The East Carolinian, January 19, 1989






EDITORIALSInside4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES 9
SPORTS1

Features
Philadanco dances up a storm.
See page 9.
Sports
Takes an indept look into lifes of basketball player
Sarah Gray and diver Sherry Campbell.
See page 15.
(She lEast (ftaroltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. h" No. I'
I hursdav January 19, 19S9
(Ireenville, NC
1H Pages
( irculation 12
Sciences ask for split from College of Arts
Bv llWlll HERRING
- lot tor signed bv the chair-
-It partments ot Biol-
Geolog and
at the fourbasic
- - be split from the College
Vrts arid Sciences and form a
karate College ot Sciences was
id to Vice-Chancellor William
Bloodworth in accordance
th the recent Strategic Plan-
concept ot a College ol
and Technoloev is also
bom. 1 in which the
four basic sciences would be
joined b the Department ol
Matl - and the Scl ol ol
molog to foi
f Science md . hnol
� S'v
Acvoi ling � Dr hai les ! .
id hairman ' I i � -
onal re og
nition that the vvoi ming
more I Vc thought the
n posal was timch with interna-
ls �� il trends and w ith the Strate-
gic Planning process instituted bj
Chancellor Eak i
n support ot this concept,
Bland wrote to 100 schools that
have units similar to theonebeing
proposed, having switched from
i ollege ol Arts and Sciences,
irom which he got back more than
U) letters, all but one ol which said
the respective schools function
much hot�or and got more accom-
hed as a separate college.
1 hey aro now able to do more
research, aro more successful at
obtaining grant funds, and have
more cooperation between de-
partments statod Bland.
" I he) only cautioned the
possibility ol narrow ing student's
education, but at EC! this is not
possible because ol the general
college requirements Some even
called a College of Arts and Sci
ences an 'anachronism' and
thought a college of our size had
so many fa( ult) and departments
that it would be difficult to man
age and give adequate represen-
tation to all departments
Dr. Bland added, "The liberal
arts college was based upon the
idoa of educating a renaissance
person and. except under certain
Program traveling to China
BjLOR1 MARTIN
siudy program in the . publicoi China will be
� igh ECU's Office ol
�nal Studios tor the 1989
S( 'ne'er.
.eprogram is being admini-
d1 - Wake forest Universitv
iiUiAtheSouth Atlantic states
,sSic� � r Asian and African
5 SAAS China �urs C ET) willas-a idemic program. s. n students from the � � . universities will be t take 1 credit hours at
a 1in Beijing. Their
- urses will deal with the lan-
guage a ntry.
In adiition to th i : n lal
ci urs s,tl itud � have the
opportunity to take part in un-
structured activities. This will
include trips tol sites in the
Boning aroa. attendance at cul-
tural events and an opportunity
to travel more widelv in China.
According to Stephanie
!iiv n
Ulti
a i
Stud ies current kn Ige ol
the Chines ot a
requirement to participate in the
program I Iowe cr
who have already taken
in Chinese will be allowed to
continue their studies at the ap
propriate level.
The faculty director, Profes-
sor E. Pendleton Batiks of the
Department of Anthropology at
Wake Forest, will accompany the
up and will teach one of the
required courses. The remainder
of the academics will be provided
! I
To be eligible for the Wake
; oresti SASASAAS Program in
ia students should have at
� a sophomore standing by the
inning of the fall semester and
have an interest in the language
and culture of China. A 3.0 G.P.A.
- pref rrcd but not required.
1 In approximate cost of the
SeeC HIN V, page 3
Fraternity to honor dead
Bv TIM HAMPTON
Sew s i i toi
robed fraternity
m ii h through ECU's
. - tonight, don't be
I they have no allegiance
. - upremacist group.
s Alpha Sigma Phi fra-
.�. ill be carrying out a
inti tt processional" to
� � r their brothers who have
i ording to Mike Bailey,
� ganizer. T1 irch by
rnity is part of e of the
� st rituals in the national
s history dating back to
arbed in black hooded
s the lantorn carrying frater-
� � brothers will be led by their
� -hail in a white robe. Begin-
c at MendenhalI Student Cen-
ter the brothers will proceed on
5tl Street b fore cuttin b ick to
the contra! i
Arriving in the mall, the
brothers will form theC I reek letter
Omeg i I . -v I zi that a
brother is an eternal brother.
"Even though the brotht rsarenol
with us, their spirit still remains
Bailey, the marshall, said.
Wl ile the hooded robes may
resemble outfits worn by some
white supremacist groups, the
fraternity has taken measures to
make suro the processional will
not be misconstrued. In a letter to
the editor printed in a Ian. 17 cdi
tion ol The East Carolinian, the
fraternity said "the ritual has no
racial overtones and it should not
be interpreted as any type of su-
premacist act
In another lettc to the editor.
Dr. l.arrv Smith, Assistant Vice
Chancellor for Student Life on
Minority Affairs, thanked the fra-
ternity for telling the campus
about the event before hand.
they (Alpha Sigma Phi) have
made every effort to inform the
East c arolina community, par-
ticularly the Black students and
stafl members that their activity is
not to be associated with any
supremacy organization.
rhe processional will mark
the first time this chapter of the
Alpha Sigma Phi has carried out
the ritual. Bailey said the event
will allow the fraternity members
to share in the ritualistic tradi-
tions ol the national fraternity.
Alpha Sigma Phi, originating
at Yale University, is the nation's
10th oldest fraternity.
circumstances, that kind if ed
tion isn't appropriate in today's
world
But I ft. Eugene E Ryan, dean
ol the College of Arts and Sci-
ences, disagrees.
rhe professional programs
aro important, but for EC
have a College of Arts and Sci-
ences shows that the universitv
gives priority to the study ol the
ba ic liberal arts. The liberal arts
give a well-rounded education
which is more exclusively profes
sional. Most people change i i

prr-t � pportu-
� ' i
in i -���
�� 'inuallv
-�� if it

��oral
:nan
�ird
� �
�tv ���
. that
A'OUlduni-� � � : t, but
SeeSPlIram' 3
Dressed in their processional robes, members of Alpha Sigma Phi prepare to honor brothers
who have died. (Photo by Mark Love- Photolab
A record 14,745 students enrolled for the fall semester at ECU make walking on Student Store
street sort of hectic in between classes. (Photo bv Mar Startari�Photolab)
Enrollment reaches 14,745
ECU has a record spring
semester enrollment of 14,745
students, the registrar's office
reported today The spring
semester began last week and
registration wasconcluded with a
drop-add period earlier this
week.
The registrar's office said
1989 enrollment was 670 students
above last year's spring enroll-
ment of 14,075. The all-time rec-
ord for a semester was sot last fall
at 15,583.
:
1 7�
mates ana
luate stu-
dents, undergraduates
comj � t of the
' ' llment at 12,150. with
A breakdown oi the spring 2,594 ite students making
enrollment showed 10,750 full- up 17.6 p the spring en-
timeundergraduatesand814full- rollment.
time graduates. There were 1,400
Affirmative Action equalizes
Bv GARY SANDERSON
Suft Wriirr
In 1964, the Civil Rights Act
outlawed discrimination on the
grounds of race, religion, sex,
national origin, handicap and
anything not related to job open-
ings in question.
In fact, ECU has taken one
additional step towards righting
decades oi past wrongs through
the affirmative action program on
campus. "In order to catch up for
100 years, if two people were
equally qualified for a job in ques-
tion, we would hire the minority
said Hr. Mary Ann Rose, Equal
Employment Opportunity Offi-
cer for ECU.
Rose said that before the Civil
Rights Act in 1964, "jobs were
more or less kept in the white
male family and that ECU's af-
firmative action program bal-
ances past unjust hiring practices.
ECU'S affirmative action plan
"establishes a series of goals for
women -nd minorities Rose
said. Guidelines are set up to hire
i ambers of minorities and
women roughly equivalent to the
population percentages of the
United States.
"We don't generally get the
percentages of applications of
blacks and women that we would
like she said. "That's why the
universitv has made a conscious
effort to advertise in minority
educational magazines She said
that a major reason why minority
applications are difficult to obtain
is because the decreasing number
of blacks going through doctorate
programs.
"We make sure we hold anv
job open for certain specified
time, to give everyone a chance
Rose said. "ECU is an affirmative
action employer. We put that in
all of our ads
Rose said that the university
currontlv has several programs
primarily for blacks, although
whites are not excluded. These
programs include the Minority
Presence Initiative (MPI).
Under this program, noted
black scholars would be brought
to ECU for a one or two day period
to teach, allow students to interact
with them and to see what ECU
has to offer. "We're trying to es-
tablish a network of black schol-
is in our hiring she
xllO
V pi gram imple
mented three oars ago In the
university is the Science Track
Enhancement Program (STEP)
This program allows groups of
minority high school students to
spend two weeks during the
summer in dormitories here on
campus in order to loam about
(ollege life
We pair the young rH"ople
with faculty scholars ' �ke
them under their w ma -e
them a little taste pi : all
about Rose sue frti aVrrs
attend seminars nightly and
spend eight hoars a day ir activi-
ties such as karate lessons and
horseback riding. "We bnng
them back for reunions and we try
to keep hold oi them she said.
"We have a good feeling
about STEP, its totally funded by
area corporations and businesses
and doesn't cost the kids a thing
she said. "It takes money to keep
kids in dorms, feed them, etc





Inside
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES 9
SPORTS15
Features
Philadanco dances up a storm.
See page 9.
'��1
Takes ail itidept look into lifes of basketball player
Sarah Gray and diver Sherry Campbell.
See page 15.
�he Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 43
Thursday January 19,1989
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Sciences ask for split from College of Arts
By DAVID HERRING
Staff Writer
A letter signed by the chair-
men of the departments of Biol-
ogy, Chemistry, Geology and
Physics, urging that the four basic
sciences be split from the College
of Arts and Sciences and form a
separate College of Sciences was
send to Vice-Chancellor William
A. Blood worth in accordance
with the recent Strategic Plan-
ning.
The concept of a College of
Science and Technology is also
being considered in which the
four basic sciences would be
joined by the Department of
Mathematics and the School of
Industrial Technology to form a
College of Science and Technol-
ogy
According to Dr. Charles E.
Bland, chairman of the Biology
Dept "There's a national recog-
nition that the world is becoming
more technical. We thought the
proposal was timely with interna-
tional trends and with the Strate-
gic Planning process instituted by
Chancellor Eakin
In support of this concept,
Bland wrote to 100 schools that
have units similar to the one being
proposed, having switched from
a College of Arts and Sciences,
from which he got back more than
30 letters, all but one of which said
the respective schools function
much better and got more accom-
plished as a separate college.
"They are now able to do more
research, are more successful at
obtaining grant funds, and have
more cooperation between de-
partments stated Bland.
"They only cautioned the
possibility of narrowing student's
education, but at ECU this is not
possible because of the general
college requirements. Some even
called a College of Arts and Sci-
ences an 'anachronism' and
thought a college of our size had
so many faculty and departments
that it would be difficult to man-
age and give adequate represen-
tation to all departments
Dr. Bland added, "The liberal
arts college was based upon the
idea of educating a renaissance
person and, except under certain
circumstances, that kind of educa-
tion isn't appropriate in today's
world
But Dr. Eugene E. Ryan, dean
of the College of Arts and Sci-
ences, disagrees.
'The professional programs
are important, but for ECU to
have a College of Arts and Sci-
ences shows that the university
gives priority to the study of the
basic liberal arts. The liberal arts
give a well-rounded education
which is more exclusively profes-
sional. Most people change ca-
reers 2 or 3 times and a broad base
prepares them for career opportu-
nities he said.
Ryan acknowledged, how-
ever, that we should continually
look at the ECU system to see if it
can be improved and that a deci-
sion will be made by the General
Administrationbased on a recom-
menda tion by Chancellor Richard
Eakin.
Vice Chancellor Bloodworm
stated, "If this is something that
would genuinely benefit the uni-
versity then we want to do it, but
See SPLIT, page 3
Program traveling to China
By LORI MARTIN
Staff Writer
A study program in the
Peoples Republic of China will be
offered through ECU'S Office of
International Studies for the 1989
fall semester.
The program is being admini-
stered by Wake Forest University
and the South Atlantic Slates-
Association for Asian and African
Studies (SASASAAS). China
Educational Tours (CET) will as-
sist with the academic program.
The chosen students from the
participating universities will be
required to take 16 credit hours at
a Chinese college in Beijing. Their
courses will deal with the lan-
guage and culture of the country.
In addition to their formal
courses, the students will have the
opportunity to take part in un-
structured activities. This will
include trips to historic sites in the
Beijing area, attendance at cul-
tural events and an opportunity
to travel more widely in China.
According to Stephanie
Evancho (Office of International
Studies), current knowledge of
the Chinese language is not a
requirement to participate in the
program. However, students
who have alreadv taken courses
in Chinese will be allowed to
continue their studies at the ap-
propriate level.
The faculty director, Profes-
sor E. Pendleton Banks of the
Department of Anthropology at
Wake Forest, will accompany the
group and will teach one of the
required courses. The remainder
of the academics will be provided
by CET.
To be eligible for the Wake
ForestSASASAAS Program in
China students should nave at
least a sophomore standing by the
beginning of the fall semester and
have an interest in the language
and culture of China. A 3.0 G.P. A.
is preferred but not required.
The approximate cost of the
See CHINA, page 3
Fraternity to honor dead
A record 14,745 students enrolled for the fall semester at ECU make walking on Student Store
street sort of hectic in between classes. (Photo by Mar Startari�Photolab)
By TIM HAMPTON
Ncwi Editor
When 50 robed fraternity
brothers march through ECU's
campus tonight, don't be
alarmed, they have no allegiance
to anv supremacist group.
ECU'S Alpha Sigma Phi fra-
ternity will be carrying out a
"black lantern processional" to
honor their brothers who have
died, according to Mike Bailey,
march organizer. The march by
the fraternity is part of one of the
oldest rituals in the national
fraternity's history dating back to
1845.
Garbed in black hooded
robes, the lantern carrying frater-
nity brothers will be led by their
marshall in a white robe. Begin-
ning at Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter the brothers will proceed on
5th Street before cutting back to
the central campus mall.
Arriving in the mall, the
brothers will form the Greek letter
Omega to symbolize that a
brother is an eternal brother.
"Even though the brothers are not
with us, their spirit still remains
Bailey, the marshall, said.
While the hooded robes may
resemble outfits worn by some
white supremacist groups, the
fraternity has taken measures to
make sure the processional will
not be misconstrued. In a letter to
the editor printed in a Jan. 17 edi-
tion of The East Carolinian, the
fraternity said "the ritual has no
racial overtones and it should not
be interpreted as any type of su-
premacist act
In another letter to the editor,
Dr. Larry Smith, Assistant Vice
Chancellor for Student Life on
Minority Affairs, thanked the fra-
ternity for telling the campus
about the event before hand.
'They (Alpha Sigma Phi) have
made every effort to inform the
East Carolina community, par-
ticularly the Black students and
staff members that their activity is
not to be associated with any
supremacy organization.
The processional will mark
the first time this chapter of the
Alpha Sigma Phi has carried out
the ritual. Bailey said the event
will allow the fraternity members
to share in the ritualistic tradi-
tions of the national fraternity.
Alpha Sigma Phi, originating
at Yale University, is the nation's
10th oldest fraternity.
Enrollment reaches 14,745
ECU New Bureau
ECU has a record spring
semester enrollment of 14,745
students, the registrar's office
reported today. The spring
semester began last week and
registration was concluded with a
drop-add period earlier this
week.
The registrar's office said
1989 enrollment was 670 students
above last year's spring enroll-
ment of 14,075. The all-time rec-
ord for a semester was set last fall
at 15,583.
A breakdown of the spring
enrollment showed 10,750 full-
time undergraduates and 814 full-
time graduates. There were 1,400
part-time undergraduates and
1,781 part-time graduate stu-
dents. Total undergraduates
comprised 82.4 percent of the
spring enrollment at 12,150, with
2,594 graduate students making
up 17.6 percent of the spring en-
rollment.
Affirmative Action equalizes
Dressed in their processional robes, members of Alpha Sigma Phi prepare to honor brothers
who have died. (Photo by Mark Love�Photolab)
Bv GARY SANDERSON
Staff Writer
In 1964, the Civil Rights Act
outlawed discrimination on the
grounds of race, religion, sex,
national origin, handicap and
anything not related to job open-
ings in question.
In fact, ECU has taken one
additional step towards righting
decades of past wrongs through
the affirmative action program on
campus. "In order to catch up for
100 years, if two people were
equally qualified for a job in ques-
tion, we would hire the minority
said Dr. Mary Ann Rose, Equal
Employment Opportunity Offi-
cer for ECU.
Rose said that before the Civil
Rights Act in 1964, "jobs were
more or less kept in the white
male family and that ECU's af-
firmative action program bal-
ances past unjust hiring practices.
ECU's affirmative action plan
"establishes a series of goals for
women and minorities Rose
said. Guidelines are set up to hire
lumbers of minorities and
women roughly equivalent to the
population percentages of the
United States.
"We don't generally get the
percentages of applications of
blacks and women that we would
like she said. "Thaf s why the
university has made a conscious
effort to advertise in minority
educational magazines She said
that a major reason why minority
applications are difficult to obtain
is because the decreasing number
of blacks going through doctorate
programs.
"We make sure we hold any
job open for certain specified
time, to give everyone a chance
Rose said. "ECU is an affirmative
action employer. We put that in
all of our ads
Rose said that the university
currently has several programs
primarily for blacks, although
whites are not excluded. These
programs include the Minority
Presence Initiative (MPI).
Under this program, noted
black scholars would be brought
to ECU for a one or two day period
to teach, allow students to interact
with them and to see what ECU
has to offer. "We're trying to es-
tablish a network of black schol-
ars to help us in our hiring she
said.
Another program imple-
mented three years ago by the
university is the Science Track
Enhancement Program (STEP).
This program allows groups of
minority high school students to
spend two weeks during the
summer in dormitories here on
campus in order to leam about
college life.
'We pair the young people
�ake
f.vive
��
with faculty scholars
them under their wing i
them a little taste of v.v. it s all
about Rose said. These students
attend seminars nightly and
spend eight hours a day in activi-
ties such as karate lessons and
horseback riding. "We bring
them back for reunions and we try
to keep hold of them she said.
"We have a good feeling
about STEP; if s totally funded by
area corporations and businesses
and doesn't cost the kids a thing
shesaid. "It takes money to keep
kids in dorms, feed them, etc"





i
I
' KSTCAROi INI N
NUAR W. lS)
Take the 'feeling good' test
l have been hearing a lot
about wellness and healthy life-
styles. How can I find vM.t hov
well 1 am and .i!1 improve my
level oi vvellne s
Manx people think ol well
ness as an �( used U rm that
� ins not being sick, rheconcept
ivellnes however is much
broadi i t is a sitive state of
ns emotional, physical
al em ironmental int�
tual spiritual and . up itional
'nor rt n du out i hai i ��
becoming il rl irl nd maximiz
ing vonr 1 I rtess vou
should u d ; land ichof our
present lifestvle habits are harm-
ful and which are beneficial.
By answering the questions
below you can txgin to find out
how healthv you are. Answer
each question with a "ves" or
no
Health Column
by
Mar Klesha Adams
re you a non-smoker?
I V you have your blood
?rcssure checked at least once a
veai
-Are you presently at
your ideal weight?
vou eat toods low in
tats and cholesterol and high in
fiber?
-Do you exercise vigor-
ously for 15-30 minutes at least 3
times a week?
-Do vou take time to relax
each day?
-Is your emotional life
stable?
-Do you know your alco-
hol drinking "limit"?
-Do you avoid illegal
drugs or medications not in-
tended for your use?
-Do you wear your seat-
belt while riding in a car?
-Do you enjoy work
school?
-Are vou satisfied with
your spiritual life?
li you answered all the ques-
tions with a "ves" vou have al-
ready achieved wellness. If you're
like most of us. certain areascould
stand a little improvement. There
.ire many campus resources that
.an help vou enhance these areas,
for example, the Student Health
Service, Counseling Center, Intra
mural-Recreational Services, and
Career Planning and Placement,
just to name a few. Each of these
department otter special pro
grams, activities, and resource
materials about wellness related
subjects. 1 lere's to your health!
It you have questions you
would like answered I'd like tr
hear from vou!
The East Carolinian
Scott Ma key
Richard Alan Cook
ECU Police seek machine thief
ECl
v ami
.
the tneti i
machine tn
Student Cei
The theft oc
tween II' ;
� i n M
nfonmation cor
�f a dolla
from tl
ng �
Model
and contained an undetermined
amount of currency and coins.
Anyone having anv informa- $1,000 could
nne is described as an ARDAC
8090 Serial Number
88 34 mches tall. 12 inches
wide. 11 inches deep, with a tlon concerning this theft or
brown simulated woodgrain location of this machine is asked
" J 'heword HANGEpnnted tocall Pirate Crime Busters at 757-
in large white letter, across the 6266 Qr pltt.Creonvi�e Cnnu.
Iront anvi has a brown
allers do not have to gi �
their names. A reward up to
e paid !� u vour in-
fames F.J. McKee, Director ol Advertising
Advertising Representatives
I Keith h ai
Adam Blai I
Ashle E Dalton
DISPLAY ADVI RT1SINC
Open Rate $4.95 local Open Rate
Hulk Rate (Contracts! Frequency K ontrad
100 l99col. inches ; I
200-299 col. inches i I '�
00 J99col. inches$4.30 10 Insertions
400 499col. inches $4 .
500-599 col. inches $4 II
600 and above$ � :
Classified Display
( )pen Rate :
COlor Advertising
One Color and black. i
Two Color and black $15
BUSINESS HOURS
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757 6366

t
ns ;

ills. �
Iront and has a brown ox grey stoppers at 758
housing, valued at $1895
-
Two ECU researchers win
recognition for study
v l �'V "
IARI ' : l'v. cogy, VS. history and
1 r searchers h ���. i v on id rec ignition 1 i theiroi algebra. The scores � students from low-income
id ofl �� ries a ere compared with
lentsal '� Imesn ' - from higher-income
� : ,r- a standard method oi
Kuth Bassschools" research, ac-
ath 1 � - ; pursuing a ist t - d gree at E 1 nd 1� . ng to Dr Mayer. She and Ms. Bass found that
m i S Mayer ol Ihe EIh groups achieved compa-mastery of the test subjects,
ived an ict i i an h ird from the . ss i itiorshe said. "The exciting results of this
� S - ision and imarch showed that, contrary to
����"many school settings, low-
tingincome students at Holmes are
cving a basic level of mastery
an parable to that of their middle-class peers Dr. Mayer
ipj r in association's- lid. She attributed the results of
national I ead-study to the presence oi sev-
specific indicators oi "ettec-
� " ng pi � 11 dealtscl ools as revealed bv a
ul � f student 1 im f the high school's teach-
g at the Edenton s using orth Carolina end-of-coursetesl �suits � measur tud nt mas-� "All factors� high expectations lor student achievement.
parent involvement, strong
school leadership and positive
school climate� ranked above Q0
percent she explained.
The research was undertaken
by Ms. Bass under Dr. Mayer's
supervision as part of the require-
ments for the graduate course in
educational administration.
Holmes High School, location of
the research field work, is the only
high school in the Edenton-
Chowan school system.
CLASS, FACULTY AND
STAFF PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will be taken from Jan. 23 through
Jan. 27. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
IT ISN'T YOUR YEARBOOK UNTIL
YOU'RE IN IT!
sF
DUEE
WORTH
GOLD
f
(
1
I
1
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CLASS RINGS
Tuesday, Jan. 17 - Friday, Jan. 20
From 9 am - 4 pm
at
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Wright Building
$20 deposit required
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I
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i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19,1989
Take the 'feeling good' test
I have been hearing a lot
about wellness and healthy life-
styles. How can I find out how
well 1 am and also improve my
level of wellness?
Many people think of well-
ness as an overused term that
means not being sick. The concept
of wellness, however, is much
broader. It is a positive state of
"feeling good" and includes six
dimensions: emotional, physical,
socialenvironmental, intellec-
tual, spiritual, and occupational.
In order to reduce your chances of
becoming ill or hurt and maximiz-
ing your level of wellness you
should understand which of your
present lifestvle habits are harm-
ful and which are beneficial.
By answering the questions
below you can begin to find out
how healthy you are. Answer
each question with a "yes" or
no.
Health Column
by
Mary Elesha Adams
-Are you a non-smoker?
-Do you have your blood
pressure checked at least once a
year?
-Are you presently at
your ideal weight?
-Do you eat foods low in
fats and cholesterol and high in
fiber?
-Do you exercise vigor-
ously for 15-30 minutes at least 3
times a week?
-Do you take time to relax
each day?
-Is your emotional life
stable?
-Do you know your alco-
hol drinking "limit"?
-Do you avoid illegal
drugs or medications not in-
tended for vour use?
J
-Do you wear your seat-
belt while riding in a car?
-Do you enjoy work
school?
-Are you satisfied with
your spiritual life?
If you answered all the ques-
tions with a "yes" you have al-
ready achieved wellness. If you're
like most of us, certain areas could
stand a little improvement. There
are many campus resources that
an help you enhance these areas,
for example, the Student Health
Service, Counseling Center, Intra-
mural-Recreational Services, and
Career Planning and Placement,
just to name a few. Each of these
departments offer special pro-
grams, activities, and resource
materials about wellness related
subjects. Here's to your health!
If you have questions you
would like answered I'd like tc
hear from you!
The East Carolinian
ECU Police seek machine thief
ECU Campus Police are
seeking information concerning
the theft of a dollar bill changer
machine from the Mcndcnhall
Student Center Bowling Alley.
The theft occurred sometime be-
tween 10:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 8th,
and 9 a.m. Monday, Jan9th, 1989.
The dollar bill changer ma-
chine is described as an ARDAC
Model 8090, Serial Number
090088, 34 inches tall, 12 inches
wide, 11 inches deep, with a
brown simulated woodgrain
front, the word CHANGE printed
in large white letters across the
front and has a brown or grey
metal housing, valued at $1895
and contained an undetermined
amount of currency and coins.
Anyone having any informa-
tion concerning this theft or the
location of this machine is asked
to call Pirate Crime Busters at 757-
6266 or Pitt-Greenville Crime
Stoppers at 758-7777
Callers do not have to give
their names. A reward up to
$1,000 could be paid for your in-
formation.
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Keith Pearce
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$495 Local Open Rate$4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 Insertions
200-299 col. inches$4.40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499col. inches$420
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$400
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 (1T-2T
Two Color and black$15500
(l225")$450
10 Insertions(4m$4.50
(1225-)$4.45
15 Insertions ll")$4,45
0225")$4.40
20 Insertions (4ll")$4 40
(12-25")$4.35
25 Inserttions T-in$435
$4.20
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
Two ECU researchers win
recognition for study
tCU Newt Bureau
CHARLOTTE� Two ECUe-
ducation researchers have won
statewide recognition for their
study of low - and middle-income
students at John A. Holmes High
School, Edenton.
Ruth Bass, a Holmes High
math teacher who is pursuing a
master's degree at ECU, and Dr.
Pamela S. Mayer of the ECU
School of Education faculty re-
ceived an "action research"
award from the N.C. Association
for Supervision and Curriculum
Development at the association's
annual meeting here Friday, Jan.
13. Ms. Bass was given a $300
student researcher prize, and an
article reporting on the research
will appear in the association's
journal, "N.C. Educational Lead-
ership
The winning project dealt
with outcomes of student learn-
ing at the Edenton school, using
North Carolina end-of-course test
results to measure student mas-
ten- in biology, U.S. history and
two levels of algebra. The scores
of students from low-income
families were compared with
classmates from higher-income
families, a standard method of
"effective schools" research, ac-
cording to Dr. Mayer.
She and Ms. Bass found that
both groups achieved compa-
rable mastery of the test subjects,
she said.
"The exciting results of this
research showed that, contrary to
far too many school settings, low-
income students at Holmes are
achieving a basic level of mastery
comparable to that of their
middle-class peers Dr. Mayer
said. She attributed the results of
the study to the presence of sev-
eral specific indicators of "effec-
tive schools as revealed by a
survey of the high school's teach-
ers.
"All factors� high expecta-
tions for student achievement,
parent involvement, strong
school leadership and positive
school climate� ranked above 90
percent she explained.
The research was undertaken
by Ms. Bass under Dr. Mayer's
supervision as part of the require-
ments for the graduate course in
educational administration.
Holmes High School, location of
the research field work, is the only
high school in the Edenton-
Chowan school system.
CULTY AND
ORTRAITS
1 be taken from Jan. 23 through
taken in the Soda Shop at the
112 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
ty to have your picture taken for
ccaneer Yearbook.
ARBOOK UNTIL
E IN IT!


& &
r

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if
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OLPRE
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You may choose either our Beef n Cheddar topped with tangy cheddar
cheese sauce on a fresh onion toll, or the Philly Beef 'n Swiss with
roasted peppers and onions, Swiss cheese and a fresh poppy seed bun.
Combined with crispy f rench fries and a soft drink, it's a meal with a
monev-saving difference!
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished traditional and
contemporary styles - each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
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CLASS RINGS
Tuesday, Jan. 17 - Friday, Jan. 20
From 9 am - 4 pm
at
The Student Store
Wright Building
$20 deposit required
rz

V





(
K
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19, 1989 3
Split of Science schools discussed
Continued from page 1
it would require some sense of
consensus Vet he cautioned that
the more we compartmentalize
one department from another, the
less interaction and dialogue be-
tween those fields of study,
which results in less cross fertili-
zation of ideas.
There is also the problem of
implementing the split between
the departments which would
affect the stature of the science
departments if such a split were
made. Presently the College oi
Arts and Sciences is the dominant
school on campus containing 19
departments and approximately
half of the university's faculty.
Such a change would affect
the science department's repre-
sentation in the faculty senate.
Presently the science depart-
ments are represented by five
senators, but under one school
they would have onlv three sena-
tors, seemingly making them
weaker in the senate.
Yet according to John C.
Atkeson, chairman of the faculty
senate, such a move might make
them stronger in that they would
Ix? speaking as one voice.
How do the other science
chairs feel about the proposed
separation? "1 favor the change
said Dr. Carl G. Adler, chairman
of the Physics department, "but I
see plusses and minuses in the
proposal
"The Physics Dept. has a
strong interest in applied physics
technology. The College of Arts
and Sciences may be too big. We
would feel more comfortable
within a smaller unit which
would facilitate cooperation and
shared research between the de-
partments
"The only obvious minus he
added, "is it would be a step away
from emphasis on a liberal arts
education. It'sagood idea, but not
such an overwhelmingly good
idea that there is no alternative
Dr. Chia-Yu Li, chairman of
the Chemistry Dept said he'd
like to see ECU become a research
institution with doctorate degrees
offered in the basic sciences. "I
have a lot of questions he said,
"but if reorganization will help us
achieve this goal sooner or more
efficiently then I'm for it. I think it
is ridiculous that the Medical
School is thriving and prosper-
ous, yet we remain only at the
masters degree level
According to Dr. Li, in order
to develop Eastern North Caro-
lina, which has a population of
more than one million people,
ECU needs to establish doctorate
programs in the basic sciences so
it can attract high caliber re-
searchers, students, and eventu-
ally industries to this area.
Dr. Scott W. Snyder, chair-
man of the Geology Dept added
that the basic sciences have differ-
ent needs than those of other
departments in the College of
Arts and Sciences. "By creating a
Col lege of Science we could crea te
an administrative arm of the uni-
versity that directly addresses
those needs he said.
Dr. Lawler receives award
GREENVIl A prestig-
ious international award for jour-
nal editing has been presented to
Dr. Donald Lawler. professor of
r
English at ECU.
Dr. Lawler received the Mod-
cm Language Association's 1988
Phoenix Award for his work as
editor of the "Victorian Institute
Journal More than 70 other liter-
ary journals were considered in
the awards competition, which
was based on editorial achieve-
ment of exellence over a period oi
years rather than on single issues
of the entry publications.
Prof. Michael I. Marcuse oi
the University 1 Man land, vice
president of the MLA's Confer-
ence of Editors oi Learned Jour-
nals, said the competition for this
year's awards was "unusually
heavy" but that the judges' task
was made casj ice the "Victo-
rian Institute ' mrnal" was the
"clear winner not or.lv for its
appealing design and overall
production quality" but also be-
cause of "the excellence of its edi-
torial direction" and its contribu-
tion to "advancing and defining
scholarship in the field of Victo-
rian literature and culture
VIJ won the 1987 Award of
Excellence from the N.C. chapter
GALLERIA FURNITURE SAVINGS
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China
GORDOKl'5
Continued from page 1
trip is $5,568. This will include
tuition, room, board, roundtrip
airfare and orientation. Students
may apply for Rivers'Scholarship
assistance to defray some of the
costs.
Applications ard hither in-
formation are available in the
Office of Internationa! Studies,
Room 1002 General Classroom
Building or by calling Stephanie
Evancho at 757-6769.
P
Golf and Ski Shop
264 Bypass i�t h, Grn�ui tv �na p� i�nC�
Whfn you -e ready tc lookski
equipment, come see trie pros
We ve shopped the world to
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Our ski experts can advise
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So before you hit the
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SEMI-ANNUAL
CLEARANCE
25 - 50
Coffman's Men's Wear is now offering substantial
savings of 25 to 50 on fashionable selections of
fall and winter merchandise for men. women and
boys An excellent opportunity to save on fine
clothing, furnishings sportsweat and outerwear all
from our regular stock of traditional fashions
o&mans
MENS WEAR
of the Victorian Society of Amer-
ica. The journal is sponsored by
the Victorians Institute, whose
current president is Prof. Beverly
Tavlor of UNC-Chapel Hill, and is
published under the auspices of
the ECU Department of English.
The journal's co-editors include
Dr. McKay Sundwall of ECU,
ADVERTISE
With
The East Carolinian!
Las Vegas.
Nevada
The Clark County
School District
projects 77 new
schools for the 90 s!
Growth opportunity
for new teachers.
Recruiters will be on
campus on Feb. 3,
1989.
Schedule an
intervciew and ob-
tain an application
at your Career
Planning and
Placement Office.
WANTED
MBODIES TO BUILD
JOIN
SUPER
CIRCUIT
For the "ULTIMATE" workout challenge
REGISTER THROUGH JANUARY
20th in 204 MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
or drop in!
The class will be held:
Each Monday and Wednesday
from 6:30-7:30pm
For more information call: 757-6387
Downtown Greenville
Carolina last Mall
Tarrvtoun Mall. Rocky Mount
STUDENT UNION FORUM
COMMITTEE SURVEY
Please take a few minutes to answer the following questions
concerning the Student Union Forum Committee. The results of this
survey will be used in determining future lectures.
The Student Union Forum Committee provides lectures, debates, sym-
posiums, and other frelated programs that will interest, challenge, and
entertain the University Community. The committee is made up
primarily of STUDENTS using student activity FEES.
What topics would you be interested in seeing addressed
on campus?
.Women's Issues
.Racism
.National Politics
.State Politics
.Foreign Relations
.Economy
.Child Abuse
Media
.Other (please specify)
Crime
.Homeless
Sex
.AIDS
.Actors
.Sports
Environment
Please check your primary sources of information.
.Posters Around Campus
East Carolinian Classified Ads
.East Carolinian Advertise-
ments
.Daily Reflector
ECU Hotline (757-6004)
WZMB 91.3
.Other (please specify)
.Local Radio Public
Announcements
.Pieces of Eight Magazine
.Entertainer
TV Public Announcements
Please name some speakers of interest to you.
For further information on this committee, please call Allen Manning,
Chairperson, at 757-6611, ezt. 210.
Please return this survey to the Information Desk at Mendenhall
Student Center or a Student
If Union Forum
II Committee Member.
- �





QUre iEaat (Earolintan
Pete Fernald, o�rM�-pr
Stephanie Folsom, m�j u�
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of AJverttsmg
Tim Hampton, mm &
KRISTEN HaLBERCs.e
Chip Carter, r.re ��,�
Dean Waters, oiiM-u
Debbie Stevens, s���ry
Brad Bannister,m
Jeff Parker, s� a-sfrw
Tom Furr, opomm Mqpr
Susan Howell, product� m
STEPI IANIE EMORY,A Ted, Supervisor
Mac Clark, BmasMmi
January 10, 1989
OPINION
Page 4
Congress
You get what you pay for
Each time there is the slightest
hint of a possibility that Congress
will get a pay raise, the masses
rumble unpleasantly. It seems the
public, unable to find anything
more important to complain about,
feels that Congress does not deserve
more money.
Mavbe so. But Congress will get
its pay raise, regardless of any oppo-
sition.
This assurance rests on four
facts. One: the public's memory is
notoriously short. By the time the
next election rolls around, the raise
will have been forgotten. Two: Bush,
alreadv in the doghouse with Con-
gress, is not likely to risk a confron-
tation so early in his presidency.
Three: no one individual will be
responsible for the raise, so the
public's disapproval will be unfo-
cused and therefore relatively
harmless. Four: it really is a good
idea.
Compared to the size of the fed-
eral budget, the amount of extra
money Congress would receive is
negligible. Even if combined with
the proposed raise for federal
judges, it would barely pay half the
cost of one Stealth bomber.
Though it appears at first glance
that congressmen make very good
money, the full picture is more
complicated. Most congressmen do
not live in Washington, D.C. full-
time. For several reasons � some
political, some personal � they
need two residences: one in Wash-
ington, D.C, and one in their respec-
tive home states.
In addition, Congress has no
pension plan. A few can make
money on the lecture circuit after
leaving Congress, but the vast ma-
jority of congressmen simply are not
good orators.
Taking into account such special
circumstances, a position in the
Senate or the House must be worth
approximately the same as other
jobs available to a person seeking
office. Too much more, and it at-
tracts the money-hungry; too much
less, and it attracts the power-hun-
gry-
But if the salary is competetive,
Congress stands a chance of attract-
ing citizens who have had experi-
ence in the private sector, who are
motivated neither by greed nor by
the promise of power, and who will
serve as better representatives of the
people. It's a worthwhile invest-
ment.
Reagan Era
Farewell or good riddance?
WAR IS PEACE: The Reagan
administration relied on petty, easy-
to-win conflicts in Central America
and elsewhere to divert attention
from pressing problems and to arti-
ficially pump up the economy. As is
its wont, the administration said
each conflict was necessary to en-
sure peace.
Even as the year 1984 recedes
into the past, George Orwell's 1984
edges closer. It is only fitting that the
eight years of the Reagan admini-
stration surround that date.
FREEDOM IS SLAVERY:
Though he failed to persuade Con-
gress to support his social agenda,
Reagan left his stamp on the Su-
preme Court and other federal
courts. Already, Reagan appointees
have chipped away at freedom of
speech (most notably in the infa-
mous student journalism case) and
IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH:
Reagan seemed to take this slogan
directly to heart. His administration
lied repeatedly to the public, but it
also took less direct measures. It did
everything within its considerable
power to dismantle the bureaucratic
apparatus which aided inquisitive
Americans in their quests to gain
access to government data. It limited
public access to public information
in the name of national security.
Freedom is a right that comes
with a responsibility: vigilance.
Reagan managed to put the country
to sleep for eight years. But a new
day is dawning, and it comes with a
thousand points of light. Awaken
and beware.
freedom from unreasonable search
and seizure (most notably by ruling
that police could search through a
citizen's garbage without a war-
rant).
Mr. Average - the
president we deserved
By ANDREW SULLIVAN
New Republic
My first impressions of Ronald Reagan � in
the cheery, waxy flesh � were formed at a Boston
election rally in October 1984. We were a select
group�young Republicans, old Republicans, the
press � but the homogeneity had its communal
charms. Someone handed me a paper stars and
stripes as we crammed inside the wire perimeter
in Government Center. A brass band played
badly; a helicopter watched from above; a strange,
ebulient old man made an unremarkable, uplift-
ing speech we had all heard somewhere before.
Unremarkable, that is, but for its unspontane-
ous climax. In what seemed at first like an unde-
served burst of candor, Reagan pledged to raise
our taxes. We cheered. A flurry of little stars
momentarily obscured his face. No doubt wan-
dered over the frosted faces around me. They
knew what he meant. And then he made his first
mistake: he corrected himself. The same momen-
tary look of fear that was to appear in the first
Reagan-Mondalc debate came over Reagan. The
crowd winced, temporarily embarassed that they
' neither expected nor cared that the president of
the United States should get such elementary
things right.
I felt powerfully on that occasion � and have
felt more clearly since � that Reaganism was
typified more by the patronizing of a president.
Reagan's failures, however unnerving to foreign-
ers, never seemed to threaten Americans. He was
too insignificant for that. The lapses were embar-
rassments rather than warnings � and amusing
rather than unsettling. Eventually the amusement
even stretched to the president himself: by the last
couple of years, he was making his own Reagan
jokes. But the essential atmosphere was a lack of
threat, a sense of attenuated unreality, which
Reagan's critics on the left correctly identified, but
incorrectly understood. This constant lack of
menace, this comfort with a president, was made
possible by a simple fact. He was Americans'
creature. They were not his. Paranoids may be-
lieve that this advertorial presidency was a con-
spiracy of the powerful against the powerless,
and, in a sense, they're right. But the powerful, in
this case, were the people. They manipulated their
president from their couches, with the flick of a
television remote control. He did what they
wanted him to do.
Critics of Reaganism have to come to terms
with this fact. Reagan's greatest political skill was
his obedience. Conservatives who puzzle over
why he failed to cash in his popularity chips for
real policy changes have simply gotten it the
wrong way round: Reagan produced the policies
for the popularity chips. When Americans wanted
him to cut taxes, he did so. When they wanted him
to stand up to the Soviets, he obliged. When they
hankered for detente, he offered them Geneva,
then Reykjavik, and finally Moscow. The only
crisis of his presidency came when he traded arms
with people Americans profoundly distrusted.
Even then, like a nervous, otherwise exemplary
employee caught engaged in creative accounting,
his instinct was to tell his bosses � and to believe
� that he hadn't done it.
On almost all the issues on which Americans
disagreed with him, Reagan caved. On social
conservatism � on abortion, women's rights, af-
firmative action � he yielded to popular edgi-
ness. Even acts of daring were by popular de-
mand: Grenada an attempt to push the polls up
after the Lebanon debacle; the Libva raid an attack
on an enemy no one could support. Only on
protectionism and Central America did Reagan
resist the ratings, and even then it was spirited
retreat. When real presidential conviction met
real congressional opposition and public indiffer-
ence (over the contras), Reagan's instinct was to
push the matter out of politics altogether � and
leave it to the devices of Poindexter and North.
The result of such an experiment in democ-
racy was as simple as it was predictable: banality
Reaganism carried all the virtues and failings of an
administration limited by democratic amnesia,
but sustained bv democratic prudence. The fitful
wisdom of the home audience ensured there were
no great disasters (and only one near miss,
Reykjavik). The economy performed better for
longer than expected. In foreign policv � the area
where democracies find it hardest to focus and
harder to act � Americans' sense that they
needed greater military strength proved to be the
right lever against late-Brezhnevism. For the rest,
Reagan lucked out. Thatcher, Kohl, and Mitter-
rand, the most anti-Soviet troika in postwar Eu-
rope, held the alliance together. The Soviet Union
imploded. Successes � South Korea, the Philip-
pines � hinged on lucky timing. But democratic
forgetfulness also led to the real, if resolvable,
deficit, precisely the kind of crunch a strong
leader would have avoided. Where foresight was
needed in foreign affairs � Cambodia, Haiti,
Nicaragua � Reagan revealed the limitations of
his masters. Only in Southwest Africa did mod-
eration bring off a minor triumph. Only in the
Gulf did political courage lead to a deserved stra-
tegic success.
To see the Reagan years as an experiment in
democratic normality is, of course, to miss the
obvious: Reagan's striking early ideology, and his
unique reliance on the media. But these two were
closely connected. Abstract ideological claims
translated into images: the case for deregulation
became "morning in America tax cuts were
defended with images of construction workers
and American flags; higher defense spending was
backed with softlens panoramas in Normandy.
The result, though, was that the arguments behind
the conservative revival were subtlv castrated.







I I 11. L.J J i lMULIiVlll
JA1NUAM i?, 170? J
Martin adminstration to go on budget diet
RALEIGH (AP)�North Caro-
lina must go on a budgetary diet
because of lean revenue growth,
Go v. Jim Martin said as he un-
veiled an austere spending pro-
gram for fiscal 1989-91 that would
give public schools most of the
$668 million available for perma-
nent spending increases.
"In a session facing a relatively
tight budget, it's even more im-
portant to keep schools at the top
of our priorities Martin told
the General Assembly Tuesday in
his State of the State address,
which highlighted the $22.7 bil-
lion spending plan.
Despite sluggish growth that
forced him to reject billions of dol-
lars in state agency requests for
new and expanded programs, the
governor said he would not seek a
tax increase for the portion of the
budget that funds programs not
involving transportation.
1 lowever, he promised to sup-
port the recommendations of a
legislative committece develop-
ing a package to finance a major
highway construction program. It
likely will include a motor fuel tax
increase and a bond issue.
He also supported increases in
university and communitv col-
lege tuition and in the cost of alco-
holic beverage sales licenses.
Martin proposed keeping im-
plementation of the Basic Educa-
tion Program on track but defer-
ring a pay raise for teachers and
state employees until April 1990.
He also requested more money
to case prison crowding, beef up
state law enforcement agencies,
cover premium increases in the
state employee health care plan,
improve environmental protec-
tion and services to the elderly,
and finance a variety of building
projects ranging form expansion
of the state zoo to a new State
Bureau of Investigation complex.
"Choices must be made the
governor said in his speech.
"Some may suggest that taxes be
increased. That might have to be
considered in the future if we find
a chronic slowdown in revenue
growth. But nobody forecasts that
grim a picture.
"So instead, I see one year in
which we will have to tighten our
belts to make room for some ur-
gent improvements, while defer-
ring others
In keeping with earlier projec-
tions, Martin said only $233 mil-
lion will be avatlah'r tor perma-
nent additions to the budget in
fiscal 1989-90. The amount should
increase to $435 million in 19�0-91
as tax collections improve, he
said.
"This creates an unusual situ-
ation of being able to budget more
generously for new programs in
the second vear of the biennium,
while having to hold to a stricter
diet in the first year he said.
In an announcement certain to
rankle state emploj ees and teach-
ers Martin said no money was
available to raise their silaries
until April 1990.
He proposed raises of 5.7 per-
cent for teachers and 4.5 percent
for other employees to take effect
at that time.
Martin left open the question of
whether all the pay increases
would be across-the-board. He
suggested that all state employees
receive a 3 percent cost-of-living
raise and that the remaining 1.5
percent go for restoration of merit
pay, which has been frozen since
1982.
The governor said some of the
money for higher teacher pay
could be used for increases under
the Career Ladder Plan, which
Martin wants to implement state-
wide beginning in 1991. But he
made no specific recommenda-
tion for dividing up the money,
saying the State Board of Educa-
tion wanted to have input.
If revenue collections increase
unexpectedly in corning months,
the pay raises could be started
earlier, Martin said. He held out
the possibility of using an antici-
pated capital gains tax windfall
resulting from the sale of RJR-
Nabisco for pay raises but said it
was too early to know how much
that transaction will yield.
Other steps could be taken to
raise money and move up the pay
raises, Martin said. Among them
are eliminating 1 percent of the
jobs in each department of state
government, which he has en-
dorsed, and various fee and li-
cense increases.
Martin's budget calls for tuition
increases at the state's communit)
colleges and within the Univer-
sity of North Carolina system. But
it does not specify the amounts.
Additionally, he requests an
increase in the cost oi licenses to
sell alcoholic beverages. Martin's
aides did not know how much the
increase would be but said it
would generate $1 million.
Martin proposed full funding ol
the fifth- and sixth-vear install-
Anthropologist to talk on human birth
ECU News Bureau
Anthropologist VVenda Tre-
vathan, a Greenville native and
professor at New Mexico State
University, will speak on "Hu-
man Birth: An Evolutionary Per-
spective" at East Carolina Thurs-
day Jan. 19.
The lecture, scheduled for 7
p.m. in Room 1028 of the General
Classroom Bidding, is free and
open to the public. Sponsoring the
event is the ECU chapter of Sigma
Xi honor society in scientific re-
search.
Dr. Trevathan is the author of
a recently published book on
human labor and childbirth in the
context of comparative mammal-
ian and primate births. She areues
that in all but a small percent of
cases retuiring medical interven-
tion, midwives, rather than physi-
cians should attend human fe-
males during childbirth.
Dr. Trevathan is the daughter
of Dr. Earl Trevathan, local pedia-
trician and member oi the ECU
medical shcool faculty.
ments of the Basic Education Pro
gram, and eight-year, $800 mil
lion blueprint for upgrading
school quality.
The governor had proposed a
one-year slowdown in BEP fund
ing but withdrew in the face of
stiff opposition from legislative
leaders.
Other education improvements
would double to 8(X) the number
of participants in a scholarship
program for prospective teachers
($1.8 million in 1989-90 and $3.6
million in 1990-91); strengthen
teacher education ($2.9 million
both years); expand summer for-
eign language institutes ($300,(X)0
both vears); and boost fundine of
dropout prevention programs.
Other highlights of Martin's
budget include:
- A $75 million reserve for eas-
ing prison crowding, including
prison construction and expan-
sion of programs that offer alter-
natives to imprisonment.
- $7.4 million to hire 100 new
highway patrol troopers and 40
State Bureau of Investigation
agents. Also, $20 million for a new
State Bureau of Investigation
complex in Raleigh.
- $93.5 million to offset cost in-
creases in the state employees'
health care program.
- $20.8 million to improve envi-
ronmental protection procrams
that would reduce the impact of
pesticides on gound water, com-
ply with air-quality standards,
establish a low-level radioactive
waste management facility, and
find a site for a hazardous- waste
facility.
- $14 million to improve serv-
ices for the elderly.
- $220 million for capital im-
provement projects including im-
provements of University of
North Carolina facilities ($47 mil
lion), completion of the North
American phase of the state zoo
($8.5 million), development of
state parks ($10 million), and a re-
serve fund for hazardous and
low-level radioactive waste proj-
ects ($16 million).
a birthday happier!
Local and Out of Town Newspapers
BALLOONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
CENTRAL BOOK
& NEWS
Green, itle Square Shopping C.nl.r � 756-7177
Open 'Til 9 30 P.M Sev.n Days A Wee
The
ECU INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL INVITES YOU TO
RUSH 89
Mon. January 23rd at Memorial Gym and at The Fraternity Locations
on:
Tuesday, January 24th
Wednesday, January 25th
Thursday, January 26th
JTraterrtttrj iie
To be in a fraternity is not merely lolmij social
club Fraternities are a way ot lite We snare e�
penses as well as eipenences. ana we are responsi
bie to each otner tor our own actions We ii.e tt
campus lot the most part, yet e are �er, actue on
campus We enjoy a good relationship with our
university s administration and in the past tew
decades have become a maior pan ol the umer
�My s student Me
Suruil Ulifc
It never can be said that traternity people don t en
joy a gouO social lite Getting to Know many ditlerent
people is only natural among such a close Knit
group One seems to tall Into a wealth ol oppo
lumties lor things to do with his spare time Events
uch as Greet WeeK is just an example ol some ol
the activities mat Irale'mties plan during the year
JBill frairrnities fjuri mji grufcrs?
� No. there a every evidence that loining a lrattrn.t
Improves your chancea ol graduating
� 33 ol men on campus without Iratemities will
graduate, and
� 47V. ol non membara on campuses with Itatei
nines graduate, but
� 65 ol all fraternity members graduate
� Scholarship programs ol Iratemities produce
greater academic success, and better achievement
lor you
Athletics
Fiatemit. men enOy an active athletic existence
rVneiher it be facK meets held events or in
ramuiais we e"Oy competing agamst oi"e another
n one sport or another
General Fraternity acts:
�All but two U.S. Presidents since 1825 have been fraternity men.
Sixteen Vice-Presidents have been fraternity men.
�63 of the U.S. Cabinet members since 1900 have been fraternity men.
�71 of the Who's Who in America listees are fraternity members.
�76 of the U.S. Senators & Representatives are fraternity members.
85 (40 of 47) of the U.S. Supreme court Justices since 1910 have been fraternity men.
�85 of the fortune 500 executives are fraternity members.
�Of the nation's 50 largest corporations, 43 are headed by fraternity members.
RUSH is open to all Male College Students Regardless of Classification or G.P.A.





V
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19,1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Immediately. Non-smoker To share 3
bedroom house Will have own bed-
room 175 00 per month plus 1 3 utili-
ties 5 minutes from school. Call
Pamela at 758-7142.
HOUSEMATE: Quite MF, wanted by
faculty member. 3 bedroom house,
newlv remodeled, walking distance to
campus Rent and lease negotiable.
Call 75: 3677.
2 BDRM. APT: For tent al E tbrook.
Take over lease until August 10 per
month call 752-3860.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTV. If vou are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available
for parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach.
Call 355 2781 and ask for Morgan
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
tvping and photocopying services. We
also sell software and computer disk-
ettes. 24 hours in and out Guaranteed
tvping on paper up to 20 hand written
pages. We repair computers and print-
ers also Lowest hourly rate in town.
SDF Professional Computer Services,
10b East 5th Street (beside Cubbies)
Greenville, NC 752-3694
NEED A D.J Hire the ELBO D.J. call
earlv and book for your formal or
party 758-1700, ask for Dillon or leave
a message.
HELP WANTED
ATTENTION � HIRING! Govern-
ment jobs � your area Many immedi-
ate openings without waiting list or
test. S17.S40 � S69.485. Call 1-602-838-
8885 EXT C5285.
WANTED. Bartenders Male or Fe-
male For more information call 746-
2319.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: In-
terested in making money part-time
photographing campus activities? No
experience necessary, we train. If you
are highly sociable, have a 35 mm
camera, and transportation, please call
between noon and 5 p.m M-F, at 1-
800-722-7033.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the held. No monetary
compensation, however room, utili-
btes and phone provided. Mary Smith
REAL Crisis Center 758-HELP.
ATTENDENTS NEEDED TO WORK
WITH ECU STUDENT: Pays $335
hr. Week-ends needed mostly. Contact
Chad Harris 758-9669.
NOW HIRING: Part-time sewing
operators at Prep-Shirt Manufacturing
1800 N. Greene Street Greenville, NC
27834. 758-3167.
CJ'S WANTS YOU: Every position
open. We are putting together the best
wait staff, cooks and prep personnel to
make CJ's the best restaurant team in
East Carolina. Call between 2 5pm. for
appointment M-F. Ask for Casey. 355-
3543.
PERSONALS
AKC REGISTERED GOLDEN RE
TRIEVER PUPPIES: 3 males priced at
$150 to $225. Call 746-2517.
JAN COPLEY: Congratulations on
your scholarhship! You deserve it! We
love you. Your sister!
TKE'S: We could not have had a better
New Year's Eve! The social was great
and we can't wait to do it again! Love,
Alpha Delta Pi.
PIKA'S: It's been a while but we sure
haven't forgotten that awesome night
at Kingston. Thanks for a super time!
We'll do it again! Love, Alpha Delta Pi
ALPHA DELTA PI: Congratulations
on your great soccer season YOU
DONE GOOD!
PI KAPPA PHI: The party was great,
the girls were good, we had a kick
time, doesn't everyone which thev
could. Rush Pi Kappa Phi, make the
difference. January 23rd-25th
BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA PHI: We
met at our house for the retreat, the
plans and goals we made were really
neat. Now lets put these plans in action
only then will we receive ultimate sat
isfacuon Pi Kappa Phi. Where things
are happening.
BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA PHI. From
the crowds at the Bio, to our new house
we did go. Over hill over dale, and
intersections Bish did wail. We all ar-
rived with can in hand, where is Barry
with his band? The little sisters burst in
led by Paige, everyone knew they were
ready to rage. The night soon came and
we all crashed. It wouldn't be long
before we again got smashed. Word!
DELTA SISTERS GET READY FOR
TONIGHT: The pledges are inviting
you to do it up right It's Thursday and
party is on our mind. When we dress
you up we'll try to be kind. We worked
we planned, and the time is near, and
we're gonna party with, "Guess who?"
to start off the new year. This poem is
written to get you through the day
because tomorrow's hang-overs are
gonna make you pay. Love the DZ
pledges.
MEN OF ECU: Sigma Phi Fpsilon in
vites vou to rush East Carolina's largest
fraternity We had some great guys last
semester and we're looking forward to
another big rush.
RUSH SIGMA PHI EPSILON. and
meet the brothers at Sig Ep, the girls of
Alpha Delta Pi, and the girls of Sigma
Sigma Sigma. The fraternity you pick
will be a lifetime experience so do it
right, rush Sig Ep.
AOPI'S:The countdown has begun.
Roseball is 17 davs away Grab a date
because this is one event you won't
want to miss.
AOPI'S OWN: Congratulations De-
lvnda Carter on your engagement. We
wish vou all the best I ove your sisters
and pledges of AOPi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL
THOSE DZ GIRLS: Who had a great
fall semester. Let's keep it up and have
an awesome spring semester.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DELTA ZETA: We would like to wish
everyone good luck on a successful
spring semester. 1 lave fun'
JAN. 27-29: Pika's come to ECU to
learn, to lead, to take the campus by
storm. Go Pikes!
HEY GREEKS: have you heard about
the party at Ratters?
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
GREEKS: Win $50 for your
group! All you have to do is
show up at Elbo by 7:00
Friday to Have a good time
$2 Teas, Free Pizza, & admission.
Friday afternoon at Elbo.
758-0080
11989 The L.A.Booker Band
12089 Channel Cats
12189 The Distance
12489 Face of Stone
(Medical Humanities)
12689 Swamp Gypsies
SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL
Bonus Diskettes
5 14" DSDD
$4.95
per box of 10
Verbatim Diskettes
5 14" DSDD
$7.95
per box of 10
SDF Professional
Computers, Inc.
106 East 5th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
752-3694
ABORTION
'Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
CaB for appointment Mon thru SaL Low
Cost I crmlnaUon to 20 wrrks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
OPPORTUNITY
Tri County Homes. Inc. is expanding it's sales force over all
of eastern North Carolina. If you are energetic, enthusiastic.
honest, and need an income of more than $25,000.00 a
yearHERE IS YOUR CHANCE
If you are looking for a company that offers benefits like life
insurance, disability insurance, as well as a retirement
program
CALL 1-800-672-4503
and ask for Karen Lambert. A scheduled
confidential interview will be arranged.
SALES
POSITION
AVAILABLE
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications
for an
Advertising Sales
Representative.
Requirements:
�Previous Sales Experience
�Good Personality &
Professional Appearance
�Excellent Communication
Skills
�Good Organizational Skills
�Must Be Dependable & Show
Initiative & Enthusiasm
�Must Have The Desire To
Excel
Apply in Person at The EasJ, Carolinian
Please lnciu&$W!m� 4
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please!
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Chnstian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
CQUJEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus
placements. Call 757-6979 or come by the
GCB, room 2028.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
r AMP! IS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with
problems that you find hard to overcome,
join us for the uncompromised word of
God Every Fri night at 7:00 in the Jenkins
Art Auditorium.
CO-OP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
1. IOC summer intern program in state
government. Majors: Political Science,
Journalism, Biology, Foreign Lang
Theatre Arts, School of Art, Ed Social
Work, Computer Science and others
interested in state govt. Dates: 6189-8
1189. Weeks: 10. Hoursweek: 40.
Positions: 30. Salary: $5hour. Housing:
Meredith College Location: Raleigh, N.C.
Deadline: 1 2789. Class Soph Jr Sr. 2)
NC state govt. (Discover the Real World)
internships. Majors: Various. Dates: 65
89-81189. Salary: Approx. $200week.
Location: N.C. Class Soph, year
complete GPA: 2.5 or greater. Hours
week: 40 Positions: 100. Deadline: 127
89. Weeks: 10. For more info, and
applications, contact Co-Op Ed. in 2028
GCB, 757-6979.
STUDY ABROAD
Applications are now being accepted for
study abroad placements under the
International Student Exchange Program
(1SEP). 1SEP is a world-wide network of
colleges and universities that provides for
exchanges of students on a one-for-one,
fully reciprocal basis. The cost of an ISEP-
sponsored study-abroad experience is,
except for travel costs, the same aa
attending ECU. If you have completed
one year of college-level study, have a
GPA. of at least 2.5, and yearn to
experience other people and places,
contact IMMEDIATELY Dr. R.J. Huraey,
Jr ISEP Coordinator, Austin 222, Office
Phone 757-6418, Home Phone 756-0682
CHTNFSF ACROBATS
The Student Union Minority Arts
Committee proudly presents The Chinese
Golden Ragon Acrobats and Magicians of
Taipei in performance on Thursday, Feb. 2
at 8 pjn. in Wright Auditorium. This
Company consists of 23 dancers,
magicians, and acrobats in colorful
costumes � half of whom are members of
the Danny Chang (Troupe Director)
family. This group has performed
extensively world wide. Tickets for this
event are now on sale in the Central Ticket
Office of Mendenhall Student Center,
(phone 757-6611, ext. 266). Office hours
are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. M-F.
PIRATE OF PENZANCE
The Performing Arts Series presents
"Pirates of Penzance" a Gilbert & Sullivan
Operetta on Mon, Jan. 30 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This production is
staged by the New York Gilbert &
Sullivan Players. They remain the
premiere production company of Gilbert
fc Sullivan's work. This production
includes such memorable tunes as, "Poor
Wandering One "A RoUickling Band Of
Pirates We and "I Am the Very Model of
A Modern Major-General Tickets for
"Pirates of Penzance" are now on sale in
the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center (phone 757-6611, ext. 266)
Office hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. M-F.
AHMAD TAMAL
The Student Union Special Concerts
Committee presents Jazz Recording Great
Ahmad Jamal in concert on Wed Jan 25 at
8 p.m. in Hendrix Threatre. A subtle,
complex, and veratile interpreter and
composer Jamal is regarded as a
magician's magician. Tickets are now on
sale for this outstanding evening of jazz.
For further details contact The Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student
Center, phone 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m M-F.
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed by the School of Art. The
School of Art is offering positions as
models for figure drawing classes spring
semester at $5 per hour. Contact Connie
Folmer in the School of Art
Administration office, Jenkins 2000 or call
757-6563.
Any student wishing to have a class
picture taken for the yearbook now has
that chance. Class photographs will be
taken Jan. 23 � Jan. 27 in the student store-
front 9 a.m. til 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. til 4:30
p.m. each day.
FACULTY AND STAFF
Faculty and staff yearbook pictures will
be taken Jan. 13 � Jan. 27 in the student
store from 9 a.m. tile 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. til
4:30 p.m. each day
CaPEDUXATJON
Interested in a summer job with a resort,
camp, or recreational facility? Feb. 9th,
ECU will host over 50 agencies looking for
summer employees. Come by or call Co-
op Ed. for more info, on yaw career
opportunities, 757-6979, GCB 2028.
EDUCATION MAJORS
It's not too late to submit your application
for the workstudy trip to Pueblo. Mexico
for Spring Break (March 4-12). If you're
concerned about the expense - don't be
Fund raising efforts will be a group
endeavor. What a great opportunity to
travel while sharing your talents and
skills in a local school. Applications are
availablein R-l54, Speight. For more info
contact Marianne Exum at (w) 757-6271 or
(h) 830-9450. I lurry! Time is running out
ESF
The Episcopal Student Fellowship meets
at 5:30 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal Church
4th St. All are welcome. Call Allen
Manning at 758-1440.
STUDENT UNION
Applications are now being accepted for
the position of 1989-90 Student Union
President. Deadline to apply is Jan. 20.
1989. Applications can be picked up at the
Information Desk or the Student Union
Office � rm. 236.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
The Overseas Development Network will
be meeting on Jan. 19th at 4 pm in
Mendenhall Student Center. We will be
discussing our adopted project and
possible fundraisers. New members
welcome! Call Tonya Batity for more info,
(hm. 830-8888; wk 757-6611 ext. 221).
Trevathan will speak at 7 p m
rm 1028 GCB.
Ian lv' m
Pf MAJQRS CI IB
Wanted All P E. Majors and intended
majors to help support our club. No DULS
� Just FUN First meeting to be held Jan
19 at 8 p.m. in Minges, rm 142.
BJJLJEYEDARTS
We're still waiting for our equipment. It
won't be in for another 2-3 weeks. There
will be another announcement stating
when we will have our next meeting It
should be in the next week or so. This
meeting will organi.e what we already
have accomplished and hopefully we will
be ready to play as soon as our darts get
here.
MFOJiQDISTSXLDENT
CENTER
Title: "Let Your Bones Dance There will
be a dance at the Methodist Student
Center on Jan 20, at 8:30 p.m. Free
admission, free refreshments The MSC is
tor Asthma research at th- I : tept of
Medicine. Study purchase a patient
ranges from blood donation to allergen
challenge All volunteers will be
compensated. It interested, call 551 31 9
WATERSKJ CLUB
The ECU Waterski Club will ha e its first
meeting of the semester Jan. I9at6pm
the Librarv. All are invited to attend foi
more info call Tommy I ewis at 830 0137
A social hour will follow the meeting
NEW STUDENT REVIEW S
Anv student that ordered a new Student
Review should come be the Buccani -
office and pick one up. We are located in
front of Jovner Librarv on the second flex :
of the publications building.
BIQLOGY CLUB
Gamma Beta Phi members On poinl
may be earned bv working at flu
Bloodmobile Jan. 18 & 19 for one hour, if
interested come by the Biology building
and sign up for times located across from
the north wing elevator.
located at 501 E. 5th St. across from Garrett
Dorm. Call 758-2030 or 752 7240 for
details.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
The Lady Pirates will host American
University Jan. 21 in Minges at 7 p.m. At
halftime there will be a dinner giveaway
as well as a Pure Gold Dancer
Performance.
Mff SWIMM1NC,
ECU. Men's and Women's swimming
teams will face Duke Jan. 21 The meet
starts at 2 p.m. in Minges Aquatic Center.
Both squads enjoy fine records this
season, but still need your support. This is
the last home meet of the year.
GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir is now accepting
new members for the Spring Semester. If
you enjoy singing, we invite you to stop
by the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center on
Wed. afternoons at 5 p.m. during
rehearsals. Deadline Jan. 25.
FOOTBALL
Mangers needed for varsity football. Pick
up application at office in Minges. 757-
6029.
CLASS PICTURES
HUMAN BIRTH
Professor Wenda Trevathan of New
Mexico State Univ. will lecture about
different aspects of her new and highly
acclaimed book, Human Birth: An
Evolutionary Perspective. Prof.
LAW SOCIETY
Our next mtg. will be at 6 p m in GC 1014
on Jan. 19. All members and other
interested students, please attend
voiiTrVlTFERS NEEDED
Normal and allergic volunteers needed
BLOODMOBILE
The Bloodmobile will be at 2 I
Mendenhall Jan 18 & 19 from 12 p m to 6
p.m. A sign up sheet for times is located in
the Bio building across from the elevator
in the north wing. Please give Sponsored
by the Biology Club.
MJNfJRITY STUDENT
ORGANIZATION
The Minority Student Organization will
meet Jan. 24, 1989, Tues at 5jjQ pm in
Speight 129 All are invited and
encouraged to attend.
COUNSELING CENTER
IMPROVING YOUR STUD SKILLS.
Learning how to improve your study
skills for greater success in college. The
following mini course and workshops can
help you prepare for the added workload
of college or help to increase your grade
point average All sessions will be held in
313 Wright Building Jan 23 Time
Management 1�2 30pm jan 24 Making
ii Using Notes 1 � 2:30 p.m. Jan 25
Efficient REading 1 � 2:30 pm Jan. 26
Test Taking 1 � 2:30 p.m. You may attend
all the topic sessions or choose the ones
where you need the most improvement
CO-REC BOWLING
A registration meeting for intramural c&
rec bowling teams will be held Jan 24 at
5:00 pm in Biology 103. 2 men and 2
Read The Bast
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
icn required per team Don't miss
1 M RTUBE WATERPJ
registration meeting for innertube
. -he intramural-recreatiora.
sdi partment will beheld Jan 31 at
Biology N102 Mens and Womens
! be formed
PS1 CHI
Id its first meeting of I
mesti - to elect new officers
in. 25 at 4:00 in the Psi Chi hbran
ttendance is manditor li
� tttend please leave a note n
.Vhi mailhov
GRADUATING NURSING
STUDENTS
d ; to receive your Nursing Pin by
1989 � lers must ho placed in :
��i nt Stores, Wright Building no lat i
. 3 1989 Orders should be placed
it the jewelry Counter. Orders must be
when the order is placed
AMM SIY INTERNATIONAL
st) International will meet Wed
25 al Bpm at the St. Paul's Episcopal
5 ! E 4th St. in the upper flo I
St idents welcome. Tor more information
vin Mercer 6121- Philosophy Dor:
CREAJ 1VE LIVING CENTER
Are vou a Pitt County resident, 60 years
Id or older and need a ride to your
medical appointment7 The Creative
Living v enter is offering transportation
service to the elderlv for medic a
appointments within Pitt county such as
doctors, dentists, clinics, therapies and the
1 lealth department Arrangements for the
service must be made at least 24 hou'S
fore the scheduled appointment. Call
the Creative living Center, 757-0303 to
reserve your nde.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE
It's time to play that "Ultimate" game
once again We had a great time and
season last semester and look forward to a
1 h ttor one this time around! Come join us
at the bottom of College Hill on Sunday's,
Monday's, Wednesday's and Thursday s
at 300.
I

MfPMN IB 1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IANUARY 19,1989 7
Bear's stress worries activists
(AP) �Terrible Ted is back at
work after a brief, bitter court
battle sparked by the concerns of
animal rights activists who wor-
ried about stress he encountered
on the job.
Ted, a 500-pound Siberian griz-
zly, grapples with patrons in
bars.They win if they put him on
his back, which is as easy as
single-handedly overturning a
Volkswagen; he wins if he bear-
hugs them for two minutes with-
out incident.
His opponents go away with a
story they can exaggerate for
friends and loved ones, and Ted
meets people and travels around
the Southeast in his horse trailer.
That setup earned the sanction
of Guilford County District Court
11 days ago, when Judge J. Bruce
Morton dismissed charges of ani-
mal cruelty and animal fighting
against William Walker and Lou-
ise Holcombe.
Walker and Ms. Holcombe, a
common-law husband and wife
who own and train Ted, have
since driven back to Calhoun, Ga
home den for Tyler Bear Shows.
With them went their star, who
had spent 48 days at Grandfather
Mountain. He was released from
that temporary habitat Jan. 6 after
Morton's ruling.
Walker still faces a civil suit for
permanent custody of the 2 12-
ycar-old bear; Sam Dockery, his
High Point-based attorney, says it
may take months to settle. The
plaintiff is N.C. Network for Ani-
mals, which wants to send Ted to
a Texas habitat for beasts that
can't be returned to the wild.
The group fears Ted will
wrestle until he's infirm; another
Walker bear, 18-year-old Ginger,
has inspired suits against the
family and legislation in other
states because of her condition.
More to the point, the activists
want to ban bear wrestling state-
wide.
The ideological conflict springs
from contrasting views of ani-
mals: Does a bear live in the
woods, or does it perform for our
entertainment?
The object of the dispute looked
healthy in his cage at Grandfather
Mountain, though animal keep-
ers hadn't done a thorough exam.
As habitat manager Eddie Clark
observed, "He was trained to
knock people down, and we
didn't feel like being wrestled. But
he's the most affectionate bear
we've ever seen
Ted poked his massive head
through a 2-foot opening to gum
chocolate chip cookies softened
by the sun. He offered the muscu-
lar hump on his back, a tan strip
setting off the darker brown of his
body, to be scratched; it felt like a
soft bristle brush, and the thick fur
was clean. His 6-inch pink tongue
lolled, bovine fashion, as he
nuzzled Clark's fingers. On the
Terrible scale, Ted fell between
Paddington Bear and Winnie The
Pooh.
Clark explained in an interview
published Tuesday in the Char-
lotte Observer that bears live
about 11 years in the wild but can
get to 30 in captivity. A grizzly can
grow to be 8 feet tall and 700
pounds, but the 6-foot Ted has
probably reached his full size.
His diet consists mostly of dog
food soaked in water, though
Clark and assistant Bob Roberts
occasionally treated him to apples
or a doughnut. A defanging and
declawing operation has left Ted
with four back molars for chew-
ing hard food, one frontal tooth
stub and the blunt nub of one
claw.
"He's tremendously strong
said Clark. "Out of playfulness,
he broke the chain that a tire was
hanging from and flattened a soc-
cer ball. He could break your neck
wi th one o( those pa ws, though he
wouldn't mean to. And he's so
big, he could roll on you the
wrong way and break your ribs
"He's smart, too said Roberts
as Ted studied him with soft
brown eyes. "He knows locks
keep him in, and he'll fumble with
them. He figured out the (lever
arrangement) on his cage within a
few minutes, and he knows what
chains are for
Chains are for keeping him in
check so he doesn't ruin his sur-
roundings. Caffc Royale, the
Greensboro night spot where
police collared Ted Nov. 16, is the
kind of place he makes a living: an
upscale fern-and-cactus bar in a
mini-mall.
Here the police filmed a video
of Ted on the fateful night afterthe
activists group complained. The
dimly lighted tape, played in its
eight-minute entirety at the trial,
showed Holcombe leading the
unmuzzled bear on a chain at-
tached to his collar. Patrons
shouted intermittently while con
testants waltzed with Ted and
Walker hollered encouragement:
"Very good, very good. Get ' im
on his back
Ted neither attacked nor de-
fended himself, content to wrap
thick arms around his opponents
until their time was up. Dozens o
patrons pressed near the combat-
ants as they pinballed around the
dance floor.
Is this amusement or abuse1?
"What this comes down to is
that some people believe animals
are not meant for people to use
said Robert Newsom,
Holcombe's attornev, in asking
the charges be dismissed.
"Circuses and shows (involve;
man's enjoyment and use of ani-
JjMlniarTiavMfendsome
people philosophically, but the
law does not forbid it"
Newsom contended the animal
fighting statute didn't apply be-
cause it was meant for bullfight-
ing or pit bulling, where the object
is injury or death. Ted, he said,
had never been hurt or hurt any-
one. He also claimed the animal
cruelty law was inapplicable:
' I cannot find a case where
anyone was convicted who
hadn't physically harmed an ani-
mal by be iting, starving, burning
or turning it out into the cold.
Incidental suffering is permitted
for an appropriate purpose, and
entertainment is one of those
M.J. Morgan, coordinator of the
Guilford chapter of Network for
Animals, conceded the argument
could be valid undercurrent la ws.
That's why she wants them
changed:
"We feel it's cruel to keep him
chained in a one-horse trailer,
where he spends most of his time,
then put him on the dance floor in
i dark club with petiole scream-
ing and pushing. Ted's claws and
teeth have been removed so he
can wrestle, and we feel that's
cruel
"In general, bears are secretive
creatures testified Bran Ritchie,
a witness for the prosecution and
a wildlife specialist form the Uni-
versity of Georgia in Athens.
"Given any opportunity, they will
get away from stress. Bears don't
see very well; their primary
senses are smell and hearing, so
putting them in with human
smells and liquor and screaming
would put a high level of stress on
them
Newsom, a bear hunter who
later called Network for Animals
"members of the lunatic fringe
argued that Ted differs psycho-
logically from wild bears:
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
RUSH
PHI KAPPA TAU
��
a2

vc
'Ot
'
4
.f-
�.i
ft
FIFTH ST.

O

TENTH ST
�A
I Want You
To Be A Phi Tau!
Mon. 8:00-11:00 - Meet the Phi Tau's at Memorial Gym
Tues. 8:00-11:00 - Pizza with the Sorority Girls of Alpha Xi Delta
Wed. 8:00-11:00 - Subs with the Sorority Girls of Chi Omega
Thurs. 8:00-11:00 - Meet the Brothers and Little Sisters of Phi Kappa Tau
-For More Information or a Ride Call 757-1319





8
Tt E FAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY W, 1V89
1
fr
Police unravel record of mass murderer
STOCKTON, Calif. (AP) -
Police today were unraveling the
steps that turned a voting drifter
with a long criminal record into a
silent killer who opened fire on a
schoolyard jammed with laugh-
ing children, killing five and
wounding 30 before committing
suicide.
Patrick Edward Purdy, 26
killed himself with a bullet to the
head after firing about 60 rounds
from a Soviet Ak-47 assault rifle
at hundreds oi oungstei s enjoy-
ing recess on Tuesday at Cleve-
land Elementary School. The five
slain were children of refugees
from Southeast Asia.
"I'm shocked. It's just hor-
rible s�ud Purdy'sgrandmother,
63-year-old ulia Chumbley oi
nearby I odi. "1 don't understand
whv and 1 probablv won't ever
know why. it troubles me to think
that sin h a terrible thing can hap-
pen. It'slikea nightmare.Thissoit
of thing happens to others, not
vou Your own grandson
Purdy vho most recently
listed his grandmother's address
as home began his assault shortly
before noon when he parked his
station wagon behind the school.
i he car burst into flames in a fire
possibly sot as a diversion, said
Deputy Police Chiei Lucian
Neely.
Then the 5-foot-ll, 140-
pound killer, chid in camouflaged
combat fatigues a flak jacket and
earplugs, entered the campus
through a hole in a fence with the
semi-automatic and two hand-
guns and walked to several port-
able classrooms about 250 yards
from the mam, L-shaped build-
ing. 1 ie opened fire from the west
side of the portable buildings,
then moved to the east side and
continued spraying the scream-
ing children before turning the
rifle on himself.
In some cases, the bullets
went through the walls of the
main building and came out the
other side to fall spent on the front
lawn, Neely said.
ITiere was no apparent mo-
live.
"He was just standing there
with a gun, making wide
sweeps recalled Lori Mackey,
who teaches deaf students in one
of the portable classrooms at the
school about SO miles southeast of
San Erancisco.
"He was not talking, he was
not yelling, he was very straight-
faced, it did not look like he was
really angry she said.
"It was just matter-of-factlv.
ITiere was mass chaos. There
were kids running in every direc-
tion
Purdy, who also was known
as Patrick West and Eddie Purdy
West, had an "extensive criminal
record said Neely. Many of the
crimes were committed in the Los
Angeles area and included solicit-
ing for sex and narcotics and
weapons violations, Neely said
As police cleaned up the car
nagc, a large handgun and the
assault rifle were seen lying on the
ground near a pool of blood. Writ-
ten on the pistol's handle was the
word "Victory The letters SSA
w ere printed on the rifle's clip in
letters 1 12 inches long.
The assault rifle Purdy used
apparently was purchased in
Oregon as a semi-automatic in
August authorities said. It is a
Soviet design, but Chinese repli-
cas are available in many gun
stores for around $300. It is ca-
pable of firing about 400 rounds
per minute as a semi-automatic.
A semi-automatic rifle can be
purchased easily in Oregon, with
out even the five-day waiting
period required for a handgun, if
the buyer signs a federal form
stating he has never been con-
victed of a serious crime or in-
dicted, among other require-
ments, said Bob Imel a
Ore gun shop owner
The torched ir was n .
tered to Patrick i Purdy
lived with an aunt and un
uly through Octobei in Sand
Ore.
"She told me he was a '�
and as a child he was an i
holic Sandy Police Chief ��
Punzel said of his conversal
with the aunt, Julie Michael
Punzel said Michael t �
Purdy left Oregon tor a job
boilermaker in Texas. Thai
throughandhe went to M
Tenn. The aunt an uncle last 1
from him at Thanksgh ii
he was in Conne I
yd,
RACK ROOM SHOES
Quayle to turn around image
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN EXTRA
WASHINGTON (AD Dan
Quyale says that as vice president
he hopes to help open up the
Republican Party to the poor and
minorites and turn �roi rid Us
image as "the party oi exclusion
The vice president-elect said
that after he is sworn in to office
on Friday he hopes to spend time
quietly visiting the disadvan-
taged and learning about their
problems.
"I'd like to go out nui nol
have a lot of advance publicity on
that, justsitdownand talk to these
people on their turf, in their
neighborhood, on their grounds
and to hearthem out and get a feel
and getasensitivitj forissuesthat
are of concern to them Qu lylc
said man interview Tuesday with
The Associated Press
The former senator from Indi-
ana also endorsed the 50 percent
congressional pay raise that Presi-
dent Reagan backs. Bush has said
he supports Reagan's stance, but
that he might take another lex k at
the matter after he becomes presi-
dent.
"I know it's a lot, " Quayle
said of the raise for federal judges
anci Congress members. Hut he
said Reagan"thought "long mu
hard. I support his decision
The pay raise plan will take
effect next month unless Con-
gress vetoes or modifies it.
On another subject, Quayle
said Soviet leader Mikhail S Gor-
bachev "is in a much strongei
position" than many Li S. skeptics
think.
"He's consolidated power
much quicker than anv oilier
Soviet general secretary said
Quayle, a former member of the
Senate Armed Services Commit-
tee.
Quayle said he thinks
Gorbachev's policy of glasnost. or
openness, "is for real but he sees
the perestroika policy of eco-
nomic reform as just a way to
consolidate power.
Quayle has met with several
reporters in the past few days af-
ter refusing interviws tor much of
the period since the Nov. 8 elec-
tion.
Discussing how he will
handle his new job, Quayle said
he will not speak out at Cabinet
meetings, but will relax his opin-
ions to President Hush privately.
'Hie key to his job, he said, is a
close, personal relationship with
the new president.
i he 11 -year old vice presi-
dent-elect said he intends to be a
"broad-rangingadvisor" to Hush,
who is 64. He said he has been
involved in Hot the discussions
for cabinet nd other
matt i tru � irlv selection
oi lames Baker as secretary of
state.
He said he meets daily with
Bush and they have discussed a
desire to "reposition the Republi-
can party, and get out of this stere-
otype, stereocast image of being
the party of exclusion rather than
the party of inclusion
w
Open
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sunday 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Ntke and Reebok)
Li i
752-7303
�3
.V fcJ-V
Thursday
Ladies Night
Ladies Free all Night
$2.00 Frozen specials
$1.00 Cans
- ��- '� � UlliJIiOl i tiilLfi -jiu SOI � 'J ' J " .�.� I �' , j
ri bi! �' rv. fx rrt'HfO yVi.lo i t �� �� I � t uoWa
oil b
i b . i aiu
ate
it ,
Si.
Friday
The Famous Late Day Tea Bash
$2.00 Ice Teas 5pm-lam
$50 Door Prize for Fraternity and
Sorority with best Attendance
Coming Jan 25th
ALL CAMPUS LIP SYNC CONTEST
GRAND PRIZE $2500.00
in cash or Scholarships!
(@J
g&
Alpha Sigma Phi
� -that's-1
AyftfKiNC
SPACE,

ii :
JOIN
UV �
i�
: v
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afc
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yr

At Alpha Sigma Phi there is always something
going on. And we believe that something is a
unique and special experience. A fraternal expe-
rience where a group of men from different
backgrounds come together to form a strong
bond of brotherhood. We encourage you to visit
�pus during rush to see for yourself, and JOIN IN!
RUSH WEEK:
Tues, Jan 24: Sub Night w Brothers & Little Sisters
W(zE3� Wed' Jan 25: Po01 & Pizza w A,Pha Om'cron Pi Sorority
" Thurs, Jan 26: Oral Bid Night
For Ride Info: 757-3516






1 HI EASTCAROl 1NIAN
Features
Dance Review
IAN R 19, 1989 I'j
Philadanco dances in Wright Auditorium
Members ol the Philadanco dance troupe performed Tuesday
night at Wright Auditorium.
By )IM SHAMLIN
SUtf Writer
Tuesday night, three dancers
in brilliant red costumes twirled
on the stage of Wright audito-
rium, their feet squeaking with
each pirouette. The Bach accom-
paniment played softly and the
squeaks echoed through the audi-
torium. One of the dancers
stumbled, quickly regained her
footing and continued for the rest
of the long first movement.
The crowd applauded po-
litely as the dancers left the stage,
not knowing that there were two
movements left in "Ritomello
Philadanco's opening piece After
that slow start, the dancing leapt
to life and maintained the level of
excellence for which Philadanco
is known
The second movement was
much smoother and more grace-
ful than the first; a duet of blue-
clad dancers flawlessly per-
formed sustained arabesques in
perfect svnehronicity. When the
original three dancers returned to
finish the dance, they did so with
renewed vigor. The applause that
followed each number came not
as a sympathetic gesture, but as a
reward for a job well done.
Philadanco's style ranged
from modern to experimental.
The entire show was baroque and
captivating. One dance in particu-
lar, "Cantus showed the acute
skill of the dancers: roughly half
ol the piece was accompanied
only by the sound of a storm,
whose rainfall and thunder af-
forded no regular beat. Still, the
trio cm stage remained, at times, in
perfect synchronization.
Danielle Gee performed a
notable solo in "Lucia Ferre In
the dance, she advanced slowly to
center stage, where she remained
for most of the dance. Even with-
out great flurries of violent mo-
tion, she danced with a under-
stated intensity that filled the
stage.
Earlier, Gee danced the lead
in "Dreamtime' the most memo-
rable piece in the program. Its
lighting effects, sharp beams of
light, pierced the smoke-filled
stage. The choreography and the
music were both hypnotically
primitive in nature- - sharp, jerk
See PHILADANCO, page 11
The Philadelphia Dance Company brought their highly-ac-
claimed performance to ECU Tuesday night.
Communication majors find job
market tough without experience
By JEFF PARKER
Staif Writer
rk an area that's tu
competition and where job
Though often overlooked
Vk hen the schools of ECU are dis-
cussed the School of Communi-
ns is putting students to
of
do
not come easily.
raduates and current stu-
dents of ECU have gone on to
work in the broadcasting industry
throughout the country, in radio
and television. Some who have
worked the television end shared
their experiences and advice.
Michael Repeta, a 1987
graduate is now a technical direc-
tor at WNCT-TV in Greenville.
After trying to get work up
around the D.C area, he returned
to North Carolina where the job
market was still competitive, but
not quite as hectic as in the metro-
politan areas. "It's not easv to
break into the business here, but it
- v- ssible said Repeta.
The directing position was
not made readily available to
Repeta. He started at the station as
a camera operator. He then
v orked his way around, handling
the teleprompter and virtually
every other piece of equipment
there before moving up to direct-
ing.
As technical director, Repeta
keeps his hand in all of the proc-
esses that put together a news
show. He has to work out the
camera angles to be used for the
show and supervise the graphics
to be shown in conjunction with
each story.
After the noon news is broad-
cast, Repeta spends the afternoon
producing local commercials and
often training new people work-
ing on the news. Looking back on
his college training, Repeta was
able to offer prospective commu-
nications graduates advice on
entering the job market.
"Ifyou'reclosetograduating,
you should try to go out with
some idea of what you want to do,
specifically, in television. Ask
people at the stations to show you
around � most will take the time
to give you a tour and answer
your questions
During school, Repeta said
the thing that prepared him the
most for the job market was
working at VVZMB. I got more out
of that than anything. Being there
in a working situation prepared
Repeta noted. Dana Mason, a
current communications major
followed this route, and worked
at VVITN this past year.
Mason worked as an associ-
ate producer, which involved
doing all manner of jobs. She
handled routine "beat checks" �
calling local police and fire de-
partments to keep up-to-date on
any area developments. Often
Mason was sent out to shoot video
for the news and to set up live
shots.
"Be prepared to carry lots of
equipment is one bit of advice
Mason offers for students. One of
the skills she stresses that will be
needed in television is editing.
"We had to edit tapes of na-
tional stories that would come in,
to get them down to the time we
had available for local news. You
rely on your own judgement a lot
for that
She hopes to work in televi-
sion, eventually as a news anchor,
or work on a film crew in motion
pictures. She adds that her experi-
ence at WITN benefited her
greatly.
"Interns can learn more from
actually working in the business,
and get more practical knowledge
Senior communications major Paul Dunn takes notes while on the job at local television station
VVITN (Photo bv Mark Love, ECU Photolab).
EMM, the Bones
Bonehead explains Hazzard
me the most for working for and they can use later
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
SUffOKlM
ust some good ol' boys
Never meanin' no harm
' Beats all you ever saw
Been in trouble with the law
Since ike day they was born
Coming
this
weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
Tipper Gore
New Deli:
i.A. Booker Band
Attic:
Treble Maniax
Mendenhall:
Young Guns
(through Sunday)
Friday
New Deli:
Kennel Cats
Attic:
Panic
Saturday
New Deli:
The Distance
Attic:
The Amateurs
Attic-
Super Bowl Party
Doors open at 4 p.m.
Kickoff time at 5 p.m.
with other people He added that
he felt he didn't get enough
hands-on experience in his televi-
sion classes at ECU, which he
stressed as invaluable to a career
in T.V. production.
As in Repeta's situation, a
graduate beginning at a T.V. sta-
tion will probably have to work
long hours doing a little of every-
thing, but good workers earn
rapid advancement.
Internships are an option for
students to consider while still in
school, and can make entering the
professional world much easier,
VVZMB Top 13 Albums
Week of 1-15-89
1 Angst� "Cry For Happy"
2. Dinosaur Jr.�"Bug"
3. Waterboys� "Fisherman's
Blues"
4. Trotsky Kepick� "Baby'
5. Soundgarden� "O.K
6. Girl Trouble� "Hit it orj
)lllt It"
7. Jet Black Berries� "Anima
ecessity"
8. Dead Milkmen� "Beelze
mbba"
9. Elvis Hitler� "Dis
raceland"
10. Death of Samantha�
Where the Women Wear the
.lory and the Men Wear the
ants"
11. Angry Samoans� "STF
t LSD"
12. Screaming Tribesman-
Bones and Flowers"
13. Volcano Song� "FAR
:ed"
Another student who served
as an intern and still works for
WITN is communications major
Paul Dunn. Dunn, like Mason, is
an associate producer, and now a
large portion of his weekly sched-
ule is spent at the station. As a
part-time employee, Dunn can't
be paid for more than twenty-nine
hours, but he actually does work
more hours than that.
"Starting out, it's a lot of
work, and not glamorous as
people would like to think. You're
going to have to put in plenty of
hours, even on holidays. But even
at the point I'm at, I can see how it
will pay off in the long run
Editing, as mentioned before,
is a large part of the job, and Dunn
also does voice-overs for photo
segments used in the newscast.
He is often called upon to put
together montages for news seg-
ments, and most recently made
up one for the late Leo Jenkins.
When asked what was instru-
mental in helping him prepare for
the working world, Dunn cred-
ited his teachers Jim Reese and
Chip Cox. While owing much to
these men and what he learned, at
the same time Dunn feels he
didn't recieve enough training
from his television production
teachings to benefit Kim in the
business world.
"We didn't get enough
hands-on experience in class. Not
nearly enough time was spent on
editing there should be a whole
class on just that
See INTERN, page 11
When Waylon Jennings
first twanged out those words
almost 10 years ago, no ons
, could have foreseen the cuJr
� tural phenomenon that the
QjB$ television series would
. become. Now in syndication,
j The Dukes of Hazzard" has
; become a sort of blueprint for
; Southern culture.
Cultural icon or not, after
; ail this time, them Dukes are
I still a kickhV thing to watch.
But to really enjoy it, you need
j to know a little bit about the
history and characters of the
; show.
Thus, for the first time
i anywhere The East Carolinian
I presents The Bonehead's
i Guide to the Hazzard Pan-
I theon.
The main characters are Bo
and Luke Duke. They arecous-
. ins. Not identical cousins like"
Patty Duke. They always wear
belt knives. Bo used to be a race
car driver. Luke used to be a
Golden Gloves toxing'duun-
pion in the Marines.
This helps explain why
Luke can whale the tar out of
the numerous thugs, shysters
and unsavory types that infil-
trate Hazzard County, ft ex-
plains how Bo keeps their car,
I the General Lee, in one piece
after sailing it over cement
i trucks and houses once or
twice an episode.
Bo and Luke Duke have at
: least three more cousins.
Daisy, a buxom young beHe,
lives with them on the farm
with their Unde Jesse. Coy and
Vance live somewhere else,
but sometimes come to the
farm to drive the General Lee
around;
Daisy has a jeep named
Dixie, Uncle Jesse has a truck
with no name and Bo, Luke,
Coy and Vance all share the
General. Tneir friend Cooter
has a tow truck.
All the vehicles in Haz-
zard have one thing in com-
mon. Whether or not they can
leap over smallbuildings, they
all have CB radios. Most Haz-
zard residents keep a CB in the
house, in the fields and even in
the bathroom, so they are
never out of of touch with their
relatives and neighbors.
On any given day in Haz-
zard county, you can see a
good five to six car chases.
Usually these chases involve 3
member of the Duke family
and a law enforcement officer.
There are two law enforce-
ment officers in Hazzard.
Sheriff Roscoe P. Coltrane
and Deputy Enos Strate keep
the peace inHazzard. Roscoe's
dog Rash is an unofficial mas-
cot of the Hazzard police, and
has helped them out of ma ny a
jam.
There are only two things
mat can stop a car chase in
Hazzard Any of the numer-
ous ponds, lakes and creeks in
Hazzard contain giant electro-
magnets specially attuned to
police verodes. Thus, as the
General Lee goes flying over a
pond, any cops following
mem are sure to be dragged
down into the watery depths.
The Only other thing ca-
pable of stopping a Hazzard
car chase is anyolmeroirner-
ou3 eignteerwheeJers that
cruise along the backroads of
Hazzard County. For some
unexplained law of physics,
even the General can't make it
over one of these, thereby
ending the car chase in a con-
venient ditch.
The County Commis-
sioner of Hazzard Count) is
the Honarable Jefferson Davis
Hogg, affectionately known as
"Boss Boss owns almost all of
Hazzard � the radio station,
the bank and the only bar in
town, The Boar's Nest, where
Daisy Duke works.
Boss loves two things �
grits souffle and money. Most
of the trouble in Hazzard starts
when Boss starts scheming to
get more money. He hires
criminal types to do his dirty
work, but usually gets foiled
by the Dukes.
Usually, there's some type
of reward involved for catch-
ing these crooks. But the
Dukes, instead of using the
money in a selfish manner, like
buying Luke a car of his own,
they invariably give the
money to the orphans.
Apparently, the orphan-
age is the only thing Boss
doesn't own. He should kxk
into it. Theorphansof Hazzard
must be richer than Donald
Trump by now.
While it looks like all the
dairy misadventures Hazzard
inhabitants experience are
pretty fun things, there is a
reason they call it Hazzard.
Daisy gets kidnapped about
once every two weeks. Bo and
Luke get thrown in the Haz-
zard jail every other day.
Also, taxes are higher in
Hazzard man anywhere else.
Boss is continually replacing
waterlogged police vehicles.
See HAZZARD, page 11





V


v
f
(
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JANUARY 19,1989 Page 9
Dance Review
Philadanco dances in Wright Auditorium
ByJIMSHAMLIN
MMJB
Members of the Philadanco dance troupe performed Tuesday
night at Wright Auditorium.
Tuesday night, three dancers
in brilliant red costumes twirled
on the stage of Wright audito-
rium, their feet squeaking with
each pirouette. The Bach accom-
paniment played softly and the
squeaks echoed through the audi-
torium. One of the dancers
stumbled, quickly regained her
footing and continued for the rest
of the long first movement
. The crowd applauded po-
litely as the dancers left the stage,
not knowing that there were two
movements left in "RitomeUo
Philadanco's opening piece. After
that slow start, the dancing leapt
to life and maintained the level of
excellence for which Philadanco
is known.
The second movement was
much smoother and more grace-
ful than the first; a duet of blue-
clad dancers flawlessly per-
formed sustained arabesques in
perfect synchronicity. When the
original three dancers returned to
finish the dance, they did so with
renewed vigor. The applause that
followed each number came not
as a sympathetic gesture, but as a
reward for a job well done.
Philadanco's style ranged
from modern to experimental.
The entire show was baroque and
captivating. One dance in particu-
lar, "Cantus showed the acute
skill of the dancers: roughly half
of the piece was accompanied
only by the sound of a storm,
whose rainfall and thunder af-
forded no regular beat. Still, the
trio on stage remained, at times, in
perfect synchronization.
Danielle Gee performed a
notable solo in "Lucia Ferre In
the dance, she advanced slowly to
center stage, where she remained
for most of the dance. Even with-
out great flurries of violent mo-
tion, she danced with a under-
stated intensity that filled the
stage.
Earlier, Gee danced the lead
in "Dreamtime the most memo-
rable piece in the program. Its
lighting effects, sharp beams of
light, pierced the smoke-filled
stage. The choreography and the
music were both hypnotically
primitive in nature� sharp, jerky
See PHILADANCO, page 11
The Philadelphia Dance Company brought their highly
claimed performance to ECU Tuesday night.
-ac-
Communication majors find job
market tough without experience
By JEFF PARKER
Staff Writer
Though often overlooked
when the schools of ECU are dis-
cussed, the School of Communi-
cations is putting students to
work in an area that's full of
competition and where jobs do
not come easily.
Graduates and current stu-
every other piece of equipment Repeta noted. Dana Mason, a
there before moving up to direct- current communications major
ing. followed this route, and worked
As technical director, Repeta at WITN this past year,
keeps his hand in all of the proc- Mason worked as an associ-
esses that put together a news ate producer, which involved
show. He has to work out the doing all manner of jobs. She
camera angles to be used for the handled routine "beat checks" �
show and supervise the graphics calling local police and fire de-
to be shown in conjunction with partments to keep up-to-date on i
each story. a� are developments. Often
After the noon news is broad- Mason was sent out to shoot vide

dents of ECU have gone on to mxermenuonnZZ. wZr- touDM
workinthebroadcastingindustry cast, Repeta spends the afternoon forthe news and to set up ft
throughout the country, in radio produanglocalcommercialsand shots
and television. Some who have
worked the television end shared
their experiences and advice.
Michael Repeta, a 1987
graduate, is now a technical direc-
tor at WNCT-TV in Greenville.
After trying to get work up
around the D.C. area, he returned . - .
to North Carolina where the job i�!�"??
market was still competitive, but
not quite as hectic as in the metro
politan areas. "If s not easy to
break into the business here, but it
is possible said Repeta.
The directing position was
not made readily available to
Repeta. He started at the station as
a camera operator. He then
often training new people work- "Be prepared to carry lots of
ing on the news. Looking back on equipment' is one bit of advic
his college training, Repeta was Mason offers for students. One oj
able to offer prospective commu- the skills she stresses that will M
nications graduates advice on needed in television is editing,
entering the job market. "We had to edit tapes of na-
"If you're close to graduating, tional stories that would come in,
you should try to go out with to get them down to the time we
had available for local news. You
rely on your own judgement a lot
for that
"f iiIih i�iiMimlf Itom miforriiiTTTnTm takes notes while on the job at local television station
WITN (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photolab).
specifically, in television. Ask
people at the stations to show you
around � most will take the time
to give you a tour and answer
your questions
During school, Repeta said
the thing that prepared him the
most for the job market was
working at WZMB. I got more out
She hopes to work in televi-
sion, eventually as a news anchor,
or work on a fUm crew in motion
pictures. She adds that her experi-
ence at WTTN benefited her
greatly.
"Interns can team more from
actually working in the business,
workedriiswavaround handling of that than anything. Being there actually working m me dus ne
Zf��2E5S5 m a workingjituarton prepared P�?1'�1
the teleprompter
Coming
this
weekend
Thursday
Susie's:
Tipper Gore
New Deli:
L. A. Booker Band
Attic:
Treble Maniax
Mendenhall:
Young Guns
(through Sunday)
New Deli:
Kennel Cats
Attic
Panic
Saturday
New Deli:
The Distance
Attic:
The Amateurs
Suwta
Attic:
Super Bowl Party
Kkkotf time 5 p.m.
me the most for working for and
with other people He added that
he felt he didn't get enough
hands-on experience in his televi-
sion classes at ECU, which he
stressed as invaluable to a career
in T.V. production.
As in Repeta's situation, a
graduate beginning at a T.V. sta-
tion will probably have to work
long hours doing a little of every-
thing, but good workers earn
rapid advancement.
Internships are an option for
they can use later.
Another student who served
as an intern and still works for
WITN is communications major
Paul Dunn. Dunn, like Mason, is
an associate producer, and now a
large portion of his weekly sched-
ule is spent at the station. As a
part-time employee, Dunn can't
be paid for more than twenty-nine
hours, but he actually does work
more hours than mat.
"Starting out, if s a lot of
work, and not glamorous as
students to consider while still in people would like to think. You re
school, and can make entering the 8�mg have to put in plenty of
professional world much easier, hours, even on hokiays. But even
r at the point I mat, I can see how it
will pay off in the long run
Editing, as mentioned before,
is a large part of the job, and Dunn
also does voice-overs for photo
segments used in the newscast.
He is often called upon to put
together montages for news seg-
ments, and most recently made
up one for the late Leo Jenkins.
When asked what was instru-
WZMB Top 13 Albums
Week of 1-15-89
1. Angst� "Cry For Happy"
2. Dinosaur Jr.� "Bug"
3. Waterboys� "Fisherman's
flues
4. Trotsky Kepick� "Baby"
5. Soundgarden� "O.K
6. Girl Trouble� "Hit it oi
3uitit"
7. Jet Black Berries� "Anima
Necessity"
8. Dead Milkmen� "Beelze-
bubba"
9. Elvis Hitler� "Dis-
graceland"
10. Death of Samantha�
'Where the Women Wear th
jlory and the Men Wear the
ants"
11. Angry Samoans� "STF
hot LSD"
12. Screaming Tribesman�
"Bones and Flowers'
13. Volcano Song� "FAR
El
mental in helping him prepare for
the working world, Dunn cred-
ited his teachers Jim Reese and
Chip Cox. While owing much to
these men and what he learned, at
the same time Dunn feels he
didn't redeve enough training
from his television production
teachings to benefit him in the
business world.
"We didn't get enough
hands-on experience in class. Not
nearly enough time was spent on
editing there shouldbea whole
class on just that"
See INTERN, page 11





I
K
10
TV IE EAST CAROLINIANJANUARY 19,1989
Animal activists protest furs
RCKZKV1LLE, Md. (AD
The Humane Society of the
United States is urging people to
cut up their American Express
cards because the credit institu-
tion mailed a fur coat catalog
announcing: "Fur � Because
winter is long and life is short
"Follow your heart. Drop
your American Express the
Washington-based Humane Soci-
ety told its 830,000 members.
That is but one more confron-
tation in a burgeoning animals
rights, animal welfare and animal
liberation movement that has
been gathering strength across
the nation.
It is by no means monolithic
or even united: The majority
would not agree with some ot the
direct action resulting in burned
buildings, theft of records and
research animals, and death
threats.
There are large differences
about philosophy and tactics.
Many, for example, are unpre-
pared to espouse vegetarianism,
while others go so far as to feed a
meatless diet to their dogs and
cats to spare the suffering o( a
farm animal. It also has closed
down some research projects,
caused one company to drop its
cosmetics line, and improved
conditions for some research ani-
mals.
Consider the following:
� More than 2,000 protesters.
led bv Bob Barker, walked up
Manhattan's Fifth Avenue the
day after Thanksgiving � "Fur
Free Fndav There were smaller
demonstrations in tb other
American cities.
� A research scientist at New
York University's prestigious
Cornell Medical College made
research history when she or the
university, or both, yielded to
demonstrations and a letter-writ-
ing campaign and returned a
$530,000 grant to the National
Institute of Drug Abuse for a
studv of barbituate withdrawal in
cats.
� In England, a few days
before Christmas, the Animal
Liberation Front claimed respon-
sibility for firebomb attacks on
five of Britain's leading depart-
ment stores, causing millic ns of
dollars of damage in retaliation
for selling fur. Dingles, the largest
store in Plymouth, was gutted.
� President-elect George
Bush drew flack for hunting quail
on a vacation in Texas.
Police in Norwalk, Conn
are holding animal rights activist
Fran Stephanie Trutt, 33, of
Queens, N.Y on $500,000 bail as
she awaits trial on charges of at-
tempted murder and possession
of pipe bombs. Trutt was arrested
on Nov. 11 outside the United
States Surgical Corp a firm that
experiments with dogs and has
been a frequent target of demon-
strators.
� In December, "Bloom
County a political comic strip,
ran a week of satire on testing
rabbits for cosmetics.
� And in Huntington, N.Y
on Long Island, a tray of vegetar-
ian dog and cat biscuits, Wow-
Bow and Wow-Meow, are baked
bv an entrepreneurial activist.
The radical side of the move-
ment date back to theanti-vivisec-
tionism of Victorian England, but
interest was rekindled by a 1978
book, "Animal Liberation by
Australian philosopher Peter
Singer.
"At last we're starting to look
like a movement, but animal
rights is in its carlv stages savs
Ingnd Newkirk, chief strategist
and director of People for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals
(PETA), the most radical of an
estimated 3,000 to 7,000 groups
involved in animal welfare.
the established giants, who tend
to be less militant.
While businessmen and sci-
entists say they are worried, activ-
ists claim they have never hurt a
human nor an animal. Alex
Pacheco, a co-founder of PETA,
says arson, property destruction,
burglary or theft are "acceptable
crimes when they directly allevi-
ate the pain and suffering of an
animal The same goes for sit-ine,
disruptions at stockholder meet-
ings in attempts to pass resolu-
tions to ban product testing on
animals.
Animal rights people say the
experiments are the real crime
and that 40 percent of all research
animals are used for cosmetic and
product testing, often as insur-
ance against a theoretical lawsuit,
not as safety measures.
cFefebee cPriqting, qc.
813 South Evans Street
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
79Z4414
u
5$
SELF SERVICE
COPY
8 12 X 11
u
Open M-F 8-5
if it's printed think of Terebrr -Pnqtmg. "Iqc
A PETA spokeswoman esti-
mates that 10 million Americans
are involved and guesses that the
operating budgets of the myriad
groups comes to about $50 mil-
lion. That's not counting the
monev held in endowments bv
Kappa
Alpha
Dear Rushee,
As you are contemplating rushing a
fraternity this spring, a number of doors
will be opened to you. Here at Kappa
Alpha, we offer the door like no other.
As a rushee, you must choose the
organization which you wish to join.
A fraternity of men with whom you will
live for the next four years, and whom you
will call your brothers for the rest of your
life.
We believe that you will agree that, in
fact. Kappa Alpha is the most unique and
traditional of any college fraternity. We
strive for both unity and selection.
Won't you come by and sample a bit of
Southern Tradition?
Good Luck Rushees! iC ' l
RUSH: c '
7-llpm Ur; fM i -
i
Tuesday Wednesday
Jan. 25
Come celebrate
Robert E. Lees B-Day
Thursday
I
Jan. 24
w our
Southern Bells
For Ridesfe Info: Call 757-0128
Jan.26
By Invitation
')
Are you all stressed out
m&z
Then Christ Presbyterian Church
is the place to be for the next
three Sundays, as we focus on:
Cfi ris t
(PresByterian
� How to Enjo) Y Mir Work.
� How to Find Mc ining in
Your W rV
� 1 l.iw to Minimize 1 ru
CflUrcfl and Anxiety.
Sundays, 11:00 a.m. at the Comfort Inn on Greenville Blvd
A congregation of the Presbyterian Church in mmca
756-1666
THETA
fraternity
RUSH
RUSH
1
RUSH WILL BE HELD AT
"THE PUB"
618 PITT STREET
Tuesday, Jan. 24th
Wednesday, Jan. 25th
(Thursday, Jan. 26th,
By Invitation Only)
For Further Info Call
752-7559 or 752-0232
SIGMA
PHI
EPSILON
a lifetime experience
�Chancellor's Cup Champs 4
Years Running
�ECU'S LARGEST FRATERNITY
�1987-88 Inter-Fraternity CouniVs "Most Outstand
ing Chapter Award" Recipient
� 1988 Winner of "ECU Spirit Award"
� 240 Chapters Nationally
� 2 Houses and a Party Room
?$90,000 in Scholarships Awarded
Amtually
Jan, 24ft
Meet Sorority Ladies at Sigma Sigma Sigma
janr35ttv
Meet Sorority Ladies of Alpha Delta Pi
Brothers and Rushees only
Located at the corner of
5th and Summit
(across from Garrett Hall)
Call 757-0487 or 757-030
for information
'The House With The Heart"
l
c
C
F

r
F
c
g
fa
ii
2
V
2
I






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19.19W
Animal activists protest furs
ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) �
The Humane Society of the
United States is urging people to
cut up their American Express
cards because the credit institu-
tion mailed a fur coat catalog
announcing: "Fur � Because
winter is long and life is short
"Follow your heart. Drop
your American Express the
Washington-based Humane Soci-
ety told its 830,000 members.
That is burone more confron-
tation in a burgeoning animals
rights, animal welfare and animal
liberation movement that has
been gathering strength across
the nation.
It is by no means monolithic
or even united: The majority
would not agree with some of the
direct action resulting in burned
buildings, theft of records and
research animals, and death
threats.
There are large differences
about philosophy and tactics.
Many, for example, are unpre-
pared to espouse vegetarianism,
-while others go so far as to feed a
meatless diet to their dogs and
xats to spare the suffering of a
farm animal. It also has closed
-down some research projects,
caused one company to drop its
cosmetics line, and improved
conditions for some research ani-
mals.
Consider the following:
�More than 2,000 protesters,
led by Bob Barker, walked up
Manhattan's Fifth Avenue the
day after Thanksgiving � "Fur
Free Friday There were smaller
demonstrations in 66 other
American cities.
�A research scientist at New
York University's prestigious
Cornell Medical College made
research history when she or the
university, or both, yielded to
demonstrations and a letter-writ-
ing campaign and returned a
$530,000 grant to the National
institute of Drug Abuse for a
study of barbituate withdrawal in
cats.
� In England, a few days
before Christmas, the Animal
Liberation Front claimed respon-
sibility for firebomb attacks on
five of Britain's leading depart-
ment stores, causing millicns of
dollars of damage in retaliation
for selling fur. Dingles, the largest
store in Plymouth, was gutted.
� President-elect George
Bush drew flack for hunting quail
on a vacation in Texas.
� Police in Norwalk, Conn
are holding animal rights activist
Fran Stephanie Trutt, 33, of
Queens, N.Y on $500,000 bail as
she awaits trial on charges of at-
tempted murder and possession
of pipe bombs. Trutt was arrested
on Nov. 11 outside the United
States Surgical Corp a firm that
experiments with dogs and has
been a frequent target of demon-
strators.
� In December, "Bloom
County a political comic strip,
ran a week of satire on testing
rabbits for cosmetics.
� And in Huntington, N.Y
on Long Island, a tray of vegetar-
ian dog and cat biscuits, Wow-
Bow and Wow-Meow, are baked
by an entrepreneurial activist.
The radical side of the move-
ment date back to the anti-vivisec-
tionism of Victorian England, but
interest was rekindled by a 1978
book, "Animal Liberation by
Australian philosopher Peter
Singer.
"At last we're starting to look
like a movement, but animal
rights is in its early stages says
Ingrid Newkirk, chief strategist
and director of People for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals
(PETA), the most radical of an
estimated 3,000 to 7,000 groups
involved in animal welfare.
the established giants, who tend
to be less militant.
While businessmen and sci-
entists say they are worried, activ-
ists clairri'they have never hurt a
human nor an animal. Alex
Pacheco, a co-founder of PETA,
says arson, property destruction,
burglary or theft are "acceptable
crimes when they directly allevi-
ate the pain and suffering of an
animal The same goes for sit-ins,
disruptions at stockholder meet-
ings in attempts to pass resolu-
tions to ban product testing on
animals.
Animal rights people say the
experiments are the real crime
and that 40 percent of all research
animals are used for cosmetic and
product testing, often as insur-
ance against a theoretical lawsuit,
not as safety measures.
eFeltbcc cPritfting, Vip.
813 South Evans Street
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
78B4414
5
SELF SERVICE
COPY
8 12 X 11
Open M-F 8-5
if if a printed . . . think of ,cFeftbce cPririting. qc
A PETA spokeswoman esti-
mates that 10 million Americans
are involved and guesses that the
operating budgets of the myriad
groups comes to about $50 mil-
lion. Thafs not counting the
money held in endowments by
TA
fraternity
��������������������������������
Kappa
Alpha
Are you all stressed out?
Dear Rushcc,
As you are contemplating rushing a
fraternity this spring, a number of doors
will be opened to you. Here at Kappa
Alpha, we offer the door like no other.
As a rushee, you must choose the
organization which you wish to join.
A fraternity of men with whom you will
live for the next four years, and whom you!
will call your brothers for the res f your
life.
We believe that you will agree that, in
met. Kappa Alpha is the most unique and
traditional of any college fraternity. We
strive for both unity and selection.
Won't you come by and sample a bit of
Southern Tradition? ,
Good Luck Rushees! � & &� V-
RUSH:
Then Christ Presbyterian Church
is the place to be for the next
three Sundays, as we focus on:
Christ
Pres6iUrian
Church
How to Enjoy Your Work.
How to Find Meaning in
Your Work.
How to Minimize Frustration
and Anxiety.
Tuesday, Jan. 24th
Wednesday, Jan. 25th
(Thursday, Jan. 26th,
By Invitation Only)
Sundays, 11:00 a.m. at the Comfort Inn on Greenville Blvd.
A congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America
756-1666
� � � � �a���a �������������� � �������
RUSH �
DUI
rill
RUSH WILL BE HELD AT
"THE PUB"
618 PITT STREET
a lifetime experience
ellor's Cup Champs 4
�ECU'S LARGEST FRATERNITY
; �1987-88 Inter-Fraternity Counts "Most Outstahd-
ing Chapter Award" Recipient
�1988 Winner of "ECU Spirit Award"
my
em
?24Q Chapter
For Portlier Info Call
752-7559 or 752-0232

V






t
THE EAST CAKOl INI AN
lANL'AKY 19,1989 11
1
thrown is "Black and Blue"
1-W YORK (Al Ruth
town is getting ahead b) going
vkv ard.
She became a recording star
rig rhythm n blue- in the
30s Now he s on Broadway
. jazz and blues dating
nm three decades before mat.
rnd it works She S teamed with
la I fopkins andai rk Smith
the revue Bl i k and Blue, a
?ration ol songs from the '20s,
md'40s. ll d on Broad-
i Ian 15 at the Minskoll 1'hea-
; ' not just the three sing rs
pil tap dancers and sell known
musicians in the band.
V hen Blacfc and blue '
ed in Paris in 1985 tl ran for
months and Vogue maga-
led it Fhe coo I thingin
����' �l black
in music.
fn the 1950s Miss Brown v as
tic Reci � � � rded
former. S � mpedoutsom
s" rhythm 'n' blues releases and
some called Atlantic "the House
that Ruth Built
She admits that, at her "Black
and Blue" audition, 1 was a little
hesitant, to tell the truth. I'd been
singing rhythm'n' blues. I had not
experienced that whole Cotton
Club scene; that's what the gen-
era! idea was based on.
"We went to Paris shortly
after the movie 'Hie Cotton Club'
had been a good hit in Paris
But now, barkening back to
some ot the fine old hits of an
earlier golden age of cabarets and
Broadway re ues, she is not only
comfortable, she promises new
success
If ' black and Blue's" three
singers are patterned after any-
body, she says, it is the Peters Sis
ters a trio of American sisters
��� ho became a hit in Europe. 'The
lasl one Virginia Peters, is living
in Paris. She saw the show and
said she was pleased. It was remi-
niscent of her good times
Miss Brown had three solos in
Paris and she still docs, but
"Mood Indigo" has been replaced
She was born Ruth VVeston on fan.
12, 1928, in Portsmouth, Va the
oldest of seven children whose
father was a Methodist choir di-
rector.
At 16, she had joined Lucky
Millinder's band.
Traveling with Millinder, she
says, "1 was keeping company
with one of the fellows in the
band. Unless I wanted to be1 bur-
ied when 1 got home, I thought I
better get married. That's how 1
got Brown
C
Bv the time she got to Wash-
ington, she and trumpeter immy
Brown were separated and
Millinder fired her for fetching
drinks for the musicians
She had left home against her
father s wishes and found herself
'
Actress researches Vietnam war
os - ;
l .v. h id I read s
r � ��'��
i : he is too


Mm
More
in the
- se

n its
� uesdaj
d season, ih
phasis cm
lys Mex
says rhe
vras only
e much
I -1 t
tin since
id looking at docu-
. n get a feeling
eople felt then. It's
; some-
. m
ist year,
� i rused on an
� nbat
� season
ne n es ahead
Signed to T ri bn Mhut Air
i -
ane - Betsy
tan Gauthier have
lays
a civilian psychologist working
tor the go ernment and Gauthier
is a young helicopter pilot. The
v's returning stars are Ter-
ence Knox, Stephen Caffrey, Tony
ker, Stan Foster, Ramon
Franco and Miguel A. Nunez Jr.
"he changes in Tour of
heretofore an all-male
-how that revolved around com-
bat situations, undoubtedlv re-
flect the success or ABC's "China
Beach I hat show, sot al a hospi-
tal and rest and recreation area.
puts its emphasis on the women
in Vietnam.
Delaney says she is some-
times confused with Dana De-
lam- who stars as a nurse in
China Beach
"My character has an office in
Saigon but she spendsa lot of time
in the field she says. "It's a good
role because I'm not with just one
person. I'm involved with all the
people. Alex is innocent when she
arrives. She hasn't been corrupted
by the world. She wants to get to
the truth of each storv, whatever it
is, at anv cost
� Aky Stadia aimafkmmkm
love interest- with it Mvrort
Goldman, the platoon leader
played bv Stephen Caffrey. She's
also attracted to Lt. johnny
McKay, the helicopter pilot
Fhiladanco given high marks
trican
losingi mb -
ind . lank i I lair
' d the entire show. It
� lancers s emed
h igging their
to
ir eni
Haard
physics
( ontinued from page l)
I tl n oney isn't coming
: ket.
ips the best featureof
ti . . unty is its im isible
leer. Whenever a crucial
nt in your psup,a
i iembodied voice rings out.
i bass twang it savs things
Mow, ! w d you sup-
�� them b. j s are gonna get
fthis ��
rhi - ustan introductory
Ac to the hippest show on
� ision. 1 his does not qual-
� .is a part of ITie 1 la-
�t yet. I k not attempt to
The Dukes ol H,iz
ithout first taking the
Placement rest
About halt-way through the
dance, Antonio C. Scott per-
formed a short solo which
brought an impromptu round of
applause from the balcony. After
that, the rest of the dancers
matched Scott's intensity, throw-
ing themselves entirely into the
dance to earn their final round or
applause.
Write a letter
to the Editor
Plaza Cinema
Plaza Shopping Ctr. 75t-OOHH
Ends Thus
SCROOGED
Starts Friday
TWINS
HELLRAISER III
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DEEPSTAR SIX
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RATKD R
TEQUILA SUNRISE
1:30-4:00-7:00-9:15
played by Gauthier. Her role as a
eorrcspondent requires her to
take frequent trips to combat
zones in a helicopter.
Delaney made her profes-
sional debut in the ABC soap
opera "All My Children
ECU intern
complimented
Continued from page 9
Unfortunately, what Dunn
talks about is what led newsdirec-
tor of VVITN, Chris McDaniels, to
end their internship program
with ECU. "Chrisisa stem profes-
sional who can help out new
people a great deal said Dunn
but he has to get something in
return. He didn't feel that our
grads were prepared enough for
what the station needs
As a resit, Paul was the last
intern student for Channel 7 from
ECU. "1 was fortunate to get this
job. I've learned more here in six
months than in anything else"
without the price of a bus ticket
home, "standing on a street cor-
ner by the Howard Theater with
my suitcase in my hand, 225 miles
from home.
"A young man walked up I
recognized; he was a singer with
1 forace Heidt. He took me to the
Crystal Caverns and introduced
me to Blanche Calloway. She gave
me a chance to sing for her audi-
ence. They received me in such a
wa she said she'd put me to work
for a week.
"Blanche was Cab
( alloway's sister. She was one of
the first female band leaders and
one of the most gorgeous women
ever to cross the stage. This show
would have been her cup of tea
Blanche Calloway became
her manager. Miss Brown savs,
She called the son of the Turkish
ambassador who was starting a
record company anil suggested
he get down and listen to this
girl
Miss Brown says that the
song people remember besi is
'Mama 1 le Treats Your Daughter
Mean
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12
CARO Nl W
VNl N lW
Escape Club wants safe sex
m its Of nun;
ihol Wild, Wild V est has
t! il hincss 'hat
k . � mds dan� � on the
IS VOI
radio
- pi ilsing rhythmic ik
Kil takes a sul � - � '
wax when Iht song suddenh
to a �� io-i
tl - � 1! choru
Given
ate sex
-
Ivrics
; guil

lh ts in mid November
md s video has been MTV's
! lip �. . th Week
It shouldn t ha e hap
. as mean! to happi n
, : Mil third mTu added
i a
;h i V � Kit does
� , lemol where to go
'�� � � kersare
mplainii � 1 he Es ape
h is oi : manv English
ive had to i ross the
' . : significant atten-

have that pi i i-
our music played
nser ative radio.
n that facility in
�ple here have
risto said
Wild Wild,
Records, went
I - � .� v in mid IV-
I ivn.
sea elub s sense ol
� �� � � � ility for
their music
� � v � ol their
� release
� �� . V I etitleisa
�rds that
-
.1
ro-
nounced 'shakes') and you call
them sheiks' (pronounced
sheiks') It doesn't quite work
Christo admits with a smile.
Hie band clearly has fun but
they reached this point only be-
cause of their initial frustration
when seriously forming the Es-
capeClub. They sa themselves
as an alternative to the synth-pop
music dominating English radio
And thev resented the manufac-
tured pop artists' "no perform-
ance" type of show.
"You might as well have sat at
home, had a beer and listened to
the album' said Zekavica "We
wanted to he a live hand and go
out and play accessible rock n'
roll. '
The band's name mirrors il
successful escape from that music
scene and the turn toward the raw
energy not unlike that of its glam
rock heroes, David Bowie, r-Rex
and C uirv Glitter.
The Escape Club's early dy-
namic performances soon earn d
it the reputation as an exceptional
live hand which led to a coveted
televsion appearance on "Tin
lube " a new music show at the
time The hand then signed with
EMI Records and released it �
debut album. "White Fields.
"It's a darker album Zekav-
ica said "We had always been put
in the U? bracket jus! because we
played guitars"
In anuary 1987, the hand
took a year oft from the st �ge to
write new songs Producerhris
Kemsy came across iin Escape
Club demonstration tape and
telephoned Their � ollaboration
resulted in the band's live energy
heard on the "Wild, Wild, West
album. The songs stand on th ir
own.
The album includes a r.eai i
mixture of uptempo music, ba!
lads like "Goodbye oey Rae,
and even an atmospheric number,
'Only the R lin
"We w rite songs �. ith melo
dies, with hook hristosaid A
song is where it's at in m Lxxk It
you're washing the di ;hes y u
don't want to hear someone pla
i ng his guitar
"You don't go around whis
tling a guitar solo, chimed in
Zekavica.
Woman's story chills readers



� .
i
led tc
- i pite

rt posi
. lot-
her,
' n
was
� ii bv ! ku
. pa
n the
l it re-
in
While the ston has been told
rt m such books as "Sybil
this is the first book b a profes
sional . i iter about her own abuse
and multiple personalities.
I Inlike Sybil, whose case has
I �. n documented bv psycholo
gists Eraser did not seek ps c hiat-
ric help. She completely blocked
out all conscious memorj ol her
abuse and maintained that the
child victim was a completely
separate personalitv
Through personal awareness
and woman consciousness-rais
ing sessions in the 1970s, she
slowly came to t rms with who
she was rheactual memory (amc
spontaneously one day in I9S3
while she was socializing with
I nt nds
i raser was a journalist befon
her first novel, Pandira " was
published in 197 haswritU n
tour novels si: � all of th� n.
themes or incid� i tsol sexual in-
ence
"Ofcoui e now I understand
that it was mv other self she said.
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I
f
1
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19,1989
Escape Club wants safe sex
(AP)� From its opening
gunshot, "Wild, Wild West" has
that undeniable catchiness that
make your hands dance on the
steering wheel as you listen to it
on the car radio.
Its pulsing, rhythmic rock
beat takes a subtle back seat mid-
way, when the song suddenly
slides into a reggae-rapping
number before it smoothly rocks
back to the original chorus.
"Give me, give me wild west,
give me, give me safe sex raps
lead vocalist and songwriter Tre-
vor Steel of the Escape Club.
A band professing a social
conscience? No, not really.
"We want to have run with
the lyrics� they're a bit tongue-
in-cheek' said JonnieChristo, the
group's bass guitarist and back-
ing vocalist, in a recent interview-
Milan Zekavica is the drum-
mer of the four-member band,
lohn Holliday is on guitars and
also serves as backing vocalist. All
hail from the London area.
The 5 1 2-year-old rock band
is having a lot of unexpected fun
since its first U.S. single, "Wild,
Wild, West has overwhelmed
the airwaves and club scenes, and
been in heavy rotation on Music
Television. It hit No. 1 on both
Cashbox and Billboard's best-
selling charts in mid-November.
The band's video has been MTV's
"Hip Clip of the Week
"It shouldn't have hap-
pened Christo said.
This was meant to happen
for our third song added
Zedavica.
Although a No. 1 hit does
create the problem of where to go
next, these personable rockers are
.not complaining. The Escape
Club is one of many English
bands that have had to cross the
Atlantic to get significant atten-
tion.
"We didn't have that privi-
lege of getting our music played
on England's conservative radio.
We were given that facility in
America and the people here have
put it to No. 1 Christo said.
The album "Wild, Wild,
West' on Atlantic Records, went
to No. 25 in Cashbox in mid-De-
cember and started down.
The Escape Club's sense of
humor, an important quality for
themselves and for their music,
shines again in the lyrics of their
second hard-hitting release,
"Shake for the Sheik The title is a
play on words that
unintentionally goes over some
American heads.
"We call Arabs 'sheiks' (pro-
nounced 'shakes') and you call
them 'sheiks' (pronounced
'sheeks'). It doesn't quite work
Christo admits with a smile.
The band clearly has fun, but
they reached this point only be-
cause of their initial frustration
when seriously forming the Es-
cape Club. They saw themselves
as an alternative to the synth-pop
music dominating English radio.
And they resented the manufac-
tured pop artists' "no perform-
ance" type of show.
"You might as well ha ve sat at
home, had a beer and listened to
the album said Zekavica. "We
wanted to be a live band and go
out and play accessible rock 'n'
roll
The band's name mirrors it
successful escape from that music
scene and the turn toward the raw
energy not unlike that of its glam-
rock heroes, David Bowie, T-Rex
and Gary Glitter.
The Escape Club's early dy-
namic performances soon earned
it the reputation as an exceptional
live band, which led to a coveted
televsion appearance on "TIk
Tube a new music show at the
time. The band then signed with
EMI Records and released its
debut album, "White Fields
"It's a darker album Zekav-
ica said. "We had al way s been pu t
in the U2 bracket just because we
played guitars
In January 1987, the band
took a year off from the stage to
write new songs. Producer Chris
Kemsy came across an Escape
Club demonstration tape and
telephoned. Their collaboration
resulted in the band's live energy
heard on the "Wild, Wild, Wesi
album. The songs stand on thiir
own.
The album includes a heofc y
mixture of uptempo music, bal-
lads like "Goodbye Joey Rae
and even an atmospheric number,
"Only the Rain
"We write songs with melo-
dies, with hook Christo said. "A
song is where it's at in my book. If
you're washing the dishes, you
don't want to hear someone play-
ing his guitar
"You don't go around whis-
tling a guitar solo chimed in
Zekavica.
Woman's story chills readers
TORONTO (AP) - The story
oi child abuse that Sylvia Fraser
tells in "Mv Father's House"
would be chilling on anv terms.
But. even more so, the story is
the writer's own. Fraser created a
separate identity, another self, to
exist when her father sexually
abused her during childhood. The
other self remained hidden and
unknown to her for 40 years until
she realized she had been an
abused child and summoned
back the memories.
She started to write a novel
about what had happened but
was "offended" by the idea that
she was putting into fiction some-
thing that was fact. She decided to
go ahead with the book despite
the self-exposure needed.
The response has been posi-
tive, she said, including many let-
ters from people who tell her,
"You've written my story"
"My Father's House4" was
first published last year by Dou-
bledav Canada and, now in pa-
perback, has been high on the
Canadian best-seller lists. It re-
cently was published in
hardcover in the United States.
WTiile the story has been told
before in such books as "Sybil
this is the first book by a profes-
sional writer about her own abuse
and multiple personalities.
Unlike Sybil, whose case has
been documented by psycholo-
gists, Fraser did not seek psychiat-
ric help. She completely blocked
out all conscious memory of her
abuse and maintained that the
child victim was a completely
separate personality.
Through personal awareness
and woman consciousness-rais-
ing sessions in the 1970s, she
slowly came to terms with who
she was. The actual memory came
spontaneously one day in 1933
while she was socializing with
friends.
Fraser was a journalist before
her first novel, "Pandora was
published in 1972. She has written
four novels since, all of them
themes or incidents of sexual vio-
lence.
"Of course, now I understand
that it was my other self she said.
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Wednesday, Jan. 25th
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Thursday, Jan. 26th
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The House at the bottom of the hill.
For more Information call 757-3042
Rush Times 7:00 - 11:00
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V.
v





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19,1989 13
The Clearly Labeled
cMfiS5'
Quote of the Week:
"Because we own
the matches
-Sellna
Big E says work relationship bad
Dear Earh is
I work with tlii- realh hot
guy, but 1 don't want to ,k him
out because it might ruin our
working relationship tthei trrn
time, 1 really do want to go out
with him. Oh. what should ! do?
Signed, Split
Dear Split Ends,
Once a long time ag ent
out with a girl he wor, i u ith
whichby the way vvashii boss in
the end, dictionaries and exacto
were thrown at the head ot the 1"
feminist should enjoy knowing
that). But that was just one iso
lated case.
My advice is to do exactly
what 1 did, allow vour momen-
tary lusts to overtake vou and
don't worry about the conse-
quences oi what will happen the
next day at work.
Paid Ho
Dear Earl vis,
1 Hiring Christmas, I went to a
bachelor party. A couple of my
friends from school were there
and as bachelor parties go, we got
drunk. From the bar we went to a
strip joint.
After watching the strippers
take our dollar bills with all parts
A their anatomy, we exited the
Mace for the drive home. But one
ol the guvs in the group said the
fun wasn't over and led the eight
oi us to a nearby hotel room.
In the hotel room there was a
big, fat prostitute. 1 really didn't
understand what was going on,
but when she said "Who is first?
my friend (1 call him Pugsley to
disguise his true identity) said "I
am, 1 am The ho then said "Well
take your clothes off which
Pugsley proceeded to do right in
front oi everybody in the hotel
room.
She performed fellatio on him
in front of us and needless to say
we were busting with laughter.
Pugsley seemed to enjoy it, even
Justftsk
Big E
when the prostitute called him
"Stump
Well Earlvis, I'm kind of
worried about Pugsley now. Is he
a blatant exhibitionalist and if so
how can I help him with his prob-
lem?
Signed, Pugsley Has a Prob-
lem
Dear Flash,
Is your friend the same giv
who plays a perverse game in
downtown bars called Dick Tag?
Does your friend belong to a so-
cial club (which I will refrain from
naming) called the Rugby club
who strip fellow members in
public settings and keep their
clothes?
As a matter of fact that name,
Pugsley, it seems I have heard that
name before in reference to a
rugby player whose real name is
Robert, but they call him Bob.
If this is the same guy, then
the answer to your question is yes
he is a true exhibitionalist. Exhibi-
tionalism is a deep seated psycho-
logical disorder in which the per-
son enjoys doing strange acts,
while nude, in front of an audi-
ence. The sickness usually origi-
nates from the thrill of tinkling in
the swimming pool at an early
age. Your friend Pugsley is a sick
man.
Now how to help him. The
best therapy, keep on calling him
"Stump
More Dukes
Dear Earlvis,
Please clear this up for me. On
"The Patty Duke Show were
there two girls, or one playing
Patty and Kathy Lane? I've heard
it was just Patty herself, but the
double effect looks so real!
And is there really such a
thing as identical cousins? If not,
then where did Vance and Coy
come from (the Duke cousins who
replaced Bo and Luke)? If you
could answer these for me 'd
really appreciate it. Oh, an I
don't believe for a moment those
rumors that you died in 78.
Signed,
Seeing Double in Ayden
Dear Double Vision,
Why do you people watch so
much television? Who gives a
damn about the "The Patty Duke
Show But after intensive re-
search on the matter, we found
out that Patty Duke's double was
none other than a young strug-
gling actor named Mike
Krzyzewski, the present head
coach of the Duke basketball
team.
It is rumored Coach K gave
such an inspiring performance as
Kathy Lane on the show that
Duke thought he could act like a
real basketball coach, so they gave
him the job. Note that it was "The
Patty DUKE Show By the way,
what was Patty's little brother's
name, wasn't it Danny?
Now to a real American T.V.
classic - "The Dukes Vance and
Coy are experimental rejects from
the mold of Bo and Luke. So when
Bo and Luke suddenly short cir-
cuited after the General Lee flew
into Jackass Pond off ot
Manning's Junction, the produc
ers decided to replace the two
Duke boys with Vance and Coy
By the way, if you say Vancv
and Coy real fast, you get Vanscoy
Diamond Mine near the Food
Lion Plaza off 1-85.
Fan Club?
Dear Big E,
One of my friends has her
own fan club. They call her all the
time at work. Every time the
phone rings we know it's for her
She doesn't even give her fan club
members the dignity of a name!
She just refers to them as Fan
Club Member 1, 2 and so on. 1
think this sort of degradation is
disgusting. Big E, how can I get
my own fan club? I, of course,
would treat my fan club to a few
beers every now and then.
Signed,
Lackey Less
Dear Fanless,
Easy solution, friendless little
buddy. Pay people to be your
friends, it's easy and it works. For
a small nominal fee of $5 a week,
I feel personally, the one and only
E will call you three times a day at
work.
Restaurant serves up delicious new taste treat � goiter burgers
GREENV1LU N.C (1
A new restaurant is causing quite
a stir in this small Bible-belt com-
munity. H is causing a stir of
stomacl s.
From all appearanc es loiter
Burgers looks like a typical last
food restaurant. It has plastic
chairs and a drive tln but
the food- - in particulai tl eii
dients used are not usual fast
d.
Instead of 100 percent ground
beef, the franchise uses 100 per-
cent goiters for their burgers. The
restaurant also offers tumor pat-
ties as an alternative to hash
browns.
"Our Goiter Burger Deluxe is
juicier, tastier than any of our
competition's products, I am
truly proud to be part of Goiter
Burger International Manager
George D. Mented said.
Although the chain of restau-
rants has been open for a month,
their concept is slow to catch on.
Some customers say the food is
good, but wish they would have
known of the ingredients before
they sank their teeth into it.
"They taste like hamburgers,
real juicy and everything, but
some guy just told me the burgers
weren't made of no cow and I am
kinda grossed out and think 1
need to go a recent customer to
the restaurant said.
Company officials say the
chain was started as an alternative nutritious than other fast foods,
to the expanding fast food mar- it is, according to frequent cut
ket. While the food isn't more tomcrs, different tasting.
Alien dentists practice among us!
Argonian invasion force on the way?
Drew gets amputated!
Actress has body removed
to avoid drug abuse!
HOLLYWOOD (BP) Drug
addict Drew Barrymore has had
her entire bodv amputated to
avoid the temptation f abusing
anv more drugs'
Drew entered the Beverly
Hills Hospital Wednesda) and
was wheeled out yesterdaj
minus her torso, arms a A legs!
Drew said that she just didn't
have the will power to n sis; all
the bad stuff my friends were ot-
tering me
"By doing this l'v set an
example for kids all across Amer-
ica just sav 'Amputate Instead
of going through expensh e ther-
apy sessions and painful with-
drawal, kids can just have this
operation and never have to
Men! Would YOU like to
have sex with this attractive
young woman? Of course
you would. Ladies, how often
has that cute frat boy in your
Geography class walked
right by you? Would you like
him to spend his entire Visa
limit on you? Of course you
would!
Now you can! Through
this amazing new MENTAL
PROCESS, you can com-
mand people to do exactly
what you want them to do!
By simply THINKING about
It, your wishes will come
true. HOW?
For a mere $19.95. YOU
will receive a booklet that
tells you how to make your
THOUGHTS into REALITY!
This book, written by the
ancient Tibetan monk we
keep hidden in the closet, is
entitled "BRAINWAVES: Ten
Easy Lessons in Mind Con-
trol and Advertising Scams
The book contains easy-to-
follow directions and dia-
grams so simple a brain-dead
Drew Barrymore could follow
them!
This book will make your
life so incredibly easy, you
will wonder why you even
worry about drugs again
Drew still has to worry about
cocaine, which she can still take
though her nose and mouth. "It's
hard now, since 1 can't use a razor
to cut it up, or hold a straw, but I
can still snort it if I really inhale
hard she said.
Just say,
4 Amputate
But in another week, after her
body has recovered from the
shock oi the first operation, she
will be going under the knife for a
second time this time to remove
FAKE AD
bother to get out of bed in
the morning. Learn how to
stare mystically at people,
Amputee Drew watches as her
friends party, aware she can no
longer partake in the festivities.
her nostrils and mouth. A handy
carrying case for the rest of her
head has already been prepared
by Samsonite� luggage com-
pany, in exchange for a series of
commercial endorsements after
Drew recovers from the second
operation.
duct above your head as you
unleash your mental powers
and even more people will
laugh at you!
Return the fan duct if
you are not completely satis-
fied with your new abilities,
but keep the cheaply-
printed booklet as our gift.
Clip this coupon and
send it in today! Don't even
take the time to put a stamp
on it! It will reach us on the
sheer power of our BRAIN-
WAVES!
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
Alien dentists have been practic-
ing on unwitting Earth people for
over a decade � implanting alien
devices in many patients!
Ben Dover, a prominent local
businessman, began to feel
strange just hours after his six-
month check-up. A newly-filled
cavity in his molar began tingling
then buzzing and finally re-
ceiving radio messages from the
planet Argon.
"I kept thinking someone had
their radio on loud but when 1
took a shower that night, I could
still hear the voices talking about
plan nine' and 'marshalling re-
serve forces beyond Venus
Dover said.
Contacting the police led to a
full scale investigation of Dr. Sam
Tentacle's office practices. Rec-
ords indicated that 90 of
Tentacle's patients had com-
plained of symptoms ranging
from the buzzing Dover de-
scribed to alien death rays
emitting from their fillings when-
ever they passed a microwave
oven.
Tentacle's office was shut
down and Tentacle and his two
assistants, Drilly-D and Tenta
clina Jones were arrested. They
admitted to being part of an ad
vance unit of an Argonian inva-
sion force.
According to authorities, the
Argonians are extremely vulner-
"l could still hear the voices ?
able to microwave radiation. As
the use of microwave ovens in-
creased in the 1980s, the Argonian
High Command ordered that
advance units penetrate Earth
security and try to eliminate the
ovens.
Patients were singled out by
the dentist's assistant, the lovely
and talented Tentaclina, for either
an Argonoian Anti-Microwave
Particle Beam or Argonian Mind
Wipe Receptors. The Receptors
render their wearers comatose
when a few bars of the Argonian
National Anthem is played.
Since being alerted to ;he
space alien's presence on Earth,
authorities are keeping a lookout
for other alien dentists. Mean-
while, Dover is searching for a
dentist who can replace his filling
and not his brain.
lina Jones were arrested. They Microwave Beams in unsuspecting Earthlings. Have you had
dmitted to being part of an ad- your six-month check-up?
Elderly couple dances to death!
Aliens' death ray blamed!
EENVILLE, N.C. (BP) � big, ugly creatures slithered out. the ray beam shone on the
erlv counle nicniekine on Thpv 1r�r�Vf�H liVp oq ;nakix " old man hean tn clutch hi
A pretty girl we tricked into
posing for us.
how to chant Nordic runes
under your breath and other-
wise generally embarrass
yourself at parties as you try
to work this ancient magic.
But that's not all! You
will also get. free of charge,
The Mystic Fan Duct that
will add potency to your
powers. Merely hold this 24
karat, jewel-embossed fan
THIS DOESNT WORK
j
� Name
I I
Address
.Phone (If you're single, attrac-
tive and think morals are pretty
Inuch unnecessary in the 80s
I I
�This offer void where l might get u into any kind
of legal hatles. g
Act
Tomorrow!
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP)
An elderly couple picnicking on
the banks of the Tar River were
kidnapped by space aliens and
forced to tango until they
dropped dead.
Beverly and Shaymont
Sweeney had packed a lunch bas-
ket and headed out to the town
commons for a quiet 45th anniver-
sary celebration. But their picnic
was to be anything but quiet.
According to authorities,
space aliens who had lain dor-
mant in the Tar River for an esti-
mated two million years were
awakened by the aroma of
Spam� sandwiches Beverly
packed. Neighbors of the de-
ceased couple say that Spam on
rye was Shaymont's favorite
lunch.
Police rushed to the scene
when the space aliens' ship rose
out from the river bed. But it was
too late for the Sweeneys. Wit-
nesses report that the couple
never had a chance.
Visiting foreign dignitary
Yug Grossedout said, "It was,
how you say, horrible! The hatch
of the space alien ship opened and
big, ugly creatures slithered out.
They looked like gas snakes
"The couple screamed and
tried to run. The space aliens
trained a ray beam on them. Sud-
denly, the old couple grasped
each others' hands nd began to
tango. They were quite good he
added.
By this time, police had ar-
rived. Police chief Gordon O
Hara reported, "The Sweeneys
began to dance faster and faster as
the ray beam shone on them. The
old man began to clutch his chest
but he kept dipping and stepping
faster and faster. Finally, he col
lapsed
Police reports indicate that
Beverly continued her mad danc-
ing, supporting her dead hus
band for another five minutes
until she too collapsed. The space
aliens then teleported the Spam�
sandwiches into their spacecraft
and flew off.
An elderly couple, just like the one pictured here, danced to
death in the park after an alien death ray sapped them.





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Eve of Fire
By Oglesb)
The Itsy-Bitsy, Teeny-Weeny
Miniscule Pint-size, li'l
"Tliat's because you're a
born loser, Toymaker
-Space Ghost
Due to the extra comic load added by Paul "hog the page" Friedrich and
our new debut strip'Eye of Fire there will be no Fun or Games this week.
Instead, we're going to print one letter from our tons of fan mail that we get
every week! We love comments, by the way, so keep 'em coming!
Yo Fun and Gamesters,
Just a quick note to applaud your declaration of 1989 as the Year of the Wrestler. I know that
your decision to do so will be viewed by many as crass sensationalism, since it was revealed only
hours before your paper went to press that in the latefTs President-elect George Bush along
with famed entertainer Peter Loire wrestled throughout Texas and Mexico as the Masked
Grappling Republicans I and II.
In spite of this I believe that through the efforts of you and your staff of thousands, people
will soon come to see Fun and Games for what it was meant to be, not as propaganda poisoning
Doug in Garner, ha! Fun and Games by Jeff "Usin' my powers for good in '89" Parker
the minds of our allies across the seas or a melon-free diet, but as an all-encompassing lifestvle
for the 1990's.
P.S. I am eagerly awaiting the premiere of your one-man play on the Sincerely,
life and times of child star Mason Reese Mason: We Hardly Knew Ye"
Thanks for the kind words, J.H Since we printed your letter, you'll soon be receiving your oum
button of our wrestling hero, VI Espectro, and the "fun and Games" home game! That's all for
this week, fans- be here next week when "Fun and Games" will be back , but a little larger . . .
and a little iviser.







!


I"HF. KASTCAROl INI AN
Sports
IANUARY19, 1W� Page 15
New NCAA scholarship restrictions protested by Thompson
WASHINGTON (AD �
There will be no more symbolic
walks across the basketball court
for Georgetown coach John Th-
ompson, but that doesn't mean
his protest against toughei
NX A A restrictions on scholar-
ships is anywhere close to a con-
tusion.
Thompson attracted national
.mention when he walked off the
. uirt Saturday' night just prior to
lie Hoyas' game against Boston
v ollege. 1 le said Monday that he
ill not duplicate that demon-
stration, but gave no indication
whether he would return to guide
rird-ranked Georgetown against
'ro idence on Wednesday.
i have no more intention of
emg to the bench and walking
off he said. "1 think that point
was made. Hut I will not go to the
bench until I am satisified. I just
have to feel sincerely that were
moving in the right direction"
Thompson's protest is di-
rected against Proposition 42,
which establishes more difficult
entrance and scholarship require-
ments tor incoming freshmen.
While the rule is slated to take
effect in 19, Thompson has said
lie wants something done about
the proposal, which he termed
"discriminatory long before
then.
Thompson refused to indi-
cate exactly what changes or ac-
tions he seeks, i le said he planned
to talk to some "people of influ-
ence" in the next tew days, but
refused to specify with whom he
will be consulting. He also in-
sisted that he has no intention of
placing any demands on anyone.
"A lot of what I am trying to
do 1 do not want to reveal because
I don't want to intimidate anyone
or badger or give an ultimatum
Thompson said. "It would be easy
tor a person to say they make a
mistake and to help you if you
don't do that to them with some-
thing as sensitive as this. I don't
want to put someone in a position
where I'm saying, 'If you don't do
this, I'm not going to go back on
the bench
In an interview with The
Associated Press and three news-
papers that had requested to meet
with Thompson, the coach ques-
tioned the balloting process used
in adopting the controversial rule.
Comparing a computer printout
that showed how each school
voted with information he had
gathered from individual athletic
directors, he noticed a discrep-
ancy.
"I wonder whether people
understood clearly what they
were doing about something that
is very significant he said. "1 am
not certain I am correct, but I am
doing research. I wonder whether
the process was explained clearly
to these people
Thompson pointed out that
three predominately black
schools voted for the measure and
that American University athletic
director Joseph O'Donnell said he
voted for the rule when in fact the
computer printout shows he
voted against Proposition 42.
"1 don't know what the story-
is, but there's something wrong
Thompson said. "It'sobvious that
it's confusing
Thompson said the vocal sup-
port he has received is "flatter-
ing but doesn't mean a thing if
the rule stays alive until it is dis-
cussed again during the January
1990 NCAA convention at Dallas.
"Why is it so sacred that it
cannot be rescinded?" he asked.
"We live in America, and anytime
we let policy rather than people
dictate what we do, we live in a
sad state. People make decisions
and we make mistakes. Let's get
the rule off the books
Proposition 42 would pre-
vent high school students who
meet only part of the NCAA's
criteria from receiving athletic
scholarships while they sit out
their first year of collegiate eligi-
bility under Proposition 48.
Thompson has claimed the
proposal is discriminatory be-
cause oi the emphasis it places on
tests he and some educators claim
arc biased against people from
lower socio-economic classes.
Campbell continues success
Bv MICHAEL ZAKELY
i.
F
�r a student athlete, per-
the hardest thing to do is
ieve success both academi-
and athletically. Diver
Sherry Campbell has managed to
. xcel in both, areas and beyond.
Campbell is the defending
Colonial Athletic Association
diving champion. She has also
been named to the Academic Ail-
American team the three years
she has been diving at the college
level. Last year, Campbell quali-
fied for the NCAA regionals be-
fore being eliminated.
Campbell holds all diving
records for women at Fast Caro-
I i na. She has a career best of 267.10
points in the 1-meter spring-
board, and 432.65 in the 3-meter
springboard. Both are East Caro-
1 I niversity school records,
spite spending much of
;e at diving, Campbell still
car 5 a 3.8 grade point average
her hrst three years oi school.
Campbell has a double major in
math and computer science. After
graduating, she plans to get a job
in computer science
s' tern- Campbell
greates. accomplish-
a diver Campbell
"My
ment as
said, "was winning the confer-
ence championship last year
Campbell's best dive is the in-
ward one-and-a-haH somersault
pike off the high board.
Campbell does not feel pres-
sure from being the senior team
captain. Most oi the pressure
comes from within to retain her
conference title. "She is the defi-
nite favorite to win the individual
conference title this year said
Fast Carolina diving coach Ion
Rose. "But she is really going to
have to hit all her dives to retain
her title
"Her greatest asset is her
maturity said Rose. "She gener-
ates a lot oi team spirit for us at
kev times
Campbell always knew she
would have success academically
at the college level. She also be-
lieved she would succeed as a
college diver. "If I do my best it is
fine if someone else beats me
Campbell said.
Campbell has alwavs gone
through a certain routine before
she docs a dive. "I always watch
myself in my mind do the dive
See SWIMMER, page 16
Sherry Campbell takes to the air as she pulls into a ruck after leaping off the three-meter
springboard. Campbell holds the East Carolina University school record in the three-meter
springboard as well as in the one-meter springboard. Although diving is a great love,
Campbell also excells in school as she currently boasts a 3.8 cumulative average (Photo by
Tom Doyle).
Lady Pirate basketball player: a star on and off the court
By DAVID MONROE
Sports Writer
ssociation
earn her
In a time when more and
more collegiate athletes arc being
influenced by monetary compen-
sation in return for performance,
it comes as a pleasant surprise to
know that East Carolina isattract-
mg the type of individuals who
are inclined to better themselves
than just pursue fame and glory as
an athlete.
One particular individual
who has chosen East Carolina not
Sarah Gray
�r its athletic reputation or po-
ential, but rather for the respect
and credibility placed upon its
graduates is Sarah Gray.
Don't be fooled though, for
Sarah Gray is no typical athlete.
During her senior year at Wash-
ington High School in Washing-
: Sarah was elected to be
n the Converse Honorable Men-
Colonial Athletic A�
(CAA) All-Rookie
freshmen year while playing for
the Lady Pirates.
Sarah, who has molded her-
self after the playing style of
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, has devel-
oped into a first class basketball
player who possesses an ex-
tremely soft-touch around the
basket and who is agile enough to
penetrate opposing defenses and
sieze opportunities when they
present themselves.
Currently ranked 2nd in the
CAA in rebounding (eight per
game) and 5th in scoring (17
points per game) and previously
ranked 5th in steals, it comes as no
surprise as to why Sarah Gray has
been singled out for her prowess
on the basketball court.
But like most East Carolina
athletes, Sarah pursues her aca-
demic goals with as much inten-
sity and desire as when compet-
ing on the court. A Special Educa-
tion major, Sarah looks forwards
to moving to Charlotte, 'C. to
help handicapped children.
Although Sarah does not
want to be singled out for her
accomplishments she wants to be
successful none the less. The suc-
cess that she has experienced
while playing basketball renews
her desire to not only succeed on
the court, but also in life. It is with
her devotion toward improving
herself and assisting those who
are less fortunate than others that
best portrays Sarah Gray as an
individual.
With several conference bas-
ketball games remaining to be
quick to point out that the success
of the Ladv Pirates would be
greatly increased if more people
would attend the home games
and support them. "The crowd
really motivates me and my team-
mates to plav better and to trv
harder Gray said.
Although she lacks Blue
Edward's ability to dunk, she too
can provide excitement for the
fans. All that is needed is a boost
from the student body to let the
Lady Pirates and Sarah Gray
know that they support them.
mwwiawwaay. �
�mmmmmmM
JliM
Walsh not expected
to return next season
MIAMI, Ha. (AP) � Bill their desire the newspaper
Walsh is not expected to return quoted DeBartolo as saying.
next season as coach of the San
Francisco 49ers, according to
published reports quoting team
owner Edward DeBartolo.
DeBartolo, in separate inter-
views published today, said he
didn't think the outcome of the
49crs' Super Bowl showdown
Sunday with Cincinnati would
have any bearing on such a deci-
sion.
As recently as Ian. 1, after the
49ers beat the Minnesota Vikings
34-9 in a divisional playoff game,
DeBartolo said heexpected Walsh
to "do his thing" and coach again
next season.
But on Monday. DeBartolo
said "a gut feeling" now tells him
Walsh will be stepping out.
"If I had to guess right now, I
would guess that Bill's made his
"He just wants to wait till af- mind up DeBartolo said. "I had
to guess again. I'd think that Bill
would want to take some time off
(from coaching), win or lose.
"Bill seems very at peace witn
himself. He's just enjoying what
he's doing. That makes me think
that he's made up his mind
Interviewed while playing
ter the season's over DeBartolo
said in interviews published.in
the San Francisco Chronicle and
Santa Rosa Press Democrat. "I
assume this is his (Walsh's) last
game
"He's told me that. Basically,
he's told (the media), too. I really
believe that Monday, probably, or
maybe Tuesday, at the latest, he'll golf at the Doral Country Club,
Walsh refused to discuss the re-
port, the Press Democrat said.
But Walsh, who has posted a
101-63-1 record since becoming
49ers coach in 1979, seemed to
hint Sunday night that changes
might be in the offing.
m All-American Basketball
iam; a prestigious honor few played, Sarah would enjoy noth-
v e the pleasure of enjoying. A ing more than to capture the CAA
ledicated worker who is highly Championship and earn a birth in
(tivated, she was selected to the the NCAA Tournament. Sarah is
8�p
Sarah Gray passes the ball back to her teammate (Photo by ECU
Photo Lab).
(make an announcement) De-
Bartolo told the Chronicle on
Monday.
DeBartolo told the Chronicle
he put at no better than 20 percent
the odds that Walsh would coach
the 49ers again in 1989.
"I wouldn't say it's etched in
stone that he's not going to
coach DeBartolo said. "I think
80-20. I can't unequivocally say
that, but I don't think he's going to
coach
He told the Press Democrat
he is almost certain that Walsh,
"I can sav that I'm going to be
back with the 4uers next year in
some capacity, he said. 1 have
one year left on my contract, so I'll
certainly be back
While he refused to be spe-
who has led the 49ers to two Super af ,c, DeBartolo told the newspa-
Bowl victories, will resign.
"He's the best coach in foot-
ball, but sometimes people lose
per Walsh's successor could come
See WALSH, page lb
Charlotte wins on the road against Philadelphia
rillLADEPHIA (AP) � The
expansion Charlotte Hornets had
an unusual experience here - they
won a road game.
When they beat the Philadel-
phia 76ers 127-122 in overtime
Monday, the Hornets snapped an
11-game road losing streak.
It was the second road victory
n 17 tries for Charlotte in their
first season in the NBA. Their last
win away from home was Nov.
19, a 107-105 edge over San Anto-
nio.
This was Charlotte's 10th vic-
tory of the season, ended a four-
game losing streak, and snapped
a five-game Philadelphia win-
ning string.
The game was the second in
two days between the teams,
Philadelphia winning Sunday in
Charlotte, 116-109.
"It was a big win, especially
against the Sixers, a quality
team said Kelly Tripucka,
whose 40 points led the Hornets.
Rex Chapman shared the
hero role with Tripucka. The
rookie had a season high tying 25
points.
Chapman's big shot came
with 15 seconds left in regulation,
a 26-foot, 3-pointer that tied the
game at 110 and forced an over-
time.
"We drew up a play
Chapman said. 'They doubled
Kelly (Trioucka), and (Tyrone)
Bogucs found me. I just let it go. i
wasn't sure it was going in
Philadelphia coach Jimmy
Lynam recalled the Chapman
shot: "We broke down defen-
sively to give Chapman a chance
to shoot three at the end. We
didn't shadow him
In the overtime, the lead
changed hands three times before
a Chapman basket gave the Hor-
nets a 120-118 lead. Tripucka and
Bogues followed with baskets to
make it 124-118.
The closest the Sixers got after
that was 124-120 with 44 seconds
remaining. Trioucka then put it
out of reach at 126-120 with 27
seconds on the clock.
Tripucka made 16 of 25 from
the field and 7 of 9 at the foul line.
Chapman was 11 for 26 from
the field and a perfect 2-2 at the
line.
See HORNETS, page 18
WINTER SPORTS
RECORD
Men's Basketball 8-7
Women's Basketball 6-7
Men's Swimming 8-0
Women's Swimming 7-1





f
16
n IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19. 1989
UNLV wins as No. 11 Syracuse lose
A r TU i u M 11 Cj u,n to r:n � 1i� �j ,
(AD The timing would
have done a Las Vegas nightclub
comic proud. It was good enough
to keep the Nevada-Las Vegas
Runnin' Rebels from defeat.
Greg Anthony's only 3-
pointer of the night came with
three seconds to go and gave the
lOth-ranked Rebels a 66-63 vie
lory over lightly regarded Fuller-
ton State.
"Maybe we're just not very
good; I don't know UNLV7 coach
ferry Tarkanian said after Mon-
day nioht's victory.
Anthony, a sophomore guard
who scored just five points in the
game, launched his desperation
25-fboter after Fullerton's Cedric
Ceballosm had tied the game at 63
with 11 seconds left when he hit a
3-point jumper.
"We got outhustled at home.
in'front of our own people Tar-
kanian moaned.
At least Nevada-Las Vegas
ended up a winner. The same
can't be said tor No. 11 Syracuse,
which fell 68-62 to Connecticut.
In other games involving Top
rwenty teams, it was No. r Michi-
gan 99, No. 16 Ohio State 73; No.
8 Missouri 104. Virginia Tech 99;
No. 12 Soton Hall 78, Villanova
61; and No. 20Stanford 93, Miami
of Florida 59.
Anthony's game-winner
overshadowed the performance
by Ceballos, who scored 31
points, grabbed 13 rebounds and
was 10-of-lO from the free throw
line in the Big West contest.
The Rebels 12-2 overall and 7-
0 in the Big West, are riding a nine-
game winning streak. Fullcrton is
5-8 and 0-4.
Connecticut 68, No. 11
Syracuse 62
Cliff Robinson scored 24
points and Phil Gamble 21 as
Connecticut handed Syracuse its
third straight loss and fourth in its
last five games - all in Big East
Conference competition. The
Orangemen are now in last place
with a 1-4 conference mark.
"The first 15 minutes we
played probably as poorly as
we've played since I've been at
Syracuse Coach lim Boeheim
said.
Syracuse led for the last time
at 39-35 with 15:07 left. But
Gamble hit a 3-point basket and a
three-point play to put the Hus-
kies back in front for good. Con- from Wally Lancaster, including
five 3-pointers, suffered its fifth
straight loss.
The Hokies, 6-8, lost their
third straight home game, which
they had not done since Cassell
Coliseum opened in 1962.
No. 12 Seton Hall 78, Villa-
nova 61
beton Hall center Ramon
Ramos scored 10 points in a deci-
sive run to lead the Pirates over
necticut then hit 14 of 15 free
throws in the final 5:31 to seal the
victory.
Billy Owens led Syracuse
with 19 points.
No. 6 Michigan 99, No. 16
Ohio St. 73
Glen Rice hit five 3-pointers
and scored 23 points in
Michigan's victory over Ohio
State. Terry Mills also scored 23
points and Loy Vaught had 22 for turnover-plagued Villanova and
the Wolverines. into first place in the Big East.
Michigan, 15-2 overall and 3- Seton Hall, 16-1 and 4-1 in the
1 in the conference, never trailed, conference, was paced by John
although the Buckeyes, 12-4 and Morton's 22 points. Villanova 10-
2-2, cut the deficit to 27-26 with 7 and 2-3, was led by Tom Greis
with 13 points.
The Pirates forced the Wild-
cats into 17 first-halt turnovers
and took control with a 23-11
spurt that began late in the first
hall and continued at the start of
the second half. Ramos finished
with 12 points
No.20Stanfod93,Miami,Fla
59
Howard Wrighl scored 21
points, including 11 in a row at the
outset of the second halt, to lead
Stanford over Miami.
8:22 left in the first half. Michigan
then had a 14-2 sourt to nut the
game a way.Perry Carter led Ohio
State with 17 points.
No. 8 Missouri 104, Viroinia
Tech 99
In Blaeksburg, Va Byron
Irvin scored 35 points and Mis-
souri held off a late Virginia Tech
rally to defeat the Hokies.
Missouri, 15-3, extended its
winning streak to six games. Vir-
ginia Tech, which got 36 points
NCAA looks into State allegations
RAl E1GH (AP) � Despite
reassurances from basketball
coach im Valvano, members of
North Carolina State University's
faculty senate say they remain
concerned about the low gradu-
ation rate oi men's basketball
plavers.
' Meanwhile,theNati nalCol-
legiate Athletic Association is
sending an investigator to
Raleigh today tomnl ea "prelimi-
nary check' into illegations
against the Wolfpack program,
said Becky French. N.C State's
legal counsel.
Ms. French said she and a
member oi the Atlantic Coast
C o nf er e n c e administration
would join the NCAA representa-
tive in the check.
Diver
dominates
Continued from page 15
correctly Campbell explained.
"always remembering the last
time 1 did the dive
There is always a certain per-
son who greatly influences an
athlete's career. Tim Fox,
Campbell's old AAU coach, has
had a major contributing force on
her. 'Tim Fox did the most for me
mentally Campbell said. "He
really toughened the mental part
oi my diving
Sherry Campbell will gradu-
ate as perhaps the greatest
women's diver in East Carolina
history. In her last year, she hopes
to retain her conference champi-
onship. "Making the Academic
Ail-American team all four years
and winning the conference
championship would be a great
thrill for me Campbell said.
What a way that would be to
end a great career as a student
athlete.
Walsh
Continued from page 15
from within the team's current
coaching staff.
DeBartolo mav, however,
have tipped his hand Friday
when he told the St. Petersburg
Times that defensive coordinator
George Seifert might be in line for
Walsh's job.
"We'll probably hire from
within DeBartolo said. "Seifert
is a good guess
David Berst, NCAA assistant
executive director, said the or-
ganization is not calling its deal-
ingsat N.C . Statean investigation.
In this case, the school's
chancellor has asked that we
come in and help them establish
some facts he said. "We told him
that we will do that, but that's not
to say that this will lead to an
investigation
Some are skeptical about sta-
tistics cited bv Valvano when fac-
ulty members asked him two
months ago about his players'
graduation rates.
Valvano said that oi the 44
players he has recruitied since
becoming coach at NCSU in 1980,
See STATF page 18
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s
t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19,1989 17
Chapman making a name for himself in Hornets basketball
CHARLOTTE (AP) � The
same star puality that made Rex
Chapman a state treasure back in
Kentucky is now making him a
crowd favorite in this basketball-
hungry city.
1 le had some dark moments
early in Charlotte, when he was
posting some awful numbers. 1 lis
iOts weren't dropping, but he
kept on shooting.
"I've been a good shooter but
I a great shooter Chapman
iid in an interview with The
harlotte Observer. "1 think of
myself as a scorer, getting points
on the break and at the tree throw
line, not just with the jumper
Chapman's coach. Pick Har-
ter, enjoys working with the 21-
year-old player. "He's tun to
coach and be around Harter
said. "He and some of his team
mates seem to have a good time
together. But he's kind of quiet. I
hope he'll learn to laugh at him-
self
1 lornets vice president Carl
Scheer, who chose Chapman in
the first round of the NBA draft,
believes he will be around a long
time.
"Rex is one of the very special
talents in the league he said.
The skv's the limit for his
potential. He has the potential to
be one of the truly outstanding
NBA players before he hangs it
up. 1 le really wants it badly. That
and his God-given talent can
carry him a long way
"Life is different in Charlotte
than it was in Kentucky
Chapman said. "1 can be myself
he said. "It's a lot different here. I
don't have anybody telling me
how or what. On the court, yes,
but not off the court
Back in Kentucky, Chapman
was a big draw - even during his
high school playing days. Every-
one went to Apollo 1 ligh games to
see King Rex.
"Others can jump higher,
shoot better, play better defense,
but he can do all those things
said his high school coach, John
Whitmer.
"I le just hasyou sittingon the
edge oi your seat waiting to see
wh.it he's going to do. He gives
you a feeling of anticipation
Chapman looks back at his
early playing days with tend
memories.
"I was a gtxxi player in
highschool and I signed early
with Kentuckv he said. "That
automatically made me even
more popular
"It was OK at first, then came
my two years at Kentucky.
Everywhere I went, people
were following me. A lot of stuff
happened. People would steal
things from me, vandalize my car.
I couldn t walk on campus with-
out wisecracks, good and bad
Chapman said it was oftei
difficult to deal with being treated
differently from other students.
"I would go out with mv
friends, but there was no place to
get peace and quiet he said. "It
wears on you. It's hard for people
to understand if they weren't
raised in Kentucky
Chapman felt his personal life
was being invaded at Kentucky.
But he insists it did not influence
his decision to leave college after
two years and enter the NBA.
"I left because 1 was ready
he said. "I wanted to pursue and
fulfill a dream. I wanted to get an
education and 1 still plan to do it,
but I've put that on hold. I enjov
playing, and 1 hope to get better
and better and hopefully be a
reallv great player in this league
Chapman, who earns a re-
ported $650,000 a year, bought a
Mercedes Benz convertible and
left it back in Owensboro for his
mother to drive. He drives a
Trans-Am in Charlotte.
He bought an apartment in
Charlotte arid furnished it, and
helped his sister buy a home.
Chapman also owns an apart-
ment in Lexington, Kv.
Injured Rice might play in Super Bowl anyway
MIAMI (AD Hie thought
oi playing a Super Rowl without
lerrv Rice is enough to nauseate
any San Francisco 4er fan, or
player, or coach.
It's not something the NFC
champions will have to stomach
on Sunday, despite the ankle in-
jury Rue suffered in practice
Monday, fust ask any 49er- or any
Cincinnati Bengal.
"If he can't walk, he'll play
oe Montana said. "The 4ers
quarterback knows his All-Pro
receiver isn't about to let his first
r Bowl appearance hinge on
i twinge six days before kickoff.
Believe me. he'll play. I'll drag
him out there
If he doesn't do the dragging,
Bengals coach Sam Wyche might.
This is a game where the two
teams should be at full strength
Wyche said. "I hope he can p"lav.
rry Riceisoneof the best plavers
they've got and one oi the best
plavers in the league "
1 hope all of them play, on
both sides
Rice left San f'Yanoisco's prac-
tice alter injuring his right ankle
and was listed as questionable for
this rematch of the 1982 Super
Bowl, San Francisco's first of two
H. championships. In the
minds oi the medics, there might
be a quest ion.
As for Rice's teammates and
opponents, forget it.
"He's the man you want to get
the football to Cincinnati Pro
Bowl safety David Fulcher said of
Rice, who when healthy is the
most dangerous receiver in the
game. "Nobody at this time is
going to miss a game like this and
I'm sure he knows how important
he is to that team
I low important? When Rice's
ankle finally healed this season,
the 49ers went on a four-game
tear that boosted them to the NFC
West title. In those four games,
Rice averaged five receptions for
104 yards.
"He's our gamebreaker
Montana slid. "That's no secret.
And you go to your big-play guy
in big games. Iliat's not a secret
either
"Knowing lerry Rice, he will
be on the field and doing his job
"He did a hook pattern and
finished it off and then he went
in Montana said. "I didn't know
it was bad
"I don't think it means much
if he doesn't (practice). By this
time, we're not learning anything
new about eachother
Bill Walsh wasn't so sure.
"So much of our offense is
related to Montana getting the
ball to Rice and without that tim-
ing and that week of work, it re-
duces our effectiveness the
coach said. "We'll rest him com-
pletely. We feel he'll be1 OK
"If he needs the time to rest
and heal Montana added, "he
should take it
lor six weeks this season,
Rice had trouble taking it to any-
body. Because of the sprained
ankle and the tendinitis that fol-
lowed, he didn't have more than
four receptions in any oi those
games and scored only once. Be-
cause San Francisco didn't have
another deep threat, the team
slumped.
In the Playoffs, with the ankle
strong and the tendinitis gone, he
had 10 catches, half of them for
scores - his first postseason touch-
downs.
"You can't take a Jerry Rice
away from an offense Fulcher
said. "He's going to get his
catches. I'm sure he'll be there
Sunday to get his catches
"You have to try to control
him. He will make catches and
make yardage. When he catches
the football, somebodv has to be
around him and give him some-
thing to remember
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until February 28th
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Phone 757-6418 (work)
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Emphasis on Scholastics
'Scholarships Awarded
"Excellence in Athletics
?Varsity Soccer Players
?Varsity Tennis Players
?Varsity Swimmers
?Lacrosse Members
?Varsity Cheerleaders
?Outstanding Intramurals
?Leadership in All Aspects of Campus Life
?Best Social Life On Campus
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SPRING RUSH 1989
LOOK FOR THE PARTY TENTS
Tuesday, Jan. 24th - Meet the Pikes and the Ladies of Chi Omega from 7-11
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Thursday, Jan. 26th - Beginning of "Pikefettie"
At the ATTIC - located at the corner of W. 5th and Reade Street






� �
I
18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19, lggg
N.C. State accused of NCAA violations
Continued from page 16
86 percent have graduated or are
still in school. Some are playing
professionally and attend school
in the summer, he said.
While Valvano promised at
the time to provide the statistic in
writing, broken down by the
number who had graduated,
dropped out or transferred, the
faculty panel has yet to receive the
information.
Robert A. Robinson, NCSU's
assistant athletic director, said
Tuesdav the delay was caused by
a mix-up. He added hat he would
provide the statist .s to the chair-
man of the faculty senate today,
but declined to give it to a re-
porter.
NCSU athletic department
officials cite the 8b percent figure
in a pamphlet they give to high
school recruits and their parents.
According to Robinson, the
figure includes basketball players
who graduated from NCSU,
those still enrolled at NCSU, those
who transferred and earned de-
grees elsewhere, those who trans-
ferred and are still in school, and
those who are playing profession-
ally but who could go back to
school if they wanted to.
Attention has been focused
on the graduation rate of
Valvano's teams in the wake of
reports about a highly critical
book, "Personal Fouls that will
be published next month about
the NCSU basketball program.
Chandra D. Cox, assistant
professor of design, was among
those not satisfied by Valvano's
response to questions about his
players' graduation rates in No-
vember.
"It did not make me feel se-
cure Cox said. "We know how
low the rates of graduation of
athletes is. I don't think it soothed
anyone's concerns. 1 don't think a
person there was impressed
Raymond C. Long, a profes-
sor of crop science who taught at
NCSU for more than 20 years, also
said he thought the claim was not
realistic. "It seems a little bit high
to me he said.
"I do hold concerns about the
academic performance of our stu-
dent athletes. I have always had
that. There are some (athletic
programs) that I think perhaps we
could do a little better on, and
men's basketball is one of them
Elizabeth Suval, chairman of
the faculty senate, said professors
were particularly concerned
about basketball players' gradu-
ation rate because the sport is
unusually demanding. "On this
campus, most of the concern is
about men's basketball Suval
said. "It spans two semesters, and
a great many games involve a lot
of time off campus
Cox said NCSU's graduation
rate was especially disappointing
when compared to that of the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, which she said
"doesn't seem to have this prob-
lem graduating its athletes
"I don't assume N.C. State's
schedule is any more rigorous
than UNCs" Cox said, "yet their
athletes are able to graduate.
That's right in our face
According to reports filed last
month with UNC system officials,
two of four players recruited by
Valvano in fall 1982 earned de-
grees from NCSU. One student
transferred.
According to reports the year
before, two of five basketball
players who entered N SI in
1981 graduated. One transferred
to another school.
"Personal Fouls" will concen-
trate on NCSU's 1986-87 team. Of
those 14 players one graduated
and eight others are cither at
NCSU or are attending other col-
leges. The other five arc no 1. nger
in school.
Calgary Flames are no longer just an offensive team as they allow lowest goals in NHL
(AD � Times have sure
changed for the old skate-and-
shoot Calgary Flames. Once an
all-out offensive team, they now
rind that the best offense is a good
defense.
"Last vear, we didn't take
care ot our end and the penalty
killing. This year we are. We still
go offensive, but now getting a
little defense is in everybody's
mind Colin Patterson said Tues-
day night after a 7-1 beating of the
Detroit Red Wings.
In 46 games, Calgary has al-
lowed just 130 goals, the lowest in
the NHL. The Flames' 2.82 goals-
against average is almost one goal
per game less than they surren-
dered last season.
Elsewhere, it was the New
York Islanders 5, Pittsburgh 2; goals for Calgary.
Quebec 7, New Jersey 4; Vancou-
ver 5, Philadelphia 3, and St. Louis Islanders 5, Penguins 2
5, Los Angeles 2. David Volek'sgoal snapped a
Doug Gilmour's 14th goal third-period tie as the Islanders
triggered a four-goal second pe- beat Pittsburgh for Coach Al
riod and Joey Mullen added two Arbour's 600th regular-season
victory.
The teams were tied 2-2 when
Volek scored on the power play at
4:03and then set up Brent Sutter's
goal at 9:29 to give the Islanders a
4-2 lead. Mikko Makeia scored
into an empty net with 1:25 left tor
New York's last goal.
King of Wake Forest awarded the ACC rookie-of-the-week
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) �
Wake Forest forward Chris
King, who scored 40 points as the
Demon Deacons broke even in
two games last week, has been
selected the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference basketball rookie-of-the-
week.
The Newton Grove nativel
started the week with a 16-point
performance in an 84-73 victoryI
on the road at Stetson. Later in thel
week, in a 75-71 home loss to
Clemson, King scored a career-
high 24 points. In the two games
he made 15 of 25 field goal at-
tempts, 10 of 13 from the freel
throw line and pulled down 14
rebounds.
King ranks 16th among thel
ACC's scoring leaders with 1731
points for a 13.3 average. He alsol
ranks fifth in the conference inl
field goal percentage at 56 per-j
cent, making 75 of 134 attempts.
Hornets
Prevail
Continued from page 15
Earl Cureton grabbed 17 re-l
bounds, while Bogues handed outl
14 and Michael Holton 10 assists.
For Philadelphia, Mike
Gminski scored 25 points on 11 of
20 from the field and three for
three on free throws. He also had
17 rebounds. Hersey Hawkins
scored 19 and Ron Anderson 16,
while Maurice Cheeks had 141
points and eight assists.
Hornets' coach Dick Harter
thought the win was due.
"I think we richly deserved I
it Harter said. "It's so important
that we have some success for our
effort. We've played hard all year
and had some tough losses. Kelly
and Rex were magnificent
Philadelphia's Charles Bar-
kley scored 16 and took down 11
rebounds, although he didn't I
play the third period because of
back spasms.
Tripucka's 14 points led
Charlotte to a 33-27 lead after one
period. He added eight more as
the Hornets prevailed 65-60 at)
ha If time.
Philadelphia in the third pe-
riod rallied 16-6 to turn a 69-641
deficit into an 80-75 lead with 4:47
left in the period. They held on to j
lead 91-83 starting the final quar-
ter.
Charlotte rallied to within;
two at 97-95, but Gerald1
Henderson's three-point basket
and two free throws boosted the
76ers to a 102-95 edge with 5:59 to
play.
The Hornets then scored
eight straight points on baskets by I
Tripucka, Booues, Kurt Rambisj
and Tripucka again to go ahead
103-102.
The lead changed hands four
times with Charlotte on top 107-
106. Gminski and Barkley scored
for Philadelphia to make it 110-
107 with 32 seconds left.
Then came Chapman's three-
pointer and the overtime.
"Today we hit the tough
shots. Today our defense was the
key Harter observed. "Last
night (Sunday) the Sixers' defense
was the key
Tripucka added: "We're
learning and we're getting bet-
He's averaging 5.8 rebounds per
contest.
It is the second time this sea-
son King has been chosen for the
woeklv honors.
Earlier, Virginia guard iuoi-
ard Morgan, who scored a career- Morgan, a 6-foot-3 senior five-game losing streak.
high 39 points in the Cavaliers'
106-83 victory over eighth-ranked from Salem, Va also grabbed six Morgan hit 13 of 25 field
North Carolina on Sunday, was rebounds, handed out two assists goals, including eight of 14 from
named the ACC player-of-the- and had two steals in leading 3-point range, a Virginia school
week. Virginia to its first ACC victory of record.
the season. The victory snapped a Morgan leads thcCavaliers in
scoring and ranks fourth in the
conference with a 20 3 point
average. He is the ACC's top free
throw shooter at 90.5 percent.
The selections were made bv
a committee of the Atlantic Coast
Sports writers Association
Come On Down
and see the
NEW SIGMA NU
FRATERNITY!
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7 Over 130,000 Members
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Jan. 23
Jan. 24
Jan. 25
Jan. 26
Bob Barker
Sigma Nu
EPC at Memorial Gym
Horsd'oeuvres Night
Pizza Night
pizza supplied by Dough Boy (while it Lasts)
Pot Luck with Little Sisters
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From 8-11 each Night.
(except Jan. 23)
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Call 830-3960
for information & rides





Title
The East Carolinian, January 19, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 19, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.649
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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