The East Carolinian, January 24, 1989






Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES 11
SPORTS16
Features
ECU Freshman works special effects
magic in 'DeepStar Six
See page 11.
Sports
Pirates gun down the Midshipmen
of Navy Monday Night.
See page 16.
�fte l-ast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No.T
at
Thursday January, 1989
Greenville, NC
Circulation 12,000
Mandatory vaccinations
Students line up for shots
Thomas Walters, one of the 6,000 ECU students required to take a measte vaccination, stood in
line Monday to receive a shot of medicine. (Photo hv J.D. Whitmire�Photolab)
Campus organization helps Nicaragua
By TOM PAGE
Assistant News Editor
The Organization tor Devel-
oping Nations is one of many
unknown yet very significant
groups on campus. The group
better known as ODN is a campus
branch of a national organization.
The chapter at ECU presently has
twelve members and has re-
mained active for two years, ac-
cording to Marianne Exum,
ECU's ODC president.
"ODN participates in many
global projects concerning devel-
oping countries. Presently our
group is raising money for a verv
important project whose goals
will have far reaching effects on
many people in need in Nicara-
gua Exum said.
Exum described the fund
raiser as "essential" to the net-
work of groups building a "soy
milk production plant" in Ciudad
Sandino a small city outside of
Manaugua. The plant project will
benefit both children in need oi
proper nutrition and also city
workers in need of income. The
plant will manufacture other soy-
products which will generate in-
come for the workers while the
milk will be distributed to chil-
dren and pregnant women free.
According to Exum the
amount requested for building
the plant is $6,762.00. The people
of the communitv have organized
themselves into cooperatives and
are developing the means for the
production oi soy beans as well as
other basic food crops on a rotat-
ing basis. Students of the Univer-
sity of Nicaragua have contrib-
uted to the planning and logistics
of the project and ODN American
campus' such as ECU are helping
with the funding.
"It is the most we can do at
such a distance but we have faith
in the project and look forward to
its completion next year. Our the
national ODN chapter is sending
one of our ECU members to Nica-
ragua this summer so hopefully
we will get an update Exum
said.
The plant, upon completion
will produce 10,00020 ml. bags of
soy milk daily. The milk will then
be distributed throughout the
communities to children who will
receive one bag a day. Health
posts will then distribute the
remaining milk to pregnant
women. The profit from sales of
the other soy products will keep
the plant running, according to
Exum.
"Although ECU's group is
only contributing in the construc-
tion of the workshop for process-
ing the soybeans we are playing a
verv important part Exum
stated. "We will be working hard
with fundraisers such as yard
sales, raffles and other projects to
pay for the basic construction,
plumbing and electrical fixtures
that the plant will invariably
need
Exum encourages all stu-
dents with an interest in develop-
ing countries to attend ODN
meetings and stressed that ODN
is not limited to any specific ma-
jors.
"Our group offers discus-
sion, education, project planning
and also internships to different
countries which is sponsored by
the national chapter on a compc-
tive basis. The next few intern-
ships will be in India, thePhillipi-
nes, and Bangledesh Exum said.
Natural child birth discussed
By TRISH GRAND
Staff Writer
"Human Birth: An Evolution-
ary Perspective was the topic of
interest last Thursday evening as
Anthropolgist Wenda Trevathan
lectured on the evolutionary se-
lection of mid wiferv in childbirth.
Dr. Trevathan, assistant pro-
fessor of Anthropology at New
Mexico State University, spoke on
her culmination of years of re-
search in the area of mother-in-
fant bonding and fetal emergent
patterns.
Except in a few cases where
medical attention is needed, Tre-
vathan argued on the importance
of the parents' choice between
childbirth in a natural setting
(such as the home) and a hospital
setting. Trevathan points out sev-
eral factors occuring thoughout
evolution that eventually made
midwifery for humans necessary.
In trying to measure evolu-
tionary success, Trevathan states
there are two points to consider:
survival and reproductive suc-
cess. "It seems to me that there is
no single point in an individual's
life where those two things come
into play more than at the mo-
ment of birth said Trevathan.
From this premise, Trevathan
suggests these two points in evo-
lutionary success may have some
connection. "The survival of the
baby is at stake at that point and
the survival oi the mother is at
stake and certainly the reproduc-
tive success of the mother is at
stake said Trevathan.
Trevathan recognized sev-
eral theories on the importance of
understanding human evolution
including the hunting hypothesis,
language, and culture. However,
she concluded that human birth
must occur first for these other
hypotheses to take place, "so it
seemed to me that it is verv critical
J
to understand this particular
process and how the forces of
human evolution have been influ-
enced bv childbirth
Bipedalism (walking upright
on two legs), encephalism (brain
enlargement), and delivery of a
helpless baby all contribute to the
need for assistance at the time of
birth says Trevathan.
The emergence of bipedalism
changed the shape of the birth
canal for humans. The largest part
of a female's pelvis is the front,
and the largest part of a baby's
head is the back. Therefore, Tre-
vathan states that "the large ma-
jority of human babies are borr
facing away from their mothers
This provides problems foi
the mother if she were to delivei
the baby alone. "Once the head is
emerged she is going to have a
hard time reaching behind her,
pulling it forward as this proce-
dure will pull the baby against the
normal flection oi hisher body.
"I've suggested that it may have
been advantageous for women
to seek some sort of assistance at
birth said Trevathan.
With regard to encephaliza-
tion, a human baby's head is only
22 percent its normal size when it
reaches maturity. The mother
must care for the needs of her
helpless child. Throughout her
research in El Paso, TX and Mex-
ico, Trevathan suggests that not
only is bonding occuring between
the mother and child when he
she is first born, but some of the
mothers behaviors may have sur-
vival value which evolved from
early humans.
The mothers "would begin
massaging and rubbing the baby
and then they would bring the
babies up and fully encompass
them said Trevathan. "By mas-
saging and rubbing the baby
helps to get the respirations
going, and helps to warm the
baby
Trevathan further explains
that eye contact with the baby
helps to calm and keep the baby
See TREVATHAN, page 3
By TON I PAGE
Assistant News Editor
The Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center smelted of rubbing alcohol
as students lined up outside
awaiting their measles vaccina-
tions. The mandatory vaccina-
tions have been issued to over
6,000 ECU students and 800 fac-
ulty members according to Kay
Van Nortwick, Associate Director
for Administration at the Student
Health Service.
A directive has come from
the North Carolina Department of
Human Resources through the
local Health department which
requires everyone who falls
within a departmental guidelines
for immediate re-immunization .
According to Van Nortwick
one case of student measles has
been reported and since then the
Health Department has taken
protective steps through the Stu-
dent Health Service to vaccinate
potential virus carriers. As a safe-
guard, the Health Department
has raised the age of initial vacci-
nation to 16 months old and older.
"The confusion sets in when
we have to determine who needs
to get a shot. Since the previous
age of vaccination was 12 moruiu
old many more people must get
vaccinated as a safeguard Van
Nortwick said.
This means that students and
faculty who recieved their vacci-
nation before 19o8 need another
shot because that vaccine is no
longer effective. The main group
the infirmary is focusing on are
those born after January 1, 1957,
according to Van Nortwick.
To get into ECU under law
students must provide the uni-
versity with an updated immuni-
zation record. Therefore, as a
consequence, in order to get back
into classes this week those stu-
dents who have been notified
must get their measles shot.
When asked how the Infir-
mary would enforce this policy
Van Nortwick explained that a
computer list would be sent to all
professors with the names of
those students who have not re-
cieved their shot and those stu-
dents would not be allowed to
return to class until they are vacci-
nated.
"Our population is close to-
gether Van Nortwick explained,
"Students attend classes together,
live in dorms together and go
downtown. Measles is a highly
contagious illness and the possi-
bility of an epedemic is always
present Van Nortwick said.
"1 don't think we will have an
epedimic, but it is worth it to take
the necessary precautions to pre-
vent a potential one, or any more
cases Van Nortwick added.
The process for checking shot
records is a tedious one, accord-
ing to Van Nortwick "The
infirmary's computers only have
shot records on those students
enrolled after 19to the rest must
be checked by hand one file at a
time
"The last notifications will g
out Monday night at 5:00 and ail
students should be notified by
Tuesday Van Nortwick said.
There is always the possibilitv
that some records will be over-
looked Van Nortwick ex-
plained. "Since this is the case all
students and faculty members
should update their she' cords
if they are in doubt
Students being notified will
receive a memo from Dr. James
McCailumof the Student Health
Service. The official notification
states that vaccines must be ob-
tained by by 8 p.m. Tuesday,
January 24 or students may not
attend class on Wednesday. The
memo stated that "the reason for
the urgency is to avoid a measles
epidemic on our campus which
would possibly necessitate clos-
ing school
Since the notifications went
out on Saturday afternoon Stu-
dent Health Service employees
have been working overtime and
have administered 1.500 measles
shots, according to Van Nortwick.
"There has been a steady flow
of students coming in but we
expect many more on Tuesday
Van Nortwick said.
"Volunteers from various
departments on campus, the
school oi nursing, as well as the
Health Department have helped
us out a lot and are greatly appre-
ciated. The atmosphere has man-
aged t.i remain cheerful with
everyone helping out Van
Nortwick explained.
When asked how students
generally reacted to this newly
implemented policy one nurse
said, "I have been giving vaccines
all day and the students don't
seem to mmd. Most of them have
been very cooperative and we
haven't had many complaints
Chad Harris, a student, com-
mented atter recieving his shot,
"It's an inconvenience, but if they
have a documented measles case
already, then the precautions are
worth it
" arm hurts, and itsa little
See MEASLES, page 2
This is a composite of your student government, the SGA, who Monday listened to ECU Athletic
Director Dave Hart as he explained ECU's position on NCAA bylaws. (Photo by J.D. Whitmire)
Hart speaks on academics
ByBENSELBY
Staff Writer
The ECU Athletic Depart-
ment will not recruit students that
fail to meet academic require-
ments set by the NCAA proposi-
tion 48, said ECU Athletic Direc-
tor, Dave Hart, speaking to mem-
bers of the SGA last night.
"We have not eliminated the
possibility of recruiting partial
qualifiers altogether Hart said.
Proposition 48 required that
incoming student-athletes have
an overall 2.0 GPA and an SAT
score of 700. If a student didn't
have either, then thev became a
non-qualitier, Hart said.
Proposition 42 was aimed at
programs that abused the num-
bers of non-qualifiers and partial
qualifiers, Hart said.
"Athletics is by far not the
most important thing going on at
this campus, but it is without
question the most visible Hart
said.
"We're trying to build a suc-
cessful program, but a program
that is operated the right way
Hart said. "We're very, very
committed to academic excel-
lence as well as athletic excel-
lence
Hart praised the SGA and
student body for their support of
athletic programs at ECU.
"Student leadership is in
many ways more Jmnrtrtant than
faculty or civ rv dership
Hart said. pie attract
good people Arw ality attracts
quality
'The wav you've supported
us at Ficklen Stadium and at
Minges Collusium is greatly ap-
preciated Hart said. "If you
haven't had the opportunity, I
hope that you will take the time to
support us
Hart said a dialogue between
ECU and NCSU is still ongoing.
"Wecontinue to talk to NCSUand
we would like to continue the
series Hart said. "But we'd like
to see the traffic go both ways
See SGA, page 3
a
-





TUHFASTCAKOl IMAM
JANUARY 24, 1989
Programs offered abroad
By ADAM CORNEOUS
Stall Writer
Are you one of those lucky
students stuck in Greenville for
the Summer sessions? You don't
have to be.
The International Studies of-
fice i offering five trip:? to four
different countries this Summer
for students with a reasonable
GPA, Students can take up to six
hours of courses which will be
transferred for credit at ECU. It
also provides an opportunity to
visit another country for a month
or more at a fairlv reasonable
r '
If you want to catch that sav-
age topical tan and earn course
credits at the same time, than
maybe a month in 1 leredia, Costa
Rica is for you. From May 8 to unc
18 ou could gp to a Summer ses-
sion at the Universidad Nacional
de Costa Rica, located 12 KM (7
miles) north oi San Jose, the
nation's capital.
Its balmy mountain climate
maintains a temperature of be-
tween 65 and 83 degrees. The
entire tour costs $1560.00 for in-
state students, $2570.00 for out-
of state students. That fee in-
cludes housing with experienced
host families, dav trips to volcano
sites, beach trips, and tours of
tropical vegatation. It also in-
cludes a visit to a coffee farm, a
banana plantation, and some of
Costa Rica's major cities.
Universidad Nacional de
Costa Rica offers studies in an-
thropology, including a class in
Contemporary Human Problems
and Global Issues (ANTH 2020),
Area Studies or' Latin America
(ASLA 2100. 2200, 2300, and
2400), Biology, both field studies
and research problems, and Con-
versational Spanish (SPAN 1040
and 2018 The application dead-
line was January 17, but has been
extended for one week, ending
tomorrow. It you're interested
contact Maurice D.Simon. 1002 B
in the General Classroom build-
ing.
If you're looking for some-
thing a little cheaper, another
pn gram at UNCR is one spon
sored by the School oi Education.
It costs $980.00 for in-state stud-
im ts and lasts from une 13 to June
27. It's a course worth three
semester hours of credit and is.
open to fifteen education stu-
dents. The course' will offer op-
portunities to visit public schools.
the faculty of the university, a
well as a t.mr oi the country's
fields and factories. Students will
learn how developing and indus-
trialized nations work together
and get a firsthand look at prob-
lems faced by the families in Costa
Rica at the same time.
For more information contact
I V Vila Rosertfeld. The deadline
tor applications is February 15.
A Summer trip to Ferrara will
liter students an opportunity to
explore the heritage of Italy at the
L'niversitia degli Studi di Ferrara.
The University will offer six credit
hours oi general college educa-
tion requirements, and offers
courses in Conversational Italian
(1TAL1050) and Arts and Sciences
Abroad (ASAB 2100, 2200, and
2400).
These courses, which focus
on the cultural heritage of Italy,
M ill deal with the country's politi-
cal history, art, music, literature
and architecture, as well as its
scientific and religious thinkers
from the Middle Ages and the
Renaissance to the present.
Settled between Bologna and
the Adriatic Sea, Ferrara still has a
Renaissance atmosphere which a
visiting student can see in its
streets, churches, and monastar-
ies.
Its location is (nit of the way of
the mainstream tourist sites,
which provides an ideal atmos-
phere tor study. Although it's a
small town, it is ranked as one of
the most prosperous in Italy, a
country which itself "Suffers from
economic stability according to
Geraldine Laudati, the program's
coordinator.
Ms. Ferrara says that the resi-
dents oi Ferrara are receptive to
exhange students, and families
frequently hold parties for Ameri-
can and Italian students.
This year the tours in Italy
include five towns, including a
trip to Monteva, home of the first
Renaissance church, and nearby
Robina. Together with Ferrara,
these lands used to make up the
rule of the Gonzaga family, its
palaces containing the mvsteri-
ous dwarves houses, which were
tiny rooms built for the dwarves
who worked as servants there.
Another trip, which goes to
Florence inlcudes a tour of the
Uffitizi Gallery which houses,
among other works,
Michelangelo's David. Trips to
Padua and Bologna, the capital of
the district oi Emilia Romagna
u inch has gamed fame for its
sausage promise tours of the first
and second oldest universities.
Byzantine mosaics works can
be soen in tours oi Venice and
Ravenna. These seventh and
tweh th century works oi art de-
picting bibilical stories are on dis-
play in the older churches and
repositiories. Mosaic workshops
may also be viewed, although
scheduled tours are tentative.
The University itself, which
was founded in 1391, has had
such students as Copernicus and
Fallopio and today boast a pro-
ductive science complex and
medical school. The entire trip to
Ferrara costs 52480.00 for in-state
students, S3280.00 for out-ot-
state. For more information on the
Ferrara trip please contact Ger-
aldine laudati at 757-6250. The
application deadline is February
1.
Looking for something a lttle
more cosmopolitan? ECU is also
offering trips to London and
Paris. From July 7 to August 7you
could go to Richmond College in
Kensington, located in the West
End of London, and get six
semester hours for an Advanced
English Elective or a Humanities
Credit from a variety of classes.
Tours to Picadilly Circus,
Houses of Parliment, Bucking-
ham Palace, and the Tower of
London are being offered, al-
though the tours are more or less
being "played by ear according
to Dr. Paul Dowel! the trip's coor-
dinator.
"We had eight students last
summer, "said Dowell. "This
summer there may be as many as
fifteen and we are expecting that
number to grow The price for in-
state students is $2456.00,
$2894.00 for out-of-statc students.
The group will be taking an
optional tour to Stratford-Upon-
Avon for an additional cost of
$149.00. Students will see Mary
Arden's house and
Shakespeares's Theatre. Tickets
to the Theatre are discounted for
students. The fee also includes
tours to either York or Durham,
Canterbury (of Chaucer's Canter-
bury' Tales), Bath (site of the
world's first planned city), And
Greenwich, home of the Prime
Meridian, where you can see the
Naval Observatorv and theCutty
Sark.
There is an optional ten-day
excursion to Paris, Brussels, and
Amsterdam for $595.00 These
rates are guaranteed if you get the
application in by February 15. Go
to Paris for shopping and sight-
seeing one dav, then travel to
Brussles to see the Mannekin Pis
and Grand Place the next. After-
wards, you will go to Amsterdam,
where you will see collections of
Yermeer, Rembrandt, and other
Dutch artists, as well as the fa-
mous canals and several hundrec'
bridges which they flow under.
See Dr. Paul Dowell in Gen-
eral Classroom building 2202 for
more information.
If the Louvre, the Eiffel tower,
Notre Dame, or Musec Picassois
is more to your taste, then the
department of foreign languages
Quake hits Soviet villages
MOSCOW (AP) - An earth-
quake destroved several moun-
tain illages in Tadzhikistan to-
day and buried one village under
a 45-foot wall of dirt and mud,
killing up to 1,000 people, officials
said.
"Almost everybody died
said Zainiddin Nasreddinov, edi-
tor-in-chief of the official Tazhiki-
stan news agency, who visited the
buried villageof Sharora in Soviet
Central Asia.
An preliminary estimate in-
dicated about 600 people had died
there, he said in a telephone inter-
view from Dushanbe, about 10
s northeast of Sharora. The
popu ition of the village was not
ki .n, lut . isreddinov said
about 70 families lived there.
n i ' at the Dushanbe
seisi k ho refused to be
tdt ntifk .rlies are large
in the area u� ue dwelling often
houst s eight to 10 people.
"The tot �1 number of deaths is
now evaluated at uo to 1,000
said the official Tass news agency.
Measles shots required
Continued from page 1
swollen but I'm glad I got it said faculty members who still need to
Chris Gallager another student gct their measles shots. The Pitt
emerging from the LSVV Cultural County Health Department will
t-cntor also be administering the vac-
The infirmary will be open cincs,andbothfacilitiesarefreeof
Tuesdy January 24 from 8:00 a.m. cnarce
to 8:00 p.m. for those students and 8
and literatures is offering nine
weeks in Paris as well as six hours
of credit at the Universitede Paris
V (Sorbonne).
Students stay at the Foyer de
Fstudiantes in the Latin Quarter
oi Paris, and tours arc offered of
the Musee d'Orsay, Montarte, the
Arc de Triomphe, Musee Rodin,
and Les Invalidcs. The classes
offered at Sarbonne include
French Civilization in France
(FRench 2116) as well as other
special classes in French language
and history.
The dates are from June 26 to
August 2 and there is an optional
three-day trip offered which tours
the landing beaches of Nor-
mandy, Claude Monet's home at
Giverny, Chartes, and the island
oi Mont-St-Michel in the English
Channel. The price for in-state
students is $2580.00. Out-of-state
costs are $3540.00. and the three-
day tour is an extra $205.00. To
find out more about the Paris trip
contact Dr. Karine Sparrow-Gin-
ter, room 3303 of the General
Classroom building.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
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Scott Makey J Keith Pcarct'
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It said hundreds died in Sharora
but did not give an exact figure.
The tremor struck about 1,800
miles southeast of Moscow, north
of Afghanistan and bordering
China, at 2:02 a.m. (6:02 p.m. EST
Sunday). It was the strongest
quake to hit the Soviet Union
since the Dec. 7 quake that struck
Armenia and killed about 25,000
people.
Rescue teams were searching
for survivors and soldiers were
rushed to the area to keep order
and restore communications and
power and water to the buildings
left standing, said Nasreddinov.
Roads into the area were
damaged and thousands of head
oi cattle were killed, Tass said.
Bulldozers and cranes were being
sent into the area to help rescuers,
the report said.
The magnitude of the earth-
quake was uncertain.
The U.S. Geological Survey in
Golden, Colo, said it measured 6.0
on the Richter scale.
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t
N
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1989 3
Solidarity urges restraint
GDANSK, Poland (AP) - Soli-
4arity chairman Lech Walesa
urged caution and restraint fol-
lowing the independent labor
movement's acceptance of Com-
munist authorities' offer to dis-
cuss its return to legal status.
"We are committed to agree-
ment " But we have to remain free
and self-governing Walesa told
about 5,000 people in this Baltic-
port on Sunday after announcing
the decision by Solidarity's na-
tional leadership.
The banned trade union
federation's statement of accep-
tance, issued as its executive
committee ended a two-day
meeting, was published by the so long struggled to diminish
state-run PAP news agency and Solidarity's influence was now
ended the union movement's 16- was seeking accord only to calm there will be no need to have a
month legal existence with a De- unrest caused by rising inflation general strike" Walesa has said he
cember 1981 military crackdown,
interning thousands of union ac-
tivists.
No date has been mentioned
for the talks, but both sides have
indicated they could begin within
a few weeks.
Last week, the country's
Communist leaders offered the
prospect of lifting the seven-year
ban on Solidarity on the condition
the movement forfeit Western
financial aid, embrace socialism
and agree to a two-year morato-
rium on strikes.
and consumer shortages.
Poland's foreign debt is $39 bil-
lion.
"I wish that there be no eu-
phoria Walesa cautioned the
thousands of supporters after a
Mass at St. Brygida's Roman
Catholic church. "Anything is still
possible
"Is it true we will be solving
Polish problems in a pluralistic
free way? We will see very soon
he said.
Janusz Onyszkicvvicz,
The government that had for Solidarity's national spokesman,
broadcast as the first item on the
national evening news.
It clears the way for the first
formal talks between Solidarity
and the authorities since Poland's
leader, Gen. Wojciech jaruzclski,
offering a partnership of sorts for
tackling Poland's chronic eco-
nomic and social ills.
Though heartened by the of-
fer, wary Solidarity activists said
they suspected the government
said cooperation between the
union movement and oovern-
ment now seems "the onlv solu-
tion" to Poland's crisis.
I le rejected a strike ban, but
added: VVe want to discuss eco-
nomic reform. " If it works then
-
ECU to hold Indian program
ECU News Hurciu
ECU will host a Feb. 22 sym-
posium on the native American
heritage of Hasten North Carolina
focussing on Indian cultures from
preshistoric times to the present.
Under auspices of the ECU
Institute for Historical and Cul-
tural Research, the symposium,
"In Search of a Lost Heritage
will be o interest to native Ameri-
cans, social science teachers, ad-
vanced high school students, col-
lege students and retired persons,
according to Dr. Henrv C. Ferrell
Jr institute director.
The program will include
presentations on "Native Ameri-
cansTodav by Dr. David K. Elia-
des, professor of history and
American Indian studies at Pem-
broke State University: "The Na-
tive American in the Late Prehis-
toric Period by Dr. David S.
Phelps, professor of anthropol-
ogy at ECU; "Cutures in Conflict:
the European Intrusion in the 16th
and 17th Centuries by Dr. Karen
Ordahl Kupperman, professor of
history at the University of Con-
necticut, and "The Final On-
slaught: A Heritage is Lost in the
Tuscarora War, " bv Dr. Thomas
C. Parramore, professor of history
at Meredith College.
The Institute for Historical
and Cultural Research was estab-
lished in the ECU Department of
History last year to help discover
and preserve the cultural heritage
of Eastern North Carolina.
Ferrell said the institute will
serve as a clearinghouse for social
sciences and humanities disci-
plines to work together and pool
resources and expertise to pre-
serve the cultural history of the
region.
It works with local historical
associations and governmental
bodies on projects to identify and
develop knowledge of the past,
Ferrell said. In addition, it is in-
volved in short courses, symosia,
technical services and research.
Trevathan proposes birth at home
Continued from page 1
fflbm crying. This behavior may
rftve evolved from the protection
c$a helpless crying baby that may
ead preditors to its location.
.In contrast, non-human pri-
:rtate babies are born facing the
rgfcther and the babe's brain is
laorc fully developed at birth
glose to 30 percent of the brain
is developed). Therefore the
mother mav assist in the birth and
the baby (not as helpless as a
human baby) can grab on to its
Sther's hair and assist in itsown
survival bv beginning to nurse as their babies at home verses a hos-
tile mother cleans her baby, pital, it may come from a "deep
Manvof these behaviors per- feeling" within the mother that
formed by mothers toward their may have originated from some
babies suggest survival-oriented evolutionary benefits. These par-
evolvement frim early humans, cnts'choices should be taken seri-
' It does secmj-aspnab.le to, me ously,torit maynotbejusta'tad
that selection favored these kinds
of things so that mothers would
respond in certain ways to en-
hance the chances of their babies
surviving said Trevathan.
Therefore, Trevathan pro-
poses that if mothers want to have
that These women decide to have
their babies at home says Tre-
vathan.
GA grants money to ROTC
mtinued from page 1
"When you're an independ-
ent school, you literally have to
ome up with 11 games to make
Our season Hart said.
"Instead of feeling sorry for
aaarselves, we need to raise our
standard Hart said in reference
If last year's overbearing sched-
ule
S Hart said that plans to in-
crease the stadium's capacity to
50,000 will be a multi-million dol-
lar project that would be privately
-funded. He also noted that a re-
gional athletic facility would
greatly enhance eastern North
Carolina.
In other business, the SGA
appropriated $200 to send two
SGA executives to a national con-
ference being held in Dallas,
Texas.
The Air Force ROTC was also
granted $1,111 to send members
of the Arnold Air Society to an
area conclave.
On Feb. 6th, Chancellor Rich-
ard Eakin is scheduled to speak at
the weekly meeting.
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will not sign any agreement at the
cost of Solidarity's independence.
Alter Sunday's Mass, about
1,000 people marched from the
church chanting, "Solidarity!
Solidarity! Legalize Solidarity
Police blocked the march after a
few blocks and the group dis-
banded peacefully.
Solidarity's statement Sun-
day said that by agreeing to nego-
tiate its reinstatement, the gov-
ernment had met its conditions
for beginning the talks authorities
first proposed during a series of
strikes in August.
"VVe arc responding, stretch-
ing out our hand because the
other side stretched out its hand
too said Walesa.
Dr. Doucs
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SJje iEaat damltman
Pete Feknald, owaMou
Stephanie Folsom, rt-injrm
James F.J. McKee, PiwrtorofUarrm
Tim Hampton, n� e�
KK1STEN HALBERG,ssiOT
Chip Carter, ��� uor
Dean Waters, crMgr,
Debbie Stevens, s
Brad Bannister, g, �r
Jeff Parker, st u�c�
TOM FURR, Orcwiifun M�ui$rr
SUSAN HOWELL, Production Mflrwgtr
Stephanie Emory,a u supcrx�
Mac Clark, bw.ssM�u(e
January 24. 189
OPINION
Page 4
MASCOT
PeeDee or not PeeDee?
That is the question.
v
"f
A point tor consideration by our Image
Enhancement Committee is to narrow
down all the symbols used to represent East
Carolina�there are over a hundred alto-
gether, taking into account all the various
stationery and notices sent out from here.
Also among those manv images are differ-
ent versions of our mascot, the Tirate.
The most common image oi the Tirate is
the one displayed by the Athletic Depart-
ment, the cartoon-style pirate with his
scowl and barrel-chested march. Though
officially this mascot's name isn't PeeDee,
everyone still refers to it by that name.
When the school decided to change the
old pirate (which looked like a prate) to this
new image, several students and alumni
protested, but with no results. When the
decision was made to let a second-grade
class pick the name for the new pirate,
people protested again, more vehemently
this time, and "officially" the name PeeDee
was dropped.
In truth, the students opposing the name
won nothing, because most people still
identify the image with that name. The
students lost anyway, because they didn't
have a voice in deciding what the mascot
that represented them was to look like.
Those who did decide the look decided
our mascot should look more like UNC's
and N.C State's mascots. The change
seemed to imply that we were trying to look
more like an ACC school.
Why? We're not in the ACC, nor going to
be a part of it. The old pirate was an image
of it's own, and it helped show our indi-
viduality. We are not UNC-Chapel Hill or
State, and there's no reason we should feel
we have to be. If a local survey were to be
taken, a large percentage would probably
admit they preferred a more realistic pirate.
The old pirate may not have looked as pol-
ished and professional as the new one, but
it was ours and not an imitation of another
school's mascot. An ideal solution would be
to revise the more realistic pirate and create
a new image that we could be proud of, one
that was uniquely East Carolina's.
Perhaps the time has come to bring the
issue of our mascot up for consideration
again. Shouldn't the people represented by
a svmbol be the ones with the most sav in
deciding on it?
Student bothered by rascist words
FOR THE HOMELESS,
,WPER THE REAGAN
Iapminisikation;
LIFE KfilNSAT
CONCEPTION,
To the editor:
I did not grow up in the South; in
fact, 1 grew up in part of this country
where a Black American was intrigu-
ing, the kind of person everyone
wanted to get to know so they could
find out more about his lifestyle, and
about his black heritage. I also grew
up in a part of this culture where
every child, by the time he was in
seventh grade, knew something
about the African culture and the
roots of our black population. Black
people were my friends, my neigh-
bors, my teachers, my doctors they
were people!
When 1 moved to the South, I was
appalled.
Ignorace, bigotry and terrible
negative attitudes about race, creed
and color are extremely prevalent in
theSouth. This is not to say that this
doesn't exist in other parts of the
country, but never before had 1 seen a
person proud to call a Black Ameri-
can, (who is the same as a White
American with the exception of the
amount of melanin produced in their
skin,) nigger j. mm
What does this word mean to
you, that's right, you sitting there
reading this, what does it mean to
you? To me it means stupidity, not to
the person being called this worth-
less word, but stupidity on the part of
the person saying it. I feel this word
should have been abolished right
along with slavery. It does not belong
in this society, for we have too many-
other social ills that need to be dealt
with.
Martin Luther King Jrsbirlhday
was celebrated for the first time this
year, in honor of a man with a won-
derful dream. Let us honor this man
and the incredible good he did to this
country by deleting the word
"nigger" form every person's vo-
cabulary.
We have two ears and one
mouth, enabling us to listen to twice
as much as we sav. I think it is time
people actually heard what they
were saying, and stopped to think
about it. I am positive many oi you
would be surprised!
Robin M. Andrews
junior
Anthropology
Condom machines
To the editor:
On January 12, 1989, 1 read an
article in favor of the installation oi
condom vending machines on the
ECU campus. I think it was a good
example of the attitude oi Americans
� in addressing their problems. We
either throw money at them, often
milVptmsof dollars, or find waysto get
around them. Ms. Bohannon, author
of the January 12 editorial, says a
possible solution to sexually trans-
mitted diseases like AIDS might be
the installation of condom vending
machines in the dormitories.
If we consider the positive as-
pects fo doing this, we'll find that
thev are few and uncertain.
Condoms might prevent the spread
of sexually transmitted diseases
Thev might prevent AIDS from be-
coming a bigger plague than it al-
ready has become. If AIDS could be
contracted from casual contact, then
we should do everything possible to
stop it. However, when it comes to
sexual transmission of AIDS, there is
only one thing that will stop it: re-
sponsibility. This University is m I
responsible for the way we choose to
live our lives, but only to inform, f
you are truly concerned about this
disease and the facts about the way it
is transmitted, then find out what
you're sleeping with before you sleep
with it!
To install these machines on our
campus because other schools do it
not only makes ECU a follower in-
stead of a leader but also makes us
look like we can't have an original
thought and is not a reason for future
policies. Another negative is that it
could affect the financial support oi
our outstanding medical school and
growing athletic program.
Although I am only 1 in 15,000
hero at ECU, there is no way I would
support East Carolina, either finan-
cially when I gpacbiate ot.jn. temple
recognition, if these machines are in-
troduced. It would show that we not
onlv lack morality but also self-re-
spect. ECU cannot afford to lose sup-
port simply because an overheated
student was too lazy to spend 10 min-
utes going to the drug store.
Michael W. Hunt
Communications
Senior
Tropical Chic - Saving the rain forests from their saviors
Bv FRED BARNES
New Republic
In case anyone is wondering where Peter Max
has been since the early 1970s, the answer is "in crea-
tive retreat according to a spokesman. But now
Max is back, and he's determined to use his art "to
show his concern for planetary issues especially
the preservation of tropical forests. For instance,
Max has produced a "quality line of sportswear"
that features shirts saying "Save the Rainforest" and
"Hug a Tree The proceeds will be donated to Peter
Max's bank account. But don't get the wrong idea;
Max says he plans to hold a SI million auction of his
work, and that money will go to the Rainforest
Action Network, a San Francisco-based organiza-
tion devoted to linking rain forest activities.
That's a lot of linking. Max is but one of many
cultural heroes who have lined up for the hottest
political cause since world hunger. The British rock
star Sting has done a rain forest benefit concert at the
Kennedy Center. And the Grateful Dead, though
long known for consciousness raising, had never
raised it for any specific political cause until last
September's benefit concert for tropical forests at
Madison Square Garden. The audience received an
extensive information kit, including ready-to-send
postcards to officials at the World Bank, at the
United Nations Environment Program, in Congress,
and in Brazil. Also: quotes from band members,
including drummer Mickey Hart's meditation on "a
profound understanding of man's biochemical rela-
tionship with nature Suzanne Vega and Roger
Homsby sang at the concert, and Kermit the Frog
was featured in a "Save the Rainforests" film.
Tropical chic is particularly evident in Washing-
ton, D.C. The Smithsonian is featuring a major exhi-
bition on rain forests, the National Zoo is raising
money to start its own tropical forest, and environ-
mental groups are staffing up on lobbyists and
grass-roots activists in the area. Among politicians,
tropical forest preservation has moved up the charts
to rate mention not only by members of Congress,
but by former presidents Ford and Carter and Presi-
dent Bush.
There is one problem with all of this. Backers of
the rain forest movement are mostly in the United
States or other modern industrialized countries. The
rain forests are not. They're mostly in developing
countries, which face other, more pressing issues,
such as feeding their growing populations. So two
questions must be answered. First, why is it our
business to tell Brazil, Indonesia, and other forested
countries what to do with their forests? And, assum-
ing there's an answer to that question, how can we in
developed countries convince the forested countries
they should listen to us?
The standard answer to the first question is that
the whole world is affected by tropical deforestation,
so everyone should have a say in what happens to
the forests. The best-known spillover effect is global
warming, caused by emission of carbon dioxide and
other gases. Deforestation (often to create farmland
or ranch land, or just for the lumber) contributes to
the greenhouse effect in two ways: burning the trees
releases carbon dioxide into the environment, and
cutting them reduces the number of trees on hand to
convert carbon dioxide back into oxygen. The effect
of deforestation on warming is substantial, perhaps
one-third of the effect of all burning of fossii fuels.
Estimates of the rate of tropical deforestation vary
from 27,000 square miles per year (a bit larger than
West Virginia) to 77,000 square miles (Nebraska). At
the latter rate, the tropical forests, now covering
about seven percent of the world's land surface, will
disappear by 2050. Recent satellite photos that show
thousands of fires in Brazil, ruining 31,000 square
miles of virgin forest per year, suggest the higher
number may be more accurate.
Unfortunately, the problem of global warming
can seem abstract and distant to political leaders
struggling with crises of debt, hunger, population
growth, and urbanization. More to the point, even if,
say, Brazil does recognize the gravity of the green-
house effect, why should it sacrifice for the entire
world? After all, northern countries don't have a
long history of such sacrifice. They got rich by cut-
ting their forests and exploiting their minerals. In
fact, even since the environmental toll of economic
development became evident, northern nations
haven't posted a strong record. The United States,
for example, has been blocked by political bickering
from taking strong action on acid rain. So Third
World leaders can justifiably tell us to clean up our
own back yard before telling them to clean up theirs.
In particular, they can demand that we cut our own,
sky-high consumption of fossil fuels, which contrib-
utes substantially to global warming.
In short, demanding unilateral action from the
Southern Hemisphere in the nameof the greenhouse
effect is unlikely to do any good. And it may back-
fire, since U.S. pressure is easily seen as Yankee
imperialism.
To be sure, in trying to drive home the urgency
of saving the rain forests, we can always note, cor-
rectly, that the greenhouse effect is not the only
problem. Consider the loss of "biodiversity Tropi-
cal forests hold over half of all terrestrial species, and
perhaps over 90 percent. Deforestation, at current
rates, will lead to a greater extinction of species than
accompanied the demise of the dinosaurs. It is hard
to reduce this issue to cost and benefits. Ecologists
warn about the large and unpredictable effects that
would follow such a mass extinction. Scientists
worry about losing the world's most complex
ecosystems before most species there are even cata-
logued, must less studied. Genetic engineers will
feel cheated by the loss of their chief feedstock, new
genes, just when biotechnology is opening the trop-
ics' genetic diversity to myriad new uses. And many
people find human-caused extinctions wrong for
moral and aesthetic reasons (which, of all the con-
cerns about biodiversity, turn out to carry the
greatest political clout).
Still, with biodiversity as with the green-
house effect, the question arises: Why should
southern nations especially care? Clearing the
forests brings them short-term economic gains�
at least to their cattle ranchers and governing
elites�even if it impedes sustainable economic
development. But the long-term, more abstract
benefits of saving the forests accrue mostly to the
north. Thafs where the biocngineering and
pharmaceutical companies are, and that's where
most of the biologists and taxonomists and Na-
tional Geographic photographers are.
Given that moral suasion is largely uncon-
vincing and ineffective, how are we to get tropi-
cal nations to do what we want? Some have
proposed boycotting imports of beef raised on
burned-out forest plantations, or wood logged in
non-sustainable ways. This approach may some-
times work, but it also risks trade retaliation, and
it suggests a moral high ground that we may not,
in fact, have. Suppose the tropical countries, or
other countries, started boycotting U.S. products
whose manufacturer entailed the burning of
fossil fuels (i.e most U.S. products). How would
we feel about that?
The fact is that if the world wants southern
nations to stop burning their tropical forests, the
world is going to have to pay them to do it. It can
either pay them in the same currency, by forging
some international environmental agreement
under which all nations cut their various contri-
butions to the greenhouse effect, or it can pay
them with money. For now, the latter is simpler.
And the mechanism tor it already exists. The
World Bank and the other multilateral develop-
ment banks (MDBs), such as the Inter-American
Development Bank, make more than $24 billion
in loans and credits available each year to devel-
oping countries. These agencies have been criti-
cized for funding projects that cause great envi-
ronmental harm. Because the United States and
other developed nations provide the funding,
they can require the MDBs to pick projects that
preserve the forests. There are signs that this is
starting already.
The idea of subsidizing the preservation oi
rain forests has been picked up by some environ-
mental groups in the form of "debt-for-nature
swaps" that have offered an attractive deal to
debtor nations including Costa Rica, Bolivia, and
Ecuador. In these swaps, environmental groups
buy up debt in hard-to-gct dollars. In return, the
debtor government agrees to make conservation
investments in the local currency. The symbol-
ism is apt: rather than "borrowing" short-term
from their natural resources, the nations reduce
debt by preserving those resources. The swaps
expand parklands, sponsor environmental edu-
cation and research, and provide funding for
maintaining parklands that otherwise often exist
only in theory.
But debt-for-nature swaps remain tiny com
pared with the economics of the overall debt prob-
lem. A far greater help to the rain forests would be an
aggressive debt reduction plan that would directly
ease the pressure on developing countries to exploit
their resources so rapidly. Tropical forest preserva-
tion can become a major issue in LDC debt negotia-
tions, joining traditional concerns about promoting
democracy and maintaining economic stability.
Environmental groups are pushing for such a solu-
tion, and Latin American governments arc starting
to see how effective the greenhouse effect could be in
getting them more debt relief than they receive
under the Baker Plan's renewed loans.
As the debt-for-nature swaps illustrate, envi-
ronmental groups have done a fair amount of hard-
nosed thinking about saving the rain forests. And
the statements attributed to their celebrity patrons,
for the most part, have been strikingly well in-
formed. But it's important to remember that con-
science alone won't save a single tree, and the for-
ested countries are unlikely to respond favorably to
stirring moral pleas or self-righteous demands.
.�
w. ��
V





4
THLCASTCAKOUNiAN
JANUARY 24, H 5
Miami now 'under control
MI AM HAD - A police of ficer
ot a black man in one of the
ighborhoods torn bv riots last
eek, but a recurrence of the vio-
nce that left one dead and stores
ted and burned seemed un-
k� authorities said today.
"It's under control. It's all
iiet Police Sgt. Robert Ed-
ards said a tew hours after late
- inday s shooting in the Liberty
a section.
I he man was in stable but
" ot critical condition" at lackson
Memorial Hospital, said hospital
pokesman Mark Santo.
Circumstances surrounding
oting were not immedi-
itely released by police, but
I �. ardssaid only a tew residents
the shooting which cor-
�ned off until about 2:30 riot-
kvctir) city was best to the Super
Police put on shows of force
i the troubled black neighbor-
hoods of Liberty City and Over-
town, where the shooting of a
black motorcyclist a week ago
today triggered three days of riot-
ing.
Many residents of Overtown
spent Sunday washing cars, play-
ing basketball, cruising the streets
past housing projects and watch-
ing the San Francisco 49ers defeat
the Cincinnati Bengals 20-16.
"There's more excitement
about the game now than about
what happened' said Anthony
Rurnes, 28, who donned a Bengals
T-shirt to watch the game with
fri :nds. "Everything seems nor-
m. now
A panel ot police officers and
Overtown residents were sched-
uled to hold their first working
meeting today to investigate the
shooting of Clement Lloyd, 23,
who was shot in the head by Offi-
cer William Lozano while being
pursued by another officer for
speeding.
Lloyd was to be buried Mon-
day.
His passenger, Allen Blan-
chard, 24, who suffered fatal inju-
ries when the motorcycle crashed,
was buried Saturday.
The Hispanic officer is on
leave with pay pending the probe
by local and federal authorities.
Miami had agonized about
the tarnish to the city's image
from rioting during what was
supposed to be a week to show-
case the city to the world.
"Put parties, anxiety behind:
It's game day implored a banner
headline in The Miami Herald en
Sunday.
Police allowed only Super
Bowl ticket-holders close to Joe
Robbie Stadium north of Miami.
Twenty-four people were ar-
rested on the grounds on charges
ranging from theft to loitering
during the Super Bowl.
"We didn't get mugged at all.
We were going to stay in the hotel
because of the rioting, but we
were a long ways from it Pat
Murphy oi Great Falls, Mont
said outside the stadium. "1
didn't seeanything going on. " I'll
come back
Rioting by blacks left one man
dead, and 11 cithers wounded
with gunshots. Thirteen build-
ings were torched and others
looted, and 372 people were ar-
rested, authorities said.
About 150 ot those arrested
were unable to pest $250 bail and
would not be arraigned again
until today, police said. If they
plead guilty, thee probably
would be released for time
served, said Sgt. Mike Mazur, a
police spokesman.
On Sunday morning, New
York civil rights attorney C. Ver-
non Mason and two members of
Miami's black community an-
lounced formation of People
Jnited For Justice In Miami.
n "TCBV
Sweetheart Pies
A sweet gift iJcd yom umheart or whole tamilv
� � AckkwtB "TGMT vu�-theart Pie
"� v, t.K fret (it Men Vanilla cw .tra�berr fro:en
yogurt �ith almost half the clones ot
premium net ream, topped with fresh
strawberries. This delettahle dessert
is pleasing to the waist as well as rhe
taste. So take home a "TC8V"
Sweetheart Pie or am ot our
rjdkious pies, anj '�hare it with y ti
sweetheart.
Nobody treats
you LIKE
TCBV
?��
IV
SM
Recipient of Federal Grant
Program to fight drug abuse I READ
325 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville (Beside Little Caesars)
$L00 OFF LARGE
"TCBV" PIE.
"TCBV
"V, .Turn im i aypor r�Wr o�Opnn W or gr txy yn . � srr .a
Ma (oru jn.i : pjm.p�fm TBY � i'�n "wi .�� � � n-
Offer expires: 2-14-88
tt
JhtLiunlri) flW hnjun �
1. I- News Kurcju
A program to fight substance
�e with education is being
si tblished at ECU under a
� I '�� grant from the U.S. De-
11 tmi nt ot Education.
! he two year grant will give
an office and full-time direc-
tor to coordinate drug use preven-
and education activities.
David A. Susina, a former
sid nee counselor at ECU, will
� ct the program. A native oi
Birmingham, Alabama, Susina
as worked with alcohol and
rug prevention efforts at ECU
for the past six years.
Susina said the new program
work closely with student
ips such as Students Against
Drunk Driving (SADD) and
BACCHUS, a group that pro-
motes responsible drinking. He
said the program will also con-
duct workshops, coordinate na-
tional alcohol and drug aware-
ness programs at ECU, provide
referrals for people with sub-
stance abuse problems, offer a
resource library, and plans to
organize a campus chapter oi
Alcoholics Anonymous.
The new program and oiicc
was established in January. Of-
fices are located in Room 303 of
the Erwin Building. The phone
number on campus is 757-6793.
"We really want to stress the
prevention and education aspect
oi substance abuse said Susina.
"We feel like people have a
background of use of substances
by the time thev come to college.
We want to work with the stu-
dents to help them make good
and responsible decisions if they
choose to use alcohol or drugs
he said.
The program is the result oi a
proposal written by a 1-4 member
planning committee of staff, fac-
ulty and community profession-
als. Jerry Lottcrhos, director of the
AlcoholDrug Program in the
School of Allied Health Sciences,
chaired the committee.
Senility can be side effect of medication
ECU New Bureau
Epis dcs oi confusion, disori-
� ition and forgetfulness in the
i rlv often thought to be signs
� ility, may also occur as side
� -� FrtSrri some medications
n m nly prescribed for the
I a pharmacist at the ECU
ol of Medicine suggests.
Dr. Doyle M. Cummings, as-
- i int professor oi family medi-
and head of clinical phar-
: y at the medical school's
trnil) Practice Center, will fur-
2r his study oi the effects oi
i immonly prescribed drugs on
elderly through a $125,000
I roject funded by the Kate B.
� Ids Health Care Trust of
inston-Salem.
The philanthropic organiza-
n awards S3 million each year
non-profit agencies in North
ir lina involved in projects di-
� d toward alternative and
ventive health care.
Cummings'three year project
ill include the development of a
gional resource center for geri-
itric pharmacology. Through the
center, continuing education pro-
grams will be ottered to physi-
cians who prescribe medication
for their elderly patients.
"The elderly are the largest
consumers of medication and are
at the greatest risk for side effects
from these1 drugs said Cum-
mings. "Previous research has
shown that the elderly eliminate
medication at a slower rate than
younger adults; therefore, doc-
tors and pharmacists need to pay
special attention to the drug
needs oi this growing segment oi
the population
Antihistamines, anti-depres-
sants, sedatives and blood pres-
sure medications can have dra-
matic side effects in elderly pa-
tients, Cummings said.
Depending on the dosages,
these drugs can also be respon-
sible for falls, changes in behavior
and delirium in some patients, he
said.
In the project, Cummings
plans to work closely with doctors
to reduce toxicitv in their elderlv
atients while continuing to treat
leir primary ailments.
CLASS, FACULTY AND
STAFF PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will be taken from Jan. 23 through
Jan. 27. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
IT ISN'T YOUR YEARBOOK UNTIL
YOU'RE IN IT!
New campus buzz words are:
(CPS) - In itsannual report of
"buzzwords" that have
spread to campuses nationwide,
National Association oi Col-
ge Stores found a new crop of
. words peculiar to colleges
ind universities. Among the find-
gs:
PC
A term menaing "politically
rivet Alternatively, someone
favor of slavery would be "non-

GROOVY
When spoken in a sarcastic
. it means stodgy or old-fash-
CHILI.
As a command, oi course, it
ins to calm down. Asanadjec-
e, however "chillin can mean
mething is great, as in "It was a
Ilin'CD
TALK TO RALPH ON THE
BIG Wl IITE PHONE
To vomit.
GOOB-A-TRON
It's one of several recent vari-
ations on goober, nerd, grind,
geek and dweeb, as in "Revenge
oi the Goob-A-Trons
GRANOLA
A word used to describe
someone who dresses or acts as if
the 1960s never ended.
BITE MOOSE
Get lost.
PARALLEL PARKING
A term meaning sexual inter-
course. "Horizontal bop" also
enjoyed a vogue as a euphemism
for sex. When one kissed, on the
other hand, one "played tonsil
hockey" or "boxed tonsils
Scholarship established
ICV Sews Bureau
Samuel C. Winchester, Jr. of
Jreenville has honored his wife,
Sylvia Weeks Winchester,
through the establishment of
ECU'S first fully endowed
Alumni Honors Scholarship.
Mrs. Winchester, who holds a
master of science in education
from East Carol .a, is a guidance
counselor at Pitt County's D.H.
Qonley High School.
The Sylvia W. Winchester
Alumni Honors Scholarship will
be awarded annuallv to an out-
standing senior at D.H. Conley
who chooses to attend ECU. The
endowment will provide an an-
nual $1,000 scholarship for an
ECU student, as long as he or she
maintains the academic require-
ments of the award.
Winchester is technical man-
ager of DuPont in Kinston. He is a
graduate of North Carolina State
University and holds a PhD from
Princeton University.





V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24,1989 5
I
Miami now 'under control
MIAMI (AP) - A police officer
gshot a black man in one of the
neighborhoods torn by riots last
�week, but a recurrence of the vio-
lence that left one dead and stores
flooted and burned seemed un-
glikely, authorities said today.
"It's under control. It's all
�quiet Police Sgt. Robert Ed-
wards said a few hours after late
Sunday's shooting in the Liberty
City section.
The man was in "stable but
not critical condition" at Jackson
Memorial Hospital, said hospital
spokesman Mark Santo.
Circumstances surrounding
the shooting were not immedi-
.ately released by police, but
Edwards said only a few residents
� were at the shooting which cor-
Kdoned off until about 2:30 riot-
Hjkveary city was host to the Super
Bowl.
Police put on shows of force
in the troubled black neighbor-
hoods oi Liberty City and Over-
town, where the shooting of a
black motorcyclist a week ago
today triggered three days of riot-
ing.
Many residents of Overtown
spent Sunday washing cars, play-
ing basketball, cruising the streets
past housing projects and watch-
ing the San Francisco 49crs defeat
the Cincinnati Bengals 20-16.
"There's more excitement
about the game now than about
what happened said Anthony
Burnes, 28, who donned a Bengals
T-shirt to watch the game with
friends. "Everything seems nor-
mal now
A panel of police officers and
Overtown residents were sched-
uled to hold their first working
meeting today to investigate the
shooting of Clement Lloyd, 23,
who was shot in the head by Offi-
cer William Lozano while being
pursued by another officer for
speeding.
Lloyd was to be buried Mon-
day.
His passenger, Allen Blan-
chard, 24, who suffered fatal inju-
ries when the motorcycle crashed,
was buried Saturday.
The Hispanic officer is on
leave with pay pending the probe
by local and federal authorities.
Miami had agonized about
the tarnish to the city's image
from rioting during what was
supposed to be a week to show-
case the city to the world.
"Put parties, anxiety behind:
It'sgameday implored a banner
headline in The Miami Herald on
Sunday.
Police allowed only Super
Bowl ticket-holders close to Joe
Robbie Stadium north of Miami.
Twenty-four people were ar-
rested on the grounds on charges
ranging from theft to loitering
during the Super Bowl.
"We didn't get mugged at all.
Recipient of Federal Grant
Program to fight drug abuse
We were going to stay in the hotel
because of the rioting, but we
were a long ways from it Pat
Murphy of Great Falls, Mont
said outside the stadium. "I
didn't see anything going on. "I'll
come back
Rioting by blacks left one man
dead, and 11 others wounded
with gunshots. Thirteen build-
ings were torched and others
looted, and 372 people were ar-
rested, authorities said.
About 150 of those arrested
were unable to post $250 bail and
would not be arraigned again
until today, police said. If they
plead guilty, they probably
would be released for time
served, said Sgt. Mike Mazur, a
police spokesman.
On Sunday morning, New
York civil rights attorney C. Ver-
non Mason and two members of
Miami's black communitv an-
lounced formation of People
Jnited Fo� Justice In Miami.
"TCBV"
Sweetheart Pies
A swt� gift idea your sweetheart or whole family
will love. A delicious "TMV" Sweetheart Pie
- fat-free Golden Vanilla or strawberry frozen
yogurt with almost half the calories of
premium ice cream, topped with fresh
strawberries. This delectable dessert
is pleasing to the waist as well as the
taste. So take home a "TCtV"
Sweetheart Pie or any of our
delicious pies, and share it with vour
sweetheart.
Nobody treats
YOU LIKE
"tcbv:
!��TCBY Svsttms. 1m
325 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville (Beside Little Caesars)
READ
$1-00 OFF LARGE
tcbv; PIE.
rVitccmcfMriiacoi
"i brio ��MM Ow onto jm ;mvtm or cmmmt pm
i tm am u� m Jm Ng pod n �h� �rt am mtm a
Offer food aw m pumipmmi XTf' � tarn Can m fa at com
Offer expires: 2-14-88
"TCBV"
ECU News Bureau
A program to tight substance
abuse with education is being
established at ECU under a
$139,000 grant from the U.S. De-
partment of Education.
The two year grant will give
ECU an office and full-time direc-
tor to coordinate drug use preven-
tion and education activities.
David A. Susina, a former
residence counselor at ECU, will
direct the program. A native of
Birmingham, Alabama, Susina
has worked with alcohol and
drug prevention efforts at ECU
for the past six years.
Susina said the new program
will work closely with student
groups such as Students Against
Drunk Driving (SADD) and
BACCHUS, a group that pro-
motes responsible drinking. He
said the program will also con-
duct workshops, coordinate na-
tional alcohol and drug aware-
ness programs at ECU, provide
referrals for people with sub-
stance abuse problems, offer a
resource library, and plans to
organize a campus chapter of
Alcoholics Anonymous.
The new program and office
was established in January. Of-
fices are located in Room 303 of
the Erwin Building. The phone
number on campus is 757-6793.
"We really want to stress the
prevention and education aspect
of substance abuse said Susina.
"We feel like people have a
background of use of substances
by the time they come to college.
VVe want to work with the stu-
dents to help them make good
and responsible decisions if they
choose to use alcohol or drugs
he said.
The program is the result of a
proposal written by a 14 member
planning committee of staff, fac-
ulty and community profession-
als. Jerry Lotterhos, director of the
AlcoholDrug Program in the
School of Allied Health Sciences,
chaired the committee.
Senility can be side effect of medication
ECU Newt Bureau
Episodes of confusion, disori-
cntation and forgetfulness in the
elderly, often thought to be signs
of senility, mav also occur as side
efPccits'rorrlrometrrediCarrons'
commonly prescribed for the
aged, a pharmacist at the ECU
School of Medicine suggests.
Dr. Doyle M. Cummings, as-
sistant professor of family medi-
cine and head of clinical phar-
macy at the medical school's
Family Practice Center, will fur-
ther his study of the effects of
commonlv prescribed drugs on
the elderly through a $125,000
project funded by the Kate B.
Reynolds Health Care Trust of
Winston-Salem.
The philanthropic organiza-
tion awards $3 million each year
to non-profit agencies in North
Carolina involved in projects di-
rected toward alternative and
preventive health care.
Cummings' three year project
will include the development of a
regional resource center for geri-
atric pharmacology. Through the
center, continuing education pro-
grams will be offered to physi-
cians who prescribe medication
for their elderly patients.
"The elderly are the largest
consumers of medication and are
at the greatest risk for side effects
from these drugs said Cum-
mings. "Previous research has
shown that the elderly eliminate
medication at a slower rate than
younger adults; therefore, doc-
tors and pharmacists need to pay
special attention to the drug
needs of this growing segment of
the population
Antihistamines, anti-depres-
sants, sedatives and blood pres-
sure medications can have dra-
matic side effects in elderly pa-
tients, Cummings said.
Depending on the dosages,
these drugs can also be respon-
sible for falls, changes in behavior
and delirium in some patients, he
said.
In the project, Cummings
plans to work closely with doctors
to reduce toxicity in their elderlv
patients while continuing to treat
their primary ailments.
CULTY AND
ORTRAITS
1 be taken from Jan. 23 through
taken in the Soda Shop at the
112 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
y to have your picture taken for
caneer Yearbook.
ARBOOK UNTIL
E IN IT!
New campus buzz words are:
(CPS)�In its annual report of
new "buzzwords" that have
spread to campuses nationwide,
the National Association of Col-
lege Stores found a new crop of
slang words peculiar to colleges
and universities. Among the find-
ings:
PC
A term menaing "politically
correct Alternatively, someone
i n favor of slavery would be "non-
PC
GROOVY
When spoken in a sarcastic
tone, it means stodgy or old-fash-
ioned.
CHILL
As a command, of course, it
means to calm down. As an adjec-
tive, however "chillin can mean
something is great, as in "It was a
chillin' CD
TALK TO RALPH ON THE
BIG WHITE PHONE
To vomit.
GOOB-A-TRON
It's one of several recent vari-
ations on goober, nerd, grind,
geek and dweeb, as in "Revenge
of the Goob-A-Trons
GRANOLA
A word used to describe
someone who dresses or acts as ii
the 1960s never ended.
BITE MOOSE
Get lost
PARALLEL PARKING
A term meaning sexual inter-
course. "Horizontal bop" also
enjoyed a vogue as a euphemism
for sex. When one kissed, on the
other hand, one "played tonsil
hockey" or "boxed tonsils
� i
Scholarship established
ECU Newt Bureau
Samuel C. Winchester, Jr. of
Greenville has honored his wife,
Sylvia Weeks Winchester,
through the establishment of
ECU'S first fully endowed
Alumni Honors Scholarship.
Mrs. Winchester, who holds a
master of science in education
from East Carolina, is a guidance
counselor at Pitt County's D.H.
Qonley High School.
The Sylvia VV. Winchester
Alumni Honors Scholarship will
be awarded annually to an out-
standing senior at D.H. Conley
who chooses to attend ECU. The
endowment will provide an an-
nual $1,000 scholarship for an
ECU student, as long as he or she
maintains the academic require-
ments of the award.
Winchester is technical man-
ager of DuPont in Kinston. He is a
graduate of North Carolina State
University and holds a PhD from
Princeton University.





i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24,1989 5
X
Miami now 'under control'
s
MIAMI (AP) - A police officer
�shot a black man in one of the
neighborhoods torn by riots last
?week, but a recurrence of the vio-
glence that left one dead and stores
Sloo ted and burned seemed un-
Shkely, authorities said today.
i'it's under control. It's all
.quiet Police Sgt. Robert Ed-
wards said a few hours after late
Sunday's shooting in the Liberty
fCity section.
The man was in "stable but
not critical condition" at Jackson
I Memorial Hospital, said hospital
I spokesman Mark Santo.
Circumstances surrounding
I the shooting were not immedi-
iately released by police, but
I Ed wards said onlv a few residents
J
were at the shooting which cor-
Idoned off until about 2:30 riot-
5uvearv city was host to the Super
Bowl.
Police put on shows of force
in the troubled black neighbor-
Lloyd was to be buried Mon-
day.
His passenger, Allen Blan-
chard, 24, who suffered fatal inju-
ries when the motorcycle crashed,
speeding
Recipient of Federal Grant
hoods of Liberty City and Over-
town, where the shooting of a
black motorcyclist a week ago
today triggered three days of riot-
ing-
Many residents of Overtown was buried Saturday,
spent Sunday washing cars, play- The Hispanic officer is on
ing basketball, cruising the streets
past housing projects and watch- leave with pay pending the probe
ing the San Francisco 49ers defeat by local and federal authorities,
the Cincinnati Bengals 20-16. Miami had agonized about
"There's more excitement the tarnish to the city's image
about the game now than about from rioting during what was
what happened said Anthony supposed to be a week to show-
Burnes, 28, who donned a Bengals case the city to the world.
T-shirt to watch the game with "Put parties, anxiety behind:
friends. "Everything seems nor- It's game day implored a banner
mal now headline in The Miami Herald on
A panel of police officers and Sunday.
Overtown residents were sched: Police allowed only Super
ulcd to hold their first working Bowl ticket-holders close to Joe
meeting today to investigate the Robbie Stadium north of Miami,
shooting of Clement Lloyd, 23, Twenty-four people were ar-
who was shot in the head by Offi- rested on the grounds on charges
cer William Lozano while being ranging from theft to loitering
pursued by another officer for during the Super Bowl.
"We didn't get mugged at all.
We were going to stay in the hotel
because of the rioting, but we
were a long ways from it Pat
Murphy of Great Falls, Mont
said outside the stadium. "I
didn't see anything going on I'll
come back
Rioting by blacks left one man
dead, and 11 others wounded
with gunshots. Thirteen build-
ings were torched and others
looted, and 372 people were ar-
rested, authorities said.
About 150 of those arrested
were unable to post $250 bail and
would not be arraigned again
until today, police said. If they
plead guilty, they probably
would be released for time
served, said Sgt. Mike Mazur, a
police spokesman.
On Sunday morning, New
York civil rights attorney C Ver-
non Mason and two members of
Miami's black community an-
nounced formation of People
Jnited For. Justice In Miami.
"TCBV"
Sweetheart Pies
A swtft gift idea your sweetheart or whole family
will love. A delicious "TCfV" Sweetheart Pie
- 96 fat-free Golden Vanilla or strawberry frozen
yogurt with almost half the calories of
premium ice cream, topped with fresh
strawberries. This delectable dessert
is pleasing to the waist as well as the
taste. So take home a "TCfV"
Sweetheart Pie or any of our
delicious pies, and share it with your
sweetheart.
Nobody treats
YOU LIKE
"TCBV!
l�
SM
1961 TCBY Svsifms, he.
325 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville (Beside Little Caesars)
Program to fight drug abuse I READ
$L00 OFF LARGE
TCBV PIE.
ft! " m� IM � SOI pOOd l (MUM � .IK IK OCWt orfm
OHn fat oiut aunufamf TCBY' � urn Cufc �� � a mm.
Offer expires: 2-14-88
fViKiTnmiLhicouooBOrtawixamnt; Om Old. m coast. BR c
I
"TCBV
Tht CnuMtr Best mqurt.
ECU News Bureau
A program to tight substance
abuse with education is being
established at ECU under a
$139,000 grant from the U.S. De-
partment ot Education.
The two year grant will give
ECU an office and full-time direc-
tor to coordinate drug use preven-
tion and education activities.
David A. Susina, a former
residence counselor at ECU, will
direct the program. A native of
Birmingham, Alabama, Susina
has worked with alcohol and
drug prevention efforts at ECU
for the past six years.
Susina said the new program
will work closely with student
groups such as Students Against
Drunk Driving (SADD) and
BACCHUS, a group that pro-
motes responsible drinking. He
said the program will also con-
duct workshops, coordinate na-
tional alcohol and drug aware-
ness programs at ECU, provide
referrals for people with sub-
stance abuse problems, offer a
resource library, and plans to
organize a campus chapter of
Alcoholics Anonymous.
The new program and office
was established in January. Of-
fices are located in Room 303 of
the Erwin Building. The phone
number on campus is 757-6793.
"We really want to stress the
prevention and education aspect
of substance abuse said Susina.
"We feel like people have a
background of use of substances
by the time they come to college.
We want to work with the stu-
dents to help them make good
and responsible decisions if they
choose to use alcohol or drugs
he said.
The program is the result of a
proposal written by a 14 member
planning committee of staff, fac-
ulty and community profession-
als. Jerry Lottcrhos, director of the
AlcoholDrug Program in the
School of Allied Health Sciences,
chaired the committee.
Senility can be side effect of medication
ECU Nni Bureau
Episodes of confusion, disori-
cntation and forgetfulness in the
elderly, often thought to be signs
of senility, may also occur as side
efrcytsn1rrSrrtkmctTTtiic:aTtons�'
commonly prescribed for the
aged, a pharmacist at the ECU
School of Medicine suggests.
center, continuing education pro-
grams will be offered to physi-
cians who prescribe medication
for their elderly patients.
"The elderly are the largest
consumers of medication and are
at the greatest risk for side effects
from these drugs said Cum-
mings. "Previous research has
patients while continuing to treat
their primary ailments.
CULTY AND
ORTRAITS
1 be taken from Jan. 23 through
taken in the Soda Shop at the
L-12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
y to have your picture taken for
caneer Yearbook.
ARBOOK UNTIL
E IN IT!
Dr. Doyle M. Cummings, as- shown that the elderly eliminate
medication at a slower rate than
younger adults; therefore, doc-
tors and pharmacists need to pay
special attention to the drug
needs of this growing segment of
the population
Antihistamincs, anti-depres-
sants, sedatives and blood pres-
sure medications can have dra-
matic side effects in elderly pa-
sistant professor of family medi-
cine and head of clinical phar-
macy at the medical school's
Family Practice Center, will fur-
ther his study of the effects of
commonlv prescribed drugs on
the elderly through a $125,000
project funded by the Kate B.
Revnolds Health Care Trust of
Winston-Salem.
The philanthropic organiza- tients, Cummings said
tion awards $3 million each year
to non-profit agencies in North
Carolina involved in projects di-
rected toward alternative and
preventive health care.
Cummings' three year project
will include the development of a
regional resource center for geri-
atric pharmacology. Through the
Depending on the dosages,
these drugs can also be respon-
sible for falls, changes in behavior
and delirium in some patients, he
said.
In the project, Cummings
plans to work closely with doctors
to reduce toxicity in their elderlv
New campus buzz words are:
(CPS)� In its annual report of
icw "buzzwords" that have
spread to campuses nationwide,
the National Association of Col-
lege Stores found a new crop of
slang words peculiar to colleges
and universities. Among the find-
ings:
PC
A term menaing "politically
correct Alternatively, someone
in favor of slavery would be "non-
PC
GROOVY
When spoken in a sarcastic
tone, it means stodgy or old-fash-
ioned.
CHILL
As a command, of course, it
means to calm down. As an adjec-
tive, however "chillin can mean
something is great, as in "It was a
rhillin' CD
TALK TO RALPH ON THE
BIG WHITE PHONE
To vomit.
GOOB-A-TRON
It's one of several recent vari-
ations on goober, nerd, grind,
geek and dweeb, as in "Revenge
of the Goob-A-Trons
GRANOLA
A word used to describe
someone who dresses or acts as ii
the 1960s never ended.
BITE MOOSE
Get lost.
PARALLEL PARKING
A term meaning sexual inter-
course. "Horizontal bop" also
enjoyed a vogue as a euphemism
for sex. When one kissed, on the
other hand, one "played tonsil
hockey" or "boxed tonsils
Scholarship established
ECV New I Bureau
Samuel C. Winchester, Jr. of
Greenville has honored his wife,
Sylvia Weeks Winchester,
through the establishment of
ECU'S first fully endowed
Alumni Honors Scholarship.
Mrs. Winchester, who holds a
master of science in education
from East Carolina, is a guidance
counselor at Pitt County s D.H.
Gonley High School.
The Sylvia VV. Winchester
Alumni Honors Scholarship will
be awarded annually to an out-
standing senior at D.H. Conley
who chooses to attend ECU. The
endowment will provide an an-
nual $1,000 scholarship for an
ECU student, as long as he or she
maintains the academic require-
ments of the award.
Winchester is technical man-
ager of DuPont in Kinston. He is a
graduate of North Carolina State
University and holds a PhD from
Princeton University.





V
THE tAsT CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24,1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Immediately Non-smoker. To share 3
bedroom house. Will have own bed-
room. 175 00 per month plus 13 utili-
ties. 5 minutes from school. Call
Pamela at 758-7142.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Stratford
Arms til end of semester. $170.00 a
month, 12 utilities. Call 756-5183 or
324-3354.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share nice 3 bedroom apt. Only
SI 20 00 mon th, 1 3 utilities. Available
Feb. 1st. Call 752-3678.
FOR RENT: Two bedrm. unfur. apt.
$220 00, available Feb.Mar. Call 758-
7078.
ONE MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To sublease apartment two blocks from
campus (list 1. Walking distance from
school, downtown, and many other
places Sublcascr has option to furnish
his bedroom or use existing furniture.
Microwave, toaster oven, color TV
with cable. Costs only $150 per month
plus utilities. Call today! 757-0412.
ROOMMATE WANTED: MF 13
rent & utilities, own room, close to
campus. Call 758-8283.
WANTED: Female of Male to share 2
bedroom, 1 bath duplex. 34 miles
from campus� 150.00 a month and 1
2 utiltities. Unfurnished. Call Dina 752-
8907.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Starting
March 1st. Responsible female. Geor-
getown Apts. Within walking distance
to campus and downtown. 12 rent. 1
2 utilities. Free cable. Call 830-1758.
Leave message.
FOR SALE
1979 VW RABBIT. Blue, AMFM ra-
dio, air, good condition. $1000. 830-
4910
FOR SALE: 1986 Black Dodge Daytona
Turbo Z. Tilt; cruise; air; leather; sun-
roof; CS handling package. Very sharp.
Low mileage; excellent condition. 830-
1584.
FOR SALE: 81 Chcvette in good condi-
tion with nice stereo. Asking $1,000.00.
FOR SALE: Britches Great Outdoors
brown leather jacket. Size 40 regular.
The fatigued leather look. Very cool &
stylish. Six months old! SI80.00.
FOU SALE: Two couches, S25.00 each.
One matching chair, $10.00. Call 355-
4562.
FOR SALE: Stereo, Exc Cond 1 year
old, $85 00; Nike Cycling Cleats, Brand
New CCX $40.00; Prince Graphite Pro
Tennis Racket 1 lOhead size$90.00with
double Prince Thermo Bag. Call 752-
5274 after 3:30 p.m.
DEPENDABILITY FOR SALE: 78
Datsun B210. New brakes, muffler, tail
pipe, head gasket. Wheels balanced
and aligned. Runs great. Make an offer!
758-8949.
FOR SALE: House in Farmville, 2
bedroom, 1 12 baths. Walking dis-
tance of downtown. Excellent condi-
tion. S39.000 00 205 Crimmersburg St.
758-2232.
KEG COOLER: Regrigeratcs to 28
degrees F. Includes tap & gauges
S75O0. 1 pair realistic home stereo
speakers. 60 watts each. Great for
Dorms or Apts. S60.00pr. Call after 4.
756-0580.
FOR SALE: Washers, Dryers, Refrig-
erators, Freezers, Stoves $100.00 it up.
Guaranteed. Also have used furniture
at reasonable prices. Call 746-6929.
1979 MAZDA GLC: 4 speed, AC,
AM-FM cassette, new tires 1100.00Call
752-6554.
FOR SALE: Pioneer Reciever, VSX
2000, 50 wc remote $200. Call 756-
7265.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VE-
HICLES: From SlOO: Fords. Mercedes.
Corvettes. Cheyys. Surplus. Buyers
Guide (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. S-1166.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available
for parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach.
Call 355-2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offoi
typing and photocopying services. Wc
also sell software and computer disk-
ettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pages. We repair computers and print-
ers also. Lowest hourly rate in town.
SDF Professional Computer Services,
106 East 5th Street Ojeside Cubbies)
Greenville. NC 752-3694.
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. call
early and book for your formal or
party. 758-1700, ask for Diljon or leave
a message.
PAPERS TYPEDRESUMES COM
POSED: Call 756-9136.
CHILDCARE AVAILABLE: Near
campus � experienced babysitter
cares for my 1 1 2 year old child in mv
home and can care for another. For
information call Dr. Susan McCannon.
Campus 6800, home 758-3827.
HELP WANTED
CJ'S WANTS YOU: Every position
open. We are putting together the best
wait staff, cooks, and prep personnel to
make CJ's the best restaurant team in
East Carolina. Call between 2-5 pm for
appointment M-F. Ask for Casey. 355-
3543.
WANTED: Bartenders. Male or Fe-
male. For more information call 746-
2319.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
Interested in making money part-time
photographing campus activities? No
experience necessary, we train. If you
are highly sociable, have a 35 mm
camera, and transportation, please call
between noon and 5 p.m M-F, at 1-
800-722-7033.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Mary Smith
REAL Crisis Center 758-HELP.
STUDENT NEEDED: To post adver-
tising materials on campus bulletin
boards. Work own hours with good
pay. Write Campus Advertising, P.O.
Box 1221, Duluth, GA 30136-1221. (404)
873-9042.
BAE COMPUTER NEEDS: Respon
sible student to represent our com-
puter. Incentive bonus plan. Interested
persons please send resume to 3563
Ryder Street, Santa Clara, CA 95051
HELP WANTED: ShippingReciev-
ing person, part-time. Warehouse
work and delivery within 250 mile
radius. Must have no classes at least 2
week days. Good driving Tecord. Pre-
fer underclassmen. Call Tommy 756-
8500 9 to 5.
COACH: Experienced for USS Sum-
mer Swim Team. References required
Apply: Tarboro Swim Club P.O Box
1301 Tarboro. NC 27886.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS: For Counselors, Water Front
Director, Asst. Swim Instructors
Friendly Day Camp is a summer dav
camp for mentally and physically
handicapped children & adults Please
write or call The Special Populations
Program, P.O. Box 590, Raleigh, NC
27602 (919) 755-6832.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACATION
IN CANCUN Become a College
Tours representative on your campus
and get a free trip. Nothing to buy �we
provide everything you need. It's a
little work for alot of fun! Call 1-800-
727-0005.
BARMAIDS WANTED: 1
No experience needed, will train, rvius
be 21 yrs. old. Excellent tips. Call 758
0058, ask for Manager.
Part-time
rain. Must
PERSONALS
AKC REGISTERED GOLDEN RE-
TRIEVER PUPPIES: 3 males priced at
$150 to $225. Call 746-2517
HEY CREEKS: Have you heard about
the party at Rafters?
REWARD: For the return of a GOLD
TONE WATCH LOST Wed. afternoon.
Has incredible sentimental value. Call
758-9694.
PI KAPPA PHI LITTLE SISTERS:
Thanks for your help and support.
Brothers.
The
PI KAPPA PHI BROTHERS: Good
luck with rush, we hope it will be the
best ever lor you Ya'll are doing a great
job with the house�we're proud of
you. -Love. The Little Sisters
TO ALL FRATERNITIES: Good luck
with rush! We hope everyone has great
success! -Theta Chi.
ATTENTION MEN: Theta Chi wants
to extend an imitation to attend rush
the 23, 24, 25 in Aycock's basement
Come see what makes us ECU's best
kept secret!
FRATERNITY CHAMPS IN FOOT-
BALL, VOLLEYBALL AND
BOWLING Theta Chi let's keep it up
this semester. We're number 2 in
Chancellor's Cup points, let's end up
number 1. BC is watchin' you!
THETA CHI'S CLAYTON WIL-
LIAMS: Is the new 1FC Vice President
Congrats Clavdawg, keep up the good
work. Roll Chi!
THETA CHI: We don't want to be the
biggest, just the best
FRATERNITIES: I lore's to you And a
rush th.it is swell. Alpha i Delta sup-
port you We're wishing you well!
SKI HAWKSNEST PARTY: Chris,
Rob, Suzanne, Russell, Kim, Jennv,
Shelly, John H, Beth, John T Fred.
Mike. & Lvnn. We took off late Friday
at 3, Mike & Shelly got lost before we
could leave. At eleven o'clock the party
began, we broke out the keg and all
gave a hand. Some things were said
that we'd rather forget, but let's hear
them again so we can all get red: "Are
vou crazy7" "Are those se?"
"Pubba can't count that high 'Have
vou ever had hair that ?" "GET UP
"Did you hear that noise outside?" 1 lad
any car trouble lately, Rob? Chris�
what a laugh! Russell�is that a vulture
or is that fAWS? Where's N.Y. City,
Suzanne? Want Mime Texas Pete Hot
Sauce, Fred 'Kim, if you wake us up
again, you're DEAD Wiped out on
any sleds lately, Beth? John 11, we love
vour Michael J. dances! The Rapping
Came�Questions. BETH AND KIM,
THANKS BUNCHES, LET'S DO IT
AGAIN! Pike is it!
LOST: Black onvx ring with 3 dia-
monds�lost Sat Jan. 14 at the Elbo�
Reward Call Teresa at 758-8120.
FRATERNITIES: Good luck with
rush' We hope you all get a terrific
pledge class -Love, the sisters and
pledges of Alpha Phi.
PI KAPP: Congrats tin
house! -Love, Alpha Phi.
a fantastic
TKFS: We had a wild time Thursday
night The party was great and we'll
have to do it again! Love, Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES: The party
Thursday night was a blast! It was truly
a great way to begin the New Year!
Love, the sisters of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: We would like to wish
all the fraternities a successful spring
rush.
PI KAPPA PHI: Congratulations on
your new house. It ltxiks great. The
Sigmas.
DELTA ZETA: We would like to con-
gratulate the new officers: President: Holly
Condrev; V.P. Rush. Kirstin Fakes; V.P.
Pledge :MandyParish;CorrespondingSec-
retary: Kathy Ulrich; RecordingSecrctary:
Susanne Brown; Treasurer: Melinda
Walker; Panhellenic: Melanie Gibson and
Melinda Lentine; and House Manager:
Lisa Weber. Good Luck!
MAKE HISTORY HAPPEN TODAY: Go
Pika Spring Rush 89 at the Attic � 24th
- 26th
BE A PART OF COLLEGE: Not just a
number "Rush Pi Kappa Alpha
PI KAPPA ALPHA: "Success has its privi-
leges
THE INVITATION IS NEAR: The "Pika"
regional conference is here! 14 chapters
come to ECU Jan. 27th - 29th.
NEGR:LJAMAICA:Spnng Break. 8 days
and 7 nights, airfare out of Charlotte. Prices
start at $499. For more details call Tripp at
758-9177.
GOOD LUCK TO ALL FRATERNITIES:
On a successful rush this week. The Sig-
mas.
BETA LAMBDA'S � AOPI'S: 1 can't wait
until Roseball! Remember � this night is
for y'all! Do vou know the Big I? Feelin'
kinda mello w Your "PT" forever � Heidi
AOPi: Presents the 1989 officers: Pres.
Patty Glander,VP � Lisa Gale, VP Pledge
Trainer � Beth Beanev, Chapter Treas-
urer Stacey Coode, Recording Sec.
Dawn Hansen, Corresponding
Amy Smith, Chapter Relations
Barbour, House Manager � Felicia
Parker, Rush Chrmn � Amanda Brewer,
Asst. Rush Chrmn � Stephanie Patton.
Panhellenic Del. � Kimm Ruark,
Panhellenic Exec. � Heidi Schaffer,
Membership Ed � Georgeann
Athanaclos, Fundraising � Tern Edelen,
Scholarship � Becky Carter, Social Chrmn
� Angie Lineberry, PR � Diana Ditzler,
Songleader � Robin Sprigg, I listonan -
Debbie Schroeder, K of R � Leslie Liedel,
Intramural Rep. � Jennifer Flesca, and
Alumni Relations � April Peterson Good
luck to everyone in their office
AOPI'S: Get ready to gig all night! Rose
ball is approaching
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
Wanna have a Great
SPRING BREAK? Spend
8 days and 7 nights in
Sunny Daytona Beach.
$190 for Transportation
and Lodging.
Dall Dave at
758-8001
to insure a seat.
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru Sat. xm
Co�t Trrmlratlon to 7Q vrrka of prrffnarv
1-800-433-2930
StmOf &u 6i4T
Get the information you need
college financing. coege selection
caree' giyciance and
SATACT es: preparation
6 EGordor7st - Kinston. NC 28501 ,919) 523-6414
GEROLD JARMON
Educational Consultant
Schedule by
Appointment Only
Sec.
� Pani
Special Bonus Diskettes Soec'al
514"DSDD
$4.95 per box ol 10
Verbatim Diskettes
514"DSDD
$7.95 per box ol 10
SDF Professional Computers, Inc.
106 East 5th St Greenville. NC 27834
752-3694
HOUSE OF HATS
for
LADIES HATS AND
ACCESSORIES
(Latest Styles and
Colors)
403 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834'
(Downtown Mall) 758-3025
OPPORTUNITY
Tri County Homes. Inc. is expanding it's sales force over all
of eastern North Carolina. If you are energetic, enthusiastic,
honest, and need an income of more than $25,000.00 a
year "HERE IS YOUR CHANCE
If you are looking for a company that offers benefits like life
insurance, disability insurance, as well as a retirement
program
CALL 1-800-672 4503
and ask for Karen Lambert. A scheduled
confidential interview will be arranged.
SALES
POSITION
AVAILABLE
Challenge
Responsibility
Leadership
Advancement
First Wachovia means unlimited potential for personal
growth and career advancement for outstanding hast Carolina
University graduates. Individual who are ready to accept the
challenges of a career in the financial sen ices industry, contact
Career Planning and Placement for an interview or further
information. First Wachovia
recruiters will be on campus FIRS 1
for interviews February' 2. WACHOVIA
The East Carolinian
for an
Advertising Sales
Representative.
Requirements:
�Previous Sales Experience
?Good Personality &
Professional Appearance
�Excellent Communication
Skills
�Good Organizational Skills
Must Be Dependable & Show
Initiative & Enthusiasm
�Must Have The Desire To
Excel
Apply in Person at The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please!
-J
Announcements
FOOTBALL
Mangers needed for varsity football
Pick up application at office in Minges.
757-6029.
COOP EDUCATION
Interested in a summer job with a
resort, camp, or recreational facility? Feb.
9th, ECU will host over 50 agencies look-
ing for summer employees. Come by or
call Co-op Ed. for more info, on your ca-
reer opportunities, 757-6979, GCB 2028.
EDUCATION MAIORS
It's not too late to submit your appli-
cation for the workstudy trip to Pueblo,
Mexico for Spring Break (March 4-12). If
you're concerned about th expense -
don't be. Fund ratting efforts will be a
group endeavor. What a great opportu-
nity to travel while sharing your talents
and skills in a local school. Applications
are available in R-154, Speight. For more
info contact Marianne Exum at (w) 757-
6271 or (h) 830-9450.
GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir is now ac-
cepting new members for the Spring
Semester. If you enjoy singing, we invite
you to stop by the Ledonia Wright Cul-
tural Center on Wed. afternoons at 5 p.m.
during rehearsals. Deadline Jan. 25.
LAW SOCIETY
Our next mtg. will be at 6 p.m. in GC1014
on Jan. 19. All members and other inter-
ested students, please attend.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Normal and allergic volunteers needed
for Asthma research at the ECU Dept. of
Medicine. Study purchase a patient
ranges from blood donation to allergen
challenge. All volunteers will be compen-
sated. If interested, call 551-3159.
MINORITY STUDENT OR-
GANIZATION
The Minority Student Organization will
meet Jan. 24,1989, Tues. at 5 pm in Speight
129. All are invited and encouraged to
attend.
CO-REC BOWLING
A registration meeting for intramural co-
rec bowling teams will be held Jan. 24 at 5
pm in Biology 103. Two men and two
women required per team. Don't miss it.
1NNERTUBE W ATERPOLO
A registration meeting for innertube wa-
terpolo by the intramural-recreational
services department will be held Jan 31 at
5p.m. in Biology N102. Mens and Worn-
ens teams will be formed.
PSI CHI
Psi Chi will hold its first meeting of the
Spring semester to elect new officers on
Jan. 25 at 4p.m. in the Psi Chi library (Rawl
302). Attendance is manditory. If you can
not attend, please leave a note in the Psi
Chi mailbox.
GRApiJATTNG NURSING
STUDENTS
In order to receive your Nursing Pin by
April, 1989, orders must be placed in the
Student Stores, Wright Building, no later
than Feb. 3,1989. Orders should be placed
at the Jewelry Counter. Orders must be
paid in full when the order is placed.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Amnesty International will meet Jan 25,
at 8pm at the St. Paul's Episcopal Church,
401 E. 4th St. in the upper floor. Students
welcome. For more information call
Calvin Mercer 6121- Philosophy Dept.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE
It's time to play that "Ultimate" game
once again. We had a great time and sea-
son last semester and look forward to a
better one this time around! Come join us
at the bottom of College Hill on Sunday's.
Monday's, Wednesday's and Thursday's
at 3p.m.
HELP YOUR PEERS!
The Dept. of Intramural-Recreational
Services is looking for Adapted Recrea-
3
hon Peer 1 lelpers 1 hese individuals
assist handicapped individuals acrp
M
it 757-6387 for additioggl
I
campus take part in recreational activi.
Be a BIG HELr this semester Conti
Kathleen
info.
EDUCATION MAIORS
ALMU
5
The Dept. of Speech-Language St Ai
torv Pathology (SLAP) will be provk
the speech and hearing screening for
students eligible for admission to
Upper Division of Teacher Education
Jan 23,24 and 25 The Dept. will be re
from 5 00 to 6.30 each day NO APPOIP
MENT IS NEEDED (first come basis)
SLAP Dept. is located in Belk Annex jpfr
Charles St.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Hey you guys! Come join the fun on
V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1W9 7

Announcements
Student Union Travel Committee's cruise
to the BAHAMAS over Spring Break
There will be dancing, swimming, relax
,mg .ind tons of other things to do aboard
ship. All transportation and "all you can
�" on the Carnival ship" The ship will
dock at Freeport and Nassau, so come on
B and shop until you drop in the world's
biggest marketplace'
r
l

my
LACROSSE CMJg
Anyone interested m playing lacrosse
�this Spring A mandatory meeting will be
held Km 2r jt -1 (X) p.m in Rawl 306.
HANG GLIDING
N-ar through the ea air at Nags I lead,
N C with IM-REC services. A hang glid-
ing trip has been scheduled at reduced
rates tor April IS Register Feb 31 April
; in 204 Memorial Gym Want to kxunv
pnore? Call Pat Cox at 757-6387.
FITNESS OLYMPICS
Compete tor the gold in titness bv taking
part in the 1989 FITNESS OLYMPICS
� ompetition This one day event has such
activities as a stationary bicvcle. rclav
obstacle course, flexibility and strength
endurance tests plus more, more, mote
R� g st r Jan 30 in 204 Memorial Gym for
the 1 eb 2 e ent m Minecs Coliseum Call
rvs, for mort
�tails
M
si: PER CIRCUIT!
Dectrif) our titness workout with a spe-
cialized circuit training program Tins
program alternates aerobic fitness with
muscular strength endurance exercise.
Registration ends Jan. 20 for these Mon
and Wed classes meeting from 630 7 .V1
p m in NIC. 108. For additional into, call
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
. c L Gospel Choir has done it again'
"We're having another give away just in
me to relieve vour financial stress. Your
525 00 is only .25 cent and begins
i aigh Ian 27from 9-3 p.m. at the
chai
Jan
Stui
!
re Stop by and give us your
1 � o v
support (Drawing to beheld Fri. at OOaf
Student Store).
RUN FOR CANCER
PI � '� ga the co ed National
� Fral m : is sp� nsoring a 24-
m :� i Cancel on April 14 and 15
� American Cancer Society. For
all i leather at 758-9550, Bryan
� - 3 or Ri se Richards at
- chapter of the Amencan
Society Find out about entering a
r donating money materials, 1 lelp
ic battle against cancer bv support-
ing Alpha Phi Omega and the American
Cancer Society in the 24-hour Run for
Cancer
MASSAGE CLINIC
The P.T. Club is having a Massage Clink-
on Ian 30 from 5:30-9.30 p.m. Tickets are
SI10 minutes in advance; $1.2510 min-
utes at the door. Just "do it
WE NEED YOUR EXPERI-
ENCE!
Your achievements in everyday situ-
ations can be useful to others. Earn that
feeling of accomplishment. Real Crisis
Center is recruiting volunteer crisis coun-
selors We will be ottering training classes
in this enriching field beginning Jan. 30
Call 758-HELP or come bv 312 E. 10th St.
CLASS, FACULTY ck STAFF
YEARBOOK PICTURES
Yearbook photographs are now being
taken' It you have never been in the year-
book, now is your chance. Remember, it's
not vour yearbook until you're in it. 1 lours
are from am. - 12 p m. & 1 p.m. - 4 30
p.m. tins week only in the Student Store
Soda shop
ACCQLNTLG MAJORS
The Accounting Sooiet .� will have its first
Spring Semester meeting on Jan. 30at 3.00
p at. in 1032 GCB. All interested students
are encouraged to attend. Refreshments
will be served after the meeting. Profes-
sional attire is recommended
SOCIETY FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT OF MAN-
AGEMENT
There will be a meeting of SAM on Feb
1 at 3:00 p m. in GCB 102S. Representa
fives trom Wachovia Hank Operations
Dept will be speaking Thev will also be
recruiting This meeting is in conjunction
with the Decision Science Society and all
members .ire encouraged to attend.
Guests are welcome
INTERMEDIATE
EDUCATION CLUB
The Intermediate Ed Club will hold its
first meeting of the Spring Semester on
Ian. 25 a: 3:00 pin in Speight 512. The
guest speaker, Marianne Exum, will dis
cuss the "Experience Education in Mex-
ico" program. All intermediate education
majors are welcome.
CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB
The Dive Club will be meeting Jan 30 m
Mendenhall mi 248 at 8 p.m. We will be
discussing the upcoming Spring Break
trip. Newcomers are welcome to attend
For more info, contact David Angel at
355 3546.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
There will be a meeting Jan. 31 in rm. 1031
at 4 p.m. New members arc welcome
HILLEL
1 hllel, a Jewish Student Organization will
be having a welcome back partv on Jan
26th. It will be from 8 p m. until7 at Strat
lord Arm's Clubhouse Music, snacks,
and soda will be provided. For more info
or rides, call Sarah at 830-4443.
cce
CCF would like to invite you to our bible
studveverv Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Rawl 130.
Bring vour Bible and a friend as we study
the book of 1 lebrews. Call Inn at 752-7N1'
if you need a ride or further info
RHOEPSILON
The Real Estate society will hold a meeting
Jan. 2 at 3 p m. in GCB 3014 The speaker
will be Conlev Branch. 1 le will speak on
the local Greenville market for both com
mercial and residential property A short
business meeting will be held afterwards
Ev ervone is welcome to come and join in
SMS
The Society of Manufacturing Engineers
is having its tirst organizational meeting
for the new year The meeting will be held
in Rawl 106 at 5.30 on Jan. 25. Discussion
will include tows, certification examina-
tion, and the Egg Drop contest A mem-
bers and interested persons are urged to
attend
MSC
There will be a dance at the Methodist
Student Center on Ian. 27th t 8 50 pin
The MSC is located at 501 E 5th St across
from Carrett Dorm. Free refreshments,
tree admission. Call 758-2030 or 752-724)
for details.
CJH.I ALP H AQMEG A
The brothers of Chi Alpha Omega invite
any young chnstian men who are inter
ested in pledging a Christian Social Fra
temity, to attend their rush on an 21 and
25 trom 8-9 p.m. meeting in the Bio build
ing lobby. For more into, contact: Dean
Laves 752-S23s or Michael Hodges 752
7071.
figh
�� �
. ?C
�y0v� fluV � '��"
TOT
Student Union
Coming Attractions
TXT,
AlliiPiic�ltcj)ff(t)it(Pi LflJ
k
AHMAD JAMAL
Wednesday, January 25
8pm HendHx Theater
Tickets ECU Students $4.00
All others $6.00
Sponsored by the Special Concerts Committee
MOVIES OF THE WEEK
DIE HARD -R
Thursday, Jan. 26-29 at 8 p.m.
and
THE DECLINE OF WESTERN CIVILATION,
PART II: THE METAL YEARS -R
Friday, Jan. 27-28 at 11 p.m.
All films are FREE to ECU Students with
valid ECU I.D.
Sponsored By the Committee
Stop by the Student Union table in front of
the Student Store Mon 23-25 and fill out the
survey and you may win a dinner for 2 at the
Hilton
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee wants
to know what concerts you would like to have at ECU.
An opinion box is located next to the information
desk in Mendenhall Student Center.
Stop by and help us to bring you
the concerts of your choice.
h
COMMUNION
Worship Cod and celebrate Communion
this Wed. at 5 p.m. at the Methodist Stu
dent Center then enjoy a delicious, all
oil-can eat home axiked meal and good
fellowship. The meal is $2 at the door,
SI 50 for members. Oil 758-2030 for info
Sponsored bv Presbyterian and Method-
ist Campus Ministries.
A MA
The American Mktg Assoc. will be hold
ing its first meeting of this semester on Jan
2d The meeting will be held in rm 11)37
CCH at 3:30p.m. The guest speaker will be
Diana Crowd who is the Mktg. Director of
"The Rio The Club. All those interested
are welcome and old members arc en
couraged to attend
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
The Lady Pirates will host arch rival UNC
Wilmington on Jan 2Sth. Ttpoff will be at
7 p m At halttime, along with the
Quincey's Dinner giveaway, a stupid pet
tucks contest will be held
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The LCU College Republicans will meet
Jan 25 and every Wed. at 7 p.m in 212
Mendenhall Please call 752 8359 for info
BOWL TEAM
Any student interested in becoming a
member of the ECu World Geography
Bowl Team, which will compete at Duke
on Feb 25 against other North Carolina
colleges and universities, come to the In
ternational House, 306 E. Ninth St, at 5
p.m. on Jan 26 for a qualification match
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
The Student Financial Management A' so
ciatior. mil hold a meeting on Jan 25 at
430 p.m. in rm 3009 GCB. Our guest
sH-aker will beCvrus B Follmer, who is a
certified registered planner and regis-
tered investment advisor for Follmer Fi-
nancial Services. All interested students
are invited to attend the meeting.
LQSI?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fri
night at 7 00
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Chnstian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs at 6 p m in the Culture Center
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place
ments Call 757-6979 or come bv the GCB,
room 2028
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
It you are challenged everyday with prob
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
vis tor the uncompromised word of God
Every Fn night at 700 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium
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, out m wm �ou
Mon. 8:00-11:00 - Meet the Phi Tau's at Memorial Gym
Tues. 8:00-11:00 - P zza with the Sorority Girls of Alpha Xi Delta
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Thurs. 8:00-11:00 - Meet the Brothers and Little Sisters of Phi Kappa Tau
-For More Information or a Ride Call 757-1319





'4
I'lirrAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24.1989
'Stealth' blimp is underway
ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. low price Hoschstetler said.
(AP) � A "Stealth" blimp being As they bob in the wind out-
developed in Pasquotank County side mammoth hangars along the
could open a new era in thedevel- Pasquotank River, blimps look
opment of military and civilian elegant and playful - unlikely
blimps, officials say candidates for combat duty. But
The airship is great for any- the Sentinel 5000 airship will be a
and submarine hunters during
both world wars, he said.
But the Navy scrapped the
last of its airships in 1962 as high-
speed bombers and high-altitude
missiles became the chief military
The naval airship would ac-
company groups of patrolling
Navy surface ships. It would be
equipped with advanced "over-
the-horizon" and "lookdown"
high-resolution radars to detect
thing you want to do that requires
you to be up in the air for a long
rime said Ron Hoschstetler oi
Airship Industries USA Inc
which is developing the experi-
high-technology warrior, com-
plete with sophisticated radar blimp
threats. Planes, helicopters and low-flying attack planes and mis
ground stations replaced the siles. Radar-absorbing materials
and sensing gear to protect U.S.
Navy ships.
'We arc really at the begin-
mental naval airship under a $169 ningof a new airship age Hoch-
million Navy contract. stetler said.
'And airships can buy you a Airships were used effec-
lot more time in the air for a low, lively as observation platforms
The new naval airship's elec-
tronic gear and its ability to stay
aloft for long periods at low cost
will make it an important tool in
airborne early-warning, anti-sub-
marine warfare and logistics,
Hochstctler said.
in the airship will reduce ar
enemy's ability to detect it on
radar.
The Navy awarded the con-
tract to build and design the air-
ship in June 1987 .
Murderer Ted Bundy to fry today
STARKE, Fla. (AP) � Ted
Bundy has confessed to 19 more
killings, but Florida's highest law-
enforcement official calls the con
demned murderer a "conniver"
i ho should die in the electric
chair as scheduled.
Bundy's appointment with a
that much about people. He's
trying to manipulate the system
again. This time, I don't think it's
going to work
Salt Lake County sheriff's
Detective Dennis Couch said
Sunday night that Bundy men-
tioned his involvement in up to
Colorado and one woman in
Washington state just to whet the
appetite of law enforcement
said VVoodard, who called
Bundv's llth-hour statements a
"hoax
"1 am disappointed that, in
psychiatrist Monday has gener- eight Utah killings, at least two
ated speculation that the suspect
in up to three dozen slavings will
try to halt his execution.
But Gov. Bob Martinez reaf-
firmed his vow "that he has no
intention of delaying the execu-
tion beyond Tuesday morning
press secretary Jon Peck said
Sunday night.
Bundy is scheduled for exe-
cution at Florida State Prison on
Tuesday for the 1978 rape and
murder of a 12-vear-old Lake Citv
girl, one of three people Bundy
killed in Florida.
The 42-ycar-old law school
dropout s under his fourth death
warrant.
During the past four days,
Bundy has admitted killing 19
young women in Washington,
Utah, Idaho and Colorado.
"Ted Bundy is a conniver and
he's a mass killer Florida Attor-
ney General Bob Buttcrworth
said.
"I don't think he reallv cares
more than authorities had be-
lieved.
Farlier Sunday, Bundy con-
fessed to two murders in Idaho,
where officials had never linked
him to any killings.
He also provided investiga-
tors Friday and Saturday with
details of eight Washington kill-
ings and one in Colorado for
w hich he has long been suspected
but never charged.
Like Butterworth, Colorado
Attorney General Duane Woo-
dard also criticized Bundy's new
cooperation, accusing the killer of
stringing along investigators to
avoid execution.
Woodard, who discussed
Bundy confessions at length with
Washington state Attorney Gen-
eral Ken Eikenberrv on Saturday
his closing hours when he had the warrants, lost an appeal to the
opportunity to inform authorities U.S. Supreme Court a week ago,
oi the whereabouts of bodies, he
didn't do it
Bundy's attorneys have an
open avenue of appeal to the U.S.
Supreme Court, but also could tonight,
ask Martinez for a stay on
grounds that Bundy wouldn't
understand the charges against
him or the severity of the sen tence
at the time of execution.
P'
"1 guess they figure it ain't
over till it's over Bundy's attor
nevs worked late Sunday.
Bundy, who has been on
death row at the prison since Julv
1979 and survived three death
and no other court has offered a
reprieve.
If all appeals fail, final prepa-
rations for execution would begin
In Tacoma, Wash where
Bundy was raised, word oi the
confessions shocked his mother,
Louise.
"If and when that claim is
raised, it would require the gover-
nor to stay the execution and
appoint a team of three psychia-
trists to interview Bundy, which
we are fully prepared to do if the
need arises Peck said.
'The key here is timing, but
the end result will be the same. It
night, said Bundy has failed to could slowdown the process, but
give investigators from either the sentence is going to be carried
state much new information. out and it's going to be carried out
"I le picks out one woman in very soon
"If Ted did do these things,
and if indeed he is substantiating
it with facts that he really did
those things oh it's the most
devastating news of our lives
she said, shaking her head and
sighing as her husband, John, sat
silently across the room.
Thomas Leach, whose 12-
vear-old daughter, kimberlv, was
Bundv's last victim, doubted the
execution would proceed, saying,
"They ain't going to do nothing
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Thursday, January 26
Cookout with a Sorority






i
r
I lit . i A
Abortion protest in D.C.
30C
DOC
ZMtC
:C
D0C
30C

WASHINGTON (AP)
I housands of anti-abortion dem-
onstrators converged on the
ation's capital today to culmi-
nate a series ot nationwide pro
sts against the Supreme Court's
o' 3 decision legalizing abortion
I eonard Dinegar ot the Na-
tional Right to bite Committee
said organizers hoped to match
last year's turnout ot 50,000
people tor what has become an
annual reminder ot the divisive
issue.
The debate has taken on
added tntensirv this war, with a
reconstituted Supreme Court
considering a Missouri vase with
b e potential to result in signifi-
cant changes in the legal doctrine
verning abortion.
The Washington protest
capped a seriesol demonstrations
marking the loth anniversary oi
the Roe vs Wade decision declar
ing that women's privacy rights
allow them to make their own
decisions on abortion
Thousands oi anti-abortion
demonstrators marched on Sun-
dae in St. Paul, Minn . Little Ro k
Ark , Allentown, Pa boston and
Burlington, Yt , while large pro-
choice rallies were held in Pitts-
burgh, bos Angeles And Seattle.
President George Bush
planned to speak to the anti-abor-
tion demonstrators in Washing-
ton today via a telephone hookup
similar to that used by former
President Reagan to address the
same group last year.
The rally on the Ellipse, south
of the White 1 louse, also was to
include speeches by Sen. Gordon
I. 1 lumphrey, R-N.l and Reps.
Robert K. Dornan, R Calif and
Christopher Smith, R-N.J.
After the rally the anti-abor-
tion protestors planned a parade
along Constitution Avenue to
Capitol Hill, reversing the route
taken just a few daysearlier by the
newly inaugurated bush.
In addition, a group calling
itsell Rachel's Rescues said it
planned a "din . t action" ettort to
prevent women from obtaining
abortions. The group declined to
disclose the location ot its
annt d eti rl
Moi � ii
re met
p merits i �l
a Planned
Parenthood office in Burlingti mi
Vt , by 40 pro-choice demonstra
tors.
The two sides faced each
other from across the street, with
each group singing, clapping and
maintaining their distance.
"Right-to-life is not a political
issue said Bishop John Marshall,
the leader of Vermont's Catholii
diocese. "It is not a matter tor the
politicians to decide. It is a reli-
gious and moral issue already
decided by God
In downtown Pittsburgh.
about 1,200 pro-choice marchers
joined a "March lor Women's
Lives They were met at the Al-
leghenv County morgue by about
10 anti-abortion marchers.
The pro civ. ice march is i
preceded K a rail) at which
Eleanor Smcal, a termer National
Organization for Women pro:
dent, said, "Some people want to
save their souls by spilling the
blood oi innocent women. That
isn't Christianit) . It's hypcx i i
The church has no business dicta t
ing the policies ot this countn
Atter her remarks, many in
the crowd turned, shook tl
ers and yelled ' Shame,
� � sh ime it the anti abor-
I, , . �
act. �ss
tion ; r �!� :� i
�et.
! he Su !�� Court
agreed I .� a Missouri case
in w hi( ha ! ral court
strut kdowna strii cent stateanti-
la as unconstitutional.
In its appeal, the si ite urged re
vei .il ot Roe vs Wade, and the
Reagan administration filed a
the Missouri case an
' ap ropriati . : irtunity" to re
n ider the !a: 22, I 3, deci-
. n.
Attorney � , Dick
rnburg � ; � . �; ;
tne ; . agan ap
Kenned
rturn
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Our Volunt�ft and SUM arc on duty 24 hra a day yaar around
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Our tongatanding goal ha ahuaya batan to praaanra and anhanca
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� nG And Accr4"�d B� ' �� s �� ol hort � �
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� ��

Quayle conveys pro-life desire
Write a letter
to the Editor
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Thr Air Race is k�jkin fcir
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As an Air Font- RON' cadet. uTt h�- trained
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CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
757-6598
ijpaitership rJttiVTr starts rVrr
WASHINGTON AP Vice
V'i dent Pan Quayle assured
Jnti-aborhon leaders today that
jhe Bush administration shan
their desire to overturn the land-
mark Supreme Court decision
k galizing abortion.
We have a lot ol crusades
Quayle said, noting that ' I have
been involved with a lot ol people
ir. mv state! Indiana1 on this issue
ildn t think of a more apj
ftriate group to be meeting �-�. ith
rtly before tl i etir
She Old Executh e Otti 1 1
mti-abortion leaders called
for a nal i tl pravcr crusade
. . it , ime as thousands ol di m-
: Orators com thecapi
tal to culmin itea sei : natit n-
�. ide pi test again ; tl I � vs
le Supreme c !ourt det 11 ii
Quayle said I . delighted
to sil dow n "u ith arious c n
'�' � ncies inl r st A in the pres-
ervatii mI life "
ien a it ; i�; u r asked
ther the Bush administration
could succeed in getting the I r
Roe vs. Wade det isi( n rever �
Q : ivle rt plied, " I ime will tt ll
We have the same c mmitmi nt.
1 le said it was impoi tant I il
ieone stand up and speak I i
"those people who are not yet
� i rn "
White H ise chief of
ohn Sununu accompanil d
Quavle to the met tii c and tl
vice president said Sununu was
re because he wanted to hi
the visitors' view s.
Bush stresses integrity to staff
WASHINi rON (AP)
Prcs d� nt Bu led iring
: - in his V
1urn brightly well after dark
instructed hs senior staff tndavto
)U' in 1 : .� i1 " irs av I
t: appearance of i nflicl I
U : St.
et - . I - work Bush siki '
at a brief ceremony in the East
Room at which 65 members were
sworn-in bv Vice President
Quavle.
Bush was to preside later in
(he da at his first Cabinet meet-
ire, and was als � to address anti
at rtion demonstrators thr
rsl a rkingda) t I :
irc e are about to ei
cealh i;reat adventure
urn
Bus
: : : mi ; I
Sununu attended I � cere
mony but did m : rai - his i
hand; he had been sworn m bv
Ouavie privad � arlier todav.
t le said he e p i ted loni
hours and I ard '��� i irk . But tl
-nghourscan result ma new Oj
p irtuhitv for all
Bu reiterated that his t ; bus � turn ng I is atten-
rity was tackling the budget tion to business after a S25n illion
. , aueural extra aean i
: I . h he w ill tocus en
1 it the week, b c,innir c
� � ii . fui sda u '
SEMI-ANNUAL
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Coffman's Men's Wear is now offering substantial
savings of 25 to 50 on fashionable selections of
fall and winter merchandise for men. women and
boys. An excellent opportunity to save on fine
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from our regular stock of traditional fashions.
� �
untrv,
: � r the
he said.
iki �: .
. n. ccni
'6
to pre
me
i iter and n n in in an
Quavli had been is! ;
� - eai in the staff. 1 le
i ,k� I tin ii U to rai e their rij I
ind md take the oath ti i "si :
x�rt and defend the onstitution
�: the United States" nd to "well
: faithfully discharge the du-
1 le planned to ad Ii
ib rtion protest i��� nl el
: s uthol tl eV hitel
del nbtral n � as cal 11
test tl ie Suj : � me irt's I
1973, di cisii m Ii .� ilizing
irch and rail i I e sam
in pre ious eai
uipse
oPPmani
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall, Rocky Mount
iome of the lapses that
tl White i louse si if! :
President Reagan, gave special tjos 0f the office oi which 1 am
fen : hasis to the need to maintain proud to enter
tK highest of ethical standards.
"It's not really very compli-
cated. It's a question ol knowing
pght from wrong, avoiding con
�icts of interest, bending over
Backwards to see that there's n -
evi n a perception of a conflict ol
interest the new president said
'ur actions must ah a) -1 i
ot the highest integrity
Bush addressed his stafl il
S - a m. By then, he had already
been at work for more than an
"It's my first official act,
Qu i le quipped. At one point, as
tl e v aces ol children in the audi-
ence began to rise, Bush inter-
: ii led his speech and joked: "I'm
. ' ; : the re s imei nc else's kids.
He � I that having his 10
grandchildren in the White
House .ill weekend had been
something 1 an ordeal. "In the
last 48 hours, they've been
ever) v here'he said.
Among those sworn in were
i meeting with Quayle at a national security adviser brent
S owcroft; David Hates Jr secre-
tary to the Cabinet; Richard C.
i'he president indicated he Breeden, assistant for issues
a.m. breakast session am
. I of statt ohn Sununu.
txpected a similar work ethic
from members oi his staff. He
rf ealed for understanding from
. who watched the cere-
mony.
"Your husbands and wives
U' embarking on an ordeal that is
la au to be a time-consuming
ih iis; Andrew 11. Card Jr
di putv to thechiel of staff; David
! � man � cmmunications di-
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tan ; Bo) di n (lrap, coun-
sel to the icent; Frederick D.
Mc( lure, assistant lor legislative
ifl lirs;and Roger B, Porter,assis
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i
4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24. 1989 9
Abortion protest in D.C.
WASHINGTON (AP) �
Thousands of anti-abortion dem-
onstrators converged on the
nation's capital today to culmi-
nate a series of nationwide pro-
Burlington, Vt while large pro-
choice rallies were held in Pitts-
burgh, Los Angeles and Seattle.
President George Bush
planned to speak to the anti-abor-
tests against the Supreme Court's tion demonstrators in Washing-
1973 decision legalizing abortion, ton today via a telephone hookup
Leonard Dinegar of the Na- similar to that used by former
ional Right to Life Committee President Reagan to address the
id organizers hoped to match same group last year.
ast year's turnout of 50,000 The rally on the Ellipse, south
pie for what has become an of the White House, also was to
innual reminder of the divisive
issue.
The debate has taken on
include speeches by Sen. Gordon
J. Humphrey, R-N.H and Reps.
Robert K. Dornan, R-Calif and
iddcd intensity this year, with a Christopher Smith, R-N.J.
reconstituted Supreme Court After the rally the anti-abor-
zonsidering a Missouri case with tion protestors planned a parade
the potential to result in signifi- along Constitution Avenue to
Cant changes in the legal doctrine Capitol Hill, reversing the route
Pverning abortion. taken just a few days earlier by the
The Washington protest newly inaugurated Bush,
gapped a series of demonstrations In addition, a group calling
inarking the 16th anniversary of itself Rachel's Rescues said it
he Roe vs. Wade decision declar- planned a "direct-action" effort to dent, said, "Some people want to
ng that women's privacy rights prevent women from obtaining save their souls by spilling the
iillow them to make their own abortions. The group declined to
kiecisions on abortion. disclose the location of its
Thousands of anti-abortion
demonstrators marched on Sun- planned effort.
May in St. Paul, Minn Little Rock, More than 500 opponents of
fek Allentown, Pa Boston and abortion were met at a Planned
Parenthood office in Burlington,
Vt by 40 pro-choice demonstra-
tors.
The two sides faced each
other from across the street, with
each group singing, clapping and
maintaining their distance.
"Right-to-life is not a political
issue said Bishop John Marshall,
the leader of Vermont's Catholic
diocese. "It is not a matter for the
politicians to decide. It is a reli-
gious and moral issue already
decided by God
In downtown Pittsburgh,
about 1,200 pro-choice marchers
joined a "March For Women's
Lives They were met at the Al-
legheny County morgue by about
40 anti-abortion marchers.
The pro-choice march was
preceded by a rally at which
Eleanor Smeal, a former National
Organization for Women presi-
blood of innocent women. That
isn't Christianity. It's hypocrisy.
The church has no business dictat-
ing the policies of this country
After her remarks, many in
the crowd turned, shook their
jQuayle conveys pro-life desire
fingers and yelled, "Shame,
shame, shame" at the anti-abor-
tion protesters, who stood across
the street.
The Supreme Court has
agreed to review a Missouri case
in which a lower federal court
struck down a stringent state anti-
abortion law as unconstitutional.
In its appeal, the state urged re-
versal of Roe vs. Wade, and the
Reagan administration filed a
brief calling the Missouri case an
"appropriate opportunity" to re-
consider the Jan. 22, 1973, deci-
sion.
Attorney General Dick
Thornburgh expressed hope on
Sunday that the high court, with
the addition of new Reagan ap-
pointee Anthony Kennedy, will
use the Missouri case to overturn
Roe vs. Wade.
"My guess is that they will
return the regulation of abortions,
like many health and safety ques-
tions, to the states Thornburgh
said on the NBC program "Meet
the Press
a letter
to the Editor
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WASHINGTON v'AP) � Vice
President Dan Quayle assured
nti-abortion leaders today that
the Bush administration shares
leir desire to overturn the land-
ark Supreme Court decision
?galizing abortion.
"We have a lot of crusades
�)uayle said, noting that "I have
been involved with a lot of people
In mv state (Indiana) on this issue.
SOC
DOC
3UC
WE ALWAYS
iD LEADERS
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where youll be challenged to ecd and rewaided far your
success. Let us gh you the details today
ing, anti-abortion leaders called
for a national prayer crusade.
That came as thousands of dem-
onstrators converged on the capi-
tal to culminate a series of nation-
wide protests against the Roe vs.
Wade Supreme Court decision in
1973.
to
Quayle said he was delighted
sit down "with various con-
couldn't think of a more appro- tituencies interested in the pres-
riate group to be meeting with ervation of life
Shortly before the meeting in
he Old Executive Office Build- vVhcn a reporter asked
whether the Bush administration
could succeed in getting the 1973
Roe vs. Wade decision reversed,
Quayle replied, "Time will tell.
We have the same commitment
He said it was important that
someone stand up and speak for
"those people who are not yet
born
White House chief of staff
John Sununu accompanied
Quayle to the meeting, and the
vice president said Sununu was
there because he wanted to hear
the visitors' views.
Bush stresses integrity to staff
lAi
killer 1 he lighr .burn well after
president Bush, declaring the da.r,k ar�Und th,S ' BuSh
fiehts in his White House will . , . , �,
Wum brighily well after dark . He h.e exPccd, J"
' mmseniorstafHTtt,ndhard w0" But thcsp
It in long hours and afeid even 'srscaesultma newep-
.e appearance of contlict-of-in- ponuratytoraii.
Bush reiterated that his top
priority was tackling the budget
tant for domestic policy.
Sununu attended the cere-
mony but did not raise his right
hand; he had been sworn m .by
Quayle privately ljSBdftES3ayi
rest.
"Let's go to work Bush said
t a brief ceremony in the East
om at which 65 members were
orn-in bv Vice President Dan
ayle.
Bush was to preside later in
ie day at his first Cabinet meet-
rig, and was also to address anti-
bortion demonstrators through
telephone hookup.
The new president, on his
rst working day, told the gather-
deficit which he will focus on
throughout the week, beginning
with a meeting Tuesday with
congressional leaders.
"We have an immense oppor-
tunity to make life better for the
people in this country he said.
"We can, by hard work, make this
a safer and more secure country.
Quayle had been asked by
Bush to swear in the staff. He
Bush was turning his atten-
tion to business after a $25 million
inaugural extravaganza.

Ig "we are about to embark on a askcd thc aides to raisc thcir right
Bally grlat adventure hands and take the oath to "sup-
Bush, seeking to prevent the port and defend the Constitution
me of the lapses that plagued 0f tne United States" and to "well
le White House staff of former and faithfully discharge the du-
rcsident Reagan, gave special tjes 0f tne office of which I am
inphasis to the need to maintain pr0ud to enter
le highest of ethical standards. "it's my first official act
It's not really very compli- Quayle quipped. At one point, as
ated. It's a question of knowing the voices of children in the audi-
He planned to address anti-
abortion protesters on the Ellipse,
just south of the White House. The
demonstration was called to pro-
test the Supreme Court's Jan. 22,
1973, decision legalizing abor-
tion.
Reagan addressed the annual
march and rally in the same fash-
ion in previous years.
ght from wrong, avoiding con-
icts of interest, bending over
ekwards to see that there's no
en a perception of a conflict of
terest the new president said.
"Our actions must always be
' the highest integrity
Bush addressed his staff at
30 a.m. By then, he had already
n at work for more than an
ur, meeting with Quayle at a
15 a.m. breakast session and
ith chief of staff John Sununu.
The president indicated he
cpected a similar work ethic
from members of his staff. He
ippealed for understanding from
ouses who watched the cere-
mony.
"Your husbands and wives
�e embarking on an ordeal that is
own to be a time-consuming
r
ence began to rise, Bush inter-
rupted his speech and joked: "I'm
glad they're someone else's kids
He hinted that having his 10
grandchildren in the White
House all weekend had been
something of an ordeal. "In the
last 48 hours, they've been
everywherehe said.
Among those sworn in were
national security adviser Brent
Scowcroft; David Bates Jr secre-
tary to the Cabinet; Richard C.
Breeden, assistant for issues
analysis; Andrew H. Card Jr
deputy to the chief of staff; David
Demarest, communications di-
rector; Marlin Fitzwater, press
secretary; C. Boyden Gray, coun-
sel to the presicent; Frederick D.
McUure, assistant for legislative
affairs; and Roger B. Porter, assis-
New Tax Law
To help you understand the new tax law, the IRS
has two new publications. Publication 920explains
changes affecting individuals and Publication
921 explains changes affecting businesses. Both are
free. Ask for one at any IRS office or call the IRS
Tax Forms number in your phone book.
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10
IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1989
Freshmen are down, broke
(CPS)� This year's freshmen
are depressed, disappointed and
debt-ridden, the biggest survey of
national student attitudes re-
ported Jan. 9.
The findings of the American
Council on Education and Uni-
versity oi California at Los Ange-
les (UCLA) annual survey of
308,000 freshmen paint a picture
ot collegians "who are not san-
guine about the future summa-
rized UCLA's Kenneth Green.
A record number of students,
for example, reported frequently
feeling "overwhelmed" and de-
pressed.
"We have verv high suicide
rates among college students
now added Alexander Astin,
the UCLA professor who directs
the survey. He attributes them to
tremendous pressures on young
people to achieve Whatever the
reason, 10.5 percent of the
nation's freshmen reported feel-
ing "depressed" frequently, up
from S.3 percent of 1987's fresh-
men and 8 2 percent of the 1985 to help college students from low-
freshman class. and middle-income families"
More than one of every five Astin concluded
freshmen felt "overwhelmed by As a result, he said, "the bur-
all I have to do den of paying for college has
Green added freshmen may shifted increasingly to students
be unhappier than previous gen-
erations because "a large number
than ever before are not attending
their first-choice college
"First-choice" colleges are
often expensive, and the survey
indicated students are not getting
enough financial aid to afford
them. Those who are getting aid
are getting it in the form of loans
that have to be repaid.
Only 15.6 percent of the stu-
dents entering college for the
Fall '88 term recieved Pell
Grants, which don't have to be
repaid. It was the lowest level in
the survey's history, Green said.
In 1980, almost a third of the fresh-
men got grants.
"The federal government has,
in effect, cut back on most of the
financial aid programs intended
their families and the nation's
colleges and universities
The resulting money pres-
sure apparently has changed the
way the freshmen view the world,
Astin and Green said. The eco-
nomic recession that plagued
families nationwide in the earlv
1980s and continues to plague
them in many farm and energy
states changed the students, too.
"These are the children of
economic upheaval Green said.
"The recession of the '80s was
worse than anything since the
Depression (of the 1930s). Their
loss of faith and preoccupation
with jobs comes from that
A record number of freshmen
- 72.6 percent - said they were
going to college primarily to get
higher-paying jobs later in life.
By contrast, a majority of
freshmen in 1968 viewed "the
college years as a timeforlcarning
and personal development
Green said.
This year's freshmen "are like
their grandparents who experi-
enced the Depression
Many people report still hav-
ing nightmares about final 20
years after graduating from col-
lege, Dr. Anne Shurling, a psy-
chology professor at Transylva-
nia University in Kentucky, re-
ported Jan. 9.
Shurling surveyed people
who graduated from Transylva-
nia from 1968 to 1978, and found
that 27 had bad dreams about
finals while they were in school.
Of the people who had the
dreams, 82 percent said they still
occasionally have nightmares
about the tests.
Finals, Shurling said, consist
oi "three or four days of intense
pressure that is repeated at the
end of each semester.
RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
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ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
Budweiser ad on campus phone book is
said to be 'explicitly sexist'
(CPS)� A Budweiser ad on
the back of Florida Atlantic
University's campus phone direc-
tory is "explicitly sexist some
FAL" residents say, and could lead
to a campus bovcott of other prod-
ucts from Anheuser-Busch,
which brews Bud.
The ad, which features three
women in Budweiser bathing
suits provocatively sprawled on a
Budweiser towel, has run in
scores oi publications on other
campuses without much formal
comment.
Mike Fleming of Fleishman
Hillard, the company's St. Louis
public relations firm, contended
he's received no other complaints
about the ad.
But at FAU, a group largely
from the Women's Studies De-
partment, circulated petitions
asking students not to "consume
nor purchase Budweiser beer
and encourage others to do the
same" because thev are "morallv,
intellectually and aesthetically
offended by the Budweiser ad
To pacify those upset by the
ad, FAU's University Relations
office is offering gummed labels
to cover the back of the phone
directory. FAU's student paper,
The Atlantic Sun, reported about
60 labels have been distributed.
"Women aren't being ex-
ploited in the ad. The complaints
are not justified. I feel it's a whole-
some ad maintained James
Orthwein, president of Double-
Eagle Distributors, which distrib-
utes Bud around FAU.
Some FAU facultv and stu-
dents agreed.
'There are no professors with
their hands on the butts of stu-
dents in it noted Prof. Raymond
McAllister. "We just don't have
the time or monev to waste on an
J
issue like this. Damn, we choose
the stupidest places to make our
stand
"If they (Budweiser) keep up
this tradition joked FAU stu-
dent president Mariann Row-
land, "there better be some guys
on next year's director)
"We believe our promotional
posters are balanced in terms of
malefemale representation the
company relied in a statement to
College Tress Service.
Fleishman Hillard spokes-
man Tom Lang noted Anheuser-
Busch produces "literally hun-
dreds" of posters "including both
men and women A poster for
iving Cobra Malt Liquor, another
company brand, features Fred
Williamson "who is widely recog-
nized as one of the top male
models in the countrv.
than Geraldo!
more
than Sally Jesse Rapheal!
It's the Return of the the
scandalous, the libelous (but
ALWAYS Clearly Labeled)
Fast Carolinian Satire Page!
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i






TH� E-ASTC AROI INIAN
Features
A
-nonsense leader Marius Weyers and timid cadet Miguel Ferrer track down the monster in
Deepstar Six a Tri-Star picture. Weyers and Ferrer play but two of the film's stereotypical
0s.
ECU freshman helps
make horror movies
BvCHIP CARTi R

unique make-up job to simulate
Siamese twins joined at the face.
Most of these special effects
a freshman, Paul Pisoni follow the same process. Pisoni
said that he first sculpts the crea-
ture, head, or body in clav. Then a
plaster cast is molded around the
sculpture. Latex or other materi-
als are floured into the mold and
the creatures are tilled with poly-
urcthanc foam. Fiberglass and
acrylic paint pro ide the finishing
touches.
Originally from New York,
Pisoni and his family now live in
Im, "War" from Troma Winterville. At 13, intrigued by
clay animation and special effects
magazines, he began making di-
nosaur movies in his workshop.
A tew years later he got a job
�t expern nee in two di-
ers '�. ng w ith restor-
s I � 'ew York mu-
i - : ked make-
. effects lor two
iti t : the so, the Tri-
tar Six Pi-
I on an exploding
Iped paint the 700
reated cut
i,
c oxic A veneer'
rps( - ii applied a
helping to restore statues in a
museum. After that, he heard
about a correspondence course in
make-up and special effects.
After taking the course, he
sent his portfolio to California,
where Mark Shostrum, special
effects director for "Deepstar"
hired him. Pisoni spent three
months in 1A. working on the
movie, returning home to start
college.
Working among all the props
made tor recent movies made 1 fe
interesting tor Pisoni. A head with
a slug-creature burrowing outoi
it sat in the corner oi the work-
shop. "It startled me about 5
See STUDENT, page 15
Violent Femmes get religion
By CHIP CARTER
stj Writci
"3" Violent Femmes,
SK-sh Records.
n � km � where this
ajimefi m. 1 wasunderthe
irssion th( i lent Femmes
up. I'm glad they're still
arund, but on "3 (iordon Gano
shiws that he's even more full oi
tkspirit than before.
album's title is mislead-
is the Femmes fourth
aj he title is a refercn e to
th r - tian trinity The Fa-
r s, n and i loly Ghost.
. . us punk is an anomaly
in music world, though
r is drawing a lot oi atten-
� . its smarmy metal-lite E
But Gano and the
s were rockin' and
r-rt . hin' vears before Strvper
ir first can oi mousse.
! i mmes self-titled first
Lr . is prettv much a table-
stompin' thrash mix of post-teen
angst. When "Hallowed Ground"
hit the stores, it didn't do so well.
The music was still the sparse
guitar 'n drums that character-
ized the first record, but 1 think the
subject matter, like the disturbed
farmer throwing his daughter in
the well and the religious slant,
turned some folks off.
Talking Head ferry Harrison
produced "The Blind Leading the
Naked which balanced secular
topics 'including the hilarious
"Old Mother Reagan" and almost
propagandic songs ("Faith") with
the most diverse musical experi-
mentation the Femmes had tried
vet.
()n "3 the Femmes are pro-
ducing themselves. They are still
walking a tightrope between the
saved and the damned,and while
they seem committed to the side
of the angels, their best moments
come in fits oi demonic, musical
possession.
"Fat" is a great little countri-
fied ditty concerning revenge and
reconciliation. "1 hope you got
fat1 hope you got really i:
Cause if you got really really i,v
you just might want to see me
come back 1 low can you argue
with logic like that?
Two songs later, Gano lets
loose on "Nothing Worth Living
For a ballad worthy of whine-
meister Mornsey himself. While
the Femmes don't ever fall into
the same bleak pit the Smiths dug
tor themselves, cuts like this or.e
makeyou wonder how long it w 11
be before they do.
Brian Ritchie and Victor 1 e-
Lorenzo still use their instru-
ments to balance out Gano's mo-
rose lyrics, but their tunes never
get as fast or as loud as they did on
previous albums.
Even "Mother oi a Girl a
direct descendant of "Gone,
Paddy, Gone is a pale echo of
the aural miracles oi the past. It
Gano reformed the Femmes to
spread the word, my advice is he
better do it a little louder, or no
one's going to hear it.
'Deepstar Six' misses
By MIC AH HARRIS
Sum Write!
Director Sean Cunningham's
"Deepstar Six" isa slow leak from
beginning to end. Through a
combination of bland characteri-
zation, cliches, and lame editing,
the movie maintains the lethargic
pace oi a sea turtle on drv land.
Set in the near future, "Deep-
star Six" follows IV. ohn Van
Gelder (Marius Weyers) and his
crew ol undersea explorers as
they install a deepsea missile
base.
Blowing up a cavern on the
location, the crew releases a !
ous monster. It's only one of sev-
eral SNAFUS this crack tram per
forms. Whether or not the im pt
crew will kill themselves bel re
the monster does g ni i il
only tension in the film.
Even so. this movie has its
good points. Two or three at least
Harry Mandfredini's score
evokes the eerie ambiance oi the
undersea world. Mac Ahlberg's
I .iotographv conveys the claus-
trophobia of a sea baseI he model
work at the movie's beginning is
beautifully crafted. so is 'ia
Peoples' flat stomach.
Itemizing the movie's bad
points isas easy as shooting fish in
a ba rrel. The basic pl it isa ren la ke
oi an obscure '60s mi
nation Inner Space Borrowing
an idea is nogreat crime, but fl
ingitout with cliches is, espe( i
when the characters are so
cliched.
Our intrepid crew includes
the virile hero (Greg E igan), the
beautiful, dedicated scientist
Peoples), the hero's wisecracking
pal (Matt McCoy), the cadet
can't take the strain (Miguel er-
ror' and the no-nonseni .
(Weyers).
'1 he re are eight more
tors, including the monster.
spotlight-sharing obscures
focus so badly that e t n the d i
tor loses track of them. Instea : I
attempting character dev
ment, we are green such cur
remarks about our heroes I il u
plans, one wants to reunite with
family, buying that littleiece I
farmland, etc. These cheap shots
at audter � � sympathies occur
bel re the character
his personal dream is
: "� te to all marine biology
il '� u should find your-
' in an undersea lab with a
t air your fondest
ir ams or your butt is gone.
V t only d es flat ch. icteri-
zal npi lu audience indiffer-
ence during action sequences.
� scenes are edited to evoke
all the excitement oi staring into
an aquarium. And to c,p the in-
ane pacing, we ha1.e a contrived
� � ' ending t ks as
it was filmed after the
� � ' ' �
� � n ' tui - are � p irently
froi : 60s Irwn
md we'i �� It
�' i kev pi
- � : il � as gai
m 11 ' ird s
� itive minds
bi hind pstar Six should be
set adrift r bai I I a desert
; so much as a
: : . : . . Cai
See related story, below left
ECU student Paul Pisoni poses with one of his creations � Siamese twins joined at the face
The twins appeared in the film "Troma's War
Dead Milkmen's new album
sounds like their old albums
By CHIP CARTER
Staft V ntcr
"Beelzebubba" � 1 he Dead
Milkmen, Enigma Records.
Without realizing it, The
Dead Milkmen have created a
new deity. Beelzebubba could be
called Lord oi the Retried Album.
So naming their fourth l.p after
him could bean ironic stabat their
own inadequacies but I doubt it.
It's not that "Beelzebubba" is
a bad album. It's just more oi the
same. The Milkmen, like 10,000
Maniacs, are a cool band with
some great songs. I just don't care
to listen 45 minutes of either band
in cme sitting.
Incidentally, the Milkmen are
a thrash-happy band live, and a
two-hour show goes b quicker
than beer through your bladder
The Maniacsusualh dragon unl
then do whateversii letl �
out currently.
The mam problem with the
new album could be lead s
Rodney Anonymous. His voici
was ingratiating tor the first two
albums, just grating on the last
two.
To his credit, he stretches a
little this time out. On cuts like
"RC's Mom he gets away from
the nasal growl that he's wal-
l �wed in for three records. And on
the next cut, "Stuart he starts
s rt amii th w rds like Lee
Vii � 1 to do.
� - � - lock
� -1 is as fun and Ich : j as I i
�' r hits Bit
; ill Dj ' thing AH
e tunes sound like
. - : � I : wavvay
� us - tl it � �. Ived into sub-
t ure si
krl never
n .u hesl amekind fc) nicism
or insight that the others did.
Musically, the new album is
better than ever. In some waysil s
a spht personality half the
songs are breaking new ground
and the other hall sound like they
see Mil KM! V page 15
Fraternities drawing fire, making changes
BRUNSWICK, N I.
14 newly pinned col-
frati rnity pledges, roused by
tlv members' spee hes and their
;t desire to belong, were led
� stairs into the darkened
imbda Chi Alpha basement and
vd up in front of the bar.
' n sent the lights, revealing
e final stage of the pinning
ht. I Lore sat 200 "kamikazes
�tent vodka concoction.
I hey drank.
fames Callahan of North Ber-
n drank until hedropped dead.
the 18-vear-old's alcohol
last winter at Rutgers Uni-
Irsity was one of a string of scan-
ls at fraternity houses around
�untrv that have brought
re pressure for reforms of the
feck -letter brotherhoods.
With their futures at stake,
iternities are responding.
Bars in many fraternity
fuses are being closed and ad-
visers are returning. And the
National Interfraternity Confer-
ence is considering a total ban on
pledging.
"It's not easy to change the
culture, but until we do I think
there are going to be very bad
days ahead for fraternities says
John Creed on, a Rutgers assistant
provost. Since Callahan's death,
Creedon has led the push for fra-
ternity reforms at Rutgers.
"Fraternities are under fire as
never before says Eileen Ste-
vens, a national anti-hazingactiv-
ist. Mrs. Stevens has traveled the
country since her son died 10
vears ago after drinking too much
during a hazing at Alfred Univer-
sity in upstate New York.
"Their very future is in
jeopardy Mrs. Stevens says. "I
think we'vecome to a point where
the people who supervise them
realize the problems are
enormous, and they're just not
sure what to do about it
The problems boil down to
two hard-dying traditions �
drinking and hazing.
Critics call fraternities an
anachronism.
"Fraternities have been en-
gaged, like the brontosaurus, in a
futile struggle against a changed
climate Earl Smith, dean at
Colby College, wrote last year in
the Chronicle oi Higher Educa-
tion. Fraternities have been
banned at Colbv since 1984, when
administrators decided they no
longer fit in at the college in Wa-
terville, Maine.
Fraternity leaders say the
scandals are relatively few, that
elitism charges are unfounded
and that the positives such as
friendship, leadership develop-
ment and community services far
outweigh any negatives.
But over the past two years,
defenders of the fraternity system
have winced at a series oi inci-
dents. In addtion to the Rutgers
death:
� Four members oi the
Univeristy of Alabama chapter oi
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the largest
national fraternity, were arrested
on charges oi selling cocaine.
I'hev were accused oi making
some oi the drug deals out of the
stately chapter house.
� At the University oi Lowell
in Massachusetts, six fraternity
members were charged under the
state's tough anti-hazing law over
a stunt that sent a pledge to the
hospital with a body temperature
of 109. The members had bundled
the victim in a sleeping bag and
turned on heaters nearby.
� A former University ot
Delaware student claimed in a
lawsuit that someone dumped
caustic oven cleaner over his head
during a fraternity "I lell Night
But nothing stirred an outcry
likeCallahan'sdeathatRutgers. It
inspired nearlyadozenbillsin the
Newjersy Legislature aiK. is cited
by fraternity critics nationally.
That probably had more
impact on ib than any other haz-
ing incident says lohnathan
Brant, director ot the National
Interfraternity Conference.
The reprisals against Lambda
Chi Alpha were switt and harsh
The Rutgers chapter was dis-
banded Ad the house doors
slammed shut
The 2K) other fraternities were
ordered to pull out theirbasement
bars, which had become standard
equipment at Rutgers fraternities,
and make other reforms.
It could have been worse.
In recent years, more than a
dozen colleges have banned.
Greek-letter organizations. Bo-
sides Colby University, fraterni-
ties are passe at Amherst College
and the University of Lowell, both
in Mass i and Frank n
and M ii ' all in Lancastt r Pa
At the Pennsylvania (
"the trustees felt the fraternities
had been reduced in many wavs
to underage drinking clubs savs
college spokesw man Patti
Lawson.
I he mounting pressure
against fraternities threatens
what has been a steadily rising
membership.
Undergraduate fraternity
membership has climbed to
400,000, according to the inter-
fraternity conference That's mere
than double the I970figuresanda
170,000 increase since l�v
Unlike the Greek system's
golden age of the lu?os, this hey-
day has come in a relatively unsu-
pcrvised environment, campus
administrators note. Gone are the
housemothers, strict rules and
other formalities that once charac-
See ACTIVISTS, page 15
J





I
1
I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1989
"Drug war" turns high-tech
CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas
(AP) � Flying wingtip-to-wing-
tip with suspected smugglers or
buzzing a boat to get a better look,
the air crews of the U.S. Customs
Service are on the front line in the
war on drugs.
Equipped with high-tech
radar that can spot a plane 200
milesaway, they roam the skicsat
20,000 feet or skim the waters of
the Gulf of Mexico.
They know the thrill of an
airborne chase.
"It seems like what we're
doing is an act of war says radar
detection specialist Steve
MacDonald as he scans the skies
on his radar screen.
Using five four-engine P3
Orions the size of airliners and
two smaller twin-engine E2C
Hawkeyes, the Customs Service
runs its surveillance detection
operations here at the Corpus
Christi Naval Air Station on the
Gulf of Mexico.
These crews have a tough job.
They are responsible for patrol-
ling the vast Gulf and the U.S
Mexican border from Texas to
California. Their equipment often
fails. They get little help from
countries south of the border.
The system of tethered radar
balloons that will someday re-
lieve much of their border cover-
age is behind schedule � only
four of a planned 17 are opera ting.
But they are excited about
their new $20 million P3 outfitted
by its builder, Lockheed, with an
airborne early warning (AEVV)
radar dome on top � similar to
that of an Air Force Airborne
Warning and Control plan
(AW ACS).
On this plane, radar opera tors
sit at two computer keyboards,
where they can track planes 200
miles away, assign color codes to
friendly and suspect aircraft, and
direct Customs planes on a chase.
A second dome plane is due in
April and Customs hopes for a
total of four.
Stanley Adams, a Customs
pilot and surveillance branch
supervisor, likened current detec-
tion coverage to hiding a pea in a
shell game.
"You keep moving the cover-
age around hoping to hit the
right place on the right night.
This is not first-class flying.
This is flying with erratic tem-
perature controls that can leave
you sweating, or can keep a soda
ice cold without a refrigerator.
This is flying on a roller
coaster, because during a chase,
the pilots have little time to find
"windows" through rough
weather.
This is flying in the three-seat
radar compartment of an E2C,
which is so narrow that a quarter
turn of a chair is all the room you
have. It is so noisy on the plane
built for aircraft carriers that spe-
cial earplugs are required.
Compared to the Hawkeye,
the P3 is a luxury, with a refrigera-
tor and a microwave oven.
On a recent winter'snight, the
P3 is patrolling over the Gulf of
Mexico when a call from a Cus-
toms intelligence agent in Hous-
ton sends the crew on a 200-mile
chase.
The pilots gun the four prop-
jet engines and the airspeed indi-
cator jumps from 240 knots to 360
knots.
As the plane bumps through
the clouds, two radar operators
search for their target on their
screens.
"Did they say his lights were
off?" one crew member asks an-
other on the radio.
"No self-respecting smuggler
would keep his lights on one of
the pilots responds.
The thrill of the chase, as
happens too often, evaporates
when the P3 arrives in the target
area. The suspect cannot be
found, perhaps because he had
already landed at a remote air-
strip.
Sometimes, though, the Cus-
toms fliers strike pay dirt.
"A couple of weeks ago we
chased a plane that landed on Cat
Island in the Bahamas savs ra-
dar operator Buck Benham. "The
drug plane had dumped its load
at the airport. We saw cars headed
for the airport to pick up the
drugs. We sent in a helicopter.
They rounded up the plane and
pilot. We kept circling 150 feet off
the ground trying to identify the
vehicles, and the smugglers were
running every which way
When looking for boats, Cus-
toms planes fly right over the top
of vessels and then circle them to
get an identification.
"I wonder what they think
down there says one crew
member as the four-engine plane
buzzes a fishing boat.
As the plane skims the Gulf
waters, the pilots have on their
laps a list of suspicious boats pro-
vided by Customs' intelligence
officers.
A fishing boat is spotted
heading for the Alacran Reef
about 80 miles from the Yucatan
Peninsula of Mexico. The reef has
a sheltered lagoon and sheds,
where Customs believes drugs
arc stored.
The plane circles several
times, and bingo � one of the
boats on the intelligence list is
spotted. The Coast Guard is noti-
fied and will send a cutter to see
whether there are drugs aboard.
Customs' chances of spotting
suspicious planes increase dra-
matically when the P3 radar dome
J
plane is flying.
Radar operator Edward
Smith locks onto a target by sim-
ply touching the monitor. He sees
the target's position, course,
speed and altitude.
As planes appear on the
screen as little squares, Smith
color-codes his displays: green for
friendly planes, yellow for un-
known aircraft and red for hostile.
Smugglers often try to evade
detection by flying in an unusual
air corridor at slow speed and low
altitude with no lights, small tail
numbers or with their numbers
painted over. There is no trans-
ponder signal.
If the radar plane wants an-
other Customs aircraft to tail a
suspect, the computer is pro-
grammed to give the chase plane
the right heading and speed.
The computer screen dis-
plays the angle needed for con-
vergence, and keeps changing the
speed, course and altitude the
Customs plane must maintain.
There are two computer screens
and each can handle three inter-
cepts simultaneously.
Little crosses on the screen
automatically plot a smuggler's
course, something that once was
computed manually bv an
operator.
In the future, Customs com-
mand centers thousands of miles
away will be able to transmit their
radar pictures to the flying plat-
form and have the P3 direct a
chase.
When the AEW is flying, the
four other P3s serve as long-range
tracking planes that can keep a
suspect on their radar for hun-
dreds of miles.
But over the United States,
the P3 will often call in a shorter-
range tracker, possibly a jet inter-
ceptor, and a Blackhawk helicop-
ter carrvine a team of officers who
can land quickly and make ar-
rests.
The job is not without danger.
Adams notes that the domed
aircraft can be spotted from apart-
ments that line the bay outside the
base. "People can sit there with
binoculars and can tell what time
we're leaving.
"We don't tell the tower
where we're going. We're maneu-
vering all the time. Wecontrol the
planning, go on short notice and
keep communications secure
Smith suspects that air traffic
controllers in Mexico "can moni-
torour search patterns and tip oii
smugglers
"Look in the bay he says.
"There are 30 or 40 shrimpers
working at night. All you need is
a high frequency radio to call
bases in Mexico. We give fake
return to base calls to flush these
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i
V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1989 13
Council rebuilds the Globe
LAKE LURE, N.C. (AP) �
supporters of the arts in Ruther-
ford County hope to add a new
t4urist attraction to the shores of
1 ike Lure in the next two years �
a historically detailed replica of
tQe Globe Theater where many of
Jiakespeare's plays debuted.
"1 think our chances of build-
ilig it are very good said Mat-
t iew McEnnernev, head of the
I utherford County Arts Council,
llrhich launched a fund-raising
ifcmpaign tor the $2.5 million
nroject earlier this month.
The replica would likely be
tfie historically accurate recrea-
tion since the Globe Theater was
destroyed in London in U44,
Supporters said.
"The fact of the project having
clme this far is quite remarkable
S&id McEnnerney, 46. 'The sort of
lavid and Goliath quality oi it �
ft's in a rural area with (the sup-
pvrO oi small organizations, and
� on � 1 think that might turn out
b be an asset in the end
McEnnernev said if all goes
well, construction on the lb- to20-
nded, 100-foot diameter Globe
Cbuld begin in July or August oi
this year, on the northwestern
itiore oi Lake Lure, near the
t�wn's community center.
The planned theater, which
would contain about 800 seats on
three tiers, should open by late
spring 1990 at the earliest or late
spring 1991 at the latest, said
McEnnerney � who sees the
project as a tribute to North
Carolina's role as a first colony, in
addition to the Globe itself.
Crews will also work on an
$11.4 million to SI 1.7 million park
featuring exhibits on North
Carolina's heritage, nature trails
and a parking area on the total
12.9-acre site. The park, says
McEnnerney, would be com-
pleted in segments and should
take five to seven years to finish.
McEnnerney got the idea fora
Globe replica from a book on the
famous theater by C. Walter
Hodges. Hodges, an expert on
Elizabethan drama and the Globe,
visited Lake Lure four or five
years ago at the request oi local
arts patrons.
It was Hodges who spotted
the land on the lake's north shore
and urged the Arts Council to
acquire it as the theater's site. The
land, owned bv the town of Lake
Lure, has been turned over to the
non-profit Globe Playhouse Inc
formed by the arts council.
If the project fails to get off the
ground within three years, own-
ership oi the 12.9-acre tract re-
verts to the town of Lake Lure.
Mayor L.C. Michelon said he
hopes that doesn't happen.
"1 think it would be great if
the project becomes a reality he
said. "It would be a Mecca for
those coming into the area as well
as a cultural center for the county.
1 see it as a real boon
Rutherford County has no
cultural center now, he said. Lake
Lure, which has no schools and
only a small library, would also
gain an educational center if the
Globe and associated park are
built.
North Carolina's two re-
gional Shakespeare companies �
the N.C. Shakespeare Festival in
1 ligh Point and the Charlotte
Shakespeare Company � have
expressed interest in the replica,
which would likely host some of
those troupe's performances.
McEnnernev said the arts
council wants to raise about
$800,000 (or its equivalent in
donated work or resources) be-
fore construction can begin. As
the project progresses, public and
private matching funds may be
available, he said, and could pay
up to half the project's total cost.
McEnnernev acknowledges
the project "isn't a sure thing but
remains committed to his dream
"Some people say, 'Why here
in rural North Carolina?' And oi
course we say, 'Why not?"
Hodges, in a telephone inter-
view with The Ashexnlle Citizen
from his Lewes, England, home
about 50 miles south of London,
feels the same way.
"Lake Lure, in many senses
. would appear to be off the map,
but it is the kind of place that can
make the map come to it Hodges
said. "It would certainly draw
very great attention, enormous
interest
The chances of the Lake Lure
Globe's construction are good,
I lodges said, if key backers dem-
onstrate faith in the project. He
said he looks forward to having
Shakespeares's laboratory rise
once again.
"Oh, I would be overjoyed �
I'd be over the moon Hodges
said.
READ
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Sanborn's "Sunday" succeeds
NEW YORK (AP) � David
inborn, probablv the world's
only professional alto saxophone
flayer hosting a TV variety show,
$�vs that even the sponsors seem
Surprised at the favorable ratings.
Since October, Sanborn has
Ifcen co-host of "Sunday Night a
weekly late-night musical variety
now on NBC affiliates. His co-
pst is fools Holland, keyboardist
the English pop band Squeeze,
ho once hosted an English TV
lusical variety show, "The
ijibe
"The ratings have been prettv
' oci Sanborn savs. "I think it
irprised everybody, the spon-
includcd. It's not exactly a
Pnderful time slot, 12:30 Sun-
iv nights
Sanborn, 43, had his first
md and cut the first of his dozen
:ordings in 1975. He played
ith the Chicago-Style Paul But-
rfield Blues Band for four years
irting in I9h7. He also toured
ith Stevie Wonder, Gil Evans,
Rolling Stones, David Bowie,
nes Taylor, Linda Ronstadt,
:kie Lee Jones, the Brecker
lothers and others.
He's been a semi-regular with
band on "Late Night with
ivid Letterman
The idea for the variety show,
says, "was presented to me as a
kiation where guest musicians
)uld sit in with a house band
it would be a pretty eclectic
Ix of musicians. That appealed
me.
"I thought it would be worth-
tile doing, to show people who
linanly wouldn't get to be on
nmercial TV, like Eddie Palmi-
David 'Fathead' Newman,
jttv Wright, Al Green, Marianne
lithfull, NRBQ, Sonny Rollins,
Slim Gail lard. If we can do some-
thing ot high quality on TV and
people like it, we've accom-
plished something
On "Sunday Night Sanborn
plays the saxophone every week.
He says, "On an ideal show, we
get somebody contemporary and
an artist who has been around a
longer time. Ivan Neville is a
young singer and Ruth Brown has
been around since the 1930s. That
would be a model show
The biggest problem with
"Sunday Night" so far, Sanborn
says, has been finding musicians
whose touring schedules permit
them to appear.
Another problem is the lack
of time for talk. "It's infuriating
Sanford says. You have 30 sec-
onds to do an in-depth interview
with a musician. There's no way
you can avoia sounding superfi-
cial
Sanborn's "The Jazz Show" is
syndicated, tor the third season,
to about 130 radio stations b
Westwood One Radio Network.
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1989
Will to Power mixes hits
(AP)� Bob Rosenberg shiv-
ers in the first cold weather he has
encountered since he was 13 and
his family moved from Philadel-
phia to Miami.
Sacrifices coexist with re-
wards in having a hit record.
Rosenberg has traveled to New
York's winter to b "tcrviewed
about Will to Power's op-dance
hit, "Free Baby a medley of Peter
Frampton's "Baby, I Love Your
Way" and Lynyrd Skynyrd's
"Free Bird The single, which
was No. 1 in December in both
Cashbox and Billboard best-
selling charts, is from the debut
LP "Will to Power on Epic.
First, Rosenberg is asked
about the group's militant-
sounding name, Will to Power. "I
read a lot of philosophy is
Rosenberg's surprising reply. "I
borrowed the name from Fricd-
nch Nietzsche. His sister put to-
gether a book, a collection of his
notes, The Will to Power
"Nietzsche said life is not just
the will to survive. It goes farther.
It's the will to master something,
have power over something. 1 like
his quote, 'A strong life masters its
environment
He adds: "I read different
philosophers. The thing 1 like
about Nietzsche is it seems like he
writes to the hermit. I'm pretty
much a loner
He was shy as a child, Rosen-
berg says, and still is, though he
has been able to remove the sun-
glasses behind which he formerly
hid.
Rosenberg, whose history
before Will to Power is longer
than the group's existence, like
making a melange of recordings
and sounds, which he could do
alone.
During his freshman year in
college in Tampa, Fla he was a
nightclub bouncer. He noticed
that the disc jockey wasn't in
physical danger and had the
chance to meet girls, so he set up a
mobile DJ companv, doing par-
ties, weddings and bar mitzvahs.
He says: "Being shy, I
couldn't get myself on the mike
announcing the bride. What 1 did,
I was a rapper, probably the first
in Horida, in 1980. People were
doing it in New York at the time
"I didn't do well in school. I
left. My parents weren't too
happy about that. 1 moved back to
Miami and started a company for
parties, age 8 through 80.1 always
got them dancing, no matter how
old thev were"
His mother, known as Gloria
Mann before she married, had a
hit record in 1955 singing the
Penguins' "Earth Angel It also
became a hit for the Crew Cuts.
A small Miami club, Big
Daddy's, hired Rosenberg as Dj.
He says: "They gave me Sunday
and Monday nights. 1 built up
those nights, over three years. I
longed to work at a big nightclub.
Looking back, I'm glad I didn't. At
a small place, I really had to work
to get people dancing. In a big
nightclub you can do about any-
thing and they'll dance
In 1982 he finished second in a
televised Forida D contest. No
job offers resulted. Rosenberg
recalls: "The positive thing is it
got me more invoved in mixing
separate songs together. I slowed
down doing parties and experi-
mented with creative multiple
edits for hours and hours
He started giving them free to
two Miami radio stations. "It was
getting my name out there. They
were getting requests for these
things
Then program director Bill
Tanner of WHQT, new in 1985,
hired him to mix dance, pop and
black music. Says Rosenberg,
"Within two months Bob Rosen-
berg 'hot mixes' were the attrac-
tion of the station. Ratings went
way up.
"I had compilation mixes. 1
started doing specialty mixes, a
Madonna mix of all her songs.
Bruce Springsteen, end-of-the-
year mixes. They were six or eight
songs in five minutes, sounding
like one long song. They became
the most sought-after items there,
from call-ins. I'd add sound ef-
fects, things from my answering
machine His Run D.M.C. mix
was the station's most popular cut
in 1986.
He made a rap record, "Mi-
ami Vice about the city's streets.
Pantcra Records got a ccasc-and-
desist order from the TV show
and had to stop selling it.
Rosenberg says: "One time I
heard a song, 'Drcamin in my
head. I put it on tape in about 20
minutes. 1 heard it so clearly 1
thought it was a previously re-
leased song.
"A week later 1 met Suzi Carr
in a nighclub Jellybean was spin-
ning records. She went there to
see him. I was just there. She intro-
duced herself, said she's a singer.
I said I wrote a song and am look-
ing for a singer. 1 played a cassette
for her. She wasn't impressed; it
sounded elementary to her. I told
her it's going to be a big hit
Carr finally sang "Drcamin
which became a 1987 single on
Thrust Records. She and saxo-
phonist Dr. J, her partner when
she sang in Miami nightclubs,
joined Rosenberg to become Will
to Power.
"The record took off Rosen-
berg says. "We couldn't press
enough. I was shrink-wrapping
them. It's lucky Epic came along
and saved me He left the radio
station.
Epic asked if Rosenberg had
other songs, for an LP. He said he
did, even though he didn't He
wrote "Say It's Gonna Rain sent
it as a sample and wrote six more
songs in a week. All are on the
album. Carr, who co-wrote two
s mgs on Miami Sound Machine's
"Primitive Love" album, and
W.B. Brown Jr. co-wrote "Show
Me the Way
Will to Power is looking for-
ward to a full-fledged tour.
Rosenberg has ideas for remixing
"Drcamin thinking it could be
hit again, and ideas for a follow-
up album.
The video for "Free Baby"
helped it, Rosenberg says. "I'm
critical of a lot of things. I'm
happy with the way the video
came out He says thai he and
Carr, who looks glamorous in the
video, "go together, off and on
The video was shot on Long
Island, N.Y. "Everything worked
out except we lost time when I
was stopped for not wearing a
motorcycle helmet. The van in
front of us had a camera. A cop
came next to me and forced me off
the read. He turned out to be a
nice guy. But he held on to my
license, which made me nervous
for the rest of the shoot.
"There was a police helicop-
ter overhead. The guys were film-
ing; we should have used that in
the video
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ax
Lawmakers suffer burn-out
after risitig to top of field
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) �
Young lawmakers usually arrive
in Raleigh fresh and eager, but
their energy level almost inevita-
bly dies off as they get to the point
that they can advance no further,
observers say.
In addition, they begin to feel
strained from the mounting pres-
sures of family, work and public
service.
'It becomes a question of
whether they can hang on and
make a living at the same time
said Walter De Vries, who heads
the N.C. Institute of Politics, a
school that aims to groom
younger people with widely var-
ied backgrounds for public serv-
ice.
Although the state pays its
legislators a part-time salary,
being a senator or representative
is virtually a full-time job. The
General Assembly's biennial long
session lasts at least six months.
And if the legislator serves on
study committees, he can find
himself traveling to Raleigh for
meetings several times a week.
'They're working in their
first full term probably 80 or 90
percent of the time in the Legisla-
ture, and probably 40 or 50 per-
cent of their second term De
Vries said.
"I had the energy to do it for
14 years, and I just ran out of en-
ergy said former Rep. Richard
Wright, D-Columbus. "If you had
tripled the salary and said, 'Here's
more money, but you're going to
have the same responsibilities in
Raleigh I still wouldn't have run
again. It just gets too stressful
Wright was 29 years old,
single and full of enthusiasm
when he first packed his suitcase
to go to Raleigh for a session of the
General Assembly.
Fourteen years later, after
climbing about as near as one can
get to the top of the state House's
power structure, Wright packed
his legislative career into boxes
and carted them home to Tabor
city. The Columbus County
Democrat had chosen not to seek
an eighth term.
Southeastern North Carolina
has sent a long string of young
men u Raleigh in the past 17
years, The Wilmington Morning
Star said. Among them: former
Reps. S. Thomas Rhodes of New
Hanover County, Tommy Harrel-
son and Tom Rabon of Brunswick
County and Ron Taylor of Bladen
County; former 9en� Julius A.
"Chip Wright of New Hanover
County; current Reps. Wright,
Harry Payne, D-New Hanover,
Alex Hall, D-New Hanover and E.
David Redwine, D-Brunswick;
and Sen. R.C. Soles, D-Columbus.
All were in their 20s or 30s
when first elected, and many
were single.
The most recent representa-
tives � most notably Payne,
Wright and Hall � have moved
dramatically in the power struc-
ture, gaining more stature with
each two-year term. Climbing
with them are other young legis-
lators from across the state.
In an annual survey of legisla-
tors' effectiveness, nine of the 20
most-effective House members
during the General Assembly's
1987 long session were younger
than 50. In the Senate, six of the
top 20 were younger than 50. The
median age in both chambers is
55.
"There is a level of leadership
that is moving fast forward said
William C. Rustin jr a lobbyist
for the N.C. Retail Merchants
Association. "That is the 36-to 45-
year-old group"
They are noted, Rustin said,
for their "fresh ideas, the energy
to make things happen, willing-
ness to make a commitment.
They are builders rather than
sustainers
Traditionally, legislntors
have won recognition for their
influence over the state budget.
The House and Senate's mosl
powerful members � House
Speaker Liston Ramsey; Rep.
Billy Watkins, D-Granville; and
Sen. Kenneth C. Royall Jr D-
Durham, all more than a decade
beyond the legislature's median
age � hold the purse strings at
budget time.
Most of the younger legisla-
tors play little or no role in the
budgeting process. Rather, they
are identified with a particular
legislative fight or an issue they
took to the forefront of the legisla-
tive agenda.
"There's always been a few
younger people who are willing
to take on the system, but there are
a few more of those now said
Hawk Johnson, a lobbyist for
cigarette manufacturer Philip
Morris Inc. " Ifs getting to be
more of a trend. Ifs trending
toward a trend
Wednesday, Jan. 26
9:00 - 1:00
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UU 1st prize for each
round
There will be four rounds in four weeks.
Entrants can sign up at the ELBO,
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$2.00 Guests
,
.
V
r- ,





V
ll-iLiiAsi CakOLiNian
JANUAKV 24. 19M 15

Activist groups pour pressure on frats
Continued from page 11
terized fraternity life.
But some college administra-
tions are starting to reintroduce
the supervision. It's met with re-
sistance from many fraternity
chapters, but some are starting to
respond.
Resident advisers have
moved into chapter houses on the
University of Southern
California's fraternity row. Fra-
ternities have gone completely
dry at Indiana University, home
to one of the strongest Greek sys-
tems in the country
The fraternities' national
magazines abound with denun-
ciations of alcohol abuse, sexism
and racism.
A recent edition of Alpha Tau
G�2? ,0,l0T8 a df"?ki"8 �TStS�r�SS
binee at two Dnvatp nri rlnKc � wir. cam
binge at two private social clubs
Fifteen Lambda Chi Alpha
members were charged with ag-
gravated hazing in Callahan's
Omega's publication chronicles death. They have yet to come to
that fraternity's efforts to halt a trial, but a conviction wouldcarry
national liquor promotion geared a maximum penalty of 18 months bodv was fnrroH
puses.
Joseph Disccnza, a lawyer for
Lambda Chi's board of trustees,
acknowledges there was "peer
pressure" for the pledges to drink.
But Discenza contends that no-
to male college students. in jail and a $7,500 fine.
The governing body of Zeta "I've had calls from all across
Beta Tau voted in September to mc country says James Meisel, a
end pledging, an idea being stud- Hackensack lawyer who is repre-
ied by the national Greek council, senting Callahan's mother.
Callahan's death came a few "Among the people I've talked to
days after more than 40 Princeton university people, crusader
students were treated for alcohol groups � there's a consensus that
He says Callahan's own reck-
less behavior was to blame for his
death, which an autopsy attrib-
uted to23ounccsofaIcoholanda
434 percent blood alcohol content
� more than four times the local
limit. b
"This one isolated incident
says nothing says Discenza, an
alumnus of the Rutgers Lambda
Chi Alpha chapter. "It says if
someone really wants to drink a
lot they can. It could have hap-
pened just as easily in my base-
ment
Michael Stcinbruck, a Delta
Phi member, is leading a fight
against the Rutgers
administration's latest proposal
for reform � a requirement that
each chapter have an adult, live-in
adviser.
Stcinbruck, 23, has a scrap-
book full of press clippings about
his chapter's work raising money
for New Brunswick homeless
shelters and other causes. He be-
lieves the university has ignored
the good works of fraternities and
acted in a reactionary fashion to
Callahan's death.
,t��. unwuiiiiy. � ����. ,w ���� o�r- wa.unxusuMiidt This one isolated inc
Student participates in scaring audiences
Continued from paee 11 tical jokes. "One morning a guy School is the most prominent possibility of more movie
Continued from page 11
times when I'd come in in the
morning half-asleep. You'd think
somebody was just staring at
you
Other props made good prac-
tical jokes. "One morning a guy
came in and I took one of the arms
from Henrietta (a ghoul from
"Evil Dead 2") that was ripped
off, and I stuck the hand in behind
t he door and scared the crap out of
him
promi
thing in Pisoni's future. He is
studying sculpture and finding
out more about traditional art. "I
want to broaden my horizons, "
he said.
But he doesn't rule out the
work.
He says he would like to go down
to Florida and investigate the
possibilities there. The new stu-
dios at Disney seem to be a good
place to continue his growing
career.
Milkmen's "Bad Party" has best message
Continued from page 11
came off "Big Lizard in Mv Back-
yard
"Smokin' Banana Peels" con-
tain some Donovan riffs that
surge into some of the hardest
thrash the Milkmen have ever
played. "Born to Love Volcanoes"
and "Everybody's Got Nice Stuff
But Me" are the same kind of
repetitious one-joke songs that
characterized their first album.
The best songs on "Beelzebubba"
have to be "Brat in the Frat and
"Bad Party
"Bad Party" is hilarious not
only for the mad organ notes
undercutting the chorus, but also
for a complete slam on the worst
band in the world. "God, I really
hate thismusicI can'tstand Gene
Loves Jezebel If there is a God in
heavenI'm sure that band will
burn in hell
that.
It's about time someone said
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GREENSBORO (AP) � For
years, when thecountyfairwasin
town, men flocked to the girlie
shows.
These days, fair managers are
trying to kill the carny, girlie-
show reputation. But it's easier
said than .lone.
Two dozen fair managers
gathered Friday in an upstairs
meeting room at the Holiday Inn-
Four Seasons to talk about clean-
ing up that image. They want to
make the fair a wholesome family
event that includesambling musi-
cians, mimes and magicians, and
involves local people in cheer-
leading contests, bake-offs, live-
stock shows.
But downstairs, among the
exhibits, an Ohio promotion firm
pushed its own brand of family
entertainment � an all-girl mud
wrestling show. "A real crowd
plcaser, a show for the entire
family said the letters under-
neath a picture of 15 leggy women
in tight, white tank tops and short
shorts.
That's not exactly what the
350 fair managers at the annual
convention of the N.C. Associa-
tion of Agricultural Fairs had in
mind for family entertainment.
Nowadays, that kind of show
is unsuccessful, they say.
t
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757-1543





1 HI EAST CAROl INIAN
Sports
ECU wins its first on Navy soil
Midshipmen rally but fall to Pirates
By MARK BARBER
V- n m 5porta I ditoi
respectively. Mote, a previously jumper and a 12 footer from the
redshirtcd freshman, continues to left baseline, following an initial
pla tearless, aggressive ball three pointer by Navy's o
against stronger opponents. Gottschalk.
ANNAPOLIS - The US Naval Going into the game, ECU After a baseline drive and
Academ pulled out some big coach Mike Steele pointed out basket by Kelly the Pirates vyere
guns Mondav night in order to that to win the ballgame, the Pi- ;�p 6-3. Gottschalk hit another
.i n . I- u ui i i j one shot, this time lust inside the
stop the Pirates ot Eait Carolina rates would have to plav solid , � . . . .
1,1 i � , , i three-point ranee anol Keuuw k
Universitv. But when the smoke defense, in both transition and , � . , . i
ui .i pi, k,i .i ii o . took an inside ob trom I avis to
tinallv cleared, the Pirates had protecting the post 1 he Pirates
indered a 70-63 victory from
the hosting Midshipmen. shipmen to onlv tour points otl
Using a whole team effort the fast break, each coming after q"�� six j
I'lv'lvvliMU.l l v � -l - i � iv vv
, , , vi, score, putting the Academy up 7-
did just that, holdme, the Mid s
, 6. K I then reeled oft another
w I
ith to
'avers in double tig- Naw steals in the first half.
uros ECU won their first game in the post. E( U allowed
ever at Naw, and came out ot only 10 points, but six of those
their two game road swing with a were late in the game alter the
I 1 : The Pirates lost to Pirates were pulled back outside
Ann rican University Saturday by tl hot touch of Navy guards
ECU ahead by 14 at the 12:40 Eric Harris and Bobby lones.
mark in the second hah after a fast Another key for the Pirates it
k : . ket by freshman Casey they were to win, according to
Mote suddenly found them- Steele, was for the team to get of I
selves ahead by only two points to a fast start, and that they did as
following a barrage of three-point Hill pepped in an eight-foot
.� ils four in all. by Navy.
Not to be denied the win the
Pirates got timely buckets from
r ird Blu Ed wards and clutch
thi - from left Kelly to in-
suh the victory. ECU is now 9-8
overall on the season. 3-3 in the
v olonial Athletic Association.
while Navy falls to 3-13 and 0-7.
GusHill started the late surge
: r the Pirates on an inside buck I
off a sharp pas from Kelly. After
a Midshipmen turnover, Ed-
wards drove inside ocr av s
- 6 I ddie Roddick to sere and
a is I �ulcd on the play. Edwards'
iritv shot tell through to put the
rates ahead 62-55.
ECU and Naw each scored
The most the Pirates could
pull ahead was by five, and the
Midshipmen fought back to catt h
ECUat20-20. From there, the lead
shifted from one team to the other,
with ECU closine out die halt
with the advantage.
With Na vahead 3 V30, Mod
went to the line v ith a one and
one opportunity and made good
on both attempts. Taking advan-
tage of steals from Reed 1 osc and
Kelly, 1 dwards sank two baskets
in the pamt, putting the Pirates up
by three, '��� 13. I he half ended
with Kelh putting in a layup on a
dish from Kenny Murj hy at the
buzzer, nd E( 1' w ent into the
intermission with a W S3 lead.
In each halt o( ; la 1 till got
the Pirates going carl Blue
closed out strong and the middles
wen sandw iched with stn ng all-
around play from Kelly and M '
EC! also c I ;tr ng ! I ei �
I ose and Stanle) I th oi
whose hands a used probl
Naval i I fense.
i CU n � . lo tks ahead t a
� ; ; ad mat nst l ival
I NC ilmingl ird iv The
match w ill be a halli i � � r the
: : � � isUN" K � .
to i �)� c hit k fn m a I
f ught 1 i ���- K6-S5. at I i i
American ' rsity in '�. i
tion Mi mdav nigl it

ic final tour mm-
i igl.i i ��
six ot I . I - poir ts c mir g
from Kelly at the free-throw line,
at the scoring tor the
me.
I dwards led all scorers in the
c imt ��� ith 21 points, tour Kcw
is season's average. Hill was
next tor the Pirates with 13, w
Kell and M te each had - as r
chs in the c imc with 12 ai 11
In I as! year's action against Navy ECLs
Hill fight for the ball against tl i
ear's game 90-88 but had trouh e M
Pirates (Photo by 1 1 Photo I ab).
ECU swimmers
drown Blue I)eils
� KRIS! I N M.M.BI RC
I .
I

The women take their mark as they await the sound of the shot signaling the beginning ot the ra c
t Photo b i im Povle).
Eades too tough for Pirates
By MARK BARBER
SDorta Wr'i In
nutcs out of the game after injuring his
"In the first half, we wen shooting hand on a drive inside,
horrible Steele said alter tin and.onh nuwrten � rre-ei ter-
game. "We played with no emo- ing the contest wa ll rthis
The theme coming from tion, we got hurt on the transition third persoi I al, which I id
-� ishington, D.C these days, �wewercasbadaswecouldbe Steele to take him out tor
. anks to new president George The Pirates controlled the remainder ot the half at the 9:23
Bush is There's a New Breeze opening tip-off, and immediately mark
American University went up 2-0 on a 10-foot jumper lvo quick baskets by center
I kthetl me into their Bender by Edwards. Eagle sophomore Ron Draper and a three-point goal
Arena Saturday night and Brock Wortman then went to by Wortman began the second
promptly breezed bv East work for AU, hitting three outside half for American, and the Eagli
lina's Pirates, walking awav shots, which allowed the Eagles to quickly built a 55-29 lead. The
:� is B2-68 victory, begin work on the inside. Wort- Pirates began to play with the
The Eagles took ad vantage of man made three from 16, 12, and intensity they had missed in
Pirate miscues in the first half, 21 feet, respectively, to send first half at that point.
33 percent shooting and American to their 124 lead.
. � �
ia
Kennv
back
siowiv U 1111
;ame. i irst, (.us 1 lill
made two layups to pull the
:� . Edwards'scant six minutes ECl struggled to get back in the
playing time, to jump out to an the game, but the closest they Murphy,
earlv lead. While ECU scored the '�� aid get would be five down, on into thi
� bucket of the game, the Al a rebound layup by Kennv
lad came back to re them- Murphy at the 11:40 mark in the rates to within 22. Eagle guard
selves, and before one could sav half. The Eagles, however, started Rodney Holmes hit a 12-foot
nauguration Weekend the getting the ball inside on the baseline jumper to put AU ahead
I �� s were staring at a 12-4defi- shorter Pirates, and went into the 59-35.
cit fr m which they never recov- intermission with a solid 39-23 Alter an E timeout.
eTQ(i. lead. Murphy sank two tree throw.
use ECU head coach Mike No help to Pirate efforts in the
Sto e's words, the Pirates were firsthalf was the absence of senior drove
. after the first five forward Blue Edwards, who came lead to 20 with 13 minutes to play.
then stole the ball from At an
m for a basket to c 'o �
ne
Murph tl � ki d tl
awav Hem �'�
arid Edward i
in. I � n i : -
. � ' ntinuedtocl the
: rica n lead, 1 t
i ild get w, 12, at 72h .vil
"22 : ' ning ccordinc I
St i Ic, tl it A-asn t g � d i ,h.
"Sure we cami ick I
but that's n tf( urorfi e,vvhi
w hat you rve I to do
be in I
"In the second half, wt laved ike
we have to play if we wa I vin
� , but th it's no g� m d hi
v aln �. out I the gan
Edwards, who nly
minutes in the const" I id I
Pirates in so �� ing w ith 22 ; ints,
wl ile ! lill had 15 and v
lu- ! I2 A merit an � as leadu
with21 pointsfroml � i i u I 12
frc;in Woi tman. I'he PiraU s wen
out-rebounded m the game 44-29.
St � le said he is i. n � i
about the lackluster performance
from his Pirates, pointing out t; it
See EAGLES, page 17


C Wed
; Villiai md M
. � . : m and dn
I � ng into conlei
ict ne loss alsi
� UNC VN edni � PI
it Dukel39-1 7
- w as a �- I vict r I i
is Head . -
.t This was the I
met I we ha e ever had.
But : lid not stoj
i s t a v ic ton I n rd
lee "1 Wkl R:
IRS sponsors events
ECU Women prevail-
break losing streak
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sr�i V r.trr
torw ard Sarah,rav lead the 1 ady
Pirates efforts with six points as
E U trailed 22-25 at the halt.
" In the second hah, senior
East Carolina's women'sbas- Ruard Pam Williams sparked
kctba � tm brok � two game ECU with back to back layups at
nc streak oi Saturday as it the 17:00 mark. Williams effort
ed the Lady 1'irates regain a
31-28 lead they they would hold
for the remainder of the game.
Past Carolina improved its
shooting m the second halt to 47
percent while the Lady Eagles
dropped to 17 percent.
freshman forward Tonya
I largrove scored fourteen points
�en minutesof'thegameVPCU in th sond hlf vi,g hcr a
onlv hit one layup and one career high 17 rx)ints for the game
freethrow while American only as ECU gradually pulled away
hit one layup. The score, with 'rom American and went on to
10 14 remaining before the halt, their secondAA win of the sea-
was 5-2, ECU.
ted its second conference win
of the season with a victory over
American University, 66-43, in
Mingi -l liseum.
The Lady Pirates, now 7-7 i I
the year and 2-3 in conference
plav, got off to a slow start against
the Lad) Eagles as they shot just
20 percent in the tirst halt. In the
son.
As the offense began produc-
Senior Gretta Savage scored
13 points for the Lady Pirates and
ing for both the LCL and Amen- .
" vv. i i u i u,r.c co pu ed down In rebounds. Har-
can, the lead changed hands se - h u' M
era! times in the first half. Junior See LADY PIRATES, page 18
� ltd met
� and Flo Jo ha
. ommon pic gold x
course! Now, t n ad I . 1
thin your j � ��
ECU Recreation il
I ! hursda. Fel
asFlTN'i S )l ' v �
n the a in M ,es G
in is t ims ot fault tafl
� � nt: te in a cari t
fitnessoriented ai ti iti sfi
; . bic c n la I
obstacle 11 �urse
Registration is an. ; ! in 2 I
Mi moi lal v ' " nasium and isfn i
: ehai go. - Opening ceremi nies
� � n al v pm with medal v
m rs receiv ing t shii ts and huj
gers tor their efforts
Int t a mural Rec Sei u es
ants Men of Steel ' for a
bulkbuilderscin uit training, las
called SI 1 ERC1RCUI 1 (Women
i Iron vv U omed as vell). Ev iv.
Monday and Wednesday from
i- 7:30 p m (his specialt) lass
challenges partic -pants with i
diovascular fitness and muscular
strength enduran c componei I
Individuals may register through
Ian 20 in Memorial G mnasium.
With the onset and onslought
o! ATC basketball action begin
ning in 1989, let us not forget the
men and women of Intramural
basketball who will slam, jam and
f( r
(Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photo Lab).

2 S '

5 Si jA
� �5
RE ��8i
v -nit��'
an2 ()n sitt regison IruiC$
tube Water Polo 315 pm
Nit-i






1
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 24, 1989 Page 16
ECU wins its first on Navy soil
Midshipmen rally but fall to Pirates
By MARK BARBER
Acting Asjt Sports Editor
redshirted freshman, continues to
play fearless, aggressive ball
� against stronger opponents.
ANNArOLIS � The U.S. Naval Going into the game, ECU
Academv pulled out some big coach Mike Steele pointed out
guns Mondav night in order to that to win the ballgame, the Ir-
respectively. Mote, a previously jumper and a 12-footcr from the Kelly, Edwards sank two baskets
stop the Pirates of East Carolina
University. But when the smoke
finallv cleared, the Pirates had
plundered a 70-63 victory from
the hosting Midshipmen.
Using a whole team effort
rates would have to play solid
defense, in both transition and
protecting the post. The Pirates
did just that, holding the Mid-
shipmen to only four points off
the fast break, each coming after
left baseline, following an initial
three-pointer by Navy's Joe
Gottschalk.
After a baseline drive and
basket by Kelly, the Pirates were
up 6-3. Gottschalk hit another
long shot, this time just inside the
three-point range, and Reddick
took an inside lob from Davis to
in the paint, putting the Pirates up
by three, 36-33. The half ended
with Kelly putting in a layup on a
dish from Kenny Murphy at the
buzzer, and ECU went into the
intermission with a 38-33 lead.
In each half of play, Hill got
the Pirates going early. Blue
closed out strong and the middles
with four players in double fig- Navy steals in the first half.
ures, ECU won their first game in the post, ECU allowed
ever at Navy, and came out of only 10 points, but six of those
their two game road swing with a were late in the game after the
1-1 split. The Pirates lost to Pirates were pulled back outside
score, putting the Academy up 7- were sandwiched with strong all-
6. ECU then reeled off another around play from Kelly and Mote,
quick six points to go up 12-7. ECU also got strong defense from
The most the Pirates could Lose and Stanley Love, both of
pull ahead was by five, and the whose hands caused problems for
Midshipmen fought back to catch the Naval offense.
American University Saturdav-
ECU, ahead by 14 at the 12:40
mark in the second half after a fast
break bucket by freshman Casey
Mote, suddenly found them-
by the hot touch of Navy guards
Eric Harris and Bobby Jones.
Another key for the Pirates if
they were to win, according to
Steele, was for the team to get off
ECU at 20-20. From there, the lead
shifted fromone team to thcothcr,
with ECU closing out the half
with the advantage.
With Navy ahead 33-30, Mote
went to the line with a one-and-
ECU now looks ahead to a
tough road matchup against rival
UNC-VVilmington Saturday. The
match will be a challenge for the
Pirates, as UNC-VV will be looking
to bounce back from a hard-
Hill
selves ahead by only two points to a fast start, and that they did as
following a barrage of three-point
goals, four in all, by Navy.
Not to be denied the win, the
Pirates got timely buckets from
forward Blue Edwards and clutch
free throws from Jeff Kelly to in-
sure the victory. ECU is now 9-8
overall on the season, 3-3 in the
Colonial Athletic Association,
while Navy falls to 3-13 and 0-7.
Gus Hill started the late surge
for the Pirates on an inside bucket
off a sharp pass from Kelly. After
a Midshipmen turnover, Ed-
wards drove inside over Navy's
6'6" Eddie Reddick to score and
was fouled on the play. Edwards'
charity shot fell through to put the
Pirates ahead 62-55.
ECU and Navy each scored
eight points in the final four min-
utes, six of ECU'S points coming
from Kelly at the free-throw line,
to close out the scoring for the
game.
Edwards led all scorers in the
game with 21 points, four below
his season's average. Hill was
next for the Pirates with 15, while
Kelly and Mote each had season
highs in the game with 12 and 10
one opportunity and made good fought loss, 86-85, at the hands of
on both attempts. Taking advan- American University in CAA ac-
popped in an eight-foot tageof steals from Reed Lose and tion Monday night.
In Last year's action against Navy, ECLs' Reed Lose ami (.us
Hill fight for the ball against their opponent. Navy won last
year's game 90-88 but had trouble Monday night against the
Pirates (Photo by ECU Photo Lab).
ECU swimmers
drown Blue Devils
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Fditor
The women take their mark as they awaiftne sound of the shot signaling the beginning of the race
(Photo by Tom Doyle).
Eagles too tough for Pirates
By MARK BARBER
Sport Writer
out of the game after injuring his Murphy then knocked the ball
from AU's Fred Tillman,
The theme coming from
Washington, D.C. these days,
thanks to new president George
Bush, is 'There's a New Breeze
minutes.
"In the first half, we were shooting hand on a drive inside,
horrible Steele said after the and, only moments after re-enter-
game. "We played with no emo- ing the contest, was called for this
tion, we got hurt on the transition third personal foul, which lead
�we were as bad as we could be Steele to take him out for the
The Pirates controlled the remainder of the half at the 9:23
away
and Edwards took the ball in for
the slam to make the score 59-41.
ECU continued to close on the
opening tip-off, and immediately mark.
Blowing American University went up 2-0 on a 10-foot jumper
took the theme into their Bender
Arena Saturday night and
promptly breezed by East
Carolina's Pirates, walking away
with an easy 82-68 victory.
The Eagles took advantage of
Pirate miscues in the first half,
namely, 33 percent shooting and
Blue Edwards' scant six minutes
of playing time, to jump out to an
earlv lead. While ECU scored the
first bucket of the game, the AU
squad came back to score them-
selves, and before one could say
"Inauguration Weekend the
Pirates were staring at a 12-4 defi-
cit, from which they never recov-
ered.
To use ECU head coach Mike
Steele's words, the Pirates were
out of the game after the first five
Ron Draper and a three-point goc
by Wortman began the second
half for American, and the Eagles
by Edwards. Eagle sophomore
Brock Wortman then went to
work for AU, hitting three outside
shots, which allowed the Eagles to quickly built a 55-29 lead. The
Pirates began to play with the
intensity they had missed in the
first half at that point
Dow
the aggressi
begin work on the inside. Wort-
man made three from 16,12, and
21 feet, respectively, to send
American to their 12-4 lead.
ECU struggled to get back in
the game, but the closest they Murphy, slowly climbed back
would get would be five down, on into the game. First, Gus Hill
a rebound layup by Kenny made two layups to pull the Pi-
Murphy at the 11:40 mark in the rates to within 22. Eagle guard
half. The Eagles, however, started Rodney Holmes hit a 12-foot
getting the ball inside on the baseline jumper to put AU ahead
shorter Pirates, and went into the
intermission with a solid 39-23
lead.
No help to Pirate efforts in the
first half was the absence of senior
forward Blue Edwards, who came
American lead, but he closest they
could get was 12, at 72-60 with
5:22 remaining. According to
Two quick baskets by center Steele, that wasn't good enough.
Draperanda three-point goal "Sure we came back to within 12,
but that's not four or live, which is
what you need to do if you want
be in the ballgame Steele said.
"In the second half, we played like
we have to play if we want to win
games, but that's no good when
nbv26,IECU, sparkedbv your already out of the game
�essive play of Kenny Edwards, who only played 23
minutes in the constest, lead the
Pirates in scoring with 22 points,
while Hill had 15 and Murphy
had 12. American was leading
with 21 points from Draper and 12
from Wortman. The Pirates were
out-rebounded in the game 44-29.
Steele said he is concerned
Alter a tough defeat on the
road by the UNC Tarheels Wed-
nesday, the ECU Swim and Dive
team traveled back home, re-
gained their pride and took to the
water to blow past the Blue Devils
oi Duke University Saturdav.
The win against the Blue
Devils finished out the regular
season schedule for the Pirates.
ECU swam its final two meets
against two Atlantic Coast Con-
ference teams. One of them, UNC,
happened to be the ACC champi-
ons in 1987-88.
The women, who beat Duke
140-97, are 8-2 going into the Co-
lonial Athletic Association Cham-
pionships in February. The only
losses came from UNC Wednes-
day- and from William and Mary
earlier in the season.
The men, who stand at 9-1,
hold the best winning percentage
ever bv an ECU swim and dive
program going into conference
action. Their one loss also came
from UNC Wednesday. The men
beat Duke 139-107.
"This was a good victory for
us Head Coach Rick Kobe said.
"We feel great. This was the finest
dual meet we have ever had
But ECU did not stop with
just a victory. Two records were
also broken and one tied a
Saturday's meet, all by womea
freshmen swimmers.
Page Holt created a nef
freshman record in the 200-yanJ
freestyle as she easily surpassed
Duke;s K. Thayer bv more than
two seconds when she touched
the wall in 1:55.78.
The 1000-yard freestyle saw a
new freshman record as well asj
varsity record by Chantal Morr.
No one came near to chaMcngu
her as she swam the 1000-vai
freestyle in 10-36.98, more than
seconds ahead of the pack.
Jenny Muench tied the E
freshman record in the 200-yai
individual medley - - ie edge
teammate Leslie jo Wilson by
more than a second when sift
swam a 2:13.42.
Commending the ECU vic-
tory even more was the tact th
the Pirates were not in the best
health prior to the meet again
Duke.
"We had swimmers iii
were sick and a couple didn9(
even swim and we just cked
up and swam hard, Kobe i �
plained. "It's always nice to be
someone in the ACC
The men had some fine pei
fonnancesas well.They swept tl
1000-yard freestyle with J.L
Lewis leading the pack in a time i.
9:41.37. Mark Cook claimed sel
See TANKERS, page 18
I
IRS sponsors events
59-35.
After
an ECU timeout,
Murphy sank two free throws, about the lackluster performance
then stole the ball from AU and from his Pirates, pointing out that
drove in for a basket to close the
lead to 20 with 13 minutes to play.
See EAGLES, page 17
ECU Women prevail
break losing streak
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
East Carolina's women's bas-
ketball team broke a two game
losing streak on Saturday as it
posted its second conference win
of the season with a victory over
American University, 66-43, in
Minges Coliseum.
The Lady Pirates, now 7-7 on
the year and 2-3 in conference
play, got off to a slow start against
the Lady Eagles as they shot just
20 percent in the first half. In the
first ten minutes of the game, ECU
only hit one layup and one
freethrow while American only
hit one layup. The score, with
10:14 remaining before the half,
was 5-2, ECU.
As the offense began produc-
ing for both the ECU and Ameri-
can, the lead changed hands sev-
eral times in the first half. Junior
forward Sarah Gray lead the Lady
Pirates efforts with six points as
ECU trailed 22-25 at the half.
In the second half, senior
guard Pam Williams sparked
ECU with back to back layups at
the 17:00 mark. Williams effort's
helped the Lady Pirates regain a
31-28 lead they they would hold
for the remainder of the game.
East Carolina improved its
shooting in the second half to 47
percent while the Lady Eagles
dropped to 17 percent.
Freshman forward Tonya
Hargrove scored fourteen points
in the second half, giving her a
career high 17 points for the game
as ECU gradually pulled away
from American and went on to
their second CAA win of the sea-
son.
Senior Gretta Savage scored
13 points for the Lady Pirates and
pulled down 15 rebounds. Har-
See LADY PIRATES, page 18
(IRS) � What do Janet Evans,
Greg Louganis and Flo Jo have in
common? Olympic gold, oX
course! Now, the road to gold is
within your grasp as well.
ECU Recreational Services
has designated Thursdav, Feb. 2
as FITNESS OLYMPIC DAY. Get
in on the action in Minges Coli-
seum as teams of faulty, staff and
students compete in a variety of
fitness oriented activities from the
stationary bicycle relay to the
obstacle course.
Registration is Jan. 30 in 204
Memorial Gymnasium and is free
of charge. Opening ceremonies
begin at 8 p.m. with medal win-
ners receiving t-shirts and hug-
gers for their efforts.
lntramural-Rcc Services
wants "Men of Steel" for a
bulkbuilders circuit training class
called SUPER CIRCUIT (Women
of Iron welcomed as well). Every
Monday and Wednesday from
6:30-7:30 p.m this specialty class
challenges participants with car-
diovascular fitness and muscular
strength endurance components.
Individuals may register through
Jan 20 in Memorial Gymnasium.
Don't miss the following I
With the onset and onslought Sport registration deadlines: G
of ACC basketball action begin- REC BOWLING Jan 24.5pm Biol
wham their way into the inirami
ral record books. Once again, re?
istration numbers are high as 101
men's and 15 women's teai
have signed up to participate.
And, as usual, the Intramura
Prognosticator IMA RECK wi
attempt to designate the top tivC
men's and women's competitor
for 1989. Hey, give lma a breakj:
The Bengals made it to the Su
Bowl!
Men
1. The Fellows
2. The Dream Team
3. Kappa Alpha
4. Sigma Phi Epsilon
5. Fried City Gang
Women
1. Pomili Power
2. Scrags
3. Delta Zeta
4. Our Perogative
5. Sigma Sigma Sigma
ECU's Mechelle Jones sets the ball up for a rirat
(Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photo Lab).
ning in 1989, let us not forget the
men and women of Intramural
basketball who will slam, jam and
ogy 103; NIKE 3 point shoot-oi
Jan 25; On-site registration li
tube Water Polo Jan 31,5 pm Bio"
N102.





I
THE LAST CAROllMAN
AR 2 5 1989 17
Tar Heels win against the burdened Wolfpack - end win streak
(AP) � January has been a
month of mixed emotions for
North Carolina State and coach
Jim Valvano, and this weekend
only compounded the pressure.
The Wolfpack was on a 10-
game winning streak, the last six
Of which had come this month.
However, the team was playing
under the burden of allegations
that the school's basketball pro-
gram was corrupt. The charges
were revealed on the dust jacket
of a forthcoming book and were
published by a Raleigh newspa-
per two weeks ago.
N.C. State's streak ended in
Chapel Hill, where the Tar Heels
took a nerve-wracking 84-81 vic-
tory. During halftime of the na-
tionally televised game, a former
Wolfpack student manager told
NBC Sports that the public would
be "shocked and appalled" at the
allegations in the book, "Personal
Fouls
Then, with the game on the
line. Scott Williams took an in-
bounds pass, then passed it back
to the Wolfpack's Chucky Brown,
whose three-point shot to send
the game into overtime glanced
off the rim.
Williams' pass reminded
many oi the play that gave the Tar
1 leels the national championship
in 1982, when Georgetown's Fred
Brown passed the ball to North
Carolina's James Worthy in the
closing seconds to preserve the
62-61 victory.
"But the crudest blow oi all
was lotting their kid pass the- ball
to us N.C. State coach Jim Val-
vano said. "1 can see Dean (North
Carolina coach Smith) in tin
huddle right now saying Throw
in to Scott and then throw it right
to Brown
"I'm almost glad it didn't go
in Valvano said. "I don't think 1
could have taken another five
minutes
If Valvano was in pain, then
so was Smith. The Tar Heels were
leading 82-72 with 46 seconds left
before Brian Howard hit a pair of
three-point baskets, Chris Corchi-
ani hit a jumper and Avie Lester
had a free throw. North
Carolina's only response was two
free throws by Steve Bucknall
with 12 seconds remaining.
Smith found a moment to see
the humor in the closing seconds,
saying there was one thing that
disappointed him.
Brown didn't stop to thank
Scott for the pass Smith said.
North Carolina is 16-3 and
part of a three-way tie in the ACC
with a 3-1 record. N.C. State fell to
12-2 and also is 3-1 in the league,
as is Clcmson.
In other ACC action, Wake
Forest capped a dismal week for
Duke, handing the Blue Devils a
75-71 defeat, which was certain to
take the Blue Devils out of their
No. 1 position. Clemson stopped
Western Carolina 77-60 and on
Sunday, No. 2 Illinois defeated
Georgia Tech 102-93.
The Blue Devils took a 91-71
beating from No. 13 North Caro-
lina on Wednesday, but went to
Greensboro hoping to extend a
nine-game winning streak in the
series with the Demon Deacons.
Instead, Wake Forest ran up a 15-
point lead in the second half, then
needed freshman Derrick
McQueen's leadership and some
clutch free throw shooting to pull
off the upset.
Wake Forest climbed to 9-6
and 2-4 as McQueen scored a ca-
reer-high 20 points.
"As the ACC season goes
along, we're doing much better
McQueen said. "I'm understand-
ing my role a lot better. Things are
picking up, things are coming
along
McQueen picked up his
fourth foul with nine minutes left,
but he scored eight of his points
after that, helping to stave oii a
Duke comeback and leading the
Blue Devils to their second
straight loss.
Duke is 13-2 and 3-2.
The Blue Devils rallied to 68-
64 after two free thnnvs bv Greg
Koubek, but Wake Forest held oft
the second rally by hitting seven
oi nine free throws in the last
minute.
Danny Ferry went on a sec-
ond-half tear, scoring 14 straight
points at the start of the period
and 21 of his 29 in the half. Phil
Henderson had 17 for the Blue
Devils.
At Clemson, Elden Campbell
scored 19 points in 21 minutes to
lead the Tigers to their fifth
straight victory and a 12-3 record
At Champaign, 111 Kennv
Battle scored 2 points Sunday as
Illinois rallied to stake its claim to
the No. 1 spot in college basket-
ball.
The lllmi, down bv 45-31 a:
the half, outscored the Yellow
Jackets 21-10 in the second over-
time to stav unbeaten at 17-0, the
best start in the school's history.
INTRAMURAL RECREATION
FACILITY HOURS
MFMORIAL G MNASIUMGARRETT WEIGHT ROOM
Mon. & Wed. 12:00 noon-1:30 pmMonThurs. 3:00 pm- 9:00 pm
Friday 11:30 am-1:30 pmFri & Sun. 1:00 pm- 5:00 pm
Mon. & Tues. 4:00 pm- 9:00 pm
Wed & Thurs. 3:00 pm- 9:00 pm
Friday 3:00 pm- 7:00 pmMEMORIAL SWIMMING
Saturday 11:00 am-5:00 pmFOOL
Sunday 12:00 noon-5:00 pm
Mon- Fri 7:00 am- 8:00 am
MonFri. 12:00 noon-1:30 pm
MEMORIAL WEIGHT ROOMMon. &: Wed. 3:00 pm- 9:00 pm
Tues. & Thurs. 3:00 pm- 9:30 pm
Mon- Thurs. 10:00 am- 9:007:30 pm-9:00 pm
pmFriday 3:00 pm- 7:00 pm
Friday 10:00 am- 7:00 pmSaturday 11:00 am- 5:00 pm
Saturday 11:00 am-5:00 pmSunday 12:00 noon- 5:00 pm
Sunday 12:00 noon- 5:00 pm
MINGES WFIGHT ROOMMINGES SWIMMINC FOOL
MonThurs. 3:00 pm-S:45
pmMon. Wed.Fri. 7:30 pm-9:30 pm
Friday 3:00 pm- 6:45 pmTues. & Thurs. 6:00 pm- 8:00 pm
Sunday 12:00 noon-5:00 pmSunday 12:00 noon - 5:00 pm
Chi Chi wins big on one hole
LA QU1NTA, Calif. (AP) �
Chi Chi Rodriguez won only one
hole but earned $120,000 and Billy
Casper increased his winnings to
$80,000 Sunday with a playoff
victory over Arnold Palmer in the
Senior Skins Game.
Rodriguez, 53, who collected
$300,000 of the $360,000 purse at
the inaugural Senior Skins a year
ago, was blanked for all but one
hole in the 1989 renewal. But that
hole, the 16th, was worth
$120,000.
Eagles beat the ECU Pirates
Continued from page 16
"Right now, other teams are pull-
ing oii our guards in order to
double-team Blue, and we aren't
doing anything about it. We've
got to do something to draw some
attention awav from Blue, and
that means that our guards have
got to be able to score
ECU,8-8 overall and 2-3 in the
conference after the AU game,
prepares for a matchup this week
against conference foe UNC-W
on the road.

HThe East Carolinian and the Sports Section
wish Chris Siegel,
Assistant Sports Editor, j
la speedy recovery following recent surgery. I
We know it's living hell! Hang In There Chris!
F.Y.I . - 807c of all American's who
get appendicitis have to have their
V appendix removed. J
SEE THE
LATE, LATE SHOW
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MIDNIGHT
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kinko's
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Spring RUSH 89
RUSH WILL BE HELD AT
The Aycock Dorm
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Tuesday, Jan. 24th
Wednesday Jan. 25th
(Thursday, Jan. 26th,
By Invitation Only)
For Further Info Call
830-3802 or 830-6682
Tuesday. Jan. 24
Meet the Girls of Alpha Omicron Pi
Wednesday. Jan. 25
Meet the Girls of Alpha Zeta Delta
Thursday. Jan. 26
Meet the brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon
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Join Sigma Alpha Epsilon and
make a Difference
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t

18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24,1989
ECU tankers beat Duke
Continued from page lb
ond place when he swam in at
10:02.09 and George Walters
settled for the third place spot in
10:04.82.
Walters was again one oi the
top three, this time on the top in
the 200-yard backstroke as he
claimed first with his time oi
1:59.78. Tom Holsten was handed
second when he swam a 2:02.00.
Raymond Kennedy re-
mained victorousin the 200-yard
breaststroke when he swam in at
2:12.00. ohn Springer claimed
third in 2:15.74. right behind
Duke's C. Roy who came in at
2:12 40.
Wednesday was a long day
for the Pirates, for both the men
and the women, as the fully-
funded UNC team easily swam
past the non-revenue swim pro-
gram of ECU.
"We swam good Kobe said,
"They're just a better team than
we are
!t was not onlv the loss that
hurt ECU, but UNC's 149-89 vic-
tory made the hopes for the ECU
men to break their longest win-
ning streak record disappear. The
men were 8-0 prior to the contest
and one more win would have
shattered the record for the long-
est winning streak in ECU swim-
ming history. The Pirates will
have to wait until next year as the
men remain tied with the old rec-
ord of eight wins in a row.
The women fared no better as
their losses were increased to two
as a result of Wednesdav's action
in Chapel Hill when Carolina
won 134-96.
The upcoming CAA action
looks hopeful for the Pirate swim-
mers according to Coach Kobe.
The men's only competition will
come from Navy has the edge
though according to Kobe asthey
won the CAA championship in
the 1987-88 season.
The women, according to
Kobe, might have a tougher time
as, again, Navy has more of an
edge on the Lady Pirate swim-
iruTs.
Forty-niner's labeled the80's team
MIAMI (AP) - - Ten years oi
dealing with deadlines, pushing
aside pressure and certifying
their greatness had prepared the
San Francisco 49ers for this. In the
best of all Super Bowl finishes,
thev claimed the 1980 as their
decade.
Thev had Joe Montana and
Jerrv Rice and Roger Craig, the
usual stars, and John Taylor, an
unexpected hero. They had the
poise, resourcef nine sand guts to
stare down defeat, urive 92 yards
in less than three minutes and
snatch Sunday's NFL champion-
ship from the Cincinnati Bengals,
20-16.
Ultimately, thev had earned
the label 'Team of the Decade
with their third Super Bowl
crown of the '80s.
"We battled through great
odds tonight to win the game
said Bill Walsh, who hedged after
the game on whether he would
retire as 49ers coach. "It's acul mi-
nation of years of hard work and a
quarterback who ib one oi the
greatest of all time
Montana and Rice who was
named Most Valuable Player with
11 catches for a record 215 yards,
engineered the magnificent
march. Tavlor culminated it with
his only reception, a 10-yarder tor
the winning touchdown with 34
seconds left.
Montana completed eight of
: ine passes on the drive through a
Bengals defense that had not
folded down the stretch of any
game this season.
"It's got to be one of our best
aid Montana, who added yet
another jewel to his sparkling 10-
vear career. In that span, Montana
has led the 49ers to three Super
Bowl victories in as many tries.
"In the situation in this typeof
game, being down by a field goal
and to come back and win it, that
way has got to rank right up
there
It docs. In 22 previous Super
Bowls, no team had staged such a
reversal in the dying moments.
The 49ers' turnaround Sunday
was as dramatic as they come.
And it provided a crushing
ending to Cincinatti's own turn-
around, in which the Bengals
went from 4-11 and racked by
dissension in 1987 to the best rec-
ord in the NFL and to 34 seconds
from their first Super Bowl cham-
lip.
"All oi us are devastated
defensive end Jason Buck
-aid We know it's possible we'll
never get another chance, never
get this close again
The Bengals were so close
that, after Jim Breech's third field
goal gave them a 16-13 lead, some
of them felt secure.
"I did feel like we had it won
corncrback Eric Thomas said,
"because of the way the defense
played all year. On the last drive
of every game, we would get them
out of there and make sure we
came out with a win.
"But Joe Montana showed
great leadership and Jerry Rice
asserted himself as a great, great
receiver
Taking over at their 8, the
49ers staged the most memorable
march the Super Bowl has seen.
Rice had catches of 7,17 and 27 to
set up the decisive touchdown.
But it was not Rice who
scored it.
"Who would you throw it
to?" said Taylor, who had
dropped the only pass sent his
way. "J.R. is the best in the game,
he was making all the big plays.
"But I wanted it. I dropped that
one. I messed up and I had to
make up for it
He did. Splitting the coverage
of Cincinnati's safeties in the end
zone, Taylor got free, Montana
spotted him and completed his
23rd pass in 36 attempts, finishing
with a record 357 yards.
"We were going to score a
KAPPA
ALPHA
touchdown even if we had to
throw Joe through the air 10 yards
to do it center Randy Cross said.
The final game of Cross' career
wasn't up to his normal level - his
poor snap forced Mike Cofer to
blow a 19-yard field goal, the
shortest miss in Super Bowl his-
torv.
Lady Pirates
Continued from page 16
grove was second in rebounding
with nine.
For the Lady Eagles, whose
record dropped to 3-13 on the
year and 1-4 in CAA play, Felicia
Young had 12 points and seven
rebounds in American's losing
effort.
East Carolina will take a
break until Saturday when CAA-
rival UNC-Wilmington comes to
town for the first meeting of the
1989 season. Last season, UNC-W
captured two victories over the
1.ad v Pirates. The first, a 75-56 win
at Mingesand then a 74-64 win at
Wilmington.
East Carolina holds the series
record over the Lady Seahawks 9-
5 and look to avenge last years
sweep by capturing their third
CAA victory.
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GRI I N 11 I 1

655MEMORIAL DRIVE
� llll UfU
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1989.
The Air Force has a special pro-
gram for 1989 BSNs If selected
you can enter active duty soon
after graduation�without waiting
for the results of your State Boards
"fo qualify, you must have an overall
2 75 GRA. After commissioning,
you'll attend a five-month intern-
ship at a major Air Force medical
facility Ifs an excellent way to pre-
pare for the wide range of experi-
ences you'll have serving your
country as an Air Force nurse of-
ficer. For more information, call
MSGT NICK NERO
919-850-9549
STATION-TO-STATION COLLECT
sr
Dear Rushee,
As you are contemplating rushing a fraternity this spring,
a number of doors will be opened to you. Here at Kappa Alpha,
we offer the door like no other.
As a rushee, you must choose the organization which you
wish to join. A fraternity of men with whom you will live for
the next four years, and whom you will call your brothers for
the rest of your life.
We believe that you will agree that, in fact, Kappa Alpha is
the most unique and traditional of any college fraternity. We
strive for both unity and selection.
Won't you come by and sample a bit of Southern Tradition?
Good Luck Rushees!
RUSH
7-11 PM
Tuesday
Jan. 24
w our
Southern Belles
THE BROTHERS OF GAMMA RHO
CHAPTER OF KAPPA ALPHA ORDER
Wednesday
Jan. 25
Come celebrat
Robert E. Lee's B-Day
Thursday
Jan. 26
By Invitation
For Rides & Info: Call 757-0128





1
(
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24.1989 19

San Francisco wins Super Bowl in last seconds
MIAMI (AP) � In the final
minutes of the Super Bowl, as the
"in Francisco 49ers drove me-
thodically down the field to the
-inning touchdown, they carved
i permanent niche for themselves
lin history.
This was not just the most
jdramatic drive in Super Bowl his-
tory, this was a drive that ex-
plained just who and what this
team is all about. This was a drive
that certified the 49ers as special.
There was a championship to
be decided on one drive. The chal-
lenge was there for Cincinnati.
Stop San Francisco now and win
the Super Bowl. The problem is, at
crunch time, it's awfully tough to
stop San Francisco.
Anybody who's watched Joe
Montana operate this offense,
anybody who's paid the least bit
of attention to the cool efficiency
of this team � not this season, but
this decade � knew the Bengals
were in trouble.
Certainly the 49ers knew it.
"I kept saying to myself, 'We
just have to be us" center Randy
Cross said. "You just know we're
going to win. Somehow, some
way, we find a way
There was a time this season
when the San Francisco 49ers
were 6-5, mediocre at best, were
traveling a road to nowhere. The
difference between them and
other teams drifting through that
kind of season is that they are the
49ers. They found a way to turn it
around.
That may be why Coach Bill
Walsh enjoyed this 20-16 victory
so much. He has won before. It
shouldn't be so special. But it is.
"Compared to the other two,
this will be remembered as one of
the greatest because we had to
come back at the end and win it in
the last seconds. This team has
great character. They just hung in
there
Faced with 92 yards to travel
and just over three minutes to do
it, the Niners simply set about the
task. There was no panic, no des-
peration, no frenzy. There was
cool professionalism � poise, the
players called it�the hallmark of
a team that now owns three Super
Bowl championships in this dec-
ade.
Earlier, the offense had
operated as if it were playing in
quicksand � and the way the sod
was coming up in the middle of
the field at joe Robbie Stadium,
they might as well have been.
But now the game was going
to be decided. Faced with pre-
cious few clicks on the clock and
that long expanse to cover, San
Francisco is the team and Joe
Montana is the quarterback you
want.
Blue Devils no longer No. 1
If Cleveland with Jim Brown
and Otto Graham owned football
in the '50s, and Vince Lombardi's
Green Bay Packers set the stan-
dard for the '60s; if Pittsburgh's
four Super Bowl championships
were the exclamation mark of the
70s, then the 49ers and Montana,
winners of three Super Bowls,
deserve to be called the 'Team of
the '80s
Those other teams were dy-
nasties, built around great players
who won and then won again. But
the NFL has moved into the era of
parity and Super Bowl teams
don't come back for encores that
quickly. All of which makes the
accomplishment of Montana
more remarkable.
The first time the 49ers won
the Super Bowl, he was throwing
to Dwight Clark and Freddie
Solomon. Seven years later, he's
throwing to John Taylor and Jerry
GREENSBORO (AP) � It
was fun while it lasted for top-
ranked Duke.
The Blue Devils were a pre-
season pick for No. 1 and stayed
there. Last week, their reign came
to a tumultuous halt. First, 13th-
ranked North Carolina raided
Durham and took a 91-71 victory.
Duke then went on the road and
Wake Forest pulled off a 75-71
upset.
"It's fun when people are
rating you number one and pat-
ting you on the back and telling
you how good you are. That's
superficial fun Krzyzewski
Said.
"Now, a lot of those same
people are saying 'you're over-
rated, you're not good he said.
"That's not fun, is it? What I think
we need to do is get back into the
middle, where we say 'What do
we think of ourselves?
Duke had run up 13 straight
victories, but they weren't all
thrillers to Krzyzewski. The Blue
Devils beat Wake Forest in De-
cember, but the 94-88 triumph
might have been a portent of
things to come, especially since it
was the narrowest victory margin
in the streak.
"Coach has tried to tell us all
year guard Quin Snyder said.
"It was like a time bomb waiting
to explode
Wake Forest set off another
explosion behind freshman Der-
rick McQueen, who scored 20
points and kept the Demon Dea-
cons going in the face of the Blue
Devils comeback.
"People were saying 'What
was wrong with Duke?
McQueen said in reference to the
December game. "I think we were
a big part of what was wrong with
Duke. I'm glad that it ended like
this this time
Since reaching its Atlantic
Coast Conference schedule, Duke
has found its domination difficult
to maintain. Its 55 percent field
goal accuracy falls off to 50 per-
cent in league contests, whereas
opponents are shooting 47 per-
cent in league games against 40
percent overall.
Duke is being outrebounded
by an average of 39-31 in the ACC,
including a 43-27 disparity in the
loss to North Carolina. Wake For-
Rice. The result is the same. They
still win championships.
"We did make it here with
three different teams and that
makes the accomplishment
unique Walsh said.
The constant, though, is
Montana. He takes the pieces of
the puzzle and puts mem to-
gether. He does whatever is nec-
essary to win.
He was not the MVP of this
Super Bowl. Eleven catches for
215 yards earned that award for
Jerry Rice, Montana's spindly
wide receiver with the legs of a
thoroughbred. Yet Montana was
the architect of this victory, the
man who made it all come to-
gether.
On the day after quarterbacks
Bob Griese and Terrv Bradshaw
were named finalists for the Hall
of Fame, the 49crs' passer as-
sembled some more arguments
for his eventual induction.
cst outrebounded Duke 41-34.
Also, both Duke and its oppo-
nents are hitting 70 percent of
their free throws in the ACC. In
the loss Saturday, Wake Forest hit
18 of 26 free throws for 69.2 per-
cent; Duke was 17 of 29 for 58.6
percent.
"Our free throw shooting
really hurt us today Krzyzewski
said. "You have to put points on
the board. We missed a lot of free
throws and thev hit theirs, and
that's to their credit
Danny Ferry has been the
offensive spark. He scored 14
straight points against the Demon
Deacons and 21 of his 29 points in
the second ha! at the 6-foot-10
Ferry has spei tnelast week with
the pain of a bad lower back.
"Danny usually can play 40
minutes and be bouncy. Now,
you can see that he gets tired
Krzyzewski said.
LUNCH SPECIAL
Savage honored
Greta Savage was named
Colonial Athletic Association
women's basketball player-of-
thc-week on Monday.
Savage helped the Lady Pi-
rates split a pair of conference
games against American Univer-
sity and George Mason Univer-
sity. She scored 30 points and
grabbed 24 rebounds in the two
contests.
Against American on Satur-
day, Savage scored 13 points and
had a career high 15 rebounds.
She scored 17 points and
pulled down nine boards against
the Lady Patriots of George Ma-
son.
On the week, Savage shot 67
percent from the field and 86 per-
cent from the free throw line.
Savage and the Lady Pirates
take to the court again on Satur-
day, Jan. 28, when they play host
to UNC-Wilmington.
MONSAT.
11 AM -3 PM
12-8 oz. Round
Sirloin
Potato Bar
Sundae Bar
$2.99
r
Daily Specials
10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student I.D.
Hot Bar and Salad Bar only
an additional $1.99 with a meal
FREE DESSERT BAR
1 with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
rr
J 2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
STUDENT UNION FORUM
COMMITTEE SURVEY
Please take a few minutes to answer the following questions
concerning the Student Union Forum Committee. The results of this
survey will he used in determining future lectures.
The Student Union Forum Committee provides lectures, debates, sym-
posiums, and other frelated programs that will interest, challenge, and
entertain the University Community. The committee is made up
primarily of STUDENTS using student activity FEES.
What topics would you be interested in seeing addressed
on campus?
Women's Issues Racism National PoliticsCrime Homeless Sex
State PoliticsAIDS
Foreign Relations Economy Child AbuseActors Sports Environment
Media Other release snecifvl

Please check your primary sources of information. Posters Around Campus Local Radio Public
East Carolinian Classified AdsAnnouncements
East Carolinian Advertise-Pieces of Eight Magazine
ments Daily ReflectorEntertainer TV Public Announcements
ECU Hotline (757-6004)
WZMB 91.3
Other (please specify)


Please name some speakers of interest to you.
For further information on this committee, please call Allen Manning,
Chairperson, at 757-6611, ezt. 210.
Please return this survey to the Information Desk at Mendenhall
I? Student Centc c or a Student KS�11?
Union Forum fl 5Sk I h
Committee Member. 3 aWlIJi
I HM ��III'
LEADERSHIP:
76
71
85
85
100
23
OF THE U.S. CONGRESS ARE GREEK
OF THOSE LISTED IN WHO'S WHO IN AMERICA
ARE GREEK
OF THOSE LISTED IN FORTUNE 500 ARE GREEK
OF ALL SUPREME COURT JUSTICES ARE GREEK
CHANCELLORS AND DEANS OF MAJOR COLLEGES
AND UNIVERSITIES ARE GREEK
U.S. PRESIDENTS ARE GREEK
SCHOLARSHIP:
BETTER G.P.A.
10 MORE GRADUATION
COMMUNITY SERVICE:
$7 MILLION TO CHARITY
850.000 HOURS TO VOLUNTEER COMMUNITY
SERVICE
KE
T,ET THE RECORD SPEAK FOR ITSELF
RUSH
803 HOOKER ROAD
756-7731
CALL FOR A RIDE





f V
20 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24,1989
THE E.C.U
INTERFRATERNITY
COUNCIL INVITES
YOU TO RUSH '89!
(Pi Kappa &&
SG3 Hooker Road
752-6927
nK0
Number of chapter Nationally: Over 120
Date and Place of Founding: December 10,1904
College of Charleston. SC
National Headquarters Location:
Charlotte, North Carolina
Fraternity Colors: Gold, White, Blue
Philanthropic Organization: PUSH
(Play Unites for the Severely Handicapped)
New House Ready For Spring Semester
What make this Fraternity Unique:
Strongest Alumni Association
Thi "Kappa Tau
DKT
409 Elizabeth St
757-1319
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place o founding: March 17,1906
Miami University
National Headquarters Location:
Oxford, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Havard Red and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization: Children's Heart Foundation
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Encourage Brothers to be involved in campus function.
(Pi Kappa Alpha nKA
Corner 5th k. Elizabeth 752773
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 150
Date and Place of Pounding: March 1,1868
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Memphis, Tennessee
Fraternity Colors: Garnet and Gold
Philanthropic Organization:
What make this Fraternity Unique:
Group effort in reaching goals
Sigma 'Tau Qamma ITT
508 W. 5th St. 757-0127
Number of Chapter Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: June 28,1920
Central Missouri State Teachers College
National Headquarters Location:
Wamnsburg, Missouri
Fraternity Colors: Blue and White
Philanthropic Organization:
Greenville Boys Club
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Academics, Individuality
Kappa Sigma KI
700E10thSt. 752-5543
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: December 10,1869
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Charlottesvlik, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Scarlet, White, Green
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Leadership
Lambda Chi Alpha A X A
Tues Jan. 24th
8-11 pm
Wed Jan 25th
8-11 pm
Thur Jan. 26th
8-11 pm
fratcnuttj ie . . .
To be in a ttatainity is not merely to be in a social
club Fraternities are a way of lite. We share ex
penses as well a; experiences, and we are responsi-
ble to each other tor cur own actions We live oft
campus, for the moat part, yet we are very active on
campus We enjo a good relationship with our
university's administration and, in the past few
decades, have become a major part of the univer-
sity's student life.
ffiill fraternities hurt tuy gnibca?
� No, there's every evidence that joining a fraternity
improves your chances 01 graduating.
� 33 of men on campus without fraternities will
graduate, and
� 47 of non-member on campuses with frater-
nities graduate, bnv
� 65 of all fraternity members graduate.
� Scholarship programs of fraternities produce
greater academic success, and better achievement
for you.
Social "JGife . .
It never can be said that fraternity people don't en-
toy a good social life Getting to know many different
people is only natural among such a close-knit
group One seems to fall into a wealth of oppor-
tunities for things to do with his spare time Events
such as Greek Week Is just an example of some of
the activities that fraternities plan during the year
c&fjfctks
Fraternity men enjoy an active athletic existence
Whether it be track meets, field events or in-
Wamurals. we enioy competing against one another
in one sport or another
SOD E Elizabeth St.
757-137
Number of Chapter Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: November 2,1909
Boston University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colon: Purple, Green, Gold
Philanthropic Organization: March of Dimes
What makes tills Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
Tau "Kappa "Lpsilon TKE
951E10l�.St 757-3042
Nu mber of Chapters Nationally: Over 350
Date and Place of Founding: January 10, 1899
IllinoUWesleyan University
National Hsadquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Cherry, Cray
Philanthropic Organization:
St hades Children Hospital
What masks this Fraternity Unique
Indrviduausm, Campus Involvement
Beta Theta "Pi B6n
P.O. Boa 7192
RUSH 1110-B Conunche St. 757-1840
Number of Chapters Nationaily Over i00
Date and Place of Founding: Augusts, 1839
Miami, Ohio
National Headquarter Location
Miami, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Pink and Blue
Philanthropic Organizstion
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Brother helping Brothers
Grnrral Fraternity Facts
a
All but two U.S. Presidents since 1825 have been fraternity men. Sixteen Vice-Presidents have been fraternity men.
� 63 of the U.S. President's Cabinet members since 1900 have been fraternity men.
� 71 of the Who's Who in America listees are fraternity members.
76 of the U.S. Senators &. Representatives are fraternity members.
� 85 (40 of 47) of the U.S. Supreme Court Justices since 1910 have been fraternity men.
85 of the Fortune 500 executives are fraternity members.
Of the nation's 50 largest corporations. 43 are headed by fraternity members.
Rush is open to all
Male College Students
Regardless of
Classification or G.P.A.
(Delta Sigma (Phi
AIO
510E.10tr.St.
757-0313
Number of Chapter Nationally Over 115
Dateand Place of Founds December 10. 1899
College of the City of New York
National Headquarters I ocation:
Indianapolis. Indiana
Fraterrity Color. Nile Green. White
Philanthropic Organization March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique
The Fraternity of Engineered leadership
Sigma (Phi "Epsilon
505 E. 5th St.
757-0487
Number of Chapter Nationally: Almost 300
Dateand Place of Founding: November 1, 1901
University of Richmond, Virginia
National Head quarters Location:
Richanoad, Virginia
Fratem ity Colors: Purple, Red
Philanthropic Organization: Heart Fund
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Diversity
Sigma Alpha "Epsilon 2 A E
402 E. 4th St.
758-5W
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding March 9. 1856
Univensty of Alabama
National Headquarters o j r
Evanston, Illinois
Htstonal: First Greek letter Fraternity founded in south
Only southern Fraternity founded before
Civil War that still exists
National policy against Hazing
Fraternity Colors Purple. Gold. White
What makes this Fraternity Unique.
Those given and accepting bids will be charter
members and part of the Alpha Pledge Class.
(Kappa Alpha
800 E. 11th St
rv,28
KA
Number of Chapter Nationally: Over 150
Date and Place of Founding Decerrfcer 21. 1865
Washington and Lee
National Headquarters location:
Lexington, VA
Fraternity Colors: Crimson and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
1st Fraternity on Campus
"Theta Chi
210Whichard
ex
830-0912
Number of Chapter Nationally: 155
Dateand Place of Founding: 1856
Norwich University, Norwich, Vermont
National Headquarters 1 ocation
Trenton, New Jersey
Fraternity Colors: Red and White
Philanthropic Organization: Ronald McDonald House
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Personal development and service to Alma-Mater
Alpha Sigma (Ph
i
AIt
422 W SthSt.
757-351
Number of Chapter Nationally: Over 50
Dateand Place of Founding December 6.1845
Yale University
National Headquarters Location:
Delaware, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Cardinal and Stone
Philanthropic Organization: American I -ung Association
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Individuality that comes together to form a ck-�e brotherhood
Sigma 9u
221 Mendenhall
IN
757-6824
Number of Chapter Nationally Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: January 1. 1864
Virginia Military Institute. Leainton. Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Lexington, Virginia
Fraternity Color. Black, Gold and White
Philanthropic Organization: Kidney Foundation
What make this Fraternity Unique:
Founded against hazing and First Social Fraternity on
campus to receive National Aihliation (source for the claim
is the February 13,1958, The East Carolinian)





Title
The East Carolinian, January 24, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 24, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.650
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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