The East Carolinian, April 4, 1989






Crime Report2
Editorial4
Classifieds6
Woods, XTC's "Orange
drivin n' cryin Lp all reviewed.
Check out page 8.
Pirates sweep Mason on barrage of
dingers over weekend, Play N.C.
Wolfpack Thursday
at 7, under the lights.
Catch the action on pagell.
She iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. h2
Tuesday April 4,1989
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Flections set for Wednesday
SGA Presidential run-offs approach
Lassiter to revamp screening
Chancellor Richard Eakin kicks off Wcllness Week v ith a 1.5
mile walk with approximately 40 other students, faculty and
staff members. (Photo by Thomas Walters
By TIM HAMPTON
I �iitar
In gearing up for Wednes-
day's election, SGA presidential
candidate Valeria lassiter slid
no eligible student should be
denied from an education at ECU
on account of lack of finances.
"This is an overall concern.
The application process for fi-
nancial aid needs to be changed.
Manv students find out on the
first day of class that their appli-
cations have been denied.
"1 advocate a change in the
financial aid office to perform a
more effective job of letting stu-
dent know their financial situ-
ation Lassiter said.
With the advent of the man-
datory meal plan, lassiter said
there is a need for an increase in
financial aid. "If the administra-
tion is going to enact the plan,
then there should be a guarantee
to students that there will be an
increase in the available fund-
ing Lassiter said.
To improve the present dis-
parity in racial equality to the
government (threeoi the65 SGA
legislators are minorities), Las-
siter said a revamping oi the
screening process currently used
for potential legislatures enter-
ing the SG A. "By no circumstance
should someone be allowed to
become a legislator the same day
they apply (the present proce-
dure) Lassiter said.
Lassiter said if elected, she
would institute mandatory re-
quirements to make individual
legislators responsible to the their
constituents. "Every legislator
would have to hold an open
meeting with their constituents
Lassiter said.
Although Lassiter partially
agrees with her opponent's stand
on teacher evaluation, she said
Tripp Roakes' call for the return
of the drunk bus is a not a im-
perative issue for the campaign.
"It is not in gear with what
the administration is trying to do
change the image. 1 think it send-
ing the wrong signal to the rest of
the state. This is an issue, but to
bring the drunk bus back is not
the solution lassiter said.
Roakes to address problems
By LORI MARTIN
Sttfl ftrim
SGA Presidential candidate
Tripp Roakes said he wants to
address the problems of the stu-
dents instead of those of the
administration.
If he wins the election, Roakes
said he wants to form a committee
of minoritv and majority leaders
to work on racial problems that
exist on campus. "If 1 win, 1 would
like Valeria (Lassiter) to co-chair
that committee with me Roakes
said.
Roakes said the committee
would brainstorm to solve any
racial issues. "1 would like to set
semester goals and long-term
goals to work toward within the
committee Roakes said he would
like the committee to meet every
two weeks in the 1989-90 year.
Roakes said he agrees with
his opponent, Valeria Lassiter, in
that financial aid is an area of
concern which needs to be ad-
dressed. "1 would like to see the
whole process made easier he
said.
According to Roakes, the
procedure involve s ompleting
complex seri 'plications. 1 he
applicants mav tin n have to wait
up to six months before beitf
notified whether or not they qual-
ify.
Roakes said he �� ants to tl-
emphasizi his main stands in the
campaign f r president, it ele t� I
he plans to providea faculty evalu
ation newspapi r ea h semester t
the benefit of the students. He
believes this w ill rrv tivate prof�
sors to be niv're effective in tl
classro mand notjustinresean
( Hher ru ern i i
Roakes campaign are to explor
method- to be I
Walkand tor. establisha "drui
bus" to provide safe rides to stu
dents on ��� ekend
"When 1 say 1 want to I
students' president meai
to be here anytime students have
a problem, Roakes �
to tight forissues tha
student body
Roakes a res rtmai
major, said w ith hisexperience a
SGA Treasurer, he will be an
fective pr� 'leeted.
Eakin w
ByMINDYMclNMS
Stiff Writer
Wellnes
Chancellor Richard R Eakin
and 35 to 40 students, staff and
facultv members made anl 5 mile
walk noon Monday to begin Well-
ness Week, five days oi events to
emphasize good health.
Kathy Hill, coach of Wellness
Improvement for State Employ-
ees (WISE), was in charge oi
mapping out the course for the
run. The participants started at
Memorial Gym and looped
around campus.
All of the participants earned
balloons in order to draw atten-
tion. Marv Alesha Adams, one of
the coordinators for Wellness
Week and also a participant in the
walk, said the balloons really drew
attention.
Another highlight of the walk
was the chance to talk to Chancel-
lor Eakin in person. Adams com-
mended Chancellor Eakin on the
personal touch that he added to
the walk.
Adams said Eakin took the
time to mingle through the crowd
in order to speak with different
individuals. "One minute he
(Eakin) would be in the front of
the crowd and the next minute he
would be in the ba k of the crowd
she added.
The walk was a success and
Adams hopes that the 1 lealth Fair,
which will be held today in
Memorial Gym from 11 a.m. to
530 p m v ill be a big success
also.
Fly High With Wellness" is
the motto tor Wellness Week and
the twenty-five en-campus and
off-campus groups that will par-
ticipate in the fail today will have
different booths set up to display
the importance f health and fit-
ness.
Different events are scheduled
to take place throughout the day.
The Intramural Department will
sponsor different aerobic activi-
ties and Zacks and TCBY will be
giving away free yogurt samples.
The activities and events will
continue on through Thursday.
Wednesday, at 7:30 p.m Harriet
Elder is scheduled to speak on the
importance of humor in health in
Jenkins Auditorium. Thursday,
Kitty Hawks Kites will help in a
kite flying contest.
With all of the activities, which
are geared toward health and fit-
ness, Adams hopes to help stu-
dents, staff, and faculty gain an
increased awareness and knowl-
edge of wellness. Adams con-
cluded by sayingI hope every-
one will support the activities and
participate

I

One of many blossoming Dogwood trees on campus. Dogwoods are being atta
the wild in North Carolina by a disease called anthracnose. (Photo by Thomas
eke
Wa
d and killed in
Iters)
SGA Legislature without quorum, again
By LORI MARTIN
Stiff Writer
The Student Government
Association was forced to adjourn
its Monday meeting because the
legislature was without quorum
after many representatives lett the
floor. The bodv passed three ap-
propriations and discussed one
bill before being adjourning.
The SGA voted to appropri-
ate the amount of $400 to Phi Mu
Alpha fraternity, an honor society
for men in music The money will
be used to conduct a clinic in order
to promote education in music.
With the funds, the group will
bring two music teachers to ECU
to work with local high school
bands. The ECU Jazz Ensemble
will perform during the clinic.
The Army Cadet Association
was appropriated $83 to be used
for a banquet. The funds will pay
for army approved banquet sup-
plies, imitation postage and two
honorariums.
The legislature debated the
request tor funds for an hour be-
fore the appropriation was passed.
I egislator Steve Skimmers said he
was againsi the appropriation
because the group is funded by
Army ROTC
"We pay i tremendous
amount of money everytime we
pay income taxes. The ROTC
program receives the money we
pay Sommers said. He said the
ROTC is an agency separate from
the university and should not be
funded by the SGA.
Zamir Siddiqi, a representa-
tive from the Army Cadet Asso-
ciation, was present at the meet-
ing to speak on behalf of the or-
ganization. He said the group is
not funded by the ROTC and has
always raised their own money.
"We are not a recruiting team
or a drill team Siddiqi said. He
said the organization has its own
constitution filed with the SGA
and is asking for funds for the first
time.
According to Siddiqi, the
Armv Cadet Association placed
in the top 10 out of 70 groups
which competed last year. He said
the organization represents ECU
and is independent of the ROTC.
"When we go to competition,
everybody wears the same uni-
form. The only thing that sets us
apart is the name of our school
Siddiqi said.
Appropriations Committee
Chairman Susan Cooperman said
the group should receive the funds
because they are working toward
a career as any other academic
fraternity. "They are in this or-
ganization to better themselves
and their careers she said.
The North Carolina Student
Legislature was allowed a trans-
fer of funds in the amount of $475.
The funds will be used for print-
ing and binding rather than for
travel which was the original
appropriation.
A bill to design a course in
human relations was introduced
by the Student Welfare Commit-
tee. If the bill is passed, the elec-
tive course will teach students to
be aware of and deal with racial
and gender-related tensions on
campus.
According to the bill authored
by Mary Davis, "The Student
Government Association recom-
mends to the administrationthat
steps be taken in the development
of an educational program de-
signed to facilitate undertanding
between different peoples
Before the bill could come to a
vote, several legislators left the
meetingleavingthebody without
quorum.
During the meeting. Speaker
Marty Helms yielded the chair to
the Vice-speaker Bob I andn in
order to make copies of a bill to
distribute within the body. His
action was criticized by a legisla-
tor.
In response. 1 lelms ex-
plained his action to the bod) 1
figured the speaker pro-tcmn
needed the practice because
there is no way 1 s ill take it
(office of speaker) next year,
Helms said.
In new business, a bill to
reclassify the ECU Gospel Choir
was introduced.
Professor
lm
pact of Roe v. Wade
By DAVID HERRING
AsiUUnt New Fditor
The 1973 Supreme Court case
Roe vs. Wade, which set a prece-
dent protecting a woman's deci-
sion to terminate a pregnancy,
symbolized changes in perceived
gender roles, said a guest lecturer
in at ECU last week.
Dr. Kathleen Berkeley, asso-
ciate professor of History at UNC-
Wilmington, also stated that a
woman's right to choose is central
to her emancipation. The land-
mark case gives women the free-
dom to express their sexuality
because contraceptives and abor-
tion allow a distinction to be made
between sexual intercourse and
procreation, according to
Berkeley.
In her lecture "Sexual Politics:
The History of Reproductive Frce-
domandtheFatcofRoevs.Wadc
Berkeley said the separation (be-
tween intercourse and procrea-
tion) was disturbing to the pre-
dominantly male legislation be-
cause of the shift in the economic
and public role of women.
"Women are no longer just moth-
ers she said, "there are other
possibilities
To make a distinction, she said
that pro-choice women usually-
work, are middle class and are
career-minded. "They often have
children or plan to have children
she said. "They're not anti-child
Whereas women opposed to
abortion, Berkeley stated, gener-
ally- have a high school education
and perhaps a partial college
education, and are full-time moth-
ers who are comfortable with the
traditional alignment of the home
See ABORTION, page 3






l
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4, 1989
Cold beer found in patrol car
March 28
1115 Damage to vehicle re-
ported east of Scott.
Ibl5 Tire and wheel found at
5th and Reade parking lot.
1700 Belk resident given a
criminal summons for worthless
checks.
118 Plvmouth man observed
by reserve officer to be defacing
wet cement of sidewalk east of
Clement.
March 29
105 Elm Street man was issued
an after hours visitation violation
with White Dorm resident. Both
subjects were uncooperative.
1205 Hit and run of vehicle
south of 'ones.
1330 Belk resident reported
suspicious man trying to solicit
money.
1743 Garrett resident warrant
tor failing to appear in court.
1550 William Thomas Arm-
wood of 108 Charlie Lane Colonial
Trailer Tark was arrested for pos-
session and with the intent to sell
and deliver schedule four drugs in
Mendenhall Student Center.
1920 Tommv Gregory Rober-
son of 200 West 8th was arrested for
one way street violation west of
iones.
March 30
215 Belk resident observed
unidentified man peeping into
dorm room.
2200 Garbage was left scattered
v or north side or Minges parking
lot after TKE boxing event.
125 Four students were given
alcohol violation citations in Gar-
rett.
1203 Breaking and entering of
vehicle parked at 14th and Berkley
lot.
1815 911 Emergency Service
despatched to Umstead.
2149 Three non-students
banned for participating in a loud
party. Clement residents were re-
ferred to Dean Speier for partici-
pating in same party.
2355 Jones Ronald Stuart and
Thoral Johan Frislid of 309 South
Summit Street were both arrested
for misdemeanor of controlled
substance violation east of Fletcher.
0005 Patrol officer reported
persons unknown threw cold beer
in the back seat of vehicle 9588
while parked cast of Music Build-
ing.
March 31
0822 Aycock candy machine
found unlocked.
1330 Larceny of wallet and $1
from same in Memorial Gvm.
1500 Aycock resident reported
the larceny of $40.
1530 Scott resident reported
larceny of licence plate - Virginia
SURFER - west of Scott dorm.
1330 Fleming resident re-
ported roommate missing.
1920 Employee of Menden-
hall Student Center audio section
reported a X-rated movie showed
in Mendenhall.
1515Cotten resident reported
the larceny of bike.
April 1
0035 Fletcher resident trans-
ported to hospital after taking an
overdose of prescription drugs in
Aycock.
0040 Donald Eugent Murry of
Bell Arthur was banned from
campus after alcohol violations
south of Cotten.
Wesley Harold Sumnell of
Farmville wasarrested forone way
street violations and simple pos-
session of schedule four drugsand
banned form campus for simple
possession.
0154 Greene resident trans-
ported to hospital for treatment to
her hand a fter it was slammed i n a
door.
0450 Greenville man reported
to Greenville Police as being pos-
sible impaired while driving a
motor vehicle.
0140 Larceny of barricade
reported. Scott resident and Elm
Street man were found in posses-
sion of said barricade.
1225 Head Resident of Aycock
reported person kicking and crack-
ing the east entrance of dorm.
1010 Car window broken.
420 Damage to east entrance
of Aycock reported. Glass was
broken.
0721 Male found in shower of
Memorial Gym.
2300 Woman reported being
assaulted on the first floor of Jarvis
Dorm. Three male subjects were
involved.
2225 Unauthorized alcohol
party held in Umstead. Three non-
student banned.
April 2
203 Alcohol violation in Belk.
419 After hours in Greene.
455 After hours in Fletcher.
1840 Damage to mirror in
basement bathroom of Menden-
hall.
2157 Jarvis resident injured
ribs while playing softball at in-
tramural field.
2234 Request for location of
daughter.
2358 Anonymous informant
observed two Scott men damage a
vehicle parked south of Scott.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey J Kuth Pearce
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blankenship
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRJL 4, 1989 3
ECU coach charged with DWI
By DAVID HERRING
Aj�ut�nt Newt Fditor
Greenville police arrested an
ECU football coach and charged
him with driving while impaired
when he was found asleep in a car
with the lights on and the engine
running early Sundav morning.
According to court files, Timo-
thy A. Kelly, assistant defensive
line coach, was arrested at 1:55
am. Sundav near Fifth and Wash-
ington streets by Officer C.L.
Robertson. Kelly is set to appea
in Pitt County District Court on
April 18.
He was released into the cus-
tody of Jeff Jagodzinski, ECU as-
sistant football coach, after post-
ing a $300 unsecured bond, ac-
cording to an article in the Daily
Reflector. Kelly was hired from
Austin Peav State University in
Clarksville, TN, by new Head
Cich Bill Lewis.
According to Robertson's
report, he didn't actually observe
Kelly driving the car, but had
reasonablegrounds to believe that
Kelly had been driving while
impaired because he "was sitting
in a car passed out with engine
running and lights on Accord-
ing to a report filed by Officer
W.T. McCarter, breathalyzer ana-
lyst, Kelly blew a .19 at 3:23 a.m.
and a .20 one minute later.
Kelly is required oy state law
to surrender his driver's license
for 10 days and must pc-y a $25 fee
to the Pitt clerk of court to have it
restored. According to State De-
partment of Motor Vehicles rec-
ords, Kelly was driving a 1989
Chevrolet owned by Glyn Collins
Chevrolet Inc of Dunn, NC.
Collins is a member of the
Pirate Big Wheel Club, a booster
organization that donates auto-
mobiles to theathletic department.
He said he has provided a car to
the university each year for tin-
last five years.
Collins stated that although
he furnishes the car, ECU pro
vides the insurance coverage and
that Kelly's arrest shouldn't aft. vt
hisagreement with ECU. Accord-
ing to ECU Sports Information
Director Charles Bloom there are
no stipulations on coaches' per
sonal use of courtesy cars.
An official statement is ex-
pected from KeUy's attorney upon
the return of ECU Athletic Direc-
tor Dave Hart.
Society pushes for widespread AIDS testing
CI1ARLOTTE (AP) � A pro-
posal being considered by the
North Carolina Medical Society to
recommend widespread testing
tor the AIDS virus would drasti-
cally alter the group's AIDS pol-
icy and could affect future state
legislation.
"We want to see some action
that makes more sense than what's
been proposed so far said
Raleigh neurosurgeon Dr. lames
Fulghum, chairman oi a medical
society committee of specialty
doctors. Under the proposals, all
hospital patients, health care and
food service workers, barbers,
beauticians, pregnant women and
convicted prostitutes would be
tested for the AIDS virus.
Applicants for marriage li-
censes would also be required to
be tested. In addition, doctors
would be required to report all
patients infected with the human
immunodeficiency virus �
whether or not they have con-
tracted AIDS � to "state health
officials.
In defending widespread test-
ing, Fulghum raised the hvpotheti-
cal possibility of an HIV-infected
cixk spilling blood while prepar-
ing food. "It's a fatal illness he
said, "and I'd just rather not have
the person put their finger in my
soup
The current policy of the N.C.
Medical Society does not include
mandatory Al DS testing or report-
ing of HIV-infected patients. It
calls for laws prohibiting discrimi-
nation against AIDS patients in
housing, employment, insurance,
transportation and health care.
And it calls for more money tor
AIDS education.
Fulghum says the medical
society has "headed off in a direc-
tion that doesn't reflect the major-
ity oi the physicians in the state
However, some medical society
leaders, public health officials,
AIDS activists and leaders of sev-
eral state and local AIDS study
committees say in interviews
published Sunday in The Char-
lotte Obseiver that Fulghum'
recommendations go too far.
"This would be a giant s tep
backwards said Dr. Jared
Schwartz, a Charlotte pathologist
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
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who helped draft the medii al
society'scurrent AIDS police Said
David Jones, coordinator of the
Durham-based N.C. AIDS Serv-
ice Coalition: "Dr. Fulghum's
proposals are radically inconsis-
tent with the conclusions that have
been reached by every objective
body that has studied AIDS
At this point, Fulghum's pro-
posals have been approved only
by hiscommittee, which endorsed
them on a 15-0 vote two weeks
ago.
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655MI MOKIALDKlVi:
CKU.NY1LI
Abortion
tt I wasn't rubbing
it in-1 just wanted
Eddie to know
the score of
last night's garnet

Continued from page 1
'�
where the father goes to work and
the mother raises the children.
"But she noted, "the father
knows best family is not the norm
anymore
Recently, the Supreme Court
agreed to review a Missouri case
that will test the constitutionality
Ot a state law recognizing and
protecting the life of an infant, and
giving it all the rights of a resident.
However, the Roe vs. Wade case
prohibits states from adopting
theories as to when k begins.
In a worst case scei trio, pro-
posed by Berkeley, if Roe vs. Wade
is overturned and each state is
allowed to separately prohibit or
restrict abortion, then "feminists
will be spiriting(pregnant) women
to states where the law is least
restrictive" for their abortions. If it
is decided that life begins at con-
ception, Berkeley warns, "Abor-
tion services will become less ac-
cessible and more expensive, and
many women,especially poor, will
not have the freedom of choice
According to Berkeley, Ameri-
can colonial governments bor-
rowed from English law which
said that life begins when the fe-
tus first moves, or "quickens
within the womb. Historically,
abortion was regarded as the natu-
ral termination of pregnancy and
concern was over the mother's
health, not that of the fetus.
Throughout colonial times,
abortion was never a punishable
offense as long as the mother
wasn't quick with child, Berkeley
stated. By the mid 1800s a healthy
woman would have 10 to 12 preg-
nancies, with 20 to 25 years of
birth and child rearing.
Women mortality rates were
as high as child mortality rates,
therefore women wanted to delay
having children and limit family
size. "In 1898 in Michigan, one-
third of all pregnancies of white,
upper-class women ended in
abortion Berkeley noted.
abortion issue is per-
ceived ii morally and emotion-
ally charged terms Berkeley
stated. "The issue of reproduction
has been catapulted to the fore-
front of the political arena. His-
torically, women have more
(medical) problems with pregnan-
cies than with abortions
To help celebrate Women's
History Month, Berkeley's speech
was co-sponsored by the ECU
Richard C Todd Chapter of Phi
Alpha Theta, the National His-
tory Honor Society, and the ECU
Women's Studies Program.
m
.
t
h
Cm
�-�
!SK
Go ahead and gloat. You can
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with AT&T Long Distance Service
Besides, your best friend Eddie
was the one who said your team
could never win three straight.
So give him a call. It costs a
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know who's headed for the Playoffs
Reach out and touch someone
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V
I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4,1989 3

I
ECU coach charged with DWI
By DAVID HERRING
Ni
Greenville police arrested an
ECU football coach and charged
him with driving while impaired
when he was found asleep in a car
with the lights on and the engine
running early Sunday morning.
According to court files, Timo-
thy A. Kelly, assistant defensive
line coach, was arrested at 1:55
a.m. Sunday near Fifth and Wash-
ington streets by Officer C.L.
Robertson. Kelly is set to appea;
in Pitt County District Court on
April 18.
He was released into the cus-
tody of Jeff Jagodzinski, ECU as-
sistant football coach, after post-
ing a $300 unsecured bond, ac-
cording to an article in the Daily
Reflector. Kelly was hired from
Austin Peay State University in
Clarksville, TN, by new Head
Coach Bill Lewis.
According to Robertson's
report, he didn't actually observe
Kelly driving the car, but had
reasonable grounds to believe that
Kelly had been driving while
impaired because he "was sitting
in a car passed out with engine
running and lights on Accord-
ing to a report filed by Officer
W.T. McCarter, Breathalyzer ana-
lyst, Kelly blew a .19 at 3:23 a.m.
and a .20 one minute later.
Kelly is required by state law
to surrender his driver's license
for 10 days and must pty a $25 fee
to the Pitt clerk of court to have it
restored. According to State De-
partment of Motor Vehicles rec-
ords, Kelly was driving a 1989
Chevrolet owned by Glyn Collins
Chevrolet Inc of Dunn, NC.
Collins is a member of the
Pirate Big Wheel Club, a booster
organization that donates auto-
mobiles to the athletic department.
He said he has provided a car to
the university each year for the
Last five years.
Collins stated that although
he furnishes the car, ECU pro-
vides the insurance coverage and
tliat Kelly's arrest shouldn't affect
his agreement with ECU. Accord-
ing to ECU Sports Information
Director Charles Bloom there are
no stipulations on coaches' per-
sonal use of courtesy cars.
An official statement is ex-
pected from Kelly's attorney upon
the return of ECU Athletic Direc-
tor Dave Hart.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
r

�DIAMONDS
�DICYCLttS
�TELEVISIONS
�GUNS
CORNER OY 10th & DICKINSON
�GUITARS
�DORM
REFRIGERATORS
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�VCR'a
GRKENVfLME

Society pushes for widespread AIDS testing
CHARLOTTE (AP) � A pro-
posal being considered by the
North Carolina Medical Society to
recommend widespread testing
for the AIDS virus would drasti-
cally alter the group's AIDS pol-
icy and could affect future state
legislation.
"We want to see some action
that makes more sense than what's
been proposed so far said
Raleigh neurosurgeon Dr. James
Fulghum, chairman of a medical
society committee of specialty
doctors. Under the proposals, all
hospital patients, health care and
food service workers, barbers,
beauticians, pregnant women and
convicted prostitutes would be
tested for the AIDS virus.
Applicants for marriage li-
censes would also be required to
be tested. In addition, doctors
would be required to report all
patients infected with the human
immunodeficiency virus �
whether or not they have con-
tracted AIDS � to state health
officials.
In defending widespread test-
ing, Fulghum raised the hypotheti-
cal possibility of an HIV-infected
cook spilling blood while prepar-
ing food. "It's a fatal illness he
said, "and I'd just rather not have
the person put their finger in my
soup
The current policy of the N.C.
Fulehum says the medical who helP "? the medical
society has "headed off in a dircc- society's current AIDS policy. Said
tion that doesn't reflect the major- JJjd f ��� of the
ity of the physicians in the state Durham-based N.C. AIDS Serv-
However, some medical society Ice Coalition: "Dr. Fulghum's
leaders, public health officials, proposals are radically inconsis-
c-cuc�urcvu. u AIDS activists and leaders of sev- tent withtheconclusions that have
Medical Society does not include eral state and local AIDS study n rfached by every objective
mandatory AIDS testing or report- committees say in interviews body that has studied AIDS
ing of HTV-infected patients. It published Sunday in The Char- At this point, Fulghum's pro-
calls for laws prohibiting discrimi- lotte Observer that Fulghum's posals have been approved only
recommendations go too far. by hiscommittee, which endorsed
"This would be a giant step them on a 15-0 vote two weeks
backwards said Dr. Jared ag�-
Schwartz, a Charlotte pathologist
nation against AIDS patients in
housing, employment, insurance,
transportation and health care.
And it calls for more money for
AIDS education.
MEMORIAL COINS
&PAWN
�BASEBALL CARDS
�STAMPS
�COIN SUPPLIES
�DIAMONDS
�TELEVISIONS
�VCR's
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
�COINS
INSTANT CASH LOANS-WE BUY
GOLD & SILVER
All Transactions Strictly Confidential
752-7736
655MEMORIALDRIVE GREENVILLE
�ib
Abortion
i
Continued from page 1
where the father goes to work and
the mother raises the children.
"But she noted, "the father
knows best family is not the norm
anymore
Recently, the Supreme Court
agreed to review a Missouri case
that will test the constitutionality I
of a state law recognizing and
protecting the life of an infant, and
giving it all the rights of a resident.
However, the Roe vs. Wade case I
prohibits states from adopting
theories as to when life begins.
In a worst case scei irio, pro-
posed by Berkeley, if Roe vs. Wade
is overturned and each state is
allowed to separately prohibit or
restrict abortion, then "feminists
willbespiriting(pregnant) women
to states where the law is least
restrictive" for their abortions. If it
is decided that life begins at con-
ception, Berkeley warns, "Abor-
tion services will become less ac-
cessible and more expensive, and
many womenespecially poor, will
not have the freedom of choice
According to Berkeley, Ameri-
can colonial governments bor-
rowed from English law which
said that life begins when the fe-
tus first moves, or "quickens
within the womb. Historically,
abortion was regarded as the natu-
ral termination of pregnancy and
concern was over the mother's
health, not that of the fetus.
Throughout colonial times,
abortion was never a punishable
offense as long as the mother
wasn't quick with child, Berkeley
stated. By the mid 1800s a healthy
woman would have 10 to 12 preg-
nancies, with 20 to 25 years of
birth and child rearing.
Women mortality rates were
as high as child mortality rates,
therefore women wanted to delay
having children and limit family
size. "In 1898 in Michigan, one-
third of all pregnancies of white,
upper-class women ended in
abortion Berkeley noted.
"The abortion issue is per-
ceived in morally and emotion-
ally charged terms Berkeley
stated. "The issue of reproduction
has been catapulted to the fore-
front of the political arena. His-
torically, women have more
(medical) problems with pregnan-
cies than with abortions
To help celebrate Women's
IlistoiyMonuXBerkeley'sspeech
was co-sponsored by the ECU
Richard C Todd Chapter of Phi
Alpha Theta, the National Hfc-
tory Honor Society, and the ECU
Women's Studies Program.
ttl wasn't rubbing
it in-Iiust wanted
w
ime.

f
A s
Go ahead and gloat. You can
rub it in all the way to Chicago
with AT8Sr Long Distance Service.
Besides, your best friend Eddie
was the one who said your team
could never win three straight.
So give him a calL It costs a
lot less than you think to let him
know who's headed for the Playoffs.
Reach out and touch someone.�
If youd like to know mote about
AT8T products and services, like
International Calling and the AT8ST
Card, call us at 1800 222-0300.
SumUniversity of Vshington-Class of 1990
ART
riaht choice.
�Hlii ilfti m�n n�r�
1.01� �" m�-0r4" � "
���
mm
MH����t.l
Wmr�' �'� ����





I
v
�lje i�ast (Entalxnmn
SfffVMf fir f �? t a'cWM "vm .iwmttootif r
Pete Fernald, ci mini ��
Stephanie Folsom, mm u
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, DmmHnfAJtmlmmt
Tim Hampton, .��� r
Cl IRIS SlECTZ L, Sports Editor
Q up Carter, F�r�ra ��,
Susan Howell, ptodtvm Monger
Dean Waters, om�
Stephanie Singleton, g ���
Brad Bannister, cyj
jErrTARKER, Stn Uhatme,
TOM FURR,C.rd.arujrr
Dehbie Stevens, s��u
Stephanie Emoryu r�
Mac Clark, snos ai
Supervisor
ApnH 1989
OPINION
Page 4
New game
It seems some SGA legislators
have come up with a new game to
play while they are in office.
Two weeks ago everyone took
part in a rousing round of spike the
speaker, delaying action on impor-
tant bills and resolutions by pound-
ing Marty Helms in a questions
period that lasted longer than a slow
evening at the Oscars. By the time
the legislature got around to dealing
with the important business at hand,
there were not enough students
present to make a quorum. Without
a quorum, the SGA cannot formally
pass any resolutions or bills. Debate,
without the ability to act formally,
becomes useless, and the SGA, in
effect, becomes stagnant.
This week legislators didn't wait
for any long grandstanding. A
number of them, including vice
president-elect Jennifer Vanderberg
and treasurer-elect Ray Madden,
didn't even bother to show. By mid-
way through the meeting enough
legislators had simply gotten up and
left so that there was no longer a
quorum and the SGA was once
again paralyzed.
This conduct among our elected
representatives is reprehensible and
indefensible. Because our legislators
put SGA so low on their priorities,
two student groups will be unable to
receive funds in time to pay the costs
they need them for. Neither funding
bill, both passed by the Appropria-
tions Committee, made it to the
floor before quorum was broken.
There is no way, now, that these
groups will get their much needed
funding in time.
Other bills, including at least
three from the Student Welfare
Committee, were also tabled iato
the next meeting in hopes of achiev-
ing a quorum then.
If legislators are not going to
participate in the SGA meetings
then they should resign immedi-
ately instead of crippling the legisla-
tive proceedings because of their
own petty self-interest.
Admittedly, SGA requires a lot
of time and a lot of dedication to the
student body. Legislators, however,
knew that before they got involved.
They have no excuse for backing out
now, after they have accepted the
responsibility of speaking for the
students.
There are, of course, several
dedicated students in the legislature
who take their responsibilities seri-
ously- To those students, we give
our thanks.
For the others, however, we have
a simple message: get active, or get
off. Stop crippling our student gov-
ernment in your own self-interest. If
you can't be at the meetings, stay for
the entire meetings and take an ac-
tive role, then do the honorable
thing and remove yourself from the
legislature.
f3ffl&25-22-
Second chance to vote for pres
To the editor:
Well, you thought you were fin-
ished. You thought that since you
had voted, you had completed your
contribution to the humble, political
domain of ECU. Well, I am writing
this letter because most of the stu-
dents (about 13,500 of you) didn't
vote � but you're in luck! You get
another chance tomorrow. All elec-
tions are over for 1989, except for the
SGA presidential run-off. On behalf
of the committee to elect Valeria
Lassiter, I want to encourage you to
vote for our candidate, but more
importantly, VOTE!
Don't get me wrong. I have never
in any way been a psychotic political
mongrel who would stop you on the
street and outline the platform of my
candidate. Like you, I've also been
assaulted by some guy preaching at
the bottom College Hill about how
his candidate is going to bring back
the drunk bus, and fix the parking
problem, and fix the Pirate Walk
problem and Well, I didn't really
listen to him because my only prob-
lem was how to get past this guy so I
could go up to my room and sleep.
But when Valeria Lassiter told me
she was running for SGA president, I
vowed to help because for once I
actually had faith in one of the candi-
dates.
I've known Valeria for almost a
year and can say in that short period
of time she has justified the impres-
sion of standing behind her word and
standing up for others. She is a posi-
tive embodiment and representatior
of every ECU student and promises
to stand by, sympathize with, and
take action upon that student's opin-
ions and necessities. Whether the
issue is how to come up with tuitior
next year or how to get a parking
place in the morning, Valeria's elec-
tion to SGA president is a step in the
direction of progress.
So on your way back from class
tomorrow, stop by one of those
purple voting boxes and follow this
simple procedure:
1. Give ID; get ballot.
2. Put check next to VALERIA
LASSITER.
3. Get ID; give ballot.
4. Go home and sleep, eat,
drink, other.
It's as easy as one, two, three
four.
Ted Christensen
Sophomore
English
Roakes endorsed
To the editor:
Tomorrow, you the students of
ECU, will be choosing your next SGA
president. The candidate who will
best represent and serve this univer-
sity is Tripp Roakes. I have worked
with Tripp on SGA the past two
years, last year on the Student Wel-
fare Committee and this past year
while serving as executive officers.
Since I have known him, Tripp's
main concern has always been the
needs of the students and trying to
find ways in which student govern-
ment can meet those needs. This
awareness is the quality we need in
our next SGA president. Tripp is also
experienced in negotiating and put-
ting forth a proposal to the university
as its highest level. Tripp has con-
crete, realistic ideas that can be put
into action. If given the opportunity,
he will strive to make them work. It
takes a lot of time and dedication to
represent the university as well as the
student body. Tripp realizes this and
is prepared to make the necessary
sacrifices and take on the responsi-
bilities of the position. I have come to
know Tripp very well and have
learned a great deal from him. I've
learned that Tripp is a determined,
hard-working individual with sin-
cere motives. He is willing to im-
prove our university in any wav
possible. He cares about ECU now
and for the future. He has done an ex-
cellent job as SGA treasurer and I
know he will do an even better job as
SGA president. I urge you, the stu-
dents, to be active members of vour
J
university by voting tomorrow for
Tripp Roakes as your 1989-90 SGA
president.
Colleen M. McDonald
Sophomore
Communications
A change
To the editor:
In the four years I have been at
ECU, I have never seen a candidate
more qualified to be SGA president
than Valeria Lassiter.
As an active member of a number
of student groups and the former
managing editor of The East Carolin-
ian, I have watched ECU politics and
politicians carefully. Year to year,
without fail, students here pick a
president that will represent the
status quo and stay with the main-
stream, marking little real prop-
for the students.
Valeria represents a change fr rr
that pattern.
A progressive thinker and an
energetic worker, Valeria will bnng
excitement back into the SGA. In the
short time I have known Valeria she
has impressed me rime and again
with her understanding of the y-
tics of what really happens at (he
university and her ability to over-
come obstacles with strong, prag
matic initiatives.
As president, Valeria wi uld
bnng thisapproach and energy to the
legislature. Hopefullv, we would st
the SGA once again take a stand for
the students, placing student needs
over the petty political bickering that
is so prevalent todav.
A vote for Valeria on Wednes-
day is truly a vote for the futun
ECU and the student bodv On
Wednesday you will be asked to
make more than a choice between
two popular, well-qualified candi-
dates. You will be asked to choo. j
new rnorejrogreive fuUHSfc
Choose the future, vote for Val-
eria Lassiter.
Clay Deanhardt
Graduate Student
English
Good soldier
To the editor:
Every now and then there c
a bold soldier. One who is not
willing to sLand amid the crow
tell it like it is, but one who is w
to risk the needless personal a
and pain that often accompanu- �
fight for the cause.
Valeria Lassiter has proven her-
self to be a leader and a good soldier
A leader because she has wh
takes to lead: innovativeness, i
enthusiasm, tact, temperance sol-
dier, because she fights best wh
odds are stacked against her.
Following the crowd has ah n s
been the easy way out. As a math -
fact, there are some people
smoke, drink, and take drugs, sir .
because everybody else does. Weil
en Wednesday, sadly to sav that
trend may continue, unless we as a
student bodv, Intervene.
See LETTERS, page 5
The shortage of land and water linked to the meat industry
Campus Spectrum
By
Craig Spitz
Monopolizing land the way it does, livestock
agriculture deserves most of the blame for defores-
tation. Of the 70 million acres of forestland cleared
between 1967and 1975,47 mill ion were converted to
grazing land, which, of course, prevents reforesta-
tion. And if the U.S. were not using 950 million acres
for livestock it would be possible to grow forests on
this land, thus eliminating the need to clear natural
forests. Also, this reforestation would eliminate
America's need to import wood and, thus, the eco-
nomic incentive to destroy rain foreests, which has
proved overpowering to most South American
countries, would be gone. In other words, if the U.S.
were not using so much land for livestock, there
would not be a need ot clear any more forests at all,
anywhere!
The shortage of water is another problem that
can be traced to the meat industry. Of the 55.1 cubic
km of water used in the U.S agriculture, according
to the USD A, claims 221.8 or just over 40 percent. But
it is important to distinguish comsumptive uses and
nonconsumptive ones. Consumptive uses evapo-
rate the water, returning it to the hydrological cycle.
Nonconsumptive uses keep the water available for
future use. Only 147 cubic km of water are actually
consumed in the U.S but of this, 122 cubic km, or 83
percent, are consumed by agriculture. Eighty-five
percent of the total agricultural use of water is for
livestock. While one pound o f beef has fewer calories
than a pound of wheat, it requires forty to fifty times
as much water to produce. With water tables con-
tinuing to fall at the alarming rate that they are, the
U.S. cannot afford such an incredible waste of such
a valuable resource for much longer.
Another environmental problem that meat pro-
duction contributes to in a big way is soil depletion.
Now some soil erosion is natural, but this natural
erosion should be balanced by soil formation. The
average rate of soil formation in the U.S. currently is
112 tons per acre per year. Unfortunately, the U.S.
is losing its soil at the alarming rate of 12 tonsacre
year. Both livestock agriculture is by far responsible
for a greater amount. In particular, cattle ranching is
the worst culprit. The grazing and trampling of
cattle remove the protective vegetation covering of
the soil which makes it susceptible to wind and
water erosion. For each MCal of rangeland beef
produce, 800 pounds of soil are lost. In comparison,
each MCal of oats depletes only 5.2 pounds of soil.
When the topsoil of an area is gone, the land is
virtually useless. Incidentally, the majority of land
rendered useless for agricultural purposes through-
out history was ruined by topsoil depletion. If the
U.S. were to adopt a vegetarian agricultural system,
then enough land could be set aside to grow forests,
which produce a great deal of soil, and the entire
problem of soil depletion would be solved.
This article is not meant to be a bad omen. It is
meant to bear good news. The problems of food
scarcity, deforestation, water depletion, and soil
erosion, which sometimes seem overwhelming, do
have a.solution. The solution is certainly a humanly
possible one, but one that will meet with a great deal
of resistance. The situation is summed up in the
saying, "We have met the enemy and he is us If
these problems stamp us out before we do them, we
know where the blame will lie. We humans will
simply have to ask ourselves whether our craving
for the taste of meat outweighs our desire to have a
future.
Over 97.5 percent of Americans eat meat in one
form or another. Today, most people are aware of the
health problems associated with excessive meat
consumption. Few are concerned about ethical
drawbacks of the practice, but at least the facts on
that subject are readily available to those brave
enough to face them. And, of course, just about
everyone knows of the hazards meat consumption
causes to one's pocketbook. But few are aware of the
environmental effects of raising animals for meat on
the massive scale presently emploved in the U.S. The
practice is extremely wasteful of food and land re-
sources, and it is the root of such serious environ
mental problems as deforestation, the water short
age, and soil erosion.
According to the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture, 950 million acres of land are utilized for live-
stock raising, while 444 million acres are used for
growing crops. But since two-thirds of the crops are
sued to feed livestock, the total acreage used for
livestock purposes comes to 1,243 million, or
roughly 90 percent of all agricultural land in the U.S.
This land is largely wasted because raising animaL
for meat is far less productive in terms of food than
the growing of crops. One acre used to raise beef
yields about 110,000 megacalories (one million calo-
ries: abbreviated MCal), whereas that same acre
could produce 2,760,000 MCal of oats. No one can
can dispute that livestock agriculture is vastly inef-
ficient compared to plant food agriculture. But even
if the resources were available to sustain this ineffi-
cient use of land, there would still be many other
problems.
Y





continued from page 4
We have tried many years to
make this campus a place of pride
and equality for all students and
yet year after year we have failed
We have failed because of our own
short-comings.
When we do not use the sys
tern, this democratic system ol
voting that allows us to be heard,
we fail ourselves We are indi
rectly voting against those things
that we believe in the most
l.ast Monday, 1 attended the
candidates forum. As 1 listened to
each candidate speak, 1 yearned
that every ECU student would
have attended The choice would.
have been very clear; and on last
Wednesday's election instead of
having a toss-up between Lassiter
and Tripp, we would have had a
"landslide victory" in lassiter s
favor.
However, as is our usual pro
cedure, only a few students at-
tended the forum, only a tew stu-
dents exercised their voting rights
and as a result we have the "popu-
lar" candidate instead of the "KM
candidate.
Tomorrow, come out and
vote. Helpmakea difference. Vote
Valeria lassiter tor SG A president.
Steven Tierce
Accounting
Senior
Drunk bus
To the editor.
Fellow student.
Tomorrow you will have the
chance to cast your vote in the
run-oft election forSGA president.
My name is Tripp Roakes and I
am one oi the two candidates tor
the office.
Why should you vote tor me
you may be asking yourself now.
Let me give you a tew reasons. I
have served in student govern-
ment tor two years as a legislator
last year ml as the treasurer this
yeai l ha e the experience to lead
this m hool into the vMVs but 1 don't
want to focus on the past. 1 wantto
tell you what 1 will do for you
when elected
1 want to work on issues that
affect us, the students. 1 will work
on getting the results ol our teacher
evaluations made available to us,
the students. The way i see it we,
the students, are the consumers
and the teachers are the product
and we need to know exactly what
we are buying
()neol the biggest problems I
see tor students is the problem of
drinking and driving. Therefore 1
am in favor of reinstitutmg the
drunk bus This bus would run
on weekends from downtown to
areas such as Tar River, Wilson
Acres, Kingston Place, Eastbrook,
and c ollege I fill. This would pro-
ide tor a valuable alternative to
drinking and driving.
I will review the Pirate Walk
program using whatever means 1
have available. This program is an
essential to the safety of females
on campus
felected 1 will be hereto work
tor the students interest on this
campus, ucit the administration's
wishes. 1 will be a student's stu-
dent body president.
Thank you for your support
last Wednesday and please cast
your vote again tomorrow tor
Tripp Roakes, SGA president.
Thank you.
Tripp Roakes
SGA Treasurer
Senior
Experienced
the editor
! am writing in support ol
Iripp Roakes for student body
president.
Although Tnpp has a consid-
erable amount of experience out-
side of the student government,
his SGA record speaks tor itself.
Tripp is by far the most qualified
candidate for the job. He has been
a personal friend of mine for the
past four years, and in that time 1
have seen him excel as a leader,
motivate others, and challenge
others to excel. Qualities such as
these are essential in a good leader,
and would definitely benefit the
student government.
Tnpp has served on the SGA
for the past three years, as a legis-
lator and as treasurer. Expeni nee
is essential in understanding and
running the student government.
I hope you will join me on
April 4th in supporting Tripp
Roakes for student bodv president.
Barbara Lamb
Panhellenic president
Senior
Students' pres
To the editor:
I am writing this letter as an
endorsement for Tripp Roakes as
your next SGA presid nt Please
support him on Wednesday. Your
vote is important.
Tnpp and I have been friends
for quite a while. He worked on
my committee in student legisla-
ture. 1 feel qualified to tell you that
when Tnpp is excited about a job,
he will do a genxi job. Since Tripp
has planned around being SGA
president for as long as he has
been at ECU, he must be tmlv
excited about it. Give Tnpp the
chance to do a good job for you
the students
As Tnpp has said, he will be a
student's president. He cares
abou t your views and will be there
tor you. Even this year, as treas-
urer, he has spent much ot his free
time in our office; I do not see his
changing, so finding Tripp next
year should not be a problem, f le
will be accessible to be your presi-
dent
Please join together and sup-
port Tripp. Let's begin working
for a common goal; we can do this
by all supporting my friend and
my choice for president � Tripp
Roakes.
Vote Wecinesdav, Apnl 5.
Thank you.
Kelly Jones
Committee to Elect
Tripp Roakes
Campus j
Forum
The hast Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points 'f
view Mail or drop them by our
office in the Publications Build-
ing, across from the entrance to
Joyner Library. For purposes oi
verification, all letters must in-
clude the name, major, classifica-
tion, address, phone number and
the signature of the author(s).
1 ettersare limited to300wordsor
less, double-spaced, typed or
neatl) printed. All letters are sub
ject to editing for brevity, obscen-
ity and libel, and no personal at-
tatcks will be permitted.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4,1909 5
CAROLINA MINI
STORAGE
� ilONIt IN UNI19
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Campus
Spectrum
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section ol the paper. The Fast Caro-
linian features "The Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student bod)
and faculty. The columns are pruned
in "The Campus Spectrum" will con-
tain current topics of concern lo the
ampus, community or nation.
r
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1)
continued from page 4
We have tried many years to
make this campus a place of pride
and equality for all students and
yet year after year we have failed.
We have failed because of our own
short-comings.
When we do not use the sys-
tem, this democratic system of
voting that allows us to be heard,
we fail ourselves. We are indi-
. rectly voting against those things
, that we believe in the most.
Last Monday, I attended the
j candidates forum. As I listened to
each candidate speak, I yearned
that every ECU student would
have attended. The choice would
have been very clear; and on last
Wednesday's election instead of
having a toss-up between Lassiter
, and Tripp, we would have had a
"landslide victory" in Lassiter's
favor.
However, as is our usual pro-
cedure, onlv a few students at-
tended the forum, only a few stu-
dents exercised their voting rights
and as a result we have the "popu-
lar" candidate instead of the "best"
candidate.
Tomorrow, come out and
vote. Help make a difference. Vote
Valeria Lassiter for SGApresident.
Steven Pierce
Accounting
Senior
-
Drunk bus
To the editor:
Fellow students,
Tomorrow you will have the
chance to cast your vote in the
run-off election for SGA president.
My name is Tripp Roakes and 1
am one of the two candidates for
the office.
Why should you vote for me
you may be asking yourself now.
Let me give you a few reasons. I
have served in student govern-
ment for two years as a legislator
last year and as the treasurer this
year. 1 have the experience to lead
this school into the 9Vs, but I don't
want to focus on the past. I want to
tell you what I will do for you
when elected.
i want to work on issues that
affect us, the students. 1 will work
on getting the results of our teacher
evaluations made available to us,
the students. The way I see it we,
the students, are the consumers
and the teachers are the product
and we need to know exactly what
we are buying.
One of the biggest problems 1
see for students is the problem of
drinking and driving. Therefore 1
am in favor of reinstituring the
"drunk bus This bus would run
on weekends from downtown to
areas such as Tar River, Wilson
Acres, Kingston Place, Eastbrook,
and College Hill. This would pro-
vide for a valuable alternative to
drinking and driving.
i will review the Pirate Walk
program using whatever means I
have available. This program is an
essential to the safety of females
on campus.
If elected I will be here to work
for the students interest on this
campus, not the administration's
wishes. I will be a student's stu-
dent body president.
Thank you for your support
last Wednesday and please cast
your vote again tomorrow for
Tripp Roakes, SGA president.
Thank you.
Tripp Roakes
SGA Treasurer
Senior
Experienced
To the editor:
I am writing in support of
Tripp Roakes for student body
president.
Although Tripp has a consid-
erable amount of experience out-
side of the student government,
his SGA record speaks for itself.
Tripp is by far the most qualified
candidate for the job. He has been
a personal friend of mine for the
past four years, and in that time I
have seen him excel as a leader,
motivate others, and challenge
others to excel. Qualities such as
these are essential in a good leader,
and would definitely benefit the
student government.
Tripp has served on the SGA
for the past three years, as a legis-
lator and as treasurer. Experience
is essential in understanding and
running the student government.
1 hope you will join me on
April 4th in supporting Tripp
Roakes for student body president.
Barbara Lamb
Panhellenic president
Senior
Students' pres
To the editor
I am writing this letter as an
endorsement for Tripp Roakes as
your next SGA president. Please
support him on Wednesday. Your
vote is important.
Tripp and I have been friends
for quite a while. He worked on
my committee in student legisla-
ture. I feel qualified to tell you that
when Tripp is excited about a job,
he will do a good job. Since Tripp
has planned around being SGA
president for as long as he has
been at ECU, he must be truly
excited about it. Give Tripp the
chance to do a good job for you �
the students.
As Tripp has said, he will be a
student's president. He cares
about your views and will be there
for you. Even this year, as treas-
urer, he has spent much of his free
time in our office; I do not see this
changing, so finding Tripp next
year should not be a problem. He
will be accessible to be your presi-
dent
Please join together and sup-
port Tripp. Let's begin working
for a common goal; we can do this
by all supporting my friend and
my choice for president � Tripp
Roakes.
Vote Wednesday, April 5.
Thank you.
Kelly Jones
Committee to Elect
Tripp Roakes
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4,1989 5
Campus
Forum
The East Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points of
view. Mail or drop them by our
office in the Publications Build-
ing, across from the entrance to
Joyner Library. For purposes of
verification, all letters must in-
clude the name, major, classifica-
tion, address, phone number and
the signature of the author(s).
Letters are limited to 300 words or
less, double-spaced, typed or
neatly printed. All letters are sub-
ject to editing for brevity, obscen-
ity and libel, and no personal at-
tatcks will be permitted.
CAROLINA MINI
� iMNftMttttll
� !�� HOOT NIT MTtt
� latUHAMCI ��MtStl
� 1 MT ft WtIC MCIM
� eOHMOClH. 4 NOUItMOID
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� COMCMTI 4 (Till conmwcTio
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STORAGE UNIT AND �
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Campus
Spectrum
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the paper, The East Caro-
linian features "The Campus
SpectrumThis is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student body
and faculty. The columns are printed
in "The Campus Spectrum" will con-
tain current topics of concern to the
campus, community or nation.
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I
Tr IE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4.1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
WORD PROCESSING: Reports, Resu
mes. Laser Printing. Rush jobs and reser-
vations accepted Call 752-1933 before 5
pm
NEED TO SUBLEASE? Law students
interested in subleasing furnished apart-
ments for summer (May � August). Want
to make arrangements as soon as possible.
Call Bert Speicher at 355-3030
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non-
smoker tosub-lot Mav � August, 1 3 rent
& utilities at Wilson Acres. Fullv fur-
nished, private bedroom, pool, cable,
laundrv, walking distance from ECU Call
Dtwn at 738-738
ROOM FOR RENT: 2 bdroom house non-
smoker $150 mnth, plus utilities. Close to
campus Call Luke after 3 pm at 758-7952
or 355-3543
WANTED: To rent 2 or 3 Bdr. house or
dublev Near campus preferred. Must al-
low pets. Needed bv Mav 1 Will takeover
lease Call 752-3860
FOR RENT. 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath
townhouse at Twin Oaks. Family man-
aged � S525 month Fireplace, Appli-
ances, Patio, Pool. Year's lease required.
Opens August 15, in time for Fall
semester. Call 752-2851.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For summer
sessions to share 1 3 rent and utilities. 2
bedroom apartment, fullv furnished Call
Scxtt at 752-8308 or Brian at 830-6863.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non-
smoker. May � December, 13 rent &
utilities, at Wilson Acres, private bed-
room, pool, cable, laundry, walking dis-
tance from ECU. Call Dawn or Karen 758-
7368 or 757-6611 ext. 210.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE TO
SUBLEASE: Beginning after Mav 8, 2
bedroom, 1 12 bath. Rent S370mon
plus utilities Close to campus. Lease ends
after 2nd summer school session For
details call 830-5138 � ask for Trish,
Susan or Tammv
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share 2 bd
apt beginning May. Non� smoker,
clean, studious, female, no pets. SI65.00
month, 12 utilities. 355-3081 Jennifer
(5�6 or after 9:30 p.m.)
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For summer
mos. Female, non�smoker. 3 bdrm at
Eastbrook Own room, ECU bus service,
pool S127 a month plus 13 utilities. If
interested call 830-6646
FOR SALE
REM TICKETS FOR SALE: Chapel Hill
and Charlotte shows. Great seats. 1-490-
6805 anvtime. Best offer
FOR SALE: 5 ft width cabinet, fits Clem-
ent, White, & Greene dorms. Very spa-
cious Has a shelf to fit large refrigerator
Call Kathleen or Amy 758-4507.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
From SI 00 Fords Mercedes Corvettes.
Chevvs Surplus Buvers Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S�1166.
FOREIGN STUDENTS: Job-hunting
Guide (Rev 1989). Sent $19.95 for the step-
bv-step guide IvvSoft International, PO
Box 241090, Memphis TN 38125-1090.
FOR SALE: 10 band stereo frequency
equalizer with IMX expander spectrum
analvzer Like new $85 Call 752-3432 and
ask for Dave.
FORMAL GOWN. Size 5-7 only worn
ondt black with white taffeta. $90.00 or
BO call 830-3806.
RECLINERS FOR SALE: Brand new, no
joke! Excellent prices! For more informa-
tion, call Mike at 752-6823.
LOFT FOR SALE: Room size already
assembled $70 or best offer. Call 758-8126
evenings.
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Windy
Ridge, 3 bedroom, 2 12 baths. Com-
pletely remodeled. With initial down
payment of S4.000.00 and S4O2.00per
month or renting for S500.00per month.
Swimming pool, tennis courts, and club-
house Call 756-1180 or 756-4747.
FOR SALE: 3ft x 1 12 ft hotpoint dorm
refrigerator. Almost brand-new. Asking
$150 � price neg. Call 752-9743.
FOR SALE: Single brass head board with
single mattress and box spring included!
Sheets available also" Only $50" If inter-
ested Call 830-6646.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D J for the best music available for
parties Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J- Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party.
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage
HELP WANTED
RESIDENT COUNSELOR: Interested in
those with human service background
wishing to gain valuable experience in the
field. No monetary compensation, how-
ever room, utilities and phone provided.
Marv Smith REAL Crisis Center 758-
HELP.
CABIN COUNSELORS &
INSTRUCTORS: (Male and Female) for
western North Carolina 8 week children's
summer camp. Over 30 activities includ-
ing Water Ski, Tennis, Heated swimming
pool, Go-Karts, Hiking, ArtRoom,
meals, salary and travel Experience not
necessary Non-smoking students write
for applicationbrochure: Camp Pine-
wood, 20205-1 N.E. 3 Ct Miami, Honda
33179.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING: Flight Atten
dants. Travel Agents, Mechanics, Cus-
tomer Service. Listings. Salaries to $105K.
Entry level positions. Call (1) 805-687-
6000 Ext. A-1166.
HELP WANTED: Full or part time desk
clerk and relief audit positions available at
the Ramada Inn. Some experience is pre-
ferred. Applv in person at the front desk
M � F 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. No phone calls
please.
NATIONAL MARKETING FIRM:
Seeks ambitious, mature student to man-
age on campus promotions for top na-
tional companies this school year Hexible
hours with earning potential up to S25O0.
Call 1-800-932-0538. Ext. 27
HELP WANTED: OVERSEAS JOBS. Also
Cruiseships. $l0,000-$105,000vr! Now
hiring! Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext OJ-
1166.
TELEMARKETING RAMADA INN,
GREENVILLE: Good phone voice and
outgoing personality helpful. 9 � 2 p.m. 5
� 9 p.m shifts weekdays Great daily
We can wait to find out whose been send
ing all the goodies Love, The Sisters and
Pledges.
CHI OMEGA COCKTAIL: St Patricks
day had a new twist this year. For there
never was before crowned a king and
queen (Wendy and Andy) What a pair!
And Kikka, we really did try to keep the
place dean But there was no one else to
blame but the Chi�Os and their dates
Little Washington will never be the same'
WENDY ONEIL AND ANDY I EWIS
The Chi Omega Cocktail Queen and King
We congratulate you. Love, The Sisters
THE BROTHERS AND PLEDGES OF
PHI KAPPA TAU: The party at the coun
try Club was a blast AH and madras and
Kackis and golf dubs too, we have to tell
you it never was dull For our next date
we'll see vou at the 19th hole! Love the
Chi�Os
KIKKI DYE: Our cocktail was a complete
success and we owe it all to you You did
a terrific job Thank you! Your sisters and
pledges of Chi Omega.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: Only a few
more weeks, promise not to peek You'll
know who we are before you know it
Love your secret sorority. SI 11IIII11111
PI KAPP LITTLE SIS PLEDGES: The Pi
Kapps want to welcome Missy Schillings,
Tara Stroud, Tracey Storey, Donna Gre-
gory, Lori Cooke, Kelly Hunnicutt, and
Laurie Christopher Our newest addition
to a great tradition!
AZD: At 8 o'clock we teed off to star
playing liguid golf Bv the time we
reached hole four everyone was ready foi
more. After finally reaching number nine
everyone was feeling real fine We all tried
to make par, but our shots went afar With
liquid golf we had a good time and hope
you enjoyed our little rhyme The brothers
and pledges of PI Kappa Phi
SORORITY RUSH: Alpha Xi Delta
would like to invite all interested girls to
Fall sorority rush Register now for the
Fall and become a part of ECU greek life
Go greek.
ALPHA DELTA PI: Have a gTeat week!
Do you know who we are!? Get psyched
for Greek week! Love, Your Secret Soror-
ity.
JENNIFER VANDERBURG: Congratu
lations on winning the election! We know
you'll fulfill your duties to perfection! To
say the least, we are very proud! We knew
you'd win � there was never a doubt' We
'ove vou! The AZD's
YO! GREEKS If finding a cool shirt is
your main quest � buy it from an AZD �
these shirts are the best!
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Oh, what a blast
we had Monday night! But what could we
say! We did it up right! With our sarcastic
skit and our rappin' song, we were hoping
vou wouldn't give us that GONG! But
there is one thing we must say to you lads:
We're the AZD's and we don't use knee-
pads! Thanks for an awesome time! Love
the AZD's.
HEY, EVERYBODY! All sing is here, it'll
be so much fun! There's lots of laughs and
prizes to be won! So go to the Attic at 8
o'clock tonight � 'cause AZD all sing is
one awesome sight! Get psyched! Love,
AZD.
MEN OF ECU: The time is here to start
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
your campaign! It's from AZD formal you
won't want to refrain! It's gonna be great'
Our formal is BOSS and if vou don't go it's
your loss! It's Pink Rose Ball '89' And none
could contest that AZD formal is defi
nately the best! With Love, Alpha Xi Delta
PI KAPPA PHI: Thursday was awesome
it was true to prediction' Partying with
you was our only mission' So thanks again
for a helluva time. If we don't do it again,
it'll be a crime! We love vou' The AZD's
WIN A FREETRIPTOTHF BAHAMAS.
Register Tuesdays only at Pantana Bob's
March 28 � April 18 Sponsored bv
Kappa Sigma The more times you come
the better the chance
HOW DOES A FREE TRIP TO THF
BAHAMAS SOUND? Be at Pantana
Bob's. Tuesday's only, March 28 � April
18. Time is running out. Get a ticket every
Tuesday for the final drawing April 25
More you come, better the odds
ATTENTION: Delta Zeta would like to
remind all ECU. women that Apnl 19 -
23 is sorority rush registration GO
GREEK! Tl IERES NO OT1IER WAY'
ALL CAMPUS: Thank you to everyone
who attended our spaghetti dinner last
Tuesday! You were all great patrons'
Hope you enjoyed our spaghetti' Delta
Zeta.
TRIPP ROAKES: Good luck in Wednes-
day's elections! We're behind vou all the
wav! Delta Zeta. VOTE TRIPP ROAKES
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
FOR RPESIDENT'
DELTA ZETA SOFTBALL PLAYERS:
Come on all you power hitters! Get psy
hed to win that game tomorrow' We love
you! Your sisters
DELTA SIGS: The toga pa'ty was a blast!
The music was rockin' S,rry about your
speakers Guess that Git and Roses did
them in' We had a great time! Let's do it
again soon' Love, the Delta Zetas
TO THE WHITE ROSE COURT: Thank
vou for our special Easter gift We reallv
needed those phones � Love Sigma Nu
ALPHA PHI: The time is almost here for
us to reveal ourselves to you Aren't you
excited7 Your Secret Sorority
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: Another great
mixer � that's no surprise The hayndes
vwre awesome � even though one truck
broke down and we had to walk home
You guvs are great' Love Alpha Delta Pi
TO ALL INTERESTED RUSHEES: We
were glad to see everyone at Spring Con
vocation We hope vou are all excited
about going through rush August 19 �
23.
NICKSTER: The best Lady I could ever
hope to know � Dear Heart
SIGMA AND PANTANA
sponsoring a Bahama's trip,
KAPPA
BOBS:
Register on Tuesday nights at PB's
drawing will held at Bahama Mama
Tht
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
bonuses
8910.
Call Dottie 5
p.m.
at 355-
HELP W .N'TED: Technical position �
production assistant needed for entry
level full time position at local TV. sta-
tion. Must be dependable and work well
with others. TV production background
helpful but not essential Send inquiries to
Production Manager WNCT�TV P.O.
Box 898 Greenville, NC 27834 EOE
ATTENTION SUMMER SESSION
STUDENTS: Will you have extra time on
your hands this summer? Will yoa nefd
extra spending money? U you answered
yes to either question we have some good
news for vou. Brody's and Brody's for
Men is currently accepting applications
for part-time sales and customer service
positions. Please apply at Brody's Caro-
lina East Mall Mon & Tues 2 � 4 p.m.
RINGOLD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER '89. EFFICIENCY 1
ft 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS.
FOR INFO. CALL HOLLIE SI-
monowich AT 752-2865
Save 25 on
H'Kt'inS'MM'DS, VL1LS,
�all jisriQVALrry
Special Order
Call'Toll Jru
far mort information
555-0298
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Stales and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Downtown Mall)758-3025
ECU Biology Club
Thursday, April6
Friday, April 7
8:00am - 1:00pm
at the
Biology
Greenhouse
Room S-lll
ABORTION
'Personal and Confidential Can
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru Sal Uw
Cost Termination to 20 worrits of prc,pvancy
1-800-433-2930
Diamonds - Jewelry - TV's -
VCR's - Watches - Guns -
Musical Instruments
BILLS
6X�
PAWN SHOP
'Strictly Confidential Transactions
INSTANT CASH LOANS
480 N. Greene Street
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)830-6828
PERSONALS
THIS THURSDAY AT THE K A HOUSE:
The Usuals and The Treble Maniax. Come
earlv, the bands start at 4 p.m. Tickets will
be on sale in front of the Student Store and
at the door. For more info call 757-0128.
PI KAPP PLEDGES: Man could not have
any pleasure in discovering all the beau-
ties of the universe unless he has
breathren with whom he might share his
joys (brotherhood my friends), No pun-
ishment is greater than solitude (tighten
up guvs, hint, hint).
North Virginia
Good Paying Summer Jobs
Male or Female Positions
Paxton Van Lines
Springfield, Va
Call:
B. J. Shamblin
800 336-4536
FAMILY CHILD ASSOCIATION: The
Family Child Association will be having a
meeting on April 4th at 6 p.m. in room 143
Home Economics Building. The guest
speaker is Lynn Powell from the Develop
mental Day Program. This is a special
program for the mentally handicapped
and at risk children. Eveyone is welcome
to attend.
REMEMBER: The Usuals and The Treble
Maniax will be at the KA house this Thurs-
day (April 6th). Everyone is welcome and
so are your coolers. Make plans now to get
there early, it's going to be a wild one!
TRIPP ROAKES � SGA PRESIDENT:
Tripp Roakes � SGA President Tripp
Roakes � SGA president. Bring your ID's
tomorrow.
VOTE TRIPP ROAKES: SGA President!
Here for the students interest. Be sure to
bring vour I Ds tomorrow.
THETA CHI SEE-SAWERS: Get ready
for your turn to ride the pine! Hey
pledges, get ready for a long night and a
bright sunrise! We'll all eat burgers, listen
to Z�103, and go up and down for special
Olympics. Whata Bargain!
SEE-SAW MANIA: Is coming this Satur-
day. Theta Chi is see-sawing for 24 hrs at
Burger King to raise money for Special
Olympics. So come by, listen to Z�1103
live and help up raise money for a worthy
cause.
THETA PRESENTS: The first annual see-
saw mania to raise money for Special
Olympics. Starting at 2:00 p.m. Saturday
at Burger King we will see-saw for 24 hrs
so come by and get a free set of Ginsu
knives and also help some special ath-
letes.
CHI OMEGA'S SECRET SORORITY:
ATTENTION:
PANHELLENIC ANNOUNCES:
Registration April 3rd-6th
& 10th 13th
Student Stores
Croatan
Bottom of Hill
10am - 3 pm
Olympic
IMarth Caralina
GREENVILLEPITT CO.
5tX&$Mjinia
PRESENTEP PV mEEA CHI FRATERNITY
24 w& or NCN5V0P Trninorn�
All PROCE-EPS 10 SPECIAL OLYMPICS
APRIL
GAT.
an
200
Arai 9
GKEEMVILLf PLVR
AT WEVm&WL
I
Now accepting
application for
The East Carolinian
Circulation Manager.
To apply for this position
bring your resume to
The East Carolinian
located on the second floor of
the publication building across from
Joyner Library.
(Salary plus commision, no phone calls please)
2nd Annual Bikini Contest
THURSDAY, APRIL 6TH
1st Prize
2nd Prize
3rd Prize
$100.00
$ 50.00
$25.00 Cash
& Prizes
TO ENTER CALL OR COME BY RAFTERS
752-4668 (leave message)
Doors Open at 8:30
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1







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4, 1989 7
Announcements
PLANXSALE
The ECU Biology Club will be sponsonng
a plant sale April 6-7 The sale will take
place m the Biology Greenhouse, room
BS-111 from S am to 1 pm
The performance of the Jazz Ensemble
Oregon will conclude the 1988-89 Cham-
ber Music Series. This performance will be
held in 1 lendnv Theatre on April 5 at 8
p m tickets are on sale now at the Central
Ticket Office MSC Hours are 11 a m6
PUTT PUTT GOLF
The resurrected putt-putt golf league will
hold a registration meeting April 4 at 5:00
pm in BIO N102 All ECU faculty, staff,
and students are welcome
HOME RUN DERBY
Babe Ruth's and other should find them-
wlvea with bat m hand Apnl 5 from 4-6
pm on the women's varsity Softball field
The annual Home Run Derby provides
great awards tor winners Bring your ECU
ID as the registration begins.
HPERS
The HFERS department announces the
Childrens s learn to Swim Program for
faculty and staff, starting Apnl 10th. For
more information call Melrose Moore 757-
fv441 or t�i42
WORLD RENOWN VIOLIN-
IST NAP) A SALERNO-SON-
NENBERG
Aorld Renown Violinist Nadja Salerno-
Sonnenberg will perform in Wright Audi-
torium at 8pm on April 20th. Her appear-
ance will conclude the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series at Fa�t Carolina Univer-
sity Her scheduled prgram will include:
SONATA No 2 in A Major, Op. 12, No. 2
by Beethoven, SONATA No. 2 ink D
Major, Op. 4a bv Prokofiev, Intermis-
sion SONATA No. 3 in D Minor, Op 108
bv Brahms. Ms. Salerno-Snnenberg will
bo acompanied by Sandra Rivers on the
piano. Tid ta for this event are now on
sale, they cai be purchased through the
Central Ticket Dftice at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center bv calling 757-6611, ext.266.
Office hours are 11 am-6 pm, Monday
through Friday
HEALTH FAIR
Fly high with wellness at the Health Fair
on Apnl 4 from 11 � 5:50 p m at Memo-
rial Gvm You can see a lot of health ori-
gnted displays and participate as well.
fc
TUPENT HEALTH SERVICE
ou are invited to "fly high with well-
ness" trom April 3 � 6 Walk with the
Chancellor on April 3 at 1210p.m. � meet
at Memorial Gvm Come to the Health
Fair (,11 � 530 p.m.) also at Memorial on
Apnl 4 Hear Harriet Elder speak on
Laughter at 7:30 p.m. in Jenkins Audito-
rium on April 5. Go fly a kite on April 6
from 3 � 5 p.m. on College Hill. Prizes
will be given for quickest in flight, highest
in altitude, and stunt flying.
WHAT'S YOU NUMBER?
The key to living a healthy life may be
our cholesterol number. Cholesterol
screening will be available at the Health
Fair April 4 at Memorial Gym. The cost is
S3 00 and the screening will be from 11
am to 1 p m and 2 p.m. to 530 p.m. If you
would like to schedule an appointment
for cholesterol screening call IRS 757-
6387, For best test resul ts don't eat or drink
anything after 6 p.m the night before.
PURE GOLD DANCERS
Pure Gold Dancer tryouts will be held
from 6-8 on Apnl 11 and Apnl 12 at the
strength complex Those trying out must
be present both davs
MS. WHEELCHAIR NC 1989
The Student Council for Exceptional Chil-
dren is proud to present Ms. Wheelchair
NCI 989 on Apnl 13 at 8 pm in the Nursing
Bldg Auditorium. She will be discussing
current legislation on the rights of dis-
abled persons as well as stories fo her ex-
periences Everyone is welcome to attend'
PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB
Massage Clinic � April 6 This is the last
one ths vear 6-9 pm at the Belk building
Rates SIminute in advance; $1 25min-
ute at the door We can massage your
back, feet, arms or legs. Don't miss it!
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
NEDVQRK
The Overseas Development Network will
be meeting on Apnl 4, at 515 pm in room
247 MSC All members must attend be-
cause we will be discussing the yard sale.
Anyone interested in the problems of
Third World countries please attend! For
more info contact Tonya Babzy (home)
830-8888 (work) 757-6611 ext. 210.
CHALLENGE WEEK
Do you hold a grudge?! Get rid of it at the
expense of intramural recreational serv-
ices. The registration deadline for Chal-
lenge week is April 10, from 11 am to 6 pm
in MG 104-A. Intramurals provides the
playing site, equipment adn officials. You
provide the players and pick the sport.
fTUPENT SERVICE
AWARDS
The Departments of Residence Education
and Housing sponsor yearly service
awards for students serving as Head Resi-
dents and Resident Advisers in ECU resi-
dence halls. Any resident may nominate a
student staff member they feel has done
an outstanding job this year. Nomination
forms are available in each residence hall
office and the deadline to submit nomina-
tions is April 10. Completed nominations
can be turned into each residence hall
officeand selection will be made by a
committee of professional and student
staff
PERFORMANCE AND OPEN
HOUSE
Students, faculty and staff are invited to
attend the final performance of a five-day
"Characterization Workshop" to be pre-
sented April 3-7 by acclaimed opera direc-
tor Talmage Fauntleroy. The performace
of opera scenes will begin at 4 pm, April 7,
in Fletcher Recital Hall followed at 5 bv an
Open House for Mr. Fauntleroy in foom
105 of the School of Music. A resident of
Florence, Italy, he is Artistic director of
Studio Lirico and director of Opera Stud-
ies at the Conservatory "Pietro Mascagni"
in Livorno. He is a 1975 graduate of the
ECU School of Music. His visit is spon-
sored by the Offices of the Chancellor,
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs,
and Equal Opportunities Programs as
part of the Minority Presence Initiative,
which brings minority scholars to cam
pus.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
All volunteers should plan to attend their
final group meetings of the semester.
Group meetings will be held in Menden-
hall on Apnl 4 and 5, depending on the
group. Please call you gTOiip leader or any
office if you cannot attend.
HOME RUN DERBY
Babe Ruth's and others should find them-
selves with bat in hand April 5 from 4-6
pm on the women's varsity Softball field.
The annual Home Rim Derby provides
gTeat awards for winners Bring your ECU
ID. as the registration ticket.
VISITING LECTURES PRO-
GRAM
The National Parks of New Zealand and
Costa Rica" April 4 (co-sponsored with
the ECU English Dept.) Robert and Patri-
cia Cahn � Environmental Journalists
and Consultants, Leesburg, VA Pulitzer
Prize 1969 and 1988 recipient of the Mar-
jory Stoneman Douglas Award 730 pm
Room 1031, GCB
METHODIST STUDENT
The Methodist Student Center is now
accepting applications for Fall 1989 for
rooms. Call 758-2030 or come by 501 East
Fifth Street for more information.
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
CAUSERS SEMINAR
All students are encouraged to hear Phil
Hanson, Personnel Staffing Specialist,
with the U S. Office of Personnel Manage-
ment discuss careers with the federal
government and the federal employment
process, including cooperative education,
summer jobs, volunteer opportunities,
and permanent careers. The session will
be held on April 11 from 2 to 4 p.m. in
Room 2019 of the GCB.
STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your grade
point average. All sessions will be held in
313 Wright Building April 10, test taking 3
� 4:30 p.m.
DISC GQLF
Curious?? Come by the registration meet-
ing for disc golf. April 11 at 5 p.m. in Bio N
102. You'll be glad you did. It's fun and
new! from Intramural�Recreational
Services.
GQLF
Linksters should attend the golfintra-
mural registration meeting April 11 at 5:30
p.m. in Bio 103. Men's and women's
teamsindividuals are encouraged to at-
tend.
BIOLOGY CLUB
Please sign up on the sign up sheet across
from Biology North wing elevator to help
with the plant sale. We need helpers for
Apr. 5, Apr. 6, and Apr. 7.
Psion
The East Carolina Chapter of PSI CHI
I lonor Society will hold a meeting April 6
at 5 p.m. in Rawl 302 All members are
urged to attend. National Certificates will
be distributed at this meeting. Notify offi-
cials if you will not be able to attend (A
note in PSI CHI mailbox will be fine.)
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
Please join us for our last (EQ2 meeting of
the semester. It will be held on April 5 at 4
p.m. in SP 308 The topic will be classroom
management.
CLOSED OUT?
Didn't get the schedule you wanted? Try
taking classes at one of 83 other schools in
the U.S. and pay ECU tuition! Take
"Manne Biology" at ORegon State, "Intro
to Business" at Amherst, "Cultural
Dance" at I lawan. You can make it hap-
pen through the national Student Ex-
change! Call Stephanie at 757-6769.
WES2FEL
Wes2fel is a Christen fellowship which
welcomes all students, and is sponsored
jointly by the Presbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries. Come to the
Methoidist Student Center (501 E 5th,
across from Garrett dorm) this Wed. at 5
A RESUME
IS A TERRIBLE
THING TO WASTE
At AccuCopy we realize the importance of clean,
professional-looking resumes. Our resume packages let
you choose between phototypesetting, laser printing, or
basic typewriter originals.
In addition, we offer the widest range of paper and
envelope choices in the area.
FAST COPIES
FOR FAST TIMES
24-hour service available
open early, open late
open six days a week
&
THE RESUME PEOPLE
� It
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
PRINTED & PLAIN
- SHIRTS
98
$2.98
SHORTS
$- 98 $2 98 $3 98
SUMMER SHIRTS, SKIRTS,
TOPS, SETS. JACKETS
MTHEsfSH
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F 0N THE C0RNER BEl0Uj �nzz
10:00-3:00 SAT 400 S. EURNS ST. 752-3866
p.m. and every Wed. night for a delicious,
all you-can eat home cooked meal with a
short program afterwards. This week:
FANTASY, which interprets music
through American Sign Language, will
perform. The meal is $2, SI 50 for mem-
bers. Call 758-2030 for more info.
CHRISTIAN f ELLQWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7.00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
CCE
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of f lebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
1 lours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
April 12th 3:00 pm
New Classroom Building
Room 1006
Presentation by
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
See what a difference a health profession can make
on your life and on the lives of others.

PCMH
People Care More Here
PITT COUNTY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
200 Stantonsburq Road � PO Bo 6028
ween

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MM
I- .





f
I
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4, 1989 7
Announcements
PLANXSALJE
The ECU Biology Club will be sponsoring
a plant sale April 6-7 The sale will take
place in the Biology Greenhouse, room
BS-111 from 8 am to 1 p m
OREGON
The performance of the Jazz Ensemble
Oregon will condude the 1988-89 Cham-
ber Music Secies. This performance will be
held in Hendrix Theatre on April 5 at 8
p m Tickets are on sale now at the Central
Ticket Office MSC Hours are 11 am6
PUTT PUTT GQLF
The resurrected putt-putt golf league will
hold a registration meeting April 4 at 5 00
pm in BIO N102 All ECU faculty, staff,
and students are welcome
HOME RUN DERBY
Babe Ruth's and other should find them-
selves with bat in hand April 5 from 4-6
pm on the women's varsitv softball field
The annual Home Run Derbv provides
great awards tor winners Bring your ECU
1 P as the registration begins.
HPERS
The HPERS department announces the
Childrens's learn to Swim Program for
faculty and statt starting Apnl 10th. Tor
more information call Melrose Moore 757-
p441 or t-U2
WORLD RENOWN VIOLIN-
IST NADIA SALERNO-SON-
NENBERG
Aorld Renown Violinist Nadja Salerno-
Sonnenberg will perform in Wnght Audi-
tonum at 8pm on Apnl 20th. Her appear-
ance will condude the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series at East Carolina Univer-
sity Her scheduled prgram will indude:
SONATA No. 2 in A Major, Op. 12, No. 2
bv Beethoven, SONATA No. 2 ink D
Major, Op g4a bv Prokofiev, Intermis-
sion SONATA No 3 in P Minor, Op 108
bv Brahms Ms. Salcrno-Smnenberg will
be acorn pan ied by Sandra Rivers on the
piano. Tickets for this event are now on
sale thev can be purchased through the
Central ticket Office at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center by calling 757-6611, ext.266
Office hours are 11 am-6 pm, Monday
through Friday.
HEALTH FAIR
Pin high with wellness at the Health Fair
on Apnl 4 from 11 � 5:50 pm. at Memo-
na! Gym. You can see a lot of health ori-
ented displays and partidpate as well.
kTrnFKTHFMTH SERVICE
You are invited to "fly high with well-
ness" trom April 3 � 6 Walk with the
Chancelk on Apnl 3 at 12:10 p.m. � meet
at Memorial Gvm Come to the Health
Fair (11 � 530 p.m.) also at Memorial on
Apnl 4 Hoar Hamet FJder speak on
Laughter at 7:30 p.m. in Jenkins Audito-
num on Apnl 5. Go fly a kite on Apnl 6
from 3�5 p.m. on College Hill. Prizes
will be given for quickest in flight, highest
in altitude, and stunt flying.
WHAT'S YOU NUMBER?
The key to living a healthy life may be
your cholesterol number. Cholesterol
screening will be available at the Health
Fair April 4 at Memonal Gym. The cost is
S3 00 and the screening will be from 11
a m to 1 pm. and 2 p.m. to 530 p.m. If you
would like to schedule an appointment
for cholesterol screening call IRS 757-
6387, For best lest results don't eat or drink
anything after 6 pm the night before.
PjTgF rroi n DANCERS
Pure Gold Pancer tryouts will be held
from 6-8 on Apnl 11 and Apnl 12 at the
strength complex. Those trying out must
bo present both days
MS WHFFI CHAIR NC 1989
rhe Student Council for Exceptional Chil-
dren is proud to present Ms. Wheelchair
NC 1989 on Apnl 13 at 8 pm in the Nursing
Bldg Auditorium She will be discussing
current legislation on the rights of dis-
abled persons as well as stories fo her ex-
nemos Everyone Ls welcome to attend!
mYSJCjTJlERAPrCLLIB
Massage Clinic � April 6. This is the last
one ths year 6- pm at the Belk building.
Rates SIminute in advance; $1 25min-
ute at the door. We can massage your
back, feet, arms or legs. Don't miss it!
OjRSiAJiEViUJEMENj:
N�TWQRK
The Overseas Development Network will
be meehng on Apnl 4, at 5 15 pm in room
247 MSC. All members must attend be-
cause we will be discussing the yard sale
Anvone interested in the problems of
Third World countries please attend! F-or
more info, contact Tonya Babzy (home)
830-8888 (work) 757-6611 ext. 210.
CiiAJiENGEJVEEK
Do you hold a grudge" Get rid of it at the
expense of intramural recreational serv-
ices The registration deadline for Chal-
lenge week is April 10, from 11 am to 6 pm
in MG 104-A. Intramurals provKles the
playing site, equipment adn officials. You
provide the players and pick the sport.
STJJDETLSERYJC�
AWARDS
The Departments of Residence Education
and Housing sponsor yearly service
awards for students serving as Head Resi-
dents and Resident Advisers in ECU resi-
dence halls. Any resident may nominate a
student staff member they feel has done
an outstanding job this year. Nomination
forms are available in each residence hall
office and the deadline to submit nomina-
tions is April 10. Completed nominations
can be turned into each residence hall
officeand selection will be made by a
committee of professional and student
staff.
PERFORMANCE AND OPEN
HOUSE
Students, faculty and staff are invited to
attend the final performance of a five-day
"Characterization Workshop" to be pre-
sented April 3-7 bv acclaimed opera direc-
tor Talmage Fauntleroy. The performace
of opera scenes will begin at 4 pm, April 7,
in Fletcher Recital Hall followed at 5 by an
Open House for Mr Fauntleroy in foom
105 of the School of Music. A resident of
Florence, Italy, he is Artistic director of
Studio Lirico and director of Opera Stud-
ies at the Conservatory "Pietro Mascagni"
in Livorno. He is a 1975 graduate of the
ECU School of Music. His visit is spon-
sored bv the Offices of the Chancellor,
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs,
and Equal Opportunities Programs as
part of the Minority Presence Initiative,
which brings minority scholars to cam
pus.
FAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
All volunteers should plan to attend their
final group meetings of the semester.
Group meetings will be held in Menden
hall on Apnl 4 and 5, depending on the
group. Please call you group leader or any
office if you cannot attend.
HMiRLTNJDERfiY
Babe Ruth's and others should find them-
selves with bat in hand April 5 from 4-6
pm on the women's varsity softball field
The annual Home Run Derbv provides
gTeat awards for winners. Bring your ECU
ID. as the registration ticket.
ment discuss careers with the federal
government and the federal employment
process, including cooperative education,
summer jobs, volunteer opportunities,
and permanent careers. The session will
be held on April 11 from 2 to 4 p.m. in
Room 2019 of the GCB.
STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your grade
point average. All sessions will be held in
313 Wright Building April 10, test taking 3
� 4:30 pm.
DISC GOLF
Curious?? Come by the registration meet-
ing for disc golf. April 11 at 5 p.m. in Bio N
102. You'll be glad you did. It's fun and
new! from Intramural�Recreational
Services.
YJSIIINGLECXUSES PRO-
GRAM
"The National Parks of New Zealand and
Costa Rica" April 4 (co-sponsored with
the ECU English Dept) Robert and Patn
cia Cahn � Environmental Journalists
and Consultants, Leesburg VA Pulitzer
Prize 1969 and 1988 recipient of the Mar
jorv Stoneman Douglas Award 7:30 pm
Room 1031, GCB
MFTHODIST STUDENT
CENIEll
The Methodist Student Center is now
accepting applications for Fall 1989 for
rooms. Call 758-2030 or come by 501 East
Fifth Street for more information.
FELERAIKiyrNMENT
CAEJERiSEMlNAR
All students are encouraged to hear Phil
Hanson, Personnel Staffing Specialist,
with the U S Office of Personnel Manage
GOLF
Linksters should attend the golfintra-
mural registration meeting April 11 at 5:30
p.m. in Bio 103 Men's and women's
teamsindividuals are encouraged to at-
tend
BIOLOGY CLUB
Please sign up on the sign up sheet across
from Biology North wing elevator to help
with the plant sale. We need helpers for
Apr. 5, Apr 6, and Apr. 7.
PSICHI
The East Carolina Chapter of PSI CHI
I lonor Society will hold a meeting April 6
at 5 p.m. in Rawl 302 All members are
urged to attend National Certificates will
be distributed at this meeting. Notify offi-
cials if you will not be able to attend (A
note in PSI CHI mailbox will be fine.)
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
Please join us for our last (EQ2 meeting of
the semester It will be held on April 5 at 4
p.m. in SP 308 The topic will be classroom
management
CLfJSETJLOlIK
Didn't get the schedule you wanted7 Try
taking classes at one of 83 other schools in
the U.S. and pay ECU tuition! Take
"Manne Biology" at ORegon State, "Intro
to Business" at Amherst, "Cultural
Dance" at I lawaii. You can make it hap
pen through the national Student Ex-
change! Call Stephanie at 757-6769.
WES2FEL
�-s2fel is a Christian fellowship which
welcomes all students, and is sponsored
jointly by the Presbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries. Come to the
Methoidist Student Center (501 E 5th,
across from Garrett dorm) this Wed at 5
p.m. and every Wed. night for a delicious,
all-you-can-eat home cooked meal with a
short program afterwards. This week.
FANTASY, which interprets music
through American Sign Language, will
perform. The meal is $2, $150 for mem-
bers. Call 758-2030 for more info.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 700 in the Jenkins Art
Auditonum.
CCJF
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring vour Bible and a fnend as we study
the book of I lebrews. CaU Jim at 752-7199
if you need a nde or further info
ATOALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
I lours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 pm and additional hours during the
week (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
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I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
APRIL 4, 1989 PACE 8

I
Woods make their mark
The Woods, a Raleigh-based rock group, is coming to Greenville this weekend. The group is best
known for their hit "Battleship Chains which was covered by the Georgia Satellites.
By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Staff Writer
The Woods have yet to make
their mark on the rock musir
world.
Each year a few rock hopefuls
spring up and demonstrate the
kind of potential that promises to
make its mark. The Woods are no
exception.
This Raleigh-based trio arc
David Enloe on guitar and vocals,
jack Cornell on bass and vocals,
andTerry Anderson on drumsand
vocals. Enloe and Cornell take
turns at lead vocals.
Enloe, Cornell and Anderson
first met at Sandhills Community
College near South Pines, N.C.
They formed a band called The
Knobs.
With the addition of a second
guitarist and a female singer they
became The Fabulous Knobs.
The Fabulous Knobs toured
the East Coast for six years in a
Toyota and recorded two
albums.Thcy split up in 1984.
The three original members
stayed together and formed The
Woodpeckers with Dan Baird, a
guitarist they met while touring
in Georgia.
Baird commu ted from Atlanta
to North Carolina to play in The
W(xd peckers.
Unfortunately, Baird left the
band to reform his previous band
the Georgia Satellites, who went
on to sign with a major label and
left the other Woodpeckers to be-
come The Woods.
Now back to the original three-
man nucleus, The Woods went
into the studio to record material
foranalbum. "BattleshipChains
penned by Anderson, was among
one of the songs to be recorded on
the album.
However, over much contro-
versy, the Georgia Satellites re-
corded the song and made it fa-
mous.
In 1985, The Woods recorded
the song and contributed their
version to the Making Waves
"Comboland" compilation album
During that time The Woods
toured with Marti Jones, played
locally with Don Dixon, and in
late 1986 completed work on "It's
Like This their TwinTone de-
but.
The album did very well for
the band. It soared to the top of
manv college radio playlists across
See WOODS, page 10
XTC's 'Oranges' one of the year's best Lps
By KAREN MANN
Stiff Writer
Whenever a band produces a
brilliant album, it's a safe bet that
the next one will be a radical
departure from their stylistic
norm. Usually it's also a major
disappointment.
This is not the case, however,
with XTC. In 1986, "Skylarking"
seemed to be the brilliant album
in their career. Lush and lyrical, it
had the musical cohesiveness that
the band's previous albums
couldn't quite achieve. With the
recently released "Oranges and
Lemons" though, the band is able
to mesh the best of "Skylarking"
into an album as vibrant as its
Beatlesque jacket.
The album begins with "Gar-
den of Earthy Delights written
by the band's perennially cheery
guitarist, Andy Partridge.
Periodically, the band's psy-
chedelic alter-ego, The Dukes of
Stratosphere, will get together and
releaseanalbum. "Garden a song
of advice to a newborn, is typical
of the Dukes' cheerfully surreal
compositions.
Partridge's best songs include
"Scarecrow People "Merely a
Man and "Pink Thing an ode
to masturbation designed to give
the PMRC fits.
BassistColin MouIding,on the
other hand, is responsible for the
band's more melancholy songs.
"King for a Day "One of the
Millions and "Cynical Davs" all
lament the cold, materialistic side
of human nature.
Yet, even the most depressing
songs are upbeat, almost dance-
able, and this is why "Oranges
and Lemons" is so good. With
"Skylarking" you could almost see
the colors of the music. On "Or-
anges" vou can feel its texture
While "Skylarking" shimmers,
"Oranges" pulsates with a nerv-
ous energv which always seems
on the brink of explosion.
Of course, it's impossible to
be perfect and most great albums
include at least one song which
isn't up to par. "Miniature Sun" is
this album's obligatory dud. The
song tries hard enough tobecatchv
but Partridge's monotone vocals
are so nerve-wracking that re-
peated listenings are almost pain-
ful.
Still, one mediocre song out of
15 isn't a bad average at all. With
"The Mayor of Simpleton" and
"King for a Day" alreadv becom-
ing minor hits, its possible that
"Oranges and Lemons" might
become one of the year's most
important albums. If this trend
continues, it'll be interesting to
see what XTC comes up with next
1
Student Counseling Center
helps students with problems
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Staff Writer
As any college student well
knows, college causes stress. What
many ECU students don't know,
however, is that they have some-
where to turn for free help: the
Student Counseling Center.
Dr. Wilbert Ball, the center's
director, is quick to point out that
the center is not just for imminent
suicides.
"We assist students with any
problem or concern they have
said Ball. "If a student comes in,
one counselor will set up an ap-
pointment to review the situ-
ation
Students can walk in and
make an appointment with the
secretary, or they can call for an thing out unless the student signs
appointment at 757-6611. The cen- a release form
ter is open from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Until 1963, most on-campus
Monday through Friday. counseling was done by student
Each of the six counselors sees advisors. Chancellor Leo Jenkins
from five to eight students per created the center and appointed
day, usually for a little less than an Dr. George Weigand to head it.
hour each. "When we look at our The directorship changed hands
statistics at the end of the year, we
will have seen about 25 percent of
the student body � which is a lot
for six people said Ball.
Most students come to dis-
cuss personal and social problems
� such as problems with relation-
ships, lack of confidence or asser-
tiveness, eating disorders, or sim-
plv being stressed out � but the
center also provides other serv-
ices. For example, students can
take assessment tests to help them
decide on a major or career.
No matter what the student's
concern, all records are confiden-
tial. "On the intake form, the stu-
dent fills out just demographic
data � hometown, etc explained
Ball. "And we don't send any-
to Ball in 1983.
The counseling center itself
has undergone changes, too. It is
now back to its original location
on the third floor of Wright audi-
torium, Wright 316, but from 1974
until 1986 it was located in Wright
Annex.
Ball shudders visibly when he
thinks of what conditions in the
center once were like. His restful
blue office used to be two offices,
and there was no respite from the
hot sun that poured in � the cen-
ter had no air conditioning.
That has changed, though,
and the center is now a comfort-
able environment. The floor stil!
creaks a bit, but the staff and stu-
dents overlook this.
"I've got a really good staff
Ball said. "I feel like we provide a
reallv good service for students. If
a student has a problem or a ques-
tion, they can feel free to come and
see us. If we can't help, we know
where to send them
Paschal Award given
The Beam played Susie's Treehouse last Wednesday night. (Photo by ECU Photolab).
Beam rocks Susie's Treehouse
Wednesday night with covers
By CHIP SWARTZ
Staff Writer
By CLEJETTER PICKETT
Staff Writct
The Herbert R. Paschal Award
for academic excellence in under-
graduate research and writing was
awarded March 31, 1989 to Lisa
W. Briley.
Briley, a history ma jor at ECU,
received the a ward for her research
paper titled "Chowan Female
Collegiate Institute 1848-1860
The paper focused on women of
Chowan Female Collegiate Insti-
tute, currently known as Chowan
College.
A graduate of Chowan Col-
lege, Mrs. Briley has an interest in
woment studies.
The Paschal Award is pre-
sented annually through and
endowment fund in memory of
the late Herbert R. Paschal. Pas-
chal was the chairman of the His-
tory Department for 16 years. He
was known for his dedication to
excellence in research.
Briley said she plans to use
the $250 award to help her con-
tinue her research. She also plans
to attend graduate school at ECU.
The runner-up award was
given to J. Michael Gay for his
paper 'Willie Jones; Firmly Loyal
to a Different Faith Willie Jones
was an anti-federalist in the 1700s.
The awards were presented
at a ceremony and reception spon-
sored by the Friends Organiza-
tion in the East Carolina Manu-
script Collection at Joyner Library.
The primary criterion for the
award was the author's degree of
use of manuscript and archival
sources, other criteria included
originality, the quality of histori-
cal interpretation, writing style,
and thoroughness in documenta-
tion.
Wednesday night the Beam,
out of Murfreesboro, performed
at Susie's Treehouse. The Beam
currently consists of Deam Arrigo
� drums, Jon Royce � guitar,
Bradford Craig � bass, guitar,
keyboards, flute, vocals, and J.P.
� lead vocals, bass , guitar, and
keyboards.
"This band's been together in
one form or another for five vears
Craig revealed. "Currently Dean
is the only founding member in
the line-up and J.P. is our newest
member of three months
The crowd was small but
appreciative as the Beam wound
their way through such classics as
"Paranoid "Good Time-Bad
Times "Ridin' the Storm Out
"American Band and "Aq-
ualung to name a few. The band
balanced their show of cover tunes
with a plethora of catchy originals
including 'Tragedy "Same Old
Story "South Kent and "Final
Journev" "We have an EP re-
corded which we're in the process
of financingat the moment Royce
offered.
The Beam play all across the
Mid-Atlantic area from West Vir-
ginia to Georgia and have opened
for such national recording artists
as BTO, KIX, and Savatage.
If I were pressed to catego-
rized the Beam I'd have to call
them a 70s Style, classic rock and
roll band. But with their original
material and Scorpions David
Lee Roth tunes popping up in their
sets this isone band that is looking
to the future rather than relishing
in the past. Royce's guitar work
and spicey fills especially stood
out on this particular night.
Any correspondence to The
Beam and information concern-
ing Beam t-shirts or the EP should
be directed to:
The Beam
Rt. 2 Box 11-c
Murfreesboro, NC 27855
dnc's new Lp is tres boss
ByTREYBIEN
n'
That boss band drivin'
cryin' is back. "Mystery Road" is
the band's latest Lp.
This album, like their last, has
many different musical sides.
"Wild Dog Moon "Malfunction
Junction" and "You Don't Know
Me" are some of the more upbeat
songs on the album.
Drivin' n' cryin still has the
same sound, something of an Aer-
osmith-Zepplin folk blend. "Ain't
It Strong" and "Peacemaker" are
two fine examples of the folk side.
One of the low points on the
CD is "With the People track
number four. This song should
have been called "Going to Cali-
fornia Part II Theonly difference
between "With the People" and
"Going to California" is that the
drivin' n' cryin' song is one sec-
ond longer than Zepplin's tune.
For that matter, "Stiaight to Hell"
could easily be mistaken for a
Grateful Dead song.
Even though Mystery Road
lacks the originality that drivin' n'
cryin' has shown in the past, it is
still a good album. Unfortunately,
if drivin' n' cryin' is not one of
your favorites, "Mystery Road"
could easily pass for a tribute al-
bum to some of the more original
groups of the 70s.
During the first listen to The
Wygals one may compare them to
the Bangles or 'Til Tuesday. The
Wygals debut album, "Honyocks
in the Withersoever displays an
optimisticattitude throughout the
album.
All of the lead vocals on the
album are supplied by Janet
Wygal, whose influence could
easily be traced back to 10,000
Maniacs, and who does a very im-
pressive job leading the band. This
is one of those rare albums where
some part of your body is guaran-
teed to move during all of the
See WYGALS, page 10
William Shakespeare's play, "Love's Labour's Lost will be performed in Wright Auditorium
next Monday night Tickets are available now.

I
� uM







t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4.1969 9
Dead Heads anger residents
4
GREENSBORO (AP) � Tem-
pers remain hot in Glenwood,
w here residents of the Greensboro
Coliseum�area neighborhood
complain fans of the rock group,
the Grateful Dead, blocked drive-
.ns, used drugs and littered and
vandalized their property.
They (defecated) right on mv
driveway shouted one resident,
minting to the evidence. "It's just
ridiculous
The man, who has lived in the
neighborhood since 1960and who
asked not to be identified because
e tears reprisals, was one of sev-
eral residents who objected to the
: allowing the fans, who call
themselves Dead Heads, to camp
nit in the coliseum parking lot.
Because of the coliseum and
si week'sGrateful Dead concerts,
Glenwood believes it shoulders a
burden the rest of the citv does
net.
"If this were over in Irving
Park, it would not be allowed
said Barbara Tucker, a resident of
27 years.
The tones of the complaints
have ranged from outrage to res-
ignation.
"About 1:30 this morning I
felt like strangling them, but other
than that noise (when Thursday
night's show let out), they haven't
done anything said Betty Alex-
ander. "You just kind of get on
your guard when there's all these
people here
A neighbor, Pam Price,
agreed: "It don't bother me at all
� as long as 1 can get out of my
driveway
The band acknowledges it
fans can cause problems. Its news-
lettcr,distnbuted by the thousands
to Dead Heads in Greensboro for
this week's two concerts, told fans:
"Our scene is just like any
other ecological system � fragile
and interdependent. We all need
to cooperate so that we'll be wel-
come wherever we go � in other
words, leave nothing but foot-
prints (no damage to the environ-
ment) and good vibes (police and
neighbors are human too)
At least one Dead Head
walked the streets around the
coliseum Friday afternoon, put
ting garbage in a plastic bag. A
newsletter protruded from his
back pocket.
Alec Fernandez, a Dead I lead
who graduated from Duke Uni-
versity in January and does con-
sulting and statistical analysis in
Chapel Hill, believes the problem
of rowdy fans has become more
serious in the past couple of years.
The band's following once
amounted to little more than a
cult � a well-behaved cult, he
said But two years ago, the band
hit the Top 10 with the song 'Touch
of Grey Fernandez blames the
radio exposure for new followers
with bad attitudes.
"Now that they're popular,
all these people come out and act
like idiots he said.
Like the band and many Dead
Heads, Fernandez said that only a
small fraction of the band's fol-
lowers are responsible for the
damage. But he acknowledged
that with 16,000 people filling the
coliseum for each night's show, a
small fraction could do a lot of
damage.
"It's just as crowded with the
carnival or the ACCTournament
said resident Dale Meadows.
"And the carnival crowd is just as
rowdy. Of course, one of my
neighbors said last night he wish, xl
the coliseum would blow up
Crabtree cracks down on walkers
RALEIGH (AP) � Many resi-
dents say they enjoy getting their
xercise by walking in an indoor
-hoping mall instead of enduring
theelements, but the management
�fone mall is putting its foot down.
The Crabtree Valley Mall
management has called a halt to
mall walking" after stores open,
ingering many who say thev
annot walk before the 10 a.m.
curfew.
A letter dated March 24 was
andedout to about 100 mall walk-
� rs March 23. It stated that their
exercise would be restricted to the
hours of 5:30 a.m. to 10 a.m
Monday through Saturday.
We realize that this policv
will create an inconvenience to
you the letter said. "But we hope
you will understand that mall
walking can present a safety haz-
ard to shoppers and walkers alike
when walking is done during
operating hours
C.L. Ruocchio, who walks
after 10 a.m. with this wife Anne,
was not happy with the restric-
tions. ' 1 aerce there are some
obnoxious walkers out there, but
what they should do is take care of
them and leave us alone he said.
The Ruocchios, both 82, have been
walking at Crabtree for about two
vears.
John Gri ma Idi, Crab tree's vice
president and general manager,
signed the "Dear Mall Walker"
letter.
"I'd say we've gotten some
negative contact on this he said,
noting that the new policy is actu-
ally an old one that had not been
enforced. Ho �H the mall might
Speight to show works in
major Philadelphia gallery
ECU News Bureau
A painting by Francis Speight,
retired artist-in-residence at ECU,
will be included in a show of
American impressionist paintings
at a major Philadelphia gallery.
Speight's "Between Houses, Ly-
ceum Avenue, Manavunk
painted in 1958, will be among
works by some 40 artists on view
at the Frank S. Schwarz & Sons
gallery, 1806 Chestnut St Phila-
delphia, from April 7 to June 30.
The Schwarz exhibition fea-
'ures other city scapes, like the
Speight painting, along with land
capes, stili lifes, portraiture and
zenre paintings. Works span the
period after the flourishing of the
Hudson River School, from 1876
to 1950.
Speight and some of the other
artists represented in the show
studied and taught at the Penn-
svlvania Academy of Fine Arts.
Speight's "Between Houses" is
tvpical of the group of Pennsylva-
nia cityscapes which comprise a
large portion of his work. In Phila-
delphia art circles, Speight is con-
sidered part of the "Manayunk"
school ot artists.
The artist is noted for his land-
scapes of rural eastern North
Carolina, particularly scenes from
his native Bertie County. Speight's
work is part of nu merous museum
and private collections through-
out the nation.
Although he retired from the
ECU School ot Art facultv several
vears ago, the artist continues to
maintain his home in Greenville.
He is married to artist Sara
Blakeslee, whom Speight met
during his years in Philadelphia.
The Schwarz gallery timed the
opening of the American Impres-
sionism show to coincide with thel
annual Philadelphia Antiques
Show. The gallery is best noted for
this exhibitions of 19th century-
paintings and rarely exhibits I
works of living artists. Speight's
works have been included in pre-
vious Schwarz exhibitions.
Under ne�
Management
� � �
The Clearly Boss
(and Always Clearly
Labeled) East Carolin-
ian Satire Page!
Not valid in any serious,
respectable, Journalism 2000
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be liable for injuries if walkers run
into shoppers.
But that reasoning didn't was!
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r
10
Tl If: EAST CAROI 1NIAN
APRIL 4, 1W
Woods
Continued from page 8
the country.
Currently, The Woods arc in
the studio working on material
for a new album. The band hopes
to attract a major record label deal
before releasing the album.
"We've been through an in-
dependent label' Anderson said.
For The Woods a major label deal
van't come any sooner than now.
"Wehave torts of material, but
we're still trving to get that big
deal' Cornell said.
Anderson said that it would
benefit the band to get the major
label deal to help them pay for the
recording of the album and hope-
fully open closed doors with the
attachment of a well-known re-
cording label.
The Woods said they are used
to touring the country and are
ready for a major label deal. They
have played at clubs in Philadel-
phia, Chicago, Los Angeles and
Gordon's work at
Gray Art Gallery
ECU News Bureau
Russell Gordon, a guest art-
ist-in-residence in painting at �he
ECU School of Art. will present a
slide lecture on April b at 7:30 in
lenkins Auditorium.
Gordon's e tensive e k hibition
record includes the Whitney
Museum oi American Art in New
ork;theSan Franscisco Museum
of Art; and the Chicago Interna-
tiona! Art Exposition
In addition to nxeivinga grant
trom the National Endowment for
the Arts in painting, he has also
been awarded the Black Creativ-
ity Award for I xct Hence.
Russell is a member of the fine
arts faculty at Concordia Univer-
sit in Montreal, Quebec
"Russell's figurative work is
undeniably influenced b the his-
torical presence of primal cultures
in a modem society says Terry
Nesbitt,diectoror'ECI' s Gray Art
Gallery. "A contemporary artist,
he mystically blends his knowl-
edge of the primitive past with his
personal experiences as a black
man living in a contemporary
society
The lecture is free and open to
the public. Jenkins Auditorium is
located on the ECU campus in the
lenkins Fine Arts Center. Parking
is available in lots adjoining the
center.
Wygals
Continued from page 8
songs.
"Creature Comforts "Pas-
sion and "Lonely" are the three
standout tracks on the album that
can do no wrong. The Wygals'
sound is nothing new, but it's a
combination of clever song writ-
ing, Janet Wygals' haunting vo-
cals and the sharpness of the band
that makes the Wygals such a
bnght star in the new music world.
jjjJ ajjip -Mas jfaam
�tfaa aajraJU
0Uaa�mai3a�iai2
Vr
3 Apr ! 1989
At your request
ECU'S Army ROTC
Zz;i Carps
757-6967 Mon-Fri
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7)
i �
a half a ay
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ay
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FALL RUSH
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io(
DCl :0si
vj
to
SORORITY LIFE
REGISTER FOR SORORITY
RUSH
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April 3-6 and April 10-13
Croatan � Student Supply � Bottom of Hill
$15.00 Fee
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Wright Auditorium
ush is'scheduled before c(asses begin in the
Tali: August 19-23
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
August 10, 1989
Call 757-4235 if any questions
New York City to name a tew.
They stopped in Greenville for
the first time on Friday to play at
the Attic. They said they were very
excited about the show.
For a lot of bands trying to
make the scene, it is not uncom-
mon to be compared to bands that
have already made it. The Woods
don't want to be linked to those
bands.
Some critics have tried to say
the The Woods' music is in the
same styleofR.E.M. and theGeor-
gia Satellites. Anderson and Cor-
nell insist this isn't true.
Anderson said The Woods are
close personal friends withR.E.M.
and the Satellites, but that they
sound nothing like either band.
He said The Woods are a rock
band
Cornell prefers to decribe The
Woods' music in a different way.
"It's the music from the time be-
tween Otis went stereo and Andy
jQnffithjvent color Cornell said.
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Y





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s
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Y
1

'
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 4,1989 PAGE 11
Five homers spell Mason doom
Pirates power past Patriots for easy win
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Stiff Writrr
Stand out Pirate hurler Jonathan Jenkins is in action against
George Mason. The pitcher won his sixth game of the season
and maintained a 0.52 ERA (Photo by Mark Love ECU Photo
Lab).
Tommy Eason hit a grand-
slam homcrun in the eighth in-
ning and the Pirates had five
homeruns overall, including two
that were back to back, in their
final game of a three-game series
against George Mason University
to crush the Patriots 12-1 in their
tenth straight victory Sunday af-
ternoon at Harrington Field.
"lhaven'tbeen hitting the ball
well the last couple of days so 1
was just trying to make contact
Eason said about the grandslam.
"i wasn't trying for it all
Eason may not have been
trying for it all, but he got it all
when, in the bottom of the eighth,
he belted a Kevin Koblinski pitch
over the fence to right, centerfield
to bring in David Daniels, John
Thomas, John Adams and himself
for the sweet, 12-1 taste of victory.
But Eason was not the only
player to shine for the Pirates.
Aside from the brillant defensive
efforts from the entire team, Jon-
athan Jenkins increased his rec-
ord to 6-0 while at the pitching
helm and ties teammate Jake
Jacobs in 11 straight career victo-
ries without a loss. "Hopefully,
we can keep winning like we are
Jenkins said. "The defense is play-
ing real good. Everyone's got a lot
of confidence
The junior pitcher, who gave
up one earned run against the
Patriots, still leads the nation in
earned run average with a 0.52.
He had a 0.36 ERA prior to the
game.
Jenkins was the leadof f pitcher
for the Pirates and pitched seven
innings. He had one hit, one earned
run, two walks and nine strike-
outs. "He didn't have the velocity
he's had coming off of his illness
Head Coach Gary Overton said of
Jenkins who has been out sick.
"He may have struggled early in
the count but he threw strikes
when he had to
Other Pirate leaders included
Calvin Brown, who was 2-4 with
two homeruns for the day Brown
leads the Pirates with seven home
runs and a .419 average. John
Thomas and John Adams hit the
back to back homeruns in the fifth
inning. "Each of the extra base hits
were big blows and seemed to
make a difference at the time
Overton said.
The three-game series sweep
against the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation opponent moved ECU
to 8-1 in the conference, behind
unbeaten UNC-Wilmington. The
Pirates hold a 20-2 record overall.
The Patriots sink to 4-11 over-
all while they continue to struggle
in theCAAswithaO-6 record after
losing to ECU and losing to UNC-
VV March 25 and 26.
George Mason opened the
scoring in the first inning when
Jaime Miracle led off with a walk
for the Patriots. He stole second.
Then Kyle Settle hit a double to
center field to score Miracle.
The first inning would be the
last time the Patriots were heard
from as they were silent for the
next eight innings. ECU took a 3-
1 lead in the bottom of the first and
would be unstoppable for the rest
of the game. A wild pitch hit
Thomas to lead off the inning for
the Pirates. Adams walked and
Eason bunted but a wild pitch
throw to first gave Eason a double,
brought in Thomas and advanced
Adams to third. Steve Goddin then
hit a ground ball up the middle to
score Adams and Eason.
The Pirates added two more
in the third when Brown hit a two-
run homer and scored two more
in the fifth with back to back home
runs. Thomas led off with a solo
homerun to right field and Adams
repeated, reaching the fence the
same place Thomas' had.
Brown made the score 8-1
when he hit a homerun to right
centerfield and the final four runs
came in the eighth inning with
Eason's grand slam.
The Pirates will host Baptist
on Tuesday where they are sched-
uled to play a doubleheader at
Harrington Field at 1 p.m. Wed-
nesday, they travel to Kinston, NC
where they play the Kinston Indi-
ans in an exhibition game. ECU
returns to Harrington Field Thurs-
dav where they will face noncon-
ference rival N.C State. Game time
for that matchup is 7 p.m.
Michigan wins NCAA Basketball Championship in overtime
. By MICHAEL MARTIN
Assistant Sports Kditor
Michiganbegan thel988-1989
NCAA basketball tournament
without a coach, but replacement
Steve Fisher did what no other
Wolverine coach has ever done,
won a national championship. In
fact, two records were set Mon-
day night: it was the first time an
interim coach has ever won a na-
tional championship, and Michi-
gan's All-American Glen Rice set
the tournament scoring oicord.
The 51st KCA A Tournament
finished in a classy way, going
down to the last seconds with
Michigan holding on for a 80-79
overtime victory over Seton Hall.
The game's first points came
from Michigan's Rice, and it was
Offense shines
the start of a tine performance from
the senior.
At the 10:31 mark of the first
half, Michigan had a 12-8 lead
stemming from a 6 to 2 run by the
Wolverines, which started with a
Rice dunk.
Seton Hall was not out of this
game. They came back from a time
(tut with a 12 to 4 run which
closed the gap to q with 6:30 left in
the first half.
The remainder of the first half
was back and forth as Michigan
took a 37-32 lead going into the
locker rooms.
vm ThckevJLp Mu lugan's success
was" a combination of several fac-
tors. First, the Pirates were unable
to stop Rice and Rumiel Robin-
son. Second, Pirate forward An-
drew Gaze was held to only two
free throws, going 0 for 4 from the
field and having spent a lot of time
on the bench. Finally, Seton Hall
was forced to look for the outside
shot, somethig that wasnot in their
game plan.
The start oi the second half
was all Michigan as thev pulled
out to a 49-35 lead with just over
15 minu tes remai ni ng to be play ed.
The Wolvcrine'sspurt wascapped
off with a spectacularbehind-the-
head dunk which gave Michigan
the 51-39 lead.
At the 9:40 mark, Seton Hall
had pulled back to within 6 on a
strong scoring drive of John Mor-
ton, 5 of his 35 points for the eve-
The score closed to two points
with just over six minutes remain-
ing and the Wolverines ahead 59-
57.
With two minutes remaining,
a Morton dunk capped off a 6 to 0
Pirate run which gave them the
lead for the first time in the half.
However, Rice responded on the
other end with a key three pointer,
and two free throws by Sean Hig-
gins gave Michigan the lead with
just under a minute to play.
Morton came through in the
clutch for Seton Hall with a valu-
able three pointer to tie the game
71-71 with 17 seconds left.
Seton Hall kept its defensive
superioritv of the tournament by
holding the Wolverines to just 5
shots in 14 attempts during the
Lit sixjuinutesoi the game, three
bang Jhpointg;
Trie�overtime, the first since
Loyola, lll.beatCincinattiin 1963,
was all Higgins, Robinson, and
Rice for Michigan, and the only
players to score forSeton Hall were
Gaze and Morton.
Gaze hi t a three pointer to ci ve
the Pirates a 74-73 lead, his first
field goal of the night. Higgins put
a shot in for Michigan at the one
minute mark to make the score 79-
76 Seton Hall ahead. Another
Higgins shot and Michigan was
down by one.
Seton Hall fouled Robinson
with threesecondsremaining,and
his two free throws gave the
Wolverines the finaUead of 80-79.
The Pirates tried for a final shot,
but it was off and Michigan won
the championship.
When Steve Fisher was asked
about the nationalchampionship,
i he responded by saying, "I'm the
happiest man alive right now
I'm so happy he (Robinson) hit
those two. He's been shooting 100
free throws every night, anCS he
told me that he was going to hit
the clutch free throws
After the game, Michigan
Scrimmage success
By CHRIS SIFGEL
Sports Fditor

Spring means the start of base-
Kill season, but it also means that
Division I schools can conduct
football practice. ECU has been
practicing for two weeks now and
after several weather delays finally
had its first scrimmage on Satur-
day.
' The football squad, under
first-year head coach Bill Lewis
went through a two and a half
hour, 117 play scrimmage in Fick-
len Stadium Saturday afternoon.
Lewis seemed to be pleased with
the results.
"What pleased me was that'
we accomplished what we set out
to do Lewis said. "We took a
look at our kicking game, broke it
down into phases and then went
into first and 10 situations, offen-
sively trving to make a first down
in three plays, and then defen-
sively trying to stop the offense in
three plays. Then, we tried sus-
taining drives with the offense
making three first downs in a row
and we concluded the scrimmage
with third down situations Lewis
continued.
The Tirate offense racked up
the yards in the first scrimmage of
theseason. An offense that seemed
to sputter at times during last
season racked up 588 yards on the
dav, for an average of over five
yards per play. ECU gained 285
yards on 60 carries on the ground
and completed 23 of 57 passes for
303 yards.
ECU was led by senior tail-
backs Willie Lewis and Darnell
Harper in the rushing department.
Lewis had 81 yards on 15 carries
and harper accounted for 72 yards
on 14 carries.
At quarterback, the senior
tandom of Charlie Libretto and
Travis Hunter, who split time at
quarterback last season, per-
formed well in the scrimmage.
Libretto connected on five of nine
attempts for 74 yards. Hunter hit
four of 12 for 54 vards and also
rushed three times for 27 yards.
Sophomore cii Blake completed
six of 13 passes for 71 yards, while
Chad Grier threw for 43 yards,
hitting on three of his 11 attempts.
"1 thought the offense became
consistent early said Lewis. Later
in the scrimmage the defense
beagn to get consistent and forced
some big turnovers
Lewsi also commented on the
plav of his offensive line. "I think
the offensive line has done a great
job blocking. All spring, I thought
they have done a good job. The
tight ends today also did well,
catching the ball Lewis said.
But the offense was not the
only bright spot during the scrim-
mage. The defense also played
well forcing three interceptions
and three sacks. Sophomore Joe
Bright led the defensive attack
with two sacks and three tackles
for losses over all. Defensive backs,
Ed Brogden, Brian McPhatter and
Tim Wolter each grabbed an inter-
ception in the scrimmage.
Although pleased with the
See FOOTBALL, page 13
Jamie Young is shown here making one of his many saves in recent lacrosse action. Young and the
Pirates won two games this weekend defeating UNC-G, 12-1 and Davidson, 8-4 (Photo by Mar Star-
tari).
Atheletic Director Bo Schembech-
ler announced that the head coach
position would be discussed with
Fisher when they returned to Ann
Arbor.
Schcmbcchler also com-
mented on the Wolverine's vic-
tory by saying, "It's a great day for
Michigan, our first national cham-
pionship, the team was magnifi-
cent, and Steve Fisher did a great
job.
Michigan, closing out what
manv call the greatest decade of
basketball, joined the list of out-
standing universities by winning
both the Rose Bowl and the NCAA
basketball tournament all in one
vear.
TTie piayers of the game were
Rumiel Robinson from Michigan
with 21 points and John Morton
forSeton Hall with 35 points.
Netters win
two of three
By CLAUDINE WURST
Staff Writsr
The men's tennis team has
been busy this past week, win-
ning two out of their five games.
They defeated UNC-W 9-0 and
UNC-Greesboro 5-4, but suffered
losses to NCSU 6-3, Campbell
Universitv 5-4, and Elon College
6-3.
The Team began their week
Tuesday against UNC-W, beating
the Seahawks in straight sets.
Coach Bill Moore said, "We
needed this win, the team had a
strong match with everyone put-
ting in a great performance
On the team's performance
against NCSU Wed Moore com-
mented, "Although the team lost,
we had some close-call matches.
NCSU is undefeated, and a good
team, but we gave them consider-
ablecompetition. Jon Melhomand
Andre Moreau both played well,
winning in 3-set matches
The Pirates match against the
See TENNIS, page 13
Lady Pirate Softball team takes third in UVA tournament
ByTRACYELARKIN
S��ff Wri�r
The Lady Pirates took third
place out of nine teams in the Uni-
versity of Virginia tournament this
past weekend.
The action started Friday as
the Pirates fell victim to UNC-
Chapel Hill 2-0. Wendy Tonker
took the loss following the Lady
Tarheels' only six hits. The lead-
ing hitters for the Pirates were
Mechele Jones and Tonker, both
going 2-3.
The Lady Pirates realized
another loss would knock them
out of contention for the champi-
onship round. They fought back
hard, next facing USC-Spar-
tanburg. The Pirates won by a
score of 4-3. Jen Sagl picked up the
win, holding the Lady Rifles to six
hits. Renec Meyers picked up a
save. The Lady Pirates had a total
of eight hits with Leslie Cramer
and Crowder having two hits
apiece.
Day two of the tournament
started early when Drexyl Col-
lege scored an unearned run in the
first inning. The Pirates did not
wake up until the fifth inning when
they scored four runs. Tracy Kee,
Jones, and Sagl all walked to load
the bases. Crowder drove a sacri-
fice fly into the field to score Kee.
Ford singled to score Jones, and
Tonker tripled to score Sagl and
Ford.
The Pirates' bats were even
livelier in the sixth inning, driving
in five runs.
Chris Byrne singled to start
the inning with Kee and Jones both
hitting a fielder's choice. Sagl
doubled, picking up two RBI's
while Crowder had a single. Ford
then slammed a triple and picked
up two RBI's, while Tonker singled
and picked up an RBI of her own.
The seventh inning arrived
and the Pirates could not be
stopped, scoring three more runs.
Kee started the inning with a triple
while Sagl walked. Crowder also
pounded a triple-scoring Kee and
Sagl. Weller then singled to score
Crowder.
The final score was 12-2 with
Tracye Larkin hurling a three-hit-
ter and boosting her record to 4-3.
George Mason was the next
game scheduled for the Lady Pi-
rates. Led by the arm of Meyers,
the Pirates won 4-2 with Meyers
holding the Lady Patriots to three
hits.
The Lady Pirates scored one
run in the second inning afer Jones
walked, and advanced around the
bases on passed balls.
In the fourth inning, both
teams scored two runs. For the
Pirates, Tonker and Byrne singled
with Jones and Barb Shueller pick-
ing up RBI's.
In the seventh inning, the Pi-
rates scored a final run after Crow-
der singled. Weller moved her
around with a sacrifice bunt and
Ford got on base by an error, pick-
ing up an RBI.
VVinning the preliminary
game against the Lady Patriots
advanced ECU to the semi-finals
facing UVA. If you recall, ECU
defeated UVA 20 in the champi-
onship game of the Lady Pirate
Classic. This time the roles were
reversed with the Pirates losing 3-
0. The game was scoreless until
the seventh inning when a combi-
nation of hits and errors scored
three Cavelier runs. The losing
pitcher for the Pirates was Sagl,
holding UVA to only four hits.
The Pirates will be back in
action tonight against Louisburg
College.





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4,1989
t

Sweep two from GMU
Mason falls prey to

By KRISTEN HALBERG
St affW riter
A homer bv John Gast in the
bottom of the seventh gave the
Tirates the spark they needed to
slip by with a win in the first game
of the doubleheader and went on
to secure another victory in the
second game against Colonial
Athletic Association opponent
George Mason University on a
chillv, breezy Saturday afternoon
at Harrington Field.
East Carolina, after struggling
the entire first game, came back to
win it 4-3 in the bottom of the
seventh inning when John Gast
led off with a home run that would
save the game for the Tirates. "I
was looking for an inside pitch,
and I got it Gast, the freshman
third-baseman said. "I'm pretty
fortunate I guess
After two Tirates went down,
Mike Andrews and David Ritchie
both singled. John Thomas then
hit a grounder to the shortstop Jim
Richbourgh. The ball went be-
tween Richbourgh's legs and
Andrews came home to secure the
4-3 win for the Pirates.
Head Coach Gary Overton
was pleased with his players'
performances for comming from
behind but was especially pleased
with the pitching performance on
Saturdav. "A lot of credit goes to
Assistant Coach Billy Best
Overton said. "He handled alot of
our pitchers very well. Our pitch-
ers deserve alot of the credit
John White 'Is credited with
the Tirate win. White, a sopho-
more pitcher who is 4-0 for the
season, had won the last three
games for the Pirates and hasn't
given up an earned run average
vet. "We got into trouble and the
coach came into the bullpen and
told me to throw strikes White
said. "Hopefully, lean keep doing
that
The Pirates then overcame the
Patriots of George Mason 4-1 later
that dav in the second game of the
doubleheader. Not only did the
Pirates win, but, as of Saturday,
thev had won nine games in a
row. The Bucs would go on to
make that total 10 in a row with
the completion of Sunday's game
rounding out the series against
GMU.
The second win on Saturday
was also the 150th win for the five-
year coach at East Carolina. "That
last part doesn't mean much
Overton said. "It's the nine in a
row that does. We seem to be
playing well for the last three
weeks. We played East Carolina
style baseball with a run here, a
run there and finding a way to
win
Jake Jacobs got the win for the
Pirates in the second game. The
senior pitcher has pitched his
fourth complete game and is 4-1
on the year.
East Carolina scored first in
the first game of the doubleheader.
In the second inning, Calvin
Brown led off with a triple. Gast
hit a double to bring in Brown and
the score swayed in ECU'S favor,
1-0.
George Mason put themselves
on the scoreboard and took a 2-1
lead in the third inning when Jaime
Miracle singled and was knocked
in by Keith Rice when he singled.
Rice then scored on an error by
Eason when Kyle Settle hit a single
that turned into a double when
Eason couldn't come up with the
ball.
The Pirates came back to tie it
Pirates
ir. the bottom of the third when
David Ritchie doubled to lead off.
Riggs then singled to score Ritchie
The score stood at 2-2 before the
deciding seventh inning when
Gast hit his homer.
In the second game of the day,
East Carolina made up for strug-
gling in the first game by playing
a more solid game. Although the
Patriots would get on the board
first when Rice singled, stole sec-
ond, went to third on a ground
ball and scored on a fielder's
choice, GMU would be scoreless
for the rest of the game.
ECU earned its first two runs
in the second inning when Gast
hit a single to center field. Goddin
hit a double off a fly ball to center
field just missing the home run
when itbounced off the fence. Gast
advanced to third. Andrews then
hit a single ground ball up the
middle to score Gast and Goddin
for the 2-1 lead.
The Pirates added to their
score in the fifth inning when Gast
walked, stole second third and
then stole home when Cauble stole
second.
ECU topped off the scoring in
the sixth inning when Riggs
singled on a grounder to right field,
advanced to second and third on
anerrorbyGMUpitcherJimLebo
and scored on a single by Kevin
Rices.
Correction
In the Thursday, March 30 edi-
tion of The East Carolinian, Ike
Robinson's name was inadver-
tantlv mistaken for Junior Robin-
son as a participant in the 400 me-
ter relay event at the Florida Re-
lavs. The sports staff regrets this
error
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Corner of 10th & Evans
1989 SUMMER SCHOOL
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
AT
CHAPEL HILL
Academic Calender
Session I: May 22 - June 27
Session II: June 29 - August 4
Tuition and Fees: (NC Resident) Undergraduate 1-5 hrs $157; 4-8 hrs $229
UNC-CH offer, during two 5-12 week terms, one of Ate
scheduled in 40 discipline. A typical comas load par tana � tar� classes af
Students from any coDege or unlTersKy. teachers, rising high eeneol
at UNC-CH may apply as Visiting Summer Students.
i in sse United Stales. Over S00 coarse sie
and others who are not enrolled
For details, plet
Ni
bjsjbjbsJ s catalog
Street
City
Stats.
a�.
Matt ta: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Chapel Hill. NC 27599.3340. Phone: (919) 943-1999.
School CB 3340. 100 Pettigrew Hall
07
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$169
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Y





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4,1969 13
II ECU wins seven in a row
Golden Flashes no match for hot Pirates

By KRISTEN HALBERG
Staff Writer
After being delayed 20 min-
utes because of rain, East Carolina
won their seventh straight game
Thursday afternoon against the
v olden Flashes of Kent State beat-
ing them 7-3, handily.
ECU sophomore John White
earned his third win in a row for
the Firates. He has had no earned
runs in the 17 innings he has
pitched.
The Tirates advanced to 17-2
.itter beating this nonconference
opponent while the Golden
Flashes moved to 7-4 for the sea-
son.
Kevin Hoffman, the Kent State
pitcher who is tenth in the nation
strikeouts with 13 per game,
cave up the lead and the tie for the
Flashes and was relieved in the
fourth inning.
The Flashes scored first in the
rsl inning when lames Givens, a
fty for Kent State, led off with a
ingle. Givens then moved to sec-
ond when Michael Ribar hit a
sacrifice bunt. Faul Zome walked
and Joeseph Blasiole singled to
.enter which loaded the bases. Fat
Rollins then hit a sacrifice fly to
left field to score Givens.
ECU didn't waste any time
getting on the scoreboard either
when, in the bottom of the first,
centerf ielder John Thomas walked
and then advanced to second on a
throwing error by the Kent State
pitcher Kevin Hoffman. Calvin
then hit an RBI to reach first and
score Thomas. John Gast, the third
baseman for the Firates, singled to
left field and Brown advanced to
second. Steve Goddin then hit a
lobb to left field for a double to
score Brown. ECU jumped ahead
2-1.
The Golden Hashes however,
began to threaten in the fourth
inning when Head Coach Gary
Ovcrton had to make two pitch-
ing changes. Matthew Rundlcs hit
a high fast ball for a home run in
the first pitch to tie the score at 2-
2. Moye then walked Ty Ross
before Coach Overton decided to
take him out of the game. Rodney
Colvin, a lefty, relieved Moye who,
after catching Rob Etcher's bunt
for the first out, walked Ribar to
load the bases.
Overton would turn to the
bullpen again, this time to John
Whi te. The sophomore pi tcher was
2-0 prior to the Kent State game
and would win his third victory
against the Golden Hashes.
Faul Zome singled on a White
pitch but ECU threw Eicher out at
the plate to avoid the Kent State
score. Joseph Blasiole then hit a
grounder to the left but the Firates
threw out Zome at second to halt
the offensive drive for the Flashes.
ECU would avoid a close call.
The Bucs would answer to the
offensive push of the Golden
Hashes by mounting a drive of
their own. In the bottom of the
fourth, East Carolina would re-
gain their lead 4-2 and would never
give it up. Mike Andrews hit a
grounder to the shortstop Ribar.
What was to be an easy out be-
came a double for the Pirates and
a two base error for the Hashes.
Ribar bobbled the ball and then
overthrew the first baseman.
David Ritchie singled up the
middle and advanced Andrews
to third. Ritchie then stole second
base and John Thomas singled up
the middle to score Andrews and
RltCAt1er the Kent State coach,
Danny Hall, was ejected from the
game in the top of the sixth inning
for a disagreement on a double
play call, ECU would begin to ice
the victory. Ritchie took it to the
fence in what was his first home
run and first extra base hit of the
season when he sliced the ball
down right field. Thomas bunted
for a single, Cauble singled and
Calvin Brown doubled to hit in
Thomas to make the score 6-2.
The flashes tried an unsuc-
cessful rally in the eighth inning
when Ross scored on a Givens low
chopper after he singled, advanced
to second on a single by Mike
Kinler and advanced to third on a
hit-and-run. The rally came to a
halt though when Rundles, Giv-
ens and Ribar all got out. The Pi-
rate lead closed to 6-3.
ECU would answer again in
the bottom of the eighth when
Thomas singled, stole second and
advanced to third on a Chris
Coublebunt. Eason then hit a line
drive and collected an RBI as
Thomas scored to round out the
scoring for the game.
A ALf, Of A MLAl
Tar Landing Seafood
sKtant Special
Shrimp Lover Feast
Boiled, Broiled, Fried & Steamed
Shrimp all on one plate.
Served with French Fries or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw, and Hushpupples
75827 ONLY?9 $6.99
Banquet Facilities Available
with this ad
Women competitive,
win two out of three
East Carolina's women's ten-
nis team has been doing well this
past week. Although they lost one
game to UNC-Greensboro 2-7 t Vy
defeated Atlantic Christian 5-4 and
Meredith College 7-2.
Tuesday's game against At-
lantic Christian was a close match.
Assistant Coach Lyn Gorski said,
In the singles matches the girl
played well, but it was the doubles
teamconsistingof Susan Mattocks
and Ellen Harvell that helped cinch
the team's overall victory
Thursday found the girls up
against Meredith CTrtlee.fljQjti
c&uuHMHBl 'efetfctftTTO
plaving under windy conditions,
but they kept a stong control of the
ball. I was pleased with the win,
because although thescoredoesn't
show it, the matches were neck
and neck
Although Saturday's game
against UNC-Greensboro was
their only lost of the wek, it was
also the team's most competitive
match. Gorski said, "this was truly
Football
a tough game, but there were some
good matches. Four of the matches
went three sets
Gorski went on to continue,
"Jill Obson and Susan Mattocks
put in stong performances, win-
ning their matches. And although
the dobules team consisting of
Bradi Dutcher and Heather Ma-
son lost after their three sets, they
played a skillful and very together
game Today the Lady Pirates
take on Campbell University.
DAY STUDENTS
DO YOU WANT TO
MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Apply now for position of
Day Student Representative
on the ECU Media Board.
Help set policies for operation of:
WZMB, The Rebel, Buccaneer,
The East Carolinian, Expressions
& THE PHOTO LAB.
Apply in Media Board Office 757-6009
2nd Floor Publications Building
Filing Dates April 4, 1989 thru April 14, 1989
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts for March rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles. Apartments and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
fi have
DOUBTS? QUESTIONS? CONCERNS?
About your faith?
WE WELCOME YOU!
Are you looking for a
FUN & FRIENDLY FELLOWSHIP
in which to express your faith?
WE WELCOME YOU AT
a
Continued from page 11
scrimmage, Lewis feels that there
is still more work to be done be-
fore the spring practice schedule
wraps up. "What we've got to do
is continue to teach the funda-
mentals. We have to be as sound
as we can and stress discipline.
We have to teach these kids what
it takes to win Lewis explained.
The Pirates will again take to
the practice field on April 4 with
the spring schedule wrapping up
on April 22. On April 22, the Pi-
rates will play the 6th Annual
PurpleGold' Pigskin Pigout
Party.
�W M
A CARING CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY
Fellowship supper. Program & Community Prayer
EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 5 p.m. at the
METHODIST STUDENT CENTER
501 E. 5th St. (across from Garrett Dorm)
THIS WEEK FANTASY will perform music in sign language
For more Information: Bill Stanley, President 830-9527. Rev. Michelle
Mikt Bun her 752-7240; Rev. Dan Earnhardt 788-2030
Sponsored by Presbyterian & Methodist Campus Ministries
� ' - -�g
ATTENTION ECU STBOENTS
Get Your SummerFall Semester Application in NOW!
i i
Rooms
�Furnished
�Refrigerator
�Fully carpeted
i�
Common Area
�2 large bathrooms
�Storage Closet
�Kitchenette & Microwave
ftmco
�ast
inc
Pirates Landing - offers a new concept in student housing $200.00per month
for 1 year lease. $200 Security Deposit.
$225.00a month with a 4, 6, or 9 month lease. $225 Security Deposit.
Pre-Leasing Available
Complex
�Sundeck
�Gazebo
�Outdoor Grills
Convenient & Economical
�Three Blocks for Campus & Downtown
�Utilities Included in Rent
�Energy Efficient
Laundry Facilities on Site
�Free Maid Service
�Central Heat & Air
REMCO EAST INC � P.O. BOX 6Q26 GREENVILLE. NC 27934 � 919 753-6061
Tennis
Continued from page 11
Campbell Camels was also a close
call. Moore said, "Campbell is a
tough team. We lost a couple of
tight matches, and the fact our
second seated player Andre
Moreau was unable to play only
compounded the loss
Against UNC-Greensboro,
Moore commented, "Greensboro
is one of the stronger teams, hav-
ing a good tennis program, but
our guys showed a lot of charac-
ter. They had three good matches
that helped their victory
Ending their week Sunday
against Elon College, the team was
defeated only after a fight. Moore
said, 'The whole team played well,
with strong performances shown
by Jon Melhorn and John
Hudson Wednesday, the Pirates
face Atlantic Christian College.
3
Support
Pirate
Athletics
WANTED!
MEDICAL STUDENTS
$$FINANCIAL REWARD$$
The North Carolina Army National Guard
MEDICAL STUDENT
COMMISSIONING PROGRAM
Educational and Incentive Programs:
"HEALTH PROFESSIONAL LOAN
REPAYMENT PROGRAM
NEW SPECIALIZED TRAINING
ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
'TUITION ASSISTANCE
?CONTINUING HEALTH EDUCATION
?KEY PERSONNEL UPGRADE PROGRAM
NORTH CAROLINA
rTTTTZi
800-662-1872
Representative at
Brody Building
11 April Room 2N-53





14
TMf I AM"ARO! INIAN
AI'Kl! 4, 1x4
TKE Boxing benefits two local charities
Bv MICHAEL MARTIN
A�utjnt Sports rditor
There's no need to travel to
New Jersey or 1 as Vegas to see
some great boxing. lust make a
note of the annual Tau kappa
Epsilon boxing tournament held
in Minges coliseum
This years tournament, the
14th consecutive brought people
from everywhere Co sponsored
b the IKE s C O Tankard Co .
and Corona Extra beer, this event
w ,b held tor a great cause the St
hide sChildren s Hospital and the
Children s Miracle Network Tele
thon.
The tournament was held
ues.
bn March
thru lluirs
dav, March 50, and started with
approximately -h1 boxers divided
into seven weight classes, all w ith
an amateur status. Most of the
boxers were from camp 1 ejune
and Fort Bragg with a few en-
red from the Pitt County area
A justa handful of out of staters
Set up in the middle of Minges
Coliseum the ring brought about
a sensation of professional box-
� A crowd of about 350 people
d in with hopes of seeing
si meoneis take a knock-out blow
However since the tournament
w .is set up tor amateurs the refe-
- were quick to intervene in a
knock-out situation.
Special ring announcer Pick
rhe Countn Rover" ones from
WITN channel 7, started the eve-
ning with a plea tor donations.
fterwards the magical "boxers
tc the nnc call echoed through
coliseum.
The crowd became absorbed
th excitement and loud clap-
I ng and wl tstling immediately
led the area. The first bout, the
124-132 weight class, brought
th n Reeves and Eugene
nton forward to the ring.
The bell sounded tor the start.
� : � � � boxers took off to-
. ds ther trading punches
� I right "liis non-stop ac
� � . for the entirety of the
� rst round. When the second
nd c;hters came
� v. ith an evil look I is eye and
trading of punches continued
: r gained th eai
tape a; nn Cted with comb;
absandupp n uts
Knit went into the third round
v. ith Hinton havine the clear
advantage both fighters were
growing tired but the Hurries ot
punches continued. When the final
lx'11 sounded, 1 linton came away
with a spht decision victory.
King girl Mami Blum, a so
phomore, presented the trophies
to the boxers and a sight to the
crowd She entered a bikini con-
test held at the Attic, won a mone-
tary prize and was chosen to be
the ring girl tor the tournament
finals
rhesecondbout featured Pete
Rivera .n ECU student Mike
PoratMw ho also happened to be a
1Kb brother fin the 136-143 w eight
class Ihis match didn't take as
long as Porath was given a stand
ing 8 count early in the first round.
V hen Rivera applied several more
uppercuts and jabs Porath took
anotherstanding-8. lust under the
two minute mark, the bout was
Sl ippedb) the referee and Rivera
w as given the victory by a techinal
knockout 11 KO)
The third bout featured yet
another ECl student Van
Whitehead and a marine by the
name of Ron Olsen. In a mere 30
seconds Olson captured the vi
ton
I h, bout looked m re
v, , V wrestling than a boxing
match. William Walker and David
Brantlev squared off in what was
the most phvs al match ot the
evening. Walker, a much jmallcr
and stocku r boxer relied on con
trolled jabs and occasional hooks
In the first round, Brantlv hit the
mat from a vicious hook tor a
standing-8. The two then traded
blows until the bell sounded,
bringing the crowd to their feet.
In the second round, the two
sluggish boxers turned into wres
tiers as Walker hip-tossed Brantley
into the ropes. After trading
words, brantlev got even by floor
ing Walker with an uppercut. As
the bell sounded, Walker retali-
ated by stunning brantlev with a
series of quick jabs.
In the final round, the two
i ame out strong after each other
Brantley took the advantag � w ith
some strong combinations, and in
an attempt to break the two box
ers. the referee inadvertently sent
Walker crashing to the mat with
an elbow. The bout was awarded
to Brantlev by a 1 KO.
The fifth bout featured lames
Marsh and lames Bryant in the
158-168 weight class. Trading
blows throughout the first two
rounds. Bryant gained the upper
hand and came awa victorious
with an unamious decision.
bout si featured C ieorge I is
cella and Walter I inkins Starting
with a series of combinations
I inkins gamed an early advan-
tage. In round two, I iscella took a
standing-8 and was virtualh oul
of the match In what mam con
sidered one of the best matches,
1 inkinscameawav with an unami
ous decision to take first Kcn Ambrose, a resident of
The seventh bout lasted 47 Williamston,N.C, has been corn-
seconds as Qucnton Joyner quit ing to the boxing tournament for
(or retired as it was called) and
I'rov Carter was crowned cham-
pion of the 168-179 weight class.
The 1K0-201 weight class pre-
sented Darious 1 ludginsand Mike
1 larrison as the contestants. One
minute and one second into the
bout, 1 larrison went down in the
result of a TKO.
In the heavyweight division
:ul, the last bout of the eve-
ning, Sam McGriff and Troy Tut-
wilder squared off in what was a
very slow paced match. Neither
boxer gained the advantage, but
at the end, the udgcs ruled in
favor of Tutwilder.
When tournament officials
were asked about problems for
the tournament, the response was
basically a lack of participation on
the behalf of Pitt County residents
and E T ' students.
"We had trouble finding stu-
dents or locals that wanted to
fight said Ste e Raper, the regis-
tration chair. "This tournament is
held tor the benefit of the children,
w hich happen to be the kev to our
future We just wanted more
peeple to come out
When sophomore lake Bar-
row was asked why he came to
watch the tournament, he re-
� ponded by saving "I wanted to
see some people get their a
ku ked
The 14th Annual IKf Boxing Tournament was not only a good time for the fans but it was also a
success for a local charity. The proceeds went to help support the St. lude's Children'sHospital and
the Children's Miracle Network Telethon (Photo by Mark Love ECU Photo Lab).
10 years now. "I heard it adver-
tised again, I wanted to see a good
fight, and it's for a good cause,
that's why I came
Thisevent wasn't a rush job. It
took a whole lot of people and a
whole lot of time to make this
tournament a success.
"Preparationsstarted in Janu
ary and it took a lot of time" RaDei
said. "A nng had to be located,
boxers had to be found, a time to
use Minges had to be set up, and
mam ether factors were in-
volved
I he i sl tor entrance was two
dollars, and tee shirts as well as a
consession stand was set up. Hie
exact total of the donation to St
(ude'sand the( Children's Miracle
Network Telethon was unavail
able, but the brothers of TKE said
it would be around SI .500.
Every Night At
We Tend To Get
A Little
Fresh
es (tin res �
do know out bound.
omt'S to sei � ing the
eat h e ening

ver nighi there
Beet Seafood
is , l �
Pasta l
ingredients, available 1 �
speoalh seasoned
-loin us atharle l s I �
a little fresh nd it on :
person.il taste usi asU a �
v our v er ov n persona
S i
.Uei'
� �
: i i � .our
It's Charley O's for dinner; The new taste of
Greenville.
The New Iaste
(H'Greenvill
t kT �Umi ei

w
N 10! O
X
Mil Kl
A
TGNinici
13J
ivL ii Ji
na
A
7
n
t�!j c.a
JT,
A'
1BT1
N
Will be held on
Wednesday, April 5th
between
9:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
YOU MUST HAVE YOUR
STUDENT I.D.
& ACTIVITY CARD!





I
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 4,1989
TKE Boxing benefits two local charities
By MICHAEL MARTIN
t Sports Editor
There's no need to travel lo
New Jersey or Las Vegas to see
some great boxing. Just make a
note of the annual Tau Kappa
Epsilon boxing tournament held
in Minges Coliseum.
This years tournament, the
14th consecutive, brought people
from everywhere. Co-sponsored
by the TKE's, C. O. Tankard Co
and Corona Extra beer, this event
was held for a great cause: the St.
Jude's Children's Hospital and the
Children's Miracle Network Tele-
thon.
The tournament was held
Tuesday, March 28 thru Thurs-
day, March 30, and started with
approximately 40 boxers divided
into seven weight classes, all with
an amateur status. Most of the
boxers were from Camp Lejune
and Fort Bragg, with a few en-
tered from the Pitt County area,
and just a handful of out-of-staters.
Set upin the middle of Minges
Coliseum, the ring brought about
a sensation of professional box-
ing. A crowd of about 350 people
filed in with hopes of seeing
someone( s) take a knock-out blow.
However, since the tournament
was set up for amateurs, the refe-
rees were quick to intervene in a
knock-out situation.
Special ring announcer Dick
"The Country Rover" Jones from
WITN channel 7, started the eve-
ning with a plea for donations.
Afterwards, the magical "boxers
to the ring" call echoed through
the coliseum.
The crowd became absorbed
with excitement, and loud clap-
ping and whistling immediately
filled the area. The first bout, the
124-132 weight class, brought
Anthony Reeves and Eugene
Hinton forward to the ring.
The bell sounded for the start,
and the two boxers took off to-
wards each other trading punches
left and right. This non-stop ac-
tion lasted for the entirety of the
first round. When the second
round started, both fighters came
out with an evil look his eye and
the trading of punches continued.
Hinton gained the early advan-
tage as he connected with combi-
nations of jabs and uppercuts. This
bout went into the third round
with Hinton havine the clear
advantage. Both fighters were
growing tired, but the flurries of
punchescontinued. Whenthefinal
bell sounded, Hinton came away
with a split-decision victory.
Ring-girl Mami Blum, a so-
phomore, presented the trophies
to the boxers and a sight to the
crowd. She entered a bikini con-
test held at the Attic, won a mone-
tary prize, and was chosen to be
the ring-girl for the tournament
finals.
The second bout featured Pete
Rivera and ECU student Mike
Porath (who also happened to be a
TKE brother) in the 136-143 weight
class. This match didn't take as
long as Porath was given a stand-
ing-8-count early in the first round.
When Rivera applied several more
uppercuts and jabs, Porath took
another standing-8. Just under the
two minute mark, the bout was
stopped by the referee and Rivera
was given the victory by a techinal
knockout (TKO).
The third bout featured yet
another ECU student, Van
Whitehead and a marine by the
name of Ron Olsen. In a mere 30
seconds, Olsen captured the vic-
tory.
The fourth bout looked more
like NW A wrestling than a boxing
match. William Walker and David
Brantley squared off in what was
the most physical match of the
evening. Walker, a much smaller
and stockier boxer relied on con-
trolled jabs and occasional hooks.
In the first round, Brantly hit the
mat from a vicious hook for a
standing-8. The two then traded
blows until the bell sounded,
bringing the crowd to their feet.
In the second round, the two
sluggish boxers turned into wres-
tlers as Walker hip-tossed Brantley
into the ropes. After trading
words, Brantley got even by floor-
ing Walker with an uppercut. As
the bell sounded, Walker retali-
ated by stunning Brantley with a
series of quick jabs.
In the final round, the two
came out strong after each other.
Brantley took the advantage with
some strong combinations, and in
an attempt to break the two box-
ers, the referee inadvertently sent
Walker crashing to the mat with
an elbow. The bout was awarded
to Brantley by a TKO.
The fifth bout featured James
Harsh and James Bryant in the
158-168 weight class. Trading
blows throughout the first two
rounds, Bryant gained the upper
hand and came away victorious
with an unamious decision.
Bout six featured George Fis-
cella and Walter Linkins. Starting
with a series of combinations,
Linkins gained an early advan-
tage. In round two, Fiscella took a
standing-8 and was virtually out
of the match. In what manv con-
sidered one of the best matches,
Linkins came a way with an unami-
ous decision to take first.
The seventh bout lasted 47
seconds as Quenton Joyner quit
(or retired as it was called) and
Troy Carter was crowned cham-
pion of the 168-179 weight class.
The 180-201 weight class pre-
sented Darious Hudgins and Mike
Harrison as the contestants. One
minute and one second into the
bout, Harrison went down in the
result of a TKO.
In the heavyweight division
(201 ), the last bout of the eve-
ning, Sam McGriff and Troy Tut-
wilder squared off in what was a
very slow paced match. Neither
boxer gained the advantage, but
at the end, the judges ruled in
favor of Tutwilder.
When tournament officials
were asked about problems for
the tournament, the response was
basically a lack of participation on
the behalf of Pitt County residents
and ECU students.
"We had trouble finding stu-
dents or locals that wanted to
fight said Steve Raper, the regis-
tration chair. "This tournament is
held for thebenefitof thechildren,
which happen to be the key to our
future. We just wanted more
people to come out
When sophomore Jake Bar-
row was asked why he came to
watch the tournament, he re-
sponded by saying "I wanted to
see some people get their a
kicked
Ken Ambrose, a resident of
Williamston,N.C, has been com-
ing to the boxing tournament for
10 years now. "I heard it adver-
tised again, I wanted to see a good
fight, and it's for a good cause,
that's why I came
This event wasn'tarush job. It
took a whole lot of people and a
whole lot of time to make this
tournament a success.
"Preparations started in Janu
ary and it took a lot of time" RaDer
said. "A ring had to be located,
boxers had to be found, a time to
use Minges had to be set up, and
many other factors were in-
volved
The cost for entrance was two
dollars, and tee shirts as well as a
consession stand was set up. The
exact total of the donation to St.
Jude's and the Children's Miracle
Network Telethon was unavail-
able, but the brothers of TKE said
it would be around $1,500.
The 14th Annu. VAuig Tournament was not only a good time for the fans but it was also a
success for a local charity. The proceeds went to help support the St Jude's Children'sHospital and
the Children's Miracle Network Telethon (Photo by Mark Love ECU Photo Lab).
Every Night At
We Tend To Get
A Little
Fresh
i 14 yes Our restaurant is quite pleasant hut we
ll do know our boundaries � except u hen n
Jp comes to serving the freshest selections
I each evening
Every night there is a new menu of fresh specials Chicken
Beef. Seafood Pasta All prepared from the freshest
ingredients available Broiled Sauteed. Baked All are
specially seasoned
Join us at Charley O s Because ever night we tend to get
a little fresh And. if you don't see the entree to please your
personal taste, just ask. we 11 try to satisfy your palate with
your very own personal favorite
It's Charley O's lor dinner; The new taste of
Greenville.
The NewTaste
Of Greenville
riery � Chokes � Atmosphere
X
HILTON INN
GREENVILLE
J
lOTTOM
LJECTH
ww
IBUJOT
Will be held on
Wednesday. April 5th
between
9:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
YOU MUST HAVE YOUR
STUDENT LD.
& ACTIVITY CARD!





Title
The East Carolinian, April 4, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 04, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.668
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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