The East Carolinian, February 2, 1989






EDITORIALSInside4
1 ASSIFIEDS FEATl RES6
7
SPORTS11
:
Features
The day in a life of a pirate mascot
See page 7.
Sports
Pirates beat William and Mary
See page 11.
She
(Haraltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
ol o. 4"
rhursday I ebruary 2, 1989
Greenville, (
12 Pages
Circulation 12,0(X)
2 IS blotter hits confiscated
Student charged for selling LSD
By I1M HAMPTON
An E( I student vvasarrested
Sunday morning for possession
ol
te to unpred. table Greenville thi w eek, bringing 7
i s decided to spend the plaving volleybal! on
0degree temperatures and short?
the mall. (Photo by Mark I ove
Program pushes for
drug prevention
SI 'after a man, who had alleg-
edly taken the drug, asked for
medical attention, according to
campus security officials.
Jeffrey Allen Turner, 19, of
157 Aycock Resident Hall was
arrested early Sunday morning
tor possession with the intent to
sell and deliver Lysergic acid di-
etlw lamide ! SD), according to .
R Rose, c hief of ECU campus se-
curity.
Turner, who was tree on a
S3,000 bond, was arrested on a
second charge Monday of posses
sion and the sale of LSD. The Pitt
County Magistrate set a second
bond of $5,000 for Turner.
According to Rose, two EC I
campus policemen talked to a
student near Tyler dormitory
early Sunday morning Hie stu-
dent said he wasn't feeling good
or 'on a bad trip' and asked tor
assistance to Pitt Memorial Hos
pitial.
The student walked into
some of the officers and requested
medical aid Rose said.
The anonymous student led
polios to the investigation of
urner While investigating room
157 Ayco k, detectives found 218
hits dt l.si). ac ording to Rose
The confiscated LSD was on
sheets, or blotter term. LSD,
popularly known as a id, is a
psy he tive hallucinogenic
dnij
I in r aj peared in court an.
� r a probable cause hearing.
Rose said Turner court date will
probable be !0 days from the ini-
tial heanrv,
MARTIN
. - - "Val �

- . :
-
I nee
n will be
i i

,ms
.� ad
I
TIL'S :
� groups
that will
ting
4
it deals witl ssues sur
res alcohol
n offer-
iwarc ness programs so stu-
dents can understand what alco-
� 5 and what it can do to them.
.� make good deci-
� s about choosing to drink or
Irinl
ffice of Substance
.b. A Prevention and Edu-
iti 5 pen for self-referrals
ind is ottering confidential one-
� one counceling tor students
with alcohol and drug-related
� �blems.
According to Susina, the of-
e hopes to establish a campus
chapter of Alcoholics Anony-
mous (AA) this semester.om-
munitv chapters are accessible to
students until the campus
chapter is formed
Susina said the office will also
� rm a chapter of Adult Children
� '� . oholicsi Ac OA). Accord
� Susina there is a growing need
tor this group on campus to give
support to students with alcohol
problem in the family.
The office, located in Erwin
301, serves as a resource library
with video tapes and pamphlets
available Call 757-6793 tor more
information.
SGA passes new Spring
election procedures
M HMP10
lenf . ernment
lection
efforts to
� time to hear
ffice hold-
id ' ek to � am
ii I lates will
cks to vie for
ci tming
: �rding to
ken �1 the legis
br �ught theelec-
lent before the
: � ntatives, vnd the
eek will allow for
irti ipation in the ele
tveeks, it gives
S more time to hold
nd � � terstocvaluate
d ites 1 lelms said
: i � spring election'
n held th. week follow
� ik Helms said th
va ation is not
good placement for the elections.
1 lelms also introduced legis-
lation in the weekly s .A meeting
which changes the period be-
tween the primary and run off
elections from the traditional two
weeks to one week.
"There is no reason tor there
to be two weeks between clec
tions Helms said The run off
eK tion decides a vu tir from the
two top vote-getters who emerge
from the primary election
Helms feels students have
be, n apathetic concerning the
run oft elections in the past years.
I le said the root oi the problem is
the two week period between
elections Two weeks after the
initial election, "People are going
to torget what is happening
Helms said
A total of 1,034 students,
roughly 6.6 percent oi the stu
dents, voted in last spring's run
off elections
In addition, the legislation
passed Monday moves the filing
period U r candidates to one week
prior to spring break.
49L
David Mayr, the recently elected president of the Student Union,
plans to continue on the progress of the previous adminstration.
(Photo by Angela Pridgen�Photolab)
Professors are overpaid
and underworked
(CPS) Professors who curl
up by the fireplace with this
winter's new book about .vhat's
wrong with colleges Charles
Sykes' "Profscam" might end
up throwing it in. This hotlv de-
bated expose depicts academi-
cians as overpaid, underworked
prima donnas who "almost
singlehandedly destroyed the
university as a center tor learn-
ing
College teachers, Sykes said,
are no good
They have been made fat and
complacent by tenure, he
charged, which trees them to
abandon their students in favor of
chasing money and prestige
through office politicking, useless
research and big grants.
"They have distorted univer-
sity curriculums to accomodate
their own narrow and selfish in-
terests Svkes writes.
These interests are so trendy
that they produce "curriculums
that look like they were designed
by a game show host Syker
added in an interview.
To Sykes, profs are reponsiblc
for a variety of ills like "pseu-
doscience "junkthink" and
Student Union elects
Mayr as new president
By MIm McIWIS
SUH Wntf
List week, the Student I nion
elected a new president. Da I
Mayr, who says he plans I
pand on existing programs.
Presently the chairperson for
the films committee, Mayr will
become president April 22. Mayr
has been active in the Student
nion tor tour years and is very
optimistic about the upcoming
year.
When asked to discuss future
plans tor the Student Union,
David said. "I want to improve
upon the outgoing administra-
tions progress Mayr feels that
Karen Pasch, the current presi-
dent, has done a lemarkable job.
During her adminstration,
Pasch has made strides promot-
ing the campus of minority ori-
ented programs and has worked.
to develop a more cohesive or-
ganization within the Union.
Mayr wants to continue to create
unification between the mem-
bers of the Student Union pro-
gram board in order to better
serve the student body.
Eventually Mayr hopes to
make ECU stud ;nts more aware
o the Student Union's activities
by working with WMB to help
promote the programs. Mayr
also predicts that the Popart
ment oi Student Life, and the
Student Union will start work
ing together. The Student Union
will program the Department ol
Student Life's events and in turn
Student Life will promote the
Union.
"Basicall , ill try to work
with Student Life in promoting
our events and we will assist in
� ramming events like the
i lill lam . Mayr said.
lliis arrangement is just one
: the mam that has been
n for the new year. Mayr
hopes that hisenergy ,iv.A enthu-
siasm v ill cause a chain reaction
among the other members.
Most ot the students at ECL
don't understand what the Stu-
lent L nion is all about. What
does this rL tnizationdo,how is
it funded, who's it1 charge?
The Student Union consists of
11 committees including, chair-
person tor each committee,
president, and assistant presi-
dent. Each committee is respon-
sible for creating a budget with
the alloted monies
Every student, whether they
are awareof itornot, helps make
tl-as allocation possible. When
tuition- are paid, there's a per-
centage that goes toward "other
fees " Most ot the money from
these fees goes toward ECU ath-
letics and only a fourth goes to
the Student Union.
Not all ot the committees will
receive the same amount of
money Tor example, the Film
committee will receive more
funding than the Major Concert
committee since more film pro-
ductions are ottered to the stu-
dent-
One of the members, Steve
Sunmers, Chairperson ot the
Major Concerts committee,
thinks David Mayr will be a real
See MAYR, page 2
"twist(ing) the ideals oi academic
freedom into a system in which
thev are accountable to no one
"A lot of undergrads go to
some oi the most prestigious uni-
versities in the country, like the
Univeristv of Michigan, Berkeley,
even I larvard,based on the repu-
tations of their professors Sykes
said.
"What they find is something
very different from what thev and
their parents have been led to
expect. Thev think they'll be
learning at the feet of those profes-
sors &rA what thev find is, if they
see those professors at all, it's as a
blur in the parking lot
Svkes maintained it can all be
changed by eliminating tenure.
Such a proposal, naturally, is
not without detractors. Sykes'
idea, noted Dr. Jonathan Knight
if the American Association of
University Professors (AAUP),
would destroy academic free-
lorn.
"Svkes says eliminating ten-
re will keep everybody on their
toes Knight said. "More likely
it'll keep everybody on their
knees
See PROFESSORS, page 2
Hey, where did that guy come from? This maintenance man
comes up for air and to check out the weather. (Photo by Mark
Love�Photolab)






EDITORIALSInside��A
CLASSIFIEDS FEATURES�6
M 7
SPORTS11
Features
The day in a .Ug of a pirate mascot
See page 7.
HWHWPWH'WB
. f
SporM
Pirates Jeat William and Mary
Sec page 11. $
She iEaat (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 47
Thursday February 2,1989
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
28 blotter hits confiscated
Student charged for selling LSD
Warm weather came to unpredictable Greenville this week, bringing 70 degree temperatures and shorts
out of the closet. This crew decided to spend the playing volleyball on the mall. (Photo by Mark Love�
Photolab)
By TIM HAMPTON
News Editor
i
An ECU student was arrested
Sunday morning for possession
of LSD after a man, who had alleg-
edly taken the drug, asked for
medical attention, according to
campus security officials.
Jeffrey Allen Turner, 19, of
157 Aycock Resident Hall was
arrested early Sunday morning
for possession with the intent to police
sell and deliver Lysergic acid di-
ethyl amide (LSD), according to J.
R. Rose, chief of ECU campus se-
curity.
Turner, who was free on a
$5,000 bond, was arrested on a
second charge Monday of posses-
sion and the sale of LSD. The Pitt
County Magistrate set a second
bond of $5,000 for Turner.
According to Rose, two ECU
campus policemen talked to a
student near Tyler dormitory
early Sunday morning. The stu-
dent said he wasn't feeling good
or 'on a bad trip' and asked for
assistance to Pitt Memorial Hos-
pitial.
"The student walked into
some of the officers and requested
medical aid Rose said.
The anonymous student led
to the investigation of
Turner. While investigating room
157 Aycock, detectives found 218
hits of LSD, according to Rose.
The confiscated LSD was on
sheets, or blotter form. LSD,
popularly known as acid, is a
psychoactive hallucinogenic
dg-
Turncr appeared in court Jan.
30 for a probable cause hearing.
Rose said Turner's court date will
probably be 10 days from the ini-
tial hearing.
Student Union elects
Mayr as new president
By MINDY McINNlS
Staff Writer
Program pushes for
drug prevention
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
The Office of Substance
Abuse axkd t revenuon -aftdJcuiu
cation is sponsoring National
Collegiate Drug Awareness Week
from Feb. b-12.
According to Director David
A. Susina, a video, "America
Hurts-The Drug Epidemic will
be shown at Joyner Library as part
of the week's activities. "It is a half
hour video about substance abuse
in America today Susina said.
"After the video tape, we will
have a discussion about what is
going on around campus with
substance abuse The video will
be shown on Tuesday at 7 p.m. in
zation that deals with issues sur-
rounding responsible alcohol
use Susina said. "We are offer-
ing awareness programs so stu-
dents can understand what alco-
hol is and what it can do to them.
Then they can make good deci-
sions about choosing to drink or
not to drink
The Office of Substance
Abuse and Prevention and Edu-
cation is open for self-referrals
and is offering confidential one-
on-one counceling for students
with alcohol and drug-related
problems.
According to Susina, the of-
fice hopes to establish a campus
chapter of Alcoholics Anony-
mous (AA) this semester. Com-
munity chapters are accessible to
Joyner B-04.
During the week, programs ECU students until the campus
will be given in the residence
halls, and information will be
available for those interested 'a
knowing more about alcohol and
drug abuse prevention.
Susina said his office will be
working to coordinate programs
and activities already being ad-
ministered on campus. The sub-
stance prevention office alcng
with SRA, SCA, BACCHUS, ECU
Public Safety and other groups
chapter is formed.
Susina said the office will also
form a chapter of Adult Children
of Alcoholics (ACOA). According
to Susina, there is a growing need
for this group on campus to give
support to students with alcohol
problem in the family.
The office, located in Erwin
301, serves as a resource library
wil 1 decide on strategies that will video and ppts
be employed in 1989 for fighting available q 757793 for more
alcohol and drug abuse.
"BACCHUS is a peer organi- information.
SGA passes new Spring
election procedures
David Mayr, the recently elected president of the Student Union,
plans to continue on the progress of the previous adminstration.
(Photo by Angela Pridgen�Photolab)
Professors are overpaid
and underworked
Last week, the Student Union
elected a new president, David
Mayr, who says he plans to ex-
pand on existing programs.
Presently the chairperson for
the films committee, Mayr will
become president April 22. Mayr
has been active in the Student
Union for four years and is very
optimistic about the upcoming
year.
When asked to discuss future
plans for the Student Union,
David said, "I want to improve
upon the outgoing administra-
tions progress Mayr feels that
Karen Pasch, the current presi-
dent, has done a lemarkable job.
During her adminstration,
Pasch has made strides promot-
ing the campus of minority ori-
ented programs and has worked
to develop a more cohesive or-
ganization within the Union.
Mayr wants to continue to create
unification between the mem-
bers of the Student Union pro-
gram board in order to better
serve the student body.
Eventually Mayr hopes to
make ECU students more aware
of the Student Union's activities
by working with WZMB to help
promote the programs. Mayr
also predicts that the Depart-
ment of Student Life, and the
Student Union will start work-
ing together. The Student Union
will program the Department of
Student Life's events and in turn
Student Life will promote the
Union.
"Basically, we will try to work
with Student Life in promoting
our events and we will assist in
programming events like the
'Hill Jam Mayr said.
This arrangement is just one
of the many that has been
planned for the new year. Mayr
hopes that his energy and enthu-
siasm will cause a chain reaction
among the other members.
Most of the students at ECU
don't understand what the Stu-
dent Union is all about. What
does this organization do, how is
it funded, who's in charge?
The Student Union consists of
11 committees including, chair-
person for each committee,
president, and assistant presi-
dent. Each committee is respon-
sible for creating a budget with
the alloted monies.
Every student, whether they
are aware of it or not, helps make
this allocation possible. When
tuitions are paid, there's a per-
centage that goes toward "other
fees Most of the money from
these fees goes toward ECU ath-
letics and only a fourth goes to
the Student Union.
Not all of the committees will
receive the same amount of
money. For example, the Film
committee will receive more
funding than the Major Concert
committee since more film pro-
ductions are offered to the stu-
dents.
One of the members, Steve
Sommers, Chairperson of the
Major Concerts committee,
thinks David Mayr will be a real
See MAYR, page 2
By TIM HAMPTON
New Editor
The Student Government
Association passed new election
procedures Monday in efforts to
give students more time to hear
views from potential office hold-
ers.
Instead of one week to cam-
paign for office, candidates will
now have two weeks to vie for
SGA positions in the coming
spring elections, according to
Marty Helms, speaker of the legis-
lature.
Helms, who brought the elec-
tion rules admendment before the
student representatives, said the
additional week will allow for
campus participation in the elec-
tion process.
"By giving two weeks, it gives
organizations more time to hold
forums and for voters to evaluate
the candidates Helms said.
In the past, spring election'
have been held the week follow
ing spring break. Helms said th
week after the vacation is not
good placement for the elections.
Helms also introduced legis-
lation in the weekly SGA meeting
which changes the period be-
tween the primary and run off
elections from the traditional two
weeks to one week.
"There is no reason for there
to be two weeks between elec-
tions Helms said. The run-off
election decides a victor from the
two top vote-getters who emerge
from the primary election.
Helms feels students have
been apathetic concerning the
run-off elections in the past years.
He said the root of the problem is
the two week period between
elections. Two weeks after the
initial election, 'Teople are going
to forget what is happening
Helms said.
A total of 1,034 students,
roughly 6.6 percent of the stu-
dents, voted in last spring's run
off elections.
In addition, the legislation
passed Monday moves the filing
period for candidates to one week
prior to spring break.
(CPS)� Professors who curl
up by the fireplace with this
winter's new book about what's
wrong with colleges� Charles
Sykes' "Profscam"� might end
up throwing it in. This hotly de-
bated expose depicts academi-
cians as overpaid, underworked
prima donnas who "almost
singlehandedly destroyed the
university as a center for learn-
- - n
ing.
College teachers, Sykes said,
are no good.
They have been made fat and
complacent by tenure, he
charged, which frees them to
abandon their students in favor of
chasing money and prestige
through office politicking, useless
research and big grants.
"They have distorted univer-
sity curriculums to accomodate
their own narrow and selfish in-
terests Sykes writes.
These interests are so trendy
that they produce "curriculums
that look like they were designed
by a game show host" Sykes
added in an interview.
To Sykes, profs are reponsible
for a variety of ills like "pseu-
doscience "junkthink" and
"twist(ing) the ideals of academic
freedom into a system in which
they are accountable to no one
"A lot of undergrads go to
some of the most prestigious uni-
versities in the country, like the
Uni veristy of Michigan, Berkeley,
even Harvard, based on the repu-
tations of their professors Sykes
said.
"What they find is something
very different from what they and
their parents have been led to
expect. They think they'll be
learning at the feet of those profes-
sors acl what they find is, if they
see those professors at all, ifs as a
blur in the parking lot
Sykes maintained it can all be
changed by eliminating tenure.
Such a proposal, naturally, is
not without detractors. Sykes'
idea, noted Dr. Jonathan Knight
Df the American Association of
University Professors (AAUP),
would destroy academic free-
iom.
"Sykes says eliminating ten-
re will keep everybody on their
toes Knight said. "More likely
it'll keep everybody on their
knees
See PROFESSORS, page 2
Hey where did that guy come from? Thia maintenance man
comet up for air and to check out the weather. (Photo by Mark
10vt-FHetoU:N





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARYS IJM
A third of southern high school grads
need remedial courses in college
(CPS)� More than a third of
the students� 36 percent� who
graduate form high school in the
South need remedial courses to
move on to college-level work, the
Southern Regional Education
Board iSREB) has found.
It's not much better else-
where. Southern college fresh-
men are "right in with everybody,
no worse and no better said
SREB research associate Dr.
Ainslev Abraham, who con-
ducted the studv.
"The only national study
done on this showed that 37 per-
cent of the students entering col-
lege needed remedial math, 29
percent needed (remedial) read-
ing and 31 percent needed (reme-
dial) writing Abraham said
The number "far exceeds any
reasonable estimate of those stu-
dents who may be 'falling
through the cracks of secondary
education SREB reported. "The
implications of these large num-
bers are serious
"Colleges have always ad-
mitted students who were under-
prepared. Some students are
admitted who don't have all the
requirements in one area or an-
other Abraham explained.
Some say it's because of the
nature of high schools.
"The need for remediation is
the downside of minimal (high
school) graduation requirements
because some students are just
working for what they have to do
to gef that diploma noted Frank
Burtnctt, executive director of the
National Association of College
Admissions Counselors.
Reforms at the high school
level will help, "but there will
always be some student who slip
through the cracks even if the
schools were perfect said
SREB's Abraham.
"Right now, it's just that there
are very large numbers
JjT filC C SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
'rK STUDENTS WHO NEED
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Professor have poor work habits
Continued from page 1
Many of the ages' greatest
thinkers� trom Socrates to Jesus
to Galileo to Freud to even certatn
scholars during the McCarthy era
in the United States� lost jobs.
money, reputations and even
their lives tor pursuing ideas that
the political or religious leaders ot
their day found offensive.
Tenure arose as a way to pro-
tect them and the masses oi more
anonymous college teachers from
the political whims of administra-
tors, who might otherwise suc-
cumb to community pressure to
punish professors engaged in
misunderstood or unpopular re-
search.
The author who wants to
dump tenure is. ironically, him-
self the son of a professor, the late
lav G. Svkes, who was a journal-
ism professor at the Univeisty of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
'Trofscam" grew out of a
1985 article written by the senior
Svkes for Milwaukee Magazine,
then edited by his son. In the
piece, entitled "The Sorcerers and
the Seven-And-A-Half Week
the senior Svkes accused his col-
leagues of poor work habits.
"It generated a gigantic re-
sponse the vounger Svkes, who
isajounalist, recalled. "Theletters
and calls indicated that this thing
had touched a nerve. The admini-
stration and lots of faculty (at the
University of Wisconsin-Milwau-
kee were outraged. But some
faculty, students and parents said
'Yeah, this is absolutely correct
A fter hi s f a ther7 s dea th, Svkes
set out to develop the article into a
book and, in the process, came to
focus on the quality of college
Prankster disrupts
sexuality class

(CPS)� A "prankster" dis-
mpted a human sexuality class at
the U niversity of Washington Jan.
9 bv tlvrowing a live rooster from
the classroom balcony and shout-
ing "Suck my cock
The rooster was killed when it
hit the floor.
UW campus police are inves-
tigating the incident, Psychology
210 lecturer Lois McDermott re-
ported.
McDermott said similar inci-
dents have happened every term
she's taught the class, but that the
rooster typically is released in a
way that it lands safely. This is the
first time there's been a fatality.
"This time I forgot to look out
for it, and was feeling pretty bad
that I forgot to warn the stu-
dents she said.
In retrospect, McDermott
said she should have known the
time for the prank was drawing
near. Just before class, a "young
man" gave her a plate on which a
banana and two oranges were
arranged to look like male genita-
lia, announcing "I just wanted to
give you this" before turning and
leaving the classroom.
teaching.
. He found that most profs
teach only seven-and-a-half to �
hours a week. Thev leave instruct-
ing and guiding students to grad
assistants, who Sykes said, now
comprise a "bitter academic un-
derclass" often of foreigners who
can't speak understandable Eng-
lish.
"I have to admit 1 was ap-
palled Sykes said, "at how
deeply ingrained the comtempt
for teaching is
People who like and are goiKl
at teaching often don't get tenure
because thev may not be good at
publishing, Svkes contended.
"To be a teacher in higher
education is virtually to commit
professional suicide he said.
It would be different without
tenure. 'Tenure corrupts, ener-
vates and dulls higher educa-
tion Svkes wrote in "Profscam
Mayr
Continued from page 1
"kick in the pants type Presi-
dent Sommers wants the cur-
rent programs to be readjusted
with a little more flavoring and
strongly believes Mayr is the
Knight, one of Sykes' most
vocal critics, disagreed emphati-
cally.
"Svkes believes that by elimi-
nating tenure, you'll weed out the
deadwood and the incompetents,
people won't get free rides
Knight argued. Yet bosses who
ing their bosses by asking to weed
out their bad colleagues.
Consequently, it's likely
Sykes' system would lead to more
deadwood, not less, Knight main-
tained.
Without the job security ten-
hire incompetents often are loathe ure give them, Knight added, the
to admit later they made a hiring best professors would move on to
mistake, and untenured teachers where the real money is: private
would be unlikely to risk anger- industry.
Schools are drug-
free, says professor
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
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(CPS)� Schools already are
drug-free, a Western Kentucky
University professor has asserted.
The reason is that students
are getting high off campus in-
stead.
A "scant" 2 to 3 percent of all
adolescents use drugs on their
school grounds, WKU Prof. Ron
percent smoked marijuana.
They favored ingesting it all
in the privacy of cars or their own
homes, not in schools.
Adams added his survey
found inner city kids used drugs
less than students in other areas.
"We may be laboring under a false
impression that the majority of
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man for the job. "David is a very Atlanta-based croup.
Adams found in a study of stu- drug use occurs with inner city
dent drug use black kids
e don t have a school
drug problem We haved a com-
munity drug problem argued
Adams, who conducted the sur-
vey for PRIDE (Parents Resource
Institute for Drug Education), an
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Adams did conclude that
teenager's use of drugs and alco-
hol was "epidemic
More than two-thirds of the
high school seniors he surveyed
said they drank beer. More than
half drank hard liquor, and 25
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Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2,1989 3
Leaders scrap over program
INTRODUCING:
RALEIGH (AP) � While say-
ing they did not expect a House-
Senate fight over the Basic Educa-
tion Program, leaders of the two
groups exhibited different levels
of commitment to the plan, which
Gov. Jim Martin called a "sacred
cow" after his proposal to scale it
back for one year drew protests.
"I believe there are no sacred
cows in the state budget process
House Speaker Joe Mavretic, D-
tdgecombe, said Tuesday at a
news conference with Sen. Hen-
son Barnes, D-Wayne. He said he
had always considered the BEP
flawed.
Barnes, Senate president pro
tern, said, "Most of us believe the
BEP, though it may not be a sacred
cow, it has a lot of importance to
this state. I think a majority of the
senators are supporting it very
strongly
The BEP, designed to provide
a basic level of instruction to all
North Carolina schoolchildren, is
being phased in over eight years
and will cost an extra $800 million
per year when fully imple-
mented. The fifth-year install-
ment scheduled for fiscal 1989-90
will cost $113 million.
Because of lagging tax collec-
tions, the Legislature is expected
to have only $232 million for per-
manent additions to the budget.
Martin in December proposed
halving the BEP installment for
1989-90 but retreated in the face of
legislators' protests.
He called for full funding in
his budget proposal, but said BEP
implemenation and other top pri-
orities such as prison construction
might leave no money for a pay
raise before April 1990, when he is
proposing raises of 5.7 percent for
teachers and 4.5 percent for other
employees. Facing a storm of
protest from teachers and state
workers, Martin and the legisla-
tive leadership have been scram-
bling to find money to start the
pay raise earlier.
Mavretic said he had in-
structed House Appropriations
Committee Chairman David Dia-
mont, D-Surry, to "lift every rock"
for items that could be cut from
the budget. Some legislators have
said the BEP should undergo the
same scrutiny for possible sav-
ings as other programs, but others
say it should be untouchable.
Barnes and Mavretic ap-
peared divided on that score. In
1984, Mavretic was chairman of a
committee involved in the debate
over whether to establish the BEP
and a career ladder program for
teachers.
He said he voted against both
programs as conceived by the
State Board of Education. "I've
never changed my personal posi-
tion that the BEP had flaws and
that the career ladder was de-
signed to fail Mavretic said.
Asked whether he was sug-
gesting that the BEP should be
considered less important than
pay raises, Mavretic said every
General Assembly is obligated to
review major state programs.
"And if this assembly chooses to
look at the BEP, that is what as-
semblies are supposed to do he
said.
Barnes said the program
might need some fine-tuning but
"we would not want to delay it
unless we had to On other is-
sues:
- Bames said he hoped the
Senate would pass a bill to give
the governor veto power and al-
low the Legislature to override
vetoes by a two-thirds or three-
fifths margin. Mavretic said he
favored veto power as part of a
package that might include repeal
of succession, a change in the way
judges are selected, and other
moves to preserve the balance of
power.
-Bames said he would vote
against a state lottery but would
not lobby his colleagues to do like-
wise. Mavretic said the issue to be
decided is whether North Caro-
linians want legal gambling and,
if so, what form would raise the
most money.
He said his research indicated
that wagering on horse and dog
races would generate more reve-
nue than a lottery.
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Hatcher, Jacobs file law suit
HF THt BUN ALWtftS ShlNES 1
SunSational
RALEIGH (AP) � A battle
that began one year ago with the
takeover of a Robeson County
newspaper continued as two
Tuscarora Indians filed a lawsuit
charging that attempts to
extradite and prosecute them on
kidnapping charges are part of a
"campaign of harassment and
intimidation Eddie Hatcher and
Timothv Jacobs filed a lawsuit in
U.S. District Court in Raleigh on
Tuesday, asking a federal judge to
block their extradition on 14 state
charges of kidnapping stemming
from the takeover of The Robe-
sonian a year ago today.
The suit, which also was filed
by the Robeson County Defense
'Committee, names Gov. Jim Mar-
tin, Attorney General Lacy Thorn-
burg, SB1 Director Robert Mor-
gan, Superior Court Judge Joe
freeman Brijt, Robeson County
iPv&tnct Attorrw,y - Richard
'Townsend and Sheriff Hubert
Stone, as well as deputies and SBI
:agents, as defendants. The suit
shows that the people of Robeson
County "are a changed People
defense attorney Lewis Pitts told a
crowd of about 50 people at a
news conference in front of the
county courthouse in Lumberton.
"No longer will they sit by
.and take the reign of terror and
the oppression, and this lawsuit
reflects their changed attitude
said Pitts who represents Jacobs.
They are calling the emperor
naked. That's the positive spirit
here one vear after the takeover
But fhornburg said the state
did not intend to stop pressing for
the extradition of the two Indians.
"It is clear that this lawsuit repre-
sents a thinly disguised effort to
prevent the state of North Caro-
lina from pursuing the
extradition and criminal prosecu-
tion of Mr. Hatcher and Mr.
Jacobs for holding 14 innocent
people at gunpoint and against
their will Thomburg said.
"The state will do everything
within its power to see that these
individuals are extradited to
North Carolina to stand trial on
state charges The suit asks for at
least $10,000 in damages from
each of the 20 defendants and a
judgement "declaring unconsti-
tutional the campaign of intimi-
dation and harassment" it alleges
is being conducted in Robeson
County.
against Hatcher and Jacobs in
December, the questioning of
people who support the two Indi-
ans and alleged attempts by
prosecutors or investigators to
question the two men without
their attorneys present. The suit
was filed under a federal civil
rights law that allows suits by
people whose federal constitu-
tional or legal rights have been
violated by state or local officials.
The suit says the federal court
should intervene on grounds that
the state prosecution and other
alleged incidents of intimidation
and harassment are an attempt to
stop the plaintiffs from exercising
their civil rights. The two defen-
dants held up to 20 people hos-
tage for 10 hours at The Robe-
sonian newspaper office in Lum-
berton.
They were charged with hos-
tage-taking and firearms viola-
tions, but a federal jury in October
found them innocent of all
charges. A special session of the
Robeson County grand jury re-
turned the 14 kidnapping charges
Dec. 6.
Hatcher was freed on $25,000
bond posted by the National
Council of Churches, but fled to
New York after being released.
He is now in the custody of the
Shoshone-Bannock Indians on
the Fort Hall Reservation in
Idaho, where he is seeking refuge.
"Just because I'm not in North
Carolina doesn't mean I'm not in
their hair Hatcher said in a tele-
phone interview. "It's sad that the
taxpayers of North Carolina are
having to finance this vindictive
campaign against me and the
Robeson County Defense
Committee by corrupt county
officials, but more so by the assis-
tance and protection of state offi-
cials including the Attorney Gen-
eral and the governor he said.
I shall not back down
Jacobs, who fled the day the
indictments were returned, is liv-
ing at the Onondaga I ndian Reser-
vation in New York pending an
extradition hearing in late Febru-
ary. The suit says the investiga-
tors and Townsend advised fam-
ily members and friends of Jacobs
that he should not use attorneys
from Christie Institute South of
Carrboro, the public interest law
firm that won his acquittal in fed-
eral court.
It says they also encouraged
Jacobs to criticize Hatcher "to
disrupt the joint defense that they
had been presenting" and to inter-
fere with the relationship be-
tween Jacobs and his attorneys.
The suit says the advice left Jacobs
"confused and uncertain
Jacobs, in a telephone inter-
view in January, said he had gone
to The Robesonian with Hatcher
because he believed Hatcher
would harm the hostages if he
went by himself. Jacobs also said
that Hatcher had ruined his life.
Shortly after that interview,
Hatcher left the Onondaga Reser-
vation for Idaho. The suit says the
state prosecution "was brought
and is being maintained in bad
faith and as an integral part of the
campaign of intimidation and
harassment
Robeson County Sheriff's
Department spokesman Bill Price
said he had talked with Stone,
who is on sick leave, "and he said
he would have no comment on it
Townsend said he had not seen a
copy of the suit by late Tuesday
afternoon.
"I feel like 1 should look at it
before I say anything, and might
not even want to say anything
then he said. "From what I have
heard, it just sounds like more of
the same thing they've been say-
ing all along
Spokesmen for others named
in the suit said they could make no
immediate comment.
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�Jie lEaat Carolinian
Serving the lat Carolina .ampus . .�mmuniln mi.
PETE FERNALD, Central Manage
Stephanie Folsom, M�-rnt u,u�
James F.J. McKee, cwot,Advening
Tim Hampton, nt� l Brad Bannister, cy m,
KRISTENHALBERG,sr�.Etor JEFF PARKER, St Wiiitiiin
Chip Carter, r�t�� � Tom Furr, emulation Manager
Susan Howell, pr�. Mr Debbie Stevens, s�
Dean Waters, m M�-ier Stepi ianie Emory, t�a sm
Stephanie Singleton, g e Mac Clark, ��.�� Manager
February 2.1989
OPINION
Pago 4
Helicopters
The new way to legally invade privacy
"In the far distance, a helicopter
skimmed down between the roots
it was the Police Patrol, snooping
into people's windows
Justice bren an's dissent from a
recent Supreme Court ruling ended
with this frighteningly appropriate
quote from 19S4. The ruling in ques-
tion allows police to spy on citizens
and search their property without a
warrant, as long as the police take
this action while inside a helicopter.
Apparently, neither the right to pri-
vacy nor freedom from unwar-
ranted search applies if the agents or"
the law manage to keep their feet off
the ground.
Specifically, the case in question
was Florida vs. Riley. Michael Riley,
a resident of New Port Richey, Flor-
ida, was growing marijuana plants
in a greenhouse in his backyard.
Pasco County detectives had been
tipped off to the crime, but, rather
than follow normal procedure, they
sent a police helicopter to search
Riley's back yard from 400 feet.
Unfortunately for Riley, some
roof panels were missing from his
greenhouse. The police spotted the
plants, then applied for a warrant.
The Florida Supreme Court cor-
rectly ruled that the search was
unconstitutional. However, a ma-
jority of the U.S. Supreme Court
ruled that since FAA regulations
would have allowed a civilian pilot
to fly where the police helicopter
had gone, the police were perfectly
within their rights.
Apparently no one bothered to
point out to Chief Justice William
Rehnquist and his Spanish Rehnqui-
sition that, for one thing, civilian
pilots simply don't happen to buzz
people's back yards. Nor does it
seem that the majority noticed the
full implications of this ruling: no
citizen now has any reasonable ex-
pectation of privacy under an open
sky. Privacy in one's own baci; yard
once meant having a fence; now it
may require a roof too.
The ruling docs more than
threaten to turn police into peeping
toms, though it threatens that too.
Mere voyeurism would be less dis-
tressing than the fact that police can
now legally � at any time, for any
reason, with neither a warrant nor
probable cause � spy on citizens.
The attorney general's office
called the ruling a defeat for the
drug trade and a "major plus" for
law enforcement. It is both. But law
enforcement carried too far is totali-
tarianism. It is oppression. It is the
idea that the citizen exists to serve
the State � an idea once identified
more with communism than with
democracy.
Certainly, there are a few advan-
tages to a totalitarian state. Mus-
solini made the trains run on time. In
addition, such states often have less
of a crime problem. But how far can
it go? How much individual free-
dom need be sacrificed frw-rtwum
venience of those who enforce the
laws? Where does it end?
The decisive votes in the case
came, not surprisingly, from Reagan
appointees. It is an ugly legacy Re-
agan left: the "war on drugs" has
assumed more importance than the
rights of human beings. And Reagan
left behind not only a Supreme
Court apparently bent on burning
the Bill of Rights, but also a succes-
sor willing to do even more damage.
With decisions like Riley, the
State edges ever closer to destroying
the fundamental rights of individu-
als. It illustrates the true nature of
the threat to democracy: a populace
walling to be lulled by material
comfort into accepting the gradual
erosion of its freedoms. The state of
Florida didn't win this case � Big
Brother did.
New meal plan policy spells out
no choice for dorm students
r the editor:
Once again the administrators of
this university have :learly and bla-
tantly shown their complete lack of
regard for the students wishes and
judgment. 1 lore, i am referring to the
burden that will be thrown onto the
shoulders of those students who en-
joy living in the resident halls but do
not like the meal plan. The reasoning
is very simple, no matter how much
this measure will improve thequality
of dining services, there will be a large
group of people who will not want it.
As cine of my fellow SGA members
put it, "Thisis America and nobody is
going to tell me what to buy
Furthermore, the University has
established the Student Government
- Association as the student political
body and this entity overwhelmingly
BPPWSRJ this measure td fix strong
arm tactics to "guarantee" thesuccess
of a program, rhec rucial point here is
the fact that the higher ups and deci-
sion makers do not give a damn about
what the students think or desire. Ob-
viously, the wheels of big business,
and this is very much a business deci-
sion, are more important than the
students' rights to free choice. And
frankly, I am disgusted
Steve Sommers
Senior
PolsPhil
Bonehead fan
enjoyed article
To the editor:
In response to Michael .
Bennett's letter about Chippy
Bonehead's article "Tips For Casual In the past year, the two finest
Sex" I must point out that we don't teachers 1 have had were denied ten-
live in a neatly ordered world. Just ure. Why did they not receive tenure?
One simple reason � they didn't
because he doesn't appreciate Do- ,av .hc acadenw administration's
praved Humor" is no reason to deny m(? Thev jy , condlK.t
research. It didn't matter that they
were well respected bv all oi their
students, they just didn't conduct
enough research. They felt that they
were doing their job � to teach the
student. What good can all of this
research and publishing of materials
do for me, the student?
I believe that the university
needs to step back and look at what
this system has caused. I have had
professors that could not even com-
municate with the class but that
the rest of the "East Carolinian
readers from this brief respite from
reality.
Sure this article fueled my desire
for rape, small bald women, Siamese
twins, and large beds, but if you
don't like it, I'd like to borrow your
quote and sav, 'Tough luck dude
This obviously was not a format
for the discussion of today's social
problems. Also, don't give me that
responsibility of the press crap. Half
the time the only thing -worth read didn't matter, thev were doing re-
News and Observer" aTe �4�arch. It doesn't seem to matter that
ing hi the
the "Doonesbury" and Bloom
County" political cartoons. Did you
know there is "Penguin Lust" in
Bloom County?
Chippy, keep up the good work,
the next interlude is for vou!
Robert G. Price
Grad Student
INDT
Tenure versus
Teaching
To the editor:
The time has come for the ad-
ministration of ECU to look at the
damage that is being done by the
present tenure system.
no-one is1 teaming a thing frbWi the
professor; that professor had done
research and gotten articles pub-
lished. He had played the game and
won, even if the people that matter,
the students, had lost.
I challenge vou, the academic
administration of ECU, to step back
and look at the quality of teachers
you have lost because thev didn't
play by your rules. Look at some oi
the teachers that passed your tenure
test but have no idea as to how to
teach a class.
Please take our teacher evalu-
ations seriously or don't waste our
time by asking us to fill them out.
If you continue to trv and become
a research institution, vou are onlv
going to hurt the ones that this uni-
versity is supposed to be here for, the
college student.
Tripp Roakes
Senior
Four ways of helping Gorbachev and the United States
By JOHSU A MURAVCHIK
New Republic
Two days before Mikhail Gorbachev's dramatic
speech to the United Nations, his aides were quoted
in the Washington Post promising a "Christmas
present" to the American people. In the same
morning's paper, you could also read about contin-
ued Soviet peace negotiations in Saudi Arabia with
representatives of the Afghan mujaheddin ; about
political reform in Hungary that would establish
freedom of speech and association; and about plans
in the People's Republic of China to sell stock in
state-owned industries to private investors.
What is going on here? What is going on is the
deepest crisis of the Communist system since its in-
vention, a crisis that amounts to almost complete
ideological collapse. The joke now popular in East-
ern Europe asks: What is socialism? Answer: The
longest road to capitalism.
George Bush's goal should be to move Commu-
nist countries further and faster down the road to
capitalism � and to democracy. Of course, we can-
not know Gorbachev's true intentions. But by shak-
ing things up in the Soviet Union, he has set in
motion processes that he cannot necessarily control.
What we need to do is influence the current course of
change by exploiting the openings created through
glasnost and perestroika .
The object of the game over the next four years
should be to help these societies move from totali-
tarianism to mere authoritarianism, which the gov-
ernment may not be the servant of the people but at
least does not try to control so many aspects of their
lives. That movement, clearly, is already under way.
TotaliUrianism has failed. For all the terror and
torture; for all the intimidation and indoctrination;
for all the internal espionage and the gulags; for all
the endless rivers of blood, there is no "new man
Recall Karl Marx's beatific image � a man who
would hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon,
and write poetry in the evening. Instead, our new
socialist man featherbeds in the morning, waits in
lines in the afternoons, and drinks himself into a
stupor in the evenings.
But there is also no new man in the raw totalitar
ian sense envisioned by Orwell: an obedient au-
tomaton. Nowhere is this utter failure of the totali-
tarian project more clear than in Poland. Not only
does virtually the whole population partake in a
spiritual life through the Church that is beyond the
reach of government; the Poles also have access to a
vast network of independent publishing and cul-
tural ventures, an independent economy, and inde-
pendent social welfare programs � even insurance
companies that will reimburse any criminal fines
imposed by the state for partaking in this under-
ground world. The eventual resul t of all this could be
to leave the state an empty shell that controls the
organs of state power and nothing else � the very
antithesis of the totalitarian project.
Indeed, Poland and Hungary today offer us an
imageofa historic transformation � thedetotalitari-
anization of the Communist world. Of course we
hope for more; we want democratization. But even
without democratization, the transformation from
totalitarianism to merely authoritarian dictatorship
would be � to borrow a phrase � a great leap for-
ward, especially if it meant dictatorship based, as
Gorbachev says he intends, on the rule of law. If
change went only that far it would constitute a great
deliverance. But it could also set the stage for a
subsequent transformation to democracy. To go
from authoritarianism to democracy is to travel an
alrcadv well-worn path. It is the trip from totalitari-
anism to authoritarianism that is the uncharted jour-
ney.
To encourage that journey, Bush must, first of
all, continue to do those things that have already
pushed the Communist countries this far. We must
maintain our military strength and be tough-
minded in our diplomatic dealings with the Com-
munist world And we must keep the pressure on the
Soviet empire by renewing support to anti-Commu-
nist insurgencies. But we must also devise tactics
that will lead to further detotalitarianization, and
that means maximizing contacts between our world
and theirs.
1. Bring back the bourgeoisie. Maximizing contacts
does not mean bailing out the Soviet and Warsaw
Pact economies. It is in our interest for perestroika to
succeed by virtue of a shift of resources from the
Soviet defense budget to the civilian economy. It is
not in our interest to obviate that shift by aiding their
state economics. Nonetheless, we have every inter-
est in the growth of private enterprise in Communist
countries. The number of private cooperatives in the
Soviet Union is reported to be in the tens of thou-
sands. In some Eastern European countries there
may be even more. One of the first things we should
do is to encourage private investment in these ven-
tures. The Overseas Private Investment Corpora-
tion, or some similar agency, could reduce the risk of
U.SSoviet joint ventures by insuring willing
American investors at subsidized rates.
2. let them grow their own food. Gorbachev has
sought to encourage private farming by offering 50-
year leases - a step toward out and out land owner-
ship. One of several reported obstacles to this reform
is the shortage of agricultural machinery suitable for
small-scale farms. It is in our interest to help the
Soviets import or produce such equipment, whether
by encouraging our own manufacturers to set up
joint ventures or by providing direct subsidies for
the purchase of such equipment. Their farmers
could also benefit from the know-how our own
farmers could provide through exchange programs.
3. Plug them into the Information Age. Few per-
sonal computers are made in the Communist coun-
tries. Philip Merrill, a former State and Defense
Department official, points out that there are untold
thousands of PCs here that are a few years old and
virtuallv without value on the American market. He
J
urges creation of a mechanism for their whole-
sale export to individuals, or schools, or volun-
tary associations in Communist countries. Re-
member, personal computers, especially when
equipped with printer and modem, are powerful
tools of individual expression and political
communication. Their proliferation could sub-
stantially decentralize the flow of ideas in coun-
tries where even Xerox machines arc kept under
lock and key.
4. Open more windows to the West. We ought
to explore every possible means of providing the
Communist countries with movies, television
programs, video tapes, books, and periodicals.
Look, for example, at the insidious liberalizing
effect that even the spread of Western popular
music has had on Soviet youth. Our own regular
daily cultural fare would be equallv corrupting.
Now that the Soviets have stopped jamming
m me radio broadcasts, we ought to explore tech-
nologies that would allow us to beam television
programs into the Communist countries from
great distances.
m






Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2, 1989 5
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Immediately. Non smoker. To share 3
bedroom house. Will have own bedroom.
173 00 per month plus 13 utilities. 5
tnmutes from school Call Pamela at 758-
7142
ONE MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
sublease apartment two blocks from
campus (list). Walking distance from
school, downtown, and many other
places. Subleaser has option to furnish his
bedroom or use existing furniture. Micro-
wave, toaster oven, color TV with cable
Costs only SI50 per month plus utilities.
Call today! 757-0412
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed imme-
diately to share 2 bedroom apartment,
during spring andor summer session. 2
miles from campus on ECU transit route.
Tav 1II rent and 1 2 utilities Call Cather-
ine 353-7307.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED. To
share two bedroom apartment. S207 rent,
$95 deposit, 12 utiltities. Call Elena 756-
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Stratford
Arms. To share 2 bedroom apt 1II utili-
ties Free cable Sl70month. Call 756-
51 S3 or 324 3354 on weekends.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: 2 br 1 block
from campus, fully furnished, semester
lease, washer-dryer. $300month. Call
757-0202 and ask for Ronnie.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom apt. Non-smoking student pre-
ferred. $121 a month plus 13 utilities.
Call 830-3753.
FOR RENT Bedroom in house. Near
ECU campus. Utilities included. Whole
house privileges. $165.00 per month. Call
758-1274 after 6:00 p.m.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom upstairs apt.
Screened in porch. Utilities included.
Near ECU campus. $250.00 per month.
Call 758-1274 after 6:00 p.m.
Classifieds
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
0eside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694
NEED ADJ Hire the ELBO D.J. call early
and book for your formal or party. 758-
1700, ask for Dillon or leave a message.
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM-
POSED: Call 756-9136.
TYPING: Term Papers, letters, resume's
� etc. Call Becky 9 a.m5 p.m. M-F 758-
1161.
LEARN TO KNIT 1-2 classeswk. $10
semester. For more information call Janet
752-8911.
HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
From $100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chevvs. Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S-l 166
79 FIREBIRD FOR SALE: Good condi-
tion V6, automatic, AMFM, air condi-
tion, new tires. S1750.00. John: 551-2460
(day), 830-5295 (eve.)
FOR SALE: Britches Great Outdoors
brown leather jacket. Size 40 regular. The
fatigued look. Very cool & stylish. Six
months old! $180.00. Call 758-74.
ATTENTION - GOVERNMENT
SEIZED VEHICLES: From $100.00
Fords, Mercedes, Corvettes, Chevys. Sur-
plus Buyers Guide. 602-838-8885 Ext. A-
5285.
ATTENTION - GOVERNMENT
HOMES: From $1 (U-rtpair). Delinquent
tax property. Repossessions. Call 602-838-
8885 Ext. GH 5285.
'81 PONTIAC WAGON: AMFM, air,
wire wheels, great shape, very depend-
able, teacher's car, $2,500.00 758-0341
after 5 p.m.
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER III: In
dudes disk drive, programs, blank disks
and more. $34000 or BO Call Frank at
355-0793 Leave message.
FOR SALE: 2 living room table lamps.
Call after 5:00 p.m. 758-5422.
2 SOFAS FOR SALE In good condition,
$55 each. 1 wood recliner with ottoman
asking $50. Call 757-0202 or 752-6554.
CAN YOU BUY: Jeeps, Cars, 4 X 4's
Seized in drug raids for under $100.00?
Call for facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
LASER PRINTER USERS HP and
Apple laser printer toner cartridges can be
recycled! Huge $$ savings. Satisfaction
guaranteed. For details call RANDMONT
at 1-800-332-3658.
AMSTRAD PC 1512: IBM compatible, 20
MB hard drive. 360 KB disk drive, mouse,
color monitor, microsoft MSDOS V3.2,
digital research DOS plus, "GEM Desk-
top "Gem Paint "Gem Doodle "Basic
2 Assorted games & business software
included. $1350.00. 756-6805.
SERVICES OFFERED
Union Program Board; 'plan and promote
the annual Student Union Banquet; select
and plan Union decorations and recep-
tions; 'select committee members and co-
ordinate and head committee meetings.
Applications being taken until February
3.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships
$10,000-$105,000yr Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
CABIN COUNSELORS & INSTRUC-
TORS: (Male and Female) for western
North Carolina 8 week children's camp
Over 30 activities including Water Ski,
Tennis, Heated swimming pool, Go-
K?rts, Hiking, Art Room, meals, salary
and travel. Experience not necessary.
Non-smoking students write for applica-
tionbrochure: Camp Pinewood, 20205-1
N.E. 3 Court, Miami, Florida 33179.
PERSONALS
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary com-
pensation, however room, utilities and
phone provided. Mary Smith REAL Crisis
Center 758-HELP.
STUDENT NEEDED: To post advertis-
ing materials on campus bulletin boards.
Work own hours with good pay. Write
Campus Advertising, P.O. Box 1221, Du-
luth, GA 30136-1221. (404) 873-9042.
BAE COMPUTER NEEDS Responsible
student to represent our computer Incen-
tive bonus plan. Interested persons please
send resume to 3563 Ryder Street, Santa
Clara, CA 95051.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS:
For Counselors, Water Front Director,
Asst. Swim Instructors Friendly Day-
Camp is a summer day camp for mentally
and physically handicapped children &
adults. Please write or call The Special
Populations Program, P.O. Box 590,
Raleigh, NC. 27602 (919) 755-6832.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACATION IN
CANCUN Become a College Tours rep-
resentative on your campus and get a free
trip. Nothing to buy�we provide every-
thing you need. It's a little work for alot of
fun'Call 1-800-727-0005.
TUTORS NEEDED: For all business
dase� Contact boa at Academic Coun-
seling, Dept of Athletics 757-6282 or 757-
1677.
RESORT HOTELS: Cruiselines, Airlines,
& Amusement Parks, NOW accepting
applications for spring and summer jobs,
internships, and career positions. For
more nformation and an application;
write national Collegiate Recreation Serv-
ice; PO Box 8074; Hilton Head, SC 29938.
$10-$15HOUR PROCESSING MAIL
T HOME: Weekly check guaranteed.
For details write V & E Enterprises 14263
San Pablo Ave Suite 111 Un Pablo. CA
94806.
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSISTER
CAMPS: (Mass.) Mah-Kee-Nac for Boys
Danbee for Girls. Counselor positions for
Program Specialists: All Team Sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
Hockey, Soccer and Volleyball; 25 Tennis
openings; also Archery, Riflery and Bik-
ing; other openings include Performing
Arts, Fine Arts, Yearbook, Photography,
Cooking, Sewing, Rollerskating, Rock-
etry, Ropes, Camp Craft; All Waterfront
activities (Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing, CanoeingKayak). Inquire
J & D Camping (Boys) 190 Linden Ave
Clen Ridge, NJ 07028; Action Camping
(Girls) 263 Main Road, Montville, NJ
07045. Phone (Boys) 201-429-8522; (Girls)
201-316-6660.
ATTENTION - HIRING Government
pbs - your area. Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. $17,840-
$69,485. Call 602-838-8885. Ext. R5285.
ARE YOU OUTGOING? Do you enjoy
talking on the phone? If so, we have the job
for you! Telemarketing positions open for
spring semester starting immediately.
Work for ECU and get paid while you gain
valuable telemarketing skills. Hours are 7
�9 p.m. daily; earn extra spending
money without cutting into study time!
Call Cindy at 7574215 or 757-6072 for an
appointment.
APPLICATIONS FOR STUDENT
UNION PRODUCTIONS CHAIRPER-
SON: Job description: 'serve on Student
SINGERS WANTED If you've sung in a
chop is and would be interested in a low-
pressure singing experience, come and
sin in Choral Lab. 3-4 Mon. & Wed. Fac-
ulty Welcome. Call Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
757-6331 for more information.
ECU STUDENT INTERESTED IN CAR
POOLING: From New Bern to ECU
MonTuesThurs. Call Bernard 637-5779
in New Bern.
BIG MONEY! BIG PRIZES Ware Talent
Show coming soon!
BE ON THE LOOKOUT: For information
concerning Ware Talen Show coming
soon. Big money! Big prizes!
SOUND MIXTURES DJ SERVICE:
Midwinter update. Alpha Omicron Pi's�
I'm ready, Let's get wild at Roseball!
AZD's�1 predict an epidemic of cabin
fever next week; Looking forward to it!
Sig Eps�let's get loud and obnoxious in
Myrtle! (But beware the foamy whirl-
pool). PERSONALS�Cool Daddy�your
buddy Ramone skipped town with my
great tee-shirts. Ernie�don't ask me to
scratch. Heim�1 hate Janet. Water r
Chick�beware the pigs head priz.
Tracy�bring some dead. Ronda�stop
lookin' at that ring. Nooche�we'll miss
you in Mvrtle. Mary Leslie�you can't
scratch! That's all for now. Call Sound
Mixtures for the best party DJ Service. Ask
for Bob. You know, the guy who drinks all
those Naturals behind the tables. Yeah,
the warranty guy. Dial 752-4916.
HAPPY HOUR: Tonight and every
Thursday night. 9 p.m. until. Drink spe-
cials and more. The Fizz �Pika.
NEW CHI OMEGA SISTERS: Congratu
lations and thanks for a sweet party. �
Sigma Phi Epsilon.
NUCLEAR WASTE OR WASTED: That
social was the GRANDDADDY. Tri-Sig,
thanks for a great time. �Sigma Phi Epsi
Ion. PS Ben get a room keyj.
DESPERATELY SEEKING: That secret
Trl-Sig to rock Jesse I. Bass. �Sigma Phi
Epsilon. 752-8096
PHI KAPPA TAU, SIGMA ALPHA
EPSILON AND PIKA, TOO It was our
pleasure to help each of you! I lope your
rush was as successful as could be 'cause
the Alpha Xi Delta's know the rushees
pledged a GREAT fratemtiy!
ALPHA OMICRON PLCretchen, Iknow
all and will tell all so beware! Get psyched
for Saturday night �Eileen.
ATTENTION GIRLS KA Little Sister
Rush is coming up soon and you are in-
vited. Feb. 7th & 8th from 8:00 to 11:00
p.m. at the KA 1 louse. Look in Tuesday's
paper for more details.
SIGMA NU LIL' SISTER RUSH: Wed
and Thurs 8:30-10:00 p.m. Join the ad-
ventuie. Become a member of "The White
Rot. Court
SIGMA i r: LIL' SISTERS: We might not
say it, but we appreciate all the things you
do for us cry much. Thanks for the out
standing support at rush. �Love, the
Brothers
TO MARY ELI FN DARLA, KAREN,
LORRAINE, AN � TACEY: Thanks for
all that special DZ if port during rush-
Love, theSij.t.u Nu brothers.
ALPHA DELTA Pi. We appreciate your
help during rush on Tuesday and party-
ing with us Friday night. We'll have to do
it again soon! �Lambda Chi's.
RING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER 89. EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS. FOR
INFO. CALL 1IOLLIE SIMONOWIC11
AT 752-2865
AZD'S: Just getting ready to rage Thurs-
day. �Love, the Pikes.
CONGRATULATIONS BILLY SES-
SOMS AND FRED REHERMAN: On a
fine job with PIKE rush.
PI KAPPA ALPHA LIL' SISTERS
Enough said.
CAROLINA'S REGIONAL CONFER-
ENCE: East Carolina Pikes�Scholastic
Award�Most Improved Chapter. Piece-
a-cake.
PIKA LIL' SISTER RUSH: Feb. 6 7. The
Attic. Watch for further details.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Welcomes every-
one downtown to enjoy their Thursday
night at our Rockefellers happy hour.
THE ALPHA XI DELTA PLEDGES:
Would like to announce the sale of Mono-
gram Lollipops for American Lung Asso-
ciation. Come by the Student Store Mon
Feb. 6-Thurs Feb. 9 from 8-2. Help us
support American Lung with these great
Valentine's gifts for only .75 cent!
AOPI'S & THEIR DATES: It's finally
here the weekend has come. Roseball is
the formal, pledges have tunes to hum.
Beta Lambda's dress in white, don't forget
this is your night! But don't get too proud
to boast, 'cause your big sisters will be
giving you a roast And to all the dates
who attend this function�get ready to gig
at the AOPi party junction. Don't forget
the pre-Roseball jam�if anyone can party
the AOPi's can BANK ON IT
LOST ID behind the Attic Sat. night.
Initials on I.D. are VS.�was in blue
leather ID. holder. $50 reward if returned.
Please contact Pam or Tricia at 752-6105 or
758-6731. PLEASE!
SIGMA PHI EPSILON EXTENDS: A
hearty thanks to Sigma Sigma Sigma and
Alpha Delta Pi for their help with RUSH.
WELCOME PLEDGES OF SIGMA PHI
EPSILON "Have fun and lets see some
hard work It's more than worth it. �
Brothers.
Wanna have a Great
SPRING BREAK? Spend
8 days and 7 nights in
Sunny Daytona Beach.
$190 for Transporta-
tion and Lodging.
Dall Dave at
758-8001
to insure a seat.
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru Sat- Low
Cost Termination to 20 weeks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
j-
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA AM'S jerry
1 lardesty, Bryce Dillard, Clay Rockett,
Chad Clark, Ken Attkisson, Brian Ander
son, Joel Mauney, Steve Barn well, Parker
Dudley, Brett Stancil and Rhett Spencer
DELTA ZETA: Way to go Basketball
team! Keep up the jammin' job
DELTA ZETA: Congratulations to Lon,
Jessica, and Catherine. We love you!?!
AZD AND AOPI: You were both the class
acts at our rush. Thanks so much for help
ing out. 1 lope to get together again soon
�Love�The Sigma Alpha Epsilon's.
PHI KAPPA TAU: Partying with you was
quite an adventure. And down in the
basement was the best thirst quencher.
The new pledges and brothers are reallv
cool. No one can beat the Phi Kappa Tau's
when it comes to poo! Thanks a lot, let's
do it again! �Love, the Alpha Xi Delta's
GIRLS, GUYS: Poolside parties and ma
jor tanning at Daytona Beach, Spring
Break '89. Call Keith, Kelly, Ron and
Wayne at 752 4693 for more information
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON AFTER-
NOON DELIGHT: Check it out Bet you
a dollar you chicken out this Friday at 5:30
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Would like
to congratulate the new pledges for their
wise choice Get ready for a great
semester �The Brothers
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Reminder
Commercial establishments
or events at commercial establishments,
regardless of the sponsor, can only be
ach ertised in the display classified section
Boxers Wanted:
March 28, 29, 30
Minges Coliseum
Boxer Registration
757-3042 or 830-1094
ATTENTION
APPLICATIONS ARE BEING
ACCEPTED FOR POSITIONS ON
BOTH THE JUDICIAL, HONOR
AND REVIEW BOARDS.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
SHOULD PICK UP APPLICATIONS
AT THE SGA OFFICES,
2ND FLOOR OF MENDENHALL.
Look for Your Sweetheart's Message
in
Lovetines
in the
February 14th issue of
The East Carolinian
Leave your sweetheart a special message
in the Valentine's Day issue of The East
Carolinian. Messages are only $1.00 so come
by the East Carolinian today!
Announcements
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TirrORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
RACOUETB ALL DOUBLES
A registration meeting for Intramural rac-
quetball doubles teams will be held Feb. 7
at 3:U0 p.m. in Biology 103. Men's and
women's partners are welcome!
FREE THROW CONTEST
A free throw contest sponsored by Intra-
mural- Recreational Services will be held
Feb. 9 in Memorial Gym from 3:00-5:00
p.m. and in Minges Coliseum from 8:00-
10.00 p.m. Winners will receive Intramu-
ral championship t-shirts. Register on-site
with your ECU ID.
SLAM DUNK CONTEST
Registration for the annual Intramural
slam dunk contest will be held Feb. 14 at
5:00 p.m. in BIO N-102. Women as well as
men are invited to sign-up. The goal will
be adjusted for women participants. Mi-
chael and Michelle Jordans should attend.
WEIGHT LIFTING CONTEST
Muscle and muscleless bound men and
women should attend the Intramural
registration meeting for the annual
weight lifting contest Feb. 20 at 5:00 p m.
in GCB 1026.
COPING WITH STRESS
A free mini-class offered by the ECU
Counseling Center for students: You
can�identify sources of stress, make
positive changes, manage your response
to stressful situations, learn to relax, im-
prove self confidence. Feb. 6,8, 10 & 13 in
329 Wright Bldg. from 3-4 p.m. No ad-
vance registration is required. Call or stop
by the Counseling Center for further info.
(316 Wright Bldg. 757-6661).
IMPROVING YOUR STUDY
SKILLS
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your grade
point average. All sessions will be held in
313 Wright Bldg. Feb. 6: Test taking�3-
430 p.m. Feb. 7: Test taking�3-430 p.m.
You may attend all the topic sessions or
choose the ones where you need the most
improvement.
FINANCIAL AID ORIENTA-
TION
Information and applications for 1989-90'
Feb. 9, 4:00 p.m Hendnx Theatre�MSC
RAFFLE
The ECU Gospel Choir will be having a
raffle Jan. 30-Feb. 3 in front of Student
Store. First prize: 7-inch herringbone "I
LOVE YOU" bracelet from Saslow's Jew-
elry. Second prize: jumbo decorated
cookie from Cookie Co Carolina East
Mall. Third prize: Floral arrangement
from Julians, tickets are .50 cent. Drawing
Feb. 3 at 3 p.m. at Student Store.
SOPHOMORES AND IRS
Earn over $60000 this summer. Ear�
$100 00 a month during your last two
vears in college Become a part of the
Army ROTC Dept here at ECU. Attend
the summer officer leadership course at
Fort Knox, Kentucky Info, meeting will
bo held on Feb 9 at 1800 hours in room 339
Rawl It's not too late for you to earn a
commission prior to graduation. For more
info, contact Cap Steve L Jones, Rawl
344, 757-6974
The Ultimate Chance for all students to
show their artistic talents! The Spring art
aim petition will be accepting entries Feb
13-17 from 3-5 p.m. in rm 221 Mendcn-
hall. Entry fee is $3.00entry and each





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2, 1989

Announcements
person mav submit 3 pieces First place
SI75.00, 2nd place $125 00, 3rd place
$75.00 and 5 honorable mentions of
S25.00. The Illumina reception will be Fob
20, 7-9 p.m. in Mendenhall Gallery Unse
lected pieces must be picked up bv Feb. 19
or no later than Feb 20 by 3 p.m. due to
lack of storage
MINORITY STT DENTORG.
The Minority Student tg will meet Feb
2 at b 00 p.m in Speight 129. All are invited
and encouraged to attend
PARTIC1PANTS NEEDED
Participants for asthma research study-
Males age IS-45, with mild to moderate
asthma. Compensation available Please
call 551-3159
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST
Looking for fellowship, fun and having
Cod's word? You are welcome to attend
"Prime Time" held at Rawl in rm 130�
every Thurs at 7 30 p.m Refreshments
served
MEN'S BASKETBALL
The Pirates are back at Minges on Teb 4th
against powerful Richmond Tipoff will
be at 7.30. There will be a pom-pom give-
away prior to the game as well as the
Honda shootout and Pure Gold Dancers
at half time. Come out and join the fun and
support Pirate athletics.
RUGBY CLUB
ECU Rugbv Club begins its spring prac
tice on Jan. 31, and Feb. 1 &2at330 behind
the Allied Health Bldg For more info , call
758-5893. All Athletes Welcome'
P.E. MAJORS CLUB
Wanted All PE Majors or intended ma
jora to attend our meeting PC Majors
meeting Feb. 2 at 8:00 pm in rm 142
Minges. Please attend�we need your sup-
port No Dues�just Fun.
INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE
Interested in spending this summer in
remote parts of the world1 The Overseas
Development Network (ODN) is spon-
soring internships for students and recent
graduates in the Philippines, India, Bang
ladesh, Nicaragua, Bolivia, Belize, and
our own Appalachian mountains Any
maior can applv. Length of stay varies
from 3-6 morths For more info, contact
Marianne Exum (h) 830-9430 & (w) 757-
6271. Hurrv' Application Deadline�
Feb. 15.
ODN
Overseas Development Network will be
meeting in 247 MSC at 5 p.m. Feb. 2 All
members and people interested in helping
third world countries please come! For
more info, call Tonya Bahv hm 830-8888
wk 757-6611 ext 221
NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good Bible study every Thur 7:30-9 in
Biology 103 The non-stop, no-frills meet
mg is designed to help you develop a
closer walk with God. In-flight refresh
ments served No ticket required; just
reserve vour time
PSJLCJil
It you are interested in a career in the field
of Psychology, you owe it to yourself to
become a member of Psi Chi- The national
honor socieitv in Psyc. Prospective mem
bers mav pick up applications in Rawl KM
and have them completed and returned
bv Feb 3 An unofficial copy of your tran
scripts must accompany your application
To applv, cumulative gpa for graduate
students and seniors 3 2, juniors 3.0 and
sophomores 2.8. Prospective members
must have completed 9 hours in Psyc.
courses with a "B" average or better
PHI BETA SICMA
There will be a Sigma Dove Interest meet
ing Feb. 2, at 6 p.m in rm 20Q0 CCB All
voung ladies are inuted to come
rhere will be an Informal Smoker on Feb
2at7p m in rm 2000 GCB. All voung men
are invited to come Blue Phi!
C ANDY-O-GRAMS
Inter varsity will be selling cand) o
grams tor Valentine's Dav in front of the
Student Store Feb. 8 10. Proceeds will go
towards 1 labakkuk coming to ECU in late
March
PHYSICAL IP. MOTOR AND
FITNESS COMPETENCY
TEST
A passing score on this test is required t
all students prior to declaring physical ed
as a major 'Maintaining an average T
score ot 45 on the six item test battery and
having a T-scoreof45on the aerobics run)
The test will be given at Minges Coliseum
on Feb 3 at 12 30 p.m. Any student with a
medical condition that would contraindi
cate participation in the testing should
contact Mike McCammon or Dr Gav Is
rael at 757-6497 To be exempted from any
portion of the test, you must have a
physician s excuse A detailed summar)
of the test components is available in the
Human Perforamnce Lab (rm 113
Minges) Your physician's excuse must
specifically state from which items you
are exempt
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
ECU School of Music Events Ian. 31- Fi b
6: Faculty Recital, Elliot Frank, guitarist
(Feb. 1, 8:15 p.m. Fletcher Recital Hall,
free); Sydney Carlson, graduate flute re-
cital (Feb 2, 7p.m Fletcher Recital I lall
free); Dean Laves, voice and Jennifer W il
hams piano, senior recitals (Feb. 3,7 p.m
Fletcher Recital Hall, free); guest jazz
performer Roger Pemberton with ECU
Rememberings
Antique
Nuiili Main
Crafts Gift
stn-�'t. Farmville
753-7333
V
Sale
10-25 Off
Antique Qah furniture
Now Thru The End Of February
Hours:
Friday 5-9 pm
Saturday 10-5 pm
Sunday 1-5 pm
Specials On
Handwoven Ponchoes,
Sweaters & Throws
Register Now
to get on the
Mexican
Connection
to
Cancun, Mexico
Courtesy of Chico's &
American Airlines
And win a Trip for Two
7 Days - 6 Nights
Crown Piazza Hotel
� Register anytime at Chico's in
Rocky Mount or Greenville
two trips will be given away!)
� Corona Beer will be giving
away promotional items
So purchase nce&ur � You need not be present to win
Must be 18 years old to register
'fi.
Jazz Ensemble and ECU Symphonic V ind
Ensemble (Feb. 3, 8 15 p m Wright Audi
torium, free); Andv Miskavage, senioi
clarinet recital (Feb h, 7 p.m , Fletcher
Rectial Hall)
S1JBSTANCE ABUSE PRE-
VENTIQN
National Collegiate Drug Awarenes
Week, be a responsible participant, I
12 Come see a special screening of: Arnei
ica Hurts: The Drug Epidemic. 1. b 7, ,
p.m. in BcM (inner Library View tin
short video and stav to discuss what is
happening on campus concerning sub
stance abuse prevention For more info
call or come by the office ot substance
abuse prevention and ed , 757 6793, 303
Frmn
SPEECH-LA NGUA (JAM)
HEARING SYMPOSIUM
STUDENT EXCHANGE
Int. rested in exploring new places7 Aca-
d mi. adventure? National Student Fx
� h mge provides an exciting opportunity
for E U students to attend one of over 80
leges ur universities across the U.S
I ive in .mother part of the country and
experii ice college life in a different set
tin); tor a semester or a vear. ECU students
pay the same tuition and fees Js at ECU,
and avoid the red tape normally associ-
ated with transferring to another institu
lion For more into and applications
please come to an info session on Feb 6,al
1 Ml in room 1006 X H
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream, Frozen
Yogurt and Sorbet
� DOPTT FORGET
31 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy.) haws DELrvERS,
1 Vanilla In U.S.A. 88-89 6 pm clo� mm� d-T
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331 E. loth St. (Nut to Wendjr
1 V an ilia in U � A M 8�
Delivery 758OOOO
50 � OFF VALENTINE
CAKE
ORDERS IF ORDERED
PRIOR TO 2889
(Expires 288MJ
I
i
I
I
I
I
I
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The lth Annual Speech 1 .nguage and
Hearing Symposium will K' held in the
Rrodv Medical Science Bide,�nlb 16-17
Conducting the workshopswill be Mar
lone A Turowski, M " CO' from
until 5 p.m. Feb 16 and 1 .nid M i urcr
man, D.Ed from 8:30 until Ip.m 1 eb 17
For more info contact 1 on vpivo Dept
ot Speech-Language & Auditory Pathol
ogy ECU. Greenville, " 127s vs 919
757-6961,
COOPERATIV1Fi)
Cooperath e 1 d .1 fro �sei
the I Iniverity, is designed ti iTelp vo
career related work eperen befon
you graduate We would liki'to exl nd ai
tn itation toall students t � �� nd .i i
info. Seminar in the (! B
spring '89 Feb 2,1 p m , ro.014
6,1 p m , ro nil 014 Ft
2016; Feb 13,4 p m , room' � �� . � .
1 p.m roomlOU; 1 eb 2"p.m r n
1014; Feb. 23,4 p.m room 2;� . : .
p m , room 2016
Be a part of
National Collegiate Drug Awareness Week
February 6-12

special screening of
AMERICA HURTS:
The Drug Epidemic
Tues Feb. 7 at 7 pm
B04 Joyner Library
sponsored by
Substance Abuse Prevention
& Education Office
757-6793 303 Erwin
52lCotanche 757-1666

CRUISE THE BAHAMAS WITH THE
CARNIVAL CRUISE LINES DURING
SPRING BREAK
(deadline to sign up is right around THE CORNER.)
PRICE PER PERSON: $499.00 (quad)
$525.00 (Non-ECU students)
(All transportation included as well as meals on the ship!)
�Be treated like royalty
�Eat exquisite meals
�Get a head start on your tan
SPONSORED BY
THE STUDENT UNION TRAVEL COMMITTEE.
For more Information contact the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall
Student Center,
Phone 757-6611
�MtMMi ran m mn - �






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
FEBRUARY, W VAUi 7
Mascots get into their jobs
By ALICIA FORD
Staff Writer
Picture this. It's fourth quar-
ter during the ECU homecoming
game. The Pirates are on the other
team's 20-yard line, up by three
points, and getting ready to score
again. The crowd is one, huge,
chanting mob ready to explode.
Suddenly, you find yourself
being picked up in the air and
passed up into the stands. Help-
less, you arc carried up into the
hundreds of screaming fans,
being passed back and forth like a
rag doll.
Think this could never hap-
pen to you? Well, it could if you
are an ECU Pirate mascot. He is
the person who is at all the games
and fundraisers dressed up like a
pirate to bring the team good luck.
The Pirates currently have
two mascots who perform not
only at games, but also at swim
meets, soccer meets, parades,
fundraisers, and special Pirate
Club activities.
Doug Gavlord, a 21-year-old
junior from Elizabeth Town, NC,
has been a Pirate mascot since
spring semester 1987. An envi-
ronmental health major, he heard
of an opening for a mascot from
his suitcmates, who were all ECU
cheerleaders. They persuaded
Gaylord to try out, and he has
been a mascot for the Pirates ever
since.
"I enjoy going to the games,
and being able to participate ac-
tively, on the field, is a big rush
Mid Gaylord.
The other Pirate masot is
sophomore David Bailey. A com-
munications art major from
Raleigh, Bailey has worked for the
Pirates since last spring, and plans
to continue doing it until gradu-
ation.
"It's really a lot of fun. I get to
go to all the games and meet all
different kinds of people said
Bailey.
the mascots travel with the
cheerleaders to in-state games.
For out-of-state games the mas-
cots and cheerleaders fly with the
team. Gaylord and Bailey take
turns going to each game and
Pirate activity.
If one has a test or something
important to do that weekend,
then the other will take his place.
If neither can make it, the athletic
marketing assistant, Joe Lcskay,
will fill in for them.
To become a mascot, you
have to trvout with thechecrlcad-
ers, usually in both the spring and
the fall. Aspiring mascots may be
asked to perform gymnastics,
display emotion, and act out pan-
tomimes like riding a bike or
walking against the wind.
"When 1 tried out there were
only four other guys with me. I
was a little nervous, but it onlv
took about 20 or 30 minutes, and I
was fairly confident of winning
Gaylord commented.
Head checrleading coach
Peggy Smith decides who be-
comes a Pirate mascot. The en-
trant who displays the most en-
ergy and enthusiasm wins.
The mascots receive some
instructions as to what to do on
the field, but they are allowed a
Angela Marie Michel lives a day in the life of a theater major. The Greenville native returned
home after three years as a computer science major at Wake Forest to study acting. (Photo by
J.D.Whitmire, ECU Photolab) a m � A m 1 � r g
i A day in the life of
a theater maj or
WZMB Top 13
1. Trotsky Icepick- "Baby
2. The Name- "Dangerous
Times"
3. Lou Reed- "New York"
4. The Replacements- "Don't
Tell A Soul"
5. Angst- "Cry For Happy"
6. Violent Femmes- "3"
7. Wonder Stuff- "Eight
Legged Groove Machine"
8. Legal Reins- "Please, The
Pleasure"
9. Dinosaur JrBug"
10. Girl TroubleHit It Or
Quit It"
11. Death of Samantha-
"Where The Women Wear The
Glory And Men Wear The
Pants"
12. Throwing Muses-
"Hunkpapa"
13. X-Men- "X-Men"
By SCOTT MAXWELL
AuUtant Features Editor
Angela Marie Michel is ar-
guably the most outgoing indi-
vidual in a group well-known for
being outgoing individuals.
Michel is a theater major.
Until three years ago, Michel
was at Wake Forest University,
majoring in Computer Science
because she didn't know what she
really wanted to do. She returned
to her hometown of Greenville to
finish college and find something
she liked.
Michel credits ECU's general
college requirements with her
entry into theater. To satisfy a GC
requirement, she took a speech
class.
front of, say, 500 people � how
many people have that kind of
guts?"
Monday mornings begin at
9:30 with Meizner class, which
teaches, appropriately enough,
the Meizner acting technique.
Michel describes the technique by
quoting Sandy Meizner himself,
who called it "Realitv of doing
under imaginary circumstance
Students aren't allowed to cover
anything up, which Michel says
helps them get to know them-
selves.
'The teacher, Don Biehn, has
done a lot in the theater. He's got
a lot of experience, and he doesn't
pull punches with you
Though there is plentv of
Coming
this
weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
Suspect
New Deli:
Spiral
Attic-
Max Creek
Mendenhall:
Willow
(through Sunday)
Friday
New Deli:
Liquid Sound
Attic:
The Point
Saturday
New Deli:
Bad Bob & the Rocking Horses
Attic:
Jackyl
Monday
New Deli:
Open Mike Night
This led to production pressure, Michel speaks glow
work, which gave her a chance to ingly of the class and of Biehn,
hang around theater people. She saying "I had no clue how to act
liked them so much and was so
interested in what they did that
she decided to become a theater
major.
Michel says that the theater
department isn't like other de-
partments � it maintains a re-
and he's teaching me how to act
From 2 to 3 Michel has an
English class, Shakespearean
Tragedies. Then at 3 she's back to
the theater, to a directing class
taught by the chairman of the
Theater Arts Department himself,
laxed and informal atmosphere in Edgar Loessin.
which most students call profes- Members of the class direct
sors by their first names. either a one-act play or one act of
"On the other hand she a two-act play, and they select
says, "there's lots of superficial- their cast from members of the
lty. It's very competitive, and class. The projects are staggered
there's a lot of pretended concern so that students direct their own
and superficial friendships, a lot plays for part of the semester and
of jealousies. Theater majors are available as cast for the rest.
aren't just one big mass of non-
conformists � there are a lot of
people who are too afraid to open
up and are actually superficial
Michel's major complaint
Michel is currently rehears-
ing for a play directed by Nina
Blanchard. Later this semester,
however, she will be directing the
first act of "The Exercise a play
about ECU'S theater department by Lewis John Carlino
is that she feels it is underfunded. Michel is not involved in the
"I wish the SGA would give theater department's current pro-
us more money for example, duction, "Boys in the Band but
we can't hire people to build sets she is currently rehearsing for a
so we have to get students to do it. theater workshop, "The Early
The costumcrs and scenic artists Girl The workshop production,
have money problems too. I don't directed by Catherine Edwards,
think the SGA realizes our pre- will be presented on Feb. 17 and
dicament 18 in Messick. The play is about
Why does she like theater so relationships among seven
much? Michel replies without women who "just happen to be
hesitation: "It'sexciting Despite
long hoursand hard work, Michel
finds theater work fun.
"I get bored pretty easily, too,
and theater keeps me entertained.
I think that's what's so great about
theater � it entertains me and
others at the same time. Besides,
to go up there and expose yourself
physically and psychologically in
prostitutes.
With all this pressure, Michel
looks forward to the weekend as
an opportunity to unwind. She
has been getting bored with
downtown Greenville because
"the bars are all starting to look
alike � although Rafters is look-
See MICHEL, page 8
wide range of choices.
"We mostly do what we
want. You have to judge for your-
self what to do by what's happen-
ing in the game and what's going
on with the crowd says Bailey.
Both mascots use the same
costume and both admit it can get
unbearably hot, especially at the
beginning of football season. If a
but ton pops off or a zipper breaks,
they usually repair it themselves.
Costumes in need of major repairs
arc sent to the dry cleaners.
They usually wear shorts and
a T-shirt underneath, then attach
a fiberglass rib cage in order to
have that famous Pirate physique.
Over the ribcage, they usually
wear a fwtball jersev or ECU T-
shirt.
"I remember the first game I
went to as the mascot Barley
muses. "It was parents' weekend,
and about ninety degrees. I
thought I was going to suffocate,
and by the time the game was over
I was dripping sweat. But you get
used to it after a while; it's not that
See MASCOTS, page 8
The ECU Pirate mascot smiles and brings good luck to the Pirate
athletic program.
Students spice up walls with art
By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Staff Wn'er
What do you do when the
walls of your dorm hall begins to
look dull and boring? The fifth
floor of Tyler Dorm has the an-
swer� murals.
It all started when resident
advisor Camille Koonce and her
neighbors Caroline Cusick and
Trade Weist decided to brighten
up the often dismal appearances
of their dorm walls. Thev decided
J
to add a touch of color and lifebv
painting the walls.
The murals, which definitely
add color, are great. The theme is
a re-creation of the late 50s and
early 60s music scene.
The painting of a huge- heart to push the idea through to Resi
bursting through a hotel reminds denee Life and Housing
us of the Elvis Presley classic Residence Life and Housing
"Heartbreak Hotel A collection allowed the residents o the fifth
of 45 singles bearing the names of floor to come up with colored
songs like "Please Mr .Postman" drawings thev would use as a
and "Splish Splash" take us back sketch for the murals. The
to the sweet sound of some oldies
but goodies.
Although this may all sound
like fun and games, it was more
than just that. The most difficult
job was getting the idea ap-
proved.
In order to get things started.
Linda Barkand, residence direx
sketches were approved and the
fifth floor began work on creating
a happy and colorful atmosphere
for their floor
For he past two weeks, the
residents on the fifth floor have
been painting the walls to meet
the deadine from Housing. After
the walls were completed.
tor at Tyler Dorm, had to present Carolyn Fulghum, director for
the idea to the area coordinator for Residence Life and Housing
College Hill. After their approval stopped by the dorm to inspect
for paint use, Barkand proceeded See MLRALS, page 8
The residents of the fifth floor of Tyler dorm have taken their walls and turned them into eye-
pleasing murals. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photolab)
Pichin' tht Bones
Bonehead peruses personals
BY CHIPPY BONSfEAD
Whenever I pick up a
newspaper, 1 feel compelled to
look at the personal ads.
Whether ifs that paragon of
Journalistic integrity, THe
Weekly World News, or that
Raleigh ad rag The Spectator,
they ail have entire sections
devoted to finding a compat-
ible male through correspon-
dence.
Depending on your mood,
personal ads can crack you up,
if your love life is in a
shambles, chances are you
won't find these desperate
cries for attention nearly aa
humorous as you should.
I love to near people de-
scribe themselves in pint.
"Sincere, lonely, considerate
Christian female, seek! new
friend to share new year with.
Love outdoors. No drugs or
smokes. Photo, 4
Not bad.
In 23 word
to tell everyone In 4
lady.
Bow bout the duck who
wrote, "Adventure-seeking
Southern belle, Bruce Lee fan.
Wants pen-pal or casual sex
partner. Tenn. area a plus, but
wifi travel
Now there's a woman!
Not only does she get into
kung-fu, she's willing to travel
to have sex with you! Now
which one had a realistic ex-
pectation of the guys who read
personals?
Men are pretty lame when
it cornea to espousing their
qualities in a limited number
of words. Nine times out of 10,
men end up paying five or six
dollars more, because they
want to Kst all their hobbies.
Take this one tor example.
"Handsome, husky, father of
small child. Seeks monoga-
mous relationship with home-
Good conversationel-
: rock music, snug-
sofa, bowling,
,okt movies, read-
Guide� and make your new
mate some popcorn, it don't
get any better than this!
On the other end of the
male spectrum, you have the
sincere sportsman. "Looks,
age unimportant�honesty is.
Must have sunny disposition.
Like camping, fishing, hiking,
skydiving, skateboarding,
elephant safaris, Sumo wres-
tling. Must be able to keep up
with my active lifestyle
1 don't think this guy
could keep up with his own
lifestyle. How does he find
time to go to work and mow
the �"?
you peruse the per-
sonals as much aa I do, you
notice certain repetitive
themes. One is the sincerity
thing. Everyone is dead seri-
ous about finding the perfect
mate.
Another thing
personals ara wten
people aged
folks have finally
thsyte too old to





if
I
8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2,1989
Chip isn't the only bone around
URBAN A, 111. (AP) � Plastic
bones that can be drilled, pinned
and wired just like the real things
are saving dogs' lives and im-
proving teaching at the Univer-
sity of Illinois veterinary school.
The lifelike models of major
canine bones allow students to
learn how to handle special in-
struments and manipulate bro-
ken bones as they are repaired.
Use of these limbs saves the
lives of up to 100 dogs a year at the
school � animals who would
have been destroyed after sur-
gery, says Dr. Ann Johnson, who
teaches orthopedic surgery at the
College of Veterinary Medicine.
"Society now demands that
we not use living animals in labo-
ratories for practice surgery if we
don't have to says Johnson.
"But, society also demands that
our vets be well trained
The simulated dog bones ac-
complish both purposes, she says.
The models were purchased
with a $2,000 grant from the Save
The Animals Fund in California
and will be used to train about 160
vet students a year.
The use of a plastic bone
that is identical to the real thing is
ideal in the classroom says Tom
Porro, production supervisor at
Pacific Research of Vashon,
Wash.
He says his company sup-
plies a half-dozen veterinary col-
leges with leg bones under the
brand name Sawbones. They cost
$15 to $20 each and are cast in
molds made from real bones.
Johnson says the models buy
extra time for teaching.
"I can stop them and take
time to ask them what they are
doing without jeopardizing a dog
in surgery she says. "The main
thing they have to learn is to use
the equipment, and the best way
is right on the bone with no
muscle in the way
The college spent about
$12,000 to set up its bone model
laboratory, with equipment rang-
ing from $35 electric drills from
the hardware store to a $700
bender to shape metal plates that
are put over fractures.
It also uses supermarket
chickens and foam rubber models
to teach students how to suture
and how to make incisions, and it
uses cardboard mailing tubes and
wooden dowels to teach the fun-
damentals of pinning a broken
bone.
Johnson says she is glad the
bone models eliminated the need
to use and destroy real animals.
"You get awfully tired of see-
ing 12 dogs put to sleep every time
you do a lab she says.
Ward Howland, executive
director of the Anti-Cruelty Soci-
ety of Chicago, says groups like
his applaud changes that reduce
the number of animals used for
research and training.
"This is a major step in giving
schools an alternative to the real
thing, so they can teach with
models but still do a good job
says Howland. "These students
will make mistakes and learn how
to do it right before they deal with
a real animal
Johnson says a survey of stu-
dents shows they were not op-
posed to using the bone models,
but they still want real surgical
experience before graduating.
The seniors have that oppor-
tunity.
"They scrub into surgery
with me and help if a client animal
comes in with a fracture she
says.
The bone models allow stu-
dents to deal with complicated
fractures they may not see in the
clinic, says Johnson, and to learn
sophisticated repair techniques
"we never tried to teach with a
live dog
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Michel "hates to be bored
99
Continued from page 7
ing a lot better since its reopen-
ing
As a result, Michel spends
less time in downtown Greenville
than she does at theater parties.
She hates to be bored, so when the
theater isn't keeping her enter-
tained, theater people are.
"I'm pretty resentful of the
fact that people assume that just
because we're theater majors,
one, we sleep around and two, we Auditorium. After she graduates,
do a lot of drugs people slap all Michel plans to "go to New York
these labels on us and I don't like and do all that poor stuff
it
In addition to her classes and "All in all, I wouldn't trade it
projects, Michel is the Assistant for anything
Box Office Manager at McGinnis
Murals brighten up Tyler hall f
Plaza Cinema
Continued from page 7
the job.
The fifth floor celebrated the
completion of the murals by hav-
ing an open house for relatives
and other resident advisors on
College Hill.
Since the project was such a
success, Bankard encourages
other floors and dorms to get in-
volved. She said that it took three
months to get approved, but now
that the ground hasbeen settled, it
should be easier for those who are
interested.
Bankard explained that the
basis for the project was not just to
beautify the hallways, but to build
a community. She stated that the
project turned into "something
wonderful" and it gave those
participating a sense of pride and
Mascots
kept busy
Continued from page 7
bad
Does being a Pirate mascot
interfere with school work or so-
cial life? "Sometimes said
Bailey. "It takes a lot of time and
effort to do both men and
women's sports activities
Bonehead
looks for
"TLC"
Continued from page 7
service.
I feel for these poor souls. 1
hope I have the strength to
deny myself a trip downtown
when I hit 26 or 27. I made a
vow that I would never go to a
bar looking to get laid after I
reached that age.
Knowing me, I'll try to get
away with it. I'll justify it �
saying I still look 23. In reality
I'll be gasping for breath after
climbing up on the barstool,
and I'll keel over from dancing
two songs in a row.
A recurring request in the
personals is a thing they call
TLC. I have yet to decipher
what these initials mean, but
my guess is Total Lusty
Clinches. I assume this be-
cause the ads always mention
that the writer has "lots of TLC
to offer
So, having done a whole
column on personal ads, I de-
cided to see what I could do
with the form. Could I distill
my Boneheaded essence down
to 25 words or less? Here goes
Famous columnist seeks
total babe for lots of TLC.
Like: comic books, X, and
bizarre sexual positions.
Drugs a plus, no dorm rats, fat
chicks.
That was easy. Send all
replies care of: The East Carolin-
ian, Publications Building.
Greenville, 27834. Take it easy,
and may the hangovers be
gentle, but the buzzes intense.
accomplishment
Bankard concludes that
building pride and a sense of
community on a floor really does
help residents to learn how to
you know when you work on a
project together you're going to
be a little nice when you ask them
to turn their music down
So, if you are ever in Tyler
dorm or near one of the surround -
work together and to get to know ing dorms, go and check out the
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Come join your friends on
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as Teaching Elder of the
Greenville Bible Church
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Crusade at San Bernadino, CA.
Excellent Bible teaching with a
Contemporary application at:
Greenville Bible Church
1348 Greenville Blvd.
(Near Red Oak)
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 10:30 am
(hcari, g impaired
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Evening Fellowship &
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6:00 pm
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.71
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2. 1989 9
The Clearly Labeled
IS&8$ �@jr�Iia2ifl@jm �giUfiir
Quote of the Week:
"Wha?"
� Rhonda Woman
Squirrel movie bought
HOLLYWOOD (BP) �
Movie moguls have bought the
rights to "Bucktoothed and
Rockin The Squirrel Man Story"
and a flim version is in pre-pro-
iuction.
fore his suicide were used to write
the official biography of the
strange visitor from another di-
mension.
Klicky-Klicky, who claimed
to be innocent of the six deaths
rhe movie has signed Mi- attributed to him by local police,
chael keaton to play the dimen
sionally-displaced squirrel crea-
ture and Jack Nicholson to por-
tray his evil twin. Despite the dif-
ferences in Keaton and
Nicholson's physical appcar-
mces, the movie's producer
committed suicide before his
death sentence could be carried
out. Apparently, Hollywood be-
lieves Klicky's story of an evil
twin, whereas the Greenville
courts did not.
Keaton and Nicholson, who
promises that "the squirrel-man's are currently wrapping up film-
ing on the new "Batman movie,
are excited about their new col-
laboration.
own mama won't be able to tell
I'm apart
The saga of the squirrel man
who terrorized the small college
:uvn of Greenville, N.C. last year,
was chronicled by the school
newpaper. Transcripts of the
v.uirrel-man's last interview be- show the audience what it feels
like to be trapped, hunted in a
world far from your own
"I think this could be the film
that gets me an Oscar. The script
alone is brilliant he added.
Nicholson enthuses over his
new role. "1 get to play someone
who is totally evil yet he has a
compassionate side a side few
people ever see. He's been pushed
over the edge and he strikes back
that's what makes this character
such a challenge it's a role un
like anything else I've ever done
The author of "The Squirrel
Man Story" is reportedly un-
happy with the casting choices.
he
Remaining anonymous, he ex-
"The Batman thing I played pressed his displeasure by dump-
for laughs Keaton said. "I want ing over 20,000 copies of "Bee-
to stretch myself in this role. 1 tlejuice" and "Mr. Mom" on the
want to get into the character, front step of producer Halph
Witted's Santa Monica home.
Can man prophesies stroke!
The infamous "squirrel-man" will be immortalized in a new movie starring Michael Keaton as
the squirrel-man, and Jack Nicholson as his evil twin. The film is slated for a Christmas release.
Chancellor takes to hospital bed
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) � loved Pookums Poodle, the acci- "The most important job I'll
reenville's famed can-people, a dental unhooking of my mother- have, of course, is helping out the
in-law's iron lung and now he Campus Beautification Commit-
says that my darling hubbykins tee. They do so much good work
will have a stroke and I will have for the school, and it is so ncces-
to take over his duties as chancel- sary to have a clean, attractive
lor " campus for visits from the other
The chancellor himself is re- UNC system chancellor's wives
ported to believe Flattnin's amaz- "Tin has been so helpful over
ing and uncanny predictions. He the years in his own special way,
could not be reached for com- that I want to appoint him as
ment, as he has retreated to a secu- Special Advisor in Charge of
race of humans noted for their
uncannv abilitv to sniff out alumi-
num cans in almost any
jumpster, have suddenly be-
vme famous for another reason
their uncanny ability to predict
tutu re events!
Tin Flattnin, a 60-ycar-old
bachelor, was often seen around
campus, using his nose to seek out
Sears Models

ALL OVER (BP) � Today's
yuppies are concentrating on one
specific style The Sear's�
Model Look.
The trend began in New York,
as yuppie salespeople from the
store that has more for your life
started posing in singles bars in-
stead of dancing. Trying to
achieve a look of nonchalant dis-
old Los Angeles native. Like, it
doesn't take a lot of brains to look
like the guys in the Sears� catol-
ogue, y'know? I just stare off into
space like I'm not all there. It's
so rad, man
Surfer isn't sure of the trend's
origins. He believes there is a
planet in another dimension,
where there exist nothing but
remnants of college parties. Now rity wing of Pitt Memorial Hospi- Aluminum Recycling to the Cam-
A new trend is in for yuppies:
the vague, bland stare of
a Sear's Model a
interest has spread to all parts of Sear's� models, trying to outpose
the country. each other eternallv.
"Like, it's the coolest fad "Like, it must be a kinda
explainsMurphSurfer,a21-year- heaven Surfer sighs.
he is a frequent guest of the school tal for tests and instruction
iiancellor's wife, who firmly be- stress management.
Mrs. Beleever feels confident
that the can man's strange proph-
ecy will come true, and is prepar-
ing herself for the unfortunate
task of succeeding her husband.
pus Beautification Committee
she said.
While the Student Govern-
ment Association is rumored to
support this move, several stu-
dents have resigned from the
Beautification Committe, includ-
ing its current president, Muffy
UHnuunHimniinmmmiimimmimiiiuiUinMtWHMimmMmin
February Horoscope
sieves in his ability to foretell the
suture before it happens.
Mrs. Ima Beleever says that
Hattnin has accurately foretold
the hit-and-run death of mv be-
Evictees punished with Aycock term
ries a loser;
Gemini slims
3iiiimmii!iiiiimiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiii!iimiiiinii!imi
Aquarius - Jan.20 - Feb. 18 : Good newsl Water
?arers won't be bearing anything else this year!
iThat faulty birth control vou used turned out to be
t-so faulty. What a relief, eh?
Pisces - Feb. 19-Mar. 20 : Those hot flashes you
peel aren't really love make sure you haven't
Slugged yourself in by mistake. The 15th and 22nd
sare Big Money days.
Aries - Mar. 21 - April 19: This is your month �
not for love, but for getting tons of junk mail ad- u u.
fdrcssed to "Occupant" and "Hungy Pizza Lover
?This will remind you of what a total loser you are, so
fstay away from sharp objects.
Taurus - April 20 - May 20 : That flu has turned
into a case of total heartbreak that all the Hall's
Imentho-lyptus� in the world won't cure. Try natu-
Iral healing remedies like Campbell's soup � Mmm-
mmm- good!
Gemini - May 21 - June 21: If you ever want to
Igct a date again, you're going to have to slim down
land stop writing all that bad poetry. Avoid high-cal
f tilings like food.
Cancer - June 22 - July 22 : Travel is always a
Igood way to meet new friends. Unfortunately for
fyou, you won't be able to travel far enough away to
fescape those nasty rumours about your personal
grooming habits. But love could turn up right
f around the corner drugstore!
Duke quote of the week:
"Ennis, you dip stick,
this is your superior
officer'
Roscoe P. Coltrane
GREENVILLE, N.C. (EP)
Two ECU students were evicted
from their apartment Wednesday
-and forced to scrvehnnrtrmc-nt
Avcock Dormitorv.
According to the owner of
Dumptovvn Park. "The evictees
were evicted for stealing all of the
faucet screens from the evictees'
apartment unit which is a direct
violation o( the ways to be evicted
code Roscoe Hogg said Wed-
nesday.
Hogg said the two ECU stu-
dents, Coo Pon and Doo Bet, had
been model tenants before the
intense investigation into the
Both Coo Pon and Doo Bet are Avcock Dormitorv. Avcock was
exchange students from Yiaman thrust into the national spotlight
,maJi,rJU� An Jcdystrial Technol- last year with "largest cocVoacb
-ogyatECU. Pon and Bet said that I contest" which Joe Beer won with
all allegations against them are an one-foot pest he had raised in
false.
"Maan, me don't understand
these people, we didn't do noth-
ing to those screens except brush
our teeth with the water that
comes out of them Pon said in an
interview at Wendy's restaurant
where he eats whenever he ob-
tains coupons.
As a consequence of their ac-
tions, local law enforcement au-
his dorm room closet.
"It bo�thf� worst punishment,
ooh ooh JR. Reid slam dunk, the
heels up by eight Bet said
before being distracted by an
ACC basketball game.
Later a smiling Bet said, "This
be the worst punishment since
they put us in International
House of Pancakes When asked
missing faucet screens earlier this thorities have decided to place the why he was so happv, he said "Me
week.
two criminals in ECU's infamous team cover the led
Recurring 'mare puzzles E
S�)l
with me trying to roll back up-
right.
Do vou think this dream
J
could be some kind of omen?
Signed,
No Doz
have dreams about gum on their
butts.
Advice: Don't stress on your
exams and stop fantasizing about
non-organic substances.
Additional note: 'predate
calling me the Biggest E.
Help mc, Running Rough
Dear Rough Rider,
It is lonely living all alone
Most experts say the best medi-
cine for loneliness is to either join
a frat or to Adopt a Highway. E
suggests you do the latter of these
two because you really don't
want to buv your friends. Besides
Dear Night tripper. After being accosted in a
Sounds like you got a hold of downtown bar last week with
some of that blotter going around claims that E is a yellow journalist you may die in a hazing incident
on campus. (See page 1) At least full of scum, E has decided to tor
you didn't go up to a campus cop down and answer some filed le
and say "I just took some really ters on common problems,
bad acid, take me to the hospitial. Hananailc
Leo - July 23 - Aug. 22 : Despite pressure from
friends, a new baby is the last thing you need right
now. Try a pet first. A chronologically-advanced but
still sexy person has their eye on you.
Virgo - Aug. 23 - Sept 22: Virgins! Find out what
you're missing! A night downtown with a Marine or
Sidewinder fan could be the magic entry into ro-
mance you've fantasized about.
Libra - Sept. 23 - Oct. 23 : Too much of a one-
handed relationship will make associates stare at
new, unsightly hair growth. An optometrist ap-
pointment is in your future. Get out of the house
more.
Scorpio - Oct. 24 - Nov. 21: You may be starved
for affection, but the new video dating club you've
joined may cause you to lose your appetite.
Sagittarius - Nov. 22 - Dec. 21 : This year has
been unkind to you. Battling those social diseases
has taken their toll on your nightlife. Treat yourself
to some counseling.
Capricorn - Dec. 22 - Jan. 19 : Lucky you! The
Biggest E,
I have been troubled lately by
a recurring nightmare that goes
something like this:
I go to my Health class in
Brewster � only it's not in
Brewster it's at the Public Safety
Building.
My teacher � only it's my
psychology teacher instead of my
health teacher � hands me my
physics test back � only it's not
my test, it's the test of the guy who
sits beside me. (Only, in the
dream, he's sitting across the
room.
Anyway, the guy has a failing
I think I am going Chinese
E is not a psychoanalysist but
from what vou have written, E has
come to several conclusions. First
of all, you have a great anxiety
about taking the sex test in Health
class. Subliminally, you know as
much about physics as about sex;
nothing.
Secondly, you have an op-
pressed fear about failing while
having sex. This is apparent when
Dear Earl vis,
I have a real bad problem
with hangnails. They grow really
long and get in the way when I
chew on my real nails. How can
you help me?
Signed, Hang Nail
Dear Hanging,
The main mechanic down at
Cooter's garage say to adjust the
JUSt .�
Big E
j new love in your life is coming your way, with an thechairfallsontoitsside withme
unlimited credit limit on their Visa�. Splurge!
MlltftflflMMIIITTriltlllfMlfllUIIMIIIIMMIIItMtMntllltllfflMMlItMtMlllllttttllillllllflllliniriltltttlffntlllttllirillMIi
you say you failed the test, but lead valve lifter on the third cylin-
wait a minute, you said you didn't der before turning the cam shaft
take the test But the other Satur- three degrees downward. This
grade on the test. And the teacher day morning when you were combined with the purchase of
writes the grade by my name in askcd about that dwebby-look- some high-octane gas should
ing guy you were seen dancing solve your problem,
with in the smoke at Rafter's, you
said, "That wasn't me Car
The part about the piece of Dear Earlvis,
gum stuck to your seat is a deep My car is running really
seated metaphor for your crude roUgh lately. The engine clicks
fantasies involving non-organic like a sowing machine and smoke
substances. A recent report indi- billows out of the back. I thought
cates that 67 percent of all women it had the measles, but their isn't
any paint rash.
hergradebook! �only it's not her
gradebook, it's my Shakespear-
ean Tragedy teacher's. I try to tell
her the grade isn't mine, but I'm
sitting on a piece of gum and I'm
stuck to the chair.
When I try to pull myself free,
9 in it. I always wake up sweating
involving a over consumption o(
Old Mister Mac.
Adopt a Highwav, it's free,
it's easy to do and most of all it's a
friend who you will alwavs be
there for you. So just go on down
to the Division of Motor Yehiciles
and say "I would like to adopt a
highway If you lucky, you mav
get a section of highway 64 and
get a chance to leave Greenville.
Lonely
Dear Big E,
I live alone and for some odd
reason 1 am alwavs lonclv. I get so
bored sometimes I acruallv read
the AP stories in your paper.
Please help me, I need some one to
talk to.
Signed, Loner
Have you ever considered
buying some Lee push-on hang-
nails? That's right Lee push-on
hangnails. They look and feel like
real hangnails because they made
from real human flesh. Only from
Lee Send those letters to:
BigE
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Greenville, N.C, 27834





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READERS: Your letters still welcome. CARTOONISTS still wanted. Strips in
Special thanks to the creator of Revlon 4" x 13" size, and funny, please. And look
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but your wrestler must be drawn in ink cartoonist next week!
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Fun and Games by Jeff 'Three hairs- means we goes together" Tarker

?"






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 2, 1989 PAGE 11
Tribe shot down
By CHRIS SIEGEL
A��t Sport Fditor
As Head Coach Mike Steele
left the floor tonight, he breathed
a sigh of relief. He had good rea-
son to, the Pirates narrowly de-
feated a scrappy William & Mary
team, 73-68.
Colonial Athletic Association
scoring leader Blue Edwards
showed why he is the leading
candidate for player of the year
honors. He pumped in a game-
high 32 points. The total gave him
his seventh game in which he has
scored 30 or more points. It was
also Edwards second game in a
row of 30 points.
The game began as though no
one wanted to score let alone win.
Neither time could get on track for
the first 2:30 of the game. But then
a nice pass from Edwards to Reed
Lose broke the ice and ECU went
up 2-0.
The first half would be played
like a tennis match as the teams
volleyed back and forth. The lead
changed hands an amazing 17
times and the teams exchanged
turnover after turnover. But
when it was all over, no blood had
been drawn and the teams went
into the lockerroom knotted at 29.
"I knew it would be a hard
fought game Coach Steele said.
"We couldn't keep them off the
boards the first half and we knew
we would have to do better the
second half to win the game
Whatever Coach Steele and
his coaches told the Pirates at
halftime certainly worked. East
Carolina came out fired up in the
second half and played a physical
half of basketball.
The Tribe did all thev could in
the second half to keep things
close. They doubled and triple-
teamed Blue Edwards which
spelled their doom as the Pirates
got hot from the perimeter.
The first 11 minutes of the
second half were similar to the
first half, but then the Pirates took
over. Gus Hill hit a hook shot in
the lane that gave ECU the lead,
46-45. This was all they needed
and the Pirates never looked back.
William & Mary tried to keep
Edwards quiet, but with seven
minutes remaining in the game he
showed why he is so important to
the Pirates. On back-to-back trips
down the floor, Edwards threw
two perfect passes to Kenny
Murphy who converted them into
two three-pointers. The jumpers
put East Carolina up, 54-51.
"Murphy's two three-point-
ers broke their back said Coach
Steele. William & Mary Coach
Chuck Swenson agreed.
"Murphy's shooting killed us
both games we played the Pirates.
The three-pointers tonight really
killed us
ECU stretched the lead to as
much as 10 down the stretch with
the icing on the cake being an
amazing aerial manuever. You
guessed it � a Blue Edwards two-
handed slam dunk that put the
Prates ip, 69-59.
East Carolina made the free
throws thev needed down the
J
stretch to ice their fourth confer-
ence victory of the season. But
Coach Steele was not completely
pleased with his team's victory.
"I was pleased with our inten-
sity and our play in the second
half, but I was disappointed with
our play the last 2:30 minutes of
the game Steele said. "Ourteam
needs to leam how to win. We let
See PIRATES, page 12
Fellows Dominate
(IRS) � The men's top intra-
mural 3-on-3 basketball squad,
The Fellows, found themselves
defending their 1988 Schick
Coastal Regional Basketball
Championship in Greenville, S.C.
The Fellows dominated the com-
petition advancing to the final
round of play undefeated.
Percy Edwards, Mark Gaines,
William Grady and Ron Wilson
combined for a 57-19 shellacking
of C. Wesley an and a 61-12 vic-
tory over USC Union. The quick-
ness and 'theft talent' of the Fel-
lows as well as their street ball fast
break style mystified their oppo-
nents and labeled them as the
team to beat.
The Fellows ran into a slight
snag during their third contest as
opponent YVinthrop College took
a nine-point halftime lead. Percy
Edwards, team motivator, spun
his web of quickness during the
second half and lead The Fellows
to a close but comfortable 53-47
victory.
Advancing to the champion-
ship bracket, The Fellows faced
their toughest challenge after eas-
ily defeating two rounds of oppo-
nents. Ready and waiting was
Wingate College who stayed with
ECU's squad until William Grady
broke VVingate's tempo with a
thundering slam dunk that
brought the house down. Win-
gate never recovered giving ECU
the victory 57-42 and a chance to
defend their title March 23 in
Charlotte, N.C.
The final game will be played
as the halftime program of the
Charlotte Hornets-New York
Knicks professional basketball
game. ECU's The Fellows will
meet the men from The Citadel to
determine the 1989 Schick Super
Hoop Coastal Regional Champi-
onship.
Face toughest team in the CAA
Pirates host Spiders
By MARK BARBER
Spoils Writer
Junior Gus Hill dumps a pass off to Blue Edwards but it is tipped
by Greg Burzell of the Tribe and goes out of bounds (Photo by
ECU Photolab).
Women split
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
Victory hovered in the aii
Wednesday for the East Carolina
basketball programs as both the
men and the women overtook the
Tribe of William & Mary. The
women however, did it on the
road as they were guest in the
William & Mary Hall where, they
overcame the Tribe 74-61.
The win makes the Lady Pi-
rates 1-1 on the road so far in the
week as Monday they fell to
UNC-Charlotte 72-56.
Greta Savage led the Lady
Pirates to victory over the Tribe
when she scored a career high 26
points.
Three other players were also
in double figures. Sarah Gray
dumped 10 points and Irish
Hamilton chipped in with 10.
Gray also had an excellent
game on the boards. She led the
Yebmmdtng efforts grabbing
seven for ECU. Gray is third in the
conference for rebounding
averaging 8.5.
See LADY PIRATES, page 12
East Carolina basketball
coach Mike Steele probably
wishes he could call Orkin to take
care of the insects due to arrive in
Minges Coliseum Saturday night.
No ordinary pests, these ar-
thropods are the University of
Richmond Spiders, and with
three starters returning from last
year's NCAA final 16 team, they
should prove to be the toughest
competition the Pirates have
faced in the "Steele Mill" this sea-
son.
"They are definitely the best
team in the conference Steele
said. "They have experience back
from last year's team, and they
play tough
Too tough for Orkin, the Spi-
ders, coached by Dick Tarrant,
boast four players averaging in
double figures. Tops on the list is
6'8" center Mike Winiecki, a sen-
ior averaging 19.5 points and 8.2
rebounds per game. Within the
CAA, however, Winiecki
averages 21.3 points and 10 re
bounds per game.
In ECU'S 83-56 los in
Richmond Jan. 11, Winiecki
scored 18 points and grabbed 10
boards.
Also in double figures for UR
is Ken Atkinson (14.3 ppg ; 2.4
rpg), Eric English (10.2 ppg; 2.3
rpg) and Scott Stapleton (10 ppg;
5.9 rpg). English scored 23 against
the Pirates in Richmond, and Sta-
pleton scored 12.
Steele said Winiecki is the
best inside player in the league
and Atkinson is the best outside
player, which is a difficult combi-
nation to play against.
ECU is not without some
guns of its erwn, though, and will
take aim at the Spiders with 6'5"
senior forward Blue Edwards
(25.7 ppg; 6.5 rpg), 6'3" forward
Gus Hill (13.4 ppg; 4.1 rpg), 6'3"
guard Kenny Murphy (7.8 ppg;
4.2 rpg) and 6'3" Reed Lose (7.2
ppg; 2.8 rpg).
Edwards is first in the CAA in
scoring this year and ranked ninth
in the nation. In Richmond, Ed-
wards ma naed to score 16 points
in spite of playing only 23 min-
utes, sitting out much of the con-
test due to foul trouble. Edwards
fouled out with seven minutes to
play.
Hill also scored 16 in
Richmond and led the Pirates
with seven rebounds.
Mike Steele
Steele expects Richmond to
play 2-3 or 3-2 matchup zones
Saturday.
"We know Winiecki and At-
kinson will get their points
Steele said. "What we want to do
is to keep their other players from
doing well. English killed us in
Richmond (23 points, 3 rbs) and
we can't let that happen again.
"It's been a tough stretch of
road games for us, so we are glad
to be at home. We just hope we
have a lot of fan support to help us
out
After Wednesday's victory
over William & Mary, the Pirates
erieTThe contest Saturday with a
4-4 record in the CAA, 10-9 over-
all. Richmond is 7-0, 12-7 on the
season. The Spiders face the Ca-
dets of-VMI in non-conference
play tonight.
At 181-150, set NCAA record
Marymount wins in highest scoring game
LOS ANGELES (AP) � The thead said. "We worked on our
Loyola Marymount Lions and defense as well as offense and
U.S. International Gulls ran amok worked hard to put that to-
through the NCAA record book gether
Memorial Gym
receives new floor
once again, bringing to a close
perhaps one of the craziest home-
and-home series ever seen in col-
lege basketball.
When the Lions and Gulls
finished their 40 minutes of non-
stop action Tuesday night, Loyola
Marymount had won the highest-
scoring game ever, 181-150, at
home in Gersten Pavilion.
That's 331 points, and just the
start one of six offensive records
set.
"We were unconcerned
It may sound strange to hear
the coaches talk about defense,
but that's what fuels these teams'
fast-break offenses.
"I thought we played very
hard defense Westhead said.
"We made some nice steals and
forced turnovers
mount.
The game was an encore to
the previous highest-scoring
game, a 162-144 Loyola victory
over U.S.Internalional on Jan. 7 at
The Lions broke their own
NCAA record for most points in a
half when they took a 94-76 lead at
intermission. Thev set that record
when Bo Kimble, who had not
San Diego, which set the previous played since r 23 in a loss to
agreed.
"Their pressure really both-
ered us Zarecky said.
Hank Gathers, who leads the
nation in scoring and rebounding,
about an NCAA record Loyola had 41 points and a school-record
Gulls coach Gary Zarecky breaking the previous record
record of 306 points
The Lions' 181 points were
the most ever by an NCAA team.
Marcellus Lee's slam dunk
with 3:52 remaining gave Loyola
Marymount a 165-137 lead,
of
in a 164-138 season-opening vic-
tory against Azusa Pacific, an
NAIA school, on Nov. 28.
Nevada-Las Vegas scored 164
points in 1976, against Hawaii-
Marymount coach Paul Wes- 29 rebounds for Loyola Mary- Hilo, also an NAIA school.
By MICHAEL ZAKELY
Sport- Writer
The total renovation of Me-
morial Gymnasium will soon be
complete. The gymnasium floor
has received a facelift that the
intramural Recreational Services
have been pointing to for a long
time.
This is the first time the gym
has ever been renovated com-
pletely including sanding and re-
surfacing. The overall facelift in-
cludes the painting of the ceiling
and of the sidewalls. The com-
plete repair and replacement of
the wooden floor has taken place.
Mew boundary lines have been
put in along with two side and one
main basketball court, one main
volleyball court, and four bad-
minton courts. Thirteen hundred
square feet of flooring was re-
placed.
Memorial Gymnasium was
built in 1952 in honor of John B.
Christenbury. Christenbury was
the coach of the East Carolina
University football team from
194043.
Total repair of the building
will take place over spring break
of this year. During that time,
additional ceiling lights will be
installed. Installment of electric
motor operates the raising and
lowering of the ceiling, also provi-
sions for portable badminton
standards, and backboard re-
placements.
The roof of the gym was re-
paired four years ago at the cost of
$180,000, but prior leakage and
termites damaged the floor
extensively.
The total cost of the renova-
tions will be $24,102. R.L. Dresser
Inc. of Raleigh, N.C. did the con-
struction over Christmas break
1988.
"Although the change has
been long overdue, we appreciate
all the positive comments from
our faculty and staff and students
that participate Nance Mize,
director of Intramural Recrea-
tional Services, said. "The gymna-
sium now has a premier playing
surface that we hope all East
Carolinians will take advantage
of
Intramural Recreational Services has finally received a new wooden floor at Memorial Gymna-
sium. The gym renovations were long overdue as Memorial hasn't seen any renovation since the
gym was built in 1952 (Photo by J.P. Whitmire, ECU Photolab).
DePaul, hit a jump shot as time
expired. In the Jan. 7 game, Lovola
led 93-68 at the half.
The 170 points in the first 20
minutes set a record for points in
one half.
The Gulls broke their own
164. Loyola matched that j-ecord NCAA mark for points by a losing
team.
Jeff Fryer added 34 points for
Loyola, 12-7, while Enoch Sim-
mons had 25.
Irving runs
for third
Over the weekend, the men's
indoor track team participated in
the Kodak Invitational held in
Johnson City, Tenn. on the cam-
pus of East Tennessee State Uni-
versity.
The team ran well, but came
away with only one finalist, Brian
Irving, who finished third in the
200-meter with a time of 21.67.
The team still continues to pre-
pare for the outdoor season which
begins on March 18 with the
North Carolina Invitational to be
held in Chapel Hill.
WINTER SPORTS
RECORD
Men's Basketball 10-9
Women's Basketball 9-8
Men's Swimming 9-1
Women's Swimming 8-2
��� .





i
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2,1989
Bvnum and Goodson top finishers
First round of NIKE shootout complete
(IRS) � The first round of the
NIKE three-point shootout has
been completed as is the final
separation of the men from the
boys. Tension was high at Minges
as waves of competitors filed in to
get a shot at being the 'best shot' as
well as a chance at walking away
with some fine NIKE apparel.
Darren Bynum and Marcus
Goodson are the top semi-final-
ists in a field of 14 with 15 points
each. When asked about the strat-
egy for the upcoming semi-final
competition, Goodson replied,
"I'm just going to try and focus on
the basket and hope for a high
percentage of shots. Hopefully
my technique will prevail
Goodson also competed in
the IRS free throw contest in
which he made 44 of 50 shots.
Bynum was unavailable for com-
ment.
The remaining two slots were
decided Monday night in a shoot-
out in Memorial Gym. Shane
Wells and Bryan Price captured
the last two spots with scores of 18
and 12 respectively. All semi-fi-
nalists receive NIKE jerseys and
socks while the top four shooters
receive NIKE shorts and NIKE
shoes.
The finals will be held Feb. 22
during the ECU vs. Liberty Uni-
versity basketball contest with the
top finisher receiving a NIKE
warm-up suit and gym bag.
tC
DOC
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Pirates win on home turf
HACK ROOM SHOES
Buyer's Market Memorial Drive
INVENTORY
Continued from page 11
up on the defensive end towards
tite end of the game. It happens
when your team is not accustom
to winning
The Pirates were lead by
Edwards who played well in all
aspects. Edwards scored 32
points and grabbed a game-high
nine rebounds. Kenny Murphy
chipped in with 16 points and six
rebounds. Murphy's points were
largely made on three three-
pointers. Reed Lose also had 16
points for ECU.
Edwards and Lose drew high
praises from William & Mary
Coach Swenson. "Blue Edwards
was the key tonight. I am im-
pressed with him more than any
other player in the conference to
date' Swenson said. He added
he felt Lose was a "hell of a
player" and was an underrated
basketball player.
The Tribe's big gun in the
game was Jimmy Apple who
scored 22 points. Scott Smith
scored 14 points and grabbed
seven rebounds. Curtis Pride
helped out by scoring 11.
Coach Steele said that tonight
was an important win for the team
and it was essential to get the
conference win at home. But he
said that things need to continue
to improve. "Our team needed a
win, but we need to get better if
we are going to beat Richmond on
Saturday
The win moved the Pirates to
10-9 overall and 4-4 in the CAA.
William & Mary dropped to 3-16
and 1-7 in the conference.
The Pirates face off against
the Richmond Spiders on Sat. Feb.
4inMingesCloiseum. Game time
is 7:30 p.m.
Lady Pirates lose to UNC-C
East Carolina (73)
MP FG FT R F A FT
Edwards 36 13-20 6-9 9 3 4 32
Hill 18 2-8 0-0 4 3 1 4
Love 28 1-2 0-0 2 2 1 2
Kelly 38 0-1 1-3 1 4 5 1
Murphy 33 5-6 3-5 6 11 16
Lose 30 5-8 6-7 6 12 16
Perlich 6 0-10-0 0 11 0
Mote 5 1-10-0 0 0 0 0
Bryant 5 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 0
Scherer 10-0 0-0 0 10 0
THURS FRI. AND SAT. ONLY!
Continued from page 11
Tiffany Stone was the high-
' light for William & Mary. She had
21 points on the game for the
Tribe.
Monday's game against
UNC-Charlotte proved to be a
long night for the Pirates as their
poor shooting and stiffness on the
tree throw line impacted the final
score.
UNC-C led by 15 in the half
and before the end of the contest,
Charlotte had increased their
margin to 16 to upset the Ladv
Tirates 56-72.
ECU shot a measly 45 per-
cent from the line as they missed
nine out of 19 free throws in the
second half.
The Pirates also were ice cold
from the field as they shot a mere
l percent. L'NC-C shot 53 per-
cent.
Savage was aain the leading
scorer in the game for the Lady
Pirates as she put 14 points on the
scoreboard tor ECU. In addition,
she had three reboundsbefore she
fouled out with 4:32 left in the
game.
Gray also fouled out with 1:00
to go in the game but not before
she could score nine points for
ECU and grab seven boards.
The Lady Pirates are back in
action Saturday as they continue
their four game stretch on the
road as they face the Spiders of
Richmond. ECU closes out their
on-the-road action Feb. 8 when
they face Deleware State.
Team2
Totals200 27-4716-24 3018 15 William & Mary (68)73
MP FG FTR F APt
Apple3610-20 0-03 0 322
Blocker152-4 0-00 5 04
Burzell280-6 0-14 5 20
O'Reilly323-6 0-01 4 49
Potts243-4 0-05 1 06
Pide263-7 5-63 4 311
S ,ith355-11 4-47 3 114
V tkeheld 30-0 0-00 0 00
- .utthews 11-1 0-01 0 02
Team5
Totals200 27-59 9-1129 22 1368
East Carolina29 44 73
William & Mary29 39 68
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GOQD 2-2 THRU 2-4 '(except Nike & Reebok)
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EAST CAROLINIAN
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 2, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 02, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.653
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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