The East Carolinian, March 21, 1989






�IPOTNP��(PW
BmsM�
crime Report3
Classifieds6
Widespread Panic, Slammin'
Watusis. International House,
all reviewed.
Flip to page 8
�P�SP$�
Lady Pirates take Softball tourney
played in Greenville
over weekend.
Catch the action on page 11.
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(Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 58
Tuesday March 21,1989
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA Candidate Profiles
Roakes to rate professors
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writar
TRIFP ROAKES
"I want to be a students' presi-
dent Tripp Roakes, SGA Presi-
dential candidate said. Roakes
proposes to address three major
issues for the benefit of the stu-
dent body if he is elected presi-
dent.
"I would like to compile the
statistics on all the professors into
a newspaper form which would
be distributed to all the students
before registration Roakes said.
The newspaper would include a
summary of the student evalu-
ations and a sort of rating of the
faculty members.
"We are consumers and we
are buying a product. We should
know what we are buying With
his proposal, Roakes believes the
faculty will have a stronger moti-
vation to be better instructors in
the classroom.
Roakes said too much empha-
sis is placed on research and r a.
enough on classroom teaching. "If
elected president, 1 would be a
member of the Board of Trustees
and 1 think that is where the issue
needs to be looked at Roakes
said.
Roakes said this type of evalu-
ation is used on other campuses
and has been an effective idea.
A second issue Roakes plans
See ROAKES, page 2
Cooperman to be involved
By TIM HAMPTON
Newi Editor
SUSAN COOPERMAN
In order to better ECU, Susan
Cooperman believes there needs
to be more interaction between
campus organizations. Running
for the Vice President of SGA,
Cooperman says "the main focus
of my campaign is involvement.
Involvement is the key word
After serving in the SGA leg-
islature for three years and acting
as chairman of the Appropriation
Committee for the '88 - '89 school
year, Cooperman says she under-
stands the mechanics for the SGA
and is ready to assume an execu-
tive office.
"I am the most qualified per-
son for the position. I read a quote
I believe in, it reads 'a real leader
really wants the job " Cooper-
man said.
Cooperman said she would
be effective in bridging the com-
munication gap between campus
groups because she is "involved
in many organizations Besides
the SG A, Cooperman is a member
of the ECU Marching Band and
has been a Resident Advisor in
Fleming Eorm for two and a half
years.
Also Cooperman has been the
secretary for the North Carolina
Student Legislature, a group
See COOPERMAN, page 5
Carroll will focus on diversity within legislature
Jones wants positive change
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
KELLY JONES
SGA Presidential candidate
Kelly Jones said she wants to initi-
ate positive changes within SGA
to earn the student body's confi-
dence in its legislature
Jones said she would like to
see the governing body working
as a whole to inspire the students
to take an active part in university
issues. "The legislators need to
sto p a t tacking each o ther and start
working together Jones said.
Jones is proposing to initiate a
quota system to elect new legisla-
tors which would give the SGA a
more evenly distributed represen-
tation of the varied campus
groups. "I would like to promote
interest in all campus groups, not
just fraternities and sororities
Jones said.
If elected president, Jones
would like to form a Board of
Leaders which would insure ev-
ery campus group of representa-
tion. ln the case where a group
may not be represented in the SGA,
it would be insured representa-
tion on that board
Jones said she wants to gener-
ate an interest in SGA so more
students will be interested in be-
coming legislators. This would
cause elections 4o be more com-
petitive and legislators already in
the body to be more active.
See JONES, page 5
By LORI MARTIN
Sutf Vi riicr
Vice-Presidential candidate
Mark Carroll said he will focus his
attention on developing a more
diversified group of legislators
with in the SGA.
1 want to make sure all of the
small organizations on campusare
represented Carroll said. He is
also interested in better enforcing
the attendance policy for SGA
meetings.
Forming a group made up of
the leaders of campus organiza-
tions is another of Carroll's pro-
posals. "With the president's help,
1 would like to form a bipartisian
group to look into current issues
and come up with a formal report
which can be presented to the
SGA Carroll said.
The report would then be
discussed with Chancellor Eakin
in order to inform him on stu-
dents' views. He plans to address
problems with parking, drugsand
transit.
If elected, Carroll plans to
tackle the problem of the lack of
parking on campuf. "1 think we
need to stop using the band-aid
approach and start planning long-
term he said. Carroll's sugges-
tion is to begin looking at the pos-
sibility of a parking deck.
Carroll said Pirate Walk is a
program which is the responsibil-
ity oi the vice-president. "Coming
from being the president of the
Student Residence Association, I
can get the support to start up
Pirate Walk again he said.
Carroll is presently meeting
with former directors and volun-
teers of Pirate Walk to discuss
strategies lor-a future program.
Although Carroll has not had
experience in the SGA, he has been
involved withSRA since 1984. He
has held the offices of secretary
and president of a residence hall,
vice-president of College Hill and
vice-president of SRA. Carroll is
presently serving as president of
See CARROLL, page 5
Lassiter stresses equality
VALERIA LASSITER
BY DAVID HERRING
Assistant News Editor
"I would like to be the SGA
president because I want every
individual on campus to have an
equal opportunity for develop-
ment began Valeria Lassiter,
SGA presidential candidate. "1
want ECU to be a positive univer-
sity that students, as well as the
community, can be proud of.
"I've read surveys which state
that students and the community
have the negative image of ECU
as a party school Lassiter contin-
ued. "I think social activities are
important, but this is an educa-
tional institution; therefore, aca-
demic excellence should be our
objective. I think one of my great-
est attributes is motivating stu-
dents to excel and feel good about
themselves
"Instead of only putting ath-
letes on television, why not high-
light the academically astute?" she
reasoned. "Students must look at
themselves and ask 'What steps
can I take to improve ECU and to
improve myself?
According to Lassiter, the first
step she would take to improve
ECU would be to get the financial
aid office to compile a list of stu-
See LASSITER, page 2
Vanderburg to bridge racial gap
ByBENSELBY
Stiff Writer
JENNIFER VANDERBURG
SGA Vice Presidential candi-
date Jennifer Ann Vanderburg
wants to improve the racial condi-
tion that exists on campus and to
make ECU a more positive place.
"We need to get the black and
white leaders of different organi-
zations together to talk to one
another so that they can exchange
ideas Vanderburg said. "Then
they can go back to their individ-
ual organizations with what
they've learned
"I'd like to see Pirate Walk
back on its feet Vanderburg said.
She mentioned the possibility
of using a golf cart to ferry stu-
dents around campus.
"I'd also like to see later li-
brary hours Vanderburg said.
"We're the third largest univer-
sity in the state. It's a shame that
the library doesn't stay open past
midnight
Vanderburg hopes to get more
non-greek students involved with
campus organizations and activi-
ties.
"We need to get more infor-
mation to freshmen about the dif-
ferent organizations and activities
that are available to them Van-
derburg said.
See VANDERBURG, page 2
Legislator says skipping meeting was 'just a joke'
By LORI MARTIN
Stiff Writer
"It was just a joke a Student
Government Association legisla-
tor said after leaving Monday's
meeting to cause the body not to
have quorum.
After 18 SGA members
walked out of the meeting, Legis-
lator Russell Lowe left in an at-
tempt to adjourn the meeting. As
a result, the legislature did not
have the number of representa-
tives needed to make any formal
decisions.
During questions and privi-
leges, Lowe highly criticized a
letter to the editor authored by
Speaker of the House Marty Helms
and Chairman of the Student
Welfare Committee Lee Toler.
The letter which appeared in
the March 16 edition of The East
Carolinian said the legislature had
approved an appropriation with-
out going through the proper
channels during the March 13
meeting. The letter said the SGA
"pushed to blindly accept the
Appropriations Committee re-
port
Lowe said he is planning to
send a letter to the editor in de-
fense of the Appropriation Com-
mittee of which he is a member.
Other legislators expressed griev-
ances about SGA while the floor
was open for questions and privi-
leges.
Legislator Tommy Gottschalk
spoke in opposition to the letter
written by the two legislators. "I
think we need to solve our prob-
lems within the four walls of this
room and not take them to the
paper Gottschalk said.
"I disagree. It is important to
the student body to know what is
going on within the student gov-
ernment Legislator Valeria Las-
siter said in response to
Gottschalk's statement. Lassiter
said the legislators need to con-
centrate on a solution to the com-
munication problem within the
SGA instead of attacking fellow
representatives.
"We are losing vision of what
our goal is as student legislators
Legislator Steve Sommers said.
"We are here to help the students
Appropriations Chairperson
Susan Cooperman defended her
committee. She said the mistake
to which Helms and Toler referred
in their letter was the fault of the
SGA faculty secretary and not that
of the Appropriations Commit-
tee.
During the debate, Speaker
Helms stepped down and yielded
the chair to Vice-Speaker Bob
Landry. He defended himself by
pointing out that his interest is in
maintaining proper parliamentary
procedures during meetings.
Three times during Monday's
debate between the legislators,
Landry found it necessary to call
order and stop personal attacks
against Helms.
A resolution concerning
Helms was introduced by the
Appropriations Committee. The
statement criticizes Helms for
making negative statements about
the legislature.
The written statement signed
by 12 members of the committee
said "The Speaker of the Legisla-
ture has consistently defamed the
character of the Student Govern-
ment
According to the SGA Docu-
See SGA, page 5
Scholars to attend ethnic literature convention at ECU
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Staff Writer
Sixty-five scholars from across
the country converged at ECU this
weekend for the third annual
national convention of the Society
for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Lit-
erature of the United States.
Professors and graduate stu-
dents from as far away as Los
Angeles presented papers on is-
sues in ethnic literature studies on
Friday and Saturday. Sponsored
by the Department of English, the
conference took place mostly in
the general classroom building.
According to Dr. Jim HoTte,
conference coordinator, the event
was a success. "It gives us na-
tional recognition he said, "first
for being able to host a conference
like this and second for being a
university where there are such a
large number of scholars and stu-
dents who are interested in such
an important topic like ethnic
studies
The conference, part of an
ongoing process to redefine what
is the national literature of the
United States, focused on the
theme Ethnic Cultures and Liter-
ary Discourse: Text and Contexts.
ECU faculty members Alex
Albright, Mark Paris, Dr. Michael
Bassman, Dr. Marie Farr, Dr.
Alfred Wang, Dr. Gay Wilentz pre-
sented papers along with Holte,
as did graduate students Patricia
Braswell, Carol Maynard, Cindy
Woodward, Tim Thornburg,
Kathleen Cussick and Joe
Campbell.
Dr. Edith Schor, a profes.�or
from New York City, said groups
like MELUS focus attention on
important ethnic studies and pro-
vide members with important
scholarly contacts with other pro-
fessors with similar interests.
Schor was one of the first people
to do scholarly research and work
on Ralph Ellison's The Invisible
Man, considered by many one of
the best novels of the twentieth
century.
In addition to the scholarly
seminars, the conference featured
See ETHNIC, page 5





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21, 198�
Roakes
Continued from page 1
to address is to bring back the
"drunk bus a program which
was discontinued three yearsago.
The program would utilize the
student transit buses which would
cany passengers from downtown
to residence halls and apartment
complexes on Friday and Satur-
day nights.
' "I feel that DVVIs are a prob-
lem for people who live in apart-
ments and on the hill Roakes
said. According to Roakes, the
program was discontinued be-
cause there was a lack of security
on the buses which is a problem
he is planning to address.
A solution to Pirate Walk is a
third issue of concern in Roakes'
campaign. Roakes said he sees no
reason why the program cannot
be operated by the students.
"You've got to have the right
marketing strategy, and you've got
to have the right people running it
(Pirate Walk) he said. "1 think
it's going to take a new, crafty idea
to get the program started again
Roakes' solution is to use a
golf cart for the program. "One of
theproblemsot theold Pirate Walk
is that people didn't want to wait
for 10 or 15 minutes for the walk-
ers to get there
In addition to his three major
concerns, Roakes plans to work
with the campus media to inform
students of SGA events. This
would inform the students of
upcoming elections for legislative
positions.
Roakes, a resource manage-
ment major, served as a SGA leg-
islator and on the Student Wei fare
Committee in 1987-88. He is pres-
ently acting as treasurer of the
SGA. He is also the chairman of
the Fine Arts Board which funds
the Marching Pirates, ECU Play-
house and Visual Arts Forum.
Lassiter
Continued from page 1
"If the administration is going
to enact a mandatory meal plan
then the university needs to guar-
antee adequate financial aid she
argued.
"Financial aid has been cut by
the government by b0 percent
said Lassiter. "My question is
where are the people (whose aid
has been cut) going to get the
money to pay their tuition?
"An academically qualified
student interested in attending a
university to better himself should
not be denied admission simply
due to a lack of tuition fees she
c ntinued, "We should be able to
find funds somewhere on campus
students as early as possible to
alert them to potential financial
aid complications in the upcom-
ing year so that they may make
necessary arrangements as early
as possible.
even if we have to pull them from
parking ticket revenues, or go to
our churches to raise money.
As SGA president 1 would
be here to represent all students,
and any student who has a prob-
lem paying tuition should be able
to contact me for alternatives �
either for a billing extension or for
financial- assistance Lassiter
stated. "I know what it means to
want to go to school and be denied
the funds � too young and inex-
perienced to understand the loan
and grant processes
If elected, Lassiter would also
address the campus parking prob-
lem. "I would investigate and
determine the university's posi-
tion on the parking problem and
then pass this information on to
the students to solicit their input
she said.
"If the administration's not
going to provide immediate solu-
tions then we need to decide
what's to be done about parking
stickers. We might consider charg-
ing faculty more for stickers be-
cause they have more accessible
parking and (relative to students)
more income
Valeria Lassiter is a rising
senior working toward her bache-
lors degree in journalism, with a
minor in political science. She
currently serves as an SGA legis-
lator for day students and plans a
career in media law.
Vanderburg
Continued from page 1
"I'd like to make ECU a more
positive place Vanderburg said.
Overall, I'd like to sec more stu-
dent involvement on campus.
E en if it's just voting. It's sad that
only 1,200 out of lb,000 students
voted in the last election
Currentlv, the 22vear-old
Senior from Charlotte is majoring
in English. She serves on the SGA
Welfare Committee, the Student
Union Special Concerts Commit-
tee, the ECU calendar and trans-
portation committees, and is the
vice-president of Alpha Xi Delta
sorority.
9pzu Receipting
Applications for:
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JApplxj in person at The East Caw-
(inian.
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will enable you to make valu-
able contributions to East
Carolina University. For addi-
tional information and appli-
cations, contact the Associate
Dean of Student's Office in 209
Whichard.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE TURNED IN BY
Thursday, March 30th
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Coming Attractions
I o S i c� I � o I I t) If o I L�kl
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Wednesday, March 22
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Travel Adventure Film:
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I
L






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21,1989 3
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3
9
Man arrested for indecent exposure
The Crime Report is taken
from ECU Campus Police logs.
Military time is used.
March 13
4:11 First degree bulgary re-
ported in Belk, personal items
stolen.
9:10 Larceny of money from
school of medicine.
16:10 Larceny of $400 in
stamps from Brcwster building.
22:08 Jones resident trans-
ported to Fitt County Memorial
Hospital Emerency Room.
March 14
3:17 Attempted first degree
burglary in Belk - unknown per-
sons tried to unlock door.
10:00 Hilton Head SC woman
reported larceny of typewriter
from car north of Fletcher.
20:10 Tyler resident served
criminal summons for worthless
checks.
March 15
2:27 Scott resident reported
breaking and entering of dorm
room and larceny of compact disc.
4:30 Man reported to trespass-
ing on third floor of Jones.
8:50 Hit and run to vehicle
reported north of Jarvis.
10:00 Larceny of car bra from
vehicle south of Belk.
11:15 Person in housekeeping
reported the larceny of personal
check from office.
12:45 Secretary in athletics
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of her office and the larceny of
her purse
13:30 Female reported that
another female assaulted her and
communicated threats.
16:45 Bicycle returned to
owner.
17:00 Man served with three
criminal summons for worthless
checks.
March 16
1:50 Damage to vent door to
suite 105 Belk reported.
2:07 Two Belk residents re-
P

i
i
15:45 Woman was victim of
an indecent exposure at Joyner
Library.
15:45 Larceny of bike east of
Jarvis reported.
16:00 Report of ECU male
student harassing a state em-
ployee.
'16.00 Luggage rack stolen
from vehicle at 14th and Berkley
Street reported.
16:30 Attempted larceny of
bike east of Jarvis.
20:40Cat reported in window
of317-DBelk.
21:02 Batsreportedin411 Belk.
23:00 Report of larceny of ti-
olet tissue holder from first floor
of men's bathroom handicap stall
oi Mendenhall Student Center.
March 17
1:45 Aycock and Belk resi-
dents were issued campus cita-
tions for underage drinking and
after hours visitation in Belk.
2:00 Jason R. Voder of 311
South Woodlawn Street was ar-
rested north of Fleming for under-
age consumption of alcohol and
for delay and obstruction of a law
enforcement officier.
6:35 Scott resident failed to
appear in court.
14:20 Faculty member re-
ported breaking and entering of
office in Austin and the larceny of
J
five terminal strips.
15:25 Two Jarvis residents
were referred to Student Life for
alcohol and for being uncoopera-
tive with a law enforcement offi-
cer.
22.31 Belk and Clement resi-
dents involved in a domestic dis-
pute in lobby of Clement.
23:05 Scott resident cited for
various alcohol violations and for
Uttering of beer can.
March 18
00:05 Androw Nathaniel
Newsom of 185 Aycock was ar-
rested for damaging the fire extin-
guisher on the third floorof breeze-
way of Belk.
00.21 Report of Jones resident
could not breathe and was throw-
ing up blood. The subject refused
medical attention.
00:25 Three men were charged
for flattening tires of and tamper-
ing with a state owned motor
vehicle parked northeast of Book
Store.
00:55 Cherry Point man
banned from campus for public
intoxication.
1:45 Peter S Gillam of Char-
lottesville Va. was arrested for
damage to real property and for
carrying a concealed weapon in
mall area north of Cotten. Subject
banned from all campus property.
2:10 River Bluff resident given
citation for underage consump-
tion of alcohol.
8:00 Pirate Landings resident
reported she was kidnapped by
her ex-boyfnend.
12:15 Apex man reported the
hit and run of his vehicle.
13:39 Greenville man banned
from campus after harassing
woman in Joyner Library.
18:40 Scott resident experi-
enced leg cramps in lobby.
18:40 Psychology faculty
member reported a strange odor
on first floor of Speight building.
21:46 Rug was set on fire in
166 Aycock.
22:31 Clement resident re-
ported that a Belk resident was
harassing her.
22:57 Two Clement residents
and one Greene resident were
issued citations for underage
drinking.
March 19
00:16 Umstead resident issued
campus citation for breach of dorm
security at southeast door of
Greene.
00:50 Patrick T. Kanetyke of
321 Scottish Court was arrested
for indecent exposure.
1:10 Three non-students from
Manteo were banned from
Fletcher for being unescorted.
4:35 Scott and Fletcher resi-
dents were given campus citations
for after hours visitation viola-
tions.
13.10 Hit and run of a vehicle
reported at 3rd and Reade park-
ing lot.
19:09 Breaking and entering
of Jones dorm room reported.
20:15 ECU Campus Police
assisted Greenville Police with a
hit and run case.
21:30 Four Garrett residents
were referred to Dean Speier for
simple possession of marijuana
and paraphernalia.
22:00 Report of a stop sign
missing from northeast corner of
green barn.
23:31 Aycock resident referred
to Dean for simple possession of a
controlled substance.
Pantana Bob's in giving away
FREE TRIP to the
BAHAMAS
for two
Register on Tuesday Nights only 9 to Close
Registration:
March 21
March 28
April 4
April 11
April 18
Drawing to be held April 25th at Kappa Sigma Bahama Mama Party
Register EVERY Tuesday to increase your Chances of Winning.
Details Given at Pantana Bob's
Private Club for Members and Invited Guests Only
ferred to Dean Speier for posses- underage possession of alcohol.
Km of schedule six (simple) drugs
and possession of drug parapher-
naliis and possession of pyrotech-
nics.
2:31 Professor reported mem-
bers o.LFhl isappa Alpha frater-
niwere extremely loud in 5th
Stifet and Harding Street parking
lok
ih:07 Damage to window of
prime booth at 10th Street and
Ccjflege Hill Drive reported.
r8:l 5 Larceny of pay check from
16:40 Reserve officer observed
a banned subject in North West
entrance of Unstead.
16:50 Two Umstead and one
Fletcher resident were observed
with underage possession of alco-
hol north of Umstead.
18:26 Report of a concern with
security of a display set up in the
lobby of Foyer General Classroom
Building.
18:40 Scott resident was trans-
ported to Pitt County Memorial
iWlflNI 01
MOWTRt. 8:00 A.MrfH 6:00 P.M.
SATURDAY 8:00 A.M. Til 5.00 P.M.
1009 DICKINSON AVE. 758 0057
�ta
KfaAQvdt
di�k of Familv Practice reported. Hospitial Emerency Room for leg
10:59 Fave'tteville man banned cramps
About It. Quality Roll Ends Are Todays Best Bargains. So Pract.cal. Yet So Thrifty.
frfm campus for being involved
indorncstlcdlsPuteeastoVhlte-
f "15:31 Tracy Lee ones of Fay-
etteyille was arrested for trespass-
in�-on campus properties.
k
Presidential powers debated
19:00 Avcock resident injured
right ankle while playing basket-
ball, desired no medical attention.
20:19 Greenville man issued
citation for public consumption of
By GARY SANDERSON
jStaff Writer
On Thursday, March 16, in
th� auditorium of Jenkins Art
Gallery, two distinguished speak-
ers debated the issue of "who
should declare war, the President
or-Congress?"
"This debate is not about
whether Congress or the Presi-
dent alone should declare war,
bat where the scales of balance
sKould be established said
Melvin Urofsky, a professor of
history at Virginia Common-
wealth University.
"Commander-in-chief means
nothing special in this instance
said Urofsky. "If we look to the
Constitution, we find that Con-
gress was given the power to raise
and maintain armies and to de-
clare war, the President was given
n� such power he said.
"The President is this coun-
try's leading diplomat" and if a
"foreign nation attacked the
United States the President must
b empowered to respond re-
plied Michael Belknap, a profes-
sor of law at California Western
School of Law.
Belknap pointed out that the
Constitution was contracted over
200 years ago. "The world was a
rriuch larger place then he said,
"ft took time to transport troops"
unlike today's "rapid means of
deployment
"The Presidency is far better
equipped to make the decision as
to whether or not the country
should go to war than the slow-
njoving Congress Belknap said.
Urofsky said that "the fra-
riers" of the Constitution "in-
tid&ed the declaration of war to
bfa deliberate act by those most
cfcrjapetent: Congress
Y "The argument today is" that
tere "is no time for deliberation"
aid "1 have no problem with that,
the problem arises when the Presi-
dent acts alone in a peacetime situ-
ation Urofsky said. He pointed
to Vietnam, Libya, Grenada and
others as examples.
"Any time there is an ex-
change of fire, this nation is tech-
nically at war replied Belknap.
He used the PersianGulf situation
and the bombing of Libya as ex-
amples. "Congress makes author-
ized paperwork comparable to
medieval chivalry to support
Presidential decisions he said.
"In today's world, we can ill af-
ford to wait around
"Only five of this nation's wars
were actual declared wars and
one of those, World War II, "was
forced by President Franklin D.
Roosevelt Belknap said. "All of
the rest were made without presi-
dents asking for Congressional
permission
Even the "judicial system has
ducked the issue of who should
have the power to make war
said Belknap. "In the court's opin-
ion, at least in some cases, the
President can declare war he
said.
Both men seemed to agree that
in emergency situations, the Presi-
dent should have the power to
take immediate action, however,
Urofsky stood firmly behind the
1973 War Powers Act while I
Belknap did not.
The War Powers legislation
requires the President to consult
with Congress before committing j
troops. Troops not authorized
mustbewithdrawnwithin60days
or 90 days if safety dictates such.
Those in attendance received I
an evaluation form in order to rate
each speaker and to inquire as to
whether or not the forum gave
them a clearer understanding of
the issue. A reception was held in
the lobby after the discussion.
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VISA MASTERCARO'CASH OR CHECK





I
Stye iEaat (Earnltnian
� - - �, � - �-�.�.
I'�- .�'vmu
Pete Fern ald, o�r m.�
STEPI1ANIE FOLSOM, M.�n E�
James F.J. McKee, o��rttr�f,iMrti�m
Tim Hampton, mm &� Brad Bannister, g e�
KRISTEN HALBERG, ��� JEFF PARKER, staff ahmtmu
Chip Carter, f �� uxw Tom Furr, o�ji� �h
Susan Howell, n nm,w Demie Stevens, &���,
Dean Waters, cmbm��� Stephanie EMORYwT�s�m�r
Stephanie Singleton, c e�m Mac Clark, �.�� Mr

5Ay,uHAT
a
x don't know
BUT X THWK THE
GJV NEXT TO ME
i� 4i L FOR IT
IS ALL FOR
- -
March 21. 19S9
OPINION
I'jgc 4
Scapegoat
Members find way to ignore problem
L
r : �
A�
as
Art project should have been displayed elsewhere
The issue of "blind faith" was
brought up by the speaker of the
legislature in last Monday's Siudent
Government meeting � an impor-
tant point to consider.
The legislator was referring to
the seeming absence oi understand-
ing toward the bills voted on in
weekly meetings. It's frightening to
think that our representatives are
too involved with getting through a
bill bv passing it than taking the time
to examine it thoroughly � again,
an important point to consider.
So, how were these issues
handled in yesterday's SGA meet-
ing? By introducing a bill to impeach
the speaker oi the legislature, of
course. Much needed discussion
finally made its way to the floor as
the main topic on the agenda. Some
legislators were concerned with the
job they were doing in representing
the students. And others talked of
throwing the speaker of the legisla-
ture out.
If it's necessary to kick out the
speaker in order to pacify those
members resistant to change, then
perhaps there should also be a bill
trying to cut through the compla-
cency present in the legislature. A
scapegoat was conveniently found
to avoid the criticism necessary for a
more effective student government.
The speaker is accused of "defa-
mation" in regards to the SGA. If
voicing concerns to the legislature
and the students it represents is
defamation, then obviously there's a
new definition. Perhaps there
should be more of this supposedly
horrid, but candid talk about pos-
sible positive changes; especially if
they're made by the students who
care.
Editorial after editorial is written
and yet the issue is still not dead. It's
time to be concerned and aware of
the problems that exist, instead of
finding a scapegoat. The SGA
seems to be executing their own
version of the "gag rule keeping in
the closet all of those who might
possibly "rock the boat
Spectrum Rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum" section of the paper, The East
Carolinian features "The Campus Spectrum This is an opinion column bv
guest writers from the student body and faculty.
The columns printed in "The Campus Spectrum" will contain current
topics of concern to the campus, community or nation. The columns are
Testricted only with regard to rules oi grammar and decency. Persons
submitting columns must be willing to accept byline credit for their efforts,
as no entries from ghost writers will be published.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Mail
or drop them by our office in the Publications Building, across from the
entrance to Joyner Library. For purposes of verification, all letters must
include the name, major, classification, address, phone number and the
signature of the author(s) Letters are limited to 300 words or less, double-
spaced, typed or neatly printed. All letters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal attacks will be permitted.
Students, faculty and staff writing letters for this page are reminded that
they are limited to one every two weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday SGA meetlllS
ditionS" i To the editor:
There are several points that
need to be brought to the attention of
the staff of The East Carolinian and
To the editor:
Concerning the exhibit that was
displayed on the mall Monday
morning, February 27, I feel it was
done in an insensitive and untasteful
way. I am an African American art
major here at ECU and I know that
art can be interpreted in different
ways. Many believe art is anything
that draws interest or causes emo-
tions. I, myself, believe in order for
something to be art, it should not
only have these characteristics but be
done in a positive way and give
positive impressions. Meaning that
when dealing with such a delicate
subject as lynching more thought
should have been in the process of
creativity. Since all people are
unable to interpret art, this exhibit
should have been placed closer to or
even in the art building. I discussed
the piece with its creators and got
their view of the situation. Even
though they did it to only raise the
issue of discrimination for discus-
sion and not to provoke violence, 1
was just devastated by the piece after
it had been partial 1 dismantled and
the figures excluded. 1 thought it was
a monstrositv. The artists told me
that all graffiti displayed on the piece
was found in the bathrooms of cam-
pus buildings. This itself is frighten-
ing because we are supposed to have
race equilibrium.
No one would believe preju-
dices are as strong as the graffiti dis-
plays. As an African American and
as a victim of racial discrimination
which occurrred here at ECU, 1
would like for my fellow African
American people to wake up and
take notice that racism lives strongly
not only in America, but here at East
Carolina. I strongly believe that ra-
cism exists so much because society
says it can. Racism is on this campus
because the judiciary system and
ECU leaders and heads are saying it
can exist. They aren't saying it can
exist verballv but bv the actions of
campus leaders and administration.
Even though people continuously
try to rob me of my rights, rob me of
my culture, rob me of my values, and
rob me of my beliefs; I will not suc-
cumb to the white man's beliefs and
let racial inequality exist. I will never
permit anyone to rob me of my past
or my future because I am my own
African American woman!
Nara Bost
Art
Sophomore
$WPRI6HTUPWS��
ZAWH, himsr-nne
aecus OF POLITICAL
HWWS- I'M TALKIU'
AB0lT7HZ Qft
UjoTgS
i�m
llAi
r
the student body concerning our
SGA. As a member of the SGA, I was
greatly disturbed by the proceedings
in last Monday's meeting. First, it
seems that, for some reason, a group
of legislators wanted to pass an ap-
propriation bill for a business frater-
nity. The problem, however, comes
with the ambiguity of that last sen-
tence. I was there and I don't know
what happened. The article that
appeared in the March 14 issue of this
paper did not contain all of the details
of the debate. The article implied that
all of the standard procedures of the
SGA had been followed; this is not
exactly the case. The rules were sus-
pended in order to consider the bill,
which had not been formally intro-
duced. There is nothing wrong with
that, but, it seems, the SGA Appro-
priations Committee did informall)
review the bill. There is nothing
improper about that, either. The
impropriety comes in with the ac-
tions of the legislators during the
meeting. A group of members
seemed to have the desire to simply
accept the informal decision of the
Appropriations Committee on the
issue. They wanted the bill to pass so
barrry that, although there were some
questions concerning it, this small
group would not allow those ques-
tions to be heard or answered.
Now is that in the best interest of
the students? Arc we as students sup-
posed to accept this blind faith in
such a small group of people? ADis
The East Carolinian in the habit of
choppingleaving out the other side
of the story, as in this case.
There is one more point that
should be brought to the attention of
the newspaper. In light of the recent
concern over the relations between
the SGA and the student bodv, it
should be mentioned that if there is to
be better communication between
the students and the SGA, then The
East Carolinian might help by taking
note of new legislation as it is intro-
duced. Since there is usually a week
between the introduction of new bills
and the vote on them, it might im-
prove student-SG A communications
if the newspaper could publish infor-
mation concerning new legislation as
it is introduced, instead of publishing
merelv the results oi S(. activities
There are changes that could and
need to be made by the SG A, The Fast
Carolinian, and the students. We can
work to make this wonderful campus
better and better, but that can't be
done while small groups in the SGA
and The East Carolinian confuse,
albeit possibly inadvertent, the is-
sues that we must face.
Bill Carroll
Political Science
Sophomore
Animal rights
To the editor:
It has been with great interest
that we have read the recent articles
in The East Carolinian concerning
animal rights. Animals should not be
subjected to mistreatment. The ani-
mal nghts groups are justified in
their anger, but it should be focused
on institutions such as the agricul-
ture and cosmetic industries that are
most cited for the abuse of animals.
Stress is an unwanted factor in
any research and we (graduate stu-
dents in the E)ept. of Biology) go to
extreme lengths to ensure that ani-
mals are not mistreated during the
studies. Animal use is a vital aspect of
biomedicai" research that cannot be
duplicated by machine. Cell culture
has been proposed as a viable alter-
native to animal studies. However, if
you take the example of drug testing,
the final stages necessitate an intact
physiological system in order to
monitor any possible side-effects. Bi-
omedicai researchers are required to
submit evidence indicating the need
and validity of a proposed study
Once the project habeen justified for
its scientific worth, stringent animal
use protocols are invoked according
to NIH guidelines.
In the past, animals have played
an important role in the development
oi vaccines, insulin treatment, and
drug development. In the future.
drugs will be developed from animai
models that will eradicate such dis-
eases as AIDS, multiple sclerosis,
cystic fibrosis, and Alzheimer's dis-
ease.
We the undersigned support the
ideals of humane treatment of ani-
mals, but maintain animal use is
secessary in medical research
Tim Mad;
Gary McBi
Judv Bod
Tom Gurganu
Don Peacock
Specie ism
To the editor:
This is in reponse to the biad
article on animal rights actn
against Yerkes Primate Research
Center (March 28). The article da
that animal rights activists have
made death threats to research i
and ha ve actually attempted tob
a medical supply corporation h
quarters, all of which is simply un-
true.
Animal rights advocates op
the prejudicial philosophy of spc
bin. Anvone who would harm i
human for the sake of animals ;
speciesist, albeit in reverse of
usual form. These unorthodox 5
ciesibtb. may call themselves anir.
rights activists, but their beha
are unequivocally denounced b
the legitmate animal rights organ
tions (and even by the undergroi:
organization called the Animal 1
eration Front). The actions descrftx d
or alluded to in the article are tot:
inconsistent with the philosoplw
animal rights and could not a .
beencarnedoutbytrueanimalng:
activists.
But there are very few revere
speciesibtsandlseriouslvdoubttiu v
are behind the death threats, ft is
much more likely that supporters oi
animal research are making the
threats in an effort to discredit .the
animal rights movment and to fceal
attention away from the real issues
And if that's what is happening, the. i
scheme is working very well, as e i
denced by the article.
As for the actual bombing at
tempt on U.S. Surgical Corporation
police have arrested a man by the
name of Marc Mead who works for
an anti-animal rights consulting firm
and admits that he was paid bv t S
Surgical to recruit and supplv an
animal nghts activist to attempt the
bombing. And, of course, evcrv
movement has its share of exceed
ingly stupid and easily led members
and Mead was able to find one for the
task.
Don't let these incidents cloud
the issues. The torturing of animals
cannot be justified by the need of
researchers to publish or bv VQ de-
sires of pharmaceutical coonrpsr.ies to
make profits. The fact is. far less
human benefit is derived from ani-
mal research than the people who
have vested economic or job related
interests in doing the research would
like you to believe. And also, we tax-
payers, who are paying for most of
the research, have a right to know
what is going on. The secrecy must
stop.
Craig Spitz
President, ECU SETA
Sophomore
Psychology
�'

i
v






TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21, 19895
tIOIlC3�S Continued from page 1
Jones wants to form a Chan-
cellor's Forum for next year. In
this forum. Chancellor Eakin
would be available several times a
month to hear suggestions and
criticisms from students. "This
would open lines of communica-
tion between the upper admini-
stration and the student body
Jones said.
Jones, a business and finance
major, has three years of experi-
ence in SGA. She served as fresh-
man class president for 1986-87
and Student Welfare Chairperson
for 1987-88. She is currently serv-
ing as SGA Vice-President.
She attended a student gov-
ernment conference in February
from which she got new ideas to
moreeffectivelyoperateSGA. "We
talked about different styles of
leadership, mo tivatinggroups that
don't want to work, ways to in-
clude freshmen and ways to make
officers more active Jones said.
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Cooperman
composed ot college students
through out the state, for one year,
has been the manager for the Pep
Band for two years and currently
is the only ECU student on the
Resident Status Committee.
On issues, Cooperman said
Continued from page 1
Pirate Walk can be revived under Although the composition of
the right leadership. Historically, the SGA legislature hasbeen called
Pirate Walk has been the respon- unbalanced by several candidates
siblity of the vice president. The
escort service has come under fire
recently because of a drop in
females requesting walkers.
and legislators in recent months,
Cooperman says she doesn't think
appointments made to the gov-
ernment in filling empty seats are
SGA leaves after recess
Continued from page 1
ments, the resolution is not offi- It was at this time Lowe left
rial because it was not formally the meeting. When he returned,
introduced to thegoverningbody. he said his action was a joke.
After over an hour of debate. Although the questions and
the movement was made to end privileges debate was the major
questions and privileges. The Vice- concern in Monday's meeting,
Speaker said he did not think the several other issues were briefly
movement was appropriate at the mentioned.
time. "1 feel that since this is ques- ice-President Kelly Jones
lions and privileges, ever)' legis- presented a plan to put new park-
iator should have the right to ing lots in selected areas of the
sjxuk Landry said. campus. The Parking and Traffic
Landry's opinion was ap- Committee will build a lot of 500
pealed, and before further action spaces in the field below Minges
bias.
However, Cooperman said
through an increase in communi-
cation with minority gToups and
non-Greeks organizations, two
factions which are presently un-
der represented in the SGA, parity
in the legislative body can be
achieved for the next school vcar.
ARE TOU BORED AND RESTLESS?
DO TOU NEED A CHALLENGE?
ARE CLASSES TOO LARGE?
If yow have i 3 4 (.PA. sttitiulaMng jirofcssors will challenge you m these small Honors course this
Fall
HONORS SEMINARS:
�I Mi, m. 001 rkUBaimfUa
Stucfc rutmuwe. acKcntiire. myter, and science fiction as novels are tuned tnto films, smile explor-
ing such classics as Deliverance. Women tn Love. The Maltese rakon Blow Up. Death tr, Venice.
Wtse Dlood. and Karenhelty 451.
nsEM 2011. �� OOa tier pel Heroines .nj A,att Htfgtl Itt GtTr1" I iterstiire
lln r.Mlith Tismlnlgnl
Study the works ofCoelhe. Nletzche. and Hesse, and delve into Cxpresstnlsm. Dada. and Avant-
Cuardr
HSF.y 2011. itc. OQ3 Contemporary World literature Wrltttn In English
Study comparative literature written tn English from the U.S Canada. Great (intain. Aftrica. the
Caribhcanm. Central and South America, and the Near and Far East
H8EM 2012 sec. OOl Listening to Music InttUiaentlv: A Study ef Style. Form snd Content
Trace mustc from post to present Listen to recordings and guest speakers, and attend concerts
� wia. itc. oqi piTtnolm
Study the complexity of human behavior
OTlIEK HONORS COURSES. ANTH 1000 ASMR 2000
BIOL 3550 BiOL 4550
KDCJC 32O0 ENQL1M0 ENGL 1250 ENCL 2200 IILTH 1000
HIST 15BO HIST 1552 UBS 1000 MATH 2171 PHIL 1110 SOCI2UO
THE HONORS MROGRAM CHALLENGING. REWARDING. STMULATIN'G
Contact Dr. David Sanders. GC 1002
could be taken, a one minute re-
cess was called on the tloor. The
movement was never recognized
b) the Speaker as the body disre-
garded a motion for order and
began to stand up for a recess.
After the recess, only 36 of the
4 legislators present returned to
the body. The legislature needed
this exact number to vote on any
issues.
Coliseum and a lot of 300 spaces
adjacent to the lot at Minges.
Die commit tee will determine
the use of the lot in April. A lot
with 100 spaces will be put at the
bottom of College Hill which will
accomedate commuters.
The meeting was concluded
with the introduction of three
appropriations and one new bill.
Ethnic literature continued from page 1
Henry and Mike "Lightning"
Wells.
Seminars were presented on
topics ranging from Black Litera-
L jciure, Native American Literature
-r-rorfd Asiarr-American LrtcTatureto
Carroll
Continued from page 1
SRA.
In additon to his SRA expen
en Carroll is chairman oi the
tudent Union Board of Directors
and serves on the Media Boa.d
i e is earning his degree in com-
munity commercial recreation
iwith a minor in small business
Ethnicity and the Fantastic, Gen-
erational and Cender Perspective
in Asian-American Literature,
Women and Ethnicity and Ethnic-
ity in a Neo-Conservative Age-
FIND IT �
In The
Classifieds.
Every Tuesday
and Thursday in
The East Caro-
linian.
.
management.
Coming March 27-31
"IF I WERE
A THIEF
Sponsored by ECU Campus Watch:
you and "ECU "Together for a
Safe Campus
SAFE
CAMPUS
fWJA
hut
-iflf
orl
tel
oIl'
.Ot
STUDY BREAK
CAMPFIRE!
Ucl
AT
Tonight. Tuesday.
March 21
8 p.m. - until
Amphitheatre
(behind Fletcher Dorm) Singing S'mores" & more
Sponsored by:
wesfel is sponsored by Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministerle! President: Bill Stanley. 830-0527; Re.
Michelle "Mike" Burcher. 752-7240; Rev. Dan Earnhardt.
758-2030. Communion and fellowship supper; Wednesdays
5 p.m. Methodist Student Ctr.
Howtoget
through college with
money to spare

1. Buy a Macintosh.
M�uiiTj-i"isiHisrfwi
5�l i �
2. Add a peripheral.
3. Get a nice, fat check.
Now through March when vou huv selected ac.nuhSK or Mac.nK.sh 11 computer, you 1 get
a rebate lor up to half the suggested retail price of the Apple" peripheralsyou add on - so you II save up to 0H
Ask for details today whea1 computers are sold on campus.
Apple Pays Half
E.C.U. Student Stores
757-6731





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21,1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Two blocks
from campus. (One bedroom available
until July V Fully furnished, walking dis-
tance to campus and downtown, hard-
wood floors, friendly neighbors. SI50
month plus utilities. 757-0412
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom upstairs apt
Screened-in porch. Utilities included.
Near ECU campus. $250 00 per month.
Call 758-1274 after 6:00 p.m.
TWO ROOMMATES WANTED FOR
SUMMER MONTHS: 3 bedroom
Eastbrook Apartments. Own room, fully
furnished, pool and ECU bus service. $128
a month plus 13 utilities. Non-smoker
preferred. If interested, call 830-6646.
2 BDR APT. FOR RENT AT
EASTBROOK: $310.00 a month�take
over lease until August. Great for summer
school. Call 752-3860.
FOR SALE
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE. 24
Wildwood Villas. 3 bedrooms, 2 12
baths. Great for college students. For more
information call Jeff Aldridge 756-3500 or
355-6700.
CAN YOU BUY: Jeeps, Cars, 4 X 4'sseized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Windy
Ridge, 3 bedroom, 2 12 baths. Com-
pletely remodeled. With initial down pay-
ment of S4.000.00 and $402.00month or
renting for $500.00month. Swimming
pool, tennis courts, and clubhouse. Call
756-1180 or 756-4747.
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 1 slightly-
used Al Merrick Design 6'4" Channel Is-
lands Thruster, includes board bag Must
sell, SI 75.00. Call 355-3364.
BIKE FOR SALE: Perfect condition.
$125.00. Price neg. 758-0076.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. W
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage
FOREIGN STUDENTS: Job-Hunting
Guide (Rev. 1989). Send $19.95 for the
step-by-step guide. IvySoft International,
PO Box 241090, Memphis, TN 38124-1090
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: If you have
papers, resumes, thesis, etc. that need to
be typed, please call 756-8934 between
5:30-9:30 p.m. 16 years typing experience
Typing is done on computer with letter
quality printer.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Mary Smith REAL
Crisis Center 758-HELP.
ARE YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT
LOOKING FOR PART-TIME EMPLOY-
MENT: Need a good solid respectable job
to begin now and continue through the
summer? Through Fall semester? And
even through graduation? Brody's and
Brody's for Men are accepting applica-
tions for dedicated, conscientious people
who show enthusiasm to be a part of a
quality retail environment. Apply with
Brody's, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4
p.m.
HELP WANTED: Secretarialaccounting
position. Part-time. Great for an account
ing student. Call Sam's Lock & Key from
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 757-0075.
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To distribute
"Student Rate" subscription cards at this
campus. Good income. For information
and application write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glenwood
Dr. Mooresville, NC 28115. (704) 6r4-
4063.
HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STU-
DENTS: Who enjoy cooking . we have
openings for cook's helpers and kitchen
aids at childrens summer camp in the cod
mountains of North Carolina Experience
not necessary, we will train. You receive
room, meals, laundry, plus $900.00-
S1000.00 salary and travel expenses. Non-
smoking students write for App.bro-
chure: Camp Pinewood 20205-1 N.E. 3
Court, Miami, FL 33179.
HELP WANTED: Part-time Children's
Youth Director, salaried position. 15
hours per week Please apply in writing to
Rev. BH1 Lcary, Winterville Baptist
Church, P.O Box 434. Winterville, NC
2S590
ADDITIONAL STAFF NEEDED Tor
small country innLnd riaurant in the
� dolrghttuHv diffdtnt coastal �tovtn oi
Beautort. NC- knowledgeable wail
people interested m learning more about
wines and gourmet cuisine�chamber
maids for our elegantly appointed
suites�position available in our profes-
sional kitchen Please call "The Cedars" at
(919) 728-7036 alter 2 p.m.
now and continue through the bummer7
Through Fall semester? And even
through graduation? Brody'sand Brody's
for Men arc accepting applications for
dedicated, conscientious people who
show enthusiasm to be a part of a quality
retail environment Apply with Brody's,
Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4 p.m.
COACH: Experienced for USS Summer
Swim Team. References required. Apply
P O Box 1301, Tarboro, NC 27886
LOOKING FOR FRATERNITY, SO-
RORITY OR STUDENT ORGANIZA-
TION: That would like to make $500 -
SI, (XX) for a tine week on-cam pus market
ing project Must be organized and hard-
working Call Jill or Corme at 1-800-592-
2121.
ATTENTION�HIRING Government
jobs - your area Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test $17,840
$69,485. Call 1-602-838-8885, Ext. R5285
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS:
For Lite Guard positions. Greenville
Country Club�756-1237. WSI preferred.
HOSTESSES AND WAITRESSES
NEEDED: Day and night work. Alsoneed
day cook Apply Tar Landing Seafood
Rest 105 Airport Rd. 758-0327
PERSONALS
TOTHF. PIKAS llietwoofustogothcr.lt
could not have gone better For all your
help we say "Thank you Until next year
tor ' Win, Lose or Draw, 11 " 1 ove, The Chi
Omeg is
HYDIHO, H PI IIO,OIK:AMPCON-
TAINED: Much thanks to all theSigma's
Three for a great time. The Pikes. Do it
,i ga l n
PIKA HAPP HOUR: Ever) Fhursday 9
until Drink specials and free beer tor
everyone (psych!) The Rzz.
TO THE BROTHERS OF TAU KAPPA
EPSILON: Chi-O and TKE socials are
campus exclusives. The best one yet Our
girls all say. The snow started us off right
and that punch "What a sight it was a
night to remember. Thank goodness for
no school the next day! Love the Chi Cs.
ALPHA DELTA PI: We can't give any
clues, as to whom we could be � we'll
only say that we're your secret sorority!
I lave a great week, and a I lappy Easter,
too. We can't wait to get together with
vou!
SUSAN DURBAM: We know yoa
worked hard on Win, Lose or Draw, k
went (WMMwell and w� have you to thank.
Love Your Sisters and Pledges of Chi
Omega.
MAKE MONEY WORKING AT HOME
: Selling information mv mail.Rush self-
addressed stamped envelope. St W Inc.
Box 2414, Greenville, NC 27858.
Greek" is what it's all about � buy yours
today � you won't want ot be left out! Ask
any AZD for details.
CHI OMEGA: hopes that everyone had
the bet Spring Break ever and hopes that
you also have a Happy Easter. Love The
Sisters and Pledges.
ALL GREEK AND GREEK HONOR
ORGANIZATIONS: It's here again, bet-
ter than ever � maybe this time you'll win
� if you're clever! April 4th at the Attic �
it's the place to be! The annual All-Sing,
sponsored by AZD! If it's Guns and Roses,
or the famous "Wild Thing it really
doesn't matter, 'cause its AZD All-Sing!
Everyone will be dancing, and songs will
be sung � so come out and support The
American Lung! Get psyched! �Love, the
AZD's
GET READY TO PARTY: Sammy and
the USUALS along with THE TREBLE
MANIAX are coming to the KA house,
Thurs. April 6th. Everyone is welcome.
Keep watching for details.
SISTERS OF ZETA TAU ALPHA: Con
granulations on winning 2nd place in our
1st annual Win, Lose or draw! Love The
Chi Orr egas.
AOPi's: You all aredoing a great job! Keep
up the great work, we're behind you. Love
sive line was his game We cheered with
the Pikes at the baseball game. But in the
end it was Notre Dame. On to Club Nu,
Fran, I can't believe you! While you were
in the Champagne room with'the rock star
I was with cousin Henry talking on the
phone in the car. Henry was making deals
in his mercedes SL. I was in love could you
tell. Those guys at Sharkcy's were tixi
groovy so we pulled that stunt from the
movies. Little did we know what was in
Store when we slipped out the back door
Somehow we met Jeff and Scott We were
diggin' them out alot. We didn't have a
choice that night. Were you really going to
stay the rest of your life? Easter is just days
away. We already have a place to stay. K
Fernandez.
GOING TO VIRGINIA BEACH THIS
WEEKEND? If so and will take a passen-
ger helping with gas money, then please
call Stephanie at 752-8579 or 757-6366
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
RING0LD TOLLERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER '89. EFF11TENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS FOR
INFO. CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH
AT 752-2865
KE-3CI
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Downtown Mall)758-3025
�rur � � ' � f " � -
� your secret sorority
ARE OU A COLI EGE STUDENT ECU: Here's the news, have you heard the
LOOKING FOR Part time employment, latest!? We're selling t-shirts and they're
need a good solid respectable job to begin the GREATEST! "Ten Reasons to be
YOUNG JAMACIAN WOMAN DE-
SIRES PEN PAL: Donna Hewitt P.O.Box
35 Montepelier, St. James, Jamacia, West
Indies.
CCONGRATULATIONS TO KAPPA
SIGMA: for winning 1st place in our 1st
annual Win, Lose or draw. Good job Boys!
Love, The Chi-Os.
HELLO TO OUR ROOMIES AND
NEIGHBORS: Sunburn, Party Ship, a
great big thanks to our neighbors for the
'use' of their 'room Human Condom,
Ten Boxes of Mac and Cheese, "What
I lappened Raft Race, Harley's and Biker
Dudes, Troll Master, Roommate of mine;
"I'm no a stoner" Busted, Wonderful
Maid Service, PJ, the 3 Mac's, "Don't you
diss me horr.egirl "Who ate all the Oh,
Michelle "Can I borrow Barn and T-
Bones, "Will you do me a favor We love
you guys! The Stoners, M,L, T.
SIG EPS: Thanks for the St. Patricks Day
social once again. You all are a great bunch
of guys. Lets do it again sometime soon.
Love the Alpha Phis.
JULIA HENIGAN: Welcome to Alpha
Phi! We are so excited to have you. Your
great and We love you! The Alpha Phis.
TO ALL THE WIN LOSE OR DRAW
CONTESTANTS: The night went well
. for all who particiapted Thank you all tor
coming. We hope you had fun! Love The
Chi-O's.
PSST. LOSTER LEGS PSST: We were
scammin' the whole way down. When we
ended up in'Overtown. It was only four,
so we knocked on Bryan's door. We hung
out at UM some. Steve Walsh's party was
fun. Merf introduced us to all the guys.
Check out the only one wi th blue eyes. Bill
Hawkins was his name first string defen-
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD .
1 I stT - � 1 �� . ,
���. �� . . �
IT s OUR BUSINESS
ACCU
FJST CO�f�S f(fi fii � Ti
758-2400
ABORTION
Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
�or appomtTnem Mon thru SaL Low
"ost TrrmlrUor. to 20 w�-�-ks of rwrgnancv
1-800-433-2930
GALLERY
LIGHT, BRIGHT, FUN,
JEWELRY
By Dave Jenssen
liMjlMi -j(ali
355-2426 Art G" Finerafts
690 Arlington Village
Mon-Fri
10-5pm
Sat
11-4pm
ATTENTION:
PANHELLENIC ANNOUNCES:
FALL RUSH WILL BE HELD:
AUGUST 19th - AUGUST 23rd
Announcements
VISITING LECTURES
The Honors Program, the Science and
Math Ed. Center and International Stud-
ies will sponsor "A Day in the Life of �
Park Ranger" March 28 (co-sponsored bv
the ECU Geology Dept.) K. Rod Cran-
son�Science Dept Lansing Community
College, Lansing, Mi Science Educator,
Summer Interpreter for the National Park
Service, and author of "Crater Lake�
Gem of the Cascades: The Geologic Story
of Crater Lake National Park 7:30 p.m
room 1026 GCB. "The National Parks of
New Zealand and Costa Rica" will be
presented on April 4th (co-sponsored
with the ECU English Dept). Robert and
Patricia Cahn�Environmental Journal-
ists and Consultants, Leesburg, VA. Pulit-
zer Prize 1969 and 1988 recipient of the
Majory Stoneman Douglas Award. 7:30
p.m , room 1031 GCB.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the April
issue. Articles can be left at the office or the
Media Board Secretary's Office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library. Deadline for submissions is ex-
tended to March 23.
FRE-PT STUDENTS
There will be 2 advising sessions for
summerfall registration for PT students.
Dates are March 22 & 23 at 7 p.m. in the PT
classroom (Belk bldg). ALL Pre-PT
students MUST attend one of these meet-
ings
BACKPACKING TRIP
Register now through March 28 for a BP
trip to the Uuharne National Forest.
Equip, transportation and trail food, as
well as instruction will be provided for a
nominal fee. All faculty, staff and students
are encouraged to register in 204 Memo-
rial Gym For additional info call 757-
6387
PUBUCINm
The League of Women Voters of Green-
ville- PittCounty is sponsoringa public in-
formational meeting about present and
future solid waste itigmt in Pitt County
The meeting will take place on March 21 at
730 p.m at the First Presbyterian Church
in Greenville.
SPORT PAY
The annual Budwciser Sport Day will
hold its registration March 28 at 5:00 p m.
in BIO 103. Participants receive FREE t-
shirts with trophies awarded to firM
through 4th place finishers Don't miss the
action This co-rec event is designed lor
teams of 2 men and 2 women
TENNIS MIX DOUBLES
A registration meeting for intramural
sport tennis mixed doubles will be held
March 28 at 5:30 p.m. in BC 103.
INTENDED MAIORS
All General College students who have in-
dicated a desire to major in Speech-Lan-
guage and Auditory Pathology and have
R. Muarelli as their advisor are to meet
on March 22 at 5:00 p.m. in BB 201. Advis-
ing for early registration will take place at
that time. Please prepare a tentative class
schedule before the meeting.
GIVE BLOOD
Please give blood. Army ROTC will be
having a Red Cross blood drive on March
21 and 22 from 12-6 p.m. at MSC Please
give
LOVE FEAST
Worship God this Holy Week at a unique
service expressing our love and commit-
ment to serve each othc- and the world
March 21, 5:15-6:15 p.m. promptly, at the
Baptist Student Union, 10th St I block
East of Wendy's Sponsored ecumenically
by the ECU Campus Ministries Assoc.
(758-2030).
MONEY, SEX & POWER
A Bible study which will explore these 3
themes crucial to Christians seeking to
live faithf"Uv. Will meet Tuesdays, 4-5
p.m. at the Methodist Student Center (501
E. 5th St, across from Garrett Dorm).
Sponsored by Presbyterian Campus Min-
istry. For further info call "Mike" at 752-
7240.
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta English Honor Society
will have an important meeting March 22
at 700 pun. in the English Dept. lounge
(GCB 2134). Old, new and prospective
members r re urged to attend.
CAREERS IN HEALTH
What are they? Find out if one is right for
you 8:00 pm. March 22, room B102
Brewster. Different career choices de-
scribed by recent ECU graduates in Envi-
ronmental Health. Sponsored by ECU
Env Health Club. Refreshments will be
served.
(EQ2
All Early Childhood Ed. majors are in-
vited to attend the next (EQ2 meetint. h
will be held on March 22 at 4:00 p.m. in
Speight 308. Join us and meet the "New
Kids on the Block
HOLY COMMUNION
Worship God and celebrate Communion
this Wed. night at 5 p.m. at the Methodist
Student Center then enjoy a delicious, all-
you-can-eat home cooked meal and good
fellowship. The meal is $2 at the door,
SI.50 for members. Call 758-2030 for info.
Sponsored by Presbyterian and Method-
ist Campus Ministries.
SRA
Filing dates for offices in Student Resi-
dence Assoc Area Residence Council,
and House Council will be from March
20th through 23rd. There will be a manda-
tory candidates meeting in Greene Lobby
on March 23rd at 7:00 p.m. Elections will
be held March 28th. Don't forget to come
and vote!
YEARBOOKS
1987 & 1988 Buccaneers along with the
1988 New Student Reviews can be picked
up in the hallway of the Publications Bldg.
anytime during the day.
CCF
Campus Christian Fellowship would like
to invite you to our Bible study every
Tues. at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130. Bring your
Bible and a friend as we study the book of
Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199 if you reed
a ride or further info.
QPN
The Overseas Development Network will
meet in room 8-E (downstairs) in Men
denhall today at 5 p.m. We will discuss the
upcoming yard sale and other fund rais-
ers. All members, and anyone else inter-
ested in learning about Third World coun-
tries, please attend. For more info, call
Tonya Batizy (h) 830-8888, (w) 757-6611
Ext. 221.
BIG KIPS
If your life has been affected, past or pres-
ent, by having been raised in a home or
environment where alcoholic and other
dysfunctional behaviors were present,
Here's Something You Should Know
Each Tues. at 4:30, in rm. 312 of the Coun-
seling Center, there is a discussion and
learning group meeting for those with
common concerns Newcomers are en-
couraged to come at 4:15. Call 757-6793 for
additional info.
BE A PART OF BACCHUS
The next BACCHUS meeting will be
March 21 at 6 p.m. in 305 Joyner Library.
BACCHUS stands for Boost Alcohol Con-
sciousness Concerning the Health of Uni-
versity Students. Find out how you can be
a part of it. Preview current videos, plan
programs like health fair, designated
drivers, etc. Call 757-6793 for more info,
and ask at the lib. desk how to find meet-
ing rm.
COURSE OFFERED
A Humanities course for 1st Summer
Session will be offered in Russian Lit. of
the 19th Century taught in English (Russ
2220), M-F, 11:20-12:50. This is a 3 credit
course dealing with Dostoevsky, Tolstoy
and other great Russian writers. The
course satisfies the General College
Humanities requirement.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting is April 3 at 7:00 in GCB
1019. We will discuss plans for our trip to
Campbell Law School on April 7. Please
attend.
CHOLESTEROL TESTING
The Student Health Service is offering you
the key to living a healthy life! Cholesterol
screening is available at the Student
Health Service M-F, 8-12. The cost is
$4.00�Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Blood
Sugar or Cholesterol, Triglycerides, HDL-
$7.00. For best test results don't eat or
drink anything after 6:00 p.m. the night
before. No appointment is necessary! For
additional info call 757-6841.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Amnesty International meets every 4th
Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 401 E. 4th St. in the upper floor�
enter from the 4th St. entrance. Next
meeting: March 22. Students welcome.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1989 Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics Spring Games will be held on
April 14 at E B. Aycock Jr. High School in
Greenville (rain date April 21) Volun
teers are needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olympians
Volunteers must be able to work all day �
from 9a.m2 p.m. An orientation meeting
will be held on April 11 in Old Joyner
Library, rm 221 from 5-5 45 pm Free
lunches and volunteer t-shirts will tv
provided the dag of the games to al! vol-
unteers who have attended the onenta
tion session For more into , contact Spe
cial Olympics office 830-4551
BALLOON RIDES
Come join the Down East Balloon Societ;
on April 15 from 4-7 p.m. at Vernon Park
Mall (Kinston) for hot air balloon rides
and help us raise funds for Children's
Hospital of Eastern N.C (weather permit
ting�rain date: April 29,4-7 pnvi Watch
the Children's Miracle Network Telethon
on WITN-7, June 3-4.
CAMP ESP'ERANCE
French summer camp, sponsored by the
N.C. Chapter of the American Assoc of
Teachers of French and the World Con tor
in Raleigh. High school: July 16-22: junior
high: ,uly 23-27; elementary: July 29-Aug.
1. The cost isS250 high school; j.Mior high
S235, elementary: S205. Held at Camp
Hanes in King, NC, 15 miles north of
Winston Salem. Info Director, Rt. 4, Box
330-A, Statcsville, NC 28677. (704) 876-
0656.
PLANT SALE
The ECU Biology Club will be sponsoring
a plant sale April 6-7. The sale wall take
place in the Biology Greenhouse, room
BS-111 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
OREGON
The performance of the Jazz Ensemble
Oregon will conclude the 1988-89 Cham-
ber Music Series This performance will be
held in Hendnx Theatre on April 5 at 8
pm. Tickets are on sale now at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC I lours are 11 am -6
p.m M-F. Telephone 757-6611, ext. 266
Don't miss this exciting evening of 1m
provisational ja.z. This event is co-spon
sored by the School ot M usic and the Dept
of University Unions
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOSE
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fn
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If ycu are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, loir,
us for the uncompromised word of God
Every Fri. night at 7.00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
CCF
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we stud
the book of Hebrews Call Jim at 752-71
if you need a ride or further info
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quah
fied for university work study program
Hours:Mon.2pm.to5pm Sat,10am to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week) If inter
ested, please call Connie � 757-6o65 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business clas,�es.
Contact Lisa at Academic counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677
ECU NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 7:30-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
ments served No ticket required; just
reserve your time.
HELP FIGHT CANCER
A 24-hour Run Against Cancer will be
sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed
National Fraternity, and the American
Cancer Society on April 14th & 15th at the
ECU track. Contestants are not required
to jog or walk the entire 24 hours, but
instead will be taking turns with nine
other team members for 1 2 hour periods
Find out about entering a team or donat-
ing money materials. For more info call
Rose Richards (752-2574) of the American
Cancer Soc Bryan Haskins uoo-youj, o.
Alpha Phi Omega or David Over ton (830-
6785) of Alpha Phi Omega.
9






i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21, 1989 7
University Scholars Awards recipients
honored for high academic achievement
BvTIM HAMPTON
cw� Iditor
Saturday was "a blue ribbon
day tor ECU" as approximately
240 people attended a University
Scholars Pav luncheon in the
Foyer Classroom building
The University Scholars
rds established in 1985, are
tour -year scholarships
i a 'n the basis of outstand-
K tdemic achievement and
leadership potential. The current
2 I niversity Scholars, represent-
ingall four undergraduate classes,
and donors ot ho grants were
V,
ful
gra
red v)t the luncheon.
The program is "more than
mere scholarships, it is a commit-
ment to academic excellent, " Dr.
William A. Bloodworth, vicechan-
cellor for academic attairs, said
before the noon program.
asting expanding in four
years, the LCU Foundation, the
organization providing the schol-
arships, is now offering 31 awards
with eight additional grants in the
process of being funded, accord-
ing to James L Lanier Jr vice
chancellor for Institutional Ad-
vancement.
Also in attention of the lunch-
eon were 34 candidates for the
19S9 scholarships. Representing
high schools throughout North
Carolina, candidates were inter-
viewed by committees of ECU
faculty and staff, University Schol-
ars Awards, alumni and current
University Scholars.
Of the 34 candidates, seven
will receive awards to be an-
nounced bv April 3.
Chancellor Richard Eakin
dedicated a special University
Scholars area in the office suite
housing the Honors Program
Plaques honoring the donors are
displayed in the area, along with a
book of profiles which tell about
each donor and the person for
whom a scholarship is named.
Science fair held in Minges
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.
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com i
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.��. iColiseumassciencestu-
from 15 counties across
Carolina took part in the
east Regional Science Fair.
rttsinkindergarden through
tool participated in the
ition, and judges deter-
mined the winners in the fields of
Physical Science, Biology and
Earth Science.
Winners of the Physical Sci-
ence category included Matt
1 lungatejim Highland Tim Clark
in the first place, Meg Hannon
and Shannon Pollard taking sec-
ond, and Ali Altuner and Charles
Colson third In Biology, Kathy
Wiltort and Charles Harris placed
first, Adricnne Allison, Emily
Fleming and Shisir Sinha second,
and Jeff Allegood and Jennifer
Long in third. Nissa Omer, Amy
Shrive, and Molly Hcinzcn all won
in the field of Earth Science.
The winners of the regional
science fair will participate in the
statewide science competition,
which will be held on April 28.
Summer Positions Available at
The East Carolinian:
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feditor, Features Intern Editor, Sports Editor and Assistan
Editor.
Apply now for a great summer job and valuable journalism experience.
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:





1Mb EAS1 i ROI INIAN
Features
MARCH 21, 1989 PAGE 8
Athens' Widespread Panic
doesn't create a lot of havoc
By JIM SHAMLIN
SUff Writer
Athens hand Wides
Saturday night in su
pread Panic brought their (�rateful Dead-inspired show to the New Deli
ppotl of their new album.
The New Deli features bands
which play "alternative" music.
This broad category includes eve-
rything from blues to punk, from
bands which are quite talented to
bands which absolutely stink.
Friday night, the Deli hosted John
Bell, Michael Houser odd Nance,
and David Schools, collectively
'mown as Widespread Panic.
The music was arranged so
th it each musician had an oppor-
ti nity to demonstrate his talent.
P11 and Houser alternated play-
ing the lead and rhythm guitar
parts while Schools and Nance
kept a steady beat on the bass and
drums, respectively. Together,
thev produced a full-bodied sound
which was surprisingly well-bal-
anced in the cavernous bar.
Their musical style was much
like that of the Grateful Dead,
whose music has sustained its
popularity as a cult band since the
1960s. The Grateful Dead has been
a starting ground for a handful of
accomplished instrumentalists,
and it shows a great deal of merit
on the part of Widespread Panic
to emulate their style.
There was, however, a great
deal of repetitiveness in Wide-
spread Panic's music, both within
each number and between each
separate piece. If the band didn't
tune instruments once in a while,
no one would know where one
song ended and the next began.
Showmanship, too, was a
problem for Widespread Panic.
Thev stood motionless on the
stage; Schools looked I
through the entire show H is is
an easv rut to tall into, since
band plays the same s � er
and over at each pert r ind
at practice.
The trick of live performan
is to make each show seem likcthc
first one the band ha- e r�e
Until Widespread Panic l ai
this, thev will continue pi i �
the small-time circuit in
towns.
All thing cmsidi red I
night's performance
but it certainly wasn't worth the
four-dollar cover chargi I i the
an prio i . � i '
crate thai rt of mu
chase their ca tt m-
. fan)
W;
By CHIP CARTER
s w
Bands today succeed for one
oi two reasons. Either the) make
good music, or their lyrics appeal
to their audience
Since 1 prefer to think that
Debbie Gibson makes horrible
music, this theory covers her (and
a multitude of others'1 nicely. On
the flip side, it also helps explain
the popularity of many barbands.
I ike the Slammin' Watusis.
Their new l.p. "Kings of Noise "
has killer licks, funsaxsol sai I
a strong album melodically. It s
their Ivrics they need some help
with.
i he strongest cuts on the al-
are t lay Watusi's "1 i in' in
Sin ,nd Lee Pope and Mark
Durante's 'Madnessand Mania
While worlds apart stylistically,
thoy show the depth this young
hand has. and their potential.
Watusi has a tendency to dive
ov rboard on social comment.
Both "Livin' in Sin" and
'Evervtovvn' make eood points.
IVkUh
but they are clumsy point;
at the cost of lyric quality
The best hoes on the album
concerns the Watusis' attacks on
Stryper and limmv Swagg. rt. To
the eellow-and-black-clad met-
alheads tor God, Watusi sings,
IIEY there johnnv, where you
i
going with your doughDough
you made from your rock and roll
show
Brother Swaggart gets his a
chorus later. "HEY there people,
who's leadingyou onMan witha
Bibleand abighard-on Priceless
stuff.
"Madness and Mania and
Pope's other tune, "Fight Ball" pay
homage to the Ramones and the
sort o thrash nonsense that go
them through "Rockand Roll High
School
Pope as a songwriter needs to
learn an important lesson: Kill
your darlings. The Watusis actu-
ally recorded his song "Born in
Chicago Someone, a band
member or producer Howard
Benson, should have shot this
down before it made vinyl.
Sec SLAMMIN, page 10
Mark Durante, Lee Pope, Benny B.B. Sapphire and Clay Watusi of the Slammin' Watusis, dance
to Fast Frank Raven's funky sax solo.
House helps foreign students
BySTFVE BAKFR
Sufi Writer
The International House helps foreign students adjust to life in
the United States by giving them a place to stay and meet. (Photo
by ECU Photolab)
An American student's ad-
justment to college is simple,
compared to the foreign exchange
students complete change in cul-
ture, llure are many barriers to
be passed by the students, often
times before thev ever arrive in
the United States.
With such a drastic change in
lifestyle, it can be comforting to
know of a place for help. There
are many such programs and
organizations to make the stu-
dents stay here more enjoyable.
One such example is the Interna-
tional House.
In 1974, Jafari Jamshid, ECU's
foreign student advisor and resi-
dent of the International Student
Association, took over a vacant
house on Ninth Street, before
demolition for parking lots could
take place. The house belonged to
a local family at one time, but was
later purchased by the university.
me umtea Mates nveivine tnem a piace iu w�i" ��'�-�. i. i ��"�� , , u j u u
uicuuhcuji B h t . later purchased bv the university.
by ECU Photolab) K ' J
Cheerleading banquet honors
athletic supporters at Hilton Inn
Bv LI L HIGHSMITH
1 he ECl cheerlcadi rs held a
banquet Wednesday night lo
honor their mosl dedicau 1 mem-
bers. Awards were given to se
eral cheerleaders tor their contri
buttons to the cheering pn gram
L ettermen jackets vs ere given
to Sammy ackson and Doug
Gaylord in a post-dinner cere
mony. The Pirate Pride award
go. en tor outstandingdedication
to ECU cheerleading and athlet-
ics was given to Gene Wingard
and Chris Penhollow. An award
for outstanding leadership went
toKimBowenand I tonShephard.
Theceremon) highlighted the
new spirit brought to the ECU
cheering squad by Peggy Smith,
the new director ol the program
Smith, hired ml 8. is attempting
to change the focus and direction
of cheerleading in a variety of
wavs.
'Where many other national
squads are "show-oriented" and
involve themselves only in the
major sports like football and
basketball, Smith steers the ECU
-quad in alternate directions.
( ur mam purpose is to sup-
port E( I athletics, all the ath-
letes Mm th said. Hut our main
goal is crowd involvement, not
performing
Smith was a cheerleader foi
tour years at the University of
Southwest Louisiana. She has
brought a high level ol energy to
the( I program hich corn
petes and consistent!) ranks na-
tionally against such s� hools as
Kentucky, Illinois, 1 lorida State,
N State and I N Chapel Hill.
Dedicationisa watchword for
ECU cheerleading In addition to
a 2.0 CPA requirement, strict
m li il guidelines including ran-
dom drug testing ,ud check-ups
before any contest, an exhaustive
five da) practice s� hedule, cheer
K idt rs must give up many of their
breaks to cheer or practice.
I heC hristmas,Thanksgiving
and Spring Break holidays were
interrupted for them due to ath-
tetk events Even the summer
break onl lasts about two weeks
due to practice.
Smith has her eyes set on
making the ECU cheerleading
squad a prominent part of school
athletics. The members of her
squad not only cheer for football,
but for men's and women's bas-
ketball, volleyball, soccer, swim-
ming, diving, baseball ad softball.
They also conduct cheerleading
camps and compete annually in
the National Collegiate Cheerlead-
ing Championships.
Also,all squads practice daily
for three hours, involving running
all days, aerobic training all days,
aerobic training all days, strength
training three days a week plus
the regular practice drills. A sixth
weekday is added to their sched-
ule by whatever athletic event the
squad covers that weekend.
Considering the number of
events supported by the squads, it
is not surprising that the group is
close-knit. "They pretty much
become a family. We spend all
year together Smith said.
This has brought a new sense
of pride to the program. 'There
was not a lot of honor involved in
being a cheerleader here. We're
changing that she said.
Jamshid wanted to establish
somewhere foreign studcntscould
go 365 days a year. Dr. Leo Jen-
kins, chancellor at the time, ap-
proved the issue but appropriated
no funds for the project. Members
working for the house accepted
donations and held international
dinners to self-fund the program.
These dinners provided the
community with a taste of many
different cultures. Many felt the
project would run out of steam.
However, the project continued
into the late 70s. Then the house
was absorbed into the residence
hall system.
With this turnover came new
ideas. Renovations were under-
taken by the school. Every single
item in the house was removed,
including the light fixtures. With
aid of the Art School's design
work, the house took on a new
image.
In the years to follow, many
different people, with many dif-
ferent cultures, added to the color
of the new home.
The majority of foreign ex-
change students live off- campus,
but the house currently accom-
modates nine, and provides room
for others if necessary. Living
there has advantages for the stu-
dents.
The house provides a place to
cook, which the dorms do not
Foods differ from culture to cul-
ture, and sometimes i t can be hard
to adjust to the new tastes and
smells.
It also provides a much qui-
eter and economical means for
one's visit to the states. The Inter-
national House provides the pleas-
ure of an apartment, without the
noise of a dorm. The house also
encourages interaction between
many different cultures.
For these reasons and others,
residencv in the house is much
sought after. As with all univer-
sity policies, guidelines for living
in the house must be met. No two
people of the same background
can take permanent residencv in
the home, upper classmen are
preferred, and the use of English
is strongly recommended.
The organization also has
other advantages for the students,
besides a place to stav. Currently,
ECU has 83 foreign exchange stu-
dents in the program here on
campus. The International House
provides these students with a
place to meet and discuss prob-
lems, organize events and trips, or
simply as a place to relax and en-
joy.
Members work as a unit to
prepare for nc stud nl
the program. Special oi
are held for these stud nts
them get into their new
life easily and effectively.
Additionalh resident
house can help the new students
by providing them with
information, such as campus ac-
tivities, off-campus housi
area businesses such as restau-
rants, malls and groa i �
There are many similar or-
ganizations nationwide. Some,
such as UN'C, operate somewhat
differently, usinga dorm
exchange students interact
among Americans. Others oper-
ate in much the same way as
ECU'S.
Although none of the organi-
zations are directly related, tl
often help one another. One such
service provides students with a
place to sta y i f the) decide to rra el
during a vacati
More interaction between the
schools is a hopeful outlook for
the organization Expansion by
all the organizations will help with
this. Communitv involvement
could also assist tow ardsthis coal
Am one interested can he-
come a member oJ the Interna-
tional House Organization Inter-
ested individuals can help with
time and
j
Peggy Smith, cheerleading advisor, hands out an award to a lucky cheerleader. The awards
banquet was held Wednesday night at the Hilton Inn. (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab)





I
.T IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21.1989 9
i
Usuals return to Greenville
By EARL HAMPTON
Staff Writer
Touring the sou theast in a blue
Ford van with a crumpled road
map can be hell at times, but psy-
cho-rock and rollers The Usuals
had no trouble navigating towards
Greenville for a Friday show at
the Attic.
After buying some burgers at
ixaleigh'sChar-Grill, the foursome
sped their van in the direction of
highway 264 and kicked in the
tutopiiot And boom, they ap-
peared in the Emerald City, a town
a here the band had started their
careers six years ago.
Tacking their belongings and
leaving Green ville last November,
1 'he Usuals are now transplanted
in the prefabrication oi Raleigh
and its suburbs Raleighwood, as
they pay the music men dues and
search for the big time.
Some Usuals groupies were
peeved at the idea of a Usual-less
Greenville, but band leaders prom-
ised to come back. Saturday night
the band returned home.
Flaying a cross-variation of
deviant, psycho-rock and roll, a
churned mixture of fresh origi-
nals, established originals and '60s
covers. The Usuals are still very
qualified to do what they do �
entertain.
Of the originals, they played
"Abusing You a reggae influ-
ence with a hard hitting message
and "Nothing to Fear a weird
jammer and title track from their
first release.
Stringy-haired lead singer
Sammy Madison had the Attic
crowd sweating with a few Led
Zeppelin tunes and a Simon and
Garfunkel song.
The stepped-up version of
slow S and G original "Celica"
was most entertaining, especially
since some of the stage side audi-
ence started a conservative ver-
sion of slam dancing. Drummer
Scott Struttsenjoyed theslamming
as he pumped his hickory sticks at
an excited rate.
But these guys weren't the
same Usuals who left Greenville
six months ago. The change was
evident in bassist Manute Cain's
new bass. Once a yellow instru-
ment with freaky purple letters
spelling L-O-V-E, Manute had a
new bass for the latest gig.
For the show, the dark, al-
most demonic looking, nicotine
addict Manute was sporting a
purple bass with psychedelic yel-
low letters reading P-E-A-C-E. A
radical change for the man in the
moth-ridden jeans.
Lead guitarist Tat Dickerson
proved his expertise by strum-
ming his two eieclricguitars and
one acoustic guitars. Dickerson
was most impressive with the
acoustic intro to "Wish You Were
Here
Before the "Welcome Home
'89 tour" for The Usuals was
complete, the band members, the
crowd and the Attic walls were
sweating for more.
rnrr SCHOLARSHIP information for
I flLL STUDENTS WHO NEED
MONEY FOR COLLEGE
Every Student is Eligible for Some Type of Financial Aid
Regardless of Grades or Parental Income.
� We have a data bank of over 200,000 listings of scholarships, fellow
ships, grants, and loans, representing over $10 billion in private sector
funding
� Many scholarships are given to students based on their academic
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Sidewinder shows off new band
By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
SiaM N rim
On Saturday night the Attic
welcomed Sidewinder back tor an
a wesome rock night to remember.
The club was jam packed and the
croud went wild when the lights
went down and Sidewinder took
the stage.
This Raleigh-based hard rock
outfit tore down the walls as they
jammed the night away with some
of the best tunes
They covered such classic
songs as "Rambin' On" by Led
Zeppelin, "More than a Feeling"
by Boston and "Little Piece of My
Heart" by Janis Joplin.
The new breed of rock-n-roU
was not forgotten when the band
performed songs by the Bullet
Boys, Europe, the new Bad Com-
pany and Ratt, repectively.
Trancing around like tigers in
a cage, the band was full oi end-
less energy as they pumped out
some of their own hard-edged
tunes.
A lot of the energy was due to
the recent line-up changes in the
band.
Vocalists Jan Fields and
Wendy Upchurch, keyboardist
Bland Sawyer and drummer Jim
Sheppard recruited three new
players for the band.
Guitarists Scott Purccll and
Rob Greene along with bassist
David Sereque joined Sidewinder
only a couple oi months ago.
Recently stepping off a Cana-
dian tour to break the new band
members in, Wendy Upchrch said
she is excited about the new line-
up changes.
She noted that theoriginal gui-
tarists and bassist left because of
the constant touring that Side-
winder must do to maintain their
popularity.
The new members are with-
out a doubt very talented and
added much to the non-stop rock-
n-roll on stage.
Throughout the night, guitar-
ist Purcell and bassist Sereque took
to the microphone and showed
the crowd they could sing as well
as play their respective instru-
ments.
Alter three hoursof hard-driv-
ing but melodic rock-n-roll, Side-
winder brought their show to an
end and the crowd to a frenzy.
As tor Sidewinder, their partv
has just begun.
After finishing up some club
dates in various parts of the state,
the bind will head further south
to Alabama, Mississippi and Flor-
ida to do some rock-n-roli touring
and headbanging.
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Conductor records lost symphony
of American composer Barber
GIVE YOUR CAREER
THE SAME CAREFUL ATTENTION
YOU GIVE YOUR PATIENTS.
(AP) American classical
c isn'l as well-known as it
should bi ii America or abroad,
v : - : ' I or Andrew Schenck.
re's a lot of substantial
there that deserves for
s I ' v n ther listen, call our
own and be proud oi " He adds
� : k h has been out
: - n is now back in style.
k has made a new
; cr-listen, back-in-style"
recording, with the New Zealand
Symphony. It'sot Samuel Barber's
"Second Symphony which was
commissioned by the Army Air
Force and premiered by the Bos-
ton Symphony in 1944.
There's a pretty dramatic rea-
son it hasn't been heard lately �
its composer tore it up.
"It's a splendidly crafted
symphony Schenck savs. "It's a
major piece by one oi America's
giants.
"As the century ends, we can
look back and see somewhere in
the middle of it we had a real
symphonic golden age of Ameri-
can composers� Aaron Copland,
Samuel Barber, Virgil Thomson,
Roy Harris, William Schuman. 1
think their music needs a vast re-
examining and re-recording.
We've got the technology and
orchestras that can do it
But what happened to Barber
See AMERICAN, page 10
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IRTQ1RVED
CLASS RINGS
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
ACCEPTED FOR THE POSTIONS OF
Chairperson
FOR THE MAJOR CONCERTS AND
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE
Apply at the
Student Union Office
Room 236, Mendenhall
Application Deadline - Monday, March 27
The Quality.
The Craftsmanship.
The Reward bu Deservt
March 20th - 24th 9:00
Monday - Friday 4:00 Pm
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East Carolina University
Date
Time
Place
$20.00 Deposit Required





10
THE EAST CAROL1NI AN
MARC H :i I9S9

American classics ignored
Continued from pat;e 9
and lus Second Symphon)
Schenck saj s Barlx r publisher
told me thai about 20 years after
the mphv.m was w ritten he said
to Barlx r Allol our ivorkshave
lasted so well. But vt can t seem
to gel the "Second S) mphony of(
the ground 1 don't think then?
was a pun intended
Barbei replied I Ik n a a
is simple It's r I i . od work
Let's k l nice and
destroy I rdidst IT j tore
the part up pen
Schenck, v ho is 4" made his
tirst record!
a Bart i rw i
don - ;
son playing 1 i � i
certo sels organized lhal
rec �rd i � � . enck
had an i u ii � Hal orati
the concert Scnenck
gut si ' dsad
Cahl Sym
The conductoi says: "i
thought the logical thing to do
was follow that with .
her project, e . n th
sider myseli a non rx : As i
talked with people aboul what
repertoire to do the ston
'Second Symphony came up
piqued my curiosit)
�s4 it w is an
tht Lon
ar-
i on
Schenck delved into the his-
tory and found good reviews. He
says "Barber was a corporal in
the Air Force He appeared at the
s mphony's premiere in uniform.
I lehad flown around, apparently,
and soaked up inspiration for the
symphony at various Air Force
bases.
There was speculation about
what he was trying to say related
to the Air Force. The most intrigu-
ing Vk as the electronic signal gen-
erated for the second movement
by Roll Labs. Alter the premiere,
he re isod the piece. 1 le took the
generator out off there. I le wasn't
terribly comfortable with the
speculation thai this part of the
symphony was supposed to be
describing an air raid
'He must have telt it the
symphony was k linked with
the military, somehow it would
denigrate its artistic merit lie
wanted it to be accepted asa work
of art in us own right.
Interestingl) , after the sym-
phony was withdrawn, the sec
ond movement was published
separately with the title "Night
Right He did something else
interesting. He lifted a portion
from the beginning ot the sym
phonj and stuck it into his opera
'Antony and Cleopatra 1 levx rote
a vocal text ov t theorchestra part
1 was astonished when ! heard it
for the first tinK "
Schenck continues " Km pei
ceptions change over time
Twelve-tone and chance music
were in style in the early '6f
Among the musical literati .it thai
time, descriptive music was t
IXX).
"1 think peopk now ai thinl
ing it is not such a terribk thingl
write descriptive pie es w ilh m i
jor chords and melodies l'h hen i
right now is the neo-nunanl
style.
"Leonard Slatkin and tru I
Louis Symph � just canv ;
with a disc ol I I i I �
n s (.it on 1 i � i �
re corded bef r�
coming l V
Schen k no ei me!
w Ui died in . �' � I i
sponded w ith attori
ber'sestau �
for him to an
Symphony
Schc nek si 11
S( oreol the Aoikini
M original tl
have to ha eparl mi
cian) mack fi
1 hen fate intei
publisht rs) . St hirmer located a
set of jMitsat its 1 ondon branch
i im condiK tor had been en
gaged by the New Zealand Sym
I hon foran onthofconcertsand
20 hours of recording time So, for
Stradivari lassies,the) madethe
rceordingof Ihesj mphony, which
Barbt r once u rote that the Boston
S) mphony found difficult.
Schenck says thai the New Zeal-
and S) mphony did a magnificent
job
"I was bombarding them We
also did Barber's 'First Symphony'
in conceit. It's a very different
I iet e, much shorter, in one move-
ment Schenk savs.
WHICHARD S BEACH DANCE
CLUB
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Doors Open at 7:30
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Slammiiv Watusis miss on Lp
Continued from page 8
I've heen
ki fit's
nuic that
l. 3 1
1 to
Take these lines
around the world y�
not eas) I I
really does r
rockin' blues on
Side. It's the v : .
keep me kickin' and
thatmeanit'sn tea .
the world, or that it s hard to 1
house rockin' bl ie in
West Side?
Granted - - . neoi trei
proud of tin ii . .
may enjov this narcis
cise, but few ot i - .
Which brings up an ther
question � who do the- Slammin'
Watusis think then audience is?
here are no less than threi hand neyleadsinj rutdn.i
on the road songs on ' Kings ot Pope yowls out
v m most i .
I ranted I n o made .s lot tra k : . :
ofmone) wit! Wanted, Dead or Here he I i.l
but that's . o reason to cliche ima
I: ilate then iEl made a lot of fire, � 11 .�. II
si al ut the end ol lull speed
world, but that doesn't mean Cats put to de.it I � .�
. for a fkx�d i f blatant idux
msda ditt Though u
Musica � e Watusis lieu this album, 1 f n
a maturity i I ; �und in main tor the Slammii
ds. Fast i: k awn s saxo don't give in to tl
phonesolosai i sweet countei urges As Pop - in
nt to Pope's . inic guitar Danger, "Fame and I
"he vocals � split between ann'sreach uu can try and
Pope and Wat u si Watusi has the cantrybutyou won't, lwi
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raNir
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Apply in Person S
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The East Carolinian
2nd Floor
Publications Building
"No Phone Calls Please
'Experience Preferred
our
gains
CANC
JOIN THE FIGHT
ANN OUNCIN G
Election of Executive Officers
for the
Student Residence Association
Area Residence Councils
Residence Hall House Councils
March 28, 1989
Filing Dates are March 20 - March 23
Campaigns will be March 24 to March 29
Candidates Meeting - March 23, 1989
7:00 pm
Greene Lobby
I
APRIL 14-15
Starting Time: 6 p.m.
Registration begins at 4:30 p.m. at East Carolina
University track
Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk,
run or jog against cancer.
Team members run in half hour shifts for 24 hours
For more information call 752-2574
For More Information and Applications
See Your Residence Hall Directors
FUN FOOD AND EXERCISE
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r:






I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 21,1989 PAGE 11
Win Lady Pirate Softball Classic
Lady Pirates take tournament
The Lady Pirates were in action inadoubleheader Monday against Ohio University. We will have all
scores and details in Thursday's paper (Photo by Mark I ove, ECU Photo Lab)
EC U takes two from JMU Dukes
By KR1STEN H ALB ERG
Sport Writer
Junior pitcher Jonathan Jen-
kins is unhittable. Jenkins in-
creased his record to 5-0 for the
season after leading the Pirates to
an 7-2 victory Sunday over the
Dukes of James Madison.
The Pirates traveled to Han-
sonburg, 'a for a three-game stint
over the weekend which left ECU
two for three against the Dukes.
The Bues moved their record to
12-2 overall and 2-1 in the Colo-
nial Athletic Association.
Jenkins pitched eight innings
on Sundav giving up six hits and
two nins to ice the victory for the
Pirates. Along with improving his
personal record to 5-0, the leading
pitcher also maintains a 0.36 ERA
which puts him among the na-
tion's leaders.
The junior pitcher pitched 24
and one-third innings this season
before finally giving up a run in
the eighth inning of Sunday's win
over JMU.
Jenkins ran his record to 10-0
onhis career and is tied with team-
mate Jake Jacobs for most con-
secutive victory's in ECU history.
He could break the record in his
next outing.
Both teams played better than
the last two outings as the players
had been giving sloppy perform-
ances.
Scherer to leave
ECU basketball
ECU jumped to an early 4 0
lead in the first inning when ECU
runners knocked oi MU pitcher
Alvin Allen. The Bucs scored one
run in the sixth and had two insur-
ance runs in the seventh to make
the score 7-0.
JMU jumped on the board to
score two in the eighth but it was
to little to late for the Dukes. Fresh-
man Tom Move relieved Jenkins
and shut MU down in order.
In Saturday's action. The Pi-
rates played a very sloppy game
in their first meeting against JMU.
The weather didn't help the poor
performance of ECU that game as
the game was delayed for 30
minutes two different times due
to rain.
But the Pirates did have one
shinning moment in the second
inning, John Cast and Cabin
Brown hit back to back homo runs
which -marks- the first time ECU
players have done this since 1986.
1MU would take the lead that
thev would never relinquish in
the fourth inning. Thev had tour
runsoff of tw o hitsand three w alks
by ECU pitching.
The Dukes exploded in the
sixth inning going on n eight run
stint which left ECU stunned.This
was the mbt runs scored against
ECU in an inning since the season
began.
The Bucs did score one in the
sixth when Brown singled home
Tommy Eason who trippled and
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Stiff Writir
East Carolina softball team'
came away with a victory Sunday
in the championship game ol the
l.ady Pirate Softball Classic, with
a 2-6 win over the University of
Virginia.
The Lady Pirates who were
5 0,overall of the eight team tour-
nament, won two games on Satur-
day and then advanced through
Sunday's single elimination toura-
ment to face the Lady Cavaliers in
the championship.
On Saturday, ECU picked up
wins over George Mason and
UNC-Charlotte.
Against George Mason the
Lady Pirates won 4-0 Tracye
Larkin picked up her second win
of the season as the winning
pitcher and three I ady Pirates
went 2 4 for the game.
Senior Mickey Lord who was
2-4, got a base hit in the first inning
which lead to ECU'S first run of
the game. Jennifer Sagl's two hits
contributed to ECU scoring in the
second and the seventh inning.
Laura Crowder also went 2 4 foi
ECU.
In the Lady Pirates second
game of the day, they faced UNC-
Charlotte, who had picked two
wins earlier in the day against
George Mason and Wagner Col-
lege.
East Carolina scored in overs
inning except the sixth
the Lady 49ers 10-2
Jennifer Sagl remai
feated on the mound, with her
thud victory of the season. I " (
Charlotte's Wendy Stratton, who
was fourteenth in the action lat�t
year in strikeouts took the loss
and dropped her record to 3 4.
A third game scheduled for
Saturday afternoon against Wag
ner College was called for dark
ncss.
The results from Satnrd ly -
play determined the seeding tor
Sunday's single elimination tour-
nament. With their two wins, the
added another run to their score
in the seventh when SteveGooden
scored on a sacrifice fly by Mike
Andrews. But, it would not be
enough to pull the Pirates out of
their rut as the Dukes won 13-4.
But the Pirates would not
dwell on their second loss for the
season, hey came back in the
second game in the series and beat
lames Madison 10-8 in a game
which would be limited to six
innings due to darkness
Jake Jacobs went the distance
on the mound. Three of eight runs
were earned a he pitched the
entire game foi the Pirates.
ECU trailed 5-0 early in the
ball game as MU snagged one
run in the first and an additional
four runs in the second.
The Pirates then mounted a
comeback. They scored three runs
in the third off oi two hits, two
walks and one JMU error to close
the gap to within two at 5-3.
Finally, in the fourth, Goodin
would tripple and Andrews and
John Cast would double to give Lady Pirates were seeded num-
the Pirates the 6-3 lead. bcr-one in their bracket and faced
JMU would tie it up in the UNC-Wilmington on Sunday
bottom oi the fourth but ECU came
Eat Carolina found them-
selves down when the Lady
Seahawks scored two runs in the
first inning.
In the fourth inning. East
�- arolina'sbatscarr alive and put
the Lady Pirates up 7-2.
Wendy Tonker started the
scoring as she singled in the fourth,
driving in Mechelle Jones. Laura
Crowder, who was 2-4 for the
game followed by driving in
Leslie Cramer. Also scoring for
ECU was Sagl, Cheryl Higgins,
Tracey Kee, Renee Meyers and
Crowder.
In the fifth inning. ECU scored
m hen Crow dor picked up her sec-
ond KB1 b) driving in Sagl and
Mickey Ford drove in Meyers
Sagl remained undefeated
w ilh a 4 0 record on the mound.
East Carolina then advanced
to the semi finals against George
Mason In earlier play, George
Mason defeated Coastal Carolina
2-1 to advance to the semi-finals.
Action was also more than the
1 ady Pirates had bargained for as
they found themselves trailing to
George Mason in the first inning.
The I .ady Pirates had seven
hits for the game and gave the
Lady Pirates a scare.
East Carolina scored in the
second inning when Cramer drove
in Weller on an error. GMU came
back and score 1 in the top of the
fifth and in the bottom of the sixth
inning ECU trailed 2-1
GMU's Robin Fcrstl walked
several ECU batters to load the
bases and Weller scored as Ferstl
walked yet another batter to tie
the score at 2-2 going into the
seventh.
George Mason managed one
run in the top of the seventh put-
ting the Pirates in a do or die situ-
ation.
Much to the liking of East
Carolina, errors and walks by
GMU loaded the bases with one
out as Mechelle Jones came to bat.
Jones singled, driving in Barb
Schuler and on an overthrown ball
to homcplate Wendy Tonker
scored the winning run.
The 4-3 win put ECU in the
finals against the Lady Cavaliers
who were also 4-0 for the week-
end's play.
Virginia, behind the arm of
Lisa Palmer was unable to stop
the Pirates momentum.
East Carolina came out in the
first with Cramer driving in
Tonker on an error and Cramer
scored the Pirates second run in
the fifth as she stole home on a
passed ball. Virginia scored no
runs, had only two hits and made
two errors which gave the Lady
Pirates the tournament champi-
onship.
In addition to the Lady Pi
rateschampionship,)unioi fV�ce
Kee also picked up top honors as
the tournament's most valuable
defensive player.
htoms Badgers takes 22nd in
' d NCAA championships
POI IS Ind.�East
sophomore Meredith
irni N
( aiolina
Bridgers finished 22nd Saturday
in the 20t yard breaststrokeat the
NCA A women's swimming and
diving championship held in In-
dianapolis
rnr
� �
back to score four runs in the sixth
which included a two-run homer
by Brown, his second of the day.
The Dukes went on to score
two in the bottom of the sixth but
their efforts would not be enough
See JENKINS, page 12
morning.
The I ady Seaha v ks . anu- into
the tournament with the best n.v
jord of 13-3, next to Virginia's 12-5
record, but the UNC-W won only
once on Sautrday against Ohio and
then were defeated by Coastal
Carolina, 10-2, and Virginia, 7-0.
Meredith Bridgers
Biidgers' time was 2:20.84.
Her time is from the preliminary
round. The top 16 in the prelimi-
naries swim for the NCAA title
Saturday night.
"I'm disappointed that she
didn't finish higher coach Rick
Kobe said. "She's had a great year,
though. Meredith �s hefcrst fe-
male swimmer wehavetjgd in the
Division I championship"meet
The Charlotte,N.C native, out
of South Mecklenburg High
School, set new varsity, pool and
conference records for East Caro-
lina this year. She qualified for the
championship meet by swimming
a 2:19.04 in the 200 breaststroke
against UNC-Charlotte in Novem-
ber of last year.
On Friday, Bridgers placed
26th in the 100-vard breaststroke
competition at the championship
meet with a time of 1:06.21.
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Sports Editor
ECU freshman basketball
pla ver jay Scherer has announced
that he will leave the team and
transfer to another school.
Scherer, a 6-3 pornt guard,
played in 20 games for the Pirates
this past season and averaged 1.8
points per game. He scored seven
points twice during the season
Jay Scherer
which was his highest output of
the season. The first time was
against Texas Christian and then
against George Mason in the sec-
ond round of the Colonial Ath-
letic Association Tournament.
Scherer played in both C A A Tour-
nament games and was a factor in
the win against American and was
a leading contributor in the game
with George Mason.
Scherer is from Huntsville,
Ala. He was Huntsville'soty MVP
and was a first-team all-state se-
lection. He averaged over 20 points
and connected on 55 percent of his
three-point attempts his senior
season for Grissom High.
Scherer was recuited by for
mer ECU assistant Dan Bell and is
expected to join Bell at Northwest
ern (La.), where Bell is now the
head coach.
Irates take second in
ultimate tournament
The Irates ultimate frisbee team recently take first in a tournament in Florida. They also finished second
in theSt Patrick's Day Tournament last weekend. Here members of the team are shown holding thier
award.
Women lose on the road
The four and a half hour ride
to Columbia SC started with un-
certainty as seven Irates climbed
into the van heading for the St.
Patrick's Day Ultimate Tourna-
ment on the weekend of March 18
and 19. intimate is played with
seven players and the Irates did
have seven but what about the
substitutes. Three Iratesstayed in
Greenville Friday night for the
Amateurs but promised to be in
Columbia by game timelO Satur-
day morning These three would
have to leave before 6:00 am to be
there on time. If you caught the
Amateui s at Darryls Friday night
and if you are a betting man, the
smart money would be on late or
no show.
Never bet against an Irate. Ten
o'clock am, Columbia SC, polo
fields, ten Irates began their quest
for the St. Patrick's Day Ultimate
Tournament.
Four games were scheduled
foi the Iratcson Saturday and four
teams would tall to the Irates
Saturday. The Nashville Hooters
out of Tennessee fell first 13-6 as
Skeeter Tucker's horizontal snag
for the score that started what
would be a long Saturday for Irate
opponents.
Columbia's Ultimate Cocks
were the perfect hosts. The Irates
ran up a 12-2 score before ending
the game 13-5. Veterans Gary
Hurley and Kevin Rhodes domi-
nated the defensive play.
Next up was Clemson. They
would go down 13-7 on the strong
play of David Kelley, Jon Richards,
and Joe McHugh.
In the last game played Satur-
day afternoon, the Irates led 7-5 at
half against St. Mary's College.
An inspirational speech bv Cap-
tain Gary Hurley sparked the in-
tense play of the second half and
the Irates outscored St. Mary's 6-1
taking the game 13-6. Ken Earley
and Lance McCardle led the psy-
ched second half run.
See IRATES, page 12
By CLAUDINE WURST
Stiff Writer
East Carolina's women tennis
team has been busy this past week.
Although thev lost all three of their
away games against Old Domin-
ion University, 9-0, High Point
College, 8 1, and Gilford College,
9-0, assistant coach Lynn Corski
said, "The team played well, us-
ing good strategy and giving the
other teams competaiti ve opposi-
tion. '
Against Old Dominion Uni-
versity, Gorski said, "Jill Hobson
and Susan Maddix had strong
single matches. Hobson had a
baseline game, using her ground
strokes to force her opponent to
really work for the match. Maddix
used smart playing, varying and
exploring different techniques on
her opponent"
In thegameagainst High Point
College, Heather Mason had the
single winning match Gorski said,
"I was impressed with Mason's
playing she had a strong, consis-
tent game
While in the last match against
Guilford College, Gorski com-
mented, "Brandi Dutcherand 1 ou
Henderson had good individual
games. Both were focused in on
their match, exploring their play-
ing, trying different styles to give
their opponents stiff competition "
Today the women travel to Vir-
ginia Beach, to play Christopher
Newport College.
Men's tennis struggling
By CI AUDINE WURST
S�ff Writer
The men's tennis team is now
1-5 after two matches this past
week. The Pirates lost 8-1 to Old
DominionatNorfolkVaonWed
March 15. While here at home on
Sun. March 19. they defeated
Pfeiter college 8-1
Head coach Bill Moore said,
The match against Pfeifer was
competitive. David Shell had a
strong match, and John Melhorn
played well, adding to the team's
already undeniable victory
Moore went on to say, "The
team is still looking for someone
to step forward and set the pace.
With the weather still hindering
us, we are off to a slow start, but I
expect the team to do fine
The men will be busy this
week. Their matches include.
March 22, at home, Dickinson
College; March 23, UNC-Wilming-
ton at Wilmington; March 24, at
home, Radford College; and
March 25, Campbell University
here in Greenville. Moore ex pects,
"the team to fair well this week,
with strong opposition coming
mainly from Campbell





I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21:1989
Lewis adds Cooper
Assistant coach named to staff
(SID) � Ron Cooper, 27, ha
been named inside linebacker
coach for the East Carolina Uni-
versity football staff, announced
head coach Bill Lewis Monday.
Cooper replaces Don Thompson,
who left the staff on March 15 for
an assistant coaches' position at
the University of North Carolina.
Cooper comes to East Caro-
lina after serving the last two years
as an assistant coach on the Mur-
ray State Universitv staff. Last
season, Cooper was the defensive
coordiantor and the secondary
coach for the Racers. The year
before, he tutored the inside line-
backers.
"1 am extremely excited to
have Ron join our staff said head
coach Bill Lewis. "We are excited
to have someone of his caliber,
both as a person and a football
coach, come to East Carolina. He
is a tremendous addition to our
university, community and foot-
ball staff. He also brings an excel-
lent reputation as a fine recruiter
and a teacher of fundamentals
Before joining the Murray
State staff, Cooper served as a
linebacker coach and recruiting
coordinator for two ycarsat Austin
Teay State University. He spent
the 1984 season as a graduate as-
sistant at Minnesota under Lou
Holtz. He worked mainly with
the nose guards for the Golden
Gophers.
Cooper began his coaching
career at Appalachian State Uni-
versity, first as a graduate assis-
tant for one year, and then full-
time assistant, working with the
defensive line.
The hiring of Cooper fills out
Lewis' coaching staff. Cooper
begins workingat ECU with Tues-
day's practice.
Tyson visits sick teen in hospital
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) � Tyson was on his way from
Nearly everyone told Troy Lee California to Indonesia, but de-
Hatcher that world heavyweight layed his trip just long enough to
champion Mike Tyson" would
never come here to visit him as he
wished, but the teen-ager stricken
with cerebral palsy had the last
word Saturday.
In January, Hatcher, 16, told
his parents he'd like to meet Ty-
son. Almost two months later, with
Bruno. that trip and we're here in North
"So many people were por- Carolina
traying Mike and Don as if they Mary Hatcher said she and
make the stop in North Carolina, received this message, they said her family "just prayed and be-
He spent about one-half hour in thev would not respond Willi- lieved that it would come to pass
the clinic, which wasalready filled ford said. "I know Don King from
a long time. I know he's always
loved people, always loved chil-
dren.
"I had no doubt that if they
with young patients and their
parents.
About 100 Tyson fans jammed
into the tiny waiting area to get
autographs. On the warm March
"It means so much she said.
Clifton Hatcher said the visit
might have meant even more to
him than his son.
"This is one in a thousand.
several hundred neighborhood day and without air conditioning
children converging, Tyson ap- in the medical building, Tyson
peared Saturday at the Twin City worked up a sweat in the close
Medical Building on the northeast surroundings,
side of this Piedmont city. Most in the crowd were not
Young and old clamored for a disappointed, as some of them
glimpse of the champion, who received autographssome
emerged from a limousine with
promoter Don King and a small
entourage shortly after noon. Even
with the crowd pressing closer to
see him, Tyson never hesitated
and went straight toward Hatcher,
who is wheelchair bound.
"I'm very much determined
to go all over the country, but
there are so many letters said the
soft-spoken Tyson, sitting next to
the teen-ager and his parents,
Man and Clifton Hatcher. "I
wanted to get this accomplished
right away
including a phone number.
The door to the waiting room
eventually was shut and the crowd
asked to leave so Tyson could be
alone with the Hatchers. The
smaller children who were sent
out peeked through an open mail
slot and through the windows to
get a glimpse.
Philip Williford, a Winston-
Salem resident who knew King
when thev were classmates in
Cleveland, helped arrange the
visit. He said Tyson made up his
mind after his victory over Frank
received the message, that they You ask for something and you
would come he said. "They re- get it he said. "It was just a
fused to go out of the countr'until miracle. I don't know what to say
they first came to see Troy about it. I'm just happy it hap-
King called the visit a "mis- pened - for him and me
sion of mercy Dr. Charlie Kennedy, who
"Mike was going to leave for treats young Hatcher, called Sat-
Indonesia. However, Mike de- urday "a bonus for everybody here
cided 'I'd rather go see the kid - including the doctors
he said. "So, we had to postpone
Banquet tickets
The East Carolina University
men's basketball tournament will
hold itsannual banquet Sun April
9 at the Greenville Hilton.
The cost for the banquet is ten
dollars per person and those in
terested in attending should make
their reservations through the
ECU basketball office by April 6.
The phone number is 757-6472.
All questions should be directed
to the basketball office.
During the banquet, post
season honors and awards will be
presented.
UNC's Smith looks to Michigan
ATLANTA vAP)-North Caro-
lines Dean Smith already is giv-
ing Michigan the psvchological
edge when the two teams meet
Thursday night at Lexington, Kv
in the semifinals of the NCAA
Southeast region tournament.
in history, both times in the NCAA
tournament. Carolina won 78-69
in the West semifinals last year
and had 109-97 triumph in the
second round of the East region
two years ago.
Smith's team will get one
Michi
knock
Smith
team
;an
We are playing an excellent psychological and physical lift as
well - the return of leading scorer
J.R. Reid to the lineup.
Reid was suspended for Sun-
day's game after violating a 1a.m.
curfew following the Tar Heel's
first-round victorv over Southern
team that we have
i out the last two vears
iaid Sunday after both
advanced with second-
round victories - his fifth-ranked
Tar Heels over UCLA 8S-S1 and
VVecan't win the NCAA title with- remaining.
ou him Madden led Carolina with 22
"We'll welcome JR. back points, Bucknall had 19 and Rick
Smith said. "I'msurehe'sashappy Fox 18 as Carolina handed Smith
as we are. He has played the best his 667th coach victory, tying him
he has played all year in the last for sixth place on the all-time vic-
thrce or four games, and 1 think tory list with former UCLA coach
our chemistry will still be there John Wooden.
Michigan also should benefit Trevor Wilson led UCLA with
from the head coaching experi- 21 points, 18 in the first half, and
ence of Steve Fisher, the top assis- Kevin Walker added 17.
tant who was elevated to theNo. 1 'They kind of took us out of
No. 10 Michigan over South Ala- University on Friday night.
ha ma 91-82.
1 don't like that psychologi-
cal matchup Smith said. "They
are iibt a very powerful team
The two have met onlv twice
"I think J.R. was more hurt
than we were Carolina's Steve
Bucknall said. "I know he really
wanted to play. We can't wait to
get him back. He'sour best player.
spot two days before the tourna-
ment began when Bill Fneder
accepted the coaching job at Ari-
zona State and wasn't allowed to
stay with the Wolverines through
the tournament.
"They appear to be getting
harder Fisher said after going to
2-0 as a head coach. "Today was
harder for me to get a handle on
sync Wilson said of the half. "We
just weren't executing like we were
in the first half
Michigan, 26-7, broke a dead-
lock at 80 when Terry Mills con-
verted a 3-point play with 2:17,
startinga 9-0 run that also included
a 3-point basket by Glen Rice, a
free throw by Demetrius Calip and
two free throws by Mills that put
Tr-il-nr ln �s Aftl kv- 4 -� r4 naraer tor me to get a nandie on two free throws by Mills that put
llclLcrb LlKZCUl lUr VVllIrllRLOR the continuity at both ends of the the game out of reach with 38
Continued from page 11
A 4-0 record and the number
one seed going into Sunday's ac-
tion left the Irates anxious to plav
Sunday but not satisfied.
Sundays single elimination
Ultimate began with Va. Tech. The
Irates picked up where they left
off by stepping all over the Fresh
Produce of Va. Tech 15-4. The play
of Jack Vitale was the difference.
The semi-finals pitted the
Irates and Knoxville Voodoo from
Tennessee but the Irates had the
magic and jumped out to a quick
8-2 lead then breezed to a 15-5
finish and into the finals.
The finals matched the Irates
with an N.C. team from Raleigh
called Y'all. This game was a
thriller from beginning to end. The
two teams traded points the entire
way with neither team holding
more than a two point advantage
at any time in the game. The Irates
took the half 8-7. The teams traded
points until 14-14. With the game
to 15, win by two, cap at 17, finals
format, the winning team must
win by two. The next two points
Jenkins wins
Continued from page 11
to overtake the Pirates before the
game was called due to the foul
weather.
The Pirates stand in second
place in the CAA's right behind
the Seahawks of UNC-Wilming-
ton. The Seahawks moved into
the first place posi tion after sweep-
ing Richmond last weekend.
East Carolina faces Davis &
Elkins at home today at 3 p.m. and
then plays Hartford at home on
Wednesday at 3 p.m.
went to Y'all alone with the cham-
pionship.
Thelratesarecurrently
16-5 and the defending champi-
3ns of the Wilmington Easter
Eggstravaganza where they will a way, finally going ahead for good
compete this weekend. a 76-75 on two Kevin Madden
free throws with five minutes
floor. We never seemed to mesh.
Carolina, 29-7, caught a redhot
foe during the first half, with
UCLA, 21-10, buildinga 51-41 lead
late in the first half.
The Heels slowly chopped
seconds left.
Rice scored 36 points and Mills
24 in leading the Wolverines to
their seventh victory in eight
games.
"That Rice kid is just unbe-
lievable South Alabama coach
Ronnie Arrow said. "He's going
to make somebody in the NBA a
better coach.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further Information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
RESERVE OFFICERS'TRAINING CORPS
TOUR FIRST STEP
TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE YOU
COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
Army ROTC Camp Challenge. Its excit-
ing and it may be your last chance to
graduate with an Officer commission
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COllISE TOUCAN TAKE.
Contact: Cpt. SteveX. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS-
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts for March rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS-
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles. Apartments and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
TWENTYONEHUNDRED PRODUCTIONS
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
I WRIGHT iDITORIUli J
East Carolina UniversiqS
WhereasThe mod Of hlSven
�nd Whylls HeJJTaking SojLong?
March 278:00pm
March '28 - 3:OOpm,f& 8:0Opm
An
Admission is FREE
all





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 21,1989 13
Blue Devils advance to third round
Duke downs WVU in defensive struggle
GREENSBORO. N.C. (AP) �
In a defensive standoff that yielded
no easy baskets, the Duke Blue
Devils capitalized on the ones they
got free.
The ninth-ranked Blue Dev-
ils, making 13 of 15 free throws in
the second half, defeated No. 17
West Virginia 70-63 in an NCAA
tournament second-round game
Saturday and advanced into the
round of 16 for the fourth con-
secutive year.
"We shot the ball better from
the free throw line Duke coach
Mike Krzyzewski said. "It was a
game where every possession was
critical
Danny Ferry scored 20 points,
making all six of his free throws in
the second half, and freshman
Christian Laettner added 14, in-
cluding three baskets in a 3:31 span
late in the game for Duke, 26-7.
"It was a defensive struggle
the whole way said Ferry, who
did not make a field goal in the
second half. "There was a lot of
pressure on shots inside. This
would have taken a lot out of us if
we had to come back the day after
tomorrow and play again
Duke, which has a 13-3 record
in tournament games over the past
four years, will meet Minnesota
in a regional semifinal Friday in
East Rutherford, N.J.
"I think we are capable of
being a Final Four team Ferry
said.
"We've got to win two more
games to get there against tough
opponents. I think we have the
players. It's just a matter of going
out and doing it
West Virginia, a 58 percent
free throw-shooting team during
the regular season, was able to
make just 4 of 11 free throws in
dcfcatand finished the season with
a 26-5 record. The Mountaineers
were 2-of-6 from the line over the
final 9:07 of the game.
"We haven't been a real good
free throw shooting team this
vear West Vircinia coach Gale
Catlett said. "We didn't get our
best free throw shooters to the line
today. It would have been nice to
make a few more free throws
After West Virginia pulled
within 62-61 on a 3-pointer by
Herbie Brooks with 3:01 left, La-
ettner scored on a layup and was
called on an offensive foul that
fouled him out.
"Christian, taking it to the hole
like that, that wasa big-time play
said Krzyzewski. "Even though
he was called for a charge, that
was a big play for a freshman to
make
Duke then went ahead 66-61
on two free throws by Ferry with
1:58 to play.
After three consecutive pos-
sessions ended in turnovers, Duke
took a 67-63 lead with 34 seconds
to play when Phil Henderson
made one of two free throws with
34 seconds to play.
The victory, No. 200 for
Krzyzewski at Duke, was sealed
when West Virginia's Shaun
Jackson was called for an inten-
tional foul with nine seconds to
play.
Herbie Brooks led West Vir-
ginia with 13 points and Steve
Berger added 12.
Trailing 55-54, the Blue Devils
ran off an 8-1 spurt, taking a 62-56
on a layup by Laettner for a 62-56
lead with 5:39 to play.
After trailing35-28 at half time,
West Virginia reeled off a 9-2 spurt,
taking the lead on a 3-pointer by
Berger and a 39-37 lead with 17:10
to play on a free throw by Chris
Brooks.
The first half was dominated
by strong defensive play by both
teams. West Virginia was forced
into 14 turnovers, Duke 10, and
neither team was able to shoot
better than 45 percent in the open-
ing 20 minutes.
The Blue Devils opened a 35-
26 lead with 1:06 left in the half on
a 3-pointer by Ferry.
2nd Annual Bni ConteU
Thursday
March 23, 1989
1st prize - $100
2nd prize - $75 cash & prizes
3rd prize - $25 prizes
For more information or to sign up.
Call or come by Rafters
752-4668
Arizona blows out Clemson - advances to semifinals
BOISE. Idaho (AP) � So far,
Arizona's road back to the Final
Four has been an expressway.
Sean Elliott scored 25 points
and the top-ranked Wildcats held
Clemson scoreless for more than
nine minutes Saturday to beat the
Tigers 94-68 and advance to the
semifinals of the NCAA West
Regional.
The 26-point blowout fol-
lowed the Wildcats' 34-point vic-
tory over Robert Morris in the
opening round.
"These two games have been
good games for us said Arizona
coach Lute Olson, whose team has
won its last 11 games by an aver-
age of 20 points.
Clemson coach Cliff Ellis was
impressed by the Wildcats.
"That's the best performance
I've seen (this season) he said.
"I think they should be rated
No.l, no doubt about it
The Wildcats, 29-3, led by 14
in the first half and withstood a
Clemson rally in the opening
minutes of the second before pull-
ing away.
Arizona, seeking its second
straight Final Four appearance,
plays No. 15 Nevada-Las Vegas
Thursday night in Denver. The
Wildcats beat UNLV 86-75 earlier
this season.
Matt Muchlebach scored 19
points for Arizona on Saturday,
including four 3-pointcrs. His two
3-point baskets helped lift the
Wildcats out of trouble after
Clemson cut the lead to four early
in the second half.
"They were on Scan so much,
coach just told me to go up and
take the shoK " Muchlebach sai�l.
Clemson, 19-11, went nine
minutes and 22 seconds without
scoring in the first half.
The Tigers led 25-23 on Ricky
Jones' jumper with 10:1 Heft in the
half. Arizona, despite a sputtering
offense of its own, scored the next
16 points to take a 39-25 lead on
Muchlenbach's steal and layup.
TheTigers finally scored when
Derrick Forrest sank a pair of free
throws with 1:49 left in the half.
Clemson committed 13 turnovers
during the scoreless streak.
"Their defense was simply the
key to it Ellis said. "The thing
that impresses me so much about
Arizona is they ha e so many good
players.
" "We came into the game say-
ing we'll make their role players
beat us. Well, the role players did
a prettv cood iob
trailing by nine at
the Tigers came out
t tlHh . ���! t�r.rui o� �"1�1 i�iii ij
ti rrirt �� i tfa i . i I
APPLICATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR
COPY EDITORS
APPLY IN PERSON
AT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Publications Building
(Behind Joyner Library)
Apply in Person
Monday- Friday
No Phone Calls Please
?Experience a Plus
After
halftime,
strong.
A pair of three-pointers by
Forrest and a dunk by Elden
Campbell pulled Clemson within
49-45 with 16:06 to play. But
Muehlebach hit two 3-pointers
and Elliott scored on a drive to
boost the lead back to 57-45, and
the Tigers never came closer than
10 again.
"We thought the second half
would beour half Ellis said, "but
Arizona simply doesn't let up
Muehlebach's backcourt
mate, Ken Lofton, also had a pair
ofthree-pointers as the Wildcats
turned the game into a rout. Ari-
zona's biggest lead was the final
margin.
"They were playing a man
(defense) on Sean all the time and
basically left our guardsalone until
Lofton and Muehlebach hit those
3-pointers Olson said.
Campbell scored 24 and For-
rest 21 for the Tigers, the sixth-
place finisher in the Atlantic Coast
Conference.
Jud Buechler added 15 points
and Anthony Cook 14 for Arizona.
There's A
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� APPLICATIONS
Now Being Accepted For
NEWS
ASSISTANT
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at
The East Carolinian
Publications Bldg.
Monday-Friday
. APPLICATIONS �
Now Being Accepted For
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WRITERS
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SETTING DIRECTIONS FOR EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Strategic Planning Forums
INVITATION
To all faculty, staff, students, and other interested
individuals throughout the University community
PURPOSE
To discuss the draft reports of the Strengths and Weaknesses
Identification Work Group, Environmental Analysis Work Group,
and the Institutional Values Work Group
MARCH 29
SCHEDULE
12:00-1:30
APRIL 6
APRIL 13
2:00-4:00
STRENGTHS AND
WEAKNESES
IDENTIFICATION
EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENTAL
ANALYSIS
1:00-3:00 INSTITUTIONAL VALUES
ASSESSMENT
MENDENHALL ROOM 221
Copies of the draft reports will be available two weeks prior to the
forum datesand can be obtained from any of the Deans or Vice
Chancellors or in theLibraries. For further information, call Sue
Hodges, Office of Planning and Institutional Research, at
757-6288.
.
I






HE A R THE
CANDIDATES SPEAK!
The Media Board and
The East Carolinian
are sponsoring a candidate
forum Wednesday, from 2:30 p.m.
until 4:30 p.m. on the mall.
� Members of the campus media will ask
the candidates questions.
�The candidates will be allowed to ask
questions of each other.
�There will be a questioning period for the
audience, also.
This may be your only chance to meet the candi-
dates before Wednesday's elections, so don't miss
the opportunity! Take a part in the future of your
university. Attend the forum Monday and vote
Wednesday.





Title
The East Carolinian, March 21, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 21, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.664
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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