The East Carolinian, February 28, 1989






2sa�M�
Crime Report2
Editorials4
Classifieds6
DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince to
play in Camp Lejeune,
Get the concert info on page 8.
'irate men go to the wire with UNC-W,
Pirate women beat the Hawks.
Catch the action on page 10.
�be lEaat (ftaroltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. S4
Tuesday February 28, 1989
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Art project dismantled after controversy
By TIM HAMPTON
s I'ditor
dt
Two creators of an art project,
picting a black figure hanging
by a rope from a tree, say their in-
tentions have been misconstrued
after ECU officials dismantled
portions of the work deemed to be
offensive in the wooded mall area
of the campus Monday morning.
Marc Svlvestre and Victoria
Higgins, two ECU graduate stu-
dents in the school oi art and crea -
tors of the work, said they at-
tempted to convey an anti-racist
statement through theuseof three
plaster figures in the mid-term
project for an art class. "People
saw part of it (the work) but they
took the symbolism out of con-
text S l estre said.
In a statement to the press,
Chancellor Richard Eakin said
tins display which was on view
tor a short time this morning
I Monday) has resulted ina sharply
mixed reaction and many have
found it to be offensive and re-
pugnant
Explaining the art, Sylvestre
and 1 liggins said thev placed two
white figures seated in lounge
chairs before the hanging black
figure in efforts to symbolize
apath) towards racism, anapath)
visual imagery was very power-
ful 1 liggins said.
But one of the first students to
see the work early Monday morn-
the work. Quoting the banner,
Sylvestre said "WAKE UP - there
is much to learn from others - It is
difficult to overcome innate ra-
ingsaid the project upset her.The cism-To ignore or avoid racism is
criminal - Racism comes from
ignorance and fear - We are all
student, who wishes to remain
anonymous, said she called cam-
pus security at 230 a.m. to inves-
tigate the mall area after she wit-
nessed the art students construct
the project.
"1 was offended by the art and
1 wanted the ECU police to find
out if the students had university
approval the source said.
The artists said the observers
racist - WAKE UP
Instead of placing the work
indoors, the artists said the project
would be more effective outdoors.
The thrust of the piece was to "stir
discussion and to compete the
denial of racism which so many
have Higgins said.
Citing a recent letter to the
editor in The East Carolinian stat-
M the project would have under-
feel is pre alent in the South stood the project's intent by read- ing that there is no racism on the
md particularly at ECU. "The ing a six foot banner included in ECU campus, Higgins said "this
guy is so blind" Svlvestre and
1 liggins said through their art thev
wanted to alert the campus that
racism does exist and is not "just
hidden on bathroom walls
In preparing for the project,
the artists researched graffiti on
the ECU campus. They compiled
a long list of racist statements
written on bathroom John stalls.
Both artists said the graffiti is only
(me indication oi racism on the
campus.
Using the list of racist state-
ments, Sylvestre and Higgins
wrote the graffiti on the two white
figures. Below the feet of the whi te
figures were 50 to 60 beer cans,
barbed wire and an abundance of
cigarette butts in efforts to sym-
bolize "the garbagery environ-
ment in which many racists live
according to Sylvestre. "It is svm-
bohc of the degradation" of the
racist, Higgins said.
Chancellor Eakin moved to
have the portions of project dis-
mantled at approximately 8 a.m.
Monday.
"It easily could be misunder-
stood as to its intent and could be
seen as conveying a message in
direct opposition to the artists'
intent Eakin said in the press
release adding, "This work, while
well-intentioned, was judged to
lack sensitivity (to the feelings of
all members oi the community.)"
'Teddy White hearings were fair'
according to VC Ronald Speier
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Stiff Writer
The charred remains of the social room on the sixth fhxir of Clement dorm after Saturdays Tire.
Fire guts sixth floor social room
of Clement dormitory Saturday
By TIM HAMPTON
No� Editor
Eire gutted a social room on
the sixth floor of Clement Dormi-
tory earlv Saturday morning. Af-
ter evacuating residents, firefight-
ers were called back onto the scene
to extinguish a second blaze dur-
ing the afternoon.
No one was seriously injured
in the fire, but an ECU campus
policeman was treated for smoke
inhalation at Pitt Memorial Hos
pitial, according to Chief Johnnv
Rose.
Investigators are searching for
a cause oi the fire in the room
which houses a table, a couch and
several chairs but have had few
clues in the case as of Monday,
Rose said.
The first outbreak oi fire
urday morning. (ampus Security
arrived at the location oi the fire
before being joined by Greenville
Fire and Rescue Units.
Residents of the dorm were
evacuated until noon on Saturday
after the initial fire was extin-
guished.
Hut at approximately 2:30 a
second tire erupted from the so-
cial room.
The second fire was sighted
by residents of the sixth floor as
gathered clothes and other neces-
sities We were walking back to
our room to get the remainder oi
our things and we saw smoke
Elizabeth Hane, of (ill Clement,
said.
I lane said she then grabbed
her belongs from 611, loca ted three
doors from the social room, and
ran to tell the resident advisor of
the second fire. After evacuating
Parted at approximately 1:15 Sat
From gold medalist to philosopher
from the second fire, Hane said
she left the scene oi the fire. "I
didn't want to see it anymore
she said.
Although university officials
offered temporary campus hous-
ing for the victims of the blaze,
1 lane said she would rather live
with a friend.
Carolyn Fulghum, director of
ECU housing, said there is no esti-
mate on the damage from the fire.
There is heavy smoke damage to
the floor Fulghum said.
I lane said the smoke damage
to her room is minimal. "Nothing
is really too damaged, but there is
soot all over the place she said.
The housing department will
be working during next weeks
vacation so residents of the smcke
damaged floor may move back.
"We hope to have the sixth floor
ready for the rcsidentsafter spring
break Fulghum.
The controversial Honor
Board hearings involving Teddv
White were conducted fairly and
without prejudice according to a
university official.
Dr. Ronald Speier, assistant
vice chancellor of student affairs,
on Thursday told past and pres-
ent members oi the Honor Board
that recent allegations of impro-
priety in the board's handling of
the White case were unfounded.
White was found guilty last
spring of assaulting at least two
students in Garrett Hall and was
subsequently suspended for two
years. Several weeks ago the case
came back into the news when
Dennis Schatzman, executive di-
rector of the North Carolina
NAACP , made allegations that
the board had violated White's
rights.
Speier said he reviewed the
judicial file (which includes trial
transcripts and his own memory
of the incident) on the case when
Schatzman first began to speak
out. His review, conducted inde-
pendently oi Chancellor Eakin's
recently promised review, yielded
no evidenceof impropriety, Speier
said.
According to Speier, White's
rightsasanaccused student, which
are found in the Student Govern-
ment Association Documents,
were reviewed with him on at least
three occasions. Speier said he first
discussed these rights with White
when he met with White to ban
him from thedormitoriesafter the
incident. Normally, when Speier
is not required to see a student
because of a housing or like viola-
tion, a student would not have
that third opportunity at discuss-
ing his or her rights, Speier said.
Later, White, likeall students
who face the Honor Board, read
and signed a statement explain-
mg his rights. Speier said. White's
third opportunitv came when he
faced the full board and was asked
if he understood his rights, an-
other routine procedure. White an-
swered that he did, Speier said.
'We have people sign that
thev understand their rights. We
have a booklet that we go over,
and the first question that we ask
in the hearing is 'Do you under-
stand your rights
"In addition I do think that
the judicial process worked ex-
actly as I described it to you,
Speier said. Earlier in the meeting
he had reacquainted the board
with the procedure followed be-
fore a case is heard. That proce-
dure, which is also spelled out in
the S.G.A. Documents, begins
when charges are generated by
police reports.
If the police feel a student is
an alleged or possible criminal,
thev will read the student the
See SPEIER, page 3
The smouldering couch which caught on fire causing the second fire in Clement dormitory.
Kay Yow discusses the secrets of success
�J . H.n .ndremem- "It's impossible to be success- beaten it We can't change the others I havebeen a
By DAVID HERRING
A��i�Unl Nrwi Fditor
According to Kay Yow, head
coach of N.C. State's lady
Wolfpack basketball team md
Olympic gold medalist, her secret
is: vou can't lose if you hold all the
ACES, an acronym standing for
attitude, committment, enthusi-
asm and services.
In an inspirational lecture,
entitled "Striving to Excel�Going
for the Gold Yow drew upon
her coaching expertise, insightful
anecdotes, and her personal phi-
losophy to demonstrate why she
is so successful, both on and off
the court.
"You can shoot airballs (in
life), but you can come back and
get another shot she began.
"People think the only concern in
basketball is winning, but every-
thing about it is broader than that.
If basketball was as superficial as
winning, I wouldn't be in it.
"I'm an educator first and
foremost and accidentally got into
coaching continued Yow, an
ECU alumnus holding bachelors
and masters degrees in education.
"Coaching gave me the opportu-
nity to work with a smaller num-
ber of youths than teaching, so I
was able to work more closely
emotionally, physically, intellec-
tually and spiritually. And it ex-
cited me
Yow stressed the importance
of learning to cope with achieve-
ment and prosperity, as well as
adversity. "It's fine to rejoice in
golden moments, but you must
move on to step two and remem-
ber your roots � where you came
from she stated. "It makes you
more appreciative of your accom-
plishment,and then you can reach
out to others and help them to be
successful.
"I'm in tune with who I am
and where I came from and that
enables me to reach out to others
around me. The La rd gave me the
ability to work with people and
I'd rather have that than any other
ability
Attitude, Yow's first key to
success, determines whether you
"respond" positively to a situ-
ation, or "react" negatively. Ac-
cording to Yow, we have little or
no control over what happens in
our life, but we have 100 percent
control over our attitude and how
we will respond.
It's impossible to be success-
ful without a good attitude Yow
noted. "What's inside determines
what a person can do. Picture two
balloons, when released one rises
to the ceiling and one sinks to the
floor. The difference is what's
inside.
"When life kicks you, let it
kick you forward � it can if you
let it said Yow in reference to her
personal battle with cancer. "1
recently had a battle with cancer
that was negativeand hard to take.
But because of that experience 1
serve as chairman of the Lin-
eberger Cancer Research Center,
Chapel Hill, and so far we have
raised $600,000 toward our $1
million dollar fund drive.
"I have grown so much as a
person through battling this dis-
ease, even though I can't say I've
beaten it. We can't change the
direction of the wind she rea-
soned, "but we can adjust our-
selves
Commitment, according tc
Yow, is important and our society
is losing it. "When we make a
commitment to excellence we
must commit to a team � be it in
a family or business � and we
must have the same goals and
understanding to pull in the same
direction for a common purpose
she said.
According to Yow, no one can
win alone, therefore each team
must make sacrifices and work
together to maximize the poten-
tial of each team member. "We
others I have been able to do what
I've done
Yow described a project she
assigned to the women's Olympic
team, where each member was to
draw a picture of their personal
goals for the team. According to
Yow, everyone on the team drew
the same picture: the ceremony at
w hich thev would receive the gold
medal.
Her team was united in their
total committment to excellence.
"If you accept second place when
first place is open, you'll have
tendency to do it the rest of your
life. Don't put limits on yourself
warned Yow. "We don't know
what we can do, but 1 guarantee
drink from wells others have dug you it's above and beyond our
and warm ourselves from fires imagination
others have built she observed. Enthusiasm and mdustnous-
"Thisappliestome.It'sbecauseof See KAY, page 7





r

1 v '
Crime Repdrt2
Editorials4
Classifieds6
v�
DJ Jazzy Jeff ind jrhe Fresh Prince to
play in Camp tejeunc.
Get the concert info oat page 8.
�!
te men go to tfcrwire hUNC-W,
Pirate women beat the'H�n�,
patch the action on page 10.
ii
She lEaat (Earnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 54
Tuesday February 28,1989
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Art project dismantled after controversy
By TIM HAMPTON
New. Editor
Two creators of an art project,
depicting a black figure hanging
by a rope from a tree, say their in-
tentions have been misconstrued
after ECU officials dismantled
portions of the work deemed to be
offensive in the wooded mall area
of the campus Monday morning.
Marc Sylvestre and Victoria
Higgins, two ECU graduate stu-
dents in the school of art and crea-
tors of the work, said they at-
saw parts of it (the work) but they visual imagery was very power- the work. Quoting the banner,
took the symbolism out of con- ful Higgins said,
text Sylvestre said. But one of the first students to
In a statement to the press, see the work early Monday morn-
Chancellor Richard Eakin said ing said the project upset her. The
"this display which was on view student, who wishes to remain
for a short time this morning anonymous, said she called cam-
(Monday)hasresultedinasharply pus security at 2:30 a.m. to inves-
Sylvestre said "WAKE UP - there
is much to learn from others - It is
difficult to overcome innate ra-
cism - To ignore or avoid racism is
criminal - Racism comes from
ignorance and fear - We are all
racist - WAKE UP
Instead of placing the work
guy is so blind Sylvestre and
Higgins said through their art they
wanted to alert the campus that
racism does exist and is not "just
hidden on bathroom walls
In preparing for the project,
the artists researched graffiti on
cigarette butts in efforts to sym-
bolize "the garbagery environ-
ment in which many racists live
according to Sylvestre. "It is sym-
bolic of the dregradation" of the
racist, Higgins said.
Chancellor Eakin moved to
mixed reaction and many have tigate the mall area after she wit
found it to be offensive and re- nessed the art students construct indoors, the artists said the project written on bathroom John stalls
pugnant the project. would be more effective outdoors.
Explaining the art, Sylvestre "I was offended by the art and The thrust of the piece was to "stir
and Higgins said they placed two I wanted the ECU police to find discussion and to compete the
white figures seated in lounge out if the students had university denial of racism which so many
chairs before the hanging black approval the source said. have Higgins said,
figure in efforts to symbolize The artists said the observers Citing a recent letter to the
editor in The East Carolinian stat-
the ECU campus. They compiled have the portions of project dis-
a long list of racist statements
tempted to convey an anti-racist
statement through theuseof three apathy towards racism, an apathy of the project would have under
plaster figures in the mid-term they feel is prevalent in the South stood the project's intent by read- ing that there is no racism on the
project for an art class. 'Teople and particularly at ECU. "The ing a six foot banner included in ECU campus, Higgins said "this
Both artists said the graffiti is only
one indication of racism on the
campus.
Using the list of racist state-
ments, Sylvestre and Higgins
wrote the graffiti on the two white
figures. Below the feet of the white
figures were 50 to 60 beer cans,
barbed wire and an abundance of
mantled at approximately 8 a.m.
Monday.
"It easily could be misunder-
stood as to its intent and could be
seen as conveying a message in
direct opposition to the artists'
intent Eakin said in the press
release adding, "This work, while
well-intentioned, was judged to
lack sensitivity (to the feelings of
all members of the community.)"
'Teddy White hearings were fair'
according to VC Ronald Speier
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Staff Writer
judicial file (which includes trial
transcripts and his own memory
of the incident) on the case when
Schatzman first began to speak
out. His review, conducted inde-
The controversial Honor
Board hearings involving Teddy
White were conducted fairly and pendently of Chancellor Eakin's swered that he did, Speier said.
ing his rights, Speier said. White's
third opportunity came when he
faced the full board and was asked
if he understood his rights, an-
other routine procedure. Whitean-
without prejudice according to a recently promised review, yielded
The charred remains of the social room on the sixth flooi �. .
Fire guts sixth floor social room
of Clement dormitory Saturday
By TIM HAMPTON
News Editor
Fire gutted a social room on
the sixth floor of Clement Dormi-
tory early Saturday morning. Af-
ter evacuating residents, firefight-
ers were called back onto the scene
to extinguish a second blaze dur-
ing the afternoon.
No one was seriously injured
in the fire, but an ECU campus
policeman was treated for smoke
inhalation at Pitt Memorial Hos-
pitial, according to Chief Johnny
Rose.
Investigators are searching for
a cause of the fire in the room
which houses a table, a couch and
several chairs but have had few
clues in the case as of Monday,
Rose said.
The first outbreak of fire
started at approximately 1:15 Sat-
urday morning. Campus Security from the second fire, Hane said
arrived at the location of the fire she left the scene of the fire. "I
before being joined by Greenville didn't want to see it anymore
Fire and Rescue Units. sneid: u ��. auu.
Residents of the dorm were � Although u�versity offals
evacuated until noon on Saturday ��� �"P�g TJTw
w iu� ;�i a . ,� wi� me for the victims of the blaze,
after the initial fire was extin- TT� �� ��� -
otwcKgrf Hane said she would rather live
But at approximately 2:30 a with Mfnd' . , . ,
second fire eVupted from the so- � �"�" FuluKm' director of
cialroom. F ECU housing, said there is no esb-
The second fire was sighted �te on lhe damage from the fire
by residents of the sixth floor as 'There is heavy smoke damage to
gathered clothes and other neces- the floor, Fulghumsaid
university official.
Dr. Ronald Speier, assistant
vice chancellor of student affairs,
on Thursday told past and pres-
ent members of the Honor Board
that recent allegations of impro-
priety in the board's handling of
e White case were unfounded.
White was found guilty last
pring of assaulting at least two
tudents in Garrett Hall and was
subsequently suspended for two
years. Several weeks ago the case
came back into the news when
Dennis Schatzman, executive di-
rector of the North Carolina
NAACP , made allegations that
the board had violated White's
rights.
Speier said he reviewed the
noevidenceofimpropriety,Speier
said.
According to Speier, White's
rights as an accused student, which
are found in the Student Govern-
ment Association Documents,
were reviewed with him on at least
'We have people sign that
they understand their rights. We
have a bookletJhat we go over,
and the first question that we ask
in the hearing is To you under-
stand your rights?'
"In addition I do think that
the judicial process worked ex-
three occasions. Speier said he first actlY as l described it to you
discussed these rights with White Speier said. Earlier in the meeting
when he met with White to ban
him from the dormitories after the
incident. Normally, when Speier
is not required to see a student
because of a housing or like viola-
tion, a student would not have
that third opportunity at discuss-
ing his or her rights, Speier said.
Later, White, like all students
who face the Honor Board, read
and signed a statement explain-
he had reacquainted the board
with the procedure followed be-
fore a case is heard. That proce-
dure, which is also spelled out in
the S.G.A. Documents, begins
when charges are generated by
police reports.
If the police feel a student is
an alleged or possible criminal,
they will read the student the
See SPEIER, page 3
sities. "We were walking back to
our room to get the remainder of
our things and we saw smoke
Elizabeth Hane, of 611 Clement,
said
Hane said the smoke damage
to her room is minimal. "Nothing
is really too damaged, but there is
soot all over the place she said.
The housing department will
Hane said she then grabbed workmg du"n�n?'
herbelongsfrom611,locatedthree vacation so residents of the smcke
doors from the social room, and �gf HLTSJttt
ran to tell the resident advisor of �e huto � th floor
the second fire. After evacuating ready for the residents after spring
b break Fulghum.
From gold medalist to philosopher
Kay Yow discusses
The smouldering conch which caught on fire causing the second fire in Clement dormitory.
the secrets of success
By DAVID HERRING
According to Kay Yow, head
coach of N.C. State's lady
Wolfpack basketball team and
Olympic gold medalist, her secret
ful without a good attitude Yow
noted. "Whafs inside determines
is youcan't lose if you hold all the coaching continued Yow, an
ACES, an acronym standing for ECU alumnus holding bachelors
attitude, committment, enthusi- and masters degrees in education
asm and services.
In an inspirational lecture,
"People think the only concern in �ve on to step two and remem-
basketball is winning, but every- ber your roots - where you came
thingaboutitisbroacrthanthat. from she �- J y�u , f a rKnn �,n . PirHirr twn
more appreciative of your accom- what a person can do. Picture two
plishment, and then you can reach balloons, when released one rises
out to others and help them to be to the ceiling and one sinks to the
successful. floor. The difference is whafs
"I'm in tune with who I am inside.
and where I came from and that
enables me to reach out to others
If s impossible to be success- beaten it. We can;t change the
direction of the wind she rea-
If basketball was as superficial as
winninp I wouldn't be in it.
"I'n an educator first and
foremost and accidentally got into
soned, "but we can adjust our-
selves
Commitment, according tc
others I have been able to do what
I've done
Yow described a project she
assigned to the women's Olympic
team, where each member was to
"When life kicks you, let it
kick you forward � it can if you
let it said Yow in reference to her
cancer. "I
entitied"StrivingtoExcel-Going r or youths than teaching, so,1 raramernaveu.u.yuu g�
for the Gold Yow drew upon "� g Jg�,gS j�L. YoWa first key � But becu�of that experience 1
her coaching expertise, insightful emotionally, Pg�wW �?.Ue success determines whether you serve as chairman of the Lin-
anecdotes, and her personal phi- tuaHy and spiritually. And it ex- Z asto- eberger Cancer Research Center,
losophy to demonstrate why she cited me. aHon or "reacf' neeativelv Ac- Chapel Hill, and so far we have
issoPsuyccessful,bothonandoff �? Stott.lSfSS raiseT $600,000 toward our $1
the court. TZStoVZSkZ noconttol over what happens in miffion dollar fund drive.
"You can shoot airbaUs (in "��� SffffilSS � our life, but we have 10C(percent "I have grown so much as a
life)butyoucancomebackand TuvZmu contiol over oiir attitude and how person through naming mis dia-
get another shot she began. � moments, but you must respond. eex, even though I cai?t say I've
Yow, is important and our society draw a picture of their personal
is losing it. "When we make a goals for the team According to
commitment to excellence we Yow, everyone on the team drew
must commit to a team � be it in the same picture: the ceremony at
a family or business � and we which they would receive the gold
must have the same goals and
understanding to pull in the same
direction for a common purpose
she said.
medal.
Her team was united in their
total committment to excellence.
"If you accept second place when
AccordingtoYow,noonecan first place is open, you'll have �
win alone, therefore each team tendency to do it the rest of your
must make sacrifices and work life. Don't put limits on yourself
together to maximize the poten- warned Yow. "We don't know
ual of each team member. "We what we can do, but I guarantee
drink from wells others have dug you it's above and beyond our
and warm ourselves from fires imagination
others have built she observed. Enthusiasm and industrious-
"ThisarHestome.It'sbecauseof See KAY, page 7





11 IE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1989
Five arrested on drug charges
Reports taken from ECU 4:05 Gregory Lynn Maine of
Campus Security logs. Military Topsail Beach arrested for tres-
passing.
20:45 Two students reported
refusing to leave Memorial Gym.
23:11 Jarvis resident issued
campuscitation fordamage to real
property by throwing snowballs
time is used.
Feb. 21
14:00
EdwinTaft Parker of 477 Jones
arrested for simple possession.
Mark Andrew Steffer of 415-
A Scott arrested for possession through two windows in Jarvis.
with intent to sell marijuana.
Robert Peter Boyer of 415-B Feb. 24
Scott arrested possession with 1:00 Six students were given
intent to manufacture marijuana, campus citations for various alco-
Mark Stephen Milantoni of hoi violation including possession
415-C Scott arrested tor conspir- and consumption in 152 Umstead.
acv with possession with intent to 1:35 Three students issued
sell and deliver cocaine. alcohol citations and after hours
11:18 Two windows reported
broken at 204-A Belk.
11:40 Aycock resident re-
ported a dorm mate assaulted him.
16:30 Jones resident reported
being struck by snowball while
driving on College Hill Drive.
16:40 Window broken at 309-
BBelk.
16:59 Two Belk residents seen
throwing snowballs at a police
vehicle.
21:10 Clement RAs report
odor of marijuana.
1:40 Two students and one
non-student banned fromcampus.
2:00 Clement resident issued
Stuart Franklvn Mintz of 401- visitation violations and for being a citation for being in violation of
A Scott arrested for conspiracy uncooperative in 126 Aycock.
with possession with intent to sell
and deliver cocaine.
15:50 Subject reported to be
threatening to kill people in the
Art building.
19:05 Bat reported hanging
from ceiling in Belk.
21:56 A run away child found
on College Hill Drive.
Crime Report
1:53 A pillow was reported to
be smoking in a dryer in the
Aycock basement.
2:10 Ten students issued alco-
hol citations.
2:35 Five students issued al-
cohol citations and visitation vio-
lations.
3:05 Visitation violation in
Clement.
10:00 Clement resident re-
Feb. 22
1:08 Michael Parathof 951 East
10th St. was arrested for larceny of
tire extinguisher and tampering
with tireextinguisherwest of Spill-
ma iv
3:0b Officer reported subjects
making loud noises.
8:10 Fleming resident trans-
ported to student health center ported hallmate missing
after passing out in the General
Classroom Building.
4:20 A student was issued
criminal summons for worthless
checks in the General Classroom
Building.
17:i5 Non student banned
from all resident halls after living
in 115-D Belk without authoriza-
tion.
20:05 Car trunk lid found
open.
20:55 Report of a student being
angrv in Memorial Gym.
' 22 40 ThadAlben Williamson
of 138 lones arrested for worthless
rhecks.
22 55 Patricia Sue Oakley of
315 C Belk arrested for worthless
checks.
visitation policy.
20:09 ECU Campus Security
assisted in apprending Gregory
M. Biven of 215-A Belk and Chris-
topher L. Yow of 215-B Belk after
they removed a 12 pack of beer
from the Freshway on 10th Street.
22:28 Slay resident issued ci-
tation for underage alcohol con-
sumption.
Feb. 25
00:05 Umstead resident re-
ported a breaking and entering of
his car with the removal of stereo,
speakers and two tapes.
00:25 Alcohol citation given
to Umstead resident.
1:08 Ptl. Austin responded to
a fire alarm at sixth floor of Clem-
ent. Greenville Fire and Rescue
Units called.
14:25 Resident Director of
Clement reported smoke coming
from roof of Clement.
18:17 Night Manager of Men-
denhall reported removal of a sign
from lobby area.
21:54 Night Manager of Men-
denhall reported the larceny of
cushions from the student center.
Feb. 26
1:00 Fleming resident made
obscene gesture toward officer.
1:40 Domestic dispute re-
ported in 217-C Belk.
1:45 Two students observed
unwinding a spool of phone sou th-
west of Erwin Building.
15:00 Umstead resident re-
ported unidentified subject ex-
posed himself to her on second
floor of Joyner Library.
15:50 Car hit and run south of
Joyner.
19:14 Jarvis resident reported
her roommate was upset over the
breakup with her boyfriend and
had discovered an unusual note
in notebook.
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Feb. 23
00:35 Unknown person bent
bicycle tire east of Mamie Jenkins
building.
00:50 Report of a man acting
suspicious in lobby and second
floor of Slay.
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PHONE:
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5P
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian
Publications Building
(across from Joyner Library)
757-6366
1989 - 1990
SGA SPRING ELECTIONS
for
.PRESIDEN1
.VICE-PRESIDENT
.TREASURER
.SECRETARY
(b Hours Completed)
REQUIREMENTS FOR NOMINATION;
I - full-lime Student
2- Hours Completed
3- Previously Enrolled at ECU for
Two Consecutive Semesters
4- In Good Standing
5- 2.0 GPA
filing begins Friday,
February 2mh thru Friday, March 3.
Deadline For Filing is Friday, March 3 ai 4.00 p.m.
SG,4 Office, Room 222
Mendenhail Student Center
Mandatory meeting of all candidates will
be held Tuesday, March 14 at 5.I5pm,
Room 242,
Mendenhall Student Center
V





i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28,1989 3
Storm causes extensive damage
By BRAD BANNISTER
Staff Writer
Although the snow of the past
weekend was heavy enough to
j cancel ECU classes and temporar-
ily close local schools and busi-
nesses, the overall damage of the
storm was not as extensive as that
of the icestorm of the weekend
before.
On the ECU campus, the main
effects of the snow storm were
several fallen tree limbs and
damage to certain university
streets, said EastCarolina grounds
superintendent Doug Caldwell.
"Moisture got under the as-
phalt and created potholes
Caldwell said, "but the icestorm
did more damage than the snow-
storm
The same was true at Green-
ville's telephone company.
According to Jackie Morris,
the phonecompany'sdistrict com-
mercial manager, there were "no
significant damages" due to the
snowstorm.
The ice storm, on the other
hand, caused approximately 400
customers to lose their service. But,
Morris said, repairs were com-
pleted over the weekend.
Roger Jones, director of elec-
tric systems at the Greenville Utili-
ties Commission, said that the
snowstorm was damaging be-
cause of the icestorm.
"We probably wouldn't have
had any trouble with the snow-
storm if it hadn't been for the ic-
estorm Jones said.
The snow brought down tree
limbs that had already been bro-
ken or weakened by the ice, snap-
ping power lines as they fell, Jones
said.
Jones estimated 'hat 5,000 to
6,000 customers out of 52,000 ex-
perienced at least one hour of
power loss and that 1,000 to 2,000
lost their power for more than 12
hours. Maximum power loss was
three to four days, Jones said.
In addition to the electric
company crew which worked 18
to 20 hour days during the storm,
the company received help from
four crews from Fayetteville, two
crews from Highpoint and two
hired tree-trimming crews, Jones
said.
Jones added that thecompany
hired additional workers to an-
swer the more than 3,000 calls the
electric company received during
the storm.
The Greenville cable televi-
sion company spent eight days re-
covering from the weather, said
cable company general manager
Tommy Edwards.
"There were 9,000 subscrib-
ers out at any given moment on
Friday and Saturday Edwards
said.
The storms cost the cable
company approximately $15,000
to $17,000 dollars in damaged
equipment, loss of service and
workers pay, Edwards said.
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Speech on arms talks to be held
StCLOUUrtL k
By DAVID HERRING
Assistant Newt Editor
Political Science Professor
Philip S. Gillette, of Old Domin-
ion University, will lecture tomor-
row at ECU on Soviet-American
arms negotiations.
Entitled "Arms Agreements:
Too Little Too Lfte, or Too Much
Too Soon?" the speech will be
given at 7:30 p.m. in room 1031 of
the General Classroom Building
and is open tree of charge to the
general public.
According to Dr. Mailffte M
Speier's
skeptical
Continued from page 1
Miranda warning, advising them
of their legal rights. Under normal
circumstances the report on a stu-
dent's case would then be re-
viewed by the attorney general,
the public defender and Speier to
decide what action should be taken
next.
In cases v lere action will be
�taken, the students are notified
through the mail that they must
appear in front of a preliminary
hearing. There they meet the
public defender. At this stage they
also are first familiarized with their
rights as a student and asked to
sign a copy of those rights after
reading them.
After a minimum of three
davs, the students will appear be-
fore the Honor Board. They are
allowed to bring an unlimited
number of material wimesses
(those familiar with the act) and a
limited number of character wit-
nesses. An unlimited number of
character witnesses may submit
signed statements.
At the board hearing, the
students are once again asked if
they understand their rights, if
they respond yes, the hearing con-
tinues. If not, the rights are ex-
plamed again.
Schatzman has said that
White was misled before the hear-
ing and was denied a chance to
have material witnesses on his
behalf. Speier said Monday that,
according to the transcripts, White
did have one material witness, a
signed statement by another and
the opportunity to present more
witnesses.
Allegations have also been
raised that John Bateman and other
Garrett Hall residents involved in
the fracas invited the fight with
White by shouting racial slurs from
their rooms.
None of the white students
involved have admitted to shout-
ing those slurs. Speier noted that,
Iaccording to the transcripts, White
and his witness said that racial
slurs were yelled, but they were
not able to identify the individual
instigators of the slurs.
Responding to the allega-
tions Schatzman has made in the
I incident, Speier said, "I have not
seen any accusation in the news-
papers or any letters from Mr.
Schatzman that I believe are true
Simon, coordinator of Interna-
tional Studies at ECU, "We're at a
critical stage in negotiations.
Under the Reagan administration
we signed the Intermediate-range
Nuclear Force (INF) Treaty. The
new Bush administration is study-
ing options before entering nego-
tiations of Strategic Arms Reduc-
tion Talks (START). Gillette's talk
will discuss domestic and inter-
national factors affecting possible
ouicojwes of future negotiations
The speech is part of ECU's
fifth annual Great Decisions se-
ries, sponsored this year by the
Office of International Studies.
Three other speeches will be given
in March and April focusing on
political change in the People's
Republic of China, the delicate
situation in the Persian Gulf, and
political conditions in the horn of
Africa.
For more information about
the Great Decisions series contact
Stephanie Evancho, Office of In-
temational Studies, at 757-6769.
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Stl?e Saat (Ear0limatt
MqPM iOMWHMHtV MW lfJ5
Pete Fernald, c��- ���
STEPHANIE FOLGOM, M�n ur
James F.J. McKee, cr�for�fu.�rhjmj
Tim Hampton, mm mm Brad Bannister, a tm
KRISTENHALBERGpoEAtor JEFFPARKER, s��ff m,
Chip Carter, ��-� tt Tom Furr, o�. m�
Susan How ell, �� m Debbie Stevens, cy
Dean Waters, c��m��,t Stephanie Emory,at� suvrvi
Stfphanie Singleton, a, tmio, Mac Clark, �.�� M��,er
February 28. 1 W
OPINION
Page 4
Animals
Mass destruction for our household needs
Veal calves are put into small
rrates at birth, so small that there's
rarelv anv room for the animal to
even turn around. They are fed an
iron-poor diet, remaining anemic
and on antibiotics all their lives in
order to produce the type of meat
their owners want.
Wildlife animals aren't taken
captive for merelv friendlv reasons
an vmore. They're used for testing of
all sorts � evervthing from new
vaccines to watching reactions to
hairsprav and make-up in their
eves.
Activists against cruelty to ani-
mals have complained for years
about the horrible abuse of animals.
Researchers and product testers
cause animals the pain they hope to
spare the individual human being
from.
Whether or not it's morally right
to use rabbits, monkeys, mice, etc.
for testing is a question receiving
strong arguments on both sides, but
even that isn' t the most urgent prob-
lem at hand.
What started out as experiments
to save human lives has turned into
mass destruction of wildlife crea-
tures. No sense can be found in
spraying household products in an
animal's eyes in order to see how-
much it takes before the animal goes
blind. Many fur curriers are also at
fault, since an approximated 50 per-
cent of the animals they catch in
traps are "trash animals" � those
which are caught by the indiscrimi-
nate traps but are not needed for
their fur.
Whether it's for materialistic
wants, food, product or medical
research, animals are often treated
unreasonably harsh for the outcome
of society's comfort.
An organization called SETA,
Students for the Ethical Treatment
of Amimals, has cropped up on
numerous college campuses. The
ECU chapter is holding its first
meeting tonight, just months after
UNC-Chapel Hill's SETA group
stirred up controversy on the
Chapel Hill campus in regards to
their medical school's holding facil-
ity.
There is a difference between
medical research and the mere tor-
turing of animals; since people are
higher up on the ladder of species
the lesser animal's pain somehow
seems unimportant to those looking
for every avenue of product testing,
whether all of the avenues are neces-
sary or not.
Organizations such as SETA are
a start for the college campuses
toward realizing the depth of cru-
elty that goes into manv of the every-
day products, cures, md food which
are taken for granted. Education and
returning hearing to the deaf ear
may turn toward such problems is
the key to a more humane society in
the future.
�'�
�?�
"llT ell
H�Lp Srtfp
AMIHAu
-
at -


'�
No alternative in the bat ordeal
To the editor:
In response to Ann Bellis letter in
last Thursday's editorial, I offer the
following:
Upon discovery of the first bat in
iry room, every step was taken by the
K.A. to remove it without harm. It
was clinging so tightly that it look us
half nn hour to get it off the ceiling.
Imagine the amount of time that
would have been involved had we
continued in that manner.
From that point on, Maintenance
took on the task of removing over a
thousand (not one-hundred) bats
from within the walls of our suite.
I'd also like to point out that the
so-called "poison" referred to was
merely roach and bee insecticide
used not to kill, but to drive the bats
out the outside holes.
I did appreciate the suggestion
of merely opening the windows to let
the bats fly out, but be real. Anyone
wi h a background in Biology should
realize that they were roosting in our
rooms due to the heat and would
have paid little attention to an open
window.
I would also like to add that the
whole ordeal was inconvenient, frus-
trating, and disgusting. I say "dis-
I gusting" not because I have an irra-
tional fear of turning into a vampire
but because there were hundreds of
animals crawling, flying, and defe-
cating all over my bed clothes and
floors.
If there had been five-hundred
winged bunny rabbits flapping
aro ind my room I would have felt
the .ante way.
hi closing I would like to put Ms.
Bel.is'soverwraught mind to rest. At
the sight of another bat in our suite,
she will be the first person I will
contact to get it out.
Kathy Niblock
Senior
Psychology
Three points
bySGA
To the editor:
I am writing in reference to
Thursday's editorial about the Stu-
dent Government Association.
While your points about a lack of
student participation in Student
Government may be true, I feel that
you neglected to mention the biggest
culprit for this lack of participation,
The East Carolinian. I would like to
point out three ways in which the
student newspaper has been lax this
year in regards to Student Govern-
ment. These are lack of publicity of
SG A events, lack of coverage of SGA
meetings, and the misguided as-
sumptions you have made in the last
paragraph of Thursday's editorial.
First of all, the lack of publicity of
SGA events this year has been inex-
cusable. How can students know
about elections for SGA offices un-
less your newspaper publicizes
these events? As the official student
newspaper for ECU, it is your rr
sponsibility to make sure this infor-
mation gets out to students. I believe
the newspaper has failed with this
responsibility.
The newspaper has also failed in
its responsibility to report on Stu-
dent Government meetings. Report-
ers from The East Carolinian have
been present at every meeting this
school year, yet articles on only a
little over half the meetings ap-
peared in the newspaper. Among
the issues your newspaper has failed
to cover include resolutions on cam-
pus lighting and financial aid re-
quirements for students. I do not
think that so many earthshaking
events happen at ECU that would
exclude an article about the Stud, i �
Government meetings once a wet
Before writing about the apat!
students in regards to Student Go
err.nent, look at your own newspa
per's apathy at reporting SGA met
ingb.
Finallv, vour assumptions thai
no-one in Student Government
any more qualified than student
currently serving on the legislate
needs to be examined. Student Go1
ernment representatives do not onh
spend their time with SGA from 5
p.m. on Mondays until appro
mately 6.15. All legislators are r
quired to serve on one of four stand
ing committees which met at least
once a week. In addition, legislat;
must have knowledge of parlianv
tary rules in order to be effectived
ing debate. Rnallv, many legislal
spend hours of research on topics
be discussed during the SGA n
ings. After hearing the amount
work needed to be an effective K .
lator, do you reallv believe that ai
one can immediately be an effe'
member of the legislature? I woi
hope not.
I hope that The East Carolmian
will remedy the problems on pub'
ity of SGA events, coverage of SC
meetings, and the attitudes the new
paper has towards the role of Studt I
Government legislators. I do not
lieve, however, that any impr
ment willbeseeninthesituatior
school year. After all, to parapru
your own editorial, all a student h. s t
to do is to read The East Carolii
any Tuesday or Thursdav, and it
soon become obvious that no
there is much more qualified to w
or edit the paper than anv other I
dent on campus.
Bob Land
SeniorHist
S
Spectrum Rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum" section of the paper,
The East Carolinian features "The Campus Spectrum
The columns are restricted only with regard to rules of
grammar and decency. Persons submitting columns must be
willing to accept byline credit for their efforts, as no entries
from ghost writers will be published.
Editor's Note:
Clay Deanhardt was not the author of
the letter to the editor on the satire
page last Thursday. We apologize for
any misunderstandings.
Schatzman takes us back to the classroom
Campus Spectrum
By
Dennis Schatzman
I want to thank The East Carolinian for the
extensive coverage it gave the state NAACP's in-
volvement in the Teddy WhiteJohn Bateman, et. al.
incident. The tone and slant of many of its articles,
editorials and (heh, heh) cartoons, however, make it
clear that the paper's management does not fully
understand the internal and external dynamics of
this whole issue. I suspect others do not understand
either.
Having been a professional journalist and jour-
nalism instructor for over 16 years, I trust that The
East Carolinian will honor professional courtesy
and allow me asmuch space as is possible to respond
to its (smile) attacks on me. Since this is a university,
I will, instead, take the opportunity to take the read-
ers back to the classroom. Today, I will teach a lesson
on, as David Stockman, President Reagan's former
budget director would say, "the way the world
works
As you know, I am a professional civil rights
administrator. Based on my experiences and train-
ing, I can state, without fear of debate to the contrary,
that racism, sexism, anti-semitism and many other
forms of discrimination, are on the rise. I am very-
clear on what my duties and responsibilities are.
Among those duties are to address major issues
concerning racism and civil rights in North Carolina.
Among the issues that concern Ihe NA ACP are
the rising number of racist acts occurring on our
sta te's high school and college campuses. The Teddy
WhiteJohn Bateman incident is just one of many
such incidents that have attracted our attention.
Based on recent events, one could make a rea-
sonable argument that asa civil rights administrator,
I am pretty good at what I do. That is no accident. I
take my responsibilties seriously and, therefore, try
to stay on top of the "game
Civil rights work often draws me into head-to-
head confrontation with the power elite. When that
happens, it's best for me that I prepare to go all four
quarters and into overtime, if necessary. Like every-
one else, I like to win. In civil rights work, the stakes
are often so high that it is imperative that I MUST
WIN!
When I prepare to negotiate with the power elite
(and ECU is an integral part of North Carolina's
power elite), I take as longas it takes to prepare; I lake
notes; I review documents; I talk to people on the
telephone and do whatever it takes to get ready for
what is in essence � war. Since war is what negotia-
tion is, you'd be smart to take whatever ammunition
into the battle that will give your team the edge.
The NAACP prides itself on understanding the
dynamics of the war on racism and civil rights.
When you find yourself in conflict, you should not
come in ill-prepared.
One of the essential requirements of preparation
is understanding the playing field and who the
players are. Do you have home field advantage, or
do they? Who's the quarterback and how good is his
arm? Can his blockers protect him well so he can stay
in the pocket or are there weaknesses on the line? If
there are, can the quarterback scramble? Can the
receivers hold onto the ball when hit? Are the run-
ning backs slashers Or are they power runners?
These are the things you must know as you prepare
your game plan.
ECU is a state-related university that impacts
greatly on over 20 counties in eastern North Caro-
lina. It survives and prospers on what every other
institution does � money. This money comes
largely from the General Assembly, grants it re-
ceives for research and consulting, gifts from alumni
and, lastly, student tuition. The chief executive off
cer at any university is the president and chancellor.
His function, first 2nd foremost, is to initiate and
maintain activities which directly relate to money.
Other matters, like student services, purchasing,
physical plant, curriculum, etc. are supervise! by
administrators and other "employees
These employees are expected to take care of
these matters so that the chancellor is free to interact
with the General Assembly, big business, grant
givers and influential alumni. Since early Septem-
ber, when Teddy White walked into our office in
Greensboro, the state NAACP has tried to resolve
the issue with some of the university's designated
employees. For various reasons, that technique has
not worked. Other strategies had to be employed. It
is as simple as that.
Therefore, we "pumped up the volume as you
young people say. When the volume got so noisy
that other people outside Greenville could hear it,
the chanrellor felt the need to step in. As a result,
there will now be a "re-evaluation" of the Teddy
WhiteJohn Fateman incident as questions continue
to swirl over how the tuation was handled by
certain employees and students with certain judicial
authority.
The East Carolinian, much to my amusement,
has questioned mv "tactics" used in bringing this
whole affair to its present juncture. Among other
things, the newspaper has accused me of "using" it
to achieve my evil ends. It is a fact that the newspa-
per, as well as the Greenville Daily Reflector, did
publish every story on this issue (including all prc-
NAACP stories) en the front page, "above the fold,
below the masthead the most coveted news expo-
sure of all. The story also led on all local television
and radio news broadcasts. So if I have used the
media, then I have done my job well. 1 came to ECU
to do my job. I make no apologies for the "tactics" I
used. My job is to be successful. In civil rights work,
success is either winning or keeping from losing.
Finally, 1 must not let the opportunity go by
without getting to the heart of the matter. Unfortu-
nately, many people, often subconsciously, have a
predisposed perception of black people and other
minorities. When someone like me comes along that
shatters that perception, many people can't handle
the anxiety that that often causes. For some, it's like
seeing some black student with a black BMW.
I hope I have used this space wisely to help
maintain an atmosphere conducive for learning and
the healthy exchange of ideas. 1 normally do not
respond to the media: its pretty easy to let them
respond to me.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28,1989 5
Residents protest oil drilling
MANTEO, N.C (AP) �
Exploratory drilling for natural gas
35 miles off the Outer Banks would
not endanger the environment,
federal officials say.
But many residents remained
unconvinced as they left a public
hearing Saturday on Mobil Oil's
plans to drill an exploratory well
near their picturesque islands.
"I don't like how you throw
around the term 'environmentally
safe said Ricky Sheppard of
Dare County. "When you refer to
drilling muds - muds that carry
heavy metals that eventually end
up in our fish - as environmentally
safe, that's an insult
More than 100 people, includ-
ing members of the N.C. Coastal
Council and the National
Audubon Society, drove across icy
roads to attend a three-hour pub-
lic hearing aimed at informing
local residents about the oil com-
pany's plans to explore for natu-
ral gas off the Outer Banks begin-
ning in 1990. Mobil Oil wants to
drill on a large geologic feature
known as the Norfolk Arch, about
35 miles east of Salvo. The site is
on the edge of the Continental
Shelf in about 3,100 feet of water.
Geologists think there may be
5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas
under the area, which would make
it one of the largest known gas
fields in the world. But before the
officials from the U.S. Department
of Interior could make their case,
the environmental organization
Greenpeace let them know the
project isn't wanted by some resi-
dents.
When the federal officials
arrived at the Manteo airport, a
replica of an oil rig spewed smoke
and droned the sounds of drilling.
Banners on the coal black rig read:
"Department of the Interior .
Hands Off the Outer Banks" and
"Save the Sea A pickup truck,
carrying the rig, followed the fed-
eral officials to a public meeting at
Manteo High School.
"The point we're trying to
make is that wherever you go,
this (pollution) follows said
Dorrie Smith of Greenpeace. The
group drove home its point by
amolifying the incessant sounds
of a drill hitting rock, nearlv
drowning out the voices of the
officials from the Interior Depart-
ment's Mineral Management Serv-
ices during a news conference at
the school.
The agency is responsible for
leasing and overseeing the devel-
opment of offshore oil and gas
reserves. Some Outer Banks resi-
dents oppose the project because
they fear it will pollute their wa-
ters and spur industrial growth
on the narrow string of islands off
the N.C. coast.
"Is there anything we can do
or say as citizens to present facts
or comments that would weigh in
future considerations and affect
the final decision on allowing this
drilling?" Virginia Valpey asked
the federal panel. "My perception
now is that your minds are made
up
The officials denied that. But
Bruce Weetman, Atlanta regional
director of the mineral services
agency, said that telling him "I
don't like this" isn't reason enough
to block the drilling.
"It is prudent national policy
to seek out and develop new
sources of energy on the Outer
Continental Shelf Weetman said.
Thirty-two exploratory wells
similar to the one proposed by
Mobil have been safely drilled
along the Atlantic seaboard,
Weetman said.
"The present facts show that,
historically, exploratory well drill-
ing is extremely safe Weetman
said. "If you have information
that is contrary, then present it to
us
Agency officials said that they
expect Mobil Oil to present its plan'
this spring to set up a drill 40 miles
off the coast. Gov. Jim Martin will
have 20 days to review the pro-
posal.
The panel of five men reas-
sured the crowd several times that
the exploratory project would be
environmentally safe. The officials
also said there is no need for the
more detailed environmental
impact study that local, state and
national opponents have de-
manded.
Mobil has paid the federal
government nearly $200 million
for drilling rights off the Outer
Banks. Between 1954 and 1984,
the government has gotten a total
of $84 billion for offshore leases.
Make Up To $1000 in One Week
Student Organizations, Frats, Sororities
needed for 1 week Marketing project
right on campus.
Must be Organized and Motivated
Call
1-800-950-8472
(Ext. 120)
Loyola disallows gay speaker
(CPS) � Students at Loyola
University of New Orleans will
not be able to hear a program about
gay men put on by a well-known
professor because the Catholic
Church, which runs Loyola, con-
demns homosexuality.
And any speakers who visit
E. Martin Duberman, a widely "Homosexuality is against
published author of scholarly Catholic doctrine Potts ex-
books and articles � to speak on lained �We need both sides of
campus about gay issues. an issie ,ike that for a balanced
Wang, however, said he prcsentaaon
couldn't extend an invitation for � �Wnen we present a contro-
Duberman to speak because stu- versial subject, it is my duty to
Ana any speaKers wnu visn dcnt government policy dictates inform other groups (who might
the campus in the future to talk speakers who oppose church disagrec) like the Jesuits said
about the subject will be preceded teachings must be balanced by faculty advisor Hepler. "I would
or succeeded by someone offering spakers who support Catholic notif them M lhcy can prcscnt
opposing view student doctrine, eithera debate format or
in a separate presentation
an
government faculty advisor
Robert Hepler has ruled.
The controversy arose when a
university employee asked stu-
dent President Will Wang to in-
vite someone � it turned out to be
Citv University of New York Prof.
"We're not against having a
speaker on this topic said Colin
Potts, vice president of the Loyola
Union. "But we need lead time,
we need to see who fits within our
budget. Speakers are selected a
semester in advance
their side and leave it at that.
A year ago, the student gov-
ernment presented a program on
pornography as a debate before a
standing-room-only crowd, Potts
said.
"While we hadn't planned on
this kind of presentation (on
homosexuality), it's not an idea to
be turned away. But the request
has to be make through the (Ideas
and Issues) committee head said
Potts.
Any other campus group can
bring a speaker to the school, Potts
said, but the student government
arranges most of the arts, film and
music presentations on campus.
The Loyola Union has re-
ceived no letters or calls criticiz-
ing its actions, said Potts. "There
have been some letters in the
(student) paper in favor of the
policy. It's not that big deal on
campus. No one's mad
5
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS-
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts for February rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS-
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnisheti
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles. Apartments and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
; m o iiyki. tfU k'tfo lliW
,m; rr�
�J�ft11
FirrdOufWnirt
Is All About
Boost Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the
Health of University Students
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1
6 P.M.
GENERAL CLASSROOM BUILDING
Room 2018
Organizational Meeting
if you can't attend but want more information,
Call 757-6793
Office of Substance Abuse Prevention and Educaiton
mii:
ton
Remember Your Orientation Experience?
Join
Preview
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
West Area Residence Council
is having a
Talent Show
March 20, 1989
7:00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
All those interested in participating should pick
up an application at Mendenhall Student Center
Information desk
or Call Mike at
752-9756
All applications should be turned into
701 Fletcher Dorm by March 1.
Tickets on sale at door.
For more information call
752-9069
Become an
Orientation Assistant
and create a
memorable experience
for the
New Freshmen.
Pick up Application Packet:
209 Whichard
Deadline for completed Applications:
March 3 at 4:00 p.m.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28. W
Classifieds
FOR RENT
APARTMENT I OR RENT: Two blocks
'rom campus. (One bedroom available
until July). Fully furnished, walking dis-
tance to campus and downtown, hard-
wood floors, friendly neighbors. SI50
month plus utilities 757 0412.
EMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non
smoker to share 2 bedroom townhouse, 1
1 2 baths. No deposit necessary Located
in Williamsburg Manor Call imena be-
tween 7 am5 p.m at 551 21 or after G
p.m. & during weekends at 756-7797.
APARTMENT FOR RENT March 1st
Georgetown Apartments Two bedroom,
12 baths. Walking distance to campus
f id downtown. Free cable. 830-1758
l eave message
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED starting in May. Three bednn.
. t at Eastbook SI 21.00 a month 13
i tilities. New Carpet and New refigera-
t -r. ECU Bus Sen .ice! Call now. 758-4924.
bEVEULY MANOR APARTMENTS:
Now leasing sp. cious 2 bedroom units
with large living room and dining area
New carpet, new wallpaper in kitchen
j;id bath. Range and refrigerator pro-
vided. Central heatair, coldhot water
and basic cable TV. included in rent as
low as $340.00 per month Call 746-SOvi
evenings for appointment
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apartment in
W lson Acres starting May 15-Aug 15.
Option to take over lease for fall Call
Marta at 752-6022.
TOR SALE
LSER PRINTER L'SERS HP and
Apple laser printer oner cartridges can be
reeded! Huge SS savings. Satisfaction
guaranteed. For details call R ANDMONT
at 1-800-332-3658.
COUCH FOR SALE: Battan wood with
pastel cushions. Good condition Price
negotiable. Call 752 6443
FOR SALS: 1979 Mazda. 4 speed, AC.
81,0(X) nines. Asking $900.00. Call 752-
65V
FOR SALE: Ringgold Towers Runil 306
fullv furnished. Takeover mortgage pay-
ments Call 407-77S-8030 in the evenings.
FOR SALE: Used sofa Average condi-
tion. Call 752-6554.
FOR SALE: Smith-Corona 2200 electric
� - portable, cartridge ribbon and corrector
type, typewriter with carrying case Like
�f' new, used only two years. $195.00. Call
756-9486 after 6 pm
SKI KEYSTONE: 2 roundtrip tickets
available from RDU to Denver, Co. De-
part March 7th return March 10th, 1989
Call loan at 756-9053 for details
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: 24
Wildwood Villas 3 bedrooms, 2 12
baths. Great for college students. For more
information call left Aldndge756 3500 or
355-6700.
LONG WEEKEND IN DC! 2 long trip air
tickets Greenville to D.C Thurs March
9 return Tues March 14 only SI7' each
Call lim (703) 875 19Ht at woik or Debo
rah (703) 979-3000or leave a message (301)
341-1559 �home
FOR SAI F: Gs top table with 4 chairs
$80.00, small table with 2 .hairs $50.00
double bed with mattress and springs
$75.00, green rediner $5000, new living
r.v.ni suit, take over payments of S46 00
month. Call 746-3513
MOVING BACK TO NFW ERSE
MUST SELL: All of my salt water fish
andinvertabrales Call SMI U34 after 7:00
p.m. or leave nitsage.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: it you are having a party and
need a D ! tor the best music available tor
parties Dance, Top 40, & Beach Call 355
2781 and ask for Morgan
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SFRVTCES: We otfer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed tvping on
paper up to 20 hand written pages We
repair computers and punters also ! ow-
es! hourly rate in vn. SDF Professional
Computer Services. 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752
3694.
NEED A PL: Hire the ELBO HI Call
oarh and book for your loin ll or party.
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes
sage
SOUND MIXTURES DJ SERVICE:
Music tor al' occassJo.is March dates
available call Bob at 72 49ir- Th' most
musit variety with the best sound qualitv
HI WANTED
$10.000-S105,(XX)yr Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
BUODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR MEN:
Are now accepting applications tor Cus-
tomer Service Representatives and also
Sales positions for the Spring semester.
Sincere individuals with flexible srhed-
ules should apply at: Brodv's, Carolina
East Mall, M W, 2 4 p.m.
HELP WANTED: Summer job, June-
August, at Emerald Isle. Mechanically
inclined individuals to operate jet ski
rentals ("all 523 4798 in Kinston day or
night
NEW FNG1 AND BROTHER'SISTER
CAMPS: (Mass) Mali kee Nac for Boys
Danbee for Girls Counselor positions for
Program Specialists: All team s; orts, es-
pecially baseball, basketball, field hockey,
s.� i a and vollev. I ill; 2 tennis openings.
also archery, riflery and biking; other
openings include performing Arts, Fine
Arts, veailHHik, photcgTaphv, cooking,
sewing, rollrsV.iting. rocketrv. ropes,
camp craft; all waterfront activities
(swimming, skiing, sailing, windsurfing,
canoeingkavak) Inquire & D Campir :j
(Boys) 190 Linden Ave Glen Ridge, NJ
07028; Action Camping (Girls) 263 Main
Road Montville. N 07045. Phone (Bovs
201 429 822, 'Girls) 201-316 6660
A II EN I ION�HIRING! Government
obs�your area Manv immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. S17,84(
S69.485 Call 1-602 838 8885 Ext B 5285
SOCCER CO ACTS NEEDED. Starting
March 6th. Montiv -Thursday after 2:30
p.m Pay star; at S00hour Call Pitt
County Community Schools. 830 4240.
NATIONAL MARKETING FIRM
SEFKS: Ambitious, mature student to
manage on campus promotions for top
national companies this schiol year Flex-
ible h. .ir- with earnings potential .o
�2,5O0 Call Ltsanneor Rebecca at ! 800-
592 2121
FOREIGN STUDENTS: ob-Hunting
Guide (Rev 1989). Send 519.95 tor the
step bv-step guide IvvSoft International,
PO Box 241090. Memphis, TN 38124.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR-
Ltterested in those with human service
background w ishing to gai valuable
experience in the field No monetary
compensation however room, utilities
and phone provided Mary Smith REA1
Crisis Center 758 1II 1 P
OVERSFAS IOBS: Also Cruiseships.
PERSONALS
THE SNOWBALL FIGHT: Was great es-
pecif'ly when thrown at room 321 Great
TKE Formal. �The Boys.
IT'S COMING: TKE Ring Girl March 14,
8 p.m at the Attic. For more info, call 757-
3507.
TO STAN THE MAN Congratulations
on winning the Prestigeous No Morals
Award. �Explain that one. �The Boys
FE FE GOT NOT HAIR: Bnnkly got it
broke, on Laney things got broke, but we
all got stoked & stroked �"Rippin' once
again TKE Formal 1989.
CONGRATULATIONS: To the 1989 1FC
Executive Board. President�Ray Mad-
den, Executive Vice President�Clayton
Williams, Administrative Vice Presi-
dent�Tripp Roakes, Treasurer�Russell
Lowe, Secretary� Cabell I awton
THANKS: To everyone that has helped
me to plan Greek Week. It's going to be the
best one yet. �Tripp
CREEK WEEK IS COMING: Funky
Nassau, Baby Buggy, Field Day, Mexican
Stand Off, Tuf-of-War, Bed & Tricycle
Races, volleyball, raft race & can man
contest Apnl 9-16.
GREEK WEEK: Is only 40 days a way-
Get psyched. April 9-16.
BELATED CONGRATS: To the new In
terfraternity Council Exec, for 1989: Pres
Ray Madden; Exec. VP Clayton Williams;
Admin. VP Tripp Roakes; Treas. Russell
Lowe; Sec. Cabell Lawton.
FRATERNITY PRESIDENTS: Greek,
Week Comm.�Wed. at 4 p.m "Presi-
dents Meeting" at 5 p.m. (Substation).
PIKA: Thanks again for another great big
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
I HI PI KAPPS PRESEN1 I I TTI F SIS-
TER RUSH: Monday and Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 27th and 28th, H-11 ;m at the
house it you die interested ta .is, we are
interested in you! The Pi kappa Phi or
gar.iation looks forward to seeing you
there'
WILLIAM WD IIMBO: 3 more days
until Daytona! he amival Hotel will
nevei forget us' Get ready to paaarty! -
Nickster.
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Ci!) for appointment Mon thru Sat. low
Coal Termination to ?n an - ks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
thirst quencher. Looking forward to an-
other social with you guys. �Love, The
Alpha Phi's.
ANDI CALLOWAY: Congratulations'
We know you are going to be an outstand-
ing president. Good luck on your new
office. �Love, Alpha Phi.
ALPHA PHI: We want to congratulate
our new officers Good luck in the upcom-
ing year. We love you & support you all
the way. �Love, Your Sisters.
PI KAPPS: Founder's Day has come and
past. All the Pi Kapps had a blast First
came the dinner, and then the ball Who
was thr't girl roaming around the hall? The
cordon bleu was simply divine And 18 J
Proof started rocking at nine When ai
was over and finished, when all was s.ud
and done, Pi Kapps had rocked the
Ramada and proved who was number
one!
CHI-O EXEC: Thanks for all your love
and support. You're doing great! Love,
Bitsy.
PRINCE CHARMING: Thanks for mak
ing my life so wonderful! Love, EJ.
GREEKS: Wanna get banged?? � 1 mean
gonged � It's time once again for the Sig
Ep Gong Show, so polish up vour acts and
stay tuned for more details.
SIG EP TERRORIST: Z, you little menac-
ing camel-rider, your actions will invoke
the full WTath of the men from the Palace
of Power. Front 1 louse � Beware of repn
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
RING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER 89. EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS FOR
INFO. CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH
AT 752-2865
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
. � � � n "� "
fast cents
to FAST T!M�S
ACCU �
E5COPY
Tnl HfSUVl PtOPLl
758-2400
sals
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Congratulations
on our fantastic Sweetheart Formal The
weekend proved to be a blast as alwav s
CLAY: Congratula.ions on Harvard' !
knw von could do it Love ya, Susan
KaPPA SIGMA: C ingratu'itions
your victory at Win, Lose or Draw' Also -
in response to your re-iueM to come to din
ner at our house� Sine' You're all invited
to come over for oar famous Spagctti
Dinner on March 28. Love, Delta Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE MY
DEITA ZETA SISTERS: Darla Browr
Rene'e Cundiff, Tracy Ford, Lon Gfl
Kelli Green, Kathy Hornbv, Kellev Kane
Suzanne Keen, Catherine Kbit, Heather
Laird, Mary Ellen l.anham, Tamrm
Pnesler, Melissa Pnida Nicole Smith
Shelly Sotir, Kas Spiegland. MkhcJe Tat.
Susan Weast, Kellv VVelh and Dav
Wooten.
KELLEY: Having you as mv hi' si- .
really helped to make this year great
You're the best' Love, Melinda
SUZANNE KEEN: You've worked s.
hard to be the best � and you did it' I lo �
you! An
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 2783-1
(Downtown Mail)758-3025
ATTENTION!
PANHELLENIC
COUNCIL

ANNOUNCES:
FALL
SORORITY
RUSH :
WILL BE HELD
BEFORE
CLASSES.
Announcements
CHFISTI AN FELLOWSHIP
(Thristiar Fellowship will be held every
Thurs at 6 p.m. in the Culture Ce iter.
LQST2
Something missing in vour life7 We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Je.ikinr Art Auditorium EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that vou find hard to overcome, join
us tor the uncompromised woid ot God
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
TRAVEL COMMITTEF
Hey you guys! Come join the fun on the
Student Union Travel Committee's cruise
to the BAHAMAS over Spring Break
There will be dancing, swimming, relax-
ing and tons of other things to do aboard
ship. All transportation and "all you can
eat" on the Carnival ship The ship will
dock at Freeport and Nassau, so come on
and shop until you drop in the world's
biggest marketplace!
CCF
CCF would like to invite you to c ur bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Ra wl 130
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or fui ther info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a m. to
5 pm and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business d?sses.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
ECU NAVIGATORS
"night 730 the weekly get together of
the Navigators, continues its strcik ot
good Bible study eve y Thur 7:30 9 in
Biologv 103. The non stop, no frills meet-
ing is designed to help von develop a
closer .valk with God In-flight refresh
ments served. No ticket required; just
reserve your time.
ANIMAL RIGHTS
ECU students for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals (SETA) will hold its introductory
mwtingonFebinGClOWOO.Alo
minute video on primates used in imn.u
nolegical studies will be shown All stu-
dents desirous of a more equitable world
for animals should attend.
19S8 BUCCANEERS
198S Buccaneers will be given away on a
first come, first-serve basis starting Feb
27 at 5 p m They wil' be given awav from
the Buccaneer office or.ly. There's only a
limited supplv and no more can be or
dered. So come early to receive your copy.
ATTNL ARISTJJD ENTS
The Parents Da Weekend Committee
needs a logo for 89. Any media or ap
proach is accepted (except usage of the
Pirate Mascot). Please turn in entries with
3x5 card stating name, address & phone
to 209 Whichard bv 5 p.m. on March 15.
The winning entry will be awarded a $25
cash prize Don't delay, enter toda For
more info , contact Tonya Batiy (w)757-
6611 ext. 210 or Ti) 830-8tS8
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication m the April
issue Articlescan be left at the office orthe
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library. The first issue for Spring semes-
ter is expected to arrive in a few weeks.
TENNIS DOUBLES
Swinging singles prepare for the Intramu-
ral tennis double competition registration
meeting to be held March 14 at 6:00 p.m. in
BIO 103
PRESEASON SOFTBALL
ft pre season softball tournament spon-
sored bv CO Tankaid Co. (Miih i Lite)
will hold its registration March 14 at 5:00
pm in BIO 103 T-shirts, trophies and
more will b awarded to participants
Don't miss the big event!
SWIM MliET
Diown vour sorrows by signing up for
this years intramural swim meet. This will
be the onlv swim meet until 1990! Don't
miss registration meeting March 15 at 5:00
p.m. in GCB 1026. Your spring tan should
look great'
SOFTBALL
Batter up! Intramural softball registration
meeting will be held March 4 at 500p.m.
in BIO 103 All men's and women's teams
must send a representative.
ACCOUNTINGOCJ ETY
The next Accounting Society bus. meeting
will be held on Feb. 27 at 3:00 in GCB 1032.
Wachovia's Regional Internal Auditor
will be the guest speaker. Professional
dress is recommended.
FAMILY CHILD ASSOC.
Family Child Assoc. will be having a
meeting today at 6:00 p.m. in room 143,
1 lome re. Bldg The guest speaker will be
Nancy Scavo who is an Earlv Intervention
Specialist with United Cerebal Palsy. All
new members or friends are welcome.
BCST HQNQR SOCIETY
BCST I lonor Sic will meet this Wed. at
5:30 in room 234 Old Joyner. Members
will be given shooting assignments and
deadlines for the show Please attend
LIBS 1000
2nd block classes begin Feb. 28th for T, Th.
Begin March 1 for M, W.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Jim Westmoreland from Career Planning
St Placement at ECU will be speaking
about career opportunities and advance-
ment Feb 28 at .5:00 p.m in room 1013
GCB Anyone who is interested may at-
tend. All new members are welcome. PBL
is the collegiate equivalent to FBLA.
NOW MEETING
The Greenville chapter of the National
Org. for Women will hold its monthly
meeting March 1 at 7 p.m. in room 305
Joyner Library. The program will consist
of videotapes and other presentations for
Women's History Month. For more info
call 756-1018.
HELP FIGHT CANCER
A 24-hour Run Against Cancer will be
sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed
National Fraternity, and the American
Cancer Society on April 14th & 15th at the
ECU track. Contestants are not required
to jog or walk the entire 24 hours, but
instead will be taking rums with nine
other team members for 1 2 hour periods.
Find cut about entering a team or donat-
ing moneymaterials. For more info call
Rose Richards (752-2574) of the American
Cancer Soc Bryan Haskins (756-9665) of
Alpha Phi Omega or David Overton (830-
6785) of Alpha Phi Omega.
REGISTRATION FOR GC
General College students should contact
their advisers the week of March 20-24 to
make arrangements for academic advis-
ing for summer terms and fall semester,
1989. Early registration will begin March
27 and end March 31.
CO-OP ED.
Representatives of the Walt Disney World
Co. will be on campus to recruit EC stu-
dents for their College Program. A re-
quired seminarpresentation will be con-
ducted on March 15. Students from all ma-
jors are invited to participate. Positions in
guest relations, attractions, merchandis-
ing, and food services, among others, are
available. Contact the Office of Co op. Ed.
in the GCB for details.
BE A MARSHAL
Any student interested in serving as a
University Marshal for the 1989-90School
Year may apply in room 214, Whichard
Bldg. To be eligible a student must have a
3 0 academic average. Deadline for appli-
cations is March 14.
LCU SKI CLUB
ECU Ski Club will be holding its weekly
meetings on Tuesday's at 9.30 p.m. in
room 212 MSC. For info, call Tommy
Lewis at 830-C137.
FACULTY CLOSING
Informal Recreation facilities will close on
March 3 at 2.00 p.m. and remain closed
through March 12. Regular hours will
resume March 13. This includes all weight
rooms, gymnasium and swimming pool
areas.
GRE
PLEASE NOTE that the April 8 admini-
stration of the Grduate Recoid Examina-
tion will be the last time the General and
Subjects examinations will be given until
October. The General portion only will be
give at the June 3 administration.
BACCHUS
BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol Consciousness
Concerning the Health of University Stu-
dents) is back! BACC11US is a peer group
whos members are concerned with the
promotion of responsible decisions about
drinking. We will meet each Wed. at 6
p.m. in 2018 GCB. Our 1st official meeting
will be March 1st and the next meeting
will be March i5. Call 757-6793 for more
info.
SUPPORT GROUP
There will be a support group for adult
children of alcoholics starting Feb. 28 at
4:15 p.m. in rm 312 tCounseling Center
Library, Wright Annex) Plans are to meet
every Tues. at that time and location (ex-
cept Spring Break) through April 17 For
more info call David Susina 757-6973 or
Rev. Dan Earnhardt 758-2030
WOMEN'S STUDIES
The new student org The Women's Stud-
ies Alliance, will meet Feb 28 from 5 �
p.m in GCB 1027 All feminist students
and faculty are welcome to attend For
further info , call 757-6268
PSE
All families and friends of children with
special .leeds and interested professienal-
are invited to the annual meeting ot I'jr
ents Supporting Parents (PSP) It will b.
held March 2nd at 730 p m in room 110
the Belk Bldg. Dr. Mike Sharpe of the
Family Support Network is the featured
speake and will be addressing the impor
tance c parent support groups in N C
Also to be introduced will be PSPs 1989
90 new officers and the plans for proviu
ing edu rational programs for parents ar. I
professionals Refreshments will b
served Free babysitting services will S
offered during the meeting for those w h
call Sandv Steele at 757-6921 or 355-311 �
by Feb. 28.
PSICHI
Psi Chi will have a short business meetin c
onM.irch 1 at 4.00 in Psi Chi librarv (Rav.i
302) All members are urged to attend
MINORITY STUDENT OR-
GANIZATION
Sections for the office ot President Yi
President, Trea urer and Secretary will be-
held March 6 at 5 p.m Speight 129 Allpo
tential candidates should plan to attend
For mi re information regarding prop, r
procedure for presentation, please contact
Sheila Gardner at 758-3713
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIA?.
EELLQWSHIi!
New location is Biologv 103 Wed eve
nings at 7 pm. Come out and make some
new friends. New topics and new ideas lo
be discussed. Habakkuk is coming in
March.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
Read the Ea5t Carolinian
CajJjU d&






N
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28.1999 7
Ayatollah Khomeini wants to broaden ties
with Soviet Union to battle 'devilish' West
NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) �
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini told
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze during an unusual
QO-minute meeting that he wants
strong ties with Moscow to help
fight the "devilish" West.
Also Sunday, Iranian legisla-
tors put forward a bill calling for a
vote on whether to break ties with
Britain, theofficial Islamic Repub-
lic News Agency reported. Last
week, Britain pulled its diplomats
out of Tehran to protest
Khomeini's death decree for Brit-
ish author Salman Rushdie.
After the audience with
Khomeini, Shevardnadze met
Prime Minister Hussein Musavi
and delivered an invitation for him
to visit Moscow, according to
1RNA. It said Shevardnadze did
not ask Khomeini to withdraw his
order for Moslem zealots to assas-
sinate Rushdie, whose novel "The
Satanic Verses" is considered blas-
phemous by many Moslems.
Britain reportedly had asked
Shevardnadze to press Khomeini
to give Rushdie a reprieve, but
IRNA said, "There was no men-
tion of the (Rushdie) affair in
Shevardnadze, the highest rank-
ing Soviet official to visit Iran since
the 1979 Islamic revolution, met
Khomeini two days after the Ira-
nian spiritual leader declared that
Iran does not need relations with
the West.
He has been widely con-
demned in the West for issuing
the death decree. Khomeini has in
the past criticized Moscow for its
officially atheist ideology, but
Iranian officials have recently
noted that the Soviet Union's 50
million Moslems are being al-
lowed greater religious freedoms
under President Mikhail S. Gor-
bachev.
Iran's Cabinet declared Sun-
day it is united behind Khomeini,
Tehran Television reported. "Your
childrenareunitedasasinglehand
against the enemies of Islam it
quoted Cabinet statement as say-
ing in a dispatch monitored in Ni-
cosia.
The declaration appeared to
be a signal that government lead-
ers want it made clear that, though
they may differ strongly on many
policy mati they are solidly
behind Khomeini in the Rushdie
a Moslem family in India, has been
in hiding since Khomeini issued
his execution order on Feb. 14.
The English-language Tehran
Times said Sunday that hostile
relations with the West stemming
from the Rushdie novel opened
"all doors" to improving ties with
Moscow. It said the two main irri-
tants to better relations with
Moscow - the Soviet supply of
arms to Iran's enemy in the eight-
year Iran-Iraq war and the Soviet
military presence in Afghanistan -
were now gone.
IRNA said it was believed to
be the first private meeting be-
tween Iran's 88-vear-old revolu-
tionary patriarch and a foreign
minister. Tehran Television
showed Khomeini, wearing a
skullcap and robes with a blanket
over his knees, talking o Shevard-
nadze.
IntramuraC-ecreationaC Services
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Shevardnadze's speech affair. Rushdie, who wasbom into
Applications from high school
seniors to top colleges is down
(CFS) � The number of high
school seniors applying to top
colleges around the nation is down
for the first time in years, most
likely because of a swindling
number of high school graduates
and increasing college costs,
admissions officers say.
"Since this is happening to
everyone, the best guess is that it's
demographics said Michael
Behnke, admissionsdirector of the
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology, where applications are
down 10 percent from a year ago.
But some suspect that stu-
dents and their families may be
reacting to tuition increases that
have consistently exceeded the
nation's inflation rate throughout
the 1960s. V�swWW? 5
"I think there's a great possib-
Htv that tuitions are a part of it
said Linda Davis Taylor, admis-
sions director of Amherst College,
whre applications are off by 4
percent from last year.
"I question whether price is
real issue argued David
Merko witz of the American Coun-
cil on Education. "It hasn't affected
them before
The number of high school
seniors has dropped steadily from
3 million in 1980 to 2.76 million in
1988, and is expected to drop to
2.44 million by 1992.
An unexpected increase in the
ranks of older students and higher
percentages of high school stu-
dents attending college helped
offset an expected drop in college
enrollment, however. To the sur-
prise of many, college enrollments
grew from 12.1 million in 1980 to
12.5 million this year.
Some college officials believe
the drop in applications from next
fall's freshman class is the first
sign the long-expected decline in
enrollment is about to begin.
Harvard University spokes-
man Peter Costa extimates a 5 to
10 percent drop in applications,
the first such decline in at least 20
years. Brown University and other
Ivy League schools report similar
declines.
Stanford University's fall
applications have decreased 6
percent, and the number of appli-
cations sent to the University of
California-Berkeley also has fallen.
"I consider this a yellow light.
We all kind of anticipated it said
Bradley Quin, admissions direc-
tor at Lafayette College in Penn-
sylvania, where applications are
down 5 percent. "I don't mean to
imply that we're not concerned.
This is a competitive business, and
it's going to make it that much;
harder to increase the quality of
our classes
Kay
Continued from page 1
ness are the cornerstones of suc-
cess, stated Yow. She referred to a
conversation with John Wooden,
ex-head coach of UCLA, in which
she queried, "Isn't it true if you
want to be successful, you must be
willingtopay the price?" To which
he replied, "No. Kay, if you want
to be successful you must 'be
eager' to pay the price
Yow continued, "Every team
in the ACC wants to win the ACC
tournament, but I want my team
to have a burning desire to win the
tournament
"A lot of people don't like to
be led, but if you can see leading
as serving others � then that is
the key to success said Yow in
herclosingremarks, tyingtogether
the four ACES one needs to be-
come a winner. "There is no T in
the word 'team' or 'togetherness
Teamwork takes sacrifices, suc-
cess has a price
R0TISSERIE CHICKEN
' RIBS � CRABS � B �'
SALADS � SANDWICHES
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS m specials
$� CC INCLUDE
ALL SPECIALS �� g CHOICE OF
n��JJvL
12RrtisserieChic5-25 orcjspuds
Rotisserie Chic Sand$425
Adventure Through Different Countries
With Our Selection Of 38 Beers 22 Wines
ASK ABOUT OUR BEER CLUBJ
CI's Has Your Winter Getaway
800 Sq. Ft. Inclosed Heated
D1CK
Call Us For Your
To-Go Food
355-3473
MONTHURS. 11-10:30 103 ERONVILIE BLVD.
FRI SAT 11-11 IN FRONT OF
FRI5AT. 11-11 FVEREADY PLANT
SUNDAY 1-10 THfe fcVttm"
msv
Try our daily drop-in specials at $1 students & $2 faculty, staff.
Howtoget
tough college with
money to spare:
Z3B
1. Buy a Macintosh.
� fTry1
2. Add a peripheral.
� V I.H
500s vOOi
3. Get a nice, k check.
Urn throw-h March � when mihuv selected Macintosh, or Macintosh II computers, you'll et
Ask tor details today where computers are sold on campus.
Apple Pays Half
E.C.U. Student Stores
757-6731
umirMiflimsamOmJtufisqfte AfpkRmlW mtmmfmmymmmmmtm pi ��-





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
1EBRUARY 28, 1989 PAGE 8
Jeff and Fresh Prince to play
By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Stiff Writer
Dj jazzy Jeff & The Fresh
Prince, with special guest Rob
Base, will perform Wednesday at
the Goettage Memorial Field
House on the Camp Lcjeune
Marine Corps Base.
The concert is in support of
their latest LP, "He's the DJ, I'm
The Rapper which spawned the
hit single "Parents just Don't
Understand
jazzy Jeff, 23, and Fresh Prince,
19, grew up in the neighboring
Philadelphia towns of Southwest
Philly and Winficld, respectively.
Jazzy Jeff, born Jeff Towncs,
started as a deejay before he de-
cided to embark on a music ca-
reer. "1 used to call mvself a bath-
room deejay he recalls "because
I would tag along to parties with
older deejays and finally get my
chance to go on when they went to
the can
Townes spent long hours in
his basement teaching himself the
techniques that distinguish his
work today � catching double
beats, scratching two records at
once and backspinning.
He debuted his new skills at a
party and instantly Townes was
established as one of the top hip
deejays in the city. But by January
of 1986 he was bored. Then he met
the Fresh Prince.
The Fresh Prince, was born
Will Smith, and wrote "poetry and
little stories" from the time he was
a kid. At 13 years old he started to
rap, reasoning that "they weren't
doing anything 1 couldn't do
Smith kept up with the New
York rap scene through purchased
bootleg performance tapes of the
Crash Crew and the Treacherous
Three, respectively.
The Fresh Prince met Jazzv
Jeff at a neighborhood party and
the two immediately clicked. By
the end of the year, they released
a single entitled "Gi rls Ain' t Noth-
ing But Trouble following it with
"Just One of Those Days" (the
humorous ancestor of "Parents
just Don't Understand").
That summer they were in-
vited to join the Def Jam Tour, also
featuring LL Cool J Public En-
emy and Whodini.
Although their previous al-
bum, Rock the House did fairly
well, it wasn't until their Jive
RCA Records double album "He's
the Dj, I'm the Rapper that DJ
Jazzy & The Fresh Prince became
household words. The LP's tirst
single "Parents Just Don't Under-
stand which is a comic tale of
misadventure and the fear of
shopping for clothes with one's
mother, won the duo an award at
the Grammys this past month.
The second single "Nightmare
On My Street was a vivid hip
hop tribute to the scary "Night-
mare on Elm Street" movie series.
DJ Jazzy Jeff & Fresh Prince
will be touring extensively this
year,but theduoshould havelittle
trouble distinguishing themselves
from other rap acts on the scene. "1
don't understand groups who
come on stage looking real mad
says Fresh Prince "We just want to
have fun
Along for the tour ride with
DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince is
Rob Base. Base has already scored
big with hissingle "It Takes Two
so the headliners are in good
company.
The concert i s being sponsored
by Camp Lejeune's Special Serv-
ices and will begin at 8 pm. Ad-
vanced tickets will be on sale for
$12 while the price increases to
$16 at the door. For additional
ticket information call 1-451-3535.
The Fresh Prince and DJ Jazzy Jeff will perform Wednesday night
in Jacksonville at the Goettage Memorial Fi Id House. Tickets
are on sale now.
High Water Band
pays blues dues
Karyn White leaves her back-up vocals for
the spotlight and a Grammy nomination
By LEE HIGHSMITH
Stiff Writer
The High Water Blues Band
brought their show to the New
Deli Saturday night. So I braved
the slush and cold to go hear what
the band calls "one of the most
dynamic blues perf onnances that
four white boys can offer
High Water is a three-year-
old band with four members.
"The drummer is Tom Clark;
we call him Dr. Tom. The-iead
player is Fred Scott, we call him
Rip. He named himself that, after
Rip Van Winkle. It's a long story.
The guitar player is Scott Scherr.
I'm Rex Gass, the bass player
Gass said.
Their relationships go some-
what farther back than the three
years since High Water formed.
Scott and Gass have worked to-
gether for ten years.
Gass has also worked in other
bands with the other two mem-
bers of High Water, Scherr and
Clark. Gass and Clark are cur-
rently membersof a top forrvcover
band.
For Saturday's performance,
the audience got a special treat.
The hand was joined by a friend,
Wayne "The Pain" Pierce on har-
monica.
The background this band has
See BLUES, page 9
(AP) � Karyn vVhite sang
backgrounds, but never intended
to settle for background singing.
"I was in groups; I knew that
would hep me write more songs
and I wouldn't have to gc 100k for
a band she says. "I knew I wanted
to be a solo artist. I just basically
did what I had to do until I could
be on my own
Now, at 23, she's in the fore-
ground. Her debut LP, "Karvn
White for which she co-wrote
two songs, has given her two hit
singles and a Grammy nomina-
tion. She wrote "Tell ine Tomor-
row" with Evan Rogers and Arnie
Roman, and "Slow Down" with
Steve Harvey and Daryle Sim-
mons. The third single will be
"Love Solid a duet jiyith Ba-
byface.
She says: "1 thought I'd love a
record to be top-10 rhythm 'ri'
blues and pop. I didn't aabout the
Grammys. I guess the most excit-
ing thing was being nominated.
When you don't expect something,
it's really great
The Warner Brothers LP was
No. 19 and climbing the Feb. 11
Cashbox magazine pop chart.
"The Way You Love Me a dance
single, hit No. 5 on the pop chart
Feb. 4, having already traveled
the rhythm 'n' blues chart, and got
White nominated for a Grammy
for best female r and b vocal per-
formance.
"Superwoman a rhythm 'n'
blues ballad, was No. 1 for three
weeks on the r and b singles chart,
beginning Jan. 21, and was climb-
ing the pop chart, at No. 61, on
Feb. 11.
Eyen thoughshe's yojung.
White has been.payiqg dues, rac-
ing disappointments as well as
triumphs.
A year ago November she
auditioned � as a dancer � for
Mick Jagger's 1988 tour to Japan.
'I came to New York. We went
into a studio. He put on a Prince
song. '1999 We just danced. I said
to myself, 'When is this guv going
to teii me to stop dancing? Docs he
see what he needs to see?' I was
getting tired. His endurance was
up.
"I didn't have to sing. He's
heard my voice from 'Facts of
Love He wanted a Tina Turner
type, a wild performer. He said
he'd let me know.
"He auditioned everybody in
the world for this gig. He didn't
call me until July. I couldn't go
because of my own album
When she was in high school
in Los Angeles, she was in a group
calledLegacy.�rone girl and five
guys she says, "they kicked me
out. They said I didn't have a
commercial sound Her favorite
singers then were Gladys Knight,
Diana Ross and Tina Turner.
"I also auditioned for
'Dreamgirls that kind of stuff. 1
would always get down to the last
three, but never got it. I went to
op-cn calls. I was auditioning for a
bunch of things but never getting
anvthing.
"My first official gig, the
summer after I graduated high
school, was going on our with
O'Bryan. I auditioned for his
manager, and him
She was recommended to Jeff
Lorber. "He was making a com-
mercial rhythm 'n' blues-pop al-
bum she says, "different for him.
'Facts of Love' was the first single
from it. It went to No. 26 on the
pop charts. It said, 'Jeff Lorber
Featuring Karyn White' on it
White sang on three cuts �
one a duet with Michael Jeffries �
on fusion keyboaidist Lorber's
1986 "Private Passion" album and
toured with him three months. The
"Facts of Love" hit proved very
important for her.
Boxleitner stars in a new NBC miniseries
LOS ANGELES (AP) �Bruce
Boxleitner has another series in
the works, but in the lull between
jobs he's back in the saddle with
no cameras turning.
"I'm taking advantage of it to
ride and hunt and play the ro-
deos says Boxleitner, whose last
series was "Scarecrow and Mrs.
King" and whose next is a wild
c�medy adventure called "The
Road Raiders
In the meantime, Boxleitner
stars with Lindsay Wagner and
Diahann Carroll in the two-part
NBC miniseries "From the Dead
of Night which will be televised
Monday and Tuesday.
During his time off he's going
quail hunting in Georgia and will
enter the cutting horse and team
roping contest at the Ben Johnson
Pro-Celebrity Rodeo in Phoenix,
Ariz.
At the presidential inaugura-
tion Washington, Boxleitner was
host of "A Salute To the First Lady"
at the Kennedy Center and was a
guest for dinner at the home of
Vice President Dan Quayle.
"I was up on stage in front of
the National Symphony and I had
to introduce the conductor, Msli-
sla v Rostorpo vich he says. "I had
to keep saying his name over and
over again so I'd get it right
Boxleitner, a Republican in an
industry noted for its liberal activ-
ism, says he found Washington to
be an exciting place.
"You don't have all the pho-
ninees and tinsel you have here
he bays, " and even when you do
it's more important. In Washing-
ton, the politicians are the starts.
The Hollywood celebrities might
get a tiny mention in the newspa-
per, which is the way it should
be
"From the Dead of Night" is
the first horror film for Boxleitner,
who's more at home in the saddle.
In his first scries, "How the Wes
Was Won which starred James
Arness, he played a fugitive forced
to become a gunslinger.
He co-starred with Kenny
Rogers in thrje "Gambler" mov-
ies as Billy Montana, a role he has
described as "an airhead out
West He later termed up again
with Arness for a remake of "Red
River
He also starred briefly in the
series "Bring 'Em Back Alive
based loosely on animal trapper
and adventurer Frank Buck, and
most recently he spent four years
co-starring with Kate Jackson in
"Scarecrow and Mrs. King
In "From the Dead of Night
he says, Lindsay Wagner "carries
the piece. I'm just there to help
out. I'm her ex-boyfriend, and
there's a triangle relationship be-
tween Lindsay, Robin Thomas and
myself. My character's always out
the door when you need him. He's
an anthropologist off to a dig.
"But when strange things start
happening to Lindsay, I'm theonly
one who realizes something reall v
is going on. People all around her
are dying and then coming back
as living dead. The producers
don't want us to say zombies. It
really isn't a zombie movie. It's a
classic thriller
Boxleitner recently completed
the movie-pilot for a new series
for CBS called "The Road Raid-
ers It's a World War II comedy-
adventure hecallsa "combination
of 'One Hew Over the Cuckoo's
Nest 'M-A-S-H 'The A-Team'
and 'The Road Warriors
"I feel like I'm more a part of
this because I helped put it to-
gether he says "I play a wonder-
ful character called Charlie
Rhodes. He's Scarecrow and Frank
Buck rolled into one. When we
first meet him he's running a sa-
loon in Manila just before the
Japanese invasion.
"He's totally unpatriotic. He's
out for himself. He's like
Humphrey Bogart in 'Casablanca
He's tough, rough-talking and
always has a cigar stuck in his
mouth. People will say I'm doing
Don Johnson. I say I'mdoingClark
Gable. Clark Gable is 'Boom
Town
Clyde Kusatsu, who was his
right-hand man in "Bring 'Em
Back Alive will be a regular in
"The Road Raiders" as the villain
and Rhodes' chief rival.
'The 'Burbs' is a
bad neighborhood
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Staff Writer
What do a group of accom-
plished actors, a talented director,
and a support team of technicians
do to have fun and still make
money? They take a couple of
months, several rolls of film, a
mediocre budget, and an outra-
geous script and create a film like
"The 'Burbs
Dana Olsen formerly wrote
"It came form Hollywood" and
"Going berserk A former staff
writer for the comedy series
"Laveme and Shirley Olsen's
experience in the art of low com-
edy shows in this script.
Ray Peterson (Tom Hanks �
"Punchline") is spending his va-
cation at home. Everything is quiet
and relatively normal until two of
his neighbors, Art Weingartner
(Rick Duccomon � "Die Hard")
and Mark Rumsfieki (Bruce Dem
� "1969"), call his attention to his
next-door neighbors, the Klopeks.
The only thing Ray knows is
that they don't mow their lawn
and are completely nocturnal. The
eerie grinding noises and suspi-
cious lights which emanate from
their basement at night are noi-
some, but Ray doesn't see this as
being too abnormal.
Later, when Ray sees them in
their backyard digging long, deep
pits, he begins to become a little
more suspicious. He joins Art and
Marc in spying on the Klopek
house at night, and sees the hide-
ous Hans Klopek (Courtney Gains
� "Children of the Corn") in-
sanely bashing a squidgy plastic
bag into the garbage. The other
members of the Klopek family,
Uncle Ruben (Brother Theodore
� 'The Hobbit") and Dr. Werner
(Henry Gibson � "Innerspace"),
are equally creepy.
Finally Ray's dog retrieves a
human femur from the Klopeks'
backyard. Believing that the bone
belongs to a neighbor who is sus-
piciously missing, Ray leads Art
and Marc in a plot to infiltrate the
Klopeks' house.
Although all of the actors are
experienced and have piayed
sensational roles in the past, their
See 'BURBS, page 9
:
Bruce D em, Tom Hanks and Rick Ducommun as Mark Rumsf ield,
Ray Peterson and Art Weingartner respectively, star in the new
movie "The 'Burbs
The movie is the story of the trials and tribulations of an ordinary
guy when some creepy neighbors move next-door, and people
start disappearing.







Britny Fox hunts hits
t,AF) "All our songs are
positive savs "Dizzv" Dean
Davidson, vocalist and rhythm
guitarist of the band Britny Fox.
"1 have a verv positive atti-
tude. I've gone through a lot ot
bad stuff and 1 came away from it
w ith a positive approach toward
life. 1 write about what 1 grew up
with.
"If you're willing to work for
what) ou want, A merica gives you
the opportunity to get it
lead guitarist Michael Kelly
Smithconcurs. If you listen, there
is a message to our songs. But
we're not a message band. To sum
it up. Life is what you make it. If
vou want something, you have to
go out and work for it
The band followed its own
advice, and the results were terri-
fic Britny Fox, out of Philadel-
phia. i one of the hottest new
heavy-metal bands. Its debut al-
bum "Britny Fox debuted at No.
45 on theCashbox magazine best-
selling pop chart. On Feb. 4 it was
still in the top 100 and, on the
heavy-metal chart it was in the
� p 20.
Last fall, they toured with
Poison.
The band's unusual name was
borrowed from a woman of three
centuries ago. 'It's the name oi a
girl who married into my family
in the 17th century savs
i idson. "1 looked at the name
long ago on our family tree and
though it would be a great name
for a band. There's an electricity
about the name, right from the
-tart.
That helped me to keep going
and stick with it
Two years ago, Davidson
joined with Smith, a former
member of Cinderella, bassist Billy
( hi Ids and d ru mmer Tony Destra
The tour worked at odd jobs,
including painting houses, in
order to subsidize the dream of
being a working band, says
Davidson, with a laugh, "I'd be
slapping the paint on those houses
and thinking, 'Yeah. Someday this
is going to be me living here
Meanwhile Bntnv Fox played th
-t Coast club circuit eventualh
igriihg with Columbia Records
Just as everything seemed to
be working, Destra was killed in a
car accident.
"I couldn't believe it says
Davidson. "It took us about six
months to recover. At that point,
we had two choices: to give up or
to continue. We decided if we gave
up it would belike throwingaway
everything Tony had worked for.
So we decided to continue
Smith adds, "What's sad is
that he isn't here to see that wedid
succeed
"Yeah, but I believe he
knows says Davidson. "I think
he had a lot to do with our getting
our present drummer, Johnny Dee.
He's so much like Tony- He even
has the same sense of humor
The band entered the record-
ing studio with determination,
cutting songs written by
Davidson.
He savs: "I'm writing about
everyday positve things. I write
all the time, dav and night, about
anything that catches my eye �
hooks, something that sounds like
a song title. I've worked six years
toward this album. Some of the
songs are that old, and others I
wrote just a year ago. We already
have songs for our next record
The band included a remake
of a 1973 Slade Song, "Gudbuy T
Jane
"We plan to do a remake on
every record. If we can't do the
song justice, we won't do it. We're
lucky in that these are bands we
grew up listening to, so they fit
our musical style Davidson says.
Blues Band is
a tight show
Continued from page 8
together is obvious on stage. They
play with an ease and familiarity
that increases the quality of their
performance. Each member of the
band has a distinct contribution to
the whole sound, and that sound
is sweet.
Scott's vocals are earthy and
mellow. He doesn't try to overdo
the jam-rhythm on the guitar, as
do so many other bands. Rather,
he plays a passionate guitar with
lots of smooth, funky riffs.
His backup Scherr enhances
the overall performance. Gass
better way to portray the charac- played a strong bass and Clark set
tors, all of whom are intentionally a good beat throughout.
k,Burbs' has bad
acting, good sfx
Continued from page 8
acting in this film is hideously
overdone. Of course, there is no
stereotypical.
"The 'Burbs" is one of those
comedies which is not meant to be
taken seriously, although it's not
as stupid as, for example, "Police
Academy Still, it bears all the
hallmarks of an idiotically silly
film: the special effects are over-
done, the cinematography is
laughable, and the music is car-
tooney.
Don't expect to see the High
Water Blues Band and just sit
around with your beer. Everything
they play is dancing music,
whether it's you and your girl-
friend or just a crowd of friends.
They play a mixture of tunes,
in the tradition of Chuck Berry,
Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf and
other blues greats. They even did
alittlebitofElvis.Bytheendofthe
As a member of the stupid night, I was worn out and craving
comedy genre, "The 'Burbs" is donuts and water.
excellent. For those who enjoy this The High Water Blues Band is
sort of film, it's well worth seeing, an excellent band. If you missed
For others who would ratherlaugh them Saturday night, don't lose
with a film than at it, it's still a hope. The New Deli is reschedul-
good movie for a rainy Saturday ing them. If you have the chance,
afternoon. don't miss'em.
RACK ROOM $H0�$
BRANDED SHOES
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I I
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Discover the
nci frederick
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I
Plan to Attend Our
JOB FAIR
Friday, March 3,
4 PM-7 PM or
Saturday, March 4,
9 AM-12 NOON
The National Cancer Institute's Frederick
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developed an international reputation in
biomedical research. The reason is simple.
Excellent resources and commitment.
As the major operation and technical con-
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FCRF in FREDERICK, MD we play a vital
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interviewers will be on hand at the Gover-
nors Inn, located in Research Triangle
Park at NC 54 & 1-40 at the Davis Drive
Exit, March 3-4 to find top-notch gradu-
ates to fill ENTRY-LEVEL opportunities in
the following areas:
� Animal Sciences
� Biological Sciences
� Computer Sciences
� Medical Sciences
� Natural Sciences
� Environmental Sciences
There's more we'd like to tell you, more we
could show you. Come to our JOB FAIR
and discover how you can join one of
America's foremost centers for biomedical
research
If you are unable to attend, please send
your resume and transcripts to:
Program Resources, Inc.
Personnel Department
P.O. Box B
Frederick, MD 21701
PROGRAM
RESOURCES, INC.
An equal opportunity employer
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Haw'is down Pirates
East Carolina loses final game
Sports
FEBRUARY 28, 1989 page 10
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
The Blizzard of '89 would put
the freeze on the town of Green-
ville for a couple of days, and
postpone ECU'S final home game
and final game of the season
against UNC-Wilmington until 4
p.m. Sunday. But, like the snow
the weather dealt out to Green-
ville residents, the Pirates were
also frozen while shooting as the
Scahawks of Wilmington pre-
vailed over East Carolina 60-55.
The loss for the Pirates moved
Wilmington ahead in the rivalry
between the two schools. They
were previously tied at 15 in the
series but the win for the
Seahawks put them up 16 games
to 15. The Pirates have not beaten
the Hawks since Feb. 23, 1985
when the two schools met in
Minges Coliseum.
ECU did not simplv give up.
After a sluggish first half caught
theriratesbehindintheballgame
by 11 points at 22-33, East Caro-
lina would go on a seven point
scoring drive midway through the
second half that would put them
to within one towards regaining
the load the Scahawks held all
afternoon.
"We weren't really alert in
the first half ECU head coach
MikeSteelesaid. 'That's how they
got the 11 point lead
ECU began to come alive af-
ter a 15 foot jumper by Kenny
Murphy with 3:45 into the second
half forced a time out by the
Hawks as the score closed to 38-
49. But the time out would not
slow the Pirates as they spent the
next 11 minutes trying to close the
Wilmington lead. The once quiet
Jans in Minges Coliseum began to
turn up the volume and after
Robbie Carter fouled both Reed
Lose and Gus Hill for the Pirates,
the Ha wk lead decreased to within
eight at 41-49.
After UNC-W earned one
point back on a foul to make the
score 41-50, the Pirates would go
on a seven point scoring stint
which would bring their lead to
within one, 51 -52, with 3:41 left to
play.
But, the shots just wouldn't
fall for the Pirates. After ha ing a
33 percent field goal percentage
in the first half, the Cagers contin-
ued to struggle in the second half
only managing a 40 percent aver-
age. "We had a chance to take the
lead Steele said. "We just
couldn't get the jump shot to fall
After a series of missed jump-
ers and missed free throw shots,
the Pirates could not steal the lead
from Wilmington. With 2:22 left
to play in the game, the taste of
victory would begin to slip away
for the Pirates.
Steele said the key to the game
was the fact that East Carolina
was 2-12 at the three-point pe-
rimeter. "We just couldn't make
any perimeter shots he said.
Steele also explained that the
team needed to give the ball to
forward Blue Edwards more of-
ten.
UNC-W coach Robert
McPherson commended the Pi-
rates on the ball bame and said
that his team was successful on
trying to shut down Edwards.
"ECU played exceptionally well
McPherson said. "We did a good
job on not letting Blue get on a
roll
Edwards was the high scorer
and only player to score in double
figures for the Pirates as he racked
up 26 of ECU's 55 points for his
team. He also had eight rebounds
and no turnovers in the ball game.
Stanley Love worked well off
the boards as he grabbed seven
rebounds for the Pirates and tal-
lied five points.
Kenny Murphy gave East
Carolina an additional eight
points and had five rebounds.
UNC-W's Larry Houzer was
the high-scorer for the Seahawks.
He wrapped up 21 points and
had nine rebounds in the game.
Antonio Howard was the
only other player from Wilming-
ton to score in double figures as
he had 19 points for the game. He
also grabbed three rebounds for
the Hawks.
After ECU's only successful
jump shot from three-point range,
Edwards broke the ECU record in
the second half for most points
scored in a single season. He fin-
ished out his career with Fast
Carolina with 711 points surpass-
ing Oliver Mack's 699 points in
tne 1977-78 season.
Edwards is also in the top 10
in the ECU record books for most
points scored in his career with
1,115. He moved up to eighth in
most assists in the season with 86.
Edwards surpassed Curt
-Vanderhorst'sl 983-84 record for-
most steals on the season with 44.
Vanderhorst had 43 steals.
Rumors have also been float-
ing that Edwards, one of the top
basketball players in the Colonial
Athletic Association, might have
a chance at being CA A player of
the year. Edwards however, isn't
concerned with an individual
award as such. "If 1 had a chance
between the conference champi-
onship and the player of the year,
1 would take the conference cham-
pionship Edwards said.
Edwards reflected on his sea-
son at East Carolina and said this
season has "made my career a lot
better. He Steele wanted me to
be an overall leader Edwards
explained, "and I think I have
done that
East Carolina travels to
Hampton, Va. Saturday for the
Colonial Athletic Association
tour, tament. They are sixth seeded
in the tournament and face Ameri-
can University in the first round
of competition.
Pirates score 104 points
Ladies pluck Hawks
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
East Carolina's Lady Pirates put
on an offensive show Saturday
night as they beat UNC-Wilming-
ton 104-57 at Wilmington's Trask
Coliseum.
ECU's starters combined for 59
points, while the bench poured in
45 points as every Lady Pirate
made a contribution to the ECU
effort.
It was the ninth time that ECU
women's basketball team scored
more than 100 points in a game.
The last time was in 1982-83 as
ECU defeated Western Kentuckv
109-54.
"We played gTeat said ECU
head coach Pat Pierson. "It was a
super team effort
The win, the third consecutive
for the Lady Pirates, boosted
ECU's record to 14-10 overall and
7-5 in the Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation play. The Lady Pirates
swept the season series with the
Lady Seahawks, as they defeated
them earlier in the year at Minges.
Three other Lady Pirates also
scored in double figures, Irish
Hamilton, Rose Miller and Toina
Coley each tossed in 10 points.
ECU combined to shoot 63 per-
cent from the floor, one o( their
best performances all year. "We
just couldn't miss said Pierson,
whose team hit 44 of 70 shots from
the floor and 16 of 30 from the line.
"We didn't seem to be slack at all
and I was really proud of how
well our bench performed and
made such a gre.it contribution
With a 47-32 lead at halftime,
the second half was where ECU
really poured it on, scoring 57
points. In addition to shooting 63
percent, while Wilmington shot
only 31 percent, ECU out re-
bounded the Lady Seahawks 50-
39.
Wilmington, who fell to 13-12
and 3-9 in theAA, had only two
An intense senior forward Blue Edwards leaps up and over two
UNC-Wilmington players to lightly tap the ball in the basket
(Photo by Mark Barber).
Lady Gamecocks use
inside game to win
players in double figures as Gina
Bennett and Rosalyn Flood each
scored 10.
ECU is now assured of a win-
ning season, with their improve-
ment over last year's 8-20 finish.
Regular play in the CAA is fin-
Grctta Savage, lead the ECU ished until the CAA tournament,
scoringwith 17 points, while Sarah March 4-11, at Williamsburg
Gray and Chris O'Connor each The Lady Pirates will finish out
added 15. O'Connor was perfect their regular season at home on
from the free throw line, shooting Monday against South Carolina
5 of five, while Gray lead all re- and Saturdav, March 4 against
bounders with 13. Appalachian State.
GREENVILLE, N.C. � Pat
Picrson's East Carolina women's
basketball squad ventured into the
land of the giants Monday night -
in more ways than one.
The Lady Pirates fell to South
Carolina's fourteenth-ranked
Lady Gamecocks 84-59 in Minges
Coliseum with much of that influ-
enced by USC's front line of Beth
Hunt and Shonna Banner.
also had a lot to do with their
shooting percentage of 60.0. Hunt
waslOof 12fromth� .1.or, Banner
was nine of 11 and for � ard Martha
Parker was four of six from the
floor
It was not a runaway from the
beginning, however. East Caro-
lina cameout and played the Lady
Gamecocks tough. ECU had a 10-
9 lead after eight minutes and it
looked as if South Carolina would
un-
Hunt, a 6'1" sophomore,
scored23pointsandgrabbedeight ose e,r SeCond straiSht Same-
rebounds while Banner, a 6'3" But memories of their loss at Vir-
junior, had 22 points and eight 8in!a I,och Saturday woke up the
boards. That was the key for the d? Gamecocks. They bounced
back and took an 11-10 lead using
a tenacious man-to-man defense.
Gretta Savage then put ECU
ahead for the final time, 12-11,
with 11:14 left in the first half on a
10-foot jumper. Hunt then went to
work for USC She hit a layup and
then a seven footer, which she
converted to three points on a free
throw. USC was up 16-12 and
never looked back.
The Lady Gamecock lead
exploded to 40-24 at halftime and
Lady Gamecocks as they
proved to 20-6 on the season.
"We were able to go insiue
really well tonight South Caro-
lina head coach Nancy Wilson
said. "Beth and Schonna did an
excellent job
East Carolina's front-line
didn't go unnoticed either. Sarah
Gray had 14 points and a game
high nine rebounds while Gretta
Savage also had 14 points. But the
duo of Hunt and Banner was just
too much for the Lady Pirates. South Carolina advanced that lead
"We got beat by a real good quickly in the third quarter,
team tonight ECU head coach See LADY PIRATES, page 12
Pat Pierson said. "They really
impressed me. They have a lot of �- �-� i t
good athletes and have size and Ruggers prevail over bad weather
quickness" " ww
ECU forward Sandra Grace takes a jump shot from the top of
the paint to give the Lady Pirates two more points (Photo by
Angela Pridgen, ECU Phofolab).
The play of USC's front-line
ECU Rugby defeats Tarheels
East Carolina Pirate Baseball has been striking out on foul weather, not on foul balls. The matchup
on the deserted Harrington Field against George Washington was cancalled Saturday due to
inclimate weather conditions (Photo by Gretchen Journigan, ECU Photolab).
By STEVE ALLEN
Sports Writer
The East Carolina Rugby
team used quickness, excellent
defense and a lot of enthusiasm
Saturday toovercomelotsof snow
and defeat UNC-Chapel Hill, 20-
3.
The freezing weather didn't
stop the Pirates in the first half as
they jumped on the Heels right
away. Showing no mercy, they
got one score from Bob Tobin and
Thomas Almon in the first five
minutes, and another score from
Doug Schrade later in the first
halftotakeal4-101eadathalftime.
The second half was quite dif-
ferent, as the weather began to
hamper the Pirates. "Everyone's
hands were cold team captain
Bob Tobin said. "The ball was
slick, and it was hard to hold on
to. After that, everything fell
apart
The Pirates didn't show any
signs of falling apart. In fact, they
played with more intensity.
Team member Bob Eason felt
the key to the second half was
penalties. He said, "Penalties
started slowing the game down.
There were a lot of penalities in a
row, and that slowed the game
down a lot
Eason himself had a score
called back in the first half when
the ball was called out of bounds,
but the referee didn't notice the
line judge's flag.
Schrade; his second score of the
game.
East Carolina has a young
rugby squad this year, but Bob
Tobin said that didn't matter in
this game. Tobin said East Caro-
lina played well even as a voung
team. He said, "We had an ad-
vantage in this game because we
were more experienced than
UNC. We still have some things
to work on, but this is onlv our
first game
Eason said under the circum-
stances, the team plaved well.
"Playing under those weather
conditions, we executed real
good he said. "We dominated
for the first ten minutes, and then
The only score for the Pirates Chapel Hill started coming on,
in the second half came from Doug but we didn't let them catch up
THE COLONIAL STANDINGS
CONFERENCE
W-L Pet.
Richmond 13-1 .929
George Mason 10-4 .714
American 9-5 .643
UNC-Wilmington 9-5 .643
James Madison 6-8 .429
East Carolina 6-8 .429
William & Mary 2-12 .143
OVERALL
g-L Ptt.
19-8 .704
16-10 .615
17-9 .654
14-13 .519
15-13 .535
14-13 .519
6-21 .222
Jones, new Cowboy owner, fires Landry
after 29 years of head coaching at Dallas
IRVING, Texas, (AP) � Jerry
Jones spent his first full day as
owner of the Dallas Cowboys
trying to live up to his pledge he
would involve himself fully in
the team's operations.
Jones quickly set up his per-
sonal office Sunday at the NFL
team's headquarters at Valley
Ranch, 25 miles northwest of Dal-
las. He fielded calls from the
media, chatted enthusiastically
with players who wandered
through and set about learning
what he could about his new
acquisition. Members of his staff
scurried about learning the ropes
in the vast complex.
Attorneys also were meeting
to iron out the final paperwork
before the sale is submitted to the
NFL office for approval.
Jones' bid is subject to ap-
proval from 21 of the 28 NFL
owners.
While Jones' family was being
given a VIP tour of the facility,
fired coach Tom Landry was in
his office, emptying 29 years of
his life into cardboard boxes.
After two daysof speculation
that H.R. "Bum" Bright was sell-
ing the team to Jones and that
Jones would bring in University
of Miami's Jimmy Johnson as
coach of the Cowboys, the 64-
year-old Landry got the official
word late Saturday afternoon. The
Cowboys announced the sale at a
news conference Saturday night.
The sale price was an estimated
$140 million.
Throughout Friday and Sat-
urday, Landry was ur ivailable
for comment. He said Sunday he
did not answer his telephone for
two days because "I just didn't
feel like talking
Jones wasn't clear Saturday
night on whether Landry would
continue to be associated with the
See LANDRY, page 12
V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28.1989 11
Tyson prevails as Bruno takes beating
- . . � t r i " T��-�
LAS VEGAS (AT)
process of intimidation
- The
comes
easy for Mike Tyson, both inside
the ring and out.
After pounding Britain's
Frank Bruno into submission in
the fifth round of a rusty but still
devastating performance, the 22-
ear-old heavyweight champion
scoffed at any pretenders to his
crown.
"How dare they challenge me,
liese boxers with their primitive
boxing-skills sniffed Tyson.
"They're as good as dead
Bruno dared to challenge Sat-
urday night and escaped alive and
upright, although he paid for it by
taking a severe beating in the fi-
nal seconds.
In the process, though, he
found a few chinks in the armor
of the man thyy'call Iron Mike.
Eight months out of the ring
and a 40-pound weight loss took
,i toll on the young champion,
who. was wild and overanxious
after sensing quick victory when
he knocked Bruno down only 14
seconds into the fight.
"I made mistakes Tyson
admitted. "I had a long layoff
and 1 had the big weight loss, if
you want excuses
That Tyson was offering ex-
cuses for a result most fighters
would have been ecstatic with,
may be a measure of the great-
ness expected from the unde-
fea ted a nd undispu ted champion.
This is, after all, a fighter who
dispatch the British challenger in
even less time.
"I was a little excited and I
wanted to get the fight over with
Tyson said of his wild headhunt-
ing tactics. "I was just too anxious
to take him out
Tyson's anxiety almost
proved disastrous when Bruno
landed a huge left hook late in the
first round that sent the cham-
pion momentarily sideways. The
punch, Tyson said later, was the
hardest he had ever taken in a
fight.
"I fely my legs twitch he
said.
But Bruno, a 10-1 underdog,
could not follow up on the punch
needed only 91 seconds to stop an ancj Tyson again moved to the at
undefeated Michael Spinksin his iacy rv the second round, the
last fight. Most expected he would fjgnt had settled into a pattern of
Bruno holding Tyson behind the
neck and the champion breaking
free on occasion to launch wild
punches.
The end was never too far
from hand, however, and when
Tyson landed a left hook to the
body midway through the fifth
round, Bruno was his. Tyson fol-
lowed with a barrage of head
punches and referee Richard
Steele stopped the fight at 255 of
the fifth round just as Bruno's
trainer. George Lawless, was on
the ring apron preparing to throw
in the towel.
"From the third round on, I
knew I could break him Tyson
said.
"I knew it was only a matter
of time
Unlike his previous fights,
when trainer Kevin Rooney
would call punch combinations
from the corner, Tyson seemed to
be on his own in this one.
Tyson fired Rooney after the
Spinks fight because of comments
Rooney made about his ex-wife,
actress Robin Givens, and the
champion had an inexperienced
Aaron Snowell and longtime
friend Jay Bright in the corner.
Both appeared somewhat in
awe of Tyson and offered little
ring advice.
"They said just what Kevin
would have said, to work to the
body Tyson said. "I'm just too
stubborn to listen
Rooney was in New York
working with some amateur fight
ers and didn't see the bout. Still,
he criticized the direction given
from the corner.
"If Kevin Rooney was in there,
itdoesn't go five rounds Rooney
said.
With Bruno safely out of the
way, Tyson and his adviser, pro-
moter Don King, talked of keep-
ing the champion busy with a
series of fights over the next year.
Not expected to coach again
Landry not bitter about being
fired
IRVING, Texas (AP) � Tom
Landry was relaxed, somehow as
he cleaned out his desk.
If he was bitter over being
fired after 29 years as the Cow-
boys' head coach he never showed
it. The onl v emotion he displayed
Sunday was a smile.
He looked a little tired, like
he had lost some sleep in the hectic
last 48 hours.
But he also looked like he was
glad it's all over.
In Landry's first interview
since he was replaced by new
owner Jerry Jones, he told The
Associated Press he will proba-
blv not coach again.
"It would be hard, not being
in the Cowboys' blue he said.
Landry, 64, walked out of his
office for the final time on Sun-
da v, saying he wouldn't be
around anymore.
It left open the question of
whether he wou Id get the $800,000
remaining on his contract for this
year.
it wouldn't be fair to keep
me around, hanging over every-
bodv's shoulder he said.
And even though he was the
only coach the Cowboys had in
their 29 years, Landry said,
"People will forget me pretty
quick
Landry was fired after Ar-
kansas oilman Jerry Jones bought
the team.
Jones and Tex Schramm, the
headquarters in Valley Ranch, 25
miles northwest of Dallas, where
he was cleaning out his desk.
Landry said he knew his ca-
reer was finished when Jones was
announced as the new owner.
"No one had to tell me, I
would have had to be pretty stu-
pid not know when they got on
the airplane to come see me
Landry said.
Though it was an emotional
experience, Landry said: "I'm not
upset over what happened. I've
jonesana lex aenranun, mu -� , . .
� , . � , j i never been one to get that upset,
Cowboys' preadent and genera �J , a$ P
manager, flew to Austin to tell � J haw
mdry he was being replaced by �� ,
Miami Hurricanes head coach �.u
, , get upset over it.
J,mmy Johnson. � g . id it . ht have
Johnson was Jones roommate �g had stepped down
on Arkansas national champion- nuiM1Ml u�wK�foHan
. irw i three years ago, but that he telt an
shipteamn 1964. obligation to bring Dallas back to
1 he AP interview took place & g Jhc Cow.
inLandrv s office at the Cowboys ownwrcj
boys went 3-13 last year, the sec-
ond worst season in their history.
"I probably should have got-
ten out, but I really enjoyed the
challenge of bringing a team to
that game. In fact, I probably en-
joy the challenge of it more than
the actual game he said.
"I knew I was taking a chance,
but sometimes it's not what you
know as much as in this case, who
you knew. And I didn't know
Jerry Jones
Landry said in a way he feels
sorry for Schramm.
"Tex has really showed a lot
of emotion through this whole
ordeal, and I guess that's under-
standable when you've been
around someone as long as we've
been around each other. But Tex
will probably have a harder time
than I will, because it looks like
he's going to have some hobbles
(restrictions) out on him
Terrapin allegations to focus
on one student, not program
ECU
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WASHINGTON (AP)
Maryland's athletic director says
an investigation into the univer-
sity's alleged violation of NCAA
rules will center on a former stu-
dent, not the entire basketball
program, according to a published
report.
The Washington Post re-
ported today that Athletic Direc-
tor Lew Perkins says the univer-
sity's investigation into whether
former Terrapins guard Rudy
Archer received transportation
from home to the university and
to Prime George's Community
College will only center on Archer.
"It is a routine practice at an
institution with potential NCAA
violations to review all the facts
and try to gather as much infor-
mation we can the university's
chief legal counsel Dennis Blumer
told the newspaper. "We will
follow the NCAA's lead and then
make a confidential report to
them
Perkins could not say how
long the in vestigation would take.
On Monday, Maryland noti-
fied the NCAA that "several
members" of the basketball staff
gave transportation to the 6-foot-
1 Archer, who played two seasons
at Allegany Community College
before playing last season for
Maryland.
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LA1N0RY, pageT





12
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28, 1989
Boggs' former lover sues
WINTER HAVEN, Fla. (AP)
� Even before practice, some of
the players were talking about
the storv. Then there wasa closed-
door meeting where Wade Boggs
apologized again. And then the
Red Sox tried to go on with busi-
ness as usual.
But the topic of the day at
Chain OLakes Park was anything
but usual. On Wednesday, news
organizations received copies of
the first installment of a Penthouse
magazine article based on the al-
legations' of Boggs' former lover,
Margo Adams.
Adams details her four-year
affair with Boggs, the alleged sex-
ual likes and dislikes of Boston
players and accuses Boggs of mak-
ing racist remarks. Adams, suing
Boggs for $12 million, is guaran-
teed at least $100,000 from Pent-
house for the story, with another
$400,000 in bonus possibilities
depending on sales.
Boggs talked to reporters af-
ter a three-hour workout, but did
not answer questions. He said he
had not seen the article and "to
tell the truth I don't really know if
1 want to read it
"I've spoken with everybody
that's involved and everything is
fine the five-time American
League batting champion said.
"1 don't think it will have an
effect on the team Boston man-
ager Joe Morgan said. "You can
tell the guys were not shook up. 11
fine Gorman said. "He
apologized and denied the state-
ment
attributed to him, saying he
has the greatest respect for me.
The general feeling in the club-
house was 'Let's put this behind
us, let's go out and play ball I
haven't read the article, but you've
got to remember she's the one
saying things, not Boggs. He and
1 get along very well
In the storv, Adams said
was not very disruptive today and Boggs made a racist remark abou t
I hope it continues that way teammateimRice, wascxtremely
"We're behind him and right jealousof New York Yankees first
now it's his problem Morgan baseman Don Mattingly, and felt
said. Red Sox pitcher Roger Clemens
"If it affects the team, then it's acted like "Mr. Perfect
my problem Adams also said Boggs be-
Red Sox general manager Lou Hevcd lose Canseco of the
Gorman, called a "bastard" by Oakland Athletics used steroids
Boggs in the article, accepted an anci thought Hall of Famer Ted
apology. Williams "was a guy that thinks
"Wade went around to each he knows everything about hit-
individual and everything ap- ting and doesn't
peared
Wood's Gamecock coaching start
up in air, assistants want to stay
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) �
South Carolina'sassistant coaches
say they'd like to stay, but whether
they'll get to or not rests in the
hands of new Gamecock coach
Sparky Woods.
"1 like it here South Caro-
lina assistant coach Tom McMa-l
hon sud. And not only myself,
but mv fa mil v. I hope I get a chance
to stay
Woods said at a news confer-
ence Tuesday where he was in-
troduced as the new head coach
that he hopes to have his staff in
place by the time South Carolina
begins spring drills March 13.
"We have great coaches on
our staff (at Appalachian State),
and I believe at least the bulk of
them would come with me
.Woods said.
But I think Appalachian
State would at least consider one
or two of them for the head coach-
ing position there
Two of those coaches, assis-
Lady Pirates
pre ail
Conanued from page 10
"I think it will be a learning
experience for us Pierson said.
They are an outstanding team
They have so many good players.
Hunt reallv had the moves tonight
and Banner was solid under-
neath
South Carolina'slead reached
27, 61-34, with 12:36 left in the
game. ECU whittled away at the
lead and brought it to within 19,
63-44 on Pam Williams' 18 footer.
However, using their pressure
defense, L'SC got the lead back up
to 2U ind coasted �hp rest of the
way.
Chris O'Connor had 10 points
for the Lady Pirates and Irish
Hamilton contributed six assists.
Martha Parker, a pre-season
All-America selection, also had 11
points and three rebounds for
South Carolina. Karen Middleton
also added 10 points for the Lady
Gamecocks.
East Carolina finishes up their
1988-89 regular season with a
homecontest against Appalachian
State on Saturday while South
Carolina hosts DePaul in their
�egular season finale on Wednes-
day night.
Landry fired
by owner
Continued from page 10
club in some capacity. But Lan-
dry said Sunday he is leaving the
organization "because it wouldn't
be fair to keep me around hang-
ing over everybody's shoulder
In his first interview since
being sacked by Jones, Landry
told The Associated Press he will
never coach again.
"I wouldn't think I would
coach again because it would just
be hard not being in the Cow-
boys' blue he said. "People will
forget me pretty quick
He said he would address the
Cowboys players at their mini-
camp today.
"It won't be an easy thing to
do Landry said.
Landry took over the Cow-
boys when they were a ragged
expansion team in 1960 and led
them to the Super Bowl five times,
winning two of them.
tant head coach David Bibee and
offensive coordinator Art Wilk-
ms, have indicated they will inter-
view for the Appalachian State
job.
Most oi the Gamecock assis-
tants said they would wait to see
what happens. But one who didn't
wait is one of the newest mem-
bers of the staff, Jacob Burney,
who came to South Carolina in
January from Mississippi State.
Shealso graphically describes
the sex lives of Boggs and several
teammates she does not identify.
She details incidents of three-
somes involving unidentified
Boston players and instances
during spring training where
players would have sex with girl-
friends "down the hall from their
wives or at a hotel down the
street
Boggs said he was not con-
cerned about fan reaction.
Bridgets
finals
Meredith Bridgers was the sole
finalist for the ECU swim and dive
team in the Independent Nation-
als held over the weekend.
Bridgers placed second in the
100-yardbreaststrokeevent when
she swam a 1:05.96.
The swim meet, held at the Uni-
versity of South Carolina in Co-
lumbia, SO, saw the home team
for the men come out with the
victory. The Gamecocks won the
meet while East Carolina, who
scored 117 points, placed ninth
out of ten teams.
For the women, the Hurricanes
oi Miami took the crown. The
Pirates placed tenth out of 11 teams
participating.
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r
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1989 catalog:
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UNC Wilmington
601 South College Road
Wilmington, N.C. 28403-3297
(919) 395-3540
UI wasn't rubbing
it in-1 just wanted
Eddie to know
the score of
last night's game
Go ahead and gloat. You can
nib it in all the way to Chicago
with KRS3 Long Distance Service.
Besides, your best friend Eddie
was the one who said your team
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The right choice.





I
f
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 28,1989
Boggs' former lover sues
WINTER HAVEN, Fla. (AP) ter a three-hour workout, but did
� Even before practice, some of not answer questions. He said he
the players were talking about had not seen the article and "to
the story. Then there wasa closed- tell the truth I don't really know if
door meeting where Wade Boggs I want to read it"
apologized again. And then the
Red Sox tried to go on with busi-
ness as usual.
But the topic of the day at
Chain Q Lakes Park was anything
but usual. On Wednesday, news
fine Gorman said. "He
apologized and denied the state-
ment
attributed to him, saying he
has the greatest respect for me.
fve spoken with everybody The general feeling in the club-
that's involved and everything is house was Tet's put this behind
us, let's go out and play ball I
haven't read the article, butyou've
got to remember she's the one
saying things, not Boggs. He and
fine the five-time American
League batting champion said.
"I don't think it will have an
effect on the team Boston man-
organizations received copies of ager Joe Morgan said. "You can I get along very well
the first installment of a Penthouse telltheguyswerenotshookup.lt m the story, Adams said
magazine article based on the al- wasnot very disruptive today and Boggsmadea racist remark about
legations' of Boggs' former lover, 1 hope it continues that way teammate Jim Rice, was extremely
Margo Adams. "We're behind him and right jealousof New York Yankees first
Adams details her four-year now it's his problem Morgan baseman Don Mattingly, and felt
Red Sox pitcher Roger Clemens
acted like "Mr. Perfect
Adams also said Boggs be-
lieved Jose Canseco of the
Oakland Athletics used steroids
said.
affair with Boggs, the alleged sex
ual likes and dislikes of Boston "If it affects the team, then it's
players and accuses Boggs of mak- my problem
ing racist remarks. Adams, suing Red Sox general manager Lou
Boggs for $12 million, is guaran- Gorman, called a "bastard" by
teed at least $100,000 from Pent- Boggs in the article, accepted an and thought Hall of Famer Ted
house for the story, with another apology. Williams "was a guy that thinks
$400,000 in bonus possibilities "Wade went around to each he knows everything about hit-
depending on sales, individual and everything ap- ting and doesn't
Boggs talked to reporters af- peared m ff
Wood's Gamecock coaching stair
up in air, assistants want to stay
COLUMBIA S C (AP) � tant head coach David Bibee and tants said they would wait to see
SouthCarolina'sassistantcoaches offensive coordinator Art Wilk- whathappens.Butonewhodidn't
savthev'd like to stay, but whether ins, have indicated they will inter- wait is one of the newest mem-
thev'lfget to or not rests in the view for the Appalachian State bers of the staff, Jacob Bumey,
hands of new Gamecock coach job. who came to South Carolina in
Sparky Woods. Most of the Gamecock assis- January from Mississippi State.
"1 like it here South Caro-I
lina assistant coach Tom McMa-
hon said. "And not only myself,
but my family. I hope I get a chance I
to stay
YVoods said at a news confer-
ence Tuesday where he was in-
troduced as the new head coach
that he hopes to have his staff in
place by the time South Carolina
begins spring drills March 13.
"We have great coaches on
our staff (at Appalachian State),
and I believe at least the bulk of
them would come with me
.Woods said.
"But I think Appalachian
State would at least consider one
or two of them for the head coach-
ing position there
Two of those coaches, assis-
Shealso graphically describes
the sex lives of Boggs and several
teammates she does not identify.
She details incidents of three-
somes involving unidentified
Boston players and instances
during spring training where
players would have sex with girl-
friends "down the hall from their
wives or at a hotel down the
street
Boggs said he was not con-
cerned about fan reaction.
Bridgers
finals
Meredith Bridgers was the sole
finalist for the ECU swim and dive
team in the Independent Nation-
als held over the weekend.
Bridgers placed second in the
100-yard breaststroke event when
she swam a 1:05.96.
The swim meet, held at the Uni-
versity of South Carolina in Co-
lumbia, SC saw the home team
for the men come out with the
victory. The Gamecocks won the
meet while East Carolina, who
scored 117 points, placed ninth
out of ten teams.
For the women, the Hurricanes
of Miami took the crown. The
Pirates placed tenth out of 11 teams
participating.
P
Tar Landing Seafood
Student Special
6 oz. Sirloin with Shrimp
(Fried. Boiled, or Broiled)
nerved with French Frie. or Baked Potato.
Cole Slaw and Huahpuppiea.
2 Dinners ONLY $9.99
105 Airport Road Present this Ad when paying
758-0327 �Dine-in ONLY
AWAtjOTAMEAL
Banquet Facilities Available
Summer School
and the
Coast Discover
UNCW.
For more information write or call for
1989 catalog:
Summer School Director
UNC Wilmington
601 South College Road
Wilmington, N.C. 28403-3297


Lady Pirates
prevail
Continued from page 10
"I think it will be a learning
experience for us Pierson said.
"They are an outstanding team
They have so many good players.
Hunt really had the moves tonight
and Banner was solid under-
neath
South Carolina's lead reached
27, 61-34, with 12:36 left in the
game. ECU whittled away at the
lead and brought it to within 19,
63-44 on Pam Williams' 18 footer.
However, using their pressure
defense, USC got the lead back up
to 29 ind coasted �Hp rest of the
way.
Chris O'Connor had 10 points
for the Lady Pirates and Irish
Hamilton contributed six assists.
Martha Parker, a pre-season
All-America selection, also had 11
points and three rebounds for
South Carolina. Karen Middleton
also added 10 points for the Lady
Gamecocks.
East Carolina finishes up their
1988-89 regular season with a
home contest against Appalachian
State on Saturday while South
Carolina hosts DePaul in their
5iegular season finale on Wednes-
day night.
Landry fired
by owner
Continued from page 10
club in some capacity. But Lan-
dry said Sunday he is leaving the
organization "because it wouldn't
be fair to keep me around hang-
ing over everybody's shoulder
In his first interview since
being sacked by Jones, Landry
told The Associated Press he will
never coach again.
"I wouldn't think I would
coach again because it would just
be hard not being in the Cow-
boys' blue he said. "People will
forget me pretty quick
He said he would address the
Cowboy players at their mini-
camp today.
"It won't be an easy thing to
do Landry said.
Landry took over the Cow-
boys when they were a ragged
expansion team in 10 and led
them to the Super Bowl five times,
winning two of them.
W

!SK
-
Go ahead and gloat. You can
rub it in all the way to Chicago
with AW Long Distance Service.
Besides, your best friend Eddie
was the one who said your team
could never win three straight.
So give him a call. It costs a
lot less than you think to let him
know who's headed for the Playoffs.
Reach out and touch someone�
If youd like to know more about
AIST products and services, like
international Calling and the AT&T
Card, call us at 1 800 222-0300.
Alex Sum Univers
AT&T
The right choice.





Title
The East Carolinian, February 28, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 28, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.660
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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