The East Carolinian, February 7, 1989






Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES 8
SPORTS10
Features
After three years, fraternity builds house.
Check out page 8.
Sports
The Spiders of Richmond spin
referee web on Pirates
Read about the action on page 10.
aUte i�ust (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 48
Tuesday February 7,1989
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Coastal ecosystems are in trouble, say professors
By DAVID HFRRING
sstMant Nev�s Idttor
By the year 2000,75 percent of
all people in the US. will live
within 50 miles of the coast, ac-
cording to Dr. Donald W.Stanley
of Inter-Coastal Marine Re-
sources (ICMR).
Increasing man's interaction
with coastal ecosystems could
cause more problems. In an at-
tempt to better understand our
coastal ecology, the ECU depart-
ment of biologv and ICMR, a re-
search arm of the Division of
Academic Affairs, are studying
various aspects of North
Carolina's coastal and marine
testuanne) resources.
Some faculty members share
joint appointments between the
biologv department and ICMR,
enabling them to conduct re-
search, sometimes on as many as
five projects at once, and teach.
According to Dr. Robert R. Chris-
tian, biologv dept the projects
give ECU students the best of two
worlds.
'The people (professors) we
have in biology and ICMR have
excellent reputations and are re-
nowned in their fields he said.
"Thev are well-respected re-
searchers having the special na-
ture oi being current in their fields
and thev can pass that on to stu-
dents
"Inestuarine ecology neither
NC. State nor Duke has the repu-
tation ECU has Christian con-
tinued. "Here we are usually re-
quired to teach at least three of
tour courses. At Duke you
wouldn't think of their star re-
searchers teaching undergradu-
ate students, but at ECU that's
part of the game. We must teach
them - and often
"ECU has, as a group, proba-
bly the best concentration of ex- off. and they are an important human sewage into streams and Since this bad algae is not
pertisconestuarineccosystemsof landscape in tcrmsof maintaining rivers. "In ecology we don't have consumed, when it dies it collect!
anywhere in North Carolina land against rises in sea level and good long term records for most on the surface forming a scum
agreed Dr. Mark M. Brinson, biol- hurricane flood waters. His as- variables so we have to make esti- which man' PcoPj. d(n lke l�
Ogy dept. "Our work is usually sessment will provide informa- mates based on indirect evi- skl or swim in. This aesthetac
some response to an ecology tion to the NC. state government dence noted Stanley, "but over pollution has occurred on oc
problem and our funding sources for long term protection strategics the past 50 years I'd estimate that
determine the nature of our re- for our wetlands. these nutrients have increased in
search projects Dr. Stanley is currently our estuaries by about three
"Our geographical location studying the pollution problems times
in our estuaries caused by an over The increase causes marine
abundance of high plant growth plants, such as algae, to grow
nutrients. Over the past 50 years faster, but algae is short-lived and
makes it easier for us to do field
work he added. Currently Dr.
Brinson is working on an assess-
ment of N.Cs fringe wetlands
and their relation to other geo-
graphical features to determine
how the development of these
areas may be better managed.
According to Brinson, N.C.
wetlands serve three basic func-
tions in our coastal ecosystem:
they are an important link in the
food chain for the fish population,
thev act as nutrient buffers and
help protect estuaries from run-
the use of nitrogen fertilization
has increased by approximately
seven times.
The fertilization allows more
crops to grow, but only a small
percentage of this fertilizer actu-
ally goes into plants. Most ends
up in streams and rivers which
channel this excess fertilizer into
the coastal estuaries.
Also, human sewage is a rich
source of these same high plant
growth nutrients and we dump
that which is not eaten bv fish is
J
left to die and rot. The decomposi
sion in the Neusc and Chowan
rivers.
"Our job is to understand
how much of these nutrients our
estuaries can withstand before the
limit is reached said Stanley,
"and we're a long way from arriv-
ing at a solution we're confident
in. We have the technology to
tion process of these plants'uses remove up to 95 percent of the
sometimes so much nutrients from the sewage, but at
up oxygen
so that fish in the area acually
suffocate.
These nutrients also cause
some types of algae to grow which
fish won't eat. This "bad" algae
becomes abundant, crowding out
the "good" algae and fish starve
from a lack of food.
a great cost. Scientists don't make
political decisions, all we can do is
present our findings
Another estuarine study is
being conducted by Dr. Roger A
Rulifson, biologyICMR, on the
declining population of striped
bass. According to R�:lifson,
See ROANOKE, page 3
SGA change legislative laws
By LORI MARTIN
Stiff Writer
Speaker of the Legislature, Marty Helms, answers a query to the chair during Monday's SGA
eeting. A bill was passed in the weekly meeting to amend legislative by laws. (Photolab)
New admission standards may be sought by
administration as number of applications soar
ECU News Bureau
With applications for admis-
sion reaching a record high, ECU
officials expect new procedures to
enable them to be more selective
of next year's student pool.
Dr.Richard Eakin, ECU chan-
cellor, told the Faculty Senate this
week that "a new process for re-
viewing applications should re-
sult in higher average test scores
and high school grade point
averages this year
Eugene Owens, acting direc-
tor of admissions, said the new-
procedures for reviewing appli-
cations "enables us to be more
selective" of the students ac-
cepted for admission. He said the
actual number of new students to
be admitted next fall has yet to be
determined.
As of Jan. 26, 7,325 applica-
tions had been received for un-
dergraduate admission to the fall,
1989, semester. This is 700, or 10.6
percent, greater then the 6,624
applications for fall, 1988, which
had been received at the same
time last year.
For last fall semester, ECU
student enrollment was a record
15,583.
Cutoffs for both in-state and
out-of-state applications were im-
posed earlier than usual last win-
ter because of the large numbers.
Under the new procedures,
applicants who applied for un-
dergraduate admission by Dec. 15
were screened and are being noti-
fied this week whether they have
been accepted, Owens said.
Prospective students who
applied by Feb. 1 will be notified
by M.irch 15. Owens said applica-
tion for out-of-state students re-
ceived by Dec. 31 will be re-
viewed and the applicants noti-
fied by March 15.
"We've received a record
number of applications Owens
said. 'The process is working
according to schedule. But we're'
not sure yet how many will be
admitted
The Student Government
Association amended legislative
procedures, heard grievances
from a disgruntled legislator and
approved funding for the
Panhellenic Council in Monday's
weekly meeting.
The SGA changed its time
limitation oi debate used during
their meetings.
The legislature approved a
time of 10 minutes for affirmative
debate or the time allowed for
legislators to argue for a certain
resolution or bill. The new proce-
dure also allows 10 minutes for
negative debate or the time al-
lowed to argue against a resolu-
tion or bill.
Speeches will be limited in
. . � i .lance to time remaining in
the round of debate. Prior to this
legislation, the SGA was limited
to five minutes per round of de-
bate as stated in the SGA Docu-
ments.
But Speaker of the Legislature
Marty Helms, who authored the
legislation, said the SGA has been
following the 10 minute proce-
dure for as long as he has been in
the government. Since the gov-
ernment has been using the for-
mat for some time, Helms thought
it was time the amendment was
added to the Documents.
In the first order of business,
Legislator Valeria Lassitcr ad-
dressed the legislature with the
charge that two members of the
SGA were guilty of misconduct
during the Feb. 30 meeting.
"I, a black student legislator,
was a victim of misconduct by
other legislators Lassiter said.
"As I was performing my duties, a
black jelly bean hit my back. I
picked the jelly bean up and in-
quired to the legislator sitting
directly behind me to whom did
the item belong According to
Lassiter, the improper conduct
continued.
Lassiter suggested the legis-
lature review the conduct of the
SGA and remove the two mem-
bers involved in the incident from
the governing body. "These legis-
lators should not be permitted to
hold any position in the SGA
Lassitcr said.
One of the accused legisla-
tors, who would rather remain
anonymous, said the incident was
a misunderstanding. He intends
to offer a private apology to Las-
siter as well as an apology to the
SGA in next Monday's meeting.
'This is all blown out of pro-
portion. It was purely an accident.
We were eating jelly beans and
one of the jelly beans fell off the
table and hit her in the leg he
said.
'This was a miscommunica-
rion Helms said. "An apology
will bfcaade and I assume it will
be accepted. There were no racial
intentions
In other business, the SGA
appropriated $1500 to the
Panhellenic Council to help fund
the publication of booklets for the
sorority rush. The total cost to
publish the booklets will be $2500.
According to a representative
from the Panhellenic Council, the
booklets will be sent to all female
freshmen announcing that rush
will take place one week before
classes begin in the fall. This will
avoid confusion during the first
week of classes when rush is usu-
ally held.
Legislator Mike Hadlev said
he is not against the funding but
the organization should have
requested the money in its annual
appropriation. He suggested all
organizations take this into con-
sideration when planning their
budgets in the future.
A meeting will be held on Feb.
17 from 2-5 p.m. for all campus
organizations to work on their
annual budgets. The purpose of
the meeting is to explain proce-
dures and issue forms for making
appropriation requests for 1989-
90.
Death of pledges cause escalation
in fraternity liability insurance
By ADAM CORNELIUS
Staff Writer
Fraternities nationwide have
been evaluating induction proce-
dures after the death of a Lamda
Chi Alpha pledge in a hazing inci-
dent at Rutgers University last
Spring.
The death of the pledge com-
bined with several other incidents
occurring over the past two years
have led to several proposals,
including a total ban on pledging.
The ban would give fratenvties a
chance to lower their insurance
rates. Although rates have been
decreasing, the rates are signifi-
cantly higher than four years ago.
The proposal is still under
consideration by the National
Intcrfraternity Conference. Cur-
rently the decision to eliminate
the pledge period is left to the
individual fraternities. On the
ECU campus the only fraternity to
vote on this proposal was Zeta
Beta Tau, which has since dis-
banded.
A spokesman for the Frater-
nity Executive Association says
that the question of banning
pledging has not yet been put into
effect.
"The Fratcrinity Executive
Association has committed to
discuss the issue and, as I under-
stand it at this July meeting, is
continuing with a thoughtful re-
view of the question. We encour-
age each national fraternity to do
so. Each national fraternity would
need to embrace this policy on its
own volition, so you have a vari-
ety of groups probably in differ-
ent stages evaluating the idea
Rav Madden, president of
See FRAT, page 3
Remember
Last week when it was warm and 'the Hill' was alive with activity? The cold has returned, but
that teasing taste of spring is still in many ECU students'minds. (Photo by Mark Love-Photolab)





y ��
T IE LAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7, 1989
Soviets leave Afghanistan
KABUL, Afghanistan (AD�
The last Red Army convoys aban-
doned their garrisons and headed
north for home today. Soviet offi-
cials said, bringing to an end a
nine-year adventure that cost
more than 13,000 Soviet lives.
Hundreds of Soviet troops, mean-
while, guarded the airport of the
war-weary Afghan capital as
military transports ferried in
loads of grain and other supplies
to help ease food shortages
caused bv guerrilla blockades.
In Moscow, the Communist
Partv new pa per Pravda reported
today that the last Soviet soldier
left Kabul" on Sunday. But Soviet
officals in the city said about 1,000
troops would remain at the air-
port until the end of the week.
They said the last convoy left
the capital on Saturday. Under a
UNbrokered accord, all Soviets
forces are to be out by Feb. 15.
Pravda said Soviet troops
would todav abondon their garri-
son in the western citv of Sh-
indand, the other remaining So-
viet militarv complex in the coun-
try. The paper said Soviet troops
had by Sunday removed defen-
sive checkpoints on the Salang
Highway to about 30 miles morth
of Kabul at the southern end of a
tunnel that cuts through some of
the roughest terrain on the with
drawal route.
Pravda said insurgents did
not fire on Soviet convoys as thev
moved along the highway, the
only land route to the Soviet bor-
der from Kabul. But four aval-
Public objects
to Congress'
pay increase
WASHINGTON (AP� The
public outcry over the proposed
51 percent pav increase for mem-
bers of Congress should hardly be
surprising. Americans have been
objecting to congressional pay
raises for nearly all of the 200-year
history of the Senate and House of
Representatives.
Alexis do Tocquevilie, a close
observer of American life, offered
an explanation in his 1S35 studv,
"Democracy in America His
conclusion: Democracies are far
more stingy than other forms of
government when it comes to
paving high-ranking officials.
Part of the reason, de
Tocquevilie, wrote, is that a salary
level which seems inadequate to
the official receiving it "appears
enormous to him whose wants do
not extend beyond the necessities
of life. When he reflects on own
humble dwelling and the small
earnings of his hard toil, he re-
members all he could do with a
salary which you judge insuffi-
cient, and he is startled and almost
frightened at the view of so much
wealth he said.
More than 150 years later,
little has changed. "We have
never had a satisfactory method
for setting compensation for high
government officials says Sen-
ate Majority Leader George
Mitchell, D-Maine.
"We still do not. If contempo-
rary public opinion were the sole
determinant, the pay of members
of Congress today would be the
same as it was in 1789
The root of the problem is in
the Constitution. Article I, Section
6 provides: "Senators and Repre-
sentatives shall receive a compen-
sation for their services, to be as-
certained by law, and paid out of
the Treasury of the United
States
That sounds well enough in
theory. But in practice it leaves the
question of congressional pay
levels up to Congress itself, pos-
ing an always sensitive, uncom-
fortable and sometimes politi-
cally explosive problem.
Some of the framers of the
Constitiution thought it woiTd
give members of Congr-s a i-
cense to steal. Others argued , at
pressure from incensed constitu-
ents would rein in greedy im-
pulses.
"Bringing up the pay i use
issue is about as wefcome n a
legislative body as a skunk is at a
Sunday School picnic says en.
Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa. "he
present congressional salary:
$89,500.
The proposal by an inde-
pendent commission: Increase it
to $135,000 to more nearly ap-
proach the compensation offered
in the private sector to lawyers,
corporate executives and others
with similar responsibilities.
ances crashed down on retreating
columns Sunday, killing three
Soviet soldiers and injuring a
fouth, the paper said.
Three officers were also in-
jured bv "terrorist grenades" in a
Kabul suburb Sundav as the Sovi-
ets handed over motor vehicles to
the Afghans, the newpaper said.
lust across the Soviet border in
Termez, where a Soviet airborne
regiment arrived from Afganis-
tan todav, military spokesman U.
Col. Igor Dorolev said the last
remaining Red Army soldiers
were on the move toward the
border.
He said Soviet soldiers re-
mained in Balkh, Samangan,
Baglan, Parvan and Herat prov-
inces. The first four are located
between Kabul and the Soviet
border: Herat province borders
the Soviet Union in the west.
Along the road behind the
Kabul airport today, several So-
viet soldiers dressed in padded
olive green uniforms manned the
bunker checkpoints, nervously-
clutching their Kalashnikov rifles.
ndrei. a 20-vear old soldier for
Moldavia, said the troops would
be flown home sometime before
Feb. 15, but said thev had not been
told exactly when.
Tass today reported heavy
shelling bv guerrillas in the Kabul
province, killing eight people,
and in the cities of Gardiz and
Khost in Pakita province, killing
one and wounding two. Rockets
and rocket-propelled grenades
also hit residential areas in the city
of Herat and the airport in the
southern city of Kandahar, Tass
said.
With the Soviet pullout, those
cities have been held by the con-
script army of Soviet-backed
President Najib, a force that guer-
rilla commanders say is demoral-
ized and crippled by desertion.
The Soviet Union sent troops into
Afghanistan in December 1979 to
replace on Marxist regime with
another and stayed to help fight
the U.S.� and Pakistani-backed
insurgents.
The Kremlin says more than
13,000 Soviet troops were killed
and 35,000 wounded in the con-
flict. In neighboring Pakistan,
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze met with Pakistani
officals today but said the talks
had failed to bring about a politi-
cal solution on Afghanistan's fu-
ture.
The insurgents refuse to share
power with Najib, an arangement
upon which the Soviets insist.
Shevardnadze told a news confer-
ence that Moscow would con-
tinue to support the Kabul gov-
ernment.
"If new complications hap-
pen, if there is continued fighting,
the Soviet Union has obligations
to that country he said. How
Arlington Village
Attic Sale
8:00 pm to 8:00 pm
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Feb. 9th
60 -75
(Final Reductions)
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Some Spring and
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Selected Jewelry
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Thurs. 10-8
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The East Carolinian
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COMPOSE YOUR OWN MESSAGE BELOW
ever, the Soviet envoy added,
"We are not thinking of any Soviet
re-entry into Afghanistan
Shevardnadze, the highest-
ranking Soviet offieal ever to visit
Pakistan, told reporters he had
not met with Afghan guerrillas
leaders based in the countrv. On
Sunday, guerrilla sources said
Shevardnadze would meet with
the insurgents today.
Leaders of the Iran- and Paki-
stan-based resistance signed a
cooperation pact Sundav in the
Iranian capital, Iran's foreign
minister, All Akbar Velayati said.
The agreement could boost the
guerrillas' chances of taking over
in Afghanistan and creating an
Islamic republic once the Soviets
are gone.
In Kabul on Sunday, Najib
told about 10,000 members of the
ruli.ig People's Democratic Party
that his Marxist government will
survive the rebel onslaught de-
spite the Soviet pullout.
"God is with us. The people
are with us. We will win the war
he told about 10,000 partv mem-
bers who gathered in freezing
temperatures near the presiden-
tial palace.
The East Carolinian
JamesF.J. McKee, I irectorof Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Ma key I. Keith
Phillip V. Cope Adam Blank
Ashley E Dalton
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7, 1989 3
Weekly Crime Report returns
ECU Campus Security Log
Book from last weekend.
Friday February 3
AM
1:05 Breaking and entering of
a car located in the parking lot
located at 14th Street and Berkley.
Two men were arrested for pos-
session of stolen property.
1:20 Extremely intoxicated
student north of Belk Dorm.
1:22 A butterfly knife was
confiscated in a dorm room. A
citation for drinking underage
was issued to a resident in the
same dorm room.
9:00 A student reported the
theft oi his car bra.
PM
1 45 A larceny of a bicycle
east of Garrett was reported by
the owner.
11:56 Two residents of Um-
stcad Dorm were issued citations
for being in possession of plants
belonging to the University.
Saturday, February 4
2:25 Resident of Aycock
Dorm was charged with drinking
underage.
2:45 Resident of Carrett
Dorm was arrested for driving
while impaired and driving at
unsafe speeds.
PM
8:15
Two residents of Garret i
PM
12:35
Three residents of
Crime Report Dorm were charged in possession Aycock Dorm were given cita-
��� of a kec of boor. ti,�- (- -i:i �j
10:35 Residents of Aycock
Dorm were charged in possession
of drug paraphernalia.
11.19 A loud party reported
in Fletcher Dorm. Shortly after-
ward, three students were given
citations for drinking underage.
of a keg of beer.
11:49 Possible over dose oc-
curred in Tyler Dorm.
Sunday, February 5
AM
1:53 Resident of Aycock
Dorm was charged with drinking
underage.
tions for drinking underage.
Earlv Mondav, February 6
AM
12:14 Residents of Aycock
Dorm were charged with posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and
marijuana.
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Behind Peppi's
Roanoke River loses spawning bass
Ocean Front and, only 3 blocks from the most
popular night) spots in Daytona
Pen Rods, Razzles, etc.
Continued from page 1 (how many will mature and
Striped bass has been declared an hatch1).
important national resource by "Enough eggs are being
Congress, bringing in around $90 spawned to make a successful
million annually in commercial striped bass population, but
and sport fisheries. fewer are reaching juvenile age
"In 1986 the striped bass stated Rulifson. "Viability has
commercial fishery in C. pro- decreased due to over harvesting,
duced landings worth approxi- poor water quality, a low food
mately $189,000 and 95 percent of supply, and variations in water
water flow interrupting the bass' or vvc can put substrates along
spawning acts stated Rulifson, thc yiXom of estuaries for scal-
�Lni WC d�'ukn,�VVi h�W .manZ loPs t0 land on and develop. We
can then collect them and allow
those landings were in the Albe
marie sound said Rulifson, "and
that doesn't include the sports
fishery which is much more valu-
able
Every spring striped bass
swim from the Albemarle sound
up the Roanoke River to spawn,
and this is the locus oi Dr.
Rulifson's study. Every four
hours for two months ECU stu-
dents worked around the clock
taking p 0 samples from the
Roano' . to determine viability
flow
On the Roanoke River, near
Roanoke Rapids, dams are used
to regulate water flow as a source
oi hydroelectric power. The peak
power demand season coincides
with peak striped bass spawning
season.
The dams are opened to in-
crease water flow and generate
more power, sometimes raising
the water level by as muchas eight
feet in one hour. "There are docu-
mented cases oi this increase in
simply swim back downstream
without spawning. Moderate
flow is best for egg viability and
juvenile abundance
"By understanding how na-
ture works we can predict how
nature will work when changes
are made said Dr. William G.
Ambrose, biologyICMR. He is
studying factors affecting the dis-
tribution and abundance of ben-
thic (bottom) marine communi-
ties.
The recent coastal red tide
epidemic wiped out 90 percent of
the state's scallop population. Dr.
Ambrose is determining the
feasability of a scallop "aaua-rul-
ture" using two methods.
"We can either breed them in
thc lab by combining scallop egg
and sperm in a test tube he said,
them to grow in the lab protected
from predators
Dr. Christian concluded,
"Environmental resources are
becoming more scarce and valu-
able which must be worked into
our politics and economics.
People need to become more
aware of environmental issues
and consider them in their day to
day decisions
"But don't panic cautioned
Dr. Stanley. 'There is some 'eco-
hysteria' out there which is un-
warranted, but don't think envi-
ronmental problems will go away
if ignored. The point is we've
done some things nature can't
Fraternities consider ending rush
Continued from page 1
the Interfraternity Conference at
ECU and a member of Delta
Sigma Phi said that a ban on
pledging would pose problems
for the fraternity system.
"I don't see how they can
enact it Madden said. "Even a
lot of civic clubs have a pledging
period where the person has to
prove themselves worthy as a
member
1 lowever, increases in insur-
ance rates may compromise fra-
ternities' current method of in-
ducting new brothers. When
Madden first joined the fratemitv,
insurance rates were $25 per
member.
'Today insurance rates are
$45 for each member Madder,
said. "Some fraternities are pay
ing as much as $80 per man
In response to these rates, 32
et the 54 national fraternities
banded together last fall to form
Fraterity Insurance Purchasing, a
group which, according to the
Fraternity Executive Association
would "both provide insurance at
competitive rates and improve or
influence operations of under-
graduate chapters. Seven of the 15
members of the 1FC at ECU are
members of this group.
Despite this long-term in-
crease, John Greene at the na-
tional headquarters of Phi Kappa
Tau savs tl ' insurance rates
have been going down since thc
incidents oi hazing which have
received national attention over
the last two years.
Among these incidents, thc
one receiving the most attention
was the death of James Callahan,
who was pledging the Lamda Chi
Alpha Chapter of Rutgers Univer-
sity when he died of alcohol poi-
soning during a hazing incident.
The chapter was closed.
Greene attributes the insur-
ance rate decrease to a response
bv fraternities and univerities to
the attention these incidents have
been receiving.
'There is a lot more attention
being paid to conduct on the
campus, not only by fraternities
but by universities. Everyone re-
alizes that the situation has got to
change and are taking the steps
necessary to do that. I think the
insurance companies are recog-
nizing this Greene said.
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�h;e iEafit Carolinian
Serving thet at Carolina campus community since 1925.
Pete Fernald, c��zM�M�r
Stephanie Folsom, MMpRf uu
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of yUwrtwif
Tim Hampton, nm e� Brad Bannister, g u,
KKISTEN HALBERG,3p��tt� JEFF PARKER stjf Mush
Ci ur Carter, ��-�� ea Tom Furr, o�uhM m�
Susan Howell, fw-rh. M���rr Debbie Stevens, m�ry
Dean Waters, om Stephanie Emory,u t� s.�
Stepi i anie Singleton, c � Mac Clark, g.�� m
February 7.19SQ
OPINION
Page 4
New Policy
Administration force-feeds students
According to Dean Carolyn
Fulgham, Director of Residence Life
and Housing, all students who live
in dorms during the upcoming
summer session must join a meal
plan. In addition, within five years
the administration plans to institute
a year-round version of the manda-
torv plan.
The administration's defense of
the mandatory meal plan is valid as
far as it goes. In the long run, the
plans would indeed provide a
greater selection of food and im-
proved campus dining facilities.
And the administration apparently
feels that the benefits to the students
will be worth the drawbacks.
Perhaps. But is that for the ad-
ministration to decide?
Clearly not. If the students are
the ones to benefit from the plan,
then the administration should cer-
tainly do more than pay lip service
to the student's wishes.
There doesn't seem to be any
chance that that will happen. The
Student Government Association's
strong opposition to the measure
was ignored. It seems clear that the
administration has its heart set on
implementing the plans, and no
amount of insistence on the part of
students will sway the administra-
tion from plans which have been
finalized.
In addition, it seems doubtful
that the administration has consid-
ered the number of students for
whom it may be easier and cheaper,
given the meal plan requirement, to
simply find residence somewhere
other than the dorms.
In sum, the mandatory meal
plans are unwarranted and un-
wanted. It is wrong for the admini-
stration to attempt to force the plan
on students, and it is equally wrong
to deny the students any real say in
the decision to implement the plan.
-T�W
Forum Rules
The Fast Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Mail or drop them by our office in the
Publications Building, across from the entrance to oyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters must include the name, major, classification, address, phone number and
the signature of the author (s). Letters are limited to 300 words or less, double-spaced, typed or neatly printed. All
letters at: subject to editing for brevity, obscenity and libel, and no personal attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this page are reminded that they are limited to one every two weeks. The
deadline for editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday editions.
Capitol Hillbilly Mr. Smith
goes to freshman orientation
By MICHAEL NEWMAN
Nrw Republic
Here is Ben Jones, newly elected congressman
from Georgia, commenting on the Washington din-
ner circuit after his first week in the capital: "If I
never see another Swedish meatball, it'll be OK with
mc Here is Barney Frank, five-term congressman
from Massachusetts, on the same subject: "All recep-
tions are total horseshit
Someday, after years of seasoning, maybe Jones
will be as eloquently cynical as Frank. For now,
though, he's the official yokel of the 101 st Congress.
Not only is Jones a good old boy from the South; he
is a former actor whose career climax came playing
that very role� as Cooter, the good-hearted greasy
mechanic who was always rescuing Bo and Luke
Duke in the CBS series "The Dukes of Hazzard
That's not to say Jones hasn't been around the
block a time or two. He prevailed in one of the most
ad hominiem congressional campaigns of 1988. In
the course of the campaign, he released a lengthy
police record� acquired during his drinking days
and including a battery charge by his former wife�
to pre-empt any use of it by his opponent. But even
amid vicious mudslinging, Jones managed to come
off as a good old boy. When his opponent, Republi-
can incumbent Pat Swindall, questioned his hon-
esty, Jones alluded to the fact that Swindall had
recently been indicated for perjury: "Being called a
liar by Pat Swindall is like being called ugly by a
possum Jones beat Swindall by 20 points.
Jones's first step toward becoming a jaded vet-
eran was taken in December, when he went through
the standard orientation for newcomers to Con-
gress, a 14-day crash course organized by the House
Administration committee. Together with his 32
classmates, Jones sat through a seemingly endless
series of presentations, on topics both mundane and
meaningful. In Washington and in Cambridge,
where the new members convened for a six-day
"issue orientation he was schmoozed, fed, lobbied,
and lectured. Like most orientations, this one had a
high percentage of seemingly pointless moments.
But, also e most orientations, it succeeded in spite
of itselt. it gave Jones a rough overview of the next
two years and put him more closely in touch with the
forces that will be governing his behavior.
Jones arrived in Washington with no plans to
"take this place by storm and change the world
What he wanted most was "to get settled he said.
"Set up an office that functions efficiently, learn the
practical things that a congressman does� turning
the mail around quickly, things like that Freshman
orientation caters to such concerns. One of the first
events on his calendar was a seminar titled "Setting
Up Your Congressional Office
Most of orientation was closed to the media.
Officials said they did this to "encourage candid
discussion" and ensure "total honesty: � and to
keep the sessions safe for stupidity. "We don't want
some guy quoted as asking, 'Who's the Speaker?'
said one organizer. He might have worried less
about inquisitiveness and more about boredom.
Even Jones, one of the more earnest in the group,
played hooky a few times ("I knew a lot of this stuff
already he explained. "When I was a kid, I used to
lCad the Congressional Record every day) At the
seminar about congressional offices, several fresh-
men were as restless as kindergartners at nap time:
they whispered to each other, manicured their nails,
excused themselves to get another doughnut.
The next presentation, sponsored by the Demo-
cratic Study Group, was more lively. Three sitting
congressmen were sharing their "candid" views
about the coming budget crunch. It turned out they
weren't worried so much about the deficit as about
whether they or the Republicans were going to get
blamed for it. When the question-and-answer pe-
riod started, one freshman took issue with this ap-
proach. "It seems to me there's enough blame to go
around he said. His elders seemed a bit taken
aback, but quickly rebounded. "Don't think of this as
a budget problem said one. "Think of it as a politi-
cal problem, because that's what it is
The second day of orientation opened with a
sermon from Representative Joe Kolter, a smarmy
four-term Democrat from Pennsylvania. "The
honeymoon is over he warned. "You've basked in
the glory of victory; now lef s talk about survival
He suggested that freshmen keep one thing in mind
while pondering vexing public policy issues: "Two
years down the road, you opponent's gonna have
something to chew on�your voting record Older
members regaled Jonesand his classmates with tales
of battles past. One spoke of the first time he got up
to address a committee hearing. "As soon as I stood
up, one of the senior members of the committee said.
'Sit down, you smartass young punk So I turned to
him and said, 'Shut up, you senile old bastard
Another listed the three most important things to do
to get re-elected: "Use the frank. Use the frank. A n J
use the frank
One week into orientation, the freshmen made
their pilgrimage to the Mecca of policy analysis.
Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government.
One of the first day's featured speakers was Alice
Rivlin, a senior feHov at the Brookings Institution
and former director of the Congressional Budget
Office. Unlike the House budget experts back in
Washington, Rivlin didn't try to lay the blarr.e on
anybody. Instead, shespokf-crf "having a substantial
surplus in the unified budget by the end of the '90s
and the need for high levels of investment "for the
next several decades. Since most freshmen were
just learning how tc link in two-year cycles, this
caused some contusion. Rivlin was barraged with
questions. How could Congress possibly institute a
five-year budget plan? Or even a two-year plan?
What exactly is the "unified budget anyway? Jones
said he found Rivlin's talk helpful� "every bit of
knowledge is useful"� but his colleagues in the
room seemed rattled.
The rest of the week's meetings were off-limits
to the media, and the Kennedy School's well-trained
press shepherds gently nudged us out of the room.
On the whole, said Jones, the Harvard program gave
"a nice overview" of the issuesand was "delightful
Why? It wasn't so much the encyclopedic commen-
tary on matters of importance, the 20-odd seminars
on'everything from AIDS poicy to the problems of
sub-Saharan Africa. No, it was'something less tan-
gible than that, something that turned Jones down-
right poetic. "We were spending whole days
together he said. "Going to classes during the day,
socializing together at night. We really got to know
each other And then, you know, it was Christmas-
time, and a little snow was falling in Harvard
Square, and we've just been treated royally. It's been
a special time
Besides digesting all the information served up
during orientation, Jones had to begin setting up his
office. He was getting scores of letters and phone
calls every day, but he had only one staffer with him
in Washington. The two of them had to contend with
the swarms of eager job seekers who roamed the
corridors of Capitol Hill like Hare Krishnas at air-
ports, smiling earnestly and handing out resumes.
Jones was also in demand among the media, and
hardly a day passed without an interview. By the
end of the second week, he had hired a few more
assistants and submitted his choices in the freshman
office lottery. (He got a cramped attic on the fifth
floor.) He still hadn't found a site for his permanent
district office, or a place to live in Washington.
One leitmotiv that ran through orientation was
the matter of re-election. Not that Jones� or anyone
else in Congress� needed reminding. Even before
he was sworn in, Jones was working on two different
fund-raisers, in Washington and in Atlanta. To get
re-elected, one congressman had said, it was neces-
sary to "be a district man and Jones took that advice
to heart. He said his primary goal for the next two
years is "to provide the best constituent services this
district's ever had He plans to have a mobile office
roam his district, and he rattled on endlessly about
answer "every piece of mail
As for the Swedish meatballs: during orienta-
tion, Jones attended a reception practically every
night. Most of these free meals weren't exactly free;
those dishing them out (and those eating them) had
ulterior menus. For example, Representative Bill
Gray, who gave a "do as Jones calls them, wanted
to win the caucus chair (he did). And the incoming
Democrats dutifully attended three receptions put
on by the House triumvirate of Speaker Jim Wright,
Majority Leader Tom Foley, and Whip Tony CoeTho,
all of who stressed the importance of party unity.
The reasons for heeding party elders, though not
what they once were, are still substantial. Jones
received some $17,000 from the party during his
campaign, and he stands to be rewarded with an-
other tidy sum in 1990.






. i3ti �tttic mk aan
�y
otJre iEaat (Earfllmian
Serving ic I'ast Carolina campus community since 1925.
Pete Fernald, ootimm,
Stephanie Folsom, mmp�, ����
James F.J. McKee, rv�orof
Tim Hampton, n�� &�� Brad Bannister, a, m
KPrnTT Hil 1PTP. "ji i ri riffi JEFF PARKER, s�ff kMn
Ci hp Carter, ;r� &�� Tom Furr, - v ������
Susan Hovvell, ������ m� Debbie Stevens, s���
Dean Waters, oofM��jer Stephanie Emory,ut�j. s.�
Stepi t anie Singleton, &� e�� Mac Clark, !��m
February 7. 1989
OPINION
Page 4
New Policy
Administration force-feeds students
According to Dean Carolyn
Fulgham, Director of Residence Life
and Housing, all students who live
in dorms during the upcoming
summer session must join a meal
plan. In addition, within five years
the administration plans to institute
a vear-round version of the manda-
tory plan.
The administration's defense of
the mandatory meal plan is valid as
far as it goes. In the long run, the
plans would indeed provide a
greater selection of food and im-
proved campus dining facilities.
And the administration apparently
feels that the benefits to the students
will be worth the drawbacks.
Perhaps. But is that for the ad-
ministration to decide?
Clearly not. If the students are
the ones to benefit from the plan,
then the administration should cer-
tainly do more than pay lip service
to the student's wishes.
There doesn't seem to be any
chance that that will happen. The
Student Government Association's
strong opposition to the measure
was ignored. It seems clear that the
administration has its heart set on
implementing the plans, and no
amount of insistence on the part of
students will sway the administra-
tion from plans which have been
finalized.
In addition, it seems doubtful
that the administration has consid-
ered the number of students for
whom it may be easier and cheaper,
given the meal plan requirement, to
simply find residence somewhere
other than the dorms.
In sum, the mandatory meal
plans are unwarranted and un-
wanted. It is wrong for the admini-
stration to attempt to force the plan
on students, and it is equally wrong
to deny the students any real say in
the decision to implement the plan.
-
Forum Rules
The Fast Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Mail or drop them by our office in the
Publications Building, across from the entrance to Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters must include the name, major, classification, address, phone number and
the signature of the author (s). Letters are limited to 300 words or less, double-spaced, typed or neatly printed. All
letters ar: subject to editing for brevity, obscenity and libel, and no personal attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this page are reminded that they are limited to one every two weeks. The
deadline for editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday editions.
V
si vA -�
& FEE5
BooKfl TTTf
Capitol Hillbilly Mr. Smith
goes to freshman orientation
By MICHAEL NEWMAN
ew Republic
Here is Ben Jones, newly elected congressman
from Georgia, commenting on the Washington din-
ner circuit after his first week in the capital: "If I
never see another Swedish meatball, it'll be OK with
me Here is Barney Frank, five-term congressman
from Massachusetts, on the same subject: "All recep-
tions are total horseshit
Someday, after years of seasoning, maybe Jones
will be as eloquently cynical as Frank. For now,
though, he's the official yokel of the 101st Congress.
Not only is Jones a good old boy from the South; he
while pondering vexing public policy issues: "Two
years down the road, you opponent's gonna have
something to chew on� your voting record Older
members regaled Jones and his classmates with tales
of battles past. One spoke of the first time he got up
to address a committee hearing. "As soon as I stood
up, one of the senior members of the committee said,
'Sit down, you smartass young punk So I turned to
him and said, 'Shut up, you senile old bastard
Another listed the three most important things to do
to get re-elected: "Use the frank. Use the frank. �n J
use the frank
One week into orientation, the freshmen mado
their pilgrimage to the Mecca of policy analysis.
Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government.
One of the first day's featured speakers was Alice
is a former actor whose career climax came playing
that very role- as Cooter, the good-hearted greasy j�j� � � ,1 thBro'okmlnshUution
mechanic who was always rescuing Bo and Luke fomcr q CongTess6lonal Budgct
Duke in the CBS series "The Dukes of Hazzard.
That's not to say Jones hasn't been around the
block a time or two. He prevailed in one of the most
ad hominiem
the course
Office. Unlike the House budget experts back in
Washington, Rivlin didn't try to lay the blame on
anybody. Instead, she sptkoo "having a substanlia
�m congressional campaigns of 988 In J J ,q
of the campaign, he released a lengthy J of investment "for the
police record-acquired dunng his drinking days S s;nc(? most freshm(?n
and including a battery charge by his former wife� . . . . . . , . . �.
,b f.u u- in i mst learning how �c .Mink in two-year cvcles, this
to pre-empt anv use of it by his opponent. But even o J J'
caused some comIuskhv Rivlin was barraged with
questions. How could Congress possibly institute a
five-year budget plan? Or even a two-year plan?
What exactly is the "unified budget anyway? Jones
said he found Rivlin's talk helpful� "every bit of
knowledge is useful"� but his colleagues in the
room seemed rattled.
The rest of the week's meetings were off-limits
amid vicious mudslinging, Jones managed to come
off as a good old boy. When his opponent, Republi-
can incumbent Pat Swindall, questioned his hon-
esty, Jones alluded to the fact that Swindall had
recently been indicated for perjury: "Being called a
liar by Pat Swindall is like being called ugly by a
possum Jones beat Swindall by 20 points.
Jones's first step toward becoming a jaded vet-
eran was taken in December, when he went through t0 lhc media, and the KcnnedySchool s well-trained
the standard orientation for newcomers to Con- press shepherds gently nudged us out of the room,
gress, a 14-day crash course organized by the House ?n the whole-�? �thc Ha�ard ?$��!�?!
Administration committee. Together with his 32 anice overview oftheissuesandwas dehghttul.
classmates, Jones sat through a seemingly endless WhY? � wasn � much thc encyclopedic commen-
series of presentations, on topics both mundane and -Y on matters.of importance, the 20-odd seminars
meaningful. In Washington and in Cambridge, on everything from A rSpoicy to the problems of
where the new members convened for a six-day suSauhara" fnca- JJj " waf fJhTmg ,C? taiV
"issueorientationhewasschmoozed,fed,lobbied, Pb�c than that, something that turned Jones down-
and lectured. Like most orientations, this one had a n8ht P0" We were spending whole days
high percentage of seemingly pointless moments, together he said. "Going to classes dunng the day,
But, also e most orientations, it succeeded in spite socializing together at night. We really got to know
of itself, it gave Jones a rough overview of the next each other And then, you know, it was Christmas-
two years and put him more closely in touch with the time, and a little snow was falling in Harvard
forces that will be governing his behavior. Square, and we've just been treated royally. It's been
Jonei: arrived in Washington with no plans to a special time
"take this place by storm and change the world Besides digesting all the information served up
What he wanted most was "to get settled he said, during orientation, Jones had to begin setting up his
"Set up an office that functions efficiently, learn the
practical things that a congressman does� turning
the mail around quickly, things like that Freshman
orientation caters to such concerns. One of the first
office. He was getting scores of letters and phone
calls every day, but he had only one staffer with him
in Washington. The two of them had to contend with
the swarms of eager job seekers who roamed the
events on his calendar was a seminar titled "Setting corridors of Capitol Hill like Hare Krishnas at air-
Up Your Congressional Office ports, smiling earnestly and handing out resumes.
Most of orientation was closed to the media. Jones was also in demand among the media, and
Officials said they did this to "encourage candid hardly a day passed without an interview. By the
discussion" and ensure "total honesty � and to cnd of the second week, he had hired a few more
keep the sessions safe for stupidity. "We don't want assistants and submitted his choices in the freshman
some guy quoted as asking, 'Who's the Speaker?' office lottery. (He got a cramped attic on the fifth
floor.) He still hadn't found a site for his permanent
said one organizer. He might have worried less
about inquisitiveness and more about boredom.
Even Jones, one of the more earnest in the group,
played hooky a few times ("I knew a lot of this stuff
already he explained. "When I was a kid, I used to
district office, or a place to live in Washington.
One leitmotiv that ran through orientation was
the matter of re-election. Not that Jones� or anyone
else in Congress� needed reminding. Even before
he was sworn in, Jones was working on two different
read the Congressional Record every day) At the fund.rai in Washington and in Atlanta. To Ret
seminar about congressional offices, several fresh
men were as restless as kindergartners at nap time:
they whispered to each other, manicured their nails,
excused themselves to get another doughnut.
The next presentation, sponsored by the Demo-
cratic Study Group, was more lively. Three sitting
congressmen were sharing their "candid" views
about the coming budget crunch. It turned out they
weren't worried so much about the deficit as about
whether they or the Republicans were going to get
blamed for it. When the question-and-answer pe-
riod started, one freshman took issue with this ap-
re-elected, one congressman had said, it was neces-
sary to "bea district man and Jones took that advice
to heart. He said his primary goal for the next two
years is "to provide the best constituent services this
district's ever had He plans to have a mobile office
roam his district, and he rattled on endlessly about
answer "every piece of mail
As for the Swedish meatballs: during orienta-
tion, Jones attended a reception practically every
night. Most of these free meals weren't exactly free;
those dishing them out (and those eating them) had
ulterior menus. For example, Representative
around" he said. His elders seemed a bit taken lo win thecaucus income
aback,butquicklyrebounded "Don'tthinkofthisas d dutifull attended EXES
a budget problem said one. "Think of it as a pohti- bv w.�!T , SSS
i budget problem
-al problem, because that's what it is.
The second day of orientation opened with a
sermon from Representative Joe Kolter, a smarmy
four-term Democrat from Pennsylvania. "The
honeymoon is over he warned. "You've basked in
the glory of victory; now lef s talk about survival
He suggested that freshmen keep one thing in mind
on by the House triumvirate of Speaker Jim Wright,
Majority Leader Tom Foley, and Whip Tony Coefho,
all of who stressed the importance of party unity.
The reasons for heeding party elders, though not
what they once were, are stiU substantial. Jones
received some $17,000 from the party during his
campaign, and he stands to be rewarded with an-
other tidy sum in 1990.

v






.
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7, 1989 5
Crack linked to homicides
GREENSBORO (AD�
"Crack" cocaine has been linked
to three homicides in the past five
weeks in Greensboro, and Dunn
police say it's the reason a man
was beaten to death with a brick
last summer on a city street.
"I've had many a junkie tell
me, you suck on that pipe one
time and vou're in love. One
time said Michael Grimes, a
Wilmington-based agent for the
U.S. Drug Enforcement Admini-
stration. "They're just going to get
hooked. Teriod. All of them
Law officers say crack, long
Bureau of Investigation, told the
Greensboro News & Records.
"Some of the child abuse cases
we're seeing are tied back to it
"It's the growing way to use
cocaine in the state Dunn said.
Crack, a pure granular form
of cocaine that is smoked, made
its debut in the state about two
summers ago, brought north from
Florida by migrant farm workers,
drug-enforcement officials guess.
Since then, it has gained a
foothold in several
Last week, Greensboro police
say, 20-year-old Christopher
Caviness bludgeoned his 45-year-
old father, Charles, to death with a
lead pipe while the elder Caviness
was in bed. Police say Christo-
pher Caviness, who has been
charged with murder, killed his
father while stealing money to
buy more crack during a night-
long binge.
Two other L.reensrxro homi-
cides since Dec. 30 are attributed
small towns
ami counties flanking Interstate to crack deals gone sour, police
95 and spread west to the Tied- said. Beginning in spring 1986,
the scourge of New York and mont. As in big cities, users tend chemists in the SBl's drug-testing
Washington ghettos, is com- to be poor blacks in their teens or laboratory tried to list all of their
20s who can'l afford powder co- crack cocaine receipts separately
caine. from powder cocaine but re-
Crack, which takes its name turned to a single classification in
from the "cracking" apart of one January 1987.
rock-hard chunk from another,
usually costs about $20 for a tiny
manding a growing share of the
drug trade in towns and cities
across North Carolina.
We're seeing more homi-
cides, more crimes of violence
related to the drug. Some of the
killings we've seen in armed rob- bag of two or three chunks, but
benes came because people were comes as cheap as $8 a bag. What
on it and overreacting Charles the buyer gets is an intense high
Dunn, deputy director of the State that lasts 15 to 20 minutes.
"We stopped when so much
of it started to be crack said
Ralph Keaton, an assistant deputy
director of the SRI. "It's just mush-
roomed.
Of about 1,100 drug samples
sent to the lab each month, about
half are cocaine, and of that por-
tion, typically 20 to 40 are crack,
Keaton estimates.
Among the counties sending
a disproportionate number of
crack cases to the lab: Hamett,
Johnston and Nash, all in the east
and all temporary homes of large
numbers of migrant farm workers
during the spring and summer.
"It was introduced here, and I
guess a lot of people liked it said
William D. Powell, police chief in
the Harnett County town of Dunn
since June 1987. Last year, more
than 100 of the 159 drug arrests in
the town of 10,000 involved crack.
"I had seen crack only once or
twice before I came here. I've seen
it so much now I'm sick of it he
said. "1 hate to say it, but we al-
most like to get a marijuana or
regular cocaine case. It's like a
change of pace
Barbara Bush discusses her role
at home in the White House
WASHINGTON (AP� Two
weeks after moving into the most
prestigious home in America,
Barbara Bush cannot conceal her
excitement. For starters, there's
the collection of presidential
china: "Grover Cleveland at
lunch today Abraham Lincolm
yesterday. Can you believe that?"
There's more. "The views are
pretty spectaoar she savs, not-
ing she can aze directlv at the
Oval Office from her second-floor
office in the White House. "See, I
can see him right there Mrs.
Bush savs, pointing across the
Rose Garden to the office occu-
pied bv her husband, President
Rush. '
In the Lincoln Bedroom, Mrs.
Rush shows off a felt-covered
frame that contains one of only
five copies of the Gettysburg
Address. "This is the only one
signed and dated. You can read
that. Isn't that amazing?"
"The Library of Congress
man who was up here one day� I
showed it. to-him and he looked
absolutely green A canopy bed
on the second-floor "was where
the four presidents before Reagan
slept M rs. Bush says as she leads
a visitor on a tour of the presiden-
tial residence. "Pretty grand,
huh?"
In an interview with The
Associated Press, Mrs. Bush said
she "felt right at home trom the
very first moment I ler husband,
she said, is "exactly the same" and
has not changed since moving up
from vice president under Ronald
Reagan.
However, she said everyone
else has changed and "ever) body
treats you differently when
you're president She said her
husband has an "enormous job
'I really do not lobby George
Push his wife said. "I don't
lobby anyone
Despite the intense demands
of his office, Bush does not seem
weighed dow n by the job, his wife
said. "I should tell you 'yes' but
no he sleeps like a baby she
said, "because he knows he's
human. I mean, he's been around
the presidency so long that I think
he really feels he can do the best
job that can be done
She said Rush awakens every
morning about 6 a.m. and has
coffee and juice in bed while read-
��
flUN
����
line'
Student Union
1 9J
�f �
m
Coming Attractions
Has he philosophized about ing morning newpapers� about
it? "No. But he's absolutely deter-
mined to do the best job he can. I
see my job as trving to take some
of that pressure off him Mrs.
Bush said.
"I see that as my job to try to
not to talk about those problems
and also� do not talk when he s
working. I mean. I think that's a
big part of it she said. "Because
he knows with me, hope, that he
can curl up with his problems and
studv them and he's not going to
have me badgering him about
something else
five in all� and scanning the
White House news summary. He
also watches morning television
shows before leaving for the Oval
Office about 7 a.m.
Mrs. Bush said the president
returns to the residence between 6
p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Does he bring
work home?
"Yes, he always has his wife
said. "He does a lot of reading.
And he does an awful lot of per-
sonal writing. He brings home
mail, works on it. He gets his little
briefcase sent up ahead, full of
work
Rapes at Duke
anser students
DURHAM (AP)� After sev-
eral rapes at and around Duke
.University in recent months, the
mood among students is one of
betraval. "The university commu-
nity is viewed by them as their
home, and home is a safe place,
where we always go all our lives
for a feeling of security said
Suzanne Wasiolek, dean for stu-
dent life.
"Their home is being in-
vaded she said. "The one place
they can feel invulnerable is at
home, and suddenly that sense of
securitv is being taken away from
them
Women at Duke are packing
Mace, hair spray and whistles to
protect themselves after the latest
in a series of sexual assaults, but
they also are dealing with issues
that go beyound the attacks them-
selves. Some men and women see
the rapes not only in terms of
phvsical attack, but in terms of the
female right to equal freedom of
movement.
They fear the rapes might
split the' town and university be-
cause many seem to assume the
rapists are from outside the cam-
pus. They are worried that all
black men suddenly are being
viewed with suspicion.
Some are infuriated at what
thev view as inadequate �security
measures. Students' sense of se-
curity began to be shaken in April,
when a Duke student was raped
in her dorm room.
A man was arrested, pleaded
guilty to rape and was sentenced
to 40 years in prison. The student
has since filed suit against the
university, saying security was
inadequate.
In the fall, there was a rash ot
assaults and break-ins in the
nearbv Trinity Park neighbor-
hoodwhere three women were
raped in their homes in Septem-
ber Police think those rapes are
related. ,a
Two more rapes occurred late
in the year. On Nov. 8, a man
armed with a screwdriver
knocked on a student's Centtal
Campus apartment, forced h I
way in and raped the student.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further Information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
STUDENT UNION OPEN HOUSE ,
Wednesday, February 15 in the Coffeehouse basement
of Mendenhall.
FREE PIZZA with Student Union coupon,
i Come by and meet your entertainers of ECU.
Sponsored by the Committees of Student Union
U.S. College Comedy Competition
Tuesday, February 7 at 8 pm in Mendenhall Rm. 244.
Comedians- Prepare a three minute routine and win a
shot at Comedy, Fame and Fortune
Open to all ECU Students
Sponsored by the Student Union Special Events Committee
ILLUMINA ART COMPETITION '89
Entry dates February 15-17. 3 - 5 pm
Mendenhall. Rm. 221
$3.00 fee per entry - 3 entry limit per person
1st Place - $175.00
2nd Place - $125.00
Y 3rd Place - $75.00
5 Honorable Mentions - $25 each
Sponsored by the Student Union Visual Arts Committee
Movies of the Week
BIRD -R
Wednesday, Feb. 8th
SWEET HEARTS DANCE - R
February 9-12
r







i


i


CHINATOWN
EXPRESS
COUpOIl nsWOisVMMBBMI
FREE DRINK
with purchase of Luncheon or
Dinner combo special.
(12 oz. soft drink or tea)
Lunch Special
11:30am-4:00pm $2.95
Dinner Combo Special
4:00pm-Close $3.39
�Two Entrees -Fried Rice
�OneEggroll .Soup
�Fortune Cookie
218-B E. 5th St.
(University Arcade)
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)757-1183
Free Delivery
Mon. - Fri.
4:30-9:00pm
(coupon not
valid on Delivery)
expires 3 31 89
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J

All films are shown at 8 pm in Hendrix
Theatre unless otherwise stated and are FREE to ECU Students
with vaUd ECU I.D.
�CACMNG OUT TO S��Vt IOU
If you're thinking of going somewhere fun
for Spring Break YOU'RE LATE!
Get off your hindparts and get down to
ITG Travel at the Plaza!
Oh Yeah, Bring your Wallet.
Air Tickets, Amtrak Packages,
and Cruises are in limited quantity!

Check out our low airfares and vacation packages
to the Surf & Sand, or the Ice & Snow,
and everywhere in between.
Call ITG and Save!
TRAVEL CENTER
355-5075
MONDAY-FRIDAY 9:00 A.M-5:00 P.M.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7, 1989

Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Immediately. Non-smoker. To share 3
bedroom house. Will have own bedroom.
175.00 per month plus 13 utilities. 5
minutes from school. Call-Pamela at 758-
7142.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Stratford
Arms. To share 2 bedroom apt 1 2 utili-
ties. Free cable. $170month. Call 756-
5183 or 324-3354 on weekends.
FOR RENT: Bedroom in house. Near
ECU campus. Utilities included. Whole
house privileges $165 00 per month. Call
758-1274 after 6:00 p.m.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom upstairs apt.
Screened in porch. Utilities included.
Near ECU campus $250.00 per month.
Call 758-1274 after 6.00 p.m.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED Strat-
ford Arms. S165.00mo. plus 1 2 electric.
Private room. Available now Call 355-
4547 Ask for Brad.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share 3 bedroom apartment at Eastbrook.
Onlv S120.00month and 13 utilties.
Available March 1st. Call 752-3678.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share 3 bed
room apt. with 2 other females. $173.00
per month plus 13 utilities, Plantation
apts 355-6731.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY: Tar River Estates. Private room
$118 75 per month.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, it Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer liskettes. 24
hours in and .out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
fteside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 72-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the EI.BO D.J call early
and book for your formal or party. 758-
1700, ask for Dillon or leave a message.
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM-
POSED: Call 756-9136
FOR SALE
79 FIREBIRD FOR SALE: Good condi-
tion. V6, automatic, AMFM, air condi-
tion, new tires. $1750.00. lohn: 551-2460
(day), 830-5295 (eve.)
ATTENTION - GOVERNMENT
SEIZED VEHICLES: From $100.00.
Fords, Mercedes, Corvettes, Chevvs Sur-
plus Buvers Guide. 602-838-S8S5 Ext. A-
5285.
ATTENTION - GOVERNMENT
HOMES: From 51 (U-repair) Delinquent
tax property Repossessions. Call 602-S38-
SS85 Ext. GH 5285.
LASER PRINTER LTERS HP and
Apple laser prir.ter toner cartridges can be
recycled' Huge S$ sav:ngs. Satisfactior
guaranteed. For details call RANDMOM
at 1-800-332-365$
AMSTRAD PC 1512 IBM compatible, 20
MB hard drive. 36C KB disk drive, mouse,
color monitor, microsoft MSDOS V3.2,
digital research DOS plus, "GEM Desk-
top "Gem Paint "Gem Doodle "Basic
2 " Assorted games it business software
included. Make offer. 756-6805.
FOR SALE: Earih Cruiser, like new S125
neg. 758-8891.
FOR SALE: Schwin Beach Cruiser. Like
new�S100. 758-8891
FOR SALE: Sachs Moped 1980.450 miles.
Excellent to get around campus. $500.758-
8891.
CLOTHES GALORE Sizes 6-14. Guess
Gasoline jeans, outfits priced from $1-
25.00. Guvs stuff too. 355-6731.
10 SPFED BIKE FOR SALE: Girls free
spirit, very good condition. 50 dollar, 752-
4224 after 6:00 p.m. Day time call 752-2814
leave message.
MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE: Yamaha 360
street bike. Two helmets. Good condition.
$600.00. Call 752-4224 after 6, daytime call
752-2814, leave message.
FOR SALE: Mako electric guitar and 100
watt Gorilla amplifier. Good condition.
$430 value�selling for $200. Free R&R
instruction video. Call Wayne 752-1182.
BIKE FOR SALE: Panasonic 2000 10
speed. Like new, onlv ridden once. Retail
S225.00, sell for $7500. Must sell�355-
0764.
IBM: Color monitor with stand, alsoCGA
card; like new, S250.00. Phone: 758-2400,
ask for Irish.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary com-
pensation, however room, utilities and
phone provided. Marv Smith REAL Crisis
Center 758-HELP.
STUDENT NEEDED: To post advertis-
ing materials on campus bulletin boards.
Work own hours with good pay. Write
Campus Advertising, PO Box 1221, Du-
luth, GA 30136-1221. (404) 873-9042.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACATION IN
CANCUN Become a College Tours rep-
resentative on your campus and get a free
trip Nothing to buy�we provide every-
thing vou need It's a little work for alot of
fun' Call 1-800-727-0005.
TUTORS NEEDED: For all business
classes. Contact Lisa at Academic Coun-
seling, Dept of Athletics 757-6282 or 757-
1677.
RESORT HOTELS: Cruisehnes, Airlines,
& Amusement Parks, NOW accepting
applications for spring and summer jobs,
internships, and career positions. For
more nformation and an application:
write national Collegiate Recreation Serv
ice; PO Box 8074; I lilton 1 lead, SC 29938.
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERflSTER
CAMPS: (Mass.) Mah-Kee-Nac for Boys
Danbee for Girls. Counselor positions for
Program Specialists: All Team Sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
Hockev, Soccer and Volleyball; 25 Tennis
openings; also Archery, Riflery and Bik-
ing; other openings include Performing
Arts, Fine Arts, Yearbook, Phonography,
Cooking, Sewing, Rollerskating, Rock-
etry, Ropes, Camp Craft; AD Waterfront
activities (Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing, CanoeingKayak). Inquire
& D Camping (Boys) 190 Linden Avc
Glen Ridge, NJ 07028; Action Camping
(Girls) 263 Main Road, Montville, N
07045. Phone (Bovs) 201-429-8522; (Girls)
201-316-6660.
ATTENTION - HIRING Government
jobs - your area. Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test S17,840-
$69,485. Call 602-838-8885. Ext. R5285.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships.
$10,000-S105,000vr Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
CABIN COUNSELORS & INSTRUC-
TORS: (Male and Female) for western
North Carolina 8 week children's camp.
Over 30 activities including Water Ski,
Tennis, Heated swimming pool, Go-
Karts, Hiking, Art Room, meals, salary
and travel. Experience not necessary.
Non-smoking students write for applica-
tionbrochure: Camp Pinewood, 20205-1
N.E. 3 Court, Miami, Florida 33179.
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 10-14 part-time soc-
cer coaches for the Spring Indoor Soccer
program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills and have pa-
tience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
5-18 in soccer fundamentals. Hours ap-
proximately 3-7 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Some night and weekend coach-
ing. Program will extend from March 13,
1989 to May, 1989. Salary rate starts at
$3.55 hr. Application will be accepted
starting Mon February 6 Contact Ben
Jamess at 830-4550 or 830-4543.
PERSONALS
SINGERS WANTED If you've sung in a
chorus and ould be interested in a low-
pressure singing experience, come and
sing in Choral Lab. 3-4 Mon. it Wed. Fac-
ulty Welcome. Call Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
757-6331 for more information.
BIG MONEY! BIG PRIZES Ware Talent
Show coming soo i!
BE ON THE LOOKOUT: For information
concerning Ware Talen Show coming
soon. Big money! Big prizes!
THE ALPHA XI DELTA PLEDGES
Would like to c nnounce the sale of Mono-
gram Lollipops for American Lung Asso-
ciation. Come bv the Student Store Mon
Feb. 6-Thurs Feb. 9 from 8-2. Help us
support American Lung with these great
Valentine's gifts for only .75 cent!
LOST ID behind the Attic Sat. n'ght
Initials on ID. are VS.�was in blue
leather I.D. holder. $50 reward if returned.
Please contact Pam or Tricia at 752-6105 or
758-6731. PLEASE'
GIRLS, GUYS: Poolside parties and ma-
jor tanning at Davtona Beach, Spring
Break '89. Call Keith, Kelly, Ron and
Wayne at 752 4693 for more information.
NEED HELP: With house cleaning, yard
work, baby sitting, etc.? RENT-A-
RROTl IER, 18 Feb. 1989. Call PI Q SIGMA
PI 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. M-F 758 7535 or 752
9723.
THE BROTHERS OF THETA CHI:
Would like to congratulate the following
men: Mike Brown, Luke Fisher, Tommy
Goodin, Tnpp Little, Paul Palermo, David
Pureza, David Russer, Donald Sawyer,
John Scot, Paul Southerland, David
White. They're the new Theta pledge
class. We're glad you chose Theta Chi,
new it's time to be the best pledge class
wj've ever had. Roll Chi!
BARBARA LAMB: She's the best! Con
gratulations on making Panhellenic Pre '
So here's to vou, and vour new acquisi-
tion' We knew only you could fill that po-
sition! We're behind you, through thick
and thin We'll support you from not til
the end! �Love, Alpha Xi Delta Sisters it
Pledges!
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Thursday night just
couldn't be beat! Partying down, at fa-
mous Third Street! It was quite a nigh
raising the dead�AZD and PIKA,
ENOUGH SAID
PIKE'S: How 'bout that Thursday morn
ing breakfast!? The ONLY way to start a
GREAT day �Love, the AZD's.
AOPI: Supcrbowl Sunday was a definate
blast! No matter whether it was a kick,
run, or pass. The Bengals gave the Niners
a scare, but for the most part, none of us
cared, cause our MVP was the imported
beer! So if y'all are willin there's no need
to fear, we'd love to meet ya the same time
every year! �The Theta Chi's.
HAPPY HOUR WITH THETA CHI: And
Pantana's on Wed. night 9 to cloiing.
P.Bs is the best place to be, so let's i 'ike
that line even longer than usual Plus,
classes before 12 on Thurs have been
cancelled! Whata bargain!
THETA CHI: And Pantana Bob's present
I lappv I lour Wed. 9 to closing Let's start
Spring early this year and begin the ECU
four day weekend in style.
DZ'S: Thursday night was really hot. We
couldn't do another shot. Kamikaze's got
us going. After the beer bongs there was
no slowing. The party turned in'o 2 dance
Oh, Kinsey, have you found your pants?
We had a blast. Let's do it again! �The
KA's.
AZD'S: Thanks for helping us out at rush.
Also, we had a killer time at the party fol-
lowing rush! Let's do it again real soon. �
Phi Taus.
PHI TAU PLEDGES: Congratulations on
choosing the best fraternity on campus�
Phi Kappa Tau�a Legend of All Time. �
The Brothers.
GIRLS: KA little sister rush begins to-
night. Come by and meet the brothers and
hi' sisters of Kappa Alpha 8:00-11:00 at
the KA House.
PAMELA JEAN: The Rose Bowl Queen'
Congratulations! We luv ya. �Robbie,
I losen & Blah.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHAS: Congratula
tions to the new AM's. �Crescent Girls.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
HEY GREEKS Come hear nationally
known speaker Bob Boyd at the ADPi
house Tuesday, February 7 at 9 p.m. Tie
topic is Love, Sex, and AIDS and it is
sponsored by Campus Crusade for Chr t.
ANGEL FLIGHT RUSH Monday, Feb. 6,
7:00 p.m. at the Detachment Tuesday,
Feb. 7, 7:00 p.m. at Colonel Patton's
House. Wednesday, Feb. 8, 7:00 p.m. at
Chico's. For more information, call 72-
5431 or 752-9334.
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS: Bring your
girlfriends to rush tonight. The Brothers
only want the best candidates for little
sisters. After all, the best already are little
sisters!
PHI TAU BROTHERS: Can't wait to
party tonight. We are bringing over some
great girls to be little sisters at the best
fraternity! �Love, Theta Kappa Tau Little
Sisters.
VAMP CREW: William, Jimbo, Markus,
and Scooby�I love you guys! We need to
road trip again real soon! �Love, the
Nickster.
DELTA ZLTAS. . . : Thanks for help;ng
makeour rush that much more succcs' ul
Maybe you could invite us over for dinner
sometime. �With much love, the Broth-
ers and Pledges of Kappa Sigma.
TO A SPECIAL ALPHA PHI: I had a
great time at the formal Thanks for aim-
ing with me. �Clint.
TO ALL NtW SORORITY SISTERS:
The Brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon
would like to congratulate you on vour
success. May Greek life be all vou want it
to be and more.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON AFTER-
NOON DELIGHT Fridays at Grogs
Beverage specials and dixrs open at "30
Check out Kev, the host with the most
AZD-PIKA DUEL BASH: Like 3rd Street
wasn't enough, we pushed on to the Fi,
where we really got hammered' Thanks
for a thrashin' good time �The Pikes.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
WIN, LOSE OR DRAW: Coming Febru
ary 13 �Pika
HEY GIRLS: Pi Kappa Alpha LiT Sister
Rush tonight 7-10 Come experience the
finest Ul' sister program on campus The
Attic.
SIGMA BASKETBALL TEAM: We re s,
lucky to have such a wonderful team
representing us Way to go on your past
win and good luck the rest of the season
�Love, Sigmas.
KATHRYN SEPENZIS: Congratulations
on being KA pinned' The best to you -
Love the Sigmas
KELLY GREER: Congratulations on get
ting Panhellenic Vice President �Love
the Sigmas
SIG EPS: We had a great time at the social,
it looks like you all got a great group of
guys. Let's get together again soon! �
Love the Sigmas
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA CRESCENT
GIRLS: Welcome back, thank you for last
semester, we had a blast on Monday
nights I lope to see ou back for Rush Feb.
7it 8 at 8 p m. at tiit I iouse. �The Broth-
ers.
HAPPY HOUR At the Fizz This and
every Thursday night 9pm until �Pi
Kappa Alpha
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DI$feAY CLASSIFIED
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville, NC27834 .
(Dotvntown Mall) 758-3025
VALENTINES DAY
ROSES?
CALL BONITAS
BOUTIQUE OF
FLOWERS AND GIFTS
for SpecialPhone 355-
7888. Greenville Square
Shopping Center.
(just down from K-mart)
WOULD YOU LIKE
i TO LEARN TO SHAG?
5 Weeks
Tuesdays
$25.00
SHAG LESSONS
At the new
Ramada Inn
Starts Feb. 14
Beginner 7:00
Intermediate 8:00
Advanced 9:00
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru Sat. Low
Cost Termination to 20 weeks of pregnancy
I
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
-�
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ACCU :
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1-800-433-2930
J
758-2400
WE DELIVER!
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
5:00 pm - 12:30 am
758-7979
I
PITT COUNTY DRIVING
SCHOOL
SERVING ALL AGES
PHONB:
355-6552 (9:00 - 5:00)
756-7457 (After5:00)
1807 SOUTH CHARLES STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
Boxers Wanted:
TKE BOXING
March 28, 29, 30
Minges Coliseum
Boxer Registration
757-3042 or 830-1094
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held everv
Thurs at 6 p.m in the Culture Center.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester and or Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenlans Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Hey you guys! Come join die fun on the
Student Union Travel Committee's cruise
to the BAHAMAS over Spring Break.
There will be dancing, swimming, relax-
ing and tons of other things to do aboard
ship. All transportation and "all you can
eat" on the Carnival ship The ship will
dock at Freeport and Nassau, so come on
and shop until you drop in the world's
biggest marketplace!
CCF
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Ra wl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Cailery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 75?-o�65 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
RACOUETBALL DOUBLES
A registration meeting for Intramural rac-
quetball doubles teams will be held Feb. 7
at 5:00 p.m. in Biology 103. Men's and
women's partners are welcome!
FREE THROW CONTEST
A free throw contest sponsored by Intra-
mural-Recreational Services will be held
Feb 9 in Memorial Gym from 3:00-5:00
p.m. and in Minges Coliseum from 8:00-
10:00 p.m. Winners will receive Intramu-
ral championship t-shirts. Register on-site
with your ECU I.D.
SLAM DUNK CONTEST
Registration for the annual Intramural
slam dunk contest will be held Feb. 14 at
5:00 p.m. in BIO N-102. Women as well as
men arc invited to sign-up. The goal wiy
be adjusted for women participants. Mi-
chael and Michelle Jordans should attend.
WEIGHT LIFTING CONTEST
Muscle and muscleless bound men and
women should attend the Intramural
registration meeting for the annual
weight lifting contest Feb. 20 at 5:00 p.m.
in GCB 1026.
FINANCIAL AID QRIENTA:
TIQN
Information and applications for 1989-90'
Feb. 9, 4:00 p.m Hendrix Theatre�MSC.
SOPHOMORES AND IRS
Earn over $600.00 this summer Earn
$100.00 a month during your last two
years in college. Become a part of the
Army ROTC Dept. here at ECU. Attend
the summer officer leadership course at
Fort Knox, Kentucky. Info, meeting will
be held on Feb. 9 at 1800 hours in room 339
Rawl. It's not too late for you to earn a
commission prior to graduation. For more
info contact Capt. Steve L. Jones, Rawl
344, 757-6974.
ILLUMINA
The Ultimate Chance for all students to
show their artistic talents! The Spring art
competition will be accepting entries Feb.
15-17 from 35 m in rm. 221 Menden-
hall. Entry fee is $3.00entry and each
pwttw may submit 3 pieces. First place
$175.00, 2nd place $125.00, 3rd place
$75.00 and 5 honorable mentions of
$25.00. The Illumina reception will be Feb.
20,7-9 p.m. in MehdenMf Gallery. Unife-
lected pieces must be picked up by Feb. 19
or no later than Feb. 20 by 3 p.m. due to
lack of storage.
PAFTICIPANTS NEEDED
Participants for asthma research study.
Males age 18-45, with mild to moderate
asthma. Compensation available. Please
call 551-3159.
INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE
Interested in spending this summer in
remote parts of the world? The Overseas
Development Network (ODN) is spon-
soring internships for students and recent
graduates in the Philippines, India, Bang-
ladesh, Nicaragua, Bolivia, Belize, and
our own Appalachian mountains. Any
major can apply. Length of stay varies
from 3-6 months. For more info contact
Marianne Exum (h) 830-9450 it (w) 757-
6271. Hurry! Applications Deadline�
Feb. If.
ECU NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigitors, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 7:30-9 in
Biology 103. The non-stop, no-frills meet-
ing is designed to help you develop a
closer walk�with God. In-flight refresh-
ments served. No ticket required; just
reserve your time.
CANDY-P-GRAMS
Inter-varsity rill be selling candy-o-
frams for Valentine's Day in front of the
tudent Store Feb. 8-10. Proceeds will go
towards Habakkuk coming to ECU in late
March
COOPERATIVE ED.
Cooperative Ed , a free service offered by
the Univerity, is designed to help vou find
career-related work experience before
you graduate V e would like to extend an
invitation to al' students to attend a Co-oi.�
info Seminar in the GCB Seminars for
spring '89: Feb 9, 4 p.m , room 2016; Feb.
13, 4 p.m , room 2016; Feb 16, 1 p.m
rooml014;Feb 20,1 p.m room 1014; Feb.
23,4pm,room 2016;Feb 27,4p.mroom
2016
PHI BETA SICMA
A formal smoker will be held Feb 9 at 7:00
p.m. in NGB, room 2002. All interested
voung men are invited to attend. BLUE
PHI!
AMNESTY INTL
Amnestsy Intl. Group 402 is looking
persons to assist in its "Brazilian Ca
paign " The group meets every f
Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Ep
Church, 401E. 4th St in the upper
enter from the 4th St. entrance
meeting: Feb. 22 Students welcome!







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7,1989 7
Announcements
ASALTOfAMEAl
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
The Financial Mgmt. Assoc. will hold a
meeting on Feb 8 at 430 p.m. in room 3009
GCB. The guest speaker will be Mr. Archie
Jennings of Shearson Lehman Hutton,
Inc. All are welcome to attend the meet-
ing.
HEART FOR ART
Ani.ual Valentine's Dav Sale pre rented by
School of Art Metals Department. It will
be Fob 8-10, 13-14. Displays are to be
found in the fover and top of the ramp (3rd
floor Jenkins Art Bldg.
PRIME TIME
It vou are wondering about God's love for
you, then come to "Prime Time" and dis-
oovef if through fellowship and hearing
Cod's word at Rawl in rm. 130 evtry
Thurs. at 7:30 p m. Refreshments served.
BCST HONOR SOCIETY
FCL' Broadcast 1 lonor Society will meet
Wed at 530 in Joyner, rm. 234. Pictures
will be taken for the yearbook. All mem-
bers should attend.
COLLEGIATE PECA
On Feb. 13at 2:00pm. inCCB2010, DECA
will be having a Valentine's Day party
The faculty and staff of the BVTE Dept are
cordially invited. DECA members please
plan to attend.
WATER HOCKEY CLUB
Underwater Hockey Club will be playing
Wed. at S.00 p.m. at Memorial Gym. Snor-
keling equip, nor skill is necessary, but if
have either, please bring The next dates of
plav will be Feb. 14 at 9:00 p.m , Feb. 15 at
8.00 p.m. Feb 28 at 9:00p.m. and Feb. 22 at
8 00 p.m. Every night of play will be at
Memorial Gvm. If an v questions call Craig
Cannon 752-7620 or Chi 752-8124. Se ev-
er vone interested underwater.
SOCWCJ APPLICATIONS
FOR SPRING. 1989
Students must have received and turned
in their applications to the major by Feb.
10. Faculty interviews must be completed
bv Feb. 27. The group meeting with Prof.
Gartman will be on March 1 & 2 at 500
p.m in Ragsdale 218. You must attend
either the March 1 or 2 meeting.
CABARET
The Performing Arts Series and the Dept.
of University Unions present CABARET,
the smash Broadway musical. This pro-
fessional performance will take place on
Feb 21, 800 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
This production is being staged by Daeda-
�4us Productions, who brought PURLIE lo-
VVright Auditorium last year. Don't miss
this exciting musical of decadent, delight-
ful, and dazzling entertainment. "Life is a
Cabaret, Old Chum, Come to the Caba-
ret Tickets for CABARET are on sale in
the Central Ticket Office, MSC. Telephone
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. - 6:00 p.m Mon. - Fri.
POTISH NAT.L RADIO
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
The Polish National Radio Symphony Or-
chestra will appear as part of the Perform-
ing Arts Series on Feb. 22, 8:00 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Over 100 members
strong, this symphony is led by Antoni
Wit and features guest pianist Piotr
Paleczny. The program for this grand
evening includes: Strauss�DON JUAN,
Op. 20; Chopin-CONCERTO No. 2 in F
Minor, Op. 21; and Brahms�SYM-
PHONY No. 2 in D Major Op. 73. Tickets
for this event are on sale now in the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, MSC. The number is
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. - 6:00 p.m MonFri.
avgft FLIGHT RUSH
Feb. 6,7:00 p.m. at the Detachment; Feb. 7
7:00 p.m. at Colonel Patton'shouse; Feb. 8,
7:00 p.m. at Chico's. For more info cau
752-5431 or 752-9334.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for publication in the April
issue. Articles can be left at the office or the
Media Board secretary's office, located in
the Publications Bldg. across from Joyner
Library. The first issue for Spring
semester is expected to arrive in a few
weeks.
MSAAfi
The Minority Student Affairs Advisory
Board will sponsor a Black History pro-
gram entitled: "Continuing the Legacy"
in Jenkins Aud. on Feb. 7 at 8:00 p.m. The
keynote speaker is Dr. Larry Smith. Music
will be rendered by Charles Maxwell and
the ECU Gospel Choir. Also featured on
the program will be Calvin Cherry who
will perform an African dance.
WQMENS EASKETBALL
The Lady Pirates will be back at Minges on
Feb. 11 after a f.ve-game road trip. They
face James Madison at 7:00 p.m. At
halftime there will be a Quinces dinner
giveaway and a performance by the Pure
Gold Dancers.
MINORITY ADVISORY
BOARD
In honor of Black History Month, the M AB
will be sponsoring "Continuing the Leg-
jy" on Feb. 7 at 8:00 p.m. in Jenkins Aud.
Please come and help us celebrate Black
History
GMAT
The Graduate Mgmt. Admission Test will
be offered at ECU on March 18. Applica-
tion blanks are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT, Educational Testing
Service. Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ 08540.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Feb. 15. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center, room
105 Speight Bldg.
NTE (SPECIALTY AREA)
The National Teacher Examination�Spe-
cialty Area Exams�will be offered at
ECU on April 1. Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to the Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 911-R, Prince-
ton, NJ 08541. Applications must be post-
marked no later than Feb. 27. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Room 105 Speight Bldg.
MEDICAL COLLEGE ADMIS-
SION TEST
Our next meeting will be at 7:00 in rm.
1012 GCB on Fc b. 9th. We will be having a
guest speaker. Plan to discuss dates for a
trip to the U.S. Supreme Court. Members
and newcomers are asked to attend.
RETURNED PEACE CORPS
VOLUNTEERS
A represen'itive from the N.C. Peace
Corps Assoc. will be on campus Feb. 9
from 7-9 p.m. in room 1003 GCB with a
slide show prepared by NC RPCVs. Come
and share your PC experiences with the
next generation.
BLACK FACULTY SYMPO-
SJUM
Crt0uSTEB(X
f�E
LADIES NIGHT
OUT
���" Toupbff m m m m l
FREE MEAL
BUY ONE SHRIMP
DINNER
GET ONE OF EQUAL SIZE
FREE
Small $5.25
Regular $6.25
Large $7.25
(Beverage not included.)
Good any time. Dine-in or Take-out.
(Offer expires Feb. 28. 1989) m m
FOSDiCK -
1890 SEAFOOD
,2903 S. Evans St.
Takeout Orders: 756-2011
Additional Parking Available
V
The new 1989 Medical College Admission
Test 0MCAT) applications have arrived in
the Testing Center. Speight Bldg room
105. The next test date is April 29. Applica-
tions must le completed and postmarked
no later than March 31.
CQLXEGE REPUBLICANS
The College Republicans will be meeting
in rm 212 tomorrow evening at 7:00 p.m.
All new members welcome, all old mem-
bers strongly urged to attend.
SERVICE AUCTION
A Service Auction sponsored by the stu-
dent chapter of ASID is scheduled for Feb.
23 from 7-9 p.m. The auction will be held
in room 205 of the Home Ec. Bldg. All
proceeds will benefit the physically dis-
abled. Donations are tax deductible. Serv-
ices include: Housecleaning, baby sitting,
car washing, yard work and window
washing. Students & faculty & staff are
encouraged to attend!
KAYAKING CLUB
The Kayaking Uud will meet again on
Feb. 7. The meetings are held in Memorial
Gvm at 830 (downstairs). Time will be
spent in the pool learning basic skills.
Trips will also be planned. The pool fee is
SI 00. Newcomers are certainly welcome.
Come down and 'yak with us.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Members of the Organization of Black
Faculty and Staff (OBLS) will present their
current andor on-going research inter-
ests during Black History Month. Presen-
tations will be held each Mon. during the
month of Feb. in the Ledonia Wright Afro-
American Cultural Center from 11:30-
1:30. Students, faculty and staff are en-
couraged to bring a brown bag lunch and
enjoy the discussion. Sponsored by the
Office of Minority Student Affairs.
SPECIAL SCREENING
Tonight at 7 p.m. in B-04 in Joyner Library,
see the new video, America Hurts: The
Drug Epidemic Stay for a while and dis-
cuss what is happening on campus con-
cerning Substance Abuse Prevention.
This is in conjunction with National Colle-
giate Drug Awareness Week, Feb. 6-12.
Sponsored by the Office of Substance
Abuse Prevention & Education. For more
info call 757-6793 or come by 303 Erwin.
IMPROVING STUDY SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college. Th?
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your GPA.
All sessions will be in 313 Wright Bldg.
Feb. 13, Making & Using Notes, 3-4:30
p.m Feb. 14, Making & Taking Notes, 3-
430 p.m. You may attend all the topic
sessions or choose the ones where you
need the most improvement.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Meeting every Wed. night at 7 p.m. Come
join us for fellowship and fun. Look for
on-campus posted announcements for
meeting location or call 758-5082 for more
info.
VfrTFMTTNECANPY-O-
GRAMS
Valentine Candy-O-Grams will be on sale
in front of the Student Store Wed Thurs
it Fri. from 10 aj�. - 2 pjn. Proceeds will
go toward the Multi-Media Production of
"Habakkuk which will be presented
March 27 & 28. There will be free general
admission for "Habakkuk
CI ASS PICTURES
Class pictures will be taken Feb. 9th & 10th
in the Buccaneer Office from 9-12 & 1-4.
This is the last chance for individual pic-
tures to be put in the class section of the
1989 Buccaneer!
BAKE SALE
Buy your sweetheart a sweet for
Valentine's Day! The Decision Science
Society will be sponsoring a bake sale on
Feb. 13 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. in front of
the Student Store. Baked goods for sale
will include cup cakes, cookies, and other
edible delights. Proceeds from this sale
will be used to fund future Decision Sci-
ence Society activities.
ASH WED. SERVICE
Worship God Wed. night at 5 p.m. at the
Methodist Student Center then enjoy a
delicious, all-you-can-eat home cooked
meal and good fellowship. The meal is $2,
$1.50 for members, 1 cent credit for each
aluminum or steel can you bring to be
recycled. Call 758-2030 for more info.
Sponsored by Presbyterian and Method-
ist Campus Ministries.
FSI CHI
Psi Chi will have initiation for new spring
members and election of new officers on
Jan. 9 at 4 p.m. in the Psi Chi library �
Rawl 302. all members are required to
attend.
Tar Landing Seafood
Daily Special
6 oz. Sirloin with Shrimp
(Fried, Boiled, or Broiled)
served with French Friea or Baked Potato,
Cole Slaw and Hushpuppies.
only $5.99
105 Airport Road
758-0327
Banquet Facilities Available
INTRODUCING:
READ
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Wednesday - LADIES NIGHT
- $2.00 Ice Teas!
-Ladies FREE
Thursday - TIAJUANA TEA PARTY!
- LADIES FREE!
- $2.00 TIAJUANA TEAS!
TRY THE RAFTERS CHERRY BOMB!
Romancing
n Rio!
eooco
T
)

LOVE
Buy a gift for $10.00 or more,
get a Valentine Card
$2.00 or less
FREE!
FREE GIFT WRAPPING
on items $3.50 or more




Gift Ideas:
Sweatshirts
T-Shirts
Stuffed Animals
Glassware
STUDENT STORE
East Carolina University
Wright Building


"H.
The Gift cannot be a Book

FOR YOUR
.VALENTINE
mtiDOOOOonnrncoooooooaococoooooooeos





IHfc -AS r CAROI 1NIAN
Features
FEBRUARYS 1989 PAGE 8
Pi Kappa Phi gets house
By ALICIA FORD
Staff Writer
After three long years of stay-
ing in apartments and dorms, the
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity is reunited
again in a new house where the
old one once stood on Hooker
Road.
The original house was lo-
cated on the corner of Fifth and
Eastern streets. During the mid-
1970'sa few of the braver brothers
decided to lay out nude on the
sure systems studies major, also
helped on moving day. "It was a
lot of fun. We didn't really party
until that weekend when we had
everybody settled in said Dick-
ens. , . . .
The house is valued at
$200,000 and the Pi Kapps'
alumni donated almost $60,000.
Pi Kappa Phi Properticsco-signcd
a loan for the chapter to help to
pay for the rest.
The new house sits on three
and a half acres of land and lias a
lake, complete with ducks and a
roof. When the chancellor's wife br fnm of thc driveway.
rove by and saw them, they lake fa a four�
court basketball court that the
and
Pi Kappa Phi house manager Randy Bishop reflects on moving into the newly-built fraternity
house. The house is the first new fraternity house built at ECU. (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU
Photolab)
Royal Court Lp rocks
Editot s n
t was just sitting at my desk,
doing those editorial-type things,
when my good buddy Trey Bien production and export musician
from over at WZMB New Rock ship
The Royal Court of China's
second album. Geared and
Primed is oneof the best albums
I've ever heard. "Geared and
Primed offers a unique blend of
Billy Idol mixed with Guns and
Roses, all while maintaining slick
91 called. He said, lieu. Have
got a surprise for you
Breathlessly, I waited to hear
what the surprise was. MB was
having another birthday party?
drivin' n' cryin u s coming to
town?
"No, no, "Not
that good. I finally have tUose
record rei ten - i e '
I was let down, until he brc
thetn over. I n em at i
took up res r in m
again.
These two hip albums can be
heard frequently on 91.3, so call
up and request those babies. And
look for the boss WZMB Top 13
album chart right here every
Thursday.
folk album than a rock album.
"Geared and Primed" is a rock
record that pulls no punches from
start to finish. One day this group
will be HUGE, just remember you
heard them here first.
The Masters of Reality mark
the return of producer Rick Ru-
bin. This group has one of the
most original sounds I've heard
in a long time. The Masters of
Reality display the eeriness of the
Doors, the breakneck rhvthms of
X, and the tightness of the Cult.
Imagine what Led Zepplin
would sound like with Rick Rubin
producing them.
"Domino" and "The Blue
were kicked off campus
moved to Hooker Road.
They lived in this house until
it was condemned by the city of
Greenville in spring 1985 due to
basement flooding and other ir-
reparable damages. The house
was empty until it was torn down
in September 1988 and a new,
two-level, western style A-frame
was built in its place.
The new house was com-
pleted in January, and 12 brothers
moved in on the third day of class
this semester. Rick Miller, the Pi
Kapps Archon President, helped
supervise the move. "It took us
about two to three days. We fin-
ished on a Friday and had the
official housewarming party that
Sunday said Miller.
One of the brothers who lives
in the house, John Dickens, a lei-
frnternity raised the money tor
and built themselves.
The party room overlooks the
basketball court, and except for
four double bedrooms, it takes up
most of the downstairs. Eight o
the Pi Kapps share these rooms,
and each has an adjoining bath.
The den, kitchen area, and
four single bedrooms are located
upstairs. Each bedroom contains
new furniture that was donated
with the house, and includes a
bed, dresser and desk. "We had to
pay for the TV ourselves, but the
couches and chairs were all do-
nated by alumni brothers said
Miller. The money for the televi-
sion and basketball court was
earned during fundraisers like
car washes and selling dough-
nuts.
ThePiKaj ps are planning on
! lilding additions onto the house
in the near future. A volleyball
court and a JO by 32'deck, com
plete with a hot tub, is in the
nuking, "hey also hope to have a
stage built on the deck. Some o(
the brothers aa- members of the
band 180 Proof, and they plan to
perform at a number of the parties
and fundraisers
Vice-president Barry Oliver is
also the drummer tor 180 Proof.
"We hope to have the deck and
stage built by April so we can be
ready for the parties and activities
we have planned this summer
Oliver siid. A communications
leisure systems studies major, he
is a senior at ECU.
The Pi Kapps currently have
31 active members and 17
pledges In order to live in the
house vou are put on a waiting
list When another brother moves
out you can move in, and it usu-
ally takes about two wars to wait.
The fraternity is planning ai offi
rial ribbon-cutting ceremony on
February 18.
Does having a brand new
house help upgrade the Pi Kapps
image and popularity? "Defi-
nitely' said Miller. ' 'On the
average, we have 10 to 15 guys
pledge a semester, and this
semest r e uui 17. We're really
happy and extremely pleased
with the noA house
ECU hosts comedians
Jeff Mays on lead guitar blis-
ters through the fast tracks such
as ' 1 ljuana Go" and "Geared and
Primed" and still has thediversity
to bring the tempo down to "Six
Empty Bottles While listening to
this album you can definately
hear influences of Zodiac Mind-
warp and Cult.
rhe vocals on "Geared and
Primed" are relentless. Joe Blan-
i works in perfect synch with emplify their sound. The songs
basslhx wailing guitars and take on a kind of dark, eerie mys-
unding drums into one of the tery feeling with a laser pitched
tightest albums oi the year. The guitar to blaze through the haze.
! p marks a definite change for "On Looking To Get Rite" the
The Royal Court of China from group displays a definite Led Zep
their first album. acoustic sound. The Masters of
Their debut album was much Reality's self-titled debut album videotaped,
slower and sounded more like a is a refreshingly different sound. Certs and
teamed up to send professional
club comedians and college com-
edy talent scouts on the road be
tween January and March in a
nationwide search for the crown
prince � or princess � of college
comedy. Comic hopefuls from
College Comedy ECU will get the chance to per-
form their best 3-minute stand-
High school class clowns
never die they goon to college!
And now, comedians at 100 col-
leges around the country will
have a chance to get their act out
of the classroom and into the
spotlight by entering the third
annual "U.S
Competition'
ECU has been selected to host up routine before fellow students
Garden" are perfect songs to ex- the competition at 8 p.m. tonight and the College Comedy cameras.
Each contestant's routine will be
videotaped for review by our
national judge, Jerry Seinfeld.
Four finalists will be selected
by Jerry Seinfeld to compete for
the title of 'The Funniest College
Comedian" at the U.S. College
Comedy Competition finals in
Daytona Beach during Spring
in Mendenhall 244. Those wish-
ing to perform should register at
7:30.
A professional comedian
from New York will warm up the
audience, and then contestants
will have their performances
Doritos have
k i.i March Based on the
number of entries in last year's
100-campus search Certs and
Doritos expect a minimum of
2,000 contestants to give it "the
old college comedy try
Finalists , ill r- ceive an all-
�expensepaid triptoDaj tona,fOtn
daysofVIPaccomodations and a
trip for two to 1 os Angeles to see
the taping oi Comic Relief 111.
errySeinfeld willopen the finals,
then ea h of the finalists will taki
the stage in an effort to get thou-
sands of Spring Breakers laugh
ing.
Entrants will receive a free
tee shirt and there will be Doritos
for the whole crowd.
Tintin turns 60, still adventurous
BRUSSELS, Belgium (AD
Tintin, the moon-faced Belgian
comic strip reporter who trots
around in knickers in action-
packed tales, has quietly turned
60.
The intrepid youngscribe a
trademark tuft of hair rising
above the round iace with the peg
nose and beady eyes first ap-
peared Jan. 29, 1929 in a cartoon
strip in a week!) insert for young-
sters in La Vingtieme Siecle, a
now defunct Brussels daily.
The rest is history, or at least
years of happy reading and re-
reading for comic strip lovers in
30 nations who have devoured
the 23 Tintin albums in any of 33
languages.
I iis albums have sold more
than 100 million copies world-
wide, said Yiviane Vandeninden,
organizer of "Herge, Dessi-
nateur" (Herge, Cartoonist), a
retrospective of the work of
Tintin'screator, George Remy. He
signed his work Herge which are
his initials in French, spelled
backward.
Herge died of cancer in 1983
at the age of 76. He raised the low-
key craft of comic strip drawing
into an art form.
His albums are gems of story-
telling and drawing. They put
Tintin � who never aged and
only late in life exchanged his
puffy pants for slacks � into fast-
paced tales that took him from the
Soviet Union to Africa, and from
the opium dens of the Far East to
the skyscrapers of America.
He even explored the moon in
two strips in the late 1940s whose
drawings remain timeless to this
day.
Herge's death has done won-
ders for the price of original Herge
drawings which fetch upwards of
$100,000, depending on quality.
Baker learned blues from dad
MORGANTON, NX. (AP)
� They call the musk she coax
from her six-strmg acoustic guitar
the Piedmont blues, but to Etta
Baker it isth language of joy and
remembrance.
It sounds that way, too, a she
lightv picks out the melody of
"Dew Drops the iirt tune she
can remember hvr daddy playing
more than 70 years ago in the
Ca Id we 11 County foothills
�Vmanv mornings I've been
awakened by my daddy's banjo.
and the smell oi ham cooking and
apples frying she said. "And it
was impossible to lay in bed when
I smelled all that good food, and
my daddy playing
"It's Vist been a wonderful
life, as far back as i can remem-
ber
Folklorists regard Baker, at
75, as one of the finest guitarists in
two-finger picking style that char-
Correction
In "A day in the life of a
theater major" (Feb. 2), Nina
Blanton's name was misspelled.
acterizes the Piedmont blues. On
an. 18 in Raleigh, she and seven
other masters of traditional arts
will be honored as the first recipi-
ents of the North Carolina Folk
Heritage Award from the N.C.
Arts Council, worth $2,000
apiece.
After 23 years of work at a
Morganton textile mill, she now
performs at festivals nationwide,
including JazzCharlotte.
Baker has no formal music
training, nor can she read music.
But, she said from her small frame
house under a spreading magno-
lia tree, "I dream music. I hear
chords in my sleep
Born in the Johns River com-
munity of Caldwell County,
where her father hrnted and
farmed for a living, she grew up
near Richmond as thc last of eight
children. The family, which later
returned to North Carolina, had
black, Cherokee and Irish - and
musical - bloodlines.
Boone Reid, her father,
played banjo, fiddle and guitar;
her mother played harmonica
and Jew's harp. Her brothers and
sister also played the eclectic mix
of traditional mountain tunes and
popular music in their racially
mixed community, at shuckings
and house parties where music
was sometimes made all night.
"I've seen my daddy dance,
and he was a tall man, but so light
on his feet that you could barely
hear him on the floor she said.
Before age 3, she was pluck-
ing out notes on a small guitar as
it lay flat across her lap. It was
during the family's time in Vir-
ginia that she first heard "the most
sweetest music the blues.
"I've had people ask me how
the blues make me feel, and I say
they make me feel good she
said. "If s supposed to be based
on somebody's sadness, but
aren't you glad it's somebody
else's and not yours?"
She's known now for her in-
ventive performances and the
delicate picking style she devel-
oped.
"I make myself play every
day about one hour and 45 min-
utes she said. "If I make a sound
that doesn't sound just right, I'll
do it all over again. I just want to
get to the point where 1 can tell
myself, 'Etta, you can play"
"But I'm not there yet. I'm
working on it, though
Baker was first recorded in
1956 for the influential album
"Instrumental Music of the
Southern Appalachians" and two
years later left the mill for music.
She sometimes plays with her
sister, guitarist Cora Phillips, as
they did during the 1982 World's
Fair in Knoxville, Tenn. The pair
won the N.C. Folklore Society's
Brown-Hudson Award for contri-
butions to folk arts that year.
It was at the fair that she
composed her lively "Knoxville
Rag the result of those chords
that come to her in bed.
Her nine children, of whom
eight survive, continue the
family's musical tradition on pi-
ano and guitar. Daughter Darlene
often accompanies her on festival
trips, she said, while Dorothy has
a beautiful singing voice. Baker
rarely sings.
As she tends her garden and
her zebra finches at home, the
music of Boone Reid haunts her
still. She got a banio a year ago and
a fiddle this month and is teaching
herself to play them, too.
These dorm residents score passing students as Greenville scores
a 9.5 for great weather last week. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU
Photolab)
Sean Young is a good actress
LOS ANGELES (AP) � The cate an empty-headed set decora-
film world has yet to get a fix on tion. That's about all she contrib-
Sean Young, whose very name uted in such films as "Young
contributes to the confusion. Doctors in Love" and "Stripes
A first glance, though, elimi- Then last year she dazzled audi-
nates any question about gender, ences with her performance as the
With a slender, leggy figure, near- sensuous Washington mistress:
perfect face and long dark hair, caught between Kevin Costner,
she is obviously all woman. and Gene Hackman in "No WayE
Such attributes might indi- Out






3i �
1Mb FASrCAROl INIAN
Features
FEBRUARY 7, 1999 PAGES
Pi Kappa Phi gets house
By ALICIA FORD
Staff Writer
Pi Kappa Phi house manager Randy Bishop reflects on moving into the newly-built fraternity
house. The house is the first new fraternity house built at ECU. (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU
Photolab)
Royal Court Lp rocks
By TREY BI1 N
fcdttC ' S t
I zvas just fitting at my desk,
doing those editorial-type things,
when my good buddy Trey Bien
from over at WZMB, New Rock
91 called. He said, "Hey. Have I
got a surprise for you
Breathlessly, Iwaitedto hear
what the surprise was. 7.MR was
having another birthday party?
drivin' n' cryin' u - coming to
town?
"No, no, �; d. "Not
that good. I finally have those
record ����. tised
twos let down, nought
them oi er. I tea ' n i oy

took up residt e � I
again.
These tu o hip albums can be
heard frequently i i ;1 v so call
up and re mest those babies. And
look for the boss W.MU Top 13
album chart right here every
Thursday.
The Royal Court of China's
second album, "Geared and
rrimed is one of the best albums
I've ever heard. "Geared and
Primed" otters a unique blend of
Billy Idol mixed with Guns and
Roses, all while maintaining slick
production and expert musician-
ship.
Jeff Mays on lead guitar blis-
ters through the fast tracks such
as "Tijuana Go" and "Geared and
Primed'andstill hasthediversity
to bring the tempo down to "Six
Empty Bottles While listening to
this album you can definately
hear influences of Zodiac Mind-
warp and Cult.
li e vocals on "Geared and
Primed" are relentless. )oe Blan-
ton works in perfect synch with
e bass line, wailing guitars and
unding drums into one of the
tightest albums of the year. The
Lp marks a definite change for
The Roval Court of China from
their first album.
Their debut album was much
slower and sounded more like a
folk album than a rock album.
"Geared and Primed" is a rock
record that pulls no punches from
start to finish. One day this group
will be HUGE, just remember you
heard them here first.
The Masters of Reality mark
the return of producer Rick Ru-
bin. This group has one of the
most original sounds I've heard
in a long time. The Masters of
Reality display the ecriness of the
Doors, the breakneck rhythms of
X, and the tightness of the Cult.
Imagine what Led Zepplin
would sound like with Rick Rubin
producing them.
"Domino" and "The Blue
Garden" are perfect songs to ex-
emplify their sound. The songs
take on a kind of dark, eerie mvs-
tery feeling with a laser pitched
guitar to blaze through the haze.
"On Looking To Get Rite" the
group displays a definite Led Zep
acoustic sound. The Masters of
Reality's self-titled debut album
is a refreshingly different sound.
After three long years of stay-
ing in apartments and dorms, the
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity is reunited
again in a new house where the
old one once stood on Hooker
Road.
The original house was lo-
cated on the corner of Fifth and
Eastern streets. During the mid-
1970's a few of the braver brothers
decided to lay out nude on the
roof. When the chancellor's wife
drove by and saw them, they
were kicked off campus and
moved to Hooker Road.
They lived in this house until
it was condemned by the city of
Greenville in spring 1985 due to
basement flooding and other ir-
reparable damages. The house
was empty until it was torn down
in September 1988 and a new,
two-level, western style A-frame
was built in its place.
The new house was com-
pleted in January, and 12 brothers
moved in on the third day of class
this semester. Rick Miller, the Pi
Kapps Archon President, helped
supervise the move. "It took us
about two to three days. We fin-
ished on a Friday and had the
official housewarming party that
Sunday said Miller.
One of the brothers who lives
in the house, John Dickens, a lei-
sure systems studies major, also
helped on moving day. "It was a
lot of fun. We didn't really party
until that weekend when we had
everybody settled in said Dick-
ens. , .
The house is valued at
$200,000 and the Pi Kapps'
alumni donated almost $60,000.
Pi Kappa Phi Properties co-signed
a loan for the chapter to help to
pay for the rest.
The new house sits on three
and a half acres of land and has a
lake, complete with ducks and a
bridge, in front of the driveway.
Directly behind the lake is a four-
court basketball court that the
fraternity raised the money for
and built themselves.
The party room overlooks the
basketball court, and except for
four double bedrooms, it takes up
most of the downstairs. Eight of
the Pi Kapps share these rooms,
and each has an adjoining bath.
The den, kitchen area, and
four single bedrooms are located
upstairs. Each bedroom contains
new furniture that was donated
with the house, and includes a
bed, dresser and desk. "We had to
pay for the TV ourselves, but the
couches and chairs were all do-
nated by alumni brothers said
Miller. The money for the televi-
sion and basketball court was
earned during fundraisers like
car washes and selling dough-
nuts.
The Pi Kapps are planning on
building additions onto the house
in the near future. A volleyball
court and a m)1v J2' deck,com-
plete with a hot tub. is in the
making. They also hope tohavea
stage built on the de k. Some of
the brothers are members of the
band 180 Proof, and they plan to
perform at a number o the parties
and fundraisers
Vice president BarryOiiveris
also the drummer for 180 Proof.
"We hope to have the deck and
stage built by April so we can be
ready for the parties and activities
we have planned this summer
Oliver said. A communications
leisure systems studies major, he
is a senior at ECl
The Pi Kapps curn ntl) have
31 active members wc 17
pledges In order to live in the
house you are put i n a waiting
list. When another brother moves
out you can move in, and it usu-
ally takes about two years to wait.
The fraternity is planning ar offi
rial ribbon-cutting ceremony on
February 18.
Does having a brand new
house help upgrade the Pi Kapps
image ivd popularity? "Defi-
nitely said Miller. " 'On the
average, we have 10 to 15 guys
pledge a semester and this
semestt i . e had 17. We re really
happy and extremely pleased
with the new house
ECU hosts comedians
High school class clowns
never die they goon to college!
And now, comedians at 100 col-
leges around the country will
have a chance to get their act out
of the classroom and into the
spotlight by entering the third
annual "U.S. College Comedy
Competition
ECU has been selected to host
the competition at 8 p.m. tonight
in Mendenhall 244. Those wish-
ing to perform should register at
7:30.
A professional comedian
from New York will warm up the
audience, and then contestants
will have their performances
videotaped.
Certs and Doritos have
teamed up to send professional
club comedians and college com-
edy talent scouts on the road be-
tween January and March in a
nationwide search for the crown
prince � or princess � of college
comedy. Comic hopefuls from
ECU will get the chance to per-
form their best 3-minute stand-
up routine before fellow students
and the College Comedy cameras.
Each contestant's routine will be
videotaped for review by our
national judge, Jem' Seinfeld.
Four finalists will be selected
by Jerry Seinfeld to compete for
the title of 'The Funniest College
Comedian" at the U.S. College
Comedy Competition finals in
Daytona Beach during Spring
Tintirt turns 60, still adventurous
BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP)
Tintin, the moon-faced Belgian
comic strip reporter who trots
around in knickers in action-
packed tales, has quietly turned
60.
The in t ep
d voui
-cr.lv
trademark tuft of hair rising
above the round face with the peg
nose and beady eyes � first ap-
peared Ian. 29, 1929 in a cartoon
strip in a weekl) insert for young-
sters in La Vingtieme Siecle, a
now defunct Brussels daily.
The rest is history, or at least
years of happy reading and re-
reading for comic strip lovers in
30 nations who have devoured
the 23 Tintin albums in any of 33
languages.
His albums have sold more
than 100 million copies world-
ide, said Viviane Vandeninden,
organizer of "Herge, Dessi-
nateur" (Herge, Cartoonist), a
retrospective of the work of
Tintin'screator, George Remy. He
signed his work Herge which are
his initials in French, spelled
backward.
Herge died of cancer in 1983
at the age of 76. He raised the low-
key craft of comic strip drawing
into an art form.
His albums are gems of story-
telling and drawing. They put
Tintin � who never aged and
only late in life exchanged his
puffy pants for slacks � into fast-
paced tales that took him from the
Soviet Union to Africa, and from
the opium dens of the Far East to
the skyscrapers of America.
He even explored the moon in
two strips in the late 1940s whose
drawings remain timeless to this
day.
Herge's death has done won-
ders for the price of original Herge
drawings which fetch upwards of
$100,0 ' spending on quality.
Baker learned blues from dad
MORC,ANTON, N.C. (AP)
� Thev c all the music she cia s
from her six-string ia ustk guitar
the Piedmont blues, but to Etta
Baker it is the langu ige of joy and
remembrance.
It sounds that wav, too, .b she
lightlv picks out the melody of
"Dew' Drops the first tune she
can remember her daddy playing
more than 70 years ago in the
Caldwell County foothills.
"A-manv mornings I've been
awakened by my daddy's banjo,
and the smc il of ham cooking and
apples frying she said. "And it
was impossible to lay in bed when
I smelted all that good food, and
my daddy playing
"It's just been a wonderful
life, as far back as 1 can remem-
ber
Folklorists regard Baker, at
75, as one of the finest guitarists in
two-finger picking style that char-
Correction
In "A day in the life of a
theater major" (Feb. 2), Nina
Blanton's name was misspelled.
acterizes the Piedmont blues. On
Ian. 18 in Raleigh, she and seven
other masters of traditional arts
will be honored as the first recipi-
ents of the North Carolina Folk
Heritage Award from the N.C.
Arts Council, worth $2,000
apiece.
After 23 years of work at a
Morganton textile mill, she now
performs at festivals nationwide,
including JazzCharlotte.
Baker has no formal music
training, nor can she read music.
But, she said from her small frame
house under a spreading magno-
lia tree, "I dream music. I hear
chords in my sleep
Born in the Johns River com-
munity of Caldwell County,
where her father hrnted and
farmed for a living, she grew up
near Richmond as the last of eight
children. The family, which later
returned to North Carolina, had
black, Cherokee and Irish - and
musical - bloodlines.
Boone Reid, her father,
played banjo, fiddle and guitar;
her mother played harmonica
and Jew's harp. Her brothers and
sister also played the eclectic mix
of traditional mountain tunes and
popular music in their racially
mixed community, at shuckings
and house parties where music
was sometimes made all night.
"I've seen my daddy dance,
and he was a tall man, but so light
on his feet that you could barely
hear him on the floor she said.
Before age 3, she was pluck-
ing out notes on a small guitar as
it lay flat across her lap. It was
during the family's time in Vir-
ginia that she first heard "the most
sweetest music the blues.
"I've had people ask me how
the blues make me feel, and I say
they make me feel good she
said. "If s supposed to be based
on somebody's sadness, but
aren't you glad it's somebody
else's and not yours?"
She's known now for her in-
ventive performances and the
delicate picking style she devel-
oped.
"I make myself play every
day about one hour and 45 min-
utes she said. "If I make a sound
that doesn't sound just right, I'll
do it all over again. I just want to
get to the point where I can tell
myself, 'Etta, you can play
"But I'm not there yet. I'm
working on it, though
Baker was first recorded in
1956 for the influential album
"Instrumental Music of the
Southern Appalachians" and two
years later left the mill for music.
She sometimes plays with her
sister, guitarist Cora Phillips, as
they did during the 1982 World's
Fair in Knoxville, Tenn. The pair
won the N.C. Folklore Society's
Brown-Hudson Award for contri-
butions to folk arts that year.
It was at the fair that she
composed her lively "Knoxville
Rag the result of those chords
that come to her in bed.
Her nine children, of whom
eight survive, continue the
family's musical tradition on pi-
ano and guitar. Daughter Darlene
often accompanies her on festival
trips, she said, while Dorothy has
a beautiful singing voice. Baker
rarely sings.
As she tends her garden and
her zebra finches at home, the
music of Boone Reid haunts her
still. She got a banjo a year ago and
a fiddle this month and is teaching
herself to play them, too.
These dorm residents score passing students as Greenville scores
a 9.5 for great weather last week. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU
Photolab)
Sean Young is a good actress
Bn ak in M in h Based
number of entries in la-t year's
100-campus search Certs and
Doritos expect a minimum of
2,000 conw stants � giit "the
old college comedy try
Finalists will n cerve an all-
�CTCpensepaid tript� D o f na.four
daysofVIPaccomodations and a
trip for two to 1 os Angeles to see
the taping of Comic Relief III.
errySeinfeld willopen the finals
then ea h of the finalists will take
the stage in an effort to get thou-
sands of Spring Breakers laugh
ing.
Entrants will receive a free
tee shirt and there will be Doritos
for the whole crowd.
LOS ANGELES (AP) � The
film world has yet to get a fix on
Sean Young, whose very name
contributes to the confusion.
A first glance, though, elimi-
nates any question about gender.
With a slender, leggy figure, near-
perfect face and long dark hair,
she is obviously all woman.
Such attributes might indi-
cate an empty-headed set decora-
tion. That's about all she contrib
uted in such films as "Young
Doctors in Love" and "Stripes�
Then last year she dazzled audi-
ences with her performance as the
sensuous Washington mistress:
caught between Kevin Costner.
and Gene Hackman in "No WayS
Out r-
V





I

I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN-
FEBRUARY 7 J98Q9
Louisianans cook gumbo dishes
OPELOUSAS, La. (AP)�
Rachel Thompson had never
tasted shrimp in her native Lou-
isiana, which is famous for its
seafood, and Ronnie Emonet had
never heard the wind moan
through the piney hills of his own
state.
Both are 16 and represent the
the Catholic Cajuns, who make
time for work around a busy
schedule of consuming the full
cup of life.
The des endants of the exiles
from Nova xrotia make up a third
of the state's population and those
of different ancestry living in
south Louisiana have absorbed
the laid-back lifestyle of the
Roemer, whose family plantation guests like their own kids, Andre-
best hope for dismantling a wall
of mistrust built generations ago Cajuns.
bv two clashing cultures, says Former Gov
Edwin Ed-
Carole Andrepont of Opelousas, wards, the first French-speaking Rouge
is not far from the Arkansas bor
der in north Louisiana.
Edwards and Roemer agree
that an exchange program aimed
at youths can eventually erase the
perception.
The idea for the exchange
program gnawed at Andrepont
and finally she talked with Linda
Graham, her Ruston counterpart
at a tourism meeting in Baton
who turned a joke into a serious Catholic elected to the state's
experiment that worked. highest office this century, says
Andreponta memberof the the division is more a perception
than anything else, but "a percep-
tion can be real
"The barrier exists in the
minds of those who have not had
the opportunity to visit one end of
the state or the other he says.
"But invariably when they
do, they come away with an
amazement of how much in com-
mon they have
"The barrier is exaggerated
but it's there adds Gov. Buddy
Louisiana Tourism Board who
has been active in international
youth exchange programs for
years, jokingly told a friend one
day, "If you want to have a real
cultural exchange, have folks
from north Louisiana come to
south Louisiana. It's like two dif-
ferent countries
An almost visible line across
the center of Louisiana separates
the staid upstate Protestants from
'I told her I had an idea about
two cities having an exchange
program and the more we looked
at it, the more we like it she says.
pont says.
The mayors and civic leaders
visited each other's municipali-
ties and, like the kids, discovered
that even with the cultural differ-
ence, people are just folks and get
different views of what they see,
depending on personalities.
"The people are more free,
more open down here says Ra-
chel, who attends Ruston High
School. "Up north, we're very
polite, but down here
"I like Ruston better than
here says Teleameckus Ander-
son, a 16-year-old junior at Ope-
In trodUCinC?
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'We talked to our mayors, school lousas High School. "They're so
officials and civic leaders. Now, nice. The hills are beautiful
we've done it
In a recently ended two-week "The family I stayed with
program, about 20 Ruston high made me feel like we were re-
school students spent a week in lated says Emonet, a junior at
Opelousas and an equal number Opelousas Catholic,
of the south Louisisana students Andrepont, meanwhile, says
stayed in Ruston. Cajuns can learn from the other
Host families provided lifestyles, maybe find a middle
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1
Cowboys write good poetry
whew the sun alwts sVwet'
ELKO, Nev. (AP)�The 300
cowboys in town this week ain't
here to rope steers or whoop it up
at a saloon. No sirree, mister,
these folks are the biggest bunch
of prose-packin' smile-slingin
versifying-est cowboys you ever
saw, and they're here for the an-
nual Cowboy Poetry Gathering.
It ain't all dogie doggerel, and
you better smile when you quote
em pardner.
Upwards of 7,000 visitors
have jammed this northeastern
Nevada town of 13,000 for the
five-day event, which began
Wednesday and wraps up Sun-
day.
The area's 40 motels have
been booked for weeks. Ten-gal-
lon hats dot Railroad Avenue and
Commercial Street, and more spill
out of the Branding Iron Bar.
The crowds have come to
hear the cowboys recite their
bunkhouse ballads, sing soulful
town, from the Elko Convention
Center to the bar at the
Stockman's Hotel.
The buckaroos don fancy
duds for the gathering � broad-
brimmed Stetsons, silver buckles
and handmade pointy-toed boots
� but their sunburned faces,
calloused hands and
the plight of Tom O'Dell, found
behind a bar with his throat cut.
When "they got him to the hospi-
tal he wouldn't sign a complaint
against the fella who done it be-
cause he was a friend of his
Mitchell and Baxter Black,
fine,
And give me to a cowgirl that
likes to ride,
So in the hereafter I may rest,
Between the two things that I
love the best
Besides stage performances,
there are informal sessions for
One such poet is Waddie
Mitchell, who runs 2,000 head of
cattle on a ranch near Jiggs. Before
he came to the gathering, he had
to make sure there was enough
hay put out and find a baby sitter
for his five children.
Mitchell began writing verse
during long winters on the range.
Like most cowboy poets, he didn't
show his work to many people
because poetry didn't quite fit the
cowboy image.
But the first cowboy. poetry
gathering five years ago brought a
who will sing and tell stories at the
, tar,away Saturday night finale, are bie greenhorn poets, singers and sto
�gaze tell their own tales of hard guns in the cowboy entertain rytellers. Exhibitions display
and solitary lives. ment world j havc bccn on handmade saddles, bits, spurs
'The Tonight Show and Black's and olhcr cowboy regalia,
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veterinarian from Brighton,
Colo cams a six-figure income
from his performances.
Gary McMahan, a singer,
songwriter and poet from
songs and tell of hard and high lot of sagebrush scribes off the
times on the range.
The activities have filled ev-
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praine.
One of Mitchell's poems tells
which coordinates the gathering,
said one of the center's biggest
challenges is keeping the cowboy
poetry pure.
That's why they've come up
Bellvue, Colo who claims to have with an ironcla rule: Every par-
theonly yodelingdog, recited this tlc,Pant has to make a living on
verse at one gathering: the range- No "drugstore cow-
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BOWLING GREEN, Ky. (AP)
� James H. Smith was a terrified,
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up in Georgia when he entered his
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"I was scared todeath Smith
recalls. "There were large lakes
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scuba diving equipment and
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Smith has won a national award
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Smith received the 1988 Lew
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Bicking, an agressive spelun-
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I
rut EASTC ROI INI AN
Sports
I BRI 'AK, 7, ivh PA A
Pirates lose in last :13
Richmond holds on to upset ECU, 56-54
ByCHRIS SIECEL
AmbUbi Sporti Mitor
On Friday, Head Coach Mike
Steele celebrated a birthday and
his Pirate team was looking,to
give him a belated birthdav pres-
ent Saturday by knocking off
league leading Richmond. But it
wasn't meant to be as the Pirates
missed three opportunities in the
final :13 seconds to tie the game.
Richmond held vn to win Sb-
"You have to give Richmond
credit They played a good
game' Steele said. "It we beat
Richmond tonight, we send a
message to the rest of the confer-
ence that we can beat anyone
The rvlO tans who packed
Minges Coliseum were treated to
an exciting ballgame. The crowd
was the second largest on the
season and the eighth largest in
Minges historv.
The teams came out at the
start of the game a little tentative.
They exchanged baskets the first
five minutes ot the game with
neither team really taking charge
Then with 141" to play tin Spi
ders mounted a run.
With the score tied at 12
Richmond went on a9-2 run Ken
Atkinson highlighted the run bj
scoring five points on a jump shot
and a three-point shot The run hv
the Spiders gave them a seven
point lead. 21-14.
But the Pirates fought right
back and started a scoring spurt of
their own. ECU rattled off 12 of
the next 14 points, the most dam-
aging coming from three-point
shots by Kenny Murphy and Gus
1 fill. Blue Edwards capped off the
run with a thundering two-
handed dunk that put East Caro-
lina up by three, 2e-23.
lust as the home town fans
started to get into the game and
coud smell an upset. Richmond
quieted them. This time they did
itbygoingonan 18 n scoring run.
Benjj Taj lor came off the bench to
ignite the Spiders and hit two
three-pointers. The close of the
first half saw the Spiders up by
nine, 41-32.
In the first half, they had a lot
of open shots Steele said. "We
knew we would line to come out
the second halt and play solid
defense and stop their transition
game
And play defense the Pirates
would: EC1 limited the Spiders
to 15 points in the second half and
a dismal 28 6 percent shooting
percentage But even that was not
enough to pull out the upset as
Richmond also played fine de
fense in the halt
East Carolina came out fired
up in the second half and took it
right to the Spiders. Edwards
ignited his team and thecrowdby
making a two-handed breakaway-
dunk to stai t the second halt. The
dunk cut Richmond's lead to
seven, 41 -34.
he next 12 minutes the Pi-
rates and Spiders would play
hard-fought, physical basketball.
ECU clawed and scratched their
way back in to the game. And
after a 15-8 run, the Pirates found
the game tied with 6:40 remain-
ing, 49-49.
Following two baskets by
Atkinson, Richmond found them-
selves up by four with 4:37 left in
the game, 53-49. Kenny Murphy
answered with a three-pointer,
but Atkinson fired up a three-
pointer of his own and the lead
was still four, 56-52.
With 2:08 left to play, Ed-
wards hit a turnaround jump shot
to pull ECU within two, 56-54.
That would be the last bucket ei-
ther team would score. But the
action in the last two minutes was
fast and furious.
After exchanging unsuccess-
ful posscsions, the Pirates found
themseleVes with the ball and :13
seconds remaining in the game.
ECU called a timeout and Coach
Steele set up the inbound plav.
"We ran our special. We
wanted to get the ball to Gus at the
top oi the key Steele said. "If he
was open, he was to take the shot.
If not he was to look for Blue in-
side
The plav ran asdesigncd. The
inbound pass went to Hill who
was so open, he took a dribble in
to get a closer shot. But as he fired
the shot up, the defense extended
out and blocked the three-point
attempt. Reed Lose immediately
fouled Scott Stapleton, who had
picked up the loose ball.
With nine seconds, Stapleton
had a chance to ice the game for
Richmond at the free throw line.
He missed the front end of the
one-and-one and ECU got the
rebound. They pushed the ball up
court to Hill who took a three-
pointer from the left corner. The
shot missed, but went out of
bounds off a Richmond plaver
with two seconds remaining, set-
ting up the last chance for the
Pirates.
With two seconds to go, ECU
had the ball out of bounds under
their own basket. The pass went
to Hill under the basket. He was
forced to put up an off-balance,
fall-away jumper that rimmed out
and Richmond had preserved
their slim two point win.
"We played outstanding de-
fense the seond half Steele said.
"We fought on the boards and
competed. We held them to just
15 points in the half and they still
find a way to win. They're a good
team
Richmond Coach Dick Tar-
rant summed up his feelings in
one statement. "We were very
fortunate to win
The Spiders were lead by
senior point guard Ken Atkinson
who scored 16 points and dished
out five assists. Atkinson scored
the last 10 points for the Spiders.
Richmond's leading scorer Mike
Winiecki was held to just 13
points and only two in the scond
half. This output was almost
SeePIRATS, page 12
Blue Edwards dazzles the second to largest crowd at Minges
Coliseum with a slam dunk in the beginning of the second half.
Edwards' dunk brought the Pirates to within seven at 11-34
(Photo by T.D. Whitmore, ECU Photolab).
Women lose to Richmond
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Spord Writr
point-
be� .
East Carolina's women's bas-
ketball team dropped its fourth
Colonial Athletic Association
game Saturday, as it lost to the
University of Richmond, 78-70.
The Lady Pirates, now 9-9
overall and 4-4 in the CAA, took
their second loss to the Lady Spi-
ders this season. In January, the
two teams met at Minges with UR
winning the 67-58 decision.
ECU'S Sarah Grav led ECU
with a career high 32
Gray, a junior forward
only the eighth ECU womer
player to ever score 30 plus rx i
in a game. Crav also led the ' a
on the boards with seven n.
bounds.
Richmond scored four
ers in double figures. Parr. Br ant
and Beth Spence socred 17 points
each as the Lady Spiders im-
proved their record to 16-3 overall
and 6-1 in CAA plav.
Despite shooting 56 percent
in the first half, ECU still trailed
UR 29-33 it the half The Lad)
iTrab re srserit:from the
for the
I
re Si
tion
ning t:
� - they trai ��! to Dele
le in rence ac-
I ad; Pirate - .� ill return
inference action Feb 11, when
they host ames Madison fniver-
SltV
ECU Tennis season underway
By CHRIS SIEGEL
AuitUnt Sports Editor
ECL Head Coach Mike Steele shows his discontent at the way a call was made in Saturday night's game
(Photo by J.D. Whitmore, ECU Photolab).
Pirates open against Bowling Green
New football schedule announced
Sept. 23 in Greenville. The game
against 1SU will mark Parent's
Weekend. On Sept. 30, ECU will
square off against Louisiana Tech
in Ficklen Stadium. During
half time of the game, the ECU
Athletic Hall of Fame will have
inductions.
The Pirates then travel to
South Carolina on Oct. 7 and fol-
lowing a week off, return home to
face Virginia Tech. The VPI game
will also be ECU's Homecoming
game of 1989.
East Carolina then travels to
Syracuse on Oct. 28, Miami (Ha.)
See FOOTBALL, page 11
By CLAUDINE WURST
Sports Writer
East Carolina University offi-
cially announced the 1989 football
schedule on Friday and the home
town fans will get to see a lot of the
Pirates in the beginning of the
season. Three of the first four
games will be in Ficklen Stadium.
The 11 game schedule for the
Pirates includes five home games
and contests against four teams
that played in post-season bowl
games in 1988. These teams in-
clude Mo. 2 ranked Miami (Fla.),
South Carolina, Syracuse and
Southern Mississippi.
The Pirates open the 1989
season on Sept. 9 against Bowling
Green in Ficklen Stadium. This is
a change from many tentative
schedules that had the first game
scheduled for Sept. 2 against
Southern Mississippi. That game
has been moved to Thanksgiving
weekend (Nov. 25).
New Head Coach Bill Lewis
will have the luxury of playing the
majority of the beginning of the
season at home. The Pirates will
travel to Cincinnati on Sept. 16
and then will face Illinois State on
East Carolina's tennis teams
gear up for their opening games
this season. The men began their
spring schedule Saturday against
Duke in Durham. The women
play their first match against Wil-
liam & Mary March 9, at home.
The men's team had their first
match against Duke Saturday at
Durham. The Pirates were de-
feated by the Blue Devils 6-0. Al-
though the men lost, Head Coach
Bill Moore said, "The team did
well for the first time out and the
matches were close
"For the next few games, we
will be working on pulling the
team together Moore said.
"With so much depth anil pot n
rial, we are still working our line-
up
Last year, the men's team fin-
ished sixth in the CAA 1 all Tour
nament. This year, Moore said,
"The Pirates will do well because
of the overall depth of the team
There are seven returning
players, a transfer student and
three competitive freshmen who
compose the Pirates. Bobby
MacPherson is a junior transfer
student from the top-ranked ten-
nis team of Anderson Junior Col-
lege in South Carolina Sammy
Tunsi, a freshman, is the No. 1
ranked player in Algeria, Africa.
All of the new members bring
added strength to the team this
season. "The men will be quite
competitive,and highly ranked in
the conferen M re said
Pirates also fin-
ished sixth in the . - Tourna-
ment last year They have tour
returning members and four new
players: Brandi Dutcher, fresh
man Ty Meyers, senior; Heather
Mason, sophomore; and Eliza-
beth Henderson, junior. "This
will be a building semester tor the
team. Assistant Coach Lvnn
Gorskj said.
I"his is also the first year for
both o the coaches. Moore comes
to ECU from East Stroudsburg
University in Pennsylvania
where he was director of tennis in
1987 s Moore received his doc-
torate in sports psychology at the
University ot Virginia where he
See TENNIS, page 12
Gamecock coach dies at 51
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)
South Carolina coach Joe Morri-
son, who brought the Gamecocks
into the national spotlight with
the success on the football field
and controversy off it, died of a
heart attack after playing racquet-
ball with three friends. He was 51.
Morrison had been playing
racquetball at Williams-Brice Sta-
dium for about a half hour with
defensive coordinator joe Lee
Dunn, attroncy Edward "Punky"
Holler and businessman Ken
Wheat before he suffered what
Providence Hospitial spokes-
woman Dawn Catalano called a
"massive heart attack
Morrison, who had a history
of heart problems, was taken to
Providence, arriving at 844 alive
but unconscious. He was pro-
nounced dead at 904 pm, Cata-
lano said.
Morrison was not feeling any
pain but did have a "small, funny
sensation near his elbow" after
playing racquetball, Athletic Di-
rector King Dixon said. But when
the players shook hands they
noticed Morrison's hands were
"awfully cold Dixon said.
Dunn called trainer Terry
Lewis, who in turn contacted a
team doctor, who checked
Morrison's pulse and heartbeat,
Dixon said
"I think they were well within
the range when the doctor got
there. But they prevailed upon Joe
to spend the night in the hospital
to have a complete check, which
Joe agreed to Dixon said.
First, however, Morrison de-
cided to take a shower. But during
the shower, he collapsed. He was
found there by one or more of his
playing partners, who began per-
forming cardiopulmonary resus-
citation on the coach, Catalano
said.
Morrison, a smoker, under-
went a sugical procedure for
removal of a blockage in a coro-
nary artery in March 1985.
Dixon said Morrison, who
had been on the road recruiting
almost constantly since the season
See COACH, page 12
Pirate's Booty
Officiating assisted Richmond
By KR1STEN HALBERG
Spoils Editor
Hello sports fans.
All across campus faithful
Pirate fans continue to weep and
dwell over Saturday night's
game. The physical contest be-
tween the No. 1 team in the CAA,
Richmond, and the seventh place
Pirates proved to be an exciting
and entertaining game for the
packed Minges Coliseum, but, to
no avail, East Carolina would not
leave the court with a victory.
The Hoopsters played their
hearts out, letting up only once
when Richmond stretched their
lead 41-32 by the end of the first
half.
ECU then buckled down,
regained the lead and went on to
lose 56-54 in the last :13 seconds
when, after three attempts, the
Pirates could not get the ball in the
basket.
But perhaps more dis-
sapointing than the loss itself was
the fact that Richmond was play-
ing with a three player handicap.
The Spiders had three extra
players on the court throughout
the game. 1 thought only five play-
ers could be on the court at one
time. This must be a new NCAA
rule tor away games
To make things even more
difficult for ECU, Richmond
dressed these three extra players
in black and white striped uni"
forms instead of the traditional
blue and red uniforms the Pirate
are accustomed to seeing whe
they play Richmond.
Finally, to really make the
Pirates scratch their heads
Richmond gave those three play-
ers the power and the whistles to
stop the game at any given time to
call fouls against East Carolina
while simply shutting their eyes
to any Richmond foul.
Now to an average viewer
these three extra players might
seem like they were the officials
See, OFFICIATING, page II






I
I
t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN'
FEBRUARY 7,1989 11
Pirate swimmers
head to the CAAs
By KRISTEN HALBERC
Spot Editor
Navy is the favorite in confer-
ence swimming and diving for the
men and women according to
ECU Head Coach Rick Kobe as his
team prepares for the Colonial
Athletic Association Champion-
ships to be held Wednesday- Sat-
urday.
"For the guys, we see the
CAA meet as a two team meet,
us and the Naval Academy
Kobe said. "Navy will be our only
competition
The Middys were the CAA
champions last season beating the
Pirates by 14 points. "We hope we
are 14 points better and Navy is 14
points worse Kobe said.
The Midshipmen have been
tough throughout the season and
look to take the CAA champion-
ship meet, but Kobe is optimistic
that his team can give them a run
tor their money. "I think us and
Navy will probably be a good 200-
250 points ahead of the next best
team Kobe said.
For the women, Navy also
won last year and look to be the
favorites again prior to CAA
competition. Kobe explained the
real competition will come from
the Dukes of James Madison. "Us
ind fames Madison will probably
ne fighting for third Kobe said.
ECU swam JMU during the
in regular season action. "She
should win but it is going to be
tough Kobe said.
For the men, Kobe predicted
Raymond Kennedy to be a power-
house for the Pirates as he should
regular season and in a hard-
fought contest, the Lady Pirates
just narrowly escaped the wrath
of James Madison to win it in Har-
risonburg, Va 153-147.
Kobe said William &: Mary
would probably fill the second
place position.
Meredith Bridgers, the
NCAA qualifier and ECU record-
holder in both the breaststrokes, is
a stronghold for the Lady Pirates
as she is almost a shoe-in to win
both 100 and 200-yard
breaFtet�okes. "Meredith will eas-
ily win in both the breaststrokes
Kobe predicted.
Sherry Campbell, also an
NCAA qualifer on both the one
and three-meter diving boards,
should also prove to be tough to
beat. However, she has lost twice
win both the 100 and 200-yard
breaststroke events. Kennedy
won the 100-yard breaststroke
and the 200-yard individual med-
ley in the C A A's last year when he
swam a 57.93 in the breaststroke
and a 1:55.40 in the IM.
Andy Johns is also favored to
win in both the 100 and 200-yard
butterfly.
Kobe has been resting his
swim and dive teams before CAA
action but the work in preparing
has been more involved. "The
work we do is a little more quality
kind of work while swimming
less yardage Kobe explained.
The swimmers will also shave
their bodies before competition.
Kobe said that a few swim-
mers still have a chance to qualify
for the NCAA's because most of
the fastest times come out of the
conference championship meet.
SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
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Why Trust Your
Pictures With an
Out of Town Lab?
INSTANT REPLAY WILL DEVELOP
YOUR PICTURES WHILE YOU WAIT
Head Coach Rick Kobe supervises the performance of the swim-
mers (Photo bv ECU Photolab).
Football schedule released
Continued from paeelO
on Nov. 4 and then rcturnnomc to
plav Temple on Nov. 11 in the
final home game of the season.
ECU finishes the season on the
road with games at Pittsburgh,
Nov. 18 and Southern Missis-
sippi, Nov. 25.
"Obviously, it is a very chal-
lenging schedule, as you can tell
bv looking at it said Lewis, who
comes to ECU after spending nine
years at the University of Georgia.
"It means we will have to be the
verv best team we are capable of
being to be successful
ECU Athletic Director Dave
Hart, Jr. also announced that se-
ries contracts have been signed
with Pittsburgh and Tulane for
the early 1990's. South Carolina,
Southern Mississippi, Virginia
Tech and Cincinnati have all
signed contract extension.
There has also been an
extension with West Virginia for
the 1995 and 1996 seasons. Akron
has been added to the schedules
for the 1991 and 1992 seasons.
1989 EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL
SCHEDULE
Sept. 6 BOWLING GREEN
(7 p.m.)
Sept. 16 at Cincinnati (7 p.m.)
Sept. 23 ILLINOIS STATE
(Parent's Weekend)
Officiating
questionable
Continued from page 10
on the court and it turns out, they
were.
Richmond is a tough, aggres-
sive team who loves to get physi-
cal with their opponents. Satur-
day was no exception for the Spi-
ders as they played with the same
style and intensity against the
Pirates as they had in ECU's last
confrontation with Richmond
and against other opponents all
season. And even with this push
and shove style of play, East Caro-
lina did not go to the free throw
line unbl 26 minutes into the
game.
Officiating is a tough occupa-
tion. This nonglorious job re-
quires an official to maintain a fair
and just game of basketball while
at the mercy of a hostile home
crowd. But the key word here is
fair, something that the officials
failed to review in their officiating
manuals before arriving on the
court.
No one can say with total
confidence that East Carolina
would have beaten the Spiders
had the officiating been better.
And while the ECU vs. Richmond
basketball game will go down in
the record books as just another
game the Pirates lost for the 1988-
89 season, ECU players, coaches
and fans will daydream of the win
that almost could have been.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct. 21
Oct. 28
Nov. 4
Nov. 11
Nov. 18
Nov. 25
(7 p.m.)
30 LOUISIANA TECH
(Hall of Fame Inductions)
(1:30 p.m.)
7 at South Carolina (TBA)
VIRGINIA TECH
(Homecoming) (2 p.m.)
at Svracuse (1:30 p.m.)
at Miami, Fla. (TBA)
TEMPLE (1:30 p.m.)
at Pittsburgh (TBA)
at Southern Mississippi
(TBA)
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I
I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7,1989
South Carolina coach dies of heart attack
Continued from page 10
ended, had been sick about a
week ago with a flu or virus that
had left him "feeling awfully
weak
"Coach Joe Lee Dunn said he
had never seen Joe feel so badly in
his life physically Dixon said.
Morrison, who played in the
NFL for the football Giants from
1959 to 1972 as a running back and
an end, came to South Carolina
after previous coaching stints at
both Tennessee-Chattanooga and
New Mexico, Morrison's career
record was 101-72-7 over 16 sea-
sons.
He was 39-28-2 in six seasons
at Sou th Carolina, including 8-4 in
1988, when he took the Game-
cocks to the Liberty Bowl, where
they lost ot Inidana 34-10. South
Carolina has never won a bowl
game, losing all eight it has
played.
The season was a controver-
sial one, however. The Game-
cocks faltered near the end, losing
four of their last six games. That
came on the heels of allegations by
former Gamecock defensive line-
man Tommy Chaikin.
In a story in Sports Illus-
trated, Chaikin, who played at
South Carolina from 1983 to 1987,
said he and other players used
steroids and about half of the 1986
team use the muscle-building
drug. Chaikin also said some
players used drugs such as co-
caine and LSD.
Morrison said he had heard
rumors some players might have
been using steroids but the allega-
tions were never substantiated.
The allegations by Chaikin
have prompted a grand jury in-
vestigation that is expected to
continue when juors reconvene
later this month.
University President James
Holderman said he didn't think
Morrison was under any added
pressure this year.
"I don't think he was under
any more stress than any football
coach was under Holderman
said.
Dixon agreed.
"I did not detect any more
stress on Joe this year Dixon
said.
Morrison's private life was
the focus of intense scrutiny two
years ago when it was learned he
had had a child by a woman he
began seeing while he was at New
Mexico. The woman, Barbara J.
Button, moved to South Carolina
after Morrison became head
coach there.
Morrison acknowledged he
was the father of Ms. Button's
daughter, Lisa Nicole Morrison,
who was born June 12, 1982 in
Albuquerque, N.M.
Despite the con trovers! tes,
Morrison was known as a winner
as a coach and a player.
Pirates lose to Richmond in final seconds of the game
Continued from page 10
seven points under his season
average.
"We ran a box and one against
VViniecki Steele said. "He got a
lot of easy baskets and layups
against us the first game. Tonight,
we really played him well and
kept him from getting those easy
shots
ECU senior Blue Edwards led
the way for the Pirates. He scored
a game-high 21 points on 10-19
from the field. He also grabbed
five rebounds and had four as-
sists. Kenny Murphy also had a
fine game chipping in with 15
points. Murphy was 34 from
three-point range and had four as-
sists.
Edwards 21 points gives him
515 points on the season. This
moves him to fourth on the single-
season scoring list at ECU. He
needs 20 points to surpass March-
ell Henry for third and Edwards
needs 185 to pass Oliver Mack for
the all-time single season scoring
record.
Senior point guard Jeff Kelly
dished out two assists to tie him
for the career assist record.
Kelly's two assists gave him 232
for his career. This tied him with
former ECU star Curt Vander-
horst. Kelly's next assist will give
him the outright record.
The loss moves the Pirates to
10-10 for the season and 4-5 in the
CAA. Richmond runs their rec-
ord to 14-7 and an unblemished 8-
0 in conference.
Edwards
Hill
Love
Kelly
Murphy
Lose
Perlich
Mote
Team
Totals
East Carolina (54)
MP FG FT R F A
10-19 1-3 5 3 4
2-11 0-0 4 4 2
39
28
18
29
36
33
7
5
200
0-0
2-3
6-11
2-5
0-1
1-2
0-0 3 10
0-0 12 2
0-0 5 14
2-2 6 3 4
0-0 0 0 0
0-0 0 10
5
23-52 3-5 29 15 16 54
FT
21
6
0
4
15
6
0
2
East Carolina.
Richmond
Shields
Staplcton
VViniecki
Atkinson
English
Taylor
Blair
Webb
Bryant
Team
Totals
32
41
Richmond (56)
MP FG FT
1-3
3-5
6-9
6-15
3-9
3-8
0-0
1-1
0-0
18
26
40
40
38
25
1
8
4
0-0
0-2
1-3
1-2
2-2
0-0
R F
5 2
3 2
9 3
1 2
5 1
3 0
200
0-0 0 0
0-0 1 1
0-0 0 0
3
23-50 4-9 3011 15 56
FT
2
6
13
16
8
9
0
2
0
22�54
15� 56
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Tennis team preview
Continued from page 10
was also the assistant coach from
1982-86.
A native of North Carolina,
Moore resides in Greenville with
his wife and two children. Moore
also serves as a sport psychology
consultant to collegiate tennis
teams and professional athletes.
52lCotanche 757-1666
Lacrosse season to open
w
ALL JEWELRY
If you enjoy all the nonstop
action of hockey and the physical
contact of football, then you'll
love lacrosse. Lacrosse a mainly
Northeastern game that combines
finesse with a lot of physical plav.
The East Carolina Lacrosse
Club began practice for their
spring season at the end of Janu-
arv. The lacrosse club, coached by
Duke Whelan, is looking forward
to another successful season.
Many returning veterans, along
with new freshman, help to make
up a strong team both offensively
and defensively this season.
The lacrosse team has many
home games this season with
their first one against Maryland.
The game is Sunday Feb. 26, at 1
p.m.
If you want to see a finesse
game, packed with actions and
physical contact, come support
Pirate Lacrosse in their seven
home games.
At omnan we're also
interested in vour future.
Let's Deal With The Basic Suit
so you can get the most out
of that very important interview.
The navy or charcoal suit is basic
to any wardrobe, especially in
the desirable dacron wool blend
which is the best all-year fabric.
We highly recommend these
suits for the about-to-graduate
senior and the young Profes-
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priced at $325.00, this very spe-
cial group of Austin Reed suits in
their Westminster series will be
priced at
$285.00
(For a limited time only)
o�fmans
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Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall, Rocky Mount
(Inquire about our college charge account for this event.)
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Necklaces
Earrings
Charms
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FEBRUARY 8, 9, 10 & 11
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GENERAL PUBLIC: $5.00 � ECU STUDENTS: $3.00
CALL: 757-6829
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 7, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 03, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.654
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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