The East Carolinian, December 1, 1988







V
i
Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES14
SPORTS21
Features
The Varsity Barber Shop a downtown landmark, pro-
prietor, Pat Moore, a barber who gives a true haircut �
minus the frills and high price.
See page 14.
Sports
Wednesday night at Cameron Indoor Stadium, the top
ranked Duke Blue Devils gave the Pirates a taste of
what Top Twenty basketball is all about
See page 21.
Bhz lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 39
Thursday December 1,1988
Greenville, NC
26 Pages
Circulation 12,000
National Security team speaks
Defense strategy is prevention
By GARY SANDERSON
Staff Writer
"When you think of the So-
viet Union's military, think of
something that is big, modern,
and modernizing said Colonel
F. Edward Ward, a member of the
Air University's Air Force Na-
tional Security Briefing Team.
Ward and a national se-
curity briefing team, which has
addressed over 1200 military and
civilian groups, addressed stu-
dents on national defense and
security Tuesday at 7 p.m. The
team has been in existence since
1983 for the purpose of informing
the people on national security.
He said that the defense
strategy of the United States in-
cluded the worldwide detercnce
of aggression through preventa-
tivc measures. "We have to be
able to guard against anv conflict,
even terrorism and sabotage
Ward said.
"Basically we guard our po-
sition through peaceful negotia-
tions,but we will fight if it's neces-
sary
Ward said that Warsaw
Pact nations have overwhelming
odds in military equipment.
"Thev have NATO na-
tions outnumbered 3-to-l in air-
craft, 2-to-l in tanks, 5-tol in per-
sonnel and 8-to-l in artillery
Ward said. "The Soviets have the
most military hardware on earth.
"Through the years,
we've found it in our best interest
to ban together with other coun-
tries in order to keep world
peace
He said that the Soviet leader,
Lenin, "envisioned a single
worldwide communistic state
we have no reason to believe that
they have abandoned that ideal
Me said that the U.S. and its allies
keep an eye on world "hot-spots"
suchasSouth Africa, Vietnam, the
Middle East and Cuba.
"Sixty-three percent of
the world's oil supply comes from
the Middle East 70 percent of
Europe's oil comes from the
Middle East he said. "We want
to keep the Middle East open to
everyone we recently sent an
unconditional message to Libyan
leader Khaddafy that wasn't ig-
nored
Ward said U.S. concerns
are far-ranging and that Cam
Rahn Bay, Vietnam "is the largest
Soviet displav of forces outside of
the U.S.S.R He said the U.S.
"wants to end Apartheid in South
Africa" and that "steps have been
made in that direction, though
people are still suffering
"Some people believe
that the Soviet arms build-up is
due to their belief in a western
invasion documented evidence
points out otherwise Ward said.
He used Afghanistan and Poland
asexamples. "TheSoviets pour $4
billion into Cuba every year,
that's not just coincidence
He said that the massive
Soviet build-up over the past 20
years is an ever-growing threat.
"The U.S. edge in quality and
technology is closing rapidly and
some would sav it has closed
Ward said. 'Today the U.S. mili-
tary is strong, our capabilities are
great but we need to prepare now
for the 1990's through continued
force modernization an F-16 is
an excellent jet, but put three or
four Soviet planes on it, and it's all
over he said.
Ward said that although
the U.S. has made advancements,
so too have the Soviets. "The
Soviets are not afraid to use legal
and illegal means to achieve the
technology they desire he said.
Col. F. Edward Ward, a member of the Air Force National
Security Briefing Team, spoke to students Tuesday on the issues of
national securitv and defense.
Environmental Blues
Hamas dispute PLO claim
BETHLEHEM, Occupied
West Bank (AP) � Young parti-
san factions, some carrying
knives and clubs, shouted threats
at each other today in a dispute
over the PLO declaration of inde-
pendence.
Agriculture makes stride
Members of the Islamic ex-
tremist group Hamas, or Zeal,
marched through the city forcing
stores shut for a strike they called
today on the 41st anniversary of a
U.N. resolution calling for crea-
tion of the Jewish state.
Leaders from the PLO-
backed United Leadership of the
uprising, who ordered their own
strike a day earlier, demanded
shopkeepers open their stores in
defiance of the fundamentalists'
strike call.
Palestinian official cancelled
Christmas celebrations in Bethle-
hem, where Christ was born, in
solidarity with the nearly year-
long revolt against Israeli occupa-
tion.
To try to block anti-Israeli
violence during the strike, the
army clamped curfews on 14
Gaza Strip refugee camps and
villages and on seven cities and
towns in the occupied West Bank,
confining 3000 residents to their
homes.
About 1.5 million Palestini-
ans live in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip, which were occupied
by Israel from Jordan and Egypt
in the 1967 Six Dav War.
J
The army beefed up patrol
the occupied territories and made
preventive arrests to reduce the
likelihood of confrontations.
See PALESTINIANS, page 2
By BEN SELBY
Suf V r!ier
77ns is the second part in a
series en the environment by Ben
Sdby.
"We've made great strides in
agricultural practices, but people
haven't really looked at agricul-
tural practices from the point of
view oi what they're doing to the
environment Spruill said. "It's
only a few people who really have
enough understanding to realie
that we've got these big non
point- sources of pollution
around the countrv
"We're not looking at the long
range in my opinion Spruill
said. "The point-sources of pollu-
tion become glamorous and the
non point-sources of pollution are
so broad and so big we just tend to
ignore them. They are going to
turn out to be significant prob-
lems
Some farmers believe that if
10 pounds of fertilizer will help
their crop grow well, then 20
pounds will help it grow better.
"It's the old idea all over again
that if something works, then
twice as much ought to work
twice as well Spruill said.
"We can't just blame
industry'said Charles Womble,
a local tobacco and peanut farmer.
"We're part oi the problem too
Obviously, I think we need
some mere research Spruill
said, but 1 think that we're going
down a dangerous path in the
state and the countrv in general in
that we're putting too much of
our effort on remediation solving
groundwater problems or pollu-
tion problems
"I think we need to spend at
least an equal amount of time on
preventing these problems
Spruill said. "I know I learned
from my colleague a few days ago
that one oi the differences be-
tween the U.S. system and the
European system is that the Euro-
peans seemed to be putting a lot
more emphasis on the prevention
of the contamination of water and
air resources
"We're doing a pretty good
dogging' in determining where
the pollution is � and let's go
clean it up Spruill said sarcasti-
callv.
"I think we can take a little bit
of our resources aw. i'rom the
clean- up end, especially in cases
where people are not directly
impacted, and start putting some
educational resources and finan-
cial resources, maybe they're one
in the same, on prevention of pol-
lution said Spruill.
"I think that we've gone back-
wards in the Reagan administra-
tion in our assessment of the envi-
ronment and the emphasis we've
placed on the environment
Spruill said. "All the record show
that the EPA and the regulatory
agencies have been cut
extensively
Conservation education,
technology, and recycling at the
local, state, and national levels
coupled with decision making on
large regional levels may be the
key to some of the pollution prob-
lems we face today.
See RECYCLING, page 2
The East Carolinian staff catches the holiday spirit and poses in front of their newfound Christ-
mas tree. From all of us to all of you, Happy Holidays! (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photolab).
mniiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiHHNtmmiiwimiiiiiHiiiiiMiu
Merry Christmas
From the staff of the East Carolinian 1
IHNHttHMMMIIinmmHIIIIIHIIIIHIIIHiMHMHIHMM
MMMjJIIHM







THE EAST CARPI IN TAN
DECEMBER 1, 1988
Palestinians clash with Israeli soliders
Continued from page 1
Five Palestinians, including Nasser said the town govern
two 14-year-old boys, were shot
and wounded in confrontations
will remain bare, he said.
Meanwhile, Defense Minister
Likud bloc asked the Labor Party
to join a new coalition govern-
with soldiers, hospital officials
said.
At least 316 Palestinians and
11 Israelis have been killed in the
nearly year-long revolt against
Israeli occupation of the"West
Bank and Gaza Strip.
ment called off all official celebra-
tions, such as the Christmas Even Yitzhak Rabin today urged his ment, offering the rival party two
tree for Israeli and Palestinian dig- Labor Party to consider joining a of the four most powerful Cabinet
nitarics and the annual Boy Scout coalition government led by the posts,
patrols. rival Likud bloc in order to with-
Manger Square, usually stand demands for4 controversial
decorated wi th bright strings of religious legislation,
colored ights, will remain dark On Monday, Prime Minister
and the 40-foot Christmas tree Yitzhak Shamir's right-wing
Labor leaders are meeting
with each other to discuss the of-
fer.
Recycling is the key to the future
Continued from page 1
"How much would it cost io
educate people to recycle all their
materials and insure that they do?
Or cut down on electricity?"
Christian asked. "The cost of edu-
cation and the expectation of
having education actually work 1
don't know he said.
Kimberl v Dale reported to the
"Greenville times" that: "Ameri-
can consumers throw away-
enough aluminum to rebuild our
entire commercial airfleet every
three months; we throw away
enough glass bottles and jars to fill
the 1350 foot twin towers of New
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two weeks; every Sunday, more of energy required by people, it
that in 500,000 trees are used to would mean less coal would be
produce 88 percent of newspa- burned, which means that you
pers that are never recycled; and don't put out as much material
we throw away enough iron and
steel to continuously supply all
the nation's automakers
"I think you can go a long way
in preventing a lot of problems
with proper education and incen-
tives to prevent pollution said
ECU biologist Dr. Robert Chris-
tian (who is not involved in the
APES program). "Basically, we're
talking about conservation
that could lead to acid rain
Christian said. 'The end result is
that it would be cheaper
How much would it cost to
educate people to recycle all their
materials and insure that they do?
Or cut down on electricity?"
Warning was issued prior to death
MIAMI (AP) � At least two ets at the end of mechanical arms,
months before the amusement The Spider and the Monster each
ride collapse that killed a teen-age have six arms � the Octopus has
girl at the Broward County Fair, eight.
the ride's manufacturer issued a South Carolina officials
bulletin warning of potential heeded the warning about the
structural defects in two similar Spider and the Octopus amuse-
rides. ment rides in September and did
Eyerly Aircraft, maker of the extensive tests on the Monster. A
Monster ride that collapsed last South Carolina inspector said the
week in Hallandale, warned that the rides are so similar he could
part of the arm mechanism on the
Spider and Octopus rides was
potentially vulnerable to cracks
and other problems, The Miami
Herald reported today.
Those rides, like the Monster,
whirl passengers around in buck-
not safely ignore the warning.
Florida's chief safety inspec-
tor Wally Rich said he did not
order additional tests because the
Monster is nothing like the two
rides for which the bulletin was
issued.
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CAROLINIAN
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The East Carolinian
Scruing tlic EOM Carolina campu community since 1925.
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Parlia
MOSCOW (AP)�P
Mikhail S. Gorbachev td
Soviet parliament todav
gain the nght to veto hisd
if it adopts his revised prj
to overhaul the Soy
system.
In a speech opening
day soecial session
preme Soviet, or parhamej
bachev said the Kremlin
shio made the veto pi
among 88 changes h
mended in response I
public comments on the
tion law and constit
amendments out be!
today.
Two high n
from the Baltics, how
tered dissan- .
elements of the reform p
when addressing the
signalling the start of a
debate in the chambi
ual ascent is the norm.
Theorigii
just five weeks a.
widespread criticism
changes would con
much power in the presic
a nation with a ru-
ship
In a reference t
Gorbachev acknc
obvious that s n
sionsof the bills w i
lated precisely er
caused quite a I
marks in thecours I
sions
Reading toda
RJR sh
to buy
NEW YORK C
bisco Inc. stockh
another moment (
either to sell their si ii
make a windfall pi
tight for the next ui
chapter in histon
rate takeover battle
A company-irr.
line for a second rou
billion-dollar bid a
and tobacco conglomei
scheduler to expire at 5
day, and no decisions
pec ted before Wedr � I
Speculation that r
offers would emerge pui
Nabisco's stock pr
share Monday to $9
50 percent above its
the takeover saga ixd
months ago.
At least two
known bidders �a:
management group
vestment firm Koh 1
Roberts k Co. � were w A
revised proposa - I
people familiar with
process.
There wa no ii
Monday whether the tfj
tender, a group led b) 'ij
ment firm First B I
planned to alter its bid
the first round was co I
riskiest but potentia.
A special committd
Nabisco's outside direof
ducting the auct
nation's 19th larger
company, declined corn
whether any additio j
had emerged
But officials ot AtlaJ
RjR Nabisco had said p
that the structure for
all offers would rem
changed from the firs
which took place ov
In that process
were submitted in secrel
York law firm reprcsel
special committee folk
analysis of what the w
and an announcemei
committee s intentions
The outside direj
tended the auction attcj
round ended, reflect!
view that those propoj
inadequate in subst;
price.
RJR Nabisco s mai
offered $100 a share in
secunties for a total of alj
billion. Kohlberg Kra
$94 a share in cash and
or $21.3 billion. First Bo�
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1988 3
Parliament may get veto power
MOSCOW (AP) � President
Mikhail S. Gorbachev told the
Soviet parliament today it would
gain the right to veto his decisions
if it adopts his revised proposals
to overhaul the Soviet political
system.
In a speech opening a three-
day soecial session of the Su-
preme Soviet, or parliament, Gor-
bachev said the Kremlin leader-
shio made the veto proposal
among 88 changes it recom-
mended in response to 250,000
public comments on the new elec-
tion law and constitutional
amendments out before the body
today.
Two high republic officials
from the Baltics, however, regis-
tered dissatisfaction with
elements of the reform program
when addressing the plenum,
signalling the start of a genuine
debate in the chamber where rit-
ual ascent is the norm.
The original drafts, published
just five weeks ago, sparked
widespread criticism that the
changes would concentrate too
much power in the presidency in
a nation with a history of dictator-
ship.
In a reference to the outcry,
Gorbachev acknowledged, "It is
obvious that some of the provi-
sions of the bills were not formu-
lated precisely enough and
caused quite a few critical re-
marks in the course of the discus-
sions
Reading today from a new
draft, Gorbachev said the Su-
preme Soviet "has the right to
veto decrees of the presidium, in-
structions of the president of the
Supreme Soviet and the leader-
ship would be required to account
to the legislature "at least once a
year
Currently, directives from
the president are made in the
name of the Presidium and are
subject to confirmation at the next
full session of the Supreme Soviet.
But practically, there are no chal-
lenges. The Supreme Soviet had
its first non-unanimous vote in
memory last month.
Gorbachev promised that
other changes also would pre-
serve the Soviet Union's tradi-
tional collective style of leader-
ship. Under that style, the highest
government body - the Presidium
of the Supreme Soviet and the
highest party body � the Polit-
buro � are collective bodies.
The head of the Presidium is
the president, traditionally a
ceremonial role.
It was not immediately clear
whether Gorbachev was giving
up his original proposal to
strengthen the president's role by
giving him chairmanship of the
Defense Council and responsibil-
ity for overseeing foreign policy.
The latest draft of the pro-
posed changes also responded to
complaints from small republics,
including Estonia, Latvia and
Georgia, by increasing the repub-
lics' representation in one of the
houses of the bicameral parlia-
ment.
Latvian President Anatoly
Gorbunov asked that the reform
package be postponed to consider
objections by his parliament, in-
cluding one to the possibility of an
individual occupying several
seats in the new Congress of
People's Deputies.
Another Baltic president,
Vitautas Astrauskas of Lithuania,
called for a convention to write a
new constitution that would give
the central government authority
to decide issues of national scope
and reserve all other matters for
the republics.
He welcomed Gorbachev's
announced changes and accepted
the president's proposal to cut off
issues of the rights of republics
until later.
Gorbachev proposed creat-
ing a special commission to settle
the question of division of power
between the 15 Soviet republics
and the central government and
suggested the deputies limit this
session to overhauling the gov-
ernment structure.
He said the complex ques-
tions of the rights of the republics
and the powers of local legislative
bodies, known as Soviets, or coun-
cils, could be left for later.
"We have just embarked on
reform he said. "In this revolu-
tionary period, we are blowing up
the old structure The first step
in reconstruction is the overhaul
before the parliament, he said.
Gorbachev rejected com-
plaints that the principle or one
man, one vote is violated by a plan
to let organizations, such as the
Communist Party and trade
unions, elect one-third of the
deputies in a new Congress of
People's Deputies.
He said the reform clearly
states that legislative elections can
have multiple candidates, but
added that because numerous
candidates could be proposed,
they must face "preliminary dis-
cussion" before their local nomi-
nating commissions. It was not
known whether the commissions
could reject specific candidates.
The Soviet leader also hinted
at promised future reforms. They
include a rewrite of the preamble
of the Soviet constitution, includ-
ing the "definition of socialist
property
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STRATFORD ARMS
CLUBHOUSE
RJR shareholders face dilemma:
to buy cheap or sell and profit
NEW YORK (AP) � RJR Na-
bisco Inc. stockholders are facing
another moment of reckoning,
either to sell their shares and
make a windfall profit or to sit
tight for the next unpredictable
chapter in history's biggest corpo-
rate takeover battle.
A company-imposed dead-
line for a second round of multi-
billion-dollar bids to buy the food
and tobacco conglomerate was
scheduled "to expire at 5 p.m. to-
day, and no decisions were ex-
pected before Wednesday.
Speculation that new, fatter
offers would emerge pushed RJR
Nabisco's stock price up $1 a
share Monday to $90, more than
50 percent above its value before
the takeover saga began two
months ago.
At least two of the three
known bidders�an RJR Nabisco
management group and the in-
might offer $105 to $118 a share in borrowed money in the takeover
plans so far have dwarfed all rec-
ords and incited critical scrutiny
of such debt-financed deals. In
recent years, such deals have
enriched many investors but
raised questions about the eco-
nomic impact of the additional
debt load on the companies.
cash and securities, or $23.8 bil-
lion to $26.8 billion.
Wall Street strategists speak-
ing on condition they not be iden-
tified said there was a widespread
presumption that the RJR Na-
bisco management group and
Kohlberg Kravis would have to
raise their previous offers to at
least match the potential worth of
the First Boston proposal.
Of the three bidders, the most
uncertainty surrounded First
Bostor iich in its original offer
propos i using a tax loophole
that expires at the end of this year
to raise the value of its offer above
the others.
Under the original plan, the
First Boston group would buy
RJR Nabisco's tobacco business
with a so-called installment note,
vestment firm Kohlberg Kravis which would not be subject to a
Roberts & Co. � were working on capital gains tax for a number of
revised proposals, according to years, thereby giving the firm
people familiar with the bidding additional money to pay share-
process, holders a fatter price.
There was no indication But that part of the transac-
Monday whether the third con- tion would have to be completed
tender, a group led by the invest- by Dec. 31 because Congress
ment firm First Boston Corp closed the loophole on this capi-
planned to alter its bid, which in tal-gains deferment, leaving
the first round was considered the many tax experts skeptical about
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riskiest but potentially the richest.
A special committee of RJR
Nabisco's outside directors, con-
ducting the auction for the
nation's 19th largest industrial
company, declined comment on
whether any additional bidders
had emerged.
But officials of Atlanta-based
whether First Boston's offer was
realistic.
The struggle for RJR Nabisco
began in late October when the
management group led by its
chairman, F. Ross Johnson, said it
was considering a debt-financed
acquisition of the company,
RJR Nabisco had said previously maker of hundreds of products
that the structure for evaluating ranging from Salem cigarettes to
all offers would remain un-
changed from the first round,
which took place Nov. 18-20.
In that process, proposals
were submitted in secret to a New
York law firm representing the
special committee, followed by a
analysis of what they were worth
and an announcement of the
committee's intentions.
The outside directors ex-
tended the auction after the first
round ended, reflecting their
view that those proposals were
inadequate in substance and
price.
RJR Nabisco's management
offered $100 a share in cash and
securities for a total of about $22.7
billion. Kohlberg Kravis offered
$94 a share in cash and securities,
or $21.3 billion. First Boston ��;
Del Monte canned fruits.
The amount and heavy use of
Fast Carolina University s
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union President
Deadline: January 20,1989
&
Assistant to the President
Student Union
Committee Chair persons
Deadline: February 17,1989
for the 1989-90 Term
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i
t
SUfe iEaat (Eartfltman
Pete Fernald, cnhimhp
Chip Carter, M�r-j Er
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Adrtant
Ioe Harris, mm m
KR1STEN HALBERGporti&ttor
Tim Hntirrrir i mm
Michelle England, &�ttM.�iW
Debbie Stevens, s
Stephanie Folsom, c
Jeff Parkerj
TOM FUKR,Cir,klum l
Susan H dwell, A. m
johnW. MEDLIN
Mac Clark,
December 1,1988
OPINION
P�ge
Christmas
Meaning obscured by rhetoric
Two thousand years or so ago �
so the story goes � a certain man
was born who ended up being
nailed to wood. These days, we cele-
brate the occasion by trading hast-
ily-bought and often insincere gifts.
"Christmas is for the children
they say. Funny how, once a year,
the children are thought of so
fondly. The rest of the time, how-
ever, ' children are tastelessly ex-
ploited and used for political pur-
poses. To borrow Garry Trudeau's
phrasing, the final presidential de-
bate of this year had both candidates
exhuming the memories of dead
children for political gain.
They're used mostly because
insisting that something must be
done "for the children" stirs up
emotions in their parents, who do
vote, but the children themselves do
not vote. In other words, they're
seen but not heard; they have taxa-
tion without representation.
And, as eventually happens with
most oppressed classes, the time has
come for a voice from the youngest
among us. A Christmastime re-
minder.
And they sav:
"It is not our responsibility to
bear the brunt of your frustration
with your inability to solve your
own problems. You created some of
Farewell
As another semester ends, The
East Carolinian, like other student
organizations, must now say goo-
dbye to its seniors. Luckily, we're
losing very few.
Joe 1 larris stepped into the job of
news editor this semester after a
cross-country trip. Nobody was re-
al lv prepared for the work load
those first few weeks dumped on us,
but after all those weeks of relaxa-
tion, I think it hit Joe a little harder
than others.
But he jammed. He did a great
job with the news department this
year, especially considering he got
little support from the managing
editor who knew virtually nothing
about hard news. In fact, there were
a lot of times that Joe was the news
department.
Kim Kayes had an idea of what
she was getting into. She had been
the editor of The Buccaneer, and she
knew how late things could get on a
publication.
As a layout artist, Kim was one of
the fastest and always cheerful.
With all the upheavals in the sports
department, Kim was a happy tran-
sition through it all.
Other staff members who are
leaving or who recently left include
former sports editor Doug Johnson,
ad rep Spencer Meymundi and as-
these problems, you perpetuated
others. Contrary to what you appar-
ently think, this does not give you
the moral authority to tell us how to
run our lives.
"It's an overused and often
badly used phrase, but nonetheless
the fact remains that we did not ask
to be here. You created us to satisfy
your own ego or for whatever other
purposes, but we do not owe you
anything in return.
"When we get pregnant, we are
not 'children having children We
are not, in fact, children as you use
the term. The world has changed
and we have changed to adapt. We
are expected to act as adults in the
face of a difficult and hostile world,
even though we are still treated as
children. You cannot protect us by
shielding us. Knowledge is power,
not ignorance.
"Solve your own problems, then
come to us with ideas of how to solve
ours.
"But until then, swallow your
own bitter medicine: Stop the mad-
ness. Leave us alone, to do our
drugs, to make our mistakes, to
learn our own lessons and to be our
own selves � just as you asked of
your own parents.
"We will not be used any more.
"Merry Christmas.
sistant news editor Sean Herring,
credit manager Michelle England
assistant credit manager Patrick
O'Neill and art director John Med-
lin.
John has cranked out ad after ad,
complaining only a little bit. He's
also the only other staff member
who's been here almost as long as
Tim, James, Pete and myself. I and
the rest of the staff wish all these
people luck in whatever jobs,
schools or classes they head for.
Reshuffling is the name of the
game this month at the paper. Copy
editor Stephanie Folsom will be-
come the second female managing
editor. Tim Hampton will take back
his old position of news editor. I will
go back to being features editor. We
have an entirely new credit depart-
ment, and Stephanie Emory is going
to take over for John Medlin.
One of the lessons I learned this
year that hit home is the power the
media wields and the temptation to
use that power carelessly or igno-
rantly. While any medium is a
powerful thing, the medium of hu-
man communication is perhaps the
most powerful of all. During this
Christmas season, keep that in mind
and remember to be kind or at least
decent to your fellow humans and
animals. Feed the world, and Have a
great holiday season.
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� �
Gorbachev has vision
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
The New Republic
A recent survey found that nearly two-thirds of
Americans have a favorable opinion of Mikhail
Gorbachev. That put him ahead of every foreign
leader except Margaret Thatcher. Had Michael
Dukakis and George Bush been listed in the survey,
he doubtless would have finished ahead of them,
too. And with good reason. Gorbachev, more than
either presidential candidate, has "the vision
thing"� a clearly articulated view of where his
nation, and the world, should be heading.
Gorbachev's national vision, of course, consists
of perestroika and glasnost: the movement of the
Soviet economic and political systems (respectively)
away from rigid, topdown control toward the West-
ern model of feedom. Gorbachev's global vision is a
retread of former California Governor Jerry Brown's
"spaceship earth" platform.
Nations, Gorbachev notes, are increasingly
faced with common problems that are best ad-
dressed internationally: environmental threats, ter-
rorism, the cost of mutual military buildup, the
prospect of nuclear apocalypse, or of economic
apocalypse in financially integrated world. Increas-
ingly, we're all in the same boat. In technical par-
lance, this means nations are playing a "non-zero-
sum game in which the contestants can all win, if
they cooperate, or all lose, if they don't.
Gorbachev is right. One of the simplest truths
about international afffairs is that over this century
they have become more non-zero-sum. Similarly,
there's no doubt that Gorbachev has correctly diag-
nosed the maladies of the Soviet economy: commu-
nism is an inherently unproductive economic sys-
tem, and things look especially bleak for totalitarian
communism in the information age, when prosper-
ity depends on the diffuse distribution of potent
information processing and transmitting machines.
The interesting questions aren't about
Gorbachev's diagnosis, but about his prescrip-
tions� their likely efficacy, his real motivations in
espousing them, and the Western responses they call
for. If reporters did n't so slavishly follow the rules of
campaign discourse defined by television, these
questions might have been addressed in depth by
George Bush during his election campaign. Alas,
they weren't. Yet they will persist. So, for his benefit,
we offer this handy guide to questions that should
have been much debated this fall.
1. Is Gorbachev for real? Yes. There is a virtual
consensus that his reform program is much more
than mere talk. Even Jeane Kirkpatrick has lately
praised growing religious and intellectual freedom
in the Soviet Union and suggested that the U.S.S.R.
may be heading toward a promotion from totalitar-
ian to authoritarian regime (no small step, in her
lexicon).
Forum Rules
Indeed, the new freedom of expression, while
still far short of American standards, is in some ways
dramatic enough to be puzzling. In the West, the
intial take on glasnost was that it was entirely subor
dinate to perestroika; either Gorbachev thought (as
many think) that some measure of political freedom
is essential to fruitful economic freedom, or he was
using free speech to woo the intelligentsia, or both
But it turns out that glasnost is keeping pace with.
even outpacing, perestroika.
To be sure, the Soviet steps toward a qua
capitalistic economy sound more than tentative
Citizens are to be allowed to buy shares in industrial
enterprises� a "stock market" is what the Soviet
finance minister called the new system; Western
capitalists will be allowed a controlling interest in
joint ventures; and farmers, while still no citizens an
allowed actually to own land, will be able to lease ir
for decades. But aspiring entrepreneurs still suffo-
cate in red tape. And, most important, the Soviet-
have resisted the invisible hand itself: freely floating
prices, which bring supply and demand into har-
mony.
2. Does Gorbachev really believe his own space
ship earth rhetoric? Whether he does or not, much of
the world seems to, and he has expoitcd this tact
brilliantly. Indeed, for all the Reagan
administration's foreign policy triumphs (notably in
upping the price of Soviet expansion, thereby
heightening the contradiction bet wen a communist
economy and an expensive empire), Reagan-suf-
fered a historic lapse in surrendering the center stage
Of world opinion to Gorbachev. He" ruTS'rfiell'to
mount a comeback by sounding kinder, gentler, and
more like Jerry Brown. (Recently, for example, he
endorsed the use of the World Court� not an insti-
tution he has always paid homage to � to resolve
some U.SSoviet disputes.) But there's more u ork to
be done on the global p.r. front.
George Bush must recapture the leadership of
international opinion, recognizing (a) that the
people of the world love to think oi themselves as
being fellow passengers on a giant spaceship; and (b)
that in many ways they really arc. Through dramatic
proposals for making the planet less tense, he can
win friends, influence people, and find out whether
Mikhail Gorbachev truly is a reasonable man, as
opposed to merely a clever one. Would Gorbachev,
for example, pull Soviet soldiers out of Eastern
European countries in exchange for a partial with-
drawal of American troops from Western Europe?
How about a conventional arms pact that�
unlike past nuclear arms treaties� would actually
save both side some money? How about clearer
rulesof the road to circumvent future mi litary entan-
glements in the Third World? Bush perfunctorily
alluded to questions like this during the campaign,
but he didn't sound as if he had lost any sleep over
them. He shouldn't get to the next election the same
way.
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop themby our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance to joyner library.
For purposes of verification, all
Utters must include the name, major,
classification, address,phone number
and the signature of the authoris).
Letters are limited to 300 words
or less, double -spaced, typed or
neatly printed. All letters are sub-
ject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will
be permitted. Students, faculty and
staff writing letters for this page are
reminded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday
for Thursday editions.
I
U.N. d
Genev
UNITED NATION!
Unless the United State'
decision to deny Yasser
entry visa, the I
Palestine will shift to .
the PLO chairman a Cx
sembly, diplomats said
Arab represc
planned to introduce a ri
today in the United Naf
deplores the US acti
pones debate on
nowduled for Thursdai
least next month, and
State Department to
visa.
Saturday's decision!
tary of State George I
bar Arafat from tl
grounds he was ar
acts of terrorism on
and has been wide
dozens of countries, inci
Arab world and such staj
allies as Britain, Canada!
tralia.
Only Israe! I
decision.
In Washington,
Department said
decision to deny the
"firm and final
A senior U.N fj
condition of ar - j
United States still -
Arafat a visa, another r
probably will i.
moving the assen
but diplomats say th
enough votes, and a sn
jority in the 30 membei
shift the assemble wh.
would be able to sp� i -
U.N legal counsel
gust Fleischhauer tol
eommttce he U.S. decil
Renowf
guilty
BOSTON (AP) �
nation's top psychiat
signed from Harvard
School's faculty after a
another school recognizJ
rized passages in the pj
writings dating back 22j
Dr. Shervert Frazit
mer director of the Nati
tute of Mental Healtl
Health resigned last ul
Harvard professor ani
McLean Hospital, a p
hospital affiliated withl
versitv.
Frazier did not di
findings oi a facultv c
that investigated the a;
but said the plagiarism
vertent, accordn
Adelstein, dean of acadj
crams at the medical
"He has accepted
dence of the committej
stein said.
"But he has asci
events to his method of
mg and composing pa
Harvard officials
da v the plagiarism was;
Paul Scatcna, a graduatJ
in cognitive sciences atl
versitv of Rochester.
Scatena said in i
interview he read
Frazier's papers while
ing phantom pain, a buij
sation that patients
feel from a limb that has!
putated.
Scatena said he fou
incorrect citations in tl
and recognized paragr,
had been lifted from aj
: other researchers. He saj
the passages to Dr.
Tosteson, dean of the!
Medical School, in Aura
Tosteson anj
Frazicr's resignation in
letter to the faculty
made public by the
Monday, says a faculty c
investigated the allegaf
concluded that plagiaj
curred in four papers
Frazier between 1966 ai
Frazier could not
for comment Monday
men at Harvard and
Hospital said he was ov
and unreachable.
He did not return
left at the hospital, and tl
at his home went unansj
Three of the discreJ
pers are about phantom
fourth is on "psychiatj
gency management
The papers, which
lished in medical joui
textbooks, were intej
"teaching instruments"
not purport to present
search data, Adelstein
One of Frazier's c
said he thought the foi
nation was an overreacl
"It's not as if he stq





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two weeks. The deadline for
il mater hit l 5 r m Fnday for
y paper and 5 p.m. Tuesday
hursday editions.
u voi Apour
0CTIN6 THS
A B-IB ?
V
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN'
DECEMBER 1,1988
U.N. delegation will go to
Geneva so Arafat can speak
CENTER
UNITED NATIONS (AP) �
Unless the United States erases its
decision to deny Yasser Arafat an
entry visa, the U.N. debate on
Palestine will shift to Geneva so
lates the 1947 U.SU.N. Head- slap in the face, of equal measure,
quarters Agreement to the host to every member of this organiza-
rountry to grant the United Na- tion
hons. The Soviet Union and China,
"The agreement does not and U.S. allies France, Spain,Svve-
the FLO chairman a General As- contain a reservation of the right den and Norway, amone others
sembly, diplomats said
Arab representatives
planned to introduce a resolution
today in the United Nations that
deplores the U.S. action, post-
pones debate on Palestine
nowduled for Thursday until at
least next month, and urges the
State Department to grant the
visa.
Saturday's decision by Secre
to bar the entry of those who rep-
resent, in the view of the host
country, a threat to its sovereignty
and security Flcischhauer said.
Many nations in the world
body said the U.S. action coun-
tered what they described as the
Palestine Liberation
Organization's move toward
modernization with its declara-
tion of Palestinian independence
Km- oi State George P. Shultz to Nov. 15 that also implicitly recog
bar Arafat from the country on rtized Israel.
grounds he was an "accessory" to jhc PLCs U.N. oberver,
Zuhdi LabibTerzi, said "We have
a message of peace that we want
to bring to the General Assembly
through Chairman Arafat. The
to
acts of terrorism on Americans
and has been widely criticized by
dozens of countries, including the
Arab world and such staunch U.S.
allies as Britain, Canada and Aus-
tralia.
Only Israel backed the U.S.
decision.
In Washington, the State
Department said Mondav the U.S.
decision to deny the visa was
"firm and final
A senior U.N. official said on
condition of anonymity if the
United States still refuses to grant
Arafat a visa, another resolution
probably will called this week for
moving the assembly to Geneva
but diplomats say they have
enough votes, and a simple ma-
jority in the 30 member body to
shift the assembly where Arafat
would be able to speak.
U.N. legal counsel Carl-Au-
gust Flcischhauer told a U.N.
commttee he U.S. decision vio-
said Arafat should be allowed to
speak.
Tunisia, where the PLO has
its headquarters, said refusing the
visa "hinders the work of the
United Nations as an instrument
tor bringing about peace and se-
curity in the world
Aducious Maksoud said
Monday that "if in 24, 36 or 48
hours at the latest, if there is no re-
versal, we will have no option but
to go to a country which respects
its obligations to the United Na-
tions
Arafat called the U.S. move "a
sheer violation of the interna-
tional law and the U.N. charter"
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United States is imposing some and said Washington was ignor-
obstacles that would impede easy ing international backing for the
access, so we have to do it some-
where else
The U.N. Committee on Rela-
tions with the Host Country
heard numerous speakers assail
the U.S. decision to bar Arafat
from speaking to the General
Assembly.
The chairman of the Commit-
tee on Relations with the Host
Countrv, Prince Constantine
Moushoutas of Cyprus, said "the
vast majority" felt the United
States had violated the Headquar-
ters Agreement, but the commit-
tee took no action.
Iraqi Ambassadador Ismat
Kittani told the same committee:
"The decision by Washington is a
independent state of Palestine,
proclaimed this month by the
Palestine National Council, the
PLO's parliament-in-exilc.
"Why are they afraid that l
speak to world public opinion
and explain the new Palestinian
decisions?" Arafat said in
Baghdad, Iraq.
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman said the shift to
Geneva was necessarv because
other PLO spokesmen in New-
York could speak instead of Ara-
fat.
"Probably no other country in
the world has worked as hard at
the peace process as the United
States has Redman said.
Renown Harvard pyschiatrist
guilty of plagiarizing book
BOSTON (AP) � One of the
nation's top psychiatrists re-
signed from Harvard Medical
School's faculty after a student at
another school recognized plagia-
rized passages in the professor's
writings dating back 22 years.
Dr. Shervert Frazier, 67, for
mer director of the National Insti-
tute of Mental Health Mental
Health resigned last week as a
Harvard professor and head of
McLean Hospital, a psychiatric
hospital affiliated with the uni-
versity.
Frazier did not dispute the
findings of a faculty committee
that investigated the allegations,
but said the plagiarism was inad-
vertent, according to Dr. S. James
Adelstein, dean of academic pro-
grams at the medical school.
"He has accepted the evi-
dence of the committee Adel-
stein said.
"But he has ascribed the
events to his method of note-tak-
ing and composing papers
Harvard officials said Mon-
day the plagiarism was spotted by
Paul Scatena, a graduate student
in cognitive sciences at the Uni-
versity of Rochester.
Scatena said in a telephone
interview he read several of
Frazier's papers while research-
ing phantom pain, a burning sen-
sation that patients sometimes
feel from a limb that has been am-
putated.
Scatena said he found many
incorrect citations in the papers
and recognized paragraphs that
had been lifted from articles by
other researchers. He said he sent
the passages to Dr. Daniel C.
Tosteson, dean of the Harvard
Medical School, in August.
Tosteson announced
Frazier's resignation in a Nov. 23
letter to the faculty. The letter,
made public by the university
Monday, saysa faculty committee
investigated the allegations and
concluded that plagiarism oc-
curred in four papers written by
Frazier between 1966 and 1975.
Frazier could not be reached
for comment Monday. Spokes-
men at Harvard and McLean
Hospital said he was out of town
and unreachable.
He did not return messages
left at the hospital, and the phone
at his home went unanswered.
Three of the discredited pa-
pers are about phantom pain. The
fourth is on "psychiatric emer-
gency management
The papers, which were pub-
lished in medical journal and
textbooks, were intended �as
"teaching instruments" and did
not purport to present new re-
search data, Adelstein said.
One of Frazier's colleagues
said he thought the forced resig-
nation was an overreaction.
"It's not as if he stole a great
idea from someone or published
someone else's research as if it
was his own said Dr. Seymour
Netv, professor emeritus oi psy-
chiatry and senior scientist at the
National Institute oi I lealth.
But Dr. Miles Shore, director
-of-the �Masaaehusctts Mewta"
Health Center, said: "Academic
institutions have a very important
obligation to guarantee the scien-
tific integrity of what goes on
within their walls and I think
Harvard
action
took the appropriate
And Harvard spokesman
Peter Costa said: "The universitv
takes very seriously any charges
of plagiarism because that's what
we're, about the search for' trehfi
and knowledge
The university hasbeen hit bv
other allegations of scientific mis-
conduct in recent vears.
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If
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1.1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
APT. FOR RENT: S108month plus 13
utilities. Private room at Cypress Gar-
dens. Walking distance to campus. Male
or female. Call 830-3606, ask for Christine,
Kathy or Beth or leave message.
SWEET ROOM FOR RENT: Room in 3
bd room house 3 blocks from campus on
Meade Street. 13 rent and utilities. Call
Troll at 757- i 007.
FOR RENT: Need 1 non-smoking female
to rent furnished trailer in real nice trailer
park. S150 00month 23 utilities. Call
756-9738.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male $15000
for rent & 14 utilities. Kingston Place.
Available December. Call 830-6897 ask for
Kipp
HUGE 1 BEDROOM: Of 5 bedroom
house. $120 month. Close to campus. Call
Luke or Christine 830-9315.
FOR RENT: Room in 3 bd. house on
Meade Street. 3 blocks from campus. 13
rent & utilities. Call Troll at 757-1007.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: $115
a month. Close to campus. 830-1887.
HOUSEMATE: Quiet MF, wanted by
faculty member. 3 bedroom house, newly
remodeled, walking distance to campus.
Rent and lease negotiable. Call 752-3677.
WANTED: RESPONSIBLE ROOM-
MATE (male or female non-smoker) to
share nice two bedroom apartment for
Spring Semester, next to Allied Health
Building (Stratford Arms). Bus service to
main campus every 12 hr. furnished.
SI80 per month plus utilities, free cable
and water. Call Keith 355-2797 or 752-
6231.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: After
Dec. 14 Serious student, non-smoker.
$147.50 per month and 12 utilities. Will
have own bedroom. Call 752-5744 after
300 p.m ask for Kathy.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share 3 bed-
room apt. near campus and downtown.
Must be responsible. Call 752-1202.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa and 2 chairs in
good condition. Price negotiable. Call 758-
2493 after 5:00.
FOR SALE: 1969 Dodge Dart. Only 60,000
orig. miles. Great car for around school;
S50Q.0O. Also 6 ft. Local Motion Surfboard
� $100.00 Call Joe 757-3642 or 757-6366.
CAN YOU BUY. Jeeps, Cars, 4 X4's seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
FOR SALE: 1973 Pontiac Ventura. Strong
V-8, must sell, $350. Call Todd at 758-4702.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer re'sume'
production, and other business and pro-
fessional services. Call 757-3111 M-F for
more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C. 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC Done by
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933.
HELP WANTED
THE AD YOU'VE BEEN WAITING TO
SEE: WREATH MAKERS has started
production! Come by 403 12 Evans St.
Mall (upstairs, doorway between
Bradshaw's &. House of Hats) to make
extra bucks in your spare time - no mandi-
tory hours: work when, as long, tt as often
as you like - $10-$20.00 ph according to
how fast you work. HANDICAPPED
person welcome - check door for hours
(usually 10 a.m. - 10 p.m 7 days a week).
TRAVEL FREE SPRING BREAK! FRA-
TERNITIES & SORORITIES INVITED:
For information about being a Campus
Travel Rep call: 800-826-9100. Ask for
Steve or Janet.
HELP WANTED: The Waffle House is
now taking applications for all positions,
full and part-time, also management. No
experience necessary, will train. Benefits
include pd. vacation after 6 months, cook
incentive bonuses, and medical and den-
tal insurance available. Must be depend-
able, honest, and enjoy working with the
public. Apply in person only! 306
Greenville Blvd , M-F, 11 a.m2 p.m.
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To distribute
"Student Rate" subscription cards at this
campus. Good income. For information
and application write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glenwood
Dr Mooresville, NC 28115. 704-664-4063.
PART-TIME HELP WANTED: Young
male for sales & stock. Must be outgoing &
aggressive. Apply at The Youth Shop,
Carolina East Center.
WAKE 'N' BAKE: In beautiful Ncgril, Ja-
maica for Spring Break '89. Very afford-
able packages. Organize group travel free
Call 1-800-426-7710.
CHILD CARENANNIES NEEDED:
Join our (Nannv Network) of over 8(X)
placed bv us in the Northeast. One year
working with kids in exchange for salaries
up to $300.00 per week Room and board,
airfare and benefits. We offer Tl IE BEST
CHOICES in families and locations. Con-
tact Maureen Carol, A1IELP1NG11ANDS
INC Recruitment Counselor, 919-577-
5154 (evenings) for brochure and applica-
tion. Featured on NBC's Today Show and
October 1987 Working Mother magazine
as nationally recognized leader in nanny-
placement. Est. 1984.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN
EARNING A FREE: Spring Break in
Mexico or the Bahamas, call CAMPUS
TOURS INC. at 305-772-8687.
KINKO'S COPIES: Needs full or part
time campus sales representative. 1 lourly
wage plus commission. SalesGood
Communication skills helpful. Call Con-
nie or Yates M-F daytime at 752-0875.
TWO STUDENTS NEEDED: To help
care for toddlers on Thursday mornings
from 9-11:30 a.m. Begin January 5th. Must
have transportation. Call Mrs. Dunn at
355-6852.
PERSONALS
TO THE 4TH FLOOR CLEMENT. It's
been a great semester with all of you
Study hard for finaLs and do well. 1 look
forward to next semester. Happy Holi-
days! �Love, Joan.
LOST-N-FOUND: Lost 6 months old
white ChowGerman Shepherd mixed.
Answers to Bailey. Lost in the East 2nd
Street area. Has brown leather collar. Call
Carmen Smith 758-4443 -h; 551-4495 -w.
REWARD.
W,W - B.W BILLY JOE: I am very proud
of you, I know you're happy too! To think
you don't have one degree, now you have
two! It's going to be hard getting used to
you not being around. AT&T, your busi-
ness has been bound. Beach trips, long
dinner sits and wild late night acts, are not
about to end. Not only do I Love You, You
Are My Best Friend. I'd wish you luck in
your future, but I know it will be great!
Afterall, I have all intentions of remaining
your mate! �Very Proud, Cole.
AOPI'S: Merry Christmas! And Happy
Founder's Day � Ninety-one years of
excellence!
LINDA, LESLIE, JILL, APRIL, MICH-
ELLE, MELISSA, JILL, DIANE AND
BETH: Happy Holidays! Good luck on
finals! You're a great staff! �Love, Joan.
AOPI'S: Wishing everyone Happy Holi-
days and a Festive New Year Good Luck
on exams.
AOPI'S: Get ready for next semester � it
will be one to remember
ALPHA DELTA PI: Wishes everyone
gcxxl luck on his or her last papers, proj-
ects, and exams!
HAPPY HOLIDAYS: From Alpha Delta
Pi
HAPPY HAPPY BIRTHDAY CASSIE
LANE Thanks for all the fun. �Love
you, Wade.
CHRISTOPHER: I love you buga Good
luck on your finals, I know you'll do
great �Love, Joan.
BYE ALDOG: To all busdrivers, 2nd
floor Scott Hall residents, Ed, Shannon,
Matt, Billy, Kyle, Stewart & Paul, it's been
great knowing ya'U, it's been real, go wild
in the spring. Bye Chris.
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Would like to wish
everyone good luck on their exams.
AMI B Cocktail this year promises to be
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
great! Maybe this year I'll leave with my
date. No smashed liquor � drink it, it's
quicker. Don't trash your dress and I'll try
not to stress - Here's to Recovery! � Love
U, Missie B.
STACY: I had a great time meeting you
Tuesday night. I hope you liked the eggs!
Let's do something soon! �Jay.
J.L.D Thanks for helping me out this
week. Don't give up on me. �Love, RE.
ALPHA XI DELTA PLEDGES: Have a
great Christmas & best of luck on exams!
�Love the sisters.
HOLLY & DONNA: You have been a
terrific help on the floor. Thanks for all
your support and for your ear in times of
trouble. You're the best of friends! �Love
Joan.
ALPHA XI DELTA COCKTAIL
DATES: Get psyched to have a blast!
'Cause we saved the best for last! Can't
wait. �Love the Alpha Xi Delta's.
FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES: Good
luck on exams & have a safe and Merry
Christmas. �Love the Alpha Xi Delta's.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Wishes a belated
congratulations to our new brothers:
David Baird, Robert Barto, Scott
Crawford, Tony Geouge, Greg Gentry,
Ronnie Giles, John Gist, James Grey, Eric
Halus, Kevin Harris, Don Harvey, Chris
Herman, Steve Huston, Chip Lanier, Scott
Mulwee, Chris McHenry, Billy Schiff,
Haywood Tyndall, Brady White, Randy
Wynn, Jason Yoder. Keep up the enthusi-
asm, next semester will be the best yet!
KA BROTHERS & LITTLE SISTER
PLEDGES: Everyone get siked, it's that
time of year, our annual Christmas party
is tomorrow, Friday, Dec. 2. Little Sister
Pledges have done a great job and we look
forward to seeing you as sisters.
THE WAY CAMPUS FELLOWSHIP
TWIG FELLOWSHIPS: Are available
every Tuesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
at 2007 Tiffany Dr. in Heritage Village
Call 355-5164 for details. Hot Bible! Great
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Fellowship!
S.L.J If it's $120 for the night, how much
for the weekend?
ECU BUSDRIVERS: To Joanna; To Scott,
alias Pedro who had Tl IE party; To Chris
A whose bravery enables him to pull out
in front of Mack trucks; To Angela, we
miss you; To Jan, the man-hater, To Stevie,
that's a big roger doger 4 good buddy; To
Dennis, not to be confused w Dennis the
"Menace To Johnny, have you seen your
cousin today - it's Ivan's fault; To Chris
W fix your car door & maybe you won't
get left at P.W. anymore; To Leanne, the
AOPi's own; To George, who will always
be a rookie; To Allen, "better late than
never" Spainhour; To Darrell, is he a bus
driver?; To Glen, Glen who?; To Ryland,
who won the "most hrs of the year
award To Marcus, are you sure you're
25?; To Rob, the legend lives on. . . ; To
Paul, whose keeping the beer industry
alive; To Bill, Are the nails in the box ar
ranged in secret code? I'm tellin' Lynn. It's
been a great SAFE semester! Thanks for
everything and remember . The radio is
for Transit use only, Don't speed on 5th
St & watch out for oncoming Mercedes!
�Love, Stef.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI CONGRATU-
LATES ITS NEW OFFICERS Paul Sulli-
van, Pres; Gary I loffman, Vice Pres; Greg
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Vacek, Tres Joey Stanaland, Rec Secre
tary; Bruce Liner, Sergeant at Arms; Mik
Daly, Marshall.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Congratulates its
graduating seniors: John "Slate" Carter
Craig Belcher, and David Daughton
Good Luck in the Real World'
ALPHA SIGMA PHI LITTLE SISTFR
PLEDGES: Get Ready' Tonight's the
night!
Buy, sell or say hello via The
East Carolinian Classified
Ads.
Deadlines for Tuesday's
paper is Friday at 4p.m. and
Thursday's paper is Mon-
day at 4p.m.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Your Best Look
Specializing In: MANICURES:
French ManicuresNail Tips
Overlays Wrapping Acrylics
PEDICURES-SKIN CARE:Body
Wrapping'Face & Body Waxing
FacialsDeep Pore Cleansing
Acne TreatmentsMuscle Tone
TreatmentsComplete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products For
Men & Worn en
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaza Dr Greenville
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
� f .i ��� Mtga - id �.�, ������ � market
� i nga �� .�� tfessn i i toolnng resume by A. . ; ,
), -r ne i i kages lei fou i hooM balioen ph �.
tse ;vntnq ,v basir WC' '�'
,f" edtKeon �p oH�� irw� oes! anop at oap?' m
ei . ope �"� �� i � toe aea
FAST copies
for fast rwes
� .1I HtW
I . � ras$ �x'�
ACCU I
BSCOPY
THE resume PEOPLE
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
� Ux-ated Near ECU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited offer-$275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
7S�-7S1S or �30-137
Office open-Apt 8,12-5:30 p.m
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Ck-an and quirt one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only $205 a month, 6 month
lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couples or
�singles Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact j.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru Sat. Low
Coat Termination to 20 weeks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
HtCOS i ire GrVrgefow" sior
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Subscription Form
Name:
Address:
Date to Begin:
Complimentary.
Amount Paid:
Date to End:
.Individual
Business:
-Date Paid:
Rate Individual $2S per yearBuflncw $15 per ymr
feturn to: The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg, � ECU. Cmavflle. NC 27KSS-4153
ADVERTISING STAFF
I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of
you for your hard work and dedication this
semester. This semester has been the most success-
ful semester the Advertising department has ever
had. I think we are building the foundation for a
tradition of quality service and excellence. The East
Carolinian's success is a direct result of your hard
work.
I look forward to next semester with high expecta-
tions. I would like to wish each of you a happy and
safe Holiday Season. I will see you all next year.
r
i
Sincerely,
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LQST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of Cod.
Every Fri. night at 700 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
COOPERATIVE EP.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered by
the University, is designed fo help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. We would like to
extend an invitation to all students to at-
tend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Nov. semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are: 'extra cash to help cover the cost of
college expenses or perhaps to increase
your "fun" budget, �opportunities to test
a career choice if you have made one or to
explore career options if undecided about
a future career, and a highly "market-
able" degree, which includes a valuable
career-related experience, when you
graduate. Co-op Seminars�Fall, 1988:
Thurs Dec. 1,1 p.m rm. 2010; and Mon
Dec. 5, 4 p.m rm. 2006.
BAHAMAS OR CANCUN?
Let the Student Union Travel Committee
take you to a new and exciting place for
Spring Break '89. Shop in the world's
marketplace, plan on eating 5-6 times a
day, dip in the pool, play shufflcboard, get
a tan, just relax . cruise the Bahamas for
5 days4 nights CjR if cruising the ocean
blue is not for you, then come with us for
7 days and nights in Cancun, Mexico.
While in Cancun, stay in a hotel that is on
one of Cancun's finest beaches. Just relax
and enjoy the sun and beach on this gor-
geous island of paradise Check out our
affordable prices at Central Ticket Office
at Mendenhall (757-6611).
GEQUES
Group photographs will not be taken after
Dec. 5. If your org. has not had their pic-
ture taken by Dec. 5, they will not appear
in the 1989 BUCCANEER. Call 757-6501
and leave date & time for the photo to be
taken. Please give two days notice for the
photographer.
CLASS PICTURES
There will be another session for students
to have their class pictures taken for the
1989 Buccaneer. If you were turned away,
or did not get the chance to have them
taken last time, you may have them taken
Jan. 23-27, 1989. Come by the Buccaneer
office & sign tip on the sheet posted on the
door. We are located on the 2nd floor of
the Publications Bldg. in front of Joyner
Library.
EDUCATION MAIORS
The School of Education is sponsoring a
workstudy trip to Puebla, Mexico dur-
ing spring break (March 4-12, 1989).
Opportunities are available to observe ed.
in Mexico, teach, and travel. All ed. majors
are invited to participate. Applications
are in the Dean's office, Speight Bldg. For
more info contact Marianne Exum at 757-
6271. Application deadline � Dec. 12.
ALL LITTLE SISTER ORG.
Get your group photo taken for the Bucca-
neer today. Call 757-6501 to set up an appt.
The last day to get a picture taken is Dec.
5.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Student Union Travel Committee has
scheduled a meeting today at 4:30 p.m.
Please plan to attend! (Group photos for
the yearbook will be taken at 5:00 p.m. at
this meeting). Thanks!
CASWELL CENTER'S
PROJECT INSIDEOUT
This is a unique opportunity to examine a
state institution for persons with mental
retardation. Project InsideOut is an in-
tensive 3 12 day live-in experience de-
signed to expose persons in the field to the
entirety of the facility. It provides an in-
valuable learning experience for students.
This year's project will be held Feb. 1-4,
1989. If you have any questions, please
contact 559-5100.
NATIONAL STUDENT
EXCHANGE
Interested in exploring new places? Na-
tional Student Exchange provides an ex-
citing opportunity for ECU students to
attend one of over 80 colleges or universi-
ties across the U.S. Live in another part of
the country and experience college life in
a different setting for a semester or a year.
ECU students pay the same tuition and
fees as at ECU, and avoid the red tape
normally associated with transferring to
another institution. For more info, and
applications, contact Stephanie Evancho
or Dr. Maurice Simon, 1002 GCB or call
757-6769.
GMAT
The Graduate Mgmt. Admission Test
(GMAT) will be offered at ECU on Jan. 28,
1989. Application blanks are to be com-
pleted and mailed to GMAT; Educational
Testing Service, Box 966-R, Princeton, N.J.
08540. Applications must be postmarked
no later than Dec. 26,1988. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Room-105, Speight Bldg.
Gj&E
The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) will be
offered at ECU on Feb. 4,1989. Applica-
tion blanks are to be completed and
mailed to GRE, Educational Testing Serv-
ice, Box 955, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Appli-
cations must be postmarked no later than
Dec. 27, 1988. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105, Speight Bldg.
'A CHRISTMAS CELEBRA-
TION"
The Greenville Choral Society will pres-
ent "A Christmas Celebration" with the
Tar River Orchestra and Chorus on Dec.
10 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Dr.
Rhonda Fleming, director of the
Greenville Choral Society has announced
that this concert will be one that the entire
family will enjoy featuring approximately
300 performers. A pre-concert program
beginning at 7:30 p.m. will feature the
Suzuki Violins of Eastern N.C. and the
Greenville Suzuki Assoc Joanne Bath, co-
ordinator. The Tar River Orchestra and
Chorus, I lernan Murno, will be appear-
ing with the Greenville Society. Tickets
are available from Cha Rich Music Co.
and Piano and Organ Distributors of
Greenville. Group rates are available. For
info call Stephen Vaughn, 752-6154. This
program is sponsored in part by Carolina
Telephone and Greenville Cable TV.
ROOMS FOR RENT
Private and semi-private. Applications
now being accepted for Spring semester.
Male or female. Cost of room for one
semester is (double room) $520 00 Spon-
sored by Wesley FoundationMethodist
Student Center.
OVERSEAS PEVELQPjVlENT
The Overseas Development Network
(ODN) is having an end ot the semester
holiday dinner on Dec. 1 at 6 p.m. Every-
one bring a covered dish - anyone inter-
ested is welcome to come I ocation: 210 S.
Pitt St For moreinfo call Marianne Exum
(h) 830-9450 or (w) 757-6271.
P.E. MOTOR & PHYSICAL
FITNESS TEST
Place. Minges. Time and date: 10:00 a.m
Dec. 6 (Reading Day). A passing score on
this test is required of all students prior to
declaring P.E. as a major. 1) Maintaining
an average T-score of 45 on the six-item
test battery. 2) Having a T-score of 45 on
the aerobics run. "Any student with a
medical condition that would eontraindi-
cate participation in the testing should
contact Mike McCannon or Dr. Gay Israel
at 757-6497. To be exempted from any
portion of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A detailed summary
of the test components is available in the
Human Performance Lab (room 113,
Minges). Your physicians' excuse must
specifically state from which items you
are exempt.
COMPUTER CLUB
The East Carolina Computer Club will
meet in Austin 223 on Dec 1 at 330 p.m.
We will have refreshments, deode on a
design for the club shirts and discuss the
Jan programming contest.
SELF-HELP POSITION
(Part-time Clerk Typist and Reception-
ist). The Dept. of Political Science seeks
reliable, conscientious, and efficient stu- ;
dent with strong skills and some experi-
ence to assist staff and faculty in a variety
of activities. Good typing, copying and '
clerical skills are desired. Please contact .
Mrs. Cynthia Smith, Brewster A-124 per- �
sonally or by telephone, 757-6030, 8 30"
am. to 5:00 p.m MonFri. We will be:
hiring as soon as possible.
-I
CO-OP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
1. IOG summer intern program in state?
government. Majors: Political Science,
Journalism, Biology, Foreign Lang TheC.
atre Arts, School of Art, Ed Social Work,?
Computer Science and others interested;
in state govt. Dates: 6189-81183
Weeks: 10. Hoursweek: 40. Positions: 30
Salary: $5hour Housing. Meredith Co��
lege. Location: Raleigh, N.C Deadline: lg�
2789. Class Soph Jr Sr. 2) NC sta
Ann
govt. (Discover � �
ships. Majors Vai - .1
1189. Salary A; . . J
hon' N C Class Soph j
GPA: 2 5 or greater H . ;
Positions 10 .j
10. For more in!
tact OvOp Ed. in 20281
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Industrial Te
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Flanagan Bldg I l
ase and seefoi
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info i- giver
JQINTHi
Are youii
If so, thei
involved ���. l
Mitchell
WASHir
lie Democrat- I
George Mitchell I f'
majority leadi rand I
will guide th
its coming si rr
George Bush
sources said.
Mitchell v.
do? a1 meeting b mtm
vOi. � te after first i n
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spoke on tl
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Mitchell, v
to the Senate in 19fi
in 1982 and r
month, will succeed R
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become chairmai
�Appropriations Com
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for the pa rtv A New E r
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SUPP





Tl IF EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1988 7
res (oej sunaland, Rev Secre
Ir Bruce L inor Sergeant at Arms, Mike
Marshal
HA SIGMA TH1 Congratulates its
.iuating seniors lohn "Sate Carter.
md David Daughton
� Real World!
H V SIGMA PHI LITTLE SISTER
IH.ls , ; Ready! tonight s the
uy, sell or sa hello via The
cist Carolinian Classified
Ads.
Deadlines for Tuesday's
.per is Fridaj at 4p.m. and
rhursday's paper is Mon-
da at 4p.m.
SP1 i CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
A Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
men! Mon thru SaL Low
o 20 werits of prrgnanry
1 800-433-2930
G STAFF
� nity to thank all of
and dedication this
he most success-
partment has over
mndation for a
Hence. The East
lit of vour hard
with high expecta-
ou a happy and
u all next year.
Announcements
v (Discover the Real World) intern
ips Majors: Various Dates: 6589 8
. I 89 salary: Approx. $200week. I oca
�. n N.C Class Soph, year complete
PA 2.5 or greater Hoursweek 40.
Positions 100 Deadline: 12789. Weeks
' For more info and applications, con-
� , t Co CY Ed in 2028 GCB, 757-6979.
IXDUSTR1 AL TECH.
Industrial Tech manufacturing class is
ling Garden Stools Come by the
igan Bldg to the firs! floor display
ase .wA see tor yourself the quality con
traction and unique design Purchase
ifo is gj en inside display case
JOIN THE CR'5
re you in college? Are you a Republican?
II so then torn the political arena and get
nvolved with EC! s College Republicans
this Thur night in Mendonhall at 7:00
p m
BIOLOGY CLUB
There will be a dinneraward party for all
Biology Club members Pec 6th at 5:00
p.m. at the Golden Coral A sign up sheet
is located by room Biol N 101. All mem-
bers shoul.l attend
"CHRISTMAS IN OLD
MLSQN'
A treasure of earl) twentieth century
architectur. will be featured on the Old
Wilson Historic District Association's
third annu.y 'Christmas in Old Wilson'
tour of hones, Dec. 11, 130-6:30 p.m.
Refreshments will be served Tickets may
be purchased at Duck Soup, the Arts
Council. My kitchen, Krmgles, Inc. or the
arman House or by calling 243 4447 or
243 1009.
WORK STUDY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
Ihe Foreign bang Dept has several posi-
tions available for students who have
qualified for Work Study through Finan-
cial Aid. If you have qualified under the
student aid program and are interested,
Mease see Gary Ambert, CCB room 2001,
phone 757-6207.
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Positions available as personal attendants
andor academic aides to assist handi-
capped ECU students with activities of
daily living and class related work. Flex-
ible hrs available, 7 daysweek. To begin
189. Contact Coop office, 2028 CCB,
757 697s
MEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
"here will be a final meeting tonight at
8:00. The place is 102 Biltmore St.
WASII1NGTON (AP) - Sen-
ile Democrats today elected
(leorge Mitchell oi Maine as theit
majority leader and the man who
Ail guide the chamber through
its coming skirmishes with
icorge Bush's White House,
sources said.
vtitchell was elected in the
clo'jd meeting by a unanimous
vOi - . te after first narrowly
missing a majority in his race
igainst Senators Daniel Inouve of
; la wan and Bennett lohnston of
! ouisiana, said the sources v �
-poke on the condition oi ano-
nymity.
Earlier in the day, Republi-
cans re-elected Bob Dole as their
leader.
Mitchell, who was appointed
to the Senate in 1980, was elected
in 1982 and re-elected earlier this
rtonth, will succeed Robert C.
Byrd, D-W.Va who decided to
step down as majority leader to
become chairman oi the Senate
Appropriations Committee.
Although the least senior oi
ihe three candidates, Mitchell is
t onsidered a strong spokesman
for the partv. A New England lib-
eral, the former federal prosecu-
tor and judge has a regutation as a
skilled, thoughtful legislator.
Mitchell garnered 27 votes on
the first ballot, one short of a ma-
jority among the 55 Democrats in
the new Senate. When it became
apparent he would eventually
win a majority, the sources said,
his colleagues approved his
nomination unanimously.
Mitchell, 55, is a liberal like
Inouve but less tradition-bound.
He appealed to Democrats
seeking someone who would
appear less ideological but still
could act as a strong public
speaker fcr the party.
Hawaii's Inouve, at 64 the
oldest and most senior in the
Senate, pi .ched himself as the
most experienced of the three. His
liberal voting record is in line with
traditional Democrats.
Johnston, 56, is the most con
servativeof the three. I lecited his
Southern roots and parliamen-
tary skill.
The th roe candidates, besides
representing different regions,
offered different perspectives for
the Democrats.
Mitchell will lead Democrats
Aside from those broad
themes, the candidates appealed
to their colleagues on very per-
sonal issues such as demands for
choice committee assignments
and changes in the Senate rules
and schedule.
Dole, the Kansas senator who
recently has been meeting with
Bush to settle their differences,
was re-elected in a voice vote that
reinstalled three Republican offi-
cers who faced no opposition,
said Walt Riker, Dole's spokes-
man.
Alan Simpson, R-Wyo was
re elected minority whip; Bill
Armstrong, R-Colo was re-
turned as chairman of the Repub-
lican Policy Committee, and Thad
Cochran, R-Miss was kept on as
GOP secretary, Rixcr said.
The GOP conference chair-
man, Sen. John Chafee, R-R.I de-
feated challenger Frank Murkow-
ski, R-Alaska, by 28-17 to retain
his post, Riker said. Sen. Don
Nickels, R-Okla defeated Sen.
John McCain, R- Ariz on a vote of
28-17 to head the National Repub-
lican Senatorial Committee.
v. � -
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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1.1988
Bush, Dole may collaborate

&3M
WASHINGTON (AP) - gotiators on the first day of his
George Bush is promising to work presidency to deal with Congress,
with former rival Bob Dole on Bush is expected to send
forging an early budget accord Congress only a sketchy blue-
but says "we're not naive" about print of his budget proposals in-
the ease of reaching accommoda- stead of rewriting the budget
tion with majority-party Demo- President Reagan will submit in
crats in the Senate. early January.
The president-elect was The vice president said he
meeting with Senate Republicans promised Dole "the White House
Dole had a one-word answer:
"No
"That's a good thing to end
on said Bush, who repeatedly
vowed no new taxes during his
campaign.
Bush on Monday continued
to fill top slots in his administra-
tion with government veterans,
announcing that Fitzwater,
two more Cabinet appointments
within the next few days. Transi-
tion sources said he would select
former Senate Armed Services
Committee Chairman John
Tower of Texas as defense secre-
tary and Texas oilman Robert
Mosbacher as commerce secre-
tary.
On the budget front, Defense
today at a breakfast in the Capitol will cooperate in every way pos- Reagan's spokesman for the past Secretary Frank Carlucci said
after a private lunch Monday with sible with Congress two years, would stay on.
the Senate minority leader. He said he planned to work "I think he's the best Bush
Bush also said he's getting cooperatively with Republicans said of Fitzwater. He represents
readv to name some new people
to his Cabinet after making a
string of holdover appointments,
including Mondav's announce-
ment that Marlin Fitzwater would
stay on as chief White House
spokesman.
After Monday's lunch with
Dole, also attended by Bush's
choice for budget director, Rich-
ard G. Darman, the vice president
told reporters: "We're going to
address the budget deficit early
on.
"We both agree that working
towards getting this deficit down
is priority, and the timing of
whatever actions I take will be
shaped, largely shaped, by a lot of
input from Capitol Hill
"We're not naive he added.
"There'll probably be some times
when we differ with the majority
party up there Bush has said he
will appoint deficit reduction nc-
Van Hecke wants
Democrats to
choose next chair
DURHAM (AP) � Mate
Democratic Chairman Jim Van
Hecke savs a nominating commit-
tee, which consists of all Demo-
cratic Council of State members
and other party officials, should
be created to choose the next party
chairman.
Traditionally, the Democrat
holding the highest elected state
'� office, either lieutenant governor
or governor, selects the chairman
and then the Democratic Execu-
tive Committee ratifies the choice.
But for the first time in North
Carolina's historv, a Democrat is
not holding either office.
"The committee would con-
sist of a broad-based group of
people that would look to the
: grass roots of the party to find a
: new chairman said Van Hecke,
who noted that he had not
� worked out the details of the
: nominating committee.
Sen. Terry Sanford should
have a say in the matter, he said.
"There will not be a situation (this
� year) where there's one titular
� leader we're looking to and
whose lead we'll follow he said,
"but certainly Sen. Sanford will
play a major role in the direction
: the party's going in, as will other
: party officials
; The Council of State called a
I meeting two weeks ago to pro-
� pose that a new board of directors,
consisting of Sanford, former
: Gov. Jim Hunt, the eight Council
of State members, Lt. Gov. Bob
s Jordan and former Senate Major-
l itv Leader Tonv Rand, be formed
to make the decision.
The meeting was postponed,
however, after an outcry from
black leaders in the state because
no women or blacks were invited
to the meeting.
Rep. Dan Blue of Wake
County noted that the membersof
the proposed board of directors
were all white men over the age of
40. The meeting has not been re-
scheduled yet.
"I recognize the role that
(Council of State members) have
to play Van Hecke told the
Durham Morning Herald Tues-
day. "They are elected statewide
in both chambers and "reach out
to Democrats as well
Bush said he would meet
soon with whomever Senate
Democrats elected todav to sue-
ceed Sen. Robert C. Byrd as major-
ltv leader. Bush has alreadv met
the old and the new. He repre-
sents the Reagan administration
and he also represents the Bush
administration. "This is continu-
ity in the best sense
Fitzwater had been Bush's
press secretary from 1985-87. He
Monday he was proceeding with
plans to submit to Bush a fiscal
1990 Pentagon budget request
that would include money to in-
Supplies & Decorations
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ECU Discount With LD.
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.ft
with House Speaker Jim Wright, will take the job on Jan. 20. Until
then, Sheila Tate will continue to
serve as press secretary for Bush's
transition.
Fitzwater, 46, called the offer
to stay "a wonderful opportu-
nity" but joked, "I think 1 repre-
sent the old and the older
Asked when the new team he
has promised would begin to
D-Texas.
Both Bush and Dole pro-
nounced their political rivalry,
which reached a bitter climax
during the New Hampshire pri-
mary, a dead issue.
"The election is over and we
both have obligations and cer-
tainly mine is to help him become
ECU
Student Stores
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a great president and I intend to appear, Bush said: "Stay tuned for
do that Dole said. the changes. We'l 1 be getting to
Asked if taxes would have to them soon
be raised to eliminate the deficit. Bush was expected to name
as
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"We already have a board of
directors, which is the executive
council he said. "It's a more
broad-based group than what the
Council of State planned
Van Hecke, who was ap-
pointed by Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan
three years ago, has decided not to
seek the position again. Executive
Director Ken Eudy has also an-
nounced his intention to resign in
January.
and I want to make sure that they
and other elected officials are all
j represented in the process of
j choosing a new chairman
But he said he did not like
j Council of State's proposal for a
board of directors.
Its n
convino
Macintol
PerstJ
howeve
VftiicJ
Loan-to-
pr(
Macinfc
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he
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1.1MB 9
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r
I
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMh R I, 1988
Twister was too close for radar
RALEIGH (AP) � The Na-
tional Weather Service did not
begin issuing tornado warnings
until 38 minutes after the first tor-
nado touched down in western
Wake County because the twister
was too close to radar to monitor,
authorities sav.
"If you are looking straight
up at a storm you can't see much
said Rod Gonski, a meteorologist
with the weather service at
Raleigh Durham International
airport.
it's like looking at a pencil at
point blank Gonski said. "You
can't tell if it's a pencil or a dot in
the middle of a circle
Gonski said the tornado that
struck north Raleigh early Mon-
day, killing two children and in-
juring more than 100 people,
could not have been predicted,
even with advanced radar svs-
tems.
"Even in hindsight it would
have been very difficult to predict
that we would have severe dam-
age from this storm Gonski said.
The weather service oiiicc in
Raleigh was operating without a
critical earlv-waming tool � a
weather radar that has been bro-
ken since Nov. 20. Meterologists
debated whether the radar's
absence kept them from issuing a
tornado warning as early as they
might have.
All agreed, however, that the
current weather radar � even
when working � doesn't have
the early-warning capability of an
experimental radar-computer
system, called NEXRAD, that
should be installed at the 173
weather stations across the
United States by 1995.
Gonski said his office's radar
would have been rendered use-
less by the heavy rains that del-
uged the radar site at the airport.
"The air around the radar site
was heavy laden with moisture
he said. "The rain absorbs and
scatters energy from the radar so
that there is not enough returned
to the signal
Gonksi said radars at Volens,
"a Charlotte and Wilmington
are covering the Raleigh-Durham
area.
"The radar coverage was
adequate he said.
But meteorologists at the
National Severe Storm Labora-
tory in Norman, Okla and the
National Severe Storm Forecast
Center in Kansas City, Mo said
the lack of a radar probably ham-
pered weather forecasting efforts
at Raleigh-Durham.
Fred Mosher, chief of techni-
cal development at the Kansas
City forecast center, said the
weather stations at Volens, Char-
lotte and Wilmington would not
give meteorologists as accurate a
radar picture of Raleigh-Durham
as their own radar.
"The beam gets wider as you
get further away, so you have less
resolution the further away you
are Mosher told The Greens-
boro News & Record.
"Normally if there's a strong
thunderstorm in the area, you
take the local radar, look for sig-
natures in the storm like liquid
water high up in the cloud he
said. "That's an indication of a
strong storm. It's difficult to do
that from far away
Mosher agreed that a storm
out break over or near a radar site
would diminish forecasters' abil-
ity to see thunderstorms that have
the potential to spawn tornadoes.
But Don Burgess, a research
meteorologist at the storm labora-
tory in Norman, said, "At least
they would have seen the storms
forming or perhaps moving into
the Raleigh-Durham area
Joe Dean, state secretary of
Crime Control and Public Safety,
said 15 minutes' warning might
have made the difference be-
tween life and death Monday- But
he added that because the storms
hit when most people were
asleep, it's hard to sav how many
would have heard a tornado
warning.
"In a disaster, the strongest
partner 1 have is the media Dean
said. "If you aren't watching TV
or aren't listening to the radio,
vou don't know
Gonski said the storms were
spawned by the collision of a cold
front into a warm, moist air mass
over the eastern part of the state.
He said temperatures on Sunday
ranged in the 70s and humidity
was similar to summertime lev-
els. Two jet streams located over
the state also contributed to the
development of the twisters, he
said.
But Gonski said that when the
cold front entered the state, it did
not exhibit the qualities of a po-
tentially damaging storm.
'The front had some history
of causing severe weather in pre-
vious days he said. "As it en-
tered North Carolina, it did not
have severe weather associated
with it
"The front looked a lot more
friendly as it entered the Caroli-
nas than when it exited Gonski
said.
Thunderstorms began to
develop as the cold front collided
with the warm air Sunday night.
Gonski said that when the thun-
derstorms grew to an elevation of
about 30,000 to 40,000 feet, their
tops were "blown off" by two jet
streams.
The high level winds then
pulled more air up into the
storms. "Suppose you had a fire-
place and then you blew a wind
across the top of the chimney,
Conski said. "You would in-
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percent, thehij
years, son
The inci
iigratebyaha
viere announ
vfere the fourth t! . .
: Many ecoi i
predicting a pi
recent weel
rates in the I i
fcien rising due to ini il
lation and I
iA foreign exchai
I "It comes as i
tact, they 'banks
hjblpback longer than
said Edward
economist foi rudentia
Securities Inc
The prime rate i
bank's costs fbon
including inter I -
ings a - unts
deposit, and tr.
creases in oth i
The rate
because banki i
tor calculat .
rate loans a: :
many types
able-rate cons in -
home equity .
"It's clear v. il
be absorbir

Sentencing hem
looked into for
death row inamfc
RALEIGH
tor North Carolina
inmates are a -
prcmeCour: I
premeCourl I
the way murderers an
to die. a decision I tal
as many a- B :
Attorney - � - I
rr an inmat J
tence the stati S
affirmed. sa a I S 5
Court rulii
also appl es to
Sgjepfficials "I
inoh which said the Majrykl
system tilted too mu
death sentences d
North Carolina
The stal
its most n : � - .
Nov I7t( seta
tence ol
convicted in 198:
formerbossata i -
laundry.
The U.S. S
ordered the state
sider I loyd s sentei
an earlier rulinj
striking down M u
sentence proced stl
court concluded that : I
land ruling did r I
Carolina.
Now law ersi rM K �
petitioned the U.S.
Court to mle that I I
decision. Mills vs Man
overturns North Cai - p
cedure.
"The petition says I
applies to North Carolina a
reported distinctions i
the North Carolina Suj
Court were unava
Robert Mahler d i
N.C. Death Penalt
Center, which ass sts
death-row inmates
lie said he expe ted the co
would decide next spi
whether to accept the appc
Similar petitions j
on behalf of Llo
inmates. Mahler said.
But a lawyer m the state
torney General - Office
state would urge the
preme Court to deny the
tions.
We feel like our Su I
Court is correct, that our statutj
different, and there is no reaj
for the US. Supreme Co
grant a review, said Senior l�
utv Attorney General fame
Coman.
"Generalh when we feel J
court is correct on a position trl
have taken, then generally we l
file a petition asking that u'urtf
review) be denied
The state Supreme Court J
series of 5-2 decisions, ha sf
that North Carolina's procedj
does not have the defects that cj
corned the U.S. Supremo Coui
Mills vs. Maryland.
The U.S. Supreme Court
that in the Maryland system,
rors in a murder trial thought U
had to agree unanimously
mitigating factors.





r
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1988
Twister was too close for radar
RALEIGH (AP) � The Na-
tional Weather Service did not
begin issuing tornado warnings
until 38 minutes after the first tor-
nado touched down in western
Wake County because the twister
was too close to radar to monitor,
authorities say.
"If you are looking straight
upat a storm you can't see much
said Rod Gonski, a meteorologist
with the weather service at
Raleigh Durham International
airport.
"It's like looking at a pencil at
point blank Gonski said. "You
can't tell if it's a pencil or a dot in
the middle of a circle
Gonski said the tornado that
struck north Raleigh early Mon-
day, killing two children and in-
juring more than 100 people,
could not have been predicted,
even with advanced radar sys-
tems.
"Even in hindsight it would
have been very difficult to predict
that we would have severe dam-
age from this storm Gonski said.
The weather service office in
Raleigh was operating without a
critical early-warning tool � a
weather radar that has been bro-
ken since Nov. 20. Meterologists
debated whether the radar's
absence kept them from issuing a
tornado warning as early as they
might have.
All agreed, however, that the
current weather radar � even
when working � doesn't have
the early-warning capability of an
experimental radar-computer
system, called NEXRAD, that
should be installed at the 173
weather stations across the
United States by 1995.
Gonski said his office's radar
would have been rendered use-
less by the heavy rains that del-
uged the radar site at the airport.
"The air around the radar site
was heavy laden with moisture
he said. "The rain absorbs and
scatters energy from the radar so
that there is not enough returned
to the signal
Gonksi said radars at Volens,
Va Charlotte and Wilmington
are covering the Raleigh-Durham
area.
"The radar coverage was
adequate he said.
But meteorologists at the
National Severe Storm Labora-
tory in Norman, Okla and the
National Severe Storm Forecast
Center in Kansas City, Mo said
the lack of a radar probably ham-
pered weather forecasting efforts
at Raleigh-Durham.
Fred Mosher, chief of techni-
cal development at the Kansas
City forecast center, said the
weather stations at Volens, Char-
lotte and Wilmington would not
give meteorologists as accurate a
radar picture of Raleigh-Durham
as their own radar.
"The beam gets wider as you
get further away, so you have less
resolution the further away you
are Mosher told The Greens-
boro News & Record.
"Normally if there's a strong
thunderstorm in the area, you
take the local radar, look for sig-
natures in the storm like liquid
water high up in the cloud he
said. "That's an indication of a
strong storm. It's difficult to do
that from far away
Mosher agreed that a storm
out break over or near a radar site
would diminish forecasters' abil-
ity to see thunderstorms that have
the potential to spawn tornadoes.
But Don Burgess, a research
meteorologist at the storm labora-
tory in Norman, said, "At least
they would have seen the storms
forming or perhaps moving into
the Raleigh-Durham area
Joe Dean, state secretary of
Crime Control and Public Safety,
said 15 minutes' warning might
have made the difference be-
tween life and death Monday. But
he added that because the storms
hit when most people were
asleep, it's hard to say how many
would have heard a tornado
warning.
"In a disaster, the strongest
partner I have is the media Dean
said. "If you aren't watching TV
or aren't listening to the radio,
you don't know
Gonski said the storms were
spawned by the collision of a cold
front into a warm, moist air mass
over the eastern part of the state.
He said temperatures on Sunday
ranged in the 70s and humidity
was similar to summertime lev-
els. Two jet streams located over
the state also contributed to the
development of the twisters, he
said.
But Gonski said that when the
cold front entered the state, it did
not exhibit the qualities of a po-
tentially damaging storm.
"The front had some history
of causing severe weather in pre-
vious days he said. "As it en-
tered North Carolina, it did not
have severe weather associated
with it
"The front looked a lot more
friendly as it entered the Caroli-
nas than when it exited Gonski
said.
Thunderstorms began to
develop as the cold front collided
with the warm air Sunday night.
Gonski said that when the thun-
derstorms grew to an elevation of
about 30,000 to 40,000 feet, their
tops were "blown off" by two jet
streams.
The high level winds then
pulled more air up into the
storms. "Suppose you had a fire-
place and then you blew a wind
across the top of the chimney,
Gonski said. "You would in-
crease the temperature of the fire
because you intensify the up-
draft
"And the whole thing went
off in a matter of minutes, liter-
ally
The first tornado strike oc-
curred just northeast of the air-
port. A clock on a tower at Hart-
ford Hills Apartments was stuck
at 1:07, apparently the time elec-
tricity was disrupted.
CLIFF'S?55
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
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Coupon Service Specials
r
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Available At:
GREETINGS!
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COGGINS CAR CARE
320 W. Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C, Phone 756-5244
MONDAY
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FOOTBALL
On Greenville's Largest
Wide Screen TV
This Week
L.A. Rams
vs
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$2.50 Pitchers
$1.00 Miller Long Necks
$1.50 Highballs
Ramada Inn
(Formerly Shearton of Greenville)
rreenvllle Blvd. � 3SS-21
The Elbo
Presents Ladies Night
All Ladies Free All Night
Come Early Drink Specials All Night
Friday: Free Pizza
$50 Cash for Sorority and Fraternity
with best attendance
Sign up when you enter
$2.00 Frozen
16 oz.
Specials
ThursSun.
rime
NEW YORK (AP)-Consul
� s may cut back on big-tl
( hristmas presents now that tl
r ition's biggest banks boost)
t eir prime lending rates to It
r. ?rcent, the highest level in 3 ll
y �rs, some analysts said.
1 The increases in the key lei
iig rate by a half percentage po
vfere announced Monday ai
vlere the fourth this year.
Many economists have be
predicting a prime rate hike
recent weeks because inteH
rtes in the bond markets hi.
b�en rising due to inflation spe
Ution and the dollar's weakn
ift foreign exchange.
; "It comes as no surprise
fjet, they (banks) seem to h;
hjelpback longer than I expected
sid Edward Yardeni, chi
economist for Prudential-Ba
Securities Inc.
The prime rate reflects.
bpnk's costs of borrowing moni
including interest it pavs on sJ
iogs accounts or certificates
deposit, and trails more subtle
creases in other interest rates.
The rate is watched clos
because bankers use it as a ba
for calculating interest on corr
rate loans and for determinil
many types of fixed and adjul
able-rate consumer loans, such
home equity loans.
"It's clear that consumers
be absorbing higher borrowii
Sentencing bein;
looked into for
death row inamti
RALEIGH (AP) � Attornc
for North Carolina death-d
inmates are asking the U.S.
preme Court to overrule state!
preme Court decisions upholdi
the way murderers are sentenc
to die, a decision that could aff'J
as many as 80 death-row inmat
Attorneys for Dock Mel
Jr an inmate whose death s�
tence the state Supreme Court 1
affirmed, say a U.S. SupreJ
Court ruling in a Maryland Cc
also applies to North Carolij
SHf pfficials contend that the i
ina. which said the , MtryU
system tilted too much in favor
death sentences, does not appl v
North Carolina.
The state Supreme Court,
its most recent ruling, refus
Nov. 17 to set aside the death i
tence of Oscar Lloyd, who w
convicted in 1985 of killing
former boss at a Cherokee Coui
laundry.
The U.S. Supreme Court
ordered the state court to recc
sider Lloyd's sentence in light
an earlier ruling by the U.S. co
striking down Maryland's dei
sentence procedure. But the stl
court concluded that the Mai
land ruling did not apply to Noj
Carolina.
Now lawyers for McKov h�
petitioned the U.S. Suprej
Court to rule that the Maryl
decision, Mills vs. ' land, a
overturns North Carolina's
cedure.
"The petition savs that Ml
applies to North Carolina, and
reported distinctions relied onl
the North Carolina Suprej
Court were unavailing
Robert Mahler, director of
N.C. Death Penalty Resou)
Center, which assists lawyers
death-row inmates.
He said he expected the coj
would decide next spril
whether to accept the appeal.
Similar petitions are planr
on behalf of Lloyd and ot
inmates, Mahler said.
But a lawyer in the state
torney General's Office said
state would urge the U.S.
preme Court to deny the
tions.
"We feel like our Suprej
Court is correct, that our statutl
different, and there is no rea
for the U.S. Supreme Court
grant a review, said Senior
uty Attorney General Jame
Coman.
"Generally when we feel
court is correct on a position tl
have taken, then generally we
file a petition asking that (furtj
review) be denied
The state Supreme Court,
series of 5-2 decisions, has
that North Carolina's procedj
does not have the defects that c
cerned the U.S. Supreme Coui
Mills vs. Maryland.
The VS. Supreme Court
that in the Maryland system
rors in a murder trial thought n
had to agree unanimously
mitigating factors.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1, 1988 11
Oyster Bar
3.65
I
als I
1 CHANGE"
ervice!
j
als
:it-end
nment
rj pecifieations)
88
1
5
e Rotation
ij.i
88
oodrich.
RCARE
56-5244
tght
nity
Prime rate hits highest level in three years
: NEW YORK (AD - Consum-
ers may cut back on big-tag
(Christmas presents now that the
ration's biggest banks boosted
teir prime lending rates to 10.5
ffercent, the highest level in 3 12
�ars some analysts said
The increases in the kev lend-
ateby a halt percentage point
vferc announced Monday and
were the fourth this year.
Many economists have been
predicting a prime rate hike in
recent weeks because interest
rtes in the bond markets have
tfcen rising due to inflation specu-
lation and the dollar's weakness
A foreign exchange.
It comes as no surprise. In
fact they (banks) seem to have
back longer than I expected
;aid Edward Yardeni, chief
economist for Prudential-Bache
urities Inc.
The prime rate reflects a
vnk s cots of borrowing money,
u luding interest it pays on sav-
;s accounts or certificates oi
posit, and trails more subtle in-
reasesin other interest rates.
The rate is watched closely
because bankers use it as a basis
�or calculating interest on corpo-
rate loans and for determining
manv types oi fixed and adjust-
trate consumer loans, such as
home equity loans.
"It's clear that consumers will
be absorbing higher borrowing
Sentencing being
looked into for
death row inamtes
RALEIGH (AP) � Attorneys
for North Carolina death-row
inmates are asking the U.S. Su-
erne Court to overrule state Su-
preme Court decisions upholding
� he way murderers are sentenced
to die, a decision that could affect
. - many as 80 death-row inmates.
Attorneys for Dock McKoy
"r an inmate whose death sen-
tence the state Supreme Court has
affirmed, sav a U.S. Supreme
Court ruling in a Maryland case
also applies to North Carolina,
�tar officials contend that therul-
�& which said the. Mar viand
system tilted too much in favor of
death sentences, does not apply in
North Carolina.
The state Supreme Court, in
ts most recent ruling, refused
v. 17 to set aside the death sen-
tence of Oscar Lloyd, who was
convicted in 1983 of killing his
�rmer boss at a Cherokee County
lundry.
The U.S. Supreme Court had
ordered the state court to recon-
sider Lloyd's sentence in light of
an earlier ruling by the U.S. court
striking down Maryland's death
sentence procedure. But the state
irt concluded that the Mary-
land ruling did not apply to North
Carolina.
Now lawyers for McKoy have
titioned the U.S. Supreme
art to rule that the Maryland
sion Mills vs. Maryland, also
erturns North Carolina's pro-
cure.
"The petition savs that Mills
i pplies to North Carolina, and the
- p rted distinctions relied on by
North Carolina Supreme
urt were unavailing said
: bert Mahler, director of the
.C. Death Penalty Resource
nter, which assists lawyers for
leath-rovt inmates.
1 le said he expected the court
"aid decide next spring
hether to accept the appeal.
Similar petitions are planned
behalf of Lloyd and other
mates, Mahler said.
But a lawyer in the state At-
rney General's Office said the
tte would urge the U.S. Su-
preme Court to deny the peti-
ns.
"We feel like our Supreme
( i uirt is correct, that our statute is
fferent, and there is no reason
r the U.S. Supreme Court to
grant a review, said Senior Dep-
. Attorney General James .
man.
"Generally when we feel our
court is correct on a position they
have taken, then generally we will
file a petition asking that (further
review) be denied
The state Supreme Court, in a
series of 5-2 decisions, has said
that North Carolina's procedure
does not have the defects that con-
cerned the U.S. Supreme Court in
Mills vs. Maryland.
The U.S. Supreme Court said
that in the Maryland system, ju-
rors in a murder trial thought they
had to agree unanimously on
mitigatir.g factors.
costs in December or early nexi
year said William V. Sullivan,
an economist for the investment
firm Dean Witter Reynolds Inc.
But some economists said it
was unclear whether the rate-hike
would adversely affect the econ-
omy, specifically consumer buy-
ing habits
"I think the direct effect is
pretty small because generally
consumers aren't affected bv
modest increases in interest
rates said James L. Kochan,
chief fixed-income strategist for
Merrill Lynch Capital Markets
Inc.
But Yardeni said some con-
sumers might cut back on spend-
ing and buying only things that
they can afford
There's an underlying sense
ol uneasiness because so many
people have been through rough
times even when the economy
was strong. The prime rate hike
coming into the Christmas season
may make people more cau-
tious he said.
The financial markets had no
major reaction to Monday's an-
nouncement. Stock and bond
prices rose modestly, while the
dollar held firm against other
major currencies.
Sullivan said the markets also
are prepared for further increase's
in interest rates.
Federal Reserve Board Chair-
man Alan Greenspan has warned
of higher short-term rates unless
lawmakers work to trim the huge
federal budget deficit, a key factor
in the recent weakening of the
dollar.
"There's a building percep-
tion in the marketplace that the
Fed is, in fact, tightening condi-
tions Sullivan said.
Sullivan and other econo-
mists predicted the Fed might
soon raise its discount rate, or the
interest it charges on loans to
banks, and if that happens, the
banks might raise rates again.
"I'd look for something (from
the Fed) in the next two weeks
said Yardeni.
USDA Choice Boneless Full Cut
ROUND
STEAK
USDA Choice
Beef Boneless
CHUCK ROAST
Prices in this ad
good thru Dec. 4,
1988.
Large Fraizer Fir 2SES
CHRISTMAS TREES
Wreaths Each 8.99
i
Where Available
Each
7.5 Oz. - NaturalBBQSour
Cream & ChivesNo Salt
Home Fries
WISE COTTAGE
FRIES- �
Jimmy Dean Mild. Hot.
& Special Recipe
ROLL
SAUSAGE
Pepsi,
Caffeine Free Pepsi
89
Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi
89
Large Beautiful
POINSETTIAS
$299
Each
�PT
Mountain Dew
Diet Mountain Dew
Genuine
IDAHO
POTATOES
99e
EXTRA LOW PRICESEVERYDAY
10 Lb.
Bag
, IDAHO
POTATOES





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1988 11
L CHANGE"
itment
for you:
ervice!
d)
6 p.m. St. til 5
als
nt-end
nment
ry Specifications)
88
1
5
This Coupon
e Rotation
d
r Balance
)
88

Coupon
"narge and BF Goodrich.
R CARE
N.C, Phone 756-5244
1
prime rate hits highest level in three years
NEW YORK (AP) - Consum- costs in December or early next
s may cut back on big-tag year said William V. Sullivan,
hristmas presents now that the an economist for the investment
ition's biggest banks boosted firm Dean Witter Reynolds Inc.
teir prime lending rates to 10.5 But s�me economists said it
jrcent, the highest level in 31 2 ws unclear whether the rate-hike
?ars, some analysts said.
The increases in the key lend-
i Jg rate by a half percentage point
vfere announced Monday and
vfere the fourth this year.
Many economists have been
predicting a prime rate hike in
recent weeks because interest
rgtes in the bond markets have
tfeen rising due to inflation specu-
lation and the dollar's weakness
ii foreign exchange.
"It comes as no surprise. In
tact, they (banks) seem to have
help back longer than I expected'
s&id Edward Yardeni, chief
economist for Prudential-Bache
Securities Inc.
The prime rate reflects a
bank's costs of borrowing money,
including interest it pays on sav-
ings accounts or certificates of
deposit, and trails more subtle in-
creases in other interest rates.
The rate is watched closely
because bankers use it as a basis
tor calculating interest on corpo-
rate loans and for determining
many types of fixed and adjust-
able-rate consumer loans, such as
home equity loans.
"It's clear that consumers will
be absorbing higher borrowing
Sentencing being
looked into for
death row inamtes
RALEIGH (AP) � Attorneys
for North Carolina death-row
inmates are asking the U.S. Su-
preme Court to overrule state Su-
preme Court decisions upholding
the way murderers are sentenced
to die, a decision that could affect
as many as 80 death-row inmates.
Attorneys for Dock McKoy
Jr an inmate whose death sen-
tence the state Supreme Court has
affirmed, say a U.S. Supreme
Court ruling in a Maryland case
also applies to North Carolina.
Sgje officials contend that the rul-
ing which said the Maryland
systbm tilted too much in favor of
death sentences, does not apply in
North Carolina.
The state Supreme Court, in
its most recent ruling, refused
Nov. 17 to set aside the death sen-
tence of Oscar Lloyd, who was
convicted in 1985 of killing his
former boss at a Cherokee County
laundrv.
J
The U.S. Supreme Court had
ordered the state court to recon-
sider Lloyd's sentence in light of
an earlier ruling by the U.S. court
striking down Maryland's death
sentence procedure. But the state
court concluded that the Mary-
land ruling did not apply to North
Carolina.
Now lawyers for McKoy have
petitioned the U.S. Supreme
Court to rule that the Maryland
decision, Mills vs. Maryland, also
overturns North Carolina's pro-
cedure.
"The petition says that Mills
applies to North Carolina, and the
reported distinctions relied on by
the North Carolina Supreme
Court were unavailing said
Robert Mahler, director of the
N.C. Death Penalty Resource
Center, which assists lawyers for
death-row inmates.
He said he expected the court
would decide next spring
whether to accept the appeal.
Similar petitions are planned
on behalf of Lloyd and other
inmates, Mahler said.
But a lawyer in the state At-
torney General's Office said the
state would urge the U.S. Su-
preme Court to deny the peti-
tions.
"We feel like our Supreme
Court is correct, that our statute is
different, and there is no reason
for the U.S. Supreme Court to
grant a review, said Senior Dep-
uty Attorney General James J.
Coman.
"Generally when we feel our
court is correct on a position they
have taken, then generally we will
file a petition asking that (further
review) be denied
The state Supreme Court, in a
series of 5-2 decisions, has said
that North Carolina's procedure
does not have the defects that con-
cerned the U.S. Supreme Court in
Mills vs. Maryland.
The U.S. Supreme Court said
that in the Maryland system, ju-
rors in a murder trial thought they
had to agree unanimously on
mitigating factors.
would adversely affect the econ-
omy, specifically consumer buy-
ing habits
"I think the direct effect is
modest increases in interest
rates said James L. Kochan,
chief fixed-income strategist for
Merrill Lynch Capital Markets
Inc.
But Yardeni said some con-
sumers might cut back on spend-
ing and buying only things that
they can afford
"There's an underlying sense
pretty small because generally of uneasiness because so many
consumers aren't affected bv people have been through rough
times even when the economy
was strong. The prime rate hike
coming into the Christmas season
may make people more cau-
tious he said.
The financial markets h no
major reaction to Monday's an-
nouncement. Stock and bond
prices rose modestly, while the
dollar held firm against other
major currencies.
Sullivan said the markets also
are prepared for further increases
in interest rates.
Federal Reserve Board Chair-
man Alan Greenspan has warned
of higher short-term rates unless
lawmakers work to trim the huge
federal budget deficit, a key factor
in the recent weakening of the
dollar.
"There's a building percep-
tion in the marketplace that the
Fed is, in fact, tightening condi-
tions Sullivan said.
Sullivan and other econo-
mists predicted the Fed might
soon raise its discount rate, or the
interest it charges on loans to
banks, and if that happens, the
banks might raise rates again.
"I'd look for something (from
the Fed) in the next two weeks
said Yardeni.
USDA Choice Boneless Full Cut
ROUND
STEAK
USDA Choice
Beef Boneless
runny
OAST
Prices in this ad
good thru Dec. 4,
1988.
Christmas 0 no
Wreaths Each o.aa
mes
Uioun.
Home Fries
WISE COTTAGE
FRIE r
Pepsi,
Caffeine Free Pepsi
��
Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi
Large Beautiful
POINSETTIAS
$999
Each
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12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER L lSS
r
Bush has to fill vacancy in Tokyo
WASHINGTON (AP) �At
least one of the 100-odd American
ambassadors that President-elect
George Bush must select could
rank in importance with many of
the Cabinet choices now drawing
most of the nation's attention.
Bush must select the succes-
sor to former Senate Democratic
leader Mike Mansfield, retiring
after a record 11 vearsasambassa
dor to Tokyo.
The job is important simply
because Japan has become so
important to America in the late
20th Century.
Together the two countries
account for 40 to 50 percent of
world economic output. They
have one of the world's most com-
plex, emotionally-charged and
changing relationships.
Mansfield calls the U.SJapa-
nese relationship the most impor-
tant in the world and says that
during his tenure in Tokyo it has
changed from that of uncle-
nephew to brother-brother.
Complicating the love-hate
feelings often felt between coun-
tries are deep cultural and lan-
guage differences and japan's
new world importance.
In only four decades, Japan
has transformed itself from a
humble, defeated American en-
emy to a U.S. protege and loyal
ally, an economic superpower
and rival, U.S. creditor, landlord
and occasional critic.
During the election cam-
paign, Bush took positions on is-
sues such as Japan's military and
foreign aid role and trade.
To demands that japan in-
crease military spending and re-
lieve some of the U.S. defense
burden, Bush a bomber pilot
against Japan in World War II -
noted that Japan's Asian neigh-
bors still remember the war and
"remain very sensitive to the issue
of Japanese rearmament
He suggested that Japan rap-
idlv boost its share of global eco-
nomic aid, a catetory in which it is
about to surpass the United
States. But that, too, could create
other conflicts, because Japan is
already becoming a rival to U.S.
dominance of such international
institutions as the World Bank.
On trade, Bush is expected to
take President Reagan's general
line of seeking to brake protec-
tionist efforts to restrict Japanese
imports into the United States
while encouraging sharpened
U.S. competitiveness.
Reagan and Yasuhiro
Nakasone, the Japanese prime
minister from 1982-87, developed
a first-name relationship un-
precedented in the two countries'
history. Their personal connec-
tion helped the nations weather a
rough period marked by U.S.
pressure against Japanese domes-
tic barriers, alleged unfair trade
practices and insular thinking
inappropriate for a country
grown rich by exporting.
Noboru Mekalaka Takeshita,
Nakasone's successor, said dur-
ing a White House visit that he
also had gotten on a first-name
basis with the U.S. president.
Tokyo news reports say he hopes
to visit Washington early in the
Bush presidency to cultivate the
same kind of relations.
Announcing his retirement,
Mansfield said he felt he could
leave "with our heads high The
U.S. trade deficit with Japan, ac-
counting for $57 billion of a global
deficit of $170 billion in 1987, is fi-
nally narrowing, he said, as a re-
sult of hard-bargained market-
openings, the costlier yen and
cheaper dollar and efforts by
Nakasone and Takeshita to boost
Japanese domestic consumption
and imports.
Names mentioned as early
candidates for the Tokyo post in-
clude Michael H. Armacost,
undersecretary of state for politi-
cal affairs, who has served in
Tokyo; Gaston Sigur, assistant
secretary of state for East Asian
and Pacific affairs; and Lamar
Alexander, the former Tennessee
governor instrumental in bring-
ino Japanese factories to his state .
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
State grants two Republican Senator
candidates election vote recounts
RALEIGH tAP) � As the
state Board of Elections certified
results in the Nov. 8 elections, it
also granted recounts for two Re-
publican challengers in a Senate
race won by Russell Walker, and
in another Senate race in which in-
cumbent R.P. "Bo" Thomas fell
264 votes short of re-election.
The board on Tuesday de-
clared Gov. Jim Martin the official
winner of the governor race, or-
dered new elections in local races
in Duplin Countv, and called for a
second recount in a state Senate
race.
The state board's action gave
final approval to most ot the re-
sults of the Nov. S election includ-
ing state voters choice of Martin, a
Republican, over Democrat Bob
Jordan, in the governor's race and
that of Vice President George
Bush, a Republican, over the
Democratic nominee, Michael
Dukakis, in the presidential race.
In the District 16 Senate race,
in which Walker appeared to
have won another term, unofficial
returns show Democratic incum-
bent Sen. Wanda Hunt a clear
winner with 50,608 votes. Walker
won the second seat with 48,170
votes. The two-seat district is
made up of four counties �
Chatham, Moore, Orange, and
Randolph.
Trailing Walker were Repub-
licans Max Reece Jr. with 47,978
votes, and Robert "Bob" Crump,
with 47,978. A recount was auto-
matic for Reece under a state law
that requires them when unoffi-
cial returns show a difference of 1
percent or less between winning
and losing candidates.
But the board voted also to
order a recount for Crump, who
trailed Walker by 568 votes,
which is also within 1 percent of
the vote given Walker even
though he was not the candidate
"with the next highest number of
votes" as provided by state law.
A recount was also ordered in
Senate District 29 where Thomas,
D-Hendersonville, was a third-
placc finishei in the two-seat dis-
trict with 49,038 votes, trailing
Republican C.W. I lardin of Can-
ton, who won 49,302 votes.
The board also voted to order
Macon County Board of Elections
to conduct a probable cause hear-
ing on Thomas' request for a new
state senate election in that
countv. said N.C. Elections Direc-
tor Alex Brock.
The purpose of the probable
cause hearing is to conduct a legal
forum at which the board divide
whether to hold evidentiary hear-
ing oi the complaints Brock
said.
"They've got to consider it
he said, rhat's what the order
will require Macon County Board
of elections to do. Whatever they
do is appealable to the state
board
Macon County election offi-
cials will decide when the prob-
able cause hearing will be held,
but it will not be held until after
the recount. Brock said.
"I'm encouraged by the fact
they ordered the hearing Tho-
mas said when reached in Raleigh
Tuesday evening. "Nothing has
changed, but I'm still confident
that the big board will find that
the Macon County elections
board erred in the manner in
which the electronic voting ma-
chines were programmed. I'm
certain of that. It's as obvious as
the nose on vour face
The state board declared
Democrat John Lewis Jr the
winner over Republican Donald
L. Smith for a seat on the state
Court of Appeals, but withheld
final certification pending a noon
deadline on Thursday for Mr.
Smith, who trailed by 15,858.
votes, to call for a recount.
In other action, voters in
Duplin County will go back to the
polls again to elect two county
commissioners and three school
board members after the state
board ruled that a programming
error on voting machines had
made it impossible to get an accu-
rate count of the votes there.
The programming error re-
sulted in some straight-ticket vot-
ers casting ballots for board
members and commissioners in
Other districts, according to Du-
plin County officials.
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Get cash for your books���hard cover or paperback whether used on
this campus or not. We buy all titles having Resale Market Value.
Sell them at:
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building





r
UniversityBortExdiange
h&
Book Buy Back With UBE
The One For The Cash
UBb pays more tor your textbooks. 1 hat s
right, UBE will buy back your textbooks
and you'll leave with extra cash
to spend over the holidays. So
remember, the one for the cash
is UBE.
TheOne For Free Gifts and Savings
When you come to UBb, you
not only leave with cash, but also
well be giving away ECU razors, campus
trial packs and tokens for $1.00 off �;
anything from our large selection of t 'P
sportswear. Let UBE pay more for �
your textbooks and you leave with
cash, free gifts and extra savings.
The One For ECU ,
While at UBE, make sure you browse
through our large selection of ECU apparrel
and ECU items. Choose from shirts and
sweats to back packs and coffee mugs. As
a matter of fact, UBE has the
largest selection of quality
sweat pants and sweat
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UBE for ECU t iiff11
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t
HU I S1 t. KOI IN! N
Features
: MBER 1,
�88 'age
Pat finds diversity at Varsity Hair Cut
By TIM HAMPTON
features I .
With the blinds pulled and
the glass door dead bolted,
Greenville's own Flovd the bar-
ber. Pat Moore, sweeps up the
dailv gathering ot blond, brown
and grev hair clippings front his
orange tiled floor.
Reflecting into the combina-
tion of kvks. Pat looked up and
said 'I enjoy this. It snot like it sa
job. 1 meet a lot ot people 1 would
never have met.
Moore, proprietor of Varsitv
i lairCutonCotancheSt. has seen
hair stvles come and c � ind bar-
bershops evolve into the multi-
chair, appointment onlv format.
No appointment is needed to see
Pat. and even it vou wanted to set
up an appointment, you can t Pa:
does t have a pi ' �' ng
but Pat traditional barber
stvle is still thiving January will
mark the22nd c ir the i I. w hite
and blue barb' r p ' hass n
downtown next I ' pv - Pool
Hall.
o appointments after 21
years, 1 ain't tooling around with
something that works Pat says
while t inghisbl ick lowl p Ri i
boks
LateTuesda noon, a bar-
rage of fresh hair stvle seekers
op m d Pat sd or.Sitting i si
tall, an angular male E L student
marveled in the wall mirror at
Pat's creation of a faded look
A conformist punk style, the
laded look requires the sides of
the head to be skinned while the
op remained several inches long.
As with the change in hair stvles,
Pat has moved with the times.
'When 1 first started, all the
college bovs wanted flat tops,
now it s ,i varietv ol things, Pat
sa i as he adjusts his gold-
rimmed glasses. Beside the
taded look Pat will accomo-
date anv request trom the spiked
look to Mohawk. Although he
doesn't cut main vvomens hair
as shaved the sides of some
K l-
ECl girls heads
� diversity in clientele pay
p tti nagetoVarsitv I lair Cut and
njovs that element of his
work Besides lawyers and busi-
pie who work down-
IC ollar workers, stu
'� anet students visit
i
'at - next customer, Rav
mend has been a loyal client for
20 years. Raymond steps his w ork
boots to the stool and ask for a
trim of his grev hair.
1 one goes by fast don't it
Rav mond
"When vou are working, it
reallv goes b fast Raymond
savs above the subtle musax es-
caping trom a small two speaker
stereo.
Before Pat can pull the vvisk
brush trom his back pocket and
dust oii Raymond's neck, a
couple, the man wearing Knits
and jeans, enter the barbershop
just before close. Pat addresses
them both by their name. Tat
takes pride in his ability to re-
member clients' names.
1 try to remember names. 1
like to know my customers per-
sonally Pat savs.
It'salready after the 5:30clos-
ing and Pat anticipates the man in
the boots to be his last customer of
the day. But this afternoon is a
busy one for Pat as a mother pulls
her two sons through the glass
door.
The fussy mother tugs the
smaller oi the two bovs, a tired
whiner, in the direction oi the
barber's chair with a bold 1964
emblem on its bottom. Once the
bov is bibbed and is snapped in,
the mother orders to cut the bangs
an inch and to cut the back close.
Pat tries to cheer the bov up,
but his whines presist. Changing
the heads on the electric razor
with proficiency, Pat angles the
buzz tool around the contours oi
the bin's neck. "Now that wasn't
too bad was it?"
Still standing near the chair,
the mother calls her eldest boy, a
13-year-old, to the stand. Reluc-
tantly, he folds his Sports Illus-
trated and shuffles aeross the
floor. The mother once again
barks cutting instructions, which
include a chopping to a long front,
to which the boy squeals "Oh,
Mom
As a stern look grows on the
mother's ico, Pat becomes the
mediator by saying "We'll fix vou
up The boy slouches in the bar-
ber chair with somewhat oi a op-
timistic demur, he knows he can
trust Pat; you see, Pat has cut his
hair since the 13-year-old was a
tyke.
Pat has a lot of returning cus-
tomers and in some families he
cuts the hair oi three generations.
And some wouldn't trust their
hair with anyone else but Pat.
"A couple oi my customers
have left Greenville, but still come
back to see me Pat savs with his
ever present smile. "1 still cut the
man's hair who modeled for me
when I went to get my barber's
license. Cecil Hinnant is his
name
Now 6:15 on a Tuesday eve-
ning, Pat would usually be home
about this time, but he is not too
upset about it. As he dumps the
collection oi hair clippings, a
melting pot oi locks, into the trash
bin and pulls his sleeves through
a blue wind breaker, Pat wishes us
a good night and savs his pat-
ented "Come back and see me
What could b - better than surfing in the tens of kelps oi the Big FlatPictured here is oe Harris, the now
ex-News Editor who has flown this journalism coop, while hi- hvs to master this wave of kelp.
'Tar River Poetry' now out
BvTODl) LOVI-TT
stiff Writer
"It's printed on an ivory
parchment sort of paper, so it has
a warm, welcoming feel to it
says editor Peter Makuck, and
indeed this is the feelingone expe-
riences with a reading ot the hHh
anniversary edition of Tar River
Poetry.
From more humble begin-
nings in the late 1961 sasa forum
for local poets. Tar River Poetry
has evolved into a journal oi
broad scope which accepts sub-
missions from writers and critics
of national stature.
In fact it is. 10 years after the
establishment of its present form
and name, rated by Writer's Di-
gest as one of the top 50 publu a
tions tor poetry. And deservedly
so. As Ralph . Mills, Ir . author
and critic, has said, Iar River
Poetry is "edited with quiet bril-
liance. Favoring no particular
school, movement of clique, it has
published a broad spectrum of
poets.
The criteria have always
been the quality of the individual
poem. The critical pieces in its
review pages have been consis
tentlv thoughtful and independ-
ent Mills said.
In a world where there is no
money to be made in poetry, the
fact that praises of the journal
such as Mills' ring consistently
true is perhaps responsible Tar
River Poetry's longev ity. Makuck
states that "it's important that Tar
River Poetry has survived for 10
years because literary journals
come and go. The life expectam v
is about five years. Fen years
dearly means that the university
lieves in what we're doing, and
that wo're valuable enough to
receive financial support
1 he hHh aniversary edition is
a celebratory double issue which
contains a rich offering oi poetry
and fouressavs. Much of the writ-
ing is, . .at, professor at
Mate I nivei tyof New York, has
said oi Iar River Poetry in gen-
eral, "written not just for other
poets and academics, but tor the
general public The poems are
clear, precise, and tend to be in-
volved with close inspection of
thing and e ents rather than with
the inner layers of the poet's
mind
lor example, there is bred
( happell's "Relativity a poem
which applies Einstein's revolu-
tionary theory to the way we see
things in our daily hv es.
I et us suppose anobserver
observing within this system. I o
him all things are systematic
Within our own lives, our actions
have meaning because we are
familiar with the system of things
that we live in. Yet at the speed of
light, the normal laws of physics
that govern our systems seem to
disappear, and as we begin to
employ the technology of relativ-
ity and the power of the atom, our
ability (and perhaps our desire) to
understand one another collapse.
The separate systems veer to-
gether and apart and this inabil-
ity to undc rstand each other "is
punctuated by the blackened
matchstem that was Nagasaki
by our possession and use ii the
atomic bomb.
Pat Moore, a Greenville barber, cuts a customer's hair while catch-
ing up on the town gossip. (Photo by Tom Walters-Photolab)
Surfing in a kelp laden coast
By JOE HARRIS
News f'ditor
(Editor's note: This is the
long awaited second part of
Joseph Davidson Harris's jour-
ney to the west coast waves and
' moaiwMiiiiiji) '� "�� ��-�-�
As we reached the top, waves
pounded the rock and threw a
drenching spray laden with kelp
over us for nearly two hours
raingearisa must.Contrary to our
beliefs, the tide did recede and
allowed us down.
lust because the tide is going
down is no indication that there is
enough room between the water
and rocks to walk on. Still an hour
after we started hiking again, we
were still being soaked by the left-
over "washers enormous waves
that seemingly come from no-
where and catch unsuspecting,
weary hikers.
The third leg oi the hike is
over cut shale. The shale is angled
toward the sea from years oi the
ocean's erosive forces.
1 Ifking over this is almost like
In "Spilled Bruce Bennett
makes a keen observation about
the seemingly undeserved anger
and frustration we give to simple
accidents.
"It's not the liquid spreading
on the floor nor indeed the park-
ing ticket, missed apointment, or
lost keys, all annoyances common
to everyday existance. These
things are "scarcely cause for sobs
that will not stop Instead, it is
"everything you ve ever spilled,
and more that causes the anger.
As the overturned glass falls and
its contents spread on the floor,
we react to not just it, but to the
abundance of mistakes we have
made, and helplessness that
comes with knowing that we will
make them again.
Among the critical essays
O J
which follow the poetry, there is
"Elvis Astride Pegasus Jim
I'lledge's look at rock music as a
background for the remembered
experiences of poets who grew up
during the formation of rock and
roll, and now vvriteabout the Stars
they listened to.
There is, as Elledge notes, a
mythology in rock music that
invokes a myriad oi emotions,
concepts, memories oi Vietnam
and phrases such as "yeah, yeah,
yeah In light of this fact, it is not
surprising that poets such as Gary
Soto, Albert Goldbarth, and Rich-
ard Blessing among others,
should vvriteabout the artists who
created the recollections oi their
generation.
The essay's title recalls the
Greek myth of Bellerophon
astride the winged horse, facing
S�� POETRY, page 15
Pickin' the Bones
walking down the curved side oi
a drainpipe. We had to lean in
towards the curvature and walk
on our toes using our hands in
some areas. In most places of this
particular stretch, it is rnfposfeible
to walk upright or without using
"�4w -tomrte ��flrWttilrrmf $fp � r "
If the intense curve of what
we came to call "hell's mile isn't
bad enough, then the moss and
barnacles are. These two-to-three
miles are littered with barnacles
and painted with moss. The moss
is as slick, it not more, than ice. If
vou lose' your tooting, thankfully
none of us did, you scrape alone
the razor-like barnacles into the 51
degree w a tor.
After a brief climb to the top
ot a ridge vou come up on an
immense green plateau fed by a
moi tain stream complete
wit! cut-throat trout and small
mouth bass. This is Big Rat. The
onlysoundsare the rolling waves.
,n occasional buz from a cricket
and the water boiling through
rocks in the stream.
Ihehikeisn t over vet, but all
the dangerous parts are �
bind. From here on out, the hi -
is - ver the flat era�land.
it fiv � but
ie are ar ��' ing
pared I � nes
Once the camp area is
hod. a"Si
inkling of ci ilization na
a weathered and branch'
trunk reads - � rs res
enjoy. Take what vou . n oth.
imp I the stream
get well away from it B ars drink
and fish from it da . arc
to take pictures of them, do it fi
a distance.
When vou set up camp I
foodstuffs from high tree limb
rope, or the raccoons will have a
regular feast. In the week that we
were there, three loaves of w heat
bread, numerous packs of Oodles
of Noodles, granola bars
trailmix were scavenged r
by raccoons.
The uncrowded waves
well worth the hike.
See SPOTS, page 15
Bonehead wraps up the year 1988
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
"It's Not My Problem Anymore
Well, it seems it's that time
oi year again. I have to wrap up
thiscolumn for the year. And it's
been a great year, hasn't it? Just
think back at all the fun things
that happened in 1988
On the social front, Dirtv
Dancing and endless beer com-
mercial meant one thing to this
country � Sexually Transmit-
ted Diseases. Whether it was
AIDS, herpes or that old
standby cervical cancer, Ameri-
cans lived in mortal fear of the
question, "What do we do after
the bars close?"
This problem was exacer-
bated in North Carolina, where
ABC laws close all bars at 1 a.m.
during Daylight Savings Time.
So far, no one at the ABC has
offered an explanation for this
bizarre law. It must get darker at
1 a.m. in the winter than it does
in the summer.
On the musical end of the
scale, there were few bright
pots. SPIN magazine came
back, Tracy Chapman got the
national exposure she deserved
and X didn't break up.
The Cars did though, REM
sold out, drivin' 'n cryin' didn't,
and cover versions of old hits
made money for artists who
couldn't come up with stuff of
their own.
Weatherwise, the atmos-
phere finally went on strike and
those ozone scabs finally got a
shot at the jobs they've begged
jfor. Raleigh survived, a tornado
that deep in my heart I know
God was sending to wipe out
Greenville. I guess ever. Cod s
aim is a little off those days.
Whose isn't!1 America
proved hor political aim is still
the stagnant status quo oi the
right-wing conservatives. But in
the end, it didn't reallv matter.
The only guv qualified to be
president blew it by picking on a
defenseless moron.
And the whole campaign
degenerated into a contest to see
which potential First Lady had
buried the most children. Who
needs it? Thank God for cable
television.
What a plethora of choices!
Greenville Cable TV alone ot-
ters five religious channels. The
Weather Channel, ESPN, CNN
and MTV were big favorites
among college students. In fact,
these channel seemed tailor-
made for us.
Channels that show the
same thing every hour, have lots
oi commercials and require the
attention span of a small house-
hold appliance were big busi-
ness again this year. No reason
why thev won't be next year too.
Ted Turner truly is a veritable
god.
Vanna White became the
Goddess of Love, causing sev-
eral hundred mythology profes-
sors to commit suicide. " The
Cosbv Show" went into syndi-
cation and can now be seen 24
hours a day, providing wit,
warmth and wisdom for mil-
lions of divorced parents, run-
away kids and other remnants
ot the nuclear familv.
At the mo ies, ta
traction and Ran bo
proved America likes to watch
sequels and psychos, and se-
quels with psychos are big
money. Michael Keaton signed
to play batman in the i
movie, throwing the comi
industry back 20 yeai
Otherwise, comics
pretty well. Robin the
Wonder bit the Bat-dust SPIN
featured hip comic books r
larlv in their mag. and
Groening's cartoon fillers on
The Tracey Ullman Shi ���
wore the fui I I ir m
media.
And w hat changes doe.
Year of the Dragon breathe
The Emerald Cit) ?Well, thecitv
got $8 million from a deceased
widow, but thev didn't get a tat-
too parlor on Fifth Street.
We hist Halloween and
gained a now look for D . .
Reflector. No new parking
spaces appeared for FCC stu
dents, but pink parking tickets
multiplied like bunnies on j
speed.
A squirrel man ran ram-
pant, Bonehead and Big E go!
evicted and The Human Mega-
phone died horribly. I got
turned into a question on a jour-
nalism test. It was a strange
year.
What to look for in 1989?
More taxes, more death and :
most probably another Tiffanv
album. Please, God. Send more i
tornadoes. And )ust wake me
when it's over. Y all take care
Spots
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THE EAST CAROI INI AN
Features
DECEMBER 1,1988 Page 14
Pat finds diversity at Varsity Hair Cut
Bv TIM HAMPTON
Kcjturcs t ditor
With the blinds pulled and
the glass door dead bolted,
Greenville's own Floyd the Bar-
ber, Pat Moore, sweeps up the
dailv gathering of blond, brown
and grev hair clippings from his
orange tiled floor.
Reflecting into the combina-
tion of locks. Tat looked up and
said "I enjoy this. It's not like it's a
job. I meet a lot of people I would
never have met
Moore, proprietor oi Varsity
Hair Cut on Cotanche St has seen
hair styles come and go and bar-
bershops evolve into the multi-
chair, appointment only format.
No appointment is needed to see
Pat, and even if you wanted to set
up an appointment, you can't, Tat
doesn't have a phone listing.
But Pat's traditional barber
Style is still thiving, January will
mark the 22nd year the red. white
and blue barber pole has spun
downtown next to Happy's Pool
Hall.
"No appointments, after 21
vears, 1 ain't fooling around with
something that works Pat says
while tvinghisblack, low topRee-
boks.
Late Tuesday afternoon, a bar-
rage of fresh hair style seekers
opened Tat's door. Sitting in stool
tall, an angular male ECU student
marveled in the wall mirror at
rat's creation of a "faded look
A conformist-punk style, the
faded look" requires the sides of
the head to be skinned while the
top remained several inches long.
As with the change in hair styles,
Pat has moved with the times.
"When I first started, all the
college boys wanted flat tops,
now it's a variety oi things Pat
says as he adjusts his gold-
rimmed glasses. Beside the
"faded look Pat will accomo-
date any request from the spiked
look to Mohawk. Although he
doesn't cut many womens' hair
he has shaved the sides of some
ECU girls' heads.
A diversity in clientele pay
patronage to Yarsitv Hair Cut and
Pat enjoys that element oi his
work. Besides lawyers and busi-
ness people who work down-
town, blue collar workers, stu-
dents and exchange students visit
Pat.
Pat's next customer, Rav-
mond, has been a loyal client for
20 vears. Raymond steps his work
boots to the stool and ask for a
trim of his grev hair.
'Time goes by fast, don't it
Ravmond
"When you are working, it
reallv goes by fast Raymond
savs above the subtle musax es-
caping from a small two speaker
stereo.
Before Pat can pull the wisk
brush from his back pocket and
dust off Raymond's neck, a
couple, the man wearing boots
and jeans, enter the barbershop
just before close. Pat addresses
them both by their name. Pat
takes pride in his ability to re-
member clients' names.
"1 trv to remember names. I
J
like to know my customers per-
sonally Pat says.
It's already after the 5:30 clos-
ing and Pat anticipates the man in
the boots to be his last customer of
the day. But this afternoon is a
busy one for Pat as a mother pulls
her two sons through the glass
door.
The fussy mother tugs the
smaller of the two boys, a tired
whiner, in the direction of the
barber's chair with a bold 1964
emblem on its bottom. Once the
boy is bibbed and is snapped in,
the mother orders to cut the bangs
an inch and to cut the back close.
Pat tries to cheer the boy up,
but his whines presist. Changing
the heads on the electric razor
with proficiency, Pat angles the
buzz tool around the contours of
the boy's neck. "Now that wasn't
too bad was it?"
Still standing near the chair,
the mother calls her eldest boy, a
13-year-old, to the stand. Reluc-
tantly, he folds his Sports Illus-
trated and shuffles across the
floor. The mother once again
barks cutting instructions, which
include a chopping to a long front,
to which the boy squeals "Oh,
Mom
As a stern look grows on the
mother's face, Pat becomes the
mediator by saying "We'll fix you
up The boy slouches in the bar-
ber chair with somewhat of a op-
timistic demur, he knows he can
trust Pat; you see, Pat has cut his
hair since the 13-year-old was a
tyke.
Pat has a lot of returning cus-
tomers and in some families he
cuts the hair of three generations.
And some wouldn't trust their
hair with anyone else but Pat.
"A couple of my customers
have left Greenville, but still come
back to see me Pat says with his
ever present smile. "I still cut the
man's hair who modeled for me
when I went to get my barber's
license. Cecil Hinnant is his
name
Now 6:15 on a Tuesday eve-
ning, Pat would usually be home
about this time, but he is not too
upset about it. As he dumps the
collection of hair clippings, a
melting pot of locks, into the trash
bin and pulls his sleeves through
a blue wind breaker, Pat wishes us
a good night and says his pat-
ented "Come back and see me
Pat Moore, a Greenville barber, cuts a customer's hair while catch-
ing up on the town gossip. (Photo by Tom Walters-Photolab)
Surfing in a kelp laden coast
By JOE HARRIS
News Editor
(Editor's
What could b e better than surfing in the tons of kelps of the Big FlatPictured here is Joe Harris, the now
ex-News Editor who has flown this journalism coop, while he tiys to master this wave of kelp.
'Tar River Poetry' now out
note: This is the
long awaited second part of
Jo$efh Davidson Harris's jour-
neirto.tfienwestcoast -waves and
MnofflWiUiiiuir ' �� ��-��
As we reached the top, waves
pounded the rock and threw a
drenching spray laden with kelp
over us for nearly two hours �
raingear is a must. Contrary to our
beliefs, the tide did recede and
allowed us down.
Just because the tide is going
down is no indication that there is
enough room between the water
and rocks to walk on. Still an hour
after we started hiking again, we
were still being soaked by the left-
over "washers enormous waves
that seemingly come from no-
where and catch unsuspecting,
weary hikers.
The third leg of the hike is
over cut shale. The shale is angled
toward the sea from years of the
ocean's erosive forces.
Hiking over this is almost like
ByTODDLOVETT
Stiff Writer
"It's printed on an ivory
parchment sort of paper, so it has
a warm, welcoming feel to it
says editor Peter Makuck, and
indeed this is the feelingone expe-
riences with a reading of the 10th
anniversary edition of Tar River
Poetry.
From more humble begin-
nings in the late 1960's as a forum
for local poets, Tar River Poetry
has evolved into a journal of
broad scope which accepts sub-
missions from writers and critics
of national stature.
In fact it is, 10 vears after the
establishment of its present form
and name, rated by Writer's Di-
gest as one of the top 50 publica-
tions for poetry. And deservedly
so. As Ralph J. Mills, jr author
and critic, has said, Tar River
Poetry is "edited with quiet bril-
liance. Favoring no particular
school, movement of clique, it has
published a broad spectrum of
poets.
The criteria have alwavs
been the quality of the individual
poem. The critical pieces in its
review pages have been consis-
tently thoughtful and independ-
ent Mills said.
In a world where there is no
money to be made in poetry, the
fact that praises of the journal
such as Mills' ring consistently
true is perhaps responsible Tar
River Poetry's longevity. Makuck
States that "it's important that Tar
River Poetry has survived for 10
years because literary journals
come and go. The life expectancy
is about five years. Ten years
clearly means that the university-
believes in what we're doing, and
that we're valuable enough to
receive financial support
The 10th aniversary edition is
a celebratory double issue which
contains a rich offering of poetry
and four essays. Much of the writ-
ing is, as Bill Katz, professor at
State University of New York, has
said of Tar River Poetry in gen-
eral, "written not just for other
poets and academics, but for the
general public. The poems are
clear, precise, and tend to be in-
volved with close inspection of
thing and events rather than with
the inner layers of the poet's
mind
For example, there is Fred
Chappell's "Relativity a poem
which applies Einstein's revolu-
tionary theory to the way we see
things in our daily lives.
"Let us suppose an observer
observing within this system. To
him all things are systematic
Within our own lives, our actions
have meaning because we are
familiar with the system of things
that we live in. Yet at the speed of
light, the normal laws of physics
that govern our systems seem to
disappear, and as we begin to
employ the technology of relativ-
ity and the power of the atom, our
ability (and perhaps our desire) to
understand one another collapse.
"The separate systems veer to-
gether and apart and this inabil-
ity to understand each other "is
punctuated by the blackened
matchstem that was Nagasaki
by our possession and use of the
atomic bomb.
In "Spilled Bruce Bennett
makes a keen observation about
the seemingly undeserved anger
and frustration we give to simple
accidents.
"It's not the liquid spreading
on the floor nor indeed the park-
ing ticket, missed apointment, or
lost keys, all annoyances common
to everyday existance. These
things are "scarcely cause for sobs
that will not stop Instead, it is
"everything you've ever spilled,
and more that causes the anger.
As the overturned glass falls and
its contents spread on the floor,
we react to not just it, but to the
abundance of mistakes we have
made, and helplessness that
comes with knowing that we will
make them again.
Among the critical essays
which follow the poetry, there is
"Elvis Astride Pegasus Jim
Elledge's look at rock music as a
background for the remembered
experiences of poets who grew up
during the formation of rock and
roll, and now write about the stars
they listened to.
There is, as Elledge notes, a
mythology in rock music that
invokes a myriad of emotions,
concepts, memories of Vietnam
and phrases such as "yeah, yeah,
yeah In light of this fact, it is not
surprising that poets such as Gary
Soto, Albert Goldbarth, and Rich-
ard Blessing among others,
should write about the artists who
created the recollections of their
generation.
The essay's title recalls the
Greek myth of Bellerophon
astride the winged horse, facing
S(e POETRY, page 15
Pickin' the Bones
walking down the curved side of
a drainpipe. We had to lean in
towards the curvature and walk
on our toes using our hands in
some areas. In most places of this
particular strdtclfftt is mfposBiblt?
. to walk upright or without using
Ht �haHdfe'ujBUUUiuHUrl JtVpport;
If the intense curve of what
we came to call "hell's mile isn't
bad enough, then the moss and
barnacles are. These two-to-three
miles are littered with barnacles
and painted with moss. The moss
is as slick, if not more, than ice. If
you lose your footing, thankfully
none of us did, you scrape along
the razor-like barnacles into the 50
degree water.
After a brief climb to the top
of a ridge you come up on an
immense green plateau fed by a
mov itain stream � complete
witl cut-throat trout and small
mouth bass. This is Big Flat. The
only soundsarc the rolling waves,
an occasional buzz from a cricket
and the water boiling through
rocks in the stream.
The hike isn't over vet but all
the dangerous parts are well be-
hind. From here on out. the hiking
is over the flat grassland, only
about five miles remains, but
these are anything but difficult
compared fo the previous ones.
Once the camp area is
reached a'sniall sign � 'the'onlv
inkling of civilization � nailed to
a weathered and branchless tree
trunk reads, "Surfers: respect and
enjoy. Take what you came with
Don't camp by the stream �
get well away from it. Bears drink
and fish from it dailv. If vou want
to take pictures of them, do it from
a distance.
When you set up camp hang
foodstuffs from high tree limbs bv
rope, or the raccoons will have a
regular feast. In the week that we
were there, three loaves of wheat
bread, numerous packs oi Oodles
of Noodles, granola bars and
trailmix were scavenged nightlv
by raccoons.
The uncrowded waves are
well worth the hike.
See SPOTS, page 15
Bonehead wraps up the year 1988
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
"If t Not My Problem Anymore
Well, it seems it's that time
of year again. I have to wrap up
this column for the year. And it's
been a great year, hasn't it? Just
think back at all the fun things
that happened in 1988
On the social front, Dirty
Dancing and endless beer com-
mercial meant one thing to this
country � Sexually Transmit-
ted Diseases. Whether it was
AIDS, herpes or that old
standby cervical cancer, Ameri-
cans lived in mortal fear of the
question, "What do we do after
the bars close?"
This problem was exacer-
bated in North Carolina, where
ABC laws close all bars at 1 a.m.
during Daylight Savings Time.
So far, no one at the ABC has
offered an explanation for this
bizarre law. It must get darker at
1 a.m. in the winter than it does
in the summer.
On the musical end of the
scale, there were few bright
spots. SPIN magazine came
back, Tracy Chapman got the
national exposure she deserved
and X didn't break up.
The Cars did though, REM
sold out, drivin' 'n cryin' didn't,
and cover versions of old hits
made money for artists who
couldn't come up with stuff of
their own.
Weatherwise, the atmos-
phere finally went on strike and
those ozone scabs finally got a
shot at the jobs they've begged
tor. Raleigh vjYed frm-naHn
that deep in my heart I know
God was sending to wipe out
Greenville. I guess even God's
aim is a little off these days.
Whose isn't? America
proved her political aim is still
the stagnant status quo of the
right-wing conservatives. But in
the end, it didn't really matter.
The only guy qualified to be
president blew it by picking on a
defenseless moron.
And the whole campaign
degenerated into a contest to see
which potential First Lady had
buried the most children. Who
needs it? Thank God for cable
television.
What a plethora of choices!
Greenville Cable TV alone of-
fers five religious channels. The
Weather Channel, ESPN, CNN
and MTV were big favorites
among college students. In fact,
these channel seemed tailor-
made for us.
Channels that show the
same thing every hour, have lots
of commercials and require the
attention span of a small house-
hold appliance were big busi-
ness again this year. No reason
why they won't be next year too.
Ted Turner truly is a veritable
god.
Vanna White became the
Goddess of Love, causing sev-
eral hundred mythology profes-
sors to commit suicide. "The
Cosby Show" went into syndi-
cation and can now be seen 24
hours a day, providing wit,
warmth and wisdom for mil-
lions of divorced parents, run-
away kids and other remnants
of the nuclear family.
At the movies, "Fatal At-
traction" and "Rambo III"
proved America likes to watch
sequels and psychos, and se-
quels with psychos are big
money. Michael Keaton signed
to play Batman in the new
movie, throwing the comic book
industry back 20 years.
Otherwise, comics did
pretty well. Robin the Boy
Wonder bit the Bat-dust, SPIN
featured hip comic books regu-
larly in their mag, and Matt
Groening's cartoon fillers on
"The Tracey Ullman Show"
were the funniest thing in any
media.
And what changes did the
Year of the Dragon breathe into
The Emerald City? Well, the city
got $8 million from a deceased
widow, but they didn't get a tat-
too parlor on Fifth Street.
We lost Halloween and
gained a new look for The Daily
Reflector. No new parking
spaces appeared for ECU stu-
dents, but pink parking tickets
multiplied like bunnies on
speed.
A squirrel man ran ram-
pant, Bonehead and Big E got
evicted and The Human Mega-
phone died horribly. I got
turned into a question on a jour-
nalism test. It was a strange
year.
What to look for in 1989?
More taxes, more death and
most probably another Tiffany
album. Please, God. Send more
tornadoes. And just wake me
when it's over. Y'all take rare.
I
Spots
Continued from page
There are three si
produce prime waves,
and most clearly visible sj
point, then lherc is an in
tion that breaks over rocl
low tides and also a bea4
located in front of tl
mouth.
When the wind is
north, endless amounts
wrap from the north sic
point inward producing!
the most tubular wave if
em California. Clean H
allow for top-to-bottom
excess of five minute
trademark of the point
is unndable at low tide
the kelp is so thick it actuj
down your board. It
place to warm-up U j I
ing and confidence read
other two spots.
At low tide the ii :
we named the "boilerroi
cause of the num -
which caused visible sw ij
boiling when the wave
up, begins to work. 11 is oi
three feet deep over the
makes taking-off a crucial
ver of do or die consequf
Here, surfers need
alert to dodge the vane
that become exposed as tl
suck up into shallower wj
boilerroom i s not a spot
it if there is the least ai
doubt in your ability.
important thing to reml
the closest medical help i
by foot.
The creek mouth
hairy spot. The take ottj
lble from the beach d
enormous rock protruc
Poetr
Continued from p;
the Chimera. Elvis Pre
contrast, defeated by
faces. He is a composite
shattered individual, ar
fessional ist, beset by tht
of the generation he re
and is finally defeated,
sense, Presley is the pre
rocker, the achiever of tl
can Dream that sours, ai
itably lost.
Poet Brendan Galv
that "there may be a she
chic poetry magazine. b
consistently more in
than Tar River Poetry
the quality of the journal
is an acurate measurii
ment for its own worth
speaks louder than any
or review. Emily Dickil
said that nature is al
house, and art is a hous
to be haunted. Tar Rivei
a haunting literary joui
Copies of the lOtfcj
sary edition are $6, andl
able at the Student Supl
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1988 15
:ut
n coast
be-
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nailed to
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pectand
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and
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new parking
- �'� '�"�d for ECU stu-
. but pinkparking tickets
: hke bunnies on .
squirrel man ran ram-
Ponehead and Big E got
.i and The Human Mega-
died hornblv. 1 got
1 into a question on a jour-
i test It was a strange :
hat to look tor in 1989?
taxes, more death and
probably another Tiffany
l Please God Send more
iocs And mst wake me
t s over. , all take care.
Spots produce prime waves
Continued from page 14
There are three spots that the ocean. The rock is frequented
produce prime waves. The first by elephant seals that choose to
and most clearly visible spot is the sun themselves from this posi-
point, then there is an inside sec- tion. Here, if you don't make the
tion that breaks over rock shelf on
low tides and also a beach break
located in front oi the creek
mouth.
When the wind is from the
north, endless amounts of waves
ducing county in the United
States. According to natives of
Shelter Cove, the mountains are
littered with marijuana farms and
owners have no tolerance for the
snooping hiker.
One resident told useachyear
take off the rock eats you.
We surfed all these spots
without incident. Each of us
started at the point and graduated people go hiking in the hills and
to the boilerroom and then to the never return. He said the farms
creek mouth. Everyday, all the are booby-trapped with every-
wrap from the north side of the spots had waves, it was a matter of thing from anti-personnel mines
point inward producing perhaps do I feel like walking to the point to doberman pinchers,
the most tubular wave in North- or do I want to hassle with the When planning to make the
em California. Clean faces that seals at the creek mouth. hike, make sure your equipment,
The seals at creek mouth are including your body, is in good
everywhere chasing bait fish that working order. The hike is so ex-
feed off the rocks. It seems they treme that faulty equipment or a
(the seals) pop up at the most in- muscle pull for that matter, could
opportune moments � usually force an early departure or end
during the take off they'd appear
directly in front of vou, just
allow for top-to-bottom rides in
excess of five minutes, are the
trademark oi the point. This spot
is unridable at low tide because
the kelp is so thick it actually bogs
down your board. It is a good
place to warm-up to get the tim-
ing and confidence readv for the enough to break concentration
other two spots.
At low tide the inside section
we named the "boilerroom be-
cause of the numerous rocks
which caused visible swirling and
boiling when the waves sucked
up, begins to work. It is only about
three feet deep over the shelf; this
makes taking-off a crucial maneu-
ver of do or die consequences.
Here, surfers need to be very
alert to dodge the various rocks
that become exposed as the waves
suck up into shallower water. The
boilerroom is not a spot to attempt
it if there is the least amount of
doubt in vour ability. The most
important thing to remember is
the closest medical help is 15 miles
by foot.
The creek mouth is another
hairy spot. The take off isn't vis-
ible from the beach due to an
enormous rock protruding from
Poetry
Continued from page 14
the Chimera. Elvis Presley is in
contrast, defeated by what he
faces. He is a composite person, a
shattered individual, and a con-
fessionalist, beset by the problems
of the generation he represents,
and is finally defeated. In a larger
sense, Presley is the prototypical
rocker, the achiever of the Ameri-
can Dream that sours, and is inev-
ltablv lost.
Poet Brendan Galvin has said
that "there may be a slicker, more
chic poetry magazine, but none is
consistently more interesting
than Tar River Poetry Indeed,
the quality of the journal's content
is an acurate measuring instru-
ment for its own worth, one that
speaks louder than any summary
or review. Emily Dickinson once
said that nature is a haunted
house, and art is a house that tries
to be haunted. Tar River Poetry is
a haunting literary journal.
Copies of the 10th anniver-
sary edition are S6, and are avail-
able at the Student Supply Store.
At Big Flat there are only a
few alternatives to surfing �
thereisnoM-TV. Fishing, reading
and lying in the sun are the obvi-
ous suggestion. Hiking in the sur-
rounding mountains is not rec-
ommended because of the mari-
juana farms.
Big Flat is in Humboldt
County, the No. 1 marijuana pro-
Plaza Cinema
Haza Shopping Ctr. 756 0OH8
Now Showing
FRESH HORSES
CHILD'S PLAY
the initial hike.
Travel as light as possible. No
cans, glass, or fluids � dehy-
drated foods are the ticket. Store
all bread, etc. in ziplock bags. A
sharp knife, waterproof matches,
iodine pills, rope, a snakebite kit,
and a simple first-aid kit are a
water looking toward the shore
and sec five or six deer casually
strolling across the beach.
SCROOGED
(Parfclfieatre
Now Showing
COMING TO
AMERICA
Now Playing at
Hendrix
Dec. 2-3, Late Show
GREAT SONGS.
GREAT DANCING.
GREAT FUN
TWO THUMBS UP!
HILARIOUS
AND HEARTFELT
m �' � - � � � u � - � "i
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16
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1.188
Man has musical obsession
NEW YORK (AP) � John
McGlinn is a cherubic 35-year-old
with a passion, some might call it
an obsession, for authentic ver-
sions of old musicals.
He is the man behind a new
and virtually complete recording
of "Show Boat nearly four hours
of music and dialogue from one of
Broadway's greatest musicals.
The new recording, using the
original orchestrations and pro-
duced bv EM 1-Angel at a reported
cost of $500,000, is pretty much
what the first-night audience
heard on Dec. 27, 1927, when
"Show Boat opened at
Broadway's Ziegfeld Theater.
A lot of the music hasn't been
heard since, at least not in the way
theatergoers experienced it more
than b0 years ago. Over the years,
the orchestrations have been
"modernized songs dropped,
dialogue cut and some of the
show's more racially offensive
lyrics softened or eliminated.
J
'Show Boat written by Jer-
ome Kern and Oscar Hammer-
stein II, is one of the musical
theater's most influential and
enduring works.
Based on Edna Ferber's epic
novel, it tells the unhappy love
storv of Magnolia Hawks,
daughter oi a showboat captain,
and Gaylord Ravenal, a charming
but irresponsible gambler.
Their tale, spanning four dec-
ades, unfolds against a backdrop
oi black oppression as well as
miscegenation, unlikely topics for
the frivolous musicals of the
1920s. Its score produced such
classic love songs as "Make Be-
lieve "Can't Help Lovin' Dat
Man "You Are Love "Why Do
I Love You?" and "Bill" as well as
Ol' Man River one of the most
stirring songs ever heard on a
Broadway stage.
For the recording, McGlinn
assembled a cast from the worlds
oi opera, musical comedy and
theater. Frederica vonStade sings
Magnolia; tenor Jerry Hadley
plays Ravenal, a role more likely
to be sung today by a baritone;
Teresa Stratasis the doomed Julie;
Bruce Hubbard, who appeared in
the 1983 Broadway revival, is the
black stevedore Joe, and in a bit of
inspired casting, 95-year-old Lil-
lian Gish speaks the small part �
some seven lines � of the old
woman who recognizes the aging
Magnolia and Ravenal at the
musical's poignant and stirring
finale.
The musical was recorded in
the summer of 1987 during 16
separate three-hour sessions, one
in New York to accommodate
MissGish and the rest at London's
famous Abbey Road studios.
McGlinn conducted the Lon-
don Sinfonietta and used the
Ambrosian Chorus, an English
choral group, to sing both the
white and black choral numbers.
It wasn't planned that way.
Originally, a black chorus from
the Glyndebourne production of
"Porgy and Bess" was to sing the
black choral parts. A problem
developed with the very first lyr-
ics the audience hears when the
curtain goes up. It's a group of
black stevedores singing, "Nig-
gers all work on de Mississippi,
niggers all work while de white
folks play
Those lyrics were from the
original production. By the time
the 1936 film version was re-
leased, the line was changed to
"Darkies all work on de Missis-
sippi The 1946 Broadway ver-
sion had it, "Here we all work on
de Mississippi McGlinn wanted
to use the original lyrics.
The chorus refused and de-
manded changes. McGlinn de-
clined, and he was supported by
the record company.
'The use of the word 'nigger'
is being used specifically to paint
a picture of a desperately cruel
and unhappy time in American
history McGlinn says.
"I would have given up the
chance to make the record if I had
to change the words because one
of the things I felt was that the
piece derived its power from the
fact that it did its best, considering
the conventions of the time, to
look at life truthfully he says.
For Broadway buffs, the re-
cording, which takes up three
compact discs, three records or
three cassettes, is a trove of un-
known music.
There is more than an hour's
worth of material that includes
songs dropped from the produc-
tion, written for the 1928 London
production or the 1936 Irene
Dunne film version or the 1946
Broadway revival for which Kern
composed "Nobody Else But
Me the last song he wrote before
he died.
stembo's
THE ORIGINAL HARDEE
Corner 5th and Rcade St (next to Stop Shop)
Phone 830-5476
Fresh Ground Hamburger
We Cook Our Own Barbecue
Serving:
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Open 10 a.m. til 1 a.m. - Closed Sunday
'This Morning' turns one
NEW YORK (AP) � Harry "I used to watch Jack Faar and I've got this thing to go to, would
Smith's arm shoots up in the air just used to be fascinated by char- you go with me? Just go with
midsentenee and he snaps his
fingers.
"You know what it was? I'll
tell vou what it was! The seed was
planted in high school, because I
had an English teacher and we
had to write a term paper. I
couldn't come up with anything
and (the teacher) John Gulassa
said. Here's some books. Why-
don't vou read these and see what
you think?' And he gave me 'On
the Road by lack Kerouac.
'That was the beginning of
the end for me. You know, the
beginning of the end which
turned out to be the great begin-
ning
Smith, 37, was searching his
memory for the genesis of the
storv of how a kid from a small
blue-collar town in the Midwest
found himself in New York City
as co-host of a network morning
news show.
CBS This Morning" cele-
brates its first anniversary this
week. Though it is still struggling
in the ratings behind NBC's
"Today" and ABC's "Good Morn-
ing America Smith and co-host
Kathleen Sullivan have devel-
oped an easy-going rapport, and
the network seems content to let
them develop a following.
The pressure doesn't seem to
get to Smith, the most likely suc-
cessor to Charles Kuralt as CBS'
resident laid-back philosopher.
Smith's feet-on-the-ground
attitude comes from deep Mid-
western roots and a strict reli-
gious upbringing. His father
worked two jobs, as a policeman
and a milkman. Smith was the
youngest of eight children, most
of whom "got married pretty
young and went out into the
world and got real jobs and had
real lives Smith said. "I was the
youngest and kind of a surprise. I
got a little bit more attention than
the other ones did, had a rich fan-
tasy life about doing something
other than going to work at the
Youngstown Sheet and Tool
Most ol those fantasies re-
volved around television.
Tahnee Welch
works hard
NEW YORK (AP) � Tahnee
Welch says it was difficult grow-
ing up as the child of a sex symbol,
but she doesn't fault her mother,
Raquel.
"She's a hard worker. She's
always taken care of herself. My
mother has never, never, never
been supported by anyone the
26-vear-old Welch said. "So I had
it in my mind that I had to do it
myself! I have this pride
The younger Welch insists
she won her part in the 1985 film,
"Cocoon on merit, not because
of her mother. Welch also appears
in the recently released "Cocoon:
The Return
"They said I never paid my
dues Welch said in an interview
in December's Gentlemen's
Quarterly.
acters like Oscar Levant Smith
said. "Certainly in my realm of
existence there wasn't anyone
real like that, and wouldn't it be
interesting to meet people and
know people like that?
me.
A "convenience date" to the
opera led to romance and later
marriage.
'I don't know if I can do it
Despite a budding interest in forever. I saw where Jane Pauley
literature and philosophy, Smith celebrated 12 years and I don't
went to college on a football schol- know if I could do that Smith
arship and planned to be a high- said,
school football coach. He at-
tended Central College in Pella,
Iowa, an intellectually "danger-
ous" place for a young jock, he
said, "because they said, 'Here are
books. How would you like to.
read them?' And so 1 did, and my
notions about being a football
coach were short-lived
He graduated with a degree
in communications and theater.
After a stint as a public TV talk-
show host in Denver, he moved
over to KMGH-TV, the CBS affili-
ate. There he anchored the noon
news with another reporter. An-
drea Joyce. Their courtship
sounds right out of "Broadcast
News
"We were just buds Smith
said. "We worked very hard and
were very career-oriented and all
that sort of stuff, so professional
that neither of us would have ever
considered going out. We used to
convenience date You know,
HERALDING THE CHRISTMAS SEASON
Annual Christmas Concert
featuring
The "ECU Symphonic 'Wind Ensemble
pbert Tonto, Conducting
'Thursday, 'December 1, 1988 at 7:30 p.m.
'Wright Auditorium, TCU Campus
With a program of traditional favorites and
popular classics as well as a special visit
from Santa, himself1.
Admission Free to the Public
Sponsored By:
Friends of the School of Music
change the meaning
of "tie one on1
December 6th 6:00 p.m. for a
MADD RED RIBBON CANDLELIGHT VIGIL.
AT 801-803 E. 5th St.
MAD
. .
Sponsored by Sigma Sigma Sigma & Delta Zeta
1985 Mothers Against Drunk Driving
m
�:
W
Y
BptttyV
. JjlT
� tuff;
� � i. ' V" �� �
- � - � -
&&�,
It took Galileo 16 years to master the universe.
You have one night.
It seems unfair. The genius had all that time. While you have a few
short hours to learn your sun spots from your satellites before the
dreaded astronomy exam.
On the other hand, Vivarin gives you the definite advantage. It helps
keep you awake and mentally alert for hours. Safely and conveniently. So
even when the subject matter's dull, your mind will stay razor sharp.
If Galileo had used Vivarin, maybe he could have mastered the solar
fa7,0� Revte with VIVARIN:
VIVARIN
sv-
Traveli
legenda
ALBANY, N.Y. (APJ
true legend of the Ti
Wilburys began when
Har er, elSOn i
needed to record an excri
short notice and invited tv
dinner companions to lei
voices.
Nine davs and 10 son
the result was one of thosl
accidents that proves
more to the music busin
accountants and estates.
Vou won't find the.
George Harrison, Bob DvJ
Orbison, Tom Petty a
Lynne on "Volume Onj
debut album by the od I
Traveling Wilburys. But t
classes and pseudonyn
hide those familiar tal
"We definitely did
treat this like a sup - J
Petty, or Charles .
Harris, nmentii reds
and Orbison over
spring that h � �
� -
The other tv. . j �
him put tog � r a song
The fon
rrieve his guitar, whicl 1
Petty's California hou :
visit a few days earlier I
The lead Heartbreak'
asked to join in on the re
Orange
say 'Da
CHAPEL HILL. NIC.
By day, Pat Sanford and cc
ers at the Orange County
Protection Society are �
down beaver dams Andbl
the animals are bu j
back.
Beavers, virtually I
the turn of the centur.
ming their wav inl
suburban areas like Ra
napolis, .C. and Myrtle!
S.C wreaking havoc wf
they go.
Some people have rej
by getting permits to kill
�P
See MCA
At
Friday, Dec
�ik -
ygsSSMk
l t � Afford lonuinv ciftrirw fquMkni ii(r�"
ndnflrr �Bmhwlnc I'M
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1, 1988 17
HARDEE
ue
IDA
ch Fries
ers
mng
1 � �
MI VIGII .
;ina & IK lta Zeta
v inq
erse
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fee
Traveling Wilburys combine the
legendary rock careers of five
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) � The Since all the nearby studios
true legend of the Traveling were booked, the three amigos
Wilburys began when George had to impose on another friend
Har er, Nelson Wilburv who had recording facilities in his
needed to record an extra song at house. Dylan said he'd be glad to
short notice and invited two of his offer his assistance.
dinner companions to lend their
voices.
Nine days and 10 songs later,
the result was one of those happy
accidents that proves there's
more to the music business than
accountants and estates.
You won't find the names
"We all sat around the grass
at Bob's house and wrote this
song called Handle With Care'
and recorded it that night' Petty
recalled. "When it was all done it
sounded really good
Much too good, they thought,
for a B-side. So they kept on writ-
George Harrison, Bob Dvlan, Rov ing and recording.
Orbison. Tom Petty and Jeff
Lynne on "Volume One the
debut album by the oddlv-named
Traveling Wilburys. But the dark
glasses and pseudonvms can't
hide those familiar talents.
"We definitely didn't want to
treat this like a supergroup said
Petty, or Charles T. Wilburv Jr.
Harrison mentioned toLvnne
and Orbison over dinner last
"It was a very innocent thing,
reallv Petty said. "We were just
kind of enjoying it and we were
deep into it before we realized
almost what we were doing
That spontaneity, and a lot of
humor, comes through on the
record. "Volume One" sounds
like a group of friends, albeit e-
tremelv talented friends, enjoying
themselves together. All five
spring that he needed a new B- trade lead and backing vocals and
side for a 12-mch single release, strum guitars.
The ether two said thev'd help The results are a cross be-
hirn put together a song. tween Harrison's early '70s solo
The former Bcatle had to re- work and the electronic flourishes
tneve his guitar, which he'd left at Lvnne brought to the Electric
Petty's California house during a Light Orchestra, Orbison's "Not
visit a few days earlier, Pcttv said. Alcne Anv More" is in the vein
The lead Hcartbreakcr was also he's mined for a quarter-century
asked to join in on the record. and the three songs Dylan domi-
Orange County Animal workers
say 'Dam those beavers'
nates are some of his best work in
years.
The song "Dirty World"
pokes fun at Prince with a series of
sexual double-entendres and the
wickedly funny "Tweeter and the
Monkey Man" is littered with
Bruce Springsteen references.
Credit a non-rocker, Prince
Charles of Britain, with the name
Traveling Wilburys, Petty said.
Harrison and Lynne per-
formed at the Prince's Trust con-
cert last year and were compli-
mented by the host following the
show, he said. The prince said the
two should form a band, and
when they asked for a name, he
suggested the Traveling
Wilburys, Petty said.
The quintet quickly adopted
the persona. Harrison is identi-
fied throughout as Nelson
Wilbur Lynne is Otis Wilbury,
Orbison is Lefty Wilbury and
Dylan's called Lucky.
The whimsical liner notes
explain that "the original
Wilburys were a stationary
people who, realizing that their
civilization could not stand still
forever, began to go for short
walks
CHAPEL HILL, N.C (AP) �
Bv daw Pat Sanford and co-work-
ers at the Orange County Animal
Protection Society are breaking
down beaver dams. And by night,
the animals arc building them
back.
Beavers, virtuallv extinct at
the turn of the century, are swim-
ming their way into urban and
suburban areas like Raleigh, Kan-
napolis, N.C. and Myrtle Beach,
S.C wreaking havoc wherever
they go.
Some people have retaliated
by getting permits to kill the bea-
vers. The Town of Chapel Hill
bought a trap and destroved four.
Ms. Sanford has asked for a
chance to rid them in a more
humane way � bv luring them
upstream.
"There's no easy answer
Ms. Sanford said. "In this specific
case, we're trying to make the
habitat undesirable. If we kill off
all the beavers there and leave the
habitat, other beavers will move
in. Then you'd have to set up a
system of constantly killing bea-
vers.
"So we're destroying their
41 wmm

W 11 Pi
dams, draining their lake, and
hope they' 11 move upstream
In Chapel Hill, the beaver
colony settled along Booker
Creek of the U.S. 15-501 bypass.
The lake made bv the beavers is so
J
deep water is backed up in back-
yards of homes in the Ridgcwood
subdivision.
Sanford said her group's aim
is to drain the lake and keep it
drained even if the beavers repair
their dams. The trick, Sanford
said, is to lay plastic pipes, perfo-
rated with holes, perpendicular to
the dam.
� � 1 J ���� 1 i win I
See MCA Recording Artists FEMME FATALE
ATTIC
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For the latest in
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Open 'til 9 p.m.
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Stadium Cleaners & Shirt Laundry
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Located at Corner of 10th & Cotanche Streets
j8-2701 (Next to Hardee's McDonald's)
�ALTERATIONS �FLUFF & FOLDING
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Now is the season for big
savings on your college
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can save
on a gold ArtCarved ring
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$20 Deposit Required






1
IS
THE CAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1.1 J8T
Bridges make good presents
DENVER (AP) � Stumped want a bridge?
for a Christmas present for the Cities, counties, park and rec-
person who has everything? How reation districts, land developers
about a bridge? � anyone who wants to preserve
The state Highway Depart- some road history and save some
ment has honest-to-goodness his- of the enormous cost of building a
toric bridges available to anyone new trestle is interested in the
who will give them good homes bridges, said Sally Tearce, staff
and will haul them away. historian for the department.
But seriously, who would Bridges in the 3-year-old
"Adopt-A-Bridge" program are
scheduled for replacement be-
cause they are deteriorating or
impractical for modern traffic.
Eighteen bridges, most made
of steel trusses, are eligible for the
program, Pcarce said. But so far
only three have reached some
stage of being moved mainly be-
cause of the difficulties in relocat-
ing them.
Moving expenses vary. For
example, to disassemble and relo-
cate all four, 185-foot-long spans
of the Fifth Street Bridge in Grand
junction is estimated to cost be-
tween $360,000 and $480,000. For
a single span: $120,000.
��
Couple fill house with loads of shaving
cream, win ten thousand big ones
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AD �
Albert and ludv Linkenberg
started with 1,200 cans of shaving
cream and finished with a house
filled 2 feet deep with mintv-
smelling cream and $10,000.
The Kentucky couple lath-
ered up radio station WI.RS-FM
for the five-digit shave bv fulfill-
ing the station's contest challenge
Hilarious libel
suit dismissed
NEW YORK (AP) �A;
dismissed Jackie Mason's el
mt against a Florida woman who
tiled a paternity suit against the
comedian.
U.S. District Judge John
Keenan threw out Mason's law-
suit Monday for lack of personal
jurisdiction.
Mason last vear sued Ginger
Reiter and her mother, Miriam
Oliver, alleging libel, invasion of
privacy, copyright infringement
and unjust enrichment, over a live
stage production Oh Jackie Oh
on which they collaborated.
Ms. Reiter's paternity lawsuit
in Florida is pending. Mason's
attorney. Jay D. Kramer, declined
comment on Monday's ruling,
saying he had not yet seen it.
There was no answer at the
Port Washington offices of Ms.
Reiter's lawyers when called for
comment Monday evening.
"What would you do for
$10,000?"
A committee chose the shav-
ing-cream idea because it created
an atmosphere that was ran but
safe, said Toncv Brooks, president
of Radio One, which owns WLRS.
It the Linkenbergs were un-
successful, the station would
have let the runner-up try his
stunt swimming across the
Ohio River with a bottle of wine
and glasses cemented to a card
table on his back, Brooks said.
Before the Linkenbergs began
their stunt Monday, the carpet
and the furniture in their two-
bedroom, one-story bungalow
were covered with plastic.
This was Judy's idea Link-
enberg declared at one point.
The Linkenbergs, with help
from friends and relatives, emp-
tied the last can more than five
hours later.
The Linkenbergs, though
thousands of dollars richer, will
have to subtract taxes, cleanup
costsand$880for the 1,200 cans of
Colgate regular, menthol and aloe
shaving cream.
Read The East
Carolinian
Take a Break From
School and Work
i1
Buy One Specialty Sandwich
andGet 2nd Sandwich
of Equal or Lesser Value
12 Price
Between 3 p.m. & 8 p.m. Expiration 12-22-88
. Not Good With Any Other Special Offers .
Entertainment For The Weekend
Dec. 1. Swamp Gypsies Folk Celtic
& Improv (9 p.m1 1 p.m.)
Dec. 2. Rhythm Persuaded (formally Knocked Out Loaded)
Dec.3. Highwatcr Blues Hand
Dec. 9, The Ix-mon Sisters & The Rutabaga Brothers
Dec. 10, The Patterson (R&RR&B)
Closed For Christmas Dec. 24 Jan. 3
Hours of Operations
Mon-Tups
llam-lOpm
Wed
11 jm-1 pm
Thur.
11 am- i 1 pm
Friday
llim-Um
Satu rd ay
12 nocn- ui
OF FLOWERS & GIFTS MC
GREENVILLE SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER
355-7888
Holiday Specials� Long Stem Roses
(in vases)
Through Christmas:
(1 Doz.)$30.00
(12 Doz.)$17.00
(3) Roses$12.00
(1) Rose$ 7.00
ALX ARRANGEMENTS SPECIALLY PRICED!
ADDITIONAL 10 DISCOUNT ALL ECU STUDENTS
ST
Event: Jeckyl
Organized By: WZMB AND THE ATTIC
Date: Sat December 3rd
Location: THE ATTIC
COPY EDITORS
NEEDED
Experience A Plus!
Apply at The East Carolinian
Publications Building - 2nd Floor
(In front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please

vV.V.V.






















Overton's Grocery Wishes
For A Safe & Happy Holiday Season
For All Students & Staff
Prices effective Wednesday, November 30-Saturday, December 3,1988
Fresh Fryer
Leg Quarters
29
lb.
Kornland
Bacon
.b $1.09
Boneless Chuck
Roast
$1.49
lb.
Ground Fresh Daily
Fresh Ground Beef
5 lbs. or more
lb.
97
Breyers All Natural
Ice Cream
12 gallon carton
$3.69
Richfood Jumbo
Eggs
dozen 135 t
Duncan Hines
Cake Mix
Yellow only17 oz. box
69
Natural Light Beer
12-12 oz. cans
$4.99
Palmolive Liquid
Detergent
22 oz. bottle regular or lemon lime
99 $
Fab Detergent
Giant 42 oz. box
99 0
Lima one with10.00 food order
Coca-Cola
All 2 Liter Products
890
Store Hours,
Open Sundays 1 p.m6 p.m
Monday-Saturday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m
1IJ
�:
sr
211 Jarvis Street 2 Blocks from ECU
Quantity Rights Reserved
OVERTON'6
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Ain't got no sleiah with reindeer, ain't no sack on my back- you'll see me comin in a bi black cadiiiac, 'cause it's Chri' mas -Elvis, from
'Christmas . . . Christmas . . . Christmas . . . Christmas . . . " - The Jordanairres, same son? Santa's Back In Town
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Fun and (James bids a cheese fondue to Hey Big Head a very tunny and
raucous strip that is leaving our grand page, to go to State and probably be
printed in The Tecnician, a newspaper Irarm report) that couldn't be tunny it
j it tried. Give 'em heck, Steve
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Tliar's iilit, you thought it v.14 ncvci get acre, bu; boy were you wrong!
Ifs WZMB day and we're giving you the chance to actually SEE some of the
Dee-jays! They actually have a lot mere, but ;ve could only tit a small amount
here. So that this can stiii be a game, vve're going to play "Match the Faces to
the Names Fun, huh? Even ii you get the answers right, you may still not
know their actual identities since WZMB people have the annoying habit of
7 calling themselves names otfett than their own. There were other pictures oi
of these people lo choose from, but Photolab was nice enough to DECIDE FOR
US which pictures would be used. As if I couldn't pick 'em out m elf! Why,
I'll fix those- oh, never mind. Listen to ZMB, celebrate WZMB DAY, and have
"n tlvis Christmad Eflgaibk Answers
A. Herman D. TreyBicn G. Andylewis J� Kirk "KP" Preston g rr
B. Trey Bien E. Jeff Morkett H. The Lizard K- J- Todd S
C. Small Mike F. Beth I. Roger Mortis E. Jill Skylark � G
RADIO Roger Mortis is in actuality JOE HARRIS, News Editor H S
SECRET: of the East Carolinian! Bye, Joe, have a nutsy, crazy lite - X
and find some work in the real world.
x
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CM
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C "3





20 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1988
The last Clearly Labeled
The last clearly la-
beled quote of the
semester: Fortune
nf thg iu�nr v�rs the hold
OJ tlie year rlaming Carrot
Hate mail makes E return to school
Dr. E.
Right now, 1 only have one
major problem. See, there is a cer-
tain portion of the East Carolinian
that really pisses me off � your
sorry section! And since you are
finally leaving, after six years, you
have acruallv solved at least one
J
person's problem, my own!
Thank you. 1 truly am glad you're
leaving! Besides, you're not origi-
nal (Copying Morton Downey Jr
come on!)
In utmost disrepect,
Dr. "Nice"
P.S. Get a decent haircut, it's
just not a smartass journalist's
image.
Dear Dr. Dick Head,
Didn't your momma ever tell
vou not to write hate mail? Since
vou didn't sien vour letter or
address your envelope, I feel obli-
gated to give you a fitting nomen-
clature and thus � Dick Head.
In the past, some have called
the E an incompetent 8-year-old.
Some have called the E a user of
scatological language. Some have
said E is a sexist individual. But
never has the E been so offended
as when he read this vixenous
conspiracy contrived within the
babbling rivers of Hades.
So like any fine, outstanding
yellow journalist from the citadels
of integrity, the E went home to
eat turkey. While gorging on a
folk load of white meat, E turned
to Dad and said "I have been of-
fended by a lowly virulent scum
who has no sense of good satirical
advice
Stabbing the plated hill of
stuffing with a surge of boiled
blood, Senior E glared at Junior E
authoritatively, "Return to the
domainsof the Emerald City, sock
a second degree and resume your
Big E column
So, just for you Dick Head,
I'm back.
P.S. That is really a good anal-
ogy you used, cooaring the E to
Morton Down r. It makes so
much sense. Do . ney is on syndi-
cated T.V. (making millions) dis-
cussing the political ramifications
of handgun control while the Big
E (not making jackshit) is burning
the midnight oil at this college
paper writing to a person he
hates. You are probably one of
these people who has problems
distinguishing between black and
white.
P.P.S. If you really think I
wear my hair as pictured, you
must have the same mentality as
one of those highschool mutants
who park at the Fast Fare on Fri-
day nights.
And another thing I am not a
doctor, I just play one on T.V.
Just&sk
Big E
Special K
white chocolate. Since then, I read
where some people actually eat
dirt, so I ate a bucket of the red
stutf. Then it was pencil lead. E, do
I have a bad sickness?
Dirt Eater
Dear E,
I love to eat. I eat food. I eat al-
most everything. My problem is
that I have started to eat a lot of
non-food products. It started
about a month ago when I was
brushing my teeth. The more I
brushed, the more I liked the taste
of Close-up, so I ate the whole
tube.
After the Close-up experi-
ence, I tried the bathroom soap
and to my surprise it tasted like
Unsigned
Dear Dirt Eater,
No, you are perfectly normal.
I jusi finished off my first Pinto
last week.
Anti-State
Dear Earlvis,
Several weeks ago, I visited
the N.C. State campus. The stu-
dents over there told me that they
are much smarter and better lov-
ers than ECU students. Earlvis, is
this true? What do they know that
we don't know?
Signed, Wolfpack envy
Dear Frank,
First of all, you have to under-
stand the mentality of a State (I'm
sorry, Raleigh Farm Institute is
not deserving of upper case let-
ters, from now on it will be �
state) student. Since state's main
focus has always been agricul-
ture, most state students major in
Farming and subsequently spend
a lot of time with pigs and cows. In
the barnyard, I guess it is true,
they are smarter and do make
better lovers.
Dateless
BigE,
I am the only person I know
who doesn't have a boyfriend. My
friends say I'm pretty and fun to
be with. I don't understand what
the problem is.
At parties and downtown,
cute guys always ask me to dance
all night long and eventually to go
home with them. Sometimes I go,
sometimes I don't. I never like to
be a flirt and I'm not very obvious
when I'm around someone I'm
interested in. But I don't under-
stand it when guys don't ask me
out. If I attract them so easily and
have a good time (not what you're
thinking of a good time) bu t really
have fun, why don't they call me?
Signed,
Wanting Someone to Love
Dear Young and Reststop,
So, you don't know anybody
who doesn't have a boyfriend.
My, my. Sounds like either you
hang around a lot of fags or a lot of
whores.
Sorry for that out burst. A lot
of guys are reluctant to ask a
female out unless the girl lays
some subtle or not so subtle hints.
Here's some examples: "Hey,
what are you doing this week-
end?" "Gee, I haven't been to a
nice restaurant in a long time
"You know the last good movie I
saw was Gone With the Wind
Or how about the blunt ap-
proach: "Wanta come over and
tilt some aluminum and vacuum
some bingers?" or if you aren't
into brain cell damage say
"Wanta come over and gurgle
some Pepsi and pig on some
twinkies?" Or, if you aren't into
the glucose scene, say, "Wanta
come over and read some Vergil
and recite some Homer?" Or, if
you aren't into becoming a total
dweeb, say, "Wanta come?"
You see, the possiblities are end-
less.
Dear Big E,
We had a major virgin friend
last year, who was deathly afraid
of curing his problem. He was
even afraid to share hisbed with a
girl when he was asked to. For the
sake of hiding his name, we will
call him "Special K The problem
began whe he met what is now his
first girlfriend, we will call her
"Helga
"Special K" is so whipped
"Helga" made him drop out of the
fraternity he was pledging. She
won't even let him read the "Big
E" column because she is afraid he
will get wise to her. He is also
doing very dumb things. During
Halloween, she made him dress
up as a raisin and he hates raisins.
She also uses his head as a foot rest
on the bus.
His grades are suffering and
he has even missed a mid-term
exam because of her.
His attitude has changed en-
tirely. He use to listen to good
music, now he listens to satanic
cult chants and Bible stories. His
dressing style changed from
Izod's to torn jeans with putrid
green sports coat with an orange
scarf.
Although all this is bad, the
real problem is that she won't let
him party with his friends. This is
causing much concern because
we have heard rumors that she is
making him have a vasectomy
because she doesn't like con-
doms.
It would be a different story if
his girlfriend even looked half-
way good, but she is a roadbeast
from Hell.
We hope you can give him
some advice and with any luck at
all he will read your column.
Signed
Men Against Road Beasts.
Dear Guy With the Whipped
Friend,
So she made him dress up like
a raisin, hilarious. It's a shame
when good friends get whipped.
Have you ever noticed whipped
people insist on calling their girl
friendsboy friends every ten
minutes just to ask stupid ques-
tions? It's kind of like the ten-
minute ticker of stupidity. "What
have you been doing? Really,
what kind of tooth brush did you
brush your teeth with?"
In "Special K's" particular
case, it sounds like we have lost
another Bush clone to the Neo-
hippies. All the way from a frat
boy to a hallucinogenic highway
can man. This may be an lrrever-
sable personalitv trait but let's try
this.
Hey Special K, yeah this is the
Big E, can I ask you some ques-
tions?
When is the last time Helga
shaved her underarms?
The last time you and Helga
had a fight, who lost and was
forced to drive to the store and
purchase some feminine hy-
giene?
Have you ever been told that
when you talk on the phone with
Helga that you sound likea plead-
ing baby?
Have you, Special K, ever
been forced to listen to The Grate-
ful Dead against your will?
Special K, if you are in our
reading vortex please answer
these questions and I will deter-
mine the severity of your Helga
obsession.
Send your problems to:
BigE
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Greenville, N.C, 27834
Till next semester, cheerio
and don't let the dick heads of-
fend you.
Squirrel Man commits suicide in jail
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
The strange saga of Greenville's
"squirrel man" is finally at its end.
The monster apparently commit-
ted suicide in the Greenville Jail
cell that was his home during the
last weeks of his life.
Klicky-Klicky, the squirrel
creature from another dimension
accused of murder, maintained
his innocence to the end. He re-
peatedly told authorities of an evil
twin brother who was responsible
for several area murders.
Whether or not he was right
remains to be seen. Klicky was
pronounced dead on arrival at
Pitt Memorial Hospital Wednes-
day night. The coroner's official
reports indicate that the death
was a suicide.
Klicky was found in his jail
cell Wednesday afternoon. A rope
was tied around his neck. "He
was hanging a couple feet off the
ground when I got there Police
Chief Gordon O'Hara said during
a press conference. "I knew his
neck was broke the minute I saw
him. But he hung on until we got
him cut down
O'Hara said that Klicky mut-
tered one word before he lost
conciousness completely.
"Sounded like 'Omohundro or
some such thing. I didn't make
head or tail um he stops for a
moment, in respect for the dead
creature he came to know as a
friend. "I didn't know what it
was
A memorial service is being
held Saturday afternoon in Fick-
len stadium after ECU's com-
mencement services. The event is
being held by the Pitt County
SPCA.
Next semester, The East Caro-
linian will run a series of inter-
views with Klicky, recorded sev-
eral days before his death. The
series will run next semester for as
many weeks as the public lets us.
The transcripts of the inter-
view reveal much of Micky's life
before he came to our dimension,
his viewpoint on life here and
details of his tragic last days of
life.
Anyone with info.mation
concerning the meaning of the
squirrel man's last word, or sight-
ings of the elusive evil twin, are
urged to call The East Carolinian at
757-6o6.
Holy rollers hit downtown Greenville
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
Forget Heritage USA and Oral
Roberts University. The new hip
hangout for religious hucksters is
downtown Greenville.
Encouraged by the city's dis-
missal of the pagan Halloween
show. They're green and don't need around town recognize the need
Jovi recruits mostly outside stealth fighters. They have their for spiritual and aquatic salva-
Carolina East Mall on Friday own personal defense system. If tion
nights. "I'm trying to give these everyone wore needles, the Tolerance and Jovi both ac-
young people some hope and commies would never bother us cept tax-deductable donations
direction in their lives. While ifs a again from their followers. So far, nei-
good practice to spend time in the Tolerance passes out cartoon thcr has earned enough to acquire
holiday, a slew of new religions malls, you need some spiritual pamphlets on Fifth Street. The a headquarters, but Jovi is negoti-
have sprung up in the Emerald guidance in how to shop, and
City, and ministers are scram- what the most shine-free make-
bling to convert ECU students up products really are. Thafs
and Greenville citizens.
Father Gibson Jovi of The
Holy Church of MTV is the most
prominent of the new pastors. His
followers now number 18, mostly
teenage girls from Rose High
tracts contain parables of sinners
who end up in an icy hell because
they wasted water. One pamphlet
McFerrin assaulted
NEW YORK, NY (BP) � Pop
star Bobby McFerrin, who rose to
fame this fall with his hit video
and song "Don't Worry, Be
Happy was assaulted by almost
100 people today in his New York
apartment.
McFerrin was beaten, tied up,
covered in excrement and forced
to watch as the group of vigilantes
calling themselves Seventy
People Against Musical Sht,
SPAMS, tortured his pet canary
and destroyed his apartment.
The leader of SPAMS, Craig
Drivel, issued a statement to the
press. "We had to take action.
That inane song continues to be
played across the nation. It's re-
ally an evil song
The release explained that the
"admittedly catchy" tune and
"chuckleheaded lyrics" meant to
inspire optimism in the public
conciousness had the opposite
effect on many people. "I person-
ally would go into a kitten-stran-
gling rage whenever I heard the
first few notes play on the radio
Drivel said.
Drivel said he went before
Congress in an attempt to halt all
airplay of the song legally, but
"the senators and reps, were all
humming and tapping their pen-
cils as they heard the proposal'
he said. 1 found out later that
President Reagan liked the song
and ordered it played every hour
on the hour on the Muzak systems
in all government buildings
The SPAMS leader also cred-
its the Republican election victory
to the song. "It was a devious
campaign ploy. People heard the
song and thought 'Hey. Things
must be good right now. I'll vote
Republican he said.
Though Drivel had the single
checked by several studios, he
found no backwards masking to
help support his claim. Desperate
for an end to the "optimism mad-
ness he felt was taking over the
country, he formed SPAMS and
planned the attack on McFerrin as
a public protest.
After the assault, McFerrin
was taken to a nearby hospital. Al-
though the diagnoses was shock,
McFerrin seemed cheerful as he
smiled at reporters before being
wheeled into the operating room.
"Don't worry hesaidBe happy
OoocKXooooeeeeoooooo
why MTV is a valuable guide for has a frozen Satan rising from a
these teens refrigerator, laughing at vegetari-
On the other end of the spec- ans he has tricked into a meat
trum, Reverend N. Tolerance of locker.
the Church of St. Mary of the Cacti The moral i s abstinence, even
lures followers with the promise in the face of temptation. The
Their doctrine includes a daily 0f an afterlife filled with peace, vegetarians end up cooking the
worship service in the Menden- happiness and low-moisture des- beef with a Bic� lighter. They arc
hall Student Center. ert vegetation. "Admittedly, it's a rescued a few hours later, but
Disciples watch an hour of strange philosophy Tolerance freeze in hell after they die due to
MTV in the Mendenhall televi- admits'But have you ever seen their lapse,
sion room and pray to Veejay an unhappy cactus?" "The kids that hang out at the
Adam Curry. Church members "No, and I'll tell you why he Fast Fare laugh at the booklets,
are encouraged to purchase Vidal answers. "Cacti are God's chosen but they'll freeze in hell for scoff-
Sassoon� products and try out for plants. Cacti store their own wa- ing at the Lord Tolerance ex-
the "Remote Control" game ter and don't bother anyone else, plains. "But the elderly ladies
Raleigh tornado victim suffers in treeless Boneian Manor
at.ng with school officials for the
permanent use of Mendenhall.
When asked if either of them
had secret pasts they thought
might come back to haunt them,
they shook their heads. After the
interview, Tolerance came back
in. "I had my fingers crossed he
said. "I did once read the Sports
Illustrated Swimsuit issue. But I
was absolved
He scurries out again, drop-
ping a cartoon tract in his wake.
The title says it all, "Somebody
Goofed On the cover, a blue and
white devil licks his lips at a pros-
trate sinner.
RALEIGH, N.C. (BP) � The
tornado that struck Raleigh with-
out warning Sunday night had
devastating effects on one Raleigh
woman.
Divorcee Penny Bonehead,
mother of the infamous newspa-
per columnist Chippy Bonehead
and mistress of stately Bonehead
Manor at Vauxhill-by-the-Gutter,
suffered property losses totalling
over $25 to the million-dollar
Bonehead estate.
"We don't have a single tree
left in the yard. And since that
sewer running under our yard is
flooding again, there's nothing to
stop the water. The backyard is
falling in and no one gives a damn
but me she wailed.
Aside from trees all over the
yard, the Bonehead driveway is
cluttered with fallen branches.
"And who had to go out and clean
it up? Me she exclaimed. "My
wonderful sons stayed in
Greenville where it was safe. I had FATHER is supposed to take care
just raked the yard, too, and me of these things, but he's too busy
with my back acting up again.
"I can't afford to hire people
to clean up this place. I'm the face
of poverty she explained. "Their
buying pianos. Well, what goes
around comes around, I'll tell
you
Other damage included a
twisted gutter, and several
shingles ripped from the roof. It
was an act of God. It's a miracle
I'm alive, no thanks to my fam-
ily she declared. Other members
of the Bonehead familv could not
be reached for comment.
Study says college gambling uncontrollable
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
College gambling is getting out of
control, a government study
shows. The study, conducted by
ECU Director of Such Studies
Rhea Searcher, says that college
students will place bets on "just
about anything
The study was conducted in
the form of a survey. Participants
were asked questions such as
"Have you ever gambled? If so,
was it with money? How much?
Would you bet on the ECU foot-
ball team? Would you take the
under on an intramural game?
Would you bet that Dan Quayle
will ever have an original idea?"
"Those that answered ques-
tions positively have been recom-
mended to school psychologists
for treatment Searcher said.
"But they are proving to be diffi-
cult patients
One patient in particular, "Big
E" (his real name),proved to be a
compulsive gambler. Dr. Cra-
nium Dwindler saidBig E' is a
compulsive gambler
"He bets orderlies on the
amount of pills he can take. He
recites the Sports Hotline scores in
his sleep. If you mention the Re-
dskins, he starts foaming at the
mouth. I could tell by the bone
structure of his face he was a
hopeless gambler Dwindler
said.
"It's sad to see so many young
minds going to waste. How much
you want to bet three of them
never get better-paying jobs than
the average Burger King� cashier
for the rest of their lives? Five
bucks?' he said. "I'll give you 10
to one odds
Pirat
By CHRIS SIEGF
Astitunt Sport I ditor
In an almost deal
packed Cameron indoor
it was a battle of David
Goliath � the 2-0 East (
Pirates vs. the nation's
one ranked Duke Blue
This time the results were
of the Giant, as Dul
ECU 95-46.
For the first eight mi
Lady Pi
for the t
By CHRIS SIK.l
4�i9tam Sport
Coming off a third pi
ish in the Appalachian Si
eraton last weekend, th(
Pirates had the formidable
playing at Duke lj
night.
Despite poor sh I
first half, the Lad)
were still close on the si -
ECU trailed at halftime 1
34-29.
But the Duke fai - I
Blue Devil team came out:
the second half. Behind tivi
plav of center Sue Harni
forward Ellen Langhi, Du
control of play. The t
Coach
Bv KRISTIN HALBI
Sport I dltOf
With ha-ketba -
daily underway, there isc
thing that is missing for thl
ers and the fans at East Caj
actual conference plav.
Theriratesd.Miot begj
ing CAA teams until la
William and Mary, and a!
this might seem like a
Coach Mike Steele isn't v
"The conference is thj
important thing, but wedc
anv more emphasis v j
than anv other game St
plained. "We look at each
bei ng of eq ual impo rt a n ce.
AOPi fal
reigns ovl
(IRS) � The Gutti
bowled 74 pins over
Omicron Ti while the men
Prerogative easily defeatec
Chi B to take the champion
the Intramural bowling ti
Tuesdav.
Lana Rexrod and
Lutv led theGurter Girls' b
averages but lennifer Slot!
Stacv Quhn and kristen i-
pulled theirweght as well
lead the team o a victor
Holi
Just in case anyoi
cided to stav in Greei
for the holidays, here)
update of Winter
games played at homj
Men's Basketball!
Games to be hel
Minges Coliseui
Sat. Dec. 3 - ECU
Campbell 7:30 p.
Sat. Dec. 10-EC
Radford 7:30 p.i
Tues. Dec. 27 - ECLl
University of Maryl
Baltimore 7:3f p.
Fri. Dec. 30 - EC1
Texas Christian 7:3i I
Mon. Jan. 16 - EC
George Mason 7:30
Women's Basket!
Games to be hel
Minges Coliseui
FrL Dec. 2 - Lady Pi
Classic
ECU vs. UNC-
lotte 8 p.m.





la
arrot
th the Whipped
limdrcssuplike
s It's a shame
Is cot whipped.
oticed whipped
�ailing their girl
nds every ten
k stupid ques-
f like the ten-
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doing? Really,
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K � ular
Ice we have lost
i the Neo-
,a- from a trat
cvgenic highway
n be an irrever-
traitbut let - try
k vrah this is the
�ome ques-
lasl time Helga
jrarms?
c you and I lelga
5l and was
c store and
feminine hv-
irerbeen told that
n the phone with
d like a plead-
5p rial K, ever
rheGrate-
ir will?
:� you are in our
please answer
i and ! will deter-
ity of your Helga
problems to:
nian
is Building
, N.C 27834
semester, cheerio
he dick heads of-
jail
rd, or sight-
jsive evil twin, are
� Fai - ! ir )linian at
recognize the need
and aquatic salva-
and fovi both ac-
uctable donations
1 lowers. So far, nei-
td enough to acquire
rs, butjovi is negoti-
ol officials for the
w oi Mendenhall.
i if either of them
its they thought
ack to haunt them,
ir hi ids After the
a me back
fingers crossed he
r id the Sports
nm -uc. But I
;ain, drop-
in tract in his wake.
s it all, "Somebody
the co er, a blue and
is his lips at a pros-
m iManor
r, and sever il
: from the roof. It
i. It's a miracle
ks to my fam-
iredd thermembers
ead family could not
br comment.
trollable
ills he can take. He
orts Hotline scores in
you mention the Re-
tarts foaming at the
uld tell by the bone
his face he was a
ambler Dwindler
to see so many young
to waste. How much
o bet three of them
?ttcr-paying jobs than
Burger King� cashier
of their lives? Five
said. "I'll give you 10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
DECEMBER 1, 1988 Page 21
Pirates fall to No. 1 team in the country
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Assistant Sports Editor
In an almost deafening,
packed Cameron indoor stadium
it was a battle of David verses
Goliath � the 2-0 East Carolina
Pirates vs. the nation's number
one ranked Duke Blue Devils.
This time the results were in favor
oi the Giant, as Duke pounded
ECU 95-46.
For the first eight minutes of
the game, the blue and white clad
Duke fans were more than a little
nervous. The Pirates kept it tight
with the Blue Devils despite some
missed shots and turnovers. At
12:49 in the first half, ECU trailed
by only six, 16-10.
But a technical on Duke coach
Mike Krzyzewski, ignited the
fans and the team. With crisp
passing and complete domina-
tion on the boards, Duke
stretched their lead to a comfort-
able margin. With 5:35 remaining
in the first half, John Smith hit a
jumper to stretch the lead to 16,
37-21. Duke never looked back
from there as they cruised to a 24-
point lead at halftime 49-25.
"I thought the first 10 minutes
of the game we played some of
our best ball said ECU coach
Mike Steele. "But 12 minutes into
the game, I look up and we are
down 16. They are a great club
and much improved over last
year's squad
The number one team in the
country came out fired up the
second half after a lackluster start
of the game. "I thought we came
out a little flat said Duke coach
Mike Krzyzewski. "We played Duke came out firing on all
well in the second half. We played cylinders in the second half. After
with a lot of tenacity. The team a ,l,s Hil' three-point basket for
played unselfish and made the ECL cut lhc ,ead to 21, Duke
extra pass that led to easy bas- See DUKE race 22
kets 'Y &
Lady Pirates prove to be no match
for the tough Blue devils of Duke
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Assistant Sports Editor
half-time lead for Duke steadily gated to shooting three-pointers
grew to as much as 33 by the end the last four minutes of the game
of the game, 93 to 60. to try to cut into a 30-point Duke
The Blue Devils passed the lead. The Lady Pirates shot an
Coming off a third place fin- ball with pin-point accuracy and amazing 16 three-pointers
ish in the Appalachian State-Sh- showed great patience on offense, throughout the game, but con-
era ton last weekend, the Lady They worked the ball inside the nected on just four.
Pirates had the formidable task of paint all night for easy layups or Duke was lead in the scoring
playing at Duke Wednesday short jumpers. Robin Baker's by Harnett who had a game high
night. seven assists and fine handling of 23 points. Leigh Morgan and
Despi tc poor shooting in the the ECU press set up opportunity Langhi added 17 apiece and
first half, the Lady Pirates (1-2) after opportunity for the Blue Marcy Peterson chipped in with
Devils. 16 off the bench.
The Lady Pirate matched up Sarah Gray lead the way for
statistically with Duke for the the Pirates with 20 points and
game in all categories except one eight rebounds. Gray was the
shooting percentage. Duke only ECU player to score in
double figures. Pam Williams
added nine and freshman Mech-
orward Ellen Langhi, Duke took for this low percentaage was the
itrol of play. The five-point fact that the Pirates were rele- bee lauy i-ika its, page z
w ore still close on the scoreboard.
ECU trailed at halftime by five,
54-29.
But the Duke fans aiiu the
Blue Devil team came out fired up
the second half. Behind the strong shot 54 percent, while ECU shot a
play o center Sue Harnett and mere 30.4 percent. A big reason
U

1
Greta Savage attempts to dribble in for the layup in a game against American University last vear.
The Lady Pirates, who lost to American 46-54, did not fare any better with Duke on Wednesday as
they were beaten 60-93 (Photo by ECU Photo Lab).
com
Coach Steele looks ahead to CAA's
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports fditor
With basketball season offi-
;lv underwav, there is onlv one
thing that is missing for the play-
� - and the fans at East Carolina -
actual conference play.
The Pirates do not begin play-
ing CAA teams until Jan. 7 at
William and Mary, and although
(his might seem like a setback,
Coach Mike Steele isn't worried.
"The conference is the most
important thing, but we don't put
any more emphasis on one game
than any other game Steele ex-
plained "We look at each game as
being of equal importance. All the
preseason games are games that
will get us ready for conference
play
Steele is more concerned with
the fact that this year there will be
more home games before confer-
ence play begins, Last year the
Pirates only had three home
games of their first 11 game
stretch. But this year, the Pirates
will play six out of the first 12
games at home. And to Coach
Steele, that will make all the
difference.
"I'm excited we have a chance
to have some home games
Steele said. "Hopefully we will
get used to playing some games at
home, get some experience and
have some success before the
conference
Steele is also using the delay
in playing conference teams as an
acc-in-the-hole to keep team spir-
its up. "The thing that the confer-
ence does is if you struggle a bit,
you can say, look, we have a new
season coming up. If you're not,
then you can say, we're playing
well, now that we're going into
the conference play, let's keep
going
Steel and his Pirates have a
tough road to travel before play-
ing CAA Conference teams. With
the likes of South Carolina, Geor-
gia Tech, Mississippi State and
No. 1 Duke all to look forward to
before Jan. 7, the Pirates are in for
some tremendous competition.
And with the doubts that
loom over the Pirates regarding
these elite teams, there is also
optimism as far as Steele is con-
cerned. With the Duke game
coming up on Wednesday, Steele
is anticipating a learning experi-
ence for his Pirates.
"Dukeisa game where we get
a good guarantee and we don't
have to travel very far. More
importantly, it gives us a chance
to play in the ACC and gives us a
chance to play one of the top
teams in the country which will be
great experience for us
Duke has signed a three-year
contract with East Carolina.
AOPi falls to Gutter Girls � Our Prerogative
reigns over Theta Chi B for IRS bowling titles
(IRS) � The Gutter Girls
bowled 74 pins over Alpha
Omicron Pi while the men of Our
Prerogative easily defeated Theta
Chi B to take the championship in
the Intramural bowling finals on
Tuesday.
Lana Rexrod and Melissa
l.utvled the Gutter Girls'bowling
averages but Jennifer Slothower,
Stacy Quhn and Kristen Halberg
pulled their we;ght as well to help
lead the team o a victory over
AOPi.
In the other lane, Theta Chi B
were defeated by this years "team
most likely to enter a sport Our
Prerogative. The gentleman from
Theta Chi B (their A team also
made it to the playoffs) tried to
stay with them, but the strike fe-
vered team of Steve Kuykendall,
Ronnie Strong and the brother
duo of Terry and Todd Turington
were just too strong and remained
victorious.
Prognosticator IMA RECK unblemished to take final game,
sees the future sports concluding Women's volleyball:
with these outcomes: Good, Bad and Ugly remain
Women's soccer: Really Great, Unstoppable and Unde-
Rottens wins by landslide. feated.
Men's soccer: Grand To catch all the highlighted
Poobah kicked out of champion-
ship game.
Men's 3 on 3 basketball:
The Fellows capture yet another
title. , ,
Women's 3 on 3 basket-
ball: The Untouchable remain
action, be sure to read the spring
preview edition of A Break in the
Action after the holidays.
Speaking of previews, spring
1989 marks the initiation of sev-
See INTRAMURALS, page 22
An intense Mike Steele studies statistics while approaching the
court for the second half of play against UNC-Greensboro. The
Pirates were unsuccessful against Duke on Wednesday, but Steele
is pleased with the performance of his team (Photo by ECU Photo
Lab).
Holiday update
Just in case anyone de-
cided to stay in Greenville
for the holidays, here is an
update of winter sports
games played at home.
Men's Basketball -
Games to be held in
Minges Coliseum
Sat. Dec. 3 - ECU vs.
Campbell 7:30 p.m.
Sat. Dec. 10 - ECU vs.
Radford 7:30 p.m.
Tues. Dec. 27 - ECU vs.
University of Maryland-
Baltimore 7:30 p.m.
Fri. Dec. 30 - ECU vs.
Texas Christian 7:30 p.m.
Mon. Jan. 16 - ECU vs.
George Mason 7:30 p.m.
Women's Basketball -
Games to be held in
Minges Coliseum
Fri. Dec. 2 - Lady Pirate
Classic
ECU vs. UNC-Char-
lotte 8 p.m.
Sat. Dec. 3 - Lady Pirate
Classic -
Consolation Game
1 p.m.
Championship Game
3 p.m.
Thu. Jan. 5 - ECU vs.
Campbell 7 p.m.
Sat. Jan. 7 - ECU vs. Wil-
liam and Mary 7 p.m.
Mon. Jan. 9 - ECU vs.
Richmond 7 p.m.
Thu. Jan. 12 - ECU vs.
North Carolina A&T
7 p.m.
Men and Women
Swim and Dive Team -
Games to be held in
Minges Pool
Sat. Dec. 3 ECU vs.
Richmond 2 p.m.
Sat Jan. 14 ECU vs. UNO
Wilmington 2 p.m.
Pirate's Booty
Rules for Pirate fan etiquette
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
Hello sport's fans.
Welcome to the final edition
of Pirate's booty for the semester.
Today's topic to boot will focus on
basketball game etiquette.
Now I was at the home game
game on Monday when the Pi-
rates dominated 68-49 against a
good UNC-Greensboro team and
I must say I was slightly im-
pressed with the modest 3,954
turnout in Minges Coliseum, al-
though it could have been much
better (I know most of you had
returned back to school for the
holidays by then).
However, now that you, the
fans, are trying to make an effort
to attend the games, proper eti-
quette is mandatory and must be
learned to ensure an exciting sea-
son.
I noticed that the fans were
greatly lacking in excitment and
enthusiasm during much of the
game. As the Pirates proceeded to
romp over UNC-G, it took a con-
traversial technical call on ECU's
Reed Lose to get the crowd up on
its feet and into the game.
I have come to the conclusion
that ECU fans don't know how to
act at basketball games. So, to
make things les confusing on the
fans, I've decided to give you, the
fans, four simple but mandatory
rules to follow when going to
basketball games.
The first rule to proper bas-
ketball etiquette is in regards to
cheering. There is a general rule at
Minges Coliseum that, unless
there is an extenuating circum-
stance (which there never is and
there never will be), noise is not
prohibited. This means you may
use your voice to yell, scream,
holler and basically make your
vocal chords ache from overuse.
Try it. No one will think you're
nuts.
Rule number two deals with
standing. Minges also has an ex-
tended policy of permitting fans
to stand during any duration of
the game. You could stand
through the entire game if you
wanted to. The real trick however,
comes with standing and cheer-
ing at the same time, although, I
assure you, it's easy to get the
hang of.
The third rule focuses on fan
participation with the cheerlead-
ers. Come on guys. Cheerleading
is supposed to be fun and reward-
ing, but for them, it sure looks
more like work trying to get the
fans to yell "Purple and merely
participate in psyching the bas-
ketball team up. Fans, be more
considerate to the cheerleaders.
Cheerleaders, I know its frustrat-
ing. Keep up the good work.
Finally, rule number four
deals with staying for the entire
game. The fans at Monday's game
were pretty good about this. Most
decided to be present for the en-
tire event although some did
trickle out with a good five min-
utes left of playing time. If there is
any trouble remembering thi
rule, remember what Mom use
to say: It's rude to get up from the
dinner table before everyone is
done eating.
These rules I have outlined
are not hard and may be followed
in any order. The key here is to
actually abide by them.
But the real beauty of these
rules is that they can be applied to
any sport, not just basketball.
WINTER SPORTS
RECORD
(As of Wed. Nov. 30)
Men's Basketball 2-1
Women's Basketball 1-2
Men's Swimming 5-0
Women's Swimming 4-1





22
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1988
match
Pirates
Continued from page 21
rattled off the next 13 points. All
American Danny Ferry capped
off the run with a three-pointer at
16-21 in the second half. This put
Duke up by 34, 62-28.
The Pirates tried to mount a
comeback, but Duke's height and field goals in a row which is an
rest of the Duke team more than
picked up the slack.
lead by Alaa
18 points.
Duke was
Abdclnaby's
Abdelnaby hit all nine of his field
goal attempts. This gives him 19
superior bench strength were just
too much for the smaller Pirates.
ECU could never cut the lead to
less than two.
The Duke team played every-
one who dressed out and all but
three Duke players scored. The
Pirates did an admirable job hold-
ing Ferry to just 11 points, but the
ACC record and just six shy of
Roy Voelkel's NCAA record of 25
straight field goals. John Smith
added 16 points off the bench for
Duke and Robert Brickey and Phil
Henderson each had 12.
The Pirates, who shot a low
32.1 percent from the field, were
led by Reed Lose's 13 points
The win gave Duke coach
coming in off the bench. Gus Hill Krzvzcwski 250 career wins and
added 11 and Blue Edwards he says he is happy to be ranked
scoied ten for the visiting Pirates.
Besides their cold shooting,
Duke's edge in rebounds was the
vital and deciding difference in
the game. Duke pounded the
glass for 44 rebounds, an over two
to one margin over the Pirates
who had just 21 rebounds.
"We tried to box out but with
their incredible height it made it
difficult said Coach Steelc. "We
played a hard physical game.
They missed shots in the first half
but we couldn't get anv re-
bounds
number one in the country. "1
think its good we are number one.
Evervone wants to be number
one said Krzvzewski.
ECU now has to regroup and
face a tough Campbell squad,
"last wars team bounced back
well after a defeat. We will have to
see how this team does said Pi-
rate coach Steele
The Pirates, 2-1, will host the
Campbell Camels on Saturday
Dec. 3 at 7:30p.m. in MingesColi-
seum.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further information, call 832 0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
PARKER'S
Parachuting is a new club at ECU
(IRS) � Do you want a taste ot
the ultimate high Now you can
. Legally! East Carolina Universi-
tvas finally recognized sport
parachuting as a club.
The cost of the first jump is
with safety precautions.
The student is also paying for
a jumpmaster, fuel for the aircraft
and the repair and maintenance of
the aircraft. All of this is covered
by the initial $100 payment with
5100 and includes everything you cach additional jump costing $15
need to jump. The first jump in- which covers much the sace ex
he would exit the aircraft at the
appropriate altitude and count to
ten. He would then deploy the
main chute.
The average student can
reach the necessary skill level for
freefall on his sixth jump. After
reaching freefall status, the next
eludes 2-3 hours of on-the-ground penses as the initial jump with the goal may be to receive a class "A"
training by a qualified instructor
covering several different aspects
such as emergency procedures,
exiting the aircraft, canopy con-
trol "od how to land.
Rental of the student
equiment is covered in the initial
cost and the student rig is loaded
exception of the ground school.
The ultimate goal of all sky-
divers is freefall. Freefall is when
the student exits the aircraft and it
is his responsibility to deploy the
main canopy.
For example, if a student was
going to make a 10 second delay,
iscencc, allowing one to jump
anywhere in the UNited States
without hazing to repeat the
coursework and progression ot
jumpsunder another certified
trainer.
For more information call
Mike Richardson at 7524860
Intramural picks in for end of the season
. ��� � i! �l,r��.V-i
Continued from page 21
eral new activities amidst the
numbers of competitive intramu-
ral sports. NIKE sports, in coop-
eration with Intramural-Recrea-
tional services will sponsor this
vears special event, The NIKE 3-
point SHOOT OUT. As bracket
winners advance, so do the list of
awards provided by NIKE sports
including: tennis shoes, bags, jer-
seys, sweat suits etc. Registration
will be held January 25 - so come
suited up and ready to play.
The month of February marks
the second annual slam dunk
competition. Billed in the past as
strictly a man's event. This year,
ladies will have the opportunity
to slam as an adjusted height goal
will be used for the competition.
Wordhasit that IntfamuraTs own
JMA.RECK; will compete in this
vears stam festival. Registration
will be held on the 14th at 5:00
p.m. inBION102.
March is a hot month for in-
tramural sport action as the fol-
lowing deadlines are scheduled:
�softball registration on
the fourth
tennis doubles registra-
tion on the fourteenth
pre-season softball
sponsored by Miller on the four-
teenth
swim meet on the fif-
teenth
Co-rec volleyball and
indoor soccer on the twenty-first
Budwciser Sport Day
and Tennis Mixed Doubles on the
twenty-eighth
The annual intramural SLUG
Fest will be held in April so soft-
ball squads should get their teams
together callv in the hopes of
success of last years all nighter ha;
paved the way for a new weekend
format.
For a comprehensive sched-
ule of all the springs upcoming
intramural sports events, be sure
to pick up an activity calendar in
204 Memorial Gym or look for
your copy in a variety of campus
locations.
Thysical Fitness Opportuni-
ties increase as well this coming
spring with the development of
Bellv Busters aerobics, Fitness
Olympics, Brown Bag Luncheons
and Fitness Assessments. In addi-
tion, the aerobics, aquarobics,
toning, weight training work-
shops and facultystaff fitness
programs remain on the schedule
with specific registration dead-
lines posted in a seperate Physical
Fitness schedule card 'located in
204 Memorial Gvmnasium.
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CHARLOTTE, NX I
They said it was just anc
night, another game Deepdi
however, none of the Chai
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a it the) had been the hi �
of the winless Miami Heat
"Thiswasa win, thi . n
win against anybody Cha
zoach Dick Harter said i
team's third victory m 13ga
99-84 triumph over the Hea
need all the
though 1 wouldi �
read the papers in the itk
and seen where they ender
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the school I - f7
in balloting -i
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Marshall coach Georg
finished - r I
followed
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I
first � � Vustriaj
Nierlich b
combined tim
9.32 seconds
Nierlich. who ha 3
time in the final run. was
1P 2 09 ;s with two rr
ans, Hans Fnn ai
Mayer, third and t
wasclockedin2 1
at 2:11.21.
It was Zui n -
reer vi tory He w n the i
Super-G on Sunday in
ding, Austria.
Mustaf nami
rookie of we
GREENSBORO N C i
lerrod Mustaf of Marvlai
named the Atlantic
Conference's first rookie
week Tuesday by the
Coast Sports Writers Assc
Mustaf, a 6-foot-lQ f
from Greenbelt, Md so
points and grabbed lt re
in two games m leadingl
land to the ehampionshu
Freedom Bowl Tournai
Irvine, Calif.
Ladv Pirates
fall to Blue
Continued from pag�
ellc Jones had eight.
Gray has lead the Pj
the scoring all three gai
season Gray, who did
last season due to a kn
has come back to be thl
spot for the Lady Pirates
off to a 1-2 start for secc
coach Pat Pierson.
Pierson and the Lad
will resume action on
Nashville, Tenn. against I
bilt and will play again o
against Tennessee State.





'S
Id
Cole
i n
b
ou
t ready
pletely
RY.
;e.
Miami falls to Charlotte 99-84
MALPASS
MUFFLER
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) �
They said it was just another
night, another game. Deep down,
however, none of the Charlotte
fomets would have liked to face
il if they had been the first victim
of the winless Miami Heat.
This was a win, the same as a
win against anybody Charlotte
;oach Dick Harter said of his
team's third victory in 13 games, a
99-84 triumph over the Heat. "We
need all the wins we can get, al-
ugh 1 wouldn't have liked to
read the papers in the morning
and seen where they ended their
losing streak
Tim Kcmpton said the Hor-
net- were interested in winning,
not necessarily beating the Heat.
We felt if we came out and
played hard and played to our
capabilities, we would win the
game kempton said.
Miami was close, having led
midway through the second
quarter and making a serious run
at ending its early-season futility
in the fourth period. But one of the
key players in the battle of the
NBA babies highlighted a fourth-
period run. He scored five points
in a 9-0 spurt to lead Charlotte out
of a 77-76 nailbiter into an 86-76
cushion which Miami couldn't
answer.
"I get more and more com-
fortable every game. I listen to the
olderguysand that helpsmeout
said Chapman, who had a rookie-
season high of 22 points.
"Coming in cold off the bench
is tough and it takes me a few
minutes to get going he said.
"I'm still not shooting as well as
I'd like. I'm missing easy shots
If his eye is off, then
Chapman's timing has made up
for the deficiency right now.
Charlotte trailed 29-26 after
Dwayne Washington's 15-foot
lean-in jumper with 7:50 left be-
fore halftime.
Chapman retaliated, starting
an 11-0 run and scoring nine
points in the burst to give Char-
lotte a 37-29 lead with 5:50 left in
the second quarter.
Washington's layup with 7:09
left to play brought Miami within
77-76 after it had trailed by as
much as 14 in the third quarter.
There was Chapman again, how-
ever. He led a 9-0 run with five
points, burning the Heat once
again.
"We played hard enough tc
stop their runs. That was the key
to our victory Harter said. "We
need to do this in all of our
games
Chapman has chosen to ig-
nore thecritics who said he wasn't
ready to play in the NBA. He also
chose to turn his back on compari-
sons between him and Miami's
first-round draft pick, Rony
Seikaly.
"Seikaly's a great player but
just had a bad night Chapman
said.
Charlotte's fourth sellout
crowd of 23388 booed Seikaly
during the team introductions,
when he approached the scorer's
table and every time he touched
the ball. It was retribution for his
comments last spring in which he
said he didn't want to play for
Charlotte.
"This crowd really didn't
bother me because I'm used to
playing infront of big crowds
Seikaly said. "This is a beautiful
place with a great atmosphere
and super fans
Robert Reid scored 17 points,
Kurt Rambis had 13 points in
three quarters and Michael
Holton finished with 10 for the
Hornets, who won by their big-
gest margin this season. Kelly
Tripucka, the Hornets' leading
scorer, sat out the game with a
strained hamstring.
Washington scored a career-
high 18 points for Miami. Grant
Long had 14 points, Pat Cum-
mings scored 13 and Rory Spar-
row had 10.
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Greenville. NC
Citadel coach named
the coach of the year
ASHEVILLE, N.C (AP) �
Charlie Taaffe, who led The Cita-
del to its first appearance in the
NCAA I-AA playoffs this season,
was named the Southern Confer-
ence coach of the vear.
J
Taaffe, in his second season at
the school, collected 64 of 79 votes
in balloting by the Southern Con-
ference Sports Media Association.
Marshall coach George Chaump
finished second with 10 votes,
followed by Furman coach Jimmy
Satterfield with three and West-
ern Carolina coach Bob Waters
and East Tennessee State coach
Don Riley with one apiece.
The Citadel finished 5-2 in
the conference and 8-4 overall,
including a 38-20 loss to Georgia
Southern in the first round of the
I-AA playoffs last Saturday. The
Bulldogs finished 4-7 in 1987.
The eieht victories were the
most by the school since 1971,
when The Citadel finished 8-3.
The All-Southern Conference
Zurbrieg wins
World Cup
VAL THORENS, France (AP)
- Switzerland's Pirmin Zurbrig-
gen won his second straight
World Cup race Tuesday, captur-
i ng the giant slalom amid fog and
rain.
Double Olympic gold medal-
ist Alberto Tomba had the fastest
start in the first run, but was dis-
qualified for missing a gate.
Zurbriggen, leading after the
first run, held off Austria's Rudi
ierlich by 16. The Swiss skier's
combined time was two minutes,
9.32 seconds.
N'ierlich, who had the fastest
time in the final run, was second
in 2:09.38 with two more Austri-
ans, Hans Enn and Helmut
Mayer, third and fourth. Enn's
�� as clocked in 2:10.02 with Mayer
at 2:11.21.
It was Zurbriggen's 33rd ca-
reer victory. He won the opening
Super-G on Sunday in Schlam-
ding, Austria.
Mustaf named
rookie of week
GREENSBORO, N.C.(AP) �
lerrod Mustaf of Maryland was
named the Atlantic Coast
Conference's first rookie of the
week Tuesday by the Atlantic
Coast Sports Writers Association.
Mustaf, a 6-foot-10 forward
from Greenbelt, Md scored 35
points and grabbed 16 rebounds
in two games in leading Mary-
land to the championship of the
Freedom Bowl Tournament in
Irvine, Calif.
Lady Pirates
fall to Blue Devils
Continued from page 21
elle Jones had eight.
Gray has lead the Pirates in
the scoring all three games this
season. Gray, who did not play
last season due to a knee injury,
has come back to be the bright
spot for the Lady Pirates who are
off to a 1-2 start for second-year
coach Pat Pierson.
Pierson and the Lady Pirates
will resume action on Dec. 15 in
Nashville, Term, against Vander-
bilt and will play again on Dec. 17
against Tennessee State.
team was also announced, with
Marshall wide receiver Mike Bar-
ber and running back Ron Darby
heading five repeat selections on
the 25-man squad.
Barber, who has caught 73
passes heading into Saturday's
playoff game against Marshall, is
the league's all-time leading re-
ceiver, with 243 receptions.
Darby has rushed for 1,226
yards in 12 games after rushing
for 1,506 yards in 15 games last
season.
Other repeat selections in-
cluded Marshall right end Sean
Doctor, Furman offensive tackle
Fe Cowan and Tennessee-Chat-
tanooga defensive lineman Tony
Bo wick.
VMI wide receiver Mark
Stock was the top vote-getter on
the offense, receiving 76 votes
Furman senior linebacker Jeft
Blankenship was the top defen-
sive vote-getter, receiving 73
votes.
L
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24
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1988
Playoff hopes dim for Redskins
r
w. jyyrcyO (A)The I" addition to gauging his Gibbs would dearly love to
V ashington Redskins have re- team's character over the upcom- see his team rebound against the
Tut leSt�.plaJing� in8 three "�s, Gibbs will at- Eagles, who are perched atop the
the season with only their selt- tempt to determine which players NFC East with an8-5 record
are worth keeping around for
next year. "We're walking into some-
esteem on the line
Last year at this time, the
Redskins had already wrapped
up the NFC East title. Now, how-
ever, the defending Super Bowl
champions are mired in a three-
game losing streak that has left
them at 6-7 and with virtually no
hope of making it back to the play- tney want to see what we can do
of fs. when the chips are down
"It's a pride factor for them, : Even defensive end Dexter
kind of a test of what's inside of Manley, who leads the Redskins
vou Coach Joe Gibbs said Mon- vvitn 10 sacks, isn't totally sure
3 wants to keep his SSfcthat'S S0jAn8 !� te
nh� �k tou8h t0 overcome. We know
job. That's what the coaches will
be looking at Rypien said.
"They've seen what we can do
under ideal conditions, and now
tough
that Gibbs said. "It's going to be
a real test for us. Very few people
will give us much of a chance in
this one
For his part, Rypien is looking
forward to giving the Eagles a bit
of what the Redskins have been
experiencing this season as de-
fending world champions.
"Now we can take some licks
at someone else Rypien said.
"People have risen up to play
the Redskins this year. Now we
ha ve a chance to get them to spend
the holidays the same way as us,
watching the playoffs on TV
day. "It's a situation where you're
going to have to really want it
bad
The Redskins harbored hopes
oi returning to the playoffs until
Sunday, when the Cleveland
Browns twice came from behind
to register a 17-13 victory. With
that loss, Washinoton all'but as-
sured itself of becoming the fifth
defending Super Bowl champion
in the last nine to miss the play-
offs.
"I'd say the odds are prettv
gloomy said Redskins quarter-
back Mark Rypien, named the
team's starter next Sunday
against the Philadelphia Eagles.
Since Gibbs took over as head
coach in 1981, Washington has
been among the league's most
successful franchises. But now the
Redskins have lost four out of five
and their incentive for the remain
whether he'll be around next sea-
son when Washington tries to
pick up the pieces.
"Some guys are going to be
out of here. I may be one of them
he declared.
While it appears ludicrous to
throw Gibbs' name in among the
people in the organization who
must worry about job security, the
NFL's winningest active coach
discussed the possibility.
"I can only lose so many
games and (owner) jack Kent
Cooke is going to tell me, 'Hey,
Joe, I can't go any further Gibbs
said. "But let me say this: I don't
worry one bit about that
Gibbs, in fact, thought he and
the Redskins might one day de-
rive something positive out of a
season that has been ruined by,
among other things, injuries,
costly turnovers and countless
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dcr of the season has nothing to do un�mely penalties
with playoff booty. "Sometimes the downturns
"You've got to take the bad and me tough times make you a
times with the good times to see better person, a better coach, a
what you're made of offensive better player he said. "It's been
a long time since we lost like this,
and now we've got to find out
what we're made of
tackle Joe Jacoby said. "We'll find
out about that the next three
weeks
Tennessee
ranked
20th in Southeast
(AP) � After what he's en-
dured the last couple of years,
Don DeVoe isn't about to be over-
come by joy just because his Ten-
nessee basketball team is ranked
20th in the country this week.
After opening with a 118-86
romp over Tennessee Tech, Ten-
nessee began its quest for the
Southeastern Conference title
with an 84-76 victory at Missis-
sippi.
"We may be in the top 20, but
we weren't favored to win the
game DeVoe said. "So rankings
really don't mean that much.
We'd like to be number one, but
on April 7
DeVoe, among the highly
respected coaches in the country,
has been a success at every stop
during a career that is in its 18th
season, 88-45 and a National In-
vitation Tournament title at Vir-
ginia Tech, 29-25 in two years of
reviving a downtrodden Wyo-
ming program, and 187-126 two
games into his 11th season at Ten-
nessee.
DeVoe got the call after Ten-
nessee struggled to an 11-16 mark
in 1978, and immediately put a
charge into the program. His first
team was 21-12 and, perhaps
more important to Big Orange fol-
lowers, swept three games
against Kentucky's defending
NCAA champions.
In succeeding years, Tennes-
see won 18, 21, 20, 20, 21 and 22
games and played in either the
NCAA or NIT each season. As for
the Kentucky thing, DeVoe built a
9-6 record over college
basketball's winningest team,
including a 7-0 mark in games
played in front of the home folks
in Knoxville.
Interest in basketball was
such that Tennessee embarked on
the building of the 24,535-seat
Thompson-Boiling Arena. It was
at that time that the basketball
program soared. Records of 12-16
and 14-15 had the natives grum-
bling.
Last season, Tennessee began
to come )v5ck, going 16-13, includ-
ing a dehcious 72-70 shocker over
Kentucky that had the fans recall-
ing the earlier DeVoe teams.
Tennessee was the only new
member of this week's Top
Twenty, although there was shuf-
fling of positions among the other
19.
Duke, No. 1 in the preseason
poll, was the choice for the second
week in a row in regular-season
balloting by a nationwide panel of
sports writers and broadcasters.
The Blue Devils, who beat The
Otadel 93-52, received 47 of 63
first-place votes and 1,229 points.
Michigan, winner of the tal-
ent-laden Maui Classic, took over
second with seven first-place
votes and 1,162 points. The Wol-
verines, 3-0, beat Vanderbilt,
Memphis State and then-No. 4
Oklahoma to claim the Maui
crown.
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West V
(AD � West Virginia cos
Don Nehlcn has no quarrel wj
being ranked No. 3, for now.
But if the Mountaineers bJ
No. 1 Notre Dame in the Fie
Bowl and don't win the natioi
championship, Nehlen will
the roof.
The Fiesta Bowl may ru
lined up Notre Dame and
Virginia, the nation's only
beaten teams (both are 11 -0), bi
war of words between West j
giniaand second-ranked Miam
under way.
"If West Virginia was to mc
above us, as long as we coi I
to win, that would be the last
you'd hear me talk al
credibility of the polls Mia
coach Jimmy Johnson said M
day.
"I would become a
proponent for the play ffS)
because I would say the i
ridiculous if that haj :
"I love Jimmy fohnsc
Nehlen replied, "but I
trying to plant soi j
crafty little turke)
ing Miami I'd be- d
thing. But he's got lour I J
that the winner oi the Fiesta Bol
should be the national chaj
pion
The argument will K
academic if Notre Dam,
West Virginia.
And the Irish, fresh from a l
10 victory over Southern Calif
nia in Saturday's 1-2 s 1
were a near-unanimous ch
the nation's top 3
team Monday in the As J
Press' next-to-last n
poll.
The setback dropped - il
ern Cal from second place I
and cost the Trojans their s
the national champ;
Defending national ,
pion Miami, an 18-16 wim
previously unbeaten ArkansJ
EAC names
players of wee
GREENSBORO, N.C(AP
Howard University quark-
Lee DeBose and North Caroluj
A&T linebacker Demetrius Han
son were named as the Easier
Athletic Conference offens
and defensive players of the yei
on Tuesday.
DeBose, a 5-foot-9,
pound senior from Gainesvill
Ha passed for 1,458 yards and
touchdowns and ran for549yan
and four touchdowns in leadinj
Howard to a 7-4 record.
He received nine oi 20 votes
Delaware State running bad
Reginald Barnes, who claimed
five votes, lei the league in rush1
ing with 1,336 yards in 10 games
Honda A&M return special
ist Howard Huckabv. who set
NCAA Division I-A A record w.ti
four punt returns for touch!
downs, received four votes anf
Bethune-Cookman quarterbad
Anthony Thomas received I
remaining two votes.
Harrison, a b-4, 215-poun
junior from Atlanta, led the con
ference with 125 tackles. He rel
corded two interceptions, threi
fumbles and two quarterbad
sacks.
Hamson received six vote
nipping Honda A.&M defensiv
end Bryan Brewer, who had I
votes. Brewer had 34 tackles
eluding nine sacks, and returned
an interception for a touchdown!
South Carolina State nose tacklj
David Ammons received threi
votes and Delaware State defer
sive back Marvin Bright Morgai
State tackle William Foveand Re
thune-Cookman safety Jeffei
Alexander received two vote
each.
Harrison and DeBose al:
lead the all-conference team anl
nounoed Tuesday. The duo wen
among nine repeaters named tJ
the team.
The honors were chosen hi
league coaches, sports informal
tion directors and a selected panej
of sportswnters.
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TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
nfCILMBER 1.1988 25
iNTER
or-
ON
Q70
IIES
HES
RIES
l own
it
1032Q
or
B-3753
Evans St.
.
'
-
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HER GARMENTS
West Virginia in battle for No. 1

(AP) - West Virginia coach
Don Nehlen has no quarrel with
being ranked No. 3, for now.
but if the Mountaineers beat
No. 1 Notre Dame in the Fiesta
bowl and don't win the national
championship, Nehlen will hit
the roof.
The Fiesta Bowl mav have
lined up Notre Dame and West
Virginia, the nation's onlv un-
beaten teams (both are 11-0), but a
war of words between W7cst Vir-
ginia and second-ranked Miami is
under way.
It West Virginia was to move
above us, as long as we continue
to win, that would be the last time
vou'd hear me talk about the
dibility of the polls Miami
�ach Jimmy Johnson said Mon-
dav.
I would become a strong
� ponent for the playoff system,
ause ! would say the polls are
culous if that happened.
1 love limmy Johnson
Nehlen replied, "but he's just
ng to plant some seeds that
i ft little turkey. If I werecoach-
Miami I'd be doing the same
ing. But he's got to understand
that the winner of the Fiesta Bowl
should be the national cham-
i he argument will become
ademic it Notre Dame beats
est Virginia.
And the Irish, fresh from a 27-
:ctorv over Southern Califor-
nia in Saturday's 1-2 shootout,
re a near-unanimous choice as
he nation's top college football
im Monday in the Associated
: s next-to-last regular-season
The setback dropped South-
. � n Cal from second place to fifth
:ost the Trojans their shot at
national championship.
Defending national cham-
n Miami,an IS-lb winner over
iouslv unbeaten Arkansas,
EAC names
players of week
GKFFNSBORO, N.C.(AP) �
iward University quarterback
DeBose and North Carolina
A&T linebacker Demetrius Harri-
n were named as the Eastern
Athletic Conference offensive
� I defensive players of the year
�� I uesday.
DeBose, a 5-foot-9, 160-
und senior from Gainesville,
passed for 1,45S yards and 20
uch d(i wns and ran for 549 yards
: four touchdowns in leading
ward to a 7-4 record.
1 le received nine of 20 votes.
aware State running back
ginald Barnes, who claimed
five votes, led the league in rush-
.�. ith 1,33b yards in 10 games.
I lorida A&M return special-
� 11oward Huckaby, who set a
NCAA Division l-A A record with
ir punt returns for touch-
: iwns, received four votes and
thune-Cookman quarterback
Anthony Thomas received the
remaining two votes.
Harrison, a 6-4, 215-pound
junior from Atlanta, led the con-
ference with 125 tackles. He re-
corded two interceptions, three
fumbles and two quarterback
sacks.
Harrison received six votes,
nipping Florida A&M defensive
end Bryan Brewer, who had five
votes. Brewer had 54 tackles, in-
cluding nine sacks, and returned
an interception for a touchdown.
uth Carolina State nose tackle
tvid Ammons received three
. tes and Delaware State defen-
ive back Marvin Bright, Morgan
State tackle William Foyeand Be-
th une-Cookman safety Jeffery
Alexander received two vote?
I h.
Harrison and DeBose also
lead the all-conference team an-
nounced Tuesdav. The duo were
among nine repeaters named to
the team.
The honors were chosen by
league coaches, sports informa-
ti( n directors and a selected panel
i -I sportswnk rs.
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moved up from third place to
second and West Virginia jumped
from fourth to third. It was the
Mountaineers' highest ranking
of a possible 1,200 points from a
nationwide panel of sports writ-
ers and sportscasters.
Miami, whose only loss was
31-30 at Notre Dame when the
Hurricanes disdained a tie with45
seconds left and tried a two-point
conversion pass that failed, re-
ceived one first-place vote and
1,124 points. The Hurricanes, 9-1,
conclude their regular season Sat-
urday night against Brigham
Young.
The other two first-place
votes went to West Virginia,
which totaled 1,069 points.
"I hope West Virginia beats
Notre Dame Johnson said. "If
West Virginia beats Notre Dame,
it means they've beaten two
teams ranked in the Top Twenty
(West Virginia beat Syracuse 31-9
on Nov. 19).
"Now, let's compare sched-
ules. We beat the preseason num-
ber one (Florida State 31-0), we
lost by a point to the current No. 1
and we lost control of our destiny
when we didn't kick the extra
point. We beat the Big Ten cham-
pions (Michigan 31-30), the co-
champions of the Southeastern
Conference (LSU 44-3) and the
champions of the Southwest
Conference (Arkansas) and we're
playing the champions of the Big
Eight (Nebraska) in the Orange
Bowl
"If the number one team loses
at the end of the year, the number
two team should go up
Not so, according to Nehlen.
"Being number three does't
bother me too much he said.
"But when the number three team
plays the number one team in the
Fiesta Bowl, there's no question in
my mind that the winner should
be the national champion. It has
to be because number t w already
has lost to number one
Florida State, which finished
second to Miami a year ago but
has won 10 straight games since
their opening loss to the Hurri-
canes, trounced Florida 52-17and
climbed from fifth to fourth with
1,013 points, followed by 10-1
Southern Cal with 946 points.
Nebraska, 11-1, held on to
sixth place with 891 points and 10-
1 Auburn, a 15-10 winner over
Alabama, remained seventh with
865 points.
UCLA, 9-2, rose from ninth
place to eighth with 733 points,
just nipping Arkansas, 10-1,
which slipped from eighth to
ninth with 731 points. Oklahoma,
9-2, again rounded out the lop
Ten with 649 points.
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TAKE-OUTS OKAY
There May Be Prizes
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When you sell your books for cosh of o
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)
V
26 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1, 1988
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There May Be Prizes
In Your Textbooks
When you sell them for cash at the ECU
Student Store. Bring your course books
to the bookstore at the end of the term
and sell them for cash. For each book
you sell, you'll receive a sweepstakes
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 1, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 01, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.645
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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