The East Carolinian, February 9, 1989






i
Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES 8
SPORTS14
Features
Controversial play, The Boys
in the Band reviewed.
Check out page 8.
Sports
The Patroits of George Mason took
another win from the Pirates.
Read about the action on page 10.
�he iEast (Eamlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 49
Thursday February 9,1989
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
The SGA legislature will decide the fate of the escort service Pirate Walk in Monday's meeting.
If projected costs hold true, the SGA will spend approximately $10 for each walk this year.
(Photolab)
Out of state students have difficulty
applying for in-state status, tuition
By MINDY McINNIS
SteH Writer
Every year, many out of state
students apply for in-state tuition
since out of state tuition i� four
times more expensive than in-
state. But first, the student must
have in-state status.
After residing in N.C. for an
one-year gTace period, a student
can apply for in-state tuition.
In the application, the student
should prove that all of the basic
requirements to receive an in-
state status have been met. The
requirements are as follows: ap-
plicants must live in North Caro-
lina for one year, obtain a North
Carolina driver's license, pay-
state taxes and register to vote.
Meeting the basic require-
ments doesn't always guarantee
acceptance. The Business depart-
ment, which is in charge of accept-
ing or rejecting applications, re-
ceives the initial letter from the
applicant.
The department looks at each
case individually and comes to a
conclusion based on two require-
ments by the law. One require-
ment states that the applicant
must have the intent to abandon
their old domicile, or home state,
and move to a new domicile per-
manently. Also the applicant
must prove their intent of living in
state.
If the department feels the
applicants hasn't met the criteria,
their application will be denied.
The student then has the option to
appeal his case to the Residency
Appeals Committee.
The Residency Appeals
Committee, which consists of
three to five members, votes on
approximately six to eight cases a
month. The chairman of the
committee, Ben Irons, doesn' t cast
a vote unless a tie breaker is
needed.
Irons believes that honesty is
the best policy. "If 1 had to say one
thing to students about applying
for in-state tuition it would be to
be certain the application is accu-
rate and complete
Irons says that the committee
has received several applications
that were not complete. He also
points out insufficient informa-
tion can be damaging. Irons says
an important factor in the case is
whether or not the student is self-
supporting or not. If not, "There is
See IN-STATE,page 2
Admission standards redefined
By ADAM CORNELIUS
Staff Writer
The Department of Admis-
sions has put forth a change in the
admissions process for the Fall
semester of 1989. These changes
include raising standards for in-
coming freshmen and transfer
students as well as instituting a
block admissions system. This
block system will set deadlines for
the receipt of applications to ECU.
Eugene Owens, Director of
Admissions for ECU, said that the
new process was enacted "In
order to get a better grip on the
quality and numbers of students
enrolling Since Jan. 26, the num-
ber of applications for the Fall of
1989 had already reached 7325.
This number is 700 more than
those received last Fall and 1,700
over the number for Fall 1987.
"This Fall we are looking for
about 2,300 to 2,400 enrolled in-
state students, Owens speculated.
"We will admit 4600 of these In
addition, Owens said that enroll-
ment for out-of-state students will
be between 450 to 475 and the
Admissions Department will
admit 1400 to 1450 out-of-state
students. Transfer students are
expected to remain at last year's
number, about 700 students.
According to Owens, admis-
sions requirements for prospec-
tive freshmen is based on their
Projected Grade Average, or
PGA. This number is based on a
students high school record, class
rank and, in the case of out-of-
state students, his or her SAT
score. Prior to the new policy,
students were admitted if thev
see NEW, page 2
Smith speaks on the Afro-American
tradition in 'Continuing the Legacy'
By CLEJETTER PICKETT
Staff Writer
"Only a people with strength
can stand 200 years of psychologi-
cal and physical abuse and
bounce back singing and dancing
with the joy of life said Dr. Larry
T. Smith speaking to faculty and
students at Jenkins Auditorium
Tuesday night.
Smith interpreted the cul-
tural heritage of Afro-Americans
in "Continuing the Legacy the
theme of the black history pro-
gram presented by the Minority
Student Affairs Advisory Broad.
While focusing on Afro-Ameri-
can heritage past and present,
Smith, the keynote speaker, said
Afro-Americans live in a cage
made of the bars of racism.
"This racism denies us our
freedom to live full, abundant
lives Smith, assistant vice chan-
cellor of student life for minority
affair, said. He said the number of
black males in American colleges
and universities is declining with
racism the underlying cause.
"We cannot deny it nor can
we allow white America to ignore
the existence of our own bodies
Smith said.
In an emotional appeal, SGA
President Larry Murphy said:
"Here I am, a white male who
can't make up for what's been
done in the past. All I can do is
help you (the black students at
ECU) now
Valeria Lassiter of Expres-
sions Magazine, and Paul Fox-
Pirate Walk may be axed
By TIM HAMPTON
Nem t'ditor
Four years after operating at
capacity, the rape-detercnt Pirate
Walk has become a shadow of it's
old self. Receiving only 85 re-
quests for escorts in the fall
semester of 1988 at a estimated
expense of $10 per walk, the Stu-
dent Government Association
funded service is on the chopping
blocks.
The SGA will decide the fate
of Pirate Walk in Mondav's meet-
J
ing. After si x years of support, one
student government leader savs it
is time to ax the escort service.
"Let it be resolved that Pirate
Walk should beabolished bv Mav
31 Marty Helms, speaker of the
legislator, said in quoting one of
the recommendations made in
legislation he authored.
In further recommendations,
1 lelms suggests ECU Campus Se-
curity resume the responsibility
of protecting students (mostly fe-
males) while walking home at
night. Regardless if Campus Se-
curity chooses to replace the rape-
detercnt service or not, Helms
advocates the discontinance of
SGA funding for Pirate Walk.
Helms said the uneffective-
ness of the program coupled with
the unreliability of escorts has lead
to Pirate Walk's downfall. Citing
statistics, Helms compared the
1,200 students who requested
'walkers' in the fall of 1985 to 85
requests made in the fall of 1988.
In addition, only 2.7 percent
of potential users call Pirate Walk,
according to Helms.
"Also Pirate Walk is expen-
ivc, we have made two appro-
priations this year totaling
SI,680 Helms said. If yearly to-
tals for walker requests equal
twice the number of the fall
semester then the escort service is
costing the SGA $10 per walk. All
SGA services are funded through
revenues taken from student fees.
A 1986 report on Pirate Walk
states the program worked at its
full capacity with 55 escorts, 18
supervising operators and a five
member executive staff. Accord-
ing to the report, the rape problem
at UNC-Chapel Hill sparked the
need for prevention as a recorded
1,200 requested walkers from Pi-
rate Walk.
Helms questions the organi-
zation of the present Pirate Walk.
"This semester, the volunteer
staff of walkers has been very un-
reliable he said. While not
knowing exact numbers, Helms
estimated the present staff has
less than ten members.
"I feel like the service is a
great concept and whole heart-
edly support it. Both present and
former chairman of the Pirate
Walk boardhave tryed to make it
work. It simply doesn't work
Helms said.
Helms proposes ECU Cam-
pus Security replace the escort
service with its own version.
Problems of unreliability and
uncontinuitv would be solved
under his proposals, according to
Helms.
'To be effective, the service
must be continual from one year
to the next. It hasn't been consis-
tent in the last couple of years
Helms said.
As SGA officers in charge of
Pirate Walk have left their posi-
tions in recent years, Helms said
the officers have left unresolved
problems to the next holder of the
title. Helms said the loss in conti-
nuity each year would not occur if
the program were under the aus-
pices of Campus Security.
Helms said Campus Security
employs students as uniformed
reserve officers who could be as-
signed to escorting students
home at night. Acting as a greater
deterent to attack because of the
uniform, Helms said the reserves
would also cut down in the
amount of vandalism and other
crimes occurring late at night.
'The reserves would be more
reliable he said, "And the Cam-
pus Security would have a contin-
ued administration. This is not
calling for a taxi service
Helms said Campus Security
has often said it is not a 'taxi serv-
ice' for students. But Helms said
the security of the ECU students is
the duty of the campus police and
no driving, only walking would
be required in the proposed pro
gram. He ha9 not contacted Lam-
pus Security about his plans.
By introducing the discon-
tinuance of Pirate Walk in Mav
Helms said the administration
will have several months to act, if
any action is deemed necessary,
on implementing a similiar sen
ice.
Cardiologist speaks on prevention
By DAVID HERRING
Assistant News Editor
Cardiology specialist Dr. Jer-
emy Swan was the guest speaker
at the Second Annual History of
Medicine Lecture held at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital last
week. Dr. Swan also spoke in
Greenville on the "History of
Cardiac Catheterizafion
He is noted for developing
the Swan-Ganz Catheter, a medi-
cal diagnostic device used to de-
tect heart attack symptoms in a
patient so that that patient's treat-
ment can be adjusted to prevent a
potential heart attack. The Swan-
Ganz Catheter readily obtains
information for determining: the
seriousness of a patient's condi-
tion, the patient's prognosis, and
the effectiveness of treatments.
The catheter, made of soft
flexible tubing, is inserted into
cither the patient's jugular or
femoral vein and then threaded
through the heart and into the
pulmonary artery. According to
Dr. Swan, the end of the catheter
has a small balloon which follows
blood flow and, acting much likea
sail on a boat, guides the catheter
to the desired site.
Once the catheter is in place,
doctors can take measurements
and obtain data, such as the
amount of blood output by the
heart, or the pressure within the
heart and lungs. This information
is carefully monitored around the
clock, providing an almost instan-
taneous update on a patient's
condition.
"In 1965 when 1 became the
director of cardiology at Cedar-
Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, it
became clear that no one had any
idea of what was taking place in
the heart attack process - what it's
causes and effects were Swan
said. "We couldn't always tell if a
patient was likely to have a heart
attack until he was actually hav-
ing the heart attack, and then it's
too late to prevent it. The catheter
gives us a better idea of how the
heart is functioning and what is
taking place
Dr. Swan began his speech,
'The reason things (medical tech-
nology) change is because of
imagination and inventiveness,
which comes from people He
told the attending PCMH staff
See SWAN, page 2
worth of Kappa Alpha Psi paid
tribute to the black male and
female. Lassiter spoke of the phe-
nomenal black woman by reflect-
ing on the writing of black author
Maya Angelou. Foxworth dis-
cussed the concept of the invisible
black man.
"You black males wonder
whether you have an effect on
other lives or whether you're
invisible, " Foxworth said. "You
must strike out with your fists.
Attempt to make them recognize
you
Featured entertainment in-
cluded poetry readings, a tribute
to African dance by Calvin Cherry
and Afro-American music by the
ECU Gospel Choir and Charles
Maxwell.
Just hanging out. Through with classes, Missy Ellis takes time out from her busy schedule to iust
hang out and say 'cheez whiz (Photo by J.D. Whitmire�Photolab)





y
HIE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY?, 1989
Tired of having a zit face?
Are you tired of having a zit buildup of the sebum. When this are several things you can do to
face? Is waking up in the morning happens, a whitehead appears on
with bumps and blemishes on
your face depressing? It may af-
fect vour self-image, self-confi-
dence, and self- esteem.
There are no exact causes of
acne. Acne is a skin condition
which occurs when glands secrete
oil that changes to a solid white
substance called sebum. Fhissub-
stance, which appears in the
openings of hair follicles, erupts
on the surface of the skin. A severe
condition occurs when the hair
follicle cannot contain the
the surface oi the skin. It not
treated, these pimples may leave
permanent scars on the skin.
Health Column
By
Mary Elesha
Adams
1 lowdovou treat acne? There
better the appearance of your
skin. First, you should wash your
face at least twice a day- You
should use a Ph-balanced soap
and warm water. Another impor-
tant factor in having clear skin is
to eat a balanced diet. If your diet
is high in tat and sugar and low in
vitamins and nutrients, you are
more likely to have acne. Vitamin
and mineral supplements have
been known to help acne suffer-
ers. Such vitamins are Vitamin A
(to restore balance), Vitamin B
complex (to help reduce excess so-
bum), and Vitamin C (to reduce
infection). These vitamins can be
found in fruits, vegetables, and
whole grain breads.
If you feel that cleansing your
skin and eating a well-balanced
diet is not enough for you, consult
a dermatologist who will help
you work out a program of treat-
ment.
This health column was writ-
ten by Diane Scrivner, Student
Health Promotion Assistant.
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See US for all Your
Automotive Needs
2616 East 10th Street
G: enviUe, NC 27834
758-7676
Representatives from 75 school systems to come
to Mendenhall in Education Career Day
By BIN St LB
Mat V ntcr
couraged to meet with the repre-
sentatives between 9 a.m. and
noon in rooms 224, 221. and the
More than 75 representatives firsl and o floor lobbies at
from North Carolina. Virginia, Mendenhall Student Center.
and South Carolina schools will
be on campus Tuesday, February
Uh at Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter for this vear's Education Ca-
lu cation majors or persons
ted in education are en-
All students exploring edu-
cation as a career are certainly
welcome said fim Westmore-
land, assistant director of Career
Planning and Placement Service.
"Us a good chance for the students
to talk to the representatives from
out of state
The ECU Career Planning
and Placement Service is sponsor-
ing the program to inform stu-
dents about job opportunites
available to teachers and others
interested in the business of edu-
cation.
Information will be provided
about teacher certification re-
Liircments in other states.
Stud nts are reminded that
interview and resume workshops
are held periodically throughout
the semester to better assist them
in attaining desirable employ-
ment upon graduation. The time
to start a job search is now.
The Career Planning and
Placement Service is located at the
Bloxton I louse, next to Greene
norm.
New admission process conies as number of applications soar
Continued fiom page 1
were ranked in the top bU percent
of their graduating class. Under
the new admissions process, stu-
dents must rank in the top half of
their class. The other require-
ments tor admission to ECL.
which includes the completion ot
courses needed for graduation
and a 2.0 high school GPA, re-
mains unchanged.
in addition, PCL's rolling
admissions policy has been
changed to a modified block ad-
missions program. Under this
system in state students must
now nave their applications in by
Dec. 13 to be notified by Feb. 1,
and by Feb. 1 to be notified by
March 13. Out of state students
who got their applications in by
Dec. 31 will have their applica-
tions processed starting with the
In-state tuition requirements
are toueh for some students
Continued from page 1
met all of the basic requirements
and was supporting himself
through loans. Again Hermes
was denied.
"Thev told me that 1 couldn t
receive in-state tuition because
a presumption that the student is
just here tor an education and will
return to their home state after
graduation Iron said.
Matt Hermes, an ECU senior,
has been denied in-state resi-
dency five times. Herme. a nati e
of Virginia, has resided in
Greenville for almost five years.
He first applied for in-state re
dencv in the summer ot '86.
Hermes was denied but later
appealed his ease to the appeals
committee. He felt that this time
he was more prepared since lie
mv father was loaning me the
money. 1 tried to tell them that 1
would be able to afford tuition
myself if it was in-state. It isn't
fair
After appealing three more
times, the case was finally sent to
the State Appeals Board. 1 lerme
was denied the fifth and final
time. "1 thought that if I kept
bugging them, that maybe they
would give it to me. Now it
doesn't matter because I'm
graduating this May
1 lermes is just one of the many
students that have been denied
the in-state status at ECU. The
Residency Appeals Committee
reverses 20 of the cases and
sustains 80.
Swan speaks on heart
Continued from page 1
members to make careful obser-
vations and to draw conclusions
using their own abilities of imagi-
nation and inventiveness.
Bom in Dublin, Ireland, Dr.
Swan received his doctorate de-
gree in physiology and went into
residency at the University of
London. Afterwards he had joint
appointments, serving as the di-
rector of graduate school in medi-
cine at the University of Minne-
sota and director of the cardiology
laboratory at the Mayo Clinic.
In 1965 he relocated to Cali-
fornia to serve as director of cardi-
ology at Cedar-Sinai Hospital and
professor of medicine at UCLA.
SHOW YOU CARE WITH

. HI
BALXO ONS
from
Anything Paper
We also have CARDS, CANDY
FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS &. GIFTS
Call Early For Delivery
Bring this Ad in for
1 FREE
RED LATEX BALLOON
with your purchase
Bells Fork Square
355-6212
highest PGA. The university will
work down the list until all appli-
cation slots are filled. This will
raise averages slightly for the
coming Fall semester.
Transfer students must still
carry thirty hours oi transferable
credit and a 2.0 GPA. Effective in
the Fall oi 1990, however, the
number oi required hours will be
increased 50 percent to 45. The
Join that crazed
and demented
Bonehead feller
on the Features
Page every
Thursday as he
redefines the
meaning of
sensored
in Pickin' the
Bones
processing date for transfer stu-
dents this Fall is March 1. Refer-
ring to the number of applications
processed for the transfer stu-
dents, Owens commented that
while there wasn't a processing
deadline last year, the Depart-
ment had to stop the admission of
transfer students by April 15.
"(The new enrollment pro-
gram) enables us to get a better
handle on the enrollment pool. I
think we can do a better job of
looking at the total picture now.
The East Carolinian
famesF.J. McKee, Directorof Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey )� Keith Pear
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blankensh
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
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Xt

Open"
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sunday 1 -6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Aigner, Nike and Reebok)






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9,1989
Tired of having a zit face?
Are you tired of having a zit buildup of the sebum. When this are several things you can do to
face? Is waking up in the morning happens, a whitehead appears on better the appearance of your
with bumps and blemishes on
your face depressing? It may af-
fect your self-image, self-confi-
dence, and self- esteem.
There are no exact causes of
acne. Acne is a skin condition
which occurs when glands secrete
oil that changes to a solid white
substance called sebum. This sub-
stance, which appears in the
openings of hair follicles, erupts
on the surface of the skin. A severe
condition occurs when the hair
follicle cannot contain the
the surface of the skin. If not
treated, these pimples may leave
permanent scars on the skin.
skin. First, you' should wash your
face at least twice a day. You
should use a Ph-balanced soap
and warm water. Another impor-
f-f pall-Vi rnliimn tant factor in having clear skin is
i if di n t v ui u 111 ii tocata baianceddiet if your diet
is high in fat and sugar and low in
vitamins and nutrients, you are
more likely to have acne. Vitamin
and mineral supplements have
been known to help acne suffer-
ers. Such vitamins are Vitamin A
(to restore balance), Vitamin B
By
Mary Elesha
Adams
bum), and Vitamin C (to reduce
infection). These vitamins can be
found in fruits, vegetables, and
whole grain breads.
If you feel that cleansing your
skin and earing a well-balanced
diet is not enough for you, consult
a dermatologist who will help
you work out a program of treat-
ment.
This health column was writ-
ten by Diane Scrivner, Student
Health Promotion Assistant.
MALPASS
MUFFLER
See US for all Tour
Automotive Needs
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville. NC 27834
758-7676
follicle cannot contain the How do you treat acne? There complex (to help reduce excess se- Health Promotion Assistant.
Representatives from 75 school systems to come
to Mendenhall in Education Career Day
By BEN SELBY
Staff Writer
More than 75 representatives
from North Carolina, Virginia,
and South Carolina schools will
be on campus Tuesday, February
14th, at Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter for this year's Education Ca-
reers Day.
Education majors or persons
interested in education arc en-
couraged to meet with the repre-
sentatives between 9 a.m. and
noon in rooms 224, 221, and the
first and second floor lobbies at
Mendenhall Student Center.
"All students exploring edu-
cation as a career are certainly
welcome said Jim Westmore-
land, assistant director of Career
Planning and Placement Service.
"Itsa good chance for the students
to talk to the representatives from
out of state
The ECU Career Planning
and Placement Service is sponsor-
ing the program to inform stu-
dents about job opportunites
available to teachers and others
interested in the business of edu-
cation.
Information will be provided
about teacher certification re-
quirements in other states.
Students are reminded that
interview and resume workshops
are held periodically throughout
the semester to better assist them
in attaining desirable employ-
ment upon graduation. The time
to start a job search is now.
The Career Planning and
Placement Service is located at the
Bloxton House, next to Greene
Dorm.
New admission process comes as number of applications soar
Continued from page 1
were ranked in the top bU percent
of their graduating class. Under
the new admissions process, stu-
dents must rank in the top half of
their class. The other require-
ments for admission to ECU,
which includes the completion of
courses needed for graduation
and a 2.0 high school GPA, re-
mains unchanged.
In addition, ECU'S rolling
admissions policy has been
changed to a modified block ad-
missions program. Under this
system in state students must
now nave their applications in by
Dec. 15 to be notified by Feb. 1,
and by Feb. 1 to be notified by
March 15. Out of state students
who got their applications in by
Dec. 31 will have their applica-
tions processed starting with the
In-state tuition requirements
are tough for some students
Continued from page 1
met all of the basic requirements
and was supporting himself
through loans. Again Hermes
was denied.
"They told me that I couldn't
' receive in-state tuition because
a presumption that the student is
just here for an education and will
return to their home state after
graduation Iron said.
Matt Hermes, an ECU senior,
has been denied in-state resi-
dency five times. Hermes, a native
of Virginia, has resided in
Greenville for almost five years.
He first applied for in-state resi-
dency in the summer of '86.
Hermes was denied but later
appealed his case to the appeals
committee. He felt that this time
he was more prepared since he
my father was loaning me the
money. I tried to tell them that I
would be able to afford tuition
myself if it was in-state. It isn't
fair
After appealing three more
times, the case was finally sent to
the State Appeals Board. Hermes
was denied the fifth and final
time. "I thought that if I kept
bugging them, that maybe they
would give it to me. Now it
doesn't matter because I'm
graduating this May
Hermes is just one of the many
students that have been denied
the in-state status at ECU. The
Residency Appeals Committee
reverses 20 of the cases and
sustains 80.
Swan speaks on heart
Continued from page 1
members to make careful obser-
vations and to draw conclusions
using their own abilities of imagi-
nation and inventiveness.
Born in Dublin, Ireland, Dr.
Swan received his doctorate de-
gree in physiology and went into
residency at the University of
London. Afterwards he had joint
appointments, serving as the di-
rector of graduate school in medi-
cine at the University of Minne-
sota and director of the cardiology
laboratory at the Mayo Clinic.
In 1965 he relocated to Cali-
fornia to serve as director of cardi-
ology at Cedar-Sinai Hospital and
professor of medicine at UCLA.
SHOW YOU CARE WITH
TIT
A LX O 6 N 3
from
Anything Paper
We also have CARDS, CANDY
FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS ft GIFTS
Call Early For Delivery
Bring this Ad in for
1 FREE
RED LATEX BALLOON
with your purchase
Bells Fork Square
355-6212
highest PGA. The university will
work down the list until all appli-
cation slots are filled. This will
raise averages slightly for the
coming Fall semester.
Transfer students must still
carry thirty hours of transferrable
credit and a 2.0 GPA. Effective in
the Fall of 1990, however, the
number of required hours will be
increased 50 percent to 45. The
Join that crazed
and demented
Bonehead feller
on the Features
Page every
Thursday as hi
redefines the
meaning of
sensored
in Pickin' the
Bones
processing date for transfer stu-
dents this Fall is March 1. Refer-
ring to the number of applications
processed for the transfer stu-
dents, Owens commented that
while there wasn't a processing
deadline last year, the Depart-
ment had to stop the admission of
transfer students by April 15.
"(The new enrollment pro-
gram) enables us to get a better
handle on the enrollment pool. I
think we can do a better job of
looking at the total picture now.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKce, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey J- Keith Pearce
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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�-





i

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARYS 1989 3
Students re-live rape horrors
(CPS)� It was 3:45 on an "1 was just thinking Get this security became a major poitical
early September morning. A care- guy out of the house He left, and issue on some campuses,
free atmosphere hung over the 1 just kind oi chased him out the Students marched and rallied
University of Illinois campus, but door. 1 just kept yelling, Get out of angrily after attacks against
my house women at Brown, Marquette,
Blakey ran to the victim's Millersville State, Duke, Mankato
room. "I went in her room and she State, Yale and Northwest Mis-
the feeling would not last long.
Residents of an off-campus
house were about to confront a
sexual assailant.
Unfortunateley,thisisnotthe
plot of a cheap, violent horror
movie. The incident happened in
-a college community. It happened
to a student, someone a lot like
you. It will happen again.
"I heard this loud bang and
woke up savs Steve Blakey, one
of the victim's roommates. "I
looked around to see where my
baseball bat was the back door
was open, with the frame shat-
tered I was scared, I just knew
someone broke in
Others were awakened by
their female roommmate's terri-
fied scream. But before they even
heard the scream, the stranger
had been roaming from room to
room stalking a victim, passing
over rooms with a combination of
male and female occupants.
One resident actually saw the
assailant but was too sleepy to
realize it was a stranger.
was walking toward the door
sanng 'Oh my God, Oh my god
The assailant, a man police
say may have assaulted nine oth-
ers in the Champaign. 111 area,
did not rape the student, but he
did beat her severely.
souri State univeristies, as well as
the universities of Wisconsin-Mil-
waukee, Pennsylvania, Minne-
sota, and, of course, Illinois.
Their anger was articulated
by two reports that sharply criti-
cized the way schools handle rape
"I le ripped off her shorts and and sexual assault. In August, the
underwear and she was nude
from the bottom down, " ex-
plained another roommmate,
who does not want to be identi-
fied because she feels uncomfort-
able discussing the incident. "We
figure he might have kicked her in
the face
"Ten more seconds and he
probably would have raped her
Blakey said.
Rape Treatment Center of Santa
Monica (Cal.) Hospital publicly
called on college presidents to
step up efforts to prevent rape,
blasting many existing policies as
insensitive and ineffective.
And in October, the Associa-
tions of American Colleges
charged campuses with fostering
sexist climates that encourage
sexual harassment, discriminatin,
Although rape iscertainlv not sexual assaults and rape,
new to the Illinois campus, last At Illinois, the number of
fall the campus community was reported sexual assults on cam-
especially on guard because of the pus has increased dramatically
series oi rapes committed by the during the last few years. In 1983,
assailant. In many instances, the students reported seven assaults.
shrubs that obstruct walkways
and beefing up security person-
nel, said Paul Dobcl, the
committee's chairman and associ-
ate vice chancellor of administra-
tive affairs.
But budge cuts have limited
resources, he said.
"People have to modify their
behavior University Police
Chief Paul Dollins said, adding
that when the sun goes down, the
dangers for women increase on
campus.
But avoiding walking alone
at night, carrying a can of mace or
wearing a whistle is not enough in
many cases.
The assailant who attacked
Blakey's roommate kicked in a
deadbolted back door and broke
open the victim's locked bedroom
door.
And that student's life will
never be the same. When the
woman returned home a few days
after the attack, she did not dis-
cuss the situation.
Her roommates thought she
was all right.
About three weeks later, she
left school.
TC
Money for College
Over 3 Million Students Will Qualify For
College Grants & Scholarships
�Learn the quickest & easiest ways you can win both
scholarships and financial aid awards.
�Learn how to improve your chances for a Pell Grant
�Learn how to increase the amount of your Guaranteed
Student Loan.
�Learn howmuch money you are eligible to receive so
you can choose the school that best suits your true
financial need.
For more information and a FREE copy of
10 Ways to Stretch your
Scholars flip Chances!
fill out and Mail the attached coupon TODAY!
(
Send for FREE Information
Name �
Address
City
Phonef
State
ZiD-
)
rapes occurred while women
were sleeping in their own beds.
Illinois is not alone. At a mid-
January conference on campus
violence held at Towson State
tound no one. As he started up the Univorsitv in Marviand, college O'Shaughnessv, assistant dean of
tairstothefirstfloor.heheardhis from aroumi lhc count, studcn�
After hearing the noise,
Blakey, a senior, searched the
darkness oi the laundrv room but
Bv 1987, that number increased to
26.
"The reporting has increased,
but I don't think that the crime is
the rise said Mary Ellen
on
roommate let out "a terror-tvpe ot
nightmarish scream. "I took the
bat and started banging it against
the wall and yelling Get the fuck
out of my house Students in
neighboring apartment buildings
later reported they could hear
Blakey's enraged threats in their
own homes.
Suddenly, the assailant came
around the corner
back door, his place of entrv.
'This guv saw me with the base-
ball bat Blakey said. "He
�topped for a second with .iis eyes
srpened wide.
estimated as manv as one out of
every four college women has
suffered as sexual assault.
Serial rapists have targetted
campuses, which are open, unse-
cureand marked bv dark areas, as
well. During the last two school
years, Michigan State University
and University oi California at
Santa Barbara have suffered
mi "the throufih dismaying, frightening
series of sex crimes.
With the pain, fear and head-
lines, too, has come an incresed
focus on dale rape at many-
schools.
And, during fall, women's
On the rise or not, the effects
of rape are devastating.
"You think about it all the
time. Some women become ob-
sessed with it said Anna Marie
Giro of Rape Crisis Services in
Champaign.
Illinois, like many other
schools, has increased efforts to
ease the danger and fear. And like
many other schools, the effective-
ness of Illinois' efforts is limited.
The university rape aware-
ness committee, established in
1982, is working to make the
campus more secure by provid-
ing better lighting, removing
ell Week' fraternity pranks kill animals
MrchtsrafrState and U. of Wasfiirifrofr
College Financial Resources J
205 E. 13th Street
Mail Coupon To: Greenville. NC 27858
1 757l1j543 J
(CFS)� Less than two weeks
after a rooster was killed during a
"University of Washington frater-
" itv stunt, greek hijinks have
claimed another animal's life this
- time at Michigan State University
vlamb.
The three-month-old lamb
ied Jan. 18 after it was stolen
from the MSU sheep barn by
igma Chi members, tied to the
-fraternity's porch and left alone,
according to The State News, the
MSU student newspaper.
"They tied it to the porch and
the animal r t excited and
jumped off the porch said
-George Good, MSU's sheep barn
manager. "Whoever tied it (used)
a slip knot, and the longer the
lamb struggled, the tighter the
knot got until it suffocated
Good said such pranks occur
:rlhree or four times a year during
rush and initiation at fraternities
and sororities.
"These pranks look fine and
dandy Good said. "And my
blood pressure has stayed pretty
3ow until this point.
"We usually find them in a
Isorority shower or a dorm room
and things turn out fine. This time
Read The Bast
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
they didn't.
Doug Olson, Sigma Chi vice
president, said fraternities often
pull such pranks, but without
such results.
"It has happened in the past
and I hope this will put an end to
it Olson said. "This is not con-
doned. It's a sick joke to play
University of Washington
officials, meanwhile, still are in-
vestigating allegations that two
Delta Upsilon members threw a
rooster from a classroom balcony
during a human sexuality class.
The bird was killed by the' fall.
Pranksters have thrown birds
into the class during past semes-
ters as well, but witnesses say the
rooster was killed because it was
thrown backwards and couldn't
use its wings.
"To the best of my knowl-
edge, the DUs are not responsible
for what happened, but we are
ooking into the incident Delta
MKMK
Jpsilon President Brian Crooper
said. "1 have checked around and
have not found anything out
But fraternity insiders told
The Daily, Washington's student
newpaper that Cropper was in-
volved and that their house had a
tradition of releasing roosters into
classrooms during "Hell Week
"We are just sick of the whole
thing said one DU member who
requested anonymity. "When I
heard about what happened I felt
that it had gone too far
Mike Walsh, another DU
member, said his house does keep
roosters during "Hell Week
"But they are just for the
pledges to take care of he added.
"The activity definitely is not
a house-condoned activity
Walsh said of the rooster's death.
T cannot believe that anybody
would intentionally try to kill an
animal just for a joke
3MIC
:xc
3MC
DOC
3�C
:xc
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED Hf LP?
I
Why not com by th� REAL Crfuir Intervention Center: 312 E.
10th St; or call 7SS-HELP, For Free Confidential Counseling or Ae-
Sittarw
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hra. a day, year around.
In order to ataitt you In virtually any problem art you might have.
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance
the quality of life for you and our community.
Lictwil And Accredited By Tn� Slat o North Carotin
m m,
� � i �
tHERN Ey
C I
C S � I
Kpn
Valentine's Special
Bolle
Reg. $24.95
NOW $19.95
� 1 week onljr! J
Telephone
355-7695
Located In The Plaza Mall Entrance
John's Flowers
orders as early as possible
on Saturday and Sunday, Valentine's Ds
East 3rd Street 752-3311
A series to assist
graduating seniors.
omnani We TV
At
also interested in
your future.
Dressing
for the
Interview:
Every interviewer will agree that the way
you are dressed for the interview is ex-
tremely important. Many potential
employers will inspect you from head to
toe When you consider that many com-
panies will interview more than one-hun-
dred applicants for a position, it makes
good sense to insure that you're properly
dressed.
A dark suit, preferably a navy, navy
pinstripe, grey, or grey pinstripe, should be
worn for the first meeting
A white shirt should he worn for each in-
terview (some large companies require that
their employees wear nothing but white
shirts)
A conservative stripe or foulard tie is
preferred Don't make the mistake of wear
ing a linen tie in the winter or a wool one
during spring or summer A burgundy stripe
with some navy blue and or grey usually
looks very nice with either of the aforemen
tioned suits.
Dark shoes, preferably a dark leather
tassel or lace up is best Light colored
loafers won't cut it (a fresh shine would be a
good ideal too) Wear a belt that matches
your shoes
W e want : Her you i ' � �
when : . - . i
suit tr select . � - - ' !
Austi Ret Hart Si tffner & M
f reeman Ch.ip- P - ' �
It�� want to make sun � �� �
different i ' i ' � - i
our ch th �' de vers
A navy blaze: - pen isible But it must
be worn properk with a conservative sti
tie. Grey pants are generally th besl to
wear with the blazer ikhak; are loo casual
for an interview) Again dark sh es an
best.
Make sure that vour clothes are clean 11
pressed
Some self proclaimed professionals sa,
that you should work vour way up to vour
best looking suit In other words, save the
best for last to make the lasting impress
when it comes down to the final cut This
makes sense until you consider that you
want to make a good enough impression at
the first interview to be asked back for the
second This is a decision you must make
for yourself
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall Rocky Mount






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9, 1989 3
Students re-live rape horrors
(CPS)� It was 3:45 on an "1 was just thinking 'Get this security became a major poitical
early September morning. A care- guy out of the house Fie left, and issue on some campuses,
free atmosphere hung over the I just kind of chased him out the Students marched and rallied
University of Illinois campus, but door. I just kept yellingGet out of angrily after attacks against
the feeling would not last long.
Residents of an off-campus
house were about to confront a
sexual assailant.
Unfortunateley,thisisnot the
plot of a cheap, violent horror
movie. The incident happened in
a collegecommunitv. It happened
to a student, someone a lot like
you. It will happen again.
"I heard this loud bang and
woke up' savs Steve Blakey, one
ot the victim's roommates. "I
looked around to see where my
baseball bat was the back door
was open, with the frame shat-
tered 1 was scared, I just knew
someone broke in
Others were awakened bv
their female roommmate's terri-
fied scream. But before they even
heard the scream, the stranger
had been roaming from room to
room stalking a victim, passing
over rooms with a combination oi
male and female occupants.
One resident actually saw the
assailant but was too sleepy to
realize it was a stranger.
After hearing the noise,
Blakev, a senior, searched the
darkness oi the laundrv room but
found no one. As he started up the
stairs to the first floor, he heard his
roommate let out "a terror-type oi
nightmarish scream. "I took the
bat and started banging it against
the wall and vellme Get the fuck
out oi my house Students in
neighboring apartment buildings
later reported they could hear
Blakev's enraged threats in their
own homes.
mv house
Blakey ran to the victim's
room. "I went in her room and she
was walking toward the door
saying Oh my God, Oh my god
The assailant, a man police
say mav have assaulted nine oth-
ers in the Champaign. 111 area,
did not rape the student, but he
did beat her severelv.
women at Brown, Marquette,
Millersville State, Duke, Mankato
State, Yale and Northwest Mis-
souri State univeristies, as well as
the universities of Wisconsin-Mil-
waukee, Pennsylvania, Minne-
sota, and, of course, Illinois.
Their anger was articulated
bv two reports that sharply criti-
cized the way schools handle rape
underwear and she was nude
from the bottom down, ex-
plained another roommmate,
who does not want to be identi-
fied because she feels uncomfort-
able discussing the incident. "We
figure he might have kicked her in
the face
"Ten more seconds and he
probably would have raped her
Blakey said.
Although rape is certainly not
new to the Illinois campus, last
fall the campus community was
especially on guard because of the
series oi rapes committed bv the
assailant. In many instances, the
rapes occurred while women
were sleeping in their own beds.
Illinois is not alone. At a mid-
January conference on campus
violence held at Towson State
University in Maryland, college
police from around the country
estimated as manv as one out of
every four college women has
suffered as sexual assault.
Serial rapists have targettcd
campuses, which are open, unse-
cure and marked by dark areas, as
well. During the last two school
years, Michigan State University
and University of California at
Suddenly, the assailant came SuantJ "��� have suffered
around the'corner toward the through dismaying, frightening
back door, his place of entrv.
"I le ripped off her shorts and and sexual assault. In August, the
This guv saw me with the base-
Sgbail bat Blakey said. "He
jsptopped for a second with. iis eyes
�f�opened wide.
series of sex crimes.
With the pain, fear and head-
lines, too, has come an increased
focus on date rape at many
schools.
And, during fall, women's
Rape Treatment Center of Santa
Monica (Cal.) Hospital publicly
called on college presidents to
step up efforts to prevent rape,
blasting many existing policies as
insensitive and ineffective.
And in October, the Associa-
tions of American Colleges
charged campuses with fostering
sexist climates that encourage
sexual harassment, discriminatin,
sexual assaults and rape.
At Illinois, the number of
reported sexual assults on cam-
pus has increased dramatically
during the last few years. In 1983,
students reported seven assaults.
Bv 1987, that number increased to
26.
"The reporting has increased,
but I don't think that the crime is
on the rise said Mary Ellen
O'Shaughnessy, assistant dean oi
students.
On the rise or not, the effects
of rape are devastating.
"You think about it all the
time. Some women become ob-
sessed with it said Anna Marie
Gire of Rape Crisis Services in
Champaign.
Illinois, like many other
schools, has increased efforts to
ease the danger and fear. And like
manv other schools, the effective-
ness of Illinois' efforts is limited.
The university rape aware-
ness committee, established in
1982, is working to make the
campus more secure by provid-
ing better lighting, removing
shrubs that obstruct walkways
and beefing up security person-
nel, said Paul Dobel, the
committee'schairman and associ-
ate vice chancellor of administra-
tive affairs.
But budge cuts have limited
resources, he said.
"People have to modify their
behavior University Police
Chief Paul Dollins said, adding
that when the sun goes down, the
dangers for women increase on
campus.
But avoiding walking alone
at night, carrying a can of mace or
wearing a whistle is not enough in
many cases.
The assailant who attacked
Blakev's roommate kicked in a
J
deadbolted back door and broke
open the victim's locked bedroom
door.
And that student's life will
never be the same. When the
woman returned home a few days
after the attack, she did not dis-
cuss the situation.
Her roommates thought she
was all right.
About three weeks later, she
left school.
T
Money for College
Over 3 Million Students Will Qualify For
College Grants & Scholarships
�Learn the quickest & easiest ways you can win both
scholarships and financial aid awards.
�Learn how to improve your chances for a Pell Grant
�Learn how to increase the amount of your Guaranteed
Student Loan.
�Learn how much money you are eligible to receive so
you can choose the school that best suits your true
financial need.
For more information and a FREE copy of
10 Ways to Stretch your
So li ola rs fi ip Ch one cs I
fill out and Mail the attached coupon TODAY!
liHeH.Week' frater
at MrchfgairrState
� �
-�j.
(CPS)� Less than two weeks
after a rooster was killed during a
University of Washington frater-
sESriitv stunt, greek hijinks have
Claimed another animal's life this
- time at Michigan State University
�Pramb.
The three-month-old lamb
died Jan. 18 after it was stolen
from the MSU sheep barn by
Sigma Chi members, tied to the
fraternity's porch and left alone,
according to The State News, the
MSU student newspaper.
"They tied it to the porch and
the animal got excited and
jumped off the porch said
George Good, MSU's sheep barn
manager. "Whoever tied it (used)
a slip knot, and the longer the
lamb struggled, the tighter the
knot got until it suffocated
Good said such pranks occur
three or four times a year during
rush and initiation at fraternities
and sororities.
"These pranks look fine and
dandy Good said. "And my
blood pressure has stayed pretty
low until this point.
"We usually find them in a
sorority shower or a dorm room
and things turn out fine. This time
they didn't
Doug Olson, Sigma Chi vice
president, said fraternities often
pull such pranks, but without
such results.
"It has happened in the past
and I hope this will put an end to
it Olson said. "This is not con-
doned. It's a sick ioke to play
University of Washington
officials, meanwhile, still are in-
vestigating allegations that two
Jpsilon President Brian Crooper
aid. "1 have checked around and
have not found anything out
But fraternity insiders told
The Daily, Washington's student
new-paper that Cropper was in-
volved and that their house had a
tradition of releasing roosters into
classrooms during "Hell Week
"We are just sick of the whole
thing said one DU member who
requested anonymity. "When I
Delta Upsilon members threw a hcard about what happcncd , fclt
rooster from a classroom balcony tha had toQ far �
during a human sexuality class. Mikc Walsh another DU
The bird was killed by the tall. member, said his house does keep
Pranksters have thrown birds roosters during �Hcll Week
into the class during past semes- -But thev are ust for thc
ters as well, but witnesses say the pigto take care of he added,
rooster was killed because it was �Tho activity definitely is not
thrown backwards and couldn't a house-condoned activity
Walsh said of the rooster's death.
use its wings.
"To the best of my know!
edge, the DUs are not responsible
for what happened, but we are
ooking into the incident Delta
30C
"I cannot believe that anybody
would intentionally try to kill an
animal just for a joke
one
30C
mmmA �
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
uw�w�
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED Hf LP?
Why not com by tho REAL Crluir Intervention Cantor: 312 E.
10th St; or coll 75S-HELP, For Froo Confidential CounMlIng Of A�-
tiBtan-
Our Volunteer and Staff are on duty 24 hra. a day, year around,
In order to assist you In virtually any problem are you might have.
Our longstanding goal haa always boon to proaorvo and enhance
the quality of life for you and our community
����� And �eer�dtt� B Th� Slit. Of North Caroltn
HK3UC
3UC
DOC
U C C I
H M
e � � t
py$H
so
ytHERN E Y
" Valentine's Special
Store Hours
MonSat. 10-9
Sun. 1-6
Bolle
Reg. $24.95
! NOW $19.95
� 1 weekonl�!j
Located In The Plaza Mall Entrance
I
I
I
I
I
I
s
Telephone
355-7695
r
Send for FREE Information
.n
Name �
Address
Citv
State
Zip
Phone(
)
College Financial'Resources
205 E. 13th Street
I Mail Coupon To: Greenville. NC 27858
( 7571543
John's Flowers
orders as early as possible
on Saturday and Sunday, Valentine's
East 3rd Street 752-3311
A series to assist
graduating seniors
At f we re
also interested in
your future.
Dressing
for thc
Interview:
Every interviewer will agree that the way
you are dressed foi the interview is ex-
tremely important Many potential
employers will insped you from head to
toe When you considei that many com
panies uill interview more than one-hun
died applicants foi a position, it makes
good sense to insure that you're properly
dressed.
A dark suit, preferably a navy, navj,
pinstripe, grey, or grey pinstripe, should be
worn for the first meeting
A white shirt should he worn for each in
terview (some large companies require that
their employees wear nothing hut white
shirts)
A conservative stripe or foulard tie is
preferred Don't make the mistake of wear
ing a linen tie in the winter or a wool one
during spring or summei A burgundy stripe
with some navy blue and or grey usually
looks verv nice with either of the aforemen
tioned suits
Dark shoes, preferably a dark leather
tassel or lace up is best Light colored
ifers won't cut it (a fresh shine would be a
good ideal too) Wear a belt that matches
vour shoes
We wa � . .
� � si �' �
Austii R. : � � ' - �" � S '�' � � ' -
nan. Chaps
U e u ii � � makt - � '� �
A navy blazer is permissible But I �� tsl
be worn properly with a conserv �tiv( sti �
tie Cjrey pants are generally the � � si I
wear with the blazer ikhak; an I isua
for an interview) Again, dark shoes
best
Make sure that y u thes are clean
pressed
Some self-proclaimed profess rials say
that vou should work vour way up to .
best looking suit In other words save the
best for last to make the lasting impress
when it comes down to the final cut This
makes sense until vou lei that vou
want to make a good enough impression at
the first interview to be asked back foi the
second This is a decision you must make
for yourself
oPPmans
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina Hast Mall
Tarrvtown Mall Rockv Mount





i
uUje Rust Carolinian
Seromt the Eaf Csofmi mmpu OMtmamty since 9J
Pete Fernald, c��iM��,�r
Stephanie Folsom, �.�� n�
James F.J. McKee, ������ Ah��w
Tim Hampton, .� &� Brad Bannister, c e�
KR1STEN HALBERCSporhEjuo, JEFF PARKER, Sty mm,m
Chip Carter, re�, Tom Furr, o�toi m,�
Susan Hovvell, ����, M��rr Debbie Stevens, w
Dean Waters,&�� m Stepi ianie Emoryu t� supers
Stephanie Singleton, q &.�� Mac Clark, Bsm� m-dui
February 1989
OPINION
Page 4
Pirate Walk
Legislation will be introduced
Monday to the SGA asked for an
abolition of Pirate Walk, an unthink-
able idea initially but hardly so after
looking into the numbers of people
who use it. When only 85 people in a
semester use a service which the
SGA appropriates well over a thou-
sand dollars for, then there's a prob-
lem.
Pirate Walk was used in election
campaigns last year to sway stu-
dents' votes, but obviously those
who cast the ballots don't use the
service. It's almost humorous how
so many people were stirred on an
issue but don't care about its results.
To stand behind this legislation
is the only sensible thing to do. The
escort service is running on money
from the SGA, which is running on
money from the students.This is not
university money from the state that
is funding Pirate Walk; it's the stu-
dents' money.
And even if it were the state's
money, why throw away money
that could be used for other things,
such as the poor lighting around
campus our administrators are
looking into but don't yet have the
cash to do something about?
If the SGA votes to get rid of
Pirate Walk there will be those an-
gered, but if numbers don't lie there
should be no more than 85 females
on this campus upset.Possibly fewer
if many of those who called for
walks may have called more than
once, thereby lowering the number
of actual callers.
It does seem a shame to say
goodbye to an escort service com-
pletely, since those who do or would
use it come out as the real losers.
Luckily, there are alternatives.
The idea of Campus Security
taking on an improved version of
Pirate Walk has been discussed and,
at this point, seems the best solution.
That is, if Campus Security is will-
ing.
If so few are using the service,
then it would be easy for Campus
Security to take on the chore of
walking those who call for an escort.
The author of the legislation, Marty
Helms, said Campus Security
wouldn' t have to act as a taxi service,
but merely include Pirate Walk du-
ties as a part of their student
reserve's duties.
It seems more reasonable to take
advantage of campus security in
their efforts to make the campus a
safer place than to spend all the extra
SGA money that could instead be
used for something more students
would use or at least benefit from.
,�ban,� CAPES if -rmv
CANCBL it? Lite, TJT
PANGS AM I GOlM-TOBeM
wywy,R�6HT?
'���
Classified a dvertisement deemed distasteful
Dear Editor:
For the past few months, the
"East Carolinian" has repeatedly
printed a classified advertisement
headed "Abortion The ad is very
disturbing, as it informs a reader of
"low cost termination" and goes on
to disclose the logos of the two major
credit cards which are accepted at the
center.
I am neither favoring nor de-
nouncing abortion; I am merely
pointing out how di stasteful and rep-
rehensible a reader may perceive
this.
I realize that the ad was probably
not composed by members of the
"East Carolinian staff, but I do want
to point out that a new paper has the
right to refuse any ad it finds offen-
sive. 1 know this is true for all newpa-
pers which are designed for profit. If
you are requred by law or school
policy to print all you receive, then I
understand your compulsion to print
the ad. If you see nothing disputable
in the ad, then I have to respect your
rifcht to an opinion. Otherwise, I want
�to remind yon that your purpose is to
serve the people associated with East
Carolina University not cater to
sponsors which may or may not have
everyone's best interest in mind.
Hope Carter
Senior
Broadcasting
Where's God?
Dear Editor:
1 wasn't surprised to see Pent-
house slander Jimmy Swaggart re-
cently. A fine example of our Liberal
Media's mind pollution epidemic.
Students, this calls for standard re-
sponse 41C: Call him a hypocrite;
buy the magazine pronto; justifv
your own problems; harden your
heart to God again.
Brother Swaggart is going to sue
for libel. Good. I hope he gets everv
penny of their porno profits. It takes
money to preach the gospel to every
creature. But the profit is there be-
cause America likes to "read" that
crap. Who gave Penthouse Magazine
the right to judge Jimmy Swaggart? A
magazine that condones alcohol and
drug abuse, premarital sex, adultery,
and every kind of sexual perversion
under the sun is calling him a hypo-
crite?
This country needs help fast.
We've gone from "One Nation Un-
der God" to a society whose only
place for God is in front of a four-
letter word, in practically no time.
And the stress cracks are starting to
show. But it's gonna get worse. A lot
worse. Fast.
Pec pie are so busy crying wolf at
Christians, trying to cover their own
guilt, that they shut their hearts to the
good news, the fact is, Jesus is the
only thing that will be able to deliver
you from the coming darkness. You
know it, way down deep. You need to
listen to what Jimmy Swaggart is
saying, not what a bunch of lost dogs
are saying about him.
Christians are forgiven when we
sin. It's just a sincere prayer away
You can be, too. It's a free gift, and Ws
the only thing that is going to take
away the guilt. You've tried everying
else. When are you gonna stop run-
ning?
Everybody meets Jesus some-
time. He wants to be your savior, but
if you insist he will be your judge. Ifs
up to you.
Vincc Worthington
Junior'
IND
The land-based missile problem finds a solution
By BARRY BLECHMAN
New Republic
It was 20 years ago � January 1969 � that the
Soviet Union first tested an intercontinental ballistic
missile with multiple warheads. Deputy Secretary
of Defense David Packard was the first American of-
ficial to voice publicly the ominous implications: If
they give the SS-9 three individually guided war-
heads with high accuracy and high yield � which
they are fully capable of doing � then they triple
their threat to Minuteman missilesl and remove our
confidence that that portion of our deterrent can
survive in adequate numbers. This is a danger which
we cannot ignore. Thus was born the central prob-
lem of American strategic planning for the past two
decades: the vulnerability of our land-based mis-
siles, which form one of the three retaliatory legs
(along with sea-based and air-based nuclear weap-
ons) that we count on to deter a Soviet nuclear strike.
It's a problem that four presidents, six secretaries of
defense, dozens of senators, hundreds of generals,
and thousands of analysts have so far proved unable
to solve. ;
The fall of Phnom Penh and Saigon, skyjackings
and hostage takings, the fall of the dollar and the
greenhouse effect, the crack epidemic � to hear
some people tell it, you'd think all of this and more
was due to Minuteman's vulnerability. In 1980
Norman Podhoretz said with a straight face that
Iranian militants would never have dared seize the
American Embassy in Tehran had all three legs of
our triad been secure.
These days few people believe that the problem
is quite that consequential. But the search for a
solution goes on. It will be taken up early in the Bush
administration, which will choose between two
competing solutions: (a) hundreds of small, mobile,
one-or two-warhead Midgetman missiles (price tag:
upward of $30 billion); or (b) tens of large, mobile,
ten-warhead MX missiles (about half that price).
Reflection on the last 20 years of vulnerability sug-
gests that neither of these options makes sense, and
that a much cheaper solution is available.
All told, 50, 60, maybe 70 basing schemes for a
Minuteman replacement have been explored. Bil-
lions of dollars have been spent, bringing jobs to
thousands of engineers and technicians, profits to
defense industry stockholders and foundation
grants to scores of thinkers from Palo Alto to Capitol
Hill. The search has not been without its amuse-
ments. One of my personal favorites was the plan to
deploy new missiles in the Western deserts of the
United States, each on an asterisk configuration of
railroad track. At the end of each leg of each asterisk,
tens of miles long, would be a hardened concrete
garage. Each missile would sit in normal times on its
launcher in the center of its asterisk. But upon being
warned of a Soviet attack, the missile would auto-
matically select one leg of the asterisk, charge down
the track, and hide in the garage. I always picture one
of Herblock's scowling H-bombs, looking furtively
around before slamming the garage door behind it.
Other proposals were less charming, but they
had their compensations. During the Ford admini-
stration, for example, there was the plan to base the
MX, already designated Minuteman's successor, in
tunnels dozens of miles long; the missiles to be
invented for digging the tunnels. The idea was
dropped when an analyst realized that a nuclear
blast anywhere in the neighborhood could shift the
earth sufficiently to make firing the missile impos-
sible.
Then there was Jimmy Carter's "race track"
scheme, involving the paving of large parts of Utah
and Nevada. This plan had the misfortune of antago-
nizing the constituents of Senator Paul Laxalt. After
junking the race track at Laxalt's behest, the Reagan
administration had to work long and hard to find an
alternative. The first idea was called "Dense-pack"
(dunce-pack, to its detractors). This plan would
have deployed the MX in silos, like Minuteman, but
would have placed the silos very close together.
Then, if all went well, the first incoming Soviet
warhead to detonate would wipe out its fellow in-
coming warheads, an effect labeled "fratricide Few
people ever took Dense-pack seriously; it sounded
good in theory, but testing the theory posed practical
difficulties.
The Reagan administration also toyed with the
idea of burying the MX miles beneath granite moun-
tains, where the missiles would be able to ride out
wave after wave of Soviet attacks. When the smoke
cleared, the missiles would be programmed to rise to
the surface, a process that might take days if not
weeks, and, like avenging angels, automatically
launch themselves against the attacker. The scheme
satisfied the requirements of deterrence, but the
missiles would have been useless for fighting nu-
clear wars, and the idea was dropped. Instead, the
Air Force began to develop a rail-mobile launcher for
MX. At least 50 missiles would ride on special trains,
normally kept on military bases but "flushed" dur-
ing crises to cruise the nation's rail system.
There is only one logical objection to this plan, it
one is contemplating fighting protracted nuclear
wars, or launching one's own pre-emptive nuclear
attack, a modern force of large and survivable
ICBMs is a must. Their speed and accuracy, their se-
cure and reliable communications, and their target-
ing flexibility make them the weapon of choice for
nuclear war-fighters. In the end, the arguments for
modernizing the ICBM force have more to do with
plans to fight nuclear wars than with a desire to deter
them. But fighting large-scale nuclear wars and
launching preemptive strikes are strategic capabili-
ties that this nation should have no use for.
Somehow, the country has survived for 20 years
with vulnerable ICBMs. We've even had a few
laughs along the way, and made a buck or two.
We've stood tall, at times, and become the envy of
the rest of the world. Maybe it's time to declare the
Minuteman problem solved. My children will never
know the tranquility of having invulnerable land-
based missiles; like the Brooklyn Dodgers and the
Automat, this delight will repose only in the memo-
ries of my generation. But at least they can see an end
to this endless debate, and to the billions we have
thrown into the fruitless quest.
�$�
f
.
V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY V, 1989 5
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Immediately. Non-smoker. To share 3
bedroom house Will have own bedroom.
175 00 per month plus 13 utilities. 5
minutes from school Call Pamela at 738
7142
FOR RENT: 3 blocks from campus Two
bedroom duplex $295 a month Residents
moving and wants person to take over
lease Lease until August Call Chip or
Tim at 757-6366.
ROOMMATE NEEDED Stratford
Arms To share 2 bedroom apt, 1 2 utili-
ties Free cable SlTPmonth. Call 756-
51 S3 or 524-5354 on weekends
FOR RENT Bedroom in house. Near
ECU campus Utilities included Whole
house privileges. $165 00 per month Call
758-1274 after r 00 p m
FOR RENT 1 bedroom upstairs apt.
Screened-in porch Utilities included.
Near ECU campus $250.00 per month
Call 758-1274 after 6 00 p m
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED Staf-
ford Arms. 5165 00mo. plus 1 2 electric
Private room Available now. Call 355-
4547 Ask for Brad.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share 3 bedroom apartment at Eastbrook.
Onlv $120 00month and 13 unities
Available March 1st. Call 752-3678.
ROOMMATE NEEDED To share 3 bed
room apt. with 2 other females. $173.00
per month plus 13 utilities, Plantation
apts. 355-6731
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED Imme-
diately to share 2 bedroom Apt. Will have
own bedroom $145.00 per month plus 1
2 utilities Deposit negotiable. Call 752-
7454
FEMALE STUDENTS WANTED: To
rent spacious three bedroom house. Call
756-1971. Leave a Message
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share two bedroom townhouse at 206 Ash
St. 3 Tar River Apartments. $150.00 rent
for your own room plus 13 of utilities
Stop bv or call 758-5682 The month of
February is Free!
ROOMS FOR RENT Available now� 2
blocks from campus; $150 per month.
Short term lease available- call 757-11202
for details.
APARTMENT FOR RENT 2 BR 1 block
from campus, fully furnished. Semester
lease, washer-dryer. $300month, call
757-0202 and ask for Ronnie.
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY Nice
spacious apt Close to campus. Mo depstt
necessary $140 a month and 1 2 utilities.
Please call 752-8843 Ask for Anthonv.
FOR SALE: Nice big sofa and a sofa chair
$40 00.
TRS 80 COLOR COMPUTER III Brand
new, with disk drive, programs, blank
disks and more. $300.00 Call Frank 355-
0793 leave message.
FOR SALE: Luxman R-404 35 watt digital
synthesized stereo receiver. Still in box.
$100.00. Call Howard at 830-1532.
FOR SALE Photorron with accessories,
all instructions, literature and boxes Only
6 months old $350 00. Call Howard at
830-1532
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.j for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. Call
early and book for your formal or party.
758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave a mes-
sage
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM-
POSED: Call 756-9136.
HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
ATTENTION - GOVERNMENT
SEIZED VEHICLES: From $100.00.
Fords, Mercedes, Corvettes, Chews. Sur-
plus Buyers Guide 602-838-8885 Ext. A-
5285.
LASER PRINTER USERS! HP and
Apple laser printer toner cartridges can be
recycled' Huge SS savings. Satisfaction
guaranteed. For details call RANDMONT
at 1 -800-332-3658.
AMSTRAD PC 1512. IBM compatible, 20
MB hard drive 360 KB disk drive, mouse,
color monitor, microsoft MSDOS V3.2,
digital research DOS plus, "GEM Desk-
top "Gem Paint "Gem Doodle "Basic
2 Assorted games & business software
included. Make offer. 756-6805.
FOR SALE Earth Cruiser, like new S125
neg 758-8891.
FOR SALE: Sen win Beach Cruiser. Like
new�$100. 758-8891
FOR SALE: Sachs Moped 1980. 450 miles.
Excellent to get around campus. $500 758-
8891.
CLOTHES GALORE Sizes 6-14. Guess
Gasoline jeans, outfits priced from $1-
25.00. Guys stuff too. 355-6731.
10 SPEED BIKE FOR SALE: Girls free
spirit, very good condition 50 dollar, 752-
4224 after 6:00 p.m. Day tune call 752-2814
leave message.
MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE: Yamaha 360
street bike Two helmets. Good condition.
$600.00 Call 752-4224 after 6, daytime call
752-2814, leave message.
BIKE FOR SALE: Panasonic 2000 10
speed. Like new, onlv ridden once Retail
$225.00, sell for $75'00. Must sell�355-
0764.
IBM- Color monitor with stand, also CGA
card; like new, $250.00 Phone. 758-2400,
ask for Tnsh
FOR SALE Beautiful 3 BR, 2 1 2 bath con-
dominium fan Quail Ridge. Jenn-aire
range quality dishwasher, disposal, nice
wallpaper. 3rd bedroom has built-in
bookshelves and desk-perfect for an
office' Cable hook-up included, pool, ten-
nis courts, clubhouse use, and social ac-
tivities. Very nice community. Call
Stephanie at 757-6769 or after 5:30 at 756-
7846 oi details.
CAN YOU BUY: Jeeps, Cars, 4 X 4'sseized
� dni "ids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Mary Smith REAL
Crisis Center 758-HELP.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACATION IN
CANCUN Become a College Tours rep-
resentative on your campus and get a free
trip Nothing to buy�we provide every-
thing you need It's a little work for alot of
fun! Call 1-800-727-0005.
RESORT HOTELS: Cruisehnes, Airlines,
& Amusement Parks, NOW accepting ap-
plications or spring and summer jobs, in-
ternships, and career positions. For more
information and an application: write
National Collegiate Recreation Service;
P.O BoV ft074; Hilton Head, SC 29938.
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSISTER
CAMPS: (Mass.) Mah-Kee-Nac for Boys
Danbee for Girls. Counselor positions for
Program Specialists: All Team Sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
1 fockey, Soccer and Volleyball; 25 Tennis
openings; also Archery, Riflery and Bik-
ing other openings include Performing
Arts, Fine Arts, Yearbook, Photography,
Cooking, Sewing, Rollerskating, Rock-
etry, Ropes, Camp Craft; All Waterfront
activities (Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing, CanoeingKayak). Inquire
J & D Camping (Boys) 190 Linden Ave
Glen Ridge, NJ 07028; Action Camping
(Girls) 263 Main Road, Monrville, NJ
07045. Phone (Boys) 201-429-8522; (Girls)
201-3166660.
ATTENTION - HIRING Government
jobs - your area Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. $17,840-
$69,45. Call 602-838-8885. Ext. R5285.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships.
S10,000-S105,000yr Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
CABIN COUNSELORS & INSTRUC-
TORS: (Male and Female) for western
North Carolina 8 week children's camp.
Over 30 activities including Water Ski,
Tennis, Heated swimming pool, Go-
Karts, Hiking, Art. Room, meals, salary
and travel. Experience not necessary.
Non-smoking students write for applica-
tionbrochure: Camp Pinewood, 20205-1
N.E. 3 Court, Miami, Florida 33179.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED: The
Greenville Recreation and 'arks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 10-14 part-time soc-
cer coaches for the Spring Indoor Soccer
program Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills aid have pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
5-18 'n soccer fundamentals. Hours ap-
proximately 3-7 p.m. Monday through
rriday. Some night and weekend coach-
ing. Program will extend from March 13,
1989 to May, 1989. Salary rate starts at
S3.55 hr Application will be accepted
starting Mon February 6. Contact Ben
James at 830-4550 or 830-4543
CHALLENGING SUMMER JOBS
WITH OUTDOOR FUN, SALARY &:
Rmbd in camps for disabled persons.
Need malefemale camp counselors, life-
guards and specialists in food service,
horseback riding, canoeing & camping in
beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains or near
Eastern Shore. Great experience for any
future career! Training provided. Apply
ASAP to CAMP EASTER SEAL, Box 54,
Roanoke, VA 24012, (703) 362-1656.
PERSONALS
THE BROTHERS AND PLEDGES OF PI
KAPPA PHI Would like to wish the little
sisters a very Happy Valentine's Day. Feb-
ruary 14 is soon here, A holiday with lots
of cheer. Yes, Valentine's Day is on its
way. Are the little sisters of Pi Kappa Phi
ready to Partaaay!
EVEN THOUGH THE MUSIC
STOPPED: At 2:00, we headed to 214 to
continue. We drank and we talked, how
did we ever make it until 400? Here's to
Roseball '89, Thanks for a great time! �
Stephanie, Lisa and Patty.
CHRIS, BRUCE AND CHUCK: We were
in our seats by 6:45. Little did we know
how fast our buzzes would take a nose
dive. Dinner and awards were over by
9:00, this was just the beginning of an awe-
some time Once again our buzzes were
enhanced. Who would have guessed how
much we could dance?
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: Looking for
ward to partying with you this Saturday
night! Get ready for a hell of a time! �
Love the Alpha Sigs.
ALPHA SIGS GET READY The big
weekend starts tomorrow. Conclave
promises to be great.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI CONGRATU-
LATES ITS NEW PLEDGE CLASS OF
SPRING '89: Dean Smith, Scott Street,
Bryan Crisp, John Amrens, Mike Curtis,
Bryan Berning, Gordon Scott, Glenn
Burns, Jim I layes, Anthony Adams, Vince
Boyd, Jay Surles, Todd Vasta. Get ready
for your best semester ever.
BROTHERS OF SIGMA TAU GAMMA
We made our appointment for last Thurs-
day night To get "IMMUNIZED" and
start feelin' alright. The "Measles Social"
was a novel idea. You dressed and im-
pressed with your brotherly cheer.
Through "three-man" and "suck-and-
blow" we got together, Getting to know
one another much better. Not knowing
what destination we'd reach, Six of us
wound up at Atlantic Beach. These
memorable good times, we find very rare.
So please don't forget us. There's much
more to share! Thanks for the memories"
You guys are real gems A good time was
indeed had bv all Let's do it again some-
time soon �Love, the Beta Sigma
Pledge Class of Alpha Phi
WHAT MAKES FOR EXCITING PER-
SONAL RELATIONSHIPS?: For a free
mail survey, write: Relationships, Box
5142, Station A, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18710.
SIGMA NU: Congratulations on all of
your new pledges! Also, Thank You for
your hard work during little sister rush.
We are looking forward to a fun-filled
semester. �Love, your little sisters.
ANNE: The rhymes you wrote were cute
and funny, but can't compare to the big
bunny. The potato was great but whaf a
surprise. Sure did turn red, wish you
could have seen your eyes. You're a great
friend �Love ya, Amy.
SINGERS WANTED If you've sung in a
chorus and would be interested in a low-
pressure singing experience, come and
sing in Choral Lab. 3-4 Mon. & Wed Fac
ulty Welcome. Call Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
757-6331 for more information.
LOST ID behind the Attic Sat night
Initials on ID. are VS.�was in blue
leather ID. holder $50 reward if returned.
Please contact Pam or Tricia at 752-6105 or
758-6731. PLEASE!
GIRLS, GUYS: Poolside parties and ma-
jor tanning at Daytona Beach, Spring
Break '89. Call Keith, Kelly, Ron and
Wayne at 752-4693 for more information
NEED HELP: With house cleaning, yard
work, baby-sitting, etc.? RENT-A-
BROTHER, 18 Feb. 1989. Call PI II SIGMA
PI 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. M-F 758-7535 or 752-
9723.
THE WEEKEND BEGAN: At No 17
AOPi's and their dates, you know what I
mean Things went rockin' into the night.
Beverages went dry, Oh what a fright
Saturday arrived, Roseball was here. We
went to the Ramada full of good cheer.
Dinner was great, the toasts were grand
Bob had us giggin'�he's our favorite DJ
Man. Once again AOPi's danced into the
early hours. Angle, our great soaal chair-
man, fell into the shower. It's about time
Jere found Lauri so dear, she finally got
her Theta Chi lavalier. Sunday came, the
festivities had ended. Most heads hurt,
they needed to be mended. The formal
was a success it was truly fine, Roseball
1989 was definitely Devine!
THE BETA PSI PLEDGE CLASS OF PI
KAPPA PHI. Wants to send you to see
Bon Jovi, Feb. 18, at the Dean Dome. For
$1.00 you will receive a chance to win 2
tickets. Call 758-8324 for further info. Ask
for Richard.
SEND A LOVED ONE A CARNATION:
$2.00 each, red, pink & white. In front of
the bookstore 12-3 p.m. Sponsored by
Clement Hall House Council.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
NEGRIL JAMAICA Spnng Broak 7
nights, airfare out of Charlotte Pnces start
at $489 Call Tnpp for more details. 758-
9177.
AZD PLEDGES Thanx for a great Satur
day night. �Love, the Pika Pledges
AZD AND PIKA PLEDGES: The real
combination.
TO ALL ALPHA DELTA PI
VALENTINE'S DATES: We're looking
forward to lots of heart filled fun at Camp
Contentnea on Friday night.
ALPHA DELTA PI PLEDGES: Thanks
for the show on Sunday night You guys
did a great job and we're all proud of you.
Keep up the good work �Love the Sis
ters.
THURSDAY NICHT PARTYING HOT
SPOT: I lappy I lour at the Fizz� p m
until. �Pika.
WIN, LOSE OR DRAW: Coming soon to
a fraternity near you.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Happv Hour at
OMARS Thursday, Feb. 9th from 6:00
p.m. until you drop! I Iclp "Z" buy a new
camel.
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA NU
PLEDGES: You guvs are doing great and
we are proud of you all Good luck for the
rest of the semester. �The Brothers.
LISA REUCHER: Tomorrow is the tenth,
the day Lisa's been waiting for, she'll fi-
nally be 21, she has to wait no more 1 lope
you have an awesome time, 1 wish 1 could
be there to celebrate vour birthday, cause
vou know I really care �Love ya lots,
your old roommie!
RHONDA We thank you much for your
ad. We understand why "FRIED" makes
you mad. Stick with us, we'll make it thru
cause in the end we love you. �Anne &
Am v.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
PLEDGES OF PI KAPPA ALPHA-
IOTA CLASS: Cale, Glenn, Lee, John W .
Stacy, Nick, Joe, Chuck, Steven, Phillip,
David, Matt, Cliff, Rodney T, Rodney T
Robert, Christopher, John R , Scott, An
thony, leff. Chip, Keith, John T, Mike
lames, Kevin Catch the wave, guys �
Pike.
I HE GIRLS ARE TOUGH: Toall the new
Pika Lil' Sisters Thanks for making The
Choice It's gonna be an intense semester
ot fun You're too cool' �Pika Brothers
A7D VALENTINE SWEETHEARTS:
1 laving fun on Saturday is our first prior
itv � but have no fear, 'cause we're one
JAMMIN' sorority! The cabin will be
decorated, in red, pink and white�Just be
prepared for one AWESOME night �
Love, the AZDs.
LISA L1NDAL: Congratulations on vour
internship at DUKE' Keeping up that
AZD tradition of excellence' We love you
� Alpha i Delta
AZD PI EDGES: Here's some advice
we're giving to you Remember it until
your pledge davs are through' Keep your
spirits high, and a smile on vour faces
'cause pledges like vou, we couldn't re
place" �Love, The Sisters
LOST: Silver grav miniature Schnauzer
Last seen between 10th & Elm St Please
call 757-0202
TIM: Thanks for giving me the best veaot
my life' I'm looking forward to manv
more' �Love, Wen
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
HING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER '89. EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS. FOR
INFO CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH
AT 752-2865
VALENTINES DAY
ROSES?
CALL BONITA'S
BOUTIQUE OF
FLOWERS AND GIFTS
for SpecialPhone 355-
7888. Greenville Square
Shopping Center.
(just down from K-marl)
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
j � -
ACCU
SSCOPY
758-2400
PITT COUNTY DRIVING
SCHOOL
SERVING ALL AGES
PHONE:
355-6552 (9:00 - 5:00)
756-7457 (After5:00)
1807 SOUTH CHARLES STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
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Return to. The East Carolinian. Publications Uldg - KCU, Creenvilie, NC 27S5S-43S3
"BEAT THE CLOCK" with
DOMINO'S PIZZA
Beginning today through Feb. 15th, order
any 16" one or more item pizza between 5 pm
and 9 pm and the time you order is the price
you pay! So don't forget to call us and play
"BEAT THE CLOCK
Limited number of toppings available.
Capture
Your
Valentine
$1 .00 1st 25 words
5C each additional word
WITH A
ABORTION
Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru Sat Low
Cost Termination to 20 weeks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
Advertise!
in the
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Magazine
Deadline
February 22, 1989
Contact
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Publications Building
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r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9,1389
V
&
Announcements
lTEDECA
OnFeb. 13at200pm inCCR2010.DECA
will be having a Valentine s Day partv
The faculty and staff of the BVTE Dept are
cordially invited. DECA members please
plan to attend.
WATER HOCKEY CLUB
Underwater 1 lockev Club will be playing
Wed at 8:00 p.m. at Memorial Cvm Snor-
kehng equip, nor skill is necessary, but if
have either, please bring The next dates of
plav will be Feb 14 at fcOO p.m Feb 15 at
8:00 p.m. Feb 2f at 9:00p.m. and Feb 22 at
8:00 p.m. Every night of plav will be at
Memorial Gvm. If anv questions call Craig
Cannon 752-7620 or Chi 732 8124 See ev-
eryone interested underwater
SOCWCI APPLICATIONS
FOR SPRING. 1989
Students must have received and turned
in their applications to the majoi by Feb
10. Faculty interviews must bo completed
by Feb. 27. The group meeting with Prof.
Gartman will be on March 1 & 2 at 5:00
pm. in Ragsdale 218. You must attend
either the March 1 or 2 meeting
CABARET
The Performing Arts Series and the Dept
of University Unions present CABARET
the smash Broadway musical This pro
fessional performance will take place on
Feb. 21, 800 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
This production is being staged by Daeda-
lus Productions, who brought PURL1E to
Wright Auditorium last year. Don't miss
this exciting musical of decadent, delight-
ful, and dazling entertainment "Life is a
Cabaret, Old Chum, Come to the Caba-
ret Tickets for CABARET are on sale in
the Central Ticket Office, MSC Telephone
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11 00
a.m. - 6:00 p.m Men. - Fn.
POLISH NAT.L R AJIQ
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
The Polish National Radio Symphony Or
chestra will appear as part of the Perform
ing Arts Series on Feb. 22, 8 00 p.m in
Wright Auditorium. Over 100 members
strong, this symphony is led by Antoni
Wit and features guest pianist Piotr
PalecCTiy. The program for this grand
evening includes: Strauss�DON 11 AN
Op 20; Chopin�CONCERTO No 2 in F
Minor, Op. 21; and Brahms�SYM-
PHONY No. 2 in D Major Op. 73. Tickets
for this event are on sale now in the Cen
tral Ticket Office, MSC. Die number is
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. - 600 p.m MonFri.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the Aprt!
issue. Articles can be left at the office or the
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library. The first issue for Spring
semester is expected to arrive in a few
weeks.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
The Lady Pirates will be back at Minges on
Feb. 11 after a five-game road trip They
face James Madison at 7:00 p.m. At
halftime there will be a Quincy's dinner
giveaway and a performance bv the Pure
Gold Dancers.
GMAT
The Graduate Mgmt Admission Test will
be offered at ECU on March 18. Applica-
tion blanks are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT, Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ 08540.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Feb. 15. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center, room
105 Speight Bldg.
NTE (SPECIALTY AREA)
The National Teacher Examination�Spe-
cialty Area Exams�will be offered at
ECU on April 1. Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to the Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 911-R, Prince-
ton, NJ 08541. Applications must be post-
marked no later than Feb 27. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Room 105 Speight Bldg.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting will be at 7:00 in rm.
1012 GCB on Feb. 9th. We will be having a
guest speaker. Plan to discuss dates for a
trip to the U.S. Supreme Court Members
and newcomers are asked to attend.
RETURNED PEACE CORPS
VOLUNTEERS
A representative from the N.C. Peace
Corps Assoc. will be on campus Feb. 9
from 7-9 p.m. in room 1003 GCB with a
slide show prepared by NC RPCVs Come
and share your PC experiences with the
next generation.
BLACK FACULTY SYMPO-
SIUM
Members of the Organization of Black
Faculty and Staff (OBLS) will presen t their
current andor on-going research inter-
ests during Black History Month Presen-
tations will be held each Mon. during the
month of Feb. in the .edonia Wright Afro-
American Cultural Center from 11:30-
1:30. Students, faculty and staff are en-
couraged to bring a brown bag lunch and
enjoy the discussion. Sponsored by the
Office of Minority Student Affairs
IMPROVING STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college o- help to increase your GPA
All sessions will be in 313 Wright Bldg.
1 eb 13, Making it Using Notes, 3-4:30
p.m Feb 14, Making it Taking Notes, 3-
430 p.m. You may attend all the topic
sessions or choose the ones where you
need the most improvement.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Meeting every Wed night at 7 p.m. Come
join us for fellowship and fun. Look for
on campus posted announcements for
meeting location or call 758-5082 for more
info
VALENTINE CANDY-O-
GRAMS
Valentine Candy-O-Grams will be on sale
in front of the Student Store Wed Thurs
& Fri from 10 a.m. - 2 pm, Proceeds will
go toward the Multi-Media Production of
1 labakkuk which will be presented
March 27 it 28. There will be free general
admission for "Habakkuk
CLASS PICTURES
- lass pictures will be taken Feb. 9th it 10th
n the Buccaneer Office from 9-12 it 1-4.
ITiis is the last chance for individual pic-
tures to be put in the class section of the
1989 Buccaneer!
BAKE SALE
Buy vour sweetheart a sweet for
Valentine's Day! The Decision Science
Society will be sponsoring a bake sale on
Feb. 13 from 9 am until 2 p.m. in front of
the Student Stor" Baked goods for sale
will include cup cakes, cookies, and other
edible delights. Proceeds from this sale
will be used to fund future Decision Sa-
ence Societv activities.
PSI.CHI
; i Chi will have initiation for new spring
members and election of new officers on
Feb Q at 4 p m. in the Psi Chi library -
attend
0. All members are required to
AM A
MA will be holding their next meeting
i eb 9 .it 130 p m. in 1032 GCB. Our guest
- peaker will be Wesley E. Singleton,
stockbroker from Edward D. Jones and
(. o All persons interested are welcome
and members are encouraged to attend.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
( ollege Rep invite everyone to join us
. cry Wed at 7:00 p.m. in 212 Menden-
hall. Come find out how we are involved
in politics at the local, state, and national
levels Call 752-8359 for more info.
GET YOUR PICTURE MADE
Make memories of college friendship last
forever with color picture buttons compli-
ments of E.J. Hamilton. Pictures will be
taken inside Student Store on Feb. 7 and 14
from 9 to 3. Single�$2.50, couple�$3.50,
group�$4.00. Stop by the store or order in
advance. For more info contact Vincent
Norris at 752-8047. Sponsored by ECU
Gospel Choir.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed National
Service Frat is sponsoring a 24-hour Run
for Cancer on April 14th and 15th with the
American Cancer Society. For more info
call Heather at 758-9550, Bryan at 756-
9665 or Rose Richards at Greenville's
chapter of the American Cancer Society
Find out about entering a team or donat-
ing moneymaterials. Help fight the
battle against cancer by supporting Alpha
Phi Omega and the American Cancer
Society in the 24-hour run.
FREE TICKETS
FREE tickets to Metallica in Greensboro
and Fayetteville this weekend on The
Metalshop, 12-4 Fri. it Sat. WZMB, 91.3.
SPINAL CORD ASSOC.
The Eastern Regional Spinal Cord Injury
Assoc. invites you and yours to attend thp
Feb. 13th meeting. The meeting will be
held at Pitt County Memorial Hospital in
the Therapeutic Recreation Room of the
Regional Rehabilitation Center from 4-5
p.m. The agenda for this meeting will be
accessibility and disability. The key
speaker will be Ken Pearson, rehabilita-
tion engineer.
STUDENTS & STAFF
"l Have a I leart For You" t-shirts are being
sold by members of the ECU Women's
Soccer Club. Great for Valentine's gifts to
your loved one. To get in touch with a
soccer player, please contact Ann Totaro
at 830-1387 or Beth Harvey at 752-9792.
VALENTINE'S DAY DANCE
ECU's District 97 of the State Employees
Assoc. will hold a Valentine's Day dance
on Feb. 14 at the Attic. Entertainment for
the evening will feature Lionel Norman, a
nationally renowned comedian with the
Comedy Zone, and the Pigz Brothers,
playing your top 40; 5Cs; and 6Cs tunes
Doors will open at 8:00 p.m. Tickets will be
on sale at the door for $5.00 each.
If you are interested in federal jobs and
how to handle the federal employment
process (permanent, summer, or Co-op),
you will want to attend a presentation by
Mr. Phil I lanson of the US. Office of Per-
sonnel Mgmt. on 22489, from 1000am
-12 noon in room 1031, GCB.
OPERA THEATRE
ECU School of Music Events Feb. 7-13:
ECU Opera Theatre productin of The
Maid Made Mistress by Pergolesi and
Gianni Schicchi by Puccini (Feb. 9-11,8.15
p.m Feb. 12, 200 p.m Fletcher Recital
Hall; tickets $2.50 for students in advance
at Central Ticket Office, $5 for adults and
at the door).
ASID
A Service Auction sponsored by the stu-
dent chapter of ASID is scheduled for Feb.
23 from 7-9 p.m. The auction will be held
in room 205 of the Home Ec. Bldg. All
proceeds will benefit the physically dis-
abled. Donations are tax deductible. Serv-
ices include: I louse cleaning, baby sitting,
car washing, yard work it window wash-
ing. Students it faculty it staff are encour-
aged to attend!
HEART FOR ART
Annual Valentine's Day Sale presented bv
School of Art Metals Department. It will
be Feb. 8-10, 13-14. Displays are to be
found in the foyer and top of the ramp (3rd
floor) Jenkins Art Bldg.
CCE
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we sfudv
the book of I lebrews Call Jim at 752-7199 r
if you need a ride or further info.
� J"
Help Us Welcome the
"Killer Bucket"
back to E.C.U.
This Thursday, February 9, 1989
32oz. of cold brew for
ONLY$l.10
Come Early, Stay Late
The management would also like to extend an invitation to
!9 and 20 year old students to enjoy the new atmosphere at
O'Rockfellers without consuming alcohol.
O'Rockefeller's is Rockin'
with ,
The Moody Dudes
Saturday, February 11, 1989
7& JCmac Sa6�
�QS(ES
�BfrLLOO(H$
�LOVT, S(T(RUC(K
QA$JIELD (BOUQU(L(I
2904 EAST 10TH STREET
GREENIVLLE, N.C. 27834
757-3857
757-3857
Register Now
to get on the
Mexican
Connection
to
Cancun, Mexico
Courtesy of Chico's &
American Airlines
And win a Trip for Two
7 Days - 6 Nights
Crown Piazza Hotel
� Register anytime at
Chico's in Rocky Mount
or Greenville (two trips
will be given away!)
No purchase necessarjr�You need not be
present to win. Muit be 18 years old to regis-
ter.
521 Cotanche 757-1666
ATTIC
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS'
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts tor February rentals)
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles. Apartments and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815







fc.
I
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9, 1989 7
Eakin says ECU is maturing
OFFICERS' TR
NG CORPS
ecu Na�i iium have also been able to build strong
Describing ECU as a "public programs by meeting the needs
" for the citizens of North immediately before us
Eakin told the lawmakers that
resource
Carolina, ECU chancellor Richard
Eakin says the institutional health
of the university in Greenville is
"robust
With enrollment at a record
15,600 students, "it is increasingly
clear that the prospective sru-
ECU "has sought involvement
constantly" and has not tried "to
stand apart.
"I take great pride in stating
that we try� always� to stand
forth asanexampleof whata truly
dents no longer view ECU as a public university should be He
largely regional university added, "I think we have reason to
Eakin said in a presentation to the pUt ECU forward to the nation as
pint education appropriations an example of how a public uni-
subcommittees of the General versity should conduct itself
Assembly's base budget commit- Eakin said ECU provides
tee Thursday. large numbers of students with a
Student constituents are sound undergraduate education
coming to ECU from throughout that is directly enriched by the
North Carolina Eakin said. He quality of the faculty and commit-
said the university's "strong array ment to a broad range of master's
of undergraduate of master's degree programs and select PhD
level programs hold broad appeal programs,
to the traditional college student The presence of high-level
"We are proud to be a public research programs "enriches the
resource for the citizens of North entire campus Eakin said. In
Carolina the ECU chancellor
said. "We like to think that the
degree of our usefulness and di-
rect service to the state is directly
related to the maturity of our ac-
complishments a a major univer-
sity.
The theme of his presenta-
tion, Eakin said, "is the success of
a university that has built effec-
tively upon its service to a region
and a state
"This is a two-way street for
many programs such as biotech-
nology, molecular biology, phys-
ics, underwater archaeological
research, technical communica-
tion, public administration, the
MBA program, master's of Social
Work and others, he said "we see
the fruits of faculty expertise
flowing quickly to our under-
graduate students
He cited ECU'S tradition of
"we are identified primarily by
means of our traditional commit-
ment to the education of North
Carolina teachers. That is cer-
tainly an important part of what
we do � and what we are going to
do in some new and invigorated
ways � but this university has
an English department that pro-
duced seven scholarly books last
year, a history department that
conducts underwater archaeo-
logical research and the study of
maritime history at a level of in-
ternational acclaim, a theatre arts
program that regularly provides
actors to the New York stage,
Schools of Music and Art that at-
tract some of the most promising
high school talent in this state
(and from elsewhere) and an ath-
letic program that is meeting
more academic standards that 1
would have thought possible
even a year ago.
"We have one of the nation's
best collections of scientists in the
area of coastal and marine
studiesTheir work in water
quality, coastal management and
environmental health constantly
attracts new scientific talent and
federal financial support
He said that "any university
of our kind that has received a
total of almost 20 million dollars
in external support for research in
increasingly effective use of our
resources He cited a current, on-1
going strategic planning processj
to "determine how ECU can bet-
ter serve the citizens of North
Carolina
He said ECU is "growing,
changing and maturing Thej
legislature has promoted access
by adhering to a low-cost tuition
principle and ensures long-term I
health through good governance
and prudent management, Eakin
said.
YOUR FIRST STEP
TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE YOU
COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
Army ROTC Camp Challenge. It's excit-
ing and it may be your last chance to
graduate with an Officers commission.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
Contact: Cpt. Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
�f

HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greenville.NC
Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream,
? Frozen Yogurt ?
and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's) BSBS3B
1 Vanilla In U.S.A. 88-89
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
us, he said. "We have served our
region and our state well by aspir- pride in having so many
mg to develop strong academic professors
ensuring that top faculty teach the past two years has put the
freshman and sophomore courses nation on notice that this univer-
and said th t the university takes sity is worth a serious invest-
"real ment
Eakin told the budget-makers

and research programs. But we
Sometimes Fakin said, that ECU is committed to "an
National Parks course offered
ECU Newt Bureau
A college level course about
the Geology of National Parks
will be offered to public school
teachers through ECU and the
Science and Mathematics Educa-
tion Center.
The course will focus on na-
tional parks and will include the
study of environmental and con-
servation efforts, geologic histo-
ries and features, and the role that
parks play in education in natural
historv and earth sciences.
0
Teachers enrolling in the pro-
gram must complete home study
assignments and attend four lec-
tures in February and March
given by nationally known ex-
perts. Those completing the
course will receive renewal credit
in earth and environmental sci-
ences.
Dr. Richard Mauger, a profes-
sor of Geology at ECU, will direct
the program.
Delivery 758-0000
Hank's makes Valentinefs Day
incredible Order any item from
our menu and have it delivered
to make your Sweetheart feel




speciat
Call 758-0000



for information about our many
Valentine's Day Specials
and for
qp All Day Delivery! U






1
K

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9,1989 7
Eakin says ECU is maturing
R
ECVN�mB�N�i have also been able to build strong
Describing ECU as a "public programs by meeting the needs
resource" for the citizens of North immediately before us
Carolina, ECU chancellor Richard Eakin told the lawmakers that
Eakin says the institutional health ECU "has sought involvement
of the university in Greenville is constantly" and has not tried "to
"robust stand apart
increasingly effective use of our
"we are identified primarily by ' reSources He cited a current, on-
means of our traditional commit-
ment to the education of North
going strategic planning process I
to "determine how ECU can bet-1
ter serve the citizens of North!
Carolina
He said ECU is "growing, j
changing and maturing The I
Carolina teachers. That is cer-
tainly an important part of what
we do�and what we are going to
do in some new and invigorated
With enrollment at a record " take great pride in stating ways � but this university has legislature has promoted access
15,600 students, "it is increasingly that we try� always� to stand an English department that pro- by adhering to a low-cost tuition
clear that the prospective stu- forth as an example of what a truly duced seven scholarly books last principie and ensures long-term
dents no longer view ECU as a public university should be He year, a history department that
largely regional university added, "I think we have reason to conducts underwater archaeo-
Eakin said in a presentation to the put ECU forward to the nation as logical research and the study of
joint education appropriations example of how a public uni- maritime history at a level of m-
subcommittees of the General versity should conduct itself ternational acclaim, a theatre arts
Assembly's base budget commit- Eakin said ECU provides program that regularly provides
tee Thursday. we numbers of students with a actors to the New York stage,
"Student constituents are sound undergraduate education Schools of Music and Art that at-
coming to ECU from throughout that is directly enriched by the tract some of the most promising
North Carolina Eakin said. He quality of the faculty and commit- high school talent in this state
said the university's "strong array ment to a broad range of master's (and from elsewhere) and an ath-
YOUR FIRST STEP
TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE YOU
COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
Army ROTC Camp Challenge. Its excit-
ing and it may be your last chance to
graduate with an Officer's commission
ARMY ROTC
health through good governance
and prudent management, Eakin
said.
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAM TAKE.
Contact: Cpt. Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
of undergraduate of master's degree programs and select PhD
level programs hold broad appeal programs,
to the traditional college student The presence of high-level
"We are proud to be a public research programs "enriches the
resource for the citizens of North entire campus Eakin said. In
Carolina the ECU chancellor many programs such as biotech-
said. "We like to think that the nology, molecular biology, phys-
degree of our usefulness and di- iCs, underwater archaeological
rect service to the state is directly research, technical communica-
related to the maturity of our ac- non public administration, the
complishments as a major univer- MBA program, master's of Social
sity. Work and others, he said "we see
The theme of his presenta- the fruits of faculty expertise
tion, Eakin said, "is the success of flowing quickly to our under-
a university that has built effec- graduate students
tively upon its service to a region He cited ECU'S tradition of
and a state ensuring that top faculty teach the past two years has put the
"This is a two-way street for freshman and sophomore courses nation on notice that this univer-
us he said. "We have served our and said that the university takes sity is worth a serious invest-
region and our state well by aspir- pride in having so many "real ment
ing to develop strong academic professors Eakin told the budget-makers
and research programs. But we "Sometimes Eakin said, that ECU is committed to "an
National Parks course offered
letic program that is meeting
more academic standards that I
would have thought possible
even a year ago.
"We have one of the nation's
best collections of scientists in the
area of coastal and marine
studiesTheir work in water
quality, coastal management and
environmental health constantly
attracts new scientific talent and
federal financial support
He said that "any university
of our kind that has received a
total of almost 20 million dollars
in external support for research in
ECU New Imh
A college level course about
the Geology of National Parks
will be offered to public school
teachers through ECU and the
Science and Mathematics Educa-
tion Center.
The course will focus on na-
tional parks and will include the
study of environmental and con-
servation efforts, geologic histo-
ries and features, and the role that
parks play in education in natural
history and earth sciences.
Teachers enrolling in the pro-
gram must complete home study
assignments and attend four lec-
tures in February and March
given by nationally known ex-
perts. Those completing the
course will receive renewal credit
in earth and environmental sci-
ences.
Dr. Richard Mauger, a profes-
sor of Geology at ECU, will direct
the program.
HOMEMADE
ICE CREM
Greeimlle.NC
Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream,
? Frozen Yogurt ?
and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
1 Vanilla In U.S.A. 88-89
Delivery 758-0000
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greeimlle.NC


Hank's makes Valentine's Day
incredible f Order any item from
our menu and have it delivered
to make your Sweetheart feel


V
speciat
Call 758-0000



for information about our many
Valentine's Day Specials
and for
qp All Day Delivery!

� ��
a�
&&&&&
? . 4 - � . -
�JL3?
VI K
r�-i
Coke
2ltr.
Ulir
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i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
FEBRUARY 9, 1989 I'ACC 8
'Boys in the Band' takes on a delicate subject
Alan (Chns ChappeU). the only one ot Harold's gifts, a "midnight
By SCOTT MAXWELL
AuiUml Ftauiw Editor
The Surgeon General warns,
this is a play not fit for the faint oi
heart. Those averse to swearing
and sexual situations: stay home.
Those allergic to even a hint of
homosexuality are definitely ad-
vised to stav safelv in front of the
TV set.
Mart Crowley's "The Bovs in
the Band" deals bluntly with
homosexuality. Though noticea-
bly dated, the play stands as a
portrait of what it was to be a
homosexual in this country as
recently as two decades ago. Even
at that, there mav be theatergoers
who hold the same attitudes as
heterosexual character � and
who will be just as surprised as he
is at what he discovers in the
course of the evening.
The plav is set in the Spring of
18, in the Manhattan apartment
of Michael (David Blanchard),
before and during a birthday
party for Harold (John Campbell
Finnegan). Harold is, in his own
words,a "32-year-old,ugly, pock-
marked lewish fairy The most
bitter interpersonal conflicts take
place between these two.
The circle of friends also in-
cludes Hank (Christian Brent
Keiber), Larry (Scot Slusanck),
Bernard (Eugene Bass) and
Emorv (Vandv Behr). In addition.
cowboy is portrayed by Manley
rope.
As the night wears on, the
revelers � or, rather, combatants
� become increasingly savage
and increasingly hostile. Gradu-
ally they expose their neuroses
and engage in personal confron-
tations of varying types and de-
grees, most of which is veiled in
Albee-esque humor.
Special commendations to
Emory (Vandv Behr), who was
brilliant as the most outrageous of
the group. With the exceptions of
Slusarick, who laid it on a bit
thick, and Keiber, who laid it on a
bit thin, the other performances
were similarly impeccable.
Slusarick and Keiber were, unfor-
tunately, outperformed by those
around them.
Of all those involved in the
production of a play, the technical
personnel may have the toughest
Director Don Biehn pulled off
the enormously difficult task of
keeping as many as nine charac-
ters busy on stage at the same
time. Shifts of action and dialogue
from one area of the stage to an-
time. The best jobs, by their na- other were well-choreographed.
ture, pass almost unnoticed.
Sympathies to the costumers,
who did a great job with subject
matter that they probably found
disgusting: late '60s-era clothes.
Other technical aspects were
equally well-executed. The set
was superb, and the sound and
lights were, thankfully, perfectly
synchronized to the characters'
actions.
Also, Biehn wrote thought-
provoking program notes. The
notes help set the play, and in-
clude a list entitled "Some Fa-
mousGaysfrom History Thelist
includes some surprises, such as
Rudolph Valentino.
There is a si7x�ble gay commu-
nity in this area, and there is also a
sizable group which doesn't un-
derstand gays and is therefore
afraid of them. Though out-
moded, "The Boys in the Bdnd"
may nonetheless help educate the
latter group away from its U
Finally, keep in mind that
"Bovs" is dated. How
"Torch Song Trilogy a n re
recent play which deals with a
similar subject, probablv v.
have been a worse choice. Though
more contemporary and n -
relevant to gays' present situ-
ation, it is also less confn i �,
tional. "The Boys in the Bar,
designed to challenge the mem-
bers of the audience, to n 1
them think. The play and the cast
succeed admirably As V
Harris would sav: five cat ht
4
r
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u
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I
Local dance theater opens 1989
season at Conley High School
By STEVE BAKER
Staff Writer
both Pope. The theatre provides a owdance will be presented by
professional performing outlet Salvatore Aiello, artistic director
for nine well-trained area danc- of the N.C. Dance Theatre. The
The Atlantic Dance Theatre ers. The troupe tours the state and music of "Shadowfax" and "Dust
will open a new season with three region offering full length concert in the Wind" by Kansas will host
pieces of choreography Saturday performances, mini-perform- the contemporary ballet. Thebal-
at 8 p.m. in the D.H. Conley High ances, and residency lectures and let inspires one with provoking
School Auditorium.
Tickets are priced at $3 for
students, $3 adults in advance
and $4 students, $6 adults at the
door. Down East Dance, D.H.
Conlev students, and the Titt-
Greermlle Arts Council now have
tickets available.
The eastern North Carolina
professional dance troupe based
in New Bern, N .C. was founded in
1985 bv Artistic Director Eliza-
1
Top 13
(1) Lou Reed � "New York"
(2) The Replacements �
"Don't Tell a Soul"
(3) Violent Femmes � "3"
(4) The Wonder Stuff �
"Eight-legged Groove Ma-
chine"
(5) Birdhouse � "Megaloma-
nia"
(6) Legal Reins � "Please, the
Pleasure"
(7) Christmas � "Ultraprophet
of Thee Psykick Revolution"
(8) The Slugs � "Non-stop
Holiday"
(9) Throwing Muses �
"Hunk papa"
(10) Full Fathom Five � "4
AM"
(11) The Chills � "Lost EP"
(12)X-Men � "X-Men"
(13) Death of Samantha �
"Where the Women Wear the
Glory and the Men Wear the
Pants"
Coming I
this
weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
The Beam
New Deli:
Spiral
Attic:
Peter Adonis Male
Fantasy Show
Mendenhall:
Sweetheart's Dance
(through Sunday)
Friday
New Deli:
The Lemon Sisters and
The Rutabaga Brothers
Attic:
TX Boogie
(ZZ Top Tribute Band)
Saturday
New Deli:
The Rhythm Persuaders
Attic:
Billy Price and the Keystone
Rhythm Band
Monday
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
master classes.
Fred Benjamin, international
dancerchoreographer of New
York Citv, will present, for the
first time, 'Tyro-Power The jazz
music of Issac Haves will provide
background air for the dance. The
music and dance quickens and
slows throughout the piece, pro-
viding moments oi fury and times
of peace.
Another new piece, "Shad-
thoughts then changes the mood
to tranquilitv and harmony.
The two professional chore-
ographers were supported by a
grant from the N .C. Arts Commi s-
sion and the National Endow-
ment for the arts, in Washington
D.C The Atlantic Dance Theatre
hosted them this summer to cre-
ate the performances.
The troupe will also include a
piece by David Anderson of
N.Y.C entitled "Couples
Undergraduate artists
show pieces in Gray
Gray Art Gallery Press Release
tion Friday. The student exhibi-
tion allows the students within
the School of Art to exhibit their
artwork in a professional gallery,
and have someone outside of the
School of Art to award prizes tor
The "UndergraduateStudent
Art Exhibition" opens Friday at
7:30 p.m. in the Gray Art Gallery.
Individual pieces of artwork for exceptional pieces of work.
this exhibition were selected by
facultv members within the
School oi Art.
Awards were chosen by
Anne Shengold, previous direc-
tor of the Knight Gallery, Spirit
Square in Charlotte, North Caro-
lina. The award winners will be
announced at the openjng recep-
The exhibition will host an
exciting cross section from vari-
ous studio courses within the
School of Art. The gallery is open
Monday through Saturday. 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursdays until
8 p.m. For more information,
please contact the gallery at (919)
757-6336.
David Blanchard and Stuart Maxwell share a tender moment as they portray homosexuals in
the East Carolina Playhouse production of "The Boys in the Band
Summer Theater will hold
auditions Feb. 18 in Messick
Seven students try out
in comedy competition
By ADAM CORNELIUS
'Staff Wrifrr
Seven amateur comedians
showed their talent Tuesday
night at the 1989 U.S. college
comedv competition in Menden-
hall. Students in all majors, from
Business to Communications,
participated in the event.
The contest, known bv some
as the "Bad Breath Tour was
sponsored jointly by Doritos and
Certs. The contestants had their
acts videotaped and the winner
will take part in the national
competition to be held over
spring break in Daytona Beach.
Tuesday night's audience
was tough.
Professional comedian John
Ridley opened the contest in a
somewhat futile attempt to liven
up the crowd for the contestants.
The first lucky comedian in the
competition, drawing a
blank,was met mostly with dead
silence and intermittent bursts of
See COMEDY, page 9
hast Carolina Theater Press Release
The producer of the 26th Sea-
son of professionally produced
shows by the East Carolina Sum-
mer Theater is seeking actors,
singers, musicians and techni-
cians. Auditions have been sched-
uled for Saturday, February 18,
from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. and from
2 p.m. until 4 p.m. in Room 206 of
the Messick Theater Arts Center.
All auditionees are asked to
bring a performance resume.
The 1989 season will feature
four shows with the following
needs: "Sing For Your Supper"
(July 3-8) was produced on Broad-
way as "Rodgers and Hart Ac-
torssingers, age 18-35, should
bring their music; an accompanist
will be provided.
"Foxfire" (July 10-15) is a play
about Annie Nations, an indomit-
able Appalachian widow, who
lives on her mountain farm with
the ghost of her dead husband,
Hector. Her tranquilitv is threat-
ened by a brash real-estate devel-
oper and by concern over her son,
Dillard. Women, age 18-35, and
men, age 18-45, will be asked to
read from the script.
"Pump Boys and Dinettes"
(July 17-22) is a mixture of a coun-
try-pop concert and musical the-
atre. The Pump Boys sell the high
octane on Highway 57 in Grand
Ole Opry country and the Di-
nettes, Prudie and Rhetta Cupp,
run the Double Cupp diner next
door. Singermusicianactors
will be asked to accompany them-
selves on one of the following in-
struments: acoustic guitars, elec-
tric bass guitar, accordian, piano,
or percussion. Please bring your
instrument with you.
A Tennessee Williams drama
(July 24-29) will also be produced.
Actors will be asked to read from
one or more of Williams' dramas.
The productions will feature
stars from television, film and
theater. Equity and non-Equity
performers will make up the ba
a nee oi the casts. Performers
be hired by the show or to:
entire season, with rehearsals set
June 19,1989, in Greenville.
Technicians should sen r
bring a resume with letters oi ref-
erence. You will be called for an
interview if your expert' -
needed. There arc also mam
prentice positions available in all
areas oi theatre production.
All members in the Surr
Theater company are paid except
for apprentices. Salaries are c
mensurate with size of role and
performing experience, talent
and training. The minimum �
ary is sufficient to cover temp1
rary living costs in Greenville
non-Equity performers and com-
plies with Equity salary scales for
performers who belong to the
union.
For further information, call
in Greenville (919) 757-6029 -
6390.
Pickin'the Bones

makes a Very modest proposal
mnnmitiMi
By CWPFY BONEHBAD
31 iff r u�um
i i � V �' '
Atonenmeoranother,allof

term or another. Many
pwrw complain loudly after an
arduous session in front of a
judge or jury of peers.
it teems Justice is never
�erred to the satisfaction of all
ved. After meditating
this problem for quite
tittie, 1 Relieve have found
agreeable solution to the
of dispensing justice.
is very
Convicted criminals
face fines, public service or
WWJe this pro-
of
It would also inevitably do
away with the insanity plea as a
defense. If my plan is imple-
mented, prospective criminals
would know what they face,
and then, if they persist in their
crirninal behavior, they would
obviously be deemed insane.
The overcrowding in our
nation's prisons would become
a thing of me past and money
spent eying to rehabilitate, exe-
cute or incarcerate felons ouid
be redirected, as this proposal
would eliminate 90 of all penal
costs.
What Is my plan? Capital
punishment? Anarchy? No,
something mat 1 hope w8J go
down in history as the ultimate
crime deterrent.
Ill the news I reed of a tor-
turous punishment inflicted
upon deviants and other crimi-
nals in a barbaric scky in the
west TWs practice can be modi-
fied to make the punishment fit
This tribe of savages inserts
glass tubes containing small ro-
dents of megmmGerbtlli& into
the anal pore o the convicted?
criminal. The tube is shattered
and the animal roams about the
intestinal tract for less man a
minute, when it dies of suffoca-
tion. The prisoner is then left
alone to expel the creature rec-
tatty.
1 subaut that this would be
the ideal1 form of correctional
treatment for any violators of
the law. DW1 offenders could be
forced to take a beer bottle rec-
taBy, speeding motorists could
have their ticketspushed within
and Htterers would have the
trash they irnpropeiiv disposed
of put in its proper place.
For theiwfresenouscrimes,
the same principle will woj
Drugs taken
hand what their crime did to
others, as a small snake coils
inside the criminars bowels.
Murderers will be bent over and
receive a gerbil for each of their
victims.
The new judicial code could
be extended to the lawyers in-
volved with the case, to insure
they use their legal abilities to
the maximum potential. As they
do now, the winning attorney
would receive 30 of the settle-
ment, but the losing counsel
would receive 30 of the pun-
ishment � a third of a broken
beer botfie, a baby hamster.
This would also necessarily
create a rather high job turnover
rate m the legal 8eid This in
turn would create awre jobs for
aft me law students who" have
worked so hard It? pass the bar.
a�� fc �� hw�a'fcSs wa
nary measures. Commercial air
time could be bought, since, as
evidenced by me rise oi such
pubtic interest programming as i
fcA Current Affair such pro-
gramming often receives high
ratings.
The crime rate all across the
country would plummet as po-
tennal criminal perpetrators
think once, think twice,
thmk,A gertsTs going up my
ass if I get caught j
I hope this
with the
public
: often more
can be
6
r
tf
o

!
��
c
r
-

!
J
1
1 "
i

:

It .





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9,1989 9
Her Alibi' needs one
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
In "Her Alibi Tom Selleck
plays Phillip, a mystery writer
whose life has become as predict-
able as his novels. Engaging in
courtroom research to get a new
idea, he finds his muse in the
spectacular form of Romanian
beauty Nina (Paulina Porizkova).
Unfortunately, Nina is the main
suspect in a murder case.
A smitten Phillip offers him-
self to Nina as an alibi. Inventing
an imaginary affair betwen them,
Phillip obtains her release and
takes her home. But when he be-
comes the butt of a series of ques-
tionable accidents (literally "the
butt" during Nina's archery prac-
tice), he wonders if she is trying to
make her alibi airtight.
"Her Alibi" is an enjoyable
movie but not an outstanding
one. It should have been better.
The amusing counterpoints of
Phillip's romaniticized detective
voiceovers to his mundane real-
ity, the high society eccentrics out
of a 30s screwball movie and the
parody titles of Phillip's books
("Murder Becomes Her "Sayon-
ora Cyanide") belie a wit that
unfortunately lapses too many
times into gratuitous slapstick
and sophmoric sexual jokes.
This low-brow approach
works against "Her Alibi" which
by virtue of Selleck's (a woman's
man) and Porizkova's (a man's
woman) presence begs to be an
adult romantic comedy.
As for the acting Selleck is
deafly playing the image he es-
tablished on "Magnum a vul-
nerable hunk as apt to goof as to
get things right. At least fans who
pay to see their hero won't be
disappointed.
Porizkova initally plays Nina
as a parody of herself in her Litee
Lauder ads: the self-possessed,
mystery woman. As a result, her
acting's a little stiff at first. How-
ever, as the movie progresses, she
injects Nina with the charm she
evidenced in "Anna" last year.
"Her Alibi" is not a waste of
time, but all things considered. if
you're a Selleck admirer or a
Paulina watcher, you may want to
content yourself with his "Mag-
num" reruns and her calendar.
Wait for this one to show up on
cable. Two and one-half catheads.
o
n
v
o
Them crazy guys
have done it again!
The All-New
All- Nutted-out
High-Octant
But always
Clearly Labeled
As� IP&g�
is still
around.
�Stilt void wh�r prohibited.

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In Arlington Village
(Arlington Bird, opposite Pitt Plaza)
Pirates Capture your Valentine's heart
with one of our uniquely styled
Oil Lamps -from $13.50
free gift wrapping ft free local delivery UPS available Visa ft Master-
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Phone 756-3363
Baranski follows up Broadway
with marriage, baby and Tony
NEW YORK (AP) � In one
12-month period, Christine Ba-
ranski got married, appeared in
her first Broadway hit, won a
Tony and had a baby.
What to do for an encore?
Have another baby, take a
sabbatical from the theater, come
back to do a challenging play like
"Hedda Gabler" in regional thea-
ter and then star on Broadway in
"Rumors the latest Neil Simon
success.
All that took more than a year,
Miss Baranski admits, but then
it's not easy to juggle a marriage, a
family and the theater.
At one time, a big-time thea-
ter career seemed almost out of
reach. Seven years ago, the ac-
tress was preparing to go on stage
at a tiny of f-off-Broadway theater,
a dismal out-of-the-way place
with a well-worn ambiance, mini-
scule salary and ore dressing
room for a dozen actors.
"I was thinking to myself, ' 1
can't believe I spent all those years
studying at Juilliard and now I'm
sitting on a toilet in a warehouse,
waiting to make my entrance
she recalls. "The experience was
difficult
Difficult until she saw a New
York Times review the next day,
praising her performance in the
plav, a one-act, two-character
comedy called "The Undefeated
Rumba Champ
From then on, she knew she
would make it in the theater. Crit-
ics and audiences reinforced her
opinion, later applauding her
performances in plays by William
Shaket earc and Tom Stoppard.
Her honors include an Obie for "A
Midsummer Night's Dream" off-
Broadway and a Tony for
Stoppard's "The Real Thing" on
Broadway.
For the moment, Miss Baran-
ski is holding forth in much more
comfortable surroundings, a
dressing room just inside the
stage door of Broadway's Broad-
hurst Theater where "Rumors"
has settled in for a run. But the
acting hasn't gotten any easier.
When the show started its
pre-Broadway trek last Septem-
ber at San Diego's Old Globe
Theater, some of the cast mem-
bers, Miss Baranski included,
couldn't get to sleep until 2 a.m.
because of the play's high energy.
"Ultimately with farce, what
you are playing is events, and
you're playing the situation she
says.
Dussault plays Witch
NEW YORK (AD � When
Nancy Dussault first saw "Into
the Woods thcitcphcnaSond-
heimaVnbs Lapffi musical � thaf
opened on Broadway more than a
year ago, she thought, "Gee, I
could do that
She could � and eventually
did.
In December, the buoyant
musical comedy performer joined
the cast of the fairy tale musical as
the Witch, a role originally played
by Bernadette Peters.
For Dussault, the show is
something of a homecoming, a
roundabout return to the Broad-
wav theatre after several long side
trips, mostly to television where
she co-hosted "Good Morning
America" and appeared in the
series 'Too Close for Comfort
Not that she was completely
away from performing on the
stage. In fact, when Dussault got
the call for "Into the Woods she
Comedy
competition
almost a hit
Continued from page 8
nervous laughter, but handled
himself fairly well under the cir-
cumstances.
Among those entering the
contest were Eric Lee, Ted Fraley,
i Richard Jordan and Dave
Reichett.
As the contestants and the
I night rolled on the crowd gradu-
ally lightened up. Among the acts
were local jokes about the recent
drug bust on campus, a modern-
day George and Gracie-type
comedy team, and a running joke
throughout the competition rag-
ging on ECU football players, one
of whom was present in the audi-
lence.
Most of the comedians were
unusually relaxed for amateurs.
. ley all kept their cool for the
three minutes they had to per-
form. Profanity and vulgarity
veren't allowed in the competi-
jon, but some of the contestants
jnaged to let something lewd
lip into their act in some form or
lother.
Aside from the fact that the
ee Doritos seemed to be the big-
st hit of the evening and that
leaudience seemed to have
.Jed a stiff drink before they
ime, the show was something
in to watch for an evening that
in't cost anything.
was in Michigan starring in a
production of "Follies another
Sondheimkmusical. I'he actress
didrft-hesitate fb corfie tb New"
York for her first Broadway show
in 10 years.
"You don't get that many
chances on Broadway any more
she says.
"f oday, it's real hard. There's
no place for kids to work
Dussault had no such prob-
lems when she began her own
career which started in the mid-
1950s with a high school produc-
tion of "Brigadoon The little girl
with the big voice later attended
Northwestern University as a
music major and worked at a tent
theatre in Highland Park, 111
where one summer she did 12
shows.
?We-were so young she re-
calls. "What did we care how hard
we worked? But we had real train-
ing.
Every day meant four hours
of singing drills, then stage exer-
cises, improvisations, learning
how to work so close to an audi-
ence, and then lectures on groom-
ing, makeup and weight mainte-
nance.
"I got a great education in the
etiquette of theatre Dussault
says. "It was so valuable
COMPLETE SKI
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Plaza Cinema
Plaza Shountnit Ctr. 756 OOHH
rVOW SHOWING
BEACHES
STARING BBTTE MIDLER
THREE FUGITIVES
WTTH NICK NOLTE ft MARTIN SHORT
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TWINS
Consolidated
Theatres
Adults $275 til
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CHILDREN
ANYTIME $250J
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
RATED PG
DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS

1:30-4:00-7:00-9:20
presents
RATED PG HER ALIBI
1: 00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
1
4
RATED PG 13
WHO'S HARRY CRUMB
1:10-3:10-5:10-7:10-9:10

EasLCarplina
Playhouse
ifintBie
Bam&
� CONTAINS AN EXTREME FRANKNESS OF LANGUAGE. THE BEST
AMERICAN PLAY IN SOME SEASONS NOT FOR EVERYBODY, JUST FOR
SOPHISTICATED PLAYGOERS - Y �ES
FEBRUARY 8, 9, 10 & 11
McGinnis Theatre � 8:15 p.m.
GENERAL PUBLIC: $5.00 - ECU STUDENTS: $3.00
CALL: 757-6829
PEACE CORPS SERVICE:
A Good Career Move
. H j '
"31
.�:?

7M-MI4 M-f Hm-1��T
clhk rmiT'Mcirr- To
����� 0kv� rnrinm �or �
���� �� vntv � vMt '� a
Tut-w t�cx mm mna
nm�. urna m ���� iaaa
ttrmj
i Ttuemum
CONSTRUC
t Mutant a�at

9
acts. CORPS
ti,
t- �
S,
Discover the Peace Corps Advantage!
Sign up for interviews at Bloxton House for February 17.
Speak with a recruiter at the Student Supply Store Lobby
on February 16th from 9:30 am until 4:00 pm.
See a film about Peace Corps in Joyner Library, Rm B-04
starting at 6:30 pm on February 16th.
0�
9C3





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEppvARY 9,1989 9
Her Alibi' needs one
By MICAH HARRIS
Stuff Writer
In "Her Alibi Tom Selleck
plays Phillip, a mystery writer
whose life has become as predict-
able as his novels. Engaging in
courtroom research to get a new
idea, he finds his muse in the
spectacular form of Romanian
beauty Nina (Paulina Porizkova).
Unfortunately, Nina is the main
suspect in a murder case.
A smitten Phillip offers him-
self to Nina as an alibi. Inventing
an imaginary affair betwen them,
Phillip obtains her release and
takes her home. But when he be-
comes the butt of a series of ques-
tionable accidents (literally "the
butt" during Nina's archery prac-
tice), he wonders if she is trying to
make her alibi airtight.
"Her Alibi" is an enjoyable
movie but not an outstanding
one. It should have been better.
The amusing counterpoints of
Phillip's romaniticized detective
voiccovers to his mundane real-
ity, the high society eccentrics out
of a 30s screwball movie and the
parody titles of Phillip's books
("Murder Becomes Her "Sayon-
ora Cyanide") belie a wit that
unfortunately lapses too many
times into gratuitous slapstick
and sophmoric sexual jokes.
This low-brow approach
works against "Her Alibi" which
by virtue of Sclleck's (a woman's
man) and Porizkova's (a man's
woman) presence begs to be an
adult romantic comedy.
As for the acting Selleck is
clearly playing the image he es-
tablished on "Magnum a vul-
nerable hunk as apt to goof as to
get things right. At least fans who
pay to see their hero won't be
disappointed.
Porizkova initally plays Nina
as a parody of herself in her Estee
Lauder ads: the self-possessed,
mystery woman. As a result, her
acting's a little stiff at first. How-
ever, as the movie progresses, she
injects Nina with the charm she
evidenced in "Anna" last year.
"Her Alibi" is not a waste of
time, but all things considered if
you're a Selleck admirer or a
Paulina watcher, you may want to
content yourself with his "Mag-
num" reruns and her calendar.
Wait for this one to show up on
cable. Two and one-half catheads.
o
n
v
o
Them crazy guys
have done it again!
The All-New
All- Nutted-out
'High-Octant
But always
Clearly Labeled
Hasft �&ir�!lilsiil�HL ���-
flir� IPag�
is still
around.
Stilt void whir prohibited '
jk
Jfttmg
Baranski follows up Broadway
with marriage, baby and Tony
NEW YORK (AP) � In one
12-month period, Christine Ba-
ranski got married, appeared in
her first Broadway hit, won a
Tony and had a baby.
What to do for an encore?
Have another baby, take a
sabbatical from the theater, come
back to do a challenging play like
"Hedda Gabler" in regional thea-
ter and then star on Broadway in
"Rumors the latest Neil Simon
success.
All that took more than a year,
Miss Baranski admits, but then
it's not easy to juggle a marriage, a
family and the theater.
At one time, a big-time thea-
ter career seemed almost out of
reach. Seven years ago, the ac-
tress was preparing to go on stage
at a tiny off-off-Broadway theater,
a dismal out-of-the-way place
with a well-worn ambiance, mini-
scule salary and ore dressing
room for a dozen actors.
"1 was thinking to myself, ' 1
can't believe I spent all those years
studying at Juilliard and now I'm
sitting on a toilet in a warehouse,
waiting to make my entrance
she recalls. "The experience was
difficult
Difficult until she saw a New
York Times review the next day,
praising her performance in the
play, a one-act, two-character
comedy called "The Undefeated
Rumba Champ
From then on, she knew she
would make it in the theater. Crit-
ics and audiences reinforced her
opinion, later applauding her
performances in plays by William
Shaket care and Tom Stoppard.
Her honors include an Obie for "A
Midsummer Night's Dream" off-
Broadway and a Tony for
Stoppard's "The Real Thing" on
Broadway.
For the moment, Miss Baran-
ski is holding forth in much more
comfortable surroundings, a
dressing room just inside the
stage door of Broadway's Broad-
hurst Theater where "Rumors"
has settled in for a run. But the
acting hasn't gotten any easier.
When the show started its
pre-Broadway trek last Septem-
ber at San Diego's Old Globe
Theater, some of the cast mem-
bers, Miss Baranski included,
couldn't get to sleep until 2 a.m.
because of the play's high energy.
"Ultimately with farce, what
you are playing is events, and
you're playing the situation she
says.
Dussault plays Witch
NEW YORK (AP) - - When
Nancv Dussault first saw "Into
the Woods the Stephen. Sond-
heimanl?s Lapfi rmi&Whaf
opened on Broadway more than a
year ago, she thought, "Gee, I
could do that
She could � and eventually
did.
In December, the buoyant
musical comedy performer joined
the cast of the fairy tale musical as
the Witch, a role originally played
bv Bernadette Peters.
For Dussault, the show is
something of a homecoming, a
roundabout return to the Broad-
way theatre after several long side
trips, mostly to television where
she co-hosted "Good Morning
America" and appeared in the
series 'Too Close for Comfort
Not that she was completely
away from performing on the
stage. In fact, when Dussault got
the call for 'Into the Woods she
Comedy
competition
almost a hit
was in Michigan starring in a
production of "Follies another
Sondheimkmusical. The actress
dkTrfthesitate fb cdrne t& New"
York for her first Broadway show
in 10 years.
"You don't get that many
chances on Broadway any more
she says.
"today, it's real hard. There's
no place for kids to work
Dussault had no such prob-
lems when she began her own
career which started in the mid-
1950s with a high school produc-
tion of "Brigadoon The little girl
with the big voice later attended
Northwestern University as a
music major and worked at a tent
theatre in Highland Park, 111
where one summer she did 12
shows.
�Wewere so young she re-
calls. "What did we care how hard
we worked? But we had real train-
ing
Every day meant four hours
of singing drills, then stage exer-
cises, improvisations, learning
how to work so close to an audi-
ence, and then lectures on groom-
ing, makeup and weight mainte-
nance.
"I got a great education in the
etiquette of theatre Dussault
says. "It was so valuable
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ft
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Continued from page 8
nervous laughter, but handled
himself fairly well under the cir-
cumstances.
Among those entering the
contest were Eric Lee, Ted Fraley,
Richard Jordan and Dave
Reichett
As the contestants and the
night rolled on the crowd gradu-
ally lightened up. Among the acts
were local jokes about the recent
drug bust on campus, a modem-
day George and Grade-type
comedy team, and a running joke
throughout the competition rag-
ging on ECU football players, one
of whom was present in the audi-
ence.
Most of the comedians were
unusually relaxed for amateurs.
They all kept their cool for the
three minutes they had to per-
form. Profanity and vulgarity
weren't allowed in the competi-
tion, but some of the contestants
managed to let something lewd
slip into their act in some form or
another.
Aside from the fact that the
free Doritos seemed to be the big-
gest hit of the evening and that
theaudience seemed to have
needed a stiff drink before they
came, the show was something
fun to watch for an evening that
didn't cost anything.
CORDON'S
Qol1 and Ski Shop
2MBfP"i
7S�-1003
L
In Arlington Village
(Arlington Bird, opposite Pitt Plaza)
Pirates Capture your Valentine's heart
with one of our uniquely styled
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free gift wrapping ft free local delivery UPS available Via ft Master-
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Phone 756-3363
Plaza Cinema
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NOW SHOWING
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STARING BKTTE MIDLER
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CHILDREN J
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BUCCANEER MOVIES
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RATED PG
DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS
1:30-4:00-7:00-9:20
RATED PG HER ALIBI
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WHO'S HARRY CRUMB
1:10-3:10-5:10-7:10-9:10

let tine
Bamidi
�� CONTAINS AN EXTREME FRANKNESS OF LANGUAGE. THE BEST
AMERICAN PLAY IN SOME SEASONS NOT FOR EVERYBODY, JUST f QR
SOPHISTICATED PLAYGOERS
�-N.y. TIMES
FEBRUARY 8, 9, 10 & 11
McGinnis Theatre � 8:15 p.m.
GENERAL PUBLIC: $5.00 - ECU STUDENTS: $3.00
CALL: 757-6829
PEACE CORPS SERVICE:
A Good Career Move

V5s
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awwg lac Vatatv a NaMa raa'd.
Tim-Sat, jag jagg. i-3Ml
ClIftK TVWT-Wa 55 �av
i.rra tame eot ava wil
tar m I
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CONSTRUC
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: �: M
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oondLrenco-
PEACECORPS
?aw
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s,
Discover the Peace Corps Advantage!
Sign up for interviews at Bloxton House for February 17.
Speak with a recruiter at the Student Supply Store Lobby
on February 16th from 9:30 am until 4:00 pm.
See a film about Peace Corps in Joyner Library, Rm B-04
starting at 6.30 pm on February 16th.
��s
9C3





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9. 189

Nicaraguan publisher grows
MANAGUA, Nicaragua
AP) � In less than 10 years since
the Sandinista revolution a na-
tion that didn't even have a pub-
lishing house has managed to
produce more than 2tX1 titles and a
crop ot native authors.
"This is par t ot the revolution-
ary process, said Roberto Diaz
Castillo, director ot the state-
owned New Nicaragua publish-
ing compart) Before the revolu-
tion the most important literary
figures weren't published in
Nicaragua
Indeed, Nicaragua produced
oneol the 1 lispanic world s great
poets Ruben Dario, who died in
1916. but although Dario is re-
vered as a strongly nationalist
poet, he lived outside the country
tor most ot his life.
Under the long rule ot the
Somoza family that began in 1936,
re was censorship and little
encouragement from the state
regarding the arts 1 lewever, the
Sandinistas, who took over after a
revolutionary war in 1979, put a
: ot emphasis on all forms of
culture. Artists, dancers, musi-
cians and writers are encouraged
by several government organiza-
tions.
Still, writers who don't tow
the Sandinista line have trouble
getting published, said Pablo
Antonio Cuadra, a noted poet and
director of the opposition news-
paper La Trensa, which has been
involved in frequent bitter con-
flicts with the Sandinista govern-
ment
The Sandinistas say I'm the
only poet opposed to the regime,
but there are a lot of disenchanted
pvxis he said.
The roots and implications of
the Sandinista revolution are the
dominant subjects of New
Nicaragua's list. Many of the rul-
ing Sandinista leaders themselves
are writers, and a list of authors
from New Nicaragua can look
like a who's who of the govern-
ment.
Vice President Sergio
Ramirez is a novelist. Agrarian
Reform Minister laime Wheelock
is a historian. First Lady Rosario
Murillo is a poet, as is former cul-
ture minister Ernesto Cardenal.
Gioconda Belli, one the
nation's most popular poets,
writes rich odes that couple love,
eroticism and strong hope of a
better tomorrow. Murillo, the
common-law wife of the presi-
dent, also writes mostly love
poems based on the ideals of the
revolution.
The man considered by most
as Nicaragua's finest living poet,
Carlos Martinez Rivas, is on New
Nicaragua's list but of a genera-
tion apart from the revolution.
One of his poems is a tribute to
Charles Darwin, another a four-
line poem called "Retrospection
140-1980
Ramirez, vice president and
oneof the most popular novelists,
recently published "Castigo
Divino or "Divine Punish-
ment
7"he book, a spicy fictional-
ized account of a scandalous
murder in the 1930s, was also
serialized in the Sunday supple-
ment of the pro-government
newspaper El Nuevo Diario.
"The theme shows that a
leader in the revolution doesn't
necessarily have to write about
the revolution Ramirez said.
"The only political part of this
book is that all the earnings will be
used for a war fund
AFTERNOON
DELIGHT
AT GROG'S
Reggae and Progressive Music
Beverage Specials
Doors OPEN at 5:30
Every Friday
FREE ADMISSION
Underage Welcome
ECU Opera Theater to
present Dr. Eakin !
Ct Nca s Rureau
Two one-act Italian comic
operas will bo presented by the
ECU Opera Theatre next month.
in nightly performances at 8:15
pm tonight through Saturday and
a Sunday matinee at 2 pm. The
performances are scheduled for
the Fletcher Music Center Recital
Hall.
Tickets to any performance
are on sale at the ECU Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center at $5 each for the
general public and $250 for stu-
dents or for persons in groups of
r more.
Each performance will in-
l a Serva Padrona'
i-ii.
Maid Made Mistressby Gio-
vanni Tergolesi and "Gianni
New yuppie
perk is an old
Swedish art
PITTSBURGH (AP) - After
hours hunched over a steering
wheel breathing bus fumes and
;htingtraffic,chauffeur Michael
Manganaro needs to be kneaded.
For him. it's a company perk,
the kind oi service offered State
Department bureaucrats, profes-
sional hockey players, and a
growing number of other Ameri-
cans.
Manganaro and about 200
other employees oi HIT leinz Co.
can kick oii their shoes and sink
into a padded chair for a 13-min-
ute rubdown once a week in a
quiet conference room at the
company's downtown headquar-
ters.
"Driving in the city really can
tense you up Manganaro, 41,
savs as he gets out oi the chair.
'This really relaxes you. It really
makes you feel good
The rubdowns are offered as
part oi a new stress-reduction
program in which the companv
pays halt oi the $12.50 fee for 15
minutes. It's one example of how
massage is going mainstream in
the United States.
Thousands of Americans are
getting rubbed the right way at
work, health clubs, hotels, malls,
airports, street fairs and at home.
"Massage is no longer per-
ceived as illicit or a toy for the idle
rich. It's for everybody says
Gene Arbetter, spokesman for the
American Massage Therapy As-
sociation. "It's for the average
worker. It's for the weekend
athlete, not just an Olvmpian
The massage association esti-
mates a Knit 10 percent of Ameri-
cans have tried professional mas-
sage at least once Those kneaded
regularlv often work in high-
pressure jobs that put kinks in
their shoulders and backs.
The body has a good self-
regulating mechanism, but we,
20th-centurv man, throw an aw-
ful lot of obstacles into that bal-
ance Arbetter says. "Cradling
the phone between the ear and the
shoulder, sitting in poor chairs,
carrying a purse or gym bag on
only one shoulder, falling asleep
in front oi the television can do
things to the circulation and the
muscle structure that are just not
kind
Schicchi" by Giacomo Puccini,
both operas will be sung in Eng-
lish by a cast oi advanced voice
students from the ECU School of
Music. Most rolesarc double-cast,
enabling singers to appear in at
least two ot the four scheduled
performances.
According to Dr. Clyde Hiss,
Opera Theater director, the two
operas selected for the Theatre's
annual Fehruarv production rep-
resent the earliest and the latest
operas oi the Italian "opera buffa"
style. Short, humorous works of
this type were originally intended
to he staged between the acts of
longer, serious operas.
ECU Chancellor Richard
Eakin will make a cameo (non-
singing) appearance Friday in the
role ot Buoso Donati in "Gianni
Schicchi
"TCBV"
Sweetheart Pies
&r
. TCBV


tra �� :��'�:�:�
waist as u
TCBV
. .
Nobody treats
yoi LIKE

TCBV
ft

Soprano Grace Oh sings a duet with Calvin Braxton in the ECU
Opera Theater's one-act Italian comic operas this weekend.
Chancellor l-akin has a cameo appearance Friday night.
I
2 5C OFF WAFFLE CONE
OR.30C OFF
WAFFLE C0NESUNDAE.
One coupon per purcha.se at participating
TCBY stores Void where orohibiti
Offer Expires (expires 2-14-89
"TfftU" i
I IDT 325 Arlington Blvd.
The Country Best htgurt � Beside Little Caesai J
Say Happy
Valentines' Day The
Contemporary
Way
with Y Sth Street cards
by American Greetings.
STUDENT STORE
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
WRIGHT BLDG.
The Department of Resident Education
Announces the
New & Improved Benefits
for
Resident Advisors
AMERICAN GREI flNGS
Mi Ml l
�A GUARANTEED PRIVATE ROOM
�EARN $2300 STIPEND IN
AN ACADEMIC YEAR
�To meet a lot of different people
�To hold a leadership position
�To have a convenient job
�To develop better communication
skills
�To learn organizational strategy
�To hone human relations skills
�To learn self management
To have the opportunity to obtain
skills that are transferable to the
workplace
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR FALL 1 QftQ
Employment: February 17, 1989.
Applications can be obtained
from any Residence Hall Office






i
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9,1989
Nicaraguan publisher grows
MANAGUA, Nicaragua
(AP) � In less than 10 years since
the Sandinista revolution, a na-
tion that didn't even have a pub-
lishing house has managed to
produce more than 200 titlesand a
crop of native authors.
'This is part of the revolution-
ary process said Roberto Diaz
Castillo, director of the state-
owned New Nicaragua publish-
ing company. "Before the revolu-
tion the most important literary
figures weren't published in
Nicaragua
Indeed, Nicaragua produced
one of the Hispanic world's great
poets, Ruben Dario, who died in
1916. But although Dario is re-
vered as a strongly nationalist
poet, he lived outside the country
for most of his life.
Under the long rule of the
Somoza family that began in 1936,
there was censorship and little
encouragement from the state
regarding the arts. However, the
Sandinistas, who took over after a
revolutionary war in 1979, put a
lot of emphasis on all forms of
culture. Artists, dancers, musi-
cians and writers are encouraged
by several government organiza-
tions.
Still, writers who don't tow
the Sandinista line have trouble
getting published, said Pablo
Antonio Cuadra, a noted poet and
director of the opposition news-
paper La Prensa, which has been
involved in frequent bitter con-
flicts with the Sandinista govern-
ment.
"The Sandinistas say I'm the
only poet opposed to the regime,
but there are a lot of disenchanted
poets he said.
The roots and implications of
the Sandinista revolution are the
dominant subjects of New
Nicaragua's list. Many of the rul-
ing Sandinista leaders themselves
are writers, and a list of authors
from New Nicaragua can look
like a who's who of the govern-
ment.
Vice President Sergio
Ramirez is a novelist. Agrarian
Reform Minister Jaime Wheelock
is a historian. First Lady Rosario
Murillo is a poet, as is former cul-
ture minister Ernesto Cardenal.
Gioconda Belli, one the
nation's most popular poets,
writes rich odes that couple love,
eroticism and strong hope of a
better tomorrow. Murillo, the
common-law wife of the presi-
dent, also writes mostly love
poems based on the ideals of the
revolution.
The man considered by most
as Nicaragua's finest living poet,
Carlos Martinez Rivas, is on New
Nicaragua's list but of a genera-
tion apart from the revolution.
One of his poems is a tribute to
Charles Darwin, another a four-
line poem called "Retrospection
1940-1980
Ramirez, vice president and
one of the most popular novelists,
recently published "Castigo
Divino or "Divine Punish-
ment
The book, a spicy fictional-
ized account of a scandalous
murder in the 1930s, was also
serialized in the Sunday supple-
ment of the pro-government
newspaper El Nuevo Diario.
"The theme shows that a
leader in the revolution doesn't
necessarily have to write about
the revolution Ramirez said.
"The only political part of this
book is that all the earnings will be
used for a war fund
AFTERNOON
DELIGHT
AT GROG's
Reggae and Progressive Music
Beverage Specials
Doors OPEN at 5:30
Every Friday
FREE ADMISSION
Underage Welcome
i
ECU Opera Theater to
present Dr. Eakin !
ECU News Bureau
Two one-act Italian comic
operas will be presented by the
ECU Opera Theatre next month,
in nightly performances at 8:15
pm tonight through Saturday and
a Sunday matinee at 2 pm. The
performances are scheduled for
the Fletcher Music Center Recital
Hall.
Tickets to any performance
are on sale at the ECU Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center at $5 each for the
general public and $2.50 for stu-
dents or for persons in groups of
10 or more.
Each performance will in-
clude "La Serva Padrona" ("The
Maid Made Mistress") by Gio-
vanni Pergolesi and "Gianni
New yuppie
perk is an old
Swedish art
PITTSBURGH (AP) � After
hours hunched over a steering
wheel, breathing bus fumes and
fighting traffic, chauffeur Michael
Manganaro needs to be kneaded.
For him, it's a company perk,
the kind of service offered State
Department bureaucrats, profes-
sional hockey players, and a
growing number of other Ameri-
cans.
Manganaro and about 200
other employees of H.J. Heinz Co.
can kick off their shoes and sink
into a padded chair for a 15-min-
ute rubdown once a week in a
quiet conference room at the
company's downtown headquar-
ters.
"Driving in the city really can
tense you up Manganaro, 41,
says as he gets out of the chair.
"This really relaxes you. It really
makes you feel good
The rubdowns are offered as
part of a new stress-reduction
program in which the company
pays half of the $12.50 fee for 15
minutes. It's one example of how
massage is going mainstream in
the United States.
Thousands of Americans are
getting rubbed the right way at
work, health clubs, hotels, malls,
airports, street fairs and at home.
"Massage is no longer per-
ceived as illicit or a toy for the idle
rich. It's for everybody says
Gene Arbetter, spokesman for the
American Massage Therapy As-
sociation. "It's for the average
worker. It's for the weekend
athlete, not just an Olympian
The massage association esti-
mates about 10 percent of Ameri-
cans have tried professional mas-
sage at least once. Those kneaded
regularly often work in high-
pressure jobs that put kinks in
their shoulders and backs.
'The body has a good self-
regulating mechanism, but we,
20th-century man, throw an aw-
ful lot of obstacles into that bal-
ance Arbetter says. "Cradling
the phone between the ear and the
shoulder, sitting in poor chairs,
carrying a purse or gym bag on
only one shoulder, failing asleep
in front of the television can do
things to the circulation and the
muscle structure that are just not
kind
Schicchi" by Giacomo Puccini.
Both operas will be sung in Eng-
lish by a cast of advanced voice
students from the ECU School of
Music. Most roles are double-cast,
enabling singers to appear in at
least two of the four scheduled
performances.
According to Dr. Clyde Hiss,
Opera Theater director, the two
operas selected for the Theatre's
annual February production rep-
resent the earliest and the latest
operas of the Italian "opera buffa"
style. Short, humorous works of
this type were originally intended
to be staged between the acts of
longer, serious operas.
ECU Chancellor Richard
Eakin will make a cameo (non-
singing) appearance Friday in the
role of Buoso Donati in "Gianni
Schicchi
Soprano Grace Oh sings a duet with Calvin Braxton in the ECU
Opera Theater's one-act Italian comic operas this weekend.
Chancellor Eakin has a cameo appearance Fnday night
"TCBV"�
Sweetheart Pies

A sweet gift idea your sweetheart or whole family
will love. A delicious "TfJV" Sweetheart Pie
- fat-tree Golden Vanilla or strawberry frown
yogurt with almost half the calories of
premium ice cream, topped with fresh
strawberries. This delectable dessert
is pleasing to the waist as well as the
taste. So take home a "TCSV"
Sweetheart Pie or any of our
delicious pies, and share it with your
sweetheart.
Nobody treats
YOU LIKE
TCBV
Ml
Iff
SM
Say Happy
Valentines' Day The
Contemporary
Way
with W. 78th Street cards
by American Greetings.
STUDENT STORE
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
WRIGHT BLDG.
25C OFF WAFFLE CONE
OR50C OFF
WAFTLECONESUNDAE.
One coupon per purchase at participating
TCBY stores. Void where orohibited
Offer Expires: (expires 2-14-89)
"TffiU"
I WIIT 325 Arlington Blvd.
The Country s Best Ibgurt (Beside Little Caesar
I
II

n
'T!
w
The Department: of Resident Education
Announces the
New & Improved Benefits
for
Resident Advisors
AMERICAN GREETINGS
� M Ml l nuri�.jn (.runnel nrporjlion
�A GUARANTEED PRIVATE ROOM
�EARN $2300 STIPEND IN
AN ACADEMIC YEAR
�To meet a lot of different people
�To hold a leadership position
�To have a convenient job
�To develop better communication
skills
�To learn organizational strategy
�To hone human relations skills
�To learn self management
�To have the opportunity to obtain
skills that are transferable to the
workplace

APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR FALL 19ftg
Employment: February 17, 198�
Applications can be obtained
from any Residence Hall Office







'i
If
ll
Divorcees seek new life
2
(AP) � Every year, more than
million Americans in some de-
ajiee of desperation seek a "sec-
md chance" in life through di-
vprce.
But a new look at this phe-
itpmenon finds that things are not
ripcessarily better the second time
arP"nd and the chances of success
me more elusive than was
thought.
And society often forgets to
think much about the 1 million or
-O children a year who are in-
volved in divorce, most of whom
sense a loss of protection and fear
6) the future.
Furthermore, the study
snows, the aftershocks of divorce
cvho through the personal lives of
artl concerned at least a decade
later.
Judith VVallcrstein, a psy-
chologist at the Universitv of Cali-
tornia and founder of the Center
tor the Family in Transition, has
studied in depth 60 families for
more than 10 years.
Her findings are to be pub-
lished next month in a book,
Second Chances � Men,
vVomen and Children a Decade
After Divorce written in col-
laboration with science writer
Sandra Blakeslee. The sub-sub
title is even more provocative.
Who Wins, Who Loses � And
Why
Among the findings that
Wallcrstein discovered as "new,
scientific and unexpected was
"that in most instances one person
was much better off
"One person is very impor-
tant in life she says. "But the
other member was, on balance,
cither in the same place or not
doing too well. You're looking at a
much greater divergence after
divorce, and that's entirely new
Who gets the major benefit of
"the second chance" boils down
to who wanted the divorce,
whether male or female.
Wallcrstein says she is not
against divorce. "Divorce is much
more than the coup de grace of a
stressful marriage she writes. "It
is a new beginning that offers
people second chances. It is no
more and no less than an opportu-
nity to rebuild lives. And there's
the rub
The book tells of the pitfalls,
the expectations, the denial, and
the quiet dramas through the
voices of those involved, and
Wallerstein has obviously won
the trust and the understanding of
these people with whom she has
been involved these many years.
"In the book there are three
major families we built on she
says. "I think those people started
off equal We ask, 'Why did you
get married?' Almost all of them
tell us they married for love. They
thought they were equal. They
weren't shotgun marriages be-
cause someone got pregnant, al-
though some of them were. By
and large they knew each other
"In so rr.e of the marriages that
we see, there never was a mar-
riage, hovv'i'ver one defines mar-
riages in terms of love, intimacy,
friendship. There was unhappi-
ness, loneliness or violence �
whatever � from the start.
"But i a wholegroup of these
marriages, there was at some
point a rcil marriage, and then it
didn't endure for a whole lot of
different reasons
In investigating the aftermath
of divorce :he found that each
participant lias a different view,
even the children, although they
are almost unanimous in thinking
that the divorce was a good thing
for their parents.
Not so for the children.
"You're in a mine field of moral
issues, because the children feel
they are worse off Wallerstein
says.
"I'm not sure they were, but
they feel they were, and that's an
important distinction. I think in
many way��� t hey were better off
Nor is it a passing thing:
"Again this finding 1 didn't ex-
pect. I was startled when I first
looked at it. It: crescendoes as they
move into young adulthood, as
they are locking at an important
love affair, n important commit-
ment. That's when they really
worry: 'Am I going to be locked
into what happened to my Mom
and Dad?
Diane Lane stars as a prostitute
!
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Di-
ane Lane was apprehensive about
the reception awaiting her in
Texas when she arrived for her
role as a "sporting gal" in the CBS
miniseries "Lonesome Dove
One of her co-stars in the epic
Western story is Tommy Lee
Jones, who was her husband and a
tough gambler in her last movie,
"The Big Town
During the filming of that
movie, she says, Jones "was so
pinto his character that I was
little intimidated. When I fin-
ked my parti ht wrtttotrt �fyrnfc
kodbye. I was a little worried
w he would greet me when 1
t to the 'Lonesome Dove' set.
jell, he swung me around and
lid, 'How are you, darling?' I'd
per seen him so jovial. People
-�ked and I said, 'He's my ex-
isband, you know
In the miniseries, Lane stars
i Lorena Wood, the town prosti-
te at the Dry Bean Saloon in
nesome Dove, Texas. Most of
� scenes are with Robert Du vail.
The four-part miniseries,
on the Pulitzer Prizc-win-
g novel by Larry McMurtrv,
Cks off the February sweeps for
fS on Sunday and is continued
Monday, Tuesdav and Wed-
lay.
Jones and Duvall both play
fftmer Texas Rangers who run a
small ranch called the Hat Creek
Outfit. They arc almost opposite
in their personalities. Jones is
Woodrow F. Call, who is sullen
and taciturn, while Duvall is
Augustus McCrae, who is charm-
ing and philosophical.
She also starred in "The Out-
siders "Rumblefish "The Cot-
ton Club 'Cattle Annie and
Little Britchci "To Elvis With
Love'and "Streets of Fire
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12
T! IE EAST CAROLINIAN
ILHKUAK l�w
y

The Clearly Labeled
v.v
, TPr
LixLL'V
o
o
g)iianaii�na
o
afciffos
Quote of the week:
"God is very very personal.
� Stickboy
Nature freak searches for 'grass'
Dearest Earlvis.
Hello. I am an outdoorsy type
ol girl, and 1 just love to run, jump
and play in the grass here at ECIJ
The smell oi the feeling oi eupho-
ria from a lit cigarette.
Recently, 1 have noticed that
all around campus, particularly
the mall area, it is getting increas-
ingly hard to find good rolling
grass. My friend, Mary o Wana
has noticed that there is no bud
ding grass anywhere on campus
Do you know where the green-
green grass went? If you do,
sweetness, please do tell.
Signed,
Hopelessly addicted to grass
Dear Druggie,
Wake up and smell the
roaches. There is no room at this
school for your kind. Crowing it
in the middle of the campus, how
absurd! Rolling around in the
leafy, Tl K infested ding, get out
oi here!
So you catch a buzz, hide
behind yourshadesand think you
can pull E's leg with some crazed
storv about lawn grass Hev. we
yellow journalists aren't that gul-
lible. Your hidden drug story is
obviously a devious communist
plot to weaken the fine moral fi-
bers of ECl students.
Ail this aside, and to really
answer -our question, the most
fertile grass grows in Aycock
Dorm But before pursuing any
clandestine drug deal in some
slimy crevice of debauchery, heed
the words ol out new Firs? ady
Barbara Bush concerning bud-
ding grass: "lust ?ay Mow.
Confused
Dear Big Egg
In reading your column last
Thursday, I was a bit contused
about the ad ice you gave to the
last four lettersorrectmeiflam
wrong, clarify my situation it 1 am
in error, but wasn't the advice to
the letter mixed up in regards to
the ropt i order ch they
should have foIl �wed
Signed, orn me it I am
TUl
Ask
wrong
Dear Correction Tape,
Wake up and read the col-
umn. Where did this egg thing
come from? Yes, you arecorrect in
your assumption: the advice
given to the last four letters was
interchanged. Reason: to test the
reader for word retention and to
see if the reader could coherently-
deduce that E was Mucking With
Your Mind.
Inquirer
Dear Earlvis,
Reading the Crime Report in
Tuesday's issue oi The Easter
Carolinian, I saw a majority oi the
crime incidents occurred in
Aycock Dorm. Why do you think
this is so?
Signed, An Inquiring Mind
! ear Tabloid Reader,
Wake up and look at the pic-
ture. After conducting an
extensive two-day research proj-
ect into the matter, our crack team
of investigators looked at this
baffling issue from many angles.
Our committee even went air
borne to take this aerial photo-
graph.
As you will notice, this is a
picture of Jones, Ayco.k and Scott
Dormitories respec tively. Origi-
nally in 1959, engineers planned
to have these three dorms spell
out the letters E -C - I'J.
To make this history lesson
short, Ira Isabel Uberry, a
Greenville builder, had different
ideas. Uberrry instructed work-
men to build Jones and Aycock in
the form of I's to spell out her
initials: 1 - I - U.
To answer your question: if
you were a I when you were sup-
posed to be a C, you w uild do a lot
of drugs too.
Why are parking tickets so
expensive and where does the
money that is given to campus
security go?
Signed, Ben Towed
Dear Ben Bio wed,
Wake up and smell the patrol
car emissions. So it's raining. You
missed the bus. You have a test in
ten minutes. But as you wheel
your green Dodge Duster into the
commuter lot without a parking
sticker, you suddenly fear having
a $20 pink slip placed under the
windshield wiper. As you drive
home, you realize you flunked
your test.
That one test cost you a 1 in
the class and made you academi-
cally ineligible. You start drinking
heavily and get a new acquain-
tance pregnant. You get married
and work for the rest of your lifeat
the Procter and Gamble making
"Always
Honestly, I don't know any-
thing about parking tickets.
Tickets
Dear Big G,
Contract
Hey Earl,
1 lev dude, I did a stupid and
dumb thing last week, I signed a
contract to live in the dorms. After
three days, 1 couldn't take it any-
more the stereos, thecommu
nal showers and the loud radi i
tors were too much forthiseighth-
year senior.
S I went down tothediret tor
of housing and said "Heydud
need to cruise this dorm si
I fnfortunately, the (deleted' �
sored) lady denied tin- request
I lelp me E, I'm dying.
Signed,
Sick of Living in the ungle
I tear (luns and Roses,
Wake up and listen to the
music. Come on, the dorm can't
be that bad.Those Flintstone b :
are so comfortable And the pri-
vacy is uncomparable. f hree I
i t your very own space, v I
� :rv.
At least you aren't und i
parents' roof. Advice: Wake up
and take a communal shower.
Big E welcomes am and all
letters. Send them or brine them
to: Big E
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Greenville, 27834
Dukes' quote of the week:
Pride is one terrible master
Waylon Jennings
Siouxie turns Greenville restaurant to poetry bar
Siouxie Siouv, the new owner of Siouxie's Poet-Filled Freehouse, looks on as the renova-
tions continue on a favorite Greenville hangout (Photo by just Desserts Whitmire)
SG A jellybean fracas turns into war, death
GREENVILLE, N.C (HP) �
Local restaurant Susie's Tree-
house has been pj rchased by art
rocker Siouxie Sioux and her
group, the Banshees. Alter some
renovations, the new Siouxie's
Treehouse will op -n again tor the
Greenville eating mblic.
New owner Sioux saw the
restaurant in an issue oi the ECU
newspaper, The E ast Carolinian,
and thought it would be a hip,
trendy thing to own a restaurant.
She contacted the present owner
and offered a million dollars for
the establishment.
Sioux wants to redecorate the
interior. "Black, let black. Super-
sonic jet black. Stevie Nicks's
n cara black. It mu -t move and
flow with the essence of the bleak
'80s � it must become the black-
ness of our time she said.
The existing booths will be
converted to 32 individual "medi-
tation nutrition" booths. "Hu-
GREEWILLE, NC (ED
The ECU Student Government
Association's weekly meeting
errupted into a jelly bean-throw-
ing tight Monday. Four students
were critically injured after they
were pelted with the candy.
The four legislators injured in
the crossfire were admitted to Pitt
Memorial Hospital after com-
plaining of having large lumps in
their throats. They have been
placed in intensive care as sur-
geons search for new techniques
to remove the impacted jellv
beans.
Campus leaders are still
baffled about the reasons for the
incident but stated that it was
probably related to a recent liqui-
dation sale of y. II; beansatanarea
retail store.
Monday
!b Bean War"
has silenced the claims made ear-
lier this week that the student
legislature lacked maturity and
competence. To most observers,
the legislators carried themselves
with the utmost respect and dig-
nity by veiling "Open fire" before
throwing and "Cease Fire" before
reloading with more beans.
"I commend these fine, out-
standing students as they serve
their constituents so well said
SGA Commander in Jellv Bean
Warfare LL. Bean.
Bean said the incident oc-
cured after legislator Steve Win-
ters introduced legislation to cre-
ate a treaty behind Pro-Bean and
Anti-Bean factions. Winters was
the first injured in the altercation
as an estimated ten jelly beans
were thrown into his mouth.
As Pro-Bean forces turned
over desks and rearmed their
troops, Anti-Bean sent several
warriors out on reconnaissance
mission to K-Mart to find more
jelly beans.
'The situation got kinda out
of hand Winters said from his
hospital room.
In the aftermath of Monday's
ruckus, an astounding 300,000
jelly beans were found on the
floor of the legislature. Most of the
jelly beans were squished and
therefore rendered inedible.
man interaction is a joke. We must
learn to eat in the dark blackness
that symbolizes lman commu-
nication and its futility, " Sioux
said.
The booths will also be
draped with dark tapestries to
completely hide the diners from
one another. The wait staff will be
instructed to leave the patrons
alone until they slash their wrist
"The thin flowofblood across
the floor will signal everyone that
this is a human soul that needs
that must have that spiritual and
material sustenance that we all
share. Only then will the staff take
a customer's order or call an
ambulance she explained.
The rock and roll atmosphere
that characterized the old Susie's
will be dropped in favor of a more
macabre, death rock theme. Local
muscians will no Linger be in-
vited to perform on the small
stage.
"1 have many associates -
will be willing tocomeshare U
tales of suffering and the pain that
grows within the innermost a
Members of Bauhaus, the Cure
Boy George Sioux explains
be discarded and v lumes
unpublished poetry will be avail-
able tor diversion instead. The
menu will remain virtually the
same but will N-1 renamed kh
Customers can look forward
rdering "92 BLT 'TeekV
Pizza, "Fried Mushroomsan
Dust Spellbound Spaghetti
i long Kong Garden Salad "
Si ux believes that her new
restaurant is just what the Emer-
ald C nv needs "I've never seen
such a town populated with so
many poets. Cloaked in swaths of
black and pale from the floures-
cent sun 1 come to offer them the
true Emerald City at the end of
their broken yellow brick road
Fake Pirate mascot terrifies the Emerald City
Look out world! God's on a nut-out again!
HEAVEN, The Cosmos �
Theologians and religious psv-
chologists arc agreeing God is
on a big nut-out!
The evidence Rev. Klee Toms
has gathered suggests impres-
sively that the Almightv may
have wigged out almost three
years ago and has been out of
A Notice to
Our Loyal
Readers
The Clearly Labeled East
Carolinian Satire Page is under
new, less offensive manage-
ment. No longer will readers of
this page be forced to contend
with such violently offensive
material as obese females who
write dreadful verse, homicidal
humanoid squirrels, measles
victims, goiter burgers or Rugby
players, except maybe some-
times.
control ever since'
Torus says, "Ever since the
appearance of Han Quayle on the
national political scene, I've been
convinced that He had lost His
mind. I decided to investigate
The results, he says, have
been frightening.
The plethora of mindless
syndicated sitcomsin the late '80s,
such as "Small Wonder "21
lump Street and "Out oi This
World helped lead Torus to his
startling conclusion. Other evi-
dence included the influx of
heavy metal ballads in the MTV
Countdown, the ubiquitous ap-
pearance of Flvis s ghost and the
whole Dirtv Dancing phenome-
non.
"These things were too foul to
be the work of men and too subtle
tor the work of Satan. I hat left
only God, but a c ,od who has seri-
ously lost it Torus said. "A God
who, with too much time to kill,
has finally gone off the deep end
and begun to toy with a planet
that is in deep doo-doo already
Dr. Justa Jack in agrees. A
noted psychologist with the pres-
tigious and heavily-advertised
Brynn-Marr hospital, jackin feels
that this is not the first time God
has gone "temporarily loopy, in
the cosmic sense
"Just how do you think all
those dinosaurs got here?" he
asks. "I mean, really. Those things
were the product of a deranged, if
not drugged mind. Can you imag-
ine the skyscraper-high piles of
excrement laying all over the
place?" Jackin asks. "Onlv a mad-
man could do that to a defenseless
planet
lackin points out other peri-
ods of history that are inexpli-
cable according to historical rec-
ords of the time. 'The whole
middle ages, the Spanish Inquisi-
tion, the Nixon years all these
are per feet examples of a Su preme
Being out of touch with his mental
faculties
He adds that there is no rea-
son that God won't come back to
his senses. "But of course, we're
dealing with a deity who took
seven days to create an entire
universe. Who knows how long it
might take this time?"
GREENVILLE, :TC (PP) �
Kinky's Photocopy and Ice
Cream Parlor is the latest victim in
a crime that's row becoming
more noticeable throughout the
Emerald City: tin e defacing oi
store windows bya mystery artist
who paints warped i mages of the
ECU pirate.
The crime wave began qui-
etly several months ago when the
mystery painter decorated the
front window of Malcom's
Cheeseburger Heaven on Fifth
Street. Most customers believed
Malcolm himself created the hide-
ous mural since it remained on the
window, when in fact, the
damn t'ing won't come off ac-
cording to owner Malcolm Gitz.
"I came ta work one momin
saw it and thought � what da
hell? Then I tries toipentinc, high-
octave gas, a razah blade, even
hydrocarbolic acid but nuttin'
worked! "
Similar stories have been told
by other merchants around the
city, at establishments such as
Queen Sandwich, Funky-Fresh
Way, I Don't Freaki n' Believe It's
Yogurt, and Dinktn' Do-nuts.
Shanna Katana, night-man-
ager of I Can't Freaki n' Believe It's
Yogurt, added another observa-
tion.
"Late at night when there's no
customers in the place, it it
talks! It mumbles dir ty things, like
my uncle's sailor friends used to
do � it's horrible
Though no other area em-
ployees have verified Katana's
story, many have noticed that
small children who c ome near the
Pirate image almost: always run
away from it after a minute,
screaming and crying. In addi-
tion, dogs turn ta il and run, and
the fur rises on cat's' backs.
ECU officials have made it
clear that the Pirates are not being
painted by any artists affiliated
with the school. "You'll notice
that these pirates don't look very
much like our mascot at all said
Jerry Atnc, Dean of the School o(
Image. "These pirates have tiny
little waists that could never sup-
port the girth of our manlv mas-
cot. And they wear uglv yellow
baggy pants. Everybody knows
those are out oi style
The Emerald City Police still
have no leads as to the identity of
the Mystery Artist, or what insol-
uble chemical is being used to
prevent the images removal
Time-Life books plans to do a
series on the phenomenon, due
out this summer.
The baleful face of this false Pirate mascot� has poppTdTpU
over town. Time-Life� books will be doing a series of books on
the phenomenon. (Photo by Juvenile Delinquint Whitmire)






"N.
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARYS 1969
The Clearly Labeled
la�� �giff�I132iifi�im �8i?(
Quote of the week:
"God is very very personal
� Stickboy
Nature freak searches for
'grass'
Dearest Earlvis,
Hello, I am an outdoorsy type
of girl, and I just love to run, jump
and play in the grass here at ECU.
The smell of the feeling of eupho-
ria from a lit cigarette.
Recently, I have noticed that
all around campus, particularly
the mall area, it is getting increas- ding grass: "Just Say Mow
ingly hard to find good rolling
grass. My friend, Mary Jo Wana
has noticed that there is no bud-
ding grass anywhere on campus.
Do you know where the green-
green grass went? If you do,
sweetness, please do tell.
school for your kind. Growing it
in the middle of the campus, how
absurd! Rolling around in the
leafy, THC infested drug, get out
of here!
So you catch a buzz, hide
behind your shades and think you
can pull E's leg with some crazed
story about lawn grass. Hey, we
yellow journalists aren't that gul-
lible. Your hidden drug story is
obviouslv a devious communist
plot to weaken the fine moral fi-
bers of ECU students.
All this aside, and to really
answer your question, the most
fertile grass grows in Aycock
Dorm. But before pursuing any
clandestine drug deal in some
slimy crevice of debauchery, heed
the words of our new First Lady
Barbara Bush concerning bud-
Jmsft Ask
BigE
Why are parking tickets so
expensive and where does the
money that is given to campus
security go?
Signed, Ben Towed
Dear Ben Blowed,

more � the stereos, the commu-
nal showers and the loud radia-
tors were too much for this eighth-
year senior.
So I went down to the director
of housing and said "Hey dude, 1
need to cruise this dorm stuff
car emissions. So it's raining. You
missed the bus. You have a test in
ten minutes. But as you wheel
your green Dodge Duster into the
commuter lot without a parking
wrong
extensive two-day research proj-
Dear Correction Tape, et into thematter' �Uf crack team
Wake up and read the col- of investigators looked at this
umn. Where did this egg thing J�ffling ,ssue from many angles.
come from? Yp? vnn arornrrprt in ur committee even went air
you? ra0sTumioynUathe0SS e "�� �� take this aerial photo- ?�ff-ffi
given to the last four letters was 8raPAh- ifiJSSP f a
interchanged. Reason: to test the As vou wi� � "� � ��isn,eld wlPer As vou �
reader for word retention and to Pjctureof Jones, Aycock and Scott home v�u ahze you flunked
see if the reader could coherently rrn'tories respectively. Origi- "LP-
nally in 1959, engineers planned . � one test cost you a F
Wake up and smell the patrol Unfortunately, the (deleted) (cen
sored) lady denied the
Help me E, I'm dying.
request.
Confused
Dear Big Egg,
deduce that E was Mucking With
Your Mind.
Inquirer
Dear Earlvis,
Reading the Crime Report in
Signed,
Sick of Living in the Jungle
Dear Guns and Roses,
Wake up and listen to the
music. Come on, the dorm can't
be that bad. Those Flintstone beds
are so comfortable. And the pri-
to have these three dorms spell tne c,ass and made you academi- vacy is uncomparable. Three feet
out the letters E - C - VJ. cally ineligible. You start drinking of your very own space, what a
To make this history lesson heavily and get a new acquain- luxury,
short, Ira Isabel Uberry, a tance pregnant. You get married At least you aren't under your
Greenville builder, had different and work for the rest of your lifeat
ideas. Uberrry instructed work- tne Procter and Gamble making paints roof. Advice: Wake up
n reading your column last Tuesday's issue of The Easter
rhursday, I was a bit confused Carolinian, I saw a majority of the
Signed,
Hopelessly addicted to grass
Dear Druggie,
Wake up and smell the
roaches. There is no room at this
was a
about the advice you gave to the
last four letters. Correct me if I am
wrong, clarify my situation if I am
in error, but wasn't the advice to
the letters mixed up in regards to
the proper order in which they
should have followed.
Signed, Correct me if 1 am
crime incidents occurred in
Aycock Dorm. Why do you think
this is so?
Signed, An Inquiring Mind
Dear Tabloid Reader,
Wake up and look at the pic-
ture. After conducting an
men to build Jones and Aycock in
the form of I's to Sfell out her
initials: I -1 - U.
To answer your question: if
you were a I when ycu were sup-
posed to be a C, you would do a lot
of drugs too.
Tickets
Dear Big G,
'Always
Honestly, I don't know any-
thing about parking tickets.
Contract
Hey Earl,
Hey dude, I did a stupid and
dumb thing last week, I signed a
contract to live in the dorms. After
three days, I couldn't take it any-
and take a communal shower.
Big E welcomes any and all
letters. Send them or brine them
to: BigE
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Greenville, 27834
Dukes' quote of the week:
'Pride is one terrible master
Waylon Jennings
Siouxie turns Greenville restaurant to poetry bar
GREENVILLE, N.C (BP) -
Local restaurant Susie's Tree
man interaction is a joke. We must " have man v associates who
learn to eat in the dark blackness will be willing to come share their
house has been m. rchased by art that symbolizes hman commu- tales of suffering and the pain that
rocker Siouxie S,oux and her nication and its futility, " Sioux grows Wlth,n the innermost soul.
group, the Banshe es. After some said.
renovations, the new Siouxie's The booths will also be
Treehouse will open again for the draped with dark tapestries to
Greenville eating public. completely hide the diners from
New owner Sioux saw the one another. The wait staff will be
restaurant in an issue of the ECU
instructed to leave the patrons
newspaper, The East Carolinian, alone until they slash their wrists,
and thought it would be a hip, "Thethin flow of blood across
trendy thing to own a restaurant.
She contacted the present owner
and offered a million dollars for
Members of Bauhaus, the Cure,
Boy George Sioux explains.
be discarded and volumes of
unpublished poetry will be avail-
able for diversion instead. The
menu will remain virtually the
same, but will be renamed m
Siouxie Sioux, the new owner of Siouxie's Poet-Filled Treehouse, looks on as the renova-
tions continue on a favorite Greenville hangout. (Photo by Just Desserts Whitmire)
SGA jellybean fracas turns into war, death
the establishment.
Sioux wants to redecorate the
interior. "Black. Jet black. Super-
sonic jet black. Stevie Nicks's
n. acara black. It must move and
flow with the essence! of the bleak
'80s � it must become the black-
ness of our time she said.
The existing booths will be
converted to32 individual "medi-
tation nutrition" booths. "Hu-
the floor will signal everyone that hon�r of her songs.
this is a human soul that needs Customers can look forward
that must have that spiritual and to ordering "92� BLT Teek-A-
material sustenance that we all
GREENVILLE, NC (EP) �
The ECU Student Government
Association's weekly meeting
errupted into a jelly bean-throw-
ing fight Monday. Four students
dation sale of jelly beans at an area ate a treaty behind Pro-Bean and
share. Only then will the staff take
a customer's order or call an
ambulance she explained.
The rock and roll atmosphere
that characterized the old Susie's
will be dropped in favor of a more
macabre, death rock theme. Local
muscians will no longer be in-
vited to perform on the small
stage.
Boo Pizza "Fried Mushroomsin
Dust "Spellbound Spaghetti'
and "Hong Kong Garden Salad'
Sioux believes that her new
restaurant is just what the Emer-
ald City needs. "I've never seen
such a town populated with so
many poets. Cloaked in swaths of
black and pale from the flounes-
cent sun I come to offer them Hie.
true Emerald City at the end
their broken yellow brick road
retail store.
Monday's "Jelly Bean War"
has silenced the claims made ear-
lier this week that the student
were critically injured after they legislature lacked maturity and
were pelted with the candy. competence. To most observers,
The four legislators injured in tne legislators carried themselves
the crossfire were admitted to Pitt with the utmost respect and dig-
Memorial Hospital after com- nity by yelling "Open fire" before
plaining of having large lumps in throwing and "Cease Fire" before
their throats. They have been reloading with more beans,
placed in intensive care as sur- 1 commend these fine, out-
geons search for new techniques standing students as they serve
to remove the impacted jelly their constituents so well said
beans. SCJA Commander in Jelly Bean
Campus leaders are still Warfare, L.L. Bean,
baffled about the reasons for the Bean said the incident co-
incident but stated that it was CUTed after legislator Steve Win-
probably related to a recent liqui- ters introduced legislation to cre-
Anti-Bean factions. Winters was
the first injured in the altercation
as an estimated ten jelly beans
were thrown into his mouth.
As Pro-Bean forces turned
over desks and rearmed their
troops, Anti-Bean sent several
warriors out on reconnaissance
mission to K-Mart to find more
jelly beans.
"The situation got kinda out
of hand Winters said from his
hospital room.
In the aftermath of Monday's
ruckus, an astounding 300,000
jelly beans were found on the
floor of the legislature. Most of the
jelly beans were squished and
therefore rendered inedible.
Fake Pirate mascot terrifies the Emerald City
those are out of style
GREENVILLE, IMC (PP) � painted by any artists affiliated
Kinky's Photocopy and Ice with the school. "You'll notice
Cream Parlor is the la test victim in that these pirates don't look very
a crime that's now becoming much like our mascot at all said
more noticeable t hroughout the Jerry Atric, Dean of the School of
Emerald City: the defacing of Image. "These pirates have tiny
store windows by a mystery artist little waists that could never sup-
who paints warped i mages of the port the girth of our manly mas
Look out world! God's on a nut-out again!
HEAVEN, The Cosmos � control ever since!
Theologians and religious psy- Torus says, "Ever since the
chologists are agreeing God is appearance of Dan Quayle on the
on a big nut-out J national political scene, I've been
The evidence Rev. Klee Torus convinced that He had lost His
has gathered suggests impres- mind. I decided to investigate
sively that the Almighty may The results, he says, have
have wigged out almost three been frightening.
Brynn-Marr hospital, Jackin feels
that this is not the first time God
has gone "temporarily loopy, in
the cosmic sense
"Just how do you think all
those dinosaurs got here?" he
ECU pirate.
The crime wave began qui-
etly several months ago when the
mystery painter decorated the
front window of Malcom's
Cheeseburger Heaven on Fifth
Street. Most customers believed
Malcolm himself created the hide-
ous mural since it remained on the
window, when in ifact, the
damn f ing won't come off ac-
cording to owner Malcolm Gitz.
"I came ta work one momin
saw it and thought � what da
hell? Then I tries toipjentine, high-
octave gas, a razah blade, even
hydrocarbolic acid but nuttin'
worked
Similar stories have been told
cot. And they wear ugly yellow
The Emerald City Police sfj
have no leads as to the identity i
the Mystery Artist, or what ii
uble chemical is being used $
prevent the images' removal
Time-Life books plans to do A
?
baggy pamsEveryfc&y Lows � Lnomenon, �
out this summer.
years ago and has been out of
A Notice to
Our
Readers
Loyal
The Clearly Labeled East
Carolinian Satire Page is under
new, less offensive manage-
ment. No longer will readers of
this page be forced to contend
with such violently offensive
material as obese females who
write dreadful verse, homicidal
humanoid squirrels, measles
victims, goiter burgers or Rugby
players, except maybe some-
times.
The plethora of mindless
syndicated sitcoms in the late'80s,
such as "Small Wonder "21
Jump Street and "Out of This
World helped lead Torus to his
startling conclusion. Other evi-
dence included the influx of
heavy metal ballads in the MTV
Countdown, the ubiquitous ap-
pearance of Elvis's ghost and the
whole Dirty Dancing phenome-
non.
'These things were too foul to
be the work of men and too subtle
for the work of Satan. That left
only God, but a God who has seri-
ously lost it Torus said. "A God
who, with too much time to kill,
has finally gone off the deep end
and begun to toy with a planet
that is in deep doo-doo already
Dr. Justa Jackin agrees. A
asks I mean really. Ttose things by other merchants around the
were the product ofa deranged, if dtV at establishments such as
not drugged mind. Can you imag- Queen Sandwich, Funky-Fresh
ine the skyscraper-high piles of WaV j Don't Freaki n' Believe It's
excrement laying all over the
place?" Jackin asks. "Only a mad-
man could do that to a defenseless
planet
Jackin points out other peri-
ods of history that are inexpli-
cable according to historical rec-
ords of the time. "The whole
Yogurt, and Dinkin' Do-nuts.
Shanna Katana, night-man-
ager of I Can't Freaki n' Believe It's
Yogurt, added another observa-
tion.
"Lateat night wl wn there's no
customers in the place, it it
talks! It mumbles dirty things, like
middle ages, the Spanish Inquisi- my uncle's sailor friends used to
tion, the Nixon years all these do � it's horrible
are perfect examples of a Supreme
Being out of touch with his mental
faculties
He adds that there is no rea-
son that God won't come back to
his senses. "But of course, we're
dealing with a deity who took
seven days to create an entire
noted psychologist with thepres- Y-Who knows how long it
ti�mi and hviiv-aHvJLn might take this timer
tigious and heavily-advertised
Though no other area em-
ployees have verifiied Katana's
story, many have noticed that
small children who come near the
Pirate image almost: always run
away from it after a minute,
screaming and crying. In addi-
tion, dogs turn tail and run, and
the fur nses on catts' backs.
ECU officials have made it
clear that the Pirat es are not being
The baleful face of this false Pirate mascot� has popped up ail
over town. Time-Life� books wiU be doing a series of books on
the phenomenon. (Photo by Juvenile Delinquint Whitmire)
mm�-





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"We better get out there-
they're big enough to hurt
each other -Uncle Jesse
Since we are still running the huge cattle-call for new
cartoonists, we thought we'd give everyone a brief lecture on . . .
How To Submit a New Cartoon
First, come up with an idea for a strip. Then pencil it out. Ink it if you have pens (if you don't,
you won't be able to work here anyway). Then bring it to the East Carolinian so we can laugh at
itbecause it'll be funny, right') Pont hring other pretty pictures you drew, because we don't
understand it if it ain't comics. Do draw up a few strips, so we can make sure you're not a one-hit
wonder. Now, here is an example of the type of humor we DON'T WANT
DO NOT SUBMIT SOMETHING LIKE THIS
Editor's Note: No one actually submitted anything like this, it is purely contrived.
Eye of Fire
Hv Ocleshy
STrVE APPEARED AND THEAi
PKAPPEAREP? ONLY THOMp- l p
�0V COlLP PO THAT. f
MULD ME Hm &0T7EFm
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There you have it! Now you're ready to come down here and be big-time! Remember, we like
strips that are innovative, creative, thought-out and entertaining. We won't print anything
like that, but that's what we like. And to any of you precomous snobby-types who don't bring
anything by because you think ifd be lowering yourself to work for this paper, WHO NFFDS
YA
Fun and Games by Jeff ' �ot an A in Espanol" Parker





�Mt
THE EAST CAROl INI AN
Half the signees from North Carolina
Sports
FEBRUARY 9, 1989 PAGE 14
National Signing Day profitable for new coaching staff
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Awl. Sports Fditor
A lot of people were in the
Pirate Club waiting with anxiety
anda feeling of hope. Wednesday
was National Signing Day for
high school football players and
Pirate fans were waiting to see
who first-year Head Coach Bill
Lewis would recruit. And by the
reactions of all involved it was a
good day.
Lewis and his staff received
24 committments from high
school football players from five
states. Twelve of the players are
from North Carolina, while the
other 12 are from South Carolina,
Georgia, Florida and Louisiana.
The players ECU did get
committments from passed up on
some big name colleges to play
football at East Carolina. The
Pirates beat out such schools as
South Carolina, Florida, Florida
State, LSU, Penn State, UCLA and
Michigan to get these players.
By recruiting 12 players from
in-state, Lewis stuck to his word
that he and his staff would recruit
heavily inside North Carolina.
"We feel comfortable that we
worked the state as hard as we
could for the time we had Lewis
said. "There's not a kid in the state
we didn't go after
Three of the players came
right from ECU's own backyard.
Carlestcr Crumpler, Jr Timmy
Moore and Don Thompson are all
BILL LEWIS
from Rose High School and aided
in the Rampants winning the Big
East Conference title last season.
East Carolina can sign one
more player, because NCAA
regulations say that a team can
sign 25 recruits. The Pirates are
hoping to sign Marlon Williams
from Atlanta, Ga. The 6' 3 200
pound linebacker has narrowed
his choices to ECU, Georgia Tech
and Wisconsin.
Many of the players have re-
ceived honors and awards for
their play on the field and also in
the classroom. Three of the North
Carolina players were ranked in
the top 30 recruits in the state.
Crumpler, Moore and Victor
McBryde of Red Springs were all
named to the top 30 players in the
state by the Raleigh News & Ob-
server. Crumpler and Moore
were also named Associated
Press First Team All-State.
Lewis and his staff did not
fully take shape until late Decem-
ber, so there was little time to
recruit. Lewis, however, was sat-
isfied wiih his staff's effort. "Con-
sidering the late start we had, I am
pleased with the k; s we have
coming in Lewis aid.
This year's ecruiting class
should fill sorr of the voids left
open by graduation and it also
should sure up some trouble
spots.
East Carolina lost three key
position players from their offen-
sive backfield. Reggie McKinney,
Tim James and Jarrod Moody
have graduated leaving the Pi-
rates short on running backs. So
to sure up the short supply of
runners, ECU recruited four run-
ning backs, with Moore and
McBryde being two of them.
With talk of a new offense that
would utilize the tight end as a
receiver, the Pirates needed to
recruit some tight ends. Once
again Lewis and his staff came
through recniiting two big tight
ends. Ike Pullett of Baton Rouge,
La and Rodney Jones of Fay-
etteville, will come to work at the
tight end position.
One of the most noticable
problems from last year's team
was the lack of a consistent kicker.
Joel Blackerby signed a letter of
intent which should help in the
kicking department. The Mari-
etta, Ga kicker was successful on
24 of 33 field goal attempts for his
career. He has kicked two field
goals of 48 yards and one of 49
yards in his career.
Whether these recruits will
make an instant impact on the
Pirate team has yet to be seen. But
they have brought a sigh of relief
and a new found optimism to the
pirate program.
The recruits will not arrive
until fall, so Lewis' main concern
is to work with the players who
are here. He feels that he has to
build a nucleus with these players
to be prepared for next season.
Lewis says that he will begin
recruiting for the 1990 season af-
ter a short break. "I am going to go
the staff two days off and then on
Monday we will begin recruiting
for next season Lewis said.
Now that recruiting is over,
the next step for Lewis and his
staff will be to see what he has to
work with. He will get a good feel
Pirates continue road woes
George Mason continues winning streak
By MARK BARBER
Sports Writer
(FAIRFAX,VA)�A rose is a rose
is a rose
East Carolina changed their
playing scenery Wednesday
night, but the story seemed to
remain the, sarne.JJLek.wha4 has
happened Several times this year,
the Pirates played a good first
half, only to be put away in the
first five minutes of the second
half and eventually lost the game,
this time televised, to George
Mason, 83�65.
The loss is a repeat perform-
ance for the Pirates, who continue
to struggle on the road. Senior
Blue Edwards scored his usual 20-
plus points, 27 in all, but ECU's
guards could only muster a mere
eight points combined.
Add it up and the Pirates fall
to 10�11 on the year and 4�6 in
the Colonial Athletic Association,
while George Mason, paced with
23 points from current CAA
player of the week Kenny Sand-
ers, climbs to 12�9, 7�3 with
their sixth straight win.
I f there was a bright spot to be
found in thebackcourt for ECU, it
was that Jeff Kelly set a school
career assist record during the
contest. Kelly had three assists on
the night, moving him ahead of
Curt Vandcrhorst (232) for first
place on the career list with 235
assists.
The Pirates don't get a chance
to relax and regroup as they head
into the Convocation Center in
Harrisonburg, Va. Saturday to
take on the Dukes of James Madi-
son. ECU will look to repeat last
year's invasion at JMU, when the
Pirates took a 68�65 victory over
the Dukes.
Wednesday, ECU kept the
game close throughout the first
half. The Pirates took the first lead
in the contest on a rebound lay�
in by Reed Lose. Robert Dykes
countered for the Patriots, hitting
a short bucket inside to tie the
game at two.
Edwards then showed his
stuff, hitting a 10-foot jumper off
the glass. The 4�2 lead was the
night's last for the Pirates. GMU's
Danny Deanc dished a pass inside
to Dykes, who laved in two more
of hisl6 total points, tying the
score at four.
The Patriots sooted their noxt
fou r from the outside: Steve Smi th
hit on a 15-foot jump shot and
Sanders buried an 18-footer.
Over the next eight minutes,
GMU stayed barely ahead of the
Pirates. With 7:18 in the half, the
score was 26�21, ECU held close
by seven points each from Ed-
wards and Gus Hill and three
from Kenny Murphy.
Down by five, the Pirates got
a bucket apiece from Edwards,
Hill and sophomore center
Stanley Love to close within one,
28�27.
The Patriots then went to
their bench and took the ball out-
side. Reserves Earl Moore and
Chuck Broadnax combined for
nine points in the final six min-
utes, and a lay-in by ECU's Casey
Mote with five seconds in the pe-
riod closed out the half with GMU
ahead 42�34.
Over and over this season
coach Mike Steelc has been heard
saying that in order for his Pirates
to win ballgames, they would
have to be in a position to win
with five minutes to go in the
contests.
That quote by Steele is usu-
ally heard after a loss like the one
Wednesday night.
Mason looked to Sanders at
the start of the second period, and
the senior responded to the call.
Held to only nine points in the
first half, Sanders started the Pa-
triots off in the second with eight
straight points to ECU's none.
Sanders spinning and hitting
in the paint. Sanders rebounding
and laying-in. Sanders driving
baseline. Sanders going up in traf-
fic.
See ROAD, oage 16
Women win handily on road
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sporti Editor
Grctta Savage led the Lady
Pirates in their win against Dela-
ware Slate College Wednesday
night when she tied her career
high of 26 points to give East
Carolina an 87-66 victory on the
road in Dover, Delaware.
The Lady Pirates rallied from
their defeat against Richmond
Feb. 4 to come out fighting right
from the beginning of the contest
with this non-conference foe. And
by halftime, East Carolina was up
by 15 points, 41-26.
The Ladv Pirates have won
two out of four games in a five
game stretch on the road. Their
final game will take them to
Washington D.C. to play Howard
University tonight before the'
return to Minges Coliseum.
The key element in the game
was the Lady Pirates' ability to
rebound. ECU killed the Lady
Hornets on the boards grabbing
32 defensive rebounds alone and
47 altogether while Deleware
State had 36 altogether.
Savage and Sarah Gray domi-
nated the boards for the Lady
Pirates each grabbing 11.
Deleware State's Barbara
Burges grabed 10 rebounds for
the Lady Hornets. She was also
the high scorer for Deleware State
with her 20-point contribution.
ECU shot 59 percent for the
night while Deleware State could
only muster a 38 percent accuracy
from the field.
Two other Lady Pirates
scored in the double figures be-
sides Savage. Sarah Gray scored
19 points while Pam Williams
made a modest contribution with
Senior leadership
By TOM ASHBY
Sport Writer
Pam Williams powers in for the layup against conference foe,
American University.
Leadership is gained through
experience. East Carolina's Lady
Pirate basketball team is a great
example of this. The 1988-89
squad relies on four seniors to
provide quality leadership. Rose
Miller, Chris O'Conner, Gretta
Savage, and Pam Williams have
answered the challenge.
At mid-season, the Lady Pi-
rate hoopsters are 8-7 overall with
a 3-3 mark in CAA play. If they
continue their same pace, they
will be on the road to an improved
season compared to last year's
campaign (8-20, 2-10 in CAA
play).
Much of the success can be
attributed to the strong play and
for that on March 18 when the
Pirates take the field for spring
practice. They will then don the
purple and gold April 22 for the
Annual Purple and Gold Scrim-
mage.
Here is a list of the 24 recruits:
11 points.
ECU did have trouble on the
foul line. They were a weak nine
for 16 from the free throw line
which is only 56 percent.
Deleware State's loss to East
Carolina puts the Lady Hornets
11-10 for the season. East Carolina
moved up to 10-9 in their season
tally while in the conference they
remain at 4-4.
When the Lady Pirates return
home thev will f acecompetition in
the conference again as they host
the Dukes of James Madison Sat-
urday at 7 p.m. On Monday, the
Patriots of George Mason visit
Minges as they attempt to defeat
ECU. Game time for this confron-
tation will be at 7 p.m.
positive leadership ot the seniors.
Coach Pat Pierson had comments
on each one of the seniors and
their roles on the team.
The first is Rose Miller. Pri-
marily a role player, Rose is the
team's sixth man. A 6'2" center
out of Newberry High School in
Newberry, S.C. Rose took MVP
honors for three consecutive
years during her time there.
Rose is a good rebounder
with a delicate shooting touch
inside the paint. She adds versatil-
ity by being able to play the for-
ward position in addition to cen-
ter.
Her major is Information
Processing and she hopes to attain
an MBA after graduation. She
enjoys outdoor sports in her free
time. "Rose is a coach's dream,
See SENIORS, page 15
Carlester Crumpler, Jr Outside Linebacker, 6' 6 220, Greenville
Don Thompson, Defensive Back, 5' 11 175, Greenville
Timmy Moore, Running Back, 5' 9 215, Greenville
Jeffrey Cooke, Outside Linebacker, 6' 1 215, Sanford
Greg Smith, Offensive Lineman, 6' 2 250, Chocowinitv
Derek Taylor, Linebacker, 6' 1 240, Atlanta, Ga.
Garrett Beasley, Defensive Back, 6' 1 190, Atlanta, Ga.
Ike Pullett, Tight End, 6' 4 230, Baton Rouge, La.
Darren Willis, Quarterback-Wide Receiver, 6' 0 173, Macon, Ga.
Ed Carter, Outside Linebacker, 6' 4 200, Tallahassee, Fla.
Daryl Taylor, Offensive Lineman, 6' 4 260, Favetteville
Travis Render, Defensive Back, 5' 10 180, Decatur, Ga.
David Blackwell, Offensive Lineman, 6' 3 270, Berea, S.C.
Chris Patterson, Offensive Lineman, 6' 5 240, Marietta, Ga.
Rodney Jones, Tight End, 6' 3 230, Favetteville
Thomas Coleman, Defensive Lineman, 6' 3 260, Miami, Fla.
Derrick Pasley, Running Back-Defensive Back, 6' 1 190, Durham
Levi Beck with, Quarterback-Defensive Back, 6' 3 180, Raleigh
Joel Blackerby, Placekicker-Punter, 5' 8 180, Marietta, Ga.
George Koonce, Linebacker, 6' 2 235, New Bern
Victor McBryde, Running Back, 6' 1 227, Red Springs
Cedric Van Buren, Running Back, 5' 11 185, Charleston, S.C.
Stephen Brown, Offensive Tackle, 6' 5 290, Winston-Salem
Clayton Driver, Wide Receiver, 6' 1 190, College Park, Ga.
Kenneth Crawford, Lineman, 6' 6 240, Riviera Beach, Fla.
As Reed Lose looks on, Stanley Love drives strong towards the
basket in a loss against George Mason earlier this season. ECU
could not break GMU's winning streak as it boasts six wins in
a row as a result of Wednesdays action (Photo bv ECU Photo-
lab).
Kelly: Mr. Assist
(FAIRFAX, VA.) � Jeff Kelly, the going into thecontcsi against the
senior point guard from ECU, Patriots at 232 assists for his ca-
broke the all-time careeer assist reer. He then earned three more Jo
give him 235 assists and gave
himself the edge over the former
record holder Curt Vanderhorsi.
Vandcrhorst played for East
Carolina in 1982-86 when he set
the 232 career assist record.
Kelly also ties the league in
assists with William & Marv's
Matt O'Reilly. They have 4.3 as-
sists per game.
In addition, Kelly is on the
JEFF KELLY Top 10 list in the Colonial Athletic
record for ECU in Wednesday Association for steals. He
night's game against George averages 1.5 steals per game plae-
Mason University. inghimin fourth place in the CAA
Kelly was tied with the record statistics.
Sanders honored
third straight week
Page also had 10 rebounds and
seven steals in the game. She lead
the CAA in steals, averaging three
a game, and is second in scoring
with 18.7 points per game.

Sanders, a senior forward
from Washington, D.C, wins the
award for the third straight week
In two games last week, Sanders
had 50 points and 29 rebounds,
including a 33-point, 22-rebound
game against American.
RICHMOND (AP) � Char-
lene Page of UNC-Wilmington
and George Mason's Kenny Sand-
ers were named the Colonial
Athletic Association players of
the week, the conference an-
nounced Monday.
Page, a sophomore guard
form Apex, N.C was 11 of 19
from the field and three of five
from the free-throw line for 27
points as Wilmington defeated
William & Mary 73-52 last week.






v?
it
V
:
3
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9,1989 15
Lady Pirates rely on veterans for success
Introducing
Continued from page 14
Pierson said. She is very coopera-
tive and coachable. She has pro-
vided us with a strong sixth man
and also with senior leadership.
She could be a little more physi-
cal
Her best game so far has been
a 13-point effort in a victory over
UNC-Wilmington.
Another key senior is Chris
O'Conner. A'5'9" forward,
O Conner led the Pirates in three
point goals (21) and in three-point
percentage (48). She led her
high school team to a 1984 Penn-
sylvania State Championship.
A consistent player, Chris
averaged 7.3 points per game last
year. This year, she is leading the
team in free throw percentage
with a blazing 90 percent.
Chris is an Industrial Tech
major with outside interests in
travel and reading.
Before the season, Pierson
said Chris would be a big leader as
a senior. She hasn't let the coach or
the team down. "She is showing
good leadership Pierson said.
"Chris has improved her inside
passing and her defense. We
would like her to shoot more,
especially against the zone. Her
number of turnovers has dropped
and we are glad to see this
Her top performance this
season was a 14-point game in a
win over N.C. A&T. She is second
on the team in assists with 3.1 per
game.
Gretta Savage has provided
steady play at the pivot position.
A 6'2" center, Savage played her
high schoool ball in Orangeburg,
S.C. She received all-state honors
in 1985 and was also a standout in
track, making all-conference.
Savage had a strong 10.7 ppg
last year and is not far off that
mark this season. She leads the
team in blocked shots with 15 for
the year. Her 50 percent career
field goal mark is tops among
ECU and in the conference. Her
jump-hook is her most potent
weapon and she can be unstop-
pable in the lane.
Pierson praised Savage and
her consistent play. "Gretta
started slowlv because of her in-
ternship in the fall. She missed fall
practices due to her work-study
program but she has made up the
lost time with hard work. Since
Christmas, she has come on
strong. She was seven of eight in
Monday night's game against
UNC-Charlotte
Savage also led the team in
scoring against George Mason
with a 17-point performance.
"Gretta is a strong emotional
leader and being left-handed, she
has a natural advantage Pierson
said.
Savage is a Social Work major
and her outside interests are to be
a model student and leader. "She
is an excellent student and we are
proud of the fact that she is gradu-
ation on time Pierson said.
The final senior on this
season's team is Pam Williams. A
5'8" guard, Williams is a floor
leader for Coach Pierson. After
being chosen all-conference for
Goldsboro H.S Pam came to
ECU. She is one of the team's top
shooters from the field (47 per-
cent) and from the line (74 per-
cent). She is second on the team in
steals with 21. Williams also pulls
down an impressive number of
rebounds for a guard. Although
she can play the point, Williams is
primarily a shooting guard. She
has made a good recovery from
her former knee injury last sea-
son, to play 100 percent this year.
Her 10.5 ppg is second on the
team and her leadership skills
have shone through. Coach Pier-
son commented on Pam Wil-
liams: "Pam is probably our most
consistent player. She puts out
good defensive effort and is a
good rebounder for her size. Her
passing has improved and she put
in some hard work last summer
which has paid off. I believe she is
our best shooter
Williams has led the team in
scoring twice, once in an 18-point
performance against Niagra Uni-
versity and also 16-points in a
victory over the Seahawks of
UNC-Wilmington.
A Physical Education major,
Williams enjoys Softball and read-
ing in addition to hoops.
along with
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Leonard-Hearns long awaited rematch
NEW YORK (AP) � In a dim
corner of the Roseland ballroom,
where lonely ladies with se-
quined high heels often sit, a cyni-
cal wag ventured: "Now, there's
hope for reuniting the Beatles
On the same stage after more
than seven years, stood Sugar Ray
Leonard and Thomas Hearns,
who picked a dance hall, of all
places, to sign for their June 12
rematch in Las Vegas.
"I'm still hanging around.
Tommy's still hanging around.
We figured we'd better get it on
before Father Time got both of
us the 32-vear-old Leonard said,
Hashing his smile by Steinway.
Leonard is the only fighter
ever to hold world champion-
ships in five weight classes.
Hearns had four world champi-
onships and could make it five
with Leonard's World Boxing
Council super middleweight belt,
which will be at stake at the Cae
sars Palace outdoor stadium.
Moreover, this rematch
marks the end of a long journey
lor Hearns.
Lady Pirates
host sweethearts
On Mondav, Februarv 13th,
the Lady Pirates Basketball Team
will play George Mason Univer-
sity at 7 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
At halftime, the Lady Pirate
Sweetheart Court will be pre-
sented. The court was selected by
the team and the king will also be
determined in some manner. The
nine member court should in-
clude: Stanlev Love, Chad Greer,
Jeff Blake, Charlie Libretto, Dar-
rell Pittman, Grant Lowe, Donny
Davis, Joe Bright ,and Kirk Mic-
hie. Come out, join the fun and
support Lady Pirate Basketball
Ex-tennis star
attempts suicide
MILAN, Italy (AP) � Retired
Swedish tennis star Bjorn Borg
was hospitalized Tuesday after
wallowing barbiturates in an ap-
parent suicide attempt, Italian
news agencies reported.
Borg, 32, who has been stay-
ing at the home of his Italian fian-
cee, rock singer Loredana Berte,
was reported out of danger at the
Milan Polyclinic after having had
his stomach pumped.
A hospital spokeswoman
confirmed Borg was admitted but
refused to give any details.
"From initial police investi-
gations, it appears to have been a
suicide attempt said the ANSA
new agency.
According to the agency, Ms.
Berte telephoned for an ambu-
lance at about 9 a.m. from her
Milan apartment.
The rock singer and the five-
time Wimbledon single's cham-
pion had planned to marry in
Milan on Feb. 26, but Italian news-
papers recently said the cere-
mony had been put off because
Ms. Berte's divorce from an in-
dustrialist has not yet come
through.
Borg was previously married
ttt Romanian born trnnis player
Mariana Simowsru.
"He avoided me as long as he
could the 30-year-old Hearns
said. "He can't avoid me any-
more. He must show up.
"This is the one thing that's
lingered on my mind, getting
back into the ring with Leonard
Hearns said. "Nobody else has
stayed on my mind like him. I feel
1 had the (first) fight won all the
way, and I still don't think it
should have been stopped
Leonard and Hearns origi-
nally met on Sept. 16, 1981 at
Caesars Palace. Leonard stopped
Hearns in the 14th round of a fight
that could have gone either way,
unifying the world welterweight
title
The fight marked the end oi
Leonard's active period. After the
fight, he sustained a detached
retina and retired in November,
1982. He came back with a lack-
lustre knockout of Kevin Howard
1 n 984 and didnXJigfat -fl�an
"until April 1987, when he wort his
third title, the WBC middleweight
belt, with a 12-round decision
over Marvelous Marvin Hagler.
"I've taken a lot of criticism
for not giving rematches Le-
onard said, "but I had the eye
injury, and we just went our sepa-
rate ways. Now just seemed like
the right time for the rematch
While Leonard said that he
expected to see a highly moti-
vated Hearns this time, "and that
means a dangerous Tommy
Hearns Leonard also admitted
he thinks Hearns has slipped.
Hearns last fought on Nov. 4,
scoring a 12-round decision over
James Kinchen in Las Vegas.
Three days later, Leonard won his
fourth and fifth world titles �
WBC super middleweight and
WBC light heavyweight - by stop-
ping Donny Lalonde in nine
rounds in Las Vegas.
After the Lalonde fight, Le-
onard rated his performance a
"10" and called Hearns' showing
a "2
"I'm not defending Tommy
Leonard said. "I think he's totally
shot. But Tommy's always had
distractions. With him, some-
rimes it's physical. I think he has
something to prove to vou and to
me.
Advised of Leonard's re-
marks said: "He's just as shot as I
am, maybe more shot. He's older
than I am. Look at his last fight.
He fought total nobody, and he
couldn't knock him out.
"I tried to make friends with
him Hearns said. "But he put a
lot of animosity on my mind, and
I don't feel the greatest in the
world about Rav Leonard
Leonard has a career record of
35-1 with 25 knockouts. Heams is
46-3 with 38 knockouts. The fight
will be televised to closed circuit
locations on a pay-per-view basis
to homes.
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16
THE EASTCAROl 1N1AN
FTRRUARY9, 198J
Athletic corruption analyzed
DURHAM (AD � AckiK vc problems in athletics,
edging that his organization has but they are not problems that are
only 15 field investigators to en- unique to athletics. We've done a
force rules at more than 300
schools, the NCAA's athletics
must be a top priority for the
boards who run the universities
"I'm not convinced that more
rules and more enforcement staff
will solve the problem' Richard
Schultz said Monday. "We have
to send a message abou t what our
mission is in higher education -
we really don't exist to win bas-
ketball championships and foot-
ball championships
Speaking at a panel discussion
on the topic of "Success Without
Cheating � The Collegiate Nth
letic Dilemma' sponsored b a
Duke student group. Schultz also
said corruption in college ath-
letics was not as widespread as
many people thought.
"Very few coaches cheat he
said. "It's not as bad as we think it
better job in dealing without
problems than the rest of society
has done
Panel members included Duke
basketball Coach Mike
Krzyzewski; Thomas Hearn,
president of Wake Forest Univer-
sity: Richard Rosenthal, athletic
director at Notre Dame Univer-
sity in South Bend, Ind and John
Feinstein. an author who writes
for Sports Illustrated magazine.
Feinstein said he believed an
understaffed NCAA enforcement
division meant that many viola-
tions went unchecked.
1 le cave as evidence an NCAA
investigation into allegations of
corruption at the University of
tucky w Inch has not vet been
ri sob ed.
Feinstein also said that holding
i discussion on corruption in col-
lege sports was at Duke was
ironic, and praised the
university's record of successful,
but clean, athletic programs.
"This forum shouldn't take
place at Duke he said. "This
forum should take place at the
University of Kentucky
Schultz predicted that after the
penalties and revelations of the
last 60 days, "next year you'll see
less major sanctions coming
down Among schools to receive
penalties recently were the bas-
ketball program at the University
of Kansas and the football pro-
gram at Oklahoma. An investiga-
tion of the basketball program at
Kentucky is now in progress.
Whw� you mokt pins tib goo � i�t �'�
INTRAMURAL RKCREATION
FACILITY HOURS
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM GARRETT WEIGHT ROOM
Gamecock coach's
death pinpointed
Mon.&Wed. 12:00 noon-1:30 pm
Friday 11:30 am-1:30 pm
Mon.&Tues. 4:00 pm-9:00 pm
Wed & Thurs. 3:00 pm-9:00 pm
Friday 3:00 pm- 7:00 pm
Saturday 11:00 am- 5:00 pm
Sunday 12:00 noon-5:00 pm
MEMORIAL WEIGHT ROOM
MonThurs.
I ri & Sun.
MEMORIAL
POOL
3:00 pm-9:00 pm
1:00 pm- 5:00 pm
SWIMMING
COLUMBIA, S.C.(AP) joe
Morrison's cardiologist says the
South Carolina footb 11 coach was
an ideal patient af.jr hi heart
troubles surfaced in 1985, but a
friend says he foresaw Morrison's
fatal heart attack because he re-
fused to stop smoking and work-
ing too hard.
Morrison dud of a heart at-
tack Sunday night after playing
racquetball with defensive coor
dinator foe Lee Dunn and two
ether friends.
�thleuc Director King Dixon
will coordinate the football pro-
gram until Morrison's success i
is named, although the univt rsity
"won't start steps towai
a replacement unl I
neral school spol
Debra Allen said.
There was a praj i and
moment of silence tor Morrison at
Monday night's basketball game
between Southern Mississipp
and South Carolina at Carolina
Coliseum, and the Gamecock
players wore black arm patches to
honor Morrison.
There will be a gravesite serv-
ice for Morrison on Wednesday in
Murfreesboro, Tenn where his
wife is from, and a memorial serv-
ice on T1 v in Lima, Ohio,
where Morrisc i was born and
raised, said Laine Dunbar of
Dunbar Funeral Home in Colum-
bia.
Morrison produced three ol
the Gamecocks' best seasons in
his six years as head coach, with a
best o 10-2 in 1984. He also was
plagued by seemingly continual
controversies. In the past 12
months, he served under three
different athletic directors and
had to field questions about
charges of steroid abuse by pay-
ers outlined in a Sports Illustrated
article in October.
Greenville businessman Dick
Flinn, a longtime friend of
Morrison's, said the athletic de-
partment controversies put addi-
tional stress on Morrison's heart
Flinn said while the death
shocked him, it did not surprise
him.
'The sad but true part is that
he just didn't take good care of
himself Flinn told
We're all human; all ot that
affected him he said. "I just sus-
pected that heart disease would
ne day get him
But Morrison's cardiologist,
Dr. Thomas Hearon of Provi-
dence Hospital, said Morrison
was working to lower his risk
fa tors for a heart attack-the lead-
ing an so o death in the United
Mon- Thurs.
pm
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
10:00 am- 9:00
10:00 am-7:00 pm
11:00 am-5:00 pm
12:00 noon-5:00 pm
MINGES WEIGHT ROOM
MonThurs. 3:00 pm-8:45
pm
Friday
Sunday
3:00 pm- 6:45 pm
12:00noon-5:00pm
Mon- Fri 7:00 am- 8:00 am
MonFri. 12:00 noon-1:30 pm
Mon.&Wed. 3:00pm-9:00pm
Tues.& Thurs. 3:00 pm-9:30 pm
7:30 pm-9:00 pm
Friday 3:00 pm-7:00 pm
Saturday 11:00 am-5:00 pm
Sunday 12:00 noon-5:00 pm
MINGES SWIMMING POOL
MonWed.Fri. 7:30pm-9:30pm
Tues.& Thurs. 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
Sunday 12:00 noon-5:00 pm
Buy 1 pizza, get 1 free,
uy 10 pizzas, get 10 free,
uy 15 pizzas, get J 5 free.
2-LARGE
PIZZAS
with
CHEESE &
2 TOPPINGS
$10.
T
I
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DINNER FOR
2
2 SMALL PIZZAS
with CHEESE & 2
I TOPPINGS & TWO
99
tax
(EXPIRES 21889)
I
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$7.
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BUY ONE PIZZA, GET ONE FREE
Call or Come by these Locations:
GREENVILLE
E. 10th Street at Greenville Blvd.
(next to Food Lion)
757-1212
323 Arlington Blvd.
756-7256
(across from Farm Fresh)
KINSTON
1203 W. Vernon Ave.
(New Fairlield Square)
523-9120
th(
Greenville Piedmont.
Morrison kept smoking and
working too hard after his coro-
nary artery disease was diag-
nosed, Flinn said.
Pirates lose
on the road
Continued from page 14
Sanders wen, on to score 14
points in the period, and coupled
with the inside play of Dykes and
the outside work of Smith, the Pa- ,
triots were ahead 83�63 with a
minute to go.
Love hit one last bucket for
the Pirates for the final 83�65
score.
Edwards' 27 points led all
scorers. Hill scored 14, and Love
had 12 for the Pirates. The Patriots
were led by Sanders and Dykes
and Smith added 15.
The Pirates have two more
road games, James Madison and
Campbell University, before re-
turning home against CAA sec-
ond�place American University
Feb. 18.
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m ki �
TRAIN YOUR WAY
TO SPRING BREAK
Sure, you and your buddies can road trip down
to Spring Break. Spend bunches of money on
gas. Hope the car doesn't break down. And try to
avoid getting busted in some speed trap. Sounds
like about as much fun as finals, right?
Wouldn't you rather
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most easily. (Like your nose, disco. What'd you think we meant?)
Don't risk the social opportunity of your lifetime by dialing extra-
crispy on the Tan-O-Meter. Remember, life's a beach and then
you fry. Take it Lite.
OLI
3ffl
tfjr
SPftlNGTRAAitNG BEGINS NOlOf
THfcRfc ARB THR.ee AJOR THIN6S 0 N66DT0
KNOUT0SVARMW6
I. P-ULL VAOU66 BBAT5PUXSH
2.Va)H6M IM POIABT.CHOOSB D-
3.0RIWKIN6 fcNDO&lVINeDOMTMlX.
If vou're road-tripp.ng to Spring Break, don't drink 'til you get there And rotate
n c" s Sw h o every two hours And buckle up Its more comfortable Sitting
fnSe caf When you hil town, start slowly Eat early and often Try something
2 hou gre as tor a change Dnnk responsibly l.aintarace Pace yourself ,n
the sun Avoid operating heavy machinery Knock before entering And bring
your raincoat
jprinobreak'a?





THE ULTIMATE PAETY
Not all the party action is going to be happening
on the beach. In fact, this year the ultimate fun
is on the water, Miller style. See, Miller is launch-
ing exclusive floating pleasure palaces just for
you hip Miller-maniacs.
There!ll be great chow, Miller Lite and Miller
Genuine Draft, celebrities and plenty of beachin1
music to keep you
rockin' aboard a
illJSciiuA'i N'Tiuj
1C-i
a 400 year-old
pirate ship, de-
pending on
where you
party.
lb get your invita-
tion to the Ulti-
mate Party, read
the stuff below
where it says
"Here's the
Secret It tells
you everything you need to know. And even if
you haven't passed a test recently, you should be
able to figure it out.
The Ultimate Parties aboard the Yacht will be
happening in Daytona Beach the weeks of March
13th and the 20th.
The Ultimate Parties aboard the lusty pirate ship,
hosted by the Texas Special Olympics, will be
happening in South Padre island the week of
March 13th.
So get ready to do it on the water, Miller style.
0"
k.
VKl
rte�!
H6R6 AR&
SUR�-FlRe
TO S GftM
Follow thse tips and
TUM SPRING 66AK
vjOU� OWJJ PERSONAL
LOfFefcTOAPPL
SOMfeUOGfC A(MWH�f?fc
sweu lbt yqvA.
.U)6Aft A FAVC6WST
TO 6CT S4tf PATHy.
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OUGUMUST PILING A
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SORRM. BlT�B6 KIMD TO ftWVAlS W66K"
w WAS tfeST NONTAX 2
&rapiagon a cu�ve
INTERIOR
DfcSI6fW0l
Decorating made easy! These
swell posters make an eye-
catching addition to your
naked walls and a handy reminder to stock plenty of
your favorite beverages: Miller Lite and Miller Genuine
Draft But they go fast. Ask for 'em at the Milter Spring
Break Oasis. Then study a whole new set of figures.
9
'flu
"f Draft
3. ACT ROMANTIC. VSfc
siMpufcLwesuKe
L8f S U)ALK ALONG Trie
BfcACH AT6V)tf 58T AAlD
SUCK D0U)rt S0M6
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4- Pl A CANOLftUGHT
�PN6R:�COL,0 MLlfcR
(bEUlMNt DRAFT EeR
ank3 oolenJ oysTeRs
secRer
Just sf
Dayto
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�P by (he Milt.r n , ,
m
spots
asl Or ifth , � '9n UP while
SnQeaM!lrPartvPatrol
could be eligible S hand' you
(,on to the Ultimate P'VeaninVifa
W.ltff


0� rvoroora-e-u,






DO IT ON THE BEACH
PARty OA) TH6 BEACH
WITH mllbr
If you thought an oasis was a place to water your cfamels,
think again. Cuz' theMUler Spring Break Oasis is
a place to chill out and have some fun.
Here's some of the great stuff you can do at the Oasis
� Beat the heat and recharge your batteries before
another party assault.
� Get your pic's taken with some Miller Celebrities. V
You never know who's going to show up.
� Hang ten on the exclusive "Surf Simulator
This you've gotta check out. The
"surf simulator" lets you feel �
like you're actually ridin' the
wild surf, shootin'the curl
and really going for it.
Gnarly, dude.
� Call home absolutely free.
That's right we said
free. So you can tell
'em you're still alive, a
eating right, having A
a great time and
please send money.
� Check out previewsof
some hot new flicks in
r
.
the Miller mini movie
theater.
� And we've saved the best .
for last. In Daytona Beach, )
you can get totally righteous
Miller Spring Break gear just
by bringing in aluminum cans or v
UPC codes from Miller products. (Hey,
if you dont know what a UPC code is,
ask your friendly retailer.) And in South
Padre Island, exchange your empties to
get the gear. Cool stuff free! What a deal.
The Miller Spring Break Oasis will be open during
Spring Break 7 days a week from 10 am to 4 pm.
Be sure to check it out!
How long can you mash
with the Dude or Dude-
ette of your choice? Bud
out in mis mega-kissing
You'H be judged
on things like lip move-
ment, passion-action and
the oW "degree of diffi-
culty" trick. Just imagine

I
rVV4ST6RU
First, you gotta look for the humun-
gous case of Miller Lite next to the
Miller Oasis. That's key! Then you lis-
ten to the radio for all kinds of clues
on what's inside the case. If you guess
right, it's yours.
inn.
MLl�R C&IWlAte DRAFT V0AAIT5 TO
KN0OR.U.TH&
&G66ST MOUTH
ON THE BeAGh? f
&d DUD6.
U)HeR6'S
TH�
9ARTJ3?

Ever wanna be a DJ? Here's your
chance. You'll get 5 minutes to rap n'
rook your brains out while being judged
by one tough crowd your friends. Win-
ners will get to emcee a special Spring
: Break event.
For more details on the fun, check out
the Miller Oasis. These promotions will
be conducted in markets where legal.
'Z
y WLLER. UTE
sJfSJ J
JJ7JV
Llfi
Lite
Here's a game that lets you get up
close and personal wNh the hot-
test beschin' bod of your choice.
And H that Isn't enough, you can
win MiHer Lite prizes too. Justtook
for the super-sized bofUe caps oft
the beach. The game host ��&
you what body parts to put on which
bottle caps. TheVesutt? A twisted,
tangled mound of flesh n way Wg
fun.





PUT YOUR FINGER
ON THE PULSE
You can't be hip if you don't know what's hot and
what's not. Let Mr. Hip fill ya'in
HOTNOT
Miller LiteWimpy Imports
MetalLight Rock
Jimmy'zSpeedo's
Stand-upSitcoms
Skateboards3-speeds
Brush cutsTails
Canvas ChucksAir anything
4-Wheel DrivesATV's
Any food you can nukeDorm food
Three StoogesThree Amigos
New ZealandHawaii
Freddy KruegerJason
Brady BunchLeave It to Beaver
HO's70's
PokerPictionaryTrivial
Pursuit
Doin' the ShagAny other dance
Faded, ripped jeansAcid washed jeans
16" softball12" soft ball
Beach VolleyballAerobics
Saturday morningSleeping in (if you're
cartoonsalone)
Lost in SpaceStar Trek
Barney FifeRobocop
Safe SexNo Sex
CD'sLP's
Frozen YogurtIce Cream
Pez CandyGum
Yo-Yo'sHacky Sack
ModerationOver Indulgence
WalleybaURacquet ball
KnuckleheadDufus
MuttsPit Hulls
Miller Genuine DraftWimpy Imports
Spring BreakGoing Home
�WfM
MHkvWsSfaxf �
� rOOU) S40U KMOl0 1
IvOHPOTS HOT SOLeT'5
HirTH�BeACW( WhJ
AVM
60O(N)TH�B6CH
ii

� e
.��
��
Shag has �� gtace the 50 a. u lhe
a ion time dancing, � w net
�" a .or the Sha� w ; �
The ��� f"� need some�' . ,
Aretha . ii.ns and sonM �m dalM�
eaeles.Thenrt
and the MiraO e oU j tU r
W'�Sftourwith hatcom-
plenty lni get the hanK

voo am- open M9 eyes.
A.26 AM- I 5T UP.
Y2.fcAM- I FALL &ACA ASLfcEP.
: AM- CRAWL 0LTTA 660-
CV.5S AM- STAND UP.
10.00 AM-CHOl � COLD PllZA
HALF A &URRIT0, AND JAlApeAJO
powo chips.
IO.30A-HePvD FOfc TH6 eeftcw.
10 35 AM TD1:00 PM- MILL�R. Lire
PAftTJ3 � SCAM 6AB6S.
r.00 PM- HEAD TO THE MJLL6R.
OASIS-DUMP OFF EMPTieS:
G6T CUBA A) CLOWES.
SCAM BAfteS.
UObPOTOTOOPM-
MlLLtR G6I06MN6
ORAFT. PAKTJ3
scam babes. :
T.OOPMCHOU) tN
C0U PlZXA.HAlPABtRRITOAMO
JALAPfcffO pflrmo CHIPS. �
T. 10 PM TO SVAJftlS6CAttAfS6
THE. BAAS LOTS OF WU.�t
UT6 AMD .(�LL6R G6KJUIM&
DRAFT B6ER .� PARTij. .
SCAM &A&6S.
SuAJR1S6T0 v.oo A-
CRASH! �





MILLER GENUINE DRAFT
BAND NETWORK
1
L j
Jtk
All

&S&
jim PRO 66ACH VOLLWBALt
live rock. And rhythm & blues, reggae,
co, roots rock and any other totally right-
eous music you can think of. The Miller Genuine
Draft Band Network helps keep it all alive by
bringing you a lineup of some of the hottest club
acts in the country.
From Memphis to Motown and Boston to Austin
over 4,000 concerts a year.
Over the past eight years, the Band Netwo
has given over 70 acts-like the Fabulous
Thunderbirds, the Del Fuegos and the
Rainmakers-il ind of support
needed to breaapto the big time.
Go ahead. Catch the big beat of the
Miller Genuine Draft Band Networ
iny
HOW TO IMPROVE
youfc Love UF6 eerw) e&M isr
QU AMD CLOSING.

5
CASUAU8 ASKSOMeor)6P0RTHS,
VA)li)fJr)6 NW1&6RS IA1 THfc LOTTfcR.
THtM COOL K&MAfcsKxx OH Mtf GOD
SVAUOU) U6RCAR.KEMS.
quickly town) to you ChAfOCeS
fORTueH6SWA.
GRA6 VA6R.HAA10 ,5HvAT0aR 6365
aE&LTieVTAMDReP6ATT0
50UR5e,LF: V6LL6 ncPHERSOlO
�ll� MacPHBRSOA),
TH6 REALW GGTPAID F0RTHIS
Name something you can dink, bump and poke Hint-
it's not a Babe.

It's a volleyball
Babes aren't the only action on the beach there's
also Miller Lite Pro Beach Volleyball. Miller Lite has
been involved in the sport since 1981 and this year
they're sponsoring 20 tournaments with over $1.5
million in prize money. If you haven't seen it, you gotta
check out the action. It's fast, furious and frazzlin' with
two-man teams competing in the sand on the same
size courts as regulation 6-man indoor games. Each
player has gotta be a pro at spiking, serving, setting,
blocking and digging. There are no specialists here.
And all you'll need to enjoy the hottest game in the
country is a cooler of Miller Lite and a couple of
beach chairs.
See the 1989 schedule below for dates and locations
of the Miller Lite Pro Beach Volleyball tournaments
nearest you. All dates subject to change.
SCHEDULE
&
v N
Y-
March 18-19
March 25-26
April 8-9
April 15-16
April 22-23
April 29-30
May 6-7
May 13-14
May 27-28
June 3-4
June 10-11
June 24-25
Jyly 8-9
July 15-16
July 22-23
July 29-30
August 5-6
August 12-13
August 19-20
August 26-27
Ft Myers. FL
St Petersburg. FL
Phoenix, AZ
Tucson, AZ'
New Orleans. LA
Houston, TX
Dallas. TX
San Jose. CA
Venice Beach. CA
Santa Cruz, CA
Honolulu. HI
Santa Barbara. CA
Newport, Rl
Rochester. NY
Milwaukee. Wl
Cleveland, OH
Chicago. IL
Seal Beach, CA
Seattle. WA
Hermosa Beach. CA
PS To impress the Babes with your knowledge, toss
around this Seach Volleyball lingo. . skyball, roof and
"singe the pits


HERE'S HOW TO 66T COOL STUFF FR66


Present the Breaker Saver Card (yeah, just like the one you see
here) at the Miller Oasis in Daytona Beach or at the Texas Special
OlympicsMiller Welcome Center in South Padre Island, and
you'll get some really cool Miller stuff. Pick up your Breaker
Saver Card at a Sales Station on campus, in Daytona Beach or
South Padre Island, or just by calling 1-800-344-6883.
You can also get great Miller gear by redeeming aluminum cans or
UPC codes from Miller products. In South Padre Island juatthe
cans w.ll get you stuff And ,n North Myrtle Beach and Key West,
head to the Miller Redemption Center with your cans and UPC
codes to get your righteous Miller gear How can ya beat that?






HOT STARS, COOL MOVIES
Swayie?
� Ladies, now that you've stopped
hats the second tiling?) Well, �Ma J�
"Road Horn
i an expert in
�s also a "coolers-one mean booncer who keeps
mi from getting outla control in the nightclubs ai
And wWi Swayie, yon know when he's not"
hhm pbrealdn'heaits.L�okfiirMIUera
and Miller Ute featured throughout the m
that's not att. Youll be seeing Miller Genuine I
Miller Lite-plus some ofyour favorite stars-
o other flicks this sun
in Belushi and Mel Harris star in "K-�r an action
comedy from Universal Pictures. Belushi is San Diego
Narcotics Detective Thomas Dooley, who says "No to
Drugs" in a major way. Unfortunately, his crazed style
means no one on the force will work with him no one
except Jerry Lee, a police dog with a nose for drugs and
adventure. When this team goes into action, they start
ittin' big time heat on the local nasties,
levy Chase hi back as LM. Fletcher in "FletchLiv
Chevy brings back the unpredictable and resource!
newspaper jon rnalist and Investigative reporter
I. M. Fletcherthe master blaster of multiple
g�i�e. In "FletchLivesrFletch inherits his
aunt's pla Beii Isle. But instead of
�adise, Hi Ih isle turns out to b
i, overgrown total mess. Not
tetevanfeBst Jimmy Lee Farnsw
ants the pUutatkm for his "BibleUn
And that where the plot
1 the fu n begi n s.
Siskel&Ebert
its at the
�btona Beac
epopcorn
College prepares you tor the busi ness ord honest1 Here
are four skills you've already mas terecl tnat can pay off way big
1 Doodling. Those mindless
. margin drawings you do
during boring lectures will help
make everyone think you're
taking notes and being a real
achiever in boring business
meetings.
2 Huge, rambling term papers.
. Bigger is better in business.
Nothing impresses the boss
better than a 10 lb. report that no
one will ever read, much less
understand.
3 Incomprehensible essay
. answers.Of course youdidn't
study, but your essay answer
shows you can at least BS And
that is the most important skill in
the business world.
4 Cramming. In college, you
. have to cram because your
week is filled with important
things like partying. In business,
you have to cram because your
week is filled with important
things like discussing
televised
sporting
events
0 M6V6R T�UST WVM GC!3 ��JHO USES
AN 0?6NIN6 UM6 UKETHA7'5 A
GREATUOOKirvte 6M"rtirV6 Suit, &vrr
VD LOOKSenrjROrt tt3
IOTtL ROOM FLOOR"
�AVOID 0ATIM& A GUVi UHOSE
GOAL INUFeiSTO&efcN
GUMS IMPERSONATOR
� AV0D DATING A Gtf UJHO$e
GOT A POST6R OF HS MOTHER
1AJWS DORMfcOOM,
�SCREtTHE BOJJFREtODS. A
PEFIAITE R6P MG IS UM�rJ
THEd SAFE'S T &6e7MTH�
SAME SlMCETHE ACUOEVT
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plusIG, check our feet, fivk�RSl
AfUt AJ0S8.1V4E B'66ER -ME ftR.
�30U ESTATE. STAOUT
OF THE UJTT6R F0 AT S1 cl
AA) HOUR OR VJ0U'U.GET CRAMPS-
�xusreN TO
the Mce poucemaa;
�COAtEOtT OFTH8lAiAT6R.
Your ups are tu(uoia6 purple mVr Fawners
XS&S ,S lV0 tf WUIU6A COUfcR-UP.
1 5)6eTT6R PtATA

�"you'Re wor&o�M6io
TH6fteflC0ReSS60 '
UK6THAT. .ARfcBOU?
flSrt DOVM) AtfD R6ST.
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sweAry
:1
SVMRTOM. i30U'R6
661T� N& R.BO "
(STOOW'T TALK TO
STRA�VG�RS"





STARS.
What's the first thing that comes to mind when you
think of Patrick Swayze?
(OK Ladies, now that you've stopped breathing hard,
what's the second thing?) Well, this June, you'll be think-
ing about his new movie Road Houser Swayze stars
as Dalton, a drifter who's an expert iifMartial Arts.
He's also a "coolerone mean bouncer who keeps the
action from getting outta control in the nightclubs and
bars. And with Swayze, you know when he's not bustin'
heads, hell be breakm' hearts. Look for Miller Genuine
Draft and Miller Lite featured throughout the movie.
But that's not all. You'll be seeing Miller Genuine Draft
and Miller Lite-plus some of your favorite stars-in
two other flicks this summer.
Jim Belushi and Mel Harris star in " K 97 an action-
comedy from Universal Pictures. Belushi is San Diego
Narcotics Detective Thomas Dooley, who says ttNo to
Drugs" in a major way. Unfortunately, his crazed style
means no one on the force will work with him no one
except Jerry Lee, a police dog with a nose for drugs and
adventure. When this team goes into action, they start
putt in' big time heat on the local nasties.
Chevy Chase is back as I.M. Fletcher in "Fletch Livesr
Chevy brings back the unpredictable and resourceful
newspaper journalist and investigative reporter
I. HM?letcher the master blaster of multiple dis-
guises. In "Fletch Livesr Fletch inherits his
aunt's plantation, Belle Isle. But instead of .
Southern paradise, Belle Isle turns out to be a J
run-down, overgrown total mess. Not onl"
that, televangelist Jimmy Lee Farnswoii
wants the plantation for his uBiblelanr
empire. And that's where the plot
thickens and the fun begins.
Get your chance to play Siskel & Ebert
and preview these sure-fire hits at the
Miller Spring Break Oasis in Daytona Beach.
What a great deal. You bring the popcorn
and you don't even have to worry about
your feet sticking to the floor.
HOVO TO u!e WHAT pU LfcAgA)
� INJ C0LLB66 TQwfiXE &AG
WGtfe IO THE PRWAT6 Se�TO?!
College prepares you for the busi ness wortd honest! Here
are four skills you've already mas terecj that q�n pay off way big
1 Doodling. Those mindless - - � tu�-
. margin drawings you do
uring boring lectures will help
lake everyone think you're
taking notes and being a real
achiever in boring business
meetings.
2Hugewambling term papers.
. Bigger is better in business.
Nothing impresses the boss
better than a 10 lb. report that no
one will ever read, much less
understand.
3 Incomprehensible essay
� answers. Of course you didn't
study, but your essay answer
shows you can at least BS. And
that is the most important skill in
the business world.
4 Cramming. In college, you
� have to cram because your
week is filled with important
things like partying. In business,
you have to cram because your
week is filled with important
things like discussing
televised
sporting
events.
'D
. r
rj
"a
.
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9TfRM�A





-NOTIZED
Aii


A. Lite T-shirt,
Neon print
100 cotton
L414615, XL 414616
B. MGD T-shirt,
Neon print
, 100 cotton
.L 414617, XL 414618
C. Lite6unglasses,
Mirrored lenses
414621
D. MGD Sunglasses,
Mirrored lenses
414622
E. Lite Croakies,
414623
F. M3D Croakies,
414624
G. Lrte Beach Towel,
100 cotton
414625
H. MGD Beach Towel,
100 cotton
414626
I. Lite 12-pack cooler,
Soft elided
414627
J. MGD 12-pack cooler,
Soft sided
414628
K. Lite Long Sleeve Shirt,
100 cotton .
M 414629, L 414630, XL 414631
L. MGD Long Sleeve Shirt,
100 cotton
M 414632, L 414633, XL 414634
BARGAINS
GM-0R6
OFFICIAL ORDER FOfctt
SeWD FO '60 NOlO LOok COO. FOR SPWM3!
Merchandise Order Form PC-60
Kern
414615
414616
414617
414618
414621
Hem
Miller Lrte T-shirt
Miller Lite T-shirt
Miller Genuine Draft T-shirt
Size
XL
Miller Genuine Draft T-shirt
414622
414623
414624
414625
414626
414627
Miller Lite Sunglasses
Miller Genuine Draft Sunglasses
Miller Lite Croakies Visor
Cost
3.97
3.97
3.97
XL
3.97
at
2.35
2.35
2.90
Miller Genuine Draft Croakies Visor
Miller Lite Beach Towel
Miller Genuine Draft Beach Towel
414628
414629
414630
414631
414632
414633
414634
Miller Lite 12-pack Cooler
Miller Genuine Draft 12-pack Cooler
Miller Lite Long Sleeve Cotton Sheeting Shirt
Miller Lite Long Sleeve Cotton Sheeting Shirt
Miller Lite Long Sleeve Cotton Sheeting Shirt
2.80
9.50
Total Cost
9.50
7.25
Miller Genuine Draft Long Sleeve Cotton Sheeting Shirt
Miller Genuine Draft Long Sleeve Cotton Sheeting Shirt
Miller Genuine Draft Long Sleeve Cotton Sheeting Shirt
XL
7.25
10.90
10.90
10.90
10.90
XL
10.90
10.90
(Prices include freht and handling) Please add applicable state and local taxes
Please Print Clearly
name
permanent home address
city
state
ZIP
school address
state ZIP
Indicate where you would like your merchandise sent
D home school
Send check or money order to:
USCO Services Spring Break '89
PO Box 619325
DallasFt. Worth Airport, TX 75621
Or call: 1-800-527-2452. In Texas, call
(214)436-8128
e Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery.
e Otter good while supplies last or until
June 15,1989.
e Void where prohibited by law.
�Orders received after April 15,1989 will
be sent to permanent home address.
Total Amount
Tax
GRAND TOTAL
signature
phone
DVisa
USCO 1058189
C 1989 BEER BREWED BY THE
j MasterCard D Check or Money Order
Exp Date��
MILLER BREWING COMPANY. MILWAUKEE. Wl 90-81037EH
and trie stcw wues amours FRfec!
'Get real Moon Calf you
know you guys aren't allowed to have sharp objects'





ANATOMY OF
A BEACH MONSTER
DUAL BEERS.
Twice the. fun;
.&
THe RIGHT WM
&0WUN6 BALL
aicePS.
FLEX-O-M ATI C
I ROM Pipe
FOREARMS '
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 9, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 09, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.655
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58123
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
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