The East Carolinian, February 14, 1989







EDITORIALSInside4
CLASSIFIEDS FEATURES6
9
SPORTS12

Features
Reviewer says 'True Believers'
will have queues at a theater near you.
Check out page 9.
Sports
Swimmers take CAA title, Kobe is
coachof the year.
Read about the action on page 12.
�be Irani (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since
1925.
Vol. 63 No. 50
Tuesday February 14, 1989
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Chancellor responds to racial allegations
By STl
I'M
Mi
Wll FOI SOM
ated
ucien
actions taken by the University
should not be disturbed
1 le went on toexplain how he
r Richard Eakin, in came to his decision: "One o( the
Feb. 8, responded to victims assaulted suffered a bro-
iade bv the NAACP ken nose and another suffered
icTeddv White case serious head lacerations. It was
treatment of black reported that Mr. White assaulted
the victims following verbal
lid regarding the provocation from students in
: ' ddv White, "At- Garrett Hall.
of all the is- "Verbal provocation, how-
iv decision that the ever, cannot excuse Mr. White's
violent reaction. Tolerance of his
behavior would make it more
difficult to maintain a safe cam-
pus.
"1 do believe that Mr. White
was provoked in some manner
and 1 do not condone verbal
provocation. Still, there was no
evidence in our records to show-
that any identifiable person ut-
tered racial slurs.
"There was no record of a
complaint by Mr. White that any
Legislator apologizes for incident,
SGA amends academic violations
specific person raciafily harassed
him. There was not substantial
evidence in the record to establish
that persons other than Mr. White
should have been charged with
disciplinarv offenses
In response to the NAACF's
concerns of racial problems on
campus, Eakin said, "I also want
to assure an environment free of
racial harassment He said a ra-
cial harassment policy is being
worked on by Dr. Alfred Mat-
thews, vice chancellor for student
life, and Dr. Larry T. Smith, assis-
tant vice chancellor and director
of minority student affairs.
Smith said Monday that the
policy is completed, but is still
subject for review by the affirma-
tive action committee. He said the
final policy should be ready bv
late March or early April.
Dennis Schatzman, NAACP
executive director, said, "It's un-
fortunate if the university stands
bv its decision, because then we
have a serious problem with East
Carolina
In a Feb. 8 article in The Daily
Reflector, Schatzman was quoted
a mentioning an incident at last
Monda s s .A meeting as an-
other example ot rascism at ECU
As stated in The Daily Reflector,
Schatman said that a bla k stu-
dent in ECU's Student Govern-
ment Association recently was
showered with black and hn
jelly beans during a meeting
By the student sow naccount
there were two jelly tx
thrown. The legislator in questii n
said there was one ellv bed i
which fell off his desk and that
the action in no wa was intended
ds racial.
bLOR1 MARTIN Staff r.icr
L;ident Government
Assocatonannounced amend-
n�int Judicial Board
� 1 in apology from a cused oi misconduct, to recognize the
�Studies Alliance
v . nst�i in Monday's meet-
-v heard an explana-1 cv from the legisla-arged with mis-Feb 6 meeting
"OnV 1n4 v January 30. I
� ' bag of jelly beans
to theS(. ting solely for the
purpS1� my personal con-
sumptl(md certainly tor no
otherre�F aw lev Fuller said.
to Fuller, the ac-
c '� seclator, a jelly bean was
1, ty knocked oi the table , legislator on the
, i( eitainly no one in this
roontcancmstruethisasanactol
mi vandue Fuller said.
"1 state emphatically that I am
not racially biased1 apologize to
the legislator and the student
body Fuller said. Another legis-
lator who witnessed the act said
the incident was "clearly an acci-
dent
In the first order oi business.
Vice Speaker of the legislature
Bob Landry said the oint judici-
ary Board voted to amend its
constitution. "In case ot academic
integrity violation not related to
class requirement or activity, the
matter will be relayed directly to
the Academic Integrity Board
Landrv said.
A second amendment said a
student may not withdraw from a
course if an academic integrity
violation is pending. Before this
amendment was added, if caught
cheating, a student- could with-
draw from the class before action
could be taken against him.
The third amendment calls
for deletion oi the constitution's
final sentence stating "members
of all judicial bodies shall be ap-
pointed for one academic year,
except that members of the Aca-
demic Integrity Board may be
reelected
"The members of the board
felt that was not the proper place
in the constitution for that sen-
tence because it had nothing to do
with the judicial board Landrv
said. "We felt it was sufficiently
covered in other parts of the
Documents
The SGA appropriated SI07
to the American Marketing Asso-
ciation. The organization re-
quested $50 for communication
and $37 for printing and binding.
The legislature voted to rec-
ognize the Women's Studies Alli-
ance, an organization advocating
political, social, and economic
equality for women and men. The
organization will work to eradi-
cate inequality in privileges,
status or rights of women and
men oi all races.
All ECU students will be eli-
gible for membership and ECU
faculty and alumni will be eligible
for non-voting membership. The
Monday, the SGA changed procedures for the Joint Judicial Board which will allow faculty to
charge a student with academic violations before the student can drop the class. (Photo by f.D.
Whitmire�Photolab) , , ,
calling tor the abolishment ot Pi-
rate Walk and urging a similai
service to be administered b
ECU Public Safety.
n Vans to hold
view organiz'�
monthly meetings.
According to Speaker oi the
Legislature Marty Helms, the fu-
ture of Pirate Walk will be de-
cided in next Monday's meeting.
Helms has proposed a resolution
According to Helms, a deci-
sion on the issue has been post-
poned for further discussion with
the chancellor and the Stud
Residence Association president
Helms said he feels strongly the
program will be effective if ap-
proved.
The SGA announced its rec-
ognition ot National Condom
Week on Feb. 12-19.
Electron microscope explores
minute world within
h
s
1
4
4

Fruit fly's eye
By DAVID HERRING
Assistant News Editor
In 19S1, the ECU depart-
ments oi biology and geologv
jointly purchased a scanning
electron microscope (SEM),
worth approximately $100,000,
for teaching and research pur-
poses.
According to Dr. Charles E.
Bland, chairman of the biologv
department, the SEM can mag-
nify objects up to 30,000 times,
whereas light microscopes can
only magnify objects up to 1,000
times.
Butterfly scales
The SFM allows its user to
examine the surface topography
oi a specimen in great detail (as is
illustrated bv the surrounding
pictures, taken by an SEM). This is
done by firing a beam of electrons
at the specimen, which scans its
surface and causes the specimen
to release "secondary" electrons.
When the beam hits projec-
tions on the surface of the speci-
men, more electrons are released
than when the beam hits de-
pressed or sunken areas, enabling
the SEM to present objects in three
dimensional detail. The secon-
See MICROSCOPE, page 2
- :
u
If
Salt grains
Computer chip
Flea's head
Germinating seed
Pollen grains





J
THE E S1 CAROLIN!
:EBRUAR 14 1
Girl tries to run over dorm mate
Military time used, 24 vX1 is
Inight, 12:00 is noon
Feb. 7
10:40 Man reported in third
floor shower of dement
b 8
220 Greenville man ar-
rested lor being intoxicated and
disruptive near Belk another
Greenville man was arrested for
' . nollege 1 hll Chive
Assault on a female in
d I Brevvster reported
Drug paraphernalia
i Ik dorm room
Resident of Tyler re-
ireless and reckless w tth
. apH ning and the com-
fthreats Tie person
5 says another resident of
.
Tyler followed her vehicile too
closely, tried to run her over and
communicated threats on College
Hill and in Fvler lobby
12:20 A no n v mo us pers o n
reported suspicious fire near
Fletcher music building
Crime Report
Feb.10
1:02 Three Wmterville men
and one Greenville reported
being assaulted
Feb.11
00:15 Two students issued
campus citations tor underage
consumption of alcohol outsideof
Aycock
01:22 Two students given
campus citations for consump-
tion of alcohol in Avcock
17:10 Man hit bv a propelled
Bb on the basketball court near
Belk
20:15 Four residences of Jones
were caught in possession oi alco-
hol underage south of Belk
21:10 Two residents of found
in citation of stop sign. In the same
room, eight students and three
non-students were given citations
for holding an unauthorized
party. All participants were
underage
21:20 Resident of Slav given
citation for drinking underage
22:50 Three non-students and
14 students were found having an
unauthorized alcohol party in
Scott. All were underage
Feb.12
00:38 Winston Salem man
banned from campus after dis-
playing fictitious drivers license
3:31 Same Winston Salem
man arrested for trespassing after
having been banned
4:40 Slay resident reported
that a man had broken a window
to entrance door to Slay wi th bare-
hand
3:52 Two Clement residents
given citations for violating visi-
tation policy, the two had allowed
a male to stay in their dorm room
after hours
13:52 Larceny of jeans from
laundry room in Umstead was re-
portec
The East Carolinian
fames! J.McKee, Director of Advertising
Scott Mak ��
Phillip V. (
.
;d'
Many colleges have race problems
CPS College leaders white campuses feel more at but are potent representations of President Olin Robinson rel
Advertising Representatives
J. Keith .
Adam Blanl i
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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� tx ks lettersanc
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the tst tveek o
feel more at but are potent representations ot
stalling more diverse pain, degredation and death to
nent;
V
rd in 1( tters I � their
and alumni, talking
tl v uld like to end
. ns in a ademe.
� merican Council on
the Washing-
ased group to which all
programs and generally
ping minorities feel less "mar-
onspicuous and isolated
from the mainstream ot the insti-
I or example, it warns presi-
� tsto payattention to symbols
like Confederate flags and fra-
rr ty slave auctions" thay may
thing to them personally,
others
At the same time, Wesleyan's
Chace moved by the movie
"Mississippi Burning" and by the
celebrations surrounding Martin
I uther King's birthday, asked
Students foi idi a-tor making "the
racial atmosphere of this place
tiled Wesleyan bettered
And Middlebury College
President Olin Robinson released
.i list of priorities to "reflect a
fundamental commitment to the
long-range success of our minor-
ity students
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
n rs
Microscope
ibushed a
imsat

the help. We si
nd tht i xtent �l I
ite Ag unsl . reju-
nee.
wever,has
n i to spot.
i :k student posters
i � p at Stanford, white
� i rked a black class-
State University of
� ockport and other
year at orth-
. � tvesl Missouri
lumbia universities
rsities of North
: � sin and Missis-
Continued from page 1
dary electrons released are col-
lided into a scintillator, produc-
ing electrical pulses which are
relayed to a cathode-ray tube.
much like ones found in television
� result is a television
rtage of the specimen's surface
. insisting of light and dark areas.
According to Bland, the SEM has
been used on a variety oi projects
which includes, examination of
algae in water samples, identify-
ing certain mold spores, examina-
tion and identification of micro-

� ars conflicts have
mpkins-Cortland
�� I. College in ew
rs State and Ramapo
nn ctate, Dartmouth
u versifies of Massachu-
. higan, California-
. � Maryland, to name a
' van President Wil-
� put it in a lyrical Janu-
ettei to all his students,
treds have surfaced, racial
am: �. has grown hot. anger
and resentment have over-
1 a-on
d Hege and univer-
- �� ommunities in this country
� rienced very bad, sick
moments Chace wrote.
College presidents often have
been surprised bv the crises, un-
re of how to respond and react-
ing on the spur oi the moment.
e ACE book, called "Mi-
noril - n Campus: A Handbook
� : I anting Diversity' is de-
sigi suggest what presidents
: to prevent the conflicts
� : � ipting in the first place.
his - the first time we've
mprehensive ap-
pr irr le is trying to set an
� : said ACE President
Robert Atwell. "Many, many in-
stituri �ns around the country are
addressing this problem. At the
vimc time, others out there are
fossils by the geology depart-
ment, study of the structure oi
bone marrow, and study of the
structure oi Trichomonas vagi-
- - a protozoa which causes
vaginal infection.
"It (the SEND has also
been used to study the recovery of
a person's retina after eye surgery
to determine what happens to the
connecting blood vessels added
bland. "It is used to look at struc-
tures too small to be seen on a light
microscope
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Tlir t AS! CAROI INIAN
TLHRLAKY H, 189 3
,
Scientists guilty of misconduct
WASHINGTON (AP) � An
Excessively permissive" attitude
by institutions tends to allow
careless and sometimes even
fraudulent medical research, a
national Institute of Medicine
cpmrruttee reported today. The
Committee, empaneled to study
misconduct in biomedical re-
search, said better research stan-
dards and systematic ways of
investigating laboratory irre-
sponsibility are needed.
"Although the committee
believes that serious misconduct
m science is rare it concludes
that institutions fail to detect and
correct early deviant behavior
primarily because of an exces-
sively permissive research envi-
ronment that tolerates careless
practices the committee report
said. Funding pressures and an
overemphasis on publication of
research in scientific journals also
encourage what the committee
called "substandard practices
The Institute of Medicine, one
of the National Institutes of
Health, organized the 17-member
committee in 1987 after a series of
fraudulent and careless labora-
tory reports had come to light.
The committee was charged with
developing proposals to
strengthen professional stan-
dards in the nation's federal and
academic laboratories.
Few institutions, the report
said, have explicit research guide-
lines and this allows the system
"to tolerate substandard activities
by a small number of individual
investigators who fail to observe
generally accepted practices
The committee said that in the
past decade there have been inci-
dents of serious research miscon-
duct at Massachusetts General
Hospital, Yale University, Cornell
University, Harvard Medical
School and Boston University.
These incidents, the study
said, "raised new questions about
the ability of academic institu-
tions to conduct objective investi-
gations of misconduct by their
own faculty members or research
staff A system of peer review
and replication of research find-
ings has been a standard way to
guard against science error in the
past, the committee said.
But it said this system has
failed because findings often
aren't checked by replication in
other laboratories, and the peer
review system depends on trust
which can be misplaced. The
committee noted that researchers
are pressured to build up a list of
publications to which they have
contributed.
Academic advancement and
salary increases can depend upon
the number of publications. As a
result, the committee said, some
authors credited with reports of-
ten participated only marginally,
the leaders of some laboratories
out their names on all research
from their labs, and the names of
prominent researchers are often
added to those of the true authors
in an effort to assure publication.
To correct the problems, the
committee made 16 recommen-
dations. These included:
-That the National Institutes of
Health establish an office to pro-
mote responsible research and
evaluate investigations of mis-
conduct by institutions.
-That by 1992 all institutions con-
ducting medical research for the
NIH be required to adopt specific
policies to promote ethical re-
search practicesand to investigate
misconduct.
-That the NIH limit the number of
publications considered inagrant
application so that evaluations of
a researcher's past work are based
on quality, not quantity.
-Academic departments should
adopt new authorship policies
that will not emphasize quantitv.
-That scientific journals develop
policies "to promote responsible
authorship practices including
a system to respond to charges of
misconduct.
-That researchers receive training
by institutions and professional
organizations in proper stan-
dards of scientific research.
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TAKE OUTS OKAY
Tower's nomination under fire
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
jienate's "old-boy club which
For generations has cheered en
former senators if they advanced
into the upper reaches of the ex-
ecutive branch, has come unglued
under the weight of former Sen.
ohn Tower's nomination to be
secretary of defense.
Tower's Senate confirmation
m
3s in serious jeopardy, the nomi-
Suv ba t tered by unproven accusa-
t.ons of heavy drinking, woman-
izing and lack of objectivity when
:it comes to defense contractors.
tManv had expected that Tower's
imination to be the nation's
(defense chief would enjoy an ef-
� rtless slide down a carefully
greased chute.
Tower, after all, had been one
9 t the powers oi the Senate where
fhe served for two dozen years and
presided as chairman of the
jArmed Services Committee - the
ssame parfel rrow beln'g askrM to
-confirm him.
If he expected special treat-
ment, he didn't get it. Instead, his
. nomination became snared in a
web of allegations and FBI inves-
tigations.
Sen. Sam unn, D-Ga the
current Armed Services chair-
man, had made clear months be-
ifore last fall's election that he in-
nded to subject new nominees
tor too Pentagon positions to in-
tense scrutiny in an effort to imo-
rove the quality of key officials.
"I said several times that it
wasn't going to be an old-boy
hearing, tha we were going to
College board says
student loans shakv
(CPS) � Student loans are a
"shaky foundation for student
aid the College Board charged
the last week of January, and
should be completely over-
hauled.
In a report called "Radical
Reform of Incremental Change:
Student Loan Policy Alternatives
for the Federal Government the
College Board presented various
experts' suggestions for retooling
Stafford Loans, the guaranteed
student loans that have become
the major source of aid during the
1980s.
The experts said administra-
tive "tinkering" has made the
loans harder for students to get
and more expensive for them to
repay, but hasn't helped solve
their high default rate much at all.
Among the suggestions for
overhaul:
-Make grants, not loans, the
cornerstone of federal student
aid, said Joseph Cronin, president
of the Massachusetts Higher Edu-
cation Assistance Corp and
make the loans to parents, not
students.
-College Board consultant
Arther Hauptman suggested
Congress should let colleges
make loans directly, competing
with banks.
-Let students repay their
loans at a rate that depends on
how much they earn after gradu-
ation. The idea was first floated by
former U.S. Dept. of Education
Sec. William Bennett, and later
picked up in slightly different
form by presidential candidate
Michael Dukakis last fall.
have a thorough review Nunn
says.
The presumption that it was
going to be something less was
wrong from the beginning. Pe-
riod
"I think everybody thought
that the old-boy network would
work as it always has and John
Tower would go sailing through,
but it hasn't worked that way
said Sen. James Exon, D-Neb the
Armed Services Committee's sec-
ond-ranking Democrat.
In part, Tower's troubles may
stem from the fact that he appar-
ently entered the confirmation
process with a relatively low res-
ervoir of good will among his
former colleagues.
Many senators say privatelv
that they were not fond of what
they say Tower's testy temper and
autocratic operating style.
'Tower is a former member of
the Senate. But it is probably ate�
the case that he doesn't have a lot
of intimate friends here or any
aura of popularity or good will
said Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind
who was chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations committee at
the time Tower headed Armed
Services.
The question inevitably is
raised of whether the Tower
nomination is being hammered
by old-fashioned partisan poli-
tics.
Not so, says Nunn, whose
own credentials are hardlv those
of a left-wing Pentagon basher.
Sen. John Warner, R-Va a former
secretary of the Navy and the
panel's ranking Republican,
backs him up.
"Sam Nunn has been fair,
equitable and - steadfastly - he has
been non-political Warner said
late last week.
Wamer said he put the ques-
tion of fairness directly to Tower
himself.
"I said, 'John, if you were in g
the position Sam Nunn and I now
find ourselves in would you do
it any differently?
The answer?
"Sen. Tower looked us right
in the eye and said, 'No Warner
said.
HURRY
Time is Running
Out!
The deadline is
February 22, 1989
to Advertise in East
Carolina University's
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at
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James F.J. McKee, p.rKto(,fUw(�.l.t
Tim Hampton, .v�
KR1STEN HALBERG.SporhEi.
Chip Carter, re� um
Susan Howell, pro. m�ct
Dean Waters, cmimm
Stephanie Singleton, cw e
Brad Bannister, oy &s�
Jeff Parker, sufin
TOM FlJRR, OmUhon Mmufer
Debbie Stevens, ,
Stephanie Emory sur
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tebmarv 14, 1989
OPINION
Page 4
Allegations
The case oi Teddy Matthew
White remains open. Indeed, it is at
the center of a still-growing contro-
versv being inflamed bv Dennis
Schatzman, Executive Director of
the XAACP. There are several dif-
fering accounts of what happened
� Schatzman has one version;
White, another; ECU, another; in
fact, it seems that everyone involved
has his own. Though not all of the
facts are available, what appears to
have happened is this:
On April 3, 1988, White and
another student were working on
their car in front of Garrett dorm.
Several white students, who had
been drinking, shouted insults at
White. A fracas followed.
"The matter was referred to the
student judiciary system, during
whose proceedings White may have
been wrongly prevented from
bringing witnesses to testify in his
behalf. The case was also tried in
criminal court; White pled guilty to
five counts of simple assault and
was found guiltv Jan. 23. The five
white students were never disci-
plined.
It appears that certain of
Schatzman's claims are correct, par-
ticularly the assertion that the white
students were shouting racial epi-
thets. There is also some evidence to
support his claim that the White case
involved a "gross miscarriage of
justice
However, even this does not
justify his subsequent actions. He
missed a scheduled meeting with
Chancellor Eakin, which the two
had set up specifically to discuss the
matter, because he lost his way. He
has intimated to several area news-
papers that ECU is not safe for mi-
nority students. He is leading afight
to have the NC state legislature
criminalize racist expressions,
claiming (falsely, it seems) that
events at ECU are the motivation for
the laws. He is using the same type
of scare tactics that have been used
so often and so successfully by the
New Right: threatening trouble in
the hopes that his opponent will
simply back down.
"Time for talking is over
Schatzman has said. "ECU is going
to have one hell of a public relations
problem if it doesn't come clean
with the issue and deal with it
fairly
Clearly, though, it is Schatzman
who does not intend to handle the
issue fairly. What he apparently
means is: "I'm tired of going
through proper channels. Even
though I haven't exhausted all other
avenues, I'm prepared to threaten
ECU with public scandal and finan-
cial pressure
Specifically, Schatzman has
seized upon a recent, still-unre-
solved occurrence at an SGA meet-
ing. In the well-publicized incident,
a white legislator is alleged to have
thrown black and brown jellybeans
at a black legislator, Valeria Lassiter.
Though the jellybeans caused no
physical harm, the behavior of the
white legislator involved (and an-
other, who allegedly helped cover
for the first) was indefensible. They
are in a position in which better
conduct may reasonably be ex-
pected of them, and Lassiter is at-
tempting to have the two removed
from their posts. Lassiter has re-
ceived a formal apology, the legisla-
tors in question have taken the op-
portunity to refute Lassiter's claims,
and the process goes on civilly.
Schatzman, however, has exag-
gerated the incident. By Lassiter's
own written account, which is in the
public record, two jellybeans were
thrown. Schatzman has publicly
stated that Lassiter was "showered"
with jellybeans � clearly a distor-
tion. Far from helping White's case,
Schatzman undermines it by
proving himself an untrustworthy
source of information.
The East Carolinian cannot con-
done Teddy White's actions, even
though we recognize that he was
probably provoked. Racial and eth-
nic offenses, loathsome though they
are, can and should be ignored by
individuals who are sufficiently
mature. They can also be dealt with
rationally, as Lassiter is doing. But
those who respond with violence
merely play directly into the hands
of the (even less mature) individuals
who deliver the insults in the first
place.
Further, we strongly denounce
Schatzman's actions. He has been
irresponsible and is using the inci-
dents at ECU to further other ends.
He has inflamed tensions, rather
than help to reduce them; he has
exacerbated the problem, rather
than help to alleviate it. Though we
sympathize with his ostensible in-
tent, we feel that his tactics have
been thoughtless at best, intention-
ally harmful at worst.
We do not appreciate being used
so that Schatzman can more easily
ram his proposed limitation on free
speech through the NC legislature.
It is ironic that it is freedom of speech
that allows Schatzman to present
misleading and untrue information
to the public.
Schatman may be making his
claims based on misinformation
that he himself has received. He may
not be purposefully lying, but he is
distorting the truth, and the end
result is the same.
There is indeed racism at ECU, as
there is nearly anywhere. Racism
cannot be stamped out, at least not
quickly. But it can be minimized.
The Racial Harassment Policy, work
oh which was begun at Chancellor
Eakin's request prior to
Schatzman's involvement and is
presently under consideration, may
be just what is needed to ensure
equitable treatment for all races �
just as sexual harassment policies
have helped to ensure equitable
treatment for both sexes. But a law or
policy which makes violence an ac-
ceptable response to racial harass-
ment can only increase violence and
racism.
Should the students alleged to
have insulted White be disciplined?
No conclusive admissible evidence
exists that they did in fact insult him,
so the answer is a grudging no. Stu-
dents who are found to have per-
formed such actions should, how-
ever, be required to perform acts of
community service, preferably ones
in which they work in tandem with
members of the race or races they
insulted.
This is perhaps the only way to
ensure a change in attitudes: not
through reverse racism, or through
criminal sanctions, or through legal-
izing violent response. If people
simply made contact with the
groups they hate, they would most
assuredly find that their hatred was
unfounded.
The possibility for a more en-
lightened future is within our grasp.
Let's not let it slip through our fin-
gers.
Campus Spectrum
By
Clay Deanhardt
With a nod of thanks to Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr I, too, have a dream. I have a dream that one
day we will live in a colorblind society: a world
where people respect one another's rights, learn
from one another's culture and treat each other as
brothers and sisters.
In this world, all Americans would get an
equal opportunity to make good. Words like
"nigger "kike" and "honkey" would be obsolete.
Racial quotas would no longer be needed to right the
wrongs of society.
At one time, I thought my dream was coming
closer to fruition. My generation has been the first to
grow up in a truly integrated society, and I hoped
that one day we could make forced integration a
thing of the past. Integration, like reconstruction,
would become a word that meant the past. Co-
existence would be the new buzzword of the day.
That was then.
This is now, and I'm beginning to lose hope.
No longer do I have to read about racial incidents in
Detroit, Miami, Chicago or Forsyth County � now
I can just walk across campus. It is becoming obvious
that integration, also like reconstruction, which
worked in the short term, is losing its ability to affect
long-term change.
We have a growing racial problem on this
campus, and it's time the administration � and the
students � did something about it. The recent prob-
lems began two years ago when a number of stu-
dents worked to fix our SGA elections, effectively
keeping Stephen Pierce, the minority candidate, out
of office. It manifests itself when the black students
on campus block-vote to elect a black homecoming
queen and we have to ask: Are they voting for the
person, or the skin color?
Last year racism crept back into the spotlight
when the SGA killed in committee a resolution
supporting the rebuilding of a true minority cultural
center (the measure was later revived and passed).
Then, in the late spring, a group of black and white
students came to blows in Garrett Dorm.
Teddy White, the black student who appar-
ently threw the first punch, has been suspen led for
two years and recently convicted on several counts
of assault. The white students, however, who alleg-
edly shouted racial slurs at White and his friends,
went unchallenged and unpunished.
The issue has recently come back to haunt the
university. The North Carolina N AACP has chosen
Black History Month (February) to protest White's
suspension. Dennis Schatzman of that group claims
White was misrepresented and treated unfairly in
front of the Honor Board, and he is demanding that
either White be re-instated or the white students
somehow be punished. Schatzman is trying to push
legislation through the N.C Legislature that would
make racial slurs illegal, and he has latched upon
White's case as his rallying point.
That mav be unfortunate for White, whose
case may get lost or even forgotten in the political
battle going on around him. If White was treated
unfairly bv the public defender or the Honor Board
� and the indications are that this is very likely -
then he deserves another chance in his own defense.
The truth probably will never be revealed
completely. Both sides are changing their stones to
meet their needs, and the two parties really being
hurt at this point are the university and racial justice.
What remains for us now is to learn from these
incidents and keep thorn from happening again.
Schatzman is wrong about one thing, at least
Black students do not have to be � and should not
be � afraid to come to ECU. It was not, after all.
White who received the beating.
In one sense, however, he is right. It i becom-
ing increasingly uncomfortable for minority stu-
dents on this campus, a fact represented in the de-
clining percentage of minority enrollment here (at
one time, 15 percent of our students were minorities,
now that figure is closer to 11 percent). Just this year
students participating in a peaceful march observ-
ing King's birthday were subjected to racial slurs
thrown from open windows and passerby s. Just two
weeks ago a white SGA legislator, one of our own
student representatives, threw carefully selected
black and brown jelly beans at the back of Valeria
Lassiter, the SGA's only black legislator.
The time has come for action from students,
faculty and administration. White should be given a
second hearing with competent counsel before a
new, impartial Honor Board. The legislator who
pelted Lassiter with jellybeans should be removed
from the legislature and barred from ever returning
� sending a message that we will not allow our
representatives to act in such an ignorant fashion.
Students should be educated, from the time
thev are new at the university, on the various cul-
tural backgrounds represented here. Minority stu-
dents should get more involved in SGA, the Student
Union and the campus media. The percentage oi
minority students at ECU has never been fully re-
flected in these gr jups.
All is not doom and gloom, however. The
university has recently hired Dr. Larry Smith as its
assistant vice chancellor and director of minority
affairs, a newly created position, and a new Confer-
ence Committee on Human Relations has begun de-
veloping new education programs. Both of these
new offices should be utilized to their fullest.
I challenge the university to take one more
step to the forefront in progressive education. Ad-
ministrators should create a new course teaching
racial relations and cultural understanding. That
course should be made a part of the General College
curriculum � required of all students who graduate
from ECU. The future oi our country is going to
depend on people oi all races and nationalities
working together, and ECU can become a new
leader in that movement.
The ideal academic environment should be
free of racial tension: It is obvious the environment at
ECU is not ideal. It is time � past time � that we
rectifv the situation.
It is time we make the dream come true.
Clay Deanhardt is a former managing editor of The
Eosf Carolinian.
'
,
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THr. EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14, 1989 5


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Students and faculty respond
Allegations made b the
IAACP gained response from
. hancellor Eakin recently, but
what about student and faculty
. esponse?
A handful of opinions were
tth red in an effort to find out
w hat people who live and work at
:I have to sav about two of the
tccusations which said more
about this University than merely
the cast in question.
These are the accusations re-
I . nded to:
l)"The majority of black stu-
. . I at bast Carolina University
iack confidence in the administra-
tion as to whether thev are trulv
fair in their dealings with conflicts
between black and white stu-
dents "
2)The University has differ
re standards for black and white
students with respect to viola-
ts of state and university rules
and regulations
iammy Oenise AnrersoT,
: r ac ounting major:
I have not been involved in
kind of c ntlict between black
jnd white students, but in the
conflicts that do involve black and
white students there seems to be
unfair treatment to black stu-
dents. This is why black students
do not have confidence in the
administration and feel we have
to stand up for ourselves. She also
added, "1 don't think we can say
the University as a whole has dif-
ferent standards
David McCreary, senior Eng-
lish major:
"I would disagree with those
accusations, because I don't see it.
The blacks that I've had class with
have done just as well or better. 1
don't think they're getting an
unfair shake as far as education or
anything else is concerned. I'm
unaware of any policies that differ
between the way blacks and
whites are treated
Dr. Alfred Matthews, vice
chancellor for student life:
"1 think the black students do
have some legitimate concerns
I'm not naive enough to believe
that-there aren't sunw racial inci-
dents Matthews also' saia, "t
have no indication that we do not
give fair treatment to black stu-
dents through anything I know
about and am aware of
Sonja Strayhom, senior urban
planning major
"Maybe, being black, we're
more on the defensive from fears
of being denied opportunities and
being oppressed; so we're always
on our P's and Q's to make sure
we aren't denied anything we're
entitled to. Oftentimes we (black
students) feel we have to look out
for ourselves. I've known a lot of
my friends and acquaintances
who felt that they didn't get the
instruction and guidance that
they deserved. Personally, I
haven't experienced that in my
major
Dr. Larry Smith, vice chancel-
lor tor minoriy affairs:
Smith said he feels he has a
limited perception, since he's
only gotten to know students
from the MSO, gospel choir, and
ECU Christian Fellowship. He
said his "focus has been with stu-
dent leadership but based on the
tu1cnt$ he's gottert to fcnrAv he
su'd, "I think that charge is ill-
founded
Bundy and the burning question
HI NDRICK HERTZBERG
the New Republic
The scene at Florida State
Pn n n the morning they gave Ted
dj the chair was straight out
of a sleazy teen exploitation
Two thousand people,
many of them boisterous college
students, gathered outside the
prison with signs saving things
like "1 Like My Ted Well Done
Sales of "Burn Bundv Bum" T-
shirts were brisk When the
arse pulled out of the prison
yard there were whoops and
igh fives. AH that was tacking
was for Bundy to push open the
. 1 of his coffin and come bound
mg out in a hockey mask.
The death penalty is uncon-
troversial in Western Europe,
where execution is unknown, and
in the Islamic countries, where it
is routine. It's an issue in South
Africa, where the gallows helps
op up apartheid; in the commu-
nist world, where glasnost has
brought forth a few calls for aboli-
tion; and of course in the United
States, where as with so many
other goods and services, a
greater variety of execution is of-
fi red than in any other country.
Besides the electric chair, the
37 capital punishment states em-
ploy poison gas, hanging, shoot-
i rtgand lethal injection. Electrocu-
tion (17 states), invented in 1888,
was sold as "scientific" and hu-
mane, though it is probably pain-
ful and undeniably disgusting:
i he body convulses, smoke pours
from its orifices, the smell of
(ooked flesh pervades the execu-
tion chamber, and the corpse is so
hot it cannot be touched for sev-
� ral minutes.
In our cool era, lethal injection
1A states) is the happening thing.
. his grotesque parody of medical
procedure takes from five to 10
minutes, during much of which
the prisoner may be awake and in
obvious pain. In one recent
botched execution inTexasthei.v.
tube slipped out of the con-
demned man's arm and sprayed
poison all over the room; that one
ended up taking 45 minutes.
However iffy the technology,
the numbers are way up. After a
10-vear hiatus, the United States
had six executions K tween 1977
and 1982. The pace has since
picked up: Bundv made it an even
100 since 1983 Some 2,200 people
wait on the nation's death rows, a
proud Republican achievement.
The Bundy case makes a good
t( si of one's views on capital
punishment, because Bundy was
such a sadistic, thoroughly evil
mass murderer that one needn't
be a proponent of the death pen-
alty to be sickened by the thought
of him living peacefully to a ripe
old age, borrowing books from
the prison library and granting
the occasional interview. Why
then was it wrong to execute him?
One argument for capital
punishment is that it deters. Yet
despite massive efforts, no one
has ever been able to show that it
lowers the murder rate. And
Bundy - who moved to Florida
only after ascertaining that execu-
tion is common there - was at-
tracted, not deterred.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
W4rrr
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Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus Fo-
rum" section of the paper, The East
Carolinian features "The Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion col-
umn by guest writers from the stu-
dent body and faculty. The columns
printed in "The Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted only
with regard to rules of grammar and
decency. Persons submitting col-
umns must be willing to accept byline
credit for their efforts, as no entries
from ghost writers will be published.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance to Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let
ters must include the name, major,
classification, address,phone number
and the sigtwture of the author (s).
Letters arc limited to 300 words or
less, double-spaced, typed or neatly
printed.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14,1989
Classifieds
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sing in Choral Lab. 3-4 Mon. & Wed. Fac-
ulty Welcome. Call Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
757-6331 for more information.
LOST ID behind the Attic Sat. night.
Initials on ID. are V.S.�was in blue
leather ID. holder. $50 reward if returned.
Please contact Pam or Tricia at 752-6105 or
758-6731. PLEASE!
GIRLS, GUYS: Poolsidc parties and ma-
jor tanning at Daytona Beach, Spring
Break '89. CaU Keith, Kelly, Ron and
Wayne at 752-4693 for more information.
NEED HELP: With house cleaning, yard
work, baby-sitting, etc.? RENT-A-
BROTHER, 18 Feb. 1989. Call PHI SIGMA
PI 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. M-F 758-7535 or 752
9723.
SEND A LOVED ONE A CARNATION
$2.00 each, red, pink & white. In front of
the bookstore 12-3 p.m. Sponsored by
Clement Hall House Council.
NEGRIL JAMAICA: Spring Break 7
nights, airfare out of Charlotte. Prices start
at $489. Call Tripp for more details. 758-
9177.
LOST: Sil er gray miniature Schnauzer.
Last seen between 10th & Elm St. Please
call 757-0202.
JENNY HIGGINS: Congratulations on a
successful year as Jr. Panhellenic Treas-
ure. �Love, The Sisters and Pledges of
Chi Omega.
ASHLEY HENDRIX: Our new
Panhellenic Representative. You will rep-
resent us well! We love vou! �The Chi-
Os.
TINA THOMAS AND ANGELA MEIN-
DERS: We love you! New Exec �The
Sisters and Pledges of Chi Omega.
THE CHI OMEGA AND LAMBDA CHI
ALPHA: Pizza Party was a big hit! We had
fun, let's do it again soon. �Love the Qu-
Os.
SUSAN HORNE, PANHELLENIC SEC-
RETARY OF 1989: We knew you could do
it! We love you! �Love, the Chi-Os.
CAM WARD AND CAROL SHORE.
Congratulations "Hall of Fame" Chi-Os.
We are very proud of you. �Love, All of
your Chi Omega Sisters and Pledges.
CAM WARD: Your sisters couldn't be
more proud of you. MOST OUTSTAND-
ING GREEK Woman, HALL of FAME,
and ARTEMIS AWARD. You've made
your mark on Chi-O and ECU. We love
you. �Your Chi Omega Sisters and
Pledges.
LOST: Small, chain, gold bracelet
Wednesday, Feb. 8 on campus. RE-
WARD! Call 830-9497.
ALPHA PHI'S: Thursday was a blast,
those Kamikaze's really did us in. We
hope you had as much fun as we did and
can't wait to do it again. �The Sig Tau's.
KIRSTEN SMITH: Congratulations on
your new found singing talent! When is
your next gig? ECU is waiting!
KAPPA ALPHAS: We really had a blast,
sorry time went by so fast. Slammin' and
Jammin' under the moonlight�we know
we won't ever forget that night! Lisa cele-
brating her 21st, while everyone else was
quenching their thirst! Out on the deck�
who was that naked boy? A party again,
we would all really er.joy! �Love, the
Delta Zetas.
GUYSGIRLS, GET READY Rafters,
Alpha Sigma Phi lil" sis and Gold's gym.
Male Best Body Contest. Feb. 15Guvs in
at 11:00. 1st�$100, 2nd�$50, 3rd�Free
membership.
KA BROTHERS: Thanks for the
Valentine's Party! Let's do it again real
soon! �Love your KA Lil' Sisters.
COME ON BY THE COFFEEHOUSE:
And see what the ECU Student Union is
planning for you! Wednesday, February
15,3:00 pm6:00 p.m.
LOST: Brown leather "Bomber" jacket in
Brewster B wing. Very special sentimental
value. If found, please contact Leslie, 752-
5407 REWARD!
TO ALL ALPHA DELTA PI AWARD
RECIPIENTS. Mary Meadows for high-
est GPA; Jan Copley for Artemis and
Greek Hall of Fame; Angie Sumrcll for
Greek Hall of Fame. You all deserve it! �
Love your Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE
SORORITIES: Who received awards at
the Panhellenic Scholarship Banquet. �
From the Alpha Delta Pi's.
HUFF: For being elected Treasurer of the
New Panhellenic executive council
You'll do a great job. �Alpha Delta Pi
THETA CHI PLEDGES: Yeah, that
means you too Jay Hollingsworth! So far,
so good! Keep up the hard work and get
ready to meet the sororities up close and
personal Hey guys, why be less than the
best? Roll Chi! �The Brothers.
THETA CHI: What has 80 legs, drinks,
and is going to invade Wake Forest this
weekend? The crew from ECU! Mason-
Dixon Jubilee is only 3 days away so get
ready for a weekend you won't forget!
TO THE SIGMA PHI EPSILON
BROTHERS AND PLEDGES: Initiation
was the date our girls had had a very long
wait, but when the time came, their was no
one to blame, but your brothers and
pledges The partv was great'
MaMMwmMa
RING0L0 TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER 89 EFFICIENCY 1 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS. FOR
INFO CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH
AT 752-2865
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Downtown Mall)758-3025
VALENTINE'S DAY
ROSES?
CALL BONITAS
BOUTIQUE OF
FLOWERS AND GIFTS
for SpecialPhone 355-
7888. Greenville Square
Shopping Center.
(just down from Kmart)
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle TTomenr
Health Center
i
CsX for appointment M n. thru SaL Low
Coat Termination to 20 weeks of pregnancy
�MS
1-800-433-2930
WAKE Nf BAKE
IN BEAUTIFUL
NEGRIL, JAMAICA
FOR
SPRING BREAK
f89!
VERY
AFFORDABLE
PACKAGES.
BOOK EARLY AND
SAVE!
CALL:
1-800-426-771
3
than Geraldo!
more
than Sally Jesse Rapheal!
If s the Return of the the
scandalous, the libelous (but
ALWAYS Clearly Labeled)
East Carolinian Satire Page!
Offer void where prohibited by law.
R - R - R - RING
"Hi! I'm Tom Reichstetter, your At&T Student
Campus Manager here at ECU. I would like
to tell you how At&t can help lower your
long distance bills. I can also answer any of
your long distance questions.
The best time to reach me is 11:30 am-1-30
pm. M&W, 1:00 pm-3:00 pm T&TH, and 3:00
pm - 5:00 pm F, but you can call anytime
758-2103
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thura at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri. night
at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Hey you guys! Come join the fun on the
Student Union Travel Committee's cruise
to the BAHAMAS over Spring Break.
There will be dancing, swimming, relax-
ing and tons of other things to do aboard
ship. AU transportation and "all you can
eat" on the Carnival ship The ship will
dock at Freeport and Nassau, so come on
and shop until you drop in the world's
biggest marketplace!
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. i:iRawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we stud v
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security PosrJon, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics�757-6282 or 757-1677
WEIGHT LIFTING CONTEST
Muscle and musdeless bound men and
women should attend the Intramural
registration meeting for the annual
weight lifting contest Feb. 20 at 5:00 p.m.
in GCB 1026.
The Ultimate Chance for all students to
show their artistic talents! The Spring art
competition will be accepting entries Feb.
15-17 from 3-5 p.m. in rm. 221 Menden-
hall. Entry fee is S3.00entry and each
person may submit 3 pieces. Fust place
$175.00, 2nd place $125.00, 3rd place
575.00 and 5 honorable mentions of
$25.00. The Ulumina reception will be Feb.
20,7-9 p.m. in Mendenhall Gallery. Unse-
lected pieces must be picked up by Feb. 19
or no later than Feb. 20 by 3 p.m. due to
lack of storage.
INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE
Interested in spending this summer in
remote parts of the world? The Overseas
Development Network (ODN) is spon-
soring internships for students and recent
graduates in the Philippines, India, Bang-
ladesh, Nicaragua, Bolivia, Belize, and
our own Appalachian mountains. Any
mapr can apply. Length of stay varies
from 3-6 months. For more info contact
Marianne Exum (h) 830-9450 & (w) 757-
6271. Hurry! Applications Deadline�
Feb. 15.
ECU NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 7:30-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh-
ments served. No ticket required; just
reserve your time
COOPERATIVE ED.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered by
the Univerity, is designed to help you find
career-related work experience before
you graduate. We would like to extend an
invitation to all students to attend a Co-op
info. Seminar in the GCB Seminars for
spring '89: Feb. 16,1 pjn room 1014; Feb.
20,1 p.m roomlOl 4, Feb. 23,4 p.m room
2016; Feb. 27,4 pm, room 2016.
AMNESTY INTL
Amnestsy Intl. Group 402 is looking for
persons to assist in its "Brazilian Cam-
paign The group meets every fourth
Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 401E. 4th St in the upper floor-
enter from the 4th St. entrance. Next
meeting: Feb. 22. Students welcome!
HEART FOR ART
Annual Valentine's Day Sale presented by
School of Art Metals Department. It will
be Feb. 8-10, 13-14. Displays are to be
found in the foyer and top of the ramp (3rd
floor) Jenkins Art Bldg.
UNPER WATER HOCKEY
CLUB
Underwater Hockey Club will be playing
Wed. at 8:00 p.m. at Memorial Gym. Snor-
keling equip, nor skill is necessary, but if
have either, please bring. The next dates of
play will be Feb. 14 at 9:00 p.m Feb. 15 at
8:00p.m. Feb. 28 at 9:00p.m. and Feb. 22 at
8:00 p.m. Every night of play will be at
Memorial Gym. If any questions call Oaij;
Cannon 752-7620 or Chi 752-8124. See
everyone interested underwater.
CABARET
The Performing Arts Series and the Dept.
of University Unions present CABARET,
the smash Broadway musical. This pro-
fessional performance will take place on
feb. 218:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
This production is being staged by Daeda-
lus Productions, who brought PURLIE to
Wright Auditorium last year. Don't miss
this exciting musical of decadent, delight-
ful, and dazzling entertainment. "Ufe is a
Cabaret, Old Chum, Come to the Caba-
ret Tickets for CABARET are on sale in
the Central Ticket Office, MSC. Telephone
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. - 6:00 p.m Mon. - Fri.
POLISH NAT'L RADIO SYM-
PHONY ORCHESTRA
The Polish National Radio Symphony
Orchestra will appear as part of the Per-
forming Arts Series on Feb. 22,8:00 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Over 100 members
strong, this symphony is led by Antoni
Wit and features guest pianist Piotr
Paleczny. 'The program for this grand
evening includes: Strauss�DON JUAN,
Op. 20; Chopin�CONCERTO No. 2 in F
Minor, Op. 21; and Brahms�SYM-
PHONY No. 2 in D Major Op. 73. Tickets
for this event are on sale now in the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, MSC The number is
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. - 6:00 p.m MonFri.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the April
issue. Articles can be left at the office or the
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library. The first issue for Spring
semester is expected to arrive in a few
weeks.
NTE (SPECIALTY AREA)
The National Teacher Examination�Spe-
cialty Area Exams�will be offered at
ECU on April 1. Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to the Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 911-R, Prince-
ton, NJ 08541. Applications must be post-
marked no later than Feb. 27. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Room 105 Speight Bldg.
BLACK FACULTY SYMPO-
SIUM
Members of the Organization of Black
Faculty and Staff (OBLS) will present their
current and or on-going research inter-
ests during Black History Month. Presen-
tations will be held each Mon. during the
month of Feb. in the Ledonia Wright Afro-
American Cultural Center from 1130-
1:30. Students, faculty and staff are en-
couraged to bring a brown bag lunch and
enjoy the discussion. Sponsored by the
Office of Minority Student Affairs.
on Feb. 14 at the Attic. Entertainment tor
the evening will feature Lionel Norman, a
nationaUy renowned comedian with the
Comedy Zone, and the Pigz Brothers,
playing your top 40; 50's; and 6Cs tunes
Doors will open at 8:00 p.m. Tickets will be
on sale at the door for $5.00 each
CO-OP ED.
If you are interested in federal jobs and
how to handle the federal employment
process (permanent, summer, or Co-op),
you will want to attend a presentation bv
Mr. Phil Hanson of the U.S. Office of Per-
sonnel Mgmt. on 22489, from 10:00 a.m.
- 12 noon in room 1031, GCB.
S.A.M. MEETING
There will be a SAM. meeting on Feb 15
at 3.00 pn. in GCB 1028. Ms. Ruth Pe
tersen from the Co-op office will bespeak-
ing about co-op programs. All members
encouraged to attend and guests are wel-
come.
GET YOUR PICTURE MADE EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
Make memories of college friendship last
forever with color picture buttons compli-
ments of E.J. Hamilton. Pictures will be
taken inside Student Store on Feb. 7 and 14
from 9 to 3. Single�$2.50, couple�$3.50,
group�$4.00. Stop by the store or order in
advance. For more info contact Vincent
Norris at 752-8047. Sponsored by ECU
Gospel Choir.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed National
Service Frat is sponsoring a 24-hour Run
for Cancer on April 14th and 15th with the
American Cancer Society. For more info
call Heather at 758-9550, Bryan at 756-
9665 or Rose Richards at Greenville's
chapter of the American Cancer Society
Find out about entering a team or donat-
ing moneymaterials. Help fight the
battle against cancer by supporting Alpha
Phi Omega and the American Cancer
Society in the 24-hour run.
STUDENTS ft STAFF
"I Have a Heart For You" t-ahirts are being
sold by members of the ECU Women's
Soccer Club. Great for Valentine's gifts to
your loved one. To get in touch with a
soccer player, please contact Ann Totaro
at 830-1387 or Beth Harvey at 752-9791
The next (EQ2 meeting will be held Feb
15 at 4:00 in Speight 308. Please join us and
get some great book club ideas!
ACCOUNTING INFO. SYS-
TEMS
The accounting firm of McGladrey, Hen-
drickson, and Pullen will make a presen-
tation to all graduate and undergraduate
business students. This presentation will
discuss accounting info, systems and will
be given by Bud Moon, Certified Data
Processor (CDP) and Rick Hemphil, CPA
The meeting is sponsored by the Decision
Science Society and is scheduled for 3:00
p.m. Feb. 22 in GCB 1009. Refreshments
will be served. All new or prospective
members are welcome.
VALENTINE'S BAT 1
There will be a Valentine's Ball for ECU
students on Feb. 17th, 8 p.m. to midnight.
Tickets are $35couple. Eligible singles
welcome. For more info call 752-4594 or
call Kate at 830-8916.
GAMMA BETA PHI
A regular meeting will be held at 700
tonight in Jenkins Auditorium. All mem-
bers should be in attendance.
"Don Pasqudle" by Donizetti (Feb. 18, 8 I
p.m Fletcher Recital Hall, free): Sher:
Gray, piano, senior recital fFeb. 19, 3
p.m Fletcher Recital Hall, tree). Faculty
Recital, Mark Ford, percussion (Feb 20
8:15 p.m , Fletcher Recital Hall, free).
B IN AN HONOR'S CLASS?
Any student graduating spring semester
1989 who hs completed with grade of B
or better 24 Honors courses (including
upper-level rex-arch courses in the major
will be a graduate of the Honors Program
and should have that notification
stamped on hisher transcript To do so,
submit the list of Honors courses bv
semester, with grades earned, to Dr.
David Sanders, 1002 GCB, 757-6373 bo
fore March 15.
INTERVIEWING VVQRK-
SHQPS
To help ECU people prepare for on and ofl
campus interviews, the Career Planning
and Placement Service in Bloxton House
is offering these one hour programs to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search The pro-
gram is open to the first 20 people to com
for each session. No sign up is required
These sessions are held in Cr&P Room on
Feb. 13 and 23 at 215 p m
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice is offering these one hour programs on
beginning a resume for your job search
Handouts and samples will be given out
to the first 20 people to come to each
session. No sign up is required. These
sessions are held in the Cr&P Room on
Feb. 16, 21 and 22 at 2:15 p.m.
FASHION SHOW
The MSO will be sponsoring a Fashion
Show in honor of Black History Month
tonight in Hendrix Theatre at 7:30 p m.
Advanced tickets $1, $2 at the door.
MSjQ
The general body of the MSO will me
Feb 16th at 6 p.m in Speight 129 All are
invited to attend.
HANG GJJBIMC.
VALENTINE'S pAY DANCE SCHOOL of music events
ECU'S District 97 of the State Employees
Assoc. will hold a Valentine's Day dance
Feb. 14-20: National Opera Co. with ECU
Symphony Orchestra in production of
Soar through the sea air at Nags Head, NC
withJM-REC Services. A hang gliding trip
has been scheduled at reduced rates fof
April 18 Register Feb. 28-April 3 in 204
Memorial Gym. Want to know more' Cat
Pat Cox at 757-6387.







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14, 1989 7
J
NC seeks waste dump site
(AP) � North Carolina offi-
cials are preparing a bill they hope
Jkvill let Tar Heel industries con-
tinue to ship hazardous waste to a
"outhCarolina landfill, but with a
in just weeks away, many in-
dustries that ship waste to the
landfill are getting frantic.
"We are now scurrying to
Find alternate sources for our
'hazardous waste said Ron
Mensik, vice president of
operations for Watts Regulator
Industries Inc. in Rutherford
County. "It's going to be an ex-
treme expense to us
The legislation, requested by
Gov. Jim Martin, would resume a
search for a site for a hazardous -
waste treatment plant and would
repeal a four-year ban on the dis-
posal oi wastes within North
Carolina. Suspension of a site
search by the 1988 General As-
� sembly and the disposal ban
helped prompt South Carolina
Gov. Carroll Campbell last month
to issue an order, effective March
1. barring waste from North Caro-
lina and eight other states not
.searching for their own waste
-disposal site.
About 200 to 300 North Caro-
lina businesses send their hazard-
ous wastes to the GSX Chemical
Services landfill in Sumter
County, S.C
"It's a question of whether it's
sufficient said Linda Little, ex-
ecutive director of the North
Carolina Governor's Waste Man-
agement Board. She said the bill
doesn't provide something else
South Carolina officials want:
repeal of a law that bars a pro-
posed waste-treatment plant near
Laurinburg by severely
restricting its discharge.
In addition, unless North
Carolina can demonstrate to the
federal government by October
that it can handle its own wastes,
it faces a loss of "Superfund"
cleanup money. A spokesman for
Campbell reacted favorably Fri-
day toward the proposed North
Carolina legislation.
"1 can tell you that pro-
posed legislation would be
viewed as very encouraging by
the governor's office Tucker
Eskew said, but he cautioned that
South Carolina officials must re-
view the provisions before mak-
ing anv decisions, kittle said other
provisions would:
- Give Martin power to ap-
point a nine-member Industrial
Waste Management Commission
that would pick a site for a treat-
ment plant by March 1990.
- Set a Jan. 1, 1993, deadline
for operating a waste-treatment
plant.
- Build waste facilities to
complement those in other states.
Martin last month asked the
legislature for authority to find a
site after the legislature halted a
search by the Hazardous Waste
Treatment Commission. Resi-
dents in Lee, Rowan and other
counties protested when they
learned their communities were
candidates for a waste site.
But some members of the
General Assembly, including
House Speaker Joe Mavretic, D-
Fdgeeombe, say they want the
legislature to take the lead in solv-
ing the problem. "I think the
deadline from the governor of
South Carolina is saying let's get
oii the dime and move forward
Rep. Dennis Wicker, D-Lee, said
in an interv iew published Sunday
in The Charlotte Observer.
"I'm not intimidated by his
statement of his March 1 deadline.
I really have some legal questions
about his ability to do that
Wicker is the chairman oi the
subcommittee that will deal with
waste legislation.
Mensik estimated that his
firm's foundry each week turns
out 30 tons of sand contaminated
with lead. The waste is shipped to
GSX.
He said shipping the waste to
other hazardous-waste landfills
would add about $250,000 in per-
mit fees and transportation costs
for the first two or three months.
"I don't think the State of North �
Carolina realizes what is happen-
ing yet. It's totally unfair to think
the other states will absorb all of
our problems Mensik said.
North Carolina has no haz-
ardous-waste landfill. The only
other one in the Southeast is at
Emelle, Ala.
A spokesman for the Emelle
site said nothing would prevent
the landfill from accepting waste
diverted from South Carolina.
South Carolina officials said they
will notify industries after thev
determine in a week or so exactly
which states will fall under the
tan.


t



Happy Valentine's Day
From
The East ?
Carolinian!

Soviets eager for weapons treaty
SUM AUJptSS&MES
SunSational
WASHINGTON (AD� The
Soviets are bending over back-
wards to comply with the treaty
Icalling for destruction of all inter-
onediate-range missiles, a sign
that thev are eager for a more
� sweeping pact to slash nuclear
arsenals, savs the chief U.S. in-
spector.
"The whole thing is going a
whole lot better than we ex-
pected said Brio. Gen. Roland
Lajoie, who in 19 previous years
of dealing with the Soviets had
found little reason to love them.
Lajoie. 52, has served two
stints as a military attache in
Moscow and was commander of
the L'S. liaison office in East
Germany in 198 when Soviet sol-
diers shot and killed American
Ma). Arthur Nicholaorv
"Each of us has some un-
pleasant little anecdote said
Lajoie, whose face was smashed
when the truck in which he was
nding was rammed from behind
by a Red Army vehicle in East
Germany five months after the
Nicholson incident.
"But says Lajoie, "we are
professional officers
And "there is a political will
on both sides to make this thing
work. But 1 am under no political
pressure to whitewash the proc-
ess Lajoie said in an interview.
He said the Soviets clearly
view verification of the Interme-
diate-range Nuclear Forces, or
INF, treaty as a foundation for
cooperation on the more ambi-
tious Strategic Arms Reduction
Treaty START to cut long-range
superpower weapons by 30 to 50
percent. START talks are stalled
while the Bush administration
reviews overall U.S. policy.
"START said Lajoie, "is
going to be much more compli-
cated" to verify because the num-
ber of weapons involved is much
larger and because it calls for
reduction rather than elimination
of specific systems.
Overhead satellites will re-
main the backbone of U.S. verifi-
cation, said Lajoie, but like the
INF pact, START calls for on-site
inspections on demand at dozens
of locations in the United States,
Western Europe and the Soviet
bloc.
Under the INF regime, the
United States also is allowed to
keep 30 inspectors outside a So-
viet mobile missile plant in
Votkinsk, 700 with the Soviets
had found little reason to love
them.
Lajoie and the other 250
Americans assigned to the inspec-
tion agency consult regularly
with the SI ART negotiators, and
some of the military officers on
the START team have accompa-
nied the INF inspectors on their
rounds to make sure that lessons
are learned.
"There are certain minor pro-
visions for which we would pre-
fer different wor 'ing said
Lajoie, noting a requirement that
inspectors tour a facility within
one hour oi arrival, no matter
what time they get there.
Since Lajoie supervised the
creation oi theOn-Site Inspection
Agency in April 1988, the Soviets
have destroyed 30.8 percent of
their 1,836 short- and medium-
range missiles, and the United
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further Information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
get ready for Spring 'BrealiJ
616 East Arlington Boulevard
Greenville, NC. 27834
(919) 756-9221
Come in andreCa?tin our Sunal tanning bed
with stereo & fan.
$5.00 per visit or
$50.00 per month, (1 visit per day).
This offer good through March 31. 1989
J
ADVERTISE WITH US
IN THE PRE-REGISTRATION MAGAZINE
Contact The Advertising Staff at the
East Carolinian Today!
Deadline:
February 22,1989
The East Carolinian
Publications Building
(across from
Joyner Library)
757-6366
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
States has destroyed 30.5 percent
of its 867 Pershing 2 and ground-
launched cruise missiles.
"We're both a little ahead of
the curve" for the three-vear de-
J
struction period, said Lajoie. The
treaty, negotiated over six years
and signed in December 1987,
bans ground-launched super-
power missiles with ranges of
300-3,000 miles.
He acknowledges that there
have been a lot of minor glitches.
They have been resolved in a
gentlemanly way. There is a tradi-
tion now of resolving these at the
lowest possible level
Tanning And Toning Center, Inc.
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HOURS:
MonFri.
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9am - 5 pm
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Greenvilie, NC
Phone:
758-0404
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1989
7:00-9:00 P.M.
. fl
i
MUSICAL

fi
S
NOTES
A Competition For All Types
Of Musicians.
�Do You Play An Instrument?
�Are You Part Of A Band? V
�Do You Sing Well? �
If you answered YES to any of the above
questions, then this is for
YOU! Y
PRTZE AWARDS:
1st PLACE $100.00
2nd PLACE $50.00
3rdPLACE $25.00
Pick up Applications at the Information
Desk in Mendenhall, or contact the
Student Union at 757-6611.

5
Sponsored by ECU Student Union Coffeehouse Committee.





u
8THE EAST CAROLINIAN
I
FEBRUARY 14, 1Q89
Computer viruses spread
MENLO PARK, Calif. (AD
�The bad news is that computers
get diseases.
The worse news is that when
they do, the illness can spread at
the speed of light, leaving every-
thing from household accounts to
business data to power plants to
defense systems fatally stricken.
Apocalypse now? It's not just
a movie.
"There's a potential risk that
matches the destructiveness of a
nuclear attack warns Donn
Parker, an authority on computer
crime at SRI International here.
Computers get sick tor the
same reasons humans catch flu or
YD. They interconnect. The ill-
nesses bear the same familiar
names that attack people: worms,
bugs, viruses. They work the
same way, invading a system and
replicating or infiltrating until the
body is overwhelmed.
A worm broadly believed to
have been planted last November
by Cornell grad student Robert
Morris within hours fouled up
some 6,000 interconnected com-
puters in a defense-university
network. Estimates of the damage
done and the man-hours spent to
repair it run from $20 to $95 mil-
lion.
Some case histories of com-
puter illness, benign and less so.
In Fort Worth, Texas, an un-
easy employee planted a "time
bomb" in his company computer.
Any time his name did not ap-
pear, indicating he'd been fired,
the hidden instruction would ac-
tivate, destroying the firm's files.
In Hay ward, Calif a rapist
used a computer to get the ad-
dresses of women he attacked by
tracing their license plates
through state files to which he had
access. In the Equity Funding
scandal of the 70s, a ring used
computers to steal some $70 mil-
. lion.
About five years ago in New
York, students at the exclusive
Dalton School found their way
into the computers at the Sloan-
Kettering Institute for Cancer
Research. They were discovered
before thev could do any damage,
intended or inadvertent, to medi-
cal files.
What Donn Parker fears is the
arrival, eventually, of the terror-
ist.
"A network is for exchange of
information says Richard Koe-
nig, associate director of the
Computer Security Institute in
Northborough, Mass. "If it needs
a lot of security, you defeat its
purpose
To stop tampering or worse,
Koenig foresees the day when
access to computer networks will
be encoded like a scrambler
phone. But that only makes com-
puters even more intimidating to
the unpracticed layman than they
already are. It's a dilemma.
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Hlnhwdv (SC 33 EXT 2 Mil. s Pas! lOlh St. Putt Pint!
Mon Thru Thurs Night
SHRIMP
SPECIAL
$3.65
Take Outs Welcome
752-3172
Connecticut law makers want to ban
alcohol use on universities' campuses
(CFS) - - In what may be the
most sweeping attempt to restrict
student drinking in the United
States, a Connout state legisla-
tor has introduce a bill which, if
passed, would ban alcohol from
state colleges.
State Rep. Edith Prague savs
her bill prohibiting the sale, distri-
bution and consumption of booze
on Connecticut's public cam-
puses is warranted by the rise in
alcohol abuse among students.
"Alcohol abuse by the youth
Students, however, dislike
the prospect of further restric-
tions. "Legislating a dry campus
is unnecessary said UConn stu-
dent government President Ross
Garber.
"I've gotten some feedback
from students who feel UConn
In Louisiana, the Hammond
City Council passed a anti-loiter-
ing ordinance last fall to discour-
age Southeastern Louisiana Uni-
versity students from hanging
around outside after local bars
and taverns close.
Also last fall, the universities
should comply with the state law, of Pennsylvania and Washington,
but shouldn't restrict the activi- Indiana and Princeton universi-
ties of adults ties and Cornell College in Iowa
"I think the kids that want to took steps to restrict campus
drink woul" still get their alcohol drinking,
from off campus added lames The Junior Leagues started a
viously dry campus.
"This is a restrictive policy
said Linn-Benton President Tom
Gonzales. "It's not a policy that
advocates an open use of alcohol.
It's to be primarily used in a social
atmosphere, with restrictive con-
ditions. It should not be inter-
preted that there will be a student
pub
GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPARTMENT
POOL MANAGER
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is now accepting applications
for a Pool Manager at its City Outdoor
Pool. Applicant must have Water Safety
Instructor Certificate and 2 years of pool
management experience. Applications may
be picked up at the City Personnel Office,
located on corner of 5th and Washington
Streets. For more information.
contact
Charles Williams, 830-4555.
of today is a major problem that Amfpacher, the editor-in-chief of three-year alcohol awareness pro-
cannot be ignored Prague said.
Numerous survevs from
around the countrv confirm her
view.Thelast week of Januarv, for
nstance, the Association of Junior
Leagues reported that "heavy "
drinking is increasing among col-
lege women in particular.
Prague contends it's because
college life revolves too much
around drinking, while academ-
ics and self-enrichment have
taken a back seat. "Learning to
the campus newspaper.
Connecticut, oi course, is not
alone in its efforts to curb student
drinking.
A few others are toving with
gram aimed at college women
called "Woman to Woman: The
Campus Generation
Alcohol contributes to many
"life damaging" problems for
the idea oi total prohibitions, too. college women, including date
At Michigan State University, rape and drug abuse, said Junior
administrators last month con- League spokeswoman Cary Cur-
ceded publicly they had consid- tis.
ered on outright drinking ban, but But while the trend appears to
opted instead to try to enforce be moving towards limiting alco-
existing policies more stringently, hoi use on campuses, at least one
"The emphasis here is not to school has loosened its drinking
lum.
drink is not part of the curricu- dry up the campus, literally, but rules a little.
it's to reduce the use and misuse Officials at Washington's
Prague also argues that much of alcohol said MSU vice prcsi- Linn-Benton Community College
dent for student affairs James agreed in October to allow the
Studer. limited use of alcohol on the pre-
of the crime committed on cam
puses is alcohol-related, and that
school policies may encourage
students to drink even though
most are younger than 21,
Connecticut's legal drinking age.
A University of Connecticut
committee already has begun
studying ways to decrease stu-
dent drinking, and may prohibit it
even if Prague's bill is not passed.
Existing university policies allow
students over the age of 21 to
drink in their dorm rooms.
UConn officials started re-
viewing campus drinking poli-
cies last spring, when student
celebrations of the school's Na-
tional Invitational Tournament
basketball victory were marred
by several incidents of vandalism.
World's largest
Mustard factory
SOUDERTON, Pa. (AP) �
The pungent smell of yellow
mustard permeates the air at the
Durkee-French Foods plant in
Souderton.
In the parking lot you can
smell the vinegar and spices
blended to make the vellow mash.
The 212,000 square-foot plant
� the world's largest mustard-
maker � produces enough
French's in a year to slather more
than 10 hot dogs for every Ameri-
can.
It's a far cry from the old
Philadelphia plant bought by
Robert Timothy French in the
1920s to make Colman's mustard,
hand-packed spices, birdseed,
gravel and biscuits. French's out-
grew that four-story building and
moved to Souderton in 1957.
French's has long been
owned by Rickitt & Colman of
London. In 1987, Reckitt & Col-
man merged its Durkee Foods
subisidiary with French's Mus-
tard to form Durkee-French
Foods. Durkee is a well-known
spice processor with operations in
Bethlehem.
The 133-employce Souderton
plant, with sales of about $40 mil-
lion last year, produces several
varieties of mustard, including
Bold 'N Spicy, Dijon and
Colman's Hot English mustard,
plus several private labels.
But the company's most
popular item is the bright yellow
mustard in the plastic squeeze
bottle. It fills more than 5 million
of the 16-ounce bottles per year.
Capture 'Vbur
Valentine's Heart
SURPRISE!
FINAL CLOSE-OUT ON OVERCOATS
$19.95 29.95
Faded Levies
$1.00 Off Per Pair
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 SAT.
(closed for Lunch
12:30-1:30)
CLOTHES
At
The Coin & Ring Man
400 S. Evans St.
On the corner below "Fizz"
'Recycled clothing (New & Used)
752-3866
with an adorable
Cupid Ziggy
Valentine doll.
Student Store w
Wright Building y
East Carolina University AMERICAN GREEI MGS

Maurice will
snub you, then he'll
rob you.
No need for a social regis-
tration or gold card at Annabelles
We've got what you want�
an enjoyable, delicious variety
of food, fair prices, and attentive
service by friendly people. It's
the taste of American casual
Come to Annabelles You'll
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raiabdle's
RESTAURANT & PUB TM
The Plaza
Greenville Blvd
756-0315
RESTAURANT & PUB
Mon-Thurs 11 30 AM- 11 00 PM
Fri-Sat 11 30 AM - Midnight
Sunday 12 Noon - 11 00 PM





I l EAS1 CAROI INIAN

Features
'True Believers' rocks
By 11M SHAMl IN
Stafl Vntrr
clerk who sees Dodd as some sort
of hero. It is Baron who pushes
Dodd into taking the case. His
support sees Dodd through situ-
ations which otherwise would
have overcome the confused law-
yer.
Not only does Dodd rely
heavily upon young Baron to see
him through his contusion, but it
is also clear that Woods relies
upon the young Downey: The two
characters are in constant conflict,
and the actors must constantly
meet each other's intensity. This
task is especially difficult tor two
actors when one is experienced
and the other an absolute begin-
ner, but Woods and Downey
seem as natural a pair as Streep
and Nicholson each provides
the cues their partner needs to
evoke a wide arrav of intense
emotion
Even the supporting
rolesare well-done. Shu Kai Kim,
plaved bv um Okumoto Karate
I ast night Hendrix Theater
screened "True Believer a film
� - i h people will soon queue
p al . mmercial cinemas. Even
� hose people w ill be pa
� five dollars ap ice none of
ild tee! disappointed as
inema.
imes Woods i gainst All
- I plays the part ot Eddie
( dd, j aw er w ho wasan activ-
foi human rights in the 1960s,
' las illen to the level ot de-
' � dealers For the first
ne in almost a decade, he is
defending an innocent man: this
becomes a sort ot crusade for
In pursuit ot the truth.
. iten bv a Nazi, be
� d in two other
rders ai d is nearh killed.
Dodd is assisted bv Roger
K bert 1 ow ne ' i I p
dem a young legal
K.P. is a laid-back radio manager
Kid II"), is a character who under-
goesa transformation from a cold,
hardened criminal to a vulnerable
human being, is a particularly
difficult role which Okumoto
portrays with stunning credibil-
ity. Cecil Skell, played by Tom
Bower, is another difficult role a
lunatic who sees the energy fields
which surround people and is
certain that Ma Bell killed Ken-
nedy. Bower, too, excels with his
character.
Perhaps the only dis-
sapointing character is that of
Robert Reynard, a character who
has a grudge against Dodd and
chooses to face him in court. Kurt-
wood Smith, who has played in a
double-handful oi filmsas well as
broadway productions, portravs
Reynard as flat, emotionless, and
utterly boring. Considering his
credentials, this role may well be
one of his greatest embarrass-
ments.
By PI ANN Nt VG1 OsKI
Sufi Ki ��
nam s K we but
rkers know
ttei K.l K � general
him to music director, assistant
luction manger and finally
general manager.
Powe states that he always
wanted, to take radio beyond the
limits Now that he has a manag-
ing position, he has the opportu-


V
1 : ma
science but I en he
his maj r I bi ideas!
. ma
jors, 1 ve has a i 11 i
i '
He start! i asa ZMBdeejav.bu!
kins :
- per
nity to do so. He goes on to say
that working at WZMB is a
whole lot of tun but that there
is a lot ot hard work behind it.
Powe is responsible tor what
is played on the radio station and
is often a strong influence on the
plans ot the music and program
:tors. I le believes that the
music and program directors help
him tocarrv on a productive radio
: n.
�v those two personali-
ti s have got to someway fit to-
� � make a station sound
g i 1 I e said.
It is obvious that WZMB of-
fers a variety oi music and Powe
says that is why so many people
tune in. "Top 40 gets redundant
he said, "and WZMB offers any-
thing you ever want to hear
exeept country
One oi the most exciting
things Powe has been working on
tor the remainder of his time at
FCC is the moving of WZMB.
WZMB will be moved from the
Old Joyner Library and into the
new Mendenhall building, which
is being constructed now.
The delay in finishing the
building has put back the date for
the move; however, a tentative
elate has been set tor this summer.
See POWE, page 11
Robert Downey Jr. (no apparent relation to Morton) opens his big mouth .it a murder trial in the
new smash hit thriller, "True Believer The previews of this have been pretty boring, but our
reviewer says the movie is pretty boss.
Polish National Radio Symphony
Orchestra to play at ECU
F (. L News Bureau
The Polish National Radio
Symphony Orchestra ot Ka-
towice, Poland, will perform at
E( ! Feb. 22, as part ot E( I 's
1988-89 Performing Art- Series.
rhe ci inert is scheduled I i 3
pm in Wright uditorium. 'I ick-
cts for the general public are 14
each, $7 for youth, and are on sale
at the E I' Central TicketM'fice,
National Opera presents the
coniedx. wDon Pasquale'
Vl'ttS
� c. but she soon tarns into a
'peno!thrift shrew.
I
�' I

I he
)pera c
sentati
ve
and
ublic, is scheduled
r Music Center
n tl-u
l( I
: oert
ft
campus,
be i '
. conduc-
Raleigh-based National
mpany was founded 40
- ago by the late AJ. Fletcher,
to present operas in the language
Ot the audience, to introduce
opera to school children and to
gi e experience and employment
to young singers.
On its annual tours across the
n, the Company has per-
formed more than 3,0ul times in

irric
; . ggirl h
� I ii i he eld-
ked intobeliex ing
I ,i demure voui .
�a bym- smaller towns and communitites
which have seldom if ever wit-
� t good nessed live operatic perform-
as ��� � II ances. Many of the National
s, "Don Opera singers have progressed to
Id man larger companies throughout the
world, including the Metropoli-
tan, New York City, Hamburg,
Vienna State, San Francisco, Chi:
cago Lyric and other opera com-
panies.
Mendenhall Student Cent r I
phone (919) "7" 661 l,ext. 266
rhe Polish orcht str i -
program will include "I on uan
Opus 2 l, by Richard Strauss
lohannes Brahms S mphonv 'o.
2 in D Major, Opus 73 ai I
mist PiotrPaIecznv,the( hopin
v oncerto No. 2 in F Min r, (
21.1 he orchestra is conducted' by
Antoni it.
Founded in Warsaw in 1934,
the Polish National Radio Sym-
phony is known throughout the
Polish-speaking world, as "the
Creal id
i iss mbled through the ini-
tiate. I olish coi lucl r- m
poser Gi e '�
symph red ving
in . astern I winning int i
natii nal a( claim at the i I
Exhibition in Par.
r the war, the ore hestra s
base �� a mi � cd to a i i mcert hall
in Katowice, the capital of the
Polish mining region which had
escaped much of the war's de .is
tation suffered by Warsaw and
other major cities.
Playhouse will hold open
auditions for 'Aenes'
Last Can
i
i ess eieast?
The Past Carolina Plavhouse
will hold open auditions for
"Agnes of God" on Wednesdav,
Feb. 22. and Thursday, Feb. 23,at
pm in room 205 in the Messick
.Theatre Arts Center.
This melodrama bv lohn Pit.
Mother Miriam Ruth, the mother
superior in the convent; and
Martha Livingstone, the court-
appointed psychiatrist. All are
encouraged to audition.
s. ripts are in the Reserve
Room of oyner Library. Ac-
tr ssesare asked to be prepared to
read from the script.
Performance dates for "Ag-
meier has roles for 3 women. Most nesot Cod arc April 14,15,17and
rolesare tor women over 18. The
roles are: Agnes, a young nun;
18 at s:
atre.
f
m in McGmnis The
Undergraduate students
open show with 200 works
Bv KAREN MANN
SM!t Writer
These two share a tender moment duing the Daedalus produc-
tions presentation of "Caberet
Daedalus Productions
to present 'Cabaret'
ECU News Burim
The Raleigh-based National Opera presents an English version
of "Don Pasquale" Saturday night No sub-titles necessary.
"Cabaret one of the most
celebrated musical hits in Broad-
wav history, will be presented at
East Carolina University by a
touring theatre company, Daeda-
lus Productions, Feb.21.
The production, part of
ECU'S 1988-89 Performing Arts
series, is scheduled for 8 pm in
Wright Auditorium. Tickets for
the genera 1 pub! ic are14 each, $7
for youth, and are available at the
ECU Central Ticket OHkc in
Mendenhall Student Center, tele-
phone (919) 757-6611, ext. 266.
The Broadway-based Daeda-
lus Productions brought touring
versions of "Ain't Misbehavin
and "Purlie" to ECU during the
1987-88 season. Their "Cabaret" is
directed byGaleB.Salusand stars
Scott Thompson in the role of the
sardonic, clown-faced emcee.
Based on Christopher
Isherwood's Berlin stories,
"Cabaret" was the first stage suc-
cess for lyricist Fred Ebb and
composer John Kander. The two
later collaborated on such land-
mark Broadway shows as
"Zorba "Chicago"and "Women
of the Year
"Cabaret" is set in Berlin in
1930 and shows the glitz and
bohemian glamour oi the citv in
its pre-war days, with the turbu-
lent overtones created by the
newly-powerful Nazis.
The two chief characters, shy
young American writer Cliff
Bradshaw and nightclub jazz
singer Sally Bowles, are engaged
in a passionate love affair. The
action takes place in the Kit Kat
Klub, a tawdry, sinister neon
nightspot for hot jazz and sugges-
tive comedy. In the course oi their
relationship, Cliff, dazzled by
Sally's exotic and shameless life-
style, is plunged into acts of in-
trigue, violence and espionage.
The show's songs range from
raucous comic turns to tender
ballads, the best known perhaps
being the title song, "Come to the
Cabaret" and "Tomorrow Be-
longs to Me
Art lovers were treated to a
visual extravaganza as the luv
School oi Art Undergraduate
Exhibition opened in Gray Gal-
lery Friday. On display were over
200 superior works from every
department. I hough paintings
usually dominate the under-
graduate shows, the emphasis
this year was on Commercial Art.
Nevertheless, the 1989 Exhibition
is tar more impressive and repre-
sentative oi the entire school than
last year's.
Three works were given
awards and thirteen were given
honorable mentions, first place
was a lithograph by Christopher
Racine entitled Admiration
The print, a family ot kiwi birds
gazing at a portrait of an owl.
shows Racine's imagination as
well as his skill.
Second place was a warded t
a painting by Yvette Mariani. The
painting, an oil work entitled
"The longing Palate is domi-
nated by two uneven dark heads
rendered in grays and blacks and
evokes a despairing mood.
"Sinking Tradition a wood
construction bv Blair Bean, won
third prize. The piece consists oi a
cherry table and chair which have
been designed so that they appear
to sink into the platform. "Sinking
Tradition" displays Bean's im-
peccable handling of one ot art's
most difficult media.
Honorable mentions were as
follows: Caroline Ladely received
an honorable mention for her
"House 2 which was con-
structed by clay and machine
parts. Dorinda Farver, from the
Environmental Design Depart-
ment, also won with a nicely de-
tailed plan for a "Special Needs
i lealth Center.
Liz Sargent and Ann Courie
also won honorable mentions for
their fabric designs Sargent's
design, a wall hanging entitled
"Windows was made with vari-
ous d eson silk Courie'suntitled
weaving is a purple suit with a
short jacket and skirt. In Metal
Design the award was given to
lames William Bailey for his intri-
cately intertwined sterling silver
double triangle bracelet. C. Den-
ise Hicks received the other
award in printmaking tor her col-
orful soft ground intaglio entitled
"Thinking Cap In painting.
Vickie Sanderlin's vibrant land
ot hang ! ' won an honorable
mention.
Three works from the Com-
mercial Arts Department re-
ceived awards. Craig O'Brien's
Booklet on The History ot
Graphic Design" and Lynne
Bryant s I ype Input Poster are
both excellent examples oi
graphic design. However the
third, David Behrens' "Just the
Fox" is slightly superior in con-
cept and design.
The Foundations Section ot-
tered a preview of some of the
School of Art's future standouts.
A biomorphic "Shape Study"
by Susan Nordven and a boxlike
wire sculpture by Jeremy Evans
also received awards.
Finally, David Blums' sur-
See UNDERGRAD, page 11





I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
FEBRUARY 14,1989 PACE 9
4
True Believers' rocks
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Surf Writer
Last night, Hcndrix Theater
screened "True Believer" a film
for which people will soon queue
up at commercial cinemas. Even
though those people will be pay-
ing five dollars apeice, none of heavily upon young Baron to see
them should feel disappointed as him through his confusion, but it
clerk who sees Dodd as some sort Kid II"), is a character who under-
of hero. It is Baron who pushes goes a transformation from a cold,
Dodd into taking the case. His hardened criminal to a vulnerable
support sees Dodd through situ- human being, is a particularly
ations which otherwise would difficult role which Okumoto
have overcome the confused law- portrays with stunning credibil-
yer. ity. Cecil Skell, played by Tom
Not only docs Dodd rely Bower, is another difficult role�a
they leave the cinema
James Woods ("Against All
Odds") plays the part of Eddie
Dodd, a lawyer who was an activ-
ist for human rights in the 1960s,
but has fallen to the level of de-
fending drug dealers. For the first
time in almost a decade, he is
defending an innocent man: this
becomes a sort of crusade for
Dodd. In pursuit of the truth,
lunatic who sees the energy fields
which surround people and is
certain that Ma Bell killed Ken-
nedy. Bower, too, excels with his
character.
Perhaps the only dis-
sapointing character is that of
is also clear that Woods relies
upon the young Downey: The two
characters are in constant conflict,
and the actors must constantly
meet each other's intensity. This
task is especially difficult for two
actors when one is experienced Rdbert Reynard, a character who
and the other an absolute begin- has a grudge against Dodd and
ner, but Woods and Downey chooses to face him in court. Kurt-
seem as natural a pair as Streep wood Smith, who has played in a
and Nicholson�each provides double-handful of films as well as
Dodd gets beaten by a Nazi, be- the cues their partner needs to broadway productions, portrays
comes involved in two other evoke a wide array of intense Reynard as flat, emotionless, and
murders and is nearly killed. emotions. utterly boring. Considering his
Dodd is assisted by Roger Even the supporting credentials, this role may well be
Baron (Robert Downey Jr.�"Up roles are well-done. Shu Kai Kim, one of his grcatcst embarrass-
Academy), a young legal played bvYuji Okumoto ("Karate rnents.
the
Robert Downey Jr. (no apparent relation to Morton) opens his big mouth at a murder trial in the
new smash hit thriller, "True Believer The previews of this have been pretty boring, but our
reviewer says the movie is pretty boss.
� him to music director, assist says that is why so rrSy people OllSll JN atlOlial RaQlO SymphOliy
Bv DEANNA NEVGLOSK1
Staff Writer
him to music director, assistant
production manger and finally
general manager.
Powe states that he always
wanted to take radio bevond the
His name is Keith To we but
his friends and co-workers know
him better as K.P. K.P. is general limits. Now that he has a manag-
manager at WZMB and his per-
sonality shows that oi someone
who is in charge, but definitely-
laid back!
In May of 'S8, Powe was of-
fered the job as general manager
at WZMB. He accepted the offer is played on the radio station and
says that is why so many people
tune in. "Top 40 gets redundant,
he said, "and WZMB offers any-
thing you ever want to hear�
except country
One of the most exciting
ing position, he has the opportu- things Powe has been working on
nity to do so. He goes on to say for the remainder of his time at
that working at WZMB is a ECU is the moving of WZMB.
"whole lot of fun but that there WZMB will be moved from the The Polish National Radio
is a lot of hard work behind it. Old Joyncr Library and into the Symphony Orchestra of Ka-
Powe is responsible for what new Mendenhall building, which �wice, Poland, will perform at
is being constructed now.
Orchestra to play at ECU
ECU News Bureau
Mendenhall Student Center, tele-
phone (919) 757-661 l,ext. 266.
The Polish orchestra's ECU
program will include "Don Juan
Opus 20, by Richard Strauss, the
Great Radio Orchestra Origi-
nally assembled through the ini-
tiative of Polish conductor-com-
poser Grzegorz Fitelberg, the
and was well on his way to man-
aging a radio station.
When Powe came to ECU five directors. He believes that the
years ago, he planned to major in music and program directors help
is often a strong influence on the The delay in finishing the
plans of the music and program building has put back the date for
the move; however, a tentative
date has been set for this summer.
computer science, but then he
switched his major to broadcast-
ing.
Like most broadcasting ma-
jors, Powe has a love for music
and always wanted to be a deejay.
Re started as a WZMB deejav, but
him to carry on a productive radio
station.
"I think those two personali-
ties have got to someway fit to-
gether to make a station sound
good he said.
" 11 is Obvious that WZMB 6f-
See POWE, page 11
ECU Feb. 22, as part of ECU'S
1988-89 Performing Arts Series.
The concert is scheduled for 8
pm in Wright Auditorium. Tick-
ets for the general public are $14
each, $7 for youth, and are on sale
at the ECU Central Ticket Office,
svmphonv gathered a following
Johannes Brahms Symphony No. m castcm Europe, winning inter-
Zin D Major, Opus 73 and, with national acclaim at the World's
pian.stPiotrPalcc2ny,theChopin Exhibition in Pans.
his hard-working attitude moved fers a variety of music and Powe
National Opera presents the
comedy, 'Don Pasquale'
thing, but she soon turns into a
spendthrift shrew.
ECU News Bureau
An English language version The Raleigh-based National
of Donizetti's comic opera, "Don Opera Company was founded 40
Pasquale will be presented here years ago by the late A.J. Fletcher,
by the National Opera Compam
and the East Carolina Symphony
Saturday at 8 pm.
The presentation, free and
open to the public, is scheduled
for the A.J. Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall on the ECU campus.
The performance will be con-
ducted bv Robert Hause, conduc-
tor ot the East Carolina Svm-
phonv.
Noted for its exuberant good
humor and hilarious plot as well
as its beautiful melodies, "Don
to present operas in the language
of the audience, to introduce
opera to school children and to
give experience and employment
to young singers.
On its annual tours across the
nation, the Company has per-
formed more than 3,000 times in
smaller towns and communitites
which have seldom if ever wit-
nessed live operatic perform-
ances. Many of the National
Opera singers have progressed to
Pasquale" concerns an old man larger companies throughout the
who foolishly determines to world, including the Metropoli-
marry a shrewd young girl who is tan, New York City, Hamburg,
in love with his nephew. The eld- Vienna State, San Francisco, Chi:
erlysuitoristrickedintobelieving cago Lyric and other opera corn-
he has married a demure young panics.
Concerto No. 2 in F Minor, Opus
21. The orchestra is conducted by
Antoni Wit.
Founded in Warsaw in 1934,
the Polish National Radio Sym-
phony is Known throughout the
Polish-speaking world as "the
After the war, the orchestra's
base was moved to a concert hall
in Katowice, the capital of the
Polish mining region which had
escaped much of the war's devas-
tation suffered by Warsaw and
other major cities.
Playhouse will hold open
auditions for 'Agnes'
East Carolina Playhouse Press Release
The East Carolina Plavhouse
will hold open auditions for
"Agnes of God" on Wednesday,
Feb. 22, and Thursday, Feb. 23, at
7 pm in room 205 in the Messick tresses are asked to be prepared to
Theatre Arts Center. read from the script.
This melodrama by John Piel- Performance dates for
Mother Miriam Ruth, the mother
superior in the convent; and Dr.
Martha Livingstone, the court-
appointed psychiatrist. All are
encouraged to audition.
Scripts are in the Reserve
Room of Joyner Librarv. Ac-
meicr has roles for 3 women. Most
roles are for women over 18. The
roles are: Agnes, a young nun;
'Ag-
nes of God" are April 14,15,17 and
18 at 8:15 pm in McGinnis The-
atre.
Undergraduate students
open show with 200 works
By KAREN MANN
Staff Writer
These two share a tender moment duing the Daedalus produc-
tions presentation of "Caberet
Daedalus Productions
to present 'Cabaret'
ECU News Bureau
"Cabaret one of the most
celebrated musical hits in Broad-
way history, will be presented at
East Carolina University by a
touring theatre company, Daeda-
lus Productions, Feb.21.
The production, part of
ECU'S 1988-89 Performing Arts
series, is scheduled for 8 pm in
Wright Auditorium. Tickets for
the general public are $14 each, $7
for youth, and are available at the
ECU Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, tele-
phone (919) 757-6611, ext. 266.
The Broadway-based Daeda-
lus Productions brought touring
later collaborated on such land-
mark Broadway shows as
"Zorba "Chicago" and "Women
of the Year
"Cabaret" is set in Berlin in
1930 and shows the glitz and
bohemian glamour of the city in
its pre-war days, with the turbu-
lent overtones created by the
newly-powerful Nazis.
Art lovers were treated to a
visual extravaganza as the 1989
School of Art Undergraduale
Exhibition opened in Gray Gal-
lery Friday. On display were over
200 superior works from every
department. Though paintings
usually dominate the under-
graduate shows, the emphasis
this year was on Commercial Art.
Nevertheless, the 1989 Exhibition
is far more impressive and repre-
sentative of the entire school than
last year's.
Three works were given
awards and thirteen were given
honorable mentions. First place
was a lithograph by Christopher
Racine entitled "Admiration
structed by clay and machine
parts. Dorinda Farver, from the
Environmental Design Depart-
ment, also won with a nicely de-
tailed plan for a "Special Needs
Health Center
Liz Sargent and Ann Courie
also won honorable mentions for
their fabric designs. Sargent's
design, a wall hanging entitled
"Windows was made with vari-
ous dyes on silk. Courie's untitled
weaving is a purple suit with a
short jacket and skirt. In Metal
Design the award was given to
James William Bailev for his intri-
cately intertwined sterling silver
double triangle bracelet. C. Den-
ise Hicks received the other
award in printmaking for her col-
orful soft ground intaglio entitled
"Thinking Cap In painting,
Vickie Sanderlin's vibrant "Land
The two chief characters, shy
young American writer Cliff
Bradshaw and nightclub jazz
The Raleigh-based National Opera presents an English version
of "Don Pasquale" Saturday night No sub-titles necessary.
The print, a family of kiwi birds
gazing at a portrait of an owl, of Whang I" won an honorable
shows Racine's imagination as mention.
well as his skill. Three works from the Corn-
Second place was awarded tc mercial Arts Department re-
a painting by YvctteMariani. The ceived awards. Craig O'Brien's
painting, an oil work entitled "Booklet on The History of
singer Sally Bowles, are engaged "The Longing Palate is domi- Graphic Design" and Lynne
in a passionate love affair. The nated by two uneven dark heads Bryant's 'Type Input Poster" are
action takes place in the Kit Kat rendered in grays and blacks and both excellent examples of
Klub, a tawdry, sinister neon evokes a despairing mood. graphic design. However the
nightspot for hot jazz and sugges- "Sinking Tradition a wood third, David Behrens' "Just the
tive comedy. In the course of their construction by Blair Bean, won Fox" is slightly superior in con-
versions of "Ain't MisbehavnY" relationship, Cliff, dazzled by third prize. The piece consists of a cept and design,
and "Purlie" to ECU during the Sally's exotic and shameless life- cherry table and chair which have The Foundations Section of-
1987-88 season. Their "Cabaret" is styie, is plunged into acts of in- been designed so that they appear fered a preview of some of the
directed by Gale B.Salus and stars trigue, violence and espionage. to sink into the platform. "Sinking School of Art's future standouts.
Scott Thompson in the role of the Tradition" displays Bean's im- A biomorphic "Shape Study"
The show's songs range from peccable handling of one of art's by Susan Nordven and a boxlike
raucous comic turns to tender most difficult media. wire sculpture by Jeremy Evans
ballads, the best known perhaps Honorable mentions were as also received awards,
being the title song, "Come to the follows: Caroline Ladely received Finally, David Blums' sur-
Cabaret" and Tomorrow Be- an honorable mention for her � � � �
House 2 which was con- See UNDERGRAD, page 11
: Thompson
sardonic, clown-faced emcee.
Based on Christopher
Isherwood's Berlin stories,
"Cabaret" was the first stage suc-
cess for lyricist Fred Ebb and
composer John Kander. The two longs to Me.





i- m
10
THE CAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14,1W-
lUe Second Annual
�&�� ��i?@MimSgiia IP�(gfo?
The editorial staff here at the
Ever-Boss Features page are con-
stantly searching for ways to
culturally enlighten and enter-
tain you, the reader.
To that end, we present a reprise
of last year's highly-successful
East Carolinian Poetry Page.
Featuring the finest in free and
traditional verse, we have gath-
ered these poems at great per-
sonal risk and expense to please
you, the reader. Enjoy.
A Valentine's
Poem
This is the love poem
Bonehcad asked me to write.
I suppose he thinks
I've got all night.
But I'll tell him something
that he doesn't know-
But with this poem
I will proceed
So you the students
all can read
My valentine's wishes
to the staff of the EC.
But please, don't laugh.
1) To Bonehead and Earlvis
of the famous Satire Page
May you never be sued
by those you enrage.
2) To Al, who keeps us
so spic and span
Please come back
as soon as you can.
3) To Jimmy and the sales reps,
I vvon't let you down
just keep selling those ads
all over the town.
4) And to this person
whoce name is Debbie,
Thanks for everything
You're a GREAT secretary!
5) And as for Hitler,
I have to ask you
Whatever happened
to "Dinner for two?"
6)To Susan and Layout
who are here late at night
You do a great job at
making the paper look tight.
7) To Kristen Halberg
and her faithful sports writers
Let's hope those scores
start looking much brighter.
8) To Jeff Parker and
his loyal comix staff
We love the way
you keep making us laugh.
9) And to our Editor,
who people confuse me with
I guess it's because
we're both Stephanies.
10) Thanks to you all
for the fun I've had
while I sit here at night
typing up ads.
11) And to the rest of you
especially Scott, Chris and Shay,
I wish you all
A HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY!
�With Much love,
Stephanie Emory
WARNING: Parental
Guidance Suggested for
this poem.
The Origin of
the Species
Fuck, fuck, fuck, fuck,
Fuck, fuck, fuck, fuck,
Fuck, fuck, fuck, fuck,
Fuck, fuck, fuck, fuck,
Fuck.
� Sir Scott of Scanning
An Introvert
Through the frozen blinds
the sounds of the city.
They're coming.
The roaches crawl toward me.
I playfully thump them away.
They like it.
They return for more.
To the right: A mound of dusky
novels.
To the left: A TV, no volume,
flashing
scenes of a beach.
All around: yellow walls rising,
held together
steadfastly with cobwebs.
I sit crosslegged on the floor.
Tiny.
Through the blinds,
the sound of the city.
They're here.
Across the hall, a door slams.
The roaches retreat.
The picture on the TV changes.
It's Rex Humbard.
1 read his lips: "You are loved
1 pull a book from the mountain
Julius Caesar.
Insight.
And Rex Humbard is an
honorable man.
�Brad the Unloved
To Try Again
A somber mood,
And then a high
I think I feel
What 1 deny.
I did not search
Or even want,
But yet I find
A truth which haunts.
I cannot let go,
I cannot hold on,
I cannot be me,
I fear it's all wrong.
But can it be wrong
To care again,
To let myself go
And let my heart win.
�Stephanie Folsom
Pearl Necklace
What could I give you,
sweet sorority sister?
That you cannot by yourself,
with Daddy's Visa?
Though I love the way
your Greek letters shine
ironed onto your grey,
fluffy sweatshirt so fine,
I can give you no gift
worthy of your attention,
Nothing but love,
and this is my intention.
But Wait! There may yet be
something glistening,
in my hand that I may
on your neck christen.
A strand of milky white pearls,
strung together with love,
each bead as virgin
as the white-winged dove.
This gift may dry up,
you may brush it away,
but whenever you wear pearls,
you'll remember this day.
� bonehead
Bar Hoppin'
Well,
Last night I peeled the gold-
rimmed label
off the sweating brown beer
bottle.
"After 2 am, no one is ugly
And after two more drinks,
You'll probably lose 10 more
pounds.
So I compete with Taylor Dane,
smoke machines and giant
speakers
for your attention.
Your hormones and mine wig
out
Stumbling up to the bar
and colliding on the dance floor.
If I had any sense
(or the least bit of shame)
I'd have left when the first slow
song came on.
But I want to get my money's
worth
out of this beer
especially since it looks like
another
one-handed night.
�bonehead
The only love
we really keep
is the love we
give away
Call us today and send something
extra special to the one YOU love!
�chocolate long stem roses
�gourmet chocolates
�confections
�gourmet foods
�many other gift items
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
(anywhere in the United States)
606 Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village
756-6539
Mon-Sat 10-6
Argh, Where Be
That Love?
Argh � Where be that love,
mateys,
for which I sailed the seven seas
Avast, ye swabs � I needs me
a wench
with which to share me booty.
Ahoy, scurvy knaves,
Twenty doubloons and a piece
of eight
to the cutthroat that finds me
a young maiden with
hair of gold
and heart of silver.
For once she was mine, but
sailed away
to more generous port
and calmer waters.
Argh � where be that love of
mine
to board me vessel once more,
And blow me down. Argh!
� Cap'n Parker
Thirst
Early morning tongue paste on a
sheetless double bed,
Momentary stumble over
strown bodies in the hallway
bunker.
Eye opens over the crusted
bowl, pouring essence of relief,
Dipping on the litter of the room
living uncaring,
Bumping into the simulated
wood grain,
Let me clarify this situation if I
may, I am running for
The kitchen green with regurgi-
tated tile
Where the humming white God
is sought,
Frigid the air hits the thirsted-
blooded face,
No Kool-Aid, no Mountain Dew,
nothing liquid,
Only the sloppy seconds of yes-
terdays left overs.
� "something sexual is about to
happen
Date: Feb 14,1989
Time: 7:30 pm
Place: Hcndrix Theater
(Mendenhall Student Center)
SI In Advance
Featuring: ;2 At The Door
ECU'S FOOTBALL PLAYERS!
�Walter Wilson � Joe Bright �
James Singlclary � Al YVhitiny
� Sam Beverly �
Ocean Front and only 3 blocks from the most
popular nighfc spots in Daytona r
Pen Rods, Razzles, etc.

Bbeak Away
lo ihe holies' action
in DayIONA BlACH'
roui Travel Associates Sunb'eon "Pac�age � xiti
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i: Ophonol � icuruoni to wait Duney WoM fPCO'
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:i: Services ot travel Associates on site voca'c UOK
All taies tips and serce charges
Ypu Drive;
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Contact:
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752-2789
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Dressing
for the
Interview:
Every interviewer will agree that the way
you are dressed for the interview is ex-
tremely important. Many potential
employers will inspect you from head to
toe. When you consider that many com-
panies will interview more than one-hun-
dred applicants for a position, it makes
good sense to insure that you're properly
dressed.
A dark suit, preferably a navy, navy
pinstripe, grey, or grey pinstripe, should be
worn for the first meeting.
A white shirt should be worn for each in-
terview (some large companies require that
their employees wear nothing but white
shirts)
A conservative stripe or foulard tie is
preferred Don't make the mistake of wear-
ing a linen tie in the winter or a wool one
.during spring or summer A burgundy stripe
with some navy blue andor grey usually
looks very nice with either of the aforemen
tioned suits
Dark shoes, preferably a dark leather
tassel or lace-up is best. Light colored
loafers won't cut it (a fresh shine would be a
good ideal too). Wear a belt that matches
your shoes.
We want to i "� r -
when ft con . - �
sion on a suit Ota select ��-�.
Austin Reed. Hart Shaft i Marx H
Free mar. Chaps P University
We iarf to makt
difference in tailoring fabt cs and sf$
our clothing de!n ers
A navy hlazer is permissible But it must
be worn properly with a conservative stripe
tie Grey pants are generally the best to
wear with the blazer (khakis an too casual
for an interview) Again, dark shoes are
best
Make sure that your clothes are clean ard
pressed
Some self proclaimed professionals sav
that you should work your way up to vour
best looking suit In other words, save the
best for last to make the lasting impression
when it comes down to the final cut This
makes sense until you consider that you
want to make a good enough impression at
the first interview to be asked back for the
second This is a decision you must make
for yourself
oPPmons
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall Rocky Mount


IL �� rMtr,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14. 1989 11
I
)
!
-
Maiden wants to remind folks
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AD -
For Karl Maiden, the role of a man
in a wheelchair murdered by lu-
ackers oi the cruise ship Achile
i auro, is more than an acting job,
it's an attempt to remind people of
terrorism's senseless violence.
"1 just didn't want people to
forget this man in a wheelchair
was thrown overboard Maiden
said. "We forget very easily
"The Hijacking oi the Achille
I auro a dramatization of the
1985 terrorist attack, aired Mon-
day on NBC.
Maiden played 1 eon kling-
hoffer, a 69-year-old Jewish man
from New York who was shot and
tossed overboard when four Pal-
estinian terrorists boarded the
Italian cruise ship and took more
than 500 people hostage tor three
days.
It snot a long part, but it's an
important part, because he's the
only one that gets killed on the
whole boat said Maiden, who
was in Nashville for two weeks
teaching acting at Vanderbilt
University.
Maiden, an actor for more
than 50 years, won an Oscar for
"A Streetcar Named Desire" in
1951 and starred in the TV series
of the 170s, "Streets of San Fran
Cisco He more recently played
the crusading father of murder
victim in the miniseries "fatal
Vision" and played Barbra
Streisand's father in the film
Nuts
Maiden said he wanted to be
part oi "The Hijacking ot the
Achille I auro" to honor the death
ot an innocent victim.
"1 lis death is a symbol to the
world of the senselessness ot ter-
rorism he said.
Klinghoffer and his 58-year-
old wife, Marilyn, took the trip
because she was told she had
cancer and or.lv had a short time
lett to live, Maiden said.
"It's ironic. She was the one
who was supposed to die first he
said. "But he was killed, and she
lived another six months after
that. That's what fascinated me
about it
The pirates had threatened io
kill passengers one at a time and
blow up the luxury liner if 50 Pal-
estinians imprisoned in Israel
were not released.
Hut Maiden said Klinghoffer,
who was partially paralyzed by a
stroke, was singled out for death
because of his wheelchair.
"It was hard to manipulate. It
was hard to get him to go from
place to place he said.
When the elderly man was
ordered to move along with ,i
group of other captives, he he-
came frustrated and lashed out at
the terrorists, Maiden said.
"lie told them 'to hell with
them' and that's when something
happened and oneot them pulled
out a pistol and shot him. They
threw him and tin' wheelchair
overboard
I he two hour drama is also
the storv ot M nilvn Klinghoffer,
played by Lee Grant, who coura-
geously ei dured her tear and the
loss ot her husband, Maiden said.
"When they were caught, the
Italians asked her to go and linger'
the people who were caught, and
she did he said.
"Some ot the advice was,
don't go, and just forget about it,
but she did it, she picked them out
of a line.
"In this world, you have to
have courage to do that
The day after Klinghoffer was
hot, the Achille Lauro docked at
an Egyptian port, where passen-
gers and hijackers got off after
officals negotiated with the pi-
rates.
'Hie tour hijackers boarded an
Egyptian plane, but it was inter-
cepted by U.S. warplanesand the
terrorists were put in the custody
of the Italians.
"(Some ot) the people who
hijacked the boat were really set
treeb the Italians, " Maiden said.
"Theothers were put on trial and
the sentences were very ridicu-
lous
The leader i the hijackers,
Magied Molqi, who was believed
to have killed Klinghoffer, was
sentenced to 30 years in an Italian
prison.
"I felt this was terrible and I
just feel it's all been forgotten
Maiden said.
PARKER'S
DINNERS INCLUDE Brunswick Stew,
Cole Salw, Boiled Potatoes or French Fries
and Corn Sticks PLATES INCLUDE Cole
Slaw and Corn Sticks
BARBECUE
1 ARC I BARIMiCLn WNNl K
I BARBI (VI IUVM.K
LARGE BARBECU1 P) Ml
SM.MJ 11AK1II rl.l.l I AH,
I - I
4 (X)
3 JO
CHICKEN
FRIED OR BARBECUED
I AKC.I CltCIII S ni.VMH
SMAl I C Hit ? H DINNER
IKU DUVl . n.ArS-
COMBINATIONS
I AKCI-C OMBINA
Hutecac O . - x. SV.
MALI. COMBINATION
Itaihr.ur BklQudun Dai Mc�t)
15
3 75
4 25
390
Blue star sprouting back to life
i
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP)-
Kearney's blue star, once consid-
ered the nation's most endan-
gered plant, is sprouting back
from the brink of extinction, gov-
ernment botanists report
Not long ago, the delicate
shrub had all but disappeared.
Only eight blue star plants
w ere known to be growing in the
wild � all of them in a remote
canyon of the Baboquivari Moun-
tains southwest oi Tucson.
But last March, in a last-ditch
effort to preserve a natural popu-
lation oi the species, federal gov-
ernment botanists planted 76 arti-
ficially propagated blue start
Powe a boss
manager
Continued from page 9
Powe explained that the new
station will provide more space
and a comfortable place for the
public. He adds that there will
also be a newsroom and a private
ft ice for the general manager.
Even though Powe will be
graduating in May, he hopes to
see the grand opening oi the new-
station. When asked what he will
miss about the present station he
said, "the atmosphere � this
place has so much atmosphere
and so much personalitv
As for future plans, Powe has
lot of them. While not looking for
any particular place to work and
live, Powe hopes to work in man-
agement at a radio station. His
goal is to own and manage an al-
ready established station.
"I wouldn't trade this experi-
ence (at WZMB) for almost any-
thing. 1 like passing on the knowl-
edge that I've gained through my
experiences at WZMB to other
people he said at the end of our
interview.
When asked what he would
miss most about leaving WZMB
and ECU he went on to say, "If
you ever notice what is on the
door here, it says, 'the people
behind the music' � I'll miss all
that
Undergrad art
students show
Continued from page 9
veillance helicopter "Death Ma-
chine (Smell Those Burning
Shits)" won an award for wood.
The piece is intricately detailed,
down to the miniature wind-
shield wipers, and should have
received a higher award than
honorable mention.
Visitors were confronted by
two of the show's more controver-
sial sculptures at the very front of
the gallery.
Robert Wilson received an
honorable mention for his un-
fitted steel man, the embodiment
of a phallic fantasy gone awry.
Albert Home's rather gory "Sa-
distic Pig" managed to scare away
most of the small children at the
exhibition. Nevertheless, it
should have received an honor-
able mention for craftsmanship
and originality.
seedlings on a private ranch on
the east side ot the Baboquivari
range.
"So tar, we're feeling real
positive about the results ot that
planting says PeggyMwell, an
endangered species botanist for
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serivce
in Albuquerque, N.M about 54 percent for the new
( t the 76 pi.mts that were plantings, which is encouraging
put in, 41 are still surviving, in at this point
addition to the original eight Olwell says the plants have
aooitien to tile original eight I'lwen says me Mams nave
plants says Olwell, whose faced tough weather conditions
agency is responsible for helping including intense summer heat
save endangered animals and and a lack of adequate rainfall
plants. 'That's a survival rate of since August.
FAMILY STYLE DINNERS(Each) 5.00
INCH D�S BarfecoK, I rkd Chkfcea,
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No Doggie I� From Faaaih Style
SEAFOOD
FISH DINNER
OYSTER HtY.
OYSTER STI �
SHRIMP DINNER .
ANY TWO COMBINA1 IONS SI. 1
SEA OCD PLATTER I afa, S: rirap
5 TO
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1 -�Mi -
I,
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14.1989 11

)
1
)
)
Maiden wants to remind folks
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) �
For Karl Maiden, the role of a man
in a wheelchair murdered by hi-
jackers of the cruise ship Achile
Lauro, is more than an acting job,
it's an attempt to remind people of
terrorism's senseless violence.
"I just didn't want people to
forget this man in a wheelchair
was thrown overboard Maiden
said. "We forget very easily
"The Hijacking of the Achille
Lauro a dramatization of the
1985 terrorist attack, aired Mon-
day on NBC.
Maiden played Leon Kling-
hoffer, a 69-year-old Jewish man
from New York who was shot and
tossed overboard when four Pal-
estinian terrorists boarded the
Italian cruise ship and took more
than 500 people hostage for three
days.
"It's not a long part, but it's an
important part, because he's the
only one that gets killed on the
whole boat said Maiden, who
was in Nashville for two weeks
teaching acting at Vanderbilt
University.
Maiden, an actor for more
than 50 years, won an Oscar for
"A Streetcar Named Desire" in
1951 and starred in the TV series
of the 1970s, "Streets of San Fran-
cisco He more recently played
the crusading father of murder
victim in the miniseries "Fatal
Vision" and played Barbra
Streisand's father in the film
"Nuts
Maiden said he wanted to be
part of "The Hijacking of the
Achille Lauro" to honor the death
of an innocent victim.
"His death is a symbol to the
world of the senselessness of ter-
rorism he said.
Klinghoffer and his 58-year-
old wife, Marilyn, took the trip
because she was told she had
cancer and only had a short time
left to live, Maiden said.
"It's ironic. She was the one
who was supposed to die first he
said. "But he was killed, and she
lived another six months after
that. That's what fascinated me
about it
The pirates had threatened to
kill passengers one at a time and
blow up the luxury liner if 50 Pal-
estinians imprisoned in Israel
were not released.
But Maiden said Klinghoffer,
who was partially paralyzed by a
stroke, was singled out for death
because of his wheelchair.
"It was hard to manipulate. It
was hard to get him to go from
place to place he said.
When the elderly man was
ordered to move along with a
group of other captives, he be-
came frustrated and lashed out at
the terrorists, Maiden said.
"He told them 'to hell with
them' and that's when something
happened and one of them pulled
out a pistol and shot him. They
threw him and the wheelchair
overboard
The two-hour drama is also
the story of Marilyn Klinghoffer,
played by Lee Grant, who coura-
geously endured her fear and the
loss or her husband, Maiden said.
"When they were caught, the
Italians asked her to go and finger
the people who were caught, and
she did he said.
"Some of the advice was,
don't go, and just forget about it,
but she did it, she picked them out
of a line.
"In this world, you have to
have courage to do that
The day after Klinghoffer was
hot, the Achille Lauro docked at
an Egyptian port, where passen-
gers and hijackers got off after
officals negotiated with the pi-
rates.
The four hijackers boarded an
Egyptian plane, but it was inter-
cepted by U.S. warplanes and the
terrorists were put in the custody
of the Italians.
"(Some of) the people who
hijacked the boat were really set
free by the Italians Maiden said.
"The others were put on trial and
the sentences were very ridicu-
lous
The leader of the hijackers,
Magied Molqi, who was believed
to have killed Klinghoffer, was
sentenced to 30 years in an Italian
prison.
"I felt this was terrible and I
just feel it's all been forgotten
Maiden said.
PARKER'S
DINNERS INCLUDE Brunswick Stew,
Cole Salw, Boiled Potatoes or French Fries
and Corn Sticks PLATES INCLUDE Cole
Slaw and Corn Sticks
BARBECUE
i rtitnr nnftinnir mrntra4 go
SMAl I. BARBECUE DINN11R 3 50
LAKGE BARBECUE PLATE 4U0
SMALL BARBECUE PLA1E 3 JO
CHICKEN
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SM AlX CHICKEN DINNER
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COMBINATIONS
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Barbecue and Chicken (While Meal)
SMALL COMBINATION
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-4.25
3 90
Blue star sprouting back to life
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP)�
Kearney's blue star, once consid-
ered the nation's most endan-
gered plant, is sprouting back
from the brink of extinction, gov-
ernment botanists report.
Not long ago, the delicate
shrub had all but disappeared.
Only eight blue star plants
were known to be growing in the
wild � all of them in a remote
canyon of the Baboquivari Moun-
tains southwest of Tucson.
But last March, in a last-ditch
effort to preserve a natural popu-
lation of the species, federal gov-
ernment botanists planted 76 arti-
ficially propagated blue start
Powe a boss
manager
seedlings on a private ranch on in Albuquerque, N.M about 54 percent for the new
the east side of the Baboquivari "Of the 76 plants that were plantings, which is encouraging
range, put in, 41 are still surviving, in at this point
"So far, we're feeling real addition to the original eight Olwell says the plants have
positive about the results of that plants says Olwell, whose faced tough weather conditions
planting says Peggy Olwell, an agency is responsible for helping � including intense summer heat
ind and a lack of adequate rainfall
of since August.
it' nj � trJ ��" �� ii�.iiv.y o h.s.h.iiimuiu mi iiuiuii
endangered species botanist for save endangered animals ai
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serivce plants. "That's a survival rate
FAMILY STYLE DINNFLS(Each) 5.00
INCLUDES Harbccuc, Fried Chicken,
Cote Slaw, Ilrunswick Stew. If oiled Potatoes
and Corn Sticks
CHILDREN Through 10 Years Old2.75
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No Doggie Bag From Family Style
SEAFOOD
nSII DINNER
OYSTER IKY
OYSTUR STF.W
SI IK1MP DINNER
ANY TWO COMBINATIONS SEATOOD
SEAJ OOD rLATfER (I uh. Shrimp. Oyiiera)
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Ireative Contribution to Your Field?
Continued from page 9
Powe explained that the new
station will provide more space
and a comfortable place for the
public. He adds that there will
also be a newsroom and a private
office for the general manager.
Even though Powe will be
graduating in May, he hopes to
see the grand opening of the new
station. When asked what he will
miss about the present station he
said, "the atmosphere � this
place has so much atmosphere
and so much personality
As for future plans, Powe has
lot of them. While not looking for
any particular place to work and
live, Powe hopes to work in man-
agement at a radio station. His
goal is to own and manage an al-
ready established station.
"I wouldn't trade this experi-
ence (at WZMB) for almost any-
thing. I like passing on the knowl-
edge that I've gained through my
experiences at WZMB to other
people he said at the end of our
interview.
When asked what he would
miss most about leaving WZMB
and ECU he went on to say, "If
you ever notice what is on the
door here, it says, 'the people
behind the music' � I'll miss all
that
Undergrad art
students show
Continued from page 9
veillance helicopter "Death Ma-
chine (Smell Those Burning
Nuts)" won an award for wood.
The piece is intricately detailed,
down to the miniature wind-
shield wipers, and should have
received a higher award than
honorable mention.
Visitors were confronted by
two of the show's more controver-
sial sculptures at the very front of
the gallery.
Robert Wilson received an
honorable mention for his un-
titled steel man, the embodiment
of a phallic fantasy gone awry.
Albert Home's rather gory "Sa-
distic Pig" managed to scare away
most of the small children at the
exhibition. Nevertheless, it
should have received an honor-
able mention for craftsmanship
and originality.
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COMPETITION
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$5,000 worth of computer equipment for your ct llege campus given in
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Competition Ends March 1,1989. Void Where Prohibited.
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�nc Bcwirh Hflh, CA





v'
orts
FEBRUARY 14, I �
Kobe voted coach of the year
Swimmers take CAA crown
By KRISTIN HALBERG
Sports dttoi
East Carolina's men's swim team celebrates the thrill of victory Saturday after winning the Colonial
Athletic Association swim tournament in Wilmington. The team easily defeated the rest of the confer-
ence, outdistancing second-place Navy bv more than 200 points.
Dukes outlast Pirates
By MARK BARBER
Sports Writer
HARRISONBURG, VA.
Basketball coaches Mike Steele oi
East Carolina and "Lefty" Dreisell
oi lames Madison agree on a lot of
things. One thing i that Blue
Edwards is the best player in the
Colonial Athletic Association.
Another thing they agree on
is that it was I Nil J's defensive
changes on Edwards m the sec-
ond half oi Saturday's game that
were the reason the Pukes
downed the Pirates 74-61.
'That guy (Edwards) is a
horse Dreisell said in his post-
game press conference. "He can
beat you all by himself. He's like a
Buck Williams, Lenny Bias or
David Thompson. One-on-one,
he's almost impossible to stop
Even 30 points from Edwards
weren't enough to carry ECU to
victors Saturday. JMU kept the
ball away from Edwards for much
of the second half and effectively
ued a spread offense, making
clutch free throws down the
stretch to pul away Ihe Pirates.
"The difference was the de-
fense on Blue Steele said. "We
played hard, we just let it get
away from us
"They had two and three
guys on me Edwards said. "We
just missed open shots, and that
reallv hurt us
Ihe loss drops ECU's record
to 10-12 overall, 4-7 in the CAA,
while JMU improves to 14-10,5-5.
The Pirates, dressed in purple
uniforms trimmed in gold, looked
like they felt at home in the purple
and gold environs of the JMU
Convocation Center in the first
half of the contest. ECU shot 59.3
percent from the field on their
way to a 35-33 lead at the intermis-
sion.
Edwards got the game going
on the Pirates' tirst possession
with a 15' jumper from the foul
line. JMU's Kenny Brooks n
swered at the other end with a 3-
pointer from the left side.
Claude Ferdinand gut the
next bucket for the Dukes, a 15
footer from the right side, and
another JMU basket by Barry
Brown uid the Dukes up 7-2.
ECU then began to get things
going. I'd wards got an offensive
rebound and laid it in for two, and
Kenny Murphy stole the ball from
Ferdinand and broke away for a
In up to make the score 7-6 at the
16:32 mark.
After Anthony Cooley tipped
in a shot in the paint for MU,
Edwards countered for the Pi-
rates, hitting a tough five footer in
- traffic. JMl'b fres.hnan center
Troy Bostic then made good on a
12' right side baseline shot to put
I ML' up 11-8.
See PI RATES, page 13
The men had one thing on
their mind while on their way to
the Colonial Athletic Association
championships Thursday, Feb. S
in Wilmington, N.C. paybacks
It the men beat the I' S.Naval
Academy in this three-day meet,
they would not only win the con-
ference championship Navy hail
taken away from them by a mere
14 points one year earlier, but they
would also get to carry out the
promise made to them bv I Kail
( oach Rick Kobe; if the gu s win.
his hair would be shaved by the
ECU swimmers themselves
Today, Kobe has about an
eighth inch of hair left on his head
and the guys have their second
CAA championship under their
belt '1 figured 1 could have a
shaved head aft r all the things
they've done Kobe said.
But what will he recorded in
E I swimming history is net the
lossot Kobe's hair, but the award
tor coach of-the year granted to
Kobe lor his fine season at ECU.
"This victory was probably
the nicest victory we've ever
had Kobe said. "We feel fortu
natc to w in two conferences and
we beat a good Navy team to do
it "
And beatNavy the) did as the
Pirates left Wilmington with a
185-point spread from the second
place Midsh'pmen. EC U's three
day total was 757 points and
Nav) 's was 572 points.
Richmond assumed thud
place in the the C v Vs with their
point total tallym ; 478. lames
Madison was fourth with 477
points and UNiC-Wilmington se
cured fifth with their three-da)
total of 409 points.
To brine, up the rear, Ameri-
can Un .ity swam for fifth
place with 397 and William &
Mary had 275 points to finish last
place.
The Pirates, in the history ot
the ECU swim program, have
never beaten the Midshipmen of
Navy. Yet, the men had won the
meet from the first day of compe
tition Kobe explained.
According to Kobe, the A
championship would be a two-
team meet ECU vs. Navy. Ihe
statistics showed the Pirates and
the Middys were 200-230 points
ahead of the next host team.
"Evervone swam very well
Kobe explained. "All oi the guys
really made an impact
Andy Johns, the lone senioi
on the men's squad, was excep-
tional in his performance in the
CAA's. He tinaled an all three
individual events he was entered
in I chad a sixth place in the 500
yard freestyle in a time ot 44 1.40
Johns then placed second in tin
100-yard butterfly with a tun . t
51.91 and finally scored anothci
second place for the Pirates win n
he swam a 1:2 42 in the 200 yard
butterfly, "lie is outstanding in
his leadership Kobe said.
lorn 1 lolsten grabbed a � ai
site and CAA record in the 1
yard butterfly when he swam a
1:52.42 to assist thePiraU m th( it
victory.
Holsten wasagainin the spot
light as he captured another var
sity and CAA record, this tune in
the 400-yard individual medly
with his winning time of 4 03.27.
The 200-yard medly relax
saw another varsity and' !
record as the Pirate relay team oi
Mark O'Brien, Raymond Ken
nedy, Andy ohns and Erick
Hoyos swam a 1:36.96 for the ic-
torv.
Kobe said the men' t.
had four paybacks to dish i ut
throughout the season. First i it
they had to knock oii the Duk -1 t
)ames Madison. They then had to
recapture their pride from Old
Dominion University.
Next on the paybac k list v a
the Atlantic Coast Conference
(ACC) team, the powerful Duke
University p.f whom thev ban
dily defeated. Finally, the Pi
rates had to face the reigning
champions of the CAA, Navy,
and, unlike last year, come out on
top.
fn.it
all oi ti . ils set
as4 n and bo ist a pr ud �
ord on the season with t!
losscomming from AO rtati
, hamj ions U i � I I I � �
( aroiina hapel I till
For th � i 'tot n il . i
thoNax al '
fa vori tcs i n I i ;
pu tnshipmoct. Th
won the i hampionshi last
.i: : i in I
in female til

di appointing r
Kobe hoped tl
third place
how er, is i t �
with tin eftorts
� ; ' e plea
in in
ECI had 11 gii
:
tii n � hilet i ll
to 19 "Y u just di : '
o n si
Mar f i i .
plat - � � :
621.5 points. Ja ' :
ished third with I
Carolina had 4 point
their f ou r t h pi a . i I
I . ' '
i " i Wiln
2 8 poii � . si nth i 1 e �
round p was 1
vho had 2 poinl lasl
pla� i
, .
� . I to ii
' f the teai
Despil Ii
ishforll
�. t toui v . i � .
M i dith i . . '
i.is in I. th the b .
yard brea itstn nts. Bridg
who was the pi rd
holder in those ev� � im a
2:21.271
i'l I- tl . kv. . I
See WOMEN, page I I
Hamilton moves into
ECU's record books
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
SfHjrti Writer
When it comes to playing
hard and doing it right, East
Carolina's Irish Hamilton fits into
Irish Hamilton
the role of the type of player any
coach would be happy with, said
East Carolina Head Coach Pat
Pierson.
Hamilton, a 5-4 guard, is
always looking for a way to help
her team and make them look
better. In helping her team during
the past three years, she has also
moved her way into the East
Carolina record books.
With 193 assists, Hamilton is
currently sixth in career assists for
East Carolina basketball. She
lead s the I ady Pirates in assists as
well as being in the top ten of the
Colonial Athletic Association
rankings.
"I never really think about
passing the ball to increase my
assist. If I see I can do something,
I will. If not, I look for the best way
to help the team the Albertson,
N.C. native said.
Pierson said Hamilton's style
is one that every player should
strive to have. "Irish is a hard
nosed player. She gives every-
thing she can to the teamPier-
son said.
There was a time when Ha-
milton could not give her all to the
team. During the 1986-87 season,
she underwent knee surgery that
could have ended her basketball
days. But with hard work and a
winning attitude, Hamilton over-
came the injury.
See HAMILTON, page 15
Lady Pirates split over weekend
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sport Writer
Playing James Madison, the
leagues top team, Fast Carolina's
Women's basketball team ex-
pected a tough game but had no
idea that Saturday's match-up at
Minges would be so trying
In a 63-53 ECU loss, every-
thing happended that one could
possibly imagine in one game.
In the first half, the Lady
Dukes jumped out to a 6-0 lead in
the first minute and a half. Senior
Gretta Savage got the Lady Pi-
rates on the scoreboard at 18:09
with an eight foot hook as the
ECU offense began to produce.
At 13:57 James Madison had
built up a 20-6 lead, their largest of
the first half.
East Carolina's troubles re-
ally began when senior starting
forward Chris O'Connor was in-
jured with 9:38 remaining in the
half. O'Connor suffered a
sprained ankle and was out for
the game is doubtful for this
week's games.
Only minutes later, the Fad)
Pirates other starting forward,
Gretta Savage also went down
and remained out of the game
until the second half.
"When we lost Chris and
Gretta, we were losing experience
and leadership but I was -very
proud oi the way our younger turm I I tl uj
players came in and handled began withal nten-
themselves in such an emotional sit) ai i put pressure nth
game said ECU head coach Pat Dukes
Pierson.
lames Madison led ECU 33-
23 at the half.
East Carolina came out strong
in the second half. Savage re-
With i.
the game got vut ot � ontn
10:17 remaining in the g
IMU's Missy Dudley and I
See LAO i PIRA1 I S paj e 1
Pure Gold seeks perfection
By MARK BARBER
Sports Writer
to 15 hours a week practicing.
Halftime viewers at ECU's
basketball games this year agree:
They say the process of puri- the Pure Gold dancers have been
fying gold is a long and tedious putting on 24k performances all
anything Fynette Johnson, Pure in Memphis, the Pure Gold team
Gold coach said. "They put in 12 came away with an impressive
one. Heat the metal, take out the
impurities. Heat the metal, take
out more impurities. Over and
over the process is repeated. The
result: pure gold.
Pure Gold, East Carolina's
dance team, can identifv its own
year long and the shows, of which
there arc no repeat performances,
seem to be getting better all the
time.
Dressed in outfits ranging
from "Steele Mill" tee shirts to
22nd place finish with 176 colle-
giate teams competing.
The dancers mean business,
and the goals Johnson has for the
team are high but obtainable.
"First, we want to place in the top
five in this year's competition
Johnson said. "That would put us
into the finals at Seaworld in the
Spring.
"Next, we want to be clas-
sified at ECU as an NCAA sport,
black spandcx, the team twists,
perfection process with that of the shakes, kicks and spins their rou- which means we could get non-
real metal. Dance team excellence tines to popular dance songs, revenue funds so we could offer
is a long and tedious process, always with rapt attention from scholarships to the dancers
Hours of practice, takeout theim- the crowd. The Pure Gold team just fin-
perfections. More hours of prac- The PureGold squad has only ished the filming of a video to be
rice, take out more imperfections, been active at ECU for five years, used in the qualifying for the na-
The result: nothing less than Pure but in its debut competition ap- tional tournament this year.
Gold. pearance at last year's Universal Classifying dance squads as
"This is the most devoted Cheerleading Association (UCA) NCAA sport teams is not a new
group I have seen in my life - in National Dance Championships See DANCE, page 15
East Carolina University's 1988-89 Pure Gold Dancers. (First Row): LaTara Bullock. (Second Row): Ta-
bitha Cardwell, Tricia Burk, Amy Walker, Christie Evans. (Third Row): Rhonda Stein, Lyn Harris, Giai
Almacher. (Fourth Row): Michelle Pearson, Teresa Hollowell.







1
!l IE I ST CARCH 'N' ' '
Fl BRUAITi 14, I9W 13
Can ECU break "
By MICHAEL MARTIN
Sports Writer
How many times have stu-
dents at East Carolina wondered:
'When is ECU ever going to get
into a conference that not only has
football, but basketball and all
other sports too?" Well, don't
hold your breath too long, be-
cause it probably won't happen in
the near future.
ECU is a member of the Colo-
nial Athletic Association (CAA).
The CAA has become well-
known and publicized because of
the likes of ECU Pirate basketball
star Blue Edwards, Navy's David
Robinson, Richmond Spiders'
men's basketball team and the
infamous I ML' coach Lefty Drie-
sell. But, to some, there is just no
other conference but the Atlantic
Coast Conference (ACC).
What is this "ACC mental-
ity?" It is Sports Information Di-
rector, Charles Bloom's idea that
there is "life outside the ACC
However, as hard as that may
be to believe, it may actually be
true One question that is often
asked by avid Pirate fans i, how
would ECU compare against the
teams of the ACC?
According to sophomore
Marc Butler, "ECU could play
with, if not beat almost all of the
ACC teams Butler is i N.C
State follower and long time sup-
porter of the ACC.
In an interview with Dave
Hart, ECU'S Athletic 1 Mrector, the
CAA is "currently the best thing
for ECU
Even though the football
team competes under the major
southern independents, they still
compete against teams that are
nationally ranked, both in confer-
ences and major independents.
"Currently according to Hart,
"we are a major force in the Colo-
nial Athletic Association
Bloom explained the compe-
tition between ECU and the other
CAA schools give ECU athletics a
chance to form rivalries both
"geographically and naturally
1 le continued by reconizing all of
the CAA teams as "unique refer-
ring to school sized, athletic par-
ticipation and fan support.
When it comes to fan support,
ssociate Sports Information Di-
rector, Dean Buehan, said: "ECU
fans are the best
1 le commented on student
attendance at all sporting events,
and was very excited. "Although
attendance at football games de-
creased slightly this year, the
people in Greenville, students,
alumni and Pirate Club still filled
the stadium at an average rate
Basketball attendance is up
overwhelmingly compared to last
ear's attendance and season tick-
ets have almost doubled, despite
our previous 8-20 record. Dave
1 lart also commented on fan par-
ticipation by calling students "the
core of our support
The difficulty of the 1988 foot-
Mentality
PPfC
ball schedule is always a topic �t
discussion throughout the state
and nation. People, however,
don't look at the other aspects of
the schedule. Financially, ECU
prospered by playing the nation-
ally ranked teams. Most people
did not realize that seven out of
the eleven teams ECl I played
went to post-season bowl games.
One, West Virginia, played for the
national championship while
Miami of Florida won the (Vange
Bowl and finished number two in
the final NCAA polls. "Thekey is
how you perceive the schedule
Dave Hart, athletic director at
ECU, said meaning that E U was
not playing "out of our league
but wc were playing teams thai
five years ago (when the contracts
were signed to plav) were just me
diocre, and have just recently
become powerhouses (such as
Syracuse and West Virginia).
Even if a conference do
open its doors to ECU, be it foot
ball or all sports, the decision
would not be immediate and a lot
of factors would have to be
weighed. The factors include:
geographic location financial .id
vantages, and television expo-
sure. Since the men's ba .ketball
teams has had one game already
covered (UNC Wilmington), and
the Ceorge Mason game on Wed
nesday, Feb. 8 will be tele ised on
Home Team Sports, which can i -
over one million viewers, the rec
ognition only helps the CAA and
ECU by showing the public the
quality of play our team posesses.
The I INC Wilmington gamehigh-
lighted Blue Edwards recordset
ung scoring performance of 36
points, in the Seahawks' own
backyard, as well as coverage of
his backboard shattering dunk at
the hi ginning of the season.
When students were asked of
their opinion on ECU getting into
the ACC, the feed-back was nega-
tive Junior Renita Wilson said
the ACC was too sophisticated"
and "we would never win
Freshmen Deanna Winches-
ter and Laura Petty both agreed
that it would ony happen if the
school continued to grow
junior Will Wilkins showed
�mo optimism by commenting
on the new ECU football coach
Bill I ewis. "The chance of ECU
gaining a conference bid will
come from 'newcoach's'ability to
give the football team a winning
u ason
Regardless of the negative,
slanderous comments people
make about ECU sports. Pirate
athletics are gaining lots of
.round The most significant way
to help the athletic program at
I .it Carolina it to go out to the
. imes and support the Pirates.
Di prove the "ACC Mentality"
ind show everybody that the
. CU tans are the best, and ask
thus who are laughing.
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Introducing
l2J3
Sheridan to consider joh at USC
COLUMBIA. S.C. (AP) �
South Carolina officials will meet
early this week with Dick Sheri
dan of North Carolina State to talk
about the Gamecocks' vacant
head football coaching position, a
Greenville, S.C, newspaper re-
ported Sunday.
The Greenville News said the
meeting with theWolfpack'sfoot-
ball coach could come as early as
Monday or Tuesday but school
officials from both Scmith Carolina
and C. State were unable to
confirm that a meeting had been
scheduled.
The News did not sav how it
obtained the information.
)oe Morrison, South
Carolina's coach for the past six
years, died Feb. 5 of a heart attack
after playing racquetball. He was
buried Thursday in his home-
town of Lima, Ohio.
N.C. State Athletic Director
Jim Valvano said Sunday that
South Carolina has been granted
permission to interview Sheri-
dan. He said he received a call
from South Carolina officials on
Friday.
"They requested permission
to interview Dick, which is stan-
dard procedure Valvano said.
"Naturally. I gave them t! it
permission. But obviously, 1 have
every hope that Dick will choose
to stav with us here at State
Sheridan could not be
reached for comment Sunday
and Valvano said he did not know
when Sheridan would meet with
South Carolina officials
Sheridan, 47, is a graduate of
South Carolina and native of
North Augusta. He served as
head coach at Furman before
moving to N.C. State in 1986
where he has compiled a 20-13-2
record and a pair of Peach Bowl
berths in three vears.
He a mfirmed early last week
it he had been "unofficially"
� . mtacted by South Carolina rep-
resentatives. Bul he would not
discuss his plans.
Sheridan turned down an
offer in December to become
coach at the University of Geor-
gia
along with
ALPHA SIG LITTLE SISTERS
presents
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Wednesday, February 15th
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Pirates lose hold on the Dukes in second halt
Continued from page 12
Reed Lose stepped in next for
the Pirateb, grabbing a rebound
and laying the ball back up tor the
score and Brooks made a solo foul
shot to make it 12-10. Murphy
made another steal tor ECU and
dished out to Hdwards, who hit a
3-pointer at 11:49 to give the Pi-
rates their first lead, 13-12.
The lead switched hands for
the rest of the half, both teams
going up by as much as four be-
fore the other team would take
back the lead.
First half highlights for ECU
included eight more points from
Edwards, who had 18 in the half,
three of which came on a 1(7 turn
around jumpshot over Cooley.
Edwards, fouled on the play, sank
the free throw.
In other highlights, Jeff Kelly
lit two timely 18' shots in a row
and Lose stole the ball and passed
out to Murphy who made a spin
ning layup to close out the period,
ECU up 35-33.
It was the second half, how-
ever, that proved that the Pirates
were on enemy turf as ECU could
only shoot 35 percent from the
floor.
"It was like they said 'let
anyone but Blue beat us Steele
said. "We had told them coming
in to eet the ball in to Blue, and if
he passes it back out they would
be open, and to shoot it.
"Our guvs were shooting
open 3-pointers whereas they
should have dribbled in for 12-15
foot wide open shots. They were
all open slots, we just missed
them
ECU started the half on a hot
note, going up 42-37 at the 15:26
mark on a 3-poinl goal bv Lose.
The Dukes' Ken Halleck coun-
tered with a 3-pointer of his own
and a Bostic layup with 13:30 to go
tied the score at 42. The teams
swapped three goals apiece to
knot the score at 48 with 8:33 left.
IM U then began to pull ahead
and the Pirates never recovered
the lead. When ECU reached 52
points, down by only two at the
6:16 mark, IM UVan off 14 straight
to lead ECU 66-52. To quote
Steele, the Pirates seemed tobeon
52 forever.
It was even scoring from
thereon inasJMU scored eight of
their last 10 points from the foul
line, ECU fouling to try to cut into
the deficit.
Edwards led all scorers in the
contest with his 30 point output.
Lose- and Murphy were the only
other Pirates in double figures,
scoring 13 and 10. Lose led ECU
with five rebounds.
For the Dukes, Bostic had 16,
Brooks and Ferdinand had 13
apiece and Cooley had 12. oole)
and Ferdinand each had eight
rebounds.
The Pirates return to action
Thursdav, travelling to Fayett v
ille to take on non-conference foe
Campbell.
���
'�fllxV
�.�

�� .
� )��'
Student Union
Coming Attractions
i � �
pi cioHtt)icnit)ij4)! ?fl)
East Carolina(61
MIrcFTR!�' 1 P
Lose38b90-051 113
Edwards3712-204-444 530
Love281-30-02 12
Kelly353 100 oj5 36
Murphy364-100-031 410
I louse10 00 001 2I)
Pcrlich40 00-000 10
Mote4000 010 00
Team3
Totals200 26-554 42116 1761
James Madison (74)
MPrcFTRF ATV
Brown203 40 032 16
Cooley396-150 063 412
Bostic35r84 663 116
Brooks343-6(� 721 313
Ferdinand 346-110-081 213
1 lalleck152-30-06
Davis172-71-11! 16
Dorsey6130 010 1)
Team2'
Totals200 29-57 11-143312 lb 74
East Carolina.352t61
James Madison3341-74
1 Attendance�i"140

k
HELP WANTED
Applications Being Accepted For
LAYOUT ARTIST
Apply in Person
Monday - Friday
at
The East Carolinian
No Phone Calls Please
Experience Preferred
STUDENT UNION OPEN HOUSE
Wednesday, February 15 in the Coffeehouse basement
of Mendenhall.
FREE PIZZA with Student Union coupon.
Come by and meet your enteitainers of ECU.
Sponsored by the Committees of Student Union
ILLUMINA ART COMPETITION 89
Entry dates February 15-17. 3 - 5 pm
Mendenhall. Rm. 221
$3.00 fee per entry - 3 entry limit per person
1st Place S175.00
2nd Place $125.OO
3rd Place S75 OO
5 Honorable Mentions - $25 each
Sponsored by the Student Union Visual Arts Committee
Movies of the Week
RUNNING ON EMPTY Wed Feb. 15
MARRIED TO THE MOB Fri Feb. 17-19
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee
All Films arc sfcowa t S pm in Heiulrix
Theatre unless otherwise stated and are FREE to ECU Students
with valid ECU ID.
All films are shown at 8 pm in Hendriz
Theatre unless otherwise stated and are FREE to ECU Students
with valid ECU ID.





1
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 14, 1989
Elliot takes new car to win despite injuries
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.
(AP)�Bill Elliot ignored his bro-
ken left wrist and bruised right
side Sunday long enough to com-
plete the entire 20 laps of the
Busch Clash at Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway.
The defending Winston Cup
champion, trying to determine if
he can handle a race car well
enough to drive in one of
Thursday's twin 125-mile quali-
fying races or next Sunday's Day-
tona 500, was not happy with his
findings.
"Man, I'm sore on my right
side he said. "My right side
hurts a lot worse today than it did
(Saturday), and that's bad be-
cause my right arm is all I have left
to drive with
The two-time Daytona 500
winner suffered his injuries in a
crash during practice on Friday.
His wrist is in a splint and
heavily bandaged and, on Satur-
day, Elliot ran only a few laps at a
time in practice and one fast lap in
Daytona 500 qualifying.
Elliot's Ford Thunderbird
started last in the Clash, a 13-car
race for last year's pole winners.
He stayed in line throughout the
50-lap sprint, winding up 12th
because Ricky Rudd faded off the
pace near the end.
"When Rudd came back to
me, I tried to wait on him and help
him, but he just wasn't running
Elliot explained. "So, I went on
and ran with that other pack. I
think I could have passed (Alan)
Kulwicki, but I just couldn't turn
the wheel and make a run at him.
"I could do OK, but because
my right side hurts so bad, it was
hard to steer like I needed to with
my right arm. I really didn't hurt
that much once the race got
going
"You forget about it when
you're running. But I couldn't
have gone much farther. My arm
was getting weak
"I learned a little bit about
how to race this new car he
continued. "I hadn't drafted with
anybody before today, and I
never did have anybody run up
under me. But, still I learned some
things about how to race just tuck-
ing up under the guys in front of
me
Elliot said he would leave
early Monday for Indianapolis,
where he will have his broken
wrist examined by orthopedic
specialist Dr. Joe Randolph, a
partner of Dr. Terry Trammell,
who has helped Rudd and numer-
ous Indy-car drivers recover from
serious orthopedic and trauma
injuries.
"I'm going to Indianapolis to
get those orthopedic guys that
work on the Indy drivers to look at
it, and I can't say what's going to
happen (later in the week) until
they tell me what I can do. I real! v
don't know
"If they perform some kind of
miracle, I might be able to run
Thursday, but right now, I just
don't know Elliot said.
Oklahoma reclaims their No. 1 ranking
(AP)�Oklahoma regained
the No. 1 ranking in The Associ-
ated Press college basketball poll
today, the fourth consecutive
week a new team has taken over
the top spot.
The Sooners, who held the
No. 1 ranking for one week before
dropping to fifth in last week's
poll, pulled an impressive double
to reclaim it, beating No. 3 Mis-
souri and top-ranked Arizona in
four davs.
Oklahoma, 21-3, received 58
first-place votes and 1,273 points
from the nationwide panel of
sportswriters and broadcasters to
isily outdistance Arizona, 18-3,
which dropped one spot with two
first-place votes and 1,162 points.
Duke had held the No. 1 rank-
but lost at Oklahoma State.
Arizona followed and was
knocked from the top spot by
Oklahoma's 82-80 victory on Sun-
day.
It was another week of parity
in college basketball as 12 mem-
bers of the Top Twenty lost a total
ing for nine weeks before falling of 14 games, five suffered by the
and setting off the month of top four teams. Five different
weekly top-ranked teams. teams were named No. 1 on the 64
Illinois followed but lost at ballots cast. Last week, six teams
Minnesota. Oklahoma was next were tabbed No. 1.
Missouri, 21-4, remained
third despite the loss to Okla-
homa, receiving two first-place
votes and 1,096 points. Geor-
getown, 18-3, dropped from sec-
ond to fourth after losing to Pitts-
burgh 79-74. The Hoyas had 1,001
points, 13 more than Illinois, 20-3.
The Fighting Illini, who were
seventh last week, had 988 points
to edge Syracuse, 21-4, which re-
ceived 974 points. The Orange-
men, Fighting Illini and Okla-
homa were the only members of
last week's Top Ten not to lose last
week.
Wednesday,
February 15th
$5.00
Memberships
From:
10 pm - 1 am
Austria's Nierlich wins
VAIL, COLO. (AD�It took
15 days of racing for the world to
discover that Alberto Tomba is
only human. It will take more to
determine if the same is true or
Rudolf Nierlich.
Skiing's superman in the
World Alpine Championships,
that concluded on a snowy Sun-
day, wasn't Italy's bombastic
Tomba "La Bomba
Tomba went down in the
morning of slalom. Two hours
later, Italian head coach Josef
Messner also took a tumble.
Rudi Nierlich knows how the
game is played, having survived a
sirnilar purge involving the Aus-
trian team a couple of years ago.
Nierlich, as quiet as Tomba is
outrageous, served notice by
impressively winning the giant
slalom that the country of the
downhiller is now the home of the
best gate racers. He punctuated
the point by winning a spill-filled
slalom on Sunday, his second
gold and Austria's third of the
two-week ski circus.
"I hope my life won't change
too much now that I'm a world
champion Nierlich said, trying
his new title on for size. "I'm sure
they'll throw a party for me back
home
Those parties are what Italian
officials and fans are blaming for
the misfiring of Tomba. Winner of
two Olympic gold medals and
nine World Cup races last season,
Tomba accomplished little in
these World Championships. He
fell in the first run of slalom,
dropped out of contention by
nearly falling in the giant slalom,
and produced his best finish in his
worst event by placing sixth in the
super giant slalom.
"In slalom, you have to stay
concentrated from top to bot-
tom Tomba said after dusting
himself off. "This season I have
not been able to keep that concen-
tration, so things have not worked
out very well for me
Italy failed to win a world
championship medal for the first
since 1970.
Nierlich won the slalom with
a time of 2 minutes, 2.85 seconds,
.44 seconds faster than runner-up
Armin Bittner of West Germany.
Marc Girardelli, winner of the
men's combined gold a week ear-
lier, got the bronze in 2:03.65.
West Germany earned its
Women place
fourth ni the
first-ever downhill title, thanks to
Hansjoerg Tauscher, and Martin
Hangl kept the Swiss powerhouse
going by capturing the super
giant slalom.
Vreni Schneider of Switzer1
land, the leader in the women's
World Cup overall standings,
was dominant despite winning
one gold instead of two or three.
She settled for silver in the
women's combined, behind
American Tamara McKinney,
and in the slalom, to Yugoslavia's
Mateja Svet.
Schneider ended her fort-
night on a brilliant note, shred-
ding the field in the giant slalom
on Saturday.
Maria Walliser of Switzer-
land became the first downhiller
ever to repeat as champion while
Ulrike Maier of Austria pulled a
surprise in taking the super-G. It
was the first victory of her career.
Like Tomba, Switzerland's
Firmin Zurbriggcn didn't win a
gold, but he didn't go home
empty-handed. He won a silver
behind Hangl in the super-G and
a bronze in the giant slalom.
Austria and Switzerland each
won three golds, with the Swiss
taking 11 total medals to Austria's
six. West Germany surprised
with four medals.
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conference
Continued from page 12
to bring home a new 100-yard
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Freshman jenny Muench was
also a brightspot for the Lady Pi-
rates as she managed to set two A
records in the conference champi-
onships. First, Muench captured
the record in the 200-yard butter-
fly when she touched the wall in
2:07.68. She then made an impact
in the 400-yard individual medley
as she ran away with the CA A and y
ECU freshmen record.
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Thomas and Jordan put on
NBA all-star show in Houston
HOUSTON (AP)�They keep
score at All-Star games because
somebody has to win and some-
body has to lose. The point of
these events, though, is not the
score, but the show.
So forget that the West beat
the East 143-134 in Sunday's NBA
convention of the best basketball
players in the world and remem-
ber instead that one magic mo-
ment when Isiah Thomas and Mi-
chael Jordan grabbed this game
by the lapels and took it into their
own little world, a private place
populated by precious few mor-
tals.
These two learned their bas-
ketball in entirely different
worlds, Thomas a product of the
concrete courts in Chicago's inner
city, Jordan a country kid from
North Carolina. Both led their
colleges to NCAA championships
before moving into the NBA
early. And both share a special
sense, an understanding of crea-
tivity and spontaneity that marks
them as special.
On Sunday, for one wonder-
ful instant, they put it on display.
The West All-Stars were in
the midst of a record first half
scoring surge that would produce
31-point lead and a halftime bulge
of 87-59. The West made 60 per-
cent of its shots in the first 24
minutes. One of the rare misses,
however, set off the Thomas-Jor-
dan show.
When Akecm Olaju won mis-
sed a six-foot shot in the lane,
Kevin McHale pulled down the
rebound for the East. He looped
the ball the other way and sud-
denly Thomas swooped down on
it, like a hawk dive-bombing its
prey. A step behind him was Jor-
dan.
There was no one back to
defend for the West, so the play
evolved into a two-on-none
break. It was an invitation for two
of the game's most innovative
players to do their thing. They did
not have to be asked twice.
Thomas caught up with the
ball and dribbled once and then
again as he advanced on the bas-
ket. The logical thing to expect
was a layup, an easy two points.
So there was perhaps one
more dribble and then Thomas
launched a bounce pass, not to
Jordan, but to the basket. He
slammed the ball to the floor so
that it bounced high and kissed
the backboard.
Lady Pirates down Patriots
Continued from page 12
Tarn Williams were ejected from
the game.
"The game was very physical
and emotions got out of hand
said Pierson. "We proved that we
could play on JMU's level and our
young kids held their own and
weren't intimidated by the physi-
cal game
East Carolina was now with
two starters out of the game, and
two more in foul trouble. The
Lady Pirates wer unable to capi-
talize on their opportunities at the
free throw line. ECU was 4-13
from tgeh line for the night as they
missed several one and one
chances in the second half.
"Free throw shooting hurt
us said Pierson. "You must take
advantage of everything you can
get, and we didn't
The final blow to the Lady
Pirates came when starting center
Sarah Gray and Savage both
picked up their fifth personal foul
and were out of the game.
ECU had cut JMU's 17 point
lead to 60-48 with 2:43 remaining,
but the Lady Pirates efforts were
in vain against the reigning CAA
champions.
The game ended on success-
ful 20 foot shot by ECU's Irish
Hamilton with 0:01 remaining.
Monday night, ECU's Lady
Pirates overcame shooting only
39 percent from the field to defeat
the tough Lady Patriots of George
Mason 71-60 before a crowd of 250
in Minges Coliseum.
Sharon Gray led both teams
in scoring hitting 18 points while
pulling down 11 rebounds for the
Lady Pirates. Pam Williams
scored 14, Rose Miller had 13 and
Chris O'Conner added 11. Wil-
liams, Miller and O'Connor each
grabbed 6 rebounds in the contest.
For GMU, Cindy Baruch had
15 points and seven rebounds
while Earlisha Dill had 11 and
two.
The victory raises the Lady
Pirates' record to 12-10 overall, 5-
5 in the CAA. GMU falls to 15-7,6-
3.
Hamilton gives all to team
Continued from page 12
"I tried not to let the injury
bother me. During the off-season. I
just worked hard and did what I
was told so that I could play again.
I decided that it was not going to
stop me and it didn't Hamilton
said.
Since the injury and surgery,
Hamilton has shed her knee brace
that hindered her play in the 1987-
8s season. Without the brace, she
leaves the memories of it behind
and focuses her attention on bas-
ketball. "I'm a lot faster without
the brace. I don't think about it
while I'm playing so then I'm not
scared to hustle and fight for the
ball
Pierson said since her arrival
in the '8788 season, (Hamilton's
sophomore year), Hamilton has
relaxed and confident playing for
her. I think using what I've
learned from both coaches has
-Teally-rtdjped-met4�" ��
The feelings are mutual be-
tween the player and the coach.
"Irish is one of the most coachable
players that I've ever had the
pleasure to work with. She's the
type that you wish you had 15
more just like her Pierson said.
"I really enjoy working with her
"Irish had a really good bas-
ketball background because she
came from an excellent high
school program at East Duplin
Pierson continued.
Hamilton, a 1986 graduate of
East Duplin High School, earned
all-conference honors and team
MVP honors during her junior
ing just me Hamilton said.
"When Coach Hunter brings up
the "team, I always have a lot of ,
"cKeertng and I hustle even more
because I feel like I'm setting an
example for them
Setting an example is a role
that Hamilton will continue to fall
into as she moves into next sea-
son. Along with being a leader at
point guard on the court, she will
also be the team's only senior.
"I will have to watch my step
more. Everything I say or do will
be an example so I have to do it
right on and off the court Hamil-
ton said about her role as the
team's lone senior.
"It will be a lot of responsibil-
ity Pierson said about
Hamilton's double duties next
year. "It's a role that she will
and senior years in high school.
Being from the area, she was handle well. I feel very comfort
improved tremendously and has exposed to ECU through camps ae wim ner leading the team on
overcome her injury. and her coach, Jerry Hunter, a tne court this year and I have no
The coaching change at ECU graduate of ECU. "ECU was a doubt that she'n do a gj.eat job
was a learning experience for good choice for me because if s next year
Hamilton as well as her team- close to home and I was familiar for now, Hamilton will focus
mates. During her freshman year, with it. Coach Hunter was a big 0n her team. She said their future
Hamilton was coached by Emily ECU supporter and he really hes in playing as a team and
Manwaring, who resigned later knew what he was talking about wanting to win more than their
when I was deciding on college opponents.
Hamilton said.
Being a local favorite has its
benefits for Hamilton. Not a game
goes by without some support
rom her home or high school and
that season.
"I learned a lot from Coach
Manwaring. I knew her from
when I attended summer camp at
ECU Hamilton said. "The
change did worry me, but after shesaysit'salwaysaboostforher
meeting Coach Pierson, I knew
that we would get along. I feel
Currently, the Lady Pirates
are 3-3 in Colonial Athletic Con-
ference play and 8-8 overall, look-
ing to improve on their 8-20 rec-
ord of last year. Hamilton said the
I play harder because I know Lady Pirates are well on the way
that someone's out there watch- t0 improvement over last year.
Dance team works on gaining
university, national attention
Continued from page 12
idea. Teams around the country
have been given the status for the
last three years, according to
Johnson. The ability to offer sho-
larships allows the teams to re-
cruit the best dancers from high
schools across the nation, Johnson
said.
Not that the dancers cur-
rently on the squad are less than
capable, though. While only four
professional sporting events, ac- known a group to put more into
cording to Johnson.
Ifwe could get into the finals
and get scholarship money, that
would put us into the big time.
Then we would be in the same
league as the Memphis State
Dance Team and some of the
other big-name teams Johnson
said.
their work. It makes them a de-
light to work with
While the team only performs
at basketball games, they do a lot
of work behind the scenes for
ECU athletics. According to
Johnson, all the squad members
have donated time and energy to
fund-raising efforts for the Pirate
Club and ECU's sports marketing
department.
One of the dancers, LaTara
of the 11 dancers are dance majors Bullock js already received na-
and only five are returners from tionaI attention for her ability.
last year's team, Johnson said this Bullock has been chosen to be one NCAA sport co-mes along and
is the best squad the school has of only 25 staff members at the with it atmetic department fund-
had yet. The team continues o UCA dance camp for 1989. pure Gofd team tQ
pull its talent from try-outs held jonnson said she hopes the honor
each Spring. given Bullock is just the beginning
Once teams receive the noto- of the respect the team deserves,
riety which comes with the ap-
pearance in the top five competi- Johnson also said the team cense lates rthis year in order to
tion televised yearly on ESPN been asked t0 perform in a j. f � ftmJmtm
theybegintobeseenasmorethan musicvideo with Little Eva some- Tryouts for the 1989-90 team
just collegiate ha1 time in February. wiU ApriX 17.19. For more
rr�nt Johnson said. The teams information about the squad or
then begin to be in demand for "I've been around cheerkad- Johnson at 757-
things such as promotional ap- mg and dancing for a long time, � �
pearances and entertainment at Johnson said, "and I've never 6178.
Until recognition as an
raise most of its own money for
uniforms and expenses. The
squad hasbeen selling "Ride With
Pride" bumper stickers and li-
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
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�sale in each Kroger Store, except as specifically noted in this ad. If
we do run out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice
of a comparable item, when available, reflecting the same savings
or a raincheck which will entitle you to purchase the advertised
item at the advertised price within 30 days. Only one vendor
coupon will be accepted per item purchased
COPYRIGHT 1989 � THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND PRICES
GOOD SUNDAY, FEB. 12, THROUGH SATURDAY, FEB 18.
1989, IN
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD
TO DEALERS
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Fresh Cut
Long Stem Roses
Paper Wrapped Dozen
Valentine's
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Tuesday
Feb.14th.
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Roses
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Kroger
Meat Wieners
12-OL





AN
FEBRUARY 14 1989
DANNY: We started off 2 years ago fight-
ig tooth and nail i guess that'sthe reason
urclyfail Bullet's
mderful scene on the
Id And tust remember, Dan.
those fights and
n I a
I stmas pair, there's so
.1: nod s finally. i'ii
; , ntine I a heart-filled
. ood times yet to come,
1th a kiss' HAPP'i
�� fl � � Pamela
i V; VI 1 MINK'S PAY TO EV-
,i �pe it is wonderful.
� dges ot Chi
JEFF: Happy Valentines Sweetie' I love
ya bunches �Love, Kat
DARREN: To the man whose body keeps
me warm at night and whose love keeps
me warm during the dav ! LOVE YOU.
Ira �
( HAR1 l MANE: 1 just tingle wl
think how much I love you. My lo e fca
you gTOWl more every day. Let's get to-
gether soon. �1 tarry
BANANA BKIAD HEAD & SALL1E
O'MALLEY: To my two roommates I
greatest�Happy

S.l
�tin
Kl RA-RA

!
and
This
-
BON1 I A I hank you tor cumin
foi youi sweet lo �
u for your precious friendship
my best friend 11 1 �
BEING, fheo
alter all these , ilenl im sM it 1 the iv � � ne's D
Ha K n i ISA, Ml CAN & ANG1 1 A . itine s Da) �Low lerry
with s. 11 ove MICHELLE H ippy � a) 1 ove ton' �Jol H" 'ME B Y:ll
MAEGGUILll CUTTIES;
lapp)
alentinc's
tl
ou know! 1 week end
to go We'll tip up
� of d.iv, oh yeah,
lAY!

rt me
ali � tii � � m
UM
iv as
1

. d � � � n
BRIAN: My friends were ri I
things come to those ��. h �waii
-
Mansa.
OE WII 1 ADSEN: !�� 1
Froi Imirer
LONEL HEART!
are
�V
1
TO (l 1 PARKER
!
you're so tine, won't you I �
tine? Me Loves aana
kd
MISSY. Roses are
� �- � '

NOSI BJIEAKI R: I
you tor n
���,�� I RII I I ESLII
1 I DN
friendshi
et toj
N1CKSTER: all the
i

ship brighter I
I


KIM'
Hi Nl Bl NNi �
SNUFFY. Thanks for sharing my bai
they're almost over Andtha: -
sharing your good times. I hope they
1 Most ot all, thanks for remind
mg me of what I could be; 1 shall '
rhe Wizard
DAMRON: Happy Valentine I
� I about Dayton 1 i
the way, mav 1 ask who Isca
HA!
VITEK: Happy Da) to th-
1 in the world.
chad to road trip to Das!

i ov A this Spring Br
I fvK NAMARA Happ) �1 1 I
MICHA1 I
� r
I
.
,0 tune that
part, 1 I
i monc. So
I KA I lappy Valentii
tier girlfriend Out
bonsiiip hat e olvedintosoi
sometimes but �
HOY SIMPSON Deal
make five months
re like the
' ' I
IAN I
'
lappy
�ton
Dl R HARVI
I
MRE: 1
. . .
will be here sexm
. '
you honey. Pick
� gel thru wo
, isses ! -end and
LAH
� s I a)' I hoj
md this day is
. � wlcarevcr)
tys wiU. 1 wisl
Fron v � I �� art,
1 011 i � entine - ' Past
n great! You're very
.i! to me and I hope the good '
v e y a, Sam.
SHELLED AND HOPE: Happy
rhanka for being two
i ove YBS, Fonnie.
WHAT TO GIVE MY PI KAPPA
ALPHA: Sweeteart for Valentino's Pay
give you a hug but that
it.l thought 1'ugtveyou
ildn t risk II So I decided to
M PAKK Happy Birtl
Happy Bon ovi Saturday�1 hope your
� � s Day is all "purple"�Y u re
the greatest best friend � -c" Carr
AY I Thanks for being my very special
buddy�1 cherish vou! 1 lappy Valentin
Day! Oh yea, Happy Birthday. -1 ove ya
lots, Susat
ERIK: You are the s tnshine of my da
Thank you for being vou. Happy
Valentine's Day! �'�.ens n
BA1RD KING: The weekend began when
you pulled down your pants, who would
ned it would end In such a
1' You ate special! �Jellyass
1 DD1E JOHNSON: Thanks for a u
derful year, and don't ever fore
much you mean to me' I love You -Tara.
BILL: This past year has been the greatest
You mean more to me each day that I'm
with you. Happy (early) Anniversary! 1
special you! �Love always. Ranee
l.EM
CAMPBELL.
HAPPY
u my heart, but vou already have VALENTINE'S DAY! That first night I'll
never forget. In Joe and Kerry's room, we
met Joe was our cupid from the start
shooting arrows, straight to our heart No
one can experience just what we've
shared Past, Present, Future 1 still care
We're two of a kind, yea that's true and I
want to tell the world- 1 LOVE YOU �
you alwavs, now, and forever, Stacy
Delta eta
MAI ISSA I ve been so many 1 taces,seen
none quite as lovely as .� u
itest, greatest inspiration'
PI NNI: He hot tuna
I'd t � is alenl i) stuff
Than for r I with nv
attitude for the past 5 months H
VaU :
IO ON A lj isl V
vou and than! '
; si is vet to come, but tell m
and the ram? Happy Valentines
N
PACO: Give me one of those big wet
kisses you're so famous tor' 1 love vou' -
ENO.
P.J.T I Iapp Valentine's Day bud
pal of mine' I Love You! � E.A.1
JAMIE: Basement and beaches, Dei
Lepperd and driving, abandoned
churches and back roads, ice cubes and
Arborgate, all m heart, all my love �Jill.
BLY: "Love is friendship that has caught
fire. It is quiet understanding, mutual
confidence, sharing & forgiving Today
we have a lot to celebrate 1 lappy
Valentine's Day and Happv One Month
Anniversary. 1 love vou. � JAM-
STRAIGHT Li"
TIM DAVIS: You.mean the world :
1 love you. �Angela Branch.
V MI CREW 1 lappy Valentine's Dav to
the besl friends a parson could have! �
- ster
boyfriends' (Not you.
MICAH-
,rhe
mous ,7
affection
lit
orget t!
get some real
Little Red-
DeMorns -The
headed Girl
MICHELLE PEARSON- Neva see vou
any more, you nutty dan
machine When vou finally figure out who
this is, give me a call, Mook' The M
rious Blonde Guy You Used To I tor
Spanish To
SHAY- To the cutest layout girl in the
Emerald City I still haven't finished
drawing you nudge, nudge, winkwmk
Your Valentine from afar
KEITH: This little note wasn't meant to be
funny, But 1 must tell vou that it's from
vour hunnv. It's been tour vears, both
in -BK. Bit IS' DAI TON: Sorry about "ly
u off the other week at the gmd ft bad ft too far to count the tun
d like to share in some kinky we've had! And so today, wout delay,
acti - with you Maybe we could do I'm wishing you a Happy Valentines
Former News Editor. Day! 1 luv u!
TO Mi WARREN ST. PALS May we ail To our Sex-God Jeff
Because he never gets Valentin s!
Kristen
MARK, RA- Will you be my Valentine?
I've fallen in love with the was you've
kicked me off the third floor You've
kicked yourself right into my heart. Be
mine
I.ORI- gee, l told you I'd write one you
sexy funky mama 1 lope to see you in
swimwcar again real soonJ.I Shelby
PARK-Can t wait to model for you next
week, I'm buying a new teddy lust for it!
Hugs and Slobbers-Paulina
CHUCK'r- Hey, Spicy, I've got some time
on my hands and I'm gunning for you
You smell like success. Let's do the skull-
thing real soon Tig ol' Bitties
KRIS MUTH�I know you'll do just fine
m paper Because I helped you
uur
un
-Mejay
OHN Mr. Wrestling' HEATH -I know that
I've been an understudy of Mil Mas-
aj Maybe I can show you some of my
holds sometime Moolah
I PI Daniels. When will you notice mc?
1 ve spied you for sometime, now use
vour blue e es and spy me. You must be
w aitmg for someone on your level-
Visiting 4 U
ROXANNE- You don't have to put on the
red light -Gordon S
Tripper I don't miss you a damn bit. Later
To Freckles: You are a damn good boss to
work for. Hang in there and stop that
Dcanhardt guy from dominating the Edi
tonal page, Late Night Glazed
IO THAT BEAUTIFUL SGA IM-
PORTER Hey baby, I Ukeyoui
bon. How about me and you gcttii
some heavy coverage? Let's w
Bojangles sometime and do sonv
journalism. �Big E
Third floor Aycock I ere a hoping 1
don't have to kuk out any Valentines
tonight. And I can do it too You dorm-
punks wanna make somcthin' of it? 1
didn't think so Big Mark, The RA from
1 tall
Heather: You're what'shappenin' in our
Shakes peah class Let's enact some
scenesThe Mysterious Guy
DANA-You sure have a way with an ed
Uing block CoOM do a special report on
meRacer X
TO PEE WEE: Why do thev call vouPee
Weeand why do you dip and bets much?
You skinnv iittle dip-stick buddy
Roscoe P. Coltrane
LORI: Why didn't you come by Famous
and slam some beers with me. Ben 1 talma
DEBBIE STEVENS: Thanks for being the
greatest secretary in the cosmos Oh, by
the way, some one is on line one.
Late Night Staff
WA H'BM L B
ad!?!
'Wll I Al RI: rhia is nuw
� II vou to see, but no
k h is me! I tap
'
ORORITIES
ippy uientm. a Da)
- � � theai
HI :
s 11 vv - R i l just wanted to wish
est of lu �
:
'
VW I I BAWi

thang �
KIDPO - � 'i
�- �
111 I II I N 1 HAD A NEW NICK-
MAM1 IN WHILE" PARKINR1D1
tal

thang an
dlK. u super:
Kelly LeBr
! n .g E, alia
I l,v. : new a:ci n "�
BM 11 'dge th� jeB

. -
iONDA WOMAN

the boa
� d � -en U � d k-a
:
IM LAYTON my
tunding board r int
� id, loving
lay and you i
- Karen
AMhl: Not onlvdo I r
I be n y Valentine! Stuart
I met this summer in that
they call the Elbo Room. At
it 1 saw your icc. my I u I
I to vou It tcxik a ' '
r but funally when we
had no one could shatu
u rest triend). I'm not meaning
I � ir brag, but we've made
times. Let's just take it dav by
(wait. I can't mink of a rhyme) Ml end this
work of poetrv here and leave vou with
this thought, you mean so verv much to
me dear, and vou dcfmatelv have nu
trt Happv Valentine's Da' � L
� N
1 IIOT DJ: This time ot vear is the K
evpress mst how 1 feel. So on this
il Valentine's Dav I'd like us to share
a! Can we go out to eat tonight' �
e, RCXTN.
I A JAMES: You arc a beautiful girl
and vou will always be special to me
Happv Valentine's Dav Sweetheart.
SLACK� I lore vou go . 12, (XX) lines o'
A 11 andi.C never had It so good
;i re a pal and a iiad, so let's road
trip and hang glide and learn some British
Magic this summer. Keep those slivers
earning! Love,
TO Mmdy Mclnnis, the hot and sew
anan that vou are When are we gt
� dinner thing? Mas he we could
il over at O. Najjar'a place and talk gram
ir. Once again, I want to emphasize!
� kscx) vou are. �E.
Britainia: Let me taste that. You were
gotsi on Hee-HarW. Come and watch
Sunday as BBC cries
She I law
To Paul H. We should really get
together again and look at your
pencils, Crunt Grunt,
To Jenn, president of the fan club: can you
really eat most guys under the table'
Pugsley: Thanks for letting me stay in this
two-foot room for free,
what a loyal Adams you are.
Pee Wee"l went 4 for 4"DinoCopanhager
Mr. Gil: Don't worry man, everything is
gonna be alright.
1'auhne and Earlene
Uncle Jessie: This is Daisy talking to you
on the bathroom C.B I need some toilet
paper, comeback Daisy Duke
To Carol Scareborough in Shakospoare's
Comedy: 1 iow do . unce
your last name' What a great it: vou
had, sorrv vou loM
was really Friday night.
To Alica Chew: Thanks foi He night
ham and cheese in Georgetown flj iaaed
you off, I'm sorry n . real na nc ia Big
Dick Head How about showing p to
Vickers every once and w :�. . 1 can
catch up on vour sleep
To Thurston Lames ave such a cool
name 1 want to be in youi tan club, 1 low
much are the initiatu





Title
The East Carolinian, February 14, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 14, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.656
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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