The East Carolinian, January 10, 1989






Inside
IDITORIALS
CLASSIFIEDS
FEATURES
SPORTS
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6
13
19
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Features
'Tequila Sunrise a confused depressant.
See page 13.
Sports
The Pirates slain William and Mary, Blue Edwards
named CAA player of the week.
Get the story on page 19.
�he iafit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 40
Tuesday January 10,1989
Greenville, NC
24 Pages
Circulation 12,000
First Chancellor's Forum
bridges education, business
By BEN SELBY
Staff Wrifrr
our work force fall very much short
of what we need Clendenin said.
"It's a very self-serving sort oi
motivation tha t leads us to the inter-
est level that we have
The opportunity is at hand for
more thought needs to be given
to educational management
and organization.
"We have to think very dif-
ferently about school and the
schooling enterprise Sch-
the "partnership" to concentrate its lechtly said. "We have to think
Leaders of government, educa-
tion, and business sought to create a
partnership to strengthen the
School svstems in eastern North resources to invent new methods ot differently about how schools
Carolina'Tuesdav and Wednesday kcePin8 studc�s in � �d to are or8?ni�d; u V y
during the first annual Chancellor's imProw thc basic education ski Is managed about how the occu-
Forur� that many in the southeast lack, pation of teaching is put to-
The two dav event, sponsored Clendenin. getter, how people are re-
by ECU and Carolina Telephone " think therc' " opportunity cnuted to �t, how they re moti-
and Telegraph Company, provided partnership between the bus- vated, how they re sustained,
an opportunity for business, indus- ness community and professional andhow they retrained. We ve
trial, civic, legislative, and educa- educators with the support of gov- got to start thinking more abou
tional leaders to meet in the spirit of emment to concentrate resources human resource development.
jA,5:j� If you don t invest in
people they eventually burn
out said Schlechtly. "We have
to reinvent school much like
partnership and to exchange ideas on ncw and nventive :method.
that will improve the education and ologies for dealing with the
economic fiber of eastern North Hmn�tnmKinnc, i�.
Carolina.
"Most businesses are totally
dependent on their human
resourcessaid John L. Clendenin,
Chairman of the Board and Chief
Executive Officer of BellSouth Cor-
poration oi Atlanta, in a press con-
ference prior to the general session
on Tuesdav afternoon.
Clendenin called for a partner-
shipbetweenbusinessandcommu-
drop-out problem said Clen-
denin.
"Public schools in many
J
ways are in the same kind of
position that a lot of American
industries are in said PhillipC.
Schlechty, president of the Lou-
isville, Ken tuck v-based Center
for Leadership in School Re-
form.
"In 1920, 20 percent oi
youngsters graduated from
nity leaders to improve public edu- high xhoo and therc was
cation so that the qualifications of strong parental support because
job candidates meet the require- we had thc right 20 percent
ments i ' today's high tech business id Schlechty. "Now we're up
'vorld. around 75 or 80 percent and
"Business in general and our we're ting asked to cucaic a
business in specific terms is terribly iot 0f children that we never had
concerned about the quality of to before. That means we have
public education systems through- to undergo a fundamental re-
out the territories in which we structure and re-examination of
operate,because that's the sourceof our purpose
our employees said Clendenin. Schlechty said that more
We're finding alot of areas emphasis needs to be placed on
where the available candidates for enriching teacher's careers and
American corporations had to
reinvent themselves
In his keynote address
Clendenin compared the
country's educational system to
an unraveling tapestry and
noted the three essential strands
ncccesary to "revveave" the tap-
estry were educational, politi-
cal, and business leadership.
He compared the fourth
critical element for revitaliza-
tion to a loom, which Clendenin
said was "the spirit of mutual
concern and cooperation with
which you have convened this
forum today
"So this gathering is
encouragingsaid Clendenin.
"It's part of a heartening ground-
swell-a pattern being woven into
community fabrics all over the
country
"It shows wave one of educa-
Strengthening the school systems was the topic of the first annual Chancellor's Forum. Leaders
of government, education and business attended. (Photo by Tony Rumple, ECU News Bureau)
tion reform has crested and now
we're rising with the swell of
wave number two said Clen-
denin. "We've become aware of
the challenge, and now we're ris-
ing to meet its awesome demands
and thev are awesome
"We've got to be realistic
about the task if we are to be opti-
mistic about the challenge said
Clendenin. "How are we as a
and that the lack of education and
its repercussion of poverty will
cost Americans hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars in our lifetime.
"How will we as a nation
compete when our most funda-
mental resource is likely to fail
us Clendenin asked. "The fu-
ture of education is the future of
turn information into insight
said Clendenin. "But the problem
is more basic than that
"There are a lot of "Johnnys"
in the southeast who can't read or
write said Clendenin. "Johnnys
who don't know where or what
Athens, Greece is
Clendenin said that Ameri-
can business needs qualified
people now, but offered little
everything else. Education is the
thread that youne minds will use . 1 ,
high-tech.company opposed ,� WCave d invite tapes of feSM
advance the cutting edge ot tele- knowledge.
Clendenin cited national re-
ports indicating that the southeast
was educationally deficient in
relation to the rest of the country.
"We're simply not producing
enough young people who can
communications with employees
who can't add the cost of a Big
Mac and an order of fries?"
Clendenin said that the link
between education and econom-
ics is more important than ever
"These Johnnys are knocking
at the doors of IBM, General Elec-
tric, A.T.&T R.J.R. Nabisco,
Coca-Cola, Norfolk Southern,
First Wachovia, and
BellSouthsaid Clendenin. "And
See LEADERS, page 6
Poverty report on region calls
for welfare reform, education
The North Carolina Poverty Committee reveals surprising statistics on"the many faces of poverty" in
the region. (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photo Lab)
By TIM HAMPTON
News Editor
Eastern North Carolina, a 41-
county area plagued by illiteracy,
poverty and substandard hous-
ing, needs improvements in edu-
cation, job training, child care and
transportation, according to a
report released Friday on the ECU
campus.
Identifying "the many faces
of poverty" in the region, the two-
year study conducted by the East-
ern North Carolina Poverty
Committee found 43.8 percent of
North Carolinians categorized as
"poor" live in the east.
'Think of it (the eastern re-
gion of North Carolina) as a Third
World country Charles Coble,
Dean of ECU's School of Educa-
tion and a member of the commit-
tee said during the presentation.
Statistically, the region has more
illiterates and a higher infant
mortality rate than some undevel-
oped nations, Coble said
"Poverty is a reality. Many of
us talk about poverty and the
need to do something to end the
cycle co-chairman Maria O'Neil
McMahan, Dean of the School of
Social Work, said. McMahan and
E.C. Modlin, Director of Cumber-
land County Department of So-
cial Services headed the 18-mem-
ber committee in creating the
report entitled: "Poverty in the
East: Shared Ownership in the
Problems and Solution
The committee used a defini-
tion of poverty as "a family of four
with an income below $11,650
taken from a Department of
Health and Human Services Feb.
1988 report.
With a common goal to in-
crease awareness on the problem,
the study also had specific recom-
mendations in areas of education,
health, public and private serv-
ices, and housing.
On the hinges of the
Chancellor's Forum (sec related
story), education became one of
the major concerns of the report.
The study found a direct link be-
tween poverty and the lack of
education.
"Over 77 percent of the
households below poverty level
in North Carolina are headed by
individuals with less than a high
school education the report
See STUDY, page 7





t
-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, 1989
Admission director sought
Bv GARY SANDERSON
SuilWritrr
In June 1988, Charles Seeley,
former Director of Admissions at
ECU took an early medical retire-
ment, leaving the position open
during the busiest time of year with
record numbers oi incoming fresh-
men applying for admittance.
Since a nationwide search for a
new director would take months,
Eugene Owens was temporarily
appointed director for one year.
Now. a search committee is socking
to till the position permantly.
"The position is advertised in
the Ian. 4 edition of The Chronicle
of Higher Education and in Black Is-
sues in Higher Education Dr. Pa-
tricia Anderson said, who was re-
cently appointed chairperson of the
search committee organized to find
a new Admissions Director. Also,
notices have been sent to all admis-
sions offices in public and private
schools in North Carolina.
Anderson said that ECU has
had difficulty in the past with send-
ing employment opportunities out
to minority groups. "ECU has a
record of not getting a sufficient
number of minority applicants,
though we have a good hiring rec-
ord said Anderson. "We want to
make the position available to all
who are qualified and interested in
the position she said.
"1 haven't been told to hire a
Mack or a woman. I've been told to
ge�. applications from them she
said. "In the end, the most qualified
applicant will get the job, no matter
what race or sex
Anderson said that she expects
anywhere from 100 to 200 applica-
tions before the February 15 dead-
line. In order to be considered, one
must have five to seven years ad-
missions experience, have interests
in student retention efforts, and
preferably have at least one gradu-
ate degree. ECU faculty applica-
tions are welcomed and encour-
aged.
"Right now we have a major
push towards student retention,
that is, keeping students who begin
college at ECU Anderson said.
"We're interested in getting stu-
dents qualified and allowing them
to reattend
Anderson said that the stu-
dent bodv would be allowed to
voice their opinion on the issue
before a final decision is
reached. "Perhaps we'll hold an
opening meeting or something
of that nature she said.
Other members of the
search committee include Caro-
line Ayeri, Trenton G. Davis,
SusanC.Smithand LarrySmith.
Jo Ann Jones will serve as non-
voting secretary of the commit-
tee.
"The committee is really
excited about the impact we can
have through our search proc-
ess and I'm personally thrilled
to be the committee chair
Anderson said.
"The admissions office
handles everything having to
do with who attends the univer-
sity Anderson said.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymand,
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
P
.$4.95
Open Rate
Bulk Rate (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50
200-299 col. inches$4.40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$400
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Local Open Rate $4.7S
Frequency (Contracts)
5 Insertions' n )$4.55
(12251 W s
10 Insertions ill c;
(12 25") $4 4"
15 lnsortions(4' 11') $4 45
(1225") $4 4m
20 Insertions (4' in $4 ;
(12" 25") $4 ��'
25 Insertions (4' n$4
Exchange program selects ECU
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 U225")$4 I
Two Color and black$155.00
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
FCL New Bureau
ECU has been selected for
membership in the National Stu-
dent Exchange Program.
NSEP is a consortium of 83
L.S. colleges and universities or-
ganized to enable students from
one institution to attend another
one for a semester or for an entire
academic year. Member mstitu-
tions are located in 38 states and
the Virgin Islands.
Based on an evaluation of the
quality and quantity of its special
programs, characteristics of the
student bodv and its location,
NSEP invited ECU to become the
third institution in North Carolina
to hold NSEP membership. The
others are UNC-Charlotte and
North Carolina State University.
Participation in the exchange
program involves housing and
travel costs for the student but
tuition and fees are the same as at
ECU. The program is open to full-
time ECU undergraduates with a
2.5 grade point average or better.
Dr. Maurice D. Simon, direc-
tor oi international studies and
coordinator for the NSEP pro-
gram, said the program "provides
students with an exciting oppor-
tunitv to unique educational pro-
grams, experience new sights and
enjoy new cultural and educa-
tional events.
"It offers students a choice of
schools in a wide range oi loca-
tions Simon said. Many NSE
members' locations offer unique
opportunities for specialized
studv he said.
"It is a marvelous opportu-
nity Simon said. "Moreover, this
is a most economical program al-
lowing students to attend more
GET ON THE
TRACK TO A
SCHOLARSHIP
1&
ffNiw An Ajr F�rce R(nc
J scholarship may get you on the
? right track to success. Find out if you
qualify for tuition and other expenses, plus
$100 each academic month. Get on the
right track. Talk to:
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
757-6598
STAURANTS
Greek Owned & Operated Since 1979
Delivery Hours
Sat Wed. 4-10 pm
Thurs. & Fri. 4-11 pm
SUBS
GREEK DISHES
SANDWICHES
SALADS
PIZZA
GREEK PASTRIES
'Best Deal in Town"
752-0326
or
752-3753
560 Evans St.
expensiveout-of-stateinstitutions fine universities and we will be
at in-state prices
The program has a tremen-
dous track record for operating ef-
fectively and for being sensitive to
the unique needs of its student
participants he said. He added
that "our hope is that 10 to 15 ECU
students will participate in the
program in 1989-90
He said that ECU will be able
to accept as many exchange stu-
dents from other institutions as
ECU students who go to exchange
Universities.
Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor, said, "I am delighted
that ECU has been selected for
membership in the National Ex-
change Program. Through this ex-
change program, our students
will be able to experience educa-
tional opportunities at many other
able to open our programs to stu-
dents from across the nation.
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Welcome Back

TAKE AN EXTRA
Open
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sunday 1-0
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Ntke and Reebok)
L I
I
COPYRIGHT 1989 THE KROGER CO ITEMS
AND PRICES GOOD SUNDAY JAN 8
THROUGH SATURDAY JAN 14, 1989 IN
GREENVILLE M RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
LIMIT QUANTITIES NCNE SOLD TO DEALERS
ADVERTISED ITEM POIKY-Each
Hems is required to be readily
each Kroger Store except as
this ad If we do run out of an
will otter you your choice oi
when available, reflecting the
raincheck which will entitle y
advertised item at the adverti
days Only one vendor coupon
item purchased
of these advertised '
availaDie tor sale in
specifically noted in
advertised Hem. we
a comparable item
same savings or a
ou to purchase the
sed price within 30
will be accepted per
OVEN ROASTED
Louis Rich
Turkey Breast
6-oz.
FROZEN
Fox De Luxe
Pizzas
6.8-7.6-oz.
Red Delicious
Apples
For
5-lb. Bag
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE,
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE,
COCA COLA CLASSIC,
Diet Coke
or Coke
$108
2-Ltr.
NONRETURNABLE 16 OZ BTLS
6-PAK . . $1.89
COUNTY LINE PROCESSED
American Cheese QQ
Food Singles 12 oz v w
IN THE DELI-PASTRY SHOPPE
Sandy Mac $049
Cooked Ham . Em
300 SHEETS PER ROLL 1-PLY.
BATHROOM -
Cottonelle XQC
Tissue 4-roii Ov
EXTRA GOLD, COORS
LIGHT OR
Coors 1 O h 99
Beer VLltyiT






I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10,1989
Admission director sought
By GARY SANDERSON
In June 1988, Charles Seeley,
former Director of Admissions at
ECU took an early medical retire-
ment, leaving the position open
during the busiest time of year with
record numbers of incoming fresh-
men applying for admittance.
Since a nationwide search for a
new director would take months,
Eugene Owens was temporarily
appointed director for one year.
Now, a search committee is seeking
to fill the position permanently.
"The position is advertised in
the Ian. 4 edition of The Chronicle
of Higher Education and in Black Is-
sues in Higher Education Dr. Pa-
tricia Anderson said, who was re-
centlv appointed chairperson of the
search committee organized to find
a new Admissions Director. Also,
notices have been sent to all admis-
sions offices in public and private
schools in North Carolina.
Anderson said that ECU has
had difficulty in the past with send-
ing employment opportunities out
to minority groups. "ECU has a
record of not getting a sufficient
number of minority applicants,
though we have a good hiring rec-
ord said Anderson. "We want to
make the position available to all
who are qualified and interested in
the position she said.
"I haven't been told to hire a
black or a woman. I've been told to
get applications from them she
said. "In the end, the most qualified
applicant will get the job, no matter
what race or sex
Anderson said that she expects
anywhere from 100 to 200 applica-
tions before the February 15 dead-
line. In order to be considered, one
must have five to seven years ad-
missions experience, have interests
in student retention efforts, and
preferably have at least one gradu-
ate degree. ECU faculty applica-
tions are welcomed and encour-
aged.
"Right now we have a major
push towards student retention,
that is, keeping students who begin
college at ECU Anderson said.
"We're interested in getting stu-
dents qualified and allowing them
to reattend
Anderson said that the stu-
dent body would be allowed to
voice their opinion on the issue
before a final decision is
reached. "Perhaps we'll hold an
opening meeting or something
of that nature she said.
Other members of the
search committee include Caro-
line Ayeri, Trenton G. Davis,
SusanC.Smithand Larry Smith.
Jo Ann Jones will serve as non-
voting secretary of the commit-
tee.
"The committee is really
excited about the impact we can
have through our search proc-
ess and I'm personally thrilled
to be the committee chair
Anderson said.
"The admissions office
handles everything having to
do with who attends the univer-
sity Anderson said.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey SPencer Mcy�n(i
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blank�ship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$495 Local Open Rate $4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 5 Insertions4
200-299 col. inches$4.40 (i225")
300-399 col. inches$430
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$4.00
Classified Disp'ay
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 (12251$420
Two Color and black$155.00
$4.50
10 Insertions" 111 $4.50
0225")$4.45
15 Insertions(4in$4.45
0225")$440
20 Insertions (4in$4.40
(l225")$4 35
25 Insertions (4in$4.35
Exchange program selects ECU
ECL" News Bureau
ECU has been selected for
membership in the National Stu-
dent Exchange Program.
NSEP is a consortium of 83
U.S. colleges and universities or-
ganized to enable students from
one institution to attend another
one for a semester or for an entire
academic year. Member institu-
tions are located in 38 states and
the Virgin Islands.
Based on an evaluation of the
quality and quantity of its special
programs, characteristics of the
student body and its location,
NSEP invited ECU to become the
third institution in North Carolina
to hold NSEP membership. The
others are UNC-Charlotte and
North Carolina State University.
Participation in the exchange
program involves housing and
travel costs for the student but
tuition and fees are the same as at
ECU. The program is open to full-
time ECU undergraduates with a
2.5 grade point average or better.
Dr. Maurice D. Simon, direc-
tor of international studies and
coordinator for the NSEP pro-
gram, said the program "provides
students with an exciting oppor-
tunity to unique educational pro-
grams, experience new sights and
enjoy new cultural and educa-
tional events.
"It offers students a choice of
schools in a wide range of loca-
tions Simon said. "Many NSE
members' locations offer unique
opportunities for specialized
studv he said.
"It is a marvelous opportu-
nity Simon said. "Moreover, this
is a moat economical program al-
lowing students to attend more
expensive out-of-state institutions
at in-state prices
"The program has a tremen-
dous track record for operating ef-
fectively and for being sensitive to
the unique needs of its student
participants he said. He added
that "our hope is that 10 to 15 ECU
students will participate in the
program in 1989-90
He said that ECU will be able
to accept as many exchange stu-
dents from other institutions as
ECU students who go to exchange
universities.
Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor, said, "I am delighted
that ECU has been selected for
membership in the National Ex-
change Program. Through this ex-
change program, our students
will be able to experience educa-
tional opportunities at many other
fine universities and we will be
able to open our programs to stu-
dents from across the nation.
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
GET ON THE
TRACK TO A
SCHOLARSHIP
XK0 An Air Force ROTC
scholarship may get wu on the
? right track to success, Find out if you
qualify for tuition and other expenses, plus
$100 each academic month. Get on the
right track. Talk to:
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
757-6598
Low iTicesi
tarmt
Leadership Ewellence Starts Here
STAURANTS
Greek Owned & Operated Since 1979
Delivery Hours
SatWed. 4-10 pm
Thurs. & Fri. 4-11 pm
SUBS
GREEK DISHES
SANDWICHES
SALADS
PIZZA
GREEK PASTRIES
'Best Deal in Town"
COPYRIGHT 1969 THE KROGER CO ITEMS
AND PRICES GOOD SUNDAY, JAN 8.
THROUGH SATURDAY. JAN 14, 1989, IN
GREENVILLE WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO DEALERS
ADVERTISED ITEM POUCY-Each of these advertised
items it required to be readily available for sale in
each Kroger Store, except as specifically noted in
this ad If we do run out of an advertised item, we
will offer you your choice of a comparable item,
when available, reflecting the same savings or a
ramcheck which will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised price within 30
days Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per
item purchased
OVEN ROASTED
Louis Rich
Turkey Breast
6-oz.
f
752-0326
or
752-3753
560 Evans St.
FROZEN
Fox De Luxe
6.8-7.6-oz.
Red Delicious
Apples
5-lb. Bag
99
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE,
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE,
COCA COLA CLASSIC,
Diet Coke
or Coke
2-Ltr.
NONRETURNABLE 16 OZ. BTLS
6-PAK . . . $1.89
COUNTY LINE PROCESSED
American Cheese
Food Singles 12-01.
IN THE DELI-PASTRY SHOPPE
Sandy Mac $049
Cooked Ham �. �m
300 SHEETS PER ROLL 1-PLY.
BATHROOM
Cottonelle
Tissue4R
EXTRA GOLD, COORS
LIGHT OR
Coors
Beer
4-Roll OV
12 H
A mm Btis. �
c
99
I
V





r
i
-
s
- .
s
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, 1989 3
Student Union President job open
By TOM PAGE
Aulstant Smi Iditot
Applications are now being
accepted for Student Union Presi-
dent for 1989. In order to fill this
position it will take a unique type
person,according to Karen
The students are the ones paying
for it, they should enjoy it
Applications for chairper-
sons will be taken from Jan. 27-
Feb. 17 after a Union president has
been selected. The president will
of
Pasch, the current Student Union
President.
"The job requires more than
justa leader. It requires communi-
cation skills that enable you to get
along with all kinds of groups and
personalities Pasch said.
According to Pasch. the
Board oi Directors tor the Student
Union reviews all applications
which must be turned in bv Janu-
ary 20, and selects the individual
who will utilize the students best
interest and retains the needed
qualifications tor the job. A per-
sonal interview will also be re-
quired before a final decision is
reached.
For many student, disinterest
in a number of the postitions ot-
tered bv the University lies in the
fart that they amply do not know ally an administrative body. It
much about the function of manv has a Board of Directors and a
campus organizations. CEO (the president) as well as
TheStudentUnionisabranch eleven committees each with a
of the University which provides chairperson. It exists solely for the
students with cultural and educa- students and it needs students to
tional programs and entertain- get involved in positions as well
ment events outside of the class- as attend the functions which are
room which all students can en- provided. "After all Pasch said,
Yarbrough writes book on Black
joy.
The organization is run by
students and funded in part by-
students as part of their "activity
fees According to Pasch, manv
students do not realize all of the
positions as well as programs that review the applications, make a
the Student Union offers. recommendation to the board of
Underneath the president directors, will interview and
are eleven separate student approve the selected persons,
committees, each with different "Right now our committees
objectives for the school year, arc headed by very diverse people
There is a committee to compli- and are not limited in any way in
ment most any major Pasch said, reference to race or gender. Any-
Some of the committees for ex- one can be selected for the job
ample are: public relations, mi- depending on individual qualifi-
nority arts, the coffee house, vis- cations. I encourage anyone who
ual arts, film, major concerts, and
the special events committee re-
sponsible for "Barefoot on the
Mall" each year.
The Student Union is also
responsible for providing the free
movies at Mendenhall and decide
which ones will be shown. Pasch
stated that ECU is the only cam-
pus on the east coast which pro-
vides this service to its students.
'The Student Union is acru
is interested in any type of enter-
tainment, planning and public
relations to apply Pasch said.
In retrospect, Pasch said that
the most valuable experience she
gained from working with the
Student Union was the prepara-
tion it provided for entering into
the working world and handling
the responsibilities as well as the
various personalities that will
inevitably be encountered.
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January 10, 1989
OPINION
Page 4
Poverty
A recent report from the Eastern
North Carolina Poverty Committee
paints a gloomy picture of this sec-
tion of the state, prompting one
observer to compare the region to a
Third World country.
We live in an era in which the
president of the United States im-
plies that homeless people live on
the street because they enjoy being
forced to sleep on heating grates in
the dead of winter. His statement,
though no more brainless than
many others he has made, reflects
and reinforces a common attitude
toward the "financially disabled
as Reagan and his former lapdog
Bush often refer to them.
It's comforting to think that the
poor are poor because they want to
be, or because there lazy, because
that belief removes guilt from the
believer. Comforting it may be, but
it is also wrong. True, there are some
who feed from the welfare trough
and have no desire to do anything
else. But to judge all by the actions oi
a few is patently ridiculous. For
most, being on welfare is a degrad-
ing and humiliating experience,
made worse by the fact that it is
difficult to get off welfare.
By way of example, take a fairlv
typical case. The head of the house-
hold is a black female high school
dropout, with four dependent chil-
dren and no husband. The house
itself is little better than a tin shack.
The woman can't go job-hunting,
because she is afraid to leave her
children at home � probably justi-
fiably afraid, as poverty-ridden ar-
eas are usually also crime-ridden.
Even if a job comes her way
somehow, she literally can't afford
to work. If she takes the job, she must
provide day care for her children (or
risk their lives and criminal charges
of neglect). Most jobs available to a
black female high school dropout do
not pay nearly enough to cover the
costs of living for five plus the costs
of day care for four.
And if, by some miracle, the job
does pay well enough, our heroine
will probably have no way to get to
her job. Many parts of the country
have countywide transportation
systems, and this area would cer-
tainly benefit from something simi-
lar, there already exists a fleet of
buses which would be available at
least part-time: the county's school
buses.
No matter how industrious they
may be, our heroine and thousands
like her are trapped by the system.
No doubt, there are always excep-
tional individuals in any group,
who rise from the gutter to "the presi-
dency of a major corporation. But,
while commendable in itself, this
has a tendency to reinforce the
wrongheaded notion that "if they
really wanted not to be poor, they
wouldn't be
It's time to face the facts: this area
is economically depressed, through
no fault of the people who are poor,
and it is not getting better. Innova-
tive, creative soluticms" trom the
public and private sectors will be
necessary to solve the problem.
But even this cannot succeed in
the face of continued indifference or
hostility from the people. This area
can be helped, but it won't be helped
as long as people persist in an "I've
got mine, so screw you" attitude.
Conservatism's lost opportunities
ByFRED BARNES
The New Republic
President Reagan likes an off-color joke, but he's
still pretty straight-laced when it comes to sex in
movies. He and Nancy watch a lot of films � there
are small theaters at both the White House and
Camp David � but not many with naked bodies and
R-rated sex scenes. Reagan believes the old directors
handled sex better, mainly by leaving it to the imagi-
nation. One of his favorite scenes occurred in a
movie by Ernst Lubitsch. Seems a couple had gotten
married, gone on their honeymoon, and arrived at a
hotel for their first night together. In Lubitsch's fi il
scene at ilie hotel, a female hand reaches out &tm
behind the door and hargs a "DO NOT DISTURB"
sign on the knob. This is sexy stuff, tastefully done,
according to Reagan.
How do I know he feels this way? Reagan told
me, and that's why I'm passing it along. In the
Reagan years, 1 had two private, off-the-record
meetings with the man himself. Well, scmiprivate
anyway. The first was in September 1984. Along
with a half-dozen other journalists, I asked Reagan
questions for an hour late one afternoon over coffee
in the White House's basement library. For the sec-
ond, soi retime in 1986,1 moved upstairs for a lunch
with Reagan, Donald Regan, and radio broadcaster
Paul Harvey. On each occasion, Reagan was
extraordinarily genial and warm, but he didn't say
anything that expanded my knowledge of his presi-
dency. AT1 I remember is that both times he com-
plained r.bout unveiled sex in current movies and
told the lubitsch story. Each time it produced smiles
all around. Later I noticed he'd used the same s.ory
in an on-the-record magazine interview.
Reagan had things too easy. He knew he could
get away with repeating an old story, and that's
often what he did. In a pinch, he could save the day
with a wingding speech, such as his moving words
at Bitburg, or perhaps just a planned quip, like the
one about Walter Mondale's "youth and inexperi-
ence As president, Reagan was breathtakingly
glib. And he relied so much on mere glibness that it
kept him from working hard and taking risks. Still,
his presidency was successful. Six-plus years of
economic growth is nothing to sneer at, deficit or no
deficit, and only on Reagan's watch and because of
his actions did the Soviet empire begin to contract.
But his presidency would have been a lot more
successful had Reagan not been so lazy � he said
he'd been assured hard work wasn't fatal, but why
take a chance? � and risk-averse.
What if Reagan had concerned himself with
personnel? I don't mean he should have fussed over
every political job in the administration, all 6,000 or
so. But what about treasury secretary and White
HDuse hief of staff? Reagan swallowed without a
momer i's reflection the job swap that sent James
leaker t: Treasury and Regan to the White House.
I" �gan lacked the political skills to be an effective
chief of staff, which might have occurred to Reagan
if he'd taken the time to think about it. Regan also let
the president take the one big risk of his second term,
the arms sale to Iran, and it was a dumb one. Baker
wouldn't have allowed it. Reagan didn't pay much
attention to his national security advisers either.
Had he, he'd have noticed that Bud McFarlane was
cracking under the pressure and that John Poindex-
ter, a fellow who blithely lied to the press about the
Grenada invasion, was singularly unsuited for the
post. Reagan couldn't be bothered.
A little boning-up on issues would have spared
him considerable embarrassment in public. Reading
a bookortwoa month might have helped, though I'll
admit the recent example of two politicians who are
avid readers, Jimmy Carter and Gary Hart, isn't
encouraging. With a better grasp of issues, Reagan
wouldn't have had to slink back to the Oval Office
like a wounded duck after each nationally televised
press conference, what few there were, obodv
expected him to rattle off the proposed amendments
to the Clean Air Act, but getting the gist of issues
right would have helped. At one session with report-
ers early in his administra ion, he couldn't explain
why his chosen basing mode for the MX missile had
been selected. He turned to Cap Weinberger, his
defense secretary, for that. This was bad. Half the
reporters present could have given the correct expla-
nation. Given his sketchy knowledge of many is-
sues, it was small wonder that reporters took Reagan
literally when he said that missiles from marines
could becalled back. He meant the subs could be, but
the press was poised to find flubs and wasn't about
to givp him the benefit of the doubt.
Having said all that, I don't begrudge Reagan a
good story. If his stories have a point, let's hear them.
Reagan specializes nowadays in Soviet stories, ones
the Soviet people supposedly tell each other. My
favorite is about the argument between an American
and a Russian over whose country has the most
democracy. The American says his country does, of
course. The people rule, after all. Why, he boasts, I go
to Washington, enter the White House, walk into the
Oval Office, march right up to the president's desk
and say, "President Reagan is doing a lousy job To
the American's surprise, the Russian wasn't taken
aback by this. Oh, we have that much democracy in
the Soviet Union, he insisted. Why, I can go to
Moscow, enter the Kremlin, walk into the general
secretary's office, march right up to his desk and say,
"President Reagan is doing a lousy job

Case closed: North faces real charges
By WALTER DELLINGER
The New Republic
"If s time to recognize that the case against Ollic
North and others in the Iran-contra affair has been
political from the start says The Wall S'reet Journal.
Conservative columnists such as George Will, Pat-
rick Buchanan, Robert Novak and James J. Kilpatrick
agree. They seem to think that the upcoming trial of
Lt. Col. North represents "the criminalization of a
policy dispute" between Congress and the presi-
dent.
A careful reading of the indictment leaves one
amazed that so many people could get the story so
wrong. United States vs. North is an embezzlement
case. The grand jury, acting on evidence assembled
by Lawrence Walsh, a distinguished Republican
attorney and former president of the American Bar
Association, alleges that North violated eight sepa-
rate criminal statues. Central among them is Section
641 of the U.S. criminal code, which makes it a felony
punishable by 10 years' imprisonment for any per-
son knowingly and willfully to "embezzle, steal, or
convert to his use or the use of another" any money
belonging to the United States.
The money in question is surely the greatest
amount ever alleged to have been embezzled from
the United States in a single criminal conspiracy. The
prosecuter charges that over $30 million was ob-
tained from the saleof arms to Iran, and that less than
half of that found its wav into the U.S. Treasury-
Most of the $30 million went into secret Swiss
bank accounts controlled by North and co-defen-
dant Richard Secord. As far as the indictment's
embezzlement count is concerned, it doesn't matter
whether the money went from there to the contras,
or to Secord and Albert Hakim, or for that matter to
the United Way or Mother Teresa. Since the money
did not belong to the defendants, they were not free
to use it for anything other than the authorized Ira-
nian arms sale.
So questions about the diversion funds to the
contras, and about whether North, Secord and oth-
ers personally profited from the arms sale are irrele-
vant to the central charges against the defendants.
That is not to say that questions of personal
corruption won't come up at the trial. One count
charges that Secord and Hakim set up a secret Swiss
account of $200,000 intended to encourage North to
stay on the National Security Council staff so that
Hakim and Secord "would continue to receive
opportunities for substantial revenues and profits in
connection with lucrative activities referred to them
by North and facilitated by himinhisoffical capacity
Another count charges that North converted to
his own personal use "at least" $4,300 of traveler's
checks from contra leader Adolfo Calevo.
The gTand jury has also charged North with
making "false, fraudulent and fictitious" statements
to the U.S. attorney general in the course of an offical
inquiry, and with "concealing, removing, mutilat-
ing, obliterating, falsifying and destroying official
documents According to the indictment, there was
also deception of the CIA. and the Defense Depart-
ment well before the inquiry began. The indictment
states, for example:
In early 1986, the defendants Oliver L. North
and Richard V. Secord agreed to retain for the Enter-
prise a substantial part of the $10 million (Iranian)
payment for the first shipment of TOW missiles by
having the defendant Secord transmit to the United
States through the CIA substantially less than was
paid for those missiles on behalf of the Iranians. In
furtherance of this plan, the defendant North told n
official of the CIA that a price of $6,000 per TOW
missile was too high and should be reduced, without
reveali' uiat the Iranian representative had al-
ready offered to pay $10,000 per missile.
When all was said and done, the U.S. govern-
ment received only $3,469 for each missile in that
particular sale; North's "Enterprise" skimmed off $6
million of the $10 million.
The Boland amendment makes only a cameo
appearance in the extensive indictment � in one
paragraph of one of the 23 counts. The paragraph
charges a conspiracy to conduct a "secret war" in a
way "calculated to defeat legal restriction governing
the conduct of military and covert action activities
and congressional control of appropriations, and to
conceal these activities from legitimate congres-
sional oversight
Here and only here does it matter whether Ol-
iver North diverted money to the contras. And
nowl.ere has Walsh or the grand jury even remotely
suggested that mere "policy disagreements" with
Congress are criminal. In fact, in a recent brief Walsh
stated that he "has explicitly refrained from assert-
ing even that open defiance of enacted congressional
restrictions on foreign military ventures would be
criminal
The heart of the prosecution's case in United
States vs. North is this: Weapons and other proper-
ties belonging to the United States, and paid for by its
taxpayers, were told to foreigners, and much of the
proceeds were fraudulently, deceitfully and secretly
set aside in private bank accounts, rather than being
given to the government.
Since the beginning of the republic, federal
criminal law has prohibited government officials
from secretly directing government funds to them-
selves or to enterprises of their choosing. Such stat-
utes protect both against private corruption and
against perversion of fundamental principle set out
in Article I of the Constitution: "No Money shall be
drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of
Appropriations made by Law
The Iran-contra affair undoubtedly raises im-
portant issues of foreign policy. But the prosecution :
itself is focused principally on alleged acts that are .
and always have been criminal. A nd unless the Iran-
contra committee and the grand jury ha ve gotten the
elementary facts of the case wrong, these charges are
Koing to be tough to beat.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IANUAKY 10,19 5
ECU graduates 1,300 students
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Staff Writrr
Dr. James G. )ones of the
American Academy of Family
Physicians, told an estimated
1 MX) graduating students at ECU
to "seek truth, keep faith and have
courage" after they leave the uni-
versity.
Jones was the featured
speaker at Saturday's fall com-
mencement exercises at which
degrees were conferred upon
approximately l,h00 graduating
seniors. The ceremony marked
the second year ECU has held
separate formal services for stu
dents who graduate in the fall or
the summer after the regular
-pnng commencement.
A Lumbee Indian, Jones is the
founding chanman oi the ECU
School ot Medicine's Department
of Family Medicine. Recently
ECU was recognize nationwide
for having the fourth highest xr
eentagc ot its medical school
graduates planning to practice
family medicine.
"I hope what I can share with
you Jones said, is a prescription
for life which has served me well
as a family doctor, a ountry doc
tor in eastern North Carolina if
you will an educator and a native
American who dared to believe
thai the American Dream was
true
torus said that prescription
wasa need to talk about values, he
said these values have fallen into
disrepute mvA that there is now a
"crying out for a return to a hap
pier ethos where decency pre
vailed and ethics were held
sacred "
"Young men and women
such as yourselves can do so
much to restore these values to a
central place in our society he
said.
Saying, 'The more we know
ot the truth the greater the chance
to live life in harmony Jones told
the students and a packed crowd
of parents and well-wishers at
Minges Coliseum that truth lies in
knowledge and that the students
had taken the first steps toward
discovering the truth by attend-
ing college.
"Without faith there is no
incentive to test the boundary of
what you arc, or more impor-
tantly what you might become
he said.
"Without faith Neil Ami-
strong would never have walked
on the moon, the Wright Brothers
would never have flown the first
ariplane, Dr. Martin Luther King
r. would never have participated
in the great freedom march. Faith
has the power to lift men and
women to greatness
tones said faith led to the
third value he espoused, courage.
He told students to have the cour-
age to seek the truth and to keep
the faith.
Noting there are two types of
courage,physical and intellectual,
Jones said intellectual courage
was often the most important and
most difficult to achieve.
"I believe it's that kind of
courage this great university has
instilled in each of you: the cour-
age to stand up for what you be-
lieve: the courage to fight for
right; the courage to strike out at
oppression wherever you find it,
and, yes, the courage to become
what you're capable of becom-
ing he said.
The ceremonies began at 10
a.m. as students seeking
bachelor's and master's degrees
followed macebrearer Beatrice A.
Chauncey, members of the Uni-
versity of North Carolina Board of
Governors, the ECU Board of
Trustees and university faculty
members into the coliseum to the
traditional music of "Pomp and
Circumstance
The Rev. Bob Clyde gave the
benediction to end the ceremony
following the traditional turning
of the mortarboard tassels �
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The second fall graduation ceremony took place in Minges Coliseum with an estimated 1300 students
graduating and turning their tassles. (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photo Lab)
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c-
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���

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, tm 5
ECU graduates 1,300 students
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Dr. Jaines G. Jones of the
American Academy of Family
Physicians, told an estimated
1300 graduating students at ECU
to "seek truth, keep faith and have
courage" after they leave the uni-
versity.
Jones was the featured
speaker at Saturday's fall com-
mencement exercises at which
degrees were conferred upon
approximately 1,600 graduating
seniors. The ceremony marked
the second year ECU has held
separate formal services for stu-
dents who graduate in the fall or
the summer after the regular
spring commencement.
A Lumbee Indian, Jones is the
founding chariman of the ECU
School of Medicine's Department
of Family Medicine. Recently
ECU was recognized nationwide
for having the fourth highest per-
centage of its medical school
graduates planning to practice
family medicine.
1 hope what I can share with
you Jones said, "is a prescription
for life which has served me well
as a family doctor, a country doc-
tor in eastern North Carolina if
you will an educator and a native
American who dared to believe
that the American Dream was
true
Jones said that prescription
was a need to talk about values, he
said these values have fallen into
disrepute and that there is now a
"crying out for a return to a hap-
pier ethos where decency pre-
vailed and ethics were held
sacred
"Young men and women
such as yourselves can do so
much to restore these values to a
central place in our society he
said.
Saying, "The more we know
of the truth the greater the chance
to live life in harmony Jones told
the students and a packed crowd
of parents and well-wishers at
Minges Coliseum that truth lies in
knowledge and that the students
had taken the first steps toward
discovering the truth by attend-
ing college.
"Without faith there is no
incentive to test the boundary of
what you are, or more impor-
tantly what you might become
he said.
"Without faith Neil Arm-
strong would never have walked
on the moon, the Wright Brothers
would never have flown the first
ariplane, Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. would never have participated
in the great freedom march. Faith
has the power to lift men and
women to greatness
Jones said faith led to the
third value he espoused, courage.
The second fall graduation ceremony took place in Minges Colisei
graduating and turning their tassles. (Photo by Thomas Walters,
He told students to have the cour-
age to seek the truth and to keep
the faith.
Noting there are two types of
courage,physical and intellectual,
Jones said intellectual courage
was often the most important and
most difficult to achieve.
"I believe if s that kind of
courage this great university has
instilled in each of you: the cour-
age to stand up for what you be-
lieve: die courage to fight for
right; the courage to strike out at
oppression wherever you find it,
and, yes, the courage to become
what you're capable of becom-
ing he said.
The ceremonies began at 10
a.m. as students seeking
bachelor's and master's degrees
followed mace brearer Beatrice A.
Chauncey, members of the Uni-
versity of North Carolina Board of
Governors, the ECU Board of
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traditional music of "Pomp and
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following the traditional turning
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ANUAR 10. 1989
Classifieds
l OR RENT
ROOMMATE NEED1 l I arg
3 blocks from campus Pri ate bedi
and bath Share utilities and heal
6874 and ask tor ohn.
ROOMS FOR RENT: One block
campus. Prefer non-smokers. Call ,v
5793.
FEMALI NON-SMOKING ROOM-
MATi WAN TFO: ! or spring semester to
share 2 bedroom, 1 1 2 bath apartment al
Oakmont Square $160 month, 1 '2 utiii
ties Call Wanda or fraci 756 0826
ROOMMATI WAN ill) R� mmate
wanted to share 2 bedroom apt at Far
River. Private room furnished (bedi
furniture available to buy) Bus service
pool $130 month rent no deposit i 3
utilities Call 830-6735
ROOM FOR REN1 . king t. . non-
smoker to share room in Tar River 3 !
miles from campus Fun roommates with.
govvi stud) habits $83 I per month � 1
I utilitiesall "2 371 -
ROOMM I t Nl 1 Dl i) IMMI DI-
TT CaB 8304910 lai RiverEs I
Private room. $118.75 per month I 1
utilities
FOR SALE
; I .CM 11 RE KR sl I
ing room furniture s fa
coffee and end tables Must sell only S150
Also bedroom furniture available Queen
size mattress, queen size tvaterbed frame,
desk dresser, bookcase must see to
appreciate ("all Mob at Tar River 830
IOR SAL1 984 Yamaha 250 Excitei
Red id condition less than 2500
mil - ides 2 helments Must sell All
offers considered Call 830 1639.
IOR SALE: 1983 Nissan Sentra h.ittch
back S f, AC. 5 speed
CaB 752 5313 oi 752 3298 aftei r p.m.
FOR $AI I�: Wood stove in excellent con
dition Double star. Price negotiable. Call
FOR SA1 I 986 Renault Alliance, auto
mafic, AC 2 door, metallic red rake over
payments of $170278 per month- CaB 830
Sl;RVU ESOFFER1 I)
PARTY: � ire having a party and
need a D ! for the best music available for
parties Dance fop l & Beach.Call 355
and ask foi Morgan
HELP WANTED
ATTENTION - HIRING! Government
jobs your area Man v emmediate open-
� ithout waiting list or test. $17 840
� 2 838 8885 EXT B5285
NATIONAL MARKETING FIRM:
Seeks ambitious, mature student to man-
age on-campus promotions for top na-
tional companies this school year. Flexible
hours with earnings potential to $2,500.
Call Lisanneor Rebecca at 1-800-592-2121.
WANTED IMMEDIATELY: Counter
person for Dry Cleaners � Laundromat
Twenty to twenty-five hours per wk, af-
ternoon, evening & weekend hours. Must
be dependable & personable, detail ori-
ented and able to use cash register Call
752 4511.
INTERESTED IN A CAREER IN MAR-
KETING, ADVERTISING, JOURNAL-
ISM, GRAPHIC DESIGN, OR PUBLIC
RELATIONS?? Local downtown -devel-
opment firm will place one person in each
specialty in a 4 month internship pro-
gram with company beginning in January
!lW Volunteer program is designed to
introduce students to careers in commu-
nications and provide hands-on exper!
ence with trained professionals. 10-15
hours per week are required. Expenses
and mileage are paid, juniors or seniors
preferred, with major as appropriate.
Interviews will be held anuary 24-27,
with selection of final candidates on lanu
ary 30. Send resume and cover letter by
lanuary 23 to Deborah Hughes. Director
of Marketing, Phil Flowers & Associates,
Inc 101 West 14th St Suite 105,
Greenville, NC 27834.
MARKETING PROMO I ION OPPOR-
TUNITIES: Student campus managers
needed to be an on campus representative
tor fortune 500 company. Please contact
Ann Bradv at 1 BOO-592-2121.
WAITRESS AND HOSTESSES
NEEDED: Full and part time will work
around class schedules. Apply in person
at Tar Landing Seafood Rest. 105 Airport
Rd. Greenville.
INTERESTED IN PAYING OFF THOSE
CHX'MAS BILLS: Or Beginning to plan
for a new spring wardrobe? Brodies and
Brodies For Men have part-time sales
associate positions available for Individ-
ual who can work flexible hours. Apply at
Brodies, Carolina East Mall. Monday-
Wednesday 2-4.
PERSONALS
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ATTENTION FRATERNITY PRESI-
DENTS: IFC meeting Today (110) at 5
p.m. - 221 Mendenhall.
DEAR ORONO: We have traveled the
world together : Maine, Va Beach & Mid
dlesex. But alas we have returned to G-
ville. I will be at O'Cools Wed. at 530 for
Black & Tans � David Bourne
ARC REGISTERED GOLDEN RE-
TRIEVER PUPPIES: 3 males priced at
SI 50 to $225. Call 746-2517.
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Would like to wel
come all students back Good luck this
semester
WELCOME BACK: To the brothers and
little sisters of Pi Kappa Alpha! First 'Lai
Sis meeting will be 9:30 Wed. the 11th in
Rm. 1026, GC building See you there for
the beginning of a great semester!
Read The East
Carolinian. Kvey
Tues. and Thur.
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Announcements
CHRISTIAN 111 I OWSHIP
Ch.rr.tian Fellowship will be held
Thurs. at 6:00 in the �. ulture t enter You
are invited to join us
COLLEGE VVORk SB DLl
vou have been awarded college work
study tor Tall Semester and � : Spring
Semester you are encouraged to contact
the. ffice about off-campus place
ments. Call 757-6979 oi comebyttu
room 2028
1 Os I I
Something missing in your lite7 We've
round it and we want to share it with on
lenLins Art Auditorium EVER In
ri
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
i are challenged ever da vithprob
that you find hard to v ercomi
- ' r the uncompn n ised - .v i I d
I v TV Fn. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
CO-OP POM IONS
AVAH BI E
1. IO , summer intern prog am
.nt. Majors: IVhtua!
: alism, Biology, Foreign I ang , The
�� Vrts School of Art, Ed So
putex Science and others interested
in state govt. Dati - � J9-81189
5:10 1 lours week 40 Positioi -
Salary: S5hour Housing. Meredith Coi
lege. Location: Raleigh. N C Deadline: 1,
. Class Soph , Ji Si 2) NC state
g vt (Discover the Real W �rid) intern-
ships Majors: Various. Dates: 6589 S
8 I Salary: Approx S200week. Loca
tion: NC. Class: Soph, year complete
GPA: 2.5 or greater. Hoursweek: 4n
Positions: 100 Deadline: 12789. Weeks:
10. For more info and applications, con-
tact Co-Op Ed. in 2028 GCB, 757 6979
1 IBS 1000
10 is MW fan 9 Feb. 27
Sections 013 021 is TT11 Ian 10 Feb. 2.1
Section Oil is W an 11 - Fob 22. Section
s rjan 10-1 21 Sections 022 031
' '�� Mar 1 pr 2'1 Scctions034 041 is
1 Tl 1 i eb 28 pr 21 Section 033 is T Feb.
28 Apr 18. Section 032 is W Mar. 1-Apr.
SIT D ABROAD
ire now being accepted foi
ibroad placements under the Inter
national Student Exchange Program
(ISEP). 1SFP is a world-wide network of
colleges and universities that provides for
exchanges oi students on a one-for-one,
fully reciprocal basis. The cost of an 1SEP-
sponsored study-abroad experience is,
except for travel costs, the same as attend
ing ECU If you have completed one year
I stud ha a G.P A of at
least 2 "� md yearn to experience other
places contact IMMi 1 !
: HI Hursey, In, ISEP Coordi
Austin 222 Office Phone757-6418,
. Ph Mie 756 0682
CO-OP I inA I ION
Cooperatj ition a free service of
fered b the University, is designed to
help career related workexperi
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend ao op Information Seminar in the
General Classroom Building Thur, Ian
124p in rm.2016. ThurJan. 19 p.m.rm.
Mon,Jan 231 pjn.rm. 1014.Thur
an 264p.m rm.2016.MonJan.304pan
rm. 2016. Thur Feb. 2 1 p nv rm 1014.
Mon 6 1 p m rm 1014 Thur, Feb 9 4
p m. rm 2016 Mon, Feb 13 4 pm rm
2016 Thur , Feb. t 1 p.m rm 1014 Mon
Feb. 20 1 p m. rm. 1014. Thur Feb 23 4
p m. rm 2016. Mon, Feb 27 4 pm rm
CHINESE ACROBATS
The Student Union Minority Arts
to
Committee proudly presents l he C hinese
Golden ragon Acrobats and Magicians of
Taipei in performance on Thursday, Feb. 2
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium This
Company consists of 23 dancers, magi-
cians, and acrobats in colorful costumes
half of whom are members of the
Damn Chang (Troupe Director") family.
This group h.is performed extensively
world wide. Tickets for this event are now
on sale in the Central Ticket Office of
Mendenhall Student Center, (phone 757
rit.ll, ext. 266) Office hours are 11 am tc
6 p m. M-F.
PIRATES OE PLXZANCE
Hie Performing Arts Series presents "Pi-
rates of Penance" a Gilbert & Sullivan
Operetta on Mon, Jan. 30 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This production is
staged by the New York Gilbert & Sulli-
van Players. They remain the premiere
production company of Gilbert &
Sullivan's work. This production includes
such memorable tunes as, "Poor Wander
ing Oner, "A Rollickling Band Of Pirates
We and "I Am the Verv Model of A
Modem Major-General Tickets for "Pi-
rates of Penance" are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center (plume 757 6611, ext. 266).
C ffu e hour are 11 a m to 6 p.m. M F.
PHILADANCO
he Philadelphia Dance Company (Phila-
danco) will perform in Wright Audito-
rium on luesday, Ian 17 at S p.m. This
performance is part oi the Performing
Arts Series. Led by John Myers Brown,
this Black i lance Troupe creates excite-
ment and makes headlines everywhere
they perform. Tickets for this dynamic
performance are available from the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student
(enter phone 757-6611, ext 266 Office
hours are 11 am. to 6 p m. This perform-
ance is sponsored in part by a grant from
the North Carolina Arts Council and the
National Endowment tor the Arts in
Washington, D.C a federal agency
AHMADJAMAL
The Student Union Special Concerts
Committee presents Jazz Recording Great
Ahmad lamal in concert on Wed Jan 25 at
8 p.m in 1 lendrix Threatre. A subtle, com-
plex, and veratile interpreter and com-
poser Jamal is regarded as a magician's
magician. Tickets are now on sale for this
outstanding evening of jazz. For further
details contact The Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, phone 757-
661 l,ext. 266 Office hours are 11 a.m. to 6
p.m M-F.
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed by the School of Art. The
School of Art is offering positions as
models for figure drawing classes spring
semester at S5 per hour. Contact Connie
Folmer in the School of Art Administra-
tion office, lenkins 20X) or call 757-6563.
PRE SEASON BASKETBALL
A registration meeting for the annual in
tramural pre season basketball tourna-
ment will be held Jan. 17 at 5 p.m. in Bio
103. All mens and womens squads are
encouraged to attend!
CLC
Are vou a Pitt County resident, 60 years
old or older and need a ride to your modi
cal appointment7 The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt countv such as doctors, den-
tists, clinics, therapies and the I lealth
department. Arrangements for the service
must be made at least 24 hours before the
scheduled appointment Call the Creative
Living Center, 757-0303 to reserve your
ride.
KARATE CLUB
The Karate club will observe the same
schedule as last semester: Mon & Wed
8:15 at Memorial Gym starting Jan. 11.
FOOTBALL
Mangers needed for varsity football Pick
up application at office in Minges. 757-
6029.
SCIENTIFIC TALK
The ECU Chapter of Sigma Xi, the Scien-
tific Research Society, will present a talk
bv Prof. Wenda Trevathan on Ian. 19 at
7:00 p.m. in room 1028 GCB. Prof. Tre-
vathan will speak about different aspects
of her new book, 1 luman Birth: An Evolu-
tionary Perspective.
INTERESTED IN AN
INT'L. CAREER?
Dr. Jay Sigler, Director of Rutgers
Unversitv's Graduate Program of Int'l.
Development Policy, will be at ECU on
Jan. 11 to discuss an innovative new pro-
gram. This program, which combines
graduate coursework with Peace Corps
service, is ideal for students from anv
major who ate interested in international
careers with public organizations or pri-
vate corporations. Students completing
the program will receive a Master in
Public Policy degree from Rutgers Univ
and a Certificate of Completion from the
U.S. Peace Corps. Jrs and Srs who
would like to learn more about this pro-
gram are encouraged to attend this meet-
ing on Jan. 11 at 3:30 p.m. in room 1014
GCB A variety of scholarships, including
full funding for minority students, are
available.
CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance. Class photographs will be taken
Jan. 23 � Jan. 27 in the student store from
9 a.m. til 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. til 4:30 p.m.
each day.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions would like to thank all con-
tributors of the Fall '88 issue and extend a
special thanks to the general manager-
and staff of The Buccaneer and The East
Carolinian for their support. Also we have
positions available such as features editor,
staff writer, and typesetter Applications
are available at the Media Board
Secretary's office in the Publications Bldg.
The deadline is Jan 17. The first issue for
this semester will come out in Feb.
IRS
Wanted: Sport care attendant. The De-
partment of Intramural-Recreational
Services is looking for individuals experi-
enced in sports care (athletic training) to
work within the sports care program.
Experience in high school, cotlepjatc ath
letic training desirable. Contact Todd"
McCollum in 204 Memorial Gvm cr call
757-6387 for more information
E. C. FRIENDS
There will be a full membership meeting
of East Carolina Friends on Jan. 11 at 7
p.m. in Medenhall 221. Applications will
also be taken for any new members at this
time
SUPPORT GROUP
A support group has ben formed for
people who are caring for a parent,
spouse, or other loved one at home. The
group is led by Freda Cross, MSW, Pitt
County Memorial Hospital and Susan
Redding, RN, Creative Living Center. The
support group will meet at St. James
United Methodist Church at 2000 E. 6th
St Greenville on Jan. 10 from 7:30 p.m.
until 8 30 p.m Respite services are avail-
able To make reservations for respite
care, call the Creative Living Center at
757-0303 from 8 p.m. to 5 p.m 24 hours in
advance.
Leaders from government, education, business seek to weave partnership
Continued from page 1
they're looking for work, today
Well, 1 haw bad news for
Johnny Clendenin said. "He
probably won't find that work at
BellSouth or anv of those other
corporations - as much as we want
them and as much .is we
desparately need them
"Even though our nation
spends185 billion annually on
education, we're turning out a
crop of functional illiterates said
Clendenin. "Business spends 30$
billion on remedial training plus
180$ billion more for on the-job-
training
Still, the figures go up on illit-
eracy, on drop outs, and on de-
spair. "Sweat and good hands
aren't enough any more said
Clendenin. "Workers qualified to
fill the 20 million new information
age jobs that this nation will create
before the century turns are be-
coming so scarce that it's scarv
Each year one million stu
dents drop out of school. Odds
show that a young person either
goes to school or he goes to jail.
The cost of incarceration costs the
nation more than education said
Clendenin.
"Collectively, these unem-
ployed or underemployed young
people pack an enormous
punch said Clendenin. "It's a
social knock-out. The less school
you take, the less money you
make
"Our nation is losing ground
and losing it fast in the world
economic race said Clendenin.
'We're losing it to a significant
degree because of Johnny. We
need not only an educated
workforce, but an educable
workforce
"lor students stepping out of
high school into the world fo high
tech it's like stepping onto a
moving sidewalksaid Clen-
denin. "You have to be prepared
for the jolt
"It really hurts when our
education system fails someone
said Clendenin. "It's tragic for the
individual who has feelings, fam-
ily, and a future. At the economic
level it hurts our collective wallet.
It's a massive maelstrom of
money swirling down and away
and draining out of sight
The detriment of education
failure is most disturbing at the
social level said Clendenin, be-
cause "It threatens to pulvarize
our nation and to tear apart our
society's wholecloth
"There is reason for hope and
there are signs of progresssaid
Clendenin. "But the pace of our
progress in the face of our prob-
lem is like charting the universe as
it expands
"There's no single party to
blame for our educational prob-
lems because the truth is the
stresses of the poverty cycle, and
all its attendant hemmorhages-
drug abuse, teenage pregnancies,
medical neglect, unemployment,
poor housing, adult illiteracy, and
so on, have a tragic and obvious
impact on our schools and they
are not equipped to resolve
them said Clendenin.
Clendenin challenged the 200
business, education, and govern-
ment leaders present to work
together to find practical solu-
tions in a spirit of cooperation and
partnership.
Following Clendenin's key-
note address Schechtly delivered
the main address in which he
defined the changing roles and
perceptions of public education
and its significance for our society
in the next "knowledge-work"
century. Schlechty called for the
restructure and improvement of
our education system.
'The purpose of school is to
get kids to do schoolwork said
Schlechtly And schoolwork is
knowledge work. The 21st cen-
tury is a knowledge-work cen-
tury
"School has always been the
business of knowledge work, but
there haven't always been jobs
which required knowledge
work
Schlechty said. "For a long
time we didn't need any more
than a 15 or 20 percent graduation
rate. The low-skill and no skill
jobs that existed in the 40's are
now high-tech
In the past school was viewed
much like any industry that
manufactured products and chil-
dren were considered the prod-
uct, Schlechty said. Teachers were
assembly line technicians and
principals were supervisors.
Schlechty compared teaching
to medicine and law in that teach-
ers became service delivery pro-
fessionals. Curriculum became
description, and principals were
ikened to hospital administrators
who took care of the bureaucratic
aspect of educaiton- "busses,
budgets, and butts
"The trouble is that you're
always thinking about teachers
like assembly line workers Sch-
lechty said, quoting a BellSouth
Corporation manager. "You need
to start thinking about them like
executives
"Teachers are leaders be-
cause the job of teachers is to get
somebody else to do something,
Schlechty said. "The principal's
job is to lead people who are
themselves leaders
"The product of school is not
children Schlechty said. "The
product of school is work. Work
for children who are our custom-
ers for knowledge work. Our job
is to invent knowledge work
"School is not simply about
meeting the needs of kids Sch-
lechty said. "School is also about
meeting the needs of society. It's
not just the child's right to read
that we must be concerned about
- it's a child's duty to read in a
democratic society
"School is not simply about
children Schlechty said. "School
is about the future of society. We
don't just give kids schoolwork
that they can do. We give kids
schoolwork which they can do
and from which they can learn
those things that are socially valu-
able
"It's not that in the good old
davs it was much better, " Sch-
lechtysaid. "It'sthegoodolddays
that didn't have to be as good
"What we have to do is to
invent a school system and a way
of putting together schools that
create a very different kind of
result Schlechty said. "And that
result is a product called
schoolwork which kids are suc-
cessful at and from which they
will learn
"We're going to have to have
a system that insists on some pat-
tern of participatory leadership
Schlechty said. "We're going to
have to make room for the people
who are being asked to lead
"We're going to have to in-
vest a lot more in human resource
development than we've ever
invested Schlechty said. "We
can't expect the individual to foot
the bill for training and develop-
ment
"We need to develop a more
sophisticated way of thinking
about the results said Schlechty.
"We can't think about school re-
form in the short term. We must
think in the long term combined
with short term action The crea-
tive partnership and cooperation
between education and business
is the way to boost our society into
the 21st century Schlechty said.
1







r

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, 1989 7

t

Study reveals 'many faces of
poverty calls for change
Continued from page 1
said. In addition, 40 percent of the
poor North Carolinians have less
than an eighth grade education.
To deter the increase in these
statistics, Coble, who led the edu-
cation portion of the study, called
for educators to leam how to re-
late with economically deprived
children in efforts to keep them in
school. Once tolerable because of
a wealth in unskilled jobs, the
high dropout rate of public school
students has become a concern
because of the growing need for
skilled labor.
"The good news is industry is
moving into eastern North Caro-
lina and with it they are bringing
jobs and opportunity, but the bad
news is the industries are first of
all interested in people trained in
certain skills said Deborah
Ryals, Eligibility Director of Pitt
County Department of Social
Services.
Coble advocated a support of
public pre-school, child-care pro-
gram for parents in poverty as
part of education's solution to the
problem. State legislators in
Raleigh are presently debating
the issue of public pre-schools.
On Thursday, other aspects
oi the report will be examined.
Davis elected to National Honors Council
STATISTICS OF POVERTY
43.8 percent of families liv-
ing in poverty live in eastern
North Carolina
20 percent of North Carolini-j
ans live in poverty
33 percent of poor house-j
holds live in substandard dwell-i
ings
77 percent of households
living in poverty are headed by
individuals of less than a high
school education
50 percent of poor house-
hold, are neaded by women
Over 50 percent of poor
households are headed bv minor-
ity
25 percent of the elderly are
of poverty status
Published in "Poverty in the
East1988, North Carolina Pov-
erty Project
ECU Newt Bureau
Mary Elizabeth Davis of Vir-
ginia Beach, Va president of the
Honors student group ECHO at
ECU, has been elected to the ex-
ecutive committee of the National
Collegiate Honors Council.
The National Collegiate Hon-
ors Council is the main body sup-
porting and supervising honors
programs at colleges and univer-
sities throughout the United
States, according to Dr. David
Sanders, director of the Honors
program at ECU.
Jontdwav
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not coaie by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
E. 10th St; or call 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. u day. year
around, in order to assist you in virtually any problem area
you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quality of life for you and our com-
munity.
Licensed AnJ Accredited By The State of North Carolina
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V

TUL EAST CAROLINIANJANUARY 10, W
SIGMA ALPHA
EPSILON
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i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IANUARY 10.1969 9
Faculty receive grant
ECU New Bureau
Two ECU faculty members
have received a grant of $9,200 to
investigate potential positive ef-
fects of a special curriculum and
support services for pregnant
adolescents in the public school
system.
Dr. Cynthia Nixon, assistant
professor in Special Education,
School of Education, and Dr.
Vickie Causby, assistant profes-
sor in Social Work, with the assis-
tance of one full-time and one
part-time graduate student, will
seek to prove that such assistance
improves not only the quality of
child care but also school atten-
dance, grades and self-esteem for
teen mothers.
Funding for the research proj-
ect, under a grant administered
by North Carolina State Univer-
sity, was made available by the
Board of Governors of the Univer-
sity of North Carolina system.
The grant subsidizes school-
based research designed to facili-
tate collaborate research on sig-
nificant problems in public school
classroom instruction and to pro-
mote cooperation between uni-
versity and public school person-
nel in developing supportive cur-
riculums to alleviate these prob-
lems.
Drs. Nixon and Causby will
conduct their investigation in the
Pitt County school system during
January through June, 1989. Ac-
cording to Nixon, Pitt County
schools have a "strong need for
supportive programs" for
adolescent mothers, in 1983 in Pitt
County there were 215 live births
from girls 19 and under, she said.
Three years later, in 1986, this fig-
ure increased to 430 pregnancies
among girls 15-19 years of age.
Approximately 70 percent of
school drop-outs in a given year
are related to pregnancy or child
care needs, and 85 percent of these
pregnant teens fall in the poverty
range, she said.
Nixon and Causby will begin
their research by targeting three
research groups. The first group
of 10 mothers will be selected
through the local Project Parent-
ing Program.
The Project Parenting pro-
gram, conducted at Agnes Fui-
lilove Alternative Community
School in Greenville, provides 15-
20 adolescent mothers with spe-
cialized training in child care both
at home and in school. The school
curriculum includes training to
enhance parenting skills � teach-
ing effective interaction between
mother and child at feeding and
play time to foster the child's de-
velopment and meet the child's
emotional needs.
Day care for the children at
the school is provided. Part of the
day the mothers spend learning
techniques for working with the
children.
A full time social worker
makes two home visits per month
to reinforce learning done at the
school. Home visits are very
structured, providing informa-
tion about pregnancy and pedia-
tric needs of the child, promoting
the mother's self-esteem, coordi-
nating additional services the
mother may need, and working
with the mother to provide a suit-
able environment for the child's
development.
Research groups two and
three, each containing 10 mothers,
will be selected from the Pitt
County public school system,
upon approval by the schools and
participants involved. Group two
will receive home visits only, with
no in-school training. Group three
will receive no support services at
home or in school.
Selection of all participants
will be based on socio-economic
backgrounds, number of family
members and amount of environ-
mental support, with these crite-
ria balanced among all three
groups. The participants must be
between the ages of 10-19, must be
pregnant or have a child no older
than 9 months. The child must be
their first.
The research project has three
goals. The researchers expect the
first group to show increased at-
tendance, maintenance or im-
provement in grade point
average, and improved self-es-
teem at the end of the research
period.
With permission of the par-
ticipants, schools will provide
statistics on grades and atten-
dance. Self-esteem will be judged
with a checklist, the Hudson In-
dex of Self-Esteem, to be done at
the beginning and repeated at the
end of the study.
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10( 1989
Alcohol defeats medication
ECU Newt Bureau
Persons suffering from hy-
pertension may be defeating the
benefits of taking daily anti-hy-
pertensive medication if they also
drink alcohol, an ECU School of
Medicine pharmacologist be-
lieves.
For the next five years. Dr. A-
R.A. Abdel Rahman, assistant
professor of pharmacology, will
investigate how alcohol may re-
duce or even eliminate benefits of
lowered blood pressure gained
from patients' daily regimen of
drugs commonly prescribed for
treatment of hypertension.
The National Institute of Al-
cohol Abuse and Alcoholism has
awarded Rahman a $349,712
grant to support his research. The
agency is a constitutent of the
National Institutes of Health, the
chief biomedical research unit of
the federal government.
"A strong link has been estab-
lished between alcohol intake and
inadequate blood pressure con-
trol in hypertensive patients
Rahman said.
"Surprisingly, this problem
has gained little attention though
it involves a large proportion of
treated hypertensive patients
When patients on drug ther-
apy are unsuccessful in control-
ling their hypertension, Rahman
said, it is often assumed that they
are failing to take their medica-
tion.
He hopes to substantiate that
these patients actually take their
medication as recommended, but
habits such as drinking may ad-
versely affect the medication's
ability to control high blood pres-
sure.
The research will specifically
focus on alcohol's effects on drugs
like clonidine, which are nor-
mally prescribed for treatment of
hypertension.
Rahman will also attempt to
determine whether the adverse
effect of alcohol is related only to
clonidine or occurs in other cate-
gories of medication used for
hypertension treatment.
A faculty member in the ECU
Department of Pharmacology
since 1985, Rahman has special
research interest in hypertension
and the drugs used for its treat-
ment.
Medical cost soar while insurance
companies dictate hospitalization
ECU News Bureau
With medical costs at an all-
time high and insurance compa-
nies dictating the length of hospi-
tal stays, an ECU nursing profes-
sor is developing and testing new
procedures for cost-effective
medica care at home.
"More and more people are
being treated in their homes
rather than in hospitals said Dr.
Mohammed A. Ahad, a professor
in the School of Nursing. The rea-
sons for this, he said, are the high
costs associated with medical care
and the limits that insurance carri-
ers, including Medicare, have
placed on the length of time al-
lowed for a hospital stay.
As a result, he said people are
being discharged early from hos-
pital care and must recover from
their illnesses at home. In addi-
tion, about 80 percent of the eld-
erly population reside in their
homes to be looked after by
members of their family and
friends.
"Traditionally, visiting
nurses have provided the re-
source for home health care said
Ahad. But he said nurses are in
short supply and costs for indi-
vidual nursing care are high.
Ahad would like to see a pro-
gram in the U.S. similar to the
home health program in England.
In that country the sick and eld-
erly commonly reside at home
under the care of trained "car-
egivers" � usually members of
the family or friends.
Ahad said the nurse's role in
this system would be to assess the
J
care needed by the patient and
serve as a supervisor for the care
given the patient. The nurse
would also train family members
to operate medical equipment
and to handle other skilled duties
that nurses more often perform.
In an effort to develop proce-
dures for such a program Ahad
spent last summer in Seattle,
Wash studying an innovative
home care program in that city.
His research, sponsored bv the
Gerontological Society of Amer-
ica, looked closely at the needs of
home care patients. Ahad listed
the most common medical prob-
lems and developed a procedure
for nurses in evaluating needs of
home patients.
The procedure, an instru-
ment for classifying home care
patients, will help nurses decide
how much time to allow for each
patient and to determine if family
members can be trained to handle
some of the work usually done by
nurses.
The procedure is being used
in Seattle and Ahad has conferred
with administrators of the Visit-
ing Nursing Association of New
York to discuss further testing of
the procedures in that state. He
hopes to have the procedure
tested in five regions.
Ahad presented details of his
research and plans for further
study to the Gerontological Soci-
ety of America in November at its
annual meeting in San Francisco.
RUSH
SIGMA
PHI
EPSILON
a lifetime experience
�ECUfs LARGEST FRATERNITY
� 1987-88 Inter-Fraternity Counil's "Most
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�1988 Winner of "ECU Spirit Award"
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Jan. 24th
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The House With The Heart"
DONT FORGET
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The "Big E "
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i
Welcome Back Students
�Jome Worship With
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New Bern Highway At Bells Fork
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Making A
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A Beautiful Place to Live
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-






I
I
4
THE EAST CARPI imiam
JANUARY 10. 1989 11
Construction still ongoing
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Staff Writer
Construction is an ongoing
process on ECU's campus and,
according to recent updates, the
Sports Medicine Physical Educa-
tion Complex, Emm Hall, and
the addition to Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center continue to lag be-
hind schedule.
Hie Sports Medicine Complex
is now projected to be substan-
tially completed by July 1, 1989.
Robert Webb, the director of
physical plant and architectural
.Manning, said a substantial
completion means that at that
date it will be possible to start
occupying the building in
phases. The building will not be
completely ready until Fall ses-
sion 1989.
The contractors for the three-
story, 82,000 square foot com-
v were given a time extension
due to the type of construction,
according to Webb. Webb said,
"Building with concrete is a slow
process and that problems oc-
curred because of complications
not apparent in the beginning of
construction.
Rod Compton, Director of
Sports Medicine, said in an inter-
view last June that "the facility
will house the perfect marriage
between academics and ath-
letes The combination of the
new complex and an expansion
of the sports medicine program
will allow ECU to offer a masters
degree in sports medicine.
Erwin Hall, home oi continu-
ing education, university col-
lege, and army ROTC, is about
three weeks behind schedule
with its renovations. New foun-
dations are being installed be-
cause of a problem in which the
buildine, was literally sinking.
Webb said the structural engi-
neer felt like the problem was
caused by a drop in the water
table due to draught and the
particular type of soil Erwin was
built on.
The original completion date
was Feb. 24, but new projections
state that the new foundations,
brick repair work, and possible
internal repairs won't be fin-
ished until mid-March.
Mendenhall Student Center's
three-level addition, which will
include a 400-seat cafeteria, new
offices, a large banquet room,
and a special events room, was
scheduled to be completed by
the beginning of this spring
semester.
Rudolph Alexander, the assis-
tant vice chancellor of student
life, said the new completion
date is now set for mid-March.
He said the facilities will not be
available to students until sum-
mer school, since completion is
so late in the semester.
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The Sports Medicine complex is just one of many construction sites yet to be completed. The projected
completion date is July 1. (Photo by Gretchen Journigan, ECU Photo Lab)
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Sate Ends August 31, 1988

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V
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10,1989
ECU doctor receives research grant
ECU Newt Bureau
An endocrinologist at the
ECU School of Medicine has re-
ceived a $79,500 gTant from the
American Cancer Society to de-
termine if a plant-derived com-
pound can be modified for use as
an alternative to current treat-
ments for leukemia.
Dr. D. Kirk Ways, assistant
professor in the Department of
Medicine and principal investiga-
Roper awarded
scholarship
tor for the research project, will
initially seek to further under-
stand the effects of the compound,
phorbol ester, on human cancer
cells.
The compound is derived
from the seeds of a Southeast
Asian tropical tree known as cro-
ton. The seeds produce a yel-
lowish-brown violently purga-
tive oil.
Through his investigation, he
hopes to determine if the com-
pound or another one with simi-
lar properties can be developed
and used to treat leukemia pa-
tients. Used in its current state,
phorbol ester is highly toxic.
"Preliminary studies show
that phorbol ester stops leukemic
cell growth and turns them into
normal white blood cells said
Ways. "Current drugs used to
treat the disease kill cancerous
leukemia cells rather than stop
their growth
Leukemia is characterized by
uncontrolled growth of white
blood cells that do not perform
their normal functions such as
fighting off infections.
"If such a therapy can be pro-
duced using the compound or an-
other like it, we could possibly
provide an alternative treatment
for leukemia which potentially
reduces side effects seen in cur-
rently used treatments said
Ways.
Ways' grant, known as the
Junior Faculty Research Award, is
given to investigators beginning
careers in cancer research.
SPORTS
WRITERS
NEEDED
TMMEDIAT
Apply in person
at
The
East Carolinian
Publications Bldg.
(across from
Joyner Library)
ECU N'twi Bureau
Earncll Purington of Roper,
assistant principal of Pines Ele-
mentarv School, Plymouth, and a
graduate student in the ECU
School of Education, has been
awarded a $500 Ralph Brimley
Scholarship at ECU.
The annual award is derived
from the interest from a fund es-
tablished 20 years ago by Dr.
Ralph Brimlev, who retired in
1973 as chairman of the ECU De-
partment of Educational Admini-
stration and Supervisi- n. Awards
are given to superior graduate
students in educational admini-
stration who are selected by the
School of Education faculty anc
dean.
Purington, 41, is a Washing-
ton County native, and the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Purington of
Roper. He is a graduate of Wash-
ington County Union School and
Elizabeth City State University
and holds a master's degree from
N.C. Central University.
He is currently enrolled in
ECU's Ed.S. degree program.
Before joining the Pines Ele-
mentary staff, Purington taught
social studies at Creswell High
School. He is active in the N.C.
Association of Educators, having
represented his 15-county district
as NCAE representative on the
Professional Rights and Respon-
sibility Commission.
SGA funds
Ambassadors
BV BEN SELBY
Staff Writer
The ECU Student Govern-
ment Association (SGA) appro-
priated $2800 dollars for the ECU
Ambassadors' registration fee for
a district meeting being held at the
University of Southern Florida
during the last week in February.
It is important for us (ECU) to
have a good showing in Florida so
that we can "show face" and
gather information that will be
useful for the national meeting
that ECU is hosting in the Fall,
said Phillip Winter, spokesman
for the Ambassadors.
Winter said that the money
would be used only for registra-
tion fees and individuals would
pay for food, transportation, and
lodging.
ECU is expectmg between
800 to 900 people to attend a na-
tional conference being held in the
Fall. It will be the largest gather-
ing of any group that has met in
Greenville to date.
In other business, the SGA
discussed a condom machine
resolution which was passed by
the legi slature last year but vetoed
by Chancellor Eakin.
"Last semester the condom
resolution was passed, and the
last I heard was that it was in the
hands of the Student Residence
Association president said Lee
Toler, Chairman of the Student
Welfare Committee. "There
hasn't been alot of action taken
since then
"Recently, Appalachain
State's chancellor authorized the
installation of condom machines
in residence halls there said
Toler.
It is my understanding that
Chancellor Eakin has refused to
authorize the condom machines
because it may promote a bad
image of ECU, said Marty Helms,
SGA speaker. "It promotes sex, as
opposed to abstinance Helms
said.
"We're telling people that this
is a very serious problem said
Helms. "And we're willing to take
drastic measures to prevent AIDS
and other sexually transmitted
diseases. If your're not willing to
abstain, please protect yourself "
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!Hlf EAST I'AROl INIAN
Features
JANUARY 10, 1989 Page 1.1
'Tequila' doesn't rise
By CHIP CARTER
Who named thi movie?
"Tequila Sunrise" sounds
good. But it brings up all sorts of
connotations to the average
viewer. The drink itself has pretty
colors, but it invariably leads to
contusion headaches and a gen-
eral feeling ot wretchedness.
And tlr.s Mel Gibson-Kurt
Russell-Michelle Pfeiffer extrava-
ganza looks good, and does blur
together like ice in a blender. It
doesn't induce nausea, but it does
leaveyou with a feelingof, "Did 1
miss something?
The premise ot the movie �
high school friends grow up. be-
come cop and drug dealer and
eventually fight is not bad.
Hard to believe Aussie Gibson
growing up in 1 os Angeles, but
tor the sake ol convenience, we'll
let it go. Gibson's accent is
stronger here than it has been in
any of his movies since "Mad
Max though.
But once you've got the basic
plot down, the movie starts spin
ning out oi control. Pfeiffer of
course gets torn between the two,
and there's some money chang-
ing hands somewhere, but after
that, 1 lost it.
Gibson is supposedly not
running drugs anymore. But
when his friend the mvsterious
Garlos arrives back in town, ev-
eryone expects one last deal. It's
never clear if the deal actually
goes down, and it's not at all clear
if drugs were involved.
Russell whoops it up as a
happy-go-lucky detective. Be-
tween him, Gibson in "Lethal
Weapon" and Emilio Estevez in
"Stakeout I'm surprised that
everyone 1 know hasn't run out
and signed up for detective
school. Looks like a fun job.
Pfeiffer sulks a lot. She's a
restaurant owner who never
gets involved with her customers.
Then, in the space of what may
have been two days or two weeks
(time is not a constant in this film)
she ends up sleeping with two of
them.
She always suspects she's
getting used, and 1 think she is.
But I'd be hard pressed to tell you
bv whom.
There's nothing in this movie
that really stands out. If it were a
hangover, it would be a Wednes-
day morning, three beers and a
shot last night hangover.
While it's not a bad movie, it's
not very good either. But with
"Lethal Weapon 11" in produc-
tion, a possible sequel to "Witches
Of Eastwick" under considera-
tion, is there any possibility Hol-
1 wood will leave this mediocre
film alone when they pull out the
list of sequels that haven't made
yet?
Wrong. Now drink.
How To Tell If School's Back In, Lesson 12 - Beer coolers like this one at Overton's are empty
(Photo by Mar Startari, ECU Photolab).
Director Oz cons Martin, Caine
in 'Dirty Rotten Scoundrels'
By CHIP CARTER
I ratures I dttOI
To Frank Oz, director of the
new movie "Dirty Rotten Scoun-
drels" I say, "(Jet thee back to the
Muppets
Hie worst thing about this
film, aside from the predictable
plot and dull dialogue, is that Oz Colgate
See, Caine thinks Martin is the
ackal, a notorious con artist who
is making life difficult for the
other scam men in Europe.
Frustrated by Caine's insis-
tence that he not reap anv profit
from their joint con games until he
has "graduated Martin is about
ready to leave when naive Janet
(Glenne Headlv)
treats comedic genius Steve Mar-
tin and the impeccably srvlish
Michael Caine as one-dimen-
sional puppets throughout the
film.
Both men arc con artists in
southern France. Martin, the
petty American swindler, is even-
tually taken under the suave
Caine's wing and groomed for
more meatier conquests.
Steve Martin pretends to be the retarded younger brother of con man Michael Caine in the poorly Ah! But this is just a my to get
directed Frank Oz film, "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels Frances Conroy plays the shocked financial victim, Martin (Hit oi Caine's backvard.
Diana Carrington.
stumbles into their lives. Thev
make a bet to see who will rip her
oii first � the loser leaving France
forever.
Just from the clues given
above you can figure out which
character is sccretlv the Jackal. But
nothing in the film ever makes
you care about the Jackal's
identity, who wins the bet, or who
gets the girl.
There are some semi-amus-
ing bits in the film. To avoid mar-
rying some of his wealthy bene-
factors, Caine introduces'the la-
dies to Ruprccht, his idiot brother.
Martin plays Ruprecht as a bum-
bling madman, and gets the onlv
laugh of the day as he sits at the
dining room table and asks, "Can
I go to the bathroom?"
Caine milos and ncxis. Mar-
tin sits absolutely still. A smile
slowly spreads across his face.
'Thank you he says, as Caine's
would-be fiancee becomes trau-
matic.
1 leadl v is perfect as a gullible
farm girl, but her about-face at the
end of the film is not unbelievable
This is a movie unworthy oi
any of its stars. It's surprising that
they couldn't find a better vehicle
for their talents but then mavbe
Oz is a better con man than thev
knew.
Art book reveals a gap
between models, ideal
Bv MICAH HARRIS
stiff Wntcr
She is a swan-like beauty of
large eyes and an acre oi rippling
hair. Whether she is a sorceress or
cloistered maiden, madonna or
whore, her posturing defines the
boundaries oi poetry.
She is the Pre-Raphaelite
Woman, rendered and defined by
a Victorian brotherhood of artists
including lohn Everett Millais,
William Holman Hunt, and
Dante Gabriel Rosetti. They
painted and sketched the often
contradictory feminine ideals that
contemporary poets Keats and
Tennvson delineated in verse.
Jan Marsh's "Pre-Raphaelite
Women: Images of Femininity" is
a beautiful art book examining the
work of those 19th Century art-
ists. Marsh, an authority on the
Pre-Raphaelite circle and author
oi "The Pre-Raphaelite Sister-
hood has constructed the tevt in
the form oi anecdotes and per-
sonal notes of the artists and their
models. This format makes the
text less exhaustive and provides
insight into the artists and their
creative vision.
It is interesting to discover,
for example, that the women the
brotherhood chose for models did
not correspond to the Victorian
concept of beauty. Rather, the
artists chose women who sug-
gested a highly personal ideal.
This difference between their
esoteric concept of female beauty
and the public's generic version
was perfect for such subject mat-
ter as holy virgins and sorcer-
esses. The angels they painted
were recognizably feminine, but
decidedly distant, even other-
worldly.
The book shows how this ar-
tistic gap colored the painters'
visions. It compares Rosetti's
portrait of his wife Elizabeth Sid-
dal with her self-portrait. His glo-
rified version radiates glamour
while she depicts herself as se-
vere, almost like an old maid.
As Marsh's notes reveal, the
painters learned the hard way
that the romanticized chivalry
thev depicted on canvas didn't
often translate well into the real
world. Hunt rescued model An-
nie M iller from a slum. He tried to
civilize her, and Miller repaid him
by turning down his marriage
proposal.
Yet, Marsh's text does not
undermine the painting's gor-
geous, romantic imagery. Rather,
the copy adds a bittersweet foot-
note to the story of the works col-
lected here and of the artists who
created them.
Mendenhall
movies
Tonight in I lendrix Theater at
8 p.m the ECU Student Union
will present a special sneak pre-
view showing of the new comedy
murder-mystery, "The fanuary
Man
Starring Kevin Kline ("A Fish
Called Wanda The Big Chill"),
Susan Sarandon ("Bull Durham
"Witches oi Eastwick "Rocky
Horror Picture Show"), Mary
Elizabeth Mastrantonio ('The
Color of Money") and Rod
Steiger, this film about a serial
killer loose1 in New York for al-
most a year promises to be one of
1989's biggest hits.
Passes are available at the
Mendenhall Student Center In-
formation Desk. Since there is a
limited number oi seats in Hen-
drix Theater, it is suggested that
viewers arrive early in order to be
admitted.
The following is a list oi
movies scheduled to be shown
this semester by the Student
Union.
Silver Screen Series
January 12-15 "Who Framed
Roger Rabbit?"
ECU'S Student Union presents a special sneak preview show-
ing of the new film "The January Man starring Kevin Kline.
January 20-22 "Young Guns"
January 26-29 "Die Hard"
February 2-5 "Willow"
February 9-12 "Sweethearts
Dance"
February 16-19 "Married to the
Mob"
February 23-26 "Crocodile Dun-
dee II"
March 16-19 "Punchline"
March 30�April 2 "Betrayed"
April 6-9 "Tucker"
April 13-16 "U2: Rattle and
Hum"
April 20-23 "Cocoon: The Re-
turn"
April 27-30 "Alien Nation"
Cinematique Series
January 11 "Heavy Metal
January-18 "Tiue Stories"
February 1 "A World Apart"
February 8 "Bird"
February 15 "Running on
See MENDENHALL, page 17
Student faces danger during African trip
ft I Ncwfl Bureau
Malaria is just one of a dozen
dangers facing lames Tisdale of
ECU.
There are also wild elephants,
poisonous reptiles, and narrow
winding trails along mountain
ridges and through dark jungles
awaiting this 18-year-old fresh-
man.
Tisdale has been selected as a
participant for an Operation
Raleigh expedition to Africa. For
the young Fayetteville native, the
trip could be the adventure of a
lifetime.
During a three-month period
beginning in January, he and
other adventurers will roam the
jungles and mountains oi
Cameroon. There thev will study
the birds, animals and insects that
thrive in the lush rainforest. Thev
will also study soil and vegetation
on Mt. Cameroon, which peaks at
13,000 feet.
Thev will construct trails
J
through the Korup National Park
near the country's border with
Nigeria and will build play-
grounds for kids in some of the
native villages.
Tisdale will also be involved
in a special scientific study for the
Department of Biology at ECU. It
includes collecting and identify-
ing mosquitoes that may carry a
relatively rare parasitic fungus.
The collection may someday lead
to better methods of biologically
controlling these pesky and
sometimes dangerous insects.
The adventure for Tisdale
will also include mountain climb-
ing, jungle patrols and rafting
through mangrove swamps.
Operation Raleigh is the
brainchild of Prince Charles of
Britain, who established the four-
year project in 1984. It has already
drawn 4,000 participants, ages 17
to 24, from more than 30 nations.
About 1,000 Americans ha ve been
a part of the 40 world wide expedi-
tions. The expedition to
Cameroon next spring is among
the last.
Tisdale said the idea for the
adventure caught his imagination
four years ago when he saw a
television commercial about
Operation Raleigh. At the time he
was 14 years old and an active Boy
Scout working on his Eagle
award, the highest in scouting.
But at 14 he was three years
away from being old enough to
apply for the then new program
that promised adventure in many
parts of the world.
When Tisdale enrolled at
ECU this fall he noticed an adver-
tisement in a newspaper involv-
ing young people to explore tropi-
cal rain forests and discover Afri-
can wildlife. With his interest
rekindled, he applied. A test of
his physical abilities followed
before he was finally accepted.
But there was still much to be
done.
Students selected for the pro-
gram are required to raise their
own funding. For Tisdale, the fee
was $5,500. Raising that amount
would be considered part of the
learning experiences associated
with the Operation Raleigh proj-
ect.
Tisdale was energetic in his
fund raising appeals. He raised
part of the cash by asking busi-
nesses to donate money for every
mile canoed upstream in the Cape
Fear River. It was sort of a canoe-
a-thon, organized by Tisdale, to
raise money for himself and for
other Operation Raleigh partici-
pants from the southern states
who participated with him in
the event.
His church contributed
monev to his trip. ECU awarded
him a' $2,000 Thomas W. Rivers
Foreign Exchange Scholarship.
An anonymous donor and a $500
grant from the ECU biology de-
partment provided the rest of the
money.
Tisdale is scheduled to arrive
at the project base camp at Buea,
Cameroon, on Jan. 2. There, the
party of 33 will undergo three
days of junglefitness training.
The party will then be divded into
three groups moving to camps at
See MALARIA, page 15





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JANUARY 10,1989 Page 13
'Tequila' doesn't rise
By CHIP CARTER
Features Editor
Who named this movie?
"Tequila Sunrise" sounds
good. But it brings up all sorts of
connotations to the average
viewer. The drink itself has pretty
colors, but it invariably leads to
confusion, headaches and a gen-
eral feeling of wretchedness.
And this Mel Gibson-Kurt
Russell-Michelle Pfeiffer extrava-
ganza looks good, and does blur
together like ice in a blender. It
doesn't induce nausea, but it does
leave you with a feeling of, "Did 1
miss something?"
The premise of the movie �
high school friends grow up, be-
come cop and drug dealer and
eventually fight � is not bad.
Hard to believe Aussie Gibson
growing up in Los Angeles, but
for the sake of convenience, we'll
let it go. Gibson's accent is
stronger here than it has been in
any of his movies since "Mad
Max though.
But once you've got the basic
plot down, the movie starts spin-
ning out of control. Pfeiffer of
course gets torn between the two,
and there's some money chang-
ing hands somewhere, but after
that, I lost it.
Gibson is supposedly not
running drugs anymore. But
when his friend the mysterious
Carlos arrives back in town, ev-
eryone expects one last deal. It's
never clear if the deal actually
goes down, and it's not at all clear
if drugs were involved.
Russell whoops it up as a
happy-go-lucky detective. Be-
tween him, Gibson in "Lethal
Weapon" and Emilio Estevez in
"Stakeout I'm surprised that
everyone I know hasn't run out
and signed up for detective
school. Looks like a fun job.
Pfeiffer sulks a lot. She's a
restaurant owner who never
gets involved with her customers.
Then, in the space of what may
have been two days or two weeks
(time is not a constant in this film)
she ends up sleeping with two of
them.
She always suspects she's
getting used, and I think she is.
But I'd be hard pressed to tell you
by whom.
There's nothing in this movie
that really stands out. If it were a
hangover, it would be a Wednes-
day morning, three beers and a
shot last night hangover.
While it's not a bad movie, ifs
not very good either. But with
"Lethal Weapon II" in produc-
tion, a possible sequel to "Witches
Of Eastwick" under considera-
tion, is there any possibility Hol-
lywood will leave this mediocre
film alone when they pull out the
list of sequels that haven't made
yet?
Wrong. Now drink.
Steve Martin pretends to be the retarded younger brother of con man Michael Caine in the poorly
directed Frank Oz film, "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels Frances Conroy plays the shocked financial victim,
Diana Carrington.
Art book reveals a gap
between models, ideal
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
She is a swan-like beauty of
large eyes and an acre of rippling
hair. Whether she is a sorceress or
cloistered maiden, madonna or
whore, her posturing defines the
boundaries of poetry.
She is the Pre-Raphaelite
Woman, rendered and defined by
a Victorian brotherhood of artists
including John Everett Millais,
William Holman Hunt, and
Dante Gabriel Rosetti. They
painted and sketched the often
contradictor' feminine ideals that
contemporary poets Keats and
Tennyson delineated in verse.
Jan Marsh's "Pre-Raphaelite
Women: Images of Femininity" is
a beautiful art book examining the
work of those 19th Century art-
ists. Marsh, an authority on the
Pre-Raphaelite circle and author
of "The Pre-Raphaelite Sister-
hood has constructed the text in
the form of anecdotes and per-
sonal notes of the artists and their
models. This format makes the
text less exhaustive and provides
insight into the artists and their
creative vision.
It is interesting to discover,
for example, that the women the
brotherhood chose for models did
not correspond to the Victorian
concept of beauty. Rather, the
artists chose women who sug-
gested a highly personal ideal.
This difference between their
esoteric concept of female beauty
and the public's generic version
was perfect for such subject mat-
ter as holy virgins and sorcer-
esses. The angels they painted
were recognizably feminine, but
decidedly distant, even other-
worldly.
The book shows how this ar-
tistic gap colored the painters'
visions. It compares Rosetu's
portrait of his wife Elizabeth Sid-
dal with her self-portrait. His glo-
rified version radiates glamour
while she depicts herself as se-
vere, almost like an old maid.
As Marsh's notes reveal, the
painters learned the hard way
that the romanticized chivalry
they depicted on canvas didn't
often translate well into the real
world. Hunt rescued model An-
nie Miller from a slum. He tried to
civilize her, and Miller repaid him
by turning down his marriage
proposal.
Yet, Marsh's text does not
undermine the painting's gor-
geous, romantic imagery. Rather,
the copy adds a bittersweet foot-
note to the story of the works col-
lected here and of the artists who
created them.
How To Tell If School's Back In, Lesson 12 - Beer coolers like this one at Overton's are empty
(Photo by Mar Startari, ECU Photolab).
Director Oz cons Martin, Caine
in 'Dirty Rotten Scoundrels'
By CHIP CARTER
features Editor
To Frank Oz, director of the
new movie "Dirty Rotten Scoun-
drels" I say, "Get thee back to the
Muppets
The worst thing about this
film, aside from the predictable
plot and dull dialogue, is that Oz
treats comedic genius Steve Mar-
tin and the impeccably stylish
Michael Caine as one-dimen-
sional puppets throughout the
film.
Both men are con artists in
southern France. Martin, the
petty American swindler, is even-
tually taken under the suave
Caine's wing and groomed for
more meatier conquests.
Ah! But this is just a ruse to get
Martin out of Caine's backyard.
See, Caine thinks Martin is the
Jackal, a notorious con artist who
is making life difficult for the
other scam men in Europe.
Frustrated by Caine's insis-
tence that he not reap any profit
from their joint con games until he
has "graduated Martin is about
ready to leave when naive Janet
Colgate (Glenne Headly)
stumbles into their lives. They
make a bet to see who will rip her
off first � the loser leaving France
forever.
Just from the clues given
above you can figure out which
character is secretly the Jackal. But
nothing in the film ever makes
you care � about the Jackal's
identity, who wins the bet, or who
gets the girl.
There are some semi-amus-
ing bits in the film. To avoid mar-
rying some of his wealthy bene-
factors, Caine introduces the la-
dies to Ruprecht, his idiot brother.
Martin plays Ruprecht as a bum-
bling madman, and gets the only
laugh of the day as he sits at the
dining room table and asks, "Can
I go to the bathroom?"
Caine smiles and nods. Mar-
tin sits absolutely still. A smile
slowly spreads across his face.
"Thank you he says, as Caine's
would-be fiancee becomes trau-
matic.
Headly is perfect as a gullible
farm girl, but her about-face at the
end of the film is not unbelievable.
This is a movie unworthy of
any of its starsjt's surprising that
they couldn't find a better vehicle
for their talents but then maybe
Oz is a better con man than they
knew.
Mendenhall
movies
Tonight in Hendrix Theater at
8 p.m the ECU Student Union
will present a special sneak pre-
view showing of the new comedy
murder-mystery, 'The January
Man
Starring Kevin Kline ("A Fish
Called Wanda "The Big Chill"),
Susan Sarandon ("Bull Durham
"Witches of Eastwick "Rocky
Horror Picture Show"), Mary
Elizabeth Mastrantonio ("The
Color of Money") and Rod
Steiger, this film about a serial
killer loose in New York for al-
most a year promises to be one of
1989's biggest hits.
Passes are available at the
Mendenhall Student Center In-
formation Desk. Since there is a
limited number of seats in Hen-
drix Theater, it is suggested that
viewers arrive early in order to be
admitted.
The following is a list of
movies scheduled to be shown
this semester by the Student
Union.
Silver Screen Series
ECU'S Student Union presents a special sneak preview show-
ing of the new film "The January Man starring Kevin Kline.
January 12-15
Roger Rabbit?"
'Who Framed
January 20-22 "Young Guns"
January 26-29 "Die Hard"
February 2-5 "Willow"
February 9-12 "Sweethearts
Dance"
February 16-19 "Married to the
Mob"
February 23-26 "Crocodile Dun-
dee H"
March 16-19 "Punchline"
March 30�April 2 "Betrayed"
April 6-9 "Tucker"
April 13-16 "U2: Rattle and
'Cocoon: The
Hum"
April 20-23
turn"
April 27-30 "Alien Nation"
Cinematique Series
��
January 11 "Heavy Metal"
January 18 "True Stories"
February 1 "A World Apart"
February 8 "Bird"
February 15 "Running on
See MENDENHALL, page 17
Student faces danger during African trip
ECU News Bureau
Malaria is just one of a dozen
dangers facing James Tisdale of
ECU.
There are also wild elephants,
poisonous reptiles, and narrow
winding trails along mountain
ridges and through dark jungles
awaiting this 18-year-old fresh-
man.
Tisdale has been selected as a
participant for an Operation
Raleigh expedition to Africa. For
the young Fayetteville native, the
trip could be the adventure of a
lifetime.
During a three-month period
beginning in January, he and
other adventurers will roam the
jungles and mountains of
Cameroon. There they will study
the birds, animals and insects that
thrive in the lush rainforest. They
will also study soil and vegetation
on Mt. Cameroon, which peaks at
13,000 feet.
They will construct trails
through the Korup National Park
near the country's border with
Nigeria and will build play-
grounds for kids in some of the
native villages.
Tisdale will also be involved
in a special scientific study for the
Department of Biology at ECU. It
includes collecting and identify-
ing mosquitoes that may carry a
relatively rare parasitic fungus.
The collection may someday lead
to better methods of biologically
controlling these pesky and
sometimes dangerous insects.
The adventure for Tisdale
will also include mountain climb-
ing, jungle patrols and rafting
through mangrove swamps.
OperaHon Raleigh is the
brainchild of Prince Charles of
Britain, who established the four-
year project in 1984. It has already
drawn 4,000 participants, ages 17
to 24, from more than 30 nations.
About 1,000 Americans have been
a part of the 40 worldwide expedi-
tions. The expedition to
Cameroon next spring is among
the last.
Tisdale said the idea for the
adventure caught his imagination
four years ago when he saw a
television commercial about
Operation Raleigh. At the time he
was 14 years old and an active Boy
Scout working on his Eagle
award, the highest in scouting.
But at 14 he was three years
away from being old enough to
apply for the then new program
that promised adventure in many
parts of the world.
When Tisdale enrolled at
ECU this fall he noticed an adver-
tisement in a newspaper involv-
ing young people to explore tropi-
cal rain forests and discover Afri-
can wildlife. With his interest
rekindled, he applied. A test of
his physical abilities followed
before he was finally accepted.
But there was still much to be
done.
Students selected for the pro-
gram are required to raise then-
own funding. For Tisdale, the fee
was $5,500. Raising that amount
would be considered part of the
learning experiences associated
with the Operation Raleigh proj-
ect.
Tisdale was energetic in his
fund raising appeals. He raised
part of the cash by asking busi-
nesses to donate money for every
mile canoed upstream in the Cape
Fear River. It was sort of a canoe-
a-thon, organized by Tisdale, to
raise money for himself and for
other Operation Raleigh partici-
pants from the southern states
who participated with him in
the event.
His church contributed
money to his trip. ECU awarded
him a $2,000 Thomas W. Rivers
Foreign Exchange Scholarship.
An anonymous donor and a $500
grant from the ECU biology de-
partment provided the rest of the
money.
Tisdale is scheduled to arrive
at the project base camp at Buea,
Cameroon, on Jan. 2. There, the
party of 33 will undergo three
days of junglefitness training.
The party will then be divded into
three groups moving to camps at
See MALARIA, page 15





s
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10,1989
Dinosaur show not just for kids
NEW YORK (AP) - Dino-
saurs are a kiddie rage these days.
Thereare dinosaur toys, books, T-
shirts, games, party favors.
'The Great Dinosaur Hunt
tonight on PBS' "The Infinite
Voyage" and next week in syndi-
cation, is not a kids' show, though
some dinosaur-crazy youngsters
might find it interesting.
This fascinating documen-
tary is taken up not with childish
fantasies but more adult consid-
erations, such as the history of
dinosaur study and present-day
scientific methods that have pro-
duced remarkable new theories
about the ex-critters.
The new theories, rather than
drying out the subject, give new
life to the dinosaurs of childhood
imagination. According to vari-
ous scientists, the vast array of
dinosaur species were active
hunters, aggressive fighters, nur-
turing mothers, sociable herd
members, scavengers and sophis-
ticated communicators.
Nature's special effects
they are called, by museum cura-
tor Robert Bakker, a Harvard
Ph.D. scientist and author of "The
Dinosaur Heresies whose
waist-length hair and a beard
smbolize his maverick ideas.
Rikker believes that, contrary to
! ng-held popular and scientific
belief, dinosaurs were not stupid,
.1 -blooded reptiles, but a
unique, warm-blooded, active
animal.
Bakker supported his theory
by studying dinosaur tracks dis-
covered in a riverbed near Glen
Rose, Texas. By comparing the
estimated height of the animal's
leg with the distance between the
tracks, Bakker concluded that it
traveled at a brisk 8 mph or so,
faster than a pack of wolves, not at
the sluggish speed of a cold-
blooded reptile lazily foraging for
food.
'Their world was not one of
the cold-blooded shuffle, but of
the hot-blooded cruise he says.
Phillip Currie studied myste-
' rious "bone beds" in Alberta,
Canada, and developed the the-
ory that they were the remains of
members of a dinosaur herd who
died trying to ford a river en
masse, as herding animals still
sometimes do today. Later, an-
other species of dinosaur fed on
the remains � Currie found bite
marks on the bones � and added
more fossils to the bone beds.
Paleontologist Jack Homer's
study of dinosaur eggs revealed
that some species emerged fully
developed and ready to run off in
search of food, while others
needed lengthy nurturing in the
nest. They later became predator
and prey.
David Weishampcl studied
the unexplained hollow crest that
topped the heads of some dino-
saur species and concluded that it
provided an amplification tunnel
between vocal box and snout.
By reconstructing the crest
with plastic tubing, he produced a
low-frequency bellow that the
animals probably used more than
70 million years ago to communi-
cate with each other. A low-fre-
quency noise, not unlike the bel-
low of an elephant, would have
carried a long distance, but been
difficult for a predator, such as
Tyrannosaurus Rex, to locate.
Bakker believes that rather
than dying out completely, dino-
saurs were the predecessors of
today's 8,400 species of birds. By
studying a species of dinosaur
closely related to "T. Rex as he
affectionately calls the mega-liz-
ard, Bakker concluded that the
structural similarities between
dinosaurs and modern birds
made them obvious relatives.
"So when you look at your
canary, you're seeing a bit of T
Rex Bakker says.
The demise of the dinosaurs
remains a mystery. They could
have died of a widespread virus,
or they might have been the vic-
tims of a sudden cataclysm, such
as a collision between Earth and a
giant meteor.
Griffith shines in 'Working Girl'
(API � What Melanie Grif-
fith does in Working Girl" to get
ahead in the business world
would get her fired from any fi-
nancial house in New York. So
why do audiences cheer for her
masterful connivings?
Because Griffith's Tess
McGill is the most endearing
movie character in years. With her
wide, innocent eyes and shy, lispy
voice, she conceals a quicksilver
mind that outraces the executives
who treat her like a servant with a
note pad.
Tess is a three-time loser, as
she is reminded by her employ-
ment counselor (Olympia
Dukakis in a pre-Oscar bit). But
Tess manages to land another job,
joining a bullpen of anonymous
secretaries. Her boss is the
smarmy Katharine Parker (Sig-
uornev Weaver), who professes to
be democratic but steals Tess'
ideas and demeans her as much as
the male superiors.
By careful reading of the gos-
sip and financial columns, Tess
divines that a money-nch con-
glomerate might be ripe to buy a
radio chain. Her boss dismisses
the notion, then goes off on a ski
vacation and breaks her leg. Tess
usurps the boss' office and ward-
robe and sets her plan in motion,
enlisting the help of an ambitious
broker, Harrison Ford.
Kevin Wade has fashioned a
screenplay filled with crisp dia-
logue, witty observation and de-
lightful surprises. So what if all of
Tess' plans, as well as her per-
sonal life, turn out beautifully?
"Working Girl" is a story that
demands a happy ending.
The proceedings are given a
sophisticated polish by Mike
Nichols, at the tor of his directo-
rial skill. Adding to the happy
blend is a lilting score by Carly
Simon, who cmplovs a handful of
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Melanie Griffith occupies the
screen throughout, and the fasci-
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Tl IF. EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, 1989 15

Wrestlers taking on Hollywood
NEW YORK (AP) - In the foot-9, blond-haired behemoth,
world of acting, there are the blue "It doesn't bother me to play that
bloods: Sir John Giclgud. Lord kind of character I've been doing
Laurence Olivier.
Enter King Kong Bundy.
Cielgud and Olivier work on
Hamlet. Bundv works on Hulk
Hogan's head.
OK, so it's not the Royal
Academy of Dramatic Art. But
Bundy, a 450-pound, bald-domed
professional wrestler, is getting
bis share of casting calls.
Bundv and a growing num-
it my whole life.
Playing that character? You
mean wrestlers are acting out
there?
Well, vcs,but not the way you
think, the wrestlers say. The per-
tormance is not in the ring (at least
no one admits to that). It's devel-
oping a persona and taking it on
the road, creating a good or evil
character for televised interviews
ber of his fellow grapplers have and arenas around the country.
gone Hollywood.
"If you think about it, it
makes a lot of sense in the right
environment says Mvrna Gard-
ner, a World Wrestling Federa-
tion marketing director. They're
very experienced, great in front of
the cameras
Producers and directors evi-
dently agree.
Grapplers such as big Andre
the Giant C-foot-4) in "The Prin-
cess Bride" and small, The Haiti
kid (a midget) in "Penitentiary
III are currently available on the
shelves of video stores. Bundy has
appeared with Richard Pryor in
the film "Moving" and appeared
as a guest on the Fox Network
show "Married with Children
esse "The Bodv" Ventura has
enjo) ed prime roles in the Arnold
Schwarzenegger box-office
smashes Predator" and "The
Running Man Superstar Billy
Graham has a film due soon. Tiger
Chung Lee worked on Eddie
Murph s The Golden Child
Big John Studd appeared in
1984V Mickiand Maude" and on
shows like "The A Team" and
"Beauty and the Beast Rowdy
Roddy Piper's third film is John
Carpenter's "They Live
And next year, I logan � per-
haps America's best-known pro-
fessional wrestler, the force be-
hind "Hulkamania a man
whose likeness can be found on
more gift items than Elvis Presley
� will star in "No I loldsBarred
rhe Hulkster will appear as
wrestler Rip Rohrem. Such type-
casting is not unusual: Rarely do
wrt ACT play romantic leads.
j "I'm not Robert Redford, I'm
Jfcllai n savs Big John Studd, a 6-
Malaria a risk
for Tisdale
Continued from page 13
different locations ui ti � country.
During the project the partici-
pants will spend time at each
camp. Science, adventure and
community service vviil be em-
phasized.
In a studv for the biology
department, Tisdale will look for
mosquitoes whose larvae have
attracted a type of fungus that if
produced in a laboratory could be
used for the biological control of
mosquitoes.
"We'll be collecting the lar-
vae, screening them on sitc and
hopefully finding those with the
fungus and sending them back
(dead) to East Carolina said Tis-
dale.
The research was recom-
mended by Dr. Charles E. Bland,
professor and chairman of the
ECU Department of Biology.
Bland has written extensively
about African species of a larva
parasite called Coelomomyces.
He plans to use the samples from
Cameroon in his studies.
Band explained that the lifes-
pan of the mosquito infected by
the fungi is greatly reduced. He
said efforts have been underway
for several years to mass-produce
the parasites to control mosqui-
toes. The parasites would be used
to infect mosquitoes in areas
where the insects are a health risk.
Africa is among the areas of
the world where mosquitoes are
at their worst. Many species of the
insect carry the dreaded disease
malaria.
While Tisdale and the other
participants will be usingmedica-
tinns to help keep themselves free
from malaria infection, the odds
of the ge'ting the disease are still
very high. A person with the dis-
ease suffers from recurring chills
and fever.
"I know this is not the right
attitude, but I've accepted the
possibility that 1 may come home
with malana'said Tisdale.
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
rector Rob Reiner. "He never
missed a mark
But "Princess Bride a sweet-
tempered, humorous fairy tale,
was an extraordinary use of these
king-sized performers. The wres-
tlers know that more often than
not, their build, bulk and bad-boy
reputations land them their parts.
"Schwarzenegger, Stallone,
(ex-football star) Fred Dryer - it's
hard to make people sympathize
with these guys. They're large,
they're good-looking, sur-
rounded by pretty girls Studd
Bad guy Rowdy Roddy Piper says -q you gCt" john Studd to
savs he was so convincing in this
violent version of the Strasbcrg
school that irate fans stabbed him
three times and shot at him once.
"In Charlotte, N.C I was
stabbed an inch from my heart.
They're carrying me out on a
stretcher, and people are spitting
step on their heads a couple of
times and then people feel sorry
for them
When Ventura landed his
role in "Predator he was re-
sponding to a call for a 6-foot-4,
250-pound killer.
"1 just walked in there, with
at me. throwing garbage at me blond hair down to my shoulders,
recalls Piper, almost wistfully
Piper retired from the ring
two years ago and turned actor at
a moment when Hollywood was
newly receptive to wrestlers.
"I think the headlines, the
national exposure of Hulk Hogan
and the World Wrestling Federa-
tion opened a lot of people's
eves savs Ventura, a former
WWF tag-team titlist and current
wrestling announcer. "People
started seeing us in a new light.
They finally realized, 'Hey, these
guvs are talented at what they
do"
While tough-guy roles are the
norm, some wrestlers have been
asked to plav against type. Andre
the Giant - the most hated man
in wrestling, according to one ring
publication � played the gentle
giant Fczzick in the criticallv ac-
claimed "Princess Bride" and
drew favorable reviews.
The Giant's acting instincts
"are pure and natural says di-
about six earrings and a Fu Man-
chu mustache, and I didn't even
read Ventura recalls. The cast-
ing director, he says, "looked me
up and down two times, then
said, 'Let's go meet the pro-
ducer
But he was fortunate enough
to hook up with director Carpen-
ter, a wrestling fan, in "They
Live a science-fiction film about
a futuristic America overrun by
wealthy aliens � Republicans.
Piper, an ex-Golden Gloves
boxer who lived for years on the
streets of Toronto, says acting
turned out to be more of a chal-
lenge than expected. As a wres-
tler, be was renowned for his
sputtering, stuttering fireworks
in interviews before and after
matches.
"I came out to L.A. originally
figuring I was gonna be another
James Dean, you know? But eve-
rything I did in wrestling was
wrong for acting. It's just the
opposite for movies. When I did
the wrestling interview show
Tiper's Pit 1 improvised every-
thing. That's what people liked �
you know, this guy is winging
everything.
And then there're the critics.
The New York Daily News re-
viewed "They Live" under the
headline, "They Live, But Who
Cares?"
"A lot of people have always
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Ventura became so friendly accused pro wrestlers of, er, act
with Schwarzenegger during the
filming that the ex-weightlifter
invited him back for "The Run-
ning Man The Body has also just
finished another film, "Thunder-
ground which is dueout in 1989.
It was easy to put wrestling be-
hind him.
"1 was a 10-year veteran, and
that's not the kind of career that's
gonna last forever says Ventura,
37, an ex-biker and Vietnam vet-
eran whose departure from the
ring was hastened by blood clots.
Piper made his acting debut
battling amphibian-like mutants
in the B-flick "Hell Comes to
Frogtown His review: "It was
homble, just a joke
ing in the ring the reviewer
wrote. "But do I feel silly now! If
Roddy Tiper is any indication,
wrestlers can't act a lick
Piper got the last laugh.
"They Live" became the nation's
highest-grossing film in its first
week out.
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10. 1989
'Couch potatozap
make it to Webster's
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP) -
The term "computer virus"
spread into use like, well, like a
virus during 1988, but the out-
break came too late to make the
latest edition of Merriam-Webster
dictionaries.
"It got a tremendous amount
oi use. It was the word of the
year said James G. Lowe, senior
editor at Springfield-based G.C.
Merriam Inc which publishes
the nation's largest-selling desk
dictionary.
The company got its start
about 150 years ago by trimming
Noah Webster's two-volume die
tionary down to a more market-
able single volume.
But adding new words is the
lexicographer's bread and butter.
"Computer virus" is an al-
most sure bet for inclusion in the
next addendum to the company's
unabridged dictionary, Lowe
said, thanks to a graduate student
who this autumn unleashed a
"vims" that clogged university
and military computers and ex-
posed the vulnerability of com-
puter banks to infection.
But "computer virus a pro-
gram designed to infiltrate and
reproduce itself in host computer
systems, was hardly the only new
term to capture the attention of
lexicographers in a year when the
normally fertile hunting gTound
ot presidential campaign politics
proved something of a disap-
pointment.
"Televangelist "coloriza-
tion as used to describe the tint-
ing of old black-and-white films,
and "zap when used to describe
what happens to a television
commercial when a viewer
switches to another channel by
remote control, are also likely
candidates for the unabridged, he
said.
And that video stalwart, the
"couch potato" made the 1989
printing of the company's colle-
giate dictionary.
Also getting attention are
"veejay a television version of
the disc jockey, and "sound bite"
along with the "phonathon" and
"pledgathon popularized by
public television, he said
"Glasnost Russian for open-
ness, is still debatable despite its
frequent appearance in the press
for Soviet President Mikhail S.
Gorbachev's reforms.
"It is still most often found in
either italics or quotes and to us
that means it has not been com-
pletely Americanized Lowe
said.
"When reporters and writers
start using it without explaining
what it means it will be ready for
consideration in the dictionary
A word gets into the diction-
ary simply by being used over a
period of years in the popular
press, said Lowe. His lexicogra-
phers spend their days reading
everything from The Wall Street
Journal to Cat Fanciers magazine
and Playboy. They make notes on
index cards each time thev see a
new word or new usage.
The citations are stored in
banks of cabinets on the second
floor housing all the words that
have stirred America since 1790,
and many more that didn't sur-
vive long enough to make the
dictionary. As of Fridav, the count
stood at'13,73,441 cards, said the
head of the dictionary company's
typing pool.
In addition to "couch potato
which has built up a fat file of
citations since appearing in The
Wall Street Journal and TV Guide
in 1979, the 1989 version oi
Webster's Collegiate Dictionary
includes these new entries:
"Deep pocket" - to describe
li tigation against a wcalthvdefen-
dant; "wish list "loose cannon
"poison pill" and "microwav-
eble" (which dictionary editors
contend can also be spelled "mi-
cro waveable").
Some new words ot 1988
were i peats, such as "doo-wop"
born -ut oi the revival of 1950s
rock n' roll, Lowe said.
Yuppies, a product oi the
1980 presidential campaign, are
still with us.
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JAN. 24th, 25th, 26th
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PHONE 752-5543757-1005





V
16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 10,1969
'Couch potatozap
make it to Webster's
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP) -
The term "computer virus"
spread into use like, well, like a
virus during 1988, but the out-
break came too late to make the
latest edition of Merriam-Webster
dictionaries.
"It got a tremendous amount
of use. It was the word of the
year said James G. Lowe, senior
editor at Springfield-based G.C.
Merriam Inc which publishes
the nation's largest-selling desk
dictionary.
The company got its start
about 150 years ago by trimming
Noah Webster's two-volume dic-
tionary down to a more market-
able single volume.
But adding new words is the
lexicographer's bread and butter.
"Computer virus" is an al-
most sure bet for inclusion in the
next addendum to the company's
unabridged dictionary, Lowe
said, thanks to a graduate student
who this autumn unleashed a
"virus" that clogged university
and military computers and ex-
posed the vulnerability of com-
puter banks to infection.
But "computer virus a pro-
gram designed to infiltrate and
reproduce itself in host computer
systems, was hardly the only new
term to capture the attention of
lexicographers in a ar when the
normally fertile hunting ground
of presidential campaign politics
proved something of a disap-
pointment.
Televangelist "coloriza-
tion as used to describe the tint-
ing of old black-and-white films,
and "zap when used to describe
what happens to a television
commercial when a viewer
switches to another channel by
remote control, are also likely
candidates for the unabridged, he
said.
And that video stalwart, the
"couch potato" made the 1989
printing of the company's colle-
giate dictionary.
Also getting attention are
"veejay a television version of
the disc jockey, and "sound bite"
�yagfr-j
Classic
along with the "phonathon" and
"pledgathon popularized by
public television, he said.
"Glasnost Russian for ojven-
ness, is still debatable despite its
frequent appearance in the press
for Soviet President Mikhail S.
Gorbachev's reforms.
"It is still most often found in
either italics or quotes and to us
that means it has not been com-
pletely Americanized Lowe
said.
"When reporters and writers
start using it without explaining
what it means it will be ready for
consideration in the dictionary
A word gets into the diction-
ary simply by being used over a
period of years in the popular
press, said Lowe. His lexicogra-
phers spend their days reading
everything from The Wall Street
Journal to Cat Fanciers magazine
and Playboy. They make notes on
index cards each time they see a
new word or new usage.
The citations are stored in
banks of cabinets on the second
floor housing all the words that
have stirred America since 1790,
and many more that didn't sur-
vive long enough to make the
dictionary. As of Friday, the count
stood at 13,739,441 cards, said the
head of the dictionary company's
typing pool.
In addition to "couch potato
which has built up a fat file of
citations since appearing in The
Wall Street Journal and TV Guide
in 1979, the 1989 version of
Webster's Collegiate Dictionary
includes these new entries:
"Deep pocket" - to describe
litigation against a wealthy defen-
dant; "wish list "loose cannon
"poison pill" and "microwav-
able" (which dictionary editors
contend can also be spelled "mi-
crowaveable").
Some new words of 1988
were repeats, such as "doo-wop"
born out of the revival of 1950s
rock 'n' roll, Lowe said.
Yuppies, a product of the
1980 presidential campaign, are
still with us.
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We Offer:
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USH KAPPA
JAN. 24th, 25th, 26th
700 E. 10th ST.
PHONE 752-5543757-1005
U-
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ilifriiiriajafcini.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, 1989 17
Sajak psychs for show
LOS ANGELES (AP) Game
show host Pat Sajak is starting a
new late-night talk show on CBS
this week, but he's not bragging
that he's taking on Johnny Carson
head-on.
Neither Sajak nor CBS want to
oversell the show the way the
syndicated "Thicke of the Night"
was trumpeted in 1983.
"We don't want that kind of
pre-show hype because there's no
way you can live up to it Sajak
says. "We want people to know
we're coming but we don't want
to build up expectations
Sajak says his exposure as
host of "Wheel of Fortune will
help because, "People know me.
That's half the battle
Sajak has quit the daytime
version of "Wheel of Fortune" on
NBC, but will continue as host of
the nighttime show, the highest-
rated show in svndication.
'The Pat Sajak Show" made
its debut on CBS on Monday,
putting the network back into the
talk show business for the first
time since it canceled Mcrv Grif-
fin in 1972. It was Griffin, who as
producer of "Wheel of Fortune
lifted Sajak, a former TV weather-
man, out of obscurity.
It looks like a renewal of the
old talk show wars, when Griffin
on CBS and Dick Cavett on ABC,
plus David Frost and Mike
Mendenhall pics
Continued from page 13
Empty"
February 22 JoJmWatrs Double
Feature
"Pink Flamingos"
"Monde- Trasho"
March 1 "Manchurian Candi-
date"
March 15 "Gorillas in the Mist"
March 22 Foreign Film Festival
"Babette's Feast"
�Wings of Desire"
March 29 "Withnail and I"
April 12 "All the President's
Men"
April 26 "Brazil"
LateSJiowisirm!
lffcuw-2?8 "Decline of West-
ern Civilization, Part II
February 24-25 "Sign of the
Times" '
March 31-April 1 "Flesh Gor-
don"
All films screen at 8 p.m. in Hen-
drix Theatre, Mendenhall, un-
less otherwise indicated.
Douglas in syndication, took on
Carson. Now, besides Sajak, Joan
Rivers and Arsenio Hall are join-
ing the frav with new syndicated
talk shows.
But this time each show is
looking to find its own niche and
audience. Taking on Carson
head-on. or even appearing to as
'Thicke of the Night" and oan
Rivers did, is an invitation of dis-
aster.
"We have great respect tor
ohnny, but we don't plan our
show around him Sajak says I
think CBS has realistic expecta-
tions. They don't think we have to
knock someone off to he a success.
Actually, Johnny's been very gra-
cious to me. 1 le once asked me to
be a guest host
Sajak will find himself com
peting not only against Carson
but against the first half of NBC's
"Late Night with David letter
man His new show will Iv 90
minutes, while Carson has long
since had his show cut to an hour
"When you get going you want to
be there as much as you can
Sajak says.
Once Sajak got the go-ahead
from CBS one of the first things he
did was talk to others who had
attempted talk shows and failed.
'The one thing we kept hear-
ing was that too many chiefs, too
many vice presidents, too many
executive producers were run-
ning around giving orders he
says. "Everybody had ide"as and
the host was forced to squeeze
them all in
"So, we're going to keep it
simple. There's just myself and
the producer, Paul Gilbert. We
basically make the decisions. CBS
has had the courage of its convic-
t Ions. Too often going on TV is like
a marriage. You marry someone
because you love them, then
pond the next five years trying to
change them. I am very wary of
network inference
Sajak cautions viewers
against expecting anything radi-
cal . I le will not be different just for
the sake o( being different.
"You make it different by
bringing your own personality to
it he says. "It's The Pat Sajak
Show That's the only talent I
have, being Pat Sajak. The reason
so few people have succeeded in
this is that thev feel they should
always be in the spotlight and get
all the laughs. You have to step
aside and let your guests shine.
When youT guests look good, you
look good
SEE THE
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422 W. 5th Street
For Information: 757-3516
RUSH DATES; Jan. 23, 24, & 25
v





18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10,1989
Smokers being banned
(AP) - For the employers of
the Marlboro Man and the vast
majority of Americans who found
comfort and contemplation in
smoke rings, the warnings had
been clear, and the formal an-
nouncement of 1964 came as no
big surprise.
Twenty-five years ago next
Wednesday, after 14 months of
studying 8,000 scientific reports,
Surgeon General Luther Terry's
blue-ribbon panel announced
that smoking was bad and "a
health hazard of sufficient impor-
tance in the United States to war-
rant appropriate remedial ac-
tion
Statistically linked to lung
cancer, heart disease, stroke and
various malignancies of the throat
and mouth, smoking was called
health enemy number one.
Remedial action began
benignly enough: warnings on
cigarette packs that reminded the
fatalistic smoker that he could be
killing himself.
But in the ensuing years it has
become a new kind of uncivil war
which smokers see as a bullying
campaign against individual
rights and many non-smokers see
as a crusade in which their health
and well-being is at stake, not to
mention their own carpets and
coffee tables which in years past
were vulnerable to falling ash and
embers.
Back in 1964, at an accelerat-
ing yearly pace, more than 70
million adult Americans in a
population of 192 million smoked
more than 523 billion cigarettes,
7.1 billion cigars and used more
than 150 million pounds of to-
bacco in other forms, a pipeful, a
chaw or a dip of snuff.
These davs, after two and a
half decades of warnings and
repressions, some 55 to 60 million
Americans smoke out of a popu-
lation of some 220 million. They
smoke 575 billion cigarettes a
vear, some 4 billion of various
types of cigars and cigarillos, and
they use a little less than 150 mil-
lion pounds of tobacco in other
forms. t
They smoke less per capita
today, but spend a lot more for it.
Most hotels and airports charge
nearlv $2 a pack, and the price
would make a World War II
smoker (18 cents a pack) choke
before he took a drag.
In 1964, smokers spent $8 bil-
lion on the ugly habit, some $3.3
billion of which went to federal,
state and local governments as
taxes. Today they spend $35.5 bil-
lion on tobacco, and almost $10
billion is collected as tax.
All of this in the face of a na-
tionwide campaign that has
banned smoking in many federal
buildings, work places, restau-
rants, airplanes, trains and rest
rooms. In terms of regulation and
educational programs, the scale is
unprecedented, save for prohibi-
tion, and the stated aims by health
authorites more ambitious than
any attempt to persuade people to
change such an ingrained habit.
Three years ago, Surgeon
General C. Everett Koop an-
nounced that he expects a smoke-
free society by the year 2000.
"This is not a prohibitive soci-
ety he said. "We're not going to
tell people they can't smoke. We
learned that we can't tell people
they can't drink
Thev can, however, devise
tactics to isolate and then elimi-
nate the habit.
Smelling victory, the surgeon
general put on a smile and sug-
gested that outdoor smoking be
mandated in the spring "and by
the time cold weather comes, it
will be well ingrained in their
habits and they won't come in to
smoke
Backed by "the whole grass-
roots movement of militant non-
smokers he said:
"I think the person that
smokes in 1995 is going to smoke
alone or with other smokers. That
might be in his bathroom or his
back yard or in a segregated area.
I wouldn't be surprised to see it
out of doors
Even now, the smoker can
sense his growing isolation.
Smokers have felt the elbow
in their backs at their local, for-
merly friendly bars and were
asked to move the ashtray. This is
something like asking the altar
boy to douse the incense in
church.
The federal government finds
itself on the horns of a dilemma. It
actually controls the growing of
tobacco by allotting acreage to
180,000 farms in 23 states and
Puerto Rico. This stabilizes pro-
duction and insures price levels.
The Commodity Credit Corp.
lends farmers money against the
value of their crops, the loans
being repaid as the tobacco is sold.
For many farms, tobacco is the
one stable factor in an other.vise
unpredictable market. Consider:
Wheat last year yielded $96
an acre. Soybeans yielded $183,
cotton $459, peanuts $632, feed
corn $202 and sweet com $724.
Tobacco yielded $3,206 per acre.
For many states it is a prime
cash crop. North Carolina reaped
$738 million last year, Kentucky
$514 million, South Carolina $151
million and so on down the line to
West Virginia which reaped $4
million.
The tobacco industry em-
ploys almost 57,000 people who
feed the product to just short of a
million retail outlets that include
almost 619,000 vending ma-
chines.
The Wash House
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10th Street 14th Street
752-6117 758-6001
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Phone:
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Appts. From
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313 Plaza Drive
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Behind Peppi's
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INSTANT CASH LOANS
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GREENVILLE
DELIVERY
SMALL
Cheese Pizza $4.95
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Corner 5th and Reade St (next to Stop Shop) Phone 830-5476
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2 pcs. Fried chicken, French Fries & Large Drink $2.29
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18 lb. Hot Dog, French Fries & Large Drink $1.99
1 Special each Day
Serving BBQ Dinners, Chicken, Fish, or Shrimp each Day.
Open 10 am - 9 pm (closed Sunday)
ion
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Across from U JB.E.
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January Entertainment
Each Wednesday - Open Mic
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Fri Jan 6 Bad Bob & The RocVdn'
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Sat Jan 7 Valence
ThurJan 12 Spiral
Fri Jan 13 Slurpeeee
Sat Jan 14 Flying Eyz
ThurJan 19 The L.A. Booker Band
Fri Jan 20 Channel Cats
Sat Jan 21 The Distance
Tue Jan 24 Dept. of Medical Humanities
presents a
"Face of Stone"
A Reader's Theatre Project
(Free Admission)
ThurJan 26 Swamp Gypsies
Ughtnin' Wells &
The L.A. Booker Band
Present a
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Tel: (919) 355-6110

i






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 10,1989 Page 1�
New head coach chosen


.

14
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Assistant Sports Editor
As 1 88 drew to an end, so did
an era in Pirate football Art Baker
stepped down as the head coach
of East Carolina and has since
taken a position with University
ot South Carolina as Associate
Athletic Director. But as a year
ends, so another begins. And to
-tart the year off, ECU named its
Ir-th head coach. Bill Lewis.
Lewis has spent the past eight
seasons as the defensive coordi-
natorsecondary coach for the
Bulldogs of Georgia. He became
the defensive coordinator at
Georgia when Erik Russell left to
become the head coach at Georgia
Southern.
We welcome a person of Bill
Lewis' abilities and character to
Fast Carolina to lead out football
program into its next plateau
said Athletic Director Dave Hart,
Ir. 'He emerged from a group oi
outstanding candidates and we
look forward to what the future
holds for the ECU program under
Bill Lewis' leadership
Prior to going to Georgia,
Lewis spent coaching stints at
such schools as Arkansas, Geor-
gia Tech. Wake Forest and Pitts-
burgh. At all four of those schools,
Lewis was in charge of defensive
backs.
After leaving Arkansas, he
became the head coach of the
Wvominf! Cowbovs In his three
Head Coach Bill Lewis
seasons at Wyoming, Lewis lead
the Cowboys to a 13-21-1 mark.
Lewis was disappointed with bis
results there, but feels that the
experience will be very valuable
as he embarks on his new position
at ECU.
During his tenure at Georgia,
the Bulldogs have attended nine
bowl games, including this years'
victory in the Gator Bowl over
Michigan State. Also during this
time, 23 players coached bv I ewis
were named to the All-South Fast
Conference teams. Seven of those
players were also named to the
Ail-American team.
Lewis attended East
Stroudsburg State College in PA
where he received a degree in
health and physical education.
Lewis played quarterback at
school and was named to the
Little All-American team.
After graduation, he spent
two seasons playing professional
baseball in the Detroit Tigers'
organization.
Lewis brings with him a total
of 25 years of coaching experi-
ence, all of which are at the college
level. He has also coached under
two of the top college coaches in
the game. He served under for-
mer Georgia coach Vince Dooley
and also coached for Frank
Broyles at the University of Ar-
kansas.
Lewis is a native of Philadel-
phia, PA. He is married and has
three sons. His oldest son, Mark
was the long snapper on this
year's Bulldog team.
The 47-year-old Lewis brings
with him the youth and determi-
nation a sagging Pirate program
needs. His intense attitude to-
wards football and his get-after-it
style of coaching shou Id lead to an
exciting season in 1989 for ECU.
Bill Lewis, now head coach at East Carolina, had previously been the
defensive coordinator at the University of Georgia (Photo by Sports
Information).
Pirates scalp the Tribe
By MARK BARBER
Sports Writer
Theodore "Blue" Edwards slam dunks one in for two points against
Texas Christian on Friday, Dec. 30. Edwards scored a career best of 38
points against the Retrievers that night and had nine rebounds. He is
the leading scorer for ECU averaging 26 points per game. Blue also is
fifth in the league in field goal shooting and is ninth in rebounds and
assists (Photo by ECU Photo Lab).
Fans on the way to William &
Mary Saturday night had to en-
dure foggy, bleak weather to
make it to see the Tribe of Wiliam
& Mary take on the East Carolina
Pirates. Once inside, the fans
watched as ECU fought off their '
one sluggish play to outdistance
the Tribe, 75-59, in the first confer-
ence game of the year for the Pi-
rates.
The Pirates relied upon the
strong play of senior forward Blue
Edwards, named player-of-the-
week last week in the Colonial
Athletic Association, who scored
31 points, 18 of which came in the
second half.
While the winning margin
was an impressive 16 points, the
game was a much closer contest
than the final score indicated.
ECU head coach Mike Steele
praised the Pirates for thier ability
to leave with the victory. "It defi-
nitely was not a pretty win, but it
was a win Steele said. "I'm
proud of our guys because they
showed a lot of poise to win this
close game
ECU took a 39-27 lead into the
half time, but the Tribe fough'
back hard to retake the lead, 51 -50,
on an 18 foot jumper by guard
Jimmy Apple. Blue Edwards
countered at the other end for the
Pirates with an eight-foot jump
shot off a screen by Kevin Stapels
and ECU was on top, 52-51.
Apple then scored again for
the Tribe, this time on a 3-point
goal, putting William & Mary
ahead, 54-52. That would be the
last time the Tribe would lead in
the contest, as ECU reeled off
eight straight points to lead 60-54.
From there, William & Mary
could only score five more points
as ECU scored their last 16.
The win improves the Pirate
record to 7-5 on the year overall, 1 -
0 in the C AA, and it is the first win
since ECU returned back from the
holiday break. The Pirates played
fdur games over the holidays. -
kA4tcr losyagjfey vM.
sippi State, ECU won VwO Mbrrfe
games, first over the University of
Maryland-Baltimore County, 97-
78, and second over Texas Chris-
tian University, 80-74. ECU then
lost on the road against nation-
ally-ranked Georgia Tech, 92-69.
The William & Mary win is a
big boost fo the Pirates who now
have 10 straight conference
games ahead. "This was an im-
portant win for us Steele said.
"William & Mary is a hard place to
shoot and they are a well-coached
team, so this gives us a lot of con-
fidence, winning on the road like
this
"We've been playing well,
and I was afraid the loss at Geor-
gia Tech might have had a bad
effect on our guys, but they
bounced back and won here,
which is something that we were
unable to do last year
William & Mary jumped
ahead of the Pirates early on in the
game, gaining a 9-2 edge four
minutes into the contest. Edwards
then took control for the Pirates
scoring ECU'S next six points,
bringing the Pirates to within
four, 12-8.
ECU continued to rally, get-
ting three 3-point goals, two from
Reed Lose and one from Ed-
wards, and took the lead for the
first time at 21-20 on a baseline
jumper by Staples. From there,
ECU outscored the Tribe 18-4 to
take a 39-24 advantage.
Kenny Murphy scored eight
during the run as ECU's balanced
attack made the going rough for
William & Mary. "It's just tough
to defend everyone Tribe coach
Charles Swensen said. "We tried
-to Atop-Edwards-inside, and-ther.
Ldse and Murphy started hitting
from the outside. They got us into
an up-tempo game, which isn't
good for us
William & Mary made an ef-
fort to get the ball inside in the
second half, and ECU only scored
10 points in the first 12 minutes of
the period, as the Tribe closed in
on the Pirates. Behind an eight-
point effort from forward Ben
Blocker and six from Apple, the
Tribe had its lead back with seven
minutes to go. The Pirate offense
then got in gear with Edwardr
hitting for 10, Jeff Kelly making
kev free throws and ECU's de-
fense picking up its pace to pull
out the win.
According to Steele, the dif-
ference came when the Pirates
began working the ball more ef-
fectively. "We had been coming
down the court, making one pass
and putting up the shot, but then,
the guys started making three or
four passes and finding better
shots, and it started working
Steele said.
As has been the case all sea-
son, the main force behind the
Pirate attack was senior forward
Edwards, who at times was triple-
teamed during the game, but to no
avail for he Tribe. Edwards shot
See PIRATES,page 22
Lewis looks toward
future in football
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
New Head Coach Bill Lewis
may have his hands full trying to
rebuild a wounded East Carolina
football program. But, the ever-
so-optimistic Lewis sees taking
on the new head coach position as
a challenge he plans on succeed-
ing.
In an interview Friday after-
noon, Lewis explained that there
are three elements which need to
be considered in order to have a
successful Pirate football organi-
zation. These elements center
around the upcoming schedule,
recruiting of new players and
hard work of both the players and
the staff.
The first consideration, the
schedule, has been taunted by
many ECU fans who feel that the
schedule has been exceedingly
difficult and thus unfair. But
Lewis did not agree. He explained
that in order for a university to get
recognized, it must compete
against the best teams.
"I feel that the schedule is a
definite plus to our football team
and this football program Lewis
said. "I f we have dreams and aspi-
rations of this program moving
among the best in college football,
you're going to have to play
against some of the better teams to
do that or you'll never be recog-
nized
Lewis stressed that a football
team's recognition will be based
on not only its winning record,
but also the intensity of its sched-
ule. Although Lewis in no way
belives that it will be easy to reach
that plateau of recognition, he
does believe the schedule is fair
and not as impossible as some fear
it has been in the past.
"The schedule we have now
is a much more sensible sched-
ule Lewis stressed. "I think it
gives us an opportunity to be
competitive
Another element to a success-
ful football program is heavy re-
cruiting by the staff. According to
the official announcement made
Dec. 5 by Athletic Director Dave
Hart, Lewis was originally hired
over the other candidates because
he was considered one of the pre-
mier recruiters. Lewis said in the
official announcement that the
new recruits "will form the base of
foundations of this program.
They will play the biggest part in
our success
"I want to appeal to every
high school coach and player
Lewis stressed. "I will recruit
head to head with energy
Lewis explained that quality
recruiting is essential in order to
reach the ultimate goal of Lewis'
program. "Our goal is to produce
a winning football team with the
integrity it needs Lewis said.
One area Lewis' scouts are
looking for ECU football pros-
pects is right here in Greenville.
Although Lewis explained that an
NCAA rule forbids football or-
ganizations from releasing the
See LEWIS, page 22
Pirates end non-conference play - look forward to action in CAA's
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Auisiint Sports Editor
: )h
As most of us were home en-
loying our holiday vacation, the
Fist Carolina men's basketball
team was busy wrapping up the
non-conference portion of their
schedule. Mike Steele and the
Pirates played a total of eight
games over break going 4-4 and
giving them an overall record of 7-
5.
Blue Edwards lead the way
for the Pirates over the holiday
break. Edwards scored an
average of almost 29 points per
game and had three games where
he scored more than 30. Edwards
scored a career-high 38 points
against Maryland-Baltimore
County.
Dec. 3 vs. Campbell
After a slow start in the first
half, the Pirates played a solid
second period and came back to
defeat the Camels of Campbell,
86-78. The win moved the Pirates
to 3-1 on the season.
The Pirates shot poorly in the
beginning of the game and
Campbell took advantage of their
height by outrebounding the Pi-
rates. Campbell pounded the ball
inside and took a 38-36 lead into
ha If time.
But, as has been the case in
most of their games this season,
the Pirates came out strong in the
second stanza. Behind the strong
play of senior Blue Edwards, ECU
shot over 60 percent for the half
and outscored the Camels50-34 in
the half and went on to win.
The Pirates were lead by
Edwards who had a game-high 30
points. Kevin Staples added 16
and Kenny Murphy chipped in
with 13.
Campbell was lead by Sand-
ers Jackson who had 17 and Mark
Mocnik added 16 coming off the
bench.
Dec. 7 vs. South Carolina
Next in line for the Pirates
were the top 20 ranked South
Carolina Gamecocks. This time
the results were not as good for
the Pirates, as the Gamecocks
used their height and rebounding
strength to beat ECU, 75-67.
The Pirates hung tough in the
first half and shocked the vocal
home crowd at Carolina Coli-
seum in Columbia. South Caro-
lina held a slim three point lead at
halftime, 42-39.
But a poor shooting second
half by the Pirates would give the
Gamecocks the edge they needed
to hang on and win. ECU shot
only 25.8 percent in the second
half and went scoreless five and a
half minutes towards the end of
the game. South Carolina made
the crucial free throws in the clos-
ing minutes and held on to win
their fifth game of the season and
remain undefeated.
South Carolina was lead by
John Hudson who scored 21.
Terry Dozier and Brent Price each
chipped in 18 for the winning
Gamecocks.
Once again the Pirates were
lead by Blue Edwards who scored
a game high 31 points before foul-
ing out. Kenny Murphy also
added nine points for ECU. The
loss dropped the Pirates to 3-2 on
the season.
Dec. 10 vs. Radford
ECU returned home against
Radford in a game most people
thought would be a fairly easy
win for the Pirates. But that would
not be the case as poor shooting
and 20 turnovers by the Pirates
lead to an 88-75 win for Radford.
The Pirates never seemed to
get on track in this game. Radford
controled the ball in the first half
and stretched their lead to as
much as 17 points before the Pi-
rates could close it to 11 at
halftime.
ECU faired no better in the
second half as Radford took con-
trol quickly and jumped back up
by 16. The Pirates cut the lead to
nine towards the end of the game,
but could get no closer as Radford
coasted to a 13 point decision.
Radford was lead by Phil
Young, who had a game-high 24
points. Ron Shelburne added 20
and Vernon Brooks chipped in
with 17.
The Pirates were lead by Blue
Edwards who had 21 in a losing
effort. Kevin Staples had 18 and
Gus Hill helped out with 14. The
loss moved the Pirates to 3-3 on
the season.
Dec. 15 vs. Winthrop
Once again the Pirates were
on the road. This time they trav-
eled to Rock Hill, SC to face a
tough Winthrop team. ECU pre-
vailed in the hard-fought struggle
75-67 and moved to 4-3 on the
season.
As the game began, there was
a notable absence on the Pirate
sidelines. Sophomore point
guard Jimmy Hinton did not
make the trip and later an-
nounced he was leaving the team
because he was unhappy with his
lack of playing time.
The Pirates struggled
through the first half and trailed
by one at halftime. But they came
out firing in the second period.
Shooting a startling 65.5 percent
in the half, ECU took control and
stretched their lead into double
figures for most of the half.
Winthrop closed at the end of the
game, but it just wasn't enough.
Senior Blue Edwards lead the
Pirates with another fine game.
Edwards scored 29 points and
grabbed nine rebounds. Gus Hill
also had a fine performance, as he
scored 21 points and hauled in six
rebounds.
Greg Washington lead the
way for Winthrop as he scored 30.
Andy McKoy added 11 and
Shaun Wise hit double figues
scoring 10.
Dec. 20 vs. Mississippi State
East Carolina continued their
road stretch traveling to
Starkville, MS to take on Missis-
sippi State. However, this was
one trip the Pirates may wish they
hadn't made as the Bulldogs
jumped on ECU, 88-79.
Se�- BLUE, page 23





i
20
T IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10.19
Lady Pirates fare well
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sport Writer
East Carolina's Women's bas-
ketball team will have a full week
of action as they host one game
and then take to the road for their
third conference game of the sea-
son.
Thursday. North Carolina
A&T State comes to town in non-
conference action for the lady
Pirates.
The real test will begin Satur-
day night, as ECU travels to Har-
nsonburg, YA to face reigning
CAA champion, lames Madison.
Over the holidays, ECU
faired well as thev played Puke,
their i ilv AGC opponent of the
year, opened their home season,
traveled to Tennessee, took on
local rival Campbell and opened
their Colonial season with a win.
Against Duke, the lady Pi-
rates were greeted by more than
1,000 Duke Fans. The Lady Blue
Devils, contenders for the ACC
title, were too much for ECU as
thev took a victory as home, u3-0.
The Ladv Pirates, then re-
turned to Greenville to open up
their home season, hosting the
annual Lxidv Tirate Classic. In
first-round play, ECU faced
UNC-Charlotte, who handed
them thir second straight loss of
the season. In the 70-54 loss, the
Ladv Pirates shot their lowest
field goal percentage thus far in
the season as thev move on to the
consolation game of their own
tournament.
In that match up with Niag-
ara College, who had lost earlier
to Virginia Commonwealth, ECU
improved their shooting with
theirbest performance of the vear,
33 percent and went on to earn
third place in the ladv Pirate
Classic with the 86-59 win.
The Lady Tirates took a break
for exams and then went to the
road again This time, ECU would
travel to Tennessee for two
match-ups.
Against Yanderbilt Univer-
sity, ECU scored only one player
in double figures while Vander-
bilt scored three players with
twenty-phis points. Yanderbilt,
defeated FCU 91-56. season, boosted ECU's record to
ECU was back on the right 5-4 and produced a career high for
track for their next game against
Tennessee State, as it rolled to an
88-38 victory. The win ended 1988
piay on a winning note for the
I-adv Pirates as they prepared for
CAA action in 1989.
In the first game of 1989, the
Lady Pirates hosted the Lady
Camels of Campbell on Jan. 5.
ECU controlled the match-up as
Irish Hamilton led the Lady Pi-
rates with 14 points, tying her
career high.
Saturday night began CAA
plav for ECU as William and
Marx came to Greenville. Last
season, ECU tied for sixth place in
the CAA with the Lady Tribe,
who also finished 2-10 in the
CAA The two teams split games
with each team earning a victory
on their home court.
On Saturday, ECU took the
home court victory again, defeat-
ing William and Mary 77-50.
The win, the Lady Pirates'
third consecutive victory of the
freshman forward Tonya Har-
grove. Hargrove, ECU's second
leading scorer against the Tribe,
pumped in 15 points to assist in
the Lady Pirate victory while jun-
ior forward Sarah Gray continued
to lead ECU, scoring 17 points.
Gray, who has led the team in
scoring in seven of nine ECU
games, has continued averaging
17 points a game for ECU and re-
mains among the scoring leaders
in the CAA.
Don't forget to catch the I ady
Pirates in action this week as they
host NC A&TState Thursday, Jan
12 and attempt to continue their
winning streak.
Stupid pet
tricks to be
held
The East Carolina University
Athletic Department in conjunc-
tion with Animal House Pets are
sponsoring a Stupid Pet Tricks
competition. 'ITiis event will take
place at halftime of the I .ady Pi-
rates basketball game, Saturday
Km 28 against arch rival UNC
Wimington. The entry deadline
will be Jan. 18 and a preliminary
round will be held Jan. 20 (site
TBA). For more information call
757-6491 or stop by scales field-
house (athletic marketing office).
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1
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10,1989 21
Swim program nearly flawless (gordon'S
By KRISTEN H ALBERG
Sport Editor
The East Carolina Swimming
and Diving teams are headed to
what may be their greatest season
,n the history oi the university as
they boast nearly (lawless records
going into the new year.
The men's and women's
squads faced the likes of John
Hopkins University and CAA
opponent University of
Richmond over the holidays, and
while these are fairly reputable
swim organizations, they were no
match for the tough Tirate swim-
mers.
The men remain undefeated
as a result of the holiday action
displaying an impressive record
of 7-0 going into the Jan. 14 match-
up against CAA opponent, UNC-
Wilmington.
The women also held strong
during the break as they increase
their winning recor I to 6-1. Their
only loss came fairly early in the
season when they lost in a close
meet against William and Mary
on Nov. 13. The women also swim
against UNC-W in this dual meet
with the men on Jan. 14.
Head Coach Rick Kobe is
nothing short of impressed with
the way his organization is faring
against the competition. "We are
very pleased with where wo st:ind
right now Kobe said We are on
target to have the greatest season
in ECU swimming history
Minges Aquatic Center
played host to Richmond on Dec.
3 and were the first team to fall to
the talented Pirate swimmers.
Both the men and the women had
easy meets with the men display-
ing a final score of 131-107 and the
women stunning the Lady Spi-
ders 127-81.
The Pirates then traveled to
North Palm Beach, Fla. where,
during their Christmas training
trip, they competed against Johns
Hopkins University. Again East
Carolina was handed the victory
when the men defeated Johns
Hopkins 56-39 and the women
stood victorious 55-40.
But the Pirate swimmers have
nothing to look forward to in the
way of easy competition. Besides
the tough UNC-W swim organi-
zation, the Pirates must face the
likes of Duke and the nationally
ranked Tarheels of North Caro-
lina before going into the CAA
Championships in Februai
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First black coach hired
STANFORD, Calif. (AP) �
Pennis Green is leaving a rea-
sonably stable job as an assistant
coach with the San Francisco
-Hers to become the first black
head coach at Stanford Univer-
sity, an institution beset by racial
incidents.
Big Ten Coach of the Year
when leading the Northwestern
Wildcats in 1982, the 39-vear-old
Green said Tuesday he hoped to
follow in the footsteps of 49ers
coach Bill Walsh, who reshaped a
struggling San Francisco team
mto consistent winners after tak-
ing it over in 1979.
Green is replacing Jack El-
wav, who was fired in early De-
J J
cember after a 3-6-2 season and
rumblings oi player discontent.
Elway posted an overall 25-29-2
record during five years at "The
Farm
Walsh called Green "clearly
the outstanding man in the coun-
frv for the iob
Green's competitors for the
Cardinal post included assistants
Paul Hackett of the Dallas Cow-
boys and Pete Carroll of the Min-
nesota Vikings.
Mcmk ran m vn
fijjgaai mmvfQj
"WHAT DO
IDO AFTER
GRADUATION?"
Many students are asking
this question. But where can
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22 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ANL'ARY 10. 1989
Pirates win in first CAA game
Continued from page 19
b2 percent from the field and was
one oi two from three-point
range.
The Pirates used a whole-
team effort, however, to win the
contest. Kelly had nine assists to
iead both teams, and Staples had a
game-leading 11 rebounds to
pace ECU.
There were four Pirates in
double figures in the game: Ed-
wards, whose 31 points led all
scorers. Staples (12), Murphy (11)
and Lose (10). William & Mary
Support
Pirate
Athletics
Lewis optimistic
about program
Continued from page 19
names of possible recruits, Lewis
mentioned that there were several
recruits in consideration at local
high schools and ECU has already
committed scholarships to some
oi these players.
A third element for a success-
ful Pirate football organization is,
according to Lewis, hard work. "If
thev want to be successful, they
are going to have to work hard to
put themselves in a position to
win with the schedule' Lewis
said of the players and the staff
members regarding the competi-
tion.
To Lewis, hard work is the
key to winning football games.
And while classes are just now
getting started for many ECU
students, the off-season football
workout program for the plavers
becan vesterdav.
Lewis added that the entire
winter workout will focuson hard
work. "The theme of that pro-
gram is going to be hard work
Lewis said, "because of the people
we are going to have to compete
against. We have got to take this
football team and put them in a
position to be as good as they are
possiblv capable of being
As far as defensive strategies
are concerned. Lewis, who used
to be the defensive coordinator at
Georgia, wants to stick to the
"lunkvard Defense" styleof play-
ing where there is an aggressive
defensive team going all out and
hitting hard to prevent the foot-
ball from getting into the end
zone.
Lewis' bicccst concern re-
gardmg the defense and any part
ot the game is that he be ex-
tremely sound as far as funda-
mentals go in all aspects of play.
Moving to the offense, Lewis
plans on concentrating on throw-
ing the possession style passing
game. He wants a two dimen-
sional offense which will have a
balance between the running and
the throwing game. He also plans
on using multiple formations to
force the defense to have to recog-
nize more things happening on
the field.
REE DEI IVERY � FREE DEUVERY � FREE DELIVERY � FREE DELIVERY � FRKE DELIVERY � F
was led by 6'8" freshman Scott
Smith, who had 19 points, and
Apple who had 18.
The Pirates prepare to take on
the University of Richmond in an
away game on Wednesday. The
next home game for ECU will be
Saturday, against James Madison
ANYTHING PAPER
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200 Arlington Blvd Suite M
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OPEN FOR
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Tuesday. January 10
8:00p.m. Hendrix
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THE JANUARY MAN
Wednesday, January 11
8:00p.m. Hendrix
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Thursday, January 12 - Sunday. January 15
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT?
Upcoming Events:
Travel-Adventure Film - "SAFARI January 19
Special Concert - AHMAD JAMAL - January 25
Spring Break Trips to Bahamas and Cancun
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WHAT DO YOU THINK?
le Student Union Special Concerts Committee wants
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An opinion box is located next to the information
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the concerts of your choice.
� FREE DFLIVERY � FRFF DFLIVFRY � FREE DELIVERY � FREE DELIVERY � I REE DELIVERY
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m -4 fr -
22 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY iq 1969
Pirates win in first CAA game
Continued from page 19
62 percent from the field and was
one of two from three-point
range.
The Pirates used a whole-
team effort, however, to win the
contest. Kelly had nine assists to
� � � �
Lewis optimistic
about program
Continued from page 19
names of possible recruits, Lewis
mentioned that there were several
recruits in consideration at local
high schools and ECU has already
committed scholarships to some
of these players.
A third element for a success-
ful Pirate football organization is,
according to Lewis, hard work. "If
they want to be successful, they
are going to have to work hard to
put themselves in a position to
win with the schedule Lewis
said of the players and the staff
members regarding the competi-
tion.
To Lewis, hard work is the
key to winning football games.
And while classes are just now
getting started for many ECU
students, the off-season football
workout program for the players
began yesterday.
Lewis added that the entire
winter workout will focuson hard
work. The theme of that pro-
gram is going to be hard work
Lewis said, "becauseof the people
we are going to have to compete
against. We have got to take this
football team and put them in a
position to be as good as they are
possibly capable of being
As far as defensive strategies
are concerned, Lewis, who used
to be the defensive coordinator at
Georgia, wants to stick to the
"Junkyard Defense" style of play-
ing where there is an aggressive
defensive team going all out and
hitting hard to prevent the foot-
ball from getting into the end
zone.
Lewis' biggest concern re-
garding the defense and any part
of the game is that he be ex-
tremely sound as far as funda-
mentals go in all aspects of play.
Moving to the offense, Lewis
plans on concentrating on throw-
ing the possession style passing
game. He wants a two dimen-
sional offense which will have a
balance between the running and
the throwing game. He also plans
on using multiple formations to
force the defense to have to recog-
nize more things happening on
the Beld.
IRhl. DLi P � i 'W. PLL1VIR � 1 REE DKL1V1 lO � l-Rt-l HI i '
r
lead both teams, and Staples had a
game-leading 11 rebounds to
pace ECU.
There were four Pirates in
double figures in the game: Ed-
wards, whose 31 points led all
scorers, Staples (12), Murphy (11)
and Lose (10). William & Mary
was led by 6'8" freshman Scott
Smith, who had 19 points, and
Apple who had 18.
The Pirates prepare to take on
the University of Richmond in an
away game on Wednesday. The
next home game for ECU will be
Saturday, against James Madison
WWTWTWTyTTWT'ff
Support
Pirate
Athletics
ANYTHING PAPER
tm
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�Birthdays. Get Well
�Anniversary &
For Any Special
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�Wedding Supplies
�Party Supplies &
Decorations
We Deliver To ECU Campus
Discount to Students with I.D.

Bell Fork Square
355-6212
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person
th- 11th
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a � a � a � w

i Hi
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ITRY OUR LUNCH
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MON-FRI
11-3
taaaaaa Coupon aataaiaan
Pick-up Special
Large 14" Pizza
With one Item
and 2 Free Drinks
$4.95
Expire 12289
Wckup Only
Tuesday, January 10
8:00p.m. Hendrix
Sneak Preview
THE JANUARY MAN
Wednesday, January 11
8:00p.m. Hendrix
HEAVY METAL
Thursday, January 12 - Sunday, January 15
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT?
Upcoming Events:
Travel-Adventure Film - "SAFARI January 19
Special Concert - AHMAD JAMAL - January 25
Spring Break Trips to Bahamas and Cancun
EAT IN AND PLAT VIDEO GAMES OR
TRY YOUR LUCK ON OUR NEW
POOL TABLE
$6.00 MINIMUM ORDER
CPupoji,RDNBQi
"T
II TWOX-LARGE
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TOPPINGS FOR
ONLY
1112.99
EXPIRES 12288
DWJVBRTj
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DELIVERY
fiflNMB,
MEDIUM 2 ITEM
PIZZAS, DOUBLE
ORDER WINGS,
2 LITER DRINK
FOR
$12.29
EXPIRES 12288
1 ran DELIVERY.
The Student Union Special Conceits Committee Wants
to know what concerts you would like to have at ECU.
An opinion box is located next to the Information
desk in MendenhaU Student Center.
Stop by and help us to bring you
the concerts of your choice.
U.
j.rittr"T"
;

-�






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
1ANUARY 101989 23
Edwards leads Pirates over break
Continued from page 19
The Pirates were never really
in this game and within the first
five minutes the Bulldogs had
pulled out to a nine point lead.
They continued to pour it on and
stretched their lead to 20 near the
end of the half. The Pirates tried to
tight back and closed the gap to 14
by halftime, 42-28.
The teams traded baskets for
most of the second half. The Pi-
rates were able to close within
five late in the game, but Missis-
sippi State hit some late free
throws to ice the victory.
The Bulldogs were lead by
Chancellor Nichols who had 16.
Reginald Boykin and Cameron
ims each had 15 and Greg Lock-
hart popped in 14.
Blue Edwards was the Pirate
leader on the floor as he scored 28.
Gus Hill had 17 and junior college
transfer Kevin Stapels had 10
points and a game-high 11 re-
bounds.
Dec. 27 vs. Maryland-Balti-
more County
The Pirates returned home to
the friendly confines of Minges
Coliseum after Christmas to take
on the Retrievers of Maryland-
Baltimore County. ECU gave
themselves and the fans a late
Christmas present as they
slammed their way to a decisive
97-78 victory and moved their
season record to 5-4.
Blue Edwards stuffed his
own stocking this holiday season
as he had five dunks on the eve-
ning en route to a career-high 38
points. Edwards dazzled the fans
with his one-handed and reverse
dunks and an occasional tongue-
wagging which made some
people wonder if they were
watching Michael Jordan.
The Pirates never trailed in
the game and scored six of their
first 12 points on dunks. But a dry
spell late in the half allowed the
Retrievers to stay close. The Pi-
rates were up at halftime bv eight,
41-33.
But that would all change in
the second half. ECU would come
out and shoot an amazing 80.8
percent from the field in the sec-
ond half giving the Retrievers no
chance to even get close.
Edwards lead the way for the
Pirates with 38, the sixth best scor-
ing performance in ECU history.
Four other Pirates scored in
double figures as East Carolina
shot 70.4 percent from the field on
the night.
The Retrievers big gun for the
game was Duane Faust who
scored 17. Larrv Simmons added
J
13 and Kenny Reynold s scored 12.
Dec. 30 vs. Texas Christian
In their last game of 1988 and
their last home game for two
weeks, the Pirates posted their
sixth victory of the season. The
Pirates had to hold off a late
Horned Frog rally to do so, but
held on to win, 80-74.
The Pirates pulled away from
the Homed Frogs for most of the
first half. They lead by as much as
12. But Texas Christian limited the
Pirates to just two free throws in
the final three minutes of the half.
ECU was up eight at halftime, 38-
30.
The Pirates pulled out to a 13
point lead in the second half, but
once again the Horned Frogs
mounted a come back. They cut
the lead to four with three min-
utes to play. But a three-pointer
by Gus Hill iced the victory for the
Pirates.
Blue Edwards, held to just
seven points in the first half, lead
the Pirates with a game-high 25
points. Hill also had a fine game
scoring 19 and senior point guard
Jeff Kelly added 8 for ECU.
Craig Sibley had 20 for the
Horned Frogs. John Lewis added
18 and freshman center Reggie
Smith had 12.
Jan. 4 vs. Georgia Tech
East Carolina had the tough
challenge of starting o(i the new
year on the road. In addUion, they
had to face Bobby Crcmins and
the 19th ranked Georgia Tech
Yellow Jackets. The Pirates fought
hard, but Tom Hammonds and
m
the Yellow Jackets were too much
for the Pirates. ECU came up short
and lost 92-69.
The Pirates played well the
first half and trailed by only three
with three minutes left in the half.
But the Yellow Jacket and All-
American Hammonds converted
on some quick score and stretched
the lead to 10 by halftime.
The Yellow Jackets slowly
pulled away in the second half
and had a 25 point lead at one
time. Georgia Tech used its size
advantage in the second half with
Hammonds doing much of the
damage. They also used good
perimeter shooting from Brian
Oliver.
Georgia Tech was lead by
Hammonds who had 30. Oliver
added 24 and Dennis Scott
chipped in with 15.
ECU was once again lead by
Blue Edwards who scored 29
points. Edwards shot 3-3 from
three-point range and also col-
lected seven rebounds. It was
Edwards' fifth straight game over
25. Gus Hill also had a fine game
with 22.
The loss dropped the Pirates
to 6-5 entering conference play.
Edwards honored
Blue Edwards has been
named player-of-the-week by the
Colonial Athletic Association for
his playing performance during
the week of Dec. 24 to Dec. 31.
During the week's basketball
action, the Pirates were host to
Maryland-Baltimore County on
Dec. 27 and Texas Christian on
Dec. 30. Edwards scored a career
best of 38 points against the Re-
trievers of Maryland-Baltimore
County and had nine rebounds.
In his bout against Texas
Christian, Edwards had 29 points
and had nine rebounds.
I
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FANFARE: When asked to name the most
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played before, Navy senior guard Bobby Jones
ranked East Carolina's Minges Coliseum
fans No. 1.
His entire list read: 1. ECU;
2. Kentucky; 3. Nevada-Las vegas;
4. Michigan State; 5. Syracuse.
8 MORE HOME GAMES TO GO!
WE NEED YOUR HELP IN THE CONFERENCE!
Sincerely,
MIKE STEELE
HEAD BASKETBALL COACH
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Classes
All Classes are available on a drop-in basis with presentation of a drop-in
ticket and valid identification. Stop by 204 Memorial Gymnasium to
purchase a drop-in ticket and pick up your complete class schedule.
AEROBICS
BUD LIGHT
Welcome Back ECU
Students & Staff
3:00PM-4:00PMMG108MonWedFri
5:15pm-6:15pm 5:15pm-6:15pm 6:30pm-7:30pm l:00pm-2:00pm 3:00 pm-4:00pmMG108 MG108 MG108 MG108 MG108 TONINGMonWedFri (LI) Tues & Thur Tues & Thur(LI) Saturday Sunday
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5:30pm-6:30pmMGPool CIRCUIT TRAININGTues & Thur
6:30pm-7:30pmMG 108 SUPRA CLASSMon & Wed
3:00pm-4:30pm MG108 10:30am-12:00noon MG 108Tues & Thur Saturday
Faculty, Staff and students are encouraed to join a variety of additional Physical Fitness programs
offered including: Exercise Wisely, Aerobic Challenge, Pepsi Physical Fitness Club, Century Walk
Club, Fitness Olympics, Weight Training Workshops and Weight Room Orientations. All available
throughout the spring .989 semester. For additional information please call Kathleen Hill at 757-6387.
A A
Weloome to a
Pli-PlLLED Bgrtmg Itgljj





f
.
24
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10,1989
�&
The One For The Largest Used Book
Inventory
Selection and Savings. That's what you
get when you buy your books trom UBE.
We have the largest selection of used
books in Eastern North Carolina and
stock most new books for every subject
imaginable. Our access to so many used
books on so many subjects means you
save money. This spring at least
75 of our stock will be
used books. Just think.
That means a little some-
thing left over for a night
out, the apartment, the dorm
room, or the bank account.
The One For ECU
While you're buying your books at
UBE; make sure you browse through our
large selection of ECU apparel and ECU
items. Choose from shirts and sweats to
backpacks and coffee mugs. And don t
forget to pick up all your notebooks, pens,
and pencils, too. At UBE, we've got
everything you need for a great T . o 1 � fT
semester at ECU LaTgCSt SeleCtlOIliJt
Used Books
The One For The Cash
Don't forget at the end of the
semester, UBE pays
more for your text-
books. That's right,
UBE will buy back
your textbooks and
you'll leave with extra cash
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So remember, the one
for the cash is UBE.
UBE FOR ECU
So stop by UBE. We're located in
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restaurant. We're the one for the books
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10:00 AM - 5:00 PM Saturday
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 10, 1989
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 10, 1989
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.646
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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