The East Carolinian, February 16, 1989






EDITORIALSInside4
CLASSIFIEDS FEATURES6
7
SPORTS11

Features
You read the Love Lines, now read the
Hate Lines on the much hated Satire Page.
Check out page 9.
Sports
Kenny Murphy excels for the Steel Mill.
Read about the action on page 11.
She iEaat CarDliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 51
I hursday February lb, 19S9
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Teddy White case to be reevaluated
By TIM HAMPTON
ChancelkrRidlard Eakin
moved to re .iluafathe reddv
White cast�r nieting with
North Carolir Mpnal ssoda-
tion tor the nent of Col-
ored Peopland local
black lead( i oti the
ECU campus
In rethe case.
Eakm reversn earlier decision
'that the� S vken by the
Universit�1not be dis-
turbed.
Th� tsoh es an incident
Apr ,vinh five white
students �in a Gar-
rett Dorm iedd White.
a black student. The incident oc
cured after the white students al
legedly made racial remarks to
wards White as he worked on his
car
After being sentenced by the
SGA Honor Board, White was
suspended for two years from
ECU. White pleaded guilty to five
counts ot simple assault in Pitt
County Court Ian 23.
"A lot of things were put on
the table, hopefully a closer look
will be made into what happened
on the night of April 3 Dennis
Schatzman, executive dire tor of
the NAACP, said atter the meet
ing with the Chancellor Wednes
day.
"He (Eakin) did agree to
reevaluate the incident, but no
other decisions have been made at
this time Ben Irons the ECU
attorney, said.
"The Chancellor agreed to
look into the matter further to
assure racial harassment will not
happen again Irons said. Fakin
refused to comment on the latest
developments atter the meeting.
In at tend.nice at
Wednesday's meeting were
Mayor Ed Carter, Pitt County
Commissioner D.I). Garrett, and
seoral cther aria black leaders in
efforts to have "other voices"
heard.
"Plans to develop a racial
'narassment policy include
seeking input from all sides
Irons sid.
In a Feb. 8 letter to Schatzman,
Eakin said the administration is
working on a harassment policy.
"I want to assure an enviroment
free of racial harassment' Eakin
said.
Schatzman disputes Eakin's
thorough study into the White
case in a Feb. 13 letter to the Chan-
cellor. "It is obvious to me that
you have no intentions oi assur-
ing an environment free of racial
harassment. Actions speak louder
than words Schatzman savs in
the letter.
Schatzman also states many
of the tacts in the case have been
omitted by the Chancellor's office
records.
Local black leaders and NAACP officials adjourn from a meeting with Chancellor Richard Eakin
h the group decided to reevaluate the Teddy White case. (Photo by Thomas
Wednesi
Walters
w n i c
tolab)
Air Force ROTC receives 11 awards
Bv (,AR SAMHRSON
i ester ci Chancell r K1 ic L Eakin
called disl1 , nembers of
the unn rR(
to his off1 i c mgratu-
late them Threcently re-
ceive.i 11rd the recent
annual regi tion ii the
Arnold Air Society Jnd Angel
Flight.
The Arnold Air Sodety is a
national organization consisting
of cadets willing to dedicate their
time to h organizations
such as the Air Force A ssodation.
The Arthritis Foundation, Hie
Bovs Club. Veterans i Foreign
Wars and others. Angel 1 light is a
national service and booster or-
ganization consisting primarily of
co-eds.
"We went from the edge of
being abolished to being the best
of the best Mid Eakin. The unit
received awards for best small-
size unit, best small- size flight,
best Air Force Association Rela-
tions, best squadronflight joint
operations, best pledge program
and others. "The campus should
definitely stand up and take note
of what they've accomplished
said Fakin.
Seven of the 11 awards we
won will go nationalthat is,
we'll have the opportunity to win
"The case seems to be hingi ng
on John Batcman who allegedly
made the racial slurs Schatzman
said. In allegations made against
the university's handling oi the
White case, Schatzman savs "de-
spite evidence, the five white stu-
dents were never punished
Schatzman said Bateman
should be suspended from ECL
for making the alleged racial
slurs. Bateman is "equally guilty"
according to Schatzman in the
letter.
According to Schatzman,
Bateman said "We didn't know
you monkeys were intelligent
enough to open the hood. Why
don't you niggers go back to Af-
rica? We'll f�k you niggers up if
you don't like it, come up here so
we can f k you motherf kers
up and we'll f k your bitches up
too
But Bateman said Wednes-
day night "I admit I did say some-
thing outside the window, but it
was not racial
Kent I lolcomb, who was also
in the Garrett dorm room on the
night of Feb. 3, 198R. said "there
were no racial statements uttered
outside that window
"I'm in the Marine Reserves
and I have more friends who are
black in my unit than white
Bateman said.
"Verbal provocation, how-
ever, cannot excuse Mr. White's
See NAACP, page 3
Board opposes tuition hike
the awards on a national basis
said unit commander Colonel
William . Patton. "We plan to
come away with from one to three
of them he said. The national
convention will be held in Colo-
rado Springs from March 24
through March 27. Patton said the
unit "should be pretty well repre-
sented" and that the number of
students from ECU will be dic-
tated by Student Government
Association funding.
Students receiving awards
and honors for the unit at the
regional convention were Scott
Grizzard, senior, Paige Dvvyer,
junior, Ella Johnson, junior, and
1 )an Dant, sophomore.
See AIR, page 3
By LOR1 MARTIN
Suit Vnlcr
Members oi the University of
North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors are not in favor of tuition
increases which are being pro-
posed by state lawmakers.
Board members indicated
their opposition to the proposed
tuition hike in a meeting in
Greenville on Monday. If the tui-
tion increase is approved, the
funds will go toward faculty sal-
ary increases and campus im-
provements for the 16 academic
institutions in the L'NC system.
Chairman of the Board of
Trustees Max R. Jovner, Sr said
an 8.5 percent increase has been
proposed for out-of-state stu-
dents. An increase for in-state
students was discussed but a
proposal was not made.
The proposal is unfavorable
to the board because the tuition
increase would not bring in
enough revenue to raise the fac-
ulty salaries to the proposed 12
percent for the 1989 academic
year.
According to Joyner, if tu I
is raised 10 percent, the faculty
salary increase1 could only be
raised one percent. For a salary
increase of 10 percent, tuition
would have to be doubled.
A proposal to raise tuition for
graduate students is also unfavor-
able. According to bo.ird member
David J. Whichard II, an increase
in this area would handicap
North Carolina universities in
their competition with the gradu-
ate programs in other states.
In addition to funds for salary
increases, funds arc needed to
make improvements on campus.
The board has requested $24 mil-
lion for an addition to Jovner Li-
brary. I believe an addition to
lovner Library has to he head and
shoulders above any other capital
request we have ECU Chancel
lor Richard Fakin said.
According to Eakin, the facil-
ity is m desperate need of space to
shelve books. Because seats have
been removed to provide space
for stacks, the library is left with
only about 800 seats for the use oi
students.
The board anticipates fund-
ing for the library addition in the
near future, but construction
would not begi n for at least a year,
Joyner said.
The L'NC system has re-
quested $8.9 million for academic
and administrative computing.
"We, as a state, have a ways to go
to catch up in the state-of-the-art
computers Fakin said.
Dean Eugene Ryan, Paige Dwyer, Scott Grizzard, Chancellor Richard I akin, Dan Dant, and Ella
Johnson pose to receive 11 awards Air Force ROTC won in a recent regional convention.
NAACP director says NC racist
Dennis Schatzman, the executive director of the NC NAACP, told an audience that racism is on
the ris" in Ampri�.i .�nd in North Carolina. (Phon v t i- " ' �- ��
By TIM HAMPTON
NMM Kdilor
Racism is on the rise in North
Carolina, Dennis Schatzman said
in a speech on the ECU campus
sponsored by Kappa Alpha Psi as
part of Black History Month.
The self proclaimed "Prince
of Darkness at ECU" for his recent
involvement in the Teddy White
case, Schatzman, the executive
director of the North Carolina
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
said "Racism and white society
arrogance is on the rise in North
Carolina
"We got trouble right here in
river city Schatzman, who has
been a Kappa Alpha Psi member
19 vears as of Wednesday, said.
"It is time for the youth to get sick
and tired of putting up w ith this
bullshit he said in encouraging
voung minorities to join the civil
rights movement.
Elected the youngest judge in
Pennsylvania at age 31 according
to Schatzman, he said he has fol-
lowed the racial inequality in law.
Schatzman, who became a mem-
ber of the NAACP at age 15 as a
condition of his release from re-
form school, said people in power
invent laws to justify what they
do. "I hope I can instill this in you,
don't take anything for truth he
added.
Citing laws centuries old
which established legal inequal-
ity for minorities, Schatzman said
'stare decisis' set precedence for
injustice in the 20th century
Addressing the audience, he
said "Never be ashamed of what
you are or where you come from
Quoting scripture,
Schatzman said "Fight for what is
right because the stone the build-
ers refuse will become the head
stone
After his speech, Schatzman
was asked about a Feb. 8 article in
The Daily Reflector about racial
problems at ECU.
When asked about a passage
in the article reading "a black stu-
dent in ECU'S Student Govern-
ment Assodation recently was
showered with black and brown
jelly beans during a meeting,
Schatzman said Schatzman said
he has misquoted on the word
See REPORTER, page 9





Inside
EDrfoRlALS�?4
CLASSIFIEDSIh-J6
FEATURESM 7
SPORTS��11
Features
You read the Love Lines, now read the
Hate Lines on the much hated Satire Page.
Check out page 9.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmimm
Sports
Kenny Murphy excels for the Steel Milt
Read about the action on page 11.
5be last Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 51
Thursday February 16,1989
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Teddy White case to be reevaluated
By TIM HAMPTON
News Fditor
Chancellor Richard Eakin
moved to reevaluate the Teddy
White case after meeting with
North Carolina National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Col-
ored People officials and local
black leaders Wednesday on the
ECU campus.
In reevaluating the case,
Eakin reverses an earlier decision
"that the actions taken by the
Universitv should not be dis-
turbed
The case involves an incident
April 3, 1988 in which five white
students were assaulted in a Gar-
rett Dorm room bv Teddy White,
a black student. The incident oc-
cured after the white students al-
legedly made racial remarks to-
wards White as he worked on his
car.
After being sentenced by the
SGA Honor Board, White was
suspended for two years from
ECU. White pleaded guilty to five
counts of simple assault in Pitt
County Court Jan. 23.
"A lot of things were put on
the table, hopefully a closer look
will be made into what happened
on the night of April 3 Dennis
Schatzman, executive director of
the NAACP, said after the meet-
ing with the Chancellor Wednes-
day-
"He (Eakin) did agree to
reevaluate the incident, but no
other decisions have been made at
this time Ben Irons, the ECU
attorney, said.
"The Chancellor agreed to
look into the matter further to
assure racial harassment will not
happen again Irons said. Eakin
refused to comment on the latest
developments after the meeting.
In attendance at
Wednesday's meeting were
Mayor Ed Carter, Pitt County
Commissioner D.D. Garrett, and
several other area black leaders in
efforts to have "other voices"
heard.
"Plans to develop a racial
harassment policy include
seeking input from all sides
Irons said.
In a Feb. 8 letter to Schatzman,
Eakin said the administration is
working on a harassment policy.
"I want to assure an enviroment
free of racial harassment Eakin
said.
Schatzman disputes Eakin's
thorough study into the White
case in a Feb. 13 letter to the Chan-
cellor. "It is obvious to me that
you have no intentions of assur-
ing an environment free of racial
harassment. Actions speak louder
than words Schatzman says in
the letter.
Schatzman also states many
of the facts in the case have been
omitted by the Chancellor's office
records.
Local black leaders and NAACP officials adjourn from a meeting with Chancellor Richard Eakin
Wednesday in which the group decided to reevaluate the Teddy White case. (Photo by Thomas
Walters�Photolab)
Air Force ROTC receives 11 awards
Bv GARY SANDERSON
Stiff Writer
Yesterday afternoon, ECU
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
called distinguished members of
the university's Air Force ROTC
to his office in order to congratu-
late them. The unit recently re-
ceived 11 awards at the recent
annual regional convention of the
Arnold Air Society and Angel
Flight.
The Arnold Air Society is a
national organization consisting
of cadets willing to dedicate their
time to helping organizations
such as the Air Force Association,
The Arthritis Foundation, The
Boys Club, Veterans of Foreign
Wars and others. Angel Right is a
national service and booster or-
ganization consisting primarily of
co-eds.
"We went from the edge of
being abolished to being the best
of the best said Eakin. The unit
received awards for best small-
size unit, best small- size flight,
best Air Force Association Rela-
tions, best squadronflight joint
operations, best pledge program
and others. "The campus should
definitely stand up and take note
of what they've accomplished
said Eakin.
"Seven of the 11 awards we
won will go nationalthat is,
we'll have the opportunity to win
�A 1� ?ot

Ilg�If
r.
-�
"The case seems to be hinging
on John Bateman who allegedly
made the racial slurs Schatzman
said. In allegations made against
the university's handling of the
White case, Schatzman says "de-
spite evidence, the five white stu-
dents were never punished
Schatzman said Bateman
should be suspended from ECU
for making the alleged racial
slurs. Bateman is "equally guilty"
according to Schatzman in the
letter.
According to Schatzman,
Bateman said "We didn't know
you monkeys were intelligent
enough to open the hood. Why
don't you niggers go back to Af-
rica? We'll f�k you niggers up if
you don't like it, come up here so
we can f�k you motherf�kers
up and we'll f�k your bitches up
too
But Bateman said Wednes-
day night "1 admit 1 did say some-
thing outside the window, but it
was not racial
Kent Holcomb, who was also
in the Garrett dorm room on the
night of Feb. 3, 1988, said "there
were no racial statements uttered
outside that window
"I'm in the Marine Reserves
and I have more friends who are
black in my unit than white
Bateman said.
"Verbal provocation, how-
ever, cannot excuse Mr. White's
See NAACP, page 3
Board opposes tuition hike
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
Members of the University of
North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors are not in favor of tuition
increases which are being pro-
posed by state lawmakers.
Board members indicated
their opposition to the proposed
tuition hike in a meeting in
Greenville on Monday. If the tui-
tion increase is approved, the
funds will go toward faculty sal-
ary increases and campus im-
provements for the 16 academic
institutions in the UNC system.
Chairman of the Board of
Trustees Max R. Joyner, Sr said
an 8.5 percent increase has been
proposed for out-of-state stu-
dents. An increase for in-state
students was discussed but a
proposal was not made.
The proposal is unfavorable
to the board because the tuition
increase would not bring in
enough revenue to raise the fac-
ulty salaries to the proposed 12
percent for the 1989 academic
year.
According to Joyner, if tuition
is raised 10 percent, the faculty
salary increase could only be
raised one percent. For a salary
increase of 10 percent, tuition
would have to be doubled.
A proposal to raise tuition for
graduate students is also unfavor-
able. According to board member
David J. Whichard II, an increase
in this area would handicap
North Carolina universities in
their competition with the gradu-
ate programs in other states.
In addition to funds for salary
increases, funds are needed to
make improvements on campus.
The board has requested $24 mil-
lion for an addition to joyner Li-
brary. I believe an addition to
Joyner Library has to be head and
shoulders above any other capital
request we have ECU Chancel-
lor Richard Eakin said.
According to Eakin, the facil-
ity is in desperate need of space to
shelve books. Because seats have
been removed to provide space
for stacks, the library is left with
only about 800 seats for the use of
students.
The board anticipates fund-
ing for the library addition in the
near future, but construction
would notbeginforatleastayear,
Joyner said.
The UNC system has re-
quested $8.9 million for academic
and administrative computing.
"We, as a state, have a ways to go
to catch up in the state-of-the-art
computers Eakin said.
the awards on a national basis
said unit commander Colonel
William N. Patton. "We plan to
come away with from one to three
of them he said. The national
convention will be held in Colo-
rado Springs from March 24
through March 27. Patton said the
unit "should be pretty well repre-
sented" and that the number of
students from ECU will be dic-
tated by Student Government
Association funding.
Students receiving awards
and honors for the unit at the
regional convention were Scott
Grizzard, senior, Paige Dwyer,
junior, Ella Johnson, junior, and
Dan Dant, sophomore.
See AIR, page 3
Dean Eugene Ryan, Paige Dwyer, Scott Grizzard, Chancellor Richard Eakin, Dan Dant, and Ella
Johnson pose to receive 11 awards Air Force ROTC won in a recent regional convention.
NAACP director says NC racist
Dennis Schatzman, the executive director of the NC NAACP, told an audience that racism is on
the rise in America and in North Carolina. (Photo bv TP wmhHt- -Ft"trlatri
By TIM HAMPTON
N�wi Editor
Racism is on the rise in North
Carolina, Dennis Schatzman said
in a speech on the ECU campus
sponsored by Kappa Alpha Psi as
part of Black History Month.
The self proclaimed "Prince
of Darkness at ECU" for his recent
involvement in the Teddy White
case, Schatzman, the executive
director of the North Carolina
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
said "Racism and white society
arrogance is on the rise in North
Carolina
"We got trouble right here in
river city Schatzman, who has
been a Kappa Alpha Psi member
19 years as of Wednesday, said.
"It is time for the youth to get sick
and tired of putting up with this
bullshit he said in encouraging
young minorities to join the civil
rights movement.
Elected the youngest judge in
Pennsylvania at age 31 according
to Schatzman, he said he has fol-
lowed the racial inequality in law.
Schatzman, who became a mem-
ber of the NAACP at age 15 as a
condition of his release from re-
form school, said people in power
invent laws to justify what they
do. "I hope I can instill this in you,
don't take anything for truth he
added.
Citing laws centuries old
which established legal inequal-
ity for minorities, Schatzman said
'stare decisis' set precedence for
injustice in the 20th century.
Addressing the audience, he
said "Never be ashamed of what
you are or where you come from
Quoting scripture,
Schatzman said "Fight for what is
right because the stone the build-
ers refuse will become the head
stone
After his speech, Schatzman
was asked about a Feb. 8 article in
The Daily Reflector about racial
problems at ECU.
When asked about a passage
in the article reading "a black stu-
dent in ECU'S Student Govern-
ment Association recently was
showered with black and brown
jelly beans during a meeting,
Schatzman said Schatzman said
he has misquoted on the word
See REPORTER, page 3





I
PTA broken into
This back door to Pizza Transit Authority was jimmied open
early Wednesday. Thieves stole $1,000 worth of merchandise.
(Photo by J.D.Whitmire�Photolab)
By MINDY McINNIS
Staff Writer
Approximately $1000 worth
of merchandise was stolen, Tues-
day, from Tizza Transit Authority
located on the corner of 14th
Street and Charles Boulevard.
Stan Briggs, assistant man-
ager of operations, was the first
person on the scene. "I entered
the store through the front door
and turned on the ovens he said.
"I noticed a light coming from the
side door and realized something
was wrong
The intruder gained access
into PTA through the back service
entrance by using some type of
metal rod to jimmy the lock.
Briggs commented, 'The door
was bent , the bolts were broken
and the wooden bar that holds the
door in place was in splinters
The suspect made off with
approximately $1,000 worth of
merchandise which included a
black and white television set
valued at $75, a stereo and tape
deck valued at $300, and three
multi-line speaker phones valued
at $200 each.
"All of the drawers had been
ECU Ambassadors to host 225
schools in national convention
Bv GARY SANDERSON
Staff Writer
During the second week in
September, ECU will host the
National Ambassadors conven-
tion, which will include 650 to 800
students from approximately 223
schools from the United States
and Canada.
"1 think the convention will
do a lot for ECU in the eyes of
other universities nationwide
said Chancellor Richard R. Eakin.
"Our ambassadors are making a
contribution not only to them-
selves but also to this institution
he said.
The ECU Ambassadors pro-
vide callers for the annual giving
telefund, serve as official students
for special university events such
as Homecoming, work with
alumni, give tours of campus
during weekdays in order to help
the admissions otYice and assist
the athletic department through
weekend tours for athletes to be
recruited.
"We're going to need total
campus support for the upcom-
ing convention said Skipper
Two ECU students
arrested Tuesday
for trafficking
Two ECU students were
charged with trafficking LSD and
"ecstasy" at Raleigh-Durham In-
ternational Airport Tuesday by
Wake County Sheriff Depart-
ment.
Quillin Gourley Davis, 20,
and Kenneth Scott Lefkowitz, 22,
were charged in possession of
3,200 hits of LSD and an undeter-
mined amount of "ecstasy also
called MDMA. Both Davis and
Lefkowitz are under $50,000
bonds.
The two residences of 407-D
Eastbrook Apartments in
Greenville were arrested after
arriving on a 12:00 flight from Los
Angles to RDU. Davis and
Lefkowitz were arrested by a joint
effort of Raleigh Police, the SBI
and Wake County Sheriff's De-
partment.
Snider, president of the Ambassa-
dors al iVI . By support, Snider
means "the loaning or vans bv
various departments and funding
from the university He said,
"Whenever we're in need oia van
we basically have to beg, borrow
or steal and we've got to resolve
issues like that in order to turn our
full attention on the convention
The theme for the convention
is "Discover the gold, find the
treasure inside yourself "We've
organized into committees to
cover every aspect of the upcom-
ing event said Kathy Johnson,
the chairperson oi the committee.
Johnson said that "committees
organized include. Decorations,
Entertainment, Transportation,
Food, Hospitality, Registration,
Hotel Accomodations, Speakers,
Seminars and Troubleshooting
Events scheduled include a
Country fair at Ficklen stadium, a
cacino night at the Holidome,
pizza parties, guest speakers, a
formal dinner at Minges and a
pig-pickin The ECU ambassa-
dors have made alternate plans in
case of rain.
"No one is going to hope for
rain, but if it comes, we want to be
prepared said Johnson. Memo-
rabilia for those in attendance
include a color television set door
prize, stationary with the univer-
sity logo, a coupon book with
ECU pens and pencils, silver
plates with the individuals'
names and a book of North Caro-
lina phrases.
Area hotels have already
been contacted and arrangements
are being made to contract
Greenville buses to help with
transportation. "We're adding
schools to the list daily said
Johnson
One of the main problems at
thisrxint is where to get all of the
pla tes for the event. "Jones cafete-
ria only has about 200 place set-
tings and that's simply not
enough she said. "We plan to
have everything readied before
breaking for the summer
Register Now
to get on the
Mexican
Connection
to
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Courtesy of Chico's &
American Airlines
And win a Trip for Two
7 Days - 6 Nights
Crown Piazza Hotel
DRAWING
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Must be 18 years old to register.
The
East Carolinian
521 Cotanche 757-1666
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN EXTRA
Hm
pon
,lonla Sat
Suik1.iv 1 )
;iv 10 0
CUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Alfiner. Nike and Reebok)
emptied as if someone was look-
ing for petty cash Briggs said.
The drivers' drop box was broken
into but no cash was stolen.
Joseph "Josh" M. Rogers,
owner of PTA, says "Although
there wasn't any evidence on the
premises, we do have a suspect,
but we can't prove anything at
this time
Rogers said that last night an
employee was fired for stealing
money. No connection between
this incident and last nights rob-
bery has been made but police are
conducting an investigation.
According to Rogers, this
isn't the only robbery that has
occurred in the last year. The
delivery drivers have already
been robbed three times.
Fortunately, these robberies
were solved through Crime Stop-
pers. Because other pizza restau-
rants in Greenville have had sim-
iliar occurrences, Rogers said it
would be in everyone's (pizza
store owners) best interest to
work together on improving
safety for employees.
The East Carolinian
Scott Makey
Phillip V. Cope
James F.J. McKee, Directorof Advertising
Advertising Representatives
J. Keith Pearce
Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16, 1989 3
Scientists can predict quakes
INTRODUCING:
MENLO PARK, Calif. (AP)
Weeks before Colombia's
Nevado del Ruiz volcano
erupted, melting glaciers and
unleashing torrents of mud that
buried 25,000 people, geologists
drafted i map showing exactly
where the muck would flow. The
1 "700-toot volcano started spew-
mg ash Sep. 11, 1985.
Scientists gave the map to
vtticials Oct. 7 and urged them to
tart emergency preparations. A
newspaper published the map a
couple of days later. But survivors
of the deadly Nov. 13 eruption
complained they weren't warned.
i here were no evacuations or-
dered as a result of the map
wriich also may not have been
understood by residents who saw
it. s.nd U.S. Geological Survey
oleanologist Robert Tilling.
"That shouldn't have hap-
pened. The whole emergency re-
sponse network failed and, as a
result, thousands died
lime and again geologists
have warned of impending disas-
ters or urged that steps be taken to
reduce the death toll in future
catastrophes. Many of these ef-
forts have been ignored because
of politics, economic concerns,
uncertainty in their predictions,
communications failures and the
very human tendency to avoid
unpleasant realities.
"Geophvsicists more than
once warned builders of the high
;eismic activib in northwest
Armenia' the v ammunist Party
newspaper Travda said after the
Dec. 7 earthquake that rocked a
part of Soviet Armenia known for
centuries for deadly quakes. At
least 24,000 people died, en-
tombed in collapsed adobe huts,
stone homes and inadequately
reinforced concrete-slab build-
ings.
"Who closed their eyes to the
warnings of the seismologists,
here and in other regions?"
Pravda asked. The earthquake
that killed 10,000 people in Mex-
ico City in 1985 collapsed about
1,000 buildings although scien-
tists and engineers knew damag-
ing seismic waves would be
amplified by the lake bed upon
which the city was built, said
Geological Survey engineering
seismology chief Thomas Hanks.
"It's not enough to assess
hazards. Something has to be
done with this information
Geological Survey scientist C.
Dan Miller told 200 officials in
November when the agency held
a "Gcohazards '88" symposium
in Mcnlo Park on how science can
save lives from quakes. Earth-
quakes, landslides, tidal waves,
hurricanes, tornadoes, floods,
volcanic eruptions and wildfires
killed more than 2.8 million
people worldwide in the past 20
years, and caused up to $100 bil-
lion in property damage, said a
1987 National Research Council
report.
"The impacts of natural haz-
ards arc increasing and will con-
tinue to do so unless the world
communitv takes concerted ac-
tion the report said, urging a
worldwide scientific effort in the
1990s to reduce the natural disas-
ter toll. "We have enough knowl-
edge already, if properly applied,
to reduce both human and prop-
erty losses substantially ii said.
Yet many nations lack the
money or the political and social
institutions capable of acting, said
Julia Taft, director of the Office of
U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance.
"The greatest human burden
from natural catastrophes falls on
the poor, powerless and helpless
victims in the Third World
Current technology could
reduce the risks for 350 million
people living on or near poten-
tially dangerous volcanoes, ac-
cording to Tilling. 'The challenge
lies in marshaling the political
will and resources, currently lack-
ing, to study and adequately
monitor the world's high-risk
volcanoes
In the United States, volca-
noes arc monitored more closely,
yet the public is reluctant to pre-
pare for disasters that can't be
predicted with certainty. Some
business people in the Sierra ski
resort of Mammoth Lakes, Calif
were outraged when the USGS
declared a "notice of potential
volcanic hazard" for the Long
Valley caldera on May 26, 1982,
prompted by thousands of
quakes in two years, new steam
vents, uplift of the crater floor and
signs of magma.
NAACP director says he will
go higher if justice not found
Continued from page 1
violent reaction. Tolerance of his
behavior would make it more
difficult to maintain a safe cam-
pus Eakin said. "One of the vic-
tims assaulted suffered a broken
ise and another suffered serious
ad lacerations Eakin said.
Schatzman said White's reac-
tion can't be condoned, he said
both sides involved in the issue
should have equal penalty. "But
'xjfh sides should be given �fai
penalty or it should be nullified
Schatzman said.
In the Chancellor's Feb. 8 let-
ter, lie states "My review of the
matter indicates that Mr. White
was charged and disciplined in
accordance with applicable uni-
versitv procedures. 1 found no
material procedural irregulari-
ties
But Schatzman disagrees.
Schatzman said Teddy White
identified John Bateman as the
instigator of the incident to
Ronald Speier, assistant dean of
student life, but wasn't part of the
Chancellor's record.
Me also said Speier insisted
John Eagan, the SGA public de-
fender in 1988, defend White.
Speier and Eagan misled White,
according to Schatzman.
Schatzman said both Speier
and Eagan "assured Mr. White
that the situation would be taken
care of and there would be no
need to bring Mr. White's wit-
nesses, who heard and saw Mr.
Bateman's and his friends' pro-
voking verbal assaults, to the
tHwmm? Board hearing
White's witness to the inci-
dent, who appeared in Pitt
County Court, named all but
Bateman as the students making
the racial slurs, according to
Bateman.
In Schatzman's letter to
Eakin, the NAACP director said
he has asked Max Joyner, Jr the
chairman of ECU'S Board of Trus-
tees, to conduct an investigation
after the Chancellor closed the
White case last week.
"If Mr. Joyner goes no further
than the "records" that vour
J
adminstration believes are com-
plete, then we must go higher to
seek justice Schatzman said.
ATTIC
Air Society awarded
Continued from page 1
"These young men and
women have done a superior
job saidratton. "I've never seen
a group come back with as many
awards. They've focused their
activities on areas they've de-
cided to work on
In the past, the Arnold Air
Society has been involved with
numerous blood drives, the bal-
loon launch at Ficklen stadium for
the Arthritis Foundation and the
contribution of funds to Veterans'
organizations earned through the
sale of metal bracelets bearing the
names of MI As and POWs from
the Korean war and the Vietnam
conflict.
On April 15, they will support
the forthcoming replica of The
Wall' which contains names of
those missing or killed at war.
Reporter says
Schatzman
not misquoted
Continued from page 1
'showered
"I did not say that
Schatzman said, "the report edi-
torialized "Consider it a mis-
quote Schatzman said.
But Cherie Evans, the re-
porter for The Daily Reflector
who wrote the article with the
headline "ECU Racial Events Stir
Call For Laws said Schatzman is
incorrect.
"I didn't misquote him on
that statement Evans said.
The replica, which tours the coun-
try by rail, is 34 the size of the real
wall in Washington, D.C.
The wall, while here in
Greenville, will be guarded by
veterans' groups 24 hours a day. �
The town, in the crater that
erupted 730,000 years ago, suf-
fered economically. A second
escape route from town was built
monitonng and warning systems
were installed, and the state pre-
pared an emergency plan.
The reaction demonstrated
the instinct "to shoot the messen-
ger Mono County Supervisor
Andrea Mead Lawrence said at
the USGS symposium. "Realize
you have triggered forces in
human nature that are bigger than
you are, and maybe bigger than
the volcano that may or may not
go off
"Because nothing in the way
of earthquakes is really happen-
ing 99.99999 percent of the time at
any given place Hanks said.
"Stoking the earthquake con-
sciousness, even in California,
presents unusual challenges
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A series to assist
graduating seniors.
At oPftnani WC TC
also interested in
your future.
Dressing
for the
Interview:
Every interviewer will agree that the way
you are dressed for the interview is ex
tremely important Many potential
employers will inspect you from head to
toe When you consider that many com-
panies will interview more than one-hun
dred applicants for a position, it makes
good sense to insure that you're properly
dressed.
A dark suit, preferably a navy, navy
pinstripe, grey, or grey pinstripe, should be
worn for the first meeting.
A white shirt should be worn for each in-
terview (some large companies require that
their employees wear nothing but white
shirts).
A conservative stripe or foulard tie is
preferred. Don't make the mistake of wear-
ing a linen tie in the winter or a wool one
during spring or summer. A burgundy stripe
with some navy blue and or grey usually
looks very nice with either of the aforemen-
tioned suits
Dark shoes, preferably a dark leather
tassel or lace-up is best Light colored
loafers won't cut it (a fresh shine would be a
good ideal too) Wear a belt that matches
your shoes.
14 e want ������� .
when it i-iwi n �- rtanr dt
ston on a uit Out select es suits b
Austin Reed Han Shaffnei S '�'��
Freeman Chap- P ' � . ersil
We wont to make � , ersta
differenci n tailoring � ���� - stj . :ha:
our chthing dt
A navy blazer is permissible But it must
be worn properly with a conservative stripe
tie. Grey pants are generally the best to
wear with the blazer (khakis are too casual
for an interview) Again, dark shoes are
best
Make sure that your clothes are clean and
pressed
Some self proclaimed professionals say
that you should work your way up to your
best looking suit In other words, save the
best for last to make the lasting impression
when it comes down to the final cut This
makes sense until you consider that you
want to make a good enough impression at
the first interview to be asked back for the
second This is a decision you must make
for yourself
oPPmans
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytovyn Mall Rocky Mount





(
(
�lie lEaat Ofefllfnfan
Serving the Fast Carolina campus community since 792-5
PETE FERNALD, General Manage,
Stephanie Folsom, mm i
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of AAmtismg
Tim Hampton. NnaEduor
KRISTEN HALBERG, Sport, EAtcr
Q IIP Carter, r-� �.�
Susan How ell, .��� Manager
DE A N VV ATE RS, Csett Manager
Step! ! NiE Singleton, c
Brad Bannister, a m
Jeff Parker, a oii�
TOM FURR, Cirmkhm Manager
Debbie Stevens, sm�
Stephanie Emory,w t� s�prm�r
Mac Clark, mmm Manager
February 16,1989
OPINION
Page 4
Ozone Layer
Apath) is. killing us in this throw
away society.
The ozone layer has holes which
are increasing in size more and more
each day by chlorofluorocarbons
(CFCs) - -a convenience used in the
manufacture of everything from
foam col tee cups and egg cartons to
coolants in refrigerators.
This might sound like a problem
each individual person should not
involve himherself with; after all,
how can one person have an effect
on a problem so massive, right?
Wrong. Each and every person
can at least be aware of what's hap-
pening to their environment and
make that first step toward bettering
it.
The opportunity for that first
step at ECU is just waiting. Changes
can be made easily, but the desire to
make them has to come first. It just
seems easier to wait until someone
makes a rule for or against doing
something before noticing a prob-
lem.
Chlorofluorocarbons are not
only killing the environment,
they're killing us as well. Research-
ers say that in 30 or 40 years there
will be an increase in cancer rates;
respiratorv problems are already
being linked to the depletion in the
ozone layer.
ECU has a vear and a half left on
its contract with Canteen Corpora-
tion which determines the products
being used in our dining areas, but
after that contract is completed bids
will be considered from other corpo-
rations. The administration has
stated that in future contracts they
will specify that no styrofoam prod-
ucts be used.
Until then there are at least two
areas to consider: The Student Store
and the Croatan. Neither one of
these snack bars is bound by Can-
teen, so it's the students who can
make the difference.
An experiment was conducted
yesterday at the student store. Two
students bought 16-ounce drinks,
but brought their own cups � plas-
tic cups. The store's policy states that
student's have to use the cups pro-
vided; the manager said if there
were enough students interested
and had ideas then a change could
be made.
Replacing styrofoam cups with
paper cups would save hundreds of
thousands of ozone layer molecules
� each chlorine atom destroys at
least 10,000 ozone molecules before
finally fizzling out.
This is but one suggestion in the
midst of numerous that could be
made. Boycotting businesses which
use styrofoam � and letting them
know why you're boycotting � is
another, as would simply taking
your own coffee mug to work in-
stead of using those throw-away-
ables day after day.
Ifs time to start' doTng something
about our environment, and feeling
good about it, without waiting for
an enforced rule to make the deci-
sion for us.
INTRODUCING ,
5CHATZMAN5
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4
Scientific illiteracy
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Cditora! Columnist
Study after study shows the American
people to be scientifically illiterate � not
only high school students, but also college
students and other voting-age adults.
Without a grasp of fundamental con-
cepts, it is difficult to see how Americans
can be trusted to make fundamental deci-
sions � on SDI, nuclear power or supercol-
liders. Scientific innovation is being
crushed by lawsuit-happy citizens, and by
jurors who award huge plaintive damages.
For example, in the wake of thalidomide,
and know ing they could be found guilty of
negligence even if they clearly were not
negligent, few companies are willing to
produce much-needed drugs to combat
morning sickness and other problems faced
by pregnant women.
Nowhere is lack of knowledge more
potentially damaging than in the ever-
changing field of computer crime. Com-
puter fraud. crashing (the malicious variant
of hacking), and intentional release of vi-
ruses and worms go largely unpunished
because laws do not exist or the seriousness
of the problem is underestimated by the
jury. Juries often do not realize that a so-
phisticated computer criminal can cause
devastating damage to systems that are
used in hospitals, nuclear power plantsand
even the less secure defense systems.
In addition, Americans have come to
believe that there is no such thing as an ac-
ceptable level of risk � that any level of
hazard should not be tolerated. With the
realization that we can be mostly free from
physical pain has come the belief that we
should be freed from psychological pain as
well. Hence there is a growing reluctance to
take responsibility for one's own actions,
and a growing reliance on the judicial sys-
tem to award damages for actions that are
easily preventable.
Most solutions to the problem of scien-
tific illiteracy center around providing
more scientific education to students. This,
however, is not enough in itself because it
does not address the true problem: the
generally anti-intellectual and anti-scien-
tific bent of the American public. Anti-sci-
entific religion (typified by the proponents
of so-called "scientific creationism") and
the New Age (which is basically a yuppie-
oriented business masquerading as a fusion
of science and religion) reflect and reinforce
this trenck
To make America a leader in the scien-
tific world will require more than beefing
up scientific texts or toughening acheive-
ment tests. It will require a change of atti-
tude on the part of the American people.
Until this happens, timidity will continue to
bulldoze scientific creativity, and igno-
rance will continue to make fools of us in the
eyes of the world we claim we should lead.
Origin poem not appreciated
To the editor:
This is in response to the poem in
the February 14 "East Carolinian" en-
titled "The Origin of the Species
Simply stated, there is no difference
in printing the word "F�" 17 times in
our university newspaper than in
spray-painting the same word an
equal number of times on a building
on the E.C.U. campus. If a visiting of-
ficial, or simply a visitor from the
Greenville community , were to see
the aforementioned poem, what
would their impression be of our
university? It would undoubtedly be
one of immaturity, irresponsibility
and second-ratedness. I, along with
other students, don't want to be
associated with such an image. You
need to become more responsible as a
journalistic medium. This in no way
implies that humor isn't a part of
conscientious journalism, rather, it
says the type of humor you endorse is
simply not funny. I enjoy your
timely, well-written articles of cam-
pus goings-on, and those of national
interest, but your approach to shal-
low humor casts a shadow over the
credible aspects of your paper.
David L. Morketter
Senior
Communications
Racism not real
To the editor:
In response to your last edition of
the East Carolinian, I found it to be
the worst paper you have released
yet. 1 have been watching and reading
it for two years now, and the news
you prin t is blown way out of propor-
tion. The only racial problems here at
ECU are in the headlines you print.
On the first page, even in the first two
articles, you continue to print racial
remarks. I'll give you the first article
about the Chancellor; however, the
SGA matter has been drug out for 2
weeks. Why make an issue out of
nothing. I'm on SGA and there isn't
any racial tension at all. The editor of
your paper is biased and shouldn't
have the job. I'm mad, ashamed, and
in disbelief of your newspaper. Hope-
fully students, citizens of Greenville
and others don't associate these racial
problems with the society of East
Carolina.
Hopefully this letter will reach
whoever needs to hear it.
Bryan Lowe
junior
SGA
Not laughing
talents of your staff are numerous,
I'm sure, so do others and yourself a
favor and put them to better use to-
wards something you will not have
to regret later
Courtnev B. Bryant
Senior
Broadcasting
Hypocrisy
To the editor:
When I read Vince
Worthington's letter in last
Thursday's The East Carolinian, I
had to laugh. Sorry, it was just a
natural reaction, seeing as how I
must be one of the "lost dogs"
Worthington seems to despise.
It is people like Worthington
(my apologies to him if this is a one
time distraction on his part) and
Swaggart who have made this a
country where some true Christians
feel persecuted in their beliefs.
Hypocrisy is defined as "a feign-
ing to be what one is not or to believe
what one does not Penthouse, Mr.
Worthington, has never pretended
to be anything it is not. Smut is smut,
and the people at Penthouse know it.
Swaggart, on the other hand,
made millions convincing people he
was pious, good and religious: that
he had their best interest at heart.
Now we've found out he was using
some of that money to comfort h
self just a little south of the Bible belt
(allegations to which he has admit-
ted the truth). Hypocrisy.
Worthington's letter also im-
plies that it is wrong for Penthouse to
write about sexual perversion, but
it's all right for Swaggart to live that
way � as long as he claims to be a
Christian and asks for forgiveness
every once and a while (along with a
little more money o he can continue
ministering in Louisiana brothels).
I have a number of truly devout
Christian friends. Thcv continue to
be embarrassed by the actions of
Swaggart, Bakker and others, and
they are afraid that people like you,
Mr. Worthington, are turning more
and more people against them. God
has said to worship only him, not
false prophets. Wake up, Mr.
Worthington, and open your eyes.
Swaggart is merely a man, and his
naming himself a truly Christian
leader does not make him one. Call a
dog a dog and focus your energies on
doing some real good for mankind
and God.
Clay Deanhardt
Graduate Student
English
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the Campus Fo
rum" section of the paper The East
Carolinian features "The Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion col
umn by guest writers from the
dent body an.i faculty. The column
printed in The Campus Spectrum
will contain current topics of con � n
to the campus, community or nat
The columns are restricted on
with regard to rules of grammar and
decency. Persons submitting col
urnns must be willing to accept byline
credit for their efforts, as no entries
from ghost writers will be published
To the editor:
In the past few months the Anti-
Christ attitude has gradually thrust
ifs evil views to the public in one
manner or another. I am referring to
your article "Look out world! God is
on a nut-out again The article was
definitely in exceptionally poor taste.
I agree one should be able to step
away from a situation and laugh at it,
but this particular topic does not fall
into that category. How far are you
willing to go for a laugh � to hell?
With the sad and ever increasing
saddening state that this world is
headed toward you should not be
satirical about the only hope that
there is for our world. "If in this life
only we have hope in Christ, we are
of all men most miserable I Cor.
15:19
Why write about something that
you evidently lack understanding of
or disregard the importance of? The
Comedy okay
To the editor:
Being a contestant in the 1989
U.S. College Comedy Competition
was an enjoyable experience. How-
ever, staff writer Adam Cornelius felt
that it was necessary to mention
"lewdness" intheactsof "someof the
contestants As for myself, slapstick
comedy is my personal favorite style
of eomedy. However, I knew as I
wrote, rewrote and revised my script
that "harder-hitting more "ma-
tured" lines in the script were needed
in order to get a response from a
young college audience that was
undoubtedly used to truly "vulgar"
comedy used by such performers as
the talented Eddie Murphy, as well
as by at least one nightclub in town.
Let it also be recognized that it was
only minutes before the show began
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica
tions Building, across from the en
trance to Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let
ters must include the name, major,
classification, address, phone num
ber, and the signature of the author
(s).
Letters are limited to 300 words or
less, double-spaced, typed or neatly
printed All letters are subject to ed-
iting for brevity, obscenity and libel,
and no personal attacks will be per-
mitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are re-
minded that they are limited to one
every two weeks.
The deadline for editorial material is 5
p.m. Friday for Tuesday papers and 5
p.m. Tuesday for Thursday editions.
when the performers were informed
of worlds that could not be used in
their performances. However, as I
recall, the words "condom "rub-
berband and "staples which were
words used in mv act, were not
words that were forbidden. Since
audiences can sometimes be brutal,
all the performers of this competition
need to be congratulated and re-
spected for bravely facing that pos-
siblitv Luckily, however, Tuesday
night's audience wasn't brutal at all.
Finally, 1 thank Mr. Cornelius for
describing myself and mv im-
mensely talented partner Shen Lynn
Jernigan as a "moderm-dav George
and Gracie� tvpc comedy team"
since Lynn and I are fans of Mr. Burns
and Miss Allen. We look forward to
any future opportunities, should
they arise of furthennt; that tvpe of
reputation without the use of the
"modern-day" punch lines. Hope-
fully, the humor and sophistication
of slapstick and "clean" comedv will
be rediscovered bv the majority of
voung audience so that more " ma-
ture" subject matter doesntt hare to f
be used in order to e,et a laugh.
Michael Harnx n
Sophomo-e
Broadcasting Comm






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16.1989 5
Gov. Martin to submit new budget plan
providing more money for teacher raise
RALEIGH (AD � Hoping to
calm unhappy teachers, Gov. Jim
Martin said he will make a tempo
rary slowdown in the Basic Edu-
cation Program the centerpiece of
a revised budget plan that will
include more money for pay
raises.
During a "summit" meeting
of legislative and education lead-
ers Monday, the governor said he
had decided to seek a 4.5 percent
pay increase starting in October
and possibly earlier. He said he
would resurrect a plan he floated
and abandoned in December.
It called for using half oi the
$113 million scheduled for BET
implementation in 1989-90 to
speed up a pay increase for teach-
ers and other state employees.
"We should do evervthing we can
to keep our employees from hav
the diverted BEP funds to start the
raise in October.
The budget he proposed in
January envisions a 5.7 percent
raise, including merit pay incre-
ments for some teachers, begin-
ning in April 1990. The governor
convened the summit on the eve
of today's planned march on the
state capital by up to 5,000 teach-
ers upset over what they see as
Martin's call for a nearly year-
long pay freeze.
Members of the summit
group, which Martin said will
meet monthlv to discuss educa-
tion issues, include the bipartisan
legislative leadership and the
heads of the secondary school
system, the community colleges
and the University of North Caro-
lina.
Martin told the group Mon-
mg their pay eroded by inflation day he was searching for a broad
Martin said.
A one-time windfall from the
RJR-abisco sale will be another
key component of the revised
budget plan, which Martin said
he will submit in April or May. If
capital gains tax payments from
the sale total $53 million, the
monev could be combined with
agreement on what the state's
priorities should be. He distrib-
uted a list oi questions, such as
whether expanding programs or
raising salaries should have a
higher prioritv and what methods
should be used to close the 12
percent gap between North
Carolina's teacher pay and the
national average.
Several of the officials urged
Martin to show leadership by set-
ting his own priorities and acting
accordingly. "Yes, I have opin-
ions and a view about it, but I
desperately wanted to see if
there's somebody around here
that agrees with me Martin said.
The governor's budget an-
nouncement drew a cautious re-
sponse from legislative leaders.
Barnes and House Speaker Joe
Mavretic, who carried out his
vow to boycott the summit meet-
ing, said they would await details
before passing judgment 1
thought the summit was clearly a
public-relations ploy Mavretic
said. "I think he (Martin) wanted
to start a dialogue so he could
tomorrow tell somewhere be-
tween 3,000 and 5,000 teachers
that he's started a dialogue
Barnes said Senate leaders
consider the BEP, an eight-year,
$800 million plan to upgrade
public elementary and secondary
schools, as "a sacrosanct program
a sacred cow But he said that
while a raid on the BEP to cover
shortfalls in other programs
would be resisted, the BEP might
vield some savincs as it is "fine-
Researcher lives alone in cave
to simulate astronaut experience
CARLSBAD, N.M. (AD �A
month in the absence of any time-
pieces has altered the waking and
leep patterns oi an Italian
woman who's spending five
months in a cave to simulate the
experiences of astronauts on long
voyages
Stefania Follini, who entered
a 100-square-foot Plexiglas cu-
bicle in Lost Cave on Jan. 13, has
been sleeping 10 hours and stav-
ing awake 20, said Maurizio
Montalbini, leader of the U.S. -Ital-
ian research team. Those cvcles
likely will lengthen more, said
Montalbini, who once spent
seven months in a cave.
Since Jan. 13, the Ancona,
Italy, interior designer's onlv
contact with the outside world
has been
computer,
through a personal
on which she relays
results of tests of concentration
and brain-wave activity. Her con-
centration also seems to have
sharpened during her first weeks
of isolation, said Montalbini, who
chose a cave in the United States
for the tests because he wanted to
be close to researchers from the
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration and universities.
Dr. Jon DcFrance of the Uni-
versity of Texas Medical School in
Houston, said the Follini experi-
ment will help researchers design
a study in which astronauts will
go on a mock space voyage to
Mars. NASA is particularly inter-
ested in the Italian study because
previous experiments have sug-
gested prolonged isolation weak-
ens the body's resistance to dis-
ease.
DeFrance's specific interest is
in attention disorders. Ms. Follini
periodically attaches electrodes to
her head for brain scans, and she
takes tests on a computer that
gauge her attention span.
Attention span "may be dis-
rupted in a number of different
ways DeFrance said. "Each dis-
ruption may have its own pattern
or signature. The disruption may
be unique. It may be able to pin-
point what brain pathways are
weakened.
"We may be able to develop
methods for refreshing attention,
so that astronauts can conduct
their activities at a high level and
very competently
Mandela connected to beatings
of four young South African men
JOHANNESBURG, South
Africa (AP)� A lawyer for three
black men said today his clients
have told him Winnie Mandela
was "involved in the events"
when they were abducted from a
church home and beaten by her
unofficial bodvguards.
The statement by prominent
anti-apartheid lawyer Geoff Bud-
lender came one day after a news-
paper reported that Mrs. Man-
dela, the wife of jailed African
National Congress leader Nelson
Mandela, took part in the alleged
beatings. One of the four, 14-year-
old StompieSeipei, has been miss-
ing since Jan. 1 and is feared dead.
Mrs. Mandela, 54, has denied
the accusations contained in the
Sunday Star, a Johannesburg
newspaper that opposes apart-
heid. She has implied they were
fabricated to hurt her husband.
Later today, an attorney who
had been acting for Mrs. Mandela,
Krish Naidoo, announced that he
had resigned as her representa-
tive. He did not give a reason
when reached by telephone by
The Associated Press.
Howevever, The Star quoted
him today as saying, "I felt it was
not within the scope of my work
to deal with the Mandela crisis
The three men, who are consider-
ing legal action, gave Budlender
statements about what happened
to them but have not authorized
him to release details, he told the
AP.
The men, aged 20 to 29, were
released from Mrs. Mandela's
home after intervention by com-
munity leaders. Budlender said
his clients "say they were ab-
ducted and they were all as-
saulted on the first night.
"They say she (Mrs. Mandela)
was involved in the events on the
first night. They say Stompic was
removed from them a day or two
afterward and they never saw
him again
Mrs. Mandela hasdenied that
she was at her home when the
bodyguards, known as the Man-
dela United soccer club, brought
the four there. She has said they
were taken from the Methodist
Church house to protect them
church said it has investigated
and found false.
Community leaders in
Sowcto, a black township outside
Johannesburg, and officials of the
Methodist Church have accused
the soccer club of abducting and
beating the four last month.
The Citizen, a Johnan-
nesburg daily, quoted Zindzi
Mandela as saying her mother
would hold a news conference
after visiting Nelson Mandela,
who is held at a house on a
prison farm near Cape Town.
n �sas
An aide in Mrs. Mandela's office,
who would not give his name,
said she would hold a news
conference Wednesday.
Zindzi Mandela was quoted
as saying her mother planned to
sue The Star and The Weekly
Mail, an anti-apartheid newspa-
per that reported Friday that the
body of Stompie Seipei had been
found. Police have been unable
to confirm that report.
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts for February rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles. Apartments and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
tuned
The summit was held in an
Administration Building meeting
room packed with television
cameras, reporters arid curious
onlookers. The meting was es-
sentially a round-table discussion
in which the officials outlined
general views on how to address
teacher pay and other issues, but
no votes were taken.
Several participants said a tax
increase for schools should be
considered. "It's not an issue on
this agenda but it sure is under-
girding everything we're talking
about said Bob Scott, a former
governor and president of the
community college system.
Martin said he was willing to
discuss a tax increase but said
advocates of higher taxes should
demonstrate thev are essential
and that taxpayers would get
their money's worth. He has said
he would support a tax increase
only to expand the career ladder
incentive program for teachers,
now being tested in 16 school
systems.
It has been a top priority for
the governor but has drawn criti-
cism from teacher groups.
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them together for three generations.
TRUMP THE ART OF DEAL - Donald J. Trump with Tony Schwartz
This is the Entrepreneurial mind at work if there ever was one.
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The man who invented High-Tech horror takes you on a chilling odyssey into the origins
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INHERITANCE - Judith Michael
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THE
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I 1
I.
HIE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16,1989
Classifieds
.
FOR RENT
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED To
share two bedroom townhouse at 206 Ash
Sj 3 Tar River Apartments SI 30 00 rent
for your own room plus 13 of utilities
Stop bv or call 758-5682 The month of
February is Free!
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Two blocks
from campus lOne bedroom available
until Julv) Fullv furnished, walking dis-
tance to campus and downtown, hard-
wood floors, friendly neighbors SI 50
month plus utilities 737-0412
FOR RENT. 2 bedroom duplex, 1 2 block
Irom campus Large den and kitchen
$250.00 per month, $250.00deposit avail
able immediately. Call and leave message
752-7538
FOR SALE
LASER PRINTER USERS! HP and
Apple laser printer toner cartridges can be
recycled! Huge SS savings Satisfaction
guaranteed For details call RANDMONT
at 1-800-332-3658.
10 SPEED BIKE FOR SALE: Girls free
spirit, very good condition 50 dollar, 732-
4224 atter 6:00 p m. Day time call 752-2814
leave message
MOTORCNCLE FOR SALE: Yamaha 360
street bike Two helmets Good condition
$600.00. Call 732 4224 after 6, dav time call
732-2S14 leave message
FOR SALE Beautiful 3 BR, 2 1 2 bath con
dominium in Quail Ridge Jenn aire
range, quality dishwasher, disposal, nice
wallpaper. 3rd bedroom has built-in
bookshelves and desk�perfect for an
office' Cable hook up included, pool, ten-
nis courts, clubhouse use, and social ac-
tivities Very nice community. Call
Stephanie at 757-6769 or alter 3 30 at 736-
784b for details.
GREENVILLE ATHLETIC CLUB MEM-
BERSHIP FOR SALE: Individual, t.ans
fer fee - S42 per month Call 758-7888 for
info after 4 p m. Leave message if no
answer'
FOR SALE: Ethan Allen bedroom set,
S473 00, Couch,$169.00,1800 s oak dining
table, $399.00, dryer, $75.00, bookcase,
$39.00, dining tabie, $69.00, coffee table,
$59.00, chair SI39.00, drum table, $65.00.
B30-8944 or 752-0751.
FOR SALE: 3 cu. fridge used for 1 vr Price
neg Call Jen 752-3677.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J for the best musk available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 353-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party
75S-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage.
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM-
POSED: Call 756-9136.
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Mary Smith REAL
Crisis Center 758 HELP.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships.
$10,000-S105,000vr Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 803-687-6000 Ext. Oj-1166.
CABIN COUNSELORS &
INSTRUCTORS: (Male and Female) for
western North Carolina 8 week children's
camp Over 30 activities including Water
Ski, Tennis, Heated swimming pool, Go-
Karts, Hiking, ArtRoom, meals, salary
and travel. Experience not necessary.
Non smoking students write for applica-
tionbrochure: Camp Pinewood, 20205-1
N E 3 Court, Miami, Florida 33179.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 10-14 part-time soc-
cer coaches for the Spring Indoor Soccer
program Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills and have pa-
tience to work with youth Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
5-18 in soccer fundamentals. Hours ap-
proximately 3-7 p.m. Monday through
Friday Some night and weekend coach-
ing. Program will extend from March 13,
1W to May, 1989. Salary rate starts at
S3 55 hr. Application will be accepted
starting Mon , February 6. Contact Ben
lames at 830-4550 or 830-4543.
HELP WANTED: Accepting applications
for waiters and waitresses. 1 year experi-
ence required Apply. Greenville Country
Gub between 2 and 5 p.m TuesFri. Call
756-1237.
WANTED: ENG Editor, proficient 34"
video tape editing. Part-time. Contact
News Director, WITN-TV. 946-3131.
EOEAffirmative Action Employer Mi-
norities and women encouraged to apply
HELP WANTED: Summer job, June-
August, at Emerald Isle. Mechanically
inclined individuals to operate jet ski
rentals. Call 523-4798 in Kinston day or
night.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS-
MEN & WOMEN�GENERALISTS &
SPECIALISTS Two overnight 8 week
camps in New York's Adirondack Moun-
tains have openings for tennis, waterfront
(WSI, ALS, sailing, skiing, small crafts), all
team sports, gymnastics, arts crafts, pio-
neering, music, photography, drama,
dance, and nurses who love fun and chil-
dren Write: Professor Robert S. Gersten,
Brant Lake Camp, 84 Leamington Street,
Lido Beach, NY 11561
LIFEGUARDS AND INSTRUCTORS:
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is now accepting applica-
tions for Lifeguards and Instructors at its
City Outdoor Pool. Applicant should
have current WSI or Advance Lifesaving
Certificate. Applications may be picked
up at the City Personnel Office, located on
the corner of 5th and Washington Streets.
For more information, contact Charles
Williams. 830-4555.
LOST: Brown leather "Bomber" jacket in
Brewster B wing. Very special sentimental
value. If found, please contact Leslie, 752-
5407. REWARD!
ARE YOU GOING: To the Miami or Ft.
Lauderdale area for Spring Break? Do you
need a quick return? Two tickets from
Miami to Raleigh are for sale. Plane leaves
March 10, 1989 at 11:20 a.m. If interested,
call Richard at 752-0794 or 752-7382.
MIKE NADEAU: You're one great guy
and one great Alpha Delta Pi. You deserve
IT. �The Scott's.
TEDDY & LISA: Hope you find two
chocolate covered studs for your birth-
day! �Lori.
SIGMAS: Monday night was a success.
Mia, we're thinking about you and are
here for you. �Love, Sigmas.
ALPHA SIGS: Saturday night we had a
blast; it's been a long time we hope it's not
the last. Had a great time! �Love, The
Sigmas.
SIGMA BASKETBALL: Started out just
for fun, little did we know we'd have
everyone on the run. You play your hearts
out dribbling about - while the rest of us -
cheer and shout! We're proud of each and
every one of you. �The Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS: To Kris Kelly
and Alice Harden on being named to the
Greek Hall of Fame. �Love, The Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS: To Debbie Ta
vik on receiving the Artemis Award for
Sigma. �Love, The Sigmas.
CLINTON ISH: Have a happy 21st, we're
ready to see vou at your "worst Febru-
ary 18th is the date and we can hardly
wait! Happy Birthday Clinton! We love
vou:
-J&T.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
PERSONALS
SINGERS WANTED If you've sung i: a
chorus and would be interested in a low-
pressure singing experience, come and
sing in Choral Lab. 3-4 Mon. & Wed. Fac-
ulty Welcome. Call Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
757-6331 for more information.
GIRLS, GUYS: Poolside parties and ma-
or tanning at Davtona Beach, Spring
Break '89. Call Keith, Kelly, Ron and
Wayne at 752-4693 for more information.
LOST: Small, chain, gold bracelet
Wednesday, Feb. 8 on campus. RE-
WARD! Call 830-9497.
LIZ WALMA: You've done an outstand-
ing job as Panhellenic Rush Director!
We're all very proud of you! �Love, your
Alpha Phi Sisters.
GRETCHEN HELMS: Congratulations
on your award for outstanding pledge! �
Love, your Alpha Phi Sisters.
PIKES, 'coking forward to Kingston
Place tonight, we're sure a party with you
guys will be outta sight! �Love, Alpha
Phi.
SHERI NEAL: Congratulations on your
election as Panhellenic Rush Director! �
Love, your Alpha Phi Sisters.
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Way to go Basket
ball Team! Keep up the good work�you,
too, Jane. Congratulations on your schol-
arship. We're proud of you!
HEIDI: Georgann and Dawn - How
Lucky I am and how blessed I have been.
You're more than my sisters�you're also
my friends. �F.J.
WOULD YOU LIKE: To rent a van in
good running condition for the last week
in March? Please leave message for
Bowen at 756-4181
CHRIS PFAUTZ: You're the greatest'
Happy B-day. �Love Deb.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: I lomeof the Lariot
AOPI: Presents our new sisters! Michelh
Allen, Natalie Brown, Wendy Buell, Julk
Carter, Toitv Davidson, Shannon Fowler,
Jodi Gear, Heather Hatch, Amy Huber,
Gretchen Jounrigan, Jennifer Journigan,
Kelli MacWelch, Sarah Metcalf, Amv
Pfrommer, Sara Rowe, Chris Saleeby, Lisa
Selby, Leanne Shaw, Christi Smith,
Stephanie Slyvester and Kim Wood Wel-
come to a lifetime of sisterhood. We're so
glad to have you as our sisters!
AOPI: Kathy, Jo, Missy, Meredith and
Beth�Keep hanging in there and work
ing hard. . . we're behind you guys �
Love the sisters of AOPi.
THETA CHI: We got to Kingston place-
There weren't any taps The theme was
CowboyIndian we put on cowboy hats.
We began the evening with a game of
chase, pictures were taken we had smiles
on our face. Our Beta Lambdas now have
the sister lable. We gigged so hard we
broke the table Things became empty wt
hit a drought, yet we still danced to Way
Out-Way Out. The music was hoppin' it
was American Pie we were singing Theta
Chi's your're the best�Thanks for the
evening �Love the sisters of AOPi.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: Thanks for
the party on Saturday night�you guys
were great and we hope to have another
pre-downtown with you again soon. �
The Alpha Delta Pi's.
ALPHA DELTA PI & DATES: The
Valentine's Party was really amazing and
we sure were glad that the fire was blaz
ing. It was cold outside but inside it was
great�Thanks to all who cleaned the
cabin�you guys are first rate!
WACKY LATE NIGHTTOP TEN
MOSTTOLD LIES: T-shirts are now in
stock. Available in large and x-large And
still only S10. Call Paul 758-9760.
S AE: Congratulates the Beta Pledge Class:
Matt Bupp, Dave Calendar, Dave Eatmon,
Dave Harbin, Lane Harris, Rob Lashley,
Neill McKay. Eddie Nylen, and Dylan
Talbot on a great job so far. Keep it up. �
The Brothers.
ADPl'S: Thanks for a sweet little get to-
gether. When va'll came knockin the
place started rockin Let's do it again
soon. �Love, SAE.
TENNISRACQUETBALL: Anyone in
terested in playing beginning tennis and
or racquetball please call Sharon at 752-
2389.
NEED RIDE: Home to Deleware or sur-
rounding states for Spring Break. Can
leave by 12:30 on 3-3-89. Will help with
expenses. Call Jen. 752-3677.
GRETCHEN BLANKENSHIP, MARIA
PANTAZIS AND INACTIVES: Thanks
for a job well done! Valentine's Dance
couldn't have happened without you! The
decorations were great, but the box was
the best! �Love, the sisters and pledges of
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
AZD.
BE MY VALENTINE: Always and For
ever and Happy Late Valentine's Day. To
Kelli P. Chowning From: Mike Valentine
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA Thanks for all
your help with conclave last weekend
The party was great! 60 shots was a blast1
Let's get together again soon! �Love, The
Alpha Sigs.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI BROTHERS,
PLEDGES AND LIL' SISTERS: Who
says sweetheart to vou? Get psvehed'
Sweetheart dance is this Saturday!
ALPHA SIGMA PHI PLEDGES: You
guys did a hell of a job Wednesday night
Get ready for Sweetheart this weekend'
CONGRATULATIONS: To the Pi Kappa
Alpha cooler recipients You know who
you are. Good job guvs!
WE ARE READY: The Pikes and the
Alpha Phi's are throwin' down Thursday
evening at legendary 3rd Street Ladies,
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
bring a big mug and a big thirst �Pi
Kappa Alpha
BE A FOUNDER OF A FRATERNITY: .
No pledging involved if you are inter-
ested in making a difference, come to
Mendenhall, room 248 on Thursday, Feb
23rd at 8 15 p m. For more info , call Kevin
830-1396.
THE PIKES AND THE ADOPT-A
HIGHWAY STATE BEALTIFICA I ION
PROGRAMS: Keeping Greenville beau
tiful
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy-
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mm thru 5at- Low
Cost Termination lo 20 weeks of pregnancy
����� M
1-800-433-2930
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
a
�'t S
ACCU
SSCOPY
758-2400
JLarsh's
FQH SAIJ-V IADIES NKOPKF.NK SWIMS! Ms Hi MOOY GLOVE &CVNEOX. LATEST NEON
COI-OKS
FOR SALE FLU. JNF. OK MEN'S SWTMWF.AR ALL AT HWt OFF. WITH COI Pi 1 IOI)A
PAJR.
FOK SALE OAKLEY RAZORS. BLADES, FROGSKINS t OME CHEI KI 5 K.T!
Mi
ll
RING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER '89EFFICIENCY 1 & 2.
BEDROOM APARTMENTS. FOR
INFO. CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH
AT 752-2865
WAKE 'N' BAKE
IN BEAUTIFUL
NEGRIL, JAMAICA
FOR
SPRING BREAK 89!
VERY
AFFORDABLE
PACKAGES.
BOOK EARLY AND
SAVE!
CALL TRIPP AT
758-9177
OR
1-800-426-7710
"BEAT THE CLOCK" with
DOMINO'S PIZZA
Beginning Sunday, Feb. 19th thru Thurs
Feb 23rd, order any 16" one or more item
pizza between 5 pm and 9 pm and the time
you order is the price you pay! So don't forget
to call us and play
"BEAT THE CLOCK
Limited number of toppings available.
R - R - R - RING
"Hi! I'm Tom Reichstctter, your AT&T Student
Campus Manager here at ECU. I would like to
tell you how AT&T can help lower your long
distance bills. I can also answer any of your
long distance questions.
The best time to reach me is 11:30 am -1:30
pm, M&W, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm, T&TH, and
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm F, but you can call anytime
758-2103
Announcements
WINTERGUARD COMPETES
Congratulations to the "Assembly Line"
colorguard for their first place perform-
ance at Eastern Alamance High School on
Feb 11 The guard consists mainly of stu-
dents at ECU, mluding Angelica Burke,
Greta Patterson, Paula Ward, April Bau-
man, Michael Banks, Mark Sessoms, Irish
I lines, Lvnn Call and Tnaa Janicki.
IM-REC SERVICES
TIMEX AEROBIX WEEK, Feb. 20-24
marks a week of fitness and giveaways for
all aerobic fitness participants. Watches,
aerobic fitness apparal, coupons and fit-
ness information wil be given away dur-
ing the week of festivites
ANIMAL RIGHTS
ECU students fdr the Ethical Treatment of
Animals (SETA) will hold its introductory
meeting on Feb 28, in CC1004 at 5:00 A 16
minute video on primates used in immu-
nological studies will be shown All stu-
dents desirous of a more equitable world
for animals should attend.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
The Pirates return to Minges Coliseum on
Feb. 18 to host American University. They
will also take on Navy, on Feb. 20. Both
games will start at 7:30.
BASEBALL
The 1989 Baseball season will get under-
way this Saturday, Feb. 18 at Harrington
Field. The Pirates will host Howard Uni-
versity in a Doubleheader that is sched-
uled to begin at 1.
METHODIST STUDENT
man
We are now accepting applications for
rooms at the Methodist Student Center at
501 East 5th St for the Fall semester 1989.
Call 758-2030.
SCIENTIFIC INFO. PRESEN-
TATION
Er. Richard Andrews will present a talk
on Science and Environmental Policy:
The U.S. and Our Global 1 labitat on Feb.
21 at 7:00 p.m. in room 1028 GCB. The talk
is sponsored jointly by Sigma Xi, the Sci-
entific Research Society, and by the ECU
I lonors Program, the Science and Math
Ed. Center and the International Studies
Program. This talk will be the first in a
series of Visiting Lectures to be held at
ECU. The others will be Shenandoah Na-
tional Park�Its Natural and Cultural
History on Feb. 27 at 730 p.m. in room
1028: A Dav in the Life of a Park Ranger.
March 28 at 7:30 p.m. in room 1026; and
The National Parks of New Zealand and
Costa Rica on April 4 at 7:30 p.m. in room
1031. All of the lectures will be held in the
GCB and are free and open to the public.
CAMPUS HOUSING
Students enrolled Spring Semester 1989
who plan to return to ECU Fall Semester
1989 and who wish to be guaranteed resi-
dence hall housing will be required to
reserve rooms during the week of Feb. 20-
24 Prior to reserving a room, a student
must make an advance room payment of
$100. These payments, which must be
accompanied by housing applications-
con tracts will be accepted in the Cashier's
Office, room 105, Silman Bldg beginning
Feb. 16. Students now living in residence
halls should obtain housing applications
from their residence hall office. Students
residing off campus should obtain the
applications from the Dept. of Housing,
room 201, Whichard Bldg. These will be
available beginning Feb. 14. ASSIGN-
MENT SCHEDULE: STUDENTS WHO
WISH TO RETURN TO THE SAME
ROOMS THEY PRESENTLY OCCUPY
MUST RESERVE SUCH ROOMS ON:
Feb. 20�8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30
p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Feb. 21�8:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. STUDENTS WHO WISH TO
RETURN TO THE SAME BUILDINGS
ON WHICH THEY PRESENTLY RESIDE
BUT DIFFERENT ROOMS WILL BE
PERMITTED TO RESERVE ROOMS ON:
Feb. 21�1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. ALL
OTHER RETURNING STUDENTS WILL
BE PERMITTED TO RESERVE ROOMS
ON A FIRST-COME FIRST-SERVE BASIS
ON: Feb. 22-24�830 a.m. to 1230 p.m.
and 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The number of
unassigned rooms in each bldg. will be
posted on the respective office door by
8:00 p.m Feb. 21. NOTICE: The residence
hall rental rate has not been set for the
1989-90 school year. However, we do
anticipate an increase in the rental rate for
the 1989-90 school year.
I IFF PLANNING WORK-
SHQE
This workshop is intended to provide
assistance to students unsure of the direc-
tion they wish their lives to take. The focus
will be on lifestyles for the future. Many
people do not think of themselves as
having influence on their futures, but
rather, just let the future happen. Partici-
pants in Life Planning will engage in a
process of self examination of present
behaviors, goal setting and decision mak-
ing. The life Planning Workshop will
meet: Feb. 20,22,24,27 In 329 Wright Bldg.
from 3-4 p.m. (attend all 4 meetings). Al-
though advance registration is not re-
quired, we would appreciate advance
notification of interest to insure mat we
have adequate materials on hand. Please
contact the Counseling Center in 316
Wright Bldg. (757-6661) for further info, or
to let us know you plan to attend.
VISITING LECTURES PRO-
GRAM
The National Parks - Public Education -
Earth Science and International Conser-
vation Issues. Co-sponsors: The Honors
Program, The Science and Math Ed. Cen-
ter, International Studies, ECU. 'Science
and Environmental Policy: The U.S. and
our Global Habitat" Feb. 21 (co-sponsored
with the ECU Sigma Xi Chapter). Richard
"Pete" Andrews�Director, Institute for
Environmental Studies, UNC-Chapel
Hill. 7:00 p.m room 1028 GCB. "Shenan-
doaH National Park-Its Natural and Cul-
tural History" Feb. 27 (co-sponsored with
the Cypress Group, The Sierra Club). John
A. Conners�Geog. Dept Radford Univ
Radford, VA, author of "Shenandoah
National Park�An Interpretive History
730 p.m room 1028 GCB.
1988 BUCCANEERS
1988 Buccaneers will be given away on a
first-come, first-serve basis starting Feb.
27 at 5 p.m. They will be given away from
the Buccaneer office only. There's only a
limited supply and no more can be or-
dered. So come early to receive your copy.
ATTN. ART STUDENTS
The Parents' Day Weekend Committee
needs a logo for 89. Any media or ap-
proach is accepted (except usage of the
Pirate Mascot). Please turn in entries with
3x5 card stating name, address & phone
to 209 Whichard by 5 p.m. on March 15.
The winning entry will be awarded a $25
cash prize. Don't delay, enter today! For
more info contact Tonya Batizy (w)757-
6611 ext. 210 or (h) 830-8888.
PHI ALPHA THETA
Phi Alpha Theta will have a meeting on
Feb. 27th at 130 p.m. in the Todd Room in
Brewster Bldg. All members are urged to
come.
There will be a meeting Feb 20 at 5 p.m. in
BN-109. Dr. Pollitzer will be speaking. We
ivill also be going out to dinner alter
wards. Sign up sheet for dinner is located
across from the north wing elevator.
ACCOUNTING INFO. SYS-
TEMS
The accounting firm of McGladrey, Hen-
drickson, and Pullen will make a presen-
tation to all graduate and undergraduate
business students. This presentation will
discuss accounting info, systems and will
be given by Bud Moon, Certified Data
Processor (CDP) and Rick 1 lemphil. CPA
The meeting is sponsored by the Decision
Science Society and is scheduled for 3.00
p.m. Feb. 22 in GCB1009 Refreshments
will be served. All new or prospective
members are welcome.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
Feb. 14-20: National Opera Co. with ECU
Symphony Orchestra in production of
"Don Pasquale" by Donizetti (Feb. 18,8:00
p.m Fletcher Recital Hall, free); Sherri
Gray, piano, senior recital (Feb. 19, 3:15
p.m Fletcher Recital Hall free); Faculty
Recital, Mark Ford, percussion (Feb. 20,
8:15 p.m Fletcher Recital Hall, free).
B IN AN HONORS CLASS?
Any student graduating spring semester
1989 who has completed with grades of B
or better 24 Honors courses (including
upper-level research courses in the major)
will be a graduate of the Honors Program
and should have that notification
stamped on hisher transcript To do BO
submit the list of 1 lonors courses b
semester, with grades earned, to Pr
David Sanders, 1002 GCB. 757 6373 be
fore March 15
INTERVIEWING WORK-
SHOPS
To help ECU people prepare tor on and off
campus interviews, the Career Planning
and Placement Service in Bloxton I louse
is offering these one hour programs to aid
vou in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your pb search The pn
gram is open to the first 20 people to come
for each session No sign up is required
These sessions are held in CT&P Room on
Feb. 13 and 23 at 215pm
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice is offering these one hour programs on
beginning a resume for your )ob search
I landouts and samples will be given out
to the first 20 people to come to each ses-
sion No sign up is required These ses-
sions are held in the CP&P Room on Feb
16,21 and 22 at 2:15 p.m.
CAMPFIRE
Sing eat s'mores and share good fellow-
ship around a campfire, Feb. 17 at 8:00 in
the Ampitheatre behind Fletcher Dorm
(Weather permitting). Bring instruments,
blankets, flashlights, dress warmly Spon
sored by Wesfel (Methodist and Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministries), 758-2030 or 752
7240.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business dasses
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677
d
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THE EASTCAROl INIAN
Features
FEBRUARY 16. 1989 PAGE 7
Aday in the life of afasion merchandising major
Former nursing major gains retail experience
By ALICIA FORD
Suit Writer
Trish Rau, a fashion merchan-
dising major at ECU, is gaining
valuable retail experience work-
ing at Scott's in the Plaza Mall this
semester. A senior from Fayettev-
lile, she plans to graduate in May
with a degree in fashion and a
concentration in business.
Rau came to Greenville bc-
cause of the reputable nursing
program at ECU. "1 had planned
on majoring in nursing, but after
taking a few business classes as
elective, 1 decided 1 wanted to be
a fashion buyer said Rau.
A fashion buyer is the person
who goes to a market and picks
out clothes for a particular retail
store. There is a local market in
Charlotte, a regional market in
Atlanta, and a national market in
New York. The buyer picks the
market most suited for their
store's needs, and purchases the
clothes that will later go on the
racks in the appropriate season.
A fashioning merchandising
major is required to perform 135
hours of an internship at a retail
outlet in order to graduate. Rau
started interning at Scott's last
May and she finished three
months later. She still works at
Scott's part-time, about 10 to 20
hours a week, and her duties
mainly consist of putting up dis-
plays and waiting on customers.
Scott's has been employing
students as interns since the store
opened four years ago. They usu-
ally have one or two a semester,
and although the students don't
get paid, they do learn valuable
experience.
bruce Chadwick, the owner
of Scott's, does not believe a per-
son needs a degree in order to be
successful in retail. "I know for a
fact that a four-year degree in
fashion is really unnecessary. You
can apply what you learn in
school, but you have to work with
the public. There is no book in the
world that is going to teach you to
know your customer said Chad-
wick.
Chadwick works with the
student interns to help them un-
derstand the world of retail sales.
"Working an internship may be
the only thing that saves these
students said Chadwick. "It's
the only thing that can really pre-
pare them for the real world. I
would hire a person with four
years of experience over a person
with a four-year degree any day
Rau says that is the main rea-
son she works while going to
school; for the experience, not the
money. She is currently taking 13
hours this semester and plans to
graduate soon. She doesn't have
much free time.
Her Monday morning starts
out with gerontology, which is the
scientific study of the process of
aging and the problems of many
aged people. "Although it's not a
required course, I thought it
would be interesting and helpful
to try and understand the older
generation, for retail purposes
and other reasons said Rau.
At noon, she has chemistry
1050, a required course for fash-
ion merchandising majors. At 1,
she takes an advanced course in
fashion merchandising. "This is a
new class and it's very interesting.
It's basically a more in-depth
studv of retail and fashion said
Rau.
On Tuesday Rau's only class
is Textiles and Home Furnishings
at 2. The purpose of this course is
to gain a basic understanding of
interior design and the fabrics
used for furniture construction.
Most people start out as sales-
persons in retail and then move
up to manager, owner, and fash-
ion buver. The starting salary for a
buyer is a round $18,000 to $19,000
a year. Rau hopes to move up to
buyer soon after she graduates
since she has experience in sales.
"I'd like to work for a major
department store for a while, and
then move to a bigger city like
Atlanta or Charlotte

Perlman leads all star line-up on
ECU's Performing Arts Series
The Cannes Chamber Or- before Mav 1, 1989, a ticket to the
ECU News Bureau
These are the members of the Beaux Arts Trio. They play instruments. They are real good at
playing the piano, the violin and the cello.
Internationally-acclaimed
concert violinist Itzhak Terlman
heads a lineup of 10 soloists and
ensembles scheduled to appear
on East Carolina University's
1989-90 Performing Arts Series.
Perlman will perform in re-
cital at ECU on April 1, 1990.
Other artists and groups
booked for next year's season are:
The Beaux Arts Trio (piano,
violin and cello), Oct. 10,1989; the
North Carolina Shakespeare Fes-
tival in the Shakespeare comedv,
"Twelfth Night Oct. 29; the San
Francisco Western Opera Theatre
in Bizet's "Carmen Nov. 10; the
North Carolina Dance theatre
with dancer Mel Tomlinson and
the East Carolina Svmphonv, Dec.
3:
chestra with flutist Ransom
Wilson, Jan. 27, 1990; a touring
production of the Michael Ben-
nett Broadway musical "Dream
Girls Feb. 18; a 50-member Is-
raeli dance troupe, "Shalom '90
Feb. 22; the Swingle Singers,
March 16 and a yet unannounced
medalist in the" Eighth Van Cli-
burn Internationa Piano Compe-
tition, performance date not
scheduled.
All performances will be held
in ECU's Wright Auditorium.
Seating is reserved, set concertgo-
ers are advised to purchase tickets
early to insure their choice of
seats.
Tickets are alrcadv on sale at
the ECU Central Ticket Office in
Wright Auditorium. If purchased
entire season- all 10 events is
$100 for the general public, $80
faculty or staff and $50 for stu-
dents and vouth. After May 1, the
prices arc $125, $100 and $50 re-
spectively.
A "select-your-own" season
ticket tor one's choice of seven of
the 10 Performing Arts series
events is $80 for the general pub-
lic, $70 for facultystaff and $40
for studentsyouth� if pur-
chases before May 1- The seven-
concert tickets will be sold after
May 1 for $100, $80 and $40.
Single performance tickets
are $35 (public), $30 (faculty
staff) and $20 (youth) for the
Itzhak Perlman concert. Single
tickets to all other events are $15,
$12, and $8.
TtWin
Top 13
Top 13 Albums
1- Elvis Costello "Spike"
2- Slammin Watusis "King
of Noise"
3- The Replacements "Don't
Tell a Soul"
4- The Violent Femmes "3"
5- Nine Pound Hammer
The Mud, The Blood, and the
Beers"
6- Bruce Cockburn "Big
Circumstance"
7- Lou Reed "New York"
8- Full Fathom Five "4 a.m
9- Brian Richtie "The Royal
Court of Bab-Ion"
10- Royal Court of China
"Geared and Primed"
11 - The Thrashing Doves
"Trouble In the Home"
12- The Buckpets "Debut"
13-XTC "The Mayor of
Simpleton"
Interesting fern facts
Coming
this
weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
The Blackjacks
Attic:
Icewater Mansion
HAS CANCELLED
Mendenhall:
Married to the Mob
(through Sunday)
Friday
New Deli:
Lightnin' Whales
Attic:
The Bad Checks
and Discord
Saturday
New Deli:
5 Guys Named Moe
Attic:
Jesse Bolt
Monday
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
By RLTH ANN VICK
Suff Writer
There came a time when I
wouldn't even set them on the
porch for fear of being arrested for
plant abuse. When 1 bought my
ferns they were healthy and beau-
tiful. Within two months, they
were reduced to brown stems and
half rotten leaves. I couldn't fig-
ure it out. Did I water them too
much, or not enough? Were they
getting enough sunlight, or was
my porch too sunny? Nothing
seemed to add up, and my ferns
just continued to deteriorate.
Maybe you've been through a
similiar experience, or are going
through one right now. Tcletip
came to mv rescue, and this toll-
free agricultural extension service
can help you too. Teletip provides
information about subjects rang-
ing from "making sausage" to
"building financial security
Plant nurseries are another
source of information for would-
be fern growers. About ten spe-
cies of ferns are sold by local nurs-
eries in Greenville, N.C. Among
them are the three most popular
ferns; the Boston, Dallas, and
Holly. Ms. Terric Green, an expert
nursery keeper at the Sunshine
Garden Center in Greenville sug-
gests that the worst soil you can
use is from your garden. Plant
ferns in a light, organic permeable
soil, like leaf or peat moss. This
type of soil will allow excess wa-
ter to run-off properly so that the
delicate roots won't drown. Ms.
Green also adds that mixing peat
moss with a soil called Baccto Lite
will deep the soil light and airy,
and prevent peat moss from
drying out.
Don't wait until the leaves on
your fern turn hard and brown
before you do something about
moisture. The fern will die if its
tiny root are allowed to dry out, so
protect the roots with an even
moisture content. An experienced
gardener can test for dryness with
her finger, but if you're not one,
buy a monitor which indicates
when a plant needs to be watered.
Use drainable containers. And
unless you use artificial ferns,
forget those fancy pots. Contain-
ers should be at least five inches
wide and eight inches deep so that
the roots will have room to grow.
It's true that ferns need hu-
midity, but the bathroom isn't the
only place to find it. If you're tired
of your bathroom's looking like a
jungle, Ms. Green suggests plac-
ing the ferns in a saucer filled with
water (approximately two inches
wider and two inches deeper than
the pot). When the water evapo-
rates, the plant will receive the
ideal 50 percent humidity that it
requires.
A day will come when you
become an expert, and some of
your friends will want a sample of
your ferns. Ms. Green suggests
the following steps for dividing a
fern:
Step 1: Break the fern away
from the pot gently to keep the
roots intact.
Step 2: Cut the fern into sec-
tions
Step 3: Break the old soil away
from the roots.
Step 4: Spread the roots apart
before replanting to give them
room to grow.
Ms. Green also advises fern
owners to mist each fern after
replanting, but not to water exces-
sively. A 5 x 8 potted fern needs 16
fl. oz. of water once a week. She
also suggests fertilizing the plants
every month from April through
September. Fertilize ferns every
two weeks the rest of the year. But
remember, the manufacturers
recommended amount needs to
be cut in half. Too much fertilizer
will benefit manufacturers of fer-
tilizer, but will kill your plants.
Once you've pampered your
delicate fern into the most beauti-
ful bouquet of greenery, you need
to decide on a defense strategy.
Children, pets, and even adults
can snip away the tiny, delicate
leaves of your fern, if you're not
careful. Children love to use them
as targets when throwing balls,
cats will often have them as a
snack, and adults are cruel
enough to use them as ashtrays.
Stop this senseless slaughter of
your ferns, by putting them in a
safe place. Beverly Bartik, a fern
raiser, suggests hanging or plac-
ing ferns in a high area, preferable
near a window.
Protect your ferns from those
cruel pant killers, and start show-
ing them off, instead of shoving
them off. Ferns aren't the easiest
plants to grow, but they're not
hopeless either. With a little love
and nurture, they can stay beauti-
ful all year round.
Interesting Facts about Ferns
1. The fern has existed for 350
million years, it's the oldest plant
on land.
2. There are:
-over 12,000 spe-
cies of ferns in the world.
-over 300 species
of ferns in North America.
-ten species of
ferns sold in Greenville, NC.
3. In the USA, the most com-
mon fern in the North: Parsley,
Fern, South: Copper
Fern, West: Lip Fern, East:
Toothed Spleen-
wort Fern.
4. Some ferns were used as a
medicine for chest pains,
rheumatism, and ulcers.
5. The fronds (stem and
leaves) are eaten in Asia and Pa-
cific Region (cooked
or raw).
6. d fronds are used as a
substitute for tea in Europe and
California.
These are members of the Swingle Singers. I'm not kidding.
We're not clear on what they sing, but we're betting it's pretty
hip. Watch for them.���,
Pickin' the late Bones
Bonehead tries to go on V-da
By CHIP CARTER
tlt Vsfettiao
I hate Valentine's Day.
And this is why. Gi rl s. Girls
have certain shall we say
quirks. Quirks that force them to
prevent their dates from having
any kind of an enjoyable time in
public.
For example.
I called up a ghi and asked
politely, "Would you like to go
do that V-Day thing? We'll eat,
see a movie, go downtown,
drink excessively, and then
spend ail hour or so tryin' to
convince each otherthat we'll be
friends after tonight
She said'Sounds good. 1'H
fielded this one. "She's taking a
shower. She said to go on and
eat if you want and she's be
ready by the time the movie
starts
1 went to Hardee's and
fumed as I ate my bacon cheese-
burger, no mayonnaise. The
movie started At 735. Allowing
for make-up, curlers and haii
dryer, there was a slim chance
she would be ready by a quarter
toeight
Allowing for previews and
Army cornrnWciaS before the
feature presentation, it might
still be worth trying to get to the
theater. I headed back to her
house at 730,
Both roommates answered
the door this time. The blonde
didn't hear the iron hissing. I
asked what my date was doing.
The roommates were"
forwarding through the
mercials on their tape.
I asked again. The brunette
said, "She's waiting for the
to heat up I could accept
The roommates argued
Sonny. J picked up one of th
.man-
the
Ten ways to make
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T
8
Tl IE EAST CAROL IN!AN
FEBRUARY 16, iH9
Country hip deep in dinosaurs
DENVER (AD � When most
people clean out their closets, they
find useless clutter. But when
Robert T. Bakker rummages
through the closets of the nation's
museums, he finds remnants of
previously unknown species of
dinosaurs.
"What we're in now is a new
dinosaur gold rush says Bakker,
a University of Colorado paleon-
tologist.
But the rush isn't to dig into
the earth, it's to search the base-
ments of museums, where frag-
ments of dinosaur bones and
skulls have been stored since they
were discovered.
"Twenty or 30 new dinosaurs
are found every year around the
world says Bakkcr. "Most good
specimens are in research storage
like an ancient manuscript
waiting to be read
In the past few years, Bakker,
43, has "read" the remains of what
he believes are four new species of
dinosaurs, including two that
have been researched and for-
mally announced.
"The four I've found were
dug up, glued together, waiting to
be studied Bakker says.
Sifting through bones and
prehistoric fragments on the
shelves of the Denver Museum of
Natural History, Bakker came
across a skull and bits of armor-
like plating. They since have been
declared a new species of the
plant-eating odosaur family, of
the genus D nversaurus.
It looked like a "two-ton
armadillo-Godzilla hybrid with
long spikes coming out of the
shoulder Bakker says.
The other find, announced in
April, was a pygmy Tyranno-
saurus rex, which stood about 8
feet and weighed about 500
pounds. Its skull was in storage at
the Cleveland Museum of Natu-
ral History.
Still being researched arc two
other finds which are on exhibit in
museums. One, he believes, is an
earlv version of an allosaurus and
the other is a relative of the stego-
saurus.
Bakker says he got hooked on
dinosaurs when he was in fourth
grade. With a bachelor's degree
from Yale and a doctorate from
Harvard, he has taught from kin-
dergarten to graduate school and
has made annual trips to Colo-
rado and Wyoming to take part in
dinosaur digs.
He and his wife, Constance
Clark, moved to Boulder four
years ago. He became adjunct
curator of the Universitv of Colo-
rado museum.
The trail to find dinosaurs has
taken Bakker to field sites and
museumsacrossthe United States
and Canada.
He says he knew about the
Denvcrsaurus skull but "had not
looked at it carefully enough
"1 was interested in the very
last dinosaurs the twilight of
the dinosaur gods he says. "I
took a second look at it
The skull was found in 1924 in
the Badlands of South Dakota and
misidcntified, he says.
The Denversaurus, an-
nounced in October, was more
advanced than other nodosaurs,
he says. The eye sockets were at its
sides, allowing the animal a 360-
degree scan.
It was about 20 feet long, 5 feet
tall at the hip and 7 feet across.
"You'd need a forklift to turn
one of these over he says.
Bakker discovered a skull of
the pygmy Tyrannosaurus rex in
storage at theCleveland museum.
The specimen was excavated in
1942 near Bozcman, Mont.
The Tyrannosaurus rex
weighed 10,000 pounds and stood
20 feet tall, but the pygmy was
full-grown at 8 feet.
"There is no doubt the pygmy
was full grown he says. "The
bones were together (in the
skull)
Similar to its giant cousin, the
pygmy was a meat-eater, with
forward eyes, much like those of a
hawk. It had little hands and,
Bakker speculates, was nimble
footed.
"It's a mystery animal be
cause there is only one of them
he says. "It's very birdlike it has
feet just like a turkey or a
chicken
Both the Denvcrsaurus and
the Tyrannosaurus rex � which
were natural enemies � lived
about 67 million yearsago, during
the last years of the dinosaurs.
In fact, a tooth of a pygmy
Tyrannosaurus rex was found
near the skull of the Denversau-
rus, Bakker says. "It might have
been chewing on the Denversau-
rus
INC.
Bonehead tries the dating scene,
learns about the 'Guiding Light'
Continued from page 7
stared at me in disbelief. I went
back to another Cosmo article.
Mere minutes later, both
roommates were called up-
stairs. I kept hearing giggles and
fake gagging sounds. I began to
get nervous. I picked up the new
issue of Mademoiselle and
looked at the bra ads. I yelled up
that we were missing the movie.
I was told that there was
hairstyle trouble and that I
should chill out. I watched the
video. Sonny (or Selita) was
having a blurry flashback. A
Tampex commercial came on. I
finished my beer. I tore the label
off. I looked at the clock. 8:45.
At 9:26, she finally ap-
peared. She looked exactly like
she did in class yesterday, only
she had on a new outfit. I won-
dered if she went through this
every day, and if she had to get
up at 4 a.m. to start dressing for
class.
Gun maker
hunts past
PERRYVILLE, Ky. (AP) �
Harold Edwards likens his search
for history to a hunt for hidden
treasure.
In researching early Ken-
tucky gun makers such as Ben-
jamin Mills, Edwards delights in
the new and exciting information
he uncovers.
"It's been a learning process
he says.
Edwards discovered in re-
searching his own family that one
of his ancestors was a gun maker.
Because of his interest in muzzle-
loading rifles, "that really excited
me he says.
Though Mills� a 19th-cen-
tury craftsman who spent much
of his life in Harrondsburg�was
no relation, Edwards wanted to
learn as much about him as pos-
sible.
He put much of the material
he collected during his seven
years of research into an article
that was published late last year
in "Muzzle Blasts the offical
publication of the National
Muzzle Loading Rifle Associa-
tion.
"Early Kentucky gun build-
ersdid not produce an abundance
of the ornate, carved rifles of East-
ern influence that are so popular
today Edwards wrote. "Most
were simple utilitarian pieces
with very little ornamentation
and reflected the simplicity of a
people concerned with survival
No matter how simple the
weapon, frontiersmen like Mills
relied on the few materials they
had with them when they go
ready to make a gun.
"They started with absolutely
nothing Edwards says. "They
not only made the guns, they
made the tools. They were very
thrifty with the materials they
had
For example, a worn file was
never thrown away.
She apologized for being so
late. We went straight down-
town, since the movie was over.
We tried to decide where to go.
She refused to go to a dance bar,
claiming they were all meat
markets. I didn't feel like sitting
in a booth drinking all night. She
wasn't hungry and I'd already
had a bacon cheeseburger.
She didn't know how to
play pool. No bands were play-
ing. As our options dwindled, I
suggested we just go to my
house and watch a movie as we
drank. She hinted that she
Tarkflheatrt
NOW SHOWING
HELLBOUND
HELLRAISER II
would rather go home and
watch what her roommates had
taped.
Sonny's the one that's still
alive. I think.
P.S. No one in this story is
real, and if they were, they
wouldn't live in Tar River apart-
ments. Word.
Plaza Cinema
yow SHOWING
BEACHES
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SOCIAL STATIONERY. GIFTS GREETING CARDS
422 ARLINGTON BLVO (OPPOSITE PITT PLAZA)
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M - F 9:30-6:00
SAT 9:30-5:00
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$20.00 Deposit Required �&
PEACE CORPS SERVICE:
A Good Career Move
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pgftCE CORPS
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Discover the Peace Corps Advantage!
Sign up for interviews at Bloxton House for February 17.
Speak with a recruiter at the Student Supply Store Lobby
on February 16th from 9:30 am until 4:00 pm.
See a film about Peace Corps in Joyner Library. Rm B-04
starting at 6:30 pm on February 16th.
&

C3






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY & 19W9
The Clearly Labeled
ISaisft Caur�Hflaiflaiai ��Ms3
9uote of the week:
"Something sexual is
about to happen
� Earl vis
HUMANS: I really appreciate the
chloroflourocarbons. Keep spraying
away! Hell, who wants to live forever?�
The Ozone Layer
MINNIE M: Get a new dress. Get a
new life. And for Walt's sake, get rid of
those damn shoes! � Mickey M.
A.D I hate you. 1 really hate you 1
used to just think I hated you, but now I'm
sure. � C.E.
fr
ft
3
D.B Thanks a lot for the flowers,
you ierk ou're so thoughtful. � S.(&)M.
TO THE GUY IN MY CLASS: If you
do not understand the word "NO buy a
dictionary! � Not signed
COMPUTERS (ESPECIALLY
MACINTOSHES): We hate you in a big,
bi ; way If vou were to fry all of your God-
forsaken circuits today, we would sit
around and laugh. � With tons of pure
hatred, everybody.
FRAT BOY: aka Hitler, aka Thurston
Lames 1 loll, no we won't clean up. Hell,
no we won't We just like you for your Prel-
udejCanvwav � Hatefully yours, Every-
body on The List.
BJ: Your house stunk. We hope the
floor rots, and vou fall through into a pit of
horribly poisonous snakes who bite you
eighty three gaillion times. � With our
money, E and B.
GOD: Why are you so wiggy? Why
did you create slurpeees7 Quit going on
all these nut-outs! I'd hate you, but you
don't exist anyway. So there. � Disre-
spectfully yours, Boner.
GREENVILLE: You are the gayest
cit 1 veever lived in Whv don't you have
,i nightlife, a real police force, a real college
and a tattoo parlor? Why don't you get a
icai life1 � I hate you, drop dead, Bone-
head.
EVERYBODY WHO HATES OUR
P( 'r TRY: Grow up and get a life. If all you
urve to whine about is our rag, I wish I had
our problems � Not the editor.
OPRAH: You'll always be fat to me,
honey. �Phil
PHIL: Maybe so but I still have
better taste in dresses. � Oprah
HORNY GIRLS: Thanks for all the
valentines I didn't get. It's nice to be re-
membered. And after all I've done for all
of you.�Parker
CLARK KENT: Why, thank
Superman. � Hawkman.
you,
SATAN: Why don't you trade in
some of those souls for some AC? We'd
appreciate it. � The Damned
ACHILLES: You may have humi
lated me and killed me, but I got to pork
Helen and you didn't. Nyah, Nyah. �
Hektor, The Underworld.
WZMB: We hate you. You don't play-
nearly enough Rick Astley, who is up for
several Grammys this year. What kind of
dumb station are you anyway? � All the
sororities, everywhere.
ALL THE TEAMS THE PIRATES
PLAYED LAST YEAR (EXCEPT THE
ONES WE BEAT): Darn you! You guys
cheated. � Art B.
NOVICE DANCERS: I think Danny
Terrio has some openings for you. Three,
in fact. � Solid Gold Dancers
AMERICAN EXPRESS
COMPANY: Take our skins, please. �
Cute fuzzy woodland animals
STING: Don't stand so close to mn
� Chip C.
J. WELCH: The rose is in the pocket.
The rose is in the pocket. You have your
instructions. � Anonymous
CHER: So shut up and get in bed
already � People who really sleep alone
C.W Get to the point Elia Kazan was
a jerk! � T.M.
TIFFANY: I think you're alone now
� People With Taste In Music
DAME FORTUNE:
Put-near Everybody
You bitch! �
BOSS: Quit pinchin'
Roscoe
my butt. �
TINA T: I can so dance. � Whitney
H.
EVERYONE: You thought I was
gone forever, but I'm back just to aggra
vate you. Deja Video forever! � Much
love, Martha Quinn.
TO TAMMY F: Thanks � Revlon
BARBARA: Even though you're the
first lady now, fat is still out. � Love,
Marilyn Q.
NIETZCHE: No You're dead. �
God
MAURY: 1 hate to tell you this, bu. I
didn't marry you for your journalistic u
togrity � Connie
G.B Have you shaved lately? �
EC.
SGA: Didn't anybody ever teach you
not to play with your food? � E.C.
READERS OF AMERICA: Thanks a
lot Being dead is the greatest adventure of
all. 1 lolv Bastards!� Robin
AMERICA: I was just joking! Don't
you get it? It was a joke: "Read my lips: no
new taxes You mean you guys really
took that seriously? No wav! It was a joke
Ahhh, what the hell do I care, anyway7
I'm the President of the United-damn
States. I can do any damn thing I want! �
George B.
GUESTS: Please don't pee in our
pool; we don't swim in your toilet. �
Cutesy Sign Makers
PETER: Thank you. I mean that now;
thank you very much � Jerry
HOLLYWOOD: Who the hell cares
who 1 larry Crumb is, or if John Candv has
a job? � Middle America
DOMINO'S: Y'all are cheap to make
us ask for the special. Way uncool. �
Signed, Everybody who almost got
gypped.
CLAY and CLAY'S CLASS: That
not my real name. You jerk, Beanheardt
� The REAL Bonehaid.
CAPTAIN MARVEL: Curse you,
you big red cheese! Why don't vou go
fight that worm with the walkman and
leave me alone!�Thaddeus S.
ROBIN G: I hate you. I hate you. I
hate you I hate you. I hate you. � Mike T
MIKE T: I don't care; I'm rich now. I
don't care, I'm rich now I don't care; I'm
rich now. I don't care, I'm rich now I don't
care; I'm rich now. � Robin G
M. KEATON: You chinless punk,
you'll never fill my boots and cowl. �
Adam W.
L
f rr-
POST-
ML�NriN�S
DEPRESSION f
BECAUSE FOKeVEHYOMB THAT
Lovep yoUj TWO peopue
DESPISEb YOUR EXISTENCE
�.� �i -
Big E sets out to catch a thief Bonehead has monument erected
Dear Earl,
My roommate and 1 had a
party recently and we had a few
things stolen. My roommate had a
few tapes, that she had recorded
for me, stolen and we both had
Disc Washers stolen. Tell me, Big
E, why did the thief take these
things rather than the good tapes,
CD's, camera and gold jewelry
which were lying nearby?
Why didn't they take my
roommate's Sugarcubes tape that
she listens to constantly? Did we
have a stupid thief or is it just
etiquette among party thieves not
to steal anything of value?
Signed, Just Curious
P.S. Are you still going to
England this summer? If not, give
me your brother's address so all
my friends and I can have a place
to stay.
Dear Curious,
So, you want to sponge off my
brother in limey-land? People
think they can just use the ole F for
theirpersonal gain. Stepon E with
slimy spiked heels the next time.
Dump your trash in E's front
yard, degrade E's name all across
campus and try to stay with E's
brother, A, in your extravagant,
self-indulgent trip over to Eu-
rope. Shame on yon
Now to your letter. E con-
fesses, it was he who pilfered your
unhumble abode and absconded
with your obscure recordings and
your Disc Washer. E does such
thievery to satisfy a compulsion to
take unimportant things. Besides,
the Disc Washer cleans my eating
�T- Q
Ask
BigE
utensils much better than soap
and water.
Dear Biggest Egg,
I'm really stressing. The new
Stevie Nicks album was due out
two weeks ago. It's still not out!
What am I going to do? I've about
worn out "Rock a Little" and "The
Wild Heart Big E, Talk to me.
Signed, The White-winged
do C
Dear Rhiannon,
Congratulations, you are the
first writer to ask "Talk to me
Stevie does so many drugs nowa-
days, she probably forgot about
the release. Have you tried listen-
ing to the records you are so tired
of backwards? It may add a new
dimension to your Steviedom.
Besides the ole coke head is up for
a Grammy.
Dear E,
I've noticed something lately
which I felt should be brought
before a much powerful judge of
character, namely the Big E.
Through my observations, I've
concluded that our campus has
been over run by several of the
cast from "Boys In the Band The
giveaway is all in the vocabulary.
Have you ever noticed that
when normal guys talk they say "I
gotta have "Can you get "Will
you meet but when feminine
guys talk they proclaim that they
"must have "must meet and
"you must do" � why is the gab
so dramatic?
Do they want to be actresses
or is life too overwhelming for I
them? Please, O Wise One, tell us
how to intrepret this conversa-
tion.
Signed, Verbal Confused
Dear Verbose,
A "much powerful judge of
character"? "O Wise One?" For-
get he fudge lingo, dude, what is
the deal with your word choice?
Your word choice suggests that
you are a frat boy who has his
clothes both folded and fluffed.
By the way, how in the eternal
fuming furnaces of Hell do these
laundry people fluff clothes? Do
they place the garments in the
fluff machine?
Anyway, E is clueless and
glueless (give me some a poxy,
man, I need a buzz) to the reasons
why certain creeds talk the way
they do. Please consult "Big E's
Book of Creed Talk for further
info.
Write to the E, he is hungry
and eats letters
BigE
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Greenville, N.C 27834
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP)
The citizens of The Emerald City
finally came to their senses and
erected a monument to world-
famous columnist Chippy Bone-
head.
Created by famous artist Sal-
vador Dolly, the statue is made of
inflatable plastic and nylon. It
portrays Chippy in his work out-
fit, holding a symbolic editorial
magic wand in his upraised hand.
The legend painted upon the
statue reads "Moore Chippy
Segundo said, "I wanted to cap-
ture ze inner essence of ze Cheepy
phenomenon. I paint ze letters to
express ze Greenville peeple's
desire for more wonderful articles
by ze Bonehead
The painter was contracted
by the mysterious Cult of Bone-
head, a religious group devoted
to deifying the college columnist.
They hold weekly readings of his
works and prostrate themselves
outside his apartment.
After a collection was taken
up among the cult members, they
contacted Dolly. The sculpture
was finished on the same day the
new Pantry convenience store
opened. The dedication ceremo-
nies took place last week.
Included in the $25 million
dollar pricetag for the opening
reception were a game of Celeb-
rity Thumper, performances by
rock groups X, Fleetwood Mac
and Dead Milkmen, rappers Salt
and Pepa and Run D.M.C. and
country stars John Schneider,
Tom Wopat and Dwight Yoakum.
After the concerts, the audi-
ence, which thronged the mile-
long, closed-off section of Tenth
Street, was invited to participate
in a parade that culminated at
historical Bonehead Manor.
Chippy threw open the doors,
saying, "This is the People's
Manor. They deserve to see it all
Afterwards, the cult threw an
exclusive dinner party, featuring
catered food from Bojangle's�.
Copies of a special comic book
detailing "The Sexual Misadven-
tures of The Bonehead written
and drawn by famed comic artist
Jamie Hernandez, was distrib-
uted to the guests.
Emcee Catherine Bach, best
known as Daisy Duke on the CBS
-TV series "The Dukes of Haz-
zard resplendent in cut-off jeans
and a tied-off plaid shirt, pre-
sented Bonehead with a complete
videotape library ol the how.
Bonehead made a speech at
the end of the night J ting that
he hadn't gotten where he w is by
himself, he wanted to thank "all
the little people . especially Li'l E.
No, I'm kidding. I'd take this
space to thank people, but there
are just too manv people I've used
and abused
Supporting this statement
were manv of the Bonehead's cult
followers. "He takes mv car for
hours on end. Edon't know where
he goes, but he sure uses up mv
gas said Luanne Lazy.
"Yeah, " agreed Frat Boy
"Everytime he gets evicted from
an apartment, who does he call to
help him? Not the Ghostbusters�,
I'll tell vou
w
Here we see the monument recently erected to honor that most
famous of columnists, our own Chippy Bonehead.






Overkill
By Fricdrich Orpheus
ca beM on ftfckl-tGcfc
�� .i i� an J-There vfcT2.ac
H �� j- as record" players W 7fca
"to ploy yfcjf fa)Ari1 Sofij5 bactatNik
Cer� rlOcoc,
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5TAiRyAft
5H l�9f yffl
The Avatar
By Harris and Haselrig
F7VWK SINATRA m yr
crntAc .ruv -�.11
Ar �"hosts
AND NOW READ THE COMPANION
STORY TO THE AVATAR LN TALES
THE UNDERCOVER CATS!
Tales of The Undercover Cats
By Parker
opS sr r
�f
(CO r)
� Tt i. � 5 T. -� j
1 Now a collector's
plate available through
the Brattford Exchange,
i Rendered on pure white
j
Delphi C hina In
noted American artist
fom (!urganus
t the Brattford I xchangi
Analysts h.n� u.iuhed
exceptional plates
go up in pri e
i .cmii' With the Wind
"Ashely"
(iu trading .11 $21 5 00
1 he King and I
"Shall we Dance?"
rrading at SSfl.oo
ighl ni the 1 i ing i ead
I hey're I e.id. I hey're Ml
Messed I p"
spei 1.1I 1 nllector's plate
has similar profit potential
V (, OF I III LIVING
Bv M.irris and (.ure,anus
( i Tin
11 i. f)i u
THEY'Rl t
I III 'Rl Ml Ml - �
I HI V Rl 1)1 Ml I HI V Rl
f i 1 i ssi n u r
M I
! - �
'� I
1 i li 1 VII 1 1
W II I I
"Hie day we feared for so long has come at
last, Chief O'Hara�we're going to have to
solve a crime on our own
-Commissioner Gordon, in Batman's abscence
Presents . . . Cartoonist Biography!
This week we feature the life and times of Micah Harris, writer of Orpheus and The
Avatar(and Tales of the Undercover Cats for a few weeks). Micah began on Orpheus in Jan. of
'88, and Avatar in August of that year. Micah currently teaches English and is working on
various works of fiction he hopes to have published in the near future.
THE LONG AWAITED INTERVIEW
Who or what influenced you in your comics work? Harvey Kurtzman,
Will Lldcr, Mort W'eisetiger and Curt Swan (their Jimmy Olsen stories),
Bob Burden, Alan Moore, and more recently Art Clokey (creator of
Gumby) and the Japanimated "Those Annoying Aliens
What is your greatest achievement? Becoming a media hero to millions
through Fast Carolinian articles.
Greatest failure? My secret life as "The Lunch Man
Career ambitions: To be a successful novelist- preferrably the successful
kind; and to teach Literature.
Favorite books or works: "Winter's Tale "A Canticle for Leiboivitz
"The House of the Spirits "Job"(the Bible "Job not Heinlein's book)
Favorite movies: "If's a Wonderful Life the original "King Kong
"Roger Rabbit "Plan 9 From Outer Space "Black Orpheus
Mission in Life: To be a force for good
Favorite Wrestler: El Espectro
Interests, pasttimes: Touring with the Original Dirty Dancers, climbing
evolutionary rungs, Beautiful babes�and lots of 'em.
Turn-ons: Beautiful babes�and lots of 'em.
Turn-offs: Milk mustaches-Oooks like slobber)
Favorite music: Kate Bush, The Beatles, Sting, Chet Atkins, Jazz and
New Age music
Everyone should be my friend because: I'm a gentle giant with a heart
of void.
a Biographer�Jeff "Argh, mateys Parker
Inside Joke
DO- IT- YOOR5tlP-EDmOi4
J &
Iik
AHA' i.
� CHI -J '� HI ' '��
! KH � PUCK OS
THE UPS ��'
(MADCf
Although Micah appears as
la homo sapien to your
�human eyes, his appearance
is a mental illusion. Here he
is in his true form, deciding
the fate of all mankind.
Ob
Nix' Pix
Bored Again-8 00am
WvJj
' - � - . J
& M






)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 16, 1989 PAGE 11
Former Pirate walk-on excels
Senior guard Kenny Murphy makes a strong move to the hoop
in a game earlier this season (Photo bv F.CL Photolab).
Baker up for USC
coaching position
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) �
South Carolina officials have not
confirmed reports that they in-
tend to meet with Dick Sheridan
I North Carolina State about fill-
ing the head football coach posi-
tion, but joe Lee Dunn says he's
the best man for the job.
"The university is not in a
position at this time to talk about
any details concerning discus-
sions between university officials
and a potential successor to Coach
oe Morrison South Carolina
-viid in a statement Monday.
The Greenville News re-
ported Sunday that a meeting
with Sheridan could conic as
early as Monday or Tuesday.
joe Morrison, South
Carolina's coach for the past six
ears, died Feb. 5 of a heart attack
after playing racquetball. He was
buried Thursday in his home-
town oi Lima, Ohio.
Meanwhile, joe Lee Dunn,
assistant head coach and defen-
sive coordinator at South Caro-
lina, said Monday he thought he
was the most qualified candidate
to replace Morrison.
"I've already-expressed the
opinion that I felt like I was the
best guv for the job but they're the
ones that have got to make that
decision, not me Dunn said, re-
ferring to university officials.
Sheridan, Dunn and former
East Carolina head coach Art
Baker are believed to be under
consideration for the post.
N.C State Athletic Director
jim Valvano, who gave South
Carolina officials permission to
talk to- Sheridan, said he is con-
cerned about the effect contro-
versv surrounding the Wolfpack
basketball program might have
on Sheridan's talks with South
Carolina.
"It would be unrealistic to
think it won't have any effect or
impact on Dick's thinking Val-
See SHERIDAN, page 12
By MICHAEL G. MARTIN
Staff Wriler
When there is a need for con-
sistency on teh 1988-89 men's bas-
ketball team, Coach Mike Steele
often turns to number 24, Kenny
Murphy. The 6-3,170 pound Sen-
ior forward has given his leader-
ship to assist the Pirates in several
key wins, and successful season
thus far.
Averaging 8.5 points, 4.3 re-
bound, and 2.3 assists per game,
the former walk-on has become a
valuable member to the team. His
10 rebounds against William &
Mary in our first meeting this year
helped the Pirates to a 75-59 vic-
tory.
His consistency has even
earned him a nickname: "K-
Nyce
'The name Murphy said,
I got it when 1 was playing in-
tramural basketball my freshman
year Evidently, the name was as
correct then, when he led the Get
Fresh Crew to two straight cham-
pionships in a row, just as it ap-
plies now.
It was thcintramurals that got
Murphy started on one of his
dreams.
"After talking with Scott
Hardce (a former ECU hoopster),
he convinced me that 1 should go
for the team
His decision could not have
come at a better time. The Pirates
were under a big transition; our
head coach Mike Steele had just
come to ECU and several posi-
tions were vacant, left from
graduating seniors. When
Murphy tried out and made the
team, the Pirates have since felt
his presence tremendously.
However, when his basket-
ball past was further explored, the
story became more unbelievable.
Murphy graduated from North
managed to gain 4 inches, which and the valued Coaches Award, a
has had great effects for his game, feat that was very hard to acom-
Murphy was not recrited out plish, especially as a walk-on.
of high school to play basketball, Murphy was also very
so he attended North Carolina pleased with the coaching staff,
A&T for one year. He was not singling out head coach Mike
satisfied with the school, so he Steel.
transferred to ECU.
"I went to school for an edu-
he played two seasons under
Coach Kevin Billerman. The
strange twist was that he joined
crn Durham High School where cation, not to play basketball His
education has come first, and his
future looks brighter everyday.
With his desire to excel in the
classroom, he has plans to join the
Drug Enforecement Agency after
graduation. Majoring in political
science, this senior just may ac-
complish anything he sets out to
do.
"Coach Steele has taught me
(and the rest of the team) how to
excel both on the court and off
Excelling must be Murphy's
speciality, because his leadership
has has had a big impact on the
other team members. He believes
in playing as a team, and watch-
ing just one of the Pirate's games
will prove this again and again.
Averaging 33 minutes per
game, Murphy's statistics are
Kenny Murphy
his high school learn because of a
bet with one of his friends.
"I had a bet with this friend
that 1 could last longer than him in
trv-outs. Before practice one day,
I hit about 10 straight shots from
the outside, pretty far out
From there, the coach noticed
Murphy, and thngs fell into place.
Although he had limited playing
time, he did manage to average
2.5 points, 1.0 rebounds, and 6.0
assists per game. Between his jun-
ior and senior seasons, Murphy
Murphy credits his mother proof 0f his leadership. From the
for always supporting him and floor; his 43 percent has rounded
giving this advice: "If you want out the performance of the other
something, you have to work for players; while at the free throw
line, his82 percent has him second
on the team in the area.
Consistency is a major part of
Kenny Murphy's basketball
game. His leadership has showed
the younger j lyers how not only
to succeed on the court, but in life
also. This articulate, highly spir-
ited student-athlete is surely to
accomplish all the goals he sets
fourth. His role on the team is
valued greatly, and he definitely
has worked hard to achieve what
he has thus far.
His immediate goals consist
it.
Murphy has done exactly
what his mother told him.
Growing up as the oldest of
three, he had to set examples for
the younger children and learn to
do things on his own, such as play
basketball.
"When I was growing up, I
didn't have an older brother to
teach me how to play ball, I just
had to learn on my own
Murphy has carrried that
advice, and the skills he learned
on the way, to ECU, and has util-
ized his knowledge to help the 0f winning the next five games,
Pirates in a rebuilding stage
His leadership as a walk-on
last season landed him teh 1987-
88 Defensive Player of the Year,
getting a good seed in the CAA
Tournament (March 4-6 in Hamp-
ton, V A), and maybe a bid to post-
season play.
Asst. coach takes position in Miami
(SID) � Tom Tuberville,
hired on Jan. 13 to serve as an
assistant coach on the East Caro-
lina University football staff, has
resigned to take a similar position
at the University of Miami, Fla.
our coaching staff that Miami and
Jimmy Johnson would think
enough of Tom to hire him back
on the staff
berville. "It was a tough decision.
Had it been anywhere else but
Miami, I would not have left.
Coach Lewis is a great person. I
was real impressed with the
coaches and the staff and the di-
Tubcrville served as a gradu-
ate assistant for one year and a
"We're disappointed any- volunteer assistant for two years- rection Jhev arc going in
time we lose a member of our under Johnson at Miami befpneS
coaching staff said ECU head coming to Greenville. He will
coach Bill Lewis. "But we do wish coach the linebackers for the
Tom and the University of Miami Hurricanes, the same position he
the very best. I do feel it is a was to coach at ECU.
compliment to our program and "I loved it at ECU said Tu-
"Tne position was made avail-
able at Miami when Dave
Wannstedt, the Hurricanes' De-
fensive Coordinator for three
years, left to become an assistant
with the Miami Dolphins.
A Camden, Ark. native, Tu-
berville has also coached at Ar-
kansas State for five seasons and
was an assistant and a head coach
at Hermitage High School in Pine
Bluff, Ark.
A decision on a replacement
for Tuberville should be made in a
week or less, according to Lewis.
Sooners' quaterback
arrested for drug sales
First game is Saturday
ECU baseball relies on youth on mound
ful pitching staff. They responded
"I'm shocked, just like every-
one else Underwood said.
"Barry had made a statement this
afternoon (about the suspension),
but I'm not always privy to a lot of
that information.
"I'm just shocked and sad-
NORMAN, Okla. (AP) �
Oklahoma, plagued by a series of
unrelated incidents since being
slapped with a three-year proba-
tion, was jolted Monday night
when FBI agents arrested starting
quarterback Charles Thompson
on a federal complaint of selling dened Underwood said, refer-
cocaine to an undercover agent. ring further questions to Switzer
Thompson, whom Co�ch or Duncan.
Barry Switzer had suspended Tne Sooners' woes started in
earlier in the day, is scheduled to Orlando, Fla when some players
appear before a U.S. magistrate allegedly trashed a hotel room
today. U.S. Attorney Bill Price where they were staying during
said he faces up to 20 years in the week leading up to the Citrus
prison and SI million in fines if he Bowl against Clemson.
Ea$t Carolina returns 15
letterwinners, including 0 posi-
tion players who started at vari-
ous times last season, as the Pi-
rates head into the 1989 baseball
season.
The question mark for Head
Coach Gary Overtoil's fifth team
is pitching,as the Pirates will rely
on a host of inexperienced hurl-
ers.
Sound familiar? A year ago
ECU counted heavily on a youth-
and Louisourg JC last season, is a
East Carolina Head Coach hard-throwing left-hander trying
by leading the team to a 33-14 Gary Overton will look for a de- tQ overc0me off-season shoulder
record, with a 3.75 earned run pendable group to join Jacobs in surgerv.
average�tops in the Colonial the starting rotation. Two juniors Sophomore Mike Whitten, 3-
Athletic Association where the PiBrien Berckman and junior q last vear, has made great strides
rates finished tied for second. college transfer Jim Bottomly �
The lone senior on this year's could hold the key to the Pirate
staff is Jake Jacobs, who finally fortunes.
had a losing decision last year Berckman, the last ECU
after winning 10 games his first pitcher to throw a no-hitter,
iwo seasons without a setback, pitched well as a starter in the first
Jacobs, a right-hander, finished 7-half of 1988. Bottomly, who
4 with a 3.32 ERA.
since arriving on the ECU campus
last year. The southpaw im-
proved throughout his freshman
year, and could be one of the more
dependable Pirate hurlers this
spring. Sophomore Tim Langdon
(1-0, 4.15), a lefty relegated to re-
See BASEBALL, page 12
is convicted
Price said Thompson's arrest
culminated a six-month investi-
gation. Thompson allegedly sold
17 grams of cocaine to an FBI
agent for $1,400 on Jan. 26.
Thompson thus becomes the
fifth Oklahoma football player to
be suspended since the NCAA
placed the Sooners' on three
vears' probation in December,
mostly for recruiting violations.
The NCAA also chastized
Switzer for failure to "exercise
supervisory control" over the
program.
Switzer said he would "say
nothing more at this time about
the matter" when he suspended
Thompson Monday afternoon.
"I just said I'm not gonna dis-
cuss it anymore Switzer said
later Monday evening. "I've
made my decision, and that's it
Athletic Director Donnie
Duncan and Interim President
David Swank could not be
reached for comment. John Un-
derwood, assistant athletic direc-
tor, said he learned about
Thompson's arrest when he re-
turned home about 10 p.m. CST
and turned on the news.
On Jan. 13. starting corner-
back Jerry Parks allegedly
wounded teammate Zarak Peters
following an argument in the ath-
letic dorm.
Parks was suspended from
the team and charged with shoot-
ing with intent to injure. He is at
home in Fort Bend, Texas, await-
ing his preliminary hearing.
Last Friday, Nigel Clay, Ber-
nard Hall and Glenn Bell were
charged with first-degree rape in
a Jan. 21 incident, also in the ath-
letic dorm. They were suspended
from the university for two years,
but can appeal the decision,
pending the outcome of the pro-
ceedings.
When Switzer was a$ked if it
was a difficult decision to sus-
pend Thompson, who took over
for Jamelle Holieway midway
through last season, he said, "No,
not at all
Thompson, a sophomore
from Lawton and labeled as the
Sooners' quickest quarterback,
See SOONERS, page 12
pitched one year at Miami (FL)
Freestyle biker earns
professional status
By DAVID MONROE
Staff Writer
You may have noticed him in
the parking lot between Jones
Dorm and Aycock Dorm spin-
ning and twisting his bicycle into
a myriad of contortions and won-
dered "Who is this guy?"
York City.
After competing as an expert
for three years, Denny was ac-
cepted into the professional ranks
of Freestyle Bikers. This signified
a milestone in his Freestyle career
and now entitles him to receive
lucrative contracts from major
sports sponsors.
Although turnnig profes-
His name isDenny Howell, a
freshmen from Elizabeth City, sional has opened many doors for
North Carolina, who has turned a Denny that were previously no
Denny Howell shows off in front of Aycock Dorm. Howell uses
his free time to prepare for a competition in Orlando, Fla to be
held in March (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photolab).
hobby into a profitable venture
and along the way has attained
status as a professional. He is a
Freestyle Biker with an agent is
Rochester, New York, is spon-
sored by L.A. Gear and Oakley-
Sun Glasses, and competes in
Freestyle competitions all across
the country. All in all, these ac-
complishmentsarequite
extraordinary when one consid-
ers that Denny Howell has only
been a Freestyle Biker for five
years.
Denny developed an interest
in the sport after reading about it
in ??? magazine. His desire to pur-
sue the sport with more intensity
came about after attending sev-
eral shows sponsored by some of
the sports most prominent and
artistic riders. Denny entered the
sport with support irom his par-
ents and after many greuling six
hour practice sessions, he entered
Madison Square Garden in New
accessibe, he should have no
problem in coping with the in-
creased publicity- During his stint
as an expert, Denny appeared in
several magazines and was even
featured on the cover of Super
BMX magazine twice. Once dur-
ing a competition in California
Denny was given a cameo ??? in a
commerical being filmed for L.A.
Gear.
FreestyleBMX originated in
California and is now a sport that
attracts millions of participants
and spectators from all corner of
the country.
The name Freestyle orginated
from two men in California; R.L.
Osborne and Bob Haro. They are
credited with inventing the sport
and for refining the expressionis-
tic moves that are characteristic to
Freestyle.
In Freestyle competition rid-
ers are evaluated on the degree of
See BIKER, page 12





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16,1989
ECU baseball gears
up for 1989 season
Continued from page 11 fly, and the Pirates were scoring at
lief duty last season, appears a clip of more than seven runs per
ready to join the starting rotation, game last year, while collectively
Freshman Tom Move, a local batting .297. The Pirates stole 77
product from Greenville's Rose bases� second-most in ECU his-
High, is a control pitcher with toryand the most in 11 years,
starting potential. Finding a place ot fit 10 play-
The closer out of the bullpen ers who started�at eight positions
will be 6-foot-7 junior Jonathan last year will be a problem for
Jenkins. Jenkins started only one Overton, albeit a nice problem to
game, but had five wins in relief have.
en route to a 5-0 mark and a 3.37
ERA. Freshman left-hander War-
ren Hall is also being counted on
to be a stopper ou of the bullpen.
Other pitchers who should
contribute are sophomore John
White, 3-0 last year, freshmen
Owen Davis and Dallas McPher-
son, and sophomores David Wil-
lis and Preston Bowers
When senior shortstop Mike
Andrews went down with a bro-
ken leg in the sixth game of the
1988 season, it caused the Pirates
problems in the field. The Pirates
played the remaining 41 games
with players at new positions
Andrews' absence, while it
was a major blow to last season's
attempt to defend the CAA title,
Gone from last season is Gary may reep benefits this season.
Smith, 8-2 with two saves. Smith, David Ritchie now a senior,
a versatile lefty, appeared in 46 m�ved from third base lo f,n in'or
games and won 18 games in just Andrews at shortstop. Ritchie
two seasons with the Pirates. (-287, 11 sb) turned into a sure-
Also gone from last year's handed shortstop and will start
club is outfielder1st baseman there this spring.
Jay McGraw, a.300 lifetime hitter, Andrews (.339 two seasons
and a proven leader. McGraw's ago), or sophomore Kevin Riggs
bat and speed (11 sb) will be will be Ritchie's middle infield
sorely missed, but his leadership partner at second base,
may be the most difficult to re- Riggs batted .355 last year
place. while starting the last half of '88 at
A year ago, Overton prom- third base. Should Riggs not play
ised that his team would be ca- second, he is capable of playing
3

:
AFTERNOON
DELIGHT
AT GROG's
Reggae and Progressive Music
Beverage Specials
Doors OPEN at 5:30
Every Friday
FREE ADMISSION
Underage Welcome
An East Carolina Pirate baseball player warms up in the batting
Cage. The Pirates take to the diamond for a doubleheader against
Howard Saturday (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU PhotolahV
Junior first baseman Calvin average in right fieldand junior
pable of scoring runs� just not as
quickly as his previous three
power-laden teams. Overton was
prophetic; the Pirates of '88 had a
hint of power, but relied more on
base hits and team speed.
A base hit here, a stolen base
third base, the outfield, or bat
from the left side as designated
hitter.
John Gast, a big (6-3, 200)
freshman transfer from Auburn,
earned starting duties at third
base in the fall. His back-up is
there, throw in a bunt or a sacrifice Riggs, or freshman Glenn Beck.
Brown (.284, 6 hr) is ECU's main
source of power. Brown drove in a
team high 51 runs in 47 games
while ripping eight home runs.
Powerful freshman David
Daniels (5-10, 215), who plays
fullback for the Pirate football
team, can play first, possibly the
outfield or DH.
Senior centerfielder John
Thomas (.274, 15 stolen bases),
sophomore Steve Godin, who led
every-day starters with a .335
John Adams (.322) are all legiti-
mate contenders for allconference
honors in the outfield.
Godin, however, will miss at
least the first part of the season
with hepatitis.
ECU is stable behind the
plate, where senior Chris Cauble
(.301, 4 hr) returns as the starter.
Highly regarded freshman
Tommy Eason had an impressive
showing in the fall and could
contribute right away.
Ac roil from U.B.B.
7sa-oo�o
The 1989 East Carolina Baseball schedule
Feb. 18 HOWARD (DH)
1 pm
Feb. 19 HOWARD
1 pm
Feb. 25 GEORGE MASON (DH)
1 pm
Mar. 1 NORTH CAROLINA
3 pm
Mar.3 ST.AUGUSTINE'S
(DH)lpm
r.Aar.5 FAIRFIELD (DH)
1 pm
Mar. 6 FAIRFIELD
3 pm
Mar. 7 at Duke
3 pm
Mar. 10 at South Carolina
3 pm
Mar. 12 CONNECTICUT (DH)
1 pm
Mar. 14 at N.C. State
3 pm
Mar. 18 at James Madison (DH)
1 pm
Mar. 19 at James Madison
1 pm
Mar. 21 DAVIS & ELKINS (DH)
1 pm
Mar. 22 HARTFORD
3 pm
Mar. 25 at William& Mary
3 pm
Mar. 26at William & Mary (DH)
1 pm
Mar. 30 KENT STATE
3 pm
April 1 'GEORGE MASON (DH)
1 pm
April 'GEORGE MASON
1 pm
April 4 BAPTIST (DH)
1 pm
April 5 at Kinston Indians
(Exhibition) 7 pm
April 6 N.C. STATE
7 Dm
April 8 at Richmond (DH)
-1 pm
April 9 at Richmond
1 pm
pril 12 at Virginia
3 pm .
April 15 �UNC-WILMINGTON
(DH) 6 pm
pril 16 UNC-WILMINGTON
1 pm
April 18 at Old Dominion
7pm
April 21 VCU
7 pm
April 22 VCU
7 pm
April 23 ATLANTIC CHRIS-
TIAN (DH) 6 pm
April 25 WINTHROP(DH)
6 pm
April 28 MOUNT OLIVE (DH)
6 pm
May 6 NORTH CAROLINA
WESLEY AN 7 pm
May 8 NORFOLK STATE
3 pm
May 9 at North Carolina
7 pm
CAPS denote home game
�Colonial Athletic Association
game
Buy one speciality sandwich
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For the latest in
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Sheridan might be best candidate for Gamecock job
Continued from page 11
vanosaid.
N.C. State's basketball pro-
gram came under scrutiny after
reports surfaced in January about
the forthcoming publication of a
book critical of Valvano and de-
tailing alleged abuses at N.C.
State.
Baker, a Sumter native,
coached East Carolina from 1985-
88 and compiled a 12-32 record.
He left at the end of last season
and now serves as South
Carolina's associate athletic di-
rector and director of the Game-
cock Club, an athletic booster
organization.

ECU student enters the professional sports world on bike
Continued from page 11
difficulty for each move, the cho-
reographed style for the move,
and the artistic impression each
rider employs in performing the
move. Points are deducted each
time the rider touches the ground
with any part of their body. The
goal is to perform fluid and con-
tinuous moves wihtout falling off
the bike or discontinuing a move.
Denny Howell has made such
an impression on the sport of
Freestyle Biking that a move has
More trouble
for Sooners
Continued from page 11
took center stage at Oklahoma as
a redshirt freshman when
Holieway suffered a season-end-
ing knee injury.
Thompson guided Okla-
homa to a 17-13 victory over Mis-
souri, then rushed for 126 yards in
a 17-7 victory over Nebraska that
gave Oklahoma the No. 1 ranking
heading into the Orange Bowl
against second ranked Miami.
The Hurricanes won 20-14.
Holieway returned as the
starter last season, but clearly
wasn't the same, having lost a
step from his injury.
Against Texas, Holieway
slightly injured his ankle in the
first quarter and Thomoson re-
placed him for good, leading
Oklahoma to a Big Eight Confer-
ence tide showdown against
Nebraska.
been named after him. It is called
"The Howell Spin In the move,
the biker performs a backwards
spin with the rear wheel off the
ground and all weight focused on
the front wheel.
As classes continue and most
freshmen worry about papers and
exams, Denny Howell still man-
ages to find time to practice and
compete. On March 25th Denny
will be in Orlando, Florida for a
major competition that sould at-
tract a national field of competi-
tors. In all this year, Denny will
probably compete in over 30 ma-
jor tournaments and a multitude
of shows. As sunimer approaches
and most s tudents prepare to hit
the beaches, DennyHowell will be
spinnng and twisting his bicycle
all across the country gathering
fame and recognition. The East
Carolinian salutes Denny Howell
and wishes him the best of luck as
a Freestyle Biker.
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Regardless of Grades or Parental Income
Wa hava a data BS of ovar 200.000 Ming of scholarshipa
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an
MEDIA BOARD
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 16, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 16, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.657
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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