The East Carolinian, January 17, 1989






J
Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES 8
SPORTSH
Features
Campus Ministries offer help.
See page 8.
Sports
Coach Kobe becomes the winningest swim coach
ever, Blue Edwards looks to future with
the Pirates and the pros.
See page 11.
�hc lEaat (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 42
Tuesday January 17,1989
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Leo Jenkins passes away
Former Chancellor Leo Jenkins, the man who envisioned
this univeristy, died Saturday night (AP Photo)
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Staff Writer
Former Chancellor Leo War-
ren Jenkins, the leader in the de-
velopment of ECU and the region
of eastern North Carolina, died
Saturday night at Pitt Memorial
Hospital of cancer.
Jenkins came to ECU in 1947
as Dean of East Carolina College
and retired as chancellor in 1978
after many major accomplish-
ments, including the establish-
ment of a fully accredited four-
year medical school, the attaining
of university status in 1967, and
the consolidation into the Univer-
sity of North Carolina system in
1972.
In his final commencement
speech in 1978, to a class 16 times
larger than the class he first deliv-
ered a commencement speech to
in 1947, Jenkins said, "The spirit in
which this university has
operated is based on a two-way
street of communication with the
people this has paid great divi-
dends. We are knowm as a univer-
sity which faces the future, and
we can be assured that the tasks
ahead will equal those that now
are history
Those tasks achieved at ECU
during Jenkins' involvement are
numerous. They include the es-
tablishment of these professional
schools: Art, Allied Health Sci-
ences, Business, Education, Mu-
sic, Nursing, Home Economics,
Technology, and Social Work.
Jenkins' fight for a medical
school granting a four-year de-
gree began more than ten years
before it was granted in 1975.
Jenkins faced Piedmont politi-
cians and higher education offi-
cials who thought it too costly and
unnecessary for ECU to have a
medical school.
In a 1986 interview reported
by the Associated Press, Jenkins
was asked about his greatest
achievement. He said: "Some
folks say it was the medical
school, and others say it was ob-
taining university status, but I feel
it was instilling a sense of pride in
the people here in the East. People
walk a little taller because of ECU,
and they take a greater pride in
themselves
During his tenure, enroll-
ment grew from 1,605 to more
than 12,000, faculty members in-
creased to more than 1,200, and
the number of academic pro-
grams increased from 24 to 174.
The operating budget rose from
$1.9 million to more than $85 mil-
lion.
Jenkins' many honors in the
years he lived in eastern North
Carolina include the dedication of
ECU's Fine Arts Center, the North
Carolina Public Service Award in
1977, and the Pitt County Board of
Commisioners dedication of June
27,1978 as Leo Jenkins Day.
Former chancellor John
Howell said Monday that from
the point of view of the students
ECU is a "much better university,
a broader university, and a better
known university" than before
Leo Jenkins came here.
Present chancellor Richard
Eakin said, "ECU has lost an es-
teemed leader. A man whose
contributions will live on for
years to come. Equally important,
eastern North Carolina has lost a
good friend.
"Under Dr. Jenkins' leader-
ship, eastern North Carolina
gained the benefits of a medical
school and quality healthcare that
it so desperately needed. We will
miss him dearly
The Associated Press and
Stuart Savage of The Daily Reflec-
tor contributed to this article.
ECU campus honors, remembers Dr. King
By LORI MARTIN
Su Vnte:
ECU's Minoritv Students
Organization (M.S.O.) and Alpha
Phi Alpha fraternity were joint
sponsors of activities held in
honor of the Rev. Dr. Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. on Monday.
The activities began with a
march at 7:30 p.m. led bv M.S.O.
president. Sheila Gardner. The
group of about 50 students
marched from Memorial Gvmna-
sium to the mall in central cam
pus.
The Rev. Steven Pierce, the
keynote speaker in the mall, said
although the dreamer is dead, his
dream still exists. "Regardless of
whether vou skin is light or dark
or somewhere in between, you are
somebodv Pierce said.
Pierce's advice to the stu-
dents was to become active mem-
bers in whatever facet of life they
are currently involved. Pierce
said that if a student is a part of an
organization 100 percent of his
efforts.
"Though the dreamer is
gone, all the things he fought for
are still alive because we are still
here Pierce said.
Gardner introduced the
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity presi-
dent, Anthony Rook. "Be proud
of yourself, do the best you can,
and keep the dream alive Rook
said in his address to the partici-
pants of the march.
From the mall the marchers
organization, he should give that were escorted by campus police
through west campus and then to
Mendenhall Student Center.
Upon reaching Mendenhall, the
crowd was 250 strong.
The Fifth Annual Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. Leadership Awards
Ceremony and Reception, spon-
sored by the Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity began at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theater before an audi-
ence of 350. The master of ceremo-
nies was Rook.
The purpose of the ceremony
was to pay tribute to King and to
recognize those minority indi-
viduals who have excelled in aca-
demics and in community serv-
ice.
Minoritv members of each
J
class were recognized as having
the highest G.P.A. The students
awarded were freshman Derrick
1 lyman, sophomore Sylvia Isler,
junior Robert Beeman and senior
Chandra Floyd.
Recipient of the Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. Student Leadership
Award was Sheila Gardner. D.D.
Garrett was given the Commu-
nitv Service Award.
Goodbye to paper library cards
The keynote speaker was the
Rev. Dr. Clarence Gray. Other
speakers were Dr. Dennis Chest-
nut, Tyrone Cox, Dr. Andrew Best
and Mayor Ed Carter.
'The message that Martin
Luther King was trying to make
us realize is not so much about
black pride or white ignorance
but that we are all God's chil-
dren Kappa Alpha Psi president
James Clinkscalc said. "He was
trying to make us all love each
other and all live together�that's
what the dream is all about
New computers come to Joyner
By TAMMY AYCOCK
Staff Writer
For the ECU community,
paper library cards are a thing of
the past. Students and faculty can
now use their ECU identification
cards to check out materials from
ECU libraries: Jovner, Music, and
Health Sciences.
Although the Health Library-
has been circulating materials on
this system for two years, Jovner
and the Music Librarv did not
begin using this system until
Tuesdav, January 3.
With the new system, called
LS 2000, library patrons no longer
have to manually fill out charge
cards for each item they wish to
check out. This task is eliminated
because library materials (except
Dewey Decimal boo1and ECU
identification card have bar-
codesfattached to them for identi-
fication purposes.
Also, patrons will be consult-
ing the LS 2000 online catalog,
instead of the card catalog, as their
primary source of information.
The major portion of our
book collection (all Library of
Congress) is online; Dewey books
are not. We will still have some
card catalog cabinets out there for
a while said Marilyn Miller,
Assistant Director of Academic
Library Services.
A new feature of the system
online catalog is the item status
report. This report provides infor-
mation such as item location and
availability. Previously, before LS
2000 was fully implemented, all
items (in Joyner and Music librar-
ies) were listed as available, even
if they were checked out. Now,
unless materials were checked
out prior to January 3, the online
catalog will indicate whether or
not they are available. If materials
are not available, their due dates
will be given.
A patron's status report is
also available. At the circulation
desk, "patrons can give their
names and find out if they have
any overdue materials. Under the
manual system (in which checked
out books were filed by call num-
bers), it was impossible to get this
information until books were two
weeks overdue Miller said.
"People need to pay special
attention to due dates. In the past,
due dates were stamped on cards
which were then placed in the
back pockets of books. In the fu-
ture, some books will not have
back pockets. We are now using
date due slips which can also
serve as bookmarks Miller said.
"For patrons who have over-
due materials, the system has
automatic blocks which prevent
any further check outs. This ap-
plies both to students and fac-
ulty Miller said.
Beginning in May, "We will
be dealing more stringently with
faculty overdues Miller said.
Because faculty are immune to
overdue fines, many faculty have
items which are several years
overdue. In the past, these faculty
could still continue to check out
materials. With the LS 2000 sys-
tem, this will no longer be pos-
sible.
Remote access is now avail-
able to the LS 2000 online public
catalog for anyone who has a
hardwire terminal into the cam-
pus network called PGNET.
"Instructions for accessing LS
2000 are available at the reference
desk in Joyner Library said
Elizabeth Smith, LS 2000 coordi-
nator at Joyner Library.
Soon, anyone who has a per-
sonal computer with a modem
will be able to dial into the LS 2000
online public catalog. "We have
the mechanisms set up for it and
it's in the process of being made
available. Information will be
forthcoming on that Smith said.
Although individual and
yearly figures are available, li-
brary administrators were unable
to give an estimate for the total
cost of automating all three librar-
ies.
Dr. JoAnn Bell, Acting Direc-
tor of Academic Library Services
explained, "The university very
seldom buys things as a whole
package. The costs have been
spread over a five year period. We
paid for a license to use this soft-
ware system; then we paid a fee to
OCLC (a library system com-
pany) to customize it (LS 2000);
then we paid fees for Out tapes
which arc the bibliograpic rec-
ords. So, there are many different
costs associated with it and we
haven't even mentioned the
equipment costs
Last summer, the S 280 sys-
tem was upgraded to a larger
svstem. The cost for this was
$449,000.
"The reason we had to pur-
chase the CPU (the larger system)
is that the computer we initially
started wHth (the S 280) was
smaller. The disk drive did not
have the capacity we needed and
the computer itself did not have
the capacity for the number of
terminals we need to have abat-
able for the faculty, staff, and stu-
dents � more memory and more
terminal ports are the reasons for
having to upgrade Bell said.
All LS 2000 purchases were
made from the libraries' regular
operating budget. "We haven't
received special funding to pur-
chase equipment Bell said.
Rip up those old paper library cards, a new computer system has come to Joyner. The online
computer will also eventually replace the card catalogue. (File photo)





I
rm : - vroi iNi
l VI
-
Students gain by volunteering
In toda) s world ol bal-
anced budgets, balanced diets
and balanced checkbooks stu-
dents in Health UV are being
challenged with the idea ot bal-
ng their college lite Center-
ing each day totally around your-
self can lead to a bleak existence
Yel each day thousands ot
college students cet up when they
reel like it go toclasses which the
chose studv when they find time,
anvi entertain themselves when
want to
Many tmd the key to ha
ing a full c a:xi successful
- �� si r Sic tar beyond concen-
trating all their energy in the intel-
nd s i Id mensions ot
I ast semester st - in
� ere given an o;
� ' -
luntee
organizations around Green
' ' v realized the vast amount ol
ch exist outside the
Health Column
By
Judy Ausherman
walls ot ECU r r the first time
student discovered the could
acquire experience b helping
those around them.
Students spent a total ol 525
hvuirs serving food at the
Greenville soup kitchen estab-
� friendships with eld
men and women at the Creative
1 nine, Center and the Greenville
Villa Nursing Home, assistii
�usactivities at the shelter for
� 'red omen, work-
children at d entures in 1 lealth
I helping 1 lealth professi
run the i � Bloodmobile.
vvl,r students designed their
p. comminute sen
credit.
Students who participated
telt the experiences helped them
supply what they were learning
in their chosen majors and the
opportunity made them feel
useful. One student commented
that she had always wanted to do
something in the community, but
never knew who to contact. Hie
majority ot the students who vol-
unteered in this program found it
to be worthwhile and rewarding.
In fact, a number of students want
to continue volunteering their
time this semester even though
they will not receive credit.
Many of the agencies which
need volunteers are not tar from
campus. It rides were needed.
usually students could arrange
transportation or ride the bus.
Any student who is cur-
rently enrolled in 1 lealth 1000 will
have an opportunity to volunteer
tor community service. It you are
not enrolled in this course and
would still like to volunteer in any
of the agencies above, you can
contact Dr. Kathleen Dunn at the
Center for Health Services Re-
search, ECU School of Medicine.
at 551-2785.
ohn Rhoadem once said
people should, "Do more than
exist - live! Do more than tou h
feel. Do more than look -observe.
Do more than hear - listen I o
more than think - ponder
Do more than talk say
something Wouldn't it be great
to put more than summer em-
ployment opportunites on your
resume when you graduate? rhe
chance tor ECU students to make
a positive impression on the
people of Greenville is by offering
their unique talents to those who
will definitely appreciate it Mark
Twain was right on target when
he said "the best way to cheer
yourscH up is to cheer someone
else up
Express yourself;
Write a lettei
to the Editor
The East Carolinian
fames ! I ' ' r � � � '
Vdvertising Representatives
xott Mak )
tii ird Alan Cool :
Ashl. v i I i �
DISP1 A ADV1 K I SING
; l oca! (pen Rate
Open Rate
Hulk Rate � ontracts)
�9 col in hes

� � in h s
; : i
oi ifl and above
( lassified 1 )isplay
� . it�
( oloi dvertising
( )neolor and I
I wi : and bl -
uencyontra
I
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00 5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
RACK ROOM.
BRANDED SHOES wtll. ttoV
Creenville Buver's Market WeiCOI M.C DaClk
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
mnm
V
TAKE AN EXTRA
It you are graduating in May, ou should cot familiar w ith th
career placement center, tl ile photo)
World remembers king
Open
Monday Saturday 10-9
Sundav 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Aigner. Nike and Reebok)
I i iL i i
Y NT1CiAF1 -Worsmp
� -
N � - irch vvt re admon-
� � the
� iday
rl
peand ird
11 realiz t is an un-
icst said tl
pastoi � � nezer
irch, where King and
5 tatr r pi ached.
I ned the annual
� ice that attracted
: federal officials l
� tional holiday honor
. . thered
im were memh rs I
family, the Rev. Jesse
L S Attornev General
rnburgh, actress lane
rgia Gov. !oe Frank
Han - o ' ' sta s ser it rs
and congressmen.
r '�'� ishington, President-
ree Hush eommemo-
ra. ithel la �� :tha glowing
tribute to King in a speech to
prominent blacks,
lived a hero's life. He
dr n la hero's dreams. 1 le left
a hero's ii delible mark on the
mind and imagination of a great
nation ' I �ld members of the
Ina iral Afro-American
Comn �� e
ith Africa. U.S. Ambas-
ird Perkins unveiled a
bust of King on a bushy
I in Pretoria where the
issvistosl md.
rotonj nn , 71 demon
were arrested on tres
e charges at the Electric
p hipard as they protested
,
r submarines
. s belief in i
j said the d
nsti ' ervai
l his I
�. .� day included the
first blacks on
.�����
sion in m i I m a century. :
is s heduled for
Kingbej in the 19
5 h . � Mont
that � ted in
. � ' '
� .
taj
scl cere rui
fers vv re to l
i
ment ber
v Christian Leadershi � rtfei
obsen u
Ba ' ' hurch - : I i koi
remebrance in Kii
A �' , hurch Sin
wid � "
his for i kind
tioi M
� :
� � , �. : ib'e toi � � e3ci � er store
. � � � illy r ted ' � id f we d
� � . idvertised iten e ��� '�" . i
. ii � � � � irable it(
� . � : �� iving i rain
heck wl �� entitle ' � �� "
� �� � idved ed pi e within 30
e vendoi ��� Ipted
tern pu ' ised
� �� ��� ' �9 THE KROGER CO '� M
PRICES GOOD SUNDAY JAN 15
SATURDAY JAN 21. 19&) N
� � . .E RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
v � ENTITIES MONE SOLD TO
sador
� �
Join Kristen
Halberg and
The
East Carolinian
Sports team
Learn About a Great Career
WHAT IS A STOCKBROKER?
A recruting session will be held at East
Carolina University to discuss the career
potential of becoming a stockbroker.
Excellent Income potential. Learn how to
plan for this exceptional career and what a
stockbroker actually does. It is important
to reserve a space if you wish to attend.
Stuart James -Where hard work can
translate directly into earnings.
the Superboivl with
Low Prices.
And More.
113 SIZE
California
Navel Oranges Each
40C OFF LALBEL
Surf
Laundry Detergent 42 oz
10
$1
Doritos Brand
Tortilla Chips
� ' z
59
ORIGINAL OR
Custard Style
Yoplait Yogurt
w X
Time:
Date:
Place:
Speaker:
9:00am - 3:30pm
January 18. 1989
Bloxton House
Steve Pizzuti






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17,1989
Students gain by volunteering
In today's world of bal-
anced budgets, balanced diets,
and balanced checkbooks, stu-
dents in Health 1000 are being
challenged with the idea of bal-
ancing their college life. Center-
ing each day totally around your-
self can lead to a bleak existence.
Yet each day thousands of
college students get up when they
feel like it, go to classes which they
chose, study when they find time,
and entertain themselves when
they want to.
Many find the key to hav-
ing a fulfilling and successful
semester lie far beyond concen-
trating all their energy in the intel-
lectual and social dimensions of
life.
Last semester students in
Health 1000 were given an oppor-
tunity to volunteer in various
organizations around Greenville.
Many realized the vast amount of
needs which exist outside the
Health Column
By
Tudy Ausherman
walls of ECU. For the first time
students discovered they could
acquire experience by helping
those around them.
Students spent a total of 525
hours serving food at the
Greenville soup Kitchen, estab-
lishing friendships with elderly
men and women at the Creative
Living Center and the Greenville
Villa Nursing Home, assisting in
various activities at the shelter for
Battered Women, working with
children at Adventures in Health,
and helping Health professionals
run the campus Bloodmobile.
Several students designed their
own community service projects
which were accepted for course
credit.
Students who participated
felt the experiences helped them
supply what they were learning
in their chosen majors and the
opportunity made them feel
useful. One student commenteu
that she had always wanted to do
something in the community, but
never knew who to contact. The
� majority of the students who vol-
unteered in this program found it
to be worthwhile and rewarding.
In fact, a number of students want,
to continue volunteering their
time this semester even though
they will not receive credit.
Many of the agencies which
need volunteers are not far from
campus. If rides were needed,
usually students could arrange
transportation or ride the bus.
Any student who is cur-
rently enrolled in Health 1000 will
have an opportunity to volunteer
for community service. If you are
not enrolled in this course and
would still like to volunteer in any
of the agencies above, you can
contact Dr. Kathleen Dunn at the
Center for Health Services Re-
search, ECU School of Medicine,
at 551-2785.
John Rhoadem once said
people should, "Do more than
exist - live! Da more than touch -
feel. Do more than look-observe.
Do more than hear - listen. Do
more than think - ponder.
Do more than talk - say
something Wouldn't it be great
to put more than summer em-
ployment opportunites on your
resume when you graduate? The
chance for ECU students to make
a positive impression on the
people of Greenville is by offering
their unique talents to those who
will definitely appreciate it. Mark
Twain was right on target when
he said "the best way to cheer
yourself up is to cheer someone
else up
Express yourself;
Write a letter
to the
The East Carolinian
Scott Makey
Richard-Alan Cook
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
J. Keith Pearce
Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$495 Local Open Rate$4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 lnsertions4
200-299 col. inches$4.40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 i225")
Two Color and black$155.00
(1225")$4.50
101nsertions(4ii")$4.50
(l225")$4.45
15 Insertions(4ll")$4.45
(12251$4.40
20 Insertions (4M11$4.40
(1225")$4.35
25 Inserttions (4lD$435
$4.20
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES , V
�� Met Welcome Back
Market
TAKE AN EXTRA
v' 10 lJ
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Alftner. Nike and Reebok)
If you are graduating in May, you should get familiar with this build
career placement center. (File photo)
World remembers King
� ers filling the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jrs church were admon-
ished Monday to remember the
slain civil rights leader's birthday
by rededicating themselves to his
work.
"It is our hope and our desire
that we will realize it is an un-
ending quest said the Rev. Jo-
seph Roberts, pastor of Ebenezer
Baptist Church, where King and
his father preached.
Roberts opened the annual
ecumenical service that attracted
local, state and federal officials to
mark the national holiday honor-
ing King. Among those gathered
on the podium were members of
King's family, the Rev. Jesse
Jackson, U.S. Attorney General
Dick Thomburgh, actress Jane
Fonda, Georgia Gov. Joe Frank
Harris and the state's senators
and congressmen.
In Washington, President-
elect George Bush commemo-
rated the holiday with a glowing
tribute to King in a speech to
about 300 prominent blacks.
"He lived a hero's life. He
dreamed a hero's dreams. He left
a hero's indelible mark on the
mind and imagination of a great
nation Bush told membersof the
Inaugural Afro-American
Committee.
In South Africa, US. Ambas-
sador Edward Perkins unveiled a
bronze bust of King on a bushy
plot of land in Pretoria where the
new U.S. embassy is to stand.
In Groton, Conn 72 demon-
strators were arrested on tres-
passing charges at the Electric
the construction of Trident nu
clear submarines. The demon-
strators cited King's belief in non-
violent protest and said the dem-
onstration was held in observance
of his birthday.
Elsewhere, planned obser-
vances of the holiday included the
swearing-in of the first blacks on
the Dallas County (Ala.) Commis-
sion in more than a century. The
ceremony was scheduled for
Selma, where King began the 1965
Selma-to-Montgomery march
that resulted in passage of the
Voting Rights Act.
The Libertv Bell in Philadel-
phia was to be symbolically
tapped today and church and
school bells were rung in Michi-
gan. Golfers were to tee off in a
suburban Los Angeles tourna-
ment benefiting King's Southern
Chri stian Leadershi p Conference.
The observance at Ebenezer
Baptist Church capped a week of
remebrance in King's hometown.
At the church Sunday, King's
widow urged Bush to hold true to
his call for "a kinder, gentler na-
tion" and to impose strict sanc-
tions against South Africa.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be
readily available for sale in each Kroger Store,
except as specifically noted in this ad. If we do
run out of an advertised item, we will offer you
your choice of a comparable item, when
available, reflecting the same savings or a rain-
check which will entitle yju to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised price within 30
days. Only one vendor coupon will be accepted
per item purchased.
COPYRIGHT 1989 - THE KROGER CO. ITEMS
AND PRICES GOOD SUNDAY, JAN. 15,
THROUGH SATURDAY, JAN. 21, 1989, IN
GREENVILLE. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO
DEALERS.
Join Kristen
Halberg and
The
East Carolinian
Sports team
Learn About a Great Career
WHAT IS A STOCKBROKER?
A recruting session will be held at East
Carolina University to discuss the career
potential of becoming a stockbroker.
Excellent Income potential. Learn how to
plan for this exceptional career and what a
stockbroker actually does. It is important
to reserve a space if you wish to attend.
Stuart James�Where hard work can
translate directly into earnings.
Time:
Date:
Place:
9:00am - 3:30pm
January 18, 1989
Bloxton House
Steve Pizsuti
10
0
113 SIZE
California
Navel OrangesEach
40 OFF LALBEL A pA
Surf 1 59
Laundry Detergent. .42oz JL
the Superbowl with
Low Prices
And More
Doritos Brand !
Tortilla Chips1 i-oz.
ORIGINAL OR
Custard Style rf
Yoplait Yogurtv
$1
Y





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17,1989 3
Reagan's drug laws backfire
CAROLINA MINI
STORAGE
mrt.
AURORA, N.C. (AP) � Eight
months ago, a few marijuana
seeds and part of a marijuana
cigarette almost put commercial
fisherman Michael "Jimbo" Ire-
land out of business.
drugs. At the heart of its new anti-
drug effort was a controversial
policy called "zero tolerance a
hardline attack on even small
amounts of drugs found on ves-
sels, vehicles and aircraft crossing
Even now, the Aurora fishing U.S.borders. Under the program,
captain cringes at the approach of
a Coast Guard patrol boat. And
the bitterness lingers. "You don't
forget something like this Ire-
land, 30, said recentlv.
On May 3, Ireland's $500,000
boat, the 90-foot Lorraine Carol,
was seized at Ocracoke Inlet by
shotgun-wielding Coast Guard-
men who found the marijuana
remnants in the vessel's crew-
quarters. The vessel and its catch
federal authorities seized 5,073
cars, 229 trucks, 133 vessels and 9
aircraft between March 21 and
Dec. 6, said Richard R. Weart, a
Customs special agent in Wash-
ington, DC.
The whole point of zero tol
been seized, including 11 com-
mercial fishing boats. The rest
involved recreational boaters,
said Michael Ragsdale, chief of
the district's law enforcement
branch. All the seized vessels
have been returned.
"We didn't know this was
going on, and then boom re-
in exchange, these fishermen
will get "much more favorable
treatment" from Customs agents
investigating user amounts of
drugs, Murphy said.
"I'm not holding anybody's
feet to the fire to sign an agree-
ment Murphy said. "It certainly
would help (fishermen). These
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called Bradley Brauer, president agreements frame what the Cus-
Moving No Placelb Store
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of the East Coast Fisheries Asso-
ciation and owner of East Coast
Fishing and Scallop Co. in New-
port News. "It's real tough when
22,000 pounds of scallops and tor in Virginia, said recently. "Our
fish � were confiscated by the countrv right now is being devas-
L.S. Customs Service. Ireland, tated bv drug abuse. What we're
crance is that drug use of any you're sitting here faced with los-
amount, as well as trafficking, is
wrong and the government is not
going to allow it Dennis
Murphy, Customs district direc-
mg a vessel because a crewman
slips a joint on the boat. We were
at that point, and that's scary
"It was insane said Jerry
Schill, executive director of the
North Carolina Fisheries Associa-
tion in Bayboro. "Some boats
toms Service believes are prudent
steps boat owners should take
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who said he was unaware of drag trying to do is to get a growing stayed in port because they were
use among his 12-member crew
and later voluntarily took drug
tests to bolster his defense, faced
felony charges of transporting il-
legal drugs and misdemeanor
charges for possession of drugs.
Even worse, he said, Customs
intolerance (of drug use) in soci-
ety. This is a good place to start,
because everybody knows that
drug abuse takes place or. some of
these boats.
"It's the seizure of assets that
gets the headlines, but it's a
agents threatened to sell his boat change in attitude that we're
at public auction. "When they trving to get as much as any-
read me mv rights and told me the thing
charges were punishable by a The confiscation of Ireland's
5250,000 fine, 10 vears in prison or vessel, however, sent chills
both, 1 can't imagine any night- through commercial fishermen in
mare compared to that he said. North Carolina and Virginia.
The charges against him were Suddenly, thev realized that their
later dropped, and his boat was
returned. But scars remain. The
ordeal cost Ireland 520,000 in le-
gal fees and $80,000 in lost income
during the two weeks Customs
held his boat. And he had to pay a
$230 fine. The crew members
charged with possessing the
marijuana were fined $7?.
Unwittingly, Ireland had be-
come one of the nation's first
commercial fishermen to fall vic-
tim to the Reagan
administration's touch war on
industry was under siege.
In the Coast Guard's 5th Dis-
trict, which is based in
Portsmouth and stretches from
New Jersey to North Carolina, a
half-dozen fishing boats with
afraid. They were so confused and
fearful of having their boats
siezed that thev staved in port
until thev found out what was
expected of them
Ireland's ordeal became a ral-
lying crv, and the zero tolerance
program came under criticism.
The debate even reached the halls
of Congress. In November, a law
to provide legal safeguards for
innocent boat ownerswent into
effect.
As a result of the outcry, Schill
said, fishermen have reason to
hope that cases of "overzealous"
enforcement of the policy are
behind them.
On Dec. 5, the two fisheries
organizations, after months of
negotiations with Customs offi-
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Americans are impressed by Reagan Era
NEW YORK (AD Ameri-
cans believe they are better off
after President Reagan's eight
wars in of rice by a margin of more
than two to one, but more are
pessirhistic"about the next five
vears than optimistic, a survey
has found.
A Time-CNN poll also found
that Americans believe reducing
the budget deficit should be Presi-
dent-elect Bush's first priority,
and thev believe Bush will do a
better job handling the deficit and
several other major issues than his
popular predecessor. Poll results
were released in this week's issue
of Time magazine.
percent predicted no change.
The survey had a margin of
error of plus or minus 3 percent-
age points.
The budget deficit was cited
as the nation's most pressing
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Fwentv-two percent said dealing
with terrorism should be Bush's
number one job.
Twenty percent cited the
fight against drugs and 11 percent
mentioned the trade deficit.
Fifty-seven percent said they
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Ihe survey of 1,012 adults
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nresidencv, compared with 27 cal standards in government,
percent who said it is worse off. while just 13 percent said he
Respondents were more pes- would fare worse,
simistic about the future, though, Vice President-elect Dan
with 43 percent saying they ex- Quayle fared much worse, with
pect conditions to be worse five 30 percent expressing an unfavor-
vears from now and 39 percent able opinion and 20 percent re-
expected them to be better. Ten garding him favorably.
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Qz iEast (Earnlmtan
Pete Fernald, o��jM�g
Stephanie Folsom, MPng uaor
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, D,rtcto,afUvtrUs,ni
Tim Hampton, nntm
Kristen Hal berg, sports t-ior
Ci up Carter, mm i��
Dean Waters, om
Debbie Stevens, u
Brad Bannister, g e
Jeff Parker, s ������
TOM FURR, Cirnkh.3H Alcmjrr
SUSAN HOWELL, Production Mn�frr
STEPIIAN1F EMORY,U t� s.
MAC LLARK, Busintss Mmtger
January 17,1989
OPINION
Page 4
Athletes
Pay them over or under the table?
The world of college athletics has
been plagued recently by the ongo-
ings of corruption and scandals in
the universities around the nation.
Many big-named colleges and uni-
versities have been charged with
everything and anything from forg-
ing grades to a recruiting pavoff to
the ultimate abuse, the abuse of the
athletic scholarship.
And with all oi this chaos the
question has risen. In order to avoid
further corruption with the athletic
departments over the countless
scandals of under-the-table money
or big payoffs to college athletes,
should the college athlete get paid
for his services on the field or court?
On the surface, this idea might
seem to be the logical solution to a
long NCAA headache. First off, the
worries of the NCAA would be over.
No longer would they have to inves-
tigate the corruption behind the
university's athletic departments
regarding the constant flow of
money and merchandise to their
athletes. Nor would the universities
have to monitor their alumni who
seem just as eager to make the big
payoff to their star athlete as the
athletic department itself does.
Why nol give the athlete a little
spending money to buy that new
Corvette or that plush condomin-
ium in exchange for bringing the
school revune and recognition?
Why not let the athlete share in
the money the schools are getting
back from their successful athletic
programs?
Sure, up close this might seem
like the simple solution to all of the
problems in the college athletic
world. However, this not the case.
To pay an athlete would mean to
take his amateur status away from
him. College athletes are not profes-
sionals. They are students who are
participating in an extracurricular
activity in a sport they happen to be
good at. In fact, the first objective of
the NCAA according to Time maga-
zine is to "retain a clear line of de-
marcation between college athletics
and professional sports
Paying college athletes would
not only take away their amateur
status, but would also deter their
incentive to be a student first and
then an athlete. With big money and
fancy merchandise handed over to
19-21 year olds, the young athlete
would no doubt get caught up in the
glory and glamour of his athletic
status. School would be secandory,
something he would have to partici-
pate in only because in order to
particpate in a collegiate sport, one
must be enrolled in a college or uni-
versity. To a young athlete, the
monetary sums would seem over-
whelming.
Finally, many athletes are al-
ready on full scholarships. At the
East Carolina University football
program, 95 full scholarships are
availab10 to student athletes. These
scholarships not only pay for tuition
and fees, but also room and board.
To many students who are put-
ting their own way through college,
free schooling as well as living ex-
penses and food all paid for by the
university, this might seem like a
gift or a payment in itself.
If thought of in this fashion, stu-
dent athletes are already getting
paid - in the form of edcuation.
r
(THCOGH WORK AT fe
PtwrnrsBAB
RAWATfOM
pror,bms��
mrme-3fiu
VO YOU THINK COLLEGE AtHLZTES SHOULV QtT PAJ
VJCCLV You LIKE" To SAY NO TO THIS FAC-E ?
Processional not a supremacist activity
Dear editor:
On Thursday, January 19 begin-
ning at 7:30 pm, the brothers of Alpha
Sigma Phi Fraternity will be holding
a ritual ceremony on campus. This
ceremony, called the Black Lantern
Processional, is enacted in memory
of deceased brothers who have
passed into the Omega chapter, sig-
nifying that, although they are no
longer present, their spirit remains
forever in the minds of the brothers.
This solemn march across the
ECU campus will orginate from the
Mendenhall Student Center. The
Processional calls for the brothers of
Alpha Sigma Phi to be dressed in
black robes with the leader of the
march wearing a white robe. The
members will also be carrying lan-
terns. It is one of the oldest traditions
of our fraternity dating back to the
mid-1800's and born at Yale Univer-
sitv. The brotherhood wishes to
stress to the student bodv that this
fraternity ritual has no racial over
tones. It should not be interpreted as
any type of supremacist act. Those
observing are asked to respect the so-
lemnity of this ceremonv.
The Brothers ol
Alpha Sigma Phi
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop themby our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance to joyner library.
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Letters are limited to 300 words
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every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday
for Thursday editions.
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the paper, The
East Carolinian features The
Campus Spectrum This is an
opinion column bv guest writers
from the student body and fac-
ulty. The columns printed in "The
Campus Spectrum will contain
current topics of concern to the
campus, community or nation.
Thecolumnsare restricted onlv
with regard to rules, ot gramrrwr
and decency.Person submitting
columns must be willing to accept
bylinecredit for their efforts as no
entries from ghost writers will be
published.
Cold War is warm, but the rivalry is not over
By LEON WIESELTIER
New Repubhc
The enlightened despoism of Mikhail Gor-
bachev is deemed to have ended a period in history.
There isan air of parturition in the capital; theold has
gone, the new has almost come. American policy-
makers seem suddenly unburdened of the most
oppressive anxiety that they ever had to feel.
The eschatological speculations that Gorbachev
has engendered in these dour and disabused men
and women is a measure of the pressure that the
rivalry between the United States and the Soviet
Union since the splitting of the atom has, quite prop-
erly, put on their minds. Now they dare to wonder if
they will always have to live by their nerves.
Is the Cold War over? The question is thor-
oughly confused. If the standard is philosophical,
the Cold War ended a long time ago. If the standard
is strategic, the Cold War will not end for a long time.
If you believe that the Cold War is a contest between
ideas, between democracy and totalitarianism,
which will end with the collapse of one of the ideas,
then you must agree that it ended decades ago, when
communism as a system of belief collapsed in the
Soviet-controlled world.
If you believe that the Cold War is a contest
between great powers, then you must agree that it
will survive the collapse of communism, because the
collapse of communism is not the same thing as the
collapse of the Soviet Union.
Indeed, Mikhail Gorbachev's thesis appears to
be: Either communism collapses or the Soviet Union
collapses. If glasnost is proceeding more swiftly than
perestroika, that is not only because political reform
is more immediate in its consequences than eco-
nomic reform, but also because Gorbachev has
grasped that the crisis of communism is the solution
to the crisis of the Soviet Union.
This thrilling man has understood the extent to
which his country's turgid, immobile institutions of
politics and economics were inscribed with certain
theories about the individual and society, about
power and the blandishments of control. It did not
take long for the new Soviet liberalizers to see that
they are fighting a force more profound and more
prestigious than Brezhnevism and its corruptions.
Gorbachev is presiding over the emergence of
civil society, over Hegel's revenge. He is substitut-
ing $c authoritarianism of a government for the
authoritarianism of a party, for the sake of efficiency.
All of this, in the name of communism, and for a
restoration of Soviet strength in the future.
Still, the citizens of this communist state are
being urged to act like citizens, not like communists.
Gorbachev's communism has a certain Unitarian
quality. It is theologically too paltry to support a
religious war.
The Cold War, of course, was about philosophy
and strategy. Philosophically, we won. The god that
failed failed. Strategically, the situation is rather
more complicated.
There is a sense in which, for the Soviets, phi-
losophy still casts a shadow over strategy. The col-
lapse of communism is partly responsible for, say,
the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan, or the
unilateral Soviet reduction in its European forces,
because it was the theory and practice of commu-
nism that threw the Soviet economy into the condi-
tion that made those commitments too costly.
The Soviet militarv finds itself threatened by the
social and economic consequences of precisely the
ideology it is dedicated to defend. A nice joke, for
Americans. Yet it is essential that we remember that
the rivalry is not over. The Soviet Union retains the
power to destroy the United States; and American
power retains its association with freedom. Inside
the Soviet Union, Gorbachev represents a revolu-
tion. Outside the Soviet Union, he represents a time
out.
For American foreign policy, this is the most
plastic hour since the end of the Second World War.
I believe that there still is sense in thinking about
American advantage. The Soviet Union will turn a
little away from the world to get itself in shape. It is
more vexed by its weakness at home than by its
weakness abroad. It will allow itself to be pushed a
bit here and probed a bit there.
;
(

Those bits add up. The truth about Gorbachev -
foreign policy initiatives is that they are designed to
make order out of a temporary retreat. Gorbachev is
the least paranoid man who ever ruki Russia. Ho
has his eye on the next century.
So should we: The economic abjection of the
Soviet Union leaves the United States with an oppor
tunity to improve its position around the world for
the next 50 years, to prepare itself against the da)
which will certainly come, when the Soviet Union
"catches up I am afraid that American diplomacy
has become too passive, too reactive, too unreflec
tive about the notion that its task is to "help Gor-
bachev
I have very little evidence of the hi storical imagi -
nation of George Bush or James Baker. Do thev see
in Europe, in the Middle East, in Angola, in Central
America, that this is a time for American activism, a
time for Washington to rain proposals on Moscow
Soviet pressure on the PLO, Soviet pressure on
the Sandinistas, Soviet pressure on the Cubans, is
possible. A larger Soviet reduction in conventional
forces in Europe is possible. A Soviet reduction in
strategic nuclear weapons is possible. A treatv ban-
ning weapons from space is possible. But not unless
the Americans rouse themselves from the fantasy
and the torpor of the last Reagan years. Not unless
we see the continuities along with the discontinui-
ties. Faiths die; interests live. The world is never too
good for realism.






Congress to drill Bush's
cabinet on no-taxes pledge
THE CAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17,1989 5
WASHINGTON (AP) - Presi- e Senate to work wel1 with
dent-elect Bush's choice of a em,
moderate, pragmatic cabinet he� are generally expen-
means the confirmation process ence?' hopefully pragmatic
that begins this week will lack the P5 �d WC(��V lhe oeace in Central America �nd
idpnlW:�i w� � � R. n8ld ideology of the first Reagan P0? �n central America ana in
ideological overtone of the Re- Mitcg� Mid �, am particular how to treat
From Baker, members ot the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee will likely want to
know what the new administra-
tion will do about helping to find
trying
very hard to establish from our
side an atmosphere of coopera-
tion and bipartisanship
Mitchell said he will seek
speedy confirmation for the ap-
pointees following committee
scrutiny, with the first batch
going to the Senate floor for votes
on Jan. 25.
The Constitution does not
establish a formal cabinet for the
president, but it has developed
oing to be needed said Charles throuSh custom datin& back to
Cook, a Washington political George Washington. Also by cus-
analyst. "The Democrats are torn, the Senate largely defers to
going to let the nominees build the president in the choice of his
their case for them official family. Rejections of ap-
Initial reactions on Capitol pointees have generally come not
Hill to Bush's cabinet selections over policy differences, but amid
have been generally positive. The political tiffs between the White
majority of those named are veter- House and Congress
agan years and instead offer de-
bate on substantive issues.
The Democrats who control
Congress are likely to use the ses-
sions to force Bush's nominees to
say how they will carry out their
boss' campaign promises to tend
to neglected social programs in a
time of extreme fiscal austerity,
and to test the strength of Bush's
no-new-taxes pledge.
'They will want to build a
record for why new revenues are
ans of federal government serv
ice. Three are holdovers from the
Reagan administration, five oth-
ers have been previously con-
firmed by the Senate for other
jobs, and four are former mem-
bers of Congress.
Senate Majority Leader
George Mitchell, D-Maine, has
said he is impressed with the
appointees as a group and expects
Beginning this week with
secretary of state-designate James
A. Baker III, Elizabeth Dole,
Bush's choice to head the Labor
Department, and Richard G. Dar-
man, the new budget director,
Congress will quiz the appointees
in an effort to discern where Bush
will depart from the policies of
Reagan, whose relations with the J"
Hill often were rockv
Nicaragua's moribund Contra
rebels; what will be done to ease
Third World debt; how to pursue
further arms reductions with the
Soviet Union; and how to breathe
life into Middle East peace efforts.
Dole will have jurisdiction
over issues that Bush make keys
to his "kinder, gentler nation"
pledge, including parentsal leave
and adjustments in the minimum
wage.
Darman's appearance before
the Governmental Affairs
Committee will be Congress' first
shot at finding out what might be
in the budget plan Bush is ex-
pected to submit in February.
In the next few weeks, atten-
tion will focus on hearings for
former Sen. John Tower, Bush's
choice for secretary of defense;
Robert Mosbacher, to be com-
merce secretary; former Rep. Jack
Kemp, to head Housing and Ur-
ban development ; Samuel Skin-
ner, '1 ransportation; Louis W. Sul-
livan, Health and Human Serv-
ices; Clayton Yeutter, Agricul-
ture; former Rep. Edward J. Der-
winski, Veterans Affairs; former
Jr Interior.
Shultz asks to tear down Berlin
Wall, praises Soviet progress
VIENNA, Austria (AP)
Praising the Soviet Union for its
progress on human rights, Secre-
tary of State George P. Shultz ar-
rived today for the end of a 35-
nation review of Moscow'srecord
and called for the dismantling of
its radio jamming transmitters.
Shultz also renewed his de-
mand that the Soviets tear down
the Berlin Wall. He called it "one
of the acid tests" of K ilin inten-
tions.
The secretary and other for-
eign ministers are in Vienna to
sign !6ff yt the fnost ambitious
tional arms control that are due to "Jamming has stopped
open in Vienna in March. Shultz said, "and we don't want
Shultz flew to Vienna from to see it reinstiruted
Washington on his final diplo- The Helsinki accords, signed
matic mission after 6 and half by the United States, the Soviet
years as State Department chief. Union, Canada and 32 European
He is to speak Tuesday to foreign nations, tacitly accepted the post-
ministers reviewing the Vienna World War II borders of Eastern
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accord.
Listing human rights im-
provements as his proudest
achievement, Shultz credited the
Soviets and their East European
allies with adopting "much more
open" sQCjptjes ihari Ihey had in
1975, wrien tit JgTtejr�e�t to fos-
Europe. In exchange for this con-
cession, the Soviets pledged to
permit more contacts with the
West and freer movement of
people and ideas.
F r wre inJotmathT. 'n ihi pr.tdu rr Smth Corona CurporaUon 65 Locus) tonut NewCanaan i. T "rM
Smith Corona IC anada ld WOTapsc on Road. Scartof ugh. I tauri Canada MB 1Y4
East-West human rights and se- ter East-West understanding was
curity accord of the 1980s, a re-
view of the 1975 Helsinki agree-
ments.
The 50-page document took
more than two years to negotiate
and was formally adopted Sun-
day. It contains landmark
signed
However, he called on the
Soviets to dismarde the giant
transmitters that had jammed
Western radio broadcasts for
years. Late last year, the Soviets �
and their East European allies Y
STEP UP TO THE BEST
commitments on human rights stopped interfering with Radio
and sets the seal on new NATO- Liberty and Radio Free Europe
Warsaw Pact talks on corv broadcasts.
Drop in heart disease rate,
still number one killer
MONTEREY, Calif. (AP) -
Heart disease remains the
nation's biggest killer, takinga life
every 32 seconds, but researchers
have made "unbelievable" prog-
ress in taming the disease, accord-
ing to the American Heart Asso-
ciation.
Figures released Sunday
show that deaths from heart and
blood vessel disease have
dropped 24 percent during the
past decade. Researchers attrib-
ute the improvement to healthier
living habits and better treatment.
"The public ought to appreci-
ate the progress that has been
made in heart disease over the
past 20 yearssaid Dr. Myron L.
Weisfeldt, the association's presi-
dent-elect.
"It's almost unbelievable.
There is almost no form of heart
disease that we can't approach
without meaningful treatment
However, Weisfeldt, a heart
specialist at Johns Hopkins Uni-
versity, cautioned that much
work remains in improving care
and encouraging people to take
better care of themselves.
"I believe we can prevent at
least 50 percent of the jschemic
heart disease in the United States
by the year 2000 if we stop smok-
ing, get cholesterol treated if ifs
above 220 and identify and treat
hypertension he said.
Ischemic heart disease is the
clogging of blood vessels that feed
the heart. It underlies most heart
attacks, the single most lethal
heart ailment.
The association said that in
1986, the most recent year for
which there are statistics, an esti-
mated 978,500 Americans died
from heart attacks, strokes and
other diseases of the heart and
blood vessels. Cancer, the No. 2
killer, took 466,000 lives.
The association's latest fig-
ures show that more than one in
four Americans suffers some
form of cardiovascular disease,
and almost half eventually die
from it.
However, the figures also
bear out the brightening outlook:
Between 1976 and 1986, the death
rate from all forms of cardiovas-
cular disease fell 24 percent, in-
cluding 28 percent for heart at-
tacks and 40 percent for strokes.
'The good news is that we
continue to see an improvement
in the death rate from the biggest
killer of our population said Dr.
Bemadine Heal v of the Cleveland
Clinic Foundation, the
association's current president.
'Those trends are dramatic
and don't seem to be reversing
she said. "The bad news is that
heart disease is still killing almost
1 million Americans a year, and
we've got a long way to go
About 60 percent of the heart-
attack deaths occur before the
victim reaches the hospital. Stud-
ies show that about half of all
heart attack victims wait more
than two hours before getting to
an emergency room.
Weisfeldt said a major goal is
getting people to go to the hospi-
tal within three or four hours of
the first sign of heart attacks.
During this period, there is still
time to give them drugs to dis-
solve the blood clots that are caus-
ing, their heart attacks. This treat-
ment can save lives and reduce
the disability of heart attacks.
Other major goals, he said,
including finding ways to im-
prove the effectiveness of
angioplasty, which uses balloons
to reopen clogged heart arteries,
and finding surgical and medical
techniques to identify and protect
people at risk of cardiac arrest.
The association estimates that
cardiovascular disease will cost
$88.2 billion this year in medical
expenses and lost wages. In 1986,
it estimated the cost at $78.6 bil-
lion.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 1989
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Immediately. Non-smoker. To share 3
bedroom house. Will have own bed-
room. 175.00 per month plus 1 3 utili-
ties 5 minutes from school Call
Pamela at 758-7142.
ROOM FOR RENT: Access to kitchen
and bath. Between 5th & 4th on Jarvis.
Utilities included. $175.00 Call before
11:00. 830-1808 or work 758-1112.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY: Female
non-smoker to share 2 Bdrm duplex.
Will have own room. $110 13 utili-
ties. 34 mile from campus. Call 758-
2096.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male or
Female. Private room, $90 a month.
Close to campus, 15 on the utilities.
Call 758-0312. Two rooms available
HOUSEMATE: Quite MF, wanted by
faculty member 3 bedroom house,
newly remodeled, walking distance to
campus. Rent and lease negotiable
Call 752-3677.
2 BDRM. APT: For rent at Eastbrook.
Take over lease until August. $310 per
month call 752-3860.
NEED ONE NON-SMOKING FE-
MALE: To share trailer in nice trailer
park. $150.00month 12 utilities.
Call 756-9758 or 830-1497.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Black sofa with bed,
average condition � 30.00. Two twin
beds 50.00 each. 752-6554.
I HAVE SEVERAL DEPENDABLE
CARS FOR SALE: From 300.00 to
1,000. Require 12 down and am will-
ing to finance the rest. 752-6554.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available
for parties: Dance, Top 40, & Beach.
Call 355-2781 and ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typing and photocopving services We
also sell software and computer disk-
ettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pages. We repair computers and print-
ers also. Lowest hourly rate in town.
SDF Professional Computer Services,
106 East 5th Street (beside Cubbies)
Greenville, NC 752-3694.
HELP WANTED
ATTENTION � HIRING! Govern
ment jobs � your area. Many em medi-
ate openings without waiting list or
test. $17,840 � $69,485. Call 1-602-838-
8885. EXT B5285.
WILLING TO TRADE: Horseback
riding in exchange for occasional stable
help, grooming, etc. English and west-
ern tack available. Experienced riders
only. Call 756-6635 after 7 p.m.
WANTED: Bartenders Male or Fe-
male. For more information call 746-
2319.
SOCCER COACH: Assistant coach for
'77 Greenville Stars Select Soccer Team.
Must possess good soccer skills, ability
to work with youth players February
through March. Salary is $7.00 per ses-
sion, Contact Willie Nelms 756-3879
after 6 p.m.
INTERESTED IN A CAREER IN
MARKETING, ADVERTISING,
JOURNALISM, GRAPHIC DESIGN,
OR PUBLIC RELATIONS?? Local
downtown development firm will
place one person in each specialty in a
4-monih internship program with
company beginning in January 1989
Volunteer program is designed to in
troduce students to careers in commu-
nications and provide hands-on expe-
rience with trained professionals. 10-15
hours per week are required. Expenses
and mileage are paid. Juniors or seniors
preferred, with mapr as appropriate
Interviews will be held January 24-27,
with selection of final candidates on
January 30. Send resume and cover
letter by January 23 to Deborah
1 highes, Director of Marketing, Phil
Flowers & Associates, Inc 101 West
14th St Suite 105, Greenville, NC
27834.
INTERESTED IN PAYING OFF
THOSE CHX'MAS BILLS: Or Begin
ning to plan for a new Spring ward-
robe1 Brodv's and Brodv's for Men
have part time sales associate positions
available for Individual who can work
flexible hours Apply at Brodv's, Caro-
lina East Mall Monday Wednesday 2-
4
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
Interested in making money part-time
photographing campus activities? No
experience necessary, we train. If you
are highly sociable, have a 35 mm
camera, and transportation, please call
between noon and 5 p.m , M-F, at 1-
800-722-7033.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSELOR:
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however room, utili-
tites and rhone provided. Mary Smith
REAL Crisis Center 758 1IELP.
BABYSITTER NEEDED: On
Monday's & Wednesday's from 12
until 5 p.m. Will need own transporta-
tion. Will also need someone occasion
ally to sit on Tuesday's If can work
either of these days, please call 756
6319.
$10-$15HOUR: Processing mail at
home. Weekly check guaranteed. For
details write V & F. Enterprises 14263
San Pablo Ave, Suite 111, San Pablo,
CA 94806.
CJ'S WANTS YOU: Every position
open. We are putting together the best
wait staff, cooks and prep personnel to
make CJ's the best restaurant team in
East Carolina. Call between 2 5 p.m. for
appointment M-F. Ask for Casey. 355-
3543
PERSONALS
AKC REGISTERED GOLDEN RE
TRIEVER PUPPIES: 3 males priced at
$150 to $225. Call 746 2517.
HEY PI K APPS: The house looks awe
some � Let's "hope Bish" gets over the
"Mr. Clean Syndrome" Those upstairs
G.P.As should be "high" (but remem-
ber, not in the house).
WELCOME BACK PI KAPPA PHI
BROTHERS: I lope you all had a great
break, and get ready for a great
semester. Love, the Little Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS: To all the
new Phi Tau brothers. We're glad that
you made it. Love the little sisters.
TO ALL PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS:
Thanks for the great turn out to the first
meeting of 89. Keep up the good work
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS: Want to
help you get in shape! Win a years free
membership to the Spa Buv a chance to
win from a little sister.
TO PHI KAPPA LAU BROTHERS:
We're looking forward to great parties
and a great semester with you. love
Phi Kappa Tau little sisters.
FROM ROOM TO ROOM V1 DID
GO: It wasa surprise social of rainbows
and snow! The sisters arrived with
blindfolds in tact, the soda was fun, it
was GREAT, in fact! Thanks to Alpha
Xi Delta pledges and the Sig Eps, too'
We liked the surprise and we love you!
The sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
NOW HIRING: Part-time "tewing
operators at Prep-shirt Manutactur
ing. 1800 N. Greene Street Greenville,
N C 27834 758-3167
KA LITTLE SISTERS: Welcome back
girls. Our first meeting is Wednesday
Jan. 18th at 9:30 p.m. If you are plan
ning to be active this semester please
attend
IHE S1STFRS AND PLEDGES OF
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: Would like
to welcome everyone back to school!
Good luck this semester!
MEADE, MISHA, EMILY,
DANIELLE, AMY, LISA AND
MARTHA: Hang in there! We are
behind you' 1 ove the Sisters of Sigm�
Sigma Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS: To the new
sisters of Gamma Beta chapter of Sigma
Sigma Sigma Christine Allabach, Gin
get Beatty, Robin Black, 1 folly Bratton,
Stephanie Boykin, Kelly Carpenter,
Luanne Collins, Suzanne Desrochers,
Paige Dusenberry, Carla Fairbanks,
Lois Gilbert, Abbie Core, Julie
Hamrick, Christi Harris, Amber
Hodge, Cyndi Holzhauser, Michelle
Klun, Cassk lane, Jill Mau, Coleen
McDonald, Elizabeth Moore, Kati
Mulligan, Amy Neal, Kim Schechter,
Mihele Streib
CONGRATULATIONS: To the new
officers of Gamma Beta chapter of
Sigma Sigma Sigma. President �
Sharyl Butts, Vice President � Melissa
Terranova, Treasurer Bottv Pivec,
Secretary � Blair mathews, Rush
Membership � Carrie O'Brien, Educa-
tion � Mia McCoy, good luck in '89!
Love the sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
AOPI'S: 1 lope everybody's break was
great. Roscball is coming so be looking
for that special date It is only 19 days
away, get prepared for an outrageous
day
AOPI'S: Beta Lambdas, Be ready for a
wild semester We can't wait to call you
sisters! Love the sisters of AOPi.
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD
IT s OUR BUSINESS
ACCU �;�
ESCOPY
v A � p ,
758-2400
I HE PIKES: Would like to congratu-
late the new 1FC executive council.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: 14 schools head to
Greenville Jan. 27. Watch out ECU here
come the Pikes.
CONGRATS: Cabell Lawton
secretary � Go Pikes!
IFC
THE BROTHERS OF PHI KAPPA
LAU: Would like to congratulate the
newly initiated brothers: Bob Durda
Greg Lee, Phil Singleton, Andy Elgin,
Mike Andrews, Jerry Bland, Ty Blan
ton, Kevin Breeden, Corey Bryant,
lerry Garner, John Hernly, Harrison
1 iubard, Gary Madey, Brian Marion,
lohn Richardson, Greg Smith, Dallas
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru Sat Low
Cost Termination to 20 wrek� of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
WAKE 'N' BAKE
IN BEAUTIFUL
NEGRIL, JAMAICA
FOR
SPRING BREAK
89!
VERY
AFFORDABLE
PACKAGES.
BOOK EARLY AND
SAVE!
CALL:
1-800-426-77
SpruilJ Great job!
PHI TAU'S: Get pumped for the for
mal at Topsail Beach It's only a month
away!
TO ALL E.C.U. MEN: We want you to
be a Phi Tau! Come rush Phi Kappa Tau
Jan. 23 26 For more information call
757-1319
BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA PHI: Wei
come back all Fraternities and soron
ties. Pi Kappa Phi Rush will be held Ian
23rd through the 25th.
GRE PREPARATION! The best 510
you'll ever spend Baron's, Arco
Cliff's notes. Retail S21 00, yours for ten
bucks Call Mike @ 752-5683
SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL
Bonus Diskettes
5 14" DSDD
$4.95
per box of 10
Verbatim Diskettes
5 14" DSDD
$7.95
per box of 10
SDF Professional
Computers, Inc.
106 East 5th Street
Greenville, NC 27834
752-3694
OPPORTUNITY
TRI COUNTY HOMES, INC. IS
EXPANDING ITS SALES FORCE OVER
ALL OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
IF YOU ARE ENERGETIC, ENTHUSIAS
TIC. HONEST AND NEED AN INCOME
OF MORE THAN $25,000.00 A YEAR
"HERE IS YOUR CHANCE"
IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A
COMPANY THAT OFFERS BENEFITS
LIKE LIFE INSURANCE, HEALTH ANC
DENTAL INSURANCE. DlSABILI
INSURANCE. AS WELL AS A
RETIREMENT PROGRAM
CALL
1-800-672-4503
AND ASK FOR KAREN LAMBERT
A SCHEDULED CONFIDENT
INTERVIEW WILL BE ARRANGED
Announcements
f i
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
General Classroom Building. Thur Jan.
12 4 p .m. rm. 2016. Thur Jan. 191 p.m.rm.
1014. Mon Jan. 23 1 p.m. rm. 1014. Thur
Jan 264pm.rm.2016.MonJan.304p.m.
rm. 2016. Thur Feb. 2 1 p.m. rm. 1014.
Mon 6 1 p.m. rm. 1014. Thur Feb. 9 4
p.m. rm. 2016. Mon Feb. 13 4 p.m. rm.
2016. Thur Feb. 16 1 p.m. rm. 1014. Mon
Feb. 20 1 p.m. rm. 1014. Thur Feb. 23 4
p.m. rm. 2016. Mon Feb 27 4 p.m. rm.
2016.
CHINESE ACROBATS
The Student Union Minority Arts
Committee proudly presents The Chinese
Golden ragon Acrobats and Magicians of
Taipei in performance on Thursday, Feb. 2
at 8 p.m. in Wnght Auditorium. This
Company consists of 23 dancers, magi-
cians, and acrobats in colorful costumes
� half of whom are members of the
Danny Chang (Troupe Director) family.
This group has performed extensively
world wide. Tickets for this event are now
on sale in the Central Ticket Office of
Mendenhall Student Center, (phone 757-
6611, ext. 266). Office hours are 11 a.m. to
6 p.m. M-F.
PIRATES OF FENZANCE
The Performing Arts Series presents "Pi-
rates of Penzance" a Gilbert & Sullivan
Operetta on Mon, Jan. 30 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This production is
staged by the New York Gilbert & Sulli-
van Players They remain the premiere
production company of Gilberi &
Sullivan's work. This production includes
such memorable tunes as, 'Toor Wander-
ing One "A Rollickling Band Of Pirates
We and "I Am the Very Model of A
Modern Major-General Tickets for "Pi-
rates of Penzance" are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center (phone 757-6611, ext. 266).
Office hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. M-F.
PHILAPANCQ
The Philadelphia Dance Company (Phila-
danco) will perform in Wright Audito-
rium on Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 8 p.m. This
performance is part of the Performing
Arts Series. Led by John Myers Brown,
this Black Dance Troupe creates excite-
ment and makes headlines everywhere
they perform. Tickets for this dynamic
performance are available from the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student
Center phone 757-6611, ext. 266 Office
hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. This perform-
ance is sponsored in part by a grant from
the North Carolina Arts Council and the
National Endowment for the Arts in
Washington, DC, a federal agency
AHMAD JAMAL
The Student Union Special Concerts
Committee presents Jazz Recording Great
Ahmad Jamal in concert on Wed Jan 25 at
8 p.m. in HendrixThreatre. A subtle, com-
plex, and veratile interpreter and com-
poser Jamal is regarded as a magician's
magician. Tickets are now on sale for this
outstanding evening of jazz. For further
details contact The Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, phone 757-
6611, ext 266 Office hours are 11 a.m. to 6
p.m M-F.
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed by the School of Art. The
School of Art is offering positions as
models for figure drawing classes spring
semester at $5 per hour. Contact Connie
Folmer in the School of Art Administra
tion office, Jenkins 2000 or call 757-6563.
PRE SEASON BASKETBALL
A registration meeting for the annual in-
tramural pre season basketball tourna-
ment will be held Jan. 17 at 5 p.m. in Bio
103. All mens and womens squads are
encouraged to attend!
FOOTBALL
Mangers needed for varsity football. Pick
up application at office in Minges. 757-
6029.
SCIENTIFIC TALK
The ECU Chapter of Sigma Xi, the Scien-
tific Research Society, will present a talk
by Prof Wenda Trevathan on Jan. 19 at
7.00 p.m. in room 1028 GCB. Prof. Tre-
vathan will speak about different aspects
of her new book, I luman Birth: An Evolu-
tionary Perspective.
CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance Class photographs will be taken
Jan. 23 � Jan. 27 in the student store from
9 a.m. til 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. til 4:30 p.m.
each day
FACULTY AND STAFF
Faculty and staff yearbook pictures will
be taken Jan. 23 � Jan. 27 in the student
store from 9 a.m. tile 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. til
4:30 p.m. each day.
IRS
Wanted: Sport care attendant. The De-
partment of Intramural-Recreational
Services is looking for individuals experi-
enced in spttrts care (athletic training) to
work within the sports care program.
Experience in high school, collegiate ath-
letic training desirable. Contact Todd
McCollum in 204 Memorial Gym or call
757-6387 for more information.
CO-OP EDUCATION
Interested in a summer job with a resort,
camp, or recreational facility? Feb. 9th,
ECU will host over 50 agencies looking for
summer employees Come bv or call Co-
op Ed. for more info, on your career op-
portunities, 757-6979, GCB 2028.
EDUCATION MAJORS
It's not too late to submit your application
for the workstudy trip to Pueblo, Mexico
for Spring Break (March 4-12). If you're
concerned about the expense - don't be.
Fund raising efforts will be a group en-
deavor. What a great opportunity to
travel while sharing your talents and
skills in a local school. Applications are
availablein R-154, Speight. For more info
contact Marianne Exum at (w) 757-6271 or
(h) 830-9450. Hurry! Time is running out.
HONORS SEMINARS
All faculty members and I lonors students
are reminded of their opportunity to de-
sign or request an 1 lonors Seminar of their
choice. The Honors Committee makes the
final selection. Please submit proposals
(with syllabus) to David Sanders (757-
6373) at the Honors Office, Room 1002
GCB by Jan. 17. See Dr. Sanders in the
1 lonors Office for more info.
MODELS
Models for figure drawing class are
needed for spring semester; if interested
contact Commie Folmer, School of Art.
Jenkins Fine Arts Center. 757-6563 or Tran
Gordley 757-6259.
MEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
It's time for one of those organizational
meetings. Tonight in Mendenhall rm. 212
at 9:30 p.m. Anyone wishing to join is
welcomed. Present members have no
choice. For more info, call Gary at 752-
7538.
MSf
The Episcopal Student Fellowship meets
at 5:30 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal Church
4th St. All are welcome. Call Allen Man-
ning at 758-1440.
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLI-
CANS
The Executive officers of the ECU Federa-
tion of College Republicans would like to
invite everyone to our first meeting of the
semester on Jan. 18 at 7 p.m. in 212 Men-
denhall. Meetings will be held every Wed.
same time, same place.
IAGNE
Wes2fel Christine Fellowship invites you
to enjoy a free lasagne supper while you
meet new people and learn about our
Spring fellowship opportunitities, plus
tour the Methodiest Student Center, 501
East Fifth St. (across from Carrett Dorm).
Sponsored by Presbyterian and Method-
ist Campus Ministries, 758-2030.
STUDENT UNION
Applications are now being accepted for
the position of 1989-90 Student Union
President. Deadline to apply is Jan. 20,
1989. Applications can be picked up at the
Information Desk or the Student Union
Office �rm 236.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
The Overseas Development Network will
be meeting on Jan. 19th at 4 p.m. in Men-
denhall Student Center. We will be dis
cussing our adopted project and possible
fundraisers. New members welcome! Call
Tonya Batity for more info, (hm 830 8888;
wk 757-6611 ext. 221).
HUMAN BIRTH
Professor Wenda Trevathan of New
Mexico State Univ. will lecture about dif
ferent aspects of her new and highly ac
claimed book, Human Birth: An Evolu-
tionary Perspective. Prof. Trevathan will
speak at 7 p.m Jan. 19 in rm 1028 GCB.
PE MAJORS CLUB
Wanted All P.E. Majors and intended
majors to help support our club. No DUES
� Just FUN First meeting to be held Jan
19 at 8 p.m. in Minges, rm. 142
BULLS�Y�J)ARTS
We're still waiting for our equipment It
won't be in for another 2-3 weeks. There
will be another announcement stating
when we will have our next meeting It
should be in the next week or so. This
meeting will organize what we already
have accomplished and hopefully we will
be ready to play as soon as our darts get
here.
THI PETA.LAMPDA
Welcome back members There will be a
general meeting on Jan. 17 at 4 p m in rm
1013. Pictures will be taken for the year-
book also.
MEIHQPIST STUDENT
CENTER
Title: "Let Your Bones Dance There will
be a dance at the Methodist Student Cen-
ter on Jan. 20, at 8:30 p.m. Free admission,
free refreshments. The MSC is located at
501 E. 5th St. across from Garrett Dorm
Call 758-2030 or 752-7240 for details.
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
ASSQC
The Student Financial Management Asso-
ciation will hold its first meeting for the
spring semester on Jan. 18 at 4:30 p.m. in
rm. 3009 GCB everyone is welcome to
attend.
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
Welcome to a new semester! Make it
worthwhile by getting involved! (E02
invites all Early Childhood Majors to at
tend the first meeting of the semester. It
will be held on Jan. 18 at 4 p.m. in Speight
308. All new and current members are
welcome to attend and get some great
flannel board activitities.
S.A.M.
There will be an important meeting of the
Society for the Advancement of Manage-
ment on Jan. 18 at 3 p m. in GCB 1028 all
members must attend
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
The Lady Pirates will host American Uni-
versity Jan. 21 in Minges at 7 p.m. At
halftime there will be a dinner giveaway
as well as a Pure Gold Dancer Perform
ance.
MF SWIMMING
ECU. Men's and Women's swimming
teams will face Duke Jan. 21 The meet
starts at 2 p.m. in Minges Aquatic Center
Both squads enjoy fine records this sea-
son, but still need your support. This is the
last home meet of the year.
GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir is now accepting
new members for the Spring Semester. If
you enjoy singing, we invite you to stop
by the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center on
Wed. afternoons at 5 p.m. during rehears-
als. Deadline Jan. 25.
LAW SOCIETY
Our next mtg. will be at 6 p.m. in GC 1014
on Jan. 19. All members and other inter-
ested students, please attend.
SIUPY SKILLS
Improving your study skills. Learning
how to improve your study skills for
greater success in college. The following
mini course and workshops can help you
prepare for the added workload of college
or help to increase your grade point
average. All sessions will be held in 313
Wright Building. Jan. 17 Making and Us-
ing Notes 3-430 p.m Jan. 18 Efficient
Reading 3-4:30 p.m Jan. 19 Test Taking 3-
4:30 p.m. You may attend ail the topic
sessions or choose the ones where you
need the most improvement.
DECISION SCIENCE
The first meeting of the Decision Scion.
Society for the Spring semester will be a i
18 at 3 p m in GCBrm 3004 The meetii
will concern the honor policy under cur
rent consideration governing compute:
related projects and the use of the a a
puter lab in the School of Business. Up
coming meetings, speakers, and event
will also be discussed Ideas and input be
ALL concerned Business students a:
welcome. A special invitation is extended
to all prospective new members.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Normal and allergic volunteers needed
for Asthma research at the ECU Dept of
Medicine. Study purchase a patier
ranges from blood donation to allergen
challenge. All volunteers will be com per
sated. If interested, call 551 3159.
WOMEN'S TENNIS TRYOUTS
117 to 120 2:30 to 4 pm. Minge
Coliseuim Tennis Courts Any question-
call: Lynn Gorski � Asst Tennis ooadi
757-6161.
WATERSKI CLUB
The ECU Waterski Club will have its first
meeting ot the semester Jan. 19at6pm it
the Library. All are invited to attend for
more info call Tommy Lewis at 830-0137
A social hour will follow the meeting
NEW STUDENT RFVIFWS
Any student that ordered a new Student
Review should come be the Buccaneei
office and pick one up We are located in
front of Joyner Library on the second floor
of the publications building.
BIOLOGY CLUB
Gamma Beta Phi members One point
may be earned by working at the Blood
mobile Jan 18 & 19 for one hour If inter
ested come by the Biology building and
sign up for times located across from the
nirth wing elevator.
BLOODMOBILE
The Bloodmobile will be at 244 Mende
nhall Jan. 18 & 19 from 12 p m. to 6 p.m. A
sign up sheet for times is located in the Bio
building across from the elevator in the
north wing. Please give. Sponsored by the
Biology Club.
COLLEGE WORK STUPY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
w V






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 1989 7
Democrats elect chairman
RALEIGH (AP) � Raleigh
attorney Lawrence Davis was
elected North Carolina Demo-
cratic chairman Saturday and
said the party and its nominees
should broaden their appeal to
the "ordinary citizen
How many Democrats have
we heard say that the party left
Ihem?" Davis said in an accep-
tance speech to the Democratic
Executive Committee. "Well,
now is the time to find all of our
friends that have ever told us that
and tell them the Democratic
Party is home
In an interview, Davis said the
party and its candidates should
teflev t the general interests of the
people as a whole
The W-member committee
i: nanimousi v elected Davis on the
recommendation of a nominating
panel appointed by the outgoing
chairman, Jim V? Hecke, who
derided against eking re-elec-
tion.
Parks Helms, a former state
legislator from Charlotte who had
planned to challenge Davis, with-
d re w a fter hi s name was placed i n
nomination in what he called a
move for unity. He told reporters
the vote would have been close
and that he believed the next
oh airman should take office with
broad support.
some Democrats privately ac-
cused Sen. Terrv Sanford, the
state's highest-ranking Demo-
cratic officeholder, and his allies
of orchestrating Davis' election
and using the nominating
committee to give the appearance
of an open process. Sanford was
out of the country Saturday.
Helms told reporters Sam
Poole, a Sanford political aide,
had telephoned him to ask if he
would accept the post of party
secretary, an offer Helms de-
clined.
"There is some resentment "
among Democratic activists,
Helms said. "We have always
been a party of very diverse
views, and I think what this proc-
ess failed to recognize was that
those views are strongly held and
that we have an obligation now to
open up the process, to make it
inclusive, and to give this grass-
roots Democratic organization an
opportunity to work
Asked whether he believed the
election was rigged, Helms said it
was "undulv restrictive
Davis, 51, represented the Win-
ston-Salem area in the General
Assembly and now lobbies the
Legislature for corporate inter-
ests.
Supporters say he is indicative
of the conservative, pro-business
Democrats whom the party must
recapture to reverse its string of
losses in the state.
"The party needs to reflect the
interests of the ordinary citizen �
mainstream economic and politi-
cal life he said. The Democratic
Party does not need to "change
stripes like a chameleon" but
should encourage candidates
who "are more disposed toward
Jeffersonian principles" to seek
office, he said.
Critics say Davis has not been
politically active enough in recent
elections to quality as chairman,
and they say his choice of clients
� such as the soap and detergent
industry, which fought a phos
phate detergent ban at the Gen-
eral Assembly suggests he is too
conservative.
The Democrats have suffered
major defeats in the two most
recent presidential election years.
Last November, George Bueh
carried the state with 58 percent of
the vote, Gov. Jim Martin was re-
elected andjim Gardner became
the state's first GOP lieutenant
governor sincel901.
While some Democrats have
said the party is suffering because
it is perceived as the captive ot
liberal special interests, Helms
said in his withdrawal speech thai
it would be a mistake to abandor
working people, minorities and
women "who have traditionally
provided that grass-roots support
that has made our party what it
is
Helms said the next chairmar
must foster the creation of "a new
image for Democrats in North
Carolina that reflects our historic
support for a progressive
agenda
The Executive Committee alsc
elected three omcrofficers recom
mended by the nominating panel,
which was chaired by former
Charlotte Mayor Harvey Gantt:
Jeanette Council, a Cumberland
County educator, as first vice
chair; Clarence Lighmer, former
Raleigh mayor, as second vice
chair; and Debbie Nelson of Cra-
ven County as third vice chair.
The nominating committee's
recommendation of Ray Farris, a
Mecklenburg county attorney, for
party secretary was rejected. The
incumbent, Betty Wallace, was re-
elected.
In elections to four seats on the
Democratic National Committee,
Betty Spier at Pitt County and
Muriel Offerman of Duplin
county defeated Johnsie Setzer of
Catawba county while state Sen.
Russell Walker of Randolph
County and Gantt defeated Van
Hecke.
77te 9ezu Image
Tanning Special!
15 Visits For $30
Month of Jan.
Silver Solarium
Large 28 Bulb
Tanning Bed
Phone:
756-4144
Appts. From
8 am - 7:30 pm
313 Plaza Drive
Greenville, NC 27834
Behind Peppi's
GO
Man reverses marijuana plea
ASHEVILLE (AP) � Charles
McHan of Murphy has hired
more attorneys and now wants to
withdraw his guilty plea to a
charge of possessing 200 pounds
o marijuana, court records show.
Mc I Ian pleaded guilty in U.S.
district Court on Sept. 20 to pos-
s ssing the marijuana with intent
to deliver. Sentencing is sched-
uled for Tuesday in Bryson City,
but last week McHan filed a mo-
tion thai he be allowed to take
Uack ki$ plea. i?
When he pleaded, he did not
knew he was being investigated
� r operating a continuing crimi-
nal enterprise, he said in the mo-
tion, filed by his new attorneys.
McHan, 44, claims the gov-
ernment did not let him know
about the investigation. Former
Assistant U.S. Attomev Kenneth
Bell, now in private practice in
Winston-Salem, said Friday he
believes he mentioned the ongo-
ing probe several times during
McHan's court hearings.
A ruling by U.S. District
Court Judge Richard Voorhees
that McHan may withdraw his
plea and have a jury trial would
void anv reason to have the sen-
tencing hearing Tuesday. The
motion will be argued Tuesday
morning, the federal clerk's office
told The Asheville Citizen.
If McHan's motion is al-
lowed, he will be tried on the
original charge � possession of
more than 2,200 pounds of mari-
juana.
McHan was arrested May 4 as
he negotiated to buy 200 pounds
of marijuana from an undercover
Drug Enforcement Administra-
tion agent in El Paso, Texas.
McHan was chainnan of the
board of Citizens Bank in Murphy
until March 30, when a group of
stockholders unhappy with the
b?nk's management ousted him.
9!
RDON'S
FOR
WOOLRICH
30�c
OFF
20OFF
NIGHTGOWNS
200 Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
Women like Barbara's style
WASHINGTON (AP) �Bar-
bara Bush says she's findingthat
many older women are "tickled
pink" at her personal style of
avoiding makeup, hair color and
dieting.
Mrs. Bush, who describes
herself as a "full-figured
woman said she hasn't been
trying to lose weight lately and
doesn't plan to accept borrowed
gowns from high-fashion design-
ers as Nancy Reaga n did.
In an interview with several
newsorganizations, she said she's
getting a good response from the
public.
My mail tells me a lot of fat,
v hite-haired, wrinkled ladies are
tickled pink Mrs. Bush said.
"They're very sweet. I think it
makes them feel better about
themselves I mean, look at me - if
I an be a success, so can they
Mrs. Bush said she feels no
,uilt about the $25 million being
pont on this week's inaugural
activities because the money is
being privately raised, except for
funds appropriated by Congress
- r the ceremonial portion.
These people are raising it
money for the inaugural) be-
cause they worked for years and
vears to elect a president she
said. "I don't feel badly about it at
all. It's putting a lot of people to
work, giving a lot of people jobs
Win a pizza party for your entire
residence hall! Between January 9 and
January 29, if the students in your dorm
order the most pizza from Domino's
Pizza, the entire dorm will win a pizza
party So, order from Domino's Pizza
You'll get the pizza that ECU students
chose as best in a taste test. And you
might win a big pizza party.
Winner will be figured on a pizza-
per-student basis so every dorm has
a chance. Maximum of 100 pizzas may
be won.
Serving ECU Campus
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd
Hours:
11:00 am-1am SunThurs
11 00 am-2am Fri & Sat
Hours vary from store to store
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
Student Union
Coming Attractions
"O.�0
(Of fOH(�ltnnt)icm PB
Interested In
Studying Abroad?
Information on academic exchange oppor-
tunities throughout the world through the
International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP), at ECU. Information available from:
Dr. R. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-6418 (work)
756-0682 (home)
k
Wednesday, January 18
8:00 pm Hendrix
TRUE STORIES
Thursday, January 19
8:00pm Hendrix
Travel Adventure Film
"SAFARI
Friday, January 20-Sunday, January 22
8:00pm Hendrix
YOUNG GUNS
Upcoming Events:
Special Concert-AHMAD JAMAL Jan. 25
CHINESE ACROBATS & MAGICIANS -Feb. 2
Illumina Art Competition-Feb. 15-17-
Entries will be Received
Spring Break Trips-Bahamas Cruise & Cancun
JANUARY CLEARANCE
Trench Coats
Over Coat
All Leather Coats
Faded Levi Jackets
Faded Levis
All Ladies Sweaters
9.95-19.95
29.95-59.95
$10 off
$5$ 10 off
2.95-5.95
2 for $5
Layaway Plan Available
CLOTHES
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
(Closed for Lunch
12:30-1:30)
400 S. Evans St.
On the corner below 'Fizz"
�Recycled Clotheng (New 8i Used)
752-3866
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee wants
to know what concerts you would like to have at ECU.
An opinion box is located next to the information
desk in Mendenhall Student Center.
Stop by and help us to bring you
the concerts of your choice.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JANUARY 17, 1989 Pa?,e 8
Ministries offer help
The Methodist Student Center on Fifth Street is just one of the many Campus Ministries that are
set up to provide fellowship for students of all denominations (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU
Photolab).
Was (Not Was) break through
on third Lp and thank many
NEW YORK (AP) Don and
David Was, authors of the hit
single "Spy in the House of Love
would like to thank manv people
for the success of Was (Not Was):
Moonie Krupka, jazz critic David
Weiss, king George Clinton, mu-
sic executive Michael Zilkha, and,
of course, Don's 2-year-old son.
Get the picture? Well, there's
more.
The Was would also like to
extend their appreciation to sing-
ers Sweet Pea Atkinson and Harrv
J
Bowen, rocker Elvis Costello and
Frank Sinatra jr all contributors
to the group's third album, "What
Lp, Dog?"
Still confused? Then go back
about 20 years when two young
smart alecks named Donald
Fagenson and David Weiss were
growing up in the suburbs of
Detroit. The story begins in eighth
grade gym class.
"Some of the students were
using tumbling equipment with-
out supervision Weiss recalled
in an interview at the Manhattan
offices of Chrysalis Records.
"When the teacher found out he
asked who had done it. Don and I
decided to withhold information,
but a guy named Moonie Krupka
ratted on us. We met outside the
teacher's office
And so the friendship was
born � Weiss, the poet, and
Fagenson, the natural musician.
They each attended the Uni-
versity of Michigan at Ann Arbor,
but eventually went separate
ways.
Weiss headed west and be-
came a jazz critic for the Los
Angeles Herald Examiner. Fagen-
son did studio work in Detroit
and performed Gilbert O'Sullivan
songs in local bars.
"I was at wits endFagenson
recalled. "You can only do so
much hack work. I called David
and said, 'Let's go down in
glory
So in 1980, Was (Not Was)
was formed. The name being in-
spired by none other than Don's
little boy, who had invented
phrases such as "Blue (Not Blue)
See WAS, page 9
By SYLVIA BILLINGSLEY
Staff Writer
You are at ECU and find your-
self a little homesick. The many
Christian fellowship programs at
the University are the perfect cure
for loneliness.
The ministries' wide variety of
programs welcome all students.
They are located in convenient
locations and have helpful con-
tact people to answer your ques-
tions. The following are Univer-
sity recognized ministries.
1) Baptist Campus Ministry �
Group singing and story telling
begin the week for the Baptist
ministry at 8 p.m. on Sundays. At
5:30 Monday nights, the group
meets at the 10th Street center for
dinner followed by Bible study at
7 p.m. The study is called "Dis-
covering Depths" and gives stu-
dents a chance to get to know
themselves through scriptures.
Wednesday, thev meet for a
bring-your-own-lunch Bible
study and Thursday they have
Pause at 7 p.m. The ministry also
sponsor intramural bowling and
volleyball. Contact Bob Clyde,
511 E. 10th St at 758-4593.
2) Campus Crusade for Christ
� This group meets weekly in
Brewster building room C103 for
fellowship and teaching. They
also hold Bible studies on campus
thoughout the week at various
times. There are three conferences
each year.
The first conference is held in
different places in North Carolina
each fall. The Christmas confer-
ence is a Southeastern regional
conference in Atlanta, Georgia
and the last conference each year
is in Daytona Beach, Florida dur-
ing spring break. Contact Jones
Doughton at 757-1273.
3) Catholic Newman Center �
The Catholic center holds their
Sunday services, or Mass, at 11:30
a.m. in room 103 of the Biology
building and 8:30 p.m. at the
Newman Center on 10th street.
On Wednesdays, the group holds
a fellowship dinner followed by
Mass at 5:30 p.m. Reflective serv-
ices, a discussion on Catholic
church beliefs, is held at 7:30
Thursday nights for both Catho-
lics and non-Catholics.
Teresa Lee, outreach and pub-
licity chairperson, said: "This
place is beautiful. Christ is so alive
here Contact Rev. Paul Vaeth,
953 E. 10th St at 757-3760.
4) Church of Christ � They
welcome all students to their
church services. Contact Mike
Ellis, 1706 Greenville Blvd at
752-6376.
5) Episcopal Campus Ministry
� This ministry offers suppers
with communion services and
various programs on Wednesday
nights at 5:30. They begin each
year getting to know one another
and meeting the faculty.
"We have a lot of adult interac-
tion with the students Marty
Gartman said. The group also
participates in a Palm Sunday
retreat each spring and a river
weekend each fall. For more de-
tails contact Mrs. Gartman, 401 E.
4th St at 752-3482.
6) Intervarsity Christian Fel-
lowship � The group holds Bible
studies from 8-10 p.m. every night
in different dormitories. On Wed-
nesdays, however, the meetings
are held in room 129 Speight
building. This meeting includes
singing, skits, and lectures on
spiritual and, sometimes, social
issues.
They also offer Bible studies for
co-ed, freshmen, and graduate
students to help with their transi-
tions. Each year an event called
Habbakkuk is held in March that
attempts to answer questions on
God and why certain things hap
pen in the world. Contact Kim
Summers, Medical Oaks Apt A -3,
at 8300654.
7) Lutheran Campus Ministry
� The group meets on Wednes-
days and Rev. Graham Nahouse
said, 'The students participate in
the life of the congregation'
Contact Rev. Nahouse, 1801 S.
Elm St at 756-2058.
8) Methodist and Presbyterian
Campus Ministries � These two
ministries combine their activities
and sponsor a 5 p.m. dinner on
Wednesdays at the Methodist
center. The dinner is followed bv
prayer and worship.
The groups also have dances,
retreats and campfires at different
times throughout the war. The
ministries send 20 students to
Mexico each May as a work team.
Contact Michelle 'Mike")
Burcher or Dan Earnhardt, 501 F.
Fifth St at 752-7240 or 758-2030.
9) Navigators - On Monday
nights, prayer is held in Avcock
dormitory basement and a girls'
Bible study is at 6:30 on Tuesday
nights at 104-A Maple Wood
Court. A program called "Flight
7:30" is held on Thursday nights
in the biology building room 103.
This session includes singing,
sharing, and the giving of a mes-
sage. The group otters fellowship
activities and volleyball games on
alternating Fridays from 7-9 p.m.
The non-denominational group
also tailgates at ECU'S home foot-
ball games. Contact Kenneth Jen-
kins at 757-6052.
'Safari' stars some
zebras and a rhino
r
ECU Newt Bureau
Ahmad Jamal to
play at Hendrix
ECU Newt Bu re�u
Jazz pianist Ahmad Jamal,
the first musician to have an Lp in
the top 10 of national charts for
108 consecutive weeks, will per-
form at ECU's Hendrix Theater
January 25.
Scheduled to begin at 8 p.m
the concert is part of the Student
Union Special Concerts series and
i 3 partially funded by a grant from
the National Endowment for the
Arts through the Southern Arts
Foundation.
Beginning with his early per-
formanaccs as a child prodigy in
Pittsburgh Jamal's career spans
more than 50 years of live club
and concert hall appearances and
numerous recordings on more
than 35 albums.
Tickets to Jamal's perform-
ance are $8 each for the general
public, $4 for ECU students and
youth. Tickets are available from
the Central Ticket Office in Men-
denhall Student Center.
"Safari a new travel docu-
mentary film, will take ECU audi-
ences on a screen journey to the
heart of deepest Africa on Thurs-
day in Hendrix Theatre, begin-
ning at 8 p.m.
Narrating the film is its
maker, Academy Award winner
Kenneth Richter.
"Safari" (the word means
"journey" in Swahili) chronicles a
trip into the southern half of Af-
rica, with an emphasis on the
natural wonders of the dark conti-
nent � its geography, its spec-
tacular scenery and especially its
wild animals and the indigenous
people who share the land with
the wildlife. An underlying
theme is the major effort many
African nations are making to
save their heritage of wild ani-
mals, plants and landscape.
Featured in the film is a visit
to Kruger Park, roughly the size of
Massachussets, which is home to
130 species of mammals and 468
different birds. Also seen are pro-
vincial and national parks and
nature reserves which offer safety
zones to several threatened spe-
cies.
The animal "stars" of chis film
include the rare white rhino, the
giraffe, the zebra, herds of
elephants, and antelopes of many
kinds.
Public tickets to the screening
of "Safari" are $4 each. Tickets
may be purchased in advance at
the Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center.
T t '
Malkovich doesn't
study for his parts
1
Ahmad Jam al, the first artist to keep an Lp in the top ten charts for
108 consecutive weeks, will perform at Hendrix Theater on Janu-
ary 25. Jamal has played on over 35 albums and has recorded such
songs as "Afternoon in Paris "Yellow Fellow and "Misty
LOS ANGELES (AP) � You
might expect an intensely serious
actor such as John Malkovich to
delve into 18th century French
history in order to play a decadent
aristocrat in "Dangerous Liai-
sons Wrong.
"Mostly you just play the part
as written'he admits. "People's
behavior and the way they view
the world and their very actions
are just in the writing. Study the
character's motivations and his-
tory?
Not for me. Afraid not
"Dangerous Liaisons" is
based on Chonderlos De Laclos'
scandalous 1782 novel and Chris-
topher Hampton's modern play
"Les Liaisons Dangereuses
Malkovich as the unscrupulous
Valmont connives with Glenn
dose, another sex-obsessed aris-
tocrat, in bedroom games that
ruin the lives of several people.
"I wouldn't really describe
Valmont as evil the actor
mused. "He has a lot of suspi-
ciousness to him, and he does a lot
of things that are really mean. But
I don't think in the end that he is
really evil
"One of the things the picture
:s about is that he is unaware that
lie is capable of love, unaware that
he is capable of feeling, unaware
that he is capable of provoking
that emotion in someone else.
Once he discovers that he can do
that, it goes against everything he
has ever believed about himself.
Finally it destroys him
Malkovich seemed a reluc-
tant recruit to Warner Bros
hoopla for "Dangerous Liaisons
Although highly visible on the
screen since his 1984 debut as the
combat photographer in "The
Killing FieldsThe has maintained
a low profile in the media. But he
considered the selling of "Dan-
gerous Liasions" to be part of his
job.
A soft-spoken man, he care-
fully chooses his words, as if wary
of being misinterpreted. He
bristled somewhat at the intima-
tion that he was not exactly type-
cast as the dashing, amorous Val-
mont.
"If you're intimating that I'm
not sex-charged or romantic, you
may be completely correct. I'm
also not a psychopath or a robot or
blind or anything else I play
The stars of "Dangerous Liai-
sons" � Malkovich, Close, Mich-
elle Pfeiffer � are American, and
their speech is Americanized.
This is part of the plan by the
original producer, Lorimar Tel-
epictures.
Malkovich was born in the
small town of Benton, 111. His life
changed in 1973, when he was
introduced to acting through a
drama class at Eastern Illinois
See MALKOVICH, page 9
The Philadelphia Dance Company, commonly called "Phila-
danco will dance tonight in Wright Auditorium. The troupe
boasts alumni who have gone on to dance with Alvin Ailey.
Philadanco dances
at Wright tonight
ECU New Bureau
"Philadanco the Philadel-
phia Dance Company, an ac-
claimed ensemble of black danc-
ers, will perform at ECU tonight
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Partially funded by a grant
from the N. C. Arts Council, the
event is part of ECU's 1988-89
Performing Arts Series.
Founded in 1970 by Joan
Myers Brown out of a need for a
performing company for minor-
ity students in the Philadelphia
area, Philadanco was intended to
foster the discovery and training
of a corps of local black dancers
from which to build a strong
dance company. The first 17 danc-
ers selected were trained by lead-
ing teachers from New York,
Boston and Philadelphia.
Since its initial performances
at schools recreation centers and
small social events, the company
has developed its performing
program with sponsorship from
the National Endowment for the
Arts and the William Penn foun-
dation. Philadanco has per-
formed in many cities on the east
coast and at such major centers as
the Brooklyn Academy of Music,
Lincoln Center, Wolftrap and the
Annenberg Center.
Several principal Philadanco
alumni, among them Kevin
Brown, Debora Chase, Deborah
Mannin and David St. Charles,
have joined the renowned Alvin
Ailey Dance Troupe. The en-
semble is now regarded as
Philadelphia's second major
dance company, and such noted
choreographers as Talley Beatty
("Arms Too Short To Box with
God") and Billy Wilson ("Bub-
blin' Brown Sugar") have
mounted works on Philadanco.
Tickets to the concert, priced
at $14 each for the general public
and $7 for youth, are available it
the Central Ticket Office in Men-
denhall Student Center.
i
I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17. 19 9
Home can't stop the operas
NEW YORK (AT) � The fa-
mous mezzo-soprano Marilyn
I lome pauses in detailing her
busy life to ruminate about one
difference between actors and
singers.
Actors, she said, don't always
gel to do the works of the greatest
writers and playwrights. But in
classical music, "we're dealing
with the masters all the time
The good things she's singing
inge from the most obscure,
hich she relishes introducing, to
very familiar, such as Bizet's
Carmen
"1 keeping saying I'm going
to pull up a bit on opera and do
SS she said. "1 keep doing
More. It seems like there are so
nany offers coming up all the
� me
In September and October,
Miss Home sang seven perform-
ances oP'Maomotto II" -an 1820
Rossini opera having its Ameri-
can premiere at the San Francisco
Opera. In November, she sang
Dame Quickly eight times in
"Falstaff a Verdi masterpiece, at
the Lyric Opera of Chicago. In
December she was at the Metro-
politan Opera six times as
Carmen. In January and Febru-
ary, the concentration is on
Rossini's 'Tancredi first in Chi-
cago, then Los Angeles.
Miss Home, who has a col-
oratura facility rare in voices
lower than soprano, is especially
acclaimed for singing Rossini,
who expected coloratura singing
even from men.
"Maometto II' is a really
fabulous Rossini work that he
rewrote she said. "He wrote it in
his Naples period, and when he
went to Paris he rewrote it as The
Siege of Corinth' � that I sang at
La Scala in 1969. The versions are
quite different
The San Francisco Opera and
Miss Home decided on "Maom-
etto" instead of "Siege" because
"Maometto" had never been pre-
sented in the United States.
"It was an enormous success
� much beyond our expecta-
tions she said. 'The Rossini
seria operas are still something
that people are not too familiar
with
In opera seria, which came
before grand opera, each scene
had a recitative to relate a plot
event, followed by an aria that
commented on the event. The
arias often were written to show
off particular singers.
Next season Miss Home will
sing in "Falstaff" and Vivaldi's
"Orlando furioso" in San Fran-
cisco.
"It's a staggeringly beautiful
opera which, whenever we've
done it, has never been less than a
screaming, stomping success
she said. "My dream is to talk the
Met into it. So far they're not inter-
ested
In May, she'll sing concerts
with the Detroit and Indiana
symphonies.
Miss Home has been singing
in public since 1954, when she
dubbed the voice of Dorothy
Dandridge in the movie "Carmen
Jones
Miss Home's former hus-
band, Henry Lewis, will conduct
"Tancredi" in Los Angeles and
Barcelona. "We occasionally do
concerts together, too. We've
always remained really close
friends 'she said.
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes
New and Returning
Students
�Fully Carpeted
�Iarge Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles: from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
Hacker called 'a big, fat slob'
��� i
LOS ANGELES (AP) To the
sociate who turned him in,
Kevin David Mitnick is the ulti-
mate computer nerd, a "big, fat
slob" obsessed with fast food and
breaking into computer systems.
To the authorities holding
him without bail, the 25-vear-old
os Angeles man is an expert
acker who calls himself Condor
and is so dangerous he must
never be allowed to use even a
telephone without supervision.
He is truly a threat to society,
someone who uses computers to
act out personal vendettasagainst
people said Jim Black, a com-
puter crime specialist with the
Police Department.
"The bottom line with Kevin
i- that if you have a job, pav a gas
bill, use a phone or drive a car he
can find you and ruin vou elec-
tronically' Black said in a tele-
phone interview. "If he wasn't in
jail, he could be listening to us
right this minute Mitnick was
being held today in a maximum-
security cell at the federal Metro-
politan Detention Center.
A federal grand jury indicted
him Dec. 20 on charges that he
used unauthorized MCI long-dis-
tance codes to tap into computers
at Leeds University in England
and the University of Southern
California and that he caused $4
million damage to a Digital
Equipment Corp. (DEC) com-
puter system.
Mitnick will plead innocent,
said his attorney, Alan Rubin.
"We will also try to get bail
set Rubin said. "I am shocked
and astonished that my client is
being held without bail and in
Was (Not Was) go
for new label deal
solitary confinement. This thing
has been blown completely out of
proportion
Longtime associate Leonard
DiCicco, 23, of Calabasas, said he
reported Mitnick's activities to
authorities because Mitnick had
been threatening him.
"He was using DEC comput-
ers where I work and threatening
that we would both go down if I
said anything said DiCicco, who
faces no charges in the inquiry.
"He has no sense of right or
wrong and no respect for anyone
else's privacy DiCicco said. "I
was beside him through all this
hacking and it's scary to think of
the things he is capable of
"He could pick apart almost
any compeer system in the
United States Black said. "There
are probably only a handful of
computer specialists with his
capabilities
In his electronic activities, the
5-11, 240-pound Mitnick referred
to himself as Cfld�rA Blf ck sajc.
DiCicco said Mitnick named him-
self for Robert Redford's
Continued from page 8
"he Was write most of the group's
iterial and also play a number
t instruments. For singers, they
recruited Atkinson and Bowen,
. ho had been performing back-
; vocals at the Sound Suite.
Clinton, mastermind of Par-
:ament-Funkadclic, enters the
story because his music and satiri-
cal style of writing arc powerful
Influences on WasCNot Was).
"George Clinton played at
ur high school dance when his
aroup was still called the Parlia-
ments Weiss said.
With the help of a friendly
iazz critic, Was (Not Was) signed
with Ze Records, an independent
label, in 1980.
"I violated journalistic ethics
by sending the demo to Ze Rec-
ords with a cover letter from
myself as a critic saying you must
listen to these guys Weiss con-
fessed.
The ploy worked. Zilkha, the
president of Ze, liked Was (Not
Was) and the group's self-titled
debut album came out in 1981.
The record sold poorly, how-
ever, and Was (Not Was) tried its
luck the following year with Gef-
fen Records.
The group's sole album for
Geffen, "Born to Laugh at Torna-
does was released in 1983. But
the record bombed.
Was (Not Was) did manage to
have a couple of hits in Europe
and is now happily signed with
Chrysalis records. "What Up,
Dog?" is a mi x of funky tracks and
the heartfelt "Love Can be Bad
Luck
character's code name in the spy
movie "Three Days of the Con-
dor
"All he did was eat Fat Bur-
gers, drink Slurpees and work on
computers DiCicco said. "He
was a big, fat slob of a guy who
couldn't get through a day with-
out breaking into a computer
somewhere
Mitnick began his hacking
career using telephones, authori-
ties said. By age 13, he was under
investigation by the police de-
partment, Pacific Bell telephone
company and the Federal Com-
munications Commission, the
Los Angeles Daily News said
Monday.
"Mitnick was a legend to the
computer world by 1981 said
John Christ, his high school com-
puter teacher.
In 1982, DiCicco said, he and
Mitnick used USC's 24-hour stu-
dent compute lafc tc get, jnto
many computers, including clas-
sified systems.
Malkovich attracts rave reviews
Continued from page 8
University.
"I kept doing it the last two
years in school, then I met the
people who started the Steppen-
wolf theater in Chicago. In '76
when we all left school, I went
with them
Malkovich became one of the
pillars of Steppenwolf, with
which he is still associated. He
attracted rave reviews when the
company played in New York,
and he won an Obie in Sam
Shepard's 'True West His sec-
ond film, "Places in the Heart
won him an Academy Award
nomination as supporting actor,
and he has followed with "Eleni
"Making Mr. Right "The Glass
Menagerie" and "Empire of the
Sun
He played Biff to Dustin
Hoffman's Willy Loman in
"Death of a Salesman"
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE
�ALL NEW 2 BEDROOMS-
UNIVERSITY
APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
(Ask us about our special rates to change leases, and
discounts for January rentals)
�Located near ECU
�Near major Shopping Centers
�ECU Bus Service
�Onsite laundry
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 758-7436
�AZALEA GARDENS
CLEAN AND QUIET one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $215 a month. 6 month
lease.
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
Couples or singles. Apartments and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
&
�' Tar Landing Seafood
Buv one Shrimp Dinner
at $4.95
v5S0 L Get the second one FREE
Dinners served with French Fries or Baked Potato, Cole Slaw, and
Hushpuppies. Served from 4:30 8:30 pm
This Tuesday, Wednesday. Thursday only
105 Airport Road
758-0327
Banquet F��
LUNCH SPECIAL
OocA-tecfe
MONSAT.
11 AM - 3 PM
12-8 oz. Round
Sirloin
Potato Bar
Sundae Bar
$2.99
Daily Specials
10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student I.D.
Hot Bar and Salad Bar only
an additional $1.99 with a meal
FREE DESSERT BAR
1 with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
J 2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
Its IIBE for quality Russell Athletic sports-
wear. High performance sweat shirts, sweat pants
and pullover hoods. And they're guaranteed to
stand up to five full years of wear. That's long
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But you better hum. (lassie Russell Athletic
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516 S Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville
'Exclusive of team or organized sports participation.
�an student Center





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 1989
State Department lacks linguists
WASHINGTON (AP) -
When it comes to foreign lan-
guages, says the State
Department's top linguist,
"Americans are somewhere at the
bottom of the civilized world
And that sure makes Harry
Obst's job more difficult. Obst is
director of languages services, the
person in charge of providing
interpreters and translators to the
White House and 30 government
agencies. He spends much of his
time scrambling for linguists to
meet the growing demand.
Sometimes Obst comes up
empty-handed and has the un-
pleasant duty of informing cabi-
net officers or other high-ranking
officials that his bureau is unable
to provide an interpreter.
"It's very uncomfortable for
me as director of this office to deal
with that says Obst, who has
about 25 slots each allotted for
interpreters and translators. Also
on his calling list are 1,900 private
contractors, mostly individuals.
Obst himself was born in
Germany and interprets for visit-
ing officials from his native land.
A few years ago, there was
jubilation at the State Department
when, after a painstaking search,
a Chinese language specialist was
found for a long-standing va-
cancy. More than 200 applicants
had failed the test.
But within hours, the linguist
was lured away by Occidental
Petroleum Corp. for a salary far in
excess of the $40,000 State Depart-
ment offer.
"We never saw the gentleman
report for duty here Obst says.
The United States, Obst says, pays
relatively little attention to lin-
guistic matters as compared with
the Soviet Union, China, Japan
and even some smaller countries,
such as Cuba.
The Soviets reward some lin-
guistic virtuosos with prestige
ambassadorships and other key
government posts. The outgoing
U.S. ambassador to the United
Nations, Vemon Walters, himself
a master of eight languages, says
the American government should
adopt a similar practice.
Thomas Pickering, the career
diplomat George Bush picked as
his ambassador to the United
Nations, is fluent in French, Span-
ish, Arabic and Swahili.
There are many reasons for
the lack of interest in foreign lan-
guages among Americans. In
some parts of the country, an
American can go a lifetime and
not hear any language but his
own.
Europeans have exposure to a
multiplicity of languages within a
relatively small area and empha-
size language training through-
out secondarv school.
Beyond that, learning a for-
eign language can be a lonely,
arduous task. The payoff for dedi-
cated study often is long in com-
ing. There is little appeal for
today's American youth to spend
hours on end poring over flash-
cards in Pushtu.
Pushtu? That is a language
spoken in Afghanistan. When an
Afghan rebel leader visited
Washington in 1987, he asked that
a native-born American be his
interpreter rather than a natural-
ized American of Afghan origin.
Not surprisinglv, none was avail-
able.
A decade ago a presidential
commission described American
incompetence in foreign lan-
guagesas "scandalous It argued
that one reason for the U.S. trade
deficit, only a fraction then of
what it is now, is that Americans
don't speak other languages well
enough to persuade foreigners to
buy their products.
J. William Fulbright, when he
was chairman of the Senate For-
eign Relations Committee, de-
scribed the problem as "cultural
and linguistic myopia
Sen. Paul Simon, Dill was so
concerned that he wrote a book
about the subject eight years ago -
'The Tongue-Tied American
The concern is shared by Dr.
Robert Gard, president of the
Monterey Institute of Interna-
tional Studies in California, one of
the few campuses in the country
which turns out accomplished
linguists.
Gard says the attitude of cor-
porate executives seems to be that
the rest of the world ought to learn
how to speak English.
That certainly was not the
attitude of the legendary Emil
Fossan, the linguistic equivalent
of Babe Ruth. By 1984, when his
40-year government ended, Fos-
san was helping out the State
Department in 34 languages.
"He was the most remarkable
translator we ever had Obst
says. Several years ago, the pau-
city of bright, bilingual Ameri-
cans forced the State Department
to drop a requirement that candi-
dates for the foreign service be
fluent in a second language. The
reason was that too many talented
people had to be passed over be-
cause of the requirement.
In other countries, language
training "is mandatory in high
school, mandatory in college and
as a result you have a good base
from which you can work Obst
says.
Stephen Bosworth, president
of the United States-Japan Foun-
dation, a private group based in
New York, says increasing num-
bers of U.S. public schools want to
add Japanese to their curriculum
but many can't find qualified
teachers.
He adds that American busi-
nesses give low priority to exper-
tise in Japanese. Given a choice
between giving a job to someone
trained in Japanese and another
who has a master's in business
administration, "they'll always
pick the one with the MBA he
says.
At the State Department, a
linguist must be able to interpret
simultaneously and consecu-
tively into both his native and
acquired languages, demands
that are "unheard of" elsewhere,
Obst says. He must be able to toss
off colloquialisms on issues rang-
ing from Rio Grande salinity
problems to high energy physics
to the nuclear fuel cycle.
Linguists say a nimble mind
must be supplemented by a num-
ber of other traits as well: motiva-
tion, a spirit of adventure, curios-
ity, self-confidence, a wish to
communicate and "an omniver-
ous appetite for the myriad fla-
vors that foreign cultures come
in as the current issue of The
Foreign Service Journal puts it.
Making life more difficult still
for State Department language
recruiters is that the agency's sala-
ries are generally smaller than
those of international organiza-
tions, which compete for the same
talent.
At the State Department, an
interpreter without supervisory
responsibilities can earn up to
$71,000. For a translator, who
deals exclusively with printed
material, the peak salary is
$65,000.
He says salaries at the United
Nations are 10 percent to 15 per-
cent higher, but others maintain
the gap is even wider.
Besides the United Nations,
the State Department also com-
petes for linguists with such inter-
national organizations as the
World Bank, the International
Monetary Fund and the Organi-
zation of American States. Unlike
the State Department, these insti-
tutions can hire non-Americans
and don't have to worry about
security clearances.
According to Obst, experts in
Japanese, Russian, Chinese and
Portuguese are the most difficult
to find.
One New York-based firm
provides Japanese-language in-
terpreters for $450 per day. When
it hires a Japanese language free-
lancer, the State Department pays
$325 a day, $300 Tor other lan-
guages.
Still, rubbing elbows with the
president during a meeting with a
foreign luminary is one of the at-
tractions of interpreting for the
State Department.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Wednesday:
All Campus Male Strip Off!
$ 100.00 1st Place
$50.00 2nd Place
$25.00 3rd Place
Ladies Only till 10:30
Admission for ladies $1.00
Guvs Admission
$1.00 Members
$2.00 Guests
JOIN IN!
At Alpha Sigma Phi there is always
something going on. And we believe that
something is a unique and special experience.
A fraternal experience where a group of
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RUSH WEEK: JAN. 24, 25, & 26
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
422 W. 5th Street
For Ride Info: 757-3516
1
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1 Ml I S1 �. ROl ININ
Sports
IANUARY 17 1989 Page 11
East Carolina drops to 2-2 in the CAA's
Patriots dominate to beat Pirates at home
B KRIST1 N II 1 HI RG
and
HRIS sn Gl I
!
was in rebounding. The Patriots
dominated the boards grabbing
36 rebounds while ECU could
only manage 25 We can't win
ball games if we don't rebound,
Steole aid
In addition, another edge for
Patriot came in shooting.
I in s oring the tirst halt
' - percent from the field
l AH sh,t a respectable 5 x
nl But the second half made
ferencc as c leorge Ma-
t 59 percent from the field
d East Carolina could only
u igi i meager 3 percent.
kenm samavrs. who is
� - leading scorer and who
� I "s Blue i dwards
plaver of the-year,
� d 23 points tor the Patriots
unds.
1 dw ards ho is the sixth
le iding scorei in the nation, had
27 points tor the night but shot
poorly from the field, hitting 10
lor 23 In addition, Edwards
grabbed six reb �unds
Mike I largi tt a freshman
guard for th Patriots, was a sur
prise in the game 1 la; getl s rod
1� points toi the night and the
S 10" guard had six rebounds
;ainst the Piral He was also
four for ; from the three point
line
GMU sRobertDyk .sisted
in icing the victory for th Patri its
as he had i 7 p.�ints and pulled in
K � � Mm phv had a g ;
nighl � � rates as hecontrib-
uted 17 points to E 1 's losing
ffort a I five rebounds. I le
shot well from tin1 perimeter, also
shooting tour tor six from the
three-p inl line.
(�us Hill tonic i out with 1:51
remaining in the game but not
b'tore he S( ored 1i points for the
Pirates.
1 he �'� in puts (leorge Mason
at 6-9 for the season and 2-2 in
conferent e play.
East arolina dropped its
:� ord t -7 and is now tied with
i AH in the conference at 2-2.
The Pirates get ready for a
three game stretch that will take
them on the road to American
avvand I "C-Wilmington. The
action begins in Washington D.C.
when the Pirates travel to Render
Arena to ace the Eagles of Ameri-
can ' 'niversitv.
Lady Pirates lose to
the Lady Dukes 72-46
k t
:
with Richmond and (. leorge
lason.
funior forward Sarah Gray
i the 1 adv Pirates in the IMP
ame scoring 1H points and pull-
ig down nine rebounds. Gra
� o has scored in double figures
games this season, is cur-
. tied tor fifth place among
A leading scorers with a 16.2
in all games and a 17-
� ' � . rage against CAA opp. i
.ra who leads ECU in total
inds has a solid hold on
nd place among the leagues
� prel ounds with 98 rebounds so
tar this season.
unst Au . senior forward
� tta Savage added 15 points to
a Pirate s effort. Savage,
: eked five shots against the
- s is currently in sixth
EC career blocks and contin-
limb.
! ady Pirates will con
� I rence play on the road
the travel to Fairfax, Va. to
� � Mason woh is 9 3
�vcrall and 2-0 in CAA play.
Against Richmond earlier this season, Sarah Grav attempts a
long pass on the breakaway. The 1 ady Pirates fared no hotter
againstieorge Mason Monday night than they did against the
Dukes on Saturday as thev hist to the Patriots bh
Blue Edwards goes up for the jumper against George Mason
Monday night. The loss against the Patriots puts IT 9-h
overall nd 2-2 in the conference (Photo by Angela Pridgen
ECU Photo I ah i.
ECU defeats JMU in front
of a sellout home crowd
By CHRIS SIEGEL
As James Madison coach
ft 1 ri( s, entered Mi: .
( oliscum Saturday night, he de-
lighted the 1(1 fans by taking a
bow. But it wa; th Pirate ti
that would take the bow s alter the
game as thev defeated I ikeof
MU,62 57.
With the in E L m . - I
n I one in A A play the first
� � th
ov
h
�nfer-
- s; i; , rates are
ilread
as man i les as last - .
when the v ent fi
Minges Co ��� is
- ed as the Pirates pla t d be-
fore their first sellout si nee Feb
' 'v and the 6,500 tans v en n I
di ap- oinl ;
"It v as i � at crowd an 1 3
great atmosphere to play in, IV
i ite coach Mike Steele said ' Hie
enthusiasm th v showed '���as a
a t 1 i f t I r 0 I: r ' i . I: I -
� rir the second half With
i tii . ime to start the second pe-
rates
ing an ea sv lames
i hson basket to start the half.
Pirates started to take control.
At 18:48 in the period, Stanley
� II tved a Blue Edwards
miss to put the Pirates up 32 :
i i be the lead ECU
ild never give ij
'����. r a William Davis three-
nter pulled the Dukes to
in one. East n na ' sk
I CU vn 1 foi e a tive
nd � � ind pass
md Ed wards v ' : ' i ' v I
: - �����. own the
- rhis would start a 14-6 run
Pirates which would put
them up 54 43 with 5:2 ft nthe
game.
But down 11, the Pukes
, mid not quit. Thev v, ildpulla
run of tl ir own Over the next
- and a half minutes lames
Madisi n ��� uld outscorc the Pi-
�5 And f( !iov ing a
rates
h
me a
See I 1 1 TV page 11
Team leader "Blue" Edwards looks toward future for Pirates
IU
,1 1
I ' �
I
�� pas
l
insiders
but that
-
is in
aid
na-
lot nly E( I 's leading
til player, he also has a
lorful" nickname. "When
�1 �v
rheodore "Blue" Edwards
was little, ! was in nn crib with
ny bottle when I started to
hoki . Edwards said. "My little
� ran and told my mother that
m ithi � " tii d the blueish tint ol
Ins skin when she entered the
room and the nickname "Blue"
-tuck w ith him since then.
Blue began plaving basket-
ball when he was very voung. "1
had two older brothers and we
used to plav pick up games in the
backyard when I was little
Edwards sail I.
!o
tho
talent to plav three vears ol high
school basketball at (ireene Cen-
tral High School. In those three
vears, Blue was named t am MVP
twice and set a school single-sea
si n st (irir n ord
After graduation, 1 dwards
� U ok w hat he learned m
e pick -up games and used hi:
wenttoLoui . urg Junior College.
In le- second year at Louisburg,
Edwards averaged 22.3 points per
game and grabbed an average of
six rebounds per contest. Among
his many honors while at junior
college, Edwards was named see
ond team National lunior College
-Ml-American.
With a high school career like
Edward's and great statistics like
he showed at I ouisburg. many
people wonder why he did not go
to a 1 Mvision I school right out of
high school. "1 didn't get any ot-
ters from any real big schools,
Edwards explained. "My coach
thought I could be a good player
and knew that the coach .it I ouis-
burg was a good fundamental
coach w ho could help me.
Atter tw o years at 1 ouisburg
it was then time tor Blue to decide
where to go next. It was not an
easy decision. Many schools had
ottered him a chance to plav But
Edwards said that there were a
few things that made him choose
EC U. "One reason 1 came here
was that mv girlfriend and I had
decided at junior college to go to
the same school when we left,
Edwards said.
But probably more important
was the fact that Edwards was
impressed with the recruiting of
coach Mike I Vmenthe. Dementhe
let Blue know that he would be
able to step right in and play for
the Pirates.
In his first season at ECl
Edwards made an automatic
impact. He averaged over 14
points and five rebounds per
game. He shot 56.1 percent trom
the field and 73.9 percent from the
tree throw line. He dazzled the
tans w ith his lumping ability and
a wide array o( spectacular dunks
Hi en Edwards ran into a
buzz m He had to sit out the
1987-88 season for disciplinary
reasons. It was a big disappoint-
ment not only to blue but also to
the fans vvho had fallen in love
w o.h him.
. this season began,
dw � ; put his past behind him
see Bl IE, page 14
h k
1 V S
I.( i winningest swim coach
ECU Swim and Dive team continues to dominate
Bj KRIS 1 I MAI 151 RG

: ' rl
easoi iturda vhei
P i r a t tool i N
� � � � Ming quati
� ' : thi women
ictori in what w as
f cad ' oa h Ri k
� � a more o mp titivc
� � �� . Pirat We rolled
� tl m Kobe said "We
mi ited from start to finish
two wins on Saturday
- b the winningest
in I� I swimming history
i k , umulated 111 winsand
jno hmg at last
na
I he men won the moot bv a
� of 1 ;s s while the Ladv
ihaw ks suffered at the mercy o( Athletii Asso iation Meet on lob.
�ECl women, 112-72.
'Most of our swimmers
warn their best rimes of the sea-
on ki be said
I he men now stand at 8 Oon
season before having to tace
the 1 arheels of UNC on Wednes-
day I his is the best start ever bv
in 1 I swim team as thev eon
ue to remain undefeated They
ha e also tied the record for most
11 msei utive wins in a season.
1 he victory over UN W put
the ladv Pirates' record at 7-1.
with their only loss coming from
the Tribe of William and Mary.
In addition to facing the al-
ways tough Tarheels of North
( arolina, the Pirates have to look
torward to another hard team to
boat, Duke University, before
road tripping to the Colonial
1 he two M A A qualifiers,
Vi redith Bridgers and Sherry
( ampbell, had good days against
the Seahawks. bridgers claimed
Mrst in the .1 " yard breaststroke
with her time ol 2:26 78 She w ill
be swimming the 200 yard
breaststroke as well as the 100-
yard breaststroke in the NCAA
Championships in March.
Sherryampbell easily
nabbed first in the event that she
qualified tor in the NCAA's, the
three-meter diving event.
Campbell r.n ked up 242 points
for her first place victory, 11
points ahead ol M. Mills of I IN(
W
Sweep was the word for the
day for the men as they had five
sweeps on the day against the
Seahawks
The East Carolina men battle their way to victory in the 200-yard freestyle event. The Pirates
easily dominated against the UNC-Wilmington team as both the men and women rolled
their way to the victory stand (Photo bv Tom Doyle).





I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 17,1989 Page 11
East Carolina drops to 2-2 in the CAA's
Patriots dominate to beat Pirates at home
By KRISTEN HALBERG
and
CHRIS SIEGEL
Sports Editor and Assistant
The "fired up" Pirates were
quickly put to shame Monday
night at Minges Coliseum. In
front of a home crowd of 5,200
tans, the 8-7 Conference foe,
George Mason University, who
dominated in rebounds for the
night, had the edge it needed to
rout the Pirates 86-74.
George Mason took the lead
with 15:11 in the second half. They
then built the lead to as much as 14
over the course of the half. ECU
managed to close the gap at seven
but could inch no closer as the
Patriots went on to win.
The key element in the game
was in rebounding. The Patriots
dominated the boards grabbing
86 rebounds while ECU could
only manage 25. "We can't win
ball games if we don't rebound
Steele said.
In addition, another edge for
the Patriots came in shooting.
ECU led in scoring the first half
shooting 64 percent from the field
while GMU shot a respectable 53
percent. But the second half made
all the difference as George Ma-
son shot 59 percent frorh the field
and East Carolina could only
manage a meager 33 percent.
Kenny Sanders, who is
Mason's leading scorer and who
challenges ECU'S Blue Edwards
for the CAA player-of-the-year,
scored 23 points for the Patriots
and had six rebounds.
Edwards, who is the sixth
leading scorer in the nation, had
27 points for the night but shot
poorly from the field, hitting 10
for 23. In addition, Edwards
grabbed six rebounds.
Mike Hargett, a freshman
guard for the Patriots, was a sur-
prise in the game. Hargett scored
19 points for the night and the
5'10" guard had six rebounds
against the Pirates. He was also
four for six from the three-point
line.
GMU's Robert Dykes assisted
in icing the victory for the Patriots
as he had 17 points and pulled in
eight boards.
Kenny Murphy had a good
night for the Pirates as he contrib-
uted 17 points to ECU'S losing
effort and had five rebounds. He
shot well from the perimeter, also
shooting four for six from the
three-point line.
Gus Hill fouled out with 1:51
remaining in the game but not
before he scored 15 points for the
Pirates.
The win puts George Mason
at 6-9 for the season and 2-2 in
conference play.
East Carolina dropped its
record to 8-7 and is now tied with
GMU in the conference at 2-2.
The Pirates get ready for a
threw game stretch that will take
them on the road to American,
Navy and UNC-Wilmington. The
action begins in Washington D.C.
when the Pirates travel to Bender
Arena to face the Eagles of Ameri-
can University.
Lady Pirates lose to
the Lady Dukes 72-46
r
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
The East Carolina women's
basketball team suffered its sec-
ond consecutive loss to Colonial
Athletic Association opponents
on Saturday night as the Lady
Dukes of James Madison handed
ECU a 72-46 loss in Harrisonburg,
Va.
The Lady Pirates, now 6-6 on
the year and 1 -2 in CAA play, shot
only 40.9 percent in the first half as
James Madison shot 61.1 percent
and were up 47-20 at halftime.
In second half play, ECU
outscored James Madison 26-25,
and shot 39.9 percent to the Lady
Duke's 26.9 percent, but the im-
provement did not come soon
enough as J M U recorded the CAA
victory.
I East Carolina now stands in a
three-way tie for fourth place of
the CAA. James Madison, sport-
ing a perfect conference record of
2-0, is in a three-way tie for first
place with Richmond and George
Mason.
Junior forward Sarah Gray
paced the Lady Pirates in the JMU
game, scoring 18 points and pull-
ing down nine rebounds. Gray,
who has scored in double figures
in all 12 games this season, is cur-
rently tied for fifth place among
CAA leading scorers with a 16.2
average in all games and a 17-
point average against CAA oppo-
nents.
Gray, who leads ECU in total
rebounds, has a solid hold on
second place among the leagues
top rebounds with 98 rebounds so
far this season. . . . .
Against JMU, senior forward
Gretta Savage added 15 points to
the Lady Pirate's effort. Savage,
who blocked five shots against the
Lady Dukes, is currently in sixth
in ECU career blocks and contin-
ues to climb.
The Lady Pirates will con-
tinue conference play on the road
as they travel to Fairfax, Va. to
take on George Mason woh is 9-3
overall and 2-0 in CAA play.
Blue Edwards goes up for the jumper against George Mason
Monday night. The loss against the Patriots puts ECU 9-6
overall and 2-2 in the conference (Photo by Angela Pridgen.
ECU Photo Lab).
ECU defeats JMU in front
of a sellout home crowd
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Assistant Sport Editor
Against Richmond earlier this season, Sarah Gray attempts a
long pass on the breakaway. The Lady Pirates fared no better
against George Mason Monday night than they did against the
Dukes on Saturday as they lost to the Patriots 67-56
As James Madison coach
"Lefty" Driesell entered Minges
Coliseum Saturday night, he de-
lighted the ECU fans by taking a
bow. But it was the Pirate team
that would take the bows after the
game as they defeated the Duke of
JMU, 62-57.
With the win, ECU moves to
two and one in CAA play, the first
time they have been 2-1 in confer-
ence since 1981 -82. The Pirates are
now 8-6 overall and have already
won as many games as last season
when they went 8-20.
Minges Coliseum was
packed as the Pirates played be-
fore their first sellout since Feb. 7,
1987 and the 6,500 fans were not
disappointed.
"It was a great crowd and a
great atmosphere to play in Pi-
rite coach Mike Steele said. "The
enthusiasm they showed was a
great lift for our team
The home cro'd became a
oig factor in the second half. With
a tie game to start the second pe-
riod, the fans ignited the Pirates.
Following an easy James
Madison basket to start the half,
the Pirates started to take control.
At 18:48 in the period, Stanley
Love followed a Blue Edwards
miss to put the Pirates up 32-30.
This would be the lead ECU
would never give up.
After a William Davis three-
pointer pulled the Dukes to
within one, East Carolina took
charge. ECU would force a five
second call on the inbound pass
and Edwards w5uTdrTita TJfoot
jump shot the next trip down the
floor. This would start a 14-6 run
for the Pirates which would put
them up, 54-43 with 5:20 left in the
game.
But down 11, the Dukes
would not quit. They would pull a
run of their own. Over the next
four and a half minutes. James
Madison would outscore the Pi-
rates 14-5. And following a
See LEFTY, page 14
Team leader "Blue" Edwards looks toward future for Pirates
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Assistant Sports Editor
I
It's Sunday afternoon and the
fans are gone, but the Pirate bas-
ketball team is hard at work. And
their leader during the game is
also their leader at practice, Theo-
dore "Blue" Edwards.
A young man who considers
himself quiet is anything but that
when he steps on a basketball
court. Edwards leads the Pirates
in points, averaging 25.6 -ec
game. He also leads the teams in
rebounds and steals. He is second
in asstetsbehind fellow senior Jeff
Kelly.
the Walstonburg, N.C. na-
tive is not Jmly ECU'S leading
basketball player, he also has a
very "colorful" nickname. When
Theodore "Blue" Edwards
I was little, I was in my crib with
my bottle when I started to
choke Edwards said. "My little
sister ran and told my mother that
she had a blue baby Edwards'
mother noticed the blueish tint of
his skin when she entered the
room and the nickname "Blue"
has stuck with him since then.
Blue began playing basket-
ball when he was very young. "I
had two older brothers and we
used to play pick-up games in the
backyard when I was little'
Edwards said.
He took what he learned in
those pick-up games and used his
talent to play three years of high
school basketball at Greene Cen-
tral High School. In those three
years, Blue was named team MVP
twice and set a school single-sea-
son scoring record.
After graduation, Edwards
went to Louisburg Junior College.
In his second year at Louisburg,
Edwards averaged 22.3 points per
game and grabbed an average of
six rebounds per contest. Among
his many honors while at junior
college, Edwards was named sec-
ond team National Junior College
Ail-American.
With a high school career like
Edward's and great statistics like
he showed at Louisburg, many
people wonder why he did not go
to a Division I school right out of
high school. "I didn't get any of-
fers from any real big schools
Edwards explained. "My coach
thought I could be a good player
and knew that the coach at Louis-
burg was a good fundamental
coach who could help me
After two years at Louisburg,
it was then time for Blue to decide
where to go next. It was not an
easy decision. Many schools had
offered him a chance to play. But
Edwards said that there were a
few things that made him choose
ECU. "One reason I came here
was that my girlfriend and I had
decided at junior college to go to
the same school when we left
Edwards said.
But probably more important
was the fact that Edwards was
impressed with the recruiting of
coach Mike Dementhe. Dementhe
let Blue know that he would be
able to step right in and play for
the Pirates.
In his first season at ECU,
Edwards made an automatic
impact. He averaged over 14
points and five rebounds per
game. He shot 56.1 percent from
the field and 73.9 percent from the
free throw line. He dazzled the
fans with his jumping ability and
a wide array of spectacular dunks.
Then Edwards ran into a
buzz-saw. He had to sit out the
1987-88 season for disciplinary
reasons. It was a big disappoint-
ment not only to Blue, but also to
the fans who had fallen in love
with him.
But as this season began,
Edwards put his past behind him,
See BLUE, page 14
Coach Kobe is ECU'S winningest swim coach
ECU Swim and Dive team continues to dominate
f
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
The East Carolina Swim and
Dive team prolonged their nearly
flawless season Saturday when
the Pirates took on UNC-
Wilmington in Minges Aquatic
Center.
Both the men and the women
had easy victories in what was
thought by Head Coach Rick
Kobe to be a more competitive
meet for the Pirates. "We rolled
over them Kobe said. "We
dominated from start to finish
The two wins on Saturday
made Coach Kobe the winningest
coach in ECU swimming history.
He has accumulated 111 wins and
47 losses since coaching at East
Carolina.
The men won the meet by a
score of 138-68 while the Ladv
Seaha wks suffered at the mercy of
the ECU women, 112-72.
"Most of our swimmers
swam their best times of the sea-
son Kobe said.
The men now stand at 8-0 on
the season before having to face
the Tarheels of UNC on Wednes-
day. This is the best start ever by
an ECU swim team as they con-
tinue to remain undefeated. They
have also tied the record for most
consecutive wins in a season.
The victory over UNC-W put
the Lady Pirates' record at 7-1,
with their only loss coming from
the Tribe of William and Mary.
In addition to facing the al-
ways tough Tarheels of North
Carolina, the Pirates have to look
forward to another hard team to
beat Duke University, before
road tripping to the Colonial
Athletic Association Meet on Feb.
8.
The two NCAA qualifiers,
Meredith Bridgers and Sherry
Campbell, had good days against
the Seahawks. Bridgers claimed
first in the 200-yard breaststroke
with her time of 2:26.78. She will
be swimming the 200-yard
breaststroke as well as the 100-
yard breaststroke in the NCAA
Championships in March.
Sherry Campbell easily
nabbed first in the event that she
qualified for in the NCAA's, the
three-meter diving event.
Campbell racked up 242 points
for her first place victory, 11
points ahead of M. Mills of UNC-
W.
Sweep was the word for the
day for the men as they had five
sweeps on the day against the
Seahawks.
The East Carolina men battle their way to victory in the 200-yard freestyle event The Pirates
easily dominated against the UNC-Wilmington team as bom the men and women rolled
their way to the victory stand (Photo by Tom Doyle).





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17,1989
In close race, McNeil wins in track meet
The ECU Men's Indoor Track
team traveled to Fairfax, VA Sat-
urday to run in the Father Dia-
mond Memorial Indoor Track
Meet at George Mason Univer-
sity.
Eugene McNeil led the Tirate
track team by winning the 55-
vard dash. He ran a quick 6.32 to
edge St. Augustines' Tarrell Car
penter by a mere one-hundredth
of a second. McNeil's first place
mark was the only time ECU
placed in the finals.
Other Pirates did well in their
respective heats. Brian Williams
claimed first in his heat in the 55-
vard hurdles running a respect-
able 7.75.
James Parker ran for third
place in his heat in the 55-yard
dash when he crossed the line in
6.6. The next heat in the 55-yard
dash saw a fifth place for East
Carolina when Terry Bennet ran a
6.65.
In the 500-meter run, Udon
Cheek ran a fourth place finish in
his heat when he tied Sandy
Chapman's time of 1:06.6.
Anthony Henry placed fifth
in his heat in the 400-meter race
running a 56.1.
Brian Irving placed fourth in
his heat in the 200-meter when he
ran a 22.62.
And finally, Teddy Vcrnon
ran a 23.37 time to finish third in
his heat in the 200-meter.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
New football coaching staff completed
(SID) � Tom Tuberville, who
has served as an assistant coach at
the University of Miami, Ha. for
the past three years, and Dale
Steele, who has coached at Kansas
State University for the last two
seasons, were named assistant
coaches on the East Carolina Uni-
versity football staff Friday after-
noon, announced Head Coach Bill
Lewis.
"I'm excited about both oi
these coaches coming of staff
said Lewis, who took over coach-
ing duties at ECU on Dec. 3,1988.
"Knowing that the staff is com-
plete, 1 feel it has fit together per-
fectly. We can forge ahead with
our recruiting efforts and start on
workout schedules for the
squad
Tuberville, as a volunteer
coach at Miami, worked with the
defensive line and linebackers. He
will serve as a linebacker coach at
East Carolina. A native of
Camden, Ark Tuberville has also
coached at Arkansas State for five
seasons and was a head coach at
Hermitage High School in Pine
Bluff, Ark. for two seasons.
A graduate of Southern Ar-
kansas University, Tuberville was
also an assistant at Hermitage
High before receiving the head
coaching duties at the school.
"Coming out of the Miami
program said Lewis, "he obvi-
ouslv knows about what it takes to
win. He has worked with two oi
the finest defensive coaches in
football � Jimmy Johnson at Mi-
ami and Larry- Lace well at Arkan-
sas State. Few teams have played
better defense than Miami has in
the last three years
Steele, a native of Prattville,
All will serve as wide receivers
coach for the Pirates. In his 12-year
coaching career, he has been an
assistant at Ball State (one year),
Wisconsin (two years), Tulanc
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A graduate of the University
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w-
f
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17,1969
In close race, McNeil wins in track meet
The ECU Men's Indoor Track
team traveled to Fairfax, VA Sat-
urday to run in the Father Dia-
mond Memorial Indoor Track
Meet at George Mason Univer-
sity.
' Eugene McNeil led the Pirate
track team by winning the 55-
yard dash. He ran a quick 632 to
edge St. Augustines' Tarrell Car-
penter by a mere one-hundredth
of a second. McNeil's first place
mark was the only time ECU
placed in the finals.
Other Pirates did well in their
respective heats. Brian Williams
claimed first in his heat in the 55-
yard hurdles running a respect-
able 7.75.
James Parker ran for third
place in his heat in the 55-yard
dash when he crossed the line in
6.6. The next heat in the 55-yard
dash saw a fifth place for East
Carolina when Terry Bennet ran a
6.65.
In the 500-meter run, Udon
Cheek ran a fourth place finish in
his heat when he tied Sandy
Chapman's time of 1:06.6.
Anthony Henry placed fifth
in his heat in the 400-meter race
running a 56.1.
Brian Irving placed fourth in
his heat in the 200-meter when he
ran a 22.62.
And finally, Teddy Vernon
ran a 23.37 time to finish third in
his heat in the 200-meter.
RESERVE OmCERfc' TBA1M1NG CORPS
New football coaching staff completed
(SID) � Tom Tuberville, who
has served as an assistant coach at
the University of Miami, Fla. for
the past three years, and Dale
Steeie, who has coached at Kansas
State University for the last two
seasons, were named assistant
coaches on the East Carolina Uni-
versity football staff Friday after-
noon, announced Head Coach Bill
Lewis.
"I'm excited about both of
these coaches coming of staff
said Lewis, who took over coach-
ing duties at ECU on Dec. 3,1988.
"Knowing that the staff is com-
plete, I feel it has fit together per-
fectly. We can forge ahead with
our recruiting efforts and start on
workout schedules for the
squad
Tuberville, as a volunteer
coach at Miami, worked with the
defensive line and linebackers. He
will serve as a linebacker coach at
East Carolina. A native of
Camden, Ark Tuberville has also
coached at Arkansas State for five
seasons and was a head coach at
Hermitage High School in Pine
Bluff, Ark. for two seasons.
A graduate of Southern Ar-
kansas University, Tuberville was
also an assistant at Hermitage
High before receiving the head
coaching duties at the school.
"Coming out of the Miami
program said Lewis, "he obvi-
ously knows about what it takes to
win. He has worked with two of
the finest defensive coaches in
football � Jimmy Johnson at Mi-
ami and Larry Lacewell at Arkan-
sas State. Few teams have played
better defense than Miami has in
the last three years
Steeie, a native of Prattville,
Ala will serve as wide receivers
coach for the Pirates. In his 12-year
coaching career, he has been an
assistant at Ball State (one year),
Wisconsin (two years), Tulane
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(three years), Wichita State (three
years) and Kansas State (two
years). He coached tight ends and
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the exception ot Wichita State,
where he coached linebackers for
two seasons.
A graduate of the University
of South Carolina, Steeie also
spent one season coaching in the
high school ranks at A.C. Flora in
Columbia, S.C.
TOUR FIRST STEP
TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE YOU
COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
Army ROTC Camp Challenge. Itte exciting
and it may be your last opportunity to grad-
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I ill
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355-6968
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Healthy
i
ECU INTERFRATERNITY
COUNCIL INVITES YOU TO
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Mon. Jan 23rd at Memorial Gym
and at The Fraternity Locations on:
Tuesday, Jan. 24th
Wednesday, Jan. 25th
Thursday, January 26th
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(Per Fist �faaaaty) ����������
To bt in t tratamrty it not manly to fee m � aocuji
club Fratamlttaa �f� � way of Hta . Wa thara a�
aaaaaa aa wait at ampanancaa, and m am raaponai-
bta to aacn othar tor our own action. Va Mv. oH
campu. tor tha moat part, yat pa) ar vary act! on
campua Vw anoy a good raiailonahlp with our
unnwralty' admtniatraiion and. m in. paat taw
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Ky� atudant Hta.
jlul fratrrtuhra trurt nrg pjraoca?
� No, thara' avary avtdanca that loining a tratamity
lajajaj your chancaa ot graduating.
33 ot man on campua without IratarnHlaa wlH
!t navor can ba aM that IralamHy paopla donl an
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paopla it only natural among tuch a cloaa-fcnii
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auch a QnMfc Waak la ut an aaampla ot aoma ot
tha acthrttiaa that tratamitiaa plan during tha yaar.
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General Fraternity Facts:
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been fraternity men
?85 of the fortune 500 executives are fraternity members.
�Of the nation's 50 lasrgost corporations. 43 no
teas Maw
Ik"





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17,1989 13
Olympic Committee honors Former Pirate
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO
Former East Carolina Univer-
sity women's basketball standout
eora "Sam" Jones has been
named Athlete of the Year in the
-port of team handball for 1988 by
the United States Olympic
Committee.
ones was a member of the
team that participated in the
Summer Olvmpics in Seoul,
South Korea. She finished the
tournament as the second leading
scorer with 35 goals.
Earlier in 1988, she had been
named MVP of the II Women's
USA Cup and led several interna-
tional tournaments with as many
as 48 goals.
Jones has been the leading
female athlete in the sport of team
handball since 1984. That year,
she also took the honor of Athlete
of the Year for her performance in
the Olympics. Following 1984,
she played on the Hypobank club
in Austria and for the German
club, Bayer Leverkusen, that won
the German Championships in
1986 and 1987 Pan American
games.
Jones is from Dudley, NC and
was a High School Ail-American
in 1978 at Southern Wayne High
School. After earning Ail-Ameri-
can honors in basketball at Louis-
burg Junior College in 1979 and
1980, she transferred to East Caro-
lina. She is fourth on the career list
for assists with 252. She was assis-
tant basketball coach under Cathy
Andruzzi before joining the
handball National Team in 1982.
DOC
3�C
ZHK.
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
B5
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED Hf LP?
m uur torn
Lb
Why not com by In REAL Crittlr Intervention Cantor: 312 E
10th St; or call 75S-HELP, For Froo Confidential Counseling or A
Our Volunteers ana Staff are on duty 24 hrs. s day. year around,
In order to assist you In virtually sny proMem area you might have.
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance
the quality of life for you and our community.
UcwMd And Accr�H14 �t TK� tut a) North C�oM��
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
ow 5 jf
N.C. State's Jim Valvano faces allegations
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AD �
sibiy shaken by allegations of
?vrongdoing at his alma mater,
former North Carolina State star
"hurl Bailey says he remembers
ie day when coach Jim Valvano
vtured the team on how there
luld be no trecbies passed out
imong them.
One of the things definitely
j&essed when 1 was there was
Hew no handouts here said
feiley after Utah's NBA game
vith the Charlotte Hornets on
1ondav.
"I think it's absurd all these
cusationsthings about drugs
nd money. It's ridiculous
Soilev said.
I don't believe any of that
�tutt I've heard Bailey said.
Valvano is the focus of alle-
gations printed on the cover of the
Becoming book, "Personal
uls Among the charges on the
mer. excerpts of which were
published last Saturday by The
$ews and Observer of Raleigh,
vvre that positive drug tests were
ept secret, grades were altered
.nd one player even played below
is capabilities in an NCAA tour-
rfement game to avoid a future
drug tct that might hamper his
yofessional career. The cover did
njjbt name a source for the allega-
:i.cns.
Bailey was a member of
V&lvano's 1983 national champi-
onship team. He said he spoke
i�th his former coach by tele-
hone on Sunday.
"V Jnniielv sujjdedL de-
gprcssed. But you know Coach V,
s a touch guv Bailev said. "1
isf wish the best for him
Bailev said he was sure that
book would sell based on the
cations, but added, "It's a
: ame that it has to cost other
eople their reputations, and the
�attaches of their families
Bailey said on his first day
ith Valvano in the fall of 1981,
� coach told him and his team-
mates that they would have to
earn their own way. He said if
v didn't go to class and flunked
out of school, they would not
play 1 Ie said Valvano should not
be blamed for players not getting
Stupid Pet tricks
competition to
be sponsored
The East Carolina University
Athletic Department in conjunc-
tion with Animal House Pets are
sponoring a Stupid Pet Tricks
competition. This event will take
place at halftime of the Lady Pi-
rates Basketball game, Saturday
Jan. 28 against arch rival UNC
Wilmington. The entry deadline
will be Jan. 18 and a preliminary
round will be held Jan. 20 (site
TBA). For more information call
757-6491 or stop by Scales Field-
I �use Athletic marketing office).
Governors' lobby
tor NFL franchise
COLUMBIA,S.C(AP) �The
'� vernors of North Carolina and
Sv mth Carolina will be among the
P5,000 who will be watching the
5 i per Bowl on Jan. 22. But the two
gi�vernors also want to be players
-&s well as spectators.
South Carolina Gov. Carroll
( impbell and his North Carolina
Counterpart, Gov. James Martin,
will lead a Carolina contingent to
.Miami for Super Bowl XXIII. Be-
sides San Francisco and Cincin-
nati, the Carolinians hope to see
She NFL's other heavyweights -
-ihc owners and officials who de-
cide where the NFL will put its
$ext franchises.
"Absolutely I'm going
i ampbell said Friday. "I'll be lob-
bying
Martin is also planning to go
g'and campaign with the owners
jmd talk to people said Jim
��ughrue, a spokesman for the
forth Carolina governor.
their degrees.
"Nobody got nothing
Bailey said.
In the meantime, Bailev Mid
he remained confident his coach
would be cleared.
"I'm praying for him, and I
hope that thingsare going to work
out, and I'm sure they will he
said.
Other former NCSU players
also denied the allegations and
said that while thev talked to the
author, Peter Golenbock, they
didn't discuss the issues in the
book.
Kenny Drummond said he
was almost certain he had talked
to Golenbock, but had been
unaware that Golenbock was
writing a book critical of the N.C.
State program and Valvano.
Drummond, who now plays
for High Point College and was
plaving in a tournament in the
Bahamas during the weekend,
said in an interview with TheNews
and Observer of Raleigh that he
had talked to a man he believed to
be Golenbock.
"If he said anything about me
(in the book) thaU didn't say, I'll
find him he said.
The book focuses on the 1986-
87 basketball team, which in-
cluded Drummond. Two other
members of that team, Charles
Shackleford and Bonnie Bolton,
told The News and Observer Mon-
day that they had not talked to
Golenbock.
Shackleford, a sophomore on
the 1986-87 Wolfpack team who
is now a member of the NBA's
New Jersey Nets, also said Mon-
day that he had no knowledge of
the actions mentioned on the
book cover.
"None of this stuff ever hap-
pened while I was there Shack-
leford said in an interview after a
Nets practice in East Rutherford,
N.J.
"Maybe it happened before I
was there or after I left, bu t i t never
happened while I was there. I
don't have any knowledge (of
this) going on.
Bolton, a junior on the 1986-
87 Wolfpack team who was
reached by telephone at his Wash-
ington home, said Monday that
he had never talked to Golenbock.
He also said he had no knowledge
of any of the violations alleged by
the book cover.
"I never got anything like
that. I never took any money.
Valvano never offered me any
money. So it can't be true Shack-
leford continued.
HOW TO
ENRICH
YOUR EDUCATION
BY $1,000
A MONTH.
If you're a math, engineering, or physical the-art nuclear reactor and propulsion
sciences major, you could be earning
$1,000 a month during your junior and
senior years.
This excellent opportunity is part of
the Navy Nuclear Propulsion Officer
Candi-date Program. It's one of the
most prestigious ways of entenng the
nuclear field-and rewarding, too. You
get a $4,000 bonus upon entrance into
the program, and $2,000 more when
you complete your Naval studies.
You also receive a year of paid
gradual-level training that's the most
comp;rehen-sive in the world, and
plant technology. As a Navy officer,
you'll lead the adventure while gaming
high-level experience that will help
make you a leader mone of the world's
high-tech industries.
In addition to the professsional ad-
vantages, nuclear-trained officers get
an unbeatable benefits package, travel
opportunities, promotions and a solid
salary.
Find out more about the Navy Nuc-
lear Propulsion Officer Candidate Pro-
gram,i make your education start
paying off today.
you'll acquire expertise with state-of-
To find out if you qualify, or for more information, contact Navy Officer Opportunitiet,
801 Overlin Road, Suite 120, Raleigh, NC 27605-1130 or call
LT. BRIAN HALSEY
1-800-662-7419
NAVY OFFICER
You are Tomorrow.
You are the Navy.
Wr
Come On Down
and see the
NEW SIGMA NU
FRATERNITY!
Collect Your Prizes
0 Student Government
0 Social Activities
0 Greek Life
2 No Hazing
0 Over 130,000 Members
Internationally
Bob Barker
Sigma Nu
Call 830-3960
for information & rides






!
(
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17,1999 13
I
Olympic Committee honors Former Pirate

i
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO
� Former East Carolina Univer-
sity womb's basketball standout
Leora "Sam" Jones has been
named Athlete of the Year in the
sport of team handball for 1988 by
the United States Olympic
Committee.
Jones was a member of the
team that participated in the
Summer Olympics in Seoul,
South Korea. She finished the
tournament as the second leading
scorer with 35 goals.
Earlier in 1988, she had been
named MVP of the II Women's
USA Cup and led several interna-
tional tournaments with as many
as 48 goals.
Jones has been the leading
female athlete in the sport of team
handball since 1984. That year,
she also took the honor of Athlete
of the Year for her performance in
the Olympics. Following 1984,
she played on the Hypobank club
in Austria and for the German
club, Bayer Leverkusen, that won
the German Championships in
1986 and 1987 Pan American
games.
Jones is from Dudley, NC and
was a High School All-American
in 1978 at Southern Wayne High
School. After earning All-Ameri-
can honors in basketball at Louis-
burg Junior College in 1979 and
1980, she transferred to East Caro-
lina. She is fourth on the career list
for assists with 252. She was assis-
tant basketball coach under Cathy
Andruzzi before joining the
handball National Team in 1982.

DOC
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FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
by Mw REAL OUrir
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DOC
30C
N.C. State's Jim Valvano faces allegations
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) �
Visibly shaken by allegations of
wrongdoing at his alma mater,
former North Carolina State star
Thurl Bailey says he remembers
the day when coach Jim Valvano
lectured the team on how there
would be no freebies passed out
among them.
$ "One of the things definitely
tessed when I was there was
ey, no handouts here said
i&iley after Utah's NBA game
oiith the Charlotte Hornets on
i&onday.
I "1 think i t' s absurd all these
cusationsthings about drugs
,d money. It's ridiculous
IJailey said.
"I don't believe any of that
s&ff I've heard Bailey said.
� Valvano is the focus of alle-
gations printed on the cover of the
incoming book, "Personal
tuls Among the charges on the
cfcver, excerpts of which were
published last Saturday by The
Ins and Observer of Raleigh,
$ere that positive drug tests were
l�pt secret, grades were altered
a&d one player even played below
his capabilities in an NCAA tour-
nament game to avoid a future
cffug test that might hamper his
professional career. The cover did
nfct name a source for the allega-
tions.
Bailey was a member of
&lvano's 1983 national champi-
onship team. He said he spoke
vth his former coach by tele-
pfione on Sunday.
He'definitely "hiindpd dp-
pressed. Bulyou know Coach V,
?pie's a tough guy Bailey said. "I
Sjust wish the best for him
Bailey said he was sure that
Sthe book would sell based on the
�allegations, but added, "Ifs a
shame that it has to cost other
fpeople their reputations, and the
'�sheartaches of their families
Bailey said on his first day
�with Valvano in the fall of 1981,
the coach told him and his team-
-mates that they would have to
�Scam their own way. He said if
5they didn't go to class and flunked
Sout of school, they would not
?play. He said Valvano should not
be blamed for players not getting
Stupid Pet tricks
Competition to
be sponsored
The East Carolina University
Athletic Department in conjunc-
tion with Animal House Pets are
'sponoring a Stupid Pet Tricks
competition. This event will take
rplace at halftime of the Lady Pi-
grates Basketball game, Saturday
:1an. 28 against arch rival UNC
jWilmington. The entry deadline
gHvill be Jan. 18 and a preliminary
-round will be held Jan. 20 (site
TBA). For more information call
�57-6491 or stop by Scales Field-
ouse (Athletic marketing office).
Governors' lobby
tbr NFL franchise
I COLUMBIA,S.C.(AP)�The
Governors of North Carolina and
pouth Carolina will be among the
f 5,000 who will be watching the
�upcr Bowl on Jan. 22. But the two
governors also want to be players
s well as spectators.
South Carolina Gov. Carroll
Stampbell and his North Carolina
Counterpart, Gov. James Martin,
�vill lead a Carolina contingent to
liami for Super Bowl XXIII. Be-
sides San Francisco and Cincin-
nati, the Carolinians hope to see
Mm NFL's other heavyweights -
he owners and officials who de-
cide where the NFL will put its
text franchises.
"Absolutely I'm going
ampbell said Friday. "Til be lob-
ying
Martin is also planning to go
and campaign with the owners
nd talk to people said Jim
ughrue, a spokesman for the
orth Carolina governor.
their degrees.
"Nobody got nothing
Bailey said.
In the meantime, Bailey said
he remained confident his coach
would be cleared.
"I'm praying for him, and I
hope that things are going to work
out, and I'm sure they will he
said.
Other former NCSU players
also denied the allegations and
said that while they talked to the
author, Peter Golenbock, they
didn't discuss the issues in the
book.
Kenny Drummond said he
was almost certain he had talked
to Golenbock, but had been
unaware that Golenbock was
writing a book critical of the N.C.
State program and Valvano.
Drummond, who now plays
for High Point College and was
playing in a tournament in the
Bahamas during theweekend,
said in an interview with The News
and Observer of Raleigh that he
had talked to a man he believed to
be Golenbock.
"If he said anything about me
(in the book) that I didn't say, I'll
find him he said.
The book focuses on the 1986-
87 basketball team, which in-
cluded Drummond. Two other
members of that team, Charles
Shackleford and Bennie Bolton,
told The News and Observer Mon-
day that they had not talked to
Golenbock.
Shackleford, a sophomore on
the 1986-87 Wolfpack team who
is now a member of the NBA's
New Jersey Nets, also said Mon-
day that he had no knowledge of
the actions mentioned on the
book cover.
"None of this stuff ever hap-
pened while I was there Shack-
leford said in an interview after a
Nets practice in East Rutherford,
N.J.
"Maybe it happened before I
was there or after I left, but it never
happened while I was there. I
don't have any knowledge (of
this) going on.
Bolton, a junior on the 1986-
87 Wolfpack team who was
reached by telephone at his Wash-
ington home, said Monday that
he had never talked to Golenbock.
He also said he had no knowledge
of any of the violations alleged by
the book cover.
"T never got anything like
that. I never took any money.
Valvano never offered me any
money. So it can'tbe true Shack-
leford continued.
HOW TO
ENRICH
YOUR EDUCATION
BY $1,000
A MONTH.
If you're a math, engineering, or physical the-art nuclear reactor and propulsion
sciences major, you could be earning
$1,000 a month during your junior and
senior years.
This excellent opportunity is part of
the Navy Nuclear Propulsion Officer
Candi-date Program. Ifs one of the
most prestigious ways of entering the
nuclear field-and rewarding, too. You
get a $4,000 bonus upon entrance into
the program, and $2,000 more when
you complete your Naval studies.
You also receive a year of paid
graduat-level training that's the most
comp;rehen-sive in the world, and
plant technology. As a Navy officer,
you'll lead the adventure while gaining
high-level experience that win help
make you a leader inone of the world's
high-tech industries.
In addition to the professstonal ad-
vantages, nuclear-trained officers get
an unbeatable benefits package, travel
opportunities, promotions and a solid
salary.
Find out more about the Navy Nuc-
lear Propulsion Officer Candidate Pro-
gram,? 1 make your education start
paying off today.
you'll acquire expertise with state-of-
To find out If you qualify, or for more Information, contact Navy Oflicer Opportunfciaa,
801 Overlin Road, Suite 120, Raleigh, NC 27605-1130 or call
LT. BRIAN HALSEY
1-800-662-7419
NAVY OFFICER
You are Tomorrow.
You are the Navy.
ie On Down
and see the
NEW SIGMA NU
FRATERNITY!
Collect Your Prizes
0 Student Government
0 Social Activities
Greek Life
No Hazing
0 Over 130,000 Members
Internationally
1 �T
Bob Barker
Sigma Nu
Call 830-3960
for information & rides





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 17, 198?
Lefty's Dukes defeated in front
first sellout in nearly two years
. - . . �. ��. � �i�� rlnihod nut tivp assists. Cus Hi!
Continued from page 11
Claude Ferdinand shot under-
neath, the Dukes trailed 59-57
with just 41 seconds left to plav.
The two teams traded baskets
the next two trips down the floor.
With 12 seconds left to play, James
Madison fouled Edwards and put
him on the free throw line. Ed-
wards nailed both ends of the one-
and-one to put the Pirates up 61-
57. Lose would round out the
scoring hitting a free throw fol-
lowing a MU turnover.
"I thought we gave them a
pretty good game Coach Drie-
sell said. "We got down by 11, but
we fought hard to get back in. We
had a chance to win, but a steal
towards the end iced it for them
The first halt of the game was
nip and tuck to the most part. The
big plav oi the first half was an
Edwards' two-handed slam with
about eight minutes to play to put disned out five assists. Gus Hill
ECU up by six. The Dukes closed scored 14 points off the bench and
and tied the game at 28 to go into Stanley Love chipped in with
the half. ci8ht-
Not onlv was the score tied, ECU also got fine play trom
but the teams had almost identical senior point guard Jeff Kelly and
statistics for the first half. Both freshman center Casey Mote,
teams committed eight turnovers Kelly dished out five assists and
in the half. ECU shot 41.7 percent had one turnover. Over the past
and grabbed 15 rebounds, while four games, Kelly has had 14 as-
JMU shot 42 percent and hauled sists and only one turnover. Mote
in 14 boards. played in his first game as a Tirate
Steele said he thought the and coach Steele said he gave the
team did not play well the first
half and was glad to see them pick
up their intensity in the second
half. Edwards supported Steele's
feelings and added that the team
did not hustle for loose balls in the
first half.
East Carolina was led in all
categories by Blue Edwards.
Edwards scored 23 points,
grabbed seven rebounds and
team the minutes that they
needed.
James Madison was led by
junior Claude Ferdinand who
finished the game with 18, four-
teen ot which he scored in the first
half. He also grabbed a game-higl
nine rebounds. Barry Brown also
chipped in with 14. William
Davis, the Dukes leading scorer,
was held to just seven points.
Blue works toward goals
Continued from p ige I i
put on his wo.k ciothes and
started playing basketball again.
As a senior and the Pirate's
premier scorer, Edwards knows
there is a lot of responsibility on
him and the other seniors. Under
coach Steele. the seniors are the
loaders on the floor Edwards
said. "And with mv role on the
team. I'm going to get my chances
to score,but I'm also going to help
my teammates any way 1 can
Since his return, Edwards has
made it very clear that he is not
going to take a back seat to any-
body in the league. All the pre-
season hoopla went to George
Mason senior Kenny Sanders and
Blue made it a point to challenge
him for player of the year 1 made
it one of my goals to be CAA
player oi the year and 1 think I'm
starting to challenge Kenny for
that Edwards said. "Idon't want
to do it just for myself, though. 1
think it would be good for the
team and the school
Edwards knows that basket
ball is not a one-person game and
he thinks this years team works
well as a unit. He also feels that
under coach Steele's format oi
coaching that the team works
hard to be better. "With coach,
who starts is determined by who
practices well. It doesn't matter
what year you are or who you are,
the best performers in practice
play in the games Edwards said.
1 le feels that the hard work
and determination are paving off.
"We have taken great strides to
work ourselves up from the base-
ment of the conference Edwards
said. 1 le and his teammates feel
that they can beat anybody in the
league. They have very precise
goals and are determined to make
them come true. "We want to win
the league outright and win the
tournament, so we get a shot at the
NCAA tournament Edwards
said.
But when the chants oi "Blue.
Blue" end at Minges Coliseum.
what will be next for Blue Ed-
wards? "It has always been a
dream of mine to plav profes-
sional basketball Edwards said.
"I have some areas to improve
before I can make it, but I'll keep
working towards that goal. Right
now though, the main goal is for
us to keep winning
It's that intensity for winning
that makes Blue Edwards a true
team leader for the Pirates. And as
he and the Pirates continue to
improve, the future looks bright.
When this talented young man
takes the floor to plav basketball,
the pandomonium begins and
there is no such thing as quiet.
CLASS, FACULTY AND
STAFF PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will be taken from Jan. 23 through
Jan. 27. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
IT ISN'T YOUR YEARBOOK UNTIL
Read
The East
Carolinian
SPRING BREAK
JAMAICA TRIP
crreenville
EgM travel center
$509 per person
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 17, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 17, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.648
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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