The East Carolinian, March 2, 1989






ItaisM�
Editorial4
Classified6
Clearly Labeled Satire9
Cartoons10
Day in the life of child
developement major
Check out nage 7.
�A �� .���.�
'jp�s?$�
All-time assist leader for Pirate
Basketball,Jeff Kelly, featured.
Catch the action on page 11.
She Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 55
Thursday March 2,1989
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Nanotech heralds a new age
By DAVID HERRING
Assistant News Editor
The human race is pregnant
with the potentials made possible
through nanotechnology, and, like
any mother-to-be must prepare
tor an increase in her responsibili-
Eric Drexler, who conceived
of nanotechnology, presented his
theories to audiences of chemists,
engineers, and physicists, none of
which were able to present rea-
sons why his theories wouldn't
work. And since the late '70s, when
he conceived of nanotech, there
have been developments in sci-
ties, humanity faces the burden of
a tremendously increased capac- ence which he predicted we would
ity for good and evil with the in- make, and which are right on the
ception of this theoretical technol- road to nanotechnology.
Nanotechnology,according to
Christine Peterson of The Fore-
sight Institute, is simply a thor-
ough, inexpensive control over the
structure of matter. In the Feb. 23
edition of The East Carolinian this
reporter discussed means by
which scientists might someday
be able to build nanomachines
(.assemblers) which will offer us
this control.
Based in Palo Alto, CA, The
Foresight Institute was founded
as a non-profit organization to
prepare the public for future tech-
nologies through public policv
discussions, stated Peterson, who
serves on the institutes board of
directors. "We have no choice - it
(nanotechnology) will be devel-
oped sooner or later, somewhere -
if not in the U.S then in another
country' Peterson Meerteti ��
"We must get as manv people
ready as possible, before it arrives,
to determine how we can guide
and develop it best so that every-
one benefits she continued. "We
advocate cooperation among
democratic nations (in the devel-
opment of nanotech) so that the
public will have some control over
how it is used
In a 1�S1 article published by
the National Academy of Science
Drexler predicted we would be
able to design more stable pro-
teins than the ones found in na-
ture and at the time protein engi-
neering wasn't even an existing
field. "There are no physical laws
which prohibit it (nanotechnol-
ogy), merely a lack of informa-
tion' said Peterson. "The assem-
blers would require very advanced
software
But, given these assemblers
and the software to command
them, nanotechnology presents a
technological step comparable to
the invention of the wheel, the
quest for fire, harnessing electric-
ity, etc. "Given fuel, raw materi-
als, and the right instructions,
assemblers will be able to make
virtually anything - including
more of themselves Drexler theo-
rizes.
"Calculations suggest replica-
tion times of about a thousand
seconds, letting a single micro-
scopic replicator produce many
tons of product replicators in a
day or so he continued. "After
reprogramming, these product
replicators could team up to build
other things, again by the ton
Walking on the frozen ground barefoot, she has to be cold.
(Photo by J.D. Whitmire�Photolab)
ECU librarian died at 51
ECU librarian Marilyn Ramey
Stephenson, 51, died Thursday
Feb. 23 at Pitt Memorial Hospitial.
The loss of Stephenson is
"very, very great, she was the
backbone to the reference depart-
ment of the ECU library Artemis
Kares of Joyner library.
Stephenson, a native of Los
Angles, California, was a gradu-
ate of Occidental College in Los
Angles. She received an M.L.S
World hunger would become
obsolete! We could take any source
of biodegradable material - straw
and soil for example - and reas-
semble the molecules into food,
using sunlight for fuel.
nate radioactive nuclear waste
sites; we could build better ex-
ploratory tools for all realms of
science and take measurements
on the molecular level; we could
build better and faster computers;
After all, steak and potatoes we could build vehicles for space
are composed of molecules of the
basic elements found in nature.
Assemblers could rearrange the
molecules and cheaply mass pro-
duce food, building it molecule by
molecule.
The medical implications
alone are staggering. We could
"infect" humans with assemblers
which would serve as an artificial,
and virtually foolproof, immune
system.
The assemblers could iden-
tify and disassemble any harmful
parasite organisms such as bacte-
rium or viruses. Assemblers
would be able to locate and repair
cell damage due to cancer growths.
According to Drexler, such
machines would bring surgical
control to the molecular level,
opening broad new horizons in
medicine. In short, human lifes-
pans could be increased to hun-
dreds or thousands of years as
assemblers are increasingly able
to remove factors which cause the
body to age.
Pollution would also become
a thing of the past. Drexler states
that with their broad ability to
rearrange atoms, assemblers will
beabletorecyclcalmostanything. gCnerarwelfar7 Wc wil
As I suggested in my last article, tQ sh ,idcs for
we could suspend assemblers in kneficial uso�uthit isn't too soon
the atmosphere and rebuild the
ozone layer. to begin the effort
Scientists could decontami-
Helms concerned by lack of
initiative in SGA Legislature
travel and exploration we could
build anything we could conceive
of that is composed of matter.
Drexler talks of building a tele-
scope the size of a planet with
which we could peer into the far
corners of the universe - and who
knows what secrets that would
unravel?
"Nanotechnology will let us
control the structure of matter -
but who will control nanotechnol-
ogy?" warns Drexler, pointing out
that, equal to marvelous feats for
the ad vancement of mankind, here
is a potential for a great abuse of
power and great evil. "In a com-
petitive world, nanotechnology
will surely be developed.
"If democratic institutions are
to guide its use, it must be devel-
oped by groups within their po-
litical reach. To keep it from being
developed in military secrecy, it
seems wise to emphasize its value
in medicine, in the economy, and
in restoring the environment
"Nanotechnology must be
developed openly to serve the
Life is wild yet true. If s all done with mirrors. (Photo by J.D.
Whitmire�Photolab)
PALS youth program
seeking volunteers
By ADAM CORNELIUS
S�f f Writer
months to the project.
"A semester lasts approxi-
mated four months, and I need a
Adult citizens of Pitt County longer commitment than that,
are being sought to volunteer one After three to four months, the
on one in a program which would kids you are working with in this
By LORI MARTIN
"The students need to be more
St�ff Writer
Legislators of the Studenl
Government Association and ECU
students are not taking the initia-
tive to better the university, ac-
cording to a speech made by
Speaker of the Legislature Marty
Helms in Monday's SGA meet-
ing.
Helms said he is concerned
about the amount of criticism of
new ideas before these ideas are
researched and examined. "People
do not give new ideas a chance
he said.
The Pirate Walk program was
used as a example. According to
Helms, his proposed constitution
to ax the program was criticized
before the advantages were ever
presented.
Helms said he realizes his
proposal may not be the best solu-
tion, but he thinks some action
needs to be taken in order to make
the program more functionable.
Pirate Walk is just one area of
concern, according to Helms.
Other proposed constitutions
made by the legislature have been
greeted with criticism and doubt
match them with troubled youth type program are just beginning
ages 7-17. to accept that person. Then if the
The project, called Preparing relationship is broken, you are
Adolescents for Life Skills (PALS) doing more damage than good
was founded "to intervene in the Interested volunteers will
concerned and be aware they can juvenile'slifeprior to involvement need to provide two references,
do something to help Helms said, or further involvement in the ju- fill out a three page form, and
It is the responsibilty of the stu- venile court system according to attend two training sessions,
dents to inform their legislators of Sharon Lermer, the director of the "One session will deal with
changes and improvements they program. communications skills and rela-
would like to see. Project PALS, similar to the tionship building techniques. The
The problem is the result of a Big Brother program, pairs youth other will provide information on
lack of communication between with adult volunteers who spend the juvenile court system, drugs
the student body and the legisla- a few hours each week with the and alcohol Lermer said,
tors. Helms feels the solution to youth. After several weeks, abond After a background check,
the problem can be found if stu- of friendship grows between volunteers are matched with
dents as well as legislators view them. Unlike the Big Brother pro- youths who are referred to the
new ideas with a more open mind. gTam, however, Lermer said that program from schools, agencies,
Helms plans to propose a new the youth referred to project PALS
constitution for the Pirate Walk
program in two weeks.
In other SGA business, sev-
eral appropriations were made to
campus organizations.
have either committed a status
offense or exhibited delinquent
behavior.
"Youth can make changes in
their lives when they experience
the juvenile court system, parents
and concerned adults. Matching
will be based on a variety of crite-
ria, including whether or not the
adolescents and volunteers are of
the same sex, whether they share
The ECU Occupational Ther- an atmosphere of acceptance and any common interests and, to a
certain extent, how far away they
live from each other.
Once paired, the volunteer
will spend at least two hours a
week with the youth doing "any-
apy Club received funds of $280 stability Lermer said in a recent
to be used to attend to the Balti- release. 'These youth are in need
more Conference. The remaining of a caring, stable influence in their
funds will be used for scholar- lives. All it takes is a few hours
si tips. each week and a lot of sharing
The Association of General All faculty and students ma- thing they want to within reason
Contractors received an appro- joring in sociology, psychology, according to Lermer. "Activities
priation of $225. The organization criminal justice, and social work ranging from walks to helping
did not have an annual appro- are encouraged to volunteer. The
priation last spring. problem with recruiting students,
The Leisure Systems Studies Lermer notes, is that volunteers
See SGA, page 3 need to commit at least nine
with homework to
museum
visits to the
See PALS, page 3
Stephenson had previously
worked in the Los Angles and
Santa Monica library systems. She
was a resident of Greenville for
the past 18 years.
A memorial service was con-
ducted Wednesday night in the
Wilkcnson Funeral Chapel by Rev.
William Hadden.
Surviving are her husband,
Dr. William E. Stephenson, par-
ents Arthur and Lorraine Ramey
N.C. Student Legislature discusses DWI,
banning smoking in public places, abuse
By DAVID HERRING
AMbtant Nn�i Editor
degreefrom the University of Cali- of West Los Angles, Cal and a
fomiainLosAnglesandanM.A. brother Grant Ramey of Santa
degree from Middlebury College, Monica, California.
Middlebury, Vermont.
legislation of the early '70s. speech made at ECU, Mavretic mandatory confiscation and sale
An emergency resolution was referred to NC A&T by saying, at public auction of the vehicle
introduced by Blake H. Dye, of "ECU ought to have a department driven if the driver is convicted of
The North Carolina Student North Carolina A&T, and passed or school of agriculture since ECU driving while impaired. The reso-
Legislature (NCSL) convened in by the NCSL stating "the NCSL is in the heart of a major agricul- lution argued that since 1984
Greenville this week to debate goes on record as supporting the tural district and I think it's there has been an ave
resolutions concerning: driving call for a public apology to be made unusual in a 16-campus univer-
while impaired penalties, traffic by the NC House Speaker, Jo- sity we have only 2 schools of
safety at intersections, the testi- sephusL. Mavretic, to North Caro- agriculture and one of them is not
monies of physically or sexually Una A&T State University for the much of a school at all
abused children, banning cigarette derogatory statements made in In a heated debate the NCSL
smoking in public places, and reference to their school of agri- defeated a resolution supporting
repeal of the Affirmative Action culture According to Dye, in a legislation that would require
rise of 1,021 cases of driving while
impaired and that confiscating
vehicles has been shown to be an
effective deterrent to crimes such
as drag racing and drug traffick-
ing.
See NC, page 2





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2,1184
Frat gives car to staff member
til Newt Bureau
GREENVILLE � Sylvia Isler
of Greenville will no longer have
to relv on buses and taxis for trans-
-�rtahon, thanks to the generos-
ity oi an East Carolina University
fraternity
The brothers of Lambda Chi
Alpha patented Isler with a car
last Wednesday. The 1977 Buick
was purchased with the proceeds
from area fund-raisers as well as
donations from alumni brothers
in other parts of the country.
The alumni brothers were
contacted by Dr. lames R. (.Jim)
Taylor of Washington, a former
Lambda Chi Alpha member and
director of ECU'S Remeidial Edu-
cation Activity Program (READ.
where Isler is employed as a de-
velopmental specialist. REAP is a
developmental day care center for
children with disabilities.
According to Taylor, Isler
supports herself and her grand-
mother on her salary and is pursu-
ing a degree from ECU in special
education by taking classes at
night.
"Sylvia has been poor all her
life Taylor said, "last semester
shecouldn't afford to buy the book
she needed for her class and had
to take taxis to the library to use
their copy
The car came as a total sur-
prise to Iser, who was moved to
tears. "1 really appreciate this from
the bottom of my heart she said
"It will mean so much to me to
have a feeling of independence
for a change and not have to de-
pend on someone else to come
and get me
In addition to the car, the fra-
ternity also presented Isler with
its first Burton Blatt Optimism
Award, which is to be presented
annually toan ECU faculty or stafi
member for outstanding research.
service or teaching in the area ot
mental retardation.
Dr. Blatt,cer tennial professor
and dean ot the School of Educa-
tion at Syracuse University, was
known for his efforts at establish-
ing a more accepting society for
people with disabilities. At hs
death in 1985, his vita listed 291
published contributions to the
field of special education. Taylor
knew Blatt and suggested that the
fraternity establish the award.
"We wanted to present this
award to someone we feel por-
trays the optimistic outlok that
Burton Blatt showed throughout
his life, said Paul Lawson,
Lambda Chi president. "Afterlis-
tening to Sylvia Isler, who gave us
a very moving speech about the
effects of poverty, we decided to
give the award to her
Isler's speech inspired the
fraternity to assist children with
mental retardation bv getting
involved with HELP Corps, a
volunteer organization, Taylor
said, is to eliminate the devastat-
ing effects of poverty.
"Seventy-five percent of chil-
dren with retardation come from
poverty stricken areas Taylor
said. "There is so much poverty in
eastern North Carolina that if we
can get the youth involved, we
can make a difference
Two brothers who are en-
rolled at REAP have already trav-
eled to their home last Sunday to
remove ice-torn limbs from the
roof or their home. The chapter
also purchased clothing and shoes
for the boys.
"We're always looking for
service projects Lawson said.
"We think this is a good opportu
nity to help out kids that need
help
The East Carolinian
lamesF.J.McKee,Direct rofAdverl
Advertising Representatives
S ott Mak . I Keith
I Phillip V.ope Adam Blankenship
�V lil.v E I alton
DISP1 A M) I R I SING
I Open Rate $4 � LocalOpenRate :1
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency(( ontracts)
! 10 199 1 in. hes
200 299 ol.inches
300 J99col inches
; 499( ol.inches
� ; ' 51 n sert ns4 -1
M 40
$4.10 I0Insertions(4
� 0 (12 2:
:
;

45
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� il land abo e $4.0i
Classified Display In � rl
I: )p n Rate
('olor Advertising
i )nc( olor and bl i k
. -oli irand bhi( k

-y-


Sylvia Isler receives the keys to a car purchased by Lambda Chi Alpha. (Photoby Tony M. Rumple)
NC Student Legislature
Continued from page 1
It was counter-argued that this
resolution is unfair because the
value ot cars is relative and that
people with more expensive cars
would therefore be more severely
punished. Also, some people
depend on their cars for income -
salesmen, et al. - and would be
more severely punished if their
cars were impounded.
A resolution was introduced
bv John-MarkM. Mitchell,
Campbell Univ which stated "the
NCSL goes on record as support-
ing legislation which requires the
delay of all red lights at all inter-
sections to provide safer highways
;n North Carolina More than
58,000 traffic accidents are re-
ported each vear at intersections
in NC and in 1987 more than 19,000
of the accidents were reported at
would be beneficia
deterrent for
11 iu
resolution
fair, and a
abuse
Passing bv a narrow margin.
theNCSLsupported "thebanning
oi smoking in public places, in-
cluding enclosures such as work
spaces, restaurants, and public
transportation Denise Taylor
NC A&T, proposed the resolu-
tion, arguing that smoke floating
in the air hurts nonsmokers who
must breathe it and that second-
hand smoke increases the carbon
monoxide in the blood forcing
blood pressure up and making
the heart beat faster.
However, there are no docu-
mented cases of lung cancer
caused from involuntary cigarette
smoke inhalation, according to
Tercise. "I feel this is not some-
intersections using stop-and-go thing the NCSL should be passing
traffic lights. because tobacco is North Caro-
Mitchcll argued that intersec- Una's biggest industry and it's
tions using delayed red lights having big enough problems al-
reported fewer accidents than stop ready he said. "I feel this will
lights that changed simultane- send out an even bigger negative
ouslv and there is no additional connotation to the rest of the coun-
cost to the state to delay stop lights try
at all intersections in NC. The The NCSL defeated a resolu-
NCSL passed the resolution. tion repealing Affirmative Action
April Parker, UNC-Charlotte, legislation implemented in the
pointed out that one of every four early'70s, which states that within
children may be physically or a region, based on the percentage
sexually abused and the only of minorities living within that
protection NC offers the child region, a certain percentage of that
abuse victim during a trial is the minority must be hired within the
exclusion oi spectators from the workplace by companies which
courtroom during the child's tes- arc government funded. The rcso-
timony. She submitted a resolu- lution suggested that Affirmative
tion, supported by the NCSL, that Action laws are reverse discrimi-
"would permit prosecutors to nation and that people shouldn't
have the testimony of a child age be forced to hire a less qualified
13 and younger in a separate and person because it could affect
comfortable room with an inde- more qualified people in the
pendent, state approved child workplace,
council, allowing for the cross "if such a law were repealed
examination of the witness; and in this day and age it would result
for the testii ony to be shown live in a decrease in the hiring of mi-
to the jury and defendant over a nonties which would greatly in-
closed-circuit television monitor crease inflation, the poverty level.
Parker supported her resolu- unemployment, and could cause
tion by stating that three-fourths a possible recession noted Per
of the abusers and molesters are cjse. "Since Affirmative Action
well-known to the victim and that there have been more women
testimony before strangers, a jury, hired in the workplace. However,
and the defendant can be ex- the (Affirmative Action) laws
tremelv stressful and traumatic.
NC � ieneral ssembly and meets
six timesa ear to write legislation
in thetormot resolutionsandbills.
Csl is imposed'150 to 200
student delegates from 25 to 30
public and private universities in
NC.
"From4( i to 60 percent of what
we pass is passed by the NC
Genera' Assembly, which is not a
bad record, Caldwell said. "We
are a visionary group often we
make resolutions years ahead of
actual implementation. We wrote
a resolution in favor oi condom
machines on university cam-
puses "
rhe ECl delegation is open
to any undergraduate, there are
no qualifications necessary to join
- only in terest and attendance. The
NCSL is a non-profit, non-parti-
san organization supported by
grants and fund raisings.
ATTIC
752-7303
"In this situation children feel
pressured and can be easily led
said Donald C. Percise, ECU dele-
gation chairperson. "We felt the
haven't really helped blacks sig-
nificantly in getting jobs
According to Phoebe
Caldwell, governor of NCSL, the
NCSL is set up as a model of the
What's up in the world of science?
Join David Herring with his in-depth look into new
research in the field of science
on the ECU campus and elsewhere.
Keeping you on top, The East Carolinian
SGA
Continued from page 1
Society was appropriated funds
equalling $220 to be used for its
annual spring banquet. A transfer
oi funds totaling $863 was ap
proved for the F.CL- Gospel Choir.

ft
BUSINESS HOURS
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
SUMMER POBliION flvfllLHBLE
for a m
ORRK ROOM TECHNICIAN
Apply in Person
Monday-Friday
- at
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2nd Floor
i Publications Building
No Phone Calls Please
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1989 - 1990
SGA SPRING ELECTIONS
or
.PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENI
(lb Hours Completed)
REQUIREMENTS FOR NOMINATION:
I - full-Time Student
2- Hours Completed
3- Previously Enrolled ot ECU for
Two Consecutive Semesters
H- in Good Standing
5- 2.0 GPI
filing begins Friday,
February Zfh thru Friday, March 3.
Headline For Filing is Friday, March 3 at 4 00 p m.
SGW Office, Room 222
Alendenhall Student Center
Mandatory meeting of all candidates will
be held Tuesday, March I H at 5. 5pm,
Room 242,
Mendenhall Student Center






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2,1969
Frat gives car to staff member
ECU Notts
GREENVILLE � Sylvia Isler
of Greenville will no longer have
to rely on buses and taxis for trans-
portation, thanks to the generos-
ity of an East Carolina University
fraternity.
The brothers of Lambda Chi
Alpha presented Isler with a car
last Wednesday. The 1977 Buick
was purchased with the proceeds
from area fund-raisers as well as
donations from alumni brothers
in other parts of the country.
The alumni brothers were
contacted by Dr. James R. (Jim)
Taylor of Washington, a former
Lambda Chi Alpha member and
director of ECU's Remeidial Edu-
cation Activity Program (REAP),
where Isler is employed as a de-
velopmental specialist. REAP is a
developmental day care center for
children with disabilities.
According to Taylor, Isler
supports herself and her grand-
mother on her salary and is pursu-
ing a degree from ECU in special
education by taking classes at
night.
"Sylvia has been poor all her
life Taylor said. "Last semester
she couldn' t afford to buy the book
she needed for her class and had
to take taxis to the library to use
their copy
The car came as a total sur-
prise to Iser, who was moved to
tears. "I really appreciate this from
the bottom of my heart she said.
"It will mean so much to me to
have a feeling of independence
for a change and not have to de-
pend on someone else to come
and get me
In addition to the car, the fra-
ternity also presented Isler with
its first Burton Blatt Optimism
Award, which is to be presented
annually to an ECU faculty or staff
member for outstanding research,
service or teaching in the area of
mental retardation.
Dr. Blatt, centennial professor
and dean of the School of Educa-
tion at Syracuse University, was
known for his efforts at establish-
ing a more accepting society for
people with disabilities. At hs
death in 1985, his vita listed 291
published contributions to the
field of special education. Taylor
knew Blatt and suggested that the
fraternity establish the award.
"We wanted to present this
award to someone we feel por-
trays the optimistic outlok that
Burton Blatt showed throughout
his life, said Paul Lawson,
Lambda Chi president. "After lis-
tening to Sylvia Isler, who gave us
a very moving speech about the
effects of poverty, we decided to
give the award to her
Isler's speech inspired the
fraternity to assist children with
mental retardation by getting
involved with HELP Corps, a
volunteer organization, Taylor
said, is to eliminate the devastat-
ing effects of poverty.
"Seventy-five percent of chil-
dren with retardation come from
poverty stricken areas Taylor
said. "There is so much poverty in
eastern North Carolina that if we
can get the youth involved, we
can make a difference
Two brothers who are en-
rolled at REAP have already trav-
eled to their home last Sunday to
remove ice-torn limbs from the
roof of their home. The chapter
also purchased clothing and shoes
for the boys.
"We're always looking for
service projects Lawson said.
"We think this is a good opportu-
nity to help out kids that need
help
SGA
Continued from page 1
Society was appropriated funds
equalling $220 to be used for its
annual spring banquet. A transfer
of funds totaling $863 was ap-
proved for the ECU Gospel Choir.
The East Carolinian
James F.J.McKce,Directorof Advertising
AdvertisingRepresentatives
Scott Makey h Kh Pearce
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate $4.75
BulkRatc(Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199col.inches$4.50 5 Inscrtions(4in$4.55
200-299col.inches$4.40 (i225') $4.50
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
OneColorandblack$90.00 (122S") .$4.20
TwoColorand black$155.00
10Insertions(4m $4.50
(12- 25 �)$4.45
15lnsertionsn IV) $4.45
U2?5")$4.40
20 Insertions (-Tin$4.40
(12251$4.35
25 Insertions f-r-in$4.35
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
Sylvia Isler receives the keys to a car purchased by Lambda Chi Alpha. (Photo by Tony M. Rumple)
NC Student Legislature
Continued from page 1
It was counter-argued that this
resolution is unfair because the
�value of cars-is relative and that
people with more expensive cars
would therefore be more severely
punished. Also, some people eluding enclosures such as work
depend on their cars for income - spaces, restaurants, and public
salesmen, et al. - and would be
more severely punished if their
cars were impounded.
A resolution was introduced
by John-MarkM. Mitchell,
Campbell Univ which stated "the
NCSL goes on record as support-
ing legislation which requires the
resolution would be beneficial, NC General Assembly and meets
fair, and a deterrent for child six times a year to write legislation
abuse in the formofresolutionsand bills.
ramgtoy a nantfwWaT-grn eflrToscTSurf!o' 200
the NCSL supported "the banning student delegates from 25 to 30
of smoking in public places, in- public and private universities in
NC.
"From 40 to 60 percent of what
we pass is passed by the NC
General Assembly, which is not a
bad record Caldwell said. "We
are a visionary group - often we
make resolutions years ahead of
actual implementation. We wrote
a resolution in favor of condom
machines on university cam-
puses
The ECU delegation is open
to any undergraduate, there are
no qualifications necessary to join
transportation Denise Taylor,
NC A&T, proposed the resolu-
tion, arguing that smoke floating
in the air hurts nonsmokers who
must breathe it and that second-
hand smoke increases the carbon
monoxide in the blood forcing
delay of all red lights at all inter- blood pressure up and making
sections to provide safer highways the heart beat faster.
in North Carolina More than However, there are no docu-
58,000 traffic accidents are re- mented cases of lung cancer
ported each year at intersections caused from involuntary cigarette LJjIJere8laafeMJ5JS
inNCandinl987morethanl9,000 smoke inhalation, according to
of the accidents were reported at Percise. "I feel this is not some-
intersections using stop-and-go thing the NCSL should be passing
traffic lights. because tobacco is North Caro-
Mitchell argued that intersec- Una's biggest industry and it's
tions using delayed red lights having big enough problems al-
reported fewer accidents than stop ready he said. "I feel this will
lights that changed simultane- send out an even bigger negative
NCSL is a non-profit, non-parti-
san organization supported by
grants and fund raisings.
ously and there is no additional
cost to the state to delay stop lights
at all intersections in NC. The
NCSL passed the resolution.
connotation to the rest of the coun
try
The NCSL defeated a resolu
tion repealing Affirmative Action
April Parker, UNC-Charlotte, legislation implemented in the
pointed out that one of every four early '70s, which states that within
children may be physically or a region, based on the percentage
sexually abused and the only of minorities living within that
protection NC offers the child region, a certain percentage of that
abuse victim during a trial is the minority must be hired within the
exclusion of spectators from the workplace by companies which
courtroom during the child's tes- are government funded. The reso-
timony. She submitted a resolu- lution suggested that Affirmative
tion, supported by the NCSL, that Action laws are reverse discrimi-
"would permit prosecutors to nation and that people shouldn't
have the testimony of a child age be forced to hire a less qualified
13 and younger in a separate and person because it could affect
comfortable room with an inde- more qualified people in the
pendent, state approved child workplace,
council, allowing for the cross "if such a law were repealed
examination of the witness; and in this day and age it would result
for the testimony to be shown live in a decrease in the hiring of mi-
to the jury and defendant over a notifies which would greatly in-
closed-circuit television monitor crease inflation, the poverty level,
Parker supported her resolu- unemployment, and could cause
tion by stating that three-fourths a possible recession noted Per-
of the abusers and molesters are cise. "Since Affirmative Action
well-known to the victim and that there have been more women
testimony before strangers, a jury, hired in the workplace. However,
and the defendant can be ex- the (Affirmative Action) laws
tremely stressful and traumatic, haven't really helped blacks sig-
"In this situation children feel nificantly in getting jobs
pressured and can be easily led According to Phoebe
said Donald C. Percise, ECU dele- Caldwell, governor of NCSL, the
gation chairperson. "We felt the NCSL is set up as a model of the
ATTIC
752-7303
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Join David Herring with his in-depth look into new
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on the ECU campus and elsewhere.
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nday-Friday
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ast Carolinian
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SGA SPRING ELECTIONS

I
for
.PRESIDENT
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REQUIREMENTS FOR NOMINATION:
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Two Consecutive Semesters
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Filing begins Friday,
February 2Hth thru Friday, March 3.
Deadline For Filing is Friday, March 3 at H.00 p.m.
SG? Office, Room 222
Mendenhall Student Center
Mandatory meeting of all candidates will
be held Tuesday, March IU at 5. 5pm,
Room 242,
Mendenhall Student Center
V





TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2, 1989 3
Environmental issues go unheard in
many states, says national survey
WASHINGTON (AP) but fared poorly in others. For
Many states are doing too little to example, Maine was given the
tackle major environmental issues highest mark for dealing with
including solid waste disposal, water quality issues but was
water quality and protection of ranked well below average in for-
food supplies, according to an est and land management and
environmental group that con- average in protecting food qual-
ducted a national survey.
Renew America, a private
environmental and conservation
organization, gave top ranking
Tuesday to California and Ore-
gon among the 50 states, with
Tennessee and Louisiana at the
California (42), Oregon (39), Min-
nesota (38), Massachusetts (37),
Wisconsin (37), Iowa (34), New
Jersey (34), Florida (32), Maryland
(32), Connecticut (30), and Wash-
ington (30). The states with the
programs were Nevada, Indiana,
West Virginia, Utah, Louisiana
and Wyoming. The report cited
increasing concerns about the
growing garbage problem, but
noted that only eight states so far
ity.
While Oregon was second
onlv to California in the overall
ranking, it was considered only
average in protecting food from
pesticides and in its protection of
drinking water. Oregon, nevcrthe-
bottom of the list. But the group, less, received the top ranking in
whose survey examined state ef- two other categories,
forts to deal with five environ- The authors of the study
mental problem areas, said that emphasized that the survey dealt
overall there still is too little being with onlv five environmental
done to tackle environmental protection issues: forest manage-
problems on the state level. ment (Washington, best); solid
Aggressive state initiatives to Waste recycling (Oregon); drink-
protect the environment remain ing water quality (Maine); food
the exception and not the rule safety (Iowa); dealing with growth
lowest ranking were: Louisiana have comprehensive recycling
(10), Tennessee (11), Utah (12), programs and only 10 have laws
South Dakota (13), Arkansas (13), requiring at least some recycling
Nevada (14), Wyoming (15), West of waste products.
Virginia (16), Kentucky (17), and Thestatesgiventhebestmarks
Indiana (18). for dealing with solid waste dis-
The report said the states with posal issues were Oregon, Con-
the best overall program aimed at necticut, Florida, Iowa, Illinois,
protecting drinking water were Minnesota, New Jersey, New
Local and Out of
Town Newspapers
?Full Selection of Magazines
Greeting Cards For All Occasions1
said Scott Ridlev, who directed
the survev. In many cases, states
are forced to make hard budget
decisions with environmental
protection losing out, added Tina
Hobson, the group's executive
director.
In other cases a state excelled
in one area that was examined.
(Oregon). The survey ranked the
states numerically, with 50 being
the highest possible when exam-
ining state actions undertaken to
deal with the five areas examined.
In the overall ranking, which
took into account state efforts in
all five areas, the top states were:
Maine, Massachusetts, New Jer-
sey, California and North Caro-
lina. The states with the worst
record were Arkansas, Nevada,
Ohio, Tennessee and Louisiana.
The study said there contin-
ues to be "substantial gaps" in the
monitoring of harmful chemicals
in foods, although some states
have taken on a growing respon-
York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island
and Wisconsin. Those with the
lowest marks were Mississippi,
South Carolina and Arizona.
The study said Oregon, Cali-
fornia, Wisconsin, Massachusetts,
Florida, New York, New Jersey
and Minnesota had the best pro-
grams for dealing with the impact
of growth. States with the poorest
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Greenville Square Shopping Center � 756-7177
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sibility to protect food supplies programs were Arkansas, Missis
especially in monitoring for pesti- sippi anci West Virginia.
cide residues. It said the five states
with the best programs for food
safety were Iowa, California,
Minnesota, South Carolina and
Wisconsin.
The states with the worst
The report said only seven
states have enacted laws that at-
tempt to protect forests by balanc-
ing the needs of timber producers
and conservationists.
Illesal aliens seized in Charlotte
ATLANTA (AP) - Federal
immigration agents in Charlotte,
.C, apprehended 27 more sus-
pected illegal aliens on a flight
bound for New York, bringing the
number to 175 seized in a thrce-
day government crackdown on a
suspect alien smuggling ring.
Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion Service officials in Atlanta,
whose jurisdiction includes Char-
lotte, said the 27 were on Pied-
mont Flight 1522, bound from
Thoenix, Ariz to New York. They
had flown to Phoenix on an Ameri-
can West Airlines flight from Los
Angeleslate Tuesday, the INSsaid.
The 27, who are from Mexico,
Brazil and El Salvador, were taken
off the plane when it made a sched-
uled stop in Charlotte at 7 a.m.
EST. "An irate citizen called our
office this morning and claimed to
be a commuter aboard the Pied-
mont flight said David
Carmichael, supervisory INS
agent in Charlotte. "The source
suggested we check Flight 1522
On Monday, INS agents ap-
prehended 79 suspected illegal
aliens aboard Eastern Airlines
Flight 80, which stops in Atlanta
en route from Los Angeles to New
York. Sixty-nine more aliens were
apprehended in Los Angeles
Mondav night as they attempted
to board the same flight.
"We saw it here (in Atlanta)
and in Los Angeles on Monday,
and now in Charlotte said Tho-
mas P. Fischer, director ofthc At-
lanta INS office. 'They're desper-
ate to unload their human cargo
and have little concern, if any, for
the aliens
INS officials in Los Angeles
said a man believed to be a leader
in the smuggling ring � Jorge
Guzman-Romero, a 42-year-old
Mexican national � was arrested
along with the 69 in Los Angeles.
Immigration officials stressed that
several independent smugglers
mav have been using the "red eye"
Hights to ferry illegal aliens to the
East Coast and that the group
arrested in Los Angeles was not
necessanlv linked to those seized
in Atlanta.
"This was a concurrent, par-
allel investigation that will con-
tinue until we close this route. We
suspect there will be other routes
Donald H. Looney, acting district
director of the Immigration and
Naturalization Service in Los
Angeles, said Tuesday.
Authorities said the chief
smuggling operators remain at
large,but thev described Guzman-
Romero as a leader. "We're not as
close as we'd like to be. We'd like
to have (the ringleaders) in hand-
cuffs said Thomas Gaines, INS
assistant district director for anti-
smuggling.
Guzman-Romero was
charged with transporting at least
three illegal aliens. U.S. Magis-
trate Volney V. Brown declined to
set bail Tuesday, saying Guzman-
Romero has no ties to the Los
Angeles area.
Gaines said investigators re-
ceived tips that several groups
used Eastern's late-nighc flight to
New York. "We feel like we have
a number of individual smugglers
who are utilizing a rather low
airfare to move their aliens away
from the border from Los Angeles
and on up to the East Coast
Gaines said at a news conference.
Smugglers often appear early
at the ticket counter and pay cash
for a block of tickets, officials said
The 69 aliens caught in Los Ange-
les allegedly paid up to $4,000 for
a package that probably included
crossing the border, passage to a
drop house and the cross-country
flight, Gaines said.
He said he didn't know if the
package included finding employ-
ment. Fifty-four were from Mex-
ico, seven from El Salvador and
four each from Colombia and
Guatemala, Looney said.
INS spokesman Joe Flanders
said most of the people, if found to
be illegal aliens, would be given
the choice of going home or re-
questing a deportation hearing.
He said some might be held as
material witnesses.
Tom Thomas, a spokesman
for the INS in Atlanta, said thou-
sands of illegal aliens may have
been shuttled across the country
on the Eastern flight nearly every
day for the past 30 days. Gaines
refused to speculateonhow many
illegal aliens may have used the
flights but said the technique is
not new, recalling at least one
sweep in recent years that netted
200 people.
Both Thomas in Atlanta and
Looney in Los Angeles said East-
ern Airlines was not a target of the
investigation. Eastern cooperated
with the INS on the Atlanta ar-
rests, officials said.
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Continued from page 1
"To maintain close supervi-
sion of the matches, enrollment is
currently limit?d to twenty
youth Lermer added that this is
not a fixed figure and will be
subject to change in the future
depending on the number of re-
ferrals and volunteers project
PALS is able to pair together.
The program is also seeking
support from businesses, clubs,
and other organizations as well as
from individuals.
"There are other ways people
can volunteer in this program,
such as providing transportation,
sponsoring a group activity, fund
raising, or offering special serv-
ices such as tutoring or tours of a
company or business office
Lermer said. "A club can sponsor
on a one-time basis what we're
going to call PALS for a day, when
all twenty adult volunteers and
kids can come together for a
supper, bowling, or any kind of
activity
PALS began this past January
after receiving a $30,031 grant by
Community Bajed Alternatives in
July 1988. CBA, a part of the N.C.
Division of youth services, devel-
ops alternatives for juvenile of-
fenders throughout the state. Ad-
ditional services are being fur-
nished by the ECU School of
Education.
For more information about
volunteering cr making a referral,
contact Sharon Lermer at the ECU
School of EducationDivision of
Services, Speight Building, (919)
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I
QlJre iEaat �ar0ltman
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nWtmuiifv t' I1-
Pete Fernald, c�im-hi
Stephanie Folsom, M�-r-x &�
James F.J. McKee, ummnfMrnm
Tim Hampton, n�� m Brad Bannister, g &�.�
KRISTEN HALBERGportfBtoor JEFF PARKER, s� a�
Chip Carter, F�re i Tom Furr, c.rn.i�hm m�
Susan Howell, Mucm m� Debbie Stevens, c��ry
Dean Waters, &-M�,cr Stephanie Emory,ut� sw�
Stephanie Singleton, cy &� Mac Clark, m� mhp
March 2,1989
OPINION
Page 4
Art
Is shock value the best method?
An art project about racism
which appeared on the Mall Mon-
day was dismantled the same day it
was put up because some of its
svmbolism was open to misunder-
standing.
The two art students who cre-
ated the scene, Marc Sylvestre and
Victoria Higgins, put two white fig-
ures covered with racist graffiti on
the ground. In front of them hung a
black plaster figure. On a six-foot
banner were written the very words
this campus needed to hear:
"WAKE UP
Granted, the point may have
been missed by those overwhelmed
by the shock value of an exhibit
depicting covert racism, but the art-
ists' expression of disgust toward
serious problems was there for all
who took a closer look at the plaster
figures and banner. People saw in
that project what they expected
ancjor wanted to see. The jnrv&r
was six feet tall. How big did it need
to be? Ten feet? Fifty?
Racial incidents and there-emer-
gence of past controversy have not
only put ECU in the spotlight this
semester, but have also given the
students, faculty, and administra-
tors of this campus a motive to take
an honest look at the attitudes that
exist within themselves. Sylvestre
and Higgins no doubt intended for
their project to reinforce this motive.
True, the project was misconstrued
by those few who saw it � but it's
questionable whether the admini-
stration handled the issue very well
by dismantling the art by 8 in the
morning.
Ifs thought that the method
must complement rather than
contravene the message. Outra-
geous emotional appeals often
make the listener react defensively,
rather than entice him to re-examine
his beliefs.
Often, but not always. The flip-
side of the issue is that some people
may have reacted angrily, but possi-
bly � hopefully � the project
achieved its goal by making them
-Irfink. - If discussion, was aroused
among anyone, then a kind of vic-
tory was achieved. If not, then this
incident was yet another to increase
the already felt tension between and
among races.
Maybe it really is time to WAKE
UP.
Gripe on the Tower
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Editorial C olumnirt
We're in luck! We were trying to get
Mike Royko's conservative chum, Grump,
to pay The East Carolinian a visit. He can't
make it because he's copyrighted, but he
was kind enough to send his close friend
and ideological equal, Gripe.
� � �
Hi, Gripe. What's on your mind?
"It's this Tower confirmation fight. I
don't like it � all those senators, pestering
a fine man like John Tower just because he
drinks and womanizes. What's a little
womanizing, anyway?"
Gee, Gripe, I never thought of it that
way. Imagine � all those people persecut-
ing poor Tower, and on evidence that's only
about a hundred times more solid than the
evidence that got Gary Hart in so much
trouble.
"Uh, yeah. But what about his drink-
ing? He's taken the pledge to stay off alco-
hol
Yes, and it takes a lot of courage to say
that. But if he's an alcoholic � and the FBI
reports suggest that this may be the case �
he won't be able to keep to his pledge, no
matter how well-intentioned. Besides, he's
been nominated for one of the most sensi-
tive positions in the country � Secretary of
Defense � and if there are legitimate ques-
tions about his fitness for the job, and there
are, then those questions should be an-
swered.
"Well the Democrats are out to per-
secute Tower � lining up against him in a
partisan fashion
Maybe. But then, Bob Dole has called
for all Republicans to "rally around the
president" and support the Tower nomina-
tion. In fact, the Republicans are the ones
who turned this into a partisan issue. Plus,
they're the ones who escalated the impor-
tance of the nomination to the point where,
if Bush loses, he faces "the wimp factor"
again but if he wins, it won't be a very
substantial victory, at least not in terms of
PR.
"Yes well look at the economy.
This has been the longest economic recov-
ery in history
Wait a minute, Gripe. Don't you want
to defend John Tower any more?
"Uh, not now; I gotta be going. I just
remembered, uh, I think maybe I'm copy-
righted too
Thanks, Gripe.
Will Mike Steele leave us behind?
To the editor:
1 just had a nightmare. I dreamed
�andlknowitisadreambecauseof
how far-fetched the whole thing is �
I went to pick up my daily newspa-
per and read in the sports section
that our very own Coach Steele has
been mentioned as a possible candi-
date for a coaching position at Indi-
ana State University. I only wish it
were a dream; unfortunately this is
reality.
I hope and pray that those offi-
cials, namely Dave Hart, who will be
involved in the decision to let Coach
Steele go or not, assuming that it
comes to that point, recognize the
popularity of our basketball coach,
and the importance of keeping him
at this university. Throughout my
four years here at ECU I have been
somewhat of a regular at the basket-
ball games and 1 can tell you first-
hand that Coach Steele has turned
things around for the basketball
program, both internally and
externally. For the first time we have
people on this campus whose favor-
ite team is East Carolina, and not
other schools with more reputable
programs. What this means ts that
we care, and the reason we care is
due to the hope that Coach Steele has
built around what used to be per-
ceived as a hopeless situation. In the
future we now have the potential to
become a recognized power in the
Colonial Athletic Association as well
as within the state in basketball. I do
not think I would be exaggerating to
say that this in turn would provide a
lift for the whole eastern part of the
state, not to mention the revenue that
would be brought in, and the effect
this recognition would have on our
overall athletic program. Even if
Indiana State University does not get
in touch with Coach Steele, this situ-
ation is likely to occur sometime in
the future; the time is now to at least
ponder what kind of sacrifices we
are willing to make to keep fine
coaches at our school, lest they slip
away into the Pat Dye heap of
"things that might have been
The year 1989 will no doubt go
down in history in our athletic pro-
gram. We can' look back and say
"yeah that's the year 1SU almost stole
Mike Steele away from us, wow!
What a difference he's made, can you
imagine ECU basketball without the
'Steele Mill'?" Or will we say,
"Damn, the last time we had a win-
ning season was in 1989. How did wo
ever let that Steele fella go?"
Perhaps the most important ac-
tor 1n this scenario will be Coach
Steele himself. Obviously he is going
to have to make a decision that will be
beneficial to his family as well as his
own career. It is my hope that when
he makes his choice to stay or go that
he also considers the variables I have
mentioned, especially the opportuni-
ties that he himself has created.
Maybe he can look back and say "I'm
glad I stayed
Tim Morns
Senior
Political Science
Upset nurse
To the editor:
I was shocked at your portrayal
of nurses in the editorial comic on
Feb. 23,1989. It is sad that even after
years of hard work to build up the
nurses' professional image, one
comic can reverse the process so
much. Society has degraded nurses
long enough. I find it hard to believe
that an institute of higher learning
could and would continue to per-
petuate this antiquated view of
nurses. We are a hard working pro-
fessional group � here at ECU and
throughout the world. We deserve
respect tor our jobs � upon which
one day evervones' lives will de-
pend. No longer will we settle for
less. We have worked hard and have
earned it, now we want the respect
we deserve.
Stacy Truitt
Sophomore
Nursing
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Mail or drop them by our office in the Publi-
cations Building, across from the entrance to Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters must include the name, major, classification, address, phone number and
I the signature of the author (s).
Letters arc limited to 300 words or less, double-spaced, typed or neatly printed. All letters are subject to editing
for brevity, obscenity and libel, and no personal attacks will be permitted. Students, faculty and staff writing
letters for this page are reminded that they are limited to one every two weeks.
The deadline for editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday
editions.
Spectrum Rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum" section of the newspaper, The East Carolinian features 'The Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column by guest writers from the student body ai 1 faculty. The columns printed in
"The Campus Spectrum" will contain current topics of concern to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted only with regard to rules of grammar and decency. Persons submitting columns
must be willing to accept byline credit for their efforts, as no entries from ghost writers will be published.
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V





s
t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2,1969 5
First black school head named
GREENVILLE, S.C. (AP) �
Thomas Kerns says he felt like
screaming from the top of his lungs
when he became the first black
superintendent of the Greenville
County School District�the larg-
estin the state.
Kerns, who graduated from
an all-black high school in a segre-
gated school system, is the first
black to be elected to the highest
administrative position in the
county school system. The 55-year-
old had held the post on an in-
terim basis since June after former
Superintendent Roy Truby re-
signed.
The unanimous decision by
the school board is the peak of
Kerns' education career � and it
nearly caused a break in the
administrator's normally reserved
manner. "I really did feel like
breaking down and screaming at
the top of my lungs Kerns said
Tuesday.
While Kems was able to keep
his composure, a telephone call
later to tell his wife the news pro-
duced different results. "She did
scream he said.
Kerns has spent most of his
li fe in Greenville County's schools.
A 1949 graduate of Sterling High
School, Kems left Greenville to
attend Johnson C. Smith Univer-
sity in Charlotte, N.C.
He spent two years in the
Army and then returned to teach
at his high school alma mater �
and never left. Kems said his
appointment is not just a victory
for Greenville's black community.
He said becoming superinten-
dent serves as an example to all
youngsters in the district by show-
ing people can work hard and stick
to their goals and get to the top.
Getting to the top took a long time
for Kerns, who spent the first 15
years of his career working at an
all-black school in a school system
that maintained dual facilities for
blacks and whites.
But in 1970, when the district
was integrated, Kems became a
rising star. Within a year, he
moved from Sterling to Greenville
High School as assistant princi-
pal.
The next year, he was ap-
pointed assistant director of the
district's personnel department.
In 1972, he became area superin-
tendent for the Central Area
Schools.
Kerns said that's when he
decided to shoot for the superin-
tendent's job. In 1983 he filled one
of the final requirements for the
superintendency, earning his
doctorate at the University of
South Carolina.
He served as the interim su-
perintendent in 1984 after Floyd
Hall left the district, and again
after Truby left. But this time, he
gets to drop interim from in front
of his title.
Kerns said he wants to con-
tinue the quiet times that have
marked his eight months as in-
terim superintendent � a trend
the district's trustees said was a
major point in choosing him for
the job. "I'm a people superinten-
dent Kerns said.
Kerns has said that he plans to
push for better pay for teachers to
keep the district from losing its
best teachers to higher-paying
neighboring school districts. That,
many people have said, is a reflec-
tion of his understanding of what
it means to be a classroom teacher.
"His qualifications are su-
perb state Sen. Theo Mitchell
said. "Dr. Kems is the man, I feel
strongly, to lead the district to new
heights
it
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Mentally retarded man flees from state institution,
found frozen to death under bridge after storm
r
l
GREENSBORO (AP) � Ron-
nie Oliphant liked to travel, but
the mentally retarded man's last
trip took him only about 35 miles
from the Greensboro apartment
where he lived under part-time
county supervision.
Oliphant, 49, was found last
Wednesday, apparently frozen to
death, lying face-up on a piece of
cardboard under a bridge in
Winston-Salem. He had been car-
rying onlv a watch, a key and six
cents.
Eight days before, on Feb. 14,
Oliphant had left his apartment in
the early-morning hours. He was
reported missing to Greensboro
police that morning by a county
staff worker who had come to
check on him and his roommate,
who is also mentally retarded.
Oliphant had been placed in a
county-supervised apartment in
March 1988 after roughly 14 years
in John Umstead Hospital, a state
mental institution in Butner. He
was not supervised full time, even
though he had wandered oti at
least once before.
Joan Vincent, assistant area
director for mental health, mental
retardation and substance abuse
services and Oliphant's legal
guardian, called Oliphant's death
"very, very sad But Kay Rceceof
Graham, one of Oliphant's three
cent's failure to alert the media body was taken to the Chief
that her brother was missing. Medical Examiner's office in
"I wish they'd gone public Chapel Hill, where an autopsy
with it on TV she said. "It's like tentatively determined he had
a child being lost. Maybe a motor- frozen to death, possibly as early
ist or somebody would sav, 'Hey,
I saw this man on TV That was a as Feb. 17, when the first big snow-
decision his guardian made, and I 11 of the winter blanketed the
don't know what her reasons Triad,
were Ms. Vincent said the county
"We at the time were feeling will review how it supervises
that we would find him in town, mentally retarded people who live
that he would show up Ms. in the community. No county
up,
Vincent said. "We had done eve-
rything with the police, had given
them pictures and did not feel that
we needed to do more than that
Oliphant's roommate said
Oliphant was in the apartment
when he went to bed about mid-
night Feb. 13. But Oliphant was
gone when the roommate awoke
at ,6:45 a.m. Feb. 14. A county
worker who arrived shortly after-
ward notified police just after 8
a.m. that Oliphant was missing.
Ms. Vincent contacted family
members, who suggested that
Oliphant might have headed for
Florida; for Long Beach, NX
where he had once lived; or for
Virginia Beach, Va where a
younger sister lives. That morn-
ings sheltered workshop instruc-
tor who was driving on Interstate
40 thought she recognized Ol-
iphant walking along the road,
sisters, said that after Oliphant's stopped and tried to talk to him.
earlier disappearance, the county
should have kept a closer eye on
her brother.
"He had a good life in the last
year, but I wish he had been closer
supervised she said. Ms. Reece,
40, also said Ms. Vincent had told
her the county was trying to ar-
range full-time supervision for her
brother but that funding was not
available.
Ms. Vincentdenicd telling Ms.
Reece that, saying that she had
told Ms. Reece only that her
brother was to be moved this week
into a different apartment in the
complex, with a new roommate.
Ms. Reece also criticized Ms. Vin-
UND students to
see 'Sammie and
Rosie Get Laid'
(CPS) � After weeks of de-
bate and protest, students at the
University of North Dakota will
be able to watch "Sammy and
Rosie Get Laid" after all.
Student President David
Glessner vetoed a student gov-
ernment ban on the film Feb. 5,
clearing the way for the movie to
be shown Feb. 23.
The UND Student Senate
voted 9-8 Jan. 28 to prohibit the
University Program Council from
showing the movie because, al-
though they had not seen the film,
many felt the title would offend
North Dakotans and spur the state
legislature to cut funding to the
school.
"I want UND to appear as an
innovator, not as a negative insti-
tution said Student Senator Steve
Martin, who supported the ban.
While the title of the film has
put off some booking agents at
commercial and college theaters
alike, the film's distributor said
UNO's was the most heated de-
bate over the movie so far.
Although the "Sammy and
Rosie Get Laid" does include some
sex scenes, critics of the ban ar-
gued the film's message is politi-
cal and the title is British slang for
being taken advantage of by an
institution.
Ms. Vincent said that after
talking to Onphant, the instruc-
tor, whom she declined to iden-
tify, thought she might have mis-
taken him for someone else. The
instructor left him walking, but
did report seeing him when she
arrived at the workshop and
learned that Oliphant was miss-
ing.
Detective Ed Hill of the
Greensboro Police Department
said that police had been told only
that Oliphant might be heading to
the coast or Florida. Police deter-
mined that Oliphant spent the
nightof Feb. 14 in a Salvation Army
shelter in Winston-Salem.
Police have no other recorded
sightings of him until his body
was found a week later. Oliphant's
workers involved with the case
will be disciplined.
"The staff acted responsibly
and followed procedures that were
in place Vincent said. "Unfortu-
nately, we've had one situation
that's been very, very sad, but one
out of as many supervised cases
as we've had isn't bad
The county now has two other
mentally retarded adults living in
apartments under part-time su-
pervision, she said. That supervi-
GUADALAJARA
SUMMER
SCHOOL
University of Arizona
offers more than 40
courses: anthropol-
ogy, art, bilingual edu-
cation, folk music and
folk dance, history,
phonetics, political sci-
ence, Spanish langu-
age and literature and
intensive Spanish. Six-
week session. July 3-
August 11,1989. Fully
accredited program.
M.A. degree in Span-
ish offered. Tuition
$510. Room and
board in Mexican
home $540. EEQAA
Write
Guadalajara
Summer School
Education Bldg Room 225
University of Arizona
Tucson. AZ 85721
(602) 621-4729 or
621-4720
sion involves personal checks in
the mornings and evenings, aug-
mented by telephone callsat other
times of the day.
Ms. Vincent acknowledged
that the incident raises questions
about the county's policy of plac-
ing mentally retarded people in
the "least restrictive environment"
� in their own homes in the
community and in jobs where
possible. But she defended the
policy and said Oliphant could
have wound up dead even if he
had been living with family
members.
"I would say that the person
could leave their home as easily as
they can an apartment she said.
"The person apparently left in the
wee hours of the morning, and
again, that can happen in a private
home. Parents can go to sleep. It is
unfair to say that this could only
happen in this situation and not in
another one
Summer School
and the
Coast Discover
UNCW.
For more information write or call for
1989 catalog:
Summer School Director
UNC Wilmington
601 South College Road
Wilmington, N.C. 28403-3297
(919) 395-3540
Have A Great Spring Break!
And Now A Word From Our Sponsor
BE RESPONSIBLE
Take Care Of Yourself And Your Friends
Remember, Don't Drink And Drive
Sponsored by Office of Substance Abuse Prevention and Education
303 Erwin Hall
757-6793
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
�DIAMONDS
�BICYCLES
�TELEVISIONS
�GUNS
�JEWELRY
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REFRIGERATORS
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�VCR'8
CORNER OK 10th & DICKINSON
752r632�
IGRITENV1IXE
MEDIA BOARD
IS
Right After Spring Break comet the:
14th Annual
TKE BOXING
Ringgirl Competition
March 14th
at
THE ATTIC
1st Place $100
2nd Place $75
3rd Place $50
Plus all three placet receive $40 etch toward purchase
f , b-tnw �uit. Call 83Q-12
now accepting applications for General Manager for
the 1989 -1990 academic year for the following:
� The East Carolinian
�WZMB-FM
�Buccaneer
� Rebel
� Photo Lab
� Expressions Magazine
Please apply at the Media Board Office,
2nd floor, Publications Building
Phone 757-6009
Applications accepted through
March 13,1989
Interviews: Mendenhall, Wednesday, March 15,3:00 pm





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2, 1W9
Classifieds
FOR RENT
APARTMENT FOR RENT. Two blocks
from campus (One bedroom available
until lulvV Fullv furnished, walking dis-
tance to campus and downtown, hard-
wood floors, friendly neighbors S150
month plus utilities 757-0412.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED Starting in Mav Three bodrm
apt at Eastbook SI21.00 a month 13
utilities New Carpet and new refrigera-
tor. ECU Bus Service' Call now 758-4924.
BFVERL MANOR APARTMENTS
Now leasing spacious - bedroom units
with largo In ing room and dining area
Now carpet now wallpaper in kitchen
and bath Range and refrigerator pro-
vided. Central heatair. cold hot water
and basic cable T V included in rent as
low as $340.00 per month Call 746-3059
evenings tor appointment
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom townhouse
$430.00. Fullv turnished. even dishes' 2 1
2 baths. Call Betsy Rav. ReMax Proper-
ties at 355-5444 or 757-3034. Immediate
occupancy available
FOR RENT Bedroom in house Near
ECU campus. Utilities included Whole
house privileges $165.00month Call
758 124 after 6 00 p m
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom upstairs apt.
Screened in porch Utilities included.
Near ECU campus. 525V1 00 month. Call
758-1274 alter 6:00 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
ASAP to share 3 bedroom apt. 1 3 rent is
only 5120.00 plus 13 utilities. Call 732-
3678
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Ringgold Towers B unit 306
fully furnished. Take over mortgage pay-
ments Call 407-778-8030 in the evenings.
FOR SALE Smith Corona 2200 electric
portable, cartridge ribbon and corrector
type, typewriter with carrying case. Like
new used only two years $195.00. Call
756 9486 after 6 p.m.
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE. 24
Wildwood Villas 3 bedrooms, 2 1.2
baths. Great for college students. For more
information call Jeff Aldndge 756-3500 or
555 67rjfj
LONG WEEKEND IN D.C! 2 long trip air
tickets � Greenville to D.C Thurs March
a return Tues. March 14 only Si75 each
v all Jim (703) 875-4965 a' work or Debo-
rah 7 B)979-3000orfcaveamessage(301)
341-1559 � home.
FOR SALE: Glass top table with 4 chairs
580.00, small table with 2 chairs $30.00,
double bed with mattress and spring!
575.00, green rechner $50.00, new living
room suit, take o er payments of S4 00
month Call 746-3313.
SKI KEYSTONE: 2 roundtnp ticket-
available from RDU to Denver Co De-
part March 7th return March 10th. lsJ
Call Joan at 7Si . f details.
CAR STEREO: Alpine. AMFM cass
Model 7163 $193.00. Call 752-8576
CAN YOU BUY:Jeeps.Cars,4 4'sseied
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts todav 602-837-3401. Ext 711
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
med a D I tor the best music available for
parties Dance. Top 40 & Beach Call 333-
27S1 and ak for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We otter typing
and photocopying services We a1-hi s1
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages We
repair computers and printers also Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 3th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J. Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
earlv and book tor your formal or party.
758-1700 ak tor Dillon or leave a mes
sage
SOUND MIXTURES D SERVICE:
Mu�ic tor all occassions. March date
available call Boh at 752 4lMt The most
musk variety with the best sound quality
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RFS1DFNT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the Id No monetary
compensation howev i room, utilities
and phone provided Mary mi�h REAL
Crisis Center 758-HE1 P
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSISTER
CAMPS: (Mas-) Mah-Kee-Nac tor Boys
Danbee for Girls Counselor positions for
Program Specialists All team sports, es-
pecially baseball, basketball, field hookev
soccer and volleyball. 2 tennis openings;
also archery, riflery and biking; other
openings include performing Arts, Fine
Arts yearbook, photography, cooking
sewing, rollerskating, rovketrv, ropes
camp craft; all waterfront activities
iswimnung skiing, sailing, windsurfing,
canoeingkavakV Inquire J& DCamping
(Bow) W0 Linden Ave C4en Kidge N
07028; Action Camping (Girls) 263 Mam
Road, Montville Nl 07045 Phone (Boys)
201-42" S322 iGirls 201-31fyf!
ATTENTION�HIRING! Government
lobs � vour area. Many immediate open
ings without waiting list or test 317 840
$69 4S Call 1-602-838 8885. Ext. B 528 i
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED:Starti ,
March 6th Monday-Thursday after 2
p.m. Pay starts at 55.00hour Call Pitt
County Community Schools 830 I I
FOREIGN STUDENTS: Job-Hunting
Guide (Kev 1989). Send $19.95 for the
step-bv-step guide. EvySoft International
PO Box 24HW, Memphis. TN 38124.
PART-TIME FIl E CLERK NEEDED:
local law hrm Afternoons�Monday
through Fridav Must hue own transpoi
tatior. "al! J55 3 10 askforCarla
FASHION ND IMAGE CONSULT-
ANTS NEEDED: For major company
expanding in eastern N C Full or part
time available Pay depends on time you
have to devote to fashion irecr $100 Of!
to S400 I1 a week starting 1 raining avail-
able Call for an interview Only serious
applicants, please 4 4653
OVERSEAS JOBS. Also cruiseships
S10,oHVS10s,iXX' yr ! Now hiring: 320-t
hshngs' (1) S03 687-6000 Ext OI
PERSONALS
CIS. Rav Drake & Co. 3 nanks tor your
help. The new system is working great' �
The East Carolinian Staff
MEN'S & WOMEN'S BASKETBAII :
Good hick this weekend We're cheering
for you There's no one else we'd want to
play tor ECU! -love & Best Wishes,
Alpha Xi Delta
KAPPA ALPHA: The snowball fight was
too much fun, we'd do it again, but hey,
we're ready for the SUN' I ove. theAD
Snow Queens.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
SISTERS OF ALPHA XI DELTA: Laura
Beach Tncia Boyd, Ann Clapp, Sarah
Condit, Hope Dail, Heather Donaghy,
Michelle Drake, Lara Ellington, Karen
Jones, Susan Lawrence, Joyce lewis,
Maria i ong, Mary Marsalek, Ashleigh
McKce, Lisa Miller, Trisha Miller, Jory
Munns, Christine Murphy, Brcnnan Pas
tor Tnsha Pridgen, Janna Ramey, Can
due Rending Julie Soltesz, and Allison
rhomas' Welcome to our sisterhood. it
only gets better' With all our love, the
sisters of AZD!
SHERRY, SHANNON, LESLIE AND
LAURA, MICHELLE, MILLIE, KAT,
MOl I i AND ELLEN: Hang in there! The
best is yet to come . hut it's worth the
wait! We're behind you all the waywhat
,no sisters tor1 Wo love you Alpha Xi
Delta.
I AMBDA CHI'S: Thanks It was real
Gnarly. - The AZD's.
IF YOU'RE AN AZD: And you're going
to key West�you'll be in good com
pan) The Best of the BEST! And if you're
an AZD who's iust headin' for the sun�
get read) to AM! Spring Break is the
NKM fun! You know it! 1 ove, Cora.
GREEKS: It's here again, better than
ever maybe this time you'll win�if
you re clever! April 4th at the Attic -it's
the place to be! The annual All-Sing spun
sored by AZD! It it's Guns and Roses, or
the famous ' Wild Thing it really doesn't
matter, cause its AZD All Sing! Everyone
will be dancing and songs will he sung�
so come out and support The American
I ung! I �� I psyched! ! ove, the AZD's.
ECU:1 lose - the ne -w have you heard the
latest'1 We're selling t shirts and they're
thi GREATEST! "Fen Reasons to be
Creek" is what it's all about buy yours
tod n you won't want to bo left out! Ask
am AZ1) for details
SIG IP PALACE OF GREEKS Chris
bwnsend Chuck Deloatche, & Willie
I lolbert you idiots are fat, out of office, out
of shape .Kiel overweight We in the front
house desrr lyed you goofs the other night
so we do not tear vour reprisals But we do
challenge you to bring your cellulite filled
bodies up to 505 Fast Fifth to trv some-
thing The Front 1 louse
SIG EP CRUISERS I ROM HELL Get
psyched tor our last Spring Break Mexico
will never be the same lames, don't forget
the rumpl man s or "the brain "
GONG SHOW RULES: No holds bar
Anything and everything you can get
.wav with!
GR1 I KS rime is drawing near for you to
strut our stuff at the annual Sig EpGong
5 how 1 ast year the Pikts ran away with
the -how Who will it be this year'
SAE: oner its on an awesome water polo
season SAE 'nuff said.
SAE BASKETBALL TEAM: Shades ol
last year in basketball Tuesday. You guvs
did us proud Softball awaits.
AOPl'S: I ixking forward to tonight. Get
ready to start Spring Break right SAE
PHI KAPPA TAU: Once again the mixer
was the best, after the Ivh down we all
needed a rest. The brave ones always sat in
the chair, but the hay ot in everyone's
hair. �Thanks Alpha I tetta Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
ALPHA DELTA PI OFFICERS: Pres.
Dorothy Harris, VP�jenny Nauioks
Treas.�Lisa Chappell, Rec. Sec �Lisa
Reucher, Pledge-Pain Berry, Cori
Sec.�Kristine Pryzgoda, Guard�Beth
Lamm, PanheBenic Del Sonia Turner.
House Mgr. �Liz Grant, r. I ec�Eve
Ivn Brown, Sr. Exec Connie Glover
Sooal �Meggan Keane
THETA CHI: Thanks for the party at
Grog's. You guvs are great and we're glad
that we finally got to meet you - Lovethe
Alpha Deita Pi's
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
SISTERS OF ALPHA DELTA PI: Robvn
Adams, Carey Aspenburg Barb Bond,
Amv Bratton, Tina Bums, Kim Cum
mings, Cina Beard, I isa Cummings,
Sarah Fallon, Kelly Hawthorne Donna
1 lillbeck, Ellen Jeffreys, Jen Kirchhoff, Bo
McDonald, Mary Meadows, Leslie Mil
hkan, Rebecca Serling Jeana Shallcross
Michelle Shuber, Marv Staton Stocks,
Cyndi Sykes, Laura Stephens
SNUGGLE BUNNY: I haven't had a ho
ho for six months 1 sure do miss them. (lot
any?�T.B.
PIKA 1.11 SISTERS: Really enjoyed the
snowiest special last Thursday at the
house and the Fi Frink specials, snow
ball fights, cold, wet shxs. and more
PI KAPPA ALPHA HAPPY HOUR: The
hottest place Thursday night. Come out
and see why Drink specials, plenty of
bodies, etc 9 p.m. until. The fizz
DELTA ZETA: Would like to wish every-
one a safe & fun SPRING BRL Ak
KELLY GIBSON. BRIDGET CLAY-
TON, RHONDA MOUNT ND STA-
GEY WALDROP: We nant to let you
know that we think you're great! Keep up
the good work' - Love, Delta Zeta
ALPHA SIGS: Thursday night w is r i
groovy, as well as the next night at the
movie From "stand" to the limbo and
lariots in the snow you guys are the
Daddy O. From 1 loodi Gurus in tie dyes,
it's well known that Alpha Sig sure can gig
with us AOPi's See you soon' Love
AOPi
SLAY DOGS GOING FO DAYTONA:
We're getting ready for an awesome
week; it's great bodies & parties we seek
we'll drink so much we 11 all he numb;
Daytona Beach�-here we come' Thebour
Lxm & spunky are revved up to go, let's
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
just hope thev won't need a tow; ive'ie
stcx-king up tor a long week's stay; Day
tona Beach �we're on our waC Get ready
to par-tay! �Luv, Nicki.
ALPHA SIGS: Get ready for an incredible
week! See va in Daytona! 1 uv, Nicki
KIM GRIFFITHS: Although youi birth
day is not until Saturda) ! next weel I
decided togiveyou your message now be
fore we leave for break 1 know its only
been a year when at tommy's I met ;
we've done so mam things together 1 II
just trv to name a tew First remembermc
you and Susan at the Bea� h Music I est
in May. The week end was terrific such a
blasttil that damn pole g tinn ; ���� ��
how about those summer nights ul
the town, when downtown would really
roar. And you and I rushing PIKA 111 sis
ter, PIKA, need I say more? And wl
about those snakes of ours, over wh
we'vecried and moam
Hon, you know what they saj
they'll get their own I could go m remi
niscing for days, but 1 think I'll en
rhyme, Do sou know this damn ti i
costingme75' ents a line " � � I �
ing you a happy birthda) with p I
more thing to sa you're a
kimmv andyouandme best trio
the vv.v. i Ia-jn Birtl
Read
ECU
Personals.
On Behalf of the Staff and Students from clement Hall.
we would like to thank the following sponsors and folks
for helpin us during the recent fire Incident:
WINN DIXIE
DOMINO'S PIZZA
FAMOUS PTZZA
CRUSTTS PTZZA
DUNKIN DOUGH 1VUTS
BOJANGLES
THE PANTRY (10th St.)
PIRATES CHEST
MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER
K-MART
SAV-ACENTER
WHITE HALL STAFF
FLETCHER STAFF
GREENE HALL STAFF
Your support will long be remembered.
Sincerely,
Clement Hall Staff
THE EAST CAROLINIAI
Subscription Form
N MM
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RING0LD TOWERS
N( W I'AK .��� - FAL1
SEMESTER 39 EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS P �R
INFO CALL HOLLIE SIMONOW1
AT 7S2-2ShT
ATTENTION:
PANHELLENIC ANNOUNCES:
FALL RUSH WILL BE HELD:
AUGUST 19th - AUGUST 23rd
ABORTION
1
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center

1-800-433-2930
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fcllovs-ship will be held every
Thurs at 6 pm in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in vour life' We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fn.
night at 7:00
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If vou are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God
Everv Fn. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
travel CQNlMjrrrTE
1 lev vou guvs' Come pin the fun on the
Student Union Travel Committee's cruise
to the BAHAMAS over Spring Break
There will be dancing, swimming, relax-
ing and tons of other things to do aboard
ship All transportation and "all you can
eat" on the Carnival ship The ship will
dock at Freeport and Nassau, so come on
and shop until you drop in the world's
biggest marketplace!
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 pm. in Rawl 130.
Bring vour Bible and a friend as we study
the book of I lebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if vou need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali
fied for university work study program.
Hours Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-177.
TENNIS DOUBLES
Swinging singles prepare for the Intramu-
ral tennis double competition registration
meeting to be bold March 14 at 6 00 p m in
RIO 103
PRF-SEASQN SOFTBALL
A pro season r-oftball tournament spon
sored bv CO. Tankard Co. (Miller I ite)
will hold its registration March 14 at 5K10
pm in BIO 103 T-shirts, trophies and
more will be awarded to participants
Don't miss the big event!
SWIM MEET
Drown vour sorrow by signing up for
this year intramural swim meet. This will
be the only swim meet until 1990! Don't
miss registration meeting March 15 at 5:X)
p m in GCB 1026 Your spring tan should
look great!
SOFTBALL
Batter up' Intramural softball registration
meeting will be hold March 4 at 5 00 p.m.
in BIO 103. All men's and women1, teams
must send a representative.
LIB5J0Q0
2nd block classes begin Feb. 28th for T, Th
Begin March 1 for M, W.
HELP FIGHT CANCER
A 24 hour Run Against Cancer will be
sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega, the eo-ed
National Fraternity, and the American
Cancer Society on April 14th & 15th at the
ECU track Contestants are not required
to jog or walk the entire 24 hours, but
instead will be taking turns with nine
other team members for 1 2 hour periods
Find out about entering a team or donat-
ing moneymaterials. For more info call
Rose Richards (752-2574) of the American
Cancer Soc Bryan Haskins (756-9665) of
Alpha Phi Omega or David Overtoil (830
6785) of Alpha Phi Omega
REGISTRATION FOR GC
General College students should contact
their advisers the week of March 20 24 to
make arrangements for academic advis
ing for summer terms and fall semester,
1989 Early registration will begin March
27 and end March 31
BE A MARSHAL
Any student interested in serving as a
University Marshal for the 1989-H1 School
Year mav apply in room 214, Whichard
Bide. To be eligible a student must have a
3.0 academic average Deadline for appli
cations is March 14.
ECU SKI CLUB
ECU Ski Club will be holding its weekly
meetings on Tuesday's at 9:30 p.m. in
room 212 MSC For info, call Tommy-
Lewis at 830 0137.
LACliLTY CLQSING
Informal kecreation facilities will close on
March 3 at 2:00 p.m. and remain closed
through March 12. Regular hours will
resume March 13 This includes all weight
room, gv. inasium and swimming pool
a. 's
CM
PLEASE NOTE that the April 8 admini
stration of the Graduate Record Examina-
tion will be the last time the General and
Subjects examinations will be given until
October. TheGencjal portion only will be
give at the June 3 administration
BACCHUS
BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol Conscious-
ness Concerning the 1 lealth of University
Students) is back! BACCHUS is a peer
group whos members are concerned with
the promotion of responsible decisions
about drinking. We will meet each Wed. at
6 p m in 2018 GCB Our 1st official meet-
ing will be March 1st and the next meeting
will be March 15. Call 757-b79" tor more
afterwards
info
SUPPORT GROUP
There will be a support group for adult
children of alcoholics starting Fcb 28 at
4:15 p.m. in rm 312 (Counseling Center
Library Wright Annex). Plans are to meet
everv Tues at that time and location (ex-
cept Spring Break) through April 17.1 I
more info , call David Susina 757-6973 or
Rev. Dan Earnhardt 738-2030.
MINORITY STUDENT OR-
Elections for the office of President, Vice
President, Treasurer and Secretary will be
held March lfatp.m in Speight 129. All
potential candidates should plan to at
tend For more information regarding
proper procedure for filing, please contact
Sheila Gardner at 758-3713.
MC ADMISSION TEST
The new 1989 Medic.il College Admission
Test vMCAT) applications have arrived
in the Testing Center. Speight Bldg room
105. The next test date is April 29 Appli-
cations must be completed and post-
marked no later than March 31.
RIDE THE WIND
Beginning windsurfers or other adven-
turers are encouraged to register for a
Windsurfing Clinic to be held March 15
and 16 from 7:30-9:00 p.m. You will be able
to manipulate the sail in a controlled envi-
ronment while learning the basics of
windsurfing. Stop by 204 Memorial Gym
for additional info, or call 757-6387. Regis-
tration is currently going on.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Attention, Attention! A Botony Professor,
Dr. Van Duke from N.C. State will be here
on March 2nd to speak on "Creation vs.
Evolution" and there will be a questions
and answers time. You are invited to come
and hear him at GCB 1031 Refreshments
STRING QUARTET
The Tokyo String Quartet will perform on
March 16th at 8 Xlp.m in Wright Audito-
rium. This event is co sponsored by the
School oi s4usi andtheDepi of Univ
sity Unions The scheduled program oi
this performance is: Quartet in C Mil or
Op. 18 No 4 by Beethoven, Quartet No. 3
by Bartok- INTERMISSION- Quartet in
G Major, Op 161, D887 by Schubert Tie
ets are now on sale and are available at the
Central Ticket Office, MSC Office hours
are MonFri 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. The phoi
number is 757 6611. ext. 2bb.
SYMPHONY
Phe ECU Symphony and the NSym
phony will combine forces few a concert on
March 19th at 3:00 p.m. in Wrighl And
Plus matinee appearance will feature
guest pianist, Karen Shaw, a member oi
the Indiana University School of Musk
Faculty. The program for thi powerful
performance is scheduled to be: RIENZ1
OVERTURE by Warner, CON ERTO in
A Minor tor Piano and Orchestra, Opus 16
by Grieg, Karen Shaw, Piano INTERMIS-
SION, TI IE PLANETS bv I tobt The first
portion of the concert will be conducted
by Robert 1 lause and the second selection
will be conducted bv Gerhard! Zirnrner
man. Tickets are not on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, MSC, 757-6611, Ext. 266
SEASQNT1CKETS
Season tickets for the 1989-90 Performing
Arts Series at ECU are now on sale This
outstanding season includes ITZHAK
PERLMAN, THE N.C. DANCE THE
ATRE, SHALON '90, THE CANNES
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA with RAN-
SOM WILSON, THE N.C.
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, CARMEN
sung in English, DREAM GIRLS, and
much more, Patrons are cautioned that
initial season ticket sales are brisk. Al-
though individual event tickets will go on
sale 3 weeks prior to each event, it is
highly possible that the series will sell out
in season sells. Don't miss out on the best
Performing VrtsSeries ler your tickets
toda Ticket- are on sak al the Central
TicketOffice MSC 757-66 Ex) 266
IVCI
Can vou -pell 1 LABAKKl
be able to considering it is written right
her However, it is not imp rt ml il you
can spell it, but cm can atten i orw
showings oi March 27th and 28th in
Wright Aud Keep watch in this paper for
mor
SAM
SAM will be touring Everead) Bath i
on March 15. All members Interested
attending should Mn up with Angela or
Dr. Koulammas bv March I
VISITING I K.TIR1 S
The Honor- Program the
Sderu e and Math Ed C enter and Intema
tional Studies will sponsoi A Day in I
I lfeot a Park Ranger" March 28 (co spon
sored by the ECU Geology Dept
Cranson -Science Dept Lansing Com
munit) College Lansing Mi Science
Educator, Summer Interpreter tor tb
National Park Service, and author of
( rater! ake�Gem of the Cascades The
Geologic Story of Crater Lake National
Park 730 p m . room 1026 GCB Th
National Parks of New Zealand and Costa
Rica" will be presented on April 4th (co
sponsored with the ECL' English Dept I
Robert and Patricia Cahn�Environ-
mental Journalists and Consultants, I e
esburg VA. Pulitzer Prize 19 and 1988
recipient of the Maiory Stoneman
Douglas Award 7:30 pm, room 1031
GCB.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stones for publication in the April
issue. Arttclescan be left at the office or the
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg across from joyner
Library The first issue for Spring semes-
ter is expected to arrive in a few weeks.

s �,
Child development ma
in the North Carolina
Spea
Bv SUM H kl
. -
ma Speight,
son of thc( ouns
� irtmcnl
k place last rucsdaj
Black Hisl nth, in
r.Sj
- and doct �
and education fi
� I
irolina �
I nical "� Sh
Cartog
By JIM SHAM!
v.j Writer
Tu davi
Brewsh i
,i professor
prcsei
student, Paul !
taught Pugliese at tl
of Ariz ' 'I
ing Pugliese ;
nment.
Pugliese
cartographer tor Tim
New
BySUZANNl SI
When m roomm
home a fev� weeks
nouneed she would
ing at a restaur;
"Greenville s newest j
exciting concepts in dini
skeptical.
Co mini
This
Weekei
Thursday
Susie's:
Se, Love & M
Attic:
Panic
Friday
Susie's:
Free Beer
(it's a band s
New Deli:
Bad Bob
and the Rock in'
Attic:
Code Blue!
Saturda
Attic:
Nanruckej





w
THE EAST CAROl INIAN
Features
MARCl I 2, 1989 PACE 7
Lesson plans take up a lot of
time for child development
By DF.ANNA NEVGLOSKI
Staff Wrilrr
Ch iki development ma jor Balsorah White reads to her class. White is a senior, who hopes to teach
in the North Carolina after graduation. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photolab)
A dav in the life for Balsorah
White, a Child Development and
Family Rotations student here at
ECU, is a busy one for this senior
who will be graduating in May.
White hails from Newport
News, V A. She transferred to ECU
almost two years ago to join the
School of Home Economics, which
her major is classified under, to
work toward a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree.
In January, White began her
internship in the School of Homo
Economics. White works up to 20
hours on Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays. The intcrship is worth
nine semester credit hours that
will go toward her degree.
White has many long days at
the preschool, located in the Home
Economics building, where she
works with childen in the three to
four-year age groups.
The preschool is a place where
the children can pick up proper
social skills, such as learning to
get along with their peers. White
is on hand to help them obtain
these skills and to prepare them
for kindergarten.
White explains, "I think chil-
dren are very impressionable at
this age and it is important that
they are in an environment where
they can socialize with others
During her internship, White
has six lead days. On these lead
days, she is required to prepare
numerous activities for the chil-
dren to work on and play with
throughout the day.
She admits that it is a lot of
hard work, but it is very reward-
ing. "There is a lot of pressure and
preparation. It requires a lot of it
me outside of the classroom
White said.
She also said that she worksat
least 10 hours outside of the class-
room to prepare for her days at the
preschool. White stresses that it is
difficult in deciding what to do in
class that will be fun for all the
children.
"llovechildren. They are very
curious and very willing to get
involved and try different activi-
ties she said.
During one of White's lead
days, she and the children made
chocolate pudding and learned
about different cultures from
around the world. "It may sound
easy, but it takes a great deal of
patience to make everything
work she stated.
While the children are taking
their naps, White has a two hour
break. During that break, she re-
turns to her dorm to finish up last
minutes preparations and to grab
See WHITE, page 8
Speaker discusses problems
Bv STEVE BAKER
Matt Writer
Black Women: Who Are
was the topic of discussion
Dr. Velrna Speight, chairper-
n I the Counseling and Educa-
� n Department. The meeting
n place last Tuesday, during
tck listory Month, in Menden-
Dr. Speight received her mas-
rs and doctorate in counseling
A education from Maryland
- i to University and also attended
North Carolina Agricultural and
i hnical Institute. She is also a
r o( Alpha Kappa Alpha.
11 i sc ii ssed the ever i ncreas-
ing regression of black rights, and
said, "we must salute and chal-
lenge in the present, to become
leaders in the 21st century She
said the modern day blacks "en-
hanced quality of life" was duo to
the long black struggle. Now she
says the battles are being halted,
in many areas, bv present day
society, for "we no longer receive
the support we need
Emphasizing that black
women should be, "inspired by
the past, and challenged by the
present she went on to say that
in order to do this, black women
must strive to perfect certain prin-
ciples.
The first, she said, is the re-
establishment of self-worth and
pride. She said, "no-one should
make you feel inferior empha-
sizing one must not allow them-
selved to be downgraded, simply
for the color of their skin.
She also said, future leaders
should know their history, "to
cherish their past She said many
had aquired a "laid-back attitude
and don't even know half-dozen
slave leaders She said one must
be "proud of their hertiage" in
order to "loam and grow
She also said, "we must be-
come politically involved, from
local all the way to the national
level She said there was "too
much apathy" and one must
"register to vote and keep politi-
cally informed
Black women, shesta ted, must
"understand and expel the mis-
conceptions of black families in a
negative, light. "If the family is
undermined, what do we have
left" was her reasoning and she
stated it must be known that the
"family has alwavs been our
strong point
Lastly, sheemphasizedrecon-
nectiveness. She said there was
"too much divicivness and we
must all learn to work together
She said, "we must obtain inti-
mate ties with our communities"
and "help those less fortunate to
further ourselves
To close, Dr. Speight summa-
rized by saving, "Bridge the past,
connect with the present, in order
to have a brighter future
Cartographer explains mapmaking
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Maff Writr
ruesday night at 7:30 p.m. in
Brewster B-102, Dr. Simon Baker,
a professor of Geography and
inning, presented his former
l ident, Paul 1. Pugliese. Baker
Jit Pugliese at the University
� Arizona and is credited with
giving Pugliese his first map as-
nment.
Pugliese has been the chief
cartographer for Time magazine
for the past thirteen years. He
works with six other people in an
office on the 25th floorof the Time
Life Building. "I'm the only car-
tographer he explains. "That's
why I'm the chief
Much of the job is computer-
ized: Four different computersaid
by plotting the basic maps, creat-
ing clip-art symbols, and typeset
names of geographic locations.
Still, much work must be done by
hand: airbrush texturing, design
layout, and the actual drawing of
the map itself.
Pugliese works only three
days each week, but may work as
manv as twelve hours each dav to
prepare maps for the magazine.
He may have to prepare as many
as f i ve finished ma ps for a ny gi ven
issue, and his work must be fast
but very accurate. The maps must
be approved by upper-level edi-
tors, a process which may take
longerthan thecrcat;onof the map,
before they can be printed.
Between 60 and 150 mistakes
are made each year, from things
as simple as mi .placing a decimal
to foolish errors such as rearrang-
ing the names of Kansas and
Nevada. "It's my name on the
map says Pugliese, "so I get very
concerned
The public is unforgiving
when it catches mistakes, even
minor ones, which can bring as
See MAPMAKER, page 8
Dr. Velma Speight spoke last Tuesday on the role of black
women in the future. (Photo by ECU Photolab)
New restaurant, CJ's, garners great review
Bv SUZANNE SLACK
Suff Writer
When mv roommate came
me a few weeks ago and an-
nounced she would soon be work-
ing at a restaurant claiming
Greenville's newest and most
exciting concepts indining I was
skeptical.
Coming
This
Weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
Sex, Love & Money
Attic:
Panic
Friday
Susie's:
Free Beer
(it's a band sorry)
New Deli:
Bad Bob
and the Rockin' Horses
Attic:
Code Blue
Saturday
Attic:
Nantucket
I could accept the claim under
the pretense of "the newest" res-
taurant in the city, but Greenville,
North Carolina, a town still revel-
ing in the glory of the grand open-
ing of a second Taco Bell, is hardly
the culinary capital of the state.
Cj's provided quitea few pleasant
surprises.
This is a restaurant well suited
to anyone who is tired of the same
old fast food lunch and dinner
fare. CJ's marque boasts "rotisse-
rie chicken, ribs, crab, and salads
a bounty which can be enjoyed
fried orin the spirit of a refresh-
ingly new concept, baked,
steamed, or broiled. CJ's is con-
venient for most as a lunch spot,
yet still not too far out of the way
for dinner.
The owners arc enthusiastic
about the restaurant's back-
ground, a story which is printed
on every menu. "A poor old boy
from central Florida" was work-
ing in a chain of restaurants called
Hooter's when he met a "good old
boy from Greenville With the
Greenville bov's money and the
Florida boy's knowledge, a place
where "vou could drink some-
thing different from every coun-
try and enjoy some great food at
sane prices" was born.
With an open-air wooden
deck for the warmer months, TV's
hung about the room tuned to any
sporting event, and several taste-
fully hung neon beer signs deco-
rating the walls, CJ's interior envi-
ronment is reminiscent of the
national chain Hooter's; however,
the comparisons stop there.
Customers are cheerfully
greeted at the door by appropri-
ated attired waitresses and asked
to seat themselves where thev
would feel most comfortable. Al-
though the tables are small and
close together, the dining area is
surrounded on three sidesby large
windows opening up what could
be a cramped room. Since there
are many ceiling fans and ash trays
are available only on request,
smokers are not a problem.
To speed lunch service on a
weekday before 2 p.m a customer
moves through a cafeteria-style
line ordering the same entrees at
the same prices found on the table
menu. The check is paid at the end
of the line, but both food and
beverage are served by a waitress.
During dinner hours and on week-
ends all service is provided at the
table.
Seating is available at either a
cushioned booth or square table
with padded wooden cafe style
chairs. On each table, between the
salt and pepper, is a shaker filled
with a spicy barbecue flavoring
salt for CJ's specialty spuds, a
basket of seasoned curly fries,
served with most meals or inex-
pensively priced ($1.15) as an
See CJ'S, page 8
top 13
Pickiri the Bones
1) Thelonius Monster �
"Stormy Weather"
2) Love Tractor � "Themes of
Venus"
3) Guadalcanal Diary � "Flip-
Flop"
4) Green on Red � "Here Come
the Snakes"
5) The Dickies � "Great Dicta-
tions"
6) Royal Court of China �
"Geared and Primed"
7) Bruce Cockburn � "Big Cir-
cumstance"
8) Thrashing Doves � "Trouble
in the Home"
9) Full Fathom Five � "4 a.m
10) XTC � "Lemons and Limes"
11) Buckpets � "Buckpets"
12) Robyn Hitchcock � "Queen
Elvis"
13) The Replacements � "Don't
Tell a Soul"
Bonehead tackles swearing
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Cuner
There are times and situ-
ations in which cussing is unac-
ceptable andor not strong
enough. Especially if, like me,
you cuss with a frequency and
fortitude that managing editors
and church-going secretaries
find appalling and hard to keep
up with.
Being the linguistic purist
that 1 am, I abhor phrases like
"Spit or get off the spot You
find such euphemisms in com-
ics and television, when writers
are trying to inject a fake harsh-
ness to the product and end up
sounding poorly censored.
Another cheap, editor-ap-
peasing trick is the old symbol-
substitution cipher. Hit that
SHIFT key and" �$�"
takes the place of any offensive
phrase.
Two drawbacks: it looks
childish, and you can't say
"�$?�" in real life. Try
telling someone they're a "Son
of an asterisk-percentage sym-
bol and they'll laugh you out
of the bar.
My wayward child, the
Clearly Labeled Satire Page, and
1 are being particularly hard hit
by our paper's new ultimate ban
on profanity. So this week, I am
forced to find some workable al-
ternatives that will express my
feelings honestly in print and
perhaps even in life.
Most curses are nonsensical
when you think about themany-
way. One of my personal favor-
ites means "intercourse the first
letter of a synonym for a half-
breed between a horse and a
mule
Some cuss words originated
as common, acceptable words,
such as the word for female dog.
So, using these two guidelines,
I'm sure I can mink of some-
thingnew.
The main problem is the ba-
sics. There are the four most fa-
mous four-letter words and one
five-letter one. These are the
building blocks of the curse hi-
erarchy. "Damn" and "hell" are
words that show up in any Bible,
so if s safe to leave them alone.
The other three simply can
not be replaced. Try it.
The act of intercourse re-
quires some thought All avail-
aWeuphemismslorit: "screw
"nail and several others that
were censored by the managing
editor, while vivid images, don't
have the same shock value as the
most vulgar term. And some of
them are silly if someone said,
"Nail you you'd probably look
for some Lee Press-ons�.
"Nailin' A is even more ri-
diculous. Truly, a finely balanced
verb is required. Other phrases
contain the same inherent prob-
lem, i.e. "I'm going downtown
to get feces-faced Loses all its
punch.
Analtexnativeistotookback
to the ancient Norse. Vikingshad
a true gift for curses, nicknames
and blessings. A lot of them m-
volved the namesof pagan gods,
awkward for daily use in our
See CHIPPY'S, pageS





8
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 2, 1989
Obituaries neglect interesting info
(AP) � Horses, they have
track records. Right there in the
racing form.
Won. Lost. Sire. Dam. Purses.
Best times.
People, they just get obituar-
ies. Seventy-five years in the
trenches and the hometown pa-
per kisses people goodbye as if
they spent their lives as assistant
purchasing agents for A jax Manu-
facturing Co. after graduating
from West Fork High School.
Funeral services 11 a.m. Tuesday.
Women, they re lucky to make
the obit pages at all because all
thev ever did was to raise three
children, wash the dog after it
chased a skunk and make the beds
every morning.
Shakespeare's Marc Antony
savs, the good is oft interred
with their bones
No offense, Will, but the good
STUFF is ALWAYS interred with
their bones.
Take the late Col. Fraser Mof-
fat. The alumni magazine of his
alma mater paid due respect to his
business and military career. But
nowhere did it mention that well
into life he could still balance a
dozen empty beer bottles end on
end.
The father of a colleague gave
his won father last rites three times,
unnecessarily as it turned out.
Being about 10, he didn't exactly
know procedure so he tried three
different versions to spread-eagle
possibilities. Think that stopped
any presses? Nope. He was pub-
licly remembered, albeit justly, for
managing restaurants.
Obits will list survivors, but
rarely, unless you're a ruling
monarch, ancestors. There's a
happy housewife I met in Califor-
nia who has survived descent from
Jesse and Frank James, the
Youngers AND the Daltons with-
out robbing nary a bank. Not obit
material in spite of what it may tell
us about the sins of the father or
even dead cousins.
In life we are surrounded by
"what ifs" and other narrow es-
capes. Not in death. I had an uncle
whose father promised to take him
to the new nickelodeon for his
10th birthday. The morning of the
great event he had sniffles. His
mother, a no-nonsense ex-school-
teacher, wouldn't let him out of
the house. That's why he wasn't
sitting in a reserved front row seat
when the Iroquois Theater burned
down in Chicago in 1903 killing
602 people. His escape never made
the prints until now.
Alumni magazines are par-
ticularly remiss. Most of 'em just
say "deceased But part of the
news is how our old pals depa rted
this realm and what they'd done
since we last saw them pouring
milk punch over their heads at
senior houseparties. Did they
make a hole-in-one? Win a lot-
tery? Scale K2?
Kid they die in a bar fight in
the Klondike? Lose a duel to a
jealous husband? Did their para-
chutes fail to open? Don't ask the
obit. .
There s a tradition at Prince-
ton University for freshmen to try
to climb up the ivy at Nassau Hall
and steal the clapper from the bell
so everyone will have an excuse
for not getting to 8 o'clock class on
time. Well, I know a guy who not
only got theclapper, he also found
out where they hid all the spare
clappers and pinched them, too.
Obit matter? You kidding?
I.ast words get dropped from
our lives as well. When Henrik
Ibsen, the Norwegian playwright,
lay dying, his night nurse told the
day nurse the patient seemed to
be slightly better.
"Tvertimod gasped the fail-
ing Ibsen. In English that means,
"On the contrary Obits never
give us a chance to say, "So long
Plaza Cinema
Ma.u ShowrtngCtr- 75�-qPMt
NOW SHOWING
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DANGEROUS LIAISONS
STARRING GLENN CLOSE
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DEEP STAR SLX
SiaBZSLEBJEAT
DLRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS
k STARRING STEVE MARTIN
Geckos inspire cartoon, clothes
Consolidated
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Adults $275 'tn
5:30
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HONOLULU (AD � Bruce
Hale can say a lot of good things
about geckos.
"Thev don't do anything bad
to you like snakes.
' "And they're lovable. In a
strange, reptilian sort of way
On occasion. Hale has even
considered the little creations er,
uh, noble.
He remembers the night a
couple of years ago when he was
driving up the Pali with his girl-
friend, Susana Brown, an interior
designer, and i the dim light he
could see a gecKO clinging to his
windshield.
"Here it was, toes stapled to
the windshield, getting buffeted
bv the wind.
"It was so noble
It all came to him that instant.
The noble gecko facing into the
wind, fighting tremendous odds.
Commander Gecko, he
thought.
A cape.
Soon a gecko appeared in a
cartoon strip he was drawing. Hale
is a cartoonist-writer who puts out
a newsletter for Hawaiian Tele-
phone employees, an he likes to
fiddle around with things like
cartoon strips in his spare time.
And so, working together, the
two of them did. After a fashion.
And after the first dozen or so
looked like fat stuffed salaman-
ders or bug-eyed frogs.
So they decided to try it.
Presto. The little fellows
caught a market toehold, priced
from about $15 to $55 depending
on size. And why not? In the past
But eventually, a stuffed toy year geckos have come on strong
gecko made from an aloha print on T-shirts and sleep wear. They've
fabric emerged. With suction cups even inspired a raft of copiers in
for a good window hold.
And gave some to friends.
So did Hale.
Pretty soon every friend who
got one was ordering two more.
And then a store called Hale and
Then a gecko appeared on his Brown about ordering geckos.
annual Christmas card. And then
his girlfriend flipped.
"I thought, 'Gee says
Brown, "I wonder if I can make
that into a toy
Whoa, they thought. Time to
fish or cut the bait.
"For me it was just having a
dream and saying, 'OK, it's time
to make it reality" says Hale.
"I can't say marketing toy
geckos was my dream, but work-
ing on my own was says Brown, and made it up says Hale.
Korea and Taiwan.
As they pressed on, Hale and
Brown culled friendly advice
about sources of materials and
labor from the state Department
of Business and Economic Devel-
opment, from Friends in business,
even from the Chamber of Com-
merce. "It's great says Hale.
"There's a company that makes
eves. In Brooklyn
J
"I couldn't find anything on
geckos after my brief search of the
literature so I said, 'What the heck


1:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:30
RATED R
MISSISSIPPI BURNING
1:00-3:30-7:00-9:30
RATED R
SEIGE OF FIREBASE GLORY
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15


�'
CJ's menu reprinted
here for convenience white works hard but
finds time for hobbies
Continued from page 7
appetizer.
Also on the table is an exten-
sive wine list with selections rang-
ing from Dom Perignon ($99) to a
California nine ($12) or by the
glass $2-$2.50). The other side of
the wine list is an international
repertoire of imported beers
($2.25) from such exotic locations
as Australia (Fosters), Mexico (Sol,
Corona), and Massachusetts
(Samuel Adams) to name just a
few.
Domestic beer is available in
both long neck ($1.75), draft
($1.10), and pitcher ($4.50). The
iced tea (.75) is excellent and a
variety of soft drinks (.75) with
free refills, are also available.
I'm looking forward to the
opening of the summer deck, and
1 hope the discriminating tastes of
Greenville rally in support of a
dining alternative like CJ's. The
restaurant is located at 103 East
Greenville Boulevard.
Mapmaker draws
for Swimsuit Issue
Continued from page 7
many as 1,500 letters, thus, it is
evident that Pugliesc's work isn't
simply to create filler items. His
most ignored work, he confessed,
are the maps he draws for the
Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edi-
tions. Few people realize that there
are maps in the swimsuit editions.
Pugliese visits ECU almost
annually. The date and time for
his next presentation will be avail-
Chippy's
new lingo
Continued from page 7
lime.
The cursee would have to
takea course in Icelandic history
to get the full effect of "May
Odin's eye fall upon you and
drip acidic humours that eat
away at your sanity until you
keel over dead and the Valkyr-
ies refuse to take you to Valhalla
and the Frost Giants wank on
your bones
No doubt, if someone
shouted that at you, you would
not mistake the depth of their
irritation with you. But unless
you knew some Norse mythol-
ogy and stayed around long
enough to hear the whole curse,
it's not very meaningful.
It seems that the art of truly
effective cussing has been lost.
In truth, it's people like myself,
who cuss so much and without
thought, who contributed to the
decline of Western Cursing.
To atone, I will continue in
my quest to come up with at
least one really boss yet brevity-
conscious curse a day. Todas
is cleverly stolen and altered
from Tolkien's "The Hobbit It
goes: "Dawn take you all and
be like unto a self-indulgent frat
boy
Well, I don't expect this to
catch on right away.
able from the Department of
Geography and Planning in the
early spring of 1990.
Continued from page
a bite to eat before she returns to
the preschool.
Along with her busy intern-
ship schedule, White is taking two
classes, Color and Design and
Dynamics of Home Economics, to
fill up her Tuesdays and Thurs-
days.
Even though White is con-
stantly working in her internship
and taking classes, she still has
time to enjoy some of her favoite
hobbies, such as swimming, run-
ning and listening to music.
As for future plans, White
hopes to work in the North Caro-
lina or Virginia area for a couple of
years and then move on to wher-
ever else her job may take her.
"I really want to work with
children; cither in a hospital situ-
ation or maybe in a headstall
program she said.
White said she will miss ECU
when she graduates. She believes
that ECU has really prepared her
for the future, especially the in-
ternship. "The internship is a lot
of work, but it is a valuable part of
my education she explains.
White concludes, "Child
Development and Family Rela-
tions is a fine program at ECU and
the internships are very beneficial
because they give you the hands-
on experience that a textbook can't
teach you
ROTiSSERIE CHICKEN
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DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS AU �qAis
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12 Rotisserie Chic
Rotisserie Chic Sand.
Adventure Through Different Countries
With Our Selection Of 38 Beers � 22 Wines
ASK ABOUT OUR BEER CLUB'
CJ's Has Your Winter Getaway
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MONTHURS. 1 1 10:30 103 E. GREENVILLE BLVD
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�V Skis & Boots20�o off
, v Jackets:
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Mens & Ladies Ski Coats30off
rtr. Mens & Ladies Woolrich Coats40 off
J V r r" Mens Bibs20 off
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71 Mens Stretch20 off
iS " Ladies Stretch in Fashion Colors40 off
Mens & Ladies Sweaters30 off
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All Sales Final. No Returns.
GORDON'S GOLF & SKI
264 ByPass (Next To Greenville TV & Appliance)
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Greenville Buyer's Market
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(Except Algner. Nike and Reebok)
l l � i i i i

Pre Season Softball
Tournament
; sponsored by:
(Corona

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ECU Intramural-Recr�ationaLScrvi
lonacrvlc�S
Register; March 14 at
5:00pm in Biology 103
Tournament will be held
March 16-19
$ 10 registration fee :
men's and women's teams welcome
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For further details call Todd Mc Collum at
� i i i
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���I�l�mm ��- i i i
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V





! ho a tar
By Harris and Haselrig Orpheus
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AND NOW, PART THREE OF THE COMPANION STORY
The Law
B Reid
rales ot 1 ho Undercover Cats
XW&Ea
Till FOl LOWING IS A PAID POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE
COMMITTEE TO ELECT HUBIE, THE DEAD COW.
Bv Friedrich
Eve of Fire
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Inside Joke
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"How is this a tribute to Space Ghost?"
And now . . . Cartoonist Biography � Richard Haselrig
I n endearing look at great cartoonists of our times)
Fun and Games takes a sincere, heartfelt examination this week at the
professional life of Richard Haselrig. Known as "Bernard" by his friends, and
that loud, excitable guy" to most of you, Richard began work on our page in
the Fall of 1988. Since then, he and writer Micah Harris (who writes nearly all
prose that exists) have faithfully brought us that intricate work known as The
Avatar. Hit it, Rich.
lbE.INTERVIEW THEY SAID COULPNT BE PONE
Who or what influenced you in your comics work? Jesus Christ,
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Japanese cartoons, Old Warner Bros, cartoons, Frank Miller, Alan
Moore, John Byrne, George Perez, Bill Sinkiewizc, Steve Rude,
Steve Bissette, John Totleben, David Mazzucelli "
What is your greatest achievement? Choosing Jesus over religion �
Greatest failure? Spelling "
Career amhitions: Becoming a comic book artist, writer, and creator.
Also work in animation and cinematography �
Favorite books or works: The Word (Bible), The four Hitch-hikers'
Guide To The Galaxy books, Lord of The Rings, Dungeons and
Dragons cartoons, Garfield, Alf, Mighty Mouse, Bloom CountyM
Doonesbury, all comics by Frank Miller and Alan Moore �
Favorite movies: Brazil, 2001, Eraserhead, Bladerunner, oldM
German films �
T his IS what happens wnen Mission in Life. To rid myself 0f selfishness and dishonestness in me
voti watch too much Alf. so can serj,e q0(j through Jesus Christ with my whole self, which I
Actually it is a self-portrait u�i help me devote my life to helping others. Really, I'm serious.
of Rich. Scientists have Word.
debated over the origin of Favorite wrestlers: Non-existent ones
R" h for manv Years often Turn-ons: Jesus, honesty in good art, good music, good movies, good
1C a u A R f humor, and good people.
resulting in bloodshed. But Tum.offs. Dishonesty, selfishness, and self-abuse, or supporting
he's really an okay guy. others sef.abuse (alcohol, drugs, etc.)
j. j e � i'
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& OFTtR'
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Favorite music: Keith Green, TheWinans, 2nd Chapter of Acts, rADTnnxiTQTQ
Sting, The Police, Genesis, Bobby McFerren LAR1UUN1&15
Everyone should be my friend because: We humans need to support STILL
each other and I want to be your friend. Am I right? I said am I g WANTED
right?
Biographer� Jeff "Pronounced KA�THOOOM Parker a CLIP N' SAVE






10
Tl IE EAST CAROL INI AN
MARCH 2.1989
Spring Break 89 satire Page
(very, very clearly labeled)
Sponsored by Bush Lite�
Gentler Beer"
"The Kinder,
(Makers of Quayle Lite� � the nonalcoholic
beer for you underage types)
Sorority chick asks
Big E for dietary
information
&
Dear Big E,
1 am going to Key West on
spring break Friday, and I don't
know it I am ready for it. First of
all, 1 am5'6and weigh 110 pounds,
and I look reallv fat in a bikini,
considering 1 am five pounds over
weight.
The other thing is my bikini
lines are not dark enough since
the winter storm came last week
and 1 was not able to drive to the
tanning spa because my sorority
sister wrecked my Beamer and I
couldn't take it to the shop be-
cause Daddy just cut me off and
my mother is on heavy sedation
alter suffering a mental break-
down.
Anyway, all the other girls
going to Key West are like rails
and have superior tans and are
going to get all the cool dudes
before thev take a gander at my
pygmalion body.
What am going to do?
Signed Keys Bound,
Dear Tanless Fat,
E sent away for a brochure the
other dav.From return mail, he
read "Beautiful Key West, Flor-
ida. White sand. Beautiful water.
Home of Ernest Hemingway.
Homeof Sloppy Joes,but wedon't
serve them. Vacation spot to mil-
lions of college students year
round. Warning: Sorority girls five
pounds over weight stay awav
Five pounds. Peoplecall E "fat
little buddy" and does that hide-
ously one-sided observation stop
him from sloshing in the waves of
the great beaches in these U.S. of
A? Did a white ashy complexion
stop E from using tanningoil while
laying out in 140� weather? No
and no.
Lighten up (hee, hce), it is
spring break and time to buy a
case of Milliard Fillmore Lager�,
or, if you are weight-conscious,
Bush Lite�. Bush LiteSisakinder,
gentler beer when drinking, when
vomiting, or just when calling Earl
on the phone. Just don't call col-
lect and please ask for my associ-
ate Ralph.
Breakless
Dear Big E,
I have never been on spring
break. What is it like?
Signed, Freshman named Al
Gilbert
Dear Person Who Has Never
Left Pitt County,
Spring Break is this wigged-
ou t week which most people never
remember. Many people drive to
really far away places southward
on 1-95 and blow a lot of green on
buzz items. Others go on cruises
and blow a lot of green on buzz
items.
Still others drive to South of
the Border to see how many ways
Official Bush
Lite� quotes
Quote o' the week:
"Stop saying my name!
Stop saying my name!
Stop saying my name!
Stop saying my name
� Stephanie Emory
This chick is really cute, but she'll go out with the most
disgusting guys imaginable as long as they drink Bush
Lite�. Florida is packed with babes just like her.
Get the picture?
this billboard character guy named
Pedro can rip you off and make
you blow a lot of green on buzz
items. Pedro's Kennel. Pedro's
Knick-knacks. Pedro's Head Shop.
Pedro's Bush Lite� Store. Pedro's
Taco Hell. Pedro's Car Wash. The
hours of gizzard-tickling laughter
will be endless at South of the
Border.
And that is what spring break
is all about.
Peer
Pressure
Dear Big E,
I've heard there is a lot of peer
pressure on spring break about
doing, well, you know. E, please
elaborate on this point.
Signed, Curious
Dear Well You Know,
There is a lot of peer pressure
about "well, you know" on spring
break. Someone always has a
harder rock gut or a better tan
than you. Someone is always doing
something you should be doing.
And there is alwavs that un-
avoidable question: "Have you
done it yet?" And then one of the
lucky studettes or studs in your
group says "Yeah, I did it last
night
But Pedro, alias Big E, doesn't
understand the � well, you know
� peer pressure behind this very
ordinary human occurrence. For
some of us the action may only
occur during spring break while
others do it every day, even in
Greenville.
O.K. insert � well you know
�let me back up. Reach into your
pocket and extract a dollar in
change. Position yourself. Take a
big breath. Insert change where it
says "Insert change
And then say "Hi Mom. Well
you know, I'm having a pretty
good time
Gambling
Dear Big E,
Florida is famous for its sun
and beaches. Can you tell me
anything about the legalized
gambling?
Signed, G.G. Manning
Dear G.G
So, since when does the sun
belong to Florida? Get your facts
right before writing the Big Pedro,
buddy.
Jai alai, the dog tracks, the
horse tracks, yeah Florida is a
gambler's haven. Jai alai, one of
the wiggiest games ever invented,
has three men throwing a ball to a
wall on the other side of Florida,
where the ball bounces back so
that three other men have to catch
it before it smashes them in the
face.
Warning: don't enter a jai alai
arena with all of your vacation
money. You may end up stran-
gling the woman sitting in the aisle
in front of you who persistently
says "Drop it" in the direction of
the three guys you bet on.
McKay quote o the
week: "You're an angry
pimple. Hamlet
- McKay Sundwall
Song quote of the week: j
"We still haven't walked
in the glow of each other's
majestic presence
- They Might Be Giants
j
Dukes quote o' the week
"Stop talkin' nonsense.
Daisy
� Coy Duke
Curse o' the week:
"Dawn take you all���
and be like unto a self-
indulgent frat boy
- Chippy Bonehead
Be Hip! Order your
official Bush Lite�
merchandise today!
Item
Bush Lite& Spring Break 'B9 t-shirt
Bush Lite's Spring Break 'B9 t-shirt
Bush Lite� Spring Break 89 Cooler
Bush Lite� Spring Break '89 mirrored sunglasses
Bush Lite� "Gat sand in gour Bush�l" condom pack
Size
XL
Bush Lite� "Get sand in your Bushlc" beach toroel
Bush Lite's Spring Break 89 underarm deodorant
Bnsh Lijii Spring Break '89 plastic mua
Bush LiU "Gtt sand in your Bush Popeef
Bush Lite� "Get sand in pour Bush� papal toboggan
Cost
6.99
9.9B
19.9B
H.98
Qty.
3.9B
9.9B
Total Cost
Bush Lite� Spring Break '89 Elvis skin flakes
Bush Lite� "Get sand in uour Bnsh�l"jams
Bush Lite� Spring Break '89 full body smimsuit
Bush Lite� Spring Break '89 used beer can
Bush Lite� "Get sand in 3our Bush� suntan oil
Bush Lite� "Get sand in your Bush� media board
XL
3.9B
5.98
7.98
29.98
59.98
all
22.98
33.98
2.98
6.9B
Free
Print Clearly or me'll break uour kneecaps off.
Total flmount
Tax
Grand Total
name and bra size
address of friend mho has omn apartment
Indicate mhether you mill take me to nicDonald's for breakfast the next morning
D fl big fat yes
? no mag, sexist pig
Send cash only to:
Those Satirical Guys
East Carolinian
ECU Publications Building
Greenville, flC 27B5B
If you're going to the beach, you want to hang out with the right crowd
so you at least have a chance to get laid. If you want to be cool, follow
these rules from your pals at Bush Lite�.
Hip
Dip
Duku of Htzzird
Buih Lite�
Ctiutl iiz
spin
X
Rip. go-go
"Wigggl"
Gym ihorti
Captain marvel
non-affiiiatid
Ouija Boards
Thumpor
Recquetbali
Coka
Tha niaihid Potato
Calvin and Hobbai
nicKig cianaa
Unknomn banda
Radskins
Elvira
Boas Cruieere
Collage Oamocrata
Driving
Smoking
Alcoholism
Hiitorg of Jnz
Taking Ro-Doz
Saz
Bathroom gnffitti
Honogcomb
Enimai
Famous columnists
P.J. ulcKee
Teenage mutant Rinji Turtles
Three dag stubble
�Beards or lags
Smell Wonder
Rng other brand
Guilt
Rolling Stone
REITl
metal ballads
"Crazgl"
Flouraacant jeme
Batman
Fret boge
Pictionerg
Quarters
Friebee
Pot
Shagging
Garfiald
Boring classes
Tribute bands
Colts
Pee Wee
Skataboarde
College Republicane
Walking
Dipping
TV junkies
Chinees Culture
Sleeping
Celibacg
Hustler
Bran Flekee
Constipation
Frit bogs
K.L. ulcKee
Smurfs
Thru milk etubble
Beer bremed by the Bush Breming Co Ralieghmood nc
"Th� Kinder G�ntl�rbarl"





I III I As 1 I s H viiAN
EC�7 leader in assists
Sports
1AR I! 2, 1989 l'A .1 '�
Kellv excels despite height
he
Bv KRIsT! N HAI HI RG
Spurt� I dihf
vVhen the performance of a
ketball player is evaluated the
ijoi determining factor far as
s asset to the team is coni erned
-od upon height The taller
ire the better basketball
ou must be
Hut one man on the Fastare
basketball team defies
� .


left Kelly
: hon senior p inl . I
n lly
lv who standsat a m
� ot-9 inches savsbeingund
- a basketball plaver does
intimidate him 1 ve always
short 1 ve never been real
50 I've never rcallv won
� it kellv explained
Kellv capitalizes on his ath
qualities to make up tor his
n the team. 1 le is a t
plaver who is an � veel
ball handler, an essei
� p int guards. i ou c an
- shortness to vour ad an
Kellv said i ou' e c I I
1
leader tor the Pirates, Kelly isalso
i pass inthetop lOinECU'srecordbooks
ime said tans for steals, lit1 had 36 steals this
heroicheplays season which put him in eighth
.�, 2 7 shots place tor most steals in a season.
Kelh s.ud He has also had 70 steals through
l( ; eand out his career which slid him into
irds bine titth place for ECU career steals.
the pre Kelly's best game came Ian
rates and 23, Is8 against the Midshipmen
iei !hi ot Navv In that same game, he
p i in s red a career high 12 points m
n't had Annapolis and had a career high
Von 12 assists
Being one �f three seniors tor
times i the Pirates, coach Mike Steele
mi a good required that all his seniors be team
,s, three leaders both on and off the court
Wc basically try to help the
voungcr guvs understand what
coach Steele wants, Kelly ex
nlaim ' has been hard on Meri
Kcnnv Murphy, blue (Blue
tnd mvself bet ause we
ire ictualK sophomcres in this
ram. lot of times wen'
searching for answers at what he
c ants "
Playing a sport at the colle
giate level demandsdiscipline not
only in the basketball setting but
in the academic setting as well.
- � � Ivworkshard at maintaining a
respectable 2.9 grade point aver-
age not letting the absense from
his classes while traveling take a
tell on his studies.
A lot of freshmen come in
. and have problems with the books
and the basketball Kelly contin-
icd "1 think that 1 understood
moreoi what 1 was �� tting mvself
islst



�.role in

. .
'


Pirates
- : urt Van , j
assists o er

Kellv
-� school
�addition of
� � 1 CM i
eff Kelly dribbles down the court as he tells his team which offense to set up. As a senior, Kellv
must be a team leader both on and off the court (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photolab).
use m
vour quickne
� because my father was a col-
lege basketball plaver and my
three brothers pla i ollege athlet-
ics
Kellv's father, Robert Kelh .
coached St P tersb irg ollege in
jersey City, N 1.
Kelly gr w up in South I )r-
ange, Nand began playing has
ketball earlv in his life. ' I've been
bourn ing a ball sin i 1 v abi �ut
four er three ears Kelly �
I le att � ded hool at
Columbia High and became the
fourtl int scorer tor I
Cougers and Is tin
sinele-came ind
career assist records
Kellv had a chance to go to st
iehns University in Tew York but
said he liked the atmosphere at
Eastarolina and knew he would
get more playing time. "1 would' �
made the team at St. Iehns al-
though 1 knew 1 wouldn't play
and just came down here and
loved the atmosphere Kelh'said
" rhe basketball program! at ECU
wasn't tix overpowering and it
w asa place 1 could c meand pla
Kelly said his career playing
basketball will end after the
lial Athletic Association tot
nt in 1 Iampt n this weekei
but he would love to follow in his
father's footsteps and coach colle-
giate level basketball. "1 would
like to coach without a doubt
Kellv said. The more and more I
think about it, I don't want to get
out ot it I've done it all mv lift
I've always been around colh .
basketball It's going to be scary. 1
dent know what I'm going I
with myself next year
Kelly'seligibility is completed
with the Pirates but fie still hasone
more year to graduate. When he
d �es graduate. Kellv plans to look
into a graduate assistantship with
a college basketball team.
Pirates look for win
By CHRIS SIEG1 I
A��t Sporti 1 ditor
Going into the Colonial At
nference Tournament ii
� � n,Va. this weekend coacl
keSteeleand the Pirate � �
r their first win in post
� - since the CAA w as
Pirates enter the I
� tl a seasi n record
are 6-8 in theA A good
� I r a tie tor fifth. But a
� � ' 1 inday went in i
- fames Madison and 1
�x seeded sixth in the tourna-
Spring Games create
Olympic-style setting
ti ' A
all .
��
1.1, � in
-� f �-
� � �
Tl Sit
� �
.lap
� ing seeded sixth, tl
- fao the Eagles � I
� an m first round i I
t their first meetingagainst
Washington) i
� the Pirates evened the
bv winning in
liseum, 66-60
ue Edwards led the way I i
rati - with 32 points, v hile
� � i . iusdefense held Ken
er one of the nation's lead
rebounders, to just two re
below his seis m aver
The tournament festivities
n on Fridav night when Max
ECU Baseball
honored by
Raleigh league

ii red
. .
I the s
I , m. The
. I ii � es
ntand the

lingto
� � urnament tins
ti kets to the
ii hen
student
� - i ffici al the
Bluel dwards does a reverse slam as an excited Minges crowd
looks on. The Pirates look to heat American in the first round
ot the CAA tournament (Photo by Mark Love, ECU photolab)
Spring Games USA, the a
liege Championships of
Intramural and Club Sports, will
take place during Spring Break at
the East Coast West Coast loca-
ms of Daytona Beach, FI and
I aim Springs,A. Spring c. iames
isa chance for the two-out-of-three
college students who participate
in intramual and recreational
-ports on campuses throughout
the country to "live the dream ' of
competing in a national sporting
event. Nineteen athletic competi-
� mscoupled with entertainment,
sports clinics, demonstrations and
special evt ntswillcreateanOlym-
pic-Villagc-type atmosphere for
participants and spectators alike
The unique dual city format
calls for weekly competitions in
which vacationing students can
compete in individual and team
eventsduring their school's spring
recess. Winners will bedetermined
in each venue, with the East Coast
champions being flown to Palm
Springs to face their West Coast
counterparts in the National Fi-
nals on April 1 and 2, lusu
The month long sports festi-
val, presented by the Pontiac
IV. is. was developed by a for-
mer intramural volleyball plaver
who went on to Olympic tame.
Sprir. tmesUSAis sanctioned
by the National Intramural and
Recreational Sports Association
NTRSA) which oversees on-
campus athletic competitions. The
event will be televised nationwide
by the MovietimeCable Network
NIRSA, together with the
Spring Games USA staff, plan to
further develop the festival into a
major annual competition College
and universities that are atiliated
with N1RSA can coordiante on-
campus competitions that lead to
placement in Spring Came- I SA
Comments Will Holsberry, Execu-
tive Director of NTRSA Spring
Games USA is a strong statement
for a sports-oriented lifestyle and
provides a focus for those students
u ho eniev competing when there
is a chance to win national recog-
nition.
The Pontiac Division is the
presenting sponsor of Spring
Games USA, continuing their
long-standing relationship with
college students. Participating
sponsors include: Diet Pepsi,
Russell Athletic. Domino's Pizza,
Hawaiian Tropic. Penn, Wilson
Sporting Goods and Right Guard
Sports Stick sponsor ot the
See GAMES, page 12
Irales head toward Florida
Intramural Championships draw near
Bv KRISTIN MAI Bl RG
Sporti I ditoi
Once again, the East Carolina
eball tam had another post
noment, this time against the
arheels of North arolina
dnesday night The came v
ancaled due to wet ground and is
tatively scheduled for Wednes
lay, March 8.
Despite the canceletions, nd
aponements, March is when
the Pirates go into full swing of
eirl989 season. Friday,they take
� the Falcons of St Augustine's in
a game that was moved from I
p m to 12 p.m.
The change in the schedule
a as due to an honor that the Pi
rates will be receiving in Raleigh
'hat night
Coach Gary Overton, along
with the entire baseball team, is
being honored bv the Hot 'stove
League. Every year the league
honors a collegiate baseball team
and this year they picked E I
The Pirates have had one
Sec PIRATES, page 12
C each ' .aiv )v
strategies on the
A
lion and one of the ECU pitchers discuss
mound (Photo by l-D. Whitmire, ECU Photolab).
(IKS) As everyone looks
forward to spring break Wg. the
1 department of Intramural-Recrea-
tional Services is experiencing a
surge of action much like that you
; ill find on the bcachesof Florida.
In basketball action, teams are
heading for the all campus cham-
pionship Prognostic ators are still
on target for this years champion-
ship goal as it looks like The 1 el
lows and a Pi cam Team rematch
in the men's independent finals
( ne darkhorse foam still in the
ra e are the Whoo who defeated
heavih favored Hoop Syndicate
62 41 1 he Whoo could make a
name tor themselves it they are
able to defeat upcoming ompet-
titors.
In the women's roundup,
ladies independent squads will be
taking top spots in the all campus
championship once again Hie
women's independent divisional
finals between the I ittle Rascals
and i tir Prerogative should heat
up the courts ot Memorial how
ever as both squads faced tough
semifinal matches to take their
place in the final contest. In an
exciting display of basketball
prowess Our Prerogative de
feated SQRD 43-38 This contest
was iewed by many as the con-
test of the season for women's
basketball action. honors before they head to the
Co Rec bowlers are still strik- warm Florida sun. rheBelkBabes
ing and Our Prerogative is lead- defending championships of the
ing the waj . Fresh off astounding sport, have captured et another
defeats over Sigma Nu Shooters, title by defeating Alpha Omicrorn
Mad Dogsand perennial favorite
the Scrags, Our Prerogative will
cc the Red Measles. The measles
infected Silent Attack 1 Gutter
Headquarters nd the Belk Pin
lopplers to find themsel es shoot-
ing against Our Prerogative to-
night
Meanwhile in the waves of
Memorial Com Pool, water polo
specialists are shooting tor top
In men's action 1 am Sinking
are the favorite tube totalers Divi-
sional champions include Sigma
Phi Epsilon who defeated Sigma
Alpha Epsilon Tau kappa Epsi-
lon B captured the fraternity B
championship.
If vou happen to be heading
See 1NTRAMI RAl S, page 12
THE COLONIAL BASKETBALL STANDINGS
CONFERENCE
W-L Pet.
Richmond13-1 929
George Mason10-4 .714
American9-5 .643
UNC-Wilmington 9-5 .643
James Madison6-8 .429
Hast Carolina6-8 429
William & Mary2-12 .143
Navv1-13 .071
OVERA1 I
W-Lret,
19-8704
17-10.615
17-9654
14-13.519
16-13.535
14-13.519
5-22.185
6-21.222
Due to a layout error. Navy was left out in Tuesday's standings.






f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ECU leader in assists
Kelly excels despite height
Sports
MARCH 2,1989 PAGE 11
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Spot Editor
When the performance of a
basketball player is evaluated, the
major determining factor as far as
his asset to the team is concerned
is based upon height. The taller
you are, the better basketball
player you must be.
But one man on the East Caro-
lina basketball team defies this
Jeff Kelly
assumption, senior point guard
Jeff Kelly.
Kelly, who stands at a modest
5-foot-9-inches, says being under-
tall for a basketball player does
not intimidate him. "I've always
been short. I've never been real
tall so I've never really worried
about it Kelly explained.
Kelly capitalizes on his ath-
letic qualities to make up for his
height on the team. He is a tough,
aggressive player who is an excel-
lent ball-handler, an essential
quality for point guards. "You can
use vour shortness to your advan-
tage Kelly said. "You've got to
use more of your quickness and
be smarter
Kelly, who would rather pass
than shoot in a game, said fans
don't understand the role he plays
on the team. Averaging 2.7 shots
attempted per game, Kelly said
his job is to set up the offense and
work the ball to forwards Blue
Edwards and Gus Hill, the pre-
mier scorers for the Pirates, and
not be a leading shooter. "The
game has gotten harder to play in
college because we haven't had
the size here at East Carolina. You
don't get the easy shots, Kelly said.
"If I shot the ball 15 times a
game, then I could become a good
shooter. But if you only take three
or four shots a game, it's difficult
to have a real good percentage
Kelly may not excel in shoot-
ing, but he has fullfilled his role in
getting the prime shooters the ball.
He finished out his season leading
ECU in assists for both the season
and in a career. Kelly had 116
assists on the season surpassing
Herb Dixon's 113 he had in the
1984-85 season for the Pirates.
Kelly also surpassed Curt Van-
derhorst's 232 career assist record
as he has totaled 266 assists over
his career with the Pirates.
"I'm pretty proud of it Kelly
said regarding his new school
records. "I think the addition of
Blue and Gus this year has helped
me out a lot more too. They are
guys who arc going to score and
get you the assist when you throw
them the ball
In addition to being the assist
leader for the Pirates, Kelly is also
in the top-10 in ECU's recordbooks
for steals. He had 36 steals this
season which put him in eighth
place for most steals in a season.
He has also had 70 steals through-
out his career which slid him into
fifth place for ECU career steals.
Kelly's best game came Jan.
23,1989 against the Midshipmen
of Navy. In that same game, he
scored a career high 12 points in
Annapolis and had a career high
12 assists.
Being one of three seniors for
the Pirates, coach Mike Steele
required that all his seniorsbe team
leaders both on and off the court.
"We basically try to help the
younger guys understand what
coach Steele wants Kelly ex-
f�lained "It has been hard on Merf
Kenny Murphy, Blue Blue
Edwards and myself because we
are actually sophomores in this
program. A lot of times we're
searching for answers at what he
wants
Playing a sport at the colle-
giate level demandsdisciplinenot
only in the basketball setting but
in the academic setting as well.
Kelly works hard at maintaining a
respectable 2.9 grade point aver-
age, not letting the absense from
his classes while traveling take a
toll on his studies.
"A lot of freshmen come in
and have problems with the books
and the basketball Kelly contin-
ued. "I think that I understood
more of what I was getting myself
Jeff Kelly dribbles down the court as he tells his team which offense to set up. As a senior, Kelly
must be a team leader both on and off the court (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photolab).
into because mjpfather was a col-
lege basketball player and my
three brothers play college athlet-
ics
Kelly's father, Robert Kelly,
coached St. Petersburg College in
Jersey City, N.J.
Kelly grew up in South Or-
ange, N.J. and began playing bas-
ketball early in his life. "I've been
bouncing a ball since 1 was about
four or three years Kelly said.
He attended high school at
Columbia High and became the
fourth 1,000 point scorer for the
Cougers and holds the school's
single-game and single-season
career assist records.
Kelly had a chance to go to St.
Johns University in New York but
said he liked the atmosphere at
East Carolina and knew he would
get more playing time. "I would' ve
made the team at St. Johns al-
though I knew I wouldn't play
and just came down here and
loved the atmosphere Kelly said.
"Thebasketball program at ECU
wasn't too overpowering and it
wasa place I could come and play
Kelly said his career playing
basketball will end after the Colo-
nial Athletic Association tourna-
ment in Hampton this weekend,
but he would love to follow in his
father's footsteps and coach colle-
giate level basketball. "I would
like to coach without a doubt'
Kelly said. "The more and more I
think about it, I don't want to get
out of it. I've done it all my life,
I've always been around college
basketball. It's going to be scary. I
don't know what I'm going to do
with myself next year
Kelhseligibility iscompleted
with the Pirates buthestill has one
more year to graduate. When he
does graduate, Kelly plans to look
into a graduate assistantship with
a college basketball team.
Pirates look for win
By CHRIS SIEGEL
AmL Sports Editor
Going into the Colonial Ath-
letic Conference Tournament in
Hampton, Va. this weekend, coach
Mike Steeleand the Pirates will bo
looking for their first win in post-
season play since the CAA was
formed.
The Pirates enter the tourna-
ment with a season record of 14-
13. They are 6-8 in the CAA, good
enough for a tie for fifth. But a
coin toss on Monday went in fa-
vor of James Madison and ECU
will be seeded sixth in the tourna-
ment.
By being seeded sixth, the
Pirates will face the Eagles of
American in first round action.
ECU lost their first meeting against
American at Washington, D.C 82-
66. But the Pirates evened the
season series by winning in
Minges Coliseum, 66-60.
Blue Edwards led the way for
the Pirates with 32 points, while
ECU's tenacious defense held Ron
Draper, one of the nation's lead-
ing rebounders, to just two re-
bounds, 10 below his season aver-
a8e-
The tournament festivities
begin on Friday night when play-
ECU Baseball
honored by
Raleigh league
ers, coaches and members of the
media have the CAA Tournament
Banquet. At this time the CAA
player of the year and all post-
season honors will be awarded.
In the running for player of
the year is ECU's own Blue Ed-
wards 'EawaraseWCMlfi '
scoring and field goal percentage:r
He has also been named CAA
player of the week three times
throughout this season, including
two weeks in a row.
Actual play will begin on Sat-
urday at 12 p.m. The first game
features the second-seeded Patri-
ots of George Mason against sev-
enth-seeded William & Mary. The
second game pits ECU versus
third-seeded American at 2 p.m.
Winners will then be paired
up and will play the semifinals on
Sunday. The first game will be
played at 2 p.m. and the second
contest will begin at 4 p.m. The
final game to determine who goes
to the NCAA tournament and the
"Road to Seattle" will be played
Monday night at 7:30 p.m.
Any ECU student planning to
attend the CAA tournament this
weekend can get tickets to the
contest for five dollars when
presenting a valid ECU student
ID card to the ticket office at the
Hampton Coliseum.
Spring Games create
Olympic-style setting
Blue Edwards does a reverse slam as an excited Minges crowd
looks on. The Pirates look to beat American in the first round
of the CAA tournament (Photo by Mark Love, ECU photolab).
Spring Games USA, the Na-
tional College Championships of
Intramural and Club Sports, will
take place during Spring Break at
the East CoastWest Coast loca-
tions of Daytona Beach, FL and
Palm Springs; CA. Spring Games
is a chance for the two-out-of-three
college students who participate
in intramual and recreational
sports on campuses throughout
the country to "live the dream" of
competing in a national sporting
event. Nineteen athletic competi-
tions coupled with entertainment,
sports clinics, demonstrations and
special events will create an Olym-
pic-Village-type atmosphere for
participants and spectators alike.
The unique dual city format
calls for weekly competitions in
which vacationing students can
compete in individual and team
events during their school's spring
recess. Winners will be determined
in each venue, with the East Coast
champions being flown to Palm
Springs to face their West Coast
counterparts in the National Fi-
nals on April 1 and 2,1989.
The month-long sports festi-
val, presented by the Pontiac
Division, was developed by a for-
mer intramural volleyball player
who went on to Olympic fame.
Spring Games USA is sanctioned
by the National Intramural and
Recreational Sports Association
(NIRSA), which oversees on-
campus athletic competitions The
event will be televised nationwide
by the Movietime Cable Network.
NIRSA, together with the
Spring Games USA staff, plan to
further develop the festival into a
major annual competition. College
and universities that are afiliated
with NIRSA can coordiante on-
campus competitions that lead to
placement in Spring Games USA.
Comments Will Holsberry, Execu-
tive Director of NIRSA, "Spring
Games USA is a strong statement
for a sports-oriented lifestyle and
provides a focus for those students
who enjoy competing when there
is a chance to win national recog-
nition
The Pontiac Division is the
presenting sponsor of Spring
Games USA, continuing their
long-standing relationship with
college students. Participating
sponsors include: Diet Pepsi,
Russell Athletic, Domino's Pizza,
Hawaiian Tropic, Penn, Wilson
Sporting Goods and Right Guard
Sports Stick � sponsor of the
See GAMES, page 12
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Spot Editor
Once again, the East Carolina
baseball team had another post-
ponement, this time against the
Tarheels of North Carolina
Wednesday night. The game was
cancaled due to wet ground and is
tentatively scheduled for Wednes-
day, March 8.
Despite the canceletions, and
postponements, March is when
the Pirates go into full swing of
their 1989 season. Friday, they take
on the Falcons of St Augustine's in
a game that was moved from 1
p.m. to 12 p.m.
The change in the schedule
was due to an honor that the Pi-
rates will be receiving in Raleigh
that night.
Coach Gary Overton, along
with the entire baseball team, is
being honored by the Hot Stove
League Every year the league
honors a collegiate baseball team
and this year they picked ECU.
The Pirates have had one
Set PIRATES, page 12
Coach Gary Overton and one of the ECU pitchers discuss
strategies on the mound (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photolab).
T-it.es head toward Florida
intramural Championships draw near
(IRS) � As everyone looks basketball action. honors before they head to the
forward to spring break 1989, the Co-Rec bowlers are still strik- warm Honda sun. The Belk Babes,
Department of Intramural-Recrea- ing and Our Prerogative is lead- defending championships of the
tional Services is experiencing a ing the way. Fresh off astounding sport, have captured yet another
surge of action much like that you defeats over Sigma Nu Shooters, title by defeating Alpha Ormcrom
will find on the beaches of Florida. Mad Dogs and perennial favorite Pi.
In basketball action, teams are the Scrags, Our Prerogative will In men's action, I am Sinking
heading for the all campus cham- face the Red Measles. The measles are the favorite tube totalers. Divi-
pionship. Prognosticators are still infected Silent Attack I, Gutter sional champions include Sigma
on target for this years champion- Headquarters and the Belk Pin Phi Epsilon who defeated Sigma
ship goal as it looks like The Fel- Topplers to find themselves shoot- Alpha Epsilon. Tau Kappa Epsi-
lows and a Dream Team rematch ing against Our Prerogative to- Ion B captured the fraternity B
in the men's independent finals, night. championship.
One darkhorse team still in the Meanwhile in the waves of If you happen to be heading
race are the Whoo who defeated Memorial Gym Pool, water polo g intRAMURALS, page 12
heavily favored Hoop Syndicate specialists are shooting for top'
62-41. The Whoo could make a
name for themselves if they are
able to defeat upcoming compet-
titors.
In the women's roundup,
ladies independent squads will be
taking top spots in the all campus
championship once again. The
women's independent divisional
finals between the Little Rascals
and Our Prerogative should heat
up the courts of Memorial how-
ever as both squads faced tough
semifinal matches to take their
place in the final contest. In an
exciting display of basketball
prowess, Our Prerogative de-
feated SQRD 43-38. This contest
was viewed by many as the con-
test of the season for women's
THE COLONIAL BASKETBALL STANDINGS
CONFERENCEOVERALL
W.L PcLW.L PcL
Richmond13-1 .92919-8 .704
George Mason10-4 .71417-10 .615
American9-5 .64317-9 .654
UNC-Wilmington 9-5 .64314-13 .519
James Madison6-8 .42916-13 .535
East Carolina6-8 .42914-13 .519
William & Mary2-12 .1435-22 .185
Navy1-13 .0716-21 .222
Due lo a layout enor, Navy w� left ool in Tuesdayg standings.

' ��JtM .��





12
llll" l.sl CAROl INI W
MAKt 11 2, WS
World -class advisory board heads Intramural s
A world class Advisory board
has been enlisted to guide Spring
Games USA the National
(, hampionship tor Collegiate In
tramural Recreational and Club
Sport Athletes. ! wo former Oh m
pians three Ph P bearing sport
adminstrators and three profes
sional athletes are the nucleus ot
the d ison Board
rhe eight Advisor) Board
Members are (leorgc Brett pro
fess � i baseball plaver with the
KansasC ity Royals; Dr. Jerry Buss,
President ot California Sports
the parent organization of the 1 os
Angles lakers and the Great
Western Forum; Pr oanChamer-
hn Presid nt ot the 1 ive Kings
i lub and an associate ot the 184
1 AOOC . 1 lal Connelly, a gold
medalist in the 1 lammer Throw at
the Koine Olympit s and an ama-
tcur athletics administrator; Pr.
Maureen lohnson, Presidentof the
World Coprorate Games; ohn
Nabor, a tour time gold medalist
in swimming at the Montreal
Olympics no an AAU Sullivan
Award winner; O.J. Simpson, a
retired NF1 All Pro running back
and ABC Sports television com
mentator; and Sinjin smith, the
all time winningest professional
beach volleyball player.
The Advisory Board willscrve
as a steering committee to the
spring Games, Inc. President
Michael Ol lara O'Hara, a 1984
LAOOC Vice President and lM
USA Olympic Volleyball ream
member, heads a Board ol I ire
tors who arc sport and special
event professionals committed to
producing a national champion
ship for college intramural ath
letes that en ouraged �arti ipa
su mal and (. M mpu sporting
deavors than any man in history
1 lr helped establish �r fcssi i
sport � leagues in haskelball,
hocke ind lle ball, creat I
professii mal tra 1� � n i pi thai
i 0 meel n f i ve
tnes i n thr different continent
Spring Games USA gets underway in Florida
ico Spring - i.mio-
mioi
totKo
Continued from page 11
Sport Stick three on three Soft
ball Cl
accepts iii
sponsors
n interesting sidelight to
SpringGames I S is the friendly
wagerbetween MavorUarn Kelly
�! Davtona Beach and Mayor
Sonm Bono ot Palm Springs.
or Kellv v ill wager a bag ol
da " mges and, a bucket ol
the vN rld's most fan us Beach
d . : tilt Ma 01 now ill olter
i bag of alifomia grapefi
and three Palm Springs Sonny
Bonot-shirts. rheMayor'sbet will
be decided at the National Finals
w lien the champions oi each venue
clash and an overall region claims
the Commissioner s Cup tor
amassmg the greatest number ol
victories in the competition
Spring Games I SA is headed
b) Michael O'Hara a former Vice
President Executive Director ol
Sportsforthe l�840lvmpics, who
has brought manv ol his Los
Angeles Olympic Organization
Committee team members to
gcther again to stage the Intramu
ral Championships
While a college undergradu-
ate. OHara and his intramural
volleyball team paid its own way
to theCollegiate Volleyball Cham
pionshipsand spiked their way to
the national title. The Collegiate
Championships led to a berth on
the first I SA Olympic Volleyball
1 ram in NM tor I v( lara and a
lifelong association with thel )lvm
pic movement. O'Hara said, "1
began as a fraternity volleyball
plaver who was fortunate to have
tion in sport rather than abuse ol and prcxluced the highest i
alcohol and tobac o indoor polo match in hi-tor
Michael OHara enjoys the the "Power Polo" International
unusual distinction ol having Challenge between Mexico and
pioneered more college, profes the United States
In the earl) s is, l1 lara a
cepted an invitation from Peter
I eberroth,hisf irmertravelaj
to serve as Executive I ire tor ol
all 23 ()lympi sports. In I �-
( )'l lara advanced to Vi c Presi
dent of Television for the'84 ()lym-
pi( s, where he negotiated ag
lived the dream' ol national and
international competition Spring
( lames I SA will let thousands ol
studentsexperienc e thedream f r
themselves arid give a national
voice to those 8 million college
students who say yes to sports as
a wav of life
Spring (lames I SA ompeti
tions run tour weeks in Davtona
Bea( hi March6 31 land two weeks
in Plam Springs (March 20-31)
rhe televised 1 inalsand surround-
ing special events will be held
April 1 and 2 in Palm Springs
ECU sottball
yet to begin
Eastan ilina's Lady Pirates
softbal! team arc read) to begin
�- eason, but so far tl i
nveatl � i dii tated play 1;
� � m with i Miki luled
mcelled, and bad
ithei � �; - ted througl
, : � 4ri( � " � iouthen -
ECI' w be in actioi
r they travel I
rgia and rida for I
� � � � ind 1 ' � �! � �
luled
vhich ha beei
� ii kcdlwelfthintheNal nalpi
n top twent rankii .
� teams did not play last s.
luse ' �! ram. h wever E
did meet Eastern M i I
pie and bastalan lina
essful winning i
Tough competition awaits
Pirates over spring break
ECl' golfers finish third in tourny, Maginnes takes third overall
arolina playing an
and steady holes
weekend, finished third
i - a strong field at the Palmetto
llegiate Tournament in
mtee,S.
tournament was origi-
. scheduled for 54 h cs but
nd v as rainec
�� Mav - ��� as tied tor
� ; i firsl rounc
npetitive
head coach Hal Morrison said.
"We are beating some good teams
early and that's a good sign
Clemson's 559 points gave
them the victory in the tourna-
ment while the Gamecocks of
South Caronna tmished second
with 571 points. ECU and North
Carolina had " points to tie for
third while Furmanand Puke tied
tor fourth with 586 points.
University of Virginia was
onlv one point away from fur-
man, and Puke and had to settle
for fifth place with 587 points. Old
Dominion earned the sixth place
spot out of h teams as they tm-
ished with a final score of 590
points.
E( "U will play in the Shadow
Moss Invitational in Charleston
S.C. March 6-7.
Continued from page II
doubleheader against Howard
since the s 'as n began Pel
hold .i 2-11 n rd I thai
Spring break pi mis
- ompetitii �n tor the ral is 1
' i 'teams fr m the BigEasl v ' tl
Atlantic thletic, Atlantic
and metro conferem �
I begins spnr il i
tion Sundae Man h 5 v hen I
play a d ublehe id r againsl :
field a � � I
1 agaii
Mai hi u i thei tra 1 I
ik
"n trr


.
:
:

md
m.
b9 and ' '
� i 69 : 140 and
- augin tied
� - �
ased with ur
- rl ek( nd
Seven sprinters
qualify for meet

Bv Mil HA1 IMARTIN
rtj Vi�
rr n's indi or track team
� ' March 4-5
1 Indoor Champion-
el Vfter �� � in-
. - � the Prati . � tied
�� ��� ipating
I tl
" � tor,
� rEn McN II fa red
and has i
� : : fin the finalsol the
r tear i embers travel-
nUni ersity include
: n Lee jui ti rs Ike Robin-
ind J ini r Robinson anc
� : ri e Irving, Richard
eddy Vcrnon
. 4 . inter ollegiate
Association oi
i is made up oi all the
� o : istem seaboard
md � '� st track organiza-
� � tl United States at the
ver90s hools wil
narl oal rancinc from t'tu
i
ri istai la fars uthas I
itii the
. ison
' Wilmir
nvitational I be held a�
A'iln � �
Intramural
games to take
place over
spring break
' tntinued from eat' 11
ivtona I r Spring brc ak ��
� to take part in the Pontiac
prine (lames. Your group i tt
� - ikers i v got together and
hallei ge squads from all othei
- i � thecountry in a variety i t
51 x �rts ranging fn �m ling, st fl
ball and tug o war to volleyl i
ultimate frisbeeor obstacle course
rhese NationaK ollege Intra-
i ind lub Sport champion
ships are pa ked w ith excitement
and will be aired on table televi
hen the sun goes down,
fireworks i erts and more
special events await all compcti-
rs
Register you team at Spring
Gamesi entral,next to the Iexan
1 lotel on Davtona Bea h Be sure
to cheer on the E I' f risbee Irates
as the) take part in the Ultimate
"risbee Competition





V
0lS$JUttm.ifmm
1
����
ta
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1989
World -class advisory board heads Intramural s
Aworid-classAdvisory Board KansasCity Royals; Dr. Jerry Buss, Nabor, a four-time gold medalist LAOOC Vice President and 1964 sional and Olympic sporting en-
has been enlisted to guide Spring President of California Sports � in swimming at the Montreal USA Olympic Volleyball Team deavors than any man in history.
Games USA � the National the parent organization of the Los Olympics and an AAU Sullivan member, heads a Board of Direc- He helped establish professional
Championship for Collegiate In- Angles Lakers and the Great Award winner; OJ. Simpson, a tors who are sport and special sports leagues in basketball,
tramural, Recreational and Club WestemFbrunvDr.JoanChamer- retired NFL All-Pro running back event professionals committed to hockey and volleyball, created a
SportAthletesTwoformerOlym- lin. President of the Five Rings and ABC Sports television com- producing a national champion- professional track concept that
pians, three PhDbearing sport Club and an associate of the 19&4 mentator; and Sinjin Smith, the ship for college intramural ath- produced 50 meets in five coun-
adminstrators and three profes- LAOOC; Hal Connelly, a gold all-time winningest professional letes that encouraged participa � �A� �,�,���?.
sional athletes are the nucleus of medalist in the Hammer Throw at beach volleyball player,
the Advisory Board. the Rome Olympics and an ama- The Advisory Board will serve
The eight Advisory Board teur athletics administrator; Dr. as a steering committee to the
Members are George Brett, pro- MaureenJohnson,Presidentofthe Spring Games, Inc. President
fessional baseball player with the World Coprorate Games; John Michael O'Hara. O'Hara, a 1984
ECU softball
yet to begin
East Carolina's Lady Pirates
softball team are ready to begin
the 1989 season, but so far, the
weather has dictated play. ECU's
exhibition with Duke, scheduled
for Feb. 26 was cancelled, and bad
weather is expected through the
season series in the southern re-
tries on three different continents
Spring Games USA gets underway in Florida
Continued from page 11
"Sport Stick three-on-three Soft-
ball Challenge Spring Games
accepts no alcohol or tobacco
sponsors.
An interesting sidelight to
Spring Games USA is the friendly
wager between Mayor Larry Kelly
of Daytona Beach and Mayor
Sonny Bono of Palm Springs.
Mayor Kelly will wager a bag of
Florida oranges and a bucket of
the World's most famous Beach
Sand, while Mayor Bono will offer
up a bag of California grapefruits
and three Palm Springs Sonny gether again to stage the Intramu- lived the dream'of national and
Bono t-shirts. The Mayor's bet will ral Championships. international competition. Spring
be decided at the National Finals While a college undergradu- Games USA will let thousands of
when the champions of each venue ate, O'Hara and his intramural students experience the dream for
clash and an overall region claims volleyball team paid its own way themselves and give a national
the Commissioner's Cup for to the Collegiate Volleyball Cham- voice t0 mose 8 n111011 college
amassing the greatest number of pionships and spiked their way to students who say yes to sports as
victories in the competition. the national title. The Collegiate a waY of lieS .
Spring Games USA is headed Championships led to a berth on Spring Games USA compeb-
by Michael O'Hara, a former Vice the first USA Olympic Volleyball tions run four weeks in Daytona
PresidentExecutive Director of Team in 1964 for O'Hara and a Beach (March6-31)and two weeks
Sports for the 1984 Olympics, who lifelongassodationwiththeOlym- �n plam Springs (March 20-31).
has brought many of his Los pic movement. O'Hara said, "I The televised Finals and surround-
Angeles Olympic Organization began as a fraternity volleyball ing special events will be held
Committee team members to- player who was fortunate to have April land 2 in Palm Springs.
gion.
. . . . . . ECU will be in action over:
tion in sport rather than abuse of and produced the highest rated spring y as mey travel to the
alcohol and tobacco. indoor polo match in history � gjgjfig anj Florida for tourna-
Michael O'Hara enjoys the the 'Tower Polo" International ment actjon and to Coastal Caro-
unusual distinction of having Challenge between Mexico and Hna. Among the teams scheduled
pioneered more college, profes- the United States. Florida State which has been
In the early '80s, O'Hara ac- ranked twelfth in theNational pre-
cepted an invitation from Peter season top twenty rankings. The
Ueberroth,hisformertravelagent, two teams did not play last season
to serve as Executive Director of because of rain, however, ECU
all 23 Olympic sports. In 1983 did meet Eastern Michigan,
O'Hara advanced to Vice Presi- Temple andCoastal Carolina and
dentofTelevisionforthe'840lym- Were successful winning all six
pics, where he negotiated agree- games.
ECU golfers finish third in tourny, Maginnes takes third overall
East Carolina, playing an head coach Hal Morrison said, with 571 points. ECU and North for fifth place with 587 points. Old
impressive and steady 36-holes "We are beating some good teams Carolina had 575 points to tie for Dominion earned the sixth place
ever the weekend, finished third
in a strong field at the Palmetto
Intercollegiate Tournament in
Santee, S.C.
The tournament was origi-
nally scheduled for 54 holes, but
Friday's first round was rail
out
John Maginnes was tied for
the overall lead with a first-roi
69 and finished the competitive
tournament with a 69-71-140 ai
in third place. Francis Vaugin tic
for sixth overall.
"I was very pleased with our
performance over the weekend
early and that's a good sign
Clemson's 559 points gave
them the victory in the tourna-
ment while the Gamecocks of
South Carolina finished second
third while Furman and Duke tied
for fourth with 586 points.
University of Virginia was
only one point away from Fur-
man and Duke and had to settle
spot out of 16 teams as they fin-
ished with a final score of 590
points.
ECU will play in the Shadow
Moss Invitational in Charleston,
S.C. March 6-7.
Tough competition awaits
Pirates over spring break
Continued from page 11
doubleheader against Howard
since the season began Feb. 18 and
hold a 2-0 record from that con-
test.
Spring break promises tough
competition for the Pirates as they
face teams from the Big East, Metro
Atlantic Athletic, Atlantic Coast
and metro conferences.
ECU begins spring break ac-
tion Sunday, March 5 when they
play a doubleheader against Fair-
field at Harrington Field. They
meet Fairfield again at home
March 6 and then travel to Dur-
ham March 7 to face the Blue Devils
of Duke University.
From Durham, the Pirates take
to the road again, this time to
Columbia, S.C. to face the Game-
cocks of the University of South
Carolina March 10.
Then March 12 they return
home to play a doubleheader oh
Harrington Field against the
Connecticut Huskies.
All games are tentatively
scheduled for 3 p.m. except for
Fairfield on March 5 and Connecti-
cut which are at 1 p.m.
Seven sprinters
qualify for meet
By MICHAEL MARTIN
Sport� Wn�r
The men's indoor track teaml
travels to Princeton, NJ March 4-51
for the IC4A Indoor Champion-1
ship Meet. After an excellent in-j
door season, the Pirates qualified I
seven sprinters, all participating
in the 55 and the 200 meter dashes.
ECU's All America i spv iter,
senior Eugene McNeills fa �red
in the 200 meter and has a 6ood
chance to finish in the finals of the
55 meter.
Other team members travel-
ing to Princeton University include
senior Jon Lee, juniors Ike Robin-I
son and Junior Robinson and!
freshmen Brian Irving, Richard
Wright, and Teddy Vernon.
The IC4A, Inter Collegiatel
Amateur Athletic Association of I
America, is made up of all the!
teams along the Eastern seaboardl
and is the oldest track organiza-l
tion in the United States at the!
college level. Over 90 schools will
participate, ranging from th�
Northeast and as far south as Flor-
ida.
The outdoor season begir
March 11 with the UNC-Wilming-I
ton Invitational to be held at!
Wilmington.
Intramural
games to take
place over
spring break
Continued from page 11
to Daytona for Spring Break, be
sure to take part in the Pontiac
Spring Games. Your group of
lreakers' can get together and
challenge squads from all other
areas ofthe country in a variety of
sports ranging from cycling, soft-
ball and tug-o-wax to volleyball,
ultimate frisbee or obstacle course.
These National College Intra-
mural and Club Sport champion-
ships are packed with excitement
and will be aired on cable televi- j
sion. When the sun goes down,
fireworks, concerts and morel
special events await all competi-
tors.
Register you team at Spring
Games Central next to the Texan
Hotel on Daytona Beach. Be sure
to cheer on the ECU Frisbee Irates
as they take part in the Ultimate
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 2, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 02, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.661
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58129
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