The East Carolinian, March 28, 1989






d Ji� A d
Crime Report3
Editorials4
Classifieds6
An inside look at Student for
the Ethical Treatment of Animals
Flip to page 9.
Tommy Eason knocks in game
winning runs in each of the Pirates'
wins over William and Mary.
Catch the action on page 11.
iEaat Carolinian
s the l ast C an Una campus community since 1925.
. i 1.mh 28 PSl�
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA candid
state positions in forum
I I R . 1 k .
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1aSs. 1 1 � ig � em to insta � � g al . . a
imi I ii

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.
. -
� the stni lenl
; � akes alsoi unnin I i
id � I his m tin g
a stud '� � adent "1 .
i thai tea hei c aluations be
pnhli .bed into a newspapei h , �
hich v ill be given out to
I nts two weeks before 11
Roakt s lid.
V . ording to Roakes
isues ol concern in hi can .
a Ha
a re na
liti le do
to r.

.
i
. far a
. 'I
. : uj s � o iperman said. "Get-
roups involved and explain-
vvhat is going on and when
in 1 ippening will be our
( ooperman said she would
like to see Pirate Walk run as a
ident oluntcer group as it was
n ill) established. She is cur-
ntly working with some of the
iginators oi the program trying
to deti rmine tactics that worked
first year of Pirate Walk.
Vice presidential candidate
it'er Vandcrburg plans to
s Pirate Walk as a primary
Ii v ted. "I am very con
rned with safety on the campus
. id 1 feel the university needs to
Vand ; said. She said
he is to personally speak
to . r. . lizations and residence
. Isl i . ��� a j to make fora
r campus.
"I w ould like to get minority
ti i j and w hite leaders � n
campus together to di
lems that are going on and think
of ways to make some pr . n
Vanderburg said. Another i
she plans to address is to
library hour- in the e enii
Ray Madden, candidati I i
the office of treasurer, said he
would like to work closely
the other elected executives in
efforts to make the student bod)
more interested and involved in
the SGA. Madden said he
like to put condom machines in
the residence halls, and he would
like to see a bell tower built
campus.
Madden's opponent, irr
Lay ton said heisconcemt d
better educating the 1
appropriation proced
areas of cono
funds to n
and exl moi
campus. "I want I rea
masses Lavtoi
After I ndidal
; tnd
represi
Caroliniai I
WZM lireeted
ward the ofti e
A rt pre enutiv
Fast Carolinian ask I
"Whilerur forvi
inlastsprii
there wasa need! ij rad
on campus. In part
Walk was one f ir Li
concerns ! I, I
fortsto uj idetl
after a ret � ' �
given in the fall semi
ones said she nia il tei
to impro e Pirate '� alk bv 1
three people to din ctth pi . � .


the a fir�
the

IS. -d sheu�
rve-atsin theItslatureto
- - le racial issue within the

, ai t say we a
t rid of racism becau
. � ryi ars Instead,
we need to determine how to
addn s it, 1 assitcr said
The ECU campus had the opportunity to hear office seekers for president, vice-pies id
of the SGA on Monda) during a forum held in them ill. Presidential candidates, Kell) I
sister and fripp Roakes from left to right) explain their positions. (Photo b Angel.
ent Mid treasurer
ones Valei ia 1 as-
i Prideen)
Legislature moves to expand foreign languages
Bv I OKI MAR UN
A report from a
theNorth
attire was given, a r - to
expandfoi
was proposed and tv ria
lions wcredis ussed in Mon
meeting of the Stud nt Gov
men! Association
Ao ording to Speaker of tl
I egislature Marty Helms, mem
re 0f EO - s iA attended the
N Student 1 egislature mo I
in Raleigh March 22 26 A pica I
legislationb) E I won the hoi
i t h si bill proposed
Ihe bill legalized the manu
facture sell and use of fireworks
m NX E I 's 1 ton Percise co
authored the document with a
legislator from the University i I
North Carolina at Charlotte
A bill to establish a real estate
appraisal board, authored b
ECU'S Michael Bartlett was
passed bv the legislature
Several ECU legislators pre
sided as officers at the meeting
. i � i oor-
was i
the entire m
v th( i offi eis were Beth
irdsei ng as Principle Clerk
ate i I ai r) i St t le as N i
ml at Arms of the 1 louse of
Rt pre t ntativ e MiA 1 lelms as
President Pro L mpore of Senate.
1 lelms told the S( ;Athem I
was du ational, and he said
II was well repres nt 1
In the aioa ol ippropi iations,
: 10 was funded tor the student
iation Network.
i he funds will be used foi a nno
ranuin foi a banquet speaker
I he l gislature dis us ied a
n u si tor funds for BA( CHUS,
i dl ug abuse and prevention or
g mization The group's requested
appropriation was to be used to
pun hase a omputer tor publica
tion and research.
Aftei debate within the body,
the request was denied The rea-
soning behind the decision was
that the s( .A did not want to set a
precedent for funding tor com-
puters
A bill stating the s( ,A is in
; i expanding ol h u ign
lanj iagi fa ilities w a � introdiu ed
Legi lati �i Bill ai roll 1 he
. ilution . alls foi i upanding the
ices by adding foreign Ian
guage tapes to the Mendenhall
Musu I istcningenter and the
(oyner 1 ibrai y Audio i: ual
( enter.
1 he bill, authored 1 arroll
and 1 egislator Matthew albert,
was mandated by Chancellor
1 �akm. professor of foreign Ian
guage -are Ambcrt, 1 ean of Arts
and Sciences and the director of
ovner Library.
1 he legislature passed a bill to
recognize Phi Mu Alpha Sym
phonia,a music fraternity Ac ord
ing to Rules and udiciary Com
mittee Chairman bob Landry, the
purpose of the group is to pro
mote creativity, performance,
education in music in America
Nominations were taken for
best speaker in the legislature and
for best legislation. The nominees
for speaker were Terry 1 lindleand
Susan (ooperman
Nominations tor best legisla
tion were for a bill proposing to
install condom machines in the
residence halls and one concern-
ing financial aid requests. A vote
was conducted bv secret ballot and
the winners will be announced at
the annual S( IA banquet on April
18.
student Welfare Chairman
I ee Toler read a bill honoring
winter sports Mandates for the
bill are chancellor Eakin, h'CU
Athletic Department and the ECU
News bureau.
S( A President 1 arry Murphy
announced a workshopconducted
by the strategic Planning Forum.
ccordmg to Murphy, the pur-
pose ot the forum is to set goals tor
1U's future.
A workshop dealing with the
university's strengths and weak-
nesses will be conducted on April
6, and a workshop on environ-
mental analysis will be held April
13.
Vice president Kelly lones
said the director of Public Safety
will speak in 211 Ragsdaleon April
29 at 11 am She urges all legisla-
tors and any interested students
to attend.
Two candidates withdraw
from SGA office races
Campaigning for this year's
Student Government elections
started two weeks ago Since that
time, two candidates have offi
daily withdrawn from the race
One of the three candidates
for vice president. Mark Carroll
quit the race Monday after a week
end deliberating whether or not
he would stay in the election.
He said he has invested a lot
of time into ECU's student life as
the president of the Student Resi
dence Association and no a feels
it is time tor him to invest more
time into bis own personal life,
i specially his friends and relatives
C arrollsaid. 1 ve Utsomuch
into the SRA for the past five years
and I've worked hard to improve
student life so �t's time to im-
prove im own student life
It S the toughest decision! ve
ever had to make in college, but
I'll probably not regret it I hope






i
HaisM�

Crime Report3
Editorials4
11- . i . . uii i- i-i . - " � .ii. .
An inside look at Student for
the Ethical Treatment of Animals.
Flip to page 9. ,
�8�fftko
Tommy Eason knocks in game
winning runs in each of the Pirates'
wins over William and Mary.
Catch the action on page 11.
�he iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 60
Tuesday March 28,1989
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA candidates state positions in forum
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
Candidates tor Student Gov-
ernment offices stated their plat-
forms and answered questions
from students and the media in a
public forum on the mall Monday
afternoon.
The forum, sponsored by The
East Carolinian and the Media
Board, gave the candidates a
chance to voice their stands on
certain issues facing the Student
Government Association a d the
student body.
Presidential candidate Valeria
Lassiter said her primary concern
is to develop a more representa-
tive SGA. If elected, she plans to
target all organizations and en-
courage them to install represen-
tatives in the legislature.
"I will urge all legislators to
meet with their constituents to see
what their concern are Lassiter
said. "I'm concerned that we pro-
vide an environment that will be
conducive to all students devel-
oping on this campusand that
we begin to recognize and target
academic excellence
"Mv main concern is that you
elect the person who has the most
experience presidential candi-
date Kelly Jones said. Jones said
her three years experience will
help her reach the SGA goals she
proposes.
Jones said she is also con-
cerned with making the SGA a
more representative body. She
plans to publicize fall elections for
legislators and advertise open
meetings of the SGA in the fall.
"I would like for the presi-
dent to have a more advisory role
with the student government
Jones said. "Although the two
different branches are separate�
the executive and the legislative�
1 feel the president should advise
the legislature on what she or he
thinks the student government
should do
Tripp Roakes, also running for
president, said his main goal is to
be a students' president. "I pro-
pose that teacher evaluations be
published into a newspaper-type
article which will be given out to
students two weeks before regis-
tration Roakes said.
According to Roakes, other
issues of concern in his campaign
are having a Halloween celebra-
tion on campus to replace the tra-
ditional one downtown and start-
ing a drunk bus to reduce the
numberof drunkdrivcrson week-
ends.
Vice-presidential candidate
Susan Cooperman said her main
point of concern is to work on
involvement and developing bet-
ter representation within theSGA.
"I don't feel we should cater to
anyoneas far as reserving so many-
scats in the SGA for certain
groups Cooperman said. "Get-
ting groups involved and explain-
ing what is going on and when
things are happening will be our
key
Cooperman said she would
like to see Pirate Walk run as a
student volunteer group as it was
originally established. She is cur-
rently working with some of the
originators of the program trying
to determine tactics that worked
the first year of Pirate Walk.
Vice-presidential candidate
Jennifer Vanderburg plans to
address Pirate Walk as a primary
issue if elected. "I am very con-
cerned with safety on the campus
and I feel the university needs to
be too Vanderburg said. She said
she is willing to personally speak
to organizations and residence
halls to explain ways to make for a
safer campus.
"I would like to get minority
leaders and white leaders on
campus together to discuss prob-
lems that are going on and think
of ways to make some progress
Vanderburg said. Another issue
she plans to address is to extend
library hours in the evenings.
Ray Madden, candidate for
the office of treasurer, said he
would like to work closely with
the other elected executives in
efforts to make the student body
more interested and involved in
the SGA. Madden said he would
like to put condom machines in
the residence halls, and he would
like to see a bell tower built on
campus.
Madden's opponent, Jim
Layton said he is concerned with
better educating the legislature on
appropriation procedures. Other
areas of concern are giving more
funds to minority organizations
and exhibiting more art work on
campus. "I want to reach the
masses Layton said.
After the candidates voiced
their concerns and proposals,
representatives from the The Eat
Carolinian, Expressions and
WZMB directed questions to-
ward the office seekers.
A representative from The
East Carolinian asked Jones:
"While running for vice-president
in last spring's elections, you sta ted
there wasa need to upgrade safety
on campus. In particular. Pirate
Walk wasoneof your largest safety
concerns. How do you access ef-
forts to upgrade the escort service
after a record low of 85 walks were
given in the fall semester?"
Jones said she made attempts
to improve Pirate Walk by hiring
three people to direct the program.
She said she solicited groups to
serve as walkers and telephone
operators.
"Then someone took it (Pirate
Walk) out of my hands Jones
said. She explained that another
legislator began working with the
program giving her little chance
to contribute to a resolution.
Lassiter was questioned bv a
WZMB representative about her
lack of experience in the SGA "It's
not the quantity, but the quali ty of
the work Lassiter said. "Itmcans
nothing to have titles if you're not
an effective worker
Tripp Roakes was confronted
with the fact that he has been del-
iquent in his responsibilities as
SGA treasurer, the office winch he
currently holds. According to in-
formation obtained by the Fast
Carolinian, Roakes has failed to
submit a treasury report for sev-
eral consecutive weeks.
Roakes defended himself by-
explaining there was a death in
his familv which accounted for
J
two of the financial statements.
He also said a SGA convention in
Texas was a cause for him to fail to
submit the report.
The floor was then opened for
the audience to direct questions to
the candidates. Steven Pierce
asked how each candidate plans
to address the racial issue in cam-
Pu Jones said she would like to
reserve scats in the legislature to
attack the racial issue within the
SGA.
"We cannot say we are going
to get rid of racism because it has
been around for yearsInstead,
we need to determine how to
address it Lassiter said.
The ECU campus had the opportunity to hear office seekers for president, vice-president and treasurer
of the SGA on Monday during a forum held in the mall. Presidential candidates, Kelly Jones Valeria Las-
sister and Tripp Roakesfrom left to right) explain their positions. (Photo by Angela Pridgen)
Legislature moves to expand foreign languages
By LORI MARTIN
Slaff Writer
A report from a meeting of
the North Carolina Student Legis-
lature was given, a resolution to
expand foreign language services
was proposed and two appropria-
tions were discussed in Monday's
meeting of the Student Govern-
ment Association.
According to Speaker of the
Legislature Marty Helms, mem-
bers of ECU'S SGA attended the
N.C. Student Legislature meeting
in Raleigh March 22-26. A piece W
legislation by ECU won the honor
of best bill proposed.
The bill legalized the manu-
facture, sell and use of fireworks
in N.C. ECU'S Don Percise co-
authored the document with a
legislator from the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte.
A bill to establish a real estate
appraisal board, authored by
ECU'S Michael Bartlett, was
passed by the legislature.
Several ECU legislators pre-
sided as officers at the meeting.
Janet Batten served a session coor-
dinator. She was responsible for
organizing the entire meeting.
Other officers were Beth
Howard serving as Principle Clerk
of Senate, Darryl Steele as Ser-
geant at Arms of the House of
Representatives and Helms as
President Pro Tcmpore of Senate.
Helms told the SGA the meet-
ing was educational, and he said
ECU was well represented.
In the area of appropriations,
$400 was funded for the Student
Planning Association Network.
The funds will be used for a hono-
rarium for a banquet speaker.
The legislature discussed a
request for funds for BACCHUS,
a drug abuse and prevention or-
ganization. The group's requested
appropriation was to be used to
purchase a computer for publica-
tion and research.
After debate within the body,
the request was denied. The rea-
soning behind the decision was
that the SGA did not want to set a
precedent for funding for com-
puters.
A bill stating the SGA is in
favor of expanding of foreign
language facilities was introduced
by Legislator Bill Carroll. The
resolution calls for expanding the
services by adding foreign lan-
guage tapes to the Mcndenhall
Music Listening Center and the
Joyner Library AudioVisual
Center.
The bill, authored by Carroll
and Legislator Matthew Gilbert,
was mandated by Chancellor
Eakin, professor of foreign lan-
guage Gary Ambert, Dean of Arts
and Sciences and the director of
Joyner Library.
The legislature passed a bill to
recognize Phi Mu Alpha Sym-
phonia,a music fraternity. Accord-
ing to Rules and Judiciary Com-
mittee Chairman Bob Landry, the
purpose of the group is to pro-
mote creativity, performance,
education in music in America.
Nominations were taken for
best speaker in the legislature and
for best legislation. The nominees
for speaker were Terry Hindle and
Susan Cooperman.
Nominations for best legisla-
tion were for a bill proposing to
install condom machines in the
residence halls and one concern-
ing financial aid requests. A vote
was conducted by secret ballot and
the winners will be announced at
the annual SGA banquet on April
18.
Student Welfare Chairman
Lee Toler read a bill honoring
winter sports. Mandates for the
bill are Chancellor Eakin, ECU
Athletic Department and the ECU
News Bureau.
SGA President Larry Murphy
announced a workshop conducted
by the Strategic Planning Forum.
According to Murphy, the pur-
pose of the forum is to set goals for
ECU'S future.
A workshop dealing with the
university's strengths and weak-
nesses will be conducted on April
6, and a workshop on environ-
mental analysis will be held April
13.
Vice-president Kelly Jones
said the director of Public Safety
will speakin211 Ragsdaleon April
29 at 11 a.m. She urges all legisla-
tors and any interested students
to attend.
Two candidates withdraw
from SGA office races
Campaigning for this year's
Student Government elections
started two weeks ago. Since that
time, two candidates have offi-
cially withdrawn from the race.
One of the three candidates
for vice president, Mark Carroll,
quit the race Monday after a week-
end deliberating whether or not
he would stay in the election.
He said he has invested a lot
of time into ECU's student life as
the president of the Student Resi-
dence Association and now feels
it is time for him to invest more
time into his own personal life,
especially his friendsand relatives.
Carroll said, "I've put so much
into the SRA for the past five years
and I've worked hard to improve
student life, so it's time to im-
prove my own student life.
It's the toughest decision I've
ever had to make in college, but
I'll probably not regret it I hope





?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28,1989
Candidates voice stands
Presidential Candidates
Tripp Roakes
Mv name is Tripp Roakes and
am running for the office of Stu-
dent Government President. I am
presently serving as the Student
Government Association Treas-
urer.
Within mv years here at ECU
I am presentlv serving as chair-
man of Fine Arts Board, and Stu-
dent Services Board. Throughout
the year President Larry Murphy
has called on me to represent him
at many of his meetings, therefore
I have alreadv sat in on many of
the committees that I will serveon
as president.
I want to be a president that
will be here for you the students
and work on things that will help
the students. Some of the main
things that I want to accomplish in
my administration are the recrea-
tion of the Drunk Bus. DWI's are
one of the biggest problems tor
our students and the drunk bus
will offer an alternative method to
getting downtown. This bus will
run for four hours on Friday and
Saturdav nights and include on its
route theareasofTar River, Wilson
Acres, Kingston Place, Eastbrook
and College Hill.
Another thing that 1 want to
bring back is Pirate Walk. Pirate
Walk as we know it now is dead. 1
am proposing that the SGA pur-
chase a golf cart to transport walk-
ers. This cost would be centrally
located and would be able to reach
all dorms within five minutes. This
would erase the 15 minute waits
and 15 walks. This is a crafty and
very marketable idea. I feel that
participation in this program
would double if not triple.
Teacher evaluations are an-
other topic that i w�uU to address.
The evaluations as we know them
"�now are
other groups. Another way would as they show my experience in
be to more heavily advertise open SGA. As well, these are qualifica-
legislative positions. tions my opponents lack.
Creating academically astute As SGA Vice President this
students should be a priority for year, I have had to serve on many
cmapus committees. This has
the university in order to move
away from the "party school"
image. I think social activities are
important, but this is an educa-
tional institution; therefore, aca-
demic excellence should be our
objective.
Establishing solutions to these1
problems allows a more condu-
cive environment for all students
to positively develop. As Presi-
dent I will commit myself to be-
coming a roving reporter and a
disseminatorof information to the
students. I will be your cataivst,
your channel and a contributor to
students on this campus.
given me much insight into the
bureaucracy unique to our cam-
pus. I have learned which admin-
istrator does what, which com-
mittee handles what, and most
importantly, how to get the things
done that I would like to do as
your SGA President.
It is very important that the
SGA President knows how to get
where she wants to got. To illus-
trate, if my opponents and I de-
cided to head to California, I would
get there first because I know the
proper way to go. In other words,
I know the proper channels to got
through to be successful in getting
things
hc done. This comes only
Vl TSimTan?t0 votftor through time - through experi-
alenaLassiter tor SGA president, nnm
presi
1) Dedicated to all students.
2) Concerned about student
welfare.
3) Committed to progress.
4) Works hard.
5) Meets responsibilties.
6) Encourages innovative
ideas.
7) Represents student major-
8) Supports academic excel-
lence.
9) Motivates student inter-
est.
10) Experienced in student
leadership.
ltv.
Kelly Jones
As a candidate for SGA Presi-
dent, I wish to share with you
some of my qualifications and
ideas.
I have been involved with
SQA, for my three years here at
'Kffrti m w��dw ECTf-ftxiaSi asCfefes-Presidenr,
results of the these published in a
newspaper form and distributed
to all students before registration.
The way I look at it is that the stu-
dents are the consumers and the
professors are the product, we
need to know what we are bu vine.
4 O
Halloween is another prob-
lem that the next SGA president
will have to deal with. The city
council has stated the downtown
celebration is over. I have been
meeting with student Life and Stu-
dent Union officials to come up
with the solution of having a Bare-
foot on the mall type celebration
during the day and bands at night.
There is going to be some type of
partv that night and if thecity will
not sponsor it then ECU should.
I want to be known as the Stu-
dent's president, a president thai
will be there for the student s con-
cerns not just whatever the ad-
ministration wants to be thrown
overon thestudents. I will be there
for vou the students.
I will appreciate you support
tomorrow and throughout the
vear. Thank vou.
then served as Student Welfare
Committee Chair, and am now-
serving as SGA Vice President.
These are important qualifications,
ence.
1 feel that I have very concrete
goals. My goals are not idealistic
ones that are not even remotely
feasuble of reaching. I want to bet-
ter the image of this school not
only to the outsider but to the in-
sider � to you, the sutdents. I
want to work for you so that you
are happy during your tenure at
ECU. I want to include you in the
decision-making process of what
to strive for, what to accomplish,
and how. My utmost goal is to
enhance involvement. 1 have sev-
eral ways to doing this: (1) imple-
ment a Chancellor's Student Fo-
rum, where the Chancelor meets
with those interested once each
month to discuss the needs and
problems as seen through the eves
of the students; (2) implement a
Board of Leaders, to be composed
of one appointed representative
from each large organization on
campus and to enhance listening
to each other; (3) take time to visit
the clubs and organizations on
campus to discuss SGA and where
it should be going. Through these
programs, I feel the students are
bound to be more involved and,
moreimportantly, more informed.
A large problem on cmapus is
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Valeria Lassister
I am a candidate for President
of SGA because 1 recognize the
possibilities here at ECL and
possess the qualities to inspire the
students and administration to
work cooperatively in order that
all students may develop to their
fullest potential.
This university must continue
striving to become the number one
university in thisstate. Thismeans
a commitment to providing solu-
tions to the parking problems,
ensuring a more representative'
SGA and a more solid commit-
ment to academic excellence.
I recommend that the admini-
stration increase efforts to giving
students definite ideas of address-
ing the parking problems. If we
arenot going to have a parking
deck, iets move on to new solu-
tons to this old problem.
As your President we will
have a ttv0re representative SGA,
by restructuring the SGA screen-
ing proofs and making sincere
efforts to target independent stu-
dents. One ay to make the proc-
ess better would be to encourage
SGA recruitment of leaders from
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BU r ONE MZ1A, GET ONE FREE!
Call or Come by these Locations:
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(next to Food Lion) 756-7256
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(New Fairfield Square)
523-9120
that there is a definite lack of com-
munication among the student
populations on this campus: This
has made people to believe that
our campus has a racial problem.
1 have ideas about trying to rem-
edy the situation. I, of course,
realize that I cannot wave a magic
wand and make all of the prob-
lems disappear, but I can do some-
thing to try to alleviate some of the
tension. Maybe a quota system is
inorder where minoritiesare guar-
anteed at least as many seats on
legislature as are proportionate to
their population on the campus? I
have several ideas such as this one
that I would like to have the op-
portunity to at least talk about
with some of the people most af-
fected so that we, together, could
try to meet the problem head on. I
am not afraid of the issues, as thev
must be confronted now beforei
they escalate.
Kelly Jones
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Scott Makey
Phillip V. Cope
Advertising Representatives
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Guy Harvey
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We're Going After The BEST
Become a part of
THE
f CREW
!As a Pirate Crew Member
�You will assist in recruiting and hosting future Pirate athletes and
their families.
�You will assist East Carolina University in gaining national
recognition through athletics.
�You will gain excellent experience in public relations.
�You will influence the future of your university and its athletic
department.
�You will meet university and community leaders.
�You will be apart of an outstanding student organization.
TabCe Set Zip At Student Store March 28th thru March 31st
NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR THE
1989-90
ATTORNEY GENERAL
AND PUBLIC DEFENDER
m
I
These salaried positions offer
an excellent opportunity to
gain experience and leader-
ship abilities that will benefit
you throughout your life. At
the same time, these positions
will enable you to make valu-
able contributions to East
Carolina University. For addi-
tional information and appli-
cations, contact the Associate
Dean of Student's Office in 209
Whichard.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE TURNED IN BY
Thursday, March 30th
:s
s
o






V.PTreasurer office seekers
state campaign platforms
Jennifer under burg
Hello' My name is Jennifer
Vanderburg and 1 am a candidate
for vice president of the Student
government Association.
There are several issues that
are my upmost concern in the up-
coming year; foremost, a student
government working tor the stu-
dents, by the students 1 would like
to see increased involvement by all
students with their school govern-
ment, and that begins now with
elections. When elected, 1 would
like to increase awareness ot SGA
elections through advertisement,
and working personally with the
different organizations 1 lowever,
1 would also like to send each group
an application and instructions to
nominateoneor two individuals to
run tor the legislature. ITiis process
would give the student body more
selection of representation on the
SGA. and make these positions a
priviledge an honor, rather than a
necessity.
Student safety is also a major
concent of mine and would like to
see pirate walk get oft the ground
and incorporate the use ot a golt
cart to transport the females on
campus. 'Tliis cart would cut down
on time and possibly increase par-
ticipation and 1 argue that there is
racial tensions on campus, and I
would like to work with all the
leaders, minority and white, to form
a common solution solution
such as this will not happen over-
night, but this is an issue that can-
not be ignored. When the students
of ECU stop being black or white
students and begin being just stu-
dents, working with one another,
productiviity within this school
would increase dramatically.
I feel as though 1 am qualified
to hold the office of vice presi 1 l
and when elected will represent
ECU in a positive, obji - tive n
ner. I am currently a li itor,and
serve on the student wc .tare com-
mittee. 1 am also involved with
student union and other vari
committee- as well as c ; resi-
dent of m sorority.
I encourage you to get out and
vote on Wednesday tor Jennifer
Vanderburg, SGA-VP
Susan Cooperman
My name is Su ai
man and I'm running tor Stud i '
Government Association ��
President First ol a I
tell you that 1 m not
you, the studi nts a
istic promises. 1 �� ill
elected will do my
ot my abilities with responsi
bility, truthfulness and care 1 feel
that when a person really wants to
do something they put more
effort intodoinga good job. That's
exactly what I want todo for ECU
my best.
East Carolina is a great school
but there's always room tor mi
provement. 1 believe one of oui
main concerns should headdress
ing the lack o student involve-
ment. My thoughts on the issue
include bringing majority and
minority student together to work
as a team not divide them into
separate entities. And yes, we do
need more equal representation
tor the minority students on cam-
pus but that can only happen it we
get more ot the minority students
involved 1 hat could probablv be
helped b N tier public ing S
Fall 1 ns and openings on
university committees
There seems to be a problem
with new SGA representatives
who are unsure ot the parlia
mentlarv procedures used in the
SGA. 1 believe that the S A offi-
cers, who should have experience
in the body, should hold a semi
narat the first meetingol the new 1
elected repress ntatives to explain
what their jobs entail, how bill-
are written, exactly what happens
in the appropriations process i u
1 feel that by starting the year with
representatives that understand
what SGA is about wind by work
ing with screened on memb i -
we'll have mu h more i I
.lators Also the more a
members w eha � '�
points vr posed I :
tore the m re vi ts a ail
�t ui
abl � : :
we can agree t
iden I
crnment As -
vc.
the appropriations Committee all
those' years. Rus year, l am the
Chairperson of that committee. I
am involved in numerous music
organizations, including the
Marching Pirates, concert Choir
and the Pep Band. I've been a Presi-
dent Advisor for two 12 years.
I'm a member of the North Caro-
lina Student Legislature and a cer-
tified trainer on the Ropes course.
1 believe that mv involvement in
such a diversified set of organiza-
tions can enable me to look at the
needs of all the student groups on
campus and provide them with a
person they know is interested in
making them the best that they
can be.
Again, mv name is Susan
Cooperman and I'm running for
SGA Vice President. Please get
involved in the future of East
Carolina and vote in the SGA
Executive Officer elections from 9
am- 6 pm on Wednesday, March
29th.
Thank you for your coopera-
tion and involvment.
Sincerely,
Susan Cooperman
Chairperson, Appropriations
Committee
Senior� Music Education
Ray Madden
On March 29 the student
body will determine, by vote, the
SGA Executive Council for the
next school year.
1 am Ray Madden and I am a
candidate for SGA Treasurer.
Presently, 1 am President of the
Inter Fraternity President; a
member of the Media Board,and
a member of the Student Union
Board oi Directors. I have also
held positions on the SGA Ex-
ecutive Cabinet and the Student
WellnessCommittee. With these
credentials 1 feel I'm the most
qualified person for the position.
Besides executing my
"stated" duties as Treasurer, 1
would make an effort to bring
back the essentials in which SGA
is based on � representing the
student body. Also, as Treasurer
1 would stress the importance of
involvement by students from
all aspects of campus inorder to
form a more well-rounded SGA.
When those new legislators are
elected next Fall, 1 will make sure
those new members will be edu-
cated on the proceduresand rules
of order within weekly meetings.
1 would appreciate your support
on the 29th, and get out and vote.
IS YOUR THESK
THE FREEZER?
I know the processes involved
in student government in allocat-
ing funds.
With this knowledge I want
to get the money to these groups I
in a fair and efficient manner.
I want also to educate them on
the process of appropration so that
they can get the money they de-
serve. 1 intend to create an admin-
isration of students under me to
help in this and to get to know the
fine details of the students needs
of money in all groups so that lean
better help them to get it.
I also want to print the budget
total in the newspaper.
1 want to encourage the arts
to get more money duo to the
art school.
I also want to see that minor-
ity organizations get an increse in
their funds they constitute a solid
1 5 percent of the student popula-
tion.
RACK ROOM SH0�S
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market TAKE AN EXTRA
Memorial Drive
I
Open
Vlonday-SaUinhw 10 9
Sundav 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Nike and Reebok)
i l
DELIVERY
i h ese L'izza
Cheese and 1 Topping
Ea h Additional Tupping
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Supreme
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FRI.&SAT. 4PM TO 1:00 AM
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DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DELIVERY CHARGE 75'
,line was. By the turn had �wtH ' pages � � '�'
� � wouklbun town IteptnwnoK ant i � '�
v �� en �b a powo fail m J has" gal '�' '
i trawl �� �� i ndustnalespionage
� I a�e made ripie ai Kmteos
Ray Madden
Toll Sci
Jim Layton
1 want a change. What I say
here means little because the
masses ot students are unaffected,
they arc untouched.
A few hundred students elect
representatives for 15,000 people.
1 want, through being SGA
Treasurer, to reach out to the
people.
This is an important post in
the student government.
There are many groups in
campus that require funding.
1 want to reach out to all of
these groups and bring them closer
into focus with the student gov-
ernment through this job.
junto's
the copy center
12' East Te Sir
GreenvMe NC
(919) 752-0875
OPENMOM rHRUFM 7 AM nil 1 7 PM
SAT � AM Till 6 PM
SUN 7 PM nil 17 PM
Student Union
Coming Attractions
� a) n (� I i n tit) JLzJiUz
im
k
Wednesday, March 29
8:00 pm Hendrix
WITHNAIL AND I
Thursday, March 30 - Sunday, April 2
8:00 pm Hendrix Theatre
BETRAYED
Friday, March 31
7:00 pm Underground
BRAD REEDER - Comedian
Friday, March 31 - Saturday, April 1
11:00 pm Hendrix Theatre
LATE SHOW; FLESH GORDON
Upyomintf Events;
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL - APRIL 19
WANTED- Major Concerts and Visual Arts Committee
Chariperson - Apply at the StudetntUnion Office
(room 236) Mendenhall.
by March 27
DELIVERY
LARGE $9.99 SPECIALITY
A LARGE MEAT LOVER'S, OR CHEESE
LOVER'S WITH TWO TOPPINGS OF
YOUR CHOICE, OR LARGE SUPREME.
jjj
(COUPON EXPIRES 4389)
All film are shown at 8 pm In Hendrix
Theatre unles. otherwUe .tated and are FREE to ECU Student.
with valid ECU I.D.
'to wm you





V.PTreasurer office seekers
state campaign platforms
JenniferVanderburg

Hello! My name is Jennifer
Vanderburg and I am a candidate
for vice president of the Student
government Association.
There are several issues that
are my upmost concern in the up-
coming year; foremost, a student
government working for the stu-
dents, by the students. I would like
to see increased involvement by all.
students with their school govern-
ment, and that begins now with
elections. When elected, I would
like to increase awareness of SGA
elections through advertisement,
and working personally with the
different organizations. However,
I would also like to send each group
an application and instructions to
nominate one or two individuals to
run for the legislature. This process
would give the student body more
selection of representation on the
SGA, and make these positions a
priviledge an honor, rather than a
necessity.
Student safety is also a major
concern of mine and would like to
see pirate walk get off the ground
and incorporate the use of a golf
cart to transport the females on
campus. This cart would cut down
on time and possibly increase par-
ticipation and I argue that there is
racial tensions on campus, and 1
would like to work with all the
leaders, minority and white, to form
a common solution. A solution
such as this will not happen over-
night, but this is an issue that can-
not be ignored. When the students
of ECU stop being black or white
students and begin being just stu-
dents, working with one another,
productivity within this school
would increase dramatically.
I feel as though 1 am qualified
to hold the office of vice president,
and when elected will represent
ECU in a positive, objective man-
ner. I am currently a legislator, and
serve on the student welfare com-
mittee. I am also involved with the
student union and other various
committees, as well as vice-presi-
dent of my sorority.
I encourage you to get out and
vote on Wednesday for Jennifer
Vanderburg, SGA-VP.
Susan Cooperman
My name is Susan Cooper-
man and I'm running for Student
Government Association Vice
President. First of all, I'd like to
tell vou that I'm not going to give
you, the students, a lot of unreal-
istic promises. I will say that if I'm
elected, I will do mv job to the best
of my abilities � with responsi-
bility, truthfulness and care. I feel
that when a person really wants to
do something � they put more
effort into doing a good job. That's
exactly what I want to do for ECU
mv best.
East Carolina is a great school
but there's always room for im-
provement. I believe one of our
main concerns should be address-
ing the lack of student involve-
� ment. My thoughts on the issue
include bringing majority and
minority student together to work
as a team � not divide them into
separate entities. And, yes, we do
need more equal representation
for the minority students on cam-
pus but that can only happen if we
get more of the minority students
involved. That could probably be
helped by better publicizing SGA
Fall Elections and openings on
university committees.
There seems to be a problem
with new SGA representatives
who are unsure of the parlia-
mentlary procedures used in the
SGA. I believe that the SGA offi-
cers, who should have experience
in the body, should hold a semi-
nar at the first meeting of the newly
elected representatives to explain
what their jobs entail, how bills
are written, exactly what happens
in the appropriations process, etc.
1 feel that by starting the year with
representatives that understand
what SGA is about (and by work-
ing with screened on members)
we'll have much more effective
legislators. Also, the more active
members we have, the more view-
points we'll be exposed to. There-
fore the more viewpoints avail-
able the better quality of decisions
we can agree upon!
I've been in the Student Gov-
ernment Association for three
vears and have been a member ot
SGA Vice President. Please get
involved in the future of East
Carolina and vote in the SGA
Executive Officer elections from 9
am- 6 pm on Wednesday, March
29th.
Thank you for your coopera-
tion and involvment.
Sincerely,
Susan Cooperman
Chairperson, Appropriations
Committee
Senior� Music Education
Ray Madden
On March 29 the student
body will determine, by vote, the
SGA Executive Council for the
next school year.
I am Ray Madden and I am a
candidate for SGA Treasurer.
Presently, I am President of the
Inter Fraternity President; a
member of the Media Board, and
a member of the Student Union
Board of Directors. I have also
held positions on the SGA Ex-
ecutive Cabinet and the Student
Wellness Committee. With these
credentials I feel I'm the most
qualified person for the position.
Besides executing my
"stated" duties as Treasurer, I
would make an effort to bring
back the essentials in which SGA
is based on � representing the
student body. Also, as Treasurer
I would stress the importance of
involvement by students from
all aspects of campus inorder to
form a more well-rounded SGA.
When those new legislators are
elected next Fall, I will make sure
those new members will be edu-
cated on the procedures and rules
of order within weekly meetings.
I would appreciate your support
on the 29th, and get out and vote.
I know the processes involved
in student government in allocat-
ing funds.
With this knowledge I want
to get the money to these groups
in a fair and efficient manner.
I want also to educate them on
the process of appropration so that
they can get the money they de-
serve. I intend to create an admin-
isration of students under me to
help in this and to get to know the
fine details of the students needs
of money in all groups so that I can
better help them to get it.
I also want to print the budget
total in the newspaper.
I want to encourage the arts
� to get more money due to the
art school.
I also want to see that minor-
ity organizations get an increse in
their funds they constitute a solid
15 percent of the student popula-
tion.
IS YOUR THESK
IN THE FREEZER?
Mine was Bv the time I had wntwi 190 pages. I was convinced that mv
house would bum down 1 nepi m note cards on ice no
In Mav there was a power failure A half-gallon of Mint Chip ice Team
infiltrated my study of industrial espionage
I should have made copies at Kinkos.
kinkes
the copy center
321 East Tenth Street
Greenville. NC
(919) 752-0875
the appropriations Committee all
those years. This year, I am the
Chairperson of that committee. I
am involved in numerous music
organizations, including the
Marching Pirates, concert Choir
and the Pep Band. I'vebeena Presi-
dent Advisor for two 1 2 years.
I'm a member of the North Caro-
lina Student Legislature and a cer-
tified trainer on the Ropes course.
I believe that my involvement in
such a diversified set of organiza-
tions can enable me to look at the
needs of all the student groups on
campus and provide them with a
person they know is interested in
making them the best that they
can be.
Again, my name is Susan
Cooperman and I'm running for
Ray Madden
Poli Sci
Jim Layton
I want a change. What I say
here means little because the
masses of students are unaffected,
they are untouched.
A few hundred studentselect
representatives for 15,000 people.
I want, through being SGA
Treasurer, to reach out to the
people.
This is an important post in
the student government.
There are many groups in
campus that require funding.
I want to reach out to all of
these groups and bring them closer
into focus with the student gov-
ernment through this job.
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN EXTRA
I
(Mch
.lnnd.iv S.il
Suntlav 1
Satunli'v 10
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Alner. tke .ind Reebok)
SMALL MLLULM LARQL
DELIVERY
Cheese Pizza $4.95
Cheese and 1 Topping$5.60
Each Additional Topping$-65
c;PFriAI TY PIZZAS
Cheese Lovers$6.90
Meat Lovers$6.90
Supreme$6.90
Super Supreme$7.55
$6.85
$7.65
$.80
$9.25
$9.25
$9.25
$10.05
$8.95
$9.90
$ .95
$11.80
$11.80
$11.80
$12.75
GREAT PIZZA HUT@PIZZA
DELIVERED! 752-4445
PftlrJVTrRY HPVBS
LSHtSSTTPM TO MIDNIGHT
FRLfcSAT, 4PM TO '
DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DELIVERY CHARGE 73'
m m mm - - - - - - COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 7 DAYS - - - - � �
LARGE $9.99 SPECIALITY
A LARGE MEAT LOVER'S, OR CHEESE
LOVER'S WITH TWO TOPPINGS OF
YOUR CHOICE, OR LARGE SUPREME.
DELIVERY
(COUPON EXPIRES 4389)
Student Union
Coming Attractions
Thursday
Wednesday, March 29
8:00 pm Hendrix
WITHNAILAND
March 3C
Sunday, April 2
k
8:00 pm Hendrix Theatre
BETRAYED
Friday, March 31
7:00 pm Underground
BRAD REEDER - Comedian
Friday, March 31 - Saturday, April 1
11:00 pm Hendrix Theatre
LATE SHOW; FLESH GORDON
ITTTf fflfflW Events:
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL - APRIL 19
WANTED- Major Concert, and Visual Arts Committee
Chperton - Apply at the StudetntUnlon Office
(room 236) Mendenhall.
by March 27
All films we shown at 8 pm In Hendrix
Theatre unless otherwise stated and are FREE to ECU Student.
with Talld ECU I J.
!





�lic iEaat Qlar0ltman
Snrnj Hw f bi CMm t�w ��miy
Pete Fernald, o��M�i�r
Stephanie Folsom, M�-r�, &�
James F.J. McKee, dm�44mm�
Tim Hampton, m�� �� Brad Bannister, gw &�
Chris Siegal, sport, faiot Jeff Parker, s��ff ��
Chip Carter, f��� && Tom Furr, c.rmi-� m-
Susan Howell, ph, m� Debbie Stevens, s�rd�ry
Dean Waters, o-toM�r Stephanie Emoryu t &,��
Stephanie Singleton, c & Mac Clark, mm ��jr
March 28,1989
OPINION
Page 4
Endorsements
Lassister and Cooperman above the rest
In contrast to last year's Student
Government Association elections,
and to this year's elections for lesser
offices, the choice for SG A president
for 1989-90 is clear.
Without doubt, Valeria Lassiter
is the best student to lead East Caro-
lina University into the 90s. She said
it best during Tuesday's candidate
forum: it's not the quantity on your
resume that counts � it's the qual-
ity.
And while Lassiter's resume is
full of quality, she was also right to
point out that an SGA president
cannot rely on past accomplish-
ments to bolster her administration.
The president must be an effective
leader with ideas, vision and drive
� all qualities Lassiter definitely
has.
As a student at ECU, Lassiter has
been involved in a wide range of
campus activities. Her experience as
a cheerleader will be a definite plus
when she must work in the many
public relations circles she will be
called to take part in. As the manag-
ing editor of Expressions; Lassiter
has learned the journalistic qualities
of curiosity, careful attention to craft
and ability to tell the important is-
sues from the unimportant ones.
On the university level, she has
been a member of a number of or-
ganizations and committees includ-
ing the Conference Committee on
Human Relations, the Minority Stu-
dent Organization, the Student Mi-
nority Advisory Board, the
Women's Studies Committee and
the Committee on the Status of
Women. Her work with these
groups has kept her in touch with
faculty and administration, invalu-
able experience for the president,
whose main function is to serve as a
liason between the students and
these bodies.
What of the future? Lassiter has
proposed getting the SGA more
involved in the financial aid process
and speeding it up for all the stu-
dents. She has also talked about
developing a long-range plan to
help students who can't always af-
ford an increasingly-expensive uni-
versity education. She is the only
candidate to talk about these pro-
gressive issues.
Lassiter is also the only candi-
date talking about highlighting the
academic environment of East Caro-
lina through television and print
media. For years, ECU has taken a
bad rap for academic and student
achievements: Valeria Lassiter is the
only candidate talking about fixing
it.
Those are her ideas. Her vision is
even more far-reaching. Lassiter has
spoken of making ECU among the
most highly respected institutions
in the nation. Certainly, we agree
that goal is unrealistic for a one-year
administration. But instead of
promising miracles, Lassiter says
she will plant the seeds and let them
grow in future years. Her idea to im-
prove the image of the university
through public relations is a step in
that direction. So is her idea to im-
prove financial aid to keep academi-
cally qualified students in school so
they can graduate.
Drive? Past actions, though they
may not assure them, certainly do
indicate future actions. Lassiter has
shown incredible drive during her
tenure at the university. According
to all reports, her membership in
different groups has not been a to-
ken, resume-bulding membership.
She has been actively involved in
university affairs for three years
now, and there is no indication that
trend will change for any reason.
Critics will charge that Lassiter
has little experience with student
legislature politics. In this election,
more than any other, that may be an
asset rather than a liability. Recent
activities in the SGA have shown us
how some people use inside knowl-
edge to push through their own
personal agendas at the expense of
the student body. As a-voice for the
common student, Lassiter will make
sure that procedures are explained
and made easier so the SGA takes
responsible action on the issues, not
the rules.
The choice, fortunately, is clear.
Valeria Lassiter is the best candidate
to be the 1989-90 Student Govern-
ment Association president.
For vice-president The East
Carolinian gives their endorsement
to Susan Cooperman.
Cooperman would work well
with Lassiter. Her background in
the Student Government Associa-
tion as a legislator and committee
head give her an edge on making the
vice president's job live up to it's
capabilities. Her experience as a
resident advisor and a member of
the North Carolina Student Legisla-
ture are also valuable assets, both
are indicative of Cooperman's abil-
ity to work well with other students
to get positive goals accomplished.
Cooperman also has recognized
the recent problems within the SGA
with legislators not understanding
the rules and procedures they need
to be familiar with to be effective.
Her idea to have a seminar each year
for beginning legislators to make
them familiar with these rules is a
good one. It would make the legisla-
tion run much more smoothly next
year and make legislators more re-
sponsive to the needs of the students
while ending the frequent power
struggles that take place there.
Valeria Lassiter and Susan Co-
operman, though they are not run-
ning as mates, would be the best
combination at the top of the SGA
Executive Branch next year.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Mail
or drop them by our office in the Publications Building, across from the
entrance to Joyner Library. For purposes of verification, all letters must
include the name, major, classification, address, phone number and the
signature of the author(s). Letters are limited to 300 words or less, double-
spaced, typed or neatly printed. All letters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal attacks will be permitted.
TTrt oxe' votc. Egg

S6A �ANDI7�rfcF "PR.1
1
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UHKfT AR6 THE 6NPICATeS THAT Uftt X0 NC?TrllK� ?
ANO UJHieH U.ILL T0 eveVTJlW Or &T W&N(r f
WTE1 VflTe! VOTE VOTE? WrTEjyT6jjgreJV�T
Letters of support for candidates
Cooperman
To the editor:
I am writing in support of Susan
Cooperman, candidate for vice-
president of SGA.
After working with Susan, as a
counselor for "Leadership Student
for Youth Development she has
proven to be very responsible leader.
I have had the opportunity to get to
know her and see her work. She has
also been voted the Head Counselor
for "LS7YD" this comming Summer
due to her fine leadership qualities.
Serving with the SGA for the past
three years, Susan has made many
accomplishments. For SGA, she has
been the chairperson for one year on
the Approprations Committee and
has served on the committee for two
years. Also, she has served as Secre-
tary for the NCEL, which is the offi-
cial Student Voice to the N.C Legisla-
ture.
Susan is not limiting herself to
SG A as she haTni � WWo fT
2 years In working with Residence
Life she has scon many changes and
has promoted all of the forth coming
plans In the Residence Hall, Susan
upholds the University policies as a
very qualified leader.
With the position of Vice-Presi-
dent, Susan could put her many
talents as a good, responsible, leader
to work tor the benefit fo the entire
University. 1 urge all of you to vote
for SUSAN COOPERMAN, Vice-
Presidcnt tor the SGA.
Lisa Deaton
Head Resident
Slay Residence Hall
Ideas to work
To the editor:
I am writing this letter in support
of Kelly Jones forStudent Body Presi-
dent.
Kelly lsby far, the most qualified
candidate. She has the most tenure in
student government. It that is not
enough, she has the most realistic
ideas, and not only that, she has the
wherewithal and the gumption to
make these ideas come to life.
Kelly is a strong advocate of in-
volvement. I believe that she will
break the curse of precedent and
really try to be involved with the
course of legislation in the student
legislature. Kelly is not one to si t back
and watch as incidents occur that are
not favorable for the students or the
school. To cite an example, 1 know
that Kelly fought diligently against
shortening the drop date � almost
single-handedly, I might add. De-
spite the fact that she was one of ap-
proximately five stvidents who at-
tended an open forum on the suject,
she stood up for the student view and
helped convince the deciding
committee not to go on with plans.
Kelly is a business major, and as
a fellow business major, I know thai
her marketing and management
skills will help her to be successful
president. As well, Kell) is the fi-
nance department's representaive
(one of two chosen from the school of
Business) to the BB&T Leader-hip
seminar. This speaks highly for her
potential to lead and to motivate
others. Mind you that a capable
leader is also a good follower kelU
has spent time following tor the past
three years. She has worked with
three different presidents and has
always been an active follower She
has authored leg1-1 nion aboiUi;gi;t
ff7:SWfwmnT�ri'rwW! W MlwlBWi
placed all studenl representives on
their respective committee Kell is
observant and learns, asa true !� a
would, through watching .
her time to be called upon to lead
Kellv is ready to be your leader
Please join me in supporting Kellv
Jones for SGA President proven to
be a great leader.
lane I luggins
Marketing
Junior
The candidate that is by far the best
choice is our present SGA Treasurer
Tripp Roakes. Tripp has served on
the SGA for the past three years both
as a legislator and Treasurer. He has
also been an active member of the
Inter-fraternity Council to which he
is now vice-presidnet of. When it
comes to dealing with students,
Tripp has a record that anyone can be
proud of. I think that experience has
a big part in the future of SGA. Tripp
knowscverything about every group
at ECU that he has funded as treas-
urer. 1 sincerely hope that you do as a
I will and vote for a person whose
experience in SGA will help pave a
road to the future. Vote Tripp Roakes
to be vour next SGA President.
iJUPIiffllK
Dilhon Knight Kalkhurst
Senior Class President
Broafeastingmajor
u
Involvement
Vote Seniors!
To the editor:
My name is Dillon Kalkhurst,
currently your senior class president.
Many student government issues
have been reported in the paper
throughout the year, but none as
important as what will happen to-
morrow. Tomorrow we the seniors
will vote for something that you may
think won't affect us because we
won't be here. Tomorrow the
sutdents will elect next years student
Government officers. The people we
choose to represent us will have ef-
fect on the the student government
and the university for years to come.
To the editor:
Kelly Jones is the most qualified
candiate running for President of Ifie
SGA and I support her in the 1�9
elections. She is a rsponsible, dedi-
cated and hardworking individo
who demonstrates true leadership�in
all areas. Kelly has been involved
with the SGA for three years; she
served as Freshman Class President,
student Welfare Chairman and-
currently Vice-President of the SQ.
which requires her to sit on numer-
ous committees within the organiia
tion. Outside of SGA, Kelly is in-
volved with several other organiza-
tions such as the ECU Marching pY
rates, Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority and
the College Choir and Immanuel
Baptist Church. Her involvements
show that she not only has outstand-
ing qualifications, but that she is a
very diverse indivudual. She is
highly concerned with welfare ofall
the students and would do an out-
standing job as President of the SGA
Electing Kelly Jones to the office of
President would not only be for (he
best interest of you the students, but
also for the campus of ECU.
In making this decision I would
like to turn to the office of President.
Karen Prevo$t
PsychologyBusiness Admin
Junior
UHY DOtfnHEStfWLE. VOTE?
i
WELL-UH, HEY I'M JUSl �
AFRBSHMM-HOUAM
SUPPOSED TO KHOtf
WHO'S RUNNIN6?
ER'I'M NOT WTNS
MENTION MIAI,
T5CHNICiayl FRESHHW
I DOMTKNObJHOW'
IMFOWEV EN0U&
ito GRADUATING-
MS SHOULD I VOTE?
I WERE WB HAVE
IT. m HONEST
MSUtKl ITS
WTHY,Rs!


m
V





I HI. I.ASIAKOI IMAN
MAK H28 1989 5
Letters continued
Kelly Jones Look for
1 came mto East C arohna in
�e tall ,is a freshman One oi the
rst people 1 came to knov v.is
Nelly Jones Kelly reall impressed
me from the start She was in
lvedand tried really hard togel
rs invoked It wasrefresl
r me to meet an upper classn
� no seemed to care about a fresh
ilh about ai! stu
its
Kell sp�ke t-1 mo aib I I
� S ind i
I now tim
. � i �� -
i� rnpc � ut
n is eonl is as
is made me want to b
l ed w ith m
ive
.� so man px pi
tain she w ould motivate
itthisscl
itp �)
h her


-
t and I
� �. .
. �
.

� '
To the editor:
What do you look tor in a
candidate for political office? Most
people would consider honesty,
communicating with others, work
ethie, and experience, as main
determining factors in deciding
on who deserves their vote. Well,
in the race tor Student Govern
ment Vice President, 1 can proudl)
otter to vou a condiate, tor your
consideration, w ho exompl i ties all
ot these high standards and a
whole lot more! (Sounds like a
used car sales pitch doesn't it"1)
But it isn't Tins is an opportunity
though tor me to tell you a little
about Susan Cooperman, a very
capable and qualified young lad)
who 1 consider the most outstand
ing candidate tor Vice-President
First eif all she definitely ex
ernplifies all the qualities needed
to bo aii excellent V.P. F:rom the
first day, two years ago, when 1
stepped into the S.G.A. until the
present, as she serves as appro
prations Committee Charperson
she has shown mo nothing but
top notch work As you know.
when you become familiar with a
group, certain people, the ones
vou see standing out asindividu
als ou can count on,begin to sur
face. Susan Cooperman is ot this
mold She is leader, and her rec
ord shows it
For three years Susan dop
erman has served in the Student
i. lovernment vis a dorm represen-
tative (more than Kith her oppo-
nents combined'1 Having been
appointed to the Appropra nations
Committee tor those three years
and as Chairperson this year,
Susan has tacked all the toughest
issues in the toughest committee
Many sav that Appropriations
Chair is the most difficult position
to hold inSGAbutSusanhasdono
a marvelous job in dealing with
groups m need ot funds. I have
witnessed her at work, serving as
a comittee member mvselt. and 1
can honestly say herabihtes pres-
ent her as a potential Vice-Presi-
dent we all could he proud of.
In addition to her S.G.A. work.
Susan is involved in manv other
activ ities. She has performed as a
member of the FCl' Marching Pi
rates for four years �� rvingasfluie
section leader foi two years, E l
concert Choir lor three years,
Resident Advisor for two 1?
years, E I Pep Band Manager foi
two years and is a member of the
International Academic honoi
fraternity Sigma Alpha Iota alone
with main either activities that i
could write on about, but 1 thin!
you understand, without .ill th
resume that Susan is a "get in
v olved" and ' takecharge" kind ol
a while and then learning th it she
was running for SGA President, I
d i ided that th- re v a: i uu mor
u ted tor the offt'
i! you v at h Kell t � m re
than fiv minut s s 'i v ill see
that her mind is always runnini
thousand: of miles per hour She
loes i ; till long I
he is always in the middle I
loing something for somebody
usiiallv the student j
person
V1ien election da)art r i ind
) V'ari� holding a balot inin
hand,as 1 have written in thi
beginning ol this lefter, rust (sk
yourseIt "What do 1 1.ok for in a
. andidite?" It v ourconsideratwI.s
arethesame as minethen Susan
( o.peiman is . our candidate
S (.A.Vice Presidi utfhankv iMl
Russell I o� (.
unor
Nu Ii .ii 1 hvsK s
N0 legiving thi editi ir:up
tor kn �� ing Kliv (ones� 11
II
it. hed lit i l
1 i
� at a moment's notice just I
nakinga few calls,and it i by son
trange i hance) calls don't work
Kelly will jump into hoc c.ir and
personallj worktosolv ethe prob
lorn I efeat is not a part of Kelly's
ocabulary; if all doors look clos i
for solving a problem, Kelly opens
i window Sheisago getter,areal
problem solver. It she has a ques
tion, she stops at nothingtoget tht
ans- or tor herself or v hoi i .
asked the question ol h r
Kelly om - isthetvpeol Pi i
J nt we need
bby V illi i
Si nior
�� ii n e Edu tti .
SRA ELECTIONS
TODAY
VOTE
JAMES GARDNER
President
'The Right Choice"
Helping Fellow Students Towards A
Better Residence Hall life
DAN'S
210 E. 5th St
Greenville, NC
919 752-1750
"MOVING AGAIN" 8W.E
EVERYTHING 20-75 OFF
Sale Starts April 3rd
Vintage clothing. Jewelry. Antiques. Furniture & Collectable
Mon-Sat 12-6pm
NEW LOCATION TO BE ANNOUNCED
i ral v
Every Night At
CHAfiUM
Wc Tend To Get

4
A Little
Fresh

,e I fin � �
do Know oin '
ornes to ser i .
e enine
: � ia nmlu ihei f h a ih'v
! �� el Seafood I'asi i
. � edients i ulable I '� i i
� �� 1.11 season :
i! i pat
Ii un us uhark' t � . � � �
i link ti esh nl i loi i l � �
Ik i sonal taste tist ,sk. hi
It's Charley O's for dinner; The new taste of
Greenville.
The New laste
()f Greenville
.l Kl � hoK VS ll
X
hii ri
- �
A
73 cr
r? c!�
v3
A
fl
pai
il
i3 C.
W
D
Will be held on
Wednesday, March 29
between
9:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
YOU MUST HAVE YOUR
STUDENT I.D.
& ACTIVITY CARD!
'fcr vtsrs j





1
c
"v
T)
Letters continued
Kelly Jones Look for.
��
I .
I came into East Carolina in
the fall as a freshman. One of the
-first people I came to know was
. Kelly Jones. Kelly really impressed
.jne from the start. She was in-
evolved and tried really hard to get
othere involved. It was refreshing
for me to meet an upper classman
who seemed to care about a fresh-
man � or really, about all stu-
" dents.
Kelly spoke to me aobut her
involvement in SGA and contin-
ues to do so now each time we
speak. She is so enthusiastic about
her present job, SGA vice Presi-
dent, and makes me excited about
� it by just talking to me. Kelly has
so much energy and constantly
thinks of new ideas for next year;
her enthusiasm is contagious, as
she has made me want to become
more involved with my school.
She is what we need in the Presi-
dent's office. I have seen Kelly
motivate so many people that 1
am certain she would motivate
everyone at this school if she were
elected.
Kelly should serve as an ex-
ample for us all. She is in a lot of
organizations, but she docs not
try to hold an office in all of them.
She believes that would be unfair
to all interested parties. Instead
she has chosen one to strive to
better through her leadership and
experience, and that organization
is Student Government Associa-
tion. Because of her membership
in other organizations � march-
ing band, sorority, panhellenic,
campus committees, etc. � she
is well versed in ideas of many
students. At the same time, Kelly
has managed to maintain an ex-
tremely high GPA and to have
enough hours to graduate in three
years. Kelly, however, is so dedi-
cated to ECU and its students that
she chose not to graduate but to
stay here and become even more
involved. Every university should
have a President like Kelly Jones.
Please join me in supporting her
Wednesday.
Brcnda Gcislcr
freshman
General College
To the editor.
What do you look for in a
candidate for political office? Most
people would consider honesty,
communicating with others, work
ethic, and experience, as main
determining factors in deciding
on who deserves their vote. Well,
in the race for Student Govern-
ment Vice-President, I can proudly
offer to you a condiate, for your
consideration, who exemplifies all
of these high standards and a
whole lot more! (Sounds like a
used car sales pitch doesn't it?)
But it isn't. This is an opportunity
though, for me to tell you a little
about Susan Cooperman, a very
capable and qualified young lady
who I consider the most outstand-
ing candidate for Vice-President
First of all she definitely ex-
emplifies all the qualities needed
to be an excellent V.P. From the
first day, two years ago, when I
stepped into the S.G.A. until the
present, as she serves as appro-
bations Committee Chairperson
she has shown me nothing but
"top notch work As you know,
when you become familiar with a
group, certain people, the ones
you see standing out as individu-
als you can count on, begin to sur-
face. Susan Cooperman is of this
mold. She is leader, and her rec-
ord shows it.
For three years Susan Coop-
erman has served in the Student
Government as a dorm represen-
tative (more man both her oppo-
nents combined). Having been
appointed to the Appropratiations
Committee for those three years
and as Chairperson this year,
Susan has tacked all the toughest
issues in the toughest committee.
Many say that Appropriations
Chair is the most difficult position
to hold in SG Abut Susan has done
a marvelous job in dealing with
groups in need of funds. I have
witnessed her at work, serving as
a comittee member myself, and I
can honestly say her abihtes pres-
ent her as a potential Vice-Presi-
dent we all could be proud of.
In addition to her S.G. A. work,
Susan is involved in many other
activities. She has performed as a
member of the ECU Marching Pi-
rates for four years, serving as flute
section leader for two years, ECU
concert Choir for three years,
Resident Advisor for two 12
years, ECU Pep Band Manager for
two years and is a member of the
International Academic honor
fraternity Sigma Alpha Iota, along
with many other activities that I
could write on about, but I think
you understand, without all the
resume, that Susan is a "get in-
volved" and "take charge" kind of
person.
When election day arrives and
you are holding a ballot in your
hand, as I have written in the
beginning of this letter, just ask
yourself "What do I look for in a
candidate?" If yourconsiderations
are the same as mine then Susan
Cooperman is your candidate for
S.G.A. Vice-President. Thank you.
Russell Lowe
Junior
Nuclear Physics
No giving up
To the editor
After knowing Kelly Jones for
a while and then learning that she
was running for SGA President, I
decided that there was none more
suited for the office.
If you watch Kelly for more
than five minutes, you will see
that her mind is always running
thousands of mites per hour. She
does not stay still long because
she is always in the middle of
doing something for somebody
� usually the students.
I have watched her solve prob-
lems at a moment's notice just by
making a few calls, and if (by some
strange chance) calls don't work,
Kelly will jump into her car and
personally work to solve the prob-
lem. Defeat is not a part of Kelly's
vocabulary; if all doors look closed
for solvinga problem, Kelly opens
a window. She is a go-getter, a real
problem solver. If she has a ques-
tion, she stops at nothing to get the
answer for herself or whoever
asked the question of her.
Kelly Jones is the type of Presi-
dent we need.
Robby Williams
Senior
Science Education
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2, 1969 5
II I II
210 E. 5th St
Greenville. NC
919 752 1750
MQvlNG RGRIN RLE
EVERYTHING 20-75u� OFF
m . (
KU I.KAJIO, TO HE AA'VOI CEl)
Every Night At
We Tend To Get
A Little
Fresh
i Iaj yes.Our restaurant is quite pleasant, but we
VLX" do know our boundaries � except when it
fyr comes to serving the freshest selections
I each evening.
Every night there is a new menu of fresh specials Chicken
Beef Seafood Pasta. All prepared from the freshest
ingredients available. Broiled Sauteed. Baked All are
specially seasoned.
Join us at Charley O's. Because every night we tend to get
a little fresh. And. if you don't.see the entree to please your
personal taste, just ask. we II try to satisfy your pallate with
your very own personal favorite
It's Charley O's for dinner; The new taste of
Greenville.
TheNewTaste
Of Greenville
Yciiery � Choices � Atmospheiv
I
HILTON INN
GREENVILLE
i�r� �wtinTUT�rt irtitur!
� rfi

ijii�st�u jtv�uuiL noiu
eeiiiiBIJp DlJifl�OTJJOf 9
yj
BCTIOHf
IF�
n
HSHOTTHYH
wwi
TX
i
Will be held on
between
9:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m
YOU MUST HAVE YOUR
STUDENT LD.
& ACTIVITY CARD!





Ti IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28.1989
K
Classifieds
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FOR RENT: I bodnvm upstairs apt
Screened m por.h Utilities included.
Neai ECU oMnpus $250.00 per month
Call 58 1274 after fcOO pm.
MEED TO SUBLEASE? Law students
inteie � �i m subleasing furnished apart
mentstur summer (Ma) �August) Wanl
to n ike arrangements as soon as possible
Call ;ert Speicher at 35S-3CBQ
FOR RENT: 1 Mr. Art fullv turn Punk
beds I person $200.00 2people$290phe
util Walking distance to campus. Call
130-4088
ROOM FOR KIN 1 2 bdroom house non-
smoker S10 mnth plus utilities Close to
campus Call Luke atter 3 pm at 758 0
WAN'TFD: To rent 2 or 3 Mr house or
dublev Near campus preferred. Must al-
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lease CaD7S2-3860
FOR SALF
CAN YOU BUY: Jeeps, Cars 4 X 4 s sei zed
in drug raids for under $100 00? Call for
facts todav 602-637-3401. Ext. 711.
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 1 slight! v-
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sell. $175.00. Call 355-3364
FOR SALE: 5 ft. width cabinet. t:ts Clem
ent. White & Greene dorms Very spa-
cious. Has a shelf to fit large refrigerator
Call Kathleen or Amv 758-4507.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
From SI00. Fords. Mercedes Corvettes.
Chevvs. Surplus. Buvers Guide (1) 805-
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ROUND TRIP TICKET TO ORLANDO
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and returning Sun April 2nd Leives
from Raleigh Durham airport Cheap
pnoe call 355-5944
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTV If you are having a partv and
need a D I for the best music available for
parties Dance, Top 40. & Beach Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
aoftware and computer diskettes 24
"ialtours m and out Guaranteed tvpmg on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town SPF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 3th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3614
NFID A D.J Hire the ELBO D Call
earlv and book for your formal or party.
738 1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage
PROFESSIONAL TYPING if you have
papers, resumes, thesis, etc. that need to
be tvped. please call 756-8c34 between
530-930 pm lb yrs. typing experience
Typing is done on computer with letter
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WORD PROCESSING Reports, Resu-
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HI LP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Marv Smith REAL
Crisis Center 758-1IELP.
HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STU-
DFNTS: Who enjoy cooking . we have
openings foe cook's helpers and kitchen
aids at chiktrens summer camp in the cool
mountains of North Carolina. Expenence
not necessary, we will train You receive
room, meals, laundrv, plus $900.00-
S1000 00 salarv and travel expenses. Non-
smoking students write for Appbro-
chure Camp Pincwood 20203-1 N E. 3
Court Miami, FT 33179.
ADDITIONAL STAFF NEEDED: For
small country inn and restaurant in the
delightfully different coastal town ot
Beaufort, NC�knowledgeable wait
people interested in learning more about
wines and gourmet cuisine�chamber
maids for our elegantly appointed
suites�positions available in our profes-
sional kitchen Please call The Cedars" at
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ATTENTION�HIRING Government
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CABIN COUNSELORS &
INSTRUCTORS: (Male and Female) tor
western North Carolina 8 week children's
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necessary. Non-smoking students write
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33179.
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28590
COACH experienced fot USS Summer
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next school year. No expenence neces-
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around student schedule Call 752-4018
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view. Good working conditions.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING: Right Alton
lants. Travel Agents, Mechanics, Cus
tomer Service Listings Salaries to S105K
Entrv level positions Call (1) 8050687-
6000 Ext. A-1166
HELP WANTED: Free room and board at
Oriental on the Neuse, short sailing trip,
and chance to pick-up S60 � S80 helping
to paint and was a 37 ft sailboat Week
ends April 1st and 2nd 756-2027.
HELP WANTED: Greenville Country
Club is looking for golf course help. Inter-
views will be Thursday, March 30 be
tweena m and 3pm
HELP WANTED: Part-time desk assis-
tantsecurity guard Nights and week-
ends. Must be able to work effectively
with the public Apply in person only 3-5
p m M-F at Shepherd Memorial Library,
530 Evans Street No phone calls
PERSONALS
ALL CAMPUS: The Pi Kapps hope every-
one hada sate and enjoyable Carter break
DO YOU HAVE PLANS FOR DINNER
TONIGHT? Even if you do you might
want to think about changing them be-
cause tonight is the Delta Zeta Spaghetti
Dinner. ALL U CAN EAT, 1 lomemade,
complete with garlic bread and served by
the ladies oi Delta Zeta So. everyone
come on over to the Delta Zeta house 5.30
� 8.00. $3 Oil tickets at door or see any
Delta Zeta
ATTENTION M & M LOVERS: The
Delta Zetas are selling your favorite treats
at S 50 a box plain or peanut' So, if you
need a hi' snack to help you get to class �
see any Delta Zeta
CHI OMEGA: Welcome back from Eater
Break' We hope you all had a fun one' Gel
psvehed for Greek week 1 ove, You Se
cret Sorority.
FRATERNITY PRESIDENTS:Committee
Meetings � 4:30 todav. Greek week
comm Wed @ 4 pm (212 MI 0
ATTENTION GREEKS: Greek week is
only days away.
ALL GREEKS WHO HAVEN'T GOT-
TEN GREEK WEEK STICKERS: Contact
Russell Lowe 757-3507 or 757-3042 by no
later than Apnl 4
TRIPP ROAKES 1 OR SGA PRESI-
DENT: The candidate that is here tor the
students concerns. Vote Tnpp Roakes.
YES! Greek week is coming up April 9 �
16. Get Psyched!
TKE END OF THE WORLD PARTY: Jim
Jones is coming, beware April 7
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT: At the Hill
Jam. Saturday, April 1 from 2-6 pm Fea-
turing Victim, The Vacationing Firemen,
and Nouveuvx Campaign. Plus food, con-
tests, and lots of fun in the sun Don't miss
it!
VOTE TRIPP ROAKES: SGA President
tommorow. Tnpp Roakes � the students
President � Be sure to bring your IDs
PI KAPPS: Thank you little sisters for the
great party Saturday night The tradition
has begun Thanks to the weather for
helping us with our more than successful
car wash. Everyone did a great job.
Hudges, Alex, Paige, Pat, You,
Eubamksy, Anyone, Stacey, Tracy, Every-
one, and Rick wish everyone a good
weekend in their own way
ELECT TRIPP ROAKES: Student Body
President tommorow The Students Presi-
dent. Bring vour ID's to vote.
SORORITY RUSH REGISTRATION
April 3rd � 6th and Apnl 10th � 13th
Sign up at the Student Store, The Croatan,
and The Bottom of the Hill (Co Greek).
WIN A FREE TRIP: To the Bahamas
Register Tuesdays only at Pantana Bob's.
March 28 � April 18 Sponsored by
Kappa Sigma
SUSANNE HUDSON: Surprise and con-
gratulations! We love you. The Sigmas.
INTERESTED IN BECOMING GREEK?
Your opportunity to see a part of Greek
life is coming up on Apnl 3rd Panhellenic
is hosting a convocation for all interested
women in Wright Auditorium at 6:00 p m
Please attend and bring a friend
DON'T FORGET TO VOTE: In the SGA
elections Tell all vour friends' The Sig-
mas.
GREEK WEEK: Is just around the corner
Let's get psvehed and ready to have seri-
ous fun The Sigmas
GO GREEK! Co Greek' Go Greek!
SOROR1 LIES: Friendships for a lifetime'
THE PLEDGES OF THETA CHI: Would
like to thank Buddv Sargent for washing
cars all day in the quite cold weather
PI KAPPS: How about that Easter week-
end. Hopefully everyone survived tlja
weekend and made it back. You name it,
we did it Budless fest was what-We de
cided to make it, and we made it a hell of
a time. Easter '89 is one that will never be
forgotten Welcome back everyone'
PI KAPPS: Uttle sisters gefcready to con
tinue the tradition withlhe Saturday
night party Everyone did an outstanding
job at our last car wash We had a blast and
made come cash. The house is still stand
ing better than ever, and we are ready to
rock-n-roll Greek week!
AZD: 1 lope you had a fun and safe Faster
We can't wait to tell you who we are You
guys are the greatest. Love, You '� rel
Sorority
DZ'S: Thanks for nuking the St. Patrick's
Day partv an evening to remember We
are looking forward to painting
house. Love, Sigma Nu
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
SIGMA NU BROTHERS: Ed, James,
Alan, Marvin, Rocky, Scott, Ron, Stewart,
David, Todd, Clay, Chris, Mike, and
Martin � Your brothers.
MARCHING PIRATES: Join in support-
ing Kelly Jones for President. We urge you
to vote and tell a friend.
DELTA SIC: Once again we had a great
time at our pre downtown mixer You
guys are the best and we hope to meet
again soon! Alpha Delta Pi
KELLY JONES FOR SGA PRESIDI NI
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Camp Contenrnea
was the place to be last Thursday night.
Thanks for starting our St Patrick da ofi
ngrTt Love The Sigmas
KELLY JONES FOR SGA PRESIDENT'
Ckiod luck Kelly! The sisters and pledges
of Zeta Tau Alpha
THETA CHI PLEGES: Thanks for all the
help in getting our yard ready for the
Spring Come smell the Roses" Love, The
Sigmas.
KELLY JONES FOR SGA PRESIDENT
A proven leader Join Zeta Tau Alpha and
support Kellv Jones on Wednesday
INVITED FACUL FY: Don't forget the tea
Wednesday at 5. We're so excited al �
meeting all of you The Sigmas
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
�am
RING0LD TOlUURS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FAIL
SEMESTER 89. EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS FOR
INFO CALL HOLL1E SIMONOWICH
AT 72-2865
HOUSE OF HATS�
for
LDIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Downtown Mall)758-3025
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD
IT s OUR BUSINESS
ACCU -I-
SSCOPY
75S-2400
ATTENTION:
PANHELLENIC ANNOUNCES:
FALL RUSH WILL BE HELD:
AUGUST 19th -
AUGUST 23rd
ABORTION
Personal and Confidential. Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
a (� : "TTirr.i Morv thru SaL Lo�
Cost TcrminatJon to 20 w�k� of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs at 6 p m in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life' We've
found it and we want to share it with vou.
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fn
night at 7:00
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If vou are challenged everydav with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God
Every Fn night at 7.00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium
CCF
CCF would like to invite vou to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Ra wl 130.
Bring vour Bible and a friend as we studv
the book of Hebrews Call lim at 752-71
if vou need a nde or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours Mon. 2p.m to 5p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, piease call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677
ECU NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur, 730-9 in
Biology 103 The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
doser walk with God. In-flight refresh-
� ments served No ticket required; just
reserve your time.
HFT.P FIGHT CANCER
A 24-hour Run Against Cancer will be
sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega the oo-ed
National Fraternity, and the American
Cancer Society on April 14th fc lth at the
! ECU track. Contestants are not required
: �o tog or walk the entire 24 hours, but
instead will be taking turns with nine
I other team members for 112 hour periods
I Hnd out about entering a team or donat-
� tag money materials. For more info call
Pom Richards (752-2574) of the American
5 Cancer Soc , Bryan HasUns (756-9665) of
Alpha Phi Omega or David Overton (830-
4015) of Alpha Phi Omega.
SEASON TICKETS
Season tickets for the 19-QO Performing
Arts Series at ECU are now on sale. This
outstanding season includes 1TZHAK
PERLMAN, THE N.C. DANCE THE-
ATRE, SHALON 00. THE CANNES
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with RAN-
SOM WILSON, THE N.C
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, CARMEN
sung in English, DREAM GIRLS, and
much more Patrons are cautioned that
initial season ticket sales are brisk Al-
though individual event tickets will go on
sale 3 weeks prior to each event, it is
highly possible that the series will sell out
in season sells. Don't miss out on the best
Performing Arts Series, order your tickets
todav Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC, 757-6611, Ext. 266.
J51T1NGLJCTJJRES
The Honors Program, the Science and
Math Ed. Center and International Stud-
ies will sponsor "A Day in the Life of a
Park Ranger' March 28 (co-sponsored bv
the ECU Geologv Dept). K. Rod Cran-
son�Science Dept Lansing Community
College, Lansing, Mi Science Educator,
Summer Interpreter for the National Park
Service, and author of "Crater Lake�
Gem of the Cascades: The Geologic Story
of Crater Lake National Park " 7:30 p.m
room 1026 GCB "The National Parks of
New Zealand and Costa Rica" will be
presented on April 4th (co-sponsored
with the ECU English Dept.). Robert and
Patricia Cahn�Environmental Journal-
ists and Consultants, Leesburg, VA. Pulit-
zer Prize 19 and 188 recipient of the
Majory Stoneman Douglas Award. 7:30
p.m room 1031 GCB.
PUBLIC INFO.
The League of Women Voters of Green
ville-Pitt County is sponsoring a public in-
formational meeting about present and
future solid waste mgmt. in Pitt County
The meeting will take place on March 21 at
730 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church
in Greenville.
YEARBOOKS
1987 & 1988 Buccaneers along with the
1988 New Student Reviews can be picked
up in the hallway of the Publications Bldg
anytime during the day
CCJ
Campus Christian Fellowship would like
to invite you to our Bible study every
Tues. at 7 pjn. in Rawl 130 Bring your
Bible and a friend as we study the book of
Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199 if you need
a ride or further info.
BIG KIDS
If vour life has been affected, past or pres-
ent, bv having boon raised in a home or
environment where alcoholic and other
dysfunctional behaviors were present.
Here's Something You Should Know
Each Tues. al 4 30, in rm 312 of the Conn
seling Center, there is a discussion and
learning group meeting for those with
common concerns. Newcomers are en-
couraged to come at 4 1 s Call 757-6793 for
additional info.
COURSE OFFERED
A Humanities course for 1st Summer
Session will be ottered in Russian Lit of
the 19th Century taught in English (Russ
2220), M-F, 11:20-12:50. This is a 3 crcdu
course dealing with Dostoevskv, Tolstoy
and other great Russian writers The
course satisfies the General College
Humanities requirement
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting is Apnl 3 at 7:00 in GCB
1019. We will discuss plans for our trip to
Campbell Law School on April 7. Please
attend
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1989 Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics Spring Games will be held on
April 14 at E.B Aycock Jr. High School in
Greenville (rain date: April 21). Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olympians
Volunteers must be able to work all day�
from 9 a m2 p.m. An orientation meeting
will be held on April 11 in Old Joyner
Library, rm. 221 from 5-5:45 p.m. Free
lunches and volunteer t shirts will be
provided the dag of the games to all vol-
unteers who have attended the orienta-
tion session. For more info , contact Spe-
cial Olympics office: 830-4551.
BALLOON RIDES
Come join the Down East Balloon Society
on April 15 from 4-7 pm. at Vernon Park
Mall (Kinston) for hot air balloon rides
and help us raise funds for Children's
Hospital of Eastern N.C (weather permit
ting�rain date April 29,4-7 p.m.). Watch
the Children's Miracle Network Telethon
on WlTN-7. lune 3-4
The ECU Biology Club will be sponsoring
a plant sale Apnl 67 The sale will take
place in the Biology Greenhouse, room
BS-111 from 8 am. to 1 pm
Oregon will conclude the 1988-89 Cham
bor Music Series This performance will be
held in 1 lendrix Theatre on Apnl 5 at 8
p.m. Tickets are on sale now at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC. Hours are 11 a.m6
p.m. M-F Telephone 757-6611, ext. 266.
Don't miss this exciting evening of im-
provisational jazz This event is co-spon-
sored by the School of Music and the Dept
of University Unions.
LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST
The Acting Co. will present Shakespeare's
Love's Labour's Lost on Apnl 10th at 8
p m in Wright Aud. Founded by the late
John Houseman, The Acting Co. is one of
the leading regional theatrical companies
in America. This delightful evening of
comic fun is part of the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series. Tickets are now on sale at
the Central Ticket Office in MSC (757-
6611, ext. 266).
SUMMER SCHOOL 1989
ROOM RESERVATION SIGN-
UP INFORMATION
Residence hall room payments for Sum-
mer School 1989 will be accepted in the
Cashier's office, room 105, Spilman Build-
ing, beginning April 5,1989. Room assign-
ments will be made in teh respective resi-
dence hall offices on April 5 201 Wichard
Building. The rent for a term of sumer
school is $225 (Cotten, Fleming and Jarvis
Halls � $280) for a semi-private room adn
$335 (Cotten, Fleming and Jarvis Halls �
$370) for a private room.
Residence hall to be used for summer
school are Fletcher and Jarvis (co-ed),
Cotten (women) and Fleming (men).
Fleming Hall will house men during the
summer, but it will revert back to a
women's residence hall Fall Semester
1989.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
The last American Marketing Association
meeting will be held or Tues March 28 at
3.30. The meeting will be held in room
1028 of the General Classroom Building
Our guest speaker will be Vince Watkins
from special products and development
at Food Lion. All persons interested are
welcome and members are encouraged to
attend.
COLLEGE HILL AREA RESI-
DENCE COUNCIL
QRE�QN
The performance of the Jazz Ensemble
Hill Jam will be Sat. April 1, from 2-6 pm
on Tyler Beach. Featuring live entertain-
ment from Victim, the Vacationing Fire-
men, and Nouveaux Campaign. Don't
miss great music, food, and lots of fun in
the sun' Sponsored bv College 1 hll Area
Residence Council
PJiTTPLLTTGOLF
The resurrected putt putt golf league will
hold a registration meeting April 4 at 5 00
pm in B10 N102. All ECU faculty, staff
and students are welcome
HOME RUN DERBY
Babe Ruth's and other should find then
selves with bat in hand April 5 from 4-6
pm on the women's varsity Softball field
The annual 1 lome Run Derby provides
great awards for winners. Bring your ECU
ID. as the registration begins
CAMPJ1SCRUSADFLFQR
CHRIST
Looking for fun, fellowship, and hearing
God's word? Your are welcome to "Prime
Time" at Rawl, Rm. 130 �everyThurs at
7:30 pm. Looking forward to seeing vou
there! Refreshments served
SAM
The last SAM meeting will be held Wed
March 29 at 3 pm in GCB 1028. Elections
for next year will be held and all members
are required to attend!
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
The Career Plannning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton 1 louse offers thse
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills A film and dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
campus will shared The next session will
be held in the Career Planning room on
March 29 at 3 pm
RESUME WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Placement Serv
ice in the Bloxton House offers these one
hour programs on beginning a resume for
your job search Handouts and samples
will be given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session. No signup is re-
quired. The next session will be held in the
Career Planning Room on March 28, at 3
pm
H1LLEL
1 lillel, a Jewish Student Organization, will
be having a Bagel and Lox Dinner on
March 29th from 7-9 pm It will be in Room
248 Mendenhall Rabbi Rose will be lead
ing a discussion on "Being a Jew in the
1980's Donations will be accepted to
cover the food costs
ECU-SETA
ECU-SETA will have a business meeting
todav at 500 in GCB 1018. Afterwards we
will discuss the topic of animal research
Everyone concerned about animals is
welcome.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Thro will be a general Assembly at 5 pm in
Km 1031 Our speaker will be Frank
Lawrence of First Federal Savings and
I oans New members welcome'
H PERS
The HPERS department announce he
Childrens s learn to swm Program : i
faculty and -rat: starting April 10th For
more information call Melrose Moore 757
6441 oi 6442
W1NTERGLARD WINS!
'Assembly Line" colorguard took fir
place during competition at South Ala
mance 1 ligh School on March 18 In addi-
tion to their tirst place froph) Assembly
Line" also brought homo high score of the
day Tht guard is under the direction of
Mr Paul Orsett
NADIA SALERNO-SQNNEN-
BERG
World Renown Violinist Nadja Salerno
Sonnenberg will perform in Wright Audi-
torium at 8pm on April 20th Her appear-
ance will conclude the 1988-89 Perform
ing Arts Series at Fast Carolina Univer
sitv 1 lor scheduled prgram will include
SONATA No 2mA Major, Op 12, No 2
bv Beethoven. SONATA No 2 ink D
Major, Op 4a bv Prokofiev, lntermi
sion, SONATA No 3 in D Minor, Op Uifr
bv Brahms Ms Salemo-Sonnenberg will
bo acompaniod bv Sandra Rivers on the
piano. Tickets for this event are now on
sale the) can bo purchased through the
Central Ticket Office at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center by calling 7S7-fl 1, ext 2f
Office hours are 11 am-6 pm, Mondav
through Friday
Elections for Student Residence Assoaa
tion. Area Residence Council, and House
Council offices is todva, March 28th
Don't forget to get out and vote1
PRE-PROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCES
The Pre-professional Health allicance will
hold a meeting at fe 30 pm in 247 Menden-
hall Student Center all members are en-
couraged to attend
FE MA1QRS CLUB






I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28,1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
� FOR RENT: 1 bedroom upstairs apt.
I Screened in porch. Utilities included.
Near ECU campus. $250.00 per month.
Call 758 1274 after 6:00 p.m.
: NEF.U TO SUBLEASE? Law students
interested in subleasing furnished apart
men ts tor summer (Mav � August). Want
to make arrangements as soon as pos.?ible.
Call Bert Speicher at 355-3030�
FOR RENT: 1 Bdr. Apt. fuDv fum. Bunk
beds, 1 person $200.00; 2 people $290 plus
util. Walking distance to campus. Call
830-4088.
ROOM FOR RENT: 2 bdroom house non-
smoker. SI50 mnth, plus utilities. Close to
campus. Call Luke after 3 pm at 758-7952.
WANTEEh To rent 2 or 3 Bdr. house or
dublcx. Near campus preferred. Must al-
low pets. Needed by May 1. Will take over
lease. Call 752-3860.
FOR SALE
CAN YOU BUY: Jeeps, Cars, 4 X 4's seized
In drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 1 slightly-
used Al Merrick Design 6'4" Channel Is-
lands Thruster, includes board bag. Must
�ell $175.00. Call 355-3364.
FOR SALE: 5 ft. width cabinet, fits Clem-
ent, White, Sc Greene dorms. Very spa-
cious. Has a shelf to fit large refrigerator.
Call Kathleen or Amy 758-4507.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
From $100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chevys. Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
�687-6000 Ext. S�1166.
ROUND TRIP TICKET TO ORLANDO
.FLORIDA: leaving Friday March 25th
Iand returning Sun. April 2nd. Le.ives
from Raleigh Durham airport Cheap
"price, call 355-5846.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
- need a D.J. for the best music available for
I- parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
� Z7B1 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
tsboftware and computer diskettes. 24
in and out. Guaranteed typing on
up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
��est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
� Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
� (beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
�:jo.
NEED A D.Jj Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party.
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: if you have
papers, resumes, thesis, etc that need to
be typed, please call 756-8934 between
5:30-9:30 pm. 16 yrs. typing experience.
Typing is done on computer with letter
quality printer.
WORD PROCESSING: Reports, Resu-
mes, Laser Printing. Rush jobs and reser-
vations accepted. Call 752-1933 before 5
pm.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Mary Smith REAL
Crisis Center 758-HELP.
HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STU-
DENTS: Who enjoy cooking. . . we have
openings for cook's helpers and kitchen
aids at childrens summer camp in the cool
mountains of North Carolina. Experience
not necessary, we will train. You receive
room, meals, laundry, plus $900.00-
$1000.00 salary and travel expenses. Non-
smoking students write for App.bro-
chure: Camp Pinewood 20205-1 N.E. 3
Court, Miami, FL 33179.
ADDITIONAL STAFF NEEDED: For
small country inn and restaurant in the
delightfully different coastal town of
Beaufort, NC�knowledgeable wait
people interested in learning more about
wines and gourmet cuisine�chamber
maids for our elegantly appointed
suites�positions available in our profes-
sional kitchen. Please call The Cedars at
(919) 728-7036 after 2 p.m.
ATTENTION�HIRING Government
Jobs - your area. Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. $17340 -
$69,485. Call 1-602-838-8885, Ext. R52S5.
CABIN COUNSELORS fc
INSTRUCTORS: (Male and Female) for
western North Carolina 8 week children's
summer camp. Over 30 activities includ-
ing Water Ski, Tennis, HEated swimming
pool, Go-Karts, Hiking, ArtRoom,
meals, salary and travel. Experience not
necessary. Non-smoking students write
for applicationbrochure: Camp Pine-
wood, 20205-1 N.E 3 Q. Miami, Florida
33179.
WANTED: Part-time childrenyouth di-
rector. Twelve, month employment with
additional hours. During summer. Please
write for application. Winterviile Baptist
Church. P.O. Box 434. Winterviile, NC
28590.
COACH: experienced for USS Summer
Swim Team. References required. Apply
P.O. Box 1301, Tarboro, NC
HELP WANTED: Part-time help wanted
to work in lab at Greenville Opticians.
Help wanted through summer and all
next school year. No experience neces-
sary. We will train you. We will work
around student schedule. Call 752-4018
and ask for manager to set up an inter-
view. Good working conditions.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING: Flight Atten-
dants, Travel Agents, Mechanics, Cus-
tomer Service. Listings. Salaries to S105K
Entry level positions Call (1) 8050687-
6000 Ext. A-l 166.
HELP WANTED: Free room and board at
Oriental on the Neuse, short sailing trip,
and chance to pick-up $60 � $80 helping
to paint and was a 37 ft. sailboat. Week-
ends April 1st and 2nd. 756-2027.
HELP WANTED: Greenville Country
Club is looking for golf course help. Inter-
views will be Thursday, March 30 be-
tween 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.
HELP WANTED: Part-time desk assis-
tantsecurity guard. Nights and week-
ends. Must be able to work effectively
with the public. Apply in person only. 3-5
p.m. M-F at Shepherd Memorial Library,
530 Evans Street. No phone calls
PERSONALS
ALL CAMPUS: The Pi Kapps hope every-
one had a safe and enjoyable Easter break.
DO YOU HAVE PLANS FOR DINNER
TONIGHT? Even if you do you might
want to think about changing them be-
cause tonight is the Delta Zeta Spaghetti
Dinner. ALL U CAN EAT, Homemade,
complete with garlic bread and served by
the ladies of Delta Zeta. So, everyone
come on over to the Delta Zeta house 5:30
� 8:00. $3.00 tickets at door or see any
Delta Zeta.
ATTENTION M & M LOVERS: The
Delta Zetas are selling your favorite treats
at $50 a box plain or peanut! So, if you
need a lil' snack to help you get to class �
see any Delta Zeta
CHI OMEGA: Welcome back from Eater
Break! We hope you all had a fun one! Get
psyched for Greek week Love, You Se-
cret Sorority.
FRATERNITYPRESIDES:Q)mmittee
Meetings � 4:30 today. Greek week
comm. Wed � 4 p.m. (212 MH).
ATTENTION GREEKS: Greek week is
only days away.
ALL GREEKS WHO HA VENT GOT-
TEN GREEK WEEK STICKERS: Contact
Russell Lowe 757-3507 or 757-3042 by no
later than April 4.
TRIPP ROAKES FOR SGA PRESI-
DENT: The candidate that is here for the
students concerns. Vote Tripp Roakes.
YES! Greek week is coming up April 9 �
16. Get Psyched!
TKE END OF THE WORLD PARTY: Jim
Jones is coming, beware April 7.
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT: At the Hill
Jam. Saturday, April 1 from 2-6 p.m. Fea-
turing Victim, The Vacationing Firemen,
and Nouveuvx Campaign. Plus food, con-
tests, and lots of fun in the sun. Don't miss
it!
VOTE TRIPP ROAKES: SGA President
tommorow. Tripp Roakes � the students
President � Be sure to bring your ID'S.
PI KAPPS: Thank you little sisters for the
great party Saturday night. The tradition
has begun Thanks to the weather for
helping us with our more than successful
car wash. Everyone did a great job.
Hudges, Alex, Paige, Pat, You,
Eubamksy, Anyone, Stacey, Tracy, Every-
one, and Rick wish everyone a good
weekend in their own way.
ELECT TRIPP ROAKES: Student Body
President tommorow. The Students Presi-
dent. Bring your ID'S to vote.
SORORITY RUSH REGISTRATION:
April 3rd � 6th and April 10th � 13th.
Sign up at the Student Store, The Croatan,
and The Bottom of the Hill. (Go Greek).
WIN A FREE TRIP. To the Bahamas.
Register Tuesdays only at Pantana Bob's.
March 28 � April 18. Sponsored by
Kappa Sigma.
SUS ANNE HUDSON: Surprise and con-
gratulations! We love you. The Sigmas.
INTERESTED IN BECOMING GREEK?
Your opportunity to see a part of Greek
life is coming up on April 3rd. Panhellenic
is hosting a convocation for all interested
women in Wright Auditorium at 6:00 p.m.
Please attend and bring a friend.
DON'T FORGET TO VOTE: In the SGA
elections. Tell all your friends! The Sig-
mas.
GREEK WEEK: Is just around the comer.
Let's get psyched and ready to have seri-
ous fun The Sigmas.
GO GREEK! Go Greek! Go Greek!
SORORITIES: Friendships for a lifetime!
THE PLEDGES OF THETA CHI: Would
like � �K�nV Ruddv Sarsent for washina
cars all day in the quite cold weather. "8 ��lhe Sign
PI KAPPS: How about that Easter week-
end. Hopefully everyone survived tljay
weekend and made it back. You name it,
we did it. Budless fest was what- we de-
cided to make it, and we made it a hell of
a time. Easter '89 is one that will never be
forgotten. Welcome back everyone!
PI KAPPS: Little sisters getoeady to con-
tinue the tradition with'he Saturday
night party. Everyone did an outstanding
job at our last car wash. We had a blast and
made come cash. The house is still stand-
ing better than ever, and we are ready to
rock-n-roll Greek week!
AZD: Hope you had a fun and safe Easter.
We can't wait to tell you who we are. You,
guys are the greatest. Love, You Secret
Sorority.
DZ'S: Thanks for making the St. Patrick's
Day party an evening to remember. We
are looking forward to painting your
house. Love, Sigma Nu.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
SIGMA NU BROTHERS: Ed, James,
Alan, Marvin, Rocky, Scott, Ron, Stewart,
David, Todd, Clay, Chris, Mike, and
Martin � Your brothers.
MARCHING PIRATES: Join in support-
ing Kelly Jones for President. We urge you
to vote and tell a friend.
DELTA SIG: Once again we had a great
time at our pre-downtown mixer. You
guys are the best and we hope to meet
again soon! Alpha Delta Pi.
KELLY JONES FOR SGA PRESIDENT.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Camp Contentnea
was the place to be last Thursday night.
Thanks for startine our St. Patrick dav off
KELLY JONES FOR SGA PRESIDENT!
Good luck Kelly! The sisters and pledges
of Zeta Tau Alpha.
THETA CHI PLEGES: Thanks for all the
help in getting our yard ready for the
Spring. Come smell the Roses Love, The
Sigmas.
KELLY JONES FOR SGA PRESIDENT:
A proven leader. Join Zeta Tau Alpha and
support Kelly Jones on Wednesday.
INVITED FACULTY: Don't forget the tea
Wednesday at 5. We're so excited about
meeting all of you. The Sigmas.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Downtown Mall)758-3025I
Announc
a CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
1 Thurs. at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
jj found it and we want to share it with you.
"�Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
H night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
rr If you are challenged everyday with prob-
3 terns that you find hard to overcome, Join
�- us for the uncompromised word of God.
Z Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
3 Auditorium.
i CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 pjn. in Raw! 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
Hie book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
� ART GALLERY
:H Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
5 Bed for university work study program.
r2S Hours: Mon. 2 p-m. to 5 p.m. Sat 10 a.m. to
22 S pan. and additional hours during the
Z week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter -
sated, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
3E tou Anne 757-6336.
.J TUTORS NEEDED
2 Tutors needed for all business classes.
Z Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
� Dept of Athletics�7576282 or 757-1677.
�f ECU NAVIGATORS
jjjg "Right 730 the weekly get-together of
rZ the Navigators, continues its streak of
S eood Bible study every Thur 730-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
2 tog Is designed to help you develop a
H doaer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
jjjj ments served. No ticket required; Just
� your time.
HELP FIGHT CANCER
I 4�B
�S A 24-hour Run Against Cancer will be
I sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed
:4E National Fraternity, and the American
: Cancer Society a. April 14th 15th at the
g BCU track. Contestant are not required
to jog or walk the enure 24 hours, but
will be taking turns with nine
ibers for 12 hour periods
taring a team or donat-
rmaterials. For more into, call
i (752-2574) of the American
Soc, Bryan HaaUn (756-9665) of
Phi Omtga or David Over ton (830-
of Alpha Phi i
SEASON TICKETS
Season tickets for the 1989-90 Performing
Arts Series at ECU are now on sale. This
outstanding season includes ITZHAK
PERLMAN, THE NC DANCE THE-
ATRE. SHALON '90, THE CANNES
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with RAN-
SOM WILSON, THE N.C.
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, CARMEN
sung in English, DREAM GIRLS, and
much more. Patrons are cautioned that
initial season ticket sales are brisk. Al-
though individual event tickets will go on
sale 3 weeks prior to each event, it is
highly possible that the series will sell out
in season sells. Don't miss out on the best
Performing Arts Series, order your tickets
today. Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC, 757-6611, Ext. 266.
VISITING LECTURES
The Honors Program, the Science and
Math Ed. Center and International Stud-
ies will sponsor 'A Day in the Life of a
Park Ranger" March 28 (co-sponsored by
the ECU Geology Dept.). K. Rod Cran-
son�Science Dept Lansing Community
College. Lansing Mi Science Educator,
Summer Interpreter for the National Park
Service, and author of "Crater Lake�
Gem of the Cascades: The Geologic Story
of Crater Lake National Park 730 p.m
room 1026 GCB The National Parks of
New Zealand and Costa Rica" will be
presented on April 4th (co-sponsored
with the ECU English Dept.). Robert and
Patricia Cahn�Environmental Journal-
ists and Consultants. Leesburg, VA Pulit-
zer Prize 1969 and 1988 recipient of the
Majory Stoneman Douglas Award. 7:30
p-m room 1031 GCB.
PUBLIC LNFQ.
The League of Women Voters of Green-
ville-Pitt County is sponsoring a public in-
formational meeting about present and
future solid waste mgmt. in Pitt County.
The meeting will take place on March 21 at
730 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church
in Greenville.
YEARBOOKS
1967 at 1988 Buccaneers along with the
1988 New Student Reviews can be picked
up in the hall way of the Publications Bldg.
anytime during the day.
Campus Christian Fellowship would like
to invite you to our Bible study every
Tues. at 7 pm. in Rawt 13a Bring your
BlbJ and a Mend as we study the book of
Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-71991 you need
a ride or further inf a
BIG KIPS
If your life has been affected, past or pres-
ent, by having been raised in a home or
environment where alcoholic and other
dysfunctional behaviors were present.
Here's Something You Should Know.
Each Tues. at 4:30, in rm. 312 of the Coun-
seling Center, there is a discussion and
learning group meeting for those with
common concerns. Newcomers are en-
couraged to come at 4:15. Call 757-6793 for
additional info.
COURSE OFFERED
A Humanities course for 1st Summer
Session will be offered in Russian Lit. of
the 19th Century taught in English (Russ
2220), M-F, 11:20-12.50. This is a 3 credii
course dealing with Dostoevsky, Tolstoy
and other great Russian writers. The
course satisfies the General College
Humanities requirement.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting is April 3 at 7:00 in GCB
1019. We will discuss plans for our trip to
Campbell Law School on April 7. Please
attend
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1989 Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics Spring Games will be held on
April 14 at E.B. Aycock Jr. High School in
Greenville (rain date: April 21). Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olympians
Volunteers must be able to work all day�
from 9 a.m2 p.m. An orientation meeting
will be held on April 11 in Old Joyner
Library, rm. 221 from 5-5:45 p.m. Free
lunches and volunteer t-shirts will be
provided the dag of the games to all vol-
unteers who have attended the orienta-
tion session. For more info contact Spe-
cial Olympics office: 830-4551.
BALLOON RIDES
Come Join the Down East Balloon Society
on April 15 from 4-7 p.m. at Vernon Park
Mall (Kinston) for hot air balloon rides
and help us raise funds for Children's
Hospital of Eastern N.C (weather permit-
ting�rain date: April 29,4-7 p.m.). Watch
the Children's Miracle Network Telethon
oWiTN-7. June 3-4.
PLANT SALE
The ECU Biology Club will be sponsoring
a plant sale April 6-7. The sale will take
place in the Biology Greenhouse, room
BS-111 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
OREGON
The performance of the Jazz Ensemble
O
M
h,
p.m. iaws are on sale now at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC. Hours are 11 a.m6
pan. M-F. Telephone: 757-6611, ext. 266.
Don't miss this exciting evening of im-
provisational jazz. This event is co-spon-
sored by the School of Music and the Dept.
of University Unions.
� JIVE'S LABOUR'S LOST
The Acting Co. will present Shakespeare's
Love's Labour's Lost on April 10th at 8
p.m. in Wright Aud. Founded by the late
John Houseman, The Acting Co. is one of
the leading regional theatrical companies
in America. This delightful evening of
comic fun is part of the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series. Tickets are now on sale at
the Central Ticket Office in MSC (757-
6611, ext 266).
SUMMER SCHOOL 1989
ROOM RESERVATION SIGN-
UP INFORMATION
Residence hall room payments for Sum-
mer School 1989 will be accepted in the
Cashier's office, room 105, Spilman Build-
ing beginning April 5,1989. Room assign-
ments will be made in teh respective resi-
dence hall offices on April 5 201 Wichard
Building. The rent for a term of sumer
school is $225 (Cotten, Fleming and Jar vis
Halls�$280) for a semi-private room adn
$335 (Cotten, Fleming and Jarvis Halls �
$370) for a private room.
Residence hall to be used for summer
school are Fletcher and Jarvis (co-ed),
Cotten (women) and Fleming (men).
Fleming Hall will house men during the
summer, but it will revert back to a
women's residence hall Fall Semester
1989,
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
The last American Marketing Association
meeting will be held or Tues. March 28 at
330. The meeting will be held in room
1028 of the General Classroom Building.
Our guest speaker will be Vince Watkins
from special products and development
at Food Lion. All persons interested are
welcome and members are encouraged to
attend
PUTT PUTT GOLF
COLLEGE HILL AREA RESI-
DENCE COUNCIL
Hill Jam will be Sat. April 1, from 2-6 pm
on Tyler Beech. Featuring live entertain-
ment from Victim, the Vacationing Fire-
men, end Nouveaux Campaign. Don't
t music, food, and tots of fun in
anal
RING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FAIL
SEMESTER 89. EFFICIENCY 1 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS FOR
INFO. CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD
Ka ia sa 3 i 1. the acl process Of
resull of qamer.ng I the sections o a book
' :����-�� proper O'der for bmdirtg
IT s OUR BUSINESS
; �� i .��� �- Juphcabng r � taming
rtsr corns rtm warn mmt
�-nrl 4 1.il,
V .1 h � � in I I �
758-2400
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care'
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-P 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call lor appoln trnen t Mon. thru SaL Low
Coat Termination to 20 weeka of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
ECU-SETA will have a business meeting
today at 5:00 in GCB 1018. Afterwards we
will discuss the topic of animal research.
Everyone concerned about animals is
welcome.
The resurrected putt-putt golf league will
hold a registration meeting April 4 at 5:00
pm in B10 N102. All ECU faculty, staff,
and students are welcome.
HOMF. RUN DERBY
Babe Ruth's and other should find them-
selves with bat in hand April 5 from 4-6
pm on the women's varsity softball field.
The annual Home Run Derby provides
great awards for winners. Bring your ECU
I.D. as the registration begins.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST
Looking for fun, fellowship, and hearing
God's word? Your are welcome to "Prime
Time"atRawlRm.l30 � every Thurs. at
7:30 pm. Looking forward to seeing you
there! Refreshments served.
SAM
The last SAM meeting will be held Wed.
March 29 at 3 pm in GCB 1028. Elections
for next year will be held and all members
are required to attend!
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
The Career Plannning and Placement
Service In the Bloxton House offers thse
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills. A film and dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
campus will shared. The next session will
be held in the Career Planning room on
March 29 at 3 pm.
RESUME WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton House offers these one
hour programs on beginning a resume for
your job search. Handouts and samples
will be given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session. No signup is re-
quired. The next session will be held in the
Career Planning Room on March 28, at 3
pm.
HatfdBL
HilleL a Jewish Student Organization, will
be having a Bagel and Lox Dinner on
March 29th from 7-9 pm. It will be in Room
248 MendenhalL Rabbi Rose will be lead-
ing a discussion on "Being a Jew in the
1980V Donations will be accepted to
cover the food coats.
ECU-SETA
PHT BETA LAMBDA
Thre will be a general Assembly at 5 pm in
Rm. 1031. Our speaker will be Frank
Lawrence of First Federal Savings and
Loans. New members welcome!
HPERS
The HPERS department announces the
Childrens's learn to Swim Program for
faculty and staff, starting April 10th For
more information call Melrose Moore 757-
6441 or 6442.
WINTERGUARP WINS!
"Assembly Line" colorguard took first
place during competition at South Ala-
mance High School on March 18. In addi-
tion to their first place trophy, "Assembly
Line" also brought home high score of the
day. The guard is under the direction of
Mr. Paul Orsett.
NAPJ A SALERNQ-SQNNEN-
BBLG
World Renown Violinist Nadja Salemo-
Sonnenberg will perform in Wright Audi-
torium at 8pm on April 20th. Her appear-
ance will conclude the 1988-89 Perform-
ing Arts Series at East Carolina Univer-
sity. Her scheduled prgram will indude:
SONATA No. 2 in A Major, Op. 12, No. 2
by Beethoven, SONATA No. 2 ink D
Major, Op. 94a by Prokofiev, Intermis-
sion, SONATA No. 3 in D Minor, Op. 106
by Brahms. Ms. Salerno-Sonnenberg will
be acompanied by Sandra Rivers on the
piano. Tickets for this event are now on
sale, they can be purchased through the
Central Ticket Office at Mend en hall Stu-
dent Center by calling 757-6611, ext.266.
Office hours are 11 am-6 pm, Monday
through Friday.
SBA
Elections for Student Residence Associa-
tion, Area Residence Council, and House
Council offices is todya, March 28th.
Don't forget to get out and vote!
PRE-PROFESSIONA1
HEALTH ALLIANCES
The Pre-prof essional Health allicancc will
hold a meeting at 6:30 pm in 247 Menden-
hall Student Center all members arc en-
couraged to attend.
PE MAJORS CLUB
5
v.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28,1989 7
Announcements
" e have a meeting Thurs at 8 p in in Km rul1 Gym You can see a lot of health ori
H2 Minges Important into to be dis- ented displays and partiapato as well
- ussed All PC majors or mrcdtxl majors
are welcome to attend STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
PHI Al PHATHETA
The lambda Eta chapter of Phi Alpha
Theta International 1 lonoi Society in I lis
tv will be hosting a Regional Confer
ence April 1 trom 'am to 4:30 p m in the
New CH Registration will be at 9 a m. in
room 3007 Eleven student papers will be
presented and the Keynote speaker is De
William N stiU Faculty, Phi Alpha Theta
members. 1 listotv mjiors and other inter
ested persons are urged to attend the reg
istraoon fee is $5 tX1
HEALTH FAIR
Fry high with wellness at the 1 tealth Fair
on April 4 from 11 � 5 50 p m at Memo
ou are invited lo "flj high with well
i ws" from April 3 - n. Walk with the
. hancellor on Apr 13at 12 10pm � meet
at Memorial Com Come to the 1 lealth
Fair (11 � 530 p malso at Memorial on
Apnl 4 Hear Harriet Elder speak on
1 aughter at 7:30 p m in Jenkins And.to
num on April r Go By a kite on April 6
trom 3 � 5 pm on College 1 till Prises
will be given for quickest inflight, highest
in altitude, and stunt flying
WHAT'S YQ LJ NL -N tBI B2
The key to living a healthy life may be
.ur cholesterol numbei Cholesterol
vieening will be available at the ! lealth
T.VT April 4 at Memorial Gym The oist is
S3 00 and the screening uill he from 11
am to 1 p m and 2pm to S 30 p m If you
would like to schedule an appointment
toi v h�. lesterol screening call IRS 757
6387, For best lest results don't eat or drink
anything after 6pm the night before.
AMBASSADORS
rhere will be a neeting on Wed at 5.15
pm in the OCB room 1031 It is very
important for all members to piesent.
HAMMA BETA PHI
All members and prospective members of
Gamma Beta Phi are urged to attend the
business meeting March 28 at 7 p rn in
Jenkins Auditorium. Fund raiser will be
discussed.
KAYAKING CLUB
Join the ECU Kayaking Club tonight 328
in Memorial Cym pool from 8 30 � 10
pm for Kayak instruction and fun We
run Whitewater rivers every weekend!
We have all the equipment so come join
us! Questions? Call Ray Irvin 830-1204
MATlQNAXSTJJilEKr EX
CHANGE
Attention skiers. How would you like to
spend next year skiing at Jackson 1 lole,
1 leavenly Valley, or Snowbird while at
lending school at a nearby college and pay
FCU tuition? You can do it at one of 83 uni-
versities through the National Student Ex-
change! Contact Stephanie at 757-6769.
Withdrawals
AWyAlj Of a MEAL
105 Airport Road
758-0327
Banquet Facilities Available
Tar Landing Seafood
Shrimp Lover Feast
Boiled, Broiled. Fried & Steamed
Shrimp all on one plate.
Served with French Fries or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw, and Hushpuppies
ONLY 779 $6.99
with this ad
schools miss deadline
WASHINGTON (AP) �
More than half the country's
hool systems have failed to meet
a federal deadline to inspect school
buildings tor cancer-causing as-
bestos and develop cleanup pro-
grams according to the Environ-
ECU Campus
Watch to focus
on safety
mental Protection Agency.
The EPA said that as many as
21 percent of the public school
districts and private schools na-
tionwide already arc in technical
violation ot the 1986 asbestos
cleanup law and could be lined as
much as$5,000 a day it thev do not
come into compliance. Manv oth-
ers obtained extensions but those
runout next May.
Congres in 1986 requin d all
school buildings to be examined
by El'A-approved inspectors and
school officials were supposed to
;ubmit formal cleanup plans to
state authorities by October 19l -s.
Only about 40 percent of the school
officials nationwide met the Octo
U , di ad line, according to infor-
mation provided bv the states to
the EPA
Continued from page 1
and bust their butts to improve
student life
The other candidate to with-
draw, Colleen McDonald, was the
only person running for the office
of secretary. She withdrew less
than a week after the official start
of campaigning and also stated
personal reasons for not staying
in the election.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
HUNGRY PIRATE
5f 1 Cotanche St. 7571666
The Biggest Burrito
rf You 've Ever Seen!
Stuffed with beef, rice,
lettuce, beans, tomato bits,
sour cream and covered
with enchilada sauce.
�Jl Guaranteed to fill you
up!
$3.25
Served t � 5, WeJcdayt I
11-5, Weekends
HvMlNin MdNNIS
to promote
sait'
motto
� I :
A new committee has been
icd at ECU to deter campus
ne. The committee, E I
Campus Watch, will focus on
improving safety by combining
efforts made by students, staff and
Dr Alfred Matthews, vio
chancellor of student life, ap
pointed the committee in the tall
The idea to form the 1VI
Campus Watch Committee is
,i on a crime prevention
. V�x l ej ain i-byEO s urity.
i iY.C�vc�m�uiuv wasmade,pos$bl
i national packet. "C am-
pus Watch ivr a Sate Campus
which was distributed among
ther colleges in the nation inorder
i nation wide cam
� � safety.
You and ECU together tor a
campus the committee s
is designed to let the people
knew that team work is
the W- to safety. Kay Godwin,
director of Greene dorm, hopes to
gel students staff and faculty to
participate this week in the "It 1
Were - Thief campaign
The campaign is designed to
call attention to vulnerability of
theft by using flyers resembling
ECU parking tickets. Studentsand
staff will place flyers everywhere
on campus that a possible crime
can occur.
On the ther the student 'staff
member w ill lea e the time, date,
and item(s) that could have been
stolen. Godwin says that the stu-
dentstaff member will always be
within legal boundaries.
Godwin hopes to effectuate
change in student attitudes b)
allowing students to see how vul-
nerable they are to crime. Godwin
also hopes that fraternities, sorori-
ties and resident adv isors will gel
involved in the campus watch
program.
Thebig' kick-off of the ECL
Campus Watch Committee will
occur on April 4 at the Health Fair
Keith Knox, crime prevention of-
ficer, is try ing to arrange tor
McGruff the crime dog to be pres-
ent at the fair.
In October, which is consid-
ered crime month, the committee
plans to place emphasison differ-
ent crimes ranging from sexual
assault every day crimes and
drugs and alcohol violations.
The committee is made up of
four faculty members and four
students: Kay Godwin, Keith
Knox,Lucy Wright, Mary Frances
White. Mitzi Maulden, Melissa
Hayes, Ken Drake, and Annette
Tender.
"We see our committee as a
join! sponsorship to encourage
crime oriented organizations and
committeestocarryout their tasks
in increasing safety awareness
among the ECU population
Godwin said. Godwin also en-
courages students, staff, and fac-
ulty to contact her for more infor-
mation on how to get involved in
the ECU Campus Watch Commit-
tee
Kay Godwin can be contacted
a 1757-6110 or at Greene residence
director's office.
44 Mom says the
house just isn't the
same without me,
even though its
a lot cleaner.95
i-jf �V f 4
no BflKIl OS&intnBUJ Ji�.� Um n lUC
K?
�;
n
V
W
'�


V
lust because your Mom is Ear
away, doesn't mean you can't be
close. You can still share the love
and laughter on AT&T Long
Distance Service.
It a sts less than you think to
hear that site likes the peace and
quiet, hut she misses you. So go
ahead, give your Mom a call. You
can clean your room later Reach
out and touch someone?
AT&T
The right choice.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
UAnrHMrl999 7

Announcements
We have a meeting Thurs. at 8 p.m. in Rm.
142 Minges. Important info to be dis-
cussed. All PE majors or inteded majors
are welcome to attend.
PHI ALPHA THETA
The Lambda-Eta chapter of Phi Alpha
Theta International Honor Society in His-
tory will be hosting a Regional Confer-
ence April 1 from 9 a.m. to 430 pm. in the
New GCB. Registration will be at 9 a m. in
room 3007. Eleven student papers will be
presented and the Keynote speaker is De.
William N. Still. Faculty, Phi Alpha Theta
members. History majors and other inter-
ested persons are urged to attend, the reg-
istration fee is $5.00.
HEALTH FAIR
Fly high with wellness at the Health Fair
on April 4 from 11 � 5:50 p.m. at Memo-
rial Gym. You can see a lot of health ori-
ented displays and participate as well.
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
You are invited to "fly high with well-
ness" from April 3 � 6. Walk with the
Chancellor on April 3 at 12:10p.m. �meet
at Memorial Gym. Come to the Health
Fair (11 � 530 p.m.) also at Memorial on
April 4. Hear Harriet Elder speak on
Laughter at 730 pm. in Jenkins Audito-
rium on April 5. Go fly a kite on April 6
from 3 � 5 pjn. on College Hill. Prizes
will be given for quickest in flight, highest
in altitude, and stunt flying.
WAT VOH NUMBER?
The key to living a healthy life may be
your cholesterol number. Cholesterol
screening will be available at the Health
Fair April 4 at Memorial Gym. The cost is
$3.00 and the screening will be from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. If you
would like to schedule an appointment
for cholesterol screening call IRS 757-
6387, For best test results don't eat or drink
anything after 6 p.m. the night before.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a nesting on Wed. at 5:15
p.m in the GCB room 1031. It is very
important for all members to present.
GAMMA BETA PHI
All members and prospective members of
Gamma Beta Phi are urged to attend the
business meeting March 28 at 7 p.m. in
Jenkins Auditorium. Fund raiser will be
discussed.
KAVAKTNG CLUB
Join the ECU Kayaking Qub tonight 328
in Memorial Gym pool from 8:30 � 10
p.m. for Kayak instruction and fun. We
run Whitewater rivers every weekend!
We have all the equipment so come join
us! Questions? Call Ray Irvin 830-1204.
NATIONAL STUDENT EX-
CHAN.GE
Attention skiers: How would you like to
spend next year siding at Jackson Hole,
Heavenly Valley, or Snowbird while at-
tending school at a nearby college and pay
ECU tuition? You can do it at one of 83 uni-
versities through the National Student Ex-
change! Contact Stephanie at 757-6769.
Withdrawals
105 Airport Road
758-0327
Banquet Facilities Available
Tar Landing Seafood
Shrimp Lover Feast
Boiled, Broiled. Fried & Steamed!
Shrimp all on one plate.
Served with French Fries or Baked Potato
Cole Slaw, and Hushpuppies
ONLY 79 $6.99
with this ad
schools miss deadline
WASHINGTON (AP) �
More than half the country's
school systems have failed to meet
a federal deadline to inspect school
buildings for cancer-causing as-
bestos and develop cleanup pro-
grams, according to the Environ-
ECU Campus
Watch to focus
mental Protection Agency.
The EPA said that as many as
21 percent of the public school
districts and private schools na-
tionwide already are in technical
violation of the 1986 asbestos
cleanup law and could be fined as
much as$5,000 a day if they do not
come into compliance. Many oth-
ers obtained extensions, but those
run out next May.
Congress in 1986 required all
school buildings to be examined
by EPA-approved inspectors and
school officials were supposed to
iubmit formal cleanup plans to
state authorities by October 1988.
Only about 40 percent of the school
officials nationwide met the Octo-
ber deadline, according to infor-
mation provided bv the states to
the EPA.
Continued from page 1
and bust their butts to improve
student life
The other candidate to with-
draw, Colleen McDonald, was the
only person running for the office
Of secretary. She withdrew less
than a week after the official start
of campaigning and also stated
personal reasons for not staying
in the election.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
Stl Cotanckt SL 757-1699
The Biggest Burrito
ifk You 9ve Ever Seen!
Stuffed with beef, rice,
lettuce, beans, tomato bits,
sour cream and covered
with enchilada sauce.
Guaranteed to fill you
up!
$3.25
Served f � 5, Weekday
5, Weekends
on safety
By MINdV MdNNIS
Slilf Wri�ci
i
A new committee has been
formed at ECU to deter campus
crime. The committee, ECU
Campus Watch, will focus on
improving safety by combining
efforts made by students, staff and
faculty.
Er. Alfred Matthews, vice
chancellor of student life, ap-
pointed the committee in the fall.
The idea to form the ECU
Campus Watch Committee is
based on a crime prevention
nafite4btainei'by ECU security;
through a national packet, "Cam-
pus Watch for a Safe Campus'
which was distributed among
other colleges in the nation in order
to promote a nation wide cam-
paign for safety.
"You and ECU together for a
safe campus the committee's
motto, is designed to let the people
of ECU know that team work is
the key to safety. Kay Godwin,
director of Greene dorm, hopes to
get students, staff and faculty to
participate this week in the "If I
Were A Thief campaign.
The campaign is designed to
call attention to vulnerability of
theft by using flyers resembling
ECU parking tickets. Students and
staff will place flyers every where
on campus that a possible crime
can occur.
On the flyer the studentstaff
member will leave the time, date,
and item(s) that could have been
stolen. Godwin says that the stu-
dentstaff member will alwaysbe
within legal boundaries.
Godwin hopes to effectuate
change in student attitudes by
allowing students to see how vul-
nerable they are to crime. Godwin
also hopes that fraternities, sorori-
ties and resident advisors will get
involved in the campus watch
program.
The big "kick-off" of the ECU
Campus Watch Committee will
occur on April 4 at the Health Fair.
Keith Knox, crime prevention of-
ficer, is trying to arrange lor
McGruf f the crime dog to be pres-
ent at the fair.
In October, which is consid-
ered crime month, the committee
plans to place emphasis on differ-
ent crimes ranging from sexual
assault, every day crimes and
drugs and alcohol violations.
The committee is made up of
four faculty members and four
students: Kay Godwin, Keith
Knox, Lucy Wright, Mary Frances
White, Mitzi Maulden, Melissa
Hayes, Ken Drake, and Annette
Fender.
"We see our committee as a
Joint sponsorship to encourage
crime oriented organizations ami
committees to carry out their tasks
in increasing safety awareness
among the ECU population,
Godwin said. Godwin also en-
courages students, staff, and fac-
ulty to contact her for more infor-
mation on how to get involved in
the ECU Campus WatchCommit-
KayGodwincanbecontacted
at 757-6110oratCreene residence
director's office.





HU l AST l AROI INIAN
Features
MARCH 28, 19H9 PACES
.
ECU student discusses SETA
By CHIP CARTER
The philosophy's very
simple Craig Spitz explains.
The causing oi unnecessary sut-
fering is not "ethically acceptable
Spitz founded the ECU chapterof
Students tor the Ethical Treatment
ot Animals, (SE 1 A) an offshoot of
the nationally organization.
People tor the Ethical Treatment
ot Animals (PETA).
Spitz, a native ot Detroit,
formed the group three weeks ago.
A SETA meeting is scheduled tor
5 p.m. tonight in General Class-
room Building room lOlS.Thetwo
previous meetings attracted
groups ot 20 to 40 interested stu-
dents.
Spitz is a reserved voungman
who speaks calmly and strongly.
I le doesn't describe himself as a
radical activist, but in this decade
ot national campus apathy and
yuppie selfishness anyone who
speaks out in favor ot a cause is
labeled a radical.
I le says lie is not an abolition-
ist, someone who fights to halt all
animal vivisection, but he would
like to sec drastic reductions in
animal usage and more humane
procedures implemented.
Activism is nothing new for
Spitz. He became a vegetarian at
17 after a year of deliberation and
a false start during a two week
stint at Hardee's restaurant.
"It really wasn't as difficult as
1 thought it would be he slid.
"After two months the cravings
for meat are just about gone
He moved to Greenville soon
afterwards. Various animal rights
movements were garnering atten-
tion nationwide, but Spitz didn't
hear about them until, "just bv
chance, I went to Sheppard Me-
morial library, and found a copy
of the Animal Agenda, and found
out there was a movement going
on. There were a lot of people who
felt the same way I did
The magazine deals with the
entire spectrum of the animal
rights movement, from the radi-
cal liberationists to those who
believe that cruelty-free animal
experimentation may be permit-
ted.
After reading the magazine,
Spitz attended a PET A conference
which dealt with activism in indi-
vidual and group form. Spitz
began writing letters and calling
people involved in the issues.
Spitz said the conference con-
tamed more information than he
could process in one day, but he
came away with many useful
ideas. PET A gave him an "activ-
See A STUDENT, page 10
180 Proof jams
Bv DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Stiff Nnfrr
Mike I ittle
Mark Pomerans
They met up with voice major
Mike Little, who lived down the
hall from them, and recruited him
When trying to come up with into the band as their lead singer.
After spending a year at Los
Angeles' prestigious Guitar Insti-
tute oi Technology, Mark Pomer-
ans joined the band as the lead
guitarist to complete the line-up.
"He's one of the best guitar-
ists I've ever heard Oliver said
of his fellow bandmate. "He's one
of the kev parts of the band
Pomerans, who is from
Raleigh, left GIT. and came back
to North Carolina to get a degree.
1 le was offered a gig with the
popular band Max Warrior, but
turned it down to concentrate on
his education.
At G.I.T Pomerans obtained
valuable experience at which has
contributed to the band. Hie
band's talent has also lead them to
record four singles at Audio Arts
lTrack Recording Studio here
in Greenville.
180 Proof plays melodic roek-
n-roll. Oliver said that they try to
play a wide variety oi music to
satisfy everyone, not just one par-
ticular group of people.
"Weplayeverything from Led
See 180 PROOF, page 10
an original name for a rock-n-roll
band, von can't get anv more origi-
nal than "180 Proof
180 Proof is a melodic rock-n-
roll band consisting of four ECU
students: Mike Little on lead vo-
cals, Mark Pomerans on lead gui-
tar Chad Richardson on bass
guitar and Rerrv Oliver on drums.
180 Proof s present line-up has
been banging out tunes for the
past three years at ECU. Hut it all
started back in the seventh grade
tor drummer Oliver and bassist
Richardson, who both hail from
Smith held, N.C
Oh or and Richardson started
the band together during their jun-
ior high school days. After junior
high, the band continued on
through high school and then
eventually on to college.
A senior working toward a
degree in Commercial Leisure
S3 stems, Oliver is the main spokes-
person for the band. He said that it
wasn't until he and Richardson
get to ECU that the present line-
up came together.
Oliver and Rivhardson de-
cided to riXm together at ECU.
Geraldo Rivera fails but keeps
coming back for more stories
NEW ORK (AP)� Wecome
to you today from the stage at
rimes Square Studios in Manhat-
' in, where we'll be bringing you
one of the most provocative pop
culture phenomena of our time.
Geraldo Rivera has been
called the "P.T. Barnum of talk
show hosts" and "the Peck's Bad
Boy of television news
"People" magazine called him
nsufferable The Washington
Post denounced his last special as
"telecom Los Angeles Times
ritic Howard Rosenberg savs he
doesn't believe a thing he sees
Geraldo do.
Tell us briefly Geraldo, in
ur own words: What is it about
vou that so affronts so manv in
uir profession?
"I think envj and ealoiisy
I ' iv a part There's a feeling that 1
mehow gypped my way to the
top. I've gone too far, gotten too
big, defied all their notions. I
?uld've faileda doen times by
now "
He should have failed, but in
the 19 vears since his television
debut, he has earned more than
130 prizes, including three Emmys
and a Peabodv, and his popular-
ity with viewers has never flagged.
"The thing about Geraldo is
thai he's passionate about what
he does savs Suzanne Falter-
Birns, a free-lance writer in the
audience during a recent studio
taping of his syndicated daily talk
how, "Geraldo
"There's no passion on TV
anymore. Everything is canned,
processed, fake entertainment.
Geraldo's show is kind of fasci-
natingly morbid "
Not so, says critic Tom Shales
of The Washington Post. "He's an
emotional cheerleader who tries
to sway audiences in a very facile
and sleazy way. I call him The
Great Panderer because he keeps
searching for cheaper, more sor-
did, more sensational topics. At
best he is embarrassing
Despite the reviews, the In-
vestigative News Group he
formed in 1986 with his wife,
brother and one employee has
grown to 30people. With Tribune
Entertainment, it produceshishve
specials and his talk show. The
fastest-growing program in syn-
dication. "Geraldo" lumped r7
percent in the national Nielsen
ratings over the past year, capital-
izing on an age-old fascination
with criminals, deviants and mis-
fits.
Geraldo also is developing a
weekly series, 'The Investigators
and has just announced plans to
buy up TV stations with five other
prominent Hispanics.
Yet he remains the punch line
to an industrv joke: Heard about
the Geraldo Rivera Home Game?
A life-size cardboard cutout of
Geraldo and a folding chair.
Geraldo's law degree has
proven invaluable. Much of his
career has been spent defending
himself against charges of distort-
ing the news: of using drugs; of
denying his heritage by calling
himself "Jerry Rivers" or, con-
verselv, of changing his name to
Geraldo Rivera to cash in on eth-
nic hiring trends.
He pleads innocent to all
counts.
"I'm the most scrutinized
person on national TV. Everything
1 say, every thing I do, is X-rayed
nine wa s to Sunday
"No storv is worth a career.
Not onl vis my own honor at stake,
but it's the knowledge that every-
thing I do is examined
He's convinced that the fuss
concerns style, not substance, and
that one day. "some biographer
� probably someone not yet born
� will show me as a person who
brought innovation to television
The Geraldo style � explo-
sive, confrontational, the antithe-
sis of the detached professional�
mirrors his off-camera personal-
ity. Long after the guests havegone
home, Geraldo is still "Geraldo
a Hispanic Dudley Do-Right, a
real-life Equalizer. Other men
walk the dog. Geraldo "patrols
thebowelsofCentralPark"witha
black Labrador named Spike.
"These are not postures he
says. He wishes he could wear a
sincerity meter.
"It was always there the
self-assuredness, the cockiness
avs Marty Berman, executive
producer oi "Geraldo They me!
at New York's WABC-TV, which
persuaded Geraldo to trade pov-
erty law for the "Eyewitness
News
Berman became his him edi-
tor in 1970. "Nobody else wanted
to work with him Not onh was
he arrogant, Berman savs. "lie v. as
fearless. He'd walk into a shoot-
inggallery in the Bronx like you d
walk into a coffee shop. He's still
verv difficult, very demanding.
But now he's running a grow n-up
organization
C.C. Over, a "Geraldo" pro-
ducer, is his fourth wife - "fourth
and final Geraldo says. The one-
time notorious womanizer has
finally removed the sign that had
long been a fixture on his bed-
room door: "Abandon hope alive
who enter here Forthefirst time,
he's wearing a ring.
Geraldo is Puerto Rican and
half Jewish, one of five children of
Lilly Friedman and Cruz Rivera
cafeteria workers who married
over her parents' objections He
speaks fondly of his mother, w ho
lives in a house he bought her in
Florida, and reverentially ot his
father, who died in 1987.
He grew up in a blue-collar
section of Long Island, "a social
politician His compulsion to
prove himself is rooted in child
hood: "When I fought, I was pro -
ing myself to the street kids. When
I did well in school, 1 was proving
myself to the smart kids
He's now a proud fathei
himself, of a 9-year-old son by his
third marriage. Gabriel Rivera
livesin California with his mother.
He and Geraldo spend every other
weekend and all summer together
Geraldo hopes to have another
child. He and C.C live in Manhat-
tan but are house-hunting upstate.
They started after a pregnant
doctor was murdered at Bellevue
Hospital. "I said, this is too much
See GERALDO, page 9
SETA founder Craig Spitz informs students about animal rights
during a meeting of the group. (Photo by ECU Photolab)
Excitement runs
high at Academy
C had Richardson
Berry Oliver
LOS ANGELES (AP
America's film industr) hoi
its own at the 61st '� i
Awards on Wednesday night h I
it's likel) that "Rain
make a big splash.
1 eading the field .vitl
nominations, the (ros1
odysseyol two disparate br tl i
appears to be the favorite I
tore the tx St picture I s ai
Dustin 1 loffman the front-i
for best actor and Barry I .11
for best director.
-Rain Man" has th d i
advantage ot being gcnei i
not unanimously; praised b
critics and embraced by th
($12? million gross in :
'The other major cati .
look as unpredictable as i hoi
race for 2-year-olds. i
aWardshave been scattered ovi i i
wide field, providing no hint as t
favorites.
The ui
ne should
edn :
contrast to la t year's i
awards I he event
Shrine Audit riun : pit
wa � f protesl
dlock and j la
1 he 1 os �'�-
sound I .
to do tx tter
The Acadei
ed to res! re
Oscar pr
Allan Can LaCa i
wil
way show
hsch pi
the on hes4ra pu l i . �
directing the a
Pasett i has 1
Margi li
ratings ivitl thi
See MORI page 9
These dancers reach towards the light in a recent dance production here at ECU. (Photo bv .D.
Whitmire, ECU Photolab)
Distillery employs town
LYNCHBURG, Tenn,(AP)
The Moore County Chamber of
Commerce has no office, no tele
phone All of its documents reside
in one thin file folder on a closet
Shelf in Miss Mary Bobo's Hoard
ing I louse.
Lynne Tolley, the chamber s
current president nd also the
boarding house hostess, shrugs
"We don't really go after new-
industries she savs. "Oh, it
somebody asks we answer But
we're not looking. Not a bit
In chambers of commerce
across America, of course, such a
viewpoint borders on heresy But
in this corner of the remote and
rolling foothills oi the Cumber-
land mountains in Middle Ten
nessee, the consensus seems t(� be
that one industry is sufficient
Whiskey.
Lynchburg, the MooreCounty
seat, is the home of the lack Daniel
distillery.
In warehouses atop the ridge
above Jack Daniel's hollow � or
"holler as it is pronounced here-
abouts 47 million gallons o
Tennessee sippin' whiske i :
in charred oak barrels, aging 1 Ik
ripe stuff is bottled daily and ru .�.
barrels filled.
To the people of Lynchburg
and MooreCounty, that is quite a
reservoir of security
There are in America one
industry towns, so-called, where
the economy relies heavily on a
dominant employer. But a re-
searcher would be hard out to find
another place in the nation where
the population of an entire countv
depends for its livelihood, direct Iv-
or indirectlv, single industry, and.
as industries go, not a verv large
one at that, jack Daniel s work
force runs about 350.
"Ten years ago says Moore
Countv judge Donald Ray, I
would have said dependence on
thedistillery was 100 percent. Now
it is somewhat less, but not much
Some people who live in Moore
County now work in adjoining
counties. There are onlv so main
jobs to go around.
"But without Jack Daniel's the
county would be in a terrible situ-
ation. Ever) family ii
Countv that has been here i
time has some member or close
relative involved with jack
Daniel's, if only as a pensioner
Today Moore Countv 131
square miles, all hilly, with a
population of 4510 - or about 34
souls per square mile - has onlv
one center oi commerce, Lyn-
chburg.
The city and countv govern-
ment are one. The county has no
doctor, no lawyer, no railroad, no
interstate highway, no river, no
motel It has one post office, one
state park, one bait shop, one
undertaker, one pool hall and one
traffic light, which, according to
the sheriff, is where most acci
dents happen because people
don't seem to have the hang of
having to stop and wait.
Jack Daniel's influence ex
tends far beyond the distillery's
studiously quaint buildings and
stone fences and crystal-clear
creek, beyond its payroll and
See JACK, page 9






3HE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28.1989 9
More Oscars for later flicks
We Want You!
To Be a Part of
Continued from page 8
Awards show.
The Oscarcast will have no
emcee.Instead,abevvot couples
companions, costars and com-
padres" will present the awards
Among them: Demi Moore and
Brace Willis; Melanie Griffith and
Don Johnson; Kim Novax and
lames Stewart; Sammv Davis r.
and Gregory Hines; Goldie Hawn
and Kurt Russell; Farrah Fawcett
and Ryan O'Neal; Bo Derek and
Dudley Moore; Kieferand Donald
Sutherland.
The nominees for best picture
'The Accidental Tourist
"Dangerous Liaisons "Missis-
sippi Burning "Rain Man
"Working Girl" � offer a wide
range of subject matter. But they
have one thing in common: all
were released last December.
This has brought renewed
claims that movies released ear-
lier in the year have less chance of
winning Hollywood's big prize.
History seems to bear that out.
Since 1934, when films became
eligible on a calendar-year basis,
18 December releases have won as
best picture. The tally: November,
9; October, 5; September, 4; Au-
gust, 3; July, 3.
Only 11 movies released in
the first six months of the year
have been picked as the best. In-
terestingly, the only January re-
lease to take the too prize was the
classic "Casablanca first seen in
Los Angeles on Jan. 2, 1943. (For
Oscar eligibility, a film must play
at least one week in an L.A. thea-
ter.)
"There's no question that a
year-end release enhances the
possibility of Oscars observes
publicist Booker McClay, who has
conducted campaigns for "E.T.
The Extra-Terrestrial "Out of
Africa" and this year's "Gorillas
in the Mist" for Universal Pictures.
Pirate
Jack Daniels makes Lynchburg a rich town
Continued from page 8 have never known the distillery to
, throw its weight around or inter-
pensions, even beyond the pint of fcn? m any clection or count
whiskey that goes with every decision Not so much as a speed-
employee s paycheck on the first � u-j �
Friday of every month, Good Fri-
day as it is known here.
Every cash register in Lyn-
chburg benefits mightily from the
300,000 tourists a year the distill-
ery draws, but it doesn't stop there.
Back in the hills, for example,
every farmer relies exclusively on
the distillery's mash by-product,
called slop, for cattle feed. "The
thin soil in these hills won't grow
crops says Ray. "All it will pro-
duce is cattle
With few exceptions, though
of about 600 for years.
The visitors actually do see
old-timers in bib overalls sitting
on benches around the town
square, whittling, swapping coon
But there is also the experi- dogs from the back of pickup
ence of 1985. That was long after
Rcagor Motlow's death and long
after he and his three brothers, in
1956, sold the company to the huge
Brown-Forman distillery in Lou-
isville, Ky. It was the year Jack
Daniel's laid off one-fifth of its
work force. The reason given was
an increase in federal taxes which
the company bv itself couldn't
meet.
There is no evidence that
Brown-Forman has interfered in
are not company
trucks. They
props.
On the square, the Lynchburg
Hardware and General Store and
the White Rabbit Saloon are two
main tourist attractions. Both are
owned by the distillery and nei-
ther is what it says it is.
Lem Motlow, Jack Daniel's
nephew, heir and successor, the
fatherof Reagor Motlow, built the
general store in 1921. CHd-timcy
wares from that era, horse collars
the populace appears more than ,dckDaniol.spolicics. 'Theyknow and salvesand such still decorate
content with its lot, and why not?
Unemployment is lower than
any surrounding county and per
capita income, at $15,928, among
the highest in rural Tennessee.
And because the distillery hasbeen
here through good times and bad
since 1866, nobody has the least
fear that Jack Daniel's will ever,
figuratively speaking, go on the
rocks.
Back when Reagor Motlow,
the grand-nephew of Jack Daniel
himself, was president of the
company, his promise was that
anyone in Moore County who
wanted a job could have one at the
distillery. He lived up to that. He
also said anyone who didn't want
a job was welcome to leave the
countv. There's that, too.
'There is that says-Ray Bm
in all mv time in Moore Countv 1
better than to kick a pulling mule
said one longtime employee,
Roger Brashears. But for the past
four years there has existed in
Lynchburg an uncommon element
of uncertainty.
J
And back in the hills, cattle
raisers dependent on that high-
its shelves and walls but they are
not for sale. Coca Cola is, for 10
cents, in a bottle. The only items
the store sells in earnest arc lack
Daniel souvenirs.
As for the saloon, it too has
kept its old-fashioned decor. It
serves sandwiches and lemonade.
Mary Bobo's Boarding House, just
off the square. It is a charming old
white-columned home which
dates from 1867. But it is not a
boarding house, not since Miss
Mary's death, at age 102, six years
ago.
Yet it contributes much to
Lynchburg's down-home mys-
tique. Rather than let it go to ruin,
Jack Daniel's bought it. Lynne
Tolley, a great-grand niece of jack
Daniel himself, serves noonday
dinner there to 65 guests daily �
Southern fare, of course: fried okra,
cheese grits, vegetables from the
garden out back. Iced tea.
Many small towns in Amer-
ica boast that their citizens don't
bother to lock their doors. In Moore
County they don't even bother to
lock the jail.
Athletics!
ECU
Cheerleading, Mikeman
and Mascot Tryouts!
When: April 3-7
Where: ECU Strength Complex
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protein slop are uneasy becauseof It hasn't sold anything stronger
astudvthecompanymadcinl984, since 1903 when Tennessee went
just before the layoffs, when it was dry, 11 years before Prohibition.
looking for new revenue.
It showed that a drying proc-
ess many distillers use to recover
spent mash would allow the
company to sell it on the open
market for nearly 10 times what it
makes distributing the wet prod-
uct to local farmers who come by
and pick it up themselves.
The irony is that Lynchburg
the town Lhat Jack built, and all ol
Moore County, is still dry. UN ell
so is most or Bourbon County
Ky.) The nearest liquor store from
here is in nearby Coffee Count)
yes, Coffee � and anyone in bib
overallson the square will tell you
the door of that store is at a dis-
These are undercurrents in an tance from Lynchburg of 12.3 miles
otherwise rranqtinseaLVrichblirg and 14 steps,
has stayed at a steady population Jack Daniel's also owns Miss
Geraldo rolls with the punches
It began with a call from Dr.
Michael Wilkins, an acquaintance
who had just been fired by Wil-
lowbrook State School on Staten
Island, then the nation's largest
institution for the mentally re-
tarded.
'He had a key. He knew what
Continued from page 8
Of course, the "Geraldo
show, with its lineup of neo-Na-
zis, hookers, and adolescent mur-
derers, isn't exactly a romp in the
park.
"Geraldo lsgood people but 1
don't know how long I'll be able to
do this says Alexander Johnson.
a thoughtful young producer
who's screening hours of kiddie
porn for an upcoming show.
Geraldo understands. Too
many seamy stories and "the
world becomes a place held to-
gether with wire hangers, spit and
chewing gum. That's not an accu-
rate view of the world. But some
of it sticks to you, even after the togivethisup. I am going to come
shower back and come back and come
He makes no apology for back until this is cleaned up
cryingon camera, a habit that dates Wilkins recalls,
back to his early days at WABC Fifteen years and countless
where, less than two years into the stories later, Willowbrook closed.
job there, he tackled the biggest Geraldo's reporting on Willow-
story of his life. He shed many brook won him the George Foster
tears before he was done. Peabodv Award and catapulted
him to the ABC network. He joined
the entertainment division, then
the staff of "2020
In 1985, Roone Arledge pulled
a "2020" segment on Marilyn
Monroe's relationship with the
Kennedys, and Geraldo threw a
tantrum. A less impulsive man
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
Anci they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. It you re
earning a BSNL write: Army TurOpportunities. P.O. Box 7713.
Clifton, N 07015. Or call toll free l-800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE AU YOU CAN BE.
time the guards changed, when I might have stopped to consider
could get inside. I asked what I
would find. He said, 'Children
being abused
That night, Wilkins accompa-
nied Geraldo and a cameraman to
Willowbrook, where they filmed
five minutes inside one of the 30-
odd buildings. Then the camera-
man went outside and threw up.
"Geraldo said, 1 am not going
that he had not yet signed his new
contract before publicly mouth-
ing off at the boss.
"I died of massive, mostly self-
inflicted wounds he wrote in the
April 1986 issue of "Esquire
His obituary was premature.
He soon attempted a comeback as
a free-lancer with "The Mystery of
AJ Capone's Vault
The gangster's vault, opened
with much fanfare on live televi-
sion, came up empty. Mortified,
Geraldo went into hiding, setting
off on what was to be an epic
voyage aboard his 44-foot sloop,
the "New Wave
Jack Daniels is unique
LYNCHBURG. Tenn. (AP) � Dan Call was also a preacher.
This remote corner of the Cum- When Jack Daniel was 14 a
berland hills is not a likely place traveling evangelist named Lady
for major industries to want to Love borrowed Dan Call's pulpit
locate. And the way jack Daniel's
distillery happened to get here is
not apt to be repeated.
Jasper Newton "Jack" Daniel
was born in 1846, the last of 10
children. When he was six his
widowed father, hard pressed,
sent him off to live with a neigh-
bor, Dan Call. Call ran a store on
Louse Creek and needed an ap-
prentice for his black slave, Near-
estGreen, who wasa superb maker son, George, and prospered.
of the store's most prominent A new federal law in 1866
product, whiskey. required all distilleries to register
Navy milks their cow
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) � Academy Farm which they share
Almost 80 years after a typhoid with Bill the Goat, the middies'
outbreak made officials wary of long-horned mascot.
with government tax collectors
and Jack Daniel's became the na-
tion's first. It is celebrated as a
national historic site as America's
and told Dan's congregation that oldest registered distillery
their pastor had better decide
whether to preach or make whis- ��������������
key because in the eyes of the Lord �
he couldn't do both.
Jack bought Dan's still, on �
credit, and went into business. �
When the Civil War ended he
moved his still a few miles to a �
lovely spring outside Lynchburg, �
brought with him Nearest Green's
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
Don't forget to VOTE
for SRA, ARC, and
House Council Offices!
March 28th, 1989
10:00 am - 4:00 pm
'Bring Jour S& Card
Be Sure To Vote!
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FELLOWSHIP
invites you to meet
See JACK, page 9
the local milk supply, the U.S.
Naval Academy isstill running its
own dairy to out milk on the
midshipmen's tables.
The cows don't graze on this
picture-book campus by the Sev-
ern River, but down the road a
few miles is the 865-acre U.S. Naval
The fresh, rich milk they pro-
duce is much in evidence in Kin
Hall, the cavernous wardroom or
dining hall where the entire 4,500-
member brigade takes its meals.
They empty nearly 2,500 of the
blue-and-gold, half-gallon cartons
daily
The Rt. Rev. B. Sidney Sanders
Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina
Wednesday, March 29
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th Street
5:30 pm - Eucharist Bishop Sanders, Celebrant
fellowship supper follozving the service





I
X
10
nnrv v �
M AR( H
Former Cabinet member relates own past
Bl.OOMHEL D Hill ttu Michigan cover noi I been fortunate krwvk nn wnnH " m.uLrtim. t il t,r,i .�-riin i .
Bl OOMHEL.Dllll I
I AI I ic dean i : Mi
Republicans skippod 111�- i
ral oeremom but lu in
as fell as the pre? id I
m as passed In
toGe rgo Bush
I i �
goveinoi r'orm r v
Ivr and on �
w ho made an al
Whiter!
ago : led I ; .
� I
rat- Frank
elt u as ina 1.1
so mam I�� Sl-
nev i .1- sa'
relaxed at i
I tnn
hair
,
Bush ti
ate Bu
Light") mdl

nev v
Coi ps ctoi
mi
I the I
during
n l . put
x w - :
SA . I
porl
5tr n th n �
'� .
k 4
ing tl
: : I
:
M

A student
speaks
Continued from page 8
mr�i I or
.
. �
. :

animal
Hepai
ind neutei
rdertoj ntunwa
M � ui ivanted p - ai
treat lordest
ECl SETA has . ead
countered some setbacks in its
young career. They planned to
have a booth s I up in Pitt I iza
concernu . ini
project was set tor thi; past �i
end
The mall man (called
pitz back and told i;m that, due
to pressure from some ol the stores
in the mall that sell fursand leather
products, SETA could not set up
their display even though the
booth planned was n isedon
the fur and leather industry
Another exhibition planned
forGreenville's Friend t theEarth
Ecology Daj ivas 1
The Dav planners wanted to con
centrate solely on ecological is
sues, though spit argues that
some animal related issues, espe
ciallv those d "ling tvith meat
consumption,directl) in oh ethe
environment.
However, Spit is n I dis
maved He says that the confer-
ence prepared him for these kii :
of disappointment and he is ready
to forge ahead with new cam
paigns
180 Proof
Continued from page 8
Zeppelin to The Romantu - t i
Motley (rue Hiver said
180 Prool has played at n
parties and gatherings over I
past three years. They have played
at the Attic and () Rex k f Her
downtown and have also pla
at a lot of fraternity parties
Oliver said that playing atj
fraternity parties has really helped
the band to pain recognition Ol-
iver and Richardson are members!
of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternitj
On April 15, 180Proof will I
performing at Rockefeller's
downtown
As for future plans for 180
Proof, the band hopes to continue
making music for a long time.
After each member gets a
degree from his respective major,
they hope to take the band out to
California
"It's always in the back of our
minds Oliver said
lit higan go ernoi
14 vears?
es, bet .use t t Romn . the
i i nment no longei is tIn lu
tion 11.America s problems
I he most povvei ful pi ol I m
ing tun. e on Eai th is the oi
ar.i.vJ. oluntarv coop
i tree people he u s
Since 197-4 R mne !
. ling hau man of Y
National Centei an
. ased in rlii igt i . .
:� dii at d toeni i mragin
teerism
i lis goal is to create a v ohm
uer (. enter in ever) communitv
' at has a I nited Way. The cen-
ters recruit and place volunteers
in local organizations
I concluded some years ago
w had barely tapped the prob
lem solving potential of people
helping people is volunteers
sc,s Romne who created the
nation s first I nited Way in I V
iroitin 1948 T concluded we had
rganized the mono) part ol vol
inteering better than we had or
i;anized the people part
Nearh every week finds
. 'nun on the road somew here
r ing to add to the 350 Volunteer
� enters already established
i "n this winter sday, Romney
had Hist returned from an eight
mile walk, a regimen he follows
even on Michigan's coldest days.
In th summer, he adds a round of
. It at nearbv Bloomfield Hills
( ountn �. lub to his exc rcise rou
tine
1 d n'tei en lu e at thritis in
little linger he s.n s "I've
been fortunate knock on wood marketing ol the first
His modern, secluded home compact economy car on the
is on the edge of ,i private pond American market the Kami I, i
that is Stocked with goldfish and "We forced the Big Three into
fringed with pine trees. In his small car production he says
study, he is surrounded by a wall The company's stock went
of lx)ks a signed photograph of liwinSfia share to $90 a share w itl.
former President Gerald Ford and him at the helm AMC was pur
rime magazine covers bearing his chased by Chrysler Corp in An
own picture KUst 1987.
Romney was born uly 8 11hi7, "1 ee lacocca has had to lose
in Chihuahua Mexico, where his down plants 1 used to make su
parents and other Mormons had cessful Romney sa s
moved toavoid I S lawsrestrict
ing the practice ol polygamy
1 legrew up in Idaho and Sail
I akeCitv. w here he met his future
wife Lenore while in high school
1 Ic was 17 and she was 1 The
were married seven years later
1 heir 57 year marriage has
produced four children, 22 grand
children and eight great grand
children.
Romnt s tt nd d four col
legt s but ik ,rr graduated f le
-pent two iars as a Mormon
missionary in England and Scot
Romney used to rent Milwau
kee County Stadium to gathei
AMC employees and their fami
lies tor a meeting
"We'd talk to them ibout l. ,
ivi were confronted with Rom
ne recalls, adding that moden
corporations and labor unions an
guilty ol thinking nl ol � agi
and profits.
lomne s tirst
IK y
( ame in 1957, n, hen he hi aded
panel to stud) problem, in il.
Detroit s hool;
In 1959, he en ited Citi
� nor sin e 1i;
koinnt ,sp �'� i ih
rapidlyafterhewnil' 1,ii
in 1966 1 le t" ,� iitiI i.i rui
the presidi n y
On a Sipteml�ei197 tt l
i n i n ter.1
startled then.it iin1i
had o ri gi i i1) ii�� �
�I IIJ' , ! �
brail vmil
it ,i t'11r o
in .
1 i e ti:
before tl: i
r . � it 4 . . ,l i �11
: nomi
Riv k U i
ii tei
!
in li
the last I I
ivhen it appear 1
! � ; :
I
' ll
I
'
ilr �
: -
land, giving speeches in Trafalgar u r Michigan, a bipartisan .
Square nd I dv Park
Romney's first exposure i,
politics uas m 1929 as .in aid, t,
S� n 1 )a id I Walsh of Ma a
-otts m
v
ton
fter that were . '
COA and the Aluminum Var�
AsstH tali i I lis first job in I V
troit t. ame in 1939 u hen he v as
local managt i t the ut. nn bih
Manufa. turer? ss iation 11,
latt i hi. anu c,( ral manai ei but
left in 1948 to join A? 1' h re h
e entu lh becami chaii man
At AMC, he oversav th�
i
that later spearheaded the dnw
tor a constitutional com ention t.
rew rite the state's constiti I
because ol a deadkx k In t n
the pov riiv .r and Li lature
Romne) sfirsti andida.
in 1 961. w hen he ran suc( t
is a delegate to the constitute
n ention
"We were the first state sint t
�- d N ar I to l ,vi ite a �.
onstitution nd ha e it ad
h a vote of the people, he a
Ai ar Liter, he was� le t d a
yu higan's first Republn an .
DON'T FORGET
To Send your
letters in
The "Big E
is back!
? � �
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1
T
� � �� tm
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28,1969
Former Cabinet member
BLOOMF1ELD HILLS, Mich
(AP) � The dean of Michigan's
Republicans skipped the inaugu-
ral ceremony, but his influence
was felt as the presidential mantle
was passed from Ronald Reagan
to George Bush.
George Romney, the former
governor, former Cabinet mem-
ber and one-time auto executive
who made an abortive run for the
White House himself two decades
ago, decided he didn't want to
fight the crowds.
"I've been going to inaugu-
ralssinceFranklin Delano Roosev
the Michigan governor's chair in been fortunate, knock on wood marketing of the first successful emor since 1948.
14 years? His modern, secluded home compact economy car on the Romney's political stock rose
Yes, because for Romney the is on the edge of a private pond American market�the Rambler, rapidly after he won his third term
government no longer is the solu that is stocked with goldfish and "We forced the Big Three into in 1966. He began to eye a run at
tion to America's problems. fringed with pine trees. In his small car production he says. the presidency.
"Themost powerful problem study, he is surrounded by a wall The company's stock went On a September 1967 televi
solving force on Earth is the or of books, a signed photograph of from $5 a share to $90 a share with
ganized, voluntary cooperation of former PresidentGerald Ford,and him at the helm AMC was pur-
a free people he says. Time magazine covers bearing his chased by Chrysler Corp. in Au-
Sincel974, Romney has been own picture. gust 1987.
founding chairman of Volunteer Romney was bom July 8,1907, "Lee Iacocca has had to close
� the National Center, an organi- in Chihuahua, Mexico, where his down plants I used to make suc-
zationbased in Arlington, Va , that parents and other Mormons had cessfuL" Romney says,
isdedicated toencouraging volun- moved to avoid US. laws restrict- Romney used to rent Milwau-
teerism. ing the practice of polygamy. kee County Stadium to gather
His goal is to create a Volun- He grew up in Idaho and Salt AMC employees and their fami-
elt was inaugurated. I've been to teer Center in every community Lake City, where he met his future "es for a meeting,
so many the 81-year-old Rom that has a United Way. The cen- wife, Lenore, while in high school. "We'dtalktothemaboutwhat
ney wassayingtheotherdayashe ters recruit and place volunteers He was 17 and she was 15. They we were confronted with Rom-
relaxed at his home, looking fit in local organizations. were married seven years later. ney recalls, adding that modem
and trim despite his snow-white "I concluded some years ago Their 57-year marriage has corporations and labor unions are
nair- we had barely tapped the prob- produced four children, 22 grand- guilty of thinking only of wages
Romney worked with the lem-solving potential of people children and eight great-grand- and profits.
Bush transition team to help initi helping people, as volunteers children. Romney's first public service
ate Bush's "Thousand Points of says Romney, who created the Romney attended four col- came in 1957, when he headed a
Light"programandtoshape three nation's first United Way in De- leges, but never graduated. He panel to study problems in the
volunteer programs which Rom- troit in 1948. "I concluded we had spent two years as a Mormon Detroit schools,
ney wants to see headed by Peace organized the money part of vol- missionary in England and Scot- In 1959, he created Citizens
Corps Director Loret Ruppe. unteering better than we had or- land, giving speeches in Trafalgar for Michigan, a bipartisan group
At Romney's urging. Bush ganized the people part" Square and Hyde Park. that later spearheaded the drive
announced the three programs Nearly every week finds Romney's first exposure to for a constitutional convention to
during the campaign. Romney on the road somewhere, politics was in 1929 as an aide to rewrite the state's constitution
trying to add to the 350 Volunteer Sen. David 1. Walsh of Massachu-
setts in Washington.
After that were stints at AL-
COA and the Aluminum Wares
sion interview show, Romney
startled the nation by saying he
had originally supported the war
in Vietnam because he had been
brainwashed by the military dur-
ing a tour of the Southeast Asian
country.
Five months later, shortly
before the New Hampshire pri-
mary, Romney withdrew from the
race.
"It wasn't because of my posi-
tion on Vietnam or anything I'd
held from 1969 to 1972, when he
resigned to return to the private
sector.
He returned to poli ticsduricg
the last presidential campaign
when it appeared strife between
the forces of Bush, former televi-
sion evangelist Pat Robertson and
Rep. Jack Kemp of New York
would rip the Michigan GOP party
apart.
"He was quick to stand up
and remind people, publicly and
privately, that there was a bigger
fight ahead of us in the fall says
Michigan Republican Party Chair
man Spencer Abraham.
Romney found the campaign
disappointing, with thecandidates
afraid to discuss issues for fear of
said there was no way I could ,osi votes
get the nomination fighting both . , ,
Rockefeller and Richard Nixon " n� � " c �V�JJ rcpub.
KT. . . i j r c' "e ys- We have a special
Nixon later picked Romney -barrel democracy
to be secretary oflHousing and andweha7en't adjusted our inst,
Urban Development, a post he lutions ��
Romney puts encouraging
volunteer work at the top of his
list of accomplishments.
"As a rcsul t of my experiences
I've concluded that the most im-
portant thing I ci.n do is to
strengthen the whole volunteer
aspect of American life he says
More important than reviv-
the fortunes
Centers already established.
On this winter's day, Romney
had just returned from an eight-
mile walk, a regimen he follows
even on Michigan's coldest days.
In the summer, he adds a round of
golf at nearby Bloomfield Hills
Country Club to his exercise rou-
tine.
I don't even have arthritis in
"I've
because of a deadlock between
the governor and Legislature.
Romney's first candidacy was
in 1961, when he ran successfully
mg the fortunes of American
Motors Corp. in the 1960s?
More important that spear- my little finger he says
heading a citizens' effort to strea m
line the state constitutibn m 1
More important than becom-
ing the first Republican to capture
A student
speaks
Continued from page 8
ist's manual" and other literature
and impressed on him the need
for doing research and getting the
facts right for activist campaigns.
At the convention, Spitz also
received instructions on starting
SETA chapters, which he has put
to use at ECU. Spitz hopes to sen-
sitize ECU students and Green-
ville citizens to the treatment of
animals.
He particularly advocates the
spaying and neutering of pets in
order to prevent unwanted litters.
Most unwanted pets are mis-
treated or destroyed.
ECU SETA has already en-
countered some setbacks in its
young career. They planned to
have a booth set up in Pitt Plaza
concerning animal rights. The
project was set for this past week-
end.
The mall management called
Spitz back and told him that, due
to pressure from some of the stores
in the mall that sell furs and leather
products, SETA could not set up
their display even though the
booth planned was not focused on
the fur and leather industry.
Another exhibition planned
for Greenville's Friend of the Earth
Ecology Day was discouraged.
The Day planners wanted to con-
centrate solely on ecological is-
sues, though Spitz argues that
some animal-related issues, espe-
cially those dealing with meat
consumption, directly involve the
environment.
However, Spitz is not dis-
mayed. He says that the confer-
ence prepared him for these kinds
of disappointments and he is ready
to forge ahead with new cam-
paigns.
180 Proof
Continued from page 8
Zeppelin to The Romantics toT,
Motley Crue Oliver said.
180 Proof has played at many I
parries and gatherings over the
past three years. They have played
at the Attic and CTRockefeller's
downtown and have also played j
at a lot of fraternity parties.
Oliver said that playing atj
fraternity parties has really helped
the band to gain recognition. Ol-
iver and Richardson are members
of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity.
On April 15,180 Proof will be I
performing at �'Rockefeller's
downtown.
As for future plans for 1801
Proof, the band hopes to continue
making musk for a long time.
After each member gets ai
degree from his respective major,
they hope to take the band out to
Catifornia.
If s always in the back of our
Oliver said.
Association. His first job in De- as a delegate to the constitutional
troit came in 1939, when he was convention,
local manager of the Automobile "We were the first state since
Manufacturers Association. He World War I to rewrite a whole
laterbecamegeneral manager, but constitution and have it adopted
left in 1948 to join AMC, where he by a vote of the people he says,
eventually became chairman. A year later, he was elected as
At AMC, he oversaw the Michigan's first Republican gov-
OJVT FORGET.
To Send your
letters in
The "Big E
is back!
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 28. 1989 l'ACl- II
Eason packs punch
Pirates sweep pair
from conference foe
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sli( Writer
Tommy Eason drove the
game-winning run both times in
the doubleheader against confer-
ence foe William & Mary on Sun-
day as the East Carolina Pirates
extended their winning streak to
five games.
The game was originally
planed for Saturday but foul
weather moved it to Sunday- ECU
then played a third game in the
three-game series on Monday.
Eason extended his hitting
streak to eight as he had hits in
each game while on the road
against the Tribe and pushed his
batting avergae to .407.
Good hitting from Eason and
Calvin Brown, who had a hit in
both games and increased his hit-
ting streak to seven in a row, and
solid pitching by Tim Langdon
and Jake Jacobs led to Pirate
domination in illiamsburg, Va.
East Carolina crushed William
& Man- in the first game 14-1.
They then continued their win-
ning streak later that day as they
took the Tribe 10-4.
Langdon won the first game
for the Pirates as he increased his
record to 2-2. He struck out five
batters while walking two and
gave up just two hits.
Jacobs extended his record to
4-0 with his victory in the second
game striking out six batters and
walking two. He had seven hits
throughout the game.
Jacobs is currently second in
the CA A's for pitching with his 4-
0 record and si ts right behind team-
mate Jonathan Jenkins whose rec-
ord stands at 5-0. Jacobs is also
second in the conference for strike
outs with 33 strike outs in 30.7
innings and is seventh in the con-
ference for earned run average
posting a 3.52.
ECU wasted no time in the
game against the Tribe when in
the first inning, Eason hit a hom-
erun to the center to give the Pi-
rates an early 1-0 lead.
The Pirates then added two
more runs in the third inning when
Eason hit a double, allowing John
Adams to score. Eason then moved
to third and scored on a sacrifice
fly by John Gast.
the only time the struggling
William & Mary could manage
points on the board was in the
fifth inning when Jim McCandless
scored on a grounder by Dave
Ryan. When McCandless singled
and Keith Yatcs walked, they were
both moved up on a sacrifice fly
before the grounder by Ryan.
The Tribe knew they were
having a bad day when in the
seventh inning the Pirates rallyed
at bat scoring 11 runs. John Gast
hit a three-run homer to end the
scoring, but not before ECU took
advantage of four walks and five
singles. Fourteen players faced
William & Mary pitching that
inning.
The late game in the double-
header opened with East Carolina
again getting some quick points
on the board. The Pirates jumped
to a 4-0 lead in the first inning
when Eason doubled to bring in
John Thomas who had singled and
stole second and third. Brown
brought in Cauble and Eason on a
double but then moved to third
baseaftera wild pitch. SteveGodin
then hit a single to bring in Brown.
The Tribe scored one run in
the third, but the Pirates would
answer to that in the fourth when
both Cauble and Eason walked.
Brown then loaded the bases when
he singled and Gast would come
to the plate to hit a sacrifice fly to
bring Cauble.
William & Mary threatened
in the bottom of the fourth when
they had three runs to close the
Pirate lead to 5-4. McCandless and
Yates both hit a single and Mc-
Candless then scored on a hit by
Jimmy Adkins. Yates and Adkins
were then singled in by Bobby
Knox.
The Bucs however would not
remain idle for long as they added
three more to their score in the
fifth to widen the score to 8-4.
The final runs by ECU would
come in the sixth. The Pirates
would score their final two runs
when Brown touched the plate '
after singling, moving to second
on a sacrifice fly and then being
singled in by Mike Andrews.
Kevin Riggs, who walked, was
brought in by a wild pitch.
ECU leads in both pitching
and batting in conference action
They average a .318 in batting
including 16 homeruns and 126
RBI. In pitching, the Pirates boast
a 2.41 ERA. Second in the confer-
ence both battingandpitchingare
the Dukes of James Madison as
they carry a .288 average in bat
ting and a 3.79 ERA in pitching
The wins move the Bucs to 15-
2 overall while maintaining sec-
ond place in the conference at 4-1
William & Mary stands at 0-2 in
the CAA's and is in fifth place.
UNC-Wilmington hold first
place in the conference as they
See PIRATES, page 14
John Adams takes a big suing in a game tin I
earlier this season. Adams and his teammah
2 after taking two from William ,v Mar)
by J.D. Whitmire ECU Photo 1 ab).
Intramurals swing and spike in spring schedule
(IRS) - Intramural independ-
ent teams swam strong in the 1989
swim meet as SHOTS and Biondi
and Friends captured the title in
the women's and men's divisions.
In the women's events, SHOTS
swam away with twelvefirst
places and several second places
as well to wash away the other
female squads. They totaled 116
jjemts with theirJjySHftSSk1"
Tors scoring onlv 36.
Seta Tau Alpha found the
second place shot followed by-
Alpha Delta Pi. Michele Turner
and Pat Olsen lead the way for
SHOTS with three individual
event first place finishes each. Jen-
nifer Dolan and Patricia Grand
took firsts in their events as well
with teammates Barbara Berry,
Tammy Childcrs and Jane Wilson
rounding out the less than shotry
attack.
j thin rrvm'i f" eate filO1
YndTricnds totaled TSpoints to
edge ahead of Sigma Phi Epsilon.
Biondi and Company took 6 first
place spots while Sig Ep pulled to-
gether four second place finishes
and a first in the 100 meter
breaststroke by Terri McNulty.
Members of Biondi and Friends
include: Don Chamberlain, An-
drew DuVall, Stew Esposito,
Stephen Halstead, Dennis Hocutt,
Keith Kaut, Kent Lewark, John Sa-
bat, Ed wardStephens, Brian Smith
With regular season starting
out with a bang, intramural soft-
ballers are looking forward to an
upsetting year as several of last
years champions will have to
prove their strength once more in
the hopes of capturing a glance at
the all campus title. At the onset
here is this years batting order of
top picks.
3. Sump thin Special
4. The Naturals
5. Sigma Phi F.plsion
Women
1. Flunkeez
2. Wahoo Stinkies
3. Pump Mammas
4. Belk Babes
5. Zeta Tau Alph i
,���� -
Softball Strikes Big!
Men
1. Renegades
2. Sultans of Swing
. ast���"�
ball �

for the '
1 i I � �
.
4 Silent
Co-Rec Volleyballs Sptk
siai
Hot hitting Eason honored
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Staff Writer
Marv 15 1 and 10-4 during
week's at don.
ast
ECU'S Tommy Eason earned
CAA baseball player of the week
Monday, after helping to lead the
Pirates to three victories last week
The freshman catcherout-
fielder had a .625 (5-8) batting
percentage for the week including
two doubles and a homerun for a
1.25 slugging percentage. He also
had two walks, four RBI and five
runs scored.
The Pirates beat non-confer-
ence foe Davis & Elkins 9-3 and
defeated The Tribe of William &
in b
ntal t'nh
liam Si
hit .
. .
lie, .
n
Tommy Eason
ni I
AN.
in rt i v
kell i ?
1
player
�d Pat
Aerobics and toning classes are just two of the things offered through the intramurals department.
Other services and facilities are available to student and staff alike (Photo by J.D. Whitmire ECU
Photo Lab)�
Team comes together for ictory
INTRAMURAL RECREATION
FACILITY HOURS
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Mon.&Wed. 12:00 noon-1:30 pm
Friday
Mon.&Tues.
Wed & Thurs
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
SWIMMINC MEMORIAL WEIGHT ROOM
11:30 am-1:30 pm
4:00 pm-9:00 pm
. 3:00 pm-9:00 pm
3:00 pm-7:00 pm
11:00 am-5:00 pm
12:00 noon-5:00 pm
MING IS WEIGHT ROOM
MEMORIAL
POOL a
Mon- Thurs
Mon- Fri 7:00 am- 8:00 am pm
MonFri. 12:00 noon-1:30 pm priday
Mon.&Wed. 3:00 pm-9:00 pm Saturday
Tues.&Thurs. 3:00pm-9:30 pm sunday
7:30 pm- 9:00 pm
Friday 3:00 pm-7:00 pm
Saturday 11:00 am-5:00pm M1NGES SWIMMING POOL
Sunday 12:00 noon-5:00 pm
ByCLAUDlNEWURST
Sport VNntei
10:00 am- 9:00
10:00 am-7:00 pm
11:00 am-5:00 pm
12:00 noon-5:00 pm
Mon. - Thurs
pm
Friday
Sunday
3:00 pm- 8:45
GARRLTT WEIGHT ROOM
. , . MonThurs.
3:00 pm-6:45 pm . c
� f�� Fri&Sun.
12:00 noon-5:00pm
3:00 pm- 9:00 pm
1:00 pm-5:00 pm
MonWed.Fri. 7:30pm-9:30pm
Tues.& Thurs. 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
Sunday 12:00 noon-5:00 pm
ton, which will be played today
and Campbell University, to be
played on Thursdav
However the men were able
to play their game last Friday,
against Radford College. The Pi-
rates defeated Radford 9-0. Coach
had a
opi
Mi
. id She!
impn eiiu i
the doubles tt.
also Ov i.
to come tog
i to get so
ichis
I
ting
I we i - d
The men's tennis team was
only able to play one of their sched-
uled games last week. Once again
the weather caused rescheduling
of matches against UNC-WUming- Bill Moore said, "Andre Moreau
Big 10 places pair
Four teams headed to Seattle
Ruggers get high seed
Twenty-two rugby teams
from across the State, including
East Carolina University, will vie
for the championship of the an-
nual North Carolina Rugby Un-
ion State Tournament on Satur-
day and Sunday, April 15th and
16th, at Smith High School in
Greensboro.
Top-seeded UNC-Chapel Hill
and second-seeded North Caro-
lina State University are favored
to meed for the championship in
the College Division. The two
squads have been ranked one and
two in North Carolina during most
of the past year. Appalachian State,
seeded third, and East Carolina,
seeded fourth, are expected to
provide strong challenges for the
title.
In the Club Division, defend-
ing champion Charlotte is top
seeded, but expected to see strong
challenges from Raleigh, Triad,
and 1988 national military cham-
pion Camp Lejeune.
Scheduled to make appear-
ances at either the Tournament or
the NCRU Awards Banquet to be
held Saturday night at the Greens-
boro Sheraton are State Senator
George B. Daniel of Yanceyville
and Greensboro Mayor V.M.
Nussbaum, Jr. Senator Daniel,
who represents Caswell and Ala-
mance Counties, played rugby as
See RUGBY, page 14
(AP) �To get from their
campus in Durham, N.C to the
NCAA Final Four, the Duke Blue
Devils prefer to go via New Jer-
sey.
The Blue Devils advanced to
the Final Four for the third time in
four years Sunday by beating
Georgetown 85-77 in the NCAA
East Regional championship.
Duke has earned all three of its
Final Four trips by winning the
East Regional at East Rutherford,
N.J and is 6-0 in Regional games
at the Meadowlands.
"This has been a great place
for us to play Duke's Danny
Ferry said.
Duke, 28-7, plays Seton Hall,
30-6, which beat Nevada-Las
Vegas 84-61 on Saturday in the
West final. In the second game,
Michigan, 28-7, plays Illinois, 31-
4. The Wolverines beat Virginia
102-65 Saturday in the Southeast
final, while the Mini beat Syracuse
89-86 Sunday to win the Midwest
John Thompson, coach of the
second-ranked I loyas, once again
lost with a favorite. Only six
monthsago, his U.S. Olympic team
lost to the Soviet Union in the
semifinals.
The ninth-ranked Blue Devils
led 75-61 with 5:41 remaining, but
Georgetown, 29-5, scored 12
straight points to cut the deficit to
two before Duke regained control
by making 10 of 12 free throws.
"We made some mistakes to
let them back in it, but Georgetown
forced those mistakes Duke
coach Mike Krzyzewski said
"Then we made our free throws at
the end, which hasn't been a
strength of ours
Christian Laettner beat
Alonzo Mourning in the battle of
freshman centers. Laettner made
nine of 10 shots and scored 24
points whil ' tjust
11 points a hod near
the end of th
Them ingfot
me was thai ked my shot
early and I got the ball back and
put it in 1 aettner sai I
Mourning i thirl team -11-
Amencan. too . - ' respoi-
sibihtv tor the l feat.
"1 was a big i why we
were behind in the final minutes
said Mourning, who sat on me
bench during the in that got
theHoyasba k ii thegame. "I
was a biv; reasi lost
M1DW1 -
Illinois 89
Kenny Ba I points
and Nick An I as
the Illini ov came a 1-point
deficit and avi meed to the Final
Four for the fu si ars.
See NCAA, pie- 1






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28,1989
Eagles capture first title
NC Central crusies to victory
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP)�
Never mind the record winning
margin. Coach Mike Bernard's
defense was his best offense as
North Carolina Central captured
its first NCAA Division II basket-
ball championship.
The Eagles, led by Antione
Sifford with 21 points and nine
rebounds, smothered Southeast
Missouri, 73-46, holding the Indi-
ans scoreless from the field for the
last 7:58 of the first half.
The largest previous victory
was in 1957 when Weaton, 111
beat Kentucky Wesleyan 89-65.
"When we go out on the
floor there is one thing we do and
that is play man-to- man defense
from buzzer to buzzer' said Ber-
nard.
'That's our forte. We live and
die with it
Over the season, the 13 th-
ranked Eagles were the best de-
fensive team in Division II, hold-
ing their opponents to 38 percent
shooting.
"I basically believe in ball-
control offense, but if we have a
chance to break, we'll break. That's
the type of offense I grew up with
from all the coaches I played for
said Bernard, who was a high
school star in Brockton and played
on the Kentucky State team that
won the NAIA championship in
1970.
The championship game was
over early as North Carolina
Central ran up 12 straight points
to take a 42-20 half time lead, while
frustrating No. 8 Southeast Mis-
souri, which had been averaging
85 points a game.
Dominique Stephens, who
had kept the Eagles hopes alive
with a foul shot after time had
expired in their 58-57 quarterfinal
victory over Sacred Heart, started
the spurt with a two handed dunk.
Senior guard Miles Clarke,
who was named the tournament's
most outstanding player, rounded
it off with a rebound basket and a
layup at the buzzer after stealing
an inbound pass.
"We played hard, but we shot
the ball terribly said Southeast
Missouri coach Ron Shumate.
"And there's a reason for it. They
made us miss
"I don't remember a team that
I've coached in all my years, in-
cluding five years of high school,
that was held to 46 points said
Shumate, whose 1977 Tennessee-
Chattanooga team won the Divi-
sion II title. "North Carolina Cen-
tral deserves the championship
Southeast Missouri, out-re-
bounded 26-9 in the first half and
44-33 for the game, closed to within
12 points early in the second half.
But the Hagles regained con-
trol and extended their lead to 66-
40 with six minutes left on a dunk
by Stephens, one of seven walk-
ons on the team that lost its top
scorer and rebounder Derrick Leak
to a knee injury in the 11 th game of
the season.
Dwayne Rutherford had 11
points to lead Southern Missouri,
which ended its season 28-4.
Clarke added 15 points and
Stephens 12 for North Carolina
Central. The Eagles 28-7 finish was
the best since future Boston Celtic
and Hall of Famer Sam Jones
starred for North Carolina Cen-
tral in the 1950's.
Billikens weather storm
Upsets set stage for NIT semis
NEW YORK (AP) � The St.
Louis Billikens have come a long
way since Rich Grawer's first sea-
son as basketball coach.
"I remember going to our last
ballgame that year with only six
players, and two of them fouled
out in the last two minutes
Grawcr said. "And to show you
how bad we were, we played bet-
ter with four players
That 1982-83 team went 5-23.
Six years later, Grawer has guided
the Billikens to a 26-9 record and
the semifinals of the National
Invitation Tournament.
St. Louis plays Michigan State
and St. John's meets Alabama-Bir-
mingham tonight at Madison
Square Garden, with the winners
advancing to Wednesday night's
championship game.
The Billikens rallied from 12
points down to beat Wisconsin in
the second round and overcame a
20-point deficit to edge New
Mexico in the quarterfinals.
"A Billiken is basically an
Eskimo good-luck charm
Grawer explained. "Ifyourubhis
rummy, it's supposed tobringyou
good luck. Well, we've been rub-
bing that tummy an awful lot the
last two weeks
St. Louis, which plays in the
little-publicized Midwestern Col-
legiate Conference, is looking for-
ward to its moment in the New
York spotlight.
"The NIT has done wonders
for our program Grawer said.
"We've won 83 games in the last
four years, but not many people
knew about us until now
The Billikens are led by junior
forward Anthony Bonncr, who
averaged 15.9 points and 10.6
rebounds in the regular season.
"He's presents a big problem
for us Michigan State coach Jud
Hcathcote said. "He's 6-8 and
he's very active
Michigan State, 18-13, finished
nearthebottomintheBigTcn.But
the Spartans beat Wisconsin in
their regular-season finale and
advanced to the NIT semifinals
with victories over Kent State,
Wichita State and Villanova.
"Quptearrvis-young, our team-
is small and our team is not physi-
cal Heathcote said, "but we do a
lot of things well
Ten years ago, Magic Johnson
led the Spartans to the NCAA
championship. This year's squad
also features a talented sophomore
guard, 6-foot-6 Steve Smith, but
that's where the comparison ends.
"The 1979 team was a great
team Heathcote said. "This is a
good team that could be great in a
year or two
St. John's and Alabama-Bir-
mingham set up their meeting
with tough road victories in the
quarterfinals. ThoRedmen, 18-13,
overcame a 13-point deficit to beat
Ohio State in overtime.
"We were wounded, but not
dead St. John's coach Lou Cnr-
nesccca said.
UAB, 21-11, beat defending
champion Connecticut by six
points.
"When you beat Connecticut
at Storrs, it's like beating the Rus-
sians in Moscow Carncsecca
said. "Napoleon couldn't win up
there
Alabama-Birmingham gets
another road test against St. John's
The Redmen play several game
each year at Madison Square
Garden, just a short subway ride
from the school's campus.
"It's always nice to be close to
home UAB coach Gene Bartovv
said. "It gives them a little advan-
tage, but I don't think it will make
a big difference
Carnesccca agrees.
"Both teams will get the same
treatment he said. "When we
play at the Garden, it's almost like
a road game because the refs go
out of their way to be fair
Wallace survives trouble
RICHMOND. Va. (AP) -
Rusty Wallace has the formula for
winning down almost to perfec-
tion.
The hard-charging driver
somehow survives trouble in the
early going, stays with the leaders
until late in the race, then uses a
final caution period and a fresh set
of tires as a launching pad to vic-
tory.
He won Sunday's Pontiac400
at Richmond International Race-
way that way - just as he did a race
earlier this season at Rockingham.
N.C.
In each of those victories, it
was Alan Kulwacki who gave up
the lead to Wallace and wound up
second.
"If it wasn't for that (last)
caution flag, Alan would have won
the race Wallace said. "The way
his car was set up, his tires were
real good after 15 to 20 laps.
"Alan was just unfortunate he
had a car that wouldn't run fast in
the first 10 to 12 laps and I had a
car that did Wallace added.
"That's the way it goes
Kulwicki survived a blown
tire and spin on lap 188 of the 300-
mile, 400-lap race, as well as two
stop-and-go penalties for running
a stop sign at the end of pit road
during the ensuing caution pe-
riod.
He took control of the race on
lap 267 and led for the next 104
trips around the three-quarter-
mile, D-shaped oval, building a
margin of about 10 seconds over
Wallace. Then Michael Waltrip
scraped the wall in turn four, leav-
ing debris on the track and bring-
ing out a caution flag.
That brought Wallace back to
the front, but the tenacious
Kulwicki was leading again when
the last of 12 caution periods in the
race began on lap 380 after Dick
Trickle blew an engine and spun
in turn two.
Then Wallace beat both
Kulwicki and Dale Earnhardt out
of the pits after each changed four
tires under the yellow flag on lap
381.
Kulwicki managed to get past
Earnhardt on lap 387, but Wallace
drove his Pontiac Grand Prix
across the finish line .41 seconds
ahead of Kulwicki's Ford Thun-
derbird.
"We came back to the point
that eventually we were the fast-
est car the frustrated Kulwicki
said. "It looked like we had the
race won, and then we had all
those yellows.
"I used to be happy with sec-
ond, and that was a good run for
us,but we had this race won. The
breaks just didn't go our way
Wallace had his own prob-
lems, making a series of mid-race
pit stops while his team tried to
figure out an apparent problem
with the right-side tires.
"It turned out to be a malfuc-
tioning air-gun Wallace said. "It
took couple of stops until we fig-
ured it out. It was not only tight-
ening the lug nuts on the right-
rear tire to about half of what it
was supposed to be.
"I didn't have the dominant
car today, but we stayed out there
and won. This was a team effort.
Everybody had a hand in winning
it
The victory was the 12th of his
career and the sixth in the last nine
starts for Wallace.
Summer Postions Available
Assistant News Editor
Copy Editor
Features Intern Editor
Sports Editor �
Apply now at the East Carolinian offices. Assistant Sports Editor
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x





1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28, 1989 13
;
i
S
1
I
Mourning takes blame
Georgetown freshman feels the heat

��
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP) � All season long, starting
in December against Shenandoah
and St. Leo, through the Big East
showdowns with Syracuse and
Seton Hall, on into the NCAA
tournament, ambitiousopponents
would drive the lane against
Georgetown and Alonzo Mourn-
ing would swat their shots away.
He was like some kind of giant
goaltender, a freshman Gulliver
playing against overmatched Lil-
liputians accumulating a school
record 160 blocked shots.
And then on Sunday, with a
Final Four berth on the line, the
Lilliputians got even.
Ninety-one seconds into the
e,ame against Duke, Mourning
rejected a shot by Christian La-
ettner. No surprise there. What
happened next, however , was a
littledifferent from whathad gone
on before. Laettner undaunted by
Mourning, merely grabbed the ball
and went right back to the basket
for two points. Now Laettner, at 6-
foot-10, is no Lilliputian. He'salso
no Mourning. But this was a state-
ment that the Blue Devils would
not be intimidated, not on this
dav, not even by the freshman
hotshot, a third team All-Ameri-
can who had anchored the Hoyas
to a 29-4 season.
Over and over, Duke went
right after Georgetown's man in
the middle and discovered that he
was really merely mortal, some-
thing Big East opponents had
occasionally doubted.
Often they ventured into his
area only to find that Gulliver was
not there, sometimes left behind
in the transition game, sometimes
even lifted from the lineup by
Coach John Thompson.
"I wasn't into the game
Mourning would say later1
didn't get back on defense. I didn't
run the floor well. 1 felt like I was
moving in slow motion. I just
didn't get clicking like I wanted. 1
have no one to blame but myself for the Lilliputians. A few mo-
The exclamation-point for his ments later, Mourning was back
troubles came with less than 10 on the bench where he would stay
minutes to play in a game Duke for the remainder of the game,
would win 85-77. Phil Hender- Even when Sam Jefferson � not
son, whose spindly legs look like exactly smaller or mobile at 6-9
, . , , and 210 pounds� fouled out of
toothpicks, came zooming down
the middle of the court on a direct
line for the land of Mourning.
And he dunked the basket-
ball, dunked it right over Gulliver
in the finest "In your face tradi-
tion of the schoolyard.
Duke's bench exploded with
the emotion of the shot and the
moment.
"I never saw a play like that
said Quin Snyder, a little bewil-
dered by it all.
The workmanlike Henderson,
perhaps the least flamboyant
player on the floor, said he thought
to himself, " Hey, you blocked
five, six, seven of our shots. This
one, you're not gonna block
By then, Duke was sitting on a
lead and the dunk triggered a 15-
5 run that put the Blue Devils in
charge. It also neutralized
Mourning,who spent long
stretches on the Georgetown
bench and wound up playing just
11 minutes and scoring just three
points in the second half.
"Alonzo appeared winded,
and I tried to give him a lot of
breathers, "Thompson
said. "They had a lot of their big
people popping out on the pe-
rimeter. Alonzo is more of a goal-
tender. And when we got behind,
we needed a smaller more mobile
lineup
Georgetown was not done,
though. With Mourning on the
bench, the Hoyas cut the lead to
77-75. Then, with 2:29 to play,
Thompson returned.his big man
to the game, an opportunity for
restitution.
The next time down the floor,
Mourning tried a hook shot. It
missed and Henderson rebounded
the game, Thompson kept Mourn-
ing seated and sent in John T- . ner.
Mourning took the brunt of
the blame for his distinctly ordi-
nary game.
"I was a big reason why we
were behind in the final minutes
and I was a big reason why we
lost he said. "It wasn't my day
But before you blame the big
guy, remember that he is just a
freshman and that without him,
Georgetown would have been
gone from this tournament much
earlier, probably in the one-point
opener against Princeton.
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Duke headed west
I i
Continued from page 11 played a good schedule and we've
mmm -yppg-vAtionen great jobrWenrwetl-tCTlctr
inois beat Michigan 96-84
and 89-73 during the season, but
playing defense every time. Thai
t-
s
I
I
Illini coach Lou Henson sounded
cautious.
"Right now, they're awe-
some he said of the Wolverines.
"1 don't think there's another team
in the tournament playing as well
as they are now
Anderson scored five points
in a 7-2 run that broke the final tie
of the game and put Illinois ahead
to stay in the final 6 and a half
minutes. He grabbed an offensive
rebound and scored, giving the
Illini a 72-70 lead, and Gill made a
pullup jumper from the free-throw
line for a 74-70 lead with 5:38 left.
"I wasn't supposed to take
charge Anderson said. "I just
got into shooting position and got
open. Kendall and Steve (Bardo)
delivered the ball to me at the
right times
Syracuse, which led 35-22,
closed to 79-78 on five straight
points by Billy Owens, but Battle
scored on an alley-oop pass from
Larry Smith and Kendall Gill
dunked to make it 83-78.
The Orangemen pulled to 87-
86 on Douglas' 3-pointer with 23
seconds left, his only basket of the
second half. Syracuse fouled
Marcus Liberty, who missed the
front end of a one-and-one with20
seconds to go. But Gill got the
rebound and passed to Battle, who
was fouled and made two free
throws with 15 seconds to go.
Gill scored 18 points for Illi-
nois, which denied Syracuse its
second Final Four trip in thru
years. Owens scored 22 points tor
Syracuse, 30-8.
SATURDAY
SOUTHEAST
Michigan 102, Virginia 65
Glen Rice made nine of 10
shots in the first half as Michigan,
under interim head coach Steve
Fisher, rolled to a 19-point hal ftime
lead and matched the nth-big-
gest victory margin in NCAA tour-
nament history.
SeanHigginsaddcc131 fortne
Wolverines, who led by as much
as 98-56. Richard Morgan scored
15 points for the Cavaliers, mak-
ing 5 of 18 shots.
WEST
Seton Hall 84, UNLV 61
Andrew Gaze scored 19 poi n ts
and helped ignite a 14-0 second-
half outburst as the Pirates ad-
vanced to their first-ever Final
Four.
"They said all year we were
the underdogs Seton Hall coach
P.J. Carlesimo said. "But we
Greg Anthony scored
points for Nevada-Las Vegas.
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 28,1989
NCAA tournament gives fan excitement and heartache
By MICHAEL MARTIN
A�t Spurts Editor
The 188-1989 NCAA Tour-
nament has been full of surprises,
upsets, heartbreaks, and excite-
ment. Many teams star ted in hopes
ol a bid to the illustrious Final
Four others were satisfied with
the invitation. Cinderella teams
looked for the big upset, national
pow erhouses looked for the easy
road to Seattle.
Starting the tournament in
championship style, Ivv League
representative Frineeton took
i Icorgetown, the Big East regular
season and tournament champion
and No. 1 seed in the East Region,
to the final seconds before the
i Unas prevailed in a questionable
51-50 victory. Had Frineeton
pulled of! the upset, it would have
been the first time in the history of
J
the NCAA Tournament that a
number 16 seed upset a number 1
seed.
Who can forget the measles�
stricken Siena University, whose
team won their conference title
without a crowd? They upset Stan-
ford in the first round only to bow
to a much taller and powerful
Minnesota team in the second
round.
The McNeese State Cowboys
made their first appearance in the
tournament, despite a dismal 16-
13 record.
When asked about the bid,
Cowboy's Coach Steve Welch
responded, "It's a tremendous
challenge for us. We will try to use
the same tactics that we used to
win the Southland Conference
Tournament
Maybe McNeese State did use
those tactics, but it did not work as
they fell early to the Fiehtine Illini
of Illinois, who just happen to be
Final Four bound. Illinois will be
making their appearance for the
first time in 37 years.
Speaking of Final Four bound
teams, a suprisingSeton Hall team
will represent The Big East in
Seattle with a stunning victory
over perennial power Nevada�
Las Vegas. It will be the Pirates'
first ever appearance in the Final
Four, and they will be facing a
tough Duke squad in the early
game.
Duke, appearing for the third
time in the last four years, has
hopes of finally winning the big
one. Last year, the Blue Devils lost
to eventual champion Kansas, a
game that many called the "true
championship game This year,
Duke will depend on the leader-
ship qualities of seniors Danny
Ferry and Quin Snyder, and the
scoring and rebounding abilities
of freshman sensation Christian
Lacttner.
Duke'sbid wascapturcd with
an 85- 77 victory over Georgetown
in the East Regional champion-
ship game Sunday.
Michigan alsoclinched a birth
Saturday with a 37 point route
over the University of Virginia in
the Southeast Regional finale. Un-
der interm head coach Steve
Fisher, the Wolverines set the 12th
largest margin of victory ever in
the tournament, and set upa show-
down with Big Ten rival Illinois.
The NCAA Tournament
could not be complete without a
controversial call ending a team's
season. That call came last week,
late in the Georgetown vs. North
Carolina State game, a game that
will never be forgotten in the
minds of the Wolf pack players and
fans.
Closing in on the one minute
mark of the second half, State had
a run going that had pulled the
game to within three points. Point
guard Chris Corchani drove the
lane and made a shot that one
referee counted and called a foul.
However, another referee saw a
walk, and that was the call that
stood.
Replay after replay showed
that there wasn't a walk, and the
basket should have counted and a
free throw awarded to Corchani.
Even the television announcers
said it was the worst call they had
ever seen in that particular situ-
ation.
Anyway, State and Geor-
getown are out, and referees are
only human. Mistakes can be
made, and it won't be the last time
in the NCAA Tournament.
The Final Four games will be
televised Saturday, locally on CBS
(Channel 9) starting at 5:30 with
Duke vs. Seton Hall, and immedi-
ately followed bv the Illinois vs
s J
Michigan game.
The National Championship
will also be televised Monday
night on CBS at 9p.m.
Plaza Cinema
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Pirates fifth
Continued from page 11
tand at 6-0, 12-7 overall. The Pi-
ill face the Seaha tvks in a
ider April 15.
East1 arolina will return home
on Fhursday to face the non con-
ference team of Kent State. Game
time is p m.
R"gb�
Continued from page 11
a student at North Carolina State
iv rsity and Wake Forest Uni-
versityand helped found the Wake
ForestU niversi tv Rugby Club and
the i )anRiverRugby Football Qub
of Yan �- ville.
The tournament structure
breaks both the Qub Division and
illege Division into several
ickets. Each bracket will play a
round robin on Saturday. The top
teams from each bracket will play
in a single elimination format on
Sunday for the Tournament Cup,
theoverallclubandcollegecham-
pionship. learns finishing in the
middle oi their brackets will play
Sunday for each Division's Plate
Championship, while the final
� up of teams will play for the
Bowl Championship. This guar-
antees a team more matches than
under a standard single or double
imination format. It also allows
the weakest teams to compete with
the strongest, fitting for a sport
that places as much emphasis on
naraderie as on competition.
Free agency
upheld by court
NEW YORK (AP) � The
NFL's new system of free agency,
which has resulted in more than
100 players changing teams since
b 1, has been upheld by the
courts.
Judge David Doty in Minnea-
polis, who is presiding over the
antitrust suit filed by the union
folio wing the 24-day strikein 1987,
which ended without a contract,
said he was denying the motion
based on his ruling last July 12.
In it, he said that outright free
agency, which the union is seek-
ing, could hurt competitive bal-
ance and "would work a whole-
sale subversion of the collective
bargining process
Doty's latest decision, re-
ceived today by the Management
( ouncil, is based on that one. In it,
he said to grant the injunction
would be to go against his earlier
motion.
"The court would have to
depart from its previous rulings
in order to grant plaintiff's mo-
tion Doty wrote. 'The court
declines fo do so
Bui he approved limited free
agency, the so called "Plan B
which was implemented unilater-
ally by the league in place of the
contract that expired Sept. 1,1987.
It allows each of the 28 teams to
protect only 37 players on its ros-
ter, with the others, an average of
22, becoming unconditional free
agents.
According to Management
Council figures, as of last Friday,
126 of the 619 free agents under
the so-called "Plan B" had changed
teams.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 28, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 28, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.666
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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