The East Carolinian, January 26, 1989







Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES7
SPORTS11
Features
Slurp soup and read The Great Measle Scare
on the clearly immunized Satire Page
See page 9.
Sports
B-Ball player, K.C Mote, once red started,
now a part of the Steel machine
See page 11.
She iraat daroltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 45
Thursday January 26,1989
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Deadline approaches
Names of students lacking
measle shots to be released
It's only a small prick. Caroline Joyner nurses her arm where
she received her mandatory measles immunization.
(Photo bv Thomas Walters�Photolab)
By TIM HAMPTON
New Fditor
Students who don't have
proper measle innoculation rec-
ords will find oiit in class today if
they need a shot.
Student Health Services is
preparing today to immunize an
estimated 1,000 ECU students
who have yet to receive the man-
datory measle vaccine after an
initial deadline was extended,
according to an ECU health offi-
cial.
During classes today, course
instructors will announce names
of students who need the shot.
Students still needing the immu-
nization will be instructed to visit
the infirmary after class and will
not be banned from campus as
earlv directed by a memo from the
director of health services.
Last week, following verifica-
tion by Pitt County Health offi-
ECU Bio-Tech is booming
cials of a red measles case involv-
ing a part time ECU student, state
health officials declared immedi-
ate immunization for the ECU
community. Since the first case, a
second case of measles has been
verified.
"If you haven't received
notice from us (Health
Services), don't wait, come
by and check your rec-
ords' Kay Van Nortwick
of the Student Health Serv-
ices said
Extending the immunization
imperative Wednesday, North
Carolina Department of Human
Resources authorities decided
there had not been enough time to
vaccinate thousands of students.
The extension follows a week of
administering vaccine shots to
6,000 students and 800 faculty and
staff members whose medical
records lacked measle (also called
Rubeola) immunization.
Since the directive, the Stu-
dent Health Services has been
busy notifying persons who may
be possible carriers of the measle
virus. The process began as work-
ers pulled health record files of
every student, faculty and staff
member.
After a week of working
overtime to mass vaccinate those
needing the shots, ECU health
officials feel normalcy will return
this week. But still, not everyone
has had the nccessarv innocula-
tions.
'The number (of un-immu-
nized students) is probablv under
a 1,000, but I reallv wouldn't
know until all of our data hasbeen
entered into the computers Kay-
Van Nortwick, Associate Director
for Administration of the Student
Health Service, said.
Van Nortwick said health
employees worked late Wednes-
day night to create a final list of
un-immunized persons. The list
was then disseminated to the
Registrar's Office who distrib-
uted the names to respective de-
partments early this morning.
The process has been "a big
undertaking" according to Van
Nortwick who commended the
cooperation the health services
has received from volunteers and
various sectors of the university
in combating the disease, which if
not detected as early as it was
could have been epidemic.
"If you haven't received no-
tice from us (Health Services),
don't wait, come bv and check
your records Van Nortwick
said.
According to Van Nortwick,
another case of the measles has
been cited since the first case last
week. To ward off the disease, the
Health Department has taken
protective steps through the Stu-
dent Health Services to vaccinate
potential virus carriers.
As a safeguard, the state offi-
cials raised the age of initial vacci-
nation to personsl6 months and
older. Previously, state law called
for innoculations at 12 months.
"Since the previous age of
vaccination was 12 months old
many more people must get vac-
cinated as a safeguard.
By DAVID HERRING
Staff Writer
Though still in its infancy,
biotechnology is booming in the
state - moving from research to
commercialization as the number
of industries in biotechnology
have increased from 32 in 1985 to
83 in 1988.
In 1982, ECU implemented a
plan for establishing and expand-
ing biotechnology programs in
the Department of Biology and
the School of Medicine. Accord-
ing to Dr. Wendell E. Allen, Dept.
of Biology, biotechnology is still a
young and developing science,
having originated around 1973.
"This is a good situation for
us (ECU) noted Allen, "because
we're a new, developing research
institution, we are unique in our
flexibility and responsive to
changes in biotechnology re-
search directions.
"When industries see poten-
tial areas for development they
sometimes engage universities to
research it so that they can learn
about it and decide whether or not
they want to pursue it. Older uni-
versities such as UNC and Duke
committed long ago to their re-
search directions making them
less flexible
In 1983, the North Carolina
Biotechnology Center (NCBC)
awarded ECU a $30,000 per year
grant to buy and upgrade equip-
ment in biotechnology-related
research, and in 1985 they in-
creased their grant to $250,000 per
year to be divided between the
Dept. of Biology and the School of
Medicine. Since 1983 the Dept. of
Biology alone has spent more
than $1.5 million to expand its
biotechnology program.
During the summer of '88 the
School of Medicine completed the
first phase of construction of a
biotechnology research building
at a cost of $2.5 million, which
came from funds genera ted by the
School of Medicine. The new
building was equipped with ap-
proximate $150,000 worth of
equipment donated by NCBC.
Today, there are more than 50
faculty members at ECU involved
in biotechnology programs; rang-
ing from outreach programs for
N.C. high school science teachers,
to cooperative research intern-
ships for students, to postdoctoral
training in biotechnology-related
research.
"By the end of this year 400
high school teachers across North
Carolina will have received ap-
propriate instruction in biotech-
nology (from ECU seminars) to
present material in an academic
and laboratory context to more
than 50,000 students by 1990
Allen stated.
"There's no reason to believe
that the only place to learn is in
school continued Allen. "There
are many advantages to the stu-
dent, ECU, and industries by inte-
grating Cooperative employment
with classroom study
In the program, the student
earns a salary while gaining full-
time work experience with a
reputable biotech company, and
most require previous experience
for permanent employees. This
also gives the student a chance to
direct his remaining studies
based on whether or not he liked
the co-op experience and would
like to pursue a career in that area.
In order to evaluate an intern,
he must be jointly supervised by a
faculty member and a company
employee. This is a mechanism by
which the university becomes
aware of the research interests of
biotech companies and stimulates
continued interaction between
those companies and ECU.
The Dept. of Biology offers a
See DNA, page 2
As of today, an estimated 1,000 students have yet to go through this almost painless process of
being immunized for measles. This upperclassmen seems to enjoy the shot. (Photo by Thomas
Walters�Photolab)
More slated for future
Construction needed to grow
Work on Erwin building, near to Mendenhall, is only one of the many on-going construction
projects on campus. Yet is more to come as ECU looks to the future.
(Photo by Thomas Walters�Photolab)
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Managing Editor
The construction underway
on main campus may be the most
obvious reflection of ECU's
growth and improvements, but
according to Robert Webb it is
only a fraction of what is actually
being planned.
Webb, the director of physical
plant and architectural planning,
said in an interview last Tuesday
that many problems are already
being researched and some im-
provement projects will begin
immediately. Other projects still
await funds.
The road conditions on cam-
pus were one of the first things
Webb said he noticed when he
came to ECU last semester. Funds
have now been allocated and a
preliminary study is underway.
Actual paving, gutter and curb
repairs on the worst areas are
scheduled to begin this summer.
Construction could not begin ear-
lier because of the constant traffic
flow.
The two parking lots to be
built on Ficklen Drive and the
expansion of a parking lot on
College Hill Drive will begin con-
struction within 30 days, accord-
ing to Webb. The design is under-
way and a contractor has been
selected. The lots allow for 928
new student parking spaces.
A master plan looking at all
the problems facing ECU's
growth is also underway. Webb
said everything from poor light-
ing on campus to turning the stu-
dent store area into more of a mall
area is being considered. Prob-
lems will be tackled one by one as
money is allocated.
An engineering firm is al-
ready conducting lighting stud-
ies. Webb said, "The bottom line
of that study will tell us the worst
areas on campus. We'll make an
effort to solve the worst problems
first
A committee is currently dis-
cussing the student recreational
facility which will house ex-
panded space for basketball, aero-
bics, and weight machines. Ap-
provals still need to be made by
the state legislature and then an
architect will be hired early this
summer, according to Alfred
Matthews, vice chancellor of stu-
dent affairs. Actual construction
on the 18-month project might
begin as early as the summer of
1990.
ECU's School of Medicine is
also experiencing growth. The
bio-technology building, which
was officially completed last July,
still awaits the infilling of its
ground floor. The rest of the
building is already occupied but
the ground floor, which will be a
pediatrics outpatient clinic, will
not be completed for another six
months.
A birthing center, a joint ef-
fort between the School of Medi-
cine and Pitt Memorial Hospital,
is scheduled for completion by
late February.
Plans are also underway to
add a third floor to the Brody
Building.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IANUAR1 26 1989
Is Chlamydia contagious?
I recently found out that 1
have chlamydia. How do I get it
and is it contagious?
Chlamydia is a bacterial in-
fection that is sexually transmit-
ted Public Health authorities esti-
mate that tour to five people get
chlamydia for every person who
has gonorrhea.
Genital infections caused bv
chlamydia occur in men and
women and may cause different
typesof medical problems includ-
ing
-sterility in males and
ertility in women
-Rei tor's syndrome, an
arthritis-like condition
-increased chance of
ectopic pregnancy (the embryo
grows in the Fallopian tube in-
stead of the uterus)
-pelvic inflamatory
disease in women
Health Column
By
Mary Elesha
Adams
-increased chance of
spontaneous abortion and still-
birth in women who have ch-
lamydial infections during preg-
nancy
-transmission of the bac-
teria to a child during birth caus-
ing eve infections and pneumonia
How do you know you have
chlamydia?
The chlamydia victim may
not know that he or she has the
disease because 60-80 percent of
women and 10 percent of men
with the disease have no symp-
toms. If people don't know they
have chlamydia they may infect
others. Symptoms may include:
-painful urination and
a watery discharge from the penis
in men
-women may have
genital itching and burning, dull
pelvic pain, vaginal discharge
and bleeding between menstrual
periods
If you think you have ch-
lamydia see your doctor, nurse
practicioner, or physician assis-
tant and ask for a test which in-
volves taking a genital sample.
The Student Health Center rou-
tinely tests for chlamydia in
women who have routine pelvic
pap exams because of the lack ol
noticeable symptoms.
The treatment tor chlamydia
is antibiotic therapy. You should
tell your sexual partner if you
have chlamydia so he or she can
also seek medical attention.
The East Carolinian
Adam Blankenship
-
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
c � K i J Kei,h Pearce
Scott Ma key
Richard-Alan Cook
Ashlev E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$495 Local Open Rate
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contract'
100-199 col. i
200-299 col
300-399 col
400-499 col
500-599col. inches
h00 and above
nches$450
nches$4.40
nches$4.30
nches$4.20
$4.10
$4.00
.$5
.00
-1
$4 I
4 '
I I
$4.45
54 �
20 Insertions 11 $4 I
$4
I;
5 Insertions 11 "
U225 �
10 Insertions I

15 Insertions ;
(12 25 I
(12 25 l
2 Inserttions l
DNA research conducted at ECU
Continued from page 1
curriculum which includes bio-
chemistry, genetics, microbiol-
ogy virology, immunology, and
has recently developed courses in
hvbridoma technology and
mechanisms of genetic recombi-
nation. The most alluring aspect
of biotechnology is the diversity
i : its uses, seemingly limited only
hum in imagination.
"Hvbridoma technology is a
cell fusion technology which pro-
vides high precision tools forbiol-
gy research, disease diagnosis
or seperation techniques, said
Allen. "If you wanted a certain
chemical, hvbridoma technology
allows you to isolate that chemical
in a raw material (a plant for ex-
ample) and then recover and pu-
nts' that chemical. It can also be
isi d to diagnose genetic detects
rding �� Di K it leen E.
Keni i EC! bacterial genetics
� V0 NIK V lIKll LINTi
gether like modular!
4
the desired DNA and select the
proper enzyme.
The commercial gams from
this technique alone are stagger-
ing. According to Dr. Kennedy,
through genetic engineering we
can create insulin tor treating dia-
betes or plants that automatically
nitrogen fixate and are more resis-
tant to disease herbicides, heat, produce the hormones by this
etc. method, extract and purity them
Dr. Allen suggested that we and then market them,
could produce human growth
hormones and recombine the
DNA from those cells with certain
cells in dairy cows so that they
produce the hormones as they
produce milk. We could mass
Classified Display
Open Rate
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00' 4?
Two Color and black$155.00
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
are pui
furniture composed of blocks,
a ith a code in each block. Some
sequences are change�
ly reorganized by the
cell gain s me advantage.
I r i xample, a virus whose
genes flip fl p like a switch
. win
: � t xpress onecharac-
teristic in one situation and an-
other characteristic in another
situation so that it can infect two
nt types of host cells. 1 here
is an enzyme responsible for this
� p-fl p- enzymes are the main
tool for recombinant DNA.
"We have a categorized 'tool
box' of naturally occurring en-
zymes with which we can artifi-
cially make any rearrangement in
a DNA sequence or make new
sequences Kennedy stated. Cer-
tain enzymes will react only with
certain DNA sequences, always
cutting and recombining at spe-
cific places - one need only find
ATTIC
Applications For Student Union
Production Chairperson
are now being accepted
Job Description:
� Serve on Student Union Program
Board.
� Plan and Promote the Annual
Student Union Banquet.
� Select and plan Student Union
Decorations and receptions
respectfully.
� Select Committee Members.
� Coordinate and head committee
meetings.
Applications are being taken until
February 3
For more information call
757-6611 ext.210
or go by
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 236
CLASS, FACULTY AND
STAFF PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will be taken from Jan. 23 through
Jan. 27. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
IT ISN'T YOUR YEARBOOK UNTIL
YOU'RE IN IT! -
Money for Coliege
Over 3 Million Students Will Qualify For
College Grants & Scholarships
�Learn the quickest & easiest ways you can win both
scholarships and financial aid awards.
�Learn how to improve your chances for a Pell Grant
�Learn how to increase the amount of your Guaranteed
Student Loan.
�Learn how much money you are eligible to receive so
you can choose the school that best suits your true
financial need.
For more information and a FREE copy of
10 Ways to Stretch Jour
Scholarship Chances!
fill out and Mail the attached coupon TODAY!
t
Send for FREE Information
Name
Address
City
� State
Zip-
Phone()
L
Mail Coupon To:
College Financial Resources
205 E. 13th Street
Greenville. NC 27858
757-1543






V

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
1ANUARY 26,1989
Is Chlamydia contagious?
I recently found out that I
have chlamydia. How do I get it
and is it contagious?
Chlamydia is a bacterial in-
fection that is sexually transmit-
ted. Public Health authorities esti-
mate that four to five people get
chlamydia for every person who
has gonorrhea.
Genital infections caused by
chlamydia occur in men and
women and may cause different
types of medical problems includ-
ing:
-sterility in males and
infertility in women
-Reiter's syndrome, an
arthritis-like condition
-increased chance of
ectopic pregnancy (the embryo
grows in the Fallopian tube in-
stead of the uterus)
-pelvic inflamatory
disease in women
Health Column
By
Mary Elesha
Adams
-increased chance of
spontaneous abortion and still-
birth in women who have ch-
lamydial infections during preg-
nancy
-transmission of the bac-
teria to a child during birth caus-
ing eye infections and pneumonia
How do you know you have
chlamydia?
The chlamydia victim may
not know that he or she has the
disease because 60-80 percent of
women and 10 percent of men
with the disease have no symp-
toms. If people don't know they
have chlamydia they may infect
others. Symptoms may include:
-painful urination and
a watery discharge from the penis
in men
-women may have
genital itching and burning, dull
pelvic pain, vaginal discharge
and bleeding between menstrual
periods
If you think you have ch-
lamydia see your doctor, nurse
practicioner, or physician assis-
tant and ask for a test which in-
volves taking a genital sample.
The Student Health Center rou-
tinely tests for chlamydia in
women who have routine pelvic
pap exams because of the lack of
noticeable symptoms.
The treatment for chlamydia
is antibiotic therapy. You should
tell your sexual partner if you
have chlamydia so he or she can
also seek medical attention.
The East Carolinian
DNA research conducted at ECU
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makev h Keith PearCe
mchaMAlLcook AdamBlankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$495 Ltcal Open Rate $4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 5 Insertions(4in4-
200-299 col. inches$4.40 0225")$4.50
300-399 col. inches$4.30 10 Insertions(4in$450
400-499 col. inches$4.20 0225")$4.45
500-599 col. inches$4.10 15 Insertionsin$4-4d
600 and above$4.00 122S$4.40
Classified Display 20 Insertions (4in$440
Open Rate$5.00 i225")$4.35
Color Advertising 25 Inserttions 4in$43d
One Color and black$90.00 (i225")$4-20
Two Color and black$155.00
BUSINESS HOURS:
Continued from page 1
curriculum which includes bio-
chemistry, genetics, microbiol-
ogy, virology, immunology, and
has recently developed courses in
hybridoma technology and
mechanisms of genetic recombi-
nation. The most alluring aspect
of biotechnology is the diversity
of its uses, seemingly limited only
by human imagination.
"Hybridoma technology is a
cell fusion technology which pro-
vides high precision tools for biol-
ogy research, disease diagnosis,
or seperation techniques said
Allen. "If you wanted a certain
chemical, hybridoma technology
allows you to isolate that chemical
in a raw material (a plant for ex-
ample) and then recover and pu-
rify that chemical. It can also be
used to diagnose genetic defects
According to Dr. Kathleen E.
Kennedy, ECU bacterial genetics
specialist, "We know that DNA
are put together like modular
furniture composed of blocks,
with a code in each block. Some
DNA sequences are changeable;
deliberately reorganized by the
cell to gain some advantage
For example, a virus whose
genes "flip-flop like a switch,
allowing it to express one charac-
teristic in one situation and an-
other characteristic in another
situation so that II can infect two
different types of host cells. There
is an enzyme responsible for this
flip-flop�enzymes are the main
tool for recombinant DNA.
"We have a categorized 'tool
box' of naturally occurring en-
zymes with which we can artifi-
cially make any rearrangement in
a DNA sequence or make new
sequences Kennedy stated. Cer-
tain enzymes will react only with
certain DNA sequences, always
cutting and recombining at spe-
cific places - one need only find
AitiiO
the desired DNA and select the
proper enzyme.
The commercial gains from
this technique alone are stagger-
ing. According to Dr. Kennedy,
through genetic engineering we
tant to disease herbicides, heat,
etc.
Dr. Allen suggested that we
could produce human growth
hormones and recombine the
DNA from those cells with certain
produce the hormones by this
method, extract and purify them
and then market them.
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
t�
can create insulin for treating dia- cells in dairy cows so that they
betes or plants that automatically produce the hormones as they
nitrogenfixateandaremoreresis- produce milk. We could mass
Applications For Student Union
Production Chairperson
are now being accepted
Job Description:
� Serve on Student Union Program
Board.
� Plan and Promote the Annual
Student Union Banquet.
� Select and plan Student Union
Decorations and receptions
respectfully.
� Select Committee Members.
� Coordinate and head committee
meetings.
Applications are being taken until
February 3
For more information call
757-6611 ext.210
or go by
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 236
ltoneyfor Colltgt
Over 3 Million Students Will Qualify For
College Grants & Scholarships
�Learn the quickest & easiest ways you can win both
scholarships and financial aid awards.
�Learn how to improve your chances for a Pell Grant
�Learn how to increase the amount of your Guaranteed
Student Loan.
�Learn how much money you are eligible to receive so
you can choose the school that best suits your true
financial need.
For more information and a FREE copy of
10 "Ways to Stretch Jour
Scholarship Chances!
fill out and Mail the attached coupon TODAY!
t
Send for FREE Information
Name �
Address
City
I
I
Phone()
� State
Zip-
College Financial Resource
205 E. 13th Street
CULTY AND
ORTRAITS
1 be taken from Jan. 23 through
taken in the Soda Shop at the
112 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
�y to have your picture taken for
caneer Yearbook.
ARBOOK UNTIL
E IN IT!
I Mail Coupon To: Greenville. NC 27858 II
7g7QL543
L.





'i
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 26.1989 3
Vietnam ConferenceThen
and Now to be held
ECU Nrw. Bureau
"Vietman�A Family Expe-
rience: Then and Now" is the
topic of the 29th annual ECU
Family Life Conference sched-
uled for Jan. 30-31.
The event is sponsored by the
ECU Family Life Committee and
the ECU Department of Child
Development and Family Rela-
tions in cooperation with the
Greenville Veterans Outreach
Center. All sessions are free and
open to the public.
The opening address will be
given by Ira Hamburg of Wash-
ington, D.C founder and presi-
dent of the Friends of the Vietman
Veterans Memorial. Hamburg's
computer consulting firm de-
signed and implemented the loca-
tor system used at the Memorial,
and Hamburg developed the
"Remember Them" project for the
survivors of Vietnan veterans.
Hamburg's remarks, "The
Wall: A Healing Journey for the
Family will be presented at 7
p.m in Hendrix Theatre. A recep-
tion will follow in the
VanLandingham Room of the
ECU Home Ecomonics Building.
Tuesday sessions, all set for
Hendrix Theatre, will begin with
a 9 a.m address, "Oral Histories
given by Ira Hamburg.
At 10:15 am Mitch Stroud and
Harold McMillion of the
Greenville Veterans Outreach
Center will speak on "Vietman
Veterans, Families and Society: A
Psychosocial Model
"Marriage and Intergencra-
tional Relationships" is the topic
of a 2 p.m address by former
Armv Nurse Corps Lt. Mary
Stout, president of Vietnam Vet-
erans of America, along with sev-
eral veteran family members.
Lt. Stout will also present the
closing address at 7 p.m. Her topic
is 'The Vietnam Veteran and
Familv: Community and Na-
tional Support
Chapter 272 of Vietnam Vet-
erans of America will host a pub-
lic reception honoring Lt. Stout
Tuesday evening at the VET Cen-
ter, 150 Arlington Boulevard,
beginning at 8:30 p.m.
This year's ECU Family Life
Conference was planned bv a
committee headed by Dr. Mel
Markowski, chair of the ECU
Department of Child Develop-
ment and Family Relations, a part
oi the ECU School oi Home Eco-
nomics.
Other committee members
include representatives from the
ECU social work, counseling,
family relations, rehabilitation
studies, nursing, psychology,
health and sociology depart-
ments.
NEWLY REMODELED
GRAND OPENING
SPECIAL
Thurs. January 26th
Special Appearance
"THE MOODY DUDES"
Please use the 5th street entrance
Doors Open at 9:00 P.M.
Through rain, sleet and through a nice day, this Postal
worker makes sure we receive Mom's much needed letter.
(Photo bv Thomas Walters�Photolab)
Wheelchair dance video made
RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
o00 wats
ECU News Bureau
Two ECU faculty members
have developed a video that they
hope will put an end to the com-
monlv-held misconception that
people in wheelchairs are fragile
and not to be touched.
In "Shake, Rattle and Roll-
Wheelchair Dance Dr. Boni
Boswell, an adapted physical
education professor, and Mike
Hamer, an English lecturer who
was paralyzed in a 1985 diving
accident, perform a creative
dance number they choreo-
graphed especially for the video
35i Harrier's wheelchair is the
main focus of their unusual yet
sensual performance. At one
point Boswell sits on Hamer'slap,
and they embrace; at another, she
stands on the seat of his chair.
"People in chairs need to have
that kind of physical interaction
with able-bodied persons
Boswell said. "They're not going
to break when you touch them. If
thev fall out oi their chairs, you
just put them back
Another objective of the slow
sequence is to encourage creativ-
ity in the disabled. "With the duet
we wanted to show that vou can
trv something new, because I had
certainly never done any kind of
choreographed dancing before
Hamer said. "But after we went
social dancing a few times, we
were tempted to try something
else
Getting other disabled per-
sons out on the dance floor is ulti-
mately what Boswell and Hamer
hope to accomplish with the
video. "It's a wonderful way to
get exercise, as much for the able-
bodied as for the disabled
Hamer said.
The 15-minute video took
more than a year of meetings,
rehearsals and filmings to com-
plete. Except for the sound, which
was recorded and mixed by Au-
dio Arts of Greenville, the video
was produced entirely on campus
by the Center for Health Sciences
Audiovisual Communication
(CHSAC). Funding was provided
by the College of Arts and Sci-
ences and the Pitt County Re-
gional Rehabilitation Center.
The film ; 'urcs five people
in wheelchairs, both paraplegic
and quadriplegic, dancing at a
local nightclub with able-bodied
partners. The dancers also make
encouraging comments and help-
ful hints throughout the film, such
as "Make sure there's a lot oi
room. I don't want to go some-
place where people are falling in
my lap and spilling beer on me
Boswell, who plans to use the
film in class, and Hamer see no
end to possibilities for the video.
im Barrett, manager of therapeu-
tic recreation at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, said he will
show it during some of his treat-
ment sessions. "Dancing isn't
necessarily for everybody, but
neither is a wheelchair track he
said. This is an alternative for
people who enjoy music. This is a
video that shows yes you can
Dr. Ulrich Alscntzer, chair-
man oi ECU's Depar'ment of
Physical Medicine and Rehabili-
tation, said the video will be
useful as an "eye opener" and
plans to show it to residents and at
professional meetings. "This is an
activity that can be pursued by
paraplegics and quadriplegics
that isn't immediately obvious
he said.
In Greenville, copies mav be
checked out from the Health'Sci-
ences Library or Joyner Library at
no charge.
TOUR UNCLE WANTS
TO PAT FOR COLLEGE. BUT ONLY
IF YOU'RE GOOD ENOUGH.
Army ROTC scholarships pay full tuition
and provide an allowance for fees and
textbooks. Find out if you qualify.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
Contact Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
AT GROG's
Reggae and Progressive Music
Beverage Specials
Doors OPEN at 5:30
Every Friday
Remember Your Orientation Experience?
Join PREVIEW '89
Become an Orientation Assistant
and create a memorable
experience for the New Freshmen.
Pick Up Application Packet: 209 Whichard
Deadline for completed Application:
February 17,1989 at
4:00pm
VUARNET.
U C C I

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ALL SUNGLASSES
Store Hours
MonSat. 10-9
Sun. 1-6
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Local and Out of Town Newspapers
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Qftlt iEaflt (Earnlinian
Sntwg the E4W i awhl .i�rfc cwmmmmtt . W5
FETE FERNALD, Gmmi Mmmgrn
STEPHANIE FOLSOM, 'tnijinj u,t
James F.j. McKee, r� fftu iwm
Tim Hampton, v� ea�
KRISTEN HALBERC, Sps Eda
Chip Carter. f�, �.�
Dean Waters, cr�t�M�.
Debbie Stevens, sm
January 26.1989
OPINION
Brad Bannister, iuh
eff Parker, stag wamm
TOM H 'PP. firrmtttimi fi1�jm
SI SA N H W E LL, PKMfafCtUM Miiiujrr
Stephanie Emorymt�sra�
.MAC C LARK, Ku siwj Maruger
Page 4
Heritage
What's in a name? Sometimes
more than Shakespeare thought,
according to the Reverend Jesse
Jackson. Jackson, the most promi-
nent black American (except per-
haps Bill Cosby) wants to replace the
racial identifier "black" with "Afri-
can-American On the surface, this
proposal seems useless � after all,
changing a name won't change the
attitudes of non-blacks towards
blacks.
But that's not the reason for the
name change. The chief reason is
that blacks need a starting point to
get in touch with the African part of
their heritage � not to be ashamed
of it. The name change is the first
step in establishing a sense of racial
solidarity, wnich vould, among its
other benefits, help to reduce black-
vsblack crime.
Besides being truly beautiful and
rich, African culture is important to
manv blacks. That's hard for many
Americans of any race to under-
stand, giver America's basic indif-
ference to history and heritage.
Jackson's plan is to promote a
greater awareness of blacks' shared
heritage, and therefore to change the
attitudes of blacks towards them-
selves and each other.
The term "African-American" is
more than just a focal point for a new
identity. Implicit in its use is the
admission that blacks are yet search-
ing and struggling for the unity they
need to survive in a society that is
still racist. The more obvious forms
of racism have largely been elimi-
nated, but the subtler kinds still
Hourish � the kinds that keep
blacks largely out of advertise-
ments, off oi television (Cosby not-
withstanding) and out of many jobs.
Why not just use the term
"American"7 Because, frankly, nei-
ther white nor black Americans are
vet ready to give up racial classifica-
tions. As long as c lassifications exist,
"Afric in-American" may well be
the Ix st of the bunch.
I
Foruin
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop themby our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance to joyner library.
For purposes of verification, ah
letters fnust include the name, major,
classification, address,phone number
and the signature of the authoris).
Letter are limited to 300 words
or less, double -spaced, typed or
Rules
neatly printed. All letters are sub-
let to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks mill
be permitted. Students, faculty and
itaft writing letters for this page are
reminded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday
for Thursday editions.
3tn;DET 0?Wi0N PtfLU
1 Xo & � oX �
WHY HOT JUST LBAVE fT Af AHR?16AV5 ?
Time to clean up the environment
To the editor:
Has anyone noticed the amaz-
ingly huge amount of garbage being
deposited along the sides of our high-
ways, streets, and roads?
I'm sure that those of us who
unconsciously throw trash out of our
car windows wouldn't do it if they
knew that these materials don't break
down and decompose into the earth.
This trash will sit there until it is
picked up and disposed of properly.
Even more important are cigarette
butts.
Cigarette butts are not only non-
decomposable, but they pose a great
threat to birds when they, mistak-
ingly, swallow them as worms and
painfully choke to death. Or they use
the butts as nest building material
and the fiberglass in the butts causes
the egg shells to soften and eventually
deteriorate, all because we stomped
out our butts rather than took a few
extra steps toward the nearest ashtray
or garbage can.
Fortunately there is a wonderful
solution to this problem. Across
North Carolina people are cleaning
up this mess a mile at a time. It's called
Adopt-A-Highway and it entails
adopting a mile of a road amdt taking
care of it. I've seen it going over well
in Wilmington and Chapel-Hill. In
Wilmington a lot of merchants are
getting involved and in Chapel-Hill
the Greek system is playing a major
role.
I know a lot of us who live in
Greenville don't really care about our
environment because it's not where
we call home, but this apathy has got
to stop because on a much larger scale
this is earth and to all of us it's the only
home we have.
Anyone interested in Adopt-A-
Highway can call Allen Lewis in
Washington, N.C. 946-3689
David Weathers Jackson
Senior
English
Boycott "Troop"
To the editor:
My Fellow, African American
Brothers & Sisters,
In recent months you have been
encouraged not to buy certain manu-
factured goods because they support
apartheid. Many are unaware of ex-
actly which companies favor white
supremacy against our brothers and
sisters in South Africa. Many compa-
nies have become successful through
the supporters of racial discrimina-
tion. Before the newest marketed
name becomes a part of your daily
wear, I feel it is my duty as an African
American to put it to a stop. The
highly acclaimed "TROOP" wear
was founded by the white supremacy
group known as the "Klu Klux Klan
Racism in disguise is what I call it. The
letters T-R-O-O-P stand for 'Total
rule over oppressed people
Through my eyes, this hasbeen one of
the biggest cover ups in fashion his-
tory. I encourage my brothers and
sisters here at ECU to support me in
my protest against racism by stop
wearing, buying and supporting
Troop wear.
Nara Bost
Sophomore
Art
The Measle Blues
To the editor:
I am so disgusted right now with
certain things involved with this
"measles epidemic" on campus.
First let me say that I am aware that
ECU officials did not bring this on
themselves and that the Health
Department has forced this vaccina-
tion of students on the university.
But the responsibility of notifying
those students who need the vacci-
nation is totally up to the unviver-
sity. The problem is with notifying
the fi fth-year seniors. This past Tues-
day a friend of mine persuaded me to
go check with the Student Health
Center to see if we needed to get "the
shot When I arrived at the infir-
mary, the nurses told me that since I
had registered before 1985 � when
the measles vaccination was not
required for admisssion to the uni-
versity � I had to show proof that I
had been vaccinated sometime in the
last 23 years, or stand in line for a
shot that day. If I had neither records
of vaccination or "the shot" before 8
p.m. that night, I would not be per-
mitted to attend class the next day.
So, of course, I stood in line and got
the shot no big deal. But what
about the unlucky seniors that didn' t
happen to wander into the infirmarv
to find out all this information? How
were they supposed to find out if
they needed the vaccination?
The next thing that made me
furious is the "Public Safety Depart-
ment" had a special "officer" in
charge of writing parking tickets to
r.ll the students who had no choice
but to park illegally in order to get
their required vaccination! Yes, fac-
ulty was ticketed as well! What is
wrong with these people? Do thev
plan this in secret SECL'PY meetings
(Strategic ECU Parking Violators)?
Why can't they leave us alone for just
thisone time? Or please show upand
direct traffic in the area: 1 urge all
who got tickets to protest them � It's
just not fair. I'm sorry 1 had to get so
mad at tins but I've just had enough!
Dillan Knight Kalkhurst
J'u o- i i� ieai�r Class (RrtwUetntu
Communications
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the paper, The
East Carolinian features "The
Campus Spectrum This is an
opinion column by guest writers
from the student body and fac-
ulty. The columns printed in "The
Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the
campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted onh
with regard to rules of grammar
an Recency, Tersons, subrvttvv.
columns must be willing to acccp:
byline credit for their efforts, as no
entries from ghost writers will be
published.
What is Bush going to do about the poor?
By FRED BARNES
New Republic
If recent experience is any guide, sometime be-
fore next November the president and Congress will
hammer out a plan that will bring the budget deficit
down another notch or two. It probablv won't be
enough to meet the Gramm-Rudman deficit target of
$100billion, but it will be enough to signify progress.
The question is: How wrenching will the proc-
ess of reaching agreement be? What price will the
economhave to pay? How seriously will the new
administration's effectiveness be undermined?
How much more disillusioned with the government
will the American people become? These questions
are for the new president to answer.
There are two paths President Bush can follow.
One option is to hold firmly to his "No new taxes,
period" pledge. The journey down this road would
be long, arduous and acrimonious, and would lead
to stalemate and confrontation. It would probably
involve another revision of the Gramm-Rudman
targets, some even phonier than usual accounting,
and only a modest amount of true deficit reduction.
Worst of all, the president and Congress would be
condemned to retrace these steps next year.
The second option, superficially, is also unat-
tractive: After months of telling us to read his lips,
Bush would have to eat his words, and call for a tax
hike. A bit awkward, to be sure. But in the long run
this may be the only route to lasting economic health
and � read our lips � re-election.
If Bush hopes to make good on his campaign
promises to protect Social Security and devote more
resources to the environment, education, prisons
and child care, some of the remaining programs will
have to undergo savage cuts.
And as long as the Democrats wisely refuse to be
the first to talk about raising taxes, they will be
unable to fashion an alternative proposal. As has
happened in three of the past four years, a budget
stalemate will develop. The frustration level will rise
on both sides. The new administration's effective-
ness and the new president's leadershipabilities will
be called into question. By June or July, Washington
will be malaise city.
Budgetary gridlock cannot continue forever.
Two things- � theGramm-Rudmanlawandthedebt
ceiling � virtually guararei that any impasse will
be broken, one vvav or another, around autumn.
First, i n mid-August the Office of Management and
Budget will issue a report showing that deep cuts in
military and domestic programs will occur in mid-
October, in compliance with Gramm-Rudman lim-
its, i f an agreement on deficit reduction isn't reached.
Sometime in September, the government will
exhaust i ts cu rrent authority to borrow. Then, unless
Congress increases the ceiling, the government will
have to begin living within its tax receipts. Such
"cold turkey" budget balancing would involve a
wrenching adjustment for both the economy and
those who depend on the government for their sus-
tenance. Congress will raise the debt ceiling.
But powerful fiscai conservatives in Congress �
Gramm and Rudman, among others � will insist
that the raising of the debt ceiling be linked either to
a budget package that cuts the deficit or to deficit-
cutting procedural reforms. Liberals will opt for the
former. The subsequent negotiations will be pro-
tracted, and by the time the budget is squared away,
Congress and the president will both have spent
months appearing ineffectual and blaming their
impotence on each other.
Bleak as it is, even this scenario could prove to be
kinder and gentler than reality. For it assumes that
foreign lenders, the Federal'Reserve Board, and
domestic financial and stock markets are willing to
put up with a prolonged budget battle.
If they aren't, and interest rates rise substantially
or thedollar or stock market plummets, then the new
administration could find itself bargaining with
Congress from a position of weakness. Adverse
market reactions might also induce a recession that
would end Ronald Reagan's long Morning in Amer-
ica and leave the administration in a much deeper
hole and the deficit much less tractable.
The second path available to Bush is in some
ways more daunting han the first, but it has the
advantage of not leading to political oblivion or
gradual economic ruin. It would involve a sustained
effort to construct a multi-year deficit reduciton
package that included tax hikes as well as spending
cuts.
Clearly this journey couldn't begin immedi-
ately. Bush won the right, in fact the obligation, to
present Congress with a oudget that achieves the
deficit targets without tax increases. But should this
proposal prove unacceptable to a majority in Con-
gress, as it almost certainly will, the president should
quickly take the lead in fashioning a compromise.
Of course, the mere thought of George Bush
leading on the tax issue would be enough to enrage
many on the Republican right. But a majoritv of
thoughtful Republicans have concluded that some
tax increases are inevitable if the deficit is to be re-
duced to manageable proportioP: To make a tax
hike more palatable to conserv; lives, Bush could
make it contingent on Congress's holding spending
below specified levels.
Democrats would undoubtedly revel in Bush's
chagrin if he reneged on his central campaign prom-
ise. However, they wctM soon find that there was
surprisingly little political hay to be made. After
raising taxes, Bush could probably convince the
public that the Democratic alternative would have
raised them by more.
And, anyway, in the long run Bush will profit
from reneging if a multi-year defici t reduction pack-
age allows interest rates to fall and the economy to
continue expanding. In that event, Democrats may
have to sign up for tours if they want to see the inside
of the White House before the turn of the century.
n
ib
m
oi
'






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 26. 1989 5
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Immediately.
Non-smoker. To share 3 bedroom house.
Will have own bedroom. 175.00 per
month plus 1 3 utilities. 5 minutes from
school. Call Pamela at 758-7142.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Stratford Arms
til end of semester. $170.00 a month, 12
utilities Call 756-5183 or 324-3354.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share nice 3 bedroom apt. Only $120.00
month, 13 utilities. Available Feb. 1st.
Call 752-3678.
ONE MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
sublease apartment two blocks from
campus (list.). Walking distance from
school, downtown, and many other
places Subleaser has option to furnish his
bedroom or use existing furniture. Micro-
wave, toaster oven, color TV with cable.
Costs only $150 per month plus utilities.
Call today! 757-0412.
ROOMMATE WANTED: MF 13 rent
& utilities, own room, close to campus.
Call 758-8283.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Starting
March 1st. Responsible female. Geor-
getown Apts. Within walking distance to
campus and downtown. 12 rent. 12
utilities. Free cable. Call 830-1758. Leave
message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed imme-
diately to share 2 bedroom apartment at
Eastbrook. Private room, no deposit, 12
rent and 12 utilities. Call 830-5165.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed imme-
diately to share 2 bedroom apartment,
during spring andor summer session. 2
miles from campus on ECU transit route.
Pay 1 2 rent and 1 2 utilities. Call Cather-
ine 355-7307.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share two bedroom apartment. $207 rent,
$95 deposit, 12 utiltities. Call Elena 756-
7357.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying service. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J call early
and book for your formal or party. 758-
1700, ask for Dillon or leave a message.
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM-
POSED: Call 756-9136.
TYPING: Term Papers, letters, resume's
� etc. Call Becky 9 a.m5 p.m. M-F 758-
1161.
HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
1979 VW RABBIT. Blue, AMFM radio,
air, good condition. $1000. 830-4910.
FOR SALE: 81 Chevette in good condition
with nice stereo. Asking $1,000.00. Call
756-9198.
FOR SALE: Britches Great Outdoors
brown leather jacket. Size 40 regular. The
fatigued leather look. Very cool it stylish
Six months old! $180.00.
DEPENDABILITY M) SALE: 78
Datsun B210. New brakes, muffler, tail
iupe, head gasket. Wheels balanced and
aligned. Runs great. Make an offer! 758-
949.
S
fOR SALE: House in Farmville, 2 bed-
toom, 1 12 baths. Walking distance of
iowntown. Excellent condition.
39,000.00 205 Gnmmersburg St. 758-
K232.
CEG COOLER: Regngerates to 28 de-
rees F. Includes tap & gauges $75.00. 1
air realistic home stereo speakers. 60
katts each. Great for Dorms or Apts
$60.00pr. Call after 4. 756-0580.
I

lOR SALE: Washers, Dryers, Refrigera-
nts, Freezers, Stoves $100.00 & up. Guar-
tteed. Also have used furniture at rea-
nable prices. Call 746-6929.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Inter
ested in making money part-time photo-
graphing campus activities? No experi-
ence necessary, we train. If you are highly
sociable, have a 35 mm camera, and trans-
portation, please call between noon and 5
p.m M-F, at 1-800-722-7033.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Mary Smith REAL
Cnsis Center 758-HELP.
STUDENT NEEDED: To post advertis-
ing materials on campus bulletin boards.
Work own hours with good pay. Write
Campus Advertising, P.O. Box 1221, Du-
luth, GA 30136-1221. (404) 873-9042.
BAE COMPUTER NEEDS: Responsible
student to represent our computer. Incen-
tive bonus plan. Interested persons please
send resume to 3563 Ryder Street, Santa
Clara, CA 95051.
COACH: Experienced for USS Summer
Swim Team. References required. Apply:
Tarboro Swim Club P.O. Box 1301 Tar-
boro, NC 27886.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS:
For Counselors, Water Front Director,
Asst. Swim Instructors. Friendly Day
Camp is a summer day camp for mentally
and physically handicapped children &
adults. Please write or call The Special
Populations Program, P.O. Box 590,
Raleigh, NC 27602 (919) 755-6832.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACATION IN
CANCUN Become a College Tours rep-
resentative on your campus and get a free
trip. Netting, tpjmy�we. provide ev�y-�
thing you need. It's a little work for alot of
fun! Call 1-800-727-0005.
BARMAIDS WANTED: Part-time. No
experience needed, will train. Must be 21
yrs. old. Excellent tips. Call 758-0058, ask
for Manager.
TUTORS NEEDED: For all business
classes. Contact Lisa at Academic Coun-
seling, Dept. of Athletics 757-6282 or 757-
1677.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Wants to thank
AOPi sorority for all their help during
rush. Thanks alot!
ALPHA SIGMA PHI RUSHES: Tonight
it all starts � good luck to all of of you!
PI KAPP: Congrats on a fantastic house!
Love, Alpha Phi.
KAYLA VAUGHN: The 8 of us 4 years
ago, took the plunge and pledged Chi O.
Seven of us were free and itchy, but dear-
est Kayla was hooked on Richie, for years
we bothered and begged and pleaded,
insisting that parties and frats were what
she needed. She grabbed thr rock, she's no
longer free, but a friend and a Beta Ep
she'll always be. Gone are the days of
potential "siam" so leave that up to
Margo, Amber, Susie, Krissi, Ashley,
Jeanie, and Cam. We love you
THETA CHI'S: At Grog's we met once
again to see who would leave with a
Superbowl win. It looked like the Bengals
had the game, yet the Niners took home
the Superbowl fame. Thanks Theta Chi's
it was a real treat, Superbowl with you
guys was certainly SWEET! Love the sis-
THE BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA
ALPHA: Would like to thank all the guys
that came ut for rush. Best wishes for a
successful semester.
GO PIKES: We lead, we learn, we take
charge. Regional Leadership Conference
Jan. 27-29.
CONGRATULATIONS TO: Emily Eure,
Meade Burke, Amy Harris and Lisa Joyer
on becoming Sigma sisters. We love you
all and welcome you into our bonds of sis-
terhood. Love, the Sisters.
ANN & AMY: I just wanted to let you
guys know that I love ya! I had a great time
last weekend. To bad we missed the I loli-
day Inn! Rhonda.
SHANNON: I hope that your Zeta week
will be a time to remember. Get psyched
for tomorrow night. Love always, Your
Big Sis, Elena.
PIKE LIL' SISTERS: Welcome back We
had an awesome time at the party. Be
prepared to throw down this weekend
during the regional conference. The Big
enchilada & the brothers.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ters and pledges of AOPi.
AOPl'S: The final plans are being made
for Roseball. Are you ready7 I Special
RING0LD TOWERS
NOW TAKING LEASES FOR FALL
SEMESTER 89. EFFICIENCY 1 & 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS. FOR
INFO. CALL HOLLIE SIMONOWICH
AT 752-2865
Special
BETA PHI: Congratulations to two of its
outstanding brothers for their exceptional
service. Rick Miller and Randy Bishop,
brothers of the week. The Chap.
CONGRATULATIONS MARK ROYS-
TER: You just won Super Bowl XXIII.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: The key to success.
Bonus Diskettes
514"DSDD
$4.95 per box of 10
Verbatim Diskettes
514" DS.DD
$7.95 per box of 10
SDF Professional Computers, Inc.
106 East 5th St.Greenville, NC 27834
752-3694
Wanna have a Great
SPRING BREAK? Spend
8 days and 7 nights in
Sunny Daytona Beach.
$190 for Transportation
and Lodging.
Dall Dave at
758-8001
to insure a seat.
THE TOWER CLUB: Its baok
DOUG C. Have a good weekend' Don't
party too much Susan
MARY LESLIE If you eva gel time 1
would love to take you to dinner ATB
RICK AND LARRY:hir fifth roommate
"not mine" is tired of doing dishes, so
leave the TNI alone and do them
RAYMOND: KoKivo stress but don't tell
us how Tell Jonnv to do his dishes SM.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care'
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thnj SaL Low
Co�t Termination to 3S wrekfl of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
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Ketum to: The East Carolinian. Publications bldg - ECU, Greenville. NC 27l�S-Ux5
OPPORTUNITY
Tri County Homes, Inc. is expanding It's sales force over all
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If you are looking for a company that offers benefits like life
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confidential interview will be arranged.
� ���'�
$79 MAZDA GLC: 4 speed, AC, AM-
mA casi-ette, new tires 1100.00 Call 752-
6fc34
i
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
Fjom $100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Cftevys. Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
67-6000 Ext. S-1166.
I
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS, CARS, 4 X 4'S:
Seized in drug raids for under $100.00?"
Call for facts today. 602-837-3401, Ext. 711.
79 FIREBIRD FOR SALE: Good condi-
tion. V6, automatic, AMFM, air condi-
tion, new tires. $1750.00. John: 551-2460
(day), 830-5295 (eve.)
FOR SALE: 1986 Honda Elite 250 motor-
cycle, 2500 miles, great shape, $999.00 call
752-5759 days.
MOVING SALE: Portable BW TV: $40,
Living room chair: $40, Dresser: $40, Sla-
lom water-ski $35. Call 756-8428 after 6
p.m.
ABLE BODIED PERSON: Interested in
part-time position cleaning carpets. Good
pay, flexible schedule. Must have reliable
transportation. Call Frank 355-0793.
tESORT HOTELS: Cruiselines, Airlines,
Amusement Parks, NOW accepting ap-
fqr y?rine and summer jobs, internships,
and career positions. For more informa-
tion and an application; write national
Collegiate Recreation Service; PO Box
8074; Hilton Head SC 29938.
PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: Needed
for entry level, full-time position at local
TV station. Must be dependable and work
well with others. TV production back-
ground helpful but not essential. Send in-
quiries to: Production manager WNCT-
TV P.O. Box 898 Greenville, NC 27835
EOE.
$10-$15HOUR PROCESSING MAIL
AT HOME: Weekly check guaranteed
For details write V k E Enterprises 14263
San Pablo Ave Suite 111, San Pablo, CA
94806.
Responsibility
Leadership
Advancement
First Wachovia means unlimited potential for personal
growth and career advancement for outstanding East Carolina
University graduates. Individuals who are ready to accept the
challenges of a career in the financial services industry, contact
Career Planning and Placement for an interview or further
information. First Wachovia
recruiters will be on campus iffo 1
for interviews February 2. WACHOVIA
SALES
POSITION
!
AVAILABLE

j�
PERSONALS
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties: Dance, Top 40, 4 Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan. ,
REWARD: For the return of a GOLD
TONE WATCH LOST Wed. afternoon.
Has incredible sentimental value. Call
758-9694.
HEY GREEKS: Have you heard about the
party at Rafters?
LOST: Black onyx ring with 3 dia-
monds�lost Sat Jan. 14 at the Elbo�-
Reward Call Teresa at 758-8120.
ATTENTION
APPLICATIONS ARE BEING
ACCEPTED FOR POSITIONS ON
BOTH THE JUDICIAL, HONOR
AND REVIEW BOARDS.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
SHOULD PICK UP APPLICATIONS
AT THE SGA OFFICES,
2ND FLOOR OF MENDENHALL.
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications
for an
Advertising Sales
Representative,
Requirements:
�Previous Sales Experience
�Good Personality &
Professional Appearance
�Excellent Communication
Skills
�Good Organizational Skills
�Must Be Dependable & Show
Initiative & Enthusiasm
�Must Have The Desire To
Excel
Apply in Person at The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
in Front of Joyner Library)
No Pbone Calls Please!
Announcements
r-HffTftTTANFr7TOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6 pm. in the Culture Center.
COXXESF WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded ��"�
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are will IJfH ���
the Cop office about off-c�npu� place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LOSE
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMFU THALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE
It's time to play that "Ultimate" game
once again. We naa a great time and sea-
son last semester and look forward to a
better one this time around! Come join us
at the bottom of College Hill on Sunday's,
Monday's, Wednesday's and Thursday's
at 3p.m.
FITNF OLYMPICS
Compete for the gold in fitness by taking
part in the 1989 FITN 3S OLYMPICS
competition. This one day event has such
activities as a stationary bicyde, relay,
obstacle course, flexibility and strength
endurance tests plus more, more, more.
Register Jan. 30 in 204 Memorial Gym for
the Feb. 2 event in Minges Coliseum. Call
757-6387 for more details.
ECU GQBEH choir
The ECU Gospel Choir has done it again!
We're having another give-away just in
time to relieve your financial stress. Your
chance at $25.00 is only 25 cent and begins
Jan. 25 through Jan. 27 from 9-3 p.m. at the
Student Store. Stop by and give us your
support. (Drawing to be held Fri. at 3:00 at
Student Store).
RiTN FOR CANCER
Alpha Phi Omega, the co-ed National
Service Fraternity, is sponsoring a 24-
hour Run for Cancer on April 14 and 15
with the American Cancer Society. For
more info call Heather at 758-9550, Bryan
at 756-9665 or Rose Richards at
Greenville's chapter of the American
Cancer Society. Find out about entering a
team or donating moneymaterials. Help
fight the battle against cancer by support-
ing Alpha Phi Omega and the American
Cancer Society in the 24-hour Run for
Cancer.
MASSAGE CLINIC
The P T Club is having a Massage Chnic
on Jan. 30 from 530-9:30 pm. Tickets arc
SI10 minutes in advance; SI 2510 min-
utes at the door Just "do it
WF MEED YOUR EXPERI-
ENCE!
Your achievements in everyday situ-
ations can be useful to others. Earn that
feeling of accomplishment. Real Crisis
Center is recruiting volunteer crisis coun-
selors. We will be offering training dasses
in this enriching field beginning Jan. 30
Call 758-HELP or come by 312 E. 10th St





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 26,1989
Announcements
FOOTBALL
Mangers needed for varsity football. Pick
up application at office in Minges. 757-
6029.
CO-OP EDUCATION
Interested in a summer job with a resort,
camp, or recreational facility? Feb. 9th,
ECU will host over 50 agencies looking for
summer employees jme by or call Co-
op Ed. for more inf. on vour career op-
portunities, 757-6979, GCB 2028.
EDUCATION MATORS
It's not too late to submit your application
for the work study trip to Pueblo, Mexico
for Spring Break (March 4-12). If you're
concerned about the expense - don't be.
Fund raising efforts will be a group en-
deavor. What a great opportunity to
travel while sharing your talents and
skills in a local school. Applications are
available in R-154, Speight. For more info
contact Marianne Exum at (w) 757-6271 or
(h) 830-9450.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Any student that ordered a new Student
Review should come be the Buccaneer
office and pick one up. We are located in
front of Joyner Library on the second floor
of the publications building.
CLASS. FACULTY & STAFF
YEARBOOK PICTURES
Yearbook photographs are now being
taken! If you have never been in the year-
book, now is your chance. Remember, it's
not vour yearbook until you're in it. Hours
are from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. & 1 p.m. - 4:30
p.m. this week onlv in the Student Store
Soda Shop.
ACCOUNTING MATORS
The Accounting Society will have its first
Spring Semester meeting on Jan. 30 at 3:00
p.m. in 1032 GCB. All interested students
are encouraged to attend. Refreshments
will be served after the meeting. Profes-
sional attire is recommended.
SOCIETY FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT OF MAN-
AGEMENT
There will be a meeting of S.A.M. on Feb.
1 at 3.00 p.m. in GCB 1028. Representa-
tives from Wachovia Bank Operations
Dept. will be speaking. They will also be
recruiting. This meeting is in conjunction
with the Decision Science Society and all
members are encouraged to attend.
Guests are welcome.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
There will be a meeting Jan. 31 in rm. 1013
at 5 p.m. New members are welcome.
HILLEL
I Iillel, a Jewish Student Organization will
be having a welcome back party on Jan.
26th. It will be from 8 p.m. until? at Strat-
ford Arm's Clubhouse. Music, snacks,
and soda will be provided. For more info
or rides, call Sarah at 830-9445.
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
study every Tuesday at 7p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring your Bible and a friend as we study
the book of Hebrews. Call Jim at 752-7199
if you need a ride or further info.
MS�
There will be a dance at the Methodist
Student Center on Jan. 27th at 8:30 p.m.
The MSC is located at 501 E. 5th St. across
from Garrett Dorm. Free refreshments,
free admission. Call 758-2030 or 752-7240
for details.
AMA
The American Mktg. Assoc. will be hold-
ing its first meeting of this semester on Jan.
26. The meeting will be held in rm 1037
GCB at 3.30 p.m. The guest speaker will be
Diana Crowl who is the Mktg. Director of
"The Rio The Club. All those interested
are welcome and old members are en-
couraged to attend.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
The Ladv Pirates will host arch rival UNC
Wilmington on Jan. 28th. Tipoff will be at
7 p.m. At halftime, along with the
Quincy's Dinner giveaway, a stupid pet
tricks contest will be held.
NAVIGATORS
"Flight 730 The weekly get-together of
The Navigators Christian Fellowship,
meets tonight at 7.30 p.m. in the Bio. build-
ing, rm. B-103. Songs, fun, food and bible
study are on. Nothing fancy, it's just
aimed at helping you get to know God
better. For more info, call Kenny at 757-
6052.
BQWL TEAM
Any student interested in becoming a
member of the ECU World Geography
Bowl Team, please meet in the Interna-
tional House, 306 E. Ninth St at 5 p.m. on
Jan. 26 for a qualification match. The ECU
team will compete at Duke on Feb. 25
against other North Carolina colleges and
universities.
ART GALLERY
Gallery Security Postion, must be quali-
fied for university work study program.
Hours: Mon. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 10a.m. to
5 p.m. and additional hours during the
week. (10 to 15 hours per week). If inter-
ested, please call Connie � 757-6665 or
Lou Anne 757-6336.
TUTORS NEEDED
Tutors needed for all business classes.
Contact Lisa at Academic Counseling,
Dept. of Athletics � 757-6282 or 757-1677.
WATERSKI CLUB
The ECU waterski club will be having its
meetings on Mon. at 930 The meetings are
scheduled for Joyner Library. All are
welcome to attend. For more info call
Tommy Lewis at 830-0137.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Looking for fellowship, fun and hearing
God's word? You are welcome to attend
"Prime Time" held at Rawl, 130 � every
Thurs. at 730 p.m. Refreshments served.
PET TRICKS CONTEST
College tuition is on the rise
At halftime of the Lady Pirates Basketball
game. There will be a stupid pet tricks
contest on Jan. 28th. The competition will
field three contestants with prizes to be
awarded by Animal House Pets. Tipoff
for the game vs. UNC Wilmington will be
7 p.m.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
A three part workshop offered to students
at no cost by the University counseling
Center. Feb. 2, 9, and 16 (Thursdays). All
three sessions will be conducted from 3 4
p.m. in 312 Wright Building. Assertive
ness Training can sharpen your interper-
sonal skills and help you target personal
goals. The workshop will focus on helping
members distinguish between their assor
five, aggressive, and nonassertive behav-
iors. Participants can learn how to express
themselves directly and openly, and re-
spond to interpersonal situations in a
manner which neither compromises indi-
vidual beliefs nor offends others. Please
call the Counseling Center (757-6661) for
Registration.
ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY
Students for Economic Democracy will bo
meeting at 7 p.m. on Sun. in Mendonhall
rom 248. All members are strongly urged
to attend.
CHINESE ACROBATS
The Student Union Minority Arts
Committee proudly presents The Chinese
Golden Ragon Acrobats and Magicians of
Taipei in performance on Feb. 2 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. This Company
consists of 23 dancers, magicians, and
acrobats in colorful costumes � half of
whom are members of the Danny Chang
(Troupe Director) family. This group has
performed extensively world wide. Tick-
ets for this event are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, (phone 757-6611, ext. 266).
Office hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. M-F.
READ
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
DOJVT FORGET
To Send your
letters in
The "Big E "
is back!
J
(CPS)�Tuition appears to be
primed to rise again nationwide.
While nothing is official yet, a
look at the budgets now being
considered by state legislatures,
regents and trustees around the
country suggest that the price of
college will be significantly
higher next year.
Oregon Gov. Neil
Goldschmidt, for example, sub-
mitted a budget Jan. 4 to his state
legislature that, if passed, would
translate into a 5 percent hike for
most states students and a 10
percent hike for students at the
University of Oregon and Oregon
State University.
"A 6-to-8 percent increase is
as good a guess as any7' for stu-
dents nationwide, said Art
Hauptman, an education consult-
ant to the American Council on
Education, after scanning such
early indicators.
Tuititons for 1988-89 rose an
average of 7 percent over 1987-88,
according to the College Board.
The inflation rate in the
United States�the increase in
prices for general items from cars
to shoes�was "only" 4 percent
during the same time.
As a result, the average 4-year
public school student is paying
$1,483 in tuition this year, while
students pay an average $6,457 to
go to private 4-year colleges, $750
to go to public 2-year colleges and
$4,415 to go to private 2-year
campuses, the College Board fig-
ured last fall.
Some bills for next fall are
already set.
Baylor University students
will pay 8 percent more next year.
The University of Northern
Iowa's prices will go up 7 percent
for in-state students, 9 percent for
nonresidents. At Utah State, in-
state students will pay 9 percent
more. At Duke University in
North Carolina, rates will rise 7.1
percent for undergrads.
The great majority of schools
just now are beginning to an-
nounce their tuitions as legisla-
tures ponder budgets and cam-
pus officials figure out how much
they need to charge students.
The trend, however, is unde-
niably upward.
Initial proposals would have
students at the 13 University of
Wisconsin campuses paying 11-
to-12 percent more next year.
Loyola University of New
Orleans officials are considering
raising tuition by as much as 18
percent next fall.
"It is fair to say that there will
be a raise in the tuition rate for fall
'89 said Dr. Maurice Scherrens,
vice president for finance and
planning at George Mason Uni-
versity in Virginia. "Yet I am cur-
rently uncertain of the exact per-
centage of increase
Colleges get the money they
need to operate from cash gifts,
earnings en their stock portfolios,
government grants and, most im-
portantly, from the federal gov-
ernment, students in the form of
tuition and state legislatures.
When legislatures don't ap-
propriate enough money, cam-
puses normally turn to students
to try to make up the difference.
"State appropriations have
been okay in the last few years
the ACE's Hauptman suggested,
and public colleges consequently
haven't had to impose the 9 or 10
percent more in tuition next fall,
he added.
Even relatively healthy
economies such as those in New
York, California and Massachu-
setts are suffering from tax reve-
nue shortfalls and have less to
appropriate to their colleges.
"One quick way of closing
those shortfalls is to raise tuition
Hauptman said.
George Mason's Scherrens
added campuses need more
money, too, to pay faculty mem-
bers as much as they could make
in private industry, to add staff
and to build and maintain their
structures. George Mason, for
one, is trying to finance a new
science building, a new dorm and
a new student union.
Students, naturally, are not
thrilled by the prospect of higher
tuition.
"I'll have to get a higher pay-
ing job said University of
Arizona junior Karen Bonz. "It's
really hard unless you've got a
silver spoon or something
If Loyola of New Orleans ac-
tually imposes an 18 percent hike,
it'll drive everyone except "the
rich, stupid kids who cart get in
anywhere else" off campus, stu-
dent government representative
Tara Loomis warned.
"The tuition increases, espe-
cially this year, are bullshit
fumed University of Utah student
Vice President Grant Sperry.
"Students are having to work
20,30, even 40 hours a week to pay
for tuition said Brad Golich of
the Arizona Students Association
at a November rally protesting a
proposed $156 tuition hike at
Arizona State University. "How
the hell can we do in school if
we're working all the time?"
In December, the regents who
set the tuition for ASU, Northern
Arizona and the University of
Arizona, said they were im-
pressed enough by the outpour-
ing of student anger over the pro-
posed raise to lower the hike to
$84.
Golich seemed satisfied, not-
ing some increases may be inev-
itable. "The reality is that (tuition
cuts) would be an incredible
amount of revenue loss for the
university system. You've got to
look at economic reality.
Remember Your Orientation Experience?
Join PREVIEW 89
Become an Orientation Assistant
and create a memorable
experience for the New Freshmen.
Pick Up Application Packet: 209 Whichard
Deadline for completed Application:
February 17,1989 at
4:00pm

ifmm�' ir





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
Painters dominate art show
By KAREN MANN
Staff Writer
On Jan. 12 ECU's Gray Art
Gallery unveiled an exhibition of
faculty art. The show, which will
be exhibited until Feb. 3, is the
latest of the regularly scheduled
faculty exhibitions and features
31 instructors from the School of
Art.
Occupying the front area of
the gallery are works by sculptors
Robert Edmiston and Norman
Keller. Edmiston's pointed steel
"Landscapes" are textural and
material opposites to the Keller
piece, a work entitled "No More
Stick ArtA Farewell to Faggots
which is constructed primarily of
wood and, yes, sticks. On the sur-
rounding walls of the gallery
hang paintings by Clarence Mor-
gan, Gabrielle Lablousky, Ray
Elmore, and Marilyn Gordley, as
well as a tapestry by Janet Fischer
and a series of monotypes by
Michael Voors.
Painters dominate the show.
The departments of ceramics, tex-
tiles, and wood are hardly repre-
sented and there are no examples
of environmental design.
A striking example of wood-
work is a music stand by Terry
Smith. The stand, which is classi-
cal in design, displays the natural
beauty of the unpainted wood.
Also notable of the "craft
arts" are works by metals instruc-
tor John Sattcrfield. Satterfield's
jewelry designs include a neck-
lace of sterling silver, titanium,
and stainless steel as well as three
anodized aluminum pins dved a
variety of colors.
Another anodized aluminum
construction is a small creature
entitled Is a Many Splendored
Thing" which resembles an art
deco sphinx. Other works include
jewelry designs by visiting artist
Steven Albair, two fused glass
works by Art Havey, ceramic
works by Chuck Chamberlain,
metal sculptures bv Bill Holley,
and painted wooden figures t'
Dick Spiller.
On the rear wall hang pain!
ings by gallery director Perrj
Nesbitt. Tran and Marilynk)
rdley and Nesbitt's non-rej r n n
tational, geometric expense;
color serve an interesting counter-
point to the bright, mostly figura-
tive paintings oi the Gordl
Other paintings include a tripl
by Mel Stanforth, figure I wo of
the finest paintings in the exl
tion are Rav Elmore's "Yellow
Wing" and Paul (lartley's "Mme
Arnolfini As Part of the Nui
Eleven
"Yellow Wing" is an evoca
tivedouble image of an Amer
Indian. Elmore's style of super
realism is particularly well suited
to the subject and displays an
unsurpassed artistic virtuosity.
Hartley draws his title char-
cater from flemish painter Jan
Van Eych's 15th-century paint-
ing, "The Wedding oi Giovani
Arnoltini Hartley renders Mme
Arnolfini with almost as much
kill as Van Eych himself, yet
red fines the parameters of her
world to create a strangely mag-
paintii .
Other non-painting works
rtmercial art logos by
( rug Malmrose, a monumental
den "Bench" by school of art
in Edward l.ovine, xero-
graphic drawings by Richard
Lair. : I graphs bv Biruta
Erdmannand DotSatterfield,and
a video by Laura Davies entitled
"Sketch 38 " Particularly inter-
i . are fine intaglio pnnts by
Michael Ehlbeck and Don
mer and a series of ink draw-
ing, rs and foliage by Sara
Edn �
These are just a few of the art works on display until Feb. 3 in the
Gray Art Gallery. The pieces are all works created by the School
of Art Faculty (Photo by J.D. Whitmeyer, ECU Photolab).
Deli hosts benefit
for disaster victims
A Day in the Life of an Urban Planning Major
Kury interns for Pitt Inspection
Dept.
By ALICIA FORD
Suft Writer
By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Stiff Writer
Tonight the New Deli Restau-
rant will host a benefit concert for
the victims of natural disasters.
The concert will feature three lo-
cal acts: The 1A. Hooker Band,
the Swamp Gypsies and Mike
JUghtnin' Wells. Proceeds from
the concert will go to the Interna-
tional Red Cross and the Quixote
Center, located in Maryland.
The proceeds will be divided
evenly between the two organiza-
tions. The International Red Cross
will use the money to aid the vic-
tims of the tragic Armenian earth-
quake. Tine Quixote Center will
aid the victims of Nicaragua,
vhere Hurricane Joan ruined the
city oi Bluefields last October.
Mike Hamer, an English pro-
fessor at ECU as well a member oi
the Swamp Gypsies, is one oi the
many musicians responsible for
organizing the concert. Hamer
and other fellow musicians have
been putting on benefit concerts
for 12 vears to aid those victims of
natural disasters and personal
hardships, long before Live-Aid
and Farm-Aid were formed.
According to Hamer, these
benefit concerts are dutiful in
providing victims with a chance
to rebuild their lives after a trag-
edy occurs. Hamer said he be-
lieves musicians have a way of
bringing peoplearound the world
together to help those who are in
need of care.
He also said he trusts both
organizations to which the money
will be given; stating that the
monev given to the Quixote Cen-
ter will be administered through
the local churches to avoid any
political ties.
The local acts are well-known
and respected musicians
throughout North Carolina. The
musicians among the three acts
have been performing for a while,
although the two bands on the
bill, the Swamp Gypsies and the
LA. Booker Band, are fairly new.
Mike Lightnin' Wells tours
around North Carolina and vari-
ous parts oi the country.
The L.A. Booker Band plays
traditional and country music, as
well as original ballads penned bv
vocalist and guitarist Linda
Roberson. The rest of the line up
features Amy Hazard on flute,
guitar and vocals; John Booker on
bass, guitar and vocals; and Lane
See NEW, page 8
In August, 19SS Pitt County
issued its first comprehensive the planning department,
land use plan for those portions of
the county outside of cities and
towns. This first effort at develop-
ing a plan for Pitt County will
attempt to look ahead to the year
2008, and establish an official set
oi regulations that will help the
county deal with the next 20 years
oi change.
A land use plan for a particu-
lar area usually includes such
elements as theecomonv, popula-
tion growth, transportation,
housing natural resources, and
community services and facilities.
Mark Kury, a 23-year-old
senior from Elizabeth Citv, is
helping with the plan by working
an internship at the Pitt County
Planning Department.
An urban and regional plan-
ning major at ECU, he transferred
here from the College of the Albe-
marle where he was planning to
major in architecture. "When 1
first got to ECU, I took a planning
course as an elective and became
interested in it. I thought it would
be great to actually play a part in
helping to mold and shape cities
and towns Kury said.
He works 15 hours a week in
the Inspections Department.
There, he assists with the devel-
opment of subdivision data and ate his job performance and
sorts through files trying to iden- mine his final grade
titv the appropriate information Kury is only the s
todevelopa computer file base for dent to perform an int-
Planning Department, ai
Kurv is taking 14 hours this
semester and his internship
counts as one elective. His profes-
sor and intern supervisor, James
Rhodes, work together to evalu-
cause oi a limited amount ol I
fice space, he is the only one they
have this semester. Rl iays
he plans to definitely c. ntinu
program in the future
more students.
and it gives the
nt a chance to learn more
: than he could ever
really learn in the classroom. It's
� . great experience. You
� at the real world he said.
Even if you don't want to
See KL Ri, page 8
Coming
this
weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
Free Beer
(A Band)
New Deli:
Natural Disaster Benefit:
Lightnin' Wells, Swamp
Gypsies, L.A. Booker Band
Attic:
Connells
w special guest Johnny Quest
Mendenhall:
Die Hard
(through Sunday)
Friday
New Deli:
Blues Defenders
Attic:
Sidewinder
Mendenhall Late Show:
Fri. and Sat.
Decline of Western Civilization
II
Saturday
New Deli:
Roily Gray and Sunfire
Attic:
WZMB Birthday Party
w Boneshakers
WZMB turns seven;
hosts party at Attic
Senior Mark Kury interns at the Pitt County Inspection Center
ECU at the center this semester, and his performance has convi
the internship program. (Photo by Mark Love.)
kurv is the sole intern from
need his supervisor to continue
figUn9 iftf &Qtm
By CHIP CARTER
Staff Writer
Student radio staion WZMB
is celebrating seven years on the
air with a party at the Attic Satur-
day night. Admission is $3 for
members, $5 for guests, and ev-
eryone is invited.
Virginia band the Boneshak-
ers, who WZMB program director
Trey Burley called "a smokingly
hot band will provide the enter-
tainment. According to Burley,
WZMB Top 13 Albums
Week of 1-26-89
1. Angst� "Cry For Happy'
2. Dinosaur Jr.� "Bug"
3. Waterboys�
"Fisherman's Blues"
4. Trotsky Kepick� "Baby"
5. Soundgarden� "O.K
6. Girl Trouble� "Hit it or
Quit it"
7. Jet Black Berries� "Ani-
mal Necessity"
8. Dead Milkmen� "Beelze-
bubba"
9. Elvis Hitler� "Dis-
graceland"
10. Death of Samantha�
"Where the Women Wear the
Glory and the Men Wear the
Pants"
11. Angry Samoans� "STP
not LSD"
12. Screaming Tribesman�
"Bones and Flowers"
13. Volcano Song� "FAR-
CED"
the Boneshakers are one of the
hardest bands to get from the
Virginia circuit.
They will be playing covers of
such bands as R.E.M the Cure,
Hoodoo Gurus and the Cult, as
well as some original tunes.
Instead of receiving gifts, the
station will be giving gifts away.
Among the prizes are records and
tapes from Record Bar and East
Coast Music and Video, month-
long guest memberships to the
Spa, Budweiscr Lights, video
memberships and a host of
WZMB paraphernalia.
WZMB has been broadcast-
ing on the ECU campus since
1982. The station started out as
WECU "in the dorms with little
circuit carriers Burley said. "We
weren't even on the FM dial
then.
Bonehead's tips for casual sex
By CmPTi 8ONE38EA0
Even though the Swingin'
Seventies are dead the One-
Nfeht Stand isn't. This un-
claimed child from the Decade
of Plea sure is still very much
around and needs some atten-
tion.
After a weekend night on
Fifth Street, if s obvious Just
how much attention it needs.
So for all yon crazy hipsters
out mere who soli want to
believe mat any sex Is better
than your right hand, we
; proudly present: The
Bonehead's Guide to Casual
Sex in 1989.
Brat of ail, the watchword
in 89 is "safety' Once fust a
The station grew, and after ftne&Od of avoiding the nifte-
two years became WZMB, "The
Unique Difference After last
semester's technical troubles, the
station adopted a new slogan,
"New Rock 91
The station is free of the me-
chanical difficulties that plagued
it last semester, and they are now
broadcasting with a stronger and
clearer signal.
By next year's birthday, they
will have something else to cele-
brate: a new home. When the
additions to Mendenhall student
center are completed, the WZMB
offices are scheduled to move into
the new facilities there.
conseouenees oi die
one-night stand, the condom is
now me best way to prevent
the sometimes ratal rarniflca-
of casual sex.
In all seriousness, Bone-
head says, "Wear your rub-
Before you Jeve your
apartment or dorm room,
Wltffeg
&N�f
start tearing off his clothes to
the wild beat of Metallica, but
you don't want your potential
partner nodding off to the
magic flute of Zamfir either. I
find that Stevie Nicks or Dire
Straits provide the best
clothes-shedding music avail-
able.
Is there extra Fun Tak� on
each poster? Nothing kills a
climactic moment quicker
than a falling poster, especially
those big,door-si2edones. The
noise mat large pieces of paper
make when they hit the
ground is unnerving to even
those of a strong constitution.
it the bedcouchfloor
big enough to roll away from
your potential partner after
intercourse? You may not have
classes the next day, but you'll
slifl want some sleep after your
social indiscretion
Nothing is more aggravat-
ing than someone exhaling a
constant blast of sub-zero
breath on your shoulder in the
middle of the night, or drool-
ing cm your side of the pillow.
Make sure you have enough
room to get away from insensi-
r sleepers.
lake aS food out of the
. if you don't have food,
"to make
may even
your toothbrush! No college
student has toothbrushes to
spare, and on the off chance
you are still horny in the morn-
ing, a toothbrush is a big fet
must
Some people have trouble
sleeping in strange beds, with
strange heating vents making
strange noises. If you have this
problem, if s easily solved by
bringing a Walkman and a
tape of noises your heating
vent makes.
Just say "NOT to tacos,
hamburgers and other funk
food after dancing. It's the
height of rudeness to pass gas
in a bed you don't own. While
they may be sympathetic,
chances are they'll hist be dis-
gusted, and you may be asked
to leave.
If you find mat you must
expel some air within
15 seconds, or your ii
lining will be in dangi
coming permanently
excuse yourself and
bathroom. Excuses can
from honest "I have to i
nowto'lthmh
the seat back do
me, won't you?
1you follow
your
witt be mom





I � �. .�
Features
JANUARY 26, 1 I age
Painters dominate art show
By KAREN MANN
Staff Writer
On Jan. 12 ECU'S Gray Art
Gallery unveiled an exhibition of
faculty art. The show, which will
be exhibited until Feb. 3, is the
latest of the regularly scheduled
faculty exhibitions and features
31 instructors from the School of
Art.
Occupying the front area of
the gallery are works by sculptors
Robert Edmiston and Norman
Keller. Edmiston's pointed steel
"Landscapes" are textural and
material opposites to the Keller
piece, a work entitled "No More
Stick ArtA Farewell to Faggots
which is constructed primarily of
wood and, yes, sticks. On the sur-
rounding walls of the gallery
hang paintings by Clarence Mor-
gan, Gabrielle Lablousky, Ray
Elmore, and Marilyn Gordley, as
well as a tapestry by Janet Fischer
and a series of monotypes by
Michael Voors.
Painters dominate the show.
The departments of ceramics, tex-
tiles, and wood are hardly repre-
sented and there are no examples
of environmental design.
A striking example of wood-
work is a music stand by Terry
Smith. The stand, which is classi-
cal in design, displays the natural
beauty of the unpainted wood.
Also notable of the "craft
arts" are works by metals instruc-
tor John Satterfield. Satterfield's
jewelry designs include a neck-
lace of sterling silver, titanium,
and stainless steel as well as three
anodized aluminum pins dyed a
variety of colors.
Anotheranc lized aluminum
construction is a small creature
entitled Isa Many Splendored
Thing" which resembles an art
deco sphinx. Other works include
jewelry designs by visiting artist
Steven Albair, two fused glass
works by Art Havey, ceramic
works by Chuck Chamberlain,
metal sculptures by Bill Hollcv,
and painted wooden figures by
Dick Spiller.
On the rear wall hang paint-
ings by gallery director Perry
Nesbitt. Tran and Marilyn Go-
rdley and Nesbitt's non-represen-
tational, geometric expenses of
color serve an interesting counter-
point to the bright, mostly figura-
tive paintings of the Gordleys.
Other paintings include a triptych
by Mel Stanforth, figure Two of
the finest paintings in the exhibi-
tion are Ray Elmore's "Yellow
Wing" and Paul Hartley's "Mme.
Arnolfini As Part of the Number
Eleven
"Yellow Wing" is an evoca-
tive double image of an American
Indian. Elmore's style of super-
realism is particularly well suited
to the subject and displays an
unsurpassed artistic virtuosity.
Hartley draws his title char-
cater from Remish painter Jan
Van Eych's 15th-century paint-
ing, "The Wedding of Giovani
Arnolfini Hartley renders Mme.
Arnolfini with almost as much
skill as Van Evch himself, yet
redefines the parameters of her
world to create a strangely mag-
netic painting.
Other non-painting works
include commercial art logos by
Craig Malmrose, a monumental
wooden "Bench" by school of art
Dean Edward Levine, xero-
graphic drawings by Richard
Laing, photographs by Biruta
Erdmann and Dot Satterfield, and
a video by Laura Davies entitled
"Sketch 88 Particularly inter-
esting are fine intaglio prints by
Michael Ehlbeck and Don
Sexauer and a series of ink draw-
ing of flowers and foliage by Sara
Edmiston.
These are just a few of the art works on display until Feb. 3 in the
Gray Art Gallery. The pieces are all works created by the School
of Art Faculty (Photo by J.D. Whitmeyer, ECU Photolab).
eli hosts benefit
or disaster victims
A Day in the Life of an Urban Planning Major
Kury interns for Pitt Inspection Dept.
opment of subdivision data and ate his job performance and deter
sorts through files trying to iden- mine his final grade.
� tify the appropriate information Kury is only the second stu-
bs August, 1988 Pitt Coiinty to develop a computer file base for dent to perform an interchip at the
By ALICIA FORD
Staff Writer
tij By DEANNA NEVGLOSKI
Staff Writer

Tonight the New Deli Restau-
$ant will host a benefit concert for
tthe victims of natural disasters.
iThe concert will feature three lo-
cal acts: The L.A. Booker Band,
the Swamp Gypsies and Mike
Lightnin' Wells. Proceeds from
the concert will go to the Interna-
tional Red Cross and the Quixote
Center, located in Maryland.
cdy occurs. Hamer said he be-
lieves musicians have a way of
bringing people around the world
together to help those who are in
need of care.
He also said he trusts both
organizations to which the money
will be given; stating that the
money given to the Quixote Cen-
ter will be administered through
the local churches to avoid any
political ties.
The local acts are well-known
and respected musicians
issued its first comprehensive
land use plan for those portions of
the county outside of cities and
towns. This first effort at develop-
ing a plan for Pitt County will
The proceeds will be divided
evenly between the iwoorganiza throughout North Carolina. The-
lions. The International Red Cross'
will use the money to aid the vic-
tims of the tragic Armenian earth-
quake. The Quixote Center will
aid the victims of Nicaragua,
fvhere Hurricane Joan ruined the
citv of Bluefields last October.
musicians among tfte three acts
have been performing for a while,
although the two bands on the
bill, the Swamp Gypsies and the
L.A. Booker Band, are fairly new.
Mike Lightnin' Wells tours
around North Carolina and vari-
Mike Hamer, an English pro- ous parts of the country.
fessor at ECU as well a member of
the Swamp Gypsies, is one of the
many musicians responsible for
Organizing the concert. Hamer
and other fellow musicians have
been putting on benefit concerts
The L.A. Booker Band plays
traditional and country music, as
well as original ballads penned by
vocalist and guitarist Linda
Roberson. The rest of the line up
features Amy Hazard on flute,
for 12 years to aid those victims of guitar and vocals; John Booker on
natural disasters and personal bass, guitar and vocals; and Lane
hardships, long before Live-Aid
and Farm-Aid were formed.
According to Hamer, these
benefit concerts are dutiful in
providing victims with a chance
to rebuild their lives after a trag-
See NEW, page 8
the planning department. Planning Department, and be-
Kury is taking 14 hours this cause of a limited amount of of-
semester and his internship fice space, he is the only one they
counts as one elective. His profes- have this semester. Rhodes says
sor and intern supervisor, James he plans to definitely continue the
attempt to look ahead to the year Rhodes, work together to evalu- program in the future, and hope-
2008, and establish an official set
of regulations that will help the
county deal with the next 20 years
of change.
A land use plan for a particu-
lar area usually includes such
elements as the ecomony, popula-
tion growth, transportation,
housing natural resources, and
community services and facilities.
Mark Kury, a 23-year-old
senior from Elisabeth City, is
helping with the plan by working
an internship at the Pitt County
Planning Department.
An urban and regional plan-
ning major at ECU, he transferred
here from the College of the Albe-
marle where he was planning to
major in architecture. "When I
first got to ECU, I took a planning
course as an elective and became
interested in it. I thought it would
be great to actually play a part in
helping to mold and shape cities
and towns Kury said.
He works 15 hours a week in
the Inspections Department.
There, he assists with the devel-
tully with more students.
"It helps us, and it gives the
student a chance to learn more
about his field than he could ever
really learn in the classroom. It's
definitely great experience. You
can't beat the real world he said.
"Even if you don't want to
See KURY, page 8
.
Coming
this
weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
Free Beer
(A Band)
New Deli:
Natural Disaster Benefit:
Lightnin' Wells, Swamp
Gypsies, L.A. Booker Band
Attic:
Connells
special guest Johnny Quest
Mendenhall:
Die Hard
(through Sunday)
Friday
New Deli:
Blues Defenders
Attic:
Sidewinder
Mendenhall Late Show:
Fri. and Sat
Decline of Western Civilization
II
WZMB turns seven;
hosts party at Attic
Senior Mark Kury interns at the Pitt County Inspection Center
ECU at the center this semester, and his performance has convi
the internship program. (Photo by Mark Love.)
, Kury is the sole intern from
need his supervisor to continue
By CHIP CARTER
Staff Writer
the Boneshakers are one of the
hardest bands to get from the
Virginia circuit.
They will be playing covers of
such bands as R.E.M the Cure,
Hoodoo Gurus and the Cult, as
Student radio staion WZMB
is celebrating seven years on the
air with a party at the Attic Satur-
day night. Admission is $3 for
members, $5 for guests, and ev- well as some original tunes,
eryone is invited.
Virginia band the Boneshak- Instead of receiving gifts, the
ers, who WZMB program director station will be giving gifts away.
Trey Burley called "a smokingly Among the prizes are records and
hot band will provide the enter- tap" from Record Bar and East
tainment. According to Burley, Coast Music and Video, month-
long guest memberships to the
Spa, Budweiser Lights, video
memberships and a host of
WZMB paraphernalia.
;
Saturday
New Deli:
Roily Gray and Sunfire
Attic:
WZMB Birthday Party
w Boneshakers
WZMB Top 13 Albums
Week of 1-26-89
1. Angst� "Cry For Happy"
2. Dinosaur Jr.�"Bug"
3. Waterboys�
"Fisherman's Blues"
4. Trotsky Kepick� "Baby"
5. Soundgarden� "O.K
6. Girl Trouble� "Hit it or
Quit it"
7. Jet Black Berries� "Ani-
mal Necessity"
8. Dead Milkmen� "Beelze-
bubba"
9. Elvis Hitler� "Dis-
graceland"
10. Death of Samantha�
"Where the Women Wear the
Glory and the Men Wear the
Pants"
11. Angry Samoans� "STP
not LSD"
12. Screaming Tribesman�
"Bones and Flowers"
13. Volcano Song� "FAR-
CED"
WZMB has been broadcast-
ing on the ECU campus since
1982. The station started out as
WECU "in the dorms with little
circuit carriers Burley said. "We
weren't even on the FM dial
then
The station grew, and after
two years became WZMB, "The
Unique Difference After last
semester's technical troubles, the
station adopted a new slogan,
"New Rock 91
The station is free of the me-
chanical difficulties that plagued
it last semester, and they are now
broadcasting with a stronger and
clearer signal.
By next year's birthday, they
will have something else to cele-
brate: a new home. When the
additions to Mendenhall student
center are completed, the WZMB
offices are scheduled to move into
the new facilities there.





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 26,1989
Kury interns for planners
Continued from page 7
work at the place you're interning
forever, the experience can create
contacts for you that you will
need in the future. It really is in-
valuable experience Rhodes
said.
Kury has satisfied his require-
ments for his major and is cur-
rently working on his double
concentrations in land use and
real estaterecreation. His Mon-
day morning starts out with Rec-
reation Programming and De-
sign, which deals with planning
recreational facilities such as
health spas, boys clubs, parks,
and hotel recreational activities.
As a requirement for the course,
he has to spend 25 hours doing
volunteer work for one of these
organizations.
After recreation class, it's off
to Weather and Climate where
Kury studies what factors con-
tribute to the weather. 'This is an
interesting class because you
learn what make one climate in
one area differnt from another.
The climate is an important factor
in determining a land use plan for
a particular area he said.
Kury also takes a Geographic
Images class that focuses in the
structure of geographic images
and the processes of their forma-
tion. Monday night, he takes a
class in the history of jazz music to
satisfy a fine arts requirement.
In addition to his internship
and other classes, Kury holds
down a part-time job waiting
tables at Annabelle's Restaruant
and Pub. He has been at
Annabelle's for over a year and
usually works four or five nights a
week.
Kury has a fairly full load this
semester and when asked about
his social life he commented,
"After work, and usually on the
weekend, I can always find time
to party with my friends at work
and spend time with my girl-
friend
Kury is planning to graduate
in December and hopes to move
to a big city such as Atlanta or
Chicago. He wants to find an en-
try-level planner position with a
city or county. "I would eventu-
ally like to work for a private
development firm after a few
years with the county said Kury.
New Deli hosts benefit concert
for Nicaraguan disaster victims
RUSH
J.PHA PHI OMEGA
The CO-Ed National
Service Fraternity
Info Night: January 31st
7-9 pm 244 Mendenhall
s
For more information, call 752-2509
EVERYONE WELCOME
Stop by our information booth in front of the
ECU Student Store Jan 26th &27
RACK ROOM SHOES
Continued from page 7
Hollis on fiddle, mandolin, banjo
and back-up vocals.
The Swamp Gypsies features
Bob Gravelin on guitar, violin,
drums, keyboards and vocals; Sue
Ludeke on recorder and vocals;
and Mike Hamer on hammer
dulcimer, harmonica and vocals.
The Swamp Gypsies play Ameri-
can and Celtic folk songs as well
as improvisational works.
Lightnin' Wells is known
throughout North Carolina for
his authentic renditions of songs
from America's past, including
blues, country, gospel, folk and
novelty songs. Wells accompa-
nies himself on guitar, ukelele,
harmonica and National steel
guitar.
Singleton scholarship
The concert will start at 9 p.m.
and will end roughly around
midnight. A donation of $4 will be
collected at the door. The goal is to
raise $400.
The concert is being spon-
sored by Greenville Concerned
Musicians, the Central America
Peace Project and the Overseas
Development Network of ECU.
For more information call 830-
0349.
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Dnvtf
()tii
lMi(hi S;it
Si Hid;iv 1
cj;iv 10 )
TAKE AN EXTRA
Tm
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Aiftner. Nike and Reebok)
I I
ECU New Buruu
Benjamin Todd Singleton, a
1982 graduate, has established a
scholarship at East Carolina Uni-
versity in honor of his parents, A.
Louis and Nancy Lou Kesler Sin-
gleton of Greenville.
Recipients selected on the
basis of academic merit will be
awarded up to $1,000 each year
for four years, provided the stu-
dent maintains the academic stan-
dards of the scholarship.
A. Louis Singleton, a former
ECU trustee, is a partner in the
law firm of Gaylord, Singleton,
McNallv, Strickland & Snyder,
Greenville. He received a B.S.
degree at ECU in 1956 and com-
pleted his law degree at UNO-
Chapel Hill in 1961. Nancy Single-
ton was an English major at ECU,
graduating in 1954.
Ben Singleton, a resident of
Raleigh, received his degree in
business administration. He is the
Regional Marketing Manager of
the Educational Sales division of
the Tandy Computer Co.
Plaza Cinema
li.i ShuviMlit! ir 7 � IKJ
MB W SHOWUNQ
TWINS
Efflfi THURSDAY
HELL RAISER PART II
DEEPSTAR 6
STAMTMQ FRIDAY
BEACHES
WITH BETTE MIDLER
THREE FUGITIVES
WITH NICK NOLTE ft MARTIN SHORT
Tark 'Theatre
Starts Friday
CHILD'S PLAY
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $275 'til
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
$2
3
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-33Q7 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
RATED R
TERROR WITHIN

1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
CRUISE THE BAHAMAS WITH THE
CARNIVAL CRUISE LINES DURING
SPRING BREAK
(deadline to sign up is right around THE CORNER.)
PRICE PER PERSON: $499.00 (quad)
$525.00 (Non-ECU students)
(All transportation included as well as meals on the ship!)
�Be treated like royalty
�Eat exquisitcTmeals
�Get a head start on your tan
SPONSORED BY
THE STUDENT UNION TRAVEL COMMITTEE.
For more Information contact the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall
Student Center,
Phone 757-6611
rated pg THE NAKED GUN
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
RATED R
JANUARY MAN
1:10-3:10-5:10-7:10-9:10
(9.) Interested in a
challenging, rewarding &
responsible career in
retail management?
(A.) Peebles Department Stores.
Executive Trainee Positions
� Starting Salary: S17.5O0 - S19.000
(based on experience)
� Employee Discounts on Purchases
� Paid Life Insurance
� Paid Hospitalization and Dental Insurance
� Paid Vacations ft Holidays
� Career Advancement Potential
� Retirement Benefits
Seebles Department Stores can offer you
these and more A growing company with
49 stores In Virginia. Maryland. Delaware.
North & South Carolina. Tennessee and
Kentucky Candidates must have a
sincere desire to learn retail management
and possess excellent people skills
For Immediate. Confidential
. mail rtw
Like all good things, we are not for
everyone But If you are ready for a fast
pace, rapid promotions, and awards baaed
on your performance your dream of being
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be willing to relocate periodically during
training. Four year college degree strongly
preferred.
Consideration,
resume to:
Peebles Inc.
Tin Mover
Asst. Dir Human Resources
One Peebles Street
South Hill. VA 23970-5001
See Your Caretr
Placement Office
Far The Date
Peebles Will Be
Interviewing
On Campus
�TLiimflmWHT
Am Eqml Ompornmiry Empioyr - MfFHV
Thursda
Ladies Night
Ladies Free all Nii
$1.75 Frozen Specials
$1.00 Cans
Friday
The famous Day Tea Bash
$2.00 Ice Teas 5pm-lam
$50 Door Prize for Fraternity and
Sorority With best Attendance
Saturday
$2.00 Teas All Night
F

1
h
o
t
t
V

I
It
f
I
c
t
!
S
r
r

F
i;
t
u






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IANUARY 26. 1989 9
�he Clearly Measled
Measly quote of the week:
'Soup is Good Food
�Those lovable Campbell's kids
easle
Scare
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
ffjie small college town of
dteenville was gripped by terror
hfs week as an epidemic out-
break of measles!
The disease, which gives its
victims flu-like symptoms that
�ventually lead to a searingly
pafoful, agonizing death, "sprang
ut of nowhere said Dr. Nod
thered.
"Although every other cam-
pis in the UNC system had out-
breaks of the measles in the past
month, we had no reason to be-
lieve it would ever reach
Greenville, " he said. "Therefore,
we didn't bother to inform the
students
That misjudgement may cost
thousands of students valuable
class time. Any student not vacci-
nated by Wednesday at 5 p.m.
was kicked out of school. As a
safety precaution, their belong-
ings were sterilized and burned
and then the outcast students
were subjected to ridicule and
sarcastic comments.
Students were first notified of
the crisis in a letter sent out from
the university. The letters, sent
Tuesday night without sufficient
postage, read, "Dear student, If
you don't get your ass innocu-
lated by Wednesday at five p.m
you're outta here. Sincerely, Your
friends at the Student Health
Services
The signature was post-
scripted with their motto, "Any-
thing for you, the students who
pay our salaries with your man-
datory health fees Bothered said
the disease attacks the cells of the
body by viciously opening up the
cell lining. This rupture, through
which all the precious cell juices
can flow right out of, is called a
meas. If a person has too many
meases, blood flow to the brain is
cut off.
Once this happens, the victim
may become erratic and irra-
tional, two words that mean al-
most exactly the same thing. They
may begin wearing shorts in the
wintertime, or voting Republican.
These irrational acts are called
measles, and once the victim gets
to this stage, there follows a rapid
slide into the Great Beyond.
The patient then begins to
decay rapidly, not unlike a leper
in time-lapse photography. Then,
an inexplicable craving for raw
slug antennae is observed.
'This craving is really quite
natural Dr. Bothered
explainsThe human body
knows what it needs to combat
disease and slug eycstalks contain
78 of the USDA recommended
daily allowance of protein
"At this point Bothered
said, "There is only one known
cure � lots of rest and plenty of
Campbell's Eyestalk & Mucous
Soup. It is somewhat distilled by
the water and tomato juices, but
still has plenty of protein and
it's Mm-mmm-mmm good
Freshmen trampled in mob !
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
Ten students are victims of the
Great Measles Scare of 1989
and they didn't have the measles!
The 10 freshmen, four fe-
males and six males, were walk-
ing along the sidewalk to the Stu-
dent Health Center. Suddenly,
they were trampled to death by a
mob of over 200 other freshmen.
Panicked by letters saying they
needed to be vaccinated or they
would be kicked out of school, the
mob didn't realize they were
killing their own schoolmates.
The ten students were found
hours later, after the initial wave
of innoculations stopped. A pass-
ing motorist helped them inside
the infirmary,but it was now4:55,
and the doctors were going home.
The physicians pointed to the
posted office hours signs, and
then walked to their cars discuss-
ing the ratio of hypochondriacs
on a college campus as opposed to
the real world.
All ten students died of expo-
sure overnight, their bodies
blocking the entrance to the
Health Center. The passing mo-
torist was nowhere on the scene
when health personnel returned
to work the next day.
Dr. Keepya Waiting com-
mented on the untimely deaths of
the freshmen, saying, "A tragedy
like this should never have hap-
pened. If only students would
learn when the regular operating
hours are for the infirmary, this
sort of tragic waste of human life
would never occur
"But in a situation like this, all
we can hope for is that these stu-
dents set an example for the rest of
the campus. If everyone takes
their brave sacrifice to heart, then
everyone will come out a win-
ner he said.
The infirmary is planning a
new advertising campaign, using
a photo of the deceased students.
Posters and TV ads will show
their frozen corpses outside the
Health building, with the slogan
"Know Your Infirmary Hours
prominently displayed.
A spokesman for the
Campbell Soup Corporation said
that the soup firm would be
happv to print up new office
hours posters and distribute them
around campus.
"Thev'U be Mm-mmm-mm
office hours after we print them
This person didn't get his measles shot, and now he's decaying
rapidly into a mess of fleshy rot. Eat your soup, kids!
Soup company is
fighting measles !
Measles wiped out Atlantis!
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
Medical authorities now hint that
the Greenville Red measles epi-
demic mav be the remnants of the
J
disease that wiped out the entire
population of the lost continent of
Atlantis!
At least, that's what Dr.
Hans Onme claims. He says he
has proof that the virus started
over 40,000 years ago and led to
the destruction of Atlantis! "Ze
bacteria, first zey ate out ze
victim's brain, zen his body and
zen his clothes and ze ground ze
were standing on Onme said.
"It could happen right here,
history could repeat itself he
warns.
The measles probably
started out as a dish culture in an
Atlantean scientist's lab, Onme
theorizes. Through some incred-
ible circumstances, much too
complicated to explain or believe,
the culture got contaminated.
"Zen, it probably mutated. I
y probably, because I wasn't
ze're, so I don't know for sure. Ze
mutated strains probably got
loose and started infecting ze
population, " Onme said.
Ze � I mean, The, actual
infection could have occurred
through sexual transmission, cas-
ual contact, or thinking porno-
graphic thoughts, he goes on to
state. Once the disease took hold
of the victim, they were history,
"and so was the ground zey was
walking on Onme adds.
"So once everybody got ze
disease, ze whole continent
probably started to erode, and zen
nobody had nowhere to live. Zey
all fell into ze water and had to
swim around a lot. It's very, very
hard to walk in ze water he
explains.
"Also, your hairdryers don't
work so good under ze ocean
Onme theorizes that the dis-
ease lay dormant for centuries.
" Maybe one or two doggies kept it
alive every generation. Zen when
you have zat squirrel man run-
ning around, all ze little doggie
glands get excited , and zen zey
start releasing measle germs he
said.
The only cure for the so-
called "Red Plague is plenty of
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
January is National Soup Month
and Campbell Soup Company is
taking advantage of the
Greenville Measles Scare to drum
up some new business.
Letters sent to all students
needing a measles vaccination
were sent on Campbell Soup sta-
tionery, which displays the
Campbell's logo in red and gold.
When held backwards to a lamp,
the words "Campbell's heals
measles" can be seen.
Spokesman for the nation's
largest soup corporation, Yesman
Sirr, said the accusation is totally
untrue. "We would never put
backward messages in anything
we do not even the alphabet
soup. We gave ECU that station-
ery because we care about those
poor, afflicted, upper-middle
class income bracketed students
he said.
Meanwhile, Campbell's soup
posters arc appearing all over the
ECU campus. Much of the monc
needed to buy large quantities o�
the measles vaccine was donated
by the soup company, but ECU
denies that any sort of public rela-
tions deal has been struck.
Gotnu -ige, public rela-
tions man i ECU said, "The
Campbell's people were very
generous to help us out in time of
need. We cannot pay them back
for all they've done, but we would
like to publicly express our grati-
tude to them in the press
In a totally non-related story,
the ECU Image Marketing
Committee announced today that
East Carolina will no longer be
known as the ECU Pirates, but as
the ECU "Country Kids
Pee Dee the pirate has been
dropped in favor of two "charm-
ing, country children who wear
lots of plaid Image said. "I think
the public will find our new image
M-mm-mmmm good
"Mm-mm-
u v u o o
rest and "good Campbell's soup
Onme said. "Zat's why all ze At-
lantis people died, zey didn't
have no Campbell's soup. Mm-
mmm-mmm good
1
Top Ten Things Heard in the Infirmary
During the 1989 Greenville Measles
Scare
1) Did you get a letter?
2) Pardon me, do you have any
Campbell's Bean and Bacon soup?
3) Do I have to get a shot if I don't live in
the dorms?
4) Did you see what we did with your
medical chart?
5) Do you think that's really Sonny's evil
twin?
6) Is anyone sitting here?
7) Why does it matter if we got this shot
before or after we were 15 months old?
8) Does this count as a university-ex-
cused absence?
9) Will a condom help prevent the
spread of measles?
10) Is this the disease with all the little
itchy bumps?
Big E advises measles victims
Justftsk
Big E
Apologies are out to a certain
member of a certain campus or-
ganization who was libeled in this
very column last week. E will here
sign in his blood that all the items,
events and happenings in the let-
ter entitled Paid Ho were of a fic-
tious nature and very untrue.
It is time to remind readers
that this is the clearly labeled Sat-
ire Page and some of the accounts,
descriptions and details have
been deviously created for the
sole purpose of your enjoyment.
In reference to the last column, the
actions of the individual cited
were created only in the mind of
one-almost-sued-yellow journal-
ist.
Sorry, dude for the inconven-
ience and the battery of false accu-
sations, Earlvis.
Dear Earlvis,
About this measle scare. I am
dying from measles. Tell me how
this all started.
Signed Dying in Greenville
Dear Diseased,
Some call it the big bang the-
ory, while others believe it was
created by a greater force. Still I
don't know, maybe we just
floated here from nowhere. VVell,
that is how this all started, sorry
you are dying from the measles.
Dear Earlvis,
My car has measles. I went to
the mini-mart the other night and
it started to overheat and broke
out in a paint rash. Other symp-
toms include a faulty cigarette
Signed, My car has measles
Dear Measles Wagon,
Sorry to hear about your car,
dude and yes, I do have a remedy.
Don's Gas Station on Rippoff St.
has a special this week for cars
with the measles. For $59.95, Don
with inject a special mixture of
Haley's M.O STP, Momma J's
Witch Hazel, chewing gum off of
David Letterman's shoe and re-
mains of John Wayne's dental
floss, into your ailing car.
But first you must sign a blue
piece of paper saying you under-
stand that your clutch may drop,
your carbeurator may become
gooey, your rods may throw and
your fly wheel may fly, as side
effects of Magic Don's (Magic is
his nickname) measle immuniza-
tion for automobiles.
Dear Earlvis,
My stuffed animals have the
measles. At first, I thought it was
just a crude joke of my devious
roommate who missed her soap
operas so she took her anger out
on my dolls. But now, after close
observation, I noticed that my
Raisin People gave the Burger
King Purrtendcrs the measles.
And then Garfield came
down with a massive rash and lost
all his fur before he died. 1 am so
sad, all my stuffed animals are
perishing before my eyes, help me
Big E, I need something to play
with.
Signed, Somebody who
sleeps alone.
Hey Doll,
E once had a stuffed animal, it
was a stuffed snake. I carried him
everywhere, did everything with
that snake, took baths with the
snake where it turned into a water
moccasin, made mud pies with
the snake where he turned into a
mud pie snake and then one day
he died. Measles weren't his
method of demise but the hands
of bully, even so I know how you
feel.
Dear Earlvis,
Several years ago, I had sex-
ual relations with a girl who gave
me a helicopter ride 1 will never
forget. Since then, 1 have found no
other mate who can do the heli-
copter. They try, but the best they
can do is spin around once before
stopping. If you could help me
locate a girl who can do the whirl,
I would be most appreciatitive.
Signed, Cookie
Dear Cookie,
Try writing
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, D.C.
and ask for Barbara.
Got a problem? Got the measles
or any other sexually transmitted
diseases?
Write to
BigE
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Greenville 27834





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"Yeah, right. Sure you're gonna pull it. Ha-haConvicted murderer Ted Bundy, at 6:59 a.m.
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-Gumby, from
At - � - Gumby Adventures
Advertisement
ATTENTION POTENTIAL CARTOONISTS
PIRATE COMICS needs new cartoonists, and kids, that could be-you! If any of you artistic types might
have an idea for a strip, contact Jeff "Kiss my Fun and Games goodbye Parker at 757-6366 or come by
the East Carolinian. Small, funny strips are needed, original size at 4" x 13 Bring sketched-out
complete cartoons and characters, NOT old pictures you drew for your high-school newspaper.
Submissions must be funny, no cutesy animals or babies. Females: one of you could be the first woman
cartoonist ever on this paper! So, start thinkin' people, and remember- you could be famous.
Fun and Games by Jeff "Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know" Parker
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II
THE EAST (AROl INI AN
Sports
JANUARY 26,1989 Page 11
Board probes allegations against N.C. State
RALEIGH (AP) � The chair-
fen of the University of North
( arolina Board of Governors will
meet with the panel's vice chair-
man and top staff to consider
other the board should investi-
gate allegations against North
irolina State's basketball pro-
am.
1 don't think the board
uld lie dormant with the con-
tinued charges that are flying
Robert L. "Roddy" Jones, a
Raleigh developer who serves as
chairman oi the 32-member
�ard, siid Tuesday.
He said he planned to hold
e meeting within 24 to 36 hours.
On Jan. 12, the UNC Board of
?vernors - which sets policy for
North Carolina's 16 public uni-
�ersities - decided that NCSU
Chancellor Bruce R. Toulton,
aided by the state Attorney
General's Office, should direct the
investigation of the athletics pro-
gram.
But Jones said Tuesday, "1 am
concerned that the matter has not
seemed to clear itself up anymore
than it has. While I still don't be-
lieve a lot of the heavy allegations,
1 do think that it is going on longer
than it should go on
The allegations stem from
promotional material and a dust
cover for the book "Personal
Fouls which is scheduled to be
published next month.
Written bv Peter Golenbock,
the book reportedly contains
charges that Wolfpack players
received cars and jewelry, and
that three grades on the transcript
of a former NCSU basketball
player had been changed to keep
him eligible.
Valvano and Poulton have
denied the allegations and have
asked the NCAA to investigate.
A few UNC board members
had misgivings about leaving the
inquiry in the chancellor's hands,
noting that he had been accused of
knowing about the grade-change
allegations, The News and Ob-
server of Raleigh reported.
But Jones, and other key
members of the panel, countered
at the time that athletic matters on
UNC campuses typically are dele-
gatcd to individual chancellors.
Only rarely have UNC sys-
tem officials intervened in mat-
ters of athletics.
Jones said Tuesday that he
planned to meet with Samuel H.
Poole, an attorney and vice chair-
man of the board, and kev mem-
bers of the UNC system admini-
stration for an update on the prog-
ress of Poulton's inquiry.
"I'm really trying to update
myself Jones said, "and in turn,
update the board. If wedon'ttake
stock we could be criticized. And
what I intend to do on behalf of
my whole board is to have a ses-
sion on bringing us up to date,
and at that time, ascertain if there
is a move we should be making as
a board
Meanwhile Tuesday, former
NCSU Professor Richard A.
Lauffer met with NCSU counsel
Becky R. French and investigators
from the NCAA and Atlantic
Coast Conference as part of an
investigation into the allegations
of grade changing at the univer-
sity.
Lauffer, who retired from
NCSU in 1988 after seven years as
head of the physical education de-
partment, declined to discuss his
conversation with the investiga-
tor.
"I really don't want to say
anything about it other than that I
feel that it was a very profession-
ally conducted interview, and
I've come away feeling very good
about the fact that investigators
arc going to do a very good and
thorough job he said in a tele-
phone interview from his home in
Emerald Isle. "I think it will hurt
the investigation if I come out
now and say anything
Lauffer said he was con-
vinced that the NCAA "definitely
is taking this seriouslv
Lauffer has said that three
failing grades for former
Wolfpack basketball player Chris
Washburn had been changed to
passing grades in the spring oi
1985.
The former professor said
that he had met with Poulton to
discuss the grades in the fall ol
1985 and that the chancellor had
told him not to worrv about the
situation. Lauffer said Poulton
had appeared unconcerned when
told that grades had been
changed.
Poulton later denied that he
had discussed the grades with
Lauffer.
Former redshirt fulfills
Casey Mote, ECU'S freshman forwardcenter, practices Wednes-
day afternoon in preparation for the Pirates' Saturday matchup
against UNC-W. The 6'7" Mote is averaging 3.3 points and 1.3
rebounds per game. (Photo �Gretchen Journigan- photo lab)
By MICHAEL ZAKELY
Sports Writer
Signing with a Division 1 col-
lege team is the goal for most high
school basketball players. So
when Casey Mote got the oppor-
tunity to play for East Carolina
fulfilled a goal he set for himself.
Mote, a freshman, was origi-
nally red-shirted until injuries
and personal problems on the
team forced Coach Mike Steele to
pull Mote from the bench and
onto the court.
Steele told Mote the team
would need his rebounding
strength. At 6'7 Mote is one of the
tallest players on the team. Mote is
happier now that he is playing. "I
am just happy I can help the team
in any way Mole said. . .
Not only did Mote get to play
his freshman year, but his first
action came as a starter in a sold-
out Minges Coliseum against
"Lefty" Driesell and the Dukes of
James Madison. Since then, Mote
Casey Mote
has played in all three of ECU's
games, two as a starter.
In his four appearances, the
tteshman forwardcenter has
averaged 3.3 points and 1.3 re-
bounds per game. He averages
55.6 percent from the floor and 60
percent from the free throw line.
Mote scored a season high of
10 points against Navy on Mon-
day to help the Pirates beat the
Midshipmen 70-63.
Mote chose East Carolina
because the coaching staff
showed a real interest in him.
Mote also liked the East Carolina
campus and surrounding area.
"The coaches showed a lot of in-
terest in me said Mote, "which
made me feel comfortable with
my decision of choosing to play
for East Carolina
Mote played high school bas-
ketball in Demorest, Georgia, at
Habersham High under Coach
Van Gregg. Mote played three
years on the varsity team and
averaged 22 points and 11 re-
bounds during his senior year at
Habersham . During his senior
year, he surpassed the 1,000 point
mark for his career. "One of my
biggest thrills in basketball was
scoring one thousand points in
my high school career, said Mote.
Mote said the weakest part of
his game is his physical strength
while the best part of his game is
shooting the ball with height.
Mote noticed the difference
between high school and college
basketball right away. The size
and quickness of college players is
the most noticeable change. "The
type of ball played in the game is
much more physical and intense
in college Mote said.
Mote was recruited by other
schools such as North Carolina at
Ashville, Texas Christian, and
Mars Hill. Mote considered these
colleges, but East Carolina won
the recruiting battle because of the
efforts of the coaching staff. Mote
hopes he can contribute to the
building of the East Carolina bas-
ketball program the next four
years.
ECU indoor track team preps for spring meets
By MICHAEL G. MARTIN
Yow is guest lecturer
Sports Writer
(SID) � Kay Yow, coach of
the gold medal-winning 1988 U.S.
women's Olympic basketball
team, will be the featured guest
lecturer for the annual Distin-
guished Alumni Lecture at East
Carolina University on Feb. 27.
A 1964 graduate with a major
in English at ECU, Yow has been
head coach for women's basket-
ball at North Carolina State Uni-
versity since 1976. She received
ECU'S Outstanding Alumni
Award in 1987 and will be ECU's
1989 nominee for the American
Association of State Colleges and
diversities (AASCU) distin-
guished alumnus award.
Drawing upon her success as
in international and Olympic
ach and her years of experience
as a teacher and coach at high
Kool and college levels, Yow
will lecture on "Striving to Excel
- Going For Gold describing
ualities and characteristics to be
a champion in any field.
The Distinguished Alumni
Lecture will be open to the public
it 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 27, in
Room 1031 of the General Class-
n om Building on the ECU cam-
pus. A rca ,Mion ull to' ow.
Yow t iught ind c 'ached at
GibsonviUe High School for one
year and at Allen Jay High School
for four years. Upon receiving her
master's degree from UNC-
Greensboro, 'She coached at Elon
College for five years. She re-
ceived the Distinguished Alumni
Award at UNC-G in 1982.
Since the Olympic games at
Seoul, South Korea, in September,
Yow has been inducted into the
North Carolina Hall of Fame and
the Women's Sports Hall of Fame.
She was selected Coach-of-the-
Year by the Greensboro Daily
News. The National Organization
of Women (NOW) voted Yow
"Woman of the Year in Sports
and the Women's Basketball
Coaches Association selected her
as recipient of the 1988 Carol
Eckman Award, which recog-
nized outstanding sportsman-
ship, honesty, courage, ethical
behavior, dedication to purpose
and commitment to the student
athlete.
Yow has also been named the
first female to receive the Amos
Alonzo Stagg Coaching Award,
See GOLD, page 12
The men's indoor track team
has been hard at work preparing
themselves for the outdoor sea-
son. Over the weekend, they par-
ticipated in two tournaments in
Chapel Hill and in Blacksburg,
Va.
The team's results were not
turned in at the request of coach
Bill Carson. However, coach Car-
son did sav that the team was
running very well against teams
of higher caliber than that of the
Pirates.
Considering the men's team
consists of sprinters alone, they
must train and run hard to keep
up with the other schools in point
standings. Running with the likes
of Auburn, Florida, Georgia, and
the Universitv of South Carolina,
J
the team ia doing quite well.
According to coach Carson,
"We're just working on leg speed
right now, getting ready for the
outdoor season
He also said the outdoor sea-
son will prosper from the indoor
season.
Although the team is very-
young, there are very high expec-
tations for the future. Team
members junior Robinson, Rich-
ard Wright, Brian Irving, and
Eugene McNeill will play a major
role in the teams success. Robin-
son and Wright, both football
players, are expected to have a
definite impact in the Pirates's 100
and 200 individual dashes and
relays.
Coach Carson went on to say
that he is not reallv concerned
with the scores of the indoor
meets, but he is concerned with
the performance oi his runners.
The team has five meets re-
maining and the IC4A Champi-
onships as well as the NCAA
Indoor Championship to be held
in Indianapolis, I.N. on March 10-
11.
Fellows take IRS tourney
(IRS) � The annual intramu-
ral sport pre season basketball
tournament was held recently
and a record twenty-one teams
across campus took part in the
action. Play was intense from the
first round through the final con-
test with hoopsters scoring the
majority of points above the rim.
In the A bracket, The Fellows,
lead by William Grady, Percy
Edwards and Mark Gaines took
no prisoners defeating one squad
130-63. Gaines popped in over 60
points for the victors. The 'two
G's Grady and Gaines were un-
stoppable both inside and the
perimeter while Edwards keyed
the offense with lane penetration
establishing himself as the assist
leader.
Their only competition came
from a squad called No Prejudice
Intended. Brian Delaney pro-
vided a few glittering moments
for NPI fans but the group still
found themselves in a losing
battle 68-58.
In the B bracket, Winter Heat
enjoyed a glorious tournament.
Shooting sensation Marcus Good-
son put on a perimeter clinic with
games of 37, 43 and 46 scoring
most points from 18-25 foot range.
Winter Heat faced a strong re-
bounding squad as they made
their climb to 'he championship
game. Here's the Beef gave the
Heat a run for their money with
outstanding inside play but fell
short 59-56.
The final tournament game pit-
ted The Fellows and Winter Heat
in a somewhat lopsided contest.
The Heat geared strategies at de-
fending fellow Mark Gaines but
found themselves out in the cold
as the remaining Fellows con-
nected from all sides of the cylin-
der and walked away with a 75-63
championship.
Pirates over the
Airwaves
East Carolina Pirate fans not
able to attend home or away
games are encouraged hear all
the action on the Pirate Sports
Network.
Lobster 10K to be held Spring Break
ORLAND1 (AP) �Students
Hocking to Florida for some fun in
the sun during Springbreak '89
are invited to compete in the an-
rual Red Lobster 10K Classic in
Orlando on Saturday, March 11.
More than $64,500 in prize
mfney is at stake, including cash
awards of $7,500 for first place in
the men's and women's divisions,
phis a total of $55,000 in bonus
mpney.
"This will be our seventh
annual classic said Race Direc-
tor Jon Hughes, who added that
all proceeds will benefit the Cen-
tral Florida Chapter of the Spina
Bifida Association. "We expect
several thousand runners, includ-
ing college students from
throughout the U.S. We'll also
have a good field of world-class
athletes from a dozen-plus coun-
tries
The race, sponsored by
Orlando-based Red Lobster
U.S.A is one of many fun events
for Springbreakers to enjoy in the
area, home of world-famous Walt
Disney World (Magic Kingdom
and Epcot Center), Sea World,
Cypress Gardens, Boardwalk and
Baseball and other area attrac-
tions. For more information about
hotels and events in the Orlando
area, call the Orlando area Cham-
ber of Commerce at 407363-
5871.
Registration fee for all run-
Iangerous to Know" Parker
ners is $10 before March 9. the
race-day registration fee will be
$15. All Red Lobster 10K Classic
participants will receive a cus-
tom-designed T-shirt, a limited
edition commemorative pin, a
sports towel, $15 worth of Red
Lobster restaurant coupons, and
an admission ticket to the post-
race party at Church Street Station
in the city's night life district.
Persons seeking more infor-
mation about the race can call Jon
Hughes at 1-800-252-RLlO. Entry
forms can be obtained by calling
Hughes or writing to The Track
Shack, 1322 N. Mills Avenue,
Orlando, Fla. 32803.
Entry forms also will be avail-
able at all Red Lobster restaurants
in Florida beginning in mid-Feb-
ruary.
"We invite all students to visit
Orlando and take part in this ex-
citing race, which in 1990, will
serve as The Athletic Congress'
U.S. Men's 10K Championships
Hughes said.
Jeff Charles, the "voice of the
Pirates delivers the exciting
play-by-play for each men's bas-
ketball game beginning with
pregame activities at 7 p.m. game
nights. All games begin at 7:30
p.m.
ECU fans in the Greenville
area can hear games broadcast on
WDLX-FM (93.3).
Be sure to catch the action Sat-
urday night as the Pirates take to
the road against their biggest ri
al, UNC-Wilmington.
WINTER SPORTS RECORD
Men's Basketball9-8
Women's Basketball6-6
Men's Swimming9-0
Women's Swimming8-1





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 26,1989
Twins named players of the week
ASHEV1LLE, N.C. (AP)
Juniors Damon and Ramon Wil-
liams of Virginia Military Insti-
tute, who combined for 147 points
in three games last week, have
been named the Southern Confer-
ence players of the week.
The identical twin brothers
from Roanoke, Va also had 23
rebounds and 14 assists last week.
Damon Williams scored 74
points and averaged 24.7 points
per game for the week, while
Ramon Williams scored 73 points
and averaged 24.3 points per
game.
Damon Williams scored 29
points and Ramon Williams had
2b in a 90-83 overtime victory over
Virginia Tech. Damon Williams
scored 27 points and his brother
had 2b in a 91-82 triple overtime
victory over Furman. In that
game, Ramon Williams scored
VMl's first two points of the third
overtime, and Damon Williams
had the final eight.
Ramon Williams scored 21
points, and his brother added 18
in an 80-76 overtime loss to Ten-
nessee-Chattanooga.
"Damon and Ramon are both
playing very, very well and have
been models of consistencv
throughout the year said VMI
coach Joe Cantafio.
Senior forward Kim Johnson
of Appalachian State was named
the Southern Conference
women's player of the week.
Johnson scored 38 points in
two games last week. She scored
26 points, including both three-
pointers she attempted, in an 82-
68 victory.
"Kim has been a consistent
double-figure scorer for us this
season and hasbeen a big factor in
our overall game said Appala-
chian State coach Linda Robinson.
"We are very excited about her
getting her 1,000th career point
this week
Hershiser picks up one more win
dM
??f
NEW YORK (AD � Pitcher
Orel Hershiser, continuing his
award-winning ways, says being
named The Associated Press Male
Athlete of the Year "caps a year of
fantastic awards
The Los Angeles Dodgers'
right-hander received nearly
twice as many votes as his World
Series rival, Jose Canseco of the
Oakland Athletics, and became
the first non-Olympian to win the
honor in an Olympic year since
Dennv McLain in 1968.
"It is a tremendous honor to
be recognized with an award
which covers all sp ts Hersh-
iser said.
After last season's heroics,
Hershiser was a unanimous
choice as the National League Cy
Young winner, was named Most
Valuable Player in the NL play-
offs and MVP of the Dodgers'
World Series victory.
Hershiser received 67 first-
McEnroe loses
to Lendl in
Austrialian
place votes and 465 points in the
balloting done by sports writers
and broadcasters on a 5-3-1 basis.
Canseco, the first player to hit
40 home runs and steal 40 bases in
a season, received 30 first-place
votes and 233 points.
Heisman Trophy winner
Barry Sanders, who set all-time
college records for rushing yards
and touchdowns, was third with
207, followed by Olympic swim-
mer Matt Bionoi with 152, NBA
star Michael Jordan with 91 and
Olympic diver Greg Louganis at
59.
Finishing out the Top 10 in the
AP voting were Magic Johnson of
the NBA's Los Angeles Lakers,
heavyweight champion Mike
Tyson, golfer Curtis Strange and
hockey star Wayne Gretzky.
The AP's Female Athlete of
the i ear will be announced today.
1 lershiser set a record with 59
consecutive shutout innings last
season. He becomes the 22nd
baseball player to win in the 58-
year history of the award and the
first since Dwight Gooden in
1985.
During the shutout streak,
which broke Don Drysdale's hal-
lowed mark, Hershiser celebrated
two other events. On Sept. 15, his
second son was born: the next
night, he turned 30.
He finished the regular sea-
son with a 23-8 record and 2.26
earned run average. He pitched
24 2-3 innings in the NL playoffs
against the New York Mets, get-
ting a save in Game 4 and pitching
a shutout in Game 7.
He pitched a three-hit shut-
out in Game 2 and a four-hitter in
Game 5 of the World Series
against Oakland.
In his final 101 innings, he
allowed just five earned runs. 1 le
also won his first Gold Glove
award and became the first
pitcher to get three hits in a World
Series game since 1924.
Canseco, the American
League's unanimous Most Valu-
able Player, led the major leagues
with 42 homers and 124 runs bat-
ted in. He batted .307 and stole 40
bases.
Sanders ran for 2,628 yards
and scored 39 touchdowns in his
junior year at Oklahoma State.
Biondi won seven medals in
Seoul, including five gold. 1 le was
the most decorated Olympian
since Mark Spitz won seven golds
in 1972.
Jordon was the first in the
NBA to be MVP and defensive
playcr-of-thc-year in the same
season. He led the league in scor-
ing for the second straight season
with the Chicago Bulls.
Louganis won both diving
gold medals at the Olympics. He
did it despite cutting his head on
the board during a dive.
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MELBOURNE, Australia
(AP) � Ivan Lendl destroyed
John McEnroe's title dream with a
straight-set victory Wednesday in
the quarterfinals of the $2.4 mil-
lion Australian Open tennis
championship.
"I played very well, but he
played better McEnroe said.
Lendl crashed a remarkable
40 passing shots past the Ameri-
can to win 7-6 (7-0), 6-2, 7-6 (7-2)
and earn a meeting in the semifi-
nals with llth-sceded Thomas
Muster of Austria.
Muster gained the semis for
the first time in a Grand Slam
event when two-time champion
Stefan Edberg of Sweden was
forced to default with a mysteri-
ous and painful back injury.
Edberg suffered the injury during
his fourth-round victory over
Australian Pat Cash and said it
would keep him out of action for
at least two weeks.
Miloslav Mecir of Czechoslo-
vakia, the ninth seed, crushed
Yugoslav teen-ager Goran Ivani-
sevic 7-5, 6-0, 6-3 to also advance
to the semifinals, where he will
face unseeded Swede Jan Gun-
narsson.
Gold
Continued from page 11
sponsored by the U.S. Sports
Academy. The award is named
for the legendary football coach
and recognized coaches of out-
standing achievement who exem-
plify the qualitites most often
found in the tradition of great
teacher-coaches.
As a head coach ininterna-
tional competition, Yow's overall
record is 21 -1. She was head coach
for the U.S. national squad which
won gold medals at the 1986
Goodwill Games and the 1986
International Federation of Bas-
ketball Associations World
Championships. Both Champi-
onship games were against the
Soviet Union national team in
Moscow. The victory at the Good-
will Games was the first time in 29
years that a U.S. women's team
had defeated the Russians.
Yow was assistant coach for
the gold-medal winning Olympic
team at the Los Angeles games in
1984. She has also coached teams
at the Pan American games and
the World University Games.
At NCSU Yow has led her
teams to three ACC Champion-
ships in 1980,1985, and 1987. Her
teams have gone to the NCAA
tournaments in 1982-87.
For more information call the
ECU Department of English at
(919)757-6041.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 26, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 26, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.651
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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