The East Carolinian, February 23, 1989






mmmmmmm
Inside
EDITORIALS��.�?4
CLASSIFIEDS.�6
FEATURES 8
Features
Maritime history and underwater archaeology
will trip to Cape Fear.
Check out page 8,
v Sports
Edwards, O'Connor win CAA players
for the week.
Turn to the action on page 12.
Bhz i:ast (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 53
Thursday February 23, 189
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,0CJ
Rape prevention discussed
Bv M1NP McINMS
Mac Wnlft
� lo ECU students know
A questionnairedeal-
impus rapes was given
-elected ECU stu-
rtsto compile data on
rap i vareness.
questionnaire included
ns which pertained to stu-
dents knowledge of campus
�s security andresolutions.lt
wasn't surprising to learn that
students at ECU know either
ven r nothing at all about
- rapes.
( ampussecurity was another
it students were asked to
imenton Mostolrthe students
security isn't strong
- the) offered some reso-
I
uritv should have more
fool rather than in pa-
1 a rs one student said. When
re on foot, they can patrol
i patrol car can't and
ikely the areas that a
� : gel to are the areas
most probable for a
k.
ling to Keith Knox,
t prevention officer at ECU
tpus Security, ECU is like a
thin a city making it easier
because all of the stu-
dent- are in one condensed area.
mpared to Pitt County,
there are more campus police per
n there are police per
I County resident.
Knox admits that there is a
� rrtore security. On certain
ts there may be as few as
e officers patrolling the
grounds of ECU. Oi those three,
not one will be on foot.
He added that despite the
condensed area of campus there
are still too few campus police.
Not one officer can have a day oft
during a regular school year be-
cause there aren't enough officers
to cover all of the shifts.
Security is not the only prob-
lem that causes a lower safety
level on campus. Most students
believe that campus lighting is
inadequate.
The SGA approved a resolu-
tion in march 88' to improve
campus lighting bv installing 150
watt high-pressure sodium lamps
to replace the present lighting
system. The high-pressure so-
dium lamps not onlv yield more
light but they consume 13 less
energy than ECU'S present light-
ing system.
ECU has hired a lighting
engineer to map out the campus
area in order to provide a suffi-
cient lighting system.
Experimental sodium bulbs
have been placed in different loca-
tions on campus such as in one
between Slay and Garrett dorm,
two in parking area between
White and Greene dorm, and
three behind the nursing build-
ing. A final date on when the en-
tire lighting system will be re-
placed has not been set.
The ECU security isn't to
blame for all of the problems con-
cerning safety. Students could
avoid possible attacks bv using a
little common sense.
Knox addsThe only way
that we can have a safe campus is
through a cooperative effort
taken bv each individual in the
university community
To deter rape attacks on cam-
pus, a student should not walk
alone. Rape can also be deterred
bv avoiding dark streets, high
shrubbery, short cuts and dark
doorways.
anet ohnson, chairperson of
ECU'S Sexual Assault Awareness
Committee says that eighty-five
percent of rapes can be prevented;
bv a little precaution, preparation
and awareness, your chances of
attack can be reduced by half.
To help in prevention, ECU
otters services such as the Pirate
Walk and emergency blue lights.
The blue lights, which are placed
at different locations on campus,
are used as a means for students to
contact security when in danger.
Hopefully if the Pirate Walk
is allowed to continue and Knox's
recommendation to add an addi-
tional twelve blue light phones is
approved, there will be an im-
provement in campus security.
ECL's Department of Public
Safety otters classes in sexual as-
sault prevention, date rape, men
concerning date rape, simple
techniques for self-defense in
preventing sexual assault and
rape preventions.
For further information con-
tact Keith Knox at "57-6294, or
come by the ECU Department of
Public Safety
Noted poet Maya Angelou spoke at Hendrix Theate: Tuesday night to an enthusiastic audience.
Angelou is the author of the autobiographical bestseller, "I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
(Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photolab).
Nanotechnology may control
structure of matter in future
By DAVID HERRING
Assistant News Editor
(Editor's note: This is a two-part
series looking intoNanotechnol-
ogy. Tuesday, David Herring
will report on the applications of
this theoretical technology)
Nanotechnology, by defini-
tion, is "a thorough, inexpensive
control over the structure of mat-
ter and although this technol-
ogy is purely theoretical at pres-
ent, it is firmly rooted in existing
technologies, which could ulti-
mately lead us to nanotechnology
capability, according to K. Eric
Drcxler, MIT alumnus.
Drexler's brainchild,
nanotechnology offers humans
the capacity to build program-
mable' molecular machines (as-
semblers) which, according to
Drexler, "will work like tiny in-
dustrial robots, directing chemi-
cal reactions by positioning mo-
lecular tools to build complex
structures atom by atom
The technology would imi-
tate the natural chemical bonding
processes found in nature, ena-
bling humans to cheaply mass-
produce any structure, natural or
man-made, simply by breaking
existing bonds, repositioning the
desired molecules and then form-
ing a new bond to hold it in posi-
tion � and one machine will do
this millions of times per second.
To give an indication of the
size involved, microtechnology
deals with objects on the mi-
crometer scale (a millionth of a
meter), such as construction of
computer chips, transistors, etc.
Nanotechnology would operate
on the nanometer scaie (a bil-
lionth of a meter) � each assem-
bler so small you could count the
number of atoms on its surface.
Easier said than done. We
must first learn how to build one
of these machines, consolidating
information from disciplines in
biology, chemistry, computer sci-
ence, engineering, geology, medi-
cine and physics. Then comes the
hard part: manipulating these
assemblers, which will require
vast amounts of software, on
which we will need to store vir-
tual libraries of data from the sci-
ence disciplines.
Drcxler proposes two ap-
proaches to nanotechnology: top-
down and bottom-up. The top-
down approach is illustrated by
the current trend in computer
technology toward miniaturiza-
tion.
Fifty years ago it would take
rooms of equipment to process
information which a computer
chip the size of a fingernail can
process in a fraction of the time. It
can be argued that if the trend
continues, microcomputers will
ultimately evolve into nanocom-
puters.
Drexler credits the top-down
approach to physicist Richard
Feynman, who in his 1959 article
"There's Plenty of Room at the
Bottom" wrote, "The principles of
physics, as far as I can see, do not
speak against the possibility of
maneuvering things atom by
atom. But it is interesting that it
would be, in principle, possible
for a physicist to synthesize any
chemical substance that the chem-
ist writes down. Give the orders,
and the physicist synthesizes it.
How? Put the atoms down where
the chemist says, and so you make
the substance
Yet Drexler himself is skepti-
cal of the top-down approach and
focuses mostlv on the bottom-up
approach. In 1944, Erwin
Schrodinger wrote What Is Life?
which, according to Drcxler, cor-
rectly viewed life as based on
molecular devices and machines.
Understanding of the func-
tions and structures of molecular
devices found in nature, such as
DNA and enzymes, has since in-
creased so that molecular biolo-
gists, through biotechnology, can
manipulate these molecular de-
vices for purposes other than their
normal "behavior Drexler has
theorized that molecular biolo-
gists could mimic natures proc-
esses by employing biotechnol-
ogy to build assemblers out of
proteins.
Given certain characteristics,
these first-generation assemblers
could then build better, more
complex assemblers made of sta-
bler substances, such as diamond.
"The road to nanotechnology
may pass through protein tech-
nology, using parts as stiff as
wood states Drexler, "but
nanotechnology itself will use
materials like diamond, five times
as stiff as steel and fifty times
stronger
"To picture such a device he
continues, "don't picture a pro-
tein molecule or a biological cell
See NANOTECH, page 2
Workman clear the Chancellor's yard of fallen debris from the weekend ice storm. (Photo by J.D.
Whitmire�Photolab)
Basketball coach Kay Yow to speak at ECU
Bv CLAY DEANHARDT
Staff Wnw
When Kay Yow was an Eng-
lish major at East Carolina
Teacher's College from 1960- � ,
1964, the former Gibson ville High �� 8 �"
School basketball star couldn't
when, as ECU'S 1989 Distin-
guished Alumna Lecturer, she
speaks Monday on "Striving to
Excel�Going for the Gold Her
public lecture will be held at 4
p.m. in room 1031 of the General
plav that sport at the collegiate
level There just weren't that
manv women's basketball teams
in the United States.
A lot has changed since then.
E.C.T.C. is now ECU. Kay
Yow has won an Olympic gold
medal coaching women's basket-
ball and is the head coach of the
perenially powerful North Caro-
lina State Unversity women's
Wolf pack squad.
ECU campus.
Yow began her career teach-
ing English and working as a li-
brarian at Allen Jay High School
in North Carolina's piedmont af-
ter she graduated with a
bachelor's degree from E.C.T.C.
When the basketball coach
there decided he wanted to coach
only the men's athletic teams,
quite a surprise.
"It's not something I had even
thought about doing she says.
Coaching, at that time, was an
almost exclusively male profes-
sion. "I can't imagine their think-
ing it (I could be a coach) any more
than I was thinking it
But blazing new frontiers has
never bothered Yow. Her Allen
Jay teams went 77-20 in four
years, winning the conference
title each year. After she coached
one year at Gibsonville High, she
decided to work on a master's
degree in physical education at
the University of North Carolina
at Greensboro.
"1 planned to go back to
Allen Jay's principal remembered
that Ms. Yow had been a basket-
ball standout during her years at (teaching) high school after that,
ShTwU?talk about her Olym- Gibsonville High School and he she says.
pic experience and her rise to the � " to la1ce �nfAllen W It was not to be.
top of the coaching profession women s program. It came as Yow spent her second year of
the master's program working
part-time in the physical educa-
tion department at Elon College,
just down the road from UNCG.
Elon was just developing a
women's athletic program, and
when they advertised for a
women's basketball, volleyball
and tennis coach and a coordina-
tor of women's athletics, Yow was
coaxed into applying. She began
her collegiate coaching career
there in 1971.
She began coaching colle-
giately at a time when many
people still felt women should not
participate in sports.
According to Yow, however,
intercollegiate athletics teach
women more about life than they
learn in just the classroom.
"If s a very educational ven-
ture she says. "You learn a lot
about yourself. Team competition
is challenging physically, emo-
tionally and spiritually.
"There are many challenges,
and you can create confidence.
You leam dedication, determina-
tion, sacrifice, commitment and
how to work with other people. It
can be a very valuable experience.
"It has been for me
But Yow says she faced a
battle getting the Elon program
off the ground.
"When I started at Elon there
were no scholarships (for
women's basketball) she says.
"Not at Elon But Kay Yow has
never let a little thing like no
scholarships stand in her way. In
five years at Elon her teams
posted a 57-19 record and won
two state championships.
Then, in 1975, Yow took on a
new challenge, becoming coordi-
nator of women's athletics and
the softball, volleyball and bas-
ketball coach at NCSU. She never
looked back.
You would, of course, expect
the new head coach of a growing
power in women's basketball to
feel a little pressure. Especially if
that new coach was one of the few
women in her field: a kind of role
model for future coaches. But
then again, you must expect the
unexpected from Yow.
"I didn't feel any pressure
Yow the philosopher says,
calmly, quietly, as if to emphasize
the fact. "I've never felt a great
deal of pressure.
"I think pressure is some-
thing we put on ourselves that can
either help you or hurt you. You
See KAY YOW, page 5





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23.1989
Guess what? Fast Food isn't healthy
College students are known
for their fast food habits. Fast food
and foods available on campus
are often high in calories, fat,
sodium, and cholestero' Many
students are concerned about eat-
ing a healthy diet because of its
importance in maintaining
weight and minimizing choles-
terol levels. Eating a health diet is
easy once vou learn how to make
the proper food choices. Knowing
how to make the proper food se-
lections is important. Many food
items have the calorie, fat, so-
dium, cholesterol, as well as other
nutrient contents listed on the
label.
Before reading a label you
should know what you are look-
ing for. Many food choices in-
volve making a trade off. For ex-
ample, pretzels have more so-
dium than potato chips, but have
significantly lower calories, fat,
and cholesterol. You need to de-
cide for yourself which of these
vou most need to avoid.
You should also know about
specific ingredients that can clue
you in on things that you may not
be aware of in your food. Hydro-
gcnated oil and palm or coconut
oil indicate high saturated fat
content. Eating foods that are high
in saturated fat can raise your
blood cholesterol level. Corn
syrup, dextrose, fructose and malt
sugar indicate the presence of
refined sugar. Sugar supplies
calories but very few nutrients.
Foods high in sugar are usually
high in calories which can lead to
weight gain. Sugar is also a major
factor in tooth decay.
Health Column
by
Mary-Elesha
Adams
Sometimes you can improve
the nutrient content of fast foods
by making smart choices from the
menu. For example, if you want a
burger, Big Mac has 518 calories,
but a Quarter Pounder without
mayonnaise has less than 400
calories, and less fat. Likewise, a
turkey sub without oil or mayon-
naise has fewer calories, less fat
and more protein than a salami
sub all the way. You don't always
have to go for "a salad" to ensure
low calories and good nutrition.
For example, a fast food baked
potato has only about 150 calories,
complex carbohydrates and lots
of vitamins, compared to a burger
at around 400. Remember to order
your butter on the side and use
sparingly.
Choosing good alternatives
to junk food is the next step to
healthier eating. Raw vegetables
make an excellent snack that ful-
fills your desire to crunch. Try ice
milk, sherbert, or low fat yogurt
instead of ice cream, and replace
chips and pretzels with unbut-
tered popcorn and nuts in the
shell. When you have a sweet
tooth, try fresh or dried fruit in-
stead of candy and chocolate.
Many of these healthy alterna-
tives are available at on-campus
eating sites and in different fast
food restaurants. It just takes
some nutrition sense and a little
will power to make the proper
choices.
If you want to know more
about foods and good nutrition
consider taking a nutrition course
like FNIM 2100. Also, the Student
Health Service has a "Guide to
Healthy Eating" booklet which
you can pick up in the Health
Resources Room. This health col-
umn was written by Laurie So-
dano, student Health Promotion
Assistant and Margie Gallagher,
Associate Professor in FNIM.
Join Chip Carter
and the East
Carolinian features
staff as they go
featuring
T
Campaign to increase organ donors
ECL" Nrwi Bureau
Donor organ recipients will
be sharing their experiences with
others in a campaign to increase
organ donation among eastern
North Carolinians.
A support group being estab-
lished under the auspices of the
transplant surgery division at the
East Carolina University School
of Medicine will serve both as a
public education tool and a sup-
port network among organ recipi-
ents and patients waiting to re-
ceive an organ.
Elder Donald Solomon, a
Kinston minister and three-time
kidnev recipient, will help coordi-
nate the support group.
"Before I had to have an organ
transplant, 1 knew almost nothing
about organ donation said Solo-
mon, who was 23 when he re-
ceived his first transplanted kid-
ney, which his body later rejected.
"I suffered from a lot of fear
because I was just uninformed
he said.
Though the support group
will focus mainly on educating
those who are contemplating an
organ transplant, Solomon says
he hopes to also launch a mass
public education program using
organ recipients as witnesses to
the value of organ transplants.
"I can share much about my
experiences�from learning that
without it (a transplant) my life
would be short, to experiencing
the rejection of an organ he said.
Solomon, associate professor
of the Herring Grove Free Will
Baptist Church in Kinston, and
ECU transplant surgery physi-
cians will set up a speakers bu-
reau. Speakers will be available to
meet with civic, social and
church-sponsored organizations
to discuss organ donation.
Solomon, who is black, says
he is particularly interested in
more education in programs for
blacks. According to state statis-
tics, of the 2,800 people with kid-
ney failure, 68 percent are black.
Statistics also show that blacks
donate their organs less fre-
quently than do whites.
"I feel strongly that the more
people know about organ dona-
tion and its benefits the easier it
will become for them to consider
donating their organs to help oth-
ers said Solomon.
"More education programs
will dispel myths he said.
Organ recipients interested in
becoming a part of the support
group are asked to contact Larry
McClinton, Department of Sur-
gery, Transplantation Surgery
section, East Carolina University,
School of Medicine, at 551-2620.
The East Carolinian
JamcsF.J.McKccDirectorof Advertising
Advertising Representatives
J. Keith Pearce
Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
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Nanotech dreams
Continued from page 1
� picture a jointed, computer-
directed industrial robot arm, full
of gears, bearings, and drive
shafts An atom, relative in
size to an assembler arm, would
"He's (Drexler) dreaming
and it's a pretty heavy dream
continued Smith. 'The tools are
not there at present to do the
things he wants to do. Many man-
THE FACTS OF LIFE
Myth
be like a BB pellet compared to a years of thinking and research
man's arm. will be required to do these
To program the assemblers, things
Drexler describes a process
wherebv Bell Lab researchers are
able to produce "bumps" on ger-
manium crystal surfaces by-
evaporating single germanium
atoms from the tip of a scanning
tunnelling microscope (STM).
"The presence and absence of
such bumps might be used to
store the ones and zeros of com-
puter data, crowding many tril-
lions of bits into a square millime-
ter he states.
A similar process has been
devised by IBM whereby mole-
cule fragments are chemically
bonded to graphite crystal sur-
faces using current from an STM.
However, such experiments have
been unsuccessful so far because
the nature of the bumps has
proven to be uncontrollable.
Once scientists overcome
these problems and get assem-
blers up and running, they would
be used to mass produce more
assemblers so that trillions of
them could be built in a relatively
short time. Drexler cites three
possible means of sending com-
mands to them: colored light sig-
nals, radio wave signals or by
stretching a wire so that it tapers
at the end, small enough to con-
nect to the device.
The assemblers would work
in an environment rich in the raw
materials they would need to do
their work, which would vary
according to the task to be per-
formed. For example, we could
suspend assemblers in the atmos-
phere, obviously rich in oxygen,
and have them replenish the
earth's depleting ozone layer by
re-bonding 02 molecules into 03
molecules.
With na no technology there is
tremendous potential for "good"
and "bad" accomplishments
which will affect the human race
as significantly as the invention of
the wheel, control of fire, harness-
ing electricity, etc. "If we could
arrange atoms as we pleased, we
would gain effectively complete
control of the structure of matter
Drexler states, "Nanotechnology
will give us this control, bringing
with it possibilities for health,
wealth, and capabilities beyond
most past imaginings
"The things he's (Drexler)
thinking about would require
expendi tures of trillions of dollars
over hundreds of years argued
Dr. Jim Smith, ECU biochemist
molecular biologist. In an analogy
to the potential to develop
nanotechnology he stated, "Theo-
retically you could count the
grains of sand on a beach, but it
would be a big problem.

� ��.
Fact
Race is .� � ' � oience no' se�ua! passion H .s on
'����.�� �- its "o se os �?�e weapon
�o be a victim o violence H can hapr
h el'en gfanaC'ne's students wo'lurg women
es Ihe � h and oo� lp sts "ena to piey on
. . � � �� � a . � m r-jted. or seem to
. Ire ;Ti,ng
Rape often occu's in one s nome�oe rt aportment, hose or
� t (ten � tf -� s �' '� the � tim in
. nd the'ape s cc . : nea
�� l coain. and again ana again�until

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Tl IE EAST'CAROLINI AN
FEBRUARY 23,1989 3
I
Appalachian hopes installation of condom
machines will spur similar plans in UNC
BCONE, N.C. (AD � Appa-
lachian State University students
hope their latest safe sex cam-
paign � condom-dispensing
machines in residence halls �
will catch on this vear at other
campuses in the University of
North Carolina system.
Since January, an outside
vendor has supplied some 20
coin-operated machines to offer
students convenient access to
condoms, a leading AIDS preven-
tion device. The ASU campus was
the first in the 16-campus svstem
to install the machines.
Gary Greene, ASU student
body president, will offer his
campus' approach Saturday to
the University of North Carolina
Association of Student Govern-
ments in Raleigh. He wants the
body, meeting on the N.C. State
University campus, to adopt a
resolution supporting the placing
of condom machines in all UNC
system campus residence halls.
"We want to tell them how it
was done and why they may want
to consider doing it Greene told
the Asheville Citizen Tuesday.
"We think the students want it
With plans in hand, other
campus leaders could then ap-
proach their campus administra-
tors as Appalachian students did.
Appalachian Chancellor John
Thomas approved the machines
last December.
"We want to send the resolu-
tion to UNC svstem President
(CD.) Spangler (Jr.) so all the
other 15 campuses can consider
it Greene said.
Although health clinics on the
UNC campuses have been dis-
tributing free condoms for years,
ASU students thought the ma-
chines would make it easier and
more convenient to get condoms
from coin-operated machines.
"The second best way to pre-
vent AIDS is with the condom
Greene said. "And we have to
take this seriously. We have had
one case on this campus and it is
estimated that three of every 1,000
people in the UNC system may be
carriers. If the averages hold, we
may have 30 carriers on this cam-
pus who don't know they have
it
The machines are in 18 ASU
residence halls and commons
areas. The campus splits profits
from the condoms about 70-30
with the vendor. Greene said,
with the campus' 30 percent
going into an AIDS education and
a sexual abstinence counseling
program. A Charlotte company,
Barnett Inc maintains the ma-
chines.
Greene would not say how
many of the 50-cent condoms are
purchased each week on his cam-
pus and other business details,
but that information will be avail-
able at the Raleigh convention, he
said.
"We can't run from this prob-
lem because college students are
sexually active. It's a choice for
safe sex. The machines are back
away in the lobby restrooms and
are very discreet Greene said.
Don't Forget Our Lunch Specials
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The NEWEST
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Man arrested for 35th DWI
DURHAM (AP) � A Raleigh
man was sentenced to four years
in prison after being found guilty
of at least his 35th driving while
impaired charge, but an anti-
drunken driving group said the
prison term � the maximum al-
lowed bv law � wasn't enough.
Otis' Donald Wadford, 52,
was sentenced Tucsdav to two
vears for DWI and two years for
puny sentences long after his arrest, and she sug-
Master Officer D.G. Millanot gested that his sleepiness and
the Durham Police Department ruddy complexion could have
testified Tuesday that he saw resulted from his medical condi-
Wadford driving slowly and tion rather than from alcohol
weaving on a Durham street on impairment,
the morning of Dec. 17, shortly Prosecutor Lawrence
after 9 a.m. He said that Wadford Campbell described Wadord's
kept driving for about half a mile driving record, on the other hand,
even after he turned on his blue as "horrendous" and said that
received a four-year jail term. But
he appealed the cases to Superior
Court the next day and was re-
leased on bond.
driving while his license was per- stop him
lights and siren in an attempt to
manently revoked by Durham
Countv District Court by fudge
Samuel Tate.
Tate also found Wadford
guiltv of obstructing police, trans-
porting a liquor bottle with a bro-
ken seal, driving with no liability
insurance and displaying a ficti-
tious license tag. Wadford, who
received no additional penalties
for those offenses, was found "not
responsible" for onlv one of
Millan said he found a half-
empty bottle of bourbon on
Wadford's front seat and beer
cans scattered about the car.
"He mumbled and slurred
Millan said of Wadford. "He
about poured himself out of the
vehicle. He wras unable to stand
on his own accord His face was
very ruddy
"It was like someone had
bathed him in alcohol. There was
"this man has no concern whatso-
ever for the public
In sentencing Wadford to
four years in prison, Tate recom-
mended that he receive "inten-
sive, ongoing treatment" for alco-
hol abuse while he is incarcerated.
Tate denied a defense request to
recommend work-release for
Wadford.
Last month, Wadford was
sentenced in Harnett County to
seven years and 30 days in prison
after being convicted of driving
numerous charges against him: just a total smell of alcohol about while impaired, driving while his
driving left of center.
"It doesn't seem like a stift
sentence at all Susan Teer, vice
president of the Durham chapter
of Mothers Against Drunk Driv-
ing, said. "He'll be out cTtTvihg
him Millan said.
Millan and Durham Police
Officer Mike Evans both testified
that Wadford refused to take a
Breathalyzer test.
Defense lawyer Martha New
again Tguess it'll take a crash to loid latc tn wadford washospi-
gct him in jail longer than these talizcd with a heart ailment not
license was permanently re-
voked, not wearing a safety belt,
transporting an open bottle of
fortified wine and giving a ficti-
tious name to a state trooper.
In September, he pleaded
guilty in Wake County District
Court to four DWI charges and
RALEIGH (AP) � Gov. Jim
Martin says he is putting together
a public school initiative that
would implement the career-lad-
der program statewide and un-
tangle the teachers' salary sched-
ule, which he called "a horrible
mess
The governor told reporters
about his budding plan Tuesday
but provided few details, saying
it's still in the planning stage. He
said it will be ready to submit to
the General Assembly in a week
or two.
The blueprint will include
funding proposals, Martin said.
He would not rule out a tax in-
crease, although some lawmakers
say they'd oppose a school tax on
top of a gasoline tax for highway
construction that has broad legis-
lative backing.
"I would not be inclined to
support a tax increase every time
we need some money said Sen-
ate President Pro Tern Henson
Barnes, D-Wayne. "We should
try to find the money in other
savings and programs
A 5.25 cents-per-gallon in-
crease in the gasoline levy is a key
component of the highway pack-
age. "I do not believe that this
(highway plan) should pre-empt
consideration of a tax package or
any other means of paying for
school improvements that would
be needed Martin said. "But
before I'm in a position to say how
that should unfold, I've got some
more homework to do
Martin called a news confer-
ence to embrace the $8.6 billion
highway construction program
pending in the Legislature. But he
said he did not want publicity
generated by a study
commission's approval of the
road package to deflect attention
from needed school improve-
ments.
He said he wanted to "assure
the people of this state that
improvements in our public
schools remain among my high-
est priorities (and) will be the top
priority in this legislative year
He said he will suggest ways
to make the program more flex-
ible as recommended by the State
Board of Education. He said he
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r

oUje iEaat (Earoltman
Pete Fernald, omu
Stephanie Folsom, mm mm
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Advertising
Tim Hampton, n�zju�
KRISTEN HALBERG,Sp�rrtEi,for
Ci up Carter, F�re &
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Jeff Parker, sg rmmw
TOM FURR, Circulation Manager
Debbie Stevens, sfcr��ry
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Mac Clark, mm mm
February 23.1989
OPINION
Pago 4
SGA
It's time for everybody to get involved!
The president, vice president,
treasurer, secretary, and speaker of
the Student Government Organiza-
tion are all fraternity sorority- ori-
ented. In fact, the overall percentage
of Greek involvement in SGA is over
60 percent, according to statistics
compiled by The East Carolinian.
Only an estimated ten percent of
the undergraduates on ECU'S cam-
pus are in fraternities or sororities,
so 60 percent is a high representa-
tion for those particular groups.
The reason for this high percent-
age is not a result of anything Greeks
are doing. Or maybe it's a result of
everything they're doing. Greeks
are getting involved in campus
government and that's something
other students seem disinterested
in. If there's to be true representation
of all types of students, then a vari-
etv of people have to get involved.
This apathy also shows up at
election time when students have a
chance to elect top officers for SGA.
The activists at ECU, the ones who
do come out in numbers, the ones
who are behind a candidate aftd will
cast their vote to see that person put
into office are those in fraternites
and sorontk �.
What we end up with is the situ-
ation wherein a small minoritv de-
cide the fate oi the majority, which
rarely satisfies the population as a
whole (take South Africa for in-
stance, though that's an extremeex-
ample). Here, however, there is no
excuse for such exclusivity in our
government, which any student can
become a part of.
Perhaps that is the problem. An
organization such as the Student
Government is very intimidating to
most students and doesn't often
clearly invite new candidates. This
results in an in-breeding which is
detrimental to the equal representa-
tion of various viewpoints. Many
students feel that if they don't have
some sort of political background in
high school or elsewhere, that it's
too late to start pursuing one.
It's not. All a student has to do is
to go and attend one of the SGA
meetings anv Monday at five and
watch the government body in ac-
tion. It will soojx become obvious
that no-one there is much more
qualified to participate than any
other student on campus. In fact,
once you view the proceedings, the
urge to have your voice heard in the
decision-making will Hkely mani-
fest itself.
J� iJAIT! THIS 19 THB SATANIC NllRSBSi'
RtAU-Y, U� MNT CARRY THAT BOOK"
'Satanic Verses' vs.
'Last Temptation'
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Editorial Columnist
The furor generated by Moslem funda-
mentalists over Salman Rushdie's novel
'The Satanic Verses" strikes many in this
country as almost comical. Since there are
comparatively few American Moslems, the
controversy is being treated almost light-
heartedly by the American media.
The Moslem world is remote in more
than distance, however. It is a remote frame
of reference for most Americans, which
could help make it easier for Americans to
view the situation objectively.
It is worth considering the reaction that
would follow from Christian fundamental-
ists in this country had the book dealt with
Christianity instead. Christian fundamen-
talists here and in other parts of the world
have behaved similarly to their Moslem
counterparts when faced with similar situ-
ations.
'The Satanic Verses" offers a chance to
reevaluate the validity of Christian funda-
mentalists' uproar over "The Last Tempta-
tion of Christ In both cases, the outraged
group responded to the presentation of an
alternate view of its beliefs with violence
and calls for censorship. Granted, the Chris-
tian fundamentalists didn't call for Martin
Scorcese's execution but they did destroy
property and intimidate many theater
owners, much as Waldenbooks has been
scared into dropping the book.
Books should not be banned, and their
authors should not face death threats �
even on religious matters. Questioning and
criticism are essential to a healthy and vig-
orous faith, as the Jesuits well know.
One hopes that the public will keep in
rrirnd the Moslems' reaction to "The Satanic
Verses" next time the Christian fundamen-
talists are up in arms. If so, the latter group
may at last get the amount of attention it
deserves- none
Student G cTVipCtywe
HES, But v yf
Cjm�5 to rm. nt
Hysterical overreaction to bats
To the editor:
I fear we have recently witnessed
yet another historical overreaction
based on ignorance and myth. 1 refer
to the poisoning and bludgeoning to
death of over a hundred bats in Belk
Dorm.
According to the biologists who
study bats, fewer than 1 2 of 1 of all
bats are rabid and these are rarely
aggressive. These biologists say that
"when people are threatened, it is
usually because they have picked up
a sick bat that bites in self-defense
Bats are not blind; they navigate not
only using their eyes, but aided by
high frequency sound, and can detect
obstacles as fine as human hair. It is
unlikely they will ever become en-
tangled in your hair.
Bats are very efficient insect ex-
terminators, consuming several
hundred insects nightlv. Many eco-
nomic plant crops, including
peaches, are bat-pollinated, and thus
depend on bats to produce fruit.
Granted that few of us, myself
included, would want a bedroom full
of roosting or flying bats. Butbv using
a little more thought and a lot less hys-
teria, it is plain that a more rational,
humane, and ecologically wise
method of removing these creatures
is simply "exclusion block their
entry into the building and operwin-
dowsBrilow them to exit. S�
1, for one, do not rest easier know-
ing that any variant in our customary
routine can be swiftly brought under
control by calling housing workers
with brooms to beat out the brains of
any intruder and reduce the unpro-
tected to a bloody pulp.
Ann Bellis
Dept. of Biology
North is bad
To the editor:
In response to Nick
Skottcgaard's letter supporting�1-
iver North I would like to ask Mr.
Skottegaard and others like him how
they can show sympathy for a
Constitution violating liar? Oliver
North degraded the country and
Constitution he seemingly fought so
bravely to protect. Not to mention the
fact that supporting the fighting in
Nicaragua is supporting death
whether it's done legally or not. It's
my opinion that Oliver North should
be punished for treason. Is this how I
want to thank him for 20 years of
loyal service to this country? Yes it is
because obviously that was 20 years
served in vain. Oliver North stabbed
his country and humanity as a whole
straight in the back. And if he gets
away with it, well then I guess he gets
the last laugh.
Mr. Skottegaard said Mr. North
"isbeing prosecuted for his hard and
loyal work for the U.S. of A Since
when did shipping illegal weapons
to support another country's war
become part of a Lt. Cols job? Mr.
Skottegaard also pointed out that
"the government has already spent
between 7 and 9 million dollars to
send this patriot to jail Another rea-
son to loathe the man. His utter fool-
ishness and treachery cost moncv,
money that could have been spent on
something useful. I guess this is a
case of the lesser-of-two-evils. I'd be
terrified to think that some mar
getting off scott-free to roam I
world selling and trading whi
knows what to people that ma
stroy themselves and others. &
million dollars i a ridiculous
amount to spend on someone s
viouslv guilty and it pains me to sa
this when there are indeed son
that could have benefited from th(
monev as Mr. Skottegaard said. I
sleep better thinking maybe one
more maniac will be taken off the
streets. It makes me sick to my st
ach when I think oi how people in
trying to turn this back-stabbing
nto some sort of hero.
BethEiln,
Broadcast11 .
Sophor
Pirate Walk
To the editor
After hearing the informahoi
concerning the Fast Carolina L'niver
sity Pirate Walk, we the members i I
Sigma Sigma Sigma feel the program
should be abolished. We feel the besl
alternative would be that the Pn.iu
Waik'te in the hands of the Pu
Safety Department, it is the responsi
bility oi the Public Safety Depart
ment to look after our safety on thi
campus. We hope the Public Safer)
Department recognizes the impor
tance oi this program and will agree
to its terms.
Membei
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Mail or drop them by our office in the Pus
cations Building, across from the entrance to Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters must include the name, major, classification, address, phone number
the signature of the author (s).
Letters are limited to 300 words or less, double-spaced, typed or neatly printed. All letters are subject to editii .
for brevity, obscenitv and libel, and no personal attacks will be permitted. Students, faculty and staff writing
letters for this page are reminded that they are limited to one every two weeks.
The deadline for editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday
editions.
I
I
Spectrum Rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum" section of the newspaper, The East Carolinian features "The Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column by guest writers from the student body and faculty- The columns printed
"The Campus Spectrum" will contain current topics of concern to the campus, community or nation
The columns are restricted only with regard to rules of grammar and decency. Persons submitting columns
must be willing to accept byline credit for their efforts, as no entries from ghost writers will be published.
IF GUNSPONT KILL PEOPLE
PWCHOfWHWA
SGH00WARP utm "J
A GUN, -
0UTAGUN.






�� '
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23,1989 5
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Pending $8.6 billion highway
give NC economic boost, says
plan to
Martin
RALEIGH (AD - The $8.6
billion, 12-year highway con-
struction program pending in the
General Assembly is "a phenome-
nal piece oi work that would
give North Carolina's economy a
big boost, Gow Jim Martin says.
It will strengthen our ability eluding a 3-cent boost in the flat
to bring manufacturing jobs into per-gallon rate and an increase
an) area of the state Martin said
Tuesday. "It will strengthen the
abihtv to get our goods to market.
It will strengthen the ability of
travelers and tourists to travel
where thev want to go in North
Carolina
Martin officially endorsed the
package at a news conference,
although he had said for months
he expected to support the recom-
mendations of the Highway
Study Commission, lie ap-
pointed five of the commission's
13 members and his administra-
tion worked with the panel in
developing the plan.
It is "the boldest highway
Democratic legislative lead- ture Subcommittee on Highways,
ers have said Martin's stamp of said he already had been ap-
approval was crucial to the proached by someone wanting to
program's enactment. They said add a road project to the list of
the General Assembly would not those promised funding under
raise taxes over the Republican the study commission plan. "1
governor's motor fuels tax, in- said 'absolutely not" Church
said.
"If we start tampering with it
from 3 percent to 7 percent in the too much, it'll come unraveled
tax at the wholesale level. Infrastructure Committee Chair-
It also would levy a 2 percent man Sam Hunt, D-Alamance,
fee on automobile title transfers, said. Legislators and administra-
The governor was briefed on the tion officials said they knew of no
studv group's plan Tuesday significant opposition to the
morning at an Executive Mansion program's major components,
meeting with Transportation Sec- despite lingering questions about
retary Jim Harrington, House what combination of taxes and
Speaker Joe Mavretic, Senate fees should be levied.
President Pro Tern Henson Bar- "I haven't heard from any
nes, Lt. Gov. Jim Gardner and opponents Harrington said,
others. "How can you be against God,
The package is expected to be motherhood and highways?"
introduced in the House and Sen- Gardner said in an interview
ate this week. It will be scruti- he also backed the package, dc-
nized bv more than half a dozen snite the aversion to higher taxes
that conservative Republicans
committees and subcommittees,
construction program in the his- but sponsors say they will resist traditionally espouse.
tory of North Carolina a phe- major changes that could endan- "You're basically talking
nomenal piece of work Martin ger the coalition of support it en- about a user's tax Gardner said,
said. "It will helpbring jobs to the joys. "If we're going to have economic
people, it will help get the people Rep. John Church, D-Vance, development in this state, you've
to the jobs chairman oi the House Infrastruc- got to have roads. That's the key to
Join Tim Hampton
and the East
Carolinian news staff
as they cover the
events on campus and
Greenville
it
The program would establish
a trust fund that would pay for an
"intrastatc highway system" that
would put 95 percent of the state's
residents within 10 miles of at
least one four-lane highway. It
also would fund "loop" highways
around major urban centers and
pave all state-maintained secon-
dary roads within 16 years.
One piece of unfinished busi-
ness is developing an "equitable
distribution formula" to ensure
that every region of the state gets
a fair share of the construction
money.
Harrington is considering a
plan that would combine the
state's 14 highway divisions into
seven regions to which money
would be distributed, Martin
said. "That's a good concept, one
that I'mpreparcd to support he
said.
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Kay Yow
Continued from page 1
make your own decisions about
pressure. It can be a motivator, or
a destrover
Yow began her international
coaching career in 1979 as an as-
Mstant coach for the World Games
in Mexico Citv. "From that point
on 1 had quite an extensive career
coaching international!v
Extensive � and successful.
In 1986, Vow coached the Ameri-
can team to a victory over the
Soviet team in the Goodwill
Games in Moscow, marking the
first time in 2 vears the U.S. team
had beaten the Soviets in major
competition. (The U.S. team won
the 1984 Olympic gold, but the
Russian team boycotted those
Olvmpics.) Folio wing the loss, the
U.SS.R. fired their women's
coaching staff and began to pre-
pare for the W rki Champion-
ships iater that year.
The US, lea bv Yow, met the
Soviets again in those champion-
ships. And once again the score
came out in favor of the Ameri-
cans. Finally, after years of grow-
ing to reach a level where they
could compete internationally,
the U.S. team took the lead in
women's basketball.
lt was a lead they would not
relinquish for the 1988 Olympics,
where Yow's team devastated the
Soviets in the semifinals before
knocking off the Yugoslavians to
win the gold medal.
Yow says winning the gold
medal was the most thrilling
thing that's happened to her as a
coach, with the experience of the
opening ceremonies running a
close second.
Back home at N.C.S.U. this
year, Kav Yow stresses the impor-
tance of academics to her players.
"We have an assistant coach
in charge of academics, as kind of
a liaison between athletics and
academics she says. "We also
have a required study hall and an
extensive tutoring program.
There's a great emphasis on it all
the time
And then there's tradition to
think about. Yow's Wolf pack
squad is 19-5 as of Tuesday and
10-2 in the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence. Their final game is Saturday
against the University of Virginia,
and the team is assured of its 14th
winning season in 15 years.
Ms. Yow's work, as impor-
tant as it has always been, has
taken a new focus since a recent
brush with cancer. In 1987 Ms.
Yow had a radical mastectomy.
Afterwards, she agreed to serve as
a spokesperson and fundraiser
for the Lineberger Cancer Re-
search Center in Chapel Hill. She-
is on a mission to raise $1 million
for research there, and after just
over a year she has passed the
half-way point, having raised
$600100.
Through it all, if there is one
thing that has remained constant
about Yow, it is her faith. Deeply
religious, Yow feels her faith has
helped her to face the challenges
that have confronted her on the
court and off.
"It's like a wheel. Each
person's wheel has a hub around
which all the spokes connect and
from which the wheel revolves.
My faith is my hub. Everything I
do is going to relate to that she
says.
"It's the same with other
people. For some the hub is
money, for others basketball.
They don't always know what it
is, but they've got one she says.
Yow's faith has been a matter
of public discussion ever since she
smuggled Bibles and other reli-
gious literature into the Soviet
Union, where they were illegal,
during the summer of the 1986
Goodwill Games and World
Championships.
She still will not openly dis-
cuss the matter for fear there may
be some reprisals against the
people who took the literature.
Expect faith to be a key focus
of Yow's lecture when she speaks
Monday at ECU. Using the Olym-
pic theme as a reference, Yow says
she will talk about what it takes to
be successful: focus, vision, plan-
ning, teamwork and desire.
It would be tough to find
some one more qualified to dis-
cuss what it takes to be a success.
Throughout her life, and beneath
the many hats she has worn, Kay
Yow has always worked to be the
best she could.
Just watch her on the basket-
ball court.
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Educators, career persons
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zoological problems this week
at the 17th annual sociological
research conference held at ECU.
More than 120 participants
from mid-Atlantic region colleges
and universities are prc-regis-
tered for the conference which be-
gins Thursday at the Ramada Inn.
The event is cc-sponsored by
Alpha Kappa Delta International
honor society in sociology chap-
ters at ECU and Virginia Com-
monwealth University,
Richmond, and the Department
of Sociology and Anthropology,
the College of Arts and Sciences
and the Student Government As-
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Friday and Saturday sessions
include sections on the sociology
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trauma, career opportunities, eat-
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Tt IE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23,1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
APARTMENT FOR RENT Two blocks
from campus. (One bedroom available
unbl July). Fully furnished, walking dis-
tance to campus and downtown, hard-
wood floors, friendly neighbors. $130
month plus utilities. 757-0412.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: Non
smoker to share 2 bedroom townhouse, 1
1 2 baths. No deposit necessary Located
in Williamsburg Manor. Call Ximena be-
tween 7 a.m5 p.m. at 551-2109 or after 8
p.m. & during weekends at 756-7797.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For summer at
llilton Head Ocean front. Brvan 758-
1665.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: March 1st
Georgetown Apartments. Two bedroom,
112 baths. Walking distance to campus
and downtown. Free cable. 830-1758.
Leave message
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: starting in May. Three bedrm.
apt. at Eastbook. $121.00 a month 13
utilities New Carpet and New refigera-
tor, ECU Bus Serivice' Call now.
FOR SALE
LASER PRINTER USERS HP and
Apple laser printer toner cartridges can be
recycled' Huge SS savings. Satisfaction
guaranteed. For details call RANDMONT
at 1-800-332-3658.
SONY RECEIVER: Excellent cond. Re-
mote control, still has4 vears on warranty.
Only SI75.00. Call: 758-9470 anytime.
FOR SALE: Need ECU Alumni Directory,
if vou have one and want to sell one,
please call rhil at 919-829-2099 or 919-876-
0669.
CAN �OU BUY: Jeeps, Cars, 4 x 4's seized
in drug raids for under SI00.007 Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
COUCH FOR SALE: Battan wood with
pastel cushions. Good condition Price
negotiable. Call 752-6443.
FOR SALE: 1979 Mazda. 4 speed, AC,
81,000 miles. Asking S900.00. Call 752-
6554.
FOR SALE: Ringgold Towers B-unit 306
fullv furnished. Take over mortgage pay-
ments Call 407-778-8030 in the evenings.
FOR SALE: Used sofa. Average condi-
tion. Call 752-6554.
FOR SALE: Ethan Allen bedroom set
$475.00, couch Slp9.00, lSOCs oak dining
table S339JC. baukj-dlrfUniniu-
tatete S49.e9r nilm MM $5
SOUND MIXTURES DJ SERVICE:
Musk for all occassions. March dates
available, call Bob at 752-4916. The most
music variety with the best sound quality.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Mary Smith REAL
Crisis Center 758-HELP.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships.
S10,000-S105,000vr Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 10-14 part-time soc-
cer coaches for the Spring Indoor Soccer
program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills and have pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
5-18 m soccer fundamentals. Hours ap-
proximately 3-7 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Some night and weekend coach-
ing. Program will extend from March 13,
1989 to May, 1989. Salary rate starts at
S3 55 hr. Application will be accepted
starting Mon February 6. Contact Ben
James at S30-4550 or 830-4543.
WANTED: ENG Editor, proficient 34"
video tape editing. Part-time. Contact
News Director, W1TN-TV, 946-3131.
EOEAffirmative Action Employer. Mi-
norities and women encouraged to apply.
BRODY"S AND BRODVS FOR MEN:
Are now accepting applications for Cus-
tomer Service Representatives and also
Sales positions for the Spring semester.
Sincere individuals with flexible sched-
ules should apply at: Brodv's, Carolina
East Mall, M-W, 2-4 p.m.
HELP WANTED: Summer pb, June-
August, at Emerald Isle. Mechanically
inclined individuals to operate jet ski
rentals. Call 523-4798 in Kinston day or
night.
i.
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSISTER
CAMPS: (Mass) Mah-Kee-Nac for Boys
Danbee for Girls. Counselor positions for
Program Specialists: All team sports, es-
pecially baseball, basketball, field hockey,
soccer and volleyball; 25 tennis openings;
also archery, nflery and biking; other
openings include performing Arts, Fine
Arts, yearbook, photography, cooking,
sewing, rollerskahng, rocketry, ropes,
camp craft; all waterfront activities
(swimming, skiing, sailing, windsurfing,
canoeingkavak). Inquire J & D Camping
(Boys) 190 linden Ave Glen Ridge, NJ
07028; Action Camping (Girls) 263 Main
�Rflatg MOntfrffig,Ty�07045 Phone (Bovs)
014
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a DJ. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call355-
2781 and ask foT'TOorgan "�
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO DJ. Call
early and book for your formal or party.
75S-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage.
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM-
POSED: Call 756-9136.
ATTENTION�HIRING Government
jobs�your area Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. $17,840-
S69,485. Call 1-602-838-8885. Ext. B 5285.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED: Starting
March 6th. Monday-Thursday after 2:30
p.m. Pay starts at S5.00hour. Call Pitt
County Community Schools. 830-4240.
HELP WANTED: Male workers needed.
From 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. NO PHONE
CALLS. Come by Carpet Bargain Center,
1009 Dickinson Ave. for interview.
NATIONAL MARKETING FIRM
SEEKS: Ambitious, mature student to
manage on-campus promotions for top
national companies this school year. Hex-
ible hours with earnings potential to
$2,500. Call Lisanne or Rebecca at 1-800-
592-2121
PERSONALS
REWARD Know anyone who has a
new large oval-shaped purple stone ring?
One was lost 2-9-89 in the downtown area.
Call Wendy 758-6946 Sentimental value.
Will pay for its return.
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Would like to con-
gratulate the newest sisters of our soror-
ity. April Barbour, June Barker, Elizabeth
Batson, Elizabeth Gerard, Suzanne Grace,
Shannon Malsey, Jeni Hedrick, Kellie
Houchen, Jane Huggins, Joyce Parleey,
Katherine Price, Lori Reynolds, Lisa Tay-
lor and Tracy Tuten.
ZTA BASKETBALL PLAYERS: Good
luck in the basketball tournament tonight.
We love you. �The non-playing sisters
and pledges of ZTA.
AOPI'S OWN: Jacque Farris, Caroline
Haire and Fay Jones. Congratulations on
becoming sisters of AOPi. Sorry Guys!
AOPI'S: Get ready for a wild weekend.
Friday's the sister party (be festive!). Who
knows what the rest of the weekend will
entail.
GREEKS: We hope everyone's plans for
Spring Bieak are coming along. Have a
spankin' week. �The sisters and pledges
of AOIM.
ADPI: Hope ya'U are ready for the pre-
downtown throw down at Grog's tonight!
We're all lookin' forward to it! �Love,
Theta Chi.
THETA CHI WANTS: To congratulate
Pat Moye on his work with Special Olym-
pics and we can't forget Clay's o-fer per-
formance on the Coach Steele Show. Way
to go air wacker!
THETA CHI PLEDGES ARE: Having a
car wash Saturday at the Fuel Dock. Come
out and get your car washed cheap! We
specialize in buses and urban assault ve-
hicles!
SIGMA BASKETBALL: Good luck in the
tournament. We'll be cheering for y'all
�Love, the Sigmas.
SIGMA FIELD REP: Hope your stay at
ECU will be one to remember. We look
forward to working with you. �Love, the
Sigmas.
SIGMA WATER POLO TEAM: t lang in
there, y'all are doing a great job We love
each & every one of you. L.D. stay in that
innertube �Love, the Sigmas.
FREE CAR WASH TO SUPPORT THE
MARCH OF DIMES: Will be held Satur-
day at Quincy's Steak 1 louse by Sigma
Alpha Epsilon Please support the March
of Dimes
SAE: Basketball team�y'all are doing
awesome. 'Nuff said. Water polo team,
keep it up and stay in vour innertube
Chuck.
SAE AFTERNOON DELIGHT: Every
iatrirngiii, nworinftppB at,5s30-
&mmiimdmmt D�te and thetwcredtblg �
bearded lady.
SIG-EPS: Paul Ax, Willie, Trum, Tripper
IL, and Chuck Wagon take your FAT A's
up North for Spring Break! So you don't
have to take your shirts offj-
KA'S: Thanks for inviting us over for the
pre-downtown party. We had a great
time. Let's do it again, soon �The Sig-
mas.
SCOTT SNYDER AND WENDY ARTS:
The cat is out of the bag. May your lies be
filled with happiness and many plump
children. �The Sweethearts.
HEY ALL YOU HOODU GURU AOPI'S:
Grab your tie-dyes and sandals and get
ready for a sixties flashback tonight. It's
going to be a gToovy time so get stoked! �
Peace, chicks. �Love, the Alpha Sigs.
GREEKS: Here's the news, have you
heard the latest!? We're selling t-shirts
and they're the GREATEST! 'Ten rea-
sons to be Greek" is what it's all about, buy
yours today�you WON'T want to be left
out! Just ask any AZD for more details!
ECU: Get psyched for Spring Break! Don't
forget to buy your 'Ten reasons to b�
Greek" t-shirts�JUST IN TIME FOR
SPRING BREAK! �The AZD-s.
LAMBDA CHI'S: In just a few hours,
we'll be rorkin' with you! Wearing leather
and chains, and riding motorcycles too!
Bring your helmets, 'cause the ride will be
rough! We're GETTING GNARLY ON A
HARLEY�are you tough enough!? (We
can't wait for this one. . .�Love, the
AZD's.
HEY HEY: DZ this weekend was a blast.
Alumni and fun, it all went too fast. Pick-
ing up spoons, three man dice. A big silver
barrel and three bags of ice. Kappa Sigs,
SAE's, and a lone Sig Ep. Stratford Arms
rocked�no tenints slept. Faye Head
came by, yogurt in hand. The stereo
rocked the girls in the band. The girls then
stormed Pantana B's place. On the ice we
slid home, everyone safe. Let's do it again.
HEY: ECU Basketball Team: The Delta
Zetas would like to congratulate you on
your win against American U. Keep up
the good work! � Love, the sisters and
pledges of Delta Zeta.
KAY YOW: Your Delta Zeta sisters would I
like to welcome you back to ECU and we
hope you enjoy your visit. We are very
proud of your success! �Love, the sisters I
and pledges of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES: We hope your
week is going fine. You're almost there.
We're having a great time! (Hope you are
too!). �Love, the sisters.
PI KAPPA ALPHA LIL' SISTERS: Ifs
your Appreciation Week. Your Big
Brother will be gettin' in touch with you
all during the week. Party with you Thurs-
day before the Fizz at the place. You are
the Best! �The Guys.
THANKS TO EVERYONE: Who partici-
pated in Win, Lose or Draw Tuesday. You
made it the success that it was. PIKE-IT.
ALPHA PHI: Thanks for a killa' good time
at the Palace last Thursday. We'll do it
again. �Pi Kappa Alpha.
THETA CHI TOP 10 MOST TOLD LIES
AT WAKE FORREST: 10 It never snows
in Winston-Salem. 9. Mike's friends are
good looking. 8. It's not gonna stick. 7. The
first meetingis at 8:30.6. Ye OT Duck Trap
has a stop light. 5. Front desk? This is
Charles Pfautz 4. Hey, the Beast is good.
3. Eat up guys, there's plenty of food. 2.
Moncla knows how to drive. I. Wake
Forrest can party.
HOMYS: Tag team wild thing nosh
masters cheezy road trip lust
lightning farts mv "bwovs I Love You!
�The Nickster (HLS).
SIGMA NU: Be a part of the fastest grow
ing fraternity on campus. Sigma Nu is
holding a second rush Mon. and Tues
Feb. 27 & 28. Enjoy pizza Mon Chinese
food Tues and on both nights live music
with a live DJ. Come on out and meet the
Brothers, pledges and Little Sisters. Go
GREEK! Rush Sigma Nu Fraternity. 410
Elizabeth St right next to Lambda Chi's
house. Call for rides and more info. 758-
6472.
THE PI KAPPS PRESENT LITTLE SIS-
TER RUSH: Monday and Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 27th and 28th, 8-11 pm at the
house. If you are interested in us, we are
interested in you! The Pi Kappa Phi or-
ganization looks forward to seeing you
there!
We started Friday with a wild time at the
house which continued into Saturday
with some basketball and a ribbon cutting
ceremony that will never be forgotten!
Saturday night we partied hard once
again with 180 Proof and Tommy doing a
good fill in as DJ The alumni were im-
pressed and the rest of us had a blast!
BETA PSI PLEDGES: Never fear another
day is here Sunday may have brought
fright, but it should have shed some light
Get strong, be proud because we know
you have potential, now is the time to use
it
NEED A RIDE: Back from Charlotte this
weekend Will contribute gas
PI KAPPS: Founder's Day was a success' money. Call Stephanie at 752-8579.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
RING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER '89. EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS. FOR
INFO. CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH I
AT 752-2865
ATTENTION!
PAN HELLENIC
COUNCIL
ANNOUNCES:
FALL
SORORITY
RUSH
WILL BE HELD
BEEORE
CLASSES.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Phi Sigma Pi Car Wash
9 am - 4 pm
Saturday, Feb. 24th
Fuel Doc
lOn the comer of Greenville Blvd and 10th Street
$2.00
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru Sat. Low
Coat Tennin.iMon to 20 week nr pregnancy
I 1-800-433-2930
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Subscription Form
Narru
ALPHA PHI: Tonight will be a blast.
Luotewg swwe) la r Tlwi'Brotheraa �
SlgtrfrjaEftstWrt �
ALPHA PHI: Can't wait for Thursday.
Just bo ready for an awesome time�SAE
style. �Love, SAE.
THETA CHI AND PANTANA BOB'S:
Are having Happy Hour from 9 till clos-
ing on Wed. Come down to the best party
in town!
THETA CHI: How was that weekend at
Wake Forrest?
AOPI: Cowboy hats and Indian attire
were the outfits that we desired. Kingston
Place served as the ok. corral, cause, ev-
eryone there was throwin' down! With
Big Silver things lined along the wall, all
but one bit the dust, but they could have
been the death of us all. Once again, y'all
have outdone the rest, that's what makes
y'all the definite best! �Love, the Theta
Chi's.
BE A FOUNDER OF A FRATERNTIY:
No pledging is involved. It you're inter-
ested in making a difference, come to
Mendenhall room 2-�8 tonight at 8:15 p.m.
For more info, call Kevin 830-13.
Address:
Date to Begin:
Date to End:
Amount Paid:
ss- Business: a
Date Paid:
Rate: Individual $25 prr yearBusiness SIS per year
Return to: The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg - HCU. Cwcnvillc. NC 27838-4353
Right After Spring Break comes the:
14th Annual
TKE BOXING
Ringgirl Competition
March 14 th
at
THE ATTIC
1st Place $100
2nd Place $75
3rd Place $50
Plus all three places receive $40 each toward purchase
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Hey you guys! Come join the fun on the
Student Union Travel Committee's cruise
to the BAHAMAS over Spring Break.
There will be dancing, swimming, relax-
ing and tons of other things to do aboard
ship. All transportation and "all you can
eat" on the Carnival ship The ship will
dock at Freeport and Nassau, so come on
and shop until you drop in the world's
biggest marketplace!
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
WEIGHT LIFTING CONTEST
Muscle and muscleless bound men and
women should attend the Intramural
registration meeting for the annual
weight lifting contest Feb. 20 at 5:00 p.m.
in GCB 1026.
FCU NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 730-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
ments served. No ticket required; just
reserve your time.
COppFRATTVEED.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered by
the Univerity, is designed to help you find
career-related work experience before
you graduate. We would like to extend an
invitation to all students to attend a Co-op
info. Semiror in the GCB. Seminars for
spring '89: Feb. 23,4 p.m room 2016; Feb.
27,4pm, room 2016.
ASffi
A Service Auction sponsored by the stu-
dent chapter of ASID is scheduled for Feb.
23 from 7-9 p.m. The auction will be held
in room 205 of the Home Ec. Bldg. All
proceeds will benefit the physically dis-
abled. Donations are tax deductible. Serv-
ices include: House cleaning, baby sitting,
car washing, yard work & window wash-
ing. Students & faculty & staff are encour-
aged to attend!
INTERVIEWING WORK-
SHOPS
To help ECU people prepare for on and off
campus interviews, the Career Planning
and Placement Service in Bloxton House
is offering these one hour programs to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search. The pro-
gram is open to the first 20 people to come
for each session. No sign up is required.
These sessions are held in CP&P Room on
Feb. 13 and 23 at 2:15 p.m.
CAMPFIRE
Sing, eat s'mores and share good fellow-
ship around a campfire, Feb. 17 at 8:00 in
the Ampitheatre behind Fletcher Dorm.
(Weather permitting). Bring instruments,
blankets, flashlights, dress warmly. Spon-
sored by Wesfel (Methodist and Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministries), 758-2030 or 752-
7240.
SOPHOMORES AND TRS
Earn over $600 mis summer. Earn $100 a
month during your last 2 years in colleg�
Become a part of the Army ROTC Dept.
here at ECU. Attend the summer officer
leadership course at Fort Knox, Kentucky.
Info, meeting will be held on Feb. 23 at
1800 hours in room 339 Rawl. It's not too
late for you to earn a commission prior to
graduation. For more info contact Capt.
Steve L. Jones, Rawl 344, 757-6974.
IN-REC SERVICES
TIMEX AEROBIX WEEK, Feb. 20-24
marks a week of fitness and giveaways for
all aerobic fitness participants. Watches,
aerobic fitness apparal, coupons and fit-
ness information wil be given away dur-
ing the week of festivites.
ANIMAL RIGHTS
ECU students for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals (SETA) will hold its introductory
meetingon Feb. 28, in GC1004 at 5:00. A16
minute video on primates used in immu-
nological studies will be shown. All stu-
dents desirous of a more equitable world
for animals should attend.
VISITING LECTURES PRO-
GRAM
The National Parks - Public Education -
Earth Science and International Conser-
vation Issues. Co-sponsors: The Honors
Program, The Science and Math Ed. Cen-
ter, International Studies, ECU. Science
and Environmental Policy: The U.S. and
our Global Habitat" Feb. 21 (co-sponsored
with the ECU Sigma Xi Chapter). Richard
"Pete" Andrews�Director, Institute for
Environmental Studies, UNC-Chapel
Hill. 7:00pmroom 1028 GCB. "Shenan-
doah National Park-Its Natural and Cul-
tural History" Feb. 27 (co-sponsored with
the Cypress Group, The Sierra Club) John
A. Connere�Geog. Dept Radiord Univ
Radford, VA, author of 5henandoh
National Park�An Interpretive History
730 p.m room 1028 GCB.
QM BUCCANEERS
lNJ Buccaneers will be given away on a
fi -come, first-serve basis starting Feb.
2. at 5 p.m. They will be given away from
the Buccaneer office only. There's only a
limited supply and no more can be or-
dered. So come early to receive your copy.
ATTN. ART STUDENTS
The Parents' Day Weekend Committee
needs a logo for 89. Any media or ap-
proach is accepted (except usage of the
Pirate Mascot). Please turn in entries with
3x5 card stating name, address & phone
to 209 Whichardby 5 p.m. on March 15.
The winning entry will be awarded a $25
cash prize. Don't delay, enter today! For
more info contact Tonya Batizy (w)757-
6611 ext. 210 or (h) 830-8888.
PHI ALPHA TKETA
Phi Alpha Theta will have a meeting on
Feb. 27th at 1:30 p.m. in the Todd Room in
Brewster Bldg. All members are urged to
come.
P.F� MAJORS CLUB
ATTENTION, all P.E. Majors: We have a
meeting Thurs. night at 8:00 p.m.�please
be there. Plans about our PARTY will
definitely be discussed. If you are unable
to make the meeting, ask a friend about
the details. Don't forget�Party is this Fri.
night Make plans to attend.
DEBATE AT BRODY
The ECU Delegation of NCSL will host the
state Feb. Interim Council on Feb. 25 & 26.
Debate is scheduled from 830 a.m. to 6
p.m. each day at the Brody Bldg. (School of
Medicine). Affirmative Action and the
use of video tapes for testimony in physi-
cally or sexually abused children cases arc
issues to be discussed. Please come out
and meet people from 20 other universi
ties in the NC College & University Sys.
For more info contact Janet at 355-6420
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the April
issue. Articles can be left at the office or the
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library. The first issue for Spring
semester is expected to arrive in a few
weeks.
MUSIC EVENTS
ECU School of Music Events Feb. 21-27:
Faculty Recital, Kim Peoria, bassoon (Feb.
23, 8:15 p.m Fletcher Recital Hall, free);
Ralph Walton, clarinet, graduate recital
(Feb. 24, 7:00 p.m Fletcher Recital Hall,
free); Faculty Recital Brad Foley, saxo-
phone, with guest pianist Donna Cole-
man (Feb. 26, 3:15 p.m Fletcher Recital
Hall, free); Tom McGinnis, piano, junior
recital (Feb. 27,7:00 pm Fletcher Recital
HaU, free).
TENNIS DOUBLES
Swinging singles prepare for the Intramu-
ral tennis double competition registration
meeting to be held March 14 at 6:00 p.m. in
BIO 103.
PRE-SEASON SOFTBALL
A pre-season softball tournament spon-
sored by CO. Tankard Co. (Miller Lite)
will hold its registration March 14 at 5:00
p.m in BIO 103. T-shirts, trophies and
more will be awarded to participants.
Don't miss the big event!






y
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23,1989 7
Announcements
BLACK FACULTY SYMFQ-
SiilM
1 lembers of the Organization of Black
Faculty and Staff (OBLS) will present their
current andor on-going research inter-
ests during Black History Month. Presen-
tations will be held each Mon. during the
mi atth of Feb in the Ledoma Wright Afro-
American Cultural Center from 1130-
l.X). Students, faculty and staff are en-
couraged to bring a brown bag lunch and
enjoy the discussion. Sponsored by the
Office ot Minority Student Affairs.
SWIM MEET
Drown vour sorrows by signing up for
this years intramural swim meet. This will
be the only swim meet until 1990! Don't
miss registration meeting March 15 at 5:00
p m. in GCB 1026. Your spring tan should
ki k great'
SOFTBALL
P-utter up! Intramural softball registration
meeting will be held March4 at 500 p.m.
in BIO 103. All men's and women's teams
must send a representative.
ALPJ1AJAFPAAJLPHA
You are cordially invited to Alpha Kappa
Alpha's Black History program featuring
Dr. Theodore Muchiteni Feb. 23 at 7.00
p.m 1031GCB.
IMPyriviNCi STV"Y SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your GPA.
All sessions will be held in 313 Wnght
Bldg. Feb. 27�Time Mgrnt, 3-4:30 p.m
Feb. 2S�Time Mgrnt, 3-4:30 p.m.
Feu LAW SOCIETY.
Oar next meeting is Feb. 23 at 6:00 p.m. in
GCB 1012 Please attend.
PSI CHI
All new members who have recieved a
letter of acceptance into Psi Chi honor
society must fill out membership cards
along with a check for $35 (made out to Psi
Chi) by Fn Feb. 24 in the Psi Chi Mailbox
(RswllOt). If both check and membership
card are not recieved, you will have to
reapplv for membership next semester
The next meeting will be held in Rawl 302
on March 1 at 400- All members must
attend
fdI GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir thanks you for
your support throughout our 10 years of
existence as a recognized campus organi-
zation. We will be celebrating this mile-
stone with a special anniversary musical
program on Sun. Feb 26 at 3.30 pm in
Hendrix Theatre. Students and children-
$1, Adults- $2. We look forward to sharing
our happy occasion with you.
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The next Accounting Society bus. meeting
will be held on Feb. 27 at 3:00 in GCB 1032.
Wachovia's Regional Internal Auditor
will be the guest speaker. Professional
dress is recommended.
ODN
The Overseas Development Network will
meet today at 5 p.m. in room 247 MSC All
members should attend because we'll be
discussing our fundraisers, especially the
upcoming dinner. Anydn interested in
learning about Third World problems
please attend. For more info call Tonya
Batizy (h) 830-8888, (w) 757-6611, ext. 210.
HONORS ORG.
The EC Honors Org. is the student honors
group at ECU; it works closely with the
Honors Program and is affiliated with the
N.C. Honors Assoc, Southern Regional
Honors Council, and National Collegiate
Honors Council. Meetings are held on al-
ternate Thursdays at 5:00 in room 1004
GCB. The next meeting will be held today.
Contact Dr. Sanders (757-63731 for more
info.
PIVE CLUB
There will be a meeting Feb. 27 in rm. 1012
GCB. Ray Scharf will be presenting a slide
show and discussion on diving in the
Bahamas. New comers welcome. For
more info call David Angel at 355-3546
after 800 p.m.
outreach production coming to ECU
March 27th and 28th. Come join us!
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Looking for fellowship, fun, and bearding
God's word? You are welcome to attend
Prime Time at Rawl, rm. 130�every
Thursday night at 7:30. Refreshments
served.
CONCERT
In, varsity is having a concert of prayer
Feb. ?4th in GCB 3008 at 7 p.m. We will be
praying specifically for the HABAKKUK
CO-OP ED.
If you are interested in federal jobs and
how to handle the federal employment
process (permanent, summer, or Co-op),
you will want to attend a presentation by
Mr. Phil Hansor. of the U.S. Office of Per-
sonnel Mgrnt. on 224R9, from 1000 a.m
-12 noon in room 1031, GCB.
CULTURE MEETING
You can learn what Mormons believe. We
will be holding a culture meeting every
Thurs. from 630-8:00 p.m. in room 248
Mendenhall. Any questions, please call
752-4310. Everyone welcome to attend.
It's hip.
It's now.
And, best of all
It's free.
The
East
Carolinian
"You get what
you pay for"
Waldenbooks explains reasons for withdrawal
NEW YORK (AP) - yhen is a
okstore legally liable for terror-
ism? The bookstore chains that
pulled "The Satanic Verses" off
their shelves probably aid so with
at least one eye on lawsuits filed
against Tan Am after a terrorist
limb blew up the airline's Flight
103 last year.
The companies - Walden-
books and B. Dalton - said concern
for employees' and customers'
safety mandated withdrawal of
the novel.
The Ayatollah Khomeini had
prenounced the book sufficiently
blasphemous to warrant a death
sentence for its author, Salman
Rushdie, and those involved with
its publication.
Waldenbooks said its store
managers had received bomb
threats. Legal experts say the
companies undoubtedly had an-
other cause for concern: their po-
tential liability if someone were
injured or killed in a terrorist at-
tack.
The companies "might be
concerned about their employees,
and they might be concerned
about themselves said George
Gabel of Jacksonville, Fla chair-
man of the American Bar
Association's committee on defa-
mation.
Spokesmen for the compa-
nies declined to say what role, if
any, the threat of lawsuits played
in their decision, or on exactly
what information they based their
actions. But in an article Tuesday
on the op-ed page of The New
York Times, Waldenbooks presi-
dent Harry Hoffman referred to
the fate of Flight 103 and the 259
people aboard.
Saying that his decision to
remove the novel followed "real
threats made against the lives of
real people Hoffman added:
"We have only to contemplate the
downing of the Fan Am flight to
be reminded that such threats
may be taken seriously
In that case, the airline was
informed by the government that
bomb threats had been made
against Pan Am jetliners flying to
the United States from Frankfurt,
West Germany. U.S. diplomatic
personnel were notified of the
threats, but the general public was
not.
Flight 103 from Frankfurt to
New York blew up over the vil-
lage of Lockerbie, Scotland, on
Dec. 21. killing all 259 aboard.
Some of the victims' relatives
have sued, claiming Pan Am
should have disclosed the threats.
In the "Satanic yerses" case,
the ayatollah sentenced to death
its author, Salman Rushdie, "and
all those involved in its publica-
tion who were aware of its con-
tent
Legal experts said that a law-
yer could legitimately interpret
"publication" to mean "distribu-
tion and give his client sound,
albeit rather conservative, advice:
gee the book off the shelf and out
of the windows.
Several prominent lawyers
said they liked the store's chances
in a legal fight. "I don't see a spe-
cific warning having been given
here toy Khomeini) said Robert
Bohner, a Brooklyn attorney who
has represented plaintiffs in
many negligence cases. "The
chances of liability in a case like
this are probably rather slim
Andrew C. Hecker Jr a Phila-
delphia attorney who heads the
ABA's committee on torts, said,
"The question is whether a com-
pany must heed every warning it
gets. It might be that if every
warning were heeded, you could
not conduct your business.
P
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Get 10 OFF the total Purchase
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pirin
PLUS FREE "HOW TO PREVENT SUNBURN
Brochure
j
K (rlf.
1989
1990
SGA SPRING ELECTIONS
FOR
� PRESIDENT
�VICE-PRESIDENT
� TREASURER
� SECRETARY
(16 hours completed)
RFQIITREMFNTS FOR NOMINATION;
1-Full-time Student
2-48 hours completed
3-Previously enrolled at ECU for two
Consecutive Semesters
4-In good standing
5-2.0 GPA
Filing Begins Friday, February 24th thru Friday, March 3.
Deadline For Filing is Friday, March 3 at 4:00 p.m.
SGA Office, Room 222
Mendenhall Student Center
Mandatory meeting of all candidates will be held Tuesday,
March 14 at 5:15 pm, Room 242, Mendenhall Student Center





THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
Features

FEBRUARY 23, 1989 PACE 8
Students search ships
By ALICIA FORD
Staff Writer
ECU students help excavate a shipwreck in Virginia last year. This year, the field school will be
on the Cape Fear river. Any interested student is invited to sign up.
Cabaret' is a worthy diversion
ECU will lx sponsoring its
11th annual Field School in man
time history and underwater ar-
chaeology at Cape Fear, N( , dur-
ing the second session of summer
school 1989.
The trip starts on )i:ne 2S and
runs approximately through
August 3. The Field School is
designed to provide the students
with a basi introduction to
American maritime history an i
the scientific methods thai are
employed in underwater re-
search
Each student will participate
in classroom lectures, workshops,
seminars, and will conduct on
site research at a series of Civil
War period shipwrecks in the
Cape Fear area. The field research
isdesigned to locate, identify, and
assess approximately 30 areas of
shipwreck sites, all sunk during
the Civil War.
Gordon Watts and William
Still, both professors of maritime
history and underwater archaeol
ogy, will bo supervising the trip
"We will accept almost anv
one, it's not a cut and dried situ
ation. Last vear we had i music
major sign up The only requin
ment is that you are al least .i
junior, and if you div y u must
have your own scuba equip
ment said Watts
I Fndergraduatcand graduate
t redil of up to five hours will he
offered for the Field ScIkk1, and
you don't hue to be a diver to
p irtcipate. They need students to
work on the boats, conduct his
torical land research, and re-
search the conservation oi hist n
cal artifacts.
Ten students will beac( epted
for the trip, although in the past
they have had as manv as 16 who
participates!
"We have to cut it i (i al nine
or ten due to a limited am
space, facilities boat and
members You need a
ratio of student to ti
to adequately sup n isi i verj
one said Watts
The ! i'ld s hool is i um i "
working out arrangm i I
use the studentsat an air tor
radar si itio in f " ; r " '
� in operation In 1
have; S �� �
base, ,i middle s hool in i �
Island,and utilized rental 1- us -
rhc (ost for the h �using is still
undetermined, and the Students
will b- responsible I r their own
� ils.
program his 1
ratioi iii c � ' � i I
recently wrapped up thro-
of research on the Yorktown Ship
See HELD, pae 9
F?v FEE HIGF1SMITH
Stiff Writer
Tuesday night, I found my-
self sitting in my room thinking
What good is sitting alone in
� Mir room? Come hear the music
play Yes, Cabaret was in Wright
Auditorium, and I couldn't resist
'tie of the greatest musicals ever
lone on stage. In other words, I
opened the doors of Wright with
�t of expectations.
The play is set in Berlin just
prior to World War Two. Cliff
tradshav (played by Dan
harkev), an aspiring novelist,
i omes to Berlin to find a master-
iece. Instead he finds love in
ightclub dancer Sallv Bowles,
md decadence and rising turmoil
in the world around him.
He rents a room in a boarding
house run by tough old Frau Sch-
neider (Judy Ferrell), an elderly
ladv preparing to marry one of
her boarders, Herr SchultzCTim
Hover).
One of the major conflicts of
the play arises out of this situ-
ation, since Schultz is a few, and
the Nazi's are making their pres-
ence felt in German life. Another
conflict emerges when Sally be-
comes pregnant.
All of this is viewed amid the
lewd Kitkat Club, hosted by the
Emcee(Scott Thompson) an out
rageously and wickedly wise
character. "Leave all your prob-
lems outside he demands at the
beginning of the show, as he leads
you in to the problems of these
unfortunate Berliners.
The Emcee was excellently
portrayed. He was rude, loud and
offensive. Perfect. He set the tone
of sleazy desparation that per-
vades the plav.
The song that should have
been the climax of the show, the
title number "Cabaret didn't get
me out oi mv seat. Sallv Bowles,
played by Carolvn Wesley, is in-
tended to be very strange, ener-
getic, sultry and English. Wesley
never had a consistent accent
throughout the plav.
Overall, 1 enjoyed the show.
The singing, dancing and chore-
ography were excellent, and thus
buried my dissatisfaction with the
Sally Bowles character. Top
notch? Maybe not, but almost
worth the seven bucks 1 paid to
get in.
day in the life of an art major
Art major not so 'typical'
By KAREN MANN
Miff Writer
Finding a typical art major is
ut as easy as finding typical
irt Students range from busi-
n like commercial arts majors
to theso-called nonconformists of
th fine arts departments.
Senior metal design student
Mice Zincone sees herself as
�eing some where in the middle of
these two extremes.
lot of people think we're
.H weirdos but vou'll find all
kinds of people over here she
savs. "I'm just me, a very up front
and ordinary person. I have my
own ideas and style. Every art
mapr is an individual
For all their individuality, art
Coming
this
weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
The Beam
New Deli:
The LA Booker Band
Attic:
Lex Luthor
Mendenhall:
Crocodile Dundee II
(through Sunday)
Friday
New Deli:
The Distance
Attic:
Over the Garden Wall
(Genesis Tribute)
Saturday
New Deli:
The High Water
Blues Band
Attic:
White Heat
Monday
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
majors do have certain things in
common. Most become interested
at an early age and enter school
with the intention of being com-
mercial artists. Zincone is from
Greenville and began taking art
classes at Rose High School. Her
father is chairman of the ECU
Decision Sciences Department
and the family went to many
School of Art gallery openings.
WTien it came time for college,
Alice naturally picked ECU.
"1 wasn't interested in going
far away she says, "that's too
much of a hassle. Besides, ECU
has one of the better art schools on
the East Coast
Zincone decided against
commercial art after dealing with
a very technical project in her first
design class. After a brief stint in
environmental design, she finallv
settled on metals.
"1 like to build with nrt)
hands. The fabrication in metals
appealed to me. It's more 3-D
than, say, CA, and I can get my
hands on it better
Tuesdays and Thursdays are
devoted to metal design classes.
At 8 am. Zincone has an inde-
pendent study with Linda Darty.
Ine class members meet about
oneeevery three weeks to present
their work in a critique. Other-
wise, students don't have to go to
class but they are expected to
spend at least 3 hours a week in
the metals studio. Zincone likes to
utilize the alloted class time
though she usually starts working
around nine instead of eight.
After a lunch break, Zincone
is back in Jenkins for an advanced
jewelry techniques class. Stu-
dents learn to work with faceted
stones such as emeralds and dia-
monds and explore new ideas in
metal. This semester the course is
being taught by visiting artist
Steven Albair.
"Steven's from a different
market and area of jewelry Zin-
cone said. "We'll all benefit from
having a different teacher
When class is over, she either
heads home or to the New Deli,
one of her favorite downtown
restaurants. Then it's more work
in the art building until around
1:30 or 2 a.m. when her day is
finally over.
"I try to make myself come
See ART, page 9
Bill �ind Ted have an excellent adventure with Socrates and Hilly the Kid in ' Bill and Ted's
Excellent Adventure Thev travel in time in a phone booth. Holy Tardis!
Bill and Ted's adventure not so
excellent unless you dig Tiff an
ByMICAH HARRIS
S'j'f Writer
Once in a while a movie come
along that you want to rush out
and see at once. Bill and Ted's
Excellent Adventure" is not that
movie.
The idea of two California
surfer types tripping through
time and having adventures is
appealing in itself. But what the
production team has done with it
is closer to appalling.
Bill (Alex Winters) and Ted
QCeanu Reeves) are two aspiring
teen rock stars who've spent so
much time practicing in the ga-
rage that they're failing history.
Ted's father (played by 1 lal Lan-
don, jr. as the despotic parent
these teen movies are lousy with)
threatens to send Ted to military
school and break up their friend-
ship and their band
No great loss, right? WRONG
the paradise of the 27th century
is dependent on these lads' suc-
cess The rulersof the future send
the "super-cool" Rufus (George
Carlin) into the past to give Pill
and Ted the secret of tune travel
and a history project tint is a
guaranteed A
"Bill and Ted's Excellent
Adventure" has its moments The
special effects are good, and there
are some genuinely funny bits,
such as Socrates and Billy the Kid
becoming pals and trying to pick
up some valley girls at the mall.
Or Ted's being analyzed live on
stage by Freud as part of the his-
tory project.
There's enough cleverness
glinting through courtesy of
scripters Chris Matheson and Fd
Solomon (story editor of "The
Gary Shandlinc Show") to show
this movie could've been better.
But then, it wouldn't be a teen
movie, would it?
"Bill and Ted" is no foot in
reality to either be removed later
or remain as an anchor and refer
ence point for the viewer. As zany
. K Hitchhiker's
Galax) was. there was alv
Arthur Dent's straight-man cl -
acter who couldn't quite a
the bizzare situations he and
weirder pals found themselvesin.
"Bill and Kd' offers no
straight man. Not only are both of
them spaced out, but the stable
characters oi their real world
with the exception of their history
teacher are presented as par
dies: Te I - estapo d.A, Bill'
oversewed father and ur
step-mother Instead of I
moving into absurdity Bill and
led' goes from silliness to silli
ness
"Bill and Teds E
�dventure" could tun e w rfc 1
on a parodic or even an absurd
level but the producers were t.s1
busy making sure they cranked
out the apropriate teen drivel. If
you groove to Tiffany
to emulate Corey Haim,
like this. ton. This movie get
bogus two cat heads
Pickin' the Suspicious Bones
Top 13
Top 13 Albums
1 � Elvis Costcllo "Spike'
2 � Replacements "Don't
Tell A Soul"
3 � Guadalcanal Diary
"Rip Flop"
4 � XTC "The Mayor of
Simpleton"
5 � Thrashing Doves
'Trouble in The Home"
6 � Christmas "Ultrapro-
phets of Thee Psykick Revolu-
tion"
7 � The Wonder Stuff
"Eight-legged Groove Machine"
8 � Slammin Watusis
"Kings of Noise"
9 � The Slugs "Non-stop
Holiday"
10 � Buck Pets "Same"
11 � DT & The Shakes
"Hits"
12 � Throwing Muses
"Hunkpapa"
13 �Sweet Baby "It's a
Girl"
Bonehead suspects plot from cordons
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Sutf Conspirator
Winter is in the air. At ECU,
conspiracy is in the air. All over
campus, things are beingmystc-
riously roped off. Buildings,
sidewalks, trees, certain profes-
sors everything is being cor-
doned by fences, tape, rope and
string.
The trend started a few
years ago, when they blocked
off the street in front of the stu-
dent store. Ostensibly, this was
to repave the street, but campus
insiders knew it was a scheme to
stop the almost militant gather-
ings of students outside the
store every day between classes.
It continued last year, when
the fence around Mendenhall
sprang up overnight. Inside the
fence, a large hole appeared.
Many students thought this was
the foundation for the Menden-
hall Reflecting Pool, but plans
changed. The annex got built in-
stead.
The fence was for, quote,
"the protection of the students
so they are not harmed by fall-
ing debris as the concrete patio
is destroyed Right. What else
was the patio but a place where
students congregated between
classes possible plotting the
overthrow of the administra-
tion.
In the past semester alone,
patches of sidewalk have been
roped off. University officials
say this was to keep newly-
dried concrete from being van-
dalized. But if s no secret that
those sections of sidewalk were
the most heavily trafficked
walkways to classes.
Eventually they tried to sec-
tion off the Publications Build-
ing, home of The East Carolin-
ian. This came during our ex-
pose of the squirrel man affair.
Obviously, the university was
trying this lame method of con-
tainment to stop our coverage of
the squirrel attacks.
Erwin Building was the
next to fall victim to this odd
method of censure. It's common
knowledge that delicate gov-
ernment secrets were being
stored there secrets that might
have indicted several school of-
cials in the Iran-Contra affair.
This week, after the Great
Blizzard, taped cordons ap-
peared around several trees and
bushes. The official university
explanation is, "We're trying to
keep students out from under
trees where large deposits of ice
have been melting and falling.
Honest"
Right, folks. If all were so
concerned about our health,
why wasn't the huge Menden-
hall Canyon roped off when it
appeared three months ago.
The student center was al-
most completely inaccessible
for weeks, and several students
returning home from down-
town at night were found the
next morning, half-suffocated in
mud.
Never saw any ropes
around that, did we? No. Of!
course not. There's obviously
some plot going on. But what
exactly is the plot71 put a team of
crack reporters on the job and
the facts are startling.
Why were certain things
contained and others weren't?
Well, the most common de-
nominator were the areas where
students frequented. Denyng
students access to these places
denied them the chance to meet,
gossip and communicate infor-
mation with other students.
Point one: Ignorant stu-
See BONEHEAD, page 9






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23. 1989 9
Rope skipping rhymes are fun
STORRS, Conn. (AP) �
Those who hear the rhyme should
also know there's reason behind
the child's game of skipping rope,
according to a University of Con-
necticut English professor.
I think maybe that if I've
found out anything, it's that all
found th world, children skip
savs Fracelia M. Butler, author of
Skipping Around the World:
The Ritual Nature of Folk
Rhymes" (Library Professional
Publications, $18.50 paperback,
$29.50 hardcover).
The book is a collection of
skip rope rhymes and chants that
Butler collected from 57countries
during more than 40 vears of trav-
els.
Butler, who teaches
children's literature, savs no mat-
ter what the country, when she
hands a child a rope, the skipping
begins
Chants are universal in
themes � protest, loneliness,
love, nonsense and the future,
such as the rhyme: "Who will I
marry? Doctor, lawyer, merchant,
chief
"That 'who will 1 marry'
rhyme is in every country Butler
says. Butler maintains that saying
rhymes while skipping is more
than childish rambling; it's a rit-
ual.
"There's magic connected
with it she savs.
"If a child skips and he
stumbles, he doesn't just go on
chanting. He stops and begins at
the beginning again he feels
that in the invisible world of the
whirling rope, if he stumbles, he's
let bad influences in or evil in. So
he has to start the ritual over
again
Butler says one of the most
beautiful American rhvmcs is one
she first heard in the 1940s:
"On the hilltop, stands a lady
Who she is, I do not know
All she wears is gold and sil-
ver
And she needs a nice young
man
Butler says what struck her
about the rhyme was that she
heard it in a black community
J
near Falls Church, Va and it's an
example of a black culture pre
serving a white rhyme.
While there are some general
themes, the collection also in-
cludes a chapter of rhymes that
Butler says "will make your hair
stand on end She was referring
to a group of rhymes collected
from urban playgrounds.
"Some adults are surprised,
even shocked she says, "to learn
that many children's rhymes, in-
cluding those for skipping, have
an unmistakable sexual, even
bawdy, element.
'They're very, very dirty
While many of the skip-rope
rhymes change little over the
years, Butler says some new one?
do crop up and reflect current
events and times, such as a popu-
lar rhyme during the administra-
tion of President Jimmy Carter:
"Peanut shells, Carter smells,
Amy got suspended
But for the most part, Butler
says, the rhymes remain very tra-
ditional and are very much like
folk tales in that "nobody really
knows the history of them or how
old they are
The art of skipping rope itself
is timeless, she says, adding that
there is evidence that ropes were
used by people in ancient Scandi-
navia and ancient Greece, but it's
not knovn if they had rhymes and
chants.
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See US for all Your
Automotive Needs
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville. NC 27834
758-7676
Bonehead thinks something
funny is going on around campus
Continued from page 8 chance o, becngujlormedo, wouU, be a�oTJroubte
Continued from page 8
dents equal easily manipulated
students.
Why were the newspaper
building and the ROTC build-
ing quarantined? The newspa-
per provides in-depth explora-
tion of events on campus. The
ROTC provides an easily mobi-
lized armed force.
With these two organiza-
tions paralyzed, the easily ma-
nipulated students from two
paragraphs ago would have no
chance of becoming informed or
being stopped should they de-
cide to mass together.
Point two: Someone doesn't
want to be stopped.
What about the other, seem-
ingly innocent areas, the trees
and sidewalks? Well, without
the resources of shelter the trees
provide and the easy access the
sidewalks provide, anyone
opposing a mass grouping of
easily-manipulated students
would be in a lot of trouble.
So what can we conclude? Is
an unknown force trying to ex-
ploit the student body of ECU
into some kind of perhaps ille-
gal activity? Is there something
sinister going on? Is the whole
thing one of my paranoid delu-
sions?
Could be. Or else somebody
at maintenence is real bored and
doesn't have anything better to
do than rope off things.
The Clearly Labeled
Satire Page, currently
under new
management, is still
the
hippest part of the
non-offensive East
Carolinian.
Our motto:
"You get what you pay
for
Local and Out of
Town Newspapers
Full Selection of Magazines
Greeting Cards For All Occasions1
Balloon.v.for all occasions
,i?Ktv3i �' -3W7 � �? i,
�sjKii'W St (iSk JFCt
CENTRAL BOOK
& NEWS
Greenville Square Shopping Center � 756-7177
Open Til 9:30 pm Seven Days A Week
laza Cinema
Consolidated
Theatres
Adults $275 'til
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME S250
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Field school scheduled
Continued from page 8
wreck Archaeological Project.
The school spent the past three
summers in Yorktown, VA, near
the Coffer Dam excavating the
remains of this revolutionary-
warship that was scuttled by
Comwallis during the Civil War.
Glenn Overton, a graduate
student with a B.S. degree in
Public HistoryMaritime His-
tory, participated in the research
at Yorktown and plans to attend
the Field School again this sum-
mer.
"It was fantastic. You can
learn so many different tech-
niques in underwater archaeol-
ogy and historical research while
vou are actually at the site Over-
ton commented.
Overton is also a graduate
teaching assistant and is currenly
teaching a class in scuba diving
this semester.
"The great thing about the
field school is that it gives the
students an opportunity to actu-
ally see the research. They have to
make an analysis of what they
find, record all their work, and
basically try and figure out ex-
actly what it is they're looking at
said Overton.
The students usually work
from eight in the morning to five
in the afternoon, Monday
through Friday. "We get to go
diving every day said Overton.
"You can stick around the site if
Art major can
still party
Continued from page 8
over here every night so I'm not
jammed up on weekends she
says. "Even so, I'm usually over
here both Saturday and Sunday
While not exactly the perfect
party schedule, especially for
Greenville's nightlife, Zincone
said, "I always find time for that
Her future is almost as organ-
ized as the present. After gradu-
ation in December, she plans to
continue her job repairing jewelry
at Brendle's.
"It's good experience because
I get to work with gold and use
different torches and solders
Even though she likes learn-
ing about jewelry's commercial
aspects, Zincone would rather be
doing her own intricate designs.
With the money saved from
Brendle's, she hopes to open her
own studio here in Greenville and
begin taking commissions.
"I really like Pitt County and I
want to stay here she says. "The
people are all nice and the area has
a lot of history. I suppose you
have to be a native to know what's
here
you want, but most of the stu-
dents go home on the weekend
Although Still and Wats pick
the students who arc already en-
rolled in the graduate program,
they also go by a first come, first
signed-up basis.
"This program is for anyone
who is interested in history, div-
ing or the conservation of arti-
facts. It's a good way to combine
the three into an interesting learn-
ing experience said Overton.
BEFORE YOU START YOUR CAREER,
IT PAYS TO LEARN THE ROPES.
Making decisions. Handling responsibility. Working with
others. These are things vou must learn to do to succeed in a
career, according to a survey ot 850 employers.
These are also what vou have to leam to succeed in the Army
which makes the Army a good place to prepare tor the working
world. This is where you'll learn teamwork, responsibility and
self-disc inline�the qualities employers look tor. Nobody will
have to show yiw the ropej�� you'll already kn�u them.
kind ixil more about now the Army can help give you an edge
on a career and on lite. C all your Army Recruiter today.
Sgt. Cottrell 756-9695
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
yiMlt Our Badger
Section
There's A
New Breeze
Blowing
over at
1900 Dickinson Ave,
Greenvillex
830-0174-
i Tom Togs
Factory Outle
900 Dickinson Ave Greenville
830-0174
All New Price Categories
Our Irregulars & Close-outs
Start at $2�� . . .Nothing over $24"
(Retail values up to $48)
Discount Prices Daily
Stores owned & operated by
the manufacturer
Trocadero Tom
Conetoe Togs Fashions
Hwy. 64 East Memorial Drive
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS
West Area Residence Council
is having a
Talent Show
March 20, 1989
7:00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
All those interested in participating should pick
up an application at Mendenhall Student Center
Information desk
or Call Mike at
752-9756
All applications should be turned into
701 Fletcher Dorm by March 1.
Tickets on sale at door.
For more information call
752-9069
T"t "V






Stye iEaat (Eawliman
: ft rj�: CM -u j�irv. pmmhmIj si�rf !
FRATBOY FERNALD, Big Smy Fr Boy
Freckles Marvel, mumtimi
James F.G.H.IJ. McKee, g
E arlvis, iuka ofhuzi uitor Brad Stairwell, oryt ���
KR1STEN FANCLUB, Almo Anytk,nt Go. EAtor U'L EFF BARKER, SUff McKm, Uogr,fha
BIPPY CONEt IEAD, Co M.jmm U,tor TOM FURRCOAT, � Lrprc Urftetirr
Sweet Baby, h , L�fcy Little Debbiecakes, shu m a tw� &
Dean Clean, d��m, iwh Stephanie Notfolsom, w ib,
Stephanie Alsonotfolsom, Pkr��, f� Clay Deanhardt, d ��, nm��
mm 23.1989 NOT-TOO-CLEARLY-LABELED SATIRE PAGE Page 10
Bats
They're all Reagan's fault
Recently, several bats were dis-
covered roosting in Belk dormitory.
The presence of these bats poses a
grave threat to the nature of democ-
racy and the moral basis of Ameri-
can society.
It is obvious that the missing
cinderblock that allowed the bats to
enter was purposefully removed by
overzealous agents of the Religious
Right who are attempting to under-
mine the efficiency of colleges which
allow male and female students to
mix freelv.
And even if it wasn't � so
what? The point is that the right
wing is doing all it can to remove
rights from the rest of us. This type
oi scare tactics simply cannot be al-
lowed to persist.
It's all Reagan's fault. Under his
so-called leadership, cinderblocks
lost their status as an equal part of
buildings and were reduced to sec-
ond-class building material. The
Reagan administration's lackadaisi-
cal attitude towards and reluctance
to prosecute cinderblock removers
has led to a rash of such incidents all
across the country.
It's easy just to treat this as an
isolated incident. But it clearly is not.
The right wing has been removing
cinderblocks from dormitories,
ACLU offices, and abortion clinics
all across America. Statistics re-
leased just last month by People for
the American Way, a liberal lobby-
ing group, show an exponential in-
crease in the number of cinderblock
thefts � up to 1024 last year, from a
low of two in the last year of the
Carter administration. Such thefts
were nonexistent under our first
president, George Washington,
who wasn't a Republican.
It is ironic that the Reagan ad-
ministration took such a soft view of
cinderblock tamperers. The Soviets
used advanced cinderblock-re-
moval technology to plant sophisti-
cated bugs in the U.S. embassy
under construction in the Soviet
Union. One would think the admini-
stration would have taken a lesson
from this cinderblock-related disas-
ter and declared cinderblocks off-
limits to Americans who seek to
advance political goals.
It's time we all fought back. It's
time for true Americans to stand up
for their rights, no matter how con-
fused they may be about just what
those rights are, and insist that the
right-wing lunatic fringe just plain
leave them alone. Because if they
don't � by 5:42 p.m. today at the
latest � they'll find themselves
hideously deformed, despised by
family and friends, suffering from
crippling, incurable and highly con-
tagious diseases, and just generally
not the sort of person who gets in-
vited over for Pictionary� a lot.
WMPffl
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian does not wel-
come your letters. Uhn-uhn. No way
Jose. Especially those letters expressing a
point of view differing from our own
divine opinion. But if you M UST, if your
immortal soul won't rest until your
name is blazoned across our letters page,
here's what to do. The mailing address is
British Airways, Ingrams Drive,
Greenwich.
For verification purposes, you must
include your name, major, classification,
address, phone number, photo, pet's
names (if any), mother's maiden name,
blood type, student ID card, two major
credit cards, social security card, library
card, proof that your name isn't Stepha-
nie, and a partridge in a pear tree.
Letters better not be more than 200
words, 'cause we count every one. Actu-
ally, we make the secretary do it. Feel free
to libel, slander and personally attack
anybody you feel like. Even that guy with
the zits in your Geography class. Stu-
dents, faculty, and staff who still think
they need to voice their unworthy opin-
ion are reminded you may only write one
letter a decade, so save up til you need it.
The deadline for all letters was yesterday.
ECU: Problem-free or what?
To the editor:
In response to your last issue of
The East Carolinian, 1 personally
found it to be the rottenest (sic) issue
of your rag yet. I have been reading
for the seven years I've been here and
you obviously don't know the first
thing about journalism (except
maybe the yellow kind).
Of course, I'm referring to almost
every article you printed in that edi-
tion. Your paper keeps claiming
there are problems on our campus.
There are NO PROBLEMS on this
campus! I am a third-year senior, and
I should know.
The only reason you make up
titles like "Board opposes tuition
hike" is to grab the readers' attention
with racy stories. Even if a problem
did, by some chance, pop up on
campus, instead of leaving it to the
administration to handle, you'd
probably run an in-depth article on it!
1 can't believe that the SGA and
the administration, and the student
body of our fair school let you keep
printing this trash. I hope someone
closes you down now that I've ex-
posed you for what you are � LIB-
ERAL GARBAGE!
Bleedin Poofter
Third-year senior
Industrial Hygeine
Whiny fascists
To the editor:
In response to Alec Smarty's let-
ter in the Feb. 16 edition of the East
Carolinian, in which he accuses me of
being a conservative fascist Republi-
can, I would like to respond by say-
ing:
WAAAAHH! WAAAAHHHH!
AM NOT! AM NOT! AM NOT
Justa Kiddin
Not sure what year
Not sure I have a major
Poem vindicated
To the editor:
In response to the letter printed
in your paper decrying Sir Scott of
Scanning's poem in your Valentine's
Day issue, I would like to rifyafew
things.
I am Mr. Scanning's editor at
Cellulite Poetry Press, Inc. The poem
printed in the East Carolinian, "Ori-
gin of the Species was the rough
draft of Mr. Scanning's poem. We
mistakenly sent the features editor of
your paper the version of Scanning's
poem that contained the verb "f�"
17 times.
The new, improved and less
naughty version reads as follows:
Intercourse, intercourse,
intercourse, intercourse,
Intercourse, intercourse,
intercourse, intercourse,
Intercourse, intercourse,
intercourse, intercourse,
Intercourse, intercourse,
intercourse, intercourse,
Intercourse.
We hope no one was inconven-
ienced due to our error.
Apologies,
James Volume
Cellulite Poetry Press
Clay has a dream
To the editor:
There used to be this guy named
Martin Luther King Jr. But forget
about him I'm Clay Deanhardt
and I have the real dream. I'm a erad
SBBHB! arca f MMWSHF fl '
I would have been the one to get
quoted if I'd been born forty years
ago. I know it. I have lots of good
ideas. Did I mention that I'm a grad
student?
I also graduated in three years.
I'm a university scholar. I know I
would have come up with all those
cool quotes like "I have a dream if
I'd been more than a toddler in the
60s.
But anyway. I do have a dream. I
see a day when everybody, under-
grad and grad student alike, bow
down in worship to me Clay Dean-
hardt. Did I mention I used to work
for the paper?
I see a day when I get articles
printed about me in thealumni news-
letter. I see a day when I run for
chancellor. I see a day when I finally
realize I'm never getting out of
Greenville.
Well, I think it's a good dream.
Clay Deanhardt
Graduate Student and
Part-Time Deity
Njeff: man or myth
To the editor:
In response to Mr. Smarty's let-
ter in your Tuesday edition of the
paper, I just want to state that I AM a
real person, with hopes, dreams, and
beliefs of my own. I am NOT a he
ment of Justa Kiddin's imagination,
created solely for the purpose of
getting two or three of his letters in
The East Carolinian each week. It
clearly states in the rules of the East
Carolinian letter column that
pseudonvms are not allowt-d in the
letters to the editor.
Enclosed is a photograph th.it
you may wish to print. It shows Mr.
Kiddin and mysel f together, proving
we are not one and the same.
Thank you,
Njeff Menaleus
A Real Person
Honest
Editor's Note: We did indeed ret ewe
a photograph of Mr. Kiddin and Mr
Menaleus. Mr. Menaleus seems to have
a female body and an oversized head that
resembles an old publicity photo oj Don
Knotts. We're thinking r iiight, Justa.
Bad! Bad Satire Page!
To the editor:
In response to the so-called
"Clearly Labeled Satire Page" you
run every Thursday, 1 have a few
things to say.
You arc all going straight to hell.
Do not pass "Go Do not collect $200.
Rev. N Tolerance
Church oi St. Marv oi the Cacti
Spectrum
Rules!
In addition to the totally us
Campus Forum, we have a section called
the Campus Spectrum Rules! This is a
rod opinion column written by guest
writers, usually by a grad student who
used to work for us. The columns printed
will contain current topics of interest,
like the fact that my apartment building
is sliding into the tar River.
The columns are restricted with
regard to the laws of grammar, decency
and physics. People and other mammals
submitting columns must be willing to
accept byline credit for their efforts, so
that everybody who picks up a pa �
know who wrote such laughable dn
Spectrum Rules, man.
Big E argues for co-species habitation in school
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
New E-Public
With the recent resurgence of rodents, house-
hold pests and other creatures living in the homes
and rooms of college students, landlords and build-
ing tenants have taken unethical measures in eradi-
cating animals and insects created by God.
The time is no w to stand up for the rights of rats,
mice, cockroaches, ants and bats.
Case in point: last week's bombing of Belk Dor-
mitory on the ECU campus by five F-15 US Air Force
jets to rid the building of "little brown bats" was
uncalled for.
University officials repeatedly bypassed pro-
posals made by the Biology department to turn the
dormitory into a zoological complex. Indoingso, the
ECU powers that be forced themselves into a "little
brown corner" with the sole alternative of nuking
the entire campus.
My question is this: if the administration felt so
strongly, why didn't old Dick call up the Ayatollah
and tell him the author of "Satanic Verses" was
living in Belk? This would have pushed the US into
war with Iran, a police action all true Americans
want.
But this is not the only instances in which ECU
officials have taken drastic measures to kill rodents.
Few people know the real reason behind the
construction of the General Classroom Building. The
huge complex wasn't constructed to. provide addi-
tional instructional-lectures rooms. It was built to
cover up the largest rat's nest in North Carolina.
Under the elaborate inner wall crevices of the
complex there are literally millions, yes millions of
rattia rodenti crawling in pestilent herds. Known to
have bred with squirrels, the rats can't be distin-
guished from squirrels and therefore they go unno-
ticed; but beware: they are really rats.
Other campuses around the nation have faced
similar dilemmas. The University of Oregon in
Eugene fire-bombed a cafeteria infested with cock-
roaches while the multi-colored potatoes were still
warm. Blockhead College in Wanna, Utah solved
their silverfish problem in a gym locker room by
unleashing silverfish-eating rats. Blockhead later
regretted the decision when they had to place rat-
eating pit bulls in the gym locker room. The dogs ate
all the rats, which ate all the silverfish; but my oh my
the mess they made.
The classic case involves cows and pigs at NC
State, where campus officials made the decision to
overlook the situation and enroll the barnyard ani-
mals as students.
Save the bats, rats, cows, pigs and other animals,
because by the year 2121 we will all be living in inner
wall crevices with the rest of nature.
Quote of the week is:
"Robin, you're feeling
the first thrusts of manhood.
� Batman
worst time wanting to do something. She actuallv
came over to my place last week and made a scene
because I wouldn't leave my friends while we were
watching the Carolina-State came. I mean, the Caro-
lina-State game is like the Super Bowl to me, so I
kinda blew her off.
E, what do I do?
Dear Big E,
After going out for a year and a half, I think I am
on the verge of leaving my girlfriend. At first it was
a great � we were caught in the passions of lusty
immorality�but now the candles of love are barely
flickering and a sudden gust of wind just may sap
the spark from the wick.
We have a big communication breakdown.
Whenever I ask her to go out, she always says she is
going downtown to get sloshed with her friends.
And then on other occasions, she shows up at the
Signed,
Should I stay, or should I go.
Dear The Clash
According to many mellow songs, breaking up
is hard to do. Untrue. Nothing a little road trip to The
Fat Lady in Raleigh won't solve. But do you really
want to break up?
The flicker on the candle of love can always be
made a blaze with the help of a lighter. In other
words, with flowers in hand do the real guy kind of
thing and act like there is no problem. Cheesy ad-
vice, isn't it? If this doesn't work, go get beat up and
stand outside her window after midnight and yell
"Adrienne, yo Adrienne

I





t
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23, 1989 11
By Friedrich Orpheus
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CONT.
AND NOW READ THE COMPANION STORY
he Undercover Cats
Bv Parker
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are far more intelligent
�McKay Sundwall
Once again featuring Cartoonist Biography!
I his neck Fun and Games takes a closer look at the life of Tom Gurganus, a
biologist grad student here at ECU. (You'll notice that often our cartoonists
aren't art students� and it's probably just as well.) Tom originally began on
this page drawing the long-lost strip Discoman (and it's probably just as well)
and in 1988 began work on Orpheus with co-creator Micah Harris. And now
THE INTERVIEW YEARS IN THE MAKING
I
Who or what influenced you in your comics work? Al Williamson,
Steve Rude, Alan Davis, Michael Whelan, Barry Smith, Boh
Burden
What is your greatest achievement? Walking on the surface of the
sun
Greatest failure? Not wearing my insulated boots while walking on
the surface of the sun
Career ambitions: Yes
Favorite books or works: Anne Rice's 'Vampire' Trilogy, The Lord of
The Rings books, Well Enough & Time, 1984, Brave New World
Favorite movies: Creature From The Black Lagoon, Who Framed
Roger Rabbit?, Bladerunner, Invasion of the Body Snatchers
(original one) The Fly (the remake), Plan 9 From Outer Space
� Mission in Life: To explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life
When not illustrating and new civilizations�to boldly go where no man has gone before!
Orpheus Tom likes to Favorite wrestlers: El Espectro and Chief Wahoo McDaniel
spend his spare time Interests, past-times: Driving to Carrboro, Vicky, Creating new life
tr �hP lost forms, deciphering Micah's handwriting
searching for the lost ' M VCR myTV, light switches, my truck's ignition
of Atlantis. � UMtm
Turn-offs: See above
(I on Iso communicates in an Favorite music Sting, REM, Alice Cooper, David Sanbom, Don "No
intricate system of clicks and Soul" Simpson , The Smithereens
bee j Everyone should be my friend because: I'm not precomous
Eve of Fire
By Oglesby
NixTix cuRsto
AAAHHH1.1.
111
� �
ana
I YEP i I'A A FULL-
neo6et colics
ACARTOOUlSTfOH
BULLOCKS, KoyJ' I Wwr j
713 � P�MP � V6AY fcAKAS
AA0�AlTkTHM
IfKHP O'GCSHtNS
CARTOONISTS
WANTED
See how popular Jimmy is now that he's a
cartoonist for us? Well, this could be you!
Bring us some samples of your cartooning,
any characters or ideas, whatever�just
make sure it looks polished and is funny, or
entertaining if ifs a serious strip (which
we don't really need but will consider).
Contact Jeff Parker at 757-6366 or come by
the Publication Building across from Joyner
Library.
Biographer Jeff "Vanguard of the Comics Revolution'Tarker





.
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
18th straight opening win
ECU 2-0 after sweep
of pair from Bison
By MICHAEL MARTIN
Sport� Writrr
The men's baseball team
opened their season with two
decisive victories over Howard
University Wednesday night and
extended their season opening
winning streak to 18 games over
the last 18 years
Howard University, from the
Mid-East Athletic Conference,
came to Harrington Field looking
for season opening victories, but
left with two decisive losses.
The Pirates started the season
on the right foot after having a
double-header postponed Satur-
day and Sunday s game cancelled
due to inclimate weather. In their
first meeting with the Pirates,
several players showed consis-
tency, but the Pirates just out-
played the young Bison team. The
Bucsdominated the Bison 8-1 and
were even more impressive in the
second game as ECU held How-
ard scoreless, 10-0.
Tommy Eason's first colle-
giate homerun was the deciding
factor in the Pirates first win, a
two run shot in the fourth inning
that gave the Pirate's a lead that
they would never relinquish.
When Eason was asked about
his homerun he said, "I wasn't
trying to hit it out, I was just trying
to get a good hit
That good hit preserved a
tradition, but more importantly
gave the Pirates their first win of
the season.
Eason went twojor four at bat
in the first game and had two
RBI's. He also had two runs
scored.
The scoring was far from over
for the team, as they went on to
I score six more runs over the next
three innings.
On the mound for the Pirates
in the first game was Jake Jacobs
who gave up one earned run
during the first three innings.
Jacobs recorded six strike outs
and onlv gave up five hits after
facing 17 batters.
In relief, Jonathan Jenkins
came in for Jacobs in the fourth
inning. In three innings, Jenkins
struck out two batters, walked
another and gave up two hits, but
still managed to hold the Bison to
their only run after six innings.
In the final inning, freshman
pitcher Warren Hall pitched to
four batters to seal the victory for
the Pirates.
Coach Gary Overton, in his
fifth season as head coach, had
nothing but positive comments to
say about the Pirates victory. "We
played ECU style baseball to-
night, excellent defense and
pitching Overton said. "The in-
field played well, and it was a
great way to start the season
Another freshman, third
baseman John Gast, turned a solid
offensive performance when he
hit his first collegiate homerun in
the fifth inning. Cast's three-run
homer brought in Calvin Brown
and Eason to extend the Pirates'
lead to 8-1.
Brown, a junior, also played a
solid game both offensively and
defensively. On the offensive
side, Brown had two scores on
two walks while batting three
times. His defensive skills also
excelled as he made several key
stops at first base.
In the second game, it ap-
peared as if Howard was still lick-
ing its wounds from the first
game, and ECU wasted no time by
jumping out to a three run lead
after the second inning.
After freshman John Gast
walked, senior Mike Andrews
and freshman David Daniels
reached base and all three scored
on another Howard walk and
several errors.
Tommy Eason again hit a
homerun, his second of the eve-
ning, to extend the Pirates lead to
Sports
FEBRUARY 23, 1989 PAGE 2
Sam Croft, the official looks on as a battered and black-eyed Reed
Lose drives in for the basket (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU
Photolab).
CAA honors Edwards'
and O'Connor's play
RICHMOND (AP) � Blue
Edwards and Chris O'Connor,
both of East Carolina, have been
named the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation players of the week, the
league announced Monday-
Edwards scored 32 points
and grabbed seven rebounds to
lead East Carolina past American
last week. He scored 31 points and
pulled down six rebounds in a 65-
60 victory over Campbell.
Senior catcher Chris Cauble awaits the fast pitch from Jake Jacobs in the first game of the doubleheader (Photo by ECU Photolab)
five. Eason compiled one hit
while at bat four times, and re-
corded two RBI's, all from his
fourth inning homerun.
Offensively, several Pirates
excelled. Calvin Brown exploded
for three hits in four at bats, in-
cluding two singles and a double.
Sophomore Steve Godin was
one for two with two RBI's and a
score.
Freshman David Daniels, the
desiginated hitter, had an out-
standing performance with two
walks, a hit and two runs scored.
Also scoring runs for the Bucs
were seniors David Ritchie (1)
and John Thomas (1).
Defensively, the Pirates were
nearly flawless as they com-
pletely shut down the Bison of-
fense. They allowed only one hit
and no runs through the cold sec-
ond game. In fact, the Bison team
was so coldboth on and off the
fieldthat they built a small fire
beside their dugout in hopes of
warmth.
Heat was what Howard
wanted and that was just what
starting pitcher Tim Langdon
gave them. The junior held the
Bison to one hit in six innings,
allowed only one walk, had six
strike outs and came away with a
shut-out to post a 1 -0 mark on the
season.
Relief pitcher Mike Whittcn
came into the game in the top of
the seventh inning to hold the
Bison scoreless. Facing six batters,
he walked two, allowed one hit
and struck out the last two batters
to end the game.
Overall, the defense proved
to be the strongest point of the
Pirates' victory. Coach Overton
had stressed defense to the team
since practice started. According
to Overton, "All along we've
stressed defense, we've worked
on it, and it payed off
With the troublesome
weather Eastern North Carolina
has faced lately, the Howard team
suffered greatly. Having to travel
to North Carolina on Saturday,
and return to Washington DC.
Saturday evening, the Howard
team definately was tired. They
left the nation's capitol Wednes-
day at 5 a.m. anticipating a 1 p.m.
start at Harrington Field. How-
ever, the tomadic activity and
rain that hit the East Coast earlier
in the week delayed the game to 3
p.m. .
When Overton was asked
about the inclement weather and
its effects on the team, he re-
sponded with the positive note
"We were anxious , itching to
play
The Bucs return to Harring-
ton Field Saturday at 1 p.m. for a
double-header with George
Washington University.
Longest winning streak since 1977-78
Pirates down Flames for fourth straight win
By MARK BARBER
Sports Writer
It was not a pretty game to
watch. Nevertheless, East
Carolina's Pirates were able to hit
16 of 18 free throws at the end to
hand the Flames of Liberty Uni-
versity a 69-60 loss and with the
win extended their win streak to
four games, guaranteeing them-
selves a winning record for the
season.
"Was that a struggle, or
what?" Pirate coach Mike Steele
said afterwards. "But it was the
fourth game we've had in eight
days and I really think we were
worn out in the second half
ECU, up by 10 at the half, led
by as much as 17 in the second
period, but the Flames changed
their defense in order to stop Blue
Edwards and slowly worked back
into the game. Edwards, who had
15 points in the first half, could
only score seven in the second
period, with no points in the last
13 minutes.
"They went to a box-in-one
defense with a chaser on us and it
worked, Steele said, "And that
was the difference in the second
half
With 1:30 to play and behind
by only six, Liberty began to foul
the Pirates in order to get the ball
back on missed foul shots.
But the Pirates wouldn't
miss�Reed Lose hit eight
straight free throws, Kenny
Murphy hit four straight and Gus
Hill hit on two attempts to spread
the lead back to nine by the final
buzzer. The only two misses un-
characteristically came from Jeff
Kelly, one of ECU'S best clutch
foul shooters.
The win raises the Pirates'
record to 14-12 with only one
game remaining � a home con-
test against rival UNC-Wilming-
ton. The winning season will be
the first since ECU went 16-13in
1982-83 and the four straight wins
is the longest win streak for the
Pirates since the 1977-78 season.
ECU is now 6-7 in the CAA. The
Flames fall to 8-16 with the loss.
The Pirates got the opening
tip, and after the ball changed
hands a few times on missed
shots, broke the ice when Ed-
wards stole the ball and broke
away for a reverse, two-handed
slam. After a double-dribbling
call on the Flames, Stanley Love
hit an eight footer in the lane.
Liberty's Charles Richardson
hit a three point goal for the
Flames, but then fouled Edwards
at the other end; Edwards sank
both free throws to put the Pirates
up 6-3 at the 17:26 mark. Flames
guard Bailey Alston pulled the
Rames to within one, 6-5, with a
15' jumper at the foul line and
Murphy took a cross-court pass
from Edwards and made good for
three from the right side, ECU up
9-5.
After a travelling call on Lib-
erty, Edwards sank a three
pointer for ECU to make the score
12-5. The Flames scrapped back,
aided by several Pirate misses,
and pulled to within one, 12-11,
with 13:07 to go.
Steele called for a timeout for
his squad, and the Pirates came
back out to score nine straight,
highlighted by another steal and
breakaway bv Edwards, who this
time capped-off the drive with a
Jordan-ish long-flying one han-
der between two Flames defend-
ers.
The two teams swapped bas-
kets for the last 10 minutes in the
period, the ECU lead varying
from eight to 12 points. With the
Pirates up 24-16, Liberty's Eric
Cunningham let out a "Help me
cry as soon as Edwards got the
ball in front of him. Ball in hand,
Edwards shuffled and promptly
drove left around Cunningham
and down the baseline for a pow-
erful two-handed slam.
It was even play for the re-
mainder of the half, and ECU
went into the intermission ahead
32-22.
"This was our 24th game of
See PIRATES, page!4
ECU looks to pluck Seahawks
By MARK BARBER
Sport Writer
The
senior
from
Walstonburg, N.C, was 67 per-
cent from the floor for the week on
24-of-36 shooting, and upped his
league-leading scoring average to
26.5 points per contest.
O'Connor scored 35 points to
lead East Carolina's women's
team to an pair of victories last
week. She tallied 11 pointsagainst
George Mason before scoring a
career-high 24 points against
American.
The senior from Altoon, Pa
made 16 of 22 shots from the floor
last week for 73 percent.
Like a line straight from a
Hitchcock movie: Look out Pirate
fans, the birds are coming. Only
this time, the line can be reversed:
Look out birds, the Pirates are hot
and waiting for birdmeat.
In what is certainly the big-
gest game of the year for ECU's
cagers, the Seahawks from UNC-
Wilmington will try to come into
Minges Coliseum and leave with
the feeling only a win on the road
can give. Likewise, the Pirates
want more than ever to close out
the regular season with a win over
their biggest rival.
ECU has a lot more at stake in
the contest than the Seahawks,
who only have regional pride to
lose.
First, a win for the Pirates will
allow the Pirates to close out their
conference play at the .500 mark,
7-7. The last time the Pirates had at
least a .500 conference record was
in 1975-76 when the school was
still in the Southern Conference.
And if the Dukes of James Madi-
son lose on the road to George
Mason Saturday, their record will
fall to 6-8, which will mean ECU
will finish the season in fifth-place
in the CAA, an important finish in
regards to the seeding at the CAA
tournament.
ECU and Wilmington would
then meet again in the first round
of the tourney, set for March 4-6.
Win or lose Saturday, the
Seahawks will finish league play
in fourth place.
Another factor for the Pirates
is that a win over UNC-W would
extend their win streak to five
games, the longest at the school
since the 1974-75 season. Besides
records, the extended streak will
provide a much needed mental
boost going into the tournament.
At a time when the team seems to
be playing together better than
they have all year, the added
confidence from the win could go
a long way in the conference
championships.
A win would also improve
ECU's home record to 11-3, the
best since the 1979-80 squad won
11 in Minges.
But perhaps the most gratify-
ing result of a win Saturday
would be the breaking of the
eight-game losing streak to the
Birds. The last time the Pirates
defeated UNC-W was in 1985,
when ECU downed the Seahawks
78-61 in Minges.
The last three games in
Wilmington between ECU and
the Seahawks have been sellouts.
UNC-W is expected to bring a
sizeable crowd into Minges Satur-
day.
"I think the biggest reason I
want to win Saturday is that
we've lost so many in a row to
(UNC-W) Pirate record-breaker
Blue Edwards said. "It would be
nice to beat them this time
The last time the two teams
met Jan 28 in Wilmington, the
awks a two point
half time lead and pulled away for
an eventual 8166. Edwards set
e Trask Coliseum opponent
�"nS "ot with 36 p�nts in
the televised game.
JltSS?wks were led with
see STEELE Mai, page 14
Y
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23,1989 13
New Gamecock football coach has 'Spark'
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) �
Sparky Woods found out what
Gamecock fans want when he
stopped at a convenience store on
the way to a news conference
where he was introduced as the
new football coach at South Caro-
lina.
"A guv had a Gamecock hat
on and 1 said, 'Winning is a matter
of life and death in this football
business down here, isn't it He
said. Hell it's a lot more impor-
tant than that
"I can assure you that if it
wasn't for these games, this
would probably be a very, very
great job said Woods, who left
Appalachian State after five sea-
sons.
Woods, whose selection
ended a search that began just
over two weeks ago following the
sudden death of Joe Morrison,
said Tuesday he was a bit over-
whelmed about jumping from
Wet and wild
Division 1-AA and taking job of
"more magnitude but had no
qualms about his decision. "If
they wanted me as much as I
wanted them, then we're very
happy with each other he said.
"I'm thrilled to be the head coach
at the Universitv of South Caro-
lina
Wood said he had three goals:
"graduation, win football games
and have fun while we're doing
it
While he wants to have fun.
Woods said he was nervous about
his new job and a 1989 schedule
that includes Clcmson, Georgia,
Florida State and North Carolina
State - nine Division I games in all.
"I'm nervous about going
against Division I schools. In his
final game as coach at the school,
the Mountaineers tied Wake For-
est 34-34.
Woods said he planned to
meet soon with the Gamecock
players and the assistant coaches
left on the staff. He said he hoped
to have a complete staff by the
time spring practice begins March
13.
He received endorsements
from President James B. Holder-
man and Athletic Director King
Dixon.
"I think he's got a fire in his
stomach. He's got a lot of enthusi-
asm Holderman said.
Dixon, who informed Woods
of his selection late Monday after-
noon, said the 35-year-old coach
"has the characteristics we were
looking for - unquestioned integ-
rity, strong character, student-
athlete oriented, and a genuine
feeling and concern for young
people
Dixon said the terms of
Woods' contract have not been
decided on, but the athletic direc-
tor said he expected it to be a five-
year deal.
"We feel as though the con-
tract we will enter into with
Sparky will be consistent with
what is normally in the Southeast,
will be very comfortable and very
competitive Dixon said.
While Woods was officially
introduced at the news confer-
ence, his hiring was less than a
well-kept secret. Several news
organizations, including The As-
sociated Press and the state's larg-
est newspapers, had already re-
ported that Woods would be
hired.
Woods guided the I-AA
Mountaineers to Southern Con-
ference titles in 1986 and 1987 and
was named the leagues coach of
the year an unprecedented three
straight times, beginning in 1985.
Woods, whose real name is
Phillip Perry Woods, was 38-19-2
in five seasons at Appalachian
State in Boone, N.C His father
nicknamed him Sparky "maybe
he was looking for a cocker span-
iel or something, I don't know
Woods said.
Woods replaces Morrison,
who died at the age of 51 of a heart
attack Feb. 5 after playing rac-
quetball.
North Carolina State coach
Dick Sheridan turned down the
Gamecock job last week. Sheridan
was widely believed to be the
school's top choice, but he said he
had not been offered the job.
Woods was one of three
Southern Conference coaches in
the running for the position. The
others were Coach Jimmy Satter-
field, who guided Furman to the
1988 I-AA championship, and
Marshall coacn George Chaump.
South Carolina assistant head
coach and defensive coordinator
Joe Lee Dunn was also among
those considered for the position.
Woods, a native of Oneida,
Tenn played college football at
Carson-Newman and began his
coaching career as an assistant at
Tennessee in 1976. One season
later he was at Kansas, and in 1978
he was an assistant at North Ala-
bama.
Woods then went to Iowa
State, where he coached the de-
fensive secondary in 1979 and
receivers the following three sea-
sons before moving on to Appala-
chian State in 1983.
IRS water polo teams take to the pool
In the men's independent
division, the leagues leading
scorer, David Onks will lead his
team Phi Sigma Pi in to their divi-
sional spot. Onks has tossed in 19
goals in three contests including a
(IRS) � Aquamen and aq-
uawomen have ascended on the
campus of East Carolina Univer-
sitv bearing inner tubes and claim-
ing to be water polo specialists.
And indeed some have proven to
be just that as intramural water powerful 9 goals as his squad de- pendent women s champions the
�or into feated rcnnmal powerhouse the Belk Babes as they paddle their
ing the fun as well. The ladies weather of February, spring time
from Alpha Delta Pi are taking no is more than just a refreshing
prisoners and taking their con- thought. Make plans now to
tests serious enough to drown spend some of your spare time in
their sister Sigmas 20-0. They are the great outdoors with an adven-
challcnging the defending inde-
polo teams carrv their rubbei
the playoffs.
In the fraternity B league, Phi
Kappa Tau is staying afloat of
their competitors with an un-
blemished record as thev take on
pennniai po
Belk Ball Slingers 12-9.
Umstead residence hall is
also tops in the independent divi-
sion as they are the main ingredi-
ent in the formula for success. The
way into the all campus female
finals.
Timex Aerobix Week con-
cludes tomorrow with an array of
their playoff rivals. Leading Umstead Sharks will have to pass
scorer Greg Smith will have to bv an Umstead Yellow Cloud to
slam a few more goals in home
before the Phi Taus head in to the
all campus championship.
ture trip coordinated by the De-
partment of Intramural-Recrea-
tional Services.
The spring of 1989 marks
registration for several exciting
adventures including: hang glid-
ing, camping, kayaking, canoe-
ing, white water rafting and
windsurfing. Registration is cur-
valuable giveaways for all aerobic
class participants. Timex watches,
aerobic fitness apparel and infor- rcnty heJ gct morc in
find themselves in the plavoff mation will be given away to sev- formation in 204 Memorial Gvm-
tinals. oral lucky PP�. nasium or call 757-6387.
The sorority ladies arc enjoy- After the unpredictable
In Penthouse article
WadeB
talks
BOSTON (AP) � The long-
awaited Penthouse magazine ar-
tide. w Boston thjrd, baseman
AVade Boggs is arriving on
newstands next week. It has eve-
rvthing promised - sex, infidelity,
racism, grudges, pranks and nas-
tincss.
Margo Adams, Boggs' former
that sex weakens your legs, and
he needs strong legs to play third
basQ
Boggs also had a superstition
related to Adams' undergar-
ments. "One night I went to the
game and he went 4-for-5
Adams said in the article. "He
found out that I hadn't worn
lover, details graphic descriptions panties underneath my dress. So
of the sex lives of several Red Sox for the next couple of months
players in the article, which was when he went into a slump, he'd
described in Wednesday's edi- ask me not to wear panties to the
tions of the Boston Globe'and the game. It wasn't sexual, it was that
Boston Herald. he'd gotten hits and wanted to be
The article said Boggs also sure of the little things he had
made a racist remark about team- done to get those hits
mate Jim Rice, saying the left There are no nude photos of
fielder "thinks he's white Adams in the April issue, which
Boggs also "would jokingly goes on sale next week. There are
sav Keith (Hernandez, the New four pictures showing Boggs and
York Mets first baseman) was a Adams together, the Globe said,
homosexual but the issue does not have the
Adams is suing Boggs for $12
million and is being paid a mini- t TINJp.Wilmington
mum of $100,000 by Penthouse Ul VY Ullliiiiuu
for the story, entitled the "Desig-
nated Swinger which was writ-
ten by David D. Shumacher. She - rcmaining tickets on Sat-
could make �fs� Fcb. 25 ECU-UNC Wilmington urday can be picked up by stu-
dependingosas of the issue. n wiU dcntsyafter 5 pFm. Qn Saturday,
, T!fntnfloTcasLns dav, Feb. 23 at 8 a.m. at the Ath- srudcnts can only pick up their
,t remarks on several occa Qffix fo M Co. sho anECU
photo that Boggs has admitted
taking when he and Adams set up
pitcher, Bob Stanley with a strip-
per.
Penthouse said there would
be a sequel in its May issue. "Next
month: Margo bares all - sensa-
tional pictures, plus more on
baseball wives and groupies and
sizzling locker room intrigue
The Globe and Herald did not
identify any players Adams al-
leged were involved in sexual in-
cidents.
Red Sox general manager Lou
Gorman, who according to
Adams is not liked by Boggs, said
the article was not likely to make
him increase his efforts o trade
the third baseman.
"I'm not going to trade him
unless someone makes an offer
that'll improve our ballclub
Gorman said. "As you know,
Wade denies many of these state-
ments were made
The Houston Astros have of-
fered pitcher Bob Knepper, out-
fielder Kevin Bass and third base-
man Ken Caminiti for Boggs, but
Boston had asked for pitcher Mike
Scott to be included in the deal.
Several other general managers
have said they do not want Boggs
at the moment because of the
controversy generated by
Adams' lawsuit.
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts for February rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles. Apartments and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN EXTRA
Tickets available Thursday
I
Opcii
Monday Sat
Snndav l (
;Y 10 0
"Several of the white ball
plavers preferred black women
when they were on the road
Adams said in the article. "This
was very upsetting to Wade. One
white player was dating a black
girl from 'Milwaukee, and Wade
told him it wasn't good for his
image to be seen with a black
woman
Al Nero, Boggs' agent, said
"it's a very sick, weak attempt on
Margo's part to hurt Wade and his
teammates
"I'm going to take a day and
then decide if I'm going to make
any kind of statement Boggs
said in a statement issued by his
lawyer, Jennifer King. "I'm not
going to dignify the story with a
response right now. Basically, I've
already refuted everything
Adams said Boggs told her he
had contracted venereal disease
from one woman and impreg-
nated another. The woman subse-
quently had a miscarriage,
Adams was quoted as saying.
Adams also detailed a num-
ber of Boggs' superstitions. She
claimed she took 64 road trips
with Boggs, purchased his clothes
and avoided sex with him during
the day because "Wade believes
seum.
On Friday, students can pres-
ent their own identification and
one other student's I.D. to obtain
two free tickets. There are also a
limited number of half-price stu-
dent euest tickets available.
C ELEBRATE
I.D. and their activity card.
East Carolina officials are
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23, 1989
Madden leads Heels to non-conference win
CHAPEL HILL, N.C (AP) -
North Carolina coach Dean Smith
predicted that Nevada-Reno
would, give the fifth-ranked Tar
Heels a difficult game, and he was
half right.
Nevada-Reno gave North
Carolina a difficult first half.
The Wolf Pack took a 12-3
lead in the first three minutes as
all five starters scored. But North
Carolina tied the score at 17 and
went on to beat the Nevada-Reno
109-86 on Tuesday. The Tar Heels,
23-5, have won five straight.
"I was very concerned com-
ing into this game because every-
one was saying this was our Har-
vard or UNC-Asheville game, but
you saw some talent out there for
Nevado-Reno Smith said. "I
honestly didn't think it would be
like that. We had too much inside
strength
Kevin Madden scored 21
points and J.R. Reid and Rick Fox
added 19 each. 1 he Tar Heels took
the lead for good when Fox, who
scored 15 of his points in the first
half, made two free throws with
13:04 remaining.
North Carolina's lead grew to
36-21 midway through the half
when the Wolf Pack, 14-10, threw
away the ball eight times in a six-
minute span and managed only
one field goal.
"I was disappointed in our
play in the first half Smith said.
"It seems we have one game every
year where we come out and play
for our scoring averages. But in
the second half, we did a much
better job
Later in the half, Fox keyed a
10-0 spurt with six points, includ-
ing back-to-back dunks, as the Tar
Heels went ahead 46-27. The Wolf
Pack closed to 16 points early in
the second half after trailing 60-39
at halftimc, but could pull no
closer.
"The size factor obviously
hurt us Nevada-Reno coach Len
Stevens said. "We are going
against giants with a front line
that is 6-3,6-6 and 6-7. When you
go against a mismatch like that,
sometimes you can negate size,
but not when a team like Carolina
has size and athletic ability.
"Our plan was to get certain
shooters a certain amount of shots
and we did that. The problem was
that we did not get the percentage
we needed to be in the game
Nevada-Reno made 33 of 88
shots for 38 percent, and were 8-
for-29 on three-pointers.
Scott Williams scored 11
points for North Carolina. Steve
Bucknall and King Rice scored 10
each.
Darrvl Owens scored 28
points for Nevada-Reno and
Gabriel Parizzia, 18.
Tyson at peace, ready for eighth title defense
LAS VEGAS (AP) �Just days
before his eighth title defense,
Mike Tvson says he's at peace
with himself and ready to go to
war with Frank Bruno.
"Things are a lot clearer
now Tyson said Tuesday.
"There are no problems. I'm very
happy at this particular moment
in my life
The heavyweight champion
declared himself free of personal
turmoil as he. and promoter Don
King met the press at the Las
Vegas Hilton. He then issued a
warning to Bruno, who be will
meet Saturday night w h his
undisputed heavyweight title on
the line.
"I'm not going to give him
any chance the 22-year-old Ty-
son said. "This is where .1 domi-
nate. 1 dominate in the ring. That's
what I do best
Tvson, who had ballooned to
about 260 pounds before begin-
ning training for Bruno, appeared
fit and in fine spirits during the
impromptu news conference,
laughing frequently and joking
with the assembled reporters.
Tyson spoke easily about his
personaj troubles, which in-
cluded a Valentine's Day divorce
from his wife, actress Robin Giv-
ens, his squabbles with his es-
tranged manager Bill Cayton and
his manhandling of a television
camera during a January visit to
his ex-wife.
"I made a lot mistakes Ty-
son said. "But I'm not going to
commit suicide. I'm not going to
kill myself over it
Tyson said he weighed 217 or
218 pounds and planned to come
in at 218 for the fight.
"I'm not a hostile person, but
he's in some trouble he said of
the British challenger.
Bruno earlier had expressed
hope that Tyson's problems, espe-
cially his split from trainer Kevin
Rooney, would take something
away from the champion inside
the ring.
But Tyson said he felt less
turmoil than he felt last June when
he knocked Michael Spinks out
only 91 seconds into their title
fight.
"It seems like there was more
then than there is now he said.
"Then, there were constant lies
being fed to the press. Even
people inside my camp were feed-
ing things
Spinks, in Las Vegas for a civil
trial brought against him and
manager Butch Lewis by the Las
Vegas Hilton, said Bruno should
hope Tyson means it when he says
he's without problems.
"It just pumps him up
Spinks said, adding ruefully,
"Ask me, I know
Spinks said he wasn't looking
for Tyson to have an off-night
against him because of his prob-
lems, but didn't expect that they
would add to his fury inside the
ring.
'People just get him angrier
by getting into his personal life
Spinks said. "Boxing is the best
job in the world to let off steam,
and people are in trouble when he
(Tyson) wants to let off steam
Most think Bruno, a hulking
Englishman who hasn't fought in
16 months, will indeed be in
trouble when he meets Tyson in
the scheduled 12-round fight,
which will be televised by HBO.
Oddsmakers have made the
unbeaten champion a prohibitive
7 12-1 favorite to win the fight,
and if s even money the sched-
uled 12-round fight won't last
four rounds.
ACC honors players
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) �
Brvant Stith of Virginia was
named the Atlantic Coast
Conference's rookie of the week
for the fourth time this season.
Stith, a 6-foot-5, 192-pound
freshman, scored 19 points and
grabbed seven rebounds in a 92-
79 victory over Virginia Military
and added 15 points and eight re-
bounds in a 65-63 victory over
Clemson.
Earlier, North Carolina for-
ward Steve Bucknall, who scored
a total of 50 points in three victo-
ries last week, was named the
ACC's player of the week.
Bucknall hit 15 of 27 field
goals, including six of 16 from
three-point range, and had 20
assists. He grabbed 11 rebounds
and had six steals as the Tar Heels
posted victories over Old Domin-
ion, Wake Forest and Maryland.
On Sunday, Bucknall scored
14 of his 16 points in the second
half to lead the Tar Heels to an 86-
75 victory over Maryland.
Pirates hot from line
Continued from page 12
the year, and I can say that ECU
gave us as much pressure as any
team we've played yet, and that
includes Clemson and Towsom
State Flame coach Jeff Meyer
said. "Our 10 turnovers in the first
half made the difference in the
game for us. In the second half,
our guys responded to the chal-
lenge, but ECU did a good of not
letting us cut into their lead
The. Flames did cut into the
lead, but the Pirates were able to
sink the free throws at the end to
hold off Liberty. Even missed foul
shots didn't help the Flames.
"The difference at the end
came when Kelly missed his four
free throws Steelesaid, "and our
guys, instead of sitting back and
expecting him to hit the shots like
he has all year, got in there and
tipped the balls back out to an-
other one of our guys. Of the four
misses, Gus tipped three of them
back out, and we were able to
keep the ball
Alston led all scorers for the
night, scoring 26 while nabbing
six rebounds for the Flames. Todd
Cline and Richardson scored 10
each for Liberty. For the ECU,
Edwards paced the team with 22
points and nine rebounds. Lose
and Murphy were the only other
Pirates in double figures, scoring
15 and 14, respectively.
Steele said his Pirates would
relax Thursday and look at films
in preparation for Saturday's
matchup against UNC-W. "They
killed us on the boards last time
we played them, and we'll have to
be � and we are � a lot better
now than we were then Steele
said
Steele also said that he felt the
Pirates would be emotionally up
for the game, which would enable
them to overcome any fatigue
possibly felt by their busy playing
schedule.
Steele Mill the site for season
closer between ECU-UNC-W
continued from page 12
19 points from senior center Larry
Houzer, who has been averaging
16.3 points per game on the year.
UNC-W's leading scorer, senior
Antonio Howard, scored 11
against the Pirates in Wilmington.
The player that hurts ECU the
most, according to Steele, is 6-6
senior forward Greg Bender, a
player who Steele says always
seems to play well against his
Pirates. Bender scored 13 in Janu-
ary against ECU.
The Seahawks come into
Saturday's contest with an 8-5
CAA record, 13-13 overall, after
losing their last two games,
against American and Campbell
Universities, both in Wilmington.
One of the biggest advan-
tages for the Pirates this time will,
hopefully, be a sellout crowd in
the "Steele Mill Students are
encouraged to get their tickets
early Friday and to arrive early in
purple Saturday.
Tipoff is at 7:30 p.m.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 23, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 23, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.659
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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