The East Carolinian, February 21, 1989






EDITORIALSInside4
CLASSIFIEDS FEATURES6
8
SPORTS10

Features
LaVonda Gaskins wins dance scholarship.
Check out page 8.
Sports
Pirate defense puts naval blockade on
Navy. Women beat conference foe.
Read about the action on page 10.
�he iEaot Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. M No. S2
Tuesday February 21, 19S-)
Greenville, NC
12 Tages
Circulation 12,0CJ
4Holy roos'ing winged mammals,
there are bats in the Belk-fry
KEE23E
iV
Residents oi this Belk Hall suite welcome others to experience an
unique alternative to campus shelter. (Photo bv Thomas Walters�
Photolab)
By TIM HAMPTON
NrwiFditor
On the door of room 417-D
Belk Dormitory a sheet of paper
reads "Welcome to the Bat Cave
Rut super hero Batman is no
where in sight.
For a week, residences of
rooms A, C and D in suite 417
have had to share their homes
with an estimated 100 small
brown bats who flew through
small cracks and holes in the
walls.
"Everybody thought we were
pulling their leg at first Kathy
iblock, resident of 417-D, said
after having the webbed mam-
mals in her room for a week.
"They didn't realize the problem
was that bad she said.
"We figured campus security
would be ones first to call, but
thev said they didn't have an offi-
cer to come at the time. They said
it anyone gets bitten to give them
a call Niblock said.
Two weeks ago, the resi-
dences of 417, located in the west-
em corner oi Belk, heard noises
coming from outside. The noise,
described as a mixture between a
bird and a mouse, was then heard
in onderblock walls of the suite.
Niblock saw the first bat on
Feb. 13 but really didn't know
what it was. "1 didn't think it was
a bat because it was so small and it
looked like a mouse Niblock
said. The bats entered the room
through small holes where the
beds are connected to the walls.
On Tuesday, an estimated 35
bats were killed by workers from
the housing department who
used brooms as their weapons.
Another 60 bats were
exterminated on Friday morning
after workers fumagated rooms A
and D with 24 cans of poison.
Workers also removed cin-
dcrblocks from the walls of rooms
of A and D in attempts to kill the
remaining bats. After workers
pulled several bricks from the
exterior of the building, an esti-
mated 300 bats flew from the in-
ner wall crevice, Isabelle Cos-
grove of 417-A.
A member of the biology
staff said it is not unusual for bat-
to congregrate in the hundreds
"Female bats can roost in the
thousands Tim Charles said "In
the mid west they roost by the
millions in some caves he said.
Charles said female bats stay
together to roost while male bats
are individualistic and live alone.
" I hese bats were prol abl i
brown bats Charles sai :
The last Kit in suite 4
sighted on Saturday but i
fly because it was dizzy fr r
poison. Niblock said wort
have chalked all the crack
have recemented the ii I
blocks in the walls. "Wemigl I
able to move in on Tuesday Ni
bl� k said
"We arc all kind oi jun
now. We were sitting outside i I
Raw! the other day and a leal
dropped from a tree and we
ran Niblock said.
Small number of rapes reported
By M1NDY McINNIS
Staff Writer
(Editor's Note: This is the
first part of a two part series on
rapes at ECU. Thursday, Mindy
Mclnnis will look into rape pre-
vention on campus.)
On the way to her night class
west oi campus, Jane Doe cuts
through a familiar but dimly lit
path. Up ahead the reassuring
twinkle of street lights urge her to
go on. West Campus is now in
view as lane rounds the corner of
the biology building.
To her left the densely-
wooded area is illuminated by the
soft glow oi campus lights. As
Jane continues toward her desti-
nation, the fear of rape is the far-
thest thing from her mind. Like
most of the students at ECU, Jane
is unaware that rape occurs.
In reality only 15 percent of all
rapes are reported, making rape
most unreported
covered that one in two college
women reported being the victim
of some form of sexual assualt.
A 1986 survey oi ;4� female
ECU students found that 335
percent reported Wine, a victim ot
unwanted sexual activity. Ac-
cording to ECU Public Safety,
several incidents were reported
and investigated in the 87-88
school year.
There was one acquaintance
rape reported whk h took place in
Garrett dorm and one rape off-
campus which involved an EC L
student. In other cases, friends of
the victims call and report the
rape to security. This is called a
third-party report. So tar, there
sailant in his shin and fled.
The other rape attempt oc-
curred when a student was walk-
ing along the dark path located at
the bottom of College Hill, the
same path that Jane Doe was tak-
ing on the way to her night class.
The attempts on these victims
were close calls and they are very
lucky that it wasn't actual rape.
Others aren't so lucky. For
instance, in the past five years, 14
rapes were reported on ECU
campus. This number could be
greatly reduces if students would
use precautionary measures such
as not allowing strangers to enter
the dorms after curfew.
Last spring a student in Jones
"4
jMMMjggi .
These are sixty of the estimated hundred brown bats which were 'hanging out' in suite 417 of
Belk Dormitory in the last week.
Frat initiation may be replaced
the most unreported violent
crime. According to studies con
ducted bv the American College counter leads to actual rape, hor
Health Association, acquaintance instance, there were two rape at-
rape occurs more often among tempts reported in 1988, a male al-
college students. In one of the legedly put a gun to the victim's
Association's surveys, itwasdis- head. The victim kicked the as-
has been two third party reports dorm was raped when another
in which one rape allegedly hap- student let in a stranger, Maurice
pened oil campus and the other Crouell. Crouell then fled but was
happened in one oi the dorms, later apprehended and found
The callers didn't give enough guilty. He was sentenced to 40
information to complete the in- years for first degree rape and 20
vestigations so the investigaitons years for attempted rape,
were dropped Rape isnt Just a local Prob-
Not every sexual assualt en- lem, it's a state problem as well as
a national problem. According to
the U.S. Bureau of the Census, an
average 26.4 women per 100,000
get raped every year in North
See RAPES, page 3
By ADAM CORNELIUS
Staff Writer
A report published by the
Fraternity Executives Association
concerning the National Inter-
fraternity Conference meeting
last Fall indicates that the pledg-
ing system is under scrutiny by
fraternity leaders and may be
replaced by an alternative
method of membership initiation
by next December.
Currently pledging involves
the first month or two of a
student's affiliation with a frater-
nity, ending with the student's
aquiring full membership The
pledge period involves orienta-
tion meetings, parties, and educa-
tion about the fraternity's history,
goals, and membership.
The FEA is comprised oi the
:hief executives of 58 fraternities
and serves as a forum which
works in close contact with the
NIC on current fraternity issues.
In a questionnaire distributed
among its members, 52 percent
voted in favor of a resolution to
Hi.
mi H miut i tit.au iirii"i
-i � . � � ill n
stud) alternatives to pledging
Fourteen percent voted against a
resolution and 34 percent of the
members remained neutral on the
issue.
At the December 3 meeting ot
the NIC House of Delegates
proposal was adopted by a vote of
50 0 in which each NIC member
was asked 'To study alternatives
to pledge status in their chapters
and to report its position on how
such a program can be imple
ire nted at the NIC convention in
IVcemhorot 1989
See 'FRAT page 2
. i
SGA postpones decision
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
jlM-M
The weekend ice storm covered Greenville in a winter wonderland. Saturday's baseball game was
postponed while the bleachers of Harrington field became frosted with ice. (Photo by Gretchen
Journigan�Photolab)
The Student Government
Association voted to indefinitely
postpone a resolution concerning
the abolition of Pirate Walk, ap-
proved appropriations for four
campus organizations, and recog-
nized the constitution of a new
campus organization in
Monday's meeting.
Pirate Walk will remain as it is
for now. A resolution authored by
Marty Helms, speaker of the legis-
lature, was postponed indefi-
nitely until further suggestions
can oe made to improve the escort
service.
The resolution called for the
abolition of Pirate Walk and
asked Public Safety to implement
a similar service for the fall
semester. According to I lelms, he
has learned the service cannot
feasibly be conducted by Public
Safety due to lack of funds.
"Since Pirate Walk was stu-
dent-operated, it should bo re-
vised by the students Helms
said. He plans to meet with Chan-
cellor Richard Eakm, Student
Residence Association President
Mark Carroll, and other SGA leg-
islators on Wednesday to discuss
the future of the program.
Helms asked the legislature
to support him in his attempt to
improve the escort service. "1
want this body to establish strict
criteria for the operation of Pirate
Walk
"I would like to see in the
neighborhood of four to five thou-
sand going to the operation of the
program Helms said. The funds
will be used tor advertisments
uniforms and possibly a new
communication system.
"My plans are to wrap this up
thi semester for the fall of 1989 so
we cn assure the students ai
excellent escort ser ice
In other business, the SGA
voted to recognize the Universit)
Scholars Organization as a cam
pus group. The group has
unofficially been on campus for
several years. Each student must
have been awarded a University
Scholars Award in order to be a
member of the organization.
The SGA appropriated $60
to the Arnold Air Society. TU
money will send two represent
ti ves of the Arnold Air Societv to a
convention in Colorado.
An appropriation of $1l"






Inside
EDITORIALSu4
CLASSIFIEDSIf
FEATURES� 8
SPORTS10
Matures
LaVoncU Gaskins wins dance scholarship.
Check out page 8.

Sports
Fixate defense puts naval blockade on
Navy. Women Jbeat conference foe.
Read about the action on page 10.
�he iEaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 52
Tuesday February 21,19S0
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
'Holy roosting winged mammals,
there are bats in the Belk-fry
��
Residents ox this Belk Hall suite welcome others to experience an
unique �ltemaHTe'to campus shelter. (Photo by Thomas Walters�
Photolab)
By TIM HAMPTON
Nam Editor
On the door of room 417-D
Belk Dormitory a sheet of paper
reads "Welcome to the Bat Cave
But super hero Batman is no
where in sight.
For a week, residences of
rooms A, C and D in suite 417
have had to share their homes
with an estimated 100 small
brown bats who flew through
small cracks and holes in the
walls.
"Everybody thought we were
pulling their leg at first Kathy
Niblock, resident of 417-D, said
after having the webbed mam-
mals in her room for a week.
"They didn't realize the problem
was that bad she said.
"We figured campus security
would be ones first to call, but
they said they didn't have an offi-
cer to come at the time. They said
if anyone gets bitten to give them
a call Niblock said.
Two weeks ago, the resi-
dences of 417, located in the west-
em corner of Belk, heard noises
coming from outside. The noise,
described as a mixture between a
bird and a mouse, was then heard
in dnderblock walls of the suite.
Niblock saw the first bat on
Feb. 13 but really didn't know
what it was. "I didn't think it was
a bat because it was so small and it
looked like a mouse Niblock
said. The bats entered the room
through small holes where the
beds are connected to the walls.
On Tuesday, an estimated 35
bals were killed by workers from
the housing department who
used brooms as their weapons.
Another 60 bats were
exterminated on Friday morning
after workers fumagated rooms A
and D with 24 cans of poison.
Workers also removed cin-
derblocks from the walls of rooms
of A and D in attempts to kill the,
remaining bats. After workers
puiled several bricks from the
exterior of the building, an esti-
mated 300 bats flew from the in-
ner wall crevice, Isabelle Cos-
grove of 417-A.
A member of the biology
staff said it is not unusual for bats
to congregrate in the hundreds.
"Female bats can roost in the
thousands Tim Charles said. "In
the mid west they roost by the
millions in some caves he said.
Charles said female bats stay
together to roost while male bats
are individualistic and live alone.
"These bats were probably small
brown bats Charles said.
The last bat in suite 417 was
sighted on Saturday but couldn't
fly because it was dizzy from the
poison. Niblock said workers
have chalked all the cracks and
have recemented the cinder-
blocks in the walls. "We might be
able to move in on Tuesday Ni-
block said.
"We are all kind of jumpy
now. We were sitting outside of
Rawl the other day and a leaf
dropped from a tree and we all
ran Niblock said.
1
Small number of rapes reported
By MINDY McINNIS
WtM Writer
covered that one in two college sailant in his shin and fled,
women reported being the victim The other rape attempt oc-
of some form of sexual assualt. curred when a student was walk-
fFHUnr' Note- This is the A 1986 survey of 349 female ing along the dark path located at
first part of ao paseries on ECU students found that 33.5 the bottom of College Hill, the
��� a?FCIJ TTu�daV M?ndv percent reported being a victim of same path that Jane Doe was tak-
M?EnU wlu'lok Sapeprey- unwanted' sexual activity. Ac- ing on the way to her night class.
ventiroTcarPus cording to ECU Public Safety, The attempts on these victims
On the wo her nieht class several incidents were reported were close calls and they are very
��52� hevvas one acquaintance instance, in the past five yja. 14
Hrinkfe of street liehtsuree her to rape reported which took place in rapes were reported on ECU
� � WeSusTsCw n Garett dorm and one ripe off- campus. This number could be
v�ew as VaTe ro1ndPs the corner of campus which involved an ECU greatly reduces if students would
ioloev buildine student. In other cases, friends of use precautionary measures such
To her left the densely cal1 and rcP�rt thc as not allowing strangers to enter
wooded area is illuminated by the rape to security. This is called a the dorms after curfew.
sXeknv of camZs lights7 As third-party report. So far, there Last spring a student in Jones
Unelominuetowardhedesh- has been two third-party reports dorm was raped when another
ShonS?r of rape is thefar- in which one rape allegedly hap- student let in a stranger, Maurice
mMhme torn hernd Like pened off campus and the"other Crouell. Crouell then fled but was
�othf happened in one of the dorms, later apprehended and found
unaware tf�?��K�rs Thecallers didn't give enough guilty. He was sentenced to 40
taHlnlvlsSSSofall information to complete the in- years for first degree rape and 20
rS� vestigationsso theXestigaitons yg
LLS 'NoJefy sexual assualt en- lem, it'fa state f oblemas well as
SWSSnSltege counter leads'to actual rape. For fe.fff
Health Association, acquaintance instance, there were two rape at- the U.S. Bureau of the Census, am
raoe occurTmore often among tempts reported in 1988, a male al- average 26.4 women per 100,000
SSShSTfc one of the legedly put a gun to the victim's get raped every year in North
Association's surveys, it was dis- head. The victim kicked the as- See RAPES, page 3
.�
It I 11
These are sixty of the estimated hundred brown bats which were 'hanging ouf in suite 417 of
Belk Dormitory in the last week.
Frat initiation may be replaced
By ADAM CORNELIUS
Staff Writer
A report published by the
Fraternity Executives Association
concerning the National Inter-
fraternity Conference meeting
last Fall indicates that the pledg-
ing system is under scrutiny by
fraternity leaders and may be
replaced by an alternative
method of membership initiation
by next December.
Currently pledging involves
the first month or two of a
student's affiliation with a frater-
nity, ending with the student's
aquiring full membership. The
pledge period involves orienta-
tion meetings, parties, and educa-
tion about the fraternity's history,
goals, and membership.
The FEA is comprised of the
hief executives of 58 fraternities
and serves as a forum which
works in close contact with the
NIC on current fraternity issues.
In a questionnaire distributed
among its members, 52 percent
voted in favor of a resolution to
Mttlt'l jlt'l.U �"
? ��v. Uiiittmtm t
study alternatives to pledging.
Fourteen percent voted against a
resolution and 34 percent of the
members remained neutral on the
issue.
At the December 3 meeting of
the NIC House of Delegates a
proposal was adopted by a vote of
50-0 in which each NIC member
was asked "To study alternatives
to pledge status in their chapters
and to report its position on how
such a program can be imple-
mented at the NIC convention in
DecemNn- of 1989
See 'FRAT page 2
SGA postpones decision
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
The weekend ice storm covered Greenville in a winter wonderland. Saturday's baseball game was
postponed while the bleachers of Harrington field became frosted with ice. (Photo by Gretchen
Journigan�Photolab)
The Student Government
Association voted to indefinitely
postpone a resolution concerning
the abolition of Pirate Walk, ap-
proved appropriations for four
campus organizations, and recog-
nized the constitution of a new
campus organization in
Monday's meeting.
Pirate Walk will remain as it is
for now. A resolution authored by
Marty Helms, speaker of the legis-
lature, was postponed indefi-
nitely until further suggestions
can je made to improve the escort
service.
The resolution called for the
abolition of Pirate Walk and
asked Public Safety to implement
a similar service for the fall
semester. According to Helms, he
has learned the service cannot
feasibly be conducted by Public
Safety due to lack of funds.
"Since Pirate Walk was stu-
dent-operated, it should be re-
vised by the students Helms
said. He plans to meet with Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin, Student
Residence Association President
Mark Carroll, and other SGA leg-
islators on Wednesday to discuss
the future of the program.
Helms asked the legislature
to support him in his attempt to
improve the escort service. "I
want this body to establish strict
criteria for the operation of Pirate
Walk
"I would like to see in the
neighborhood of four to five thou-
sand going to the operation of the
program Helms said. The funds
will be used for advertisments,
uniforms and possibly a new
communication system.
"My plans are to wrap this up
this semester for the fall of 1989 so
we can assure the students an
excellent escort service
In other business, the SGA
voted to recognize the University
Scholars Organization as a cam-
pus group. The group has
unofficially been on campus for
several years. Each student must
have been awarded a University
Scholars Award in order to be a
member of the organization.
The SGA appropriated $60C
to the Arnold Air Society. Thc
money will send two representa-
tives of the Arnold Air Society to a
convention in Colorado.
An appropriation of $111





4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21,1989

Rash of hit and runs reported
Military time is used, 00:00 is
midnight, 12:00 is noon.
Feb.13
16:00 Belk resident reported
the communication of threats
from a Wilmington man.
19:45 Storm drain without a
grate reported.
?0:00 Damage to vehicle re-
ported.
22:27 Keg oi beer found in
Scott dorm room.
2300 Stolen property, two
traffic signs, were found in
Aycock.
23.00 Resident of Aycock
found to be in possession of
empty keg oi beer.
Feb.14
4.54 Slav resident reported
harassing phone calls to his room.
14:50 Bats reported in resi-
dence hall.
23:27 Man reported trespass-
ing-
Crime Report
Feb 15
3:15 Four males given cam-
pus citations for visitation viola-
tions
15:15 Resident oi White dorm
reported damage to vehicle.
18:25 Tyler resident reported
drivers license lost in Menden-
hall.
21:21 Loud party of underage
students in Belk.
21:55 Jones RA reported
damage to east central door.
Feb. 16
00:10 Six persons given cita-
tions for underage consumption
of alcohol.
01:05 Female resident of Jones
reported a man trespassing in the
bathroom while she was taking a
shower.
11:19 Vandalism reported on
second floor of Jenkins Art Build-
ing.
14:10 Threatening phone call
received by resident of Garrett.
22:45 Two student given cita-
tions for selling doughnuts in
Tyler.
16:00 Girl reported being as-
saulted in her Clement dorm
rcxim.
Feb.17
00:10 Jones resident given ci-
tations in possession of pyrotech-
nics (fireworks) and underage
alcohol consumption. Another
lones resident given citation for
placing pennies in door.
01.35 Possible attempted sui-
cide in Tyler dorm.
10:15 Jones resident reported
damage to vehicle.
12H5 First DegTee Burglary
reported in Belk. A wallet, con-
taining $45, was stolen from pants
of male resident. A teller card was
stolen from purse of female. Both
victims were asleep with the door
unlocked when incident oc-
curred.
19:05 Unidentified man dam-
aged wall of tv room in White
dorm.
20:19 Resident of White re-
ported a hit and run to car parked
at 9th Street and James Street
parking lot.
23:00 Raymond E. Campbell
of Apartment 10,1005 Elm Street
was arrested for damage to real
property in Belk Hall.
Feb. 18
02:09 Mother reported son
had taken an overdo? 2 of a drug in
Belk dorm.
02:35 Umstead resident broke
window of dormitory.
16:30 Woman was ap-
proached by suspicious male
south of Greene Hall.
02:13 Jones RA reported un-
known male on the third floor of
Jones.
07:00 Michael Wayne Houpe
of 401 BScott Hall wasarrestcd for
possession of schedule 1 drug,
LSD.
22:50 Rescue Unit sent to Belk
dorm.
23:00 Bayonet found in Belk
dorm room.
Feb. 19
01:30 Pamela S. Thaxton of
301 East Fifth Street was arrested
for DWI and exceeding posted
ipeed limit south of Brewster
Building.
11:00 Slay resident reported
creaking and entering of his ve-
licle and larceny of radar detec-
:or.
11:30 Reported damage to
chicle north of Aycock.
01:44 Glass broken in kitchen
area of Fletcher.
04:45 Aycock dorm door bro-
ken.
21:53 Clement resident re-
ported suspicious male in her
room saying he was repairing her
closet door.
22:15 Resident of Scott re-
ported larceny oi $80.
Feb. 20
02:40 Marine banned from
campus after being reported
unescorted in Jones.
01:27 Steven J. Hammond of
467 Jones Hall was arrested for
trespassing on third floor of Jones,
drunk and disruptive, resisting
arrest and obstruction and delay
of a law enforcement officer.
12:30 Bike reported stolen
east of White.
15:00 Damage to vehicle west
of Avcock.
TKK director says
'Frat hazing violates human values'
and environmental
tern.
The action of ZBT ma v set into
Continued from page 1 problems
The proposal comes amid changes
growing concern over the hazing Some fraternities are already
of pledges, which has led to the responding to the problems. The
death of over fortv students since supreme council of Zeta Beta Tau
1978. According to the FEA re- fraternity passed a resolution in
port, significant movement is September abolishing the institu-
underway at the national and tion oi pledging within their fra-
campus levels to address the haz- ternity, noting that pledging was
ing issue as well as the issues of put into effect 100 years after the
�vxual abuse, discrimination, and foundation of the fraternity sys-
ilcohol.
Eleven out of the 44 FEA
members questioned said that
they were ready to proceed to find
a way to eliminate pledging from
the membership structure, 12
were receptive but needed more
time to develop the issue, and six
v�re undecided. Nine said they
were going to wait for the self-
study process to work thorugh
their fraternity and the NIC, and
six were not in favor of the con-
cept at all.
In a report to the San Jose
Mercury News Dwavne Woerpel,
the NIC representative of Tau
kappa Epsilon fraternity said,
Hedging has become synono-
mous with hazing. We must face
the realities of our world today or
race extinction. The public is fed
up. The administrators are fed up.
And the students are fed up
Apparcn f, insurance com-
panies are also noticing the haz-
ing incidents, which range from a
pledge who was burned by oven
cleaner to another who died of
alcohol poisoning. T.J. Schmitz,
executive director of TKE said
fhat fraternities were rated
among the ten worst insurance
risks because of hazing and alco-
hol-related problems.
"In the final analysis, 1 believe
we must admit that our structure
is a central part of the problem
Schmitz said. "We have created a
sub-status membership category
which, in part, fosters these be-
haviors, without action we may
end up as a modern-day example
of the dodo bird, extinct because
we did not respond to the internal
motion a return to the roots of the
fraternity system.
"The highest human values
enunciated in our rituals and
creeds have been pushed into the
shadows and forgotten in the
wake of these senseless hazing
tragedies Schmidt said. "Be-
cause of this profile, I believe fra-
ternities are often unable to re-
cruit the top students now on
campus
Dn�cl Nonstop
R�eighOurh�m
To Ctncun. M�nco
LIVE
REMOTES
Thurs Feb. 23, 5-7 p.m. r
Rodio Personalities Kitty Kinnon
In Greenville and Kevin Silvo in Rocky Mount
It's A Party! g
To Announce Winners Of The Q
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1 D�ys-6 NigMs
At The CROWN
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Door Prizes
No Pucchot N�c���ory You N�d Not to Pr���nt To Win )
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10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
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CLOTHES
At
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400 S. Evans St.
On the corner below Fizz"
Recycled clothing (New & Used)
752-3866
A series to assist
graduating seniors.
At roppmani we re
also interested in
your future.
Dressing
for the
Interview:
i
Every interviewer will agree that the way
you are dressed for the interview is ex
tremeiy important. Many potential
employers will inspect you from head to
toe When you consider that many com-
panies will interview more than one hun
died applicants for a position, it makes
good sense to insure that you're properly
dressed
A dark suit, preferably a navy, navy
pinstripe, grey, or grey pinstripe, should be
worn for the first meeting.
A white shirt should he worn for each in-
terview (some large companies require that
their employees wear nothing but white
shirts)
A conservative stripe or foulard tie is
preferred. Don't make the mistake of wear
ing a linen tie in the winter or a wool one
during spring or summer A burgundy stripe
with some navy blue and or grey usually
looks very nice with either of the aforemen-
tioned suits
Dark shoes, preferably a dark leather
tassel or lace up is best Light colored
loafers won't cut it (a fresh shine would be a
good ideal too) Wear a belt that matches
your shoes.
U e u am to offei
i hen it es to mat
i suit Our select es suits bj
Aust Reed � I � t S ffrn '�' - � �
Freema � � � � �
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A navy blazer is permissible But it m isJ
be worn properly with a conservative stripe
tie Grey pant- are generally the best to
wear with the blazer (khakis are too casual
for an interview) Again, dark shoes are
best
Make sure that your clothes are clean and
pressed
Some self proclaimed professionals say
that you should work your way up to your
best looking suit In other words, save the
best for last to make the lasting impression
when it comes down to the final cut. This
makes sense until you consider that you
want to make a good enough impression at
the first interview to be asked back for the
second This is a decision you must make
for yourself
oPfrnans
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall Rocky Mount
V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21,1989 3
Ex-Drug dealer re-lives saga
WILMINGTON (AP) � Dale
Varnam was a high school gradu-
ate who salvaged cars for a living.
When he got a chance at adven-
ture and money through drug
smuggling, he jumped.
"It was like this cocaine, it
was power he said. "It gave a
power of everything. It was a
power to manipulate. It changed
my life so much at that time. At
that time, I didn't care about noth-
ing
Varnam, now 38, savs it was
money - and not a love of drugs -
that led him into the business. He
got drunk for the first time on the
night of high school graduation
and smoked two joints in his
whole life, he said. He snorted
lines of cocaine onlv once, he said,
because he didn't like the way it
made him feel.
"I didn't care about drugs
he said. "The money was what I
was in it for - the green Living
near the Lockwood Folly Inlet,
Vamam grew up several minutes
from what has historically been
one of the hottest importing spots
in the state.
In Vamamtown, as in many
isolated towns along the coast,
Varnam had close-knit family and
friendships laced with boyhood
memories. Those ties are what
initiallv drew him into the drug
business.
"Let's sav back in from '78 to
the '80s, a lot of my friends was
involved in drugs, and I would do
so much for them just because of
the goodness of my heart, really
Varnam told the Wilmington
Morning Star. As the drugs -
mainly marijuana - came in, Var-
nam, then in his late 20s, would
hide it in the woods until his
friends came to pick it up, he said.
Or he would help them unload it.
At the time, he didn't view
drugs as particularly harmful. Il-
legal drugs seemed about as seri-
ous to him as moonshine, he said.
His feelings would later change.
In the late '70s and early '80s,
illegal drugs in Brunswick
County were so widespread, he
said, that he barely knew anyone
who wasn't either using, import-
ing or selling them. Business was
so brisk around Varnamtown, he
said, that once after he blinked his
car lights at a low-flying airplane,
the pilot thought his yard was a
drop-off point, and left two bales
of marijuana on his front lawn.
The adventure of smuggling
appealed to him, and the money
fit neatly into his preferred life-
style: fast cars and women. For a
high school-educated man who
salvaged cars for a living, the
amount of money to be had
seemed tremendous.
The smuggling also high-
lighted a part of his heritage that
fascinated him: his pirate ances-
tors. When he began dealing co-
caine in the 1980s, he took on pi-
rate trappings.
At the gate to his home, sur-
rounded by a frontier-style
wooden fence and called Fort
Apache, he flew a skull-and-
crossbones flag. The flag was both
a sign of his heritage, he said, and
a symbol of cocaine: poison.
Through his network of
friends, Vamam said, he became
known as reliable. While they
were getting caught and sent to
jail, he kept a low profile and
didn't buy a lot of flashy items.
By 1982, his business associ-
ates included importers from
Central and South America. That
year was a crucial one for Var-
nam.
Tired of how the high-pres-
sure life was affecting his two
daughters and wife, Vamam said,
he quit the illegal drug business.
During that "clean" period, he
was miserable.
"I missed the adventure, the
excitement he said. "My mind
was still deranged from all the
money
Six months later, he was back
in the business, he said, and for
the first time was dealing cocaine.
After that, his life took on a
frenzied, underworld nature that
he still recalls with amazement.
He was constantly ferrying
cocaine between Florida and
North Carolina, driving in one of
his Corvettes or flying with it. He
moved huge amounts, eliminat-
ing what he calls the middle man.
Some of the drug money he
gave as anonymous gifts to
friends in financial need, he said,
but, mostly, he spent it. After he
and his wife separated in the early
1980s, he went on buying crazes,
keeping many of his possessions
in Florida.
As Varnam's dealings grew,
he became more and more open
with his drug-trafficking lifestyle.
The law was after him, and he
knew it.
When an agent came to him in
early 1987 with enough informa-
tion to put him behind bars for
life, Varnam decided to cooper-
ate. By that time, he said, he was
ready to get out of the business.
'They said, 'Hey, the train's
leaving he said. "I said, '1 want
on Best thing I ever done in my
life
None of Varnam's assets
were seized. He said he gave
away most of the things he bought
with drug money.
If he could, the former drug
dealer said, he would start over on
the side of the law. "I'd go in to
destroy it from another way, in-
stead of allowing it Vamam
said.
$ $
MEDICAL SCHOOL
WHO WILL PAY YOUR EXPENSES?
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TWO THREE AND FOUR-YEAR
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INTRODUCING:
Rapes often go unreported because victim knows offender
Continued from page 1
Carolina. On the national level,
37.5 women per 100,000 are raped
every year. If all of these rapes,
national as well as state, were
broken down into catagories, sta-
tistic? would show that most
rapes occur on the college level.
What causes campus rapes?
According to Janice E. Harris,
Greenvillle Detective and Narcot-
ics Division, most college rapes
are alcohol related and they usu-
ally occur after the night clubs
close. In order to help cut down
the number of rape incidents stu-
dents need to learn more about
rape itself.
In most cases, the victim
knows the offender personally so
she might be hesitant to report the
rape. Sometimes the victim will
experience guilt and shame be-
cause she may believe that she
provoked the attack. These feel-
ings stem from the myths that
have been associated with rape.
One myth suggests that
women provoke rape by the way
they dress. A manner in which a
woman dresses is her prerogative
and she isn't responsible for the
way an offender may respond.
A female has the right to de-
cide with who to have sexual
contact with. Forced sexual con-
tact against a woman's will is rape
and there is no inbetween.
Many rapes go unreported
because women have a fear of
having prior sexual encounters
exploited in the courtroom. This
type of display doesn't go on
anymore due to the new Rape
Shield Law.
This law prevents the defense
attorney from dragging up the
victim's previous sex life. This
law is a big relief for students
since most of them lead an active
sex life.
Leading an active sex life and
being raped are not related be-
cause anyone could be raped.
Studies show that most men who
rape lead normal sexually active
lives.
I The East Carolinian
Publications Building
757-6366
Wednesday - LADIES NIGHT
- $2.00 Ice Teas!
- Ladies FREE
Thursday - TLAJUANA TEA PARTY!
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otfje iEaat (Ear0lttuan
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since H.?5
Pete Fernald, c��r�M�jj�r
Stephanie Folsom, MPnS em�
James F.J. McKee, dim of Advertising
Tim Hampton, mm u� Brad Bannister, cm u,to,
KRISTEN HALBERG, ���� JEFF PARKER, si�r illustrator
Chip Carter, mm vhtor Tom Furr, a i imtpii m�
Susan Howell, p m�i� Debbie Stevens, s��tary
Dean Waters, &� M�r Stepi ianie Emory,m t� su;�
Stepi ianie Singleton, aw uor Mac Clark, mmm m
February 21.1989
OPINION
Page 4
Black history
Attitudes pick up where laws leave off
Dr. Carter G. Woodson founded
"Negro History Week" in 1926 with
the idea of teaching Whites to shed
their chauvenism and Blacks to shed
their feelings of inferiority.
That week became a month-long
recognition of the history of African-
Americans � a month for all Ameri-
cans to remember those who
worked so hard in the past for the
civil rights enjoyed today.
Sitv-three years later, we look at
how far this country has come and
the progress made towards a truly
integrated society with an appropri-
ate pat on the back. Remembering
the struggles of men like Woodson
and Martin Luther King, Jr cases
like Brown vs. Board of Education,
and books like Uncle Tom's Cabin
show us how much closer we are to
a society where we can just exist as
people, not seemingly different
creatures judged by skin color.
The changes thus far have been
brought about mostly by laws.
There are a lot of things in this coun-
try that are refused attention, such
as rascism of every nature, until a
law is made. Thirty or forty years
ago they were necessary as a forceful
change, but now we're living in the
new version of an old society.
This generation has come so far
and yet has immense ground to
cover. After another 63 years there is
the hope that we can live in a society
without archaic prejudices between
racial and ethnicgroups. There is the
hope that we can truly honor those
of the past by completing the goals
which they spent their lives striving
toward.
And yet it is only a hope. Laws
were used to change the past, but
this time nothing less than a change
in attitudes will suffice in shaping
the future. Ifs not up to the lawmak-
ers in the legislature anymore. Law
can be made upon law but without
letting go of the bitter and fearful
attitudes between races, our
children's ideas about each other
will be at a standstill instead of
moving towards an even better na-
tion to live in.
TERR0WS
IN
2000
(AF1ZR 7M6 OZOME
tWER MAS ALL
Bur DePteieD)
1 WANT A
PIAHF. TwO
POOARS.
THemzfiz
GfMYFSLLOU
raF�JUHF0HT0q
Don't forget North's good points
To the editor:
What is the appropriate way to
reward a Marine Officer for twenty
years of loval service? The answer is
definitely not to send him to jail. But
that is what some people want to see
happen to Oliver North.
In 1968, four years after a near
fatal automobile accident, Oliver
North graduated from the United
States Naval Academy. Immediately
a f ter wards he went to Officers School
in Quantico, Virginia and soon after
to Vietnam to fight for his country.
He fought like a true American hero
while earning a silver star, a bronze
star, and two purple hearts. After
eleven months he returned to Quan-
tico to teach battles tactics, taught
jungle training in Japan, and re-
turned to teach at the Naval War
College. It was there he was recog-
nized by John Poindexter and was
brought to Washington to serve at the
National Security Council as a White
House aide.
Now this man is being prose-
cuted for his hard and loyal work for
the United States of America. The
government has already spent be-
tween 7 and 9 million dollars to send
this patriot to jail. How many home-
less Americans could we have shel-
tered and fed with that money?
Throughout his time at the NSC,
Oliver North never wanted to do
anything but serve his country. As a
former career Marine Corp Officer,
Oliver North has worked with great
love of Cod and country, never prof-
itting personally, always in an effort
to protect his and our country. Now
fighting for his freedom, we all owe a
great deal to Oliver North for twenty
vearsofserviceand putting his life on
the line for our country. Is this the
way we are going to thank him?
Support Oliver North.
Nick Skottegaard
ECU College Republicans
Marketing
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expressing all points of view. Mail or
droj) than byourofficein the Publica-
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trance to Joynei I ibrary.
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Letters arc limited to 300 words or
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writing letters for this page are re-
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f.m. Tuesday for Thursday editions.
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iddition to the "Campus Forum" sec-
tion of the paper. The East Carolinian
itw The Campus Spectrum This
is an opinion column by guest writers
�' the student body and faculty. The
lumns are printed in "The Campus
trunt" will contain current topics of
ern to the campus, community or
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regard to ruQ of gtiihfhffialld de-
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� be willing to accept byline credit for
theii efforts, as no entries from ghost
riters will be published.
1 gggggjjjgjggt-tfWgWWggrjSjg
Don't leave a legacy of garbage � recycle
1 low much space do you take up on this
planet? There's the size of your body, your room
or house or apartment, your car and it's parking
space, any additional storage you rent, your
office if it sits vacant when you're not in it
And then there's your trash. We don't think
about trash, because once it becomes an annoy-
ance to us, overflowing into the room of emitting
noxious fumes, someone gets around to taking it
to the dumpster, and at least for our concerns, ifs
gone, never to be seen again.
Where does it go? In Pitt County, your trash
goes to Allen Landfill, a lined space of land about
3 miles west of the hospital, where it is added to
the trash of the other 100,000 residents of this
county, to rest and hopefully to rot, returning to
the earth. Only most of it doesn't rot, like plastic,
glass, and aluminum, they just sit there forever
and take up space. Your space. You and I each, on
the average, generate 1,547 pounds of trash ev-
ery year. Using rough calculations based on the
trash I carry out of my house, that would better
than fill the average dorm room over your head.
Multiply that times the years you will hopeful
live, and you will realize thay YOU take up a
whole lot of space, more than you might have
thought.
And that space is running out. As I under-
stand it, the Allen Landfill could be FULL as
early as next year. And so Pitt County is quickly
pining the thousands of other communities
searching for solutions to what has become a
critical problem. A complicated problem. Noone
wants a landfill started in their backyard, as gar-
bage scow captains found out last year while
floating the Gulf Stream, leaving in their wakes
refuse that closed beaches. And much of our
trash, as it decays or is burned, becomes quite
toxic and dangerous to us and our environment.
Maybe the best example is that seemingly harm-
less Styrofoam packaging, which when broken
or burned releases chlorofluorcarbons into the
air, eating away the protective ozone. Scientists
are predicting a new hole to form over the arctic
within the next three weeks.
And it is an expensive problem. Perhaps you
or your folks have directly experienced trash
collection fee hikes recently. Some fees have
Campus Spectrum
By
Mike Burcher
jumped 600 over the past year.
It is YOUR problem. Yours and the person's
sitting next to you and across from you. Are you
enjoying a soda or a cup of coffee or a beer as you
read this? What you do with that drink container,
especially if ifs disposable, will be a legacy that
you leave to your children and your children's
children. Unless you choose otherwise, that plas-
tic bottle, aluminum can, Styrofoam cup will
long outlive you in some landfill somewhere.
The good news is that you CAN do some-
thing about the trash problem. You can even
make money from it, if you are ambitious
enough.
Over half of what we throw away can be re-
cycled. Pitt County has two recycling collection
points (14th Street, and on County Home Rd, about
1 2 mile from Bells Fork) which receive newspaper,
mixed paper, cardboard, clear glass, colored glass,
and aluminum cans. Several businesses will pay
betweem $.3540 per pound of aluminum cans. It
takes approx. 24 cans to make a pound. The East
Carolina Vocational Center will also pay for card-
board and computer paper.
I lost a lot of sleep one night figuring out the
economics of all this in terms of the ECU campus. It
each residential student (this is NOT counting fac-
ulty, staff, off-campus, or commuter students) gen-
erates only one aluminum can per day for one
semester (a conservative estimate which does not
even begin to account for weekend consumption),
ECU sends 600,000 cans per semester to the Allen
Landfill, weighing 12.5 tons, taking up 11,200 cubic
feet of space uncrushed, and which could be re-
cycled for $9,250. SGA take note. And remember this
is a CONSERVATIVE estimate.
I admit that at this point, recycling is not conven-
ient for most students. Chancellor Richard Eakin is
now appointing a task force that will begin to resolve
that problem within the next few years. But in the
meantime, the Methodist Student Center will give
you 1 cent for each can you bring, aluminum or steel,
towards a $1.50 home-cooked meal Wednesday
nights. (Note: Pepsi uses steel cans, which can be
recycled in Washington for $.05pound, approx. 12
cans). And if you do have a means of getting to the
collection points, there is no reason vou have to wait
for the Chancellor's committee. Certainly campus
groups, fraternities and sororities could be on the
cutting edge of some campus-wide solutions instead
of waiting for a decree from the administration.
Other ways you can help solve the trash prob-
lem:
Use refillable "rcturn-for-deposit" bottles instead
of disposable products, especially the plastic 2-liter
bottles which never decay Even non-returnable
bottles that can be recvcled are better than plastic.
Carry your own coffeetea mug which you can
wash and reuse instead of using Styrofoam cups
provided at so many functions and offices. Both the
manager of the Student Stores, and the director of
Food Services have agTeed to consider alternatives
to the Styrofoam products used on campus, espe-
cially in terms of letting people bring their own cups,
if students and staff show enough interest.
When you give a party, use cups and utensils that
can be washed. Soap is a whole lot cheaper than
"plasricware Pirate cups are great for this.
Write your local government, congresspeople and
senators and let them know your views about the
environment and trash issues. Some states have
already enacted bans on the use of chlorofluorocar-
bons. They won't know what you think unless you
tell them.
"oycott businesses which use Styrofoam packag-
ing, and encourage businesses which don't.





Tf IE EAST C A ROLIN IAN
FEBRUARY 21, 1989 5
-
I
5
S
I
I
School eases smoking rules
Qct ready for Spring rBreakj
(CPS)� Bucking a national
trend, the University of Louisville
has softened its proposed anti-
smoking rules, bowing to threats
of fundig cuts from legislators in a
state where tobacco is a $2 billion
industry.
University President Donald
Swain said Feb. 7 that the new
policy, supposed to take effect
March 1, will not include a provi-
sion that all "irreconcilable con-
flicts between smokers and non-
smokers be resolved in favor of
nonsmokers.
Some Kentucky legislators
contended the policy was unfair
to smokers and threatened to
decrease state funding to the uni-
versity if the new rules were im-
plemented.
"We've tried to address all
concerns, including those of the
legislators Swain said.
"There was concern that
smokers be treated with some
balance. We were concerned that
the previous policy was a little
one-sided
Swain said the revised policy
directs department heads to settle
conflicts with employees.
The revised smoking policy
also doesn't include previous
bans on smoking in open work
areas, directing instead that such
areas be spearated into smoking
and non-smoking sections or be
designated one or the other after
discussions with employees.
"If it's fair to smokers, that's
what we want to look at said
state Rep. Donnie Gedling, chair-
man of the legislature's Tobacco
Task Force and an outspoken
opponent of the university's ear-
lier proposal.
Another key legislator,
House Agriculture Committee
Chairman Clay Crugpper, said
any smoking policy was inappro-
priate for a public institution in a
tobacco-growing state. "1 didn't
think they needed any regula-
tion he said.
Louisville's policy revision is
the exception to a growing trend,
however. Scores of colleges and
universities across the United
States have restricted smoking in
recent years, and some have even
banned smoking completely from
campus buildings. The policies
generally have grown even more
restricitive'since the start of the
1988-89 school year.
Washington's Big Bend Com-
munity College, Penn State, Stan-
ford, Tulane and Mankato State
universities and the universities
of Texas, Illmios, Colorado, Ne-
braska and North Dakota are
among the instutions that have
restricted on-campus smoking.
616 East Arlington Boulevard
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Chancellor Richard Eakin to discuss
economics of eastern region in March
ECU Newt luraau
Dr. Richard Eakin, chancellor
of ECU, will discuss the economic
situation and outlook for eastern
North Carolina during a public
television program next month.
Eakin will be the guest of for-
mer University of North Carolina
president Bill Friday on Friday's
North Carolina People program
that airs over the 10-channel net-
work of North Carolina Public
Television. It is scheduled at 7:30
p.m. on Monday, March 6, and
again at 7:30 p.m. Mondav, March
27.
Stations of the UNC Center
for Public Television are WUND-
TV ch. 2, Columbia; WUNC-TV
Ch. 4, Chapel Hill; WUNE-TV Ch.
17, Linville; WUNM-TV Ch. 19,
Jacksonville; WUNK-TV Ch. 25,
Greenville; WUNL-TV Ch. 26,
Winston-Salem; WUNF-TV Ch.
33, Asheville; WUNP-TV Ch. 36,
Roanoke Rapids; WUNJ-TV Ch.
39, Wilmington, and WUNG-TV
Ch. 58, ConcordCharlotte.
North Carolina People
hosted by president-emeritus Fri-
day is in its 18th year and is the
longest running North Carolina
public television production.
�&
Martin and Mavretic debate issues
as Republican party controls House
RALEIGH (AP) � Despite a
flareup over teacher pay raises
that had the rumor mill churning,
tli3 bipartisan coalition that
wields power in the state House
of Representatives is in no danger
of collapsing, its leaders say.
In fact, it's difficult to envi-
sion circumstances undealent of
Siamese twins joined at the head,
unable to survive without each
other. Since the faction succeeded
in replacing former Speaker Lis-
ten Ramsey with Joe Mavretic,
Republicans have had their first
taste of genuine power for the first
tinuvjpevemory.
They would lose it in an in
SGA funds
Continued from page 1
was approved last month for the
group to attend a regional con-
vention where they won 11
awards.
An appropriation of $840
requested by the Elections
Committee was approved. The
committee is responsible for the
elections for SGA executive of-
fices in March.
The funds will be used for
wages for students monitoring
boxes and counting votes, adver-
tising and food for the workers.
According to Helms, an annual
appropriation is traditional for
the Elections Committee.
Paul Puckett was elected to
serve as chair of the Election
Committee for this year's election
on March 29. His responsibilities
will be to solicit campus groups to
monitor ballot boxes and to insure
the ballot locations are run prop-
erly.
An appropriation of $1900 for
the Inter-Fraternity Council was
approved by the SGA. The money
will pay for advertising of fall
rush, printing and binding of
materials and registration.
The Irate Frisbee Club re-
ceived an appropriation of $1015
to cover traveling expenses to
tournaments and registration
fees. The 16 members of the team
will compete in tournaments in
North Carolina, South Carolina
and Florida.
Although the frisbee club
conducts fund raisers, most of the
money is spent maintaining the
frisbee golf course on campus.
Susan Cooperman, appro-
priations chairperson, an-
nounced a deadline of March 3 for
all campus organizations to sub-
mit their appropriation requests
for the 1989-90 year. Cooperman
said the groups must have an
approved constitution filed with
the SGA and raise at least 15 per-
cent of the funds they request
stant if the old regime were re-
stored. And the Democrats, a
minority within their own party,
realize that many if not all of their
54 colleagues still regard their
defection as betrayal.
If the Ramsey loyalists re-
turned to power, the 20 renegades
would be stripped of anything
resembling influence. Addition-
ally, the coalition members are
under pressure to demonstrate
they can effectively run the
House.
But as in marriage, to which
the bipartisan arrangement is of-
ten likened, there will be argu-
ments - no matter how much the
partners depend on each other.
That's what happened last week
when Mavretic, D-Edgecombe,
hewed to the hard line in chastis-
ing Republican Gov. Jim Martin's
approach on teacher salaries.
The day before 5,000 or more
teachers marched on Raleigh to
demand higher pay, Martin con-
vened a "summit meeting of
education and government lead-
ers to discuss the issue. Mavretic
was the only person invited who
refused to go.
He branded the summit a
"public-relations ploy" and ac-
cused the governor of making an
unrealistic campaign promise to
boost North Carolina teacher
salaries to the national average by
1992. The next day, as Martin lis-
tened, Mavretic hurled moie
darts his way in a fiery speech tc
the teachers.
Some Republicans cried foul.
"I think it is time that the speaker
be reminded that he would not be
where he is today if the governor
hadn't worked with the Republi-
cans tc put him there Sen. Jim
!ofcrw-HW R-Cabarrus. wrote in a
letter to House Minority Leader
Jchnathan Rhvne, R-Lincoln.
(Ilie lEast (Carolinian
To qualify tor Warrant Officer
Fhyht Training, you'll need a
high school diploma, and pref-
erably two years of college.
Then you must complete Army
Basic Training before going to
flight school. When you've
completed flight training, you
could have the wings of an
Army aviator.
Tii find out more about
Warrant Officer Flight Train-
ing, contact your local Army
Recruiter.
Sgt. Cottrell
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BL
Ocean Front and only 3 blocks from the most
popular nightw spots in DaytonaJ))
vf Jk Pen Rods. Rarzles, etc.
more
than Sally Jesse Rapheal!
Ifs the Return of the the
scandalous, the libelous (but
ALWAYS Clearly Labeled)
Fast Carolinian Satire Page!
Off wi wh�� prohibit by Uw.
(919) 756-9221
Come in and retake in our Sunat tanning bed
urith stereo & fan.
$5.00 per visit or
$50.00 per month, (1 visit per day).
This offer good through March 31. 1989
MEDIA BOARD
is now accepting applications for General Manager
the 1989 - 1990 academic year for the following:
� The East Carolinian
�WZMB-FM
�Buccaneer
�Rebel
� Photo Lab
�Expressions Magazine
Please apply at the Media Board Office,
2nd floor, Publications Building
Phone 757-6009
Applications accepted through
February 24,1989
for �
youi Travel Associates Sunoteak "Package maudes
:j: Round tup ttanspoitation via Oeiuie mo'otcoocn
ft Seven nighlj accommodations Ol one 0
Daylono J tines! oceanltonl hotels
Opltonoi eicuisions to Wall Disney Wotid iPCOl
and o'nei Hondo o"iocions
:): A money saving discount cotd
:�: Setyices ol t'Ovel Allocates on site vocotion sta"
:): AH loies tips ond jetvice cnaiges
You Drive:
$113 for 4
Wt Privc; i
$178 for 4 March 4-12
Contact;
Lisa Deaton
752-2789
Renee' Hlncr
758-8688
�im
e
e
West Area Residence Council
is having a
Talent Show
March 20,1989
7:00 pm
Hendrix Theatre
All those interested in
participating should
pick up an application at
Mendenhall Student Center
Information desk
or
Call Mike at 752-9756.
All applications should be turned into
701 Fletcher Dorm
by March 1.
Tickets on sale at door.
For more information call
752-9069.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21,1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
APARTMENT FOR RENT Two blocks
from campus. (One bedroom available
until July). Fully furnished, walking dis-
tance to campus and downtown, hard-
wood floors, friendly neighbors. $150
month plus utilities. 757-0412.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDr D: Non
smoker to share 2 bedroom town louse, 1
1 2 baths. No deposit necessary. Located
in Williamsburg Manor. Call Ximena be-
tween 7 a m5 p.m. at 551-2109 or after 8
p m. & during weekends at 756-7797.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom duplex, 1 2 block
from campus. Large den and kitchen
5230.00 per month, $250.00 deposit, avail-
able immediately. Call and leave message
752-7538.
ROOMMATE NEELED: For summer at
Hilton Head. Ocean �front. Bryan 758-
1665.
ROOMMATE WANTED: March 1st
Responsible female. Georgetown Apts.
Walking distance from campus and
downtown. 12 utilities and 12 rent. 830-
1758. Leave message
APARTMENT FOR RENT: March 1st.
Georgetown Apartments. Two bedroom,
1 1 2 baths. Walking distance to campus.
830-1758. Leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: starting in May. Three bedrm.
apt. at Eastbook. $121.00 a month 13
utilities. New Carpet and Ntvv refigera-
tor. ECU Bus Serivice! Call now. 758-4924.
FOR SALE
LASLR PRINTER USERS! HP and
Apple laser printer k ner cartridges can be
recycled! Huge S$ savings. Satisfaction
cuaranteed. For details call 7ANDMONT
at 1 -800-332-3658.
SONY RECEIVER: Excellent cond Re-
mote control, still has 4 vears on warranty.
Only S175.00. Call: 758-9470 anytime.
FOR SALE. Need ECU Alumni Directory,
if vou have one and want to sell one,
please call Phil at 919-829-2099 or 919-876-
0669.
FOR SALE: Ethan Allen bedroom set,
$475.00, Couch, SI69.00,1800's oak dining
table, S399.00, bookcase, $39.00, dining
table, $69.00, coffee table, $59.00, chair
SI 39.00, drum table, $65.00. 830-8944 or
752-0751.
FOR SALE: 3 cu. fridge used for 1 yr. Price
neg. Call Jen 752-3677.
FOR SALE: Apple He computer, monitor
and 2 disk drives. $450.00. Call 355-5670
CAN YOU BUY: Jeeps, Cars, 4 x 4's seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts todav. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party.
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage.
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM-
POSED: Call 756-9136.
TUTOR AVAILABLE: For Math 0045,
Math 1063, Math 1065. Will tutor on cam-
pus. Cull Denise at 757-6420 or 830-1750.
SOUND MIXTURES DJ SERVICE:
Music for all occassions. March dates
available, call Bob at 752-4916. The most
music variety with the best sound quality.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wish ng to gain valuable
experience in tht held. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone providtu. Mary Smith REAL
Crisis Center 758-HELP.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships.
$10,000-$!05,000vr Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166
CABIN COUNSELORS &
INSTRUCTORS: (Male and Female) for
western North Carolina 8 week children's
camp Over 30 activities including Water
Ski, Tennis, Heated swimming pool, Go-
Karts, Hiking, Art Room, meals, salary
and travel. Experience not necessary.
Non-smoking students write for applica
tionbrochure: Camp Pmewood, 20205-1
N.E. 3 Court, Miami, Florida 33179.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart
ment is recruiting for 10-14 part-time soc-
cer coaches for the Spring Indoor Soccer
program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge ii. soccer skills and have pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
5-18 in soccer fundamentals. Hours ap-
proximately 3-7 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Some night and weekend coach-
ing. Program will extend from March 13,
1989 to May, 1989. Salary rate starts at
$3.55 hr Application will be accepted-
starting Mon February 6. Contact Ben
James at 830-450 or 830-4533'
WANTED: ENG Editor, proficient 34"
video tape editing. Part-time. Contact
News Director, WITN-TV, 946-3131.
EOEAffirmative Action Employer. Mi-
norities and women encouraged to apply.
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR MEN:
Are now accepting applications for Cus-
tomer Service Representatives and also
Sales positions for the Spring semester.
Sincere individuals with flexible sched-
ules should apply at' Brody's, Carolina
East Mall, M W, 2-4 p.m.
HELP WANTED: Summer job, June-
August, at Emera.d Isle Mechanically
inclined indhiduals to operate jet ski
rentals. Call 523-4798 in Kinston day or
night.
NEW ENGIAND BROTHERSISTER
CAMPS: OMass) Mah-Kee-Nac for Boys
Danbee for Girls. Counselor positions for
Program Specialists: All team sports, es-
pecially baseball, basketball, field hockey,
soccer and volleyball; 25 tennis openings;
also archery, riflery and biking; other
openings include performing Arts, Fine
Arts, yearbook, photography, cooking,
sewing, rollerskating, rocketry, rcpes,
camp craft; all waterfront activities
(swimming, skiing, sailing, windsurfing,
canoei.igkayak). Inquire J & D Camping
(Boys) 190 Linden Ave, Glen Ridge, NJ
07028; Action Camping (Girls) 263 ,4ain
Road, Montvi'le, NJ 07045. Phone (Boys)
201-429-8522; (Girls) 201-316-6660.
ATTENTION�HIRING Government
jobs�your area. Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. $17,840-
$69,485. Call i-602-838 8885 Ext. B 5285.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED: Starting
March 6th. Monday-Thursday after 2:30
p.m. Pay starts at S5.00hour. Call Pitt
County Community Schools. 830-4240.
HELP WANTED: Male workers needed.
From 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. NO PHONE
CALLS. Come by Carpet Bargain Cer'er,
1009 Dickinson Ave for interview
PART-TIME BABYSITTER NEEDED
Thursday mornings from 8-12. Own
transportation needed Call 756 6319,
leave name, sch?dule and phone number.
MAKE MONEY WORKING AT HOME:
Sell informati n by mail Free details'
Rush self-addressed stamped envelope
to Cheryl Chavis, 819 Greene Mall,
Greenville. NC 28364.
PERSONALS
GIRLS, GUYS: Poolside parties and ma
jor tanning at Daytona Beach, Spring
Break '89. Call Keith, Kelly, Ron and
Wayne at 752-4693 for more information.
ARE YOU GOING: To th. Miami or Ft
Lauderdale area for Spring Ireak7 Do you
need a quick retm? Two tickets from
Miami to Raleigh a.e for so.le. Plane leaves
March 10, 1989 at 11:20 a.m. If interested
a�ll Richard at 752-0794 or 752-7382.
REWARD Know anyone who has 1
new laige oval shaped purple stone ring7
j One was lost 2-9-89 in the downtown ore.
' Calk Wendy 758r6946 Sentimental vnlue.
' Will pay tor its taturn. ' ,
STRINGBEAN Happy 21st Birthday!
REM was planning a birthday concert at
the Delta Sig House, but they're overseas.
Michael, Pete, Bill and Mike send th ir
apologies�they're dedicating "You are
the everything" to us when they're in
Australia I Love You. �Maude.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOL-
LOWING GREEK WOMFN: Highest
GPA�Alpha Kappa Alpha; Most Im-
proved GPA�Alpha Omicron Pi; High-
est GPAs�Mary Meadows and Amanda
Huggins; Outstanding Greek Woman�
Cam Ward; Outstanding Pledge�Debra
Lyons; Outstanding Pledge Class�Delta
Zeta; Gay Blockard Award�Patti Barnes;
Artemis Award�Debbie Tavik, Cam
Ward, Tracy Crimaldi, Barbara Lamb,
Leslie Liedel, Mandy Marlowe, Jan Co-
pley, Cheri Vitthews, Constance Foster
and Veronica McKinney.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
INDUCTEES INTO THE GREEK HALL
OF FAME: Liz Walma, Renee I luffman,
Cam Ward, Carol Shore, Debra Windley,
Andrea Murray, Cassandra Bizzell,
Gwendolyn Branch, Jennifer Vanderberg,
Barbara Lamb, Cheri Matthews, Juanita
Nicholson, Constance Foster, Jeronica
Williams, Angela Sumrell, Jan Copley,
Delynda Carter, Leslie Liedel, Alice
Harden, Kris Kelly, Holly Condrey,
Shelley Ray, Mandy Marlowe and Alicia
Thomas Congratulations!
BEST OF LUCK TO THE 1989
PANHELLENIC COUNCIL: Pres.�Bar-
bara Lamb; V-P�Kelly Greer; Treas-
urer�And! Huff; Secretary�Susan
1 lorne; Rush Chairman�Sherri Neal;
Members-At-Large: Kelly Jones, Heidi
Schafer, Melanie Gibson, Veronica McK-
inney, Juanita Nicholson and Tammie
Daugherty.
NEED K1DE: 1 lome to Deleware oi sur-
rounding sttes for Spring Break. Can
leave by 12:30 on 3-3-89. Will help with
expenses. Call Jen. 752-3677.
BE A FOUNDER OF A FRATERNITY:
. No pledging involved. If vou are inter-
ested in making a difference, come to
Mendenhall, room 248 on Thursday, Feb.
23rd at 8:15 p.m. For more info, call Kevin
830-13.
ATTENTION ALL GIRLS: Pi Kappa Phi
will be holding little sister rush on Febru
ary 20th and 21st. Come out to the new
house from 8-11 and meet the brothers
and little sisters of Pi Kappa Phi. Call for
ride: 756-2371 or 756-7731.
JOHN: This Valentine's Day was special
� all because of you�you sent me on a
scavenger hunt and told me you loved me
too. On this special day you pledged vour
love to me�to my heart 1 wear it near�
around mv neck your lavalier. I love vou
BBA. �Christ.
ATTENTION: Congratulations to the
best ECU Pledge Class! Good job, Delta
Zeta, Beta Pi Pledge Class. You made us
proud at the banquet and forever! �Love
the sisters of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: Pledges, the week is fi-
nally here. Get yourselves in gear. It'll all
be over soon, singing our favorite tune. If
they could see me now the gang would
know the DZ sisters love their pledges so!
Get Psyched. -
HOLLY CONDREY. You took the job and
it's been tough. You're movin'and shakin'
the greatest stuff. Keep it up all year thru.
1000 we're behind you. �Love the sis-
ters and pledges of DZ.
OUR CHI OMEGA BASKETBALL
TEAM: Good job girls! We made it to the
finals We're very proud. Good luck to-
night. �Love, The Chi-Os.
MISSY AND ALYCE: The Chi-O's love
you guys! You'll do a great job
your sisters.
-Love
TO THE 17 PLEDGES OF PHI MU
ALPHA SINFONIA: Congrats to Jimmy
C, Mike D Chris D , Allen F� Robert H ,
John H, Hamilton H, Andy H, Scott L,
I lubert L , Wes L, James P Chris P , Steve
P Rich S James S, and Enc S Good luck
guys! We're all behind you! �the broth-
ers.
KELLY GREER, BARBRA LAMB, AND
LIZ WALMA: Thanks for all your help
Sunday night1! �Shen
TO A CERTAIN SIC EP: Last Friday
night would have been great, if a certain
person hadn't made me so irate Locking
the door showed no class, that must be
why your known as such an ass I really
like beer, but not on my head, if you do it
again, vou will be dead' �Fivetowns
RING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER '89. EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS. FOR
INFO. CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH
AT 752-2865
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. XC 27834
(Downtown Mall)758-3025
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
- �� - - . a.

f AST COPi�S
fO FAS r�fs
ACCU :
S5COPY
758-2400
. rgetoum Sops
ABORTION
Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Ca'i for appointment Mon thru SaL Low
Cost TV ��� '�� "Tenancy
WAKE Nf BAKE
IN BEAUTIFUL
NEGREL. JAMAICA
FOR
SPRING BREAK 89!
VERY
AFFORDABLE
PACKAGES.
BOOK EARLY AND
SAVE!
CALL TRIPP AT
758-9177
OR
1-800-426-7710
1-800-433-2930
R - R - R - RING
"Hi! I'm Tom Reichstetter, your AT&T Student
CampLis Manager here at ECU. I would like to
tell you how AT&T can help lower-your-lorvg
distance bills. I can also answer any of your
long distance questions.
The best time to reach me is 11:30 am -1:30
pm, M&W, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm, T&TH, and
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm F, but you can call anytime
758-2103.
1!
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Hey you guys! Come join the fun on the
Student Union Travel Committee's cruise
to the BAHAMAS over Spring Break.
There will.be dancing, swimming, relax-
ing and tons of other things to do aboard
ship. All transportation and "all you can
eat" on the Carnival ship The ship will
dock at Freeport and Nassau, so come on
and shop until you drop in the world's
biggest marketplace!
CCF
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TirrORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
VflFiriHT i iftiNG CONTEST
Muscle and muscleless bound men and
women should attend the Intramural
registration meeting for the annual
weight lifting contest Feb. 20 at 5:00 p m.
in GCB 1026.
ECU NAVIGATORS
"Right 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 7:30-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
ments seWed. No ticket required; just re-
serve your time.
COOPERATIVE ED.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered by
the Univerity, is designed to help you find
career-related work experience before
you graduate. We would like to extend an
invitation to all students to attend a Co-op
info. Seminar in the GCB. Seminars for
spring '89: Feb. 23,4 p.m room 2016; Feb.
27, 4 pm , room 2016.
AMNESTY INTL
Amnestsy Intl. Group 402 is looking for
persons to assist in its "Brazilian Cam-
paign The group meets every fourth
Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 401 E. 4th St in the upper floor�
enter from the 4th St. entrance. Next
meeting: Feb. 22. Students welcome!
CABARET
The Performing Arts Series and the Dept.
of University Unions present CABARET,
the smash Broadway musical. This pro-
fessional performance will take place on
Feb. 21, 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
This production is being staged by Daeda-
lus Productions, who brought PURLIE to
Wright Auditorium last year. Don't miss
this exciting musical of decadent delight-
ful, and dazzling entertainment. "Life is a
Cabaret, Old Chum, Come to the Caba-
ret Tickets for CABARET are on sale in
the Central Ticket Office, MSC. Telephone
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. - 6:00 p.m Mon. - Fri.
POLISH NAT'L RADIO
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
The Polish National Radio Symphony
Orchestra will appear as part of the Per-
forming Arts Series on Feb. 22,8 00 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Over 100 members
strong, this synphony is led by Antoni
Wit and features guest pianisi Piotr
Paleczny. The program for this grand eve-
ning includes: Strauss�DON JUAN, Op.
20; Chopin�CONCERTO No. 2 in F
Minor, Op. 21; and Brahms�SYM-
PHONY No. 2 in D Major Op. 73. Tickets
for this event are on sale now in the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, MSC. The numler is
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. - 6.00 p.m MonFri.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the April
issue. Articles can be left at the office or ihe
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library. The first issue for Spring
semester is expected to arrive in a few
weeks.
BLACK FACULTY SYMPO-
SIUM
Members of the Organization of Black
Faculty and Staff (OBLS) will present their
current andor on-going research inter-
ests during Black History Month. Presen-
tations will be held each Mon. during the
month of Feb. in the Ledonia Wright Afro-
American Cultural Center from 11:30-
1:30. Students, faculty and staff are en-
couraged to bring a brown bag lunch and
enjoy the discussion. Sponsored by the
Office of Minority Student Affairs.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed National
Service Frat is sponsoring a 24-hour Run
for Cancer on April 14th and 15th with the
American Cancer Society. For more info
call Heather at 758-9550, Bryan at 756-
9665 or Rose Richards at Greenville's
chapter of the American Cancer Society.
Find out about entering .i team or donat-
ing moneymaterials. Help fight the
battle against cancer by supporting Alpha
Phi Omega and the American Cancer
Society in the 24-hour run.
CO-OP ED.
If you are interested in federal jobs and
how to handle the federal employment
process (permanent, summer, or Co-op),
you will want to attend a presentation by
Mr. Phil Hanson of the US. Office of Per-
sonnel Mgmt. on 22489, from 10:00 a.m.
-12 noon in room 1031, GCB.
ASID
A Service Auction sponsored by the stu-
dent chapter of ASID is scheduled for Feb
23 from 7-9 p.m. The auction will be held
in room 205 of the Home Ec Bldg. All
proceeds will benefit the physically dis-
abled. Donations are tax deductible. Serv-
i' -es include: House cleaning, baby sitting,
car washing, yard work & window wash-
ing. Students & faculty & staff are encour-
aged to attend!
ACCOUNTING INFO. SYS-
TEMS
The accounting firm of McGladrey, Hen-
drickson, and Pullen will make a presen-
tation to all graduate and undergraduate
business students. This presentation will
discuss accounting info, systems and will
be given by Bud Moon, Certified Data
Processor (CDP) and Rick Hemphil, CPA.
The meeting is sponsored by the Decision
Science Society and is scheduled for 3:00
p.m. Feb. 22 in GCB 1009. Refreshments
will be served All new or prospective
members are welcome.
INTERVIEWING WORK-
SHOPS
To. elp ECU people prepare for on and off
car pus interviews, the Career Planning
and Placement Service in Bloxton House
is o' rering these one hour programs to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search. The pro-
gram is open to the first 20 people to come
for each session. No sign up is required.
These sessions are held in CP&P Room on
Feb. 13 and 23 at 2:15 p.m.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice is offering these one hour programs on
beginning a resume for your job search.
Handouts and samples will be given out
to the first 20 people to come to each ses-
sion. No sign up is required. These ses-
sions are held in the CP&P Room on Feb.
16,21 and 22 at 2:15 p.m.
CAMPHRE
Sing, eat s'mores and share good fellow-
ship around a campfire, Feb. 17 at 8:00 in
the Ampitheatre behind Fletcher Dorm.
(Weather permitting). Bring instruments,
blankets, flashlights, dress warmly. Spon-
sored by Wesfel QMethodist and Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministries), 758-2030 or 752-
7240.
SOPHOMORES AND JRS
Earn over S600 this summer. Earn 5100 a
month during your last 2 years in college.
Become a part of the Army ROTC Dept.
here at ECU Attend the summer officer
leadership course at Fort Knox, Kentucky.
Info, meeting will be held on Feb. 23 at
1800 hours in room 339 Rawl. It's not too
late for you to earn a commission prior to
graduation. For more info contact Capt.
Steve L. Jones, Rawl 344, 757-6974.
IN-REC SERVICES
TIMEX AEROBIX WEEK, Feb. 20-24
marks a week of fitness and giveaways for
all aerobic fitness participants. Watches,
aerobic fitness apparal, coupons and fit-
ness information wil be given away dur-
ing the week of festivites.
ANIMAL RIGHTS
ECU students for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals (SETA) will hold its introductory
meetingon Feb. 28, in GC1004 at 5:00. A16
minute video on primates used in immu-
nological studies will be shown. All stu
dents desirous of a more equitable world
for animals should attend
SCIENTIFIC INFO. PRESEN-
TATION
Dr. Richard Andrews will present a talk
on Science and Environmental Policy:
The U.S. and Our Global Habitat on Feb.
21 at 7:00 p.m. in room 1028 GCB. The talk
is sponsored jointly by Sigma Xi, the Sci-
entific Research Society, and by the ECU
Honors Program, the Science and Math
Ed. Center and the International Studies
Program. This talk will be the first in a
series of Visiting Lectures to be held at
ECU. The others will be Shenandoah Na-
tional Park�Its Natural and Cultural
History on Feb. 27 at 730 p.m. in room
1028; A Day in the Life of a Park Ranger.
March 28 at 7:30 p.m. in room 1026; and
The National Parks of New Zealand and
Costa Rica on April 4 at 730 pjn. in room
1031. All of the lectures will be held in the
GCB and are free and open to the public.
CAMPUS HOUSING
Students enrolled Spring Semester 1989
who plan to return to ECU Fall Semester
1989 and who wish to be guaranteed resi-
dence hall housing will be required to
reserve rooms during the week of Feb. 20-
24. Prior to reserving a room, a student
must make an advance room payment of
SI 00. These payments, which must be
accompanied by housing applicabons-
contracts will be accepted in the Cashier's
Office, room 105, Silman Bldg beginning
Feb. 16. Students now living in residence
halls should obtain housing applications
from their residence hall office. Students
residing off campus should obtain the
applications from the Dept. of Housing,
room 201, Whichard Bldg. These will be
available beginning Feb. 14. ASSIGN
MENT SCHEDULE: STUDENTS WHO
WISH TO RETURN TO THE SAME
ROOMS THEY PRESENTLY OCCUPY
MUST RESERVE SUCH ROOMS ON:
Feb. 20�8:30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. and 130
p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Feb. 21�830 a.m. to
12.30 p.m. STUDENTS WHO WISH TO
RETURN TO THE SAME BUILDINGS
ON WHICH THEY PRESENTLY RESIDE
BUT DIFFERENT ROOMS WILL BE
PERMITTED TO RESERVE ROOMS ON
Feb. 21�130 pm. to 4:00 pjn. ALL
OTHER RETURNING STUDENTS WILL
BE PERMITTED TO RESERVE ROOMS
ON A FIRST-COME FIRST-SERVE BASIS
ON: Feb. 22-24�830 a.m. to 12:30 pm.
and 130 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The number of
unassigned rooms in each bldg. will be
posted on the respective office door by
8:00 p.m. Feb 21. NOTICE: The residence
hall rental rate has not been set for the
1989-90 school year However, we do
anticipate an increase in the rental rate for
the 1989-90 school year.
VISITING LECTURES PRO-
GJLAM
The National Parks - Public Education -
Earth Science and International Conser-
vation Issues. Co-sponsors: The Honors
Program, The Science and Math Ed. Cen-
ter, International Studies, ECU. "Science
and Environmental Policy: The U.S. and
our Global Habitat" Feb. 21 (co-sponsored
with the ECU Sigma Xi Chapter). Richard
"Pete" Andrews�Director, Institute for
Environmental Studies, UNC-Chapel
Hill. 7:00 p.m room 1028 GCB. 'Shenan-
doah National Park-Its Natural and Cul-
tural History Feb. 27 (co-sponsored with
the Cypress Group, The Sierra Club) John
A. Conners�Geog. Dept, Radford Univ
Radford, VA. author of "Shenandoah
National Park�An Interpretive History
730 p.m room 1028 GCB.
1988 BUCCANEERS
1988 Buccaneers will be given away cm a
!





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21f 1989 7
1

Announcements
first-come, first-serve basis starting Feb
27 at 5 p.m. They will be given away from
the Buccaneer office only. There's only a
limited supply and no more can be or-
dered. So come early to receive your copy.
ATTN. ART STUDENTS
The Parents' Day Weekend Committee
needs a logo for 89. Any media or ap-
proach is accepted (except usage of the
Pirate Mascot) Please turn in entries with
3x5 card stating name, address & phone
to 209 Whichard by 5 p.m. on March 15.
The winning entry will be awarded a S25
cash prize Don't delay, enter today! For
more info contact Tonya Batizv (w)757-
6611 ext. 210 or (h) 830-88S8.
PHI ALPHA THFTA
Phi Alpha Theta will have a meeting on
Feb. 27th at 1:30 p m. in the Todd Room in
Brewster Bldg. All members are urged to
come.
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity is
sponsoring "Fill Your Lungs with
Laughter" for the American Lung Assoc.
at the Attic Feb. 22 at 9:30 pm Remember
this is Comedy Zone night and you are
guaranteed to ' g Everyone is invited.
P.E. MAJORS CLUB
ATTENTION, all P.E. Majors: We have a
meeting Thurs. night at 8:00 pm.�please
be there. Plans about our PARTY will
definitely be discussed. If vou are unable
to make the meeting, ask a friend about
the details. Don't forget�Paitv is this Fri.
night Make plans to attend.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST
Looking for fellowship, fun and hearing
God's word You are welcome to attend
Prime Time held at Rawl, rm. 130�every
Thurs. night at 7:30. Refreshments served.
DELTA SIGMA THETA
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. will be
sponsoring a Health Awareness Week
during Feb. 20-23. Also, the sororitv is
now selling buttons for SI 00 in honor of
Black History Month.
INTERMEDIATE ED. CLUB
The Intermediate Ed. Club will be holding
it next meeting on Feb. 22. All Intermedi-
cte Majors are invited.
DEBATE AT BRODY
The ECU Delegation of NCSL will host the
state Feb Interim Council on Feb 25 & 26.
Debate is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 6
p.m. each day at the Brody Bldg. (School of
Medicine). Affirmative Action and the
use of video tapes for testimony in physi-
cally or sexually abused children cases are
issues to be discussed. Please come out
and meet people from 20 other universi-
ties in the N.C. College & University Sys.
For more info contact Janet at 355-6420.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the April
issue. Articles can be left at the office or the
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from loyner
Library The first issue for Spring
semester is expected to arrive in a few
weeks.
MUSIC EVENTS
ECU School of Music Events Feb 21-27:
Faculty Recital, Kim Peori.i, bassoon (Feb.
23, 8:15 p.m Fletcher Recital Hall, free);
Ralph Walton, clarinet, graduate recital
(Feb. 24, 7:00 p.m Fletcher Recital Hall,
free); Faculty Recital, Brad Foley, saxo-
phone, with guest pianist Donna Cole-
man (Feb. 2 3:15 p.m Fletcher Recital
1 lall, free); om McGinnis, pia.io, junior
recital (Feb. 27, 7:00 p.m Fletcher Recital
Hall, free).
TENNIS DOUBLES
Swinging singles prepare for the Intramu-
ral tennis double competition registration
meeting to be held March 14 at 6:00 p.m. in
BIO 103.
PRE-SEASON SOFTBALL
A preseason softball tournament spon-
sored bv CO. Tankard Co. (Miller Lite)
will hold its registration March 14 at 5:00
p.m. in BIO 103. T-shirts, trophies and
more will be awarded to participants.
Don't miss he big event!
I
SWIM MEET
Drown your sorrows by signing up for
this years intramural swim meet. This will
be the only swim meet until 19S0! Don't
miss registration meeting March 15 at 5:00
pm. in GCB 1026. Your spring tan should
look great!
SOFTBALL
Batter up! Intramural softball registration
meeting will be held March 4 at 5:00 p.m.
in BIO 103. All men's and women's teams
must send a representative.
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
You are cordially invited to Alpha Kappa
Alpha's Black History program featuring
Dr. Theodore Muchiteni Feb. 23 at 7:00
p.m 1031GCB.
IMPROVING STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your GPA.
All sessions will be held in 313 Wright
Bldg. Feb. 27�Time Mgmt 3-4.30 pm
Feb. 28�Time Mgmt 3-4:30 p.m.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a very important general
meeting 22289 in'Mendenhal1 at 5:15
p.n . We will be voting on an urnmend-
ment to the by-laws. Please remember
that missing more than 2 meetings
semester is grounds for probation.
CELEBRATION
Black I listory Month. Speaker. Dr. Vema
Speight. Topic: "Black Female Leader-
ship Time. Feb. 21 at 7:00 p.m. Place: rm.
221 Mender.hall. Refreshments will be
served. Sponsored by Tyler Hall House
Council.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting is Feb. 23 at 6:00 p.m. in
GCB 1012. Please attend.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
The Student Fin. Mgmt. Assoc. W11 me A
Feb. 22 at 4:30 p m. in room 3009 GCB. The
guest speakers will be Michael Walsh and
jerry Smith from Wachovia. The topic will
be interviewing techniques and banking
lobs.
rsi chi
All new members who hive recieved a
letter of acceptance into Psi Chi honor
society must fill out members' .ip cards
along with a check for 35 (made out to Psi
Chi; by Fri Feb. 24 in the Psi Chi Mailbox
(Rawl 104). If both check and membership
card are not recieved, you will have to
reapply for membership next semester.
The n ;xt meeting will be held in Rawl 302
on March 1 at 4:00- Ml members must
attend
COMMUNION
Worship God with the Lord's Supper fol-
owed by a home-cooked meal ($2, $1.50
for members). Wed. 5 pm, Mediodist Stu-
dent Ctr. (5th st. across from Garrett
Dorm), wes'fel Christian Fellowship.
Sponored by Methodist and Presbyterian
Campus Ministries.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir thanks you for
your support throughout our 10 vears of
existence as a recognized campus organi-
zation. We will be celebrating this mile-
stone with a special anniversary musical
program on Sun. Feb. 26 at 3.30 pm in
Hendrix Theatre. Students and children-
Si, Adults- $2. We look forward to sharing
our happy occasion with you.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
IN THE ARMY, YOU'LL
TAKE CHARGE IN
MORE WAYS THAN ONE.
There's an added dtmeftskin to being a nurse in the Arms. You'll
have increased responsibilities. And you'll enjoy the respect .md
prestige th.ir come n.itunlU to people who serve a officers in the
Arm) Nurse Corps.
Vur opinion and counsel
will be actively sought and hs
tened to. You'll have opportuni-
ties to practice nursing in t
variety ot envuonments, horn
high-tech mihur hospir.il to
MASH units. m the I Inited
States or overseas.
Army Nursing pro ides good
pay and benefits, opportunities
ti r continuing educatk n in - ur
chosen specialty, seniority thai
moves with you when vou Jo.
and oh experience vou can't put .� price tag on.
Discover the Army Nurse Corps difference. T.ilk to an Army
Nurse Recruiter today.
Sgt. Cottrell
756-9695
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
Federal Register implements rule which requires
grant recipients to prove they don't use drugs
(CPS)� In a move some stu-
dent advocates are calling remi-
niscent of "1984's" Big Brother,
the federal government said Feb.
3 i wauilclisrkart asking, 8tKiem!
wht) get Pell Grants to prove they
don't use illicit drugs.
The measure was published
in the Federal Register, the list of
regulations and rules the govern-
ment produces to enforce federal
laws. The drug rule, which will
automatically go into effect if it's
not formally challenged within 90
days, was created to implement
the Drug-Free Work Place Act of
1988. It asks that all federal grant on tips that students have gotten
recipients like weapons manufac- involved in drugs or on newpaper
rurers, highway builders and articles about drug activities
apparently even students work in Bradsha w said,
"drug-free" environments. Past convictions for drug
Applying it to students, said possession or sales shouldn't af-
Sheldon Steinbach of the Ameri- feet a student's Pell Grant applica-
can Council on Education, the tion, Bradshaw said, but it is an
campus presidents' lobbying issue the Education Department
group in Washington, D.C was is considering,
"a strained interpretation (of the "If the money is going to be
law) that strikes me as being be- used for drugs, then it's better if
yond the pale of what was in- they hand it to someone who
tended would make good use of it said
The U.S. Dept. of Education, Pell Grant recipient at San Diego
which issued the rule, disagrees. City College, who asked that her
Somehow, students will have name not be used,
to swear they're not drug abusers. "it's great she said.
"We're deciding if students But Kevin'Harris, organizing
iHmiHmii1l�ll"wOlil"L4"jJlilk"i4MaiiaB
will have to sign a separate form director of the United States Stu- Florida Gov. Bob Martinez an-
or just check a box on the grant dent Association in Washington, nounced that, starting in August,
application form said depart- DC, called the regulations "an all new state employees�includ-
ment spokesman Jim Bradshaw. invasion of the personal right to ing faculty members, administra-
f'BjUj, tljey will have to certify they privacy and a poor signal for the tors, staffers and students- work-
are drug-free and not using the new Bush administration to send
funds for drug-related activities to students.
If students lie on the form, In fact, students are not the
Bradshaw said, they could lose orly ones being attacked in the
their grants. war on drugs. In early January,
Still, no one knows how to
determine if they are lying. "We
don't have the resources to check
on every student Bradshaw ad-
mitted.
"We'll base our information
ers at State University System of
Florida campuses� would have
to pass drug tests before being
hired.
LADIES NIGHT
OUT
"����� � ToTjpoi? � � � � �
FREE MEAL
BUY ONE SHRIMP
DINNER
GET ONE OP EQUAL SIZE
FREE
Small $5.25
Regular $6.25
Large $7.25
(Beverage not Included.)
Good any time. Dine-in or Take-out.
(Offer expires Feb. 28. 1989)
FOSDICK
1890 SEAFOOD
2903 S. Evans St.
Takeout Orders: 756-2011
I Additional Parking Available
"Ainerica?s Best Pizza"
We guarantee it
Now
Serving
Beer
Pool Tables
Video Games
r2MALL"l2 DELUXE TEXTRA LARGE 1CT 2 H
4 ITEM PIZZAS ITEM PIZZA. FREE
�Q QQ LITER or SODA i
$8.99 j $799 ,
(EXPIRES 22889)J (EXPIRES 22889)j
830-9400
HIS.
Greenville
Charles St.
N.C.
� us. Than,
rrl. 8�t.
Bear:
llOOa.m
ll:00�.m
imiiyiio � ikh nmwm � ikh nniuio � �itn





L
-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21. 1989 7
Announcements
first-come, first-serve basis starting Feb
27 at 5 p.m. They will be given awav from
the Buccaneer office only. There's only a
limited supply and no more can be or-
dered. So come early to receive your copy.
ATTN. ART STUDENTS
The Parents' Day Weekend Committee
needs a logo for 89. Anv media or ap-
proach is accepted (except usage of the
Pirate Mascot) Please turn in entries with
3x5 card stating name, address it phone
to 209 Whichard by 5 p.m. on March 15.
The winning entry will be awarded a S25
cash prize. Don't delay, enter today! For
more info contact Tonya Batizv (w)757-
6U ext. 210 or (h) 830-8888.
PHI ALPHA THFTA
Phi Alpha Theta will have a meeting on
Feb. 27th at 130 p.m. in the Todd Room in
Brewster Bldg All members are urged to
come.
PHI SIGMA PI
Fhi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity is
sponsoring "Fill Your Lungs with
Laughter" for the American Lung Assoc
at the Attic Feb. 22 at 9:30 p.m Remember
this is Comedy Zone night and you are
guaranteed to laugh Everyone is invited
P.E. MAJORS CLUB
ATTENTION, all P.E. Majors: We have a
meeting Thurs. night at 8:00 p.m.�please
be there Plans about our PARTY will
definitely be discussed If vou are unable
to make the meeting, ask a friend about
the details. Don't forget�Paity is this Fri
night Make plans to attend.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST
Looking for fellowship, fun and hearing
God's worcP You are welcome to attend
Prime Time held at Rawl, rm. 130�every
Thurs night at 730. Refreshments served.
DELTA SIGMA THETA
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. will be
sponsoring a Health Awareness Week
during Feb. 20-23. Also, the sorontv is
now selling buttons for SI 00 in honor of
Black History Month.
INTERMEDIATE ED. CLUB
The Intermediate Ed. Club will be holding
it next meeting on Feb. 22. All Intermedi-
ate Majors are invited.
DEBATE AT BRODY
The ECU Delegation of NCSL will host the
state Feb Interim Council on Feb. 25 & 26.
Debate is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 6
p.m. each day at the Brody Bldg (School of
Medicine). Affirmative Action and the
use of video tapes for testimony in physi-
cally or sexually abused children cases are
issues to be discussed. Please come out
and meet people from 20 other universi-
ties in the N.C. College & University Sys.
For more info contact Janet at 355-6420.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the April
issue Articles can be left at the office or the
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library The first issue for Spring
semester is expected to arrive in a few
weeks.
MUSIC EVENTS
ECU School of Music Events Feb 21-27:
Faculty Recital, Kim Peori.i, bassoon (Feb.
23, 8:15 p.m Fletcher Recital Hall, free);
Ralph Walton, clannet, graduate recital
(Feb. 24, 7:00 p.m Fletcher Recital Hall,
free): Faculty Recital, Brad Foley, saxo-
phone, with guest pianist Donna Cole-
man (FeK 26, 3:15 p.m, Fletcher Recital
I lall, free); Tom McGinnis, pia.io, junior
recital (Feb. 27, 7:00 p.m Fletcher Recital
I lall. free).
TENNIS DOUBLES
Swinging singles prepare for the Intramu-
ral tennis double competition registration
meeting to be held March 14 at 6:00 p.m. in
BIO 103.
PRE-SEASON SOFTdALL
A pre season softball tournament spon
sored by CO. Tankard Co. (Miller Lite)
will hold its registration March 14 at 5:00
p.m. in BIO 103. T-shirts, trophies and
more will be awarded to participants.
Don't misshe big event!
I
SWIM MEET
Drown your sorrows by signing up for
this years intramural swim meet. This will
be the only swim meet until 19S0! Don't
miss registration meeting March 15 at 5:00
p.m. in GCB 1026. Your spring tan should
look great!
SOFTBALL
Batter up! Intramural softball registration
meeting will be held March 4 at 5:00 p.m.
in BIO 103. All men's and women's teams
must sond a representative.
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
You are cordially invited to Alpha Kappa
Alpha's Black History program featuring
Dr. Theodore Muchiteni Feb. 23 at 7:00
p.m 1031GCB.
IMPROVING STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your GPA.
All sessions will be held in 313 Wright
Bldg. Feb. 27�Time Mgmt 3-4:30 p.m
Feb. 28�Time Mgmt 3-4:30 p.m.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a very important general
meeting 22289 inMendenhaL1 at 5:15
p.n . We will be voting on an ummend-
ment to the by-laws. Please remember
that missing more than 2 meetings
semester is grounds for probation.
CELEBRATIQNUl
Black I listory Month. Speaker: Dr. Vema
Speight. Topic: "Black Female Leader-
ship Time: Feb. 21 at 7:00 p.m. Place: rm.
221 Mender.hall. Refreshments will be
served. Sponsored by Tyler Hall House
Council.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting is Feb. 23 at 6:00 p.m. in
GCB 1012. Please attend.
FINANCIALCMT. ASSOC.
The Student Fin. Mgmt. Assoc. will me t
Feb. 22 at 4.30 p m. in room 3009 GCB. The
guest speakers will be Michael Walsh and
Jerry Smith from Wachovia. The topic will
be interviewing techniques and banking
iobs.
ZSJLCHI
All new members who hive redeved a
letter of acceptance into Psi Chi honor
society must fill out membersip cards
alone; with a check for S35 (made out to Psi
Chi, by Fri Feb. 24 in tho Psi Chi Mailbox
(Rawl 104). If both check and membership
card are not recieved, you will have to
reapply for membership next semester.
The n ?xt meeting will be held in Rawl 302
on March 1 at 4:00- ll members must
attend
COMMUNION
Worship God with the Lord's Supper fol-
owed by a home-cooked meal ($2, $1.50
for members). Wed. 5 pm, Mtihodist Stu-
dent Ctr. (5th st. across from Garrett
Dorm), wes'fel Christian Fellowship.
Sponored by Methodist and Presbyterian
Campus Ministries.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir thanks you for
your support throughout our 10 years of
existenoe as a recognized campus organi-
zation. We will be celebrating this mile-
stone with a special anniversary musical
program on Sun. Feb. 26 at 3:30 pm in
Hendrix Theatre. Students and children-
Si , Adults- $2. We look forward to sharing
our happy occasion with you.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
IN THE ARMY, YOU'LL
TAKE CHARGE IN
MORE WAYS THAN ONE.
There's an added dimension to being .i nurse in the Army. You'll
have increased responsibilities. And you'll enjoy the respect and
prestige that come naturalK to people who serve a officers in the
Arms Nurse Corps.
Yur opinion and counsel
will he Activet) sought and lis-
tened to. Vui'll have opportuni-
ties to practice nursing in a
variety or environments, from
h-tech military hospitals to
nig
MASH units, in the I 'nited
States or overseas.
Army Nursing prov ides good
pav and benefits, opportunities
t� continuing education in your
chosen specialty, seniority that
moves u irh vou when vou do.
and oh experience vou can't put a price tag on.
Discover the Army Nurse Corps difference. Talk to an Army
Nurse Recruiter today.
Sgt. Cottrell
756-9695
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BEAU YOU CAN BE.
Federal Register implements rule which requires
grant recipients to prove they don't use drugs
(CPS)� In a move some stu-
dent advocates are calling remi-
niscent of "1984's" Big Brother,
the federal government said Feb.
2 i wki:start a�kjry&�tudcn.t&.
wrfb get Pell Grants to prove they
don't use illicit drugs.
The measure was published
in the Federal Register, the list of
regulations and rules the govern-
ment produces to enforce federal
laws. The drug rule, which will
automatically go into effect if it's
not formally challenged within 90
days, was created to implement
the Drug-Free Work Place Act of
1988. It asks that all federal grant
recipients like weapons manufac-
turers, highway builders and
apparently even students work in
"drug-free" environments.
Applying it to students, said possession or sales shouldn't af-
Sheldon Steinbach of the Ameri- feet a student's Pell Grant applica-
can Council on Education, the tion, Bradshaw said, but it is an
campus presidents' lobbying issue the Education Department
group in Washington, D.C was is considering,
"a strained interpretation (of the "If the money is going to be
law) that strikes me as being be- used for drugs, then it's better if
yond the pale of what was in- they hand it to someone who
tended would make good use of it said
The U.S. Dept. of Education, Pell Grant recipient at San Diego
which issued the rule, disagrees. City College, who asked that her
Somehow, students will have name not be used.
ers at State University System of
Florida campuses� would have
to pass drug tests before being
hired.
will have to sign a separate form director of the United States Stu- Florida Gov. Bob Martinez an-
or just check a box on the grant dent Association in Washington, nounced that, starting in August,
application form' said depart- D.C called the regulations "an all new state employees�includ-
ment spokesman Jim Bradshaw. invasion of the personal right to ing faculty members, administra-
j'Bjiij they will have to certify Lhey privacy and a poor signal for the tors, staffers and students work-
are drug-free' and not using the new Bush administration to send
funds for drug-related activities to students.
If students lie on the form, In fact, students are not the
Bradshaw said, they could lose orly ones being attacked in the
their grants. war on drugs. In early January,
Still, no one knows how to
determine if they are lying. "We
don't have the resources to check
on every student Bradshaw ad-
mitted.
"We'll base our information
on tips that students have gotten
involved in drugs or on newpaper
articles about drug activities
Bradshaw said.
Past convictions for drug
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to swear there not drug abusers.
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ems
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jkm pniwin � ikie mtivijo





THfc FAST I ARCH INIAN
Features
FEBRUARY 21, 1989 PAGE 8
Dancer wins scholarship
By CLEJhTTER PICKETT
Suff Writer
"Always alive said La-
Vonda Gaskin describes herself.
Gaskin. the 1989 recipient of the
Marie Wallace Pa nee Scholar-
ship, the onlv scholarship given in
the department strictly for danc-
ers, is a senior majoring in dance
at East Carolina Universitv.
Gaskin has been dancing
since she was a child growing up
in Wilmington, N.C Although
she has participated in many
dance related activities through-
out her life, she never thought she
would receive a dance degree.
After high school, Gaskin
planned to stay home and attend
UKC-W. Her mother encouraged
her to attend FCU and earn her
degree.
Initially, she was unsure of
majoring in dance, despite the
manv awards and recognitions
she previouslv received for her
dance ability. She wondered
whether she loved dance enough
to pursue a career in it. As a so-
phomore, Gaskin considered be-
coming a business major, appre-
hensive oi the hard work and
dedication that accompanies
being a dancer.
It wasn't until she began tour-
ing with 5.6.7,8, an ECU student
repertory- company which tours
North Carolina performing
Broadway musicals, that she real-
ized dancing was for her.
"That was the time of trial and
error where I had no free week-
ends at all that's when I real-
ized you' ve got to love it to be able
to do it she said.
"1 dance because I love it
She knows her chosen held is
a competitive one which requires
hard work and dedication, but
she is willing to give it her best.
"It's really hard. There are
times when I say 'Wha t am I doing
here because I spend most of my
life in the studio, but it all comes
back to vou have to love what vou
are doing
Gaskin has dreams of being
the best. "I've always wanted to
be a Rockette she said. "That's
one of my greatest ambitions
Her speciality is tap and she
was once honored in high school
for her performance in a high kick
routine. Both tap and high kick
are characteristics of being a
Rockette.
However, in the 11th grade,
she visited Radio City Music Hall
and learned that one must be 5'5"
or taller to become a Rockette and
Gaskin is only 5'2
Gaskin isn't letting the ob-
stacle of becoming a Rockette in-
terfere with her ambition. "I don't
necessarily want to be rich and
famous. I just want to be success-
ful in some way She plans to
move to either New York or Cali-
fornia to become a professional
dancer.
Gaskin was a dancer in the
Motion Picture "Traxx" starring
Christopher Lloyd, which was
filmed in DEG Studios in 1987.
She also danced in other produc-
tions including "42nd Street"
performed at the Opera House
Theatre in Wilmington.
Authorpoet Maya Angelou will
speak tonight at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Pre�- Release
Renowned poet and novelist
Maya Angelou will speak tonight
in Hendrix theater at 8 p.m. The
lecture is sponsored by The Stu-
dent Union Minority Arts
Committee.
Angelou has written four
autobiographical bestsellers and
four volumes of verse. Since 1981,
she has been Professor of Ameri-
can Studies at Wake Forest Uni-
versity.
Her books include "1 Know
which became a CBS television
movie in 1979, and "Singin' and
Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like
Christmas
She also wrote the 1983 stage
play "On a Southern Journey
She received the Golden Eagle
Award for her PBS documentary
Why the Caged Bird Sings "Afro-American in the Arts
Dreams influence life
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) � Stud-
ies of troubled Vietnam veterans
and of people going through di-
vorce show sleep researchers that
one's dream life heavily influ-
ences one's waking hours � and
vice versa.
During a recent Arizona
Conference on Sleep and Cogni-
tion nse.iivhers reported that
dreams arc not random, that they
have meaning and serve vital
mental health functions.
Dr. Milton Kramer, medical
director of the American Institute
for Sleep Disorders Inc in Ohio,
says dreams are a continuation of
thought processes during waking
hours.
Kramer identifies two types:
a progressive, sequential type in
which problems are stated,
worked on and resolved, and a
repetitive, traumatic type in
which the problem is simply re-
stated with no resolution.
The latter type is common in
depressed people going through
divorce, says Rosalind D.
Cartwright, director of Chicago's
Sleep Disorder Service and Re-
search Center.
She says depression is quite
common during divorce, though
the sufferers often do not recog-
nized it. She says that 47 percent
of the men and 51 percent of the
women she studied were de-
pressed, according to psychologi-
cal tests.
Often their dreams would be
of childhood or adolescence, but
rarclv of adulthood. Thev seem to
be reviewing how they got into
the present situation, Cartwright
savs.
They're more repetitive in
their dreaming she says. "They
mav state the problem and restate
it across the right, and they seem
to have no forward drive of work-
ing through it
People who were not de-
pressed, she savs, had dreams
covering a wider time frame, and
some dreams speculated about
new roles in their lives after di-
vorce, she says.
It's important for those going
through divorce to recognize the
symptoms of depression and to
get help if needed, Cartwright
says. Symptoms include troubled
sleep, not enough hours of sleep
and frequent awakenings.
Weight loss and uncontrol-
lable crying also arc symptoms.
"Anyone going through a
stressful life event may have a
little of that she says. "But if it
persists for more than three
weeks, those are signs of trouble
and they should get help
Kramer notes that effectively
working through problems while
dreaming can influence mood on
awakening. His subject showed
both patterns of dreaming, pro-
gressive and repetitive.
"This shows there is not uni-
versal success in altering the
emotional preoccupations of the
previous day he says. "This may
account for some of the variability
in how one feels on awakening
from a night's sleep
Generally, those with few
emotional problems who feel
upset at night may feel better in
the morning because "dreams
have worked their magic and
done their job Cartwright says.
"But we know the depressed
don't have that restorative func-
tion of their sleep. They feel worst,
at their lowest point, first thing in
the morning. And looking back at
the depressed dreams, I see no
progress
Kramer has studied what is
called "chronic delayed post-
traumatic stress disorder7 in Viet-
nam veterans. These vets seem
fine for many years after return-
ing home but then begin to have
disturbing memories of Vietnam,
nightmares and difficulty in con-
centrating, he says. They either
begin withdrawing or have diffi-
culty coping with their intense
emotions, he says.
Similar disorders have been
seen in veterans from other wars
and in survivors of tragedies, he
says. Kramer believes the intense
See SLEEPERS page 9
LaVonda Gaskin, a senior dance major at ECU, recently won the Marie Wallace Dance Scholar-
ship. Gaskin, who dreams of being a Rockette, has danced in the 1987 movie, "Traxx as well as
productions such as "42nd Street
Dreamers learn to overcome
fears while they're still asleep
TUSCON, Ariz. (AP) � Most
people can learn to control their
dreams and sue them to overcome
fears, nightmares and depression,
according to a Stanford Univer-
sity dream researcher, though he
has his critics.
Stephen LaBerge of
Stanford's Sleep Research Center
says he knows "lucid dreamers"
who have overcome their fears of
heights and snakes by confront-
ing those fears in dreams. Lucid
dreamers know they're dreaming
and can direct the course of the
activities they're imagining, he
said at a recent Arizona Confer-
ence on Sleep and Cognition.
LaBerge, a research associate
in psychology, says he has
worked with about 100 lucid
dreamers over the past 11 years.
One lucid dreamer was able
to "greatly lessen" his fear of
heights during dreams by delib-
erately stepping off the edge of a
tall building and floating away,
LaBerge says.
Rosalind Cartwright of the
Sleep Disorders Center at Rush-
Presbytcrian-St. Luke's Hospital
in Chicago told of a recent study
of depressed people who were
able to change the endings to
depressing dreams.
"They became aware in the
dream that they were dreaming,
then changed the ending to stop
the badness Cartwright says.
"This technique also has a great
deal of potential in treating night-
mares
LaBerge savs lucid dreaming
is a skill anyone can learn.
He predicts that lucid dream-
ing will become increasingly
popular as a tool for self-explora-
tion and self-help because "it's
such a simple, straightforward,
effective means of dealing with
fears and exploring the powers oi
the mind
In recent studies at the Stan-
ford sleep lab, lucid dreamers
have been trained to signal the
onset and conclusion oi their
dreams by moving their eyes to
the left and right repeatedly in a
prearranged pattern. Subjects
also have been taught to hold their
breath, count to five, then exhale
while they're dreaming, he says.
"These people arc capable ot
remembering instructions given
to them before sleeping, then exe-
cuting them consciously while in
sleep they re aware of what
they're doing he says.
Critics charge that those sub-
jects probably were awake, not
dreaming, when they carried out
the tasks. But LaBerge says im-
portant physiological indicators
� brain waves, heart rate, respi-
ration rate and others � demon-
strate that those people were in
deep sleep.
Critics also charge that
LaBerge's experiments lack basic
control measures and that sub-
nets' reports of lucid dreaming
are influenced by the researchers'
expectations.
'Yes, there may be lucid
dreaming, and yes, mavbe vou
can use it to help yourself, but we
don't yet know enough about he
process says David A. Dingcs.
co-director of the Institute for
Experimental Psychology at the
University of Pennsylvania.
Dinges asks: "How often do
they occur? What state are these
people in when they occur? How
many people get them? To what
extent can these results be sepa-
rated from the searcher's expec-
tations?"
Thomas stars as televangelist in
new HBO special 'Glory, Glory'
LOS ANGELES, (AP) � The with co-executive producer He's earnest but dull, and the rat-
Rev. Bobby Joe Stuckey takes over Bonny Dore, who had worked ings start to tumble. In despera
B fore the Blizzard of 89, there was warmth. Just days before the Great Ice Storm hit Friday, many
hidents like these were worshipping the sun. (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photolab)
his father's television evangelism
empire in HBO's "Glory, Glory"
and is soon up to his halo in
trouble, just like well, some
recent headline-makers.
But Richard Thomas, who
stars as Bobby Joe, insists that the
script for the 3 12-hour musical
comedy was written long before
Jim and Tammy Bakker and
Jimmy Swaggart became house-
hold names.
"The script's been around for
a while says Thomas, best-re-
membered as John Boy on the TV
series "The Waltons "We filmed
it last summer in Toronto. It more
or less started as an examination
of the phenomenon of television
evangelism
The story originated in 1981
briefly with evangelist Oral
Roberts in polishing his broad-
casts.
"If I felt the film was taking
tion, he turns to a down-and-out
rock singer who becomes the
charismatic Sister Ruth. The rat-
ings and the donations reach
cheap shots at someone's faith 1 unprecedented levels with Sister
never would have done it Tho
mas says. At the center, Stuckey is
a man of true faith but he's been
seduced into straying. He can
speak for the importance of spiri-
tuality, but all institutions are
subject for compromise and cor-
ruption
The movie, directed by Lind-
say Anderson ("The Whales of
August "O Lucky Man") will
premiere on Sunday
Ruth.
But behind the altar, un-
known to Bobby Joe, she's leading
a life of Sodom and Gomorrah,
He's deeply in love with her, and
when it omes crashing down he's
the candidate for a pillar of salt.
Ellen Greene stars as SisHfir
Ru th, Winston Rekert as an inves-
tigative reporter, James Whit-
more as a church elder and Barry
Morse as Bobby Joe's father, the
Bobby Joe is a biblical scholar Rev. Dan Stuckey.
totally lacking in the star quality "When they called me they
his father used to turn his little See 05 ,
church into a television eTipire. r 6






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
FEBRUARY 21, 1989 PAGE 8
Dancer wins scholarship
By CLEJETTER PICKETT
Suff Writer
"Always alive said La-
Vonda Gaskin describes herself.
Gaskin, the 1989 recipient of the
Marie Wallace Dance Scholar-
ship, the only scholarship given in
the department strictly for danc-
ers, is a senior majoring in dance
at East Carolina University.
Gaskin has been dancing
since she was a child growing up
in Wilmington, N.C. Although
she has participated in many
dance-related activities through-
out her life, she never thought she
would receive a dance degree.
After high school, Gaskin
planned to stay home and attend
UNC-W. Her mother encouraged
her to attend ECU and earn her
degree.
Initially, she was unsure of
majoring in dance, despite the
many awards and recognitions
she previously received for her
dance ability. She wondered
whether she loved dance enough
to pursue a career in it. As a so-
phomore, Gaskin considered be-
coming a business major, appre-
hensive of the hard work and
dedication that accompanies
being a dancer.
It wasn't until she began tour-
ing with 5,6,7,8, an ECU student
repertory company which tours
North Carolina performing
Broadway musicals, that she real-
ized dancing was for her.
"That was the time of trial and
error where I had no free week-
ends at all that's when I real-
ized you've got to love it to be able
to do it she said.
"I dance because I love it
She knows her chosen held is
a competitive one which requires
hard work and dedication, but
she is willing to give it her best.
"It's really hard. There are
times when I say 'What am I doing
here because I spend most of my
life in the studio, but it all comes
back to you have to love what you
are doing
Gaskin has dreams of being
the best. "I've always wanted to
be a Rockette she said. "Thafs
one of my greatest ambitions
Her speciality is tap and she
was once honored in high school
for her performance in a high kick
routine. Both tap and high kick
are characteristics of being a
Rockette.
However, in the 11th grade,
she visited Radio City Music Hall
and learned that one must be 5'5"
or taller to become a Rockette and
Gaskin is only 5'2
Gaskin isn't letting the ob-
stacle of becoming a Rockette in-
terfere with her ambition. "I don't
necessarily want to be rich and
famous. I just want to be success-
ful in some way She plans to
move to either New York or Cali-
fornia to become a professional
dancer.
Gaskin was a dancer in the
Motion Picture "Traxx" starring
Christopher Lloyd, which was
filmed in DEG Studios in 1987.
She also danced in other produc-
tions including "42nd Street"
performed at the Opera House
Theatre in Wilmington.
Authorpoet Maya Angelou will
speak tonight at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Press Release
Renowned poet and novelist
Maya Angelou will speak tonight
in Hendrix theater at 8 p.m. The
lecture is sponsored by The Stu-
dent Union Minority Arts
Committee.
Angelou has written four
autobiographical bestsellers and
four volumes of verse. Since 1981,
she has been Professor of Ameri-
can Studies at Wake Forest Uni-
versity.
Her books include "I Know
Why the Caged Bird Sings
which became a CBS television
movie in 1979, and "Singin' and
Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like
Christmas
She also wrote the 1983 stage
play "On a Southern Journey
She received the Golden Eagle
Award for her PBS documentary
"Afro-American in the Arts
Dreams influence life
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) � Stud-
ies of troubled Vietnam veterans
and of people going through di-
vorce show sleep researchers that
one's dream life heavily influ-
ences one's waking hours � and
vice versa.
During a recent Arizona
Conference on Sleep and Cogni-
tion, researchers reported that
dreams are not random, that they
have meaning and serve vital
mental health functions.
Dr. Milton Kramer, medical
director of the American Institute
for Sleep Disorders Inc in Ohio,
says dreams are a continuation of
thought processes during waking
hours.
Kramer identifies two types:
a progressive, sequential type in
which problems are stated,
worked on and resolved, and a
repetitive, traumatic type in
which the problem is simply re-
stated with no resolution.
The latter type is common in
depressed people going through
divorce, says Rosalind D.
Cartwright, director of Chicago's
Sleep Disorder Service and Re-
search Center.
She says depression is quite
common during divorce, though
the sufferers often do not recog-
nized it. She says that 47 percent
of the men and 51 percent of the
women she studied were de-
pressed, according to psychologi-
cal tests.
Often their dreams would be
of childhood or adolescence, but
rarely of adulthood. They seem to
be reviewing how they got into
the present situation, Cartwright
says.
"They're more repetitive in
their dreaming she says. "They
may state the problem and restate
it across the right, and they seem
to have no forward drive of work-
ing through it
People who were not de-
pressed, she says, had dreams
covering a wider time frame, and
some dreams speculated about
new roles in their lives after di-
vorce, she says.
It's important for those going
through divorce to recognize the
symptoms of depression and to
get help if needed, Cartwright
says. Symptoms include troubled
sleep, not enough hours of sleep
and frequent awakenings.
Weight loss and uncontrol-
lable crying also are symptoms.
"Anyone going through a
stressful life event may have a
little of that she says. "But if it
persists for more than three
weeks, those are signs of trouble
and they should get help
Kramer notes that effectively
working through problems while
dreaming can influence mood on
awakening. His subject showed
both patterns of dreaming, pro-
gressive and repetitive.
"This shows there is not uni-
versal success in altering the
emotional preoccupations of the
previous day he says. "This may
account for some of the variability
in how one feels on awakening
from a nighfs sleep
Generally, those with few
emotional problems who feel
upset at night may feel better in
the morning because "dreams
have worked their magic and
done their job Cartwright says.
"But we know the depressed
don't have that restorative func-
tion of their sleep. They feel worst,
at their lowest point, first thing in
the morning. And looking back at
the depressed dreams, I see no
progress
Kramer has studied what is
called "chronic delayed post-
traumatic stress disorder' in Viet-
nam veterans. These vets seem
fine for many years after return-
ing home but then begin to have
disturbing memories of Vietnam,
nightmares and difficulty in con-
centrating, he says. They either
begin withdrawing or have diffi-
culty coping with their intense
emotions, he says.
Similar disorders have been
seen in veterans from other wars
and in survivors of tragedies, he
says. Kramer believes the intense
See SLEEPERS page 9
LaVonda Gaskin, a senior dance major at ECU, recently won the Marie Wallace Dance Scholar-
ship. Gaskin, who dreams of being a Rockette, has danced in the 1987 movie, "Traxx as well as
productions such as "42nd Street
� �� �� � Ma
4 � � �
� � I. Ill�l '
w
Dreamers learn to overcome
fears while they're still asleep
TUSCON, Ariz. (AP) � Most
people can learn to control their
dreams and sue them to overcome
fears, nightmares and depression,
according to a Stanford Univer-
sity dream researcher, though he
has his critics.
Stephen LaBerge of
Stanford's Sleep Research Center
says he knows "lucid dreamers"
who have overcome their fears of
heights and snakes by confront-
ing those fears in dreams. Lucid
dreamers know they're dreaming
and can direcj the course of the
activities they're imagining, he
said at a recent Arizona Confer-
ence on Sleep and Cognition.
LaBerge, a research associate
in psychology, says he has
worked with about 100 lucid
dreamers over the past 11 years.
One lucid dreamer was able
to "greatly lessen" his fear of
heights during dreams by delib-
erately stepping off the edge of a
tall building and floating away,
LaBerge says.
Rosalind Cartwright of the
Sleep Disorders Center at Rush-
Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital
in Chicago told of a recent study
of depressed people who were
able to change the endings to
depressing dreams.
"They became aware in the
dream that they were dreaming,
then changed the ending to stop
the badness Cartwright says.
"This technique also has a great
deal of potential in treating night-
mares
LaBerge says lucid dreaming
is a skill anyone can learn.
He predicts that lucid dream-
ing will become increasingly
popular as a tool for self-explora-
tion and self-help because "it's
such a simple, straightforward,
effective means of dealing with
fears and exploring the powers of
the mind
In recent studies at the Stan-
ford sleep lab, lucid dreamers
have been trained to signal the
onset and conclusion of their
dreams by moving their eyes to
the left and right repeatedly in a
prearranged pattern. Subjects
also have been taught to hold their
breath, count to five, then exhale
while they're dreaming, he says.
"These people are capable of
remembering instructions given
to them before sleeping, then exe-
cuting them consciously while in
sleep � they're aware of what
they're doing he says.
Critics charge that those sub-
jects probably were awake, not
dreaming, when they carried out
the tasks. But LaBerge says im-
portant physiological indicators
� brain waves, heart rate, respi-
ration rate and others � demon-
strate that those people were in
deep sleep.
Critics also charge that
LaBerge's experiments lack basic
control measures and that sub-
jects' reports of lucid dreaming
are influenced by the researchers'
expectations.
"Yes, there may be lucid
dreaming, and yes, maybe you
can use it to help yourself, but we
don't yet know enough about he
process says David A. Dinges,
co-director of the Institute for
Experimental Psychology at the
University of Pennsylvania.
Dinges asks: "How often do
they occur? What state are these
people in when they occur? How
many people get them? To what
extent can these results be sepa-
rated from the researcher's expec-
tations?"
Thomas stars as televangelist in
new HBO special 'Glory, Glory'
Before the Blizzard of 89, there was warmth. Just days before the Great Ice Storm hit Friday, many
students like these were worshipping the sun. (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photolab)
LOS ANGELES, (AP) � The
Rev. Bobby Joe Stuckey takes over
his father's television evangelism
empire in HBCKs "Glory, Glory"
and is soon up to his halo in
trouble, just like well, some
recent headline-makers.
But Richard Thomas, who
stars as Bobby Joe, insists that the
script for the 3 12-hour musical
comedy was written long before
Jim and Tammy Bakker and
Jimmy Swaggart became house-
hold names.
"The script's been around for
a while says Thomas, best-re-
membered as John Boy on the TV
series "The Waltons "We filmed
it last summer in Toronto. It more
or less started as an examination
of the phenomenon of television
evangelism
The story originated in 1981
with co-executive producer
Bonny Dore, who had worked
briefly with evangelist Oral
Roberts in polishing his broad-
casts.
"If I felt the film was taking
cheap shots at someone's faith I
never would have done it Tho-
mas says. At the center, Stuckey is
a man of true faith but he's been
seduced into straying. He can
speak for tbe importance of spiri-
tuality, but all institutions are
subject for compromise and cor-
ruption
The movie, directed by Lind-
say Anderson ("The Whales of
August "O Lucky Man") will
premiere on Sunday.
Bobby Joe is a biblical scholar
totally lacking in the star quality
his father used to turn his little
church into a television e-npire.
He's earnest but dull, and the rat-
ings start to rumble. In despera-
tion, he turns to a down-and-out
rock singer who becomes the
charismatic Sister Ruth. The rat-
ings and the donations reach
unprecedented levels with Sister
Ruth.
But behind the altar, un-
known to Bobby Joe, she's leading
a life of Sodom and Gomorrah,
He's deeply in love with her, and
when it vomes crashing down he's
the candidate for a pillar of salt
Ellen Greene stars as SisteV
Ruth, Winston Rekert is an inves-
tigative reporter, James Whit-
more as a church elder and Baity
Morse as Bobby Joe's father, the
Rev. Dan Stuckey.
"When they called me they
See THOMAS, page 9
�ipp(V9





?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21. 1989 9
c-
�n
is
V
Wild donkeys take over island
CINNAMON BAY, U.S. Vir-
gin Islands (AT) � Wild donkeys
are driving the tranquil Carib-
bean island of St. John to distrac-
tion.
An estimated 300 donkeys
roam the smallest of the three
main U.S. Virgin Islands. Thev
knock over garbage cans, chew up
gardens, wake people in the
night, intrude on campers, eat
native tamarind trees and foul the
treets with their droppings
Sometimes, theornerv 300-pound
pests kick and bite.
Thev also reproduce rapidly.
After their first pregnancies, fe-
males stay in heat and can give
birth annuallv. It is estimated that
the donkev population will
double in five vears.
Thev reproduce faster than
jackrabbits in Australia, savs
Eileen Sundra, a native of North-
held, N.J who has lived on the
island for eight years and bought
an air gun to keep them away
rrom her garden.
The burros, descendants oi
wild asses from northeast Africa,
were brought to St. John in the
mid-lbOOs during Spanish colo-
nial davs. Thev were ideal for the
rugged terrain and were valued
.is work animals in sugar and cot-
ton plantations.
But with the advent of cars
and roads in the 1950s there was
little need for donkeys, and thev
were graduallv turned loose.
"Todav. thev have no real
domain, says St. John administra-
tor WilHam Lomax. Thev roam
the whole island and they don't
seem to fear human beings. We're
concerned they'll injure some-
one
In the Caribbean, the problem
which administers percent of
St. John, say the 7-mile-long is-
land of 3,000 people is too small
tor-residents, thousand's of tour-
ists and 300 donkeys.
last November, under cover
oi night, park rangers shot to
death 10 donkeys in Cinnamon
Bay, an area favored by tourists
for its sandy beach, coral reefs and
tropical campgrounds.
David Nellis, a biologist who
heads the Fish and Wildlife De-
partment of Agriculture and Eco-
nomic Development.
Gilbert Sprauvc, a professor
of foreign languages at the Virgin
Islands University, denounced
"the destruction of animals of
servitude, animals which used to
ease the pain.
"There were wild donkeys in
They dumped the carcasses St. John before the age of mechani
into the ocean and hoped the
slaughter would go unnoticed.
Within two days everyone
knew the Tark had been there
blowing away donkeys says
zation, and I don't recall they
were a threat to anybody. I don't
think they are much of a problem
now
Ranger Richard Jones coun-
tered by saying that parks people
would be responsible if a tounst
was hurt petting or feeding an
"aggressive" donkey.
Multimillonaire Laurance
Rockefeller, who owns a chunk of
St. John and helped establish the
National Tark, proposed ship-
ping donkeys to impoverished
Haiti, where they could be useful.
Other options include sterili-
zation, euthanasia or adoption.
"But people don't want a
u ild, mangy donkey says Jones.
"They have no value, no use
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Thomas stars as televangelist
Continued from page 8
said the part was for a nice, clean-
out preacher Thomas says.
Some things you do because
thev're radically different from
what vou've done before. Some
vou do because they're familiar.
This was familiar, but I liked the
way it was written. It's satire
without taking cheap shots.
"He compromises himself
with this woman and before he
knows it he's trapped in a web of
deceit and conspiracy
In February, Thomas goes to
the Hartford Stage in Connecticut
tor "Peer Gvnt He will appear in
a new translation of Henrik
Waltons" in 1977. The immensely
popular series that ran on CBS
from 1972-81 was based on Earl
Hamner's reminiscences about
his boyhood in Virginia, in 1977.
As for another series, Thomas
says he would certainly consider
it.
"But a series takes up so much
of your time it would have to be
something I absolutely loved he
says. "I prefer plays, but I'm an
actor. The material comes first. If
it's right I'll got anywhere and
work in any medium.
"I have been lucky as an actor.
I've always gotten work. I've
never had to wait by the phone.
Too many actors regard the thea
tion like having tea with a maiden
aunt. When people see me in a
film thev see mv work
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN EXTRA
BE
Ibsen's seven-hour play, which ter as some place you go to stretch,
will be presented over two nights, as though it was an aerobics class.
The six-week run will keep him Or they say it's their duty to go
there until May. back, as though it were an obliga-
"I plaved Hamlet' there in
1987 Thomas savs. "That's
Open
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sunday 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Aigncr. lke and Reebok)
it
l i.i i
is unique to St. John. With the Shakespeare's longest play and
creation of the National Park in
1956, more than half oi the 21
square miles of land was pre-
served� a donkey Utopia. Other
islands became more developed
and most donkeys died out
Officials of the National Tark.
this is a thousand lines longer
than Hamlet Many people con-
sider the play to be Ibsen's master-
piece
Thomas, who spends much of
his time teaching classes at col-
leges across thecountrv, left "The
Sleepers' waking problems
haunt them during the night
Continued from page S
emotional stress ot living through
wars or disasters makes these
people more vulnerable during
times oi stress later in life, such as
a divorce.
"The previously troubling
experiences may become a meta-
phor to express feelings such as
hostilitv and rage stirred by the
present breakdown he says.
The interplay between cur-
rent problems and past traumatic
experiences is illustrated by the
dreams of some Vietnam vets,
Kramer savs.
One vet, for instance,
dreamed of trving to cross a river
in Vietnam and a "big guv" was
trying to help him. Every time
thev tried to get to the other side,
they would end up at the begin-
ning.
In the dream the subject
might well be referring to the
therapeutic efforts he is attempt-
ing with the doctor Kramer
says. That's the idea of the 'big
guy
This could be a metaphor
about going from one place in life
to another. The more he tries, the
more he ends up in the same
place
This is all
vou need to apply
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Pi
University of North Carolina At Chapel
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V.
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�Rising Senior Minority Undergraduates
�Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural
Sciences, Biomedical and Environmental
Engineering.
Skills Enhancement Workshops Available
�Room and board plus $1500 Stipened.
�Application Deadline March 1, 1989.
�Period of Program May 30, 1989 to
July 28, 1989.
For Application Forms and
Additional Information Contact:
Dr. Larry Smith
204 Whichard Building
East Carolina University
UNC-CH Contact is:
Associate Dean Henry H. Dearman
The Graduate School. 200 Bynum Hall CB 4010
UNC-CH
Chapel IIU1. NC 27599 4010
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21 �!�?-
"ft
i
Wild donkeys take over island
LUNCH SPECIAL
CINNAMON BAY, U.S. Vir-
gin Islands (AP)�Wild donkeys
are driving the tranquil Carib-
bean island of St. John to distrac-
tion.
An estimated 300 donkeys
roam the smallest of the three
which administers60 percent of
St. John, say the 7-mile-long is-
land of 3,000 people is too small
for-residents, thousands of tour-
ists and 300 donkeys.
Last November, under cover
of night, park rangers shot to
tered by saying that parks people
would be responsible if a tourist
was hurt petting or feeding an
"aggressive" donkey.
.� �v� Multimillonaire Laurance
mam U.S. Virgin Islands. They death" 10 donkeys in Cinnamon �$ desnction of animalsTof kefe,ler'wh��wnsachunkof
knockovergarbagecans,chewup Bay, an area favored by tourists servitude, animals which used to St ohn and P"1 establish the
gardens, wake people in the for its sandy beach, coral reefs and ease the pain. National Park, proposed ship-
night, intrude on campers, eat tropical campgrounds. "There were wild donkeys in P?n.s. doJnkevs to impoverished
native tamarind trees and foul the They dumped the carcasses St. John before the age of mechani-
streets with their droppings, into the ocean and hoped the zation, and I don't recall they
Sometimes, the ornery 300-pound slaughter would go unnoticed. were a thrat to anybody I don't
pests kick and bite. "Within two days everyone think a are mu�J of a7problem
They also reproduce rapidly � Ko T ,rl h4,1 hppn thtft "
David Nellis, a biologist who
heads the Fish and Wildlife De-
partment of Agriculture and Eco-
nomic Development.
Gilbert Sprauve, a professor
of foreign languages at the Virgin
Islands University, denounced
"the destruction of animals of
After their first pregnancies, fe- blowing
males stay in heat and can give
birth annually. It is estimated that
the donkey population will
double in five years.
"They reproduce faster than
jackrabbits in Australia says
Eileen Sundra, a native of North-
field, N.J who has lived on the
Haiti, where they could be useful.
Other options include sterili-
zation, euthanasia or adoption.
"But people don't want a
wild, mangy donkey says Jones.
MONSAT.
11 AM -3 PM
12-8 oz. Round
Sirloin
Potato Bar
Sundae Bar
$2.99
away donkeys says Ranger Richard Jones coun- "They hwe no va,ue'no use
Thomas stars as televangelist
r
He t Bar and Salad Bar only
all additional $1.99 with a meal
FREE DESSERT BAR
with All Steak Dinners
Continued from page 8
Waltons" in 1977. The immensely tion like having tea with a maiden
popular series that ran on CBS aunt. When people see me in a
Daily Specials
10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student I.D.
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
island for eight years and bought said the part was for a nice, clean- from 1972-81 was based on Earl film they see my work
J 2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
an air gun to keep them away
from her garden.
The burros, descendants of
wild asses from northeast Africa,
were brought to St. John in the
mid-1600s during Spanish colo-
nial days. They were ideal for the
rugged terrain and were valued
as work animals in sugar and cot-
ton plantations.
But with the advent of cars
and roads in the 1950s there was
little need for donkeys, and they
were gradually turned loose.
"Today, they have no real
domain, says St. John administra-
tor William Lomax. "They roam
cut preacher Thomas says. Hamner's reminiscences about
"Some things you do because his boyhood in Virginia, in 1977.
they're radically different from As for another series, Thomas
what you've done before. Some says he would certainly consider
you do because they're familiar, it.
RACK ROOM SHOES
"But a series takes up so much
of your time it would have to be
something I absolutely loved he
says. "I prefer plays, but I'm an
actor. The material comes first. If
This was familiar, but I liked the
way it was written. If s satire
without taking cheap shots.
"He compromises himself
with this woman and before he
knows it he's trapped in a web of if s right IT1 got anywhere and
deceit and conspiracy work in any medium.
In February, Thomas goes to "I have been lucky as an actor.
the Hartford Stage in Connecticut I've always gotten work. I've
for "Peer Gynt He will appear in never had to wait by the phone.
a new translation of Henrik Too many actors regard the thea-
Ibsen's seven-hour play, which ter as some place you go to stretch,
the whole island and they don't will be presented over two nights, as though it was an aerobics class,
seem to fear human beings. We're The six-week run will keep him Or they say if s their duty to go
concerned they'll injure some- there until May. back, as though it were an obliga-
one "I played 'Hamlef there in
In the Caribbean, the problem 1987 Thomas says. "Thafs
is unique to St. John. With the Shakespeare's longest play and
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN EXTRA
CM
10
CUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Elxcrpt Alner. 'tke and Reebok)
creation of the National Park in
1956, more than half of the 21
square miles of land was pre-
served� a donkey Utopia. Other
islands became more developed
and most donkeys died out.
Officials of the National Park,
this is a thousand lines longer
than 'Hamlet Many people con-
sider the play to be Ibsen's master-
piece
Thomas, who spends much of
his time teaching classes at col-
leges across the country, left "The
Sleepers' waking problems
haunt them during the night
CominuedfrompigeS dreaJ ��'��
emotional stress of living through in Vietnam and a "big guy" was
wars or disasters makes these trying lo help Wm Every nme
people more ydnerabie during they tried to get to the other side,
they would end up at the begin-
timesof stress later in life, such as
a divorce.
The previously -troubling
experiences may become a meta-
phor to express feelings such as
hostility and rage stirred by the
present breakdown he says.
The interplay between cur-
rent problems and past traumatic
experiences is illustrated by the
dreams of some Vietnam vets,
Kramer says.
ning.
"In the dream the subject
might well be referring to the
therapeutic efforts he is attempt-
ing with the doctor Kramer
says. "Thafs the idea of the 'big
"This could be a metaphor
about going from one place in life
to another. The more he tries, the
more he ends up in the same
place
Card.
A�Alj0FAMEAL
105 Airport Road
758-0327
Banquet Facilities Available
Tar Landing Seafood
Student Special
6 oz. Sirloin with Shrimp
(Fried, Boiled, or Broiled)
served with French Fries or Baked Potato,
Cole Slaw and Hushpuppies.
2 Dinners ONLY $5.99
Present this Ad when paying
�Dine-in ONLY
I nivcrsitv of North Carolina At Chapel
Hill Invites Applications I or The
Minority Pre-Graduate

Research Experience
V
�9-week Summer Research Project with
UNC-CH Faculty Mentor
�Rising Senior Minority Undergraduates
�Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural
Sciences, Biomedical and Environmental
Engineering.
�Skills Enhancement Workshops Available.
�Room and board plus $1500 Stipened.
�Application Deadline March 1, 1989.
�Period of Program May 30, 1989 to
July 28, 1989.
For Application Forms and
Additional Information Contact:
Dr. Larry Smith
204 Whichard Building
East Carolina University
UlfC-CH Contact la:
with Automatic Approval, it's easier to qualify while you're still in school.
Now getting the Card is easier than ever. For the
very first time, students can apply for the American
Express Card over the phone.
Simply call 1-800-942-AMEX. We'll take your appli-
cation by phone and begin to process it right away.
Jj It couldn't be easier.
NORTHWEST nal s more- because y�u attena"
AIDI IlKrQ t,lisscho0'fll!l time'vou can a,sotake
AlHLIN t- advantage of the Automatic Approval
IOOK TO US offer for students. With this offer, you can
get the American Express Card right now�
without a full-time job or a credit history. But if you
have a credit history, it must be unblemished.
It's actually easier for you to qualify for the Card how
while you're still a student, than it ever will be again.
Become a Cardmember
Fly Northwest $99 roundtrip.
As a student Cardmember you will be able to enjoy
an extraordinary travel privilege fly twice for only
$99 roundtrip to any of the more than 180 Northwest
Airlines cities in the 48 contiguous I'nited States
(only one ticket may be used per six-month period)
And, of course, you 11 also enjoy all the other excep-
tional benefits and personal service you would expect
from American Express.
Applvnowbv
calling 1-800-942-
AMEX. And then
you can really go
places�for less.
i
UNC-CH
taitl
HaflCBf 4010
11
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�SBroiwMatamnwaHfoforcomptele
� fi89 American Eapres Travel RdatriSewtasC�n�iis htc






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 21,1989 PAGE 10
ECU defense sinks
Navy for win at home
By CHRIS SIEGEL
A��t. Sport Editor
Hie Midshipmen of Naw
sailed into Minges Coliseum
Monday, but had to ambandon
ship as the Pirates did the attack-
ing. The defense of the Pirates
neutralized Navy and walked
away with its second straight
conference win. ECU won hand-
ily 67-58.
It was dazzling defense that
keyed the victory for the Pirates
according to Head Coach Mike
Steele. "1 think the difference in
the game was our man-to-man
defense and getting to their three
point shooters' Steele said.
The Pirates forced 12 Mid-
shipmen turnovers and held
Navy to a mere 35.8 shooting
percentage for the game. ECU
held the Middies to only 26.9 per-
cent from three-point range, as
Navy connected on just seven of
27 attempts.
The Pirates would control the
opening tip-off and from there
would establish the tempo of the
game. On the first trip down the
floor, senior Blue Edwards would
can a three-pointer to put the Pi-
rates up 3-0.
Navy would answer back and
following a three-pointer bv Joe
Gottschalk would take the lead 7-
5. But that lead was short lived.
ECU would storm right back.
Over the next five minutes the
Pirates would outscore the Mid-
dies 10-6. Gus Hill finished the
run for the Pirates canning a jump
shot and a layup. East Carolina
was up by four, 17-13.
Navy would not roll over and
die, though. After several missed
opportunities for the Piraies, the
Midshipmen capitalized on three
jump shots. Djuan Graham would
top off the run with a 14-foot
lumper. That put Navy up 19-17.
This would be the last lead the
Middies would see on the night
East Carolina showed Navy
why it has won the their last two
games. Over the last six minutes
ot the half, ECU outscored the
Midshipmen 9-6, with Edwards
doing most of the work. He con-
nected on a three-pointer and hit
two free throws to account for five
of the 10 points. He also made a
fine assist to Brooks Bryant for an
easy layup. Edwards two free
throws came with a 1:22 left in the
half and ECU up three, 28-25.
Both teams had several
chances to score in the last minu te,
but neither could do so. The last
chance for the Pirates was an
Edwards three-pointer that
ended up lodged between the rim
and the backboard. The half
would end with ECU leading 28-
25.
Coach Steele and his staff
seemed concerned as they en-
tered the lockerroom at half. But
whatever thev told the Pirate
J
team at intermission was effec-
tive, because ECU came out in the
second half on fire.
Edwards would start off the
half by canning a leaning jumper
in the paint and ECU was quickly
up by five, 30-25. FollowingaSam
Cook jumper, the Pirates would
can three straight layups and
pushed thier lead to nine, 36-27.
Cook would come back for
Navy and can a short jumper, but
once again Edwards would an-
swer for the Pirates. Edwards
would make a strong move to the
basket and make the layup along
with being fouled. He would can
the free throw and two more and
suddenly ECU was up 12 with
14:57 remaining in the game. ECU
had command and a 41-29 lead.
East Carolina would continue
to hold on to their lead and
stretched it to as much as 18.
Edwardshit a free throw to give
the Pirates their largest lead in the
game. With 6:25 remaining in the
contest, ECU led 59-41.
The Midshipmen would try
to fight back into the game, but
could never cut the lead to less
See PIRATES, page 11
Lady Pirates win
O'Conner honored by CAA
Junior Reed Lose goes up strong to take a rebound away from
Midshipmen guard Joe Gottschalk (Photo by Angela Pridgen,
ECU Photolab).
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
Two Lady Pirates scored their
career highs Saturday night as
East Carolina's women's basket-
ball team boosted their record to
13-10 overall and 6-5 in the Colo-
nial Athletic Association in a 87-
83 win over American.
Senior Chris O'Connor
scored 24 points, her career high
in the Lady Pirate win. O'Connor
was 11 of 15 from the floor and
two of two from the three-point
range.
O'Connor has been selected
as the CAA women's player of the
week for her efforts which in-
cluded four assists and three
steals.
ECU now holds down fourth
place in the conference.
Junior Irish Hamilton was 6-7
from the freethrow line as she
scored a career-high 22 points in
the ECU outing. Hamilton also
added three assists and six steals
to her efforts against the Lady
Eagles.
Pam Williams and Gretta
Savage added 10 points each for
ECU, while Sarah Gray led the
way on the boards with 10 re-
bounds.
The Lady Pirates had a slim
36-34 lead over the Lady Eagles at
halftime. ECU shot only 42 per-
cent from the field during the first
half, but improved their shooting
to 59 percent in the second half to
earn the conference victory.
American is now 4-21 overall
and 2-9 in CAA play as they
ranked sixth in the conference.
Earlier in the season, ECU
claimed their first victory over the
Lady Eagles, 66-43, in Minges
Coliseum while freshman Tonya
Hargrove also had a career high
performance scoring 17 points.
With three games remaining
in regular season play and the
CAA tournament still to be
played in mid-March, the Lady
Pirates'hopesofa winning season
are still alive. Under second year
head coach Pat Pierson, ECU has
already passed their eight wins of
1988 regular season play and their
two conference wins.
Earlier in the season, ECU
was victorious over one of its
See LADY PIRATES, page 12
IRS basketball competition heats up
Pirates win on home
turf despite turnovers
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Asst. Sports Editor
After three straight games on
the road, the Pirates were thank-
ful to be in the happy confines of
Minges Coliseum. They were
even happier after the final
buzzer sounded Saturday and the
scoreboard showed ECU had
claimed its second straight vic-
tor) This time they defeated con-
ference foe American, 66-60.
"It wasn't a pretty game
said Coach Mike Steele. "It's the
worst we've played in three
games. But even though we
played bad, we beat a good team.
It was an important game for us
The Pirates commited 21
turnovers, but made up for the
muscues on the boards and at the
free throw line. The Pirates were
15-16 at the charity stripe and hit
all eight free throws down the
stretch to ice the victorv. Thev also
J J
outrebounded the bigger Ameri-
can squad, 33-27.
The key to the rebounding
advantage was the fact that they
held the nations second-leading
rebounder Ron Draper to just two
rebounds, 10 below his average.
The Pirates came out a little
sluggish the first half. American
outscored ECU 8-3 in the first four
munutes of the game.
The Pirates then ran off eight
straight points to take their first
lead 9-8 with 12:59 remaining in
the first half. Freshman Brooks
Bryant did most of the work in the
Pirates spurt. Bryant canned three
jumpers and Blue Edwards got
the other two on a jump shot.
American came right back
hitting five straight later in the
half to take the lead 17-16. The
Pirates came right back with eight
straight of their own and, with
four minutes left in the period,
had their biggest lead of the half,
24-17.
American outscored the Pi-
rates 9-2 over the last few mun-
utes and tied the game before
halftime. At intermission, the
score was knotted at 28.
The second half would turn
(IRS) � Intramural basket-
ball squads have passed the half-
way mark with all divisional fi-
nals up for grabs. In the men's in-
dependent A division, last year's
All Campus Champions 'The
Dream Team' continue to head up
the action with an undefeated
record.
Their dream may become a
nightmare if high league scorers,
The Fellows, who have put to-
gether 137 points in a single con-
test, have anything to do with it.
Also on the war path are Here's
the Beef and Fried City Gang.
Men's independent B squads
are being hung over by 100 Proof.
This band of hoopsteers look to
moveinto the A division next vear
J
with a divisional championship.
Their hottest competition is com-
ing from a group of rapping
roundballers, Heave D and the
Boyz. Next on target is Total
Chaos who has left the gymna-
sium confused with their quick-
ness and strength.
In fraternity action, point
system leaders Sigma Phi Epsilon
may not even make the cut as the
new boys on the block, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, hit the number
one spot. Tau Kappa Epsilon fol-
lows behind in the Frat A division
and is looking tough in the B divi-
sion as well.
Our Prerogative continues to
dominat intramural play and
this tin khe females will have
their way on the basketball
courts. O.P. gets the top vote in
women's action followed closely
behind SQRD and the Little Ras-
cals. As for the sororities, three
teams remain undefeated as Zeta
Tau Alpha, Sigma Sigma Sigma
and Alpha Delta Pi head into the
playoffs.
Co-rcc bowlers are lighting
up the lanes in Mcndenhall with
extremely high individual
averages and team scores adding
up. The top ranking squads are as
follows:
l.Our Prerogative
2. The Scrags
3. Just Us
4. PinTopplers
5. The 300 Club
Our Prerogative is the favor-
ite, but second through fifth place
is up for grabs.
Several individual bowler's
averages are worth noting at this
point. In the ladies lane, Holly
Eckman from the Mad Dogs tops
her opponents with 179 followed
closelv behind bv Belk Pin
Topplcr's own Donna Tender.
Christine Elzie and Sonia Long,
both from Our Prerogative, hold
the third and fourth spot with
individual averages of 170 and
164 respectively.
Jeff Hussey from Just Us is
striking hot this year and boasts a
188 average leading all other male
competitors. Steve Kuykenddall
from Our Prerogative is the next
in line with a 171 average fol-
lowed by Ray Chilcote with 169
and The Red Measles' own Mike
Swain breaking out with a 167
average.
On Wednesday, the four fi-
nalists from the NIKE three-point
shoot out competition will trv to
hit the spot once again and walk
awav with the grand prize - a full
NIKE warm-up suit and bag.
The final four surpassed 60
other competitors and are as fol-
lows: Darren Bynum, Marcus
Goodson, Shane Wells and Mark
Games. These four have already
received NIKE jerseys, socks and
shoes for their efforts.
This week marks the official
Timex Aerobix Week. In promot-
ing this week for physical fitness,
Intramural-Recreational Services
will be having giveaways in each
of it's aerobic fitness classes on
Wednesday and Thursday.
Watches, aerobic fitness apparel,
coupons and fitness information
tips will be given away to partici-
pants during the week of festivi-
ties. The prizes are outstanding
arid available to all aerobic fitness
participants.
Season opens Friday with Palmetto tourney
ECU golf team looks toward a third title
By LORI MARTIN
Sport! Writer
The Pirate golf team will
open its spring season Friday
with The Palmetto Intercollegiate
tournament in Santee, S.C.
According to Coach Hal
Morrison, qualifying has already
determined which six of the 15
golfers will represent ECU.
Morrison said the team has a
good chance of winning a third
consecutive conference title this
spring. "Richmond will be the
team that will be hard to beat
Morrison said. "They have a little
more experience than we do
Returning veterans for the
Pirates are three 1988 all-confer-
ence players, Frances Vaughn,
Tee Davies and Paul Garcia. Also
valuable to the team is John
McGinnis, last year's winner of
the Guilford Intercollegiate tour-
nament. Other important players
will be John Chapman, Simon
Moye and Doug Hoey.
The golf team has a new goal
for the spring of '89, to qualify for
the NCAA Championship Tour-
nament in June. In order to qual-
ify, the team must finish in the top
seven half of thedistrict, Morrison
said. This will enable them to play
in a qualifying tournament with
the other six from their half of the
district and an additional eight
teams from the other half of the
district. The top 11 teams will
then advance to the NCAA's.
The golf captains for the
spring season are Garcia, a red-
shirt junior, and Davies, a true
senior. "Both Paul and Tee are
Softballers look forward to
year of powerhouse competition
great leaders and will be good for
the team Morrison said.
"It takes a strong academic
student to play golf for the var-
sity team Morrison said.
Because some tournaments
last for three or more days, the
golfers are required to miss more
classes than other varsity athletes.
The golfers proved their aca-
demic strength in the fall
semester with one member mak-
ing the Dean's list and six making
the honor roll.
The team will participate in
eight tournaments this spring.
Most tournaments last for two or
three days and only five or six
golfers can go to each. Because
there are 15 golfers on the team,
most of their practice time is spent
qualifying. Fifteen to 25 teams
participate in each tournament.
The home courses for the
ECU golfers are Greenville Coun-
try Club and Brook Valley Coun-
try Club. Because both courses are
private, the Pirates are unable to
host home tournaments.
The golfers played in five
tournaments in the fall season
during September and October.
They placed third in the Campbell
Intercollegiate tournament. From
the other tournaments, thev took
two fifth place finishes and two
seventh place finishes.
Morrison is in his third vear of
coaching the ECU golf team.
According to Garcia, the team
has made a great improvement as
a result of Morrison's time and
patience. Morrison has 11 con-
secutive conference titles to his
credit which has earned him a
place in the Golf Coaches Hall of
Fame.
By TRACYE LARKIN
Sporti Writer
Look beyond the hedges of
Herrington field and there lies
another field. This is home to the
Lady Pirate fast-pitch softball
team.
The softballers had a sixth
place Southern region ranking
mid season, last year. The South-
ern region consists of all Division
I colleges in the Southern part of
the United States.
The team lost five players; but
with two seniors and a force of 10
juniors they will not be lacking in
experience. The Lady Pirates also
have a group of six talented rook-
ies who are expected to see play-
ing time. According to eight-year
coach Sue Manahan, "There is as
much potential on the field as I
have seen since I have been at
ECU
Leading the team in offense
this year will be three year veteren
and team captain, Mickey Ford.
Ms. Ford received the honor of
best offensive player for the Pi-
rates last season having a batting
average of .321.
The defensive attack will be
led by three returning junior
pitchers: Renee Meyers, Jenifer
Sagi, and Tracye I .arkin. The three
had a combined ERA of 1.82 last
season. "The pitching staff has
matured and is ready to lead the
team Manahan said. A new
addition to the mound this year
will be sophomore Wendy
Tonker.
The Lady Pirates are going
through strenuous workouts,
preparing for the upcoming sea-
son. The team also has been in-
vited to five major tournaments
and will host the First Annual
Lady Pirates Classic.
The softballers will face .na-
tionally ranked powerhouses this
year such as Florida State and
University of South Carolina.
Junior pitcher Renee Meyers said,
"Our team has the talent and de-
termination to beat these so-
called powerhouse teams; and I
know we can
The Lady Pirates open their
season March 1, at home against
Furman.
;
X
llie ECU softball team practices their hitting to prepare them for their first game March 1 against
Furman. The Pirates hope their potential and experience will give them a chance against the nation-
ally ranked powerhouse teams (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photolab).





-
I
X
'
V,
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21. 1989 11
Winning medals will be primary goal
Olympic Commision draws up report
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) �
George Stoinbrenner promised
his critique of America's Olympic
program would be packed with
meat But now that the secret is
out some members are wonder-
ing, "Where's the beef?"
Steinbrenner's U.S. Olympic
Committee Overview Commis-
sion issued a 21-page plan Sun-
day for trimming the fat from a
bloated bureaucracy to create a
aner, meaner USOC.
The report declares winning
nedals the primary goal of the
SOC sounds a rallying crv for a
national marketing blitz, but of-
rs tow new initiatives.
Rather than specifics on how
) resolve nagging athlete and
bach selection problems, the
port gives only guidelines.
Instead of devisine a detailed
program to put more monev in
support a jobs program and pro-
vide relatively small amounts of
direct financial aid.
Without saying how much
money, if any, has been misspent
or wasted, the report urges more
than a dozen financial steps, say-
ing that "without the very strong-
est financial planning and ac-
countability procedures, the
USOC may very well face finan-
cial disaster as early as the 1992-96
e;uadrennium
Edwin Moses, the two-time
Olympic gold medalist in the 400-
mecer intermediate hurdles, said
he would have liked to see more
specifics that could lead to
changes quickly. Nothing in the
report is likely to affect U.S. per-
formances in the 1992 Olympics.
Moses and many USOC offi-
cials were satisfied, though, that
the report at least addresses the
"I think when a company letics, critics such as speedskater
goes from being a small, family- Bonnie Blair said, was participa-
type business to a large corpora- no. ,nd strivi for one's own
tion you have to go through some not just winbmng.
land of restructuring m order to "Winning medals must al-
operate efficiently he said. "? thc Primary &�
"Everybody might not be happy, Sl?njn" IT" ?T 2
thouch " asked about that goal, he turned
Steinbrenner's panel shook the l� ar�Und' , ,
up the USOC, to the delight of If the winn,nS of mcda,s
some and the consternation of
others, by saying it should slash
its executive board from 89 to 43
voting members and eliminate 19
of 32 committees to cut costs and
work more smoothly.
Steinbrenner, the New York
Yankees' principal owner and
new USOC vice president, was
criticized by many Olympic ath-
letes for his "winning is every-
isn't important, how come every
one of your newspapers puts the
medal count on the front page?"
he said.
"It's important for this coun-
try to be among the best. The
American public must never be
satisfied just to make the team and
not care about the performance,
and there's some of that
Moses didn't quarrel with
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655MEMORIAL DRIVE
thing" attitude when he was ap- Steinbrenner's emphasis on win
the pockets of athletes, the report issue of reshaping the USOC to
simply supports the current effort make it more responsive to ath-
increase tuition assistance, letcs' needs.
Pirate victory due
to tough defense
pointed last year to head the
commission.
The point of amateur ath
Continued from page 10
than nine. Following two free
throws bv freshman Robin
House. Navy would score four
straight points to make the final
score, 67-58.
The Tirates were led by Blue
cd wards who scored a game-high
2 points. The Colonial Athletic
Conference's leading-scorer also
did a little moving in the ECU
record books with that perform-
ance. The 28 points gave Edwards
a career total of 1,067 points,
which places him 12th on thc all-
time career scoring list. Along
with his points, Edwards also
gabbed a game-high 11 rebounds
and dished out five assists.
East Carolina also got help
from its othere two seniors, Jeff
Kelly and Kenny Murphy.
Murphy chipped in with eight
points, while Kelly dished out
seven assists. Kellv's seven assists
moved him into secondon, the.
single-season assist list. Kelly
now has 111 assists for the season.
Two other Pirates also contrib-
Support
Pirate
Athletics
uted in this team effort. Gus Hill
added 10 points and Reed Lose,
even though he played part of the
game hurt, scored eight points
and had five rebounds.
Navy was led bv forward
Bobbv Jones who scored 14 points
and grabbed four rebounds. Sam
Cook added 10 points and had
seven rebounds.
The win moves the Pirates to
13-12 on the season and 6-7 in the
CAA. The loss closes out a disap-
pointing CAA season for Navy.
The Midshipmen won just one
league game and finished at 1-13.
Their overall record is now 5-21.
The Pirates will be back in
action Wednesday in Minges
Coliseum. ECU will square off
with the Flames of Liberty in a
non-conference game. Tip-off will
be 7:30 p.m.
Lose
Edwards
Love
Kelly
Murphy
Hill
Bryant
House
Perhch
Mote
Team
Totals .
Jones
Cook
Prather
East Carolina (67)
MP FC FT R F A
38 4-8 0-0 5 0 2
38 7-1512-13 11 3 5
19 2-3 0-14 10
39 0-0 3-3 2 1 7
38 3-6 2-2 2 0 2
20 4-10 2-3 1 4 1
14 2-2 0-0 10 0
1 0-0 2-2 0 0 0
1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
3
200 22-44 21-24 29 9 17
Navy (58)
MP FC FT R
31 5-15 0-0 4
23 5-8 0-0 7
25 1-3 0-2
1-1
0-0
0-0
0-0
2-2
0-0
0-2
TP
8
28
4
3
8
10
4
2
0
0
Cottschalk 24 2-9
Harris 28 2-8
Davis,M. 4 1-2
Davis,Mel 8 0-2
Graham 25 3-9
Turner 19 2-7
Marusich 13 3-4
Team
Totals 200 24-67 3-7
F A
0 1
5 0
3 0
1 4
1 3
0 0
2 3
1 1
3 0
3 0
9
0
1
1
1
4
4
5
4
40 19 12
67
TP
14
10
2
7
5
2
0
8
4
6
58
East Carolina28 39 � 6
Navy25 33 �58
ning medals. "I think that's what
any athlete wants he said. "Ev-
eryone is in it to win
Graf wins
again
FAIRFAX, Va. (AP) � Steffi
Graf couldn't remember anything
similar. Zina Garrison will never
forget it.
In a display of tennis that was
extraordinary even by her own
spectacular standards, Graf won
the opening 20 points Sunday in a
6-1, 7-5 victory over Garrison in
the finals of the $300,000 Virginia
Slims of Washington.
After she won her $60,000 top
prize, Graf, the world's top-
ranked player, was asked if she
had ever gotten off to such a daz-
zling start.
"Not winning 20 points in a
row, that's for sure she re-
sponded.
West Germany's Graf, 12-0
this year and 84-3 since the begin-
ning of 1988, captured 25 of the 29
points in the first set.
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(Qg jiontt)nnnt)Hoi r oi





A. -
I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 21,1989
Edwards breaks 1.000 point barrier
Pirates win over weekend
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Aaat Sports Editor
As Coach Mike Steele and his
Pirate team exited the bus Thurs-
day night, there wasn't but one
thing on their minds�winning.
After losing three games in a row,
ECU needed a victory badly and
they got it at the expense of the
Campbell Camels. It was not a
high scoring affair, but the Pirates
prevailed 65-60.
In a game that was high-
lighted by defense, there was a
bright spot offensively. Senior
Blue Edwards scored a game-
high 31 points in front of vocal
Campbell fans and even a few
professional basketball scouts.
Not only was this Edwards ninth
game over 30 points, it also
pushed Edwards over the 1000
point mark for his career. His 1007
points makes him the 16th leading
scorer in ECU history.
The sparse Cumberland
County Memorial Arena crowd
had little to get excited about in
the first half. The two teams
traded baskets for the first eight
minutes of the game.
Trailing 10-8, Edwards shot a
10-foot jumper that hit the front of
the rim. He grappei his own re-
bound and slammed it home to tie
the score at 10-10. Thirty seconds
later Edwards hit two free throws
to put the Pirates up 12-11. That
would be the last lead of the half
for ECU.
Neither team caused any-
great damage the rest of the half.
Campbell made a slight push
towards the end of the first half
and mounted a 7-4 run to grab the
half time lead. The Camels lead at
intermission 28-25.
The quiet Pirate team that
played the first half must have
stayed in the locker room, because
ECU jumped out to a big lead
early in the second half. East
Carolina started the half with the
hot shooting touch and forged
ahead on a 154 run. With 12:05
left in the game ECU was up by
eight, 40-32.
The two teams volleyed back
and forth for the next six minutes.
Then it was Campbell's turn to
mount a comeback. Following
seven straight points, the Camels
had pulled to within one, 51-50.
The game remained close
with ECU never going ahead by
more than three. But with 1:30
remaining and the Pirates up
three, the stage was set for an
exciting finish. Edwards would
get his fifth foul with 1:11 remain-
ing in the game. Henry Wilson
would hit the two free throws and
pull Campbell back within one,
59-58.
The Pirates would bring the
ball down court and milk the
clock. With :30 seconds left in the
game and only four seconds left
on the 45 second clock, Reed Lose
would find Kenny Murphy un-
derneath the basket for an easy
two. ECU up, 61-58.
Campbell worked their of-
fense well and following a near
steal by Murphy, Mark Mocnik
would get an easy layup to draw
the Camels to only one point
down, 61-60. But that would be
all, as the Pirates would get two
clutch free throws from Jeff Kelly
and Murphy would add two to
make the final score 65-60.
The Pirates were lead by
Edwards' 31 points. The eighth
leading scorer in the country also
grabbed six rebounds and dished
out six assists. Coach Stecle spoke
highly of Edwards' performance
after the game. "I think Blue
played better tonight than any
other game this year. He had a
great game and completely domi-
nated the game Steele said.
But Edwards was not the lone
star for the Pirates. Although the
only scorer in double figures, two
other Pirates played big roles in
the win. Senior point guard Kelly
shot well for the game. Kelly con-
nected on three of six from the
field and hit the two clutch free-
throws to win it for ECU. Kelly
also ran the offense well and had a
game-high eight assists.
A surprise,here also appeared
against Campbell. Freshman
Brooks Bryant came off the bench
to play well for the Pirates. He
may have only scored four points
and had two rebounds, bu t he had
two clutch defensive plays to
make the Pirate win possible. In
the last two minutes of the game,
Bryant took a charge and tied up a
loose ball to help ECU maintain
slim one point leads.
Campbell was lead by Henry
Wilson who had 18 points and
seven rebounds. Sanders Jackson
pitched in with 13 points and
seven rebounds and Mark
Mocnik chipped in 10.
Pirates break losing streak
Continued from page 10
out to be a dogfight just like the
first half. Draper would get a tech-
nical foul for the Eagles and
Edwards would hit the free
throws to put ECU up 30-28 early
in the half.
The big blow for American
would come at 15:13 when team-
leader Draper would be whistled
for his fourth personal foul. De-
spite this though, the Eagles
would rattle off eight straight
points and take the lead. With
11:34 remaining in the game,
American was ahead of the Pi-
rates, 42-36.
The Pirates would fight right
back and following an alley-oop
to Edwards, the Pirates were back
in the lead 45-44. American would
regain the lead and stretch it to
three before Edwards showed his
magic again.
With ECU down three and
American having the momen-
tum, Edwards canned a three-
pointer from the right wing and
the Pirates would never look
back.
Gus Hill would come in off
the bench and nail two important
three-pointers. American was
forced to foul to stay in the game,
Lady Pirates win
Continued from page 10
remaining opponents. The Lady
Pirates defeated the Lady
Seahawks of UNC-Wilmington,
87-69 in January at Minges.
The Lady Pirates will take a
break after their two consecutive
wins and prepare to travel to
Wilmington to take on C AA rival
UNC-Wilmington on Saturday.
but the Pirates responded by hit-
ting eight for eight from the free
throw line.
The Pirates were led by Sen-
ior Blue Edwards who scored a
game-high 32 points. Edwards'
performance was his 10th game of
the season in which he scored 30
plus points. It was also his third
straight game of 30 or more
points. Hill's two three-pointers
paced him to 10 points. He also
helped out on the boards grab-
bing six rebounds.
Brvant had his second nice
game for the Pirates. He scored
eight points and grabbed two
rebounds.
ECU career assist leader Jeff
Kelly padded his stats as he
dished a game-high seven assists.
Although in foul trouble, Kelly
led the Pirates through some turn-
over plagued spots and was as-
sisted in running the offense by
Kenny Murphy.
American was led by Chuck
West who scored 15 points.
Draper scored 11 and Dale Spears
chipped in with 11.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 21, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 21, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.658
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58126
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