The East Carolinian, January 31, 1989






Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES 8
SPORTS11
Features
Sullivan Player's production of
The Pirates of Pensance' comes to ECU
See page 8.
Sports
Pirates get 'killed on the boards' in
loss to CAA rival UNC-W
See page 1L
She lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 46
Tuesday January 31,1989
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
NAACP send allegations to Chancellor
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Managing Fiiitor
Chancellor Richard Eakin
received a letter Monday from the
NAACP which made allegations
against ECL's handling of the
Tedd Matthew White case last
Spring.
The incident in question oc-
curred last April when White and
other students, who were work-
ing on a car outside oi Garrett
dorm, were involved in a fight re-
sulting from remarks shouted by
students on the third floor.
Evidence given to Dennis
Schatzman. C. executive direc-
tor for the NAACr, by White and
other witnesses states that the
remarks were racial and the fight
was invited.
Schatzman claims in the let-
ter that the university did not give
White a fair trial in light of evi-
dence showing both parties in-
volved to be guilty. He said he
pioposes White, who was sus-
pended for two years, either be re-
instated or else the white students
involved �James B. Denmon,
John V. Haar, and Michael H.
fensen � receive equal punish-
ment.
The letter Chancellor Richard
Eakin received alleged that:
DWhite was denied the right
to present witnesses before tne
1 lonor Board;
2)The fight was perpetrated
by five white students who were
drinking;
3)The campus newspaper
never printed quotes from the
black witnesses;
4)Dcspite evidence, the five
white students were never pun-
ished;
5)The university police failed
to repor t the completed testimony
oi the black student upon his ar-
rest;
6)"The majority of black
students at Fast Carolina Univer-
sity lackconfidence in thcadmini-
stration as to whether thev are
truly fair in their dealings with
conflicts bet ween black and white
students
7)"The University has differ-
ent standards for black and white
students with respect to violations
of state and university rules and
regulations
As stated in the Student Gov-
ernment Association Documents,
an accused student is made aware
of his or her rights in a prelimi-
nary conference.
Those rightsbeing questioned
include: l)"HisHer right to an
assigned counsel or a counsel of
hisher own choosing from the
students under the jurisdiction of
the board in which hisher case
shall be heard 2)"His Her right
to mandatory summoning of
material witnesses and procure-
ment of evidence
When asked about the judi-
cial board proceedings, Speier
said, "In accordance with the
family right to privacy act, I am
not at liberty to divulge any infor-
mation about any student
In a telephone interview with
White early this morning, White
said he was made aware of these
rights in the required 72 hours
before the hearing.
He said he became confused
about those rights, because his as-
signed counsel, John Fagan, and
Dean Ronald Speier gave him con-
flicting advice before the hearing.
"Thev didn't really make me
aware of anything said White.
"I told him (Fagan) exactly
how the story happened said
White. White's account f the story
was that racial slurs were being
shouted from third floor Garrett
while he was working on his car.
"I went up to the guy's room
(alone), he pushed me, and the
fight resulted from that said
White.
He said reports of there being
a group of fraternity members
beating students in room 348 were
See Case page 2
Mandatory meal plan slated tor summer
school students living in dormitories
By BEN SELBY
Staff Writer
The fellows are chowing down on thatgood ole Jones Caf etria food. If you are planning to live on campus
for summer school, get used to this scene, a mandatory meal plan is going into effect. (Photo by Mark
Love�Photolab)
Nontraditional students
Returning to the college classroom
By ADAM CORNELIUS
Suff Writer
Every Monday, Wednesday
and Friday Greg Estep, 31, wakes
up at 6 in the morning to drive
from Smithfield to Greenville,
where he takes classes until 2 p.m.
He then drives back to Smithfield
and goes to work on a cotton farm.
He sometimes doesn't get home
until midnight.
Estep is a nontraditional stu-
dent.
Eight years ago Estep left
ECU as a junior when his wife
became pregnant. He returned
last semester and plans to gradu
help them in re-entering the job decrease is caused by a projected
market or in changing jobs. decrease in high school graduates
As of last semester, 30 percent enrolling in college. While the
Of ECU'S student population, or part-time student enrollment is
roughly 4,700 students, were over increasing nation wide, Sykcssaid
A mandatory meal plan will
go into effect for summer school
resident students and campers to
"break-in" the new dining facility
at Mendenhall Student Center,
said Dean Carolyn Fulghum, di-
rector of Residence Life and
Housing.
Fulghum said that a perma-
nent, year-round mandatory
meal plan would go into effect
within five years.
The meal plan would save
students money, provide greater
selection of foods, and improve
dining facilities on campus, said
dining service officials.
The Student Government
Association opposed the meal
plan because they felt it would be
an infringement on students'
rights, SGA Speaker Marty
Helms said. "Thelegislaturefeltit
should be the student's option
Helms said.
Helms feels that it will be
Emotions rise
good tor students because the
meal plan has worked elsewhere.
It's "irrelevant now" because the
mandatory meal plan won't go
into effect for a few of years,
I telms said.
"It's in the student's best in-
terest Helms said. They're
going to see an improvement in
the quality of the meals and facili-
ties
"Any time you make a
change, students will be upset
said Frank Salmon, Director oi
Dining Services. Salmon said that
ECU provides nutritious meals
for its students, but feels that "the
dining facilities are crowded,
cramped, and antiquated
Larry Sampson, manager of
the Mendenhall Cafeteria, said a
permanent mandatory meal plan
couldn't go into effect until more
dining facilities are provided.
Plans for a pizza parlor, ham-
burger stand, deli, and sweet
shop are rumored to be in the
works, Sampson said.
Sampson said that students
can now eat three hot meals a day
for about $7.50. "I would like to
think that we serve nutritious
meals for a minimum dollar
amount Sampson said. "We're
toying with the idea oi leaving a
facility open until midnight lor
students that have to miss a hot
meal during the day
Some students are dissatis-
fied with the present meal plan
and selection of foods offered.
"I think that the word 'man-
datory' scares a lot oi people oft
said Rob Sheldon, a senior mar-
keting student. "If it's not pre-
pared the way you like it, or the
way you have to eat it.it doesn't
do any good anyway
"What about people who are
on restricted diets that have spe-
cial needs?" asked Sheldon "Or
people that are very health-con-
scious that don't even care to eat
the food that thev serve because of
the way it is prepared.?"
"I was on the meal plan for
one semester Sheldon said. "It
wasn't what I wanted, so I got off
it
23 years of age. According to
Marvin Sykes, the coordinator of
University College, the majority
of those students can be classified
as nontraditional.
"Although a precise number
of students is not available, we
expect that the number is signifi-
cant Sykes said.
Apparently the adult student
is expected to be a rising trend in
the future. As of August 1988, 45
percent of the nation's under-
age in December with a degree in graduate and graduate enroll- market today requires people to
Business and a concentration in ment were at least 25 years old. have more and better education.
Production Management. He That national number is expected There is also a significant number
hopes this will help him get out of to increase to over half the college of women who work. They seek
the job which he is in now. population before the year 2000. training and education in order to
"It's about time Estep said, Locally, the numbers of nontradi- get better jobs The actual num-
referring to his job. "My supcrvi- tional 'students enrolling at ECU ber of women re-enrolling as stu
sors don't pay anv attention to the total about 600 per semester and
that really work hard these numbers are increasing
each semester at the rate of 25
the phenomenon hasn't hit ECU
vet.
"The increase in part-time
students is happening more na-
tionwide than it is at ECU
Speculating on the reasons
for the increase in adult student
enrollment, Sykes said, "There's a
concept today of upward mobil-
ity. There are a lot of people who
know that they need to have a
degree for job advancement, pro-
motion, and security. The job
Hamburg speakes on Vietnam
By BEN SELBY
Staff Writer
people
there It is for this reason that
Estep wants to go into production
management, preferably in the
field of pharmaceuticals since he
previously worked in pharma-
ceutical production and has a
knowledge of the business.
Estep is one of the many non-
traditional students on campus. A
1987 report which was released
by the division of continuing
education defines a nontradi-
tional student as, "One whose
class graduated from high school
three or more years ago and or
whose employment, family obli
percent.
Another facet of the nontradi-
tional student population, the
part-time student, has also been
increasing while the numbers of
full-time students may actually be
decreasing. According to the
April 1988 National Center for
Education Statistics Targeted
Forecast, part-time students
(those enrolled 12 hours or less)
will increase 100,000 from 5.4
million in the Fall of 1988 to 5.5
million in 1992.
At the same time, the num-
bers of full-time students are ex-
gations or commuting students
have come back to school because peeled to decrease from 7.2 mil-
they need a bachelor's degree to lion to 6.9 million in 1992, with
either get into a particular field, total enrollment decreasing from
get additional undergraduate 12.6 to 12.4 million in those same
credits to pursueother fields, or to years, respectively. In part, the
dents nationwide has actually
doubled from 1.5 million in 1972
to 3 million today.
The typical adult student
tends to be active, open-minded,
and more likely to be concerned
with grades than most students,
in part because they pay for their
own education. They are also
more likely to stand up for their
consumer rights than the tradi-
tional student.
Despite this desire to learn,
the university atmosphere is often
difficult for these students, many
of whom are twice the age of the
average student.
In addition to the pressures of
family and work, they have to
bear the added burden of registra-
tion, parking, and schoolwork.
Departments such as the Univer-
sity College, located on the sec-
ond floor of Erwin Hall,
An audience of 200 university
students, health professionals,
veterans and their families were
visibly emotional as accounts of
encounters at the Vietnam Veter-
ans Memorial were told at Hen-
drix Theater last night.
"China has its Great Wall,
Jerusalem has the Wailing Wall,
and America has the Vietnam
Veterans Memorial Wall said
Ira Hamburg, president of the
Friends of the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial.
'The wall is not a place where
the names of 58,000 of the dead
are Hamburg said, quoting a
passage from Laura Palmer's
book, "Shrapnel In the Heart "It
is a place where 58,000 names are
alive
Hamburg said that he has
observed pain, anger, joy, and
healing in the faces of those who
visit the wall.
"It is the healing that the
memorial is about Hamburg
said. "The wall is a testament to
the most wretched conflict of our
time that sent many people into
exile, jail, death, and pitted
brother against brother, and fa-
ther against son
"When you have a family
member that is wounded by Viet-
nam, then you have a family that
is wounded by Vietnam Ham-
burg said. "Wounds that are hid-
den and have been long-su-
pressed. We have not docu-
mented the hidden cost of life,
pain, and suffering
"What is healing ?" Hamburg
asked "Healing is not forgetting.
It doesn't happen to you. It is
something vou have to do he
said.
Hamburg told the story of a
medic, distraught by not seeing
the name of a soldier whom he
had put on a helicopter and was
See Vietnam, page 2
Ira Hamburg, president of the Friends of the Vietnam Veterans,
shared experiences about the war at Hendrix Theather last night
(Photo by J.D. Whitmire� Photolab)





i
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,1989
$-
Case said to be mishandled
Continued from page 1
inaccurate. "I went up by myself
he said. White stated that the onlv
other person involved was his
brother, Rick, but that he (Teddy)
was the one most responsible for
the incident.
In reference to the student
whose nose was broken outside of
the dorm. White said, "There was
a guv leaning on my car when I
cameout When heinquired as to
what the guy, Jensen, was doing
and reached for the paper Jensen
was writing his license plate
They read the paper and they Eakin said, "The case was
had it in their mind what hap- handled through the student dis-
pened ciplinary system. There was an
"Any case may be appealed investigation as well as a campus
where there are reasonable police investigation and the re-
grounds for prejudicial error in suits were handed over to the
violation of cither parties rights district attorney's office,
committed during the hearing pro- "The incident was thoroughly
ceedings but "a request for ap- investigated and reviewed by the
peal must be submitted to the student disciplinary system and
office of the Associate Dean of
Students within five school davs
after any board decision or ruling
by the Attorney General accord-
ing to SGA Documents.
On January 23, White plead
number on. he said lensen slapped guilty in Pitt County Superior
his hand and the following fight Court to five counts of simple
resulted from that. assault. His 30-day sentence in
White said he was told not to each case was suspended and he
bring his witnesses; that he would was put on a two-year probation-
run need them. He said he was ary period with a fine of $922 in
told that he would probably not
be suspended.
White said one character wit-
ness was heard, but the ernes who
heard racial slurs weren't allowed
to come into the hearing Fie
described the incident as a " whole,
big. messed-up thing
restitution tecs.
When asked about the
NAACP's allegations, Eakin said
he was still reviewing the letter
and would decide on his response
ata later date. He said of the Honor
Board decision, "According to the
information I had, the student dis-
"This is why 1 think 1 got sus- ciplinary system operated as it was
ponded said White. "Everyone intended to operate. I saw no rea-
went by what the newspaper said, son to overturn the decision
Vietnam discussed
then by the district attorney's of-
fice. 1 believed the incident was
appropriately referred and con-
sidered bv those groups
If the NAACP doesn't receive
cooperation Schatzman said
"other avenues" will be sought.
He said those other avenues in-
clude the U.S. Office of Civil
Rights. The NAACP "will peti-
tion to have a stop on federal funds
to a state supported university
said Schatzman.
Schatzman had two scheduled
interviews with Chancellor Eakin
but missed both appointments. He
said he was ill at the time of the
first meeting and lost his way,
missing the second.
In a telephone conversation
Monday, Schatzman was asked
about a piece of legislation he had
Continued horn page 1
certain to die. The medic was sent
to an information center at the
memorial to ask about the 'dead'
soldier.
At the Siime time, a veteran
was asking about the name oi a
medic that he had seen "blown
apart' as he was air lifted from a
firefight.
The veterans had been look-
ing for each others' name. The
men embraced each other.
Hamburg said that most en-
counters are less dramatic, but
there is some magic power of the
memorial that brings men and
women to tears
"The Vietnam Veterans
ans might find each other Ham-
burg said. "And where family
members of veterans might find
some veteran that knew a loved
one
"1 have seen men and women
facing the wall Hamburg said.
"Their body stiffens, eyes become
fixed-not at the wall, but through
it to another time. They are frozen,
lost, and gone
More than 10 million people
from all over the world have vis-
ited the memorial since it was
dedicated in November of 1982,
Hamburg said.
Hamburg serves as a volun-
teer to insure that the historical
significance and emotional legacy
fcC
Memorial lsplace .where veter- of tlio memorial not be forgotten MMmMMmmmmmMM
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A WORLD APART
February 1
WILLOW
February 2-5
recently proposed to two legisla-
tors and how the ECU case had a
bearing on that legislation. The
legislation, if passed, would make
racial and ethnic violence and in-
timidation a misdemeanor.
Schatzman said the issue at
ECU is a prime example being
used to push for the new legisla-
tion, because the incident took
place at a state university.
ECU's incident was cited by
Schatzman in Monday's Ralicgh
News and Observer in an article
concerning an increase in racial
incidents across the state.
White is now attending Agri-
cultural and Technical University
in Greensboro. White said, "I'm
not in the place I should be to
better my education I wish it
had never happened. I would
rather be at ECU pursuing my
music career. If he hadn't pushed
me it would have been nothing
The East Carolinian
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,1989 3
Reagan leaves college agenda
(CPS)� As Ronald Reagan
leaves office in a flurry of farewell
broadcasts and parties, he leaves
behind much ot the ambitious
college agenda he outlined eight
years ago either unaccomplished
or simply abandoned.
That's good news to Charles
Saunders of the American Coun-
cil on Education, which repre-
sents college presidents in Wash-
ington, D.C "Fortunately, the
Reagan administration's legacy is
not as serious as they would have
liked"
Yet the administration's fail-
ure to accomplish many of its
campus goals�abolishing the
US. Department oi Education,
shifting the responsibility for
funding campuses from Wash-
ington to the states, ending al-
leged waste and fraud and getting
colleges to adopt courses that in-
corporate "family values"�is
upsetting to others.
They were not successful
said Jeanne Allen oi the Heritage
Foundation, a conservative think
tank that helped formulate much
oi the administration's education
agenda. "There is little legacy
Not all oi Reagan's higher
education goals remain unaccom-
plished, of course. Officials kept
their pledge to reduce federal
spending for higher education by
halting direct aid for campus
housing and libraries and by
doing away with aid programs
like student Social Security and
the Middle Income Student Assis-
tance Act.
Between 181 and 1988,
moreover, the administration
dramaticallv shifted the nature of
student aid from grants to loans.
For good or ill, the shift is
likely to be President Reagan's
most enduring reform of Ameri-
can colleges.
"We're not likely to see a shift
(back to grants) in the future
observed the College Board's
Gwendolyn L. Lewis.
Otherwise, observers think
historians won't be able to point
to many other long-term impacts
of the Reagan years on the way
students go to college.
When pressed, they mention
how William . Bennett, Reagan's
second Education secretary and
now "drug czar" in the Bush
administration, helped start a
lively national debate about the
quality of college education.
Bennett regularly blasted the
nation's higher education leaders
as wasteful price groupers who
pushed for higher federal fund-
ing, raised tuition exorbitantly
and offered students poor educa-
tions.
Such tactics, said Allen, effec-
tively focused public attention on
costs and quality. "Bill Bennett
made sure people know what's
going on with their taxes she
said.
"There's an awareness and
concern about American educa-
tion that was generated during
the Reagan years agreed Terrell
Bell, President Reagan's first
Education Secretary.
Others, however, say the ti-
rades merely alienated educators
and did nothing to improve
higher education.
"1 worry about to what extent
Bennett's negative attacks on
higher education made it difficult
to achieve our goals said Saun-
ders. "Week in and week out, he
accused students of ripping off
colleges, colleges of ripping off
students. What effect has that had
on our nation's confidence in
higher education?"
"One of the biggest failures of
the Reagan administration said
Bob Aaron of the National Asso-
ciation of State Universities and
Land Grant Colleges, "was that it
failed to maximize the use oi the
presidency as a bully pulpit. It
was erratic. It was not sustained
Faculty and administrators
were so busy defending them-
selves against such attacks that
they had no time to work on ways
to improve their classes.
"In terms of innovation, I'd
give them an absolute zero
Saunders said oi the Reagan
administration.
At various times, the admini-
stration did propose plans to give
parents tax breaks for saving for
college and to replace aid pro-
grams with an "income contin-
gent loan" which students repay
in increments depending on hos
much they earn after graduation.
While the income-contingent
loan idea is still being tested�
students so far generally have not
been using it�most of the
administration's other innova-
tions were offered in the name of
rolling back the federal
government's role in education.
"Ronald Reagan says there is
no federal role in higher educa-
tion said Fred Azcarate, presi-
dent of the United States Student
Association. "I thought that ques-
tion was settled with the Higher
Education Act of 1965
In the name of freeing col-
leges from federal control, for
example, Reagan's Justice Dept.
declined to investigate more than
300 student and faculty com-
plaints of campus racial and sex-
ual discrimination through 1988,
the Association of American Col-
leges said.
For the same reason, it ap-
proved tax breaks for Bob Jones
University, a private religious
college that forbids interracial
dating.
President Reagan also sought
to dismantle the U.S. Dept. of
Education, which administers
most federal college programs,
but dropped the idea in 1983.
"The Dept. of Education
said Bell, who was hired to help
dismantle it, "is here to stay
In Reagan's view, states were
to pick up the funding slack for
colleges, but states have not
rushed in to fill the void.
In fact, according to a 1988
study by the Center for Higher
Education aITlinois State Univer-
sity, states' higher education
spending during 1987-1988 repre-
sented 8.1 percent of their budg-
ets, down from 9.2 in 1980-1981.
On the other hand, the ad-
ministration endorsed extending
federal control over students by
making them swear they did not
1
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Become a member of the
"White Rose Court"
use drugs and had registered for
the draft in order to get federal
student aid.
It expanded Washington's
role on campuses, too, by asking
1 ibrarians to report which foreign-
ers checked out what books, limit-
ing scholarly exchanges with
experts from certain countries,
threatening to withhold funding
from professors whose work did
not meet the approval of Chester
Finn, the highly ideological chief
of the Education Depts research
office, and by campaigning to
stress the "role of religion" in text-
books.
nUanfyou
S & R Computer Associates,
Inc.
for sponsoring the EC3 programming contest.
I- East Carolina Computer Club I
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I
�aat (Earnlttuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1.
Pete Fernald, Gee,aiMmger
Stephanie Folsom, m? m
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director ofWwrtiwtj
Tim Hampton, . t,
KRISTEN HALBERG,si uno.
Chip Carter, ft �,
Dean Waters, mm.
Debbie Stevens, w
Brad Bannister, g &
Jeff Parker, ay rawum
TOM FURR, Grcniiw Aljiuger
Susan Howell, Proj�fw m-u
Stephanie Emory,a �, su,�
Mac Clark, bubwssmu
January 31.1989
OPINION
Page 4
Proposition 42
Recently in the news consider-
able attention has been drawn to
basketball coach John Thompson of
academically respected Geor-
getown University. Thompson
walked off the court Jan. 16 in pro-
test of the new NCAA regulation,
Proposition 42, which increases the
difficulty of admitting student ath-
letes into a college.
Under Proposition 42, incoming
student athletes are required to have
both a 2.0 grade point average in
high school and a minimum Scho-
lastic Aptitude Test score of 700, or a
score equivalent to that on another
test in order to receive an athletic
scholarship. If a student does not
meet both of these requirements, he
would then prove to be ineligible as
a freshman to acquire a scholarship.
Thompson opposes the new
NCAA rule because he says it is
discriminatory toward student ath-
letes from lower socio-economic
classes, blacks in particular. Many
coaches have voiced a dislike for the
SAT, saying $hey feel the test is cul-
turally biased, m
Wharitoitosort fails to recog-
Juze in ffij'flffijfift'p3 is the well,
being of the athlete himself. How
does Thompson expect the young
student-athlete to survive academi-
cally even one semester in a respect-
able university such as Georgetown,
where students struggle to get ac-
cepted with a high school GPA of 3.5
and a 1200 on their SAT scores? So
how can a student who struggles
through high school with a 2.0 GPA
and can get no better than 700 on
their SAT's compete with the brilli-
ancy that an institution like Geor-
getown has to offer? After all, the
student receives 200 points on the
SAT just for filling in his name on the
scantron sheet.
Thompson is out of sync with the
most important attribute to colleges
and universities have to offer: a
higher education. A student should
attend a college when they are ready
both academically and mentally, not
sooner. A student is not a student
until he has proved himself aca-
demically, not athletically, and only
then should he profit from his
talents.
Thompson sees these academic
standards as unfair but it would be
hard to survive in any college or
university, respectable or other-
wise, with standards lower than
those demanded by Proposition 42.
Are colleges and universities
here to provide me stuaent athletes
with a degree or are they merely a
stepping stone towards the world of
professional sports, basketball or
otherwise?
� i
IS 1HISAPICTURE OF: CD A HOMELESSPERSONf
t&CMt� ��A CONGRESSMAN
oJmm W0RKIN5 ON HIS
AUTOMATIC
MY RAISE ?
Points on the Board
VS PWKT5 ON THE T&T
"Casual Sex" has no wit or humor
Once again the readers of the East
Carolinian have had to endure
shoddy and cheap journalism. I am,
of course, referring to your "Tips for
Casual Sex" by Chippy Bonehcad. To
come right to the point, the article
lacked wit, imagination, consistency,
and most of all wisdom.
If the objective was to make light
of "Casual Sex it missed bv a wide
margin. It was actuallv heavy on the
depraved side. This is not, however,
the first time such an article has been
written by this author. Case in point,
last year you published an article
about the virtues of genocide. There
are no virtues to genocide or casual
sex for that matter. Certainly, Chippy
should be able to come up with more
entertaining subjects than killing old
pcopleandlivingout your sexual fan-
tasies.
The "Casual Sex" article was also
riddled with inconsistancies. The
most obvious is with your "key
word" safety. You freely admit that
there arc, "sometimes fatal ramifica-
tions of casual sex But you also
imply that the condom is as rugged
and dependable as a Ford pick-up
truck. What happens when
someone's luck runs out and they
contract AIDS or herpes for example?
I low about, "Tough luck, Dude I'd
hardly call that consoling. To be brief,
I won't detail how your article fuels
the problem of rape on this campus.
You might disagree with me but it
certainly does not diminish the prob-
lem. Not to mention unwanted preg-
nancy.
Need I remind vou of the
enormous responsibility and power a
tree press has? You have an obliga-
tion to report the facts fairly, to in-
spire, and to be a watch-dog for the
public. But when that obligation is
betrayed, the public must be the
watch-dog over the press. And if the
public chooses to be silent, the press is
given free reign to do as it chooses. No
direction means no benefit for either
party! You might say, "Spare me the
lecture My response comes from a
proverb which says, "Whoso loves
instruction loves knowledge, but he
that hates reproof is stupid
Let's leave the smut where it was
found � on the bathroom wall and
keep it out of OUR paper.
Michael J. Bennett
Medical School Employee
. 3
JkAj
The East Carolinian welcomes Jit-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop themby our office in the
Publication Building, across frcm
the rrtTx� p joyner library.
For purpo. of verification, all
letters must include the name, major, d Ijbcl, and no persona!attacks wi
classification,address,phonenumber
and the signature of the authoris).
letters are limited to 300 words
or less, double -spaced, typed or
neatly printed. All letters are sub-
f w editing for brevity, obscenity
ill
be permitted. Students, faculty and
staff writing letters for this page are
reminded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday
for Thursday editions.
I
lrtAPBR,�,I 60TT WITHWAK-gMMUTOMATTC,
TO R00NP, 6A5 OPgftfiTfl? MILITAM ASSAULT RFLS�,
Bush should eat his words and call for a tax hike
By ROBERT WRIGHT
New Republic
If recent experience is any guide, sometime be-
fore next November the president and Congress will
hammer out a plan that will bring the budget deficit
down another notch or two. It probably won't be
enough to meet the Gramm-Rudman deficit target of
$100billion, but it will be enough to signify progress.
The question is: How wrenching will the proc-
ess of reaching agreement be? What price will the
economy have to pay? How seriously will the new
administration's effectiveness be undermined?
How much more disillusioned with the government
will the American people become? These questions
are for the new president to answer.
There are two paths President Bush can follow.
One option is to hold firmly to his "No new taxes,
period" pledge. The journey down this road would
be long, arduous and acrimonious, and would lead
to stalemate and confrontation. It would probably
involve another revision of the Gramm-Rudman
targets, some even phonier than usual accounting,
ana only a modest amount of true deficit reduction.
Worst of all, the president and Congress would be
condemned to retrace these steps next year.
The second option, superficially, is also unat-
tractive: After months of telling us to read his lips,
Bush would have to eat his words, and call for a tax
hike. A bit awkward, to be sure. But in the long run
mis may be the only route to lasting economic health
and� read our lips � re-election.
If Bush hopes to make good on his campaign
promises to protect Social Security and devote more
resources to the environment, education, prisons
and child care, some of the remaining programs will
have to undergo savage cuts.
And as long as the Democrats wisely refuse to be
the first to talk about raising taxes, they will be
unable to fashion an alternative proposal. As has
happened in three of the past four years, a budget
stalemate will develop. The frustration level will rise
on both sides. The new administration's effective-
nessand the new president's leadership abilities will
be called into question. By June or July, Washington
will be malaise city.
Budgetary gridlock cannot continue forever.
Two things�the Gramm-Rudman law and the debt
ceiling � virtually guarantee that any impasse will
be broken, one way or another, around autumn.
First, in mid-August, the Office of Management and
Budget will issue a report showing that deep cuts in
military and domestic programs will occur in mid-
October, in compliance with Gramm-Rudman lim-
its, if an agreement on deficit reduction isn't reached.
Sometime in September, the government will
exhaust its current authority to borrow. Then, unless
Congress increases the ceiling, the government will
have to begin living within its tax receipts. Such
"cold turkey" budget balancing would involve a
wrenching adjustment for both the economy and
those who depend on the government for their sus-
tenance. Congress will raise the debt ceiling.
But powerful fiscal conservatives in Congress �
Gramm and Rudman, among others � will insist
that the raising of the debt ceiling be linked either to
a budget package that cuts the deficit or to deficit-
cutting procedural reforms. Liberals will opt for the
former. The subsequent negotiations will be pro-
tracted, and by the time the budget is squared away,
Congress and the president will both have spent
months appearing ineffectual and blaming their
impotence on each other.
Bleak as it is, even this scenario could prove to be
kinder and gentler than reality. For it assumes that
foreign lenders, the Federal Reserve Board, ; nd
domestic financial and stock markets are willing to
put up with a prolonged budget battle.
If they aren't, and interest rates rise substantially
or the dollar or stock market plummets, then the i .ew
administration could find itself bargaining with
Congress from a position of weakness. Adverse mar-
ket reactions might also induce a recession that
would end Ronald Reagan's long Morning in Amer-
ica and leave the administration in a much deeper
hole and the deficit much less tractable.
The second path available to Bush is in some
ways more daunting than the first, but it has the
advantage of not leading to political oblivion or
gradual economic ruin. It would involve a sustained
effort to construct a multi-year deficit reduciton
package that included tax hikes as well as spending
cuts.
Clearly this journey couldn't begin immedi-
ately. Bush won the right, in fact the obligation, to
present Congress with a budget that achieves the
deficit targets without tax increases. But should this
proposal prove unacceptable to a majority in Con-
gress as it almost certainly will, the president should
quickly take the lead in fashioning a compromise.
Of course, the mere thought of George Bush
leading on the tax issue would be enough to enrage
many on the Republican right. But a majority of
thoughtful Republicans have concluded that some
tax increases are inevitable if the deficit is to be re-
duced to manageable proportions. To make a tax
hike more palatable to conservatives, Bush could
make it contingent on Congress's holding spending
below specified levels.
Oemocrats would undoubtedly revel in Bush's
ch -srin if he reneged on his central campaign prom-
ise, rlowever, they would soon find that there was
surprisingly little political hay to be made. After
raising taxes, Bush could probably convince the
put !ic that the Democratic alternative would have
raided them by more.
And, anyway, in the long run Bush will profit
from reneging if a multi-year deficit reduction pack-
age allows interest rates to fall and the economy to
continue expanding. In that event, Democrats may
have to sign up for tours if they want to see the inside
of the White House before the turn of the century.
Perhaps that prospect win be enough to get the
president thinking and speaking honestly about the
nation's economic future.
I
'
-
V
"





1
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,1989 5
School fears 'Playboy' image
(CPS)� Administrators at
Louisiana College have halted
sales of a fundraising calendar
featuring campus students in
bathing suits, fearing it was giv-
ing the Baptist school a "playboy"
image.
Aimed at raising money for
the college's chorus, the "Men of
Louisiana College" calendar,
which even campus President
Robert L. Lynn characterized as
"about as scintillating as a Scars
catalog was tame enough that
the local Alexandria Dailv Town
Talk published a photo from it.
However the photo, which
was of a male student in a hot tub
with two female classmates, gen-
erated complaints.
"1 thought it was in very poor
taste for a Christian college said
Rev. Charles Hutzler, pastor of
the Alpine Baptist Church. "1 was
outraged. It makes us look like
we're liberal or something
Lynn decided to halt sales of
the calendar after others advised
him it could give the 800-student
college, which is supported by the
Lousiana Baptist Convention, a
playboy image.
Such images can be trouble-
some at schools funded by the
Southern Baptist Convention.
Alter riayboy magazine deter-
mined that Mercer University, a
Baptist campus, was among the
top "party schools" in the nation
in 1987, litcralists in the Georgia
Baptist Convention mounted an
ultimatley unsuccessful cam-
paign to replace Mercer's trustees
with more conservative church
members.
Calendars have caused
troubles at other campuses, but
usually for different reasons.
Penn State University, for
example, banned a "Women of
Lion Country" calendar from its
bookstore after students objected
it was offensive to women.
Calendars featuring photos
of nude or semi-nude classmates
provoked angry protest at the
universities of Illinois and Texas-
Austin, respectively, during the
1987-88 school year, but they
stayed on sale.
More recently, Ohio State of-
ficials yanked a' simialrlv racv
"Men of the Scarlet and Gray"
from its campus stores because it
used OSU's logos, emblems and
trademarks without permission.
Only 23 Louisiana College
calendars were sold when Lynn
banned them, but students
seemed to agree with their
president's view of its modesty.
Kandy Key, one of the women
in the hot tub picture, said her
mother and members of her
church teased her about the
photo, "but basically they didn't
see anything wrong with it
Another student in the hot
tub shot, John C. Smith, said of the
notoriety the incident was giving
him, "I loveit. I'm becoming a cult
star
Why Trust Your
Pictures With an
Out of Town Lab?
INSTANT REPLAY WILL DEVELOP
YOUR PICTURES WHILE YOU WAIT
zE INSTANT REPLAY "
ONE HOUR PHOTOS ANO PORTRAITS
"Quality, Convenience and Personal Service"
THE PLAZA
(next to Annabelle's)
355-5050
Language workshop set for next week
ECL' Nrwi Bureau
"Language and Literacy for
All Ages" is the topic of the'l939
Man- Lois Staton Reading-Lan-
guage Arts Conference at ECU,
set for Feb. 2-3 in ECL's Menden-
hall Student Center.
The annual conference is
sponsored by the Department of
Elementary and Middle Grades
Education in the ECU School of
Education in honor of Dr. Staton,
professor emeritus at ECU.
Featured speaker this year is
Dr. Courtney Cazden, professor
and researcher at Harvard Uni-
versitv, who will address the Fri-
day morning and afternoon gen-
eral sessions.
Pet ferret puts
owner in jail
(CPS) � A Virginia Tech stu-
dent who has already served jail
time to save her pet ferret is in
trouble again.
This time Robert Schcerer is
suing Jennifer Au and the pet
store at which she works for aToYaT"
pi $500,000.
Schcerer claims Au's ferret bit
rum while the animal was in a
cage at the Docktor Pet Center
where Au works.
Au's been through such accu-
sations before. A 5-year-old boy
previously was bitten by one of
three ferrets�including Au's
�caged at the store.
In that case, a judge ordered
the three animals tested for rabies.
Unfortunately, the only ferret
rabies test Virginia recognizes as
valid requires that the animal be
decapitated and have its brain
cells examined.
Instead of submitting to the
test, Au allegedly had a friend
smuggle her pet out of the coun-
try.
The court found Au in con-
tempt of court. She spent five days
in jail last summer as a penalty.
Schcerer claimed the animal
bit him on May 27, before it was
smuggled to safety. Au said there
were warning signs posted, that
the ferret could not have
squeezed its head through the
mesh of the cage and labeled the
charges "ridiculous
Speakers at concurrent ses- tne auditorium of Wahl-Coates
sions are Dr. Dixie Lee Spiegel, Laboratory School, from 7:15 to
associate professor at UNC-
Chapcl Hill and author of "Read-
ing for Pleasure: Guidelines"
published by the international
Reading Association; Dr. Kather-
me Misulis of the ECU faculty and
specialist in the field of content
8:30 p.m. Topic of the parents'
session is "Strengthening Your
Child's Reading and Language
Skills at Home: Advice from the
Central Office Supervisor of
Teachers
The evening session is free
Coble, Betty Long, Patricia An-
derson, Elizabeth Wheatley,
Donald Spence and Patricia Ter-
rell, all of the ECU School of Edu-
cation.
While the Thursday evening
session is free, attendance at the
Friday sessions on campus re-
FREE
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ONE COUPON PER VISIT.
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PERSONAL PORTRAITS
bv
EINSTANT REPLAY
area reading; and Dr. William and open to all interested persons, quircpay�cr,t of a $15 per person
Blanton, director of the Model with child care provided by two rofilstra�on fee. Further informa-
Clinical Teaching Program at
Appalachian State University and
co-editor of "Reading Research
and Instruction
A special Thursday evening
session for parents will be held in
pet
Freshman booted
for false claims
(CPS) � A black freshman
who falsely claimed he had been
assaulted in his dorm room and
gotten death threats has been
suspended for two years from
Northwest Missouri State Uni-
vcrsitv.
News that the student had
lied about the assault and death
threats "shocked" Northwest Stu-
dents and raised fears the school's
administrators won't take real
racial incidents seriously, said
Northwest spokesman David
Gieseke.
The campus had been just as.
shocked last fall when the stu-
dent, whose name is being with
held, told campus police whit
classmates had assaulted him ii
his room and that he'd gotten le-
ters threatening to kill him.
"We held meetings of stu-
dents, faculty and staff last Octo-
ber that aired out some tensions
said Gieseke.
Rumors flew that some stu-
dents on the rural, predominately
white campus�only 125 of
NMSU's 5,000 students are black
had formed a Ku Klux Klan
chapter.
tion and advance registration
forms are available from "Marv
pro
ECU School of Education student
organizations.
Dr. Staton will also address IT0,S Staton Reading-Language
the conference. Others appearing Arts Conference School of Edu-
on the program are Professors calon' Speight Building, ECU,
Mabel Laughter, Barr Tavlor, Greenville, NC 27858; telephone
Roger G. Eldridge Jr Charles (919)757-6833.
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. a�m��
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,1989
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Immediately. Non-smoker. To share 3
bedroom house. Will have own bedroom.
175.00 per month phis 13 utilities. 5
minutes from school. Call Pamela at 758-
7142
ONE MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
sublease apartment two blocks from
campus (list.). Walking distance from
school, downtown, and many other
places. SuWeaser has option to furnish his
bedroom or use existing furniture. Micro-
wave, toaster oven, color TV with cable.
Costs only $150 per month phis utilities.
Call today! 757-0412.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Starting
March 1st. Responsible female. Geor-
getown Aprs. Within walking distance to
campus and downtown. 12 rent. 12
utilities. Free cable. Call 830-1758. Leave
message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed imme-
diately to share 2 bedroom apartment at
Eastbrook. Private room, no deposit, 1 2
rent and 1 2 utilities. Call 830-5165.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed imme-
diately to share 2 bedroom apartment,
during spring andor summer session. 2
miles from campus on ECU transit route.
Pay 1 2 rent and 1 2 utilities. Call Cather-
ine 355-7307.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share two bedroom apartment. $207 rent,
$95 deposit, 1 2 ubltities. Call Elena 756-
7357.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Stratford
Arms. To share 2 bedroom apt 1 2 utili-
ties. Free cable. $170month. Call 756-
5183 or 324-3354 on weekends.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: 2 br. 1 block
from campus, fully furnished, semester
lease, washer-dryer. $300month. Call
757-0202 and ask for Ronnie.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom apt. Non-smoking student pre-
ferred. $121 a month plus 13 utilities.
Call 830-3753.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 81 Chevette in good condition
with nice stereo. Asking $1,000.00. Call
756-9198.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
From $100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chevys. Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S-1166.
79 FIREBIRD FOR SALE: Good condi-
tion. V6, automatic, AMFM, air condi-
tion, new tires. $1750.00. John: 551-2460
(day), 830-5295 (eve.)
FOR SALE: 1986 Honda Elite 250 motor-
cycle, 2500 miles, great shape, $999.00 call
752-5759 days.
MOVING SALE: Portable BW TV: $40,
Living room chair: $40, Dresser: $40, Sla-
lom water-ski $35. Call 756-8428 after 6
p.m.
FOR SALE: Britches Great Outdoors
brown leather jacket Size 40 regular. The
fatigued look. Very cool & stylish. Six
months old! $180.00. Call 758-7496.
ATTENTION - GOVERNMENT
SEIZED VEHICLES: From $100.00.
Fords, Mercedes, Corvettes, Chevys. Sur-
plus Buyers Guide. 602-838-8885 Ext. A-
5285.
ATTENTION - GOVERNMENT
HOMES: From $1 (U-repair). Delinquent
tax property. Repossessions. Call 602-838-
8885 Ext. GH 5285.
'81 PONTIAC WAGON: AMFM, air,
wire wheels, great shape, very depend-
able, teacher's car, $2,500.00. 758-0341
after 5 p.m.
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER III: In-
cludes disk drive, programs, blank disks
and more. $340.00 or BO. Call Frank at
355-0793. Leave message.
FOR SALE: 2 living room table lamps.
Call after 5:00 p.m. 758-5422.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. call early
and book for your formal or party. 758-
1700, ask for Dillon or leave a message.
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM-
POSED: Call 756-9136.
TYPING: Term Papers, letters, resume's
� etc. Call Becky 9 a.m5 p.m. M-F 758-
1161.
HELP WANTED
ssifieds
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Inter-
ested in making money part-time photo-
graphing campus activities? No experi-
ence necessary, we train. If you are highly
sociable, have a 35 mm camera, and trans-
portation, please call between noon and 5
p.m M-F, at 1 -800-722-7033.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary com-
pensation, however room, utilities and
phone provided. Mary Smith REAL Crisis
Center 758-HELP.
HELP WANTED: ShippingRecieving
person � part-time. Warehouse work
and delivery within 250 mile radius. Must
have no classes at least 2 weekdays. Good
driving record. Prefer underclassmen.
Call Tommy 756-8500 9 to 5.
BAE COMPUTER NEEDS: Responsible
student to represent our computer. Incen-
tive bonus plan. Interested persons please
send resume to 3563 Ryder Street, Santa
Clara, CA 95051.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS:
For Counselors, Water Front Director,
Asst. Swim Instructors. Friendly Day
Camp is a summer day camp for mentally
and physically handicapped children &
adults. Please write or call The Special
Populations Program, P.O. Box 590,
Raleigh, NC 27602 (919) 755-6832.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACATION IN
CANCUN Become a College Tours rep-
resentative on your campus and get a free
tyip. Nothing to buy�we provide every-
thing you need. It's a little work for alot of
fun! Call 1 -800-727-0005.
TUTORS NEEDED: For all business
classes. Contact Lisa at Academic Coun-
seling, Dept. of Athletics 757-6282 or 757-
1677.
RESORT HOTELS: Cruiselines, Airlines,
& Amusement Parks, NOW accepting
applications for spring and summer jobs,
internships, and career positions. For
more nformation and an application;
write national Collegiate Recreation Serv-
ice; PO Box 8074; Hilton Head, SC 29938.
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: Needed
for entry level, full-time position at local
TV station. Must be dependable and work
well with others. TV production back-
ground helpful but not essential. Send
inquiries to: Production manager WNCT-
TV P.O. Box 898 Greenville, NC 27835
EOE.
$10-$15HOUR PROCESSING MAIL
AT HOME: Weekly check guaranteed.
For details write V & E Enterprises 14263
San Pablo Ave Suite 111, San Pablo, CA
94806.
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSISTER
CAMPS: (Mass.) Mah-Kee-Nac for Boys
Danbee for Girls. Counselor positions for
Program Specialists: All Team Sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
Hockey, Soccer and Volleyball; 25 Tennis
openings; also Archery, Riflery and Bik-
ing; other openings include Performing
Arts, Fine Arts, Yearbook, Photography,
Cooking, Sewing, Rollerskating, Rock-
etry, Ropes, Camp Craft; All Waterfront
activities (Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing, CanoeingKayak). Inquire
J & D Camping (Boys) 190 Linden Ave
Glen Ridge, NJ 07028; Action Camping
(Girls) 263 Main Road, Montville, NJ
07045. Phone (Boys) 201-429-8W2; (Girls)
201-316-6660.
ATTENTION - HIRING Government
jobs - your area. Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. $17,840
$69,485. Call 602-838-8885. Ext. R5285.
ARE YOU OUTGOING? Do you enjoy
talking on the phone? If so, we have the job
for you! Telemarketing positions open for
spring semester starting immediately.
Work for ECU and get paid while you gain
valuable telemarketing skills. Hours are 7
�9 p.m. daily; earn extra spending
money without cutting into study time!
Call Cindy at 757-4215 or 757-6072 for an
appointment.
HELP WANTED: Shippingreceiving
person. Part-time. Warehouse work and
delivery within 250 mile radius. Must
have no classes at least 2 week days. Good
driving record. Prefer underclassman.
Call Tommy 756-8500, 9-5.
PART-TIME HELP WANTED: Sales and
stock. Some heavy lifting required. Must
be neat & outgoing. Apply at the YOUTH
SI IOP at Arlington Village.
APPLICATIONS FOR STUDENT
UNION PRODUCTIONS CHAIRPER-
SON: Job description: 'serve on Student
Union Program Board; plan and promote
the annual Student Union Banquet, 'select
and plan Union decorations and recep-
tions; 'select committee members and 'co-
ordinate and head committee meetings.
Applications being taken until February
3.
PERSONALS
SINGERS WANTED If you've sung in a
chorus and would be interested in a low-
pressure singing experience, come and
sing in Choral Lab. 3-4 Mon. it Wed. Fac-
ulty Welcome. Call Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
757-6331 for more information.
ECU STUDENT INTERESTED IN CAR
POOLING: From New Bern to ECU
MonTuesThurs. Call Bernard 637-5779
in New Bern.
PIKA HAPPY HOUR: Every Thursday 9
until. The Attic. Drink Specials.
AZD'S: You helped make another fine
rush. Couldn't have done it without you.
�The Pikes.
ZTA SISTERS Zeta week was great, it
was the perfect ending to our pledging.
We'd like to thank all of you for making
our pledging so much fun. Thurs and es-
pecially Fri. night were incredible. Defi-
nitely nights we'll never forget. A special
thanks to Tessa and Wendy for leading us
these past months. You guys taught us
everything we know! Thanks again for
everything. We're all happy and proud to
finally be sisters. We love you all. �The
new ZTA Sisters. . ,
-HAPPY BIRTHDAY MICHAEL
Love, Nixon's best Friend.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI INVITES EVERY-
ONE: To their happy hour at Rockefeller's
Thursday night.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Wants to thank the
ladies of Delta Zeta for all their help dur-
ing rush.
CONGRATS TO THE NEW CHI
OMEGA COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN:
Activities Susan Durham, Alumnae Rela-
tions Lisa Thompkins, Career Develop-
ment Kelly Brown, Community Service
Kristin Hogg, Corresponding Secretary
Jill Persensky, Food Chairman Angela
Meinder, Intramurals Jen Snell, House
Manager Laura Ward, Social Chairman
Kikki Dye, Spirit Wendy ONeil and Phi-
lanthropy Missy Michalove. We know
you'll do a great job! �Love, The Sisters
and Pledges of Chi Omega.
THE NEW OFFICERS OF CHI OMEGA:
Congratulations to President Kendra
Curtis, Vice President Cathy Faires, Treas-
urer Tina Thomas, Secretary Krista
Kamenski, Pledge Trainer Kris White,
Personnel Bitsy Squires, Panhellenic
Susan Home and Rush Chairman Windy
Spell. Good luck, we're all behind you! �
Love, The Sisters and Pledges of Chi-
Omega.
AMANDA, KIM, SHARI, WINDY,
MISSY AND JEANIE: The old exec of Chi
Omega will leave a mark in history,
You've shared your thoughts and we've
learned from you, To be the best that we
can be! �Love, The Sisters and Pledges of
Chi Omega.
CHI OMEGA: Would like to welcome
everybody back and wishes everyone a
great spring semester! �The Sisters and
Pledges of Chi Omega.
BIG MONEY! BIG PRIZES Ware Talent
Show coming soon!
BE ON THE LOOKOUT: For information
concerning Ware Talen Show coming
soon. Big money! Big prizes!
DEL: Just wanted you to know. . . you're
1. Ha! Ha! He! He! �Love, Skot.
SAE: Congratulations to all the pledges
who have joined ECU's upcoming frater-
nity. We had a spankin' time Thurs night
Let's get together again soon. �Love the
sisters and pledges of AOPi.
AOPI'S. 5 days left till AOPi rocks
Greenville. Roseball and the Ramada will
never be the same!
PHI TAU BROTHERS: Get ready tonight
to party with your little sisters! We're
looking forward to it! �Love, Theta
Kappa Tau.
CONGRATULATIONS: To the out
standing new sisters of Alpha Phi soror-
ity! We are proud of you all! lulianne
Ridolphi, Rhonda Dale, Tracy Stawarz,
Becky Suarez, Ann Johnson, Amy
Spencer, Amy Lipscomb, Veronica Potter,
Lisa Crawford, Leigh Boggs, Lori Cav
iness, Andrea Worthirtgton, Jeannctte
Voorhies, Star Almasie, Kecia Colon, Jill
Delvero, Melanie Hamilton, Gretchen
Helms, Malinda Highsmith, Kathy
Jablonski, Ellen Joyner, Sarah Kennedy,
Cheryl Kulin, LaDonna McKeel, Michelle
Vassil, Jennifer Zieglcr, Kim Manning,
Cheryl Robinson, Lisa Williams, Manvi
Sepesy, Jill Liles and Stephanie Creasy
TO MY LITTLE SWEET MOMMA'S:
You two will be wonderful sisters of
Alpha Phi. Cheryl, you are the best friend
ever and 1 love you dearly Congratula-
tions Girls �Love your big sister, Bon-
nie.
CHI OMEGA: Would like to tell Angela
Clay, Leigh Ackiss, Amy ONeil, Summer
Hunsucker, Courtney Mauldin, Kathy
Hewitt, Beth Haywood, Michelle Gibb
and Anna Eubanks that we love them
Hang in there girls. �Love sisters of Chi
Omega.
TO ALL FRATERNITY MEN OF ECU:
Chi Omega wishes y'all lots of luck in a
successful Spring Rush. �Love, The Chi-
Os.
ANDREA OVERBY AND RENEE
HOFFMAN: Thanks to you for all the
hard work! We couldn't have done it
without you We love you both! �The
sisters of Alpha Phi.
that we love you! �Love the sisters ot
Alpha Xi Delta
ECU RUGBY CLUB: Begins its Spring
Practice on Jan 31 & Feb. 1 & 2 at 3 30
behind the Allied Health Building AH
Athletes Welcome.
TO THE NEW RHO ZETA SISTERS OF
CHI OMEGA: Congratulations girls, it's
been a long time coming and y'all deserve
it! Cate Bohanon, Robyn Cayton, Ashley
Dagenhart, Madge Duffey, Tina Get good.
Heather Cieraik, Megan Greenwald,
Ashley 1 lendrix, Jenlyn Jones, Jennifer
Higgins, Paula Joseph, Jennifer Kinlaw,
Danielle LaMonica, Jenifer Levine, Tracy
Lewis, Stacie McCarver, Christy O'Brien,
Bridgette Pichot, Angie Proctor, Tracy
Siska, Jenifer Snell, Tracy Stallings and
Colleen Wunner. We love vou! �Love the
Sisters of Chi O.
SUSAN HORNE: Good luck, your sisters
are behind you. We love you. �The Sis-
ters and Pledges of Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS ASHLEY
DAGENHART We love you! �Love,
The Sisters and Pledges of Chi Omega
CHI OMEGA SISTERS. Thanks for
coming out and makn.g n.sh a big suc-
cess. �The Pikes
CAROIINAS REGIONAL CONFER-
ENCE: Will go down in Pika history. We
learned, we led, we took charge. �PIKE
EM.
PIKE LIL' SISTERS: Thanks for
singlehardedly making Thursday night
another historical party. You gave the
new guys a great welcome. �Love, the
Brothers.
TO THE BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA
ALPHA: The Chi Os would like to thank
you for your invitation to help with rush
We saw some good boys going through
Good Luck to your Pledge Class of '89. �
Love The Sisters and Pledges
BETA PSI: The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi
would like to congratulate the new Beta
Psi pledge class: Ted Burgwald, Mark
Wallace, Will Barker, David Chrisman,
Richard Littiken, Dennis Oliver, Rob
OConner, Mark Love, bud McAdam,
Tommy Gottschalk, Geoff Ulrich, Chris
Wall, David Grumpier, John Lock, Lofton
Herring, John Peacock, David Sedor,
Matthew Stein met?, Craig Jackson, and
Chris Eubanks Make the most of it
AZD'S: Thanks for helping us out with
ru-h We had a great time at the party
We'll have to eet together again The
brothers and pledges of Pi Kappa Phi
Special
Speed;
Bonus Diskettes
5 14 "DS DO
$4.95 per bo of 10
Verbatim Diskettes
5 1 r DS DD
$7.95 per box of 10
SDF Professional Computers, Inc.
106 East 5th St Greenville, NC 27834
752-3694
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Downtown Mall) 758-3025
RING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER '89. EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS. FOR
INFO CALL HOLL1E S1MONOWIC11
AT 752-2865
SPRING BREAK: Negril Jamaica,
nights, airfare out of Charlotte Prices start
at $499. Call Tripp for more details758-
9177.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
SISTERS OF ZETA TAU ALPHA Tracy
Tuten, June Barker, April Barbour, Jeni
1 ledrick, Jane 1 luggins, Elizabeth Batson,
Joyce Parkey, Kathenne Price, Elizabeth
Gerard, Suzanne Grace, Lisa Taylor,
Shannon Halsey, Lori Reynolds, Kelli
Houchen. Glad that you are a part of us
now, we are so proud of you. �Zeta Love
THETA CHI: Thank you so much for let-
ting us be a part of your Rush It was fun.
�The sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha.
ALPHA XI DELTA'S It's coming . . the
great Valentine's Dance! Get psyched,
Don't hesitate, Get readv to part and
GRAB YOUR DATE!
PHI KAPPA TAU, SIGMA ALPHA
EPSILON AND TKE, TOO: It was our
pleasure to help each of you! 1 lope your
rush was as successful as could be 'cause
the Alpha Xi Delta's know the rushees
pledged a GREAT fraternity!
PI KAPPA PHI: Your house is a dream, it
really looks great. The social with you was
definitely FIRST RATE! The Men of Pi
Kapp are true as can be they are the perfect
gentlemen, a great fraternity! So thanks
for inviting us to party with you! We had
a blast and hope you did, too! �Love, the
Alpha Xi Delta's.
ALPHA XI DELTA PLEDGES: You
should be counting the days! Closed
weekend is coming�it's not far away!
There'll be a banquet dinner and scrap-
books galore! Those glorious doughnuts
and a few surprises in store. The house
will be crowded and MeMe might fret, but
good memories of this weekend you'll
never forget! Remember the quill and the
gold and double blue, and never forget
SUMMER MINISTRY
OPPORTUNITIES!
�Caswell Baptist Assembly.
Interviews Feb.21.
�Youth Corps. Youth work in
Southern Baptist Churches.
Applications due Feb.3.
Call: Baptist Student Ctr. at
752-4646
for infomation
Wanna have a Great
SPRING BREAK? Spend
8 days and 7 nights in
Sunny Daytona Beach.
$190 for Transportation
and Lodging.
Dall Dave at
758-8001
to insure a seat.
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thro Sat. Uw
Cost Termination to 20 weeks of ;rcgnancv
1-800-433-2930
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to
change leases, and discounts for
February rentals)
�1 .ocated near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756 7815 or 7588436
�AZALEA GARDENS
CLEAN fl( Ql'IFTT one twiiroom furnished apart
merits, cnrri' efficient, free water and sewer.
optional washers, dryers, cable TV. Couples or
s.r.Vs ory $2 1 5 a month. 6 month lease
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
. � : v � ca Apartments and mobile homes
�. Azalea Caidtna new Brook Valley- Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD
IT s OUR BUSINESS
ACCU
� A � - � '� 4S- r.vt :
758-2400
ATTENTION STUDENTS
Americas number one
name in temparary help.
Kelly Services, is now
accepting applications
for employment. If you
have some free time this
semesterm why not earn
so e great cash for that
spring break vacation. Al
variety of assignments
available. Call today for
details.
204 E. Arlington Blvd
Suite E Arlington Center
355-7850
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will b� held every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. in the Culture Center.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
UMBZ
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome Join
us for the uncompromiaed word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
FOOTBALL
Managers needed for varsity football.
Pick up application at office in Minges.
757-6029.
INNERTUBE WATERPQLO
A registration meeting for innertube wa-
terpolo by the intramural-recreational
services department will be held Jan 31 at
5p.m. in Biology N102. Mens and Wom-
ens teams will be formed.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE
It's time to play mat 'Ultimate game
once again. We had a great time and sea-
son last semester and look forward to a
better one this time around! Come join us
t the bottom of College Hill on Sunday's,
'onday's, Wednesday's and Thursday's
3pjn.
LACROSSE CLUB
Anyone interested in playing Lacrosse
this Spring? A mandatory meeting will be
held Jan. 26 at 4 00 p.m. in Rawl 306.
HANG GLIDING
Soar through the sea air at Nags Head,
N.C. with IM-REC services. A hang glia-
ing trip has been scheduled at reduced
rates for April 18. Register Feb. 31 - April
3 in 204 Memorial Gym. Want to know
more? Call Pat Cox at 757-6387.
FITNESS OLYMPICS
Compete for the gold in fitness by taking
part in the 1989 FITNESS OLYMPICS
competition. This one day event has such
activities as a stationary bicycle, relay,
obstacle course, flexibility and strength
endurance tests plus more, more, more.
Register Jan. 30 in 204 Memorial Gym for
the Feb. 2 event in Minges Coliseum. Call
757-6387 for more details.
RUN FOR CANCER
Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed National
Service Fraternity, is sponsoring a 24-
hour Run for Cancer on April 14 and 15
with the American Cancer Society. For
more info call Heather at 758-9550, Bryan
at 756-9665 or Rose Richards at
Greenville's chapter of the American
Cancer Society. Find out about entering a
team or donating moneymaterials. Help
fight the battle against cancer by support-
ing Alpha Phi Omega and the American
Cancer Society in the 24-hour Run for
Cancer. t
WF NFED YOUR EXPERI-
ENCE!
Your achievements in everyday situ-
ations can be useful to others. Earn that
feeling of accomplishment. Real Crisis
Center is recruiting volunteer crisis coun-
selors. We will be offering training classes
in this enriching field beginning Jan. 30.
Call 758-HELP or come by 312 E. 10th St.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
ATTENTION ALL FUTURE ENTREPRE-
NEURS! PBL-FBLA is proud to announce
Josh Rodgers, owner of Pizza Transit
Authority, who will be speaking on Jan. 31
at 5:00 p.m. in room 1013 GCB. Everyone
is invited to come to the meeting.
CCE
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
1 lours. Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677
WATERSKI CLUB
The ECU waterski club will be having its
meetings on Mon. m ?- mcuK-eungsare
scheduled for Joyner Library. All are
welcome to attend. For more info call
Tommy Lewis at 830-0137.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
A three part workshop offered to students
at no cost by the University counseling
Center. Feb. 2,9, and 16 (Thursdays). All
three sessions will be conducted from 3-4
p.m. in M2 Wright Building Asserrive-
ness Training can sharpen your interper
sonal skills and help you target personal
goals. The workshop will focus on helping
members distinguish between their asser
tive, aggressive, and nonasserhve behav-
iors. Participants can learn how to express
themselves directly and openlv, and re-
spond to interpersonal situations in a
manner which neither compromises indi-
vidual beliefs nor offends others. Please
call the Counseling Center (757-6661) for
Registration
RACOUETBALL DOUBLES
A registration meeting for Intramural rac-
quetball doubles teams will be held Feb 7
at 5:00 p.m. in Biology 103. Men's and
women's partners are welcome!
FREE
A free throw contest sponsored bv Intra-
mural-Recreational Services will be nek!
Feb. 9 in Memorial Gym from 3:0C 500
p.m. and in Minges Coliseum from bOO-
10:00 p.m. Winners will receive Intramu-
ral championship t-shirts Register on-site
with your ECU ID.
-



L





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31.1989 7
Announcements
COPING WITH
A free mini-class offered by the ECU
Counseling Center for students: You
can�identify sources of stress, make
positive changes, manage your response
to stressful situations, learn to relax, im-
prove 9elf confidence. Feb. 6, 8, 10 &. 13 in
329 Wright Bldg. from 3-4 p.m. No ad-
vance registration is required. Call or stop
bv the Counseling Center for further info.
(316 Wright Bldg 757-6661).
IMPROV!N G STUDY!SKILLS
earning how to improve your study
skills tor greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help y ou prepare for the added workload
of college i r help to increase your grade
point average. All sessions will be held in
J13 Wright Bldg Feb. 6: Test taking�3-
I ; p m Feb 7: Test taking�3-4:30 p.m.
i ou tv iv attend ai the topic sessions or
choose the ones where you need the most
Improvement.
KWAKING CLUB
The
Kayaking Club will meet tonight at
U you tune ever been interested in
white water adventure or flat water canoe
trips come down to Memorial Gvm to-
� at 8 30. Time will be spent learning
the basic skills of Kayaking and boat han-
dling Pool fee is only $1.00. Come one,
COMEDIANS
Its � , o early to prepare a 3-minute
com .iv routine for the U.S. College
C omedy Competition on Feb. 7, 8:00 pra,
Mender.hall rm. 244. For more info call
757 rHl Fxt. 271
FINANCIAL AID ORIENTA-
TION
marion and applications for 1989-90!
Feb c, 4:00 p m , 1 iendnx Theatre- MSC.
RAFFLE
The ECU Gospel Choir will be having a
raffle an 30-Feb. 3 in front of Student
Store First prize: 7-inch herringbone "I
LOV E i v )U bracelet from Saslow's Jew-
elry. Second prize: jumbo decorated
co kie bi Cookie Co Carolina East
Mai; rhird prize: floral arrangement
from Julians. Tickets are .50 cent. Drawing
Teb. 3 at 3 p.m. at Student Store.
SOPHOMORES AND
Farn over $600.00 this summer Earn
$100.00 a month during your last two
ears Uege Become a part of the
YTC Depl here at ECU. Attend
rui er offi er leadership course at
v I- i ntucky Info, meeting will
� Pel 500 hours in room 339
I � not too lute tor you to �:arn a
ssi n prior to graduation. For more
� rttact Capt Steve L. Jones, Raw)
"s44, 7-( 974
FITNESS OLYMPICS
:
the
For
.
All faculty, staff and students should sign-
r Intramural Fitness Olympics. Jan.
I in 20-4 Memorial Gvm, 4-6 men. women
�t
a
participants per team. Eight
w a k) and wild fitness events will be on
hand with awards presented to all final-
ists C ill " 7 6387 for additional info.
ADVANCED LIFE-SAVING
B E -CERTIFICATION
wt
naJ (.
n d crash course for persons inter-
paining advanced life saving re-
ion will be held Jan. 28-29 from
p m. Register in 204,Memo-
, or contact Kathleen 1 lill at 757-
ILLUMINA
The Ultimate Chance for all students to
show their artistic talents! The Spring art
competition will be accepting entries Feb.
15-17 from 3-5 p m in rm. 221 Menden-
hall. Fntrv fee is S3.00entry and each
person mav submit 3 pieces. First place
$175.00, 2nd place $125.00, 3rd place
$75.00 and 5 honorable mentions of
525 00. The Illumina reception will be Feb.
20, 7-9 p m. m Mendenhall Gallery. Unse-
lected pieces must be picked up by Feb. 19
or no later than Feb. 20 by 3 p.m. due to
lack of storage
GAMMA BETA PHI
A regular meeting of Gamma Beta Fhi will
I today in Jenkins Auditorium. All
members should be in attendance.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Fta Sigma will hold their first meeting
4 tt semester oday at 5:15 p.m. in 212
Mendenhall Dr. David Sanders, Phi Eta
Sigma's advisor will talk about the ECU
1 ionors Program Please try to attend.
LIRTJV A CHOVIA
All graduate and undergraduate business
students are invited to a presentation by
First Wachovia. This presentation will
discuss career opportunities relating to
info systems, mgmt. science and
operations mgmt used by First Wachovia
in the banking industry. The meeting is
scheduled for 3:00 p m. Feb 1 in GCB
I 28 This meeting will be sponsored by
the Decision Science Society and all new
or prospective members are welcome.
MINmLTY-SIliPENT QRG.
The Minority Student Org. will meet Feb.
2at6O0pminSpeight 129 Allareinvited
and encouraged to attend
PimcjPAKIiJ�ET2ED
Participants for asthma research study.
Males age 18-45, with mild to moderate
asthma Compensation available. Please
caU 551-3159.
CAMEHCUSAPE FQR
CME1SI
Looking for fellowship, fun and having
God's word' You are welcome to attend
'Prime Time held, at Rawl in rm 130�
every Thurs. at 7.30 p.m. Refreshments
served.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
The Pirates are back at Minges on Feb. 4th
against powerful Richmond. Tipoff will
be at 7:30. There will be a pom pom give-
away prior to the game as well as the
1 londa shootout and Pure Gold Dancers
at half time. Come out and join the fun and
support Pirate athletics.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
The Pirates, under the direction of Coach
Mike Steele, return to action Feb. 1st
against William & Mar v. Tipoff time is set
for 7:30. At halftime there will be the
1 londa shootout and a performance by the
Pure Gold Dancers
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi will have its Spring Sroker
Jan. 31st at 6:30 in Biology rm. 103. We
invite all "nose who meet the require-
ments stated in the invitation to join us.
Refreshments will be served. Come out
and find out what we are aH about.
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
The next (EC)2 meeting will be held Feb 1
at 4:00 in Speight 308. Career planning
will be the topic. Learn mor about your
future in education bv gaining info, about
resumes, interviews, etc. Join us!
RUGBY CLUB
ECU Rugby Club begins its spring prac-
bceonjan 31,andFcb 1 &2at3:30behind
the Allied I lealth Bldg. For more info call
758-5893. All Athletes Welcome!
P,F. MAJQRSCLLIB
Wanted AH PE Majors or intended ma-
jors to attend our meeting. PE Majors
meeting Feb 2 at 8:00 p m. in rm. 142
Minges Please attend�we need your sup-
porj No Dues�Just Fun.
WESFEl
Come to the Methodist Student Center
this Wed. night at 5 p m. and every Wed.
night for a delicious, all-you-can-eat
home cooked meal with a short program
afterwards. This week "Up Golden
Creek a tilmstnp about growing popu-
lation of elderly, the problems they are
facing, and how we can respond. The meal
is S2, SI.50 tor members Sponsored by
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministries.
INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE
Interested in spending this summer in
remote parts of the world? The Overseas
Development Network (ODN) is spon-
soring internships for students and recent
graduates in the Philippines, India, Bang-
ladesh, Nicaragua, Bolivia, Belize, and
our own Appalachian mountains. Any
major can apply Length of stav varies
from 3-6 months. For more info contact
Marianne Exum (h) 830-9450 & (w) 757-
6271. 1 lurrv! Applications Deadline;�
Feb 15.
ODN
Overseas Development Network will be
meeting in 247 MSC at 5 p.m. Feb 2. All
members and people interested in help-
ing third world countries please come! For
more info call Tonya Batizv hm. 830-8888
wk. 757-6611 ext. 221.
PSI CHI
If you are interested in a career in the field
of psychology, you owe it to yourself to
become a member of Psi Chi � the na-
tional bone- sodeiy in Psyc. Prospective
members muy pick up applications in
Rawl 134 and have them completed and
returned by Feb. 3. To apply cummulative
GPA for graduat i students and seniors 3.2
juniors 3.0 and sophomores 2.8. Prospec-
tive members must have completed 9
hours in Psyc with a "B" avg. or better.
NAVIGATORS
"Right 730 the weekly get-together of
the Navigators, continues its streak of
good bible study every Thursday, 7:30
p.m. in Bio. Bldg B-103 The meeting is
designed to help you develop a closer
walk with God. Refreshments served No
ticket required; just reserve your time
Thursdays, 7:30 to 9 p.m
SLAM DUNK CONTEST
Registration for the annual Intramural
slam dunk contest will be held Feb. 14 at
5 00 p.m. in BIO N-102. Women as well as
men are invited to sign up. The goal will
be adjusted for women participants. Mi
chael and Michelle Jordans should attend
WEIGHT LIFTING CONTEST
Muscle and muscleloss bound men and
women should attend the Intramural
registration meeting for the annual
weight lifting contest Feb. 20 at 5:00 p.m
in GCB 1026
HELP YOUR PEERS
The Dept. of Intramural-Recreational
Services is looking for Adapted Recrea
tionPeer Helpers. These individuals will
assist handicapped individuals across
campus take part in recreational activity
Be a BIG HELP this semester. Contact
Kathleen Hill at 757-6387 for additional
info.
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Dept. of Speech-Language & Audi-
tory Pathology (SLAP) will be providing
the speech and hearing screening for ah
students eligible for admission to the
Upper Division of Teacher Education on
Jan. 23,24 and 25. The Dept. will be testing
from 5:00 to 6:30 each da v. NO APPOINT-
MENT IS NEEDED (first come basis) The
SLAP Dept. is located in Belk Annex on
Charles St.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Hey you guys! Come join the fun on the
Student Union Travel Committee's cruise
to the BAHAMAS over Spring Break
There will be dancing, swimming relax-
ing and tons of other things to do aboard
ship. All transportation and "all you can
eat" on the Carnival ship The ship will
dock at Freeport and Nassau, so come on
and shop until you drop in the world's
biggest marketplace!
EDUCATION MATORS
It's not too late to submit your application
for the work study trip to Pueblo, Mexico
for Spring Break (March 4-12). If you're
concerned about the expense - don't be
Fund raising efforts will be a group en-
deavor. What a great opportunity to
travel while sharing your talents and
skills in a local school. Applications are
available in R-l 54, Speight. For more info ,
contact Marianne Exum at (w) 757-6271 or
(h) 830-9450.
rmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
CQ-QP EPUCATlQjSj,
Interested in a summer job with a resort,
camp, or recreational facility? Feb Mth,
ECU will host over 50 agencies looking for
summer employees Come by or call Co-
op Ed. for more info, on your career op-
portunities, 757-6979, GCB 2028.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Any student that ordered a new Student
Review should come be the Buccaneer
office and pick one up We are located in
front of Jovner Library on the second floor
of the publications building.
CHINATOWN
EXPRESS
�Two Entrees
�One Eggroll
�Fortune Cookie
FREE DRINK
with purchase of Luncheon or
Dinner combo special.
(12 02. soft drink or tea)
Lunch Special
11:30am -4:00pm
$2.95
Dinner Combo Special
�Fried Rice 4:00pm - Close
�Soup $339
Free Delivery
Mon. - Fri.
4:30-9:00pm
(coupon not valid on Delivery)
inoz l.t
CRUISE THE BAHAMAS WITH THE
CARNIVAL CRUISE LINES DURING
SPRING BREAK
(DEADLINE to sign up is right around THE CORNER.)
PRICE PER PERSON: $499.00 (quad)
$525.00 (Non-ECU students)
(All transportation included as well as meals on the ship!)
�Be treated like royalty
�Eat exquisite meals
�Get a head start on your tan
SPONSORED BY
THE STUDENT UNION TRAVEL COMMITTEE.
For more Information contact the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall
Student Center,
Phone 757-6611
iwamMwu
i nir rn win. �
rV
If you're thinking of going somewhere fun for Spring BreakYOU'RE LATE!
Get off your hindparts and get down to ITG Travel at the Piaza! Oh Yeah! Bring your
Waqllet. Air Tickets, Amtrak Packages, and Cruises are in limited quantity.
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r� SUPER AIRFARE SPECIALS �i
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BUFFALO$198HOUSTON$258
ATLANTA$188SEATTLE$358
ORLANDO$200CLEVELAND$168
CHICAGO$223ST. LOUIS$218
CHARLOTTE$78PHOENIX$318
WASH, DC.$168DENVER$278
DALLAS$258BOSTON$221
MIAMI$220NASHVILLE$198
"LAD Th�� tares �ir� subject to cfi�no�S�al ere limited '� day advancerese-wftfiont are
THE. required Pnc�s o�sd on o" peak travel Tr�v�i on oti' ds s'igMly higher Fvtt �w�
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Check out our low airfares and vacation packages
to the surf and sand, or the ice and snow, and ev-
erywhere in between. Call ITG and Save.
i� SPECIAL VACATION PACKAGES
LAS VEGAS
1 Nights With Air.
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298
770
from
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239
PARIS
6 Nights With Air, Hotel
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THE
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ranee reservations art required Prices ��� subtext lo change Walee are higher dunng
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when 2 tiavet together
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TRAVEL CENTER
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MONDAY-FRIDAY 9.00 A.M5.00 PM.





y
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JANUARY 31.19? Page 8
'Pirates' shines in Wright
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Stiff Writer
Last night, The New York
Gilbert and Sullivan Players pre-
sented "The Pirates of Penzance
The impeccable performance
took place in Wright auditorium
at 8 pm.
This well-known musical,
presented many times in theatres
as well as in cinema, keeps audi-
ences returning to sec it several
times. Each performance oi "The
Pirates oi Penzance" is essentially
original, since each different per-
former, director, choreographer,
and theater technician asserts a
unique interpretation.
The skill of the performers,
both singers and musicians, was
evident in their polished execu-
tion. The talented voices of The
Pirate King (Del-Bouree Bach)
and Mabel (Colby Thomas) were
particularly outstanding�their
tone and dexterity won them
many rounds of well-deserved
applause.
Furthermore, the choregra-
phy involved every character on
the stage in some action. Al-
though some may consider move-
ment by non-essential characters
a distraction, it helps the normally
two-dimensional characters take
on a distinct personality.
The work of the stage techni-
cians, too, is not to be forgotten:
The two sets are well designed,
using stairs and platforms to give
the performance height as well as
depth and width. The lighting,
too, was appropriate. The first
act, which takes place on a sunny
beach, is flooded with red and
yellow light; and the second act
which takes place in a gloomy
Gothic ruins, is palely lit in sub-
dued blue.
Perhaps the only thing that
lacked professional luster was the
quality of the acting: many of the
unsung lines were delivered flatly
and without emotion. Of course,
it was a musical, not a play, and
the performers were musicians,
not actors. Still, a bit of brushing-
up on acting techniques would
greatly enhance the quality of the
performance.
Surelv, anyone who missed
last night's performance can see
"The Pirates of Penzance" at an-
other time, but this particular per-
formance, which far outshines
many others, has come and gone.
The cast of one of the country's premiere touring repertory emsembles of Gilbert and S
van plays poses for a picture.
nlli-
Greenville garners a Greek
By KAREN MANN
Stjff Writer
Members of the touring cast of Gilbert and Sullivan's famed
musical, "The Pirates of Penzance
"We wanted to open late
nights because there's really
nowhere around here to get food
that late says Omar Chahid.
"Also, if you live in the dorms and
don't have a car, you can't walk
very far
It was a similar situation
which convinced Omar to open
his new Greek restaurant, Omar's
Express, in Greenville. Since 1982
Omar was a partner in Hector's
Greek restaurant in Chapel Hill.
While visiting his wife Sheila's
familv in Greenville one week-
end, he became aware of
downtown's- lack of late-night
dininc.
"I�couldn't u mm it wb.cn I
'came here dwririfpflN-day. I
thought 'doesn't anyone live
here?' but he laughs, "It's much
different at night
Finding no relief for the old
"after downtown munchies
Omar decided to trv his luck in
Greenville with the experience he
gained at Hector's.
"It's really hard to deal with
new people at first he says, "But
there are a lot of nice people here.
No one tries to steal anything. At
Hectors we had to check every
night to see if the napkin holders
were still there
"Every weekend we'd have
fights he adds. His cousin and
assistant, Ali Chahid, laughs in
agreement. "We don't care if you
dance, bring a tape and we'll play
it for you
Omar's wide variety of sand-
wiches includes Greek favorites
such as gyros, souvlaki and Greek
grilled cheese, as well as such
standard American fare as hot
dogs, barbegue and a 5-star beer
selection. Qbcof hisoio&t popular
culinary cflfcktions, though, is fhe
cheeseburger on a pita.
"I fixed myself one at
Hector's one night, just to see
what it would be like. I liked it so
much I thought, 'maybe 1 should
put this on the menu
Sterners fix a fountain
DEW ART, Pa. (AP) �Young
women dressed in white � doilv
caps, skirts, blouses and aprons�
arc abiistle behind the marble
soda fountain.
A few yards away, George
Sterner sells some countrv-
J
smoked ham. Wood floors creak
to the rhvthm of browsers' feet.
Bolts of doth, nuts and bolts,
tufted animals, candy, groceries,
clothes � all displayed on about
3,000 square feet � are part of a
going concern run by Sterner, 70,
and his wife, Charlotte, 68.
The couple seems to thrive on
it, and Sterner's General Store,
age about 133, is doing well, too,
thanks.
Several years ago, the Stern-
ers decided to restore the
operation, as much as possible, to
the way it looked at the turn of the
century. They now seem some-
what surprised at their success.
There was no conscious deci-
sion to attract tourists, Charlotte
Sterner says. "George and I like
antiques; we like old things; we
have a strong feeling for the past
But the Sterners discovered
that old is in, even among those
too young to remember a real
country general store.
Twenty years ago, the store's
customers lived within 10 miles of
Dewart, located in northern Leba-
non County, just as they have
since it opened. In one recent
month, however, the Sterners'
guest book listed visitors from all
over Pennsylvania, 20 other states
and two foreign countries.
"By and large, almost every-
one who comes in is so apprecia-
tive and so surprised that this is
not one of those � what I would
call tourist traps Charlotte
Sterner says.
With customary country reti-
cence, she won't say just how
good business is. "We're holding
our own; we keep paddling
hard
The Sterners have managed
to attract tourists while maintain-
ing their regular customers. Items
such as bananas, breakfast cereal,
work clothes and thermal under-
wear attest to that.
"I don't like to think of it as
touristy she says, when asked
about some of the other items.
Tourist merchandise, she says,
consists of "gimmicks which, af-
ter you take them home, you find
you have no use for
"I prefer to call it country
merchandise
Tourists hear of the store by
word of mouth, advertising or
mention in a state tourism bro-
chure.
George Sterner's great-uncle
bought the place in 1873. His
grandfather and father took turns
See COUPLE, page 9
As it turned out, the chees
burger on pita became a favorite
of UNC basketball standout Jeff
Lebo. Lebo frequented Hector's
often, along with .R. Reid (a steak
and cheese fan), ames Worthy,
and Michael Jordan. SamTerkins,
says Omar, would visit the restau-
rant whenever he returned to
Chapel 1 ill. "It would be nice if he
could visit here he smiles.
Future menu additions arc
also in the works. Baklava, slush
ka bob and Greek salad will be
introduced in the near future.
According to Omar, a re.il Greek
salad consists oi seven different
kinds of vegetables and includes
fetta cheese, olives, and ancho-
vies.
Omar alsohooes to begin
-Hervmg ' v v�eW y . jm � i n rVwpjy
ual pi7rs on c� kcl pita bft.iff
The result would be an inexpen
sive and exotic version oi the per
son.il pizza.
"Not only will this be the
cheapest pizza in town sav:
Omar, "but the pita bread will
DMHRb
make it k - t'att ning
Omar's unique cooking sr !e
evolved from a variety of cultui
of French and Moroccan descent,
he lived in Casablanca until mov-
ing to France at age 14. lbs
mother, he says, loved to c � �
French, Morroccan and Spai
cuisme later, while studying art
in Grenoble, he found work in a
re taurant as a plate designer.
His job was to arrange the
meal to be artistic as well as appe
tizing. Omar eventually moved to
America and studied in lev.
land before transferring to UN
Working at Hector's gave him a
new cultural perspective on cui
sine.
' 1 like to try different thing
ho says. "I use seasonings from
mamy htiqrmt owHun.�? and 'Vk
customers love it. If not HI fakn it
off the menu
In Omar's opinion, the ms
tomer definitely comes first and
he takes issue with theimper onal
attitude of fast food res' mrants
See EXPR1 SS, page 9
Omar's Express, the newest downtown restaurant, boasts a five-star beer selection and late
hours (Photo by J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photolab).
Sheena Easton recounts recording history
(AP) � Sheena Easton came
to America from Scotland in 1981,
singing uptempo pop. "Since
1982, '83, my career has been
dance-pop, and the new album is
dance-pop she says. "It wasn't
that far a step from doing
uptempo to doing more dance-
able pop
The new album she refers to is
'The Lover in Me her first for
MCA Records. It was No. 82 and
climbing the best-selling pop
chart on Jan. 28. The first single,
the title song, was No. 16 and
climbing the best-selling singles
chart.
It's her first album in America
in three years. Easton cut "No
Sound But a Heart" for EMI
America, which became EMI-
Manhattan. In the shuffle, the
album wasn't released and she
couldn't record for a year. "EMI
still owns it she says. "I'm not
legally allowed to go into details
She has been heard from,
though. Prince's 1987 hit, "U Got
the Look was a duet with Eas-
ton. She did commercials for a
health spa and was on five high-
profile episodes of "Miami Vice
as the bride of Don Johnson.
Her first single, "Morning
Train was a hit in 1980. The next
year, she sang "For Your Eyes
Only" in a James Bond film.
"Since 'Telephone' was a No. 1
dance single in 1983 she says, "I
followed it with 'Struf and 'Sugar
Walls
"But my singing now has 100
more times a rhythm 'n' blues
overtone radio stations
The single is No. 4 on the Jan.
28 rhythm 'n' blues chart, while
the album is No. 29, r and b.
Easton met Prince in 1985. He
produced "101" and co-produced
"Cool Love" on "The Lover in
Me
She says, "In 1984, when I was
recording the album that had
'Struf on it, I sent a message to
Prince through an engineer work-
ing for us both to say I was a major
fan and I would love to record one
of his songs
'Two days later he sent me
the tape of 'Sugar Walls He'd just
written it for me. We met for the
first time in the studio when he
produced it. We've written to-
gether some, if we come up with
an idea. I write with a few people.
Mainly, I write lyrics on my own
and decide who I want to write
the melody to it
Easton, who has been di-
vorced twice, has lived in Los
Angeles since 1982. Easton was
the name of her first husband.
She attended the Royal Scot-
tish Academy of Music and
Drama. She says: "It taught me
how to be a drama student pretty
well. It didn't teach me how to
act
"For the past few years I've
been looking at scripts and talk-
ing about acting. Much to the
chagrin of my film agent, I've
never had the time to commit to
any project. I tour six months.
Recording can take nine months.
Then I make videos, do press and
tour again
But, during Easton's time out
from recording, her agent discov-
ered that "Miami Vice" was look-
ing for an actress to play
Johnson's bride. Easton says:
"The timing worked out well. It
meant immediate filming. It was
a short commitment. The role was
small enough that I could cope
with it and large enough to get
attention. I went along and audi-
tioned and got it and did it
She auditioned opposite
Johnson. "He was very active in
the selection for this role she
says. The series' first choice was
Lorraine Bracco, but she got the
flu and Easton was summoned.
She says: "I've been singing
with an American accent since I
was 10 and 1 was prepared to talk
with an American accent. The
producers of the show liked the
idea of the character being Euro-
pean. She had to be different to
make this hard-bitten cop fall
over and want.to marry her
She wasn't given the wed-
ding dress, Easton says What
would I do with it? Wear it to
parties? They have a memorabilia
collection they put on displa in
diffcrentcihes. There was talk m it
going in there. They bought the
wardrobe, but I chose it
Easton says that audience
response was so good she was
asked to stav on the show. ' I Wi1s
in preproduction for this album
and I didn't want to be a regular
on a TV show. Finallv, I agreed to
come down for two davs to film a
death scene. Somebodv was ret
ting at Don's character so mcv
shot me in the back. You saw the
person take aim and me collapse
in Don's arms h
She was impressed wuh
Johnson. "If d be 4 in the morning
See SHEENA, page 9





!
MSI I A- . ' UN I AN
JANUARY 3LJS82 S
Golden Dragons give
Wright a tumble
i � l Vew! Hi rv in
Chinese Golden Dragon Acrobats and Magicians of Tapei
perform many traditional acts of balance and skill Friday
it in Wright Auditorium.
The Chinese Golden Dragon
Acrobats and Magicians of Taipei,
Taiwan's leading troupe of jug-
glers, tumblers, magicians, come-
dians and dancers, will perform
in Wright Auditorium Thursday
at 8 p.m.
Tickets, on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, are $8 each for the
general public anil $4 tor students
and youth. Telephone ticket or-
ders may be charged to major
credit cards.
The troupe, featuring the
Family (hang, has presented its
displays o( balance and skill
throughput the IS. in recent
years, including performances at
the Kennedy (enter in Washing
ton, D.C. and at various college
campuses.
The Chinese Acrobats are
part of a lone, tradition dating
back to 300 B.C. During the Han
Dynasty (206 B.C-220 AD.)
acrobats flourished and became
high court entertainment. Taint
ings, reliefs and tomb figurines (it
the period depict a wide variety of
acrobatic entertainment stilt
and tight-rope dancing, hand-
stands, pole balancing, jumping
through rings surrounded by
swords and plate twirling.
In modern times, the Chang
family is among the best-known
heirs of this tradition. I.ien-Chi
Chang, father of the company
director, heads the Taiwanese
National School of Acrobats in
Taipei, a government-sponsored
school. Selected students begin
training at the age of eight, study-
ing acrobatics for four hours a
day.
Among the companv's most
popular tricks are handstands
from the top of tall stacks of pre-
cariously-balanced chairs. Other
balancing feats incorporate jug-
gling and tumbling, interlaced
with magic, Rung Fu and tradi-
tional Oriental dance. One
acrobat thrilled a Michigan audi-
ence last winter by riding about
the stage on a unicycle while bal-
ancing a dagger point down �
on his mouth.
The Chinese Acrobats' ECU
performance is sponsored bv the
EC U Student Union Minority
Arts Committee.
Hair Connection is your
hairweaving center.
Hair connection will take
you from short to long
and thin to thick.
What Mother Nature didn't
give you. Hair Connection will!
Call Lila at 355 4963 or 355 0152
Shampoo, Blow dry, & Curl $12.00 Tues & Wed.
Relaxers $29.95
Curls $39.95
Haircuts S 8.95
Leisure Curl, Hawaiian Silk, Wave Nouveau Indian Silk, Optimum.
and many more!
Open Mon. Sat.
INTRODUCING:
f i
ouple restores fountain as a labor of love
itinued from page 8
. ere also postmasters tor
)ld mail boxes in the
st to that. George Sterner
1 as postmaster several
and the post office was
I down the street.
latest addition to the
is a soda fountain and ice
: irlor.
ias created more activity
ire than anything we've
� � � savs Sterner,
r his wife, it was a labor of
started, she says, when a
: told her that an old soda
� iin was stored, dismantled,
- m in the area.
Sterners bought thefoun-
and had it restored. They
i some old ice cream parlor
Mhs and had them copied.
hack bar came from an
ilei in Philadelphia,
d tin ceiling from a
Sheena E.
may act
ntinued from page 8
1 been working 20 hours.
uld crack jokes with the
le went out of his way to
me look good and feel
�� ible. If I was a few inches
mark he would adjust his
� io that the camera could
instead of veiling, This
� her mark I appreciated
Someone in his position
ive to do that
singer got acting offers
� but turned them down,
-a iththealbum. "If the
i ng came along, I'd have
if I could adjust my sched-
,tvs. "I'm continuing to
� � r supporting roles in good
ts rather than leading roles
" projects. I'm not in it to make
� ,t bu k. I'm in it to learn the
� ii ting and hopefully, in 10
rs, I'll have learned enough to
: �ing major roles
I don't foresee leaving re
, "here's no reason to
ton has sung and made
es tor ecology causes and
k gainstDrugs. "Justthink-
I u k 10 years she says,
le used to say sex, drugs
: rock in one breath. Drugs
rei onsideredahiprock'n' roll
� go Now rockers are run
I miles a dav and keeping
rugs are frowned on When
make something socially
eptable, people do it less
Omar's Express
Don't leave
home without it
Continued from page 8
Who's going to talk to you
�nd bo friendly at those places?
one wants to take the time;
the) think'Oh, this is just another
istomer
"You don't have to buy any-
,l mg to come to Omar's Express,
this place is for everyone
school in McEwensville. Other
items, including an ice cream
parlor light, were donated.
Charlotte Sterner has fond
memories of her grandfather tak-
ing her to the soda fountain when
she was 3 years old. During her
high school years, the fountain
was the place for friends to gather
after a movie or school event.
And as our daughters grew
up, I thought, 'What a shame that
there isn't that opportunity for
young people to do that sort of
thing now They seem to be at
such loose ends Mrs. Sterner
says.
So she created the kind of
fountain she remembers. Egg
creams, phosphates and other
fountain treats are featured.
The fountain doesn't attract
much of a high school crowd, but
M rs. Sterner savs she revels in the
delight of young children and the
old, who sometimes sing to the
tunes of the player piano.
Wednesday - LADIES NIGHT
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- Ladies FREE
Thursday - MARGARITAVILLE PARTY!
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4-
rwtewwi
W'W'I
-Trr

1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,
C
,
1


Golden Dragons give
Wright a tumble
ECUNmmIm
The Chinese Golden Dragon Acrobats and Magicians of Tapei
will perform many traditional acts of balance and skill Friday
night in Wright Auditorium.
The Chinese Golden Dragon
Acrobats and Magicians of Taipei,
Taiwan's leading troupe of jug-
glers, tumblers, magicians, come-
dians and dancers, willperform
in Wright Auditorium Thursday
at 8 p.m.
Tickets, on sale at the Central
Ticket Office, are $8 each for the
general public and $4 for students
and youth. Telephone ticket or-
ders may be charged to major
credit cards.
The troupe, featuring the
Family Chang, has presented its
displays of balance and skill
throughout the US. in recent
years, including performances at
the Kennedy Center in Washing-
ton, D.C. and at various college
campuses.
The Chinese Acrobats are
part of a long tradition dating
back to 300 B.C. During the Han
Dynasty (206 B.C-220 A.D.)
acrobats flourished and became
high court entertainment. Paint-
ings, reliefs and tomb figurines of
the period depict a wide variety of
acrobatic entertainment � stilt
and tight-rope dancing, hand-
stands, pole balancing, jumping
through rings surrounded by
swords and plate twirling.
In modern times, the Chang
family is among the best-known
heirs of this tradition. Lien-Chi
Chang, father of the company
director, heads the Taiwanese
National School of Acrobats in
Taipei, a government-sponsored
school. Selected students begin
training at the age of eight, study-
ing acrobatics for four hours a
day.
Among the company's most
popular tricks are handstands
from the top of tall stacks of pre-
cariously-balanced chairs. Other
balancing feats incorporate jug-
gling and tumbling, interlaced
with magic, Kung Fu and tradi-
tional Oriental dance. One
acrobat thrilled a Michigan audi-
ence last winter by riding about
the stage on a unicycle while bal-
ancing a dagger�point down�
on his mouth.
The Chinese Acrobats' ECU
performance is sponsored by the
ECU Student Union Minority
Arts Committee.
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What Mother Nature didn't
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INTRODUCING:
Couple restores fountain as a labor of love
Continued from page 8
running it.
All were also postmasters for
Dewart. Old mail boxes in the
;est to that. George
several
school in McEwensville. Other
items, including an ice cream
parlor light, were donated.
Charlotte Sterner has fond
. memories of her grandfather tak-
store attest to that. George Sterner . hef the J fo when
ret.red as Postmaster several � wag 5 M her
years ago, and tiie post office was Wgh J � fou&tam
moved down the street. wa the place for friends to gather
The latest addition to the r �
store is a soda fountain and ice
cream parlor.
"It has created more activity
in the store than anything we've
ever done says Sterner.
For his wife, it was a labor of
love. It started, she says, when a
friend told her that an old soda
fountain was stored, dismantled,
on a farm in the area.
The Sterners bought the foun-
tain and had it restored. They
found some old ice cream parlor
booths and had them copied.
The back bar came from an
antiques'dealer in Philadelphia,
the molded tin ceiling from a
Egg
other
fountain treats are featured.
The fountain doesn't attract
fountain she remembers
creams, phosphates and
after a movie or school event
"And as our daughters grew
up, I thought, 'What a shame that
there isn't that opportunity for
young people to do that sort of much of a high school crowd, but
thing now They seem to be at M Sterner says she revels in the
such loose ends Mrs. Sterner delight of young children and the
says. old, who sometimes sing to the
So she created the kind of tunes of the player piano.
Wednesday - LADIES NIGHT
- $2.00 Ice Teas!
- Ladies FREE
Thursday - MARGARITAVILLE PARTY!
- LADIES FREE!
- $2.00 MARGARITAS!
TRY THE RAFTERS CHERRY BOMB!
Sheena E.
may act
Continued from page 8
and we'd been working 20 hours.
He would crack jokes with the
crew. He went out of his way to
make me look good and feel
comfortable. If I was a few inches
off my mark he would adjust his
position so that the camera could
get me, instead of yelling. This
girl is off her mark I appreciated
that. Someone in his position
doesn't have to do that
The singer got acting offers
after that but turned them down,
continuing with the album. If the
perfect thing came along, I'd have
to see if I could adjust my sched-
ule' she says. "I'm continuing to
look for supporting roles in good
projects rather than leading roles
in B' projects. I'm not in it to make
a fast buck. I'm in it to learn the
craft of acting and hopefully, in 10
years, I'll have learned enough to
merit doing major roles
"I don't foresee leaving re-
cording. There's no reason to
Easton has sung and made
speeches for ecology causes and
Rock Against Drugs- "Just think-
ing back 10 years she says,
"people used to say sex, drugs
and rock in one breath. Drugs
were considered a hip rock 'n' roll
way to go. Now rockers are run-
ning 10 miles a day and keeping
fit. Drugs are frowned on. Who
you make somethine socially
unacceptable, people do it less
Omar's Express
Don't leave
home without it
Continued from page 8
"Who's going to talk to you
and be friendly at thoee places?
I No one wants to take the time;
i they think XX, this if just another
(customer
I "Yon don't have to boy any-
I thing to come to Oner's Express,
pis place is for everyone
Foixr Original Voices. Four Brilliant Releases
TANITATIKARAM
ancient heart
TANITATIKARAM
Ancient HqcbTi
This 19-year-olcTs astonish-
ing first album has already
gone gold in her native UJC
Mystical. Soulful. And, ulti-
mately beyond categorization.
OtAPE llCD
fjejytf mum jw
One of the new artist break-
throughs of the year! Jazzy,
folky, moody, always distinc-
tive. The debut from a band to
watch. Includes "What I Am
Otape IZcd
Edie Bricked
& New Bohemians
Shooting Rubberbands
At The Stars
JULIA FORDHAM
Last year, she wowed Britain;
now she's racking up raves
here. A stunning debut filled
with original sounds and
musical ideas � catchy, too.
Otape IZcd
She caught pop ears on Erik
B. & Hakim's "Paid In FulL"
Now this Israeli superstar
puts an exotic touch on a
striking set of ballads and
dance cuts.
6&11&
On Sale Through February 16th.
The PiajLa � Carolina tost Moll
J





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,1989
Cajun cooking on the rise
ST. MARTINVILLE, La. (AP)
� Hunched over his accordion in
the shade of a live oak tree, Lennis
Romero was letting his ethnic
pride show.
"Cher, it don't surprise me
one tarn bit that Cajun food is a
big, yeah, in London, Holland and
Russia he says. "The rest of the
world just been a 'ti slow in catch-
ing up with the good things in
life
Lenni s and his brother, Ophe,
a virtuoso on the 'ti fer, or triangle,
had just stomped out "Jam-
balaya" for some "foreign
French" tourists who arrived on
the banks of Bayou Teche in a bus
marked "un voyage au vrai pays
des Acadiens a trip to the real
Cajun country.
Me oh, my oh, Cajun culture
has busted out of the bayou and
gone global. Suddenly last sum-
mer, crawfish etouffee and file
gumbo were on the menu at the
summit in Moscow.
Amsterdam's hottest new restau-
rant is Riekje Sluizer's Cajun
Louisiana Kitchen, "geopend
voor lunch London has two
Cajun-style restaurants and lib-
eral doses of sauce piquant are
spicing up traditionally bland
British cuisine at such posh nosh-
eries as Wilton's and the Savov
Grill.
Now busloads of European
tourists, led by the French, are
venturing deep into the bayous
where before World War II paved
roads seldom penetrated.
don't know if that blackened Black cooks on the plantations
menu special is the chef's favorite added another dimension, like
or his latest failure laughs Joe okra and gumbo, both African
Cahn, who presides over the New
Orleans School of Cooking.
Cajun cooking has been
around since the earliest exiles
from Nova Scotia found love at
words. Creole culture was cava-
lier, gallant, refined; its cuisine
elegant, subtle, rich in sauces.
Cajuns, a corruption of
"archadia the name given to
first bite of alligator tail meat, but Canada's maritime provinces by
its delights took a while catching the explorer Verrazano on first
on beyond the swamps of the sighting their virgin forests, were
Atchafalaya. victims of one of this continent's
When Fannie Merritt Farmer worst human rights atrocities,
collected America's best recipes Originally from Normandy,
for her Boston Cooking School Brittany and Picardy, they were
cookbook in 18, the word Cajun deported from Nova Scotia,
didn't make the index. which France lost to England in
Even today, Antoine's in the War of Spanish Succession.
New Orleans, founded in 1840, The year of Le Grand Derange-
doesn't mention the word Cajun ment was 1755, and D-day was
in its extensive menu, although Sept. 5, when entire villages were
"Creole" has a half-dozen listings summoned to their churches to
from "gombo (sic) Creole" to hear King George II's proclama-
"Poulet a la Creole Bernard tion confiscating their land,
Guste, the great-great-grandson homesand cattle and exiling them
of founder Antoine Alciatore, along the Atlantic seaboard. Sol-
admits however to being "a bit diers hurried them down to the
more heavy-handed with the waiting boats, sometimes sepa-
pepper pot to please tourists who rating husbands from wives, par-
ents from children and parting
lovers as in the tale Hawthorne
told to Longfellow.
Mostly trappers, fishermen
and farmers, the exiles settled into
expect Louisiana cooking to be
hot, real hot, which was never the
creole style
Prudhomme points out that
"as Louisiana food has grown in
popularity throughout the coun- Louisiana's swamplands where
try, the distinction between Cajun their hardy, food-loving descen-
and Creole has almost vanished dants seldom ventured beyond
In history, the distinction is the range of their pirogues and
clearer. Creoles are descended pickup trucks until 1947 when the
from aristocratic families who first oil rigs loomed over the
fled the terrors of the French re vo- marshes. Their cuisine, culled
lutions, sometimes with their from the woods, bayous, tiny
As Ophe conceded, there was chefs, dressmakers and dancing gardens and barnyard animals
a'tilanruage problem at first. The masters. They intermarried with too old to produce, called for slow
Romero brothers speak quaint Louisiana's Spanish settlers, cooking and high octane sauces to
French that like the meandering whose cooking pots bubbled with tenderize briskets of squirrel,
bavou has been bent out of shape spices and condiments from the wild rabbit, alligator and senile
in the last two centuries. But once
the visitors from Paris and Lyons
figured out that 'ti was Cajun for
petit and that an alligator was
neither un caiman nor un croco-
dile, they were able to communi-
cate their desire to sample "soupe
de cocodrie
In St. Martinville, the spiri-
tual capital of Cajun-land, the
tour group posed for photos
around the statue of
"Evangeline the heroine of
LofigfeUow's epic about the' Brit-
ish expulsion of French settlers
from Acadia, or Nova Scotia, in
1755. Then in the old Indian ceme-
tery, they saw the grave of Emme-
line Labiche, whose real-life sepa-
ration from her lover inspired the
poem.
Like Americans cramming
into the Crazy Horse Saloon in
Paris, the French contingent
braved the overflow crowd at
Mulate's, the Cajun nightclub in
Breaux Bridge, for a fais do-do,
literally "make go to sleep the
Saturday night dance named for
the tiny room where small chil-
dren dozed while their parents
two-stepped until dawn.
Cajun music, like Cajun cook-
ing, is echoing around the world.
Bayou artists such as fiddler Mi-
chael Doucet and pianist Zachary
Richard have rabid fans in Paris,
Montreal, Quebec, Martinique,
San Francisco and New York's
Greenwich Village. Don
Montoucet's Cajun combo had
the comrades jumping when Chef
John Folse from Lafitte's Landing
in Donaldsonville set up a Cajun
restaurant at the Moscow World
Trade Center at the summit in
June.
If Paul Prudhomme had
shown up that night at Mulate's,
he would have been mobbed like
a young Charles Boyer for auto-
graphs by both the locals and the
French pilgrims on the trail of
what their culture has brought
forth on this continent.
Prudhomme, the first Ameri-
can chef to be awarded the Merite
Agricole by the French govern-
ment, is proprietor of K-Paul's
Louisiana Kitchen in New Or-
leans, a culinary superstar on TV,
radio and videotapes, and the
author of cookbooks that have
sold more than 600,000 in hard-
back.
Prudhomme popularized the
"blackening" method of sealing
in the flavor of meat and fish with
intense heat, as if cooked over an
open fire. Its ubiquitous popular-
ity has produced such menu
aberrations as blackened meat-
loaf and blackened omeletes and
has made the lowly redfish, once
snubbed in haute cuisine, an en-
dangered species in Texas and
Louisiana. Some months ago,
undercover agents from the Texas
Parks and Wildlife Department
mounted a sting operation to foil a
ring of commercial fishermen and
food wholesalers dealing in ille-
gally caught redfish.
"Dining out these days you
Aztecs, Incas and the Caribbean, sows.
Ocean Front an
popular nighty
only 3 blocks from the most
spots in Daytona Jt
Ren rods, Razzles, etc. f
v.
Jit
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Even down to this generation,
as both Prudhomme and Cahn
recall, Cajuns seldom went to the
store, even more rarely to a res-
taurant.
"We grew virtually every-
thing we ate says Prudhomme,
who grew up the youngest of 13
children on a farm near Opelou-
sas. "If a chicken didn't lay or a
rooster couldn't fertilize eggs or a
mother pig was too old to have
babies, we killed them for food for
the family
The five flags fluttering from
the columned porch of the Pres-
bytere, or priests' house, in St.
Martinville chronicle the course
of Cajun culture, from the rule of
French Bourbon kings in 1756, to
the Spanish in 1762, Napoleon's
First Republic in 1800, Jefferson's
purchase of Louisiana States in
1803 and a Confederate govern-
ment during the Civil War.
The craze for Cajun culture
has seemingly endless manifesta-
tions. Cajun humorist Justin
Wilson's cooking show is now
aired in bizarre bayou-busted
English on 284 public TV stations.
"Belizaire the Cajun" is embla-
zoned on movie marquees, and
for mystery fans author Daniel
Woodrell chronicles the cases of
Cajun cop Rene Slade.
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INVENTORY
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in the
February 14th issue of
The East Carolinian
Leave your sweetheart
a special message in the
Valentine's Piy issue
of The East Carolinian.
Messages are only
$1.00, so come by the
East Carolinian today!
Publications Building
(across from JoynerLibrary)
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maximum retail value of S5.000 Winners must sign and return an A�dav:t ot
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returned pna 3W a)ans EntnisMramipniatyotsponsormMi
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I HI � SI R( INI N
Sports
n
ECU falls to UNC- Wilmington
By MARK BARB1 R
Spurt V r itrr
II M1N TON, N A
Wilmington newspaper had .1
headline in its Saturdav editioi
which predicted the UN W
gameplan tor keeping its ei
game win streak over the Pirati
of East Carolina alive would Vx I
stop Blue Edwards in Saturdav
night's contest. 1 lie Seahawks
didn't stop Edwards. E( U lost
S 1 -66.
Edwards shredded the
Seahawks before a sold-out
vT.us d tor a new 1 raskoliseum
opponent scoring record with Mi
points, but with a 18 8 rebi
disadvantage and a no pi -
tort from Pirate guards even
Edw ards couldn't save E( 1
1 earl ei game this season Blue 1 dv a
I - who scored a record 36
eum against I 'C-W, was
.n ks as they prevailed Sl-hh I Ph
rds slams on
points tot a:
not 1
oio b Mark
e in tot tw o
1 opponent
to hold off
1 ove, ECL
adies defeat I NC-W
l IV eased past (ho Pirates
Thcv killed us on �
boards. ' Pirate coach Mike Steele
said. "In my wildest dreams 1
didn't think thev would 01
und us likethat it'sexti
disappointing
! he Seahawks doul
teamed Edwards in tho se nd
halt and only fi ur oi Edv 11 I
points in the period came fr - tl
nine p linte
II' I for ECI loft ipen
v hen ! dwards w as double
teamed, won- unable to record a
point to give the Pirates a bal-
anced scoring throat efi Kelly
�a as 11 4 tor the night, Kenn
M 1 in h was 0 and lott Perlic h
was
1 ho 1. ss drops 1(1 to4 in
the oli 1 ial thleti 'sso iatiai.
'� 9 overall, while the Seahawks
impi ' -9. ECU has nol
igainst I N( VV in V iln
ton sin o anu 11 1,183 The last
three meetinj f the two teams in
I task funo been sellouts
With four minutcs to go in the
tho Soahau ks v. 1 11
down b seven and the Pirates
1 mo. i to be in 11 introl of tho
� :� ith 4? se onds in the half,
! ' VV took I h .id ba k and
� 1 the ink rm
w ith a ' .H advantagi
ntum staved
th ieal iwks in the se� 1 md h
� I whil ECI red 1 ght
ntsii the first 14 minutesol I
pei : scored 30 ai :
� lacomfortal ' I he
0 with a layup. Edwards grabb i In the second period it was
the defensive rebound at the other the inside play of UN Vh sHou-
end and hit a Tpointcr, putting zcr and Carter and the lackluster
E I up 5-0. UNC-W's Antonio
1 loward drove in a layup to pull
the Seahawks to within throe, but
ius 1 hll put I v U up by si�. with a
pointer oft tho right baseline
it I. had its biggest load of
tho night, 102, after Edwards
nabbed another defensive r�
bound and Love twisted in a re-
verse-layup after an in-the-lane
- from Kelly.
The Pirates couldn't sta
id, though, and with throe
!U turnovers, UNC-W fought
play of the Pirates that doomed
ECU and assured tho impressive
vu t n I r the il r I louzer
red

'
� i
� . � � j � � .
tx UI
� I �
basket and 1
tnd Carter red
I ntsand id 1 irds

Piral uld only fight ha -
; 1 1 11
� �, �
S ah iwl 1 r M Phersor
- ai I he �s ���. rn 1 about th
possibility of Ed - nng
back to take tho lead, 15-12 at tho Tr re than : � nts and another
12 58 mark. The Seahawks relied Fc - player having a better-than-
on the outside shooting of sopho- average p�� m
more guard Brannon Lancaster '�'�'�' ' ' oi the
who hit two 3 painters and a 17'
jumper during the comeback. ;hero.il
Iwards then came alive for was6'6 ui - irtei irterhad
the Pirates, scoring 16 of the ral� � �' s
team's next 20 points. Edwards r ' Pcr game before
hit two 3-pointers, made four I aturda s n �� � arter
five foul shots, grabbed four re- endod UP with 1 p ints and nine
bounds and had an assist during r nstthePiral
the streak, capping off the one re were no heroes for 1
man show by taking a pass from vas

tu
fr
id.
ie other
m the toul line
a mo
Mrst : � � ; iv wa
�- 1 : Il 1 tob
o ve pu i
10 1 M ll
. on the baseline and slam-
ming a dunk over UNC-W's Rob-
biearter Fdwards was fouled
on the play and converted tho free
throw to put the Pirates up. 32-25
Seahawks wore abl I
Bv (. AROl YX ILS1 K 1
riii s i Irish
.t-

.1
.� �-thaif.Saih
�-
11
her s
r rtervt�
. �on w,IS
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x i �1 V .hav 0I ll OiH.V
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- ve.�
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imi

n di
: : � .
. �
the �
. ares in
; irl� ne Page
points
� : : this
ferenci match-
Lady Pl-
am and
� � md Satur-
travel to Ri hmond
. iders
15 fr m th f r ancj 1-Uot'i"
from the charity stripe Reed 1
was the onlv other Pirate in
res with 10points(4 5,
2 2
'C-W ha I five plavers in
wKe advantage of Pirate fouls and d uble-figures, led bv Houzer
mad ven free throws in the last Wlth 1Q Lancaster had 14, Greg
four minutes to take the wand Bender V' 1 ward 11
from ECU'S sails and cot back in and art -
the game. Seahawk center Larry
Houzer, who scored onlv five The Pirates return to action
points in the first half, hit two fi ul Wednesday night at home host-
shots with 42 seconds left to give � ' ' f William & Mary
UNC-W their halftime load Tip-off is set tor 7 30 p.m.
Dream Team and No
Prejudice excel

Sarah Cray takes to the line to score one of hot 15 points against
the Seahawks of UNC Wilmington. The Pirates won the contest
and dropped their conferei ce rival to 9-6 (Photo by ECU Photo
Lab).
jpitefine p rf 1 m
ances bv top ranked. "Hie Fellows,
in IM basketball play, other
squads continue to pound the
boards in Memorial Gymnasium
I Minges Coliseum.
! ast year's all campus cham-
pions. The Dream Team, cami
verv close to experiencing a night-
mare in a recent contest against
o Prejudice Intended. Over
� ms packed themselves into
Memorial Gymnasium to cheer
n P1. At the half, the Dream
cam lead No Prejudice 28-17
despite the fan power. However,
much like the fans oi Cameron
Indoor, the tide turned with
cheers from the onlookers as No
Prejudice Intended bounced back
and found themselves a basket
behind with two minutes left in
the contest.
I he Dream Team put to
gether several three point plays
md with the help of NP1 free
� row devastations (12 massed
attempts), last vcar's champions
came awa with a key victory
Anthony Thompson lead the
Dream with 16 points foil wed by
Limes Singletary with 12 For No
Prejudice, a balanced attack bv
Greg Stewart, Nate Stokes and
Urestus Davenport totaled 24 of
their final points.
In other action, the rout of the
w 00k honors go to 100 Proot who
proved their 2.X1 proof strength
against Pi Kappa lpha Scrubs
Larry Fame, Bamet Easter
: Ricky Torain each scored 20
points tor the Proof As mathmati-
cians know that al 1 Ids up to
See IKS, page 14
New lighting system lights up Minges
B MARK BAR hi R
� . ice as bright as the ones
i1. o replaced, according to
mt, Associate
� : � 1 Internal R la
. . � � Accoi to VanSant, the
. 11 e q a �
a new lichtii - ' rnu'r'v llM' were the
1 in Minces : ghts installed in Minges
� , . ketball �'���� n lhe eum opened in
�67 Sin then, there have been
ements made to the
eum's lighting svstem, Van
11 �
I he new lights, 44 m all, are
atts apii 'i eand are located
at cm h n 1 I 11 1 urt, 11 per
'tbali program
1 ij the shad
i ; -
at
corner. Whereas the old lights
were mercury vapor, the now
lights are metal halide, which is
the type being used in the newer
arenas around the country, ic
cording to VanSant.
"At the time when Minges
was built, the mercury vapor
lights were state of the art Win
sant said. "But over the years,
they have become outdated
When tho now lights were put
in, approximately h() ot the old
lights, at 400 watts apiece, were
removed. VanSant said the old
hehts will probably replace the
even older lighting system cur-
rently being, used in Memorial
C iymnasium.
"With theold lights, we had a
situation where we had inconsis
tent lighting on the (Minges)
floor VanSant said "We would
have maybe only 4 foot candles
of light in the corners, but in the
middle of the court we would
have around 90 foot-candles.
"Now we have a consistent
200 foot candles across the floor
Tho minimum level of light
needed to televise a game is 150
foot candles, according to Van-
Sant. With the installation ot the
now lights, the Pirates should be
able to look forward to having
tele ised homo games in seasons
to come, VanSant said.
The cost tor the now system
was roughly $30,000, and its de-
sign was recommended by Dibble
& Associates of Washington, N C
ITie updated lighting is part
two of this year's remodeling oi
Minges Coliseum. Before the sea-
son began, the coliseum was
painted, the tloor was improved
and repainted, bleachers were
refurbished and luxury boxes
were added to the north side ot
the arena
According to VanSant, the
next step will likely be the instal-
lation of permanent concession
stands by next basketball season.
Whether the new lights will
help or hinder the Pirates play at
homo remains to be seen The
Lady Pirates had no trouble dis-
pensing oi the Lady Seahawks
Saturday, and the men face their
first contest under tho lights
Wednesday night against confer
nee foe William & Marv
Before: This is dull Minges Coliseum before the new lights
After. This is Minges Coliseum with the new and improved lighting system (Photo by JD.
Whitmore, ECU Photo Lab).





v
C
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
��'
IANUARY 31.1969 11
ECU falls to UNC-Wilmington
By MARK BARBER
Sports Writer
WILMINGTON, N.C. � A
Wilmington newspaper had a
The guards for ECU, left open 0 with a layup. Edwards grabbed
when Edwards was double�
teamed, were unable to record a
point to give the Pirates a bal-
anced scoring threat. Jeff Kelly
was 0-4 for the night, Kenny
headline in its Saturday edition Murphy was 0-3 and Jeff Perlich Gus Hill put ECU up by six with a
In the second period, it was
the defensive rebound at the other the inside play of UNC-W's Hou-
end and hit a 3-pointer, putting zer and Carter and the lackluster
ECU up 5-0. UNC-W's Antonio pUy of the Pirates that doomed
Howard drove in a layup to pull ECU and assured the impressive
the Seahawks to within three, but victory for the Seahawks. Houzer
which predicted the UNC-W was 0-1
gameplan for keeping its eight- The loss drops ECU to 3-4 in
game win streak over the Pirates the Colonial Athletic Association,
of East Carolina alive would be to 9-9 overall, while the Seahawks
stop Blue Edwards in Saturday improve to 5-2,9-9. ECU has not
night's contest. The Seahawks
scored 14 points in the second
half, 10 of which were under the
basket and nabbed six rebounds
and Carter scored six inside
points and had five boards.
didn't stop Edwards. ECU lost
81-66.
Edwards shredded the
Seahawks before a sold-out
crowd for a new Trask Coliseum
opponent scoring record with 36
points, but with a 18-38 rebound
Is an earlier game this season, Blue Edwards slams one in for two
points. Edwards, who scored a record 36 points for an opponent
In Trask Coliseum against UNC-W, was not enough to hold off
Hhe Seahawks as they prevailed 81-66 (Photo by Mark Love, ECU
Photo Lab).
Ladies defeat UNC-W
disadvantage and a no-points ef- game. With 42 seconds in the half,
fort from Pirate guards even
Edwards couldn't save ECU as
UNC-W eased past the Pirates.
"They killed us on the
boards Pirate coach Mike Steele
said. "In my wildest dreams I
didn't think they would outre-
bound us like that�it's extremely period, UNC-W scored
disappointing
The Seahawks double-
teamed Edwards in the second
half and only four of Edwards' 13
points in the period came from the
3-pointer off the right baseline
ECU had its biggest lead of
the night, 10-2, after Edwards
nabbed another defensive re-
bound and Love twisted in a re-
won against UNC-W in Wilming- verse-layup after an in-the-lane
ton since January 24,1983. The last pass from Kelly,
three meetings of the two teams in The Pirates couldn't stay
Trask have been sellouts. ahead, though, and with three
With four minutes to go in the ECU turnovers, UNC-W fought possibility of Edwards scoring
first half, the Seahawks were back to take the lead, 15-12 at the more than 25 points and another
down by seven and the Pirates 12:58 mark. The Seahawks relied ECU player having a better-than-
seemed to be in control of the on the outside shooting of sopho- average performance and becom-
Coming into the contest,
Seahawk coach Don McPherson
said he was worried about the
'unsung hero" of the
ing the
game.
If there was an unsung hero, it
was 6'6" junior Carter. Carter had
been averaging 3.6 points and 3.8
rebounds per game before
more guard Brannon Lancaster
UNC-W took the lead back and who hit two 3-pointers and a 17'
held on to go into the intermission jumper during the comeback,
with a 40-38 advantage. Edwards then came alive for
The momentum stayed with the Pirates, scoring 16 of the
the Seahawks in the second half, team's next 20 points. Edwards
and while ECU scored only eight hit two 3-pointers, made four-of- Saturday's matchup. Carter
points in the first 14 minutes of the five foul shots, grabbed four re- �� UP with 10 points and nine
30 and bounds and had an assist during rebounds against the Pirates,
had a comfortable 7046 lead. The the streak, capping off the one- There were no heroes for ECU
Pirates could only fight back to man show by taking a pass from other than Edwards, who was 10-
within 15 by the close of the con- Kelly on the baseline and slam- of15 from me flor and 13-of-15
test. ming a dunk over UNC-W's Rob- from the charity stripe. Reed Lose
The first half of play was eve- bie Carter. Edwards was fouled
field. The other nine points came ry thing the game was billed to be. on the play and converted the free
from the foul line. Stanley Love put the Pirates up 2- throw to put the Pirates up, 32-25.
The Seahawks were able to
�K
�-
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
k
� Victory was sweet Saturday
ght, as East Carolina's Lady
ites defeated conference rival
IC-Wilmington, 87-69 at
Stages Coliseum.
East Carolina, who had not
players scoring in double figures.
Pam Williams led ECU with
16 points, 10 in the first half. Sarah
Gray tossed in 15 points, Rose
Miller 13, Chris O'Connor 12,
Irish Hamilton 10.
Miller's 13 points wasa career
high for the senior reserve. "Rose
came in and was a leader. She kept
her poise when Wilmington was
cheated the Lady Seahawks since making a comeback, and being a
VI, took control early in the
ie, jumping out to a 17-0 lead.
ilmington did not score until
?45 remaining in the half.
"Past Carolines success in the
ffrst half came from the outside
senior, that was what she needed
to do Coach Pat Pierson said.
East Carolina, now 8-7overaH
and 3-3 in CA A play, have already
passed their two conference wtft�
of 1988. Last season they finished
thooting by guards Pam Williams 2-10 in the CAA, and this year,
with three CAA wins under their
belt, still have six CAA games
fend Irish Hamilton.
"That was the best we've shot
from the perimeter this year
$aid ECU coach Pat Pierson, as her
team recorded their third Colo-
nial Athletic Association victory
pf the year.
The Lady Seahawks never led
ECU, but did pull within one with
5:40 left in the half. Theresa Reese
ihit one of four three-pointers of
the game to threaten ECU's lead.
The Lady Pirates had increased
-their lead to 46-35 by halftime.
East Carolina continued the
six
remaining on the schedule.
UNC-Wilmington dropped
to 9-6 overall and 2-4 in the CAA.
The Lady Seahawks saw four
players score in double figures in
their losing effort. Charlene Page
led Wilmington with 18 points
and eight rebounds.
ECU will be on the road this
week with two conference match-
ups. On Wednesday, the Lady Pi-
rates will take on William and
pressure in the second halt get- williamsburg and Satur-
iing an offensive boost from the J m d � chmond
entire team. All but one Lady Pi- J
rate scored for the team, with five to meet the Lady Spiders.
was the only other Pirate in
double figures with 10 points (4-5,
2-2).
UNC-W had five players in
uute advantage of Pirate fouls and double-figures, led by Houzer
made seven free throws in the last " 19- Lancaster had 14, Greg
Bender (13), Antonio Howard (11)
and Carter.
The Pirates return to action
Wednesday night at home, host-
Sarah Gray takes to the line to score one of her 15 points against
the Seahawks of UNC Wilmington. The Pirates won the contest
and dropped their conference rival to 9-6 (Photo by ECU Photo
Lab).
four minutes to take the wind
from ECU'S sails and get back in
the game. Seahawk center Larry
Houzer, who scored only five
points in the first half, hit two foul
shots with 42 seconds left to give ing me Triie of William & Mary.
UNC-W their halftime lead. Tip-off is set for 730 p.m.
Dream Team and No
Prejudice excel
(IRS)�Despite fine perform- � The' Pjeajn Team jprat fc
ances by top ranked, The Fellows, gether several three point fays,
in IM-basketball play, other and with the help of NPI free
squads continue to pound the throw devastations (12 missed
boards in Memorial Gymnasium attempts), last year's champions
and Minges Coliseum. came away with a key victory.
Lastyear's all campus cham- Anthony Thompson lead the
pions, The Dream Team, came Dream with 16 points follwed by
very close to experiencing a night- James Singletary with 12. For No
mare in a recent contest against Prejudice, a balanced attack by
No Prejudice Intended. Over 100 Greg Stewart, Nate Stokes and
fans packed themselves into Urestus Davenport totaled 24 of
Memorial Gymnasium to cheer their final points,
on NPI. At the half, the Dream In other action, the rout of the
Team lead No Prejudice 28-17 week honors go to 100 Proof who
despite the fan power. However, proved their 200 proof strength
much like the fans of Cameron against Pi Kappa Alpha Scrubs.
Indoor, the tide turned with Larry Fame, Barnet Easterling,
cheers from the onlookers as No and Ricky Torain each scored 20
Prejudice Intended bounced back points for the Proof. As mathmati-
and found themselves a basket cians know, that alone adds up to
behind with two minutes left in
the contest. See IRS, page 14
New lighting system lights up Minges
By MARK BARBER
Sport Writer
The future for East Carolina's
men's and women's basketball is
looking a lot brighter these days.
Thanks to a new lighting
system installed in Minges Coli-
seum, home of Pirate basketball,
ECU's basketball program has
stepped out of the shade�liter-
ally.
Inaugurated Saturday night
as the Lady Pirates walked past
the Lady Seahawks of UNC-W,
fhe new lights are billed to be at
least twice as bright as the ones
they have replaced, according to
Henry VanSant, Associate Ath-
letic Director for Internal Rela-
tions.
According to VanSant, the
lights formerly used were the
original lights installed in Minges
when the coliseum opened in
1967. Since then, there have been
no improvements made to the
coliseum's lighting system, Van-
Sant said.
The new lights, 44 in all, are
1,000 watts apiece and are located
at each corner of the court, 11 per
corner. Whereas the old lights
were mercury vapor, the new
lights are metal-halide, which is
the type being used in the newer
arenas around the country, ac-
cording to VanSant.
"At the time when Minges
was built, the mercury vapor
lights were state of the art Van-
Sant said. "But over the years,
they have become outdated
When the new lights were put
in, approximately 60 of the old
lights, at 400 watts apiece, were
removed. VanSant said the old
liehts will probably replace the
even older lighting system cur-
rently being used in Memorial
Gymnasium.
"With the old lights, we had a
situation where we had inconsis-
tent lighting on the (Minges)
floor VanSant said. "We would
have maybe only 45 foot-candles
of light in the corners, but in the
middle of the court we would
have around 90 foot-candles.
"Now we have a consistent
200 foot-candles across the floor
The minimum level of light
reeded to televise a game is 150
foot-candies, according to Van-
Sant. With the installation of the
new lights, the Pirates should be
able to look forward to having
televised home games in seasons
to come, VanSant said.
The cost for the new system
was roughly $30,000, and its de-
sign was recommended by Dibble
& Associates of Washington, N.C
The updated lighting is part
two of this year's remodeling of
Minges Coliseum. Before the sea-
son began, the coliseum was
painted, the floor was improved
and repainted, bleachers were
refurbished and luxury boxes
were added to the north side of
the arena.
According to VanSant, the
next step will likely be the instal-
lation of permanent concession
stands by next basketball season.
Whether the new lights will
help or hinder the Pirates' play at
home remains to be seen. The
Lady Pirates had no trouble dis-
pensing of the Lady Seahawks
Saturday, and tine men face their
first contest under the lights
Wednesday night against confer-
ence foe William & Mary.
Before: This is dull Minges Coliseum before the new lights-
L
After. TlusUMlnfes Coliseum witti
Whitmore,ECUPnotoUbK
MW MM tapfwed llghHm systeaa CNnfe- bjrJJX
IPPHUM
m nn mi inin i kimijw





12
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,1989
l
Tarheels beat Georgia Tech, continue win streak
CHAPEL HILL, N.C (AP) �
There are times, North Carolina
Coach Dean Smith says, that he
doesn't know what to think of his
basketball team, but a 92-85 vic-
tory over Georgia Tech Saturday
helped him make up his mind - for
now.
"I don't really know if we're
that good sometimes Smith
said.
"We're still winning and I like
that.
"Sometimes I don't think
we're very good and sometimes I
think we are he said.
Smith took the positive ap-
proach this time as Kevin Madden
scored 16 points to lead six play-
ers in double figures. The Tar
Heels won their fourth straight
game to raise their record to 18-3,
5-1 in the ACC.
Scott Williams had 15 points
and JR. Reid and Pete Chilcutt
had 12 each. Jef: Lebo, returning
to action after sitting out three
baskets.
"We spent more attention
preparing on (Georgia Tech's
Tom) Hammonds Smith said.
"Dennis is streaky and he was on
a hot streak today"
Scott was cooled a bit by
North Carolina's trapping de-
fense, which forced Georgia Tech
into 11 turnovers in the first half.
The Yellow Jackets lost a five-
games with a sprained left ankle, point lead midway through the
had 11 points and Steve Bucknall period, trailed by as much as 14
scored 10.
The victorv overshadowed a
29-point effort by Georgia Tech's
Dennis Scott, who hit nine 3-point
early in the second half and fell
short with a rally when North
Carolina went on another scoring
run.
"Once we were moving the
ball, we were getting layups We
were eating the trap up Scott
said. "A couple of times, we had
some mental breakdowns. That's
part of the came
Hammonds scored on a
layup with 10:56 left in the first
half, giving Georgia Tech a 21-16
edge. North Carolina came back
with a 21-4 run to take control.
Rick Fox started the run with two
free throws at 10:03 and ended the
spurt with .mother tree throw at
4.21.
The Tar I eels stretched their
45-36 halftime lead to 5440 alter
Madden's two free throws with
17:41 left. Georgia Tech regained
its momentum and fought to
within 67-63 after Maurice Brit-
tian hit a 12-foot jumper with
10:01 left to play.
Seven straight points by the
Tar Heels, four bv Madden, held
off the threat and Georgia Tech
goH no closer than seven points.
"I'vegot to re run acou
6'10" guvs it we'n i ng
in this league Georgia Tt
coach Bobby Cremins said I
trying to combat the taller Lar
Heels. "We hang in there, I I
we're just short hand d
Hammonds had 22
and Brian Oliver scored 121
Yellow Jackets, 12 6 and
The East Carolinian
JOIN KRISTE1N HALBER .S SPORTS COVERAGE!
Ruggers prepare for upcoming season
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Rugby Link
After a tough and disappoint-
ing fall season, the Rugby Team is
about to begin practice for a busy
spring schedule.
The season plans to be one of
the toughest in history The team
will face such foes as powerhouse
Old Dominion University and
University of North Carolina at
Charlotte. Thcv will also do battle
in two tournaments at Charlotte
and Raleigh.
The Raleigh tournament is for
the unofficial state championship.
The outings should prove to be a
test for the veteran ruggers and
give some of the new troops
needed experience.
The season also plans to see
the graduation of old time rug-
gers Mike 'Top gun" Burrell, Eric
Mussier, Greg "Sweet Daddy"
Roache, and Bob "Keg" Eason
These fellows agree that they
would like to go out on a "butt-
kicking" note.
Practice begins Feb. 1, behind
the Allied Health building at 4
p.m. For those interested in play-
ing, no experience is necessary
only gcxid athletic ability and an
intense will to win. For more in-
formation call Dave Bowman at
758-8038 or BlairByrd at 758 5893.
So come out and join the oldest
club sport at ECU,a markof excel-
lence since lu75.
UVA's Coach Holland returns
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
(AP) � After a six-game absence
for stomach surgery, Virginia
coach Terry Holland said he felt
fine on the bench Saturdav during
the Cavaliers' 88-69 Atlantic
Coast Conference victory over
Wake Forest.
"It was really like 1 had never
been away said Holland, who
was coaching his team for the first
time since handing over the reins
to assistant Dave Odom on Jan. 1
and going into the hospital to
repair a bowel blockage.
Richard Morgan scored 25
points and John Crotty hit 18 as
Virginia pulled away in the sec-
ond half. Morgan scored 16 of his
points in the second half, includ-
ing eight duiing a crucial Cavalier
Tun. . w"
Virginia is now 11-6 overall
and 3-2 in the ACC, having won
its last four games. The Cavaliers
were 3-3 under Odom's leader-
ship.
"Things were going so well
for us that I didn't feel pressured
to come back quickly, and was
able to work back into it slowly
said Holland, who had attended
several Virginia practices
throughout the week before offi-
cially rejoining the team Satur-
day.
Wake Forest dropped to 9-6
and 2-6.
"We have some young play-
ers that are struggling with their
games right now Coach Bob
Staak said. "1 thought we played
well against North Carolina and
we played well in beating Duke. 1
thought that would give us some
momentum coming into this
game, but it didn't
Virginia outscored Wake For-
est 11-3 over the final 3:08 of the
first half to take a 37-30 halftime
lead. The Cavaliers then opened
the second half with a 16-7 run,
ending with Morgan's jumper at
15:13 for a 53-37 Virginia lead. It
was Morgan's eighth point of the
run.
Wake Forest never threat-
ened after that. A 3-point goal by
Robert Siler with 4:56 left nar-
rowed the deficit to 78-67, but
Virginia scored three
unanswered baskets to make it
84-67 with 3:01 remaining.
Morgan, who is averaging
27.0 points per game in ACC
competition, made only two of
seven shots from the floor in the
first half, but sank six of 11 after
intermission.
"We told Richard at halftime
that we'd get to him Holland
said.
"I think the way he played in
the second half was a result of his
patience. We were able to post
him up against (Derrick)
McQueen a couple times in the
second half, and he got some big
Applications For Student Union
Production Chairperson
are now being accepted
Job Description:
� Serve on Student Union Program
Board.
� Plan and Promote the Annual
Student Union Banquet.
� Select and plan Student Union
Decorations and receptions
respectfully.
� Select Committee Members.
� Coordinate and head committee
meetings.
Applications are being taken until
February 3
For more information call
757-6611 ext.210
or go by
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 236
baskets
Virginia's Curtis Williams
added a career-high 15 points off
the bench, and Bryant Stith to-
taled 14 points and nine rebounds
for the Cavaliers.
McQueen, a freshman point
guard, led Wake Forest with 18
points. The Demon Deacons, who
haven't won at Virginia in 12
vears, also got 13 points from both
Sam Ivv and David Carlyle.
RUGBY SEASON
SC HEDULE
Feb.25L'NC-C Home
March 4-11Spring Break
March 18 Charlotte Tournament
March 25Easter
April 1Duke Away
April 8ODU Home
April 15Raleigh Tournament
April 22Alumni Home
SEETHE
IATE, LATE SNOW
OPEN 'TIL
MIDNIGHT
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n

12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,1989
Tarheels beat Georgia Tech, continue win streak
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
There are times, North Carolina
Coach Dean Smith says, that he
doesn't know what to think of his
basketball team, but a 92-85 vic-
tory over Georgia Tech Saturday
helped him make up his mind - for
now.
"I don't really know if we're
that good sometimes Smith
said.
"We're still winning and I like
that.
"Sometimes I don't think
we're very good and sometimes I
think we are he said.
Smith took the positive ap-
proach this time as Kevin Madden
scored 16 points to lead six play-
ers in double figures. The Tar
Heels won their fourth straight
game to raise their record to 18-3,
5-1 in the ACC.
Scott Williams had 15 points
and JR. Reid and Pete Chilcutt
had 12 each. Jeff Lebo, returning
to action after sitting out three
games with a sprained left ankle,
had 11 points and Steve Bucknall
scored 10.
The victory overshadowed a
29-point effort by Georgia Tech's
Dennis Scott, who hit nine 3-point
baskets.
"We spent more attention
?reparing on (Georgia Tech's
om) Hammonds Smith said.
"Dennis is streaky and he was on
a hot streak today
Scott was cooled a bit by
North Carolina's trapping de-
fense, which forced Georgia Tech
into 11 turnovers in the first half.
The Yellow Jackets lost a five-
point lead midway through the
period, trailed by as much as 14
early in the second half and fell
short with a rally when North
Carolina went on another scoring
run.
"Once we were moving the
ball, we were getting layups. We
were eating the trap up Scott
said. "A couple of times, we had
some mental breakdowns. That's
part of the game
Hammonds scored on a
iayup with 10:56 left in the first
half, giving Georgia Tech a 21-16
edge. North Carolina came back
with a 21-4 run to take control.
Rick Fox started the run with two
free throws at 10:03 and ended the
spurt with another free throw at
4:21.
The Tar Heels stretched their
45-36 halftime lead to 5440 after
Madden's two free throws with
17:41 left. Georgia Tech regained
its momentum and fought to
within 67-63 after Maurice Brit-
tian hit a 12-foot jumper with
10:01 left to play.
Seven straight points by the
Tar Heels, four by Madden, held
off the threat and Georgia Tech
gdt no closer than seven points.
"I've got to recruit a couple of
6'10" guys if we're going to bang
in this league Georgia Tech
coach Bobby Crcmins said of
trying to combat the taller Tar
Heels. "We hang in there, but
we're just short-handed
Hammonds had 22 points
and Brian Oliver scored 12 for the
Yellow Jackets, 12-6 and 2-2.
The East Carolinian
JOIN KRISTEN HALBERGS SPORTS COVERAGE!
Ruggers prepare for upcoming season
By EARL VIS HAMPTON
Kniby Link
After a tough and disappoint-
ing fall season, the Rugby Team is
about to begin practice for a busy
spring schedule.
The season plans to be one of
the toughest in history. The team
will face such foes as powerhouse
Old Dominion University and
University of North Carolina at
Charlotte. They will also do battle
in two tournaments at Charlotte
and Raleigh.
The Raleigh tournament is for
the unofficial state championship.
The outings should prove to be a
test for the veteran ruggers and
give some of the new troops
needed experience.
The season also plans to see
the graduation of old time rug-
gers Mike 'Top gun" Burrell, Eric
Mussler, Greg "Sweet Daddy"
Roache, and Bob "Keg" Eason.
These fellows agree that they
would like to go out on a "butt-
kicking" note.
Practice begins Feb. 1, behind
the Allied Health building at 4
p.m. For those interested in play-
ing, no experience is necessary
only good athletic ability and an
intense will to win. For more in-
formation call Dave Bowman at
758-8038 or Blair Byrd at 758-5893.
So come out and join the oldest
club sport at ECU, a mark of excel-
lence since 1975.
UVA's Coach Holland returns
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
(AP) � After a six-game absence
for stomach surgery, Virginia
coach Terry Holland said he felt
fine on the bench Saturday during
the Cavaliers' 88-69 Atlantic
Coast Conference victory over
Wake Forest.
"It was really like I had never
been away said Holland, who
was coaching his team for the first
time since handing over the reins
to assistant Dave Odom on Jan. 1
and going into the hospital to
repair a bowel blockage.
Richard Morgan scored 25
points and John Crotty hit 18 as
Virginia pulled away in the sec-
ond half. Morgan scored 16 of his
pointsurv the second half, includ-
ing eight dujinea ctuomI Gavalie
Virginia is now 11-6 overall
and 3-2 in the ACC, having won
its last four games. The Cavaliers
were 3-3 under Odom's leader-
ship.
"Things were going so well
for us that I didn't feel pressured
to come back quickly, and was
able to work back into it slowly
said Holland, who had attended
several Virginia practices
throughout the week before offi-
cially rejoining the team Satur-
day.
Wake Forest dropped to 9-6
and 2-6.
"We have some young play-
ers that are struggling with their
games right now Coach Bob
Staak said. "I thought we played
well against North Carolina and
we played well in beating Duke. I
thought that would give us some
momentum coming into this
game, but it didn't"
Virginia outscored Wake For-
est 11-3 over the final 3:08 of the
first half to take a 37-30 halftime
lead. The Cavaliers then opened
the second half with a 16-7 run,
ending with Morgan's jumper at
15:13 for a 53-37 Virginia lead. It
was Morgan's eighth point of the
run.
Wake Forest never threat-
ened after that. A 3-point goal by
Robert Siler with 4:56 left nar-
rowed the deficit to 78-67, but
Virginia scored three
unanswered baskets to make it
84-67 with 3:01 remaining.
Morgan, who is averaging
27.0 points per game in ACC
competition, made only two of
seven shots from the floor in the
first half, but sank six of 11 after
intermission.
"We told Richard at halftime
that we'd get to him Holland
said.
"I think the way he played in
the second half was a result of his
patience. We were able to post
him up against (Derrick)
McQueen a couple times in the
second half, and he got some big
baskets
Virginia's Curtis Williams
added a career-high 15 points off
the bench, and Bryant Stith to-
taled 14 points and nine rebounds
for the Cavaliers.
McQueen, a freshman point
guard, led Wake Forest with 18
points. The Demon Deacons, who
haven't won at Virginia in 12
years, also got 13 points from both
Sam Ivy and David Carlyle.
RUGBY SEASON SCHEDULE
Feb.25UNC-C Home
March 4-11Spring Break
March 18 Charlotte Tournament
March 25Easter
April 1Duke Away
April 8ODU Home
April 15Raleigh Tournament
April 22Alumni Home
SEETHE
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Lays Brand
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H
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IN OIL OR WATER
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58
0






I
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 31,1989 13
Super Bowl wins ratings race
LOS ANGELES (AD � NBC The 49ers defeated the Cin-
and the Super Bowl, taking a cue dnnati Bengals in the Super Bowl
Francisco 49ers, as NBCs coverage got a rating of
from the San
came out winners in the AC.
Nielsen Co. television ratings last
week.
The Super Bowl coverage
came in first by a wide margin.
The postgame show was second,
also by a comfortable margin.
NBC, in its 31st weekly vic-
tory tor the season, took eight
placesin the top 10 and easily won
the wook that ended Sunday.
44.6. Each ratings point equals
904,000 homes with television, so
more than 40 million homes tuned
in to the game. The postgame
show had a rating of 32.5.
The first part of the NBC
mimseries "Brotherhood of the
Rose which followed the game
Sunday, placed ninth
25.3. NBC's "Cheers" was fourth.
ABC's "Roseanne the big-
gest new hit of the season, was
fifth, and ABC's "Who's the
Boss? was sixth as the network
came in second.
Rounding out the top 10 were
NBC's "A Different World sev-
enth; "Golden Girls eighth; and
"L.A. Law tenth.
rated Sunday show, "Murder, She
Wrote was knocked to 46tn
place by the Super Bowl coverage.
NBC won the week with an
average of 20.0. ABC had 12.1 and
CBS 12.0.
In the season to date, NBC has
15.6, ABC 13.0, and CBS 12.4.
In the news category, ABC
Third-place CBS had only one
show in the top 20, its coverage of won with an 11.7 rating, closely
A rerun of NBC's "The Cosbv the inaugural gala in Washington, followed by CBS'11 6andNBC's
Show" was third, with a rating of which places 20th. CBS' high- 115
100 SUPER SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS
North Carolina 4-H Camps

FIVE DIFFERENT PROGRAMS & ENVIRONMENTS
Coast to Mountains
NcedcoUege student; tor
� (ibin tounelor
Program -t.iit lor
� v imnting sailing.
� marine ecology, pioneer hfe.
� canoeing, .irvhcrv.
� natural resources i�.iljhte. torc-irv �.iicr rm�ioev ect
1 ir applications nt.k!
� J RobnuFVw
B� 7606
N I Stale ! - ArrNs
Join us for the most memorable summer of your life
helping kids
Mr. Flory will be on Campus February 9 for interviews
Pembroke to induct All-Americans
PEMBROKE, N.C (AD �
Pembroke State University will
induct former All-Americans in
track and cross country, wrestling
nd academics into its athletic hall
I tamo Feb. 4.
PSU Chancellor Paul Givens
I Saturday those inducted this
ir will include Garry 1 lenrv, a
� time Ail-American and six-
e national champion in track
and cross-country; two-time
N MA All-American wrestler
5t c I a Trad; and Ronnie Rudd. a
baseball player who was a two-
time Academic Ail-American.
1 lenrv was the national cross-
country champion for the NA1A
in 1978 and the NCAA Division II
in 1980. He was a four-time na-
tional champion in track, winning
two titles in 1979 and two in 19S1.
Henrv, who graduated in
1982, led PSU to the 1978 NAIA
national cross-country champi-
onship and a second-place team
finish at the NCAA Division 11
national cross-country champi-
onships in 1980.
LaPrad was a three-time
Carolinas Conference wrestling
champion, won 13 tournament
championships and was named
an All-American in 1975 and 1979
at 158 pounds. He also was a
member of the USA wrestling
team that toured Japan and Korea
in 1977.
He is the head wrestling
coach at Summervillc, S.C where
he has a 158-2 record.
Rudd is the only N.C. base-
ball player to win the national
Gene Waldron Award, which is
based on baseball accomplish-
ment, academic standing and
contributions to the community
and the campus. He wasan NAIA
Academic Ail-American in 1973
and 1974.
Whik 11 PSU, the left-handed
pitcher helped the Braves win
three NAIA district titles and one
NAIA area championship. He
had a 19-6 record at PSU.
Rudd is the head baseball
:oach and assistant football coach
at Laney High School in Wilming-
ton.
Former state Supreme Court Justice dismisses himself
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) � For-
mer state Supreme Court Justice J.
Phil Carlton said Monday he can-
I serve on a four-member panel
appointed to investigate allega-
tions of wrongdoing in the North
Carolina State University basket-
program.
Carlton. in a letter to Univer-
sity of North Carolina President
C . D. Spangler. said he could not
serve on the independent panel
because his law firm has per-
formed legal services for the
NCSU booster club and basket-
ball coach Jim Valvano.
"You are wise to create this
independent commission and its
members should certainly be free
of any past associations which
could cast the slightest doubt on
their independence Carlton
wrote.
On Friday, Spangler ap-
pointed Carlton; Dr. D. VV.
Colvard, the former chancellor oi
UNC-Charlotte; William Klop-
man, former chairman of the
board and chief executive officer
of Burlington Industries; and
Samuel Poole, vice chairman of
the UNC Board of Governors and
chairman of the board's special
committee on intercollegiate ath-
letics, to investigate the charges.
The investigation stems from
the publication ot allegations
.i ppeanng on the dust jacket of the
forthcoming book, "Personal
Fouls The book, which focuses
on the 1986-87 Wolf pack basket-
ball team, allegedly charges that
Valvano distributed money from
boosters to players, that positive
drug test were kept secret and that
grades were changed to maintain
eligibility for basketball players.
Valvano and NCSU Chancel-
lor Bruce Poulton have denied the
charges. Poulton two weeks ago
was asked to conduct an investi-
gation by the Board of Governors.
But Spangler called for an inde-
pendent probe Friday because the
charges had received widespread
coverage and quesitioned the in-
tegrity of NSCU.
Carlton said he acepted a spot
on the panel Friday, but discov-
ered Monday that some of the 90
other lawyers in his firm had rep-
resented the Wolfpack Club and
Buy one speciality sandwich
and receive the other speciality
sandwich of equal or leser value for
12 price!
Not good with other special offers.
Good between 5 pm and 9 pm Mon. - Sat.
Expires March 1. 1989
February Entertaining at
Thur. Feb. 2 Spiral, Progressive
Fri.
Sat.
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Feb. 3 Liquid Sound
Feb. 4 Bad Bob & the
Rockin Horses
Mon-Tues
11-10
Wed
11-1
Thur
11-11
Fri
11-1
Sat
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The East
(Publications Bldg across from Joyner Library)
LUNCH SPECIAL
MONSAT.
11 AM - 3 PM
12 - 8 oz. Round
Sirloin
Potato Bar
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$2.99
I1
Daily Specials
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Regular Priced
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With Student I.D.
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an additional $1.99 with a meal
FREE DESSERT BAR
with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
10th St. - 758-2712
Wednesday, February 1
9:00 - 1:00
Lip Sync contest
Grand Prize
2500.
$100
1st prize for each
round
Riverbluff
Apartments
We Welcome
Parents
And Students
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
The Second of Four Rounds in Four Weeks
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or for more information
Call 758-4591
$2.00 frozen drinks specials ALL NIGHT
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I
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ANUARY31,1989
3
Clemson players suspended for one game
CLEMSON, S.C (AP)�
Seven Clemson players� includ-
ing two starters and a pair of top
reserves� were suspended for
one game on Saturday by Coach
Cliff Ellis for violating study hall
rules.
Six of the players� the sev-
enth is being red-shirted this sea-
son� didn't play against eight-
ranked Duke on Sunday in Dur-
ham, N.C
Elden Campbell, a 6-foot-10
junior center who leads the Tigers
in scoring (16.4 points) and is sec-
ond in rebounding (7.0), and
guard Marion Cash, a 6-3 junior
who leads the team in assists (96),
were among those suspended, a
news release from the university
said.
The statement said the sus-
pensions were "independent of
any other cases currently under
review a reference to an investi-
gation into an incident a week ago
outside the players' apartment
complex on campus that report-
edly involved some team mem-
bers and two campus security
guards.
Ellis, whose home telephone
number is unlisted, could not be
reached for comment. Sports In-
formation Director Bob Bradley
said Ellis would not comment
further on the suspensions.
The players were suspended,
ATTENTION
APPLICATIONS ARE BEING
ACCEPTED FOR POSITIONS ON
BOTH THE JUDICIAL, HONOR
AND REVIEW BOARDS.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
SHOULD PICK UP APPLICATIONS
AT THE SGA OFFICES,
2ND FLOOR OF MENDENHALL.
IRS Co-Rec Bowling
begins
Continued from page 11
60 points. Tack on an additional
52 points for 100 proof and you
have a rout of 112-13. The game
had to have been 'boresville
Co-Rec bowling action heats
up this week as 20 mixed teams
compete at Mendenhall Bowrmg
Center. This years top five bowl-
ing picks are as follows:
1. Belk Pin Topplers
2. The Red Measles
3. Our Prerogative
4. The Scrags
5. Gutter Headquarters
This years dark horse pick is
the Mad Dogs.
In Club sport action, the
woman's soccer club kicks off its
spring season with an Indoor
Tournament held at N.C.
VVesleyan Saturday, Feb. 4. The
tournament will be held all day
and fans are welcome to attend
the opening event for the
women's soccer program.
Support
Pirate
Athletics
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
the one-page statement said, "for
violation of basketball team pol-
icy regarding academic study hall
rules The statement did not
elaborate on what the violations
were.
Also suspended by Ellis were
top reserves Dale Davis, a 6-9 for-
ward who's averaging 11.2 points
and leads the team in rebounding
with 7.9 a game, and Tim Kincaid,
a 6-3 guard who has started five
games this season and is
averaging 7.4 points.
Guard Donnell Bruce and
center Rod Mitchell were also
suspended along with forward
Sean Tyson, who is being red-
shirted this season.
The suspensions leave the
Tigers with just seven players on
their roster as they prepared to
take on Duke in an Atlantic Coast
Conference game. Clemson is 12-
4 and 3-2 in the ACC, while Duke
which lost three straight games,
stands 13-3 and 3-3.
Duke Sports Information Di-
rector John Roth said Coach Mike
Krzyzewski had no comment on
the suspensions.
In all, the six suspended play-
ers accounted for 57 percent of
Qemson's points and 59 percent
of its rebounds.
Of the three starters left, only
junior guard Derrick Forrest is
scoring in double figures,
averaging 11.3 points a game.
Senior forward jerry Pryor
averages 8.3 points and 6.5 re-
bounds, while forward Ricky
Jones averages 3.3 points a game.
Colby Brown, a 6-8 sopho-
more who has seen limited action
this year, made his first collegiate
start in replacing Campbell.
Freshman David Young, who is
averaging 5.9 points, replaced
Cash.
Sanders, Dudley named
players of the week
RICHMOND (AP) �George
Mason's Kenny Sanders and
James Madison's Missy Dudlev
were named the Colonial Athletic
Association players of the week,
the conference announced Mon-
day.
Sanders, last year's CAA
player of the year, scored 72
points and grabbed 36 rebounds
in the Patriots' three victories last
week. Sanders is currently second
in the CAA in scoring and re-
bounding, avergaing 23.1 points
and 10.8 rebounds per game.
Against East Carolina Jan.
16, Sanders scored 23 points and
had 10 rebounds.
Dudley scored 39 points in
the Dukes' two victories last
week. She also set a school record
with five three-pointers in the
Dukes' 73-57 victory over
Richmond.
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts for February rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles. Apartments and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 31, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 31, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.652
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58120
Preferred Citation
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