
situations.
Neither is Madonna a poet
like Stevie Nicks. Madonna's
strength lies in her non-fictional
accounts of her own life. "Prom-
ise" relays the image oi Madonna
as a child, trying to say good-bye
to her dying mother. It is a power-
ful image and one that never dete-
riorates into sentimentality.
"Cherish" isthrowaway pop.
For some reason. Madonna felt
the need to tip tl e hat to the old
Association song, Cherish
which was a silly tune io begin
with.
Perhaps the best surprise on
the album is theduet between Ma-
donna and Prince, "Love Song
The collaboration iii mega stars is
a tricky thing. Some turn into ego
exercises, as with Michael Jackson
and Paul McCartney; others be-
come true masterpieces, ,)s
Prince's duet with Sheena Hasten
See MADONNA, page 9
Theater sponsors Day of Dance
ECU News Bureau
On Sunday, April 9, the Thea-
ter Arts Department of East Caro-
lina University will sponsor the
rwelfth Annual Day of Dance in
the studios of thev lessick Theater
Arts Center on the ECU campus in
(Ireenville. The Day of Dance is a
seriesof workshops for dancers at
all levels of training and will in-
clude master classes in ballet, jazz,
modern and tap. Guest artist Erika
Violinist
Goodman will be featured this
year in ballet.
Principal dancer with the
Jeffrey Ballet Company from 1966
to 1Q76, Firika Goodman worked
closely with Joffrey, Gerald
Arpino, I eonide Massine, Kurt
fooss and Twyla Tharp. She had
more than a dozen leading roles
created for her by Arpino and
originated the forty-minute solo
as the "Girl in White" in Tharp's
�! ipe.
For Massine, Goodman was
selected to recreate "The Ballei
inPetrou hka; for Jooss, she recre-
ated ' ' ' I �irl"
n Green Table. In additi i
dancing professionally with
foffrey, Goodman started her
company career with the
� City Ballet and w� nl
perform as a Guest Artist with the
Boston Pallet and the Penns)
nia Ballet.
Until recentl) i ry mem-
K r of the Joffn y Ball I �
m has � . t foi the
New Jersey Ballet Compam
their school; spent two years at
Sec DANCE, page 9
closes
series
III News Bureau
Violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg will perform in Wright
Auditorium April 10 at 8p.m.
Violinist Nadja Salerno Son-
nenberg will close the 1988 89 East
Carolina University Performing
Arts Scries April 20 with a solo
concert in Wright Auditorium
beginning at 8 p.m.
i ailed by audiences and crit-
ics throughout the ITS. and Eu-
rope as a brilliant, fiery young
musician. Ms. Salerno-Sonnen-
berg is noted for her strong, rich
tone and original interpretations
of classical, romantic and contem-
porary music.
She has appeared with nu-
merous leading symphony orches-
tras: the New York Philharmonic,
the Philadelphia Orchestra, the
Pittsburgh Symphony, the Chi-
cago Symphony, the Cincinnati
Symphony, theCleveland Orches-
tra, the I .ondon Philharmonic and
others. She has also been featured
at Ravinia, Tanglewood, Aspen
and other major music festivals
and in solo recitals in New York,
Washington, Vienna, Munich,
Geneva, Rotterdam, and Lisbon.
See SONNENBERG, page 9
ECU'S 12th annual Day of Dance will feature guest artist Erika
Goodman. Registration fee for the workshops is $20.
32389
1) Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper
� "Root Hog or Die"
2) Raunch Hands � "Payday"
3) The Dickies � "Second
Coming"
Robyn Hitchcock � "Queen
Elvis"
4) Thelonius Monster �
"Stormy Weather"
5) drivin' 'n' cryin' �
"Mystery Road"
6) The Connels � "Fun and
Games"
7) XTC � "Oranges and
Lemons"
Four Who Dared � "Kids
With Dynamite"
8) Run Westy Run � "Run
Westy Run"
Green on Red � "Here
Comes the Snakes"
9) The Cowpokes � "Zamfir
Ain't No Guru"
10) Swamp Zombies �
"Fink"
11) Goo Goo Dolls � "Jed"
12) Lyres 1983 � "Lef s Have
a Party"
13) The Crowd � "Big Fish
Stories"
Pickiri the Bones
Bonehead confesses secret
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff 1 unuo.lt
"It's like a dream
No end and no
beginning
Who will admit to liking the
new Madonna single?
Much like last year'sGeorge
Michael tune, "One More Try
a surprising amount oi people
with taste secretly like the song.
But their ethics, good sense and
fear of humiliation keep the
from admitting it.
So, when the radio begins
playing it, as those first few bars
of organ music stream out from
the speakers, you panic. You
hope that whoever driving
doesn't think to change the chan-
nel, even though you automati-
cally responded to the song by
saying, "God. Not more Ma-
donna
Meanwhile, they may casu-
ally change the station in a half-
hearted attempt to find some-
thing more worthy to listen to.
After pushing all the preset
buttons, they say, "Ahhh, noth-
ing else is on. 1 hate radio all
the while ignoring the Led Zep-
pelin tape poised in the cassette
player.
The song segues into the
catchy chorus Neither of you
feel like talking, but you have to
say something or you might
actually start humming. You
catch your feet tapping the floor-
board.
The traitors are keeping per-
fect time with the song. They
don't care if your friends find
out you have a closet fixation for
the Navel Queen. You fire doz-
ens of neurons to your feet with
the message, "Stop. Stop it right
now. Stop or I'll jog barefoot
across a gravel parking lot
They don't listen. You tap
your knuckles against the door,
trying ha id to boa tout a counter
rhythm, but the song keeps over-
powering your fingers. They
submit.
You look at your friend. He
is gritting his teeth. He looks
over and says, 'This song really
gets on my nerves You nod
agreement, and watch his fin-
gers click in time against the
stwringjvheeL
You nod. Then you say,
"Well, at least it's not Michael
fackson The driver laughs and
then falls silent again. Your feet
are flying wildly across the floor
mat. Absurdly, you wonder if
your body has been possessed
bv the spirit of a Solid Gold
Dancer.
The song nears its end. You
venture, "That black chick in the
choir needs her own recording
contract
The driver responds with,
"Yeah, she's got some pipes. She
sounds better than Madonna
You say, "That's for sure The
song ends. The rebellious parts
of your body slowly come to a
halt.
As the car pulls up into the
parking lot of your favorite rec-
ord store, you say, "Have you
seen that video yet? It's pretty
wild
The driver says, "Yeah. At
first I thought she'd sold out, but
that video was pretty intense
Both of you enter the record
store.
Her album is prominently
displayed everywhere but u
resist the temptation to pick it
up and look at it. and neil
you says anything about her
recent divorce from Scan Penn,
Later that night, you try to
study, but the words to the song
keep running through your
head. You wonder it ou should
come clean about this, stand up
and shout out to the world, "Hey!
Madonna's all right. At least she
doesn't do concerts in malls, and
cover Beatles songs
Your foot taps in agreement
"Won't anyone else come tor-
ward and declare their love oi a
woman who didn't shave for her
nude pictorial? Is there no one to
defend this Priestess oi the Bel-
lybnttoC"
Well, faithful ones, rejoice.
The Bonehead loves her. and isn't
ashamed of it. So what if this
means I'll be barred from the
WZMB studios forever?
I love you, Madonna. Don't
ever change 'Til next time, may
the hangovers be gentle, but the
�"zzps intense.
1





A
i
4 .

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features

APRIL 6,1989 PAGE 8
Madonna reviewed
By CHIP CARTER
Nttum editor
Madonna now has four al-
bums to her credit, numerous 12-
inch remix singles, an Lp of re-
mixed singles, three movies and
more videos in heavy rotation than
she can shake her navel at. Her
newest album, "Like a Prayer
follows the trend she established
with her previous release, 'True
Blue Combing personal state-
ments, pouucai ealities and pop
fluff into a fifty-minute compact
disc, she has come up with an al-
bum that rivals her first one in in-
tensity and danceability.
Her self-titled debut back in
1983 (has it been that long?) was
nothing more than a resurgence of
synthesized disco but disco with
a freshness and power that
stunned the music industry and
the public. Disco died, but Ma-
donna lifted it Lazarus-like from
the grave and rechristened it
"dance pop
She followed that success with
the highly commercial but criti-
cally disappointing album "Like
a Virgin Its prefabricated songs
and empty lyrics could have killed
her career, if it hadn' t been for her
strong public persona and vari-
ous other projects she dabbled in.
The next release, 'True Blue
was shipped out after her media-
scrutinized wedding to Sean Penn
and after considerable delays. She
did record three times during the
hiatus, all three tracks for motion
pictures. For "Visionquest she
wrote the ballad "Crazy for You"
and "Into the Groove" came from
her movie debut, "Desperately
Seeking Susan
"Groove" was arguably the
best dance song she'd done to da te.
She followed this with "Live to
Tell a haunting ballad crafted
for her husband's film, "At Close
Range This song appeared on
"True31ue" as well.
Ihese mj-bctween projects
suggested that, Madonna shone
brightest when not trying to fulfill
a 10-song-per-album quota. In-
deed, her first release was com-
posed almost entirely of singles
she had previously released.
"Like a Prayer" suffers from
the same sort of punch-the-clock
mentality, but also breaks free in
several places to reestablish Ma-
donna as a pop artist in league
with Prince and John Cougar
Mellencamp. The title song is not
very controversial in itself, but the
accompanying video has caused a
huge stir.
Madonna plays an innocent
bystander who sees a girl brutally
attacked by a gang. A black man
who tries to help the girl is ar-
rested and before going to the
police, Madonna finds refuge in a
church where she dreams about
having the stigmata and kissing
the feet of a statue of a black saint
above the altar. The saint looks
suspiciously like the wrongly-ac-
cused black man, and when he
comes to life, it becomes apparent
they are the same.
Catholics and other fanatical
groups have tried to ban the video
without trying to understand the
implications of the video � that
not getL ig involved is more dan-
gerous than breaking a few ta-
boos.
Ironically enough, the song
breaks no new ground for Ma-
donna, taboo or otherwise. It's the
same old groove, but pleasant
enough, especially the back-up
singers and the choir during the
chorus. The in tcrsplicing of church
music with the body of the song is
no new trick in the world of pop�
ACDC and many other heavy
melalbandshavedoneitforyears.
The strongest tracks on "Like
a Prayer" are the ones where Ma-
donna explicates her personal life
into universal experiences. "Til
Death Do Us Part" is obviously
about her break up with Penn. It
contains startlingly frank situ-
ations and language. Nothing
dirty, but whenever the word
"bruise" is used in connection wi th
Penn, it's usually not a joke.
"Oh Father" and "Promise to
Try" deal with Madonna's rela-
tionships with her parents. "Fa-
ther" is almost too sugary with its
violins and happy memories, but
the song succeeds any way. "Prom-
ise" is much stronger. Madonna is
not Bruce Springsteen, who is ba-
sically the short story writer of the
pop scene. His songs overflow
with fully realized characters and
situations.
Neither is Madonna a poet
like Stevie Nicks. Madonna's
strength lies in her non-fictional
accounts of her own life. "Prom-
ise" relays the image of Madonna
as a child, trying to say good-bye
to her dying mother. It is a power-
ful image and one that never dete-
riorates into sentimentality.
"Cherish" is throwaway pop.
For some reason, Madonna felt
the need to tip the hat to the old
Association song, "Cherish
which was a silly tune to begin
with.
Perhaps the best surprise on
the album is the duet between Ma-
donna and Prince, "Love Song
The collaboration of mega-stars is
a tricky thing. Some turn into ego
exercises, as with Michael Jackson
and Paul McCartney; others be-
come true masterpieces, as
Prince's duet withSheena Easton
See MADONNA, page 9
Theater sponsors Day of Dance
ECU News Bureau
Coming
This
Week
Thursday
Attic
WZMB Battle of the Bands
Susie's:
NRG
Mendenhall:
Tucker
(through Sunday)
Friday
Attic:
Chairman of the Board
New Deli:
Bad Bob and the
Rocking Horses
Susie's:
Tipper Gor
Saturday
Attic:
TX Boogie
New Deli:
Jello
Tuesday:
Susie's:
Day For Night
Wfdnesday;
Attic:
Comedy Zone
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
Susie's:
The Beam
On Sunday, April 9, the Thea-
ter Arts Department of East Caro-
lina University will sponsor the
Twelfth Annual Day of Dance in
the studios of the Messick Theater
Arts Center on the ECU campus in
Greenville. The Day of Dance is a
scries of workshops for dancers at
all levels of training and will in-
clude master classes in ballet, jazz,
modern and tap. Guest artist Erika
Violinist
Goodman will be featured this
year in ballet.
Principal dancer with the
Joffrey Ballet Company from 1966
to 1976, Erika Goodman worked
closely with Joffrey, Gerald
Arpino, Leonide Massine, Kurt
Jooss and Twyla Tharp. She had
more than a dozen leading roles
created for her by Arpino and
originated the forty-minute solo
as the "Girl in White" in Tharp's
Deuce Coupe.
For Massine, Goodman was
selected to recreate "The Ballerina"
in Petrouchka; for Jooss, she recre-
ated the role of "The Young Girl"
in Green Table. In addition to
dancing professionally with
Joffrey, Goodman started her
company career with the New �
York City Ballet and went on to
perform as a Guest Artist with the
Boston Ballet and the Pennsylva-
nia Ballet.
Until recently a faculty mem-
ber of the Joffrey Ballet School,
Goodman has also taught for the
New Jersey Ballet Company and
their school; spent two years at
See DANCE, page 9
closes
series
ECU News Bureau
� " 1 .�)��' �!
Violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg will perform in Wright
Auditorium April 10 at 8p.m.
Violinist Nadja Salemo-Son-
nenberg will close the 1988-89 East
Carolina University Performing
Arts Series April 20 with a solo
concert in VVright Auditorium
beginning at 8 p.m.
Hailed by audiences and crit-
ics throughout the U.S. and Eu-
rope as a brilliant, fiery young
musician, Ms. Salerno-Sonnen-
berg is noted for her strong, rich
tone and original interpretations
of classical, romantic and contem-
porary music.
She has appeared with nu-
merous leading symphony orches-
tras: the New York Philharmonic,
the Philadelphia Orchestra, the
Pittsburgh Symphony, the Chi-
cago Symphony, the Cincinnati
Symphony, the Cleveland Orches-
tra, the London Philharmonic and
others. She has also been featured
at Ravinia, Tanglewood, Aspen
and other major music festivals
and in solo recitals in New York,
Washington, Vienna, Munich,
Geneva, Rotterdam, and Lisbon.
See SONNENBERG, page 9
ECU's 12th annual Day of Dance will feature guest artist Erika
Goodman. Registration fee for the workshops is $20.
32389
1) Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper
� "Root Hog or Die"
2) Raunch Hands � "Payday"
3) The Dickies � "Second
Coming"
Robyn Hitchcock � "Queen
Elvis"
4) Thelonius Monster �
"Stormy Weather"
5) drivin' V cryin' �
"Mystery Road"
6) The Connels � "Fun and
Games"
7) XTC � "Oranges and
Lemons"
Four Who Dared � "Kids
With Dynamite"
8) Run Westy Run � "Run
Westy Run"
Green on Red � "Here
Comes the Snakes"
9) The Cowpokes � "Zamf ir
Ain't No Guru"
10) Swamp Zombies �
"Fink"
11) Goo Goo Dolls � "Jed"
12) Lyres 1983 � "Let's Have
a Party"
13) The Crowd � "Big Fish
Stories"
Pirkin the Bones
Bonehead confesses secret
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Turncoat
"If s like a dream
No end and
beginning
no
Who will admit to liking the
new Madonna single?
Much like last year'sGeorge
Michael tune, "One More Try
a surprising amount of people
with taste secretly like the song.
But their ethics, good sense and
fear of humiliation keep them
from admitting it.
So, when the radio begins
playing it, as those first few bars
of organ music stream out from
the speakers, you panic. You
hope that whoever's driving
doesn't think tochange thechan-
nel, even though you automati-
cally responded to the song by
saying, "God. Not more Ma-
donna
Meanwhile, they may casu-
ally change the station in a half-
hearted attempt to find some-
thing more worthy to listen to.
After pushing all the pre-set
buttons, they say, "Ahhh, noth-
ing else is on. I hate radio all
the while ignoring the Led Zep-
pelin tape poised in the cassette
player.
The song segues into the
catchy chorus. Neither of you
feel like talking, but you have to
say something or you might
actually start humming. You
catch your feet tapping the floor-
board.
The traitors are keeping per-
fect time with the song. They
don't care if your friends find
out you have a closet fixation for
the Navel Queen. You fire doz-
ens of neurons to your feet with
the message, "Stop. Stop it right
now. Stop or I'll jog barefoot
across a gravel parking lot
They don't listen. You tap
your knuckles against the door,
trying hard to beat out a counter-
rhythm, but the song keeps over-
powering your fingers. They
submit.
You look at your friend. He
is gritting his teeth. He looks
over and says, "This song really
gets on my nerves You nod
agreement, and watch his fin-
gers click in time against the
steering wheel.
You nod. Then you say,
"Well, at least it's not Michael
Jackson The driver laughs and
then falls silent again. Your feet
are flying wildly across the floor
mat. Absurdly, you wonder if
your body has been possessed
by the spirit of a Solid Gold
Dancer.
The song nears its end. You
venture, "That black chick in the
choir needs her own recording
contract
The driver responds with,
"Yeah, she's got some pipes. She
sounds better than Madonna
You say, "Thaf s for sure The
song ends. The rebellious parts
of your body slowly come to a
halt.
As the car pulls up into the
parking lot of your favorite rec-
ord store, you say, "Have you
seen that video yet? It's pretty
wild
The driver says, "Yeah. At
first I thought she'd sold out, but
that video was pretty intense
Both of you enter the record
store.
Her album is prominently
displayed everywhere, but you
resist the temptation to pick it I
up and look at it, and neither of
you says anything about her
recent divorce from Scan Penn.
Later that night, you try to ;
study, but the words to the song !
keep running through your
head. You wonder if you should j
come clean about this, stand up j
and shout out to the world, "Hey!
Madonna's all right. At least she i
doesn't do concerts in malls, and I
cover Beatles songs
Your foot taps in agreement. ,
"Won't anyone else come for-1
ward and declare their love of a
woman who didn't shave for her
nude pictorial? Is there no one to
defend this Priestess of the Bel-
lybutton?"
Well, faithful ones, rejoice.
The Bonehead loves her, and isn't
ashamed of it. So what if this
means I'll be barred from the
WZMB studios forever?
I love you, Madonna. Don't
ever change. Til next time, may
the hangovers be gentle, but the
buzzes intense.







THE PAST CAROLINIAN
AHBLkian
Madonna
Continued from page 8
proved. The combinations rarely
tall into the mediocre range.
"Love Song" is no exception.
The Prince-penned runeshowsoff
both singers and their sensuality
well Madonna and Prince rose to
stardom on their music and their
highly sexual images. Perhaps a
t�etter choice of material would
have been Prince's "Erotic City a
truly nasty song that he and Sheila
E. put on the flip side of "Let's Go
Crazy' off the "Purple Rain"
soundtrack. But in this kinder, gen-
tler era of safe sex, "Love Song" is
suggestive enough to get the blood
flowing, and safe enough to play
on the radio.
The hottest dance songs are
the upbeat "Express Yourself a
vaguely feminist anthem about
truth in relationships, and the title
track. While "Til Death Do Us
Part" is fast enough for the dance
floor, its almost confusing chorus
may not make it the club hit "Like
a Prayer" has become.
"Death" is interesting for
other reasons. Madonna has obvi-
ously been listening to some ex-
perimental pop artists, and their
influence helps this record. Cana-
dian techno-pop queen Jane Si-
berry is garnering a cult following
in the States, and from the spoken
word chorus on "Death a tech-
nique Siberry uses often, It seems
Madonna has joined this legion of
admirers. Hints of Kate Bush and
Laurie Anderson show upas well,
especially in the ballad "Spanish
Eyes
Madonna has had to grow up
in the public eye. From her nude
photo scandals to her record-
breaking album sales to her vigor-
ous support of AIDS research and
other charitable causes, Madonna
Ciccone has proved beyond a
shadow of a doubt that she has the
power to stay in the vicious pop
circle. She continues to hint at an
artistic integrity that keeps rear-
ing its head despite her produc-
ers' apparent attempts to squash
it.
True, multi-million dollar
Pepsi commercial deals tend to
negate said integrity. But you have
to keep in mind two things: She
didn't back down from the con-
troversy her video caused her
corporate sponsors, and she was a
singer first.Thisalbum proves that
she remembers that.
Sonnenberg
Continued from page 8
As a concert performer,
Salemo-Sonnenberg plays with
intensity and fierce concentration,
and with some remarkable man-
nerisms. Sheoften swaysand rocks
as she plays, grimacing, rolling
her eyes and even stamping her
feet in rhythmic passages. Her
vigorous, athletic style of playing
has won her the title of "tomboy
and a critic once observed that she
hoists her violin upon her shoul-
der as though it were a baseball
bat.
"I cannot think of another
musician whose playing has
stirred me so profoundly said
Tim Page of Newsday, one of her
most enthusiastic admirer. Kate
Ri vers of the Washington Post has
dubbed her "a world class talent
Public tickets for the Salerno-
Sonnenberg concert are $14 each,
S7 for youth. Tickets are now on
sale at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, tele-
phone (919) 757-6611, ext. 266.
Telephone ticket orders may be
charged to major credit cards.
Her numerous appearances
with Johnny Carson on the NBC-
TV "Tonight Show profile on
CBS-TV's "60 Minutes" and inter-
views in various popular maga-
zines have made her one of the
most familiar personalities in the
world of classical music.
Ms. Salerno-Sonnenberg's
ECU concert is part of a 1988-89
tour which is taking her to all
corners of the continental U.S
with orchestral performances and
solo recitals in San Francisco,
Seattle, Houston, Minneapolis,
Philadelphia and New York.
Born 28 years ago in Rome to
a musical family, young Nadja
began musical studies at the age
of four. A few year later, the fam-
ily emigrated to theUS. so the
promising child violinist could
study at the Curtis Institute in
Philadelphia. Later, she began
studies with Dorothy DeLay at
the Juilliard School in New York.
While still a student, her concert
career was launched after she won
first prize in the prestigious Wal-
ter W. Naumburg International
Violin Competition.
Freedom
Individual thoug
Like a circlein a rectangle, each of us
to be unique. Individual thought.
of expression.
Express yburself in The East Carolinian.
Positions are now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't
beat.
Team e:
as
Ly today
fjZiyiS & Cy� diamond �kox&
ST a Otat Saijsou
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ARLINGTON VILLAGE
BEHIND C. HEBER FORBES AND THE HUB LIMITED
355-5090
Dance
A graduate of the ECU School of Music, Talmage Fauntleroy will
present a workshop culminating in a performance Friday after-
noon.
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask -js about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts for April rentals)
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�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
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Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
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Continued from page 8
City College of New York as an
Artist-in-Residence; served on the
faculty of the Actors and Direc-
tors Lab; and was a guest teacher
in 198 at the Rcdbank Perform-
ing Arts High School. Abroad,
Goodman taught at the Balet-
takademicn in Stockholm, Swe-
den.
In addition to the master
classes in ballet to be taught by
Goodman, classes will also be
taught in tap, modern, jazz and
ballet by the ECU Dance Faculty:
Alan Arnett, Patricia Pertalion,
Mavis Ray and Patricia Weeks,
and by Jane Atkinson of the Atlan-
tic Dance Theater.
All classes for the Day of
Dance will be filled on a first-come,
first-serve basis; therefore, pre-
registration is encouraged. Regis-
tration fee is $20 and registration
on April 9 will begin at 9:30 am in
the Messick Theater Arts Center,
Room 108.
Additional details and pre-
registration forms for the work-
shop are available from the De-
partment of Theater Arts.
April 12th 3:00 Dm
New Classroom Building
Room 1006
Presentation by
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300 Farmer Street
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757-0373
Greenville, NC





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6.1989
The Clearly Happy
)t �aiffODllflflaflaaa' Saftflir� IP�
Quote o the week:
44 You can make some-
body love you
� Oprah Winfrey
Happy, happy Satire Page
For all our alumni pals
E advises columnist
BigE:
I can't stand it. Everything is
just too perfect. There aren't any
problems on campus at all. I'm
even glad that Dan Quayle is the
Vice President. Help!
Signed, Famous Editorial Col-
umnist
� Becoming the topic of dis-
cussion in a Journalism Ethics
class.
Alumni
Dear Deranged Computer
Glare,
Couldn't agree with you more,
you black-Chuck-Taylor-wearing
baud, you. Nothing is wrong at
ECU or in America. When the boss
(who's a frat boy, but we don't
hold it against him) slapped a big
bonus on E's desk the other day, E
thought "something has to go
A typical happy day in Greenville, where everyone is just as happy as can be and no one believes the lies wrong� I'm making almost $1
printed in the'student paper, which occasionally might maybe make it seem as if there were some an hour now All's Well That's
problems or something. But there really aren't any, honest, because if there were the alumni might not
contribute as much money. (Photo by Thomas Walters)
Life full of good stuff
GREENVILLE, NC (BP) �
Today, like every day here in the
Emerald City, was full of peace,
harmony and goodwill towards
men.
Blacks, whites, males and
cast for the Greenville city limits
that again predicts another year of
sunny daysand 70� temperatures,
with light rainfalls every other
Monday night.
"Of course, there will be a day
in late November where the tern-
females, one-armed Armenian
plumbers and three-toed Spanish perature drops to a chilly 65�, so
businessmen all enjoyed another " we're advising everyone to plan
day of bliss and tranquilitv in this ahead and bundle up that night
non-violent, non-controversial
college town.
No racial slurs occurred, no
offensive cartoons appeared in any
publications, the only crime re-
ported was a jaywalking on Evans
Street, and there was a sale at
Rose'
ECU chancellor Back Achin
commented, saying, "Well, it's just
another perfect day. 1 feel privi-
leged to be in charge of such a
beautiful campus with such well-
behave students
Mayor Phineus Glutenus also
spoke. "I picked up some attrac-
tive floor lamps at Rose's for only
$19.95. Of all the wonderful, stress-
free days we've enjoyed in the last
few years, this one stands out in
my mind as a personal favorite
The National Weather Serv-
ice has released a long-range fore-
Peace
Report
Due to the overwhelming flow
of good tidings around the cam-
pus this week, the crime column
had to be dropped and replaced
by our new informative feature,
The Peace Column. In this rather
attractive addition toourcozy little
newspaper, any good news that
occurred during the week will be
reported. And if s all because we,
at'the East Carolinian, love you
readers! We really do! Each and
every one of you is special in your
own way.
April 5
3:15 Dorm resident reported that
persons unknown broke into his
'81 Datsun and installed a Pioneer
AMFM cassette player and two
Bose 75-watt speakers.
6:30 Mother reported stranger
giving candy to her baby.
7:15 Marines from Camp
Lejeune discovered fixing a street
light on corner of 5th and Cotan-
che.
8:30 Jones women reported that
two strange males came from
behind Joyner Library and es-
corted them safely across campus.
9:05 Mysterious benefactor paid
all library fines for each student,
totalling $645.00
year. The polls don't really mean
anything
Rested attributed the low
ranking to the fact that this would
have been the 18th season in a row
that ECU would have been ranked
number one. Unidentified AP
sources confirmed that this was
the real reason behind the star-
tlingly low rankings.
Local resident Olda Librarian
is pleased with her decision to
retireinGreenville. Librarian, who
lives in Tar River apartments, said
"I worked in Joyner Library for 50
years and it's quieter here than it
ever was in the library. The young
peopleare so thoughtful, and they
never play that awful devil-wor-
ship music
ECU senior Lisa Brownnoser
echoes her neighbor's sentiments.
While sweeping Librarian's front
porch, she adds, "It's a wonderful
town, where you can meet so many
different people, and learn so
much from them. Especially the
elderly
The two smile at each other as
meteorologist Milt Precipitation
said
Unemplovment is again at a
national low of .000037c for 1988.
"In fact, the only person out of
' - ' � A is nw mother-in-
law, Glutenus joked. "But she
k�eps busy enough
Hurtin said that the univer-
sity is again doing "financially
splendid. Of course, a few extra
dollars from the alumni wouldn't
hurt he laughed.
"We could go ahead and add
another two floors to the parking
deck we've planned to build
On a slightly dimmer note,
the AP sports poll has ranked the
Pirate football and basketball
teams as number three and two in
the nation, respectively. Athletic
Director Notta Rested laughed, the sun sinks slowly on the tab-
"Well, maybe we'll be on top next leau of this town without malice.
Paid Well
And when the Chancellor
gave me his white RX-7, E almost
went potty in his pants. No lie, ol'
Richard gave up the gold-plated
keys and a whole tank of gas. All's
Well that Drives Well.
But that's not all Cimpus Se-
curity said that all twenty of E's
overdue parking vk lations are
void because "the subject (E) has
shown an enthusiastic effort in the
washing of patrol vehicles
But one thing bothers E in this
perfect world: what makes you so
famous? Have you met the crite-
ria for becoming famous? 1 lore is
the checklist:
� Being verbally attacked
while eating nabs
� Knowing the correct defi-
nition of nabs (Lance's Orange
Crackers)
� Being spit on for what
you've written
I tear Big E,
Since graduating from ECU
in 1970,1 have followed the steady
downfall of an alumnus. Once a
line example of the close-knit
moral fibers of Eastern North
Carolina, ECU'S alumni have
fallen Jar from grace. Greenville is
quickly becoming the largest ha
ven for immorality and bad taste.
The spineless derelicts who
call themselves graduates but con-
tinued to live in Greenville and
work at pizza joints only degrade
the city 1 once railed an Emerald
Big E, how do you propose to
revamp the tainted image ot the
school, and how do would you
eradicate these termer students
who refuse to leave Greenville7
Signed, Carol H.Walker
Ossippee, NC
Dear Graduate from Hell.
Haven of immorality- Spine-
less derelicts.
You have it all wrong. Every
thing is great here in the city by
the Tar. Everyone is happy. There
is no disenchantment whatsoevt r.
For example: not one student
has been trampled to death on
campus sidewalks this year. No
one has dropped hallucinogens in
the Student Store's coffee ma-
chines since 1970. (Editor's note
students graduating in 1970 were
roguts.
While the number of visita-
tion violations (boys: leave those
women's dorms before 1 a.m.) is on
the rise, the number ot transves-
tites living in dorms of the oppo-
site sex is down compared to fig-
ures compiled in 1969. (Editor's
note: student attending in 1969 were
um different.)
Your statement concerning
graduatesstayingaround to make
pizzas is unfounded A recent
report states that most area pizza
emplovees are t ollege drop outs.
Cheater
Dear Fiarlvis,
My roommate has a continu-
ing problem with her boyfriend.
They ve fought every single day
for three wars, and it'sdnving me
crazy! She comes to me and tells
me what a jerk he is but then goes
runningback to hischeatingarms.
Last night they had a tight,
and she said that was the last straw
Hut I know she'll be kissing his ass
tomorrow. E, what can I do to save
my beloved roomie from this
,
rogue
Signed, Roommate Hears All
Deai H liars.
You must be confused. There
are no problems here at ECU, in
Greenville, or in the entire world,
for that matter - except that
maybe the university could use
just a little more money from the
alumni, maybe. But it's really all
right it we don't get it, honest.
There is no pain, no reckless
disregard for anyone's feelings
and there are no jackass-rogue
boyfriends.
E feels like you fabricated this
a hole scenario because you can't
sleep at night. But there are no
sleepless nights in Greenville
because e er thing is perfect. And
there you are.
Happy
Quotes
10:09 Cotten Hall woman called
in to report that she just had a
good feeling.
10:30 A kitten climbed down
out of a tree on Biltmore Street all
by itself.
11:15 Several East Carolinian
staff members fell in love.
11:30 Racial harmony was offi-
cially declared.
After this time, no more notice-
able events occurred calling for
police attention. Feeling benefi-
cent and overcome with good will,
the Campus Police all met in the
Krispy Krcme parking lot and
decided unanimously to not give
any more parking tickets for the
night.
"Heck, the kids have all learned
their lesson commented officer
number 12, "and they mean well.
So we thought, 'Shoot, lef s let 'em
park wherever they please� they
probably have good reasons for
bendin' the law a little Besides,
'taint hurtin' nobody nohow
In further acts of goodness, the
Campus Police began leaving
greeting cards and candy treats
on students' windshields as to-
kens of their affection.
McKay quote o' the
week:
"They're Saying Des- world-famous (or is that world-infamous?) columnist Chippy Bonehead teams up with the Six Empty
demona does parties Chairs for a concert that made this incredibly happy town even more incredibly happy. (Photo by Mori
� McKay Sundwall Lartin)
Bone gives free concert
Song quote o' the
week:
Tm down on my
knees; I'm gonna take
you there
� Madonna
Curse o' the week:
"You vacuous, coffee-
nosed, malodorous per-
vert
� Graham Chapman
GREENVILLE, NC (BP) �
Last Wednesday's SGA Forum
Debate was spiced up by an im-
promptu concert by Chippy Bone-
head and the Six Empty Chairs,
fresh from their 1989 "Pickin' and
a Grinnin World Tour.
Bonehead came on stage after
the candidates were introduced
and told the crowd, "We're here
to play a few tunes for y'all. Hope
I'm not ioterruptin' anythang
The enthusiastic crowd of 40
students cheered.
The Six Empty Chairs, who
havebeen playing with Bonehead
(in the Biblical sense) since 1988,
took their places on stage and
tuned up their invisible instru-
ments. They leapt into a pulse-
stopping rendition of their Bill-
board chart smash, "Empty Coke�
Bottles and Frozen Bananas
After the first song, Bonehead
said to the audience, "I was asked
to come play today for a very
special reason. I'm living proof of
what a wonderful university this
is. In the history of this school, its
graduates have gone on to become
nothing but fashionably yuppie,
materially rich but socially con-
scious community leaders
"I am here due to the gracious
donationsofthealumniofthisfair
school. They paid for my travel
expenses, the food, the free car
that 1 didn't wreck and the con-
doms the band will be using after
the show
He ended his speech with
heartwarming words of advice.
"Support your alumni in all they
do. And when you are alumni,
remember the university that fos-
tered you, molded you, and gave
you free tickets to football games
Then the band reached back
to their first album A Court Date
With God and performed last
year's novelty hit, "1 Hate Black
and White TV's Cause My
World's So Grey The audience
applauded.
Several Rose High School
cheerleaders in the audience were
hospitalized, reportedly struck
blind by Bonehead s near god-like
presence.






t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL6.1989 11
By Friedrich Orpheus
By Harris and C.urganus
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ADVERTISEMENT
v oming next week . . . -
a (TV m &
s History in the -making.
I lu most famou characters of Pirate Comics
,1 star together in the ju
�, event of the year.
Plus some surprises
Irom Comics Past.
SHAG
RTOONIST BIOGRAPHY
ie
.
Starring Paul Friedrich!
sn't be n around for quite a while, be that as it may) now
artist who has had the longest running comic strip on
ted Overkill in 1984, and it was a little bitty strip that
tions other than The East Carolinian. Be that as it may.
1 family came along, and eventually all of them died
team of Hubie and Uncle Lou. Since then Overkill has
-HAS A&5� HAJR5
srL� Col? -tt
n�SU- OVE ROW,
-60E5
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WHEM HE R(M$
OUT OF AlONE.
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ccr ko zppywor
X 5T A CAT
, mm i it's deadlines on time. You don't see that everyday. And
, itl 1 rF.R VIEW THAI MI FFED A LOT OF PEOPLE
01 '� hat influenced you in your comics work? Rocky and
art Roadrunner cartoons. Hubie was inspired
uull hung in last year's house, Uncle Lou was
pircd by me
0 haf 1- your great si achievement? It will be the moment I get
,ni diploma from . The Rodney Dangerfield of Schools,
the s hoot thai g ts no respect
ire a test failure? G tting my yearbook photo taken
areei ambitions: To put humor and violence back into
Saturday morning artoons
Favorite book(s): tnziin
Mission in I tfe: To scale the liighest mountain, to swim the
deepest sea to be famous epough to get into movies for free
Favorite wrestler: Ernest Borgnine
Interests, favorite pasttimes: Lofs of things, none of which
inwliv filling out questionnaires like this one
rurn-ons: Hot chocolate, Catholic girls, thunderstorms
1 urn offs: Death, guilt, turnips
1 eryone should be my friend because: I've got cable
Favorite music: Funk
Theme song. song by The Pixies that goes a little something
like: "Hey Paul, lieu Paul, . . . Let's have a ball
Here's the man himself, meeting with
our own Chancellor Eakin, showing Paul
his favorite Overkill gag!





t
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6. 1989 11
I
i
S
By Friedrich
s.nd (jiirganus
Comics History in the 'making.
rhe most famoi characters of Pirate Comics
A ii star together in the

I
r
event of the year.
Plus some surprises
from Comics Past.
Gambda Gambda Hev
By Flliott
V0TME& PROFILES
(,?1
r
"SHAG
"HAS NOSE RAjRS
sryL� cup
-6C�S
RTOONIST BIOGRAPHY


i
Starring Paul Friedrich!
n't been around for quite a while, be that as it may) now
artist who has had the longest running comic strip on
irted Overkill in 1984, and it was a little bitty strip that
blications other than The East Carolinian. Be that as it may.
ki family came along, and eventually all of them died
� team of Hubie and Uncle Lou. Since then Overkill has
i s mi t it's deadlines on time. You don't see that everyday. And
&$��$&&'
,1
I'
7
-OFTEA DlELTS
WHEM HE Rom
OUT OF AlONEV.
-UK�5 TO PCK AT
KATS
WORK,AU)T
'SITAIC-4IM"
OIj5T a cat.
1
.ill i ii, VIEW iii.MMl FFED A LOT OF PEOPLE
or n hat influenced you in your comics work? Rocky and
, inkle cartoons, Roadrunner cartoons. Hubie was inspired
. con skull that hung in List year's house, Uncle Lou was
cd hi IHC
What i- your great A achievement? It will be the moment I get
my diploma from A. .11 The Rodney Dangerfield of Schools,
the school that gt ts no respect
Greatest failure? Getting my yearbook photo taken
v areei ambitions: To put humor and violence back into
Saturday morning cartoons
Favorite book(s): Tarzan
Mission in I ife: To scale the highest mountain, to swim the
deepest sea, to be famous epough to get into movies for free
Favorite wrestler: I rnest Borgnine
Interests, favorite pasttimes: Lots of things, none of which
involve filling out questionnaires like this one
I urn-ons: Hot chocolate, Catholic girls, thunderstorms
Turn-offs: Death, guilt, turnips
Everyone should be my friend because: I've got cable
Favorite music: Funk
Theme song: A song by The Pixies that goes a little something
like: "Hey Paul, Hey Paul, . Let's have a ball
Here's the man himself, meeting with
our own Chancellor Eakin, showing Paul
his favorite Overkill gag!





I
THE EAST CAROI INI AN
White coes to 5-0
Sports
APRIL 6, 1989 PAGE 12
��� m
ECU continues to roll, take doubleheader from Baptist Bucs
111 '�'�"��������������� ��� i. j�i,iJ . � � tii.j i-ij iis� n � -tii . l� j r . , � .� I �. �:
Bv KR1STEN HALBFRG
Stift Writer
The East Carolina baseball
team is off to its best start in the
history of Pirate baseball. They
increased their record to 22-2 on
Tuesday after sweeping a double-
header against Baptist College.
The Pirates took the Bucca-
neers 5-2 in the first game while
they prevailed l)-4 in the second
game.
John White captured his fifth
win oi the season on the mound in
the second game and has no losses
as the sophomore pitcher boasts a
0.00 ERA.
White pitched 1 13 innings
for the Pirates, had two hits and
no runs.
Brien Berckman took the win
in the first game for ECU as he
goes 2-0 for the season. The junior
from Fayetteville pitched seven
innings and gave up seven hits
and two runs, one of them earned.
The Pirates wasted no time
getting on the scoreboard in the
first game with a run in the first
inning. John Adams and Tommy
Eason both walked and John Gast
hit a grounder. But an error on the
ground ball brought in Adams for
the 1-0 lead.
Baptist would answer back to
the Pirates in the third when Kevin
Futrell reached on an error and
was sent to third. A sacrifice flvby
Dan Wolfe scored Futrell and the
Buccaneers had tied it up at 1-1.
But the Pirates would not
hesitate on regaining the lead. In
the bottom of the third, Adams
led off with a single and Eason
walked. Gast singled to drive in
Adams and David Ritchie, Eason's
courtesy runner, advanced to third
on a fly out. He then stole home
when Gast stole second to put the
Pirates up by two, at 3-1.
ECU wrapped up their scor-
ing in the fifth when they scored
two more runs. Adams hit a bloop
single just over the third baseman's
head. He moved to second on a
fielder's choice, advanced to third
on a wild pitch and scored on a
Calvin Brown sacrifice fly. Gast
then walked, stole second and was
driven in on a double by Steve
Goddin.
Baptist scored on a solo home
run in the seventh by Mike Olean,
but it wasn't enough for the Buc-
caneers as they went on to lose 5-
2.
The Buccaneers took the early
lead again in the second game of
the doubleheader when Smalley
singled. Steve Ebersole then
walked and Hardy Ferguson
singled to score Smalley. David
Sink and Courtney Jackson both
walked to force Ebersole to score.
But the Pirates took the lead
bv one in the second when Godin
singled and Chris Caublc walked.
The bases were then loaded un
when Kevin Riggs walked. Godin
scored on a Mike Andrews' sacri-
fice fly and Thomas drove in
Ritchie, who was running for
Cauble, on a single. Adams then
scored Riggs on a hit and the Pi-
rates were up, 3-2.
Baptist came back in the fifth
to tie it up. Ferguson, who singled
earlier, scored later on a double to
make the score 3-3.
But the Pirates would not
remain idle as they added three
more runs in the bottom of the
fifth to regain the lead at 6-3.
Thomas led off wi th a double, then
advanced to third on a sacrifice fly
ball. Eason drove him home on a
single. Brown then came to the
plate and homered, ako binr
in Eason. Brown now ha
home runs for the year
The Pirate momentum w
not be let up. In the sixth inning,
ECU added three more to I
lead. Cauble advan ed I
when he was hit ;�. a � ild
Riggs then singled and a
der by Andn
Daniels, the rui
Cauble. Riggs �
the Andre
Adams then hit his I
run of the seasi n to increase the
Pirate lead to 9-3.
Baptist trud to catch upin
seventh, but only managed
more run to maki I
Pirates blow by Hurricanes
Bv TRACVE LARKIN
Stiff Writer
Freshmen Barb Shueller and
Laura Crow dor both hit home runs
in the first game of a doubleheader,
which the Pirates swept from
Louisburg College Tuesday.
The I ady Pirates walloped the
Hurricanes lo-4 in the first game
with a total of nine hits.
Louisburg lumped on the Pi-
rates early, scoring an unearned
run in the first inning. The Pirates
then scored three runs in the sec-
ond inning to put themselves on
top. The Hurricanes were not
giving up without a fight, and
proved it bv putting three more
runs on the scoreboard in the next
three innings.
The Pirates started a rally in
the fifth inning by scoring a total
oi eight runs. Shueller slammed a
home run and picked up two RBIs.
In the sixth inning, the Lady
Pirates wrapped up the game by
scoring five more runs. This put
the ten-run rule into effect. Crow-
der hit a home run and picked
three RBIs.
The leading hitters wereChris
Bvrne 2-4, Crowder 2-2 and
Shueller 1-1. The winning pitcher
was Tracye Larkin allowing only
six hits and recording four strike-
outs.
The second game of the pair
proved to be a even more success-
ful, as the Pirates pounded the
ball harder and defeated the Hur-
ricanes, 22-2. The winning pitcher
was Jenifer Sagl holding the Hur-
ricanes to three hits while record-
ing five strikeouts. Sagl was not
onlv the leader on the mound, but
also was the leader at the plate.
She went 2-4 with a double and
one RBI.
The Pirates jumped on the
Lady Hurricanes early this time,
scoringone run on the first inning,
and thirteen runs in the second
inning. Crowder hit a grandslam,
making it her second home run of
the day. Crowder said, "1 was
See SOFTBALL, paKe 13
Pirates fare well in Arizona
The men's track team divided
into two teams over the weekend,
one participating in the Sun Angel
Track Classic held in Tempe, Ari-
zona, and the other competing in
the Colonial Relays in Wil-
liamsburg, Va
The first team, competing on
the campus oi Arizona State Uni-
The team of Ike Robinson,
Brian Irvin, Richard Wright, and
Eugene McNeill placed 7th over-
all (4th in the college ranks) with a
time of one minute, 24.98 seconds
in the 4X200 relay.
In the 4X100 relay, the team oi
Robinson, Irvin, Kelvin Wrighton,
and McNeill placed 9th (3rd in the
versify, ran with the top college college ranks) with a time of 41.7
teams in the United States as well seconds.
as several rofessional teams, in- The second team traveled to
eluding Sta rs and Stripes and The the College of William and Mary
San Diego 1 rack Club. and came home with a fourth place
finish.
Jeff Shu make, Udon Cheek,
Teddy Vernon, and Gary Wright
ran the4X200 relay in a timeof one
minute and 29 seconds.
Assistant coach Lee McNeill
said that the weather was cold
and rainy, and that may have had
some effect on the team's stand-
ing and finishes in other events.
The team's next meet will be
this weekend at UNC-Wilming-
ton in the UNCW Relays.
The four members of the newly-founded, ECU crew team proudly hold their oars in v ictorv. Th
finished a solid third in the Augusta Invitational Tournament (Photo bv J. D. Whitmire 1 CU Pr-
Lab).
Strong showing
ECU Crew wins bronze medal
Offense keys lacrosse victories
rially on the man up offense, hoyt bc ,eft out scoring two more, as
By KLNNLTH McKENNA
Stiff Writer
The East Carolina Lacrosse
Team continued their season last
weekend with two decisive wins
over U.N.CGreensboro and
Davidson.
East Carolina's first win came
when they pummeled UNC-G by
a score of 12 to 1. Everyone on the
starting offense scored for ECU as
they tormented the Greensboro
goalie with numerous shots. A
hat trick by Captain Jeff Cartledge
led the attack, with Pete Gibbs
adding two more to the tally. Al-
though Jay Black was held to one
goal, his assists made many more
possible. The rest of the goals are
accounted for by the first midfield
line. The line made up of Kelly was all ECU. Drew Bourque and
Hoyt, Ken McKenna and Branin McKenna scored the first two goals
Thorn worked well together espe- for the Pirates but Hoyt would not
buried three goals and Thorn two,
with their powerful outside shoot-
ing. McKenna completed the scor-
ing with a goal and two assists to
Cartledge and Hoyt.
The ball was on the offensive
side for the majority of the game
due to strong defense and clears.
Earlc McAuley repeatedly
brought the ball down to the of-
fense. The goal tending speaks for
itself, only one goal which came
off a broken play. All the midfield-
ers prevented many fast breaks by
hustling back for defense. The
whole team definately came to
play.
The second game was an 8-4
win over Davidson. This game
began with a quick goal from
Davidson, but the rest oi the half
sisted from McKenna and Black.
Cartledge scored another and
Thorn finished the half with a
crank shot which the goalie never
saw.
The second half ECU spent
watching from the penalty box.
Luckily superior goaltending and
a man down defense that showed
no mercy shut down Davidson's
chancoofw'inuii.g Themando'n
See LACROSSE, page 13
WASHINGTON N.C. � The front and downtown area, the
ECU Crew Club won a bronze regatta planners discovered that
medal in the prestigious Augusta Augusta's location was central to
Invitational Regatta on Saturday, many regional colleges and uni-
Entered in both men's heavy- versities many of which have start-
weight and lightweight events, up programs similar to the ECU
they were eliminated from ad- crew. In the past several years,
vancing into the finalsof the men's schools from the northeast such as
heavyweight novice event by big- Cornell, Syracuse, Dartmouth and
ger crews. In the afternoon, they Princeton with traditionally strong
fared better in the lightweight nov- rowing programs have entered
ice event by placing third in the fi- crews in the regatta as a primer to
nals. their regular racing season.
The Augusta Regatta, The ECU crew was treated to
founded only six years ago, has a spectacular finale at the end of
quickly become the most famous the day. First, the American
rowing regatta in the southeast-
ern United States. Almost 40
schools and rowing clubs were
represented including national
teams from Russia, Bulgaria,
France, Great Britain and the
United States.
Originally conceived as a way
to help revive the Augusta water-
women's team beat the Russian
women's team bv a fraction of a
second over the 2000m (1.26 mi)
course. Following that, the Ameri-
can men's team and the Russian
men's team battled head on only
to see an almost mirror image of
the women'sevent as the U.S. nar-
rowlv lost to Russia bv 0.4 sec-
onds or about ten f
Cornell team
Bulgaria fourth in :
Another unexpected trc I
provided to ECU coxswain ai
Political Science major Heath
Schofield who had the opportu-
nity to practice both her
macy and her Russjan lang
with USSR team membe rs
Other ECU part wei
Matt McCullock b Geoffrey
Gray (2), Alan Whi te 31 and An .
Rosoff istroke). Kelly Skinner
served as spare and team mai
ager. The team uses equipment
and coach.es borrowed from �
Pamlico Rowing Club in Was
ington, C. The addition oi a s
ond four-oared shell in the fall c t
1989 will enable the crew mem-
bers to recruit additional mem-
bers tor both men's and women s
programs.
Pirate's Booty
m' �
Where, oh where are the ECU fans?
get any fan support whatsoever, who prides itself on athletics, yet
Averageattendanaceisaroundthe we show little or no support for
300-400 level this year, up from one of our most successful pro-
last year. This is still no where grams.
Monday was opening day for near the support one of the na- This year's team could be one
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Sports Editor
gamesare sitting there going this
guv is nuts 1 m not crazy, 1 just
want to see a team who deserves
fans get a little support. It
were playing, would you rather
play in front of 300 fans or 3 ?
For those of you who think
J.T. Gibbs shows some of the solid sticking that led the ECU
lacrosse team to two victories over the weekend (Photo by Mar
Startari).
Major League baseball. But when tion's leading baseball teams de- of the most exciting teams in ECU's
the first pitch was thrown on the serves. history. With a wealth of young
professional level, one team had The Pirate baseball program talent and a pitching staff that is they win because the)
already run up a 22-2 record. No consistently has a winning record sending hitters to the dugout anybody, boy are you in for a
it wasn't the World Champion Los and represents ECU well in post- wondering what happened to surprise. On this year's schedule
Angeles Dodgers or the Oakland season competition and in the them, the Pirates could be headed are teams such as North Carolina,
A's, it was the East Carolina Pi- Colonial Athletic Conference, for a trip to the NCAA tourna- Duke, South Carolina and Vir-
rates. Over the past three seasons, the ment. Wouldn't it be a shame to ginia. Also, the Pirates will face
Not very many people realize team has compiled a 99-41 record, think that you, as a student, have the Wolfpack during the season.
that the Pirate baseball team is off won the CAA championship in never seen them play. In the home-and-home series the
to one of their best starts in his- 1987 and was a participant in the Walt Whitman once called Pirates have already defeated the
tory. Not many people are aware NCAA Atlantic Regional. baseball "America'sgame It has Wolfpack in Raleigh Tonight th
that one of ECU's pitchers is first What more can fans ask for?
in the country in earned run aver- How about this � in the team's 38
age (ERA). It is not common year history, they have had only
knowledge among ECU students one losing season. Pretty imprcs-
becn referred to for years as the Wolfpack gets a chance for re-
American pastime, but that must venge. So let's go out and support
not be the case at ECU. I know it is the Pirates as they face one of their
spring and the weather is nice so strongest rivals.
that head coach Gary Overtonob- sive for a team that goes relatively people head for the beach, but the So the next time
tained his 150th career win. Some unnoticed. team plays during the week and ting around with nothing to do,
people may wonder why such One thing that usually affects even plays some night contests, grab your ECU calendar and see if
featsaregoingunnoticed.lt is very fan support is whether a team is (No excuses, you can't get a tan there is a baseball game. Your
simple no one is going to the winning or losing. Here is a pro- when the sun isn't out.) support could make a difference
games. gram that doesn't know how to For years students have done and the team would sure appreci-
In the past few years there has lose, but still gains just a handful an admirable job of supporting ate it. The only way things will
been marked increase in atten- of supporters. Major colleges Pirate athletics, but it seems we change is if you attend. So catch a
dance at basketball games and the across the country have audiences forget about the non-revenue Pirate baseball game and enjoy
football team keeps bringing in � t tne thousands for baseball, sports like baseball. I realize some the long heritage of winning Pi-
the fans, but baseball struggles to u e we are a Division I school oi vou wno attend the baseball rate baseball.






t
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN'
APRIL 6.1989 13
Unbeaten at 6-0
ECU Ruggers keep on winning
This past weekend, the ECU
Ruggers extended their unde-
feated season to 6-0. In their hard-
est match so far this season, the
ECU Ruggers battled toa 19-8 vic-
tory. The team coming off their
tournament win in Charlotte took
the game much too lightly said
veteran Bob Eason.
Duke quickly took advantage
of the situation and scored a trv
and converted on the extra point
putting them upby six. The team's
leading scorer Philip Ritchey an-
swered back with a score of his
own, bringing the Pirates to within
their record to 3-0. Veteran Scott
Daniels scored first showing the
rookies how it was done. Two
rookie ruggers, Dan Monaghan
and Scott rriestly, scored for the
first time ever.
The ECU Ruggers will need
all the support they can get this
weekend when they play ODU,
the sixth ranked team on the East
reach Bob Eason kicked a penalty Coast. Tlie teams have been play-
kick in to finish off the Duke Blue ing for the last two years and have
Devils. a very competitive tradition. The
The Pirates B-side team also game will start at 1 p.m. on Satur-
had a strong showing, beating the day, behind the Allied Health
Blue Devils 12-0 and improving Building.
two, t-4 That spark was all the
team needed, because moments
later rookie rugger Thomas (Flash)
Almond broke around the out-
side and scored, giving ECU its
first lead of the day.
Duke took the lead just one
more time. Both Bob Tobin and
Philip Ritchey added a score a
piece with strong individual run-
ning. With the score almost out of
QWffo
Golfers finish 14th at Furman
Bv LORl MARTIN
SUM Writer
The Pirate golfers returned
home with a disappointing 14th
place finish atter traveling to
reenville S.C. to participate in
the 20th Annual Furman lntercol-
ite March 31-April 2.
The Pirates shot a three-day
total of UN putting them in 14th
place in the 22-team field. The
U niversity of Georgia, behind their
strong second-day performance of
279 nine under part, won the
tournament with an 874 total. In a
tie for second, five shots back, were
Wake Forest and the University of
Virginia.
Individually, Todd White of
irman University led the tour-
nament with a three-day total of
2 )6 � 10 under par). White won by
� . e strokes over Tim Dunlavcv of
captain Paul Garcia with a three-
day total of 224. Next in line was
lohn McGinnes with 230 followed
by co-captain Fee Davies with 232.
Also playing for the Pirates were
Francis Vaughn (233) and Greg
Powell (243).
Coach 1 lal Morrison said the
Pirates were not able to put four
good scores on the board. I le said
the team is only one player away
from being a consistently good
team.
The Furman Intercollegiate
saw the Pirates worst finish ol the
season, and it came in their big-
gest tournament. Fourof the teams
participating were in the top 20 in
the nation and several others are
waiting to break into that cate-
gory.
Morrison said this finish all
but eliminates FCU's chances of
going to the NCAA district tour-
nament. Garcia said the team is
now concentrating on trying to
win a third consecutive CAA
Conference Championship.
The Pirates travel to Chapel
Hill this week to play in the Tar
1 leelIntercollegiate. They will end
their season the following week
bv trving to defend their confer-
ence title in Hot Springs a.
the Pirat was CO-
Ladies
split two
Lady Tirates tennis team
has faced some strong competi-
tion the past few days. The team
played hard, winning one and
It sing another.
Monday, the women played
Christopher Newport College, de-
feating them in a close game, 3-4.
I icsday, the team matched
. nst Campbell University, ac-
tefeat, 6-3
Although it was a hard game
it Christopher Newport,
assistant coach Lvnn Gorski com-
rtted, It was a competitive
ne. While Heather Mason and
lly Murray swept away their
pp nents, it was our doubles
im insisting of Susan Mattocks
and Ellen 1 larrell, that pulled out
the team's victory
Gorski continued, "The score
was tied with the last chance at
winning resting on Mattocks and
Harrell. After one loss and one
win in the set, the girls played a
strong, physical and mental match
to win the last game in the set
Head coach Bill Moore as-
sisted the girls match against
Campbell. Moore commented,
"Although welost, the girls played
well. We had a lot oi three set
matches, and a lot oi tie-brcak-
jrs
With theCAAChampionship
Tournament approaching April
13, the women are winding down
their season. Although they face
UNC-Wilmington, at Wilmington
on Friday, you can still catch their
last home match against Pfeiffcr
College on Monday.
Co-captain Paul Garcia lead the Pirate golf team in their recent
tournament at Furman. Despite their poor finish, the Pirates look
to repeat as CAA champions in two weeks (Photo by Lori Martin)
FALL RUSH
x is your
Softball
Continued from page 12
excited, but I would have been
more excited had it been against a
nationally ranked, team such as
UVA
East Carolina continued the
rally through the fifth inning scor-
ing eight more runs. Neither of
Louisburg's runs were earned.
The leading hitters for the
Tirates were Crowder, 2-2; Sagl, 2-
4; and Mechellc Jones, 2-2.
Lacrosse
Continued from page 12
defense, made up of the starters
and longsticks Bobby Hodes and
Wes Davis kept Davidson out like
a locked door to the goal. Goalie
Jamie Youngguarded his goal like
a nest, shutting down attackmen
driving the crease with punishing
stick checks.
J ensively Black scored on
an ass t from Gibbs and Hoyt
completed his hat trick. Hoyt
completed the weekend with six
goals and an assist, definatly get-
ting Pirate Lax player of the week.
, E
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REGISTER FOR SORORITY
RUSH
Monday-Thursday, 10 am-3 pm
April 3-6 and April 10-13
Croatan � Student Supply � Bottom of Hill
$15.00 Fee
RUSH INFORMATION NIGHT
Monday, April 3 at 6 pm
Wright Auditorium
'Jiusfi is schedukd before classes begin in the
Jatt: August 19-23
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
August 10, 1989
Call 757-4235 if any questions
Baseball '89:
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at 7:00 p.m.
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'
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6,1989
Pleads guilty to drug charge
Key figure in Pete Rose investigation appears in court
�V - . r-�i u : l nMMrfi nn thrPP vehicles, i
CINCINNATI (AP) � A man
identified as a key figure in an in-
vestigation that led to a gambling
probe of Cincinnati Reds manager
Pete Rose has committed himself
to plead guilry to federal drug and
tax charges.
Ronald Peters, 31, owner of a
restauraunt-bar in Franklin in
southwestern Ohio, appeared
Monday in U.S. District Court to
announce that he will plead guilty
to a charge of cocaine distribution
and of making a false statement
on his 1985 income tax return.
The U.S. attorney's office
brought the charges against Pe-
ters in a bill of information. In
agreeing to plead guilty, Peters
informed U.S. Magistrate Robert
Steinberg that he is waiving his
right to have his case sent before a
federal grand jury.
The FBI said Peters arranged
a July 22, 1988, meeting at a Mid-
dle town restaurant, about 25 miles
north of Cincinnati, at which his
alleged source of cocaine, Dan ell
Cope of Franklin, sold an ounce of
cocaine for $1,600 to an FBI infor-
mant who wore a microphone so
federal agents could listen.
The government did not iden-
tify the informant but the Dayton
Daily News has identified him as
Paul Janszen, a Cincinnati body-
builder who in the past has re-
portedly helped Rose in physical
training.
Janszen is serving a six-mc ath
sentence in a Cincinnati halfway
house after pleading guilty in
January to a charge of evading
income taxes from the sale of ster-
oids. Janszen's lawyer, �Merlyn
Shi vcrdecker of Cincinnati, would
not comment on the report. ,
"We're not going to get in-
volved in the melee and confirm
or deny the accuracy of those
reports Shiverdccker said.
Cope is serving a four-year
term in the Marion, 111 federal
penitentiary for a cocaine distri-
bution conviction, federal authori-
ties said.
Major League Baseball an-
nounced last month it is investi-
gating Rose. Baseball officials have
refused to disclose the nature of
the investigation, but published
reports have said it is focusing on
Rose's gambling activities. There
has been no suggestion that Rose
is linked to narcotics.
Washington lawyer John
Dowd, who is overseeing base-
ball's investigation of Rose, has
said the probe likely will last until
at least mid-April.
Internal Revenue Service
agent Lowell Wood said Peters
lied on his 1985 income tax return
by failing to report $80,000 in in-
come from gambling and book-
making. Peters reported income
of $23,523.
Peters also failed to report
thousands of dollars in invest-
ments in two partnerships, and at
least $26,000 in full or partial
payments on three vehicles, in-
cluding a Jaguar automobile.
Wood told the court Monday.
Peters, his lawyer, James
Ruppert of Franklin, and federal
authoritiesdcclined any comment
on whether Peters was involved
in gambling with Rose.
The Dayton Daily News has
reported that investigators found
betting slips in Peters' bar that led
them to Rose. David Chicarelli, a
lawyer for Peters, declined com-
ment on the report. Rose has de-
clined comment on the investiga-
tion and related reports.
Sanders takes Heisman and runs
Two college superstars go to NFL
(AD � Heisman Trophy
winner Barry Sanders was granted
admission to the NFL draft Tues-
day, just three days after the Okla-
homa State junior running back
asked for a special exemption to
turn pro.
NFL spokesman Joe Browne
said Sanders, a true junior with a
war of eligibility left, is being al-
lowed into the April 23 draft be-
cause Oklahoma State ison NCAA
probation and because he is leav-
ing school with the blessing both
of Coach Pat Jones and athletic
director Mvron Roderick.
The 5-foot-9,183 pound Sand -
ci rushed for 2,628 yards, ind id-
ing four gamesofat least 300 yards
and 39 touchdowns last season.
Those were two of the 24 NCAA
records he broke or tied.
He is expected to be chosen
extremely high, perhaps third by
the Detroit Lions, who have ex-
pressed a strong intresk st in hiin.
The NFL's decision is one of
several in the last (c: years that
have allowed underclassmen into
the draft, either regular or supple-
mental.
Miami of Florida quarterback
ACC ,Big East meet
CHARLOTTE (AP) � The
ACC and Big East conferences
have reachedmultiyear agree-
ment for a series of early season
college basketball doubleheaders,
a newspaper reported today.
The conferences are expected
to announce this week the first set
of games will be Dec. 4-7 and will
be televised nationally by ESPN,
according to officials in both
leagues.
Sites and pairings for the
games will not be decided until
late May, officials said. The Char-
lotte Coliseum is among sites being
considered.
ACC Commissioner Gene
Corrigan con finned Monday ior
The Charlotte Observer that there
would be an announcement con-
cerning the series this week but
declined to comment on its con
tent.
ACC and Big East teams have
rarely met in the regular season.
The onlv games this season were
Connecticut at Virginia and Seton
Hall vs. Virginia in the Sugar Bowl
Classic in New Orleans.
Steve Walsh also said Tuesday he
will turn pro and skip his final
year of eligibility with the
Hurricaneswith an undescrib-
able feeling of satisfaction
Walsh said he had nearly
accomplished his goals to win a
national championship, "become
the best player 1 could be and
obtain a finance degree, so "I feel
nght now is the best opportunity
for me to move on
Walsh is eligible to forgo his
senior season for the pros because
he will cam his degree ibis sum-
mer.
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 6, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 06, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.669
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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